Citation
National series of selections for reading

Material Information

Title:
National series of selections for reading adapted to the standing of the pupil
Added title page title:
National series
Added title page title:
Parker's second reader
Creator:
Parker, Richard Green, 1798-1869 ( Author, Primary )
Felter, John D ( Engraver )
A. S. Barnes & Burr ( Publisher )
Hobart and Robbins ( Stereotyper )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
A.S. Barnes & Burr
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
204 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Readers (Elementary) -- 1800-1870 ( lcsh )
Recitations -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Readers ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Printed boards ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
At head of title: Parker's second reader.
General Note:
On cover: National series.
General Note:
Ill. stereotyped by Hobart & Robbins.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements: on back cover.
General Note:
Frontispiece signed: Felter, SC John D. Felter?.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Richard G. Parker.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026903769 ( ALEPH )
16149205 ( OCLC )
ALH5913 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text






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___ PARKER'S SECOND S PARKER'S SECOND READER. |

ee

| NATIONAL SERIES
die
SELECTIONS FOR READING;



ADAPTED TO THE STANDING OF THE PUPIL.

BY RICHARD G, PARKER, A. M.

PRINCIPAL OF THE NORTH JOHNSON SCHOOL, BOSTON}; AUTHOR OF “ AIDS TO
ENGLISH COMPOSITION,” ‘‘ OUTLINES OF GENERAL HISTORY,” “THE
_ SCHOOL COMPEND OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY,” ETC.

PART SECOND.

DESIGNED FOR THE YOUNGER CLASSES IN SCHOOIS, ACADEMIES, &C,

“ Understandest thou what thou readest ? ” — Acts 6:30. —

——



NEW YORK:
A. 8 BARNES & BURR,

51 & 53 JOHN STREET.

@OLD BY BOOKSELLERS, GENERALLY, THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES,



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to Act of Congress, in the . ear Eighteen ¥ andred ani
Fifty-ane,
Br A. S. BARNES & CO.,
In th $lerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of
New York.

Entere* according

-
re peener een

STEREOTYPED BY
HOBART & ROBBINS;
NEW ENGLAND TYPE AND STERBOTYPE FOUNDERY,

BOSTON



— ES A con






















PREFACE. .


























In the preparation of this volume, I have
kept fresh in my recollection the immature state
of the minds which I have endeavored to en-
lighten; and while it has been my aim to pre-
sent such a succession of reading lessons as are
suitable for the younger classes in our common
schools and academies, I have not forgotten that
the first step to be taken, in making good read-
ers, is to open the understanding wide enough
to afford a sufficient entrance for the ideas
which are to be communicated by reading.
Words are but sounds, by which ideas should
be conveyed; and written language is of little
use, if it convey but sound alone. Great pains
have therefore been taken to exclude from this |
volume what the young scholar cannot under-
stand, while, at the same time, it has been the
aim of the author to avoid a puerile style, by
which the early intellect is kept down, and its
exertions are repressed. In every step and
Stage of its progress, the maxim “Excelsior”
should be the aim of the youthful mind; and the
hand of the teacher should be extended, not to





aca EET LE EN ee eens
CE ee

VI PREFACE.



lift it up, but only to assist it in its endeavors
to raise itself. All of the labor must not be
done by the teacher, nor by books. They are
of use only in exciting the mind to act for
itself. They may, indeed, act as pioneers, but
the pupil must not be carried in their arms;
he must perform the march himself. And
herein lies the great difficulty of the teacher’s |
task: on the one hand, to avoid the evil of leav-
ing too little to be done by the scholar; and,
on the other, to be careful that he be not
required to do too much. Real difficulties
should be lightened, but some labor should be
permitted to remain. To make such labor
attractive, and easily endured without discour-
| agement, is the task which best shows the tact
and skill of the teacher. If this volume be
found useful in aiding the teacher, by doing all
that should be required from the book, the
design of the author will be accomplished.

Bm. G, FP.
Kneeland Place, ;
May, 1851.









CONTENTS.





e Poetical Extracts are designated by Italic Letters |






Lesson Page
UL 6 0s 0 ae 68 ‘0:0 6 0.6 6.4 e ee eee

1. The Author’s Address to the Pupil, ........ 9
2. Same subject, continued,. ....... oo © oo AS
aa 8 ” 20. 0-0: 6's bee ae oa ee
4. The Discontented Pendulum, ... . ie Taylor, 19
5. Address of the Author to the Pupil, continued, . . . 23
6
7
8




: ee ee ee ee ee ne. oo ae
. How to find out the Meaning of Words, . . Original, 29
. Same subject, continued, ........ - 81

mm ee ee

















RG een ee a
We. WO, ok Mik hea Se 6 4. ee eee es 88
TI. Detaitiowes ss ose 6 vile 2 e608 a 42 |,
12. Reading and Spelling, .. . Sa oS ee
18. Importance of Learning to Spell, . | Original Version, 51
14, Demosthenes, ....... o + + + + + Original, 53 |;
Be EN Sw oa te sks ‘oo ee ¢ 57 |;
16. Fire: aConversation, ...... ost . a
17. Same subject, continued, ......e.. . 67 |;
oa .* _ concluded, ...... 8 = 78 ;
‘|| 19. The Lark and her Young vy Altered from sop, 79
WA Dog, «2s so 6 ye Wey ¢ « © © © « Origtnal, 82 |;
21. Same subject, concluded, ......... eo | ie
22. Frogs and Toads, . . . cts... e - - Bigland, 87 |
23. Maida, the Scotch Greyhound, Altered from Bigland, 90 |





ee a ae ee Ge ee 94
ey ONE Oia! his ace Child’s Companion, 96
26. Same subject, continued, .. . "

aa | + concluded, ... -
SNES


















f re. ester aenrmemenernen nom atreannennre ssonecenenyend testa nacnnncanaaieeanannaaeinanianhiaeatsaaeanASARSASAGLI CALE? | aanaennR -oetal
|} VIII CONTENTS.
28 Make Good Use of Time, . . . Emma C. Embury, 102 |
29, Same subject, continued, .. . s 107
3o.6C« es concluded, .. . ” i111
|



31. Verse, or Poetry, ...-+-+- 2 e « « Original, 116
82. A Morning Hymn, .... + « « « Anonymous, 121
838. Evening Hymn, «+--+ - eee s 122 |
84. The Gardener and the Hog, ..-.+.-- Gay, 123
35. The Hare and many Friends,.....+.- ey
S6.\Maxims, . . «2 - ‘se eee . - Selected, 128
37. How to be Happy, .....-+.--> Child at Home, 129
88. Obedience and Disobedience, ~. Child’s Companion, 1838
89 Obstinacy, ....-+-.-. Lessons without Books, 189
40. King Edward and his Bible, L. H. Sigourney, 144
41. What does it Mean to be Tempted? . . . Rose-bud, 147
42, Same subject, continued, ....... m 151
43. 6 “<6 «eé i DIT ee ae ee 154
44, \« oe concluded, » - + + «6 +.s 9 157
45. Mary Dow, .. +++ ++ ++. HF. Gould, 163







on Bees, « «6 «+ 2 8 Sia 6 ees - 165
47 The Dissatisfied Angler Boy,.. . “ 166
48. The Violet: a Fable, . . Children’s Magazine, 168
49, Captain John Smith, . . . . Juvenile Miscellany, 170
50. Same subject, continued, . . és : 178
5] «ce “ce «ee 2 ae ee 176
oo.“ as concluded, .. $6 179
58. John Ledyard, .....-. ” 180
54. Same subject, concluded, . . r 183

55. Learning to Work,. . . « « « « « « « Original, 185
56. Same subject, continued, . . - . + « « - Abbott, 187
a és conclud@ly.» 0 « «20 e ss = =6189

eee Parker's Rhetorical Reader, 193
59. The Semicolon,.... “ 199
ty « 202





ae:



him drink. The horse must do that himself.



















pattern ee Reaver

LESSON I.

The Author’s Address to the Pupil.

1. I present to you, my little friend, a
new book, to assist you in learning to read.
I do not intend that it shall be a book full
of hard words, which you do not under-
stand.

2. I do not think it proper to require
children to read what they cannot under-
stand. I shall, therefore, show you how
you may understand what is in this book,
and how you may be able, with very little
assistance from your teacher, to read all
the hard words, not only in this book, but
also in any book which you may hereafter
take up.

3. . But first let me repeat to you a say-
ing, which, when I was a little boy, and
went to school, my teacher used to repeat
tome. He said that any one might lead a
horse to the water, but no one could make






NATIONAL SERIES.




10



He must open his own mouth, and draw in
the water, and swallow it, himself.

4. And so it is with anything which I
wish to teach you. I can tell you many || |
things which it will b@useful for you to || |

|
|
































know, but I cannot open your ears and
make you hear me. I cannot turn your
eyes so that they will look at me when I
am talking to you, that you may listen to
me. That, you must do yourself; and if
you do not do it, nothing that I can say to
you, or do for you, will do you any good.

5. Many little boys and girls, when
their teacher is talking to them, are in
the habit of staring about the school-room,
or looking at their fellow-pupils, or, per-
haps, slyly talking to them or laughing
with them, when they ought to be listening
to what their teacher is saying.

6. Others, perhaps, may appear to be
looking at their teacher, while, at the. saine
time, they are thinking about tops and
marbles, or kites and dolls, and other play-
things, and have no more idea of what
their teacher is saying to them than if he
were not in the room.

7. Now, here is a little picture, from
which I wish to teach you a very import-
‘ant lesson. ‘The picture represents a nest,
with four little birds in it. The mother
bird has just been out to get some food for |

VE!


















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 1]



them. The little birds, as soon as their
mother returns, begin to open their mouths





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Mas















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Ur PISS IS Sy <<

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Viki

wide, and the mother drops some food from
her bill into the mouth of each one; and
in this manner they are all fed, until they
are old enough to go abroad and find food
for themselves. |

8. Now, what would these little birds
do, if, when their mother brings them their
food, they should keep their mouths all
shut, or, perhaps, be feeling of one another
with their little bills, or crowding each
other out. of the nest?

19. You know that they would have to go
Without their food; for their mother would
not open their mouths for them, nor could

Q%*












PARKER'S SECOND READER. 13

LESSON ILI.

The same subject, continued.

1. I rotp you, in the last lesson, that I
would teach you how to understand what is
in this book, and how to read the hard
words that you may find in this or in any
other book.

2. Now, before you can understand them,
you must be able to read them; and in or-
der that you may understand how to read
them, you must take the words to pieces;
that is, take a few of the letters at a time, |
and see whether you can read a part of the
word first, and then another part, until you
have read the whole of it in parts, and then
you can put the parts together,.and thus |
read the whole word.

3. Now, in order that you may under-
stand what I mean, I will explain it to you
by taking a long word to pieces, and let-
ting you read a part of it at a time, until
you have learned how to read the whole
word.

4. In the next line. you may read the
parts of the word all separated :

Ab ra ca, dab ra.

Now you have read the parts of the word
| ab-ra-ca-dab-ra all separated, you can read



NATIONAL SERIES.



them very easily together, so as to make one
word, and the word will be Abracadabra.

5. This long and hard word was the |j,
name of a false god, that was worshiped
many hundreds of years ago, by a people
who did not know the true God, whom we
worship ; and they very foolishly supposed
that by wearing this name, written on
paper, in a certain manner, it would cure
them of many diseases.

6. Here are a few more long and hard
words, divided in the same manner, which
you may first read by syllables, that is, one
syllable at a time :

Val e i eee

In. de: “Yat. 1 ga bil i ty.
Hy po chon dri a cal.

Me temp sy cho sis.

{Hal lu ci na’ tion.

Zo oO no mi 4.

Ses qui pe dal i ty.

7. You may now read these long words
as they are here presented, without a divis-
ion of the syllables, as follows : valetudi-
narian, indefatigability, hypochondriacal,
metempsychosis, hallucination, zoonomia, |
sesquipedality.

8. Now, you see that words which look
hard, and which you find difficult to read,
can be easily read, if you take the pains to



——





PARKERS SECOND READER. 15
thn nent lstasinenitiicammacigst
divide them into parts or syllables, and not
try to read the whole word at once.

9. I now propose to relate to you a lit-
tle story which I read when I was a little
boy, and which I think will make you re-
member what I have just told you about
reading hard words, by first taking them to
pieces, and reading a part of them at a
time.

10. A father, who was dying, called his
seven sons around his bed, and showed





them a bundle of small sticks tied to-
gether, and asked each one to try to break

all the sticks at once, without untying the
bundle.

11. Each of the: sons took the bundle

SRS cient cee eetenetae o> ences ees he
LO Peete anon eden











| 16 NATIONAL SERIES.

Ts aiiaiiaasnmnineicenitinaneintn ssa eae
of sticks, and putting it across his knee,
| tried with all his strength to break it; but
not one of them could break the sticks, or
even bend them, while they were tied to- |
| gether.

12. The father then directed his oldest
son to untie the bundle, and to break each
stick separately. As soon as the bundle
was untied, each of the sons took the sticks
separately, and found that they could easily
preak every one of them, and scatter them,
in small pieces, all about the floor.

13. “Now,”’ said the father, ‘ my dear sons, to learn a lesson from these
sticks. So long as you are all united in
love and friendship, you need fear little
from any enemies; but, if you quarrel
among yourselves, and do not keep to-
gether, you see py these little sticks how
easily your enemies may put you down
separately.”’

14. Now, this was a very wise father,
and he taught his sons a very useful lesson
with this bundle of sticks. 1 also wish to
teach you, my little friend, whoever you
are, that are reading this book, another use-
ful lesson from the same story.

15. Hard words, especially long ones,
will be difficult to you to read, unless, like
the sons in the story, you untie the bundle ;
that is, until you take the long words apart,

sail Oe nn ene

-—--——,












a









PARKER'S SECOND READER.



and read one part or syllable at a time.
Thus you may learn what is meant by that
wise saying, ‘‘ Divide and conquer.”’





—_—_¢@—___



LESSON III.

The same subject, continued.

1. I wave another lesson to teach you
from the same story of the old man and the
bundle of sticks, which I think will be very
useful to you,and will make your lessons
very much easier to you. ;

2. Whenever you have a lesson to learn,
do not look at it all at once, and say, I can-
not learn this. long lesson; but divide it into
small parts, and say to yourself, I will try
to learn this first little part, and after 1 have
learned that, Iwill rest two or three minutes,
and then I will learn another littlé part, and
then rest again a few minutes, and then I
will learn another.

3. I think that in this way you will find
study is not so hard a thing as it seemed to
you at first, and you will have another ex-
planation of that wise saying, Divide and
conquer.

4. I will now tell you another story that

I read when I was a little boy. It was
ee














— LL EET, ST SL REE - ~~ emeeeee --













18 NATIONAL SERIES. |

story, I must tell you what a fable is.

5 A fable is a story which is not true. || —
But, although it is not a true story, itis a || —
very useful one, because it always teaches || —
us a good lesson.

6. In many fables, birds and beasts are
represented as speaking. Now, you know
| that birds and beasts cannot talk, and there- || |
fore the story, or fable, which tells us that || |
birds and beasts, and other things, that are
not alive, do talk, cannot be true.

”. But I have told you, that although
fables are not true storiesy they are very
useful to us, because they teach us a useful
lesson. This lesson that they teach is
called the moral of the fable; and that is
always the best fable that has the best
moral to it, or, in other words, that teaches
us the best lesson.

8. The story, or the fable, that I promised
to tell”you, is in the next lesson, and I wish
you, when you read it, to see whether you
ean find out what the lesson, or moral, 1s
which it teaches; and whether it is at all
like the story of the father and the bundle
of sticks, that I told you in the last lesson.
While you read it, be very careful that you
do not pass over any word the meaning of
which you do not know.

a ia le |

cepacia LL 4
called a fable. But before I tell you the |

a ne a ia ition ee nae eS in apts a 4

ee

en eS LL TL









PARKER’S SECOND READER. 19

ee ———

LESSON IV.

The Discontented Pendulum. —J ane TAYLOR.



AN TR a | * les,
i i We
i it} i 4s,
; \ yi i; WH Whee
PS) nif | Sed



1. Aw old clock, that had stodl for fifty
years in a farmer’s ‘kitchen, without" giving
its owner any cause of complaint, one
summer’s morning, before the fa was
stirring, suddenly stopped.

2. Upon this, the dial-plate (if we vail
credit the fable) changed countenance with
alarm ; the hands made a vain effort to con-
tinue their course; the wheels remained
motionless with surprise ; the weights hung
speechless ; each member felt disposed to
lay the blame on the others.

3. At length the dial instituted a formal

3



——-



20 NATIONAL SERIES.

Ln caattianaamasiascciliiamensaneiie sematiaaiinteataeae
inquiry as to the cause of the stagnation,
when hands, wheels, weights, with one
voice, protested their innocence.

4. But now a faint tick was heard below
from the pendulum, who thus spoke : — “ I
confess myself to be the sole cause of the
present stoppage ; and I am willing, for the
general satisfaction, to assign my reasons.
The truth is, that I am tired of ticking.”’

5. Upon hearing this, the old clock be-
came so enraged, that 4t was on the very
point of striking. ‘‘ Lazy wire!’’ ex-
claimed the dial-plate, holding up its
hands. uw

6. “Very good!” replied the pendulum ;
‘it is vastly easy for you, Mistress Dial,
who have always, as everybody knows, set
yourself up’ above me, —it is vastly easy
for you, I say, to accuse other people of |
laziness! You, who have had nothing to
do, a e days of your life, but to stare
| peopl the face, and to amuse yourself
! with watching all that goes on in the

kitchen ! , |
| 7. «Think, I beseech you, how you would



—— ee

i.
like to be shut up for life in this dark closet, |
and to wag backwards and forwards, year

after year, as I do.”’ ) |

8. «* As to that,’’ said the dial, ‘‘ is there
not a window in your house, on purpose for
you to look through?” — * For all that,’’

tea ail sf





A

ee neenennennee:





PARKER'S SECOND READER. 21
ssatesichoeseeshtnnsebaanenientatensntitdnaianeittentiisiatnnmseninniaiidil
resumed the pendulum, “it is very dark
here; and although there is a window, I
dare not stop, even for an instant, to look
out at it.

9. ‘Besides, I am really tired of my
way of life; and, if you wish, I’ll tell you
how I took this disgust at my employment.
I happened this morning to be calculating
how many times I should have to tick in
the course of only the, next twenty-four
hours ; perhaps some of you, above there:
can give me the exact sum.”’

10. Thé»minute-hand, being quick at
figures, preg@iily replied, « Eighty-six
thousand four hundred times.”

11. ‘Exactly so,” replied the pendu-
lum; ‘well, I appeal to you all, if the
very thought of this was not enough to fa-
tigue one; and when I began to multiply
the strokes of one day by those of months
and years, really, it is no wonder if I felt
discouraged at the prospect: so, after a
great deal of reasoning and_ hesitation,
thinks I to myself, I’ll stop.”

12. The dial could scarcely keep its
countenance during this harangue; but,
resuming its gravity, thus replied: ‘Dear
Mr. Pendulum, I am really astonished that
such a useful, industrious person as your-
self, should have been overcome by ui
sudden action. ,

esse tesaensassssnseteesmnasaisnenssifuantnesioensiees/tesiua«







2?, NATIONAL SERIES.

13. ‘It is true, you have done a great
deal of work in your time ; so have we all,
and are likely to do; which, although it
may fatigue us to think of, the question is,
whether it will fatigue us to do. Would
you now do me the favor to give about
half a dozen strokes, to illustrate my argu-
ment ?”’

14. The pendulum complied, and ticked
| six times in its usual pace. ‘ Sumed the dial, ‘‘may I be allowed to in-
quire if that exertion was at all fatiguing
or disagreeable to you?”’ a

15. ‘Not in the least,’’ @plied the pen-
dulum; ‘“‘it is not of six strokes that ]
complain, nor of sixty, but of millions.”’

16. “Very good,” replied the dial;
‘but recollect, that though you may thank
of a million strokes im an instant, you are
required to execute but one ; and that, how-
ever often you may hereafter have to swing,
a moment will always be given you to
swing in.”’

17. “That consideration staggers me, I
confess,’ said the pendulum.—‘‘ Then I
| hope,” resumed the dial-plate, ‘we shall
all immediately return to our duty ;,for the
| maids will lie in bed, if we stand idling
| thus.”’

18. Upon this, the weights, who had
| never been accused of light conduct, reed

—_———

















emai















all their influence in urging him to pyro-
ceed; when, as with one consent, the
wheels began to turn, the hands began to
move, the pendulum began to swing, and, |

Peg.
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 23 |

to its credit, ticked as loud as ever; while
a red beam of the rising sun, that streamed
through a hole in the kitchen window, shin-
ing full upon the dial-plate, it brightened
up, as if nothing had been the matter.

19. When the farmer came down to
breakfast that morning, upon looking at the
clock, he declared that his watch had gained
half an hour in the night.

£











—_—_=— eee

LESSON V.

Address of the Author to the Pupil, —
continued from Lesson 3d.

1. Tne fable of the old clock, which has
just been read, is intended to teach us a
| lesson, or moral, and that is, that when-
; ever we have anything to do, whether it
| be a long lesson or a piece of hard work,
we must not think of it all at once, but
divide the labor, and thus conquer the dif-
ficulty.
2. The pendulum was discouraged when
it thought that it had to tick eighty-six

-——-





3*





24 NATIONAL SERIES.
Tl
thousand four hundred times in twenty-four
hours; but when the dial asked it to tick
half a dozen times only, the pendulum
confessed that it was not fatiguing or disa-
greeable to do so.

3. It was only by thinking what a large
number of times it had to tick in twenty-
four hours, that it became fatigued.

4, Now, suppose that a little boy, ora
little girl, has a hard lesson to learn, and,
instead of sitting down quietly and trying
to learn a little of it at a time, and after
that a little more, until it is allflearned,
should begin to cry, and sayy I cannot learn
all of this lesson, it is too long, or too hard,
and I never can get it, that little boy, or
girl, would act just as the pendulum did
when it complained of the hard work it
had to do.

5. But the teacher says to the little boy,
Come, my dear, read over the first sentence
of your lesson to me six times. The little
boy reads the first sentence six times, and
confesses to his teacher that it was not very
hard work to do so.

6. The teacher then asks him to read it
over six times more ; and the little boy finds
that, before he has read it to his teacher so
often as the six times more, he can say it
without his book before him.

7. In this way, that little boy will find,

-_- oom.

-_— oe... oo -





















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 25 |

that it is not, after all, so hard work to get
what he calls a hard lesson; because all
that he has to do, is to read a small portion
of the lesson at a time, and to repeat the
reading of that small portion until he can
repeat it without the book.

8. When he has done this, he can take
another small portion of the lesson, and do
the same with that, until, by degrees, he
has learnt the whole lesson; and then he
will feel happy, because he knows that his
teacher, and his parents, will be pleased
with him.

9. But some pupils say to themselves,
when they have a lesson to learn, I do not
want to study this lesson now ; I will study
it by and by, or to-morrow morning.

10. But, by and by, and when to-
morrow comes, they feel no more disposed
to study their lesson than they did when
the lesson was first given to them.

11. Now, my little friend, if you wish
your time at school to pass pleasantly, do
not say to yourself, I will get my lesson
by and by, or to-morrow, but set yourself
about it immediately, learn it as quickly as
you can, and I will assure you will not only
make your teachers and your parents hap-
pier but you will be much happier your-
self.






























26 NATIONAL SERIES.

—————— nl

LESSON VL.
The Author to the Pupil.

1. In the first lesson, I told you that I
would show you how to understand what is
‘n this book; and how you may, with very
little assistance from your teacher, be able
to read all the hard words that you find in
any book.

2. Many little boys and girls are very fond
of running out of their places in school,
and going up to their teachers with a great
many unnecessary questions. This always
troubles the teacher, and prevents his going
through with all his business in time to
dismiss you at the usual hour.

3. Whenever you meet with any real
difficulty, that you cannot overcome your
self without his assistance, you should
watch for an opportunity when he is at
leisure, and endeavor to attract his atten-
tion quietly, and without noise and bustle,
so that your fellow-pupils may not be dis-
turbed, and then respectfully and modestly
ask him to assist you.

4, But if you are noisy and troublesome,
and run up to him frequently with questions
that, with a little thought, you could easily
answer yourself, he will not be pleased with
you, but will think that you wish to make

——







eT ned



0 EE SS ONES





PARKER'S SECOND READER. 27





trouble ; and, perhaps, will appear unkind
to you.

5. I will now endeavor to show you
how you may understand what is in your
book, so that you will have no need to be
troublesome to your teacher.

6. In the first place, then, always en-
deavor to understand every line that you
read; try to find out what it means, and,
if there is any word that you have never
seen or heard of before, look out the word in
a dictionary, and see what the meaning of
the word is; and then read the line over
again, and see whether you can tell what
the whole line means, when you have found
out the meaning of the strange word.

7. Now, as you can understand every-
thing best when you have an example, I
will give you one, as follows. In the tenth
chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, at the
first verse, there are these words:

1. “There was a certain man in Cesarea, called
Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian

nda,

2. “A devout man, and one that feared God with all
his house,, and gave much alms to the people, and prayed
to God always.” '

8. I suppose you know what most of
the words in these verses mean, except the
word centurion in the first verse, and the
word alms in the second.



LL

—



“—-





28 NATIONAL SERIES.

LO

9. Now, if you look for the word cen-
turion in the dictionary, it will tell you that
centurion means a military officer, who com-
manded a hundred men. Thus you find
that Cornelius was a soldier; and not only
that he was a soldier, but that he was an
officer, that commanded soldiers.

10. Again, if you look for the word alms
in your dictionary, you will find that it
means money given to the poor; and thus
you find that Cornelius was a very good
man, and not only prayed to God, but also
gave much money to assist the poor.

11. You see, then, how useful a book a
dictionary is at school, and how important
it is that you should have one. If your
parents cannot give you a very good one,
any one is better than none.

12. But if you have no dictionary, or
if you cannot find the word you wish to
find in the dictionary, you must then wait
for a convenient time to ask your teacher,
and he will always be pleased to find that
you are trying to understand the words in
your lesson.

13. If you have a dictionary, and do
not know how to find out the words in it,
ask your teacher to show you; and when he
has showed you how to use it, be sure never
to pass over a single word without know-
ing what it means.



~ a
AS SS LD LS LCE) ees





PARKER’S SECOND READER. 29



LESSON VIL.

How to find out the Meaning of Words, —
ORIGINAL.

| |

an f ;

iat

ae

\ ened

\ me

Wi! \i
\



1. Many years ago, when I lived in a

small town, near the Merrimac river, a little |
Spanish girl came to board in the same |

house. 4
2. She could speak very well in her own |
language ; but the people m her country |
speak a language very different from ours: |
and when she first began to speak, she |
heard nothing but Spanish words ; and she |

ss no other,

3. She could not speak a word of Eng-
Peper regenera renene nae nemaliilen alae mn ee

2 eee



































NATIONAL SERIES.
Un eeeamemmutmnicemgiranrenacateniainnnreas
lish, and did not understand a word that
was spoken to her by any of the family.

4. Her parents were very rich, but they
| placed her in the family, that she might

learn to speak English.

5 She had no dictionary to turn to, to
look out the meaning of words; and if she
was hungry, she could not ask for bread,
and if she was thirsty, she could not ask
for water, nor milk, nor tea, for she did not
know the meaning of either of the words,
water, tea, nor milk. ~

6. Perhaps you would be puzzled to tell
how she could learn to speak English, if
she had no one to teach her, and had no
dictionary to inform her about the words.

7. But it was not many days before she
could say ‘bread,’ if she was hungry,
and ‘‘water,’’ if she wanted to drink ; and
I was very much surprised to find how
soon it was, at the dinner-table, she could

at tea-time, for tea, or milk, or sugar, or
butter, or bread.

8 T have no doubt that you would like
to know how this little Spanish girl learned
intend to tell you quite yet, but I think

| the next lesson.



lal
==)

ask for meat, or potato, or pudding ; and, |

LL serena ene

|

to speak all of these words. I do not |}

you will find out yourself, if you will read |





> ie aie aes ee —
SS > . OO. O OO TD 0 0 a nT ST





LESSON VIII.
The same subject, continued.

1. Asovur twenty years ago, I was very

ill, and, for a long time, my friends thought

I never should recover.

2. By the very attentive care of my phy-
sician, and by the devoted attention of my
wife, I unexpectedly grew better; and the
doctor said that I must take a voyage for
the recovery of my health.

3. A kind friend, who was going to the
West Indies, in a vessel of his own, very
venerously offered to take me with hin,
and I gratefully accepted the offer.

4. We sailed from Boston early one
morning, and were soon out of sight of the
land. I was quite ill during the voyage ;
but fortunately the voyage was a short one,
and we reached the place of our destina-
tion on the fourteenth day after we sailed.

5. The island, where we landed, was a
beautiful spot; and lemons, oranges, pine-
apples, and many other delicious fruits,
were growing out in the open air.

6. The people who lived on this island
did not speak the English language; and
the family with whom I was to reside could
speak only in French.

a I observed, at dinner-time, that some





nn ee







PARKER'S SECOND READER. 31

ee EE
LT
a a a a a TT

. ee





re TT

———— ee
32 NATIONAL SERIES.

sin snsipiseneieiaseeteniianiaedasttiie
of the persons at the table held out their
tumblers to the servant, and said something
which sounded to me like O.

8. I often heard this word; and every
time it was spoken, water was brought, or
poured out, or something was done with
waler. |

9. I then made up my mind that this
word that I thought was O meant water;
and I found out afterwards that I was
right, except that I did not spell it right.

10. This I discovered by means of the
Bible, from which the family used to read.

11. It was a very large one, with very
large letters; and as I was very fond of
hearing them read, and of looking over the
book while some one was reading aloud, I
noticed that whenever the reader came to
the letters e, a, u, he called them O;
and thus I found out that water, in their
language, wes called O, but was spelt
e, a, U.

12. In the same manner, I found out
| the words, or names, which they gave to
| bread, and sugar, and butter, and meat,
and figs, and oranges, and lemons, and

pine-apples.

13. And now, perhaps, you may be able
| to find out how the little Spanish girl, men-
'| tioned in the last lesson, learned the meaning

of English words that she had never heard



aed

ad

—

-< ——$—$$—$$$ $$$ $$ ———
I I

|







PARKER'S SECOND READER. 33





until she came to live in the family where |
nothing but English was spoken.

14. She was obliged to listen, when any
one spoke, and watch to see what was
wanted; and in the same manner in which
I found out the meaning of O, and what to
call bread, and sugar, and butter, and meat,
and figs, and oranges, and other fruits, she |
learned tocall things by their English names.

15. But, in order to do this, she was
obliged to listen very attentively, to try to
remember every new name thatshe learned ;
and, by so doing, in less than a year she
could talk almost as plainly as any one in
the house.
| 16. It was very easy for her to learn the
|| names of things, because she heard them
spoken very often. Such words as chair,

table, water, sugar, cake, potato, pudding,
and other words which are the names of*
.
|
|

CE CC A tt
TT ee eee

things she could see, she learned very
|| quickly.
| 17. But such words as come and go, or
|| run and walk, and the little words to and
|| from, and over and under, or such words
as quickly and slowly, and many other W'<::
of the same kind, she could not learn s
easily.
18. In the next lesson perhaps you will |}
find out howshe learned the meaning of
these words.

















34 NATIONAL SERIES.
Fe eee lima

‘LESSON IX. |

The same subject, mtinued.



1. Tuere was a small family living very |
near to your residence, my young friends
who are reading this lesson, consisting of
the father, the mother, and four young chil-
dren. 7

9. The oldest was a boy of twelve years
old, the next was a little girl of about eight,
| the third was another pretty little girl of
| six, and the youngest was an infant boy,

only nine months old.
3. As you may well suppose, the baby,
ool as he was called, was the delight, not only
of the father and the mother, but also of
his elder brother and his two sisters.









ee a ——n



—

‘. PARKER'S SECOND READER.



a



4. The oldest brother had a dog whose |
name was Guido, —an Italian name, which ,
is pronounced as if it were spelt Gwe'do. |

5. The dog had learned tolovethedear |'
little baby as much as the rest of the fam- |
ily; and very often, when he was lying on f
the floor, the baby would pull his tail, or |
his ears, or put his little hand into the crea- |
ture’s mouth, and Guido would play as
gently with him as if he knew that the
baby was a very tender little thing, and
{| could not bear any rough treatment.

6. Nothing pleased the whole family,
|



and Guido among the rest, so much, as to
hear the baby try to say papa, and mamma,
and bub, and sis; for he could not say |
brother, nor sister, nor pronounce any other
words plainly.

7. The youngest sister was very fond of
making him say these words; and every
time the little creature repeated them to
her, she would throw her arms around his
little neck, and hug and kiss him with all |

| the affectionate love her little heart could ©
express. |
8. She often used to dress her little doll |



|
| as prettily as she knew how; tying its frock |
| on one day with a pretty blue ribbon, and on
another with a red one; for she had noticed, |
that whenever the doll was newly dressed,
|| the dear little baby would look very stead- |



‘

ae as nen od







4%*





ee, ae

36 NATIONAL SERIES.

a



| ily at it, and hold out its little arms towards
| it; and then she would carry it to her little
| brother, and say to him, ‘‘ Dolly, — pretty
| dolly, — bub want to see dolly r

' 9. One day she had dressed her doll in
a very bright new dress, with very gay rib-
bons, and was carrying it towards her father
to show it to him, when suddenly she heard
the baby cry out, ‘* Dolly !”’

10. She immediately ran with delight
to her little brother, holding up the doll in
its new shining dress, and repeated her
usual words, ‘‘ Dolly, — bub want dolly ?”’

11. The baby, delighted, looked up in its
mother’s face, and laughed, and crowed,
and giggled, and in its delight again re-
peated the word ‘‘ Dolly !”’

12. Pleased with her success, the little
sister was unwearied in her efforts to make
her little brother repeat other words; and
day by day she was gratified to find the
list of words which he lisped was growing
in length.

13. By the unwearied endeavors of
father, mother, brother and sisters, this |
pretty little baby, by the time that it was
three years old, could speak plainly any-
thing that was repeated to him, and had
learned thenamesofalmost everything that
he saw about the house, the yard, and the
street. :



NT ee cere ce ELL TT LL





ee

PARKER’S SECOND READER. 37





14. But it was observed that Guido,
the dog, although he could not speak a
werd, had also learned the names of many
things; and when George, the oldest son,
i told him to go and bring his ball to him,

Guido would wag his tail, and go up into

' George’s chamber, and look about the room
until he had found the ball; and then he
would run down the stairs, and dropping
the ball at his young master’s feet, look up
in his face, expecting that George would
throw it down for him to catch again.

——
——



ae —~ Reoe = _—_—- ——_—_
—S-RAGWARD SOD SF

15. The baby, however, learnt words |

and names much faster than Guido; for
although Guido knew as much as any dog.
knows, yet dogs are different creatures from







=
r

j
| 38 NATIONAL SERIES.
|





| children, and cannot learn so much nor so
fast as children can, because it has not
pleased God to give them the same powers.

16. Now, perhaps you may wish to know

| who this interesting family were of whom I
have been speaking; and you will probably
be surprised to learn, that all I have told
you about this little baby is true of every
little baby, and that the manner that every
infant is taught to speak is the same.

17. It is the same manner as that in
which the little Spanish girl, mentioned in
the seventh lesson, was taught to speak the
English language.



LESSON X.
Words. — ORIGINAL.

1. I Toxrp you, in the last lesson, how an
infant child first learned'to speak, when it
was taught by its father and mother, and
brother and sisters.

2. I intend to show you, in this lesson, ,
how the little child learned the meaning of
a great many words himself, without the as-
sistance of any one else. 7

8. He was very fond of Guido, the dog,
and watched everything he did, especially

*














—_—_—

“S



PARKER'S SECOND READER.



eee

when his brother George was playing with
him.

4, When George called Guido, and said
to the dog, ‘‘Come here, Guido,” the little

boy could not help noticing that Guido went

to George.

5. When George’s father or mother called
George, and said, ‘“‘ Come here, George,”
the little child saw that George went to his
father, or his mother.

6. Now, nobody told the little child what
George, or his father, or his mother, meant
by the word come ; but he always saw, that
when any one said to ancther, ‘6 Clome,”’
that the one who was spoken to always
moved towards the person who called him,
and in this way the little child found out
what his father or his mother meant by the
word come.

7. It was in this way, my young friend
who are reading this lesson, that you, your-
self, learned the meaning of most of the
words that you know.

8. When you were a little child, like
the infant of whom I have been speaking,
you knew no more about words, or about
speaking, than he did.

Sa ————————

9. But, by hearing ott:ers speak and use |}

words, you learned tousethem yourself; and
there is no word ever used, either in books

| Goa anywhere else, that you cannot Sind out





ee ET TT



| 40) NATYONAL SERIES.



its meaning, provided that you hear it used
frequently, and by different persons.

10. I will now give you an example, to

|, show you what I mean. I will give you a
word that you probably never heard of be-
fore ; and although I shall not tell you what
the word means, I think you will find it out
yourself, before you have read many more
lines of this lesson.

11. The word hippot is the word that I
shall choose, because I know tuat you do
not know the meaning of it; but I wish you
to read the following sentences in which
the word is used, and I think that you will
find out what hippot means, before you
have read them all.

12. In California, and in Mexico, and
in most parts of South America, there are
many wild hzppoi, which feed on the grass
| that grows wild there.

15. The Indians hunt the hippoi ; and
when they catch them, they tame them,

and put bridles on their heads, and bits in
‘| their mouths, and saddles on their backs,
and ride on them.

14. A carriage, with four white hippoz,
has just passed by the window, and one of
the hippot has dropped his shoe. The
coachman must take him to the blacksmith,
to have the shoe put on.

15. The noise which hippoi make is a

—



ET

-——
SL







SOA ee.

| split into two parts; but the hoofs of heppoi

——————————— —- -—

T° SA RT



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 4]





—_

very strange noise, and when they make it
they are said to neigh ( pronounced na).

16. The hoofs of cows and goats and
sheep and deer are cloven; that is, they are

are not split or cloven, and for that reason
they are called whole-hoofed animals.

17. My father has in his barn four
hippot. One of them is red, and has a short
tail; another is white, with afew dark hairs
in his mane, or long hair on the top of his
neck ; the third is gray, with dark spots on
his body; and the fourth is perfectly black,
and has a very long tail, which reaches
almost to the ground.

18. Now, from these sentences, I think

you willsee that Azppor does not mean cows,
or goats, or sheep, or deer; and I do not
think it necessary to tell you anything more
about it, except that it is a word that was
spoken by the Corinthians and the Colos-
sians and the Ephesians, the people to whom
St. Paul addressed those epistles or letters
in the Bible called by their names.
19. When you have read this lesson,
your teacher will probably ask you what
the word hippo: means; and I hope you will
be able to tell him that hippot means —
[here put in the English word for hippoi.]

slashes pineal teeeepsspiiobanctctnenettsatt geste celeron etnias siasip antennae
lagi a sas ---—— - Rennie J

— wee ee







{ 42 ! NATIONAL SERIES.

LESSON XI.
Definitions.

| J]. Iw the last lesson, I gave you a word |
| which you had not seen before, to find out
the meaning of it, without looking in a
dictionary.

2. I told you, in a former lesson, how the
Tittle Spanish girl found out the meaning
of words which she did not know; and



afterwards informed you how the infant
child was taught to speak.

3. Now, I doubt not that you can speak
a great many words, and know what they
mean when you use them; but I do not
think that you ever thought much about
the way in which you learned them.

4, Perhaps you will be surprised to hear
that everybody learns to talk and to use
words in the same way that the little Span-
ish girl and the little infant learned them;
that is, by hearing others use them in differ-
ent ways, just as the word Aippot was used |
in the last lesson.

5. Nobody ever told you, probably, the
meaning of a great many words that you

| know ; and yet you know them full as well,
and perhaps better, than if any one had told

‘| you about them.
6. Perhaps you have a brother whose |

ee TL
a re
a a eT









eo 8





PARKER'S SECOND READER. 43 |

4

he wished to ask them, and that he would.



| name is John, or George, or James, or a

or Lucy. You have always heard them
called by these names, ever since you, or
they, were quite young; and have noticed
that when John was called, that the one
whose name is John would answer; and as’
each one answered when spoken ‘to, you |
learnt which was John, and whiok was |
eT: and which was Lucy. |
7. So also, when a certain animal, having |
two lerge horns and a long tail, ana which |
is muked every night and morning, passed
by. you heard some one say cow ; and in this
way you learned what the word cow means.
8. So also, when water falls from the
sky in drops, little children hear people say |
it rains; and thus they find out what rain
means. |
9. Now, when anybody asks you what’
any word means, although you know it very ,
well, yet it is a very hard thing to tell |
what it means, — that is, to give a definition |
of it, —as you will see by the little story I |
am about to tell you.
10. A teacher, who was very anxious to '
make his scholars understand their lessons,
once told them he had a very hard question |

sister whose name is Mary, or Jane, or Ann,





let the one who auswered the question best |
take the head of af the class. he a









aie siaseagmengenmenaeteciateaneninrnee CPO EL
See ermine —EE

©
l~





an ne ——— nad

44 NATIONAL SERIES.







TT, atieweeeinnnemnniertateenciennenienet nena
| 1. This teacher never allowed any of
‘his pupils to speak to him without first
raising his right hand above his head, to
| signify that the child had something to say; |
‘and when any child raised his hand in this }
way, if he was not busy, he called upon the |} |
, child to say what he wished.

12. In this way he prevented the children
from troubling him when he was busy; and
in this way he also prevented them from in-
terrupting each other, as would be the case
if several of them should speak at once.

13. On the day of which I am about to
| speak, he said to them, Now, children, I
\ have a very hard question to ask you, that
does not require you to study, but only to
think about it, in order to answer it well;
and the one who gives me the best answer
shall go to the head of the class. The
question is this : What is a bird?

14. Before they heard the question, they
-Jooked very sober, and thought their mas-
| ter intended to puzzle them, or to give them
' a long sentence to commit to memory.
Butas soon as they heard the question, they
i began to smile among themselves, and won- |
oe how their teacher should call that a
‘ hard question.

15. A dozen hands were immediately
raised, to siguify that so many of the chil-
dren were ready to answer it.

——=





‘



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 45 |
Fa iepethaesienterataniansamminiomanaeenensionisartt

16. Well, John, said the teacher, sila
hand is up ; can you tell me what a bird is ? ||

17. John immediately rose, and stand-
ing on the right-hand side of his seat, said,
A bird is a thing that has two legs.

18. Well, said the teacher, suppose some
one should saw off two of the legs of my
chair ; it would then be a thing that has two
legs; but it would not be a bird, would it ?
You see, then, that your answer is not cor-
rect.

19. I will not mention the names of the
other children who raised their hands; but
I will tell you what the answers were
which some of them made to the questions,
and what the teacher said about each of
their answers. —

90. One of the children said that a bird
is an animal with two legs. But, said the



























LE NE

teacher, all little boys and girls, and all
|| men and women, are animals with two legs ;
|| but they are not birds.
. 91. Another child said that a bird is an
|} animal that has wings. But the teacher
said there cze some fishes that have wings,
| and that fisnes are not birds.
22. A bright little girl then modestly
rose and said, A bird is an animal that has
legs and wings, and that flies. The teacher

smiled upon her very kindly, and told her
| that it is true that a bird has legs and

eee









| 46 NATIONAL SERIES.

wings, and that it flies; but, said he, there
is another animal, also, that has legs and
wings, and that flies very fast in the air. It
is called a bat. It flies only in the night;
but it has no feathers, and therefore is not
| a bird.

23. Upon hearing this, another bright-
eyed child very timidly rose and said, A
bird is an anivial that has legs, wings and
feathers. Very well, said the teacher ;
but can you not think of anything else that
a bird has, which other creatures have not ?

24. The children looked at one another,
wondering what their teacher could mean;
and no one could think what to say, until
the teacher said to them, Think a moment,
and try to tell me how a bird’s mouth
looks. Look first at my mouth. You see
I have two lips, and these two lips form
my mouth. Now, tell me whether a bird
has two lips; and if he has not, what he
has instead of lips. ;

25. One of the children immediately
arose and said, that a bird has no lips, but
he has a bill; and that bill opens as the
lips of a man do, and forms the mouth of
|| the bird.

26. Yes, said the teacher; and now
iisten to me while I tell you the things you
should always mention, when you are asked

what a bird is, —



i





|
=

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 4





First, A bird is an animal.

Secondly, It has two legs.

Thirdly, It has two wings.

Fourthly, It has feathers. |

Fifthly, It has a hard, glossy bill.
27. And now, said the teacher, you see
that I was right when I told you that I had
a hard question to ask you, when I asked
What is a bird ?
28. Now, if you will join all of these
things which belong to a bird in the descrip-
tion which you give in answer to my ques-
tion, What is a bird, you will then give a cor-
rect definition of a bird, —that is, you will
tell exactly what a bird is, and no more,
and no less.
29. A bird is an animal covered with
feathers, having two legs, two wings, and
a hard, glossy bill.
30. When you are asked what anything
is, recollect what I have told you about a
bird, and try to recall everything that you
ever knew about the thing, and in this way
you will be able to give a satisfactory
answer.
31. This will also teach you to think,
and that is one of the most important ob-
jects for which you go to school. It will
enable you also to understand what you
read ; and you can always read those things
best which you understand well.

5*

ee 6 EC LL I LL AL TT

LT

———

A AL LLL LT





TT 6

NATIONAL SERIES.

LESSON XII. |
Reading and Spelling.







|

; AnorHER important thing for which
you go to school is to learn how to spell.
It is not always very easy to spell, because
there are so many different ways in which
the same letters are pronounced in differ-
ent words. )

2. That you may understand what I
mean, I shall give an example, to show you
how many different ways the same letters
are pronounced in different words; and
also another example, to show you how
many different ways there are of spelling
the same sylluble.

3. To show you, first, in how many dif-
ferent ways the same letters are pronounced
in different words, I shall take the letters
0, u, g, h.

4. The letters 0, u, g, h, are sounded
or pronounced like the letter o alone, in the
word though. The letters 0, u, g, h, are
pronounced like uf, in the word tough.

5. In the word cough, the letters 0, u,
g, h, are pronounced like off. In the words
slough and plough, the letters 0, u, g, h,
are pronounced like ow; and in the word
through, they are pronounced like ew, or ||

like w.

BS .d

—_—-







e_--



[ PARKER'S SECOND READER. 49







| 6. In the word hiccough the letters ough
jare pronounced like wp—and in the word
lowgh, the letters are pronounced like doh.
7. There are many words which end
with a sound like shun ; and this syllable
| is spelled in many different ways, as you
| will see in the following example.
| 8. Inthe words ocean, motion, mansion,
physician, halcyon, Parnassian, Christian,
‘and many other such words, the last sylla-
| ble is pronounced as if it were spelled shun.
9, You see, then, that in some words
| a syllable sounding very much like shun
|| is spelled





/




















céam, aS Nn ocean ;
in some it is spelled ¢éon, as in nation ;
|| in some it is spelled s¢on, as in mansion ;
|| in some it is spelled czan, as in physician ;
in some it is spelled cyon, as in halcyon ;
in some it is spelled szan, as in Parnassian.
| 10. It is s*ch things as these which
make both reading and spelling very hard
lessons for young children. If they think
of them all at once, as the pendulum did of
the eighty-six thousand times that it had
to swing in twenty-four hours, it 1s no won-
der if they feel discouraged, and say, I |
can’t get these hard lessons. |
11. But you must recollect that, as the
pendulum, every time it had to swing, had
a moment given it to swing Im, so you

a SSeSeSee
——

















se

oe LS i ee

50) NATIONAL SERIES.



also have a moment given you to learn
everything in; and if you get a little at a)
time, you will, in the end, finish it all, if it
be ever so large.

12. You have seen the workman en- ||
eaged in building a brick house. He takes |
one brick at a time, and lays it on the mor- ||
tar, smoothing the mortar with his trowel ;
and then he takes another brick, and an- |;
other, until he has made a Jong row for the ||
side of the house.

13. He then takes anocher brick, and
lays that on the first row; and continues
laying brick after brick, until the house |}
gradually rises to its proper height.

14. Now, ifthe workman had said that 3
he could never lay so many bricks, the
house would never have been built; but he |}
knew that, although he could lay but one |}
brick at a time, yet, by continuing to lay
them, one by one, the house would at last
be finished.

15. There are some children, who live
as much as a mile, or a half of a mile,
from the school-house. If these children
were told that they must step forward with ||
first one foot and then the other, and must
take three or four thousand steps, before
they could reach the school-house, they
would probaoly be very much discouraged,

: Levery_morning, before they set out, and
















| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 51

would say to their mothers, Mother, I can’t
go to school, —it is so far; I must put out
one foot, and drag the other after it, three
thousand times, before I can get there.

16. You see, then, that although it may
appear to be a very hard thing to learn
to read and to spell so many words as there
are in large books, yet you are required to
learn but a few of them at atime; and if
there were twice as many as there are, you
will learn them all, in time.

17. I shall tell you a story, in the next
lesson, to show you how important it is to
know how to spell.

——@——__

LESSON XIII.
Importance of Learning to Spell.—

ORIGINAL VERSION.

1. A RicH man, whose education had
been neglected in early life, and who was,
of course, very ignorant of many things
which even little boys and girls among us
now-a-days know very well, lived in a
large house, with very handsome furniture
in it.

2. He kept a carriage, and many ser-
vants, some of whom were very much bet-
ter educated than he was himself. _|









~~





52 NATIONAL SERIES



—_———

8. This rich man had been invited out
mavy times to dine with his neighbors ;
ang he observed that at the dinners to
which he was invited there were turkeys,
and ducks, and chickens, as well as par-!
tridges, and quails, and woodcocks, to-
gether with salmon, and trout, and pickerel,
__ with roasted beef, and lamb, and mutton,
and pork.

4, But he noticed that every one seemed
to be more fond of chickens than anything
else, but that they also ate of the ducks
and the turkeys.

5. He, one day, determined to invite his
friends to dine with him, in return for their
civilities in inviting him; and he made up
his mind to have an abundance of those
things, in particular, of which he had ob-
served his friends to be most fond.

6. He accordingly sent his servant to
market, to buy his dinner ; and, for fear the
servant should make any mistake, he wrote ||,
his directions on paper, and, giving the
paper, with some money, to the servant, he
sent him to the market.

". The servant took the paper and
the money, and set off. Just before he
reached the market, he opened the paper,
to see what his master had written. |

8. But his master wrote so very badly, |

it took him a long time to find out what was





otune ES SS TT

“y



eT



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 53







a —



written on the paper; but, at last, he con
trived to make it out, as follows:
' 9, ‘Dukes would be preferred to Turks;
| but Chittens would be better than either.”

10. What his master meant by dukes,
and turks, and chittens, he could not guess.
No such things were for sale at the market,
and he did not dare to return home with-
out buying something.

11. As he could find nothing like dukes
nor turks, he happened to see a poor woman
carrying home a basket full of kittens. This
was the most like chittens of anything he
could find; and not being able to get what
his master had written for, he thought his

| master meant kittens. He therefore bought
the basket of kittens, and carried them

home for his master’s dinner.

|



LESSON XIV.

Demos'thenes. —— ORIGINAL.

| 1. Tuere lived, a great many years ago,
' in Athes, one of the most renowned cities
of Greeve, a very celebrated orator, whose
name was Demos thenes.
2. But you will not understand what an
orator is, until you are told that it means a







| 54 NATIONAL SERIES.





of people, to persuade them what to do, or |
to give them information, or good advice.

8. Thus, when a minister or clergyman
preaches a good sermon, and speaks in such || |
a manner as to please “ll who hear Kim, | |
convincing them of the. duty, and per- if
suading them to do it, he is called an
orator. |

4. Demos’thenes was not a clergyman,
or minister, but he spoke before large assem-
blies of the Athenians, and they were very
much delighted to hear him. Whenever it
was known that he intended to speak in |
public, every one was anxious to hear him.

5. Now, I wish to show you how hard |
he worked, and what he did, to become a |
great orator.

6. In the first place, then, he had a very
weak voice, and could not speak loud
enough to be heard by a large assembly ;
and, besides this, he was very much troubled |
with shortness of breath. These were very
great discouragements, and had he not
labored very hard to overcome them, he |
never could have succeeded. | |

“. To cure his shortness of breath, he
used to go up and down stairs very fre-
quently, and run up steep and uneven
places; and to strengthen his voice, he
| often went to the sea-shore, when the
waves were very noisy and violent, and

EE






























IR







el
—$—$———





PARKER’S SECOND READER. 55

a ect ne ete
talked aloud to them, so that he could hear
his own voice above the noise of the waters.




! eae = = ey x fy. oe ca
ART = ( Mi} {Vf 4 we
Dns is ity,

Vf OY b “ AM

pid Up Ae, or)
- aay ep
a y Y

= fe eel em te
TS . > FT een 7 4 4
Ra Nay st
eR Aer AN Bees "Ss
Rev, Ney

UR: f
~ Powel.
SUR
a 4 ~ be SH y

8. He could not speak the letter r plainly,
but pronounced it very much as you have
heard some little boys and girls pronounce
it, when they «ay a wed wose for a red rose,
or a wipe cherwy instead of a ripe cherry.

9. Besides this, he stammered, or stut-
tered, very badly. To cure himself of
these faults in speaking, he used to fill his
mouth full of pebbles, and try to speak
with them in his mouth. |




10. He had a habit, also, of making up
‘faces, when he was trying to speak hard
words ; and, in order to cure himself of this,
he used to practice speaking before a look-








|

!
}
{







——-—_—..

56 NATIONAL SERIES. i









_—



ing-glass, that he might see himself, and
try to correct the habit.

11. To break himself of a habit he had
of shrugging up his shoulders, and making |
himself appear hump-backe4, he hung up a
sword over his back, so tht it might prick

him, with its sharp point, whenever he |
did so.

; wy PON
Ui? itt 3

NAN eT)

Â¥ : ea Y//
Oh ane
ae Nien



12. He shut himself up in a eave under
ground, and, in order to confine himself
there to his studies, he shaved the hair off |
of one half of his head, so that he might
be ashamed to go out among men.

13. It was in this way that this great
man overcame all of his difficulties, and, at
last, became one of the greatest orators
that have ever lived.

————





cr









14. Now, whenever you have a hard
lesson to read, or to study, think of De-
mos thenes, and recollect how he overcame
all his difficulties, and I think you will find
that you have few things to do so hard as
| these things which he did. |
15. When your teacher requests you to
put out your voice and speak loud, remem-
| ber what Demos’thenes used to do to
strengthen his voice, and you will find
very little trouble in speaking loudly enough
to be heard, if you will only try.

LESSON XV.
Hard Words.

1. Ix one of the former lessons, you
were taught how to rea@ long and hard
words, by taking them to pieces, and read-

| ing a part of a word at a time.

2. I promised you also that this book

|| should not be filled with hard words; but I
| did not promise that there should be no
|| hard words in it.

|| 3. Having taught you how to read hard
'| words, I propose, in this lesson, to give you

| a few long words to read, —not for the pur-

| pose of understanding what they mean, but

-__—.

PARKER’S SECOND READER. 57






|







































58 NATIONAL SERIES.



only to make you able to read such words,
when you find them in ony other book.

4. The best way of getting rid of all
difficulties, is to learn how to overcome
them, and master them; for they cease to
be difficulties, when you have overcome
them.

5. Demos’thenes, as I told you in the
last lesson, had a very hard task to per-
form, before he became a great orator.
You, also, can become a good scholar, if
you will take pains to study your lessons,
and learn them well.

6. Before you read any lesson to your
teacher from this book, it is expected that
you will study it over, and find out all the
most difficult words, so that you may read
them right off to him, without stopping to
find them out, while he is waiting to hear
you read them.

7. Now, here I shall place a few hard
words for you to study over, to read to
your teacher when you read this lesson to
him; and he will probably require every
one in your class to read them all aloud
to him.

8. I wish you not to go up to your
teacher to ask him to assist you, until you

that you cannot.



|| have tried yourself to read them, and i




9. There are some words that are not ||



—— + _ eG
ee ET TT

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 59

pronounced as they are spelt, as I have
taught you in a former lesson.

10. Such a word as phthisic, which is
pronounced as if it werespelled ¢is’¢c,I dare |
say would puzzle you, if you had never |
seen it before; but before you go up to your |
teacher, to ask him any questions, you
should read over the whole of your lesson,
and perhaps you will find, in the lesson
itself, something that will explain what puz-
zled you; and thus you could find it out
from your book, without troubling your
teacher.

11. Here are some of the long words I
wish you to read.

12. Organization, Theoretical, Meta-
physical, Metempsychosis, Multitudinous,
Arithmetician, Metaphysician, Hyperboli-
cal.

13. Apotheosis, Indefeasible, Feasibil-
ity, Supersaturated, Prolongation, Meridi-
onal, Ferruginous, Fastidiousness.

14. Haberdashery, Fuliginous, Exhala-
tion, Prematurely, Depreciation, Appre-
ciability, Resuscitate, Surreptitious, Inter-
‘locutory.

15. Sometimes the letters a e, and o é,
are printed together, like one letter, as in
the words Ceosar, Coelebs, and then the vr
lable is pronounced as if it werespelled

| With e alone, as in the following words ¢ |.

6* ne ee

TS a TT TT
it










rN

i









60

—_———_

NATIONAL SERIES.



16. Diszresis, Apheeresis, Scumen-
ical, AXthiop, Subpoena, Encyclopedia,
Phoenix, Phoebus, AXolus.

17. When there are two little dots over
one of the letters, they are both to be
sounded, as in the word Aérial, which is
pronounced a-e-ri-al.

18. The letter ¢ is one which puzzles
many young persons who are learning to
read, because it is sometimes pronounced

like s, as in the word cent + and they do not |
know when to pronounce it like k, and
when to sound it like s.

19. But if you will recollect that c is
sounded like & when it stands before the
letters a, 0, or u, and that it is sounded
like s before the letters é, 2, and y, you

like k, as in the word can, and sometimes



will have very little trouble in reading

words that have the letter ¢ in them.
20). So also the letter g has two sounds,
called the hard sound, and the soft sound:

The hard sound is the sound given to it in‘.

the word gone ; the soft sound is that which
is heard in the word gentle.

21. The same rule which you have just
learnt with regard to the letter ¢ applies to
the letter g. It has its hard sound before
a, 0, and uw, and its soft sound before €, 8,





SS







and y.
922 There are, it is true, some words |

LS tceeensiithiditineen eee -



—_ Fc cee
oe ee eee en

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 61



6







where this rule is not applied; but these
words are very few, so that you may safely
follow this rule in most words.

23. The letters ph are sounded like /,.
The letters ch are sounded sometimes like
|| &, asin the words loch and monarch, and
|] sometimes like sh, as in the words chaise
‘|| and charade ; and they have sometimes a
sound which cannot be represented by any
other letters, as in the words charm and
chance.

24. I suppose that you have probably
learned most of these things which I have
now told you in your spelling-book ; but I
have repeated them in this book, because
|| [ have so often found that little boys and



learned,

25. If you recollect them all, it will do
you no harm to read them again, but it
will impress them more deeply on your
| memory. But if you have forgotten them,
| this little book will recall then to your
| mind, so that you will never forget them.
| 26. I recollect, when I was a little boy,
that the letter y used to trouble me very









much when it began a word, and was not
followed by one of the letters which are
called vowels, namely, a, e, 1, 0, u. I
knew how to pronounce Ya, Ye, Yt, YO, yu s

nd §

_— LO CTCL ttt

girls are very apt to forget what they have |

but one day, when I was studying a lesson |

OAL Ct

LLL tense enepeatea







| 62 NATIONAL SERIES. T

——— A —

in geography, I saw a word which was
spelt Y, p, r, e, 8, which puzzled me very
much.

27. I knew that the letters p, 7, e, s,
would spell pres, but I did not know what |)
to call the y. After studying it a long |
time, I found that the letter y, in that word ||,
and some others, was to be pronounced
like the long e, and that the word was
pronounced pres, though itwas spelled
5, 00%, & 4%.

28. Perhaps you will be able, when you
grow up, to write a book; and to tell little
boys and girls who go to school, when you
have grown up, how to read hard words, bet-
ter than I have told you.

29. If you wish to do so, you must try
to recollect what puzzles you most now,
and then you, will be able to inform them
how to get over their difficulties and
troubles at school; and when they grow
up, Lhave no doubt that they will feel very |,
grateful to you for the assistance you have |
given them. P | |





f





LESSON XVI.

fire,*—a Conversation between a Mother
and her litile Daughter.



oT << 7p

a
(ae SAE Se eS
!

OTL
y | Y=

\\
ti
Y\\t)
' c
NN
Row
nah go

=i

7 Naat
7 NG

Nw. ARR SCS

Daughter. Mother dear, you told me,
the other. day, that nobody knows what
light is, except the Great Creator. Now,
can you tell me what fire is ? ;

Mother. I fear, mychild, that you have
asked another question which I cannot
citi ities tcneihitiiah alia aiik tiniest. e

* This lesson, together with the two following lessons, is
taken from a little book, called * Juvenile Philosophy,’’ pub-
lished by Messrs. A. S. Barnes & Co., 51 John-street, New
York. It consists of nine conversations, between a little

girland her mother, on the subjects, Rain, Color, Vision or
Sight, the Eye, Light, Fire, Heat and Wind.



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 63 |

——————————X———_—[_[_[_=£_£_=_=[__{__{D I



LE ~ — S



a

64 NATIONAL SERIES.

directly answer. What fire is, is known
only by its effects.

Daughter. And what are its effects,
mother ?

Mother. Some of its effects are as well
known to you, my dear, as they are to me;
and I shall, in the first place, call to your
recollection what you yourself know about
fire, before I attempt to give you any
further information in relation to it.

Daughter. Why, mother, I am sure I
do not know what fire is.

Mother. No, Caroline, I know that you
do not know what fire is; neither do I, nor
does any one, except the Great Creator
himself. This is one of his secrets, which,
in his wisdom, he reserves for himself.

But you certainly know some of the
effects of fir r instance, you know
that when been out into the cold,
you wish, on your return, to go to the fire.
Now, can you tell me what you go to the
fire for ?

- Daughter. Why, certainly, mother ; Buk
go to the fire to warm myself.

Mother. And how does the fire warm
you, my dear ?

Daughter. Why, it sends out its heat,
mother ; and I hold out my hands to it, and
feel the heat.




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—_—_—



2 TT, — eM! oaeate edit! *
—_—_—_-—

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 6
Mother. And where does the heat come
from, Caroline ?

Daughter. Why, the heat comes from
the fire, mother.

Mother. Then, my dear, you know at
least one of the effects of fire. It produces,
or rather sends out, heat.

Daughter. But does not the fire make
the heat, mother ?

Mother. If you had a little bird, or a
mouse, in a cage, and should open the door
and let it out, should you say that you
|| made the little bird, or the mouse ?

Daughter. Say that I made them, moth-
er ?—- why, no; certainly not. I only let
them go free. God madethem. You told
me that God made all things.

Mother. Neither didithe fire make the
heat. It only made if omewhat in }
the same manner that you |
bird or the mouse free, by opemimg the door
of the cage. . _

Daughter. Why, mothwz, is heat Kept in
cages, like birds or mice ?

Mother. No, my dear, not exactly in
cages, like birds or mice ; but a great deal
closer, in a different kind of cage.

Daughter. Why, mother, what sort of a
cage can heat be kept in ?

Mother. I must answer your question,
Caroline, by asking you another. When j

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“_— NATIONAL SERIES.

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Alice makes her fire in the kitchen, how
does she make it ?

Daughter. She takes some wood, or some
coal, and puts under it some pine wood,
which she calls kindling, and some shav-
ings, and then takes a match and sets the
shavings on fire, and very soon the fire 1s
made.

Mother. But does she not first do some-
thing to the match?

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Daughter. O, yes; I forgot to say that
|| she lights the match first, and then sets fire
| to the shavings with the lighted match.

|| Mother. But how does she light the
' match, my dear ?

i » Daughter. Why, mother, have you never

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—



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 67
seen her? She rubs one end of the match
on the box, where there is a little piece of
sand-paper, and that sets the match on fire.

Mother. Is there any fire in the sand-
paper, Caroline ?
| Daughter. Why, no, mother; certainly
| not.

Mother. Was there any fire in the match,
before she lighted it ?

Daughter. Why, no, mother; if there
had been, she would have had no need to
light it.

Mother. You see, then, that fire came
when she rubbed the match against the
sand-paper; and that the fire was not in the
sand-paper, nor in the match.

Daughter. Yes, mother, but I did not
see where it came from.

Mother. I am going to explain that to
you, my dear, in the next lesson.

LESSON XVII.
The same subject, continued.

Mother. Did you ever see a person rub
his hands together, when he was cold ?

Daughter. O yes, mother, a great many

times. I have seen father come in from the ||

—



| 68 NATIONAL SERIES.

ihtsionishtsietneveeineysnmenersunyasmteaitseiesoepeanbiaaitmunisssastiss,
cold, and rub his hands together, and after-
wards hold them to the fire and rub them
again, and then they get warm.

Mother. And now, Caroline, take your
hand and rub it quickly backwards and for-
wards, over that woolen table-cloth, on the
table in the corner of the room, and tell me
whether that will make your hand warm.

Daughter. O, yes, dear mother ; I feel |
it grow warmer, the faster I rub it.

Mother. Here are two small pieces of
wood. Touch them to your cheek, and
tell me whether they feel warm now.

Daughter. They do not feel warm, nor
cold, mother.

Mother. Now rub them together quickly
a little while, and then touch them to your
cheek.

Daughter. O, dear,
mother! they are so hot
that they almost burnt my
cheek.

Mother. Yes, Caroline;
and do you not recollect,
when you read Robinson
Crusoe, that his man Fri-























light her fire and the lamp in | the ‘same |

-







Daughter. O, yes, dear mother; and I i
have often wondered why Alice: could not |:

oS



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PARKER’S§ SECOND READER. 69 |



























manner, without those matches, which have |
so offensive a smell.

Mother. It is very hard work, my dear,
' to obtain fire by rubbing two pieces of wood
together ; and it would take too long a
time to do it. The two pieces of wood
would grow warm by a very little rubbing ;
but in order to make them take fire, they |
must be rubbed together a great while.

Daughter. But, mother, if it takes so
long a time to get fire by rubbing two
pieces of wood together, why can Alice set
the match on fire so easily by rubbing it
once on the sand-paper ?

Mother. That is what I am about to ex-
plain to you, my dear. Here, take this
piece of paper and hold it up to the lamp.

Daughter. It has taken fire, mother.

Mother. Now take
this piece of pine wood,
and hold that up to the

‘lamp in the same man-
ner, and see whether
that will take fire too.

Daughter. Yes, mo-
ther, it has taken fire ;
| . but I had to hold it up

to the how much longer than I did the
paper.

