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Anecdotes of the American Revolution

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Anecdotes of the American Revolution
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Anecdotes of the American Revolution

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ANECDOTES

OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION;

SELECTED FROM

GARDEN'S ANECDOTES, GORDON’S LETTERS,
NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS, MASSACHUSET?S
HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS, NEW YORK HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS
AMERICAN ANECDOTES, HISTORICAL ANECDOTES,

OTHER WORKS ON HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY.

HARTFORD:
PUBLISHED BY C. M. WELLES.
1850.



Entered, according to ‘Act of Congress, in the year 1844, by
ALEXANDER V. BLAKE,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern Distriet
of New York.

Stereotyped by
RICHARD C. VALENTINE,
4 Gold Street, New York



CONTENTS.



Preface, ° «6 Mgt, ° 7
Introduction,

Madame Shatswell and the Whig Committe, -

Spirit of the Yankee Boys, .
Generosity of John Hancock, . . .
Sergeant Smith and his White Horse, .
Escape of Plunket from the British,

The Surgeon and the Ghost,

Sympathy of Washington, °
A Mistake turned to a — Account, .
Gallantry of a Youn + 6
The Wounded British ry ° 3

Lamenting the loss of a Hat, : ° °

The Stuttering Colonel, . .
Fighting on my own hook, . 8
Honesty of Livingston, . + + +
An Uninvited Guest, . . . é .
Good Feelings of er 7
Sir Guy Carlton, : 7 8
Inhumanity of ee. er
Yankee Capt 5 oe ele
American om . 8
La Fayette and Cornwallis, ° ee e¢@
Wit of a Ni . .

Civility of ashington, .
Maternal Tenderness, . ° : ‘
A Mistake on Sunday, 8

Dr. Franklin in Congress, +s 8
Magnanimity of Baron De Steuben, . .
Patriotic School Boys, . . «© .
An Unnecessary Alarm, . « «© .
A Nobly Reply, oe eet
Washington at Prayer, * 6 6

The End of a Farce, ° 7 6
Attention to Orders, . ° ° ee
Prose Better than Poetry, . 38 (lt

.

RPLSLSSRALS EASELS SEER SESSSEKE SITS



4 CUNTENTS.

Ordinary Fare of Marion, .

Mr. John Edwards and Admiral ‘Arbuthnot,

The Poor Fisherman and his Schooner,

Patriotism of Bishop White,

Bishop White a Chaplain of Congress,

Dr. Franklin’s Almanac,

.

.

General Prescott and the Connecticut Succotash,

Providential Interpositions, . °
Death of the Baron De Kalb, .
Execution of Col. Haynes, . +
General Morgan, ° ° °
Powder and Balls, . ° ° .
How to save a Dinner, .
No Bayonets here, .«

Poverty of the American Army, .
Mr. Robert Morris, « ‘
General Gadsden at St. Augustine,
The Amputation of a — ’
First Prayer in Congres .

Lord Stining and the ne British Spy, .
Military Courtesy, .

The Brave Little Yankee, e .
An Inconvenient Wound, . e
The British Lion, . 8
The Stuttering Soldier, . + +
The American Sharp-shooters, .«
The Rebel Flower, . . « ‘
Rare Presence of Mind, .

The Chevalier Duplessis Mauduit, .
Defending an Enemy, « :
Mrs. Isaac Holmes, . .
The Frenchman = the Negro, .

Female Wit, . ‘

Mrs. Jacob Motte, . .
Mrs. Thomas Heyward, . .
A Rare Act of Public Munificence,
Courageous Young Woman, . -
Governor Clinton, ° .
Remarkable Incident,

The Tables Turned, .

Gallantry of the Gloucester Militia,
Hickory Clubs,



CONTENTS.

Col. Stark and the Clerical Soldier, .
of Col. Stark,
How to cheat a Highway Robber, .
Anecdotes of Sergeant Jasper, .

Sagacity and Coura;

Washington’s Retaliation,

.

The Gun that could fire all day, .

Barbarity of the Loyalists,

Female Patriotism,

The Home-made Soldier,

The British Officer and the Miller,

A Son of Erin preferring a Razor to his Rations, |
Lord Cornwallis’ oj — of Sumter,
ndians frightened,

St. Leger and the

An Incident of the Revolution,
Col. Brown and General —

Yankee Mistake,

The Mysterious Stranger,

George Roberts, .

Sees Sea Captain in London, , . °
Acknowledging a Fault, the mark of a great Mind
A Specimen of Hard Fighting,

Morgan at the Battle of the owpens
Humor of Patrick Henry, .

Effects of Tea, .
Death of Major Andre,
Nancy Hart, .
Harriet Ackland,

Running the Gauntlet for Stealing Tea,
Major Pitcairn at Lexington, .
Mrs. Burr and the burning of Fairfield,
Eloquence of Patrick _— °

Emily Geiger,
Captain Ross, :

.

.

Samuel Adams and American Independence, ,

Baron Steuben’s Wit,

The British Parliament and the Stamp Act
Repeal of the Stamp Act,

Royal Commission Torn to Pieces,
of Bunker Hill,

The First Martyr
General Seas | Figh
You can spare one
American General,

a Duel,

tter than two,

1*



6 CONTENTS.

Eeking forward to the Gallows, . oe "38
Patriotism of Gen. Nelson, ° ’ . 7 ; 209
Benedict Arnold, a Traitor, . . » » Q11
Generosity of an American Lieutenant, - « « 12
Colonel Small, . » 213
Benevolence of Colonel Wm. Washington, » « 14
Fidelity to an Enemy, ° . . . 214
Patriotism of Benjamin West, . * . e ° 215
The Runaways become Captors, . ee ee R16
The British afraid of a Logof Wood, . . « 217
An Example of Fortitude, - =. + + + + 217
Deception of Tarleton, . + + + «© *& 218
Col. Owen Roberts, . ‘ . > ° ‘ - 219
Mr. John Adams, .- . ‘ . s 220
Situation of the American Army, © ew RB
Meeting an Emergency, .- owe RRB
Religious Feeling of the Revolution, Ve. es 8k
General Putnam’s Entrance into the ae . «+ = 229
A Fable, by Samuel Adams, $ i . 230
Noble conduct of the Earl of Effingham, 6 «231
De Kalb’s aceount of his Family, - «+ + 232
General Marion’s Address to his Soldiers, . . 235
Rey. Thomas Allen, . .- 2 ew 237
An American Soldier, . . : . 7 ; 238
Benedict Arnold, the Traitor, « + + + + 239
Gen. Andrew Pickens, - . ‘ ‘ . ¢ 240
General Stuart, . . ’ . é . 243
La Fayette and an old Soldier, . ’ : . 244
Red Jacket, - ¢ ¢ ° ° . 245
The Retort Courteous, - . ° : ° . 246
The Best Road in America, . . 7 7 246
British Ingratitude, . . . : 247
Mrs. McKay and Colonel Brown, » 6 «+ 250
Yankee Indignation, . : . 251

Magnanimity of M. De Bouille, . . . 252



PREFACE.



Tue following Anecdotes were principally selected by
a youth of twelve years of age. Having had constant ac-
cess to 4 library well supplied with books on History and
Biography, he early acquired a taste for reading such
works ; and the present small volume is one of the results
of such an attention to this species of literature. The
selection was made at intervals between hours of devotion
to elementary and classical study ; and may hence be
viewed as having been rather an amusement, than a labor
of painful toil and research.

The utility of compilations like the present is too well
known to require particular commendation. They are
always read with avidity, if well made ; being usually
preferred to the most fascinating kinds of fiction; and
what is far more important, they are among the most
beneficial books to be found. They almost invariably cre-
ate a taste for reading history and biography. Good an-
ecdotes in these literary regions are analogous to the pre-
cious stones found in the bosom of the earth; which,
though sparsely scattered, will long be sought with the
most cheerful and untiring assiduity. A single case of
success may cheer on the fond and enthusiastic votary of
these deeply hid treasures, even for months, amidst noth
wg but the mere rubbish that contains them.

So it is with persons in reading history and biography



8 PREFACE.

they press forward, without apparent wearisomeness,
through the more dull and uninteresting details, that they
may here and there gather up these choice fragments.
Nor is this all; by successive gleanings of such frag-
ments, a desire will be created to examine the frames in
which the pictures are enclosed; in other words, to
know more of the characters of the individuals—and of
the times—and of the historical events with which they
are connected. It is believed, that the reading of a work
like the present, will usually lead young persons espe-
cially, to the study of larger and more systematic pro-
ductions on all kindred subjects.

And, it may be added, that the brief and sententious re-
mark, which commonly characterizes a good anecdote,
will furnish a better index to the distinctive peculiarities
of the individual that utters it, than a whole essay of dull
and didactic description ; it will cast a gleam of light on
all his mental delineations not to be found otherwise, save
in familiar personal acquaintance. This of itself would
give value to the present effort to benefit the public, suffi-
cient to balance all the labor it occasioned.

J. L. BLAKE,

New York, May 1, 1844.



INTRODUCTION.



Tue American Revolution should always be contem-
plated in reference to the great moral interests of the civil-
ized world. There are important analogies between the
physical and the social organizations of our globe. These
analogies may not at once be apparent, in all their relay
tions, to the superficial observer. But to the eye of the
philosopher, their delineations are deeply and distinctly
marked. They cannot be misapprehended; and they
give a satisfactory solution to phenomena, that wouls
otherwise remain inexplicable mysteries.

The remark has a thousand times been made, that to
human apprehension, the organizations of the world, both
physical and social, embrace a compound of good and
evil. The proportions appear to vary under different cir-
cumstances, and to the ken of different individuals, as
they may be severally constituted or predisposed. In
each, after a due course of operation, certain develop-
ments are the necessary result. From these develop-
ments the philosopher becomes confirmed in a faith that
he adopted as a matter of hypothesis; and from them
likewise the Christian becomes confirmed in his faith,
which had been received from Divine Revelation.

These observations are suggested as preliminary to a
very brief exposition of the moral results of the American



10 INTRODUCTION.

Revolution. Human warfare, especially in its more bar-
barous forms, is terrifying, even to the imagination. It
can be justified only by the necessity for it, and the con-
sequences flowing from its existence. We look upon it
in the abstract, as we do upon the most frightful convul-
sions of nature. Here the elements are thrown into vio-
lent agitation ; the earth inwardly moves as if in agony ;
the winds howl; the clouds blacken: the tempest rages ;
the lightning darts its flashes through the regions of
space ; we shrink back in terror at the threatening danger
and the overwhelming grandeur of the scene; but how
soon does all become quiet and beautiful! How soon
does the whole become an impressive lesson in making
known to us the wisdom and goodness of the Deity, be-
yond what could be known from the ordinary course of
nature !

How illustrative is this of what we witness in the dis-
orders of society! We cannot reflect upon human suf-
fering with an unmoved heart. The view of a slaughtered
army ; the dying groans of the wounded ; the tears and
distress of the wife made a widow, and the mother made
childless, in the progress of a civil war like that to which
we are alluding, does verily overpower the stoutest minds,
and cause a kind of paralysis to come over the social af-
fections. But we know, after all, these desolations are
usually succeeded by exhibitions of kindness and social
virtue, and general prosperity, that would not otherwise
have come into existence. Observation will satisfy every
one that such is the fact. And philosophy may teach us,
that amid all these evils a redeeming spirit will introduce



INTRODUCTION. 11

us toa more enlarged and exalted state of enjoyment.
This appears to be the governing law of the world.

Nor is this all. A more familiar, and still a more strik-
ing, illustration of the principle suggested, may be stated.
The tender mother may nurture her daughters in the most
delicate manner; may shudder at the idea of their becom-
ing removed from the maternal roof, and from maternal
assiduity and kindness, to encounter the frowns of adver-
sity which may lurk in their path; and especially to en-
dure the pains and the trials incident to womanhood. In
her paroxysms of fearful anxiety she may even be dis-
posed to restrain them within the reach of her affectionate
protection, thereby securing them against the liabilities
to personal suffering, and eare, and anguish, which she has
herself experienced. This isa case of no rare occurrence.
There is no fiction in the picture. We have seen the
reality hundreds of times.

But how ignorant is such a mother of the laws that
govern human existence! Her love is ardent and sincere ;
but her philosophy is unsound. Were her fond imagin-
ings, and her half-formed wishes to prevail, how imper-
fectly would these tender daughters subserve the great
purpose of their being !—society would lose many of its
most delightful charms; and the world itself could
scarcely maintain its accustomed routine of beneficent
existence. On the other hand, let them embark on the
broad theatre of life ; let them become mothers ; let them
exert their controlling and powerful influences upon the
_ other sex; let generation thus succeed generation, and

how much good is produced, compared with what would



12 INTRODUCTION.

be seen, were she, in her mistaken kindness, to have

thwarted the intentions of nature !

The indulgent father, too, may shudder at the idea of
permitting his favorite inexperienced boys to become the
victims of disappointment, and knavery, and insult, which
may befa]l them, should they plunge into the whirlpool of
business without his protection. But were his feelings,
and not his reason, to regulate their destiny, in vain

would he look for the enterprise and the vigorous capa- |
bilities in business that would crown them with success —

and honorable reputation, and to which the man of the

j

world bends all his efforts. Without this training and —

these hazards, that are generally the lot of young men
in the arena of the world’s turmoils, and which make
the kind father almost shudder, who would become pow-
erful by the exertions of his intellect? Who would ac-
cumulate wealth, and give employment and sustenance to
the laboring classes of the community? Who would
have the means to endow public institutions, and to make
glad the unfortunate poor by uncounted benefactions ?
Analogous to this is the case of our country, as con-
nected with the revolution. ‘The capabilities of a coun-
. try in a colonial state can no more be developed, than
physical and intellectual capabilities in man, while under
the restraints of parental tutelage, to which allusion has
been made. Had the American states remained in alle-
giance to the British government without resistance,
thousands and thousands of violent deaths might have
been prevented ; floods of tears might have had no occa-
sion to flow; countless numbers of bleeding and aching

i ar



INTRODUCTION. 13

hearts might never have been pierced; and there might
have been none of that general desolation now recorded
in the history of that memorable crisis. Yet, these were
the perils, and the agonies, that gave sinew, and strength
and greatness, and manhood to the country.

Had it not been for them, the population of the now
confederate states of the American Republic might not
have been one third what it now is. Had it not been
for them, the American Union would have been without
that national character which now commands respect and
reverence in every quarter of the globe. Had it not been
for them, that spirit of American enterprise that now
places the country, in national rank, and in fair competi-
tion for whatever is great and honorable and good, with
the mother country, would never have existed, The
American Revolution, therefore, may be considered one
of the great agencies of Providence for renovating the
condition of the world.

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ANECDOTES,

MADAME SHATSWELL AND THE WHIG COMMITTEE,

Ar the time of the war of the revolution, the
lady of the manor, Ipswich, Massachusetts,
was a descendant of Simon Bradstreet, one of
the early governors of the province, whom
Mather calls the “Nestor of New England.”
Her husband was a stanch whig, a leader of
one of the classes into which the town was
divided ; and though the good lady coincided
fully in his political sentiments, she did not
much like the infringement upon domestic lux-
uries which many of the patriotic resolutions
of the meetings contemplated.

In short, Madame Shatswell loved her cup
of tea, and as a large store had been provided
for family use before the tax, she saw no harm
in using it as usual upon the table. There
were in those days, as there are now, certain
busybodies who kindly take upon themselves
the oversight of their neighbors’ affairs, and
through them the news of the treason spread
over the town. A committee from the people
immediately called at the house to protest



16 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

against the drinking of tea. Some months pass-
ed away, and one sabbath, Madame Shats-
well’s daughter, a bright-eyed, coquettish dam-
sel, appeared at church in a new bonnet.
This was a new. cause of excitement, and the
committee came again to administer reproof.

The lady satisfied them again, however:
and they, finding that the hat contained no
treason to the people’s cause, again departed.
Two years of the war had now passed away,
and meanwhile the daughter, Seonatin had
found a lover. It was the beginning of win-
ter; the army had just gone into winter quar-
ters; and the young suitor was daily expect-
edhome. Wishing to appear well in his eyes,
the maiden had spun and woven with her
own hands a new linen dress, from flax raised
upon the homestead; and some old ribands
long laid aside, having been washed and iron-
ed to trim it withal, the damsel appeared in it
at church the Sunday after her lover's arrival.
Here was fresh cause of alarm, and forthwith
on Monday morning came the officious com-
mittee, to remonstrate against the extrava-
gance.

The old lady’s spirit was now aroused, and
she could contain herself no longer. “ Do
you come here,’ was her well-remembered
reply—*“ do you come here to take me to task
because my daughter wore a gown she spun —
and wove with her own hands? Three times —
have you interfered with my family affairs. —



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 17

Three times have you come to tell me that my
husband would be turned out of his office.
Now mark me! There is the door! As you
came in, so you may go out! But if you ever
cross my threshold again, you shall find that
calling Hannah Bradstreet a tory, will not
make her a coward!” It is needless to add
that Madame Shatswell’s family affairs were
thereafter left to her own guidance.

——_—_

SPIRIT OF THE YANKEE BOYS.

The British troops which were sent to Bos-
ton, to keep that rebellious town in order, were
everywhere received with the most unequiv-
ocal marks of anger and detestation. During
their stay “the very air seemed filled with
suppressed breathings of indignation.”

“The insolence and indiscretion of some
subaltern officers increased the ill-will of the
citizens; and vexations and quarrels multi-
plied daily.” At this period of public exaspera-
tion, the boys were much in the habit of build-
ing hills of snow, and sliding from them to the
pond in the Common. The English troops,
from the mere love of tantalizing, destroyed
all their labors. They complained of the in-
jury, and industriously set about repairs.
However, when they returned from school,
they found the snow hills again levelled.

2



18 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

Several of them now waited upon the Brit-
ish captain to inform him of the misconduct
of his soldiers. No notice was taken of their
complaint, and the soldiers every day grew
more provokingly insolent. At last, they re-
solved to call a meeting of all the largest
boys in town, and wait upon General Gage,
commander-in-chief of the British forces.

When shown into his presence, he asked, with
some surprise, why so many children had call-—
ed tosee him. “ We come, sir,” said the fore-

most of them, “to claim a redress of griev-
ances.”

“What, have your fathers been teaching
you rebellion, and sent you here to utter it ?”
“ Nobody sent us, sir,” replied the speaker,
while his cheek reddened, and his dark eye
flashed: “we have never injured or insulted
your troops ; but they have trodden down our
snow-hills, and broken the ice on our skating
ground. We complained, and they called us
young rebels, and told us to help ourselves, if
we could. We told the captain of this, and
he laughed at us.

“ Yesterday our works were a third time de-
stroyed ; and now we will bear it no longer.”
General Gage looked at them with undisguis-

ed admiration, and turning to an officer who —

stood near him, he exclaimed, “ Good heavens!
the very children draw in a love of liberty



with the air they breathe”’—and added, “ You —

may go, my brave boys; and be assured that



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 19

if any of my troops hereafter molest you, they
shall be severely punished.”



GENEROSITY OF JOHN HANCOCK.

During the siege at Boston, General Wash-
ington consulted Congress upon the propriety
of bombarding the town of Boston. r. Han-
cock was then President of Congress. After
General Washington’s letter was read, a sol-
emn silence ensued. This was broken by a
member making a motion that the House
should resolve itself into a committee of the
whole, in order that Mr. Hancock might give
his opinion upon the important subject, as he
was deeply interested from having all his es-
tate in Boston. After he left the chair, he
addressed the chairman of the committee of
the whole, in the following words. “It is
true, sir, nearly all the pro I have in the
world is in houses and other in the
town of Boston; but if the e _ of the
British army from it, and the liberties of our
country require their being burnt to ashes—is-
sue the order for that purpose immediately |”







SERGEANT SMITH AND HIS WHITE HORSE.

At the very first exhibition of American
courage, which proved so fatal to the Britisk



20 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

troops in their excursion to Lexington and
Concord, Sergeant Smith showed himself a
skilful marksman. Learning from rumor,
which seemed to have spread that night with
a speed almost miraculous, the destination of
the detachment, he arose from his bed, equip-
ped himself with cartridges and a famous rifle
he had used at Lovell’s fight at Fryeburg, sad-
dled his horse, and started for Lexington meet-
ing-house. Meeting with a variety of hin-
derances, and twice escaping narrowly from
some straggling parties of the red-coats, it
was late when he arrived on the ground, and |
the troops were already on their rapid retreat
towards Boston.

Learning that the people were all abroad,
lining the fences and the woods to keep up
the fire upon the enemy, he started in pursuit,
and in the course of a few miles, on riding up
a hill, he found the detachment just before
him. Throwingythe reins upon his horse, and
starting hi ull speed, he rode within a
close alae and fired at one of the leading
officers. e officer fell; and the sergeant,
retreating to a safe distance, loaded his rifle
again, and again rode up and fired, with equal
success. He pursued the same course a third
time, when the leader of the retreating body
ordered a platoon to fire at him.

It was unavailing, however; and a fourth,
fifth, and sixth time, the old rifle had picked off
its man, while its owner retreated in safety,



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 21

‘D—n the man !” exclaimed the officer, “ give
me a musket, and I'll see if he bears a charm-
ed life, if he comes in sight again.” It was
but a moment, and again the old white horse
came over the brow of a hill. The officer
fired, but in vain; before the smoke of his
charge had cleared away, he too had fallen
before the unerring marksman, and was left
behind by his flying troops.

When the day had closed, the wounded
were collected by the neighbors upon the
road, and every kindness rendered to them.
The officer was not dead, and on being laid
upon a bed where his wounds could be exam-
ined, his first question, even under the appre-
hension of immediate death, was, “ Who was
that old fellow on the white horse !”

ESCAPE OF PLUNKETT FROM ~~

Captain Plunkett, a high-spirited Irishman,
whose attachment to the cause of liberty had
led‘him to seek a commission in the continen-
tal army, had, by the chances of war, been
compelled to give up his sword, and to sur-
render himself a prisoner to the enemy. Pre-
viously to this untoward event, by the suavity
of his manners, and uniformly correct conduct,
he had rendered himself an acceptable guest



-
22 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

in many families in Philadelphia, and particu-
larly so, to one of the Society of Friends, who,
however averse to warfare, were not insensi-
ble of the claims of those to their regard, who,
by the exercise of manly and generous feel-
ings, delighted to soften its asperities.

There was among them a female, mild and
gentle as a dove, yet, in firmness of mind, a
heroine, and in personal charms, an angel.
She saw the sufferings of the captive soldier,
and under the influence of pity, or perhaps a
more powerful passion, resolved, at all haz-
ards, to relieve him.’ It accidentally happen-
ed that the uniform of Captain Plunkett's
regiment bore a striking resemblance to that
of a British corps, which was frequently set
as a guard over the prison in which he was
confined. A new suit of regimentals was
in consequence procured and conveyed, with-
out suspicion of sinister design, to the Cap-
tain.

On the judicious use of these rested the
hopes of the dair Friend to give him freedom.
It frequently happened that officers of inferior
grade, while their superiors affected to shun
all intercourse with rebels, would enter the
apartments of the prisoners, and converse
with them with kindness and familiarity, and
then at their pleasure retire, Two sentinels
constantly walked the rounds without, and
the practice of seeing their officers walking
in and out of the interior prison, became so



s
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 23

familiar, as scarcely to attract notice, and
constantly caused them to give way without
hesitation, as often as an officer showed a dis-
position to retire. .

Captain Plunkett took advantage of this
circumstance, and putting on his new coat,
at the moment that the relief of the guard
was taking place, sallied forth, twirling a
switch carelessly about, and ordering the ex-
terior door of the prison to be opened, walked
without opposition into the street. Repairing
without delay to the habitation of his fair
friend, he was received with kindness, and
for some days secreted and cherished with
every manifestation of affectionate regard.
To elude the vigilance of the British guards,
if he attempted to pass into the country
in his present dress, was deemed impossi-
ble.

Woman’s wit, however, is never at a loss
for contrivances, while swayed by the influ-
ences of love or benevolence. Both, in this
instance, may have aided invention. Plunkett
had three strong claims in his favor: he was
a handsome man—a soldier—and an Irish-
man. The general propensity of the Qua-
kers in favor of the royal cause, exempted
the sect in a great measure from suspicion ; in
so great a degree indeed, that the barriers of
the city were generally intrusted to the care
of their members, as the best judges of the
characters of those persons that might be al-



*
24 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

lowed to pass them, without injury to the
British interests.

A female Friend, of low origin, officiating
as a servant on a farm near the city, was in
the family, on a visit to a relative. A pretext
was formed to present her with a new suit of
clothes, in order to possess that which she
wore when she entered the city. Captain
Plunkett was immediately disguised as a wo-
man, and appeared at the barrier accompanied
by his anxious deliverer. “ Friend Roberts,”
said the enterprising enthusiast, “may this
damsel and myself pass to visit a friend at a
neighboring farm?” “Certainly,” said Rob-
erts, “go forward.” The city was speedily —
left behind, and Capt. Plunkett found himself
safe, under the protection of Colonel Allen
M’Lean, his particular friend.



THE SURGEON AND THE GHOST.

A circumstance occurred during the encamp--
ment of General Lincoln at Perrysburg, that
from its singularity deserves to be recorded.
A soldier named Fickling, by the irregularity
of his conduct, long excited the indignation of
his comrades, and, at length, from repeated —
efforts to escape to the enemy, had been —
brought to trial, and condemned to death. It
happened that, as he was led to execution, the



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 25

surgeon-general of the army passed accident-
ally on his, way to his quarters, which were at
some distance off. On being tied up to the
fatal tree, the removal of the ladder caused
the rope to break, and the culprit fell to the
ground.

This circumstance, to a man of better char-
acter, might have proved of advantage ; but,
being universally considered as a miscreant,
from whom no good could ever be expected
a new rope was sought for, which Lieuten-
ant Hamilton, the adjutant of the First Regi-
ment, a stout and heavy man, essayed by
every means, but without effect, to break.
Fickling was then haltered, and again turned
off, when, to the astonishment of the bystand-
ers, the rope untwisted, and he fell a second
time, uninjured, to the ground. A cry for
mercy was now general throughout the ranks,
which occasioned Major Ladson, aid-de-camp
to General Lincoln, to gallop to head-quar-
ters, to make a representation of facts, which
no sooner were stated, than an immediate par-
don was granted, accompanied with the order
that he should instantaneously be drummed,
with every mark of infamy, out of camp, and
threatened with instant death if ever he
should, at any future time, be found attempt-
ing to approach it.

In the interim, the surgeon-general had es-
tablished himself at his quarters, in a distant
barn, little doubting but that the catastrophe

3



26 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.



was at an end, and that Fickling was quietl
resting in the grave. Midnight was at han
and he was busily engaged in writing, when,
hearing the approach of a footstep, he raised
his eyes, and saw with astonishment the figure
of the man who had, in his opinion, been ex-
ecuted, slowly and with haggard countenance
approaching towards him.
“How! how is this?” exclaimed the doctor,
in great terror. “ Whence come you? What
do you want with me? Were you not hanged
this morning ?” “ Yes, sir,” replied the resusci-
tated man, “I am the wretch you saw going
to the gallows, and who was hanged.” “Keep —
your distance,” said the doctor, “ approach
me not till you say ne 2 ay come here ?” |
“Simply, sir, to solicit food. I am no ghost,
doctor. The rope broke twice while the
executioner was doing his office, and the
general thought proper to pardon me.” “If
that be the case,” rejoined the doctor, “ eat
and welcome ; but I beg of you, in future, to
have a little more consideration, and not in-
trude so unceremoniously into the apartment
of one who had every reason to suppose that —
you were an inhabitant of the tomb.”



SYMPATHY OF WASHINGTON.

General Washington one day stopping for
refreshment at a house in New Jersey, in





ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 27

which a wounded officer lay, who was sensi-
bly agitated by the slightest noise, constantly
spoke in an under tone of voice, and at the
table, in every movement, evinced marked
consideration for the sufferer. Retiring to
another apartment at the conclusion of the
meal, the gentlemen of his family, unrestrain-
ed by his presence, were less particular.
They spoke in higher tones; when the gener-
al, who heard them with uneasiness, immedi-
ately returning, opened the door with great
caution, and walking on tip-toe to the extrem-
ity of the apartment, took a book from the
mantel-piece, and, without uttering a word,
again retired.

The gentlemen took the hint, so respectfully
given, and silence ensued. This anecdote
serves to relate, not only in this particular in-
cident, but in every case, the sympathy mani-
fested by the Father of his country ar any
individual was suffering from pain. He was
considerate, affectionate, and kind, to the poor
man as well as to the rich ; his purse was ever
open to the needy ; forgiving, but firm, and a
lover of justice ; such was Washington.

A MISTAKE TURNED TO A GOOD ACCOUNT.

Some time previous to the evacuation of
Charlestown, Colonel Menzies, of the Penn



28 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.





sylvania line, received a letter from a Hes.
sian officer within the garrison, who had once
been a prisoner, and treated by him with
kindness, expressing an earnest desire to show
his gratitude, by executing any commission
with which he would please to honor him.
Colonel Menzies replied to it, requesting him
to send him twelve dozen cigars ; but, being a
German by birth, and little accustomed to ex-
press himself in English, he was not very ac-
curate in his orthography, and wrote sizars.
«T'was no sooner said than done ;” twelve
dozen pairs of scissors were accordingly sent
him, which, for a time, occasioned much mer-
riment in the camp, at the expense of the
Colonel, but no man knew better how to profit
from the mistake. Money was not at the
period in circulation; and by the aid of his
runner, distributing his scissors over the coun.
try, in exchange for poultry, Menzies lived
luxuriously, while the fare of his brother offi.
cers was a scanty pittance of famished beef,
bull-frogs from ponds, and cray-fish from the
neighboring ditches.



GALLANTRY OF A YOUNG BOY.

When Captain Falls, at the battle of Ram-
sours mill, received a mortal wound and fell,
his son, a youth of fourteen, rushed to the



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 29

body, as the man who had shot him was pre-
paring to plunder it; regardless of his Eee
nent’s strength, the intrepid youth, snate

up his father’s sword, plunged it into the
breast of the soldier, and laid him dead at his
feet.



THE WOUNDED BRITISH OFFICER.

During the action at Stono, Lieutenant
Parham, the adjutant of the light infantry, was
stationed by Major Pinckney in the rear of
the continentals, purposely to keep the men
in their stations, and prevent the possibility
of skulkers falling behind. As he passed
over the field of battle, a British officer, des-
perately wounded, pressed him so earnestly
to afford. him a drink of water, to slake con-
suming thirst, that to refuse was deemed im-
possible, and the request was complied with.

The British officer now presenting an ele-
gant watch, said,—* Take it, sir, ’tis yours by
conquest ; your generous procedure, too, gives
you still greater title to it.” “I came into
the field,” said Parham, “to fight, and not to
plunder ; it gives me pleasure to have render-
ed you service: I ask no other recompense.”
“Keep it for me then, in trust,” rejoined the
officer, “till we meet again, for if left in my
hands, it may be wrested from me by some

3



30 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

marauder, who, to secure silence, may inflict
death.” “1 will accede to your wishes, and
take charge of it,” said Parham, “ but, as soon
as an opportunity occurs, I will consider it a
sacred duty to return it.”

A very considerable period elapsed before a
second meeting took place ; but, in strict con-
formity to his honorable feeling and volun-
tary promise, Parham no sooner found himself
within reach of the man to whom he had
pledged the restitution of his property, than

e waited upon him, presented the watch,
and was greeted with an expression of grate-
ful commendation, that amply rewarded his
correct and liberal conduct.




—_—_—

LAMENTING THE LOSS OF A HAT,

At the battle of Eutaw, when General
Marion’s brigade was displaying in face of
the enemy, Captain Gee, who commanded the
front platoon, was shot down, and supposed
to be mortally wounded. The ball passed —
through the cock of a handsome hat that he
had recently procured, tearing the crown ve
“much, and, in its progress, the head also. He
lay for a considerable time insensible ; the
greater part of the day had passed without a—
favorable symptom ; when, suddenly reviving,
his first inquiry was after his beaver, which



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 31

being brought him, a friend at the same time
lamenting the mangled state of his head, he
exclaimed—* O never think of the head ; time
and the doctor will put that to rights; but it
grieves me to think that the rascals have
ruined my hat forever.”



THE STUTTERING COLONEL.

Colonel Peter Horry was a descendant of
one of the many Protestant families who re-
moved to Carolina from France, after the
revocation of the edict of Nantz. He early
took up arms in defence of his country, and
through all the trials of peril and privation,
experienced by Marion’s brigade, gave ample
proof of his strict integrity and undaunted
courage. The fame which he acquired, as one
of the band of heroes who defended the post
at Sullivan’s Island, was never tarnished.
For, although in a moment of despondency he
once said to his general—*I fear our happy
days are all gone by ;” it was not the conse-
quences that might accrue to himself, but the
miseries apprehended for his country, that
caused the exclamation, for never were his
principles shaken—never, even for a moment,
did the thought of submission enter his bo-
som.

No man more eagerly sought the foe ; none



32 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

braved danger with greater intrepidity, or
more strenuously endeavored to sustain the
military reputation of his country. A ludi-
crous story is told of him, that, thoug:. prob-
ably varied in the narration, has its founda-
tion in truth. Colonel Horry was once or-.
dered to wait the approach of a British de-
tachment in ambuscade; a service he per-
formed with such skill, that he had them
completely within his power; when, from a
dreadful impediment in his speech, by which
he was afflicted, he could not articulate the
word—* fire.” In vain he made the attempt
—it was, “fi, fi, fi, fi,’—but he could get no
further. At length, irritated almost to mad-
ness, he exelaimed—*Shoot, d—n you—shoot,
—you know very well what I would say,—
shoot, shoot— ;” accompanying the words with —
an oath.

He was present in every engagement of
consequence, and on all occasions increased —
his reputation. At Quimby, Colonel Baxter,
a gallant soldier, possessed of great coolness,
and still greater simplicity of character, call-
ing out, “I am wounded, colonel!” Horry re-
plied—* Think no more of it, Baxter, but
stand to your post.” “But I can’t stand,
colonel—I am wounded a second time!”
“Then lie down, Baxter, but quit not your

.” “Colonel,” cried the wounded man,
“they have shot me again, and if I remain
any longer here, I shall be shot to pieces.”



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 33

“Be it so, Baxter, but stir not.” He obeyed
the order, and actually received a fourth
wound before the engagement ended.



“ FIGHTING ON MY OWN HOOK.”

At the battle of Yorktown, while the aids
of the American chief were issuing his orders
along the line, a man was discovered a short
distance from it, who presented rather a gro-
tesque appearance, being dressed in the coarse
common cloth worn at the time by the lower
orders in the back country, with an otter-cap,
the shape of which very much resembled the
steeple of a meeting-house, and a broad lea-
ther apron. His equipments consisted of a
small woodchuck’s skin, sewed together in the
form of a bag, and partly filled with powder,
and an old rusty gun, which meas about
seven feet eight inches from the muzzle to
the end of the breech, and which had probably
lain in the smoke ever since the landing of
the pilgrims.

One of the aids passing him in the course
of his rounds, inquired of him to what regi-
ment he belonged. “I belong to no regi-
ment,” said the fellow, after he had fired his
“long carbine.” A few moments after the
officer rode by again; but seeing the fellow
very busy, and sweating with exertion, he



34 ANECDOTES OF THE, REVOLUTION.

once more inquired to what regiment he be-
longed. “To no regiment,” was the answer;
the speaker at the same time levelled his piece
at a “red-coat,” who was preparing to fire,
but who dropped dead before he had half rais-
ed his gun. “To what company do you be-
long ?”—* To no company.”—* To what bat-
talion do you belong ?”—* To no battalion.”—
“Then where the d——1 do you belong, or
whom are you fighting for ?”—* Dang ye,” said
the fellow, “I don’t belong anywhere, J am
Sighting on my own hook !”

HONESTY OF LEVINGSTONE.

A soldier of General Marion’s brigade,
named Levingstone, an Irishman by birth,
meeting with an armed party, on a night
profoundly dark, suddenly found a horseman’s
pistol applied to his breast, and heard the im-
perious command—* Declare, instantaneous-
ly, to what party you belong, or you are a
dead man.” ‘The situation being such as to
render it highly probable that it might be a —
British party, he very calmly replied, “I think, —
sir, it would be a little more in the way'of —
civility if you were to drop a hint, just to let —
me know which side of the question you are —
pleased to favor.” “No jestirig,” replied the
speaker, “declare your principles, or die.”



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 35

“ Then ” rejoined Levingstone, “I will not
die with a lie in my mouth. American, to
extremity, you spalpeen; so do your worst,
and —— to you.” “You are an honest -fel-
low,” said the inquirer: “ we are friends, and
I rejoice to meet a man faithful'as you are
to the cause of our country.” .



AN UNINVITED GUEST.

During the siege of Yorktown, Baron de
Steuben, giving a breakfast to several of the
field-officers of the army, in the course of the
entertainment, while festivity was at its
height, and in anticipation of the honors
which await@d them, mirth and good-humor
abounded, a shell from the enemy fell into the
centre of the circle formed by his guests.
There was no time for retreat; to fall pros-
trate on the earth afforded the only chance
of escape. Every individual stretched himself
at his length. The shell burst with tremendous
explosion, covering the whole party with mud
and. dirt, which proved rather a source of
merriment than serious concern, since none
of the party sustained any further inconveni-
ence.



36 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

GOOD FEELINGS OF WASHINGTON.

Washington was never known to injure
intentionally the feelings of any person, no
matter whether his friend or his most hostile
enemy. In illustration of this trait, an inci-
dent may be related, referring to the surren-
der at Yektean, While the continental
troops were preparing to receive the British,
who were to march forth from the garrison, and
deliver up their arms, Washington was heard
to remark to the troops—* My brave fellows,
let no sensation of satisfaction for the tri-
umphs you have gained, induce you to insult
your fallen enemy—let no shouting, no clam-
orous huzzaing increase their, mortification. ©
It is sufficient satisfaction to us, that we wit- _
ness their humiliation. Posterity will huzza
for us.”



SIR GUY CARLETON.

While the gallant defence of Quebec, by
General Carleton, evinced the excellence of
his military talents, and his liberal treatment
of the vanquished did honor to his humanity,
particular credit is due to him, for his skilful
management even of the prejudices of the
trooy s under his command. Apprehending,



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 37

during the protracted siege, that the return of
St. Patrick’s Day would occasion the soldiers
of the garrison, chiefly Irishmen, to indulge
too freely in generous libations to the memo
of the patron saint of Erin; and that his vigi-
lant adversary would profit by their intemper-
ance to attack the town; in orders, issued on
the 16th of March, he invited “ all true Irish-
men to meet him on the following day, at 12
o’clock, on parade, to drink the health of the
king, St. Patrick’s Day being, for that year
only, put off till the 4th of June.” An Irish.
man himself, and highly honored by all who
served under him, his proposition was applaud-
ed, and perfect sobriety reigned where, ac-
cording to all former experience, riot and dis-
order alone were to be looked for.



INHUMANITY OF TARLETON.

From the vicinity of Rocky Mount, an al-
most beardless youth, of the name of Wade,
was seduced to enrol himself in the ranks of
Tarleton’s Legion. Repentance quickly fol-
lowed his departure from duty; and he de-
serted with the hope of rejoining his family
and friends. Fate forbade it. He was taken,
tried, and sentenced to receive A THOUSAND
Lasues. It is scarcely necessary to relate the
sequel. He expired under the infliction of the
punishment !

4



38 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

YANKEE CAPTAIN.

Till the last hour that the British kept posses-
sion of New York, independent of custom-house
forms, they obliged the captains of American
vessels, bringing in articles for sale, to dance
attendance, in many instances, for days toge-
ther, seeking passports, to prevent detention
by the guard-ships. An unfortunate Yankee
who had sold his notions, and was impatient
to depart, having been repeatedly put off
with frivolous excuses, and bid to “ call again,”
indignantly exclaimed, “ Well, I vow, for a beat-
en people, you are the most saucy that I ever
met with.” “Make out that fellow’s passport
immediately,” said the superintendent to an
officiating clerk, “ and get rid of him.”



AMERICAN AIR-GUNS.

