Citation
Golden steps to respectability, usefulness, and happiness

Material Information

Title:
Golden steps to respectability, usefulness, and happiness being a series of lectures to youth of both sexes, on character, principles, associates, amusements, religion, and marriage
Spine title:
Golden steps for the young
Added title page title:
Golden steps for youth
Creator:
Austin, John Mather, 1805-1880
Smith, Thomas B., 19th cent ( Stereotyper )
Derby, C. L ( Illustrator )
Derby, Miller & Co ( Publisher )
Rice & Buttre ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
Auburn
Publisher:
Derby, Miller, and Co.
Manufacturer:
Thomas B. Smith
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1850
Language:
English
Physical Description:
243, <11> p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Young men -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Young women -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Marriage -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- Auburn
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text: <11> p.
General Note:
Added t. p., engraved by Rice & Buttre drawn after C.L. Derby.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by J.M. Austin.

Record Information

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026577208 ( ALEPH )
45670213 ( OCLC )
ALG1828 ( NOTIS )

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AUBURN, N.Y.
DERBY, MILLER & C®













L GOLDEN STEPS _



~ 4 ?
: Aesuertability, _ aud Bayniness.
é ‘
BEING # SERIES OF LECTURES TO
*
YOUTH OF BOTH SEXES,
ON : ti
. CHARACTER, PRINCIPLES, ASSOCIATES, AMUSE-
MENTS, RELIGION, AND MARRIAGE. *

BY JOHN MATHER AUSTIN, ;

AUTHOR oF “voice TO yourTH;” “voice TO MARRIED,” ETC, ETC. _ 4

e . 2 Ww

“ Onward! onward ! Toils despising, : “te | . 3 Ne

» Upward, upward! Turn thine eyes, ex a hy ~ oo
Only be content when rising, i ae

+ : Fix thy goul amid the skies,” a. ’ = a sg

AUBURN: | .

‘
’ DERBY, MILLER, AND COMPANY:
1851,
‘





RPP PPP PPP PIP IPP PIP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPB PP PPD PDP

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850,
BY DERBY, MILLER & CO.,,
In the Clerk’s Office of the Northern District of New York.
LOB PDP BB LL DDD DGD GD DAA ABLALLMODOODPI III YO MAAAANAALAARR

SAPP PAPADAARAAININOOOn oon" ow"
THOMAS B. SMITH, STEREOTYPER,
216 WILLIAM STREET, W. Y.





CONTENTS,



LECTURE I.
PAGE

THE VALUE OF A GOOD REPUTATION . e . . 9

LECTURE II.

THE PRINCIPLES AND PURPOSES OF LIFE, . e —

LECTURE IIL.

SELECTION OF ASSOCIATES . .« «© «6 « .~ 60

LECTURE IV.

THE HABITS AND AMUSEMENTS ‘ . ° e - 80

LECTURE V.

THE RELIGIOUS SENTIMENTS . . "4 ° - 116

LECTURE VI.

MARRIAGE aoe ° . ° ° ° ° - 194













Se ee ee eee “ T
» ° :

PREFACE.

Tue Lectures embraced in this volume, were
written for the pulpit, in the usual manner of prep-
aration for such labor, without any expectation
of their appearing in print. The author is but too
sensible. that they are imperfect in many features, 3
‘both in matter and style. It is only in the hope #}. —
that they will be of some benefit to the class to
whom they are addressed, that he has consented to
submit them to public perusal. He has aimed at
nothing eccentric, odd, or far-fetched; but has
sought to utter plain and obvious truths, in a plain
and simple manner. There is no class more inter- ol
esting, and none which has higher claims on the 7
wisdom, experience, and advice, of mature minds,
than the young who are about to enter upon the ||
trying duties and responsibilities’ of active life. . |
Whatever tends to instruct and enlighten them; to |
point out the temptations which will beset their i.
pathway, and the dire evils which inevitably flow |









vi




PREFACE.

from a life of immorality ; whatever will influence
them to honesty, industry, sobriety, and religion,
and lead them to the practice of these virtues, as

“Golden Steps” by which they may ascend to Re-

spectability, Usefulness, and Happiness, must be of
benefit to the world. To aid in such a work, is
the design of this volume. If it subserves this end
—if it becomes instrumental in inciting the youth-
ful to high and pure principles of action, in hedging
up the way of sin, and opening the path of wisdom,
to any—if it drops but a single good seed into the
heart of each of its readers, and awakens the slight-
est aspiration to morality, usefulness, and religion—
it will not have been prepared in vain. With a
prayer to God that he would protect and bless the
youth of our common country, and prepare them
to preserve and perpetuate the priceless legacy of
Freedom and Religion, which they will inherit
from their fathers, this book is given to the world,
to fulfil such a mission as Divine Wisdom shall
direct. | :
Tue Avurtuor.



Avsurn, June, 1850.













GOLDEN STEPS ©

FOR

YOUTH OF BOTH SEXES.“ f* —














LECTURE It
s Che Balue-of ¢ Goot Reputation.

*



“ Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time

to come.”—1 Tim. Vi. 19.
&



*
yy ) N this ssignenis St. Paul ass
| ke #) a principle which should conte.
mend itself to the mature
) consideration of every youth-
ful mind. Ifthe youngwould
{) have their career honorable
and» prosperous—if y would
JAM enjoy the respect and con-
xP fidence of community ; if they
would have the evening of their
a = days calm, serene, and peaceful—
Pi. they must prepare for it early in
life, They must lay “a good foundation

against the time to come”—a foundation
1*







— eee eee





10 ~ . LECTURES TO YOUTH.

which will be capable of sustaining the
edifice they would erect. The building
cannot be reared in strength and beauty,
without it rests on a secure “ corner-stone.”
The harvest cannot be gathered unless the
seed is first cast into the ground. A wise
Providence has so ordered it that success,
prosperity, and happiness through life, and a
wespected and “green old .age,” are to be
enjoyed only by careful preparation, prudent
forecast, and assiduous culture, in the earlier
»-) periods of our existence.

+

“True wisdom, early sought and gained,
In age will give thee rest;
O then improve the morn of life,
* To make its evening blest.” -

The youthful live much in the future.
They are fond of gazing into its unknown
depths, and of endeavoring to trace the out-
line, at least, of the fortunes that await them.
With .ardent hope, with eager expecta-
tion, they anticipate the approach of coming
years—confident they will brmg to them
naught but unalloyed felicity. But they



LECTURES TO YOUTH © Bi

should allow their anticipations of the future

to be controlled by a well-balanced judg-

ment, and moderated by the experience of

those who have gone before them.

In looking to the future, there is one im-

portant inquiry which the young should put

to their own hearts:—What do I most.

desire to become in mature life? ‘What

position am I anxious to occupy in society @

What is the estimation in which" wish to
be held by those within the circle of my. oe

acquaintance ? . a.

The answer to these inquiries, from the ||

great mass of young people, can gyell be

anticipated. ‘There are none -amol “them,
who desire to be disrespected and shunned
by the wise and good—who are anxious to
be covered with disgrace, and infamy—who
seek to be outcasts ‘and vagabonds in the
world. The thought that they were doomed
to such a condition, would fill them with alarm.
Every discreet youth will exclaim—* Nothing
would gratify me more than to be honored
and respected, as I advance in years; +0








* ee ea ee | a ee oe ~ =
al - : A . ;
’ . e

12 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

move in good, society; to haire people seek
my company, rather than shun it; to be
looked up to as an example for olhene to
imitate, — to enjoy the confidence of all
around me.”

Is notsthis the desire of the young of this
large audience? ‘Surely there can be none
here so blind to the future, so lost to their
gown good, as to prefer a life of infamy and
its ever-atcompanying wretchedness, to re-
spectability, prosperity, and true enjoyment ?
|} But how are these to be obtained ? Respec-

- tability, prosperity, the good opinion. of com-
munity, do not come simply at our*bidding. ||
We cannot reach forth our hands and take |
‘them, as we pluck the ripe fruit from the |
bending branch. . Neither will wishing or |
hoping for them shower their blessings upon |
us. If we would obtain and enjoy them, we
must Jabor for them—rarn them. They are |
only secured as the well-merited reward of a
pure and useful life !

The first thing to be aimed at by the |
young, should be the establishment of “|

sees cilieeeeasiliiactl








LECTURES TO YOUTH. 13

coop cHaracger: In all theif’ plans, antici-
pations, and prospects for fatt: years, this
should form the grand starting-point !—the
chief corner-stone! It should be the founda-
~tion of every hope and thought of prosperity
and happiness in days to come. It is the
only basis.on which such a hope can mature
to full fruition. A good character, estab-
lished in the season of youth, becomes avich,
and productive moral soil to its —possessor. —
Planted therein, the “Tyee of Life” will
spring forth in a vigorous growth. Its roots
will strike deep and strong; in such a soul,
and draw thence the utmost vigor and fruit-
fulness. Its. trunk will grow up in majes-

tie proportions—its wide-spreading branches
will be clothed with a green luxuriant
foliage, “goodly to look upon”—the most
beautiful of blossoms will in due time, blush
on every twig—and at length each limb and
bough shall bend beneath the rich, golden
fruit, ready to drop into the hand. Beneath
its grateful shade you can find rest and
repose, when the-heat and burden of life









14 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

come upon you. And of its delicious fruit,
you can pluck and eat, and obtain refresh-
ment and strength, when the soul becomes
wearied with labor and care, or the weight
of years. Would you behold such a tree?
Remember it grows alone on the soil of a
good reputation!! ‘Labor to prepare such a
soll.

Believe not, ye youthful, that God has
made the path of virtue and religion hard
and thorny. Believe not he has overhung
it with dark clouds, and made it barren of
fruit and beauty. Believe not that rugged
rocks, and briers, and brambles, choke the
way, and lacerate the limbs of those who |
would walk therein! No! he has made it
a smooth and peaceful path—an easy and
pleasant way.— Wisdom’s ways are ways of
pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.”

The young who overlook these considera-
tions—who lay their plans, and cherish their
expectations, in reference to their future
career, without any regard to the importance

“of a good character—who, in marking out

ie
-










LECTURES TO YOUTH. 15

their course, lose sight of the necessity of
_ laboring to establish a worthy reputation to
commence with—who, in building their hopes
of success and happiness, are not convinced
that “a good name” is the only foundation
on which such hopes can legitimately rest—
have commenced wrong. 'They have made a
radical and lamentable mstaxe at the outset.
4. mistake, which, unless speedily corrected,
will prove most disastrous in all its influences,
and be keenly felt and deplored throughout
hfe. —

Those who fall into error on this point,
who view a good reputation. as a matter of
no moment—well enough if you can secure
it without much trouble, but not worth
laboring for, with zeal and perseverance—
have placed themselves in a- most critical
position. They are like a ship in the midst
of the wide wastes of ocean, without chart
compass, or rudder, liable to be turned hither
and thither by every fickle wind that. blows,

_ and dashed upon dangerous reefs by the,
heaving billows. Failing to see the impor







~:
,

16 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

tance of establishing a good character, they
fall easy victims to sinful temptations, and,
ere long, verging farther and farther from the
path of rectitude, they. at length find every
fond hope, every fair prospect, blasted for life.

To a young man, a good character is the
best capital he can possess, to-start with in
life. It is much better, and far more to be
depended on than gold. Although money
may aid in establishing a young man in
business, under favorable circumstances, yet
without a good character he cannot succeed.

His want. of reputation will undermine the

best advantages, and failure, and ruin, will,

sooner or later, overtake him with —

certainty ! !

When it is known that-a young man is
well-informed, industrious, attentive to busi-
ness, economical, strictly temperate, and
moral, a respecter of the Sabbath, the Bible,
and religion, he cannot fail to obtain the
good opinion and the confidence of the whole
community. He will have friends on every
hand, who will take pleasure in encouraging







epee cee oe
==

LECTURES TO-YOUTH. ' 17

Seen

and assistmg him. The wise and good will |
bestow dele commendation upon him; and
parents will point to him as an exantple for- ||
their children to imitate. Blessed with |
health, such a youth cannot fail of success
and permanent happiness.
But let it be known that a young man is |
|

— ‘ —

ignorant or indolent, that he is neglectful of
business, or dishonest; that he is given to
intemperance, or apeied to visit places of
dissipation, or to associate with vicious, com-
panions—and ‘what are his prospects? With
either one or more of these evil qualifications
fixed upon him, he is hedged out of the path

SL ssh

of prosperity. To cover up such character-

testes

istics for a great. length of time, is a moral
unpossibility. Remember this, I beg you. |
It is beyond the power of mortals to conceal |
vicious habits and propensities for any long
period. And when once discovered, who Will -
repose confidence in such a youth? Who
will trust him, or encourage him, or counte-
nance him? Who will give him employ-
ment? Who will confide anything to his

et slices aster

SS







se cece LEE EL LL AL A



~-
eee

18 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

es

oversight? Who will render him assistance
in -his business affairs, when he is strait-

ened and in need of the aid of friends?.

Behold his prospects! How unpromising,

| how dark!! Itis impossible for such a young
man to succeed. No earthly power can confer
prosperity upon him. He himself under-
mines his own welfare, blackens his own
name, and dashes down the cup of life.which
a wise and good Providence has kindly
placed to his lips, and calls upon him to
drink.

. If a good eharacter,.a spotless reputation,
is all-essential to the prosperity of a young
man, what must it not be to a young woman ¢
A well-established character for morality and
‘virtue is of great importance to people of
every class, and in all circumstances. But to
is 3 ung lady, a “good name” is a priceless
jewel. It is everything —hiterally, EVERY-
“rarNe—to her. It will give her an attrac-
F | tion, a value, an importance, in the estima-
tion of others, which nothing else can impart.




*



seg eC EL LL: LLL Ae eee ee
.

.
cessation ET LE ES Ln
. .

RE





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 19

In possession of a spotless character, she may
reasonably hope for peace and happiness.
But without such a character, she is nothing !
Youth, beauty, dregs, accomplishments, all
gifts and qualities will be looked upon as
naught, when tainted by a suspicious repu-
tation! Nothing can atone for this, nothing
can be allowed to take its place, nothing can
give charm and attraction where it exists,
When the character of a young woman is
gone—all is gone! Thenceforward she can
look for naught ‘else but degradation and
wretchedness, | |

The reputation of a young woman is of
the most delicate texture. It. requires not
overt.acts of actual wickedness to tarnish its
brightness, and. cast suspicion on its purity.
Indiscreet language, careless deportment, a
want of discrimination in- regard to aSSO-
clates, even when no evil is done, or intended,





will often bring into qnestion her character} e
greatly to herinjury. Many are thé instances: ff -
where a single word, spoken at random, in ~|}.*

the giddy thoughtlessness of youthful vivacity,











20 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

without the slighest thought of wrong, has
cast a shadow upon the character of a young
woman which it required years to eflace.
How important 4 that every word uttered, and
every deed performed, should be maturely
weighed.. A discreet lady will not only be
careful to avoid evil itself, but will studiously
refrain from everything which has even the
appearance of evil. |
«“ Whatever dims thy sense of truth,
Or stains thy purity,

Though light as breath of summer air,
Count it as sin to thee.”

Young women frequently err in their
understanding of what it is that gives them
a good name, and imparts their chief attrac-
tion. Many seem to imagine that good
looks, a gay attire, in the extreme of fashion,
and a few showy attainments, constitute
Be rything essential to make them interesting
and attractive, and to establish a high rep-
utation in the estimation of the other sex.
Pence they seek for no other attainments.
In this, they make a radical mistake. The














LG TT,

cee ——
———————— oo



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 21

charms contained in these qualities, are very

shallow, very worthless, and very uncertain.
“There can no dependence be placed upon
- them, | .

If there is one point more than another, in
this respect, where young ladies err, it is in
regard to Dress. There are nota few who
suppose that dress is the most important
thing for which they have been created, and
that it forms the highest attraction of woman.
Under this mistaken notion—this. poor in-
fatuation—they plunge into every extrava-

‘ gance in their attire; and, in this manner,

squander sums of money, which would be
much more profitably expendéd in’ storing
their minds with useful knowledge, or, in
some cases, even in procuring the ordinary
comforts of life. ©

There is a secret on this point I would

like to divulge to young women. It is this
That any dress, which, from its oddness, oF. ||.
‘ts extreme of fashion and display, is cal |] :
lated to attract very particular attention, is ||

worn at the expense of the good name of its

ae % ss

|






oe

2 i. wol a







22 LECTURES TO. YOUTH.

possessor. It raises them in the estimation of
none; but deprives them of the good opinion
of all sensible people. It gives occasion for *
suspicion, not only of their good sense, but
of their habits of economy. When a young
woman is given to. extravagant displays in
_ dress, it is but publishing to the world, her
own consciousness of a want of other attrac-
tions of a more substantial nature. It is but
virtually saying, “I seek to excite attention
by my dress, because I have no other good
quality by which I can secure attention.”

Could a young woman who passes through
the streets decked out extravagantly in all ©
thatthe milliner and dress-maker can furnish,
realize the unfavorable impression she makes,
upon sensible young men—could she but see
the curl of the lip, and hear the contemp-
tuous epithet which her appearance excites,
and know ‘how utterly worthless they esteem
—her—she would hasten to her home, throw
off her foolish attire, and weep tears of
bitterness at her folly.

Parents are often much to be blamed for




























LECTURES TO: SOUTH. 23

this indiscretion in their daughters. They
should give them better advice; and instruct —
- them to cultivate other and worthier attrac-
tions than the poor gewgaws of DREss! Do
they not know that the worthless and aban-
doned of the female sex dress the most gaily
and fashionably? Should they not urge
their daughters to seek for a higher excel-
lency, a more creditable distinction than
this?

Here is another secret for young ladies:—
All the attraction they can ever possess by
means of dress, will be. derived from three
sources, viz. Plainness, Neatness, and Ap-
propriateness. In whatever they deviate
| from these cardinal points, they will to the ©
‘game degree make themselves ridiculous—
weaken their influence, and lose the good
opinion of those they are the most anxious to
win. I beg these truths to be impressed
deeply on the mind. . a

Dress, personal. beauty, and showy accom-
plishments, go but a short way to establish
the reputation on which the. happiness of







24 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

woman really depends. Instead of placing
reliance on these, they should seek to culti-

.vate those qualities, habits, and dispositions, —

_ which will give permanent merit and value,
in the estimation of those whose attention
and regard they are desirous to cultivate. A
- sweet and gentle disposition—a mild and for-
giving temper—a respectful and womanly
demeanor—a mind cultivated, and well-
stored with useful knowledge—a thorough
practical acquaintance with all domestic du-
ties; (the sphere where woman can exhibit
her highest attractions, and her most valu-
able qualities,) tastes, habits, and views of
life, drawn not from the silly novels of the
day, but from a discriminating judgment,
and the school: of a well-learned practical ex:
perience in usefulness and goodness :—these

are the elements of a good name, a valuable —

reputation in a young woman. They are
more to be sought for, and more to be de-
pended upon, than any outward qualification.
They form an attraction which will win the
regard and affection of the wise and enlight-






wned, where the fascinations of dress, and
- >ther worthless accomplishments, would


























LECTURES TO YOUTH. 25

orove utterly powerless. |

I desire the young, of both sexes, to re-
member that it is one thing not to have a
bad reputation, but quite another thing to
have a good one. The fact that an individual
does nothing criminal, or offensive, although
creditable in itself considered, does not be-
stow the amount of merit after which all
should seek.. They may do nothing particu-
larly bad, and nothing very good, It 1s
meritorious to refrain from evil; but it 1s
better still to achieve something by active
exertion, which shall deserve commendation.
The Apostle exhorts us not only to “cease |
to do evil,” but to “learn to do well.” The |
young; while striving to avoid the evils of a
bad reputation, should. assiduously seek for
the advantages of a good one.

How can the young secure a good charac-
‘er? Its worth, its importance, its blessings,”
we have seen. Now, how can it be obtained ¢
This is a question, worthy the serious con-
2 oe

»
Soa se







26 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

sideration of every youth. Let. me ‘say in
reply :—

1. That a good character cannot be tnher-
ited, as the estate of a father descends to his
heirs. However respectable and worthy pa-
rents may be, their children cannot share in
that respect, unless they deserve it by their
own merits. Too many youth, it is to be
apprehended, are depending upon their pa-

rents’ reputation as well as their parents’ |}

property, for their own standing and success
in life.- This is an insecure foundation. In
our republican land, every individual is
estimated by his or her own conduct, and
not by the reputation of their connections.

It is undoubtedly an advantage in many

points of view, for a young person to have
respectable parents. But if they would in-
herit their parents’ good name, they must
imitate their parents’ virtues.

2. AA good character cannot be ilies
with gold. Though a man or a woman may
have all the wealth of the Indies, yet it can-

not secure a worthy name—it cannot buy ©













‘LECTURES TO YOUTH. 27

the esteem of the wise-and good, without
the merit which deserves it. The glitter of
gold cannot conceal an evil and crabbed dis-
position, a selfish soul, a corrupt heart, or.
vile passions’ and propensities. Although
the sycophantic may fawn around such as
possess wealth, and bow obsequiously before
them, on account of their riches, yet, in fact,
they are despised and contemned in the
hearts even of their hangers-on and followers. |
3. A good character cannot be obtained by
simply wishing for it. The Creator has wisely
provided, that the desire for a thing does
not secure it. Were it to be thus, our world
would soon present a strange aspect. It is,
undoubtedly, much better that it should be
as itis. We have the privilege to wish for
whatever we please; but we can secure
only that which we labor for and deserve.
Were the traveller to stand throughout the
day, at the foot of the hill, wishing to be at
the summit, his simple desire would not
place him there. He must allow his wishes
to prompt him to proper exertion. It is only’
















































28 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

by persevering industry, and patient toil,
contented to take one step at a time; that his
wish is gratified, and he finds himself at
length upon the brow of the eminence.

_ In like manner, the youthful, to obtain -

possession of a good character, must earn it.
It must be sought for; by an earnest cultiva-
tion of all the graces and virtues, which are
commended by God and man. It cannot be

secured in a moment. As the edifice is erect-

ed by diligently laying one stone upon
another, until it finally becomes a splendid
temple, piercing the heavens with its glitter-
ing spire, so a good name must be built up.
by good deeds, faithfully and constantly per-
formed, as day after day carries us along
amid the affairs of life. |

Let the youthful fix their eyes upon this
prize’ of a good reputation—the only end
wor striving for in life. Let them studi-
ously avoid evil practices, corrupt associates,
and vicious examples. Let them patiently
and faithfully lay the foundations of virtuous
habits, and practise the lessons of wisdom



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 29



and the precepts of religion—and in due time

tlie prize shall be theirs. The spotless
wreath of a virtuous character shall rest, upon
their brow. The commendation, the conti-
dence, and the good-will of man shall accom-
pany them; and the choicest of the blessings
of God shall rest upon them, and sweeten all
their days.

RE ce PE 0s 98 TD SD aT SO _~






















Che Principles an Wurposes ot Lite.



B LECTURE [1
|
|

“The heart of him that hath understanding, seeketh knowledge.”—Proy. xv. 14.







eh HE practical anitins of Solo-
A) mon is seen in this simple
precept. The youthful,.who
have the slightest understand-
ing of the journey of life—
- who have been impressed,
even in the smallest degree, with
the perils to which they are eX-.
posed; the trials to be endured ;
the vicissitudes through which
they must necessarily pass; the ob-
stacles they must overcome; the
At 3 deceptions and allurements they will
have to detect and vithgtand-—cannot fail








LECTURES TO YOUTH. _ 31

to acknowledge ‘the wisdom of seeking for
knowledge to enlighten and prepare for
the exigencies which awart the inexperienced
traveller —— this world’s wayward
scenes.

Those who commence their career without
forethought, or discrimination in regard to

the moral principles by which they will be

governed, and. without selecting the best and
safest path of the many which open before
them, are involved in a blindness of the most

pitiable description. They would not mani-

fest this want of discretion on matters of

much less importance. The commander of |

the ship does not venture his voyage to sea
without his compass, his chart, and a full
supply of stores. We would not sail an hour
with him, if we believed him ignorant:or in-
different to the necessity of these important
preparations. How hazardous, how foolish
the youth who launches away on the momen-
tous voyage of life, without compass, or




chart, or any preparation which extends bem js
yond the present moment. True, the ship



EO OS PT ow
















harbor in safety, with her gay pennons fly-
ing, her’swelling sails filled with a favorable

breeze, a smiling sun above, a smooth sea be-.

neath, and all the outward indications of a
prosperous voyage. But follow her a few
hours. The terrific storm-king spreads
abroad his misty pinions, and goes forth in
fury, ploughing up ‘the waters into mountain
billows, and shrieking for his prey. The
eloomy night settles down upon the bosom
of the mighty deep, and spreads its dark pall

over sea and sky. Muttering thunders stun

the ear, and the lightning’s vivid flash lights .

up the terrific scene, and reveals all its inde-

geribable horrors. Where now is the gay ship —
which ventured forth without needful prepa-

ration?. Behold her, tossed to and fro by
the angry waves. All on board are in alarm!
The fierce winds drive her on, they know
not whither. Hark to that fearful roar! It
is the fatal breakers! Hard up the helm!

j\ePut the ship about! See, on every hand.
|| frowns the fatal lee-shore! Pull taught

3.° LECTURES TO YOUTH.

destitute of all these essentials, may leave the

TS AO

a

——_—_—-—— ne
a

Nr



. .

| *
LECTURES TO YOUTH 33

each rope—spread. every sail. It is in vain!
Throw out’ the anchors! Haste!- strain
every nerve! Alas! Jt is all too late. The

danger cannot be escaped. On drifts the —
fated. craft. Now she mounts the crest of

an angry wave, which hurries forward. with
its doomed burthen. Now she dashe® against
the craggy points of massive rocks, and sinks
into the raging deep. One loud, terrific wail
is heard, and all is silent! On the rising of
the morrow’s sun, the spectator beholds the
beach and the neighboring waters strewn
with broken masts, rent sails, and drifting
fragments—all that remaing of the proud
ship which yesterday floated so gaily on the
ocean waters!!_ |

Behold, O ye youthful, a picture of the
fate of those who rush upon the career of life,
without forethought or preparation, and with-
out the light of well-selected moral principles
to guide them. All may appear fair and
promising at the outset, and for a season.
But before many years can elapse, the pros-
pects of such youth must be overclouded;









34 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

and ere long disappointment, overthrow, dis-
grace and ruin, will be the closing scenes of
a life, commenced in so much blindness. -
«Well begun is half done,” was one of Dr.
Franklin’s ‘sound maxims. A career well
begun—a life commeneed properly, with wise
forecast with prudent rules of actidmy and
under the influence of sound and pure, moral
and religious principles—is an advance, half-
way at least, to ultimate success and pros-
perity. Such ‘a commencement will not, it
is true, insure you against ‘the misfortunes
which are incident to earthly: existence. But
if persevered ingit will guard you against the
long catalogue of evils, vexatious penalties
and wretchedness, which are the certain fruit
of a life of immorality ; and will bestow upon
you all the real enjoyments, within the
earthly reach of man.
- As people advance in years, they perceive
more and more the importance of commen-
cing life properly. ; so
See that wretched outcast! .Poor and
miserable, shunned by all but depraved asso-





LECTURES TO YOUTH.

~~

ciates, he drags. out the worthless remnant
of his days. Does he think he has acted

wisely? Hark to-his soliloquy —* Oh, could

I begin life again—could I but live my days

over once more—how. differént the course I _
‘would pursue. . Instead of rushing on blindly

andyhéedlessly, without forethought or care,
and allowing myself to become an easy prey

_to temptation and sin, I would. reflect mia

turely, and choose wisely, the path for my
footsteps. Faithfully would't search for the
way of virtue, hacia sobriety, and. good-
ness, and strictly would I walk therein !” The
opportunity hhe ‘so ¢éagerlyscovets, and to
obtain which he would deem no sacrifice too
oreat, is now before ony reef in the as-
sembly. |

This thought is beautifully elaborated in

the following allegory:

“Tt was midnight of the new year, and an
aged man stood thoughtfully at the window.

~~ He gazed with: a long, despairing look, upon
the fixed, eternal, and glorious heaven, and -
down upon the silent, still, and snow-white .

35

5... .
= Pana ew *
ne ect ene gee ee? hy” .
: . ete





tees

i Spt ee
a










*
36 LECTURES TO YOUTH.













earth, whereon was none So joyless,-so sleep-
less as he. For his grave stood open near
him; it was covered only with the snows of
age, not decked with. the green of youth;
and he brought with him, from a long and
rich life, nothmg save errors, crimes, and
sicknes#—a wasted body, a desolate soul, a
breast filled with poison, and an old age
heavy with repéntance and sorrow. The fair
days of his youth at this hour, arose like

—_-

spectres before’ his mind, and carried him
back to the bright-merning, when his father
had first’planted him at the starting-point of

life; whence, to,the right, the way conducts
along the sunny path of virtue, to a wide and
peaceful land, a land of light, rich in the har-
vest of good deeds, and full of the joy of
angels; whilst, to the left, the road descends
to the molehills of vice, toward a dark cav-
ern, full of poisonous droppings, stinging ser-
pents, and dank and steaming mists. |

“The serpents clung around his breast,
and the drops of poison lay upon his tongue,

and he knew not where he was.







LECTURES. TO YOUTH. - 37

“Senseless and in unutterable anguish, his
ery went forth to heaven: ‘Grant me but
youth again! O, father, place me but onee
again upon the starting-point of. life, that I
may choose otherwise !’

“But his father and his youth were far
away. He beheld* wandering lights dance
- upon the marshes, and disappear upon the
graveyards; and he exclaimed, ‘These are
my days of folly

“He beheld. a star shoot + ieee the
heaven, and vanish: it glimmered as it fell,
and disappeared upon the earth. ‘Such, too,
am IY whispered his bleeding heart; and
the serpent-tooth of remofse struck itcenih
into its wounds.

“ His heated fancy pictured to him night-
wandering forms slow-creeping upon the
house-tops; the windmill raised its arm, and
threatened to fell him to the earth; and in
the tenantless house of death, the only re-
maining mask assumed imperceptibly his
own features. -

“ At: once, in a. the midst of this Aclivivee,



4




























38 . LECTURES TO YOUTH.




the sounds from the steeple, welcoming the
new year, fell upon his ear, like distant
church music.

“He was moved, but to a gentler mood.
He gazed around, unto the horizon, and
looked forth upon the wide earth;-and he
thought of the friends of his youth, who,
happier and better than he, were now teach-
ers upon the earth, fathers of happy children,
and blessed each in his condition.

“¢ Alas! and I, too, like ye, might now be
sleeping peacefully and tearless through this
first night of the year, had I willed so! I
too might have been happy, ye dear parents,
had I fulfilled your new-year’s ‘wishes and

~ admonitions !’

“Tn the feverish reminiscences -of om ile
it seemed to him as if the mask which had
assumed his features in the house of death
arose, and grew into a living youth, and his
former blooming figure stood before him in
the bitter mockery of illusion.

“He could look no longer; he hid his
eyes, a flood of hot tears streamed forth and



—_————— ss

———

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 39

were lost in the snow. And he sighed, now
more gently, and despairing, ‘Return but
again, O youth, come once again !

“And youth did return; for he had but
dreamed thus fearfully in the new-year’s
night. He was still. young; but his sinful
wanderings, they had been no dream; and
he thanked God that he could yet turn from
the miry ways of vice, and again choose the
sunny path which leadeth unto the pure land
of the harvest of righteousness.

“Turn thou with him, young man, if thou
standest upon his path of error. ‘This fear-
ful dream will in a future be thy judge; but
shouldst thou-ever exclaim, in the bitterness
_of remorse, ‘Return, fair time of youth !—
_ youth will not come when thou dost call for
her.”

It is much easier to start right and keep
right, than to start wrong, and then endeavor
to get right. Although those who take the
wrong path at the commencement, should
afterwards seek to obtain the right one, and
persevere until they find it, still the labor to

‘






si







AO LECTURES TO YOUTH.

retrieve the early error will be difficult. It.

1s painful to walk in the way of wickedness
—it is painful to break away from it, when
once there It is painful to contimue on—it
is painful to turn back.. This is in conse-
quence of the nature of sin, Itisa path all
evil, all pain, all darkness—everything con-
nected with it is fruitful of wretchedness.

Those who stray therein, find themselves be- |

set with perils and troubles on all sides.
Avoid it, as you love happiness!

“Ne’er till to-morrow’s light delay
What may as well be done to-day;
Ne’er do to-day, what on the morrow
Will wring your heart with sighs and sorrow.”
A

A young man may, in early life, fall into.

vicious habits, and afterwards turn from
them. Some have done so. But they de-
clare that the struggles they were compelled
to make—the conflicts and trials, the buffet-
ing of evil passions, and the mental agony
they endured; in breaking away, were ter-
rible beyond description. Where one, who







LECTURES TO YOUTH. Al

has fallen into bad habits in youth, has after-
wards abandoned them, there are a score who
| have continued their victims, until ruin, and
a premature death, closed their career. How
much safer, how much easier and pleasanter,
| how much more promising and hopeful, to
; commence life with good habits well estab-
| lished, with high principles, sound. maxims,
| enlightened rules of conduct, deeply fixed in
| the soul. This is a plain, pleasant, prosper-
7 path—readily found, and easily followed.
In no-other can you secure true enjoyment.

|
|
|
“ We cannot live too slowly to be good
And happy, nor too much by line and square,
But youth is burning to forestall its nature,
And will not wait for time to ferry it
Over the stream; but flings itself into
The flood and perishes. * * * * * * *
|

The first and worst of all frauds is to cheat
Oneself, * * * * * * * *% K * *”

There is nothing more essential to the

| young than to accustom themselves to ma-
ture reflection, and practical observation, in |
regard to the duties of life, and the sources |
of human enjoyment. This is a task, how- |

petesaeiiiieihdiiieaaiaal





























42 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

ever, which but few of the youthful are in-

clined to undertake. The most of them are

averse to giving up their thoughts to sober

meditation on the consequences which accrue

from different courses of conduct, or to prac-
tieal observation on the lessons taught by

the experience of others. The Present !—
the Present !—its amusements, its gayeties, its
fashions, absorbs nearly all their thoughts.
They have little relish to look towards the
future, except to anticipate the continuance
of the novelty and joyousness. of the spring-
time of life. The poet utters a most salu-
tary admonition in his beautiful lines:

«The beam of the morning, the bud of the Spring,
The promise of beauty and brightness may bring;
But clouds gather darkness, arid touched by the frost,
The pride of the plant, and the morning are lost.
Thus the bright and the beautiful ever decay—
Life’s morn and life’s flowers, oh, they quick pass away r

I would not cast one unnecessary shadow
on the pathway of the young; but they
should be often reminded, that the season of
youth, with its romance and light-hearted-



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 43

ness, soon, too soon, departs! Spring, with
its budding beauties, and fragrant blossoms,
does not continue all the year. It is speed-
ily followed by the fervid summer, the ma-
ture and sober autumn, and the dreary snows
of winter. In order to have thriving and
promising fields in summer, rich and abund-
ant. harvests in autumn, and bountiful sup-
plies for comfort and repose in winter, “ good.
seed” must be sowed in thespring. So, also,
if you would have the summer of life fruitful
of prosperity—its autumn yield a rich and
bountiful harvest, and the winter of old age
made comfortable and peaceful—the good.
seed of pure habits, and sound moral and re-
ligious principles, must be carefully sowed in
the rich soil of the heart, in the budding
spring-time of youth.

Due observation and reflection will mable
the young to sow the right kind of seed at the
right time. Theré is much in this. Those
who sow late will be likely to have their
harvest blighted by chilling rains and: nip-
ping frosts. The earlier the seed is cast into









A4 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the ground, the greater the certainty that it
will produce an abundant crop. Reflection
and discrimination are all-essential to the
youthful. Those who think deeply will act
wisely. They will detect and avoid the
dangers which beset their pathway, and into
which the thoughtless so easily fall. ‘They
will readily penetrate the specious appear-
ance, the harmless aspect, the deceptive veil,
which vice and immorality can so readily
assume. They will understand the old
maxim, that “all is not gold that glitters.”
This is a simple truth, and yet how few of
the young practise upon it. See this young
man. How easily he gives way to tempta-
tion—how readily he is led astray. Why
does he thus turn aside from virtue’s path ?
Why thus trample upon the affectionate
counsel and admonition of wise parents and
kind friends? Ah! he sees a glittering
bauble in the way of sin, and imagines it is
the shining of the gold of true and solid hap-
piness. Eagerly he presses on to secure the
prize. He plunges into the wickedness to







LECTURES TO YOUTH. 45

which it tempts him—he seizes the dazzling
treasure, and finds—what? Pure gold ?—
~ true delight ?—unalloyed happiness? Alas,
foolish youth! No! That which he took
for the glitter of gold, proves to be worthless
ashes in his hand. And the high pleasure
he was anticipating, results in naught but
disappointment, disgrace, wretchedness.
“Teach me the flattering paths to shun,
In which the thoughtless many run ;

Who for a shade the substance miss,
And grasp their ruin in their bliss.”

_ A well-established habit of practical ob-
servation, enables the youthful to guard
against the mistakes of conduct, into which
others have fallen, and to. make the short-
comings of their fellow-beings, salutary ad-
monitions for their own instruction. When
thoughtful, observing young persons, see an
individual do a mean, unmanly action, they
will reflect much upon it. They will notice
how contemptible it makes him appear—
how it degrades him in the estimation of the
honorable and high-minded—how it belittles





46 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

him in the view of society at large—and how
unworthy it makes him appear even in his
own eyes. ‘These observations, if faithfully
made, will. guard them — like acts
themselves.

When they behold one arraigned at the
bar of public justice, to answer to the of-
fended laws of his country, they will make it
a salutary lesson of instruction. They will
realize the deceptive and ruinous nature of
wrong-doing—how, while promising them
the very elixir of happiness, it pours naught
but bitterness and poison into the cup of
life, entailing degradation and wretchedness
upon its victims. They will become satisfied
of the solemn truth of the words of the Most
High, that “though hand join in hand, the
wicked shall not be unpunished.”

When they see neighbors, who might pro-
mote each other’s enjoyments, by living
peaceably together, fall out in regard to
some trivial misunderstanding, and engage
in angry disputes, and-a bitter warfare, dis-
turbing the harmony of the neighborhood,



LECTURES TO. YOUTH. 47

and destroying their own happiness—the
young who exercise practical observation,
will be instructed, to avoid similar troubles
in their own affairs. They will realize the
folly and blindness of such a course, and the
necessity of exercising a forbearing and for-
giving spirit, and the wisdom of submitting’ to
injuries, if need be, rather than to become
involved in angry recriminations and hostil-
ities. :

Thus by a constant habit of observation
and reflection, the youthful can turn the fail-

ings of others to their own account. As the |}, ~

industrious bee extracts honey from the most
nauseous substances, so can the thoughtful
and observing draw instruction not «only
from the example of’ the wise, but from
the folly of the wicked !

In preparations for future usefulness and
success, the young should establish certain
fixed principles of moral conduct, by which

|| they will be steadfastly governed in all their

intercourse with the world. Without some

well-defined landmarks, by which they can



e.

48 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

be guided in emergencies, when everything |
depends on the course of conduct to be pur-
sued, they will be in imminent peril. ‘Temp-
tations are strewed along the pathway of the
young, and assail them at every turn. If
they could clearly contemplate the effects of
giving way to temptation—were all the un-

fore them—they would never be induced to
turn aside into sin. Could the young man as
he is tempted to quaff the fashionable glass ||
of intoxicating beverage, see plainly the
_.|| ignominious life, the poverty and wretched-
ness, and the horrid death by delirium. tre- |
ens, to which it so often leads, he would ||
“set i#down untasted, and turn away in alarm.

|
happy consequences to stand out visibly be-
|



But it is the nature of temptation to blind
and deceive the unwary, and lead them into
sin, by false representations of the happiness
to be derived from it. Hence the young
need to establish, in their calm, cool moments,

ea i IE

when under the influence of mature judgment
and enlightened discretion, certain fixed rules

of conduct, by which they will be governed,

i ieeniinriaeaiiliiliiaeaiaanle _|



ee

LECTURES TO YOUTH. A9

and on which they will depend in every hour
of temptation. |

One of the first and most important rules
of life which should be established by the

youthful, is the constant cultivation of purity |
of heart. This is the great safeguard of the ©

young. It is their brightest jewel—their
most attractive ornament—the crowning glo-
ry of their character and being. It adds
a captivating lustre to all charms of whatever
description; and without it all other ex-
cellencies are lost in perpetual darkness, It
should be a fixed rule, never-to violate the
dictates of purity either in action, language,
or thought. Many imagine it is a matter of

small moment what ‘heir thoughts maybe,

so long as in action they do not transgress
the requirements of virtue. This, however,
is a serious error. The outward action is

but the expression of the inward thought.

Wicked deeds would never have birth, were
they not first prompted by wicked desires.
Hence if the young would have their words
and deeds characterized by purity, they must

ae

4



ae as white and spotless as the driven snow—




| emergency. ”

50 . LECTURES TO YOUTH.

see that their hearts and thoughts are con-
stantly pure.

“Pure thoughts are angel visitants! Be such
The frequent inmates of thy guileless breast.
They hallow all things by their sacred touch,
And ope the portals of the land of rest.”

The heart is the source of all actions. A
dark, muddy fountain cannot send forth clear
waters. Neither does a pure fountain send
forth muddy waters. A foul heart, the re-
ceptacle of unclean thoughts and impure
passions, is a corrupt well-spring of action,

. which leads to every vicious practice. Let

the hearts of the youthful be pure as crys-

tal, let their thoughts be sanctified by vir-

uewand ‘holiness; and their lives shall be

winning the admiration of all who know
them. With purity as a shield, they are

doubly guarded. against sin. However en-

ticing temptation may be—however artfully
or strongly it may assail them—they are
prepared to rise above it, in any and every





"
ts ae ;
Aaye , bys ’

; o
os

LECTURES. TO YOUTH. 51

Another of the fixed rules of conduct
should be to aim high in all the purposes of
life. The great obstacle to success with many
of the young, is, that they adopt no standard
of action for their government; but allow

__||. themselves to float along the current of time

‘|| like a mere straw on the surface of the waters,
liable to be veered about by every puff of
wind and whirling eddy: If the éurrent in
which they float happens to waft them into
the smooth waters, and the calm sunshine of
virtue and -respectability, it is a matter of
mere fortunate chance. If they are drawn
into the dark stream of sin, they have but
little power to resist, and are soon hurried
into the surging rapids, and hurled over*the —
boiling cataract of ruin! True, they may
not utterly perish even in plunging down the
cataract. They may possibly seize hold of
some jutting rock below, amd by a desperate
effort drag themselves from the raging waters.
But they will come: forth bruised, bleeding,
strangling, and half-drowned, to mourn the
folly of their thoughtlessness. “How much

7





_

52° LECTURES TO YOUTH.

wiser and better to have taken early pre-
caution, and guarded in the first place against
the insidious current, which compelled them
to purchase wisdom at so dear a rate.

To avoid this great folly, the youthful
should establish a fixed purpose for life.
They should set their mark, as to what they
wish to become; and then make it the great
labor of their lives‘to attain it. And let
that mark be a high one. You cannot. make
it too elevated. The maxim of the ancients
was, that although he who aims at the sun
will not hit it, yet his arrows will fly much
higher than though his mark was on the
_ earth. A young man who should strive to
~ bea second Washington or J efferson, might
not attain to their renown. But he would
become a much:greater and better man, than
though he had only aspired to be the keeper
of a gam apg hopes or théleader of a gang
of blacklegs. In all your purposes and
plans of life, aim high!

“ Again a light boat on a streamlet is seen,
Where the batiks are o’erladen with beautiful green,





SO a a ll ne

ee
PF - .
a TO YOUTH. 53

Like a mantle of velvet spread out to the sight,
Reflects to the gazer a bright world of light. ;

The fair bark has lost none of its beauty of yore,

But a youth is within it—the fair child before ;

And the Angel is gone—on the shore see him stand,

As he bids him adieu with a wave of the hand.

Ah! a life is before thee—a life full-of care,

Gentle Youth, and mayhap thou wilt fall in its snare.
Can thy bark speed thee now? withont wind, without tide?
Without the kind Angel, thy beautiful guide?

Ah! no;—then what lures thee, fair youth, to depart ?
Must thou rush into danger from impulse of heart?

Lo! above in the ‘bright arch of Heaven’ I see

The vision, the aim so alluring to thee:

"Tis the temple of Fame, with its pillars so fair,

And the Genius of Wisdom and Love reigneth there.
Advance then, proud vessel,—thy burden is light,— _
Swift speed thee, and guide his young steps in the right;
For in life’s ‘ fitful changes’ are many dark streams,

And paths unillumed by the sun’s golden beams.”

Cherish self-respect. Have a deep regard
for your own estimation.of your own merits.
Look with scorn and contempt upon low and
vicious practices. Cultivate pride of character.
I care not how proud the youthful are of
all their valuable attainments, their correct
habits, their excellings in thatlwhich is manly,
useful, and good. The more pride of this
description, the better.. Though it should
reach even to egotism and vanity, it is much



54 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

better than no pride in these things. This
pride in doing right is one of the preserving
ingredients, the very salt of man’s moral
character, which peninee from plunging into
vice.

Live for something besides séf. Build
with your own hands. the monument that
shall perpetuate your memory, when the dust
has claimed your body. Do good. Live for
others, if you would be embalmed in their
recollections,

“Yhousands of men breathe, move, and
live—pass off the stage of life, and are
heard of no more. Why! They did not
a particle of good in the world; and none |
were blessed by them; none could point —
to them as the instruments of their re-
demption; not a line they wrote, not a
word they spoke could be recalled, and so
they perished ; theirlight went out in dark-
ness, and ‘théy: were not remembered more
than the insects of yesterday. Will you’
thus live and die,O man immortal? Live
for something, Do good, and leave behind |








. so"

LECTURES TO YOUTH. - BB












you a monument of virtue that the storm of
time can never destroy. Write ‘your name
by kindness, love, and mercy, on the hearts
of the thousands you come in contact With
year by year, and you will never be forgotten.
No, your name—your deeds—will be as
legible on the hearts you leave behind, as
the stars on the brow of evening. Good
deeds will shine as brightly on the earth as
the stars of heaven.” *

“Up! it is a glorious era! ,
Never yet has dawned its peer)
Up, and work! and then a nobler
- In the future shall appear.
‘Onward!’ isthe present’s motto,
To a larger, higher life ;
‘Onward! though the march be weary,
Though unceasing be the strife. _














Pitch not here thy tent, for higher
Doth the bright ideal shine,

And the journey is not ended
Till thow reach that height divine.

Upward! and above earth’s vapors,
Glimpses shall to thee Be given,

And the fresh and odorous breezes,
Of the very-hills of heaven.”



* Dr. Chalmers. ee |

—_ @



56 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

_ Among the fixed principles which you
should establish for your government, by no
means overlook Honesty and Integrity. The
poet never uttered a truer word than that

“ An honest man’s the noblest work of God.”

Honesty is approved and admired by God
and man—by all in heaven, and by all on
earth. Even the corrupt swindler, in his
heart, respects an honest man, and stands
abashed in his presence.

In all your actions, in all your dealings,

-]ét strict and rigid honesty guide you. Never
be tempted to.swerve from its dictates, even
in the most. trivial degree. There will be
strong allurements to entice you from this.
path. The appetite for gain—the voice of
avarice—will often whisper that honesty
may be violated to advantage. There will
be times when it will seem that its dictates
may be placed aside—that a little dishonesty
will be greatly to your benefit. Believe not
this syren song. This is the time you are in
the most danger of being deceived to your





'
}
{
{



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 57

serious injury. Although there may bé occa-
sions when you will seem actually to lese by
adhering to honesty, yet you should pot
shrink a hair’s breadth. Whatever you may
lose, in a pecuniary point of view, at any
time, by a strict submission to honesty, you
will make up an hundred-fold in the long-
run, by establishing and preserving a reputa-
tion for integrity. Looking at it in simply a
pecuniary point of view, community will
give their countenance, their patronage, and
business, much quicker to a man who has
established a reputation for honesty, than to
one who is known, or suspected of being
fraudulent in his dealings. Every consider-
ation which can bear upon the young, relig-
ious, moral and. pecuniary, unite to urge them
to establish, in the outset of life, the rule of
unswerving honesty and integrity, as their
constant guide. Let it not be forgotten, that
in every possible point of view, and in every
conceivable condition of things, it will always
be true, that “ Honesty is the best. policy.”

I would have the young also ctiltivate and

&

-"





58 LECTURES TO YOUTH. |

establish: as a fixed rule of life, a friendly and
accommodating disposition. This is all-essen-
tial to make their days pleasant and happy.
Other virtues will influence the world to re-
spect you; but an affectionate disposition will |
cause those with whom you have intercourse,
to love you. Those who wish the friendship
and good will of others, must themselves
manifest a friendly disposition, and a spirit
of kindness. Whoever would be accommo-
dated and assisted, must themselves be ac-
commodating, and ready to aid those who
require it. In all these things we see the
wisdom of the Saviour’s golden rule—* All
things whatsoever ye would that men should
do unto you, do ye even so unto them.” Be
kind, accommodating, loving, and peaceful,
in the whole current of your disposition, and
the cup of your life will be sweetened with
peace and joy.

I exhort the young to adopt the noble
motto of the coat-of-arms of New York—_
“ EXcELsIoR !”









LECTURES TO YOUTH. 59

“The shades of night were falling fast,
As through an Alpine village passed
A youth, who bore, ’mid snow and ice,
A banner with the strange device, ' le
EXceE.sior !” |

Let it be the aim of every youth to lift aloft
this glorious banner, and soar wpward to a
surpassing excellency. - Let them seek to
excel in all things high and good. ‘Let them
never stoop to do an evil act, nor. degrade
themselves to commit a wrong. But in their
principles, purposes, deeds, and. words, let
their great characteristics be Truth, Good-
ness, and Usefulness! |

“ Be just and fear not!
Let all the ends thou aim’st at, be thy country’s,
Thy God’s, and Truth’s !”



® ink



LECTURE III.

Srlertion of Wssuriates,

“Be not thou envious against evil men, neither desire to be with them ;
for their heart studieth destruction, and their lips talk of mischief.”—Prov.

<| HERE i is aeiing more impor-

3) tant to the youthful, or that

HYy)) should receive more serious

y consideration at their hands,

than the selection of
S* clates. We are by nature
social beings. We desire, we
seek, and enjoy, the society of

our fellow-creatures. This trait.

is strongly developed in the

- young. They yearn for each other’s
companionship, and they must have
it, or they pine away, and sink into
misanthropy. ‘This disposition may propetly







LECTURES TO YOUTH. 61

be indulged; but great care and prudence
should be exercised in regard to it.

While mingling in each other’s society, it
is natural, almost unavoidable, that the youth-
ful should imbibe much of the leading char-

acteristics of their associates. Being highly -

imitative in our nature, it is impossible to be
on social and familiar terms with others, ‘for
any great length of time, without copying

somewhat of their dispositions, ways, and

habits. )
‘Let a young man, however upright and
pure, associate habitually with those who

are profane,. Sabbath-breaking, intemperate,

and unprincipled—who are given to gam-
bling, licentiousness, and every low, brutal
and wicked practice—and_ but a brief space of

time will elapse before he will fall into like hab-

its himself, and become as great an adept in

. iniquitous proceedings as the most thorough-

paced profligate among them. When a young
woman associates with girls who are idle, dis-
respectful and disobedient to parents—who
e- vulgar, ‘brazen-faced, loud talkers and



+ dei:



- 62 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

laughers—whose chief occupation and de-
light is to spin street-yarn, to. run from house
to house and store to store, and walk the
streets in the evening, instead of being at
home engaged in’ some useful occupation—
whose whole conversation, and thoughts, and
dreams, relate to dress, and fashion, and gew-
gaws, and trinkets, to adorn the person, ut-
terly negligent of the ornaments of the mind
and heart—whose reading never extends to
instructive and useful books, but is confined
exclusively to sickly novels and silly love-
stories ;—how long will it be before she will
become as careless and good-for-nothing as
they ?

This predisposition of the young to imitate
the characteristics of those with whom they
associate, has been so well and so long known,

»|| that it has given rise to the old proverb—



“Show me your company, and I will show
you your character.” So perfectly did Solo-
mon understand this, that he uttered the
wise maxim—* Make no friendship with an
angry man; and with a furious man thou









LECTURES TO YOUTH. 63

shalt not go; lest thou learn nie ways, and
get a snare to thy soul.”

The young should remember, that people
will judge them by the company they keep.
This principle is perfectly correct. In select-
ing their associates, they act. voluntarily.
They choose such as’ they please. When
they seek the society of the ignorant, the
vulgar, the profane and. profligate, they give
the best of reasons for believing that they
prefer profligacy and vulgarity to virtue and
purity. To what other conclusion can the
observer come? If they preferred virtue

and purity, they would certainly seek pure

and virtuous associates. Hence society have
adopted the véty correct principle of judging
the young. by the character of their associ-
ates. If they would be thought well of, they
should strive to associate with those who
are known to be virtuous and good. How-
ever blameless and upright young persons
may have been, if they begin to -associate
with those whose reputation is poor, and
whose conduct is improper, they will soon





64 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

be esteemed no higher than their compan-
100s. | |
These reflections. show the youthful how

important it is, that their associates should |

be.of the right stamp. They should see the
necessity of selecting their companions. The
great difficulty with the young is, that they
leave this important matter altogether too
much to “chance.” If they happen to fall
into good company, it is very well; and
their associates and intimate friends will be
likely to be of that class. But if, unfortu-
nately, they meet with the vicious and un-
principled, and are, to any great extent,
thrown in their way, they are as likely to
form intimacies with themâ„¢as with any
others. |

Such negligence is exceedingly unpromis-
ing and dangerous. Whoever allows it, will
be in far more danger of falling under the
‘nfluence of the vicious than the exemplary.
Instead of this heedlessness, they should
carefully and thoughtfully select their asso-
ciates. . They should not be willing to form





RO ee ee) ee a A ee

—————————eEEe=Ee=EeEeENEeweaeweesess™—“‘*”

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 65

terms of intimacy with every one into whose
society they may be casually thrown. They
should inform themselves of their tastes, hab-
its, and reputation. And from the circle of
their. acquaintance should choosé those with
whom they would form terms of intimacy.

Be cautious to select aright. The entire
eareer in after-life depends very much on
this. How many a young woman of fine at-
tractions has had her reputation injured, and
her prospects for life destroyed, by associat-
ing with those whose character and habits
proved to be bad, When once young wo-
men get a taint on theif reputation in this
way, or in any other manner, it is exceed-
ingly difficult to wipe it out. |

The ruin of multitudes of young men can
be traced to the same origin—a bad selec-
tion of associates. I have in my mind’s eye
now, a case in pomt. A young man, born
in this city, and known to most of you, was
naturally endowed with the rarest abilities
and the finest talents. He belonged to one
of the most wealthy and respectable families.







66 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

He had every advantage for cultivation, and
_ for the highest and most thorough education.
Had he been thoughtful and wise to have
improved his opportunities, the way was
open for him to the highest advancement.
He might have been blessed with respecta-
bility, wealth, and honors. He could have
risen to the most dignified positions in life.
- His voice might have been heard in strains
of persuasive eloquence, from the sacred pul- |
pit, or in the halls of justice, or in the senate
chamber of our state or national councils.
He might have occupied a seat on the bench
of the highest courts, or have aspired to. the
executive chair of the nation. But where is
he now, and what are his circumstances and
his position in the world? See issuing from
the door of yonder filthy groggery, a wretched
specimen of humanity—the distorted carica-
ture of a man! His garments are thread-
bare and patched—his eyes are inflamed, |
sunken and watery—his countenance bloat-
ed and livid—his limbs swelled and totter-
ing. Although but in the morning of his





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 67

manhood, yet the lines of premature old age |
and decrepitude are deeply carved upon his
pale, dejected face; and in his whole aspect,
there is that forlorn, broken-spirited, an-
guished look of despair, which shows he him-
self feels that he has sunken, beyond earthly
redemption, into the awful pit of the con-
firmed ,drunkard! ‘This is the young man
whose early opportunities were so favorable,
and whose prospects were so bright and flat-
tering. He has become a curse to himself.
He has brought: disgrace and wretchedness
on his connections, and is an outcast and
vagabond, with whom no young man who
now hears me would associate for a single
hour ! : :

What has brought him to this pitiable —
condition—this state of utter wretchedness ?
It was a want of forethought. He totally
neglected the considerations I have endeav-
ored to impress upon the young. He was
careless and indifferent in regard to his asso-
ciates. He would not be admonished to turn
from the company of the vicious, and seek





BRR eNO ;
os r ow * R r 7 " = 7 é
x

ee ee eee ee ee eae or ON ee Te
7 = ' i 7 . ogee as.

























68 LECTURES TO. YOUTH.






the society of those of good habits and up-
right character.. Despite the counsel of pa-
rents and friends, he would associate with
companions of corrupt habits—with the pro-
fane, the drinking, the Sabbath-breaking—
those whose chief delight was to visit oyster-
cellars and grog-shops—whose highest ambi-
tion was to excel in cards, and dice, and
sleight-of-hand tricks—and who sought for
no better employment than to range the
streets and alleys, to engage midnight ad-
ventures and Bacchanalian revelries. Min-
gling with such as his associates, and fall-
ing unavoidably into their habits, he is now
reaping the détter—srrrer fruits of his folly.
His time misspent—character destroyed—
health ruinedevery source of happiness
obliterated —his life wasted and_ literally
thrown away—his days, a Jlank—ah! worse
than that—filled with the terrific visions, the
horrid dreams, the flames of the unquencha-
ble fire, which float and burn in the veins
of the confirmed inebriate!

Young men! Do youshudder at the con-





























te
LECTURES TO YOUTH. 69

dition of this wretched youth, whose form
yet flits like a shadow through our streets ?
Would you avoid his fate? Do you start
back in affright at the mere thought of. be-
|| coming the poor, cast-off wreck of humanity
- that he is? -Then avoid the rock on which
he foundered his bark. Shun, as you would
a nest of vipers, the company of the reckless
and profligate. Avoid all association, all
companionship, all intimacy, with those whose
habits deviate from the high rules of recti-
tude, purity, and virtue. ~

Allow me to paint you a picture of an op-
posite character, drawn also from real life.
I have another young man in my mind’s eye,
who originated in our own county. He had
but few of the advantages of him whose mel-
ancholy career I have painted. He was the
son of parents who possessed. but little means,
and who could afford him no assistance after
the days of childhood. He was early placed
td the hard labor of a mechanic. But he did
not sink into lewdness and. vice, under the
pressure. of his adverse circumstances. He

een






70 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

would not spend his leisure hours at public
resorts, in the midst of the profligate and
reckless: Each moment of respite from la-
bor, he applied himself to study and the im-
provement of his mind. With great wisdom
he avoided the company of idle, profane and
vicious youth ; and would associate with none
but the discreet, the intelligent and virtuous.
He was determined to risz in the world, and
to win a name which should live long after
he should pass from the earth. He placed
his-mark high! - With indomitable courage
and unwearied perseverance, he pursued the
path he had chosen for himself. He cut his
way through every obstacle, and overcame
every hindrance and difficulty, though they
might seem to tower mountain high. Friends |,
came to his aid, as they will to the. assistance
of every youth who is industriously seeking
to rise in the world by the strength of his
own merits. At length, after great exer-
tions, he obtained a profession, and entered
into a field where he could bring into active
exercise the fund of knowledge he had been





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 71

acquiring under so many difficulties. One
thus industrious, thus pure in his habits, thus
upright and honorable in all his transactions,
could not fail to reveive the commendation
and confidence of his fellow-citizens. Rap-
idly he rose from one post of honor to an-
other. Ere long he was sent to the Legisla-
ture of our State. Soon he entered the halls
of Congress, where he won the confidence of
his compeers, and arose to honorable distinc-
tion. From step to step he advanced—high
and higher still he ascended the ladder of
fame—until now, the poor mechanic boy of
Montville, occupies the second place in the
gift of the American people—within one step
of the highest pinnacle of fame to which man
can attain on the earth! How noble the
career—how splendid the example—placed
before the youth of our coutitry, in the his-
tory of this eminent man!. How honorable
to himself—how worthy of imitation.

I need not ask the young men of this au-
dience, which place they would prefer to oc-
cupy, the position of the poor inebriate of



ears

72 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



whom I have-spoken, or that of the Vice-
President of the United States? It is in-
structive to inquire why the one, with oppor-
tunities so good, sunk so low, and the other,
with early advantages so limited, has arisen
so high? This disparity in their condition
is to be attributed to the different paths
they selected at the outset of life. While
the one trampled on all his advantages, and
foolishly associated with the vicious and un-
principled, the other diligently applred him-
self to the acquisition of useful knowledge,
and was scrupulous to associate with none
but those who were discreet and virtuous,
and whose influence was calculated to elevate
and purify him.

These two cases, drawn from real life, are
but a mperenin of instances with which the
world is filled." ‘They show how immensely
important it is for the young to reflect ma-
turely on:the course they would pursue, and
the necessity of selecting for their associates
such as have habits, tastes, and principles,
proper for commendation and imitation.

. {L a nn ee



—e Ul 7 ate. eS, a, Le ee ee eS ae on a —
3 ees : r 3



LECTURES TO° YOUTH. 73

Most. of those who come under the infiu-
ence of corrupt associates, are led thither
more from sheer thoughtlessness, than from
any disposition te become depraved. They
full into the company of those who are gay,
sociable and pleasant in their manners; who
make time pass agreeably, and who contrive
many ways to drive dull care away, which
do not, in themselves, appear very bad.
Lhe thoughtless youth becomes attached. to
their society, and gradually gives -himself up
to their influence. Almost imperceptibly to
himself, he follows them farther and farther
from the path of rectitude, until, before he’
is aware of it, some:vicious habit has fixed
its fangs upon him, and made him. its wretch-
ed slave for life.

The. difficulty in these eases, is the want
of a due exercise of reflection and discern-
ment. The young should guard against be-
ing deceived by outward appearances. Be-
neath a pleasant, agreeable exterior—beneath
sociability and attractive manners—there
may lurk vicious. propensities, depraved ap-

4 *











74 _ LECTURES TO YOUTH.

petites, and habits of the most corrupt na-
ture. Hence the young should look beyond
the surface, and guard against deceptive ap-
pearances. It should not be enough to make
a young man or a young woman. your asso-
ciate, that they are sociable and attractive in
their manners, and can make their company
agreeable. Search farther than this. Strive
to know their tastes, their habits, their prin-
ciples. Inquire how, and where, they spend
their leisure hours—in what company do
they mingle—what practices do-they appro-
bate—what is their general conduct and de-
meanor? If in all these respects, they are
found to be discreet, virtuous, and worthy
of imitation, then hesitate not to associate
with them, and allow yourself to be influ-
enced by them. But if you-find them defi-
cient in any of these characteristics, however
attractive they may be in other respects,
shun their company, and avoid their influ-
ence. The effect of associating with them
would be to lead you astray, to your ruin.

.





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 75
| In selecting associates, studiously avoid
those who are low, coarse, and vulgar in
their behavior and manners. Rudeness and
vulgarity’ are unbecoming any age. But:
they are especially offensive and indecorous ©
in youth. The young man, or young wo-
man, who has not sufficient self-respect and.
pride of character to deport themselves with
modesty, circufaspection, and politeness, 1s
unfitted to be an- associate. A bold, brazen,
forward demeanor, indicates a heart far from
possessing those delicate and amiable traits,
which are alone worthy of imitation. Vul-
garity in language or demeanor, indicates a
vitiated heart. Cultivation and refinement
of manners are, to a good degree, evidence of
a pure spirit, and high and honorable feelings.
The youth who is truly polite, has a great
advantage, in every respect, over those who
are deficient in this desirable qualification.
Many, however, entertain very erroneous
views of the nature of politeness. It does
not consist in putting on an air, a simper, a
strut, or a bow. Neither is it to be mani-

TT














icteric AES





a

76 “LECTURES TO YOUTH. >

fested in high-flown words, or a fashionable
pronuntiation. Many young persons who

can make very accomplished bows, and-go
through all the postures and attitudes of the

schools, are still ignorant of the first princi-
ples of genuine politeness, and violate them
every day. Politeness is not to be learned
of the dancing-master, the fop, or the belle.
Do you inquire where it can be obtained ?
I answer, in the gospel of our Saviour. -True-
hearted Christians are always.polite. They
cannot be otherwise, while influenced by the
Christian spirit. For the first great princi-
ple of true politeness is found.in the Saviour’s
golden rule—‘“ All things whatsoever ye
would..that men should do to you, do ye
even so to them.” Treat others as -you wish
to be treated yourself, and you-cannot fail
of being polite. Treat them as you wish not
to be treated, and you are illbred and vul-

gar, though you may be dressed in the ex-.

treme of fashion, and steeped in Cologne!
‘Politeness, in its true acceptation, is ‘but an-

other word for kindness. The truly polite









f LECTURES TO YOUTH. 77

if and woman, are not haughty, nor exclu-

sive—they are not starched; nor supereilious.

ay show their politeness in being respect-
: ‘fal to the-feelings of persons of every rank,
condition, “nd complexion. They .treat all

kindly and gently; and seek to make those
im their presence to feel easy and happy.
The whole secret of politeness may be sum-
med up-in a. single sentence—Make your-
selves agreeable and pleasant to whomsoever

you meet. With this intent, your manners’

will be easy and natural; and you will be
polite in every true sense-of the word, though
brought up an the centre of the wilderness.

_In selecting those they would imitate in
regard to politeness, the young should not
choose the starched fop, the gaudily-dressed
dandy, who may owe all their attractions to
the unpaid tailor—nor the fashionable belle,
who sneers upon everything plain and useful.
They, more than all others, violate the first
principles of politeness in their demeanor.
But select the plain-dressed, the modest, the
affable, the kind and friendly at heart. «In
&

















78 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

these you find the true’ lady —the gent
gentleman. es gig ‘sg ‘ ae al

Tn regard to this whole wibijoct of th 3e-.
lection of ‘associates, I would earnestly coun-.
sel the young to listen respectfully to the’ \
advice of their parents, guardians, and elder’ -
friends. 'Théy should not be henistroneroaaiag
wise in their own conceits; but should
to the counsel of others. Your parents
far better calculated to judge of associates
than themselves. You are liable to be plind |
ed to their defects, and deceived by specious
‘appearances. But parents scrutinize the]
from a different position. They have been.»

through the school of experience, and are |
much better prepared to judge of character. ‘%
Listen, O ye youthful! to their warning
voice. They are moved by love for you—
they speak for your good. When. they en-
treat you to avoid the society of certain indie ||
viduals, and escape their influence, heed their
exhortations. Your own heart will tell you, |] :
that your father and mother would not i |

Ain aR

“a
—
D> pik? Q B
a ‘






LECTURES TO YOUTH. 79






: pes x, simply to thwart your feelings; but
at they see danger hovering around you,
dv Lwould snatch you away, as the bird from
at fowler’s snare! That is a-wise and prom-
A “i mg son—a prudent and. hopeful daughter
: —who pays respectful deference to the coun-
"se of parents,.and yields a cheerful compli-
e he with their wishes | * |






















“So live, that teas thy summons comes, to join

ithe inpumerable. caravan, that moves

$ = cm ~'To'the pale-realms of shade, where each shall che

dh fi * His chamber in the silent halls of death,

II ‘Thou’ go not, like the quarry-slave at night,

| _ Scourged to his dungeon; but, sustained and soothed
By aneunfaltering trust, approach thy grave

|. Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch

: About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams !”

J







LECTURE IV --

Pabits oul Aurusements.

RRR RRR eee , - >
«Ponder the path of thy feet, and let all thy ways be established.”
—Prov. iy. 26. , ais eo

;
i

HERE is not a youth present
}) this evening, who will not
\ acknowledge this to be sound

and wholesome advice. Were






> you walking in a slippery,
dangerous way, amid «the
darkness of midnight, you would |
give the strictest heed to the
friendly precaution—* Ponder the |
path of thy feet. Be careful where |
you step. When you put your foot |
\ down, see to it, that it rests on some-
thing well-established some rock,
some spot of earth, that is firm and solid.”
This advice would be heeded, because of ||





a LECTURES TO YOUTH. Sl

your consciousness that by stepping heed-
lessly, you-would be im danger of stumbling
into a pit, or falling over a precipice, where
your limbs would be broken, or life destroy-
ed. Simple discretion would hid you be-
ware, under such circumstances. The youth-
ful should fully realize that they are walking
in a pathway, which to them is wholly un-
tried and unknown. Itis a road surrounded
by many. dangers, unseen by the careless
traveller; where he is liable to be lured aside
to ruin, by a thousand fascinations and temp-
tations, and where multitudes possessing the
best advantages, the highest. talents, the
brightest genius, the rarest gifts, have stum-
bled and fallen, to rise no more on earth.
- While pressing on ardently and thoughtlessly
_ in this dangerous highway, apprehending no
. difficulty, and fearing no peril, a voice from
| onhigh callsto the young, and urges them
to *Ponder'the path of their feet, and to let
all their ways—their footsteps—be estab-
lished!” There is wisdom, prudence, good-
ness, in this exhortation.

6
























— e+

32 LEOTURES TO YOUTH.

Qrestion the old man—the aged traveller
—who has passed over this pathway of life,
end is just ready to step up into the myste-
rious road of a higher existence. Ask him
as to his experience—beseech him for advice.
Looking back through the vista of his long
and chequered way, of light and shadow, of
joy and sorrow, he will exclaim—“O ye

youthful! Give heed to the admonition of
the wise man— Ponder the path of thy feet,
and let all thy ways be established.’ ”

‘The admonition of the text is important
in reference to the Habits and Amusements
of the youthful. We are all more or less
the creatures of habit. Our ways, from ear-
liest infancy, are more the result of the force
of habit, than we are generally aware. The -
actions, words, and thoughts of men, form.
for themselves certain channels, in which
they continually seek to flow, unless turned
aside by a strong hand, and’a painful effort.

Habits are formed - insensibly. We are
not aware of any moment when they are

created; but the first consciousness of their





a

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 83



being fixed upon us, is, when their great

_ power is felt impelling us strongly to certain

courses. A single deed does not create a
habit. One thread of hemp forms not a °
rope.~ It contains but a very slight amount
of strength. But when a large number of
threads are laid and twistéd together, they
make the mighty cable, which, attached to
the ship, enables her to bid a proud defiance
to the fierce gales and mountain ‘billows of
ocean. Thus the young are continually, yet
unconsciously, spinning the threads of habit.
Day by day the strands increase, and are
twisted tighter together; until-at length
they become. strong and unyielding cords,
binding’ their possessor to customs and prac-

‘tices which ‘fix his. character and prospects

for life.

~ Tt is of the greatest iene that the
y oung should inquire faithfully into the na-
ture of the habits’ they are forming. They
should not fall into self-deception—a com-
mon error, on this subject. The love of in-

dulgence should not be permitted to blind





oo





84 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

them to the legitimate consequences of care-
' Jess habits: Let them look abroad on their
fellow-beings, and. critically study the ten-
dencies and fruits of their habits. When
they see one prosperous in life—one who is
respected, confided im, and beloved by all—
who leads a quiet, pleasant and peaceful hie,
_— mark his habits, and strive to imitate
them. They will bless them as well as him,
if faithfully practised. And when they be-
hold a man disliked and despised by his
neighbors, especially by those who know
him best—or one who has fallen into dis-
grace and ruin; who has. lost his character,
his health, his happiness, and become an out-
east. and vagabond,—let them not fail to
learn what. his habits have been. Look at
them carefully and critically. Ponder well
the effect they have had upon him. And
then strive to avoid them. Shun them as
the poisonous viper whose sting is death.
Let them wind not a single coil of their fatal
chains around the free spirit of the young.
The same appalling consequences will be

ct i Mil a” A a or i i Cl taal
aie a

een







LECTURES TO YOUTH. 85

visited on every youth who indulges them,
that have fallen on those whose condition ex-
cites both pity and loathing in their breasts.

In youth, habits are much easier formed
and corrected, than at a later period of life.
If they are right now, preserve, strengthen
and mature them. If they are wrong—if
they have dny dangerous mfluence or ten-
dency—correct them immediately. Delay
not the effort an hour. The earlier you
make the attempt to remedy a bad _ habit,
the easier it will be accomplished.- Every
day adds to its strength and vigor; until, if
not conquered in due time, it will become
a voracious monster, devouring everything
good and excellent. It will make its victim
a miserable, drivelling slave, to be continu-
ally lashed and scourged into the doing of
its low and wretched promptings. Hence
the importance of attending to the habits
in early life, when they are easily controlled
and. corrected. If the young do not make
themselves the masters of their passions, ap-
petites, and habits, these will soon become









. 86 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

their masters, and make them their tool and
bond-men through all their days.
Usually at the age of thirty years, the

moral habits become fixed for life. New

ones are seldom formed aiter that age; and
quite as seldom are old ones abandoned.
There are exceptions to this rule; but in
general, it holds good. If the habits are de-
praved and vicious at that age, there is little

hope of amendment. But if they are cor-

rech—if they are characterized by virtue,
goodness, and sobriety—there is a flattering

prospect of a prosperous and peaceful life..

Remember, the habits are not formed, nor
can they be corrected, in a-single week ‘or

month. It requires years to form them, and
years will be necessary to correct them per-

manently, when they are wrong. Hence, in

order to possess good habits at maturity, it

is all-important to commence schooling the
passions, curbing the appetites, and bringing
the whole moral nature under complete con-
trol, early in youth. .This work cannot be
commenced too soon. The earlier the ef-



ae ee eee
a ee ee ee

eter nee =e

a LL LLL

|
|
!

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 87

fort, the easier it can be accomplished, To
straighten the tender twig, when it grows
awry from the ground, is the easiest thing
imaginable. A child can do it at the touch
of its finger. But let the twig become a ma-
tured tree before the attempt is made, and
it will baffle all the art of man to bring it to
a symmetrical position. It must be uproot-
ed from the very soil, before this can be ac-
complished. ‘It is not dificult to correct a
bad habit when it commences forming. Eut
wait until it has become fully developed, end
it will require a long and painful exertion of
every energy to correct it.

Permit me to enumerate a few of the more
mumpontont habits, which the young should
seek to cultivate.

First of all—the most: Lalmatittat of all—
and that, indeed, which underlies and gives
coloring to all others—is the habit of Trx-
PERANCE. Surely it is needless for me, at
this day, to dwell upon the evils of intem-
perance. It cannot be necessary to - paint
the bitter consequenves—the destruction to














88 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

property, health, reputation—the overthrow
of the peace of families, the want and mis-
ery, to which its victims are frequently
reduced. The disgrace, the wretchedness, |
the ruin, the useless and ignomimious life, 7
and the horrid death, which are so often
caused by habits of intemperance, are seen,
and. known to all. No one attempts, no one
thinks of denying them. The most inter.
ested dealer, or retailer in intoxicating drinks .
—the most confirmed inebriate—will ae-
knowledge without hesitation, that intem-
perance is the direst evil that ever cursed a
fallen race!! The deleterious consequences
of other vices may sometimes be concealed —
for a season, from outward observation. Not
so with intemperance. It writes its-loath-
some name, in legible characters, upon the
very brow of its wretched victim. “Zamna
drunkard!” is as plainly to be read as though
a printed label was posted there! |
Need I warn—need I exhort—the young
to avoid the habit of intemperance. Per-
haps there is not a youth present, who is not







LECTURES TO YOUTH. 89

ready to say, “To me this exhortation is
needless. I have not the slightest expecta-
tion of becoming a drunkard!” Of course
not. There never was a man who desired,
or expected, to become -a victim to intem~_

-perance. The great danger of this habit is,

a

that it creeps stealthily and imperceptibly
upon the unwary. It does its work gradu-
ally. The most besotted inebriate cannot
tell you the day, nor the month, when he
became a confirmed drunkard. It is in the
nature of this habit, that those who expose
themselves at all to its assaults, become its
victims, while they are entirely unaware
of iy - ) |

The only safeguard and security, against
this scourge of man, is total abstinence from
all intoxicating drinks !! Tere is the true,

the safe ground for the young. There is no

other condition of entire security. No man
who drinks, however sparingly, has assur-
ance of a sober life. He needlessly, and
foolishly, places himself in danger—turns his
footsteps into the only path that can’ possi-



90 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



!
|
i |
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i
|
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|

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bly lead to the drunkard’s ruin and the
drunkard’s grave!

Drink the first drop that can intoxicat e,
and your feet stand at the very brink of the
ocean of intemperance. Its briny waters
‘are composed of human tears. Its winds,
the sighs of those made poor and wretched
by the mebriation of husbands, fathers, sons.
Its billows, ever tossing, are overhung with
black and lowering clouds, and. illuminated
only by.the lightning’s vivid flash, while
hoarse thunders reverberate over the wide
and desolate waste. Engulphed in this
dreary ocean, the wretched drunkard is buf:
feted hither and thither, at the merey of its
angry waves—unow dashed on jagged rocks,
bruised and bleeding—then engulphed in
raging -whitlpools ‘to suffogating depths
anon, like a worthless weed, cast ‘high into
the darkened. heavens b} the wild water-
spout, only to fall again into the surging
deep, to be tossed to and fro on waters
which cannot rest! Rash youth! Would
you launch away on this sea of death? Quaff











LECTURES TO YOUTH. 91

of the intoxicating bow], and soon its hun- |

ery waves will be around you. Would you

avoid a fate so direful? Seal your lips to

the first drop, and the drear prospect will
sink forever from your vision!

Young men who would guard themselves
against the baleful habit of intemperance,
should shun all resorts where intoxicating

drinks are vended. They should avoid

throwing themselves in’ the way of tempta-

tion. “Lead us not into temptation,” should

be the constant prayer of the young. When
by any combination of circumstances, they
find themselves in the company of those who
quaff of the poisoned bowl, whether in pub-
lic or private, they should exercise a manly
pride-in firmly refusing to par ticipate In

their potations. This is a legitimate and

commendable pride, of which the young can-
not have too mich. Let them ee them-
selves on the high rock of principle, and
their feet will not slide in the trying hour.

“Oh! water for me! bright water for me,
And wine for the tremulous debauchee!







LECTURES TO YOUTH.



It cooleth the brow, it cooleth the brain,
It maketh the faint one strong again!

It comes o’er the sense like a breeze from the sea,
All freshness, like infant purity. |

Oh! water, bright water, for me, for me!

Give wine, give wine, to the debauchee.”




“The young man walks: in the midst
of temptations to appetite, the improper in-
dulgence of which is in danger of proving
his ruin. Health, longevity, and virtue de-
pend on his resisting these temptations. The
providence of God is no more responsible,
because a man of improper indulgence be-
comes subject to disease, than for picking
his pockets. For a young man to injure
his health, is to waste his patrimony and de-
stroy his capacity for virtuous deeds,

“If young men imagine that the gratifica-
tion of appetite is the great source of enjoy- |
ment, they will find this in the highest de-
gree with industry and temperance. The
epicure, who seeks it in a dinner which costs
five dollars, will find less enjoyment of appe-
tite than the laborer who dines on a shilling.
If the devotee to appetite desires its high



















LECTURES TO YOUTH. 93

gratification, he must not send for buttalo
tongues and champagne, but climb a moun-
tain or swing anaxe. Leta young man pur-
sue temperance, sobriety, and industry, and
he may retain his vigor till three score years
and ten, with his cup of enjoyment full, and
depart painlessly; as the — burns out
in its socket, he will expire.”*

- Next to Temperance in importance, I
would rank the habit of Iypustry. We
were evidently made for active occupation.
Every joint, sinew, and muscle plainly shows
this. A young person who is an idler, a
drone, is a pest in society. He is ready to
engage in mischief, and to fall into vice, with
but little resistance. It is an old saying,
that “an idle brain is the devil’s workshop.”
Those who are not actively employed in
something useful, will be very likely to fall
into evil practices. Industry is one of the
best. safeguards against the inroads of vice.
The young, whatever may be their condi-
tion, or however abundantly they may be-



* Horace Manna.





LLG LE AC tt tt et
Sn pets near
-

94 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

lieve their future wants already provided for,
should actively engage in some honorable
occupation or profession—in something that
will benefit mankind. They should be fired
with the high and noble ambition of making
the world better for their living in it. Who

can wish to pass a blank existence? Yet this -

is the life of every idler, poor or rich, Be
stirring in anything which is ‘useful—any-
thing which will make others happy. Then
you will not have lived in vain.° Behold
how a good man can devote his life to labors
for the benefit of others. Would you par-
take of the immortal fame of a Howard ?
Imitate, to the extent of your ability, the
example of industrious benevolence he has
placed before the world.
“From realm to realm, with cross or crescent crowned,

Where’er mankind and misery are found,

O’er burning sands, deep waves, or wilds of snow,

Mild Howard journeying seeks the house of woe.