Mother. Now take this piece of hard
wood, and do the same with that.











NATIONAL SERIES.

|
|
|



we

Daughier. The hard wood takes longer
still to catch fire, mother.

Mother. Yes, my child, And now I am |’

going to make the hard wood take fire more
quickly than the paper did.

Daughter. Dear mother, how can you do
it ?

Mother. I am going to show you, my
dear. Here is a small phial, which con-
tains something that looks like water. It
is spirits of turpentine. I shall dip the
point of the piece of hard wood into the
phial, and take up a little of the spirits of
turpentine. Now, Caroline, touch the
point of the hard wood with the turpentine
on it to the flame. e!

Daughter. Why, mother, it caught fire
as soon as I touched the flame with it !

Mother. Yes, certainly ; and you now
see that some things, like the spirits of tur-
pentine and the paper, take fire very readi-
ly, and others take fire with more difficulty.

Daughter. Yes, mother ; but when Alice
drew the match across the sand-paper,
there was no flame nor fire to touch it to.
How, then, could it take fire? .

Mother. Hold this piece of paper up to
the blaze of the lamp, my dear, but be
careful not to touch the fire or flame of the
lamp; only hold it close to the blaze.

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| PARKER'S SECOND READER. we





Daughter. Why, mother, it has ‘Silk
fire !

Mother. You see, then, that a thing will
sometimes take fire when it does not touch ,
the fire.

Daughter. Yes, mother; but I do not
understand where the fire comes from.

Mother. The fire comes from the heat,
'| my dear. Now, you know that heat is pro-
| duced by rubbing two things together ; and

that some things, like the spirits of turpen-
tine, take fire very easily, or with very
little heat ; and others, like the hard wood,
require to be heated some time, —or, in other

Se

words, require much heat, — to make them
take fire, or to bud. Some things require
only as much heat to make them take fire
as can be obtained by rubbing them to-
gether very quickly, like the wood which |
Robinson Crusoe’s man Friday used. |

Daughter. But, mother, the match is |
made of wood, — why does that take fire
so easily ? |

Mother. It is true, Caroline, that the |
match is made of wood; but it has some- |
thing at the,end of it, which takes fire
much more!easily than the spirits of tur-_
pentine. Indeed, so easily does it take fire, |
that it requires only so much heat to set it.
on fire as can be obtained by drawing the |
match once across the sand+paper.

~ et cL CC LL LL LLL EOL LL TI
i ee









| 72



NATIONAL SERIES.





Daughter. But, mother, matches do not
always take fire. I have seen Alice rub
several across the sand-paper, before she
could set one on fire.

Mother. ‘That is true, and the reason of
this is, that the matches are not all well
made. Now, if I should take several pieces
of hard wood and tie them together, and
dip their ends into the spirits of turpen-
tine, what would happen, if. the ends of
some of the pieces did not touch the spirits
of turpentine, because I had not tied them |
together with their points all even ?

Daughter. Why, mother, some of them
would take fire easily, because the points
had the spirits of turpenting: on them ;
while those which did not tough the spirits
could not be lighted so easily. -

Mother. So it is, my dear, with the
matches. They are all dipped into the sub-
stance which takes fire so easily ;. but some
of the ends do not reach the substance, and
do not become coated with it, and therefore
they will not light more easily than the
|| pine wood of which they ere made.





1 a





es

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 73 ||



















LESSON XVII. _
The same subject, concluded.

Daughter. Well, mother, I understand,
now, how the match is set on fire. It is
rubbed on the sand-paper, and that pro-
duces heat, and the heat sets the match on
fire. But I always thought that fire makes

heat, and not that heat makes fire.
| Mother. Heat does not always make fire,
Caroline ; for, if it did, everything would
be on fire.

Daughter. Everything on fire, mother!
why, what do you’mean ?

Mother. I mean, my dear, that every-

thing contains heat.
— Daughter. Everything contains heat,
mother, did you say? Why, then, is not
everything warm? Some things, mother,
are very cold; as ice, and snow, and that
marble slab.

Mother. Yes, my child, everything con-
tains heat, as I shall presently show you.
When Alice goes to make a fire in a cold |
day, she does not carry the heat with her, ,
and put it into the fire, nor into the wood, |!

nor the voal, does she ?
|| Daug iter. Why, no, to he sure not, ’

mother.

_Mother.

And the heat that comes from





——
a

ee eerste
| 74 NATIONAL SERIES.

the fire, after it is made, does not come in
at the windows, nor down the chimney,
does it ?

| Daughter. Why, no, mother; it feels
cold at the windows, and cold air comes
down the chimney.

Mother. But, after the fire is made, we
feel much heat coming from the fire, do we
not? *

Daughter. Why, yes, mother; that is |)
| what the fire is made for. We feel cold,
and we want a fire to make us warm; and
when the fire is made, it sends out heat,
and makes us warm.

Mother. Well, now, where can the heat
come from? You know what fire is made

from, do you not ?

Daughter. Certamly, mother; the fire
is made of wood, or of coal.

Mother. But is the wood or the coal warm
before the fire is made ?

Daughter. No, mother, the wood and the
coal come from the cold wood-house, or the
cellar, and they are both very cold.

Mother. And yet, the wood and the coal
hecome very hot when they are on fire.

Daughter. O yes, mother, so hot that |
we cannot touch them with our hands, |
and we have to take the shovel or tke tongs |;
to move them. |

—_—_———_—_—--——.
——— TT TT A ane Sf” —_ SS

















PARKER'S SECOND REAI ER. 75

Mother. And do they burn the shovel
and the tongs, my dear?

Daughter. Why, no, mother; if they
did, the shovel and the tongs would be of
little use in stirring the fire.

Mother. Can you think of any reason why
they do not burn the shovel and the tongs !

Daughter. You told me, mother, that
some things require a very little heat to set
them on fire, and that other things require
a great deal. I suppose that there was not
heat enough to set them on fire; and if
there had been, they would not burn, be-
cause they are made of iron.

Mother. You are partly right, my dear,
and partly wrong. ‘They would not burn,
because there was not heat enough in the
fire to burn them. But there are very few
things, and in fact it may be doubted
whether there is anything, which will not
burn, when sufficient heat is applied. But
let us return to the fire: you say the heat
does not come from the windows nor from
the chimney, and you say, also, that the
wood and the coal are both cold. Now, |
where can the heat come from ?

Daughter. I am sure I cannot tell,
mother ; will you please to tell me?

Mother. You recollect that I told you
that the rubbing of the match on the sand-
paper produces a little heat, which caused



—S


















76 NATIONAL SERIES.

the match to burn. The match was then
applied to the shavings, and, as it was
burning, gave out heat enough to set the
shavings on fire; the shavings produced
heat enough to set the pine wood, or
kindling, on fire, and then the pine wood,
or kindling, produced more heat, and set
the wood and coal on fire. Now, there
was nothing to produce the heat but the
match, the shavings, the wood and the
coal; and the heat must have been in them.
The fire only served to set it free, and let
it come out of the match, the wood, and the
coal.

Daughter. But, mother, how did the
heat get into the wood and coal ?

Mother. It is not known, my dear, how
the heat got into the wood and coal, any
more than how the fruit gets on to a tree.
We say that it grows on the tree; but
what growing is, and how it is caused, are
among the secrets of God.

Daughter. If the heat is in the wood and
the coal, mother, why do we not feel it in
them? They both feel cold. I cannot
perceive any heat in them.

Mother. The heat is in the wood and the |
coal, although you do not see it. Do%
see any smoke in the wood and the coal,
my dear ?

aka Daughter. _No, mother, I do not.

—



PARKER'S SECOND READER. (7

Mother. Did you never see a stick of
wood fall on the hearth from the kitchen
fire, and see the smoke coming from it ?



Daughter. O yes, mother, very often ;
and the smoke goes all over the room, and
into my eyes, and makes the tears come
into my eyes.

Mother. And can you see the smoke in
the wood before the wood is put on the
fire ?

Daughter. No, mother, I am sure I
cannot.

Mother. But you are sure that the smoke
comes from the wood, are you not ?

Daughter. O yes, mother; I see it com-
ing right out of the wood.

- Mother. Then, my dear, I suppose you
know that if there is something in the wood





















NATIONAL SERIES.



and coal, which you call smoke, although
you cannot see it until it comes out, you
can easily conceive how another thing,
which we call heat, can be in the wood and
coal, which we cannot perceive until it is
made to come out.
Daughter. O yes, mother ; how wonder-
ful it is!
Mother. Yes, my dear, all the works of
God are wonderful; and what is very sur-
prising is, that many of his most wonderful
works are so common, so continually before
our eyes, that we do not deem them won-
derful until we have been made to think
much about them, by talking about them, |
as you and | have talked about the rain, |,
and the clouds, and light,. and its colors.
Daughter. I have been thinking, mother,
about Alice and the fire. You told me
that the fire did not make the heat, any
more than I make the little mouse or the
bird when I open the cage door and let
them out. I see now how it is. Alice
brings the wood and the coal into the
kitchen fireplace, and the match lets the
heat out of the shavings, and the shavings |
let it out of the wood and the coal, until we
get heat enough to make us warm.
Mother. Yes, my dear; and there is no,
more heat in the room after the fire is made
than there was before, — only, before the |

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earl)’, and help them cut down the corn.
maaan iain 09

Seema
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 79

fire was made, the heat was hid, and we
could not perceive it; but when the fire is
made, it makes the heat come out, and
makes it free, just as I make the little bird
free, by opening his cage door.



LESSON XIX.

The Lark and her Young Ones. — Altered
from Adsop.

j. A Lark having built her nest in a
corn-field, the corn grew ripe before the
young ones were able to fly. Fearing that
the reapers would come to cut down the
corn before she had provided a safe place
for her little ones, she directed them every
day, when she went out to obtain their food,
to listen to what the farmers should say
about reaping the corn.

2. The little birds promised their mother
that they would listen very attentively, and
inform her of every word they should hear.

3. She then went abroad; and on her
return, the little birds said to their mother,
Mother, you must take us away from here ;’
for while you were gone we heard the
farmer tell his sons to go and ask some of
his neighbors to come to-morrow morning











80 - NATIONAL SERIES.

neces aensniensnsniittos
4. Is that what he said? asked their
mother. Yes, mother, said the little birds ;
and we are very much afraid that you can-
not find a safe place for us before the
‘farmer and his neighbors begin to cut down
the corn. |

5. Do not be afraid, my children, said |
the lark ; if the farmer depends on his neigh-
bors io do his work for him, we shall be |
safe where we are. So lie down in the
nest, and give yourselves no uneasiness.

6. The next day, when the mother went
out for food, she directed the little ones
again to listen, and to tell her all that they
should hear.

”. In the evening, when she returned,
the little ones told her that the farmer’s
neighbors did not come to assist him on
that day ; and that the farmer had told his
sons to go and request his friends and rela-
tions to come and assist him to cut down
the corn, early in the next day morning.

8. I think, my children, said the lark,

we shall still be safe here; and we will,
‘therefore, feel no anxiety or concern to-
night.
9. On the third day, the mother again
charged the young larks to give her a
faithful report of what was done and said,
while she was absent.

10. When the old lark returned that |

A I

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————



—_—-

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 81 |,





eS

evening, the little larks told her that the
farmer had been there, with his sons, early
in the morning; but, as his friends and
relations had not come to assist him, he had
directed his sons to bring some sharp sickles
early in the next morning, and that, with
their assistance, he should reap the corn
himself.

11. Ah! said the mother, did he say so ?
Then it is time for us to prepare to be gone ;
for when a man begins to think seriously
of doing his work himself, there 1s some
prospect that it will be done; but if he
depends on his friends, his neighbors, or his
relations, no one can tell when his work
will be done.

12. Now, this little story is called a
Fable. It cannot be true, because birds
do not and cannot speak.

13. But, although it is not true, it is a
very useful little story, because it teaches
us a valuable lesson: and that is, that it is
best to do our own work ourselves, rather
than to depend upon others to do it for us ;
for, if we depend upon them, they may dis-
appoint us, but whatever we determine to
do for ourselves, we can easily accomplish,
if we go right to work about it.



ee




























82 NATIONAL SERIES.

LESSON XxX.

Dogs. — ORIGINAL.

1. I never knew a little boy that was
not fond of a dog, and I have never seen
many dogs which were not fond of little
children.

2. It is not safe for little children to
touch every strange dog that they see, be-
cause some dogs are naturally rather cross,
and may possibly bite any one who touches
them, when they do not know the persons.

3. But when a dog knows any one, and
sees that his master is fond of that person,
he will let such a person play with him.
He is always pleased with any attentions
that his master’s friends bestow on him.

4. Large dogs are generally more gentle
than small ones, and seldom bark so much
as the little ones do. They are also more
easily taught to carry bundles and baskets,
and draw little carriages for children to
ride in.

5). Some people are very much afraid of
dogs, because they sometimes run mad.
The bite of a mad dog produces a very
dreadful disease, called Hydropho’bia.

6. This is a long and hard word, and
means a fear of water. It is called by
that name because the person who has the



—————— eee





























83



PARKER'S SECOND READER.

disease cannot bear to touch or to see
water.

7. Dogs that are mad cannot bear to
see water. They run from it with dreadful |
cries, and seem to be in very great dis-
tress.

8. Whenever, therefore, a dog will drink
water, it is a pretty sure sign that he is not
mad.

9. This dreadful disease very seldom
affects dogs that are properly supplied with
water. |

10. Dogs require a great deal of water.
“They do not always want much at a time,
and it is’ seldom that they drink much.
But whoever keeps a dog ought always to
keep water in such a place that the dog
may go to it to drink, whenever he re-
quires it.

11. A dog is a very affectionate animal,
and he will permit his master, and _ his
master’s children and friends, to do a great
many things to him, which he would per-
haps bite others for doing.

12. There are many very interesting
stories told of dogs, which show their love
and fidelity to their masters, which you
can read in a book called ‘‘ Anecdotes of
Dogs.”’

13. But there are a few little stories
about dogs that I know, which I will tell



s*



os

a EE

84 NATIONAL SERIES.





you, that are not contained in that book.
I know these stories to be true. |

14. My son had a dog, whose name was ||
Guido. He wes very fond of playing in |
the street with the boys, early in the morn- |
ing, before they went to school.

15. Guido was always very impatient
to get out into the street in the morning, to
join the boys in their sports; and all the
boys in the street were very fond of him.

16. He used to wake very early, and
go into the parlor, and seat himself im a
chair by the window, to look out for the
boys; and as soon as he saw a boy in
the street, he would cry and whine until
the servant opened the door for him to
go out.

17. One very cold morning, when the
frost was on the glass, so that he could not
see out into the street, he applied his
warm tongue to the glass, and licking from
it the frost, attempted to look out.

18. But the spot which he had made
clear being only large enough to admit one
of his eyes, he immediately made another,
just like it, in the same manner, for the |
other eye, by which he was enabled to.
enjoy the sight as usual. In the next les- |
son, I will tell you some other little stories |
of Guido, and another dog, whose name was

Don, that belonged to my daughter.

——



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 85 |}



|
LESSON XXII.

The same subject, concluded.

1. One day I went to take a walk, with
a friend of mine, in the country ; and Don,
the dog I mentioned in the last lesson, fol-
lowed us.

2. We walked to a little grove about a
mile from my house, to see the grave of a
beautiful little child, that was buried on the
summit of a little hill, covered with pies,
spruce and other evergreens.

3. While we were admiring the beauty
of the spot, Don was running about the
grove; and I completely lost sight of him,
and supposed that he had returned home.

4, But presently I saw him at a dis-
tance, barking up a tree at a squirrel that
had escaped from him.

5. As I turned to go home, I said to my
friend, You see Don is away, and does not
see me. I am going to drop my handker-
chief here, and send him after it.

6. We had got half way home, when
presently Don came bounding along, and
very shortly came up to us.

7. As soon as he came up to me, I
stopped, and feeling in my coat-pocket,
said to him, — Don, I have lost my pocket-
handkerchief, — go find it.

ae a a er











iii tmacitenretin pennies |
86 NATIONAL SERIES. t
8. I had scarcely uttered the words ||
before he was off. He was gone only two |}
or three minutes, and then, returning with |}
| my handkerchief in his mouth, he dropped }}
| it at my feet. |
9. Guido, the other dog, was very fond
of going into the water himself; but he
never would allow any one else to go in.
| 10. The reason was this. My little son ||
|| George was one day looking over into the |!
| water, to watch the eels that were gliding |
| through the water below, and losing his
balance, he fell into the water. )
11. No one was near except Guido, and |}
lhe immediately jumped in after George, ||
and, with great labor, brought him on shore,
and saved him from drowning.

12. Ever since that time, Guido has |
been very unwilling to let any one go near ||
the water. It seemed as if he had reasoned
about it, and said to himself, It is hard |}
work to drag a boy out of the water, but it |}
is much easier to keep him from going in. ||

13. Guido was not a very large dog.
He was of the breed, or kind, named
Spaniel; so called because that kind of

' dog originally came from Hispaniola. He

| had long ears, curling hair, a long bushy
tail, and webbed feet, like all dogs that are
fond of the water. |

14. Webbed feet are those in which the







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| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 87 ||
vinnestehabliaalatininhon stitch scat ods: ken wiathnee
toes are not separated, but seem to be
joined together by a thin substance, like
thick skin, which enables them to swim
more easily.

15. Don was a very large dog, of the
Newfoundland species, a kind which is re-
markable for its beauty and intelligence.




























Ss oeenennneet * ceemmmeememnel

LESSON XXII.
Frogs and Toads. — Biauanp.

1. Froas and toads resemble one another
in figure, but custom and prejudice have
taught us to make a very different estimate
of their properties: the first is considered
as perfectly harmless, while the latter is
supposed to be poisonous.

2. In this respect, the toad has been
treated with great injustice : it is a torpid,
harmless animal, that passes the greatest
part of the winter in sleep.

3. Astonishing stories have been told of
toads found in the center of solid blocks
of stone, and other similar situations, with-
out the least trace of the way by which
they entered, and without any possibility
of their finding any kind of nutriment.

4. Toads, as well as frogs, are of a
variety of species ; and in the tropical cli-





' esting particulars respecting a toad which







decimate


88 NATIONAL SERIES.
eee enamine
mates they grow to an enormous size.
It is very probable that they contribute
to clear both the land and the water of
many noxious reptiles of a diminutive size,
which might prove exceedingly hurtful to
man.

5 The toad, however, is one of the
most inoffensive of all animals. We have
even heard that it has sometimes been suc-
cessfully applied for the cure of the cancer,
the most dreadful, and one of the most
fatal, of human evils.

6. Mr. Pennant has related some inter-

was perfectly domesticated, and continued
in the same spot for upwards of thirty-six
years.

7. It frequented the steps before the
hall-door of a gentleman’s house in Devon-
shire ; and, from receiving a regular supply
of food, it became so tame as always to
crawl out of its hole in an evening, when
a candle was brought, and look up, as if
expecting to be carried into the house.

8. A reptile so generally detested being
taken into favor, excited the curiosity of
every visitant; and even ladies so far con-
quered their natural horror and disgust as
to request to see it fed. It seemed particu-
larly fond of flesh maggots, which were
kept for it in bran.

ee eee tt ES LL

eel



==





PARKER'S SECOND REALER. 89









9. When these were laid upon a table,
it would follow them, and, at a certain dis-
tance, would fix its eyes and remain mo-
tionless for a little while, as if preparing
for the stroke, which was always instanta-
neous.

10. It threw out its tongue to a great
distance, when the insect stuck by the glu-
tinous matter to its lip, and was swallowed
with inconceivable quickness.

11. After living under the protection of
its benefactor upwards of thirty-six years,
it was one day attacked by a tame raven,
which wounded it so severely that it died
shortly afterward.

12. The erroneous opinion of toads con-
taining and ejecting poison has caused
many cruelties to be exercised upon this
harmless, and undoubtedly useful tribe.
Toads have been inhumanly treated, merely |;
because they are ugly; and frogs have
been abused, because they are like them.

13. But, we are to observe, that our
ideas of beauty and deformity, of which
some arise from natural antipathies im-

‘ planted in us for wise and good purposes,
and others from custom and caprice, are of
a relative nature, and peculiar to ourselves.

14. None of these relative distinctions,
of great and small, beautiful or ugly, exist
| in the all-comprising view of the Creator







| 90 NATIONAL SERIES.
of the universe: in his eyes, the toad is
as pleasing an object as the canary-bird, or
the bulfinch.







LESSON XXIII.

Maida, the Scotch Greyhound. — Altered
from BINnGLEy.

~ :
* 2-2



eS
<0 posons?

1. A wovunn is a dog with long} smooth,
hanging ears, and long limbs, that enable
him to run very swiftly. The greyhound
is not so called on account of his color, but
from a word which denotes his Grecian
1 origi









——



PARKER'S SECOND READER.

a caseaneeeeqeepcin tN ee TC OTN TTT

92. The Scotch greyhound is a larger
and more powerful animal than the com-
mon greyhound; and its hair, instead of
being sleek and smooth, is long, stiff and
bristly. It can endure great fatigue.

8. It was this dog that the Highland
chieftains, in Scotland, used in former times,
in their grand hunting-parties.

4. Sir Walter Scott had a very fine dog
of this kind, which was given to him by |
his friend Macdonnel of Glengarry, the
chief of one of the Highland clans. His ||
name was Maida.

5. He was one of the finest dogs of the
kind ever seen in Scotland, not only on ac-
count of his beauty and dignified appear-



SS. aaa

ll ance, but also from his extraordinary size

baer a ne

and strength.
6. He was so remarkable in his appear-

|} ance, that whenever his master brought

him to the city of Edinburgh, great crowds
of people collected together to see him.

7. When Sit Walter happened to travel
through a strange town, Maida was usually
surrounded by crowds of people, whose curi-
osity he indulged with great patience, until
it began to be troublesome, and then he
gave a single short bark, as a signal that
they must trouble him no more.

8. Nothing could exceed the fidelity,
obedience and attachment, of this dog to

a nnn Ea EEERRREDyRNgaD
ee a





9



i 92 NATIONAL SERIES.
his master, whom he seldom quitted, and |!
on whom he was a constant attendant, when ||
traveling.

J. Maida was a remarkably high-spir- ||
ited and beautiful dog, with long black ||
ears, cheeks, back, and sides. The tip of
his tail was white. His muzzle, neck,
throat, breast, belly and legs, were also
white. |

10. The hair on his whole body and ||
limbs was rough and shaggy, and particu- ||
larly so on the neck, throat, and breast:
that on the ridge of the neck he used to |
raise, like a lion’s mane, when excited to
anger.

11. His disposition was gentle and ||
peaceable, both to men and animals; but ||
he showed marked symptoms of anger to
ill-dressed or blackguard-looking people,
whom he always regarded with a suspicious
eye, and whose motions he watched with
the most scrupulous jealousy.

12. This fine dog. probably brought on
himself premature old age, by the excessive
fatigue and exercise to which his natural
ardor incited him ; for he had the greatest ;
pleasure in accompanying the common
greyhounds ; and although, from his great
size and strength, he was not at all adapted ||
for coursing, he not unfrequently turned ||
and even ran down hares. :

i a



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PARKER'S SECOND READER. 93



13. Sir Walter used to give an amusing
account of an incident which befell Maida
in one of his chases. ‘I was once riding
over a field on which the reapers were at
work, the stooks, or bundles of grain, being
placed behind them, as is usual.

14. *‘* Maida, having found a hare, began
to chase her, to the great amusement of the
spectators, as the hare turned very often
and very swiftly among the stooks. At
length, being hard pressed, she fairly bolted
into one of them.

15. ‘* Maida went in headlong after her,
and the stook began to be much agitated
in various directions ; at length the sheaves
tumbled down, and the hare and the dog,
terrified alike at their overthrow, ran dif-
ferent ways, to the great amusement of the
spectators. ’’

16. Among several peculiarities which
Maida possessed, one was a strong aversion
to artists, arising from the frequent restraints
he was subjected to in having his portrait
taken, on account of his majestic appear- .
ance. “

17. The instant he saw a pencil and paper
produced, he prepared to beat a retreat ;
and, if forced to remain, he exhibited the
strongest marks of displeasure.

18. Maida’s bark was deep and hollow.

et ee we

en





















94 NATIONAL SERIES.



ing in a very tiresome way. When he
was very fond of his friends, he used to |;
grin, tucking up his whole lips and show-
ing all his teeth; but this was only when he
was particularly disposed to recommend
himself.

19. Maida lies buried at the gate of Ab-
botsford, Sir Walter’s country seat, which
he long protected; a grave-stone is placed
over him, on which is carved the figure of
a dog. It bears the following inscription,
as it was translated by Sir Walter:

“ Beneath the sculptured form which late you wore,
Sleep soundly, Maida, at your master’s door.”

——

LESSON XXIV.
Gelert. — Brnatey, altered.

1. I wave one more story to tell you
about the Highland greyhound. It is an
old Welsh story, and shows how extremely
dangerous it is to indulge in anger and re-
sentment.

2. In a village at the foot of Snowden,
a mountain in Wales, there is a tradition
that Llewellyn (pronounced Lewel'lin), son-
in-law to King John, had a res dence in
that neighborhood.















3. The king, it is said, had presented
him with one of the finest greyhounds in
England, named Gelert. In the year 1205,
Llewellyn, one day, on going out to huni,

called all his dogs together; but his favor-
ite greyhound was missing, and nowhere to
be found.

4. He blew his horn as a signal for the
chase, and still Gelert came not. Llewel-
lyn was much disconcerted at the heedless-
ness of his favorite, but at length pursued |
the chase without him. For want of Ge- |)
lert, the sport was limited; and getting
tired, Llewellyn returned home at an early
hour, when the first object that presented
itself to him, at his castle gate, was Gelert,
who bounded, with his usual transport, to
meet his master, having his lips besmeared
with blood.

5. Llewellyn gazed with surprise at the
anusual appearance of his dog. On going
into the apartment where he had left his
nfant son and heir asleep, he found the
bed-clothes all in confusion, the cover rent,
und stained with blood.

6. He called on his child, but no answer
was made, from which he hastily concluded
that the dog must have devoured him ; and,
viving vent to his rage, plunged his sword
to the hilt in Gelert’s side.

7. The noble animal fell at his feet, ut-

—_

Se PARKER'S SECOND READER. .
|

|



.
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— eee neeeneeeane mm tt et iheemnanas eieneion







| NATIONAL SBRIES. |

tering a dying yell, which awoke the infant,
who was sleeping beneath a mingled heap
of the bed-clothes, while beneath the bed lay
| a great wolf covered with gore, which the
faithful and gallant hound had destroyed.

8. Llewellyn, smitten with sorrow and
remorse for the rash and frantic deed which
had deprived him of so faithful an animal,
caused an elegant marble monument, with
an appropriate inscription, to be erected
over the spot where Gelert was buried, to
commemorate his fidelity and unhappy
fate. The place, to this day, is called
Beth-Gelert, or The Grave of the Grey-
hound.















——_¢@——___—_.

LESSON XXYV.

Knock Again. — Cuttp’s Companion.





1. I nememper having been sent, when
I was a very little boy, with a message
from my father to a particular friend of his,
who resided in the suburbs of the town in
which my parents then lived.

2. This gentleman occupied an old-
fashioned house, the door of which was ap-
proached by a broad flight of stone steps of ||

a semi-circular form. The brass knocker
was an object of much interest to me, in















pect ee
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 97

those days ; for the whim of the maker had
led him to give it the shape of an elephant’s
head, the trunk of the animal being the |
movable portion. |

3. Away, then, I scampered, in great
haste ; and having reached the house, ran
up the stone steps as usual; and, seiz-
ing the elephant’s trunk, made the house
reécho to my knocking. No answer was
returned.

4. At this my astonishment was consid-
erable, as the servants, in the times I write
of, were more alert and attentive than they
are at present. However, I knocked a
second time. Still no one came.

d. At this I was much more surprised.
I looked at the house. It presented no ap
pearance of a desertion. Some of the win-
dows were open to admit the fresh air, for
it was summer ; others of them were closed.
But all had the aspect of an inhabited
dwelling.

6. I was greatly perplexed ; and looked
around, to see if any one was near who could
advise me how to act. Immediately a ven-
erable old gentleman, whom I had never
seen before, came across the way, and,
looking kindly in my face, advised me to ,
knock again.

7. I did so without a moment’s hesita-

i tion, and presently the door was opened,

en a oe a ne — ——— = ee —_———

a







npc a SESS TSS SSS

NATIONAL SERIES.

























i

so that I had an opportunity of delivering ||
my message. I afterward learned that the
servants had been engaged in removing a
heavy piece of furniture from one part of
the house to the other ; an operation which
required their united strength, and pre
vented them from opening the door.



LESSON XXVI.
The same subject, continued.

1. As I was tripping lightly homeward,
I passed the kind old gentleman, about half
way down the street. He took me gently
by the arm; and, retaining his hold, began
to address me thus, as we walked on
together :

9. “The incident, my little friend,
which has just occurred, may be of some
use to you in after life, if it be suitably
improved. Young people are usually very
enthusiastic in all their undertakings, and
in the same proportion are very easily
discouraged. |

3. «Learn, then, from what has taken
place this morning, to persevere in the
business which you have commenced, pro-
vided it be laudable in itself; and, ten to
on3, you will succeed. If you do not at

we ee 6) 6 ae eS 6







PARKER'S SECOND READER.







eee ee

first obtain what you aim at, knock again.
A door may be opened when you least
expect it.

4. ‘In entering on the practice of a

profession, engaging in trade, or what is
usually called settling in the world, young
people often meet with great disappoint-
ments. }
d. ‘* Friends, whom they naturally ex-
pected to employ them, not unfrequently
prefer others in the same line; and even
professors of religion do not seem to con-
sider it a duty to promote the temporal in-
terest of their brethren in the Lord.

6. ‘* Nevertheless, industry, sobriety, and
patience, are usually accompanied by the
Divine blessing. Should you therefore, my
little friend, ever experience disappoint-
ments of this kind, think of the brass
knocker ; knock again; be sober, be dili-
gent, and your labors will be blessed.

7. ‘*In the pursuit of philosophy many
difficulties are encountered. These the
student must expect to meet; but he must
not relinquish the investigation of truth,
because it seems to elude his search. He
may knock at the gate of science, and
apparently without being heard. But let
him knock again, and he will find an
entrance.”’



