Some British officers, soon after Gage’s arri-
val in Boston, walking on Beacon Hill after

sunset, were affrighted by noises in the air,
’ (supposed to be flying bugs and _beetles,)
which they took to be the sound of bullets.
They left the hill with great precipitation,
spread the alarm in their encampment, and
wrote terrible accounts to England of being
shot at with air-guns, as appe=ed by their



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 39

letters, extracts of which were soon after pub-
lished in London papers. Indeed, for some
time they really believed that the Americans
possessed a kind of magic white powder,
which exploded and killed without a report.
In that much celebrated and admirable

poem of the day, M’Fingal, the circumstance
is thus satirized :

No more the British colonel runs

From whizzing beetles as air guns ;

Thinks horn-bugs, bullets, or thro’ fears

Moschetoes takes for musketeers :

Nor ’scapes, as if you’d gained supplies

From Beelzebub’s whole host of flies.

No bug these warlike hearts appals ;

They better know the sound of balls.



LA FAYETTE AND CORNWALLIS.

For some months previous to the capture
of Cornwallis, and while his army were tra-
versing the Carolinas and Virginia, he was
opposed by the Marquis de La Fayette, with
an inferior force. So confident was he of sue-
cess, and so much did he despise the extreme
youth of La Fayette, that he unguardedly
wrote, in a letter, which was afterwards in-
tercepted, “ The boy cannot escape me.”

He once formed the plan of surprising the
Marquis, who was on the same side of James
river with himself; but was prevented by the
f4u wing incident. General Z Fayette, wish-



40 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

ing to ascertain the particular situation of his
opponent, contrived to send a spy into his
camp to obtain intelligence. Having reached
the British camp, the spy was soon introduced
to his lordship, who inquired the reason of
his deserting the American army. Charles
Morgan artfully replied, “I have been in the
continental service from the beginning ; and
while under Washington, | was well satis-
fied ; but being now commanded by a French-
man, I am dissatisfied, and have quitted their
service.”

Lord Cornwallis commended his conduct ;
and Charley, without suspicion, entered upon
the double duties of an English soldier and an
American spy. While in conversation with
his officers, Lord Cornwallis asked Charley
how long it would take the Marquis to cross
James river. Pausing a moment, he replied,
“Three hours, my lord.” “Three hours!”
exclaimed his lordship—* it will take three
days.” “No, my lord,” said Charley, “the
Marquis has such a number of boats, and
each boat will carry so many men. If you
will please to calculate, you will find that he
can cross in three hours.” His lordship,
turning to his officers, said, “ The scheme will
not do.”

After obtaining the necessary information,
Morgan prepared to return to the American
camp; and he prevailed on seven British sol
diers to desert with him.






ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 41

“ Well, Charley, have you got back ?” said
the Marquis, when he returned to head-quar-
ters.

“ Yes, please your Excellency ; and I have
brought seven men with me.”

The Major-general offered to reward him,
but he refused money ; and when it was pro-
posed to promote him to the rank of sergeant,
or corporal, he replied, “I have ability to dis-
charge the duties of a common soldier, and
my character stands fair ; but should I be pro-
moted, I may fail and lose my reputation.”
He, however, requested that his destitute
comrades, who came with him, might be fur-
nished with shoes and clothing ; which was
very readily complied with.

WIT OF A NEGRO.

When the Count D’Estaing’s fleet appeared
near the British batteries, in the harbor of
Rhode Island, a severe cannonade was com-
menced, and several shot passed through the
houses in town, and occasioned great conster-
nation among the inhabitants. A shot passed
through the door of Mrs. Mason’s house just
above the floor. The family were alarmed,
not knowing where to flee for safety. A ne-
gro man ran and sat himself down very com-
posedly, with his back against the shot-hole

4*



42 | ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

in the door; and being asked by young Mr,
Mason why he chose that situation, he replied,
“ Massa, you never know two bullet go in one
place.”

CIVILITY OF WASHINGTON.

At the commencement of the revolutionary
war, there lived at East Windsor a farmer of
the name of Jacob Munsell, aged forty-five
years. After the communication by water be-
tween that part of the country and Boston was
interrupted, by the possession of Boston harbor
by the British fleet, Munsell was often employ-
ed to transport provisions by land, to our army
lying in the neighborhood of Boston. In the
summer of 1775, while thus employed, he ar-
rived within a few miles of the camp, at Cam-
bridge, with a large load, drawn by a stout ox
team. In a part of the road which was
somewhat rough, and where the travelled
pathway was narrow, he met two carriages,
in each of which was an American general
officer. The officer in the forward carriage,
when near to Munsell, put hi*head out of the
window, and called to him in an authoritative
tone—* D—n you, get out of the path.” Mun-
sell immediately retorted—* D—n you, 1 wont
get out of the path—get out yourself.” After
some vain attempts to prevail on Munsell to



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 43

turn out, thé officer’s carriage turned out, and
Munsell kept the path. The other carriage
immediately came up, having been within
hearing distance of what had passed ; and the
officer within it put his head out of the win-
dow, and said to Munsell—* My friend, the
road is bad, and it is very difficult for me to
turn out; will you be so good as to turn out
and let me pass?” “ With all my heart, sir,”
said Munsell; “but I wont be d—d out of the

ath by man.” ‘This last officer was General

ashington.

MATERNAL TENDERNESS.

The superiority to all selfish consideration
which characterizes maternal tenderness, has
often elevated the conduct of women in low
life, and perhaps never appeared more admi-
rable than in the wife of a soldier of the 55th
regiment, in America, during the campaign
of 1777. Sitting in a tent with her husband
at breakfast, a bomb entered, and fell between
them and a bed where their infant lay asleep.
The mother begged her spouse would go
around the bomb, before it exploded, and take
away the child, as his dress would allow him
to pass the narrow space between the dread-
ful messenger of destruction and the bed.

He refused, and left the tent, calling to his



44 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

wife to hasten away, as in less than a min- |

ute the fuse would communicate to the great
combustibles. The poor woman, absorbing
all care in anxiety to save her child, tucked
up her garments to guard against touching
the bomb, snatched the unconscious innocent,
and was hardly out of reach, when all the
murderous materials were scattered around.
Major C , of the 55th regiment, hearing
of this action, distinguished the heroine with
every mark of favor. She survived many
years to lament his fate at Fort Montgomery,
in the following month of October.



A MISTAKE ON SUNDAY.

The Rev. Mr. Parker, of Provincetown, had
been for years in the habit of praying for the
British government ; but at the eventful peri-
od of the American revolutiofi, he, together
with most other clergymen of that time, was
zealously opposed to the oppressive measures
of England ; however, by a strange absence
of mind, he, one Sabbath, long after America
had been declared independent, continued his
usual prayer, “ We beseech thee to bless the
king, the queen, and all the royal family,”
—then pausing, with evident a
and vexation, he added, “Pshaw! pshaw ! it
was the continental congress I meant.”

arrassment |



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 45

DR. FRANKLIN IN CONGRESS.

When the Declaration of Independence was
under the consideration of Congress, there
were two or three unlucky expressions in it,
which gave offence to some members. The
words “ Scotch and other auxiliaries,” excited
the ire of a gentleman or two of that country.
Severe strictures on the conduct of the British
king, in negativing our repeated repeals of
the law which permitted the importation of
slaves, were disapproved by some southern
gentlemen, whose reflections were not yet ma-
tured to the full abhorrence of that traffic.
Although the offensive expressions were im-
mediately yielded, those gentlemen continued
their depredations on other parts of the in-
strument. I was sitting by Dr. Franklin,
who perceived that 1 was not insensible to
the mutilations.

“| have made it a rule,” said he, “ when-
ever it is in my power, to avoid becoming the
draughtsman of papers to be reviewed by a
public body. I took my lesson from an inci-
dent which I will relate to you. When I was
a journeyman printer, one of my companions,
an apprentice hatter, having served his time,
was about to open shop for himself. His first
concern was to have a handsome signboard,
with a proper inscription. He composed it
in these words:— John Thompson, Hatter,



46 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

makes and sells hats for ready money,’ with the
figure of a hat subjoined. But he thought he
would submit it to his friends for their amend
ments. The first he showed it to, thought the.
word ‘ hatter’ tautologous, because followed by
the words ‘ makes hats,’ which showed he was
a hatter.—It was struck out. The next observ-
ed that the word ‘makes’ might as well be
omitted, because his customers would not care
who made the hats ;—if good and to their
mind, they would buy, by whomsoever made.
He struck it out. A third said he thought the
words ‘for ready money’ were useless, as it
was not the custom of the place to sell on
credit—every one who purchased expected to
pay. They were parted with, and the inscrip-
tion now stood, ‘John Thompson sells hats,’
Sells hats? says his next friend ; why, nobody
will expect you to give them away. What
then is the use of that word? It was stricken
out, and ‘hats’ followed it, the rather as there
was ome painted on the board; so his inscrip-
tion was reduced ultimately to ‘ John Thomp-
son,’ with the figure of a hat subjoined.”

MAGNANIMITY OF BARON DE STEUBEN.

After the capture at Yorktown, the superi-
or officers of the American army, together with
their allies, vied with each other in acts of



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 47

civility and attention to the captive Britons.
Entertainments were given by all the major-
generals, except Baron Steuben. He was
aboye prejudice or meanness; but poverty
prevented him from displaying that liberality
towards them, which had been shown by
others. Such was his situation, when. calling
on Colonel Stewart, and informing him of his
intention to entertain Lord Cornwallis, he re-
quested that he would advance him a sum of
money as the price of his favorite charger.
“Tis a good beast,” said the Baron, “ and has
proved a faithful servant through all the dan-
gers of the war; but, though painful to my
heart, we must part.” Colonel Stewart im-
mediately tendered his purse, recommending
the sale or pledge of his watch, should the
sum it contained prove insufficient. “My
dear friend,” replied the Baron, “’tis already
sold. Poor North was sick, and wanted ne-
cessaries. He is a brave fellow, and pos-
sesses the best of hearts. The trifle it
brought is set apart for his use. My horse
must go; so no more, 1 beseech you, to turn
me from my purpose. I am a major-general
in the service of the United States; and my
private convenience must not be put in a
scale with the duty which my rank imperious-
ly calls upon.me to perform.”



48 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

PATRIOTIC SCHOOL BOYS.

In November, 1776, the General Court or-
dered four brass cannon to be purchased for
the use of the artillery companies in Boston.
Two of these guns were kept in a gun-house
that stood opposite the Mall, at the corner of
West-street. A school-house was the next
building, and a yard enclosed with a high
fence was common to both. Major Paddock,
who then commanded the company, having _
been heard to express his intention of surren-
dering these guns to the British army, a few
individuals resolved to secure for the country
a property which belonged to it, and which,
in the emergency of the times, had an impor-
tance very disproportionate to its intrinsic
value.

Having concerted their plan, the party
passed through the school-house into the gun-
house, and were able to open the doors which
were upon the yard, by a small crevice,
through which they raised the bar that se-
cured them. The moment for the execution
of the project was that of the roll-call, when
the sentinel, who was stationed at one door
of the building, would be less likely to hear
their operations.

The guns were taken off their carriages,
carried into the school-room, and placed in a
large box, under the master’s desk, in which



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 49

wood was kept. Immediately after the roll-
call, a lieutenant and sergeant came into the
gun-house to look at the cannon, previously
to removing them. A young man, who had
assisted in their removal, remained by the
building, and followed the officer in, as an in-
nocent spectator. When the carriages were
found without the guns, the sergeant exclaim-
ed, with an oath, in true soldier phraseology,
“These fellows would steal the teeth out of
your head, while you’re keeping guard.” They
then began to search the building for them,
and afterwards the yard ; and when they came
to the gate that opened into the street, the of-
ficers observed that they could not have pass-
ed that way, because a cobweb across the
opening was not broken. They next went
into the school-house, which they examined
all over, except the box, on which the master
placed his foot, which was lame ; and the offi-
cer, with true courtesy, on that account ex-
cused him from rising. Several boys were
present, but not one lisped a word. The Brit-
ish officers soon went back to the gun-house,
and gave up the pursuit in vexation. The
guns remained in that box for a fortnight, and
many of the boys were acquainted with the
fact, but not one of them betrayed the secret.
At the end of that time, the person who had
withdrawn them, came in the evening with a
sarge trunk on a wheelbarrow; the guns
were put into it and carried up to a black-
5



50 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

smith’s shop at the South-end, and there de-
posited under the coal. After lying there for
a while, they were put into a boat in the
night, and safely transported within the Ameri-
can lines.



AN UNNECESSARY ALARM.

A sentinel on the banks of Ashley River, op-
posite to Dorchester, perceiving a “red-coat”
moving through the brush-wood on the other
shore, gave the alarm that the enemy were
without their lines. This being communica-
ted to Lieut. Colonel Laurens, a troop of dra-
goons, and a company of infantry of the le-
gion, were ordered to cross the river and
reconnoitre. But the rapidity of the stream
determined Captain O'Neil, who commanded,
to wait until a boat which had been sent for
should arrive.

In the interim, Laurens galloped up, and
demanded, with warmth, “Why this halt,
captain ’—were not orders given to cross ?”
“Yes, colonel, but look at the current, and
judge if it be practicable.” “This is no time
for argument,” rejoined Laurens. “ You who
are brave men, follow me.” Saying this, he
plunged into the river, but was instantaneous-
ly obliged to quit his horse, and it was with
extreme difficulty that he was enabled to
reach the opposite shore.



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 51

O’Neil, than whom a braver man did not
exist, highly indignant at the speech of Lau-
rens, replied, “ You shall see, sir, that there
are men here as courageous as yourself,”
and at the head of his troop entered the river.
Now, all was tumult and confusion, for al-
though no lives were lost, several of the men
were so nearly drowned, that it became ne-
cessary to use every means to make them
disgorge the water they had swallowed ; and
all were so much exhausted, that a temporary
halt was indispensably needful.

The infantry, by the aid of a plank, and large
doors torn from a neighboring warehouse,
passed over with less difficulty. During the
mean time, Laurens, attended by Messrs. Ralph
and Walter Izard, and Mr. Wainwright, who
ever accompanied him as aids, hastened to
the spot, where the British regimental had
been seen. It was then found that a military
coat had been hung up in a tree by a soldier
who had been whipped and drummed out
of the 64th regiment, for drunkenness, and
whose lacerated back could admit of no cov-
ering. '



A NOBLE REPLY.

At the retreat of the British troops from
Lexington, General Warren came near being
killed by a musket ball, which took off a lock



52 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

of hair, curled close to his head, in accordance
with the custom of the times. His mother,
being very much affected by the occurrence,
entreated him not to risk his life again, which
was so precious to her, and of so much value
to his country.

His answer was,—‘ Wherever danger is,
dear mother, there will your son be. Now is
no time for one of America’s children to
shrink from the most hazardous duty ;1 will ei-
ther see my country free, or shed my last drop of
blood to make her so.” And he did; he fell
on the same field, and at the same time, as
did Putnam ; both fighting for the rights and
liberties of their country.

WASHINGTON AT PRAYER.

After the unsatisfactory engagement at Ger-
mantown, the American troops were quarter-
ed for the winter at Valley Forge, where their
sufferings were extreme. It happened, during
their sojourn, that a very pious Quaker by the
name of Potts had occasion to pass through a
large grove, which was not a great distance
from the head-quarters. Proceeding along, he
thought he heard a noise. He stopped a min-
ute, and listened attentively.

He did hear the sound of a human voice at
some distance, but quite indistinctly. As it



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 53

was in the direct course he was pursuing, he
went on, but with considerable caution. At
length he came within sight of a man whose
back was turned towards him, on his knees, in
the attitude of prayer. Potts now stopped,
and soon perceived Gen. Washington, the com-
mander of the American army, returning from
bending before the God of hosts above.

Potts was a pious man, and no sooner had
he reached his home, than he broke forth to
his wife—

“ All’s well!—all’s well! Yes—George
Washington is sure to beat the British—
sure |”

“ What’s the matter with thee, Isaac?” re-
plied the startled Sarah. “Thee seems to be
much moved about something.”

“ Well! what if 1am moved? Who would
not be moved at such a sight as I have seen
to-day ?”

“ And what hast thou seen, Isaac ?”

“ Seen! I’ve seen a man at prayer !—in the
woods |—George Washington himself! And
now I say—just what | said before—All’s
well! George Washington is sure to beat the
British | sure!”

This is one of the anecdotes, that tend to
establish the decided Christian character of
Washington. Much also might be adduced
from a memoir of his life of the same descrip-
tion. He was indeed a pious, as well as a
brave man.

5*



54 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

THE END OF A FARCE.

While the British held possession of Boston,
there were various amusements got up, to
while away their time. Among these was a
small theatre, and in the evening of Feb. 8th,
1776, the officers were acting a farce, entitled
“The Blockade of Boston.” One character,
intended to ridicule Washington, was dressed
up with a large wig, and a long rusty sword.
Another was an American sergeant, in his
country dress, with an old gun on his shoul-
der, eight feet long.

At the same moment this grotesque-looking
figure appeared, one of the British sergeants
came running on the stage, and cried out,
“The Yankees are attacking our works on
Bunker Hill.” The audience took it as a part
of the play, but General Howe knew that it
was no joke, and cried out to the officers, “ To
your alarm-posts.”



ATTENTION TO ORDERS.

At the siege of York, the young Baron de
Carendeffez, about the age of fifteen, was sent
into the magazine to distribute ammunition
for the use of the French artillery, and while
seated on a barrel of powder, saw a shell from



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 55

the enemy fall within two feet of his position.
The soldiers who were in the battery, expect-
ing immediate explosion, ran off in every di-
rection.

The expected catastrophe, however, did not
follow ; the fuse of the shell was in its flight
extinguished. This being perceived by the
fugitives, the battery was as quickly reoccu-
pied, when Captain Lémery, the commanding
officer, addressing himself to the youth, who
still retained his seat, said—* You young
rogue, why did you not fly the impending dan-
ger? why not embrace a chance for life !”
“ Because, captain,” he heroically answered,
“ my duty required that I should make a dis-
tribution of ammunition, and not desert my
post, and fly like a poltroon.”

———__

PROSE BETTER THAN POETRY,

A colonel in the army, who was much in-
clined to be poetical in his prose, telling Ma-
jor Edwards that he had heard a report con-
cerning him by which he had been greatly
amused, the major assured him that it was al-
together without any foundation. “O no,”
said the colonel, “deny it not—it must be
true, and I will circulate and give it curren-
cy.” “Thank you, thank you, kind sir,” re-
joined Edwards, “by your doing so, much



56 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

time will be saved, which otherwise would
have been spent in contradicting the story.”

ORDINARY FARE OF MARION,

A British officer was sent from the garrison
at Georgetown, to negotiate a business inter-
esting to both armies; when this was conclu-
ded, and the officer about to return, General
Marion said, “If it suits your convenience, sir,
to remain for a short period, I shall be glad of
your company to dinner.” The mild and dig-
nified simplicity of Marion’s manners had al-
ready produced their effect; and to prolong
so interesting an interview, the invitation was
accepted. The entertainment was served u
on pieces of bark, and consisted entirely o
roasted potatoes, of which the general ate
heartily, requesting his guest to profit by his
example, repeating the old adage, “ that hun-
ger was an excellent sauce.”

“But surely, general,” said the officer, “ this
cannot be your ordinary fare.” “Indeed it is,
sir,” he replied ; “ and we are more fortunate
on this occasion, entertaining company, than
usual, to have more than. our accustomed
quantity.” It is said that this officer, on his
return to Georgetown, immediately declared
his conviction, that men who could without a
murmur endure the difficulties and dangers of



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 57

the field, and contentedly relish such simple
and scanty fare, were not to be subdued; and
resigning his commission, immediately retired
from the service,

MR. JOHN EDWARDS AND ADMIRAL ARBUTHNOT.

It must appear both injudicious and unjust
that Mr. J Me Edwards has been so little no-
ticed. His name has been scarcely mentioned
in the records of our revolution; yet there
was no citizen of the republic, in whose bo-
som the love of liberty glowed with more gen-
erous enthusiasm. Possessing wealth beyond
any other mercantile man of the day, he was
the first individual in Carolina who tendered
his fortunes in support of the American cause.
His friend, the venerable Josiah Smith, was
no less liberal in his loans to goverment ; and
it cannot be doubted but that their example
must, in a great degree, have contributed to
give stability to public credit, and to induce
many of less sanguine hopes to risk their for-
tunes for the public good.

Warned by his more prudential friends that
he placed too much at hazard; that the suc-
cess of America, opposed to the power of
Britain, could scarcely be expected ; and that
the total loss of his possessions would follow ;
with a feeling of patriotism that cannot be



58 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

too highly appreciated, he replied—* Be it so!
I would rather lose my all than retain it sub-
ject to British authority.” His subsequent
conduct proved that this was no vain boasting.
Shortly after the fall of Charleston, invited
‘to a conference by Admiral Arbuthnot, who
was quartered on him, and occupied the prin-
cipal apartments of his house, a conversation
took place, the purport of which, immediately
after the conclusion, was communicated by
him to his son-in-law, Mr. John Bee Holmes,
from whom I received it. “ Nothing, Mr. Ed-
wards,” said the admiral, “ has appeared more
extraordinary to Sir Henry Clinton and my-
self, than that you, a native of Great Britain,
should have taken part with the rebels, and
appeared throughout the contest a strenuous
and decided advocate of revolutionary princi-
ples. How, sir, is it to be accounted for ?”

“ Because,” replied Mr. Edwards, “I con-
scientiously approved, and have pledged my-
self to support them.” “ But, Mr. Edwards,”
rejoined the admiral, “ as a man of sense, you
may have been heretofore deluded—your eyes
must now be opened to the futility of resist-
ance ; and as a man of honor, you are bound
by every means in your power to aid in promo-
ting the submission of the people, by a recon-
ciliation with the merciful government that
would obliterate every recollection of past
offences, and again receive them with favor
and forgiveness.”



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 59

The admiral proceeded for a considerable
length of time, in pretty much the same strain
of language ; tying to persuade Mr. Edwards,
with the neighbors, to implore pardon from
the British for past misdeeds, as they consid-
ered them. Mr. Edwards made an eloquent
reply, ending with the words—* And if you
were to say to me—Your fate ds u
your resolve—take protection or perish—I would
without a moment’s hesitation—pm.”

—_—_

THE POOR FISHERMAN AND HIS SCHOONER.

After the evacuation of Boston, by the Brit-
ish troops under Gen. Gage, Capt. Nelson
was left in command of a frigate, with direc-
tions to cruise off the outer harbor, and to
give notice to British vessels of the evacua-
tion.

During one of his cruises, he captured a
fishing schooner of about sixty tons, belonging
to Capt. Davis, of Plymouth, Mass. It was
his whole property, and he supported a wife
and six children by selling the fish that were
taken on board of her.

In about a fortnight after the capture, the
owner (instead of resigning himself to his
fate, and abandoning all hope of regaining
his vessel) determined to go on board the
frigate and see the captain. He procured a



60 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

boat with this view, and having put on board
of her two dozen fowls, some cabbages and
other vegetables, that he thought would be
acceptable to Capt. Nelson, he ventured out,
was admitted on board the frigate, requested
to see the captain alone, and was taken down
into the cabin.

“ Captain,” said he, “I understand that you
have taken my schooner; she is the whole
support of myself, my wife, and six children.
Now, sir, the great men of your country, and
of my country, have made this war, and the
poor people are obliged to submit, and I did
not know but what Capt. Nélson might give
me back my schooner.”

Nelson being astonished at the request, re-
plied, “ This is not a common war; you are
rebels, you have rebelled against your king
and country, and besides, my men are entitled
to their prize money.” Soon after, he left
him in the cabin, and went on deck to talk
with his officers and men; he then returned
to the cabin. “Should you know your vessel
if you were to see her again?” “I guess I
should,” said the captain, and soon after the
schooner came up, with all her sails set, and
completely fitted up in man-of-war style. “Is
this your vessel?” said Capt. Nelson. “O
dear, sir, no,” replied Capt. Davis. “I don’t
wonder that you don’t know her,” replied Nel-
son, “as I have laid out about one hundred
and fifty pounds upon her as my tender.”



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 61

After some further conversation, Capt. Nel-
son consented that Capt. Davis should have
his vessel again, and told him to go on shore
and bring with him a sufficient number of
hands to take charge of her. He did so, and
after Capt. Davis had thanked Capt Nelson,
with tears in his eyes, and blessed him, and
was about ans off in his boat, “ Stop,
stop,” cried Nelson, “you are not paid yet for
your fowls.”

“O for mercy’s sake, Capt. Nelson, say
nothing about that.” “Either receive pay-
ment or else no vessel,” said Nelson, and threw
him two guineas. “I cannot receive pay,”
said Capt. Davis, “ and this is twice as much
as they would come to.” “Either take the
money, or no vessel,” said Nelson ; “ the rebels
will say that you have been bribing me.”
And Capt. Davis went off, deeply impressed
with gratitude for the noble and generous con-
duct of Horatio Nelson.

PATRIOTISM OF BISHOP WHITE.

The distinguished reputation of the late
Bishop White is well known. Early in the
revolution he was invited to preach before a
battalion, but declined, and mentioned to the
commanding officer that he had objections
to the making of the ministry instrumental to

6



62 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the war. And he continued, in the service of
the Protestant Episcopal Church as required,
to pray for the king till the Sunday before the
4th of July, 1776. Shortly after that he took
the oath of allegiance to the United States,
and ever subsequent thereto remained faith-
ful. It was evident to all that he acted un-
der a high sense of duty, and with that sound
a which characterized him through
life. .

At the time of taking the oath of allegiance,
the following incident is said to have occur-
red. When he went to the courthouse for the
purpose, a gentleman of his acquaintance
standing there, observing his design, intima-
ted to him, by a gesture, the danger to which
he would expose himself. After taking the
oath, he remarked, before leaving the court-
house, to the gentleman alluded to—*I per-
ceive, by your gesture, that ie thought I was
exposing my neck to great danger by the step
which I have taken. But I have not taken it
without full deliberation. I know my danger,
and that it is the greater on account of m
being a clergyman of the Church of England.
But I trust in Providence. The cause is a
cd one, and I am persuaded will be protect
e



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 63

BISHOP WHITE A CHAPLAIN OF CONGRESS.

In September, 1777, while the British were
advaneing to Philadelphia, of which they
took possession soon afterwards, Congress
having just fled to Yorktown, he was chosen
chaplain. He had, for safety, removed his
family to Hartford county, in Maryland.
While on a journey between that place and
Philadelphia, he stopped at a small village,
where he was met by a courier from York-
town, who informed him of his being appoint-
ed by Congress their chaplain, and requested
his immediate attendance. Nothing, he said,
could have induced him to accept the appoint-
ment, at such a time, even had the emolu-
ment been an object, which it was not, but
the determination to be consistent in his prin-
ciples in the part he had taken.

This was one of the gloomiest periods in
the history of the revolution ; General Bur-
goyne was marching, without having yet re-
ceived a serious check, so far as was then
known, through the northern parts of New
York. He thought of it for a short time, and
then, instead of proceeding on his journey,
turned his horses’ heads, travelled immediate-
ly to Yorktown, and entered on the duties of
his appointment.

While officiating as chaplain, he had ry
tunities of observing some tokens of the diffi-



64 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

culties under which Congress labored in pro-
curing the means of carrying on the war, and
the very reduced state of their finances at
some periods. The two following facts, re-
lated by himself, are striking proofs of their
destitution of funds, and the very low state of
their credit. On one occasion, going into the
chamber of Congress to perform his duty as
chaplain, he remarked to one of the members,
“You have been treating yourselves, I per-
ceive, to new inkstands.”—* Yes,” was the re-
ply, “ and private credit had to be pledged for
the payment.” At another time, observing
that the clerks had removed from their usual
room, and inquiring the cause, he was told
that there was no wood to make a fire there,
nor money to buy it. These incidents must
have occurred after Congress returned to Phil-
adelphia.

—_—

DR. FRANKLIN’S ALMANAC.

The late Capt. John Paul Jones, at the time
he was attempting to fit out a little squadron
during the revolutionary war, in one of the
ports of France, to cruise on the coast of Eng-
land, was much delayed by neglects and dis-
appointments from the court, that had nearly
frustrated his plan. Chance one day threw
into his hands an old almanac, containing



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 65

Poor Richard's Maxims, by Dr. Franklin. In
that curious assemblage of useful instructions,
a man is advised, “If he wishes to have an
business faithfully and expeditiously aieunal,
to go and do it himself ;—otherwise to send.”
Jones was immediately struck, upon reading
this maxim, with the impropriety of his past
conduct, in only. sending letters and messages
to court, when he ought to have gone in per-
son. He instantly set out, and, by dint of per-
sonal representations, procured the immediate
equipment of the squadron, which afterwards
spread terror along the eastern coasts of Eng-
land, and with which he so gloriously captured
the Serapis, and the British ships of war re-
turning from the Baltic. In gratitude to Dr.
Franklin’s maxim, he named the principal
ship of his squadron after the name of the
retended almanac maker, Le Bon Homme
ichard, Father Richard.



GENERAL PRESCOTT AND THE CONNECTICUT SUCCO-
TASH.

The British general, Prescott, who was cap-
tured at his quarters on Rhode Island by Col-
onel Barton, being on his route through the
state of Connecticut, called at a tavern to dine.
The landlady furnished the table with a dish
of succotash, boiled corn and beans. The gen-
eral being unaccustomed to such kind of food,

6*



66 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

exclaimed, with warmth, “ What, do you treat
us with the food of hogs?” and taking the
dish from the table, strewed the contents over
the floor. The landlord being informed of
this, soon entered, and with his horse-whip
gave the general a severe chastisement. The
sequel of this story has recently been com-
municated by a gentleman at Nantucket, who
retains a perfect recollection of all the cir-
cumstances. After Gen. Prescott was ex-
changed, and restored to his command on the
island, the inhabitants of Nantucket deputed
Wm. Rotch, Dr. Tupper, and Timothy Folger
to negotiate some concerns with him in behalf
of the town. They were for some time re-
fused admittance to his presence, but the doc-
tor and Folger overcame the opposition and
ushered themselves into the room. Prescott
raged and stormed with great vehemence, until
Folger was compelled to withdraw. After
the doctor announced his business, and the gen-
eral had become a little calm, he said, “ Was
not my treatment to Folger very uncivil ?”
The doctor said yes. Then said Prescott, “I
will tell you the reason: he looked so much
like the Connecticut rascal that horse-whip-
ped me, I could not endure his presence.”



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 67

PROVIDENTIAL INTERPOSITIONS.

After the defeat of our army on Long Island,
in 1776, the residue of our troops were re-
duced to a situation of extreme hazard, and
by many it was supposed that a few hours
would seal their fate. They were fatigued
and discouraged by defeat, a superior ene-
my in their front, and a powerful fleet about
to enter the East river, with the view of
effectually cutting off their retreat, and leav-
ing them no alternative but to surrender.
The commander-in-chief resolved to attempt
to extricate his army from the impending ca-
tastrophe, by evacuating the post, and cross-
ing the river to New York, The passage
was found at first to be impracticable, by rea-
son of a violent wind from the northeast and
a strong ebbing tide.

But providentially the wind grew more
moderate, and veered to the northwest, which
rendered the passage perfectly safe. But a
circumstance still more remarkable was, that
about two o’clock in the morning a thick fog
enveloped the whole of Long Island in obseu-
rity, concealing the retreat of the Americans,
while on the side of New York the atmosphere
was perfectly clear.

Thus, by the favor of an unusual fog, our
army, consisting of nine thousand men, in one
night, under great disadvantages, embarked



68 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

with their baggage, provisions, stores, horses,
and the munitions of war, crossed a rapid riv-
er, a mile or more wide, and landed at New
York undiscovered, and without material loss.
The enemy were so near that they were heard
at work with their pick-axes, and in about
half an hour after the fog cleared off, the
enemy were seen taking possession of the
American lines, and they were astonished
that our troops had got beyond the reach of
pursuit.

Garden, in his Anecdotes, says that a cleri-
cal friend, on this occasion, observed that,
“ But for the interposition of a cloud of dark-
ness, the Egyptians would have overwhelmed
the Israelites upon the sea-shore. And but
for the providential intervention of a fog upon
Long Island, which was a cloud resting on the
earth, the American army would have been
destroyed, and the hopes of every patriot bo-
som extinguished, perhaps forever.”

On the retreat of our army from New York,
Major-general Putnam, at the head of three
thousand five hundred continental troops, was
in the rear, and the last that left the city. In
order to avoid any of the enemy that might
be advancing in the direct road to the city,
he made choice of a different road till he
could arrive at a certain angle, whence a
cross-road would conduct him in such a di-
rection as that he might form a junction with
our main army. It so happened that a body



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 69

of about eight thousand British and Hessians
were at the same moment advancing on the
road, which would have brought them in im-
mediate contact with Putnam before he could
have reached the cross-road.

Most fortunately, the British generals halt-
ed their troops, and repaired to the house of
Mr. R, Murray, a Quaker and friend to our
cause. Mrs. M. treated the British officers
with cake and wine, and they were induced
to tarry two hoursor more. By this happy in-
cident, Putnam, by continuing his march, es-
caped a rencounter with a greatly superior
force, which must have proved fatal to his
whole party. I have recently been informed
by the son and aid-de-camp of Gen. Putnam,
that had the enemy, instead of a halt, marched
ten minutes longer, they would have reached
the cross-road, and entirely cut off the retreat
of our troops, and they must inevitably have
been captured or destroyed. It was a common
saying among our officers, that, under Provi-
dence, Mrs. Murray saved this part of our
army.

When, in the year 1777, Gen. Burgoyne’s
army was reduced to a condition of extreme
embarrassment and danger, Gen. Gates re-
ceived what he supposed certain intelligence
that the main body of the British army had
marched off for Fort Edward, and that a rear-
guard only was left in the camp situated on
the opposite side of Saratoga creek. He de-



70 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

termined, therefore, to advance with his entire
force to attack the enemy in their encamp-
ment, in half anhour. For this purpose, Gen.
Nixon with his brigade crossed the creek in
advance.

Gen. Glover was on the point of following,
but just as he entered the water he perceived
a British soldier crossing near him, whom he
called and examined. By this British desert-
er, the fact was ascertained, that the detach-
ment for Fort Edward had returned, and that
the whole British army was now encamped
behind a thick brush-wood, which concealed
them from our view. This information being
instantly communicated to Gen. Gates, the or-
der for attack was immediately countermand-
ed, and the troops were ordered to retreat ; but
before they could recross the creek, the enemy’s
artillery opened on their rear, and some loss
was sustained.

This was a most critical moment, and a
quarter of an hour longer might have caused
the ruin of the two brigades, and effected such
a favorable turn of affairs as to have enabled
Burgoyne to progress in his route to Albany, or
make a safe retreat into Canada. In his nar-
rative of the expedition under his command,
Burgoyne laments the accident which occa-
sioned the failure of his stratagem, as one of
the most adverse strokes of fortune during the
campaign. But Americans ought never to
forget the remarkable providential escape.



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 71

DEATH OF THE BARON DE KALB.

Among the enthusiastic foreigners who
generously espoused our cause, and at an
early period of the revolution resorted to the
American army, I will name some, whose
meritorious services entitle them to the grate-
ful recollection of the present and future gen-
erations. Baron de Kalb was by birth a
German. He had attained a high reputation
in military service, and was a knight of the
order of merit, and a brigadier-general in
the armies of France. He accompanied the
Marquis de La Fayette to this country, and
having proffered his services to our Congress,
he was, in September, 1777, appointed to the
office of major-general. In the summer of
1780, he was second in command in our south-
ern army, under Major-general Gates.

When arrangements were making for the
battle at Camden, which proved so disastrous
to our arms, in August, 1780, this heroic offi-
cer, it was said, cautioned Gen. Gates against
a general action under present circumstances.
But that unfortunate commander was heard
to say, that “ Lord Cornwallis would not dare
to look him in the face.” And in the evening
preceding the battle, ‘an officer in the pres-
ence of Gen. Gates said, “1 wonder where
we shall dine to-morrow !”

“ Dine, sir,” replied the confident general,



72 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“why at Camden, to be sure. I would not give
apinch of snuff, sir, to be insured a beef-steak
to-morrow in Camden, and Lord Cornwallis
at my table.” Baron de Kalb was decidedly
opposed to the proceedings of Gen. Gates, and
frequently foretold the ruin that would ensue,
and expressed a presentiment that it would be
his fate to fall in that battle. In a council
of war, while the enemy was approaching,
the baron advised that the army should fall
back and take a good position, and wait to
be attacked; but this was rejected by Gen.
Gates, who insinuated that it originated from
fear.
De Kalb, instantly leaping from his horse,
placed himself at the head of his command on
foot, and with some warmth retorted, “ Well,
sir, a few hours, perhaps, will prove who are
the brave.” It was the intention of Gen.
Gates to surprise the enemy in their encamp-
ment, while at the same time Cornwallis had
commenced his march to surprise his antago-
nist. The contending armies had scarcely en-
gaged in the conflict, when our militia broke,
and leaving their guns and bayonets behind,
fled with the greatest precipitation.
- Gen. Gates immediately applied spurs to his
horse and pursued, as he said, “to bring the
rascals back,” but he actually continued his
flight till he reached Charlotte, 80 miles from
the field of battle. The Baron de Kalb, at
the head of a few hundred continental troops,



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 73

was now left to cope with the whole British
army, and he sustained the dreadful shock for
more than an hour; hundreds of the bravest
men had fallen around this undaunted hero ;
he himself in personal conflict was seen to
parry the furious blows and plunge his sword
into many opposing breasts. But alas! the
hero is overpowered, having received eleven
bayonet wounds; he faints and falls to the
ground.

Several individuals of both armies were
killed while endeavoring to shield his body.
His aid-de-camp, Chevalier de Buysson, rushed
through the clashing bayonets, and stretching
his arms over the body of the fallen hero, ex-
claimed, “ Save the Baron de Kalb! save the
Baron de Kalb!” The British officers inter-
posed and prevented his immediate destruc-
tion, but he survived the action but a few
hours.

To a British officer, who kindly condoled with
him in his misfortune, he replied, “I thank
you for your generous sympathy, but I die the
death I always prayed for; the death of a sol-
dier fighting for the rights of man.” His last
moments were spent in dictating a letter con-
cerning the continental troops which support-
ed him in the action, after the militia had fled,
of whom he said he had no words that could
sufficiently express his love and his admiration
of their valor.

Gen. Washington, many years after, on a

7



14 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

visit to Camden, inquired for the grave of De
Kalb. After looking on it awhile, with a
countenance marked with thought, he breathed
a deep sigh, and exclaimed, “So there lies the
brave De Kalb; the generous stranger who
came from a distant land to fight our battles,
and to water with his blood the tree of our
liberty. Would to God he had lived to share
with us its fruits!” His exit was marked
with unfading glory, and his distinguished
merit was gratefully acknowledged by Con-
gress, in ordering a monument to be erected
to his memory.

EXECUTION OF COL. HAYNES.

After the city of Charleston had fallen in-
to the hands of Lord Cornwallis, his lordship
issued a proclamation, requiring of the inhab-
itants of the colony, that they should no long-
er take part in the contest, but continue
peaceably at their homes, and they should be
most sacredly protected in property and per-
son. This was accompanied with an instru-
ment of neutrality, which soon obtained the
signatures of many thousands of the citizens
of South Carolina, among whom was Col.
Haynes, who now conceived that he was en-
titled to peace and security for his family
and fortune.



ANECDOTES OF ''HE REVOLUTION, 15

But it was not long before Cornwallis put a
new construction on the instrument of neutrali-
ty, denominating it a bond of allegiance to the
king, and called upon all who had signed it
to take up arms against the Rebels! threat-
ening to treat as deserters those who refused !
This fraudulent proceeding in Lord Cornwallis
roused the indignation of every honorable and
honest man.

Col. Haynes now being compelled, in viola-
tion of the most solemn compact, to take up
arms, resolved that the invaders of his native
country should be the objects of his vengeance.
He withdrew from the British, and was in-
vested with a command in the continental
service ; but it was soon his hard fortune to be
captured by the enemy and carried into Charles-
ton. Lord Rawdon, the commandant, imme-
diately ordered him to be loaded with irons,
and after a sort of mock trial, he was sen-
tenced to be hung !