Down many a winding step to dungeons dank,

Where anguishwails aloud and fetters clank,

To caves bestrewed with many a mouldering bone,

And cells whose echoes only learn to groan ;

Where no kind bars a whispering friend disclose,
No sunbeam enters, and no zephyr blows ;>&









LECTURES TO YOUTH. 95

He treads, inemulous of fame or wealth,

Profuse of toil and prodigal of health;

Leads stern-eyed Justice to the dark domains,

If not to sever, to relax his chains;

Gives to her babes the self-devoted wife,

To her fond husband liberty and life,—

Onward he moves! disease and death retire; ~
And murmuring demons hate him and admire.”

To young women industry is equally es-
sential and commendable. An idle woman

is a poor and worthless thing. For what

does she imagine she was created? Of what
service is she to the world? In what re-
spect would not the world be as well with-
out her? A do-nothing young lady is most
assuredly pitied and despised by those whose
good opinion she is most anxious to se-
cure. | Se

It is not enough that a young woman can
play skilfully, sing delightfully, dance grace-
fully, dress fashionably, and has an abundant
flow of “small talk.”. The world. looks be-

yond these outward -ornaments, ’ and asks.

—THas she a good heart and ‘gentle disposi-
tion? Is she affectionate and forbearing?
Can she rule her temper and control her

-" . *






























| 96 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

| tongue? Does she respect and obey her pa-
| rents? Has she a well-cultivated and well-
|| stored mind? Is she industrious, prudent,
economical? Is she able and willing to en-
gage in household duties? Accomplishments
are not to be overlooked. But the qualities
above enumerated are essential, indispensa-
ble, to the character of a oo daughter and
a useful wife.

“ Action! That's the word. The great
world itself throbs with life. Action, untir-
ing harmony pervades the Universe of God.
The Creative Power has so ordained it. The
physical formation of the world, and all there-
in, forbids inactivity. The vast machinery
must move, or the whole cease to exist. Man
was never designed to be a drone. Had he —
lived pure in the first Paradise, he could not
have been idle. Sick or well, in cold or
heat, day or night, the machine moves on,
the heatf, like a steam-engine, throbs away,
and faithfully pumps its crimson currents un-
ceasingly to every part of the animal frame.
Action is one of the first elements of health



Full Text


——— |.

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AUBURN, N.Y.
DERBY, MILLER & C®







L GOLDEN STEPS _



~ 4 ?
: Aesuertability, _ aud Bayniness.
é ‘
BEING # SERIES OF LECTURES TO
*
YOUTH OF BOTH SEXES,
ON : ti
. CHARACTER, PRINCIPLES, ASSOCIATES, AMUSE-
MENTS, RELIGION, AND MARRIAGE. *

BY JOHN MATHER AUSTIN, ;

AUTHOR oF “voice TO yourTH;” “voice TO MARRIED,” ETC, ETC. _ 4

e . 2 Ww

“ Onward! onward ! Toils despising, : “te | . 3 Ne

» Upward, upward! Turn thine eyes, ex a hy ~ oo
Only be content when rising, i ae

+ : Fix thy goul amid the skies,” a. ’ = a sg

AUBURN: | .

‘
’ DERBY, MILLER, AND COMPANY:
1851,
‘


RPP PPP PPP PIP IPP PIP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPB PP PPD PDP

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850,
BY DERBY, MILLER & CO.,,
In the Clerk’s Office of the Northern District of New York.
LOB PDP BB LL DDD DGD GD DAA ABLALLMODOODPI III YO MAAAANAALAARR

SAPP PAPADAARAAININOOOn oon" ow"
THOMAS B. SMITH, STEREOTYPER,
216 WILLIAM STREET, W. Y.


CONTENTS,



LECTURE I.
PAGE

THE VALUE OF A GOOD REPUTATION . e . . 9

LECTURE II.

THE PRINCIPLES AND PURPOSES OF LIFE, . e —

LECTURE IIL.

SELECTION OF ASSOCIATES . .« «© «6 « .~ 60

LECTURE IV.

THE HABITS AND AMUSEMENTS ‘ . ° e - 80

LECTURE V.

THE RELIGIOUS SENTIMENTS . . "4 ° - 116

LECTURE VI.

MARRIAGE aoe ° . ° ° ° ° - 194







Se ee ee eee “ T
» ° :

PREFACE.

Tue Lectures embraced in this volume, were
written for the pulpit, in the usual manner of prep-
aration for such labor, without any expectation
of their appearing in print. The author is but too
sensible. that they are imperfect in many features, 3
‘both in matter and style. It is only in the hope #}. —
that they will be of some benefit to the class to
whom they are addressed, that he has consented to
submit them to public perusal. He has aimed at
nothing eccentric, odd, or far-fetched; but has
sought to utter plain and obvious truths, in a plain
and simple manner. There is no class more inter- ol
esting, and none which has higher claims on the 7
wisdom, experience, and advice, of mature minds,
than the young who are about to enter upon the ||
trying duties and responsibilities’ of active life. . |
Whatever tends to instruct and enlighten them; to |
point out the temptations which will beset their i.
pathway, and the dire evils which inevitably flow |






vi




PREFACE.

from a life of immorality ; whatever will influence
them to honesty, industry, sobriety, and religion,
and lead them to the practice of these virtues, as

“Golden Steps” by which they may ascend to Re-

spectability, Usefulness, and Happiness, must be of
benefit to the world. To aid in such a work, is
the design of this volume. If it subserves this end
—if it becomes instrumental in inciting the youth-
ful to high and pure principles of action, in hedging
up the way of sin, and opening the path of wisdom,
to any—if it drops but a single good seed into the
heart of each of its readers, and awakens the slight-
est aspiration to morality, usefulness, and religion—
it will not have been prepared in vain. With a
prayer to God that he would protect and bless the
youth of our common country, and prepare them
to preserve and perpetuate the priceless legacy of
Freedom and Religion, which they will inherit
from their fathers, this book is given to the world,
to fulfil such a mission as Divine Wisdom shall
direct. | :
Tue Avurtuor.



Avsurn, June, 1850.










GOLDEN STEPS ©

FOR

YOUTH OF BOTH SEXES.“ f* —








LECTURE It
s Che Balue-of ¢ Goot Reputation.

*



“ Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time

to come.”—1 Tim. Vi. 19.
&



*
yy ) N this ssignenis St. Paul ass
| ke #) a principle which should conte.
mend itself to the mature
) consideration of every youth-
ful mind. Ifthe youngwould
{) have their career honorable
and» prosperous—if y would
JAM enjoy the respect and con-
xP fidence of community ; if they
would have the evening of their
a = days calm, serene, and peaceful—
Pi. they must prepare for it early in
life, They must lay “a good foundation

against the time to come”—a foundation
1*







— eee eee


10 ~ . LECTURES TO YOUTH.

which will be capable of sustaining the
edifice they would erect. The building
cannot be reared in strength and beauty,
without it rests on a secure “ corner-stone.”
The harvest cannot be gathered unless the
seed is first cast into the ground. A wise
Providence has so ordered it that success,
prosperity, and happiness through life, and a
wespected and “green old .age,” are to be
enjoyed only by careful preparation, prudent
forecast, and assiduous culture, in the earlier
»-) periods of our existence.

+

“True wisdom, early sought and gained,
In age will give thee rest;
O then improve the morn of life,
* To make its evening blest.” -

The youthful live much in the future.
They are fond of gazing into its unknown
depths, and of endeavoring to trace the out-
line, at least, of the fortunes that await them.
With .ardent hope, with eager expecta-
tion, they anticipate the approach of coming
years—confident they will brmg to them
naught but unalloyed felicity. But they
LECTURES TO YOUTH © Bi

should allow their anticipations of the future

to be controlled by a well-balanced judg-

ment, and moderated by the experience of

those who have gone before them.

In looking to the future, there is one im-

portant inquiry which the young should put

to their own hearts:—What do I most.

desire to become in mature life? ‘What

position am I anxious to occupy in society @

What is the estimation in which" wish to
be held by those within the circle of my. oe

acquaintance ? . a.

The answer to these inquiries, from the ||

great mass of young people, can gyell be

anticipated. ‘There are none -amol “them,
who desire to be disrespected and shunned
by the wise and good—who are anxious to
be covered with disgrace, and infamy—who
seek to be outcasts ‘and vagabonds in the
world. The thought that they were doomed
to such a condition, would fill them with alarm.
Every discreet youth will exclaim—* Nothing
would gratify me more than to be honored
and respected, as I advance in years; +0





* ee ea ee | a ee oe ~ =
al - : A . ;
’ . e

12 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

move in good, society; to haire people seek
my company, rather than shun it; to be
looked up to as an example for olhene to
imitate, — to enjoy the confidence of all
around me.”

Is notsthis the desire of the young of this
large audience? ‘Surely there can be none
here so blind to the future, so lost to their
gown good, as to prefer a life of infamy and
its ever-atcompanying wretchedness, to re-
spectability, prosperity, and true enjoyment ?
|} But how are these to be obtained ? Respec-

- tability, prosperity, the good opinion. of com-
munity, do not come simply at our*bidding. ||
We cannot reach forth our hands and take |
‘them, as we pluck the ripe fruit from the |
bending branch. . Neither will wishing or |
hoping for them shower their blessings upon |
us. If we would obtain and enjoy them, we
must Jabor for them—rarn them. They are |
only secured as the well-merited reward of a
pure and useful life !

The first thing to be aimed at by the |
young, should be the establishment of “|

sees cilieeeeasiliiactl





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 13

coop cHaracger: In all theif’ plans, antici-
pations, and prospects for fatt: years, this
should form the grand starting-point !—the
chief corner-stone! It should be the founda-
~tion of every hope and thought of prosperity
and happiness in days to come. It is the
only basis.on which such a hope can mature
to full fruition. A good character, estab-
lished in the season of youth, becomes avich,
and productive moral soil to its —possessor. —
Planted therein, the “Tyee of Life” will
spring forth in a vigorous growth. Its roots
will strike deep and strong; in such a soul,
and draw thence the utmost vigor and fruit-
fulness. Its. trunk will grow up in majes-

tie proportions—its wide-spreading branches
will be clothed with a green luxuriant
foliage, “goodly to look upon”—the most
beautiful of blossoms will in due time, blush
on every twig—and at length each limb and
bough shall bend beneath the rich, golden
fruit, ready to drop into the hand. Beneath
its grateful shade you can find rest and
repose, when the-heat and burden of life






14 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

come upon you. And of its delicious fruit,
you can pluck and eat, and obtain refresh-
ment and strength, when the soul becomes
wearied with labor and care, or the weight
of years. Would you behold such a tree?
Remember it grows alone on the soil of a
good reputation!! ‘Labor to prepare such a
soll.

Believe not, ye youthful, that God has
made the path of virtue and religion hard
and thorny. Believe not he has overhung
it with dark clouds, and made it barren of
fruit and beauty. Believe not that rugged
rocks, and briers, and brambles, choke the
way, and lacerate the limbs of those who |
would walk therein! No! he has made it
a smooth and peaceful path—an easy and
pleasant way.— Wisdom’s ways are ways of
pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.”

The young who overlook these considera-
tions—who lay their plans, and cherish their
expectations, in reference to their future
career, without any regard to the importance

“of a good character—who, in marking out

ie
-







LECTURES TO YOUTH. 15

their course, lose sight of the necessity of
_ laboring to establish a worthy reputation to
commence with—who, in building their hopes
of success and happiness, are not convinced
that “a good name” is the only foundation
on which such hopes can legitimately rest—
have commenced wrong. 'They have made a
radical and lamentable mstaxe at the outset.
4. mistake, which, unless speedily corrected,
will prove most disastrous in all its influences,
and be keenly felt and deplored throughout
hfe. —

Those who fall into error on this point,
who view a good reputation. as a matter of
no moment—well enough if you can secure
it without much trouble, but not worth
laboring for, with zeal and perseverance—
have placed themselves in a- most critical
position. They are like a ship in the midst
of the wide wastes of ocean, without chart
compass, or rudder, liable to be turned hither
and thither by every fickle wind that. blows,

_ and dashed upon dangerous reefs by the,
heaving billows. Failing to see the impor




~:
,

16 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

tance of establishing a good character, they
fall easy victims to sinful temptations, and,
ere long, verging farther and farther from the
path of rectitude, they. at length find every
fond hope, every fair prospect, blasted for life.

To a young man, a good character is the
best capital he can possess, to-start with in
life. It is much better, and far more to be
depended on than gold. Although money
may aid in establishing a young man in
business, under favorable circumstances, yet
without a good character he cannot succeed.

His want. of reputation will undermine the

best advantages, and failure, and ruin, will,

sooner or later, overtake him with —

certainty ! !

When it is known that-a young man is
well-informed, industrious, attentive to busi-
ness, economical, strictly temperate, and
moral, a respecter of the Sabbath, the Bible,
and religion, he cannot fail to obtain the
good opinion and the confidence of the whole
community. He will have friends on every
hand, who will take pleasure in encouraging




epee cee oe
==

LECTURES TO-YOUTH. ' 17

Seen

and assistmg him. The wise and good will |
bestow dele commendation upon him; and
parents will point to him as an exantple for- ||
their children to imitate. Blessed with |
health, such a youth cannot fail of success
and permanent happiness.
But let it be known that a young man is |
|

— ‘ —

ignorant or indolent, that he is neglectful of
business, or dishonest; that he is given to
intemperance, or apeied to visit places of
dissipation, or to associate with vicious, com-
panions—and ‘what are his prospects? With
either one or more of these evil qualifications
fixed upon him, he is hedged out of the path

SL ssh

of prosperity. To cover up such character-

testes

istics for a great. length of time, is a moral
unpossibility. Remember this, I beg you. |
It is beyond the power of mortals to conceal |
vicious habits and propensities for any long
period. And when once discovered, who Will -
repose confidence in such a youth? Who
will trust him, or encourage him, or counte-
nance him? Who will give him employ-
ment? Who will confide anything to his

et slices aster

SS




se cece LEE EL LL AL A



~-
eee

18 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

es

oversight? Who will render him assistance
in -his business affairs, when he is strait-

ened and in need of the aid of friends?.

Behold his prospects! How unpromising,

| how dark!! Itis impossible for such a young
man to succeed. No earthly power can confer
prosperity upon him. He himself under-
mines his own welfare, blackens his own
name, and dashes down the cup of life.which
a wise and good Providence has kindly
placed to his lips, and calls upon him to
drink.

. If a good eharacter,.a spotless reputation,
is all-essential to the prosperity of a young
man, what must it not be to a young woman ¢
A well-established character for morality and
‘virtue is of great importance to people of
every class, and in all circumstances. But to
is 3 ung lady, a “good name” is a priceless
jewel. It is everything —hiterally, EVERY-
“rarNe—to her. It will give her an attrac-
F | tion, a value, an importance, in the estima-
tion of others, which nothing else can impart.




*



seg eC EL LL: LLL Ae eee ee
.

.
cessation ET LE ES Ln
. .

RE


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 19

In possession of a spotless character, she may
reasonably hope for peace and happiness.
But without such a character, she is nothing !
Youth, beauty, dregs, accomplishments, all
gifts and qualities will be looked upon as
naught, when tainted by a suspicious repu-
tation! Nothing can atone for this, nothing
can be allowed to take its place, nothing can
give charm and attraction where it exists,
When the character of a young woman is
gone—all is gone! Thenceforward she can
look for naught ‘else but degradation and
wretchedness, | |

The reputation of a young woman is of
the most delicate texture. It. requires not
overt.acts of actual wickedness to tarnish its
brightness, and. cast suspicion on its purity.
Indiscreet language, careless deportment, a
want of discrimination in- regard to aSSO-
clates, even when no evil is done, or intended,





will often bring into qnestion her character} e
greatly to herinjury. Many are thé instances: ff -
where a single word, spoken at random, in ~|}.*

the giddy thoughtlessness of youthful vivacity,








20 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

without the slighest thought of wrong, has
cast a shadow upon the character of a young
woman which it required years to eflace.
How important 4 that every word uttered, and
every deed performed, should be maturely
weighed.. A discreet lady will not only be
careful to avoid evil itself, but will studiously
refrain from everything which has even the
appearance of evil. |
«“ Whatever dims thy sense of truth,
Or stains thy purity,

Though light as breath of summer air,
Count it as sin to thee.”

Young women frequently err in their
understanding of what it is that gives them
a good name, and imparts their chief attrac-
tion. Many seem to imagine that good
looks, a gay attire, in the extreme of fashion,
and a few showy attainments, constitute
Be rything essential to make them interesting
and attractive, and to establish a high rep-
utation in the estimation of the other sex.
Pence they seek for no other attainments.
In this, they make a radical mistake. The











LG TT,

cee ——
———————— oo



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 21

charms contained in these qualities, are very

shallow, very worthless, and very uncertain.
“There can no dependence be placed upon
- them, | .

If there is one point more than another, in
this respect, where young ladies err, it is in
regard to Dress. There are nota few who
suppose that dress is the most important
thing for which they have been created, and
that it forms the highest attraction of woman.
Under this mistaken notion—this. poor in-
fatuation—they plunge into every extrava-

‘ gance in their attire; and, in this manner,

squander sums of money, which would be
much more profitably expendéd in’ storing
their minds with useful knowledge, or, in
some cases, even in procuring the ordinary
comforts of life. ©

There is a secret on this point I would

like to divulge to young women. It is this
That any dress, which, from its oddness, oF. ||.
‘ts extreme of fashion and display, is cal |] :
lated to attract very particular attention, is ||

worn at the expense of the good name of its

ae % ss

|






oe

2 i. wol a




22 LECTURES TO. YOUTH.

possessor. It raises them in the estimation of
none; but deprives them of the good opinion
of all sensible people. It gives occasion for *
suspicion, not only of their good sense, but
of their habits of economy. When a young
woman is given to. extravagant displays in
_ dress, it is but publishing to the world, her
own consciousness of a want of other attrac-
tions of a more substantial nature. It is but
virtually saying, “I seek to excite attention
by my dress, because I have no other good
quality by which I can secure attention.”

Could a young woman who passes through
the streets decked out extravagantly in all ©
thatthe milliner and dress-maker can furnish,
realize the unfavorable impression she makes,
upon sensible young men—could she but see
the curl of the lip, and hear the contemp-
tuous epithet which her appearance excites,
and know ‘how utterly worthless they esteem
—her—she would hasten to her home, throw
off her foolish attire, and weep tears of
bitterness at her folly.

Parents are often much to be blamed for

























LECTURES TO: SOUTH. 23

this indiscretion in their daughters. They
should give them better advice; and instruct —
- them to cultivate other and worthier attrac-
tions than the poor gewgaws of DREss! Do
they not know that the worthless and aban-
doned of the female sex dress the most gaily
and fashionably? Should they not urge
their daughters to seek for a higher excel-
lency, a more creditable distinction than
this?

Here is another secret for young ladies:—
All the attraction they can ever possess by
means of dress, will be. derived from three
sources, viz. Plainness, Neatness, and Ap-
propriateness. In whatever they deviate
| from these cardinal points, they will to the ©
‘game degree make themselves ridiculous—
weaken their influence, and lose the good
opinion of those they are the most anxious to
win. I beg these truths to be impressed
deeply on the mind. . a

Dress, personal. beauty, and showy accom-
plishments, go but a short way to establish
the reputation on which the. happiness of




24 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

woman really depends. Instead of placing
reliance on these, they should seek to culti-

.vate those qualities, habits, and dispositions, —

_ which will give permanent merit and value,
in the estimation of those whose attention
and regard they are desirous to cultivate. A
- sweet and gentle disposition—a mild and for-
giving temper—a respectful and womanly
demeanor—a mind cultivated, and well-
stored with useful knowledge—a thorough
practical acquaintance with all domestic du-
ties; (the sphere where woman can exhibit
her highest attractions, and her most valu-
able qualities,) tastes, habits, and views of
life, drawn not from the silly novels of the
day, but from a discriminating judgment,
and the school: of a well-learned practical ex:
perience in usefulness and goodness :—these

are the elements of a good name, a valuable —

reputation in a young woman. They are
more to be sought for, and more to be de-
pended upon, than any outward qualification.
They form an attraction which will win the
regard and affection of the wise and enlight-



wned, where the fascinations of dress, and
- >ther worthless accomplishments, would


























LECTURES TO YOUTH. 25

orove utterly powerless. |

I desire the young, of both sexes, to re-
member that it is one thing not to have a
bad reputation, but quite another thing to
have a good one. The fact that an individual
does nothing criminal, or offensive, although
creditable in itself considered, does not be-
stow the amount of merit after which all
should seek.. They may do nothing particu-
larly bad, and nothing very good, It 1s
meritorious to refrain from evil; but it 1s
better still to achieve something by active
exertion, which shall deserve commendation.
The Apostle exhorts us not only to “cease |
to do evil,” but to “learn to do well.” The |
young; while striving to avoid the evils of a
bad reputation, should. assiduously seek for
the advantages of a good one.

How can the young secure a good charac-
‘er? Its worth, its importance, its blessings,”
we have seen. Now, how can it be obtained ¢
This is a question, worthy the serious con-
2 oe

»
Soa se




26 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

sideration of every youth. Let. me ‘say in
reply :—

1. That a good character cannot be tnher-
ited, as the estate of a father descends to his
heirs. However respectable and worthy pa-
rents may be, their children cannot share in
that respect, unless they deserve it by their
own merits. Too many youth, it is to be
apprehended, are depending upon their pa-

rents’ reputation as well as their parents’ |}

property, for their own standing and success
in life.- This is an insecure foundation. In
our republican land, every individual is
estimated by his or her own conduct, and
not by the reputation of their connections.

It is undoubtedly an advantage in many

points of view, for a young person to have
respectable parents. But if they would in-
herit their parents’ good name, they must
imitate their parents’ virtues.

2. AA good character cannot be ilies
with gold. Though a man or a woman may
have all the wealth of the Indies, yet it can-

not secure a worthy name—it cannot buy ©










‘LECTURES TO YOUTH. 27

the esteem of the wise-and good, without
the merit which deserves it. The glitter of
gold cannot conceal an evil and crabbed dis-
position, a selfish soul, a corrupt heart, or.
vile passions’ and propensities. Although
the sycophantic may fawn around such as
possess wealth, and bow obsequiously before
them, on account of their riches, yet, in fact,
they are despised and contemned in the
hearts even of their hangers-on and followers. |
3. A good character cannot be obtained by
simply wishing for it. The Creator has wisely
provided, that the desire for a thing does
not secure it. Were it to be thus, our world
would soon present a strange aspect. It is,
undoubtedly, much better that it should be
as itis. We have the privilege to wish for
whatever we please; but we can secure
only that which we labor for and deserve.
Were the traveller to stand throughout the
day, at the foot of the hill, wishing to be at
the summit, his simple desire would not
place him there. He must allow his wishes
to prompt him to proper exertion. It is only’













































28 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

by persevering industry, and patient toil,
contented to take one step at a time; that his
wish is gratified, and he finds himself at
length upon the brow of the eminence.

_ In like manner, the youthful, to obtain -

possession of a good character, must earn it.
It must be sought for; by an earnest cultiva-
tion of all the graces and virtues, which are
commended by God and man. It cannot be

secured in a moment. As the edifice is erect-

ed by diligently laying one stone upon
another, until it finally becomes a splendid
temple, piercing the heavens with its glitter-
ing spire, so a good name must be built up.
by good deeds, faithfully and constantly per-
formed, as day after day carries us along
amid the affairs of life. |

Let the youthful fix their eyes upon this
prize’ of a good reputation—the only end
wor striving for in life. Let them studi-
ously avoid evil practices, corrupt associates,
and vicious examples. Let them patiently
and faithfully lay the foundations of virtuous
habits, and practise the lessons of wisdom
LECTURES TO YOUTH. 29



and the precepts of religion—and in due time

tlie prize shall be theirs. The spotless
wreath of a virtuous character shall rest, upon
their brow. The commendation, the conti-
dence, and the good-will of man shall accom-
pany them; and the choicest of the blessings
of God shall rest upon them, and sweeten all
their days.

RE ce PE 0s 98 TD SD aT SO _~



















Che Principles an Wurposes ot Lite.



B LECTURE [1
|
|

“The heart of him that hath understanding, seeketh knowledge.”—Proy. xv. 14.







eh HE practical anitins of Solo-
A) mon is seen in this simple
precept. The youthful,.who
have the slightest understand-
ing of the journey of life—
- who have been impressed,
even in the smallest degree, with
the perils to which they are eX-.
posed; the trials to be endured ;
the vicissitudes through which
they must necessarily pass; the ob-
stacles they must overcome; the
At 3 deceptions and allurements they will
have to detect and vithgtand-—cannot fail





LECTURES TO YOUTH. _ 31

to acknowledge ‘the wisdom of seeking for
knowledge to enlighten and prepare for
the exigencies which awart the inexperienced
traveller —— this world’s wayward
scenes.

Those who commence their career without
forethought, or discrimination in regard to

the moral principles by which they will be

governed, and. without selecting the best and
safest path of the many which open before
them, are involved in a blindness of the most

pitiable description. They would not mani-

fest this want of discretion on matters of

much less importance. The commander of |

the ship does not venture his voyage to sea
without his compass, his chart, and a full
supply of stores. We would not sail an hour
with him, if we believed him ignorant:or in-
different to the necessity of these important
preparations. How hazardous, how foolish
the youth who launches away on the momen-
tous voyage of life, without compass, or




chart, or any preparation which extends bem js
yond the present moment. True, the ship



EO OS PT ow













harbor in safety, with her gay pennons fly-
ing, her’swelling sails filled with a favorable

breeze, a smiling sun above, a smooth sea be-.

neath, and all the outward indications of a
prosperous voyage. But follow her a few
hours. The terrific storm-king spreads
abroad his misty pinions, and goes forth in
fury, ploughing up ‘the waters into mountain
billows, and shrieking for his prey. The
eloomy night settles down upon the bosom
of the mighty deep, and spreads its dark pall

over sea and sky. Muttering thunders stun

the ear, and the lightning’s vivid flash lights .

up the terrific scene, and reveals all its inde-

geribable horrors. Where now is the gay ship —
which ventured forth without needful prepa-

ration?. Behold her, tossed to and fro by
the angry waves. All on board are in alarm!
The fierce winds drive her on, they know
not whither. Hark to that fearful roar! It
is the fatal breakers! Hard up the helm!

j\ePut the ship about! See, on every hand.
|| frowns the fatal lee-shore! Pull taught

3.° LECTURES TO YOUTH.

destitute of all these essentials, may leave the

TS AO

a

——_—_—-—— ne
a

Nr
. .

| *
LECTURES TO YOUTH 33

each rope—spread. every sail. It is in vain!
Throw out’ the anchors! Haste!- strain
every nerve! Alas! Jt is all too late. The

danger cannot be escaped. On drifts the —
fated. craft. Now she mounts the crest of

an angry wave, which hurries forward. with
its doomed burthen. Now she dashe® against
the craggy points of massive rocks, and sinks
into the raging deep. One loud, terrific wail
is heard, and all is silent! On the rising of
the morrow’s sun, the spectator beholds the
beach and the neighboring waters strewn
with broken masts, rent sails, and drifting
fragments—all that remaing of the proud
ship which yesterday floated so gaily on the
ocean waters!!_ |

Behold, O ye youthful, a picture of the
fate of those who rush upon the career of life,
without forethought or preparation, and with-
out the light of well-selected moral principles
to guide them. All may appear fair and
promising at the outset, and for a season.
But before many years can elapse, the pros-
pects of such youth must be overclouded;






34 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

and ere long disappointment, overthrow, dis-
grace and ruin, will be the closing scenes of
a life, commenced in so much blindness. -
«Well begun is half done,” was one of Dr.
Franklin’s ‘sound maxims. A career well
begun—a life commeneed properly, with wise
forecast with prudent rules of actidmy and
under the influence of sound and pure, moral
and religious principles—is an advance, half-
way at least, to ultimate success and pros-
perity. Such ‘a commencement will not, it
is true, insure you against ‘the misfortunes
which are incident to earthly: existence. But
if persevered ingit will guard you against the
long catalogue of evils, vexatious penalties
and wretchedness, which are the certain fruit
of a life of immorality ; and will bestow upon
you all the real enjoyments, within the
earthly reach of man.
- As people advance in years, they perceive
more and more the importance of commen-
cing life properly. ; so
See that wretched outcast! .Poor and
miserable, shunned by all but depraved asso-


LECTURES TO YOUTH.

~~

ciates, he drags. out the worthless remnant
of his days. Does he think he has acted

wisely? Hark to-his soliloquy —* Oh, could

I begin life again—could I but live my days

over once more—how. differént the course I _
‘would pursue. . Instead of rushing on blindly

andyhéedlessly, without forethought or care,
and allowing myself to become an easy prey

_to temptation and sin, I would. reflect mia

turely, and choose wisely, the path for my
footsteps. Faithfully would't search for the
way of virtue, hacia sobriety, and. good-
ness, and strictly would I walk therein !” The
opportunity hhe ‘so ¢éagerlyscovets, and to
obtain which he would deem no sacrifice too
oreat, is now before ony reef in the as-
sembly. |

This thought is beautifully elaborated in

the following allegory:

“Tt was midnight of the new year, and an
aged man stood thoughtfully at the window.

~~ He gazed with: a long, despairing look, upon
the fixed, eternal, and glorious heaven, and -
down upon the silent, still, and snow-white .

35

5... .
= Pana ew *
ne ect ene gee ee? hy” .
: . ete





tees

i Spt ee
a







*
36 LECTURES TO YOUTH.













earth, whereon was none So joyless,-so sleep-
less as he. For his grave stood open near
him; it was covered only with the snows of
age, not decked with. the green of youth;
and he brought with him, from a long and
rich life, nothmg save errors, crimes, and
sicknes#—a wasted body, a desolate soul, a
breast filled with poison, and an old age
heavy with repéntance and sorrow. The fair
days of his youth at this hour, arose like

—_-

spectres before’ his mind, and carried him
back to the bright-merning, when his father
had first’planted him at the starting-point of

life; whence, to,the right, the way conducts
along the sunny path of virtue, to a wide and
peaceful land, a land of light, rich in the har-
vest of good deeds, and full of the joy of
angels; whilst, to the left, the road descends
to the molehills of vice, toward a dark cav-
ern, full of poisonous droppings, stinging ser-
pents, and dank and steaming mists. |

“The serpents clung around his breast,
and the drops of poison lay upon his tongue,

and he knew not where he was.




LECTURES. TO YOUTH. - 37

“Senseless and in unutterable anguish, his
ery went forth to heaven: ‘Grant me but
youth again! O, father, place me but onee
again upon the starting-point of. life, that I
may choose otherwise !’

“But his father and his youth were far
away. He beheld* wandering lights dance
- upon the marshes, and disappear upon the
graveyards; and he exclaimed, ‘These are
my days of folly

“He beheld. a star shoot + ieee the
heaven, and vanish: it glimmered as it fell,
and disappeared upon the earth. ‘Such, too,
am IY whispered his bleeding heart; and
the serpent-tooth of remofse struck itcenih
into its wounds.

“ His heated fancy pictured to him night-
wandering forms slow-creeping upon the
house-tops; the windmill raised its arm, and
threatened to fell him to the earth; and in
the tenantless house of death, the only re-
maining mask assumed imperceptibly his
own features. -

“ At: once, in a. the midst of this Aclivivee,



4

























38 . LECTURES TO YOUTH.




the sounds from the steeple, welcoming the
new year, fell upon his ear, like distant
church music.

“He was moved, but to a gentler mood.
He gazed around, unto the horizon, and
looked forth upon the wide earth;-and he
thought of the friends of his youth, who,
happier and better than he, were now teach-
ers upon the earth, fathers of happy children,
and blessed each in his condition.

“¢ Alas! and I, too, like ye, might now be
sleeping peacefully and tearless through this
first night of the year, had I willed so! I
too might have been happy, ye dear parents,
had I fulfilled your new-year’s ‘wishes and

~ admonitions !’

“Tn the feverish reminiscences -of om ile
it seemed to him as if the mask which had
assumed his features in the house of death
arose, and grew into a living youth, and his
former blooming figure stood before him in
the bitter mockery of illusion.

“He could look no longer; he hid his
eyes, a flood of hot tears streamed forth and
—_————— ss

———

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 39

were lost in the snow. And he sighed, now
more gently, and despairing, ‘Return but
again, O youth, come once again !

“And youth did return; for he had but
dreamed thus fearfully in the new-year’s
night. He was still. young; but his sinful
wanderings, they had been no dream; and
he thanked God that he could yet turn from
the miry ways of vice, and again choose the
sunny path which leadeth unto the pure land
of the harvest of righteousness.

“Turn thou with him, young man, if thou
standest upon his path of error. ‘This fear-
ful dream will in a future be thy judge; but
shouldst thou-ever exclaim, in the bitterness
_of remorse, ‘Return, fair time of youth !—
_ youth will not come when thou dost call for
her.”

It is much easier to start right and keep
right, than to start wrong, and then endeavor
to get right. Although those who take the
wrong path at the commencement, should
afterwards seek to obtain the right one, and
persevere until they find it, still the labor to

‘






si




AO LECTURES TO YOUTH.

retrieve the early error will be difficult. It.

1s painful to walk in the way of wickedness
—it is painful to break away from it, when
once there It is painful to contimue on—it
is painful to turn back.. This is in conse-
quence of the nature of sin, Itisa path all
evil, all pain, all darkness—everything con-
nected with it is fruitful of wretchedness.

Those who stray therein, find themselves be- |

set with perils and troubles on all sides.
Avoid it, as you love happiness!

“Ne’er till to-morrow’s light delay
What may as well be done to-day;
Ne’er do to-day, what on the morrow
Will wring your heart with sighs and sorrow.”
A

A young man may, in early life, fall into.

vicious habits, and afterwards turn from
them. Some have done so. But they de-
clare that the struggles they were compelled
to make—the conflicts and trials, the buffet-
ing of evil passions, and the mental agony
they endured; in breaking away, were ter-
rible beyond description. Where one, who




LECTURES TO YOUTH. Al

has fallen into bad habits in youth, has after-
wards abandoned them, there are a score who
| have continued their victims, until ruin, and
a premature death, closed their career. How
much safer, how much easier and pleasanter,
| how much more promising and hopeful, to
; commence life with good habits well estab-
| lished, with high principles, sound. maxims,
| enlightened rules of conduct, deeply fixed in
| the soul. This is a plain, pleasant, prosper-
7 path—readily found, and easily followed.
In no-other can you secure true enjoyment.

|
|
|
“ We cannot live too slowly to be good
And happy, nor too much by line and square,
But youth is burning to forestall its nature,
And will not wait for time to ferry it
Over the stream; but flings itself into
The flood and perishes. * * * * * * *
|

The first and worst of all frauds is to cheat
Oneself, * * * * * * * *% K * *”

There is nothing more essential to the

| young than to accustom themselves to ma-
ture reflection, and practical observation, in |
regard to the duties of life, and the sources |
of human enjoyment. This is a task, how- |

petesaeiiiieihdiiieaaiaal


























42 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

ever, which but few of the youthful are in-

clined to undertake. The most of them are

averse to giving up their thoughts to sober

meditation on the consequences which accrue

from different courses of conduct, or to prac-
tieal observation on the lessons taught by

the experience of others. The Present !—
the Present !—its amusements, its gayeties, its
fashions, absorbs nearly all their thoughts.
They have little relish to look towards the
future, except to anticipate the continuance
of the novelty and joyousness. of the spring-
time of life. The poet utters a most salu-
tary admonition in his beautiful lines:

«The beam of the morning, the bud of the Spring,
The promise of beauty and brightness may bring;
But clouds gather darkness, arid touched by the frost,
The pride of the plant, and the morning are lost.
Thus the bright and the beautiful ever decay—
Life’s morn and life’s flowers, oh, they quick pass away r

I would not cast one unnecessary shadow
on the pathway of the young; but they
should be often reminded, that the season of
youth, with its romance and light-hearted-
LECTURES TO YOUTH. 43

ness, soon, too soon, departs! Spring, with
its budding beauties, and fragrant blossoms,
does not continue all the year. It is speed-
ily followed by the fervid summer, the ma-
ture and sober autumn, and the dreary snows
of winter. In order to have thriving and
promising fields in summer, rich and abund-
ant. harvests in autumn, and bountiful sup-
plies for comfort and repose in winter, “ good.
seed” must be sowed in thespring. So, also,
if you would have the summer of life fruitful
of prosperity—its autumn yield a rich and
bountiful harvest, and the winter of old age
made comfortable and peaceful—the good.
seed of pure habits, and sound moral and re-
ligious principles, must be carefully sowed in
the rich soil of the heart, in the budding
spring-time of youth.

Due observation and reflection will mable
the young to sow the right kind of seed at the
right time. Theré is much in this. Those
who sow late will be likely to have their
harvest blighted by chilling rains and: nip-
ping frosts. The earlier the seed is cast into






A4 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the ground, the greater the certainty that it
will produce an abundant crop. Reflection
and discrimination are all-essential to the
youthful. Those who think deeply will act
wisely. They will detect and avoid the
dangers which beset their pathway, and into
which the thoughtless so easily fall. ‘They
will readily penetrate the specious appear-
ance, the harmless aspect, the deceptive veil,
which vice and immorality can so readily
assume. They will understand the old
maxim, that “all is not gold that glitters.”
This is a simple truth, and yet how few of
the young practise upon it. See this young
man. How easily he gives way to tempta-
tion—how readily he is led astray. Why
does he thus turn aside from virtue’s path ?
Why thus trample upon the affectionate
counsel and admonition of wise parents and
kind friends? Ah! he sees a glittering
bauble in the way of sin, and imagines it is
the shining of the gold of true and solid hap-
piness. Eagerly he presses on to secure the
prize. He plunges into the wickedness to




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 45

which it tempts him—he seizes the dazzling
treasure, and finds—what? Pure gold ?—
~ true delight ?—unalloyed happiness? Alas,
foolish youth! No! That which he took
for the glitter of gold, proves to be worthless
ashes in his hand. And the high pleasure
he was anticipating, results in naught but
disappointment, disgrace, wretchedness.
“Teach me the flattering paths to shun,
In which the thoughtless many run ;

Who for a shade the substance miss,
And grasp their ruin in their bliss.”

_ A well-established habit of practical ob-
servation, enables the youthful to guard
against the mistakes of conduct, into which
others have fallen, and to. make the short-
comings of their fellow-beings, salutary ad-
monitions for their own instruction. When
thoughtful, observing young persons, see an
individual do a mean, unmanly action, they
will reflect much upon it. They will notice
how contemptible it makes him appear—
how it degrades him in the estimation of the
honorable and high-minded—how it belittles


46 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

him in the view of society at large—and how
unworthy it makes him appear even in his
own eyes. ‘These observations, if faithfully
made, will. guard them — like acts
themselves.

When they behold one arraigned at the
bar of public justice, to answer to the of-
fended laws of his country, they will make it
a salutary lesson of instruction. They will
realize the deceptive and ruinous nature of
wrong-doing—how, while promising them
the very elixir of happiness, it pours naught
but bitterness and poison into the cup of
life, entailing degradation and wretchedness
upon its victims. They will become satisfied
of the solemn truth of the words of the Most
High, that “though hand join in hand, the
wicked shall not be unpunished.”

When they see neighbors, who might pro-
mote each other’s enjoyments, by living
peaceably together, fall out in regard to
some trivial misunderstanding, and engage
in angry disputes, and-a bitter warfare, dis-
turbing the harmony of the neighborhood,
LECTURES TO. YOUTH. 47

and destroying their own happiness—the
young who exercise practical observation,
will be instructed, to avoid similar troubles
in their own affairs. They will realize the
folly and blindness of such a course, and the
necessity of exercising a forbearing and for-
giving spirit, and the wisdom of submitting’ to
injuries, if need be, rather than to become
involved in angry recriminations and hostil-
ities. :

Thus by a constant habit of observation
and reflection, the youthful can turn the fail-

ings of others to their own account. As the |}, ~

industrious bee extracts honey from the most
nauseous substances, so can the thoughtful
and observing draw instruction not «only
from the example of’ the wise, but from
the folly of the wicked !

In preparations for future usefulness and
success, the young should establish certain
fixed principles of moral conduct, by which

|| they will be steadfastly governed in all their

intercourse with the world. Without some

well-defined landmarks, by which they can
e.

48 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

be guided in emergencies, when everything |
depends on the course of conduct to be pur-
sued, they will be in imminent peril. ‘Temp-
tations are strewed along the pathway of the
young, and assail them at every turn. If
they could clearly contemplate the effects of
giving way to temptation—were all the un-

fore them—they would never be induced to
turn aside into sin. Could the young man as
he is tempted to quaff the fashionable glass ||
of intoxicating beverage, see plainly the
_.|| ignominious life, the poverty and wretched-
ness, and the horrid death by delirium. tre- |
ens, to which it so often leads, he would ||
“set i#down untasted, and turn away in alarm.

|
happy consequences to stand out visibly be-
|



But it is the nature of temptation to blind
and deceive the unwary, and lead them into
sin, by false representations of the happiness
to be derived from it. Hence the young
need to establish, in their calm, cool moments,

ea i IE

when under the influence of mature judgment
and enlightened discretion, certain fixed rules

of conduct, by which they will be governed,

i ieeniinriaeaiiliiliiaeaiaanle _|
ee

LECTURES TO YOUTH. A9

and on which they will depend in every hour
of temptation. |

One of the first and most important rules
of life which should be established by the

youthful, is the constant cultivation of purity |
of heart. This is the great safeguard of the ©

young. It is their brightest jewel—their
most attractive ornament—the crowning glo-
ry of their character and being. It adds
a captivating lustre to all charms of whatever
description; and without it all other ex-
cellencies are lost in perpetual darkness, It
should be a fixed rule, never-to violate the
dictates of purity either in action, language,
or thought. Many imagine it is a matter of

small moment what ‘heir thoughts maybe,

so long as in action they do not transgress
the requirements of virtue. This, however,
is a serious error. The outward action is

but the expression of the inward thought.

Wicked deeds would never have birth, were
they not first prompted by wicked desires.
Hence if the young would have their words
and deeds characterized by purity, they must

ae

4
ae as white and spotless as the driven snow—




| emergency. ”

50 . LECTURES TO YOUTH.

see that their hearts and thoughts are con-
stantly pure.

“Pure thoughts are angel visitants! Be such
The frequent inmates of thy guileless breast.
They hallow all things by their sacred touch,
And ope the portals of the land of rest.”

The heart is the source of all actions. A
dark, muddy fountain cannot send forth clear
waters. Neither does a pure fountain send
forth muddy waters. A foul heart, the re-
ceptacle of unclean thoughts and impure
passions, is a corrupt well-spring of action,

. which leads to every vicious practice. Let

the hearts of the youthful be pure as crys-

tal, let their thoughts be sanctified by vir-

uewand ‘holiness; and their lives shall be

winning the admiration of all who know
them. With purity as a shield, they are

doubly guarded. against sin. However en-

ticing temptation may be—however artfully
or strongly it may assail them—they are
prepared to rise above it, in any and every


"
ts ae ;
Aaye , bys ’

; o
os

LECTURES. TO YOUTH. 51

Another of the fixed rules of conduct
should be to aim high in all the purposes of
life. The great obstacle to success with many
of the young, is, that they adopt no standard
of action for their government; but allow

__||. themselves to float along the current of time

‘|| like a mere straw on the surface of the waters,
liable to be veered about by every puff of
wind and whirling eddy: If the éurrent in
which they float happens to waft them into
the smooth waters, and the calm sunshine of
virtue and -respectability, it is a matter of
mere fortunate chance. If they are drawn
into the dark stream of sin, they have but
little power to resist, and are soon hurried
into the surging rapids, and hurled over*the —
boiling cataract of ruin! True, they may
not utterly perish even in plunging down the
cataract. They may possibly seize hold of
some jutting rock below, amd by a desperate
effort drag themselves from the raging waters.
But they will come: forth bruised, bleeding,
strangling, and half-drowned, to mourn the
folly of their thoughtlessness. “How much

7


_

52° LECTURES TO YOUTH.

wiser and better to have taken early pre-
caution, and guarded in the first place against
the insidious current, which compelled them
to purchase wisdom at so dear a rate.

To avoid this great folly, the youthful
should establish a fixed purpose for life.
They should set their mark, as to what they
wish to become; and then make it the great
labor of their lives‘to attain it. And let
that mark be a high one. You cannot. make
it too elevated. The maxim of the ancients
was, that although he who aims at the sun
will not hit it, yet his arrows will fly much
higher than though his mark was on the
_ earth. A young man who should strive to
~ bea second Washington or J efferson, might
not attain to their renown. But he would
become a much:greater and better man, than
though he had only aspired to be the keeper
of a gam apg hopes or théleader of a gang
of blacklegs. In all your purposes and
plans of life, aim high!

“ Again a light boat on a streamlet is seen,
Where the batiks are o’erladen with beautiful green,


SO a a ll ne

ee
PF - .
a TO YOUTH. 53

Like a mantle of velvet spread out to the sight,
Reflects to the gazer a bright world of light. ;

The fair bark has lost none of its beauty of yore,

But a youth is within it—the fair child before ;

And the Angel is gone—on the shore see him stand,

As he bids him adieu with a wave of the hand.

Ah! a life is before thee—a life full-of care,

Gentle Youth, and mayhap thou wilt fall in its snare.
Can thy bark speed thee now? withont wind, without tide?
Without the kind Angel, thy beautiful guide?

Ah! no;—then what lures thee, fair youth, to depart ?
Must thou rush into danger from impulse of heart?

Lo! above in the ‘bright arch of Heaven’ I see

The vision, the aim so alluring to thee:

"Tis the temple of Fame, with its pillars so fair,

And the Genius of Wisdom and Love reigneth there.
Advance then, proud vessel,—thy burden is light,— _
Swift speed thee, and guide his young steps in the right;
For in life’s ‘ fitful changes’ are many dark streams,

And paths unillumed by the sun’s golden beams.”

Cherish self-respect. Have a deep regard
for your own estimation.of your own merits.
Look with scorn and contempt upon low and
vicious practices. Cultivate pride of character.
I care not how proud the youthful are of
all their valuable attainments, their correct
habits, their excellings in thatlwhich is manly,
useful, and good. The more pride of this
description, the better.. Though it should
reach even to egotism and vanity, it is much
54 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

better than no pride in these things. This
pride in doing right is one of the preserving
ingredients, the very salt of man’s moral
character, which peninee from plunging into
vice.

Live for something besides séf. Build
with your own hands. the monument that
shall perpetuate your memory, when the dust
has claimed your body. Do good. Live for
others, if you would be embalmed in their
recollections,

“Yhousands of men breathe, move, and
live—pass off the stage of life, and are
heard of no more. Why! They did not
a particle of good in the world; and none |
were blessed by them; none could point —
to them as the instruments of their re-
demption; not a line they wrote, not a
word they spoke could be recalled, and so
they perished ; theirlight went out in dark-
ness, and ‘théy: were not remembered more
than the insects of yesterday. Will you’
thus live and die,O man immortal? Live
for something, Do good, and leave behind |





. so"

LECTURES TO YOUTH. - BB












you a monument of virtue that the storm of
time can never destroy. Write ‘your name
by kindness, love, and mercy, on the hearts
of the thousands you come in contact With
year by year, and you will never be forgotten.
No, your name—your deeds—will be as
legible on the hearts you leave behind, as
the stars on the brow of evening. Good
deeds will shine as brightly on the earth as
the stars of heaven.” *

“Up! it is a glorious era! ,
Never yet has dawned its peer)
Up, and work! and then a nobler
- In the future shall appear.
‘Onward!’ isthe present’s motto,
To a larger, higher life ;
‘Onward! though the march be weary,
Though unceasing be the strife. _














Pitch not here thy tent, for higher
Doth the bright ideal shine,

And the journey is not ended
Till thow reach that height divine.

Upward! and above earth’s vapors,
Glimpses shall to thee Be given,

And the fresh and odorous breezes,
Of the very-hills of heaven.”



* Dr. Chalmers. ee |

—_ @
56 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

_ Among the fixed principles which you
should establish for your government, by no
means overlook Honesty and Integrity. The
poet never uttered a truer word than that

“ An honest man’s the noblest work of God.”

Honesty is approved and admired by God
and man—by all in heaven, and by all on
earth. Even the corrupt swindler, in his
heart, respects an honest man, and stands
abashed in his presence.

In all your actions, in all your dealings,

-]ét strict and rigid honesty guide you. Never
be tempted to.swerve from its dictates, even
in the most. trivial degree. There will be
strong allurements to entice you from this.
path. The appetite for gain—the voice of
avarice—will often whisper that honesty
may be violated to advantage. There will
be times when it will seem that its dictates
may be placed aside—that a little dishonesty
will be greatly to your benefit. Believe not
this syren song. This is the time you are in
the most danger of being deceived to your


'
}
{
{



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 57

serious injury. Although there may bé occa-
sions when you will seem actually to lese by
adhering to honesty, yet you should pot
shrink a hair’s breadth. Whatever you may
lose, in a pecuniary point of view, at any
time, by a strict submission to honesty, you
will make up an hundred-fold in the long-
run, by establishing and preserving a reputa-
tion for integrity. Looking at it in simply a
pecuniary point of view, community will
give their countenance, their patronage, and
business, much quicker to a man who has
established a reputation for honesty, than to
one who is known, or suspected of being
fraudulent in his dealings. Every consider-
ation which can bear upon the young, relig-
ious, moral and. pecuniary, unite to urge them
to establish, in the outset of life, the rule of
unswerving honesty and integrity, as their
constant guide. Let it not be forgotten, that
in every possible point of view, and in every
conceivable condition of things, it will always
be true, that “ Honesty is the best. policy.”

I would have the young also ctiltivate and

&

-"


58 LECTURES TO YOUTH. |

establish: as a fixed rule of life, a friendly and
accommodating disposition. This is all-essen-
tial to make their days pleasant and happy.
Other virtues will influence the world to re-
spect you; but an affectionate disposition will |
cause those with whom you have intercourse,
to love you. Those who wish the friendship
and good will of others, must themselves
manifest a friendly disposition, and a spirit
of kindness. Whoever would be accommo-
dated and assisted, must themselves be ac-
commodating, and ready to aid those who
require it. In all these things we see the
wisdom of the Saviour’s golden rule—* All
things whatsoever ye would that men should
do unto you, do ye even so unto them.” Be
kind, accommodating, loving, and peaceful,
in the whole current of your disposition, and
the cup of your life will be sweetened with
peace and joy.

I exhort the young to adopt the noble
motto of the coat-of-arms of New York—_
“ EXcELsIoR !”






LECTURES TO YOUTH. 59

“The shades of night were falling fast,
As through an Alpine village passed
A youth, who bore, ’mid snow and ice,
A banner with the strange device, ' le
EXceE.sior !” |

Let it be the aim of every youth to lift aloft
this glorious banner, and soar wpward to a
surpassing excellency. - Let them seek to
excel in all things high and good. ‘Let them
never stoop to do an evil act, nor. degrade
themselves to commit a wrong. But in their
principles, purposes, deeds, and. words, let
their great characteristics be Truth, Good-
ness, and Usefulness! |

“ Be just and fear not!
Let all the ends thou aim’st at, be thy country’s,
Thy God’s, and Truth’s !”



® ink
LECTURE III.

Srlertion of Wssuriates,

“Be not thou envious against evil men, neither desire to be with them ;
for their heart studieth destruction, and their lips talk of mischief.”—Prov.

<| HERE i is aeiing more impor-

3) tant to the youthful, or that

HYy)) should receive more serious

y consideration at their hands,

than the selection of
S* clates. We are by nature
social beings. We desire, we
seek, and enjoy, the society of

our fellow-creatures. This trait.

is strongly developed in the

- young. They yearn for each other’s
companionship, and they must have
it, or they pine away, and sink into
misanthropy. ‘This disposition may propetly




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 61

be indulged; but great care and prudence
should be exercised in regard to it.

While mingling in each other’s society, it
is natural, almost unavoidable, that the youth-
ful should imbibe much of the leading char-

acteristics of their associates. Being highly -

imitative in our nature, it is impossible to be
on social and familiar terms with others, ‘for
any great length of time, without copying

somewhat of their dispositions, ways, and

habits. )
‘Let a young man, however upright and
pure, associate habitually with those who

are profane,. Sabbath-breaking, intemperate,

and unprincipled—who are given to gam-
bling, licentiousness, and every low, brutal
and wicked practice—and_ but a brief space of

time will elapse before he will fall into like hab-

its himself, and become as great an adept in

. iniquitous proceedings as the most thorough-

paced profligate among them. When a young
woman associates with girls who are idle, dis-
respectful and disobedient to parents—who
e- vulgar, ‘brazen-faced, loud talkers and



+ dei:
- 62 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

laughers—whose chief occupation and de-
light is to spin street-yarn, to. run from house
to house and store to store, and walk the
streets in the evening, instead of being at
home engaged in’ some useful occupation—
whose whole conversation, and thoughts, and
dreams, relate to dress, and fashion, and gew-
gaws, and trinkets, to adorn the person, ut-
terly negligent of the ornaments of the mind
and heart—whose reading never extends to
instructive and useful books, but is confined
exclusively to sickly novels and silly love-
stories ;—how long will it be before she will
become as careless and good-for-nothing as
they ?

This predisposition of the young to imitate
the characteristics of those with whom they
associate, has been so well and so long known,

»|| that it has given rise to the old proverb—



“Show me your company, and I will show
you your character.” So perfectly did Solo-
mon understand this, that he uttered the
wise maxim—* Make no friendship with an
angry man; and with a furious man thou






LECTURES TO YOUTH. 63

shalt not go; lest thou learn nie ways, and
get a snare to thy soul.”

The young should remember, that people
will judge them by the company they keep.
This principle is perfectly correct. In select-
ing their associates, they act. voluntarily.
They choose such as’ they please. When
they seek the society of the ignorant, the
vulgar, the profane and. profligate, they give
the best of reasons for believing that they
prefer profligacy and vulgarity to virtue and
purity. To what other conclusion can the
observer come? If they preferred virtue

and purity, they would certainly seek pure

and virtuous associates. Hence society have
adopted the véty correct principle of judging
the young. by the character of their associ-
ates. If they would be thought well of, they
should strive to associate with those who
are known to be virtuous and good. How-
ever blameless and upright young persons
may have been, if they begin to -associate
with those whose reputation is poor, and
whose conduct is improper, they will soon


64 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

be esteemed no higher than their compan-
100s. | |
These reflections. show the youthful how

important it is, that their associates should |

be.of the right stamp. They should see the
necessity of selecting their companions. The
great difficulty with the young is, that they
leave this important matter altogether too
much to “chance.” If they happen to fall
into good company, it is very well; and
their associates and intimate friends will be
likely to be of that class. But if, unfortu-
nately, they meet with the vicious and un-
principled, and are, to any great extent,
thrown in their way, they are as likely to
form intimacies with themâ„¢as with any
others. |

Such negligence is exceedingly unpromis-
ing and dangerous. Whoever allows it, will
be in far more danger of falling under the
‘nfluence of the vicious than the exemplary.
Instead of this heedlessness, they should
carefully and thoughtfully select their asso-
ciates. . They should not be willing to form


RO ee ee) ee a A ee

—————————eEEe=Ee=EeEeENEeweaeweesess™—“‘*”

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 65

terms of intimacy with every one into whose
society they may be casually thrown. They
should inform themselves of their tastes, hab-
its, and reputation. And from the circle of
their. acquaintance should choosé those with
whom they would form terms of intimacy.

Be cautious to select aright. The entire
eareer in after-life depends very much on
this. How many a young woman of fine at-
tractions has had her reputation injured, and
her prospects for life destroyed, by associat-
ing with those whose character and habits
proved to be bad, When once young wo-
men get a taint on theif reputation in this
way, or in any other manner, it is exceed-
ingly difficult to wipe it out. |

The ruin of multitudes of young men can
be traced to the same origin—a bad selec-
tion of associates. I have in my mind’s eye
now, a case in pomt. A young man, born
in this city, and known to most of you, was
naturally endowed with the rarest abilities
and the finest talents. He belonged to one
of the most wealthy and respectable families.




66 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

He had every advantage for cultivation, and
_ for the highest and most thorough education.
Had he been thoughtful and wise to have
improved his opportunities, the way was
open for him to the highest advancement.
He might have been blessed with respecta-
bility, wealth, and honors. He could have
risen to the most dignified positions in life.
- His voice might have been heard in strains
of persuasive eloquence, from the sacred pul- |
pit, or in the halls of justice, or in the senate
chamber of our state or national councils.
He might have occupied a seat on the bench
of the highest courts, or have aspired to. the
executive chair of the nation. But where is
he now, and what are his circumstances and
his position in the world? See issuing from
the door of yonder filthy groggery, a wretched
specimen of humanity—the distorted carica-
ture of a man! His garments are thread-
bare and patched—his eyes are inflamed, |
sunken and watery—his countenance bloat-
ed and livid—his limbs swelled and totter-
ing. Although but in the morning of his


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 67

manhood, yet the lines of premature old age |
and decrepitude are deeply carved upon his
pale, dejected face; and in his whole aspect,
there is that forlorn, broken-spirited, an-
guished look of despair, which shows he him-
self feels that he has sunken, beyond earthly
redemption, into the awful pit of the con-
firmed ,drunkard! ‘This is the young man
whose early opportunities were so favorable,
and whose prospects were so bright and flat-
tering. He has become a curse to himself.
He has brought: disgrace and wretchedness
on his connections, and is an outcast and
vagabond, with whom no young man who
now hears me would associate for a single
hour ! : :

What has brought him to this pitiable —
condition—this state of utter wretchedness ?
It was a want of forethought. He totally
neglected the considerations I have endeav-
ored to impress upon the young. He was
careless and indifferent in regard to his asso-
ciates. He would not be admonished to turn
from the company of the vicious, and seek


BRR eNO ;
os r ow * R r 7 " = 7 é
x

ee ee eee ee ee eae or ON ee Te
7 = ' i 7 . ogee as.

























68 LECTURES TO. YOUTH.






the society of those of good habits and up-
right character.. Despite the counsel of pa-
rents and friends, he would associate with
companions of corrupt habits—with the pro-
fane, the drinking, the Sabbath-breaking—
those whose chief delight was to visit oyster-
cellars and grog-shops—whose highest ambi-
tion was to excel in cards, and dice, and
sleight-of-hand tricks—and who sought for
no better employment than to range the
streets and alleys, to engage midnight ad-
ventures and Bacchanalian revelries. Min-
gling with such as his associates, and fall-
ing unavoidably into their habits, he is now
reaping the détter—srrrer fruits of his folly.
His time misspent—character destroyed—
health ruinedevery source of happiness
obliterated —his life wasted and_ literally
thrown away—his days, a Jlank—ah! worse
than that—filled with the terrific visions, the
horrid dreams, the flames of the unquencha-
ble fire, which float and burn in the veins
of the confirmed inebriate!

Young men! Do youshudder at the con-


























te
LECTURES TO YOUTH. 69

dition of this wretched youth, whose form
yet flits like a shadow through our streets ?
Would you avoid his fate? Do you start
back in affright at the mere thought of. be-
|| coming the poor, cast-off wreck of humanity
- that he is? -Then avoid the rock on which
he foundered his bark. Shun, as you would
a nest of vipers, the company of the reckless
and profligate. Avoid all association, all
companionship, all intimacy, with those whose
habits deviate from the high rules of recti-
tude, purity, and virtue. ~

Allow me to paint you a picture of an op-
posite character, drawn also from real life.
I have another young man in my mind’s eye,
who originated in our own county. He had
but few of the advantages of him whose mel-
ancholy career I have painted. He was the
son of parents who possessed. but little means,
and who could afford him no assistance after
the days of childhood. He was early placed
td the hard labor of a mechanic. But he did
not sink into lewdness and. vice, under the
pressure. of his adverse circumstances. He

een



70 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

would not spend his leisure hours at public
resorts, in the midst of the profligate and
reckless: Each moment of respite from la-
bor, he applied himself to study and the im-
provement of his mind. With great wisdom
he avoided the company of idle, profane and
vicious youth ; and would associate with none
but the discreet, the intelligent and virtuous.
He was determined to risz in the world, and
to win a name which should live long after
he should pass from the earth. He placed
his-mark high! - With indomitable courage
and unwearied perseverance, he pursued the
path he had chosen for himself. He cut his
way through every obstacle, and overcame
every hindrance and difficulty, though they
might seem to tower mountain high. Friends |,
came to his aid, as they will to the. assistance
of every youth who is industriously seeking
to rise in the world by the strength of his
own merits. At length, after great exer-
tions, he obtained a profession, and entered
into a field where he could bring into active
exercise the fund of knowledge he had been


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 71

acquiring under so many difficulties. One
thus industrious, thus pure in his habits, thus
upright and honorable in all his transactions,
could not fail to reveive the commendation
and confidence of his fellow-citizens. Rap-
idly he rose from one post of honor to an-
other. Ere long he was sent to the Legisla-
ture of our State. Soon he entered the halls
of Congress, where he won the confidence of
his compeers, and arose to honorable distinc-
tion. From step to step he advanced—high
and higher still he ascended the ladder of
fame—until now, the poor mechanic boy of
Montville, occupies the second place in the
gift of the American people—within one step
of the highest pinnacle of fame to which man
can attain on the earth! How noble the
career—how splendid the example—placed
before the youth of our coutitry, in the his-
tory of this eminent man!. How honorable
to himself—how worthy of imitation.

I need not ask the young men of this au-
dience, which place they would prefer to oc-
cupy, the position of the poor inebriate of
ears

72 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



whom I have-spoken, or that of the Vice-
President of the United States? It is in-
structive to inquire why the one, with oppor-
tunities so good, sunk so low, and the other,
with early advantages so limited, has arisen
so high? This disparity in their condition
is to be attributed to the different paths
they selected at the outset of life. While
the one trampled on all his advantages, and
foolishly associated with the vicious and un-
principled, the other diligently applred him-
self to the acquisition of useful knowledge,
and was scrupulous to associate with none
but those who were discreet and virtuous,
and whose influence was calculated to elevate
and purify him.

These two cases, drawn from real life, are
but a mperenin of instances with which the
world is filled." ‘They show how immensely
important it is for the young to reflect ma-
turely on:the course they would pursue, and
the necessity of selecting for their associates
such as have habits, tastes, and principles,
proper for commendation and imitation.

. {L a nn ee
—e Ul 7 ate. eS, a, Le ee ee eS ae on a —
3 ees : r 3



LECTURES TO° YOUTH. 73

Most. of those who come under the infiu-
ence of corrupt associates, are led thither
more from sheer thoughtlessness, than from
any disposition te become depraved. They
full into the company of those who are gay,
sociable and pleasant in their manners; who
make time pass agreeably, and who contrive
many ways to drive dull care away, which
do not, in themselves, appear very bad.
Lhe thoughtless youth becomes attached. to
their society, and gradually gives -himself up
to their influence. Almost imperceptibly to
himself, he follows them farther and farther
from the path of rectitude, until, before he’
is aware of it, some:vicious habit has fixed
its fangs upon him, and made him. its wretch-
ed slave for life.

The. difficulty in these eases, is the want
of a due exercise of reflection and discern-
ment. The young should guard against be-
ing deceived by outward appearances. Be-
neath a pleasant, agreeable exterior—beneath
sociability and attractive manners—there
may lurk vicious. propensities, depraved ap-

4 *








74 _ LECTURES TO YOUTH.

petites, and habits of the most corrupt na-
ture. Hence the young should look beyond
the surface, and guard against deceptive ap-
pearances. It should not be enough to make
a young man or a young woman. your asso-
ciate, that they are sociable and attractive in
their manners, and can make their company
agreeable. Search farther than this. Strive
to know their tastes, their habits, their prin-
ciples. Inquire how, and where, they spend
their leisure hours—in what company do
they mingle—what practices do-they appro-
bate—what is their general conduct and de-
meanor? If in all these respects, they are
found to be discreet, virtuous, and worthy
of imitation, then hesitate not to associate
with them, and allow yourself to be influ-
enced by them. But if you-find them defi-
cient in any of these characteristics, however
attractive they may be in other respects,
shun their company, and avoid their influ-
ence. The effect of associating with them
would be to lead you astray, to your ruin.

.


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 75
| In selecting associates, studiously avoid
those who are low, coarse, and vulgar in
their behavior and manners. Rudeness and
vulgarity’ are unbecoming any age. But:
they are especially offensive and indecorous ©
in youth. The young man, or young wo-
man, who has not sufficient self-respect and.
pride of character to deport themselves with
modesty, circufaspection, and politeness, 1s
unfitted to be an- associate. A bold, brazen,
forward demeanor, indicates a heart far from
possessing those delicate and amiable traits,
which are alone worthy of imitation. Vul-
garity in language or demeanor, indicates a
vitiated heart. Cultivation and refinement
of manners are, to a good degree, evidence of
a pure spirit, and high and honorable feelings.
The youth who is truly polite, has a great
advantage, in every respect, over those who
are deficient in this desirable qualification.
Many, however, entertain very erroneous
views of the nature of politeness. It does
not consist in putting on an air, a simper, a
strut, or a bow. Neither is it to be mani-

TT














icteric AES


a

76 “LECTURES TO YOUTH. >

fested in high-flown words, or a fashionable
pronuntiation. Many young persons who

can make very accomplished bows, and-go
through all the postures and attitudes of the

schools, are still ignorant of the first princi-
ples of genuine politeness, and violate them
every day. Politeness is not to be learned
of the dancing-master, the fop, or the belle.
Do you inquire where it can be obtained ?
I answer, in the gospel of our Saviour. -True-
hearted Christians are always.polite. They
cannot be otherwise, while influenced by the
Christian spirit. For the first great princi-
ple of true politeness is found.in the Saviour’s
golden rule—‘“ All things whatsoever ye
would..that men should do to you, do ye
even so to them.” Treat others as -you wish
to be treated yourself, and you-cannot fail
of being polite. Treat them as you wish not
to be treated, and you are illbred and vul-

gar, though you may be dressed in the ex-.

treme of fashion, and steeped in Cologne!
‘Politeness, in its true acceptation, is ‘but an-

other word for kindness. The truly polite






f LECTURES TO YOUTH. 77

if and woman, are not haughty, nor exclu-

sive—they are not starched; nor supereilious.

ay show their politeness in being respect-
: ‘fal to the-feelings of persons of every rank,
condition, “nd complexion. They .treat all

kindly and gently; and seek to make those
im their presence to feel easy and happy.
The whole secret of politeness may be sum-
med up-in a. single sentence—Make your-
selves agreeable and pleasant to whomsoever

you meet. With this intent, your manners’

will be easy and natural; and you will be
polite in every true sense-of the word, though
brought up an the centre of the wilderness.

_In selecting those they would imitate in
regard to politeness, the young should not
choose the starched fop, the gaudily-dressed
dandy, who may owe all their attractions to
the unpaid tailor—nor the fashionable belle,
who sneers upon everything plain and useful.
They, more than all others, violate the first
principles of politeness in their demeanor.
But select the plain-dressed, the modest, the
affable, the kind and friendly at heart. «In
&














78 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

these you find the true’ lady —the gent
gentleman. es gig ‘sg ‘ ae al

Tn regard to this whole wibijoct of th 3e-.
lection of ‘associates, I would earnestly coun-.
sel the young to listen respectfully to the’ \
advice of their parents, guardians, and elder’ -
friends. 'Théy should not be henistroneroaaiag
wise in their own conceits; but should
to the counsel of others. Your parents
far better calculated to judge of associates
than themselves. You are liable to be plind |
ed to their defects, and deceived by specious
‘appearances. But parents scrutinize the]
from a different position. They have been.»

through the school of experience, and are |
much better prepared to judge of character. ‘%
Listen, O ye youthful! to their warning
voice. They are moved by love for you—
they speak for your good. When. they en-
treat you to avoid the society of certain indie ||
viduals, and escape their influence, heed their
exhortations. Your own heart will tell you, |] :
that your father and mother would not i |

Ain aR

“a
—
D> pik? Q B
a ‘



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 79






: pes x, simply to thwart your feelings; but
at they see danger hovering around you,
dv Lwould snatch you away, as the bird from
at fowler’s snare! That is a-wise and prom-
A “i mg son—a prudent and. hopeful daughter
: —who pays respectful deference to the coun-
"se of parents,.and yields a cheerful compli-
e he with their wishes | * |






















“So live, that teas thy summons comes, to join

ithe inpumerable. caravan, that moves

$ = cm ~'To'the pale-realms of shade, where each shall che

dh fi * His chamber in the silent halls of death,

II ‘Thou’ go not, like the quarry-slave at night,

| _ Scourged to his dungeon; but, sustained and soothed
By aneunfaltering trust, approach thy grave

|. Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch

: About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams !”

J




LECTURE IV --

Pabits oul Aurusements.

RRR RRR eee , - >
«Ponder the path of thy feet, and let all thy ways be established.”
—Prov. iy. 26. , ais eo

;
i

HERE is not a youth present
}) this evening, who will not
\ acknowledge this to be sound

and wholesome advice. Were






> you walking in a slippery,
dangerous way, amid «the
darkness of midnight, you would |
give the strictest heed to the
friendly precaution—* Ponder the |
path of thy feet. Be careful where |
you step. When you put your foot |
\ down, see to it, that it rests on some-
thing well-established some rock,
some spot of earth, that is firm and solid.”
This advice would be heeded, because of ||


a LECTURES TO YOUTH. Sl

your consciousness that by stepping heed-
lessly, you-would be im danger of stumbling
into a pit, or falling over a precipice, where
your limbs would be broken, or life destroy-
ed. Simple discretion would hid you be-
ware, under such circumstances. The youth-
ful should fully realize that they are walking
in a pathway, which to them is wholly un-
tried and unknown. Itis a road surrounded
by many. dangers, unseen by the careless
traveller; where he is liable to be lured aside
to ruin, by a thousand fascinations and temp-
tations, and where multitudes possessing the
best advantages, the highest. talents, the
brightest genius, the rarest gifts, have stum-
bled and fallen, to rise no more on earth.
- While pressing on ardently and thoughtlessly
_ in this dangerous highway, apprehending no
. difficulty, and fearing no peril, a voice from
| onhigh callsto the young, and urges them
to *Ponder'the path of their feet, and to let
all their ways—their footsteps—be estab-
lished!” There is wisdom, prudence, good-
ness, in this exhortation.

6





















— e+

32 LEOTURES TO YOUTH.

Qrestion the old man—the aged traveller
—who has passed over this pathway of life,
end is just ready to step up into the myste-
rious road of a higher existence. Ask him
as to his experience—beseech him for advice.
Looking back through the vista of his long
and chequered way, of light and shadow, of
joy and sorrow, he will exclaim—“O ye

youthful! Give heed to the admonition of
the wise man— Ponder the path of thy feet,
and let all thy ways be established.’ ”

‘The admonition of the text is important
in reference to the Habits and Amusements
of the youthful. We are all more or less
the creatures of habit. Our ways, from ear-
liest infancy, are more the result of the force
of habit, than we are generally aware. The -
actions, words, and thoughts of men, form.
for themselves certain channels, in which
they continually seek to flow, unless turned
aside by a strong hand, and’a painful effort.

Habits are formed - insensibly. We are
not aware of any moment when they are

created; but the first consciousness of their


a

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 83



being fixed upon us, is, when their great

_ power is felt impelling us strongly to certain

courses. A single deed does not create a
habit. One thread of hemp forms not a °
rope.~ It contains but a very slight amount
of strength. But when a large number of
threads are laid and twistéd together, they
make the mighty cable, which, attached to
the ship, enables her to bid a proud defiance
to the fierce gales and mountain ‘billows of
ocean. Thus the young are continually, yet
unconsciously, spinning the threads of habit.
Day by day the strands increase, and are
twisted tighter together; until-at length
they become. strong and unyielding cords,
binding’ their possessor to customs and prac-

‘tices which ‘fix his. character and prospects

for life.

~ Tt is of the greatest iene that the
y oung should inquire faithfully into the na-
ture of the habits’ they are forming. They
should not fall into self-deception—a com-
mon error, on this subject. The love of in-

dulgence should not be permitted to blind


oo





84 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

them to the legitimate consequences of care-
' Jess habits: Let them look abroad on their
fellow-beings, and. critically study the ten-
dencies and fruits of their habits. When
they see one prosperous in life—one who is
respected, confided im, and beloved by all—
who leads a quiet, pleasant and peaceful hie,
_— mark his habits, and strive to imitate
them. They will bless them as well as him,
if faithfully practised. And when they be-
hold a man disliked and despised by his
neighbors, especially by those who know
him best—or one who has fallen into dis-
grace and ruin; who has. lost his character,
his health, his happiness, and become an out-
east. and vagabond,—let them not fail to
learn what. his habits have been. Look at
them carefully and critically. Ponder well
the effect they have had upon him. And
then strive to avoid them. Shun them as
the poisonous viper whose sting is death.
Let them wind not a single coil of their fatal
chains around the free spirit of the young.
The same appalling consequences will be

ct i Mil a” A a or i i Cl taal
aie a

een




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 85

visited on every youth who indulges them,
that have fallen on those whose condition ex-
cites both pity and loathing in their breasts.

In youth, habits are much easier formed
and corrected, than at a later period of life.
If they are right now, preserve, strengthen
and mature them. If they are wrong—if
they have dny dangerous mfluence or ten-
dency—correct them immediately. Delay
not the effort an hour. The earlier you
make the attempt to remedy a bad _ habit,
the easier it will be accomplished.- Every
day adds to its strength and vigor; until, if
not conquered in due time, it will become
a voracious monster, devouring everything
good and excellent. It will make its victim
a miserable, drivelling slave, to be continu-
ally lashed and scourged into the doing of
its low and wretched promptings. Hence
the importance of attending to the habits
in early life, when they are easily controlled
and. corrected. If the young do not make
themselves the masters of their passions, ap-
petites, and habits, these will soon become






. 86 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

their masters, and make them their tool and
bond-men through all their days.
Usually at the age of thirty years, the

moral habits become fixed for life. New

ones are seldom formed aiter that age; and
quite as seldom are old ones abandoned.
There are exceptions to this rule; but in
general, it holds good. If the habits are de-
praved and vicious at that age, there is little

hope of amendment. But if they are cor-

rech—if they are characterized by virtue,
goodness, and sobriety—there is a flattering

prospect of a prosperous and peaceful life..

Remember, the habits are not formed, nor
can they be corrected, in a-single week ‘or

month. It requires years to form them, and
years will be necessary to correct them per-

manently, when they are wrong. Hence, in

order to possess good habits at maturity, it

is all-important to commence schooling the
passions, curbing the appetites, and bringing
the whole moral nature under complete con-
trol, early in youth. .This work cannot be
commenced too soon. The earlier the ef-
ae ee eee
a ee ee ee

eter nee =e

a LL LLL

|
|
!

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 87

fort, the easier it can be accomplished, To
straighten the tender twig, when it grows
awry from the ground, is the easiest thing
imaginable. A child can do it at the touch
of its finger. But let the twig become a ma-
tured tree before the attempt is made, and
it will baffle all the art of man to bring it to
a symmetrical position. It must be uproot-
ed from the very soil, before this can be ac-
complished. ‘It is not dificult to correct a
bad habit when it commences forming. Eut
wait until it has become fully developed, end
it will require a long and painful exertion of
every energy to correct it.

Permit me to enumerate a few of the more
mumpontont habits, which the young should
seek to cultivate.

First of all—the most: Lalmatittat of all—
and that, indeed, which underlies and gives
coloring to all others—is the habit of Trx-
PERANCE. Surely it is needless for me, at
this day, to dwell upon the evils of intem-
perance. It cannot be necessary to - paint
the bitter consequenves—the destruction to











88 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

property, health, reputation—the overthrow
of the peace of families, the want and mis-
ery, to which its victims are frequently
reduced. The disgrace, the wretchedness, |
the ruin, the useless and ignomimious life, 7
and the horrid death, which are so often
caused by habits of intemperance, are seen,
and. known to all. No one attempts, no one
thinks of denying them. The most inter.
ested dealer, or retailer in intoxicating drinks .
—the most confirmed inebriate—will ae-
knowledge without hesitation, that intem-
perance is the direst evil that ever cursed a
fallen race!! The deleterious consequences
of other vices may sometimes be concealed —
for a season, from outward observation. Not
so with intemperance. It writes its-loath-
some name, in legible characters, upon the
very brow of its wretched victim. “Zamna
drunkard!” is as plainly to be read as though
a printed label was posted there! |
Need I warn—need I exhort—the young
to avoid the habit of intemperance. Per-
haps there is not a youth present, who is not




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 89

ready to say, “To me this exhortation is
needless. I have not the slightest expecta-
tion of becoming a drunkard!” Of course
not. There never was a man who desired,
or expected, to become -a victim to intem~_

-perance. The great danger of this habit is,

a

that it creeps stealthily and imperceptibly
upon the unwary. It does its work gradu-
ally. The most besotted inebriate cannot
tell you the day, nor the month, when he
became a confirmed drunkard. It is in the
nature of this habit, that those who expose
themselves at all to its assaults, become its
victims, while they are entirely unaware
of iy - ) |

The only safeguard and security, against
this scourge of man, is total abstinence from
all intoxicating drinks !! Tere is the true,

the safe ground for the young. There is no

other condition of entire security. No man
who drinks, however sparingly, has assur-
ance of a sober life. He needlessly, and
foolishly, places himself in danger—turns his
footsteps into the only path that can’ possi-
90 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



!
|
i |
}
i
|
|
t





|

|
|

bly lead to the drunkard’s ruin and the
drunkard’s grave!

Drink the first drop that can intoxicat e,
and your feet stand at the very brink of the
ocean of intemperance. Its briny waters
‘are composed of human tears. Its winds,
the sighs of those made poor and wretched
by the mebriation of husbands, fathers, sons.
Its billows, ever tossing, are overhung with
black and lowering clouds, and. illuminated
only by.the lightning’s vivid flash, while
hoarse thunders reverberate over the wide
and desolate waste. Engulphed in this
dreary ocean, the wretched drunkard is buf:
feted hither and thither, at the merey of its
angry waves—unow dashed on jagged rocks,
bruised and bleeding—then engulphed in
raging -whitlpools ‘to suffogating depths
anon, like a worthless weed, cast ‘high into
the darkened. heavens b} the wild water-
spout, only to fall again into the surging
deep, to be tossed to and fro on waters
which cannot rest! Rash youth! Would
you launch away on this sea of death? Quaff








LECTURES TO YOUTH. 91

of the intoxicating bow], and soon its hun- |

ery waves will be around you. Would you

avoid a fate so direful? Seal your lips to

the first drop, and the drear prospect will
sink forever from your vision!

Young men who would guard themselves
against the baleful habit of intemperance,
should shun all resorts where intoxicating

drinks are vended. They should avoid

throwing themselves in’ the way of tempta-

tion. “Lead us not into temptation,” should

be the constant prayer of the young. When
by any combination of circumstances, they
find themselves in the company of those who
quaff of the poisoned bowl, whether in pub-
lic or private, they should exercise a manly
pride-in firmly refusing to par ticipate In

their potations. This is a legitimate and

commendable pride, of which the young can-
not have too mich. Let them ee them-
selves on the high rock of principle, and
their feet will not slide in the trying hour.

“Oh! water for me! bright water for me,
And wine for the tremulous debauchee!




LECTURES TO YOUTH.



It cooleth the brow, it cooleth the brain,
It maketh the faint one strong again!

It comes o’er the sense like a breeze from the sea,
All freshness, like infant purity. |

Oh! water, bright water, for me, for me!

Give wine, give wine, to the debauchee.”




“The young man walks: in the midst
of temptations to appetite, the improper in-
dulgence of which is in danger of proving
his ruin. Health, longevity, and virtue de-
pend on his resisting these temptations. The
providence of God is no more responsible,
because a man of improper indulgence be-
comes subject to disease, than for picking
his pockets. For a young man to injure
his health, is to waste his patrimony and de-
stroy his capacity for virtuous deeds,

“If young men imagine that the gratifica-
tion of appetite is the great source of enjoy- |
ment, they will find this in the highest de-
gree with industry and temperance. The
epicure, who seeks it in a dinner which costs
five dollars, will find less enjoyment of appe-
tite than the laborer who dines on a shilling.
If the devotee to appetite desires its high
















LECTURES TO YOUTH. 93

gratification, he must not send for buttalo
tongues and champagne, but climb a moun-
tain or swing anaxe. Leta young man pur-
sue temperance, sobriety, and industry, and
he may retain his vigor till three score years
and ten, with his cup of enjoyment full, and
depart painlessly; as the — burns out
in its socket, he will expire.”*

- Next to Temperance in importance, I
would rank the habit of Iypustry. We
were evidently made for active occupation.
Every joint, sinew, and muscle plainly shows
this. A young person who is an idler, a
drone, is a pest in society. He is ready to
engage in mischief, and to fall into vice, with
but little resistance. It is an old saying,
that “an idle brain is the devil’s workshop.”
Those who are not actively employed in
something useful, will be very likely to fall
into evil practices. Industry is one of the
best. safeguards against the inroads of vice.
The young, whatever may be their condi-
tion, or however abundantly they may be-



* Horace Manna.