eS








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'2011-08-17T21:08:48-04:00'
describe
'373033' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQA' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
9e710f32a5ab351398af949135786ed3
0b01dfd0deaaf7134f114811247b88461da0e6c0
'2011-08-17T21:07:49-04:00'
describe
'25361' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQB' 'sip-files00005.pro'
0f3b9e9ba018d760623f46d550b8bf9c
b22eeb7a6bb1c725e477f10a6d84ee90e0045bb3
'2011-08-17T21:01:47-04:00'
describe
'129124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQC' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
41ebcc97da054e0af39154e4777aab4c
46e2254ce04d1a174b7f770b48973dda89563fc3
'2011-08-17T20:59:14-04:00'
describe
'7226705' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQD' 'sip-files00005.tif'
daf47761ac40d905a74457e6008e17db
b9b859ca2c09f0ec2ec1931d05a62eb88b533605
'2011-08-17T21:07:45-04:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQE' 'sip-files00005.txt'
c68937ac8d88426254a5e544741dd06c
b30b37d42eb29e5e17e4482951b14ba59ebc03a0
'2011-08-17T21:02:28-04:00'
describe
'45436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQF' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
30f4a6fd937bb75acc4d016260eef15d
7c68db4b394ae8539f047d17bcd742093b36322b
'2011-08-17T21:10:10-04:00'
describe
'926822' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQG' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
3b05932a854c9a106e039e0b9db39de6
9fb7c8455c6a10807b45fa61e00128fa6fc62fe2
'2011-08-17T21:08:21-04:00'
describe
'378955' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQH' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
904800c757cf5304321cd3b641d50b39
b6a232cc9327689ac2edc2c34ddfb4b6d906756f
'2011-08-17T21:01:20-04:00'
describe
'38334' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQI' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b58fa0825ee29387e78351094d3ad6d7
db198bd6a048ff95e2cd7f47a9021977b9c44999
'2011-08-17T21:06:32-04:00'
describe
'134279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQJ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
f8aa0f2410b55bede4dd0dc53749cc72
37bf98e809b5b75139f5314b38326dd3aca16d87
'2011-08-17T21:04:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQK' 'sip-files00006.tif'
390c89e3f7be0c48b521ad6d23cb5c27
64307ab1b2bc49322be0da5daa13ecf38fb9080f
'2011-08-17T21:03:59-04:00'
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQL' 'sip-files00006.txt'
b5df989dacfdf60f03aa8ba88cb4616d
f87826d25c9beafc73a53b7038b8c2d8588aacb2
'2011-08-17T21:10:04-04:00'
describe
'47645' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQM' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
561267d7752e8bc0208619af09c4069f
768f6c5f64b1821af35b815bfa76ef343df74041
'2011-08-17T21:03:52-04:00'
describe
'919498' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQN' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
bfe4d84e96be91371e85fc971567e184
bad2af873eae551f5b96b37deb5f91f9aceff21a
'2011-08-17T21:05:44-04:00'
describe
'387987' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
1a581de08f1d20978ed57036bd4c1a6a
58dbf2e228288dc5a47eb0eedbd944fb4a3244a0
'2011-08-17T21:06:23-04:00'
describe
'41593' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQP' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f8c11dff645e5091163648510908d890
9f9ce56168f66d6780d1a6b4e18ea782601be4db
'2011-08-17T21:01:54-04:00'
describe
'138038' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQQ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5e2c78f516dea478d55062cb1d355e06
13d70199aac4cc4f8fd239dc0438b98df2f76bac
'2011-08-17T21:02:26-04:00'
describe
'7365055' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQR' 'sip-files00007.tif'
870a97f0dca6ccb830155357d581f306
750ddff96751d9aa35ffdc23dc89c4d7ccbe74e4
'2011-08-17T21:00:48-04:00'
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQS' 'sip-files00007.txt'
43876b1690b1c51b99742b790bc395ae
dac20242cd57a35786cca3ce02baf19420afb8b6
'2011-08-17T21:02:11-04:00'
describe
'49236' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQT' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
1991fb9685d667a19b9c81b0869b0062
8a5352f578e0be3a015c216e29b25df7a1acc753
'2011-08-17T21:04:23-04:00'
describe
'926825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQU' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
81b2b490a0f2e76b0de6a91557cec18e
002e75e3aa447efb8c65ca30b40d8bd2d5cfcec0
'2011-08-17T21:05:23-04:00'
describe
'398688' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQV' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ee43f1cae8d83501b405eec7ca5097fa
61e0f0a240c74a82d46a5ef285e63cd6112dcaf4
'2011-08-17T21:01:14-04:00'
describe
'21961' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQW' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a3c2a84dfd525d2bdf6a415479241b42
7e19262e48cbac40139561c7173b602b9c8d93e7
'2011-08-17T21:04:04-04:00'
describe
'139005' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
865ec341b7e41aa7d78d20426a80f53e
87930c9fd1459569f4a7001c5c2c73929408266e
'2011-08-17T21:02:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c637fe7b0b79e502bb8f2bfffea8e539
d20be3335afc164c57760a715a04fe2df9b8f6fa
'2011-08-17T21:01:28-04:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQQZ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
4d5148701e0d49cc89595a79abad5358
6b0bab4caf266c3618e8f4cffaef0c8211375926
'2011-08-17T21:01:16-04:00'
describe
'50006' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRA' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
478c71287f271a5f585ecf91c7d52d75
4402b7e43aa0e602034418bbc67b26bc0115d887
'2011-08-17T20:59:52-04:00'
describe
'893379' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRB' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3151c95df71253a29f3e85af980f99b5
e619ff6f9f509b7da678f7ee69e6dfdfd2aa9c9a
'2011-08-17T21:08:11-04:00'
describe
'432794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRC' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a94e78e4ceb16fe4031a6e0b6be75bb5
aca2dfc3f2c5a7599f868fe76ccfa5c77f3dd1f7
'2011-08-17T21:02:47-04:00'
describe
'33270' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRD' 'sip-files00009.pro'
f110a91e2d7ec7dc0b5df80e675fbbe6
706beac26d39ac3b7123a4444d616f1beda64680
'2011-08-17T21:00:33-04:00'
describe
'152279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRE' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
7318856472759f23d20e5259f098f7eb
ca2ffeca7cb207613e97f26b77677ae6eafb3b3d
'2011-08-17T21:02:25-04:00'
describe
'7153657' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRF' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ae39bdb1a046be3ad515fec16c37a9de
36d7d06475b0bb140ee16ecbd42c0e106b5f9608
'2011-08-17T21:07:28-04:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
ea3cfad3d137cd95e387de2a39aeed90
ef82069b796405bdb64bb13024fbf743da1522f6
'2011-08-17T21:06:22-04:00'
describe
'52938' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRH' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
fca1a5c514514973c3651dd9a21e3915
9a2410a8df297a82319d65fe55eb9ae31c84e902
'2011-08-17T21:02:05-04:00'
describe
'926815' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRI' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
ec020f7f83359ac4b9f601ddce2a018a
b98f0d5f9755a99b13677afab53cd17b3c7bc745
'2011-08-17T21:00:58-04:00'
describe
'444617' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRJ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
d292376b1775e66daeeb7b25beef3539
717f6948fe6107f253b4b73073a1bfcd5c9e0087
'2011-08-17T21:05:00-04:00'
describe
'17326' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRK' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d642ddb1813ab086e6d4b820472671f5
eeb34551baab79fa97477a5542fca414c71f8b48
'2011-08-17T21:09:34-04:00'
describe
'148883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRL' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
907d23e84500813173d8206c88e4ab7b
e516a7ea4a3657c48694acbda30d6ded14ec2138
'2011-08-17T20:59:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRM' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ed8ead72085258892cbdf23e10f160dd
5c49f30c5651b5fbeadd4f99947307d407b5307d
'2011-08-17T21:01:27-04:00'
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRN' 'sip-files00010.txt'
30a11421d2c62ae61003c4c0d35efc0a
0e79e89c786fb0c245d5dec0d072acdf5a6c1c55
'2011-08-17T21:04:05-04:00'
describe
'51557' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRO' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
39340718017c2e4bc22a981fd9d5b8b3
d7e304e985f99beb2c64aba99bcf123c85bcb36d
'2011-08-17T21:01:30-04:00'
describe
'919477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRP' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5f2af9b151656bb2c508b1fe72282d17
90f47d13c4eeb174164d7bc280995c7e89287b44
'2011-08-17T21:01:34-04:00'
describe
'443810' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
bc6065738eb51eddc88dcfd8eda0d387
4e3dd322a0e1661414b40eee03b66ab9ced5228e
'2011-08-17T21:09:15-04:00'
describe
'31444' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRR' 'sip-files00011.pro'
3e6b2477e01f08f736e0dc42d800c73f
6ec977cda79c2ffcd639f0047c12471a560ee127
'2011-08-17T20:58:55-04:00'
describe
'156335' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRS' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
f9ca5a92631bae2bbccc4d46261c94ad
f967919e092c47f8003aa2e31e3b437794974b49
'2011-08-17T21:09:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRT' 'sip-files00011.tif'
72f6e2131e732e83e45d45eba5823c18
cbc72bdc1e25c8495c1db8093c1a3e998c054635
'2011-08-17T21:00:17-04:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRU' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f846fbc7dc0d61d98ae2e29642d914c5
38b7acaba942c6f0469343fd878a5a86dbcce944
describe
'55003' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRV' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
3f64a68bb09823f7cb77a352469f01f3
e56751bca64b8a8ffe21ecbacc27983e7cd35121
'2011-08-17T21:01:45-04:00'
describe
'926823' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
6b6b98573b3fb212bedb60b277328327
faf1969abeab50f88e703c6016cbfdebf9b7f2fe
'2011-08-17T21:06:28-04:00'
describe
'413393' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRX' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
0b832b15b4758209cca97526dba003de
c411eba4ff3b6886f5e2362422542b2d5c57ebe1
'2011-08-17T21:06:54-04:00'
describe
'27420' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRY' 'sip-files00012.pro'
97b83ea2c7f95725ebd69b03a8f407d4
734f44a542f2d29227f99dd96430706ca5eb2fee
'2011-08-17T20:58:32-04:00'
describe
'145337' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQRZ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
82d2bd4c3d72c563399a7a7ddcc0ca5d
701e5c811e89794958d0e2b74e4f4b5276a732b0
'2011-08-17T21:07:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSA' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a170ed909ef020d8df13893f71d4347f
9d995d31370bcbec0276719208fe75e5f136559f
'2011-08-17T21:04:27-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSB' 'sip-files00012.txt'
59fd13121da2d5519c3ddd63328ae261
d41274cf2567357ffb5a7d48c8650c46264cea7e
'2011-08-17T21:10:16-04:00'
describe
'50530' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSC' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
828f22d466359303c7f5eb6163d33a52
255f1d50946b6df3f70cccc80af5a1a4a9787c90
'2011-08-17T21:01:29-04:00'
describe
'889472' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSD' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
fce41491a684f8ac00adf41ced086f6a
4cccda4dc4698df26386aff9d9192e60f7741806
'2011-08-17T21:09:03-04:00'
describe
'408760' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSE' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
4c853cb40913bbaf47dd26d431d04756
af43cd1cc48f6891ee53831174d1905c40e013e0
describe
'28509' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSF' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1a046c910ec4af088235508150dff41b
fa219b31a77cd2e4e3c950343bf50b851eed6b12
'2011-08-17T21:08:46-04:00'
describe
'141994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
af80175e165347a68b7c03cc64d43b21
bc114d563a87c09b045ce45541c2203a6425bc51
'2011-08-17T21:00:36-04:00'
describe
'7123369' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSH' 'sip-files00013.tif'
954517e70df7b01d6dacead9762ae0d0
620c27c91ac2c548af6b772d070ef498ddb27773
'2011-08-17T21:00:55-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSI' 'sip-files00013.txt'
16a8e296e128f9907d0dfed110376c0c
a976f76a630b5626f2b093dfd388b3e7f5829ab8
'2011-08-17T21:07:16-04:00'
describe
'51185' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSJ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3c95ada30e61e9aaaaaa74db41638e92
a7bb4b316594484ec86e779b65aab405ce33212b
'2011-08-17T21:08:35-04:00'
describe
'926797' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSK' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
dff32ad6549d18475ae4edcda84b37fd
0338321a52e66969310f65af5fa59c5d75b6dd1c
'2011-08-17T21:02:38-04:00'
describe
'436169' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSL' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
3ef3895b945a28dc7f00d407ad63b5d8
9615aa72804a4716fcf9993f805a63477c022e1d
describe
'16017' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ff6b00bac0a701024ba8740ecd489b6a
8e60638bd521d8a110b61dfb120ca8f4320b5b0c
'2011-08-17T21:01:10-04:00'
describe
'145596' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
e62742f1613d2b2f2fb752af4f4ef327
caf4d760bb83ade7fd2423d1088b858b30851f3b
'2011-08-17T21:00:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSO' 'sip-files00014.tif'
7a3d0c9e7709a455313e2ad4ad58776f
a22b377c89123245bfa4c5e89e2380f168789e4e
'2011-08-17T21:01:26-04:00'
describe
'712' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b50077dce450f04385868c2c03320026
de3eff8e16aa1221ee84e52ae08b0f9c43566252
'2011-08-17T20:59:12-04:00'
describe
'51515' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
0d70b5fb801dbb3558d0c86c273dedb2
359de56dea954da2fe3bc494e1c37f17e72fd278
'2011-08-17T21:00:56-04:00'
describe
'896135' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
70b896ae4b4c7887b02ca0daf61490dc
92c285486fb58472ac39120eafde8011d927de08
'2011-08-17T21:05:39-04:00'
describe
'431899' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
deb6e4942c981e2d288c53ae70e20b30
08d1de6a57a907568f32462d25169b2998022d8b
'2011-08-17T21:04:53-04:00'
describe
'32696' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQST' 'sip-files00015.pro'
a9f1622637d1e7eff9df1dfb46d9d9c4
613de9686ec7a2cdeab9f102f78a4b8efaa2c351
'2011-08-17T21:00:30-04:00'
describe
'152230' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ca8da99031dc3a0f125b6e505e970b79
6b010a9956425b848d095dd678b8aecaf86c6f0e
'2011-08-17T21:02:32-04:00'
describe
'7175933' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8573d838188dee407657cb76ad02eb75
7011f8a9a489c1eea9d140139a2117ece6bb8c26
'2011-08-17T20:59:46-04:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ce3f52df065b07af6ee5c88d80e36137
32fd1e427cde87bb4977abba665417cf24f91df5
'2011-08-17T21:04:06-04:00'
describe
'52966' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
f6ca6e00ba5ebd32beb0d92a0cf7550b
7da88fc15f961d7caea11d9a75562914e53a1401
'2011-08-17T21:05:02-04:00'
describe
'926816' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
4055124dea61955bad6c39ae045cb93e
fb4a6c6261129f0dd1afadd8eb1a1b44d3f27307
'2011-08-17T21:02:54-04:00'
describe
'402535' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQSZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
56285507ab2544ab63d96754127c8a9b
9e934daa8b17e765b1ccfb1d7388cebcff6f03f8
'2011-08-17T21:05:09-04:00'
describe
'27075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
24666519cdc2aebae91213450aafdf56
d361115af36a9f7c513c6d4fbef854f2c89bfbb0
'2011-08-17T21:06:58-04:00'
describe
'139560' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
57565841a25de3e66c54eba0165477fc
e3d5558b810a3dee71fc366ce5fea5799c7343c7
'2011-08-17T20:58:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
9af380476c765286e545c4fbdde50f05
103b00aad49acc9e7bdd913811306c43acda4f18
'2011-08-17T21:02:31-04:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c55444663bed95e23f840a5355de8c54
80cb83803cca1a62b7a06845b8f2ddf990cdea16
'2011-08-17T21:10:18-04:00'
describe
'49110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
2520fb780fd883e0dc178eaf00ce4909
35b2de776deb14384b27d992aae4712be2475db4
'2011-08-17T21:05:28-04:00'
describe
'885757' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
67d39b1f4a92276dd5794a8f3ef24907
3a7c31ac96eeca69a6197a54dce8230547286daa
'2011-08-17T21:00:18-04:00'
describe
'433706' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
26087b002da38ba22fac75872516d7f9
18487ee3851b4e082b305b5a8d0d4f3b04462393
'2011-08-17T21:01:32-04:00'
describe
'32355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9d00600f90c4f7e0f0badd1d42c0d073
8925af0a3aedb713a58a6f861e09731e2441d1f2
'2011-08-17T21:01:57-04:00'
describe
'152168' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
39f137d2a8b1368f3ad01aeb26dfcf79
fd8eee460f2ba736f0a69e786c561f0ffeea77d5
'2011-08-17T21:08:16-04:00'
describe
'7093145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
64ec88015f0a638c98d082df100912ea
b001a1c7c45771ce8beb93c53de55729a5fd1c55
'2011-08-17T21:04:29-04:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
2a1b2daf074f4e9d3b25cebe3f0258c6
ccd73357abd7c1293e7b033384377388301d091c
'2011-08-17T21:03:09-04:00'
describe
'53554' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
73ab8fbf453ec13b2aed9838d3b5e8c9
610eff16356c8371a0dcb7ed7b23c09739f3492b
'2011-08-17T20:58:41-04:00'
describe
'926798' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
65b4d108aa3af920895907f99034bae3
23b55c8b907fe44e124e08504666dc787978b878
'2011-08-17T21:09:35-04:00'
describe
'429943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
da563b2aec2da3b61b8e8d5dfad7b9dd
e1de0296ec5a062e288d971932548e223876359d
'2011-08-17T21:07:11-04:00'
describe
'15838' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
fc23fd6f8a234ec6293974a46d5d9d32
8010374251a70542b652dd299a29a8eb4f77c643
'2011-08-17T21:00:00-04:00'
describe
'142530' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e118c5917998f102cda0189e46cfafd8
bf97556762b1448d2f138530cc3a0a73a27ea707
'2011-08-17T21:08:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
f86c58eb70ad52e72fb697a2e6332d1a
4097cd14f3c54824f6ba813550fc934faff98ecd
'2011-08-17T21:06:14-04:00'
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
7995cacf939dccc0dcc6c430d5989f31
753697595d3c9e6869c3eb9085f5096450fa9a38
describe
'49282' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
11730d733061e5f07b2ea720653ee449
42c695c61dcaf24336e0c6e8a79a9f8fed18422e
'2011-08-17T21:02:12-04:00'
describe
'924592' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
714d68c3abb71314e918f3c1b0595659
c52da57d99c4c0b0ef2e778513dc1d601ba7ae93
describe
'430158' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ab7d08610815bbad78495ed62e363da0
86ca31c78cf0b26a725960ebedc86f89659e3ae3
'2011-08-17T21:06:46-04:00'
describe
'32552' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3a43cec8965beb48b7e65fde81f68123
47eb47d56f46d77db1238e623bed646843ed2085
'2011-08-17T21:09:22-04:00'
describe
'151227' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
70c5d72a522b10c3debd99fce2e4929f
5d85ba586afe08f02ede749e279b194e170a4a91
'2011-08-17T21:01:58-04:00'
describe
'7404395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
7672b99bc63666d6dabed7b4b07af723
699eaf21ac45d925c0320d53758682465acda45d
'2011-08-17T20:59:19-04:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c6c10ddf5d8e8d9ef2408433f3bb2193
9e5f1507182ace3af8df47cbab6991bf764e2d21
'2011-08-17T21:05:42-04:00'
describe
'53078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQTZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2006e6b2131b3c7d0bdc40455ee63e79
9cc433af77798b805a35fd4cd73a506054ec7e7a
'2011-08-17T21:05:35-04:00'
describe
'926660' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
e94a22e3997691bb1009dc1196c47a90
a30d02737093bebd71b7a5f504e672374df12a98
describe
'449569' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c9c0f6af300aba121e76b6cf0ef20739
a10c8fa8252ad0dcf804e93f4b02289135132801
'2011-08-17T21:09:16-04:00'
describe
'31396' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
899199cdf10e7266207168fce721d909
8f9a39ba89c70ec890bd266d51dbd242d6e0d2ac
'2011-08-17T21:04:01-04:00'
describe
'159725' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
755f7f54e0269df322c232dd91c8710d
b044d6541046fbd3b7ae02d9f230fd55d68f2c59
'2011-08-17T21:04:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
6ce8df5a96822fb7946be2d2e6ee8a7d
8a4e05f4aeac2db547107a99f0135b5ec4e6f249
'2011-08-17T20:59:57-04:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
7d515afddec6c86ca1b212c26f80aaab
fba4f479971f1b997d1625388ab4c913145ad33d
'2011-08-17T21:06:10-04:00'
describe
'54736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ec9843bd6df1b1daba71f0faef1bd00c
6eb2b6b2f9a8adcf0c21474115c421f002b35da0
'2011-08-17T21:08:31-04:00'
describe
'924684' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
90cd6e3c4e58b18c6dbb6fb4cc2bedb3
dee3d96ad6d09248eab220047203f5fefa486b26
'2011-08-17T21:03:56-04:00'
describe
'414788' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e6468fa756b61e34ac34a276f147b0c3
0b82fcf73bc80e7d69084d59db85dec8b39122d8
'2011-08-17T21:08:08-04:00'
describe
'31338' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
242092fca4caf6fa18c93d5116a6e22a
17ca9c86f766eac08949cde1bccad86dd60211fd
'2011-08-17T21:05:37-04:00'
describe
'144355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c0955d81a3733ba4c4f1983d67afa4e1
961946fc12c63aa53fec2a7272604443a6aae534
'2011-08-17T20:58:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
2426e80f0f4d555ed6efd08fa5375784
d65b27daef77b7afd0ff6627b7d7c7fe32fd302d
'2011-08-17T20:58:59-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
24a729f5e816c6e3ab7535f3cdb5bba8
60b8db2192fda3c22cec42475152e56696b8da9c
'2011-08-17T21:04:45-04:00'
describe
'51488' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3f5584895a9035fb4754edcb62eb54ff
0aaea1ed4a1543be14d80512186e995ddc5e3cf2
describe
'926747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6919138e840f6780e5017e60d96f5863
8cef0fc0b2683214ed02adc757775d7044548f5f
describe
'402977' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c57cd51f1698cf276628674369a42149
8ec04d6fa6f159741b6cbc32785bb9f6a780da83
'2011-08-17T21:04:33-04:00'
describe
'26568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
59faafe79d16abb0cfb3639d434484a6
59bc7a59a9511d1cb9d6687f0ec61b12f16d1610
'2011-08-17T21:02:07-04:00'
describe
'141374' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
aebe759fa0abce4281545e51f6643a7b
97b3b09386a3fa1775240e75a5d898e141f52ee7
'2011-08-17T21:02:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
41414f31aafd93387dc7773c25ce5f51
b0c7af7252f6f92092b5fe3856250cc52b955786
'2011-08-17T21:09:23-04:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
45d3a8f9b4ff6d19115f0ae68b9d7d90
3d1b97f54dd362bcbaa112333d8b6c2fb363fb03
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'50506' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
b7783cf9427708b2c63398c498efea0c
5d924bc918ba75a9fd6082894b2e95150631633a
'2011-08-17T20:59:06-04:00'
describe
'924673' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
32f4ba5248b1e275500b89f0fc7eabdf
9d694cb60bcde1b56a628358cd19e8c36189a7ab
'2011-08-17T21:09:51-04:00'
describe
'436675' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0ea2ae7d86c7f9b2f47191ec3e869bf3
afe07210dee6114ffd755cd1dcaf38e1c51b2548
'2011-08-17T21:00:10-04:00'
describe
'33105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3f069824e6d9c6eaa75c78c4c359ff18
4a328c22e60b6a32513eeea90283a35600abd6ad
'2011-08-17T21:08:50-04:00'
describe
'153733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
76047baed589f4f232e800fd90ed0f1f
d992eb52b95f610edc1da8bb6f3b038e5aa21d8c
'2011-08-17T21:01:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQUZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e64cee5d09c1cd405c7717bd16ade54a
c480fa523c8cf9af4d58f5c8fdb425da6a4af1e8
'2011-08-17T21:07:37-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
7e8404d89b4d7cb120052c4a8fa8b5a5
953cbca70edcd1099d2701563b0b46792705d722
'2011-08-17T20:58:40-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'54691' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9b46f05f401feb4091715ebfbc2fb17b
3c36b307446bab983473fc8c97fa8c1ee1c0436f
'2011-08-17T21:06:03-04:00'
describe
'926774' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e5db9b804b106d74a2dc7aeb6f052024
0e23ee62e001417e0b4852382f8297c6803c8f65
'2011-08-17T21:05:01-04:00'
describe
'447124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
69e87f9996a158d3a644c531800f772d
d7a40b11495efa9586b02730c950e3f898f75885
'2011-08-17T21:03:18-04:00'
describe
'31436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
f8180cf169c8d6a14f33a30f758f330a
52ef832aa2af933a4ff5bc7369aee66215d053fe
'2011-08-17T21:00:05-04:00'
describe
'159375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
72cd24b08931331012735d0c95069150
cfa0b38ced8f5d54ca3dba957a5030d00feaa111
'2011-08-17T21:01:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
0a61e32725aa7e96d41cf3f7480ddf53
fd2136296cb2e747eb395480d51fb8cb538b6352
'2011-08-17T20:59:11-04:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b46176114551a5e4690a2ff62b2e5bf1
f9472115af44b6e333bc20c7fb33bd9dcf7a8c84
'2011-08-17T21:07:39-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'54526' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
5930acf81d290d6d2189c8017a370477
7d312c372567e3f994ab8f6561569d2ebc00e728
'2011-08-17T21:08:20-04:00'
describe
'924615' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6ccaeeba056a22c30308a068b8c753e6
de94ca454e184c406babfb3b58363ccdcf180975
'2011-08-17T21:08:25-04:00'
describe
'417437' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b831e30ded0bbde3bcd8d05117ac3640
e20c3239930f156fce0ad7e91366c192761e48c9
'2011-08-17T21:04:40-04:00'
describe
'29967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
530f95eaa6bfc8e8827233db3c15545a
de9a0278e1ced74cfd2c59d0048a541dd6224415
describe
'145898' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
adcf2b051de690f3865e330d443dada4
943f0111ab390d41f359f1fa5358fa904e41fa03
'2011-08-17T20:58:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
3b30a6bb8a8146ed9393e52781e384da
d2cfca3de354818e6d3089d1fbf9732a9a47f501
'2011-08-17T21:05:58-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d3a42038e8924fe1236105ae4e1805d5
94e522476371fd74567294216b031000f93aeb45
'2011-08-17T21:03:54-04:00'
describe
'52151' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
d84ac434475c5d21027f0b62f283707b
b54ae41d14ad9268004c3adda4c083e91f39dd94
'2011-08-17T21:09:20-04:00'
describe
'926818' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
84e6d98600bbd6e6604374814cd17011
05e12444de277318f6db3f5012a2d266d963edb4
'2011-08-17T21:09:08-04:00'
describe
'437452' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1ba8e22dbea4f5dab110dfa50b6eeaeb
9280afcdb8971920e9cf9b2c042729fb880103ac
'2011-08-17T21:04:49-04:00'
describe
'31492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
546738c8cc43b5f2e509e810408bad20
ae0ef688b3ccf08fdb476a48ea80a4499c64a8df
'2011-08-17T21:03:33-04:00'
describe
'154482' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
f26277a82d7d7e07efbaeb1fe2f7252b
d020c8a4060711b4dad30d3cadb36cbfc1b98400
'2011-08-17T21:04:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
59b344d9d4f497fb36606e778fbebcbe
4bd13d203b72ae1718cfdf1a7672e8f5faa34c4f
'2011-08-17T21:08:53-04:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
811a55e8a9ac29c5b61be39b492a150f
233235dcbd26e03a0a0874ff397835e02fdb9e7c
'2011-08-17T21:02:51-04:00'
describe
'53821' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
50463ff08d583b9cc2ae4b3c4b2a771c
1cdaf8f46546b5a8ef0def7eeead74b51e0d8bcb
'2011-08-17T21:08:07-04:00'
describe
'924682' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e2fb6c0eaef5492066ceaa6eb2972bba
98078282721ff6d40b582349703aeaa8e3f45f1e
'2011-08-17T21:06:59-04:00'
describe
'441658' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6e629094e2c2ede350a7ab17cc0fbc4e
0b0fa77db84badc7d501bab242eb71385e096692
'2011-08-17T21:04:41-04:00'
describe
'32164' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQVZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
345c0e3853e78cf2feebdedcac94d4dd
92eadc80f33938c148528bad51bd5ccd4e23a3bf
'2011-08-17T21:07:09-04:00'
describe
'156461' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c1fbbf720f66dcffac02cc03901d3abc
bca506613eef01bfc257ddf84d7f65aa7d38c208
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
141f99ab8f54c37c81389b8e5f0ed11c
598f3ec8ca94b99d70642f3ba1deaf516ae028e5
'2011-08-17T21:05:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a6595742705ac75e0ca33e3a6355e7c3
b0ffd0ef187167c2899d4324e1bba48265f9a084
'2011-08-17T21:01:48-04:00'
describe
'55068' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
441c8dcf3aaedae357afb929f8b2ed0c
e434e84478853fd499cc7f137f7653afdc88b93d
'2011-08-17T21:07:13-04:00'
describe
'926757' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
51903ef673d1283f9907ca6aadd4da13
30c7da667878e3850af7e5828bd7c8a48c656989
'2011-08-17T21:00:15-04:00'
describe
'405009' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
48e555ab16d8bf362a49d9ab204f043e
897b31543850aef528868217a1faca9b57e46336
'2011-08-17T21:05:38-04:00'
describe
'13164' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
348f1dce30f2d5d77d235bcbae5fad7f
48130785f9f4e7f85ba21ec6c24ef7e4cea8b4b8
describe
'133795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
96b97bfc16f2b166e7f63673f5239adf
23c9a536ce702e797645d49360c223abde50eef0
'2011-08-17T21:01:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e1523f05a11e736c7854b66ec2dbd3f5
a4eb42fc25e84978484679143a8879049cac71b3
'2011-08-17T21:06:11-04:00'
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
76383c68c23fc9447a6752ca01e4c9c2
06448d8a7ab555323939101bf7cefcee31eaa40f
'2011-08-17T21:06:21-04:00'
describe
'47926' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c16d25bcea75a0fffdacc5da4dd498d5
e2dfe0a912e29c141d54a3786085c8f5284b8b06
'2011-08-17T21:07:07-04:00'
describe
'924661' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
e7ad08cc0e51176a7a8ae12611c9018f
2f47c51e81ad0b7565eaa7bb89487923992d46c3
'2011-08-17T21:08:45-04:00'
describe
'431980' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f4c8c0e968c188d8b0d2eb94efb902f3
a1378a8a0b926646b91eb6a58b02f565e0cd410d
'2011-08-17T20:58:51-04:00'
describe
'31336' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3e4ed20459594eeb03c82825d3a79061
d58afc07187f89c95dd812cda5847a06b1c40726
'2011-08-17T20:58:50-04:00'
describe
'151312' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
fde3715ac39ef380cf587112eec7745d
a7a079d1c09128d9f826c42f360938bd5a0218c8
'2011-08-17T21:07:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c4be3c546d9e5b3fdb2f9278de0ccd05
00ce5a03007892e66bedb6536bbde993444447c5
'2011-08-17T21:00:01-04:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4d2d8f45dd9c91b72794468fb24f4e57
cecc02bf9c5f93ccb71324af89bfa7b8b22ed717
'2011-08-17T20:58:52-04:00'
describe
'53219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d6289cc77bc4d158a2a916fd0c4a92f6
9b4ee883b598ab15a5b932cf551eda3050e232fd
'2011-08-17T20:58:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
f75ca9f6cab40853e24c59fae13f27c8
9920f805d60a9b1001492239cf09f4e091bddffe
describe
'432511' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3eae2e0d2424b89d10f582dfd05bf4b8
eeff925aefc5a708978bcc1f7372d541e8fc0d5c
describe
'29242' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
09c37367b9fa4a8ef8ff1898265869b6
7ca517b835ea04b1c1d7654dd04c8fc8e7da7dfc
describe
'150212' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9581bf0dd5ddfc1159644cb25446c22a
c3f7b323c94cbe1f5eff426e3fb7ad762bbaf06f
'2011-08-17T21:00:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d8caa86d384f6878fb1b599b5848a1f2
011aae2fb7b6bde63240d9a3722ac5158ee5997e
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c97791ffcba6ae1ddadb93f395f0bee2
b793cefe1e578d520f19a690f9b2355ff2dddba9
describe
'52010' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
cf7fad47af4f62d949a4cf1b34fbe2c6
73fc7293059b079eb41b244037eed008c2a2920e
'2011-08-17T21:08:28-04:00'
describe
'924618' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQWZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
cf57c66148a02a8d7be5f83665bdbfa3
6f2c85ad057ea4d57d9d6f4177c70c75c838774e
'2011-08-17T21:10:00-04:00'
describe
'426642' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d6281a6afe8bc73a97f9d21f5eef46c8
f369b3b39c2a4e1839fd61c337c3466cf27e5731
'2011-08-17T21:05:32-04:00'
describe
'30827' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
feb09df8a8a2ed6630ca7ac4bf628b39
be77b2a3de6d396b192f9e50950d8f03c4943cce
'2011-08-17T21:01:50-04:00'
describe
'148835' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
196bb0900f3f5182c47a844f4b02a8b1
3f3fa8be7d19f0ea2e9500745d7096313266bf6e
'2011-08-17T21:01:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
83fb669a2532528b8b4ae512411f5415
201c25b354647829010c0cf52b533366991a16cd
'2011-08-17T21:00:04-04:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
aeba608e1a8819074903e4d4f6840b81
dbdb4849b66d24b095beb02888c10d288c5e5126
'2011-08-17T21:02:56-04:00'
describe
'53080' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
5ea3cae80812f67ae27794ab9e85c9b9
bbc907e59198b951d74c9403bbbd7563d841d4c1
describe
'926795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
afd719dc5b8f7e5d29cdd5c0b2d01fea
c8ed8235f467c7c562204408889eabd446b4e5b9
'2011-08-17T21:07:41-04:00'
describe
'448042' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
ac668e0ad56407c1e82a087b71a4e1d1
4ef1c96065e0d5618cde4e40accb81e2d63112b8
describe
'30642' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
25ff7dc949c47cb6f9b50461441d3353
ccfde2d06b3813f93f489ee4064d32a4f9b01dab
'2011-08-17T21:07:23-04:00'
describe
'156751' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
bcbbcc245d7dbd7a49adf23b71accc3b
03c8f016c7af5598203af0823c2a27760848c63a
'2011-08-17T21:03:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
60eb555c318b6a5dfbff2e9a2511889a
314fa13340d6e72c399b374e603c5f38b79c84ac
'2011-08-17T21:03:51-04:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
fe8da0c1f127f4e098ac11e14f28440b
8fba37c18743fae4dbc9fb461165e934783e1daa
describe
'53273' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7c11c6db4600a34bf6fe3ae9456824ed
e5360d072e593db028fcb9bae42d79fda4879bad
describe
'945810' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
755d09b4b38a86efd54f0231be09d278
df399a4a550983a74ac3b6b87c415a7a235f0f22
'2011-08-17T20:59:20-04:00'
describe
'404747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a2a85ce8e70b73f0d45977d45e03bd96
72f933c3c41e5136c5ab958978beafb90a81e14a
'2011-08-17T20:59:28-04:00'
describe
'16960' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
241f4106d1e45eb4a04c807393518dcf
054d68df613a87f19e142a4fdeb40c7093f913f2
'2011-08-17T21:09:57-04:00'
describe
'131509' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
83995d237d29403a4e833a4cb28005b7
05bd23b9364a421175f5cba544d19c35796006e2
'2011-08-17T20:59:59-04:00'
describe
'7571787' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f236874f601528bf919d72aea32a7b31
90dffe2a2bf1754e2742fbc67eab6671bc4b2823
'2011-08-17T21:05:55-04:00'
describe
'735' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
b29a2de3580156a6818c8b80ba150353
3c6f52eb565e02824b6ba92700701a330745eaec
describe
'44134' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
f7b2828cced371a4c9d34889044553d5
f781a06483f49db7ac7ab80735556d2203c74ea2
'2011-08-17T21:02:55-04:00'
describe
'926739' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
d45e87ccba117b42eabb714e2c565e45
4fee6b8c4b0390f53f7523c75df886c01b10a2be
describe
'453017' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
30392830e195fd46411179c59d393882
3e0fdb3adbad46877a3fe04c627b0e40d162e437
'2011-08-17T21:08:09-04:00'
describe
'33136' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
cddba01a8c568a24db9db6d0fe3e8376
79a367d8256900f5731778531dd8ca555d0e9c46
'2011-08-17T21:05:40-04:00'
describe
'158082' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
736b0bfaedbc5ef0fda7a666a28d73d9
bafd80906046a6203373df15c0461a9165f5fe95
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
9760fc23f2c08b972ffb611bf40f33dc
afe917377b6812a8dacf65439d099ed05e089ef6
'2011-08-17T21:05:49-04:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQXZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
cdad24b2a9234ef855d8282a5b724c37
a3c40c6b6fc0ea221d32aba9f221850ba5aba8b4
describe
Invalid character
'54364' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a5756cc8694d546e027ea23372fbeead
92527a0aaa461bf9c78f166ef1bc10f957810dce
'2011-08-17T21:04:13-04:00'
describe
'924693' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ce818efadb2cbbd1994c30d6c995ac95
6f4cf0637089b5cd9ab8e3b1915d0e1cd1694c86
'2011-08-17T21:04:32-04:00'
describe
'434007' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e0cafb596ef5e9c81a8ceb5687410552
2c3dd164bb56eb403784d9d1a5e6c8f5aa6240d1
'2011-08-17T21:04:36-04:00'
describe
'32089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
a1a8625195e4f904079ad06b10395612
e68fd3a268300cf0abc7340888e73af75ca140c9
'2011-08-17T21:03:47-04:00'
describe
'151031' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
cd590c5bfa7028b1ac998343273f2ee2
2dce98a321fd9e79a1d4adf0f7a8c04098d443a9
'2011-08-17T21:01:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
deec2d5db65113e83e23c32802a9eb59
644a34418d391282932215162dbc423c0f472ee1
'2011-08-17T20:59:39-04:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d89ea0db4fe417bc95b16d063d622089
22d2b4bfcd8ce2e9da7dc669f03ad793cf8fc6d7
'2011-08-17T21:10:03-04:00'
describe
'52851' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c6cac6b54e89a59321cd6605bab95ee6
ab00bc04a179f896dcd22232b081ed1f48cbb277
'2011-08-17T21:08:24-04:00'
describe
'926765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
63f029cfa28df7016f3c4361fe42fae2
08dd0ae35e00fd8f3c24626ff4df685b71fcb8f8
'2011-08-17T21:10:15-04:00'
describe
'441463' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
44f3217a9deec066120fbd29073323e0
34f6a45e93c150f9cb04f2332aa8bf3eb5f6916f
'2011-08-17T21:05:53-04:00'
describe
'17639' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f83260e25f78934ddff37c08726f1814
b3898bbf4c7388316fc1915ff12e4ec9b1f78b09
'2011-08-17T21:00:45-04:00'
describe
'147152' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
31288965892a006e935df020efcbc9a3
c0afcfcaebc5c2cfa8e53b5fc3b9816e52ce017a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4e94115521b3c9c83adb8808175c6305
1f253adcd41a45dce4b402c981bb91205e2dbdee
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
ce727c9eae5fc294da5923d9c47d95b0
127addc0910a093b4e29375e576ded36bbd9de81
describe
'51121' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
f2154f324f73b5cab82014b22ac8e52d
4f79f29e81f9d7c319bff6d50d2f967ea3efec0c
'2011-08-17T21:07:44-04:00'
describe
'924701' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
5c12e3d329b97f7a790d9ecad337a736
1427d273db65338680c5298291f90395938a7124
'2011-08-17T20:58:36-04:00'
describe
'399055' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
6bc9d6e200438ec76b0295473d1adff7
5dff89fe229a107a95fcd27ac7fc9ad3bb988b4d
'2011-08-17T20:58:26-04:00'
describe
'26156' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYR' 'sip-files00037.pro'
fa6ec05287d6da5acf2026d00222650c
664d16419284923c5ed5146b1bbe5d4947ec3ee1
'2011-08-17T21:08:17-04:00'
describe
'137553' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
4318b3215803f4524aa3893a6935387a
3cddb6a8398e35c8fb620b462247693a55475465
'2011-08-17T21:09:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
4773ed00ec1a4df11bff2b65f3792221
6b3fba3f5ef25866ee2b554fd0848b85c404d244
'2011-08-17T21:09:54-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
6923e615aa0aeafb951efc459f09c325
3b86a7e4a69ba2cd0b9e8e126f373b44ed82d133
'2011-08-17T21:03:26-04:00'
describe
'48835' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1f2482fe30ada5ab943727ab9fa8cade
88868e76a130f1501226ae8415e89d622dd046a4
'2011-08-17T20:59:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
bcf61cc13f2c1d87b67f0a4dc8bb7cfb
e680ebf66c03f91ebb313f85433c3b51a1339ef0
'2011-08-17T21:02:39-04:00'
describe
'440276' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
508896f6376fd9d5abee5ed51f676557
7f32121a5efe542879162e12f7cd7e07f064cbfc
'2011-08-17T21:09:56-04:00'
describe
'30432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
95bb7b498c9162b0c4f331aaf8df78ef
f32b076646686105a04c8cd9cc7d08503a5c1db9
'2011-08-17T21:00:51-04:00'
describe
'153544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQYZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
9ba08b5aab87e40c54284552ac4062a2
40c329566f042f37e1d90ff74e0ad6f05bd7510b
'2011-08-17T21:07:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
db858262d713e499ac2cdd2d8a0ae268
e4463d8020ee07f454da6b8b3845cfafb679edc8
'2011-08-17T21:03:42-04:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
931bc79b0217fa3905fe45c2b6be7832
c03228445497863d27523200c01d0a691b6298ba
'2011-08-17T21:00:41-04:00'
describe
'52941' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
bcb48766f657a3abe8157ed88258c49b
34bc7a9973ceccec726bca3168249f6ff2d83e76
'2011-08-17T21:05:12-04:00'
describe
'924593' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
1f225e27d6f90892d77b3cb4aee2faa6
d3453ffa69993a43b4dc8a3fed595a7e6cc44537
'2011-08-17T21:09:43-04:00'
describe
'422967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b1a64e39693a2c262bd4cadc1d6800e3
d0bf6803aa19f7ffe63412199eade2b7153c2e12
describe
'31307' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b8fccf661e2ee080a8b9c9a3801d9716
9222f2786d6540c0b5b79bead905a8da76d427f0
'2011-08-17T21:07:05-04:00'
describe
'146143' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZG' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1d3b355f5db5b730ec3f8cb9d7ffff2c
40a91abceddaa55f01e486634be13d1d0686cc70
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b1574ab8276de108fa161c948cfe71ad
9df7e2630f393a29da3e93040f3c23035b96448c
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
13f774d90eaf5829a3c059a22cab5798
f3da1c522d90e15f2eb76465fa50465c03c877bc
'2011-08-17T21:00:06-04:00'
describe
'51766' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f48699bd68c6ab4e9fe00df49f69ff70
77fe65f3cc3a30fb95f5d21cd9d585849423caff
'2011-08-17T21:05:25-04:00'
describe
'926820' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f1aab0ef89f9422d199ae1fc2c6ea4a4
1aafb123affc182f1129a726d7ea5c70f872dd32
'2011-08-17T21:03:19-04:00'
describe
'444199' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
679ae2829fcba26554493e8e998e4232
a80f1c05121b8155ff373f173b52291118011628
'2011-08-17T21:07:42-04:00'
describe
'31998' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
b6e812187b7620136ac15b19f9c413e0
6f41fcc24c463096141e3a7b4d1747e4680b6485
describe
'154604' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
139b3b45e90a5938c844b33016366ecb
8679dc22fd4bb43f280397a6153039d165bab535
'2011-08-17T20:59:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ecd15e1238fc04f3cecdd98cb1c971bd
aaa8b11ae67b354e5194ce8a77544f1daa2ef8d9
'2011-08-17T21:10:20-04:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
cf59887d66f9dad9b668caaf1c5f0014
f9ddc29c64b007067f2f700ddb7ad1dd4d8b19c3
'2011-08-17T21:01:35-04:00'
describe
'53004' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
a35efdbf2cbc7d05dbd53161ce912622
6fb5ae8cc66c0a020d3201aa0d5192aae45f481b
'2011-08-17T21:08:01-04:00'
describe
'924597' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
38f87711ba8b95fb29d4b9a877b87f43
149978fb70a809fb70502c81245f5f180324996c
'2011-08-17T21:06:27-04:00'
describe
'402440' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f7925d9734645d46bb0dbb880ae27761
17c9dd0b852c032d784f4e018c3cfb11cf44198f
describe
'27862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
396c3426a6f83761966fa8179b2e5f3b
4441c96522a441fada7155ce31167e368412628d
'2011-08-17T21:06:09-04:00'
describe
'138189' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
13ffa0274fb303d3a8d1dbadbb16000c
59b19825a7165dd0f8473b7f785c613b8cee2f3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
25b5eeea57d734258257583d52547714
857fedd9778f4981c745cc4ae89b56a4088dd676
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
5f5b7719e7871cb70a5911a1e5752684
5c87da81d181f3ee96365c92b71f61453b3c9df0
'2011-08-17T21:00:16-04:00'
describe
'49764' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
fd5fb6e2a93e14a92320e1710caea045
4959397a382ab32bbf88ba37e71f76cd6d02facb
'2011-08-17T20:59:49-04:00'
describe
'926783' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b9fbec177694ff92e7bba8fa75468e94
a1302188b3ec695fce4f9b820b3c32fbc06684fd
'2011-08-17T21:04:30-04:00'
describe
'448701' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABQZZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
470e373a16617e98cfa23ec8fb2adc9a
86200bf2dde1e4b2c5b1278015d793e9d90290a0
describe
'32808' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
4cede28094cc2a23f01460f36dce32cd
18f2accb4ddab46fcf5c1d08549c5150d12dd454
'2011-08-17T21:05:21-04:00'
describe
'155928' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4e4b028d8ce05291d0fc2f2c8424421a
543f8003f7363eab25393a96091c8bdb40557a15
'2011-08-17T21:06:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAC' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f01a48cc8af0db85b653cbfd0945c784
df427ec8e89af2e61b43188517babf64766ca9d3
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2ebe8bba540124b58f63f883dc026784
41f04bd8c4fc2e48106e6e3e6f5a18fbedd11a7d
'2011-08-17T21:01:01-04:00'
describe
'53600' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
3898550f5f6116b3d9b3e39317e2ea85
33440701cd4de4f0e76ec2b24949b11666909299
'2011-08-17T21:05:14-04:00'
describe
'922912' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a7a3044e95a93d7efd940ae7c6ce9ce4
5c11c9eac0ef0467aaffc3b4b924930b6e2c71fc
'2011-08-17T21:02:16-04:00'
describe
'437830' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAG' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
26fd91afd61e1f636013dafac5c3f1fc
5baa8099f66e696884756f4effcc452a8fcac721
describe
'32953' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
750426818517dfa3beaa0e313919706b
aaf2b7519e141b78ebc1718072b35db04f9f9b98
'2011-08-17T21:05:50-04:00'
describe
'149291' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAI' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
3695f9bca82dabcdc404e40876a8e7dc
1702417bb6ec92cc2310ad9603b4903122880e83
'2011-08-17T20:59:45-04:00'
describe
'7387693' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ccc7f55629290360e3396bdfc785e0f3
6ceb571ba2618ce90cfaa993c959656a8256fd8e
'2011-08-17T21:08:29-04:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
04d20470230a222f9154dbffc40ddbb2
8885bc1096baa369fc6ca27f8802c65dccb3233c
'2011-08-17T21:04:34-04:00'
describe
'52105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAL' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a8fff7d22de7ccf4a434e0098c772cb1
a0b883989b3a1521c10f7f7bd9446256a48d2d52
'2011-08-17T21:00:34-04:00'
describe
'900981' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
76b113b2562126a64883e1f053e8d2ef
dd7d6f56891ba6701d277d3a706651a799567ffc
'2011-08-17T21:04:50-04:00'
describe
'445879' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
60df7db5c6c3c52a18ceb4a00e76aa22
81aabda2b9ac7df4ee8ee5aa2169b82bb462a91d
'2011-08-17T21:08:19-04:00'
describe
'32048' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
a3cd78c6fb8b89cfdfc9bf27d475113a
19b3b59c82bdb770759758dc4da31cbc6d36529e
'2011-08-17T21:00:37-04:00'
describe
'155222' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
bcc27bcc4ee73c342b7751cc12515825
51cd2424b78340c6344c8bb4469768d5cca69668
'2011-08-17T21:07:59-04:00'
describe
'7214485' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAQ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7c5863111e2b396bdba320f2277ef562
f5e5566fe5bae6687ede40d01828d3123e2c41f7
'2011-08-17T21:02:20-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
bc103b511aab658d7ec120afae0ab9b4
9d497a94824ec95060c144b0c5b118dd02a14113
'2011-08-17T21:00:29-04:00'
describe
'53568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAS' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9368aa9ecce349f3cb8c23bbb118e4ad
70e02d66f8fb6d8587268cfd86ae0ccb48f51812
'2011-08-17T21:04:42-04:00'
describe
'924697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAT' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c054e18ceebbc06bb996b036d22f1a15
c305917e674502dcafe4d988d712bab610600e18
'2011-08-17T21:09:53-04:00'
describe
'422822' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
849702e8f0a9932ba263c525f3e13406
7db47dee2768b61b38195e3766154f444ae4f3d0
'2011-08-17T21:08:30-04:00'
describe
'31604' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAV' 'sip-files00045.pro'
913405cce567d26db697e48667b0a09f
891696a5a0c879025dae0e4d7cd8825e321ad5c7
describe
'145086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
45e693ae2640ad23112d932cd7a83edb
1fe52ec077524314268058957e8bfa929a5e52a8
'2011-08-17T21:06:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
68b60ac221294c92af835287227b57d0
9e6e389ee95836fec14fe974e07e7de10ccaa820
'2011-08-17T21:07:00-04:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
b155a23a174392bb21078cf846776c03
3f745cabe89fac31a2dff0fa39e742611daec773
'2011-08-17T21:05:13-04:00'
describe
'51892' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRAZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
356f1b7a3bfdcf98b44976cc31144cab
69c5cdbeb9d40ce6118ae156cde10551346c3ab8
'2011-08-17T20:59:33-04:00'
describe
'926762' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
53a787fe1f38ebb5b4fca92012869d53
ca6c1b6327511f10aba37e3da625138b550003fc
describe
'433453' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fe875196da0886806faf826e46c47bf3
d2d55d77381435f9cdc3ddd7fd65ad8b58ade8f7
describe
'30511' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
949029ffc072f4e4366d70fddeb51630
61a66fcf4282c2a2d7c75fb97d4a7a9d321d283c
'2011-08-17T21:00:31-04:00'
describe
'150701' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
00c3bffc476d6ffde12c920066f85d1d
4e426324177d05268e571230e81c3b75cbe070d4
'2011-08-17T21:07:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBE' 'sip-files00046.tif'
1a3b4e6e99ad353c86d17f5a7edc511d
8e0fe72fb3d1f136edf1e9dd7c7e5cde261f57bc
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3d8441def53a423e436e175b409b23a9
da6c82012a7fe1b258ab0eed876619ce7a890b18
'2011-08-17T21:09:02-04:00'
describe
'52608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7418c84b3a70840ec015d41696feb73a
2ac0bc492b05671e086128c5bc09a71f488c0c28
'2011-08-17T21:02:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b62a68d04abf0675f700485ef0f1dd90
b294425c94bc8e44b6f8fd3f2fc0304e6ee1a6e9
describe
'396107' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ed319518a16fbdce5ad55e6666867798
2ba0ec13332e733b3260817789f0bd5466cef1d4
'2011-08-17T21:03:13-04:00'
describe
'27826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a82adc433bc34df654e2d0637fbc2986
669f408f89af25568a4606a9f0e4bad8897fd76e
'2011-08-17T21:01:42-04:00'
describe
'136294' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5c4553c2880ea119cae458c54bb4aaf3
60f5dc8ce56da2f8df94d7654ed1fdb3de6fdfba
'2011-08-17T21:04:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e157aec75d10dfc2cbdb4334c677b19f
506d66fae7555bbbb4d7325b90e491285a14ae39
'2011-08-17T20:59:56-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
64a0f89281b99224d133839e9ac746d6
367171dc5f74fd06b9d0621d4f7608002887ff77
'2011-08-17T21:04:20-04:00'
describe
'49092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
ed5a46bae3f5f96875f10669d0b9f2d5
c62638d8564b841e373f3915b9778232455a8596
'2011-08-17T20:58:37-04:00'
describe
'900936' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d08bcb952d7ce11939a6791bcc7db3c8
c99e2520000e2a1b1af445945de50092c4f1aca4
'2011-08-17T21:01:37-04:00'
describe
'457357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
059641ccbad8737c807badc04ec61578
f0ca4e197576e7c5e48ebb3bf95b531bda588d99
'2011-08-17T21:01:08-04:00'
describe
'32530' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
12f41222a75e81882997b0c01cad2894
1b7806eccc4327210fd908fec48e5758a19a71df
'2011-08-17T21:00:20-04:00'
describe
'155681' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
18d3fb758e849eaf120cfcdd58238231
464a77595364733bb74bd1ee346ff6b2d43789c9
'2011-08-17T20:59:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
2e4cbd026e12c8d2e4f6a2bfef073741
2eed0d1ee218a5065b0fc73c641850b2af10f36f
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
1995a25e97018fa0cb71b41cff4db20b
7f349ffb7106592c4e3a20826bb42edb1220318b
'2011-08-17T21:09:49-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'52590' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
659386c1356c6083105264d5e90fe982
0fadb5530639713629022de4ed57a3f06698cfd6
'2011-08-17T21:01:38-04:00'
describe
'924702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
abdb9f7dab9626e5ca5bfc26100c375d
3bccd3f112d82c04c4442d4eb308faa63a706c72
'2011-08-17T21:08:41-04:00'
describe
'431094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
e545a85d06f2e267a0616714a16655c0
50c9342b7c60eda1295bffc0bb87481c72de1d82
'2011-08-17T21:03:27-04:00'
describe
'32105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
d899b301e7e9fe5fcbd644dbe23fc215
308b958dd44667e1e98324b182c56790bbeea006
describe
'148174' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b7f2c43e7851cdf1721853559025f907
b340afcc10a33733323c6a81e075352c7af324f3
'2011-08-17T20:59:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRBZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9e76e044a7bfcbcdad9f6ea2e50c88cf
f32ef14b447e1d1c7ce6ac2b12b9ffcc96819048
'2011-08-17T21:03:10-04:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
8c961929d6571fbfc471705cc54133c4
3cd1f56f55eb049041a691a3d47e9161555bde24
'2011-08-17T21:05:08-04:00'
describe
'52141' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
526811e69a19c217bfa4944a647dbf28
6d7e7c3cec20ff24f053a5d84ef0396df01dbf25
'2011-08-17T21:07:36-04:00'
describe
'881982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
80fd8bbbb00f962b6bc134834ebb4cfa
5862b025b8cb1c7abc6615a1ced2867e42e789b6
'2011-08-17T21:05:51-04:00'
describe
'406672' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
c4e1911c36bc02a5b8a846372c553e61
b63b852c2c281fbae9774437bd642fdb5c5408e6
'2011-08-17T20:58:54-04:00'
describe
'26728' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
998ac243ef875356b35e8bdce05a56d7
0dcd7a6ed056036b525a6f37dbaebe19787dafc4
'2011-08-17T21:01:49-04:00'
describe
'141003' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
22811657efcc7b25b94688463d751d61
f579d5e0801c9ec2ace2dd06219961d5e9f8c27c
describe
'7062877' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCG' 'sip-files00050.tif'
aee5b1422cf92e75a903681a752ff34a
1dc7c4bb66c4e95ef29a2b6e8b6b6c81ae8dd49d
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCH' 'sip-files00050.txt'
4741c9444ef488a8009c6b527f166d9b
6577ef013147d4809a9cf3d7cc9165179ed082e1
'2011-08-17T21:01:13-04:00'
describe
'49791' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
8f3e39961e803103ca55de7d589e44f4
3d17053906ca3bce7e5a2fc075fd8479c2e3f751
'2011-08-17T21:05:47-04:00'
describe
'914575' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5b0ce747d2f11b66967e893a7683b28f
f3e1f4bb25a7b134e07afab6c8b55905e95aef50
'2011-08-17T21:01:06-04:00'
describe
'430762' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5d043dfb6ac451e35ad3c163379fbd72
1f648eccc05af26da427fee9cc8e4a94cc627ae2
describe
'31758' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
03498d966b2862d7d10df7597070beb1
5c4926918eede37f0352d29bc6ae7ecc90ca908b
'2011-08-17T21:00:40-04:00'
describe
'149868' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
666ac0921ad5db4b7c54d696f85726ba
f693dfcc4bdddbef33b8aac66107f72d9925c625
'2011-08-17T21:06:01-04:00'
describe
'7323499' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
60323ddce0f6065d19f6eb6e4f37d4fb
efa5a7aa75907c67ed8e96ab7f8697ab1c329ecc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
5abba1a11c6eaaf938c556823817ad8b
31816528476f89ddf07ea19f5aed956a016f5619
describe
'53664' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
8f368aca35af90b8e331f8b4b64a6ab4
97cfced3bcc4c37e51f6acabaf7a3056a06568b3
'2011-08-17T21:08:36-04:00'
describe
'922192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
cbeb4295747eb828e4d2ec376fd0d372
a59dcbf1ba304b3f9e530dd63cc015bb7a7e0a1b
'2011-08-17T21:06:42-04:00'
describe
'416477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCR' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
87a719e92f4e06b8de98fd9d3cd3b187
99d003c3f2c69e43f5d45d500862ad10bf609152
describe
'27461' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
84a7a7b8ca1cb20a9e275b3f68108343
4adae98215e76f12247ad927588dd877ee48f4f3
describe
'143550' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
c1b420e50dfe73137403db45d3c37457
5e32cfd7a100041521fb5927c09511860361e83c
describe
'7384887' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
5ddb76a516271cf18dae4d01fb156460
ffdc3adeb1b6d2663cf2330305a4924c21929265
'2011-08-17T21:05:54-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a5d9f3359cf748fc35103e19f970c49b
4202b7f85d2a28ac878702f8e54c75d526f22f9a
'2011-08-17T21:04:52-04:00'
describe
'50556' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e3a3cb98847f8a41157ffed89f20e04d
f48d29926538f141f45f641d5fd65a7a73324c53
'2011-08-17T21:08:47-04:00'
describe
'914090' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
7cb948d3685491196c2808fcf6688fbd
d404f3aa1bde513cab94d75531a76f783e618e33
describe
'423250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9d779bd2fca53ca07cbd70123b6df4a9
80ab42ffa2661377473faf151aa584ade2ab906c
'2011-08-17T21:08:57-04:00'
describe
'31465' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRCZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
526073b7f00cdc3b54b5db8ee569989e
7a0e2ceaa81950cfbc9693ca06a9b0d494956303
'2011-08-17T21:00:50-04:00'
describe
'144753' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
8429d74c44e521018ded1d29335b15ea
400c89a3147a5eff5c71c2a61eddbd51e6ad3856
describe
'7317161' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
fd21db92076a3328a2ef82f794146979
8028aa6c736ea1d55fb91cefe2bca5daab94ee29
'2011-08-17T21:01:05-04:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b26d290cbef315bb3dc556f10631a67c
4506d1d8ae63d1826be2f91d4e25fd642e36be23
describe
'51697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDD' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4748830ca2332163714253a637b4f5e8
8bd3d01c066479815033f640a15cd0b41bb3fc64
'2011-08-17T21:01:31-04:00'
describe
'922234' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ed7a15eda727d21d1623d021bc08046b
0d23959e81a77e93f0521a4b2b86254503c82703
describe
'443271' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
08959b36d225c1874637ea8f3b0f5df4
c3ba62abc6adad2e256b191201feb23b058a4835
describe
'18436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
31e0262c376e739e352f8c7c8c3e1f6a
a471e91e2ec7043d4188ebf9c25de26bf25890c4
describe
'143610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d136f93d40c854e18441b150bd313d9b
3e706d6643aa6b7a3d19b5c4f90971a143865266
'2011-08-17T21:08:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
27ddef863bd631972c23f446122de93a
875bc8b564b04405d1f122d3330bd74e2d4f7ccf
'2011-08-17T20:59:26-04:00'
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f8e5c87a2fbcccef2dd9c9ede734e742
e51af1684f6b28c6dbdb4d601d74876387b84b4b
'2011-08-17T21:02:06-04:00'
describe
'50204' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6acb734ac10b891cac69d3fa3463b2fc
f5e37f971703dca90f9798fe3dbd1c636c9e776d
describe
'914506' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
15dc458065fa7f20535f32bcf1f36d4d
ecb5fefd70e7c4352907cb40709e1818d16f9fc3
describe
'448521' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDM' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
5720504b604a1036c76928a481e0f904
a9e40c67986b225f5b13757a273982c8d1b2d38d
'2011-08-17T21:04:51-04:00'
describe
'17200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
a4c19fb4ffceecb8d169c29470b2f7cc
01b187323974fd0ab4ac78a70dbca823cab8e134
'2011-08-17T21:09:26-04:00'
describe
'142790' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bcea6c38ea898a030b6de98aff031e70
ace84a6fb2b1fb32ab1cc846879c6d4eb3047576
'2011-08-17T21:00:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
24f5d8fc33034c496757fcb01da34fe0
e13063f645cbfa6f4ccc4c80731abdabcac0637a
'2011-08-17T21:05:24-04:00'
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
f37882ee6b32b692e3b18e2c2555cd5c
c05eec6732523b89f7ea9cc8d56b8b6027aa81f5
'2011-08-17T21:03:43-04:00'
describe
'51650' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
7c9264cd68eb4a6343acb66fe2776d4d
bae1455b433866fcada9aa0241e112adfae6e8c7
'2011-08-17T21:08:39-04:00'
describe
'922255' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
736ddc1b9092adfff1625cb237ec2eee
38de7c599d77a9dcc4125268177e4a66154d481f
'2011-08-17T20:58:58-04:00'
describe
'405359' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDT' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c76d46d21cb890d0e5016991da20a6f4
bb29798ffaad3a35d97886ac2ec996b174cedeb4
'2011-08-17T21:08:05-04:00'
describe
'25932' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
60473e1b5518e8c974a8cfef0dae1353
e8f9799d37ffb709898194b86555cb4949536f71
describe
'136624' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b12bb89b67ed1be9136a934da348ca79
6720acb143f86750454a7d88a194ab31d3b2f8b5
'2011-08-17T21:00:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c9ea3e6af62b22a997fb2137daef8a6d
678dd9d91c46ef6c82dc80931da8d3e116f93fbd
'2011-08-17T21:09:48-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
c9158de5118778f257929f896d6726e9
4ae23e122849912e527f58db23bfdfc6d94bd7bf
'2011-08-17T21:02:13-04:00'
describe
'48721' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c73b50530343738c1e70487a68bbccb0
e7dc3eb5258c9aec59c962fb2d92dfba7e95ae29
'2011-08-17T20:59:21-04:00'
describe
'914540' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRDZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
388b9d78e9bcb244cae4e0418f0dc440
c6705adfcb9f9c07710321a73a416c342c12b54d
describe
'417511' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
ebeb2bb41f5db13abe2c4bc643d21399
35eeab0dd62a320037aa2381b26e72627799bbb8
'2011-08-17T21:06:33-04:00'
describe
'30257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
1dbca7d1eb4ccefae8ce684db2e64060
a0fb3adf18438750b4943724ce65dbd2287b404c
describe
'143856' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ab4b5f39cb591897417e838fca8e57c9
f3d895a46e6d8fe85ed19677087a9508716fd315
'2011-08-17T21:05:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRED' 'sip-files00057.tif'
5f228a97f3b05615fede080c7d7f5590
a4f6e103aa0344374fe91aee3faf51c80a004fa9
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
df403459f87fe2222167b6a0410f6a24
dc75cfd48dc9fbc963a87607bd6cb87487ed55af
describe
'52000' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
73cccaacb7e07d75e29694353e3d4b89
0d783591a10899041b185c389921ad8f925dca57
describe
'922259' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
6adb2e1b89d29466d30dbcde4f6dcb70
370f4c833f0b9cc3b25a638900beec216dfe4a2b
'2011-08-17T21:10:19-04:00'
describe
'431566' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
88f33e4e944aa534c6878768c8468c03
8ceafe523d9a0fccadcb72343527edae978e75a4
describe
'30525' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e695c66768c1f1075ee6e75f99ec4848
8066c4c3b21cf67e7f353ff007bb84fb30ebe9f7
describe
'146523' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2736551fabb8b33f664e69e950d8fc38
8323285cfa7f2a0c0006eff5dc7203da4f8e5bd8
'2011-08-17T21:10:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
7d6034f216d969eee5f9e98824344437
4469b1d3a104107082d368adb09f7e91c5527d8d
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b4053be4c9781de30a134f7db95f4ee1
389d192744a724e6c5cc2ecdc3fcde798034dfa3
'2011-08-17T21:08:10-04:00'
describe
'52008' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3639375399b0cea3d8a061a12199b92b
9d7a78a5138f70ad3467df1cef34dd51d8995413
describe
'914566' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
fa45f577e71bc8e431b5edbd81873a6f
a9e59d1b61e74bcbf1e2e44552be57cf0ea4a19c
'2011-08-17T20:59:27-04:00'
describe
'427352' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
2c666ce7cb5ba9d238d9557a332f51b8
2de32803bbd63f185770b125846c414bfffe74d7
'2011-08-17T21:01:07-04:00'
describe
'31432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREP' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6c1053e33c890e28833c8eeca402f63b
3a531f138099b529249c7080a49f299d43011dd0
describe
'147251' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
635217e839d4504b36b8d2a8a1d15fd7
ec22b7da38ef55f38c6573ff7ae5c23e12a4becd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRER' 'sip-files00059.tif'
84b7d538d5590aa56b928abb907a1f7e
81677f31a6d13fec78075248943adf936a71d917
'2011-08-17T21:06:06-04:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRES' 'sip-files00059.txt'
cd1cc63b71c505732dde831faee8b0d9
2bf748edfe20abc354117e9161b4fc3a1e9e4451
'2011-08-17T21:08:55-04:00'
describe
'53608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRET' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
1f2ef04a13fd69c3ccbdd09497f9f803
602bfa82b98aa278840d67acbb4fa3a6f095cbec
'2011-08-17T21:02:59-04:00'
describe
'898788' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
86d5a3c5967a73c5b78c49027c4994c3
1dc59b4954d3f87a7b7b2609da98dc0fee56ee2f
describe
'428027' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
54af2c497c4d0c3dee46e5d8f637815f
761644dc3deb5847519def9ab3c95b380a3627d1
describe
'31959' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREW' 'sip-files00060.pro'
86db5e9f0a9f470ffe330fdd10235aa4
84bb419607364c18ad690cf6fa83639058f9bfd0
describe
'145967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f373a64b27fbd421e5aaba239e130f7e
e755567260d5676d9c718c0f005d4c2af335c908
'2011-08-17T20:58:35-04:00'
describe
'7194635' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
1447e2669a5acdfceeb6b6e33256a44b
f46ae18f5dc952d19f72e48c61225067b0a1bba1
'2011-08-17T21:09:46-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABREZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7c2c649eb9a4fa3b116759101967ed01
6053564b651e30dcab151ae8622f8967ba4ab9e3
'2011-08-17T21:02:24-04:00'
describe
'52019' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
01cd205933ad2285362f1b49452257d1
1d68fca1a1a7bf5bc61a76fb5d1e1b912dc499cc
'2011-08-17T20:59:04-04:00'
describe
'930703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
00093bc35fc5738a97a8adc1df84faeb
6fd3adc0de29cfb6533df638282b9d11e24ad597
'2011-08-17T20:58:28-04:00'
describe
'390661' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
07760f97c36ea0d7bf8f315354b9e170
426ba4abf3b246f2016d0c44a1d08376264e5182
'2011-08-17T21:00:43-04:00'
describe
'23830' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFD' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b4a2736ff7e26fcc0440f26201ffea1c
acaea28913b866f29f67b8e8d154709e90ecb7b5
'2011-08-17T21:06:05-04:00'
describe
'133255' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
258594559de16d6b7f04f6506bad530f
94be527f48ab71b50c8e0d747e5c9301f09bbdc9
describe
'7450893' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
7e32a2de2012c8a9645a706b7ea807ba
85602f4150595a7120b23476ea7b1a70a9eb9b14
'2011-08-17T20:58:31-04:00'
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
77c5851e68b02b45de920df843da0bb7
908d42e8d2d1a44f61279b5c9d753c2fcbfb8c30
describe
'46099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7508673bff3987d4142768aa46ca3f0d
8ed5c64272dd057c65f0128ddba5dd89eec7f0d3
'2011-08-17T21:09:14-04:00'
describe
'922258' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f21306f194c4454fdb255872af5608d1
39780e90979359676da70981ff4b6ae69862a5f1
'2011-08-17T21:00:49-04:00'
describe
'433417' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6c08e8b516994570c77d40e452c3d8fc
2359dff5c7807c801b10b598b33922623a4004d4
'2011-08-17T21:02:48-04:00'
describe
'17583' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
cfca3cecbf5f5ac75a394aae9f9b9893
90a93029af44105895b5fae03b6dab9202550272
'2011-08-17T21:07:24-04:00'
describe
'137750' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFL' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f1ff5a2c03df63736b9cc4335e0f0b47
a124eba49bf574fc96a0997b96c1b46d46c45ad7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c676fe8ac197316a740ba1f886fa2c5c
f969363a4c8fdee9b8d8ec55d9624d6cee9877af
'2011-08-17T21:00:54-04:00'
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
aff8d452b6bbed4a813cabc748a38c38
6f7d469aad8916b727e20633875d4efb03a97129
'2011-08-17T21:01:00-04:00'
describe
'48454' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
317c551a5b9c392bbc25bc36ddb91dac
d9534063f51c3a6db176c3735000d23771be0cb2
describe
'914562' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a81d1fcf39a4bc2f00475fc6e408481e
395fe8dadd076e79591ae6bccbf8a7aa3874ae7a
'2011-08-17T21:05:41-04:00'
describe
'409802' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a04e481cd51367183fabd9caa4ffaffc
297fd72ce5400fd87d282a842d432ee54ee4cf3a
describe
'27920' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1d128f9a20223dde0619bb58317e7bdb
c319d668d19437d6b5bd7b96ecb255726fba5ad7
describe
'140293' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
89c038e2394737e4068a4d3f4c9d3169
83416812d64ed99690c9b27eeb274a6815bb392d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
086fd63e13a7b2b43f9dfae012689eb7
f56abb7315a20657c35d3b870684a3fdc827c236
'2011-08-17T21:07:22-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
1123a05f1af4955763d445bc720982c1
a856963bd4b0e229bd603ed1d298dbd6f935d59e
'2011-08-17T20:58:56-04:00'
describe
'51372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
02ed9637e3b109ac0d51df60a91553db
61978218010c275bbceaa74d99b8fec90beaf894
'2011-08-17T21:01:09-04:00'
describe
'922266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
0af595eccdf330e65aed0308f68d3bfd
301dbabc7656b4db72c6063f8c1053e2b64011aa
describe
'427876' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
796a817004bdb0888fa9fbad871193a2
5571bd8a4f3a1da32cf8a04b48f8b3f786d57792
'2011-08-17T20:59:24-04:00'
describe
'28362' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
418a54cc26df9ced42d62900c2d80170
51df3384f48fb7fcdd75ea1aeca3ff44fefffdb0
'2011-08-17T20:59:42-04:00'
describe
'146640' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRFZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
d48ca2fc53bd076118abcb9accda31e3
f49b6b4a3523be98ac1630ce53645fb9393d6842
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
9bc9801f7726bafc366d78cb246c6558
510445ba12962ff8936045bfb26e04b76e0eb764
'2011-08-17T21:08:27-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
690c1755dad381441eb1fbf1282f2a52
97928ce8b2a77e06ebdf3f463d45b4ba343bc8c3
'2011-08-17T21:05:29-04:00'
describe
'52497' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
831ae18a581f51d1c460f9d1e98a372b
41af15b7b335de2af7a2837fd59a959c1fe256e3
describe
'914563' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGD' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c46739f9eb66b05468aef1dcf263f070
e12c63da5b04057316c0018025e5dc1b7bee5b2b
'2011-08-17T21:06:36-04:00'
describe
'379869' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
898cea5239d7f65052006afc5a72647b
a8522a07c1a765130b284b0e96232b1e985b6f39
describe
'15238' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
201d7ac4c1ba41354330d35542ce2669
27bf8efed17d33fb4035877f5cfb7fa6ff155449
'2011-08-17T21:00:46-04:00'
describe
'126292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5d0c8d80f64a5a75370210553600893c
43aae2bbf2300b6888ace0d93eaf90f07d57cef0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGH' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a99654504279e54c81061cdaae64c917
bf3a630d3468a26651feedf118867d71cd55f173
describe
'687' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
1cab60a08014627171c76851eba1c462
bc601ec2d01b18bb78f5888330f8a4593c23caf8
'2011-08-17T21:09:11-04:00'
describe
'46608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5a43e802f49f58fc2a0665726932528b
53b2c279fe9b69ee87d040ee9dc0ae913a020077
describe
'922241' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGK' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9c51c12e71a0c8df248c83a6c88499e2
ac7b06373600756925681d518be270f7acd681ed
describe
'393838' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGL' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
b20c62589e4594e4320bbb257c97273c
ab066ba5e494a5516fa2417bf2fa1c434a851852
'2011-08-17T21:04:10-04:00'
describe
'23284' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGM' 'sip-files00066.pro'
6720fa38510dc8441c748302126c24d2
526b0c5cb0cceef3da932f4e8aae36427149fd06
describe
'133995' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b9fa671859d0ada99ed005741dc0e482
4c3bad41e9e7cb207f2e8083d0e3102edd5713b2
'2011-08-17T21:02:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGO' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a14d8f5dcfc42e55896798e7071d0ae4
8af58b8fbf9b1d8c7d007e59a862d1cb233b68a7
'2011-08-17T21:03:46-04:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGP' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7f5f92e57819f9d277fe67017f51db3b
b357fc85355b98f24d7e366e4bac8dc91fc8158d
'2011-08-17T21:03:49-04:00'
describe
'48633' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGQ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
59b0b1bc9b8407854332d5ed73105cdf
2c44ab4bb0aed86ab0b24e7fc5f6e2d7289d6108
'2011-08-17T21:06:56-04:00'
describe
'914541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGR' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7ab0a9a0cbb945203cb52f7d4026221d
71546696187354447a811945250077e1b28b329b
'2011-08-17T20:58:57-04:00'
describe
'414321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGS' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
00f92d635e780f284273ce94e19c047f
beaf34626d180dcadd1bac8e3e101872d27c13ab
'2011-08-17T21:00:13-04:00'
describe
'27520' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGT' 'sip-files00067.pro'
e4384c4fc227362207001eb895bb3f4b
b62175856f10d2781ab860a17b7590728a7e9258
'2011-08-17T21:02:44-04:00'
describe
'143228' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGU' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
45a497f021d771b827d289da5a61ffa0
0b6e960b03e97330dacd9d988721f32847cdc95b
'2011-08-17T21:08:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGV' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2250833f4e6b74745d5d2d029dfbee9a
d6c752fa107b997f930aa69538cfbb1642fdafd4
'2011-08-17T20:59:22-04:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
356536836c1f21c8cde5d85d8555da08
9ea9afb4ee3d8bb91ded81d8fdb7fa141cb421af
'2011-08-17T21:06:49-04:00'
describe
'52066' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGX' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
3ffa494764b3ad881730d76a0c9ab31a
27dd333a492f02d7868f33074e03adf6344a9d7b
describe
'922136' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGY' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a02715e2dc57abcf35955013a456a401
679167ecb95d606fccad3aca365f887630fa4fe7
'2011-08-17T21:06:08-04:00'
describe
'432186' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRGZ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
21cb4e02f8ce7f1f2a81528549ccfa7b
a679d822d54341cec5c8821dddd91cc886a02614
describe
'27220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
4c633b3ac54bdd42055e85024ffcedf9
706dbb07feb9e40c9d88306fb5333e544646d583
describe
'148536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c60243d7845984226376177b9a4e2d83
81362d4e18db1a31f34f58fb73571f71404771da
'2011-08-17T21:03:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHC' 'sip-files00068.tif'
86cef1830ef4b5be4d678814c3367285
3585417a36fcb4a0d35cbf49d547be4a5c4d338b
'2011-08-17T21:03:30-04:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d954676fc2520f957d4d58e18d2cbf1d
f938d2c949b9bdabd76dd7972ae404f616d5aa7f
'2011-08-17T21:02:49-04:00'
describe
'52277' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHE' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
8f59651ca970db53ed918a43c7312c35
f3db686b2310b6ebd85350531f360ddb732a26d8
'2011-08-17T21:07:19-04:00'
describe
'914576' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHF' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
6d7645bd9502c2feb3a73d7a8a8a44bc
12c1096d5b7bcb5ab46e27b7919b85c60d5a01b7
describe
'416988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHG' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
bd59e735846283f49d98c094a7928a28
bb8500493a758da1e0f13902ec3fa8113e39b418
'2011-08-17T21:05:30-04:00'
describe
'30499' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHH' 'sip-files00069.pro'
8f9398bbb5cfef7bdffa30edb29dbc08
a9fb174db904466c16eaa2d7b9a93020f86ee30a
describe
'143210' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHI' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
806e99ed730413bc6c6205a962f0ae5f
d90e55c9344ac4c30b9ed2769b0735a419db5e16
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHJ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
51bdfd2b09a0ac95f62072ce7dfd310e
86ddd091f1a82425599a36ba37958e11c2f7332b
'2011-08-17T21:08:54-04:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHK' 'sip-files00069.txt'
2dfd70cc639c14ee784ef161701be04b
14337ab0b776368903d8b526cadc9021bb4c78fa
'2011-08-17T21:00:02-04:00'
describe
'52059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHL' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
cbf082431c37e6485c5ad2a4f4325828
150f1f8f1a7d9441e3ad3196cd47dc45f36a3178
describe
'931544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHM' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
00dedc9a40b69124bb1ca8c6750fc571
42d06b99c051faa0d2bbd87c9064f7a283991bc1
describe
'428312' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHN' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
f11586204272f0f2764acb5c2797ccc2
14b4e5cb03548e4731a1a58dfe04eeb8356d67b3
'2011-08-17T21:01:03-04:00'
describe
'31239' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHO' 'sip-files00070.pro'
393cf676a740eb4e8b05ce5b0503f882
058119a7519d3917f72f510c89ef201d98bf48b8
describe
'144662' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHP' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e4302ee256a216c17f3ddec3476d827b
8af2d02c53c15b9713358cdd069cff01f7934fc3
describe
'7456881' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHQ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6d19619779a473f359619941be38ed68
717d0dcab68aecf2e0484c9865360c023675aae6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
b9ae40ddc454ae0491586ee18318f915
2294fdf1844bea4c59be9b86c2707c70a6f614e8
describe
'50275' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHS' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
a41ea32751f9a6892d5f4f73963fe6f9
d8639125ed9183a390a25b5357d713fb3256a8d3
'2011-08-17T21:08:22-04:00'
describe
'914558' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHT' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3008e0d11e3b390edce4c5a90f8440b4
9935371ed711aac23eace2c0496d45e1fbd37632
describe
'410468' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHU' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
06d58d4bcc9010f1f8c4df7717f06919
60529e44cc7454a0af7dee57875c7e704a4bd9bf
describe
'27065' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHV' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f15a5b4c046521f180e3b7cae3d1048c
628b03c8b50ea3d66fd7fa525a571f2f6f58d9d9
describe
'139850' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHW' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
85db3fa2d8cc6f49ad95e097af831ac1
aa50a2785b0d13507aef2402d5f9732e514c8854
'2011-08-17T21:06:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
4d43fc02712a0035530189a2b762ec3e
c42deae4e7beaff0752e38a171982005bcad7984
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
8acd812c68acff5c997466646763ce7b
2b393b9d218071338eb8d83cfe429891be421723
'2011-08-17T21:03:41-04:00'
describe
'49526' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRHZ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
1fcc54d2b001d71f6309d2db93b5e14e
40ae70a199f6d9118c67a763d16ebadd52f18be5
describe
'922220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIA' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
e93337a1239c6ba23a7d20df6571e465
4fae10ffbf653135f2f6c52f8adcff0bba60eb24
'2011-08-17T21:03:44-04:00'
describe
'412015' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
0d45633288470800d907a2122ee265d8
708113dabba8938771a9ab766772865367372ded
'2011-08-17T21:03:31-04:00'
describe
'26518' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIC' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ddccbe5290e3df84dfb3f72eea81bab4
4e68f9283d2e209eb4cff110474e6c716cf07584
describe
'139689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRID' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
ae9119f762939ea0eda64d25ae922c3f
e5c4e3acb97c24e38d6255984e9bc8df7a07718e
'2011-08-17T21:06:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIE' 'sip-files00072.tif'
4ff8f91579e6a572804a2c7cf10178f4
d5c9400880ff72a049189cfa2b33a8e79e2fbaec
'2011-08-17T21:07:54-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
62a2d0183f7bc6f900ba5da135491004
b8c92c519db4548601e80fe7396ea6609b007d71
'2011-08-17T21:09:38-04:00'
describe
'50586' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIG' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
30b0397e2e60ca5e8f0b24d03f37bec5
1c1f2059c031a98f42b061addff397189f4d46f9
describe
'914565' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIH' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f44723d03bc438cc2bd8fa4ba1d72014
44fa332678983de2a608e0652be62b1803b9ebca
describe
'402260' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRII' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
3570b6094a917bba2955ab67229dc991
ed9b5dbaa61c0374851528afa9b615e7bbc409ad
describe
'27596' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIJ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
622c528181e18e8a485f9c110d8974bc
03e33c9d72d6b7b2e6c8f3219defe2546bea4997
describe
'139611' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIK' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4ea587049dce9f391e0a100ff9b02d69
1c16fed060da1169cdb0aace16c5a0e27b632f8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6db62736abb30edcd5e1ccf355dbe88e
8791a3ce4ec3ff9d8f1b0b579eff1c439705a71c
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
fac8600d078938fcd9b09b6728186534
59cffe84d5fd3f76457432a625402ec2158abbe2
'2011-08-17T21:04:58-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'51078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIN' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
aeac1085528c95849009c7f438ba5a0f
422ebf3cd14893a70f233049d1ba9ec64c5671f5
'2011-08-17T20:59:03-04:00'
describe
'922190' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIO' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b1049154e885f53742e54f4002ae97dc
f53ec7dd3d4730f739c1e2a5bce94b009d06fba5
describe
'434034' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
467cc4972350853eb7dfc4a9f14fac55
df5efbd1b8bf57e5bfc81d1055147d35abdf36b5
'2011-08-17T21:08:52-04:00'
describe
'32167' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIQ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
87487fa04cf0589dcfd0eb8f8eba3efd
dcdb37820a64d2e80c3c49a8cd0d1e4804e8f238
describe
'150633' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIR' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
4480cc7409815ec283de850aa9756fd8
966678c60b7a0a9f59e95e7ceef44a895b44f99f
'2011-08-17T21:09:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIS' 'sip-files00074.tif'
7f37ea2c70166b0d643570b183d95e0e
699429b4ef0651c1db4886d4764ec0676f2728b5
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
659d90735c4d7674858d79a0cb75968f
f2efe7898cd89b0e198a0c3cd3f4895a81f288dc
'2011-08-17T21:04:26-04:00'
describe
'52571' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIU' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
6475dd1d313b0d02b0e1e58334b6d4db
729eb8ff39091a84efc7aff660eff7e240645806
'2011-08-17T21:06:51-04:00'
describe
'883572' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIV' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
665446a127bd8bb1a5c1f66cc00a4d6b
940f8a4765054325620c28a2a4add3b511316675
'2011-08-17T21:06:24-04:00'
describe
'416849' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIW' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b01331aaf5f8510d0e33d21b6b0cb4dd
6ff715e5748c51296110d83334af8e8475994818
'2011-08-17T21:00:21-04:00'
describe
'30436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIX' 'sip-files00075.pro'
a780b10e8c4e3f3bc694a4f6526af115
48cb3c9275776a395a699e3678b17dd58c4b991a
describe
'144954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
20d652399028cced52cb86569672f234
7b6054589f09c9d2164dc1d1d59306c1c13d6f65
describe
'7076297' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRIZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
7d021a587faeee27edb9ec6b1261f0b0
2fa648118e8eb8f4def5c7ba8c43a94beabdbb6e