This sentence seized all classes of people
with horror and dismay. A petition, headed
by the British Gov. Bull, and signed by a
number of royalists, was presented in his be-
half, but was totally disregarded. The ladies
of Charleston, beth whigs and tories, now
united in a petition to Lord Rawdon, couched
in the most eloquent and moving language,
praying that the valuable life of Col. Haynes
might be spared; but this also was treated
with neglect. It was next proposed that Col



716 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

Haynes's children, (the mother had recently
expired with the small-pox,) should in their
mourning habiliments be presented to plead
for the life of their only surviving parent.
Being introduced into his presence, they
fell on their knees, and with clasped hands
and weeping eyes, they lisped their father’s
name and plead most earnestly for his life.
(Reader! what is your anticipation—do you
imagine that Lord Rawdon, pitying their mo-
therless condition, tenderly embraced these
afflicted children and restored them to the
fond embrace of their father? No! the un-
feeling man was still inexorable—he suffered
even these little ones to plead in vain!) His
son, a youth of thirteen, was permitted to stay
with his father in prison, who beholding his
only parent loaded with irons and condemn-
ed to die, was overwhelmed in grief and sor-
row.
“Why,” said he, “my son, will you thus
break your father’s heart with unavailing sor-
row? Have I not often told you that we
came into this world but to prepare for a bet-
ter? For that better life, my dear boy, your
father is prepared. Instead then of weeping,
rejoice with me, my son, that my troubles are
so near anend. To-morrow | set out for im-
mortality. You will accompany me to the
place of my execution ; and when I am dead,
take and bury me by the side of your mother.”
The youth here fell on his father’s neck erv-



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 77

ing, “Oh, my father! my father! I will die
with you! I will die with you!” Col. Haynes
would have returned the strong embrace of
his son; but alas! his hands were confined
with irons. “Live,” said he, “my son, live
to honor God by a good life ; live to serve your
country ; and live to take care of your brother
and little sisters !”

The next morning Col. Haynes was con-
ducted to the place of execution. His son
accompanied him. Soon as they came in
sight of the gallows, the father strengthened
himself and said—* Now, my son, show yourself
aman! That tree is the boundary of my life
and of all my life’s sorrows. Beyond that the
wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are
at rest. Don’t lay too much to heart our separa-
tion from you: it will be but short. It was but
lately your dear mother died. To-day I die,
and you, my son, though but young, must short-
iy follow us.” “Yes, my father,” replied the
broken-hearted youth, “I shall shortly follow
you; for indeed I feel that I cannot live
long.” ,

On seeing therefore his father in the hands
of the executioner, and then struggling in the
halter, he stood like one transfixed and mo-
tionless with horror. Till then he had wept
incessantly, but soon as he saw that sight, the
fountain of his tears was stanched, and he
never wept more. He died insane, and in his
last moments often called on the name of his

*



78 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

father in terms that brought tears from the
hardest heart.

GENERAL MORGAN.

This distinguished officer commenced his
military career under General Braddock, but
in so inferior a station as to have been subject-
ed to corporal punishment for some unguard-
ed expressions towards a superior. It is pain-
ful to mention such a circumstance ; and it
would not have been done had it not been re-
corded to his honor, that, incapable of enter-
taining lasting resentments, he had been dis-
tinguished, during the revolutionary war, by
generous attention to every British officer
who became his prisoner. Commanding a
rifle company before Quebec, he was directed,
under Arnold, to attack the lower town; and
on the retirement of that officer, when wound-
ed, taking the van of the assailing column,
he carried the first and second barriers.

He even penetrated into the upper town,
and was in possession of the main-guard,
giving paroles to the officers who surrendered,
when every posepoet of success being baffled
Wy. the fall of Montgomery, and the enemy en-
abled to turn their entire force against him,
he was surrounded and captured. His bravery
well known, and his activity justly apprecia-



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. © 79

ted, an attempt was made by an officer of
rank in the British service to induce him, by
the tender of wealth and promotion, to join
the royal standard; but, with the spirit of
true republican virtue, he rejected the pro-
position, and requested the tempter, “ never
again to insult him by an offer which plainly
inplied that he thought him a villain.”

POWDER AND BALLS.

Let ancient or modern history be produced,
they will not afford a more heroic display than
the reply of Yankee Stonington to the British
commanders. The people were piling the
balls which the enemy had wasted, when the
foe applied to them. “We want bails ; will you
sell them?” They answered: “ We want pow-
done send us powder, and we'll return your

alls.”

HOW TO SAVE A DINNER.

General Charles Lee, while at White Plains,
in 1776, had his quarters in a small house
near the road by which Gen. Washington
had to pass when reconnoitring. Returning
with his suite, they called in and took a din-



80 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

ner. They were no sooner gone, than Lee
told his aids, “ You must look me out another
place, for I shall have Washington and his
puppies continually calling on me, and they
will eat me up.” The next day Lee, seeing
Washington out on the like business, and ex-
pecting that he should have another visit, or-
dered his servant to write with chalk upon
the door, “No victuals dressed here to-day.”
When the company approached and saw the
writing, they pushed off with much good hu-
mor for their own table, without being offend-
ed at the habitual eccentricity of the man.



“ No BAYONETS HERE.”

At the surprise of Georgetown, Sergeant
Ord, an extremely brave soldier, being, with a
small party of the legion-infantry, in posses-
sion of. an enclosure surrounding a house
from which they had expelled the enemy, the
recovery of the position was sought by a
British force, whose leader, approaching the
gate of entrance, exclaimed—* Rush on, my
brave boys, they are only worthless militia,
and have no bayonets.” Ord immediately
placed himself in front of the gate, and as
they attempted to enter, laid six of his ene-
mies in succession dead at his feet, crying out,
at every thrust—“ No bayonets here—none at



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 81

all, to be sure !” following up his strokes with
such rapidity, that the British party could
make no impression, and were compelled to
retire.

In every instance where this heroic soldier
was engaged in action, he not only increased
his own reputation, but animated those around
him by his lively courage. In camp, on a
march, and in every situation, he performed
all his duties with the utmost cheerfulness and
vivacity, preserving always the most orderly
conduct, and keeping his arms, accoutrements,
and clothing in the neatest possible condition.
He might, indeed, be considered a perfect sol-
dier.



POVERTY OF THE AMERICAN ARMY.

The following incident is only a representa-
tion of many similar cases of distress for cloth-
inginthe American camp. During the severity
of the winter campaign in North Carolina, Gen.
Greene, passing a sentinel who was barefoot,
said, “I fear, my good fellow, you must suffer
from cold.” “Pretty much so,” was the reply ;
“but Ido not complain, because I know that
I should fare better had our general power to
procure supplies. They say, however, that in
a few days we shall have a fight, and then,
by the blessing of God, I shall take care to se-
cure a pair of shoes.”



82 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

MR. ROBERT MORRIS.

At the most distressful period of the war,
General Washington wrote to Congress, “ that
he was surrounded by secret foes, destitute of
the means of detecting them, or of getting in-
telligence of the enemy’s movements and de-
signs. The army was in rags, had few or no
blankets, and military stores were in the dregs.
The troops, reduced in numbers, must retreat
without the means of defence if attacked, and
would probably disperse from the want of
subsistence and clothing in an inclement sea-
son, too severe for nature to support. In a
word, we have lived upon expedients till we
can live no longer; and it may be truly said
that the history of this war is a history of
false hopes and temporary devices, instead of
system and economy which result from it.”
All business was in consequence suspended in
Congress, and dismay was universal, since no
supplies of the requisitions demanded could
be provided.

Mr. Robert Morris—to whose liberality the
United States is indebted, for the generous
manner in which he loosened his purse-strings
and gave, for the purpose of assisting the Union
in any way, when the treasury department
was low in funds—on this occasion quitted
the hall with a mind completely depressed,
without a present hope or cheering expecta-



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 83

tion of future prosperity. On entering his
counting-house he received the welcome in-
telligence, that a ship which he had despaired
of, had at that moment arrived at the wharf,
with a full cargo of all the munitions of war,
and of soldiers’ clothing. He returned to Con-
gress almost breathless with joy, and announ-
ced the exhilarating good news. Nor did pro-
pitious fortune make an ending at this point.

Accidentally meeting with a worthy Qua-
er, who had wealth at command, and a heart
well-wisher to the American cause, although
from his religious principles averse to war
and fighting, he thought it no departure from
the strict rule of propriety, to endeavor, by
every exertion, to awaken his sympathetic
feelings and obtain assistance. Assuming
therefore an expression of countenance indic-
ative of the most poignant anguish and deep
despair, he was passing him in silence, when
the benevolent Quaker, who had critically
observed him, and marked the agitation of his
mind, feelingly said, “ Robert, I fear there is
bad news.”

The answer was, “ Yes, very bad ; I am un-
der the most helpless embarrassment for the
need of some hard money ;” meaning silver.
“Hof much would relieve thy difficulties,
Robert?” The sum was mentioned. “But I
could only give my private engagement in a
note, which I would sacredly pledge myself
and my honor to repay,” rejoined Mr. Morris.



84 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“ Oease thy sorrows then, Robert ; thou shalt
have the money in confidence of thy silence
on the subject, as it regards me.” The specie
was procured, immediately remitted to Wash-
ington, and saved the army.



GENERAL GADSEN AT ST. AUGUSTINE.

The conduct of the British commanders to-
wards this venerable patriot, in the strongest
manner evinced their determination rather to
crush the spirit of opposition, than by concil-
iation to subdueit. The man did not exist to
whose delicate sense of honor, even a shadow
of duplicity would have appeared more abhor-
rent than to General Gadsen. Transported by
an arbitrary decree, with many of the most
resolute and influential citizens of the Repub-
lie, to St. Augustine, attendance on parade
was peremptorily demanded, when a British
officer, stepping forward, said, “ Expediency,
and a series of political occurrences, have
rendered it necessary to remove you from
Charleston to this place ; but, gentlemen, we
have no wish to increase your sufferings; to
all, therefore, who are willing to give their
paroles, and not to go beyond the limits pre-
scribed to them, the liberty of the town will
be allowed ; a dungeon will be the destiny of
such as refuse to accept the indulgence.”

The proposition was generally acceded to.



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 85

But when General Gadsen was called to give
this new pledge of faith, he indignantly ex-
claimed—* With men who have once deceived
me, I can enter into no new contract. Had
the British commanders regarded the terms
of the capitulation of Charleston, 1 might now,
although a prisoner under my own roof, have
enjoyed the smiles and consolations of my
surrounding family ; but even without a shad-
ow of accusation proffered against me, for any
act inconsistent with my plighted faith, 1 am
torn from them, and here in a distant land in-
vited to enter into new engagements. | will
give no parole.” “Think better of it, sir,”
said the officer ; “a second refusal of it will fix
your destiny—a dungeon will be your future
habitation.” “Prepare it, then,” said the in-
flexible patriot, “I will give no parole, so help
me God.”

An opposition to the mandate of the prevail-
ing authorities, was esteemed as a crime too
flagrant to pass unpunished. The rectitude of
his character, the respectability of his age,
afforded no plea in his favor; he was immedi-
ately separated from the rest of his compan-
ions in misfortunes, and for the remaining pe-
riod of his captivity condemned to pass his days
in solitary confinement. It was not, however,
for persecution to daunt and overcome a mind
as firm in patriotic virtue as his. Patient under
every insult, he felt the pressure of tyranny,
but bent not beneath its weight.

8



386 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

Sensible that activity of mind would in-
crease its energies, and better enable him to
support oppression, he diligently engaged in
the study of the Hebrew language, and was
hourly increasing his reputation as a scholar,
while his enemies vainly hoped that he was
writhing under the penalties of his political
offences. When first shut up in the castle at
St. Augustine, the comfort of a light was de-
nied him by the commandant of the fortress.
A generous subaltern offered to supply him
with a candle, but he declined it, lest the of-
ficer should expose himself to the censure of
his superior.

After André’s arrest, Colonel Glazier, the
governor of the castle, sent to advise General
Gadsen for the worst—intimating that, as
General Washington had been assured of re-
taliation if André was executed, it was not
unlikely that General Gadsen would be the
person selected. ‘To this message he replied,
“that he was always prepared to die for
his country; and though he knew it was im-
possible for Washington to yield the right of
an independent state, by the law of war, to
fear or affection, yet he would not shrink from
the sacrifice, and would rather ascend the
scaffold than purchase with his life the dis-
honor of his country.”



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 87

THE AMPUTATION OF A LIMB.

Lieutenant Samuel Seldon, of Virginia,
commanded one of the advance parties, when
General Greene, after having invested the
post at Ninety-six for several weeks, deter-
mined to attempt its reduction by assault.
At the signal appointed to attack, Seldon en-
tered the ditch of the principal work; and
while his right arm was raised, with the
intention of drawing down a sand-bag from
the top of the parapet, a ball entering his
wrist, shattered the bone of the limb nearly to
the shoulder. For so severe a wound, the
only remedy was amputation.

It is well known that on such occasions the
operating surgeon requires the assistance of
several persons to hold the patient’s limb, and
to support him. To this regulation Seldon
would not submit. It was his right arm he
was about to lose. He sustained it with the
left during the operation, his eyes fixed stead-
ily on it; uttered not a word, till the saw
reached the marrow, when, in composed tone
and manner, he said, “I pray you, doctor, be
quick.”

When the business was completed, he feel-
ingly exclaimed, “I am sorry that it is my
right arm; if it had been my left, the occa-
sion would have caused me to glory in the
loss.” He recovered and lived many years



88 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

afterwards, the object of affection and esteem
to all who had the good fortune to know him.

——e

FIRST PRAYER IN CONGRESS.

The following beautiful reminiscence of
the first Congress in Philadelphia is from the
pen of old John Adams :—

When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made
a motion that it should be opened with pray-
er. It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York,
and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina, because
we were divided in religious sentiments, some
Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabap-
tists, some Presbyterians, and some Congre-
gationalists, so that we could not join in the
same act of worship. Mr. Samuel Adams

-rose and said, that he was no bigot, and
could hear a prayer from any gentleman of
piety and virtue, and at the same time a
friend to his country. He was a stranger in
Philadelphia, but had heard that Mr. Duché
(Dushay they pronounce it) deserved that
character, and therefore he moved that Mr.
Duché, an Episcopal clergyman, might be de-
sired to read prayer to Congress to-morrow
morning. The motion was carried in the af-
firmative. Mr. Randolph, our President, wait-
ed on Mr. D., and received for answer that if
his health would permit he most certainly



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 89

would. Accordingly he appeared with his
clerk, and in his pontificals, and read several
prayers in the established form, and then read
the Collect for the 7th day of September,
which was the 35th Psalm. You must re-
member this was the next morning after we
had heard the rumor of the horrible cannon-
ade of Boston. It seemed as if Heaven had
ordained that Psalm to be read on that morn-

ing. .

After this, Mr. Duché, unexpectedly to every-
body, struck out into extemporary prayer,
which filled the bosom of every man present.
I must confess I never heard a better prayer,
or one so well pronounced—Episcopalian as
he is. Dr. Cooper himself never prayed with
such fervor, such ardor, such correctness and

athos, and in language so elegant and sub-
ime, for America, for Congress, for the pro-
vince of the Massachusetts Bay, especially the
town of Boston. It had excellent effect upon
everybody here. I must beg you to read the
psalm. If there is any faith in the sortes
Virgiliane, or Homerice, or especially the
sortes Biblia, it would have been thought
providential.

Here was a scene worthy of the painter's
art. It was in Carpenter’s Hall, in Philadel-
phia, a building which we learn by a recent
article still survives in its original condition,
though sacrilegiously converted, we believe, in-

to an auction mart for the sale of chairs and
8*



90 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

tables, that the forty-four individuals met to
whom the services were read.

Washington was kneeling there, and Henry,
and Randolph, and Rutledge, and Lee, and
Jay ; and by them stood, bowed in reverence,
the Puritan patriots of New England, who, at
that moment, had reason to believe that an
armed soldiery was wasting their humble
households. It was believed that Boston had
been bombarded and destroyed. They prayed
fervently for America, for the Congress, for
the province of Massachusetts Bay, and es-
pecially for the town of Boston ; and who can
realize the emotions which they turned im-
ploringly to Heaven for divine interposition
and aid? “It was enough,” says Mr. Adams,
“to melt the heart of stone. I saw the tears
gush into the eyes of the old, grave, pacific
Quakers of Philadelphia.”

—_——

LORD STIRLING AND THE BRITISH SPY.

Lord Stirling, who was a major-general in
the army of the United States during the war
for independence, having detected a spy from
the British in his camp, and the crime being
fully proved upon him, he was ordered for ex-
ecution. Being under the gallows, the awful
scene before him filled his soul with fear and
devotion, when he thus addressed the Deity ;



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 91

—*“O Lord, have pity on me ! extend thy mer-
cy to a wretched sinner! O Lord, forgive me,
and save me from the torments of hell !"—
The general, thinking that the address was to
him, replied, “ Don’t talk to me—I'll have no

mercy on you—hangman, do your duty, turn
him off.”

MILITARY COURTESY.

In September, 1776, a piquet of 450 men
from Gen. Heath’s division, constantly mount-
ed guard, by relief, at Morrisania, near New
York, from which a chain of sentinels within
half gun-shot of each other were planted.
The water passage between Morrisania and
Montresor’s Island being in some places very
narrow, the sentinels on the American side
were ordered not to fire on those of the Brit-
ish, unless they began; but the latter were'so
fond of beginning, that there was frequent
firing between them.

This being the case one day, and a British
officer walking along the Montresor’s side, an
American sentinel who had been exchanging
shots with one of the British, seeing the offi-
cer, and concluding him to be better game,
gave him a shot and wounded him. He was
carried to the house on the island. An offi-
cer with a flag came immediately down to



92 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the creek, and calling for the American officer
of the piquet, informed him, that if the Ameri-
can sentinel fired any more, the commanding
officer on the island would cannonade Col.
Morris’s house, in which the officers of the
piquet were quartered.

The American officer immediately sent to
Gen. Heath, to know what answer should be
returned. He was directed to inform the flag
officer, that the American sentinels had been
instructed not to fire on sentinels, unless they
were first fired upon—then to return the fire ;
and that such should be their conduct: as to
the cannonading of Col. Morris’s house, they
might act their pleasure. The firing ceased
for some time, until one day a raw Scotch
sentinel having been placed, he soon after dis-
charged his piece at an American sentinel,
which was immediately returned; upon which
a British officer came down, and calling to the
American officer, observed, that he thought
there was to be no firing between the senti-
nels. He was answered, that their own began ;
upon which he replied, “He shall then pay
for it ;” the sentinel was directly after re-
lieved, and there was no more firing between
them at that place ; but they were so civil to
each other on their posts, that one day at a
_ of the creek where it was practicable, the

ritish sentinel asked the American, who was
nearly opposite to him, if he could give him a
chew of tobacco; the latter having in his



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 93

pocket a piece of a thick twisted roll, tossed
it across the creek to the other, who after
biting off a quid sent the remainder back.

THE BRAVE LITTLE YANKEE.

It happened, in 1776, that the garden of a
widow, which lay between the American and
British camps, in the neighborhood of New
York, was frequently robbed at night. Her
son, a mere boy, and small for his age, having
obtained his mother’s permission to find out
and secure the thief, in case he should return,
concealed himself with a gun among the
weeds. A strapping Highlander, belonging to
the British grenadiers, came, and having filled
a large bag, threw it over his shoulder; the
boy then left his covert, went softly behind
him, cocked his gun, and called out to the
fellow, “ You are my prisoner: if you attempt
to put your bag down, I will shoot you dead ;
go forward in that road.”

The boy kept close behind him, threatened,
and was constantly prepared to execute his
threats. Thus the boy drove him into the
American camp, where he was secured.
When the grenadier was at liberty to throw
down his bag, and saw who had made him
prisoner, he was extremely mortified, and ex-
claimed, “ A British grenadier made prisoner



94 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

by such a brat—by such a brat !” The Amer-
ican officers were highly entertained with the
adventure, made a collection for the boy, and
gave him several pounds. He returned full
satisfied for the losses his mother sustained.
The soldier had side-arms, but they were of
no use, as he could not get rid of his bag.

oo—e—_

AN (NCONVENIENT WOUND.

While pursuing the enemy, during an action
at Saratoga, previous to the surrender of Bur-
goyne, in October, 1777, I heard, says General
Wilkinson, in his memoirs, some one exclaim,
“Protect me, sir, against this boy ;’ when,
turning my eyes, it was my fortune to arrest
the purpose of a lad thirteen or fourteen years
old, in the act of taking aim at a wounded of-
ficer, who lay in the angle of a worm fence.
Inquiring his rank, he answered, “1 had the
honor to command the grenadiers ;” of course
I knew him to be Major Ackland, who had
been brought from the field to this place on
the back of a Captain Shrimpton, of his own
corps, under a heavy fire.

I dismounted, took him by the hand, and ex-
pressed hopes that he was not badly wounded:
“ Not badly,” he replied, “but very inconve-
niently ; | am shot through both legs; will
you have the goodness, sir, to have me con-



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 95

veyed to your camp ?” I directed my servant
to alight, and we lifted Ackland into his seat,
and then ordered him to be conducted to head-
quarters.



THE BRITISH LION.

In the commencement of the American rev-
olution, when one of the British king’s thun-
dering proclamations made its appearance,
the subject was mentioned in a company in
Philadelphia ; a member of congress who was
present, turning to Miss Levingstone, said,
“ Well, Miss, are you greatly terrified at the
roaring of the British lion?” “Not at all,
sir, for I have learned from natural history,
that beast roars loudest when he is most fright-

THE STUTTERING SOLDIER.

During the revolutionary war, when drafts
were made from the militia to recruit the con-
tinental army, a certain captain gave liberty to
the men who were drafted from his company, to
make their objections, if they had any, against
going into the service; accordingly, one of
them, who had an impediment in his speech,



96 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

came forward and made his bow: “ What is
your objection?” said the captain. “1 ca-ca-
cant go,” answers the man, “ because I st-st-
st-stutter."—* Stutter!” says the captain, “ you
don’t go there to talk, but to fight.” “ Ay,
but they'll p-p-put me on g-g-g-guard, and a
man may go ha-ha-half a mile before I can
say wh-wh-wh-who goes there?” O that is no
objection, for they will place some other sen-
try with you; he can challenge, and you can
fire.” “ Well, b-b-but I may be ta-ta-taken and
run through the g-g-guts before I can cry qu-qu-
qu-quarters,” This last plea prevailed; and
the captain, laughing heartily, dismissed him.

THE AMERICAN SHARP-SHOOTERS.

Colonel Forsyth, so celebrated in the last
war as the commander of a band of sharp-
shooters which harassed the enemy so much,
happened, in a scouting party, to capture a
British officer. He brought him to his camp,
and treated him with every respect due to his
rank. Happening to enter into conversation
on the subject of sharp-shooters, the British
officer observed that Col. Forsyth’s men were
a terror to the British camp—that as far as
they could see they could select the officer
from the private, who of course fell a sacri-
fice to their precise shooting. He wished



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 97

very much to see a specimen of their shoot-
ing.

Forsyth gave the wink to one of his officers,
then at hand, who departed, and instructed
two of the best marksmen belonging to the
corps, to pass by the commanding officer’s
quarters at stated intervals. This being ar-
ranged, Col. Forsyth informed the British offi-
cer that his wish should be gratified, and ob-
served he would step in front of his tent to
see whether any of his men were near at
hand. According to the arrangement made,
one of thé best marksmen appeared. The
colonel ordered him to come forward, and in-
quired whether his rifle was in good order.
“ Yes, sir,” replied the man.

He then stuck a table knife in a tree about
fifty paces distant, and ordered the man to
split his ball. He fired, and the ball was
completely divided by the knife, perforating the
tree on each side. This astonished the Brit-
ish officer. Apropos, another soldier appear-
ed in sight. He was called, and ordered, at
the same distance, to shoot an ace of clubs out
of the card. This was actually done. The
British officer was confounded and amazed—
still more so when the colonel informed him
that four weeks before, those men were’ at
work in the capacity of husbandmen.

9



98 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

THE REBEL FLOWER,

An officer, distinguished by his inhumanity
and constant —_ of the unfortunate,
meeting Mrs. Charles Elliot in a garden
adorned with a great variety of flowers, asked
the name of the Camomile, which appeared
to flourish with peculiar luxuriance. “The
Rebel Flower,” she replied. “ Why was that
name given to it?” said the officer. “ Be-
cause,” rejoined the lady, “it thrives. most
when most trampled upon.”

RARE PRESENCE OF MIND.

At the battle of Eutaw Springs, after the
British line had been broken, and the Old
Buffs, a regiment that had boasted of the ex-
traordinary feats that they were to perform,
were running from the field, Lieutenant Man-
ning, in the enthusiasm of that valor for which
he was so eminently distinguished, sprang for-
ward in pursuit, directing the platoon which
he commanded to follow him. He did not
cast an eye behind him, until he found himself
near a large brick housein to which the York
volunteers, commanded by Cruger, were re-
tiring.

The British were on all sides of him, and



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12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:59 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:00 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:01 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:02:02 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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ANECDOTES

OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION;

SELECTED FROM

GARDEN'S ANECDOTES, GORDON’S LETTERS,
NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS, MASSACHUSET?S
HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS, NEW YORK HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS
AMERICAN ANECDOTES, HISTORICAL ANECDOTES,

OTHER WORKS ON HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY.

HARTFORD:
PUBLISHED BY C. M. WELLES.
1850.
Entered, according to ‘Act of Congress, in the year 1844, by
ALEXANDER V. BLAKE,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern Distriet
of New York.

Stereotyped by
RICHARD C. VALENTINE,
4 Gold Street, New York
CONTENTS.



Preface, ° «6 Mgt, ° 7
Introduction,

Madame Shatswell and the Whig Committe, -

Spirit of the Yankee Boys, .
Generosity of John Hancock, . . .
Sergeant Smith and his White Horse, .
Escape of Plunket from the British,

The Surgeon and the Ghost,

Sympathy of Washington, °
A Mistake turned to a — Account, .
Gallantry of a Youn + 6
The Wounded British ry ° 3

Lamenting the loss of a Hat, : ° °

The Stuttering Colonel, . .
Fighting on my own hook, . 8
Honesty of Livingston, . + + +
An Uninvited Guest, . . . é .
Good Feelings of er 7
Sir Guy Carlton, : 7 8
Inhumanity of ee. er
Yankee Capt 5 oe ele
American om . 8
La Fayette and Cornwallis, ° ee e¢@
Wit of a Ni . .

Civility of ashington, .
Maternal Tenderness, . ° : ‘
A Mistake on Sunday, 8

Dr. Franklin in Congress, +s 8
Magnanimity of Baron De Steuben, . .
Patriotic School Boys, . . «© .
An Unnecessary Alarm, . « «© .
A Nobly Reply, oe eet
Washington at Prayer, * 6 6

The End of a Farce, ° 7 6
Attention to Orders, . ° ° ee
Prose Better than Poetry, . 38 (lt

.

RPLSLSSRALS EASELS SEER SESSSEKE SITS
4 CUNTENTS.

Ordinary Fare of Marion, .

Mr. John Edwards and Admiral ‘Arbuthnot,

The Poor Fisherman and his Schooner,

Patriotism of Bishop White,

Bishop White a Chaplain of Congress,

Dr. Franklin’s Almanac,

.

.

General Prescott and the Connecticut Succotash,

Providential Interpositions, . °
Death of the Baron De Kalb, .
Execution of Col. Haynes, . +
General Morgan, ° ° °
Powder and Balls, . ° ° .
How to save a Dinner, .
No Bayonets here, .«

Poverty of the American Army, .
Mr. Robert Morris, « ‘
General Gadsden at St. Augustine,
The Amputation of a — ’
First Prayer in Congres .

Lord Stining and the ne British Spy, .
Military Courtesy, .

The Brave Little Yankee, e .
An Inconvenient Wound, . e
The British Lion, . 8
The Stuttering Soldier, . + +
The American Sharp-shooters, .«
The Rebel Flower, . . « ‘
Rare Presence of Mind, .

The Chevalier Duplessis Mauduit, .
Defending an Enemy, « :
Mrs. Isaac Holmes, . .
The Frenchman = the Negro, .

Female Wit, . ‘

Mrs. Jacob Motte, . .
Mrs. Thomas Heyward, . .
A Rare Act of Public Munificence,
Courageous Young Woman, . -
Governor Clinton, ° .
Remarkable Incident,

The Tables Turned, .

Gallantry of the Gloucester Militia,
Hickory Clubs,
CONTENTS.

Col. Stark and the Clerical Soldier, .
of Col. Stark,
How to cheat a Highway Robber, .
Anecdotes of Sergeant Jasper, .

Sagacity and Coura;

Washington’s Retaliation,

.

The Gun that could fire all day, .

Barbarity of the Loyalists,

Female Patriotism,

The Home-made Soldier,

The British Officer and the Miller,

A Son of Erin preferring a Razor to his Rations, |
Lord Cornwallis’ oj — of Sumter,
ndians frightened,

St. Leger and the

An Incident of the Revolution,
Col. Brown and General —

Yankee Mistake,

The Mysterious Stranger,

George Roberts, .

Sees Sea Captain in London, , . °
Acknowledging a Fault, the mark of a great Mind
A Specimen of Hard Fighting,

Morgan at the Battle of the owpens
Humor of Patrick Henry, .

Effects of Tea, .
Death of Major Andre,
Nancy Hart, .
Harriet Ackland,

Running the Gauntlet for Stealing Tea,
Major Pitcairn at Lexington, .
Mrs. Burr and the burning of Fairfield,
Eloquence of Patrick _— °

Emily Geiger,
Captain Ross, :

.

.

Samuel Adams and American Independence, ,

Baron Steuben’s Wit,

The British Parliament and the Stamp Act
Repeal of the Stamp Act,

Royal Commission Torn to Pieces,
of Bunker Hill,

The First Martyr
General Seas | Figh
You can spare one
American General,

a Duel,

tter than two,

1*
6 CONTENTS.

Eeking forward to the Gallows, . oe "38
Patriotism of Gen. Nelson, ° ’ . 7 ; 209
Benedict Arnold, a Traitor, . . » » Q11
Generosity of an American Lieutenant, - « « 12
Colonel Small, . » 213
Benevolence of Colonel Wm. Washington, » « 14
Fidelity to an Enemy, ° . . . 214
Patriotism of Benjamin West, . * . e ° 215
The Runaways become Captors, . ee ee R16
The British afraid of a Logof Wood, . . « 217
An Example of Fortitude, - =. + + + + 217
Deception of Tarleton, . + + + «© *& 218
Col. Owen Roberts, . ‘ . > ° ‘ - 219
Mr. John Adams, .- . ‘ . s 220
Situation of the American Army, © ew RB
Meeting an Emergency, .- owe RRB
Religious Feeling of the Revolution, Ve. es 8k
General Putnam’s Entrance into the ae . «+ = 229
A Fable, by Samuel Adams, $ i . 230
Noble conduct of the Earl of Effingham, 6 «231
De Kalb’s aceount of his Family, - «+ + 232
General Marion’s Address to his Soldiers, . . 235
Rey. Thomas Allen, . .- 2 ew 237
An American Soldier, . . : . 7 ; 238
Benedict Arnold, the Traitor, « + + + + 239
Gen. Andrew Pickens, - . ‘ ‘ . ¢ 240
General Stuart, . . ’ . é . 243
La Fayette and an old Soldier, . ’ : . 244
Red Jacket, - ¢ ¢ ° ° . 245
The Retort Courteous, - . ° : ° . 246
The Best Road in America, . . 7 7 246
British Ingratitude, . . . : 247
Mrs. McKay and Colonel Brown, » 6 «+ 250
Yankee Indignation, . : . 251

Magnanimity of M. De Bouille, . . . 252
PREFACE.



Tue following Anecdotes were principally selected by
a youth of twelve years of age. Having had constant ac-
cess to 4 library well supplied with books on History and
Biography, he early acquired a taste for reading such
works ; and the present small volume is one of the results
of such an attention to this species of literature. The
selection was made at intervals between hours of devotion
to elementary and classical study ; and may hence be
viewed as having been rather an amusement, than a labor
of painful toil and research.

The utility of compilations like the present is too well
known to require particular commendation. They are
always read with avidity, if well made ; being usually
preferred to the most fascinating kinds of fiction; and
what is far more important, they are among the most
beneficial books to be found. They almost invariably cre-
ate a taste for reading history and biography. Good an-
ecdotes in these literary regions are analogous to the pre-
cious stones found in the bosom of the earth; which,
though sparsely scattered, will long be sought with the
most cheerful and untiring assiduity. A single case of
success may cheer on the fond and enthusiastic votary of
these deeply hid treasures, even for months, amidst noth
wg but the mere rubbish that contains them.

So it is with persons in reading history and biography
8 PREFACE.

they press forward, without apparent wearisomeness,
through the more dull and uninteresting details, that they
may here and there gather up these choice fragments.
Nor is this all; by successive gleanings of such frag-
ments, a desire will be created to examine the frames in
which the pictures are enclosed; in other words, to
know more of the characters of the individuals—and of
the times—and of the historical events with which they
are connected. It is believed, that the reading of a work
like the present, will usually lead young persons espe-
cially, to the study of larger and more systematic pro-
ductions on all kindred subjects.

And, it may be added, that the brief and sententious re-
mark, which commonly characterizes a good anecdote,
will furnish a better index to the distinctive peculiarities
of the individual that utters it, than a whole essay of dull
and didactic description ; it will cast a gleam of light on
all his mental delineations not to be found otherwise, save
in familiar personal acquaintance. This of itself would
give value to the present effort to benefit the public, suffi-
cient to balance all the labor it occasioned.

J. L. BLAKE,

New York, May 1, 1844.
INTRODUCTION.



Tue American Revolution should always be contem-
plated in reference to the great moral interests of the civil-
ized world. There are important analogies between the
physical and the social organizations of our globe. These
analogies may not at once be apparent, in all their relay
tions, to the superficial observer. But to the eye of the
philosopher, their delineations are deeply and distinctly
marked. They cannot be misapprehended; and they
give a satisfactory solution to phenomena, that wouls
otherwise remain inexplicable mysteries.

The remark has a thousand times been made, that to
human apprehension, the organizations of the world, both
physical and social, embrace a compound of good and
evil. The proportions appear to vary under different cir-
cumstances, and to the ken of different individuals, as
they may be severally constituted or predisposed. In
each, after a due course of operation, certain develop-
ments are the necessary result. From these develop-
ments the philosopher becomes confirmed in a faith that
he adopted as a matter of hypothesis; and from them
likewise the Christian becomes confirmed in his faith,
which had been received from Divine Revelation.

These observations are suggested as preliminary to a
very brief exposition of the moral results of the American
10 INTRODUCTION.

Revolution. Human warfare, especially in its more bar-
barous forms, is terrifying, even to the imagination. It
can be justified only by the necessity for it, and the con-
sequences flowing from its existence. We look upon it
in the abstract, as we do upon the most frightful convul-
sions of nature. Here the elements are thrown into vio-
lent agitation ; the earth inwardly moves as if in agony ;
the winds howl; the clouds blacken: the tempest rages ;
the lightning darts its flashes through the regions of
space ; we shrink back in terror at the threatening danger
and the overwhelming grandeur of the scene; but how
soon does all become quiet and beautiful! How soon
does the whole become an impressive lesson in making
known to us the wisdom and goodness of the Deity, be-
yond what could be known from the ordinary course of
nature !

How illustrative is this of what we witness in the dis-
orders of society! We cannot reflect upon human suf-
fering with an unmoved heart. The view of a slaughtered
army ; the dying groans of the wounded ; the tears and
distress of the wife made a widow, and the mother made
childless, in the progress of a civil war like that to which
we are alluding, does verily overpower the stoutest minds,
and cause a kind of paralysis to come over the social af-
fections. But we know, after all, these desolations are
usually succeeded by exhibitions of kindness and social
virtue, and general prosperity, that would not otherwise
have come into existence. Observation will satisfy every
one that such is the fact. And philosophy may teach us,
that amid all these evils a redeeming spirit will introduce
INTRODUCTION. 11

us toa more enlarged and exalted state of enjoyment.
This appears to be the governing law of the world.

Nor is this all. A more familiar, and still a more strik-
ing, illustration of the principle suggested, may be stated.
The tender mother may nurture her daughters in the most
delicate manner; may shudder at the idea of their becom-
ing removed from the maternal roof, and from maternal
assiduity and kindness, to encounter the frowns of adver-
sity which may lurk in their path; and especially to en-
dure the pains and the trials incident to womanhood. In
her paroxysms of fearful anxiety she may even be dis-
posed to restrain them within the reach of her affectionate
protection, thereby securing them against the liabilities
to personal suffering, and eare, and anguish, which she has
herself experienced. This isa case of no rare occurrence.
There is no fiction in the picture. We have seen the
reality hundreds of times.

But how ignorant is such a mother of the laws that
govern human existence! Her love is ardent and sincere ;
but her philosophy is unsound. Were her fond imagin-
ings, and her half-formed wishes to prevail, how imper-
fectly would these tender daughters subserve the great
purpose of their being !—society would lose many of its
most delightful charms; and the world itself could
scarcely maintain its accustomed routine of beneficent
existence. On the other hand, let them embark on the
broad theatre of life ; let them become mothers ; let them
exert their controlling and powerful influences upon the
_ other sex; let generation thus succeed generation, and

how much good is produced, compared with what would
12 INTRODUCTION.

be seen, were she, in her mistaken kindness, to have

thwarted the intentions of nature !

The indulgent father, too, may shudder at the idea of
permitting his favorite inexperienced boys to become the
victims of disappointment, and knavery, and insult, which
may befa]l them, should they plunge into the whirlpool of
business without his protection. But were his feelings,
and not his reason, to regulate their destiny, in vain

would he look for the enterprise and the vigorous capa- |
bilities in business that would crown them with success —

and honorable reputation, and to which the man of the

j

world bends all his efforts. Without this training and —

these hazards, that are generally the lot of young men
in the arena of the world’s turmoils, and which make
the kind father almost shudder, who would become pow-
erful by the exertions of his intellect? Who would ac-
cumulate wealth, and give employment and sustenance to
the laboring classes of the community? Who would
have the means to endow public institutions, and to make
glad the unfortunate poor by uncounted benefactions ?
Analogous to this is the case of our country, as con-
nected with the revolution. ‘The capabilities of a coun-
. try in a colonial state can no more be developed, than
physical and intellectual capabilities in man, while under
the restraints of parental tutelage, to which allusion has
been made. Had the American states remained in alle-
giance to the British government without resistance,
thousands and thousands of violent deaths might have
been prevented ; floods of tears might have had no occa-
sion to flow; countless numbers of bleeding and aching

i ar
INTRODUCTION. 13

hearts might never have been pierced; and there might
have been none of that general desolation now recorded
in the history of that memorable crisis. Yet, these were
the perils, and the agonies, that gave sinew, and strength
and greatness, and manhood to the country.

Had it not been for them, the population of the now
confederate states of the American Republic might not
have been one third what it now is. Had it not been
for them, the American Union would have been without
that national character which now commands respect and
reverence in every quarter of the globe. Had it not been
for them, that spirit of American enterprise that now
places the country, in national rank, and in fair competi-
tion for whatever is great and honorable and good, with
the mother country, would never have existed, The
American Revolution, therefore, may be considered one
of the great agencies of Providence for renovating the
condition of the world.

»
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ANECDOTES,

MADAME SHATSWELL AND THE WHIG COMMITTEE,

Ar the time of the war of the revolution, the
lady of the manor, Ipswich, Massachusetts,
was a descendant of Simon Bradstreet, one of
the early governors of the province, whom
Mather calls the “Nestor of New England.”
Her husband was a stanch whig, a leader of
one of the classes into which the town was
divided ; and though the good lady coincided
fully in his political sentiments, she did not
much like the infringement upon domestic lux-
uries which many of the patriotic resolutions
of the meetings contemplated.

In short, Madame Shatswell loved her cup
of tea, and as a large store had been provided
for family use before the tax, she saw no harm
in using it as usual upon the table. There
were in those days, as there are now, certain
busybodies who kindly take upon themselves
the oversight of their neighbors’ affairs, and
through them the news of the treason spread
over the town. A committee from the people
immediately called at the house to protest
16 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

against the drinking of tea. Some months pass-
ed away, and one sabbath, Madame Shats-
well’s daughter, a bright-eyed, coquettish dam-
sel, appeared at church in a new bonnet.
This was a new. cause of excitement, and the
committee came again to administer reproof.

The lady satisfied them again, however:
and they, finding that the hat contained no
treason to the people’s cause, again departed.
Two years of the war had now passed away,
and meanwhile the daughter, Seonatin had
found a lover. It was the beginning of win-
ter; the army had just gone into winter quar-
ters; and the young suitor was daily expect-
edhome. Wishing to appear well in his eyes,
the maiden had spun and woven with her
own hands a new linen dress, from flax raised
upon the homestead; and some old ribands
long laid aside, having been washed and iron-
ed to trim it withal, the damsel appeared in it
at church the Sunday after her lover's arrival.
Here was fresh cause of alarm, and forthwith
on Monday morning came the officious com-
mittee, to remonstrate against the extrava-
gance.