LLG LE AC tt tt et
Sn pets near
-

94 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

lieve their future wants already provided for,
should actively engage in some honorable
occupation or profession—in something that
will benefit mankind. They should be fired
with the high and noble ambition of making
the world better for their living in it. Who

can wish to pass a blank existence? Yet this -

is the life of every idler, poor or rich, Be
stirring in anything which is ‘useful—any-
thing which will make others happy. Then
you will not have lived in vain.° Behold
how a good man can devote his life to labors
for the benefit of others. Would you par-
take of the immortal fame of a Howard ?
Imitate, to the extent of your ability, the
example of industrious benevolence he has
placed before the world.
“From realm to realm, with cross or crescent crowned,

Where’er mankind and misery are found,

O’er burning sands, deep waves, or wilds of snow,

Mild Howard journeying seeks the house of woe.

Down many a winding step to dungeons dank,

Where anguishwails aloud and fetters clank,

To caves bestrewed with many a mouldering bone,

And cells whose echoes only learn to groan ;

Where no kind bars a whispering friend disclose,
No sunbeam enters, and no zephyr blows ;>&






LECTURES TO YOUTH. 95

He treads, inemulous of fame or wealth,

Profuse of toil and prodigal of health;

Leads stern-eyed Justice to the dark domains,

If not to sever, to relax his chains;

Gives to her babes the self-devoted wife,

To her fond husband liberty and life,—

Onward he moves! disease and death retire; ~
And murmuring demons hate him and admire.”

To young women industry is equally es-
sential and commendable. An idle woman

is a poor and worthless thing. For what

does she imagine she was created? Of what
service is she to the world? In what re-
spect would not the world be as well with-
out her? A do-nothing young lady is most
assuredly pitied and despised by those whose
good opinion she is most anxious to se-
cure. | Se

It is not enough that a young woman can
play skilfully, sing delightfully, dance grace-
fully, dress fashionably, and has an abundant
flow of “small talk.”. The world. looks be-

yond these outward -ornaments, ’ and asks.

—THas she a good heart and ‘gentle disposi-
tion? Is she affectionate and forbearing?
Can she rule her temper and control her

-" . *



























| 96 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

| tongue? Does she respect and obey her pa-
| rents? Has she a well-cultivated and well-
|| stored mind? Is she industrious, prudent,
economical? Is she able and willing to en-
gage in household duties? Accomplishments
are not to be overlooked. But the qualities
above enumerated are essential, indispensa-
ble, to the character of a oo daughter and
a useful wife.

“ Action! That's the word. The great
world itself throbs with life. Action, untir-
ing harmony pervades the Universe of God.
The Creative Power has so ordained it. The
physical formation of the world, and all there-
in, forbids inactivity. The vast machinery
must move, or the whole cease to exist. Man
was never designed to be a drone. Had he —
lived pure in the first Paradise, he could not
have been idle. Sick or well, in cold or
heat, day or night, the machine moves on,
the heatf, like a steam-engine, throbs away,
and faithfully pumps its crimson currents un-
ceasingly to every part of the animal frame.
Action is one of the first elements of health
—ws

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 97.

and happiness. The mind will stagnate and
engender moral miasma, as much as the pool
never stirred by .a° tide or swept by the
winds. | .
“God has written action on the Heavens.
Silent, but ceaseless, the worlds that gleam
out upon us, keep on their course. Every
orb follows the track marked out for it. ‘The
Ocean rolls and heaves. The spring gushes
out from the hill-side and dances from rock
to rock, and the. brook hums .and murmurs
its melody as it goes. Upon the meadow,
the springing grass tells of the process that
annually clothes the turf. with wealth and
beauty. The leaves put out, rustle in the
winds, and fall to thei rest, while others fol-
low. The fierce, fiery energy of the lght-
ning writes the truth upon the scudding
clouds. The formless waves -that in the at-
mosphere ripple and dash against the cheek, .
tell of a restless ocean around us, a medium
of health and sound. From the world that
rolls, to the summer flies that float on the
air and glance in the sun, the truth is pro-

eee eee

7
98 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

claimed that all is activity. Man cannot be
idle—should not.”* | :

“One of the most mischievous phrases in
which a rotten Morality, a radically false and
vicious Public Sentiment, disguise themselves,
is that which characterizes certain individt-
als as destitute of financial capacity. A ‘kind,
amiable, generous, good sort of man,’ (so runs
the varnish,) ‘but utterly unqualified for the
management of his own finances’—‘a mere
child in everything relating to money,’ &e.
&c.—meaning that with an income of $500
a year, he persisted in spending $1000; or
with an income of from $2000 to $3000, he
regularly spent from $5000 to $8000, accord-
ing to his ability to run in debt, or the cre-
dulity of others in trusting him.

“The victims of this immorality—debtor
as well as creditor—are entitled to more
faithful dealing at the hands of those not di-
rectly affected by the misdemeanors of the
former. It is the duty of the community to
rebuke and repress these pernicious glosses,

* T. W. Brown. |








LECTURES TO YOUTH. 99



making the truth heard and felt, that inor-
dinate expenditure is knavery and crime.
No man has a moral right thus to lavish on
his own appetites, money which he has not
earned, and does not really need. If public
opinion were sound on this subject—if a man
living beyond his means, when his means
were commensurate with his real needs, were
subjected to the reprehension he deserves—
the evil would be instantly checked, and ulti-
mately eradicated.

“The world is full of niall who can’t
imagine why they don’t prosper like their
neighbors, when the real obstacle is not in
the banks nor tariffs, in bad public policy
nor hard times, but in their own extrava-
gance and heedless ostentation. The young
mechanic or clerk marries and takes a house,
which he proceeds to furnish twice as expen-
sively as he can afford; and then his wife,
instead of taking hold to help him earn a
livelihood by doing her own work, must have
a hired servant to"help her spend his limited
earnings. Ten years afterward, you will find


100 , LECTURES TO YOUTH.

him struggling on under a double load of
debts and children, wondering why the luck
was always against him, while his friends re-
eret his unhappy destitution of financial abil-
ity. Had they, from*the first, been frank
and honest, he need not have been so un-
lucky.

“Through every i of society ie: vice
of inordinate expenditure imsinuates itself.
The single man ‘ hired out’ in the country at
ten to fifteen dollars per month, who con-
trives to dissolve his year’s earnings in frol-
ics and fine clothes; the clerk who has three
to five hundred dollars a year, and melts
down twenty to fifty of. it into liquor and
cigars, are paralleled by the young merchant
who fills-a spacious house with costly furni-
ture, gives dinners, and drives a fast horse,
on the strength of the profits he expects to
realize when his goods are all sold and his
notes all paid. Let a man have a genius for
spending, and whether his income is a dollar
a day or a dollar a minute, it.is equally cer-
tain to prove inadequate. If dining, wining,




|| not so; A man who sells his property for



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 101



and party-giving won't help him through with
it, building, gaming; and speculation will be
sure to. The bottomless pocket will never
fill, no matter how bounteous the stream
pouring into it. The man who (being sin-
ele) does not save money on six dollars a
week, will not be apt to on sixty; and he
who does not lay up something in his first
year of independent exertion, will be pretty
likely to wear a poor man’s hair into his
_ grave. |

“No man who has the natural use of his
faculties and his muscles, has any right to
tax others with the cost of his support, as
this class of non-financial gentlemen habitu-
ally do. It is their common mistake to fancy
| that if a debt is only paid at last, the obliga-
tion of the debtor is fulfilled; but the fact is







































another’s promise to pay next week or next
month, and is compelled to wear out a pair
of boots in running after his due, which he
finally gets after a year or two, is never really

paid. Very often, he has lost half the face








-

102 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

of his demand, by not having the money
when he needed it, beside the cost and vex-
ation of running after it. There is just one
way to pay an obligation in full, and that is
to pay it when due. He who keeps up a

running fight with bills and loans through’

life, is continually living on other men’s
means, is a serious burden and a detriment

to those who deal with him, although his —

estate should finally pay every dollar of his
legal obligations.

“Tnordinate expenditure is the cause of a
great share of the crime and consequent mis-
ery which devastate the world. The clerk
who spends more than he earns, is fast quali-
fying himself for a gambler and a thief; the
trader or mechanic who overruns his income,
is very certain to become in time a trickster
and a cheat. Wherever you see a man
spending faster than he earns, there look out
for villainy to be developed, though it be
the farthest thing possible from his present
thought. ?

“ When the world shall have become wiser,


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 103

and its standard of morality more lofty, it
will perceive and affirm that profuse expen-

diture, even by one who can pecuniarily af-

ford it, is pernicious and unjustifiable—that
a man, however wealthy, has no right to lav-
ish on his own appetites, -his “tastes, or his
ostentation, that which might have raised
hundreds from destitution and despair to
comfort and usefulness. But that is an im-
provement in public sentiment which must
be waited for, while the other is more ready
and obvious.

“The meanness, the dishonesty, the im-
quity, of squandering thousands unearned,
and keeping others out of money that 1s
justly theirs, have rarely been urged and |
enforced as they should be. They need but
to be considered and understood, to be uni-
versally loathed and detested.”*

Nearly allied with the Habits of the young,
are their Amusements. That the youthful
should be allowed a reasonable degree of
recreation, is universally admitted. The laws
Ty ere a pte aaeeepeeenipneainaniens maaan

* Horace Greeley.




104 LEO TURES TO YOUTH:



of health demand relaxation from the labors

and cares of life. The body, the mind, con-
stantly strained to the highest exertion, with-

out repose, amd something to cheer, refreshen,
and re-invigorate it, will speedily fall-into
disease and death. The very word recrea-
tion—(re-creation)—indicates that to a de-
gree, proper amusement has the power to
revive the wearied energies, supply afresh
the springs of life, and give a renewed elas-
ticity and endurance to all the capacities of
our nature. |

Yet there 4s no subject surrounded with
greater difficulties, than the amusements of
the youthful. here is no amusement, how-
ever harmless and proper in its nature, but

what can be carried to such excess, as to in-

flict deep injury. It is while searching for
recreations, that the youthful meet* the most
dangerous temptations, and fall into the most

vicious practices. How important that they

should make this a matter of mature reflec-
tion and acute discrimination. Pleasure we
all desire. It is sought for by every human



nee ee


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 105

being. But it is essential to distinguish be-
tween true pleasure, which we can enjoy
with real benefit, and false pleasure, which
deceives, demoralizes, anddestroys.. The poet
truly describes the nature of this distinction,
when he says,

“Pleasure, or wrong, or rightly understood,
Our greatest evil, or our greatest good !”

One of the first things requisite to be un-
derstood is, that in order to enjoy any amluse-
ment, a previous preparation is necessary.
That preparation is to be obtained by wseful
occupation. Tt is only-by contrast that we
can enjoy anything. - Without weariness, we
can know nothing of rest. Without first en-
during hunger and thirst, we cannot expe-
rience the satisfaction of partaking of food
and drink. In like manner, it is only by
faithful and industrious application to busi-
ness of some kind—it is only by occupying
the mind in useful émployment—that we
can draw any satisfaction from recreation.
Without this preparation, all amusement






106 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



loses its charm. Werethe young to engage
in one unceasing round of pastimes, from day
to day, with no time or thought devoted to
useful occupation, recreation would soon be
divested of its attractions, and become in-
sipid and painfully laborious. To be bene-
ficial, amusements should be virtuous in their
tendencies, healthful in their influence on the
body, and of bref duration.

Among the many pastimes to which the
young resort for amusement, card-playing
often fills a prominent place. This is a gen-
eral, and in some circles, a fashionable prac-
tice; but it is objectionable and injurious in
all: its influences, and in every possible point
of view. -Nothmg good or instructive, noth-
ing elevating or commendable, in any sense,
can come from it. All its fruits must neces-
sarily be evil.

It is a senseless occupation. Ndthing can
be more unmeaning and fruitless, among all
the employments to which a rational mind
can devote its attention. It affords no use-
ful exercise of the intellect—no food for pro-





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 107

fitable thought—no power to call into activ-
ity the higher and better capacities. It is
true, I suppose, there is some degree of cun-
ning and skill to be displayed in managing
the cards. But what high intellectual, or
moral capacity is brought into exercise by a
game so trivial? . It excludes interesting and
instructive interchanges of sentiment, on top-
ics of any degree of importance; and substi-
tutes talk of a frivolous and meaningless
character. To a spectator, the conversation
of a card-table, is of the most uninteresting
and childish description.

There are, however, more serious objec
tions than these. Card-playing has a ten-
dency of the most dangerous description, es-

pecially to the youthful. Let a young man

become expert in this game, and fond of en-
gaging in it, and who does not see he is lia-
ble to become that most mean and despica-
ple of all living creatures—a GAMBLER. Con-
fident of his own skill as a card-player, how
long would he hesitate to engage ina game
for a small sum? He has seen older ones
ee



‘byt
et .




108 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

playing—perhaps his own parents—and he
can discover no great harm in doing the same
thing, even if it is for a stake of a few shil-
lings. From playing for small sums, the
steps are very easy which lead to large
amounts. And in due time, the young man
becomes a gambler, from no other cause than
that he acquired a love for card-playing, when
he engaged in it only as an amusement.
Parents have a responsibility, resting on
them in this respect, of which they should
not lose sight. They cannot be surprised
that their children imitate their examples.
With all’ the dangerous associations and ten-
dencies of card- playing, would they . have
their children acquire a passion for it? What
wise parent ¢an make such a choice for his
son? Ah, how many a young-man has be-
come a gamester, a black-leg, an inmate of
the prison cell, because, in the home of his
childhood, he acquired a love of the card-
table. He but imitated the practice-of-pa-
rents, whose duty it was to set him a better
example, and was led to the path of ruin!







LECTURES’ TO YOUTH. 109

If, from its influences, card-playing, even
for amusement, is improper for gentlemen, I
conceive it much more so for ladies. A wo-
man—and more especially a young woman—
seems entirely out of place at a card-table.

The associations are so masculine—they bring —

to mind so much of the cut-and-shuflie trick-

ery, vulgarity and profanity—so many of the

words and phrases of that hell, the gaming-
table—that for a lady to indulge in them,
appears entirely opposed to.that modesty

and refinement, which are so becoming the

female character. -I trust all young ladies

of discretion will shun the card-table. I am
confident every woman, who possesses a pro- :
per sense of the dignity and delicacy which 4
form the highest attractions of the female
character, willavoid a practice which is made
an instrument of- the most despicable uses,
and to which the. most vile and abandoned |
constantly resort. |

“ Daughters of those who, long ago,
Dared the dark storm and-angry sea,
And walked the desert way of woe,’
And pain, and trouble to be free!


| 110 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

Oh, be like them! like them endure,
And bow beneath affliction’s rod ;

Like them be watchful, high and pure—
In all things seek the smile of God.”

The same caution I have uttered in regard
to card-playing, I would apply to all games
of hazard and chance. The young should
never indulge in them, even for amusement.
Although they may be able to see no harm
in them as recreations, yet the influences
they exert, and the associations into which
they lead, cannot but exert a deleterious in-
fluence. They can do no good. They may
lead to the most dire results!

Another amusement in which the youthful
frequently engage, is Dancing. This is the
most fascinating of pastimes. And it might
be made the most proper, healthful, and in-
vigorating. In the simple act of dancing—
of moving the body in unison with strains of
music—there can be no harm. It is a cus-
tom which has been practised in all ages,
and among all. nations, both civilized and
barbarous. The very lambs in the green
and sunny meadow, and the cattle on a thou-




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 111

sand hills, in many a fantastic gam ul, exult
and rejoice in the blessings a kind 1 rovidence
bestows upon them. It is one of Nature’s
methods of attesting the conse casnesg of en-
joyment.

Dancing, when viewed m the light of a
pleasant bodily exerci:2, is undoubtedly
healthy and beneficial It is- peculiarly so
to females, and those whose occupation and
habits are of a sedentary character. When
properly engaged in, it strengthens the limbs,
developes the chest, enlarges the lungs, and
invigorates the whole system.

But this pastime is greatly abused, and is
so perverted as to have become one of the |
most serious evils. In this view, it is subject
to severe and well-grounded censure. As .
dancing is usually conducted in modern times,
it has proved one of the greatest evils into
which the youthful have fallen. The routs
and balls to whieh the young resort, as-gen-
erally managéd, cannot be too severely con-
demned. The late hours to which they

are prolonged—the rich and unhealthy pas-



‘ , oe
at. f eee = vy eS “a
Se plaice oe: Me a IR a iN tee

a a = ee


112 LECTURES TO. YOUTH.

try partaken of in abundance—the intoxicat-
ing drinks passed. around, or conveniently
found in the side-room, or at the bar—the
thoughtless manner of dressing, exposing to
cold and damp, and so confining the Jungs,

that when, by reason of exercise, they need -

the most room for expansion, they have the
least, thus sowing the seeds of speedy disease
and early death—the. long-continued excite-
ment and over-fatigue—the improper .com-

pany which often assembles on such occa- -

sions—these all combine to make such assem-
blages a source of injury in all their influences
and consequences. They should be discoun-
tenanced by every parent and well-wisher of
public good. The young of both sexes, who
have any just regard for their morals- and
their health, should avoid these routs, and
balls, and cotillion parties. Their tendency,
in every respect, is evil in the extreme.
Dancing among ae pastimes
—or by young people, at private parties, or
social gatherings, engaged in temperately,
and for a brief period, with proper precau-

*
«

Cee -





LECTURES TO YOUTH» 113

tions in regard to health, cannot be objec-
tionable. In this, as in most other amuse-
ments, it is the excess, the abuse, that causes
the injury. .

In urging these considerations on the
young, 1 would not seek to deprive them
of any amusement suited to their age and
circumstances. Youth is the season of joy-
ousness—of light-hearted pleasure, and bud-
ding hope. I would not overshadow one
ray of its bright and beautiful sunshine—nor
check one throb of its innocent pleasure.
The shadows, the cares, and burthens of life,
will come upon them full early enough, at
the latest. In the spring-time of their days
—the delicious, romantic morning of their
being—they can experience some of the
sweetest hours of their earthly existence.
Nor. would I rob them of that’ which God
and nature designed: them to enjoy. But I.
would have them seek for innocent ‘amuse-
ments—for recreations and enjoyments, of a
pure and elevated character. None other

can make them truly happy. All things |







114 *LEOTURES TO YOUTH.



sinful in their nature, or demoralizing in
their tendency, are unmitigated evils, de-
structive in their consequences. However
attractive they may appear to the inexpe-
rienced, in the form of amusements, yet in
the end, they will “bite as a serpent, and
sting as an adder.”

There is no necessity that the young should
resort to that which is low and vicious to find
amusement. A thousand means of recrea-
tion surround them, of the most harmless
character. The enjoyments of the paternal
roof—the social party, where the young en-
gage in sprightly conversation, or mnocent
pastimes—the friendly eall—the perusal of
interesting and instructive books—the scan-
ning of the journals of the day, by which
they can look out upon the shifting scene of
the busy, restless world—the summer morn-
ing walk, to behold the opening beauties of
the glorious day, and listen to the singing of
the birds, the lowing of the flocks and herds,
the murmuring of the streamlet, nature’s
early anthem of praise to God—or the even-





LECTURES TO YOUTH» 115
ing ramble, to watch the flowers as they open
their fragrant leaves to be bathed in sweet
distilling dews—to gaze upon the golden sun-
set, making the fleecy clouds to blush with a.
crimson glow, as the king of day bids them
6“ tht ¥ tho

good night ;” or to Behold the stars, as one

by one they come forth to their appointed
- stations, bestudding the whole heavens with

crystal coronets.—These, O youth! and count- -
less other fountains, are open for* you, from
which the sweetest and purest enjoyments
can be obtained. Seek for amusement—for
pleasure—in these directions, and the cup
which you press to your 7 shall be one of

enemas neyo! !

“ While some in folly’s pleasures roll,
And court the joys that hurt the soul,
Be mine that silent, calm repast,

A conscience peaceful to the last.”


LECTURE V.
Chr. Lrligions Sentiments,



7 “ Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth.”—Eccl. xii. 1.








Co HERE are few subjects 80
ROD) generally uninteresting to the
AS youthful as Religion. The
great majority prefer to have
their attention .called in any
other direction, and to be ad-
dressed on any topic, rather than
this, which, in fact, is the most
important of all. There is evi-
dently a defect somewhere in this
‘. matter, which should be corrected.
\ Where shall we seek for it? . Not in

any natural, inherent aversion to the

subject of religion, resting in the hearts of
the young. It is neither reasonable in itself,






LECTURES TO YOUTH. | 117

nor respectful to the Creator, to insist he has
so constituted the human soul, that it is nat-
urally and necessarily indisposed to a topic
which is most vitally connected with its hap-
piness, and which should receive a large share
of its attention.

_ This indifference is to be attributed chiefly,
I think, to improper impressions in regard
to the nature and objects of religion. The
young look upon it as something gloomy,
saddening, and distasteful—something that
forbids enjoyment, chains in dire bondage
the free, glad spirit of early life, and casts
dark and cheerless shadows on“the sunshine
of youth’s bright morning! -They imagine
it to stalk forth from a dark cell, arrayed in
hood and cowl, to frown upon them in their
innocent pastimes—to curdle their blood
with severe rebukes, because of the buoy-
ancy of their hearts, and. to. drive them back
with scowling reprimands, when they would
walk in the sunny paths which God has
kindly opened for their elastic footsteps.
Hence they close their ears to its invitations ;


118 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

turn away from its instructions, as something
designed to impose a heavy yoke upon them ;
and postpone its claims, to be attended to
among the last acts of Ife.

That these views and feelings should widely
prevail, on a subject so important as religion,
is a matter of deep regret. ‘They are erro-
neous and deleterious, in the extreme. Let
the young strive to. become acquainted with
the true nature of the religion of Christ, and
they will learn that such are not its require-
‘ ments, nor its fruits. It is not the purpose
of its Divine Author to sadden the heart, or
fillthe mind with gloom; but to cheer and
gladden the soul, and lead it to the highest
and sweetest enjoyments of existence. It is
not the aim of religion to deprive the young
of any real enjoyment—any recreation proper
to their age or their nature, as intellectual,
moral, and spiritual beings. But it would
assist the*young to distinguish between per-
manent happiness, and those hurtful and
wicked gratifications which corrupt the heart,
and plunge the whole being into the dark


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 119

pool of sin and woe. Religion is the friendly
Guide sent from our Father in heaven, to
lead his creatures away from peril and woe,
and direct their footsteps into the most beau-
tiful and happy paths of existence.

«“ Through life’s bewildered way,
Her hand unerring leads ;
And o’er the path her heavenly ray
A cheering lustre sheds.”

What sight can present: itself to the eye
more pleasing than a religious youth. By
this I do not mean a gloomy, downcast, sor-
rowful young man, or young woman, Wihose
countenance is overcast with shadows, and
whose presence chills every beholder. Itisa
darkened superstition, a cold, cheerless ascet-
icism, and not the Christian religion, which
gives this unnatural and forbidding appear-
ance. A religious youth is one who is cheer-
ful and happy—whose countenance is per-
vaded with an expression of ‘benevolence, a
smile of contentment—who 1s constant in at-
tendance on public worship—who respects



+ le eee
> ta i ee i Ci ee et Be Ml tl
120 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the Scriptures, and. makes their daily perusal
one of the fixed duties of life—who loves
God, and strives faithfully to keep his com-
mandments—who reverences the Saviour of
man, and takes him as a pattern in all things
—who is honest, industrious, economical, and
strictly temperate. Behold the fair picture!
Is it not goodly to look upon? Can earth
furnish a spectacle more beautiful? Such a
youth is beloved of all men. Angels, Christ,
the Father, smile their approval on every
one treading this high pathway

‘ “ Sweet is the early dew
” Which gilds the mountain tops,

And decks each plant and flower we view _
With pearly, glittering drops ;
But sweeter far the scene
On Zion’s holy hill, —

When there the dew of youth is seen
Its freshness to distill.”

Is there a youth in the audience who does
not desire to occupy a position so elevated
and so honorable? Do not imagine it is be-
yond your reach. Every one can attain to
it by proper exertion. It is not difficult of


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 121

accomplishment, With pure desires, and
right intentions, nothing is more feasible.
In fact, so to conduct as to secure such a
character, and attain to such a position, 1s
the most easy, pleasant, and happy path in
which the young can walk. All others are
full of difficulty, vexation, trouble, and
wretchedness. - All others yield fruit the
most bitter and poisonous—fruit whieh, how-
ever luscious and tempting it may appear to
the eye, like the apples of Sodom, will turn
to ashes in the hand. |

If the young are looking simply for a
peaceful and happy life, where prospe:
will be the most likely to attend them, and
where the richest and choicest blessings will
be showered on their pathway, they will find
it in the practice of religion. So far from
being a heavy burthen, a grievous cross, it is
the lightener of. all burthens, the easiest of
all yokes, the kindest, truest-friend, to help
along the rough spots, and smile and cheer
in the darkest hours of man’s earthly pil-
grimage, Listen to the representations of

6


122 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

religion found in the Word of God:: “ Wis-
dom is more precious than rubies; and all
things thou canst desire are not to be com-
pared to her. Length of days is in her right
hand; and in her left hand riches and honor.
Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all
her paths are peace.* “Come, ye children,
hearken unto me. I will teach you the fear
[reverence] of the Lord. What man is he
that desireth life, and loveth.many days,
that he may see good? Keep thy tongue
from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile.
Depart from evil, and do good. Seek peace
and pursue it.”+ “Blessed is the man that
walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly,
nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sit-
teth in the seat of the scornful. But his de-
light is in the law of the Lord; and in his
law doth he meditate. day and night. And
he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers
of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his
season. His leaf also shall not wither. And
whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.” There

* Prov. iii. 15, 16, 17. + Ps. xxxiv. 11-14. + Ps.i.1, 2, 8.




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 123

is nothing sad and gloomy in these views;
but everything pleasant and inviting.

I would. disabuse the young of the idea
that religion is needed only by the aged, the
sick, and the dying; and that it can be of no
essential service at.other times. . It does in-
deed. become the hoary head,-more than the
jewelled diadem. It is the comforter of the
sick—the supporter of the departing spirit—
giving it a sustaining power which all earth’s
riches cannot purchase. But religion is quite
as appropriate and essential to the youthful
as to the aged and sick. It 1s equally as im-
portant that men should live right, as de
right. There is no way so effectually to in-
sure a peaceful and happy death, as to live a
good and useful life. Religion leads to such
a life, and prepares the way for such a death.

Hence the necessity that the young should —

give themselves up to its influences in the
morning of their days, that their meridian
may be fruitful of good, and their evening
sunset calm and serene. *

Away, then, with the supposition, that re-



“eee is Lin ee ae



124 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



ligion is not adapted, nor necessary to youth.
“The flower of youth never appears more
beautiful, than when it leans towards the Sun
of Righteousness.” Religion is the brightest
ornament with which the young can bedeck
themselves. The fragrant blossom which
crowns the tree, is not more beautiful, or
hopeful of coming fruitfulness, than is re-
ligion to the freshness of youth. Indeed, as
the blossom is necessary to insure the rich
and golden fruit, so is early religion requisite
to a useful and prosperous career. It is the
best preparation the young can secure for
after life, whatever calling they may pursue.
There is no occupation, no pursuit, no pro-
fession, which they will not be far better
prepared to enter, by the influence of -an en-
lightened, cheerful, enlarged Christian faith
and practice. These will interfere with no
useful enterprise, no honest business, no laud-
able calling ; nor prevent the prosecution of
any of the many projects among.men, which
comport with the public good, and are exe-
cuted on principles of integrity. Religion




























LECTURES TO YOUTH. 125

will make its possessors better and more suc-
cessful laborers, mechanics, manufacturers,
agriculturists, merchants, and more respected
and useful members of any of the learned
professions.
_ If there is any pursuit, any business, which
you cannot prosecute with the sanction of
religion, avoid it at once and forever. You
had better do anything else than engage in
it. I would have the. young strongly m-
pressed with this view. It would be far pret-
erable to suffer poverty and obscurity, in an
honest and useful calling, than to. obtain the
possession and fame of great riches, in-a
| pursuit which the pure and enlightened prin-
ciples of ‘Christianity would condemn. Al-
though you may succeed in hoarding up
mountains of gold in such a pursuit, and in
possessing broad domains and “the cattle on
a thousand hills,” yet all this will not afford —
you one throb of genuine enjoyment. There
would be that in the manner of obtaining
these possessions, which would utterly de-
prive them of all power to impart happiness.

ww




———$——.s

126 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

Wealth secured by extortion, fraud, or any
practice or business of a corrupting nature,
injurious to the morals, and destructive to
the well-being of community, will be of no
more value to him who thus obtains it, as far
as his happiness is concerned, than so much
dust. It is the consciousness of having ob-
tained riches in honest and useful pursuits,
that gives zest and relish to the enjoyments
they procure. Without this consciousness,
the’man of wealth has less of pure peace and
happiness than the poorest honest man in the
wide world. In the very nature of things,
as a wise and holy God has constituted us,
this must inevitably be so. All past history
and experience furnish indubitable proof of
the correctness of this position. If I can
| impress this single truth on the hearts and
memories of the youthful, I shall do them a
service of a value beyond all human compu-
tation.

* These considerations, I trust, will tend to
convince the young of the vital importance
of obtaining now, at the commencement of






LECTURES TO YOUTH. 127

their career, the direction and influence of
well-grounded and enlightened religious views
and principles. I would have them become
neither fanatics nor bigots; but would urge
them to place themselves under the pure and
divine light of the gospel of Christ, that they
may be exalted to the highest and noblest
principles of human action, and to the sum-
mit of human enjoyment.

To what sources should the young apply
for correct religious doctrines and principles?
While they should give due heed to the in-
struction and advice of the learned, the wise
and good, within whose influence they may
be thrown, yet they should not depend
wholly upon these sources for the attainment
of truth. The wisest and best among reli-
cious teachers, differ materially on funda-
mental points. To rely solely on the con-
victions of others, however exalted their
talents or sincere their opinions, would be
injustice to yourselves, and tothe truth you

would obtain. Let no man think for you.

He who would persuade you to allow him to



- i a TE a i el a ais ail


128 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

do so—who would have you distrust the
convictions of your own reason, throw aside
the decisions of your judgment, and allow
him to judge and decide for you, in religious
matters, does in fact assume to be your mas-
ter, and. would reduce you to a poor and
pitiable spiritual bondage. |

Let not the young overlook the fact, that
they have been endowed by their Creator
with the faculties of reason, judgment, and
discrimination. These must necessarily be
exercised in forming enlightened religious
opinions. Those who fail to do this, fall an
easy prey to every error that will but com-
mend itself by something novel and startling.
Christianity is pre-eminently, a reasonable
system of doctrines. There is no topic claim-
ing the attention of man, in the investigation
of which it is-so important to exercise with
all deliberation, the highest capacities of
reason and refleetion, as religion. From the
great multiplicity of opinions which prevail,
those who are distrustful of their own judg-

ment and reason, and who: are more disposed






a

i
<
. ,

to receive the apse diait of others, than to
depend on the convictions of the good sense
with which they have been endowed, will
speedily become involved in a labyrinth of
errors, from which it will be difficult to ex-
tricate themselves. Let the young, in all
their religious investigations, hesitate not to
appeal continually to the highest and noblest
capacity of their nature, and give all due
weight to its decisions. Freely, abundantly,
your Maker has bestowed a reasoning capa-
city upon you. Freely, unhesitatingly, always
should you appeal to its directing light. ©
Whoever counsel the young against the
exercise of reason in regard to religion—
whoever warn them to beware of its decisions
on a.topic so momentous—lay themselves
open to a just and legitimate suspicion, of
being the abettors of error. Is not this self-
evident? Error is born in ignorance.. It
burrows in darkness, and draws all its vital-
ity from stupid credulity. Enlightened reason
strips away the. false garbs by which it de-
ceives the thoughtless, reveals its deformities,

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 129

z


130 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

and holds up its absurdities naked and. re-
pulsive, to the gaze of the passer-by. In
view of such an unwelcome office, it 1s natu-
ral that error should dread the eye of reason,
should shrink away at its approach, and cry
out mightily against its scrutiny.

Not so is it with truth. It cultivates no
apprehension of reason. It courts, invites
its approach, and-smiles in conscious strength
at its most critical investigations. Truth has
everything to gain, and nothing to lose from
the researches of reason. The clearer and
keener the eye of the one, the more beauti-
ful the appearance of the other. Truth and
Reason are twin sisters, born of God, and
despatched from heaven, to guide and bless
earth’s children. They are linked together
inseparably. The one is never found except
in the presence of the other. Their blended
light is all that gives value and beauty to
Christianity, and all that makes it of any
more importance than the merest heathen
fable. Mutually they co-operate with, and
strengthen each other. All Truth is reason-




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 131

able, and all the legitimate deductions of
Reason are true. Truth forms the vital at-
mosphere which Reason inhales. Reason is
the very sunlight in which Truth bathes its
beauteous form.

Remember, O youth, religion does not re-
quire you to separate these heaven-born
guides to men. _Never expect to find reli-
gious truth, without beholding it radiant
with the light .of. reason. Reject without
hesitation, whatever is presented to you as
truth, unless reason throws its divine sanction
around it. In all your investigations, let
Reason direct your footsteps; and, guided
by revelation, it will at last, and unerringly,
lead you to the glorious abode of Truth.

It is readily allowed, there are truths in
Christianity which reason cannot fathom.
Not because they are opposed to reason, but
because they are beyond its reach. They
are infinite, while man’s reason is finite. But
it is only by the light of reason that man
can see any consistency or propriety in the
assertion of such truths. Reason may sanc-



























132 LECTURES TO YOUTH.




tion what it cannot fully grasp, as the bound-
lessness of space, or the endlessness of time.
One thing may be adove reason, another thing
may be opposed to reason. ‘The former it
may approve—the latter it will peremptorily
condemn. This is an important distinction,
which should never be overlooked in its
bearing on religious tenets.

In all researches for an enlightened reli-
gious faith, there are but two sources of in-
formation, on which reliance can be placed
with entire confidence, viz. the Works of
Nature, and the Revealed Word of God.
Both are equally the productions of the In-
finite Mind, and can be studied with the
highest profit. —

Nature’s works are but an “elder Scrip-
ture,” written by Jehovah’s finger. In glow-
ing-suns and stars, we read its brilliant and
instructive lessons, ‘These all teach us aright
of the perfections of the Sovereign Creator.
They are “golden steps,” on which the mind
ascends to aclearer view of the great Creator.
Behold the o’erarching canopy with which


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 133

God has adorned our earthly abode. See
how it glitters with burnished worlds, more

numerous than the dust of earth. All are in
motion. With a velocity which outstrips the
wind, they wheel their flight around their
vast orbits, with a precision which astonishes
and confounds the beholder. Yonder rolls
the planet Jupiter. Could I put my finger
down at a certain point in its orbit, as it
rushes past, it might exclaim—“ Although
the journey around the orbit in which I re-
] volve, is two thousand nine hundred and six-
ty-six millions six hundred and sixty-one

thousand miles, yet in four thousand three

hundred and thirty-two days, fourteen hours,
| eighteén minutes, and forty-one seconds, I
| will. pass this point again!!” And away it

flies to fulfil the grand prophecy. . I watch
| with intense interest for more than eleven
|

_*

years. At length they have expired. The
days also run by—the hours pass—the
minutes. And as the clock ticks the forty-
first second, lo! old Jupiter wheels past the
given point, without the variation of the




134 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

thousandth part of a moment. ‘Thus it. has
been journeying from the morning of creation.
Thus perfectly revolve all the heavenly
bodies.

. Mysterious round! what skill, what force divine,
Deep felt, in these appear! A single train,
Yet so delightful mixed, with such kind art,
Such beauty and beneficence combin’d ;
Shade, unperceived, so softening into shade ;
And all so forming an harmonious whole ;
That as they still succeed, they ravish still.”

In the magnitude of the heavenly bodies,
and the precision of their movements, we
behold the most glorious and convincing evi-
dences of the omnipotence of God’s power, {|
and the perfection of His wisdom and skill.
In the splendor of the starry dome of night
—in the thousand attractions of our earthly
abode—the loveliness of its summer land-
scapes—the beauty of its flowers, and the
balmy fragrance they distil upon the air—in
the warmth of the precious sunlight, which
floods hill, valley, field, forest, and ocean—in
the refreshing influences of the evening dew,
and “the early and latter rains’—in the
























LECTURES TO YOUTH.

grateful breeze which bears life and health
to our nostrils—in the rich productions of
the ever-bountiful soil—in these, in all nature’s
wide departments, we read, with rejoicing
eyes, the witnesses of the impartial goodness
and boundless beneficence of the Father of
spirits ! ,
“ My heart is awed within me, when I think ©

Of the great miracle that still goes on,

In silence, round me—the perpetual work

Of thy creation, finished, yet renewed

Forever. Written’on thy works I read
The lesson of thy Eternity.” *

Nature furnishes a thousand evidences of
man’s immortality—that greatest of all truths
asserted by revelation, and sustained by re-
ligion. We see a corroboration of this mo-
mentous fact, in the transformation of the
loathsome caterpillar into the beautiful but-
terfly, by the process of an actual death—in
the dying and reviving of the vegetable
kingdom—in the luxuriant plant and golden
harvest, springing from the dead body of the
seed—in the numerous forms and processes in
which life springs from death all around us.




136 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

“ Oh, listen, man,
A voice within us speaks the startling word,
‘Man, thou shalt never die!’ Celestial voices
Hymn it round our souls; according harps,
By angel fingers touched when the mild stars
Of morning sang together, sounds forth still -
The song of our great immortality ;
Thick-clustering orbs, and this our fair domain,

_ The tall, dark mountains, and the deep-toned seas,

Join in the solemn, universal song.
O, listen, ye, our spirits; drink it in
From all the air! ’Tis in the gentle moonlight:
Is floating in day’s setting glories ; Night,
Wrapped in her sable robe, with silent step
Comes to our bed and breathes it in our ears.
Night and the dawn, bright day and thoughtful eve,
All times, all bounds, the limitless expanse,
As one great mystic instrument, are touched
By an unseen, living Hand, and conscious chords
Quiver with joy in this great jubilee.
The dying hear it; and as sounds of earth
Grow dull and distant, wake their passing souls '
To mingle in this passing melody.”*

Still more valuable resources for the attain-

ment of religious truths are found in the

holy Scriptures—the revealed word of the
Most High. In forming their religious opin-
ions, let the young fail not to make these
sacred pages their constant study. Nor should
they dream they will find there any contra-



* Dana,




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 137

diction to the lessons read on the broad pages

of Nature’s book. These are but different
methods in which the same God reveals him-
self to his creatures. He will not contradict
himself. His revealed word as plainly asserts
his power, wisdom, and goodness, as_ his
works shadow forth these glorious perfec-

.tions, While the Scriptures do not contradict

the voice uttered by nature, they lead us to
higher departments of religion, and to clearer
revelations of God and his character. They
represent him as a Father, exercising a pa-
rental government over man—a government
characterized by benevolence, justice, mercy,
and truth, and administered for the promo-
tion of his own glory, and the highest good
of those called to obey. The Scriptures,
moreover, bring to our knowledge the Son of
God and his gospel—presenting us in the life
of Jesus Christ, a beautiful example of truth,
purity, righteousness, and love, and imparting,
in his teachings, the most perfect rules of hu-
than conduct, and the brightest anticipations
of life and immortality beyond the grave.




138 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



In perusing the Scriptures, let reason be
your guide. Reason should not be elevated
above the Scriptures; yet they cannot be
understood without its aid. The Creator, in
the Bible, addresses himself directly to man’s
reason: “Come now, and let us reason to-
gether, saith the Lord.”* Without the ex-
ercise of reason in reading the. Bible, it will
be as a sealed book. How else can man com-
prehend its truths, and be instructed by its
rich lessons of wisdom? In the exercise of
this highest capacity bestowed upon us, the
word of God will appear harmonious in all
its parts—beautiful and sublime in all its
truths—instructive in all its lessons—inspir-
ing the brightest, broadest hopes the mind
can conceive. But lay reason aside, in its
perusal, and it will be involved in inextrica-
ble confusion, and impenetrable darkness.

The young should not lose sight of the
fact, that we have the Bible only in the form
of a translation by uninspired men, from the
original Hebrew and Greek, in which it was

* JTsaiah i. 18.




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 139

‘penned by the inspired writers. Hence it
should not seem surprising that there are
some inaccuracies. connected with this trans- 4
lation ; nor that certain words, allusions, and ;
forms of speech, appear obscure and unintel-
ligible. There is a plain and simple rule by
which all obscure and disputed words and
passages should be understood. Give them
such construction as will most perfectly cor- -
respond with the attributes and character of
God, as revealed in his word and works, his
omnipotence and omniscience, his wisdom and
goodness, his justice and mercy—and as will
best accord with the grace and love which
moved the Saviour in his divine mission to
the earth. i

For the following excellent suggestions in
regard to the study of the Scriptures, I am
indebted to a popular writer of the present
day. ee | -

“On the Sabbath the Bible should be
studied. Every person, old or young, igno-
rantor learned, should devote a portion of
time every Sabbath to the study of the










aetna eS



140 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

Scriptures, in the more strict and proper
sense of that term.. But to show precisely
what I mean by this weekly study of the

Bible, [ will describe a particular case. A
| young’ man with only such opportunities as
are possessed by all, resolves to take this |
course. He selects the Epistle to the Ephe-
sians ior his first subject; he obtains such
books and helps as he finds in his own fam-
ily, or as he can obtain from a. religious
friend, or procure from a Sabbath-school
library. It is not too much to suppose that
he will have a sacred Atlas, some Commen-
tary, and probably a Bible Dictionary. He
should also have pen, ink, and paper; and
thus provided, he sits down Sabbath morn-
ing to hiswork. He raises a short but heart-
felt prayer to God that he will assist and
bless him, and then commences his inquiries.

“The Epistle to the Ephesians I have sup-
posed to be his subject. He sees that the
first question evidently is, ‘ Who weré the
Ephiésioms ? He finds the city of Ephesus
upon the map; and from the preface to the











LECTURES TO YOUTH. 141



Epistie contained in the commentary, or from
‘any other source to which he can have ac-
cess, he learns what sort of a city it was—
what was the character of the inhabitants,
and if possible, what condition the city was
in at the time this letter was writtemâ„¢, He
next inquires in regard to the writer gf this
letter or Epistle, as it is called. It was
Paul; and what did Paul know of the Ephe-
sians? had he ever been there? or was he
writing to strangers? To settle these points,
so evidently important to a correct under-
standing of the letter, he examines the Acts
of the Apostles, (in which an account of St,
Paul’s labors is contained,) to learn whether
Paul went there, and if so, what happened
while he was there. He finds that many in-
teresting incidents occurred during Paul's
visits, and his curiosity is excited to know

whether these things will be alluded to in |




the letter; he also endeavors to ascertain * ||

where Paul was when he wrote the letter.
After having thus determined éveryt

lating to the circumstances of the case, he is is
142 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

prepared to come to the Epistle itself, and
enter with spirit and interest into an exami-
nation of its contents.

“ He first. glances his eye cursorily through
the cHapters of the book, that he may take
in atgonce a general view of its object and
design—perhaps he makes out a brief list of
the tdpics discussed, and thus has a distinet
general idea of the whole before he enters
into a minute examination of the parts. This
minute examination he comes to at last—
though perhaps the time devoted to the
study for two or three Sabbaths is spent in
the preparatory inquiries. If it is so, it is
time well spent; for by it he is now pre-
pared to enter with interest into the very
soul and spirit of the letter. While he was
ignorant of these points, his knowledge of

- the Epistle itself must have been very vague
and superficial. Suppose I were now to in-
troduce into this book a letter, and should
begin at once, without saying by whom the

| letter.awas written, or to whom it was ad-
dressed. It would be preposterous. If I


LECTURES TO YOUTH. , 143

_ wished to excite your interest, I should de-
scribe particularly the parties, and. the cir-.

cumstances which produced the letter origi-
nally. And yet how many Christians there
are, who could not tell whether Paul’s*etter
to the Ephesians was written before opafter
he went there, or where Titus was when

Paul wrote to him, or for what special pur-

pose he wrote ! ) |
“This method of studying the Scriptures,
which I have thus attempted to describe, and
which I might illustrate by supposing many
other cases, is not intended for one class
alone; not for the ignorant. peculiarly, nor

for the wise; not for the rich, nor for the

poor; but for all. The. solitary widow, in
her lonely cottage among the distant moun-
tains, with nothing but her simple Bible in
her hand, by the light of her evening fire,

may pursue this course of comparing Scrip-

ture with Scripture, and entering into the

spirit.of sacred story, throwing herself back
to ancient times, and thus preparing herself
to. grasp more completely, ard to feel more


144 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

vividly the moral lessons which the Bible is
mainly intended to teach. And the most
cultivated scholar may pursue this course in
his quiet study, surrounded by all the helps
to a thorough knowledge of the Scriptures
which learning can produce or wealth obtain.

«] hope the specimens I have given are
suffidient to convey to my readers the gene-
ral idea I have in view, when I speak of

studying the Bible, in contradistinction from
the mere cursory reading of it, which is so
common among Christians.

“Select some subject upon which a good
deal of information may be found in various
parts of the Bible, and make it your object
to bring together into one view all that the
Bible says upon that subject. Take for in-
stance the life of the Apostle Peter. Sup-
pose you make it your business on one Sab-
bath, with the help of a brother, or sister, OY

any other friend who will unite with you in |

the work, to obtain all the information
which the Bible gives in regard to him. By
the help of thé*Concordance you find all the

%



ae





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 145

places in which he is mentioned—you com-
pare the various accounts in the Four Gos-
pels; see in what they agree and in what
they differ. After sollowing down his his-
tory as far as the Evangelists bring it, you
take up the book of the Acts, and go through
that for information in regard to this Apos-
tle, omitting those parts which relate to other
subjects. In this way yon become fully ac-
quainted with his character and history ;
you understand it.as a whole.

“ Jerusalem is another good subject, and
the examination would afford scope for the
exercise of the faculties of the highest minds
for many Sabbaths: find when the city is
first named, and from the manner in which
it is mentioned, and the circumstances con-
nected with the earliest accounts of it, ascer-
tain what sort of a city it was at that time.
Then follow its history down; notice the
changes as they occur; understand every
revolution, examine the circumstances of
| every battle and siege of which it is the
scene, and thus become acqtainted with its





SS

LECTURES TO YOUTH.

whole story down to the time when the
sacred narration leaves it. To do this well,
will require patient, and careful investiga-
tion. You'cannot do it as you can read a
chapter, carelessly and with an unconcerned
and uninterested mind; you must, if you
would succeed in such an investigation, en-
gage in it am earnest. And that is the very
advantage of such a method of study; it
breaks up effectually that habit of listless,
dull, inattentive reading of the Bible which
so extensively prevails. | |
“You may take the subject of the Sab-
bath; examine the circumstances of its first ||
appointment, and then follow its history :
down, so far as it is given in the Bible, to |
the last Sabbath alluded to on the sacred |
pages. ) |
“ The variety of topics which might profit- |
ably be studied in this way is vastly greater
than would at first be supposed. There are |
a great number of biographical and geo-
graphical topics—a great number which re-
late to manners, and customs, and sacred in-

;













LECTURES TO YOUTH. 147

structions. In fact, the whole Bible may be
analyzed in this way; and its various contents
brought: before the mind in new aspects, and
with a freshness and vividness which, in the
mere repeated reading of the Scriptures in
regular course, can never be seen.”*

In connection with this general subject, I
would make a few suggestions to the young,
in regard to those who differ from them on
religious doctrines. That there should be a
diversity of opinions in respect to a subject
so purely speculative as religion, should not
be.a matter of surprise. Indeed, when the
disparity in strength of mind, intelligence,
discrimination, early instruction, and educa-
tional bias, which prevails in society, is taken
into consideration, it would be singular if
religious differences did not exist. Our civil
institutions and laws, guaranteeing unto every
individual unlimited freedom of opinion, en-
courage investigations which tend, for a
definite period at least, to produce these
differences.

-

* Abbott’s Young Christian.


148 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

There are not a few who view with alarm |

the multiplicity of religious doctrines and
sects, which prevails in our day. They are
disposed to look upon it as an imperfection in
our institutions, or as a token of the degen-
eracy of our age; and they fear that the
most disastrous consequences will flow from
+4, to Christianity. I cannot but view these
apprehensions as groundless. They seem to
grow out of a-singular want of knowledge of
the organism of the human mind. Moreover,
they indicate an-erroneous conception of the
inherent power of truth; and a marvellous
lack of confidence in. the self-sustaining capa-
city of the Christian religion. If Christianity
cannot exist and progress among men without
chaining the human mind in bondage, stifling
all research, and forbidding a critical investi-

gation of doctrines put forth in its name,

then it must at length become extinct. Men
will and must think, reason, investigate, on
religious subjects, as well as other topics,
whatever result may follow. I cherish, how-

ever, none of these fears. The multiplicity —





; hae



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 149





of denominations, and the diversity of opin-
ions, can work no serious injury to religion.
The discussions, researches, and critical ex-
aminations, which necessarily grow out of this
state of things, will but sift error from truth ;
and result, ultimately, in laying broader ‘nid
deeper the foundations of pure Christianity
in human society; bringing out its highest
excellencies and beauties to the admiration
of men, and elevating it far above the
poisoned arrows of scepticism. It is the
errors engrafted on Christianity, in dark and
ignorant ages, that have given the infidel all
his weapons of attack. “When these errors
. shall at length all be detected and expunged
by candid research, and faithful investigation,
the shafts of the sceptic will fall harmless at
the base of the graceful and glorious temple
‘of Christ’s religion. In the words of John
Milton— Though all the winds of doctrine
were let loose to play upon the earth, so
truth be in the field, we do injuriously * * *
to misdoubt her strength. Let her and false-
hood grapple. Who ever- knew truth put

















































fai . « * ° i “ ‘
2. ve ete» Mane) eRe. 4 Bi oS kee 5 lat ali "i * t : ai


te SF



150 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

to the worse in a free and open encoun-
ter ?”

What line of nnlias should the young
adopt towards those who differ from them
on religious doctrines ¢

In the first place, let it never be for gotten
that others have the same civil, moral, and
religious right to differ in sentiment from
you, that you have from them. This right
is recognized. by our republican government,
and is sanctioned by the gospel. One of the

directions of the Saviour is, that men should .

“search the Scriptures.”* There woud be no
propriety in this commandment, had not in-
dividuals the right to. understand the teach-
ings of the Scriptures, according to their
best judgment, with the light they possess.
Moreover, Protestantism allows among its
first principles, the legitimate right of indi-
vidual interpretation of the Scriptures, and
private judgment in religious matters. It
was for this right that Luther and. Zuinglius,
Melancthon and Calvin, and all the Refor-

* John v. 39.
































LECTURES TO YOUTH.

mers, contended against the arrogant assump-
tion of the Roman Church. That Church
insisted that the people were not to under-
stand the Scriptures for themselves, butavere
bound to receive, unquestioned, such inter-
pretations as the bishop or priest should
teach them. Whoever deny freedom of
opinion, in regard to religion, to. all men,
clearly violate the spirit of the gospel, the
recognized rights conferred by the Protestant
religion, and the sanctions of our political
institutions. 7

Admitting then, as. you must, the privilege
of others to differ from you in religious sen-
timent, you should not allow that difference
to be a matter of offence. It should be no
disparagement in your view, nor lessen them.
in your estimation.. However great you may
consider the errors of your neighbors, if

- you. are satisfied. they are sincere, you should

respect them for their sincerity! Hypocrisy,
in every form, should be denounced. ‘Those
who profess to believe what they do not, or
to be what they are not—who assume the

151 .

















152 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

Christian name when they are in fact, but
bitter and narrow-minded bigots—are only

worthy to be heartily despised.

Let me caution the young, also, against a
spirit of exclusiveness. In our age and
country, a religious aristocracy is no more to
be acknowledged than a political. All de-
nominations stand on an equality, in their
rights and privileges, and in the estimation
in which they are to be ~held as public
bodies. No sect can put on airs, and assume
to lord it over others, in any respect what-
ever, without subjecting itself to the severest

censure.’ Among the rights belonging equally
~ to all, is the Christian name. Every denomi-

nation which receives the Scriptures as -the
inspired word of God, and believes in Jesus
Christ, as the Son of God and the Saviour
of men, is justly entitled to the name of

Christian, and to be acknowledged and —

treated as such. This is the only test laid
down in the New Testament, as a careful
examination will satisfy the candid mind.

For any one sect to attempt to monopolize












LECTURES TO YOUTH. 153

the Christian name, and assume that all the
piety, godliness, and virtue in the land, is to
be found in its borders ‘alone, is to place
itself in a most ridiculous position. A pre-
tence so arrogant and groundless, in our en-
lightened day, can have ‘no other effect than
to excite a smile of pity on the countenance
of sincere and candid Christians. I would
have the young give no countenance to these
pretensions ; but seek to attain to higher and
nobler principles. Let them place sectarian
bitterness and prejudice beneath their feet,
and imbibe enongh of the Christian spirit
to acknowledge freely, that, in all denomina-
tions, good and pious people can be found.
In estimating those of other views, the
young should avoid denouncing a whole de-
nomination, and condemning their doctrines
as demoralizing, because some corrupt men
may have been found in their midst. If
this rule of judging was generally adopted,
where: is there a class of Christians which
could stand? Were there not among the
chosen twelve of our Saviour, a Judas to




154 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

betray him, and a Peter to deny him with
oaths? Shall we, therefore, insist that Chris-
tianity is false and corrupting? ‘There are
few sects in the land; which have not had
both clergymen and church-members guilty
of the most corrupt practices. Are we to
conclude from this, that the doctrines of those
who have had these unworthy members, are
false and. licentious? Who are willing to
adopt this test? A denomination cannot

consistently apply a test: to others which they

are not willing to abide by themselves.
~Candor will lead all upright minds. to
acknowledge that corrupt men will find their
way into every sect, and that it is manifestly
wrong to judge of the whole body by this
class. ‘To decide of the practical tendencies
of different and conflicting doctrines, seek
to understand their effect on the great mass
of those who receive them. Do they influ-
ence them to honesty, industry, benevolence
and neighborly kindness? Do they inspire
respect for the rights and interest of fellow-
beings? Do they open the ear to the cry


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 155

of poverty and want? Do they lead to a.
love supreme to God, and to our neighbor
as ourselves? These are the legitimate fruits
of Christianity. Where they. abound, you
need not doubt the spirit of Christ prevails, |
and that the truths of his gospel are in the
midst of such a people. ys

I would exhort the young to respect re-
ligion, in whatever form they find it, and
to have a high and just regard for the rights
and feelings of professing Christians o? every
class. In this, as in all things else, be gov-
erned by the Redeemer’s golden rule—* All
things whatsoever ye would that men should
do unto you, do ye even so unto them.”

Amid the multiplicity of sects and doc-
trines, let every youth search for religious
truth, as the “pearl of great price!” Be
careful that your researches are in the right
direction—not- downward to the dark and
mysterious of past and ignorant ages, but
upward to the bright, the simple, and glorious.
Ever seek for expansive and enlightened
conceptions of God, his character and pur-




156 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

poses—of Christ, his gospel and its results—
of man, his nature, his high relationship, his
duty and destiny. The more elevated and
comprehensive your views on these subjects,
the more exalted will be your feehngs and
principles of action; and the better will you
be prepared to live a life of purity and use-
fulness, and to die triumphing in the brightest
and oweltent hopes of immortal light and
happiness.

In concluding this subject, I woul ‘call }
attention to the following suggestions of sev-
eral able writers, in regard to Religion and
its influence on its possessors :—

“In the great and universal concern of
religion, both sexes, and all ranks are equally
interested. The truly catholic spirit of Chris-
tianity accommodates itself, with an astonish-
ing condescension, to the circumstances of the
whole human race. It rejects none on ac-
count of their pecuniary wants, their personal
infirmities, or their intellectual deficiencies.
No superiority of parts is the least recom-
mendation, nor is any depression of fortune


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 157

the smallest objection. None are too wise
to be excused from performing the duties of
religion, nor are any too poor to be excluded
from the consolations of its promises.

“Tf we admire the wisdom of God in hay-
ing furnished different degrees of intelligence,
so exactly adapted to their different. cond
tions, and in having fitted every part of this
stupendous work, not only to serve its own
immediate purpose, but also.to contribute to

_ the beauty: and perfection of the whole; how

much morv ought we to adore that goodness
which has perfected the divine plan, by ap-
pointing one wide and comprehensive means
of salvation: a salvation which all are invited
to partake ; by a means which all are capable
of using ; which nothing but voluntary blind-
ness can prevent our comprehending, and
nothing but wilful error can hinder us from
embracing.

“The muses are coy, and will only be wooed
and won by some highly-favored suitors. The
sciences are lofty, and will not stoop to the
reach of ordinary capacities. But ‘wisdom


158 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

(by which the royal preacher means piety)
is a loving spirit; she is easily seen of them
that love her, and found of all such as seek
her’ Nay, she is so accessible and eonde-
scending, ‘that she preventeth them that
desire her, making herself first known ‘unto
them.’ , a

“We are told by the same animated writer,
‘that wisdom is the breath of the power of
God.’ How infinitely superior in grandeur
and sublimity, is this description to the origin
of the wisdom of the heathens, as described
by their poets and mythologists! In the
exalted strains of the Hebrew poetry, we
read, that ‘wisdom is the brightness of the
everlasting light, the unspotted mirror of
the power of God, and the image of his
goodness.’ |

“The philosophical author of ‘The Defence
of Learning,’ observes, that knowledge has
something of venom and malignity in it,
when taken without its proper corrective;
and what that is, the inspired St. Paul teaches
us, by placing it as the immediate antidote—




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 159

‘Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth,
Perhaps it is the vanity of human wisdom,
unchastised by this correcting principle, which
has made so many infidels. - It may proceed
from the arrogance of a self-sufficient pride, -
that some philosophers disdain to acknowl-
edge their belief in a Being who has judged
proper to conceal from them the infinite wis-
dom of his counsels; who (to borrow the
lofty language of the man of Uz) refused to —
consult them when he laid the foundations
of the earth, when he shut up thé sea with
doors, and made the clouds the garment
thereof. . | |
“A man must be an infidel éither from
pride, prejudice, or bad education ; he cannot
be one unawares, or by surprise; for infidel-
ity is not occasioned by sudden impulse or
violent temptation. . He may be hurried by
some vehement desire into an immoral action,
at which he will blush in his cooler moments,
and which he will lament as the sad effect of
aspirit unsubdued by religion ; but infidelity
is a-calm, considerate act, which cannot plead

SSS



an

|

NR eee eile estinsisinstesieeesnenngeeecnse
ee ee
Se

a
160 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the weakness of the heart, or the seduction
of the senses. Even good men frequently
fail in their duty through the infirmities of
nature and the allurements of the world;
but the infidel errs on a plan, on a settled
and deliberate principle. _

“But though the minds of men are some or
times fatally infected with this disease, either
through unhappy prepossession, or some of
the other causes above-mentioned, yet I am
unwilling to believe that there is in nature
so monstrously incongruous a being as a fe
male infidel. The least reflection on the tem-
per, the character, and the education of wo-
men, makes the mind revolt with horror from
an idea so improbable and so unnatural.

“May I be allowed to observe that, in
general, the minds of girls seem more aptly
prepared in their early youth for the reception
"of serious impressions than those of the other
sex, and that their less exposed. situations in
more advanced life qualify them better for
the preservation of them! The daughters
(of good parents I mean) are often more care-





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 161



fully instructed in their religious duties than
the sons, and this ‘from a variety of causes.
They are not so soon sent from under the
paternal eye into’ the bustle of the world,
and so early exposed to the contagion of bad
example: their hearts are naturally more
“ flexible, soft, and: liable to any kind of im-
pression the forming hand may stamp on
them; and, lastly, as they.do not receive.the
same classical education with boys, their
feeble minds, are not obliged at once to re-
ceive and separate the precepts of Christian-
ity, and the documents of pagan philosophy.
|

























The necessity of doing this perhaps somewhat
weakens the serious impressions of young
men, at least till the understanding i is formed ;
and confuses their ideas of piety, by mixing
.them with so.much heterogeneous matter.
They only casually read, or hear read, the
Scriptures of truth, while they are obliged
to learn by heart, construe, and repeat, the
poetical fables of the less than human gods
of the ancients. And, as the excellent author
of ‘The Internal Evidence of the Christian




162 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



Religion’ observes, ‘Nothing has so much
contributed to corrupt the true spirit of the
Christian institution, as that partiality which
we contract, in our earliest education, for the
| manners of pagan antiquity.’

“ Girls, therefore, who do not contract this,
early partiality, ought to have a clearer no-
tion of their religious duties: they are not
obliged, at an age when the judgment 1s so
weak, to distinguish between the doctrines ©
of Zeno, of Epicurus, and of Christ; and to
|| embarrass their minds with the various’ mor-

als, which were taught in the Porch, in the
Academy, and on the Mount.

“Tt is presumed that these remarks cannot
possibly be ‘so misunderstood, as to be con-
strued into the least disrespect to literature,
or a want of the highest reverence for a
learned education, the basis of all elegant
knowledge: they are only intended, with all
proper deference, to point out to young wo-
men that, however inferior their advantages
of acquirmg a knowledge of the belles-lettres
are to those of the other sex, yet it depends





ee eS eS

e ¥
Si ah Be Py

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 163

on.themselves not to be surpassed in this most
important of all studies, for-which their abil-
ities are equal, and their opportunities per-

haps greater.

“ But the mere exemption from infidelity
is so small a part of the religious character,
that I hope no one will attempt to claim any
merit from this negative sort of goodness, or
value herself merely for not being the very
worst thing she possibly can be. Let no
mistaken girl fancy she gives a proof of her
wit by her want of piety, or that a contempt
of things serious and sacred will exalt her
understanding, or raise her character even in
the opinion of the most avowed male infidels,
For one may venture to affirm, that with all
their profligate ideas, both of women and
religion, neither Bolingbroke, Wharton, Buck-
ingham, or even Lord Chesterfield himself,
would have esteemed a woman the more for
her being irreligious,

“With whatever ridicule a polite free-
thinker may affect to treat religion himself,
he will think it necessary his wife should



164 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



entertain different notions of it. He may
pretend to despise it as a matter of opinion,
depending on creeds and systems; but, if he
is a man of sense, he will know the value of
it as. a governing principle, which is to in-
fluence her conduct and direct her action. If
he sees her unaffectedly sincere in the practice
of her religious duties, it will be a secret
pledge to him that she will be equally exact
‘in fulfilling the conjugal; for he can have no
reasonable dependence on her attachment. to
him, if he has no opinion of her fidelity to
God; for she who neglects first duties, gives
but an indifferent proof of her disposition to
fill up inferior ones; and how can a man of
eany understanding (whatever his own re-
ligious professions may be) trust that woman
with the cares of his family, and the education
of his children, who wants herself the best
incentive to a virtuous life, the belief that she
is an accountable creature, and the reflection
that she has an immortal soul ?

“Cicero spoke it as the highest commen-
dation of Cato’s character, that he embraced






LECTURES ‘TO YOUTH. 165

philosophy, not for the sake of disputing like
‘a philosopher, but of diving like one. The
chief purpose of Christian knowledge is to
promote the great end.of a Christian life.
Every rational woman should, no doubt, be
able to give a reason of the hope that is in
her; but this knowledge is best acquired,
and the duties consequent on it best per-
formed, by reading books of plain piety and
practical devotion, and not by entering into
the endless feuds, and engaging in the un-
profitable contentions of partial controver-
sialists. Nothing.is more unamiable than
the narrow spirit of party zeal, nor more
disgusting than to hear a woman deal out |}
judgments, and denounce vengeance, againstâ„¢ *
any one who happens to differ from her in
some opinion, perhaps of no real importance,
and which, it is probable, she may be just as
wrong in rejecting, a8 the object of her cen-
sure is in embracing. A furious and unmer-
ciful female bigot wanders as far beyond the
limits prescribed to her sex, as a Thalestris
ora Joan d’Are. Violent debate - has made




166 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

as few converts as the sword;—and both
these instruments are particularly unbecom-
ing when wielded by a female hand.

“But, though no one will be frightened
out of their opinions, yet they may be per-
suaded out of them; they may be touched
by the affecting earnestness of serious con-
versation, and allured by the’ attractive
beauty of a consistently serious life. And
while a young woman ought to dread the
name of a wrangling polemic, it is her duty
to aspire after the honourable character of a
sincere Christian. But this dignified charac-
ter she can by no means deserve, if she is
ever afraid to avow her principles, or ashamed
‘to defend them. A profligate, who makes it |
a point to ridicule everything which: comes
under the appearance of formal instruction,
will be disconcerted at the spirited; yet
modest rebuke of a.pious young woman:
But there is as much efficacy in the. manner
of reproving profaneness, as in the words. If
she corrects it with moroseness, she defeats
the effect of her remedy by her unskilful


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 167

manner of administering it. If, on the other
hand, she affects to defend. the insulted cause
of God in a faint tone of voice, and studied
ambiguity of phrase, or with an air of levity,
and a certain expression of pleasure-in her
eyes, which proves she is secretly delighted
_ with what she pretends to censure, she injures
religion much more than he did who publicly
profaned it; for she plainly indicates, either
that she does not believe or respect what she
professes. ‘The other attacked it.as an open
foe; she betrays it as a ‘false friend. No one
pays any regard to the opinion of an avowed
enemy; but the desertion or treachery of a |
professed friend is dangerous indeed !” |

“A desire after happiness is inseparable
_ from the human mind. It is the natural and
healthy craving of our spirit; an appetite
which we have neither will nor power to
destroy, and for which all mankind are
busily employed in making provision. This
is as natural, as for birds to fly, or fishes to
swim. For this the scholar and the philoso-


168 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

| _
pher, who think it consists in “knowledge,
pore over their books and their apparatus,

light the midnight lamp, and keep frequent |

vigils, when the world around them is asleep.
For this the warrior, who thinks that happi-
ness is inseparably united with fame, pursues
that bubble through the gory field of con-
flict, and is as lavish of his life, as if it were
not worth a soldiers pay. The worldling,
with whom happiness and wealth are kindred
terms, worships daily.at the shrine of Mam-
mon, and offers earnest prayers for the golden
shower. ‘The voluptuary gratifies every crav-
ing sense, rejoices in the midnight revel, ren-
ders himself vile, and yet tells you he is in
the chase of happiness. ‘The ambitious man,
conceiving that the great desideratum blos-
soms on the sceptre, and hangs in rich clus-
ters from the throne, consumes one half of
his life, and embitters the other half, in
» climbing the giddy elevation of royalty. All
these, however, have confessed their -disap-
pointment; and have retired from the stage
exclaiming, in reference to happiness, what




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 169

ae ) :
Brutus, just: before he stabbed himself, did
-in reference to virtue, ‘I have pursued thee

|| everywhere, and found thee nothing but a

name.’ This, however, is a mistake; for both
virtue and happiness are glorious realities,
and if they are not found, it is merely be-
cause they are not sought from the right
sources.

“1. That religion is pleasure, will appear,
if you consider what part of our nature it
more particularly employs and gratifies.

“Tt is not the gratification of the senses, or

of the animal part of our nature, but a provi- -

sion for the immaterial and immortal mind.
The mind of man is an image not only of

God’s spirituality, but of hisinfinity. It isnot

like the senses, limited to this or that kind of |}

object ; as the sight intermeddles not with

that which affects the smell; but with an ~

universal superintendence, it erbitenben upon,
atid takes them all in. It is, as.I may say,
an-ocean, into which all the little rivulets of
sensation, both external and internal, dis-

charge themselves, Now this is that part of
-

TT _
170 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

man to which the exercises of religion prop-
erly belong. ‘The pleasures of the under-
standing, in the contemplation of truth, have
been sometimes so great, so intense, so en-
grossing of all the powers of the soul, that
there has been no room left for any other
kind of pleasure. How short of this are the
delights of the epicure! How vastly dispro-
portionate are the pleasures of the eating,
and of the thinking man! Indeed, says Dr.
South, as different as the silence of an Archi-
mides in the study of a problem, and the
stillness of a swine at her wash. Nothing is
comparable to the pleasures of mind; these
are enjoyed by the spirits above, by Jesus
Christ, and the great and blessed God.
“Think what objects religion brings before
the mind, as the sources of its pleasure: no
less than the great God himself, and that
both in his nature and in his works. For
«the eye of religion, like that of the eagle, di-
rects itself chiefly to the sun, to a glory that.
neither admits of a superior nor an equal.
The mind is conversant, in the exercises of



LECTURES TO YOUTH. 7 171
































piety, with all the most stupendous events
that’ have ever occurred in the history of the
universe, or that ever will transpire -till the
close of time. The creation of the world;
its government by~a universal Providence ;
its'redemption by the death of Christ ; its
conversion by the power of the Holy Ghost ;
the immortality of the soul; the resurrection
of the body ; the certainty of an eternal ex-
istence ; the secrets of the unseen state; sub-
jects, all of them of the loftiest and sub-
limest kind, which have engaged: the inqui-
ries of the profoundest intellects, are the mat-
ter of contemplation to real piety. What
topics are these for our reason, under the
guidance of religion, to study : what an ocean
to swim in, what a heaven to soar in: what
heights to measure, what depths to fathom.
Here are subjects, which, from their infinite
vastness, must be ever new, and ever -fresh ;
which can be never laid aside as dry or
empty. If novelty is the parent of pleasure,
here it may be found; for although the sub-
ject itself is the same, some new view of it,
172 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

some fresh discovery of its wonders, is ever
bursting upon the mind of the devout ‘and
attentive inquirer after truth.

“ Tow then can religion be otherwise than
pleasant, when it is the exercise of the noble
faculties of the mind, upon the sublimest
topics of mental investigation; the volun-
tary, excursive, endless pursuits of the hu-
man understanding in the region of eternal
truth. Never was there a more interesting
or important inquiry than that proposed by
Pilate to the illustrious Prisoner at his bar ;
and if the latter thought it not proper to an-
swer it, it was not-to show that the question
was insignificant, but to condemn the heht
and-flippant manner in which a subject so
important was taken up. Religion can an-
swer the question, and with an ecstasy greater
than that of the ancient Mathematician, ex-.
claims, ‘I have found it: I have found it,
The Bible is not only true, but trura. It
contains that which deserves this sublime
emphasis. It settles the disputes of ages,
and of philosophers, and makes known what




IEEE



“

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 173

is truth, and where it is to be found. It
brings us from amongst the quicksands and
shelves, and rocks of. skepticism, ignorance,
and error, and shows us that goodly land, in
quest of which myriads of minds have sailed,
and multitudes have been wrecked; and re-
ligion is setting our foot on this shore, and
dwelling in the region of eternal truth.

“2. That a religious life is pleasant, is evi-
dent from the nature of religion itself. .

_ “ Religion is a principle of spiritual life in
the soul. Now all the exercises and acts of
vitality are agreeable. To see, to hear, to
taste, to walk, are all agreeable, because they
are the voluntary energies of inward life.
So religion, in all its duties, is the exercise
of a living principle in the soul: it is a new
spiritual existence. Piety is a spiritual taste.
Hence it is said, ‘ If so be ye have tasted that
the Lord is gracious” No matter what the
object of a taste is, the exercises of it are al-
ways agreeable. The painter goes with de-
light to his picture; the musician to his -in-
strument ; the sculptor to his bust; because




S174 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



they have.a taste for these pursuits. The
same feeling of delight attends the Christian
to the exercises of godliness: and this is his
language, ‘ It is a good thing to give thanks,
and to draw near to God. O how I love thy
law! it is sweeter to my taste than honey.
How amiable are thy tabernacles.’ Religion,
where it is real, is the natural element of a
Christian; and every creature rejoices in its
own appropriate sphere. If you consider
true piety with disgust, as a hard, unnatural,
involuntary thing, you are totally ignorant —
of its nature, entirely destitute of its influ-
ence, and no wonder you cannot attach to it
the idea of pleasure: but viewing it as it |
ought tobe viewed, 1m the light of a new
nature, you will perceive that it admits of
most exalted delight.

“3. Consider the miseries which it pre-
vents.

“Tt does not, it is , true, piuvedi sickness,
poverty, or misfortune : it does not fence off
from the wilderness of this world, a mystic
enclosure, within which the ills of life never





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 175



intrude. No; these things happen to all
alike ; but how small a portion of human
wretchedness flows from these sources, com-
pared with that which arises from the dispo-
sitions of the heart. ‘The mind is its own
place, can make a heaven of hell, a hell of
heaven.’ Men carry the springs of their hap-
piess or misery in their own bosom. Hence
it is said of the wicked, ‘that they are like
the troubled sea which cannot rest, which is
hever at peace, but continually casting up
mire and dirt. In contrast with which, it is
affirmed that ‘the work of righteousness is
peace ; and that the good man shall be satis-
fied from himself? Would you behold the
misery entailed by pride, look at Haman ; by
covetousness, look at Ahab; by malice, look
at Cain; by profaneness ‘and sensuality,
united with the forebodings of a guilty con-
science, look at Belshazzar ; by envy, and a
consciousness of being rejected of God, look
at Saul; by revenge, look at Herodias writh-
ing beneath the accusations of John, and

thirsting for his blood ; by apostasy, look at


























-176 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

Judas. Religion would have prevented all
this, and it will prevent similar misery in
you. Hearken to the confessions of the out-
cast in the land of his banishment; of the
felon in his irons, and in his dungeon ; of the
prostitute expiring upon.her bed of straw ;
of the malefactor at the gallows— Wineteh-
ed creature that I am, abhorred of men, ac-
cursed of God! To what have my crimes
brought me! Religion prevents all this:
all that: wretchedness which is the result of
crime, is cut off by the influence of gen-
uine piety. Misery prevented is happiness
gained.

“4, Consider the consolations it imparts.

“Our world has ‘been called, in the lan-
guage of poetry, a vale of tears, and human »
life a bubble, raised from those tears, and in-
flated by sighs, which, after floating a little
while, decked with a few gaudy colors, 1s
touched by the hand of death, and dissolves.
Poverty, disease, misfortune, unkindness, in-
constancy, death, all assail the travellers as
they journey onward to eternity through









LECTURES TO YOUTH. 177





this gloomy valley; and what is to comfort
them but religion ?
“The consolations of religion are neither
few not small; they arise in part from those
things which we have already mentioned in
this chapter; z.¢. from the exercise of the
understanding on the revealed truths of God’s
word, from the impulses of the spiritual life
within us, and from a reflection upon our
spiritual privileges; but there are some
others, which, though partially implied in
these things, deserve a special enumeration
and distinct consideration.
“A good conscience, which the wise man

says is a perpetual feast, sustains a high place |

amongst the comforts of genuine piety. It
is unquestionably true, that a man’s happi-
ness is in the keeping of his conscience ; all
the sources of his felicity are under the com-
mand of this faculty. ‘A wounded spirit
who can bear? A troubled conscience con-
verts a paradise into a hell, for it is the
flame of hell kindled on earth; but a quiet
conscience would illuminate the horrors of





mi

178 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the deepest dungeon with the beams of heav-
enly day; the former has often rendered
men like tormented fiends amidst an elysium
of delights, while the latter has taught the
songs of cherubim to martyrs in the prison
or the flames:

“Tn addition to this; religion comforts the
mind, with the assurance of an all-wise, all-
pervading Providence, so minute in its” su-
perintendence and control, that not a spar-
row falls to the ground without the knowl-
edge of our heavenly Father: a superintend-
ence which is excluded from no point of space,
no moment of time, and overlooks not. the
meanest creature in existence. Nor is this
all; for the Word of God assures the be-
liever that ‘all things work together for good.
to them that love God, who are the called
according to his purpose.’ Nothing that
imagination could conceive, ig more truly
consolatory than this, to be assured that all]
things, however painful at the time, not ex-.
cepting the failure of our favorite schemes,
the disappointment of our fondest hopes, the

+




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 179

loss of our dearest comforts, shall be over.
ruled by infinite wisdom for the promotion
of our ultimate good, This is a spring of
comfort whose waters never fail.

“Religion consoles also by making mani-
fest some of the benefits of affliction, even at
the time it is endured. It crucifies the world,
mortifies sin, quickens prayer, extracts the
balmy sweets of the promises, endears the
Saviour; and, to crown all, it directs the
mind to that glorious state, where the days
of our mourning shall be ended: that happy
country where God shall wipe every tear
from our eyes, and there shall be no more
sorrow or crying. Nothing so composes the
‘mind, and. helps it to bear the load of trouble
which God may lay upon it, as the near pros-
pect of its termination. Religion shows the
weather-beaten mariner the haven of eternal
repose, where no storms arise, and the sea is
ever calm; it exhibits to the weary traveller
the city of habitation, within whose walls he
will find a pleasant home, rest from his labors,
and friends to welcome his arrival; it dis-

%




180 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

closes to the wounded’ “warrior his native -

country, where the alarms of war, and the
dangers of conflict, will be no more encoun-
tered, but undisturbed peace forever reign.
In that one word, HEAVEN, religion provides
a balm for every wound, a cordial for every
care. | u

“ Here, then, is the pleasure of that wis-
dom which is from above; it is not only en-
joyed in prosperity, but continues to refresh
us, and most powerfully to refresh us, in ad-
versity ; a remark which will not apply to
any other kind of pleasure.”"

“Tn many persons, a seriousness and sense
of awe overspread the imagination, whenever
the idea of the Supreme Being is presented
to their thoughts.’ This effect, which forms
a considerable security against vice, is the
consequence not so much of reflection as of
habit; which habit being generated by the
external expressions of reverence which we
use ourselves, or observe in others, may be



* Christian Father’s Present.


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 181

destroyed by causes opposite to these, and
especially by that familiar levity with which
some learn to speak of the Deity, of his attri-

butes, providence, revelations or worship.

“God hath been pleased (no matter for
what reason, although probably for this,) to
forbid the vain mention of his name :—‘'Fhou
shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God
in vain.’ Now the mention is vai when it
is useless; and it is useless when it is neither
likely nor intended to serve any good pur-
pose; as when it flows from the lips idle and
* unmeaning, or is applied, on occasions incon-
sistent with any consideration of religion and
devotion, to express our anger, our earnest-
ness, our courage, or our mirth; or indeed
when it is used at all, except in acts of reli-
gion, or in serious and seasonable discourse
upon religious subjects.

“The prohibition of the third command-
ment is recognized by Christ in his sermon
upon the mount; which sermon adverts to
none but the moral parts of the Jewish law:
‘I say unto you, swear not at all: but let






LECTURES TO YOUTH.

your communication be Yea, yea; Nay, nay:
for whatsoever is more than these cometh of
evil” The Jews probably interpreted the
prohibition as restrained to.the name JEHo-
yan, the name which the Deity had ap-
pointed and appropriated to himself; Exod.
vi. 3. The words of Christ extend the pro-
hibition beyond the name of God, to every-
thing associated with the idea :—‘ Swear not,
neither by heaven, for it is God’s throne;
nor by the earth, for it is God’s footstool ;
neither by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the
Great King.” Matt. v. 35.

“The offence of profane swearing is aggra-
vated by the consideration, that in a duty
and decency are sacrificed to the slenderest
of temptations. Suppose the habit, either
from affectation, or by negligence and inad-
vertency, to be already formed, it must al-
ways remain within the power of the most
ordinary resolution to correct it: and it can-
not, one would think, cost a great deal to re-
linquish the pleasure and honor which it con-
fers. A concern for duty is in fact never
LECTURES TO YOUTH.



strong, when the exertion requisite to van-
quish a habit founded in no antecedent pro-
pensity is thought too much or too painful.