'2011-08-17T21:00:12-04:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJA' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d641660a373b9409e92c6f47a3766ae5
c83958271f657451c7d8f85df9aa370b221c81b0
describe
'53438' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJB' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
597ef512d1bc71b18eb411a1c26801c5
d4fc22341fdf0edc65fe4b6e669784cfc816ad83
describe
'922263' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJC' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
424c1b0b08f98328a29bc8a1829b8844
32ae5a70915f48203fb0094ccf09dea895057002
describe
'409158' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJD' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
cdddb839fd6f09c89f9d1ee004dc13cc
18c6eb7fbb73a3e4f04e1df6ea03fae165e03cbf
'2011-08-17T21:03:07-04:00'
describe
'16397' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJE' 'sip-files00076.pro'
3a6ed7a4d416cbf185d8c25d8bd3edff
1a732676e0685e6e8f9a67d93a54a05c9507e337
describe
'133281' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJF' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
46cae643d4e6856882383704f51abee9
102025b80ef0b1b8a47b038067963a712cca6e97
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJG' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6e0a235b31ae219a8aeb275348d0fe92
f1bb161885054deccfb925696f5e20372f4fcf13
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJH' 'sip-files00076.txt'
c29a2632e61037c828104a5794aab136
dae1d1d6d351a2313d66830cc51584bc350fdf1a
'2011-08-17T21:00:27-04:00'
describe
'48534' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJI' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
da9c778805116e38033db64c2ea8f9da
002f741c2850797ca09443dc85456ce95690b390
describe
'914578' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJJ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
3cb157e91e02c8217309cc918445c4a1
5d4ad2bfa5cbe41c3c66ba5d7d3e75ed8e47a717
'2011-08-17T21:10:06-04:00'
describe
'426971' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJK' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b531afef2dad2d8cbb412ca737752b5e
a0020fce17516b910657f6c6bb3d40ba2bd781c0
describe
'32197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJL' 'sip-files00077.pro'
9a3df6772eef5257c3b0dd9cedd7291f
709e222278c3de4dded2a05ce26b157a8c5c94d9
'2011-08-17T21:02:01-04:00'
describe
'146849' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJM' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
1099432ccd995587c4c44d5fa26b69ee
8d2c57956666428acd4c1ea0de4a1eaeb0c660f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJN' 'sip-files00077.tif'
c23d03500b7f98a0e513914888f8cd0d
52d42d954af07aed5e4c9d80f15304f3e082ccc4
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJO' 'sip-files00077.txt'
bc350dc031f4a76414ab11ec1756b92b
d4924c8e55de168b9978a44d0da8d270773c7f6a
'2011-08-17T20:58:49-04:00'
describe
'51813' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJP' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
df0e48e6c0585e4bcb516998f6ecede8
49ebe87bb9946597fd49c1172434a500576d8a67
'2011-08-17T20:59:17-04:00'
describe
'922210' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJQ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c7659f0f724e5c0b90e513b9e5dc0f92
6626f76a2f12d2a12f7c37eeeeb2fce1f6beb06c
'2011-08-17T21:01:41-04:00'
describe
'412092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJR' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
fcedb79ce93e7a7217587494e406ba0a
83031c0c22368df1c5bb6cc29e142d46faa73432
describe
'28737' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJS' 'sip-files00078.pro'
614111c3c3232db51a3a9ba59e9183b6
dbe7cf01ef186dd581ce305f2bc074401f622ed4
'2011-08-17T21:07:20-04:00'
describe
'142051' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJT' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
5d02e4aa3a3dd4bdc9083fe791a198f3
919a8b286794ed1cd1ae4c7a6170e08803e7064a
'2011-08-17T21:08:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJU' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7c43c63723d4387361518ef0ae51888a
669f9f2a14a4f0081d995ce3136e1507d8eef274
'2011-08-17T21:06:50-04:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJV' 'sip-files00078.txt'
0c831fa7f07c61855272a0bacc28ac05
d2d4562aa370c93ecbabcd9cfc2fb88961e1f427
'2011-08-17T21:08:37-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'49529' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJW' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
f89adba9e5ce0769c0708c757f61c620
6bbef1522bcd25eb13508c5e366b8e89647c4ab6
'2011-08-17T21:00:44-04:00'
describe
'953406' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
4d5ca199bcb16de04ced3e2f21d1deda
be2998365a434e9bc33deae94a1440f13932d221
'2011-08-17T21:09:42-04:00'
describe
'421450' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJY' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
09dee45672e97143b9bb1e67df28c8f5
5fda04c10f6a36e7a17d37911abaafb09f82a263
describe
'32262' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRJZ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
bb83c638d10da8293cd3f760fb095a8b
393c4d8c9ed5595b4077a4438a10642df8ca06e6
'2011-08-17T21:01:02-04:00'
describe
'145930' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKA' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f850158b7d8db50a802dd10edb04d0de
c1a99d36403646015e4b9de7a681be00397db6d6
describe
'7632589' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKB' 'sip-files00079.tif'
fa1f04afa13580fd3f26f0172b158ca2
4521c0a0dd2e47597c18a877c9bb9ed5fcf1edd7
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
75075c3578fa7567752da41a1553281e
12eec157251e1b1fdd462ecec4ae845dc28ba17f
describe
'49464' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKD' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
1f1a19c970a5d51ac770bf52f5bac904
1c53ec17b9dab4e162d698e4cc6ea66207429833
'2011-08-17T21:10:17-04:00'
describe
'922202' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
da5e48d379c57618f501d3a008ee81f9
c1e7a954f4a2a7b953664dbce0b2d6d0f6d00038
'2011-08-17T21:02:04-04:00'
describe
'414676' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKF' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
1e025f58eb9b5ef94fb509b07d256292
b64c7af710a3cdde02e376b497eae15377f03bcf
describe
'29796' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
6b983fa66699ce34d999328dbe7c2202
e1f1bd58e5500baa64aa023c804cfbcb645aac4f
describe
'141757' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKH' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
a261141e694683b1787cf84afa58e4a1
4c3dc6a8f5402cf67d82ecf82e20787660ae1bbf
'2011-08-17T20:59:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKI' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c60923d4b5a1573672937bdd3e84ca20
83c68abdb1bfa8ec04396cc9f65f24bd7dd843d8
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
7f3e80c3fe61a308cb4d238fae7629c5
eb011fcce9c87dcef9e3454bd046ff4c367a7974
'2011-08-17T21:06:26-04:00'
describe
'50279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
5a2a09516d12e72bd744c6f7a40d5089
0f14e80a76395331f009718c7034b41e69addf6d
'2011-08-17T21:09:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
70bfc4a1529d160e3352b8e7a17561d0
d98205a84d14bbcd00689ff985260d21c6c769eb
describe
'408990' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKM' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
583a7eecf991f71a193fd27b5e85781b
42afd37c38fe1071e0f61ba9084ff4a2039d9dd5
describe
'28518' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
bf404adb0b72829a7825ba26a9b4b5cb
b6d5b1020d27e78c6fd600cee85c1f78ebfb527b
'2011-08-17T21:10:07-04:00'
describe
'140861' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKO' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
db4323be9fc2e05ed6ce906efeb72fbb
d72fee2c1b3470caecdb2ee8e1bb7e38bfafc697
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKP' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ed4c482b7d77244e78e71f377d98a5e1
bd8cbf939ec7bd82d6349f0cdb546d702db6fde0
'2011-08-17T21:04:25-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0a69edd48a0f166d75474c96718fce73
5621c03926e281b406d0add5519ff2f4e9175f24
'2011-08-17T21:09:00-04:00'
describe
'50793' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c8f980b8dda933287df1195d31294584
8e91b43a1571cdcf97c363b2822bc1b384284c5c
describe
'922193' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKS' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
9894789c7dd564f343730b0c08f393a1
61fde8b897d1256b7a3658901cf0459eff27b6db
'2011-08-17T20:58:43-04:00'
describe
'414335' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKT' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
40ed179d10ceddb2e51ec108baf51938
54ccc40e3985bddd416a62f7858795a319c7a2ce
'2011-08-17T21:05:16-04:00'
describe
'28178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ffa070d93b2f061ff6f597c60af24cf3
b22adbad2067bc441f3b34968cdb8474b270e7fe
describe
'144529' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
93641fcc5fd8bec1ccd3352751a57384
f3c9d294742b111296c096c59d9c806d241e0127
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
ca4fb632b78652f50308fdc711d70bbb
01a232ee53aec8cc791c206ed8b76812df31e55c
'2011-08-17T20:59:32-04:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
fe8129967b89365f766f224754b6bc3d
5b0729f4846f578bb0b6540e6dbc0b1dc6f1a9d1
describe
'50824' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKY' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
ec65bb03bda93061f9db0c894c5fde11
08486a335db174df8bd7e18e5dc2978e1be1ac3f
describe
'914581' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRKZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
dcc086c3dbfb03e85a1c1273b9d0bed9
2b5964ade380c715c38cafac6a1617f309ab6f09
describe
'419937' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
51f885c3b90bda70f1b6a73deb5a89cf
9453700a103ed906a2e188eafa5af2e19a97ef0e
'2011-08-17T21:01:33-04:00'
describe
'32381' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLB' 'sip-files00083.pro'
e8c8011782c99fcef37a2727e36ec753
8c63c6360f44cc4625b3f9311887b9423ba91a76
'2011-08-17T20:59:58-04:00'
describe
'145634' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b15b4a66183ab66be7913ac85e11479d
65349094a9d3a55d01dcaa771678b85c841cf2d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
45d1c48d598400dfcd1dafe9a795c85c
4d749bbd24ba12287b74c3e4b39010a441daf8ef
'2011-08-17T21:01:52-04:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
19fa15f17d70ae06a9c73dcb73163472
d6755885a3d91ec56a99018e0c9fd9e189c73f66
describe
'51789' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
727df1769ee9eca41ef3c7948b3cb55c
8969444c50ab64fe7f2fbab964ad1a67b67fd33b
describe
'922260' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
e7dff216724ee4b0bfd0cd74191a4e73
1282dd143b9f5c1bb55d1c51851026f9db0a35fd
'2011-08-17T21:05:31-04:00'
describe
'420110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
56e0691abd060e398a25ed4ab7c20f26
51ab2f66d075ac483c1be8bfbd92892b7e6a4bd4
'2011-08-17T21:05:18-04:00'
describe
'28144' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
4a251ea5be34a7418c416ab1515690b5
06f1add641d99e24e3e13d08a428df0c2dbb0b40
describe
'145076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
40f43938909ebc00251f7c9b8d8f7529
929610f01c220c871df20a39908323d61b0a1faa
'2011-08-17T21:02:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
9106341b90e017a08d31d5bd62d610d3
d4cab9145cb89035ffc4c0eeae7d240ee800ca9c
'2011-08-17T21:05:22-04:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d7316d2f5ec733342f33a355c4dd94fd
607e8e63f1e98cf0a69ca1c7c20e8a0efa943e07
describe
'51509' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
e231d6e5c33e6eefbcf77e067c15742c
1cf79da74e2fe7172913ac6982c20d2759334300
'2011-08-17T21:10:11-04:00'
describe
'914590' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
4ffb2e10aa37943aea5fa82f1c1a0259
7d998a2cd3f1304951f158e2d5c441116ad0ba52
describe
'431192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
50be6547a61917670fa23df784164256
92cef919abec25258236ce9cb41caea05cd08997
describe
'31691' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLP' 'sip-files00085.pro'
805eb83bcec266994d3b1caea51b3aae
545b24b870340a71f9e6e37e2589a24f1e7cd259
describe
'148709' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
30ed3934114c6840855cb370820ab168
cdb73708c6ffb66a651f3e2167bce29f416d5001
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
745f0bd7f98fda49379b1c415c10a753
c0e705822df074103c1fcc7ee4cd8c1fe5676400
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
24c6291b65636ef865bb76fb3287465f
00fc2629d5ac8bc2dd680099696ad370d7f943cb
'2011-08-17T21:00:24-04:00'
describe
'53180' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0a0994f46815803a4570560203128baf
d2d69d66a9fb2378ca95df77c468ff03f393dec6
describe
'922225' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
106688d24289713b5a7797af65cc4e64
f8600f2955aa21c0a1db8d15dff2b3611621f4ac
describe
'409165' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b59f14ced0a297812d77855ce6dd8976
d7160030e06d40c9a9073e58c7cb38466276fe33
describe
'27453' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5a40cb5160e4ea16ddbb9a2f651a3998
824a192c7693acd4f8b91340893b674c26783a05
'2011-08-17T21:02:09-04:00'
describe
'140947' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
0cd458001eb39c7b53f4be48992c0d4e
bc7d5e69513f6399db05f027670125d7f4ad90d2
'2011-08-17T21:02:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
b02305d1e811c8c81ca8cd0aeaf2a617
c6a738ce58314467890effe302883544a774f48c
'2011-08-17T21:04:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRLZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
cb9f99122f113cde7eaea525f4760b76
bd116f84a0ddfcf70c6746b6fa6c35e820e2ffa7
describe
'49813' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
93f9933e44e9fcaee0a06d6a892e88e7
285ac0b649bebec9671152ff1c8be5b9939c9c14
'2011-08-17T21:03:00-04:00'
describe
'914537' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f337c101e3554cd620dccc94947da78f
2de817237b2461da487b1e4e017d0c9f924ff2db
'2011-08-17T21:01:15-04:00'
describe
'420143' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
22d39cb3abaf2e91b5bcc49e916f1a98
66cf867454ca90e656fc7f857d620ce58ae80909
describe
'31309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
e34293f128c9b8090f23a4a3a940d4d7
5af6c10eb6d8f98d2c9e23181abebc6450acbce3
describe
'146217' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRME' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
ddd04cec337bc7692d6cafe409abdb6e
0d4fcbb69c3aa20a3b2c1516c3dc5bfc6959aafa
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
5dd99669cc5cb6a9a2f1f1383a5f78ed
56f0d927c28f44afc0f861edfe5883b4a4a878a2
'2011-08-17T21:06:29-04:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
5a790692eb6c70ec3ee578aac8e5eda3
6e08bd3a5c195aef84dbb9872387f9b1c7f9081b
'2011-08-17T21:02:42-04:00'
describe
'53237' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
648e5384325b0dc62f3f0ccd4de3a1ca
5e2d27135c62ebafb0291dea9f05a22fc686fc0f
'2011-08-17T21:03:36-04:00'
describe
'922237' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMI' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
c25fd6a96d81d9940cbd824cd32d1365
594f194c4bb200ccf56b2c809da9c545cdc265ed
describe
'434057' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
775103d91408ee0455eb8de68024156b
fb9f34c54c262eed7e60c76cde2b1df5fecdf8c2
'2011-08-17T21:04:59-04:00'
describe
'33145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
007fe9e2c1de1f05b7d52cb6858c696e
dff7964c08dd1c571664a44aa9e6e8878f22975b
describe
'149388' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRML' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
555e75ca96276629e1ad83c746b4b5ff
40844c4aea3813b5a2d686d0a547c33b6fcb29e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
10edeb8d47cba161f4d17167a0518579
c1009ff33c2057d47d96b67f3970421d7982f383
'2011-08-17T21:05:20-04:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
8a6f4ca5ecd134449f95c8b9912c3b84
0df15901b755c6ef05e08f5ba40b49b2abb1aabb
describe
'52611' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
e3b4447a29c55c4b731317c500d33591
55221c59aaa809736caf5222fecca33cbb9e906d
describe
'914556' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMP' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
bf9b5b60ce8c3c287b56a80778a47e3c
a6833a2145d5a9b3bae6ffd797c875e6c455e8d4
describe
'371633' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
99d969a4467a2dbe494b85ec65930e03
d3c94f2ad4be0c235053ce0516738aaecb56aa27
describe
'12307' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMR' 'sip-files00089.pro'
62d2573385183f5504ae2966be74f303
e79578eaeecf613ec410c6915b0adcd5e0f939a2
describe
'118988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
56c06aee72a25dd78849e3aa97497c32
60ce2e18344d863652ab2604ce3d8762a09efc2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMT' 'sip-files00089.tif'
5f46b6899f1bfd75d9cea117cf04d67a
c7693f72cfe4600660591f6d8d80a16d3d98d494
'2011-08-17T21:09:44-04:00'
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMU' 'sip-files00089.txt'
b017c922202ebaab65a9b3a3fd4b8dc1
ae37726278dc00e389fb02487675465785db4307
'2011-08-17T21:00:38-04:00'
describe
'45388' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMV' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
8227cdeb353124685cbf8485759737c0
0648db05f3bc9830b4781ff4241aac049bb6eb74
describe
'922219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
2059a289a91fb8c34ce82645d2c56e81
993963f4f139f964cd15fc5895e896b25f08abc9
'2011-08-17T20:59:37-04:00'
describe
'445958' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMX' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
66d0c18edb4b5d58824aa4d08147207d
e742fc085de412e6a76688a7234293f5c53cdc5a
'2011-08-17T21:02:53-04:00'
describe
'31917' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
54dfa9c1d4c7f1d4656bf6bc883d9e09
b76a41b7c4447ddaa0ed2943dd52d3d4d656b833
'2011-08-17T21:06:20-04:00'
describe
'153530' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRMZ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
a30ef50b67561251ba4b925a66e3cd1f
9bb9bfc835a2d32bc2360f126fbf15b1e166befd
'2011-08-17T21:09:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNA' 'sip-files00090.tif'
86580b41de95bba955c57e8329a77740
23ce91b4289aebe83d6e0fad73d0243c4fd361ab
'2011-08-17T21:06:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNB' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c6d198ad9adc32fe0db82a26f37f6e5c
b9a7657c50fc1337cb2e2a60a1eb2326d2da8631
'2011-08-17T21:04:02-04:00'
describe
'53566' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNC' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
68c87cf7b7a80ef20c47d8128e0464d6
8e85d500b3c4d8ddce0b287d3e0e3dfc972f9062
describe
'914593' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRND' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
4189eca5f8bd2d7306099fe510bf5ea4
26fca16346ac2ad261599e611714cfead878b3c9
'2011-08-17T21:04:48-04:00'
describe
'424058' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNE' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c38e3e518bc7abb0377c6a3ea3e5f66d
6dc4fb333548f57382ac3c9428c1ae938996771e
describe
'30168' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNF' 'sip-files00091.pro'
77bdb6a64b85311cfc3a5d24a13fd007
2f0b785b44f72d8a8886e27a83b21811c6c6e062
describe
'146685' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNG' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
726b0b1d27a82eca2b048f6c476d0db5
2f520c582cb6f4ab519393e56461ffb701ea4799
'2011-08-17T21:03:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNH' 'sip-files00091.tif'
8b703e978363e4f98a0a274ea76cc191
9e1d711463dae7a56b855c27c5f6d65eaf9f7c3d
'2011-08-17T21:08:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNI' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4947190628e52351cdd12e6ca4229ae5
14edd5d8f9491139a083f6dda6e915b09f181024
describe
'53440' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNJ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
02c889a3c0fd1d8ca3ca0ab493f7bf4b
5ec219965a2ae7f18598dc3173a5dbc27861208c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
313354fd584d6e683e07339864b65ab0
dec98bec46a29cd52f61897d2dcaa9627579e5c2
describe
'434574' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNL' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
075102ffbf91467e3cf463a649feb756
7698c801b53cb572a45aed9fe355ca08df41c5d5
describe
'31760' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
6549d8ace41127589b70deb7b9bc0676
259f0bd681251acb2c3c88b6b7333621881e84f9
'2011-08-17T20:59:50-04:00'
describe
'150068' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
58fff2fe1d0be6fd26422d1dd9144c6e
4d6af01557cb6fbad9ea190848688452becbc5e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNO' 'sip-files00092.tif'
02be5d5710a57140c9d03609a99cd841
39383524990112706f868f4107cda37fa2982c96
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNP' 'sip-files00092.txt'
d29a92d1e26bf7a57b1d79bbf1d20843
63bbeadde214e97b8ad90768e6582eed63a35e3f
describe
'52591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNQ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
90d15e997363df7e472c997b72eb2108
f6324356faa10d6afa8387aede5c4928aaa17a1b
describe
'914589' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
0ba08e119897bde2057b0f5a8bb67f66
fbbfa5b99c43fbc6b1d417d6af54432a1646de9d
describe
'380357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNS' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
5901851a99bf199db5d00d12df2b66c6
01448f027bb6bef6c63cfd2f2f3661cf6347d254
describe
'26274' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNT' 'sip-files00093.pro'
7667169c10ea4d3c544bd73de5b6b35f
6bc627cad3ba49253b190ab8a5a804b54297e8f2
describe
'131181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNU' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
99d35bfafeb45fdaaad9bb69aeb5907b
1c099fe3395b84d2aeb37d67a0ef963b36e5ff14
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNV' 'sip-files00093.tif'
548d370ca2caf470a1f1d6479f112702
d50885c5211b734a11a348052b0b7d74d2860b9a
'2011-08-17T21:10:14-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
858a3306092202fd3be66034cec82761
a59446f12eea651d1460a86cb47073b82d2f9291
'2011-08-17T21:04:46-04:00'
describe
'48792' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNX' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7d552a58d7ce683387a4d23f5ded450c
00397da0e64f33df413bfef65c586119efcd9f23
describe
'922250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNY' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
6304e50404b6e54f08da873f2031e1dc
acfe95a7453744d0609bf5a8c0b9280d377c60bb
'2011-08-17T20:59:48-04:00'
describe
'437631' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRNZ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
07a8caf0374772d6bfeea96b3ba8fa12
d1d22819d3ec8b48bdc211a7a32ff95ef385b3a3
describe
'32567' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROA' 'sip-files00094.pro'
47131a3406a24235ba891b1ce918c294
c87d6bbb6efa4fcf8f73aa8c4378c66b1a7cd10f
describe
'151938' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROB' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e5c22fc877261b83680c5ee776323b81
53558d218c2142bc86cea54c1cbd05f8e51c935b
'2011-08-17T21:00:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROC' 'sip-files00094.tif'
33910d0c57c829b0ce89c06a914d0c0c
27f5fbf8cc42299ab0b96360271b23d6d6d245f2
'2011-08-17T21:00:59-04:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROD' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a5107ef3cba188ba61e700c9cfb373c0
d80c82ef04e438e3dda0e447ee70295f6fac4f71
describe
'52459' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROE' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
86d3b4d1af4d17ea1322f9132255bcb6
ad18d3d9e5f7ecc58e8537d1358399a1f419ce56
describe
'914595' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROF' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
c90a686261d35aebfc3a7bc68b841780
9dc5057812d3e6ea1e0579f9440c9584527b8c59
describe
'413126' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROG' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0800cef8be2b937f61ab45e1e47e10b2
6d52f87f5db0415c1afd770cac054973a1e56db0
'2011-08-17T20:59:29-04:00'
describe
'27483' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROH' 'sip-files00095.pro'
7805699edfbf7d0041c15190c87052fa
a8603d1dc86eefa53d062a06d2d72fc1d5e201c0
describe
'140771' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROI' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
429fb3b25447f2dfa9c28601b2dfc6b6
4db6e77114a5ed7258fe4518fb2b379ccf4d43e0
'2011-08-17T21:01:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROJ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
d0b5b8ed96370f866c9c7f29b7fb1bc1
49bd74e6a468cdc6cfa3782a68d2c56c390ddc6c
'2011-08-17T21:05:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROK' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6becf81a445cc23856182f161f2362d5
e5b7ba9ba9b9c118a2a01a96d7ce85543bdd0736
'2011-08-17T20:59:31-04:00'
describe
'51234' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROL' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
7303aab54e83c09e5624026979e7aeda
c876262efe154678344ccec7b84680f1e2a2b6e5
describe
'922257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROM' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
b9290534245c2a0839bc723d3ae8cc1d
e15f232ac9086ba17de2b7d35f542579d7b26e8c
describe
'436387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRON' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
70d021e59c26ce0370de118dc8970fe2
8dea0be9f362956c5c8638f3547310b13edcf538
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROO' 'sip-files00096.pro'
f97a615cbd6f1aa323c7fce51bfb09f9
2bb499fbcff4e4f7f90a068ebad34f8470b004a6
describe
'150336' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROP' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
154861f485579debff612be9b08aa3d1
758ede8b23b44663120467f8ec55c9215d8e928d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROQ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
aa93dd856bb5e75932b6605faba2d397
49dea22b711fd169f51907ce180de4b3d7fd5266
'2011-08-17T20:59:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROR' 'sip-files00096.txt'
cf071a910f50b9aeed3a32befb020688
c4fd4f74d0efef13a368f2003712e771ff026fbe
describe
'52601' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROS' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
aef40f4e5e19c9a798cfc17ba30ba47e
76cf103accf34ba1340c3f32002f58f57eceea15
describe
'914582' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROT' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
4835a76d37fb348a561b034705a99a24
c3772293afa75419a2a0514c3d48b76bf5c914b7
'2011-08-17T21:04:15-04:00'
describe
'402784' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROU' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ebd6a487846175963677d69749a569db
8000fd70bc1f478ebcdd9db20540ade14a673ae0
'2011-08-17T21:04:00-04:00'
describe
'26625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROV' 'sip-files00097.pro'
44dd51ca61a3f6df7348db647c4c66e5
28a458435b406aef0171b12b6aa01b3681fbcdaf
describe
'139666' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROW' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
1351fbc34f7a3dc641f759acd1ce4b36
dedb46598a7446a8f60d9b6b592fda8a1d0159ab
'2011-08-17T21:02:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROX' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7d85bcc0914b2e66c012f339db7c6a83
26815f247b20c8cb7cab0cfbb29ebbee9d41cdb3
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
cccb8c974d44d08c52e5f0bbe7aa0805
1ae760a760606d0dd47a3d88d500cae2b3899581
describe
'51044' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABROZ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
0633eadf588377ffba2f1381f8529ec0
91326e692c33763fe245babd1c1b93f8e9a496af
describe
'922181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPA' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
188f2e54057f4159f9e5692842b7e4be
2d38bc60d1f787d6b9598fda2804c4005b2d22ff
'2011-08-17T20:59:16-04:00'
describe
'424232' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPB' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
718fb363fab9a460a821e55c61c27791
b543ccc48a7c2a03f2d705785e8fae5325230d64
'2011-08-17T21:10:09-04:00'
describe
'30030' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPC' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1a2ae0049b6c9dc5b7f3411983311c65
12cc9ff5804c90a3a32f75be6ab216d559260f6a
describe
'145496' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPD' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7d3dd70f52e98555c7f66b4f509d93c1
e383d110ae360b0747af8d11d62f40a2c17de027
'2011-08-17T21:00:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPE' 'sip-files00098.tif'
a77236d3db97724f34266e2c44afd126
c234493eb9fd76d40d3667022c7c75e5c3ee62b5
'2011-08-17T21:04:16-04:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPF' 'sip-files00098.txt'
81ece582dc7676abece4da2121ae4125
d4c022937f2518ac35c9e176c8fd5dbd1c6d5f56
'2011-08-17T21:07:31-04:00'
describe
'51672' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
40d478249a34ebcee1c09f915111cd3a
d1ecc757a915f88ec164c8e8c030268d701794f2
describe
'914585' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPH' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b9f459a989a26963a143ff415bfc9b79
a238115d380b4f15983296f9ea0d3b586e99df84
'2011-08-17T21:10:21-04:00'
describe
'399010' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPI' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
c76cbc93709702aadb4c64f2f68b836f
da5e44543b7b79e5adc066b315a79a9287b598b8
'2011-08-17T21:00:39-04:00'
describe
'29487' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPJ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
0cbb989c54ea4832764825c1967e4ba1
3642e533dd98622683593eda6d278d349b876d17
'2011-08-17T21:08:00-04:00'
describe
'137982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
cd653fafd7063679c82811dae099ce21
eb1b0ba5b204cbd94f9c4daa9239d7ed8c3e2034
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
51db28c75faa15616534f393bba1d3cc
a476142ade141657f4f7e1007f9a66a0f3d56b43
'2011-08-17T21:07:47-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPM' 'sip-files00099.txt'
45fa7df546150f7ad9e9f464d0f8589b
da05dc25fde2e23e51388acaf2942c36f33ffe86
describe
'50915' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPN' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7c132844527a87bbb4ca7803257df64a
44e068b6af33d15db103ddf2b29fa6ead0792751
'2011-08-17T21:04:07-04:00'
describe
'922166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
e3b6d31532df0764e44de8c7fde29d91
c172e737d0b4339b4cff851a00432f886388f4b0
'2011-08-17T21:04:17-04:00'
describe
'436544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPP' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ce017bfc5cc242160b10dc199c975c94
aac33f0636478e4b4028c23ea0f9b51d0e9fd6be
describe
'32221' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPQ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
78637d5339271c0bec1b1c71326c451c
cd6210ef10fe3f405ddb60d576afa5a0f548cde7
'2011-08-17T21:02:34-04:00'
describe
'150194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPR' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
9cae33eaa5dc70de24df0911f8ab31f0
b15d4de9a87cd360370c4d9addd8b1dab4299c43
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPS' 'sip-files00100.tif'
07985f9cb986f0893b6a971901520ae6
d7bb27ffd487aea0a54fc6cd5b3a7f0fda707157
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPT' 'sip-files00100.txt'
cf10837e7f30a1b0ead424ad4ee8780d
2ae43f1607dc78cd1d8052c2801d1852b6c9a9ff
describe
'52178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPU' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
e5b668cccdec8230d1564f0c14cd3f56
1d0574ac703638ef3e3fa620fee4d57cf2eecfd6
describe
'1062188' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPV' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
7363d2f253c133df28eb4b7a76084cb9
2e41903a0d09e9ac21002d88277b1b5993fbacb4
'2011-08-17T21:01:36-04:00'
describe
'368909' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPW' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
986ee8da07e311d5bf26e84cbd1ebf3b
4a51724713ba4fb7897556871d4e83533fb35f58
describe
'11984' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPX' 'sip-files00101.pro'
bea11447dc784a269bc8a7dc8ffc2d8f
def2722faed5a8c8e5c7327e0eb1330f3bb02ff1
describe
'119071' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPY' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
e7d8be050091bb2ff622ff89c6477233
4532b0c6c022e872251849b5582e2f4e5855530d
'2011-08-17T20:59:23-04:00'
describe
'8503425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRPZ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
b10898c909e336ba5ab00389ab90490f
a27020988c4bebc747d87e648d4090db920b2856
'2011-08-17T21:03:40-04:00'
describe
'521' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQA' 'sip-files00101.txt'
dbf6492f261176280fa4b8aa347db7a6
4c3f196592676314a34a7906c024b4fecd24f8d4
describe
'44603' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQB' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e29294cbb4b5c6328924fc12b413e1eb
edc40f6ad5f6e62e881aed159da8e5542c08bac2
describe
'1044745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQC' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
04ecca6947aad03e966aff268357d729
50ebad8397509505f1ac5fd02ec08b1987d693f6
describe
'421891' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQD' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
6fa381ad325c4865aa30f63baa73021c
6adbee5368f8168339fe86b18502b46b37c6fe95
'2011-08-17T21:06:02-04:00'
describe
'32547' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQE' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f489e13a37c90d05074cc926ef9df72d
938a1b12010e3b1811f10b87b0b9509c34bfad72
describe
'148840' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQF' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6a30fd988f86c9d6fcad62aedd70b668
25981d72e1bcb7e3e2b53da4976134c64dca778c
'2011-08-17T21:04:24-04:00'
describe
'8368125' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQG' 'sip-files00102.tif'
7bece932495a5637c8b2ad222db4358b
57604f32f90bb625b6cbfa731babb12f91f685de
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQH' 'sip-files00102.txt'
639e6cfc665eda215fb12ef272ba5b01
08d2ff6c09a208fa341830e8de6e97d779df576d
describe
'59565' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
6bbb18c20b59615dcd91bc740332b440
5dd9f3f7e14d12cf96958abb736af566eb9b704f
'2011-08-17T21:07:12-04:00'
describe
'1086467' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQJ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3af3c1ae283a1fbf2ee6e56bc7541231
17c6eacac4d00973b395e80d2c4ea0cca0510b1d
'2011-08-17T20:59:44-04:00'
describe
'427897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQK' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7245ff8e91cdd6e746af1eb5bfb0dcdf
210e0d76367a05af03df8f6599341ad1b1caad92
describe
'33257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQL' 'sip-files00103.pro'
4d4e4583f3d81b4f3950b13553f206fe
a4f33c0fbc2a8ad6cbe6139a58737fcd73dba8c1
describe
'150306' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQM' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
23985681a389c4aebbeb95105dde1f6a
7a96f15f997566d7a0bf17967936bb81eb04db4b
'2011-08-17T21:05:57-04:00'
describe
'8702059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQN' 'sip-files00103.tif'
618fd009db4b8fafed853b86fb0b6267
643307e10cec30f64c4de06ab7a67d3b7550f1de
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQO' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a492ffe3224932a7f7dfd47ba8997e6b
c3fd15082b483dbcc8fc12df6a5f1a81a1863dcf
'2011-08-17T21:03:11-04:00'
describe
'55729' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQP' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
65f57604d3d065944f53bd8d315dfda3
0c80ec5eb7e991eb47abcc685700202706857e90
describe
'1044703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQQ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e96678f693994b9fe079b59029a830e6
99614ff01e7ad11b93a6c49d62db94b36703fd54
describe
'406557' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQR' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
1e97884c802cc764e79a6cc0b962a504
f39c29efb3bd4659b6ad2d9374f532b7f85a84f8
'2011-08-17T21:03:08-04:00'
describe
'30262' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQS' 'sip-files00104.pro'
864c40225f7729a4b67ea089f7be894c
4217aab63464ab028150c8fd2b2f6e22c687756c
describe
'144403' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQT' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b9e8cb9b60e84996d1c379315b2a5cb8
960c67ee02f17616e9a505f11cf2345051eb18fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQU' 'sip-files00104.tif'
aecd51b00c4ca4d7138b8ec89585aaee
9e23a03e6cb023f8c4c3fcfeed373b942dc33069
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQV' 'sip-files00104.txt'
0fe5db6fe86bb5ad5763108a6b9cb223
8a9da9bc519cc9576142bf2ab586ff6c7fd2c507
describe
Invalid character
'58324' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQW' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
cddee5f9ffb0df0847953d4e5e10e25e
5c0cbc249e41bdc65c4c1714200970b04bb636b5
'2011-08-17T21:05:33-04:00'
describe
'1086500' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQX' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
64ff1f607ff2c49fc131e3a50a0e69dd
2d629b859ac2ad53f4a9d1ca76c7b92c3f095ca7
'2011-08-17T21:02:46-04:00'
describe
'419967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQY' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
6a07f5c31bbcca99d987c72c09a744ac
f89b153fd336c33504d51932b05c3359995d8c37
'2011-08-17T21:04:54-04:00'
describe
'32439' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRQZ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
4fe3fa94ed1c1e35f37ed959de298a7a
5e48c9b108c6dec062a4e0f93612e114294bd545
describe
'148059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRA' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
df889381337d01de180495a4d20c47bb
77f0b6197911cb8865ca9ab932f829732c18bc0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRB' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b474141ad90cf70635ca605bf48e7091
d1a66644b87bc5e6bfcc7ec076e608a486c6fa56
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRC' 'sip-files00105.txt'
8beac12f208c85dc19b59ff121867a7c
6955ffb42453f25dabb01e77a152d2a97ab79bff
'2011-08-17T21:10:13-04:00'
describe
'55623' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRD' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
75a59ccc50fab00f3554f85c7942e38c
15f823a69166cc4155f67eb11fd3ea6dfbbba7f0
'2011-08-17T21:04:03-04:00'
describe
'1056545' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRE' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
94a38db5e25561b28db80f02d775bd57
62b4e0843c948c2cfb533ab3b73a8c3dede96987
'2011-08-17T21:09:18-04:00'
describe
'395938' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRF' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
fd2eac7eb39e872f437713b2ed6be631
05dbe5677a5422c9cd39cb943ab12778aef7c41d
describe
'27708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRG' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8123f36375a62fb824b3e9e60d2390de
afd6655393eed45dcd092fc3a1cfa91445697dc8
describe
'136181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRH' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d48a6fc79046694dc24d07ebd308cb8c
0eae42bc090951d33f8bec6595df1cbb2c80f5ba
'2011-08-17T21:07:10-04:00'
describe
'8458253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRI' 'sip-files00106.tif'
be6588bbfabbc0e6c4bcf0f30e0ee225
a81db2f0b4b12c9b37c39cabdffb7026434f6427
'2011-08-17T21:07:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRJ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1ca2b67c69080404ff0b28c96679d95b
da8e821933193f0f2d0ca7c219337cec3ab88034
'2011-08-17T21:07:40-04:00'
describe
'49591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRK' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e38cb8255b8aee93f1500644bfaf6a6f
d4c3eb709516bf36999f92e5a07e38be033ca944
'2011-08-17T21:07:58-04:00'
describe
'1116025' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRL' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
66622e314602e2e0c8d7b540f54eb202
410ae191e70b7c8d02abac94db6ce63f28f2a338
describe
'428201' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRM' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
71a1a5771e2adc41d96d63430b9699e9
1ddc951c20c5248987ac66bb5dbaaf1c86f76796
'2011-08-17T21:08:51-04:00'
describe
'32039' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRN' 'sip-files00107.pro'
fcb52e5e309002b68cea1079d1394d1a
3e6d2dc5bf27909986590af1a7dc189ebed0b8a2
describe
'146273' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRO' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
4f39ab50dbf2e006fc3c2576ec0d8b61
740fa57eded9e874be3c24658894f06beba8f32f
describe
'8934135' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRP' 'sip-files00107.tif'
78fcdb22da3e1fcfb4d36e423e7e5634
ba6606518ad90c692de0e5bc9597d62fb0bd4a98
'2011-08-17T21:09:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRQ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1ffe3efb576f967bdef545377b45df58
c11045ad7b5a3b5444a33238183ce1d8cac5192e
describe
'50932' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRR' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
89837d1257899a7531eb3795ead1f484
9502fb91b1bb7b38c70c563424d9fa9adc1f172e
describe
'1044744' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRS' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
ef14563e65c99de3bbd77310f01e9900
9fe681493ac803ee9600328096f946515be021e0
describe
'412765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRT' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
de05e413b3f3b2ca49a91f106539fe61
0b14f35c6107b463a02ed766a857e8d3e2a527d6
describe
'18220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRU' 'sip-files00108.pro'
6b0b00ef82cfb4757e9c07b04533f576
2b68e1d61f0f40dba5ea58ff704dd06dcce12901
'2011-08-17T20:58:53-04:00'
describe
'137184' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRV' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
800154cc5633033ebe5bc296d9c5023e
6f02a98aec1dd878e7f9f74003d1e5c4c3e1fca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRW' 'sip-files00108.tif'
918947dcbb0a9c5a71dfccd5769f82d5
9df6f4a498adef28615100a7684eb2ce3cf60a32
'2011-08-17T21:04:12-04:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRX' 'sip-files00108.txt'
99d6e7a53a4d16f08f7c064bbc2f4da2
c6b517146bbaee38cefd810c99be42795ff2a902
describe
Invalid character
'55855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRY' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1d6cd643c500a0550e0069baec18e86c
977f947e8d47e9e94088db1eb811a808eeca9889
'2011-08-17T20:59:13-04:00'
describe
'1086387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRRZ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
fcf932ecaab00b3450bb72c2d3aa8cb3
1f6c459505888889fa5dd8140ca4f8492b792db1
'2011-08-17T21:03:17-04:00'
describe
'423843' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSA' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
a34c9b4a5b8569bdf82db569b41e833f
78b5fee87498233a859d6da85bb83baa5e514903
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSB' 'sip-files00109.pro'
0081e3c5fbe2022bc26d190783f10880
4784698e28ee299153458d348be2f9f273f22f19
describe
'148753' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSC' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
33d971b99563e8d51a53e881d7ae097b
acb3f938b3c1c9a322b0531e60b6e0520c43fd75
'2011-08-17T21:05:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSD' 'sip-files00109.tif'
463b4f7ecf8245cc09beeb198c8b26e2
ce9d80e8d3eed963f13078a66ec3c0c71b7c9aef
'2011-08-17T21:03:29-04:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSE' 'sip-files00109.txt'
c0021e907e1334474e12daab620dfa70
441932af0a83fb829071ffade9191ba643b2158c
'2011-08-17T20:59:40-04:00'
describe
'55161' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSF' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
38274b4f946e6c64d7a5078e5db5fa34
6fdb1399cfca2b280a1f4e279cfcf67e553ac151
describe
'1044610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSG' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
e593fa69a71528e187b0b16cda352f2d
c78a4862a0fd8ad14b0dca66f76d4c18fe34340b
'2011-08-17T21:01:39-04:00'
describe
'401752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSH' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
822b9d86367def6069d7d39f1a95bcee
e47c9b08864adeac246132ed9a451c36818227df
describe
'28620' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSI' 'sip-files00110.pro'
d3d3677dd338bf7f9891d0ddb550b1ef
d6823ac343f1091b96658ae7218bdd2c57db7899
describe
'140715' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSJ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3f52809d6f548a7ae54a7c5ae23720c3
1729758937a76c18b891f15af978e3176b724518
'2011-08-17T21:07:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSK' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e578c10f93f7f5ef1bd8e9ee43339891
7c266abe4f12b6b4704b87e22e111156c4eeb830
'2011-08-17T21:01:55-04:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSL' 'sip-files00110.txt'
bafae67fb048d5708b7088606b49a64e
a0598c16a59b170a507ff12e23b5a5ba39e10f46
describe
'56845' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSM' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f5c4de147b0571b44ca9bb11f899b2b5
1f80a74085d7b1718ffe4664e48db5e2d45e75a3
describe
'1078575' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSN' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
33567c463319aba3d443dfa12299fa5d
43197480a1df94ed7783d4cc8828aa238bb8c8f1
describe
'412910' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSO' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
adfe2c64a4fab5cc2d5116430a205a20
d243e604726855633c5bc83fc9ba936b8c39a6e1
describe
'20066' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSP' 'sip-files00111.pro'
acb82bfb5344dd2cb0dcea481ee56af1
ffac45b39a7922883c93378d53adec4d718af924
describe
'136078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSQ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
6ebc3bee1eb9279d4cf3f8803ad6154b
a1208880bb1a2260e770a2748b147f7e334f35a2
describe
'8634689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSR' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ff3b5092c56ef4095becb4d1c4e07584
69c69823600233231c81d502eeb970db1b83daed
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSS' 'sip-files00111.txt'
44e3c1b00dcd69d3b15648d49c5bbc42
38e925469de4287f320c145d1e822db15f290f00
describe
'50137' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRST' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
36537ebd775b1fffc409f0d6a82fcb55
4aa644c15c30aeeb31ac43da3ebc27b76ba0744b
'2011-08-17T21:08:03-04:00'
describe
'1044736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSU' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
8c8b4871e70c09c7a5eba838007f8236
5747e38353f8c34320c56e06af3bc3bd2ea61153
describe
'433568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSV' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
663038c407e63ac3c2c7005ec4f5d7b2
47f37d0b07ac8d620fcb36b173f5a0524245d751
describe
'33982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSW' 'sip-files00112.pro'
87eee2cf25ae02ade6b085ce656e656e
39782b8f52ef6b100f3fb8e45f844f047ee74883
describe
'150745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSX' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
280c3fd10be3e272319ce0a7140c0266
17b4460c7a81fa13c76bffe668f17e769d8362fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
14a3f86783be576b8e439669b02c1452
c446062b5424779f93711172ea54ab4148239b87
'2011-08-17T21:03:04-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRSZ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
a98152029b440fcb94ffd5be32d7fa7c
e820880b77c81afab8b165e1b13403b3fff0debd
'2011-08-17T21:08:59-04:00'
describe
'60050' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTA' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
9233227480831d2688b163611a51288c
63a35499ab4f51638e52711e3c5d6cd86b95b70b
describe
'1086490' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTB' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
0c4f3919b6694be8562031dee304b90d
03dd32334576212d0c1732d2f466fe0e48559df1
describe
'416839' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTC' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
bb09f216f21d2ef1e0bc9ad195a529b4
7527694357f49121c8f6738895c932efa1825f12
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTD' 'sip-files00113.pro'
979032197dd7eab7b61041af44871d10
c0e63edc081b9ed707a4ad85d733b9596355cf4c
'2011-08-17T20:59:53-04:00'
describe
'146892' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTE' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
1a69527f7ae5e240a4445170eed67ac5
d06def1ae185d65e67cbd983c54c486ddc6b4de3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d791eed5318420f97dd44ef29e720ef1
470ec7e16fd1da2bf1b8b6bd56e0c321ade9f00e
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTG' 'sip-files00113.txt'
08d01d2a4abc468b8afbd4da7bba92dc
002900ab14b9225ccb813b465a3b1190f718ac82
describe
'54981' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTH' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
64375d4e407594e213856f0342147540
31f7d91958a49c3925b5ff48a794dd8b57e602a4
'2011-08-17T21:04:18-04:00'
describe
'1044755' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTI' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
bd9e8753e12c42c1751e3c0f9adb55c7
94b67121eb4d596397f927c4fd1212a446b39d31
describe
'413356' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTJ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
cbfd17695487eaa8e335bfd32138ed0a
2d543f69bcd7c03a63b0fcd0ac8b51c186941bd2
'2011-08-17T21:10:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTK' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b95bfdc28c481707ab94539f0728e8c7
5b202cdd87fe0f4b8764dee8ef86f13c6155dffe
describe
'147301' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTL' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
13346bd1bff29ee67cc1d4ef91da2415
0feba32538151b5a7d2be361e4060df6336307a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTM' 'sip-files00114.tif'
26bf4988fac7828430b218d4d1c36e87
eab40a680a69dc26bbc62ba9f56cfba197955751
'2011-08-17T21:02:10-04:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTN' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2feff3e6a464dc03bd5ae5d5ba1facf2
be91d90a4e5e762e3c8af5bb2a28ac176b7bffa5
'2011-08-17T20:59:54-04:00'
describe
'58425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTO' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
bef11ab0daa98883dd606ccce7737db9
d6b616d7fe7e05459d898e5295db888c636d5032
describe
'1086501' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTP' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
66a22547c535a66da9568bf8473a76b7
24ed26b0ac54a3fa8e20894fa592f93753a89ecf
'2011-08-17T21:00:42-04:00'
describe
'394764' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTQ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
8b6655cac5c23e946e7cd74bfea6e047
33e58d8dbfd538964f58860de320793f3076e19b
'2011-08-17T21:08:43-04:00'
describe
'26545' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTR' 'sip-files00115.pro'
4c06c77b366ac7ab9290fcba40af6f56
963e3034661ee84ca1fe0f9feb06a65201547aeb
describe
'137236' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTS' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
edf585aae119748f11c08be7e0dd9700
b4ddce79eb876b82a8856e88e02aae8a5d312bae
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTT' 'sip-files00115.tif'
d0048e093a38746f578f0ba577bf006c
9bb16695b12973f81a22a1a362db3e88ba314cc5
'2011-08-17T21:03:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTU' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2044ec13cb914919e0ebfcc925ae151b
644091a9631991114a9cefbe58cec00fd2184b49
describe
'52677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTV' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
4add0141910c478e18564ace92236f45
0b661a20061b78c356d88127ed9cf00bd53805a1
'2011-08-17T21:03:03-04:00'
describe
'1087382' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTW' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
3a2fe604e18fccb23fe98193d9398495
c3b2a11613a78e4d7e8876d2d8674924d29f47e7
describe
'379746' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTX' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9e3a88d3385ed00f77c82c99da46d21b
653d1f790950beacc45180e59acf82eb336cca85
'2011-08-17T21:05:06-04:00'
describe
'27592' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTY' 'sip-files00116.pro'
68b8bd10b555bbce21383d15319c095c
1a1bc5b0357dd44836d78a8cb573856ab383a695
describe
'129177' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRTZ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9f8176eac2cc0360811579d80554f3f2
efd1237d7eb1823b571d3bacfaf0a64cd8695046
describe
'8705017' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUA' 'sip-files00116.tif'
a589a4ed2a6f983b16503b9d78dcc9d0
1a7d298d589b7d15a66c83c01df0f3a3a05f6c16
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUB' 'sip-files00116.txt'
94fe1a24c3c5c5d4c3c30421b8ac879e
feb80384781f5c82670eee54a0d926a1fb8bd573
describe
'47924' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUC' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2508e36455301f85b11dbd44064bc3b2
64d6e18fb2bf369db733e743df5f8631c4056807
'2011-08-17T21:06:07-04:00'
describe
'1082430' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUD' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
bad576269bad0ced516a1a6939dc6e74
d1e837bb67b74b28e691617d335f8ba620852c20
'2011-08-17T21:00:23-04:00'
describe
'389498' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUE' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
7aa82be6868ee4efc19ec6b241be9c73
6543f3524e07aea78aef06c41642b9666dea8752
'2011-08-17T21:06:34-04:00'
describe
'31988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUF' 'sip-files00117.pro'
c9b9d35e33b2cd37960f48bebc990957
5ce24811a5b2e6adb6af7b6d2a4b565146eff558
'2011-08-17T21:04:37-04:00'
describe
'133966' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUG' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
6ee3abebc6573b12601db1791400c917
098225ee9a8f5608613da044f734ee3e2c8aaf68
describe
'8665407' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUH' 'sip-files00117.tif'
f41d82c55f7cc177723a0c0971f709cc
b607f178bb7acd1216e0fe39cafda6586043c7ba
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUI' 'sip-files00117.txt'
bd7a474a6acfadf6444adef125f4d36c
d69909fadfe8e18175dfc293f82b965fa38b3904
'2011-08-17T21:03:37-04:00'
describe
'49230' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUJ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
3f35fd68327f563b3170a076b7525814
6ca94e05d7cc9cb9d63446fa6489808989bc9488
describe
'1044751' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUK' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7ef4d12ec17d6e0255fc207cb7e7c029
5fee4bc3c251c6deb1704e0c81ad27a2d4bcb2d5
describe
'383493' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUL' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
da410f33086ebcb61728960f3f96b0d3
740baa8f5de4ce32c9493d4f40b0b731af3020cc
describe
'28127' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUM' 'sip-files00118.pro'
743e99dbe8fe57bde748d62b0d25aa50
5d8f881e3b86d4b44fb59a7497cdde4464097e83
describe
'134473' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUN' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
02826efa46193131e4eb3b54a9f3b318
28bdc41038534a0d0887a1f9c6afcee933e2643f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUO' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4ac285c367553ae5d9a0b1c36b15ebd6
c1c72778bab49d912fd5c47778b2316e3b826ece
'2011-08-17T21:01:24-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUP' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e81ddcbb4ca98d84e90605d2c75ef27a
c12c62f3fd493dae00b49d00da8e6d441391bdc2
'2011-08-17T21:00:53-04:00'
describe
'56111' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUQ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
4f08d1c6a4771aeb87e9104a985d29fc
fcc191a84a3e2ce6e1e482b5735c0f7339dd1601
describe
'1086469' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUR' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
bbbb1688d5ba7c4af4f36a080454fb7b
08aa114142dd38f6eb060e6c19326d886a0becdf
describe
'369197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUS' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
9769f274b0766223858c01727f08abf7
88e58ab5d1eaaf6203d58ede4fa0cce952fe7d71
'2011-08-17T21:02:23-04:00'
describe
'23927' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUT' 'sip-files00119.pro'
2bc14e968e6bc94695fe80c0871609b4
388dcb390cd8a5f5d1714b1d64c487f3d2da1e0e
'2011-08-17T21:06:39-04:00'
describe
'128514' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUU' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
f44bc401379c60a8354f6cc4436b41a2
c9d637d6ee4afab0167fa9e8b7c2b7e2b2e3dfc8
'2011-08-17T20:58:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUV' 'sip-files00119.tif'
713587415c5bb32c7e3a5aa3b2c643eb
1845ab6f54066a3829e703ea1010301c15481c20
'2011-08-17T21:09:13-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUW' 'sip-files00119.txt'
356da950932546e994ef0c3c4b7a5d94
3a0476eab94ad151f08307e6632d02dc97aefe87
describe
'50099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUX' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
49aed7b7d66015da4e16c0dac0ff98f1
e83373604ca9cfe6520900959c3538872557d493
'2011-08-17T21:06:30-04:00'
describe
'1044734' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUY' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7dc758559bea169e2a120d5441148022
5bfddf65016f2ef2ec16c120c3f05b405a91515b
describe
'391170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRUZ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a2b3a6c0a40afea5a6a0a06a87099f59
355596584f9cdc84d55b55da7e210b38a81d714a
'2011-08-17T21:10:05-04:00'
describe
'24971' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVA' 'sip-files00120.pro'
3e52f06b42cc40a0c17f945cd19a5667
4b389fd993288a1b6893bb73403f8ffb51437a53
describe
'135863' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVB' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
4dea460e0a3a1c1f918895bdc0164f1a
b4f79aeba57dd9bd28c3d31bc928b6b7c38e159d
'2011-08-17T21:04:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVC' 'sip-files00120.tif'
30d667e1e642acbe750cb58dccf7ba34
d0d8e0497154f8becf01a22660ae18c34c0ebcad
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVD' 'sip-files00120.txt'
08a1a9096bcc46d1c212f48d15f30f94
af8febb99daf3564e2c51d15e85606bd47a33828
describe
'55736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVE' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
40950db9284922a91753e5549eb96106
87cdecdab36c5445b744184780942c3a9a7babe6
describe
'1086488' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVF' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
4bb94b5f6e427abc9e7c78a9a4956799
dd2c6acb95b5248bef4a2fdf7ce99348b4849ad7
'2011-08-17T21:07:38-04:00'
describe
'376276' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVG' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
f64fb09a4f6f934b24cb72163d5c704a
cdd4f2adf0aa0384d0903f7169421b0170daa4be
describe
'22745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVH' 'sip-files00121.pro'
43803d66f889e285baf506f9a9f0cb1e
49a7254e7250f7d81379e9a382b351ea4d100a1c
describe
'128610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVI' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
836f973042c304bfad158b12f8c5325d
ca4e72bcaef3de621cede93f15e1a67f313349af
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVJ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
7e42cc9509e968f7a8db1a58c6c28500
4df2940ff4787a6e36fac12adc9224b60ab19334
'2011-08-17T21:00:26-04:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVK' 'sip-files00121.txt'
4a717a52a2071541fb65b4ae7391962e
b7ae8baf6b1b1d67423c10617812545d5f737fd5
'2011-08-17T21:09:10-04:00'
describe
'50489' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVL' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
f5c7f3126ff918c9b6b4c1f0e55eab79
b71efeaa2a8cd47fa5678e7512635c02538dbadc
describe
'1044748' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
eda300f24ea9f09a25ef7cd9f44d71b5
b39d190f165b916a8d05e5e7b43a8ed6d5f262ce
describe
'363363' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVN' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
261b60ddedefd981eced66e1e4145547
7dbfdb9301c382591b535d06508d3c3289a63ce4
describe
'22536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVO' 'sip-files00122.pro'
8c8dd8901a2795187cc3723cd8025b80
d2e1cbf382876e5b3122cafb1931c4b90f77f60b
describe
'125341' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVP' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
b078656a685aaf39f6223cd25a95456a
90c06e8976f741401cc3cb8a258ddc7ea43ff516
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVQ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
d979ccbe64bb7a9330d75d4e5a4dcdfe
25606b97d6a44c9ead6b6f733da7179f096ec09a
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVR' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a26f3ac9144abf72401e565df5f7d486
1e21dd5feafe538001639e4f5532de09cac2a29d
'2011-08-17T21:01:46-04:00'
describe
'52441' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVS' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
affc118e97ec48efba188e6af4d6bb10
c608c96da4b39fc8872035531daf9de1473156c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVT' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
2d11cc76c60c912c6a50408d17f5a68f
3771ae4f24ea9f315b9c73b1d842d02042fff9fb
describe
'415543' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVU' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
7e9a1074d978240bdf8425c3feb4f787
c74bb62013ffb20c9cbc8b2e09649a1cac7cdec2
describe
'31132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVV' 'sip-files00123.pro'
249f178b6d8e54d208f5f86b813f163b
b3e0302c6fb4c22f2f200fb0e83742f7b74f8b6d
describe
'144592' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVW' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3a3864bf4cc7371d0683a9f9a775f403
8e8d49e9d05f37e38afc66656cd8a49564ae269d
'2011-08-17T21:00:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVX' 'sip-files00123.tif'
de37b427280249c4782bbc1a6c8f4953
c5097b807fd541be04f2d60c5f8f78fe10480eb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
db841af6d70906678a7d15386c64fd27
013d3ff3fccd3beec018da36a1b3e81ba3c5fb04
describe
'54587' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRVZ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
67a56241f3f2d7505323160362818137
298e97dc0e5060313559bb768d5c4b0df59c9ecd
describe
'1044722' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWA' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2f0d61972dd7d97abadad18299847cd0
64802cc0984c32d90b18100d87450f08b35041b1
'2011-08-17T21:05:15-04:00'
describe
'376766' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWB' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
240dcfde72dd9a479d17db70c7fd323e
bf3892c075f5870fac2b5b0c476b3ddf72479037
'2011-08-17T21:04:28-04:00'
describe
'24956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWC' 'sip-files00124.pro'
1ea88661564cf5f509f478078c3ef5e3
31ab00871490a9c2fdff66aa2d789c780b590696
'2011-08-17T21:04:08-04:00'
describe
'131990' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWD' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
fac675f058021802e014d0835487ad66
14572334019cb89785aa87694d1dd86b4950a7a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWE' 'sip-files00124.tif'
05684c0e511ec52a0c81d8b67a06327d
754739cf3ab63d18c828f56b8578776b9239d881
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWF' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f9d9bbe514d694bb44a84d18915adb5f
3a7aa9b6dbf1d2a12ef9d8767423fb5a5479b4e8
'2011-08-17T21:02:35-04:00'
describe
'54705' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWG' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
c5b4d72bfc8efab844d5b54d9a53e91c
00a8d2d9341ed77c9d33c5e0340f0d26502db886
'2011-08-17T21:03:38-04:00'
describe
'1086497' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWH' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
c51753406ba9b3ee77a31606c6d0274c
b5e86c6fcc16f26267a3fb0378cce6838c56b0d1
describe
'404534' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWI' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b771ac051845f2c64fccabb8f2ac51be
b145e53dcd0ef354923dc992e4dd2efb5e8d6350
describe
'28441' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWJ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b0e418c9001bc2f153ff007c5e68eadd
ff8d180a0616ea424635dbc76ecb27e3a8d7c8c3
describe
'140826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWK' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
9130305cf2e21d1b815d720b77ca3125
d070aab36e6f2a8dfba876fb4ea399735177cc46
'2011-08-17T21:07:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9bee405e30e4ee9547ee6fc107ab56ee
63508ffd4df2339717eeb5270309aafbd6e1804d
'2011-08-17T21:09:06-04:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWM' 'sip-files00125.txt'
f8333638ce332896a0ec176f5c244f5e
e5e0cbf9f3365b99a42ba23263199833db0a413d
describe
'53036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWN' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
c2ec54b9ffcfd5693864cfbd85cd344b
78871c6f74b54309c0c3f0d63bf644b1abb5e808
describe
'1044611' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWO' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
8c399db73739b2b42be43def54b12c3e
6d4332313b5ed52dbe2fe8adcacf04ddb099877c
describe
'394458' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWP' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
bdb01ea8ad9c0f396aba642cc3040f3a
a221a59c491cc31bb6ec18f90930c831a0cd798a
'2011-08-17T21:08:23-04:00'
describe
'25215' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWQ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
eacdfcf48e340c5487e229cc9e14b2f0
55a987f6b0aefd380679f40bfc3fe04e11ef11a2
'2011-08-17T20:58:46-04:00'
describe
'137190' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWR' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
a8a6beb117ad3a0a6dd458147ca54dc4
c1de10bdcfe8a42e2286746a5f47c0827bad9864
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWS' 'sip-files00126.tif'
17c2e4578a8fcb40e20b7ebe372cc5a9
cb940657c0eef4c4fc91d706d8c6222c9524b682
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWT' 'sip-files00126.txt'
8572460d3dff35eecb5f009c42cce151
6ecfc12c2e43d06f6e193d9d286b91a8330bf47f
describe
'55458' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWU' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
84fda9bbb51a157b03cdbd15ca9a357e
4cc846ad30ecb45fa9d72f3b5ed4bb6b6b52fb62
describe
'1086493' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWV' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
99149ba44f404cdcfe332ba57b6652d5
be0880d6d536d28aafc80bb7200c8bae4c809d11
'2011-08-17T21:02:21-04:00'
describe
'374895' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWW' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
07569b35840e946989b61f59385e3772
2943e70a34770956add600406d0d5a63cbbdba55
describe
'22195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWX' 'sip-files00127.pro'
4f4bba91e83dc7579af3e61137bb62a3
430f4e28783ffb88f5109a899746e52976df7341
'2011-08-17T21:06:04-04:00'
describe
'130357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWY' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
225ad9b83cda2857f3457a72e8f12d99
3acb55375056f9a7cc1706a9ba336d4911d6fb6a
'2011-08-17T21:00:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRWZ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
2217dfccdaa2971c157042b250882f74
5d276af31f431958727673c5aabec23c4024b949
'2011-08-17T21:02:27-04:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXA' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c13ec995d5ec8e0a19293e53b828b8df
914b3ee2c78c878326e5304d32646d97d864d287
describe
'51954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXB' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
f49c89a10e4e4d65591622c5522dbcac
b607fe9a717ff563013ddd0d02f74c02512e1f0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXC' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
1e0737728bd3a57dd8c0960da9a06499
f3e70450f4c45cb5573ec33c5561129517266c96
describe
'377737' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXD' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
25de43ee61a24c2e4fd5b73d95b89ade
12b6d3382c62cd272d3b799271ea14a7137e9827
describe
'24690' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXE' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5d9f1c1b15f6e09d275c365b277e6fe0
8895e2a604bd131b12b4ef18f9a18b6d2c0a17d1
describe
'133179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXF' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
fd0d7e7eb15c274a7b3e482d0cd03ef7
d3d37508a9213675b62b580da5badc6f262aee9e
'2011-08-17T20:58:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXG' 'sip-files00128.tif'
0c2418296f59fbcded84835e136b1ca1
de460f774556a6b9bf37f5b839658d40c3ecdac7
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXH' 'sip-files00128.txt'
8bb00dcbf320297ad4be4b72e072018b
304e911dbd3b845e0edd705c669acc526195eec3
describe
'54814' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
178fa10b145fea7343ddcf402fdeda61
02267cca7feb797b556b0a119092cd752e9b5e74
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXJ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
1f008a9d30376e777359f22c5f0b4a9b
2a47c953ac4b163061689675637f7c46ee8d090c
describe
'421226' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXK' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
c3941c14b444f310f5ffacdabdb621db
40623adff526993f1cba82678ec96e7e40509f69
describe
'32622' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXL' 'sip-files00129.pro'
3741b4dccd1e6765aef57727856f8f72
c380e3379a9df4f2adea293784c79a9817c7e63c
describe
'149197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXM' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
52524c5a2ebe3f7fe361c9a8bc293e54
d61c50311b43497615138afa397132f3825a72f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXN' 'sip-files00129.tif'
172b1d930978f43cb39b673af9f05866
e88ede5648029e9c45c4a91fdaf15fa05de37f67
'2011-08-17T21:00:52-04:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXO' 'sip-files00129.txt'
c5d1ad8abff172af0ee9a6c070dbec5c
e7c86aaaa0ce8a0a81fd77b7a7ccae352b1bcb5a
describe
'56105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXP' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
a39342919fb7545edc0bf2507292ed6d
f14defce60becfbbdc80543b6bd3ff3a55edf5ce
describe
'1044695' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXQ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d57199bb6b310771a81bd480e6516df6
caafb327a73a6a0ce54a31f0f5ca49cd88a2b1c8
'2011-08-17T21:01:56-04:00'
describe
'419271' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXR' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ddd4000481e92b989a3b382100f491d7
5f3b3eea21fa9b6ab83abaf27e959a7ee5a02494
describe
'32415' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXS' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8499d06b1962a4d2af5ae01dcb1e872e
1b17960ce923edcf26595c765e692f5e93d44e8e
describe
'149172' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXT' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
35221000830ed24e6fb07cef6cb75cc8
11ce7aedcd2b096934eb184054cd167fb93ad911
'2011-08-17T21:06:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXU' 'sip-files00130.tif'
c9ea4c89ed27a28cefde326c035101b8
54935250fbdce1bdae7ea21086afdfe26b2570c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXV' 'sip-files00130.txt'
87b21cf72cbdcfbc06b8c22f276caead
0b0dbc1624125d225c75802b73aed591624ee4b5
describe
'59209' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXW' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
0248d1edb5e4c275b1f25ef1c4284d4d
2bf950b47d3a1b0bd373d1f453131d65345584dd
describe
'1086502' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXX' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b15fa2dde2dde533ae7bd4a63a8c7524
ff5eff9c283ddac8ac053d1a5409b2a510b2b6f1
describe
'414783' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXY' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
af51727bf6e221a66203e899e2a547de
a7c12bded46ac88e6b7f3f219ea049800e5c6b16
describe
'30385' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRXZ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
7aff49b1744ceff1798e3b9f1d327909
4741a64a5b40b47d86a75c65151a320d2808fa46
'2011-08-17T21:01:19-04:00'
describe
'147059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYA' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
01969aab03e651829dd6fd7a131250b4
74ca3f45c8488f85898ad2b6efc61450dc9d8471
'2011-08-17T21:03:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYB' 'sip-files00131.tif'
f4ae02b20d82873096bea12a6a149b01
f8152afc20448fdc88996893001e06e27b1bbb3f
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYC' 'sip-files00131.txt'
5e92e1a27fd08daeabc8cc7ded0869fe
0c5b0fc1a2e9f5261bff0004f60a51cf3e40b137
describe
'55963' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYD' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
6caf93bf8835e31834bfb17cfc2725e0
9b28fe2d6c8bd86e6a6385e1ceb07606fad77182
describe
'1044747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
0c6404ae2fcd56137f97ae20eb7303f0
a88fb9f905ec15037eed7dd7924845040a317ce7
describe
'383139' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYF' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
6e2b222592d69a00b018f18a81b41e7f
3c4714bff9c808ee44f4ad44f5336849cd3b3d90
describe
'25557' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYG' 'sip-files00132.pro'
c74aba4e982240fcde9ec2a1bbd9f67e
8928aa236e10d8645f9463536e50124d04bbedf1
describe
'133897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYH' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
617c687cf30e1c2463603ababeea6333
4b9912c98b1ddb32ccad842772abed4dc766f91d
'2011-08-17T21:07:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYI' 'sip-files00132.tif'
5956a507dbdfaf44bd2cfeeb4dfb9d90
a81cbe70ce927706334807ec0c7b82fa63718102
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYJ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
43223fe2d1d76a576d5cf31c82c298d4
342f89534f6943990889bcc5097fa880385d4d55
describe
'54990' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYK' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
f264f6c8345d300496b6fad06038e422
118d1b54e7402fc467f76f0b9211ba635797e4be
'2011-08-17T21:07:04-04:00'
describe
'1086503' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYL' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
6bd1f1e5063bff0664890025a94f1702
0d8462f4e759d18b03a9dc7f297a5641ea37ffed
describe
'427404' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYM' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
bee3f666ba57b8bfd04db00c62307574
bf3b8b1f29d9a3684a04859fdf1a603ea572f9e1
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYN' 'sip-files00133.pro'
959985b53d4b350d25e67c5e70ff270a
2c87609747c5ac4cce241dad4cdfab9ea53db782
describe
'150689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYO' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
93a1ea7dacc1d6874a48261bd91249b5
6040bfde741ed813745a07169e5e79b2ef3a23d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYP' 'sip-files00133.tif'
19dfad8ac439e951fd86a71c9f37e177
f19606898f30b9237d2b0028568ed87ce4ebd7f5
'2011-08-17T21:06:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYQ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
4e0516b4cdb3a0e67e5312f5a435ed35
2309001e21dacaff3f7c790e5c4eccb095d8f38b
describe
'56099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYR' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
60c729a61abe5e80c4d1a40acda2d524
e1f320f6491939a88eaa673971d9b9cfce07017b
describe
'1044661' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYS' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d9ae6776b14478d4292609d630670757
ad8194e404cd2fcded4cf1d8ce204c41c4844d15
describe
'409190' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYT' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
81044351d9e0c2e309b7d83571abd049
6868f867e97ab80e64e29f1406af8908d54ed488
describe
'19353' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYU' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c781fd082c83bc8d0aa8d52f55dc9e89
7f9b7c5a9adf2db3294e484a08f7ab8876a73d42
describe
'137006' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYV' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
b5009c099fd3f8f75072c7e9bbe1eec9
f2d5a2c3d39d4aa61f0072b78f21927beb845109
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYW' 'sip-files00134.tif'
dae0f13afbf684750312121400efe080
90da6983d5797483b813e76b9997fe05e442ed57
'2011-08-17T21:02:36-04:00'
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYX' 'sip-files00134.txt'
b9681df0bf43a9af675fbc6a868210bc
db425a162b93f8ca755debc2a92bd010f2d5693d
describe
'54758' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYY' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
771642a10d9f121763bc21772d8cbad0
0c394be3d705208ecc359660f0bdc886d244c977
describe
'1086506' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRYZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
c723544ec5173d8e0d4acb9c81df947b
ec89cb15d02c6d6637ce0e286cd3d482a7fe4c96
'2011-08-17T20:59:47-04:00'
describe
'428536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
60c0ff8feaf516725ecd528da0674543
2683182edc44c4696ac0cdc661ad222002ff7cbb
describe
'34038' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
c1df82a11c512d3cc03b466686735f53
a8227aab439e4ba5f684289c0b162532cf8b861c
describe
'151389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZC' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
66aab3b030deaf71937c1f9ed297f027
6539310e0f9256c8aa532fb80f18652d681dbfa2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZD' 'sip-files00135.tif'
16bc6f63338351b833fdd04da8e23c6e
baf722bee9c2cc01f30af081d2f9e0f8e7a5cea2
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
db56712b30c8e71429f1c5aab4a19a41
f06ce046bcffee64b4ff71876ba35fcaa4a913f9
'2011-08-17T21:02:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'56253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZF' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
002bb0240ff9684d46713439d106fd75
1c8b59a990048fde2a8c8ba42a88661a6854aad3
describe
'1044741' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZG' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
383730438de6ac6ac640bf012008c162
8721c6284baaf6a943ff01bf536a29f876ff4db0
'2011-08-17T21:07:35-04:00'
describe
'396959' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZH' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
c4f49436f64352c3de4ac54441757420
e064432796aca3ecc296dc589b18d0749b73ff72
describe
'30155' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZI' 'sip-files00136.pro'
d6c28a1e67911d82ed57ccdc83b57b7e
606ec289fdd7572c227c67bba7c4c9f492044710
describe
'139383' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZJ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
97e95e346929e73ce30980c6433df94a
69ee23045c79767f6c4dcbb1eb10a92ff7e86271
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZK' 'sip-files00136.tif'
ae41ad956bb0eef08e377378e77a1184
878843027bd91475e5e40806f773a9b9713b755f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZL' 'sip-files00136.txt'
c611e17c24d6ce541ff61a86ca5a819d
eb21136c9d1a8f779403745ca8ca42cab6785d31
describe
'57080' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZM' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
cc52c9df95ba8bea36c6557af61abac3
1e79dd8afa9d9b3d65ecdf7840bfe41731e603b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZN' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
30fabbd1a13316b69f927120dfa66ad2
99714e954ba299e868c66a9df958af5d5a4b4fe7
describe
'408375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZO' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
f31a0c5364a3d741b87eae824a5559d8
990e1eacf89c397f956809ea1ff4627a04d37d06
describe
'29463' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZP' 'sip-files00137.pro'
3568764450d49241447db62cca8001e0
d90854901c4965c8a2a35ab99ee9998cefb271cc
'2011-08-17T21:03:35-04:00'
describe
'144857' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZQ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
308c78981ca1877537b38093fe074903
166cb9d77998f9ceb6bf12289870807c896d3c90
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZR' 'sip-files00137.tif'
943d5452bc40dcb72320a256050834f8
158d11aa0bf3870ae53fad61af76b7dc9bbe5a64
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZS' 'sip-files00137.txt'
b6c58b37148c4f24bfb4e3e5714b3a47
f413772592a50a92e8b36e5b2b822acae51122a8
describe
'55492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZT' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
5015f951ca957e6901153bde5a52117b
bd626317dd0fa76f46476d0605c27a5b1edf6c06
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZU' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
0bf0bfdae2c2acda391c3ff9687b8c02
4cda84a091a66b718803b1e1ace7f413bbc407f1
describe
'406091' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZV' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
7028a39a1b3682f5b2c20c1b7193c912
62063422489ef452628f048639793bb798c606f8
describe
'29395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZW' 'sip-files00138.pro'
18b50a92eadf5b4504ad3773ab340f38
cc9c96c9bad8ba2b8f2be9ae83864e615df62bae
'2011-08-17T21:04:22-04:00'
describe
'141711' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZX' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f28537c0ad23cc430c0f7a167923db3b
1532cbec829d1bcddf5e0660230feee8d6cf87b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZY' 'sip-files00138.tif'
09f76e4e13e170beb60a4609a46846ef
64f4f169006aa1f4415ef0e6d38042e041c0c87a
'2011-08-17T21:08:40-04:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABRZZ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
abe5b6d5d6591fcb7560c2086a47e6d6
ff4e8c2e2f1cafadb4fbd67a3c1858d46c8807ca
describe
'56908' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAA' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
fdc764c449cb4c762ba4cc75a281524c
978f8e8b16bc9048a6e585efa999245d14febc14
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAB' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
d449b6b268e7b28eee2732f58025ed75
094d46b9ff2b74ce3e8d33b3e7df69f5d7f5c888
describe
'429303' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAC' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
49795126bfe98f5c8ad5a3cb185c96db
8c5df523e2e8a31f333d3a3a5c60477a26cf909f
describe
'31908' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAD' 'sip-files00139.pro'
4cd5ea6c8e588fa0d8e49311cd0be1d0
173e10c3c3e332030c2b3836d101d3e482833768
describe
'148765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAE' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
8c43a71e1c94def7ceda4d0558cbe2c1
199472cf4395770ffd9f8e735d68bc84df7f8e2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAF' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1bad7b7bedf8aae33a55229a19204191
afaa87f2d62a887bdf2eca9ef843a1d22a6d3c16
'2011-08-17T21:03:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAG' 'sip-files00139.txt'
d0c08d940d9c8d60f32073909b653542
b72684089254f1e12b1a436920b992978c2276fb
describe
'55552' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAH' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
ca5a32f6c8e5f76eda899a94e96e546b
a8d97e8b8b507781ad0901ee624725e64ad8d693
'2011-08-17T21:09:12-04:00'
describe
'1044621' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAI' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
2d5a542b05b36e6ef36ec141107085e8
f1046eb1a568ed6068bba6dc57a52fe450b4d8d1
describe
'412931' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAJ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
3c7a87adf00ea513f7dde17d9054481a
17ae841e3d38795044a063546733cc2a691f6ed3
describe
'19497' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAK' 'sip-files00140.pro'
c61530d38e2b188c21b479ffd1faee11
2672b9ce99a3b3e2125922669b807c071801c79e
describe
'138514' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAL' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
cc573bd1cb0f039fb47d77896a6d32a8
03e2c02942d95ac90f527771038813ada07a1126
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAM' 'sip-files00140.tif'
08c2a390e71b09e644e9170e20316f5d
2757b60fc8a9094f16db90e24fbbc0edcf937b60
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAN' 'sip-files00140.txt'
c8a4a0c486f2f5cfc828062aed00320d
2d20ef9bbbf164dc57b2711d9e7bc132dd17d414
describe
Invalid character
'56451' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAO' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
3de06d709832e3b8a30109af8a7af2b7
f2db8924f130181fb076c02860b962b4783470bf
describe
'1086505' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
9eb30aae0bdbfc4a52aa3654f14b7a9a
d348d1f522ae34f3133fcd160bedc54af778f641
'2011-08-17T20:59:51-04:00'
describe
'424462' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a45c6019ac76e9766b3a87f127a24403
987dbc401033a2ddb3abb4384c8d1c7d8976bf74
describe
'31920' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAR' 'sip-files00141.pro'
2277e602c3fa30f1f24c801e90930cfb
61d40da39917a940f5b6c85702e542e3213ad972
'2011-08-17T21:03:22-04:00'
describe
'149127' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAS' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