The old lady’s spirit was now aroused, and
she could contain herself no longer. “ Do
you come here,’ was her well-remembered
reply—*“ do you come here to take me to task
because my daughter wore a gown she spun —
and wove with her own hands? Three times —
have you interfered with my family affairs. —
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 17

Three times have you come to tell me that my
husband would be turned out of his office.
Now mark me! There is the door! As you
came in, so you may go out! But if you ever
cross my threshold again, you shall find that
calling Hannah Bradstreet a tory, will not
make her a coward!” It is needless to add
that Madame Shatswell’s family affairs were
thereafter left to her own guidance.

——_—_

SPIRIT OF THE YANKEE BOYS.

The British troops which were sent to Bos-
ton, to keep that rebellious town in order, were
everywhere received with the most unequiv-
ocal marks of anger and detestation. During
their stay “the very air seemed filled with
suppressed breathings of indignation.”

“The insolence and indiscretion of some
subaltern officers increased the ill-will of the
citizens; and vexations and quarrels multi-
plied daily.” At this period of public exaspera-
tion, the boys were much in the habit of build-
ing hills of snow, and sliding from them to the
pond in the Common. The English troops,
from the mere love of tantalizing, destroyed
all their labors. They complained of the in-
jury, and industriously set about repairs.
However, when they returned from school,
they found the snow hills again levelled.

2
18 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

Several of them now waited upon the Brit-
ish captain to inform him of the misconduct
of his soldiers. No notice was taken of their
complaint, and the soldiers every day grew
more provokingly insolent. At last, they re-
solved to call a meeting of all the largest
boys in town, and wait upon General Gage,
commander-in-chief of the British forces.

When shown into his presence, he asked, with
some surprise, why so many children had call-—
ed tosee him. “ We come, sir,” said the fore-

most of them, “to claim a redress of griev-
ances.”

“What, have your fathers been teaching
you rebellion, and sent you here to utter it ?”
“ Nobody sent us, sir,” replied the speaker,
while his cheek reddened, and his dark eye
flashed: “we have never injured or insulted
your troops ; but they have trodden down our
snow-hills, and broken the ice on our skating
ground. We complained, and they called us
young rebels, and told us to help ourselves, if
we could. We told the captain of this, and
he laughed at us.

“ Yesterday our works were a third time de-
stroyed ; and now we will bear it no longer.”
General Gage looked at them with undisguis-

ed admiration, and turning to an officer who —

stood near him, he exclaimed, “ Good heavens!
the very children draw in a love of liberty



with the air they breathe”’—and added, “ You —

may go, my brave boys; and be assured that
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 19

if any of my troops hereafter molest you, they
shall be severely punished.”



GENEROSITY OF JOHN HANCOCK.

During the siege at Boston, General Wash-
ington consulted Congress upon the propriety
of bombarding the town of Boston. r. Han-
cock was then President of Congress. After
General Washington’s letter was read, a sol-
emn silence ensued. This was broken by a
member making a motion that the House
should resolve itself into a committee of the
whole, in order that Mr. Hancock might give
his opinion upon the important subject, as he
was deeply interested from having all his es-
tate in Boston. After he left the chair, he
addressed the chairman of the committee of
the whole, in the following words. “It is
true, sir, nearly all the pro I have in the
world is in houses and other in the
town of Boston; but if the e _ of the
British army from it, and the liberties of our
country require their being burnt to ashes—is-
sue the order for that purpose immediately |”







SERGEANT SMITH AND HIS WHITE HORSE.

At the very first exhibition of American
courage, which proved so fatal to the Britisk
20 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

troops in their excursion to Lexington and
Concord, Sergeant Smith showed himself a
skilful marksman. Learning from rumor,
which seemed to have spread that night with
a speed almost miraculous, the destination of
the detachment, he arose from his bed, equip-
ped himself with cartridges and a famous rifle
he had used at Lovell’s fight at Fryeburg, sad-
dled his horse, and started for Lexington meet-
ing-house. Meeting with a variety of hin-
derances, and twice escaping narrowly from
some straggling parties of the red-coats, it
was late when he arrived on the ground, and |
the troops were already on their rapid retreat
towards Boston.

Learning that the people were all abroad,
lining the fences and the woods to keep up
the fire upon the enemy, he started in pursuit,
and in the course of a few miles, on riding up
a hill, he found the detachment just before
him. Throwingythe reins upon his horse, and
starting hi ull speed, he rode within a
close alae and fired at one of the leading
officers. e officer fell; and the sergeant,
retreating to a safe distance, loaded his rifle
again, and again rode up and fired, with equal
success. He pursued the same course a third
time, when the leader of the retreating body
ordered a platoon to fire at him.

It was unavailing, however; and a fourth,
fifth, and sixth time, the old rifle had picked off
its man, while its owner retreated in safety,
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 21

‘D—n the man !” exclaimed the officer, “ give
me a musket, and I'll see if he bears a charm-
ed life, if he comes in sight again.” It was
but a moment, and again the old white horse
came over the brow of a hill. The officer
fired, but in vain; before the smoke of his
charge had cleared away, he too had fallen
before the unerring marksman, and was left
behind by his flying troops.

When the day had closed, the wounded
were collected by the neighbors upon the
road, and every kindness rendered to them.
The officer was not dead, and on being laid
upon a bed where his wounds could be exam-
ined, his first question, even under the appre-
hension of immediate death, was, “ Who was
that old fellow on the white horse !”

ESCAPE OF PLUNKETT FROM ~~

Captain Plunkett, a high-spirited Irishman,
whose attachment to the cause of liberty had
led‘him to seek a commission in the continen-
tal army, had, by the chances of war, been
compelled to give up his sword, and to sur-
render himself a prisoner to the enemy. Pre-
viously to this untoward event, by the suavity
of his manners, and uniformly correct conduct,
he had rendered himself an acceptable guest
-
22 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

in many families in Philadelphia, and particu-
larly so, to one of the Society of Friends, who,
however averse to warfare, were not insensi-
ble of the claims of those to their regard, who,
by the exercise of manly and generous feel-
ings, delighted to soften its asperities.

There was among them a female, mild and
gentle as a dove, yet, in firmness of mind, a
heroine, and in personal charms, an angel.
She saw the sufferings of the captive soldier,
and under the influence of pity, or perhaps a
more powerful passion, resolved, at all haz-
ards, to relieve him.’ It accidentally happen-
ed that the uniform of Captain Plunkett's
regiment bore a striking resemblance to that
of a British corps, which was frequently set
as a guard over the prison in which he was
confined. A new suit of regimentals was
in consequence procured and conveyed, with-
out suspicion of sinister design, to the Cap-
tain.

On the judicious use of these rested the
hopes of the dair Friend to give him freedom.
It frequently happened that officers of inferior
grade, while their superiors affected to shun
all intercourse with rebels, would enter the
apartments of the prisoners, and converse
with them with kindness and familiarity, and
then at their pleasure retire, Two sentinels
constantly walked the rounds without, and
the practice of seeing their officers walking
in and out of the interior prison, became so
s
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 23

familiar, as scarcely to attract notice, and
constantly caused them to give way without
hesitation, as often as an officer showed a dis-
position to retire. .

Captain Plunkett took advantage of this
circumstance, and putting on his new coat,
at the moment that the relief of the guard
was taking place, sallied forth, twirling a
switch carelessly about, and ordering the ex-
terior door of the prison to be opened, walked
without opposition into the street. Repairing
without delay to the habitation of his fair
friend, he was received with kindness, and
for some days secreted and cherished with
every manifestation of affectionate regard.
To elude the vigilance of the British guards,
if he attempted to pass into the country
in his present dress, was deemed impossi-
ble.

Woman’s wit, however, is never at a loss
for contrivances, while swayed by the influ-
ences of love or benevolence. Both, in this
instance, may have aided invention. Plunkett
had three strong claims in his favor: he was
a handsome man—a soldier—and an Irish-
man. The general propensity of the Qua-
kers in favor of the royal cause, exempted
the sect in a great measure from suspicion ; in
so great a degree indeed, that the barriers of
the city were generally intrusted to the care
of their members, as the best judges of the
characters of those persons that might be al-
*
24 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

lowed to pass them, without injury to the
British interests.

A female Friend, of low origin, officiating
as a servant on a farm near the city, was in
the family, on a visit to a relative. A pretext
was formed to present her with a new suit of
clothes, in order to possess that which she
wore when she entered the city. Captain
Plunkett was immediately disguised as a wo-
man, and appeared at the barrier accompanied
by his anxious deliverer. “ Friend Roberts,”
said the enterprising enthusiast, “may this
damsel and myself pass to visit a friend at a
neighboring farm?” “Certainly,” said Rob-
erts, “go forward.” The city was speedily —
left behind, and Capt. Plunkett found himself
safe, under the protection of Colonel Allen
M’Lean, his particular friend.



THE SURGEON AND THE GHOST.

A circumstance occurred during the encamp--
ment of General Lincoln at Perrysburg, that
from its singularity deserves to be recorded.
A soldier named Fickling, by the irregularity
of his conduct, long excited the indignation of
his comrades, and, at length, from repeated —
efforts to escape to the enemy, had been —
brought to trial, and condemned to death. It
happened that, as he was led to execution, the
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 25

surgeon-general of the army passed accident-
ally on his, way to his quarters, which were at
some distance off. On being tied up to the
fatal tree, the removal of the ladder caused
the rope to break, and the culprit fell to the
ground.

This circumstance, to a man of better char-
acter, might have proved of advantage ; but,
being universally considered as a miscreant,
from whom no good could ever be expected
a new rope was sought for, which Lieuten-
ant Hamilton, the adjutant of the First Regi-
ment, a stout and heavy man, essayed by
every means, but without effect, to break.
Fickling was then haltered, and again turned
off, when, to the astonishment of the bystand-
ers, the rope untwisted, and he fell a second
time, uninjured, to the ground. A cry for
mercy was now general throughout the ranks,
which occasioned Major Ladson, aid-de-camp
to General Lincoln, to gallop to head-quar-
ters, to make a representation of facts, which
no sooner were stated, than an immediate par-
don was granted, accompanied with the order
that he should instantaneously be drummed,
with every mark of infamy, out of camp, and
threatened with instant death if ever he
should, at any future time, be found attempt-
ing to approach it.

In the interim, the surgeon-general had es-
tablished himself at his quarters, in a distant
barn, little doubting but that the catastrophe

3
26 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.



was at an end, and that Fickling was quietl
resting in the grave. Midnight was at han
and he was busily engaged in writing, when,
hearing the approach of a footstep, he raised
his eyes, and saw with astonishment the figure
of the man who had, in his opinion, been ex-
ecuted, slowly and with haggard countenance
approaching towards him.
“How! how is this?” exclaimed the doctor,
in great terror. “ Whence come you? What
do you want with me? Were you not hanged
this morning ?” “ Yes, sir,” replied the resusci-
tated man, “I am the wretch you saw going
to the gallows, and who was hanged.” “Keep —
your distance,” said the doctor, “ approach
me not till you say ne 2 ay come here ?” |
“Simply, sir, to solicit food. I am no ghost,
doctor. The rope broke twice while the
executioner was doing his office, and the
general thought proper to pardon me.” “If
that be the case,” rejoined the doctor, “ eat
and welcome ; but I beg of you, in future, to
have a little more consideration, and not in-
trude so unceremoniously into the apartment
of one who had every reason to suppose that —
you were an inhabitant of the tomb.”



SYMPATHY OF WASHINGTON.

General Washington one day stopping for
refreshment at a house in New Jersey, in


ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 27

which a wounded officer lay, who was sensi-
bly agitated by the slightest noise, constantly
spoke in an under tone of voice, and at the
table, in every movement, evinced marked
consideration for the sufferer. Retiring to
another apartment at the conclusion of the
meal, the gentlemen of his family, unrestrain-
ed by his presence, were less particular.
They spoke in higher tones; when the gener-
al, who heard them with uneasiness, immedi-
ately returning, opened the door with great
caution, and walking on tip-toe to the extrem-
ity of the apartment, took a book from the
mantel-piece, and, without uttering a word,
again retired.

The gentlemen took the hint, so respectfully
given, and silence ensued. This anecdote
serves to relate, not only in this particular in-
cident, but in every case, the sympathy mani-
fested by the Father of his country ar any
individual was suffering from pain. He was
considerate, affectionate, and kind, to the poor
man as well as to the rich ; his purse was ever
open to the needy ; forgiving, but firm, and a
lover of justice ; such was Washington.

A MISTAKE TURNED TO A GOOD ACCOUNT.

Some time previous to the evacuation of
Charlestown, Colonel Menzies, of the Penn
28 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.





sylvania line, received a letter from a Hes.
sian officer within the garrison, who had once
been a prisoner, and treated by him with
kindness, expressing an earnest desire to show
his gratitude, by executing any commission
with which he would please to honor him.
Colonel Menzies replied to it, requesting him
to send him twelve dozen cigars ; but, being a
German by birth, and little accustomed to ex-
press himself in English, he was not very ac-
curate in his orthography, and wrote sizars.
«T'was no sooner said than done ;” twelve
dozen pairs of scissors were accordingly sent
him, which, for a time, occasioned much mer-
riment in the camp, at the expense of the
Colonel, but no man knew better how to profit
from the mistake. Money was not at the
period in circulation; and by the aid of his
runner, distributing his scissors over the coun.
try, in exchange for poultry, Menzies lived
luxuriously, while the fare of his brother offi.
cers was a scanty pittance of famished beef,
bull-frogs from ponds, and cray-fish from the
neighboring ditches.



GALLANTRY OF A YOUNG BOY.

When Captain Falls, at the battle of Ram-
sours mill, received a mortal wound and fell,
his son, a youth of fourteen, rushed to the
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 29

body, as the man who had shot him was pre-
paring to plunder it; regardless of his Eee
nent’s strength, the intrepid youth, snate

up his father’s sword, plunged it into the
breast of the soldier, and laid him dead at his
feet.



THE WOUNDED BRITISH OFFICER.

During the action at Stono, Lieutenant
Parham, the adjutant of the light infantry, was
stationed by Major Pinckney in the rear of
the continentals, purposely to keep the men
in their stations, and prevent the possibility
of skulkers falling behind. As he passed
over the field of battle, a British officer, des-
perately wounded, pressed him so earnestly
to afford. him a drink of water, to slake con-
suming thirst, that to refuse was deemed im-
possible, and the request was complied with.

The British officer now presenting an ele-
gant watch, said,—* Take it, sir, ’tis yours by
conquest ; your generous procedure, too, gives
you still greater title to it.” “I came into
the field,” said Parham, “to fight, and not to
plunder ; it gives me pleasure to have render-
ed you service: I ask no other recompense.”
“Keep it for me then, in trust,” rejoined the
officer, “till we meet again, for if left in my
hands, it may be wrested from me by some

3
30 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

marauder, who, to secure silence, may inflict
death.” “1 will accede to your wishes, and
take charge of it,” said Parham, “ but, as soon
as an opportunity occurs, I will consider it a
sacred duty to return it.”

A very considerable period elapsed before a
second meeting took place ; but, in strict con-
formity to his honorable feeling and volun-
tary promise, Parham no sooner found himself
within reach of the man to whom he had
pledged the restitution of his property, than

e waited upon him, presented the watch,
and was greeted with an expression of grate-
ful commendation, that amply rewarded his
correct and liberal conduct.




—_—_—

LAMENTING THE LOSS OF A HAT,

At the battle of Eutaw, when General
Marion’s brigade was displaying in face of
the enemy, Captain Gee, who commanded the
front platoon, was shot down, and supposed
to be mortally wounded. The ball passed —
through the cock of a handsome hat that he
had recently procured, tearing the crown ve
“much, and, in its progress, the head also. He
lay for a considerable time insensible ; the
greater part of the day had passed without a—
favorable symptom ; when, suddenly reviving,
his first inquiry was after his beaver, which
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 31

being brought him, a friend at the same time
lamenting the mangled state of his head, he
exclaimed—* O never think of the head ; time
and the doctor will put that to rights; but it
grieves me to think that the rascals have
ruined my hat forever.”



THE STUTTERING COLONEL.

Colonel Peter Horry was a descendant of
one of the many Protestant families who re-
moved to Carolina from France, after the
revocation of the edict of Nantz. He early
took up arms in defence of his country, and
through all the trials of peril and privation,
experienced by Marion’s brigade, gave ample
proof of his strict integrity and undaunted
courage. The fame which he acquired, as one
of the band of heroes who defended the post
at Sullivan’s Island, was never tarnished.
For, although in a moment of despondency he
once said to his general—*I fear our happy
days are all gone by ;” it was not the conse-
quences that might accrue to himself, but the
miseries apprehended for his country, that
caused the exclamation, for never were his
principles shaken—never, even for a moment,
did the thought of submission enter his bo-
som.

No man more eagerly sought the foe ; none
32 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

braved danger with greater intrepidity, or
more strenuously endeavored to sustain the
military reputation of his country. A ludi-
crous story is told of him, that, thoug:. prob-
ably varied in the narration, has its founda-
tion in truth. Colonel Horry was once or-.
dered to wait the approach of a British de-
tachment in ambuscade; a service he per-
formed with such skill, that he had them
completely within his power; when, from a
dreadful impediment in his speech, by which
he was afflicted, he could not articulate the
word—* fire.” In vain he made the attempt
—it was, “fi, fi, fi, fi,’—but he could get no
further. At length, irritated almost to mad-
ness, he exelaimed—*Shoot, d—n you—shoot,
—you know very well what I would say,—
shoot, shoot— ;” accompanying the words with —
an oath.

He was present in every engagement of
consequence, and on all occasions increased —
his reputation. At Quimby, Colonel Baxter,
a gallant soldier, possessed of great coolness,
and still greater simplicity of character, call-
ing out, “I am wounded, colonel!” Horry re-
plied—* Think no more of it, Baxter, but
stand to your post.” “But I can’t stand,
colonel—I am wounded a second time!”
“Then lie down, Baxter, but quit not your

.” “Colonel,” cried the wounded man,
“they have shot me again, and if I remain
any longer here, I shall be shot to pieces.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 33

“Be it so, Baxter, but stir not.” He obeyed
the order, and actually received a fourth
wound before the engagement ended.



“ FIGHTING ON MY OWN HOOK.”

At the battle of Yorktown, while the aids
of the American chief were issuing his orders
along the line, a man was discovered a short
distance from it, who presented rather a gro-
tesque appearance, being dressed in the coarse
common cloth worn at the time by the lower
orders in the back country, with an otter-cap,
the shape of which very much resembled the
steeple of a meeting-house, and a broad lea-
ther apron. His equipments consisted of a
small woodchuck’s skin, sewed together in the
form of a bag, and partly filled with powder,
and an old rusty gun, which meas about
seven feet eight inches from the muzzle to
the end of the breech, and which had probably
lain in the smoke ever since the landing of
the pilgrims.

One of the aids passing him in the course
of his rounds, inquired of him to what regi-
ment he belonged. “I belong to no regi-
ment,” said the fellow, after he had fired his
“long carbine.” A few moments after the
officer rode by again; but seeing the fellow
very busy, and sweating with exertion, he
34 ANECDOTES OF THE, REVOLUTION.

once more inquired to what regiment he be-
longed. “To no regiment,” was the answer;
the speaker at the same time levelled his piece
at a “red-coat,” who was preparing to fire,
but who dropped dead before he had half rais-
ed his gun. “To what company do you be-
long ?”—* To no company.”—* To what bat-
talion do you belong ?”—* To no battalion.”—
“Then where the d——1 do you belong, or
whom are you fighting for ?”—* Dang ye,” said
the fellow, “I don’t belong anywhere, J am
Sighting on my own hook !”

HONESTY OF LEVINGSTONE.

A soldier of General Marion’s brigade,
named Levingstone, an Irishman by birth,
meeting with an armed party, on a night
profoundly dark, suddenly found a horseman’s
pistol applied to his breast, and heard the im-
perious command—* Declare, instantaneous-
ly, to what party you belong, or you are a
dead man.” ‘The situation being such as to
render it highly probable that it might be a —
British party, he very calmly replied, “I think, —
sir, it would be a little more in the way'of —
civility if you were to drop a hint, just to let —
me know which side of the question you are —
pleased to favor.” “No jestirig,” replied the
speaker, “declare your principles, or die.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 35

“ Then ” rejoined Levingstone, “I will not
die with a lie in my mouth. American, to
extremity, you spalpeen; so do your worst,
and —— to you.” “You are an honest -fel-
low,” said the inquirer: “ we are friends, and
I rejoice to meet a man faithful'as you are
to the cause of our country.” .



AN UNINVITED GUEST.

During the siege of Yorktown, Baron de
Steuben, giving a breakfast to several of the
field-officers of the army, in the course of the
entertainment, while festivity was at its
height, and in anticipation of the honors
which await@d them, mirth and good-humor
abounded, a shell from the enemy fell into the
centre of the circle formed by his guests.
There was no time for retreat; to fall pros-
trate on the earth afforded the only chance
of escape. Every individual stretched himself
at his length. The shell burst with tremendous
explosion, covering the whole party with mud
and. dirt, which proved rather a source of
merriment than serious concern, since none
of the party sustained any further inconveni-
ence.
36 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

GOOD FEELINGS OF WASHINGTON.

Washington was never known to injure
intentionally the feelings of any person, no
matter whether his friend or his most hostile
enemy. In illustration of this trait, an inci-
dent may be related, referring to the surren-
der at Yektean, While the continental
troops were preparing to receive the British,
who were to march forth from the garrison, and
deliver up their arms, Washington was heard
to remark to the troops—* My brave fellows,
let no sensation of satisfaction for the tri-
umphs you have gained, induce you to insult
your fallen enemy—let no shouting, no clam-
orous huzzaing increase their, mortification. ©
It is sufficient satisfaction to us, that we wit- _
ness their humiliation. Posterity will huzza
for us.”



SIR GUY CARLETON.

While the gallant defence of Quebec, by
General Carleton, evinced the excellence of
his military talents, and his liberal treatment
of the vanquished did honor to his humanity,
particular credit is due to him, for his skilful
management even of the prejudices of the
trooy s under his command. Apprehending,
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 37

during the protracted siege, that the return of
St. Patrick’s Day would occasion the soldiers
of the garrison, chiefly Irishmen, to indulge
too freely in generous libations to the memo
of the patron saint of Erin; and that his vigi-
lant adversary would profit by their intemper-
ance to attack the town; in orders, issued on
the 16th of March, he invited “ all true Irish-
men to meet him on the following day, at 12
o’clock, on parade, to drink the health of the
king, St. Patrick’s Day being, for that year
only, put off till the 4th of June.” An Irish.
man himself, and highly honored by all who
served under him, his proposition was applaud-
ed, and perfect sobriety reigned where, ac-
cording to all former experience, riot and dis-
order alone were to be looked for.



INHUMANITY OF TARLETON.

From the vicinity of Rocky Mount, an al-
most beardless youth, of the name of Wade,
was seduced to enrol himself in the ranks of
Tarleton’s Legion. Repentance quickly fol-
lowed his departure from duty; and he de-
serted with the hope of rejoining his family
and friends. Fate forbade it. He was taken,
tried, and sentenced to receive A THOUSAND
Lasues. It is scarcely necessary to relate the
sequel. He expired under the infliction of the
punishment !

4
38 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

YANKEE CAPTAIN.

Till the last hour that the British kept posses-
sion of New York, independent of custom-house
forms, they obliged the captains of American
vessels, bringing in articles for sale, to dance
attendance, in many instances, for days toge-
ther, seeking passports, to prevent detention
by the guard-ships. An unfortunate Yankee
who had sold his notions, and was impatient
to depart, having been repeatedly put off
with frivolous excuses, and bid to “ call again,”
indignantly exclaimed, “ Well, I vow, for a beat-
en people, you are the most saucy that I ever
met with.” “Make out that fellow’s passport
immediately,” said the superintendent to an
officiating clerk, “ and get rid of him.”



AMERICAN AIR-GUNS.

Some British officers, soon after Gage’s arri-
val in Boston, walking on Beacon Hill after

sunset, were affrighted by noises in the air,
’ (supposed to be flying bugs and _beetles,)
which they took to be the sound of bullets.
They left the hill with great precipitation,
spread the alarm in their encampment, and
wrote terrible accounts to England of being
shot at with air-guns, as appe=ed by their
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 39

letters, extracts of which were soon after pub-
lished in London papers. Indeed, for some
time they really believed that the Americans
possessed a kind of magic white powder,
which exploded and killed without a report.
In that much celebrated and admirable

poem of the day, M’Fingal, the circumstance
is thus satirized :

No more the British colonel runs

From whizzing beetles as air guns ;

Thinks horn-bugs, bullets, or thro’ fears

Moschetoes takes for musketeers :

Nor ’scapes, as if you’d gained supplies

From Beelzebub’s whole host of flies.

No bug these warlike hearts appals ;

They better know the sound of balls.



LA FAYETTE AND CORNWALLIS.

For some months previous to the capture
of Cornwallis, and while his army were tra-
versing the Carolinas and Virginia, he was
opposed by the Marquis de La Fayette, with
an inferior force. So confident was he of sue-
cess, and so much did he despise the extreme
youth of La Fayette, that he unguardedly
wrote, in a letter, which was afterwards in-
tercepted, “ The boy cannot escape me.”

He once formed the plan of surprising the
Marquis, who was on the same side of James
river with himself; but was prevented by the
f4u wing incident. General Z Fayette, wish-
40 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

ing to ascertain the particular situation of his
opponent, contrived to send a spy into his
camp to obtain intelligence. Having reached
the British camp, the spy was soon introduced
to his lordship, who inquired the reason of
his deserting the American army. Charles
Morgan artfully replied, “I have been in the
continental service from the beginning ; and
while under Washington, | was well satis-
fied ; but being now commanded by a French-
man, I am dissatisfied, and have quitted their
service.”

Lord Cornwallis commended his conduct ;
and Charley, without suspicion, entered upon
the double duties of an English soldier and an
American spy. While in conversation with
his officers, Lord Cornwallis asked Charley
how long it would take the Marquis to cross
James river. Pausing a moment, he replied,
“Three hours, my lord.” “Three hours!”
exclaimed his lordship—* it will take three
days.” “No, my lord,” said Charley, “the
Marquis has such a number of boats, and
each boat will carry so many men. If you
will please to calculate, you will find that he
can cross in three hours.” His lordship,
turning to his officers, said, “ The scheme will
not do.”

After obtaining the necessary information,
Morgan prepared to return to the American
camp; and he prevailed on seven British sol
diers to desert with him.



ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 41

“ Well, Charley, have you got back ?” said
the Marquis, when he returned to head-quar-
ters.

“ Yes, please your Excellency ; and I have
brought seven men with me.”

The Major-general offered to reward him,
but he refused money ; and when it was pro-
posed to promote him to the rank of sergeant,
or corporal, he replied, “I have ability to dis-
charge the duties of a common soldier, and
my character stands fair ; but should I be pro-
moted, I may fail and lose my reputation.”
He, however, requested that his destitute
comrades, who came with him, might be fur-
nished with shoes and clothing ; which was
very readily complied with.

WIT OF A NEGRO.

When the Count D’Estaing’s fleet appeared
near the British batteries, in the harbor of
Rhode Island, a severe cannonade was com-
menced, and several shot passed through the
houses in town, and occasioned great conster-
nation among the inhabitants. A shot passed
through the door of Mrs. Mason’s house just
above the floor. The family were alarmed,
not knowing where to flee for safety. A ne-
gro man ran and sat himself down very com-
posedly, with his back against the shot-hole

4*
42 | ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

in the door; and being asked by young Mr,
Mason why he chose that situation, he replied,
“ Massa, you never know two bullet go in one
place.”

CIVILITY OF WASHINGTON.

At the commencement of the revolutionary
war, there lived at East Windsor a farmer of
the name of Jacob Munsell, aged forty-five
years. After the communication by water be-
tween that part of the country and Boston was
interrupted, by the possession of Boston harbor
by the British fleet, Munsell was often employ-
ed to transport provisions by land, to our army
lying in the neighborhood of Boston. In the
summer of 1775, while thus employed, he ar-
rived within a few miles of the camp, at Cam-
bridge, with a large load, drawn by a stout ox
team. In a part of the road which was
somewhat rough, and where the travelled
pathway was narrow, he met two carriages,
in each of which was an American general
officer. The officer in the forward carriage,
when near to Munsell, put hi*head out of the
window, and called to him in an authoritative
tone—* D—n you, get out of the path.” Mun-
sell immediately retorted—* D—n you, 1 wont
get out of the path—get out yourself.” After
some vain attempts to prevail on Munsell to
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 43

turn out, thé officer’s carriage turned out, and
Munsell kept the path. The other carriage
immediately came up, having been within
hearing distance of what had passed ; and the
officer within it put his head out of the win-
dow, and said to Munsell—* My friend, the
road is bad, and it is very difficult for me to
turn out; will you be so good as to turn out
and let me pass?” “ With all my heart, sir,”
said Munsell; “but I wont be d—d out of the

ath by man.” ‘This last officer was General

ashington.

MATERNAL TENDERNESS.

The superiority to all selfish consideration
which characterizes maternal tenderness, has
often elevated the conduct of women in low
life, and perhaps never appeared more admi-
rable than in the wife of a soldier of the 55th
regiment, in America, during the campaign
of 1777. Sitting in a tent with her husband
at breakfast, a bomb entered, and fell between
them and a bed where their infant lay asleep.
The mother begged her spouse would go
around the bomb, before it exploded, and take
away the child, as his dress would allow him
to pass the narrow space between the dread-
ful messenger of destruction and the bed.

He refused, and left the tent, calling to his
44 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

wife to hasten away, as in less than a min- |

ute the fuse would communicate to the great
combustibles. The poor woman, absorbing
all care in anxiety to save her child, tucked
up her garments to guard against touching
the bomb, snatched the unconscious innocent,
and was hardly out of reach, when all the
murderous materials were scattered around.
Major C , of the 55th regiment, hearing
of this action, distinguished the heroine with
every mark of favor. She survived many
years to lament his fate at Fort Montgomery,
in the following month of October.



A MISTAKE ON SUNDAY.

The Rev. Mr. Parker, of Provincetown, had
been for years in the habit of praying for the
British government ; but at the eventful peri-
od of the American revolutiofi, he, together
with most other clergymen of that time, was
zealously opposed to the oppressive measures
of England ; however, by a strange absence
of mind, he, one Sabbath, long after America
had been declared independent, continued his
usual prayer, “ We beseech thee to bless the
king, the queen, and all the royal family,”
—then pausing, with evident a
and vexation, he added, “Pshaw! pshaw ! it
was the continental congress I meant.”

arrassment |
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 45

DR. FRANKLIN IN CONGRESS.

When the Declaration of Independence was
under the consideration of Congress, there
were two or three unlucky expressions in it,
which gave offence to some members. The
words “ Scotch and other auxiliaries,” excited
the ire of a gentleman or two of that country.
Severe strictures on the conduct of the British
king, in negativing our repeated repeals of
the law which permitted the importation of
slaves, were disapproved by some southern
gentlemen, whose reflections were not yet ma-
tured to the full abhorrence of that traffic.
Although the offensive expressions were im-
mediately yielded, those gentlemen continued
their depredations on other parts of the in-
strument. I was sitting by Dr. Franklin,
who perceived that 1 was not insensible to
the mutilations.

“| have made it a rule,” said he, “ when-
ever it is in my power, to avoid becoming the
draughtsman of papers to be reviewed by a
public body. I took my lesson from an inci-
dent which I will relate to you. When I was
a journeyman printer, one of my companions,
an apprentice hatter, having served his time,
was about to open shop for himself. His first
concern was to have a handsome signboard,
with a proper inscription. He composed it
in these words:— John Thompson, Hatter,
46 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

makes and sells hats for ready money,’ with the
figure of a hat subjoined. But he thought he
would submit it to his friends for their amend
ments. The first he showed it to, thought the.
word ‘ hatter’ tautologous, because followed by
the words ‘ makes hats,’ which showed he was
a hatter.—It was struck out. The next observ-
ed that the word ‘makes’ might as well be
omitted, because his customers would not care
who made the hats ;—if good and to their
mind, they would buy, by whomsoever made.
He struck it out. A third said he thought the
words ‘for ready money’ were useless, as it
was not the custom of the place to sell on
credit—every one who purchased expected to
pay. They were parted with, and the inscrip-
tion now stood, ‘John Thompson sells hats,’
Sells hats? says his next friend ; why, nobody
will expect you to give them away. What
then is the use of that word? It was stricken
out, and ‘hats’ followed it, the rather as there
was ome painted on the board; so his inscrip-
tion was reduced ultimately to ‘ John Thomp-
son,’ with the figure of a hat subjoined.”

MAGNANIMITY OF BARON DE STEUBEN.

After the capture at Yorktown, the superi-
or officers of the American army, together with
their allies, vied with each other in acts of
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 47

civility and attention to the captive Britons.
Entertainments were given by all the major-
generals, except Baron Steuben. He was
aboye prejudice or meanness; but poverty
prevented him from displaying that liberality
towards them, which had been shown by
others. Such was his situation, when. calling
on Colonel Stewart, and informing him of his
intention to entertain Lord Cornwallis, he re-
quested that he would advance him a sum of
money as the price of his favorite charger.
“Tis a good beast,” said the Baron, “ and has
proved a faithful servant through all the dan-
gers of the war; but, though painful to my
heart, we must part.” Colonel Stewart im-
mediately tendered his purse, recommending
the sale or pledge of his watch, should the
sum it contained prove insufficient. “My
dear friend,” replied the Baron, “’tis already
sold. Poor North was sick, and wanted ne-
cessaries. He is a brave fellow, and pos-
sesses the best of hearts. The trifle it
brought is set apart for his use. My horse
must go; so no more, 1 beseech you, to turn
me from my purpose. I am a major-general
in the service of the United States; and my
private convenience must not be put in a
scale with the duty which my rank imperious-
ly calls upon.me to perform.”
48 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

PATRIOTIC SCHOOL BOYS.

In November, 1776, the General Court or-
dered four brass cannon to be purchased for
the use of the artillery companies in Boston.
Two of these guns were kept in a gun-house
that stood opposite the Mall, at the corner of
West-street. A school-house was the next
building, and a yard enclosed with a high
fence was common to both. Major Paddock,
who then commanded the company, having _
been heard to express his intention of surren-
dering these guns to the British army, a few
individuals resolved to secure for the country
a property which belonged to it, and which,
in the emergency of the times, had an impor-
tance very disproportionate to its intrinsic
value.

Having concerted their plan, the party
passed through the school-house into the gun-
house, and were able to open the doors which
were upon the yard, by a small crevice,
through which they raised the bar that se-
cured them. The moment for the execution
of the project was that of the roll-call, when
the sentinel, who was stationed at one door
of the building, would be less likely to hear
their operations.

The guns were taken off their carriages,
carried into the school-room, and placed in a
large box, under the master’s desk, in which
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 49

wood was kept. Immediately after the roll-
call, a lieutenant and sergeant came into the
gun-house to look at the cannon, previously
to removing them. A young man, who had
assisted in their removal, remained by the
building, and followed the officer in, as an in-
nocent spectator. When the carriages were
found without the guns, the sergeant exclaim-
ed, with an oath, in true soldier phraseology,
“These fellows would steal the teeth out of
your head, while you’re keeping guard.” They
then began to search the building for them,
and afterwards the yard ; and when they came
to the gate that opened into the street, the of-
ficers observed that they could not have pass-
ed that way, because a cobweb across the
opening was not broken. They next went
into the school-house, which they examined
all over, except the box, on which the master
placed his foot, which was lame ; and the offi-
cer, with true courtesy, on that account ex-
cused him from rising. Several boys were
present, but not one lisped a word. The Brit-
ish officers soon went back to the gun-house,
and gave up the pursuit in vexation. The
guns remained in that box for a fortnight, and
many of the boys were acquainted with the
fact, but not one of them betrayed the secret.
At the end of that time, the person who had
withdrawn them, came in the evening with a
sarge trunk on a wheelbarrow; the guns
were put into it and carried up to a black-
5
50 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

smith’s shop at the South-end, and there de-
posited under the coal. After lying there for
a while, they were put into a boat in the
night, and safely transported within the Ameri-
can lines.



AN UNNECESSARY ALARM.

A sentinel on the banks of Ashley River, op-
posite to Dorchester, perceiving a “red-coat”
moving through the brush-wood on the other
shore, gave the alarm that the enemy were
without their lines. This being communica-
ted to Lieut. Colonel Laurens, a troop of dra-
goons, and a company of infantry of the le-
gion, were ordered to cross the river and
reconnoitre. But the rapidity of the stream
determined Captain O'Neil, who commanded,
to wait until a boat which had been sent for
should arrive.

In the interim, Laurens galloped up, and
demanded, with warmth, “Why this halt,
captain ’—were not orders given to cross ?”
“Yes, colonel, but look at the current, and
judge if it be practicable.” “This is no time
for argument,” rejoined Laurens. “ You who
are brave men, follow me.” Saying this, he
plunged into the river, but was instantaneous-
ly obliged to quit his horse, and it was with
extreme difficulty that he was enabled to
reach the opposite shore.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 51

O’Neil, than whom a braver man did not
exist, highly indignant at the speech of Lau-
rens, replied, “ You shall see, sir, that there
are men here as courageous as yourself,”
and at the head of his troop entered the river.
Now, all was tumult and confusion, for al-
though no lives were lost, several of the men
were so nearly drowned, that it became ne-
cessary to use every means to make them
disgorge the water they had swallowed ; and
all were so much exhausted, that a temporary
halt was indispensably needful.

The infantry, by the aid of a plank, and large
doors torn from a neighboring warehouse,
passed over with less difficulty. During the
mean time, Laurens, attended by Messrs. Ralph
and Walter Izard, and Mr. Wainwright, who
ever accompanied him as aids, hastened to
the spot, where the British regimental had
been seen. It was then found that a military
coat had been hung up in a tree by a soldier
who had been whipped and drummed out
of the 64th regiment, for drunkenness, and
whose lacerated back could admit of no cov-
ering. '



A NOBLE REPLY.

At the retreat of the British troops from
Lexington, General Warren came near being
killed by a musket ball, which took off a lock
52 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

of hair, curled close to his head, in accordance
with the custom of the times. His mother,
being very much affected by the occurrence,
entreated him not to risk his life again, which
was so precious to her, and of so much value
to his country.

His answer was,—‘ Wherever danger is,
dear mother, there will your son be. Now is
no time for one of America’s children to
shrink from the most hazardous duty ;1 will ei-
ther see my country free, or shed my last drop of
blood to make her so.” And he did; he fell
on the same field, and at the same time, as
did Putnam ; both fighting for the rights and
liberties of their country.

WASHINGTON AT PRAYER.

After the unsatisfactory engagement at Ger-
mantown, the American troops were quarter-
ed for the winter at Valley Forge, where their
sufferings were extreme. It happened, during
their sojourn, that a very pious Quaker by the
name of Potts had occasion to pass through a
large grove, which was not a great distance
from the head-quarters. Proceeding along, he
thought he heard a noise. He stopped a min-
ute, and listened attentively.

He did hear the sound of a human voice at
some distance, but quite indistinctly. As it
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 53

was in the direct course he was pursuing, he
went on, but with considerable caution. At
length he came within sight of a man whose
back was turned towards him, on his knees, in
the attitude of prayer. Potts now stopped,
and soon perceived Gen. Washington, the com-
mander of the American army, returning from
bending before the God of hosts above.

Potts was a pious man, and no sooner had
he reached his home, than he broke forth to
his wife—

“ All’s well!—all’s well! Yes—George
Washington is sure to beat the British—
sure |”

“ What’s the matter with thee, Isaac?” re-
plied the startled Sarah. “Thee seems to be
much moved about something.”

“ Well! what if 1am moved? Who would
not be moved at such a sight as I have seen
to-day ?”

“ And what hast thou seen, Isaac ?”

“ Seen! I’ve seen a man at prayer !—in the
woods |—George Washington himself! And
now I say—just what | said before—All’s
well! George Washington is sure to beat the
British | sure!”

This is one of the anecdotes, that tend to
establish the decided Christian character of
Washington. Much also might be adduced
from a memoir of his life of the same descrip-
tion. He was indeed a pious, as well as a
brave man.