“ A contempt of positive duties, or rather
of those duties for which the ‘reason is not so
plain as the command, indicates a disposition
upon which the authority of revelation has
obtained little influence. This remark is ap- —
plicable to the offence of :profane’swearing,
and describes, perhaps pretty exactly, the
general character of those who are most ad-
dicted to it. vase

“Mockery and ridicule, when exercised
upon the Scriptures, or even upon the places,
persons, and forms set apart for the ministra-
tion of religion, fall within the meaning of
the law which forbids the profanation of
God’s name; especially as that law is ex-
tended by Christ’s interpretation. They are
moreover inconsistent with a réligious frame
of mind: for as no one ever either feels him-
self disposed to pleasantry, or capable of
being diverted with the pleasantry of others,
upon matters in which he is deeply inter-




184 LECTURES TQ YOUTH.

ested; so a mind intent upon the acquisition
of heaven rejects with indignation every at-
tempt to entertain it with jests, calculated to
degrade or deride subjects which it never
recollects but with seriousness and anxiety.
Nothing but stupidity, or the most frivolous
disposition of thought, can make even the in-
considerate forget the supreme importance
of everything which relates to the expecta-
tion of a future existence. Whilst the: in-
fidel mocks at'the superstitions of the vulgar,
insults over their credulous fears, their child-
ish errors, or fantastic rites, 1t does not occur
to him to observe, that the most preposter-
ous device by which the weakest devotee
ever believed. he was securing the happiness
of a future life, is more rational than uncon-
cern about it. Upon this subject nothing is
so absurd as indifference ; no folly so con-
temptible as thoughtlessness and levity.
“The knowledge of what is due to the
solemnity of those interests, concerning which
Revelation professes to inform and direct us,
may teach even those who are least inclined


LECTURES: TO YOUTH. 185

to respect the prejudices of mankind, to ob-
serve a decorum in the style and conduct of
religious disquisitions, with the neglect of
which many adversaries of Christianity are
justly chargeable. Serious arguments are
fair on all:sides. Christianity is but ill de-
fended by refusing audience or toleration to
the objections of unbelievers. But whilst we
would have freedom of inquiry restrained by
no laws but’ those of decency, we are entitled
to demand, on behalf of a religion which
holds forth to mankind assurances of immor-
tality, that its credit be assailed by no other
weapons than those of sober discussion and
legitimate reasoning ;—that the truth or
falsehood of Christianity be never made a
topic of raillery, a theme for the exercise of
wit or eloquence, or a subject of contention
for literary fame and victory ;—that the
cause be tried upon its merits ;—that all ap-
plications to the fancy, passions or prejudices
of the reader, all attempts to preoccupy, -en-
snare, or perplex his judgment, by any art,
influence. or impression whatsoever, extrinsic






——

186 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

to the proper grounds and evidence upon
which his assent ought to proceed, be rejected
from a question which involves in its deter-
mination the hopes, the virtue, and the re-

pose of millions;—that the controversy be -|-

managed on both sides with sincerity ; that
is, that nothing be produced, in the writings
of either, contrary to or beyond the writer’s
own knowledge and persuasion ;—that ohjec-
tions and. difficulties be proposed, from no

other motive than an honest and serious de-
_ sire to obtain satisfaction, or to communicate
information which may promote the discov-
ery and progress of truth ;—that, in conform-
ity with this design, everything be stated
with integrity, with method, precision, and
simplicity ; and above all, that whatever 1s
published in opposition to received and con-
fessedly beneficial persuasions, be set forth
under a form which is likely to invite in-
quiry and to meet examination. If with
these moderate and equitable conditions be
compared the manner in which hostilities
have been waged agaist the Christian re-



te ee


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 187

ligion, not only the votaries of the prevailing
faith, but every man who looks forward
with anxiety to the destination of his being,
will see much to blame and to complain of.
By one unbeliever, all the follies which have
adhered in a long course of dark and ‘super-
stitious ages, to the popular creed, are as-
sumed as so many doctrines of Christ and his
Apostles, for the purpose of subverting the
whole system by the absurdities which it is
thus represented to contain. By another, the

ignorance and vices of the sacerdotal order,

their mutual: dissenstons and persecutions,
their. usurpations and encroachments upon
the intellectual liberty and civil rights of
mankind, have been displayed with no small
triumph and invective; not so much to guard
the Christian laity against a repetition of the
same injuries (which is the only proper use
to be made of the most flagrant examples of
the past,) as to prepare the way for an in-
sinuation, that the religion itself is nothing
but a profitable fable, imposed upon the fears
and credulity of the multitude, and upheld




Se) CS





188 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

by the frauds and influence of an interested _
and crafty priesthood. And yet, how re-
motely is the character of the clergy con-
nected with the truth of Christianity! . What,
after all, do the most disgraceful pages of
ecclesiastical history prove, but that the pas-
sions of our common nature are not altered
or excluded by distinctions of name, and that
the characters of men are formed much more
by the temptations than the duties of their
profession? A third finds delight in collect-
ing and repeating accdunts of wars and mas-
sacres, of tumults and insurrections, excited
in almost every age of the Christian era by
religious zeal; as though the vices of Chris- |
tians were parts of Christianity ; intolerance
and extirpation precepts of the Gospel; or
as if its spirit could be judged of from the
counsels of princes, the intrigues of statesmen,
the pretences of malice and ambition, or the
unauthorized cruelty of some gloomy and
virulent superstition. By a fourth, the suc-
cession and variety of popular religions ; the
vicissitudes with which sects and tenets have





LECTURES TO YOUTH. 189

flourished and decayed ; the zeal with which
they were once supported, the negligence
with which they are now remembered ; the
little share which reason and argument ap-
pear to have had in framing the creed, or
regulating the religious conduct of the mul-
titude ; the indifference and submission with
which the religion of the state is generally
received by the common people ; the caprice
and vehemence with which it is sometimes
opposéd ; the frenzy with which men have
been brought to contend for opinions and
ceremonies, of which they knew neither the
proof, the meaning, nor the original: lastly,
_ the equal and undoubting confidence with
which we hear the doctrines of Christ or of
Confucius, the law of Moses or of Mahomet,
the Bible, the Koran, or the Shaster, main-
tained or anathematized, taught or abjured,
revered or derided, according as we live on
this or on ‘that side of a river; keep within
or step over the boundaries of a state; or
even in the same country, and by the same
people, so often as the event of a battle, or


190 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the issue of a negotiation, delivers them to
the dominion of a new master ;—points, we
say, of this. sort are exhibited to the public
attention, as so many arguments against the
truth of the Christian religion ;—and with
success. For these topics being brought to-
gether, and set off with some aggravation of
circumstances, and with a vivacity of style
and description familiar enough to. the writ-
ings and conversation of free-thinkers, insen-
sibly lead the imagination into a habit of
classing Christianity with the delusions that
have taken possession, by turns, of the pub-
lic belief; and of regarding it as, what the
scoffers of our faith represent. it to be, the
superstition of the day. But is this to deal
honestly by the subject, or with the world ?
May not the same things be said, may not
the same prejudices be excited by these rep-
resentations, whether Christianity be true or
false, or by whatever proofs its truth be at-
tested? May not truth as well as falsehood
be taken upon credit? May not a religion
be founded upon evidence accessible and
LECTURES TO YOUTH. 191

satisfactory to every mind competent to the
inquiry, which yet, by the greatest part of
its professors, is received upon authority ?

“ But if the matter of these objections be
reprehensible, as calculated to produce an
effect upon the reader beyond what their
real weight and place in the argument de-
serve, still more shall we discover of manage-
ment and disingenuousness in the form under
which they are dispersed among the public.
Infidelity is served up in every shape that
is likely to allure, surprise, or beguile the
imagination; in a fable, a tale, a novel, a
poem ; in interspersed and broken hints, 're-
mote and oblique surmises; in books of
travels, of philosophy, of natural history; in
a werd, in any form rather than the ‘right
one, that of a professed and regular disquisi-
tion. And because the coarse bnffoonery
and broad laugh of the old and rude adver-
saries of the Christian faith would offend the
taste, perhaps, rather than the virtue, of this
cultivated age, a graver irony, a more skilful

and delicate banter is substituted in its place.


192 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

An eloquent historian, beside his more direct,
and therefore fairer, attacks upon the credi-
bility of Evangelic story, has contrived to
weave into his narration one continued sneer
upon the cause of Christianity, and upon the
writings and character's of its ancient patrons.
The knowledge which this author possesses
of the frame and conduct of the human mind
must have led him to observe, that such at- i
tacks do their execution without inquiry. ||
Who can refute a-sneer? Who can come
pute the number, munch less, one by one, scru-



tinize the justice of those disparaging imsinua-
tions which crowd the pages of this elaborate
history? What reader suspends his curios- |
ity, or calls of his attention from the prin-

cipal narrative, to examine references; to
search into the foundation, or to weigh the
reason, propriety, and force of every transient
sarcasm and sly allusion, by which the Chris-
tian testimony is depreciated and traduced ;
and. by which, nevertheless, he may find his
persuasion afterwards unsettled and per-
plexed 2” °

*

*
—_

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 193

“But the enemies of Christianity have pur-
sued her with poisoned arrows. Obscenity
itself 1s made the vehicle of infidelity. The
fondness for ridicule is almost universal; and
ridicule to many minds is never so irresistible
as when seasoned with obscenity, and em-
ployed upon religion. But in proportion as
these noxious principles take hold of the im-

_agination, they infatuate the judgment; for

trains of ludicrous and unchaste associations,
adhering to every sentiment and mention of
religion, render the mind indisposed to re- |
ceive either conviction from. its evidence, or
impressions from its authority. And. this’
effect, being exerted upon the sensitive part

of our frame, is. altogether independent. of

argument, proof, or reason ; is as formidable
to a true religion as to a false one; to a well-
grounded faith as to a chimerical mythology,
or fabulous tradition. Neither, let it be ob-
served, is the crime or danger less, because
impure ideas are exhibited under -a veil, i in
covert and. chastised language.” ”

13




LECTURE VI.
On PALoarringe.



“Have ye not read that he which made them at the beginning, made them
male and female? And said, For this cause shall a man Jeave father and
mother, and shall cleave to his wife; and they twain shall be one flesh.
Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What, therefore, God
hath joined together, let not man put astinder.”—Matt. xix. 4, 5, 6.





.F. * not impossible that some
aay doubt the propriety of
Ried ng into. the pulpit
the subject which will claim
our attention this evening.
‘Marriage is.a topic of so
much every-day conversation ; it
is so often and habitually treated:
as a light and trivial affair—
forming as it does, in every
circle of society, a standing matter
for jest and laughter, for tattle and
_.|| gossipthat many are surprised at the idea






Hig




—y

*
- LECTURES TO YOUTH. 195

of treating it in a’ thoughtful and serious

manner. So far from this being an objec-

tion, it is an urgeht reason for presenting this

subject under the sedate influences of this

place and occasion. .I would bring out the

important event of Marriage, from amid the

frivolity with which it is usually associated,

and present it in its real and true aspect—

as a topic demanding the most sober and
mature consideration. ;

Marriage is a divine covenant, instituted
by God himselfi—‘ And the Lord God said,”
It is not good that the man should be alone.
I will make him ahelp-meet his.” From
the body of Adam, woman was formed, and
given to him as‘a companion, a » wife. “And
Adam said, This is now bone of my bones,
and flesh of my flesh. She shall be called
woman, because she was taken out of man.
Therefore shall a man leave. his father and
mother, and shall cleave unfo his wife: and
they shall be one flesh.” The Saviour also,
in the language of the text, unqualifiedly
sanctions the marriage covenant, and adopts











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e,

196 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

it as one of the sacred’ institutions of the
Christian dispensation.

The marriage relation is vitally connected
with the highest interests of human society.
It restrains, purifies, elevates mankind. It is
the great preserver of morality and religion ;
and forms one of the most effective of the
influences which prevent the world from
being deluged with licentiousness, and every
loathsome form of evil. All the comforts
of domestic life—the sacred. and deathless
ties of the family circle—the dear delights,
the cherished associations, the hallowed mem-
ories of the paternal fireside—spring | di-
rectly from the marriage state. It is this
alonesthat gives us the home of our child-
hood, the love, the protection, the wise coun-
sel and advice of parents. It is this that
affords the sacred retreat in mature days,
where, from the strifes, and cares, and bitter
disappointments of the business mart, the
husband and father can retire, and amid the

| soothing attentions and the unbought love of

wife and, children, renew his — and


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 197

courage for future struggles. It is this
that furnishes the aged patriarch and the
venerable matron, with the safe covert, the
quiet refuge, the warm, snug corner, where
they can pass the winter of life, surrounded
by children and children’s children, who
delight to rise up and do them reverence, and
minister to their comforts.

«Domestic happiness! thou only bliss
Of paradise that hath survived the fall!
. (Sp e+ eae «6

Thou art the nurse of virtue; in thine arms |
She smiles, appearing, as in truth she is,
Heaven-born, and destined tafe skies again.”

Among all nations, wherever the marriage
tie is the most generally formed, and held the
most sacred, there woman holds the highest
position and: obtains her truest estimation—
there civilization and refinement—there truth,
purity, fidelity, and all the virtues and graces
that can adorn and elevate humanity, bloom
in vigorous luxuriance. And in the same
degree that this sacred relationship is neglect-
ed, and its obligations disregarded, in any

St








|

‘. =
ae
a

198 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

nation, do we find woman degraded, and ig-
norance, barbarism, sensuality and. vice, in
every shape, prevailing and preying on the
vitals of society. ie

In view of these. considerations, it assuredly
cannot be deemed improper, in addressing
the young, to call their especial attention to
a subject so interesting as Marriage, and one
so vitally connected with all that is valuable
and sacred. Indeed dny series of discourses
designed to counsel them, which should
omit this all-important topic, would seem to
be deficient in one of the first essentials of
salutary admonition. |

In presenting this subject to the considera-
tion of the youthful, I would admonish them
against thoughtless engagements, and hasty
marriages. A heedlessness in these matters,
is fraught with dangerous consequences. Mat-
rimony is not to be viewed as a mere joke,
or frolic, to be engaged in at any moment,
without forethought or preparation, It is the
first great step, the most momentous event,
in the life of a young couple. Their position,



oe




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 199

their circumstances, their habits, their man-
ner of occupying time, their prospects, all
undergo an almost total change at this im-
portant era. It will be to them a source of
prosperity, of peace, of the highest enjoy-
ments, or of adversity, misfortune, wrangling,
and bitter wretchedness—as they do, or do
not, exercise discretion’ and judgment in
forming the connection. No thoughtful young
man, no prudent young woman, will enter
into an engagement of marriage, much less
consummate the act, without viewing it in all
its bearings. They will maturely weigh the
consequences which follow, and seriously re-
flect upon the new scenes, duties, responsi-
bilities, and labors, to which it leads."

I know that to many, perhaps most of the
young, the whole matter of matrimony is
viewed in a light so romantic—its pathway
seeming to be so in the midst of rosy clouds,
so fanned by ambrosial gales, so intermixed
with flowery meads and rural bowers, the
songs of birds and murmuring streams—that
it is exceedingly difficult for them to follow a

ad

* 2

. a

, nk
ia






200 LECTURES TO -YOUTH.

train of sober thought on the subject. It is
important, however, that they should seek to
rise above these deceptive conceptions, and
take such a view of this matter, as shall ap-
proach the reality, and save them from-the
disappointment which so often follows this
consummation of their fondest dreams,

The seléction of a companion. for life is a
transaction altogether more serious than.the
young appear generally to. view it, They
too often forget, that from.all the world, they
are choosing one to walk with them in closest
intimacy, during all their days;.and that it
depends on the wisdom of their choice, whe-
ther the journey of life shall be peaceful and
pleasafit, or sad and wretched. It has passed
into a species of proverb, that the selection
of a wife or a husband, is like purchasing a
ticket in a lottery—no one knows whether a
prize or a blank will be drawn. There is too
much’ truth in this saying, as selections of
husbands and wives are often made. “When
the young are governed in such things, by
fancy rather than judgment—when they are

%




——Sewx

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 201

carried away captives by some. outward,
worthless attraction, rather than by solid and
useful qualities—their success will, indeed,
depend on blind chance.. But there is no
necessity for so great a hazard, A young
man, ora young woman, may positively know
beforehand, whether they will draw a prize
or a blank. In fact, they may select the
prizes without any mistake, and let the blanks
go for what they are worth. Let them ex-
ercise but an ordinary degree of judgment,
. sound discrimination and good sense, and
there will be no danger of drawing a blank.
- When a young man has attained to a suit-
able age, and is engaged in some honest and
useftil occupation, whereby he is in possession
of means to maintain a family, it then be-
comes not only a privilege, but a duty, to se-
lect a wife, to be the sharer of his joys and
his sorrows. In making this choice, he should
act calmly, deliberately, and thoughtfully.
He should bear in mind that he is selecting,
not for a day, or a year, but for all life. The

object of his affections *should be one, who
9* |





—s
oe

LECTURES TO YOUTH.



will live pleasantly with him, and make him
happy, not for a few months only, but during
long years to come, when the romance of
marriage shall have been succeeded by the
cares and struggles of maturer life. She
should be one of whom he can Bay, in the
words of the poet :—

- “Oft as clouds my path o’erspread,
Doubtful where my steps should tread,
She, with judgment’s steady ray,
Marks and smooths the better way.”

There is no greater folly than to select a
wife for mere personal beauty alone. Beauty
will always have its’ attractions; and when
connected with an amiable deposition and
useful qualifications, its influence. cannét be
objected to. But when unaccompanied with
these characteristics, its power is to be re-

sisted, and the heart steeled against all its
fascinations. The young man who permits
himself to fall so desperately in love with a
lady, on account of mere personal beauty, as
to marry her, despite the counsel of. his
friends, and when he himself sees, or might see,


LEOTURES TO YOUTH. 203

a sad want of other and more valuable quali-
fications, commits an error, the wretched
effects of which will be experienced through
life. When this outward beauty loses its
charm and passes away, as it, will in a brief
space of time, what has he left? A cross-
erained, ill-natured, fault-finding, petulant,
selfish wife, who will prove a “thorn in his
side,” during all his days, rather than a lov-
ing and valuable companion.

Good looks are always attractive. But
there is something still more desirable in a
wife, viz, a sweet disposition and an even
temper, a gentle, affectionate heart, and a well-
cultivated and enlightened mind. Let young
men, by all means, seek for such qualifications
in those whom they would choose for their
companions. In these characteristics there 1s
a beauty and loveliness which will not fade
away with the consummation of marriage;
but they will grow. brighter and more at-
tractive from year to year, during all life.

Moreover, I would caution young men .
against allowing their hearts to be taken




204 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

captive under circumstances where they are
especially exposed to deception. A young
woman may exhibit a fine appearance in a
ball-room—amay be very attractive ata party,
and cut a fashionable and dashing figure in
the public streets, and still make a poor, good-
for-nothing wife. These are the last places
in which choice should be made of a com-
panion, to render aid and comfort amid the
struggles of life. Whenever your attention
is attracted by a young lady, study her in the
family circle—learn her domestic qualifica-
tions. Is she a respectful, dutiful, loving
daughter? Is she a kind and affectionate
sister? Does she manifest a noble, generous,
friendly spirit? Does she exhibit delicacy,
refinement, and purity in her tastes and man-
ners? Is she industrious,economical, and fru-
gal in her habits? Will she be likely to as-
sist you in husbanding your income, and tak-
ing care of your earnings? Is she thoroughly
versed in all domestic affairs, so that she her-
self could do all things connected with house-
hold matters, should necessity require it?


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 205

These, I acknowledge, are very ordinary, very
homely inquiries; but nevertheless they are
of the highest. importance. A young man
who will marry, without having thoroughly
made all such investigations, and becoming
satisfied that his intended is not deficient, to
any great extent, in these qualifications, is
blind to his own highest good, and will in
long after-years, amid domestic inquietude,
and family troubles, mdulge unavailing re-
grets at his blindness and folly. But when-
ever a young woman can be found, possessing
these invaluable characteristics, I would ad-
vise the youth seeking for a companion, to
win her for a wife if possible. Although
she may be plain in person, and poor in prop-
erty, yet she will be of more worth than rv-
bies; and all riches cannot be compared with
her. She will be a faithful friend. and wise
counsellor, and will smooth the rugged path-
way of life. However the world and its af-
fairs may go without, he who has such a wife,
will ever have a home, where neatness and
comfort, peace and love, and all that can


206 = LECTURES TO YOUTH.



yield contentment and enjoyment, will smile
upon him!

All the care, discrimination, and judgment
urged on young nien in selecting wives, I
would commend to young ladies, in accepting
husbands. If to the former, marriage 1s an
important event, fraught with consequences
lasting as life, it is peculiarly so to the latter.
It surely is no trivial event for a daughter
to leave the home of her childhood, the ten-
der care and watchful guardianship of kind
- parents, the society of affectionate brothers
and sisters, to confide herself, with all her
interests: and her happiness, to another with
whom she has hitherto associated. only as a
friend. Is it not necessary to exercise pru-
dence, forethought, discretion, im taking a
step so momentous ?

A young woman should not marry because
the youthful are expected to enter matrimo-
nial bonds at a certain age, nor merely be-
cause they have had an offer of marriage.
Such an admonition may seem to be unne-
cessary ; but. I think it called for. It is true,









LECTURES TO YOUTH. 207



beyond question, that young women some-
times receive the addresses, and finally be-
come the wives, of men for whom they have
formed no very strong attachment, and, in-
deed, in whom they see many characteristics
and habits, which they cannot approbate.
This is done on the principle, that it is the
first offer of marriage they have had, and

may be the only opportunity of settlement
for life that will ever present itself. Nota
few parents have urged their daughters to
such a course—totally blinded to the evils
which often flow from it.

Such a procedure is fraught with danger.
It perils the happiness of all coming days.
How many have, under such circumstances,
left the abode of their childhood, where
every comfort surrounded them, to spend a
life of wrangling, bitterness, and, sometimes,
abject poverty. Better, a thousand times, to
remain at home, better live in “single bless-
edness” all your days, than to become con-
nected with a man whose disposition, habits,
or character, you cannot fully approve.





208 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

Though he may be as rich as Cresus—though
he may lead you to a palace for an abode,
and. deck you with jewels—yet, if you can-
not give hin your entire approbation, if
your heart’s fondest affections are not cen- |
tred upon him, if he is not all you can
sanction and love, unite not your destiny
with him. The life of a contented, useful
“old maid” is infinitely to be preferred to that
of a wretched, heart-broken wife. “Those
unequal marriages which are sometimes called
excellent matches, seldom produce. much hap- |
piness. And where haggtntts i is not, what
as all the rest ?” .

In accepting the addresses of young men,
with a view to matrimony, allow me to
caution you against being too much influ-
enced. by good looks and fascinating manners.
It is due to young ladies to say, that they |
show much more good sense in this respect
than the other sex. They do not select
their companions so much on the ground of
mere personal beauty, without reference to -
higher and better qualifications, as do young






LECTURES TO YOUTH. 209

men. Still, a precaution to them on this
point will not be wholly useless.

Here is a young man who js gay in his
manners, and fashionable in his attire—a
dandy of the first water, all buckled and
strapped after the latest pattern. His bosom
is decked with golden chains, and his fingers
“with platter rings. His tongue is as prolific
of lackadaisical words, as his head is devoid
of good sense. He showers the politest at-
tentions in th@ assembly room, or during the
ride, or walk. He is, in fine, the very beau
ideal of a “ ladies’ man!” ‘There is another
young man. His manners are respectful, but
without courtly polish. His dress is plain
and neat, with no display and no gaudy orna-
ments. He knows nothing of the thousand
ways and arts by which the other makes him-
self so agreeable. He has no “small talk”
in his vocabulary, and must utter sound
sense, on useful subjects, or remain silent.
He may appear somewhat awkward in his
attentions to ladies, but is, nevertheless,
friendly and obliging in his demeanor. In


210 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

his whole life and character, he is a retiring,
but most worthy youth. Are there not some
mE +.

young ladies who would prefer the company
of the showy, chattering fop; who would re-
ceive his address, yea, accept him as a hus-
band, and reject the diffident, modest youth ?
Yet the latter would make a kind, affection-
ate, provident husband; likely to attain to®
respectability, high-standing, and wealth:
while the former would most probably prove
a poor, cross-grained broken-stiek; ill-natured,
and perhaps dissipated; dragging wife and
family into the insignificance and poverty to
which he speedily would sink! Surely dis-
creet young ladies will think many times,
‘and weigh well the consequences, before
making such a choice.

Where the hand of a young woman is sought
in marriage, she should look beyond the mere
personal accomplishments of dress, manners,
and conversational powers of him who would
make her his wife. Many an individual who
has the appearance and manners of a gentle. |
man, is, in reality, a black-hearted vi








LECTURES TO YOUTH. 211























a marriage with whom would seal their
wretchedness for life. In"accepting. a hus-
band, there are certain requisites which
young women should consider ‘as “mdispen-
sable.

He should have some honest and useful
trade, profession, or occupation. nothing” young man, will assuredly make a
“ sood-for-nothing” husband. No one can
justly charge you with sordid motives, for
scrutinizing critically his capability to secure
to you, and such family as may gather around
you,.a maintenance that shall insure you
against poverty and want.

His habits shouldbe unexceptionable. He
should be honest, upright, truthful, mdus-
trious, and economical—pure in his conversa-
tion and tastes. Not only should he have the
ability to obtain a livelihood, but should

possess prudence and frugality to lay up and
Wecure the fruits of his industry.
~ Above all, he should be strictly and rigid-
ly temperate. On this point I would speak
with emphasis. Most earnestly would I










212 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



admonish young Women never to unite their
destiny with that of a drinking young man.
Alas! flow many a wife, when too late, has
lamented in bitter tears ee
in this respect. A youngâ„¢man, who, in this
age of temperance, has not sufficient self-
respect, pride of character, and good se

to refrain from the intoxicating bowl before
marriage, will be very likely to sik into a com-
mon drunkard afterwards. This is not always
the case; but the exceptions are so rare, that
she who ventures the risk, places herself in a
condition which hazards her happiness for
life. However propershis other habits may
be, however amiable and’pleasant his disposi-
tion, however bright and promising his pros-
pects, however high his position, or respec-
table his family connections—if he drinks the
lethean draught, even but sparingly, he is
tampering with a viper, which will almost
certainly sting him to death, and poison th y
joys, and destroy the prosperity of all con-
nected with him. |

The world is filled with scenes which attest


































LECTURES TO YOUTH. 213

the need Of this admonition, All around we
behold the wrecks of families, torn asunder
by the intemperance of husbands and tathers
which otherwise aight have been united and
happy. Wives forsaken, broken-hearted, im-
poverished—children beggared and neglect-
-ed, growing up in rags ‘and ignorance, to
become the victims of sin and shame. All
these attest the danger that woman encoun-
ters, who links her destiny with a drinking
young man. O ye youthful and inexperienced,
turn not:a cold ear to my exhortation.. With
all the solemnity the momentous topic in-
spires, I beseech you, as you value a life of
peace and prosperity, never, under any pos-
sible consideration, give your hand to a man
who presses to his lips the intoxicating cup!
Though you may have granted your affections,
and plighted your troth, to one who is given,
_even but slightly, to this practice, if on your
“earnest expostulation, he will not abandon
it, you should, without hesitation, break all
connection with him. Every consideration of
prudence, self-respect, and safety, urges you





214 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

to such a step, however painful -“hnd every
law, human and divine, will justify you in
adopting it.

The suggestions Which follow, on the views
of Marriage that should be entertained. by
young men, and “Female qualifications for
Marriage,” are so appropriate and excellent,
that I cannot forbear giving them an inse
tion in these pages.

“Whatever advice may be given to the
contrary by friends or foes, it is my epinion —
that you ought to keep matrimony steadily ||. —
in view. For this end, were it for no other,
you ought to mingle much in society. Never
consider yourself complete without this other
half of yourself. It is too much the fashion
among young men at the present day to
make up their minds to dispense with mar-
riage ;—an unnatural, and therefore an un-
wise plan. Much of our character, and most
of our comfort and happiness depend upon
it. Many have found this out too late; that
is, after age andefixed habits had partly dis-
qualified them for this important duty.

<





LECTURES TO YOUTH. .







« Accotding to the character of the person
you select, in a considerable degree, will be
your own. “Should a mere face fascinate you
to a doll, you will not need much “mental

~ energy. to- -please her; and the necessity of
exertion ‘on. this acct it F heing small, your

—own self will sink, or at least not rise, as it

Htherwise might do? :

“But were I personally acquainted with
you, and should, I perceive - an honorable at-—

tachment taking” possession of your heart, I
should regard, it as a happy circumstance.
Life then has-an object. ‘The only thing to
be observed, is that, it be managed with pru-

» dence, honor, and good sense.

“The case of John Newton is precisely in
“point.” In very early life this man formed a
strong attachment to a lady, under circum-
stances-which did not permit him to make it
: kfiowng*which was probably well for both
patties.” It did not.diminigh her happiness,
sO long as she ‘remained ‘in: ignorance on the
subject ; and in scenes ofgsorrow, suffering,
and temptation, the hope of one day obtain-






CRee ener ce ee ee ete ted rtaipeeneninelieeaie









































i ceeeenienementieeentene
*

216 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

ing her soothed him, and. kept. hififrom per- |
forming many dishonorable, actions. ‘The |
bare possibility,’ he says, ‘ of seeing her figain, .
was the only obvious means ‘of yresfraining | EN
me from the most — oe fe
self and others.’ “a

“ The wish to marry, if ipridendy induler
will lead to honest arid persevering exer tid
to obtain a reasonable income+oné wh ch ;
will be satisfactory to the object of yo your
hopes, as well as to her friends “He y , ais ;
determined on living a singlé.Jife, very atu- | :
rally contracts his, endeavors to. oe own nar-. | |
row personal wants, or else squapders freely, [ ¥
in the belief fhat he can alway’ procure
enough to support himself. Indeed it cannot, id
have escaped even the careless ot
in proportion as*an individual: relinquishes. }
the idea of matrimony, just in the same-pro- ff
portion do his‘ mind and feelings vontratt. , ie :
On the he contrarygghat, hope which aimg ata |]
beloved partner—a‘family—a firesid y wall :
lead its possessop.to activity i in all -his con-
duct. It Will alee his talents, and urge











ai
Le








“TWotorzs TO YOUTH. 217






them to their full energy, and probably call
_in the*aid of economy ; a quality so indis-
iL. pensable to every condition of life. The
2 ql } single consideration, ; What would shé think
a pW ely she now to see ” called up by the
~ «| ebtrusion of a favorite. miaGe,—how often has
‘|| %@ stimulated a noble mind and heart to
| a 3 which. otherwiSe had never been per-
Ht fe yed | Poets:
x e roe I repeat oe aware » that this advice
+ oi liable tod pie But what shall be done ?
I} hages of some sort will haunt the mind
} more or less—female’ influence i in some shape
or other. wilh operate. Is it not better to
* give “the “imagination a virtuous direction
oth to leaye it to range without control, and
i Fs “withottt ¢ end?
_. “Lrepeat it, nothing is better calculated
he le ike preserve a young man from the contami-

|e nation. of low pleasures and pursuitsthan











ye

i-
oy, /

~ ——
tg ye OR ies
oe. é

P
ed
1
“ie
“ie

ee att
Â¥ :

and. wirtqous of the other sex: Besides, with-

_ out such society his mannegs can never ac-

quire the true polish of a ‘zentleman,—gene-
. . A 10 ,



frequent intercourse with the more refined ® ™


218 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

ral character, dignity, and refinertient ;—nor
his mind and heart the truest and noblest
sentiments of a man. Make it an object
then, I again say, to spend some~portion of
every week of your life in the company of _
intelligent and virtuous ladies. At all events,
flee solitude, and especially the exclusive so-
ciety of your own sex. The doctrines even

of Zimmerman, the great apostle of solitude,

would put to shame many young men, who.
seldom or never mix in female society.

“Tf you should be so unfortunate as not
to have among your acquaintance any ladies
whose society would, in-these points of view,

be profitable to you, do not be in haste to

mix with the ignorant and vulgar; but wait
patiently till your own industry a good
conduct shall give you admission to better
circles ; and in the meantime cultivate your
mind. iby reading and thinking, so that when
you actually gain admission to good society,
you may know how to prize and,enjoy it.
Remember, tootthat you are not to be so
selfish as to think nothing of contributing to




LECTURES TO YOUTH.

the happiness of others. It is blessed to gwe
as well as to ecewe.

“ When you are in the company of ladies,
beware of silliness. It is true they will
sooner forgive foolishness than ill manners,
but you will, of course, avoid both. I know
one young gentleman of great promise, who
adopted the opinion that in order to qualify
himself for female society, he had only to be-
come as foolish as possible, while in their
presence. That young man soon lost the
favor ofall whose friendship might have
operated as a restraint; but unwilling to as-
sociate with the-despicable, and unable to
live in absolute solitude, he chose the bottle
for his companion; and made himself, and
the few friends he had, miserable.

«“ Nothing, unless it be the coarsest flattery,
will give more offence, in the end, than to
treat ladies as mere playthings or @hilaren.
On the other hand, do not become pedantic,
and lecture them on difficult subjects. They
readily see through all tls. ~ Neither is it
good manners or policy to'talk much of your-

. |





220... LECTURES TO YOUTH.

self, They can penetrate this also} and they
despise the vanity which produces it. In de-
tecting deception, they are often much quick-
er than we apprehend.

“ A young gentleman, in one of the New
England States, who had assumed the chair
of the pedagogue, paid his addresses to the
beautiful and sensible daughter of a respect-
able farmers One day, as she was present in
his school, he read to her a hymn, which he
said was from his own pen. Now it was ob-
vious to this lady, and even to some of the
pupils, that the hymn was none other than
that usually known by the name of the
‘Harvest Hymn,’ modified by the change of
a few words only. How much effect this
circumstance might have had I cannot say
with certainty ; but I know.it disgusted one,
at least, of the pupils; and I know, too, that
his addresses to the lady were soon after-
wards discontinued.

“ A young man who would profit from the
society of young ladies, or indeed from any
society, must preserve a modest and respect-






LECTURES TO YOUTH. . 221 1

fal spirit ; ‘must seek to conciliate their good
will by quiet and unostentatious attentions,
and discover more willingness to avail him-

self of their stock of information, than to dis-
- play his own knowledge or abilities.

“He should observe, and learn to admire,
that purity and ignorance of evil, which is
the characteristic of well-educated young
ladies, and which, while we are near them,
raises us above those sordid and sensual con-
siderations which hold such sway over men,
in their intercourse with each other. He
should treat them as spirits of a purer sphere,
and try to be as innocent, if not as ignorant
of evil as they are ; remembering that there
is no better way of raising himself in the
scale of intellectual and moral being. But
to whatever degree of intimacy he may ar-
rive, he should never forget those little acts
of courtesy and kindness, as well as that re-
spect, and self-denial, which lend a charm to

every kind of polite intercourse, and espe-
cially to that of which I am now speaking.

“Whenever an opportunity occurs, how-




222 _ LECTURES TO YOUTH.

ever, it is the duty of a young man to intro-
duce topics of conversation which are decid-
edly favorable to mental and moral improve-
ment. Should he happen to be attending to
the same study, or reading the same book
with a female acquaintance, an excellent op-
portunity will be afforded for putting this

rule in practice.

FEMALE QUALIFICATIONS FOR MARRIAGE.

“The highest as well as the noblest trait
in female character, is love to God. When
we consider what are the tendencies of Chris-
tianity to elevate woman from the state of
degradation to which she had, for ages, been
subjetted—when we consider not only what
it has done, but what it is destined yet to do
for her advancement,—it is impossible not to
shrink from the presence of an impious, and
above all an unprincipled atheistical female,
as from an ungrateful and unnatural being.

“ Man is under eternal obligations to Chris-
tianity and its Divine Author, undoubtedly ;
but woman seems to be more so.


~ | reg Pe on m, “ou "ep oy ,
. Soe es
223



LECTURES TO YOUTH.
“That charge against females which in the
minds of some half-atheistical men is magni-»
fied into a stigma on Christianity itself,
namely, that they are more apt to become re-
ligious than men ; and that we find by far
the greater part of professing Christians to
be females, is in my own view one of the
highest praises of the sex. I rejoice that |
their hearts are more susceptible than ours,
and that they do not war so strongly against
that religion which their nature demands. I
have met with but one female, whom I knew
to be an avowed atheist. ,
“Indeed there are very few men to be
found, who are skeptical themselves, who do
not prefer pious companions of the other sex.
_J will not stop to adduce this as an evidence
of the truth of our religion itself, and of its
adaptation to the wants of the human race, for
happily it does not need it. Christianity 1s
based on the most abundant evidence, of a
character wholly unquestionable. But this °
I do and will say, that to be consistent, young |
men of loose principles ought not to. rail at


924 spores 1 TO heres

rere —F " wens
“ a "}
. €

fomalag for Their piety, and then whenever

sthey “seek for a constant friend, one whom
al they can love,—for they never really love

the abandoned—always prefer, other things
p being equal, the society of the pious and the
é virtuous.

“Next on the list of particular qualifica-
tions in a female, for matrimonial life, I place
COMMON SENSE. In the view of some, it ought ©
to precede moral excellence. A person, it 1s
said, who is deficient in common sense, is, in
proportion to the imbecility, unfit for social
life, and yet the same person might possess a
kind of negative excellency, or perhaps even
a species of piety. ‘This view appears to me,
however, much more specious than sound.

“ By common sense, a8 used in this place,
I mean the faculty by means of which we see
things as they really are. It implies judg-

> ment and discrimination, and a proper sense
of propriety in regard to the common con-
cerns of life. It leads us to form judicious
plans of action, and to be governed by our
circumstances in such a way as will be gene-

Ld


LECTURES TO YOUTH. 225

rally approved. It is the exercise of reason,
uninfluenced by passion or prejudice. To

man, it is nearly what instinct is to brutés..

It is very different from genius or talent, as
they are commonly defined ; but much better
than either. It never "blaine forth with the
splendor of noon, but shines with a constant
and useful light. ‘To. the housewife—but,
above all, to the mother,—it is indispensable.

“ Whatever other recommendations a lady

may possess, she should have an.inextinguish- ©

able thirst for improvement. No sensible

person .can be truly happy in the world,

without .this; much Jess qualified to make
others happy. But the genuine spirit of im-
provement, wherever it exists, atones for the
absence of many qualities which would other-
wise be indispensable: in this respect resem-

bling that ‘charity’ which covers ‘a moulti-
tude of sins.’ Without it, almost everything.

would: be of little consequence,—with it,
everything else is rendered doubly valuable.

~ “One would think that every sensible per-
son, of either sex, would aspire at improve-

15









be oe
226 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

ment, wore it merely to avoid the shame of
bein® stationary like the brutes. Above all,
f° it is most surprising that any lady should be
satisfied to pass a day or even an hour with-
out mental and moral progress. It is no dis-
credit to the lower animals that— their little
all flows in at once, that ‘in ages they no
more can know, or covet or enjoy,’ for this is
the legitimate result of the. physical constitu-
tion which God has given them. But it is
far otherwise with the masters and mistresses
of creation ; for
‘Were man to live coeval with the sun,

The patriarch pupil should be learning still,
And dying, leave his lessons half unlearnt.’

“There are,—I am sorry to say it—not a
few of both sexes who never appear to
breathe out one hearty desire to rise, intel-
lectually or morally, with a view to the gov-
ernment of themselves or others. -They love
themselves supremely—their friends subor-
dinately—their neighbors, perhaps not at all.
But neither the love they bear to themselves
or others even leads them toa single series



yy: s

LECTURES TO YOUTH, 227

*

of any sort of action which has for its ulti-

mate object ‘the improvement of anythin f : ae
higher than the condition of the mere animal. || ~

Dress, personal appearance, equipage, style
of a dwelling or its furniture, with no other
view, however, than the promotion of mere
physical enjoyment, is the height of their de-
sires for improvement !

“Talk to them of elevating the intellect
or improving the heart, and they admit it is
true; but they go their way and pursue their
accustomed round of folly again. The prob-
ability is, that though they assent to your
views, they do not understand you. It re- |
quires a stretch of charity to which I am
wholly unequal, to believe that beings who
ever conceived, for one short moment, of the
height to which their natures may be ele-
vated, should sink back without a single
struggle, to a mere selfish, unsocial, animal
life ;—to lying in bed ten or twelve hours
daily, rising three or four hours later than
the sun, spending the morning in preparation
at the glass, the remainder of the time till








228 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

dinner in unmeaning calls, the aftefnoon in
yawning over a novel, and the evening in the
excitement of the tea-table and the party,
and the ball-room, to retire, perhaps at mid-
night, with the mind and body and soul in a
feverish state, to toss away the night in vapid
or distressing dreams. ;
“How beings endowed with immortal
souls can be contented to while away pre-
cious hours in a manner so useless, and withal
so displeasing to the God who gave them
their time for the improvement of themselves
and others, is to me absolutely inconceivable!
Yet it is certainly done; and that not merely
by a few solitary tniibjusle scattered up
and down the land ; but in’some of our most
~ populous cities, by consideuliie numbers.
- “Should the young man who is seeking an
‘help meet,’ chance to. fall: in with such begs
as these—and some we fear there are in al-
most every part of our land,—let him shun
them as he would the ° choke damp’ of the
cavern.
“Their society would extinguish, rather









LECTURES TO YOUTH 229

than fan the flame of every generous or be-
nevolent-feeling that might be kindling in
his bosom. Wé¢th the fond, the ardent, the
never-failing’ desire to improve, physically,
intellectually, and morally, there are few fe-
males who may not make tolerable compan-
ions for a man of sense ;—2without it, though
a young lady were beautiful and otherwise
lovely beyond comparison, wealthy as the
Indies, surrounded by thousands of the most
worthy friends, and even talented, let him
beware! Better remain inseelibacy a thou-
sand years (could life last so long) great as
the evil may be, than form’a union with such
an object. He should pity, and seek her ref-
ormation, if not beyond the bounds of possi-
bility; but loye her he should not! The
penalty will be absolutely insupportable.

“ One point ought to be settled,—l think —
unalterably settled—before matrimony. It
ought indeed to be settled in early hie, but
it is better late, perhaps, than never Each
of the parties should consider. themselves as
sacredly pledged, in all cases, to-yield to con-



















arsine








230 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

viction. I have no good opinion of the man
who expects his wife to yield her opinion to
his, on every occasion, unless she is convinced.
I say 0 every occasion ; for that she some-

&




at to do so, seems to be both scrip-
tural and rational. It would be very incon-
venient to callin a third person as an um
upon every slight difference of -vcdegie
tween a young couple, besides being very
humiliating. But if each maintain, with per-
tinacity, their opinion, what can be done?
It does seen® to»me that every sensible wo-
man, who feels any good degree of confidence
in her husband, will perceive the propriety
of yielding her opinion to his in such cases,
where the matter is of such a nature that it
cannot be delayed. .

“ But there are a-thousand things ocours
ring, in which there is no necessity of ‘form-
ing an immediate opinion, or decision, except
from’ conviction. I should never like the
idea. of*a woman’s conforming to her hus-
band’s views to please him, merely, without
considering whether they are correct or not.

> -

.








LECTURES TO YOUTH. 931

It seems to mea sort of treason against the

~ God who gave her a mind of her own, with

an intention that she should use it. But it
would be higher treason still, in male or fe-
male, not to yield, when actually € mvincec
“Without the knowledge and the love of
domestic concerns, even the wife of a peer is
but a poor: affair. It wasthe fashion, m
former times, forlaties te understand a great
deal about these thingsyand it would be very
hard to make me*believe that it did not tend
to promote the interdStseand honor. of their
Weahends. * °°. |
oe The concerns of-a great family never can
be well managed, if left wholly to hirelings ;
anid.there are many parts of these affairs in
which it would be unseemly for husbands to
meddle. Surely, no lady can be too hig
zankto make it proper for her to be well
ted’ with the character and general






x > i ; e - .
demeanor of all the female servants. To re-
“ceive and give character is too mugh to be

deft to a sepvant, however good, whose ser-
vice has been ever so long, oBacceptable.
- "= 8

+ *

—_- TA
LO

eens



SS




» 232 LEOTURES TO YOUTH.

“Much of the ease and happiness. of the
great and rich must depend on ¢he character
of those by whom they ate assisted. T hey
live under the same roof with them; they
are frequently the children of their ternate









inane and preeepts which
and when ladies sensi How
weight there must’ bégn one waa kes
than in ten thousar words fro P yerSOn: .
who, call her*w like, is still a fellow
~ servant, it does appear stratige’ that 4
should forego the performahce ofthis. so
important and pleasing part oPtheir dat
“T am, however, addressing myself, in a,
work, to persons in the iniddlg ranks off
and here a knowledge: of domestic a
SO necessary in every Wife, that. the
ought to have it continually in his eyes.
only a knowledge of these affairs—not nly i
to know how things eught.to be done, but« ||”
how to do them ; not only to " What ins
| u |
een Q ol to ” put into » pie or a



e-: @e
‘LECTURES TO YOUTH. 233

pudding, but to be able zo anne the pie or
.. the pudding. « *.

“ Young people, when they come e together,
- qught not, unless. they ‘have fortunes, or are
to do unusual business, to think about ser
: yale! ‘Servants for what! To help them


















ts
bead md drink, and sleep? When they henetl
oa children, there my - be some Aelp in a farm- 4
F er’s -¢ tralfeoma ’s “house, but until then,
>
what. call § is there Sir a servant in a house,
|| the miaste whieh h earn ever a a
7 2 ade > er of 1 = > a. y

at is consume "2
4 ae ae and drinking come three times
| every day ; they must come; ard, however

~~

Pe S tt 2 we may, in the days of. our ‘health and
ri -vige care about choice food. and. about cook-
St Ww every sogn get tired of heavy or phe
i bread, and of, spoiled joints of meat. e

ar them for once é6r twice perhaps; but
out the, third time, we begin ‘to lament;
|) about’ the fifth time, it must be an extraor-

. i dinary affair. that will* keep: us from .com-
# plaining; if t ike continue ae a month or
two, we be rr ent 5 an en ad

gin repe ¢ t eat





234 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

all our anticipated delights. We diseover, .

when it is too late, that we have not got:a |

help-mate, but a burden ; and, the fire of
love being damped, the unfortunately edu-
cated creature, whose parents are more to
blame than she is, unless she resolve to learn
her duty, is doomed to lead a life very nearly )
approaching te that.of misery ; for, however
considerate the husband, he never can esteem —
her as he would have done, had she been
skilled in domestic affairs. _

“The mere manual performance of domes-
tic labors is not, indeed, absolutely: necessary
in the female head of the family of profes-
sional men; but, even here, @d also in the
case of winds merchants and of gentlemen

iving on thejr fortunes, surely the head of
the household ought to be able to give direc-
tions as to the purchasing of meal, salting
meat, making bread, making preserves.of all
sorts; and ought to see the things done. |

“THe lady ought tb:take care that food be.
well cooked; that there be. ways a suffi-



; gieseenrniy$ that there be coodliving with- ‘a

a




LECTURES TO YOUTH. 235

out waste; and that in her department, no-
thing shall be seen inconsistent with the rank,
station, and character of her husband. [If he
have a skilful and industrious wife, he will,
unless he be of a singularly foolish turn,

gladly leave all these things to her absolute

dominion, controlled only by the extent of
the whole expenditure, of which he must be
the best judge. |

“ But, in a farmer's or a tradesman’s family,
the manual performance is absolutely neces-
sary, whether there be domestics or not.
No one knows how to teach another so well
as one who has done, and can do, the thing -

himself. It was said of a famous French

commander, that, in attacking an enemy, he
did not say to his men ‘go on,’ hpt “come on 2
and, whoever has well observed the move-
ments of domestics, must know what a prodli-
gious difference there is in the effect of the
words, go and come.

“ A very good rule woul be be, to have no-

“thing to eat, in a farmer’s.or mechanic’s house,

‘ +

that the mistress did not know how to pre-,

tact TOL




_ 236 LECTURES TO YOUTH.



pare and to cook; no pudding, tart, ple or
cake, that she did not know how to make.
Never fear the toil to her: exercise is good
for health; and without health there is no
beauty. Besides, what is the labor in such
a case? And how many thousands of ladies,
who idle away the day, would give half their
fortunes for that sound sleep which the stir-
ring housewife seldom fails to enjoy.
“Yet, if a young farmer or mechanic marry
a girl, who has been brought up only to
‘play music, to draw, to sing, to waste paper,
pen and ink in writing long and half-romantic
letters, and to see shows, and plays, and read
novels ;—if a young man dé*marry such an
unfortunate young creature, let him bear the
_ consequences, with temper. Let him be just.
Justice will teach him to treat her with great
indulgence ; to endeavor to persuade her to
learn her business as a wife; to be patient
with her; to reflect that he has taken her,
being apprized of her inability ; to bear in
mind, that he was, or seemed to be, pleased
with her showy and useless acquirements ;




LECTURES TO YOUTH. » Faas



and that, when the gratification of his pas-
sion has been accomplished, he is unjust, and:
cruel, and. unmanly, if he turn round upon
her, and accuse her of a want of that knowl-
edge, which he well knew, beforehand, she
did not possess.

“For my part, I do not know, nor can I
form an idea of, a more unfortunate being

than a girl with a mere boarding-school edu-
--cation, and without a fortune to-enable her
to keep domestics, when married. Of what
use are her accomplishments? Of what use















her music, her drawing, and her romantic
epistles? If she should chance to possess a
sweet’ disposition, and good nature, the first.
faint cry of her first babe drives all the tunes
and all the landscapes, and all the i imaginary |
beings out of:her head forever.
“The farmer or the tradesman’s wife . has
to help earn a provision for ‘her children ; or,
at the least, to help to earn a store for sick- .
ness or old age. She ought, therefore, to be
qualified to begin, at once, to assist her hus-
band in his earnings. The way in which she




" 238 LECTURES TO YOUTH.







can most efficiently assist, is by taking care

of his property ; by expending his money to

the greatest advantage ; by wasting nothing,
but by making the table sufficiently abun- ||
dant with the least expense.

“ But how is she to do these things, unless
she has been brought wp to understand do-—
mestic affairs? How is she to do these
things, if she has been taught to think these
matters beneath her study? Howis the man
to expect her to do these things, if she has
been so bred, as to make her habitually look
upon them as worthy the attention of none
but low and ignorant women ?

“ Tgnorant, indeed ! Ignorance consists in
a want of knowledge of those things which
your calling or state of life naturally supposes
you to understand. A ploughman is not an
ignorant man because he does not know how
to read. If he knows how to plough, he is

| not to be called an ignorant man; but a wife

may be justly called an ignorant woman, if
she does not know how to provide a dinner
for her husband. It is cold comfort for a


LECTURES TO YOUTH. © 239 ||

hungry man, to tell him how delightfully his
wife plays and sings. overs may live on
very aerial diet, but husbands stand in need
of something more solid; and young women
may take my word for it, that a constantly
clean table, well cooked victuals, a house in
order, and a cheerful fire, will do more :to-
wards preserving a husband’s heart, than all
the ‘accomplishments’ taught in all the ‘es-
tablishments’ in the world without them.”*
Other considerations might be urged on
the young of both sexes, as prerequisites to
a hopeful and a happy marriage. But if the
reflections already offered are duly heeded,
they will enable those who are influenced by
them, to secure the blessings and escape the
evils of the marriage state. As a general
remark, I would suggest that in selecting a
companion for a connection so lasting, it
should be a leading object to find as great
a similarity of opinions, habits, tastes, and
feelings, as possible. This is especially im-
portant in regard to religious sentiments. It

* Young Man’s Guide.






240 LECTURES TO YOUTH.

is a serious misfortune for a young married
couple to find themselves differing materially
on the subject of religion. T his is more
particularly an evil when both are strongly
attached to their respective opinions, and
anxious to attend different churches. I have
frequently known this greatly’ to embitter
the cup of domestic enjoyment. Where
husband and wife can ‘sympathize in each
other’s sentiments—can walk together to the
house. of God, with their children—can
strengthen and enlighten one another. in re-
gard to the great truths to which they there
listen—can unite in instructing their family
|| in the same doctrines and principles of
|| Christianity—it opens one of the highest and
_ sweetest sources of domestic happiness. But
an absente of this unity in religious opinions,
is liable to lead to frequent disputations and
‘ contentions, which often result in recrimina-
fions, and hard and bitter feelings. There
are not wanting instances where the most
serious difficulties and the greatest unhap-
piness have grown out of these disagreements.












nee
I .
. .

LECTURES TO YOUTH. 241

Hence it is both proper and needful, to
admonish the young, in choosing a wife or a
husband, to make a concurrence in religious
faith, one of the great essentials requisite to
a union. , .

In case of a different result—when husband
and wife unfortunately find a wide disparity
in the leading doctrines of their religion—
they should seek to make the best of their
misfortune, and guard against allowing it to
prove a bone of contention in their midst.
They should agree to disagree in forbearance’
and love. ‘They should respect each other’s
views, and be cautious not to say or do that
which can cast disparagement on their re-
spective sentiments. Neither should demand
or expect the other to abandon his or her
doctrines, without full conviction of their er-
roneous nature. Both should be tolerant and
forbearing—willing to grant the other the
same freedom. of opinion they claim for them-
selves, .

It should be an established rule with hus-
band and wife, to attend the worship of





242 LECTURES TO YOUTH.





God together. This is by far the most
agreeable and proper procedure. Should 1%
not be pleasant, however, for both to worship
statedly in the same church, and listen to the
proclamation of the same doctrines, they
should arrange their plans to attend each
other’s meetings on alternate Sabbaths. This
kind and friendly reciprocity would be fair,
just, and honorable to both parties, and
might lead ultimately to a similarity of opin-
‘ons. But for a husband or a wife to refuse
such a concession, and insist that the other
shall forsake their attached place of worship,
abandon their sentiments, or remain totally
silent in relation to them, on pain of having |
the harmony and peace of the family ¢e- |

|

































stroyed—would be to exhibit a spirit totally
ungenerous, and in violation of every dictate |
of the Christian religion. |
I have made these suggestions, not only |
for the benefit of those who have recently |
entered upon married life, but to admonish |.
those who ate unmarried to come to an




e e e
understanding on this subject, and make all |
|











LECTURES TO YOUTH — 24

243
these arrangements before the consummation —
of their vows. Or, what is still better, let
| these considerations convince the youthful of

|



the necessity of making a similarity of re-
ligious sentiment one of the chief qualifica-
tions in forming a tie, which, for good or
evil, will connect them with another during
the remainder of the earthly journey.






BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.



The Odd Fellows’ Amulet: or the principles of Odd
Fellowship defined ; the objections to the order answered ;
and its advantages maintained; with an address to the pub-
lic, the ladies, and the order. By Rev. D. W. Brisrot, Pas-
tor of the M. E. Church, and P. &. of Osco Lodge, No. 304,
at Auburn, N. Y. ,

The Rev. Mr. Bristol, the author of the above work, is a popular clergyman of ths
Methodist church. He appears to have written the work not merely for Odd Fellows,
but to disabuse the public mind, if possible, of prejudices formed against the Order.
A spirit and design of apparent sincerity appears to pervade the entire york, and the
writer discusses his themes and meets the objections urged against Odd Fellows, with
a great deal-of candor and respect. No person, we think, can read it, whatever may
have been his prejudices hitherto, without having those prejudices at least, conside-
rably softened, if not wholly taken away. The style of the writer is captivating,
while the arrangement and classification of his subjects adds interest to the volume.
We have no hesitancy in recommending the Amulet as a book that may be read by
the public.— Genesee Evangelist.

We have wiled away several hours pleasantly and profitably in its perusal, and can
recommend it as a work deserving of a large circulation. The principles of the Or-
’ der are set forth by its author, the Rev. D. W. Bristol, a distinguished Methodist
clergyman, in a masterly manner, objections instituted by many to the Order, are
fairly tested, and answered in a mild and satisfactory way. It is a cheap and useful
work, and we cheerfully recommend it to public favor.—Mirror of the Times.

Able and exceedingly interesting articles, that we would most cordially commend
to the attention of every reader, while we are gratified at being able to bring them
under the notice of members of the great Order. The work contains also Addresses
by Rev, D. W. Bristol, and is embellished with several fine Steel Engravings. Fully
and correctly defining the principles of O. F., it should fill a niche in the library of
every Odd Fellow, where it will furnish a mine of valuable matter whence he can
draw at all times for the facts illustrative of the great principles of the noble institu |
tion of Odd Fellowship.—Golden Rule.

It is an excellent work, and worthy of the patronage of the Order. The objections
often urged against our institution, are most thoroughly examined, and ably answer-
ed. The book is got up in good style, and is offered at a low price.—T'he Ark.

We should think that every lover of the Crder which this book upholds would -
adorn his library with it; and every person that is opposed to it should also have
one so that they could see their objections answered. We would say to every lover
of the poor and afflicted, buy one and peruse it for yourselves and see what the Odd
Fellows do for them. Its motto is ‘Do unto others as ye would ha¥e others do unto
you.””— The Bee.

This is a clear, forcible, and well written exposition of the subjects above named ,
and a book that every Odd Fellow in the country should be in possession of. The
work is well got up, and embellished with several fine engravings appropriate to the
subject of which it treats. It is sold at the low price of one dollar, and can be mailed

~» to any part of the United States.—Banner of the Union.


BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.





—_—_——

Headley’s Women of the Bible: Historical an¢
descriptive sketches of the Women of the Bible, as maidens
wives, and mothers; from Eve of the Old, to the Marys ol
the New Testament: by Rev. P. ©. Headley, in one 12m
volume, illustrated — uniform with “Headley’s Sacrelll
Mountains.” : $1,25.

The author of this work possesses enough traits of resemblance to the author di
the Sacred Mountains, to leave no doubt of his right to the name of Headley. Theme
is much of that spirited descriptive power, which has made the elder brother #
popular favorite, and gives promise of @ successful career on his own account. The
sketches are brief, and embody all the historic incidents recorded of them.— Maw
York Evangelist.

A younger brother of J. T. Headley is the author of this beautiful volume. It wi ll
probably have a larger circulation than the splendid work issued last fall by tine
Messrs. Appleton, being better adapted for the general reader, in form and prilrey
while it is ornamental enough for the centre table. It contains nineteen descriptive
piographical sketches, arranged in chronological order, including nearly all te
distinguished women of the sacred annals, and forming an outline of Scripts te
inatory. The iMustrations are from original designs, and are numerous aikl appro-
crate. No ordinary powers of imagination and expression are shown in the virid
and picturesque descriptions ; and the fine portraiturcs of character rivet [he
rateresi, and set forth the Scripture delineations in a stronger light. In this respoct
the bouk has no rival, for no other is so complete, following so closely at the same

time, the sacred narrative. We hope it is but an earnest of other works fromike
pen of its gifted author.— Home Journal.

We were so struck with the title of this work, and the prepossessing appeariaice
of its typography, that we have so far departed from the usual course adopted in
like cases, as to read carefully the work in hand, betore recommenling U Lomwnr
readers. And we are prepared to say, that a more attractive volume hag 2ot fillen
in our way fur a long Une. lt is made up of brief historical and descripiive euill es
of the most remarkable females of a most extraordinary era in the worl? hisimry.
"She author has appropriated very much of the poetry and romance ol the “Sibu, in
the sketches he has given of nineteen women, who have come down to uy ‘hr ich
their peculiar merits, ew:balmed in sacred inst iration. Whoever reads the “tur of
Sarah, the beautiful Hebrew maiden, the admiration of the Chaldean shepherd
the pride of her kindred ; or of Rebecca, whom the * faithful steward of Abrsfiieit
journeyed to the land of Nahor and selected as the bride of Isaac, aud whe, ii is
siid, ** was very fuir to luok upon 3? or of Rachel, the beautiful shepherdess whoa
tonded her father’s flocks in the valley of Haran; or of Merriam, Deborah, Je 7ha's
Teaughter, Delilah, Ruth, Queen of Sheba, the Shunamite, Esther, Elizabeth, ¥argin
Mary, Dorcas, and others — will read a story far more interesting and attractive’ lian
any romance or novel. Every young lady in town should read this work; an‘ we
will venture to say that they zi// do so if they but once get hold of it, for it 1s albeok
that cannot be laid aside.— Oswego Times. ;


BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.

LD

Golden Steps to Respectability, Usefulness and
Happiness; being a series of Lectures to the youth of
both sexes on Character, Principles, Associates, Amuse~-

ments, Religion, and Marriage. By Joun Matuer Austin.
Derby, Miller & Co., Auburn, 1850, 243 pp.

The author of this book is a writer of superior attraction, and has here selected a
subject of deep interest. Could the youth of the country be induced to exchange the
Buntline, Lippard, and Ingraham literature of the day, for such reading as this, the
benefits to themselves and society would be incalculable.—Lockport Courier.

We honor the heart of the writer of this volume as well as his head. He has here
addressed an earnest and manly appeal to the young, every page of which proves his
sincerity and his desire for their welfare. The subjects treated of in the different lec-
tures are those indicated on the title page. Integrity and virtue, usefulness, truth
and honor, are the “ Golden Steps” by which the young may ascend to respectability,
usefulness, and happiness. We trust the seed thus sown will not be without its fruit,
and that his readers will imbibe the spirit of the motto he has chosen—

“ Onward ! onward! toils despising,
Upward! upward! turn thine eyes,
Only be content when rising,
Fix thy goal amid the skies.”
Albany State Register.

The work of Mr. Austin, written in a pleasing style, and nervous and pointed in its
argumentation, will hold a prominent position among the fortunate endeavors by
which the rising generation are to be influenced. The volume before us is beautiful
in its exterior, and this, combined with the aim of the author, in which he has admi-
rably succeeded, will. give it a wide range, and secure for it, we hope, an invaluable
influence.—Buffalo Christian Advocate.

A plain, familiar, forcible exposition of the duties and responsibilities of Youth,
which can hardly be read without exerting asalutary and lasting influence. Judging
from the popularity of Mr. Austin’s former works, we predict for it a wide circula-
tion.—New York Tribune.

If the precepts eloquently and forcibly urged in these pages could be brought home
and impressed upon the minds of the mass of youth in our land, they would confer
lasting and incalculable benefits upon the rising generation. We cordially commend
this work to the attention of the young and all who have charge of them.

The publishers have executed their work admirable, and have brought out an ele
gant and beautiful book. Their work will compare favorably with any of the New
York houses.— 7'roy Post.

The following extract has reference to the “ golden steps” of the President of th
Taited States, Millard Fillmore :—(See page 69.)




BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.

nee

The Young Man’s. Book: or Lectures for the Times.
By Wim W. Patron. One 12mo. vol.

The lectures contained in this volume are not made up of merely common place
remarks. They are elevated in sentiment, chaste in style, and impressive in manner.
No person who reads the volume can fail to profit by it, or to admire the evangelical
views and elegant language of the author. ‘The work deserves to be a favorite with
young men.—Northern Christian Advocate.

It is a genial, earnest, manly book. The author is himself a remarkable example
of independent thinking and philanthropic feeling. The bugle note which he sounds
to young men is no uncertain sound. He goes with his whole soul for bettering the
world, where he thinks it bad, and few of the young men who heard his lectures or
shall read his book, will not be strongly inclined to go withhim. We cordially advise
all young men who are anxious to do and be something in this universe, to cultivate
an acquaintance with Mr. Patton or his book.—Boston Chronotype.

There are seven lectures in this volume devoted to subjects rather unusual ina
work of this kind, and having the impress of earnest feeling and reflection. That
some of the points are overstated does not detract from the excceding value and im-
portance of most of the views presented—all the more important because so intre-
quently attended to in the puipit, or in works designed for the young. The book is
written in a perspicuous and forcible style, and both from its matter and spirit is
likely to become popular and useful.—New York Evangelist.

This is an excellent book—excellent in its purpose, in its execution, and in its
adaptation to the present day. In some respects this book differs from all kindred
works that we have seen. Asa writer Mr. Patton is lucid, earnest, and direct, never
obscure and seldom other than forcible. Regarded merely asa literary performance
we must pronounce these lectures highly creditable. Their timely and important
mora! inculcations should commend them more especially to the friends of religion
and entitle them toa place in every christian household.—Charier Oak.

These are able and earnest lectures to young men, delivered to the author’s con-
gregation in Hartford, and contain many valuable considerations and glowing appeals
2 rouse the youth to diligence, courage, and faith in the struggle of life.—New York

bserver.

The counsels, warnings, and encouragements, to the young, contained in this vol-
ume, are, as designed, adapted to the times. It is interesting In its style as well as
matter, and cannot fail to profit that class to whom it is addressed.—7'he (Boston)
Puritan.

The author of these lectures is himself a young man. He has addressed those of
his own age, not with the stern reproof or grave counsel of a father, but with the af-
fectionate entreaty, kind, yet faithful warning of a brother. The subjects of the lec-
tures are judiciously selected and cannot fail of doing good to those who are soon to
bear the burdens and responsibilities of society.—Besion Mecorder.

A volume of lectures, seven in number, on subjects of vast importance, and writ-
ten with much force. The book will profit those who read it.—New York Commer:
cial Advertiser.

The lectures were delivered on Sabbath evenings to densely crowded audiences,
and were spoken of in terms of high praise at the time. At the request of many who
heard them they are now published. The lectures .are valuable, containing a vast
amount of goud advice and information for that class of persons for whom they were
originally designed, and ina time like the present, when pernicious literature ap-

ears to be the order of the day, they are still more acceptable.—(Hurtford) Chris-
tian Secretary.

We can positively say that the object of the work is most praiseworthy, the sub-
aq treated of are important, the counsels it contains are weighty, and are enforced
na happy style with a spirit well calculated to gain the attention of those who are
addressed.— Hartford (Ci.) Courant.

In design and execution it is worthy to go side by side with the late porpvlar anc
widely circulated work known as Beacher’s Lectures to Young Men. The fifth lec
ture is well suited to our columns and we hope to give it a place ere long.—N. ¥
Advocate and Family Guardian.


I~ oe
, .

BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.



The Life of the Empress Josephine, first wife
of Napoleon. By P. C. Hzapizy. 12mo., pp. 378.
Derby, Miller & Co., Auburn, New York.

There are few of the female characters of modern history whose lives abound with
more interesting events than that of the Empress Josephine. Her whole course was
one of romantic, and also of tragic interest. If the illustrious husband was eminent,
far above all other men of his time, for vast intellect and rodigious achievements,
Josephine seemed, in the more lofty and majestic traits of chasse to transcend the
most distinguished of her female cotemporaries. Like her husband, she is a great
subject for biography. Many memoirs have been written of her, possessing more or
less merit, but none have been without interest. The author of the present beok has,
we think, been very successful. It is by far the most interesting history of Josephine
that we have yet seen. He seems to have had recourse to the best sources for his
muterials, which he has combined and put together with skill and judgment. His
style is flowing, elegant, and often eloquent. In short, it is a book well worth read-
ing. It will not fail to attract the public attention. As to the mechanical execution
of the book, it is but justice to the proprietors to say, that it will compare favorably
with the productions of the press of any city in the Union. It contains a fine mezzo-
tint poxtrait of Josephine, showing a beauty of person equalled only by the moral
grandeur of her character.— Washington Union.

It is not without its sparkling gems. Occasional flashes of thought make the rea-
der pause to contemplate their freshness and beauty, and reveal a well-stored mind
in sympathy with the noblest human traits, in close communion with the glories of
naturc. His text, too, is happily chosen. Who has not felt a lingering, peculiar,
undefinable interest in the highly extraordinary and tragic career of the Empress
Josephine ? Would it not extend this notice too far, we should like to touch. the more
prominent of the many eventful passages which marked the history of this remark-
able child of superstition, to gaze for a moment upon the vascillating star of her des-
tiny, and trace its ]Juminous ascent from the veriest depths of agonizing gloom and
despair, to the loftiest pinacle of worldly splendor and renown, where she grasped
for a moment the fleeting phantom of happiness, only to sink again into the arms of
misfortune, and feel still more keenly the bitter pangs of adversity. But all this will
be found in a very readable form in this interesting volume, and we cheerfully com-
mend it to notice.— Utica Observer.

We do not know of a biography of this important and interesting personage, 80
complete in its historic details, and so congenial to the spirit of her life, as this:
while it has also the advantage of a popular style, abd of thats view of the subject
which accords with the general sentiment. Mr. Headley writes in a Clear, well-sus-
tained and engaging style—evidently entertaining a warm approbation of his subject,
and alive to the sublimity and purity of her life. Treating of one of the most impor-
tant epochs of French history, the work is finely adapted to enlist the interest of the
reader, and to supply a kind and degree of information not 2 accessible else-
where. It can hardly fail of proving a highly popular, as it is a highly creditable
work.—N. Y. Evangelist.

The writer of this book is a brother of J. T. Headley, the author of “ Napoleon and
his Marshals” -“ Washington and -his Generals,” &c. There is a strong. family re-
semblance between the two. The qualities which have given such a wide celebrity
to the one, seem to be fully enjoyed by the other. Both brothers are characterized
by that peculiar vividness and, so to speak, intensit of style which always makes a
book readable and interesting. The “ Life of Josephine” possesses much of this pe-
culiar charm. The author has studied his subject well and could hardly have chosen
a beiter one to write upon. Josephine is a-charmed name to many hearts. ‘There
are few who do not feel an interest in her singularly eventful career. At first the
daughter of a West India planter,—then the wife of a French nobleman,—anon tno
consort of Gen. Bonaparte and afterwards Empress of France ;—her@icture presents
us with a scene of constantly increasing brightness, where the dark shades never
chase away the light, till we behold her ending a career of dazzling splendor as a de-
throned Empress and repudiated wife. Josephine was in many respects @ model of @
woman.— Amherst Express.





The American Lady’s System of Cookery, com-
prising every variety of information for ordinary and Holiday
occasions. By Mrs. T. J. CROWEN.

The “ American System of Cookery” is a capital book of its class, and for which
we bespeak the good word of all thrifty housekeepers. It introduces us into a wil:
derness of sweets, where no rude surfeit reigns! The almost innumerable variety of
ood things, clearly and orderly set forth, is most apetizing for the hungry reader,
just before dinner. : eal
Here is an American housewife, sensible and thrifty, who has laid down directions
for making all sorts of dishes, baking all kinds of-cakes and pies, manufacturing every
variety of confectionery, preserving, pickling, &c., 80 plainly that a housekeeper of
a week’s standing can easily act upon her directions, and yet taken so comprehensive
a scope, that the very best ‘and most skilful will find something new. We take for
granted, that as the latest, it is the best book of its class.
The writer of this volume has previously published a similar work, on a smaller
scale—* Every Lady’s Book”—of which more than two hundred thousand co jes are

= be have been sold. If this is not popularity, we know not what is.—Lilerary
or .

The “American System of Cookery,” 1s the title of a goodly sized duodecimo, pub-
lished in New York. The authoress of this work has obtained considerable celebrity,
by a work which she entitled “ Every Lady’s Book,” and we believe she will add t<
her deserved credit by the present volume, which comes home to the stomach of
every man. The receipts are abundant and practical.—North American.

Of all the reforms, none is more loudly called for than one in American Cookery—
that being one in which everybody is interested. That the national health would be
better, if the national kitchen were more philosophically and phyorologically mana-
ged, there:seems to be no doubt anywhere. Even morals suffer, beyond question,
through the influence of crude, ill-selected aliment. Who knows but the Mex’* .
_ — be traced to an ill-cooked, ill-assorted, contradictory, and irritating cabt:ic»
inner

A Lady of New York tells us how to make a great many nice, wholesome thig~,
and we beg our readers not to imagine we speak rashly, or even theoretically, uj, 00
this all-important subject—we have tasted, and we testify without a misgiving. “The
proof of the pudding,” eic.— Union Magazine.

Thus our wife settles the question. The same author’s ‘‘ Every Lady’s Book,” she
said, might be useful for some folks, but the real simon pure, Yankee, American
Cook Book, was the thing exactly, just such a book as she should have made, if she
had cooked it up herself. She says it is made on common sense principles; the rules
are exactly such as sensible folks. follow in this democratic land, who regard taste,
health,”and economy. Our wife says, that, with some Cook Books, one has to deduct
half the spice, shortning and sugar. Our book, however, as our wife declares, is
practicable, and is to be followed to the letter.— Central Washingtonian News.

This book is compiled by a person of practical knowledge of the subject, who, as
stated in the preface, has been for the last eight years employed in collecting infor-
mation on the subject of the work, and in reducing to practice the receipts obtained.

—Evening Post.

By the spiciness of the preface, and by the very funny epistle with which the au-
thoress of this book sends us a copy, We cannot doubt her to he a woman of talent 5
and as Mrs. Child has applied her genins to the making of such a book, we can be-
lieve even a Cooking Book may be better for genius in the writer.—Home Journal.

This appears to be the most complete and satisfactory collection of receipts in the
culinary art, which the skill and enterprise of American ladies, devoted to the subject,
have produced. It contains a large amount of matter in a volume of very good size,
as a manual, and we have confidence, from the decided testimony of those who have
tested its merits, in recommending it to house-keepers.— Protestant Churchman.




BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.



History of the War with Mexico, from the com
mencement of hostilities with the United States, to the
ratification of Peace; embracing detailed accounts of the
brilliant achievements of Generals Taylor, Scott, Worth,
Wool, Twiggs, Kearney, and others; by John 8. Jenkins,
8vo., 20 illustrations, morocco gilt. $2,50.

A History of the late war prepared for popular circulation. The writer takes a
patriotic view of his subject. His narrative of the commencement of the war would,
we presume, not displease Mr. Polk. He follows the campaign throughout with
industry and spirit, drawing from public documents, diplomatic correspondence, and
the newspaper letter writers by the way. More facts, we believe, are brought
together than in any single publication of the kind. The narratives of adventure in
California, Col. Doniphan’s march, and other passages, are told with interest; the
writer evidently seeking to make a useful book. The portraits and illustrations of
scenes are riumerous; the mechanical execution of the whole work being highly
creditable to the Auburn publishers.— Literary World.

This is a volume of over 500 pages. The publishers have brought it out in excel-
lent style. The paper, type, printing and binding, are admirable. The book has
been written with due regard to accuracy, and in a popular style. It is the most
eiaborate, and probably the best History of the War yet published.— AlJany
Evening Journal.

We have been unable to notice, until now, this new work from the penof the
author of “ The Generals of the last War with Great Britain, etc.” In this volume
we have at last a complete and interesting. history of the late collision between the
two Republics of the Continent. Toa minute and detailed account of the position
and policy of Mexico, the origin and causes of War, are added soul-stirring descrip-
tions of the brilliant-and successful engagements of our army with the enemy. This
narrative is written after a careful examination of the diplomatic correspondence
and the various “publications, of a public or private character, that have appeared
from time to time, calculated to throw light on the subject. To render the work
still more interesting and desirable, it has been illustrated with portraits of the most
distinguished officers of-our own and the Mexican army, with views of the ever
memorable battle-fields of Buena Vista and Cerro Gordo. The reputation of ths
author will insure for this history a very general circulation.—Albany Allas.

*¢


BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.

The Lives of Mary and Martha, mother and
wife of Washington: by Margaret. C. Conklng,
with a steel portrait, 18mo, scarlet cloth.

Miss ConKLIne, who is a daughter ef Judge Conkling of Auburn, is favorably
knowa as the author of Harper's translation of “Florian’s History of the Moors
of Spain.” She also wrote “Jsabel, or the Trials of the Heart.” In the preparaticn
oi the pretty little volume she has done a praiseworthy deed, and we hope she will
receive the reward she merits. She has taught us in the work

“ how divine a thing
A’ woman may be made.”

‘Yhe mother and wife of Washington were, in many respects, model women, and
the daughters of America will do well to study their character — which is finely
drawn on these pages.— Literary Messenger.

This beautifully printed and elegantly bound little work, reflecting the highest
credit upon the skill and task of the publishers, contains biographical sketches of
Mary, the mother, and Martha, the wife of the Father of his gountry. It is a most
valuabie contribution to the history of the American people, embracing not.only the
great public events of the century during which the subjects lived, but those pictures
of home life, and that exhibition of social manners and customs, which constitute
the most important part of life, but which, from the fact of their apparent triviality
aud intangibility, the historian generally passes over. The authoress evidently
sy mpathises earnestly with her subject, and feels that in the exhibition of those
womanly virtues which characterized the heroines of her narrative, she makes the
most eloquent plea.in favor of the dignity of her sex. It is dedicated to Mrs. WM
H. SEWARD, and contains a finely executed engraving of the wife of Washington.
We cordially commend it to the public, and most especially our lady readers.—
Syracuse Journal.

This acceptable and well written volume goes forth upon a happy mission,

“To teach us how divine a thing
A woman may be made,”

by uafolding those charms of character which belong to the mother and wife of the
hero of the Land of the Free; and in the companionship of which, while they illus-
trated the watchful tenderness of a mother, and the confiding affections of a wile,
i; shown those influences which made up the moral sentiments of a man, whose .
moral grandeur will be felt in all that is future in government or divine in
philosophy ; and one whose name is adored by all nations, as the leader of man in
ia the progress of government, to that perfection of human rights where all enjoy
liberty and equality. To say that Miss Conkling has fulfilled the task she says a
‘too partial friendship has assigned her” faultlessly, would perhaps be too
unmeasured praise, for perfection 1s se|dom attained; but it will not be denied but
that her biographies are traced in the chaste elegances that belong to the finished
periods of a refined style, which fascinates the reader with what she has thus contri-
buted to our national literature.

‘he design of the volume is, to picture a mother fitting the “ Father of his

Country ” ina light full of the inexhaustible nobleness of woman’s nature, and yet
as possessing that subdued and quiet simplicity, where Truth becomes the Hope on
whieh Faith looks at the future with a smile. The mother of Washington was
tried in a school of practice where frugal habits and active industry were combined
wi the proverbial excellences of those Virginia matrons, who were worthy mothers

cf such men as Washington, Jefferson, Marshall, and Henry. Miss C. has pictured
with fidelity and elegance, er views of this remarkable woman ; not less beaull-
fully has she sketched the character of Martha, the wile; following her from her
brilliant manners as the Virginia belle, through the various phases of her life, she
gives a rapid but comprehensive view of those characteristics which make up the
quiet refinement of manners native to her, and which ever gave her the reputation
of an accomplished wife and lady. And with peculiar delicac Miss Conkling has
yortrayed the thousand virtues with which she embellished a home; her amiable
Sisposition and winning manners made the happiest to the purest and best of al.
sen fame has chosen for its noblest achievments.— Syracuse Star.
BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.

a





The Missionary Offering, a memorial of Christ's
Messengers in Heathen Lands, dedicated to Dr. J udson,
8 engravings, 12mo., muslin. $1,25.

We have seen no book ef late which, upon a hasty examination; we could more
cheerfully and confidently recommend. The history of the labors of Missionaries
in foreign lands has always been one of unsurpassed interest to a great class of every
community, by whom such enterprizes are conducted, and in no similar work lave
we seen this history more ably and truthfully set forth than in the one before us.—
Buffalo Commercial Advertiser.

Tiere is a volume of about four hundred pages, neatly printed and illustrated,
made up of the most interesting matter, from the pens of the first writers. Such a
work cannot fail to interest. What a glorious band have cast aside the heart-cling-
ing ties of home, country, and friends, and borne the peaceful emblem of Chris-
tianity to the darkest climes. Bloody rites have ceased, the funeral flame is
extinguished, the crushing car has ceased to roll, and mental and moral darkness
has given away before the silent labors of the missionary. The records of sucha
history cannot but interest, revealing as they do, some of the sublimest features in
the character of man — sacrifices and toils and triumphs, vefore which the brightest
achievements of earth dwindle into folly.— Cayuga Chief.

Tur. MissIONARY OFFERING is composed of poetical and prose writings of rare
excellence, reminiscences and incidents connected with foreign and home missions,
&c. We consider it a valuable and interesting book, especially to the Christian and

philanthropist, and all who look upon the missionary enterprise as an institution,
under the guidance of Providence, for the moral regeneration of thé world.— Geneva

Gazette.

a id

Rational Psychology, or the subjective idea and the

objective law of all intelligence: by Laurens P. Hickok,

D. D, Professor of Christian Theology in the Theological
Seminary, Auburn. |

The few, not the many, will find pleasure and improvement in the study of a
weatise like this, discussing with much ability and research, indicative of close and

) atient thought, the abstruse science of mind, and reaching principles by a careful -

induction of well arranged and considered facts. The author has favorably intro-
duced himself, in this work, to the thinking portion of the religious public, ard will
calmly await the verdict of the learned world upon this elaborate performance. It
is a handsomely printed octavo of 700 pages.— N. Y. Observer. «



% ‘4




BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.

reer LD





The American Fruit Culturist: By J. J. Thomas;
containing directions for the propagation and culture of
Fruit Trees, in the Nursery, Orchard, and Garden; with
descriptions of the principal American and Foreign varieties
cultivated in the United States: witlr 300 accurate illustra-
tions. 1 volume, of over 400 pages, 12mo. $1,00.

A cheaper, but equally valuable book with Downing’s was wanted by the great
mass. Just such a work has Mr. Thomas given us. ‘ We consider it an invaluable
addition to our agricultural libraries.— Wool Grower.

We predict for it a very rapid sale ; it should be in the hands of every fruit grower
and especially every nurseryman. It is a very cheap book for its price.— Ohio
Cultivator.

It is a most valuable work to all engaged in the culture of fruit trees.— Utica
Herald.

It is a book of great value.— Genesee Farmer.

Among all the writers on fruits, we do not know of one who is Mr. Thomas’
superior, if his equal, in condensing important matter. He gets right at the pith of
the thing — he gives you that which you wish to know at once; stripped of all use-
less talk and twattle. No man has a keener eye for the best ways of doing things.
Henze we always look into his writings with the assurance that we shall find some-
thing new, or some improvements on the old ; and we are seldom disappointed.
This book is no"exception. It is full. There is no vacant space init. It is likea
fresh egg — all good, and packed to the shell full.— Prairie Farmer. ,

In the volume before us we have the result of the author’s experience and obser-
vations, continued with untiring perseverance for many years, in language at once
concise and perspicuous.— Albany Cultivator.