85f27587d07930bb54404ccee834b388
61668cf2546f4039262203d9009e1e4a4d207337
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAT' 'sip-files00141.tif'
65a96ec7b2b2f068e5dd805ba2986126
b631fe3255b5ba33e2c2f9b3a01890ea0b8631f9
'2011-08-17T21:07:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAU' 'sip-files00141.txt'
3c112b77d9b71d4b356a2aff5c9fe357
29e9a0202095c4de5a922ff8731105723a6af96a
describe
'55366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAV' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
a74bcb59fe1e07afe20b527e12f237d7
7147e24a6bdeedeb2a6281a560344094bbc6266e
describe
'1044651' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAW' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
b75f6cc2478f74877dbc7dfcaa84f4a1
898e8479020afb3935dfef9030bc2153d07a7839
describe
'422736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAX' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
5a309ea4af5c62f4b9a4417f3513a1cd
0b0123312e8d045d0f584cbd7e80e14141075a7f
describe
'32201' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAY' 'sip-files00142.pro'
88d78580c6266b12c3ad001cce32ff50
9668809fd4104568facf558df65b0a108de2af06
describe
'148292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSAZ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c556f9497325b309c85a67f9b3672b6a
55935a9a5d4505bcbb183e5dfef4cc363abec36c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBA' 'sip-files00142.tif'
fa91c7e5c036b4116637b2dd87c8f280
54da5a3ceaa07d065546104fc7b1703558738286
'2011-08-17T20:58:42-04:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBB' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1736b257655043001511186afe304562
7680683656c6418a291a202faf4335c415e694ba
describe
'59194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBC' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
9210eacefdd1a9921c4848ba1d66ff1c
379b831063c2738d48da1e2c0466c8c8a39cae2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBD' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
cb65754c1ecca77644811002ec1fed69
2566ccdae0020be67fab52a0f491abf0e1b64c25
describe
'403973' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBE' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1264227daffd7742d1863119bfa00412
ac0c0dc4ce2ba65d4ace72c80b8aaf415b5a4714
'2011-08-17T21:10:02-04:00'
describe
'27196' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBF' 'sip-files00143.pro'
42a831887852cf8def204c328455355d
142019a45db1999bdbc4ce4e005fb4142fd4e83c
describe
'140865' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBG' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0cd7c700d47725b79cedc7ae59147c39
f4112731db9f98370530896240c395707ea9c03e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBH' 'sip-files00143.tif'
36f8a514efe592e2b411846974102b52
39c6b6ff5a0d6d6a9af53cf7d4d1bfd0639616a2
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBI' 'sip-files00143.txt'
5514fc6dadce09b429c04a942fb7cc9c
84edc41a95c7b753f9050c536db0df75f0d29afe
'2011-08-17T21:02:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'53250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBJ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
63000cfdc51689a61304712b7128b2f9
48d888c56c3391623d2bee8e27e1c19c83e88422
describe
'1044749' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBK' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
941399077b9ceb5f6b4848f08cc39fc9
c31cc14ccef9a4b2de551a07965c18e0eb3e6e1b
'2011-08-17T20:59:07-04:00'
describe
'408281' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBL' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
16d076bc7707630fc9bdaa8f21f2f974
bdf78d4e482f65b393f0f37db2564e53325875dc
describe
'16928' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
b55678c0cbeff5355e6e56566531d706
2dd83047d197dd48a4745c07bf820ff3cc7efc99
describe
'137322' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e0fc642a24e94feeffcfd9b6301e58dc
b21fbcd6ff19d4a49cfce5b31dccf6934fd144f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBO' 'sip-files00144.tif'
c0e557db8869a40e26668da993cf0a09
4f5c0a48ffcd4ec89ffaa4716bd7a71895d48112
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBP' 'sip-files00144.txt'
469888356506de57b94361646721c961
e21b0de00af2844e89ccf0ac22945a32b87453ab
'2011-08-17T20:59:35-04:00'
describe
'55421' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBQ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
a14cf4382fc5e830bd2222b066884d67
ae59a19502ee7a0e2e9a4c9a286cb6a06b24f3f5
describe
'1086379' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
6586f1bff4be4599cc61cac04331a719
5f7e6bb92ea99a3b9f84e6afdac018e89bfd4f2b
'2011-08-17T21:00:25-04:00'
describe
'424931' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
49e5872bf5c037e04996e8f073fa9b6c
7623bd1aaa0986ab9c101da4eed032288e275f44
describe
'31788' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e389000876642a8cbbdcda98df8ef0c8
ac8bdad648658983987dbbf7222c6361fb6b7391
describe
'149366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d04faa1e221425f4eb5252dd366ff55c
76e386cdc2738711bef023aa9e0ee6f9c2f22518
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBV' 'sip-files00145.tif'
3fa7948ab3782e40c3d57bf89e9e0d10
b70bba9db9dc7930910bb347b30ad6524d4c2d0b
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
8ca8e2b937c44ec389b1a6b585c28e6c
1b78542e98361b965e8eafef921b069d764c7cb1
describe
'55123' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBX' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
5017b9bbef68463b51285c89e39e36c0
f325f994ba2c73ba1bfa9456c0d3f6ec16c1b2bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBY' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
25135f6d6a3a60c9a8aacebb224a420c
ae417930bf1c58e81374c728fead8a9a935d411d
'2011-08-17T20:58:45-04:00'
describe
'381157' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSBZ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
ce6bbe01285aebf45dfad30b8e3a52cf
813796a5b1e2c6dbe257ee3f0d7e82183a5b694c
describe
'26726' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCA' 'sip-files00146.pro'
1b85ca2751af9bef60d6f83410170881
38ec3f1e74461a258cf1eea12b3bb0b2766eda4c
describe
'133050' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCB' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
8211471a4136e0d23bf65fc50435c241
4b63d5a42606ec9a3bae254dffa783810d6fed31
'2011-08-17T21:03:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCC' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e742333b0ec97923429aa881782fc39f
c4e7bc27b135d5f47b10e0be1bba9f56aa127ecf
'2011-08-17T21:03:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCD' 'sip-files00146.txt'
9afa6aa80329c05e4d81c4fc17224ed5
fcf2f1fd1fb932f3c91d4b30023f10fbe8226cb6
describe
Invalid character
'54752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCE' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
821aee1c2d4d4dffb44995c59180aa68
1797a0b194b3ac2029f7572be0bffeaa8cd867f9
describe
'1086463' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCF' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
650f9eb88df4a0dc6f890f1b8b8f8a58
8beb2dae09810638add44d3421a9d9a6e557ec97
'2011-08-17T21:06:00-04:00'
describe
'423587' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCG' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
477ffa2ad0fd35fdd54abc1f30ef5cea
9c62bcc10b250137268af696b16449305a817d9f
describe
'32142' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCH' 'sip-files00147.pro'
1c2ba53f03715a212d2734956350b3b2
a27f27b956c09684690b8f703b569aaa71272efe
describe
'147973' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCI' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
4f33a0af3500036bba7829824b47d3e8
cdbe8affa168327217b30f8e0c6144ed75af217c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCJ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
9aaabb550ea8252b13bd0c3c918132b8
a15c4710e8a75e1287b7ba005b08b4a0dbaecf0b
'2011-08-17T20:59:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCK' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ba47e1d651ec95e24c66ff18c1058f95
c06a2dd3b5a89ee732692018dc142e388210bcee
describe
'55397' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCL' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
3fd4f0bebf16c0dd1310889279e9d516
f7ffde4404488684d34f5d1f6a202664d4a192eb
describe
'1044726' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCM' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
8c3b731310aae0c737a4e282fbfeb64c
57a21d619166a2c33c586bd16e349d6c1007f9f2
'2011-08-17T21:07:26-04:00'
describe
'415756' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCN' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
793f2ad8e2401f5a4ea0099187b9330f
02aea06535ebb80edbeb185d7ca4d2f6eb4adac5
'2011-08-17T21:04:14-04:00'
describe
'32539' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCO' 'sip-files00148.pro'
522fbe570bbf1b17397f2e1fad862a77
16ff04e7662bcbb41ecff00d210b9d0ea8ca6430
describe
'145491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCP' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
9fcf3cabd71955d4a15aedd80abb5b2c
bf59af67616b21207d6b4b9e9650b295be6ce2b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCQ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
d622c9c00f6c74c75c43d07bcbac2661
ece6970f1d9886c22e25ed5678123c3f8464fb5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCR' 'sip-files00148.txt'
469c9e22a58ac8ad44435f5e7ff3aeb7
e2a605f22609d88388ce3eaa5f341563cc52b8f3
describe
'58331' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCS' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
111275f3b7527e83fee137f2a2aa58ba
54e28dc28537193fb086f77e831de7be19f687d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCT' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
5f70c456f26839832ccf190246fb0a30
1c29af844d6c17c72a08dc50262b2ccbdafbeb7e
describe
'422877' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCU' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
1dad0000dcffd688bdb4a86aed49a8f0
4502ac5c6c2716c8b39ea890b11701d9e079dbec
describe
'32194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCV' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d2db92f97b0940e24a4efdec4c3c7740
6697a27f3c8974d96c819ee3710d718682c7cb88
describe
'149191' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCW' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
51ffb9a837624f9fc55914b9f9b2c48d
fc80fbbf701455104750f502552a4b957a9ccefc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCX' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e6c24f04945aa55cd666a907d4142510
af8fa2b27edb2a5491c01390718056e0ba0acea5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
72541d68a6ddfaef65d2ae733b675520
0189fc334958d7de38b38052256ce6dc23c985dc
describe
'55274' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSCZ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
685c445a5fe13ef449e6070870c130eb
ac33aab9b4a9914a25821af7d820dfb9344b6c65
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDA' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
f30ff3045787b9ba7764dcfebf780e6b
aea169478b18d98d913aace1bbdb57822a11f582
describe
'384027' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDB' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
22c89b31dc021429dbae9deeb4b0cc07
152ddb07af52bdd2793d760e2a1195186d5ccaa8
describe
'27149' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDC' 'sip-files00150.pro'
5b92059816cbe03eeb50cf56785a6529
03c1478b63874cb643f95cc9c3427367a7a2a7aa
describe
'133946' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDD' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
1ad84063c75f0bd1c4d31ac746d31060
2af8a5c22e568e4affe840607926090961d09575
'2011-08-17T21:01:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDE' 'sip-files00150.tif'
df7296322c4355243d65f299adcd5674
74b736f1a8276a4014015bdb2b22d4769f07ba8a
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDF' 'sip-files00150.txt'
0e211f79c7be2eb138c4dfeeb1bd98a8
e9099f9b3f0b4752c122e71bc54f199511292a72
describe
'55335' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDG' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
8cf6144de71f1d4d5deb31206d6f047a
098a602ddd66634e0bba4a67292eeb0e4a14f84f
describe
'1086466' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDH' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
b47b5299237f3677cebc034b8003b9e4
e63b168c6d69bd6478384495a14551be8e183b80
describe
'427867' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDI' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
f9326bed1c93bdfdda5d42cc349d9a60
72a4c7a93121a22cab91d2057eaf54efbaf8cf09
describe
'32323' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDJ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
8462099291c690e0040fddcf69b9b21d
06235906d8395126a713346ec903c18d7cd3d108
describe
'148392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
fa69cd715902204b35ad742bc322ff63
294a0d2ec18abb70d01d7699d6cad4fed90fd108
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
ceb0d55fb59cb61b41550527c5e8c214
f984292394d42378c0f389b84cb74417c2a268f4
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
857923c0d4adc49a2b9742309ce2d34b
9aff6e5836fb6c6e9d01dd0ff8b5e1cd3a136e23
describe
'55687' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDN' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
68927a0fc672ce07e50a9418b6fdd008
1f9f50057544af95f1dcf022e2105b67250ee751
describe
'1044698' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDO' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
18279eaa189351666b95117169fcc8c6
6e27dbfdb03221b391db73740d19c37105f9f867
describe
'417697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDP' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
03ffae1d160b0345fc582c9a961e08e6
ededb2d2a0cba2c28f1bd9be0adc52228ee579c8
describe
'17353' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDQ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
ef59e594508c2a1b07c47e647e356154
b28bdf39f0c23f381ed0f614f1b02a6f08f85a78
describe
'138175' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDR' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
f498717458a50bac7432a9ff83edc8c6
224c247a955be7c5053e04893452be23e2725baa
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDS' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f939915b27e3e85a1f50b3bad85166f2
62ad49f965e54db0fff51dae8700680fa910f1e0
'2011-08-17T21:05:52-04:00'
describe
'731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDT' 'sip-files00152.txt'
f3d3fa7e9f3eecc88c2677e4360524d4
ec8d05f24e582ab51c2521eb2239b50a12927a70
describe
'55205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDU' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
e9d1757c5553c660401632dac2fcfcd6
aec53e02ef3f8b8b0e3137a2c33c62b23f78b243
describe
'1086492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDV' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
af376132de1f66a224ad77ba99c5e750
7f0941f734ab5a399684046409ca1c9da8de4083
describe
'404860' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDW' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
75f6927332b700d43a07ba5bd6f7707b
e61d5f259b607b70b73d26d2c40cb0f49e83b6d8
describe
'13504' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDX' 'sip-files00153.pro'
7a8492b953b14817a3de4d77000d4a87
3671138c61fa82d46a9475d303d449fce97c4e1b
describe
'132433' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDY' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
9273c6436fdc975987661c010fb54787
2eae161ad000fbdbc282df4a093146663defdca1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSDZ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
4cef07c3fd17de4ca8b39e8af5580536
3a8a09bae2245f2688c913d9a328dc02c83e2758
describe
'596' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEA' 'sip-files00153.txt'
64e46472f43fe26d1866468309eb84f3
9947dc66c6fad7dc9f2cbd5d2e69535c876c3e64
describe
'50884' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEB' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
8bffb2314fe475dac3f62dd4e6e2c8cf
83e9636b1da4825d94f1c3da6f7af455f0e7c92b
describe
'1044742' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEC' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1331103f8a5cfaa23e4cf4659671f356
7abc1d063f5582c2e5baef016fcd6be310eb3b53
describe
'417441' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSED' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
25944aaf5023b70691beddb46c123136
3c1f5a8f686abb3fb374fdec1366389f026b44ed
describe
'32536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEE' 'sip-files00154.pro'
1efb0a08018902c926c0b6a18b3458c3
ecb8c52b2fcf37af1a9f08022afdb0cc3d87bd43
describe
'145627' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEF' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
106f1fe5a7f0922a59b8bacda8b76387
4bbeaf2505941b0f0609d461d3b14025d5dcd01c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEG' 'sip-files00154.tif'
bb44ffaa85ae0080f9dca43e5961bac5
e195f95f4f336fb4d11585151cd8828b0834ff95
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEH' 'sip-files00154.txt'
9e7a2583c2db43c94ef7881e657adce3
e1a79be087846db1d9297a404f221f3bf31737fe
describe
'57738' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
98ef1df47951e7a65e139660bb70bf97
dcaf0710e9c0bdb385dc28300d3ab5d62065b777
'2011-08-17T21:02:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEJ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
c4fdd9ed2fad254fec638cc5ce5e52b1
f32fc8adb5d11bd8990b61b67399209110b59a85
describe
'419747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEK' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
f6f427ac86715c8f2c1fe7b7ae084263
0f500b8ddac638d63f56a23788fd51ff7157b50d
describe
'31349' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEL' 'sip-files00155.pro'
f65d717f111d547d619f4b6e0a12e6ab
3eeb29eecf3131eb1cdb0d7769cf5be8a2b37db1
describe
'147225' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEM' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
0c1298697d28bfdae1dd64535d377f02
85818d1da89033620f97adc9b260d825215dc736
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEN' 'sip-files00155.tif'
e62af74ecd3eb53597539680429e1f9d
b218211a6e86bba5bb66e295d70bcb93a2780ca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEO' 'sip-files00155.txt'
4b3c8f1de5c221410c663d88a6393ea0
82b198f44801331b593728f7cebcf38cdd416428
describe
'54781' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEP' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
d7d4a1f8147d2c7563348486d7e12039
0c98664010de7d5b2b0c5006f2d1f00b775d0073
describe
'1044754' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
59fee0de682e1990d7b4eeac2a12b323
77508459e3b297cabb1d388c247b5005a6ebe23d
'2011-08-17T21:07:27-04:00'
describe
'398042' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSER' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
1290e438680a763223c4893c9828bf2a
032a2dffb1122d255e3d39b2467a57ecfb32fe77
describe
'27916' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSES' 'sip-files00156.pro'
5f2416d40f18af5a1ebbab2712e81d36
747669fa2cbb42cef5d79b49b049a1fbef89ec8b
describe
'139808' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSET' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
7b6d6107972c2918d4421660887c53b9
d70d91e07399b7ba7e2d02753566394583460c87
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEU' 'sip-files00156.tif'
f2bf2e7623ef17f27d4c151fa9c695ae
d8f1f3323a686e27aec41a9197ec381c167eae2e
'2011-08-17T21:03:23-04:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEV' 'sip-files00156.txt'
aa2665ccc04766980855f35c509e8c1e
5f1d0a8449fcae0a56bc6210f5b49163eaf83ade
describe
'56871' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEW' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
ece52810da7097270f07f563c131a9a3
6d13e649c9a12d3818636a48c780d15a0d715388
'2011-08-17T21:08:12-04:00'
describe
'1086423' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEX' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
6e5473f5b4e3a0e04e3e43e404bacf12
a4f9a9601dd29355342a25503edd9744fcb2069d
describe
'431285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEY' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
5e348326749057cd1c8a6e93d91d2b03
9f01522579455a812be02289c524f5a3aea360dc
describe
'32891' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSEZ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
975013783928fbed400c19df77a41fa2
d7e2b8f8a1b8d57e667df4c6433133b10ede1848
describe
'149098' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFA' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
c587addd86a33755c902a3853c66e419
ad9fdca331cf1f784e98cd00c33303110f6b7dac
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFB' 'sip-files00157.tif'
3384f71b23db59879bd45976d2bf90a0
0bf6251d08f290d5ae08aa9a9203abea7d7a18d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFC' 'sip-files00157.txt'
f00087a0f864eb70e5111a1d6faaaa86
377a09709a2e800d9d8e8a67339d3351bd23565b
describe
'55204' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFD' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
4ded8fbd214957c7906e19bf78db17b5
d21516f3befbfba25adee9f8ef8f154bde4a50a2
describe
'1050254' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFE' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
0f5ddfd70cda3d346d49e07a7483e6a6
f2d0d8e12f8fa6ea681293d7e03c0dc9a9fb1720
'2011-08-17T21:00:09-04:00'
describe
'409705' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFF' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
1f2be277c0b2cbcb99bab598dd4a6557
77450be977e0d456107b2a0f1e0b059949bfada9
describe
'31799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFG' 'sip-files00158.pro'
cfcd9d8b36ea75d0f42ca80a5e03e6f6
6eb18a05e21078f25f4d572013492988095a3a34
describe
'141587' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFH' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
0bbf12e0e04fff67dee531250b4c4a31
b0b7ad778c0b79dd8e69f139ca53ee81ec7c1a48
describe
'8407943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFI' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4a1ee607e2822e8cf4a1f889fb366792
57b0bb640c85cf504037460623fdc2081d7aa05d
'2011-08-17T20:59:15-04:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFJ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
319844d9bca2a7276c6bd23a08ded246
bda4072766bb4d68cf682f437e1bcd5b84228adf
describe
'54198' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFK' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
b3500e489868beeb4810d2573b33d025
d5488a58fe915ec8dfd8a33df23d81c703d6389a
'2011-08-17T21:04:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFL' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
85253fa9edda4be16ec197bbffd25f90
d2de064913af2d7185facbfbfa06aaf01dfaf695
'2011-08-17T20:59:18-04:00'
describe
'428986' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFM' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
5eca3c6e0bd85f8ef323c06b5133ae74
e6ab2216ea58c453166383098d8b8c279f261218
describe
'33625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFN' 'sip-files00159.pro'
b3e8e92a940b04225687920703e52164
abb98b26273f3d9a802704b2e90994eca1d9a28d
describe
'150314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFO' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
33efad8d6e2a9a9110b9afc290802bdd
756a4d020038fbdfc03b5ca35cc0a65c2b9f7050
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFP' 'sip-files00159.tif'
0d2a9858cdfefad41c7d471b5a1743c6
1ca11baa0832c129bf56ea2594b206aee5632c4d
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFQ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c763cd152484235caa672ca139bf930c
c12c5981ffc9a7ef40b78ad94abbf5b11e2d5f43
describe
'56034' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFR' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
599efe4e1495e82f81dca50b39b109cb
c2de98f22d026e7c51ac40a484ec873baad8fb14
describe
'1047791' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFS' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
864bb7c3114ba3b23188208db984117d
3b79dee891668a9e217928589ee50562cd9fdb45
describe
'416581' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFT' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
0c8341ee6b398b8e480f1fd1e10f0ca5
8caba68ad72ec673eeab731699bd47ed17dcf141
'2011-08-17T21:00:03-04:00'
describe
'32435' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFU' 'sip-files00160.pro'
cab3c33d1b9e9f3fb924fba1e12ba128
4aee96668bfc28aedfefb7bb69f3a00afcc8ce3b
describe
'140932' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFV' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
ec55b7587b6d0b57f416259398bdea2c
58a0dd3745ca0e5c92fabafecf37aad1d9e1db41
describe
'8388137' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFW' 'sip-files00160.tif'
2f55c990e3a1efa95d12d8066a2af59f
e674df6651ab1a3ff4e09756b4ee225923fee937
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFX' 'sip-files00160.txt'
ddb31b5e0ca3e509f433678865db6799
c1dfa4c2fc1ec62849660949fbfb771f82d0cdae
describe
'53523' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFY' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
57a3e46d2e6cf777ad60cf69e8dff692
8255f147bddab30fba1f5cfca2ab75b7a2a13e9e
describe
'1086424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSFZ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
05e1405b402ab04f2ef7726bc740a0e5
e40d18cc32dbadbc2e930f7e85a3a1b22646377d
describe
'420847' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGA' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
3c3508f13ddd5c4b4098e0e5766cbf2c
ef57c37a8a4aaa88b926fbad820ab2c30884e434
describe
'17495' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGB' 'sip-files00161.pro'
570819481900cbf335c3b5b878c58333
f0841a4cfeeec53448907ceb6ae1f7ba9935a04a
describe
'138621' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGC' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
f0c8cd3cf3c11a3781233edc51a9b1aa
309a7c6ec4dc7fa1f390b581a08a17b5b48d0e6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGD' 'sip-files00161.tif'
2896f8d7523c0c1467c085be4224b725
951957d33282cc4dd622833316a7889386b7784c
'2011-08-17T21:01:51-04:00'
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGE' 'sip-files00161.txt'
d9af987a6a57d3de235727c4b5dd7e6e
ead74de86a368b96b3919086903ae1ec78b9baf0
describe
'52685' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGF' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
7d260d211420007a64d171ba9ef7d048
2437528859eaf8848c6e6fd707f5ab1bea861a3f
describe
'1044758' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGG' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
2c2d3c43f10c103efe7fb436cf6fdd40
95295fa0f765fcbc4881e1758c5c6268a0a452bf
describe
'384491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGH' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
faaf99e13de321819908db1d19995e69
757e2948550beda9a99b88142c077a5fa1989606
describe
'26115' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGI' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a86d29cf751478f95806b687894ac604
da01caf64d4da4db1a96792c40327f4e37195fd2
describe
'133331' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGJ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b2d70c59530b5da3fa2762cc49d82376
04b0d3aa327168cec2a9db371e7026e1a1c332f1
'2011-08-17T21:07:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGK' 'sip-files00162.tif'
d8d502ce05ebb954ea53fe9f0f081a6f
5606ba7dbae91d7919c4f486fb92c3f5254c7638
'2011-08-17T21:05:11-04:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGL' 'sip-files00162.txt'
494af99b3282c821e03e876be1e3200a
51b3fc96e1a5df38e13d736c6b10831d74785766
describe
'54648' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGM' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
db5808935bbfa68cc243f16e11ede430
289b568eb525746e4ff923682120eb37915d4f52
describe
'1086495' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGN' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
f6f91dad5ce562dd64e483da7c164428
78544c650f0811b088e0ae8bedf26918206d5c22
describe
'398287' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGO' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
755c70653b88e0b237a8ba7279ed616d
a556e728f661018438fab467f6230b1022ec243c
describe
'26881' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGP' 'sip-files00163.pro'
cd3e987ab6880fc37ca77c53a3c6d186
5485b790269121377588f4fe291f236b6c1de0a4
'2011-08-17T21:07:34-04:00'
describe
'136510' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGQ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
84df2390a0fe4549913485172e50dfc0
f2b46bb186834c9f83d6723e4e30900ffeadc3bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGR' 'sip-files00163.tif'
5fe903cf7542cb0b286f88fc0ec49c81
06e80dabd138d4034c0241cd5b325e8f853a4f81
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGS' 'sip-files00163.txt'
d1f58bb9e919ebec6e1a3fb50dd4344f
4df4dc97ea83c5d1821aa2fd49e26d69a6aa0eb3
describe
'52605' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGT' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
5a463258d56111fc22d6a7c96fa0b6d1
d037712a22d8878e583b0d1d216cbe6491b1564f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGU' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
8c7ab9f1f4a708c287f1c7f42ed6e403
0244a8513744031a1ca5b0af7968d772c7e23d20
describe
'371273' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGV' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
4376760674219015170aa957f4eba14a
3870abb46029d4f172d425c2ea66b473e65bea18
describe
'24229' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGW' 'sip-files00164.pro'
ab281ce8256b416499d6b524aa93508b
fa867f81799d451c640482c48a5047232d440a6d
describe
'128900' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGX' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
b7a92eeedb0bf41702ddeca7e2e90edc
4b7ce5b3dabea46b786a7c952f38f4ec9ae8059c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
545a8e518c457a8ccfb0d41d644f01ae
c172c508d812db03bb54c96ba7a9cbade73cb65c
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSGZ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
550138082dff7ba51bff95c6b26b0ca6
0c92073886347ae2c4f7de498e96f44ffc0f6b3e
describe
'53216' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHA' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
0d13f6b3daa062c1e4daecb1cddc230c
9fb684a5043815ef14da4c80d06152d07ee990d8
describe
'1086381' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHB' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
115cb9e5055b5787dff5c890ac074650
60a456bd6ecbd9f188cfc25032d6d968e873d91b
describe
'400130' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHC' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
2237b31110fdcaf949a49e5028567197
cc46018dc7ddf1606f182dc32555f34622fd305f
describe
'14178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHD' 'sip-files00165.pro'
247f381d2b283227ff2825000bf9ddc9
84c3fc57777fde7a6bf028fb7a33b34c3382b155
describe
'131758' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHE' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
34375094e18cc239c9d80a6c0adf5b30
59d04957c0b133b50699193820803d8dd97fccd9
'2011-08-17T21:04:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHF' 'sip-files00165.tif'
0a7fde325516357f681d5c3f089ab4c3
4f55abe28c49ab57eadb45b4e1ae1cce6df0c426
'2011-08-17T21:06:52-04:00'
describe
'649' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHG' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a7ef620f5f08f32d14ce811766200ad3
18e7933703e991fe9be767f878f65196ed0df4ac
describe
'50449' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHH' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
1f5c7a5206060c88552e033c90a2b365
4e35480f32456df4c09a6bfac8ab78ff6e817e54
describe
'1044746' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHI' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
da2093fe97497bd020559e43a1a9d4a9
e4c82221d596539a6a613fe2f5ede63aa511454b
describe
'375979' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHJ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
7dd923321fe49f71ad88f85466610fb6
0753a4e1baad72c6a172d1af3875437b66341d44
describe
'22595' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHK' 'sip-files00166.pro'
676bd07e1fa68dfab280c994e1c74a69
ce95335efeccb64c63ed4ac02fe6603709356f27
describe
'129227' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHL' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f19289c930ba9705c55a107098db3629
8b5e3abaa4c8d5f8ab1cec83f7c9c890feb6250e
'2011-08-17T21:02:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHM' 'sip-files00166.tif'
81f21b917ed2c27e7778e2cf69ae8fd0
c563ce7392cbe9a7da008f26a1f21911dce6bec9
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHN' 'sip-files00166.txt'
1df96b288435b53ebc8f1de647e23cce
cac9043b0669457c0a65a8eca4dbff65bdd47dbe
describe
'53222' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHO' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
67f5a98cb14e6e4896345b823d1ac8ff
6e46467b3bfc0c6ee8abf25ffc2ff906de2e9437
describe
'1086487' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHP' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5a151b24175b5a4084b7826c31e600aa
83142db0f726be11486ea7675d374bb76f3f7111
describe
'390255' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHQ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
5fa17886d1afe15d69f563bfa97c580a
91c8a7aa25bf66f8901be0b0236fe2d520e1a018
'2011-08-17T20:58:39-04:00'
describe
'24989' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHR' 'sip-files00167.pro'
737f8394552f6cf183e412f1255e164a
04cfb9404499a6964744320b2bec5fc7bf892cd8
describe
'133943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHS' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
ae519fb0dc5cf1b5949cc36c2f3c42a9
8e39e476efcbe2a3bf9fe0996206f5ec279528a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHT' 'sip-files00167.tif'
4dcdf70298ed792f8552a66cc8d5e231
7c3d57398934bd0ad6fe18ad18e8f7b4ba5ec51d
'2011-08-17T21:03:48-04:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHU' 'sip-files00167.txt'
044696bcbbd98daaec6bbe6fb4862b03
3991cbcb948690963d1315ab0fd40b7f3ccb1cad
describe
'51006' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHV' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
60d1e7fd3a08a5e0fed6b2b5f2de32b7
c9c0e696f0f58bd21c9b4e1dfd76302cebbfb702
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHW' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
9286f61cb0adabaebdbeafedd2c037d5
f23ddf752800f15f20eb45782d2b0eff3a1c09d8
describe
'391030' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHX' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
403dd79952b21d901281348b2821b8b3
c978987d414611437b73923d4f2721c4fa09e432
describe
'26205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHY' 'sip-files00168.pro'
2d36ec94823c95c918eb1a07fb3df5fd
d26daf9399b32a00e3c0ae7a894be905bc35a51b
describe
'135639' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSHZ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
5670210a6aeccdbe073328466815b542
ac271540af6d43bb0088c5688c427a99b9dcd5d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIA' 'sip-files00168.tif'
d2086a34583fb19489ebfc2de11d2940
ca7aa26b89f4f1d5d45cba7278d98e5efe888565
'2011-08-17T21:08:44-04:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIB' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ca0438b35b04cf3a7155ddc48d1d4e9e
7530fae5d7930d24d9c582c37f96e1a362ef59fd
describe
'55072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIC' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
0b17bb3d140e5c54c315fe68e4039202
d0f99aa5b76e3a225e1edfa3f7fb2b952feaec6f
describe
'1086481' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSID' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
bc5d127be1d110919c8ad7a8e04292ba
a87a1dba37778fad27f6d10357dcc4c16b1cd489
describe
'392373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIE' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
19fed168eb74ed23aa823e3909819c09
20760dd908ff735c5a1bada9e6b288973a8164a0
describe
'26650' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIF' 'sip-files00169.pro'
e1f832e5634db332729302c504d488f7
d971ad6b1162fdf20719b56aca92eecafcd455d2
describe
'135897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIG' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
ef9f5586bfb98c1cce46baa5fa243697
4b3a854f7579a912a1601734525e877060abd5d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIH' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d0134c10281de88af56f228abb370ce1
e356e16abc99754965c0b65530b467d7e3ddf8d0
'2011-08-17T21:01:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSII' 'sip-files00169.txt'
45a4e4a017e55e4eff02f9be01af409e
fedaab6026dcde339245130f8ac4dcdfe1887c4a
'2011-08-17T21:09:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'52045' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIJ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
da68fabba0c9921706b7b035d214fdef
8bf279474f3d3e08adac784d46d662a74f3c6728
describe
'1044691' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIK' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
d40c13d9f673a8518886443db776848a
94e80ea92bd063fa93f8f07090239a856fe172f7
describe
'406315' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIL' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
9972f37a77008e6415b3f508f476e825
778170b2e5388f1b0c4d55c2b62ed5c36e170e28
describe
'17646' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIM' 'sip-files00170.pro'
e140345da7fe56c41a7efd87fbb645c6
5471d81eed156ad1d6fc654d56eedec21d10ff99
'2011-08-17T21:05:19-04:00'
describe
'135472' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
1fbd45b4d343d2b5f48f2563d00371cd
3edddc1de1f92a0de5d034431b60025d96c53766
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIO' 'sip-files00170.tif'
4c736bc4ad01d0da31c7f6b4a0f47318
05d368e4abc21e53d083315e6c77f13ab9f4e010
describe
'768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIP' 'sip-files00170.txt'
dc38843bb89d2d50eecdf7810c4ffc5b
fb5965249007e1a32f886daf8c561154ab57ae15
describe
'55176' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIQ' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
16217e9412532d16882aca6bb368ac15
9e873c97db6cf7810dd38b17dec545d15e901a78
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIR' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
76188408593a4c54971f2c1b0747c602
14f13781851c7cb302c2cbfb70fc171d5c8075d8
'2011-08-17T21:05:48-04:00'
describe
'427166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIS' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
1eee590811109d4ca7b7a0e0d8e41a68
27e0579500fe80a664b6616b30fed61cd9c629d0
'2011-08-17T21:01:40-04:00'
describe
'31529' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIT' 'sip-files00171.pro'
5c0fa47744503ccf4831c383354e76a5
47e79f1f9b4b2ae821b6a19aca5a766d04d4aef9
'2011-08-17T21:06:38-04:00'
describe
'149267' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIU' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
bd4464634917ede1aeb4cec79357396a
238ec6c7af5121dc57b837a769c64fd89442d619
'2011-08-17T21:03:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIV' 'sip-files00171.tif'
378825a12d42bfc44ad244ad624e404c
5cca8456d9d00aed6c36069ba3f43db555c9e1b8
'2011-08-17T21:00:11-04:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1510effc4d18d2c1d4eb97abb533db8a
9b3a78fd5a747460eb99a6ae9c47fbcccfa207cf
'2011-08-17T21:08:56-04:00'
describe
'55303' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIX' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
e8ebb4c6fb2cf5863021456dff598b99
eb6b5acd0bf95108ce28acd28780761f8f078329
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIY' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
3cc352474dcf8cc7db406b5dc9748192
b3e3fc046530e6623074ab8f074f8fd45c6c7b74
describe
'381457' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSIZ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
507452476e13911e3771c41fe3abfc19
0eca40567a2d9d4aeb5b559c1e9852395178149e
'2011-08-17T21:08:58-04:00'
describe
'25445' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJA' 'sip-files00172.pro'
a7eef2bf10c671bb72bc8674d53ff482
7e5dedd64f5ca970ca7fddd99c8e3b6808c6180a
describe
'132706' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJB' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
f8ea98d5e5606898960e46348501589f
7c5b73fe81ec23d1b6e2bcde5fdecb227961c9f2
'2011-08-17T21:09:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJC' 'sip-files00172.tif'
c334a49fabc9338134b797b3888525ed
7d923043ae2f1782ec0f2ff0f3bb34f4a1798f90
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJD' 'sip-files00172.txt'
9747d6d0b67d79813caec83ea724ae93
f08427669442c2d5e9194706e53c68897fe1aa28
describe
'54899' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJE' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
4015682e87d8d99a748047ca367b0ecd
c4bf1add0497059bbdd0f25e2a0b9fbf63124c4c
'2011-08-17T21:07:17-04:00'
describe
'1028277' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJF' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
cc842e400f69f1c01544c083388caf27
c5dc6557076a9582821222fd8999313cfcae5c09
describe
'414065' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJG' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
73b8e61658f0fc63c3e573c17e2e00d6
6ec90343ff9b2353856b0726356f547d39b57e1b
describe
'32597' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJH' 'sip-files00173.pro'
b80452e28a54d152f5c8fd250cc51c44
088fb544ab1138701e8e499f96459a38ead7f1ea
describe
'145612' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJI' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
9f1cab5beb8a17e365a07222ff5ab9bb
60f8064578c7a6c5f11dcbe8a12f010fcd6bd8ef
describe
'8236259' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJJ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
91f909ea6a9685157409e25fa46d0adf
c98b8d40dfc83f4a4734eda0d3ee26f90f7ed47f
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJK' 'sip-files00173.txt'
908f37e6d5b73c3d4be41bebb8d93850
b199b98976424d0c16146be0b543ae2594a52fa8
describe
'57844' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJL' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
1cb8bb8f79b760dd9e97162ce75ecb8b
5a2395b80b00b7ee2063bcf75e22aa2296e8fe11
describe
'1082189' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJM' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b6d90f8a19c8da333fe9cf525ed08bbc
97811faf82a9bdc16c655fa099ebef66d3767b99
describe
'395810' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJN' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
af405c9601e506c4f96fa9e341b907b6
08842d02738e6db2f56477cc90486032491c928b
describe
'14442' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJO' 'sip-files00174.pro'
c01b938f0fc5b2c23d4c85c094d2b1e0
3ac0be698d21321232c57ff06dab454a19a6aa37
describe
'130383' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJP' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
1b0ad871c408455eaba02d7bb5d6bd1e
dcd612a703fac5b26c8a51f6d612650df2f838e6
describe
'8663287' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJQ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
1fd659f6ce892c5ded0aa687b65c6142
7e53b6ffb53bb239f979303e55a272e3db4119ce
describe
'586' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJR' 'sip-files00174.txt'
d304323426b02a062c572e27f8b9cda6
7c895293e7f978bbe6dc0c7ab0ec4cf0bdbd7170
describe
'48153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJS' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
5c5a328ef9a80610267d1ce5a4490b7c
e46f3208ad0b47ffec776fa24f859c7e41b84b27
describe
'1025820' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJT' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
34a384d55ea99e88319d0737514459ff
30989cd982f136873b456c2d5213e5fb807b9ed7
describe
'416499' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJU' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
e3efdb700df6191405c9151a0eba32c6
533df1dd067f4acda68f0b5e8ad1065e5bbda3f7
describe
'30722' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJV' 'sip-files00175.pro'
2299f9e7fa3a37e70f98fca37f7c0b44
d1872e605da4310f89329b4b129150a5ac74ace0
describe
'147756' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJW' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
e517fcca5bc36f36e4ce3c58e3941900
10ef470a37e10c90b8a166b933630827baab2221
describe
'8216683' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJX' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4ac97270dcf044a6a346c46af6bcca95
97026c7748b4787b7b820180a39da8a3cd16ebc8
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJY' 'sip-files00175.txt'
8e01e527eb438dc1ba8ac578df5460e5
d72fc5e59260d99f91c6194f18ab70ee3443a35d
describe
Invalid character
'58656' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSJZ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
20710bddd8b5b6bff219344b49bf502b
fd53456f83297da81c5b0379e76113884c771e90
describe
'1044687' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKA' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
29c2f2edcce7bafc9cb66623723f1be9
7ba9a126514f19ba4916762ec137264ee358a991
describe
'426775' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKB' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
8939df69e4631793371b02078e0c0735
ca65f8eabf489866ece07b47536311e68831d59f
describe
'32072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKC' 'sip-files00176.pro'
a26309cf78a8fb4565248ae8b1dd0b6b
7444e2df5674ee8a5e22aa41f2db74e2616455e3
describe
'150463' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKD' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
470394521b82598bf3fcf4469a09efdf
9c66d3bd3bf67d260ff2c209144d81cda3f3c379
'2011-08-17T21:03:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKE' 'sip-files00176.tif'
13850530930ea5a22d8db9d1c8a23b02
05770b75373df4640ec68597a8d7237db8d24011
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKF' 'sip-files00176.txt'
97905c48fbdb6f3161a8161d19cd091b
5e9d6170f327ad1252c754e432aa2b25832f10dd
describe
'60817' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKG' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
33ca9c2e60f65fc5b08af7f2830abceb
0497efc0123fe852a75b135aac535bebaa100d7d
describe
'1031147' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKH' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
3bf26e14298b2dd7ea7e0a4b547b44dd
e505edb82017ed1c74909c15f49b1d667abc8ee6
describe
'401761' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKI' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
628399a288446ccc043f1871b686093b
408bdfc79ba7adf10069dc42a15a819e4bc2b713
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKJ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
5d8956ea58ad880ea57286c6ec274edf
f13622f3c841d61e3f9638fe761dfc7820c1b5bb
describe
'142094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKK' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
357bc4d7f0d845da211db3cece8000d6
dbe23aef1a9efd110636a2fb27a498282d8987d3
describe
'8259135' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
6ee80d6cea4d8da4ec71983ff9ca3854
f82f3606129c515f8463378a4a6dfd20c4e36228
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKM' 'sip-files00177.txt'
ca7902d0b569e348809d2dff4c0deaf2
a77ec0a3a82da8864eecdbc7e52a6e703ececd5b
describe
'56181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKN' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
39fa4fb4a62b49104fd3def39887cc17
b586d906ad4d7fbaa556fcb55f5c5ed530c11959
describe
'1044581' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKO' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
efca60f6502389694b9fc561a7a693a7
87ed71bf6d77aea126493db2ba17fed03dfba1a2
describe
'407800' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKP' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ee30238816e2bf0b0caa1433a1b59233
582912b61db22ce0428e37dd251acbe418860370
describe
'28659' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKQ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
214f59c9efdf6244d19bb84b95548c43
c7af5b4050cf5c6eb507d999ae2d16073db11aa0
describe
'142799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKR' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
09cd0a5ec91561340c3ee7312bf17558
4a3bd570d66088422e28a13bcf180972e3b93b12
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKS' 'sip-files00178.tif'
902d31f2411c9ca0654fa6ac8930be62
857c4842b29c4c6011d9d86e383a8e11a4953fe5
'2011-08-17T21:09:05-04:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKT' 'sip-files00178.txt'
8d2ede113c6bc033cb416e06b557c514
f991ae757b5ecde653a77f49a8ea1cbaf0b1f677
'2011-08-17T21:02:18-04:00'
describe
'58292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKU' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
d5b6e0ae518ce2a951302d7efe81236e
d04d5513c16bdf8afe947c1602151046ab7184b2
describe
'1022814' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKV' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
c0bf4058ef170a7f4c96e00b38ad3ff3
93dbb36a1ec2491ae2a794f76a89c10312b37437
describe
'394056' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKW' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
7eb9d608f0e7ebed726452193f9b0987
02c92a5fae81d15bf460efc2bb8c823bd90e801d
describe
'26333' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKX' 'sip-files00179.pro'
62dc255cb26f2a4bb2d03458c0cd35d7
91b0d735779ecca3a0677de5925d4edb15be3cbf
describe
'139806' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKY' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
00415efbb5d2bc10776971b66aed21bc
c139b7946a9a85cc1d2818a2117591c88ddb2c32
describe
'8192647' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSKZ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
52c518be99ca7b10cb1014f3b6b01153
42eace2ae046aa3fd3a6efb18c3cc5e35031bc94
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLA' 'sip-files00179.txt'
e821eafd57cfb18fdaa1ae8d859817c6
e8c7128147326f77ff32ab5f131479cf8d29bf4b
describe
'56392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLB' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
6574fbe7bb2ad052a9763c2725a7423a
d28cb7d154b51f275d689480c9326e24f07e5064
describe
'1044753' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLC' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
856d87159582d62f1edacb24cc65bd11
4a0a47577b6d39d89ff05b5a6efe99cf816e49ab
'2011-08-17T21:03:28-04:00'
describe
'419366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLD' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
322d2c09eacaf6814b4ace73e0eac650
e1953ea068c17f7fbd767f4406a582f132a2c466
describe
'31365' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLE' 'sip-files00180.pro'
5b460ce90427f2f299e54ea810bc3bb6
72873c5f58f08d234ec62a92fa756d3237092b7b
describe
'146758' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLF' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
6a282b52442b502f4ab8296699d54459
90ecec5a043fc78154156dc36cfd09c0fe9786ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLG' 'sip-files00180.tif'
85b625cccffb107ed1ad8e79be25b996
b42ca9d26b7049bbf27cd898a0c70704c32a319e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLH' 'sip-files00180.txt'
d990ade1dfae3db5126b13bfa0ff6b75
b71263842c4a94a354e10b9345d68361487e89e3
describe
'59275' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
b87372459fc005a0ab1ffdd89203d4ff
6f2676d14cba81d51e6ff1742d7bb5777cbfb48a
describe
'1037927' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLJ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
e9607e77b0df6b22c29a2e6bff8ca93a
bb0784a0a5d674eee10858a4ac6ef9d891784786
describe
'392765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLK' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
9c94e43a3b94900f74da0cd62a9f79ca
5734121bb3692abfa2ac37d152d08aafdbd5d2c3
describe
'27056' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLL' 'sip-files00181.pro'
a1b2a1f95ad12f24d61e8230eb424e4c
146e163f98ed184f2c6bd3c88c25bb9f963126d5
describe
'137402' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLM' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
ad3b910331972b4467d3dd84e884d4ac
dbc08a68bd99724a4210f09b49178bf3c513b300
describe
'8313419' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLN' 'sip-files00181.tif'
00e1bfde078a39e20fdbbe91f655c42a
70c69eb26d3f9fe801a1204e1b87d48ab660e7b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLO' 'sip-files00181.txt'
8d0e5f072e1010d6badd28924397779e
5aaf00335a826e2c826288c79a37022467112047
describe
'54238' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLP' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
65389b2eb1e1a805778500716f45d0fc
17f162bf47edc19a0924a852cb1f2e7b70252a02
describe
'1105808' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLQ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
a9170cf7e9f17650c90c4c52081e9973
ddda2995f9ccb888994f32e56019596d15096434
describe
'406642' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLR' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
5c22257147e3c20da55a6af81bacacdc
bae5845929b93b2517ce373ede52b054aff9230a
'2011-08-17T21:06:55-04:00'
describe
'29464' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLS' 'sip-files00182.pro'
925fea9ec1e084f724222f5d6ee9b1ca
b79594d3d112f1db1cb49de25f2a10417ebb8212
describe
'139175' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLT' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
9cb839a0c6841629e96bef38271f1cf8
91a87c659f4ebfa364c55a987f6be2d955e2842f
describe
'8852269' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLU' 'sip-files00182.tif'
77dc15659945d13703a2a2f7f28fe3e9
4837f972f160aba930d1e51c9a2eb2071e598c86
'2011-08-17T21:06:17-04:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLV' 'sip-files00182.txt'
1ef543a9e6c907fbd9403510a9576eb2
bf9b57020d7afb56b53b574a6363b94f508afc83
describe
Invalid character
'48797' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLW' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
14f52227e08b5170335756edf330a6b6
8c4610396dc8bf4c4ce6eddc9f7faf797e5c0484
describe
'1049747' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLX' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
a9a470e5eff51b63270cce38c8e1266f
a5d98be9e0f648a8bdada488acd996de75ec5fa8
describe
'418913' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLY' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
78e08b5db774ddac4f1bc16b64d85ed5
2c519fbb90834f575d62a76f63348339fba5913a
describe
'30529' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSLZ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
236137cf7ccfd2ebf49779cc0793c495
602e56cab2db18c5bdda894c26ea529ea3948ecb
describe
'147770' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMA' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
244787a384d63932789d89d22b02a1ac
fedf29f06fe743c866d19166b4a5338585c091d6
describe
'8408227' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMB' 'sip-files00183.tif'
efb5842d6c8f09af823d3fd8a0201993
9879be12ccdfcee596602ddb480b6d0be9cba3a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMC' 'sip-files00183.txt'
ec45a6a485f8c10cac0c9abfa1edb298
264d4c9a21c95375898186471e048e2235f5e0ec
describe
'58269' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMD' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
7c5e974a81d3f259c940b41603314c4e
406d59a7504e81f897215bb9d910a239da5fd9b4
describe
'1044750' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSME' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
4e63660b181f7fdf708833291e55b183
15120255530e9bcd1adb8e30d4f2e62bb4deebbb
describe
'392988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMF' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
14b44da3f69b579c9b63756da1ab0926
3e378fef50ec98922fc962c59c33d7067c4cb03f
'2011-08-17T21:03:34-04:00'
describe
'27695' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMG' 'sip-files00184.pro'
0c037dc590ac9cb9aca925139fc13c1d
374a765521fdcb4212425bc93d4d7d4aad18995b
describe
'138480' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMH' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
10f8ae497b8f1d2995c60518c9b58a0e
7cf9d446155f07dce1d88c80f9775b315f0f98fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMI' 'sip-files00184.tif'
f383a9a4ed3cf6adefc9c6a4bd08175e
c21125743a5281b82fd156e315ec0145443bd1fb
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMJ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
07434409885e6c047e057778a4a35e5e
13845e4fd4da3a6bffa66e2bce0cdda8f20cb0e9
describe
'56370' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMK' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
bee93bea2268399047e0f0cd8fdd49c9
a2e9b4a86413f92d21a18e3ecfed9cb57df67626
describe
'1022191' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSML' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
95c842ab7c89bb1d29b51e014b31f5ea
62a70c5a045ab1bbf73136ad0d3b39b97bbbcd2f
describe
'387185' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMM' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
cc544d4d28cbb58c0f051a8621c17c01
2502c61b44bdeab59ff888b9d30a71597a681820
describe
'26744' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMN' 'sip-files00185.pro'
0c145853a6ecdaf9719f780803e99359
b5456f383a97118e8a2188a83bdb984b943803ec
describe
'136395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMO' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4e00755be30944e940148ad3bebd8f6f
5764cf0dbb651e5f3911382618b902bc3036fd01
describe
'8188689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMP' 'sip-files00185.tif'
af1c95cbbc42290405307153495ff284
3be01480af77c0e9f56cefeacedd3bc92ae15433
'2011-08-17T21:01:59-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMQ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
f51c40fc8ef7194f931418d8ae5b3e7b
26652d467fe8a1b7e8c8eebd67a736deb2830289
describe
'54315' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMR' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
46e5c5c9acbd95cca5f0c46935391a34
75f11cee314c74c9cb768b417ea359259a58f54a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMS' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
0b9921ce92c6065ff9d7888ef3e67c7e
cb8d22e0cbcf89bf3d15235427503c3f913f2df6
describe
'419988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMT' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
b39db165090d2ea88db89c8125565e1d
3d721a7f990bdd616f61a5b53749905f7443270c
describe
'32157' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMU' 'sip-files00186.pro'
028f3b88e28dc1f9f3ad36bdc26d80e6
c426b9a5708c617a2e5e403dfaf4c46e934ef13e
describe
'148165' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMV' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
158e009ab89fcf689fc7d2624dd551cd
756395bdca86ba773de2808a07e97b7e47cf6c4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMW' 'sip-files00186.tif'
337800c4c9a937792c4b893985dbc14a
81782e3c0cacb3949f7e903991a387e01c548967
'2011-08-17T21:09:31-04:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMX' 'sip-files00186.txt'
4939b0a645417ea5a9de1de57268c410
7df776adabf5f6a580e8506add31a1a9cf5f6092
describe
'60210' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMY' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
c707d34076b3ab009bcd4a0a2b13e1bb
fdab7cb5c2384e528c8f2cf1f36ed64725035e63
describe
'1059145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSMZ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
edf3bac0dc54d5aebf319d8a19bd8a63
a2e649f39d77e5db1f7611178971a74ecc315086
describe
'408656' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
b40777ac78f8fb389772340dc21e4582
fe0841ae6189f019e90d23f5681b3af8f0fec454
describe
'31849' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNB' 'sip-files00187.pro'
5089bbd3491826662c6f94b555dc364d
fa98ae0788c60d3065411af6a9334d570d7a331f
describe
'141386' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNC' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
c38de8e5158c1831381a95e695915aca
672a8714a602bf695a7338f3f0d86134d2b24618
'2011-08-17T21:06:45-04:00'
describe
'8479541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSND' 'sip-files00187.tif'
48212afb2857c9b8051fea7f57f5b6e3
1b778ca871a4d8ee62485214c6d286ffa35772fe
'2011-08-17T21:01:04-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNE' 'sip-files00187.txt'
646fd5b64f456ebc5d74b9615d4ef422
abb66b77eb0cf14f081394d2be54b414b6c5d850
describe
'53567' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNF' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
04b2b82149e8f78e71aae7a045503566
4e874762d4368f1ae8d1c308521175add5b62e1a
describe
'1075980' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNG' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
ea8b1afc4a2188acefc31ee3f65221da
26c0820bf79b81fe40ba44dc57b79966862dd489
describe
'387902' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNH' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
8e539b73dd718d0b73cc04f7297033ab
f32de206558306bee56f3e181cc82072fae63612
describe
'13013' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNI' 'sip-files00188.pro'
006b02d434fd787d7341803291783098
2141d981bf13875e32665378dcd0cada8280ef0b
describe
'126812' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNJ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
426e317f2b611af0f07d5932b44aa971
a3db96d184eef075b2940cb82268f8d8278c8b9e
describe
'8618403' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNK' 'sip-files00188.tif'
cbf65b24bde4457c1cb5489df6f0c607
05ee2805ae634966ccfa4fe0086d0f84bfa7507a
describe
'557' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNL' 'sip-files00188.txt'
faa0092a6a9d9676d172c0cc4938e74d
aef3d3b8dc3f8146c550bd4fefaf6ef12ad0ed07
'2011-08-17T21:05:59-04:00'
describe
'51069' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNM' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
aed723ee8c007779e1d886389fa6c5df
bf5e0afbcba829d95f730e841108e684d663b7cc
describe
'1011660' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNN' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
13d3de888bb1576c31da24f4a76cf55c
5547c3df6ddde0a4c509cd3f4951811d086771e5
describe
'412343' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNO' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
199998ad3f20d32c5c6e38dc41898bb3
77b084183be06f950b95542af748c6f63984f928
'2011-08-17T21:08:38-04:00'
describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNP' 'sip-files00189.pro'
24a1aed4db30f199e7fd4670367a300d
f9d372a8f875a37297806ed384a56a47968b321a
describe
'146146' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNQ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
d996893dd7a9167abb6eb0448902142b
f1be3c1038ee74422748741878560a6ae32d94ee
describe
'8103219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNR' 'sip-files00189.tif'
7703f1fbb043e261136d08b7da077362
fcca1b143b8e2550a13967bb677ed20b0e5aac53
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNS' 'sip-files00189.txt'
f5e38bc35404dbd123f17f05c084ca89
ec152b1e3d6b38f00de23273e2a052eff39dfd84
describe
Invalid character
'58366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNT' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
5285d3a5436b622d8ce59d8801da6136
15ccd5fb4c6b836c7780dc07a3ddf821cdb72999
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNU' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
4c54cb050e8438af28cd706b1abe8865
992340cb1a6de2e6f37d04b60e382c6c7f5103e4
'2011-08-17T21:08:26-04:00'
describe
'417057' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNV' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
8a8b4885e91a5c5bfc5d410f972711e2
4c5882f418f36d35a4519251059a70f024059410
'2011-08-17T21:09:52-04:00'
describe
'32046' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNW' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6744d1f3eba59b8d6dec15121061f99c
053aa0de6e2077106fad9a66cecefba64d7ceef2
describe
'146028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNX' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ff189d7e9f7e428e26ed45c8b756d22f
0c0e7397a348643de344852d96a0155cb6b20575
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNY' 'sip-files00190.tif'
2fbfe894db374361debc025abb460828
907517660d0c616adc3d144027cf7a589abc6358
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSNZ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
37880044d6e32f4b53d5a0637ee392dc
70c9105c0d12181fa704bf61c6547f7be3da2a1f
describe
'59250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOA' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
f02a8fdab39b2c46d22f9304a6c0613e
bf671817476debbcb6d0a3bab41b9fec10a5852a
describe
'1022792' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOB' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
f9e5c65e68d95ae08cc129c8499b3c8b
c84a9c08771e89d71df67b1ca16eb252c7e0a893
describe
'381536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOC' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
b2e4ea4dc48aeaa758fa4acee7cc66e1
12bd09799579aeef622e29058eb66237f44840c3
'2011-08-17T21:05:04-04:00'
describe
'21828' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOD' 'sip-files00191.pro'
c86de1a8dd0dfa4dcbc10a2deac85c78
bcafe6aa6ead90fbcab372d42064aa619a771c13
describe
'131958' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOE' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
c8284ff43541d2b1d8ca122a7500d62b
5bdf226ebe4f1a06701701661332e8d469cbaef6
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOF' 'sip-files00191.tif'
28e791e815a1cf35f20757111401b9e2
1de2683ba58737410f3b396eb752f9a65eff1e65
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOG' 'sip-files00191.txt'
92ed4e65f9253feca8bc531645e38931
27c4bd1940613a7d240f3e08d3dfaa200c0b78f6
describe
'53672' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOH' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
0370abd5ba99832458ef56c8d680b1c5
c95c51221791f46acc74fb6301b398f984f835ad
describe
'1044757' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOI' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
f712d00c1232ca7b798b6c74654a2ae7
b1bd954d2498175144d3fe79ba6f16704982d2a7
describe
'369971' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOJ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
b643d3ccf1769780a60854e6ec5e208c
512cacb6360530f7a491f6fb44f5d1e7d5cd31e0
describe
'23224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOK' 'sip-files00192.pro'
148d1cce06988cd551e0cedc04ef72d4
947399915e977f3e215538abff8cd833ea5b95d3
describe
'131105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOL' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
66cc8c3e469c74e93e68cd700523662a
b7fb635da517daacb32e0c61b0faf277ad06721e
'2011-08-17T21:09:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOM' 'sip-files00192.tif'
0fb25cc65b14b713070d9f793e86d6e0
23b4b2a10c93235422c3eaf31ab8fa9496135dc5
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSON' 'sip-files00192.txt'
66369c7313eb8fb82a1646476c0cba5e
bb3a727a606d975142680e7d5813b03fc69bde9a
describe
'54311' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOO' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
a27ec9716ae0ec7919d783e2ee5f291c
75170cc36f3b01b227d25fb7fd53255a70f0d6fd
describe
'1042550' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOP' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
7ba982cb8e68494625ed4c97d149bddb
2180dcbbe4bd9f41207c15801285e96c33ff0adf
describe
'387401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
a14a3d94aa779cc2ea547b7f2071fbbc
a97580ce82d521898fde5a1ce28535ee9b219d22
describe
'27865' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOR' 'sip-files00193.pro'
e3fe3d8060729c8060d876c7fb15a9e0
86404500046951de0067761b0590ab96efe86fe1
describe
'137555' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOS' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e142af2f538f36a01a78769b39ba269e
78cffd2395ad4c32882cb2733e962344ac20b1e8
describe
'8350553' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOT' 'sip-files00193.tif'
afef14a3405bc6ff9d8c81fc58d7d2db
ccbedc93db2fa1242cb112f643d12f158c5ac773
'2011-08-17T21:07:53-04:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOU' 'sip-files00193.txt'
18bdbf3cd55a16486bca30b844dd8610
24e7de7d90865d73bf59df7ea589d3a1e5b05c3c
describe
'56586' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOV' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
c74282c4b64dfa5e5cdc7644eab5f25b
fa714536e8e083a401672e4e033f93bb99a640b8
describe
'1056425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOW' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
202c00419d364de46bd6e23110250188
9ffd656d9d102ededd8c31d38bfc56d9f21a698d
describe
'416972' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOX' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
03224bef99ebe5d92fa09b85628dd4c8
9cc07ad6b2ee5ddb62da213cd763924f8f97fc91
describe
'31524' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOY' 'sip-files00194.pro'
b8a28607c344517a86ae48bb0035757c
0a73d7b52478ac4be54cda551c45df4030d07949
describe
'146577' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSOZ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
58e9c76fa21a380396885233d3d3cd5c
945c39d45a23897e59615cc8c35da8ba2109c49a
describe
'8461603' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPA' 'sip-files00194.tif'
df1b837d259f44f662458e1d4966d699
6703879ac63859de0f91c42f2c7b87a00f5ab150
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPB' 'sip-files00194.txt'
d4ff5c75debef4d489165a9680349f1a
9d652ab62f6010bccab4ad6d7cca3ce3c0451a1c
describe
'58119' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPC' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
a97d695a2242196d8c95a95090cef5bc
d736b2151ec5afbde7d9b72ff0c0b6cd89f862de
describe
'1160181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPD' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
ff1f0bda68f387252c511af27fc1ea3c
d2c45b14e79c18a9e7ec7eef19385c92c82e8544
describe
'386517' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPE' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
d87c4b1bb1fd93b5f26abe7c619a351b
e0cc2aaaa2e0e0c78d287266e43e29da689ba43e
describe
'27155' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPF' 'sip-files00195.pro'
6805078a632bb272f7c762d4505b8530
f83aec1b3acf4e7a369836688577b8b41744a894
describe
'132250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPG' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
cd2b45c89db3650694476b05bfab095d
0768f5504fe1883d69382f1c03f9e90a5e86d23d
describe
'9287647' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPH' 'sip-files00195.tif'
07c936b746ef165a8b8f47cd1cc59feb
168c14dcfab77a1e4d5fdb81dd5667c1668bea4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPI' 'sip-files00195.txt'
fa5f3e67c06b7f5e530324c07f7a4053
c8595f2b9e4ccb655d774acbf89a3bf3d6a18eaf
describe
'47737' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPJ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
e97d7f66f80aaf212adbeebd6e71c02e
ae9866d12cb49ee03365e1645de47c51c58e0705
describe
'1044756' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPK' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
8907a1650050d11ac4b31758bf8c92e6
6356eb35e69725c864e25d3ababdc65032c99bc5
describe
'404689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPL' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
1b4a88887faa90fc8ce88ed2f3e49f78
cf3ecd357624ee53f791fe6fe786fca321ccffd2
describe
'36989' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
3cc8bc764696e1a6d1322f683677fb98
ca4295877bf431bae287416eeb89f92f2e9460a1
describe
'138723' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
62cdc5d48c0d3a7730af8ae84f03338c
294f75d932e89b19c98ccfd9c1229170db876943
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPO' 'sip-files00196.tif'
566c9eb17cf08be99bca7ed81d279894
4aed7d0eaeebade9311085c9f966174ab1800e27
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPP' 'sip-files00196.txt'
403963b44e2101a11a77baf54af58d31
a1e515b16a8a093a1a017038f0c2ba29484ef798
describe
'56794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPQ' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
40ee3101f9f1fe50d4fec7f960f57b7c
9f4131fb3c8267a658296c70063c1e380a043a5f
describe
'1060070' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPR' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
bec82824afe9592ed7beda33fa08be72
bfe615cb99b713075ed481cbaf684d85970a3312
describe
'404162' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPS' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
f4924f2965208705c058eaecbfb2fd94
e3e66c806a5ee4b163d50491670bb0b049f5fda6
describe
'29229' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPT' 'sip-files00197.pro'
a687bf4bb02ba9f3368f5468bf2bb915
d3f468db420e28ae2175e5219d95a7364e8c5c8d
describe
'141305' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPU' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
337296a08a98685e7650f651aae377bf
795268465158b360ed3f7430ca6ee50881da1a25
describe
'8490807' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPV' 'sip-files00197.tif'
a2064e7efa5df404e889abb902d4acc4
d7450cef81d423a90c99adc9be47467258fe435a
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPW' 'sip-files00197.txt'
3fbb8329b744931c04fb23e1c96c8f71
26043774380eeaece71012374fd769fbf7dfb461
describe
'56420' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPX' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
e06d729f89cd0d858ca239da4be89c23
75ddada295b2998730c513f395ff987b740885d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPY' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
3528e6bd18cc56278ee5a7a55c104e38
76a13b1f5085030978bfea884f3d30eb6827ecc5
describe
'378367' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSPZ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
430d71679a28679de147ab33df24ce04
1c85c87655b7ca7ffcd8b0eb4a2b60d1eed242c2
'2011-08-17T21:05:07-04:00'
describe
'23891' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQA' 'sip-files00198.pro'
9f7c0ca8e3a5be22af971e97ff48e457
761d110921a0e497427011274918573c5115ef9f
describe
'133303' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQB' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
9b5f7434a0ad8a23d864eae6a5ca16dc
78ed738531348b5ddefff15f45038a932806da05
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQC' 'sip-files00198.tif'
7f2e328a261c86804d02129dc930f852
a26ba3ed2e721e2d5b2b749cdfff632d4bef81b3
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQD' 'sip-files00198.txt'
6a5dc4eb3a0a45481fcea0334dcc789a
04485f3f8f135364c93d4baa5e1316b07c53ed18
describe
'55116' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQE' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
957143a3aefe9a0e8d8339926dcec52a
31ce276d737a08d76d3fb516d1cfc2c44639c5d5
describe
'1035947' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQF' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
a117a77f8722b9c5c69add717afb8952
bcf6681635b2c5670cb69cd2f8a29394f9c9465e
describe
'402457' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQG' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
fce7374f26d04a6801e41106e583be50
44e78bb3a84b631aa8e0cd291952f73e6c6d7e8a
describe
'28195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQH' 'sip-files00199.pro'
71655a828b7157efeb7d6c83fd63fa72
1c5692583fe6d754d19c8fed03d83a7f7370480e
describe
'143028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQI' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
a354ee24bc44267ca7db16e07f0f4c7e
4a8f86a6153ba2baeef017e366bebecf51da9c8f
describe
'8297739' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQJ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
a5ad2351578d2c045a0c7194a661d6f6
8c24e294e1048b5202ede8ef5c7d56174be79335
'2011-08-17T21:09:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQK' 'sip-files00199.txt'
4b9501112795a5a2667220bef260c373
7e66e5901366862ab60e49b0a209540d95c25fce
describe
'57257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQL' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
809f40f2f307d68ad646e36582a6330c
ba59a76956f6c8e2c00ed2d63a2c4f03ad5c356a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQM' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
f1400bbd46901a070c6f8fe74426541a
e148557fdaa8d6c5ea63c3df8a0dc4fbcce8e6a7
describe
'407128' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQN' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
e2ceed11a916ced237b8080c1d3b2751
dc9999d19cf757940d5b6b8be9d4041b730c1e13
describe
'29625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQO' 'sip-files00200.pro'
3cdaf32a4cfc06a8e9b48732270aa650
66351577e9192a766c207a3fc2b5b4c10160436e
describe
'141966' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQP' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
05bb9950c0e4ad30adb8b560179249ae
a740c25ad816d91e00fe24bdf1f3df5a78f654b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQQ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
03cbf2462dba5f88e91235e9eb276040
e2fa37c1ade68126242d377ba1fbb030a96f333c
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQR' 'sip-files00200.txt'
4f90529bdf0fe9724844d42d5819bcc0
0238cd77b5dce19d7bf5d7905a94e0a7be40feff
describe
'58104' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQS' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
ad2d9b2bf41f24209bd61c225b18e32f
c6684846b2084ca6df87a36ac4997ab64ed61d6c
describe
'1154462' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQT' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
d966c70075cf44c72d2f157a3ea700dd
534e06b0ca34082ef599e1411c1ae572f5e92944
describe
'379855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQU' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
1bdd55d56bee4271cb347d1cca866a91
2f5345a4e8d33cabb0aef6c58434f0e7959fed8d
describe
'24731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQV' 'sip-files00201.pro'
5eb855422aa8359b91cb8644445e6c0c
eb27b9ef5fe43dbc9779ace5c2343d709c5afc30
describe
'128938' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQW' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
d82822f3081ee047c67993af18e86a96
16850d500e870f0a367fa401597c8d1645131581
describe
'9241795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQX' 'sip-files00201.tif'
582d204d5d0dc220ff6050098bd8e75f
ce413a3f13cd6c453099ec81b3d8cdd559b33eae
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQY' 'sip-files00201.txt'
c953cd19863a144e9dfacbe46284e8e3
d854ba2c4ba5bd0e019fc2b82457791b983f33db
describe
'45561' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSQZ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
a8f16df398264369372f01e1430f3f7c
67347ac89910bc7b86684cdc4bd03ebdedb595b6
describe
'1044708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRA' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
5694a154bdc53fdb2a42c1f533c03a5d
ecbaadf8951806252a99b296fcd976cfc8c0d4cf
describe
'411474' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRB' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
6cb1dbf41e1b14a59f73cbc97c9ef38d
0687500dd16638a1c2df66d3e57bd2e1e33782db
describe
'29574' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRC' 'sip-files00202.pro'
7fd073925e16bef016aed84e5982f2c3
addb175e90689a011e16bbcda6ab89d030213597
describe
'144231' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRD' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
f30ee246fc72458f7f9b3c1a43c78837
3eba0e188e0d9d08f4cfece2f3cf5c0782ee8ee7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRE' 'sip-files00202.tif'
d6ec524ae4b19909a21f80ed7142481d
d67f982db00bf7ba928465cd58578dc7207df199
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRF' 'sip-files00202.txt'
376aecfabf802f9fd31d69f9a5cb7959
e1549a8b3b969c456bbf341df5da7204ca2ba9df
describe
'58450' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRG' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
f75ea0c9baf2de8ae72700c3c06331c3
ad696deac86a81ecbdccee72507e6ec3a14e1de2
describe
'1100844' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRH' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
629b9b80457146e2f7364d7a18e4fa5e
566e8899bd7abd5f16287086de1ffc87415d6b0f
describe
'413920' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRI' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
4b7f3fde86adde9065215d89f5321917
4f42ddc5d44144a6539db395459533cd0cac5784
describe
'27834' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRJ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
3303d8b7baec23a8afe576f36fa65483
4ef97858b5e39f2492ffc70f5370b30a53171079
describe
'140239' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRK' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
135155544bd97887a9ae9ddd524ef925
464a190147e7bf125877f5ee5a6a50a2fc21367c
describe
'8812927' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRL' 'sip-files00203.tif'
cac0c2bc5550fae658a7d14375ebcb7d
e2cbd2dddc22b5ea885812c87c3c2851c79b6291
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRM' 'sip-files00203.txt'
cf3988e9c7bdfd319175427cdba4cd97
f2e2c6e60000b56e7acd0da6b41c89ab48b0f7b9
describe
'51311' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRN' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
051cfb7f301274784e1b84133413f9cd
5b1ca4c91d0c125a489aeca74d971bb36e8d0c03
'2011-08-17T21:09:59-04:00'
describe
'1035235' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRO' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
c0698e593ba6815093cd70c41179da32
cfeff04cac286a4fc7650413cfafad727627e61a
'2011-08-17T21:09:21-04:00'
describe
'268561' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRP' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
933a3ef068882e9f32efaa5e163866ea
906a21cccb80ca7c941de82dd5bfdfec4805061f
describe
'360' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRQ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
c35343345cfa6db4b4caaf05311c2a27
663500ed656489fc556f3e82fdc88df3f004b8eb
describe
'85112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRR' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
4df93de6af7af434cfa017952a3dcc9a
3b55b593a150b6a74066f800efdfad1f2794d697
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRS' 'sip-files00204.tif'
0af718006f6e4f5f2303383e14c7a583
83346022196eb5eb581a06b68bc6391a6df01ab6
describe
'197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRT' 'sip-files00204.txt'
56f8fd5207d459ebfdbf0c799a167b7e
9aa26ba4f265cab7ddda12b22a249fb956e24d53
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRU' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
b4080a36573b1591a165aaa0e711c221
e32cbc18bbee00649c87950f1e46d81335c54be6
describe
'1290036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRV' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
6f9a0d7c9e910d544388a11f50c60840
219d98ce6d1676c350ed331c6d422eb461c8f1ac
'2011-08-17T21:02:58-04:00'
describe
'711113' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRW' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
90593fbf0119a57f2ed6bade5cfbbff3
0a539bab30d5f638f3137b10553d1a4629c05270
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRX' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
e2727af96c05f5181402a196bbd2a255
303fee2d3decfabec1abed4205e6c4478450f10d
describe
'197457' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRY' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
79b9d589955dbd17a4a26c4b8d449b28
65273fdec3c773c60cc2f70f7e80623c8fd55731
describe
'30963440' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSRZ' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
cb3e12a0b9cd91c86562cab54f196e2b
c049dceab6eb0b01125d5f532ff006857600fb8c
'2011-08-17T21:07:56-04:00'
describe
'83' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSA' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
afeb0597ad0cc79303b85f53b1057153
3868b2c0f50982ac9e13f89835095a4a51272253
describe
'54438' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSB' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
5db5aa54574d82668dfe430fa0ef6542
dba1abf0f04b4557fd7f143e093b944878c6d317
describe
'1220456' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSC' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
1b915267ee724fc23a579d4c1a6cd8aa
2e1350fdc569249ee569322fa44efc00d9e6d050
describe
'447846' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSD' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
a033699545c42539d121ec407d37bf9c
1481cc55e3080a57c62a917ba309ab7c2bfc221c
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSE' 'sip-filescover2.pro'
9f00bd8954cacda64379a3840ddccbab
6aa037bf1448c133e5f7fcb8da3532a3558df7f3
describe
'126498' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSF' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
1ae9aa1c52fec010a26dfb495f5f76e6
f7d4ec941e3192eb335daec3e70dce5fce8ee833
describe
'29293452' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSG' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
c19e5dc72aa301f96e3e153f4442f4db
692f3f3248b636dcec957cca1c7994e3d1e524fe
'2011-08-17T21:09:36-04:00'
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSH' 'sip-filescover2.txt'
4da07d6aa193b98b17977d6158b1f383
53af95747d4d91d8a6cf479749165d479dd83194
'2011-08-17T20:58:27-04:00'
describe
'38754' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSI' 'sip-filescover2thm.jpg'
79a98f2ff904915bfb130a453c6cc1c7
9cced2c9a44ab6b488b48c0cb6facd2917bfe861
describe
'1212618' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSJ' 'sip-filescover3.jp2'
32475e7af9cb712312d14800d9777efd
fd9d3f622ead1a9679d5a3cf0c005903f8544bce
'2011-08-17T21:06:44-04:00'
describe
'490411' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSK' 'sip-filescover3.jpg'
642a09d8a8e4bb007390b2dc53da8c85
3c9c577b69ff8cd97130af439091a6195f52f9f1
describe
'1872' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSL' 'sip-filescover3.pro'
870084e60ff5631fbef7ed6b8e56fb5b
dc0406b62d928e270ece434e1b7b80a352b1b281
describe
'133982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAQfileF20080805_AABSSM' 'sip-filescover3.QC.jpg'
274f0d83872d48d883be97c447a56b73
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describe
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___ PARKER'S SECOND S PARKER'S SECOND READER. |