5*
54 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

THE END OF A FARCE.

While the British held possession of Boston,
there were various amusements got up, to
while away their time. Among these was a
small theatre, and in the evening of Feb. 8th,
1776, the officers were acting a farce, entitled
“The Blockade of Boston.” One character,
intended to ridicule Washington, was dressed
up with a large wig, and a long rusty sword.
Another was an American sergeant, in his
country dress, with an old gun on his shoul-
der, eight feet long.

At the same moment this grotesque-looking
figure appeared, one of the British sergeants
came running on the stage, and cried out,
“The Yankees are attacking our works on
Bunker Hill.” The audience took it as a part
of the play, but General Howe knew that it
was no joke, and cried out to the officers, “ To
your alarm-posts.”



ATTENTION TO ORDERS.

At the siege of York, the young Baron de
Carendeffez, about the age of fifteen, was sent
into the magazine to distribute ammunition
for the use of the French artillery, and while
seated on a barrel of powder, saw a shell from
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 55

the enemy fall within two feet of his position.
The soldiers who were in the battery, expect-
ing immediate explosion, ran off in every di-
rection.

The expected catastrophe, however, did not
follow ; the fuse of the shell was in its flight
extinguished. This being perceived by the
fugitives, the battery was as quickly reoccu-
pied, when Captain Lémery, the commanding
officer, addressing himself to the youth, who
still retained his seat, said—* You young
rogue, why did you not fly the impending dan-
ger? why not embrace a chance for life !”
“ Because, captain,” he heroically answered,
“ my duty required that I should make a dis-
tribution of ammunition, and not desert my
post, and fly like a poltroon.”

———__

PROSE BETTER THAN POETRY,

A colonel in the army, who was much in-
clined to be poetical in his prose, telling Ma-
jor Edwards that he had heard a report con-
cerning him by which he had been greatly
amused, the major assured him that it was al-
together without any foundation. “O no,”
said the colonel, “deny it not—it must be
true, and I will circulate and give it curren-
cy.” “Thank you, thank you, kind sir,” re-
joined Edwards, “by your doing so, much
56 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

time will be saved, which otherwise would
have been spent in contradicting the story.”

ORDINARY FARE OF MARION,

A British officer was sent from the garrison
at Georgetown, to negotiate a business inter-
esting to both armies; when this was conclu-
ded, and the officer about to return, General
Marion said, “If it suits your convenience, sir,
to remain for a short period, I shall be glad of
your company to dinner.” The mild and dig-
nified simplicity of Marion’s manners had al-
ready produced their effect; and to prolong
so interesting an interview, the invitation was
accepted. The entertainment was served u
on pieces of bark, and consisted entirely o
roasted potatoes, of which the general ate
heartily, requesting his guest to profit by his
example, repeating the old adage, “ that hun-
ger was an excellent sauce.”

“But surely, general,” said the officer, “ this
cannot be your ordinary fare.” “Indeed it is,
sir,” he replied ; “ and we are more fortunate
on this occasion, entertaining company, than
usual, to have more than. our accustomed
quantity.” It is said that this officer, on his
return to Georgetown, immediately declared
his conviction, that men who could without a
murmur endure the difficulties and dangers of
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 57

the field, and contentedly relish such simple
and scanty fare, were not to be subdued; and
resigning his commission, immediately retired
from the service,

MR. JOHN EDWARDS AND ADMIRAL ARBUTHNOT.

It must appear both injudicious and unjust
that Mr. J Me Edwards has been so little no-
ticed. His name has been scarcely mentioned
in the records of our revolution; yet there
was no citizen of the republic, in whose bo-
som the love of liberty glowed with more gen-
erous enthusiasm. Possessing wealth beyond
any other mercantile man of the day, he was
the first individual in Carolina who tendered
his fortunes in support of the American cause.
His friend, the venerable Josiah Smith, was
no less liberal in his loans to goverment ; and
it cannot be doubted but that their example
must, in a great degree, have contributed to
give stability to public credit, and to induce
many of less sanguine hopes to risk their for-
tunes for the public good.

Warned by his more prudential friends that
he placed too much at hazard; that the suc-
cess of America, opposed to the power of
Britain, could scarcely be expected ; and that
the total loss of his possessions would follow ;
with a feeling of patriotism that cannot be
58 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

too highly appreciated, he replied—* Be it so!
I would rather lose my all than retain it sub-
ject to British authority.” His subsequent
conduct proved that this was no vain boasting.
Shortly after the fall of Charleston, invited
‘to a conference by Admiral Arbuthnot, who
was quartered on him, and occupied the prin-
cipal apartments of his house, a conversation
took place, the purport of which, immediately
after the conclusion, was communicated by
him to his son-in-law, Mr. John Bee Holmes,
from whom I received it. “ Nothing, Mr. Ed-
wards,” said the admiral, “ has appeared more
extraordinary to Sir Henry Clinton and my-
self, than that you, a native of Great Britain,
should have taken part with the rebels, and
appeared throughout the contest a strenuous
and decided advocate of revolutionary princi-
ples. How, sir, is it to be accounted for ?”

“ Because,” replied Mr. Edwards, “I con-
scientiously approved, and have pledged my-
self to support them.” “ But, Mr. Edwards,”
rejoined the admiral, “ as a man of sense, you
may have been heretofore deluded—your eyes
must now be opened to the futility of resist-
ance ; and as a man of honor, you are bound
by every means in your power to aid in promo-
ting the submission of the people, by a recon-
ciliation with the merciful government that
would obliterate every recollection of past
offences, and again receive them with favor
and forgiveness.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 59

The admiral proceeded for a considerable
length of time, in pretty much the same strain
of language ; tying to persuade Mr. Edwards,
with the neighbors, to implore pardon from
the British for past misdeeds, as they consid-
ered them. Mr. Edwards made an eloquent
reply, ending with the words—* And if you
were to say to me—Your fate ds u
your resolve—take protection or perish—I would
without a moment’s hesitation—pm.”

—_—_

THE POOR FISHERMAN AND HIS SCHOONER.

After the evacuation of Boston, by the Brit-
ish troops under Gen. Gage, Capt. Nelson
was left in command of a frigate, with direc-
tions to cruise off the outer harbor, and to
give notice to British vessels of the evacua-
tion.

During one of his cruises, he captured a
fishing schooner of about sixty tons, belonging
to Capt. Davis, of Plymouth, Mass. It was
his whole property, and he supported a wife
and six children by selling the fish that were
taken on board of her.

In about a fortnight after the capture, the
owner (instead of resigning himself to his
fate, and abandoning all hope of regaining
his vessel) determined to go on board the
frigate and see the captain. He procured a
60 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

boat with this view, and having put on board
of her two dozen fowls, some cabbages and
other vegetables, that he thought would be
acceptable to Capt. Nelson, he ventured out,
was admitted on board the frigate, requested
to see the captain alone, and was taken down
into the cabin.

“ Captain,” said he, “I understand that you
have taken my schooner; she is the whole
support of myself, my wife, and six children.
Now, sir, the great men of your country, and
of my country, have made this war, and the
poor people are obliged to submit, and I did
not know but what Capt. Nélson might give
me back my schooner.”

Nelson being astonished at the request, re-
plied, “ This is not a common war; you are
rebels, you have rebelled against your king
and country, and besides, my men are entitled
to their prize money.” Soon after, he left
him in the cabin, and went on deck to talk
with his officers and men; he then returned
to the cabin. “Should you know your vessel
if you were to see her again?” “I guess I
should,” said the captain, and soon after the
schooner came up, with all her sails set, and
completely fitted up in man-of-war style. “Is
this your vessel?” said Capt. Nelson. “O
dear, sir, no,” replied Capt. Davis. “I don’t
wonder that you don’t know her,” replied Nel-
son, “as I have laid out about one hundred
and fifty pounds upon her as my tender.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 61

After some further conversation, Capt. Nel-
son consented that Capt. Davis should have
his vessel again, and told him to go on shore
and bring with him a sufficient number of
hands to take charge of her. He did so, and
after Capt. Davis had thanked Capt Nelson,
with tears in his eyes, and blessed him, and
was about ans off in his boat, “ Stop,
stop,” cried Nelson, “you are not paid yet for
your fowls.”

“O for mercy’s sake, Capt. Nelson, say
nothing about that.” “Either receive pay-
ment or else no vessel,” said Nelson, and threw
him two guineas. “I cannot receive pay,”
said Capt. Davis, “ and this is twice as much
as they would come to.” “Either take the
money, or no vessel,” said Nelson ; “ the rebels
will say that you have been bribing me.”
And Capt. Davis went off, deeply impressed
with gratitude for the noble and generous con-
duct of Horatio Nelson.

PATRIOTISM OF BISHOP WHITE.

The distinguished reputation of the late
Bishop White is well known. Early in the
revolution he was invited to preach before a
battalion, but declined, and mentioned to the
commanding officer that he had objections
to the making of the ministry instrumental to

6
62 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the war. And he continued, in the service of
the Protestant Episcopal Church as required,
to pray for the king till the Sunday before the
4th of July, 1776. Shortly after that he took
the oath of allegiance to the United States,
and ever subsequent thereto remained faith-
ful. It was evident to all that he acted un-
der a high sense of duty, and with that sound
a which characterized him through
life. .

At the time of taking the oath of allegiance,
the following incident is said to have occur-
red. When he went to the courthouse for the
purpose, a gentleman of his acquaintance
standing there, observing his design, intima-
ted to him, by a gesture, the danger to which
he would expose himself. After taking the
oath, he remarked, before leaving the court-
house, to the gentleman alluded to—*I per-
ceive, by your gesture, that ie thought I was
exposing my neck to great danger by the step
which I have taken. But I have not taken it
without full deliberation. I know my danger,
and that it is the greater on account of m
being a clergyman of the Church of England.
But I trust in Providence. The cause is a
cd one, and I am persuaded will be protect
e
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 63

BISHOP WHITE A CHAPLAIN OF CONGRESS.

In September, 1777, while the British were
advaneing to Philadelphia, of which they
took possession soon afterwards, Congress
having just fled to Yorktown, he was chosen
chaplain. He had, for safety, removed his
family to Hartford county, in Maryland.
While on a journey between that place and
Philadelphia, he stopped at a small village,
where he was met by a courier from York-
town, who informed him of his being appoint-
ed by Congress their chaplain, and requested
his immediate attendance. Nothing, he said,
could have induced him to accept the appoint-
ment, at such a time, even had the emolu-
ment been an object, which it was not, but
the determination to be consistent in his prin-
ciples in the part he had taken.

This was one of the gloomiest periods in
the history of the revolution ; General Bur-
goyne was marching, without having yet re-
ceived a serious check, so far as was then
known, through the northern parts of New
York. He thought of it for a short time, and
then, instead of proceeding on his journey,
turned his horses’ heads, travelled immediate-
ly to Yorktown, and entered on the duties of
his appointment.

While officiating as chaplain, he had ry
tunities of observing some tokens of the diffi-
64 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

culties under which Congress labored in pro-
curing the means of carrying on the war, and
the very reduced state of their finances at
some periods. The two following facts, re-
lated by himself, are striking proofs of their
destitution of funds, and the very low state of
their credit. On one occasion, going into the
chamber of Congress to perform his duty as
chaplain, he remarked to one of the members,
“You have been treating yourselves, I per-
ceive, to new inkstands.”—* Yes,” was the re-
ply, “ and private credit had to be pledged for
the payment.” At another time, observing
that the clerks had removed from their usual
room, and inquiring the cause, he was told
that there was no wood to make a fire there,
nor money to buy it. These incidents must
have occurred after Congress returned to Phil-
adelphia.

—_—

DR. FRANKLIN’S ALMANAC.

The late Capt. John Paul Jones, at the time
he was attempting to fit out a little squadron
during the revolutionary war, in one of the
ports of France, to cruise on the coast of Eng-
land, was much delayed by neglects and dis-
appointments from the court, that had nearly
frustrated his plan. Chance one day threw
into his hands an old almanac, containing
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 65

Poor Richard's Maxims, by Dr. Franklin. In
that curious assemblage of useful instructions,
a man is advised, “If he wishes to have an
business faithfully and expeditiously aieunal,
to go and do it himself ;—otherwise to send.”
Jones was immediately struck, upon reading
this maxim, with the impropriety of his past
conduct, in only. sending letters and messages
to court, when he ought to have gone in per-
son. He instantly set out, and, by dint of per-
sonal representations, procured the immediate
equipment of the squadron, which afterwards
spread terror along the eastern coasts of Eng-
land, and with which he so gloriously captured
the Serapis, and the British ships of war re-
turning from the Baltic. In gratitude to Dr.
Franklin’s maxim, he named the principal
ship of his squadron after the name of the
retended almanac maker, Le Bon Homme
ichard, Father Richard.



GENERAL PRESCOTT AND THE CONNECTICUT SUCCO-
TASH.

The British general, Prescott, who was cap-
tured at his quarters on Rhode Island by Col-
onel Barton, being on his route through the
state of Connecticut, called at a tavern to dine.
The landlady furnished the table with a dish
of succotash, boiled corn and beans. The gen-
eral being unaccustomed to such kind of food,

6*
66 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

exclaimed, with warmth, “ What, do you treat
us with the food of hogs?” and taking the
dish from the table, strewed the contents over
the floor. The landlord being informed of
this, soon entered, and with his horse-whip
gave the general a severe chastisement. The
sequel of this story has recently been com-
municated by a gentleman at Nantucket, who
retains a perfect recollection of all the cir-
cumstances. After Gen. Prescott was ex-
changed, and restored to his command on the
island, the inhabitants of Nantucket deputed
Wm. Rotch, Dr. Tupper, and Timothy Folger
to negotiate some concerns with him in behalf
of the town. They were for some time re-
fused admittance to his presence, but the doc-
tor and Folger overcame the opposition and
ushered themselves into the room. Prescott
raged and stormed with great vehemence, until
Folger was compelled to withdraw. After
the doctor announced his business, and the gen-
eral had become a little calm, he said, “ Was
not my treatment to Folger very uncivil ?”
The doctor said yes. Then said Prescott, “I
will tell you the reason: he looked so much
like the Connecticut rascal that horse-whip-
ped me, I could not endure his presence.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 67

PROVIDENTIAL INTERPOSITIONS.

After the defeat of our army on Long Island,
in 1776, the residue of our troops were re-
duced to a situation of extreme hazard, and
by many it was supposed that a few hours
would seal their fate. They were fatigued
and discouraged by defeat, a superior ene-
my in their front, and a powerful fleet about
to enter the East river, with the view of
effectually cutting off their retreat, and leav-
ing them no alternative but to surrender.
The commander-in-chief resolved to attempt
to extricate his army from the impending ca-
tastrophe, by evacuating the post, and cross-
ing the river to New York, The passage
was found at first to be impracticable, by rea-
son of a violent wind from the northeast and
a strong ebbing tide.

But providentially the wind grew more
moderate, and veered to the northwest, which
rendered the passage perfectly safe. But a
circumstance still more remarkable was, that
about two o’clock in the morning a thick fog
enveloped the whole of Long Island in obseu-
rity, concealing the retreat of the Americans,
while on the side of New York the atmosphere
was perfectly clear.

Thus, by the favor of an unusual fog, our
army, consisting of nine thousand men, in one
night, under great disadvantages, embarked
68 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

with their baggage, provisions, stores, horses,
and the munitions of war, crossed a rapid riv-
er, a mile or more wide, and landed at New
York undiscovered, and without material loss.
The enemy were so near that they were heard
at work with their pick-axes, and in about
half an hour after the fog cleared off, the
enemy were seen taking possession of the
American lines, and they were astonished
that our troops had got beyond the reach of
pursuit.

Garden, in his Anecdotes, says that a cleri-
cal friend, on this occasion, observed that,
“ But for the interposition of a cloud of dark-
ness, the Egyptians would have overwhelmed
the Israelites upon the sea-shore. And but
for the providential intervention of a fog upon
Long Island, which was a cloud resting on the
earth, the American army would have been
destroyed, and the hopes of every patriot bo-
som extinguished, perhaps forever.”

On the retreat of our army from New York,
Major-general Putnam, at the head of three
thousand five hundred continental troops, was
in the rear, and the last that left the city. In
order to avoid any of the enemy that might
be advancing in the direct road to the city,
he made choice of a different road till he
could arrive at a certain angle, whence a
cross-road would conduct him in such a di-
rection as that he might form a junction with
our main army. It so happened that a body
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 69

of about eight thousand British and Hessians
were at the same moment advancing on the
road, which would have brought them in im-
mediate contact with Putnam before he could
have reached the cross-road.

Most fortunately, the British generals halt-
ed their troops, and repaired to the house of
Mr. R, Murray, a Quaker and friend to our
cause. Mrs. M. treated the British officers
with cake and wine, and they were induced
to tarry two hoursor more. By this happy in-
cident, Putnam, by continuing his march, es-
caped a rencounter with a greatly superior
force, which must have proved fatal to his
whole party. I have recently been informed
by the son and aid-de-camp of Gen. Putnam,
that had the enemy, instead of a halt, marched
ten minutes longer, they would have reached
the cross-road, and entirely cut off the retreat
of our troops, and they must inevitably have
been captured or destroyed. It was a common
saying among our officers, that, under Provi-
dence, Mrs. Murray saved this part of our
army.

When, in the year 1777, Gen. Burgoyne’s
army was reduced to a condition of extreme
embarrassment and danger, Gen. Gates re-
ceived what he supposed certain intelligence
that the main body of the British army had
marched off for Fort Edward, and that a rear-
guard only was left in the camp situated on
the opposite side of Saratoga creek. He de-
70 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

termined, therefore, to advance with his entire
force to attack the enemy in their encamp-
ment, in half anhour. For this purpose, Gen.
Nixon with his brigade crossed the creek in
advance.

Gen. Glover was on the point of following,
but just as he entered the water he perceived
a British soldier crossing near him, whom he
called and examined. By this British desert-
er, the fact was ascertained, that the detach-
ment for Fort Edward had returned, and that
the whole British army was now encamped
behind a thick brush-wood, which concealed
them from our view. This information being
instantly communicated to Gen. Gates, the or-
der for attack was immediately countermand-
ed, and the troops were ordered to retreat ; but
before they could recross the creek, the enemy’s
artillery opened on their rear, and some loss
was sustained.

This was a most critical moment, and a
quarter of an hour longer might have caused
the ruin of the two brigades, and effected such
a favorable turn of affairs as to have enabled
Burgoyne to progress in his route to Albany, or
make a safe retreat into Canada. In his nar-
rative of the expedition under his command,
Burgoyne laments the accident which occa-
sioned the failure of his stratagem, as one of
the most adverse strokes of fortune during the
campaign. But Americans ought never to
forget the remarkable providential escape.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 71

DEATH OF THE BARON DE KALB.

Among the enthusiastic foreigners who
generously espoused our cause, and at an
early period of the revolution resorted to the
American army, I will name some, whose
meritorious services entitle them to the grate-
ful recollection of the present and future gen-
erations. Baron de Kalb was by birth a
German. He had attained a high reputation
in military service, and was a knight of the
order of merit, and a brigadier-general in
the armies of France. He accompanied the
Marquis de La Fayette to this country, and
having proffered his services to our Congress,
he was, in September, 1777, appointed to the
office of major-general. In the summer of
1780, he was second in command in our south-
ern army, under Major-general Gates.

When arrangements were making for the
battle at Camden, which proved so disastrous
to our arms, in August, 1780, this heroic offi-
cer, it was said, cautioned Gen. Gates against
a general action under present circumstances.
But that unfortunate commander was heard
to say, that “ Lord Cornwallis would not dare
to look him in the face.” And in the evening
preceding the battle, ‘an officer in the pres-
ence of Gen. Gates said, “1 wonder where
we shall dine to-morrow !”

“ Dine, sir,” replied the confident general,
72 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“why at Camden, to be sure. I would not give
apinch of snuff, sir, to be insured a beef-steak
to-morrow in Camden, and Lord Cornwallis
at my table.” Baron de Kalb was decidedly
opposed to the proceedings of Gen. Gates, and
frequently foretold the ruin that would ensue,
and expressed a presentiment that it would be
his fate to fall in that battle. In a council
of war, while the enemy was approaching,
the baron advised that the army should fall
back and take a good position, and wait to
be attacked; but this was rejected by Gen.
Gates, who insinuated that it originated from
fear.
De Kalb, instantly leaping from his horse,
placed himself at the head of his command on
foot, and with some warmth retorted, “ Well,
sir, a few hours, perhaps, will prove who are
the brave.” It was the intention of Gen.
Gates to surprise the enemy in their encamp-
ment, while at the same time Cornwallis had
commenced his march to surprise his antago-
nist. The contending armies had scarcely en-
gaged in the conflict, when our militia broke,
and leaving their guns and bayonets behind,
fled with the greatest precipitation.
- Gen. Gates immediately applied spurs to his
horse and pursued, as he said, “to bring the
rascals back,” but he actually continued his
flight till he reached Charlotte, 80 miles from
the field of battle. The Baron de Kalb, at
the head of a few hundred continental troops,
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 73

was now left to cope with the whole British
army, and he sustained the dreadful shock for
more than an hour; hundreds of the bravest
men had fallen around this undaunted hero ;
he himself in personal conflict was seen to
parry the furious blows and plunge his sword
into many opposing breasts. But alas! the
hero is overpowered, having received eleven
bayonet wounds; he faints and falls to the
ground.

Several individuals of both armies were
killed while endeavoring to shield his body.
His aid-de-camp, Chevalier de Buysson, rushed
through the clashing bayonets, and stretching
his arms over the body of the fallen hero, ex-
claimed, “ Save the Baron de Kalb! save the
Baron de Kalb!” The British officers inter-
posed and prevented his immediate destruc-
tion, but he survived the action but a few
hours.

To a British officer, who kindly condoled with
him in his misfortune, he replied, “I thank
you for your generous sympathy, but I die the
death I always prayed for; the death of a sol-
dier fighting for the rights of man.” His last
moments were spent in dictating a letter con-
cerning the continental troops which support-
ed him in the action, after the militia had fled,
of whom he said he had no words that could
sufficiently express his love and his admiration
of their valor.

Gen. Washington, many years after, on a

7
14 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

visit to Camden, inquired for the grave of De
Kalb. After looking on it awhile, with a
countenance marked with thought, he breathed
a deep sigh, and exclaimed, “So there lies the
brave De Kalb; the generous stranger who
came from a distant land to fight our battles,
and to water with his blood the tree of our
liberty. Would to God he had lived to share
with us its fruits!” His exit was marked
with unfading glory, and his distinguished
merit was gratefully acknowledged by Con-
gress, in ordering a monument to be erected
to his memory.

EXECUTION OF COL. HAYNES.

After the city of Charleston had fallen in-
to the hands of Lord Cornwallis, his lordship
issued a proclamation, requiring of the inhab-
itants of the colony, that they should no long-
er take part in the contest, but continue
peaceably at their homes, and they should be
most sacredly protected in property and per-
son. This was accompanied with an instru-
ment of neutrality, which soon obtained the
signatures of many thousands of the citizens
of South Carolina, among whom was Col.
Haynes, who now conceived that he was en-
titled to peace and security for his family
and fortune.
ANECDOTES OF ''HE REVOLUTION, 15

But it was not long before Cornwallis put a
new construction on the instrument of neutrali-
ty, denominating it a bond of allegiance to the
king, and called upon all who had signed it
to take up arms against the Rebels! threat-
ening to treat as deserters those who refused !
This fraudulent proceeding in Lord Cornwallis
roused the indignation of every honorable and
honest man.

Col. Haynes now being compelled, in viola-
tion of the most solemn compact, to take up
arms, resolved that the invaders of his native
country should be the objects of his vengeance.
He withdrew from the British, and was in-
vested with a command in the continental
service ; but it was soon his hard fortune to be
captured by the enemy and carried into Charles-
ton. Lord Rawdon, the commandant, imme-
diately ordered him to be loaded with irons,
and after a sort of mock trial, he was sen-
tenced to be hung !

This sentence seized all classes of people
with horror and dismay. A petition, headed
by the British Gov. Bull, and signed by a
number of royalists, was presented in his be-
half, but was totally disregarded. The ladies
of Charleston, beth whigs and tories, now
united in a petition to Lord Rawdon, couched
in the most eloquent and moving language,
praying that the valuable life of Col. Haynes
might be spared; but this also was treated
with neglect. It was next proposed that Col
716 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

Haynes's children, (the mother had recently
expired with the small-pox,) should in their
mourning habiliments be presented to plead
for the life of their only surviving parent.
Being introduced into his presence, they
fell on their knees, and with clasped hands
and weeping eyes, they lisped their father’s
name and plead most earnestly for his life.
(Reader! what is your anticipation—do you
imagine that Lord Rawdon, pitying their mo-
therless condition, tenderly embraced these
afflicted children and restored them to the
fond embrace of their father? No! the un-
feeling man was still inexorable—he suffered
even these little ones to plead in vain!) His
son, a youth of thirteen, was permitted to stay
with his father in prison, who beholding his
only parent loaded with irons and condemn-
ed to die, was overwhelmed in grief and sor-
row.
“Why,” said he, “my son, will you thus
break your father’s heart with unavailing sor-
row? Have I not often told you that we
came into this world but to prepare for a bet-
ter? For that better life, my dear boy, your
father is prepared. Instead then of weeping,
rejoice with me, my son, that my troubles are
so near anend. To-morrow | set out for im-
mortality. You will accompany me to the
place of my execution ; and when I am dead,
take and bury me by the side of your mother.”
The youth here fell on his father’s neck erv-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 77

ing, “Oh, my father! my father! I will die
with you! I will die with you!” Col. Haynes
would have returned the strong embrace of
his son; but alas! his hands were confined
with irons. “Live,” said he, “my son, live
to honor God by a good life ; live to serve your
country ; and live to take care of your brother
and little sisters !”

The next morning Col. Haynes was con-
ducted to the place of execution. His son
accompanied him. Soon as they came in
sight of the gallows, the father strengthened
himself and said—* Now, my son, show yourself
aman! That tree is the boundary of my life
and of all my life’s sorrows. Beyond that the
wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are
at rest. Don’t lay too much to heart our separa-
tion from you: it will be but short. It was but
lately your dear mother died. To-day I die,
and you, my son, though but young, must short-
iy follow us.” “Yes, my father,” replied the
broken-hearted youth, “I shall shortly follow
you; for indeed I feel that I cannot live
long.” ,

On seeing therefore his father in the hands
of the executioner, and then struggling in the
halter, he stood like one transfixed and mo-
tionless with horror. Till then he had wept
incessantly, but soon as he saw that sight, the
fountain of his tears was stanched, and he
never wept more. He died insane, and in his
last moments often called on the name of his

*
78 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

father in terms that brought tears from the
hardest heart.

GENERAL MORGAN.

This distinguished officer commenced his
military career under General Braddock, but
in so inferior a station as to have been subject-
ed to corporal punishment for some unguard-
ed expressions towards a superior. It is pain-
ful to mention such a circumstance ; and it
would not have been done had it not been re-
corded to his honor, that, incapable of enter-
taining lasting resentments, he had been dis-
tinguished, during the revolutionary war, by
generous attention to every British officer
who became his prisoner. Commanding a
rifle company before Quebec, he was directed,
under Arnold, to attack the lower town; and
on the retirement of that officer, when wound-
ed, taking the van of the assailing column,
he carried the first and second barriers.

He even penetrated into the upper town,
and was in possession of the main-guard,
giving paroles to the officers who surrendered,
when every posepoet of success being baffled
Wy. the fall of Montgomery, and the enemy en-
abled to turn their entire force against him,
he was surrounded and captured. His bravery
well known, and his activity justly apprecia-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. © 79

ted, an attempt was made by an officer of
rank in the British service to induce him, by
the tender of wealth and promotion, to join
the royal standard; but, with the spirit of
true republican virtue, he rejected the pro-
position, and requested the tempter, “ never
again to insult him by an offer which plainly
inplied that he thought him a villain.”

POWDER AND BALLS.

Let ancient or modern history be produced,
they will not afford a more heroic display than
the reply of Yankee Stonington to the British
commanders. The people were piling the
balls which the enemy had wasted, when the
foe applied to them. “We want bails ; will you
sell them?” They answered: “ We want pow-
done send us powder, and we'll return your

alls.”

HOW TO SAVE A DINNER.

General Charles Lee, while at White Plains,
in 1776, had his quarters in a small house
near the road by which Gen. Washington
had to pass when reconnoitring. Returning
with his suite, they called in and took a din-
80 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

ner. They were no sooner gone, than Lee
told his aids, “ You must look me out another
place, for I shall have Washington and his
puppies continually calling on me, and they
will eat me up.” The next day Lee, seeing
Washington out on the like business, and ex-
pecting that he should have another visit, or-
dered his servant to write with chalk upon
the door, “No victuals dressed here to-day.”
When the company approached and saw the
writing, they pushed off with much good hu-
mor for their own table, without being offend-
ed at the habitual eccentricity of the man.



“ No BAYONETS HERE.”

At the surprise of Georgetown, Sergeant
Ord, an extremely brave soldier, being, with a
small party of the legion-infantry, in posses-
sion of. an enclosure surrounding a house
from which they had expelled the enemy, the
recovery of the position was sought by a
British force, whose leader, approaching the
gate of entrance, exclaimed—* Rush on, my
brave boys, they are only worthless militia,
and have no bayonets.” Ord immediately
placed himself in front of the gate, and as
they attempted to enter, laid six of his ene-
mies in succession dead at his feet, crying out,
at every thrust—“ No bayonets here—none at
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 81

all, to be sure !” following up his strokes with
such rapidity, that the British party could
make no impression, and were compelled to
retire.

In every instance where this heroic soldier
was engaged in action, he not only increased
his own reputation, but animated those around
him by his lively courage. In camp, on a
march, and in every situation, he performed
all his duties with the utmost cheerfulness and
vivacity, preserving always the most orderly
conduct, and keeping his arms, accoutrements,
and clothing in the neatest possible condition.
He might, indeed, be considered a perfect sol-
dier.



POVERTY OF THE AMERICAN ARMY.

The following incident is only a representa-
tion of many similar cases of distress for cloth-
inginthe American camp. During the severity
of the winter campaign in North Carolina, Gen.
Greene, passing a sentinel who was barefoot,
said, “I fear, my good fellow, you must suffer
from cold.” “Pretty much so,” was the reply ;
“but Ido not complain, because I know that
I should fare better had our general power to
procure supplies. They say, however, that in
a few days we shall have a fight, and then,
by the blessing of God, I shall take care to se-
cure a pair of shoes.”
82 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

MR. ROBERT MORRIS.

At the most distressful period of the war,
General Washington wrote to Congress, “ that
he was surrounded by secret foes, destitute of
the means of detecting them, or of getting in-
telligence of the enemy’s movements and de-
signs. The army was in rags, had few or no
blankets, and military stores were in the dregs.
The troops, reduced in numbers, must retreat
without the means of defence if attacked, and
would probably disperse from the want of
subsistence and clothing in an inclement sea-
son, too severe for nature to support. In a
word, we have lived upon expedients till we
can live no longer; and it may be truly said
that the history of this war is a history of
false hopes and temporary devices, instead of
system and economy which result from it.”
All business was in consequence suspended in
Congress, and dismay was universal, since no
supplies of the requisitions demanded could
be provided.

Mr. Robert Morris—to whose liberality the
United States is indebted, for the generous
manner in which he loosened his purse-strings
and gave, for the purpose of assisting the Union
in any way, when the treasury department
was low in funds—on this occasion quitted
the hall with a mind completely depressed,
without a present hope or cheering expecta-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 83

tion of future prosperity. On entering his
counting-house he received the welcome in-
telligence, that a ship which he had despaired
of, had at that moment arrived at the wharf,
with a full cargo of all the munitions of war,
and of soldiers’ clothing. He returned to Con-
gress almost breathless with joy, and announ-
ced the exhilarating good news. Nor did pro-
pitious fortune make an ending at this point.

Accidentally meeting with a worthy Qua-
er, who had wealth at command, and a heart
well-wisher to the American cause, although
from his religious principles averse to war
and fighting, he thought it no departure from
the strict rule of propriety, to endeavor, by
every exertion, to awaken his sympathetic
feelings and obtain assistance. Assuming
therefore an expression of countenance indic-
ative of the most poignant anguish and deep
despair, he was passing him in silence, when
the benevolent Quaker, who had critically
observed him, and marked the agitation of his
mind, feelingly said, “ Robert, I fear there is
bad news.”

The answer was, “ Yes, very bad ; I am un-
der the most helpless embarrassment for the
need of some hard money ;” meaning silver.
“Hof much would relieve thy difficulties,
Robert?” The sum was mentioned. “But I
could only give my private engagement in a
note, which I would sacredly pledge myself
and my honor to repay,” rejoined Mr. Morris.
84 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“ Oease thy sorrows then, Robert ; thou shalt
have the money in confidence of thy silence
on the subject, as it regards me.” The specie
was procured, immediately remitted to Wash-
ington, and saved the army.



GENERAL GADSEN AT ST. AUGUSTINE.

The conduct of the British commanders to-
wards this venerable patriot, in the strongest
manner evinced their determination rather to
crush the spirit of opposition, than by concil-
iation to subdueit. The man did not exist to
whose delicate sense of honor, even a shadow
of duplicity would have appeared more abhor-
rent than to General Gadsen. Transported by
an arbitrary decree, with many of the most
resolute and influential citizens of the Repub-
lie, to St. Augustine, attendance on parade
was peremptorily demanded, when a British
officer, stepping forward, said, “ Expediency,
and a series of political occurrences, have
rendered it necessary to remove you from
Charleston to this place ; but, gentlemen, we
have no wish to increase your sufferings; to
all, therefore, who are willing to give their
paroles, and not to go beyond the limits pre-
scribed to them, the liberty of the town will
be allowed ; a dungeon will be the destiny of
such as refuse to accept the indulgence.”

The proposition was generally acceded to.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 85

But when General Gadsen was called to give
this new pledge of faith, he indignantly ex-
claimed—* With men who have once deceived
me, I can enter into no new contract. Had
the British commanders regarded the terms
of the capitulation of Charleston, 1 might now,
although a prisoner under my own roof, have
enjoyed the smiles and consolations of my
surrounding family ; but even without a shad-
ow of accusation proffered against me, for any
act inconsistent with my plighted faith, 1 am
torn from them, and here in a distant land in-
vited to enter into new engagements. | will
give no parole.” “Think better of it, sir,”
said the officer ; “a second refusal of it will fix
your destiny—a dungeon will be your future
habitation.” “Prepare it, then,” said the in-
flexible patriot, “I will give no parole, so help
me God.”

An opposition to the mandate of the prevail-
ing authorities, was esteemed as a crime too
flagrant to pass unpunished. The rectitude of
his character, the respectability of his age,
afforded no plea in his favor; he was immedi-
ately separated from the rest of his compan-
ions in misfortunes, and for the remaining pe-
riod of his captivity condemned to pass his days
in solitary confinement. It was not, however,
for persecution to daunt and overcome a mind
as firm in patriotic virtue as his. Patient under
every insult, he felt the pressure of tyranny,
but bent not beneath its weight.

8
386 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

Sensible that activity of mind would in-
crease its energies, and better enable him to
support oppression, he diligently engaged in
the study of the Hebrew language, and was
hourly increasing his reputation as a scholar,
while his enemies vainly hoped that he was
writhing under the penalties of his political
offences. When first shut up in the castle at
St. Augustine, the comfort of a light was de-
nied him by the commandant of the fortress.
A generous subaltern offered to supply him
with a candle, but he declined it, lest the of-
ficer should expose himself to the censure of
his superior.

After André’s arrest, Colonel Glazier, the
governor of the castle, sent to advise General
Gadsen for the worst—intimating that, as
General Washington had been assured of re-
taliation if André was executed, it was not
unlikely that General Gadsen would be the
person selected. ‘To this message he replied,
“that he was always prepared to die for
his country; and though he knew it was im-
possible for Washington to yield the right of
an independent state, by the law of war, to
fear or affection, yet he would not shrink from
the sacrifice, and would rather ascend the
scaffold than purchase with his life the dis-
honor of his country.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 87

THE AMPUTATION OF A LIMB.

Lieutenant Samuel Seldon, of Virginia,
commanded one of the advance parties, when
General Greene, after having invested the
post at Ninety-six for several weeks, deter-
mined to attempt its reduction by assault.
At the signal appointed to attack, Seldon en-
tered the ditch of the principal work; and
while his right arm was raised, with the
intention of drawing down a sand-bag from
the top of the parapet, a ball entering his
wrist, shattered the bone of the limb nearly to
the shoulder. For so severe a wound, the
only remedy was amputation.

It is well known that on such occasions the
operating surgeon requires the assistance of
several persons to hold the patient’s limb, and
to support him. To this regulation Seldon
would not submit. It was his right arm he
was about to lose. He sustained it with the
left during the operation, his eyes fixed stead-
ily on it; uttered not a word, till the saw
reached the marrow, when, in composed tone
and manner, he said, “I pray you, doctor, be
quick.”

When the business was completed, he feel-
ingly exclaimed, “I am sorry that it is my
right arm; if it had been my left, the occa-
sion would have caused me to glory in the
loss.” He recovered and lived many years
88 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

afterwards, the object of affection and esteem
to all who had the good fortune to know him.

——e

FIRST PRAYER IN CONGRESS.

The following beautiful reminiscence of
the first Congress in Philadelphia is from the
pen of old John Adams :—

When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made
a motion that it should be opened with pray-
er. It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York,
and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina, because
we were divided in religious sentiments, some
Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabap-
tists, some Presbyterians, and some Congre-
gationalists, so that we could not join in the
same act of worship. Mr. Samuel Adams

-rose and said, that he was no bigot, and
could hear a prayer from any gentleman of
piety and virtue, and at the same time a
friend to his country. He was a stranger in
Philadelphia, but had heard that Mr. Duché
(Dushay they pronounce it) deserved that
character, and therefore he moved that Mr.
Duché, an Episcopal clergyman, might be de-
sired to read prayer to Congress to-morrow
morning. The motion was carried in the af-
firmative. Mr. Randolph, our President, wait-
ed on Mr. D., and received for answer that if
his health would permit he most certainly
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 89

would. Accordingly he appeared with his
clerk, and in his pontificals, and read several
prayers in the established form, and then read
the Collect for the 7th day of September,
which was the 35th Psalm. You must re-
member this was the next morning after we
had heard the rumor of the horrible cannon-
ade of Boston. It seemed as if Heaven had
ordained that Psalm to be read on that morn-

ing. .

After this, Mr. Duché, unexpectedly to every-
body, struck out into extemporary prayer,
which filled the bosom of every man present.
I must confess I never heard a better prayer,
or one so well pronounced—Episcopalian as
he is. Dr. Cooper himself never prayed with
such fervor, such ardor, such correctness and

athos, and in language so elegant and sub-
ime, for America, for Congress, for the pro-
vince of the Massachusetts Bay, especially the
town of Boston. It had excellent effect upon
everybody here. I must beg you to read the
psalm. If there is any faith in the sortes
Virgiliane, or Homerice, or especially the
sortes Biblia, it would have been thought
providential.

Here was a scene worthy of the painter's
art. It was in Carpenter’s Hall, in Philadel-
phia, a building which we learn by a recent
article still survives in its original condition,
though sacrilegiously converted, we believe, in-

to an auction mart for the sale of chairs and
8*
90 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

tables, that the forty-four individuals met to
whom the services were read.

Washington was kneeling there, and Henry,
and Randolph, and Rutledge, and Lee, and
Jay ; and by them stood, bowed in reverence,
the Puritan patriots of New England, who, at
that moment, had reason to believe that an
armed soldiery was wasting their humble
households. It was believed that Boston had
been bombarded and destroyed. They prayed
fervently for America, for the Congress, for
the province of Massachusetts Bay, and es-
pecially for the town of Boston ; and who can
realize the emotions which they turned im-
ploringly to Heaven for divine interposition
and aid? “It was enough,” says Mr. Adams,
“to melt the heart of stone. I saw the tears
gush into the eyes of the old, grave, pacific
Quakers of Philadelphia.”

—_——

LORD STIRLING AND THE BRITISH SPY.

Lord Stirling, who was a major-general in
the army of the United States during the war
for independence, having detected a spy from
the British in his camp, and the crime being
fully proved upon him, he was ordered for ex-
ecution. Being under the gallows, the awful
scene before him filled his soul with fear and
devotion, when he thus addressed the Deity ;
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 91

—*“O Lord, have pity on me ! extend thy mer-
cy to a wretched sinner! O Lord, forgive me,
and save me from the torments of hell !"—
The general, thinking that the address was to
him, replied, “ Don’t talk to me—I'll have no

mercy on you—hangman, do your duty, turn
him off.”