We can say with confidence to our readers, that if you need a book to instruct you
in the modes of growing trees, &c., from the first start, the systems of pruning, etc.,
etc., you will find the American Fruit Culturist an extremely valuable work. The
million Who purchase it, will find matter adapted to their wants, superior to any
work as yet published.— Cleveland Herald. ‘

For sale in New York by M. H. NEWMAN & CO. and C. M. SAXTON.
Boston, B. B. MUSSEY & CO. Philadelphia, THOMAS, COWPERTHWAITE &

<{ Copies in paper covers sent by mail, free of expense, on receipt of $1,00
post paid. Directto . DERBY & MILLER,
| Auburn, N. Y.


.

BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER.



The Life of Gen. Zachary Taylor, 12th President
of the United States, brought down to his inauguration
Steel. portrait, 12mo., muslin; a new edition, by H. Mont

- gomery. $1,25.
* * 18,000 of the above work have been sold by us.

“THE Lire or GEN. Z. TAYLor.”—H. Montgomery, Esq., editor of the Auburn
Daily ‘Advertiser, has found leisure, amid the multitude of his engagements, to get
up the most respectable looking and carefully prepared biography of the old General
we have yet seen. It makes a neat volume, and is printed on excellent paper and
new type, and bound in the very best style. It cannot fail to find a tremendous sale ;
a result due alike to the book itself, and the enterprise of its busy publishers.—
Albany Evening Journal. :

“Lire oF GENERAL ZacHARy TAyLor, by H. Montgomery,” is the latest and
most complete of the numerous volumes putporting to be ‘ Lives’ of the General.
The author of this work — likewise editor ofthe Auburn Journal — is already known
as a forcible and pleasing writer, handling his subject with a masterly hand; these
characteristics are fully developed in the book before us. The stirring-incidents of
General Taylor’s life, and the recent battles on Mexican soil are well portrayed —
the very fair and impartial style of narration being a rare quality in depicting battle
scenes. The book will repay an attentive perusal.—N. Y. 7'ribune.

Tue Lire or MAsor GENERAL ZacHARY Taytor. By H. Montgomery.— ,

Another and still another “ illustrated”? Life of the gréat American, (would that he
had as many lives as the publishers give him;) the American Whom Carlyle would
recognise as ‘a hero’’ worthy of his pen’s most eloquent recognition; THE MAN OF
puTy in an age of Self. An American in everything; in valor, in strong muscular
sense; in simplicity and directness and cordiality of feeling; an American in every
thing, save in devotion to our new political God of Expediency.

The volume before us is put forth in Auburn, by the editor of the Auburn Daily
Advertiser, whose vigorous, fluent style, and skill in compressing his materials,
niust make his elegant volume very generally acceptable. Many of the traits
ascribed to General Taylor have been assimilated by some of his admirers to the
leading military characteristics of Frederick the Great. But, unlike Frederick,
Taylor is anything but a martinet in discipline; and, though his movements of small
bodies of troops against vast odds, are characterized by the vigorous will,and, iron
determination of Frederick, the arbitrary disposition of the Prussian despot is wholly
slien to his tolerant and candid nature. Taylor’s affectiondte and almost ntal
relation to his soldiers, perhaps, alone first suggested the parallel, @s we find it
hinted in the following stanza of some verses upon one of his battles, quoted by Mr,
Montgomery : |
“¢Ortp Zacu!’ ‘Oxip ZacH!’ the war cry rattles ‘i

Among those men of iron tread, - ey
As rung ‘ Oxp Fritz’ in Europe’s battles

When thus his host Great Frederick led.’’
Literary Word.

Mi




















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12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:56 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:57 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:58 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:04:59 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00198.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00198.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00199.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00199.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00200.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00200.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00201.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00201.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:00 PM 00202.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00202.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00203.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00203.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00204.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00204.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00205.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00205.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00206.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00206.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00207.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00207.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00208.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00208.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00209.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00209.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00210.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00210.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00211.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00211.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00212.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00212.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00213.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00213.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00214.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00214.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00215.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00215.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00216.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00216.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00217.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00217.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00218.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00218.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00219.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00219.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00220.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00220.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00221.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00221.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00222.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00222.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00223.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00223.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00224.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00224.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00225.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00225.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00226.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00226.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00227.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00227.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00228.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00228.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00229.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00229.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00230.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00230.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00231.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00231.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00232.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00232.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00233.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00233.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00234.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00234.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00235.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00235.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00236.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00236.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00237.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00237.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00238.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00238.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00239.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:01 PM 00239.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00240.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00240.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00241.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00241.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00242.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00242.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00243.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00243.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00244.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00244.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00245.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00245.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00246.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00246.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00247.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00247.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00248.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00248.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00249.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00249.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00250.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00250.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00251.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00251.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00252.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00252.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00253.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00253.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00254.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00254.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00255.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00255.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00256.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00256.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00257.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00257.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00258.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM 00258.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM back.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM back.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:02 PM












xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080805_AAAAAR' PACKAGE 'UF00001815_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-08-05T16:18:05-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:23:59-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298722; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-16T18:41:26-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '1443429' DFID 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSTU' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 57fcff65e9fd29ce5239cdc43ba074a1
'SHA-1' 367729480aac9925edd1460d0435dc0361bc3654
EVENT '2011-08-18T05:00:19-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'63446' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSTV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
5811cbbf58483d0de616e1d1188a2dc3
6c5295ea040c96ad45414c6b4afd2ed687d4f20c
'2011-08-18T04:49:14-04:00'
describe
'6060' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSTW' 'sip-files00001.pro'
603bb189005ae82d7c54b9c1c3f2c580
3df61c6d98cec524767082bd5a1ce8315c105dfb
'2011-08-18T05:01:04-04:00'
describe
'17958' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSTX' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e9ee6813ba6322f895aceaec8e48c499
259004fce48018705e8cd27197dc4b8cb39c152f
'2011-08-18T04:57:17-04:00'
describe
'11558677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSTY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
c51ee11d310af616d0b11f893c0a6b18
bea9ebde5844b75562fcf4ab4841d33bfc3bb9d9
'2011-08-18T05:02:20-04:00'
describe
'366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSTZ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
e963d05ff7100bc8f34082b2ade80790
9861503d61e5704d658ae24c4db38e1320538a07
'2011-08-18T05:02:57-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'5473' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
0f024c8d9f6922038131582c2fdee995
450d472f2f9a2a05ad5db3e0871684d6a00ddac5
'2011-08-18T04:52:47-04:00'
describe
'1476074' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
cf5459a382434fd936320873ac65c4ac
41a84c71e63d5476b7c487813d86b9974f6c952e
'2011-08-18T04:46:52-04:00'
describe
'101710' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
3f27b5357377aeef6e10e8c0ef778237
2930e961651698cd887492af8817a893cb8e695e
'2011-08-18T04:45:47-04:00'
describe
'9730' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUD' 'sip-files00002.pro'
b1e3bbffc91bd45a992a8242b9e062ec
872e6fbb9647d6ef6a1c1306ab9a74215171b0bc
'2011-08-18T04:44:31-04:00'
describe
'29292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
1be3164fdbfb8089206efd4f16924efe
36d619a29de44c19e5a4693a4613fbccd2e1ff64
'2011-08-18T04:53:27-04:00'
describe
'11819955' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
22e8e62816ea0e9ea1c6cdd7ad4d67b4
63ed00c70d08077ab4417fb3843b7c170208a31b
'2011-08-18T04:42:42-04:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUG' 'sip-files00002.txt'
e46c61ee2ad9ffb02eb35553824430e5
116c2137bf7837ef8ff25c6fe456b026168201aa
'2011-08-18T04:48:32-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUH' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
0cf5af7cb295608ad9fb21b17e21018f
7cf3d382838a03b2b5e982adec7ccb2f2fb9fab2
'2011-08-18T04:57:22-04:00'
describe
'1100311' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUI' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
bdf1353bf9efcce1b9e275b7af1dd13f
0618925e7adc91b56fa8197a9d3a336de22a5ff6
'2011-08-18T04:51:32-04:00'
describe
'24314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
cd82cd00ae63d0c027bf37f45a5373c7
c57853afb3b49244b37ea1bde25b92259fdc7af5
'2011-08-18T04:42:28-04:00'
describe
'419' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUK' 'sip-files00003.pro'
0388cff978abb3bb2b45af1ddff90555
5fb0229d510907b280d35b226836766e925c3337
'2011-08-18T04:55:44-04:00'
describe
'7778' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUL' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
c5b62bfa865dc93228e0a8c970ff1dd6
51d27f6c3d16a714a20463ae9e5b8c17fb64c66d
'2011-08-18T04:43:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUM' 'sip-files00003.tif'
7c1034b08fa46cf6b7ee81d924c4c0d6
4a156b505666b2b141423d8b9c8ea6d7b6c06e29
'2011-08-18T05:04:12-04:00'
describe
'193' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUN' 'sip-files00003.txt'
4283d80257fc3e1c60176c89b331b126
f403f4927c70bcf2023919015f9f0711f6331f93
'2011-08-18T04:41:22-04:00'
describe
'2779' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUO' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
9df863211dbf2f228b04779aa4027312
1c5da64fb25dade2f6ddd11e52612e23e9c1da33
'2011-08-18T04:56:12-04:00'
describe
'1476068' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUP' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
12d0615f9d70756762af645bb9e5c8b1
ec8cd8d7a4fa41e7cf57f0e03b47c73c545f8963
'2011-08-18T04:50:42-04:00'
describe
'66282' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUQ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
f917ee67d0cb7f9c08408348fcb4e518
ed6be1d895a40974c6fd270b0174088049bf026d
describe
'12705' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUR' 'sip-files00004.pro'
53aa5dcbc9bb02db1ea4be63eb2436bc
a9bbb292714b38555d842eab865bbcea38f07662
'2011-08-18T04:48:18-04:00'
describe
'22311' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUS' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
6737b1d2f840fdf2c0158dbb4c2bb55d
61593e24c966522d4044664772913b20e22422ad
'2011-08-18T05:04:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUT' 'sip-files00004.tif'
53d1c2db1fc42ad54406248a91d766db
6e766330f89881209d1120ae38e9e0234cf879a8
'2011-08-18T04:44:53-04:00'
describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUU' 'sip-files00004.txt'
77b9fb1e29fbd83080b2dc871058495c
f440e52c38eddd90ead6da6e2bfa5b106222c71b
'2011-08-18T04:46:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6802' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUV' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
e11870b666aedc21c9eb9a754c817f9b
96f4161484ff02fc6c2009a2469cf7e74b9ebdcf
'2011-08-18T05:02:11-04:00'
describe
'1224102' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUW' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
8d22f557a0fac8fa28ba7b372008d9e2
c1eab861a983f47cd1d01839bd3635a6d7d023d9
'2011-08-18T04:43:03-04:00'
describe
'40501' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUX' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
e051513aa924c8e68cc70f7d852b9397
0867fb94509e140c99ad74c0ae48352bce650bca
'2011-08-18T05:01:36-04:00'
describe
'5825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUY' 'sip-files00005.pro'
1cdf8daee84ff0cf514049dec440d19e
206e8e8a18d96ce9eab54b908983e1570de504d7
'2011-08-18T04:51:29-04:00'
describe
'13544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSUZ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
f5d4fa39f7704409a03fa736aedc30f5
1f8425ac3be478cf9ccc0dc432de28c993274c85
'2011-08-18T04:59:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVA' 'sip-files00005.tif'
0c16581b25ee15a7926988e3f1836ba0
1dd12051c4af11ee4ec386ac61505f0f6860695f
'2011-08-18T04:47:11-04:00'
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVB' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5d0b1bbbc3b3f5cbbb8e1654af16414d
f649c9f28442b1d1226ea6bfc9361d58dca18ed1
'2011-08-18T04:43:48-04:00'
describe
'4501' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVC' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
94602bee7cc9ff7f874f9b0b93d03e5b
c32b061a7aaa23368b7c7a2415bde8b2491cb858
'2011-08-18T04:43:21-04:00'
describe
'1278192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
ff7fddc4668feb7f3671d4313b0a04b8
be2847f61eed9904db7872f25a2c2e574597f981
'2011-08-18T04:53:47-04:00'
describe
'46906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
0604da5fa6c6f7ae1294a19c3973052c
16f0ec4632a7dd9ddc736cbcd642782adae8f582
'2011-08-18T04:49:26-04:00'
describe
'9825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
facc24dc54f5c7275c008e75396f30a6
dbc2a967e4041c1f3c150a46dc92dd45b0f89bd0
'2011-08-18T04:56:25-04:00'
describe
'16823' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
9ea2f5f2178deaf7e7d0631f932f2750
fc6ec536358944f143fcd44264594c2c4a2a3a3d
'2011-08-18T04:42:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVH' 'sip-files00006.tif'
c5a630c7b9942b13734f6186e070ac54
2477dce4a242ec72c8fbf6ea374afda991c822f0
'2011-08-18T04:58:36-04:00'
describe
'583' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVI' 'sip-files00006.txt'
39432538eb77b97443488f58e36746d3
e6e831109370c04a14c480ca4d3be71472501569
'2011-08-18T04:41:07-04:00'
describe
'5469' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVJ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
41e9b5dabb09136f1d6735d090904023
27d9fc887cd4e7a4b1530c8728504d37fe6c84b8
'2011-08-18T04:50:36-04:00'
describe
'992565' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVK' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
c34ef0b0179bcabfc2c6c146d827f981
5c8a4787709ac10df144907af305e61b89409cf0
'2011-08-18T04:47:20-04:00'
describe
'16613' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVL' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
98e8ddd2b35d0f3d25df8203e1f63377
a9c737dfd606f931ba0db77ef1499cefb3f3e334
'2011-08-18T04:46:43-04:00'
describe
'384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVM' 'sip-files00007.pro'
a60cd569513916aec44ab933a9101d68
e522a1b5a9686a17361d84b085d66173046b2040
'2011-08-18T05:00:51-04:00'
describe
'5061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVN' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5990fcb461b5f5d7bfe8c728e724dd49
70137d3636f5b7722461c6e8899cbd89db08706d
'2011-08-18T04:41:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVO' 'sip-files00007.tif'
451d26d969bc6b962bce19f39bceef0d
42b8b43e7aa05ab5d47d5b51037851b38e966ba2
'2011-08-18T04:54:03-04:00'
describe
'198' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVP' 'sip-files00007.txt'
41467e69fc9b4808875f8ad6ca966552
321bce7b6d115dc5a0bcd44eba77aa4dd3237367
'2011-08-18T04:40:36-04:00'
describe
'1812' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVQ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
6e4ff0c380c859177719edabe0f9a0ac
3630fd742ae0af59c55f48ad47a355bcfd64895a
'2011-08-18T04:43:16-04:00'
describe
'1523331' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVR' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
fcd980ea6572e9ed9b95331f2f241ea0
958ae31489c892fd30ee1362928ca6cf6b0ab903
'2011-08-18T04:47:49-04:00'
describe
'85250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVS' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
2d299da728935a0f7839ee38934d9053
e1a2b23595e1a8b7ff72bef3bb6a8c7973eadaf1
'2011-08-18T04:47:41-04:00'
describe
'27233' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVT' 'sip-files00008.pro'
696b75a7258ffc286693080265a8956f
a29906356dc46c0385372aacb54448e759aec105
'2011-08-18T04:40:58-04:00'
describe
'28220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVU' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
41ac5d9e0d1ae507c0d1d1766486c7da
da87b92834d542bb414a263306c624151c705af4
'2011-08-18T04:50:04-04:00'
describe
'12195699' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVV' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1b7d6deec06245a7b2676c1946854fd2
dec1482c908bb435b454288202689e804d4a26d3
'2011-08-18T04:42:22-04:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
5312597724f1afcfb9fde271547f8647
dc30583d0b8acdd2d3be977f1c7d0300ac91e2b1
'2011-08-18T04:48:14-04:00'
describe
'7885' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVX' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
4c831390d7e29a968e3b236fe5574829
843535d92b4ea268251aa3e1896210dda6176a45
'2011-08-18T04:43:02-04:00'
describe
'1443393' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVY' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
fda7ca7cf83d7d67de56eaab49847dfc
df964d051c9ca73fa2811e539b094ccd15b7109b
'2011-08-18T04:50:23-04:00'
describe
'82885' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSVZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
864dff34af307382fb324602fd7c913b
2229b8539b461fdf10d966fe8f2f35cac47680ef
'2011-08-18T04:47:25-04:00'
describe
'28455' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
97fd63ffa8fb45adca149269cc5e45c5
134e423ddeeba4e457275717afc2fe418e508fa2
'2011-08-18T04:41:59-04:00'
describe
'28591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e5e943a9d55a6014335d8fe96e5f45a6
dbf47fb19724043d5a3a5ebea1fa92b32384b0be
'2011-08-18T04:59:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d3ac6912e7a600a26dac6cce2d7be6d3
d12a895948a49bac9af5d18a6b4530c032cfec8c
'2011-08-18T04:49:32-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWD' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b772d0e6567b1754b4e997fd6733676e
837297338ac7b03531ea5e46b19983f8432a63f1
'2011-08-18T04:59:25-04:00'
describe
'8804' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
f01bc5b877dba5b8618662906f0c7fac
4d8bdae5d854bdddf56b762e89e66230f92574ca
'2011-08-18T04:50:01-04:00'
describe
'1113493' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWF' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
7e2ac9d3f6bf69fc9bcd72cf2423e9d5
1c900847bb9e14bdc5ac46ae764f21f68d944128
'2011-08-18T04:56:31-04:00'
describe
'35009' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWG' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
19a4a5945ccb3d0c397ff609b5c0fb18
49acbfa1f73f69e5806a3406d804ef306877a8c1
'2011-08-18T04:59:22-04:00'
describe
'1963' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d0a901b454dcd5c4b60681490869c8d4
49a5b27d256a6efd6efe3cebe649bab20253841f
'2011-08-18T04:55:21-04:00'
describe
'11285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ff88fb328b255a14897d3ed3a4d5f677
44023738bbff4d320f7e0a0a4280bf7dcfa9f96b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWJ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
67cc1236d3dcd5c209e94f4e292dd2b2
ffb6a15aaeed7057eddf66df430d22cb659a7e50
'2011-08-18T04:56:09-04:00'
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWK' 'sip-files00010.txt'
b51c1e1c239e0b15966ad4c823a62b4e
7cd250ce141f1ed49c36dfeccc1804d6872b1d88
'2011-08-18T04:43:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3629' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ee29e11130f08e82139b94f7c96036ed
cdd54ca93ff8b525442960f5f979443971bbf068
'2011-08-18T04:50:15-04:00'
describe
'982456' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWM' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
77ec85f9344b07b7549d567256dbdb21
541f4fff412873e5e5b30dd7c049576aeb179dcf
'2011-08-18T04:54:04-04:00'
describe
'21668' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWN' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6d58edb58c28096f25016ab5b97243ab
9ced176e540b3aa2c73f1934045e0f837527a04c
'2011-08-18T04:48:29-04:00'
describe
'494' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
0666baf8eae91dcd86bbe191bb81617f
c6a2174b0c9c805a895c07c31cb8ca43bb722baf
'2011-08-18T04:41:16-04:00'
describe
'6826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
164ebc8852d1355e6de302c14796c7b1
b9b54a658709dad89b7dfc49a72eb9c09f3b001c
'2011-08-18T05:03:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
88fa211d183024ba8ce145937ed9eb19
51f0819823f772541f2a07eb68e653c4a4201f55
'2011-08-18T04:42:30-04:00'
describe
'34' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3e2b2d300eccabb1876b3096582aedfc
33c6034b633b9f1996a5c5b934348b3a5fc164fe
'2011-08-18T05:02:46-04:00'
describe
'2384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4706d9dcdca75540384b98a66db9b844
1eb109b77ba6b44dc1155549b68cefc215727c5b
'2011-08-18T04:48:05-04:00'
describe
'1475926' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
1848fb533cbd5adcf70221ad2fc7957f
36090c359a0e79b98c748f337d24e8b352554686
'2011-08-18T04:45:36-04:00'
describe
'85645' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
82a01a3c541a07c59a2df93c6b91a443
25637c61f534d0bf3bef0651aa6fc0e19d761c6d
'2011-08-18T04:50:34-04:00'
describe
'15689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
d1f89b9a30d646b19dc259ca53a966b8
cbf6f9c2f73a64c80762abb211caa75878065549
'2011-08-18T04:41:14-04:00'
describe
'28444' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
8be3cb16cd8e43f600dd9776650c30f2
5fd0e749a0cdbb34a35cbcd7b715f5614f5088ee
'2011-08-18T04:58:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
0ef4752f77655710e3f3ece6ceb262e5
61848be92c3423cafb916a952043ed1559d3f190
'2011-08-18T04:52:46-04:00'
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
1645c1be2de598e63272dbde768753ba
7727da9722e3d638ac531c8ca17fb39667e795a7
'2011-08-18T04:52:02-04:00'
describe
'8010' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSWZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
2ae5df466dcfcfec82a2ac549a1a138e
17575cea8b7f72cfbca3a0634a08cdef6a7d0f63
'2011-08-18T04:56:43-04:00'
describe
'1443432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3302ca53da09577e26b8c670a065624d
0c4b3051e45775670e8c631257ce4dd9b26e31ba
'2011-08-18T04:50:44-04:00'
describe
'92047' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
3d680539a0899304ed6af67a2754d1ca
7d7ce49595fd51998d7214e9a9872ab77ef92fba
'2011-08-18T04:50:17-04:00'
describe
'26446' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
dbb6b350378026bd0f1a45aa0894dc71
787be0bc033a7cf4fcfc23bf93d8a0c3ba218a5f
'2011-08-18T04:48:34-04:00'
describe
'31130' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
52422b93d28c73e5aa1c5fdf9aff97ac
07081771c29147f94abc913eb6de7d9deb51356b
'2011-08-18T05:01:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
e0f57a484429b03439688a809d76922b
f8a4ea7bbc0b0fdc224805484f02f006ed1a6aa4
'2011-08-18T04:44:38-04:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d870672c22ed04dab0231c081565d4a0
5c9506db9d0a82c4d77a970758eed490f3fc034f
'2011-08-18T05:00:01-04:00'
describe
'9941' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
92de31befb32cfd2083e7454e042aea5
e5cdd2d132bea15b1cebb1de3cf9d4a0e2f51915
'2011-08-18T04:42:51-04:00'
describe
'1476100' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
e26c3cd37efcb294faf4bdaf72d5fd0d
77199e2bfde3ba52a8ce41a4f5498496204a035a
'2011-08-18T04:46:23-04:00'
describe
'99420' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a41fb94dfdaeb4d59613ea97b9c585c6
bcf7bdf86d8ca593781b5799874157bc57d7e5eb
'2011-08-18T04:43:26-04:00'
describe
'26444' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
04a0db646e740b0b1bfcb1b304ca053d
6009809d034b21e4c6a6a7da2f068cd0ab738361
'2011-08-18T04:55:34-04:00'
describe
'35494' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
3f0d42bcd9ed98157660e68a03824372
d6e47e69bdea5a583a48af8edd5d344d1d409b4f
'2011-08-18T05:03:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1354e02cf4ffe153d60cfb5abc420549
ac3d90d61c783e262dce09159c6d799df3f2a570
'2011-08-18T04:47:43-04:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
0a1bcae0c093c1f4d63a6852d8d863be
9c71cb4b08322010075945d5f0d6064325d096ec
'2011-08-18T04:45:02-04:00'
describe
'9755' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d5b6ab3c2d33ce3f33511200592b8c9f
8ecdc61ce6ad32917fd960493852a7feef24504c
'2011-08-18T04:54:08-04:00'
describe
'1497804' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
fc27231cbf44800f0a53d9b8f0fef15c
d2e3e2b5a36cb70aaac87c4e926205ad1d4d1b86
'2011-08-18T04:42:08-04:00'
describe
'98753' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c6a3ca43c7e29580d3adaf4936e4c6e8
c5280e2e77a64325e74d48b2324ad0b4586ea8ce
'2011-08-18T04:43:32-04:00'
describe
'26809' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXQ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
236029ce06efc551e08d95204446275f
7a8385abb667e95e3025cad2302f4b780b77c84a
'2011-08-18T05:02:06-04:00'
describe
'33274' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3f088aca1cc8e54202580e75b57281ba
b2c90c910d0e39525739dabd180308970d0ad459
'2011-08-18T04:55:07-04:00'
describe
'11990825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9bb3b4bb4eb548304c693732f3a0f0ce
67307924c5128a76e82ae9daa6d95b4079447bb9
'2011-08-18T04:42:59-04:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
fe1b722d1abcc925635b3d1235c1f9e3
df0857b3e778da80e8d6ded80c43134e9933f395
'2011-08-18T04:50:33-04:00'
describe
'9442' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
a78989333055ef5680fd3db5b3170fd3
64b5e01bf88233058c5c5a0799440fe06be183e2
'2011-08-18T04:53:20-04:00'
describe
'1476099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
64074bb6e4bcd08e806aaeb23a3a0ab9
09665412f2e3728ad45d5095ce4e5f645d203374
'2011-08-18T04:42:47-04:00'
describe
'99197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
9f46c27e3e3ffa3b90b092a3dbe86709
c5003596fdfb2aa7481ccbe52bbb1318b2324ace
'2011-08-18T04:44:26-04:00'
describe
'28193' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
de5abf2d2508d120b5535fc97cf1776f
769a9bbe897e6cf7300e75f75ffb3caa4f78706b
'2011-08-18T04:41:09-04:00'
describe
'34779' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7c03db4719aa1ee7530cecbece0f13e8
c69a563852d66af54d682e34e62e0d7ec5313fe2
'2011-08-18T04:40:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSXZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
281c6bb6f72ab9351741a92b02a6ffc7
05bbbdd7eff5b4d13044ff029c61072e0a8ea879
'2011-08-18T04:45:57-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
afa2fd02ef29956637d7911d9ff1b198
87c2553986a98f4aaf474c3a933f2409c4b999d6
'2011-08-18T04:40:28-04:00'
describe
'9360' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3a8abfd740d3b6df027240610a6cca5e
57fdf8e0fefeebb5ec1e36218432d49f7259d263
'2011-08-18T04:56:47-04:00'
describe
'1443413' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
1d00e9fde40b15f851c58630fedf01ea
c0595af63f7fbe264bf4649b0aa813645bae552e
'2011-08-18T05:03:08-04:00'
describe
'93906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
81ac0fbfd0fd3790c718613fba5d1cc5
16bc1b9d382715d1850050ad070b0bc73639e42b
'2011-08-18T04:44:17-04:00'
describe
'26711' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f6ae3f2cbca00fb7dc9d0be51f95e047
c033bc69e10e57fd050344f2e35644b0da1bc162
'2011-08-18T04:49:16-04:00'
describe
'32892' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f0082da575ca6b347f8c849e1c4d1df2
f7c2ac2f3087beacc887b490c0c0d9763f7c53ea
'2011-08-18T04:48:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
8a7c5661869e240ab6b7019075dd13cf
64a4e0008ce1987671239443d937be5b4202b55a
'2011-08-18T04:59:32-04:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
98657e647b3b7dcf767b20613a5a69a8
e9971e57315008fc1e3f7d5ed19f25ca404e4c55
'2011-08-18T04:48:19-04:00'
describe
'10396' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYI' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
b94f468dbd124117aec138edea260fe2
74f64f8ead7e54f6e33b68bca5d34992b38f6e79
'2011-08-18T04:55:37-04:00'
describe
'1432005' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
3ab461bd24a59a0580c5a3ccf31f9d29
1301888df3a1f8b423fad8dd40abc761b825c8d0
'2011-08-18T04:44:46-04:00'
describe
'100000' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
677a6e88e40a6093c65765be57473c6f
6f700d393d295282f7322ac7581d6cd1c8f528c4
'2011-08-18T04:52:06-04:00'
describe
'27192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ffb81232cbeb6f582d23280250ffa1e8
12c495c1f04327bffbb14ce1eb68ca27c771ecfe
'2011-08-18T04:41:49-04:00'
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
09610e656e4696a5aac228a1044cbf72
f0e8c425740db2e229331c01ef76f0fbf08480ef
'2011-08-18T04:45:52-04:00'
describe
'11468163' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9ccc23ea8a3fc616a921c56abfe7a8a7
3de15e5b74bca1bef7d5e1f343791c4819130e98
'2011-08-18T05:01:35-04:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
3b7a48ac8a1e9793a53fc059abda8227
d56308e70c5b2f7c2529218061ffa1402b0a9812
'2011-08-18T04:57:57-04:00'
describe
'9658' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
677c58646bece9eabb85c6efb678c0e3
cf6b3bd35034f9e6fcda08b4c5bf9d48166f0c75
'2011-08-18T04:46:34-04:00'
describe
'1443253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
7a3236b649f7a6a6303c6b1b466648c9
c3e42ce8310ecde0006a01edc97a93b68fa9ff97
'2011-08-18T04:59:11-04:00'
describe
'92195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
679d44187cb91c4d4bea3361f5ce62f4
78deb8440105aa114e254faa513e0d0751cb8754
'2011-08-18T04:53:32-04:00'
describe
'28534' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYS' 'sip-files00019.pro'
bab5f9e4001dec4f05025a0fe20e2ece
afd36576fab0dbd33fcca56234de1d7b4d886561
'2011-08-18T04:57:58-04:00'
describe
'32491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYT' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
aec5b876093c2065109ec9469da558d4
adcbea4df1b68d146ca7a544636f4cabfa1af96a
'2011-08-18T04:43:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b2c9212decbba83c77a421b441eb16e3
ceab4aa13985dad6407a090613568b4fad2f73d7
'2011-08-18T04:53:44-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
a74cba697f2a9d56e40bce94d1b27779
a277f64a299ecc844f71ee6d2959c5e36ca0a2c4
'2011-08-18T04:57:16-04:00'
describe
'10028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
08fcb745fcbdaa12476abbba964d7838
66554b9b40109ddfb971ecf5f041d8e73e0969bb
'2011-08-18T04:44:16-04:00'
describe
'1411025' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1572f0585c1ff3b03f1bbd1c5dd20dbb
be4e41dbe40c5f85b0a2cdc8dc540a4410cea07a
'2011-08-18T04:49:58-04:00'
describe
'96463' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
81d9f595f80d8d477093ce5f54a5ab39
5e1bb8126febf911b2d28dfbcbc895b86fc97cab
describe
'27967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSYZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
13560025b9953d16e1222fe7d82363a9
b2c8b4d09a43fb41abbb7bb6d1a7064c64f3a4e0
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0889b090d00781bf302a12d2818d846c
69e0446d27ea790d1ae83c0704dd2c50cef6e05f
'2011-08-18T04:48:39-04:00'
describe
'11299371' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
74465172e7450b2fbdb9a1a686b8bbe2
62c10531f7f515a803c2664daf703fb02459b7fe
'2011-08-18T04:59:54-04:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
e9d9b5d141047772f61d9175b800c3a8
fd10fa81297efffdc618bf08d6085173719575ea
'2011-08-18T05:03:51-04:00'
describe
'9423' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5e6a4f8682784ba0cd72f736c2e947c2
896de0a0ee87020431d8c5ba1cabab0b2b3adfcd
'2011-08-18T04:59:27-04:00'
describe
'1443263' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cf7c615e25b297e9812af472f0586e78
b2de9bcc260d9881980777f9693a9931490637c3
'2011-08-18T04:50:50-04:00'
describe
'91642' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f98a11cc387d2382c2b9328f7e809ee3
411c6ec924eaf1c92fc843a5552e82f17e816a52
'2011-08-18T04:40:29-04:00'
describe
'26980' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0374d09fff2268df4efdaf914fff96eb
0aa3a3aadb601bbbe4845e4f57b6606bc44a9d8a
'2011-08-18T04:53:56-04:00'
describe
'32310' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
63bddeae3f7ddf717ed80e5fcb71693f
eef63c26337fa0b02bc27f4ce618eec2495649c9
'2011-08-18T04:45:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
85b1af7c98e3ffcef24a74f736f00f36
4fba5087b101ca1b3ce1064dc7160859cd7026ca
'2011-08-18T04:40:49-04:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6ea2dd59ee4bb332c03949606961cf5a
6066df2a7359e7fb61987f6f336fe2420012e8a0
describe
'10147' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
0a35001735ba53974f64a9a02d1cb5b7
3f53707e605597c4bf295a50a7d2581c95617e5f
'2011-08-18T04:59:08-04:00'
describe
'1426724' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
68a890c9d61884a69f5b357ce2cd09d5
3f7d2f781f24d4d45e18920de9206ba8a31d3f5b
'2011-08-18T04:50:03-04:00'
describe
'99770' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
71d658613eab7e198d32933add021e71
717a57d5b5b7a2a45b843a522090acaf324e748a
'2011-08-18T04:47:40-04:00'
describe
'27590' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
38ec545e5923e12c22231e26b63e93fc
d40034f76c2cd5e88247ff97a6eec19d565353be
describe
'34997' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
27458385a0e87c6f4c6ddfcb351cdc17
907602083a5fbf5158a7b6bd68187a8c210d39c1
'2011-08-18T04:49:56-04:00'
describe
'11424883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
d806af1b1e136de069d2fca54f0b18fc
3dafa164e3717550953fd759e47f8ca5c23e2164
'2011-08-18T04:41:52-04:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
0bb1c06c1e64ea7e1abaacb762c50467
f43e030577c9f12a653ebb42d50104cbd600d426
'2011-08-18T04:56:28-04:00'
describe
'9942' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e4ad509c2d8bb7dae64749c7183d6119
cd973a48fe6c7a8ee8de4bd3a20b41f4310ea943
'2011-08-18T04:43:11-04:00'
describe
'1443372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7612aa1550669293de36b20481055abf
871753fe181e8bff4bf3e634a9cee0d851f406f5
'2011-08-18T04:55:28-04:00'
describe
'86314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
8bbca519a04fa618467e44fad73f6f89
fed94cc3f186d5bb8967d934546c606488e09756
'2011-08-18T04:53:19-04:00'
describe
'26401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
346abb92a8b06bd72d26d97fafd72dc5
04caadf4a7b06ab8a9be6d33b693d5c947d9ceb5
'2011-08-18T04:45:08-04:00'
describe
'30008' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
1f06bcced37526639b2bb8bb6d47bbc3
2c4536ed7cac1449348ab3e7d56770d1427b6d25
'2011-08-18T04:59:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
92f2952b996517a167539649c1e08d89
bdfbc692f2bbf5c8eb3b2701db442c4125a3ce64
'2011-08-18T04:49:10-04:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b907b59b1900ab2447f2c8014e99bd86
ae5bcd72dd521a5cb667c3a311c52652ed4985c3
'2011-08-18T04:49:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9418' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
85185410b6239c488544a4be0924ee49
10bdaed7cc7d2961c8037c45305701961a8970c9
describe
'1476092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABSZZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
f59de1c6b57b4e60447e0389e1e18565
3e79e9b4190f12382304157b3750da4b24480cbb
'2011-08-18T04:45:55-04:00'
describe
'95026' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d63e55c52d7923a4af9022544cde05d8
693e65f554f4c82cd5ede6cc52623deace96fe6c
'2011-08-18T04:48:01-04:00'
describe
'26334' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7bb41f6491ffa8ab9927dd82ee8bb401
1a821f17db5be598e0302a83daa5eebe6908810e
'2011-08-18T04:50:53-04:00'
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
b74adbbae9ac060d4be2f372377f22ae
428316df38cb96a2fd9db922839e3159e4d25fdc
'2011-08-18T04:47:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
b83cbfa3ab2b30f4d18014f2afbc05b7
30e79b1a4a0a46088192296cdd474411394d64f5
'2011-08-18T04:44:13-04:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
80e25a2b4953c09ea8c0855e336fcfed
0ac6af57829f5a9a3bcc92ed0ded1b04df401df3
'2011-08-18T04:43:37-04:00'
describe
'9470' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0693b5db972a00d91f8b356cabdd813e
4f619c656a33f0a0ac947f25d31a0b460823c9db
'2011-08-18T04:59:20-04:00'
describe
'1443405' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
b912f7c07cd8f8593ea4e4e6144c2890
d096f06eaa6d395dc1f97d4c289539062b22750d
'2011-08-18T04:48:21-04:00'
describe
'96636' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
e75213588306ebb87af3ead043fcc9cb
425dfc2961148043f0c976679abd59ef16e3efdd
'2011-08-18T04:47:05-04:00'
describe
'28181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
2b41f0ff55d3e0c17f45219ebff71239
49d92ced7659dbf1b3eb24806baea5e805d23ffc
describe
'33746' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d5c933cc40761bc891f303fefe4caa35
c8cb3dbd208d6cef71eb49ac7c19789e11f4d007
'2011-08-18T04:53:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f93106443af73263037a267ed16a51ea
b92ae001e59db2266e5465676f9079ca0bc34459
'2011-08-18T04:49:29-04:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
36a67d572964f7c498196299aa6194d9
46e36b380285572e58b3afacb59f98de753df843
'2011-08-18T04:51:20-04:00'
describe
'10503' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
49d6fd600dad7348ead6639faed9f494
305d8e44c8a14fc7a7c8f85ea4435e00b9e58af7
'2011-08-18T04:59:03-04:00'
describe
'1476097' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
7647c55b06259dae0fb8ef2cc89ad6aa
cfa7281219d4100f841efcc23b000ec0e38d345e
'2011-08-18T05:01:14-04:00'
describe
'97540' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
839c296a801b33c7a446ce3611329b4d
0881a3e9164be4b0364197fce5f85ae28e79af60
'2011-08-18T04:55:27-04:00'
describe
'26805' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
bcd42a37f85f2a4f3b3c73ce5ed09374
e4f1974c747c5b74fe393ce4e16318e52903655b
'2011-08-18T04:48:53-04:00'
describe
'34642' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e8f52195fbaa0b6b822f07bc7017746b
78708e19f4aeb74740d758d3427898c0306ad0fe
'2011-08-18T05:02:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
87f51ebc85c839239b597200c05fac2e
66f1226b4567d3691ae6a2403e4a81e8691a8f3f
'2011-08-18T04:53:04-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
7ebe6f2395509e3892804ccc641514bc
cc214f91e63c8cb4cb7c36d1737d1e3fd404a036
'2011-08-18T04:51:28-04:00'
describe
'9627' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
10fbe383ae8cb491f5e6dbe8e132f84c
c9e8b0a5b37842a5206107141018b63f011ab8ca
'2011-08-18T05:03:36-04:00'
describe
'1443358' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b8acfca50f71dfd6f94b0b294cfcc586
22f6f6e298c498afe4acc79998b2dcd96822eb4e
'2011-08-18T04:49:55-04:00'
describe
'96954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
5e4ab252f660b26c22658267587f2e5c
f008c5331d4842e1d0609d353377949c711c635b
'2011-08-18T05:00:27-04:00'
describe
'28332' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f2d16a4efacb4f4bb2f91dae1b3cb3f9
eba3882f814b6092cfa5b9585228327212ad5174
'2011-08-18T04:45:25-04:00'
describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4354a3c5390135169d9806c8437f2bbc
af7615c8a247596e78a911ddcd058268deea8db4
'2011-08-18T04:41:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c1dfb5dc41a17ba8b6fd1e159bd23c34
45fe085ab726a5b69a493ea2db75777740a796a6
'2011-08-18T05:03:18-04:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTAZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
07dbe8e16a7665e0831e232be12e0d65
9fab9d9d54cb3383071d78071c3d1801a9548d1c
'2011-08-18T04:57:32-04:00'
describe
'10484' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
0d73a08a2754941d836285bebd02e6e0
1f0faade2e0f882962da34ed3d23b285e6808625
'2011-08-18T04:41:15-04:00'
describe
'1475960' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
93da3d6f00fbfe1703c97922949566a4
51aa83a460fb0a34ed97a74e6edac4cbd4b6cca8
'2011-08-18T04:47:50-04:00'
describe
'94683' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
bacd42ff824f7247c8f6d02cf02753b1
c9dfc8c61f45f073f226fa9971966c5062e7aef8
'2011-08-18T04:55:39-04:00'
describe
'27763' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b88e220972f2f951511c37e8f6ce905b
fddb0602482f11b082c8d11cf6d4b3467c2aa4e5
'2011-08-18T04:43:31-04:00'
describe
'33041' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
880df8b82f112820234fcc9d0760e7ad
6401d6b4ffd2b702d500068c6935f3cb3b925321
'2011-08-18T04:58:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
464ea5b1db751bb1dee0e470903830f1
5280cd7c9bfb9f109d85691b20f2504eb2d44060
'2011-08-18T04:53:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
5651eaa0b285b1b173110f1eb002143b
27cd831042661d227266c376d7685390c9f320b5
describe
'9272' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
112082369107ba73bf7aed5258d18686
5d315428f29a7c217c4bdb3ddc31d1c853bf68e4
'2011-08-18T04:48:23-04:00'
describe
'1443431' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
58385fc65bfb279e991ca8880b35049d
75363cf558bff7c7e1d85687d4a06bc14e4ac421
'2011-08-18T04:52:22-04:00'
describe
'90660' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
2e1981614363a1abf10d3c14b99b3e45
b2c735e3fd346f54b68421d1710a43094b37e97b
'2011-08-18T04:47:06-04:00'
describe
'26780' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
adda21474f26e8a9effd5f67a4854c19
d97a6f2ff9f66da9cf79e060a75939946035eb0a
'2011-08-18T04:50:59-04:00'
describe
'31984' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
92482671b857cdfae9d2661c7b868046
7513409416d1e30067954a24bf9cd526d8c1b80a
'2011-08-18T04:54:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
23014da3053d5a5df5046c53aa649271
bfd13ae2fc610b26f59bd02ad3ada8a6029a276c
'2011-08-18T04:41:02-04:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
832b1c8521a533d3caddfd5f4aedf610
365e3f8d769212f2cf552b1b6d977812fe12e2ef
'2011-08-18T04:43:01-04:00'
describe
'9934' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
ccbc53ede23dedd50ee6784e53b94c3f
2e1dbd9f6dec45e4796838b8be4961a3ae6fedf7
'2011-08-18T04:45:11-04:00'
describe
'1476026' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
7bf2637ae08d79178ef4d9c76c3a9ad3
f5137bd6ced7a5c2261441b2cc1741c8e810c499
'2011-08-18T04:42:56-04:00'
describe
'97380' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
88295fe11f1d7f7a80c012ec1f378a54
d90c32472a5134965e67ae5be637fc6e9bae3af6
describe
'28381' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
317e591fd582c2bf9d282aee0e2eded5
923de622d8e6121cffe994d3b9641d3379fa914e
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1eed3bc178fb3278f6343b45a85080e9
507912b783f2f52e657a081527a086c9ff01e355
'2011-08-18T04:58:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d2075b06a3e1e941a9814e4a79b52c52
0449fd35003c308f34bdb33f0aa49bab6eeacf87
'2011-08-18T04:52:38-04:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c741181197082e21e2deeaebfb8d56a6
f78dd3635ccdf54767234aa4b1cdc7bd3cabf8a0
'2011-08-18T05:01:21-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9513' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
54e68406eaac9f452d6dd73d02b6ddcc
a4b147c4ad1ca7fe7c748a4ea22699df66b216a1
'2011-08-18T04:51:10-04:00'
describe
'1443434' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
a12ee8b8499b48ccafb8d8ff98dfbb38
a72fbb4de760e7b782ae72cad5af5c02c5bdc1d5
'2011-08-18T04:55:23-04:00'
describe
'89127' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b2662113dd0a9ea933c5f7a972ab3a7a
0fe24a7b5abcd2801e035f419f14c2da10591300
'2011-08-18T04:46:48-04:00'
describe
'28126' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
af2bd45997750a5b1e2871ce6e43697b
6bd1ca0eed96de4883eea3a0d8a769f1525b85e5
'2011-08-18T04:43:43-04:00'
describe
'32092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTBZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
98a6797db171eb85eba00b428157a381
6245d5d5d06a404e772d27d88693a290bd4c3495
'2011-08-18T04:55:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b06c56b8e30ef41eb72b32c3f1610fe8
ff5a4f70a3009e510d44b3939a788411d70af815
'2011-08-18T04:49:41-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f63e55688c983928dabdc45a350eea2f
5719ae17a02342f9429c29392ef3ffe7608986df
'2011-08-18T04:42:46-04:00'
describe
'9591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
44074a16032f42f714f31c80eaa4b536
bf1738a062f8555d53e021e40f51afaf370eb958
'2011-08-18T05:02:26-04:00'
describe
'1286675' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
bca084caa1d1acf1548e4ec35f177cf4
509dc537dc231b6d430b1fdd7ad66dc35620383e
'2011-08-18T04:54:57-04:00'
describe
'49078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCE' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fc41b31274da48433149591bbfdaa39a
b0714e2bf03f4f5b8cccaee3d7653e2302c36b3f
'2011-08-18T04:47:32-04:00'
describe
'10242' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c78c068d4e1bf07ceef7238f3c833dad
c727de9b6c36890930594cb81cbb7195a0fd9de6
describe
'15965' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
fea490cd0116f618d13f1ef00766ce83
07f525b6f45aca45f90ef0ac6dc5a57ad79f548e
'2011-08-18T04:45:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
40e76fe6fa02dcb926587c2a808ec983
9833aa838f8dfb0d18895a21d9a807a3c0180e3d
'2011-08-18T04:53:24-04:00'
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
959c312c68e91e96759ff24157d3a947
c11540ab7d63c903b255e296a257007b5cc5a81a
'2011-08-18T04:49:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4721' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f61c313517653ebd17fa43f68662319b
9b8c33dbbe9f7b67c3b84b1cff1cc627ba40358c
'2011-08-18T04:45:38-04:00'
describe
'1443406' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a6742724ef1dc6b4d8eed4b03b5d29df
cde68e74d59778bb44bb9d8624c755cd5321760f
describe
'76028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
95ffa7235a9ee4eb0aed5f63aeb92f53
d0f1b87f9dbae43a0cfdc45f94287d1f0cc01a25
'2011-08-18T04:56:00-04:00'
describe
'15733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d820af883b36aaf50c958ed203f685a1
1c8f8fd9e5be9c7434d92c83b392e974781cbcb2
'2011-08-18T04:43:39-04:00'
describe
'25285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCN' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
0d30475423566ced79c613fe64245568
22eca4452d3d35bcb9f1fb11db0cdedc1bfbf14a
'2011-08-18T04:40:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ae39c5fa4dbcee9f262beb158bb36e64
a4af756db8146826902a97e72a9c7c7cd383ccf3
'2011-08-18T04:52:21-04:00'
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0d4be934471a4d666bccb1fe2c87c30d
af28c91b73e43103a825fb1af2c5f34c11cb1776
describe
Invalid character
'7932' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
13959158bc0a706d8a6bca608e52cb8a
7c4ea5fc59c60e15b7beb83b9e11d05590b3cd16
'2011-08-18T04:49:04-04:00'
describe
'1476082' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
bb4b9d188c64daedf2f0043bfbc3f7f6
e966bf0d53e6bc7535579df89c5c25c553564351
'2011-08-18T04:47:58-04:00'
describe
'94469' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d70881fe0522a93fcd8ad2935c2d1173
0b8253c59773eed42baade88fba6f83466ce984a
'2011-08-18T04:43:22-04:00'
describe
'27794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5520cef99cfd58c59da99b4edebd8344
01222a61000c6b8bc3a674c267d07673ed584529
'2011-08-18T04:50:46-04:00'
describe
'32149' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
b6a0274196760bb8d066933a7f366e6a
bd67659d4a435db5100d239eaa0ca06ecddfdaed
'2011-08-18T04:40:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a77af5b8d4b641236b1a60c1f81b4e7d
adaf099523024c0ed84f4c06fcd5ad1d49b6b26c
'2011-08-18T04:44:19-04:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ecf0ca5b89317310ee63a4bc9a1e4c5f
c816c7efbe621d4b329eccb2421488ee76202c2d
'2011-08-18T04:54:38-04:00'
describe
'9056' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
be9849cb32bb74f2ba058511b624fcb7
dd3a0a8cfd98234478139b02b905deb621cedf8d
'2011-08-18T05:01:59-04:00'
describe
'1443371' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
034b3e95124b970e0df93b5f0657e917
dfb0ab2747496dc977f9df7659b75910b72b195a
'2011-08-18T05:03:58-04:00'
describe
'93471' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTCZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
0370d7085cf6a04812f10e63def62bef
b481ef44acb3fc0095868b942e4b284b433546d0
'2011-08-18T04:51:02-04:00'
describe
'28560' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
53bd5728d2ad855e2b91ef91278f7a12
06fab595e47228ac49b5839560be45555dd8d542
'2011-08-18T04:53:23-04:00'
describe
'32794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
2bccf334ef6fe511bde7a44d59250d01
b10361b5f22d9c8141401015afcab62adc70a810
'2011-08-18T04:49:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d7387e19f60df1e4bb903d722752ba62
a634ac374c75313843ac51e184e497f570bfabf6
'2011-08-18T04:46:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDD' 'sip-files00035.txt'
2281ee26cd75b71d93593a242f159cbf
d0598f18859bc0f06d6ee9268930351533c36e77
describe
'10016' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
997cbd002a7da70be1008f2bdf1a5eeb
da479740e5897326187eaacf920fba163031c1b0
'2011-08-18T04:54:55-04:00'
describe
'1476090' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1e5dd6b959f675bf412f8aa309c1e495
542a2ce2e66ad413b390683065e5fee3f3a2538b
'2011-08-18T05:00:04-04:00'
describe
'99635' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
10fe7a9acce434e8470e9d69415c0a22
277e05a99d80fdc3bbff242c163ddb684277356f
'2011-08-18T04:59:01-04:00'
describe
'27237' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
dfdb36068fa9042d953a344c49f4f423
a136d4f83557c17812916a99b8fbfc80c395deff
'2011-08-18T05:01:03-04:00'
describe
'34560' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c9d33aa75a7baf079a9e8572f3fa00c2
796d99d2e49936f15c6772e5deb1bda2cf0964c0
'2011-08-18T04:56:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
bda884f60de1ea8ccc52b7741f74f5dd
616e531c4b0259521e23c612ec5c98c5f035ad7f
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
ba61c9f1f4efff200c82b309b455a222
07d764b68e751db8c0e5d480e66dfef363797c66
'2011-08-18T05:01:01-04:00'
describe
'9665' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
87f9edea7cbd5c048ab3c1c463bc5088
195cf3320b9470b8986ddf4b7ce71ccf67aa1f3e
'2011-08-18T04:46:39-04:00'
describe
'1443424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e2416c81c6e1fe49cee95e95047f5a4c
403710e98492b58be6319a16843f904e98d57c93
'2011-08-18T04:46:54-04:00'
describe
'100877' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
314575ef0f037f520a4d0077a0fd1608
aa3137d2c171c3ca4e3e5f0a3c4a8265107a861d
'2011-08-18T04:50:39-04:00'
describe
'27208' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b0be05c99681c53fcc6fb3a74988c9c4
ea611a9b82a924c3f2f5c45fd0a241654ba24bb6
'2011-08-18T04:47:56-04:00'
describe
'35336' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
26346ecd3e7335d8719a5693d3a8fa78
80fb54834058cc424604f573920e3bef07149095
'2011-08-18T04:50:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a5fc6070961e020017d46c5275d27608
135b0469672b0736ebfaffaa3e98b3b7a55e368b
'2011-08-18T04:43:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
e82f417426f18f5bad2cb075cf90de41
4b728f20d7a1a22da7b73d92d8ef5ca60bbd9d96
'2011-08-18T04:43:46-04:00'
describe
'10896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
47f6ba4132a3418a5cf88bfad9919c83
97b0fe26a466accb393de6f5c8396b1decca3a47
describe
'1483366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
60cbe80d4994ece3312ecb5f4d5a01a7
02fb87b235b8f8a8aa103af4457b71a3d581e8b3
'2011-08-18T04:57:24-04:00'
describe
'111795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
90dd9f1abadd74c82fcfaf6e70677d28
227888de9637d8f9cc8a6b57fb42c5f3da78e3ba
'2011-08-18T04:53:33-04:00'
describe
'27724' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
5c72df62dab8bae07ac698bc55dd06ac
f6eac69b12772bec9365a0309b6026a0a033764e
'2011-08-18T04:52:39-04:00'
describe
'38424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
1f9de34c77fcf98f0939bc1f94c70412
0a84db05ae7e10b33b6b165e5a1cf418d4751fda
'2011-08-18T04:48:36-04:00'
describe
'11875327' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
f17771b3207d550955b388ac10f6f0a7
11af32fc2f9472d9422d1ffb96d9f4c98ee60ca3
'2011-08-18T04:57:53-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
da94fbc857e6b0bbb39d9c3295d267e0
7db5bf3169749e8fe83fd07bb9fa2458585a2795
'2011-08-18T04:44:06-04:00'
describe
'10451' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTDZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e3fc5dea175d9709a2648af88577e123
c1cc374295a387362acf818e9a9722612692ba0b
'2011-08-18T04:43:15-04:00'
describe
'1443416' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
d16a3be10455e9d13a2eb9fd6c758e00
880c6091986d27c1f908db967ccbdbfffc4f3769
'2011-08-18T05:03:20-04:00'
describe
'96722' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f34401f12c43039513613ac9a6257528
328293a7edc3ba186b6b57c5d688c64c2de522c6
'2011-08-18T05:02:58-04:00'
describe
'28147' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b2affbae88704389dc49c667c72ddc12
431acaac6957e16d9978c8e0e83b35fbdffaf586
'2011-08-18T04:40:47-04:00'
describe
'33987' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTED' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
02043d89627b1713287a9ec315a57623
f269585855e464a4fdbf6f38ef97f84ca464d41e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
a7f8ea882cba8c9d7c1d95d73a7a82b9
9256d887b1d698315713af662c1a52599347182f
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f7c843d2683dde7c35bbd23a2d7c2cd0
0866c215510dbcec16a84852fb9dddecfeb5a235
'2011-08-18T04:58:00-04:00'
describe
'10599' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e8da07bcf741772c8474cdab0527bb43
6719af6dfb6a462b60bcc82139b7e86482a71988
'2011-08-18T04:43:13-04:00'
describe
'1476094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f0fefff0235316bdfefdc79c6000bb2d
a9b633ef393504bd71a1a9c941afcb0b94fe5722
'2011-08-18T04:44:07-04:00'
describe
'93650' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
ee4f6d74875e91b3c8ba235ca8315e4a
3fe4ce158caf9104e0ee7d87788a9ce458d964cc
'2011-08-18T04:51:47-04:00'
describe
'24821' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7a6ae06c7ea88cff66443127b0f047cb
38044b27e38ec3e59ad437910d63e309787d2049
describe
'32274' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
705133de64959c85b3e541b48411898d
03ae1e3840c44febd59c5a7c0037b99803488bb2
'2011-08-18T04:54:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ebe71fdd3ded05387026337ef09290a0
6fafa329f6807a0fdec8bdf8eacab07517b7935d
'2011-08-18T04:45:50-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
c6f190397f3e0d0f6c83b8fdc7e3b8d0
4a2d286fabc3126998c6b418facd4cb8df9e6df7
'2011-08-18T04:47:39-04:00'
describe
'9110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
3c7a41a9126ed03c2fac42559fc69923
f74b6bf7888bc7d4b8557c0f0e52dec4c3e96f94
'2011-08-18T04:56:13-04:00'
describe
'1443338' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
0dc2a95ed8630b2702c3784a451a3755
a0a6d20d58eb5cbda57d531083283b1431e535a4
'2011-08-18T04:49:34-04:00'
describe
'91224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
56ddaf34532d6cf143d7b3e9b3c2710f
8a77dc3686342fcc9e4bf0ba9d04e6337dbe0cd7
'2011-08-18T04:43:28-04:00'
describe
'25948' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
0173c350e16af50ce216335363fc28e3
805470b0c21f9ee0641136a3d6ef289f705be45e
'2011-08-18T04:49:39-04:00'
describe
'31995' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTER' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
975456379fc2440ffcc2983844dbdbe0
7269c9d1c4f09f1c1cae424598e486c6a3848cce
'2011-08-18T04:51:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTES' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1b6a3b5a75d61d56126256f227e6f814
8c3a3b5e543e8e4fcf5269f6f4d4d293600dd134
'2011-08-18T04:52:50-04:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTET' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4f0a4badfc0be62421c389e9d46e0b9e
4e2d370cc13692d6ea89c96b7de80c367faf84e2
'2011-08-18T04:54:43-04:00'
describe
'10057' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
db56cda253dbf3ef2aa8783f368cf360
f542de732ca07d9db1e9dcdbd4d5bd76373d8b55
'2011-08-18T04:48:35-04:00'
describe
'1476102' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f5774dbef0a084244228c6f62e4ee136
e3f9b4bf657ae3c6a411974888d71f782f6f5550
'2011-08-18T04:41:11-04:00'
describe
'96718' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEW' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8863447793274687254d873c8df3f8c6
cc67b5c8cda4120c196a7f5e4be26c8b8412bc71
'2011-08-18T04:44:51-04:00'
describe
'26432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
af340ffda4548762fae2afbd7045ae3b
38931c4e2e0c44f5e93af7c3fe3b7a9b32ad4116
'2011-08-18T04:45:12-04:00'
describe
'33893' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c529e0139e21e478fc6106cd2cd48e40
d960c8fc24f36dac2a28daa5481eedb20aca81a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTEZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3b4793033cf6a4c7bec170c7bbbd8c53
b52f07c3a8c2b7961a0be88ad055c0f899421e22
'2011-08-18T04:57:08-04:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
8ff28b13ae8b10b87a4a74a8ec3c66a3
a2ea366136e756ec5d89a448849dbd282fe2ebfe
describe
'9614' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
8413284092c2bebf4860b5d6243edeaf
153cfb816eb5a05e8e988dd7060bd632e7deefef
'2011-08-18T04:43:20-04:00'
describe
'1443363' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
15f0a08ac65962ca62078fd9585b3b90
ed397f3f685a1b98e5309bdf2e4a44f99cdd8e26
'2011-08-18T04:41:33-04:00'
describe
'86759' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
e9bf6efda16ef14d4bad30522d845ea7
9fd2338bc15e0ea3a0d4a8a0db76780d4a2dbf2d
'2011-08-18T04:42:29-04:00'
describe
'26382' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
3406cadc5ddef2bcb4e608ad4a9087f1
f085fa3193422745d7bc45111164169985fe4cf3
'2011-08-18T05:01:26-04:00'
describe
'31203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8d523e523791a5c0462566a0fa717708
958a0ba8d9e65ddcbe03a8c47e1420cae0e866df
'2011-08-18T04:56:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
6785cffc58ec6280bf3e241e397817cb
41f3a9d75b8e544828d9f5678a34d09be2387eb7
'2011-08-18T04:44:25-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
44f6e089d5d1628377de77e89271a48e
4be901242ff7a04cdcd9edd39624e3fe039dd103
'2011-08-18T05:01:54-04:00'
describe
'9753' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
281387f3ca4babd90422cedc9a3ec338
eb54b0cdd91329056039ed75852bf69c26ec3ba9
'2011-08-18T04:43:23-04:00'
describe
'1476040' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
fa9b29215bdbd4fdf6962882feb94947
3e08b23f06ff8949f7db3b821ae8ee124eeaaeb6
'2011-08-18T04:53:42-04:00'
describe
'89803' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
3d29eca13e8e59b7b3c87138ee781504
5bf235197f867679421360ae7174bdf5b3f5e6ca
'2011-08-18T04:46:58-04:00'
describe
'28806' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
0b9dff2fe4fd4e3674770e35f4913304
d9adaa2ffaa7b0cbe72466217347cac9a2ed9977
'2011-08-18T04:45:42-04:00'
describe
'30260' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFM' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
f1a90e04d6cb1ee5ff6548b6349e2371
015354330bb866efbdf5d44d9ab7433d665f4045
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFN' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8a803895b34375e66c78a0e46c55fc08
b95b239b5596c5667f55b1a952110c2cc98c4dd9
'2011-08-18T04:44:08-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
acccb9248a5165de6f962866b9994a60
246d07600fc4bc7b42b4c67b24540271c32d8b3c
'2011-08-18T04:59:04-04:00'
describe
'8522' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFP' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2cb2280c959961ef5a77a3e09d3db64f
50f4507a10bda48f87689bbd10fc25301d73f0cb
describe
'1488900' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFQ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
733295ba51de369abb7f197969da786c
ffc44260e8244c5b7474065529ced7b6454ab3e4
'2011-08-18T05:02:42-04:00'
describe
'94523' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFR' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
9e648de1299e7fd0603d29068d198d61
7798150aff52987bce2e871312056dc6a78fad84
describe
'29384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFS' 'sip-files00045.pro'
745fafbe06a874823ad345583a2b8d5b
626940377b68c177bab301e9c8e7d6fb81986368
'2011-08-18T04:41:20-04:00'
describe
'32132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFT' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
857ae675d0e10107551c294ffc135095
2f8ac63c68c73dac6621ccbce23c3683cda2e048
'2011-08-18T05:04:00-04:00'
describe
'11919539' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
758b64bbf13e6f1b8bbdcadce87d9882
2fa8198d7f472e1b54535e50c083f98c4e7c2a4f
'2011-08-18T04:46:27-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFV' 'sip-files00045.txt'
bb0f5803f93960cc246e447ca95c6db7
e164daf8151afae37a3cf5f662a2e5756ba4982b
'2011-08-18T04:41:36-04:00'
describe
'9283' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFW' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9a46d08f864c3a3eeee5a47f671c7d8c
376b9aff0382ea6e0452a8e1587dfe27e38fbd2b
'2011-08-18T04:46:11-04:00'
describe
'1476081' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFX' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7e81058a60c9bb7ea199394e6f1fb979
862776b5c51d532be39f30d63fbfd52447e3fe20
'2011-08-18T05:02:07-04:00'
describe
'95711' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
48fa4a9ae8986fb671f24b3256213727
5f236b987f980c7d4849a271ea2b53a772b84f5b
'2011-08-18T04:52:29-04:00'
describe
'27966' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTFZ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
52e56f59ce7e0469eec03bd7913f15a0
7dcd6a6c1c3c81e9fcff8ee797d6729c8a4e2d5b
'2011-08-18T04:54:05-04:00'
describe
'33508' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGA' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
82a5bc2943351eae12b461cdb5af8641
b9db25a075737e607f3f20d4c1fca60c84888392
'2011-08-18T04:51:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b99871e4668a5e5878cec5a27d4c5ed0
af2709369c8e9fbcc3ccdf0c8488834476b83589
'2011-08-18T04:55:55-04:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGC' 'sip-files00046.txt'
640b69134913692bd1fd2fb5fb347ac7
6418bb132e0f8cd3b8381dc1eedcbef21c454874
'2011-08-18T04:59:50-04:00'
describe
'9277' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGD' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3a878dd384b0b6045d226f071ed4cccd
c1e75253536a8562d60d297c49d9d94b2904ae35
'2011-08-18T04:58:04-04:00'
describe
'1443328' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGE' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b095585e7e6e1fb46da98a02bfbbbcb9
9c21bee0ee9477a30a101564a3511097c0abe4ab
'2011-08-18T04:41:30-04:00'
describe
'93392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e4a2fb4e16ca814df4e594f7b882b75a
64ff51f79abcfc13e68688263ebe6183d8bb3f76
describe
'28011' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGG' 'sip-files00047.pro'
84a7cfadac012b27a2e6bea661512ed7
4a6bbeef41276509ddefc19f5abad915d1b89a5d
'2011-08-18T04:54:13-04:00'
describe
'33246' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGH' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
576a5a699b08256713aa5e03fcf5389c
91cf15c28c34f4ce857c28710db151b879aaf1c4
'2011-08-18T05:03:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGI' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a80cb44c8714d5207b95ab1cafdca049
e6b48395a36cd4ead74db9ee90fba53d98418420
'2011-08-18T04:53:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGJ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
74aaf39eb2f2f8bd21fd82f7cd482760
373c10542abf1dc8ff4c7bc8df74049a37b36dd7
'2011-08-18T05:03:27-04:00'
describe
'10283' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
c24056761f369089723c62982e321a92
1ad260b1d855766e30cb6c9b91f723e7dfe40369
'2011-08-18T04:44:42-04:00'
describe
'1476078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c772cc9c17bd9b2e8c9cc0c4434bfc0f
9668c76a625e2d23e59fa3b7d5d0d00648bee8e1
describe
'89708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGM' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
41445830a31b843c88e7aa229f4088cf
98d99233ef0709328ebdc3f9091554921e472b9e
'2011-08-18T04:56:16-04:00'
describe
'27301' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGN' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e1c28b11c0487424243ed2712ae7081a
b78dbcbdceea4c9e700962e1214ea83792a35fba
'2011-08-18T04:41:58-04:00'
describe
'31854' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
294f5cb67f2ea76c9ccb22fefa077656
d1ca2a693699768af50f8bc76307a1cb3fccebe2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
2b82aeae09f6ff7bed1b2c6d8fd44678
6271b28fc6364b5738eb03ba6c0cea9d0c15e84e
'2011-08-18T04:43:19-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
1c421d96813b396d367eb14448a403da
2f7e05f8d310fe6b62e38c0e6be1552de5cd5256
'2011-08-18T04:42:24-04:00'
describe
'8534' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
f95f515284f2ba372e515bd3c610e7da
cd3b6a01826a64d3a00da4d395fb3b0192679e74
'2011-08-18T04:50:21-04:00'
describe
'1443400' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
87b96bfb807bcc511b138f037778b826
59e4290b63e3b67d071a3266ca522bfffdc5222b
'2011-08-18T04:50:35-04:00'
describe
'91776' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ee6ac6dce0dd6b3a45b41ff64d08fd1e
609ee32748e622b1e514da1cedd4788ec0de82fc
'2011-08-18T04:45:27-04:00'
describe
'26953' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
a850a49ee60c15d1f2d2761501db06ad
13fd4782e63ed4a2c9d95bc1e6e64fdca8e07ef3
'2011-08-18T04:49:59-04:00'
describe
'32064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ad219bf76f7bf2db22170126c14d962a
2e90bd7a8051fbc69b73a70b46a4ec93e8270cdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a897b15f138e6a71659e5d58f4da6e30
a2b6501d73a3122867f853458e39f742f252b874
'2011-08-18T04:43:45-04:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
fd476288b3926ee76f8d1df7230d20eb
c618004249e71b2d3a3410ac6cd094b5797d88b4
'2011-08-18T04:42:32-04:00'
describe
'10249' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8bd95618480e7432097e7d126900350e
96200563df6a3a894c89457ae15dff687350746e
'2011-08-18T04:57:09-04:00'
describe
'1476098' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTGZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2c5269e5922db9716603ff602b2f350a
03c358af69e405ae4a87b2499782036f7c697f0e
'2011-08-18T04:42:34-04:00'
describe
'92467' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
33cdb97f6ea8e0aee4248040cddaa431
abded2701598de1901e7f4b3221f7e72831c6215
'2011-08-18T04:41:45-04:00'
describe
'26966' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c3f65480137aa7b4e06f0f9a3b76f986
d37d450570291440ae2e762847dcb4410a62af01
'2011-08-18T04:44:03-04:00'
describe
'33001' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e6f3d5f4e865c8b32f3ca30d285b6703
e325fbd98c01b02343b7224c39adbc70fd21f2a2
'2011-08-18T04:40:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
df6dae59eba8d58265710bd3d5091346
a15c44c9091f8e5de8546c2d73ac3ab88a44904a
'2011-08-18T04:50:48-04:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c3d92057cb5c1f69b04e1215fccf190e
f7d3004d5b241d5adaf842b888ee8cfdd4b7303c
'2011-08-18T05:04:21-04:00'
describe
'8835' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
a073d0adeb1c07ef59123ec177f90207
bb3cb5c6f354a3b30cd4b1d6048603f94c25b459
'2011-08-18T04:55:20-04:00'
describe
'1443315' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
f83a92521945cedef497261c4bd31cf7
a535bb012e770446dc4be0caae256535a8584625
'2011-08-18T04:47:54-04:00'
describe
'92136' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ac368fe6518421b56cede0ebfe703ee7
1ffb615ccbd0364dec080c827cb10a5f9b3bfdee
'2011-08-18T05:01:31-04:00'
describe
'28947' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHI' 'sip-files00051.pro'
98b71974a137e2107b86fcd9bcbd879f
ddd324fcda58e17ff7b59095866372f422c01060
'2011-08-18T04:54:15-04:00'
describe
'32163' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2aaf5c53f48710851263bfbb3222fb9e
eacbd0199779fd1fa7af4517e89c75ac33d6be11
'2011-08-18T04:56:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
01b7cd923496c09909b285bd0b991f39
44168c31b17d4b49a1f4a804e9217aae6c86a717
'2011-08-18T04:57:41-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
5f4cdc1b7939010cd445d04e097480c6
5ad4f40805f980dbd69a5bc1989f6483e860fdaa
'2011-08-18T04:57:59-04:00'
describe
'9897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
bfa5723e5b8377ce6b815d1eb27a71c2
ace9028c078428e4ad37eb054f55f3a8c8bf3d51
'2011-08-18T04:43:59-04:00'
describe
'1476086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHN' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
059cdc8d5a24f613e979d95ec0a0c959
54c6768c1f36d9cb62eeb77d15a1324001a299ac
'2011-08-18T04:50:20-04:00'
describe
'97765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
14f2c98cadaf821554b0e7ee61e6bd40
4c7c281ad437225326760d13f39d8d1e22498b3e
describe
'27869' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHP' 'sip-files00052.pro'
e26013a20d95d678bc7c637716b635c4
dfa03d078cddda6a97ef74f0617fca44ebda2bda
'2011-08-18T04:59:28-04:00'
describe
'34450' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
a67782dc73f2644b2ead2423fa776711
77eec31cccf32b0166d3069a4ce3f98fe1608762
'2011-08-18T04:47:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHR' 'sip-files00052.tif'
4eefdbedc2b81329d6fded3a6f58ca02
0373e6d4cee028eb42311a6eed39bdd58989bf80
'2011-08-18T04:41:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHS' 'sip-files00052.txt'
ebde307dcc17fcb471117dfa9c4fc9d1
844cfb875ea10805c9844f63f4884f10bddcc4ce
'2011-08-18T04:42:23-04:00'
describe
'9435' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
4d3918e8af3414268582f93fea9a154e
d364cea069c0c23f5376d22e8eb59d230ab89f9d
'2011-08-18T04:50:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHU' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
063a2747572866e42e77121535d08d9d
73983aa560b96b8afe012efcd9477bf5dc624998
'2011-08-18T04:47:15-04:00'
describe
'92848' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f8acdfef8208f8f3d9e550fccacfd40b
72223a911d42a080c78ed3c845953fcdff36cbf5
'2011-08-18T05:00:10-04:00'
describe
'26379' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
eaa8cf81ec97c00cb995ba565e44069c
799ab91472f35b6e9f433d100cd93fc3b925a284
describe
'32421' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
408aba54b3e8498b8c0b9e2c6ca433ff
e9210b25bfb32c4186ff5e7ab2a4e38b27631514
'2011-08-18T04:52:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHY' 'sip-files00053.tif'
3593ce270b61eed444483472e9821edc
be2aa45c2ace48fc213a1fcfd2c206412210cc9d
'2011-08-18T04:46:40-04:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTHZ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
1b0b9899730d9d41c71724b803391e46
5b2ec9ba58a7262384493d6250fea52686db59b6
'2011-08-18T04:57:38-04:00'
describe
'10053' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIA' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c118e64c7446923156acc22653488df1
b27bb58b0b0c29fdcfeefb5cb3ee2cc2d812977b
'2011-08-18T04:41:54-04:00'
describe
'1476091' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
0c14810f61b7dca201ecb3467bd0d88b
564bc0d8a236a3b1b99bfc06931eafc13cb07fc1
'2011-08-18T04:52:30-04:00'
describe
'107203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIC' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
fed7972400310327532d367065ca9f61
fea80105dddc563b4ecb75d4d0082ba299d1311a
describe
'28427' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTID' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ab9f287809e2506f2ce195894c33f9d8
606a006839c48f20f0871c9e667bb90b8b6a9d2c
describe
'37972' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIE' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3decf5befb5a73a8f1e5c57b881ff952
5318834a975c8a4bc13ad883c7d797c9f6d962c5
'2011-08-18T04:54:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
71454da52d8dd21738506b27cb3b6b2e
79a962a2b7252894f7b44053740c80cbeb6eb8a3
'2011-08-18T04:57:00-04:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
a7ba92ef0f1c7d39ce0f963e61f3652a
bbdddc58644a6a2218f5baf5c3ce252fd976c70f
describe
'10423' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIH' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e822bfc7f23f49448d9bd21f181188ea
612f2085cd3b8f2efa8771560483e516ccd1279e
'2011-08-18T04:47:14-04:00'
describe
'1443375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTII' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
47fd815670ec6fa6c5000ad212cffb7c
defe11d16af11b15d73d39082c95aa5626748d2e
describe
'94088' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIJ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
81e894795cbed621c262888c898ce210
358ddef25070a36fd884313939b06ca0bbc9af42
'2011-08-18T04:58:27-04:00'
describe
'27302' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIK' 'sip-files00055.pro'
07b519befe0e6acf96f57310787fa382
eef29349ab13670177d323fdae1758e4b078ae8f
'2011-08-18T05:01:52-04:00'
describe
'33272' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIL' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
1ae3d51dd48b105804b866b3e4398ffb
e3b558effc943d0fc908615ec3067076207a615c
'2011-08-18T04:59:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIM' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ba5db076e8ec5c3db1d75888bd815d01
a05eca468bd74eaab9e6bc297442dbba3067b928
'2011-08-18T04:46:02-04:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIN' 'sip-files00055.txt'
4f5368913af2ed2745c3b67176b3e722
532f10527af82f2271caf5300b72ec590d6373dc
'2011-08-18T04:48:43-04:00'
describe
'10399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIO' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
cb829ba91c5455aa3bcb21e919198d4a
e20ccbf0bfda43ef1f85c4bccaac86e193324822
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIP' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
20cee656a24e0883c88ba20097200463
c3a83e60849c3e8b550bea6a80a8b414952ec7f2
'2011-08-18T04:46:03-04:00'
describe
'102544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
1f113f4078c5ac31acedc02c0b28c129
e6719adabb1a9fbcd0dc151cb7bc4d19725e55fc
'2011-08-18T04:42:35-04:00'
describe
'38748' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIR' 'sip-files00056.pro'
726a3a198b25ac3eebfa8cefd7ac6f39
91276f4f495fab4d6817cacb2d6d82c7801eff4e
'2011-08-18T04:57:19-04:00'
describe
'34031' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIS' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
ed480f28209cc6f4cb31c313dacd1b83
9c49715e98caf9cb3bed4680ff5af2e466458d81
'2011-08-18T04:47:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b495c6d72cf168b79a486e0c7061773c
aea3f84c7b76d96743d5d6646d1b8feeb6ed2c28
'2011-08-18T04:55:52-04:00'
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIU' 'sip-files00056.txt'
99327e93af92b26125e35658bfbeac9d
ce2cd5e14e2af97344073f6fd123d475ad486c99
'2011-08-18T04:56:38-04:00'
describe
'9247' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIV' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
2a1a28630454ec5fbd717cc5a99b4ec9
4bb7167d075c893bb84f95ca559dc538cf9c279f
'2011-08-18T04:43:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
daf0637474831618937956c28c42bf31
3917f6323249cfd0609534c57739f4261f8e73e7
'2011-08-18T04:57:15-04:00'
describe
'90587' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
351df292b9440400e22a4c2098574dea
64cae95c92790c6625a6410c8550e11ce5e6c4c5
'2011-08-18T04:40:56-04:00'
describe
'25432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
84e6571a8bb6220ea7b3b94ab6a7f54c
b6bdd79b705e8e8a49503dd4355c62101032ce0d
'2011-08-18T04:52:07-04:00'
describe
'32483' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTIZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f7ca4c26ad55e061ba264c6524f46e75
c9e2a97aaddd65c98da9745d52d0a77efaecc1ce
'2011-08-18T04:50:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
77d294e183b4c497e5e9f099d511b634
0e5079c9f0fa1433d701350a84c4c1595ee10b61
'2011-08-18T04:44:41-04:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
e0d7478cacd803c5b89f74250c3d3366
90fb0fdc086d67b3cc14dc5d54a38eefcb0b575d
'2011-08-18T04:44:39-04:00'
describe
'10597' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJC' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f26458fb28d9f47729e7660d80f3e165
fbb41bca4b7642b3819ad9ea052969fa04a8451c
describe
'1476027' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJD' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a2b1d994af77627f1ae7a073f9ded96a
6903c1044218768bfb5fd00152a558ce55bf0fa7
'2011-08-18T05:00:59-04:00'
describe
'83341' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJE' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
67d16f61b601d1804c2deee63846b21d
b76f2f21551b023be6bab73b48febacd87b613eb
'2011-08-18T04:45:18-04:00'
describe
'25801' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJF' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a0a8de1e9fb7950bb9f3799fd57af7f6
313851bcf7c515e9e885eba87cceee44a84b3194
'2011-08-18T04:43:05-04:00'
describe
'28897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
22985f7bb93855e61cea38940c236c51
711300725950636eb2b4dc6f84c9afa37ce949c3
'2011-08-18T04:45:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9cfc751a49c0d37973608e6a72c6b074
f5ef16692785d0db3e0941025b65d842cf49fc38
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c9d7a4fe5d86b1d7d5ab14d8edc92fa5
f02243576d7e4dd78557d408e590caedd0b8bf12
'2011-08-18T04:59:46-04:00'
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJJ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
81ebb839f74e3142823011367d449cd8
4d3d057301836778b32631a6bb5b232116104591
'2011-08-18T04:53:08-04:00'
describe
'1443265' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
392e799077e68afc5792b116e8981c04
a72307096e91e4a9a31597fa02b47ec23afd2d32
describe
'1515692' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJL' 'sip-filesback.jp2'
1b13767eacb24158250c9b6e1f2d9fa2
993da0a078f79a19cec7c66078a59b25de0421ba
'2011-08-18T04:53:48-04:00'
describe
'90448' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
1c418d3bf8e9f9a2f9acdaaa2fc6ac2e
7feba772d34c6a124711d1893f07438201b0f2bf
'2011-08-18T04:49:17-04:00'
describe
'26043' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
fb0143c7b25425ca5d9a6879b3da83de
1a830a7ff8fc8f220aa16b11404d2277749659f9
'2011-08-18T04:45:22-04:00'
describe
'31678' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c23c8e788d490bf98ffe0da1342289bb
6f1f769c1ffa7ad00b05aef4aa98ecdd6ea05181
'2011-08-18T04:43:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
580db448646a90e7c7df5776a1ecb08a
0ca3e02e655bbb22200cafaeb223a9439410328c
'2011-08-18T04:45:45-04:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
74c68a465fb697439e54ca13f2b7847e
e55d7558bb30f1f8de904d0ad0c5a4cc2e5a6218
'2011-08-18T04:43:07-04:00'
describe
'10059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJR' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3523e9ea0f3a0c8b530c7167549202d6
c4f7f63adfea049fd1b148e703531a5ff5300c82
'2011-08-18T04:50:10-04:00'
describe
'1476083' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJS' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
ed261e8bbbe7828d98e9f8651fb46eb5
223190b1ec0d304645a6c32af579996d533296bc
'2011-08-18T04:47:33-04:00'
describe
'98496' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJT' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5ddb93b2605935a49076ca764efb32a5
761daa1fc956b2116b04eb6a795f9dd0c6828435
describe
'28659' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJU' 'sip-files00060.pro'
372a6339f2deead4fd377e96174d32b2
0b5acc497251e448365a62ab602c47b405011d5e
'2011-08-18T04:45:35-04:00'
describe
'35195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
b5618058bc8f624d44a927e1df2d6c49
6b75397d0ab1995aa64c85766c42bd44ef5d1979
'2011-08-18T04:40:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJW' 'sip-files00060.tif'
32e155f5b808e96e12b90afb41b363fd
48f9a55d777b2de73b6b1626228a5c91c75b6de2
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJX' 'sip-files00060.txt'
354dd440c5fbe68b4aa095b1b160b381
b1b775034e9b01fbc3f8356bf174e63b54518540
'2011-08-18T04:49:50-04:00'
describe
'9587' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
e48817f263ff1a846b84832ec9f10c1d
9da40d1c7317bad7395f9ead4e785e9fa9779630
'2011-08-18T04:58:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTJZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
1c94d3a75b4ec4eb7c591cc063617c75
9d649f26b0ef47358f1229517cb1b0c8f22fda13
'2011-08-18T04:43:17-04:00'
describe
'90745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b6b49711424434a2334ddbbe7266d690
49347f7163a2040d68186a3ba45df3c1a70d3f3e
'2011-08-18T04:44:01-04:00'
describe
'25961' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b584973a8cde953a7b57caac03aad3ba
247ede92d9084365e0cd417fc3868ea61aa1ef04
'2011-08-18T04:50:16-04:00'
describe
'32358' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1ceae59e0b604701dbeb07c03ed88fba
cf817414ce1248a766d2519735101676d42b4bd2
'2011-08-18T04:57:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
6d2f14bc19b346035d18111b3cea4db3
a86367eb2f0120c2c3a0d300eff69fc8925e87bd
'2011-08-18T04:47:30-04:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3d87983136b3f9ef444b74c27f83779e
239606964772b478534ce70796c84238c147754d
'2011-08-18T04:57:46-04:00'
describe
'10367' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0b1281faa9ae651aa9908e1b80cf9a00
611f1a0fc2ca43273bfcefe8c17e16cef2963145
'2011-08-18T04:43:40-04:00'
describe
'1476087' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
86d12c3e9b6cabca4825b6a63b1d7df8
daea7af7ec01fe7364a961cc57bbb9eb97b08b9a
describe
'67089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
685316f373e14a66ead5a42e092345d1
511683868954b759b818d9bda2f4ca65eb65230d
'2011-08-18T04:50:45-04:00'
describe
'17402' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
05749f33afc61865f1c0ed2c720ec4e8
c10d4fb4409d5903c5ed561d866d68294db67feb
'2011-08-18T04:59:02-04:00'
describe
'23498' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
6f4f722fa03dc1ded007502312e57cb6
e0d128605f493adf6c3f6bfebbb5f4a11e682d22
'2011-08-18T04:54:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
4eb414250767f8d42c24ede387a214d3
0f274cac19bcb264fac486db9d2cfc768e03a8e1
'2011-08-18T04:44:04-04:00'
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4a7fa39f16e10ce933d19c6bb9cd1aac
2e36cd83f66e3a3bee216d1d6ebb82de6d25cdfa
'2011-08-18T04:45:54-04:00'
describe
'6857' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
89ec94ee460606571b4d4cce791731fb
098ad77753aa761de7e194c0fa7c519c91a0dc88
describe
'1443385' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4c2afcd48dc322bab31fe7f1a1b1fe88
08f1936ddced032ce21a3aa2d43b8507d3d045ae
'2011-08-18T04:51:26-04:00'
describe
'76948' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
9247fad9f2c4ddbdc472041bbc9b3bd8
b4a016912a9b0ad35a19e3acd134b256537219b4
'2011-08-18T04:48:58-04:00'
describe
'17264' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
b51c0a4c9a666026e926253a1bdf362b
b2eb031ca310893dce7af6e7bab8679eb59c126f
'2011-08-18T04:51:03-04:00'
describe
'26921' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2ef84808431c7cbb942f24bcb86f566e
4453c2acb6c8d47b239497721757e89d124faffe
'2011-08-18T04:56:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9a7b500096a01a3527113e545929f3fd
9b70dfdf76f1d1a42a1392fcad954d409a9a8361
'2011-08-18T04:46:56-04:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4185f8a3a4eac14481f5defee7fd0ef2
8a0ad8d8e291ca1c82a26a155b0de6eb62332419
'2011-08-18T04:50:09-04:00'
describe
'8255' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
dbc594ece7a2a581b49cf3e8cee83a8f
ff32b642f82442ded390116e6e4a8747578145da
'2011-08-18T04:44:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
c06b9d3ae664ea7656ddd63f7705c244
7f00b9d65248cdf400e23453a0a7114f889b598c
'2011-08-18T04:47:22-04:00'
describe
'99431' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
f179f0bec3da5a7877c9170b5715f176
9e4194651ed0895017f9e1636fb66976cafa975b
describe
'27797' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
41a18e3bf6b4666de4f795381be46fb8
b2256b6d23d4ded523ced3a39e255677f85310cf
'2011-08-18T04:52:45-04:00'
describe
'35123' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
8e6b9e69f1d6ec1820a5363a2d41e947
cea29fc9a53bbeb2d9bb74c5465c2f880e7f29c7
'2011-08-18T05:03:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKY' 'sip-files00064.tif'
eaef145bd342204dd73c835d3dfca38f
81f9a7f0e6a085d0b8f2be6a60b45147974c2633
'2011-08-18T05:02:53-04:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTKZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
d5c4ee5c8679da63150da35176a0f78f
1ce54ffeed9ddc99cdd155530f56b305337d3a2f
'2011-08-18T04:58:46-04:00'
describe
'9883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2d220ff2e8b08b330a5c36ebd2aab36d
ac0ec5d8a860bae3f025ce46a39fea934a18a4c5
'2011-08-18T04:46:24-04:00'
describe
'1443384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLB' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
1ffe1d986c450cf07e0042c46c344e86
1da7f4f6aa66304c61bf8daf8c80e4da153771ee
'2011-08-18T04:50:30-04:00'
describe
'95442' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8ef08b1b74031482605354cdc2943ff3
cf8614f31e57f8718a5097d35a4da1398d066955
'2011-08-18T04:43:49-04:00'
describe
'27171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
9c166f74a09181900d1cae150ae13b8a
c5127e0a753569413d8d51656d702f5c4c2a7449
'2011-08-18T04:51:43-04:00'
describe
'34241' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0d8d92bdb6b55fcfeab9e2563b06453d
c047587e1047c852d332d018118b1d3e53414465
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
15c238900f434fd8818d26385f4e5f5c
dcc85b1592a90f8b74b49ec8df10be9c24bb65b6
'2011-08-18T04:48:12-04:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f7231ccbd314c32c3ea0c1aa550e4533
d699aa82f6fc2fe6c15a92edad6d2ed3c0324e50
'2011-08-18T04:58:08-04:00'
describe
'10717' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
b4172b8b0b6b3e05f64380b2899bf130
034adbc19ee8127fdbb2626ff6404262c377f625
describe
'1476101' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLI' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6ffe78671e17c6a1978a5c85620596d9
fe7159082deed7a9c82336410692a16c3a5ed29d
describe
'100888' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
b0feb8aa45bd61663b010b7bd679ae53
03fc9308db4de11cba8460d5a05cad5c7d8671ab
describe
'27819' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1e08bcf979efd28c4a1c68f51847607a
1dc3c554cb00c424021f9b2b1de17e8341ea4c0f
'2011-08-18T05:00:35-04:00'
describe
'36166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
0df582689b6b07febb7563ea0b4a93e6
fe6faba46a0e2c4e77487885e159661b865e7e6d
'2011-08-18T04:56:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5f074982f3691f5eab760004a2bdc844
e55e3f1232eeaba47108db19e4db31da87548497
'2011-08-18T04:49:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
fece9b2bfcb61df8a4a76a2c6162edce
2b3d21e7b1a35c3eca93ee8159da1d27a8f46858
'2011-08-18T04:46:38-04:00'
describe
'10144' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
bbd681ea4be05a385a065fc127c7f0a0
62f3bcadb308b707f5770142647507e64540dec8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
8efddb57e014465d2f4fd576e760cf42
700696d0c074d0a5ce9bef8b35bb30e09c945426
'2011-08-18T05:02:28-04:00'
describe
'92752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b486b17ecdb3a9bc756a4d65c1f0ea3d
9f3bd92d584da0e991125110b666dbaf86f38f63
'2011-08-18T04:51:17-04:00'
describe
'26766' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
5e0d422c91632c9c47be4d855ddf87b7
dca268cd68e13495fdd7a93962c4eedb3e14e488
describe
'33387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b3ce0482eb0c9b5838cf1af328c4580c
504f5196374fc5ca7ca1c57fe16357d423b788d7
'2011-08-18T04:42:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
861a16630cd45529cd6775d1eeb03518
0a75e99137d38cc3dbbb16ba7c1100f1c4b67e61
'2011-08-18T04:42:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
204e1a0e4bc7783d20f497828c1fac9c
1b4394792ab97ed9129d3f4e1cac15c1a1921983
'2011-08-18T05:03:49-04:00'
describe
'10738' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
7f4c2e8609a57fabaf2e1e32b376f5e9
c690a932a3f29323a5e617b99c2613fe98f4c927
describe
'1448994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
777ce904c63a5c6a5c93b7666a150870
cb8c4f4e56167aea7a37388ec9d28d0ae5a0eeab
'2011-08-18T04:53:36-04:00'
describe
'101657' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
96b030abd9c7e0473e7c324fd00ee0d2
7bdaab5f45308e6baddc61454a12846176c731d2
'2011-08-18T05:00:28-04:00'
describe
'27799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e06cc2b6e34c432f85060eb816544c28
141bc949299489b6eb8794776c6cdae87fa9e8d4
'2011-08-18T04:48:57-04:00'
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTLZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c622d8a6d276b3f875926d6c833a51f1
a50dc206d18807947d280306adfc227ec14ed12d
'2011-08-18T04:42:25-04:00'
describe
'11600345' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d3cbaf28dd489c5251a5b3d7f3a2dcda
0b4c809446eab04791d037bed2df58eadba21c0e
'2011-08-18T04:43:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
5fe77c6c713542f771146de332c0e6de
02afb30037a7805babb7539c11eedf2a9408b69c
'2011-08-18T04:42:10-04:00'
describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
494ba17ac476525a4b0f3ec41afb0c08
eaeaf5b2f1e259723d585158c40fc267cd277bb1
'2011-08-18T04:57:45-04:00'
describe
'1443414' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
08a09421ed402ed692ddfffdd852ab88
9406e5a17a2f37f909c5d33cbd3a9856286c7218
'2011-08-18T04:56:07-04:00'
describe
'101650' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTME' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
71a67fc64f2a91a1121053ee2cce05cf
d8e947fee592beb18c6709e4bd391db886333c80
'2011-08-18T04:51:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e9c3c99388c9c7697549743783466038
8c02edcdad3d98a218ad4c0d2461e82e835751c1
'2011-08-18T05:01:13-04:00'
describe
'36789' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
97f000207a30de4fa39c07a78dbe809b
db4564484aa909c777062f31bd70641e6aa5b6c3
'2011-08-18T04:40:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b62cbac8bfdf9ca13007c058a7bfd5b4
5a513dcfd8ee7c03822007c8791364d865a5c26b
'2011-08-18T04:49:22-04:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
21f93a5e3d55bac90a01d665f248d9ee
2ff2e3c172532eed2dbad9bbef41cf6619b2e1ae
'2011-08-18T04:41:19-04:00'
describe
'11513' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7ed9ad35fd5950376139db7dce13d366
f92f286330bebee12b16beb9b345c02dd057b7d2
'2011-08-18T04:44:59-04:00'
describe
'1476079' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
fe5a93d224d07193fc29748b0f9b907f
8025c0c26b5760f1180a1fad13ca4db53d0079ad
'2011-08-18T04:54:30-04:00'
describe
'97145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTML' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
10b62543141a5ba86506e1d3fbeb35d0
3ccac4714f123787a5f59b9a9158b10f2993075d
'2011-08-18T04:41:18-04:00'
describe
'27220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e3e73d63ef1fe12f5a148dbe038755f8
e2d0b2f1d9d7b726eeb5c13d1b334cf238912084
describe
'34768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
4b042922751600e0b9f9f115f16d9737
3085d5719dc9e751a7d71ed740f57a9310831800
'2011-08-18T04:55:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f454592fecfc7612a3a022f5f084b5e7
4fa74fc6567ceb8da7206b0ca19e2aa3acbe824c
'2011-08-18T05:00:49-04:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
07e8dfab38c0f43aadc631394054742a
a464753006757e967ce6305e9da6a2708a2dfc79
'2011-08-18T05:03:42-04:00'
describe
'9786' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
37f49059761d937db94ccdd1264c9f47
80113f849bd1b1339ca8eff09dbe42bacb62d571
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
dc0769e090ddc7da0726bd7957f3a6a7
df225af62f7e50e472d05c6d48a28e494a3d6156
'2011-08-18T04:44:14-04:00'
describe
'97284' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
97924ae47fb66202976f133f40761aa0
76d75cc9f0ebfe864d10183b93db25049fd6d7ec
'2011-08-18T04:44:52-04:00'
describe
'27873' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMT' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f26726d2ca26711eed6b8c2b3ce642f1
7cbfaf15a27ee75fd3bf082651ac10e18655d73f
describe
'34867' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d3590fe63d67414ca6950b1284608636
49021a937baf369bcd1802acf963ba5192db9645
'2011-08-18T04:51:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
9c9b6d2b933536359e0feb05fcb56aec
a9f88d02604e7b77a55c84b9e9f455750a7daae2
'2011-08-18T04:57:30-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
f0b201b64eb4bc1fe2ebec7d2d61d576
29d0df7611996b768ecf6820f732c61d8ffa9c83
'2011-08-18T04:53:59-04:00'
describe
'10864' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
f6f3e83d3201629d6b95700f82f803fe
3137c46d31182bf30e207c6cb3dddf921f70dd0d
'2011-08-18T05:02:17-04:00'
describe
'1348671' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
3fe2b1cbeee5f7fbe406d9d015596af1
b703d209783abd753da7b6c5889a1a5ce2b192e7
'2011-08-18T04:51:58-04:00'
describe
'94194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTMZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
cd47e80272b82293ac437ec323721e41
e53f214840e48116caa6fd827c169e115fcbf4c1
'2011-08-18T05:03:53-04:00'
describe
'27887' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
eebf2cf9f8477e6e647d532fdf578f40
3f38af3d4678ce236b74da3d606a8274548f470d
describe
'32951' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
88ac3b886fa61fd18f315d4550d435d5
e7d81be4716919e37faa052f12708e4a7ca3047d
'2011-08-18T04:50:41-04:00'
describe
'10797503' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e7b7057969e3c050bfeaaef10fd4ea1d
32a46a4734c9115f71d8092c372265137ab07b74
'2011-08-18T04:45:17-04:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTND' 'sip-files00072.txt'
7568aeaab384bf8af40f30c898a7d622
b9bfe02cfea3968ca3e2db56decaa3af4476d15e
describe
'10593' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9ef405b45bcc666b4e0cd0896e70c3bb
4ddbf729eea8db28c7aecc9965f4b59932b3d1d8
'2011-08-18T04:50:54-04:00'
describe
'1383332' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
fdf5165d826e0a68491365ec2799a707
c72c6be98ca919ab0e10d5436f8dbd78c0a69231
'2011-08-18T05:00:57-04:00'
describe
'96197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
51e2bfdeb8e8806de249b3f9f9ffd0e2
4155aa84d6a6c88f7c5b29a85accfb6cfb0ad746
'2011-08-18T04:57:48-04:00'
describe
'28649' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
cfa470eb4cb420a049539947fe602c7f
875d53c5c1d1ab04542d9b9d3799a2584bed56d3
'2011-08-18T05:00:11-04:00'
describe
'34049' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
30049d1d053f89a6e88375f52507bde4
7b30f8c31c21a16abd1ed88b269dbea5e625804d
describe
'11078629' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8c4902db0810ca0ecf9aea8b1d2a736d
f387d45abe838f3ffeeb44c35d48ede8531be0f4
'2011-08-18T05:04:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
24567e3185fa4de3cadeaba52bbee1ec
84c95f61066c844bfaceab06e756554aa761638c
'2011-08-18T05:02:51-04:00'
describe
'10679' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
f4cc59cc9d6ecc95ea96ad26264c6ded
a513597241a29df0a649cb250935d12cf06aed43
describe
'1381747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
3b44da33b52f2f4632b83bcc7afbf877
ef943909735a901ba554fd2f9525c2a596c776e9
describe
'99500' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
26d001463db6b4825be175e9934609fd
7548e5b60bd1622803a9fadb76a3904209860887
'2011-08-18T04:51:44-04:00'
describe
'29819' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
0ef7a06e9ab665b76c45cd990428d4c5
2fcd36d4181c9f3a607422f857050cc9094fad65
'2011-08-18T04:43:42-04:00'
describe
'36343' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
c1a494191f83bf82e554309cf95d286a
5368356eaf499607c5105d9629fba74355f343d0
'2011-08-18T04:46:47-04:00'
describe
'11065181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
5bb45e634393de7835657423dceb52c6
b75026e8bbc59530f47bf0c6ef4ef688fa6f64be
'2011-08-18T04:53:11-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
6e21698440cf6c52f1313f26489e167a
fac55f46f96d1f46aed0ddfe452c965fbdfe6820
'2011-08-18T05:03:50-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10776' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
acc3c970959416c16d96a546ff1fec53
1965b878b85e527fe26e7711153c037486228bb4
'2011-08-18T04:47:02-04:00'
describe
'1446475' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
4b026164af6c7a131601947cdc57c03f
dccb95f78531ca788584990bb54bc21819d0d32c
'2011-08-18T04:47:45-04:00'
describe
'99372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f3ff693cf8e980a2091114cd5c4c4e2a
0d419327bc21a53068e479e3217c9a6a397c4e5d
'2011-08-18T04:56:05-04:00'
describe
'27824' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
c611f8dc55cd1214a81b3a8c6e8f32e9
a0e34fcf4b891479063242a7e06e58db2fbabdf2
describe
'33917' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8bfc605ba29c6673180f9f2356511f19
2902bf34401e75660e159839d6b596e9dc66f41d
'2011-08-18T04:59:45-04:00'
describe
'11583211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
5fb89461fab0e4eddee1a050daaa3eff
05767d9b8808e9ee68036d2573aef82a119000ef
'2011-08-18T05:03:41-04:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
260ac66431d6e5cd4f0781eb0bd9d434
eb1789826411eebac970cbba63a43612f651dba6
'2011-08-18T04:44:02-04:00'
describe
'10093' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTNZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
b4720dca68b6495ada02329f63cab116
d5407c1c54fd9e38ceff663c93d20cf1f0b6349e
'2011-08-18T04:54:20-04:00'
describe
'1381744' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
5d25d5c8977fbe83032751515d365728
61dfbec8202c805ff2a235eb1d3a14ad1142825a
'2011-08-18T05:01:53-04:00'
describe
'95008' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d01e83eb140f40a458eb5e5a374acb86
06e414aaa0a4332b346f7e8403e386ccc9b6c6c8
'2011-08-18T04:58:07-04:00'
describe
'28199' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
e0a5cf55b5d4c29250056feb3753c465
e68736df945f8f5ef505a9171fc8cf30eb0c0f36
'2011-08-18T04:48:44-04:00'
describe
'33736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b3e021bd00b329f3c6772326ff43b409
edc9fa5acb946fcad8a55325d6a47c15e68876a3
'2011-08-18T04:42:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c57e4d541a91040ed024fc0e07103da9
10acadc77e75d54d3ac5b22da430caa9c5674498
'2011-08-18T04:45:05-04:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
fdf4f5df2c0ff87f69e239ed74d4854f
4a7014c219e35cd7e847064a86360c536d8c5d30
'2011-08-18T04:44:22-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10012' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b870f62f47f305f29e0621d7f56e0ffb
f46be5face169affbfd668e209ec371bbbef75e2
'2011-08-18T04:44:09-04:00'
describe
'1383309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOH' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
786f601a1e5395697af8d5da57b5a759
c0d9a07466ede85ba99801ea8e53860e510d7cb7
'2011-08-18T04:41:29-04:00'
describe
'93336' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ea0c5be8672b27eff948b5d91c13f29d
0c4606442a832f70a7e32307113f797cfcb7c7be
'2011-08-18T04:43:06-04:00'
describe
'26991' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
c2e68ea629bea12fd7fe70280b8a8168
84192b4603d48268a16a90838fbb3aa2c8fc9247
'2011-08-18T04:50:00-04:00'
describe
'33217' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
7883b1bd04ea3271387d69ea23e89cb7
d15e36d5899f7a9c123d607e07c4f0a6f50e2c14
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f62300c78d439eaa4944819e9cdc3c15
171d30dcd3ffb2d11dd2d7fddc4b156a5d1d3944
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4726dfa7b2f86690c733a82cdce7d8e9
4d8f1b622176210086950fd5a7ee34a6763ed8c7
'2011-08-18T04:42:20-04:00'
describe
'10533' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTON' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
42352c1612b6d09e6b7a6faa6dee3983
3e83970706dacfbded062abce3cfbe650d1755ee
'2011-08-18T04:51:18-04:00'
describe
'1381728' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
7feb42a6e8330c3901685d557b0d33db
ac7269bc62218627b9ff57409a445ef128eaf788
describe
'98888' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f4bf5b1876b137b3d0219d05f918e3bf
6046498d0c156d0223bfe0c04dfd4335728d5a7d
'2011-08-18T04:46:50-04:00'
describe
'28665' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
fdc538df6dec03f48f1231be8a46d777
e1a5498ab214c16917dcfd6f3ae210f88b8b67d6
'2011-08-18T05:03:56-04:00'
describe
'35856' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
07dbbe829a20035ac9c135472e714da7
05029de9a32032be9dfa886419956f2aa193995a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8cc61863deaf8ae333095b4e66d64466
a4b283ec8e4dd894ea130eb560f8706c9d3a5606
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
3ad673087142a70be569153597c6e7de
e713dab5df21426e358c09d79f320c4af92c7541
'2011-08-18T04:40:45-04:00'
describe
'10536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
4c3a45d40657f8d951a6d462e17ac2af
a1604823f7cc8c3aab804af28ceb2e7023b512a1
'2011-08-18T04:48:38-04:00'
describe
'1455208' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b11ddb7f261059d9b9ead9bb82f24b3d
37a9a32efe3e9e68ca3a9070f93ef749825beb77
'2011-08-18T04:47:38-04:00'
describe
'101674' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ecda569715cab4d430a724f4a8fc15be
4f680f9009f0d32e6869ea4dcf3a908b57225f7e
'2011-08-18T04:44:29-04:00'
describe
'28955' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
0d8d7df14d8b534cce8e59447c8ae85b
044ba5a6ee960eac086b7183bc994ff1a456703a
'2011-08-18T04:41:41-04:00'
describe
'35594' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
42010912aa3623601feed3d33145d864
9e73dfa97f43830c3e05237a480a80995f640c6d
describe
'11652681' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTOZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
41b2c73131a9741a4f10393683cd691a
34b6c8c526f01944fa4b39988698c96cb68c69b1
'2011-08-18T04:51:46-04:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
0be9680d9025d5c95608178d74c3ffb9
10e9c6ea8851ac55aa4e246ee2485bba1fb3b157
describe
'9901' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
3a2d3c0ef2e61a83ae262e0ed99e8302
175c22077e2b717ec799e28a723b8e91569e7fa3
describe
'1397984' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
dfd1caa88b35bbf46bf4dcdbb9c67bf2
ee7cb1d8297178208428d57382babc00d5043144
'2011-08-18T04:48:40-04:00'
describe
'99780' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
505e10d76a772a286d2514290675724f
0e026c77ada86afced4b405bb0e34722b8bc2b04
'2011-08-18T05:00:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ef0a7881fbc2fe234112e409ce388e41
314e0df4492d7e88c2702f07914ade7e7a1a770f
describe
'33938' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0bc782a2013012e40bbef07e7d6562a6
4ff8f2fb488a94a95c7beaf06d5e60c072b67b0f
'2011-08-18T04:51:34-04:00'
describe
'11195265' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
83f0ecf1cfee64b6fbfe5b3ad3d6f459
35f6a1b6db5ee981e625b61075565d3401c28bc3
'2011-08-18T04:56:23-04:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
bf2c3d07b5c7472503d258ee8d00d4c4
13a21f10bbf82d1f24378a3a8eb07a101a21bf86
describe
'10389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
984559300b89ef8f36388c3997b9d0e7
de55ced446f58889e6e2c82cb74bab366caafb55
describe
'1455203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
45732d44cdcc20f96a59b6b9f031b0b9
0ca472fa5b751343ca532938ca90de60be752348
'2011-08-18T04:57:33-04:00'
describe
'104965' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
49d153c8f28e6b6f01b0bade929b300d
193dec4b5d39c779721702ca1ff77d5461ec3d18
describe
'27111' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
835525a6241423c69c8b5d38b1c68f6b
5b5e137aed497459034bb4e0d8895a4f7324a593
'2011-08-18T04:45:09-04:00'
describe
'36035' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
9485534f941e25578d54d276906096ad
160e6a9df3e838243b1fb2da639e31f11b010ca1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
849ca3fe7b88f30bf7f4d209c597c0d2
ebfecaaf08329217e6ad7a9c7ca84085815eb535
'2011-08-18T04:43:34-04:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
c8e4c23455f9a66fc163908173bbf888
4c4c12b237f21bee2d990d65c2bf37b1adf531c4
'2011-08-18T04:55:30-04:00'
describe
'10101' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
71d53858becb8549b63195cceb62a56a
952133d76ecd5aa7b24d319dd58154be37599eb8
describe
'1398002' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
d8384579e98a66b68fdc2950dfbd3d9b
a1e115a67da6890c4c8d03c46ed9e561f2008e6d
'2011-08-18T04:58:16-04:00'
describe
'77434' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
7297b79f30f4bb35551ffa31cfb2dee1
37ec9dad6926a82ad836dbcf6b2a9964453ffcd2
'2011-08-18T04:46:57-04:00'
describe
'20727' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d0e9e415e76132d364971aeaccd5a8b8
4e6337bb2b9706d02c352b73e3b013c8f0de0b45
describe
'26321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
bafcfa854deec750f7a77a67f414de13
f39ed56663dc3ba613403881a4f4540eb54e926c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
b0e6d36dd16b059353db267fb8c83662
fa8361cfc4d88621577fc7febbb0358dcc5d0127
'2011-08-18T05:02:34-04:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
7caad6b91747c1435f05780cbc02a06b
6466cd8f35f599764c1891850d5095417f431bed
describe
'7987' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
42e10608b5a9b9f252af724e72b7d080
64f403d7e033afff70adb2547ae9330baa3e9e50
describe
'1455193' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d71b5ed8d768846baca85111928bb4c2
e69f9872fadd225d1dfefc5f85601249c9d4897f
'2011-08-18T05:00:58-04:00'
describe
'90074' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5a4e0c4a4bb018ebd1abc2eeeb6a6e3d
57d2785db823cbcb10eb76d476545b480a396eb1
'2011-08-18T04:55:26-04:00'
describe
'16706' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTPZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
a9b372bff52057314cdbadbee14011da
b415950b7fe5e8d69e7ff39db3c4ffd1c580ec08
'2011-08-18T04:41:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a781ebd3d6cc74a470d5517c18a2623a
5de83c713b025508b0bc6328993c1aa7949f98c1
'2011-08-18T04:47:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a2524c319a1a71cc52943b435b7ca86c
7bea1e412f5a62ce413a290f7f8fc6c52d75b9f1
'2011-08-18T04:46:07-04:00'
describe
'825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
0aa456ae4533d359c2fe0c3a231e5ee3
077ff094ca4491f0596f655e2be432ac73ec8d2e
'2011-08-18T04:45:01-04:00'
describe
'8429' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQD' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
08c290c995b3e83ef6fab266539d20b5
c7d69233036a665675c01717d906023a7440c0da
'2011-08-18T04:51:16-04:00'
describe
'1397973' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ac0d525d590fd468387b7d8a23c13c16
d393fd73701cb457518aa401bf1c893a55cd2efb
describe
'99901' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
5915acf5373d7ae6d9af35cd5622d207
80b56e22fa596dc54f1fee1b02aa701c19c54295
'2011-08-18T04:52:13-04:00'
describe
'28194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a10ece95ef67e70a38dea19453a464d5
352615a5a2cedecdd5ce5408732da06d4e706a31
describe
'35266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d7e68256dd1565ac0727b8c79de62008
de74d82dcb992c5f28e19c57e6bc3c791438d97b
'2011-08-18T04:59:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
a04ef5aa46e6e873f740a0b07a063b0f
65104e7a9ed211dee0a58cd20cb9ddebb9d2302d
'2011-08-18T05:02:37-04:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
55658deb064a61f35f7a9c0d7ba51597
c01f12ff3454fa12edb3e94fb4f5de6297475901
'2011-08-18T04:41:12-04:00'
describe
'10504' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
f238bc7324b640443d6fb80517e8798b
16aca130e28dde97a471bd9a7764ea654a2df371
describe
'1455201' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f8686ad12888a53021b63df474ec82b1
856c7dbaeefd41d0efdc4ad9321d6f935e099422
'2011-08-18T04:48:46-04:00'
describe
'100769' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
c72547306e756d431976ef0f52063d8a
f24c10634950ca2fd1047bb3c27ade4ba5c0cbcc
'2011-08-18T05:03:33-04:00'
describe
'28159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
21adc7b077be1a9cac01b59cd61c05ef
7a5a44de6b5ebc6bcb30509baac2658594b49d18
describe
'35398' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
6f30e5acfcb8361e75723c211b882150
4b16865491f2900047dffb03b0380b16787ea397
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
0cd71a888c87fc8abbcdfa0aaa512a70
42cc3311e1d53ebc461d50d543d0c1b2b71633ed
'2011-08-18T05:01:47-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
aa668d0705aa6459be9b0d5cbe43ec0a
4fc09c459bb51aefd73dc0232e4168bf15134c3b
describe
'9921' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
e03faf4054b897e0038c0b7b3bee51b4
8a83e9256fa40f80dfbda890a00e04e22ca79360
'2011-08-18T05:01:48-04:00'
describe
'1397983' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
c9bea53f4bd09574d9472ced651e0c14
3581de7ac52b4d4646ee5d4ecce4103a46848ba3
'2011-08-18T04:46:53-04:00'
describe
'91295' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
f71cbb625c1840daab6b893e35ac70d1
291ebd9a076dbc53e0ac28647c2b6f7c8fa47fa9
'2011-08-18T04:50:06-04:00'
describe
'29392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c20da15e7d112b27fb339235f972dfa1
f1fe5e731f0096566d1e18e501cb3d2bc0a38506
'2011-08-18T04:47:23-04:00'
describe
'31471' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3ea1828d58e0edd89df747788933693a
f0617c399a61335004fa1aefbea9b8900f09fc6a
'2011-08-18T05:03:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8141ee38e2b2557c8dd70dc91c7bfa87
88e423c988b61eeb31faf1d4f397a3239bd581b5
'2011-08-18T04:51:22-04:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2ea8b902e0b5bba0dc9ea5e261a0285e
ff7598122883e8ba6c2af6efc46d6d1a3e9210fc
'2011-08-18T04:43:08-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
f4714a1660e6909df4be669eb6bb9f6a
edf8184af28cbb5b80d783ae02f645172e57bc9f
'2011-08-18T05:04:19-04:00'
describe
'1455199' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTQZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
aeaf8d26859ffd5d99e986ad9cc3d58b
25c312ed4c2c17d4a1807bed1cfa69afef9eefaf
'2011-08-18T04:42:39-04:00'
describe
'98795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
ffa74f475b8754c156f523e3b6795751
f8569e004990c56dd2232f458cfbd40e93fb88bb
describe
'28063' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
9d6f671e8cc680dcf10b24bfe98e6330
ba5132ec188cd84cf22a530983c96b35f8ef49a9
'2011-08-18T04:47:04-04:00'
describe
'35370' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
6280539f60b54d765c3e374aa5e720ed
a2192658171d30d72a0d84c38eda0ceb1e518dd4
'2011-08-18T05:03:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
ce93fcce828b7966e3c5912400b0ef96
8a246888e2618de6dd624b8f021cd53e521514f6
'2011-08-18T04:45:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRE' 'sip-files00087.txt'
bfbc5c26e57a67cef3d097bd088846a7
667e9dfcd7674b9ef1818252db89bacd9dc1190c
'2011-08-18T04:45:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRF' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
a19e721862b635ea165fc08e1f560dcc
1b15d8dca091e838559980aa11b922327937d304
describe
'1397976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
54c86b7a603dba1a21db6a02d47c80d8
0dfe20d3e0a752a153b698ca88a5a0629bf55576
'2011-08-18T04:58:26-04:00'
describe
'92882' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
159d10238b0761d7247ecac4d56579fa
f2c1503cad30281c31577cd06998df908eb8f990
'2011-08-18T04:49:07-04:00'
describe
'165171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRI' 'sip-filesback.jpg'
f02826788ac27c3d5815a4869d4c4b9b
970ed1f30e8543473021bdfedf3d15a496612d15
'2011-08-18T04:49:49-04:00'
describe
'31049' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRJ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
40e006cb7782da88d307e4bd2311f8fc
07d438f04e2d835313bfc7200ef338055a48fad7
'2011-08-18T04:43:29-04:00'
describe
'33351' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
719a6b10729e6f8e351a6a7288a7d218
124c67b9003f4c73b11d9baa318a899eb9d9dda4
'2011-08-18T04:58:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRL' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1b1845708a2e08796b64c5b1b5e707e3
90af564bc5b9cc2e18da4e0ac21d8ef63c88a7d0
'2011-08-18T04:45:37-04:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRM' 'sip-files00088.txt'
8a649a8354002a7e1742cdd1404079e3
ab1b1b00b21241538a4ae6aa31d1db7280a3d2fd
'2011-08-18T04:52:09-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10146' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRN' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
701356f135ed617051fb2e3dd40063c6
c494d7235634c94ab66dcbcf368adfed51c9de4c
describe
'1455138' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRO' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7f374c015df7a83bbea785ba1083a2a6
49b1b8b37b21a9f5bd4e83b8a4b25108e59732a3
'2011-08-18T04:57:42-04:00'
describe
'90079' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRP' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
c7bbfac0da134f6ff167b60ce9c55592
19353503eb78f6291c1f59ac362457191e86f931
'2011-08-18T04:55:31-04:00'
describe
'28039' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRQ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
13d77bfb7d9bc256012c72074389d498
80daabbdfffc97735da4fbdeae637d520b644bb8
'2011-08-18T05:00:36-04:00'
describe
'31180' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRR' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
85f87c7d553c709a0b7fb2a9557cb214
7b3e3b4c968db8314e9d101498949c6c25b568eb
'2011-08-18T05:03:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRS' 'sip-files00089.tif'
72bedc5f0794ca639bf88709aebba3e9
1310a11f3f3749568d131fdae5e7b2a83f5f0f72
'2011-08-18T04:45:51-04:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRT' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4f10c18f78d1716147f8929be468c123
e9f8990eda83c7f1c648b9c43747cb789d7c3590
'2011-08-18T04:42:03-04:00'
describe
'8779' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRU' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b50c2122d867a3cb629cbe65ca8ba72d
e97fda7424e9f2721e2d84724bba47df647eb2c0
'2011-08-18T04:43:58-04:00'
describe
'1397855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRV' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
b274485baf0c2d7424c0047c8ceadde9
56da6b5b0324b396d2e6cb831f609e2dbf09f49e
describe
'86472' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRW' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f0c3ac669950c6624cb8c367c2c5ed73
7dc2ed58a5320902a4bb82648468605b31c5b7a2
'2011-08-18T04:47:55-04:00'
describe
'31974' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRX' 'sip-files00090.pro'
96e1063175833f550dcf59dc7eefaf5c
86234c0c1d84053463741896229c628485595837
describe
'30512' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRY' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
7514d8f45a524e8990aa73c547788fe6
91be8f8756b14abcdfa1e440e101c32ca5367f8c
'2011-08-18T05:01:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTRZ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
26d70e20f4be0a977f6ebac564a3f164
73c72d6c99e062f8c2d5935b6d05689e72d41306
'2011-08-18T04:57:18-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
5ac8a64603f9e50535bd89a234f5936f
86ea349e6f1bcd822094cf8729906a2c54d99e93
describe
Invalid character
'9599' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSB' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
9dfdfee9345691a03a37a6174c2fc513
8ae307ba677c3ec9c5b73036bd0ad0120777b20b
'2011-08-18T04:56:48-04:00'
describe
'1455154' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSC' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
0a4da2839a264af5f756f80f7a7d1310
70c1323cc69ea6dfe3ac745a538283f6fabf4286
describe
'95704' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSD' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
2efc9ce108b43f958794b96ee963ea88
11bda3adcee98affdb647639cfc54124ebb11023
'2011-08-18T05:02:45-04:00'
describe
'27755' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
43563ee3f82e7ebb18eba5dccfc18b8a
8168eb1ed207b12f8b22dcd919a4e46decd28fde
'2011-08-18T04:52:40-04:00'
describe
'34949' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSF' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
57e925e3c81297d3ee919d0c87cdfae2
f638fa233e857ce1d8098f01f11391ad1d80b30e
'2011-08-18T04:51:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSG' 'sip-files00091.tif'
711b45593533e0dc6da4a19d8ab05593
6f0b20163f248621096fa76b732bb4d1498f9fa0
'2011-08-18T05:03:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSH' 'sip-files00091.txt'
2a885f8bd8ca4f2709c2822b2c4db920
e37ce66cf3254cddcc0ab317fdae79bbf9488106
'2011-08-18T04:40:27-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9545' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSI' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
8ff303f781979fddfea252e973c11374
70a2e776af51ebd30a3baef77c3e0492c7f39723
'2011-08-18T04:44:49-04:00'
describe
'1354472' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSJ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
aafb99dc1f0edbeaece484e7fd708d7f
a4ed288676ee2917c392fdd475a7597fe1e49338
'2011-08-18T04:45:46-04:00'
describe