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| NATIONAL SERIES
die
SELECTIONS FOR READING;



ADAPTED TO THE STANDING OF THE PUPIL.

BY RICHARD G, PARKER, A. M.

PRINCIPAL OF THE NORTH JOHNSON SCHOOL, BOSTON}; AUTHOR OF “ AIDS TO
ENGLISH COMPOSITION,” ‘‘ OUTLINES OF GENERAL HISTORY,” “THE
_ SCHOOL COMPEND OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY,” ETC.

PART SECOND.

DESIGNED FOR THE YOUNGER CLASSES IN SCHOOIS, ACADEMIES, &C,

“ Understandest thou what thou readest ? ” — Acts 6:30. —

——



NEW YORK:
A. 8 BARNES & BURR,

51 & 53 JOHN STREET.

@OLD BY BOOKSELLERS, GENERALLY, THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES,



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to Act of Congress, in the . ear Eighteen ¥ andred ani
Fifty-ane,
Br A. S. BARNES & CO.,
In th $lerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of
New York.

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STEREOTYPED BY
HOBART & ROBBINS;
NEW ENGLAND TYPE AND STERBOTYPE FOUNDERY,

BOSTON
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PREFACE. .


























In the preparation of this volume, I have
kept fresh in my recollection the immature state
of the minds which I have endeavored to en-
lighten; and while it has been my aim to pre-
sent such a succession of reading lessons as are
suitable for the younger classes in our common
schools and academies, I have not forgotten that
the first step to be taken, in making good read-
ers, is to open the understanding wide enough
to afford a sufficient entrance for the ideas
which are to be communicated by reading.
Words are but sounds, by which ideas should
be conveyed; and written language is of little
use, if it convey but sound alone. Great pains
have therefore been taken to exclude from this |
volume what the young scholar cannot under-
stand, while, at the same time, it has been the
aim of the author to avoid a puerile style, by
which the early intellect is kept down, and its
exertions are repressed. In every step and
Stage of its progress, the maxim “Excelsior”
should be the aim of the youthful mind; and the
hand of the teacher should be extended, not to


aca EET LE EN ee eens
CE ee

VI PREFACE.



lift it up, but only to assist it in its endeavors
to raise itself. All of the labor must not be
done by the teacher, nor by books. They are
of use only in exciting the mind to act for
itself. They may, indeed, act as pioneers, but
the pupil must not be carried in their arms;
he must perform the march himself. And
herein lies the great difficulty of the teacher’s |
task: on the one hand, to avoid the evil of leav-
ing too little to be done by the scholar; and,
on the other, to be careful that he be not
required to do too much. Real difficulties
should be lightened, but some labor should be
permitted to remain. To make such labor
attractive, and easily endured without discour-
| agement, is the task which best shows the tact
and skill of the teacher. If this volume be
found useful in aiding the teacher, by doing all
that should be required from the book, the
design of the author will be accomplished.

Bm. G, FP.
Kneeland Place, ;
May, 1851.






CONTENTS.





e Poetical Extracts are designated by Italic Letters |






Lesson Page
UL 6 0s 0 ae 68 ‘0:0 6 0.6 6.4 e ee eee

1. The Author’s Address to the Pupil, ........ 9
2. Same subject, continued,. ....... oo © oo AS
aa 8 ” 20. 0-0: 6's bee ae oa ee
4. The Discontented Pendulum, ... . ie Taylor, 19
5. Address of the Author to the Pupil, continued, . . . 23
6
7
8




: ee ee ee ee ee ne. oo ae
. How to find out the Meaning of Words, . . Original, 29
. Same subject, continued, ........ - 81

mm ee ee

















RG een ee a
We. WO, ok Mik hea Se 6 4. ee eee es 88
TI. Detaitiowes ss ose 6 vile 2 e608 a 42 |,
12. Reading and Spelling, .. . Sa oS ee
18. Importance of Learning to Spell, . | Original Version, 51
14, Demosthenes, ....... o + + + + + Original, 53 |;
Be EN Sw oa te sks ‘oo ee ¢ 57 |;
16. Fire: aConversation, ...... ost . a
17. Same subject, continued, ......e.. . 67 |;
oa .* _ concluded, ...... 8 = 78 ;
‘|| 19. The Lark and her Young vy Altered from sop, 79
WA Dog, «2s so 6 ye Wey ¢ « © © © « Origtnal, 82 |;
21. Same subject, concluded, ......... eo | ie
22. Frogs and Toads, . . . cts... e - - Bigland, 87 |
23. Maida, the Scotch Greyhound, Altered from Bigland, 90 |





ee a ae ee Ge ee 94
ey ONE Oia! his ace Child’s Companion, 96
26. Same subject, continued, .. . "

aa | + concluded, ... -
SNES















f re. ester aenrmemenernen nom atreannennre ssonecenenyend testa nacnnncanaaieeanannaaeinanianhiaeatsaaeanASARSASAGLI CALE? | aanaennR -oetal
|} VIII CONTENTS.
28 Make Good Use of Time, . . . Emma C. Embury, 102 |
29, Same subject, continued, .. . s 107
3o.6C« es concluded, .. . ” i111
|



31. Verse, or Poetry, ...-+-+- 2 e « « Original, 116
82. A Morning Hymn, .... + « « « Anonymous, 121
838. Evening Hymn, «+--+ - eee s 122 |
84. The Gardener and the Hog, ..-.+.-- Gay, 123
35. The Hare and many Friends,.....+.- ey
S6.\Maxims, . . «2 - ‘se eee . - Selected, 128
37. How to be Happy, .....-+.--> Child at Home, 129
88. Obedience and Disobedience, ~. Child’s Companion, 1838
89 Obstinacy, ....-+-.-. Lessons without Books, 189
40. King Edward and his Bible, L. H. Sigourney, 144
41. What does it Mean to be Tempted? . . . Rose-bud, 147
42, Same subject, continued, ....... m 151
43. 6 “<6 «eé i DIT ee ae ee 154
44, \« oe concluded, » - + + «6 +.s 9 157
45. Mary Dow, .. +++ ++ ++. HF. Gould, 163







on Bees, « «6 «+ 2 8 Sia 6 ees - 165
47 The Dissatisfied Angler Boy,.. . “ 166
48. The Violet: a Fable, . . Children’s Magazine, 168
49, Captain John Smith, . . . . Juvenile Miscellany, 170
50. Same subject, continued, . . és : 178
5] «ce “ce «ee 2 ae ee 176
oo.“ as concluded, .. $6 179
58. John Ledyard, .....-. ” 180
54. Same subject, concluded, . . r 183

55. Learning to Work,. . . « « « « « « « Original, 185
56. Same subject, continued, . . - . + « « - Abbott, 187
a és conclud@ly.» 0 « «20 e ss = =6189

eee Parker's Rhetorical Reader, 193
59. The Semicolon,.... “ 199
ty « 202


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him drink. The horse must do that himself.



















pattern ee Reaver

LESSON I.

The Author’s Address to the Pupil.

1. I present to you, my little friend, a
new book, to assist you in learning to read.
I do not intend that it shall be a book full
of hard words, which you do not under-
stand.

2. I do not think it proper to require
children to read what they cannot under-
stand. I shall, therefore, show you how
you may understand what is in this book,
and how you may be able, with very little
assistance from your teacher, to read all
the hard words, not only in this book, but
also in any book which you may hereafter
take up.

3. . But first let me repeat to you a say-
ing, which, when I was a little boy, and
went to school, my teacher used to repeat
tome. He said that any one might lead a
horse to the water, but no one could make



NATIONAL SERIES.




10



He must open his own mouth, and draw in
the water, and swallow it, himself.

4. And so it is with anything which I
wish to teach you. I can tell you many || |
things which it will b@useful for you to || |

|
|
































know, but I cannot open your ears and
make you hear me. I cannot turn your
eyes so that they will look at me when I
am talking to you, that you may listen to
me. That, you must do yourself; and if
you do not do it, nothing that I can say to
you, or do for you, will do you any good.

5. Many little boys and girls, when
their teacher is talking to them, are in
the habit of staring about the school-room,
or looking at their fellow-pupils, or, per-
haps, slyly talking to them or laughing
with them, when they ought to be listening
to what their teacher is saying.

6. Others, perhaps, may appear to be
looking at their teacher, while, at the. saine
time, they are thinking about tops and
marbles, or kites and dolls, and other play-
things, and have no more idea of what
their teacher is saying to them than if he
were not in the room.

7. Now, here is a little picture, from
which I wish to teach you a very import-
‘ant lesson. ‘The picture represents a nest,
with four little birds in it. The mother
bird has just been out to get some food for |

VE!















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 1]



them. The little birds, as soon as their
mother returns, begin to open their mouths





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wide, and the mother drops some food from
her bill into the mouth of each one; and
in this manner they are all fed, until they
are old enough to go abroad and find food
for themselves. |

8. Now, what would these little birds
do, if, when their mother brings them their
food, they should keep their mouths all
shut, or, perhaps, be feeling of one another
with their little bills, or crowding each
other out. of the nest?

19. You know that they would have to go
Without their food; for their mother would
not open their mouths for them, nor could

Q%*






PARKER'S SECOND READER. 13

LESSON ILI.

The same subject, continued.

1. I rotp you, in the last lesson, that I
would teach you how to understand what is
in this book, and how to read the hard
words that you may find in this or in any
other book.

2. Now, before you can understand them,
you must be able to read them; and in or-
der that you may understand how to read
them, you must take the words to pieces;
that is, take a few of the letters at a time, |
and see whether you can read a part of the
word first, and then another part, until you
have read the whole of it in parts, and then
you can put the parts together,.and thus |
read the whole word.

3. Now, in order that you may under-
stand what I mean, I will explain it to you
by taking a long word to pieces, and let-
ting you read a part of it at a time, until
you have learned how to read the whole
word.

4. In the next line. you may read the
parts of the word all separated :

Ab ra ca, dab ra.

Now you have read the parts of the word
| ab-ra-ca-dab-ra all separated, you can read
NATIONAL SERIES.



them very easily together, so as to make one
word, and the word will be Abracadabra.

5. This long and hard word was the |j,
name of a false god, that was worshiped
many hundreds of years ago, by a people
who did not know the true God, whom we
worship ; and they very foolishly supposed
that by wearing this name, written on
paper, in a certain manner, it would cure
them of many diseases.

6. Here are a few more long and hard
words, divided in the same manner, which
you may first read by syllables, that is, one
syllable at a time :

Val e i eee

In. de: “Yat. 1 ga bil i ty.
Hy po chon dri a cal.

Me temp sy cho sis.

{Hal lu ci na’ tion.

Zo oO no mi 4.

Ses qui pe dal i ty.

7. You may now read these long words
as they are here presented, without a divis-
ion of the syllables, as follows : valetudi-
narian, indefatigability, hypochondriacal,
metempsychosis, hallucination, zoonomia, |
sesquipedality.

8. Now, you see that words which look
hard, and which you find difficult to read,
can be easily read, if you take the pains to



——


PARKERS SECOND READER. 15
thn nent lstasinenitiicammacigst
divide them into parts or syllables, and not
try to read the whole word at once.

9. I now propose to relate to you a lit-
tle story which I read when I was a little
boy, and which I think will make you re-
member what I have just told you about
reading hard words, by first taking them to
pieces, and reading a part of them at a
time.

10. A father, who was dying, called his
seven sons around his bed, and showed





them a bundle of small sticks tied to-
gether, and asked each one to try to break

all the sticks at once, without untying the
bundle.

11. Each of the: sons took the bundle

SRS cient cee eetenetae o> ences ees he
LO Peete anon eden








| 16 NATIONAL SERIES.

Ts aiiaiiaasnmnineicenitinaneintn ssa eae
of sticks, and putting it across his knee,
| tried with all his strength to break it; but
not one of them could break the sticks, or
even bend them, while they were tied to- |
| gether.

12. The father then directed his oldest
son to untie the bundle, and to break each
stick separately. As soon as the bundle
was untied, each of the sons took the sticks
separately, and found that they could easily
preak every one of them, and scatter them,
in small pieces, all about the floor.

13. “Now,”’ said the father, ‘ my dear sons, to learn a lesson from these
sticks. So long as you are all united in
love and friendship, you need fear little
from any enemies; but, if you quarrel
among yourselves, and do not keep to-
gether, you see py these little sticks how
easily your enemies may put you down
separately.”’

14. Now, this was a very wise father,
and he taught his sons a very useful lesson
with this bundle of sticks. 1 also wish to
teach you, my little friend, whoever you
are, that are reading this book, another use-
ful lesson from the same story.

15. Hard words, especially long ones,
will be difficult to you to read, unless, like
the sons in the story, you untie the bundle ;
that is, until you take the long words apart,

sail Oe nn ene

-—--——,












a






PARKER'S SECOND READER.



and read one part or syllable at a time.
Thus you may learn what is meant by that
wise saying, ‘‘ Divide and conquer.”’





—_—_¢@—___



LESSON III.

The same subject, continued.

1. I wave another lesson to teach you
from the same story of the old man and the
bundle of sticks, which I think will be very
useful to you,and will make your lessons
very much easier to you. ;

2. Whenever you have a lesson to learn,
do not look at it all at once, and say, I can-
not learn this. long lesson; but divide it into
small parts, and say to yourself, I will try
to learn this first little part, and after 1 have
learned that, Iwill rest two or three minutes,
and then I will learn another littlé part, and
then rest again a few minutes, and then I
will learn another.

3. I think that in this way you will find
study is not so hard a thing as it seemed to
you at first, and you will have another ex-
planation of that wise saying, Divide and
conquer.

4. I will now tell you another story that

I read when I was a little boy. It was
ee














— LL EET, ST SL REE - ~~ emeeeee --










18 NATIONAL SERIES. |

story, I must tell you what a fable is.

5 A fable is a story which is not true. || —
But, although it is not a true story, itis a || —
very useful one, because it always teaches || —
us a good lesson.

6. In many fables, birds and beasts are
represented as speaking. Now, you know
| that birds and beasts cannot talk, and there- || |
fore the story, or fable, which tells us that || |
birds and beasts, and other things, that are
not alive, do talk, cannot be true.

”. But I have told you, that although
fables are not true storiesy they are very
useful to us, because they teach us a useful
lesson. This lesson that they teach is
called the moral of the fable; and that is
always the best fable that has the best
moral to it, or, in other words, that teaches
us the best lesson.

8. The story, or the fable, that I promised
to tell”you, is in the next lesson, and I wish
you, when you read it, to see whether you
ean find out what the lesson, or moral, 1s
which it teaches; and whether it is at all
like the story of the father and the bundle
of sticks, that I told you in the last lesson.
While you read it, be very careful that you
do not pass over any word the meaning of
which you do not know.

a ia le |

cepacia LL 4
called a fable. But before I tell you the |

a ne a ia ition ee nae eS in apts a 4

ee

en eS LL TL






PARKER’S SECOND READER. 19

ee ———

LESSON IV.

The Discontented Pendulum. —J ane TAYLOR.



AN TR a | * les,
i i We
i it} i 4s,
; \ yi i; WH Whee
PS) nif | Sed



1. Aw old clock, that had stodl for fifty
years in a farmer’s ‘kitchen, without" giving
its owner any cause of complaint, one
summer’s morning, before the fa was
stirring, suddenly stopped.

2. Upon this, the dial-plate (if we vail
credit the fable) changed countenance with
alarm ; the hands made a vain effort to con-
tinue their course; the wheels remained
motionless with surprise ; the weights hung
speechless ; each member felt disposed to
lay the blame on the others.

3. At length the dial instituted a formal

3



——-
20 NATIONAL SERIES.

Ln caattianaamasiascciliiamensaneiie sematiaaiinteataeae
inquiry as to the cause of the stagnation,
when hands, wheels, weights, with one
voice, protested their innocence.

4. But now a faint tick was heard below
from the pendulum, who thus spoke : — “ I
confess myself to be the sole cause of the
present stoppage ; and I am willing, for the
general satisfaction, to assign my reasons.
The truth is, that I am tired of ticking.”’

5. Upon hearing this, the old clock be-
came so enraged, that 4t was on the very
point of striking. ‘‘ Lazy wire!’’ ex-
claimed the dial-plate, holding up its
hands. uw

6. “Very good!” replied the pendulum ;
‘it is vastly easy for you, Mistress Dial,
who have always, as everybody knows, set
yourself up’ above me, —it is vastly easy
for you, I say, to accuse other people of |
laziness! You, who have had nothing to
do, a e days of your life, but to stare
| peopl the face, and to amuse yourself
! with watching all that goes on in the

kitchen ! , |
| 7. «Think, I beseech you, how you would



—— ee

i.
like to be shut up for life in this dark closet, |
and to wag backwards and forwards, year

after year, as I do.”’ ) |

8. «* As to that,’’ said the dial, ‘‘ is there
not a window in your house, on purpose for
you to look through?” — * For all that,’’

tea ail sf


A

ee neenennennee:





PARKER'S SECOND READER. 21
ssatesichoeseeshtnnsebaanenientatensntitdnaianeittentiisiatnnmseninniaiidil
resumed the pendulum, “it is very dark
here; and although there is a window, I
dare not stop, even for an instant, to look
out at it.

9. ‘Besides, I am really tired of my
way of life; and, if you wish, I’ll tell you
how I took this disgust at my employment.
I happened this morning to be calculating
how many times I should have to tick in
the course of only the, next twenty-four
hours ; perhaps some of you, above there:
can give me the exact sum.”’

10. Thé»minute-hand, being quick at
figures, preg@iily replied, « Eighty-six
thousand four hundred times.”

11. ‘Exactly so,” replied the pendu-
lum; ‘well, I appeal to you all, if the
very thought of this was not enough to fa-
tigue one; and when I began to multiply
the strokes of one day by those of months
and years, really, it is no wonder if I felt
discouraged at the prospect: so, after a
great deal of reasoning and_ hesitation,
thinks I to myself, I’ll stop.”

12. The dial could scarcely keep its
countenance during this harangue; but,
resuming its gravity, thus replied: ‘Dear
Mr. Pendulum, I am really astonished that
such a useful, industrious person as your-
self, should have been overcome by ui
sudden action. ,

esse tesaensassssnseteesmnasaisnenssifuantnesioensiees/tesiua«




2?, NATIONAL SERIES.

13. ‘It is true, you have done a great
deal of work in your time ; so have we all,
and are likely to do; which, although it
may fatigue us to think of, the question is,
whether it will fatigue us to do. Would
you now do me the favor to give about
half a dozen strokes, to illustrate my argu-
ment ?”’

14. The pendulum complied, and ticked
| six times in its usual pace. ‘ Sumed the dial, ‘‘may I be allowed to in-
quire if that exertion was at all fatiguing
or disagreeable to you?”’ a

15. ‘Not in the least,’’ @plied the pen-
dulum; ‘“‘it is not of six strokes that ]
complain, nor of sixty, but of millions.”’

16. “Very good,” replied the dial;
‘but recollect, that though you may thank
of a million strokes im an instant, you are
required to execute but one ; and that, how-
ever often you may hereafter have to swing,
a moment will always be given you to
swing in.”’

17. “That consideration staggers me, I
confess,’ said the pendulum.—‘‘ Then I
| hope,” resumed the dial-plate, ‘we shall
all immediately return to our duty ;,for the
| maids will lie in bed, if we stand idling
| thus.”’

18. Upon this, the weights, who had
| never been accused of light conduct, reed

—_———

















emai












all their influence in urging him to pyro-
ceed; when, as with one consent, the
wheels began to turn, the hands began to
move, the pendulum began to swing, and, |

Peg.
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 23 |

to its credit, ticked as loud as ever; while
a red beam of the rising sun, that streamed
through a hole in the kitchen window, shin-
ing full upon the dial-plate, it brightened
up, as if nothing had been the matter.

19. When the farmer came down to
breakfast that morning, upon looking at the
clock, he declared that his watch had gained
half an hour in the night.

£











—_—_=— eee

LESSON V.

Address of the Author to the Pupil, —
continued from Lesson 3d.

1. Tne fable of the old clock, which has
just been read, is intended to teach us a
| lesson, or moral, and that is, that when-
; ever we have anything to do, whether it
| be a long lesson or a piece of hard work,
we must not think of it all at once, but
divide the labor, and thus conquer the dif-
ficulty.
2. The pendulum was discouraged when
it thought that it had to tick eighty-six

-——-





3*


24 NATIONAL SERIES.
Tl
thousand four hundred times in twenty-four
hours; but when the dial asked it to tick
half a dozen times only, the pendulum
confessed that it was not fatiguing or disa-
greeable to do so.

3. It was only by thinking what a large
number of times it had to tick in twenty-
four hours, that it became fatigued.

4, Now, suppose that a little boy, ora
little girl, has a hard lesson to learn, and,
instead of sitting down quietly and trying
to learn a little of it at a time, and after
that a little more, until it is allflearned,
should begin to cry, and sayy I cannot learn
all of this lesson, it is too long, or too hard,
and I never can get it, that little boy, or
girl, would act just as the pendulum did
when it complained of the hard work it
had to do.

5. But the teacher says to the little boy,
Come, my dear, read over the first sentence
of your lesson to me six times. The little
boy reads the first sentence six times, and
confesses to his teacher that it was not very
hard work to do so.

6. The teacher then asks him to read it
over six times more ; and the little boy finds
that, before he has read it to his teacher so
often as the six times more, he can say it
without his book before him.

7. In this way, that little boy will find,

-_- oom.

-_— oe... oo -


















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 25 |

that it is not, after all, so hard work to get
what he calls a hard lesson; because all
that he has to do, is to read a small portion
of the lesson at a time, and to repeat the
reading of that small portion until he can
repeat it without the book.

8. When he has done this, he can take
another small portion of the lesson, and do
the same with that, until, by degrees, he
has learnt the whole lesson; and then he
will feel happy, because he knows that his
teacher, and his parents, will be pleased
with him.

9. But some pupils say to themselves,
when they have a lesson to learn, I do not
want to study this lesson now ; I will study
it by and by, or to-morrow morning.

10. But, by and by, and when to-
morrow comes, they feel no more disposed
to study their lesson than they did when
the lesson was first given to them.

11. Now, my little friend, if you wish
your time at school to pass pleasantly, do
not say to yourself, I will get my lesson
by and by, or to-morrow, but set yourself
about it immediately, learn it as quickly as
you can, and I will assure you will not only
make your teachers and your parents hap-
pier but you will be much happier your-
self.



























26 NATIONAL SERIES.

—————— nl

LESSON VL.
The Author to the Pupil.

1. In the first lesson, I told you that I
would show you how to understand what is
‘n this book; and how you may, with very
little assistance from your teacher, be able
to read all the hard words that you find in
any book.

2. Many little boys and girls are very fond
of running out of their places in school,
and going up to their teachers with a great
many unnecessary questions. This always
troubles the teacher, and prevents his going
through with all his business in time to
dismiss you at the usual hour.

3. Whenever you meet with any real
difficulty, that you cannot overcome your
self without his assistance, you should
watch for an opportunity when he is at
leisure, and endeavor to attract his atten-
tion quietly, and without noise and bustle,
so that your fellow-pupils may not be dis-
turbed, and then respectfully and modestly
ask him to assist you.

4, But if you are noisy and troublesome,
and run up to him frequently with questions
that, with a little thought, you could easily
answer yourself, he will not be pleased with
you, but will think that you wish to make

——







eT ned



0 EE SS ONES


PARKER'S SECOND READER. 27





trouble ; and, perhaps, will appear unkind
to you.

5. I will now endeavor to show you
how you may understand what is in your
book, so that you will have no need to be
troublesome to your teacher.

6. In the first place, then, always en-
deavor to understand every line that you
read; try to find out what it means, and,
if there is any word that you have never
seen or heard of before, look out the word in
a dictionary, and see what the meaning of
the word is; and then read the line over
again, and see whether you can tell what
the whole line means, when you have found
out the meaning of the strange word.

7. Now, as you can understand every-
thing best when you have an example, I
will give you one, as follows. In the tenth
chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, at the
first verse, there are these words:

1. “There was a certain man in Cesarea, called
Cornelius, a centurion of the band called the Italian

nda,

2. “A devout man, and one that feared God with all
his house,, and gave much alms to the people, and prayed
to God always.” '

8. I suppose you know what most of
the words in these verses mean, except the
word centurion in the first verse, and the
word alms in the second.



LL

—



“—-


28 NATIONAL SERIES.

LO

9. Now, if you look for the word cen-
turion in the dictionary, it will tell you that
centurion means a military officer, who com-
manded a hundred men. Thus you find
that Cornelius was a soldier; and not only
that he was a soldier, but that he was an
officer, that commanded soldiers.

10. Again, if you look for the word alms
in your dictionary, you will find that it
means money given to the poor; and thus
you find that Cornelius was a very good
man, and not only prayed to God, but also
gave much money to assist the poor.

11. You see, then, how useful a book a
dictionary is at school, and how important
it is that you should have one. If your
parents cannot give you a very good one,
any one is better than none.

12. But if you have no dictionary, or
if you cannot find the word you wish to
find in the dictionary, you must then wait
for a convenient time to ask your teacher,
and he will always be pleased to find that
you are trying to understand the words in
your lesson.

13. If you have a dictionary, and do
not know how to find out the words in it,
ask your teacher to show you; and when he
has showed you how to use it, be sure never
to pass over a single word without know-
ing what it means.



~ a
AS SS LD LS LCE) ees


PARKER’S SECOND READER. 29



LESSON VIL.

How to find out the Meaning of Words, —
ORIGINAL.

| |

an f ;

iat

ae

\ ened

\ me

Wi! \i
\



1. Many years ago, when I lived in a

small town, near the Merrimac river, a little |
Spanish girl came to board in the same |

house. 4
2. She could speak very well in her own |
language ; but the people m her country |
speak a language very different from ours: |
and when she first began to speak, she |
heard nothing but Spanish words ; and she |

ss no other,

3. She could not speak a word of Eng-
Peper regenera renene nae nemaliilen alae mn ee

2 eee
































NATIONAL SERIES.
Un eeeamemmutmnicemgiranrenacateniainnnreas
lish, and did not understand a word that
was spoken to her by any of the family.

4. Her parents were very rich, but they
| placed her in the family, that she might

learn to speak English.

5 She had no dictionary to turn to, to
look out the meaning of words; and if she
was hungry, she could not ask for bread,
and if she was thirsty, she could not ask
for water, nor milk, nor tea, for she did not
know the meaning of either of the words,
water, tea, nor milk. ~

6. Perhaps you would be puzzled to tell
how she could learn to speak English, if
she had no one to teach her, and had no
dictionary to inform her about the words.

7. But it was not many days before she
could say ‘bread,’ if she was hungry,
and ‘‘water,’’ if she wanted to drink ; and
I was very much surprised to find how
soon it was, at the dinner-table, she could

at tea-time, for tea, or milk, or sugar, or
butter, or bread.

8 T have no doubt that you would like
to know how this little Spanish girl learned
intend to tell you quite yet, but I think

| the next lesson.



lal
==)

ask for meat, or potato, or pudding ; and, |

LL serena ene

|

to speak all of these words. I do not |}

you will find out yourself, if you will read |


> ie aie aes ee —
SS > . OO. O OO TD 0 0 a nT ST





LESSON VIII.
The same subject, continued.

1. Asovur twenty years ago, I was very

ill, and, for a long time, my friends thought

I never should recover.

2. By the very attentive care of my phy-
sician, and by the devoted attention of my
wife, I unexpectedly grew better; and the
doctor said that I must take a voyage for
the recovery of my health.

3. A kind friend, who was going to the
West Indies, in a vessel of his own, very
venerously offered to take me with hin,
and I gratefully accepted the offer.

4. We sailed from Boston early one
morning, and were soon out of sight of the
land. I was quite ill during the voyage ;
but fortunately the voyage was a short one,
and we reached the place of our destina-
tion on the fourteenth day after we sailed.

5. The island, where we landed, was a
beautiful spot; and lemons, oranges, pine-
apples, and many other delicious fruits,
were growing out in the open air.

6. The people who lived on this island
did not speak the English language; and
the family with whom I was to reside could
speak only in French.

a I observed, at dinner-time, that some





nn ee







PARKER'S SECOND READER. 31

ee EE
LT
a a a a a TT

. ee


re TT

———— ee
32 NATIONAL SERIES.

sin snsipiseneieiaseeteniianiaedasttiie
of the persons at the table held out their
tumblers to the servant, and said something
which sounded to me like O.

8. I often heard this word; and every
time it was spoken, water was brought, or
poured out, or something was done with
waler. |

9. I then made up my mind that this
word that I thought was O meant water;
and I found out afterwards that I was
right, except that I did not spell it right.

10. This I discovered by means of the
Bible, from which the family used to read.

11. It was a very large one, with very
large letters; and as I was very fond of
hearing them read, and of looking over the
book while some one was reading aloud, I
noticed that whenever the reader came to
the letters e, a, u, he called them O;
and thus I found out that water, in their
language, wes called O, but was spelt
e, a, U.

12. In the same manner, I found out
| the words, or names, which they gave to
| bread, and sugar, and butter, and meat,
and figs, and oranges, and lemons, and

pine-apples.

13. And now, perhaps, you may be able
| to find out how the little Spanish girl, men-
'| tioned in the last lesson, learned the meaning

of English words that she had never heard



aed

ad

—

-< ——$—$$—$$$ $$$ $$ ———
I I

|




PARKER'S SECOND READER. 33





until she came to live in the family where |
nothing but English was spoken.

14. She was obliged to listen, when any
one spoke, and watch to see what was
wanted; and in the same manner in which
I found out the meaning of O, and what to
call bread, and sugar, and butter, and meat,
and figs, and oranges, and other fruits, she |
learned tocall things by their English names.

15. But, in order to do this, she was
obliged to listen very attentively, to try to
remember every new name thatshe learned ;
and, by so doing, in less than a year she
could talk almost as plainly as any one in
the house.
| 16. It was very easy for her to learn the
|| names of things, because she heard them
spoken very often. Such words as chair,

table, water, sugar, cake, potato, pudding,
and other words which are the names of*
.
|
|

CE CC A tt
TT ee eee

things she could see, she learned very
|| quickly.
| 17. But such words as come and go, or
|| run and walk, and the little words to and
|| from, and over and under, or such words
as quickly and slowly, and many other W'<::
of the same kind, she could not learn s
easily.
18. In the next lesson perhaps you will |}
find out howshe learned the meaning of
these words.














34 NATIONAL SERIES.
Fe eee lima

‘LESSON IX. |

The same subject, mtinued.



1. Tuere was a small family living very |
near to your residence, my young friends
who are reading this lesson, consisting of
the father, the mother, and four young chil-
dren. 7

9. The oldest was a boy of twelve years
old, the next was a little girl of about eight,
| the third was another pretty little girl of
| six, and the youngest was an infant boy,

only nine months old.
3. As you may well suppose, the baby,
ool as he was called, was the delight, not only
of the father and the mother, but also of
his elder brother and his two sisters.









ee a ——n
—

‘. PARKER'S SECOND READER.



a



4. The oldest brother had a dog whose |
name was Guido, —an Italian name, which ,
is pronounced as if it were spelt Gwe'do. |

5. The dog had learned tolovethedear |'
little baby as much as the rest of the fam- |
ily; and very often, when he was lying on f
the floor, the baby would pull his tail, or |
his ears, or put his little hand into the crea- |
ture’s mouth, and Guido would play as
gently with him as if he knew that the
baby was a very tender little thing, and
{| could not bear any rough treatment.

6. Nothing pleased the whole family,
|



and Guido among the rest, so much, as to
hear the baby try to say papa, and mamma,
and bub, and sis; for he could not say |
brother, nor sister, nor pronounce any other
words plainly.

7. The youngest sister was very fond of
making him say these words; and every
time the little creature repeated them to
her, she would throw her arms around his
little neck, and hug and kiss him with all |

| the affectionate love her little heart could ©
express. |
8. She often used to dress her little doll |



|
| as prettily as she knew how; tying its frock |
| on one day with a pretty blue ribbon, and on
another with a red one; for she had noticed, |
that whenever the doll was newly dressed,
|| the dear little baby would look very stead- |



‘

ae as nen od







4%*


ee, ae

36 NATIONAL SERIES.

a



| ily at it, and hold out its little arms towards
| it; and then she would carry it to her little
| brother, and say to him, ‘‘ Dolly, — pretty
| dolly, — bub want to see dolly r

' 9. One day she had dressed her doll in
a very bright new dress, with very gay rib-
bons, and was carrying it towards her father
to show it to him, when suddenly she heard
the baby cry out, ‘* Dolly !”’

10. She immediately ran with delight
to her little brother, holding up the doll in
its new shining dress, and repeated her
usual words, ‘‘ Dolly, — bub want dolly ?”’

11. The baby, delighted, looked up in its
mother’s face, and laughed, and crowed,
and giggled, and in its delight again re-
peated the word ‘‘ Dolly !”’

12. Pleased with her success, the little
sister was unwearied in her efforts to make
her little brother repeat other words; and
day by day she was gratified to find the
list of words which he lisped was growing
in length.

13. By the unwearied endeavors of
father, mother, brother and sisters, this |
pretty little baby, by the time that it was
three years old, could speak plainly any-
thing that was repeated to him, and had
learned thenamesofalmost everything that
he saw about the house, the yard, and the
street. :



NT ee cere ce ELL TT LL


ee

PARKER’S SECOND READER. 37





14. But it was observed that Guido,
the dog, although he could not speak a
werd, had also learned the names of many
things; and when George, the oldest son,
i told him to go and bring his ball to him,

Guido would wag his tail, and go up into

' George’s chamber, and look about the room
until he had found the ball; and then he
would run down the stairs, and dropping
the ball at his young master’s feet, look up
in his face, expecting that George would
throw it down for him to catch again.

——
——



ae —~ Reoe = _—_—- ——_—_
—S-RAGWARD SOD SF

15. The baby, however, learnt words |

and names much faster than Guido; for
although Guido knew as much as any dog.
knows, yet dogs are different creatures from




=
r

j
| 38 NATIONAL SERIES.
|





| children, and cannot learn so much nor so
fast as children can, because it has not
pleased God to give them the same powers.

16. Now, perhaps you may wish to know

| who this interesting family were of whom I
have been speaking; and you will probably
be surprised to learn, that all I have told
you about this little baby is true of every
little baby, and that the manner that every
infant is taught to speak is the same.

17. It is the same manner as that in
which the little Spanish girl, mentioned in
the seventh lesson, was taught to speak the
English language.



LESSON X.
Words. — ORIGINAL.

1. I Toxrp you, in the last lesson, how an
infant child first learned'to speak, when it
was taught by its father and mother, and
brother and sisters.

2. I intend to show you, in this lesson, ,
how the little child learned the meaning of
a great many words himself, without the as-
sistance of any one else. 7

8. He was very fond of Guido, the dog,
and watched everything he did, especially

*














—_—_—

“S
PARKER'S SECOND READER.



eee

when his brother George was playing with
him.

4, When George called Guido, and said
to the dog, ‘‘Come here, Guido,” the little

boy could not help noticing that Guido went

to George.

5. When George’s father or mother called
George, and said, ‘“‘ Come here, George,”
the little child saw that George went to his
father, or his mother.

6. Now, nobody told the little child what
George, or his father, or his mother, meant
by the word come ; but he always saw, that
when any one said to ancther, ‘6 Clome,”’
that the one who was spoken to always
moved towards the person who called him,
and in this way the little child found out
what his father or his mother meant by the
word come.

7. It was in this way, my young friend
who are reading this lesson, that you, your-
self, learned the meaning of most of the
words that you know.

8. When you were a little child, like
the infant of whom I have been speaking,
you knew no more about words, or about
speaking, than he did.

Sa ————————

9. But, by hearing ott:ers speak and use |}

words, you learned tousethem yourself; and
there is no word ever used, either in books

| Goa anywhere else, that you cannot Sind out





ee ET TT
| 40) NATYONAL SERIES.



its meaning, provided that you hear it used
frequently, and by different persons.

10. I will now give you an example, to

|, show you what I mean. I will give you a
word that you probably never heard of be-
fore ; and although I shall not tell you what
the word means, I think you will find it out
yourself, before you have read many more
lines of this lesson.

11. The word hippot is the word that I
shall choose, because I know tuat you do
not know the meaning of it; but I wish you
to read the following sentences in which
the word is used, and I think that you will
find out what hippot means, before you
have read them all.

12. In California, and in Mexico, and
in most parts of South America, there are
many wild hzppoi, which feed on the grass
| that grows wild there.

15. The Indians hunt the hippoi ; and
when they catch them, they tame them,

and put bridles on their heads, and bits in
‘| their mouths, and saddles on their backs,
and ride on them.

14. A carriage, with four white hippoz,
has just passed by the window, and one of
the hippot has dropped his shoe. The
coachman must take him to the blacksmith,
to have the shoe put on.

15. The noise which hippoi make is a

—



ET

-——
SL




SOA ee.

| split into two parts; but the hoofs of heppoi

——————————— —- -—

T° SA RT



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 4]





—_

very strange noise, and when they make it
they are said to neigh ( pronounced na).

16. The hoofs of cows and goats and
sheep and deer are cloven; that is, they are

are not split or cloven, and for that reason
they are called whole-hoofed animals.

17. My father has in his barn four
hippot. One of them is red, and has a short
tail; another is white, with afew dark hairs
in his mane, or long hair on the top of his
neck ; the third is gray, with dark spots on
his body; and the fourth is perfectly black,
and has a very long tail, which reaches
almost to the ground.

18. Now, from these sentences, I think

you willsee that Azppor does not mean cows,
or goats, or sheep, or deer; and I do not
think it necessary to tell you anything more
about it, except that it is a word that was
spoken by the Corinthians and the Colos-
sians and the Ephesians, the people to whom
St. Paul addressed those epistles or letters
in the Bible called by their names.
19. When you have read this lesson,
your teacher will probably ask you what
the word hippo: means; and I hope you will
be able to tell him that hippot means —
[here put in the English word for hippoi.]

slashes pineal teeeepsspiiobanctctnenettsatt geste celeron etnias siasip antennae
lagi a sas ---—— - Rennie J

— wee ee




{ 42 ! NATIONAL SERIES.

LESSON XI.
Definitions.

| J]. Iw the last lesson, I gave you a word |
| which you had not seen before, to find out
the meaning of it, without looking in a
dictionary.

2. I told you, in a former lesson, how the
Tittle Spanish girl found out the meaning
of words which she did not know; and



afterwards informed you how the infant
child was taught to speak.

3. Now, I doubt not that you can speak
a great many words, and know what they
mean when you use them; but I do not
think that you ever thought much about
the way in which you learned them.

4, Perhaps you will be surprised to hear
that everybody learns to talk and to use
words in the same way that the little Span-
ish girl and the little infant learned them;
that is, by hearing others use them in differ-
ent ways, just as the word Aippot was used |
in the last lesson.

5. Nobody ever told you, probably, the
meaning of a great many words that you

| know ; and yet you know them full as well,
and perhaps better, than if any one had told

‘| you about them.
6. Perhaps you have a brother whose |

ee TL
a re
a a eT






eo 8





PARKER'S SECOND READER. 43 |

4

he wished to ask them, and that he would.



| name is John, or George, or James, or a

or Lucy. You have always heard them
called by these names, ever since you, or
they, were quite young; and have noticed
that when John was called, that the one
whose name is John would answer; and as’
each one answered when spoken ‘to, you |
learnt which was John, and whiok was |
eT: and which was Lucy. |
7. So also, when a certain animal, having |
two lerge horns and a long tail, ana which |
is muked every night and morning, passed
by. you heard some one say cow ; and in this
way you learned what the word cow means.
8. So also, when water falls from the
sky in drops, little children hear people say |
it rains; and thus they find out what rain
means. |
9. Now, when anybody asks you what’
any word means, although you know it very ,
well, yet it is a very hard thing to tell |
what it means, — that is, to give a definition |
of it, —as you will see by the little story I |
am about to tell you.
10. A teacher, who was very anxious to '
make his scholars understand their lessons,
once told them he had a very hard question |

sister whose name is Mary, or Jane, or Ann,





let the one who auswered the question best |
take the head of af the class. he a






aie siaseagmengenmenaeteciateaneninrnee CPO EL
See ermine —EE

©
l~





an ne ——— nad

44 NATIONAL SERIES.







TT, atieweeeinnnemnniertateenciennenienet nena
| 1. This teacher never allowed any of
‘his pupils to speak to him without first
raising his right hand above his head, to
| signify that the child had something to say; |
‘and when any child raised his hand in this }
way, if he was not busy, he called upon the |} |
, child to say what he wished.

12. In this way he prevented the children
from troubling him when he was busy; and
in this way he also prevented them from in-
terrupting each other, as would be the case
if several of them should speak at once.

13. On the day of which I am about to
| speak, he said to them, Now, children, I
\ have a very hard question to ask you, that
does not require you to study, but only to
think about it, in order to answer it well;
and the one who gives me the best answer
shall go to the head of the class. The
question is this : What is a bird?

14. Before they heard the question, they
-Jooked very sober, and thought their mas-
| ter intended to puzzle them, or to give them
' a long sentence to commit to memory.
Butas soon as they heard the question, they
i began to smile among themselves, and won- |
oe how their teacher should call that a
‘ hard question.

15. A dozen hands were immediately
raised, to siguify that so many of the chil-
dren were ready to answer it.

——=





‘
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 45 |
Fa iepethaesienterataniansamminiomanaeenensionisartt

16. Well, John, said the teacher, sila
hand is up ; can you tell me what a bird is ? ||

17. John immediately rose, and stand-
ing on the right-hand side of his seat, said,
A bird is a thing that has two legs.

18. Well, said the teacher, suppose some
one should saw off two of the legs of my
chair ; it would then be a thing that has two
legs; but it would not be a bird, would it ?
You see, then, that your answer is not cor-
rect.

19. I will not mention the names of the
other children who raised their hands; but
I will tell you what the answers were
which some of them made to the questions,
and what the teacher said about each of
their answers. —

90. One of the children said that a bird
is an animal with two legs. But, said the



























LE NE

teacher, all little boys and girls, and all
|| men and women, are animals with two legs ;
|| but they are not birds.
. 91. Another child said that a bird is an
|} animal that has wings. But the teacher
said there cze some fishes that have wings,
| and that fisnes are not birds.
22. A bright little girl then modestly
rose and said, A bird is an animal that has
legs and wings, and that flies. The teacher

smiled upon her very kindly, and told her
| that it is true that a bird has legs and

eee






| 46 NATIONAL SERIES.

wings, and that it flies; but, said he, there
is another animal, also, that has legs and
wings, and that flies very fast in the air. It
is called a bat. It flies only in the night;
but it has no feathers, and therefore is not
| a bird.

23. Upon hearing this, another bright-
eyed child very timidly rose and said, A
bird is an anivial that has legs, wings and
feathers. Very well, said the teacher ;
but can you not think of anything else that
a bird has, which other creatures have not ?

24. The children looked at one another,
wondering what their teacher could mean;
and no one could think what to say, until
the teacher said to them, Think a moment,
and try to tell me how a bird’s mouth
looks. Look first at my mouth. You see
I have two lips, and these two lips form
my mouth. Now, tell me whether a bird
has two lips; and if he has not, what he
has instead of lips. ;

25. One of the children immediately
arose and said, that a bird has no lips, but
he has a bill; and that bill opens as the
lips of a man do, and forms the mouth of
|| the bird.

26. Yes, said the teacher; and now
iisten to me while I tell you the things you
should always mention, when you are asked

what a bird is, —



i


|
=

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 4





First, A bird is an animal.

Secondly, It has two legs.

Thirdly, It has two wings.

Fourthly, It has feathers. |

Fifthly, It has a hard, glossy bill.
27. And now, said the teacher, you see
that I was right when I told you that I had
a hard question to ask you, when I asked
What is a bird ?
28. Now, if you will join all of these
things which belong to a bird in the descrip-
tion which you give in answer to my ques-
tion, What is a bird, you will then give a cor-
rect definition of a bird, —that is, you will
tell exactly what a bird is, and no more,
and no less.
29. A bird is an animal covered with
feathers, having two legs, two wings, and
a hard, glossy bill.
30. When you are asked what anything
is, recollect what I have told you about a
bird, and try to recall everything that you
ever knew about the thing, and in this way
you will be able to give a satisfactory
answer.
31. This will also teach you to think,
and that is one of the most important ob-
jects for which you go to school. It will
enable you also to understand what you
read ; and you can always read those things
best which you understand well.

5*

ee 6 EC LL I LL AL TT

LT

———

A AL LLL LT


TT 6

NATIONAL SERIES.

LESSON XII. |
Reading and Spelling.







|

; AnorHER important thing for which
you go to school is to learn how to spell.
It is not always very easy to spell, because
there are so many different ways in which
the same letters are pronounced in differ-
ent words. )

2. That you may understand what I
mean, I shall give an example, to show you
how many different ways the same letters
are pronounced in different words; and
also another example, to show you how
many different ways there are of spelling
the same sylluble.

3. To show you, first, in how many dif-
ferent ways the same letters are pronounced
in different words, I shall take the letters
0, u, g, h.

4. The letters 0, u, g, h, are sounded
or pronounced like the letter o alone, in the
word though. The letters 0, u, g, h, are
pronounced like uf, in the word tough.

5. In the word cough, the letters 0, u,
g, h, are pronounced like off. In the words
slough and plough, the letters 0, u, g, h,
are pronounced like ow; and in the word
through, they are pronounced like ew, or ||

like w.

BS .d

—_—-




e_--



[ PARKER'S SECOND READER. 49







| 6. In the word hiccough the letters ough
jare pronounced like wp—and in the word
lowgh, the letters are pronounced like doh.
7. There are many words which end
with a sound like shun ; and this syllable
| is spelled in many different ways, as you
| will see in the following example.
| 8. Inthe words ocean, motion, mansion,
physician, halcyon, Parnassian, Christian,
‘and many other such words, the last sylla-
| ble is pronounced as if it were spelled shun.
9, You see, then, that in some words
| a syllable sounding very much like shun
|| is spelled





/




















céam, aS Nn ocean ;
in some it is spelled ¢éon, as in nation ;
|| in some it is spelled s¢on, as in mansion ;
|| in some it is spelled czan, as in physician ;
in some it is spelled cyon, as in halcyon ;
in some it is spelled szan, as in Parnassian.
| 10. It is s*ch things as these which
make both reading and spelling very hard
lessons for young children. If they think
of them all at once, as the pendulum did of
the eighty-six thousand times that it had
to swing in twenty-four hours, it 1s no won-
der if they feel discouraged, and say, I |
can’t get these hard lessons. |
11. But you must recollect that, as the
pendulum, every time it had to swing, had
a moment given it to swing Im, so you

a SSeSeSee
——














se

oe LS i ee

50) NATIONAL SERIES.



also have a moment given you to learn
everything in; and if you get a little at a)
time, you will, in the end, finish it all, if it
be ever so large.

12. You have seen the workman en- ||
eaged in building a brick house. He takes |
one brick at a time, and lays it on the mor- ||
tar, smoothing the mortar with his trowel ;
and then he takes another brick, and an- |;
other, until he has made a Jong row for the ||
side of the house.

13. He then takes anocher brick, and
lays that on the first row; and continues
laying brick after brick, until the house |}
gradually rises to its proper height.

14. Now, ifthe workman had said that 3
he could never lay so many bricks, the
house would never have been built; but he |}
knew that, although he could lay but one |}
brick at a time, yet, by continuing to lay
them, one by one, the house would at last
be finished.

15. There are some children, who live
as much as a mile, or a half of a mile,
from the school-house. If these children
were told that they must step forward with ||
first one foot and then the other, and must
take three or four thousand steps, before
they could reach the school-house, they
would probaoly be very much discouraged,

: Levery_morning, before they set out, and













| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 51

would say to their mothers, Mother, I can’t
go to school, —it is so far; I must put out
one foot, and drag the other after it, three
thousand times, before I can get there.

16. You see, then, that although it may
appear to be a very hard thing to learn
to read and to spell so many words as there
are in large books, yet you are required to
learn but a few of them at atime; and if
there were twice as many as there are, you
will learn them all, in time.

17. I shall tell you a story, in the next
lesson, to show you how important it is to
know how to spell.

——@——__

LESSON XIII.
Importance of Learning to Spell.—

ORIGINAL VERSION.

1. A RicH man, whose education had
been neglected in early life, and who was,
of course, very ignorant of many things
which even little boys and girls among us
now-a-days know very well, lived in a
large house, with very handsome furniture
in it.

2. He kept a carriage, and many ser-
vants, some of whom were very much bet-
ter educated than he was himself. _|






~~





52 NATIONAL SERIES



—_———

8. This rich man had been invited out
mavy times to dine with his neighbors ;
ang he observed that at the dinners to
which he was invited there were turkeys,
and ducks, and chickens, as well as par-!
tridges, and quails, and woodcocks, to-
gether with salmon, and trout, and pickerel,
__ with roasted beef, and lamb, and mutton,
and pork.

4, But he noticed that every one seemed
to be more fond of chickens than anything
else, but that they also ate of the ducks
and the turkeys.

5. He, one day, determined to invite his
friends to dine with him, in return for their
civilities in inviting him; and he made up
his mind to have an abundance of those
things, in particular, of which he had ob-
served his friends to be most fond.

6. He accordingly sent his servant to
market, to buy his dinner ; and, for fear the
servant should make any mistake, he wrote ||,
his directions on paper, and, giving the
paper, with some money, to the servant, he
sent him to the market.

". The servant took the paper and
the money, and set off. Just before he
reached the market, he opened the paper,
to see what his master had written. |

8. But his master wrote so very badly, |

it took him a long time to find out what was





otune ES SS TT

“y
eT



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 53







a —



written on the paper; but, at last, he con
trived to make it out, as follows:
' 9, ‘Dukes would be preferred to Turks;
| but Chittens would be better than either.”

10. What his master meant by dukes,
and turks, and chittens, he could not guess.
No such things were for sale at the market,
and he did not dare to return home with-
out buying something.

11. As he could find nothing like dukes
nor turks, he happened to see a poor woman
carrying home a basket full of kittens. This
was the most like chittens of anything he
could find; and not being able to get what
his master had written for, he thought his

| master meant kittens. He therefore bought
the basket of kittens, and carried them

home for his master’s dinner.

|



LESSON XIV.

Demos'thenes. —— ORIGINAL.

| 1. Tuere lived, a great many years ago,
' in Athes, one of the most renowned cities
of Greeve, a very celebrated orator, whose
name was Demos thenes.
2. But you will not understand what an
orator is, until you are told that it means a




| 54 NATIONAL SERIES.





of people, to persuade them what to do, or |
to give them information, or good advice.

8. Thus, when a minister or clergyman
preaches a good sermon, and speaks in such || |
a manner as to please “ll who hear Kim, | |
convincing them of the. duty, and per- if
suading them to do it, he is called an
orator. |

4. Demos’thenes was not a clergyman,
or minister, but he spoke before large assem-
blies of the Athenians, and they were very
much delighted to hear him. Whenever it
was known that he intended to speak in |
public, every one was anxious to hear him.

5. Now, I wish to show you how hard |
he worked, and what he did, to become a |
great orator.

6. In the first place, then, he had a very
weak voice, and could not speak loud
enough to be heard by a large assembly ;
and, besides this, he was very much troubled |
with shortness of breath. These were very
great discouragements, and had he not
labored very hard to overcome them, he |
never could have succeeded. | |

“. To cure his shortness of breath, he
used to go up and down stairs very fre-
quently, and run up steep and uneven
places; and to strengthen his voice, he
| often went to the sea-shore, when the
waves were very noisy and violent, and

EE






























IR




el
—$—$———





PARKER’S SECOND READER. 55

a ect ne ete
talked aloud to them, so that he could hear
his own voice above the noise of the waters.




! eae = = ey x fy. oe ca
ART = ( Mi} {Vf 4 we
Dns is ity,

Vf OY b “ AM

pid Up Ae, or)
- aay ep
a y Y

= fe eel em te
TS . > FT een 7 4 4
Ra Nay st
eR Aer AN Bees "Ss
Rev, Ney

UR: f
~ Powel.
SUR
a 4 ~ be SH y

8. He could not speak the letter r plainly,
but pronounced it very much as you have
heard some little boys and girls pronounce
it, when they «ay a wed wose for a red rose,
or a wipe cherwy instead of a ripe cherry.

9. Besides this, he stammered, or stut-
tered, very badly. To cure himself of
these faults in speaking, he used to fill his
mouth full of pebbles, and try to speak
with them in his mouth. |




10. He had a habit, also, of making up
‘faces, when he was trying to speak hard
words ; and, in order to cure himself of this,
he used to practice speaking before a look-





|

!
}
{







——-—_—..

56 NATIONAL SERIES. i









_—



ing-glass, that he might see himself, and
try to correct the habit.

11. To break himself of a habit he had
of shrugging up his shoulders, and making |
himself appear hump-backe4, he hung up a
sword over his back, so tht it might prick

him, with its sharp point, whenever he |
did so.

; wy PON
Ui? itt 3

NAN eT)

Â¥ : ea Y//
Oh ane
ae Nien



12. He shut himself up in a eave under
ground, and, in order to confine himself
there to his studies, he shaved the hair off |
of one half of his head, so that he might
be ashamed to go out among men.

13. It was in this way that this great
man overcame all of his difficulties, and, at
last, became one of the greatest orators
that have ever lived.

————





cr






14. Now, whenever you have a hard
lesson to read, or to study, think of De-
mos thenes, and recollect how he overcame
all his difficulties, and I think you will find
that you have few things to do so hard as
| these things which he did. |
15. When your teacher requests you to
put out your voice and speak loud, remem-
| ber what Demos’thenes used to do to
strengthen his voice, and you will find
very little trouble in speaking loudly enough
to be heard, if you will only try.

LESSON XV.
Hard Words.

1. Ix one of the former lessons, you
were taught how to rea@ long and hard
words, by taking them to pieces, and read-

| ing a part of a word at a time.

2. I promised you also that this book

|| should not be filled with hard words; but I
| did not promise that there should be no
|| hard words in it.

|| 3. Having taught you how to read hard
'| words, I propose, in this lesson, to give you

| a few long words to read, —not for the pur-

| pose of understanding what they mean, but

-__—.

PARKER’S SECOND READER. 57






|




































58 NATIONAL SERIES.



only to make you able to read such words,
when you find them in ony other book.

4. The best way of getting rid of all
difficulties, is to learn how to overcome
them, and master them; for they cease to
be difficulties, when you have overcome
them.

5. Demos’thenes, as I told you in the
last lesson, had a very hard task to per-
form, before he became a great orator.
You, also, can become a good scholar, if
you will take pains to study your lessons,
and learn them well.

6. Before you read any lesson to your
teacher from this book, it is expected that
you will study it over, and find out all the
most difficult words, so that you may read
them right off to him, without stopping to
find them out, while he is waiting to hear
you read them.

7. Now, here I shall place a few hard
words for you to study over, to read to
your teacher when you read this lesson to
him; and he will probably require every
one in your class to read them all aloud
to him.

8. I wish you not to go up to your
teacher to ask him to assist you, until you

that you cannot.



|| have tried yourself to read them, and i




9. There are some words that are not ||
—— + _ eG
ee ET TT

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 59

pronounced as they are spelt, as I have
taught you in a former lesson.

10. Such a word as phthisic, which is
pronounced as if it werespelled ¢is’¢c,I dare |
say would puzzle you, if you had never |
seen it before; but before you go up to your |
teacher, to ask him any questions, you
should read over the whole of your lesson,
and perhaps you will find, in the lesson
itself, something that will explain what puz-
zled you; and thus you could find it out
from your book, without troubling your
teacher.

11. Here are some of the long words I
wish you to read.

12. Organization, Theoretical, Meta-
physical, Metempsychosis, Multitudinous,
Arithmetician, Metaphysician, Hyperboli-
cal.

13. Apotheosis, Indefeasible, Feasibil-
ity, Supersaturated, Prolongation, Meridi-
onal, Ferruginous, Fastidiousness.

14. Haberdashery, Fuliginous, Exhala-
tion, Prematurely, Depreciation, Appre-
ciability, Resuscitate, Surreptitious, Inter-
‘locutory.

15. Sometimes the letters a e, and o é,
are printed together, like one letter, as in
the words Ceosar, Coelebs, and then the vr
lable is pronounced as if it werespelled

| With e alone, as in the following words ¢ |.

6* ne ee

TS a TT TT
it










rN

i






60

—_———_

NATIONAL SERIES.



16. Diszresis, Apheeresis, Scumen-
ical, AXthiop, Subpoena, Encyclopedia,
Phoenix, Phoebus, AXolus.

17. When there are two little dots over
one of the letters, they are both to be
sounded, as in the word Aérial, which is
pronounced a-e-ri-al.

18. The letter ¢ is one which puzzles
many young persons who are learning to
read, because it is sometimes pronounced

like s, as in the word cent + and they do not |
know when to pronounce it like k, and
when to sound it like s.

19. But if you will recollect that c is
sounded like & when it stands before the
letters a, 0, or u, and that it is sounded
like s before the letters é, 2, and y, you

like k, as in the word can, and sometimes



will have very little trouble in reading

words that have the letter ¢ in them.
20). So also the letter g has two sounds,
called the hard sound, and the soft sound:

The hard sound is the sound given to it in‘.

the word gone ; the soft sound is that which
is heard in the word gentle.

21. The same rule which you have just
learnt with regard to the letter ¢ applies to
the letter g. It has its hard sound before
a, 0, and uw, and its soft sound before €, 8,





SS







and y.
922 There are, it is true, some words |

LS tceeensiithiditineen eee -
—_ Fc cee
oe ee eee en

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 61



6







where this rule is not applied; but these
words are very few, so that you may safely
follow this rule in most words.

23. The letters ph are sounded like /,.
The letters ch are sounded sometimes like
|| &, asin the words loch and monarch, and
|] sometimes like sh, as in the words chaise
‘|| and charade ; and they have sometimes a
sound which cannot be represented by any
other letters, as in the words charm and
chance.

24. I suppose that you have probably
learned most of these things which I have
now told you in your spelling-book ; but I
have repeated them in this book, because
|| [ have so often found that little boys and



learned,

25. If you recollect them all, it will do
you no harm to read them again, but it
will impress them more deeply on your
| memory. But if you have forgotten them,
| this little book will recall then to your
| mind, so that you will never forget them.
| 26. I recollect, when I was a little boy,
that the letter y used to trouble me very









much when it began a word, and was not
followed by one of the letters which are
called vowels, namely, a, e, 1, 0, u. I
knew how to pronounce Ya, Ye, Yt, YO, yu s

nd §

_— LO CTCL ttt

girls are very apt to forget what they have |

but one day, when I was studying a lesson |

OAL Ct

LLL tense enepeatea




| 62 NATIONAL SERIES. T

——— A —

in geography, I saw a word which was
spelt Y, p, r, e, 8, which puzzled me very
much.

27. I knew that the letters p, 7, e, s,
would spell pres, but I did not know what |)
to call the y. After studying it a long |
time, I found that the letter y, in that word ||,
and some others, was to be pronounced
like the long e, and that the word was
pronounced pres, though itwas spelled
5, 00%, & 4%.

28. Perhaps you will be able, when you
grow up, to write a book; and to tell little
boys and girls who go to school, when you
have grown up, how to read hard words, bet-
ter than I have told you.

29. If you wish to do so, you must try
to recollect what puzzles you most now,
and then you, will be able to inform them
how to get over their difficulties and
troubles at school; and when they grow
up, Lhave no doubt that they will feel very |,
grateful to you for the assistance you have |
given them. P | |


f





LESSON XVI.

fire,*—a Conversation between a Mother
and her litile Daughter.



oT << 7p

a
(ae SAE Se eS
!

OTL
y | Y=

\\
ti
Y\\t)
' c
NN
Row
nah go

=i

7 Naat
7 NG

Nw. ARR SCS

Daughter. Mother dear, you told me,
the other. day, that nobody knows what
light is, except the Great Creator. Now,
can you tell me what fire is ? ;

Mother. I fear, mychild, that you have
asked another question which I cannot
citi ities tcneihitiiah alia aiik tiniest. e

* This lesson, together with the two following lessons, is
taken from a little book, called * Juvenile Philosophy,’’ pub-
lished by Messrs. A. S. Barnes & Co., 51 John-street, New
York. It consists of nine conversations, between a little

girland her mother, on the subjects, Rain, Color, Vision or
Sight, the Eye, Light, Fire, Heat and Wind.



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 63 |

——————————X———_—[_[_[_=£_£_=_=[__{__{D I
LE ~ — S



a

64 NATIONAL SERIES.

directly answer. What fire is, is known
only by its effects.

Daughter. And what are its effects,
mother ?

Mother. Some of its effects are as well
known to you, my dear, as they are to me;
and I shall, in the first place, call to your
recollection what you yourself know about
fire, before I attempt to give you any
further information in relation to it.

Daughter. Why, mother, I am sure I
do not know what fire is.

Mother. No, Caroline, I know that you
do not know what fire is; neither do I, nor
does any one, except the Great Creator
himself. This is one of his secrets, which,
in his wisdom, he reserves for himself.

But you certainly know some of the
effects of fir r instance, you know
that when been out into the cold,
you wish, on your return, to go to the fire.
Now, can you tell me what you go to the
fire for ?

- Daughter. Why, certainly, mother ; Buk
go to the fire to warm myself.

Mother. And how does the fire warm
you, my dear ?

Daughter. Why, it sends out its heat,
mother ; and I hold out my hands to it, and
feel the heat.




ooo ete came: + eee


—_—_—



2 TT, — eM! oaeate edit! *
—_—_—_-—

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 6
Mother. And where does the heat come
from, Caroline ?

Daughter. Why, the heat comes from
the fire, mother.

Mother. Then, my dear, you know at
least one of the effects of fire. It produces,
or rather sends out, heat.

Daughter. But does not the fire make
the heat, mother ?

Mother. If you had a little bird, or a
mouse, in a cage, and should open the door
and let it out, should you say that you
|| made the little bird, or the mouse ?

Daughter. Say that I made them, moth-
er ?—- why, no; certainly not. I only let
them go free. God madethem. You told
me that God made all things.

Mother. Neither didithe fire make the
heat. It only made if omewhat in }
the same manner that you |
bird or the mouse free, by opemimg the door
of the cage. . _

Daughter. Why, mothwz, is heat Kept in
cages, like birds or mice ?

Mother. No, my dear, not exactly in
cages, like birds or mice ; but a great deal
closer, in a different kind of cage.

Daughter. Why, mother, what sort of a
cage can heat be kept in ?

Mother. I must answer your question,
Caroline, by asking you another. When j

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“_— NATIONAL SERIES.

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Alice makes her fire in the kitchen, how
does she make it ?

Daughter. She takes some wood, or some
coal, and puts under it some pine wood,
which she calls kindling, and some shav-
ings, and then takes a match and sets the
shavings on fire, and very soon the fire 1s
made.

Mother. But does she not first do some-
thing to the match?

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Daughter. O, yes; I forgot to say that
|| she lights the match first, and then sets fire
| to the shavings with the lighted match.

|| Mother. But how does she light the
' match, my dear ?

i » Daughter. Why, mother, have you never

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—



PARKER'S SECOND READER. 67
seen her? She rubs one end of the match
on the box, where there is a little piece of
sand-paper, and that sets the match on fire.

Mother. Is there any fire in the sand-
paper, Caroline ?
| Daughter. Why, no, mother; certainly
| not.

Mother. Was there any fire in the match,
before she lighted it ?

Daughter. Why, no, mother; if there
had been, she would have had no need to
light it.

Mother. You see, then, that fire came
when she rubbed the match against the
sand-paper; and that the fire was not in the
sand-paper, nor in the match.

Daughter. Yes, mother, but I did not
see where it came from.

Mother. I am going to explain that to
you, my dear, in the next lesson.

LESSON XVII.
The same subject, continued.

Mother. Did you ever see a person rub
his hands together, when he was cold ?

Daughter. O yes, mother, a great many

times. I have seen father come in from the ||

—
| 68 NATIONAL SERIES.

ihtsionishtsietneveeineysnmenersunyasmteaitseiesoepeanbiaaitmunisssastiss,
cold, and rub his hands together, and after-
wards hold them to the fire and rub them
again, and then they get warm.

Mother. And now, Caroline, take your
hand and rub it quickly backwards and for-
wards, over that woolen table-cloth, on the
table in the corner of the room, and tell me
whether that will make your hand warm.

Daughter. O, yes, dear mother ; I feel |
it grow warmer, the faster I rub it.

Mother. Here are two small pieces of
wood. Touch them to your cheek, and
tell me whether they feel warm now.

Daughter. They do not feel warm, nor
cold, mother.

Mother. Now rub them together quickly
a little while, and then touch them to your
cheek.

Daughter. O, dear,
mother! they are so hot
that they almost burnt my
cheek.

Mother. Yes, Caroline;
and do you not recollect,
when you read Robinson
Crusoe, that his man Fri-























light her fire and the lamp in | the ‘same |

-







Daughter. O, yes, dear mother; and I i
have often wondered why Alice: could not |:

oS
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PARKER’S§ SECOND READER. 69 |



























manner, without those matches, which have |
so offensive a smell.

Mother. It is very hard work, my dear,
' to obtain fire by rubbing two pieces of wood
together ; and it would take too long a
time to do it. The two pieces of wood
would grow warm by a very little rubbing ;
but in order to make them take fire, they |
must be rubbed together a great while.

Daughter. But, mother, if it takes so
long a time to get fire by rubbing two
pieces of wood together, why can Alice set
the match on fire so easily by rubbing it
once on the sand-paper ?

Mother. That is what I am about to ex-
plain to you, my dear. Here, take this
piece of paper and hold it up to the lamp.

Daughter. It has taken fire, mother.

Mother. Now take
this piece of pine wood,
and hold that up to the

‘lamp in the same man-
ner, and see whether
that will take fire too.

Daughter. Yes, mo-
ther, it has taken fire ;
| . but I had to hold it up

to the how much longer than I did the
paper.

Mother. Now take this piece of hard
wood, and do the same with that.








NATIONAL SERIES.

|
|
|



we

Daughier. The hard wood takes longer
still to catch fire, mother.

Mother. Yes, my child, And now I am |’

going to make the hard wood take fire more
quickly than the paper did.

Daughter. Dear mother, how can you do
it ?

Mother. I am going to show you, my
dear. Here is a small phial, which con-
tains something that looks like water. It
is spirits of turpentine. I shall dip the
point of the piece of hard wood into the
phial, and take up a little of the spirits of
turpentine. Now, Caroline, touch the
point of the hard wood with the turpentine
on it to the flame. e!

Daughter. Why, mother, it caught fire
as soon as I touched the flame with it !

Mother. Yes, certainly ; and you now
see that some things, like the spirits of tur-
pentine and the paper, take fire very readi-
ly, and others take fire with more difficulty.

Daughter. Yes, mother ; but when Alice
drew the match across the sand-paper,
there was no flame nor fire to touch it to.
How, then, could it take fire? .

Mother. Hold this piece of paper up to
the blaze of the lamp, my dear, but be
careful not to touch the fire or flame of the
lamp; only hold it close to the blaze.

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| PARKER'S SECOND READER. we





Daughter. Why, mother, it has ‘Silk
fire !

Mother. You see, then, that a thing will
sometimes take fire when it does not touch ,
the fire.

Daughter. Yes, mother; but I do not
understand where the fire comes from.

Mother. The fire comes from the heat,
'| my dear. Now, you know that heat is pro-
| duced by rubbing two things together ; and

that some things, like the spirits of turpen-
tine, take fire very easily, or with very
little heat ; and others, like the hard wood,
require to be heated some time, —or, in other

Se

words, require much heat, — to make them
take fire, or to bud. Some things require
only as much heat to make them take fire
as can be obtained by rubbing them to-
gether very quickly, like the wood which |
Robinson Crusoe’s man Friday used. |

Daughter. But, mother, the match is |
made of wood, — why does that take fire
so easily ? |

Mother. It is true, Caroline, that the |
match is made of wood; but it has some- |
thing at the,end of it, which takes fire
much more!easily than the spirits of tur-_
pentine. Indeed, so easily does it take fire, |
that it requires only so much heat to set it.
on fire as can be obtained by drawing the |
match once across the sand+paper.

~ et cL CC LL LL LLL EOL LL TI
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| 72



NATIONAL SERIES.