MILITARY COURTESY.

In September, 1776, a piquet of 450 men
from Gen. Heath’s division, constantly mount-
ed guard, by relief, at Morrisania, near New
York, from which a chain of sentinels within
half gun-shot of each other were planted.
The water passage between Morrisania and
Montresor’s Island being in some places very
narrow, the sentinels on the American side
were ordered not to fire on those of the Brit-
ish, unless they began; but the latter were'so
fond of beginning, that there was frequent
firing between them.

This being the case one day, and a British
officer walking along the Montresor’s side, an
American sentinel who had been exchanging
shots with one of the British, seeing the offi-
cer, and concluding him to be better game,
gave him a shot and wounded him. He was
carried to the house on the island. An offi-
cer with a flag came immediately down to
92 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the creek, and calling for the American officer
of the piquet, informed him, that if the Ameri-
can sentinel fired any more, the commanding
officer on the island would cannonade Col.
Morris’s house, in which the officers of the
piquet were quartered.

The American officer immediately sent to
Gen. Heath, to know what answer should be
returned. He was directed to inform the flag
officer, that the American sentinels had been
instructed not to fire on sentinels, unless they
were first fired upon—then to return the fire ;
and that such should be their conduct: as to
the cannonading of Col. Morris’s house, they
might act their pleasure. The firing ceased
for some time, until one day a raw Scotch
sentinel having been placed, he soon after dis-
charged his piece at an American sentinel,
which was immediately returned; upon which
a British officer came down, and calling to the
American officer, observed, that he thought
there was to be no firing between the senti-
nels. He was answered, that their own began ;
upon which he replied, “He shall then pay
for it ;” the sentinel was directly after re-
lieved, and there was no more firing between
them at that place ; but they were so civil to
each other on their posts, that one day at a
_ of the creek where it was practicable, the

ritish sentinel asked the American, who was
nearly opposite to him, if he could give him a
chew of tobacco; the latter having in his
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 93

pocket a piece of a thick twisted roll, tossed
it across the creek to the other, who after
biting off a quid sent the remainder back.

THE BRAVE LITTLE YANKEE.

It happened, in 1776, that the garden of a
widow, which lay between the American and
British camps, in the neighborhood of New
York, was frequently robbed at night. Her
son, a mere boy, and small for his age, having
obtained his mother’s permission to find out
and secure the thief, in case he should return,
concealed himself with a gun among the
weeds. A strapping Highlander, belonging to
the British grenadiers, came, and having filled
a large bag, threw it over his shoulder; the
boy then left his covert, went softly behind
him, cocked his gun, and called out to the
fellow, “ You are my prisoner: if you attempt
to put your bag down, I will shoot you dead ;
go forward in that road.”

The boy kept close behind him, threatened,
and was constantly prepared to execute his
threats. Thus the boy drove him into the
American camp, where he was secured.
When the grenadier was at liberty to throw
down his bag, and saw who had made him
prisoner, he was extremely mortified, and ex-
claimed, “ A British grenadier made prisoner
94 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

by such a brat—by such a brat !” The Amer-
ican officers were highly entertained with the
adventure, made a collection for the boy, and
gave him several pounds. He returned full
satisfied for the losses his mother sustained.
The soldier had side-arms, but they were of
no use, as he could not get rid of his bag.

oo—e—_

AN (NCONVENIENT WOUND.

While pursuing the enemy, during an action
at Saratoga, previous to the surrender of Bur-
goyne, in October, 1777, I heard, says General
Wilkinson, in his memoirs, some one exclaim,
“Protect me, sir, against this boy ;’ when,
turning my eyes, it was my fortune to arrest
the purpose of a lad thirteen or fourteen years
old, in the act of taking aim at a wounded of-
ficer, who lay in the angle of a worm fence.
Inquiring his rank, he answered, “1 had the
honor to command the grenadiers ;” of course
I knew him to be Major Ackland, who had
been brought from the field to this place on
the back of a Captain Shrimpton, of his own
corps, under a heavy fire.

I dismounted, took him by the hand, and ex-
pressed hopes that he was not badly wounded:
“ Not badly,” he replied, “but very inconve-
niently ; | am shot through both legs; will
you have the goodness, sir, to have me con-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 95

veyed to your camp ?” I directed my servant
to alight, and we lifted Ackland into his seat,
and then ordered him to be conducted to head-
quarters.



THE BRITISH LION.

In the commencement of the American rev-
olution, when one of the British king’s thun-
dering proclamations made its appearance,
the subject was mentioned in a company in
Philadelphia ; a member of congress who was
present, turning to Miss Levingstone, said,
“ Well, Miss, are you greatly terrified at the
roaring of the British lion?” “Not at all,
sir, for I have learned from natural history,
that beast roars loudest when he is most fright-

THE STUTTERING SOLDIER.

During the revolutionary war, when drafts
were made from the militia to recruit the con-
tinental army, a certain captain gave liberty to
the men who were drafted from his company, to
make their objections, if they had any, against
going into the service; accordingly, one of
them, who had an impediment in his speech,
96 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

came forward and made his bow: “ What is
your objection?” said the captain. “1 ca-ca-
cant go,” answers the man, “ because I st-st-
st-stutter."—* Stutter!” says the captain, “ you
don’t go there to talk, but to fight.” “ Ay,
but they'll p-p-put me on g-g-g-guard, and a
man may go ha-ha-half a mile before I can
say wh-wh-wh-who goes there?” O that is no
objection, for they will place some other sen-
try with you; he can challenge, and you can
fire.” “ Well, b-b-but I may be ta-ta-taken and
run through the g-g-guts before I can cry qu-qu-
qu-quarters,” This last plea prevailed; and
the captain, laughing heartily, dismissed him.

THE AMERICAN SHARP-SHOOTERS.

Colonel Forsyth, so celebrated in the last
war as the commander of a band of sharp-
shooters which harassed the enemy so much,
happened, in a scouting party, to capture a
British officer. He brought him to his camp,
and treated him with every respect due to his
rank. Happening to enter into conversation
on the subject of sharp-shooters, the British
officer observed that Col. Forsyth’s men were
a terror to the British camp—that as far as
they could see they could select the officer
from the private, who of course fell a sacri-
fice to their precise shooting. He wished
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 97

very much to see a specimen of their shoot-
ing.

Forsyth gave the wink to one of his officers,
then at hand, who departed, and instructed
two of the best marksmen belonging to the
corps, to pass by the commanding officer’s
quarters at stated intervals. This being ar-
ranged, Col. Forsyth informed the British offi-
cer that his wish should be gratified, and ob-
served he would step in front of his tent to
see whether any of his men were near at
hand. According to the arrangement made,
one of thé best marksmen appeared. The
colonel ordered him to come forward, and in-
quired whether his rifle was in good order.
“ Yes, sir,” replied the man.

He then stuck a table knife in a tree about
fifty paces distant, and ordered the man to
split his ball. He fired, and the ball was
completely divided by the knife, perforating the
tree on each side. This astonished the Brit-
ish officer. Apropos, another soldier appear-
ed in sight. He was called, and ordered, at
the same distance, to shoot an ace of clubs out
of the card. This was actually done. The
British officer was confounded and amazed—
still more so when the colonel informed him
that four weeks before, those men were’ at
work in the capacity of husbandmen.

9
98 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

THE REBEL FLOWER,

An officer, distinguished by his inhumanity
and constant —_ of the unfortunate,
meeting Mrs. Charles Elliot in a garden
adorned with a great variety of flowers, asked
the name of the Camomile, which appeared
to flourish with peculiar luxuriance. “The
Rebel Flower,” she replied. “ Why was that
name given to it?” said the officer. “ Be-
cause,” rejoined the lady, “it thrives. most
when most trampled upon.”

RARE PRESENCE OF MIND.

At the battle of Eutaw Springs, after the
British line had been broken, and the Old
Buffs, a regiment that had boasted of the ex-
traordinary feats that they were to perform,
were running from the field, Lieutenant Man-
ning, in the enthusiasm of that valor for which
he was so eminently distinguished, sprang for-
ward in pursuit, directing the platoon which
he commanded to follow him. He did not
cast an eye behind him, until he found himself
near a large brick housein to which the York
volunteers, commanded by Cruger, were re-
tiring.

The British were on all sides of him, and
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 99

not an American soldier nearer than one hun-
dred and fifty or two hundred yards. He did
not hesitate a moment, but springing at an
officer who was near him, seized him by the
collar, exclaiming, in a harsh tone of voice,
“ Sir, you are my prisoner,” wrested his sword
from his grasp, dragged him by foree from
the house, and keeping his body a shield of
defence from the heavy fire sustained from
the windows, carried him off without receiv-
ing any injury whatever.

Manning has often related, that at the mo-
ment when he expected that his prisoner
would have made an effort for liberty, he
with great solemnity commenced an enumera-
tion of his titlkes—*I am Sm Harry Barry,
deputy adjutant-general of the British army,
captain jn the 52d regiment, secretary to
the commandant at Charleston.” “Enough,
enough, sir,” said the victor, “you are just
the man I was looking for; fear nothing for
your life, you shall screen me from danger,
and | will take especial care of you.”

He had retired in this manner some dis-
tance from the brick house, when he saw
Captain Robert Joiett, of the Virginian line,
engaged in single combat with a British offi-
cer. They had selected each other for battle
a little before, the American armed with a
broad sword, the Briton with a musket and
bayonet. As they came together a thrust was
made at Joiett, which he happily parried, and
100 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

both dropping their artificial weapons, being
too much in contact to use them with effect,
resorted to those with which they had been
furnished by nature.

They were both men of great bulk and vig-
or, and while struggling, each anxious to bring
his adversary to the ground, a grenadier, who
saw the contest, ran to the assistance of his
officer, made a lunge at Joiett with his bay-
onet, but luckily drove it between the curve
into his coat. In attempting to withdraw the
entangled weapon, he threw both the combat-
ants to the ground; when getting it free, he
raised it deliberately, determined not to fail
again in his purpose, but to transfix Joiett.

It was at this crisis that Manning approach-
ed—not near enough, however, to reach the
grenadier with his arm. In order to gain
time, and to arrest the stroke, he exclaimed
in an angry and authoritative tone—* You
brute, will you murder the gentleman !’ The
soldier, supposing himself addressed by one of
his own officers, suspended the contemplated
blow, and looked around to see the person
who had thus spoken to him.

Before he could recover from the surprise
into which he had been thrown, Manning,
now sufficiently near him, smote him with his
sword across the eyes, and felled him to the
ground; while Joiett disengaged himself from
his opponent, and snatching up the musket as
he attempted to rise, laid him dead by a blow
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 101

from the but-end of it. Manning was of infe-
rior size, but strong and remarkably well form-
ed—Joiett, literally speaking, a giant. This
probably led Barry, who could not have wished
the particulars of his capture to be commented
on, to reply, when asked by his brother offi-
cers how he came to be taken, “I was over-
powered by a huge Virginian.”



THE CHEVALIER DUPLESSIS MAUDUIT.

This young Frenchman, who in his twen-
tieth year drew his sword in the cause of
America, has the credit of displaying the most
romantic gallantry at the battle of German-
town. The laurels gained by this chivalrous
youth, in the successful defence of the fortress
at Red Bank, against a powerful detachment
of Hessians, led on by Colonel Donop, were
no less honorable to him. So certain were
the assailants of victory, so confident of their
own superiority, both in discipline and valor,
that on their approach to the American lines,
one of the officers, advancing in front of his
troops, exclaimed—* The king of England
orders his rebellious subjects to lay down their
arms ; and they are warned, that if they stand
the battle, no quarter whatever will be given.”
It was immediately answered—* Agreed | The
challenge is accepted! There shall be no
quarter on either side r

9
102 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

It is unnecessary to detail particulars of the
action that immediately followed. The de-
feat of the Hessians was complete. ' Theirlead-
er and a large portion of the detachment fell.
It might have been expected, after the threat-
ening denunciation of vengeance held out, that,
in just retaliation, indulgence might have
been given to resentment; but with victory,
humanity regained its benign influence in
every American bosom, and the vanquished
experienced every kind and benevolent atten-
tion that could sooth their misfortunes, and
teach them more highly to appreciate the
courage and forbearance of an enemy against
whom they were prepared to execute such
deadly animosity. The unfortunate Donop,
who fell mortally wounded, turning, when
nearly in the agonies of death, to M. de Mau-
duit, said, with great expression of feeling—
“ My career is short. 1 die the victim of my
ambition, and of the avarice of my king, but
in dying in the arms of honor, | have no re-
grets.”

We cannot leave the generous Mauduit
without briefly noticing his lamentable and un-
timely end. On the 3d of March, 1791, the day
previous to his assassination, the Baron de Ca-
rendeffez, with a few other of his friends, re-

aired to the government-house at Port-au-
rince, the spirit of revolt then being at its
heightin the Island of St. Domingo, to warnhim
of the danger which threatened him, the storm
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 103

ready to burst on his head, and emphatically
said—* Your regiment—the regiments of Ar-
tois and Normandie are in insurrection—the
sailors in the port, and every miscreant in the
place, have sworn your destruction—believe
the information we give you—quit the scene
of horror—you cannot otherwise escape de-
struction.”

With dignity, he answered—*I know the
risk that | run—the danger to which | expose
myself; but honor bids me remain at my post.
Death is my destiny—I expect it. But there
stands my commander,” (pointing to M. de
Blanchelande,) “ if he bids me depart, | obey ;
if he does not, I die on this spot.” He then
added—* Remember, my friends, that I pre-
dict, that that scoundrel will save himself,
leaving me to pay the forfeit.”

He judged with accuracy ; the general fled,
leaving the brave Mauduit at the mercy of
exasperated assassins, to whose ferocity he
became a victim. But, although the com-
mander escaped from the present danger, yet
he did not altogether escape, for the moment
he arrived in France, he perished by the
hands of the executioner. 0



DEFENDING AN ENEMY.

Captain Butler, who headed a marauding
party under a British commission, surrendered
104 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

himself on the terms held out to the disaffected,
by a proclamation of Governor Matthews. A
more sanguinary being did not exist. He had
cruelly oppressed some of the whig inhabit-
ants, and but a little before murdered some
of the Americans whose friends were then in
camp. Irritated to madness, and to a disre-
gard of all sense of duty, at the thought that
such a man was, by submission, to escape the
just reward of his crimes, a hasty and intem-
perate message was sent to General Marion,
purporting that such a villain should not re-
ceive protection.

To this insulting communication, Marion
calmly replied—*Confidently believing that
the pardon offered by Matthews would be
granted, the man whom you would destroy
has submitted. Both law and honor sanc-
tion my resolution. I will take him to my
tent, and at the hazard of my life protect
him.” A second message now informed him
that Butler should be dragged from his tent
and put to death—since it was an insult to
humanity, that such a wretch should be de-
fended.

The honorable feeling of Marion was now
exalted to the highest pitch, and calling the
gentlemen of his family together, he exclaim-
ed: “Is there a man among you who will re-
fuse his aid in defending the laws of his coun-
try! I know you too well to suppose it! Pre-
pare then to give me your assistance ; for,
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 105

though I consider the villany of Butler un-
paralleled, yet, as an officer acting under or-
ders, I am bound to defend him; and I will
do so, though I perish.” He then collected a
guard around the tent into which he had in-
troduced him, and at an early hour after
nightfall, had him conveyed to a place of se-
curity.

—___—_

MRS, ISAAC HOLMES.

Among the patriots selected for transporta-
tion to St. Augustine, was Mr. Isaac Holmes.
The imperious call on him at early dawn to
quit his chamber, and deliver himself up to the
guard who waited to carry him off, caused
him to descend the stairs when but partially
dressed. His gentle wife, appalled by no
fears, exhibiting no symptoms of despondency,
had followed him in silence. The mandate
being given for departure, she handed him his
coat, and with undaunted resolution said,
“Take it, my husband, and submit. Waver
not in your principles, but be true to your
country. Have no fears for your family; God
is good, and will provide for them.”
106 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

THE FRENCHMAN AND THE NEGRO.

There was in the legion of Pulaski a young
French officer of singularly fine form and ap-
pearance, named Celeron ; as he passed the
dwelling of Mrs. Elliot, a British major, whose
name is lost, significantly pointing him out,
said—* See, Mrs. Elliot, one of your dlustri-
ous allies—what a pity it is that the hero has
lost his sword.” “Had two thousand such
men,” replied the lady, “been present to aid
in the defence of our city, think you, sir, that
I should ever have been subjected to the ma-
lignity of your observation !” At the moment,
a negro, trigged out in full British uniform,
happened to pass—* See, major,” continued
she, “one of your allies—bow with gratitude
for the service received from such honorable
associates—caress and cherish them—the fra-
ternity is excellent, and will teach ws more
steadily to contend against the results.”

——

FEMALE WIT.

The haughty Tarleton, vaunting his feats
of gallantry to the great disparagement of
the officers of the continental cavalry, said to
a lady at Wilmington, “1 have a very earnest
desire to see your far-famed hero, Colonel
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 107

Washington.” “Your wish, colonel, might
have been fully gratified,” she promptly re-
plied, “had you ventured to look behind you
after the battle of the Cowpens.” It was in this
battle that Washington had wounded Tarle-
ton in the hand, which gave rise to a still
more pointed retort. Conversing with Mrs.
Wiley Jones, Colonel Tarleton observed—
“ You appear to think very highly of Colonel
Washington ; and yet I have been told, that
he is so ignorant a fellow, that he can hardly
write his own name.” “It may be the case,”
she readily replied, “but no man better than
ourself, colonel, can testify that he knows
ar to make his mark.”

MRS. JACOB MOTTE,

The patriotic enthusiasm of Mrs. Jacob
Motte demands particular notice.’ When
compelled by painful duty, Lieutenant Col-
onel Lee informed her, “ that in order to ac-
complish the immediate surrender of the Brit-
ish garrison occupying her elegant mansion,
its destruction was indispensable,” she instant-
ly replied—* The sacrifice of my property is
nothing, and I shall view its destruction with
delight, if it shall in any degree contribute to
the good of my country.” In proof of her sin-
cerity, she immediately presented the arrows
108 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

by which combustible matter was to be con-
veyed to the building.

—_

MRS. THOMAS HEY WARD.

An order having been issued for a general
illumination, to celebrate the supposed victory
at Guilford, the front of the house occupied by
Mrs. Heyward and her sister, Mrs. George
Abbot Hall, remained in darkness. Indignant
at so decided a mark of disrespect, an officer
forced his way into her presence, and sternly
demanded of Mrs. Heyward, “ How dare you
disobey the order which has been issued ;
why, madam, is not your house illuminated ?”
“Ts it possible for me, sir,” replied the lady
with perfect calmness, “to feel a spark of
joy’ Can I celebrate the victory of your
army, while my husband remains a prisoner
at St. Augustine.” “That,” rejoined the offi-
cer, “is a matter of little consequence ; the
last hopes of rebellion are crushed by the de-
eat of Greene: you shall illuminate.”

“Not a single light,” replied the lady, “shall
be placed with my consent, on such an occa-
sion, in any window in the house.” “Then,
madam, I will return with a party, and before
midnight level it to the ground.” “ You have
power to destroy, sir, and seem well disposed
to use it, but over my opinions you possess no
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 109

control. I disregard your menaces, and reso-
lutely declare, I will not illuminate.”

Mrs. Heyward was graceful and majestic
in person, beautiful in countenance, angelic in
disposition. None but a ruffian could have
treated her with indignity. On the anniversa-
ry of the surrender of Charleston, May 12th,
1781, an illumination was again demanded in
testimony of joy for an event so propitious to
the cause of Britain. Mrs. G. A. Hall, who
labored under a wasting disease, lay at the
point of death. Again Mrs. Heyward refused
to obey. Violent anger was excited, and the
house was assailed by a mob with brickbats,
and every species of nauseating trash that
could offend or annoy. Her resolution re-
mained unshaken, and while the tumult con-
tinued, and shouts and clamor increased in-
dignantly, Mrs. Hall expired.

A RARE ACT OF PUBLIC MUNIFICENCE.

We give below an anecdote of Robert Mor-
ris, as related by Judge Peters, showing the
style in which this benevolent individual be-
stowed unbounded favors on our country,
when, in the hour of need, she was most in
want of necessaries on which the fate of the
contest would depend. We give it in exactly
his own language.

10
110 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“Tn 1779, or 1780, two of the most distress-
ing years of the war, General Washington
wrote to me a most alarming account of the
prostrate conditiqn of the military stores, and
enjoining my immediate exertions to supply
deficiencies. There were no musket cartridges
but those in the men’s boxes, and they were
wet; of course, if attacked, a retreat or a rout
was inevitable. We (the board of war) had
exhausted all the lead accessible to us, having
caused even the spouts of houses to be melt-
ed, and had offered, abortively, the equivalent
in paper of two shillings specie for lead.

“] went, in the evening of the same day in
which I received this letter, to a splendid en-
tertainment given by Don Mirailles, the Span-
ish minister. My heart was sad, but I had
the faculty of brightening my countenance
even under gloomy disasters, yet it seems then
not sufficiently adroitly. Mr. Morris, who
was one of the guests, and knew me well,
discovered some casual traits of depression.
He accosted me in his usual blunt and disen-
gaged manner—‘I see some clouds passing
across the sunny countenance you assume—
what is the matter?’ After some hesitation I
showed him the general’s letter, which I
brought from the office with the intention of
placing it at home in a private cabinet. He

layed with my anxiety, which he did not re-
ieve for some time.

“ At length, however, with great and sincere
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION 111

delight, he called me aside, and told me that
the Horken privateer had just arrived at
his wharf, with ninety tons of lead, which she
had brought as ballast. It had been landed
at Martinique, and stone ballast had supplied
its place, but this had been put on shore, and
the lead again taken in. ‘ You shall have
my half of this fortunate supply ; there are the
owners of the other half) (indicating gentle-
men inthe apartment.) ‘ Yes, but I am al-
ready under heavy personal engagements, as
guarantee for the department, to those and
other gentlemen.’

“Well, rejoined Mr. Morris, ‘they will
take your assumption with my guarantee.’ I
instantly, on these terms, secured the lead, left
the entertainment, sent for the proper officers,
and set more than one hundred people at work
during the night. Before morning a supply
of cartridges was ready and sent off to the
army.”

COURAGEOUS YOUNG WOMAN.

At the attack on the Middle Fort, at Scho-
harie, by the British and Indians, on the 17th
of October, 1780, an interesting young wo-
man, perceiving, as she thought, symptoms of
fear in a soldier, who had been ordered to a
well, (without the works, and within range
112 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

of the enemy's fire,) for water, snatched the
bucket from his hands and ran for it herself.
Without changing color, or giving the slight-
est evidence of fear, she drew, and brought
pail after pail to the thirsty soldiers, and,
wonderful to relate, she escaped without re-
ceiving one single injury.

GOVERNOR CLINTON,

At the conclusion of the struggle for inde-
pendence, virulence against the tories was
the order of the day, and once a British offi-
cer was placed on a cart, in the city of New
York, to be tarred and feathered. This was
the signal for violence and assassination.
Governor Clinton, at this moment, rushed in
with a drawn sword, and rescued the victim
at the risk of his life.

REMARKABLE INCIDENT.

A very singular occurrence took place at
the siege of Augusta. Two outlaws, distin-
guished by the enormity of their offences,
were taken and condemned to die. Every
soldier in the army shrunk from the office of

an. It was at length determined that
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 113

the one deemed least guilty should be pardon-
ed, provided he would act as executioner of
the other. The terms were accepted, and the
most atrocious culprit turned off. He who
was pardoned had little time for triumph, for
his part was but just performed, before a four
pound shot from the enemy’s battery struck
him on the breast, and laid him dead by the
side of the man whom he had just hung.

THE TABLES TURNED.

In August, 1775, General Gage sent two
armed schooners from Boston to Machias,
with cash, to buy live-stock, and gave orders
to take the stock by force, if the inhabitants
would not sell it. They did refuse ;—the
crews of the schooners then attempted to take’
off the stock by force, upon which the inhab-
itants rose, made all the men prisoners, seized
on the schooners and cash, and shared about
5l. sterling a man.



GALLANTRY OF THE GLOUCESTER MILITIA.

On the 9th of August, 1775, the British
sloop of war Falcon, Captain Linzee, hove in
sight off Gloucester, Massachusetts, in quest
of two schooners from the West Indies, bound

10*
114 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

to Salem, one of which he soon brought to; the
other, taking advantage of a fair wind, put
into Gloucester. Linzee having made a prize
of the first, pursued the second into the harbor,
bringing his prize along with him.

He anchored, and sent two barges with fif-
teen men in each, armed with muskets and
swivels, and attended by a whale-boat, in
which was a lieutenant and six privates, with
orders to seize the other schooner and bring
her under the Falcon’s bow. The militia and
other inhabitants, indignant at this daring at-
tempt, prepared for a vigorous resistance :—
The bargemen under the command of the
lieutenant boarded the schooner at the cabin
windows, which provoked.a smart fire from
the people on shore, by which three of the
enemy were killed, and the lieutenant wound-
ed in the thigh, who thereupon returned to
the sloop of war.

Linzee then sent the other schooner and a
cutter he had to attend him, well armed, with
orders to fire on the “damn’d rebels” when-
ever they could see them, and that he would
in the mean while cannonade the town; he
immediately fired a broadside into the thick-
est settlements; and looking with diabolical
pleasure to see what havoc his cannon might
make— Now, said he, ‘my boys, we will aim
at the damn’d Presbyterian Church. Well
done, my brave fellows ; one shot more and the
house of God will fall before you.’
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 115

Not a ball struck or wounded a single in-
dividual, although they went through the
houses in almost every direction filled with
women and children. The small party on the
water-side performed wonders, for they soon
made themselves masters of both the schoon-
ers, the cutter, the two barges, the boat and
every man inthem. In the action, which last-
ed several hours, the Americans had but
one killed, and two wounded; of the British
thirty-five were taken prisoners, and several
wounded. The next day the Falcon warped
off, with the loss of half of her crew, as well
as the loss of her prize, tender, and boats.

HICKORY CLUBS.

Baron de Glaubeck having signalized him-
self in many engagements after the battle of
Guilford, General Greene recommended him
to the governor of North Carolina, and ad-
vised him to put the cavalry of that state
under his command. The governor took the
general’s advice, and accordingly placed the
baron at the head of the cavalry; but to his
great astonishment, not a man among them
had a sword; however, in order to supply the
deficiency, he ordered every man to supply
himself with a substantial hickory club, one
end of which he caused to be mounted with
116 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

a heavy piece of iron; then, to show an ex.
ample to his men, he’ threw aside his sword,
armed himself with one of these bludgeons,
and mounted his horse.

After giving his men the necessary instruc-
tions in wielding their clubs, he marched with
his whole body, consisting of three hundred,
towards Cornwallis’s army, in order to recon-
noitre his lines, where he arrived the same
day, about one o'clock. Cornwallis was then
retreating towards Wilmington, and his men
being fatigued, had halted to take some re-
freshment. The baron having seized this fa-
vorable opportunity, charged two Hessian
piquets, whom he made prisoners ; and routed
three British regiments, to whose heads he
applied the clubs so effectually, that a con-
siderable number were killed on the spot;
and finally he retreated with upwards of six-
ty prisoners.

COL. STARK AND THE CLERICAL SOLDIER.

Just before night Stark met Colonel Baum, at
the head of his Hessians, tories, and Indians,
on the branch of the river Hoosick. Stark’s
numbers were but little more than half those
of Baum, having lessened them considerably
by sending one party for arms, another for
beef cattle, &c. However, he made the best
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 117

show he could with the few men he had, by
spreading them out in a single file, and by
displaying the greatest number in the most
sightly situations.

They both halted and looked at each other
till dark ; when Stark fell back to his encamp-
ment left in the morning, but kept patroles
going all night, by which he found that Baum
was throwing up a breast-work. In the
morning, Stark made his disposition for at-
tacking Baum in front and rear; by sending
two flanking parties, one on the right and the
other on the left, to meet in his rear and begin
the attack, while he should show him Yan-
kees’ play in front. Not many minutes after
the two parties had marched, it began to rain
violently, and they came back to the main
body, and all returned again to their encamp-
ment.

In the course of the following night they
received some reinforcements. The most re-
markable of these was a minister from Berk-
shire, who appeared the temporal as well as
spiritual leader of his people. Although they
had a military commander, the minister had
to be their organ. He came to the command-
ing officer, and addressed him in the following
strain: “ We, the people of Berkshire, have
been frequently called on to fight, but have
not been permitted. We have now resolved,
if you will not let us fight, never to turn out
again.” The general asked him if he wished
118 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

to go at that time, when it was dark and rain-
ed. “No.” “Then,” continued Stark, “ if the
Lord should give us sunshine again, if I do
not give you fighting enough, I will never ask
you to come again.”



SAGACITY AND COURAGE OF COL, STARK.

After the evacuation of Boston, Stark went
to the northern posts with Gen. Gates ; but
did not go into Canada, for he had opposed the
expedition of Montgomery with all his rea-
soning powers. Gen. Gates and Col. Stark
had long been upon the intimate terms of
brothers; they commonly addressed each other
by their given names—they had both been
taught the art of war in the same school, and
their mode of warfare was the same. Nei-
ther had been accustomed to defeat. The
study of these plain men was to vanquish
their enemies. A fine cocked hat, or a pretty
coat, the soldier’s strut, or an elegant horse,
bore but little weight on their minds.

Stark was not less in the council than in
the field.

In the fall of 1776, a small party of the
British came up the lake before Ticonderoga
to take soundings of the depth of the water.
From the prospect of attack, Gates summoned
a council of war. There were there no offi-
cers who had been in actual service except
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 119

Gates and Stark. Gates took Stark aside, and
the following dialogue ensued :
‘Gates. What do you think of it, John?

Stark. 1 think if they come, we must fight
them.

Gates. Pshaw, John! tell me what your
opinion is seriously.

Stark. My opinion is, that they will not fire
a shot against this place this season; but
whoever is here next, must look out.

They returned to the council, and Gates
told what Stark had said—that there would
not be a shot fired against them at that time.
This being the first doubt suggested of an im-
mediate attack, it produced much surprise—
many offered to lay bets of it. Stark gave
his reasons, that it was so near the time of
year when the lake would be frozen, that their
survey of the lake could only be in prepara-
tion for another season—for they would never
make an attack upon Ticonderoga at a time
when, if successful, they could not immedi-
ately pursue the advantages of their victory.
This proved to be the case.

Soon after this, Washington ordered Stark
to join him in Pennsylvania; and about the
time of his arrival, the former began to con-
template his attack on Trenton. On the 24th
of December, 1776, he called a_ council.
Stark was not present at the first of the meet-
ing; but when he arrived, Washington in-
formed him of the business of the council, viz.
120 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

To take into consideration the best mode to
be pursued under existing circumstances.
Stark said—* Your men have long been ac-
customed to place dependence upon spades,
pick-axes, and hoes for safety ; but if you
ever mean to establish the independence of the
United States, you must teach them to put
confidence in their firearms.”

Washington answered—* That is what we
have agreed upon: we are to march to-mor-
row for the attack of Trenton; you are to
take command of the right wing of the ad-
vanced guard, and Gen. Greene the left.”
Stark observed, he could not have been better
suited. Here it may be proper to notice an
event not generally understood, the particu-
lars of which were related at the funeral of
the deceased general, by a companion in arms
then present. It is well known that just pre-
vious to this important action, the American
army was on the point of being broken up by
suffering, desertion, and the expiration of the
term of enlistment of a great portion of the
troops.

A few days previous; the term of the New
Hampshire troops expired. Stark was the first
to propose a re-engagement of six weeks.
He, for the moment, left his station as com-
mander, and engaged as recruiting officer :
and not a man failed to.re-engage. He led
the van of the attack—and the result corres-
ponded with the hopes of the nation. Seven
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 121

days after he was with Washington at Tren-
ton, when Lord Cornwallis with 12,000 men
nearly hemmed them in. By consummate
address the impending fate of the Americans
was avoided—Washington fell on the enemy’s
rear at Princeton, and so broke up the British
plans, that the enfeebled American army was
enabled in turn to hem up the British in the
environs of New York.

HOW TO CHEAT A HIGHWAY ROBBER.

After the enemy evacuated Philadelphia,
Congress adjourned to meet there again the
first of July. The delegates dispersed from
Yorktown at different times and in different
companies, at their convenience. Col. Bart-
lett set off with his servant only with him,
there being a wood of considerable space
through which they were obliged to pass.
This wood was infested with a band of rob-
bers, supposed to be about twenty in number,
who plundered all that travelled through it.

At such times of violence, people who had
been driven from their homes and occupations
by the movements of contending armies, re-
sorted to like violence upon the weary tray-
eller, to obtain subsistence ; or perhaps some
renegado tories, who were then called “ cow-
boys,” might compose this band. When they

11
122 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

had arrived at the tavern near the wood, and
stopped to refresh themselves and horses,
they were informed that it was dangerous to
pass alone ; that the robbers were very active
about that time, and related an anecdote of
the paymaster of the army, who took a large
quantity of paper money from Yorktown a
few weeks before to the army under Gen.
Washington.

This gentleman was an officer in the army; «
he was alone, and on approaching the wood
he learned the active spirit and supposed
number of the robbers. Finding it would
not be safe for him to attempt to pass in his
present character, he put off his military uni-
form and every appearance of rank; took an
old shabby-looking horse, saddle, bridle, and
farmer’s saddle-bags, in which he stowed his
money, and also a Quaker hat and dress, with-
out any side-arms, and set off on a country
Quaker’s jog.

When he had arrived at a certain part of
the forest he was met by two of the band,
who accosted him with the salutation of “ stop
—deliver !” He saw others around at a dis-
tance in the wood; his presence of mind and
equanimity were equal to the task, and as-
suming the Quaker air and seriousness, he
told them that he had not much money ; but
that if they had a better right to it than him-
self and family, they might take it; he then
spoke of religious and moral duties, at the
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 123

same time taking from his pocket a few small
silver and copper pieces which he offered to
them.

They were so completely deceived by this
manceuvre that one observed to the other, he
was ‘a poor Quaker, not worth robbing,’ and
they "let him pass on without touching his
money. He saluted them with a “ farewell,”
and went on in his old jog, passed through,
and carried his money safely to the army.



ANECDOTES OF SERGEANT JASPER.

At the commencement of the revolutionary
war, Sergeant Jasper enlisted in the second
South Carolina regiment of infantry, com-
manded byColonel Moultrie. He distinguish-
ed himself in a particular manner, at the at-
tack which was made upon Fort Moultrie on
Sullivan’s island on the 25th of June, 1776.

In the warmest part of the contest the flag-
staff was severed by a cannon ball, and the
flag fell to the bottom of the ditch on the out-
side of the works: this accident was con-
sidered by the anxious inhabitants of Charles-
ton, as putting an end to the contest by strik-
ing the American flag to the enemy.

At the moment that Jasper made the dis-
covery that the flag had fallen, he jumped
from one of the embrasures and mounted the
124 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

colors, which he tied to a sponge staff, on the
parapet, where he supported them until ano-
ther flag was procured. The subsequent ac-
tivity and enterprise of this patriot induced
Colonel Moultrie to give him a sort of a rov-
ing commission to go and come at pleasure ;
confident that he was always usefully em-
ployed.

He was privileged to select such men from
the regiment as he should choose to accompa-
ny him in his enterprises. His parties con-
sisted generally of five or six, and he often
returned with prisoners before Moultrie was
apprized of his absence. Jasper was distin-
guished for his humane treatment when an
enemy fell into his power. His ambition ap-
pears to have been limited to the characteris-
tic of bravery, humanity, and usefulness to
the cause in which he was engaged.

When it was in his power to kill but not to
capture, it was his practice not to permit a
single prisoner to escape. By his sagacity
and enterprise, he often succeeded in the cap-
ture of those who were lying in ambush for
him. In one of his excursions. an instance
of bravery and humanity is recorded by the
biographer of Gen. Marion, which would stag-
ger credulity, if it were not well attested.

While he was examining the British camp
at Ebenezer, all the sympathy of his breast
was awakened by the distresses of Mrs. Jones,
whose husband, an American by birth, had
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 125

taken the king’s protection and had been con-
fined in irons for deserting the royal cause,
after he had taken the oath of allegiance.
Her well founded belief was, that nothing
short of the life of her husband would atone
for the offence with which he was charged.

Anticipating the awful scene of a beloved
husband expiring upon the gibbet, had exci-
ted the severest emotions of grief and dis-
traction. Jasper secretly consulted with his
companion, Sergeant Newton, whose feelings
for the distressed female and child were
equally excited with his own, upon the prac-
ticability of releasing Jones from his impend-
ing fate.

Though they were unable to suggest a plan
of operation, they were determined to watch
for the most favorable opportunity, and make
the effort. The departure of Jones and sev-
eral others (all in irons) to Savannah, for
trial, under a guard consisting of a sergeant,
corporal, and eight men, was ordered upon
the succeeding morning.

Within two miles of Savannah, about thir-
ty yards from the main road, is a spring of
fine water, surrounded by a deep and thick
underwood, where travellers often halt to re-
fresh themselves with a cool draught from
the pure fountain. Jasper and his companion
considered this spot the most favorable for their
enterprise. They accordingly passed the guard
and concealed themselves near the spring.

11*
126 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

When the enemy came up, the corporal,
with his guard of four men, conducted the
prisoners to the spring, while the sergeant
with the other four, having grounded their
arms near the road, brought up the rear. The
prisoners, wearied with their long walk, were
permitted to rest themselves on the earth.
Two of the corporal’s men were ordered to
keep guard, and the other two to give the
prisoners drink out of their canteens.

The two last approached the spring where
our heroes lay concealed, and resting their
muskets against the tree, dipped up water:
and having drunk themselves, turned away,
with replenished canteens, to give the prison-
ers also. “ Now, Newton, is our time!” said
Jasper. Then bursting from their conceal-
ment, they snatched up the two muskets that
were rested against the tree, and instantly
shot down the two soldiers that kept guard.

By this time the sergeant and corporal, a
couple of brave Englishmen, recovering from
their panic, had sprung and seized up the two
muskets which had fallen from the slain: but
before they could use them, the Americans,
with clubbed: guns, levelled each at the head
of his antagonist the final blow. Then, se-
curing their weapons, they flew between the
surviving enemy and their arms, grounded
near the road, and compelled them to sur-
render.

The irons were taken off, and arms put in
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 127

the hands of those who had been prisoners,
and the whole party arrived at Parisburgh
the next morning and joined the American
camp. ‘There are but few instances upon re-
cord where personal exertions, even for self-
preservation from certain prospect of death,
would have induced a resort to an act so des-

erate of execution; how much more lauda-
le was this, where the spring to action was
roused by the lamentations of a female wn-
known to the adventurers !

After the gallant defence at Sullivan’s
Island, Colonel Moultrie’s regiment was pre-
sented with a stand of colors by Mrs. Elliot,
which she had richly embroidered with her
own hands; and as a reward for Jasper’s par-
ticular merit, Governor Rutledge presented
him with a very handsome sword. During
the assault against Savannah, two officers
had been killed, and one wounded, endeavor-
ing to plant these colors upon the enemy’s
parapet of the Spring hill redoubt.

Just before the retreat was ordered, Jasper
endeavored to replace them upon the works,
and while he was in the act, received a mor-
tal wound and fell into the ditch. When a
retreat was ordered, he recollected the honor-
able conditions upon which the donor pre-
sented the colors to his regiment, and among
the last acts of his life, succeeded in bringing
them off.

Major Horry called to see him, soon after
128 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the retreat, to whom it is said he made the
following communication: “I have got my
furlough. That sword was presented to me
by Governor Rutledge, for my services in the
defence of Fort Moultrie—give it to my father,
and tell him I have worn it in honor. If the
old man should weep, tell him his son died in
the hope of a better life.

“Tell Mrs. Elliot that I lost my life sup-
porting the colors which she presented to our
regiment. Should you ever see Jones, his
wife and son, tell deem that Jasper is gone,
but that the remembrance of that battle,
which he fought for them, brought a secret
joy into his heart when it was about to stop
its motion forever.” He expired a few mo-
ments after closing this sentence.

WASHINGTON’S RETALIATION.