'89676' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSK' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
4a5d86d4092faf2fb1e7aed2ec7b4792
0df10cd680a40613a19fba1b8ba90c3a280e5ea3
'2011-08-18T05:00:08-04:00'
describe
'26951' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSL' 'sip-files00092.pro'
31bb97574ebe62c4727833739f969989
4f3d1680c99c15e34a5759dd12b847b41786bec7
describe
'32781' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
de1b9574c51e500f5144bead635f2d04
a2b6da8e8d298cc7e33150ffce375111596bfbe1
describe
'10844097' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
0ec5d99360f1bcdb827cd54d76cc60fc
ebe71aaad0b44584737774c0d89c3b8cb101c076
'2011-08-18T05:03:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSO' 'sip-files00092.txt'
f7d69a175f511153ca30276034ac7933
15a63a226dd9e9ea5e97115b19d20b6082e337d9
'2011-08-18T05:03:15-04:00'
describe
'9917' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSP' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7cd9c50f6151ca1b4eddfa44ec7a55f4
feeee3a4ebde7270e2e72353effbbcd8a57b81e8
'2011-08-18T04:56:26-04:00'
describe
'1455195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSQ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
0fd9bffb48bc1264d20b34c1c99573f4
b936a2decaacc46a96156d3c58c34cfb6ee09669
'2011-08-18T04:51:27-04:00'
describe
'87497' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSR' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
427208016f33c069fa9bac9f45368ed7
17fcd18efb54d021eade501daa3d1523da7cb8ca
'2011-08-18T04:47:00-04:00'
describe
'27169' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSS' 'sip-files00093.pro'
d39e060db41069c347a1e9aa2b13e4b7
bc4a8fc43458d4a4d217592ba4c2ce740b447c31
describe
'30300' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTST' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
35c93f3041b83037e3b7298e08d459b2
da6bde9f14f9810620919252bde4884d309661b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
3c91c6f0e3a88c55674887fc638d016e
fd8b6bb5d1cd4889b2b8621b2a11f4d332c41676
'2011-08-18T04:43:52-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSV' 'sip-files00093.txt'
037080207a8dc96840061a339f6c0aa0
d086efb1e32d0b47af5f48bc7b7c36e353d9ac54
'2011-08-18T04:55:19-04:00'
describe
'8431' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSW' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a08fe18ccf05ed6282e26c3d025abba7
a79320f6657c7b1b32c50e37e8027999911deeb3
'2011-08-18T04:55:09-04:00'
describe
'1337482' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
fef2ea4de45b7cb23abded137ad89dc6
d3485c76387d1748852979aa38d72d7dd2710e61
'2011-08-18T04:53:35-04:00'
describe
'86638' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
9b306a30e02de27428da566494713461
d2fd082c5656a79780e122a4c48fcf978bd557f5
'2011-08-18T04:57:51-04:00'
describe
'27368' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTSZ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
a6edb1378fb9a09655ca95b08f066aff
8f5cda4074fae29118024304e9c52420468a0fa7
'2011-08-18T04:44:00-04:00'
describe
'29252' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b896931625f1b9625cbfc7d2499021b9
f9449ffab244d2498e2c0e0d80ad80fe84c4fe23
'2011-08-18T04:51:35-04:00'
describe
'10708217' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
3ec648d1295bf80d5c51d839684edc88
3c748af0060491b53e41e4694c52c0a9bcc85db8
'2011-08-18T04:42:15-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTC' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b08206ad1c7075031662a8cf8bcedd1e
5db1bdb733008774da8906b501290fd3de29558f
describe
'9339' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTD' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
747561f60e2eb9f559c08d9b4e53ff79
33ba13d2af625f8f0ee0ec43407a6225952371c0
'2011-08-18T05:02:30-04:00'
describe
'1455151' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTE' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a6fe08fb704d2fbaa3717ded6b1fe163
1e958924e57aa516cb3bdd553d5c655cd749068f
'2011-08-18T04:48:00-04:00'
describe
'94309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTF' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
a4235b616f3b4ee18842ab4de7c9f081
80e48e9ba4e5302276bb74f045a2b818bf8bdf99
'2011-08-18T05:01:57-04:00'
describe
'30044' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTG' 'sip-files00095.pro'
5dc801a64f5bc5d54b5bcb7a3dcb13fd
726a4fa1f6ed0e7f25cf8cede3555643fb21ef49
describe
'33051' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTH' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d606a7d945ccae571154df2c8cd379ca
79da1909fd68c46ca72635c623bd0e9e2e06c624
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTI' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8292e26267dd4ae9671af4ccc22337f5
f3a71ff34892d3d89e0d56525b27c4ebe808f5f2
'2011-08-18T04:51:56-04:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTJ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
46998c41745dccb30cc1fa6677512625
e1b181fb046abf1f58972a15cfd713571a2031e9
'2011-08-18T04:52:37-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9085' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTK' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
7241bd861576e984ff52a9297adb8f02
5c80b441cabaef7cba7a4a98b2a744941bf85f1d
'2011-08-18T04:42:13-04:00'
describe
'1354452' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTL' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
d15e48f38d4624701138b7a000d3436e
ea5fa7c72198ccf54535e1636e398dd4b24b0543
'2011-08-18T04:55:29-04:00'
describe
'92131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTM' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e682a0cc6ceb1feef62c4182fcdc45ba
35a53d558aefff2da55ede79e00207ae191a77b8
describe
'27059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTN' 'sip-files00096.pro'
0195bb2c6331ed2830d584723cccca3d
350359572aa68461cadbed044227ea6f647f3135
'2011-08-18T04:41:23-04:00'
describe
'33665' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTO' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4820e02de12315d68bcef64a512f5f33
f274945fd31e091c0109f7b77ad4ed8555294549
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5d20074813a5165fcee1c336488a4f7d
8618dbe356f86db8c0955a2a3bbca7fcee70589b
'2011-08-18T04:40:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
bd334cc206740f66ee10a9e42eae2149
5222117834da9fd7b36ef8e99dcdac366d666d7c
'2011-08-18T04:56:19-04:00'
describe
'10045' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTR' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
1a132917b81885032be40ab7644bfb50
9667251580a475b194844cd041d3def3a8e24829
describe
'1455178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
481da29da027d5c30e3c88632625dfcd
d26c8f0e6cb043497b7afc38608beb7e9b6dd95a
describe
'92787' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
60a0e93316b347a16cf11fb613695240
c5c0c706002dd86a4bc4b0243babbaed1ee8dbe5
'2011-08-18T04:42:38-04:00'
describe
'33921' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTU' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c2237f6e672e737cf6c785d0a1fdbffa
92fbc574f16581415ec6cf822cd721b42525c41b
'2011-08-18T04:46:09-04:00'
describe
'31826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTV' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
3bb9ed34939cb947540a40d3aa3134a9
0bbfe7d34d59dbecd7e9059d3e72ec7efd0eed4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTW' 'sip-files00097.tif'
307706947fbfe58ed8892218ceaefe7d
7f4cc80933415ceef449354add4b858b8f38b639
'2011-08-18T04:58:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTX' 'sip-files00097.txt'
49e6ab534cf68ab2711c84d8dc0dfc47
82b63ef75e4ed3fa98c3d07c9c7d1965fb81041c
describe
Invalid character
'8735' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
ffd67f9559f58ec39fc4ed158c307ec3
1c6e529805231d715755e6281091564e1860b159
'2011-08-18T04:58:02-04:00'
describe
'1349964' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTTZ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
91901f9850b710aac03d571d605631d7
6ba364260dcefd8ecd1d7bc394187d35d6d51ac7
'2011-08-18T04:47:46-04:00'
describe
'86217' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUA' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
6afaa0415ed9abe0659dae7302c2b902
726c66469bf665be8fe0322a3053deab631d1a33
'2011-08-18T04:47:17-04:00'
describe
'29074' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUB' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6a2ed96aac2637c273c875edca841f87
3be41977d09eaec27d790ed41e574372c3af15ed
'2011-08-18T04:56:34-04:00'
describe
'30752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUC' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
a7a2ea8e6a6df70ac5bcc1edb5ff5834
017554f2eefceca2ea68f0f144c85f5881417ae0
'2011-08-18T04:47:44-04:00'
describe
'10808737' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUD' 'sip-files00098.tif'
66b1615e3392dc6912ddb631d333766c
f21134471752c7ccfb56fc3c8c6585731a4b00fd
'2011-08-18T04:44:54-04:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUE' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2088dd9c70ff33ab8b4b78759e8f314f
4f49f3dcd0d3bbf2450144e2ca85ae087f230f5c
'2011-08-18T04:45:00-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9563' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
08f7399638e1057a2eac9396c0d46f8b
338ad14c798bd7f67c5b4536f4b4c46b40d0f951
'2011-08-18T04:58:10-04:00'
describe
'1455177' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
510e44d6a61fd1ec99556b472fa1b1ac
59f5f499824f5740c23b56c3d84f39b475e0d653
'2011-08-18T04:44:27-04:00'
describe
'96939' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUH' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
3fbb48cbff837d4914d02e6492a7343a
c132ee1a14ef1e558706a007f63dcbb71db6de02
'2011-08-18T04:55:43-04:00'
describe
'27791' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4d2a7874d7c8cc0bd5e7b71b8f30a5b8
4eea1356b261a9c72bc1a777826d5063f0464e34
'2011-08-18T04:53:38-04:00'
describe
'35145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
65ea712f0ec91796387ab8dd87651aba
53b0c2082591e882ba891c93cd438c3a406b938f
'2011-08-18T04:46:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
79f1b7df655d74a962b7090dbdb5dbe9
5fee7bfe65a7f94ef004ff5d437177999bf5e6c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUL' 'sip-files00099.txt'
12d4903f188a8b0e678c31bb241a5b8b
b2321d5e60f78e1b1a42a6dcf11fb61d6bfb9f13
'2011-08-18T04:57:26-04:00'
describe
'9552' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
e2498ae666c8e7a8e586de5b533dee17
c3650f31da8a192ded7d6665479d57ae16ae329b
describe
'1343782' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUN' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
13c7ec9134f092a9ac95defd8162e5fb
9e297b39fac00a9f8894fe91747af3970f658bf6
describe
'94097' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
7725a1b3c0e1db0ca1063c64b1d368eb
70c0ed26e1153a510aa75c16b21168004d121265
'2011-08-18T05:00:44-04:00'
describe
'27131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUP' 'sip-files00100.pro'
00915ae56e9ddf09bd70a6b6d4a7e574
fe698a5b226afdc51937c7f55e9011feae56efec
describe
'34270' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUQ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
937ce42302a7d0e3a26253a5f7cefc1d
05cd29b8c959c1e86e1adacca174f95c93af22cb
'2011-08-18T04:54:14-04:00'
describe
'10758477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUR' 'sip-files00100.tif'
8be7fc246e5d4f74ae82f586d33ea59b
2560fa2ad36d012f123dec23586a94c8b8f2e7b1
'2011-08-18T04:42:21-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
6cd91f07904bd35fb3731284bfea7122
cfdddcb31d5f3a30b28b3f1de733282f1f76a6eb
describe
'10465' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUT' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
0dc41066578cc67d1680cca8d887064b
d65d8905b3400f5732dda14d45ccb07e77cd1843
'2011-08-18T04:47:52-04:00'
describe
'1455200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
97c01683e476ecd03b90ef4724c4ec76
c899340e5a7944382a8fdc3d84dfb1f7b199e6f4
'2011-08-18T04:47:51-04:00'
describe
'100177' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUV' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
3c27a3f4cdffacbac9ffdc765cd8f5e1
537cedb0c3eefab61b606ae8160a4973faa1fc79
'2011-08-18T05:02:49-04:00'
describe
'27278' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUW' 'sip-files00101.pro'
ea33fac36099e619a4bac16fb7875cce
7348fde8e56032c6a2b8c97ebce3490afabe3392
'2011-08-18T04:58:06-04:00'
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUX' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
1b92aa5106389c460ae686db6139966e
855ccdb521acdf76f0cda9b2dfe8c89e45318c7e
'2011-08-18T04:50:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2d3ec289c7d7f58d73134d4f2d8e838e
948a995a24109d517ad47600aa56d2f10c1d2df1
'2011-08-18T04:55:59-04:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTUZ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
fcf8978adcab63aa33d75ed47a12be97
74655ed0df7db580ec7320e7be9fd5eb4dfef668
describe
'9684' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVA' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4b11a6c9bb5e04665f7e1bf046400915
61287366474c90dec3b45d74f7fc6abe1a7d9ea9
describe
'1290235' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVB' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
217d192398c08500d2fa6d67912955b2
f943e26deabb36990a6f03a90fb0c145bc09dbae
'2011-08-18T04:41:25-04:00'
describe
'94947' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8b0ca69012e8995aeb97b0e34f82147a
6e008f1dc42463122f97f81da67db25ced8923b2
'2011-08-18T04:42:16-04:00'
describe
'27529' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVD' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1254e30507285c33872fd4470e7cf233
668d7f9989be6ec4cff80a267cf1bfab28ecec7f
'2011-08-18T04:56:17-04:00'
describe
'34475' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVE' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
bb73e38eaefa7002784be19f4f0238b3
42bceb4b427928d5ed22e099496729875ad74e2d
describe
'10328665' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVF' 'sip-files00102.tif'
bfa591fd4ff41d516e5ca7dcedf1d06e
d2e68af30b63879b8df0d386c625b9076cdfe7f8
'2011-08-18T04:50:13-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVG' 'sip-files00102.txt'
11f968e84836546aea2e06d5d00320a8
a2448f34ca83f96fd1aeb5dc8bba7bf0f9b9da8b
'2011-08-18T04:46:59-04:00'
describe
'11202' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVH' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
7d337f4935c4490a4af28a6e7f690b32
f8962d955ddef8f0d6dc7b3999fe6156b096f16e
describe
'1455128' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVI' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
000e9e180e1a713e98a676f7411e3672
3849d52c39b6e09c8fdd276d02c18aa328e6010c
describe
'94338' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
73a56d01297a67a99805832f9255a039
c0e128ff335046bdec83ed11c451f52e8bbffc0a
'2011-08-18T04:56:04-04:00'
describe
'28009' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVK' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ace159b3b34aba094ae0fb725d8073fa
bc061991e304a930c43ad36f25fdce11aaf6535e
'2011-08-18T04:53:52-04:00'
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVL' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ce685842bfe6b5f2d1f2af70dab39758
c4f51c7bf0d44d70bd40b612c29c1523e54d0514
'2011-08-18T04:43:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVM' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4eec6b8145df1bc65d072db30a45fa28
90da86f05d45aad446a0372e9cfdf5e86d574f9a
'2011-08-18T04:47:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVN' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6fbff2a47a3003ebff969edd7529a4be
89badc6407665f0fb5cccbaebfd6554b150d494c
'2011-08-18T04:45:48-04:00'
describe
'9270' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVO' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
43635b2de51a466e689eac9b48bf40be
e8bacee2362ef43a679f4498dbcac10f855670b1
'2011-08-18T04:56:29-04:00'
describe
'1397994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVP' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e33293a3b9a84b25f58dfc1f639b245d
3d9dc922441ccdff1493dd4c0045628e4a9e62af
describe
'92064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVQ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
40724e8ed0fc8e56640c3687d128c96f
bb0158a2bbb981060fca4cec1d65f91f10681223
'2011-08-18T04:48:54-04:00'
describe
'27954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVR' 'sip-files00104.pro'
71181b0785f02a40f214cff59cb8cf75
3d35450ed57b59e8a4f19430ad26a390c88e7ef8
describe
'33418' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVS' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
8c6381e9e1539c1a9e593c2fe322cc7f
44a2525f75f9b8d0667327c9afe5ce673d065652
'2011-08-18T05:03:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVT' 'sip-files00104.tif'
8fb5fddf033cd72ae099d5ce90ee9e71
bbda9a3dcc0c6b9ed1414a1ee627544b513815be
'2011-08-18T04:41:35-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVU' 'sip-files00104.txt'
81df83290e2c3e50660a03e55a98d3ef
603dc31c00e5de26ca5011db72b29a825ff12816
'2011-08-18T04:44:11-04:00'
describe
'10397' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e3dd2c6a930768141b5e973391677f23
9f4c255b8957b2e0e01fe04975059545d0ebcb99
'2011-08-18T05:00:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVW' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
5ab1bd9f4473879f18a257a464f9a805
a06a94f7e45179928315bdace5551f716aa88f1a
'2011-08-18T04:59:49-04:00'
describe
'95010' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVX' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
57c5fb81c8d50a9d5a901eac4ff46268
a0559e46073a9be1669c2c049b6d36b67cd83d3c
describe
'26767' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVY' 'sip-files00105.pro'
04af0d78429c61b86d9e25712983dbba
78af54f5159a0c6cba503532d6d28a02b0709827
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTVZ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
18c6d3cab30d609a3d1b9921d9ce12dd
8b867856ea8289435185305332a474650fdcf14d
'2011-08-18T04:55:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWA' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f3bae86538996022a52cf3da22de0531
02bcbc537daed8ebe8d7c7db5ebaf16f7432a502
'2011-08-18T04:47:37-04:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWB' 'sip-files00105.txt'
f6514115bd10744009319b6ae69622ad
bb1422254e5e20aad2c20507322f51df8ae1caae
'2011-08-18T04:46:19-04:00'
describe
'9664' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWC' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
ed3e1823f3eb3275e868f1db77bec85e
71d609770b0260b18fad49962ad6573694feb5b9
'2011-08-18T04:51:19-04:00'
describe
'1398001' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWD' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
8dd1e5b70b9178abb656a40ec30b2247
ec32f2a47f6efd05a9c9381baa53884a4fbbeeae
'2011-08-18T04:56:50-04:00'
describe
'93909' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWE' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
e454d397bc7f96d1a60b407887dffcb7
4327151344445e5836a90038376e0eab334b3050
describe
'27645' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWF' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8bbd816328c9fce91cbe947de8714281
ff7f9793873ba198449ab511ed51eee853202a84
describe
'34131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWG' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
636628583c315a3ecdf6a1b2ad3ef350
2365f90e06f2c5f1342ce847bb1157dbc038b4ae
'2011-08-18T04:45:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWH' 'sip-files00106.tif'
01af5dad203bdbb46f9fe56d8dc70baa
b7a8f2e04201880ba16dc1115cf121e5c979bcae
'2011-08-18T04:49:09-04:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWI' 'sip-files00106.txt'
70fd7efb6827c9193cce9b657cd24c56
adc0f4575daf7264185176fe6dafc20ea586c47b
'2011-08-18T04:43:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10528' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWJ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
3f3e4f0798d18f99f6974dfdc4e1c36a
79136196f7fc74ac28a3ff2584a0dcf7e4b2c6c1
'2011-08-18T04:46:49-04:00'
describe
'1455184' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWK' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
c4a8c6311d4d78ea55f0ae71c945c00a
cd61de79221d1eccb1a17b497f9dfa5d131c9ad5
'2011-08-18T04:45:31-04:00'
describe
'97651' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWL' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
c67186d44a40b9d749dd08537f9abf7c
c03513e9af83e4ec1ce5cddbaaf8de69967dbd2f
'2011-08-18T04:49:33-04:00'
describe
'27956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWM' 'sip-files00107.pro'
62ef5b6535094b9d74783bd3896960ef
cf7709de7145482ca0a58ba758de9624f2a0fa65
'2011-08-18T05:00:32-04:00'
describe
'34735' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWN' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
246ae8b346ef173e8dce248f1e87ff1a
cb733bc5308fecb6b077038c8d93889d4e425e16
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWO' 'sip-files00107.tif'
265ce78f8392910037118a1d8076edce
1bf98dbd6db290a42e10ea49a29a2b8a89d80c04
'2011-08-18T04:45:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWP' 'sip-files00107.txt'
8464aa78f92557045451cb039a7711a1
542d111ee0118de5dc839255517d9d2283007d32
'2011-08-18T04:54:52-04:00'
describe
'9892' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWQ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
110403d94c706d94e9548635446a3bf7
1305940659e4b69a801471b97cd56df4562f5d09
'2011-08-18T04:47:03-04:00'
describe
'1397896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWR' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
a11dafabd8a3e7c0e9477b38ce913c2b
a2092da3ac69ed1dc5338e49873ece39c6504dce
'2011-08-18T05:03:31-04:00'
describe
'86917' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWS' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
5fec80668f79129da4d2ee667f0df4a8
b3841acd190227ba0a7b10a003cd8ef8eac65c82
describe
'29500' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWT' 'sip-files00108.pro'
2fc882eefbc3acccb064d2bfea077aeb
4efa66745519233f0cb2caa82f0d28f77f4e7d59
'2011-08-18T04:55:32-04:00'
describe
'30942' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWU' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
ac76e5bbc0f36cab541b996487894939
5bff1f6819b629174aa32824ca7a5d0d7201d2e0
'2011-08-18T04:50:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWV' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7959027c3c988e91f6414897726d1b42
3bd62036dd164a04737313a8063b1e78b800a396
'2011-08-18T04:58:54-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWW' 'sip-files00108.txt'
cf3586159912f298ba99cdbade4d555a
c79bab51c429736093e4232f8a2be02a0ce39e4e
'2011-08-18T04:50:28-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWX' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3a6167fcaa32d2496e9316e251758132
7606c7d68aa2a5c98c39da37b7971b60626aed73
describe
'1455202' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWY' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
6b2d614c35e0cdf7ce7d54027bd971ec
9a0bffb21d2284a8e21b50276517da3aba48182a
'2011-08-18T04:48:55-04:00'
describe
'97796' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTWZ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
a9ca1f85cc5f70a35acc9a20429601b4
bad9926e6c6853744f0c611a26064aff26f6ab0c
'2011-08-18T04:42:14-04:00'
describe
'27718' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXA' 'sip-files00109.pro'
962ef390e853a4114360c93661ca0f2b
d513dbbb8d126fe06f9fcf67f8c81e50a5cd0945
'2011-08-18T04:55:53-04:00'
describe
'35181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXB' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
e08138fa95083f8885563b783168ecad
0c16cee6efbb10f8b87db0306fabc9c594aeff11
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXC' 'sip-files00109.tif'
e01681e25fbcc3de5af87f1ba72c8773
192b979b0d77f43b169b21ef1a98664d8cc3eb46
'2011-08-18T05:04:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXD' 'sip-files00109.txt'
fbb7e60e14047662a5ba976500d8b598
4a67460526bf3d49514bb02368891867585df877
describe
'9681' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXE' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
d92d13bd734f3a4ce8a148fa620c462a
c7d442993537fb4fa2aace8e1435c38edb0ba6ef
'2011-08-18T04:41:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXF' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
e3770aa35a6426d3672d07679220d2d8
28993607e4b12d962863de193a01241ea5ddba71
'2011-08-18T05:03:38-04:00'
describe
'95235' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXG' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
f3ff75f9e4b26f1893c9648aa58c2a34
c7d235cb74ecf37b4b67e1dd97b6181c93cb97ee
describe
'28015' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0a93371e4a9f08dbedf6f42b80c7b50d
5042c4963998a99567971ed9d7dbf15e2b29acbe
'2011-08-18T04:54:32-04:00'
describe
'34425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXI' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e4afdc1e84af2db2aa58501880639a5e
a4496682f0dab2375418f930eee2e87d16b9ee80
'2011-08-18T04:51:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXJ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
8ff82560ef4a8df51fc498a06d28af75
27f7e9b9c78cfa66d823da18e9f2408063836262
'2011-08-18T04:51:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXK' 'sip-files00110.txt'
92e0d77fc04bfb6d099a8df7648349ed
b2365cd929e3fadc9b37d3eb42680f6246c9a740
'2011-08-18T04:45:44-04:00'
describe
'10633' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXL' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8eb5800dc4d18b4b9a2e6e2513d1e156
de8d0f311b542436327f12d5d754a3eaede029ef
'2011-08-18T04:56:56-04:00'
describe
'1455083' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXM' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
cf2ff4ad4dc8954108594a4a0ca30be7
f34f613b410a97bff92e2060f94b8794feaef036
describe
'99340' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXN' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
0a8eb9ad2935980ef150abca8f1b1be2
7ef2508e0acc842627b85b8c3b9b69b656b6c027
describe
'28357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXO' 'sip-files00111.pro'
f34776b9b25c2ded6b7a1d188bf6ab3a
118b1b294d2fac7c47baed59871f7fc56242eda7
describe
'35458' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXP' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
a0bf29fcbda4d9e5a4d8c6e7898a6285
d14d2aab3ffd941c8dafa2740ffe1c75ba71aa6a
'2011-08-18T04:51:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXQ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
217abc26866f587dccad27e3cc960a3f
c62be536c5ef7eeb09028586eae13de1f89df107
'2011-08-18T04:47:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXR' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6b1f6f42260239f436f895803403ece8
09a3c67e044de3c5978fe5705dbccb287f54f6b7
describe
'9752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXS' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
a223f1dbe9bf321f8df1547bfa708fec
97f06a8882c275c5263c2407b23abe59a9c7613b
describe
'1397952' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXT' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ac134d1edb37ff1141a7cf45a99fb8e9
15d82bb6b72af0aec47b84cbe79aa030e75bc720
describe
'91953' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXU' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cbce3b919389c27ae532ff9e874961e3
5037e5353e647bea458431701a0f9077fed42b9a
'2011-08-18T04:48:37-04:00'
describe
'29442' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXV' 'sip-files00112.pro'
908323a56e4a8ab6a7863959fbb2084d
bfe6af82fb07a5759926995665966947176d3c33
'2011-08-18T04:44:44-04:00'
describe
'32138' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXW' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
af11876a4e74b8e7c66cca15c3607dcd
304c1577b72bac3174e785febbb4ca71a48116e0
'2011-08-18T04:57:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXX' 'sip-files00112.tif'
787b400b9806ac4e3553e5ff6b18fd71
6c92f4ef37522fc9eaffd21f5c750eb455713e79
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXY' 'sip-files00112.txt'
f92bf579ab04ce6d30fd61140f63199c
37ca10137cb05bacd81fcaa5daeaa62077e9184d
'2011-08-18T04:51:00-04:00'
describe
'9688' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTXZ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c2326024de7224def6e43663b08d581c
4f53b4019c228f3ac5117c00e478adbc5026831f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
6756a52a9adb3513c224dcadd336eb96
8e63b1ada198a070ce3290faa75e537d2209de4b
describe
'97171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
cf654b67fee84bea0fe16f7f41f6c359
ff545e4a3dba0204147a8799ae6704ea93874bf8
'2011-08-18T04:57:35-04:00'
describe
'27792' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
4494bc77c821a865416dd223ca46bcca
edf226d53e328623c8063448fb5c823e34d77b50
'2011-08-18T05:03:48-04:00'
describe
'33877' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
ea8fe18ba2e45496a07f0a759d0ef813
ea7cdcd225e06a473ddc61448d97ab80c34a7165
'2011-08-18T04:51:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYE' 'sip-files00113.tif'
e46c99e570361e6a65a0e1ddf900d17f
357331c8f05c4f1c9c1b81b9d5912297b6c855f6
'2011-08-18T04:43:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
ed94c6e7178f2a1b1d0e855c62217b15
af96a3772c14318a8a3da89652faec72d4271867
'2011-08-18T04:41:08-04:00'
describe
'9689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYG' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
612d55e7e9e7b6fb9c38ffd2ae924ab8
f399190b3ec3493af37cb05d689afde7fd21449a
'2011-08-18T04:48:06-04:00'
describe
'1471153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
4e7b192f016677fa2e23b58b98a01f85
ec0ddeab406e97b482ff04f0231799ecbcfc039a
describe
'101059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
91d9783d3be4241245883e3507d204ae
44ab47cf37a193a22a3c7921da1a3616a9a1e118
'2011-08-18T04:58:44-04:00'
describe
'27086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYJ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ac72943626d788512e0ae5dcb2ac21a8
a2ada6a9004b2e46ec15024449270179ec5cacf6
'2011-08-18T04:58:57-04:00'
describe
'35148' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c660fe1d6c84c3c34ce99ed83de3bcfd
101d9dbabb7e8bc0cd9a8f3f0ba25b7a91110d7a
'2011-08-18T04:56:44-04:00'
describe
'11777559' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
dd75dbdb857f332863f5f4781d748bd5
2f20b863e525d6edf5874b52eb4c9e874d335755
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYM' 'sip-files00114.txt'
1057d9119d2ef7a2f3dbe111485e0ec0
39f9dcfc97ebdffd80635ebb70bd16c0d15d12d0
describe
'10430' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
4190e8d543eac11ecd0907becf17a4e5
94fa53e875a49106023f67d014245e321a213249
'2011-08-18T04:56:20-04:00'
describe
'1455196' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYO' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d2447c2a5f36834226185530edfb9703
3b5846e67a1717c2462d60288900590bf8ac010d
'2011-08-18T04:54:34-04:00'
describe
'99455' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYP' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
924e00a8597cc7fbe64f267d2dc43cf0
08a3f2cab9cfafb5af1ea3499c28ebe1bc671c11
describe
'28768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYQ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a15dd9ddaec4308cd069394ed2cfc6bc
a35385cbaf58103ece1fdaee9ebd3b949e84685b
'2011-08-18T04:44:28-04:00'
describe
'34738' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYR' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
9b53d23d1c81590c6577b86f940c7f7d
9371eebc280b0ab7ef8ddc7ca7b6401174634a82
'2011-08-18T04:48:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYS' 'sip-files00115.tif'
4785a080f931cfa0d185fe9260a277d9
eb5035d262f179b504edec9605e04ff98cbec47e
'2011-08-18T04:43:10-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYT' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2d6be24f86fbefa9f226ee3a0a79325c
a54e8564bf4d1d055659586a683ad9d5c1d4b982
'2011-08-18T04:55:12-04:00'
describe
'9671' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYU' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ab2afe6de736bc3483fcc5e9dc67ef36
31a7fe3cd012fe9495e4e70eacf391af68d0b2ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYV' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
5470269243d0b153d4b7ae6b7abf296c
f28f9adac03461995eaaebb1822f073d440e04cf
'2011-08-18T04:42:17-04:00'
describe
'95291' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYW' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
6e3fb19f1d064a8c2407156c04ef10de
1cbb3ec9eeff09ee33f17d170f22a16284e3e588
describe
'26850' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYX' 'sip-files00116.pro'
1330c7b4491819d470a1a809cb189b04
f5be44d6d5dfc08d61482ffdeff49ac0b2206f92
describe
'34193' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYY' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
8f611a891c5d4f28db3985a5f88ec476
56e595acd971ac7912bd7e94a37cc7323f08ec4f
'2011-08-18T04:54:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTYZ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3985fae429949dce6c119c5e61706437
444821f932c4fb607096bfcbf6fceeedee0b207f
'2011-08-18T04:46:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZA' 'sip-files00116.txt'
50e917ec1297ec4ebf5cfe65f69a103e
84d887febe7307290dca22ef0d011209ca821644
describe
'10740' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZB' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
bf335aef2159c383ca97c7f5e2f679af
ebb41a609dcfd33799b4225607117f7f8f6b8603
'2011-08-18T04:54:36-04:00'
describe
'1455126' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZC' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ba507c2862c3956fe1de4d25ac4eff6b
84ba744d7293fe3fa91eeecbbeafe0ecd964cd54
'2011-08-18T04:48:03-04:00'
describe
'101375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZD' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
25b58dac2ee2542b3daab1fbf1ac14d4
657ffb2e22d1244cfec2450eab738778eb4c4599
'2011-08-18T04:45:39-04:00'
describe
'27639' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZE' 'sip-files00117.pro'
65039020f603c909d41abfacd27b6708
005683990a815b4de015686b123d08406f0a418a
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZF' 'sip-filesback.pro'
a6070890fe56cd555b1e6240e25b8c55
bbeb9e3eb8650dc51def51aebe0b556d7d314a85
'2011-08-18T04:44:35-04:00'
describe
'36692' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZG' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
90311e87bedefb1fa57eb6985c1e23be
06d502649ce13984152871fdb50cbf7569819de9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZH' 'sip-files00117.tif'
8f38d914ad67f12609b830bc05ae8016
25745dff8a4cd893d6f021711c49fd39dadf207a
'2011-08-18T04:58:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZI' 'sip-files00117.txt'
743b4139ad03125dd30695f9b74f76e8
822258de127fe07625ec5b71730653137b9cd665
'2011-08-18T04:55:48-04:00'
describe
'10054' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZJ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
6f466128b84e250e3c8283c7ffd839ba
694be7b512340138e0fb3de87fb6de6863a6158f
'2011-08-18T05:02:39-04:00'
describe
'1397867' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZK' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
da29cbb298e5274343bc0dc1976c1a72
6d7f7dd61a16eb18a2832ba77fe4bd5c3a9e2b7c
describe
'76775' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZL' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
1a0207e7adfcad85fb43be94d8060815
450517e3814670141c924f23e9a2db8cac3759cd
describe
'21376' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZM' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ff383f05d9b81a2876b468a018c1f14f
50574fc6d3a546a664cb0e0b075d3e0275a4014c
describe
'26277' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZN' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
cf202c893016dd25f02eed2a48ba3eb1
8a94d38d61df4e84b336746c96088bc2e2f5c065
'2011-08-18T05:04:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZO' 'sip-files00118.tif'
979b2ce06bd73d277f0b8946d95ae362
44e852ca252397e1212262cc44372e222949e6d4
'2011-08-18T04:59:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZP' 'sip-files00118.txt'
07fa03b0c80eeea3dda8e0cb8beafb8c
20ad93a50e0eaf6fd6fc73ad4e40829d888f7048
describe
'8459' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZQ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7c9a243371da4663a92e449f28666b06
5155124b4a46e1aaf4ec30c6adf04e5f583e958b
describe
'1455163' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
9c1d2e093f909814b106c27938d84b63
b81407c77d87bf73de91e882a1b96213ada71dce
describe
'84068' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZS' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
31d061be0b0da46144c291080c515d74
159ffae0b64a7e5ecde471d77a5665a06d2c1bc8
describe
'16921' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZT' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c216c9e581f1a4bf2948ae90a370b2af
7dc746371a6a51e180d66e5956b42de6d2187418
describe
'29035' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZU' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
6d2dd1e67f022134466222c2d1b20ca2
962e7d7f0c2221e3e9057148510ce2aa52574d0b
'2011-08-18T04:57:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZV' 'sip-files00119.tif'
bc90aa7b636081a96de84bde344f01cc
fb4e51d73f11b252dac6351cd7ded173b2153354
'2011-08-18T05:01:12-04:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZW' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c2a7d6b95a77254ee97be4ea3de27f39
7eb697e4574a957e798e270e9c2b9fd408d9d988
'2011-08-18T04:46:08-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8232' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZX' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
c75231d3dbfcbe90e31035e33815febe
1644d9ef8042f02811ebc4d38308afab6d6b2829
describe
'1398000' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZY' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
6b4a86e7486fbd3ad3736ac9193563e4
1365b1be4f9efaf3ea76263564b2955a6e4c264f
describe
'93824' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABTZZ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
6cf6f4e3cac9739033256c8db3dd03d0
c39fc0732e498d4388c93ee2dd29d630470970a4
'2011-08-18T04:57:31-04:00'
describe
'27896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAA' 'sip-files00120.pro'
491907cf1c28d9a7d5ab492a0bd27119
f79db8967b49d9a3c17099ffbf0bd76f85d19501
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAB' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
ef3c51789f93b9f5f449f3eaefe2903f
eb99463a2fef5d2273ebd14d51125fe7241df577
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAC' 'sip-files00120.tif'
da3b337a2959907f2a3d8e87c8a1d2c7
41c290b854c69fed1c1023a7f9959b65d213c435
'2011-08-18T05:00:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAD' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8120d01a429750e0442e11c98d317ef2
bcdf248cd84cbda6159d567cef74e2b4cd7ca2af
'2011-08-18T05:00:22-04:00'
describe
'10253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAE' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
5ccf2a3606c861e067aaea02e6a5e35b
c30c090aed468345ce5e43e990158af39c649568
'2011-08-18T04:48:45-04:00'
describe
'1455205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAF' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
444783f3e64dc088d9b57bf7aadbd447
877aa69ea40fae7012e3f92a79337b9f20f88128
'2011-08-18T04:58:25-04:00'
describe
'98670' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAG' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
92fd2e4153e4b037fd6fb0cf037ed26b
c643876ef9dfcef5ee8050395bdfca10e43ac9f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAH' 'sip-files00121.pro'
25bd024603cdd8868a4ac4bd5b573a61
4596feedefaff56060ec9b5fe98cb4021836f3bc
'2011-08-18T04:54:41-04:00'
describe
'34889' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAI' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
26667a14802aaa15fe1c236e2857b290
66c5bb7ee6a79b1418d92045e63c4fa25bde0d32
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAJ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ac83c1e0d525ede9f67c187fecd7ad7e
fe0373f10ad0b62b133f016a6b9b662c7d3ea4fa
'2011-08-18T04:55:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAK' 'sip-files00121.txt'
dfcc3b415c1eea09061a341630e1748e
1f959d5605693b768cca66f04be7eaa27209bd67
describe
'9750' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAL' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
f30010c10bc5b08b49460530da8f4953
ceaae3eda169e8398fcee06d53ff2714e85342ab
'2011-08-18T04:42:44-04:00'
describe
'1398005' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
cc7d9d69924ee9a2fffcc9e7d60bb040
dc7ff06e7e3099ac349d4e3b01d40193469bc617
'2011-08-18T04:54:25-04:00'
describe
'86966' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAN' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
28cda55bf11cd30c0e2f577f23aa9efd
59097178aaf7d8b6047cff0c64d8146abef486c1
describe
'25368' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAO' 'sip-files00122.pro'
1194fa43c901c88b63b98df6bcc487f9
556ed6c7b716138f242e6b67ed87bf9c3f9354f8
'2011-08-18T04:55:36-04:00'
describe
'31091' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAP' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
dc51601894acfe2571f2e11d4419fbeb
4e347473cf3fa7382ef573054240c1a0739c14f4
'2011-08-18T05:01:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAQ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
00c9b04e89c45299ea877cec2d28a380
3e3326f004e86d3e627751280e2fa98bb3f73c25
'2011-08-18T04:46:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAR' 'sip-files00122.txt'
49c82698300718e6f5a31650cd2c01a5
a1f75305164ab2aae4a704798faccd35e1892ed6
'2011-08-18T04:48:08-04:00'
describe
'9763' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAS' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
56a392ca4f911d7c5e954cc5bd786cd4
90605049a9750eceed95a5d0afdfe8d7c80bc1f5
'2011-08-18T04:57:14-04:00'
describe
'1455124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAT' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a86cdbbccc11bf5782a199bd56369409
663f4e4ee361414f5e434efe51c7570da48db1ab
'2011-08-18T04:52:55-04:00'
describe
'89609' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAU' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
9d03d696fb68acd0ce4c231ef6cd0022
c146367c11aeeddbb18a29f7f3118497a1f10a66
describe
'26375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAV' 'sip-files00123.pro'
4d4ab41578dc7b1e70f8c5ad0a91afa8
7ddf1f0fe7018e3d93c71ec7ce47509b3f524871
describe
'32284' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAW' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
2037623efab811f2da2dc9918617c53d
97c9e2e66ff3cfddcc377d59408d670d762aaae9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAX' 'sip-files00123.tif'
8a6b2a69f79ddf530dfcc445f380c590
fe2afc0483cf3660c51022ea5b6bb267e64b7ece
'2011-08-18T04:44:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
644ebae1ef1106bda6f0ddd8024657e5
3326b5fd610cf1f6cfa8f3577ecf60a6d85cc17b
describe
'8900' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUAZ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
b2bdfab7c18046a6d2e8d4eff489129f
3dc9c276546403fcd21599c2fa0b219e5f279b01
'2011-08-18T04:41:06-04:00'
describe
'1397832' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBA' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c21ae3920dd0ed285d91cfef0b5bcca1
550aa0a387ea080f82c607f05783579583da9748
'2011-08-18T04:46:14-04:00'
describe
'92175' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBB' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
6b7c184d16246b9ddcf5f8e283dd3b5e
7e581ecd10b673b7b1fd4d8a84cc4df32dea2dfc
'2011-08-18T04:57:54-04:00'
describe
'27959' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBC' 'sip-files00124.pro'
874660bd837f924f729cfd8fb90b9703
610c374d24e50af50488d3bd2c0e7edbc8688b29
'2011-08-18T05:02:25-04:00'
describe
'33061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBD' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
6fab57b34e02e81ffc6f06364a1759e8
8817bd6b7fd8be10dcadc6b3a9dd51e99677e320
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBE' 'sip-files00124.tif'
d4f17b698b2c07b7b2000e368598c461
c51acea48b1234ab31d58f595eee4c4b5c749765
'2011-08-18T04:46:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBF' 'sip-files00124.txt'
cb018b4730309cdbd8b0cf27288c0895
243cc057f1ad98d963b8cafadc71e774d1ca7e72
describe
'10291' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBG' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
381aa2f8d0817d748e47bbd6ba3af799
7449df02dc4c18b56e401ec02e9589cadc4de993
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBH' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
62c5bfc6a52b30fdde12774f21db9d8d
6aaf3db4d8772abb600ba5b495e513fa09e8e1a5
'2011-08-18T05:00:29-04:00'
describe
'97524' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBI' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
5fa96814e52a1b3a9c217070f221ec47
f809968fbdde1d8db2e9f276ec20d9b49b133690
describe
'28921' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBJ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
bbecd1e0edf306e1bf06dc317c186d0a
b4603a79cfc2087be1480f363630814836dbab57
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBK' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
624a1dfd3825eeede49ba2f69de00993
fa9e525eeda467967a22d0829a7d798bf5d8241c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
b653ef2cb8bb2141fb0f8865265199db
1cec14f1047cf6244d8834e5c01492ce2e83e3f2
'2011-08-18T05:02:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBM' 'sip-files00125.txt'
2855fcbd3e6d447d20ab21503476d6da
0181fc686ca913fe5c2abbbdc16fc2afb8812a0a
'2011-08-18T05:00:00-04:00'
describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBN' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
d89a329b6dfa3ef87b36eb7e68aaa8e1
b0feeb9ede4809616672f44334b4edcfefa868dd
'2011-08-18T04:41:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBO' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
1a1ea8481e792e7707aa5335b5114352
8cddfa0d566a07708a0a15f2743e4dc7c86ca028
'2011-08-18T05:01:06-04:00'
describe
'94733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBP' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
b34ad50a7d0c2a89f1660e64279964ee
cc444b7b962b3c2d5015dd91faf1cf2ac7d481d6
'2011-08-18T04:49:27-04:00'
describe
'28223' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBQ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
17d81878b582ed277663977979b458f2
3502a3b0c805f020d957d25bd3318895046322cc
'2011-08-18T04:58:28-04:00'
describe
'33601' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBR' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
4817ecc7991eda9da820c9ef1b5cea65
937467f623daf6ce9e910c0868b7cde22c71da0c
'2011-08-18T04:48:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBS' 'sip-files00126.tif'
3be92519fc6d2cf3041bda17b0ccc587
6639eb2e0f4a40449787a14703c4495234c7b310
'2011-08-18T04:46:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBT' 'sip-files00126.txt'
2bef43488f1d2956e48e25d21d8b7cc6
8d8431ac5c74e9acceadcced5bc3477175d7cc21
'2011-08-18T04:44:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBU' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
3bb9e12a47cc6a112f72c3f1d8bce13f
8185244c6bcd458578a6b17b7f8b3a8f69b365aa
describe
'1455054' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBV' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
c943747ba42b3f9191eb5f7b4f803862
f973a7c3944c022b3ac7f9e54f8edef5819f077f
'2011-08-18T04:59:07-04:00'
describe
'98197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBW' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c48c3eb9096fb6296461b92f7762cb93
0da3fc72f53827ae156bb6a8e62674c6ffd5b318
describe
'28878' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBX' 'sip-files00127.pro'
89ed54b483481053eea687d2fee81e3a
e7bf8eeb1da753bcbce915dc505a41c1652f46ce
'2011-08-18T05:02:32-04:00'
describe
'35934' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBY' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
d25a7e3f13c28f127e127f2cf036bc2b
0d4d605bebdc63e55acabafe5a9d0833b75ea03e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUBZ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
6610c15a7c5ef7a19f74e6585a3b2ee9
4dfe3ff85902c32ce90951dfa7635b38341ffae9
'2011-08-18T04:51:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCA' 'sip-files00127.txt'
48e9eb2be9aec644bcaebaaa728b1611
26dfa568d4ccfd50f26adb86e841dda0aa725092
describe
'9694' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCB' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
982d0400f9fcb4a0d924fec4e447687f
7ea3d1108bfbc5ce960d3ebdf522794b44898ecd
'2011-08-18T04:54:29-04:00'
describe
'1397999' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCC' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
af981a4297f1dedbd6424fbc1775e7cf
3c91f04674f724705dbe963ff3c820d2e741ed49
describe
'94399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCD' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a1293641da3925a077ea5f6f5b613bf2
9beeb2f01f0a8b36ff4205b1346bbcfa1034af36
'2011-08-18T04:53:31-04:00'
describe
'27660' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCE' 'sip-files00128.pro'
573b8735b849bd33829d0609b45fb4be
89532a7f610d27249564398cf882e6fe273a5b29
'2011-08-18T04:53:51-04:00'
describe
'33591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCF' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
7d0019264bc1e7e76699e7d247304d00
da7a6fe74a72a90a221bc0323c0e70ad7bdb9971
'2011-08-18T05:02:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCG' 'sip-files00128.tif'
c6727115c5a9c20141e9ea98c602e4ce
21f9189424cd71662f43bbd6073be89230566f0f
'2011-08-18T04:44:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCH' 'sip-files00128.txt'
3a07fa04a000a71b609284d72b24fb0c
dffe9b4fb5fca673baa7ebecb821a6796fe64421
describe
'10651' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
e4a0881fb775feff4f8f8d4c39ca72ee
08281d711c5354d816d944488da18325425892ba
describe
'1455127' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCJ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
092b29893ba98b30841e167412631019
1c29385c8126aeb21f5868f09b98bb73315e52b5
'2011-08-18T04:55:47-04:00'
describe
'95555' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCK' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a4d1c674d0fd8f3459975d31c727c2e1
acdaa06618ebd496d8ca614931aa50345a5345e7
'2011-08-18T04:49:37-04:00'
describe
'28084' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCL' 'sip-files00129.pro'
21ba1f1549f589189e610a03ca67f3c2
f9660a2afbc497460f04bea4f7eb13137229d3dd
'2011-08-18T04:44:21-04:00'
describe
'34544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCM' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
cf12bc7b24e91ef8c9537f54543b7192
5eb8cd6616820ae6327a02d38b574f6955f0afa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCN' 'sip-files00129.tif'
a7856290b38d1fda0d8a5357c102c7a5
db1571eae53c78eb545a88f9b6a888097fba0fca
'2011-08-18T04:59:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCO' 'sip-files00129.txt'
09d1408ca5ec645568c3cd6f9c6a6fee
ebc837392b2b4ba2c8fd8dd159f9ea708328a98f
'2011-08-18T04:54:33-04:00'
describe
'9557' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCP' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
db2785bd4ef3c9f1c1d3f3591de23e0d
2a3da1867bc67922bcef300b9180bfa80cd1bcde
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCQ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
9a9060962827407a2fec02f6a5e4e0aa
8777c08fbb843e10973f1c91b6e533cabba9913f
describe
'95820' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCR' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
e0a9185d536f08f676bec1420db9919f
7662d32d5736e0fe38d1621ca38a93670513a62b
describe
'27839' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCS' 'sip-files00130.pro'
4ed34f433e916b694dddf6961bf1202e
46da81231105ef454df28c37b1a14235259011e9
describe
'33976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCT' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
0b5110e7420616afe897486c9ac87f47
5f6ab804d5d68a3afe41a68400102ed27a502139
'2011-08-18T04:54:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCU' 'sip-files00130.tif'
3db095b734a5254430a638d7d4a60a1f
43f8ce81b8dee6cd0b61e179e097085ee4d8f7a7
'2011-08-18T04:53:22-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCV' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6f72ee5592e4b6d8917a8e0d9f628f57
7acbca54b5f90e89a6441985f43e3429fcc6012c
'2011-08-18T04:42:40-04:00'
describe
'10622' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCW' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
4cef46a2525e3714398dcea237d3c498
984ad4f47914e5efce244e7892c2ecbc755c7976
'2011-08-18T05:04:06-04:00'
describe
'1455185' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCX' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
4c98f79d1b5c97fd56fb0a5d369f3a6b
bc9731c28df543aec7e3135090e2444435bb7e99
describe
'100471' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCY' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
44adcbc4a3b4b65ed70a444997ac3d4a
c45e3c552eed2e10f27a990aa72216f63e1ea5b0
'2011-08-18T04:59:23-04:00'
describe
'28319' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUCZ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
39284e84bfa6919cc85e9285e1d0d616
29361a3ff64bce478eed3cbae0e323d2208aad4c
'2011-08-18T04:55:11-04:00'
describe
'36098' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDA' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
9bf5df1a458f69b10575c96397d8eb00
aa39cd6d3ad540c0e76b604c6f659a4d45ac0fbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDB' 'sip-files00131.tif'
bdfd6409643d880b141eadc4b2f4d912
747637ccfd26ec07907ed3f2c56d37d31263a169
'2011-08-18T04:53:09-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDC' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d637a325e8cec9d3606a1cb454f93acb
2acce49fcba0de0db5976590940014cf054e95eb
'2011-08-18T04:48:04-04:00'
describe
'9818' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDD' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
dd26377dd841cd08360160825e6ea8e6
ab32180ef056f0e226572185deae2007e3dd9be1
describe
'1397985' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
19a556f9babe7c1e8165841c62cdce3c
adb149bbca71f52dfc4adf4b8fd813b19a9143d5
'2011-08-18T04:58:39-04:00'
describe
'97807' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDF' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
152530497c327847c6b461288611c9ed
61767c565e775ab09b417e4335dbab385342196a
'2011-08-18T04:41:42-04:00'
describe
'28909' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDG' 'sip-files00132.pro'
f4f6a2ca88deba01e126a273da657219
5f7329b1237eb23ce3359064d77f57b9c6420f54
'2011-08-18T04:53:29-04:00'
describe
'35115' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDH' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
2f560ae160bd83ce39fc8fdf02c32152
14ca29f522d2bba2460f5e3be22b7ff70d7ac3d4
'2011-08-18T04:48:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDI' 'sip-files00132.tif'
7d361cf8c7c63d0a13ddd207b552f954
a984f38909b495f75d2a5541339140534809a0c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDJ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
cdfef3c0058823ef4ebd887fab374d80
c6f5e4c692a73965186ee869e66731f1eb7f76a3
describe
'10640' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDK' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
bddb4846c0b636dcee1c360aeb22c68e
e201ba8a6e7cf672b3ccb28cd4e5d3c7a1c94277
'2011-08-18T04:44:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDL' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
5b15718b0df38577b6fdcb5b6556e46a
014f39597d0f575008c58b377c4c1e53b8364772
'2011-08-18T04:50:29-04:00'
describe
'100433' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDM' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d37f345764acdfd99b5eb24d114d556a
638f01f37b57d016c5e6d0044039c593e8add25d
describe
'28170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDN' 'sip-files00133.pro'
94249e4fe677ed36c714797912b18255
9bdcb19d64e75a4673d1a1d101952c44c4ae4195
'2011-08-18T04:49:36-04:00'
describe
'35801' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDO' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
09114d46e09b1174a3aa4b050a3476bb
b5358c922faffe2be3e2b7f138dc572e47af5955
'2011-08-18T05:00:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDP' 'sip-files00133.tif'
629da2ba3bfb04baffcc069c8bdd712d
341b0bc90b4d86a9d7b615924ff1beb91ca62d9a
'2011-08-18T04:43:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDQ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
e6ba9e35a4d70e579d40639702b6e83c
3b3cb3a967b8d471459165943fed2dcb4893e67b
'2011-08-18T04:41:34-04:00'
describe
'10017' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDR' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
0e0ef840cb96b3f5aa4e85e45ac3d778
a6fd0139ef8073e28c784f53df10156309f2e916
'2011-08-18T04:59:10-04:00'
describe
'1397944' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDS' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
882f14cbf8937314da0f7d467286195f
0f05999c69aebd8fe93476ff25984a7c57fb0332
describe
'94811' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDT' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
5d9d988cc147885704e8b79c3bd4f7a2
c2d180a6d18995e561fbf5b8e4b5a79af7b6a403
describe
'27357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDU' 'sip-files00134.pro'
768f4d52c13fd82292f79cd2ebf9cec7
8d8ec790a77f1a67ff98d6b4cb0a54cdf6fe9d6a
describe
'33106' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDV' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
4ca157c26d59471d88cc966cd792f4ba
8b4a4ed7181167807a7fbcdaf482354b355dca9b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDW' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ade20bce6e92ea32eba1a80c188a5e6f
bb27affbc3decb387fb84c93d8bb0d33eb4f3399
'2011-08-18T04:50:32-04:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDX' 'sip-files00134.txt'
c00c5e5d034bc1b37fcfbf6d428600cf
d7dbae7d2edac236ff7859b1d76f9c73b46702b9
describe
'10171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDY' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
be6fdb3bd92dd9b6f27773f67bd4b99f
f380501a3e1f902f05d8ff72aa8c5d6b86017db8
'2011-08-18T05:01:15-04:00'
describe
'1455197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUDZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
2a0950af631ba4ed717dd26d966f28f2
39be2dfd4cad7ff01342aff8c5f75ce98b80ea02
'2011-08-18T04:42:01-04:00'
describe
'96332' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
a703621f1c04985f1404c1e1959a3470
c99b93149f04c6fd6fa32d670250e5b14506b4db
'2011-08-18T04:41:56-04:00'
describe
'27505' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
32a8b30e5775d7f6b4e02027aad21b4c
c45a1a1a711838c60ea474728f42ffd5aa055e2d
describe
'35095' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEC' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
3962e737e6d87b2ec687fe3412689a4d
384c925fd3f55373ce9c7e27afad6e0f59ede0aa
'2011-08-18T04:47:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUED' 'sip-files00135.tif'
01811408b8595f343688dfbb96574334
ea5c1e2140afff3dd76551b13b044da581fb84f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
3957292134ae1268163c984d756bc055
998f001941245f0bbc9f840467e38759a52ef8a6
'2011-08-18T04:42:33-04:00'
describe
'9546' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEF' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
0bdd64fee4408de6e9c44cd2a65e0839
f7bd4009b954b028a0901dfd457eabb22247d522
'2011-08-18T04:57:44-04:00'
describe
'1397705' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEG' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
0854c24643f41da3c0a7f2355d46ebb2
ac4a269de8e46069e1b6c59261a6dae9f9799796
'2011-08-18T04:43:44-04:00'
describe
'96190' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEH' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b29c2c5d6ce9aec2e61655c1266a79e7
eca77b3e3a66fcd8ec1332e9450a2bce6ad3908d
'2011-08-18T04:58:58-04:00'
describe
'27913' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEI' 'sip-files00136.pro'
a2c6abef59637f02645bad5525a05296
a539109608fb97718d6842baa5fecbef520d21b4
'2011-08-18T05:00:55-04:00'
describe
'34575' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEJ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
cd6c2859b5bcf4cd19c842c60d4bf605
4454d7891db2ffc8382e8f3e380e1f8ea33abfe0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEK' 'sip-files00136.tif'
057d31b5e7d3cde87399ee96a88b872c
b106dc875d1c1c10b548fe3b991e4749dbd450b7
'2011-08-18T04:55:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEL' 'sip-files00136.txt'
9b8271eaeb5bff7109d2a2c9fd771343
ac35f6ffff8de48685f93d49d4790a956d626929
'2011-08-18T04:50:27-04:00'
describe
'10888' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEM' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
e41c048e8f6c997767a1ecf612bf0b2a
2ffbffe49bdbcfed501af4818eae91d394f351df
'2011-08-18T04:43:25-04:00'
describe
'1441721' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEN' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
377ef82cbf06348cefea11210449e02e
7178e63fb9d706c487809488dd1e469ad01c9378
describe
'92518' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEO' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
b701eab051ed21da88d4f4db82fe4f31
ae2b8e725d9088f36c41beced9966dffd8df705a
'2011-08-18T04:49:51-04:00'
describe
'32050' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEP' 'sip-files00137.pro'
2ff0dd8b0695ca9aee927a27c2d37dbd
c1805466874457964474d80660699559f9850983
describe
'32925' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEQ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
c20ac54c53e96c63503d342a2bb2c5a7
084ac6bfdd229ce571b25f9b13dbeaa8051c34d4
'2011-08-18T04:57:03-04:00'
describe
'11544855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUER' 'sip-files00137.tif'
af5e77e50139b0a3fd65811ea4550c3c
9882a2692020edf332cf681bc397338801bfd4b5
'2011-08-18T04:51:41-04:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUES' 'sip-files00137.txt'
e6868c24b2df8cffe3b922586e29a48a
6e640399768bec1ef077fb95b719098ee6628fdb
'2011-08-18T04:58:59-04:00'
describe
'8955' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUET' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
63dd06968cd0d6fd24e41b1b080b4967
69a758cd5b13e1aba2d714dee122a079ec3d23e6
'2011-08-18T04:49:11-04:00'
describe
'1408873' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEU' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
df55fc134f7dc7d2b8b655ce808ab628
926081464a0f3ad4aaf27abc05c7a441a1dd87ab
'2011-08-18T04:41:28-04:00'
describe
'94606' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEV' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
5028bc2aa2f442ebb13b09769d3a65b9
5927a09711b14eda9b1b2664ae9cae53dbe9864a
describe
'27891' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEW' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e17275fe58112a382937f418a74fdc01
c5d96ba42be3448b6ad7a25ec92f7440693e2e5d
describe
'32733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEX' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
860e781ae3efa6dc9a340d8718178176
ebad31ef6db3a079ec51f3773a34247308853ec4
'2011-08-18T04:46:12-04:00'
describe
'11282081' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEY' 'sip-files00138.tif'
ec696ad45af845560a7e29593a0719f6
77af2ad520a4af6dca86d964217810ce5ddd5b00
'2011-08-18T04:42:53-04:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUEZ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
982c926865c532bc043e38186f03bbab
2ca4f17699aebd0aec73cad4073b84a9cca45d7a
describe
'10364' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFA' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
9d5ce3d1f623010ad94c90c9fbba389b
e05e37c2ccaab6b2dfa957650e918f143db4409f
'2011-08-18T04:43:57-04:00'
describe
'1441723' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFB' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7042635cd4a60c1511931de982c9262c
7c95aecaa2f5c2dafd66a44de64bcd03e85787cd
'2011-08-18T04:45:43-04:00'
describe
'94603' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFC' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
2ede3b31df3b6feeacfbb307138b8dcd
26fd882131bcd36c07dc56e404f03ab90115b449
'2011-08-18T04:42:37-04:00'
describe
'34533' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFD' 'sip-files00139.pro'
cd38b2a3b8df3c2b189d405ad81b6dc9
6c670497ec68673e92be3c08b6421b10705de2db
'2011-08-18T05:03:35-04:00'
describe
'31839' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFE' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
2a78c5e9fc846cd08ba8d1eaae267e89
238b22986687ba35ef96e584133a0231e91e8dfc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFF' 'sip-files00139.tif'
4bb52468d452d089efc63f47a60525f9
3e63436d52e147af8b1840da0a353843af7eecf4
'2011-08-18T04:40:44-04:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFG' 'sip-files00139.txt'
308c7418037448ba5cf7463187230c8b
1bf3522e56e2b3321e6985e3a6effb6aa0b58afc
'2011-08-18T04:52:49-04:00'
describe
'8495' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFH' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
af38b776e4d7d63bf08854ccb58c2d63
ae7ed8252c09139e8998d5673044f6b2be2196e8
'2011-08-18T04:50:37-04:00'
describe
'1408718' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFI' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
c924045c2a9611e4c99d8ac9443d4e39
31f41ce4620ffaa447671119a9bb76abbc488e22
'2011-08-18T04:54:51-04:00'
describe
'96601' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFJ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
4fd8d207dcc841c82fb5c886a44c599b
cfd03b899988c2196e8f5bfc0ee9a3e5393dffda
'2011-08-18T04:48:52-04:00'
describe
'29768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFK' 'sip-files00140.pro'
9ce6420a428aab2bb56bd998d5051113
40652fe71cbbe39f46be4624e654e0be89eb367a
describe
'33538' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFL' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
faef06996e87c7d4ddd721cd993492a6
2531a03e0380dc4f3e34ec3c3a8e82866cfc29a1
'2011-08-18T04:40:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFM' 'sip-files00140.tif'
227ef374c3b522320350c9d77419dffa
f380b2b7e642800a18a29d6f956951434e4a4d3a
'2011-08-18T04:55:51-04:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFN' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b531e6b8812a2b245ebbd37e6d5f9ad8
db80117c30f5055b7f1ee0aeaeb55a74a2ab51c5
describe
Invalid character
'10303' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFO' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
add917495fed107b0bc2ac736bf3d0a3
438f72983fa6f7665c1b37e4ba419099f1d38c5a
'2011-08-18T04:49:44-04:00'
describe
'1441725' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
1e30fdfc237174e37c9fb921e9db8151
c432586059d6e9f5762ab55d8173e78ded60afe5
describe
'98142' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
b940af5247db6c8ef64aaeaa5f3a421e
65104c4d04a797bfa86e4c004076d0da82d4b35b
'2011-08-18T04:54:27-04:00'
describe
'27646' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFR' 'sip-files00141.pro'
a42a23021227a0ab35f9fe5a46427dd0
fc461a30ece0a02a4629376b73571fa78a5013a9
describe
'35216' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFS' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
a0c52e5a5c32e51003987811d9ddb6b2
ea308dbbb99b56e986708a66c0b52db421bea6b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFT' 'sip-files00141.tif'
1bbf482ed8d6ea95a9df87f843d325fc
b33600a4d6fd28e12ec69b71e85f949e1f4ebdb1
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFU' 'sip-files00141.txt'
45912abe536f9ddc802972e69628f8cf
2f2aa93e9728e33f42a799223f2ab50fd76455a8
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFV' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
ea312d871cdaaa26f73f063079bdbbff
4d18041b9b97db8f9ff94f45d2d27d2465125710
describe
'1438450' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFW' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
56461eab85a03acd684cf4cdefe5542b
7c70f7bbf7c37ea2fc185679e80057292a80fea3
describe
'102119' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFX' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
db30cde7d94115ce82cba94a3620180a
dea87a636da4036f022b22228e378f616873f004
'2011-08-18T04:58:37-04:00'
describe
'26151' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFY' 'sip-files00142.pro'
af343dc21b9c6d1a1ef72f977af46de0
052768d93adf116e72f9e784b02f5c718a13af83
describe
'36840' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUFZ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
9c8d25d578ff0dda787c230ed35ca83d
470eefd32a140edd0eb3060a2ada43dcade8c44a
describe
'11515585' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGA' 'sip-files00142.tif'
fea21c8f6fcc150275909fdafbe3d548
242b836f2839105b4be49714decfc99462971e6b
'2011-08-18T04:52:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGB' 'sip-files00142.txt'
245b1f127455f94bbac58965915418ab
d389683aa3c52b6e2872671faac13383d74071fb
describe
'9953' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGC' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
834b12c6adea061f0693849f3f7e7243
a562c05afa79366f6673105c95746aa078eee46a
describe
'1441731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGD' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
8f82b58e2bcb619a99f88bb3a597be6b
8fc025e2bb4615c210beda3a24a65fc1f4f9431c
describe
'99352' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGE' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f64cac8bd50de732bcf15b57c5ed2f70
b666b1e76f3d257542ff2e8cd5edad393dad61a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGF' 'sip-files00143.pro'
891b217488142f9a9e46277420026267
56ec0ca833d546db6f7139467b91bd632742e7ab
'2011-08-18T04:56:11-04:00'
describe
'35988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGG' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
cb83475007fa3470ef1f91d0df3995fd
3da4abe744921297afaf8ab784aeac2cd66a97d7
'2011-08-18T04:53:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGH' 'sip-files00143.tif'
7152c45fe9f092fc68ec697df185ae4e
7e770b338aafe0b19e962f3b3bc41dfcdb06970c
'2011-08-18T04:44:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGI' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e280aeab4627ab0454e50e0bce708c38
b9695f7a7230f8f1ca3de7d918c2788f40158e55
'2011-08-18T04:54:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGJ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
53baf9ad820625679cc0480a3877e0cc
796585c5eb577249c9d88a466002a94bc9fc66e5
'2011-08-18T04:45:21-04:00'
describe
'1408862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGK' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
2552b62f1f0fe7d2580f2e0e20ce2bec
1ae7fd23f339c5e99040a75790d893ab43a8bf2b
describe
'100403' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGL' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
e11c8347626007e064e4f28bacdf66a8
18e85263664dfc0dbf6b62a251465921a395aa6a
describe
'28618' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
1d46d4299292b02c8b14160eed07fd13
d5d11ba4900ad0cbf54bb296837b6f45cba0f8d8
'2011-08-18T04:42:52-04:00'
describe
'34712' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e1131885e3149234e1f140638b514c5a
fd172109aa0182be9d80290da582038f520b2970
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGO' 'sip-files00144.tif'
830ce602d151b9db23f631dccc981cce
a88609b855f8461f0c286b4bcb85a73805be1a11
'2011-08-18T04:41:26-04:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGP' 'sip-files00144.txt'
35e88af0db9c512f9ded095111fdc263
e2fc8026ff489756c878983b24685d9a1929f944
describe
'10828' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGQ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
bd5e27ff2bc8d3bd391434134721a060
6b8891dc5b632b6ddd4f36bc64f5c7cdcc827fb0
'2011-08-18T04:56:15-04:00'
describe
'1441714' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
dcc7e52a8abdcd39eaf61a00b0e85b7c
b0fa1ccb6fe74cf6beada6e37d7c0340675942a5
'2011-08-18T04:57:36-04:00'
describe
'99705' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
21bed62d1ce0f10224ea2833aa0a6971
48417d2d52e8b651394035144b64275612e01342
'2011-08-18T04:42:09-04:00'
describe
'27636' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
9b20facc170d71d96c2068f695b388af
7050304cc9a9ad72e46ddec4a9fe2e76b99d496d
'2011-08-18T04:58:32-04:00'
describe
'36161' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
46c07da56d735d9361c867584f5673e0
fb2222a307120b5efb4182209db973cb1bd01ce0
'2011-08-18T04:44:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGV' 'sip-files00145.tif'
203ec4a8772723ade60f662e0eab9073
30b86d8161f412ccf76e8f621f99077520b26d5f
'2011-08-18T04:47:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
1366fb48b5b508f789532b7892a196d2
f9bc6305c1962e17fb5d7a31f80cc5a057c44347
describe
'9937' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGX' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
903c8a1cf140443193ee91f4d38cce5e
adea5354801a01c33ecfbce3f7c66a42989e3d8f
'2011-08-18T04:40:38-04:00'
describe
'1408841' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGY' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
696577a6681acbcd5da0b6b4d2af1152
a14c3e86f60ce937f81b4e69b2b3d97c1d3e721e
'2011-08-18T04:47:47-04:00'
describe
'98153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUGZ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
13916103a81edf38bede2c60c3fba4de
9fe46513c1b65778306d73ddac78cd5739dc709e
describe
'27699' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHA' 'sip-files00146.pro'
c5c8a9c3a5a7ac4efdbb2d92f4001bea
a32aca707dc77325bae718e8c6f65ba707ed42f3
'2011-08-18T04:46:41-04:00'
describe
'33610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHB' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
7f3ee1e2d921d5dc0151863ae5598e53
d617eeba9865eb40a9204d9b6f437c2b177ae256
'2011-08-18T05:03:14-04:00'
describe
'36378936' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHC' 'sip-filesback.tif'
50cc9d96dbbf366fe7c3555147d42793
80d3dc943f651207183ff1a927c048263807f115
'2011-08-18T04:42:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
36811708b13196a2b4fcd8def83934d4
1a08d73af45f1ef2ae0ff09f19a8ab6eeec23df6
'2011-08-18T04:48:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
7b40340ed7d12203c33fc98fe91ed0ef
c751dcbc0fc0cda4cb5b86e4b8c7a2909979642d
describe
'11009' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
be23f7b4794637e2d62f840c21ff82a9
b9d8a93958def292918b6f61eedd507818f3ba58
'2011-08-18T04:55:45-04:00'
describe
'1441560' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5dedf2f865d4dddc39e462dd6e92bfa1
d33b99cfd95a2c40ebb9678072935dfba658a5f3
describe
'98128' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
6350dc72940f893b24d9d2d1da869f4f
5b7717e81b0ac1bad9aa2f03589eb8d8fe85b593
'2011-08-18T05:02:27-04:00'
describe
'27882' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHI' 'sip-files00147.pro'
a5fb1674d57da029033ca12532658cc6
e4e080412b622fda94cff7f8f45768c46bee769b
'2011-08-18T04:56:32-04:00'
describe
'35067' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9b767434b75986651b065b02c1a2b575
7f091c1d2828d5229e049f2ae76a709a551d16f8
'2011-08-18T04:56:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
7c488e0db421cbbce4cb34d9c42a18b5
244bf9781a6ff801deb4eee7795f40c34e23685b
'2011-08-18T04:59:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ca16acfbc558ecccbdecbe49827c255b
071417273976dfd9c4c81ae0d30a108b17630d9c
'2011-08-18T04:44:58-04:00'
describe
'9976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHM' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
55c089499eab42a67fdb94be5f277610
c35afd9c9876d5b5d4c6828fbb5e1be60d8235a3
describe
'1408827' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHN' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
bed489b44e31baf5628f35e70885b066
7eba14c60721ff091ec2a183be9dc0ca315a0cea
describe
'99880' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHO' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d608ae73a3c8657172636991bbc89293
f0e647e1823c12675e70bf8bf9e6fb3770bad640
'2011-08-18T04:41:27-04:00'
describe
'30899' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
0ce1014b4069efd86ada229e81dd4d3c
73cc4202ea9d00bb653c1d168002dd11a4e0146b
describe
'35805' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
085d539860f2d4c863ff1cd043948631
f32ee77964f29666a2e3557ff370fd86ae906a6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
565e3127a96f8104616e0885eaf3f52f
d3e5122abdd74fa3d3196e4780fae632f6aa092a
'2011-08-18T04:58:22-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHS' 'sip-files00148.txt'
4ca287d0353374c26de25d97340f05e5
b937cf7093b4271b68ae18ff9333b6c6a739e480
describe
Invalid character
'11478' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHT' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
5e416776ab139e28790b89b3f958b85b
927ef30d8432f36b13b7d72f45ca48113f1c43de
'2011-08-18T04:53:25-04:00'
describe
'1441724' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
dff1c6c8efcbb733c7dde33db340754c
aa022314bd120e38a0009125b3e48a4b4ccfcd32
'2011-08-18T04:56:46-04:00'
describe
'97637' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
9ca779c26cbce7279049297997b33543
a7371c90788360f2ffab02ff69c71b72abb24084
'2011-08-18T04:59:15-04:00'
describe
'26919' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHW' 'sip-files00149.pro'
c130cf0da59ea13b05ec3d4edb5b2b8f
7e63fc936dea4cb06e2adc1dade328b559be7dd9
describe
'34845' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
c1bf52a8924fd7fce1da7c4d48ca7297
d318fcc9b2506f8cb9e92cb3fbab7fed68fee58f
'2011-08-18T04:48:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
8eb924538e8b3ff69559e3cc902da7b0
2e117c4593855083d3e8b0dbff980dfc1a789a85
'2011-08-18T04:45:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUHZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
8b7e64d68878b3bba7435b9b9a6148ac
435518544a39722e8e50bbe42777940ac673bcc0
'2011-08-18T04:41:03-04:00'
describe
'9956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIA' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
086d5759d6ad24fabbe2ab91a51a9d04
a32f7de5316df5dd781fd7c74e934f1c7966f951
'2011-08-18T04:42:43-04:00'
describe
'1408845' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
908af24dc15dadd77a41c5336ef17ac2
50b3c49e880e00afed8343296c133a801915ec03
describe
'96182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
f47f7dd734b9fc78381b8a92a7aca48e
cb20f0ed9136830c68a18f99497eda198166ca43
describe
'27523' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUID' 'sip-files00150.pro'
589b060c3102e43f77625d636b2534e0
bbc9ecb5947f9d88c5bdae4a13df057fe2fee0b0
'2011-08-18T04:40:37-04:00'
describe
'33064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
60121ed4fcaf2eb50ef07b929bb1cc1c
aa1334dd57a7468a2ec6ad356e52c2aa7e553cc8
'2011-08-18T04:50:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
3ddaabdc792a3fc690e3ba293e9c594d
1ef5324c230d7942f9f608af7de5ecda37c488ff
'2011-08-18T04:42:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
5bdf37e024d68c65c24446f6bf9f2035
aae014971906028b7f98088e473710a0c4d23625
describe
'10327' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
cffd165f4733dd4ce21060540a90afc0
f18766b4f5b9a485821d00bc988fd2079a48aa39
describe
'1368207' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUII' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
50e4080857a2c34dc6396ad67fa29b1f
18f362bd95994eb0c0364375119bcbdb1032038a
'2011-08-18T04:45:40-04:00'
describe
'103445' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
05d5f723ec6abf12a7d6418a59695ffb
f940a25f3b3d8dd684d6d8cda1edcab8012bdc96
'2011-08-18T04:52:41-04:00'
describe
'28888' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
cc6c70caaab525591e52be3a538afcc9
37a73c9722ff1e4f8c1ded95381396bcffa7222e
describe
'36623' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
f4799e1f506e9b32f312df89c013b4f6
af6b7eb3add83a0945ef7d590ca7cabf300d01f8
'2011-08-18T04:56:49-04:00'
describe
'10956731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
92a59e6d7a563f3e66701b3340f0bb08
09581ed6690f2a4d1cd4e418df149544cd3e8eee
'2011-08-18T04:43:35-04:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
98a2622f973e07c6133119322b2d3b77
0e48f8c0c80d9319427d0a7f94e9225cd837e423
'2011-08-18T04:41:00-04:00'
describe
'11328' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIO' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
fe5c88fcead93f25bb1ff819a82dd01e
cef8d47c45fbfb4f9b59364f86dfe2cffe498a84
'2011-08-18T04:54:50-04:00'
describe
'1400189' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIP' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
8e295f8bff78d14f4e53f7dbc2add805
dbfa9806c099d91573280c9c66e8bce119679830
'2011-08-18T05:01:51-04:00'
describe
'104389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
401488cb555aa5713d10f3cdc3845a00
9453cb7da95347ac2b04b63523daaf0d7b8e2b88
describe
'28998' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
1b5b101fbf75b118fff205d6b7138221
25a39fa588d27c4d98837891a9c7bc6db4feaace
describe
'36079' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
80eba0605cf14cc7b2bb74561fc4061b
50064fd266687b53e1d94e908b42997c48097898
'2011-08-18T05:00:20-04:00'
describe
'11212755' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
270f59536be59fa031bdb3b4d61333c8
f199010d15f68e38170793e8fa498efbe1277302
'2011-08-18T05:03:32-04:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c7625b2c6151631e197a5c848e5666c6
fcb513baa20d970a400dfc66e30f5350f286a107
'2011-08-18T04:54:40-04:00'
describe
'10224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ed03b96663c5bd938465240d32489281
fe7c0b0fc430ad4187efb14acc50175bfce4cdff
'2011-08-18T04:44:10-04:00'
describe
'1368200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
4e6daf4c2948b943af9417dd96474ef4
75938238aabde268770dc8a3148c8713a7c82273
describe
'93178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
7504cf7dfd0d354f36991f3c5df3ddb4
b2b34f0ee4c400d4e3254f54346894094973f5ab
'2011-08-18T04:52:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIY' 'sip-files00153.pro'
6d9416bc92d0f879f933d6aff4088837
a7d20a44eeeba88d6b049d089930849143d8aadf
'2011-08-18T04:40:31-04:00'
describe
'33328' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUIZ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
3a125361bdefe9d22c222616e58e0d61
05c7070fd98a08cba7d142270fea0e97dd3a43a7
'2011-08-18T04:51:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
27f0b5db683b79dc89ea4c935f9c35ff
c8e940c6c72d610e6b379a31371eed08c3464ae5
'2011-08-18T05:00:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJB' 'sip-files00153.txt'
b36edced1664798eea1b4b1f5a5395da
1b9f173e46a09542f1a5a871838ef938aa0be3bc
describe
Invalid character
'10117' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJC' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
f9b35ba22e517ef6ebb3ce54a8ea0d1c
9e618bf7384af6541cb3b27d646a16d4de17f2f0
'2011-08-18T04:46:37-04:00'
describe
'1400195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJD' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9f4abea51cb86bee8602d734499f4bbd
5ce80c1302ba1081a0c221a4b05e8dc3a8f659be
'2011-08-18T04:51:24-04:00'
describe
'95988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJE' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
449c986e8296c9a9d00b4b1049029b34
e482201f73eceb107b9129063f191f204a9bd28d
'2011-08-18T04:56:37-04:00'
describe
'27472' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
0b0a19e0243e34d76ea5d052e846d05e
04a7c0da23bcb4bd879f1c48c5cb2e556048728d
'2011-08-18T04:41:17-04:00'
describe
'33409' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
f283b5883462a4ad457a687e41b9f29d
740af00246d509bf25955b43029ca274d587e33e
'2011-08-18T05:02:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJH' 'sip-files00154.tif'
4ee7610ff5e80ba89f45ea0c7f7b541c
95e7b3e0f7151933e67df016bcbbc1c97245b68c
'2011-08-18T04:51:40-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
3f7bd448bb68bacd1aa864457e9672b0
443ce0d858b5535f91c344b40f3be6deaeaa7fa7
describe
'9649' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJJ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
37e4ca42bb2d9f4369e215d9739fcaf5
3ff0e2dd81ecb09fc471f29a009c37d90bce3e58
describe
'1368192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
5e59383b373f544c7d0022bcaa37edf5
25c39302f140afd01bb3a4d55d9c7f6ae1ab9e4e
describe
'96075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJL' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
86bcb7d3cdae0878f0065dd3ea8ab7b4
5fd3a24e54478759a4049319fa72341d3d7145bd
'2011-08-18T04:59:30-04:00'
describe
'27656' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
997287b381dee931f62cb9ac5215d97b
27791aeda35e74177e0d89bd66468034dd2a15a5
'2011-08-18T04:56:39-04:00'
describe
'34901' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
3029a7a9a6b71b07e9f199df38f8a3f0
9a1fe8d3efcf734e719d046fa6c315800ef5d1ce
'2011-08-18T05:03:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
3c0942e223e8899b672d45b9783e513e
51d91b5bb1dc3fc4c24654dbd34bead6614d017f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
794455e5420ba9edc0e84c9a5b5c00de
6726c3e515aa5deecd79a58ebd761c60a09ef55c
describe
'10675' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJQ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
fa9d29106aeec24544444020b5bf7350
94eda2855aa9cb707df2f2d766cd87838453a0c4
'2011-08-18T04:44:56-04:00'
describe
'1400089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
3ac21602bc7f66b0c3bb34ff7ff24dff
38cf77520e13d25f1c2332cde78e4f70e81aa01f
describe
'99341' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJS' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f3320b0a87f3bdd599d6b165823d0e5b
242cfbf17769c6be0b490e9b8714c6bc846ec08f
'2011-08-18T04:54:49-04:00'
describe
'27976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
4c3531c7fcd33c53e6ebcf5d9c596aa3
c07642ff2693a15db263a7048d65c50a5f9d0831
describe
'34141' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
219c35a3019cd612bf01f87a3da26767
4e1efc9a69efc064a7538077b7de473d40fb1a3a
'2011-08-18T04:49:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
497c46d2e06dd4f56c60f118fc3be9f0
1796ebcd203e98acd38f1e0cd0fa9dd7d2f249d0
'2011-08-18T04:57:50-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
041f488ec0fb966795c0a73ed0d27356
e98c080b92d098030740c4fc224bb9c118734295
describe
'9996' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
76033590d0763ad93ee23a447319baa3
b2597c1b39404039cf7f97869129d58a8030b36f
describe
'1368206' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
9a95b1d387fdb27ab010d1a1fc519d9f
4c4993de9dca420cc81c704c361c529320bc06a3
'2011-08-18T05:00:02-04:00'
describe
'91778' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUJZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
fd7540065530ec825d3b562eb24fa4e4
e606c299c225264ce653f70b0a644bff162a8b26
describe
'28285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
37e7fce2e7c6fca26091fcc93dc8e32e
9032505ca00db67cc219c717f4df07a1fa57b332
describe
'31486' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKB' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
f1309e53a88f4a9668df88aca3759a5a
5c398f9ebcb486da2c19d56b72477234a6c704c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
009a3ec50278c9f444397f02d5cfc03d
00c5f269efa9785aba7e76e8c09438c20e2d507e
'2011-08-18T04:44:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKD' 'sip-files00157.txt'
62c4a69ffd82ad5b07e9dbef2ac6e08c
e4426de0a0bf902b3f7be918264c521b33eef996
describe
'9852' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8cb33817e9b18483e794ea5e01b93512
fe32734d9ffe86ba2cc333305e1855f72340df54
'2011-08-18T04:42:45-04:00'
describe
'1400176' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKF' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
30c2281cb6361c7c0b068035fcd7df56
6627c547e8cc38b52219f811de8b791286381f36
'2011-08-18T04:42:31-04:00'
describe
'95543' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
f15556a3aea6367058d6cc09017f2c28
7f42814b4779ebbc453a33a6d81b5207b8b34031
'2011-08-18T04:48:48-04:00'
describe
'27513' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKH' 'sip-files00158.pro'
7eaf5e23b0bd371e8c3ced4b6395070f
c5f726b503591630f2160244f8d80b0a21c3db26
describe
'32031' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKI' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
83b8d7e5c518fdc44e8b1fab5bf58dd9
cb523424490ca36949fabb856a22f1a78aca27fc
'2011-08-18T05:00:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
2e5248619b0161ee92d3569dbf7042a0
1911fc360800065c8578bdbd2a6583e968095ef4
'2011-08-18T04:52:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKK' 'sip-files00158.txt'
db73210c73f55d4340ce6e93589a966c
218677367314629e2ce786a5cc03d25c7daf5e88
describe
'9342' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKL' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
208f062fdd81c05c0723e9a38e5d9190
b2df198c8c0c389cf0e398b33f78dadae4a97730
describe
'1368194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKM' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
196e78adcb7fd31da4931326569f6e68
3d7da582e29c48f1b4de8213ecb3c5ebf426b9cd
'2011-08-18T04:54:11-04:00'
describe
'94708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKN' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
9f05acd2877be395659f15e30ca6ce09
abe53b9d40a0fdf550aed217164b1e70dbcd5687
'2011-08-18T05:03:34-04:00'
describe
'27885' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
a7fd3c250b589a65da000cfefdc1676e
377abbf96083d51168e26d337fe0c83046ed643a
describe
'34184' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
7c1a32f4ce63e6086ae617cd09aa353a
03e37d591d9a960edf02beb684699af1169e404e
'2011-08-18T04:56:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKQ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
af4fa6006a25009ae22b20fb392178ab
2e4b7ecf85efba149769dc686ba5f852a0db003f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKR' 'sip-files00159.txt'
169372143aec14c8149cebdcf7bcbf03
0b011e71662b4189b43d439194b16e1c30a05b23
'2011-08-18T04:59:48-04:00'
describe
'10595' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
c9f17dcbd98c7bdf6571fc9495d3e041
23ab729f6a10a6c4f202a0f1edc9b54c0cac77d3
describe
'1400213' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
0de2d50a470b7499ceaa09280fabb669
c0e3a8dec4bfe930d65dfd291b4e715f268bad41
describe
'100028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
ab9d7e9c0bd9109dcc5e6104b0299cf2
2da17f26b9e35bf29421931f1f39a5b40ecfd118
describe
'27889' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKV' 'sip-files00160.pro'
65bfcc49b4879a78c96c5b193aaed197
637e02226b61b5e547609563512113c409c133ed
describe
'34532' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKW' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
7baca6fc41f24a57f53f9f7561ead8cf
0429036758c177102e57d0e2f4b45419a88af4fa
'2011-08-18T04:58:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
c27019f56c1286e9fb97d597591a7405
b62f7dffd1ac01179addb79d3c0bd2251ecfaecb
'2011-08-18T04:40:51-04:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
ce3507358823a5c82c8ca743e17adb1b
ad18ab3445475a4f3bca310746d3f1e100c51484
'2011-08-18T04:56:40-04:00'
describe
'9757' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUKZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
364a442ba13eb0aadbcb5bdf2613b650
986227072e45527b5c710195194a44e96f6d7825
'2011-08-18T05:03:52-04:00'
describe
'1368137' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
8d1b8bb23031a021de04df8b6638af8b
814aff0cc37c90505683d9a5d1c83bd26ea14a4e
describe
'91354' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
0a8d99d51d1605e22bc664e0c753e9b2
ea84ac8b89e09dd494617366eb7f4712aa07f6a4
'2011-08-18T04:51:54-04:00'
describe
'26542' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4595297c8615a7effe1ddc64fd308e40
89955f540a2dc519aa1eda2e69536aaa9504f30f
'2011-08-18T04:44:23-04:00'
describe
'32669' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
92fac5827335cda62d559f931b1b4311
39fdda62f9dadb5214951b5d69be93918c5612a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
d71092ef47b2991f454eb33d8814d34b
586c81d91155d9705cf38c42354f8ec017cd81f6
'2011-08-18T04:49:30-04:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULF' 'sip-files00161.txt'
cad8754e4237e132ed93d9be5aed0d30
7bcb043d98549abef3b9859839eaee9803f46563
describe
'10223' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
d1973f03e5df89e76be99170d5b66ae0
5a38a724cc067956ac6ee46addd6a19966fb7942
describe
'1400215' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
df5a1c63a00134f5a221c778fce9ad78
0a332d09663649d793c32bb719a6b45456b28fda
'2011-08-18T04:41:21-04:00'
describe
'100571' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a417e9259e8ba5d43f594d682eaa7b49
1dce17fdf480dd4d116b3d8fba7628fa335ee04d
'2011-08-18T04:45:23-04:00'
describe
'28182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULJ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a647a0935b4ccd42dd23f1e9cf1fdfa3
178b898fcabc7d6b12f50ec57bcbecb81c471854
'2011-08-18T04:50:52-04:00'
describe
'35015' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
fc5baf00560290bb1629b20c08ca8f50
ca069dda8cd2e997d038f3ebbaf127861d28241e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
334bf1ce5c444f7d7f97534a899689de
196abbe7c5a6101d8e06b0718bc69bfb6991a190
'2011-08-18T04:42:19-04:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULM' 'sip-files00162.txt'
4f4f3013ade39cf53c9f16a0fe92428d
148c5649bc21bd4c13382c893f20ad37a344a0c6
'2011-08-18T04:49:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULN' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
24931555ed2b7ca0d8d7999bd95a8878
b37e0ae1a988161be376541afa7ff08228e7dc99
'2011-08-18T04:50:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
b551b1998417c7d4389bfc8f8c703769
b32db58d99802b073e1ae6339c6c11f54fc61ddc
describe
'100480' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
80e1e15e0d4ef591701581887d01da47
99c2e324c7a91f96cd8fe2e099ae73560f2f6626
'2011-08-18T05:00:47-04:00'
describe
'28179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
4bbaa66a3bf9925e7598822f5320803b
0ee9f139548c5cc8ec687c5eecb9925e3ef651f8
describe
'35545' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
991f4947e610ce74a948c9490ce96dfa
473ed98c87fb4ed264c1a8b91065babc17b11d10
'2011-08-18T04:51:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULS' 'sip-files00163.tif'
e7e969d8bdb761b8183ca2d88abcc2f5
3a2592d7835796a2625514b58db662d0fb2d6d5a
'2011-08-18T04:50:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULT' 'sip-files00163.txt'
b843db6952b57334e1c2ad4a816236f1
25da0d01c247d145344f3a366875e16dd3088411
'2011-08-18T04:46:45-04:00'
describe
'11039' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULU' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
ee3ea4e49a978ea38ebadb167a975586
340fa5ed74c11e9cc9cd19ef9771f5ce24dedead
'2011-08-18T04:53:45-04:00'
describe
'1400094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3ffa31857bc069b3e5def6b8f71e8b8c
e9667dcc0046784ecb79e7fe7cfc958973ac775a
describe
'100994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
c50cd53d638867611f39564bfd547940
240e0520a8d6a9fe6a611b36c747c6ce58384822
describe
'28803' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULX' 'sip-files00164.pro'
ca15ea66fb00ffc76d5a6fdcd0c84162
0083d0517f124c9957c74f4ba50f806259a7bb67
describe
'34657' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULY' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
830f04a4fc04d42663f26d31965daf4a
8fd800d34b209f320e53b2ffdf2d89868ec30cbe
'2011-08-18T04:58:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABULZ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
a562684a1599ac9c5964707415e69cc4
a4677919d83db5c210d2aa30d2599b2c1d680c68
'2011-08-18T04:49:47-04:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
68b13bc2cb846d3b2751b6a9242553e3
6fab0851a95ec500345ddaeedd66469674c10c06
'2011-08-18T04:48:22-04:00'
describe
'9794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
6d4de0d00422c809739b92858171fa31
4dae34f248526bca25b08102304e7c42994a388e
describe
'1368202' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
017f22b6282901f42311ad28c2ba5480
066f8ead9f86e74f0b4d43f48671e782951303db
'2011-08-18T04:48:30-04:00'
describe
'98440' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ac3a08e959bb35a2cb8bdecec76f12d7
0317b24d77cbc6742b70002a32270ba8b4996e3e
describe
'28183' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUME' 'sip-files00165.pro'
793a1722a0a47a486a591a34f508ba67
6ce1fff204faaf02b3ca35864d42c9308bbbe181
describe
'35810' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
a42004c92359e33c7ba1af6f1bb652b9
a9f0847538d5ca336db06635d1131b36dd27bd52
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
accddc92143e385108cf416e4e083c24
1c7446f864aeb76975ea336861826a4c729701e2
'2011-08-18T04:48:25-04:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
5381b29bfe02b794cb57bd79c4cc26eb
d98dc0165a2091b639fbd2894a24d78a02b71a6a
describe
'11170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
489a4fff2b044efe7e9e68f42bbb74c6
16842a94a2a199a2d264bf405ca035f547c67b1e
'2011-08-18T04:46:22-04:00'
describe
'1400201' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6844be7eea93507c52efa3be3bfd301e
74b9b6883655217aa103164389b156ea0e350058
'2011-08-18T04:52:35-04:00'
describe
'96614' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
c4f656e2f716b3f744e7bcb4a2e3562d
95be89533e8e37091b9ed7b957734da58da8f39f
'2011-08-18T04:41:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUML' 'sip-files00166.pro'
5e125f273f92277ff4d4d46d37b03e12
5ca46d679e4ee9f68a22f39a34fba51189c3161d
describe
'33723' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
a62fa879ebf9f529fc91a5515381443f
c73a2c646cf0ce68174d0e2e4ee7d617176fbef0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
0bad828ff11aa799c25825a9006bea40
d19068ad9d344dea06419647f5be02ad8cbaf8b3
'2011-08-18T04:46:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMO' 'sip-files00166.txt'
38babfcc35c26ff3d9d8a2c6b56c5bad
7e664d6132e6ffb79b72afce9093bb0c339b24ce
'2011-08-18T04:58:01-04:00'
describe
'9493' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
4e994980f0cd7f4913cd48d14bdaca67
a5fbab836293fedafd7b4f6ed036a4dc648b45df
'2011-08-18T04:47:18-04:00'
describe
'1368201' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMQ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
ef92a1585f7dc52bae702e797dbe1158
e840d2806f5840b24681f0b5ca4d5b3539152112
describe
'95315' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMR' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
d990efc49340df4c9925d284ae70b5fb
db37c46216b01a2a01e991d5fe640fb06035ed2a
describe
'28987' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
5c185f2855a537b3b360f8b030660503
8357f21371effe09db4f6ab29b3cc6e0d9651458
'2011-08-18T04:56:01-04:00'
describe
'34741' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMT' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a901779f7b52707ff004a80f8fd071e1
4e69c93543df3cd5d40e2e57cd1911f7e4eece48
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMU' 'sip-files00167.tif'
27eed2b731b7589c4bc246f793052c52
3efa634a57965c50a406a467685157dc31ae41e9
'2011-08-18T04:45:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
f64bd3425dd4a2361f3ea61aef6c95b2
95fda13b008ad5508be3e02994cfdc5eba06bf36
'2011-08-18T05:03:30-04:00'
describe
'10398' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMW' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
2e1e92f3d3d3bb05bf5fbe10c33d35e9
5cb055df0f72414a80155bceae8932fc90b480d9
describe
'1400160' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
804a1b312068b248d66b5a9b9ccb3b83
5c0446ea30d732edf45ee338396bbe645348054e
'2011-08-18T04:50:58-04:00'
describe
'98491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
9b1e495d73bf7f817ab423f905ce8475
2fa8c990daa29a917e7d3dd76d7c8055aa23bd76
describe
'28314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUMZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
22455292336c924e89a3aa503c614cad
d30b38bee3dce987329764303eb9c1ca69ff1ead
'2011-08-18T04:40:55-04:00'
describe
'35558' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNA' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
4d5b7dce99bc98d268a7d88757637edd
2bbfc39da2d7667194e1c4d2b590260606977bd6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
42e532d7c7b77f1676f3e1b074331d3f
16de33d97e2de175adbb9eb796201771d1823252
'2011-08-18T04:51:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
d281e5ae81088ebdd922a3bcd2f26aab
1ca2b95ae7910110d06cdb8725e9523481374f77
describe
'10015' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUND' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
fcdf816393830375d8733ae5d892ac3f
7ceaceb3bc00cc3083e8e46dad51029515daa5f0
describe
'1368179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
97302bd50cf9bf3389d5cac2821eb605
415ff948ef767117250d2f14a0cd74a9ef27fc19
describe
'97297' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
3a6097669db0abbd3f80fd98481188ea
4ea219fdad4d42ed658039aaf3592f136d1f67c2
'2011-08-18T04:56:35-04:00'
describe
'27866' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNG' 'sip-files00169.pro'
b810a7671e4a158f8ecae9f89a3f0dc3
632df15af2b103fc261510dd9239304e52419a48
describe
'34787' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
a0ffab8687fe6dcd10eccf71ef65c7d5
52c84b60b5fae65898de28bf355d989560c442fd
'2011-08-18T04:40:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNI' 'sip-files00169.tif'
a0cc723aaa20fd080ea30f24ea742aeb
543195cd983dc0029da3fce14b54f25f338e8d7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
389ef2cbea58c3bdc96ae61e3460b1df
293838fbd22bbbaa34c9152ab609cf1e47883fe3
describe
'10621' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
5f13eeacde051d40307c28c4ddcbf8a3
bf03d92ffd5ab5e13122eac334f3cbfff7464d23
describe
'1399897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
1c0844f8610172ca4740130660a7cfc6
f228681ee9e5d660e0d559035716ca6446d093d1
'2011-08-18T04:47:01-04:00'
describe
'101139' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
1b5a68b6097ceefb4271c37eb4747a15
12891f563950f8f39a64606c347e66be02c55440
'2011-08-18T04:41:53-04:00'
describe
'27351' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
86d8736160ef911914aa4f0a206b05be
c1571171a5308c09bf82f88f623a0146e0ba49ae
'2011-08-18T05:03:54-04:00'
describe
'35159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
0ee4e9f2f29ecbbd790ef443f2ac6088
fc97cb998c1ead180bbf73e1fb20c7d8bff2be80
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
67d36d1fa479c902ae3bb92e169977ba
b3a30c8300fff3f9621f70fde6d2c6c8b1a48f4c
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
937e982a24bdb052e8ba59b489dcbd4a
778605e0d4deb1afd7cf3b13d91ed79d1095e669
describe
'10021' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
fd834582e50d9fdb65417b9cec9d042f
8b17aeb67d81f1269443b7a3d606dfcb5b57969d
'2011-08-18T04:43:50-04:00'
describe
'1368118' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNS' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
000e17893ed65fe8dbf5cb33db843103
e713fa273e937c9213ff3f4b4139b12485379f82
describe
'101965' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNT' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
575d05aae4e12073821fef61540ffbd4
2ea0e5bf9d11c46736c276b562329ca28208d6a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNU' 'sip-files00171.pro'
cc692c4b1baf52a9377eac7a15f4d47d
ce81a60ac5a7cff4f5cb3e15e1be42f2ea14e182
describe
'35769' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNV' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
17396195987f9b95cab1c0cbecb5919c
91c8399402c41026eaf60f3cfd6059a47f7a964a
'2011-08-18T04:43:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
0b7a03d4d4315f1c20175d27ef01ef28
81029728992cc67ecb678576bd6d56f43b4b8df8
'2011-08-18T04:57:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNX' 'sip-files00171.txt'
17701abd15269ec432e1052ba79c27ad
47eb3b3f4967c56960a1d69e9bbb0cd6f6868ace
'2011-08-18T04:59:51-04:00'
describe
'10823' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNY' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
4c26f6effa7c7aed8f4a22142d7d3e44
2e90b6a7c3dd0e4240857121c169a63d7c1c4829
describe
'1400141' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUNZ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
818118f8671b52bb2131c832f7b4a7bb
d20755a714863207cb87ec40296375e364a41eab
'2011-08-18T04:42:41-04:00'
describe
'98057' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOA' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
5f090c5d08b9b8277bd3a9c93c8de922
5b48f55b55c840af149cdfea08dc6894d7ca63e2
'2011-08-18T04:53:41-04:00'
describe
'27988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOB' 'sip-files00172.pro'
bfea8090d244c0684eda992b6bf81cb0
4da91ba3da9a6b5c5e1eaf01b2e7d9810bcdfe7a
describe
'34931' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
83aff4df514c96f1c7d0a917851a75e2
60e2f2e2aa912f6ed036912a2a5efcc2b0e74246
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
a8246117764a23b063f11c76484d8c23
8a9e8642f981d61c4cd31dd2f5f731c5a38beb48
'2011-08-18T04:44:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOE' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b952ff8a799c0521f7910ca4674d933e
c4bfdec63ae58704f746e1654c93ad8a61b1ef51
describe
'9674' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
c1159d84aac4a30158d9076fa94e4fc1
5966d1bbb36df1e2d3b944b8c29673dcdc3b69f3
'2011-08-18T04:53:58-04:00'
describe
'1368203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
01c78b01fe1a3959fe66d2d6762363fd
36b7c86217519da57c9b11e8b6da5962373844cd
describe
'98625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
36682572d991abf791cf86ea9ae9d026
86ec50872d252673dc31636b7656a161aede7442
'2011-08-18T04:54:01-04:00'
describe
'28608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOI' 'sip-files00173.pro'
a27c69abf5bdf20b9629534812c01285
b52d0d62ac6ba30837543dc36f1546aaa91711ed
'2011-08-18T04:58:40-04:00'
describe
'36138' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOJ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
cffe00bebe99b7c1c4e209b187e50191
7f84d3fd7dd46b87fd48ac077350d427362b0e43
'2011-08-18T04:58:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
8a65e4c3fb4c45e7de9583f2573eb987
89e5eb982327131b1cbc0ee7800da3af0fc6b415
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOL' 'sip-files00173.txt'
476d220339c05cc1ab861bd9f4050736
5d8f1aded8bd32bf622986b961049f4d8f840cd9
describe
'10834' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOM' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
45e678e7044f7ef70890dfa8f59a7b82
d891c0afc0a3dc4e009d90faa8bb07721d58aa3c
describe
'1400198' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUON' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
e04c0f4791053c5d0b46895f16dd3c4a
41469200c8500ee4b1a6ff5848e0c7501617c97c
'2011-08-18T04:42:27-04:00'
describe
'99591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
cf8d2adef8144027f67da472be9720c1
25c0a5f1160478b2798be964d521fe66d24af9fc
'2011-08-18T04:45:32-04:00'
describe
'28830' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
2e7a3721f5341b74fda5d1a3601d2fc1
09819b92df9962b35e7df34492d2689ff3b75b3e
describe
'36340' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
b3a6e63df27a8f925202ccba4d610ad2
dfa8425addeabc0245f1784027a3411a5dff4c4e
'2011-08-18T04:45:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
21eed1a2311a2f5781f01f7ef3fda069
1b24eaf0752c0bec883ed630ab1fb3ab46564e1a
'2011-08-18T04:54:45-04:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
87de4ea69dfee6bbf55c18b243a2bed7
5be9cb654e4b2b59b30a8268b66fa389dfccfa53
'2011-08-18T04:49:53-04:00'
describe
'10167' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
3cb2aa6977482d4278d8b73938287631
9cd54daed352c0ba7d33ba5f5a02891545f0cda3
describe
'1368182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
fbc49824a8bf7e0a5a6e69d9e563f09a
5940776e8188e3a59b02e181f8f3f786a01f326d
describe
'94582' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
a268bea7f443b55a14c611980ee87ce3
b6a65a909f245be18d431307da962750febf6d3d
describe
'28279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOW' 'sip-files00175.pro'
86e0ebb37311d5f1dddb33a422927e68
9ba5886e8acddda80d1f0650f9bd65ccab8a3113
'2011-08-18T04:55:56-04:00'
describe
'33789' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
988c093b1183dc0fa107c7fee81c160e
987f192a14143721acc2270753c5871864e44253
'2011-08-18T04:42:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
eb87461eef350fbb2ce079c4a366abcf
f907c5da62c2fdcf18efad7a8f8ab5f0bb457d32
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUOZ' 'sip-filesback.txt'
aa63ae1aebe896b73908105903f9417f
a2e7a2b6b4c4e1d1cb88792c0d5bbae7967d48b9
'2011-08-18T04:48:33-04:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
9e3d5a8a1d3aa818106bb05eae35aefe
ac2e32ffb4304e07f5e506d1d1bf95ac7a58c98a
'2011-08-18T05:03:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPB' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
16e7bb18527477b6e43a8ae776f104d0
66b294fd39ed87bc1fc90e9df095378e5089f812
describe
'1400211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPC' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
0e9628fc3514e05e2e491dc90f4175f0
7ca16a8775d4ff33806a691b0f99ec7b4f6d3111
'2011-08-18T04:40:30-04:00'
describe
'95950' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPD' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
15b289599511bec382fff98b2ccb403e
12b01579e5f8ed76e4f52f69bb5bc82e751b2282
'2011-08-18T05:02:41-04:00'
describe
'29026' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPE' 'sip-files00176.pro'
555a11da470123f3f2e01faa26f4958a
30e5e24233cdd13aee70ea054e794fbda9cda28f
describe
'34811' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPF' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
75c0122d8d5db07063cbc601f7722912
f831c37337d6ad96975c2bbdf6d1f2740caed171
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPG' 'sip-files00176.tif'
3b206d904dde72b5c1d829c9395686bf
3c43756f41f0c4523aee0ee2559cc8c12e575c5d
'2011-08-18T04:49:46-04:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPH' 'sip-files00176.txt'
b0df57c32c3bd221fff9f1d1d219d2b7
b9188308ee0dc610aea2b07502de9f3e469bbf8e
'2011-08-18T04:59:16-04:00'
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPI' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
a9ff62e76911dcb87c92ac30faf8a3c9
779c29debf92cd0579452d41355c37141bbfa4ce
describe
'1426108' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPJ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
0d5376d4708a047258701b3369745747
910f7a86b6d7109024c8f1ea9f6387cf929cb0d9
'2011-08-18T04:44:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPK' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
4e67d2db47ec25dfdfa8e1e03af2c2d0
f3b13ba722a9853fc5602421b35a80893b3016e4
'2011-08-18T04:57:56-04:00'
describe
'27733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPL' 'sip-files00177.pro'
0d99bc1b21f391dec3d77d2c24b7b2f9
69af549f25ac37baf70f3c4553a9e722dea37cf3
describe
'35559' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPM' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
bf78d9c3281863d2b4f2967dafda6565
8ff3285cbc2c8a8725685f1c15bd9dfebfc0f430
'2011-08-18T04:47:21-04:00'
describe
'11417005' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPN' 'sip-files00177.tif'
91a47b5e9885e832fd1a8ac64722e568
d28b7b1aa13c7111f768347199c0b99b02305d74
'2011-08-18T04:49:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPO' 'sip-files00177.txt'
50f9f649e69c12bf25e030a9ba43176a
2b5f3063a4104925ae220d666190ebc31dd0ba3c
describe
'10421' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPP' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
dad6f74e86c9e6c62d73e4245d2d0e49
638de361a2c0f8a7802006ec63c1478fffde2bfc
describe
'1400086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPQ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e4d61c35ae52e068f46d10d23a99c2d0