Daughter. But, mother, matches do not
always take fire. I have seen Alice rub
several across the sand-paper, before she
could set one on fire.

Mother. ‘That is true, and the reason of
this is, that the matches are not all well
made. Now, if I should take several pieces
of hard wood and tie them together, and
dip their ends into the spirits of turpen-
tine, what would happen, if. the ends of
some of the pieces did not touch the spirits
of turpentine, because I had not tied them |
together with their points all even ?

Daughter. Why, mother, some of them
would take fire easily, because the points
had the spirits of turpenting: on them ;
while those which did not tough the spirits
could not be lighted so easily. -

Mother. So it is, my dear, with the
matches. They are all dipped into the sub-
stance which takes fire so easily ;. but some
of the ends do not reach the substance, and
do not become coated with it, and therefore
they will not light more easily than the
|| pine wood of which they ere made.





1 a


es

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 73 ||



















LESSON XVII. _
The same subject, concluded.

Daughter. Well, mother, I understand,
now, how the match is set on fire. It is
rubbed on the sand-paper, and that pro-
duces heat, and the heat sets the match on
fire. But I always thought that fire makes

heat, and not that heat makes fire.
| Mother. Heat does not always make fire,
Caroline ; for, if it did, everything would
be on fire.

Daughter. Everything on fire, mother!
why, what do you’mean ?

Mother. I mean, my dear, that every-

thing contains heat.
— Daughter. Everything contains heat,
mother, did you say? Why, then, is not
everything warm? Some things, mother,
are very cold; as ice, and snow, and that
marble slab.

Mother. Yes, my child, everything con-
tains heat, as I shall presently show you.
When Alice goes to make a fire in a cold |
day, she does not carry the heat with her, ,
and put it into the fire, nor into the wood, |!

nor the voal, does she ?
|| Daug iter. Why, no, to he sure not, ’

mother.

_Mother.

And the heat that comes from


——
a

ee eerste
| 74 NATIONAL SERIES.

the fire, after it is made, does not come in
at the windows, nor down the chimney,
does it ?

| Daughter. Why, no, mother; it feels
cold at the windows, and cold air comes
down the chimney.

Mother. But, after the fire is made, we
feel much heat coming from the fire, do we
not? *

Daughter. Why, yes, mother; that is |)
| what the fire is made for. We feel cold,
and we want a fire to make us warm; and
when the fire is made, it sends out heat,
and makes us warm.

Mother. Well, now, where can the heat
come from? You know what fire is made

from, do you not ?

Daughter. Certamly, mother; the fire
is made of wood, or of coal.

Mother. But is the wood or the coal warm
before the fire is made ?

Daughter. No, mother, the wood and the
coal come from the cold wood-house, or the
cellar, and they are both very cold.

Mother. And yet, the wood and the coal
hecome very hot when they are on fire.

Daughter. O yes, mother, so hot that |
we cannot touch them with our hands, |
and we have to take the shovel or tke tongs |;
to move them. |

—_—_———_—_—--——.
——— TT TT A ane Sf” —_ SS














PARKER'S SECOND REAI ER. 75

Mother. And do they burn the shovel
and the tongs, my dear?

Daughter. Why, no, mother; if they
did, the shovel and the tongs would be of
little use in stirring the fire.

Mother. Can you think of any reason why
they do not burn the shovel and the tongs !

Daughter. You told me, mother, that
some things require a very little heat to set
them on fire, and that other things require
a great deal. I suppose that there was not
heat enough to set them on fire; and if
there had been, they would not burn, be-
cause they are made of iron.

Mother. You are partly right, my dear,
and partly wrong. ‘They would not burn,
because there was not heat enough in the
fire to burn them. But there are very few
things, and in fact it may be doubted
whether there is anything, which will not
burn, when sufficient heat is applied. But
let us return to the fire: you say the heat
does not come from the windows nor from
the chimney, and you say, also, that the
wood and the coal are both cold. Now, |
where can the heat come from ?

Daughter. I am sure I cannot tell,
mother ; will you please to tell me?

Mother. You recollect that I told you
that the rubbing of the match on the sand-
paper produces a little heat, which caused
—S


















76 NATIONAL SERIES.

the match to burn. The match was then
applied to the shavings, and, as it was
burning, gave out heat enough to set the
shavings on fire; the shavings produced
heat enough to set the pine wood, or
kindling, on fire, and then the pine wood,
or kindling, produced more heat, and set
the wood and coal on fire. Now, there
was nothing to produce the heat but the
match, the shavings, the wood and the
coal; and the heat must have been in them.
The fire only served to set it free, and let
it come out of the match, the wood, and the
coal.

Daughter. But, mother, how did the
heat get into the wood and coal ?

Mother. It is not known, my dear, how
the heat got into the wood and coal, any
more than how the fruit gets on to a tree.
We say that it grows on the tree; but
what growing is, and how it is caused, are
among the secrets of God.

Daughter. If the heat is in the wood and
the coal, mother, why do we not feel it in
them? They both feel cold. I cannot
perceive any heat in them.

Mother. The heat is in the wood and the |
coal, although you do not see it. Do%
see any smoke in the wood and the coal,
my dear ?

aka Daughter. _No, mother, I do not.

—
PARKER'S SECOND READER. (7

Mother. Did you never see a stick of
wood fall on the hearth from the kitchen
fire, and see the smoke coming from it ?



Daughter. O yes, mother, very often ;
and the smoke goes all over the room, and
into my eyes, and makes the tears come
into my eyes.

Mother. And can you see the smoke in
the wood before the wood is put on the
fire ?

Daughter. No, mother, I am sure I
cannot.

Mother. But you are sure that the smoke
comes from the wood, are you not ?

Daughter. O yes, mother; I see it com-
ing right out of the wood.

- Mother. Then, my dear, I suppose you
know that if there is something in the wood


















NATIONAL SERIES.



and coal, which you call smoke, although
you cannot see it until it comes out, you
can easily conceive how another thing,
which we call heat, can be in the wood and
coal, which we cannot perceive until it is
made to come out.
Daughter. O yes, mother ; how wonder-
ful it is!
Mother. Yes, my dear, all the works of
God are wonderful; and what is very sur-
prising is, that many of his most wonderful
works are so common, so continually before
our eyes, that we do not deem them won-
derful until we have been made to think
much about them, by talking about them, |
as you and | have talked about the rain, |,
and the clouds, and light,. and its colors.
Daughter. I have been thinking, mother,
about Alice and the fire. You told me
that the fire did not make the heat, any
more than I make the little mouse or the
bird when I open the cage door and let
them out. I see now how it is. Alice
brings the wood and the coal into the
kitchen fireplace, and the match lets the
heat out of the shavings, and the shavings |
let it out of the wood and the coal, until we
get heat enough to make us warm.
Mother. Yes, my dear; and there is no,
more heat in the room after the fire is made
than there was before, — only, before the |

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earl)’, and help them cut down the corn.
maaan iain 09

Seema
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 79

fire was made, the heat was hid, and we
could not perceive it; but when the fire is
made, it makes the heat come out, and
makes it free, just as I make the little bird
free, by opening his cage door.



LESSON XIX.

The Lark and her Young Ones. — Altered
from Adsop.

j. A Lark having built her nest in a
corn-field, the corn grew ripe before the
young ones were able to fly. Fearing that
the reapers would come to cut down the
corn before she had provided a safe place
for her little ones, she directed them every
day, when she went out to obtain their food,
to listen to what the farmers should say
about reaping the corn.

2. The little birds promised their mother
that they would listen very attentively, and
inform her of every word they should hear.

3. She then went abroad; and on her
return, the little birds said to their mother,
Mother, you must take us away from here ;’
for while you were gone we heard the
farmer tell his sons to go and ask some of
his neighbors to come to-morrow morning








80 - NATIONAL SERIES.

neces aensniensnsniittos
4. Is that what he said? asked their
mother. Yes, mother, said the little birds ;
and we are very much afraid that you can-
not find a safe place for us before the
‘farmer and his neighbors begin to cut down
the corn. |

5. Do not be afraid, my children, said |
the lark ; if the farmer depends on his neigh-
bors io do his work for him, we shall be |
safe where we are. So lie down in the
nest, and give yourselves no uneasiness.

6. The next day, when the mother went
out for food, she directed the little ones
again to listen, and to tell her all that they
should hear.

”. In the evening, when she returned,
the little ones told her that the farmer’s
neighbors did not come to assist him on
that day ; and that the farmer had told his
sons to go and request his friends and rela-
tions to come and assist him to cut down
the corn, early in the next day morning.

8. I think, my children, said the lark,

we shall still be safe here; and we will,
‘therefore, feel no anxiety or concern to-
night.
9. On the third day, the mother again
charged the young larks to give her a
faithful report of what was done and said,
while she was absent.

10. When the old lark returned that |

A I

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————
—_—-

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 81 |,





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evening, the little larks told her that the
farmer had been there, with his sons, early
in the morning; but, as his friends and
relations had not come to assist him, he had
directed his sons to bring some sharp sickles
early in the next morning, and that, with
their assistance, he should reap the corn
himself.

11. Ah! said the mother, did he say so ?
Then it is time for us to prepare to be gone ;
for when a man begins to think seriously
of doing his work himself, there 1s some
prospect that it will be done; but if he
depends on his friends, his neighbors, or his
relations, no one can tell when his work
will be done.

12. Now, this little story is called a
Fable. It cannot be true, because birds
do not and cannot speak.

13. But, although it is not true, it is a
very useful little story, because it teaches
us a valuable lesson: and that is, that it is
best to do our own work ourselves, rather
than to depend upon others to do it for us ;
for, if we depend upon them, they may dis-
appoint us, but whatever we determine to
do for ourselves, we can easily accomplish,
if we go right to work about it.



ee

























82 NATIONAL SERIES.

LESSON XxX.

Dogs. — ORIGINAL.

1. I never knew a little boy that was
not fond of a dog, and I have never seen
many dogs which were not fond of little
children.

2. It is not safe for little children to
touch every strange dog that they see, be-
cause some dogs are naturally rather cross,
and may possibly bite any one who touches
them, when they do not know the persons.

3. But when a dog knows any one, and
sees that his master is fond of that person,
he will let such a person play with him.
He is always pleased with any attentions
that his master’s friends bestow on him.

4. Large dogs are generally more gentle
than small ones, and seldom bark so much
as the little ones do. They are also more
easily taught to carry bundles and baskets,
and draw little carriages for children to
ride in.

5). Some people are very much afraid of
dogs, because they sometimes run mad.
The bite of a mad dog produces a very
dreadful disease, called Hydropho’bia.

6. This is a long and hard word, and
means a fear of water. It is called by
that name because the person who has the
—————— eee





























83



PARKER'S SECOND READER.

disease cannot bear to touch or to see
water.

7. Dogs that are mad cannot bear to
see water. They run from it with dreadful |
cries, and seem to be in very great dis-
tress.

8. Whenever, therefore, a dog will drink
water, it is a pretty sure sign that he is not
mad.

9. This dreadful disease very seldom
affects dogs that are properly supplied with
water. |

10. Dogs require a great deal of water.
“They do not always want much at a time,
and it is’ seldom that they drink much.
But whoever keeps a dog ought always to
keep water in such a place that the dog
may go to it to drink, whenever he re-
quires it.

11. A dog is a very affectionate animal,
and he will permit his master, and _ his
master’s children and friends, to do a great
many things to him, which he would per-
haps bite others for doing.

12. There are many very interesting
stories told of dogs, which show their love
and fidelity to their masters, which you
can read in a book called ‘‘ Anecdotes of
Dogs.”’

13. But there are a few little stories
about dogs that I know, which I will tell



s*
os

a EE

84 NATIONAL SERIES.





you, that are not contained in that book.
I know these stories to be true. |

14. My son had a dog, whose name was ||
Guido. He wes very fond of playing in |
the street with the boys, early in the morn- |
ing, before they went to school.

15. Guido was always very impatient
to get out into the street in the morning, to
join the boys in their sports; and all the
boys in the street were very fond of him.

16. He used to wake very early, and
go into the parlor, and seat himself im a
chair by the window, to look out for the
boys; and as soon as he saw a boy in
the street, he would cry and whine until
the servant opened the door for him to
go out.

17. One very cold morning, when the
frost was on the glass, so that he could not
see out into the street, he applied his
warm tongue to the glass, and licking from
it the frost, attempted to look out.

18. But the spot which he had made
clear being only large enough to admit one
of his eyes, he immediately made another,
just like it, in the same manner, for the |
other eye, by which he was enabled to.
enjoy the sight as usual. In the next les- |
son, I will tell you some other little stories |
of Guido, and another dog, whose name was

Don, that belonged to my daughter.

——
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 85 |}



|
LESSON XXII.

The same subject, concluded.

1. One day I went to take a walk, with
a friend of mine, in the country ; and Don,
the dog I mentioned in the last lesson, fol-
lowed us.

2. We walked to a little grove about a
mile from my house, to see the grave of a
beautiful little child, that was buried on the
summit of a little hill, covered with pies,
spruce and other evergreens.

3. While we were admiring the beauty
of the spot, Don was running about the
grove; and I completely lost sight of him,
and supposed that he had returned home.

4, But presently I saw him at a dis-
tance, barking up a tree at a squirrel that
had escaped from him.

5. As I turned to go home, I said to my
friend, You see Don is away, and does not
see me. I am going to drop my handker-
chief here, and send him after it.

6. We had got half way home, when
presently Don came bounding along, and
very shortly came up to us.

7. As soon as he came up to me, I
stopped, and feeling in my coat-pocket,
said to him, — Don, I have lost my pocket-
handkerchief, — go find it.

ae a a er








iii tmacitenretin pennies |
86 NATIONAL SERIES. t
8. I had scarcely uttered the words ||
before he was off. He was gone only two |}
or three minutes, and then, returning with |}
| my handkerchief in his mouth, he dropped }}
| it at my feet. |
9. Guido, the other dog, was very fond
of going into the water himself; but he
never would allow any one else to go in.
| 10. The reason was this. My little son ||
|| George was one day looking over into the |!
| water, to watch the eels that were gliding |
| through the water below, and losing his
balance, he fell into the water. )
11. No one was near except Guido, and |}
lhe immediately jumped in after George, ||
and, with great labor, brought him on shore,
and saved him from drowning.

12. Ever since that time, Guido has |
been very unwilling to let any one go near ||
the water. It seemed as if he had reasoned
about it, and said to himself, It is hard |}
work to drag a boy out of the water, but it |}
is much easier to keep him from going in. ||

13. Guido was not a very large dog.
He was of the breed, or kind, named
Spaniel; so called because that kind of

' dog originally came from Hispaniola. He

| had long ears, curling hair, a long bushy
tail, and webbed feet, like all dogs that are
fond of the water. |

14. Webbed feet are those in which the







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| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 87 ||
vinnestehabliaalatininhon stitch scat ods: ken wiathnee
toes are not separated, but seem to be
joined together by a thin substance, like
thick skin, which enables them to swim
more easily.

15. Don was a very large dog, of the
Newfoundland species, a kind which is re-
markable for its beauty and intelligence.




























Ss oeenennneet * ceemmmeememnel

LESSON XXII.
Frogs and Toads. — Biauanp.

1. Froas and toads resemble one another
in figure, but custom and prejudice have
taught us to make a very different estimate
of their properties: the first is considered
as perfectly harmless, while the latter is
supposed to be poisonous.

2. In this respect, the toad has been
treated with great injustice : it is a torpid,
harmless animal, that passes the greatest
part of the winter in sleep.

3. Astonishing stories have been told of
toads found in the center of solid blocks
of stone, and other similar situations, with-
out the least trace of the way by which
they entered, and without any possibility
of their finding any kind of nutriment.

4. Toads, as well as frogs, are of a
variety of species ; and in the tropical cli-


' esting particulars respecting a toad which







decimate


88 NATIONAL SERIES.
eee enamine
mates they grow to an enormous size.
It is very probable that they contribute
to clear both the land and the water of
many noxious reptiles of a diminutive size,
which might prove exceedingly hurtful to
man.

5 The toad, however, is one of the
most inoffensive of all animals. We have
even heard that it has sometimes been suc-
cessfully applied for the cure of the cancer,
the most dreadful, and one of the most
fatal, of human evils.

6. Mr. Pennant has related some inter-

was perfectly domesticated, and continued
in the same spot for upwards of thirty-six
years.

7. It frequented the steps before the
hall-door of a gentleman’s house in Devon-
shire ; and, from receiving a regular supply
of food, it became so tame as always to
crawl out of its hole in an evening, when
a candle was brought, and look up, as if
expecting to be carried into the house.

8. A reptile so generally detested being
taken into favor, excited the curiosity of
every visitant; and even ladies so far con-
quered their natural horror and disgust as
to request to see it fed. It seemed particu-
larly fond of flesh maggots, which were
kept for it in bran.

ee eee tt ES LL

eel



==


PARKER'S SECOND REALER. 89









9. When these were laid upon a table,
it would follow them, and, at a certain dis-
tance, would fix its eyes and remain mo-
tionless for a little while, as if preparing
for the stroke, which was always instanta-
neous.

10. It threw out its tongue to a great
distance, when the insect stuck by the glu-
tinous matter to its lip, and was swallowed
with inconceivable quickness.

11. After living under the protection of
its benefactor upwards of thirty-six years,
it was one day attacked by a tame raven,
which wounded it so severely that it died
shortly afterward.

12. The erroneous opinion of toads con-
taining and ejecting poison has caused
many cruelties to be exercised upon this
harmless, and undoubtedly useful tribe.
Toads have been inhumanly treated, merely |;
because they are ugly; and frogs have
been abused, because they are like them.

13. But, we are to observe, that our
ideas of beauty and deformity, of which
some arise from natural antipathies im-

‘ planted in us for wise and good purposes,
and others from custom and caprice, are of
a relative nature, and peculiar to ourselves.

14. None of these relative distinctions,
of great and small, beautiful or ugly, exist
| in the all-comprising view of the Creator




| 90 NATIONAL SERIES.
of the universe: in his eyes, the toad is
as pleasing an object as the canary-bird, or
the bulfinch.







LESSON XXIII.

Maida, the Scotch Greyhound. — Altered
from BINnGLEy.

~ :
* 2-2



eS
<0 posons?

1. A wovunn is a dog with long} smooth,
hanging ears, and long limbs, that enable
him to run very swiftly. The greyhound
is not so called on account of his color, but
from a word which denotes his Grecian
1 origi






——



PARKER'S SECOND READER.

a caseaneeeeqeepcin tN ee TC OTN TTT

92. The Scotch greyhound is a larger
and more powerful animal than the com-
mon greyhound; and its hair, instead of
being sleek and smooth, is long, stiff and
bristly. It can endure great fatigue.

8. It was this dog that the Highland
chieftains, in Scotland, used in former times,
in their grand hunting-parties.

4. Sir Walter Scott had a very fine dog
of this kind, which was given to him by |
his friend Macdonnel of Glengarry, the
chief of one of the Highland clans. His ||
name was Maida.

5. He was one of the finest dogs of the
kind ever seen in Scotland, not only on ac-
count of his beauty and dignified appear-



SS. aaa

ll ance, but also from his extraordinary size

baer a ne

and strength.
6. He was so remarkable in his appear-

|} ance, that whenever his master brought

him to the city of Edinburgh, great crowds
of people collected together to see him.

7. When Sit Walter happened to travel
through a strange town, Maida was usually
surrounded by crowds of people, whose curi-
osity he indulged with great patience, until
it began to be troublesome, and then he
gave a single short bark, as a signal that
they must trouble him no more.

8. Nothing could exceed the fidelity,
obedience and attachment, of this dog to

a nnn Ea EEERRREDyRNgaD
ee a





9
i 92 NATIONAL SERIES.
his master, whom he seldom quitted, and |!
on whom he was a constant attendant, when ||
traveling.

J. Maida was a remarkably high-spir- ||
ited and beautiful dog, with long black ||
ears, cheeks, back, and sides. The tip of
his tail was white. His muzzle, neck,
throat, breast, belly and legs, were also
white. |

10. The hair on his whole body and ||
limbs was rough and shaggy, and particu- ||
larly so on the neck, throat, and breast:
that on the ridge of the neck he used to |
raise, like a lion’s mane, when excited to
anger.

11. His disposition was gentle and ||
peaceable, both to men and animals; but ||
he showed marked symptoms of anger to
ill-dressed or blackguard-looking people,
whom he always regarded with a suspicious
eye, and whose motions he watched with
the most scrupulous jealousy.

12. This fine dog. probably brought on
himself premature old age, by the excessive
fatigue and exercise to which his natural
ardor incited him ; for he had the greatest ;
pleasure in accompanying the common
greyhounds ; and although, from his great
size and strength, he was not at all adapted ||
for coursing, he not unfrequently turned ||
and even ran down hares. :

i a



SO

a ye re ey en ee nee penennyenene,




a EE gar
a

~—— a a .
ES Se Se ened set eetishsngosoensssasusnasindasamonsmamansamenenneniiiiioeeens





—_—_—__—.



TE ce
_—- — -—r—(‘—OW) +4 ee



-—_—_—_--—_-— -—.

ee
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 93



13. Sir Walter used to give an amusing
account of an incident which befell Maida
in one of his chases. ‘I was once riding
over a field on which the reapers were at
work, the stooks, or bundles of grain, being
placed behind them, as is usual.

14. *‘* Maida, having found a hare, began
to chase her, to the great amusement of the
spectators, as the hare turned very often
and very swiftly among the stooks. At
length, being hard pressed, she fairly bolted
into one of them.

15. ‘* Maida went in headlong after her,
and the stook began to be much agitated
in various directions ; at length the sheaves
tumbled down, and the hare and the dog,
terrified alike at their overthrow, ran dif-
ferent ways, to the great amusement of the
spectators. ’’

16. Among several peculiarities which
Maida possessed, one was a strong aversion
to artists, arising from the frequent restraints
he was subjected to in having his portrait
taken, on account of his majestic appear- .
ance. “

17. The instant he saw a pencil and paper
produced, he prepared to beat a retreat ;
and, if forced to remain, he exhibited the
strongest marks of displeasure.

18. Maida’s bark was deep and hollow.

et ee we

en


















94 NATIONAL SERIES.



ing in a very tiresome way. When he
was very fond of his friends, he used to |;
grin, tucking up his whole lips and show-
ing all his teeth; but this was only when he
was particularly disposed to recommend
himself.

19. Maida lies buried at the gate of Ab-
botsford, Sir Walter’s country seat, which
he long protected; a grave-stone is placed
over him, on which is carved the figure of
a dog. It bears the following inscription,
as it was translated by Sir Walter:

“ Beneath the sculptured form which late you wore,
Sleep soundly, Maida, at your master’s door.”

——

LESSON XXIV.
Gelert. — Brnatey, altered.

1. I wave one more story to tell you
about the Highland greyhound. It is an
old Welsh story, and shows how extremely
dangerous it is to indulge in anger and re-
sentment.

2. In a village at the foot of Snowden,
a mountain in Wales, there is a tradition
that Llewellyn (pronounced Lewel'lin), son-
in-law to King John, had a res dence in
that neighborhood.












3. The king, it is said, had presented
him with one of the finest greyhounds in
England, named Gelert. In the year 1205,
Llewellyn, one day, on going out to huni,

called all his dogs together; but his favor-
ite greyhound was missing, and nowhere to
be found.

4. He blew his horn as a signal for the
chase, and still Gelert came not. Llewel-
lyn was much disconcerted at the heedless-
ness of his favorite, but at length pursued |
the chase without him. For want of Ge- |)
lert, the sport was limited; and getting
tired, Llewellyn returned home at an early
hour, when the first object that presented
itself to him, at his castle gate, was Gelert,
who bounded, with his usual transport, to
meet his master, having his lips besmeared
with blood.

5. Llewellyn gazed with surprise at the
anusual appearance of his dog. On going
into the apartment where he had left his
nfant son and heir asleep, he found the
bed-clothes all in confusion, the cover rent,
und stained with blood.

6. He called on his child, but no answer
was made, from which he hastily concluded
that the dog must have devoured him ; and,
viving vent to his rage, plunged his sword
to the hilt in Gelert’s side.

7. The noble animal fell at his feet, ut-

—_

Se PARKER'S SECOND READER. .
|

|



.
ge -
— eee neeeneeeane mm tt et iheemnanas eieneion




| NATIONAL SBRIES. |

tering a dying yell, which awoke the infant,
who was sleeping beneath a mingled heap
of the bed-clothes, while beneath the bed lay
| a great wolf covered with gore, which the
faithful and gallant hound had destroyed.

8. Llewellyn, smitten with sorrow and
remorse for the rash and frantic deed which
had deprived him of so faithful an animal,
caused an elegant marble monument, with
an appropriate inscription, to be erected
over the spot where Gelert was buried, to
commemorate his fidelity and unhappy
fate. The place, to this day, is called
Beth-Gelert, or The Grave of the Grey-
hound.















——_¢@——___—_.

LESSON XXYV.

Knock Again. — Cuttp’s Companion.





1. I nememper having been sent, when
I was a very little boy, with a message
from my father to a particular friend of his,
who resided in the suburbs of the town in
which my parents then lived.

2. This gentleman occupied an old-
fashioned house, the door of which was ap-
proached by a broad flight of stone steps of ||

a semi-circular form. The brass knocker
was an object of much interest to me, in












pect ee
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 97

those days ; for the whim of the maker had
led him to give it the shape of an elephant’s
head, the trunk of the animal being the |
movable portion. |

3. Away, then, I scampered, in great
haste ; and having reached the house, ran
up the stone steps as usual; and, seiz-
ing the elephant’s trunk, made the house
reécho to my knocking. No answer was
returned.

4. At this my astonishment was consid-
erable, as the servants, in the times I write
of, were more alert and attentive than they
are at present. However, I knocked a
second time. Still no one came.

d. At this I was much more surprised.
I looked at the house. It presented no ap
pearance of a desertion. Some of the win-
dows were open to admit the fresh air, for
it was summer ; others of them were closed.
But all had the aspect of an inhabited
dwelling.

6. I was greatly perplexed ; and looked
around, to see if any one was near who could
advise me how to act. Immediately a ven-
erable old gentleman, whom I had never
seen before, came across the way, and,
looking kindly in my face, advised me to ,
knock again.

7. I did so without a moment’s hesita-

i tion, and presently the door was opened,

en a oe a ne — ——— = ee —_———

a




npc a SESS TSS SSS

NATIONAL SERIES.

























i

so that I had an opportunity of delivering ||
my message. I afterward learned that the
servants had been engaged in removing a
heavy piece of furniture from one part of
the house to the other ; an operation which
required their united strength, and pre
vented them from opening the door.



LESSON XXVI.
The same subject, continued.

1. As I was tripping lightly homeward,
I passed the kind old gentleman, about half
way down the street. He took me gently
by the arm; and, retaining his hold, began
to address me thus, as we walked on
together :

9. “The incident, my little friend,
which has just occurred, may be of some
use to you in after life, if it be suitably
improved. Young people are usually very
enthusiastic in all their undertakings, and
in the same proportion are very easily
discouraged. |

3. «Learn, then, from what has taken
place this morning, to persevere in the
business which you have commenced, pro-
vided it be laudable in itself; and, ten to
on3, you will succeed. If you do not at

we ee 6) 6 ae eS 6




PARKER'S SECOND READER.







eee ee

first obtain what you aim at, knock again.
A door may be opened when you least
expect it.

4. ‘In entering on the practice of a

profession, engaging in trade, or what is
usually called settling in the world, young
people often meet with great disappoint-
ments. }
d. ‘* Friends, whom they naturally ex-
pected to employ them, not unfrequently
prefer others in the same line; and even
professors of religion do not seem to con-
sider it a duty to promote the temporal in-
terest of their brethren in the Lord.

6. ‘* Nevertheless, industry, sobriety, and
patience, are usually accompanied by the
Divine blessing. Should you therefore, my
little friend, ever experience disappoint-
ments of this kind, think of the brass
knocker ; knock again; be sober, be dili-
gent, and your labors will be blessed.

7. ‘*In the pursuit of philosophy many
difficulties are encountered. These the
student must expect to meet; but he must
not relinquish the investigation of truth,
because it seems to elude his search. He
may knock at the gate of science, and
apparently without being heard. But let
him knock again, and he will find an
entrance.”’



















eS







100 NATIONAL SERIES.

_ LESSON XXVIL.
The same subject, concluded.

1. ‘*Do you ever pray to God? I hope
and trust you do. God commands and en-
courages us to pray to him. But he does
not always answer our prayers at the time,
or in the way, we expect.

2. ‘*What then? We know that he
hears:them. We know that he is a gra-
cious God, a reconciled Father in Christ. ||
Let us knock again. Let us ask in faith,
and, if what we ask be pleasing in his
sight, he will grant it in his own good
time.

3. ** You know who it was that said,
‘ Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and
ye shall find ; knock, and it shall be opened
unto you: for every one that asketh, re-
ceiveth; and he that seeketh, findeth ; and
to him that knocketh, it shall be opened.’

4, ** Once more : our progress in the Di-
vine life, even after we have wholly given
ourselves to the Lord, does not always equal
our wishes or expectations. We find
much indwelling sin, much remaining cor-
ruption, to struggle with.

— § But let us not despond. The
| grace of our Lord is sufficient for us, and
| PARKERS SECOND READER. 101 |

his strength is made perfect in our weak-
| ness. Let us knock again.
6. ‘* Let us continue, with humble con--





fidence, to do what we know to be pleasing
in our Master’s sight. Let us work out
our own salvation, with fear and trembling;
for it is God that worketh in us both to will
and to do of his good pleasure.”’

7. We had now reached the gate of my
father’s garden ; and the good old yentle-
man, taking me kindly by the hand, bid me
try to remember what he had said. He
then went his way, and I saw him no more.

8. I afterward endeavored to find out
who he was; but I did not succeed. His
advice, however, sunk deep into my mind,
and has often been of singular value to me
since.

9. My disposition is naturally sanguine,
and my disappointments proportionably
acute. But, upon calling to mind the old
mansion, the brass knocker, and my vener-
able counselor, I have frequently been led
to knock again, when I might otherwise
have sat down in despondency.

10. I hope that many of my readers
will derive similar benefit from the perusal
of this little history; for the sole end of its
publication will be answered, if the young |!
persons under whose eyes it may come be
Induced, at every season of doubt and per-

















—



102 NATIONAL SERIES. |



| in God, to knock again.

LESSON XXVIII.

Make Good Use of your Time. — Emma OC.
HiMBURY.



‘*To everything there is a season, and a time for every
purpose under heaven.’’

1. «*My dear Anna,”’ said Mrs. Elmore,
| as she bade her little girl farewell, ‘ I shall
|| be absent ten days; and as you have already
| had so many lessons from me respecting the
manner of distributing your hours of amuse-
ee

————— COLL, A i teeta aetna ee

plexity, in the exercise of simple confidence




PARKERS SECOND READER. 103




ment and study, I will only say to you,
now, ‘ Make good use of your time.’ ”’

2. Anna’s eyes filled with tears as the
carriage drove off, and she felt very lonely
when she returned to the parlor without
her mother. She thought over her mother’s
parting words, until she felt quite proud
of the confidence reposed in her, and re-
solved not to abuse it by neglect.

3. She acéordingly took her books and
sat down to her studies, as attentively as
if her mother had been waiting to hear her
recitation.

4, Anna was an affectionate, intelligent
child. She would have made any sacrifices
to please her mother, and she really loved
her studies ; but her one great fault was a
disposition to loiter away time.

5. This her mother well knew; and
after tryihg admonition, until she almost j,
feared she was increasing the evil by allow- ||
ing Anna to depend too much upon her
guidance, she determined to test the effect
of leaving her to her own responsibility. |

6. For an hour after her mother’s de-
parture, Anna sat in close attention to her |
studies. All at once, she started up. ‘‘1||
am so hungry,” said she, ‘‘I must go to |i
| Betty for some luncheon;—but stop —l
' will finish my exercise first.”’

She wrote a line or two ; then throw-

tA

a

—_
104 NATIONAL SERIES.



ing down her pen, petulantly exclaimed,
‘There! I have made two mistakes, be-
cause I was in such a hurry ; —I will not
finish it till I come back.”

8. So away ran the little girl to her old
nurse, and the next half-hour was spent in
satisfying her hunger. As she was return-
ing, with laggard step, she happened to
spy, from the window, a beautiful butterfly
fluttering about the rose-bushes in the gar-
den ; and, quite forgetting her unfinished
exercise, away she flew in chase of the but-
terfly.

9. But, agile as were her movements,
the insect was too nimble for her; and
after an hour’s race beneath the burning
sun, she returned, flushed and overheated,
without having succeeded in its capture.

10. Again she applied herself to her
books; but study was not so easy now as it
would have been a little earlier. Anna was
too tired to apply her mind to her lessons;
and after loitering a while over her desk, she
threw herself on the sofa, and fell into a
sound sleep, from which she was only /!
awakened by a summons to dinner.

11. After dinner, Betty proposed taking ‘:
her out to walk ; and though conscious that
she had not performed half her duties, she
had not resolution enough to refuse to go.
Tying on her bonnet, she took a little |

—— ee



—_———






ee a



wee a

4
‘
ee tne ern

ooo

PARKER § SECOND READER. 105























basket on her arm, and set out with Betty
to gather wild-flowers.

12. When they reached the woods, Betty
sought out a mossy seat under an old tree,
and, taking her work from her pocket, be-
gan to sew as industriously as if she had
been at home.

13. ‘O Betty !”’ exclaimed Anna, ‘‘ how
can you sit and sew, when there are so
many pleasant sights and sounds around
you?”

14. «I can hear the pleasant sounds, my
child, without looking round to see where
they come from,” replied Betty; ‘‘and as
for the pretty sights, though I can enjoy
them as much as any one, I cannot neglect
my work for them.

15. ‘I promised your mother to have
these shirts finished when she came home,
and I mean to do so.” —‘‘ Dear me!”’ said
the little girl, “‘I wish I had brought my
book, and I might have studied my lesson
here.”’ |

16. **No, no, Anna,” said the old
woman; ‘‘little girls can’t study in the
woods, with the birds singing and the grass-
hoppers chirping around them. Better
attend to your books in-doors.”’

17. Betty continued her sewing; and
towards sunset, when they arose to return,
she had stitched a collar and a pair of jj































SERIES.



106 NATIONAL



wristbands, while Anna had filled her
basket with flowers.

18. As they approached the village,
Betty called at a poor cottage, to inquire
after a sick child, and Anna was shocked |
at the poverty and wretchedness of the in-
mates. The little children were only half
clothed, their faces were covered with dirt,
and their rough locks seemed to bid defi-
ance to the comb.

19. Pitying the condition of the poor
little girls, Anna determined to provide
them with some better clothing; and she
returned home full of benevolent projects.

20. The next morning, as soon as she
rose, she began to look over her wardrobe ;
and selecting three frocks which she had
outgrown, she carried them to Betty, to
alter for Mrs. Wilson’s children.

21. **I shall do no such thing,”’ said
Betty ; ‘‘Mrs. Wilson’s children are not
suffering for clothes ; the weather is warm,
and they are as well clad as they will be
the day after they are dressed up in your
finery.

22. ** Mrs. Wilson is an untidy, slovenly
woman; and though your mother charged
me to look after her sick baby, she did not
tell me to furnish new clothes for the other
dirty little brats ! ’’ )

23. **Well, Betty, if you don’t choose

.
satis Aah aekeieealii apetcenietanstb
me oe



—_—_—_—
——— ee



to do it, Ill try it myself.’’— ‘‘ Pretty work
you Il make of it, to be sure! you will just
cut the frocks to pieces, and then they will
‘| fit nobody.”’

24. ** Well, I am determined to fix
them for those poor little ragged children,”’
said Anna; ‘‘ andif you will not help me, I
will get Kitty the chambermaid to do it.”’



LESSON. XXIX.
The same subject, continued.

1. Anna found a very good assistant in
the warm-hearted, thoughtless Irish girl.
Kitty cut out the frocks, and Anna sat
herself down to make them.

9. She found it rather tedious work,
and, if she had not been afraid of Betty’s
ridicule, she would have been tempted to
throw her task aside; but as Kitty prom-
ised to help her, as soon as her household
duties were completed, Anna determined
to persevere.

3. When night came, she had finished
oue frock, and begun another; so she went
to bed quite happy, forgetting that, in her
benevolent zeal, she had neglected her
studies and her music, as well as her moth-

er’s plants and her own Canary-bird.



10*

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 107

vil




108 NATIONAL SERIES.

ere



4. The next day, she again went, to
work at the frocks, and, with Kitty’s assist-
ance, they were completed before tea-time.
| Never was a child happier than Anna,

when she saw the three little frocks spread
| out upon the bed.

5. A degree of self-satisfaction was

| mingled with her benevolence, and she be-
gan to think how pleased her mother would |
he to learn how hard she had worked inthe
cause of charity. She ran off for Betty to |
take her down to Mrs. Wilson’s cottage ; |
but she found Betty in no humor to gratify
her.

6 «Tl have nothing to do with it ”
said the old woman. ‘‘ Kitty helped you to |i
spoil your pretty frocks, and she may help
you dress the dirty children ; — they will
look fine, to be sure, in your French calico
| dresses !”’

7. Anna was too happy to mind Betty’s
scolding; so away she flew to find Kitty,
and they set off together for Mrs. Wilson’s
cottage. When they arrived there, they
found the children by the edge of the pond
making dirt pies, while their faces and|
hands bore testimony to their industry. |

8. Kitty stripped and washed them, |
though nothing but the bribe of a new frock |
could have induced them to-submit to 80)
unusual an operation. Anna almost danced

I
































——_— —<—<— ——— a es


| PARKER’S SECOND READER. 109



with pleasure, when she beheld their clean
faces, well-combed locks, and new dresses.



9. Her mother had now been three days
gone, and Anna felt that she had not quite

| fulfilled her trust. But she satisfied her-
self with the thought that two days had
been devoted to a charitable purpose, and
she was sure her mother would think that |
she had made good use of that portion of
her time.

10. The fourth day, she determined to
make amends for past neglect, by studying
double lessons. She went to her room and
locked the door, resolving to perform all |!
her duties on that day, at least. |
11. She had scarcely commenced her i

a igi a
ean etree









ee = + -_—_—


tae oo ee
j a ete eee: oa « ae p mene

110 NATIONAL SERIES.

ee en ee — e ee

studies, however, when she recollected that
she had not watered her mother’s plants
since she had been gone. She threw down
her books, and running into the garden,
sought her little watering-pot ; but it was
not to be found.

12. She was sure she had put it either
in the summer-house, or the tool-house, or
under the piazza, or somewhere. After
spending half an hour in search of it, she
remembered that she had left it under the
great elm-tree, in the field.

13. By this time, the sun was shining |
with full vigor upon the delicate plants ; and,
forgetting her mother’s caution to water
them only in the shade, she overwhelmed |
the parched leaves with a deluge of water,
and went off quite content.

14. She then thought of her bird; and on
examining his cage, found that he could
reach neither the seed nor the water. So
she replenished his cups, decorated his
cage with fresh chickweed, treated him to
a lump of sugar, and played with him until |
she had loitered away the best part of the
morning.

15. Immediately after dinner, a little
friend came to see her, and the rest of the
day was consumed in dressing dolls, or ar-
ranging her baby-house. |






PARKER'S SECOND READER. 111







LESSON XXX.

The same subject, concluded.











1. On the fifth day, she summoned cour-
age enough to persevere, and actually per-
formed every task with attention.

9. In the afternoon, Betty took her out
to walk, and Anna coaxed her into a visit
to Mrs. Wilson’s cottage. What was her
indignation, as she approached the house, to
see the children again playing on the mar-

gin of the duck-pond !
|° 3 Ag goon as they saw her, they ran to
| hide themselves, but not until she had ob-
served that their new frocks were as dirty,
and almost as ragged, as the old ones.
Betty did not fail to make Anna fully sen-
sible of her éwn superior wisdom.

4, ‘I told you so, child,”’ said she; ‘‘ I
told you it was all nonsense to try to dress
up those dirty creatures ; much good you
have done, to be sure!’”? Anna almost cried
with vexation, as she thought of all the
time and labor she had wasted upon her be-
nevolent task, and she walked home with a
heavy heart.

5” The next morning, she had scarcely

risen from the breakfast-table, when Kitty
: | came to show her a beautiful little ship,

——==———























—_—-—






—-—-

112 NATIONAL SERIES.





——- ~~

which her brother, who was a sailor, had
made for her, as a token of remembrance.










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6. Anna was delighted with it; nothing
could be more beautiful than its graceful
form, its delicate rigging and snowy sails.
She begged to have it set on her table, that
she might see it while she was studying,
and the good-natured Kitty left it with her.













7. But in vain the heedless child tried to
study ; her eyes and thoughts wandered
perpetually to the pretty toy before her.
‘‘ How Ishould like to see it sail !’’ said she
to herself. The more she looked at it, the
more anxious she became to see it in the
water.

8. At length, taking it carefully up, she
stole down stairs, and hurried across the

| canteens LD, ELLOS LLL





ee
113




























garden to a little brook in the adjacent
field. Here she launched her tiny bark ; |}
but it had scarcely touched the water, when ||
it turned over on itsside. She then recol-
lected that she had once heard her father
speak of the manner of ballasting a ship ; so
she hastened to gather a quantity of small
stones, with which she filled the little cabin.

9. Again she intrusted her ship to the
crystal streamlet; but, alas! the weight
of the stones carried it straight to the bot-
tom. ‘There it lay in the pebbly channel,
with the clear waters rippling above it, and
the little girl stood aghast upon the brink.

10. She bared her arm, and attempted
to reach it, but without success. At length,
while making a desperate effort to regain it,
she lost her balance, and fell into the water.

11. Fortunately, the water was not
deep, and she soon scrambled out again; but
she was thoroughly wet, and, having been ||
very warm béfore the accident, she was
now chilled to the heart.

12. Grasping the little ship, the cause
of all the mischief, she hurried home, and
creeping softly into the kitchen, sought her
friend Kitty, to screen her from Betty’s
anger. By this time she was shivering
with a violent ague, and Kitty carried her

imme diately to Betty.
12. Poor Anna! she was now obliged to






114 NATIONAL SERIES.

a








be put to bed, and to take some of Betty’s bit-

ter herb tea, seasoned too with scolding, and
‘| all kinds of evil predictions. She felt very
unhappy, and cried sadly ; but repentance,
in this case, came too late.

14. Her head began to ache dreadfully ;
her skin was parched with fever, and before
the next morning she was very ill. She |
had taken a violent cold, which brought on
an attack of scarlet fever; and when Mrs.
Elmore returned, she found her little daugh-
ter stretched on a bed of sickness.

15. How did that fond mother tremble,
as she watched by the bedside of her dar-
ling child, uncertain whether she would |)
ever again lift up her head from her un-
easy pillow !

16. Anna did not know her mother in
the delirium of fever, and her melancholy ,
ery of ‘‘ Mother! mother! come back !— _—
I will never be so bad again!’’ wrung
Mrs. Elmore’s heart.

17. For three weeks Anna lay between
life and death ; and when she was at length
pronounced out of danger, she was as help-
less as an infant.

18. One day, as she sat propped up by
pillows, she told her mother all that had
passed during her absence, and awaited
her decision respecting the use she had
made of her time.

—






a
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PARKER S SECOND REANER. 115
| 19. ** My dear child,’’ said Mrs. Elmore,
|| **T trust the past will afford a lesson you
will never forget. So far from having
made good use of your time, you have
| doné harm in everything you have under-
\| taken.
| 20. ** Your attempts at study, instead of
affording you any real instruction, have
only given you habits of inattention, which
you will find very difficult to overcome ;
for your eyes have wandered over the page,
while your thoughts have been with the
{| fool’s, to the ends of the earth.
| 24%. ‘¢ Your irregular care of my plants,
|| which you thought would serve instead of
habitual attention, has been the means of
destroying them as effectually as if you |
| had allowed them te perish from total neg-
|| lect.

22. “ Your injudicious benevolence to the
| Wilsons served only to make the children
envious of each other, without giving them
‘Ii habits of neatness, which are essential to
ll the well-being of such a family ; while it
had a worse effect upon yourself, because
it not only wasted your precious time, but
excited in you a feeling of vanity, on ac-
count of what you considered a good |,
action.

93. ‘Tf, instead of trusting so boldly to |
| your good resolutions, you had entered

li













116 NATIONAL SERIES.













- puentaeaanaineaataaaaett te



——

upon your duties with an humble mind, |
and resolved to try to do right, —if you had
apportioned your time with some degree of ||
regularity, — you might have performed all |;
that was required of you, enjoyed all your
amusements, and gratified every kindly
feeling, without a single self-reproach.

94. ‘As itis, you feel sensible of having
failed in everything, — of having exposed
yourself to great peril, and subjected your |} -
mother to great anxiety, simply from your
disposition to loiter, when you should labor.

55. «J trust that, in the solitude of your |
sick chamber, ‘the still small voice ” of |
your many wasted hours has made itself
heard, and that hereafter you will not so |}
utterly fail to ‘make good use of your
time.’ ””












LESSON XXXI.
Verse, or Poetry.

1. Att the lessons in this book which you ||
have thus far read have been in prose. I}
intend to give you some lessons in verse, or, |
as it is sometimes, but improperly called,
poetry. |
2. There is a great deal of difference |

a


































PARKER'S SECOND READER. 117
Sanna aarEIDNE See Oe
between verse and poetry; but as this book
| is intended for those who are not quite old
enough to understand all these differences,
I shall not attempt at present to point them
out to you.

8 But I wish you first to understand
\lthe difference, which you can see with
your eye, between prose and verse. The
lines of verse often end in what are called
rhymes. Thus, if one line ends with the
word found, the next line ends with a
word which sounds very much like it, as
ground, round, bound, sound, hound, wound.

4. These are called rhymes. Here are
a few such lines.

ES TS”

IMPROVEMENT OF TIME.

“ Defer not till to-morrow to be wise ;
T'o-morrow’s sun to thee may never rise.”

BEST USE OF MONEY.

« When wealth to virtuous hands is given,
It blesses like the dew of Heaven ;
Like Heaven, it hears the orphan’s cries,
And wipes the tears from widow’s eyes.”

5. Sometimes the rhymes occur in alter-
nate lines; that is, two lines come together
) which are not rhymes, and are followed by
two lines to make rhymes to both, as fol-
lows :








118 NATIONAL SERIES.



«“ Let the sweet work of prayer and praise
Employ our youngest breath ;
Thus we’re prepared for longer days,
Or fit for early death.”

6. There are some kinds of verses that
do notrhyme. These are called blank verse.
Here is an example of blank verse:

“Mark well, my child, he said; this little stream
Shall teach thee charity. It is a source
I never knew to fail: directed thus
Be that soft stream, the fountain of thy heart.
For, oh! my much-loved child, I trust thy heart
Has those affections that shall bless thyself;
And, flowing softly like this little rill,
Cheer all that droop. The good man did not err.”



7. Now, there are several things that I
wish you to notice in these lines. In the
first place, if you will count the syllables,
you will find that there are exactly ten syl-
lables in each line; and it is always the
case, that in verse it is necessary that there
should be a certain number of syllables of a
certain kind. |

S. What that number is, I cannot now
explain to you; but you will be able to un-
derstand from a book called a grammar,
which you will probably study at some
future time, if you do not study it now.
It is contained in that part of grammar
called Prosody.

_—_—-









—
a


| PARKER'S SECOND READER.

119

9. The next thing I wish you to notice
is, that every line of verse always begins
with a capital letter.

10. And thirdly you will notice, that the |
lines of verse are more regular in their
sound than lines of prose. They have a
kind of musical sound about them, which
you very rarely hear, except in verse.

11. And fourthly you will notice, that
some of the words are shortened by leaving
out a letter, and putting in its place a
mark called an apostrophe, which looks just
like a comma, only it is placed higher up
in the line, as in the following line :














“Thus we ’re prepared for longer days.”




12. In this line, if the words were writ-
ten out at full length, with all their letters
in them, the line would stand as follows:




“Thus we are prepared for longer days.”



13. But this would destroy what is
called the measure of the line, by putting
too many syllables into it; and therefore the
words we are are shortened, so as to be
read as one syllable, and the line is to be
read as follows :






“Thus weer prepared for longer days.”



11*


accent OPO

120 NATIONAL SERIES.

14. The next difference T shall point
out to you between prose and verse, 1s
that in verse the words are placed in a
different order from what they would be in
prose ; as you will notice in the following
lines :

«When all thy mercies, oh my God!
My rising soul surveys,
Transported with the view, L’m lost
In wonder, love and praise.”

15. Now, if these lines were written in
prose, the words would stand in the follow-
ing order: “* O my God! when my rising
soul surveys all thy mercies, I’m trans-
ported with the view of them, and lost in
wonder, love and praise.’

16. And now that I have explained to
you a few of the points in which verse dif-
fors from prose, I will only add, that when
you read verse, you must not stop at the
ond of every line, unless there is a pause
or mark there ; and that you must avoid
reading it as if you were singing it to a
tune.










| PARKER’S SECOND READER. 121 |

LESSON XXXII.
God Present Hverywhere.

1. Txov, Lord, by strictest search hast
| known | :
|| My rising up and lying down ;
| My secret thoughts are known to thee,
|| Known long before conceived by me. —
9, Surrounded by thy power I stand,
On every side I find thy hand:
||O skill for human reach too high!
Too dazzling bright for mortal eye!
| 8. From thy all-seeing Spirit, Lord,
What hiding-place does earth afford !
O where can I thy influence shun,
||Or whither from thy presence run ?
4. If up to heaven I take my flight, |
\| Tis there thou dwell’st enthroned in light;
If to the world unseen, my God,
There also hast thou thine abode.
| 5. If I the morning's wings could gain,
|| And fly beyond the western main ;
Hen there, in earth’s remotest land,
I still should find thy guiding hand.
6. Or, should I try to shun thy sight
Beneath the sable wings of night;
One glance from thee, one piercing ray,

|| Would kindle darkness into day. |

re SS




ete





NATIONAL SERIES.

———_—

4. The veil of night is no disguise,
No screen from thy all-searching eyes ;
Through midnight shades thou find’st thy |

| way,
As in the blazing noon of day. |

8, Thouknow’st the texture of my heart, ||
‘My reins, and every vital part : )
Pll praise thee, from whose hands I came |
A work of such a wondrous frame.

9. Let me acknowledge too, O God, |

That since this maze of life | trod,



Thy thoughts of love to me surmount
The power of numbers to recount.
|| 10. Search, try, O God, my thoughts
and heart,
If mischief lurk in any part ;
Correct me where I go astray,
And guide me in thy perfect way.





LESSON XXXIIf.
Devotion.

1. Wurtx thee I seek, protecting Power, |
Be my vain wishes stilled ;
And may this consecrated hour
With better hopes be filled.
2. Thy love the power of thought by -
stowed,
To thee my thoughts would soar:

er a nr
Nt a tS

PARKER’S SECOND READER. =

Thy mercy o’er my life has flowed,
That mercy I adore. |
3. In each event of life, how clear
Thy ruling hand I see!
Kach blessing to my soul more dear,
Because conferred by thee.
4. In every joy that crowns my days,
In every pain I bear,
| My heart shall find delight in praise,
| Or seek relief in prayer.
| 5. When gladness wings my favored
| hour,
Thy love my thoughts shall fill;
Resigned, when storms of sorrow lower,
My soul shall meet thy will.
6. My lifted eye, without a tear,
The gathering storm shall see ;
My steadfast heart shall know no fear—
That heart will rest on thee. |





LESSON XXXIV.
Lhe Gardener and the Hog.—Gay.

1. A GARDENER, of peculiar taste,
On a young hog his favor placed,
Who fed not with the common herd,-—
His tray was to the hall preferred ;
He wallowed underneath the board,
| Or in his master’s chamber snored,

ee + ee eS - - - 2
i-. —- . ~—— ~ — ee

A



-_






| 124 NATIONAL SERIES.

Te a ac elalebaepioeemeveelaenreneenvsinneentnny ont

Who fondly stroked him every day,
And taught him all the puppy’s play.
2 Where’er he went, the grunting friend
Ne’er failed his pleasure to attend.
As on a time the loving pair
| Walked forth to tend the garden’s care,
The master thus addressed the swine :
3. «My house, my garden, all is thine :
On turnips feast whene’er you please,
And riot in my beans and peas ;
If the potato’s taste delights,
Or the red carrot’s sweet invites,
Indulge thy morn and evening hours,
But let due care regard my flowers ;
My tulips are my garden’s pride —
What vast expense these beds supplied !”’
4, The hog, by chance, one morning
roamed
Where with new ale the vessels foamed ;
He munches now the steaming grains,
Now with full swill the liquor drains ;
Intoxicating fumes arise,
He reels, he rolls his winking eyes ;
Then, staggering, through the garden scours,
And treads down painted ranks of flowers ;
With delving snout he turns the soil,
And cools his palate with the spoil.
5. The master came, — the ruin spied.
‘Villain, suspend thy rage!’ he cried :

‘¢ Hast thou, thou most ungrateful sot, :
|, My charge, my only charge, forgot’?
oo



—


PARKER'S SECOND READER. 125





What, all my flowers ?’’ No more he said;
But gazed, and sighed, and hung his head.
6. The hog, with stuttering speech,
returns : —
‘* Explain, sir, why your anger burns ;
See there, untouched, your tulips strown,
For I devoured the roots alone!”’

7. At this the gardener’s passion grows ; |
From oaths and threats he fell to blows ;
The stubborn brute the blows sustains,
Assaults his leg, and tears the veins.

Ah ! foolish swain, too late you find
That sties were for such friends designed !
8. Homeward he limps with painful
pace,
Reflecting thus on past disgrace :
Who cherishes a brutal mate,
Shall mourn the folly soon or late.

—_——_o—__—-

LESSON XXXYV.
The Hare and many Friends. — Gay.

1. A wars, who, in a civil way,
'| Uomplied with everything, like Gay,
Was known by all the bestial train
Who haunt the wood, or graze the plain.
Hur care was never to offend,
And every creature was her friend.
2. As forth she went, at early dawn,

se et








NATIONAL SERIES. |



To taste the dew-besprinkled lawn,
Behind she hears the hunter’s cries,
And from the deep-mouthed thunder flies.

3. She starts, she stops, she pants for

breath ;
She hears the near advance of death ;
She doubles to mislead the hound,
And measures back her mazy round ;
Till, fainting in the public way,
Half dead with fear, she gasping lay.

4. What transport in her bosom grew,
When first the horse appeared in view !

‘¢ Let me,’’ says she, ‘‘ your back ascend,
And owe my safety to a friend.
You know my feet betray my flight, —
To friendship every burden ’s light.”’
5. The horse replied : — ‘* Poor honest
puss,
It grieves iny heart to see thee thus.
Be comforted, — relief is near ;
For all your friends are in the rear.”

6. She next the stately bull implored ;
And thus replied the mighty lord : ——
‘ That I sincerely wish you well,

I may, without offense, pretend

To take the freedom of a friend.

Love calls me hence; a favorite cow
Expects me near yon barley-mow ;
And when a lady’s in the case,

You know all other things give place.


































127

PARKER'S SECOND READER.

To leave you thus might seem unkind ;
But see, — the goat is just behind.”’
7. The goat remarked her pulse was
high,
Her languid head, her heavy eye, —
*¢ My back,”’ says he, ‘* may do you harm ;
|| The sheep ’s at hand, and wool is warm.”
8. The sheep was feeble, and complained
His sides a load of wool sustained :
Said he was slow, confessed his fears ;
For hounds eat shcep, as well as hares.
9. She now the trotting calf addressed,
| To save from death a friend distressed.
| ‘* Shall I,’”’ says he, ‘‘ of tender age,
| In this important care engage ?
Older and abler passed you by;
How strong are those! how weak am I!
10. ‘* Should I presume to bear you hence,
|| Those friends of mine may take offense.
Excuse me, then, — you know my heart ;
But dearest friends, alas ! must part.
How shall we all lament! Adieu!
For see, — the hounds are just in view.”’
11. ’T is thus in friendships ; who depend
On many, rarely find a friend.


LESSON XXXVI.

, Meazims. — SELECTED.

r NATIONAL SERIES.

Never delay until to-morrow what you
can do to-day.

Never trouble others for what you can do |}
yourself. :

Never spend your money before you have |






















it.
Never buy what you do not want, because |}
it is cheap. |
Pride costs more than hunger, thirst, or ||
cold.
We never repent of having eaten too ||
little.
Nothing is troublesome that we do wil- |)
lingly. |
How much pains have those evils cost us ||
which never happened ! 3
Take things always by their smooth ||
handle. :
When angry, count ten before you speak; ||.
if very angry, a hundred.
Hear as little as possible spoken against |
others; and believe nothing of the kind, ||
until you are absolutely forced to believe it.}}
Always believe that if you heard what ||
may be said on the other side of the |}
question, a very different account of the ||
matter might be given. ;






| _ Do to others what you would have them
| do to you.
|

LESSON XXXVII.
How to be Happy. — Cutty av Hoon.

1. Every child must have observed how
much happier and more beloved some chil-
dren are than others. There are some
children whom you always love to be with.
They are happy themselves, and they make
you happy.

2. There are others, whose society you
always avoid. The very expression of their
countenances produces unpleasant feelings.
They seem to have no friends.

3. No person can be happy without
friends.. The heart is formed for love, and
cannot be happy without the opportunity of
giving and receiving affection.

4. But you cannot receive affection, un-
less you will also give it. You cannot find
others to love you, unless you will also
fove them. Love is only to be obtained by
; re love in return. Hence the import-
ance of cultivating a cheerful and obligi ng
disposition. You cannot be happy without
it.




nT

NATIONAL SERIES.































5. I have sometimes heard a girl say,
‘‘T know that I am very unpopular at
school.’? Now, this isa plain confession
that she is very Cisobliging and unamiable
in her disposition.

6. If your companions do not love you,
it is your own fault. They cannot help
loving you, if you will be kind and friendly.
If you are not loved, it is a good evidence
that you do not deserve to be loved. It is
true, that a sense of duty may, at times,
render it necessary for you to do that which
will be displeasing to your companions.

“. But, if it is seen that you have
a noble spirit, that you are above selfish-
ness, that you are willing to make sacri-
fices of your own personal convenience to
promote the happiness of your associates,
you will never be in want of friends.

8. You must not regard it as your mis-
fortune that others do not love you, but
your fault. It is not beauty, it is not
wealth, that will give you friends. Your
heart must glow with kindness, if you
would attract to yourself the esteem and
affection of those by whom you are sur
rounded. |

9. You are little aware how much the |
happiness of your whole life depends upon
the cultivation of an affectionate and oblig
ing disposition. If you will adopt the reso


nt Say

131





























PARKER'S SECOND READER.



lution that you will confer favors whenever

you have an opportunity, you will certainly

be surrounded by ardent friends.

i 10. Begin upon this principle in child-
hood, and act upon it through life, and you
will make yourself happy, and promote the
happiness of all within your influence.

11. You go to school on a cold winter
morning. A bright fire is blazing upon the
hearth, surrounded with boys struggling to
get near it to warm themselves. After you
get slightly warmed, another school-mate
comes in, suffering with cold. «Here,
James,’’ you pleasantly call out to him, ‘J

}am almost warm; you may have my

place.”’

12. As you ‘slip aside to allow him to
take your place at the fire, will he not feel
that you are kind? The worst dispositioned
boy in the world cannot help admiring such
generosity |

13. And even though he be so ungrate-
ful as to be unwilling to return the favor,
you may depend upon it that he will be
your friend as far as he is capable of friend-
ship. If you will habitually act upon. this
principle, you will never want friends,

14. Suppose, seme day, you were out
with your companions, playing ball. After
you had been playing for some time, ||
another boy comes along. He cannot be





10*
ere een D

132 NATIONAL SERIES.

ee eet A ELLE D





































chosen upon either side, for there is no one
to match him. ‘‘Henry,’’ you say, “‘ you
may take my place a little while, and I will
rest.’”’

15. You throw yourself down upon the
grass, while Henry, fresh and vigorous,
takes your bat and engages in the game.
He knows that you gave up to accommo-
date him ; and how can he help liking you
for it ? |

16. The fact is, that neither man nor
child can cultivate such a spirit of gener-
osity and kindness, without attracting af-
fection and esteem.

17. Look and see which of your com-
panions have the most friends, and you will
find that they are those who have this
noble spirit, — who are willing to deny
themselves, that they may make their asso-
ciates happy.

18. This is not peculiar to childhood.
It is the same in all periods of life. There
is but one way to make friends; and that
is, by being friendly to others.

19. Perhaps some child, who reads this,
feels conscious of being disliked, and yet
desires to have the affection of his com-
panions. You ask me what you shall do.
I will tell you.

20. I will give you an infallible rule.

Do all in your power to make others happy. |








| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 133

Be willing to make sacrifices of your own
convenience, that you may promote the
happiness of others.

21. This is the way to make friends,
and the only way. When you are playing
with your brothers and sisters at home, be
always ready to give them more than their
share of privileges.

22. Manifest an obliging disposition,
and they cannot but regard you with affec-
tion. In all your intercourse with others,
at home or abroad, let these feelings influ-
ence you, and you will receive a rich re-
ward.

eee

LESSON XXXVIII.

Obedience and Disobedience. — Cutp’s
CoMPANION.

1. You have never disobeyed your pa-
rents, or your teachers, or any who have
been placed in authority over you, without
being uncomfortable and unhappy! Obedi-
ence, in a child, is one of the most neces-
sary qualities; for it protects him from all
the evils of his want of experience, and
gives him the benefit of the experience of
others.

2. One fine summer’s day, I went to

on em ee =

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134 NATIONAL SERIES.

a ilmeapmnaninhsiusaaieantaesiantnasnmnsateictnitlatenssmtaantit
spend an afternoon at a house in the coun-
try, where some young people were enjoy-
ing a holiday.

8. They were running cheerfully up and
down a meadow, covered over with yellow
crocuses, and other flowers; and I looked
on them with delight, while they gamboled
and made posies, as they felt disposed.
























“ Flere sister with sister roamed over the mead,
And brother plucked flow’rets with brother ;

And playmates with playmates ran on with such speed
That the one tumbled over the other.”

4, Now, they all had been told to keep
away from the ditch at the bottom of the
field; but, notwithstanding this injunction,
one little urchin, of the name of Jarvis,
seeing a flower in the hedge on the oppo-
site bank, which he wished to gather, crept
nearer and nearer to the ditch.

5. The closer he got to the flower, the
more beautiful it appeared to be, and the
stronger the temptation became to pluck it.

6. Now, what right had he to put him-
self in the way of temptation? The field,
as I said before, was covered over with
flowers ; and that in the hedge was no better
than the rest, only it was a forbidden flower,
and when anything is forbidden it becomes,
on that very account, a greater temptation
to a disobedient heart.








PARKER'S SECOND READER. 135 |

snioonatillitieeinesarnbbebetatbcwtpneasstopinaens gis ct

7. Jarvis had gathered a whole handful
of flowers before he saw the one growing
in the hedge; but he threw all these away,
so much was his mind set on getting the
one which he wanted. _

8. Unluckily for him, in getting down |
the bank, his foot slipped, and down he
rolled into a bed of stinging nettles, at the
bottom of the ditch, which fortunately hap-
pened to have in it but little water.

9. Jarvis screamed out with might and
main, as he lay on his back; for, whichever
way he turned, his cheeks and his fingers
brushed against the nettles.



10. His cries soon brought his compan-
ions around him; but, as they were all
young, they knew not how to render him

aate jomeplaai Riches inlb eksetin: ae coehealiitn ooiea




1356 NATIONAL SERIES.





assistance, on account of the stinging net-
tles, and the depth of the ditch.

11. I ran to the spot, and pulled up
Master Jarvis in a pretty pickle, his jacket
and trowsers plastered with mud, and his
hands and face covered with blotches.

12. Here was the fruit of disobedience !
And as it was with Jarvis, so will it be
with every one who acts disobediently. |

13. Whenever you feel a temptation to
disobey God; to disobey his holy word ;
to disobey the admonitions of- your own
conscience; to disobey your parents, your
teachers, or any in authority over you, — be
sure that a punishment awaits you, if you
do not resist it.

14. As you are not able to resist it in
your own strength, ask God’s assistance for
Christ’s sake, and it will not be withheld.
Now, remember Jarvis, and the bed of
stinging nettles ! :

15. The Bible tells us very plainly how
much God sets his face against disobedi-
ence. ‘The children of Israel walke 1 forty
years in the wilderness, till all the people
that were men of war, which came out of
Egypt, were consumed, because they obeyed
not the voice of the Lord.”

16. ‘Let no man deceive you with vain |
words: for, because of these things cometh |
the wrath.of God upon the children of dis-



EN — ~
- ann .






| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 137

|| obedience.’’ Nor is it disobedience to God |




|| that is alone hateful in his sight; for disobe-
|| dience to parents is spoken of as an evil
| thing, too.

I7. ‘ The eye that mocketh at his father,
|| and despiseth to obey his mother, the ravens
|| of the valley shall pluck it out, and the
|| young eagles shall eat it.’’
|| 18. But I cannot bear to think that you
|| are disobedient! I would rather consider

you obedient in all things, and encourage
you in holding on your way, obeying the
|| will of God, and the word of all in author-
ity over you. |

“The Lord rules over sea and land,
And blest indeed are they
Who all his counsels understand,
And his commands obey.”

19. I have often been struck with the
simplicity with which some children obey
their parents. This tractable disposition is
very aiiable in a child.

20. It was no longer ago than last week,
that, in crossing a field, I overtook three
children: one, a little girl of about five
years old, was on the foot-path, and, just as

| 1 came up, her brother called her to him,
where he was in the field.

21. ‘*No, William,” said the little maid ;



TS SS er et ett artnet

“‘my mother told me not to go of the foot. |,


138 NATIONAL SERIES.

























9?
°

| obey my mother

92. I caught the little creature up in
my arms; and having a small neat book ip
my pocket, suitable for a child, I gave it tc
her, and told her to remember that the
reason why I gave it was, that she had
been obedient to her mother.

“Though cares on cares in parent hearts be piled,
Great is that blessing —an obedient child!”

93. Without obedience there can be ne
order. The man must obey his master, the
maid her mistress, and the scholar his
teacher. If you attend a Sunday-school,
whatever class you are in, be obedient to
your instructors, or you will make but little
progress. By obedience you will learn
faster, secure the respect of those about
you, and set a proper example to those
younger than yourself.

24. If you are in a place of work, be
obedient to your employer. ‘Those make
the best masters and mistresses who have
been the most obedient servants; for the
discharge of one duty disposes us to per-
form another.

25. The best way to qualify yourselves
to act well when grown up, is to act well
' while you are children.

—

leech Re
path, and it would be very wicked to dis- f

—_—_—_—_- —-~
PARKER 8 SECOND READER. 139

~

LESSON XXXTX.
Obstinacy.— Lessons witnout Books.