It is now settled as a fact beyond dispute,
that General Gates was connected with Gen-
eral Lee in a wicked plan to supersede the
illustrious Washington. The commander-in-
chief was well aware of the means they used
to deprive him of the affections of the army
and the confidence of the people. How he
sought revenge, is shown in the following an-
ecdote :

' “T found General Gates traversing the
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 129

apartment under the influence of high ex- *
citement. His agitation was excessive—
every feature of his countenance, every gest-
ure betrayed it. He had been charged with
unskilful management at the battle of Cam-
den, and he had just received official dis-
patches, informing him that the command was
transferred to General Greene. His counte-
nance betrayed no resentment, however; it
was sensibility alone that caused his emotion.

“ He held an open letter in his hand, which
he often raised to his lips, and kissed with
devotion, while he repeatedly exclaimed—
‘Great man! Noble, generous procedure !”

“ When the tumult of his mind had a little
subsided, with strong expressions of feeling
he said, ‘I have this day received a commu-
nication from the commander-in-chief, which
has conveyed more consolation to my bosom,
more ineflable delight to my heart, than I be-
lieved it possible for it ever to have felt again.
With affectionate tenderness, he sympathizes
with me in my domestic misfortunes, and con-
doles with me on the loss I have sustained in
the recent death of my only son; and then,
with peculiar delicacy, lamenting my misfor-
tune in battle, assures me that his confidence
in my zeal and capacity is so little impaired,
that the command of the right wing of the
army will be bestowed on me, as soon as I
can make it convenient to join him.’”
130 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“ ~PHE GUN THAT COULD FIRE ALL DAY.”

During the revolution, a rifleman by the
name of Timothy Murphy possessed a double-
barrelled gun. It was a mystery which the
Indians could not clear away, that he could
fire twice, without a second loading. They
thought, as their bullets never chanced to hit
him, that he was attended by some invisible
being, who warded off theirs, but sped his ball
with unerring certainty to the mark. By
some means they got acquainted with the se-
cret, and took care never to expose them-
selves, till he had fired the second time.

One day, having separated from his party,
he was pursued by a party of Indians, all of
whom he outran, except one ; when Murphy
turning around fired upon the Indian and
killed him. Wishing to strip the dead of his
scalp, (a great honor with him,) and thinking
that the rest had given up the race, he stop-
ped. However, this last thought did not last
long, for he soon saw them. He snatched up
the gun of his fallen foe, and with it killed
one of his pursuers. The rest, now sure of
their prey, gave a yell of joy, and rushed
heedlessly on, expecting to quickly have him
a prisoner. Being nearly exhausted, and like-
ly to be overtaken, he again turned round,
. and with the remaining charge of his rifle,
picked off another of his enemies. The others,
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 131

greatly astonished at this wonderful feat of
magic—as they thought it—fled, crying out,
“The gun can fire all day without loading n



BARBARITY OF THE LOYALISTS.

The following circumstance supports the
opinion, that in most cases the tories were
more barbarous than the savages. While a
pare of the enemy were prowling about Scho-

arie, the Indians killed and scalped a mo-
ther, with a large family of children. They
had just completed the work of death, when
some loyalists came up, and discovered an in-
fant breathing sweetly in its cradle. An In-
dian, well known for his inhumanity, ap-
assert the cradle with uplifted hatchet.

he babe looked up in his face, and smiled ;
when the feelings of nature triumphed over
the ferocity of the savage; the tomahawk
fell with his arm, and he was stooping down
to take the child in his arms; but one of the
tories, cursing him for his humanity, thrust it
through with his bayonet, and thus transfix-
ed, held it up while struggling in the agonies
of death, as he exclaimed—* This, too, is a
rebel !”
182 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION

FEMALE PATRIOTISM.

“ A good lady—we knew her when she had
grown old—in 1775, lived on the seaboard,
about a day’s march from Boston, where the
British army then was. By some unaccounta-
ble accident, a rumor was spread in town
and country, that the regulars were on a full
march for that place, and would probably
arrive in three hours.

“This was after the battle of Lexington,
and all, as might be supposed, was in sad con-
fusion; some were boiling with rage, and full
of fight ; some, in fear and confusion, were
hiding their treasures; and others flying for
life. In this wild moment, when most people,
in some way or other, were frightened from
their property, our heroine, who had two sons,
one about nineteen years of age, the other
about sixteen, was seen by our informant pre-
paring to discharge them to their duty.

“The eldest she was able to equip in fine
style: she took her husband’s fowling-piece
made for duck or plover, (the good man being
absent on a coasting voyage to Virginia,) and
with it the powder-horn and shot-bag. But the
lad thinking the duck and goose shot not quite
the size to kill regulars, his mother took a
chisel, cut up her pewter spoons, hammered
them into slugs, and put them into his bag,
and he set off in great earnest, but thought
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 183

he would call one moment and see the par-

son, who said, ‘ Well done, my brave boy ! God
reserve you!’ and on he went in the way of
is duty.

“The youngest was importunate for bis
equipments, but his mother could find nothing
to arm him with, but a rusty old sword. The
boy seemed rather unwilling to risk himself
with this alone, but lingered in the street in a
state of hesitation, when his mother thus up-
braided him: ‘ You John H*****, what will
your father say, if he hears that a child of his
is afraid to meet the British /—Go along : beg
or borrow a gun, or you will find one, child;
some coward will be running away, I dare
say; then take his gun and march forward :
and if you come back and I hear you have
not behaved yourself like a man, I shall carry
the blush of shame on my face to the grave.’

“She then shut the door, wiped the tear
from her eye, and waited the issue. The boy
joined the march.”



THE HOME-MADE SOLDIER.

The following is a bona fide fact, taken
without emendation from the life of a mother
in Israel. It will show that there was an
anti-British spirit in the women as well as the
men of 76. I hope all the girls in our country,
and especially in our large cities, will read it,

12
134 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

though I am afraid some of them will need a
dictionary to find out the meaning of the
terms wheel and loom. ‘The first is the name -
of an old-fashioned piano with one string, the
other is a big house-organ with but few stops.
But to the story.

Late in the afternoon of one of the last
days in May, ’76, when I was a few months
short of 15 years old, notice came to Towns-
end, Massachusetts, where my father used to
live, that fifteen soldiers were wanted.

The training band was instantly called out,
and my brother that was the next older than
I, was one that was selected. He did not re-
turn till late at night, when all were in bed.
When I rose in the morning I found my mo-
ther in tears, who informed me that my
brother John was to march next day after to-
morrow morning at sunrise. My father was
at Boston, in the Massachusetts assembly.
Mother said that though John was supplied
with summer clothes, he must be absent seven
or eight months, and would suffer from want
of winter garments. There were at this time
no stores, and no articles to be had except
such as each family could make itself. The
sight of mother’s tears always brought all the
hidden strength of the body and mind to ac-
tion. I immediately asked what garments
were needful. She replied, “ pantaloons.”

“O, if that is all,” said I, “we will spin
and weave him a pair before he goes.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 185

“Tut,” said my mother, “ the wool is on the
sheep’s back, and the sheep are in the pas-
ture.”

I immediately turned to a younger brother
and bade him take a salt-dish and call them
to the yard.

Mother replied, “Poor child, there are no
sheep-shears within three miles and a half.”

“] have some small shears at the loom,”
said I.

“ But we can’t spin and weave it in so short
a time.”

“] am certain we can, mother.”

“ How can you weave it '— there is a long
web of linen in the loom.”

“No matter, I can find an empty loom.”
By this time the sound of the sheep made me
quicken my steps towards the yard. I re-
quested my sister to bring me the wheel and
ecards while I went for the wool. I went into
the yard with my brother, and secured a white
sheep, from which I sheared, with my loom
shears, half enough for a web; we then let
her go with the rest of her fleece. I sent the
wool in by my sister. Luther ran for a black
sheep, and held her while I cut off wool for
my filling and half the warp, and then we
allowed her to go with the remaining part of
her fleece.

The good old lady further observed that the
wool thus obtained was duly carded and spun,
washed, sized, and dried; a loom was found
136 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

a few doors off, the web got in, wove and pre-
pared, cut and made two or three hours be-
fore the brother's departure—that is to say,
in forty hours from the commencement, with-
out help from any modern improvement.

The good old lady closed by saying, “I felt
no weariness, 1 wept not, I was serving my
country. I was relieving poor mother, I was
preparing a garment for my darling brother.

“The garment being finished, I retired and
wept till my overcharged and bursting heart
was relieved.”

This brother was, perhaps, one of General
Stark’s soldiers, and with such a spirit to cope
with, need we wonder that Burgoyne did not
execute his threat of marching through the
heart of America.



THE BRITISH OFFICER AND THE MILLER.

The shrewdness and successful address of
Captain Timothy Wheeler, on the occasion
when the British detachment proceeded to
Concord, deserves notice. He had the charge
of a large quantity of provincial flour, which,
together with some casks of his own, was
stored in his barn. A British officer demand-
ing entrance, he readily took his key and gave
him admission. The officer expressed his
pleasure at the discovery; but Captain Wheel-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 13”

er, with much affected simplicity, said to him.
putting his hand on a barrel, “This is my
flour. Iam a miller, sir. Yonder stands my
mill; I get my living by it. In the winter I
grind a great deal of grain, and get it ready
for market in the spring. This” (pointing to
one barrel) “is the flour of wheat: this”
(pointing to another) “is the flour of corn;
this is the flour of rye ; this” (putting his hand
on his own casks) “is my flour; this is my
wheat ; this is my rye; thisis mine.” “ Well,”
said the officer, “we do not injure private
property ;” and withdrew, leaving this impor-
tant depository untouched.



A SON OF ERIN PREFERRING A RAZOR TO HIS RATIONS.

The anecdote which follows was presented
to Garden, author of Anecdotes of the Revolu-
tion, by a gentleman intimately acquainted
with Colonel Forrest, and, as related by him,
gives a true picture of the times during the
great struggle.

“ At the period of the war, when our treas-
ury was most exhausted, the men of my regi-
ment became so refractory from the want of
pay, that I was compelled to resort to every
shift and stratagem to keep them in necessa-
ry subordination. Necessity at last obliged
me to enter into a compromise with them.

12
138 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“| pledged myself, that if they would only
promise to conduct themselves with propriety,
and preserve the discipline essential to the
well-being of the army during my absence,
I would personally apply to the treasury,
forcibly represent their grievances, and exert
every energy to obtain the justice they re-
quired. My proposal was acceded to, and I
quitted the regiment. Having at the period
many friends in the paymaster’s department,
my representations were attended to, and
through their kind attention I obtained a
month’s pay, according to the tenor of my re-
quest.

“] ordered my regiment to be paraded, and
candidly submitted to them the result of my
negotiation. The entire corps expressed con-
tent and satisfaction, save only one individual,
a son of Erin, who appeared to exhibit deci-
ded marks of extreme discontent. Dissatis-
fied with his conduct, and more highly irrita-
ted by his surly looks, I approached, and up-
braiding him for his unreasonable behavior,
asked his motive for showing such signs of
discontent, while the rest of the regiment, his
companions in arms, appeared cheerful and
well pleased on the occasion.

“He sarcastically replied— Upon my sal-
vation, my colonel, and the honor of a true
soldier, which I will be bound to say you
have ever found me to be, I had not the least
idea of being dissatisfied with your happy
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 139

negotiation ; God bless you, my jewel, for I
am sure you have done as much for us and
more than any other, besides yourself, could
have done any how ; but I believe I was onl
sorry alittle when I looked so highly provoked,
that your honor had not brought me an old
razor instead of my month’s pay, that 1 might
scrape my beard with just to appear a little
dacent on parade.’”

————__

LORD CORNWALLIS'S OPINION OF SUMTER.

General Sumter became so guarded in his
attention to the security of his camp, and so
happy in the choice of his positions, that
every attempt to injure him on the part of the
enemy proved abortive, whilst the enterprises
which he conducted were, for the most part,
productive of the most brilliant success. His
attacks were impetuous, and generally irre-
sistible. No man was more indefatigable in
his efforts to obtain victory ; none more ready,
by the generous exposure of his person, and the
animating example of intrepidity, to deserve it.

He was the terror of all the British offi-
cers; and Lord Cornwallis, ina letter to Col-
onel Tarleton, says—“I shall be glad to hear
that Sumter is in no condition to give us fur-
ther trouble—he certainly has been our great-
est plague in this country.”
140 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

8T. LEGER AND THE INDIANS FRIGHTENED.

At the time when Fort Stanwix, command-
ed by Colonel Gansevoort, was attacked by a
party of British and Indian allies under St.
Leger, General Arnold was dispatched with
a body of troops to assist the colonel in his de-
fence. As he was advancing up the Mohawk,
he captured a tory by the name of How-yost
Schuyler, who, being a spy, was condemned to
death. How-yost was one of the coarsest
and most ignorant men in the valley, appear-
ing scarce half removed from idiocy ; and yet
there was no small share of shrewdness in his
character.

He was promised his life if he would go to
the enemy, particularly the Indians, and alarm
them by announcing that a large army of the
Americans was in full march to destroy
them, &c. How-yost, being acquainted with
many of the Indians, gladly accepted the of-
fer; one of his brothers being detained as a
hostage for his fidelity, who was to be hung if
he proved treacherous.

A friendly Onedia Indian was let into the
secret, and cheerfully embarked in the design.
Upon How-yost’s arrival, he told a lamentable
story of his being taken by Arnold, and of his
escape from being hanged. He showed them,
also, several shot-holes in his coat, which he
said were made by bullets fired at him when
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 141

making his escape. Knowing the character
of the Indians, he communicated ‘his intelli-
gence to them in a mysterious and imposing
manner. When asked the number of men
which Arnold had, he shook his head mysteri-
ously, and pointed upward to the leaves of
the trees.

These reports spread rapidly through the
camps. Meantime the friendly Oneida arrived
with a belt, and confirmed what How-yost
had said, hinting that a bird had brought him
information of great moment. On his way he
had met with two or three Indians of his ac-
quaintance, who readily engaged in further-
ing his plans. The sagacious fellows dropped
into the camp as if by accident; they spoke
of warriors in great numbers, rapidly advan-
cing against them.

The Americans, it was stated, did not wish
to injure the Indians, but if they continued
with the British, they must all share one com-
mon fate. The savages were thoroughly
alarmed, and determined on an immediate
flight, being already disgusted with the British
service. Col. St. Leger exhorted, argued, and
made enticing efforts to the Indians to remain,
but it was all in vain. He endeavored to get
them drunk, but they refused to drink. When
he found them determined to go, he urged
them to move in the rear of his army, but
they charged him with a design to sacrifice
them to his safety.
142 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

In a mixture of rage and despair, he broke
up his encampment with such haste, that he
left his stores, cannon, and tents to the besieg-
ed. The friendly Oneida accompanied the
flying army, and being naturally a wag, he en-
gaged his companions who were in the secret,
to repeat at proper intervals the cry, “ They
are coming ! they are coming!” This appall-
ing cry quickened the flight of the fugitives
wherever it was heard. The soldiers threw
away their packs, and the commanders took
care not tobe in the rear. After much fatigue
and mortification, they finally reached Oneida
Lake, and there probably for the first time
felt secure from the pursuit of their enemies.
From this place St. Leger hastened with his
scattered forces back to Oswego, and thence
to Montreal.

How-yost, after accompanying the flying
army as far as the estuary of Wood creek,
left them and returned to Fort Schuyler, and
gave the first information to Gansevoort of the
approach of Arnold. From thence he pro-
ceeded to German Flats, and on presenting
himself at Fort Dayton his brother was dis-
charged. He soon after rejoined the British
standard, attaching himself to the forces un-
der the command of Sir John Johnson.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 143

AN INCIDENT OF THE REVOLUTION.

The following history of William Bancroft
in the days of the revolution may be read by
some with satisfaction, and is worthy to be
kept in remembrance among the noble deeds
of those times. It was related some years
since by Mr. Bancroft, a slight notice of which
is in Gordon’s History of the American Revo-
lution.

“ When on a tour to the west, 1 met with
the subject of this treatise at New York.
The grateful remembrance of the soldiers of
the revolution by our country, became the
subject of conversation. After there had
been an interchange of opinion among us,
Mr. Bancroft observed that he had applied to
Congress for a pension, but, owing to the cir-
cumstance that his name was stricken off the
roll before he had served nine months, to
serve General Washington in a more hazard-
ous relation, he could not obtain it; though
he thought his circumstances and his claims
for consideration were as great as any sol-
dier’s. He then related the following history
of his life.

“]T was born in Woburn, north of Boston.
At the age of 14, I was sent to Boston, and
put behind the counter. I was warmly at-
tached to the whig cause, and at the age of
sixteen was obliged to leave town. 1 then
«

144 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

enlisted in the army as a soldier for three
years. I studiously endeavored to understand
my duty in my relation, and thought I was a
proficient—at least, as much so as other sol-
diers. One day, immediately after Washing-
ton’s arrival at Brooklyn, I was detached, by
the officer of the day, among the guard. It
so happened that I was placed as a sentinel
before the general’s quarters at 9 o’clock.
About 10 o’clock the general’s carriage drove
up, which I knew as a soldier, but not as a
sentinel. I hailed the driver—

“ Who comes there ?”

He answered, “ General Washington.”

“ Who is General Washington ?”

He replied, “The commander of the Ameri-
can army.”

“JT don’t know him; advance and give the
countersign.”

The driver put his head within the car-
riage, and then came and gave me the counter-
sign.

“The countersign is right,” I replied, “ Gen-
eral Washington can now pass.”

The next morning the officer of the guard
came to me and said, “ General Washington
has commanded me to notify you to appear at
his quarters precisely at 9 o'clock.”

“ What does he want of me ?”

“] don’t know,” replied the officer.

In obedience to this order, I went to his
quarters at the time appointed ; but my mind
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 145

was greatly harassed to know whether I had
discharged my duty aright the night previous.
I gave the alarm at the door and a servant
appeared,

“Inform General Washington,” said I, “that
the person whom he ordered to his quarters
at 9 o’clock is now at the door.”

The servant made the report, and immedi-
ately bade me come in, and conducted me to
the general’s room. When I entered he ad-
dressed me—

“Are you the sentinel who stood at my
door at 9 o’clock last night ?”

“ Yes, sir, and I endeavored to do my duty.”

“] wish all the army understood it as well
as you do,” said the general. This relieved
the burden on my mind.

The general then continued, “ Can you keep
a secret (”

“T can try.”

“ Are you willing to have your name struck
from the roll of the army, and engage in a
secret service at the hazard of your life, for
which I promise you forty dollars a month ?”

“Tam willing to serve my country in any
way you may think best.”

“Call here precisely at seven o'clock this
evening, and I will give you further instruc-
tion.”

I then retired, and precisely at seven o'clock
I returned. The general presented me with
a sealed letter without any superscription.

13
146 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

He asked me if I had ever been on Roxbury
Heights. I told him I had, and at his request
I described the level ground on the top. He
gave me the countersign, lest I should not be
able to return before the sentinels received it;
directed me to converse with no one on the
way, and if I should observe any person who
appeared to notice me particularly, not to go on
the height, until out of his sight. And when I
had ascended to the height, I must look round
carefully, and if I discovered any person, I
must keep at a distance from him, and suffer
no one to take me. If every thing appeared
quiet, I must go to the west side of the plain,
where I should see a flat rock which I could
raise by one hand; and a round stone about
four feet from it ; 1 must take the round stone
and place it under the edge of the flat rock,
ack would raise it high enough to put my
hand under it. “You must then feel under
the rock,” said the general, “till you find a
second hollow ; if there is a letter in it, bring
it to me, and put this in the same place.”

Having received my instructions, I made
my way for the height, and nothing occurred
worthy of note, except that I found the rock and
the stone described, and in the hollow a let-
ter, sealed, without any superscription. I
then adjusted the rock and placed the stone
as I found it. I returned to the general’s
quarters, and delivered the letter I found un-
der the rock. He then said—
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 147

“You may retire, and appear at seven
o'clock to-morrow evening.”

This I did for some time, carrying and
bringing letters, without being annoyed in
any respect. A length I observed a person
at some distance travelling the same way I
was going, and he eyed me with more atten-
' tion than was pleasing to me. I took rather
a circuitous route, and when I came on the
height, I was confident I saw two persons,
if not more, descend the hill on the opposite
side, among the savins. I went evento make
the discovery, but could see no one. This I
told the general on my return.

He reprimanded me for my presumption.
He said, “ They might have sprung on you and
taken you. Never do the like again.”

When I returned the next evening, he gave
me stricter charge than before.—There was
nothing occurred until I ascended the height ; I
then plainly saw three persons dodge behind
the savins. I hesitated what to do. I placed
my head to the ground to obtain a clearer
view of the opposite side. In an instant three
men rushed from behind the savins on the
other side in full run to take me. I rose and
ran with all my speed. No Grecian in their
celebrated games exerted himself more than I
did. I found one of the three was a near
match for me.

When I came to the sentinel, he was not
more than six rods from me. I gave the
148 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

countersign without much ceremony. The sen-
tinel then hailed my pursuer, who turned upon
his heels and fled. I went to the general’s
quarters, and on presenting this letter, | said—

“Here is the letter you gave me,” and then
related the above story to him.

He told me I might retire, and need not call
on him again till he should give me notice.
He strictly charged me when in company or
in camp to make myself a stranger to the
movements of friends or foes, not to enter into
any dispute about the war or the army, but
always to be an inquirer.

In about a week the general sent for me,
and | repaiicd to his quarters at the usual
hour. He inquired if | was ever down on
what was then called Cambridge Neck. I
told him I had been there twice. He then
handed me a letter as usual, and said—

“Go to the lower house and enter the front
door, and when you enter the room, if there
be more than one person present, sit down
and make yourself a stranger ; when all have
gone out of the room but one, then get up and
walk across the room repeatedly; after you
have passed and re-passed, he will take a let-
ter out of his pocket and present it to you,
and as he is doing this you must take this let-
ter out of your pocket and present it to him.
I charge you not to speak a word to him on
the peril of your life. It is important you
observe this.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 149

1 went to the house, and on entering the
room, I found but one man in it, and he was
at the corner of the room. He rose at my
entering. 1immediately commenced my trav-
el across the room and eying him attentively.
The tnird time I passed us put his hand into
his pocket, took out a letter, and extended it to-
wards me, and I took out my letter, and extended
it towards him. With his other he took hold
of my letter, and I did the same with his. I
then retired with a bow, and returned to the
general. We two could well recognise each
other, though we were not allowed to speak.
This mode of communication continued for
some time.

One evening, as this man was presenting
his letter, he whispered to me—

“Tell General Washington the British are
coming out on the Neck to-morrow morning
at two o'clock.”

When I delivered the letter to General
Washington, I addressed him thus—

“General, the person who delivered this
letter to me whispered and said— Tell Gen-
eral Washington the British are coming out
on the neck to-morrow morning at two
o'clock.’

The General started and inquired—

“ Was it the same person you received let-
ters from before ?”

“ Yes, sir.”

13*
150 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

He then broke the letter and read it, after
which he asked—

“ Did you speak to him ?”

“No, sir.”

Then saying, “Stop here until I return,”
he took his hat and cane and locked the door
after him. He was gone nearly an hour and
a half.

When he returned he said, “I do not know
that I shall need your services any more ; you
will continue about the encampment, and I
will allow you the same pay you now have.”

Having nothing to do, | had the curiosity to
ramble about the army and vicinity to find
the man who whispered to me, but I never
saw him. Whether that whisper was fatal
to him [know not. The injunction to me was
tantamount to it in case of disobedience. I
continued with the army till they left Cam-
bridge, when I was discharged.

COLONEL BROWN AND GENERAL ARNOLD.

Col. Stone, in his Life of Joseph Brant, states
that Col. Brown detected, or believed he de-
tected, a design on the part of Gen. Arnold to
play the traitor when the American army was
at Sorel, by an attempt to run off with the
American flotilla and sell out to Sir Guy
Carleton. During the winter of 1776-7, while
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 151

Arnold, and many other officers were quarter-
ed in Albany, a difficulty arose between him
and Brown. The latter published a handbill,
severely reflecting on Arnold, and concluding
with these remarkable words: “ Money is this
man’s God, and to get enough of it, he would
sacrifice his country.”

Arnold was greatly excited, and applied a
variety of coarse and harsh epithets to Col.
Brown, calling him a scoundrel and threaten-
ed to kick him whenever he should meet him.
This coming to the ears of the latter, he pro-
ceeded to the dining place of Arnold, where a
number of officers were assembled; going
directly up to Arnold he stopped, and looked
him full in the eye.

After a pause of a moment, he observed—
“I understand, sir, that you have said that you
would kick me; I now present myself to give
you an opportunity to put your threat into exe-
cution!” Another brief pause ensued. Ar-
nold opened not his lips. Brown then said to
him, “ You area dirty scoundrel!” Arnold still
remained silent. Col. Brown, after apologiz-
ing to the gentlemen present for his intrusion,
left the room. Arnold seems to have kept an
unbroken silence on the occasion, which may
be accounted for by the supposition that he
feared to provoke inquiry on the charges of
Col. Brown.
152 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

YANKEE MISTAKE,

Upon the flight of the British from Lexing
ton, a major of their army received a wound
in the cheek with a goose shot. Gen. Robin-
son observed that the Yankees must certainly
have mistaken him for a goose, or they would
not have treated him with so much disrespect.

THE MYSTERIOUS STRANGER,

Some time in the course of the year 1775,
about the month of November, Congress was
informed that a foreigner who was then in Phi-
ladelphia, was desirous of making to them an
important and confidential communication.
This intimation having been several times re-
peated, a committee, consisting of Mr. J ay, Dr.
Franklin, and Mr. Jefferson, was appointed to
hear what the foreigner hadto say. These gen-
tlemen agreed to meet him in one of the com-
mittee rooms in Carpenter’s Hall. At the time
appointed they went there, and found already
arrived an elderly lame gentleman, having
the appearance of an old wounded French of-
ficer. They told him they were authorized to
receive his communication, upon which he
said, his Most Christian Majesty had heard
with pleasure of the exertions made by the
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 153

American colonies in defence of their rights
and privileges ; that his majesty wished them
success, and would, whenever it should be
necessary, manifest more openly his friendly
sentiments towards them.

The committee requested to know his au-
thority for giving these assurances. He an-
swered only by drawing his hand across his
throat, and saying, “Gentlemen, I shall take

_ care of my head.” They then asked what

demonstrations of friendship they might ex-
pect from the king of France. “Gentlemen,”
answered the foreigner, “if you want arms,
you shall have them; if you want ammuni-
tion, you shall have it; if you want money,

_ you shall have it.” The committee observed

that these assurances were indeed important,

_ but again desired to know by what authority

they were made. “Gentlemen,” said he, re-
peating his former gesture, “I shall take care
of my head,” and this was the only answer
they could obtain from him.

He was seen in Philadelphia no more. It
was the opinion of the committee that he
was a secret agent of the French court, di-
rected to give these indirect assurances, but
in such a manner that he might be disavowed
if necessary. Mr. Jay stated that his com-
munications were not without their effect on
the proceedings of this Congress. This re-
mark probably related to the appointment, on
the 29th of November, of a secret committee,
154 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

including Mr. Jay, for corresponding “ with
the friends of America in Great Britain, Ire-
land, and other parts of the world.”



GEORGE ROBERTS.

George Roberts and myself (says a cor-
respondent of the Natchez Ariel) were fellow
sailors with Paul Jones, in his expedition a-
gainst the British in 1773, when he terrified the
commerce of that country, by constantly hover-
ing about the coasts of Scotland and Ireland,
though having only a ship of eighteen guns.
When Jones landed on the coast of Scotland,
and took away all the family plate of the
Earl of Selkirk, Roberts was one of the sail-
ors who marched into the castle while that
strange deed was done ; I remaining on board
the ship. The plate was all brought on board,
and safely disposed of, though, as it turned
out, much to the commodore’s loss, as he had
afterwards to buy it up in Paris, to return it
to the owner. He intended to capture the
earl, and detain him as a hostage ; but being
absent from home at the time we landed, it
was prevented.

In the next year, 1779, Roberts and I sailed
again with our brave commander from Brest,
in France, in the frigate Good Man Richard,
carrying forty guns, and four hundred and
twenty men, or thereabouts, as near as I can

nlp
ANECDOTES OF 'THE REVOLUTION. 155

recollect. She was an old ship, not fit for the
hard service we put her to, as it afterwards
came out. On the 22d September, off Flam-
borough Head, which is a high rock that
overlooks the sea, we fell in with the Baltic
fleet, under the convoy of the frigate Serapis,
of fifty-eight guns, and the sloop Countess of
Scarborough, a heavy ship, but | do not recol-
lect having heard how many guns she carried.

Just as the moon rose, at eight in the even-
ing, the enemy fired his first broadside, when
within pistol shot of us. And now a most
murderous scene began. The action raged
with horrid violence, and the blood ran ankle
deep out of the ship’s seuppers. Our rigging
was cut up to atoms, and finally both ships
took fire—so that friend ‘and foe were obliged
to rest from fighting, that they might extin-
guish the flames. The Richard being old,
was soon shot through and began to sink.

In this awful condition, Jones’s voice, like
the roaring of a lion, was heard above the din
of the battle, ordering to “ grapple with the
enemy.” We accordingly made our ship fast
to the Serapis: and it was easily done, as the
two were so near to each other, that when I
drew out the rammer of the gun I belonged to,
the end of it touched the side of the Serapis !
Being thus fast and safe, we fought without
any resting, until nearly all our guns were
burst or dismounted—the ship nearly full of
water—our first lieutenant, Grubb, shot dead
156 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

by Jones’s own pistol, for hauling down the
colors without orders, and which happened
only at my elbow—our decks covered with
dead and dying, and the ship cut up into
splinters.

While in this awful and desperate situation, |

my friend Roberts, seeing how near spent we

were, jumped on the main yard of our vessel, —
which projected directly over the decks of the —
Serapis, with a bundle of hand grenades. —

These he contrived to throw down upon the
Serapis’ deck, and succeeded in blowing up
two or three of their powder chests; the ex-
plosion of which killed and wounded a great
many men.

The captain of the Serapis, perceiving his
activity, ordered some shot to be fired at Rob-

erts. One of them struck a rope by which he —
supported himself, and caused him to fall upon —

the gunwale of the enemy’s ship, which I ob-
serving, caught hold of him and pulled him
aboard. He immediately got upon the same
yard-arm again, with a fresh supply of hand
grenades, and made such dreadful havoc on

the enemy’s deck, that in a few minutes they —

surrendered. For this great bravery, Paul

a



|
|

|

Jones publicly thanked him on the quarter —

deck of the Serapis the next afternoon, giving
him double the allowance of grog for the
week afterwards.

It was near midnight when the action ter- —
minated. The top of Flamborough Head was —
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 157

covered with people watching the engage-
ment, and no doubt the sight must have been
grand. The next day our ship sunk, being
fairly battered to pieces by the enemy’s shot,
as they poured a shockingly murderous fire
into us all the while. Commodore Dale, who
died in this city about two years ago, was
Jones's second lieutenant, and was badly wound-
ed about the middle of the battle. He was
ordered to go below, though he still wished to
fight upondeck. After he went down, he was
very useful in taking care of a large number
of English prisoners we had on board. We
had 174 men killed, and nearly as many
wounded and missing. The Serapis had 135
men killed, and about 80 wounded.

Captain Parsons, the English commander,
fought nobly, and defended his ship to the last.
He had nailed his flag to the mast, and was
afraid to haul it down when he surrendered,
as none of his men would go up to tear it
away, because they dreaded the sharp-shoot-
ers in our round-tops. So when he concluded
to give up, he mounted the gunwale just by
where I was standing, and called out in a
loud voice, “ We surrender, we surrender.”
Capt. Jones not hearing this, I left my gun.and
ran to him and told him of it. He instantly
ordered the firing to cease, and the flag haul-
ed down—but no Englishman would do it, as
musket shots were still exchanged between
the two vessels, On hearing this, George

14
158 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

Roberts jumped aboard the enemy’s ship,
mounted the tottering shrouds, and hackea
down the British ensign from its proud height.
‘As it fell, what I considered as very remark- .
able, a capful of wind took it, and laid it di-
rectly at Jones's feet, at the same time spread-
ing it nearly all over the dead body of Lieut.
Grubb, who, in the heat of the fight, was still
lying dead on the deck. When the crew of
the Richard saw the flag fall, they gave thir-
teen tremendous cheers, at which Captain
Parsons shrunk back from his high stand into
the shadow of his mizen mast.

When we returned from this cruise, being
affected in my hearing by a splinter, which
struck me under the ear, I left the service,
and saw and heard no more of my friend
Roberts, from that time until I saw his death ..
inserted in your paper. He was a true, hon-
est man, and bold to a degree not to be daunt-
ed. He was younger than I—and yet he
has closed his eyes in that sleep to which all
of us, soldiers or not, must one day give up.

—_——_

YANKEE SEA CAPTAIN IN LONDON.

A sea captain, who chanced to be in Lon-
don during our revolutionary war, met several
British officers in a tavern who were busily
discussing American affairs. “We should
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 159

have conquered them long ago,” said one,
“had it not been for that arch rebel, Wash-
ington.” “ With all his skilful manceuvres,
they are the same as conquered, already,” ob-
served another. The American said nothing,
but his countenance bore strong marks of hon-
est indignation. “What, Jonathan, are you
from the rebel colonies?” asked the officers.
“IT am from New England, gentlemen.”
“ Well, what news do you bring? Will your
crops be heavy enough to feed the regulars ?”
“My countrymen tell me,” replied he, “that
British blood is the best manure they have
ever had. Turnips' larger than a peck meas-
ure are raised on Bunker Hill.”



ACKNOWLEDGING A FAULT, THE MARK OF A GREAT
MIND.

Were we to form an estimate of Mr. Jay’s
character only from the language in which he
denounced those who were hostile, or indiffer-
ent to the liberties of his country, and from
the measures he proposed against them, we
should be ready to believe that a stern and de-
voted patriotism had absorbed the most delicate
and amiable feelings of his breast. But his
public as well as private conduct was govern-
ed by a strict sense of moral obligation ; and
while he never permitted his friendship. or
sympathy for individuals to interfere with the
160 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

paramount claims of his country, he delighted
to indulge the kind and generous sensibilities
of his nature, whenever circumstances would
allow him. He invariably discountenanced
all inhumanity and unnecessary rigor towards
the enemy, or the tories.

On one occasion, having reason to believe
that a zealous committee-man in Westchester
county, had exercised his power with unjustifi-
able severity, he complained of his conduct,
and procured a vote of censure against him
from the convention. Some time after, this
person met him, and assured him that he was
innocent of the alleged charge, and complain-
ed that he had been condemned without hav-
ing an opportunity of vindicating himself,
Mr. Jay, struck with the justice of this re-
monstrance, instantly replied, “ You are right,
and | was wrong, and I ask your pardon.”
This frank acknowledgment disarmed the
committee-man of his resentment, and grasp-
ing Mr. Jay’s hand, he exclaimed—*1 have
often heard that John Jay was a great man,
and now I| know it.”



A SPECIMEN OF HARD FIGHTING,

It had been the policy of the British, since
the general submission of the inhabitants of
South Carolina, to increase the royal force by
embodying the people of the country as Brit-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 161

ish militia. In the district of Ninety-six,
Major Ferguson, a partisan of distinguished
merit, had been employed to train the most
loyal inhabitants, and to attach them to his
own corps. That officer was now directed by
Lord Cornwallis to enter the western part of
North Carolina near the mountains, and to em-
body the loyalists in that quarter, for co-opera-
tion with his army. Cornwallis, in the mean
time, commenced his march with the main
army from Camden, through the settlement
of the Waxhaw to Charlottesville, in North
Carolina,

About the same time, Colonel Clark of
Georgia, at the head of a small body of men
which he had collected in the frontiers of
North and South Carolina, advanced against
Augusta, and laid siege to that place. Col-
onel Brown, who with a few loyal provincials
held that post for the British, made a vigorous
defence ; and, on the approach of Colonel
Cruger, with a re-enforcement from Ninety-
six, Clark relinquished the enterprise, and
made a rapid retreat through the country
along which he had marched to the attack.
Major Ferguson receiving intelligence of his
movements, prepared to intercept him. The
hardy mountaineers of Virginia and North
Carolina, collecting at this time from various
quarters, constituted a formidable force, and
advanced by a rapid movement towards Fer-
guson.

14*
162 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

At the same time, Colonel Williams, from
the neighborhood of Ninety-six, and Colonels
Tracy and Banan, also of South Carolina, con-
ducted parties of men towards the same points.
Ferguson having notice of their approach,
commenced his march for Charlottesville. The
several corps of militia, amounting to near
three thousand men, met at Gilbert-town, late-
ly occupied by Ferguson. About one thou-
sand six hundred riflemen were immediately
selected, and mounted on their fleetest horses,
for the purpose of following the retreating
army. They came up with the enemy at
King’s mountain, October 7th, 1780, where
Ferguson, on finding he should be overtaken,
had chosen his ground, and waited for an at-
tack.

The Americans formed themselves into three
divisions, led by Colonels Campbell, Shelby,
and Cleaveland, and began to ascend the
mountain in three different and opposite di-
rections. Cleaveland, with his division, was
the first to gain sight of the enemy’s piquet,
and halting his men, he addressed them in the
following simple, affecting, and animating
terms. “ My brave fellows, we have beat the
tories, and we can beat them; they are all
cowards. If they had the spirit of men, they
would join their fellow-citizens in supporting
the independence of their country. When
engaged, you are not to wait for the word of
command from me. I will show you how to
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 163

fight, by my example. I can undertake no more.
Every man must consider himself as an officer,
and act from his own judgment. Fire as
quick as youcan. When you can do no better,
get behind trees or retreat, but I beg you not
to run quite off. If we are repulsed, let us
make a point to return, and renew the fight ;
perhaps we may have better luck in the sec-
ond attempt than in the first. If any of you
are afraid, such have leave to retire, and they
are requested immediately to take themselves
0 aa
This address, which would have done honor
to the hero of Agincourt, being ended, the men
rushed upon the enemy’s piquets, and forced
them to retire; but returning again to the
charge with the bayonet, Cleaveland’s men
_ gave way in their turn. In the mean time,
- Colonel Shelby advanced with his division,
and was in like manner driven back by the
bayonets of the enemy ; but there was yet
another body of assailants to be received:
Colonel Campbell moved up at the moment
of Shelby’s repulse, but was equally unable
to stand against the British bayonets; and
_ Ferguson still kept possession of his mountain.
_ The whole of the division being separately
baffled, determined to make an other effort in
co-operation, and the conflict became terrible.
Ferguson still depended upon the bayonet ;
but this brave and undaunted officer, after
gallantly sustaining the attack for nearly an
164 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

hour, was killed by a musket ball, ana his
troops soon after surrendered at discretion.
The enemy’s loss on this occasion was 300
killed and wounded, 800 prisoners, and 1,500
stand of arms. Our loss in killed was about
20, among whom was Colonel Williams, one
of our most active and enterprising officers ;

our number of wounded was very considera-
ble.

MORGAN AT THE BATTLE OF THE COWPENS.

In the autumn of 1780, Gen. Greene was
appointed to the command of the forces in
Carolina. He was accompanied by Col. Mor-
gan, a brave and active officer, who com-
manded a body of riflemen.

On the entrance of Morgan into the district
of Ninety-six, Lord Cornwallis detached Lieut. ~
Col. Tarleton to drive him from his station,
and to “push him to the utmost.”

Tarleton’s force consisted of about 1000
choice infantry, and 250 horse, with two field-
eo To oppose this force, Morgan had —

ut 500 militia, 300 regulars, and 75 horse,
under the command of Colonel Washington. —
The two detachments met on the 17th of Jan.
1781, at the Cowpens. i

The ground on which this memorable battle
was fought, was an open pine-barren. The


ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 165

militia were drawn up about 280 yards in
front of the regulars, and the horse some
small distance in the rear. Just after day-
break, the British came in sight; and halting
within about a quarter of a mile from the
militia, began to prepare for battle. The sun
had just risen, as the enemy, with loud shouts,
advanced to the charge. The militia hardly
waiting to give them a distant fire, broke, and
fled for their horses, which were tied at some
distance. Tarleton’s cavalry pushed hard af-
ter them, and coming up just as they reached
their horses, began to cut them down. On
seeing this, Col. Washington with his cavalry
rushed to their rescue, as if certain of victory.
Tarleton’s men were all scattered in the chase.