158ae4c9ef2063218125e273544a7eb1b792ace1
describe
'100182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPR' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
03ae03a3929ea2ad23e8529aa9329e38
99c97fb4cdfe20c6b9be28444bb649efb2d929cb
'2011-08-18T04:51:04-04:00'
describe
'28387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPS' 'sip-files00178.pro'
97baa7dede166d4f763e1fb31a67ba70
6b546c417a556161613dc296d4d6bbbbcf76077f
'2011-08-18T04:55:10-04:00'
describe
'35364' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPT' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
f087a9169576d149d8e72ca6575d5a49
e754c490533253cc1d639f9861d7cc37e4ef567c
'2011-08-18T05:00:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPU' 'sip-files00178.tif'
6b2a449cc56e1e616a9a8eab3b5e418f
a150df6bdf7b7d6c46bef0e5fb39e5871c9130e5
'2011-08-18T04:47:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPV' 'sip-files00178.txt'
57df354f304357b78116ba53427ca106
a8664b27b51cfc8278a21f2a408ba8aa3a735d3e
describe
'10148' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPW' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
9854368da45713eb47b99e7bf1acb2e6
461ea52f6d8c4374d8de2e04b8ccaae324a55ace
'2011-08-18T04:47:57-04:00'
describe
'1368205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPX' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
24b61ba18b44b8bef372b24d9c330118
248f4a6e42746854714ec6f93a541f0fd8f9c170
describe
'91714' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPY' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
9e52bdde099c8cdead896c22e4fe2142
0ba08c2a25587364e86d8ddb2ac2e9352063f84f
'2011-08-18T05:02:31-04:00'
describe
'27391' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUPZ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
8eff2d7b03a4a1a8fbac1cd8456fe30f
7a8cc178b17731ae583ca49f5c134adae7c4207a
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQA' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
00bdff610aca9ed7be6ad8dc197e9717
baafcd97118de9cac815146cc8a7566cffcfa8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQB' 'sip-files00179.tif'
35755097128ca8c85d263141eaae4e53
8ce041815216285a7b24dba491b9b5c724d3365d
'2011-08-18T04:45:58-04:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQC' 'sip-files00179.txt'
f28af4ee7d80f7d6a2eb7f50d2abbd6e
f4c66e179d14319a06e71f3a22e0664740aef021
describe
'10182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQD' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
c6f2c0574af681369b451b48375d9caa
2ad10341c049991066db3dec6fbe0f0569df96d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQE' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
a47bd8a9148f6fec346a7308bcb84ce3
1e6052639d989346f6ef38bc5a2ff26053a53a12
describe
'99702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQF' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
5f3867b5136db8845015b4f5c92fa1a5
0277255f4f83bd7adfac9b2114069f17625b45d3
describe
'27392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQG' 'sip-files00180.pro'
536e24282f093a7e89173cf05545a559
d0a150960d9b5f08ce234774f54e710d583348b9
describe
'36809' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
b5f6297031fd7ad080c0ecaccbf64e1a
74c1f23bdc3067ff4bb786551e697c69bc467041
'2011-08-18T04:41:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQI' 'sip-files00180.tif'
97a2ddd3ddf23488e789a322ddefe918
2021aa812c18a9b8c1893ab1b7a2c26345a630c8
'2011-08-18T04:50:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQJ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
f324f6137a2a496d9402dbad9bd9c340
60b5b2c39bee28c1b192934417fdc9a59fc804d0
describe
'10716' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQK' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
d7ed622d990cf83e6c5162038004fd85
973837be43db898631dfd97868d905324146ebd1
'2011-08-18T04:58:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQL' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
b8d6149bc311bb8d50164f2a29d19d3b
ecb855fc90c39c668114863793a724413daea795
'2011-08-18T04:46:36-04:00'
describe
'98509' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQM' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
8c7a7f340922c855ea5fe6c625196b2e
5ccb652a015e87dba6d121d4606c40ff75af57a5
'2011-08-18T04:59:24-04:00'
describe
'28292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQN' 'sip-files00181.pro'
fdf3f0bfc63a21129de926c0eaa0a313
e82b9cab8e9af688b8eccc7dc7a87656574b2003
describe
'35002' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQO' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
15ce37ac9f15243a322f38f71cd5f036
3583ec1a439e99a48a49b03cfd51247937d9309c
'2011-08-18T05:01:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
c021425c5396856d451080c53352e040
ec94d1d2c03e70961a0d30c535915735624b39be
'2011-08-18T04:44:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQQ' 'sip-files00181.txt'
d3b14e7dbfd6f08212599d5129c05e95
cc5818804f7b27085eda9519092d4e0c5e9f4bea
describe
'10760' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQR' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
cba2759affade3a61b6ad9969c4a9b5c
3a1cfc51d7e45ee4d78f24c3d24f59e7d043b95a
describe
'1400180' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQS' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
65df917d2dca46c4f381fa8f5134c8b8
a508d3534380ccb193b25469c766cd5bbce713e6
'2011-08-18T04:55:17-04:00'
describe
'102196' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQT' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
1e8fd015ff10b5db8718ac6f3943fed0
6705049b40f7a36c79224437331b97e4ca4a061f
describe
'28296' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQU' 'sip-files00182.pro'
45daba2d2c55a28f345727828688122f
d96923e4d894ada973be2796221868f5874d1064
'2011-08-18T04:54:17-04:00'
describe
'37061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQV' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
119efc751be64021a6fc002f88909721
88757095a9cf3a9e624b421511604b254c5c6794
'2011-08-18T05:00:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQW' 'sip-files00182.tif'
324fb6a71da6ad67494350e9968d833e
4524d4d975c8f373752efdeb81a54c0bd88c6fa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQX' 'sip-files00182.txt'
4412acda88d0d82b8fb8c00b5e11818a
abd542ab79204c71f38d81c78b869cf367ea6080
describe
'10301' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQY' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
e9f40cba3b427d00320eab3af7b06341
e302a20a051450e36f25542a0e43cdf8c82055d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUQZ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
5ecd7cba4d756efd05f327f7355912f1
240f7b2396bb8fed5cb74d3e1defcdf5a95c6b3e
describe
'93544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURA' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
bee95621d84f722a9e4b8165ddc35e1f
62bfd1b9e543e421fefd2fffedf14c2cf184c274
describe
'26345' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURB' 'sip-files00183.pro'
77220a033c1a4a4a0605d471e43f3b33
092b2d707b8e08c9dc2113c737c204ef41d5a331
describe
'33799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURC' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
2058928ef308146bae3a556ea19e1b29
f1114aad64143fccdeadee9b00f2432d96775eaa
'2011-08-18T04:46:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURD' 'sip-files00183.tif'
91e0fd5d1d23ceccb25889871b25ef8b
b9f066a0d10ef0678d80050751671539cc9318e7
'2011-08-18T04:41:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURE' 'sip-files00183.txt'
ad9b0bec2a68e0b50718f9c9fa0126f5
c4ce73270bc497a1955e1ac953ac48ea45fdb845
describe
Invalid character
'10455' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURF' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
c53a93b7f17725733bfe7b2ae4ca382c
71c75d07b45687f9118ea6bbf6ce63573e1f8133
describe
'1400209' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURG' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
d75f58713577a0ee57cbfce3b2a32ba5
637420b11db99e22569be349927b93fde8fbec93
'2011-08-18T04:42:12-04:00'
describe
'100099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURH' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
cb7c20db0eeba2e87576614cd0d7f1aa
7859369bf2a4d728e08af895f8c0f0900cd33b18
describe
'28119' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURI' 'sip-files00184.pro'
25460a6931fd396ad91129cee75b0e79
2a226971b85945649712a576c44a4db399cea2bd
'2011-08-18T04:49:35-04:00'
describe
'35663' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURJ' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
d63c2d89233a17383e0b47dd88a44e69
e7da45e6fd94c4139efe8096c04736f80bc55c84
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURK' 'sip-files00184.tif'
3d143d7d68eab41c8fa9652bb788d8bf
37763eb26a305e45abf3835da7607ce182227c3b
'2011-08-18T05:00:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURL' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8351303c0b06cfc0bf558cd2583ad5ea
04d71a39ed767936af84cf96bebd991b7ba8dc65
describe
'10064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURM' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
ef8eb6d21d14b9c778e46e3c1683be82
2f6f42065cb09590bb61f3bfd400f26208e4b145
'2011-08-18T04:42:04-04:00'
describe
'1368078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURN' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
149abaf1f3a4f609209b2d7e18e8b80e
e785ebc154d45b8bcf176d25a334e583614a5ec5
'2011-08-18T04:50:40-04:00'
describe
'97063' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURO' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
c793beae1d96761b236f90bb86d10d73
8038bdcfa297c570f18b959cba0d4841e69f184a
describe
'28055' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURP' 'sip-files00185.pro'
728cb2687779760bc05e0929ce033fc2
219b7f4fe700262558eb546dba5eec3d4020384f
'2011-08-18T04:45:19-04:00'
describe
'34602' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURQ' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
839b37e98ee675c39a8b689091d984a9
e6428e3dcb2f16b674fce8fd7c52244c28099576
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURR' 'sip-files00185.tif'
574253c4ab7cf98ecd14857d15059c93
f2c11d13a58f5eb94213d1ef7a7b30ae12fc201e
'2011-08-18T04:53:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURS' 'sip-files00185.txt'
7719266174ff129c31889bdb107e73db
b24315246ecb5c0cf9d1da5819b416d2b00ed290
describe
'10603' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURT' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
43e2afadeb313b053a89adfcf2de8965
4ee828c378bf69acd1f291c4d3a78f6b975d268c
'2011-08-18T04:56:10-04:00'
describe
'1400173' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURU' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
909039eeb3087fe47f8e41ade04ba768
9a500b603acd32e8d205565c12b1bf2f224825c3
describe
'97649' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURV' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
6eca537321c537635e0db92048f5c5c7
9dc5ba6449e9dc72f407fd34b4345b749834f7a1
'2011-08-18T04:50:55-04:00'
describe
'27902' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURW' 'sip-files00186.pro'
b6a445e3a11ff0c74b3df7b49e107689
f02d6f80f52b2848a2a482cf8aa051c7988efd07
describe
'34130' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURX' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
266b9066f70d142bae39b4116f7bce96
69407fd3dab7ab299d1cfbabd31e1d50105ffe2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURY' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f86711c935921a9591ef426428d27a8f
17b249d376f13388910b164489afc1d51dc1aafc
'2011-08-18T04:58:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABURZ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
2623793a94932d36b63c8e2209ce2ddc
91a613a2463e17803bc8cd9c5958ba287fd10216
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSA' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
7c19534c3b1dbbda2366cf2aeb7a7cac
d62bc2a09eb7f624248a89a62d89692f988092c7
'2011-08-18T04:49:01-04:00'
describe
'1368173' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSB' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
b90bf1d90274d06eb9d1195f1dc7cc2b
d79d8731799ce12124390ea47d1337748ff1712c
describe
'102224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSC' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
dd2d3c8bd256447282fdd7e7cfcffd5b
6ce59da4aa24356b39bac63eeb0754d48a6c9c3c
'2011-08-18T04:59:47-04:00'
describe
'30049' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSD' 'sip-files00187.pro'
991a28350bb60d721c7d99acd7870fea
7836b95e4d5e45625fc90ac9badb68b3c71b3af1
describe
'36890' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSE' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
8190897941d1818c272bcd6b60f5c65b
41c5468654fe63242d4411acc391c0c9b2177957
'2011-08-18T05:02:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSF' 'sip-files00187.tif'
929c19057b359841c247aec311ca7319
20b252b41ef8111ddb63267d18fb67fc7ff146eb
'2011-08-18T04:43:56-04:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSG' 'sip-files00187.txt'
9704ab1c5ecd0680847c9cb46fc954e4
37d89a53ade82b12f0485121e650189dc6cf812a
describe
Invalid character
'11004' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSH' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
29202cc84903a3e1dc44f16da0b84821
a1d82e5f3856827d5cc3986ecba2717268ce98fe
describe
'1400190' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSI' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
671076aa6849393336d64a2456df4b63
60643750b68e9a1333537fb22727f8d87983d2f6
'2011-08-18T04:48:26-04:00'
describe
'102085' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSJ' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
c9167ce03273c2f48e0d9c8e7615cf31
c84e657ae9f1eca4a4380d498b4e7fa0f3a2d7d2
describe
'28851' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSK' 'sip-files00188.pro'
92fa4066ac8f05f909682eaba599d852
74921d90b1c39543fb86ddef4ed7027f37e8b9d0
'2011-08-18T05:02:29-04:00'
describe
'36292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSL' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
329f1a58ec025755c51fe7eda4a0b341
a704dcba19e6023d9af28aff9cbe2cdbcd1ee257
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSM' 'sip-files00188.tif'
d2291929ebabec0af851ecfc78b5af8e
da9dda77184d3d710d28b92cdb6017c1d50bb0a9
'2011-08-18T05:00:33-04:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSN' 'sip-files00188.txt'
25219fc0bbd757f3c332f24460a49a2d
a81f6f1f15915746769e9b4274e45c944d08e413
describe
'9873' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSO' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
4b24613b24829c43100ae8ec9775cc51
515adac2b68f0da3ea501a3b916567bde2d9eb90
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSP' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
cea69fb44e48ef51ff7685c17778aedc
3c95de76bb699bc0cd6af768b1450e457611a3c3
'2011-08-18T04:42:05-04:00'
describe
'98718' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSQ' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
4af67b55469408d064002ec1e5f42f93
1b578cf5c6167a2b5cd982b006a0b96f79a25775
'2011-08-18T04:49:24-04:00'
describe
'29223' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSR' 'sip-files00189.pro'
3f0303f4cbbfe133cdba4b539225ed80
b1f9274556b2c27c67d0b53e79d5ae329d7c0777
describe
'34333' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSS' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
b6d04d9695e2c6113d3ce2875baf151b
475e80f78e297640a7876fb67f535b270ad74153
'2011-08-18T04:52:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUST' 'sip-files00189.tif'
9bd4b86c41a937b7bcb0d485738fc18b
fd3c42a8eb631ddf3c8092ee76aa6a2b76d16bfe
'2011-08-18T04:52:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSU' 'sip-files00189.txt'
78351d5349b8cfb7b2ae740929a4c559
cf4d72e3982274e5b6edd6b262c5833046ebb1db
'2011-08-18T04:45:28-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10614' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSV' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
d3db7edcdbdc8e24aa64f07ce65e026b
02dbe9d57552850a51ee420299868a992c9418ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSW' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
cfcf6e685421731969906b577c5714e8
658d8c05af3938cedfa2d7e34edfa03dd3282614
describe
'102484' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSX' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
32d610097e1ad65aaa908474518a3de4
7979ef9df033ae7d0c97afa5a29ca2b65807f1c4
'2011-08-18T04:57:37-04:00'
describe
'29475' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSY' 'sip-files00190.pro'
7227108f92f7be57532a826eecebaf4c
b96627730d1fb6334a0d44baf04722d734b78ade
describe
'37184' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUSZ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
bded8d122f6a05e1c54be5cc892f5ea3
a4a80a5766cdb488590cb53f86933a2948cd0133
'2011-08-18T04:54:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTA' 'sip-files00190.tif'
77ca0d66133e7941a9fc7b21372fd225
1d23402f92a08ea93a0f9b2f2907890a0ff95a76
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTB' 'sip-files00190.txt'
2cd697535ea2a494fc07c94e9bdaee29
5946e7f456c1f9692fb0ccae48beef3c3dfe8a4f
'2011-08-18T05:03:07-04:00'
describe
'10251' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTC' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
1da83cc232f27ec45c9f1875a6264541
07b4b5835db80d413419a8a6b6daecf016f6bf2a
describe
'1368022' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTD' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
a7c7df6ae2f38bbefb03870403620964
ed25666071827407f123791b01f39cdadba819cc
'2011-08-18T04:58:12-04:00'
describe
'101319' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTE' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
fed44726107b583ef2a7557c86a0e688
50e154ab680c5e459bc882859a5c6173776286a2
describe
'29046' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTF' 'sip-files00191.pro'
d63cfb8042d16ccd134b29daff79e5ce
afc76e5af3becf94caeaf432a1a6291f39b72492
'2011-08-18T04:48:41-04:00'
describe
'37563' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTG' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
fbe5446045ceafad73c1a498152103c7
afbda51dc25461118412fbb3a83b5d3a29436a5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTH' 'sip-files00191.tif'
edbbb9b383605671ea9158b9ebe38461
640d9352543200d22ef557c4d5799be77058ed62
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTI' 'sip-files00191.txt'
5754b408257f77afd8f228c53d65141b
357d94ae89f79c9bebd130d5238d81d2b0a866c3
'2011-08-18T04:56:06-04:00'
describe
'10875' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTJ' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
b1ab5abc4465ab4d2f42812d10034f41
15ac35a2b265f7276865b0afeacd8c5304d59561
'2011-08-18T04:43:27-04:00'
describe
'1400169' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTK' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
d713b62f63f16347bcd551bbb86fa07c
3f79d5f831f20e22ec6b37dffe5d0598621cc0e8
'2011-08-18T04:48:13-04:00'
describe
'103692' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTL' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
7ae17cd682977da2799843e4acb74446
5de4aac1d886d496a1d410d954da496abbb8b5d4
describe
'28411' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTM' 'sip-files00192.pro'
07b84db503b125da335d2fb28790d7fc
75c7a4f82831f5613d5d5a6cd94162a5ec1cf73b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTN' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
b2a1feb107ed0b16f30843fb5a2e945c
8d72826cc1ef8dda155a8412ce6dcb1e52b18069
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTO' 'sip-files00192.tif'
eb1b3f7643d538c7324f505fb471d64a
dfc906990dce80035fd809983e37d2f16c79813d
'2011-08-18T04:54:06-04:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTP' 'sip-files00192.txt'
b3695ca7ddce0e994646a8c6984f38a7
6508ed390e25b386c78e654fc5a1b8666551053e
describe
'10192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTQ' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
17f747b2efb7ef4927cf6ac39302db96
901c6749d0597c4af8029eeb74b4ee986a5aba9d
'2011-08-18T05:01:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTR' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
d06a605b9384aedea3e0fab296cf37d4
6c4e0a7f62e982a9592e4ac18064f84228304bc9
'2011-08-18T05:02:16-04:00'
describe
'100609' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTS' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
f61bfe8b165eaded0e382fb9e2168a40
919f5699bf65a1deec6b1dac10ba6c787f0d663b
describe
'29005' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTT' 'sip-files00193.pro'
7d6d6ebd87a26477e5cee3644d5aef87
c35aeadfc57a0f788e5eff50501ed401f5fb27b9
'2011-08-18T04:56:45-04:00'
describe
'35768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTU' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
6907f8fbbcbd33b3aa64ba9fb63f7384
58a7aa0a59a1856445485b2981e99948caf28f56
'2011-08-18T04:57:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTV' 'sip-files00193.tif'
db1f25d97ec2e194aee17b3fd7ea178e
37fad72cbcef308e47815ada1e182e22f5a321f2
'2011-08-18T04:53:37-04:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTW' 'sip-files00193.txt'
ac6351f5baadb0b92dc9f8b6063b854f
93e7ad8710a49cb07c40616bb599ac6cafc6af82
describe
'10862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTX' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
a16383a330a004fffe03b6224c20cfe1
9fae27d73d4b870ff359a95e43e7fa1787bd2dfc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTY' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
55cb5ac08bec9304a385c17c142879d7
81b70264a27715605e65056a56c9d17ebf6f9513
'2011-08-18T04:50:57-04:00'
describe
'102895' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUTZ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
27c678670239bc34300a8dc6764c7d44
076a0b67078ce049c4df2a659eb4536081c7b054
describe
'28809' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUA' 'sip-files00194.pro'
601de37c501e725665c3ae4f0dac31cf
1ea474f32ae5a5cc8fdd262edf3c187c12d098da
describe
'36606' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUB' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
5ee44e8192f9ff762539f8f07bd8ff50
c48b2333c6d3c59d4a0fe0284a10844052c9dcfa
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUC' 'sip-files00194.tif'
371d8e3c7edbe44a1b8e2da8fa15430e
495aa5e01aa11ad75f7e5ec6940083f6b1a3e620
'2011-08-18T05:00:42-04:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUD' 'sip-files00194.txt'
4704a03c9a4ff0d00f4e91eb04916a88
ee33a65f28a03f43cfea60be3946649fa6c8d52b
describe
'10228' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUE' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
bfaf5d114954259de3f8e0d33af79721
f308033c37e95fe98ddc6da43fee556be6fe8b5f
describe
'1379228' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUF' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
bf297227fb06f38b709fe9c42b9e9871
d5ceb2e0b66316b335f9a7ca3f9b05294d434aa6
describe
'104153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUG' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
b27b852431980cc69f697f1b6f3b3405
19e069d3880170b6b20e038f66a4a9c0cf6ff66a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUH' 'sip-files00195.pro'
9a780caa087b8149c164771981eea7a6
687ce94f7bae6962da3de3377bafee56b1a4faa2
'2011-08-18T04:54:26-04:00'
describe
'37406' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUI' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
ba881c27e1f1602e0698ec79fba51bce
03d484f82187e76996a0cb6c7714a08f8d061c29
'2011-08-18T04:49:57-04:00'
describe
'11044853' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUJ' 'sip-files00195.tif'
7a979f5baf3bff62989b1b746e1baef2
5d0ec480b163eb99c8515e151e797e8fbaa3a077
'2011-08-18T04:45:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUK' 'sip-files00195.txt'
ee4bbe49c9fef914559aa7ee5181689d
ca8f0c7aab2650692e7ab79e93d5e5386eb9e38b
'2011-08-18T04:50:49-04:00'
describe
'10784' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUL' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
02c587952f2749be4de01ddc647c61ab
75f9abd33918a17286e1ecef09ba3601e29bb26f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUM' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
104b14cdb23d63a5099939ac0fc1818c
d11baf924f4eef0b5a7f82ba54673301799e3535
'2011-08-18T04:53:10-04:00'
describe
'102711' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUN' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
40f847d29bf8fd3a6195cbbe2945a62c
c5d11d7d67889a5f35431ab323ec194bc4ba7e94
'2011-08-18T04:55:35-04:00'
describe
'28124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUO' 'sip-files00196.pro'
69a58bb7020dc226f4a725a2fac01d09
fe0aa34ba2c777b045f16db2f7916f0b3573b5e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUP' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
10dde9d41babaec31d7c73287c94da3e
4b0f7c9f3614944cbf70ba183a6775c937c7f746
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUQ' 'sip-files00196.tif'
eaf17eb28f98e015acc509019ece1ad4
c2cb50ece229d5fa521e6974473a6e97e3452edc
'2011-08-18T04:42:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUR' 'sip-files00196.txt'
f1eaebc81a86654676884e85420b6dbb
de1c87ff7f6b24bce8b34e1cb6cfa47616a6320b
'2011-08-18T04:41:32-04:00'
describe
'9977' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUS' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
adc0c765679cfe26195bb50f9e0a3be5
519e6257b34cb007f0be23d2e117a1c6c822e7d7
describe
'1379233' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUT' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
535bc00303771b1e01bac39320c6225d
846b1ac7834cf7559d3e40e9f0c0456fc2d68fdf
'2011-08-18T05:03:13-04:00'
describe
'89070' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUU' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
7c8e31ca37554eeb7f9b6e8eeb8af699
94ff78e2616bdffff1226d053a9e0995568d4a24
describe
'21162' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUV' 'sip-files00197.pro'
6fd85df7c74383de34d71b1ec9b6cd89
cf629972c6ad6c1c5cbbc30869637c624c42370e
describe
'30321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUW' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
f86b6729656942d92211ef3a0e305adb
2b9a3cf453d53492267d5863229c31f4eabffc3f
'2011-08-18T04:57:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUX' 'sip-files00197.tif'
9315634093f352b349b95c883372eb1d
b8403e5edd0d9abd7fb93232fe277b3bfddd714c
'2011-08-18T04:51:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUY' 'sip-files00197.txt'
a5e76ee04684ccb6173d9a8d2bb4f3b8
01a81155cb8037a6e63b75a1213c53e315e779c6
'2011-08-18T04:44:47-04:00'
describe
'9261' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUUZ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
3f6748ca9580bc7db92250c464984355
7fc570c0cc846da934c28cb15dd485b3982f9cc1
describe
'1400216' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVA' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
cd82d69139f906c02b688836b798b90a
90aa5c9c0934d4e3901bca7539913cd418c97ab3
describe
'103818' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVB' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
b0978f0d44e9084876716f7dc5b86a8a
81d279f2a2844582bd4c12223610745675de6048
'2011-08-18T04:59:00-04:00'
describe
'27507' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVC' 'sip-files00198.pro'
6c77f606ef0384781f21b524c7ef452b
934d86d96b830ca53af7b3f4c058d1f14ea44970
'2011-08-18T04:49:19-04:00'
describe
'35297' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVD' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
c31d52fadf76b82e26fb0823512d05a3
f61227874454174817d9eaeb7438532c35783f05
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVE' 'sip-files00198.tif'
da7ed268b68f664c8484b16dc79417a6
6e74dd86ae190a8e9a99b047f459104784415e92
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVF' 'sip-files00198.txt'
d9dfea98a96ec7d27350e0010735afb6
623b24218c739853fe6d586040a79c6af83cb9a7
describe
Invalid character
'10134' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVG' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
699b40eeb3c7823938bdcef597eea0d8
0d1030273008749fede6a706be2f7244bfd1aa72
describe
'1379231' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVH' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
52d03b32f9742761badb4f7cdb7cd006
ce7fa56af9a293615d6604ac7b0e740a243060c2
'2011-08-18T04:59:37-04:00'
describe
'99532' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVI' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8f06b982a7b693fa010378e55ff44288
506ab15443108c36910062b0f128a2542b25c953
'2011-08-18T04:59:55-04:00'
describe
'28575' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVJ' 'sip-files00199.pro'
eb7719646f6462a3fe154aa251ef0c83
ee8794e5ef6ed13a257454216709fd05147d3e5c
describe
'33891' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVK' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
cd5c5b1f01ebdb6cace9fb2ed95009e5
e21cd3cb4c304a9b7d5371b5a6d8b98835dc15fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVL' 'sip-files00199.tif'
5b42595bb6f235c3d1c6f098116e9fc4
98cdd0741fbcd61181b24b04f8223df07419f893
'2011-08-18T04:47:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVM' 'sip-files00199.txt'
431f6c0d6f66fb704465ca66fd8b414a
4bb109f26576ebf9d891d307c4276bb6feeebf0e
describe
'9940' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVN' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
9761c6a184b86a09e08cf4956f41c523
0f2aa1ce448978aabf184360ffca7838900907f8
describe
'1400152' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVO' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
df308d21c397517266931dea2ab2817c
b22a7dacabb67f1f9652c6e762513c6055dc7ab9
describe
'94238' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVP' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
e1c971bad8bab4e200e1a62d63fe3659
84b294442f8105b390aac1dfc3fac57d7cb9b898
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVQ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
7f855ba3b1f9d3e537563fb42a489ca2
15183c1c288b71aeb60aee17b8388d38e7973b6c
'2011-08-18T04:45:34-04:00'
describe
'30315' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVR' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
0186af7cc3725302d2936b7b6a3156ad
50c97dcaaf1ecc8fbf84f49b930724362da74fbd
'2011-08-18T04:47:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVS' 'sip-files00200.tif'
41785f9efb5a0f34da6bad57404a0000
1d0fc4d90b43e72a761c63e6f98a25b26044a7bc
'2011-08-18T04:53:50-04:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVT' 'sip-files00200.txt'
467ad21d7615482f4daebb400b9d8462
edb527d24d6f4c528f9a0116e13ab20eb6285759
describe
'9142' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVU' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
8e4fc4e3dcd4a152a43522d6a9d1c081
a5f7c8d9731a91dfd05ff80cc3927f7b87e7ff48
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVV' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
07410be64bf638b3dba3c5a18745572f
099b9542dd3727f2512a5a193c69af2037dca473
'2011-08-18T04:46:15-04:00'
describe
'98751' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVW' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
7f2e98ee8b74dee9cee22d8f254082d6
0543011e648730061ddbafc22d64248752700d39
'2011-08-18T05:04:14-04:00'
describe
'28275' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVX' 'sip-files00201.pro'
2e4c273f96e1bdaa3a35970de118aed8
6d2745194f449dc318204420a592d5a8c8d75d6a
'2011-08-18T04:59:58-04:00'
describe
'34954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVY' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
89ec3b6ad54aab3b7212d497b7297145
07095a6c410043186ef558d9ba26d113b7160307
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUVZ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
67999f964a21af1ca9ba0431049e2740
55bf9b33e4490abcdff086767d908f0284611a10
'2011-08-18T04:53:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWA' 'sip-files00201.txt'
20bcc676ee8678adbbf32da29d384b8d
8805edf7d4ae8ec8e30553cfd2e70d350b3c9e52
describe
Invalid character
'10241' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWB' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
ea227501ae5710919a0c4a88e7470b1a
18aca49b251351f9910716ac397e3d90d3c80bd5
describe
'1400164' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWC' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
ba2f1a70a7a1cfff9748ba917ea508ee
2b43d2d3db65f4759dbbe714706892c10ce9b306
describe
'103200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWD' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
4e623782f80880804a9e72d1acdea853
6b92a8211f18409ca660f7c55715ab5b50a7511e
describe
'28658' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWE' 'sip-files00202.pro'
12abcaed00c31efa2331ab001e47c1b1
5239202c8f32cbc7a69ae7637ad13c4bb7b3120f
'2011-08-18T04:46:42-04:00'
describe
'35391' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWF' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
765e11c9e200f9c093dd08f52d478166
2ea613be4873beb051de9497622e800dd153e6d7
'2011-08-18T05:00:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWG' 'sip-files00202.tif'
c698369696e1d203a4f86efb5a7a2f73
028cb85b1b00194c65d4afac95ceb2862e23c489
'2011-08-18T04:58:49-04:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWH' 'sip-files00202.txt'
fed09c1fee2e97ff83a7c7f4fac16174
495a55a8ccf46abcefbee7f5cf4bdb2c219273ba
describe
Invalid character
'10066' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWI' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
d101aac018b0cb9a04af8d3732da3a75
15bbf22e8c59ccc6c10d8998abf8e99aa23b9260
'2011-08-18T04:52:19-04:00'
describe
'1379235' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWJ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
94ee4db24762e6c3449920d907442cbc
d1a57007efb91392acf58316be3521d932c9b192
'2011-08-18T04:45:07-04:00'
describe
'102162' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWK' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
14c27a35ee7cd3e84f8709b5680876be
912a80e2fd69a12d7e774e1fbb224edec68925ba
'2011-08-18T04:40:32-04:00'
describe
'28593' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWL' 'sip-files00203.pro'
de7074f2c1683f6f2dc00a91cbcd7f71
e34459c868c1d7ee8ed118df5421bf7782d665f4
describe
'36415' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWM' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
938bc7dcec9df3cc6baa8fa31467f2d7
5ba3de2f0206dd3f53373bc97c9d9841108c3b15
'2011-08-18T05:00:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWN' 'sip-files00203.tif'
b29a9d3fe3174f1a8c165f7f10df2bcd
6b073deaa708efb918d44cc19fbb86a7c70c6e59
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWO' 'sip-files00203.txt'
74f55ebc38f4e5e50f19487ce7539d58
afb1c9a4dc24235d475d42f07a118505f6d38fe1
'2011-08-18T05:04:02-04:00'
describe
'10378' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWP' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
500d25fdd6c24780cc7f4bf7b17df209
cd488e2038d9450d3de58ad14fa73c2758a6b69f
'2011-08-18T04:51:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWQ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
30c7e74358c6b2204c5574e715d19aa3
253a1eb9eeebbc078638ab7bbf84bd14183bcdbf
describe
'99694' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWR' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
e7a420246c125fe6a7a614e798b22c9c
c25dff0870d228644fcc373e26f6f4364db9bd8f
'2011-08-18T04:53:46-04:00'
describe
'29343' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWS' 'sip-files00204.pro'
63d03fd44d36b2ddfd12ddd2128cdb35
c984a6802516ee5bcdaa51461738bf65cb96281a
describe
'34579' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWT' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
d5d920e56c462958f64f2c9a9352cdd6
e9251d1a555ec96054bac40ee7074d044c04c452
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWU' 'sip-files00204.tif'
34fb460f2a153896608e94a6df7369f7
722d6d91b980594228bd3a23e85f4af265dcd799
'2011-08-18T04:42:50-04:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWV' 'sip-files00204.txt'
91d325d1a9b7f531affe756af184be2f
e80ae9c052e7636b6d8b44b97511c73515c53e37
'2011-08-18T05:00:54-04:00'
describe
'9542' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWW' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
29f3082c65ade3d6e1044db63a0470de
9e43216591f352b29a4b5343e3a06adf7ca2e604
describe
'1379218' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWX' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
29ccea8c804a2730db2d82c20fea48c2
27c41b17cf51a53e2dfb10f5c3e71de8aefabcc7
'2011-08-18T05:02:54-04:00'
describe
'93467' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWY' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
843ee0ea3887ea3925ca8d73298d1797
4f8b14700167abe6e5b9d6ba4bef814229b5b845
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUWZ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
0567a73cb9a949dbd044312fbe8ea16a
51af89fc133ccf72f129a9ab097f3043cdaa2182
describe
'33756' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXA' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
a212a8d158c1e23868c630abde049265
fb4eda23e35458ba548ec60484e3c1ad3ff4a179
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXB' 'sip-files00205.tif'
c10480423434811b547455ef629ef9b5
ccc8443e2a91dd5f3ecefece740ad7b330d79e46
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXC' 'sip-files00205.txt'
0fbd3088e619e12dd23a2782b70e7628
98a281037b85a301f40628a6e6c2a4e5c82165e4
describe
'9792' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXD' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
23b2e16a3a427de554440c8885403779
fa80eca39d417ce230522de6b8d7865e8b1c4e4a
describe
'1400033' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXE' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
073bcca56ec592aebb1a42d075c10eef
4bbe8654ba81662b924ebf6446133be704704c47
'2011-08-18T04:48:27-04:00'
describe
'99568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXF' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
816d92b1bef0fdcd08068e0ed02038c8
4d3dff151051650b8acdf63ca04505c3dca1b205
describe
'28033' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXG' 'sip-files00206.pro'
aab2ec829173ac3d62f69113aca58ac1
644f643ae9c663695eea6aef14ff1e63bc706f76
describe
'34447' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXH' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
1a36dab0d5b41a371163c2e0d0559e43
83c71d889d4a8f7a453eab1e8ec70616e4d1ae2e
'2011-08-18T04:43:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXI' 'sip-files00206.tif'
f0ddbed44cb71eb3c16c39159cda0d4a
2db27d97ef907f492bf07bb7e3c10ff506ebfa28
'2011-08-18T04:48:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXJ' 'sip-files00206.txt'
4df36d5a00739d4699ba29aee6b2f96f
6e2905f43c8e9a51a1a2b1d213eb99a8f119abbc
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXK' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
3e620d82d72e2817026b55f2be361e22
26fa28acf142a4f72698fb18e1c10edf38fb64d1
describe
'1379232' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXL' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
1d84c1fee9af42b02f046c4764686290
00ff3f827c8715a67f7b9858aee2502e5bd5e4c8
describe
'101181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXM' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
2f55ffeb2537eeb7614bb7b82966cb6e
8f665790d69b1b49a956de625ea48d170d5218c1
'2011-08-18T05:02:22-04:00'
describe
'28912' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXN' 'sip-files00207.pro'
c5c865f22ffa2ecddc4870798f3357e2
14f1f2b80d5600e19d408ec2179754e1e471647c
describe
'35654' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXO' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
a20326f049514e098cc4db9b77155fc6
979a5b4b02ba55a5d458b6f8f0b7f468c7a53a69
'2011-08-18T04:41:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXP' 'sip-files00207.tif'
38a407942afea8fc66aa49e99e1f64d9
9daa5e3ca01685a370bda98ff9c80f9c824b55fe
'2011-08-18T04:48:42-04:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXQ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
9c43daeb8f2b8dec8387c48f32f483c5
c0eafedbba1455227e8584cde08d4b36072be237
'2011-08-18T04:47:24-04:00'
describe
'10459' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXR' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
314f65d95ea77f55ce493a9ab9c5f91d
c7ae731375f1dc7a87f50e1b3c3bc675f3a5b13e
describe
'1400210' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXS' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
07bb789e0c28bdeec120ff167a640239
a58c659e764a8faf5db6de04bc08ee726c829404
describe
'98817' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXT' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
906d16748069f420cc3604e12aba5cef
5b237afd884192dda24d34f3f7818ab6d859a872
describe
'28539' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXU' 'sip-files00208.pro'
72113bda2371316abe589f09ef705f64
468e3f166bfdbbb741cea977f499df2b0b7b933d
'2011-08-18T04:54:39-04:00'
describe
'34549' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXV' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
5bccba6fcc5d6a84d8296ccb2b8f96e2
979c813c446a65e674fc0ff44f3250aea618ff49
'2011-08-18T04:46:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXW' 'sip-files00208.tif'
23ab3d7a638c04eef18285495e0d6b0d
bc3f7204cd7a2d0071a45a90752cdec2debceaa5
'2011-08-18T04:53:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXX' 'sip-files00208.txt'
47cab014c2f085ebe82cb55a12898d8f
9b9887beb55b219c0bcc8e4fd8ccf3056828b231
describe
'9636' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXY' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
8a26e010674719738366a4e0ed66bef6
40a05bde69553d842973963d5f146927f6ce1838
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUXZ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
dc1e04f7bbe83cce04f9670a89d282b1
83bf6a6d7a04a56efc571476d43670fe25185eb8
'2011-08-18T04:49:02-04:00'
describe
'97036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYA' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
e3565d77a7fa8cefdfbd4a8f1885a28b
b87ba182f4cd294a127e6d0e6285afdca477e5fe
'2011-08-18T05:01:10-04:00'
describe
'27148' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYB' 'sip-files00209.pro'
3e7b0d34c393b9cabd2f841828ad6560
43b8cac34727b73145741304c6a49cdd22161b90
'2011-08-18T04:47:08-04:00'
describe
'32752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYC' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
82781f6523805e3ba5cd688fa760d82e
1b60f7e3f6ae3ffd44fbc6a1a624da41dcbc885e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYD' 'sip-files00209.tif'
31f40db1b28bc7959276652be78b6725
a37e96caf2cf102fa04a386e8c2294c8de754bc2
'2011-08-18T04:58:14-04:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYE' 'sip-files00209.txt'
a05d342886c3da85b569b88971b64063
379c9f64cede558aecb26eecce24e64fd7a1787a
'2011-08-18T04:51:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYF' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
2ba9a92de181bbedba26e1e1ca9b6475
cada432eb19f676b8fc20ad3faddb008d4575d74
'2011-08-18T04:57:04-04:00'
describe
'1400197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYG' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
d764f17354fc615a04fcaa256427db31
0fe75da767df2f00cf20f383d1d3b4bb497ea16e
describe
'99096' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYH' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
89fee3a6308945afcb3044664b1da583
2507869241a0c2841346636055ec0d01e9ef53c6
describe
'27461' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYI' 'sip-files00210.pro'
575d58559e697e9af38d9f62b90028db
0c8e49ec78f4557b7f12a7284cc4b5c2d3b95ffa
describe
'34347' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYJ' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
7ca1c0dad35edf9989392ab3722305e2
92003b0b100303e2b3c6bac29ab3519c80fba732
'2011-08-18T05:03:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYK' 'sip-files00210.tif'
c2e9cc255f0e92fe708c12125d07484f
9c8c809c8aaeafd0c558caab3090cc9747aa0fdb
'2011-08-18T04:46:00-04:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYL' 'sip-files00210.txt'
8224719531684e566681439278033c71
7ecc57f563fb7c8ee6693afd172c62075d076bbd
describe
'9812' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYM' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
bd0a67ca7605b732abed8652b2febc1b
2212aaf4f05c2b523b9c5a81e27b8c45c74fa25f
describe
'1379223' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYN' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
929a01fe97023557b38cfe430b0340fc
e972a844591525ab1a0d8279c79bc6c28ffa916d
describe
'95068' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYO' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
c42c55c1b3c6d67c0b267c2c45da89a8
b7a02fc327ee26b572a88709add43d727fd20d72
'2011-08-18T04:46:31-04:00'
describe
'27092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYP' 'sip-files00211.pro'
c3759f645e9a01a8ea8c9d3ca863bc44
48a9fb8c368638cfed7359bf96bc21cc027fa93f
'2011-08-18T04:41:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYQ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
c2b6909ef27ed8fe9afcdc95fe72a79f
82d18630dacd0a14c2fd10eae2c7f6093b5db8eb
'2011-08-18T04:42:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYR' 'sip-files00211.tif'
de1b4bc4a1515068b45ecbd1cf1a7829
a784148d32ca4afd0fe9a6c837d2c3eae457bd18
'2011-08-18T04:49:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYS' 'sip-files00211.txt'
53efec26f43facef948ce7a9eaf1223b
dc7b110a4dcc057fb2fc916819f717c77aa8907d
'2011-08-18T04:58:09-04:00'
describe
'10073' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYT' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
9122371662621e01f1994fc2688da14c
92fde1168690c18b3743c70b190982890a9dc189
describe
'1400207' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYU' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
805f0be8cba252b8823b971328e0c2a1
856a367af5647ab61cc243066f9ab2a7f02fe16d
'2011-08-18T04:57:27-04:00'
describe
'101925' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYV' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
6f0352c3809f84aeb9ad9e33da9a40f2
247d50660f954debefa092d891c9c2e6f2f9f46e
describe
'27978' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYW' 'sip-files00212.pro'
2a55d9b618f5b64a59e0b2e1efee4648
4525df2ba3797657ce821c1d6b613231330cde46
describe
'37401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYX' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
5ce9e01acfd81f7d685ca8a0f13643c7
d367c2a41f0c69c142c33c027de279151cd72a55
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYY' 'sip-files00212.tif'
ffbff25cdbd2be986fafbd109242972c
581c20d89baf7300b4f2de026c0119f3e49feff3
'2011-08-18T05:00:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUYZ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
ebb6e670dc4c05b373d10e88584c1e8b
8e2c6dc2af4e5cb3e2fd95d600b55344b69af44d
'2011-08-18T04:45:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZA' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
a286012791e7c143372d39d346546218
429feb37dcd6a0207254d6601bbeab78749efcf6
describe
'1379024' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZB' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
d73c9b17f45b5614c6d663e5d06c08d0
382d6a1b329f6a37d7c9230d4edda008c85880bf
'2011-08-18T04:48:16-04:00'
describe
'103798' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZC' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
a7910e27ce9e7c647b38ce8cf2a9607c
e87c64438e603525e09beebaa6ea2aa85f6676f6
'2011-08-18T04:57:12-04:00'
describe
'28363' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZD' 'sip-files00213.pro'
d47ab5227d21b343c251ba4e1520209f
f14c9fa72488242528389f10192edb6f5ecda2a5
'2011-08-18T05:01:43-04:00'
describe
'36015' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZE' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
72976a223d74e03136a096bbcc5ecb29
13c5e2b52393044736c50f59db94772950884998
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZF' 'sip-files00213.tif'
ffaf668ee7cf8dae44e2343ae46bf31b
a08fcb06abe40c6cf38a5575a72bd367095f00cb
'2011-08-18T04:44:45-04:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZG' 'sip-files00213.txt'
c2f592ef91323f562599beac378e9c5d
5f0fd2b2f8be4bac1d11ccb35aff35692aa4c693
describe
Invalid character
'10488' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZH' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
35d85c1520d542497ce58115249bdd88
d1c3e873691d1e7ec548291b4d9447a886569e2e
'2011-08-18T05:03:43-04:00'
describe
'1400096' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZI' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
9790e46309783eae4dcefd148013340d
d6c23a2fca07f2d35683d5c90176ff9cf40a2021
describe
'98390' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZJ' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
1005c4aeeb52c01cb85f5d40c5c9dac8
76196e4a519060defe0f1a65c1de1ca5053cfc6d
describe
'26513' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZK' 'sip-files00214.pro'
8fc38945f73a320e6573003aeea0a909
2e41d2fce73de60644547745976e90239afaed10
describe
'34302' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZL' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
cf8cf7a6d9a5c94cbae214d0d74816f0
41c680c75d0dd6adad42c631e24c679dcf8d5124
'2011-08-18T04:44:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZM' 'sip-files00214.tif'
ddc98b865e089683648036f1389a7714
e3a205638aa06162ce3fbee005fe0f03e8a07ff6
'2011-08-18T04:49:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZN' 'sip-files00214.txt'
ebe3293d73f21d33936455600a5cc29c
a79f9b3c62a38b84621b51fa9ca53a79b2238833
describe
'9836' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZO' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
8f2100ec7fb946f78c9b0f50ca02371d
0e5d59add661db0918553e35700ce534d0a73292
describe
'1379229' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZP' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
fd0399457acc4d25eee9f7bfc4ba7e30
630dd2c4a0b802d3a7a3c06781182aadb2001ef5
'2011-08-18T05:03:45-04:00'
describe
'103004' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZQ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
4e21ac28f727dd575a800e31c7f11c43
304d46f59e4df5b98965b671bf27ad8880a92599
describe
'30058' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZR' 'sip-files00215.pro'
5339eabaaf1b378c69659cec35792d11
4f2546105ad394015580f21a3da2106c64fabdc5
'2011-08-18T05:00:03-04:00'
describe
'37153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZS' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
c811353b49fd107add961df3c66a66d0
3b8335ebb4a7729c921752638a193ffe8642030b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZT' 'sip-files00215.tif'
80eee87c92a78f80f764b5141e22a64b
1087ab336971fb2bc7fb1ced4319fa9000dca739
'2011-08-18T04:55:41-04:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZU' 'sip-files00215.txt'
321123f2d1fa94898f23d720d6b37b3a
2f61ad54dbb6ce267c4d4455569a95ab1557af0c
'2011-08-18T04:40:35-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10852' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZV' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
d3d53c767162a803a4c5896440082c9a
c77cffaaa912d153a8bf4245d65dc638ef98eb99
'2011-08-18T04:51:36-04:00'
describe
'1400217' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZW' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
98ac6b93709c719cc2a64acd0cedf57d
d68d6714e8fc8de9afd043a44f2536ce86968ad1
describe
'102817' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZX' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
e96aa9f96cafbeae679afbdc45ea7868
6982af5cf93d8241640ff0c53ae2185b65dd1634
'2011-08-18T04:58:03-04:00'
describe
'28692' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZY' 'sip-files00216.pro'
3404f2cbe6094be87491f57c53bea148
c9fcefe24d2f485022a5060170fb89fe48087217
'2011-08-18T05:01:45-04:00'
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABUZZ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
3c707326082bface79b7911806b252fe
be5c52bbab4023488e66ac96ca820d79431e7cdf
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAA' 'sip-files00216.tif'
c18b7fb8a6fe586acc22d86a70a72445
33644e64c2c6a8c93c2b24adbc7ca061346c0cca
'2011-08-18T04:58:24-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAB' 'sip-files00216.txt'
b1c871f585d6a8418b392b566be3cc52
a2758a6643494e47560d513537e26cdc50cccf49
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAC' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
d824ca07d46837dc675e97d60d376fbd
fc391bbadf5f3bae01fb2eae74fe1d052d771d07
describe
'1379237' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAD' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
a474fad419ec164b335409a7f4e4a584
fce19f79c510407bca73c890ea33414c3eaeec71
'2011-08-18T04:49:38-04:00'
describe
'100391' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAE' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
610d83ce5c454dff07e2f7eeb87c3937
b129eb70ec5b4f7053a76093c55714bd92f6f0f5
describe
'26906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAF' 'sip-files00217.pro'
c73f2e3b90f6d849575f66d3e5216f3d
3491e10cdde2689a52720d4e4b1089a59f38bf9f
describe
'36050' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAG' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
c749db75c4ff7d6b241dd854c431ae9c
bc5d78fb7d2a38107d11b6fd0bb54a79a5f59896
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAH' 'sip-files00217.tif'
5716395cfe5a352e8938b37aa01c7111
17358b0bbe11eca30e9514ede7f9d34638615ed9
'2011-08-18T04:44:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAI' 'sip-files00217.txt'
1e74a0bdf5d90471ad0cc3a20bf0da80
521023afae95c21d7162abb4616075bc1da1d29b
'2011-08-18T04:51:11-04:00'
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAJ' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
71f096d3125589fe257649ff62c61bd9
9f3153943d94220ce3237e1f6e24bf88a3e482a0
describe
'1400194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAK' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
01e1c552d2328925f375f6aa58d8edba
665c5469c38362dbdefb6e266e4b3deaa6f9044b
describe
'105421' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAL' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
5349c95006a523fb32a7b88de3869a78
7d762cccf55e5102a0956f8890a1d42b152be63d
describe
'26996' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAM' 'sip-files00218.pro'
0074e0d9900d6540a7428697c5ca417c
1498b5773692b9d375f3f1a535769aa0d1d74b09
'2011-08-18T04:46:10-04:00'
describe
'36244' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAN' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
feb92460d6c052e3ee2513414a74766e
4788da68e194605203d9d6b3bd48ea23d3614f12
'2011-08-18T04:56:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAO' 'sip-files00218.tif'
6f6907e234065b9dc8ad5f5ec9e2bc08
b47d914b102c4e96e1774b2348ccb063487908a4
'2011-08-18T05:02:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAP' 'sip-files00218.txt'
6434cc07fc046d69cdaa0d27de451dcd
61c299a174ed7bedfa430b5a9c0396fac3041ec4
'2011-08-18T05:00:34-04:00'
describe
'10357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAQ' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
82d7b8ff0b1679382ee4cee484b0c5e9
2b629299a93be52efc76c00a6e33283797f39fe0
describe
'1379047' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAR' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
b7c34be4ed4dfdc7c2afc1caa738df33
741c3981756dc93490cae11ddd85a5e6b5170e27
'2011-08-18T04:49:18-04:00'
describe
'113372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAS' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
259fd0e9c093ecc7efa1887ff1230bd8
56ee6bbe57a4ab1629b7a76987c4ce6e2d948485
'2011-08-18T04:55:38-04:00'
describe
'27256' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAT' 'sip-files00219.pro'
fe9c046119e8a1dd11558ee98815a2db
404c4bb374ae3266c306eba2dbf6657f60e7d1ff
describe
'38783' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAU' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
5c2ab4adc262d2b58651e4382c71785c
fbe90789e16fa73edc4dde650bbc1d006f0fd358
'2011-08-18T04:52:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAV' 'sip-files00219.tif'
ac0999862d9998a2c2d43ee0e91daf35
37d9aafb0bfa74a8c4ff225ba7ebe47faeac214d
'2011-08-18T05:01:58-04:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAW' 'sip-files00219.txt'
b2be31344d89f223cbe61a8778fe536a
4ddf8723a93e06bb378500cf47568d0972a2e8e0
describe
'11273' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAX' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
d127368f8a993194bea4257070f566f9
5e2a45d7642a61b3f36a15f42a4930b4ff1bf122
'2011-08-18T04:51:38-04:00'
describe
'1400130' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAY' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
54102041797d83d1a5028ac5775b88a3
068446b7870b4610def6e304369ea374574d10a1
describe
'109625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVAZ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
8bf51d39bc9f885f03ada7c392f1c57b
a2d00daf40cbc36ff786dadb526d7a99911e6ba7
'2011-08-18T04:52:14-04:00'
describe
'27972' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBA' 'sip-files00220.pro'
622e5216d99f037d9cb91e2bb38450ca
41254afa24acb993c6f86793fc43786855edeb35
'2011-08-18T04:57:21-04:00'
describe
'37134' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBB' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
ffe2ffc4f9da26a2fbb2e6f113e7e232
872066a4a61819c7708c8f92cca70fd28242c2ad
'2011-08-18T04:59:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBC' 'sip-files00220.tif'
7511a176b533110bca28f54c341546a4
db0720d476d805ca6e25c0afdce3b3d7dfb213ce
'2011-08-18T04:59:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBD' 'sip-files00220.txt'
86a6f3ceaf935ebe8f616b4aba15c9ca
e460dbf153dadc67b31c4a375e870dd46c09afca
describe
Invalid character
'10546' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBE' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
f508bf403527aeb98e050089de24c5d1
f8121d1e5d4f496e0355ea8266aff0ac85ab912c
describe
'1379205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBF' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
ed2988628f972188fc7b4c7f7409d22e
91ba6b362341d0e293d6c3ff1146c87ec4d40fe8
describe
'105906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBG' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
4a3162ccaedffb9d9a5877aff31b7c91
f6fad2f571aaf89c571c09c980c5d0a0712721ac
'2011-08-18T05:00:46-04:00'
describe
'28356' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBH' 'sip-files00221.pro'
fb3dc232cb0cfd67d57a5596dcb7d19c
fd59fb6c5c86e4a1ba9c286e2a93a62567f16cff
'2011-08-18T04:59:26-04:00'
describe
'38210' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBI' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
5c7fd66e658bd9993af558074c78101e
9591f6f530a00642a822e7e88724202c1e791151
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBJ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
76ebdcfbb6c9d20f71ea122d48c72eb7
82bb6b2afeeea49550430b2219f482115dd8df5f
'2011-08-18T04:40:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBK' 'sip-files00221.txt'
97fd01407641baf3b7321a2a210220d5
3d17e85959e1bfc99a92265fb568544701d7a914
describe
'10913' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBL' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
17f6322c9a210a9ab8e51a7d2c067225
911721a060b1b694981e9b57dcdda5615c78c320
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBM' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
ac671536ddfe3bf292405565ae5a5f8b
6c40f7eacc8cf6c321899e1e31cf7da59d02a3c1
describe
'102250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBN' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
e179d44cae3698f734e7b0c71944a1dc
52ac22957d555fe706e6b5376e9284f3918604be
describe
'28094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBO' 'sip-files00222.pro'
3cdaaf6e7f7786a5133f5ed099878fc2
c523d269c4bca0a04cdedcdf96246172dff4bdb7
describe
'35525' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBP' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
9256d7bb3e3fbdc09a57859e3a0b4c97
0c5534201a0ef61e85ad5fbd0e636776e0e25010
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBQ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
9f4b7a5b303f5c7eade2fec5e32aef7c
6540a0753cd7815665e38c82d44d66676d6e6c33
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBR' 'sip-files00222.txt'
dc92900849fb8650078cdae51140be14
569fced15303df6216c5408e69067ae8d2da1342
'2011-08-18T04:50:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBS' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
9a77f0fd06452807517e48179d29ee5b
cd32f64fa8725a03427d1dc021899c2f306fdb32
describe
'1379213' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBT' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
f0dec10dad4f7903e20c7efc255afce6
4118da34f5a031b8aa169c0d9205bbc8c8f1ae7c
'2011-08-18T04:57:05-04:00'
describe
'101016' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBU' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
1561d00228341da1dd817bca14c348f1
90c14ac50285c2948ac1e892edc382e35c23fb56
describe
'26931' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBV' 'sip-files00223.pro'
ac1ac624ea3c53b87b02dc7eb0c545f0
06381e7db0854cde349ac336865b26cfd0d79905
'2011-08-18T04:48:20-04:00'
describe
'36816' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBW' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
03a875b6db802a941b13e17022a003b6
58c4295bc350bbb81e0ead849ce98d8bfbe07421
'2011-08-18T04:55:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBX' 'sip-files00223.tif'
637a770c6bb375d134fb0e49f7ca5f46
0e61a1b9c49041215cc61fd3bb68116a6711deec
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBY' 'sip-files00223.txt'
6a81762e8f29d9de5286b5d3c2e676a2
866740efdf8392219d430b8422c7036c4a39c1d5
'2011-08-18T04:46:46-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10505' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVBZ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
e45f275c223d531ce7daf7ec2bfd10f2
c500a912c7ecb4aff83c596ace243351de7d6611
describe
'1400171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCA' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
b20e92bf747fec42970d7f384a3e5d00
636a137af84b531eb8c2c2c39ed64ddface58143
describe
'101653' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCB' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
a96c2c79853c49d651f6b75110f1b0ce
5b9298c04c328b86bd116cfc1336bddbbd6d835c
describe
'28745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCC' 'sip-files00224.pro'
c1aa9f03a9fda4c4e8e09d91b73584b8
df0d17da5b0a09bf7b3b5185d0dbbc234ee9f11b
'2011-08-18T05:04:03-04:00'
describe
'35847' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCD' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
a14d03361e4b3effd066b8fa5b56e978
ff17b9b993681eed33141c5968c2f4a69afb7a92
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCE' 'sip-files00224.tif'
c3e5b498249610a63b57fa9a10900af8
02f40041c7abe912f29a5913e86488410e7e753d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCF' 'sip-files00224.txt'
06b83616e425dd76d4e8099f6faeded1
3003284f1f8438dcac9df0cde192cc42b66c1425
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCG' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
745078dde26d71b7422344093909d531
1fd51c559b95734d6681c0346d4958ef0d9d46f2
describe
'1379211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCH' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
90ffdc38d7237acc35aa8155c589ef3b
6c815604fbfb4ea7ec95e891d38cd705abe005fa
'2011-08-18T05:00:15-04:00'
describe
'96791' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCI' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
8373a9746f7a857e9e52efcaaf7a0fb8
ff33437b9425de47e5829952d22c4f0981c20523
'2011-08-18T04:48:47-04:00'
describe
'26089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCJ' 'sip-files00225.pro'
f912163ea5267b762ce2d27681d20333
ad2fad837be08c7822455fc22e49aee75ce3e908
describe
'33475' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCK' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
44a9077fe8e3367ab418e6e4e81370b6
7e5693619fb7d5f50046ebebabccf17f48398cb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCL' 'sip-files00225.tif'
f59c9b6a508170d0a3d547dd2fdda596
ed0b70a265a050204f378893e45fbfc0881c1c1d
'2011-08-18T04:50:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCM' 'sip-files00225.txt'
29a63ea109b09beee48e31f2e7d11f15
23480f32e7cee5964be1a4bc91f37282d06d5846
describe
'10075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCN' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
8c33092be4ed3f5c2b91568f777b37ed
e6a1eb1f80b0c90f773ccd729e62818d7cd2946d
describe
'1400120' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCO' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
434b6dff3b3721abe2e9452daf8941c8
5e390bbf2ff89a6ef25c26b488412a5e7a2df449
'2011-08-18T04:57:20-04:00'
describe
'101893' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCP' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
51a6ba1cf5ac48065c39dc4b38f041c6
2af4787c66a4b1bce2947fe5c47ac165aab670ea
'2011-08-18T04:43:33-04:00'
describe
'27994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCQ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
e3aa62147e40786dcae4126d28c1b7b9
5e7a43fa69c81419b2efcbe8228f64f7516e8475
describe
'35799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCR' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
3d967bfc7f3b6e690a22eac9948960cc
f4ff0585dc18e2086a96db0c8dc0f4ea97ddb8b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCS' 'sip-files00226.tif'
47b1485d1a8855f5cccc7c8595cc57a9
ea36f2b6a3b57ddd622e8f8abcaa4e660d176d60
'2011-08-18T04:49:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCT' 'sip-files00226.txt'
9f2f8a6b7928ea00ab8dd43ba2de60ea
523ae0d4c99ca6d73e4bfa25ed97fb9c0a33cb17
describe
'10213' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCU' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
749895371b024fcec733ba570bb63113
0e1acc17afe2af7ac7febd9f7c694e2db781247b
describe
'1379238' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCV' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
3438590af5709e9f343336137869f0ad
6134ea874f524ec71e47b94358eb66f99e27e797
'2011-08-18T04:44:32-04:00'
describe
'103459' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCW' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
5f6f1be93b084200fe1e82120cdf460f
0f586b6491bc982e2f515d2fe71d8e1bd35fa087
describe
'29177' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCX' 'sip-files00227.pro'
97f5a03463f9744e0ad6212dc0545707
9af79e0f064e00285b297b8c1dde4c34251b5ebf
describe
'36919' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCY' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
b83b1faa73e1d74cedafeafcb4159123
6136db6949e34a83ff4fe682c1654faa6ef88fc2
'2011-08-18T04:45:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVCZ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
b9d02f79be96e4aadd65c09dacab46d8
8fc4ed6b7b3ce2c4f484d771ad242079e81be74c
'2011-08-18T04:59:06-04:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDA' 'sip-files00227.txt'
9fd932c153c98bdbbf8b75428284ecb4
8a0e74aadc2973d015881c8d0f7c74bf5631aae0
describe
Invalid character
'10863' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDB' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
3851b222cef580c1418ae3d10fc35e68
fa84a18a877e78cc6702281664b1482923adbfd8
describe
'1400212' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDC' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
ecf19c2f701f4502c762989195da3c9a
5cf2a2c36611496dde18c381e1daedae1b2f3516
describe
'105599' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDD' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
de8be6e9e93061b8a7c953e445c64bab
539050fedf992ae08a1abf394f4e813eaf013792
'2011-08-18T04:58:15-04:00'
describe
'28982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDE' 'sip-files00228.pro'
277797142f4695ee3c6b32a11a5de443
fc9ddf1b58c68e033c27f2f84fa49c4059451779
describe
'35844' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDF' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
09ddf0af1741c85e283a437c027e7ed3
71ec2df5a035b6bb7f54f6d35262e32e8b4005bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDG' 'sip-files00228.tif'
013ddd15987ab35b54ff84ef81c3c287
063e77dfe92bb4a0321322029cf95850a25c86d9
'2011-08-18T04:44:50-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDH' 'sip-files00228.txt'
80877c539fec72486476f432b3059844
7416b5fff29aed5b6ecacb0320ba674b331e02af
'2011-08-18T05:00:12-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10340' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDI' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
6935fbdb011a9fbc7f3b68bb862a1275
6659f5498192be2f93c9e9df58fcc20ec9cec517
'2011-08-18T04:55:16-04:00'
describe
'1379191' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDJ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
a61546b329e8b0145ababb04a8bb570e
1b4524c4f4154b6951fd7605224243488213eb76
'2011-08-18T04:46:18-04:00'
describe
'101208' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDK' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
f37f7bfe2a1b470ba93e940efe8af890
1f4a80e46bf4d4343bfab4cd5bd1dbad4731f9cc
describe
'28914' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDL' 'sip-files00229.pro'
217a383223e23a6bd48b65f973b38900
3ccf36110c3eb9d8e50a15b983ea5d468ea67f61
describe
'35658' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDM' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
53cd280776dd0027aa715c8c088c5d1c
659ebf5652bb7f5eb70b187d303b9bae06803e0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDN' 'sip-files00229.tif'
78c1601c931cde3d1d38c3a0edff8a97
e8385006b009f49285f175dfd19c72c3667e1795
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDO' 'sip-files00229.txt'
7eb20e05d61783f3f77948ea17ffdfd6
dc2c9e329b501674022bf8ed45c6a8dccf23a5e2
describe
Invalid character
'10578' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDP' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
e50dc48797d1307a40ad7314dc5d1236
7357936e7213c9472609f8aa2a80840a3d1a9f83
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDQ' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
fb4d7dc46934a968005576f0cae41957
0a12fc27a76dbeab64585a4f4e91c5c5835bbfb1
'2011-08-18T05:04:01-04:00'
describe
'103295' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDR' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
0b20afc89cfbd9e3442c4ab49ccaa2da
c2f7f98b9bd2f6038bc7fadf05d453313f2c4f8c
describe
'27629' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDS' 'sip-files00230.pro'
41dd8c45c6344ac3d27b05ace833caac
a5bf204bf6f87e7f55aca1b8d00b239a26be42b7
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDT' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
2dc7a8222e5f2c2fcc4ebbd7a243125a
87c9a9ec0c7b97d70fce37ec774d4a0ccdd45298
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDU' 'sip-files00230.tif'
9ea5fd96a16b63a856a32489405f0426
6cf75eceaceeb8fcaacd597f07f5ab613ee858a8
'2011-08-18T04:58:56-04:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDV' 'sip-files00230.txt'
1be69e07339b4ba1eb42aa56f5c01a6a
cc77306397b57b4a16bb967f96fc1f03a6d54852
describe
'10404' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDW' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
1fe3825c1f8640145309feafccffa8c0
cb703e6837c4a3964b707373afe1e93f4d7ff01b
'2011-08-18T05:04:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDX' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
63481e34e4511583dcc90641954b19da
e45626fe88f410d0c080a97aea7d473fdecd1447
describe
'100075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDY' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
6a384c76462cc61406e810d49af41e67
bc81456a94d2f9029c1987ee494c5630ba909503
describe
'27007' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVDZ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
0b0094feda75510bc4e107fb20fd5529
71a4bd4aaa485b87570e7c410afa03448adde89f
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEA' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
9ac3d3540b81505d43cf816dadb7a6b0
7316078f1f5c9504f756ab0abdc5ff4ca69e28ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEB' 'sip-files00231.tif'
9d578fb6ac6ff36e8b8f4076ea496643
5b9968ffafb6b7494a86f7deb256dfd59357b663
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEC' 'sip-files00231.txt'
e639419e64e76591e24f38c9e21ecf40
3d993c0ba5ed96c25f7bdbca12cc4f1e79e9d228
describe
'10434' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVED' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
f3f953aae8fa7189ad910441aef3851b
b06a617cbe5fe628cb98a432eea3772bada1fc14
'2011-08-18T04:56:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEE' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
97636b1e86d5083e35f2e917661d7984
c275714adc751fe1bbf56e5f55c5f5cab1bfa535
describe
'102368' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEF' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
2fb5f425bcf69fc4c99d02fb3fc7062c
0a202d55d3d48cfe1630130e6847064b1087d0e7
'2011-08-18T04:42:57-04:00'
describe
'28643' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEG' 'sip-files00232.pro'
5cab10aa0fec6c958138a676024d6f5c
4cb7aabbb714367a4dada32c4c4e134a01427634
describe
'36178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEH' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
1ae1ad3562e25f280ff6def9f922e121
9b24c6ea97b55af27e80d3c7e28dd960f9668c9e
'2011-08-18T04:49:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEI' 'sip-files00232.tif'
13ace511655bd1275a60b3b0ab7509cf
452299b465ac8946eb5d98572234458912d45fa2
'2011-08-18T05:03:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEJ' 'sip-files00232.txt'
004879af2f2a354bc355b4ef9e840cfe
0d82d2d4438fd6ecd73e9aa33dd76f3401647880
describe
'10188' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEK' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
c0dc0d31adb0f20864c63545687a6f85
b4f2a81ae31a8ff49eb432344a8145494b3e26ed
describe
'1379234' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEL' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
23dbc5ccc023fcfbd5c1c76023b92759
db022da8c383db62b43b14daff47de27c7bbfcc1
'2011-08-18T05:03:03-04:00'
describe
'99299' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEM' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
519556c07e3bf5b33a0c1a19f1631627
2d8a66024b555c0a07b2bf39b2e0dbfb78d2a5ff
describe
'28167' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEN' 'sip-files00233.pro'
0be30c830ee5cbf8097708e1942ebd89
8926dbe085a033f7c4a89ab72976445c781f0c5a
describe
'34189' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEO' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
61525b78cc8bdab99594e93400cbc31a
fefec944291a39de3d78890c702078358f8aca34
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEP' 'sip-files00233.tif'
d48c87c1cb63159573dc4ae9a1cbf9d7
8d37d9ec4da7db4b0b863ad51bf2ae0fa250aa13
'2011-08-18T04:44:55-04:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEQ' 'sip-files00233.txt'
803560f9d6d211b17e82836893f2200f
99bed19ce987185b5d281fdc566917eb48ab89f2
describe
'10138' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVER' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
5e1c6b70d0f221f162b0bdeb49f56aa3
a991530ce01948ce96808e3cb0213312e4a346d2
'2011-08-18T05:02:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVES' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
865a238a1aae3c5388082f3043eeaeb5
c2a3ed4e966fa77ae4f0a9682f5fda85708f3f87
describe
'104386' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVET' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
d6b3ea26029decd56affe7b144210e95
29759b386f88901f4038f2be16f5fb7ca37ff839
describe
'27221' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEU' 'sip-files00234.pro'
bce7558df9700bf11dbad24bb87639b9
514dd58fdbc76e8b956a6cf98e750044ffadddcf
describe
'35747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEV' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
a23ce3bd3c61448f9e8da25509b1ff9a
69872b84c4f8d59ab44a12d014475773ef48ca42
'2011-08-18T04:58:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEW' 'sip-files00234.tif'
c0dacf3a9e8d3e70869defac46c4e0b0
7964db5d64869a97e9a20abbf2e6bdb907765d1e
'2011-08-18T05:02:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEX' 'sip-files00234.txt'
cfed2b969765ab7372b47fe4cf869aa6
23ad3e757194aab66933ef3e3f1a4d797c5adb5f
describe
'10308' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEY' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
7d5b9e8011a09abb857d0ad200532da5
6ebea8523c6986196b51c5e826b42ef45b76ef45
'2011-08-18T04:54:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVEZ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
68b2b8d249e7ee8df4ebc9988f7c1fd1
e50cc6029faab0872d790eb8ddc33cf2069a2d9e
describe
'109378' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFA' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
0fea3fe420f6d5f6dfc27eef3d3a631a
e8dc9c36a2aa5e23500feb4267379535c6ffa162
describe
'26138' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFB' 'sip-files00235.pro'
c1373f726dece8cc2ebd322b42c1cc98
25764b0171e9245eac84f4b0b5917d6278cfb265
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFC' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
e4997a0393dfb340574058b639d2ace6
3139842a90b2b6cebfa014b6b7ad8c853f777211
'2011-08-18T04:58:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFD' 'sip-files00235.tif'
2b17354f0c7735fbd3171bff28628be5
9a202a7e7825aa5c12716256280b19527ee3734f
'2011-08-18T04:53:30-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFE' 'sip-files00235.txt'
6f740cb85040242cf9507ff9f482d5f0
f7aca2a9e7680301660ca1c5a3e7e94bdabd9b7b
describe
'10567' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFF' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
34d6ea5eef4d539745f78373ad204874
6a4f223612ece58471fc2c179f8bd60524bc1e0c
'2011-08-18T05:00:37-04:00'
describe
'1400150' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFG' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
778be5263930b66a68580ca134523ae8
5c113760fc103c37f3a72bf052cc7f000b660037
describe
'103733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFH' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
2b7884b41c88d7c530cf5121d56c3e55
4cc72bc2b8544afe3264cee016ecfc42135a6568
'2011-08-18T05:04:08-04:00'
describe
'24764' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFI' 'sip-files00236.pro'
849b90e06c8a2d3c1943ab65e45fa1e7
326a90dca6ba80bb07213a21518f2a56d4f01a34
'2011-08-18T04:55:33-04:00'
describe
'35712' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFJ' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
5bfe48a9c8d52ad2f74872f87eccbd82
10c09faed92b7253bd93dc738015bad078c31e80
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFK' 'sip-files00236.tif'
5be4e6812138ac147f0a1323b39f1d6e
3a10ad9ae71f5b695a555fd7fc48ff6a3342d1bb
'2011-08-18T04:40:48-04:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFL' 'sip-files00236.txt'
26f9ae6ad8de6abd41da1bd9235b4424
c78a617775dd12e567b9ca822e5fbe395cf3dcce
describe
Invalid character
'9969' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFM' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
f0675cc3c70eaaa9f686b15a47fb6508
b0638b9637618027aa3f081045443abf8af46bbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFN' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
0284416b2838ae0fcf5b10573f99d18c
bd44887b82a0fecc457388f330857985387244fa
'2011-08-18T04:45:53-04:00'
describe
'102734' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFO' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
c010a6707f2d56a24c702ffaf173ad46
03e846965b445615da6db2d29fa883d757c9c88d
'2011-08-18T04:58:55-04:00'
describe
'28843' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFP' 'sip-files00237.pro'
f681c1ee3519598526f9cd5cdddcc3ef
9be0982d2766ce946e557cf02143b07756cc190f
'2011-08-18T04:59:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFQ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
410e7d6542922dc9885962487599956f
2f11bb9341ce351aa5e7f06c89b813dc0bd695da
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFR' 'sip-files00237.tif'
1e05386ded7c9e7061b88bab1d9d67df
2e38e4f88cc1ba5f830af5bb9c7b40930c6b5006
'2011-08-18T05:01:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFS' 'sip-files00237.txt'
9d64ba6c835cad205c1f1615edbaf0d1
13e3fa5ebdb95fbdfa856835a2fa445e0a1baa1d
describe
'10299' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFT' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
460a7472b44c6e374dbab4af5e7192a0
bf66fe1abe3bd17f3dbff1e18ab2493de39d07a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFU' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
3df55539fdd71bd4aab45bb1e88d24e6
2cdada0882c451b7750a29028a7893e3afc69738
'2011-08-18T05:04:18-04:00'
describe
'97208' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFV' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
3fd08d2a5807287bcaf2191a05cb984d
f37622edfda0f22a01cc672d1d8a9642ef43382d
describe
'27023' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFW' 'sip-files00238.pro'
bc41fe33f4434c3c38192c4d31bfcc76
be58c22a891b9f9a29ddd6c93682e1849fd71a5b
'2011-08-18T04:54:37-04:00'
describe
'34661' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFX' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
46bafdbd1c326ca0fe7a5e496c2944d4
b7615afc4deaafd037e7ee4644c03d48ff832298
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFY' 'sip-files00238.tif'
46a683747f699f36ea8a066d18f319c8
36c8317be40c72c02fd891e02547b473f746fed1
'2011-08-18T04:42:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVFZ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
621da72dd5c30463721356ae123084f0
7639c2439dc4bb68daf67ee245b7ba17e13c8836
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGA' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
42446b2bef6e63aeabc5b587db63ba31
c1663bb78c6f43d244fedd6e2a382924ef1f1d5b
describe
'1379221' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGB' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
e66394e1e01379b64b777b04e0092bfe
2d0609e3aa98002b91e24ab65bac026f27f997c7
describe
'98978' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGC' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
4204a3f6212ae699969c599006168d75
f134ac2f522e8c89a3b41dfe819dabd985573810
describe
'28321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGD' 'sip-files00239.pro'
8a6369c4b3fb6581529bd1430f1b41c8
0b58f9c3cae8c2b8c54d20eb3f2d1724232229e5
describe
'35369' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGE' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
3af062eadb1205363459bcb445fa3637
f86e977222c62969818c5e887efe8e106b3d9d73
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGF' 'sip-files00239.tif'
70012e2ab1f943503831266355f896b3
61ee0db502d814b7abef1abb1e76c10336be61ee
'2011-08-18T04:52:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGG' 'sip-files00239.txt'
b375203faf2c133c611165d54b86cf21
8de800c6aff2944f8a198b0cb43f536b2e458451
describe
'10326' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGH' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
1dc731dac60bfd7f4687f5dbcd8f2fe6
70e62288664bb85c2c0cf0d9ec666759bde9b212
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGI' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
14487618672a2cdfd8653f760e1e82cc
d73d378019ecb2e3d224b93dc05c08933d7db5e5
describe
'97992' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGJ' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
8d0e575fe73b590ca47d220e82c8dc8e
5dfca37967d2e55ea81547d42e383312834229a9
'2011-08-18T04:42:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGK' 'sip-files00240.pro'
208e4df1e8450dc662f025ce96e2c75d
2977228bc32bdf6e0a430fc355ae4bf3003ee7f0
'2011-08-18T04:59:36-04:00'
describe
'34088' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGL' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
a20fe8e1bc6c19ef44b8eb1f6e495ffa
60951c6017992967a15dc041b7eec6bc5df3ae9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGM' 'sip-files00240.tif'
a1414e66d86f096eecd9770a6f0b85eb
312de12e87feb5bebbd0e7342e7d712b2c7a1c8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGN' 'sip-files00240.txt'
fd92f6c41a1f5c8a278c6f3e744604e4
0a0f3af2f06d2b28a086f8090f6b63d84827db21
describe
Invalid character
'9959' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGO' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
e4bcc995b9a9a3b591f488018fcfee49
240533eddbfded4d1042ae8cb4f3feb8d9051c97
describe
'1374076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGP' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
134238b96e203694203869bbff9b9f86
4cc9f31ef7da45159ebf4777ee757decc1f12376
'2011-08-18T04:57:34-04:00'
describe
'103313' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGQ' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
354a6b70f1baa56e03cb7218e69fb613
7ee6c2faec3356129723f3f54b3d19f6a06c760e
'2011-08-18T04:44:12-04:00'
describe
'28036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGR' 'sip-files00241.pro'
6841b150db62bd5ece65a5f3df7eb0ba
1dd10807b6a7fb1f52d46502cc1a927cc551db0c
'2011-08-18T04:51:13-04:00'
describe
'36906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGS' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
f18cedbfdc3f36632d88b34e72f446fa
e7b0d8c9fe04380d81ce0325a1f1b2b3a8eff93f
describe
'11000599' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGT' 'sip-files00241.tif'
4dd28d57d03aa96db6e5732574ff0da8
7ab5c1763505d6866e74c68bc2e2bbcd60c2c9f3
'2011-08-18T04:59:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGU' 'sip-files00241.txt'
bcfffb6119148ba2a157d2bfacac6425
081a95d6ccc858eaaa55015979c4b9a17a68a6ab
'2011-08-18T04:59:21-04:00'
describe
'10535' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGV' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
6f4627083a6699c21a92d54c49e5dd0d
d5e86eada2aa4b9f2f82a66d558b4709573bbff2
'2011-08-18T04:54:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGW' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
44845e3aec7806f3c4d0dfb76276de40
24cd502da638de2f8eb1d205b4e16ac6467f860e
describe
'98136' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGX' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
8c92f4e3d264a29c1ab81d2d43effb24
52b2278bd035151734e74f4271677ac19f00d197
describe
'28395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGY' 'sip-files00242.pro'
0e5f32dc80ec670417bb162b337791eb
d15608ef974b12f05fd6827c14c43057bc9df91e
describe
'34861' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVGZ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
f7608505c68e15d79c61ed579b248c59
26f669146f4189df15fa7a15f156eff59afa6639
'2011-08-18T04:54:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHA' 'sip-files00242.tif'
2ab9d27837fbb9c24d97e54c00599fa5
7c035c46956209bc029ab16db380e169b668f89e
'2011-08-18T04:45:30-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHB' 'sip-files00242.txt'
1d78284a914579697082c707cd0fa9cd
c49a369d88aa3d44752828ab6c44f568dea985e6
describe
'9808' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHC' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
52774ed9f88e25352c82732d7c693c36
2ee0d8f65d22297a89a553e424df3cdebc060e40
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHD' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
fc6b1b414746e8c59153cd1a3e2d4c3c
ce65bcb47e44970dad87505f36f973f6cc478337
'2011-08-18T04:59:35-04:00'
describe
'99494' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHE' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
f0c0f19ebe32c74cc79aafebbc0be8fc
2d964ab63ccd787a6acc4c947dacc4106ec5bdfc
describe
'29103' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHF' 'sip-files00243.pro'
825e8b6f9e2cc260ba17b970b19cb9c9
54f1646488d4fc4a16078da7b2d309b319af6b39
describe
'36017' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHG' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
4e1d481512a2c90d86ecddc0b2ddec6f
923d13dc4a85cd1e7857eb7906ecf79e02761651
'2011-08-18T04:40:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHH' 'sip-files00243.tif'
423fde07735a8ef0c87dda6e3128e72c
e3c6b70cc4ffe31e3117246de66ceb754c6bf393
'2011-08-18T04:55:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHI' 'sip-files00243.txt'
fb8ea632cf12b0b5fd5c7ffac3ecc799
a4b12a383c3c003ba1fa1fc60dbcfedce39a403c
describe
'10297' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHJ' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
5b3bd1e352a21373c7c2dee368ddffc3
6bd7a34bb66939a8c5d2845a28c846a8db79753b
'2011-08-18T04:57:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHK' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
2847265cf055e9eb726ba040e9f32cf8
d1af3fd26e58a381b1909d81cf01dd9e658ae0aa
'2011-08-18T04:41:01-04:00'
describe
'92435' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHL' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
f13ab4218a341a71da55000a3438a501
8a58e1c1687d821e8dc6a98dd25bf0d7229987ff
describe
'26596' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHM' 'sip-files00244.pro'
9d7c3704c2a50e3de0be5da584e6cac1
a1267e2b314951542a3b3f791d1d5c2c3fc6eeb5
'2011-08-18T04:57:13-04:00'
describe
'33635' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHN' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
59ba53b3cdd9e6f92f63e1f0b475f3da
ddb36bddfff00782b7521e37a4680c0c5b95db8d
'2011-08-18T04:54:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHO' 'sip-files00244.tif'
2edbf0e94c5bce72ce57afb4b35b177c
db6674d7771572f80a549a99167d67ccb4f69a9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHP' 'sip-files00244.txt'
2a5c7c44919839f868019701c482d0b6
fd7b3af025604908c41859673f982df52a8e1e57
describe
'9333' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHQ' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
1e6ddfcd637c042d0fc3aa54ad199867
da10bf70bd7bdde0bf7f3ae952ecb36c466d72ac
describe
'1379105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHR' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
6badf357c0d4205bbac074cb032828fc
1de0b3e50d39315449d4a4fa4a6ec59c256d905b
'2011-08-18T04:53:49-04:00'
describe
'97610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHS' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
2e5323764096023cbfba0429c3e0904c
76d50de5060135e7caca42b244b50cf4df375288
'2011-08-18T05:00:40-04:00'
describe
'28211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHT' 'sip-files00245.pro'
a4cf1da4e8445329cc8a37913e25b3ef
eebab2e52c730ec7b6a589e986600be1ca9cf2bc
describe
'35077' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHU' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
717c9c96b0d627a18e5bfead3ec40f4b
8f06abe587278d0557845c8739e3fec9395a5fb6
'2011-08-18T04:41:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHV' 'sip-files00245.tif'
acb818f580091f1252dd899b4f2daf3d
3c3fe049fcdacc666b1113eb33cbc9f0947c3349
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHW' 'sip-files00245.txt'
3d4a99b6b8fb39f666ccfc48d9c9e9c2
d658b661d46be90ab4d7e96571624b5b7d7b7055
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHX' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
2279cb586b709fcc7f26933395fca2ac
37e97e6131394b659f162f18b508a6a66269ee0e
'2011-08-18T04:57:01-04:00'
describe
'1271370' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHY' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
0e225e64685807dc683512a7bc520159
84946d3561c2bc99ae0d702b41f1daa570f2edc9
'2011-08-18T05:00:13-04:00'
describe
'50795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVHZ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
85418b57f223f5d6099b9383053a64d4
573efa03435a4d9ead20bf1ae21004ff5bbb5046
describe
'10843' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIA' 'sip-files00246.pro'
ee0f19a17844c528f1a54ad0d2a2f62c
0cdc5312137c776a7b1d94eef0dba712da1a0f0d
describe
'17970' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIB' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
04a3f2b0b9b518b1dac2913e5ee1d623
389b9c379979caaf44e0fa0a4e0dede3542434bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIC' 'sip-files00246.tif'
c8d0ded7edc5cf89e828960c38a57dc8
86209ba24a456b66a4f85163c638f838e303042c
'2011-08-18T05:00:31-04:00'
describe
'455' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVID' 'sip-files00246.txt'
7fbc08122eaaec3c70730e3fcd37262d
2fd78a5959f627324ecf66c74b4971cd25b1157f
describe
Invalid character
'5420' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIE' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
0c204a9ccd944697abbd662455ac23c3
1d1b8af2926b4ea1e4ef5d15630c45e610c4f34b
'2011-08-18T04:47:12-04:00'
describe
'894283' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIF' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
3c0f01eefb939cfc5427024f07b2f65e
4b8a0efe4c20fd5c384ea9cad1eaab0acc60ae99
describe
'16590' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIG' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
6ea0eeccd91b3875c2ce95340254dc16
fd30a612967b3c18a8b0a4f4aae7e076ffaf8fd3
describe
'402' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIH' 'sip-files00247.pro'
d1af53c1c88e41a9f5fde4b7bce9a807
99cc77d45a2ddcc64d3e7a2c1311d89d5e176dae
describe
'5654' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVII' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
c8b750862a225da4e698258953d8fe1d
66eb31d3bc76e01d304447f0d3c0d319347fa312
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIJ' 'sip-files00247.tif'
b3949e0a312660ea74bdd5beac6661df
94298a901665c7c0e1b4fec9a9aebf6a3217ffb1
'2011-08-18T04:56:54-04:00'
describe
'14' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIK' 'sip-files00247.txt'
9179c3352bfdb381b94872df9cd5577a
4da563ffb0ef0f573bc83e6fa02051a99d440211
'2011-08-18T05:02:18-04:00'
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIL' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
c9f9a86a43f41f5d6750e45120e06a49
d99f4c7a7135c11291d8b40eec5280a33adc7d8c
describe
'1400205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIM' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
d7e2f7e4605b23a2181bce563e7178b4
a0fae0b84caf6465a849663364705c8dd5c73eb6
'2011-08-18T04:59:29-04:00'
describe
'126092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIN' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
b944e4cd53ad1d46343428f4e697fb7d
2bb1da9bc169b4cb5c6faefbc85f184526fbe776
describe
'85468' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIO' 'sip-files00248.pro'
2897e8a1e6645786737e9a268c205882
1f2231515982bb8d1eb566b62af3077bfa2aa2f5
describe
'39477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIP' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
dcadbb797e8a8c8b7dddc3f96815bf83
fe847279bf34a2e316bf4e8d2634d184fc89d36b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIQ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
0ef4b2464d8b84a9ebe6bd34ac5c8987
2db347da425bbbc89f23918db28e6a8edfee39c3
'2011-08-18T04:53:54-04:00'
describe
'3664' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIR' 'sip-files00248.txt'
a5c55a64a922644f594591cf7b145a3f
6e9ab42d6e871d6aa01a6616623c6bf9528554f1
describe
'10298' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIS' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
d0a2bf66419a41ae841dc62c7b7d8abf
b8e4b4becf3cd0079c9634bb598ea57e1958070f
'2011-08-18T05:00:53-04:00'
describe
'1379089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIT' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
bbf48973b8a18d7d6a5bd253852c55d7
2c34f5e57c6641ebd78fe054af5a81436c1f9feb
'2011-08-18T05:02:38-04:00'
describe
'115345' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIU' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
00b3641fb007c4b47a77153a8a67c3f3
8260a3f765619f112d8e8d24ae957f9f10803ac7
describe
'86492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIV' 'sip-files00249.pro'
f8a13e258fed8bea9be33c8d28995d54
d010c65cd91a2d1b125c0eff8b2a889c0008a7e8
describe
'35813' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIW' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
a7739e7d6079a9c8b0435e4b349cf5aa
bd36b5d97217df21093fc3af73d024226a493501
'2011-08-18T04:54:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIX' 'sip-files00249.tif'
abb39c8cdd8d94f0334ceaa4298772d6
9de110e0618425546dca9fe36d61d85ed211889c
'2011-08-18T04:41:46-04:00'
describe
'3778' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIY' 'sip-files00249.txt'
1163b85db12b91c747e33072bca3ad63
7c1b45cee70f3f2a5dccb7d248ffcbd1a3fd6833
describe
Invalid character
'9153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVIZ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
e2d78a711708bd72f3a82a68139e448f
3a972b62569bef5a58e2f7196beffaf1acb79d41
describe
'1400179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJA' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
d1673b3f652247e392b1234a870cae6a
8464b505913188d65bd6df3eeb5cbb213c572fa8
'2011-08-18T04:56:18-04:00'
describe
'109958' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJB' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
4ebc885f6d92c841863d22747f242e2e
75fc91c8cafe2f445216adcd7ee569b0e46f6529
describe
'69567' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJC' 'sip-files00250.pro'
387c0a8d3d76ff8134e80879347bddb6
35cbf6a77902940fe238980d75391343eefb17bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJD' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
6bbdd199ac0d89c5eed4d4fc49c72ff6
8526c6fd370359325f1eec8a8de0c36ebbc4249d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJE' 'sip-files00250.tif'
6e937eed7b7cffbc7678aea6deba2065
ecc95a1a03702528126d86ad8a3e51b333f4b278
'2011-08-18T05:00:39-04:00'
describe
'3000' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJF' 'sip-files00250.txt'
697b18043bfecf7918a51cf7c92b858e
5657c7de95e4fe0e1e70dc1ae7c31a5ee17b3ffa
describe
Invalid character
'9443' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJG' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
ec14978e7c1217173652b6050812696e
688c5c28026c7156ac9ee0d9a09ea4b72f38f2e9
describe
'1379224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJH' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
7e5301586e315fde583056e172d40a5e
f1e1835ac46efe15d953e221626bb411852493f7
describe
'138220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJI' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
4bea8caa3b52b36d22cb6b083f023a23
21e1bd1ff9bd80b83fe0883f54d2f9abee489833
describe
'108504' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJJ' 'sip-files00251.pro'
1f4d4e42f8b52fdb668bcb1d7c51dd56
f0729900cd1911876d9dc8c631240bf1a5cc4cc7
describe
'41082' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJK' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
69b1868ce57287d8836f55ec91e5658d
02dba72287614850ae4923205b8ddfb1368ed69e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJL' 'sip-files00251.tif'
ca4731a8176fef083154107b625e045f
ebbe6e0ce56b952be6cdc7a1171acde0df544e14
describe
'4553' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJM' 'sip-files00251.txt'
99702652f0f891f7aee13f0b07556f0f
8b4435fc7dd800f7770779d0d6429a67c642e39d
describe
'10636' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJN' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
dc82f74fffcff2c83c34ccff60ca55e9
0426cfbff02bb93cdcfb241c7d745372819f1432
describe
'1400192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJO' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
f146624b43efe56f8959e4d07cd6c09f
9f4286d80eac0f9a49a1114d11da970187b00c72
describe
'140019' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJP' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
4e33e30e38a26d9f9232660e670b6150
791d0733b43e7601c595a519acc13b9638e3335e
describe
'116355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJQ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
8ddf57ea556ba5300ca7f4ac58c61175
4e02231d9dee713a6134727ba1017344f2bb5d9b
describe
'39897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJR' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
89b968086b5b8e81720d0713323e7f4f
75f1c4432a07d8393807a53ff03537157d3dea4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJS' 'sip-files00252.tif'
1913a475f37a5fa312a403e0abd94251
61b048ff3fdafca380275201a6ad17522b913a81
'2011-08-18T04:55:04-04:00'
describe
'4870' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJT' 'sip-files00252.txt'
f58061c538ba1957240d2bd0b8ba60e2
00201cf3d96ca6d9524c75382719c976eaf0715b
describe
'9878' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJU' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
53e634e53a25db6af7581b1ee63cd848
88c764ef9c10778606fbaaf09fd2789007bb09db
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJV' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
411119c5b108ac22d507c9ce0b7ffe2f
eb9a147fc5377e53667489daefe6e9eddd36d933
describe
'130827' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJW' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
672f9623f62f432896eb37bd9f2de85d
f8e0f1be40551bee667725b1ddd0edf581142743
describe
'102180' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJX' 'sip-files00253.pro'
d55a524d77a80a1f0f6eb275eb51c2c8
187830cba97e63e30e0681c125591fdf931ceeef
describe
'38732' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJY' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
7f555e62b4d377a9cbdb341f29166507
1a4bdaae2144a9d882febf6bfdb5ba0e7acb9624
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVJZ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
a4ca224fffdfb7b13cf74c7f652cc2b8
1f415b94cce7ede40ea9dfb95677c1061e1ce394
describe
'4375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKA' 'sip-files00253.txt'
f53724bbd4ef949a28b6c3d9607418ad
ff86fa70c85eac6138f9f32259c9f2abeb97cf09
'2011-08-18T04:41:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9985' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKB' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
e4476e7a0917004c3e88f6852692555a
323958d8944b29029061e1529466c899d20103c1
describe
'1400185' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKC' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
dc281c21aa22b46010ccfd41e45a2a01
5d424aec58867acbf582b1a5b7ba3d468a51874a
describe
'101943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKD' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
8dbfa1636ff263630e4635d95029ae5b
6b5ad465bd04db621399882b8a6b9011ae721fb9
describe
'64321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKE' 'sip-files00254.pro'
6b9c36bb910e7856855b6b21ca9ded51
1dfa15df587bf210b755585e7d05e06ab64c0d77
describe
'31125' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKF' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
e5fbc67562c718ac5c3fe5d58a62c658
01184db64589711a70c09dcf2a2ae3fcfa1eed5f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKG' 'sip-files00254.tif'
27de59434f8e0f3f60acd5b734833aaf
fc44b5369c4bfd787a6cb7fe53656c17d3215ac0
'2011-08-18T04:50:08-04:00'
describe
'2683' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKH' 'sip-files00254.txt'
defa20ba22c924b0474c734e64e52365
f557981aeef208673e77e6b16f841d74c8ba81b5
describe
'8203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKI' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
4075a4a1b054905e609b8bb06707be40
e95a368508449c59b787c0240319085498afefc0
describe
'1379227' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKJ' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
ac5286995b0078ddd944748195de44d4
4959905798bc16746fd466b5516f8f4312a04a7f
describe
'137447' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKK' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
1dbb29e701184cc9262c0d4f9cf7977b
0e156c9b22cb8409485ea4ea5bfb019995bbe62b
describe
'108089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKL' 'sip-files00255.pro'
029f14c1babe06c88cfaa14e3207ec55
4702543d361c05a44b823fb26d20bc5fc07ca550
'2011-08-18T04:59:19-04:00'
describe
'40576' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKM' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
2efe6f3512ed16256a13fc1153e1ea65
85fec7c98d50c84958549f6acdd7ef72f624d033
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKN' 'sip-files00255.tif'
96b6b3f30cd3d85fd6f9d9825f992249
876d70a7aa8500e9faddf4778d937b71411ff185
'2011-08-18T04:53:43-04:00'
describe
'4677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKO' 'sip-files00255.txt'
fe2a7863473f31cc3818918aa6026052
ccac90f9af9f692d4c0a6fb43b8ceccd08d28a7a
describe
'10659' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKP' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
4df7b2da24a54872bfd6f62cd53a9ebe
b28da04d5acb17c9a8ccccbd48f317806a43b1ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKQ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
e7496d2d3b36173c8ee26e68ecc7b4c7
f76b23c44e36e763c68464da65ef830c40b2befe
'2011-08-18T04:52:08-04:00'
describe
'106072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKR' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
79495797444292ddbd8d273df5140f31
b62ae1504b06c53fa74060a2ca0e1cbced866a69
describe
'64982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKS' 'sip-files00256.pro'
7d37806808329289aa2cd17c9c199ed5
020e63e92762ee650ae241347d8b9b8358c8a630
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKT' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
a760ac2df2bb30679bf999b5a5b83ea6
6d27d450a1f61aa8f40668ea96f9d9a33103fe4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKU' 'sip-files00256.tif'
dee6291f07fb015dcb3fd503d760be87
6d090d78358bdc376325b268d700ddd94cedb30a
describe
'2777' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKV' 'sip-files00256.txt'
190907b9c3b1c93070114bda0d0bac39
23caff9038a6a1dcb5a48bf59446b54aa2a2f4fc
'2011-08-18T04:47:16-04:00'
describe
'9241' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKW' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
24deab800009150f99326f3104cd72b5
93f3d4df2353bd6893e82e1705085e9c469bd6e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKX' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
32db9f9e8151f288e97c022f82e7df5d
a27c8cd53e68ddf3a196eddfbd5b27323006197e
'2011-08-18T04:48:49-04:00'
describe
'101797' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKY' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
9eee4c724c70c3b5c95725eff1d09f04
e1600f60af7bb30710920d0d614e67d507a945e5
describe
'60629' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVKZ' 'sip-files00257.pro'
53959cb9629e1dc035d0093c2522576b
eebde50923cc161f92486695f54d01e040a05650
describe
'33442' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLA' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
c392153021925ea5726572dceba4b60e
eea4eb9dde35dea70dc817b19c98a421cc903306
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLB' 'sip-files00257.tif'
09dee7d129a166748d2b324af1efdf97
7b7f954f8eee7c78a58382a25a0067c1042e9997
'2011-08-18T04:45:20-04:00'
describe
'2862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLC' 'sip-files00257.txt'
17890de20bda603b4ecceb8d0301e241
036fe9a4645e571823fb3b2475b9a1b1ff94f67c
'2011-08-18T04:54:56-04:00'
describe
'9252' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLD' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
4a455e37a1897b264aa8f4970548421b
67893a52d55507b545389c375f34b7a4637423a0
describe
'1414864' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLE' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
7da6be8803e1bff1bf26cbfb91fb5239
f74a0d0b335f301b1848f9cd15aaf76225a11f8f
'2011-08-18T05:01:42-04:00'
describe
'126583' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLF' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
97d3e660f29bcdb4b690182e528cc5c5
d512841b9cb3969f8f2bb9754c091c24b151bd64
'2011-08-18T04:53:21-04:00'
describe
'79791' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLG' 'sip-files00258.pro'
57357a6d0653986b44f2632b7db07f27
3868a0f4f42c81ba424b76b0ba114d58c23b0a69
describe
'38493' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLH' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
1742a7b08d66eeb1c11bb41f5001f166
ec86153e3b48529cd84f33bd20d7e10902af2c37
describe
'11327079' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLI' 'sip-files00258.tif'
410adae13b30c8d1824279569b98b746
5c70eb0fa925ee0bfba09ff940891c7b64c3344f
'2011-08-18T04:43:24-04:00'
describe
'3489' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLJ' 'sip-files00258.txt'
559d675b2b83ab27a758737c2c376266
f20818f68afd8c49e49f8c728bbdb58dc0002a09
describe
Invalid character
'9357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLK' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
6f3a73cfb8a048d90919458e7cb736f2
e650cb6d07a89268ad0d4e602c2b464ffbc5f75c
'2011-08-18T04:48:17-04:00'
describe
'34956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLL' 'sip-filesback.QC.jpg'
4be0f0510faae9c12bb9a75cb2b3fa61
55d5dbe81dcf7f51a11729c647785c7418d4a803
describe
'7661' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLM' 'sip-filesbackthm.jpg'
0c6b8d35e7a8787c9e6a724c0f7b3574
a18a47ed999d7d1cea90dd8a2898c8e889c2d727
describe
'1541555' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLN' 'sip-filescover.jp2'
b24652b13a5cab91377626ebb852b80f
55bbd47e5b123ba0fcf2eb16e232041e526ebc8a
describe
'148576' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLO' 'sip-filescover.jpg'
045c91b5e69f9a01646373e699a0d57a
db7fa1c9ddcc3c739316ba0c83a1eb439b188946
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLP' 'sip-filescover.pro'
0797b2c6ae27f35c450a52f54d9b07c4
928ab4daff4828a4482092bcd39a6680aea49db1
describe
'32154' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLQ' 'sip-filescover.QC.jpg'
402f1e498aa1b557679121168446568e
3d016fe6df81a37faa828221879879c5c9b9094a
describe
'37002166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLR' 'sip-filescover.tif'
6f6f2429ff71e1da1778ba13c1b9ecab
8181661b182d8a125d6c36360a43e62c4d8e5790
'2011-08-18T04:40:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLS' 'sip-filescover.txt'
007c3e21d69f3c94f8eb4a7152be4958
327f0908fdd173522b165c13cf27b2330a976f94
describe
Invalid character
'7229' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLT' 'sip-filescoverthm.jpg'
bce892ca49d16f86c6a2643817080e4d
cf91be4b98505205cae0e48fde7d447a8d8254a2
describe
'444792' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLU' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
77d0340b86c73c1ea6368905e8178ee3
2560d70c9ad77b61189beaa14cc2460a9b8e124f
describe
'62306' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLV' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
aa968cd2e384957e4c03f11111a180e3
44db602ea721029b0439fe1d550b7a102ec29a89
'2011-08-18T04:43:09-04:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLW' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
940ae2a4f3445957c1311cf0885c98c4
82c828f7459619468211d32880e84b0e9463fd84
describe
'15166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLX' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
fd26b7d60817e0ff49820a4194e06f2d
dd94c5d540a89c789c39c83d9661dca73bd50f30
'2011-08-18T05:01:37-04:00'
describe
'10677768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLY' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
584e1c908eae81fb4cf997932e1ed797
c431886a6bc224294edd4752cd5aa9edea3910ad
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVLZ' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'5608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVMA' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
b07dfdadb25848810fc6f9df6c89a5d9
59dfa9bc7a7139fe3df34e53dc54e3df3c2813fd
'2011-08-18T05:00:14-04:00'
describe
'436131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVMB' 'sip-filesUF00001815_00001.mets'
24d88d25362ebbe5bd70e14b57628f26
8940d21d1703bbd825ef61256dab65ee47121c79
'2011-08-18T05:04:10-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T18:17:12-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'563275' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAARfileF20080805_AABVME' 'sip-filesUF00001815_00001.xml'
a5bb47b8f5bed8eeac5af47bc4431e2e
aee036f3715e44920d2b90827f9f6afe8c2415ec
'2011-08-18T05:04:15-04:00'
describe
'2013-12-16T18:17:16-05:00'
xml resolution