1. Tere is a certain fault which al-
most all children have in a greater or less
degree. It is called by different names ;
sometimes it is termed wilfulness, some-
times pertinacity, and sometimes it receives
the still harsher name of obstinacy.

2. Almost all our faults are owing to the
perversion or abuse of propensities origin-
ally good; and perseverance, when car-
ried too far, or expended upon unworthy
objects, becomes a troublesome infirmity.

3. Louisa and Emily had both some-
thing of this infirmity, but differing both in
degree and in its mode of operation.

4. What are called litile things did not
trouble Emily at all; and, on the contrary,
they troubled Louisa very much.

0. But, when anything did seem pecu-
‘liarly desirable to Emily, — when she set
her heart upon having her own way, — she
carried her perseverance to a degree which
deserved to be called obstinacy.

6. She could give up, as children term
it, with less effort, and more grace, than
most others; but if anything determined
her not to give up, she was immovable |

ne ae: ee Ooo ew


140 NATIONAL SERIES.

7. ‘You are almost always in the right,”’ |
my daughter, her father once said to her,
‘¢and Heaven preserve you from error ; for
when you once fall into it, you will be too

apt to persevere.”’

8. It happened, at one time, that she
and Louisa were having some nice sun-
bonnets made. Emily went for them at |
the time when they were to be finished,
and finding only one completed, immedi-
ately appropriated it to herself, because she
|| was really in greater need of it than Louisa,
who had one that answered her purpose

very well.
|| 9. Louisa resented this, because that,
being the eldest, she considered herself as
having the first right; but Emily could not
|| be persuaded to give up, although Louisa’s
|| equanimity was very much disturbed on
|| that account. i

10. If it had been proposed to her be

|| forehand to let Louisa have the bonnet vol-
untarily, she would not have hesitated, for
she was not selfish; but when Louisa
\| claimed it as a right, she resisted.

11. Her mother afterwards told her that
|| she should always avoid uritating the pe-
|| culiar humors of her companions. ‘‘ You,”



said she, ‘‘ would not have minded waiting
for the other bonnet a day or two, but to
Louisa it was quite a serious evil.” .

quite a serious evil.” |




+o ate

PARKERS SECOND READER. 14]



12. And here let me remark upon the
proneness which all children have to mag-
nify the importance of little things. A strife
often arises among them, about just nothing
at all, from a mere spirit of competition.



Another, who would not else have Paact
of desiring that particular seat, immediately
regards it in the light of a prize, and ex-
claims, ‘* No, I meant to have that seat;
and I had it just before you took it.”

| 14. Half a dozen claimants will appear
directly, and perhaps get into a serious
quarrel ; whereas, had the reply been, in
the first instance, ‘‘ Very well, let it be
your seat,’’ there would have been an end

i to the matter.

13. One says, ‘This is my seat.

ee



_—--—





1142 NATIONAL SERIES.

15. But to return to Louisa. She mag-
nified a thousand little things, of every day ||
occurrence, in such a manner as proved a
very serious inconvenience to herself.

16. She wished to have her potato sliced,
but never mashed. She could not bear to
see a door open a single moment; and,
even if she were at her meals, and the
closet door happened to stand ajar, she
would jump up and fly to shut it, with the
speed of lightning.

17. She could not endure the feeling of
gloves ; nor could she any better endure to
have her hat tied. Her aunt bore with all
these follies a while, and then deliberately
resolved to counteract them.

18. Louisa at first thought this was very
hard and unreasonable. ‘‘ Why can’t I
have my potato sliced, Aunt Cleaveland ?”’
said she ; ‘‘ what hurt can it. do? And why
can’t I shut the door when it is open? is
there any harm in that ?”’

| 19. **Not at all, my dear, in the thing
itself,’’ Mrs. Cleaveland replied; ‘but
there is a great deal of evil in having your '
tranquillity disturbed by things of such
small moment. |
20. ‘If you allow yourself to be dis- |
tressed by trifles now, how will you bear
the real trials of life, which you must inev-
|| itably sustain, sooner or later ?

——- + -

4
- eee eewere neteeneree ofl


PARKER S$ SECOND READER. 143

21. ‘* By and by, you will find out that
your suffering from these sources is all im-
aginary , and then you will thank me for
having restrained you. |

22. ‘*Now, here is this nice dish of
mashed potatoes, which we have every
day. Ifsucha little hungry girl as you are,
since you have breathed our healthy moun-
tain air, cannot eat it, and with relish too,
I am greatly mistaken; and, in process of
time, I have no doubt you will cease to ob-
serve whether the door is open or shut.”’

23. On the first day of trial, Louisa just
tasted the potato, and left the whole of it ||
upon her plate. Her aunt took no notice
of this. The next day, Louisa came in to
dinner after a long walk, and was very
hungry.

24. There was but one dish of meat upon
the table, and it was of a kind which she
did not much like; so, forgetting all her
repugnance to mashed potato, she ate it
very heartily.

25. Mrs. Cleaveland, however, forbore to
take any notice of this change ; and it was |
not until after several weeks had elapsed, ||
and Louisa had ceased to think of the dis-
tinction between sliced potato and mashed
potato, that her aunt reminded her of the
importance which she had formerly attached
to the former.

13*


NATIONAL SERIES.



26. ‘* Now, my dear Louisa,’’ said Mrs.
Cleaveland, ‘‘ since you find the task is not |]
so very difficult as you apprehended, prom-
ise me that you will try to cure yourself of
all these little infirmities; for such I must
term them.

27. ‘*There is so much real suffering in
life, that it is a pity to have any which is
merely imaginary; and though, while you ||
are a little girl, living with indulgent
friends, your whims might all be gratified,
a constant and uniform regard to them will
|| be impossible by and by, when you are old
enough to mingle with the world.”’

ei ieiait ie
LESSON XL.
King Edward and his Bible. — Mrs. L. H.
SIGOURNEY.

1. I wus tell you a little story about a
young and good king. He was king of ||
England more than two hundred and eighty
years ago. His name was Edward, and, |
because there had been five kings before
him of the name of Edward, he was called
Kdward the Sixth.

2.*He was only nine years old when he
began to reign. He was early taught to be
good, by pious teachers, and he loved to do

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{ | PARKER'S SECOND READER. 145

|| what they told him would please God. He
| had a great reverence for the Bible, which
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he knew contained the words of his Father
in heaven,

3. Once, when he was quite a young
child, he was playing with some children
about his own age. He wished much to
reach something which was above his head. |
To assist him, they laid a large, thick book
| In a chair, for him to.step on. Just as he |
was-putting his feot upon it, he discovered it |
to be the Bible. |

4. Drawing back, he took it in his arms, |
kissed it, and returned it to its place.
|| Turning to his little playmates, he said, with
i|}@ serious face, —‘** Shall I dare to tread


146 NATIONAL SERIES.



|
| under my feet that which God has com-
manded me to keep in my heart ?”’
5. This pious king never forgot his
| prayers. Though the people with whom he
lived were continually anxious to amuse

























him, and show him some new thing, they
never could induce him to omit his daily
devotions. |

|| 6. One day he heard that one of his
teachers was sick. Immediately, he retired
to pray for him. Coming from his prayers,
he said, with a cheerful countenance, ‘‘ I
think there is hope that ‘he will recover. I
have this morning earnestly begged of God
to spare him to us.”’

7. After his teacher became well, he
was told of this; and he very much loved
| the young king for remembering him in his
prayers.

8. Kdward the Sixth died when he was
sixteeti years old. He was beloved by all,
for his goodness and piety. His mind was
alm and serene in his sickness.

9. If you are not tired of my story, I
will tell you part of a prayer which he used
often to say; when on his dying bed.

10. ‘* My Lord God, if thou wilt deliver
me from this miserable life, take me among
thy chosen. Yet not my will, but thy will,
be done. Lord, I commit my spirit tinto
thee. Thou knowest how happy it were




PARKER'S SECOND READER. 147



















for me to be with thee. Yet, if thou
shouldst send me life and health, grant that
I may truly serve thee.”’

11. Children, you should do like King
Kdward, reverence your Bible, and love to
pray to God.

——_——_-o—_———-

LESSON XII.

What does it Mean to be Tempted. — M. H., |
IN THE Rosk-BuD.

1. ‘*Morner,”’ said little Frank, ‘I
wish you would tell me what it means to be
tempted. I heard you say, the other day,
that people are tempted to do many wicked
things ; — pray tell me, mother, if such a
little boy as I am is ever tempted ?”’ ,

2. ** Yes, my child, every day you live ;
and when I have told you what temptation
is, | think you will confess that you have
not only been tempted, but often yielded
to temptation.

3. ** To be tempted, means to be drawn
by the offer of present pleasure to do what
is wrong. There are many kinds of tempt-
ation, and I think you will understand me
better if I give you an instance.

4. ‘“*You know, my dear Frank, that
both your father and I have forbidden your

SC

ne

ae

i










i drowned, because we think it very
ge for you to venture there. But
you also know that the other day you went,
; and suffered severely afterward for your |
disobedience.’’

d. ‘* Yes, mother,’’ said Frank; ‘ but
sn I should not have gone, if William
Brown had not showed me his pretty ship,
just as I was coming out ‘of school, and.
asked me to go see him launch it ; and oh,
mother, if you had only seen it! | |

6. ‘*It had masts and sails, just like a
real ship; and on the deck a little man,
which William called the captain. And
then, when it was on the water, it saiked
along so sweetly !—the pond was as’ h
as a looking-glass, so that we could see two
little ships all the time.

7. “I didn’t think of disobeying you,
mother; I only thought of the pretty ship,
and that there could be no harm in seeing
William’ sail it.”—‘«The harm, my dear

son (as you @all it),’”’ said his 3

** was not in sailing the boat, —this is an
innocent pleasure in itself; but it was
doing it after it had been forbidden by your
parents, that made it wrong.

8. ‘*The temptation to eS To

a NATIONAL SERIES
| going to the pond where your cousin Henry

|| came in the form of a little ship. You
i| Were dra drawn by it to the pond, the for-

Lc Tissncabastiinepedennciainebienenndiadestnaninndbendepahnaabiplodinmeniasieatendtapemumaasmnimene oben rie
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 149
bidden spot. You saw it sail gayly off, and

|

———__.,.
_—
a ee e+ ee eS eS



|

ST tt et it at ty





stood on the bank delighted.”’ :

9. ‘* But, mother,”’ interrupted Frank, ||
‘¢T should n’t have got into the water and |
muddied my clothes, if the little ship had n’t |
got tangled in the weeds; and the boys all ||
shouted, Clear her! Clear her! and I |}
could n’t help stepping in, I was so near;
and my foot slipped, and I fell in.”’

10. ‘* Yes,’’ said his mother, “and but ||
for assistance of your play-fellows, you might
have been drowned. Buf God, whose eye
was upon you all the while, saw fit to spare

|

nee er

you; and how thankful you ought to be
that he did not take you away in your dis-
obedience !

Il. “You now see how you were
tempted, first to go with William Brown |
to the pond, and then to step into the
water; which shows how one temptation
leads to another. But did not something |
within you, my son, tell you, while there,
that you were doing wrong to disobey your
parents ?”’ |

12. **No, mother; I do not recollect
that it did. I’m sure I did not think a |}
word about it till I was alone in bed, and
was asking my heavenly Father to take
care of me. Then something seemed to
say, ‘ Frank, you have done wrong to-day.’ ||

13. ‘* And I felt how wicked I had been, |}

—_ ES LESS





oe ee









{ ‘ isin teeihataaeneepenenstigeaasanenpaniinomsctengmamsuedemnanadomnmante
| 150 NATIONAL SERIES.

| and could not ask God to forgive me till I
had confessed all to you. I knew you
were away when I came home, and [
thought you had n’t returned.
_ 14. “JT was so unhappy that I called
_ Betsy, and told her how I felt. She told me
‘it was an accident, and no matter at all ;
| that she had taken care of my clothes, and
she believed you would never know any-
thing about it.

15. ‘* But all this was no comfort to me:
the something within would not be quiet.
If it had spoken to me in the same way
when I first saw the little ship, I think ]
should not have gone to the pond.”

16. ‘* Frank,” said his mother, ‘this
something within, which is conscience, did
then speak, but you did not listen to its |
voice. The voice of temptation was louder,
and you obeyed it, just as you followed
some noisy boys, the other day, though J
was calling to you, ‘ Frank, come back.’

17. ‘I spoke louder than usual, and at
any other time you would have heard my
voice ; but you were too much attracted
by the boys to listen to me.

18 ‘* Temptation makes us deaf to the
voice within ; and yielding to temptation,
as you see, my son, leads us into sin; and
this is why we pray, in the Lord’s prayer,
‘Lead us not into temptation, but deliver

cae ee

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ian LL et annaaeemaan

——

meme eee LLL LLL LL LLL LLL LLL LLCO

hos


——————_=_=*=:_“_™_-__——_ =
| PARKER'S SECOND READER. 15] |
ateerermnynirialntaeneyeihigaasiihattiibii ie

|








|| us from evil,’ which is sin, for there is no |
|| greater evil than sin.

ie Re ee keep us from this great
|| evil that God has given us this voice within,

| to warn us not to follow temptation, though
the sin appear but a trifling one, and though
it hold out the promise of pleasure, as the

\| little ship did.”

ne

LESSON XLII.
The same subject, continued.

| 1. “Twin name some of the temptations

to which little boys are a good deal ex-
|| posed, and yield to without thinking, and
| Sometimes without knowing to what they
may lead.
| 2. ‘Sometimes the temptation to steal
| comes in the form of some beautiful fruit ;
| perhaps in his father’s garden, which he has
been forbidden to touch ; or perhaps in an
| Orchard far from the eye of the owner,
| Where he might take it without fear of
being seen; and he Says to himself, ¢ No
one will ever know it; I will take only a
few.’

3. ‘But does he forget that the eye of
| God is upon him, and does he not hear the
voice of conscience saying, ‘ Thou shalt not

re
eee. te Se a

14














152 NATIONAL SERIES



steal!’ He would shudder to be called a

thief; but taking what does not belong
‘| to us, be it ever so small a thing, is steal-
| ing.
4, ** And when detected, he is tempted
to lie, to conceal his fault and avoid punish-
ment; and here again we see how one sin
| leads to another. The temptations to cru-
elty are many. Sometimes they appear in
the form of a bird’s nest, placed by a fom
and loving mother on the high bough of
a tree, to secure her young brood from



sees the nest, climbs the tree, and, though
the little birds are too feeble to fly, and the
anxious mother flutters round, as if to en-
treat the cruel boy to spare her little ones,
he is unmindful of her tenderness, and,
thinking only of his prize, bears it off to his
companions, who enjoy it with him.

6. ‘*Here is a sinful feeling indulged,
which, if not subdued, may lead to murder.
I wish you to remember, my dear boy, that
itis by allowing ourselves to commit little
'| sinstthat we become great sinners.

- 7. “You would be frightened if you
could have placed before you a picture of
the course of sin. You would exclaim,
What a monster!—he must never come
near me, — it is dangerous even to look on





danger.
5. ** The boy, in his rambles in the woods,



itl


© eee.



pi lipemic engticatatartancaiage or no * hacer

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 153





him! Let me entreat you, then, my son,
to guard against temptation. |



to a wicked companion, who had often led
you into mischief, ‘Go away; I do not like
your company,’ temptation, though for a
; while it may plead to be indulged, will soon
do as the wicked companion would, if often

|
|
8. “If you say to temptation, as you would



sent away with such a reproof, discon"
tinue to come; or, if found in your com-
pany, will not harm you; for conscience,
like a good friend, will be ever near; and
your blessed Saviour, who has promised to
help those who are tempted, will assist you

to overcome temptation.
9. “I hope now you understand what it


——————————
154 NATIONAL SERIES.







means to be tempted.’ — ‘I think I do,
mother,’’ said Frank, ‘and I thank you
for telling me so much about temptation, I
shall never again repeat the Lord’s prayer !
without thinking what it means, and I hope |
God will keep me from the great evil of
sin.”’ He then kissed his mother, and she
promised to tell him, some other time, how
we are tempted by sinful thoughts.








na
. x rs
——_——-o-— PIF Se Aw

LESSON XLII.

The same subject, continued



1. Iv was not. long after Frank had the
conversation with his mother upon the

TS tee:





eee


ane

| her promise to tell him how we may be ||
| tempted to sinful thoughts.

tee





_——



155

PARKER'S SECOND READER.



temptation to sinful actions, that he claimed

2. It was Sunday evening. Frank and |
his mother were sitting alone together at a
window which opened upon a flower-garden,
rich in the hues with which God has seen
fit to adorn this beautiful part of creation.

3. ‘*You have been at church to-day,
my son,”’ said his mother; ‘‘ and to my eye
you did nothing offensive, for you sat still
during the sermon, and appeared engaged
with your book during the prayers.

4. ‘*T saw only the outward part; but
remember there was an eye of infinite puri-
ty looking upon your heart, and seeing the
thoughts that were passing there. You
only can tell if they were fit to meet that
eye.” |
d. Frank looked down; for, like most
children, he was not apt to examine either
his thoughts or motives, but was well sat-
isfied if he gained the approbation of his
parents.

6. His mother, seeing he was struggling
to disclose something, said, ‘‘ You are an
honest boy, Frank, and do not, I trust,
wish to conceal the truth from your mother.
If you have received my approbation for cor-
rect conduct, you certainly cannot enjoy it,
if you feel that it is not deserved.”’

14*

~
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LLL LOL LO CLA A OCC Ce EO et tar mee SO eR SE PR

LL

(Se eee
eed Ne ee een

—

|

~~ —_-——
eeepc I LLL LAL LL



pepeaenecentte ete
156

NATIONAL SERIES.

7. ‘That is what troubles me, mother,’’
said Frank; ‘‘ for, while I was sitting so
still, and you thought I was attending to
the sermon, I was all the while watching a
pretty little dog, that was running from
pew to pew, trying to find his master ; and
when he got on the pulpit step, and rolled
off, I came so near laughing that I was
obliged to put my handkerchief to my
mouth, and make believe to cough.

8. **T kept my eye upon him till church
was done, and thought, if I could see him
at the door, I would try to make him fol-
low me home, and keep him.

9. “*T feel now, mother, that all this
was very wrong, and that these naughty
thoughts tempted me to break God’s holy
Sabbath.”’ |

10. ‘*I am glad you feel this, my son ;
for, besides being sinful to desire to have
the little dog, which was coveting what
belonged to another, the time and place in
which you indulged the thought was the
breaking of that commandment which says,
‘Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it
holy.’ v2

11. ‘* But, mother,’’ asked Frank, im-
patiently, ‘‘how shall I keep these thoughts
out? They come before I know it. Some-
times a boy has a new suit of clothes on,
and I cannot help looking at him; and

a cc

—e ee ee





cee eeemaea sense enna SORES
a

eee neni tt LC OL LLL,
nemesis aaa CO OL LLL LLL LL
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 157



sometimes the girls will play with their
gloves, and tie and untie their bonnets ;
|| and sometimes the little children get to
|| sleep, and I can’t help watching them, to
see if they will not slip off the seat.

12. ‘*I think, mother, if we did not sit
in the gallery, I shouldn’t see so many
things to tempt me to wicked thoughts in
church.”’

13. ‘If I really believed this myself,
Frank, I should think it important to change
|| our seat: but the mischief does not lie here ;
|| it is in your heart.
|| 14. ‘If this were right, and you really
|| loved God and his service, the thought of
|| his presence would keep out these trouble-
|| some intruders ; not altogether, my son, for
|| the best of people are sometimes subject to |.
|| wandering thoughts ; but it is a temptation
|| which they overcome, by turning their at-
|| tention immediately to the services, and by
taking their eyes from the object that drew
|| away their thoughts from God.”



——

—_——@——_——

LESSON XLIV.
The same subject, concluded.

1. ‘*Ir some great king, who loved his
people, and was continually giving them |






“oo



158 NATIONAL SERIES.

some good things, should appoint a day |
when he would meet his subjects, rich and
poor, young and old, and should declare to |
them how they may best please him; and a
person should be appointed to read to them,
from a book he had himself written, direc-
tions for their conduct; and that, as a re-
ward for obedience, should promise they

| should be admitted to his palace, where

nothing that could trouble them should ever
be allowed to enter — ”’ |
2. ** Why, mother,’ exclaimed Frank, ||
‘‘T should so admire to see a king, that I |
should be willing to do everything he re- ||
quired ; and should be afraid, all the time, ||
of doing something he did not hke, while |}
in his presence. I should keep looking at |}
him all the time, to see if he were pleased ;
— but go on, mother.”’ |
3. ** Well, my son, suppose this great |
yerson, who is also good, should keep a |
book in which he noted down all your ac-
tions, and even looks; and, on a certain day ||
which he had appointed, and which was
known to himself, should call together a
great multitude of people, his friends and
yours, and should read to them all that he
had written there,— do you think you would
be careless or indifferent what was written ||
agaist your name ?”’
4, **OQ’no, mother! I should be so anx- |
pains detract csncoten feasts



——
, a ae






oe
LL de .
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 159

i tt ne





ious that I should want to hide myself, for
fear something should be read that I should
be ashamed of, something very bad. But,
mother, no king ever did this, that you

know of. If he did, pray tell me more '

about him ; and if his subjects were not all
good and obedient.’’

). “I have heard of a king, my son,
who has done more than this; but not an
earthly king. | Earthly kings are limited
in their power ; for they are but men. But
the king of whom I speak. is the Lord of
the whole earth.’’

6. “*Do you mean God, mother??? «<«T
do, my son. You have told me how you
should behave in the presence of an earthly
king on the day he should appoint to meet
his people ; and would you treat with less

a

reverence and respect him who is the King

of kings and Lord of lords 2

7. ‘Can you, on entering his house, say,
‘The Lord is in his holy temple,’ and feel
no desire to meet him there ; but allow any
trifle that meets your eye to carry your
thoughts away? Do you, when his holy
book is read, feel no desire to hear the
directions he has given to lead you to your
heavenly home ?

8. ‘And when the petitions are sent
up imploring his blessings, and asking his

forgiveness, have you none to offer? Are


~ ~ —_ a _ —_— y

160 NATIONAL SERIES.

Fe ea eM
you so blest as to have nothing to ask, and
so good as to need no forgiveness ?

9. “O my son, be careful how you
neglect these gracious privileges! And
when his ministers, whom he has appointed
to declare his will, — to instruct you out of
his word, — preach to you from the sacred
pulpit, will you turn a deaf ear, and lose
their instructions, and at the same time
displease your heavenly Father ?

10. **This great and powerful king is
also your father and friend. He loves you
more than any earthly friend. He is wil-
ling to hear all your petitions, and is even
more ready to give than we are to ask. He
has appointed one day in seven in which to
meet us, and this is the Sabbath, about the
keeping of which we are now talkigg.

11. «*And he has also appointed a day
in which he will judge the world, from the

‘book which he has kept of our accounts.

12. ‘*On that day there will be assem-
bled a great multitude, which no man can
number, out of every kindred and tongue ;
great and small, good and bad. You and
I will be there, my son.

13. ‘* There will be the minister and his
people, the Sunday-school teacher and his
scholars, all to receive either the sentence,
‘Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the
kingdom prepared for you from the founda-

+ rearv\Vvm"-


















































PARKER’S SECOND READER.

|





tion of the world, or, ‘Depart from me,
ye cursed, into everlasting punishment,’ ”

14. Frank was moved by this represent-
ation of the consequences of his neglect of
the duties he owed his heavenly Father,
and said, “O; how sad it would be, how
dreadful, if, on that day I should be sent
to dwell forever where God is not, and
where you and father are not !”

15. “ Dreadful, indeed, my son, would
| be such a separation; and when you think
of this, let it make you more earnest to
serve and please God; for Jesus Christ,
who came upon earth once to die for us all,
and will come again to judge the earth, has
gone to prepare mansions in heaven for
those who love him, that they may dwell
with him forever in perfect happiness.

16. “ Let us now, my son, pray to our
heavenly Father toprepare us for this bless-
edness, that where he is, there we may be
also.” Frank and his mother knelt togeth-
er, and offered up the following prayer :-—

—— enn














PRAYER FOR GOOD THOUGHTS,

17. Almighty and most merciful Father!
teach us thy will, that we may know how
to please thee. Put good thoughts into our
hearts, and right words into our lips, that
our services may be. such as thou wilt
please to accept.





—_———




1162 NATIONAL SERIES.



18. Forgive, we pray thee, the sins we
have committed this day, in thought, word, ||
or deed, and make us truly sorry on account |
of them. Help us to love thee more, and |
serve thee better, for the time to come.

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—_—-—



19. Bless all our friends, and make them
thy friends. Make usa household serving
thee, that after this life is over, we may
all meet in heaven. |
_ 20. O then, great Shepherd, whoneither
|| slumberest nor sleepest, take us under thy
protection this night ; and when the cheer-
ful light of day again returns, lead us forth
in thy fold,and keep us from every tempt

ation that will draw us away from thee. | |
21. May our peaceful slumbers remind |






tthe estan

Accepted ene anagem ee

SS





163 |

PARKER'S SECOND READER.

us of the sleep of death ; and, on the morn-
ing of the resurrection, wilt thou clothe us
in the righteousness of Christ, and receive
us to dwell with him in life everlasting!

Amen.
—_——o-—_—_

LESSON XLV.
Mary Dow.—H. F. Goutp.

1. ‘* Come in, little stranger,’’ I said,
As she tapped at my half-opened door,
While the blanket pinned over her head
Just reached to the basket she bore.
2. A look full of innocence fell
From her modest and pretty blue eye,
As she said, ‘*‘ I have matches to sell,
And hope you are willing to buy.
3. ‘A penny a bunch is the price ;
I think you ’ll not find it too much ;
They ’re tied up so even and nice,
And ready to light with a touch.”’
4. I asked, ‘* What’s your name, little
girl ?”’ |
‘<’T is Mary,” said she, — ‘* Mary Dow,”’
And carelessly tossed off a curl,
That played o’er her delicate brow. |
5. ‘* My father was lost in the deep, — |
The ship never got to the shore ; |
And mother is sad, and will weep,

| When she hears the wind blow and sea roar.







oe _s


apne
| 164 NATIONAL SERIES.

6. ‘She sits there at home, without |!
food, t
Beside our poor sick Willie’s bed ;
She paid all her money for wood,
And so I sell matches for bread.

7. ‘* For every time that she tries
Some things she ’d be paid for to make,
And lays down the baby, it eries,

And that makes my sick brother wake.

8. ‘‘I’d go to the yard and get chips,

But, then, it would make me too sad,
T'o see men there building the ships,
And think they had made one so bad.
9. “I’ve one other gown, and, with ||
care,
We think it may decently pass,
With my bonnet that ’s put by to wear
To meeting and Sunday-school class.
10. ‘*I love to go there, where I’m ||
taught,
Of One who ’s so wise and so good,
He knows every action and thought,
And gives e’en the raven his food.
11. ‘* For He, I am sure, who can take
Such fatherly care of a bird,
Will never forget or forsake
The children who trust to his word..

12. ‘* And now, if I only can sell
The matches I brought out to-day,

I think I shall do very well,
| And mother ’ll rejoice at the pay.”’

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SOF eee ee ee SE 4 = een ree







PARKER'S SECOND READER. 165
SOA ae teterntenyeninconcctnss ao igs
13. ‘Fly home, little bird,’ then JI
thought,
‘Fly home, full of joy, to your nest!”
Yor I took all the matches she brought,
And Mary may tell you the rest.

‘bilities
LESSON XLVI.
lt Snows. —H. F. GOULD.

1. Ir snows! it snows! from out the sky,
The feathered flakes, how fast they fly !
Like little birds, that don’t know why
They ’re on the chase, from place to place,
While neither can the other trace.

It snows! it snows! a merry play
Is o’er us, on this heavy day !
2. As dancers in an airy hall,
That has n’t room to hold them all,
While some keep up and others fall,
The atoms shift ; then, thick and swift,
They drive along to form the drift,
That, weaving up, so dazzling white,
Is rising like a wall of light.
3. But now the wind comes whistling
loud,
To snatch and waft it, as a cloud,. -
Or giant phantom in a shroud ;
It spreads, it curls, it mounts and whirls,
At length a mighty wing unfurls,




a

166 NATIONAL SERIES.

And then, away! but where, none knows,
Or ever will. —It snows! it snows!
4. To-morrow will the storm be done ;
Then out will come the golden sun,
And we shall see, upon the run
Before his beams, in sparkling streams,
What now a curtain o’er him seems.
| And thus with life it ever goes,
’T is shade and shine! — It snows! it
snows !
‘cisslisidie

LESSON XLVIL.

The Dissatisfied Angler Boy.—H. F.
GouLp.



1. I’m sorry they let me go down to the
brook,

I’m sorry they gave me the line and the

hook,













~— Sree
SO ee neon

- _—__——
ee ee SO nati
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 167



——

And I wish I had stayed at home with my
k

I'm SGPC was no pleasure to see

Tha t, little, harmless, suffering thing,

Sile rithe at the end of the string ;

Or to hold the pole, whilé I felt him swing ||

In torture, and all for me!

2. T'was a beautiful speckled and glossy

trout,

And when from the water I drew him out

On the grassy bank, as he floundered about,

It made me shivering cold,

To think I had caused so much needless
pain ;

And I tried to relieve him, but all in vain;

O! never, as long as I live, again

May I such a sight behold!

3. O, what would I give once more to

see

The brisk little swimmer alive ard free,

And darting about, as he used to be,

Unhurt, in his native brook!

‘T’is strange how people can love to play,

|| By taking innocent lives away ;
| I wish I had stayed at home to-day,

. With sister, and read my book.




16 NATIONAL SERIES.











LESSON XLVIII pel

The Violet: a Fable. — Cumbre
AZINE.

1. Down in a humble dell
A modest violet chanced to dwell
| Remote from gayer flowers ;
Its days were passed in simple ease,
| It sipped the dew and kissed the breeze,
Nor thought of happier hours.
2. » Long lived it in this quiet way,
Tull, on a hot and sultry day
About the midst of June,
It chanced to spy a lady fair,
All dressed in satins rich and rare,
Come walking by, at noon.
3. And thus the silly flower began : —
‘* T much should like to live with man,
And other flowers to see ; —
«Why is it (for I cannot tell)
That I forever here should dwell,
Where there is none but me ?”’
4: While thus it spoke, the lady stopped
To pick up something she had dropped,
And there the flower she spied ;
And soon she plucked it from its bed,
Just shook the dew-drop from its head,
And placed it at her side.
0. Soon at the lady’s splendid home
| The violet found that she was come,




























PARKER'S SECOND READER. =|

For all was bright and gay :
And then upon the mantel-shelf,
With many a flower beside herself,
Was placed, without delay.
6. And oh, how glad and proud was she
|| In such a splendid place to be ! —
But short was her delight ;
For rose and lily turned away,
And would not deign a word to say
To such a country wight.

7. She passed the day in much disgrace,
And wished that she might change her place,
|| And be at home again :

She sighed for her own mossy bed,
Where she might rest her aching head ;
But now to wish were vain.
8. Next morn, the housemaid, passing by,
Just chanced the little flower to spy,
And then, without delay,
|| She rudely seized its tender stalk,
‘| And threw it in the gravel walk,
And left it to decay.
9. And thus it mourned, — **Q silly
flower,
To wish to leave its native bower!
Was it for this I sighed ?
| O, had I more contented been,
| And lived unnoticed and unseen,
I might not thus have died !”
10. Nor let this lesson be forgot :
Remain contented with the lot

Le een eee enemas:









—_,












me

170 NATIONAL SERIES.













That Providence decrees.
Contentment is a richer gem
Than sparkles in a diadem,
And gives us greater ease.



LESSON XLIX.

Captain John Smith. —JuventteE Miscet-
LANY.

1. Tue adventures of this singular man
are so various, and so very extraordinary,
that the detail of them seems more like ro-
mance than true history. He was born in
Lincolnshire, England, and was left an.
orphan at an early age.

2. His love of adventure displayed itself
while he was yet a school-boy. He sold his
satchel, books and clothes, and went over to
France, without the knowledge of his
guardians.

3. Afterward, he served as a soldier in

| the Netherlands for several years. At the
end of his campaign, he returned to Eng-
land, where he recovered a small portion of
the estate left him by his deceased father.
4. This money enabled him to resume
his travels under more favorable auspices,
at the age of seventeen. He again went to |







France, and embarked at Marseilles (pro-

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—P enhenensieinnemnrcaanioneen = poiadagllll
! PARKER'S SECOND READER. 171

Se eect ee

| nounced Mar-sales’), with some pious pil-
| grims, bound to Ital

5. During this voyage a violent tempest
threatened destruction to the vessel; and
poor Smith being the suspected cause of

the impending danger was thrown, with-
out mercy, into the sea.





—



6. He saved himself by his great ex-
pertness in swimming ; and soon after went
on board another vessel, bound to Alexan-
dria, where he entered into the service of
the Emperor of Austria, against the Turks.
7. His bravery, and great ingenuity in
all the stratagems of war, soon made him
famous, and obtained for him the command

ot two hundred and fifty horsemen.



i eaten





a et nate




NATIONAL SERIES.

172



8. At the siege of Regal, the Ottomans
sent a challenge, purporting that Lord Tur-
bisha, to amuse the ladies, would fight with
any captain among the Austrian troops.
Smith accepted the challenge.

9. Flags of truce were exchanged be-
tween the two armies, and crowds of fair
dames and fearless men assembled to wit-
ness the combat. Lord Turbisha entered
the field well mounted and armed.

10. On his shoulders were fixed two
large wings made of eagles’ feathers, set in
silver, and richly ornamented with gold and ||
precious stones. A janizary, or Turkish
soldier, bore his lance before him, and
another followed, leading a horse superbly
caparisoned.

11. Smith came upon the ground with
less parade. A flourish of trumpets pre-
ceded him, and his lance was supported by
a single page.

12. The Turk fell at the first charge,
and Smith returned to his army in triumph.
This so enraged one of the friends of the
slain that he sent a challenge to Smith,
offering him his head, his horse and his
armor, if he dared come and take them.

13. The challenge was accepted, and
the combatants came upon the ground
|| with nearly the same ceremony and splen-
| dor. Their lances broke at the firs





——— i ee ee,

a















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 173

| charge, without doing injury to either ; but, -
at the second onset, the Turk was wounded, ,
|| thrown from his horse, and killed.

LESSON L.
The same subject, continued.

1. Tue Christian army were at this
j| ime anxious to finish erecting some for-
tifications, and were very willing to amuse
their enemies in this way. They there-
fore persuaded Captain Smith ‘to send
a challenge in his turn, offering his head, in
|| Payment for the two he had won, to any
one who had skill and strength enough to
take it.

2. The offer was accepted ; and a third
Turk tried his fortune with the bold adven-
turer. This time Captain Smith was near-
ly unhorsed ; but, by his dexterity and
judgment, he recovered himself, and soon
returned to the camp victorious.

3. These warlike deeds met with much
| *pplause ; and the prince gave him a coat
of arms, signed with the royal seal, repre-
senting three Turk’s heads on a white
field.

4. Not long after this, Captain Smith

Se eer enteeeaeetieenee,




174





was left wounded on the field of battle, ——
was taken prisoner by the Turks, — and
sent as a slave to a noble lady in the interior
of the country.

d. He could speak Italian well, and his
fair mistress was very fond of that language.
She listened to accounts of his bravery, his
adventures, and his misfortunes, with deep-
ening interest ; and finally sent him to her
brother, a powerful bashaw, with a request
| that he should be treated with much kind-
ness.

6. The proud officer was angry that his
sister should trouble herself about a vile
Kuropean slave ; and, instead of attending
to her request, he caused him to be loaded
with irons, and abused in the most shame-
ful manner.

7. During the long and tedious period
of his slavery, he suffered as much as it
is possible for man to endure; but at
length he killed his tyrannical master, and,
with great peril, escaped through the des-
erts into Russia.

8. His romantic genius would not long
allow him to remain easy. He could not
be happy unless he was engaged in daring
| and adventurous actions. He no sooner
heard of an expedition to Virginia, under
the command of Christopher Newport, than

he resolved to join it.

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PARKER S SECOND READER. 175





9. He arrived in this country with the
first emigrants, who settled in J amestown,
April 26, 1607. It is said this infant set-
tlement must have perished, had it not been
for the courage and ingenuity of Captain
Smith.

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10. Once they were all nearly dying with
hunger, and the savages utterly refused to
sell them any food. In this extremity,
Smith stole the Indian idol, Okee, which
was made of skins stuffed with moss, and
would not return it until the Indians sold
them as much corn as they wanted.






176 NATIONAL SERIES.

SL LL LLL LLL LLL LLLLLLL LLL LLL LLL LLL LL LLL ELL



LESSON LI.
The same subject, continued.

1. Tue colony were once in imminent
danger of losing their brave and intelligent
friend. While exploring the source of the
Chickahominy river, he imprudently left
his companions, and, while alone, was seen
and pursued by a party of savages. He
retreated fighting, killed three Indians
with his own hand, and probably would
have regained his boat in safety, had he

from which he could not extricate himself.

2. By this accident, he was taken pris-
oner ; and the Indians would have tortured
him, and put him to death, according to
their cruel customs, had not his ever-ready
wit come to his aid. ;

3. He showed them a small ivory com-
pass, which he had with him, and, by signs,
explained many wonderful things to them,
till his enemies were inspired with a most
profound respect, and resolved. not to kill
the extraordinary man without consulting
their. chief.
« 4. He was, accordingly, brought into
le presence of the king, Powhatan, who
received him in a robe of raccjon skins,
and seated on a kind of throne, with two

eee,








6
.

not accidentally plunged into a miry hole, |






















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 177
—s—eatnantnnniettsasenenneritsssiontinuabniteaiiii. ae
beautiful young daughters at his side.

After a long consultation, he was con-
demned to die. |

o. Two large stones were brought, his
head laid upon one of them, and the war-
clubs raised to strike the deadly blow. At
this moment, Pocahontas, the king’s favor-
ite daughter, sprang forward, threw herself
between him and the executioners, and by
her entreaties saved his life.

6. Powhatan promised him that he
should return to Jamestown, if the Eng-
lish would give him a certain quantity of
ammunition and trinkets. Smith agreed to
obtain them, provided a messenger would
carry a leaf to his companions. On this
leaf he briefly stated what must be sent.

7. Powhatan had never heard of writ-
ing ; —he laughed at the idea that a leaf
could speak, and regarded the whole as an
imposition on the part of the prisoner.

8. When, however, the messenger
returned with the promised ransom, he
regarded Smith as nothing less than a
wizard, and gladly allowed him to depart.
It seemed to be the fate of this singular
man to excite a powerful interest wherever |
he went.

9. Pocahontas had such a deep attach-
ment for him, that, in 1609, when only
fourteen years old, she stole away from her




























178 NATIONAL SERIES.





tribe, and, during a most dreary night,
walked to Jamestown, to tell him that her
| father had formed the design of cutting off
the whole English settlement.

10. Thus she a second time saved his
life, at the hazard of her own. This charm-
ing Indian girl did not meet with all the
gratitude she deserved.

11. Before 1612, Captain Smith received
a wound, which made it necessary for him
to go to England, for surgical aid; and
after his departure a copper kettle was
offered to any Indian who would bring
Pocahontas to the English settlement.

12. She was, accordingly, stolen from
her father, and carried prisoner to James-
town. Powhatan offered five hundred
bushels of corn as a ransom for his darling
child.

13. Before the negotiation was finished,
an Englishman of good character, by the
name of Thomas Rolfe, became attached to
Pocahontas, and they were soon after mar-
ried, with the king’s consent.

14. This event secured peace to the
English for many years. The Indian bride
became a Christian, and was baptized.






PARKER'S SECOND READER. 179



LESSON LIL.
The same subject, concluded.

1. In 1616, Pocahontas went to Eng-
land with her husband, — was introduced
at court, and received great attention.

2. King James is said to have been very
indignant that any of his subjects should
have dared to marry a princess; but Cap-
tain Smith has been accused, perhaps
falsely, of being sufficiently cold and selfish
to blush for his acquaintance with the gen-
erous North American savage.

3. Pocahontas never returned to her na-
tive country. She died at Gravesend, in
1617, just as she was about to embark for
America.

4, She left one son, Thomas Rolfe; and
from his daughter are descended several
people of high rank in Virginia, among
whom was the celebrated John Randolph
of Roanoke.

5. Smith had many adventures, after his
wound obliged him to leave Jamestown. |
He visited this country again; made a voy-
age to the Summer Isles; fought with /|
pirates; joined the French against the |
Spaniards ; and was adrift, in a little boat, |

| alone, on the stormy sea, during a night so
| tempestuous that thirteen French ships

th TT ee a
-_---e-









Ire




180 NATIONAL SERIES.



'| were wrecked, near the Isle of Re; yet he
|| was saved.

6. He died in London, in 1631, in the
fifty-second year of his age, after having
‘| published his singular adventures in Ku-
'|rope, Asia, Africa, and America.

epee meee

LESSON LIT.
John Ledyard. — JUVENILE MISCELLANY.

1. Few men have done so much, in a
short life, as John Ledyard. When he was
a mere boy, he built a canoe with his own
hands, and descended Connecticut river
alone and unassisted.

2. He enlisted as a soldier, at Gibraltar ;

‘| and afterwards, in the humble character of
| corporal of the marines, he sailed round
the world with the celebrated Captain
Cook.

3. After his return to England, he
formed the bold design of traversing the
northern parts of Europe and Asia, cross-
ing Behring’s Straits, and examining the
‘whole of North America, from east to west.

4. Sir Joseph Banks, famous for his
generosity to men of enterprise, furnished
him with money for the undertaking. He

. expended nearly all of it in purchasing sea

ES LL






'




PARKERS SECOND READER. 181




































stores ; and these, most unluckily, were all

seized by a custom-house officer, on ac-
count of some articles which the English
law forbade to be exported. »

0. Poor Ledyard was now left in utter
poverty ; but he was a resolute man, and
he would not be discouraged. With only
ten guineas in his purse, he attempted to
walk over the greater part of three conti-
nents. |

6. He walked -through Denmark and
Sweden, and attempted to cross the great ||
Gulf of Bothnia, on his way to Siberia;
but when he reached the middle of that in-
land sea, he found the water was not
frozen, and he was obliged to foot it back
to Stockholm.

7. He then traveled round the head of
the gulf, and descended to St. Petersburg.
Here he was soon discovered to be a man
of talents and activity; and though he was
without money, and absolutely destitute
of stockings and shoes, he was treated with
great attention.

8. The Portuguese ambassador invited
him to dine, and was so much pleased with |
him, that he used his influence to obtain
for him a free passage in the government |
wagons, then going to Irkutsk, in Siberia,
at the command of the Empress Katharine.
9. He went from this place to Yakutz, and

Gaitateststanrenstetitoncterpnentens anuneremnanapeenemaaeameenananens LLL LLC

ee ee ee

SA it ttt tt a cee


182 NATIONAL SERIES.



there awaited the opening of the spring,
full of the animating hope of soon complet-
ing his wearisome journey. But misfortune
seemed to follow him wherever he went.

10. The empress could not believe that
any man in his senses was traveling
through the ice and snows of uncivilized
Siberia, merely for the sake of seeing the
country and the people. » |

11. She imagined that he was an Eng-
lish spy, sent there merely for the purpose
of prying into the state of her empire and
her government. She therefore employed
two Russian soldiers to seize him, and con-
vey him out of her dominions.

12. Taken, he knew not why, and
obliged to go off without his clothes, his
money, or his papers, he was seated in
one of the strange-looking sledges used in
those northern deserts, and carried through
Tartary and White Russia, to the frontiers
of Poland.

13. Covered with dirty rags, worn out
with hardships, sick almost unto death,
without friends and without money, he
begged his way to Konigsberg, in Prussia.






LESSON LIV.

The same subject, concluded.



















1. In this hour of deep distress, he
found a person willing to take his draft
for five guineas on the Royal Society of
England. With this assistance, he arrived
in the land of our forefathers.

2. He immediately applied to his ever-
ready friend, Sir Joseph Banks, for em-
ployment. Sir Joseph, knowing that nothing
suited him better than perilous adventures,
told him that a company had just been
formed, for the purpose of penetrating into
the interior of Africa, and discovering the
source of the river Niger.

3. Burning sands, savage negroes, ven-
omous serpents, all the frightful animals of
the torrid zone, could not alarm the in-
trepid soul of Ledyard. He immediately
expressed his desire to go.

4. When the map was spread before
him, and his dangerous journey pointed
out, he promptly exclaimed, ‘I will go
to-morrow morning.”’ '

0. The gentleman smiled at his eager-
ness, and gladly intrusted him with an ex-
pedition in which suffering and peril were
certain, and success extremely doubtful.
| He left London on the 30th of June,




















“1
PARKER'S SECOND READER.



























184 NATIONAL SERIES.
1788, and arrived in Grand Cairo on the
19th of August.

6. There he spent his time to great ad-
vantage, in searching for and deciphering
the various wonders of that ancient and
once learned land.

7. His letters from Egypt were delight-
| ful. They showed much enthusiasm, united
with the most patient and laborious exer-
tion. The company formed great hopes
concerning his discoveries in Senaar, and
awaited letters from that country with
much anxiety.

8. But, alas! he never reached there.
He was seized with a violent illness at
Cairo; died, and was decently buried be-
side the English who had ended their days
in that celebrated city.

9. We should never read accounts of
great or good men without learning some
profitable lesson. If we cannot, like Led-
yard, defend Gibraltar, sail round the
world with Captain Cook, project trading
voyages to the north-west coast, study
Egyptian hieroglyph‘ics, and traverse the
dreary northern zone on foot, — we can, at
| least, learn from him the imgertant lesson
of perseverance.

10. The boy who perseveringly pores
over a hard lesson, and who will not give

up an intricate problem until he has stud-
Se een

———- — -——










PARKER'S SECOND READER.












life, will make him a great man; and he
who resolutely struggles against his own in-
dolence, violent temper, or any other bad
propensity, will most assuredly be a good
one.

—————

—_¢@-———.

LESSON LY.
Learning to Work. — Ortarnat.

1. A Few years ago, several little vol-
umes were published, called ** The Rollo
Books,’’ which are full of interesting stories
about a little boy of that name. They were
written by a gentleman whose name is
Abbott.

2. They are not only interesting, but
also very instructive books; and no little
boy or girl can read them, without learning
many very useful lessons from them. They
are not only useful to young persons, but
their parents, also, have derived many use-
ful hints from them, in the management of
their children.

3. The following little story is taken
from one of them, called “Rollo af Work 3’?
and i hope that my little friends who read
this story at school will also read it at
home to their parents, because it will be
both interesting and useful to them.

-—

ied it out, forms a habit, which, in after |!

ieteemieineeeetel

ee


186 NATIONAL SERIES.
Seine eipeaipeaatinatcst icant isa i
4. The story begins, by telling us that
Rollo’s father had set him at work in the
barn, with a box full of nails, directing him
to pick them all over, and to put all those
that were alike by themselves.
9. Rollo began very willingly at first,
but soon grew tired of the work, and left it
unfinished. The remainder of the story will
be found in the following lessons, in Mr.
Abbott’s own words.



$$

LESSON LVI.
The same subject, continued. — Asport.

1. Tuat evening, when Rollo was just
going to bed, his father took him up in his
lap, and told him he had concluded what
to do.

2. ‘* You see it is very necessary,’ said
he, ‘‘that you should have the power of
confining yourself steadily and patiently to |,
a single employment, even if it does not
amuse you.

3. **I have to do that, and all people
have to do it; and you must learn to do it,
or you will grow up indolent and useless.
You cannot do it now, it is very plain.

4. “If T set you to doing anything, you

go on as long as the novelty and the amuse- |































PARKER'S SECOND READER. 187
ment last; and then your patience is gone,

getting away from your task.

0. ‘Now, Iam going to give you one
hour’s work to do, every forenoon and after-
noon. I shall give you such things to do
as are perfectly plain and easy, so that you
will have no excuse for neglecting your
work, or leaving it.

6. ‘* But yet I shall choose such things
as will afford you no amusement; for my
wish is that you should learn to work, not
play.”’

7. ‘But, father,” said Rollo, “you told
me there was pleasure in work, the other
day. But how can there be any pleasure
in it, if you choose such things as have no
amusement in them, at all ?”’

8. ‘* The pleasure of working,”’ said his
father, ‘‘is not the fun of doing amusing
things, but the satisfaction and solid happi-
ness of being faithful in duty, and accom-
plishing some useful purpose.

9. ‘* For example, if I were to lose my
pocket-book on the road, and should tell
you to walk back a mile, and look carefully
all the way, until you found it, and if you
did it faithfully and carefully, you would
find a kind of satisfaction in doing it; and

17

and you contrive every possible excuse for





|

a

when you found the pocket-book, and |
brought it back to me,’ you would enjoy |

SSeS -_—_——-


188 NATIONAL SERIES.

a high degree of happiness. Should not
rou?”

’ 10. ‘* Why, yes, sir, I should,’ said
Rollo. — ** And, yet, there would be no
amusement in it. You might, perhaps,
the next day, go over the same road, catch-
ing butterflies; that would be amusement.
Now, the pleasure you would enjoy in look-
ing for the pocket-book would be the solid
satisfaction of useful work.

11. ‘The pleasure of catching butter-
flies would be the amusement of play.
Now, the difficulty is, with you, that you
have scarcely any idea, yet, of the first.

12. ‘You are all the time looking for
the other; that is, the amusement. You
begin to work, when I give you anything
to do; but if you do not find amusement in
it, you soon give itup. But if you would
only persevere, you would find, at length, |
a solid satisfaction, that would be worth a
great deal more.”’

13. Rollo sat still, and listened; but his
father saw, from his looks, that he was not
much interested in what he was saying ;
and he perceived that it was not at all
probable that so small a boy could be rea-
soned into liking work.

14. In fact, it was rather hard for Rollo
} understand all that his father said; and

[ stl harder for him to feel the fore of harder for him to feel the force of ut. |

nn
mu a a




PARKER'S SECOND READER.

| He began to grow sleepy, and so his father
let him go to bed.

a

LESSON LVII.

The same subject, concluded.

1. Tue next day, his father gave him
his work. He was to begin at ten o’clock,
and work till eleven, gathering beans in the
garden.

2. His father went out with him, and
waited to see how long it took him to gather
half a pint, and then calculated how many
he could gather in an hour, if he was indus-
trious. Rollo knew that if he failed now






190 NATIONAL SERIES.



he should be punished in some way, al-
though his father did not say anything about
punishment.

3. When he was set at work, the day

| before, about the nails, he was making an

experiment, as it were, and he did not ex-
pect to be actually punished, if he failed ;
but now he knew that he was under orders,
and must obey.

4. So he worked very diligently, and
when his father came out, at the end of the
hour, he found that Rollo had got rather

|| more beans than he had expected. Rollo

—-+ se

was much gratified to see his father pleased ;
and he carried in his large basket full of
beans to show his mother, with great pleas-
ure.

o. Then he went to play, and enjoyed
himself very highly. The next morning,
his father said to him, — ‘‘ Well; Rollo,
you did very well yesterday; but doing
right once is a very different thing from
forming a habit of doing right. I can
hardly expect you will succeed as well to-
day ; or, if you should to-day, that you will
to-morrow.”’

6. Rollo thought he should. His work
was to pick up all the loose stones in the
road, and carry them, in a basket, to a
great heap of stones behind the barn.

7. But he was not quite faithful. His |


—

PARKER'S SECOND READER.



19]



father observed him playing several times.
He did not speak to him, however, until
the hour was over; and then he called him
in.

8. ‘* Rollo,” said he, ‘‘ you have failed
to-day. You have not been very idle, but
have not been industrious ; and the punish-
ment which I have concluded to try first
is, to give you only bread and water for
dinner.”’ |

9. So, when dinner-time came, and the
family sat down to the good beef-steak and
apple-pie which was upon the table, Rollo
knew that he was not to come. He felt
very unhappy, but he did not cry.

10. His father called him, and cut off a
good slice of bread, and put into his hands,
and told him he might go and eat it on the
steps of the back door. ‘‘ If you should be
thirsty,’’ he added, ‘‘ you may ask Mary te
give you some water.”’ 7

11. Rollo took the bread, and went out,
and took his solitary seat on the stone step
leading into the back yard; and, in spite
of all his efforts to prevent it, the tears
would come into his eyes.

12. He thought of his guilt in disobey-
ing his father, and he felt unhappy to think
that his father and mother were seated to-
gether at their pleasant table, and that he
could not come, because he had been an

17*











Eo
A ,



192 NATIONAL SERIES.



undutiful son. He determined that he
would never be unfaithful in his work
again.

13. He went on, after this, severai days,
very well. His father gave him vavious |!
kinds of work to do, and he began, at last,
to find a considerable degree of satisfaction
in doing it.

14. He found, particularly, that he en-
joyed himself a great deal more after his
work than before; and, whenever he saw
what he had done, it gave him pleasure.

15. After he had picked up the loose
stones before the house, for instance, he
drove his hoop about there with unusual
satisfaction; enjoying the neat and tidy
appearance of the road much more than
he would have done, if Jonas had cleared
it. In fact, in the course of a month, Rollo
became quite a faithful and efficient little
workman.


PARKERS SECOND READER. 193



LESSON LVI.

The Comma.

Tae Comma is a mark like this ,

When you come to a comma in reading,
you must generally make a short pause.
Sometimes you must use the falling inflec-
tion of the voice, when you come to a
comma; and sometimes you must keep
your voice suspended, as if some one had
stopped you before you had read all that you
intended. The general rule, when you come
to a comma, is, to stop just long enough to
count one.

EXAMPLES.

Diligence, industry, and proper improve-
ment of time, are material duties of the
young.

He is generous, just, charitable, and
humane.

By wisdom, by art, by the united
strength of a civil community, men have
been enabled to subdue the whole race of
lions, bears, and serpents.

[Sometimes a comma must be read like a
question. |

Do you pretend to sit as high in school as

Anthony? Did you read as correctly,





—_




194 NATIONAL SERIES.




















articulate as ~~) speak as loudly, Or
behave as well, as he?

Did he recite his lesson correctly, read
audibly, and appear to understand what he
read ?

Was his copy written neatly, his letters
made handsomely, and did no blot appear
on his book ?

Was his wealth stored fraudfully, the
| spoil of orphans wronged, and widows who
had none to plead their rights ?

Have not you, too, gone about the earth
like an evil genius, blasting the fair fruits
of peace and industry ? |

Is that a map which you have before
you, with the leaves blotted with ink ?

Will you say that your time is your own,
and that you have aright to employ it in
the manner you please ?

[Sometimes a comma is to be read like a
period, with the falling inflection of the
voice. |

The teacher directed him to take his
seat, to study his lesson, and to pass no
more time in idleness.

It is said by unbelievers that religion 1s
dull, unsocial, uncharitable, enthusiastic, a
|| damper of human joy, a morose intruder
upon human pleasure.

Charles has brought his pen instead of

ee ee ee ee ee eee








ror



— es ae

PARKER'S SECOND READER. 195

his pencil, his paper instead of his slate, his
grammar instead of his arithmetic.

Perhaps you have mistaken sobriety for
dullness, equanimity for moroseness, disin-
clination to bad company for aversion to
society, abhorrence of vice for uncharitable-
ness, and piety for enthusiasm.

Henry was careless, thoughtless, heed-
less, and inattentive.



[Sometimes the comma is to be read like
an exclamation.]

O, how can you destroy those beautiful
things which your father procured for you!
that beautiful top, those polished marbles,
that excellent ball, and that beautiful painted
kite, —oh, how can you destroy them,
and expect that he will buy you new ones!

O, how canst thou renounce the bound-
less store of charms that Nature to her
votary yields! the warbling woodland, the
resounding shore, the pomp of groves, the
garniture of fields, all that the genial ray
of morning gilds, and all that echoes to the
song of even, all that the mountain’s shel.
termg bosom shields, and all the dread
magnificence of heaven, oh, how canst thou
renounce, and hope to be forgiven !

[Sometimes the comma, and other marks,



——

| are to be read without any pause or inflec-
| tion of the voice.] |










196 NATIONAL SERIES.



we have, in which you can pursue your
studies. |

You see, my son, this wide and large
firmament over our heads, where the sun
and moon, and all the stars, appear in their
turns.

Therefore, my child, fear, and worship,
and love God.

He that can read as well as you can,
James, need not be ashamed to read aloud.

He that can make the multitude laugh
and weep as you can, Mr. Shakspeare, need
notsfear scholars.








[Sometimes the pause of a comma must
be made where there is no pause in your
book. Spaces are left, in the following
sentences, where the pause is proper.|

James was very much delighted with
the picture which he saw.

The Europeans were hardly less amazed

at the scene now before them.

The inhabitants were entirely naked.
Their black hair, long and curled, floated
upon their shoulders, or was bound in tress-
es around their head.

Persons of reflection and sensibility
contemplate with interest the scenes of
nature.

The succession and contrast of the sea-



-_—- —— ee eee,
$$

You see, boys, what a fine school-room |!

—— ——

—— ——
Seen ear SLE i ininiaeilait ttt dilitt
Fe Oa catty etna ce een cena SR aeeneeetusinenatessesieeeeee_.s — we

PARKER'S SECOND READER 197 ||
restatement tie
sons give scope to that care and fore-
sight, diligence and industry, which are
essential to the dignity and enjoyment
of human beings.





(The pupil may read the following sentences ; but before
reading them, he may tell after what word the pause should
be made. The pause is not printed in the sentences, but it

l! must be made when reading them. And here it may be
observed, that the comma is more frequently used to point out
the grammatical divisions of a sentence than to indicate a
rest or cessation of the voice. Good reading depends much -
upon skill and judgment in making those pauses which the
sense of the sentence dictates, but which are not noted in the
book ; and the sooner the pupil is taught to make them, with
proper discrimination, the surer and the more rapid will be
his progress in the art of reading. ]

While they were at their silent meal a
horseman came galloping to the door, and,
with a loud voice, called out that he had |
been sent express with a letter to Gilbert
Ainslee.

The golden head that was wont to rise at
that part of the table was now wanting.

For even though absent from school. [
shall get the lesson.

For even though dead I will control the
‘|! trophies of the capitol.

It is now two hundred years since at
tempts have been made to civilize the North
American savage. |

Doing well has something more in it than
the fulfilling of a duty.

| You will expect me to say something of |

ee ee SS ts ee



of 2) Te esr eesypeeseettenstieseserste








198 NATIONAL SERIES.





the lonely records of the former races that
inhabited this country.

There is no virtue without a characteristic
beauty to make it particularly loved by the
good, and to make the bad ashamed of
their neglect of it.

A sacrifice was never yet offered to a
principle, that was not made up to us by
self-approval, and the consideration of what
our degradation would have been had we
done otherwise.

The following story has been handed
down by family tradition for more than a
century.

The succession and contrast of the
seasons give scope to that care and fore-
sight, diligence and industry, which are
essential to the dignity and enjoyment of
human beings, whose happiness is connected
with the exertion of their faculties.

A lion of the largest size measures from
eight to nine feet from the muzzle to the
origin of the tail, which last is of itself
about four feet long. The height of the
larger specimens is four or five feet.

The following anecdote will show with
what obstinate perseverance pack-horses
have been known to preserve the line of
their order.

Good-morning to you, Charles! Whose

LLL LLCLLLLLO LLL LLL LL LLL LL LLL ELL LC LC Ee ~

—_—00°NT0DauauuauauauuE eo
PARKER'S SECOND READER. 199

etraclecmpuctetvitsichinsssphactaeliada tiie kia t Sade

book is that which you have under your
arm ?

A benison upon thee, gentle huntsman !
Whose towers are these that overlook the
wood ?

The incidents of the last few days have
been such as will probably never again be
witnessed by the people of America, and
such as were never before witnessed by any
nation under heaven. |

To the memory of Andre his country has
erected the most magnificent monuments,
and bestowed on his family the highest
honors and most liberal rewards. To the
memory of Hale not a stone has been
erected, and the traveler asks in vain for
the place of his long sleep.





——_¢——___.

LESSON LIX.

The Semicolon.

THe Semicoton is made by a conma
placed under a period, thus :

When you come to a semicolon, you
must generally make a pause twice as long
as you would make at a comma.

Sometimes you must keep the voice sus-
pended when you come to a semicolon, as
in the following : |

Seas SS â„¢

terre treeteenallttetenentenansenseene

a eee


——e Oe







200 NATIONAL SERIES.
| EXAMPLES.

That God whom you see me daily wor-
ship ; whom I daily call upon to bless both
you and me, and all mankind ; whose
wondrous acts are recorded in those Scrip-
tures which you constantly read ; that God
who created the heaven and the earth is
your Father and Friend.

My son, as you have been used to look
to me in all your actions, and have been ||
afraid to do anything unless you first knew
my will; so let it now be a rule of your
life to look up to God in all your actions.

[Sometimes you must use the falling ||
inflection of the voice when you come to a
semicolon, as in the following :]

EXAMPLES.

Let your dress be sober, clean, and ||
modest ; not to set off the beauty of your
person, but to declare the sobriety of your
mind; that your outward garb may resem-
ble the inward plainness and simplicity of
your heart.

» In meat and drink, observe the rules of
Christian temperance and sobriety ; con-
sider your body only as the servant and
minister of your soul; and only so nourish
it, as it may best perform an humble and
obedient service.

_Z=__"“_"—(‘§@#/_/_/_/“/_/_/$_'*,--



!


















201 |

Condescend to all the weakness and in-
firmities of your fellow-creatures ; cover
their frailties; love their | excellences ; |
encourage their virtues ; relieve their ||
wants ; rejoice in their prosperity ; com- !!
passionate their distress ; receive their
friendship ; overlook their unkindness ; for-
give their malice ; be aservant of servants ;
and condescend to do the lowest offices for
the lowest of mankind.



PARKER'S SECOND READER.





[The semicolon is sometimes used for a |
question, and sometimes as an exclama- |
tion. ]

EXamPLes.

Hast thou not set at defiance my author-
ity ; violated the public peace, and passed
thy life in injuring the persons and proper-
ties of thy fellow-subjects ?

O, it was impious; it was unmanly ; it
was poor and pitiful !

Have not you too gone about the earth
like an evil genius ; blasting the fair fruits
of peace and industry ; plundering, ravag-
ing, killing, without law, without justice,
merely to gratify an insatiable lust for
dominion ?

What a glorious monument of human in-
vention, that has thus triumphed over wind
and wave; has brought the ends of the

earth in communion ; has established an
Rater wineries

- -_-—








——
— ee

202 NATIONAL SERIES.













iasalbesiiephinncnsidadeeanisesedslannindinities i kedisuilik:..

| interchange of blessings, pouring into the |
sterile regions of the north all the luxuries
of the south; diffused the light of knowl-
edge and the charities of cultivated life ;
and has thus bound together those scattered
portions of the human race, between which
Nature seemed to have thrown an insur-
mountable barrier!

—__—_@——__..

LESSON LX.

The Colon.

Tux Coton consists of two periods placed
one above the other, thus :

Sometimes the passage ending with a
colon is to be read with the voice suspended ;
but it should generally be read with the
falling inflection of the voice.

The general rule, when you come to a
colon, is to stop just long enough to count

| three; or three times as long as you are
directed to pause at a comma.

EXAMPLES.

Law and order are forgotten : violence |i
and rapine are abroad: the golden cords of
society are loosed.

The temples are profaned: the soldier’s

“se resounds in the house of God: the

————————__z_{_{_{_x_Z2_ EEE -—_

















PARKER'S SECOND READER. 203



marble pavement is trampled by iron hoofs:
horses neigh beside the altar.

Blue wreaths of smoke ascend through
the trees, and betray the half-hidden cot-
tage : the eye contemplates well-thatched ||
ricks, and barns bursting with plenty : the
peasant laughs at the approach of winter.

[The following passages ending with a
colon are to be read with the voice sus-
pended :]

Do not flatter yourselves with the hope of
perfect happiness: there is no such thing
in the world.
| A boy at school is by no means at

liberty to read what books he pleases: he
must give attention to those which contain
his lessons ; so that, when he is called upon
to recite, he may be ready, fluent, and
accurate, in repeating. the portion assigned
him.

As we perceive the shadow to have
moved along the dial, but did not perceive
its moving ; and it appears that the grass
has grown, though nobody ever saw it
grow : so the advances we make in knowl-
edge, as they consist of such minute steps,
are perceivable only by the distance gone
over. 6
When the proud steed shall know why
man restrains his fiery course, or drives
SE _—___ J

*

-_——










$< $< o_O
}

2.04 NATIONAL SERIES.

him o’er the plains ; when the dull ox, why
now he breaks the clod, is now a victim,
and now Egypt’s god: then shall man’s
pride and dullness comprehend his actions’,
passions’, being’s use and end.

Jehovah, God of hosts, hath sworn, say-
ing: Surely, as I have devised, so shall it
be; and as I have purposed, so shall it
stand.

George, you must not laugh at me ; I
will not bear it. You forget what you are
about when you ridicule me: I know more
than you do about the lessons.

I never heard a word about it before,
said George, yesterday: who told you ||
about it, Charles?

I never heard one word of it before, said
my uncle Toby, hastily: how came he
there, Trim ? a

Thou shalt pronounce this parable upon
the King of Babylon ; andshalt say : How
hath the oppressor ceased ! ee.

It is not only in the sacred fane that
homage should be paid to the Most High :
there is a temple, one not made with
hands ; the vaulted firmament: far in the
woods, almost beyond the sound of city-
chime, at intervals heard through the
breezelessggir.

THE END.


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2. ee READING, ANP ELOCHWTION,
s . BYR. G. PARKER AND 5. MADISCN AY ATA any
Th: National School hie. . i PArkers Ractor: al Reader
The National First Reader, | Smiths Facentle Sefiner, |
Thé National Secend lieader. Smite. So wor School & hee, os |
4 Toe National Thitd Reader. : Smith's Oo foes Negi, eg | |
The National Fourth Readev, PWrichts Ate? we Ortho lag, . | Be
Therese ski = “ender, Day's Art af FE: ee t . |
dhe Nuvionai Pn sancing Speller. ; Nigh SeLoe. | iterdty
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2. ENG.1ISH GRAMMAR, RHETORIC, &c..

Claricser is, Leassns in Gr nmar, Willard’s: Morals.for (he ¥ouns.

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Clark’s Anabaiot the Ene Sh Language. | Boyd's Milton ‘ Parashise Lost,
Welds Anhy Si- of Che EX dish Mestenee. “Boyd 8 Pollok’s Coupee of Time,





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Lay ss APDer-k hecaric. : ‘1 Boyd's Youngs i Night Thoughts,
















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oe vieg? OW Users ei Riais. 98° Differential and Integral Jeivwlua






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ay ios U aiver:: a hie ba Tasidos,

bes, “ae c. HiSTCRY AND MYTHOLOGY, && a
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' ition’ ‘Prinvcipies of Chemistry. ¢ abs — Ane ae Grometrys, ee
eek. Elem nes of Mechanics, COMPO) a. t, naa eae, ne
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