Washington’s men, on the contrary, advan-
ced closely and compactly, and gave the Brit-
ish cavalry such a fatal charge, that they fled in
the utmost precipitation. The British infantry
now came up; and having crossed a little
valley, just as they ascended the hill, they
found themselves within twenty paces of the
regular Americans, under Col. Howard, who
at this moment poured upon them a general
and deadly fire. This threw them into con-
fusion. The militia, seeing this change in the
battle, recovered their spirits, and began to
form upon the right of the regulars.

Morgan, waving his sword, instantly rode up,
exclaiming with a loud voice, “ Hurrah! my
brave fellows |—Form! form !-—Old Morgan was
166 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

never beat in his life! One fire more, my heroes
and the day is our own!” With answering
shouts, both regulars and militia then advan-
ced upon the enemy ; and following their fire
with the bayonet, instantly decided the con-
flict.

The British lost in this engagement up-
wards of 300 killed and wounded, and more
than 500 prisoners. The loss of the Ameri-
cans was but 12 killed and 60 wounded.




——_

HUMOR OF PATRICK HENRY.

The versatility of talent for which Patrick
Henry, the American orator and patriot, was
distinguished, was happily illustrated in a
trial which took place soon after the war of
independence. During the distress of the re-
publican army, consequent on the invasion of
Cornwallis and Philips, in 1781, Mr. Venable.
an army commissary, took two steers for the
use of the troops, from Mr. Hook, a Scotch-
man, and a man of wealth, who was suspect-
ed of being unfriendly to the American cause.
The act had not been strictly legal ; and on
the establishment of peace, Hook, under the
advice of Cowan, @ gentleman of some dis-
tinction in the law, thought pores to bring
an action of trespass against Mr. Venable, in
the District Court of New-London.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 167

Mr Henry appeared for the defendant ; and
is saia o have conducted himself in a manner
much to the enjoyment of his hearers, the un-
fortunate Hook always excepted. After Mr.
Henry became animated in the cause, he ap-
peared to have complete control over the pas-
sions of his audience: at one time he excited
their indignation against Hook—vengeance
was visible in every countenance ; again,
when he chose to relax and ridicule him, the
whole audience was in a roar of laughter.
He painted the distress of the American army,
exposed, almost naked, to the rigor of a win-
ter’s sky; and marking the frozen ground
over which they marched, with the blood of
their unshod feet.

“ Where was the man,” he said, “ who had
an American heart in his bosom, who would
not have thrown open his field, his barns, his
cellars, the doors of his house, the portals of
his breast, to have received with open arms
the meanest soldier in that little band of fam-
ished patriots? Where is the man !—There
he stands ; but whether the heart of an Ameri-
can beats in his bosom, you, gentlemen, are to
judge.”

He then carried the jury, by the power of
his imagination, to the plains around York, the
surrender of which had followed shortly after
the act complained of. He depicted the sur-
render in the most glowing and noble colors
of his eloquence; the audience saw before
168 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

their eyes the humiliation and dejection of the
British, as they marched out of their trenches;
they saw the triumph which lighted up every
patriot’s face ; they heard the shouts of victory,
the cry of Washington and liberty, as it rang
and echoed through the American ranks, and
was reverberated from the hills and shores
of the neighboring river; “but hark!” con-
tinued Henry, “what notes of discord are
those which disturb the general joy, and si-
lence the acclamations of victory’ They are
the notes of John Hook, hoarsely bawling
through the American camp, ‘Beef! beef!
beef!”

The court was convulsed with laughter ;—
when Hook, turning to the clerk, said—* Never
mind yon mon; wait till Billy Cowan gets up,
and he’ll show him the la.” But Mr. Cowan
was so completely overwhelmed by the tor-

rent which bore upon his client, that when he —

rose to reply to Mr. Henry, he was scarcely
able to make an intelligible or audible remark.
The cause was decided almost by acclama-
tion. The jury retired for form’s sake, and in-
stantly returned with a verdict for the defend-
ant.



EFFECTS OF FEAR.

In the time of the American revolutionary
war, while the army was encamped at West

‘Sts ete
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 169

Point, a party of soldiers discovered an
eagle’s nest, half way down a precipice, ad-
jacent to the fort. To get at the nest, a sol-
dier was Jet down by a rope, fastened round
his middle. When he had descended near the
nest, the eagle came upon him with hideous
screams, aiming at his head. He had no way
of defending himself, but by taking out his
knife, with which he kept her off by striking
at her. In one of the passes he made at her,
he had the misfortune to strike the rope, and
cut one of the strands entirely off. The other
strand began to untwist, while his companions
drew him up as soon as possible.

In this situation, he every moment expected
the rope to part, when he must have fallen
from the tremendous height among the rocks.
However, he was drawn up to the top of the
precipice, when the remaining strand of the
rope was nearly reduced to a wisp of tow.
He was only 25 years old; but in the course
of a few hours, his raven black hair was chang-
ed to the whiteness of wool.

DEATH OF MAJOR ANDRE.

In the year 1780, General Arnold, who, from
his rank and talents, had been in great favor
with the Americans, quitted their ranks and
joined the British army. This, though a val-

15
170 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

uable acquisition, was too dearly purchased
by the degradation and death of the brave
and amiable Major André, who volunteered
his services to make arrangements with Ar-
nold on the occasion. By some accident, Ma-
jor André was compelled to remain disguised
within the American lines all night, and next
morning was discovered, after he had passed
them on his way to New York. He was seiz-
ed, confined, tried, and sentenced to be hung
as a spy, notwithstanding every remonstrance
that could be urged against it.

The American officers who guarded him
the day before his execution, describe him as
maintaining the utmost firmness and com-
posure ; and when they were silent and mel-
ancholy, he would, by some cheerful remark,
endeavor to dispel the gloom. However, his
composure was not the result of a want of
sensibility, or a disregard of life ; but of those
proud and lofty feelings, the characteristics
of true greatness, which raises the soul above
the influence of events, and enables the sol-
dier, with unfaltering nerve and steady eye,
to meet death in whatever form it may ap-
proach him; for in his sleep, nature would
play her part—and home and friends—his
country and his fame—his sisters and his love,
would steal upon his heart, contrasting fancied
pleasures with certain pain, rendering his
dreams disturbed, and his sleep fitful and trou-
bled.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 171

Early in the morning, the hour of his execu-
tion was announced. His countenance did not
alter. His servant burst into tears: “ Leave
me,” said he, with greatness, “until you-can
behave more manfully.” The breakfast was
furnished from the table of General Washing-
ton. He ate as usual, then shaved and dress-
ed himself; placed his hat upon the table, and
cheerfully said, “1am ready at any moment
to wait upon you, gentlemen.” Lieutenant
Bowman describes it as a day of settled mel-
ancholy, and that Major André was, apparent-
ly, the least afflicted.

To General Washington it was a trial of
excruciating pain. It was with great difficul-
ty that he placed his name to the warrant for
his execution. Captain —— and Lieutenant
Bowman walked arm in arm with Major
André. It is well known that he solicited to
be shot ; and it was not until he came within
sight of the gallows, that he knew the man-
ner of his death. “It is too much,” said he,
momentarily shrinking. “I had hoped,” add-
ed he, recovering himself, “that my death
might have been otherwise. But I pray you
to bear witness that I die like a soldier.’

NANCY HART .

Nancy Hart and her husband settled, before
the revolutionary struggle, a few miles above
172 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the ford on Broad river, known by the name
of the Fishdam ford, in Elbert county, Georgia,
in the bend of the river, near a very extensive
canebrake ;—an apple orchard still remains
to point out the spot, and to prove the provi-
dent powers of its planters.

In altitude, Mrs. Hart was almost Patago-
nian, and remarkably well limbed and mus-
cular—in a word, she was ‘ lofty and sour ;’
she possessed none of that nobility of nerve,
which characterizes modern times; marked
by nature with prominent features, circum-
stances and accident added not a little to her
peculiarities; she possessed none of those
graces of motion which a poetical eye might
see in the heave of the ocean’s wave, or the
change of the summer’s cloud; nor did her
cheeks (I will not speak of her nose) exhibit
those rasy tints that dwell on the brow of the
evening or play in the gilded bow. No one
claims for her throat that it was lined with
fiddle strings ; but this must be acknowledged,
that her step bespoke energy; and be it said,
only for the sake of truth, that she could round
off a sentence regardless of being called a
hard swearer.

The perforating punch of the grate-maker
never did closer work on the yielding tin, than
did that dreadful scourge of beauty, the small-
pox, when it sat its emphatic signature on her
face ! She was horribly cross-eyed as well as
cross-grained, but nevertheless she was a
‘
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 173

sharp-shooter. Nothing was more common
than to see her in pursuit of the bounding stag
—the huge antlers that hung round her cabin,
or upheld her trusty gun, gave proof of her
skill in gunnery, and the white comb drained
of its honey, and hung up for ornament, tes-
tified her powers in bee finding. She was re-
markable for her frequent robberies on these
patterns of industry, and piqued herself on the
invention of an infallible bait for their dis-
covery. Many can testify to her magical art
in the mazes of cookery, being able to get up
a pumpkin in as many forms as there are days
in the week: she was extensively known and
employed for her profound knowledge in the
management of all ailments, and yielded the
palm to no one in the variety and rarity of
her medicaments.

Her skill and knowledge took wider and
more profitable range, for it is a well known
fact that she held a tract of land by the safe
tenure of a first survey, which was made on
the Sabbath, hatchet in hand. But she was
most remarkable for her military feats. She
possessed high-toned ideas of liberty; not
even the marriage knot could restrain her on
that subject; like “ the wife of Bath,” she re-
ceived over her tongue-scourged husband

“The reins of absolute command, ~
With all the government of house and land,
And empire o’er his tongue and o’er his hand.”

The clouds of war gathered and burst with

15*
174 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

a dreadful explosion in this state. Nancy’s
spirit rose with the tempest ; she declared and
proved herself a friend to her country, ready
“todo or die.” All accused of whiggism had to
hide or swing. The lily-livered Mr. Hart was
not the last to seek safety in the canebrake
with his neighbors ; they kept up a prowling,
skulking kind of life, occasionally sallying
forth in a kind of predatory style. The Tories
at length determined to beat the brake for
them. They however concluded to give Mrs,
Hart a call, and in true soldier manner ordered
arepast. Nancy soon had the necessary ma-
terials for a good feast spread before them ;
the smoking venison, the hasty hoe-cake, and
the fresh honeycomb, were sufficient to pro-
voke the appetite of a gorged epicure !

They simultaneously stacked their arms
and seated themselves, when, quick as thought,
the dauntless Nancy seized one of the guns,
cocked it, and with a blazing oath declared
that she would blow out the brains of the first
mortal that offered to rise or to taste a mouth-
ful. They all knew her character too well to
imagine that she would say one thing and do
another, especially if it lay on the side of
Satan. “Go,” said she to one of her sons, “ and
tell the Whigs ‘that I have taken six Tories.”
They sat still, each expecting to be offered up,
with doggedly mean countenances, bearing
the marks of disappointed revenge, shame,
and unappeased hunger.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 175

Whether the incongruity between Nancy’s
eyes caused each to imagine himself her im-
mediate object, or whether her commanding
attitude, stern and ferocious fixture of counte-
nance, overawed them, or the powerful idea
of their unsoldierlike conduct unnerved them,
or the certainty of death, it is not easy to de-
termine. They were soon relieved, and dealt
with according to the rules of the times.
This heroine lived to see her country free ; she,
however, found bees and game decreasing,
and the country becoming old so fast, that she
sold out her possessions, in spite of the re-
monstrances of her husband, and was among
the first of the pioneers who paved the way to
the wilds of the west. —



HARRIET ACKLAND,

“ During a halt of the army, in their retreat
on the 8th of October,” says General Bur-
goyne, “lreceiveda message from Lady Harriet
Ackland, submitting to my decision a proposal
of passing to the American camp, and request-
ing Gen. Gates’s permission to attend her hus-
band, who, wounded, was a prisoner. Though
I was ready to believe, for | had experienced
that patience and fortitude in a supreme de-
gree were to be found, as well as every other
virtue, under the most tender forms, I was as-
176 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

tonished at this proposal. After so long an
agitation of spirits, exhausted not only for
want of rest, but want of food, drenched in
rains for twelve hours together, that a woman
should be capable of such an undertaking as
delivering herself to the enemy, probably in
the night, and uncertain what hands she might
first fall into, appeared an effort above human
nature.

“The assistance I was enabled to give
was small indeed; I had not even a cup of
wine to offer her; but I was told that she had
found, from some kind hand, a little rum and
dirty water. All I could furnish to her was
an open boat and a few lines, written on dirty
wet paper, to Gen. Gates, recommending her to
his protection. The chaplain who had officia-
ted at the funeral of Gen. Frazier accompani-
ed her, and with one female servant, and the
major’s valet, who had then in his shoulder a
ball received in the late action, she rowed |
down the river to meet the enemy.” |

|

—

RUNNING THE GAUNTLET FOR STEALING TEA.

During the time we were throwing the tea
overboard, there were several attempts made
by some of the citizens of Boston and its vi-
cinity, to carry off small quantities of it for
their family use. To effect that object, they
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 177

would watch their opportunity to snatch up a
handful from the deck, where it became plenti-
fully scattered, and put it into their pockets.
One Captain O'Connor, whom I well knew,
came on board for that purpose, and when he
supposed he was not noticed filled his pockets,
and also the lining of his coat.

But I had detected him, and gave information
to the captain of what he was about. We were
ordered to take him in custody, and just as he
was stepping from the vessel, I seized him by
the skirt of his coat, and in attempting to pull
him back tore it off ; but springing oe
a rapid effort, he made his escape. He had,
however, to run a gauntlet through the crowd
_ upon the wharf; each one, as he passed, giving

him a kick or a stroke.

The next day we nailed the skirt of his
coat, which I had pulled off, to the whip-
ping-post in Charlestown, the place of his resi-
dence, with a label upon it, commemorative
of the occasion which had thus subjected the
proprietor to the popular indignation,

Another attempt was made to save a little
tea from the ruins of the cargo, by a tall aged
man, who wore a large cocked hat and white
wig, which was fashionable at the time. He
had slyly slipped a little into his pocket, but
being detected they seized him, and taking
his hat and wig from his head, threw them,
together with the tea of which they had emp-
tied his pockets, into the water. In considera-
178 ANECDOTES OF rHE REVOLUTION,

tion of his advanced age, he was permitted to
escape, with now and then a slight kick.

The next morning, after we had cleared the
ship of the tea, it was discovered that very
considerable quantities of it were floating up-
on the surface of the water; and to prevent
the possibility of any of it being saved for use,
a number of small boats were manned by
citizens and sailors, who rowed them into
those parts of the harbor wherever the tea
was visible, and by beating it with oars and
paddles, so thoroughly drenched it, as to render
its entire destruction inevitable.

MAJOR PITCAIRN AT LEXINGTON.

A considerable quantity of military stores
having been deposited at Concord, an inland
town about eighteen miles from Boston, Gen
eral Gage purposed to destroy them. For the
execution of this design, he, on the night pre
ceding the nineteenth of April, detached Liew
tenant-colonel Smith and Major Pitcairn,
with eight hundred grenadiers and light im
fantry; who at eleven o'clock embarked i
boats at the bottom of the common in Boston,
crossed the river Charles, and landing at
Philips’ farm in Cambridge, commenced a st
Jent and expeditious march for Concord.

Although several British officers, who dined
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 179

at Cambridge the preceding day, had taken
the precaution to disperse themselves along
the road leading to Concord, to intercept any
expresses that might be sent from Boston to
alarm the country ; yet messengers, who had
been sent from town for that purpose, eluded
the British patroles, and gave an alarm which
was rapidly spread by church bells, signal
guns, and volleys. On the arrival of the Brit-
ish troops at Lexington, towards five in the
morning, about seventy men, belonging to the
minute company of that town, were found on
the parade under arms. Major Pitcairn, who
led the van, galloping up to them, called out,
« Disperse, disperse, you rebels: throw down
your arms and disperse.”

The sturdy yeomanry not instantly obeying
the order, he advanced nearer ; fired his pis-
tol; flourished his sword ; and ordered his sol-
diers to fire. A discharge of arms from the
British troops, with a huzza, immediately suc-
ceeded; several of the provincials fell, and
the rest dispersed. The firing continued after
the dispersion, and the fugitives stopped and
returned the fire. Eight Americans were kill-
ed, three or four of them by the first fire of
the British ; the others after they had left the
parade: several were wounded.


180 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

MRS. BURR AND THE BURNING OF FAIRFIELD.

On the 7th of July, 1779, Gov. Tryon, with
the army which I have already mentioned, sail-
ed from New Haven to Fairfield ; and the next
morning disembarked upon the beach. A few
militia assembled to oppose them; and in a
desultory scattered manner, fought with great
intrepidity through most of the day. They kill-
ed some, took several prisoners, and wounded
more. But the expedition was so sudden and |
unexpected, that the efforts made in this man-
ner were necessarily fruitless. The town
was plundered; a great part of the houses,
together with two churches, the court-house,
jail, and school-houses, were burnt. The
barns had just been filled with wheat and
other produce. The inhabitants, therefore,
were turned out into the world, almost literal-
ly destitute.

Mrs. Burr, the wife of Thaddeus Burr, Esq,,
high sheriff of the county, resolved to continue
in the mansion of the family and make an at
tempt to save it from the conflagration. The—
house stood at a sufficient distance from other
buildings. Mrs. Burr was adorned with all
the qualities which give distinction to her sex;
possessed of fine accomplishments, and a dig-—
nity of character, scarcely rivalled ; and proba-
bly had never known what it was to be treat-_
ed with disrespect or even inattention. She—
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 181

made a personal application to Gov. Tryon,
in terms whieh, from a lady of her high re-
spectability, could hardly have failed of a
satisfactory answer from any person, who
claimed the character of a gentleman. The
answer which she actually received was, how-
ever, rade and brutal ; and spoke the want not
only of politeness and humanity, but even of
vulgar civility. The house was sentenced to
the flames, and speedily set on fire. An at-
tempt was made in the mean time, by some of
the soldiers, to rob her of a valuable watch,
with rich furniture ; for Gov. Tryon refused to
protect her, as well as to preserve the house.
The watch had been already conveyed out of
their reach ; but the house, filled with every
thing which contributes either to comfort or
elegance of living,was laid in ashes.

While the town was in flames, a thunder-
storm overspread the heavens just as night
cameon. The conflagration of near two hun-
dred houses illumined the earth, the skirts of
the clouds, and the waves of the Sound, with
a union of gloom and grandeur, at once in-
expressibly awful and magnificent. The sky
speedily was hung with the deepest darkness,
wherever the clouds were not tinged by the
melancholy lustre of the flames. At intervals,
the lightning blazed with a livid and terrible
splendor. The thunder rolled above. Be-
neath, the roaring of the fires filled up the in-
tervals with a deep and hollow sound, whi.

16
182 ‘ ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

seemed to be the protracted murmur of the
thunder, reverberated from one end of heaven
to the other.

Add to this convulsion of the elements, and
these dreadful effects of vindictive and wan-
ton devastation, the trembling of the earth ;
the sharp sound of muskets; and the shouts
of triumph, with the groans here and there of
the wounded and dying. Then place before
your eyes crowds of miserable sufferers min-
gled with bodies of the militia, and from the
neighboring hills taking a farewell prospect
of their property and their dwellings, their
happiness and their hopes ; and you will form
a just but imperfect picture of the burning of
Fairfield.. It needed no great effort of imagi-
nation to believe, that the final day had ar
rived; andthat amid this funereal darkness,
the morning would speedily dawn, to which
no night would ever succeed ; the graves yield
up their inhabitants ; and the trial commence,
at which was to be settled the final destiny of
man.

The apology Gov. Tryon made for this In-
dian effort, was conveyed in the following
sentence: “The village was burnt to resent
the fire of the rebels from their houses, and to
mask our retreat.” This declaration unequivo-
cally proves that the rebels were troublesome —
to the invaders, and at the same time is to be
considered as the best apology they were able
to make. But it contains a palpable false-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 183

hood, intended to justify conduct which ad-
mits of no excuse, and rejects with disdain
every attempt at palliation. Why did this
body of men land at Fairfield at all? There
were here no stores; no fortress; no enemy,
except such as were to be found in every vil-
lage of the United States. It was undoubt-
edly the original object of the expedition to
set fire to this town, and the apology was cre-
ated after the work was done. It was per-
fectly unnecessary to mask the retreat. The
townsmen, and the little collection of farmers
assembled to aid them, had no power to dis-
turb it. No British officer, no British soldier,
would confess, that in these circumstances he
felt the least anxiety concerning any molesta-
tion from such opposers.

The injuries done to a single family, were
an immense overbalance for all the good ac-
quired in this expedition, either by the individ-
uals engaged in it, or the nation in whose ser-
vice they acted. Particularly that highly re-
spectable pair, Mr. and Mrs. Burr, in the loss
of the mansion of their ancestors, and the
treasures with which it had been stored
through a long succession of years,—where the
elegant hospitality which had reigned in it—
the refined enjoyments which were daily felt
and daily distributed to the friend and the
stranger—the works of charity which were
there multiplied, and the rational piety, which
was at once the animating and controlling
184 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

principle, diffused a brilliancy marked b
every passing eye,—lost more than the Briti
nation gained by this devastation.

ELOQUENCE OF PATRICK HENRY.

Patrick Henry was the son of Colonel John
Henry, a native of Aberdeen, in Scotland, and
born at Studley, in the county of Hanover, and
state of Virginia. In his youth, he gave no
signs of future greatness. No persuasion
could induce him either to read, or to work ;
but he ran wild in the forest, and divided his
time between the uproar of the chase, and the
languor of inaction.

He married at eighteen; he was for some
time a farmer, and then entered into mercan-
tile undertakings, which in a few years ren-
dered him a bankrupt, and reduced him to a
state of wretchedness. He now determined
to try the bar. About this time, the famous
contest between the clergy on the one hand, and
the legislature and the people on the other,
concerning the stipends of the former, took
place ; and he exhibited such displays of elo-
quence in“ the parsons’ cause,” as it was termed,
as drew the admiration of all his fellow-citizens.
His exertions were so unexampled, so unex-
pected, so instantaneous, that he obtained the
appellation of “'The Orator of Nature.”
ao

ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 185

When the question was first agitated con-
cerning the right of the British parliament to
tax America, he gave, as has been truly re-
marked, “the first impulse to the ball of the
revolution.” Men who were on other occa
sions distinguished for intrepidity and decision,
hung back, unwilling to submit, yet afraid to
speak out, in language of bold and open defi-
ance, In this hour of despondency, suspense,
and consternation, Henry arose, to cheer the
drooping spirits of his countrymen, and to
call forth all the energies of the Americans, to
contend for their freedom. When the house
of Burgesses was within three days of its ex-
pected close, Henry produced, and carried the
far-famed resolutions concerning the stamp
act, which formed the first firm opposition to
the scheme of taxing America by the British
parliament. In 1774, he appeared in the ven-
erable body of the old continental congress of
the United States, when it met for the first
time. Henry broke the silence, which, for a
while, overawed the minds of all present, and
as hé advanced, rose with the magnitude and
importance of the subject, to the noblest dis-
plays of argument and of eloquence.

“ This,” said he, “is not the time for cere-
mony: the question before the house is one
of awful moment to this country. It is no-
thing less than freedom, or slavery. If we
wish to be free, we must fight. 1 repeat it, sir,
we must fight! an appeal to arms, and to the

16*
186 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

God of Hosts, is all that is left us. It is in
vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen
may ery, peace ! peace ! but there is no peace.
The war is actually begun. The next gale
that sweeps from the north, will bring to our
ears the clash of resounding arms. Our breth-
ren are already in the field. Why stand we
here idle? hat is it that gentlemen wish?
What would they have? Is life so dear, and
peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the
price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Al-
mighty God! I know not what course others
may take ; but as for me,” cried he, with both
his arms extended aloft, his brows knit, every
feature marked with the resolute purpose of
his soul, and his voice swelled to its boldest
note of exclamation, “ give me liberty, or give
me death!” He took his seat, and the cry
“To arms !” seemed to quiver upon every lip,
and gleam from every eye.

Henry lived to witness the glorious issue
of that revolution which his genius had set
in motion ; and, to use his own prophetic lan-
guage, before the commencement of that revo-_
lution, “to see America take her station
among the nations of the earth.”



EMILY GEIGER.

At the time General Green retreated before |
Lord Rawdon from Ninety-six, when he had
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 187

passed Broad River, he was ve desirous to
send an order toGeneral Sumter, who wasonthe
Wateree, to join him, that they might attack
Rawdon, who had divided his force. But the
general could find no man in that part of the
state who was bold enough to undertake so
dangerous a mission. The country to be pass-
ed through for many miles was full of blood-
thirsty tories, who on every occasion that of-
fered, imbrued their hands in the blood of the
whigs. At length Emily Geiger presented
herself to Gen. Greene, and proposed to act
as his messenger ; and the general, both sur-
prised and delighted, closed with her propo-
sal.

He accordingly wrote a letter and delivered
it, and at the same time communicated the
contents of it verbally, to be told to Sumter in
case of accident. Emily was young, but as
to her person or adventures on the way, we
have no further information, except that she
was mounted on horseback, upon a side-saddle,
and on the second day of her journey she was
intercepted by Lord Rawdon’s scouts. Coming
from the direction of Greene’s army, and not
being able to tell an untruth without blushing,
Emily was suspected, and confined to a room ;
and as the officer in command had the modes-
ty not to search her at the time, he sent for an
old tory matron as more fitting for that pur-
pose. Emily was not wanting in expedient,
and as soon as the door was closed and the
188 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

bustle a little subsided, she ate up the letter piece
by piece.

After a while the matron arrived, and upon
searching carefully nothing was to be found
of a suspicious nature about the prisoner, and
she would disclose nothing. Suspicion being
thus allayed, the officer commanding the
* scouts suffered Emily to depart for where she
said she was bound; but she took a route
somewhat circuitous to avoid further deten-
tion, and soon after struck in the road to Sum-
ter’s camp, where she arrived in safety. Emi-
ly told her adventure, and delivered Greene’s
verbal message to Sumter, who in conse-
quence soon after joined the main army at
Orangeburg. Emily Geiger afterwards mar-
ried Mr. Threrwits, a rich planter on the Con-
garee. She has been dead 35 years, but it is
trusted her name will descend to posterity
among those of the patriotic females of the
revolution,



CAPTAIN ROSS.

During the first American war, Captain
Ross of the British army made engagements
with a young lady in England, which her pa-
rents refused to ratify. Honor and duty com-

elled him to go to America, and the object of
his affections was resolved to follow him. She
departed in men’s clothes, and just arrived at
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 189

the scene of war time enough to learn that a
sanguinary skirmish had taken place between
the savages and the detachment commanded by
the object of her search. She flew to the field
of battle, found it strewed with dead bodies,
in the midst of which she perceived the form
of Captain Ross! She instantly caught him
in her arms, and thought she felt his heart
beat. She discovered he was wounded, and
she endeavored to stanch the wound, which
was yet bleeding, and for some time she ap-
plied her lips to it and sucked it. This reme-
dy, well known, but seldom resorted to, in-
sensibly restored him to life. In the mean
time no feared, by making herself known,
she might cause an emotion to her lover,
which might be attended with certain danger.
She therefore disguised her complexion and
her features, as she had already disguised her
sex, and with unremitting care, nursed and
attended him for forty days; at the end of
which, perfectly assured of his restoration to
health, she made herself known to him, who
during his long indisposition had never ceased
to speak of her, and express the regret he
felt, that ere he quitted this world he should
not have the satisfaction of being united to
her he so fondly loved. It is not easy to de-
scribe the joy of the lovers in a meeting so
unhoped for. They departed together for Phi-
ladelphia, where they ratified their vows of
eternal affection at the altar.
190 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

SAMUEL ADAMS AND AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE,

Mr. Adams was a member of the first con.
tinental Congress, which assembled in Phila.
delphia on the 5th of September, 1774 ; and
continued a member of that body until the
year 1781. During this period, no delegate
acted a more conspicuous or manly part. No
one exhibited a more indefatigable zeal, or a
firmer tone of character. He early saw that
the contest would not probably be decided
without bloodshed. He was himself prepared
for every extremity, and was willing that such
measures should be adopted, as should lead to
an early issue of the controversy. He was
accordingly among the warmest advocates for
the declaration of American independence. In
his view, the die was cast, and a further
friendly connection with the parent country
was impossible.

“J am perfectly satisfied,” said he, in a let-
ter written from Philadelphia, to a friend in
Massachusetts, in April, 1776, “ of the ne-
cessity of a public and explicit declaration of
independence. 1 cannot conceive what ¢
reason can be assigned against it. Will it
widen the breach? This would be a strange

uestion, after we have raised armies, and
fought battles with British troops; set up am
American navy; permitted the inhabitants of
the colonies to fit out armed vessels, to cap-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 191

ture of the ships, &c., belonging to any of the
inhabitants of Great Britain ; declaring them
the enemies of the United Colonies; and
torn into shivers their acts of trade, by al-
lowing commerce, subject to regulations to be
made by ourselves with the people of all coun-
tries, except such as are subject to the British
king. It cannot surely, after all this, be im-
agined that we consider ourselves, or mean to
be considered by others, in any other state
than that of independence.” The independ-
ence of America was at length declared, and
gave a new political character, and an imme-
diate dignity to the cause of the colonies.
But notwithstanding this measure might itself
bear the aspect of victory, a formidable con-
test yet awaited the Americans. The year
following the declaration of independence,
the situation of the colonies was extremely
gloomy. The stoutest hearts trembled within
them, and even doubts were expressed wheth-
er the measures which had been adopted,
particularly the declaration of independence,
were not precipitate. The neighborhood of
Philadelphia became the seat of war ; Con-
gress, now reduced to only twenty-eight mem-
bers, had resolved to remove their session to
Lancaster.

At this critical period, Mr. Adams accident-
ally fell in company with several other mem-
bers, by whom the subject of the state of the
country was freely and confidentially discuss-
192 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

ed. Gloomy forebodings seemed to pervade
their minds, and the greatest anxiety was ex-
pressed as to the issue of the contest. To
this conversation Mr. Adams listened with
silent attention. At length he expressed his
surprise, that such desponding feelings should
have settled upon their hearts, and such de-
sponding language should be even confidentially
uttered by their lips. To this he was answer-
ed, “ The chance is desperate.” “ Indeed, in-
deed, it is desperate,” said Mr. Adams, “ if
this be our language. If we wear long faces,
others will do so too; if we despair, let us not
expect that others will hope; or that they
will persevere in a contest, from which their
leaders shrink. But let not such feelings, let
not such language be ours.” Thus, while the
hearts of others were ready to faint, Samuel
Adams maintained his usual firmness, his un-
shaken courage, and his calm reliance upon
the aid and protection of Heaven, and con-
tributed in an eminent degree to inspire his
countrymen with a confidence of their final
success.

A higher encomium could not have been be-
stowed on any member of the continental Con-

ess, than is expressed in relation to Mr.
Adams by Mr. Galloway, in his historical and
political reflections on the rise and progress
of the American rebellion, published in Great
Britain, 1780. “He eats little,” says the au-
thor, “ drinks little, sleeps little, thinks much;
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 193

and is most indefatigable in the pursuit of his
object. It was this man, who by his superior
application, managed at once the factions in
Congress at Philadelphia, and the factions of
New England.”

—_—_—

BARON STEUBEN’S WIT.

Dining with him shortly after the resigna-
tion of Mr. Robert Morris, as financier of the
United States, the cause of which appeared
inexplicable to the company present, “ To me,”
said Baron Steuben, “there appears no mys-
tery. I will illustrate my sentiments by a sim-
ple narrative. When I was about to quit
Paris to embark for the United States, the
better to ensure comfort when in camp, I judg-
ed it of importance to engage in my service a
cook of celebrity. The American army was
posted at Valley Forge when I joined it. Ar-
rived at my quarters, a wagoner presented
himself, saying that he was directed to attach
himself to my train, and obey my orders.

Commissaries arriving, furnished a supply
of beef and bread, and retired. My cook look-
ed around him for utensils indispensable, in
his opinion, for preparing a meal, and finding
none, in an agony of despair, applied to the
wagoner for advice. “We cook our meat,”
replied he, “ by hanging it up by a string, and

17
194 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

turning it before a good fire, till sufficiently
roasted.” The next day, and still another
passed, without material change. The com
missary made his deposit. My cook showed
the strongest indications of uneasiness by
shrugs and heavy sighing ; but, with the ex-
ception of a few oaths, spoke not a word of
complaint. His patience, however, was com-
pletely exhausted; he requested an audience,
and demanded his dismission. “Under hap-
pier circumstances, mon general,” said he, * it
would be my ambition to serve you, but here I
have no chance of showing my talents, and I
think myself obliged, in honor, to save you ex-
pense, since your wagoner is just as able to
turn the string as | am.” “ Believe me, gen-
tlemen,” continued the baron, “ the. treasury
of America is, at present, just as empty as my
kitchen was at Valley Forge ; and Mr. Morris
wisely retires, thinking it of very little conse-
quence who turns the string.”

——

THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT AND THE STAMP ACT.

At the time of that disastrous warfare, in
which Washington rose upon the ruins of the
incautious Braddock, resolutions had passed
the British parliament, for laying a a
duty in America ; but they were not follow
immediately by any legislative act. The de
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 195

claratory — of that body met no opposi-
tion, on either side of the Atlantic ; because
“the omnipotence of parliament,” was then a
familiar Sevens but afterwards, when the
measure was examined, it was better under-
stood, and constitutional objections were urged
by many sagacious statesmen, both in Eng-
land and America.

But, notwithstanding the powerful reasons
offered against this unjust and hazardous ex-
periment, George Grenville, impelled by @
partiality for a long-cherished scheme, in the
following year, 1765, again brought into the
house of commons this unpopular bill, and
succeeded in its enactment. By this, the in-
struments of writing, in daily use among a
commercial people, were to be null and void,
unless executed on paper or parchment stamp-
ed with a specific duty. Law documents and
leases, articles of apprenticeship and con-
tracts, protests and bills of sale, newspapers
and advertisements, almanacs and pamphlets,
—all must contribute to the British treasury.
When the measure was examined, Charles
Townshend delivered a speech in its favor ;
in concluding which, “ Will these’ Americans,”
he said, “children planted by our care, nour-
ished by our indulgence, till they are grown
up to a degree o€ strength and opulence, and
protected by our arms; will they grudge to
contribute their mite to relieve the weight of
the heavy burden under which we lie ?”—
96 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“ They, planted by your care !” replied Col-
onel Barré ; “no; they were planted by your
oppressions. They fled from tyranny, to an
uncultivated, inhospitable country, where they
exposed themselves to all the hardships to
which human nature is liable; and amongst
others, to the cruelty of a savage foe, the most
subtle, and, I will take it upon me to say, the
most formidable people, on the face of the
earth ; and yet, actuated by principles of true
English liberty, they met all hardships with
pleasure, compared with what they had suffer-
ed in their own country, from the hands of
those who should have been their friends.

“They nourished by your indulgence! They
grew up by your neglect. As soon as you be-
gan to extend your care, that care was dis-
played in sending persons to rule them, in one
department and another, who were, perhaps,
the deputies of deputies to some members of
this house ; sent to spy out their liberties, to
misrepresent their actions, and to prey upon
their substance: men, whose behavior, on
many occasions, has caused the blood of those
sons of freedon to recoil within them; men
promoted to the highest seats of justice—some
who, to my knowledge, were glad in going to
a foreign country, to escape being brought to
a bar of a court of justice in their own.

“They protected by your arms! They have
nobly taken up arms in your defence, haye
exerted a valor amidst their constant and la-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 197

borious industry, for the defence of a country,
whose frontier was drenched in blood, while
its interior parts yielded all its little savings
to your emolument. And believe me, that
the same spirit of freedom which actuated
these people at first, will accompany them still ;
—but prudence forbids me to explain myself
further. God knows, I do not, at this time,
speak from any motives of petty heat. I de-
liver the genuine sentiments of my heart.
However superior to me, in general know-
ledge and experience, the respectable body
of this house may be, yet I claim to know
more of America than most of you; having
seen that country, and been conversant with
its people. They are, 1 believe, as truly loyal
as any subjects the king has; but a people
jealous of their liberties, and who will vindi-
cate them, if ever they should be violated.
But the subject is too delicate ; I will say no
more.”

The night after the bill passed, Dr. Frank- :
lin wrote to Mr. Chas. Thompson, “ The sun
of liberty is set; you must light up the can-
dies of industry and economy.”—Mr. Thomp-
son answered, “1 was apprehensive that other
lights would be the consequence, and I foresee
the opposition that will be made.”

17*
198 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

REPEAL OF THE STAMP ACT.

Notwithstanding that the stamp law was to
have operated from the first of November, yet
legal proceedings in the courts were carried
on as before; vessels entered and departed
without stamped papers; printers boldly cir-
culated their newspapers, and in most depart-
ments, business was conducted, by common
consent, in defiance of the parliament, as if
no stamp act was in existence. The people
of Philadelphia, and after them, nearly all
the commercial portion of English America,
prohibited lawyers fro instituting any action
for money due to an inhabitant of England.

Nor was their determined spirit of opposi-
tion confined to a mere defensive means 0
parliamentary defeat. Still further measures
were adopted. ‘Associations were formed
against importing British manufactures, until
that law should be repealed ; which, by throw-
ing many thousands in the mother country out
of employment, and depriving her merchants
of the usual benefits attending extensive or-
ders, made it the interest of both classes in
England to advocate the cause of the Ameri-
cans.

In order to remedy the deficiency of British
goods, the colonists applied with diligence to
domestic manufactures ; to increase the quan-
tity of wool, they abstained from eating lamb:
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 199

and to form a barrier against the encroach-
ment of the obnoxious act, they resolved to
protect, by force of arms, all who should be in
danger from resistance.

Conduct so magnanimous and firm had the
desired effect. Warm discussions followed in
the British parliament. The Marquis of
Rockingham, much esteemed for his sincerity
and the vigor of his genius, was appointed first
lord of the treasury, in the room of George
Grenville ; and General Conway was called to
fill the place of colonial secretary. Anxious-
ly desirous to obtain a revocation of the ob-
noxious taxes, the new administration employ-
ed the opinion and authority of Dr. Franklin ;
who, as agent for some of the colonies, was
examined at the bar of the house of commons;
and in that pungent manner, characteristic of
his superior mind, gave extensive information,
which served greatly to remove prejudices,
and promote a disposition friendly to a repeal.

The ablest speakers in both houses denied
the justice of taxing the colonies. “ You have
no right,” said William Pitt, “to tax America.
I rejoice that she has resisted. Three mil-
lions of people, so lost to every sense of vir-
tue, as voluntarily to submit to be slaves,
would have been fit instruments to make
slaves of all the rest.” The opposition could
not be withstood; the repeal was carried in
March; an event which caused great joy in
England. The ships in the river Thames dis-
200 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

played their colors, and the city was illumina-
ted. In America, the home-spun clothes were
presented to the poor, and orders for Britis»
goods were given more extensively than ever



ROYAL COMMISSION TORN TO PIECES.

The news of the battle of Lexington flew
through New England like wildfire. The
swift horseman, with his red flag, proclaimed
it in every village, and made the stirring call
upon the patriots, to move forward in de-
fence of the rights so ruthlessly invaded and
now sealed in the martyr’s blood. Putnam, it
will be recollected, left his plow in the furrow,
and led his gallant band to Cambridge. Such
instances of promptness and devotion were not
rare. Wehave the following instance of the dis-
play of fervid patriotism from an eye-witness—
one of those valued relics of the band of ’76,
whom now a grateful nation delights to honor.

When the intelligence reached New Salem,
Mass., the people were hastily assembled on
the village green, by the notes of alarm.
Every man came with his gun, and other has-
ty preparations for a short march. The mili-
tia of the town were then divided into two
companies, one of which was commanded by
Capt. G. This company was paraded before
much consultation had been had upon the
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 201

proper steps to be taken in the emergency,
and while determination was expressed on al-
most every countenance, the men stood silent-
ly leaning on their muskets, awaiting the
movement of the spirit in the officers. The
captain was supposed to be tinctured with
toryism, and his present indecision and back-
wardness were ample proof, if not of his at-
tachment to royalty, at least of his unfitness
to lead a patriot band. Some murmurs be-
gan to be heard, when the first lieutenant,
William Stacy, took off his hat and addressed
them. He was a man of a stout heart, but
of few words.
Pulling his commission from his pocket, he
said—* Fellow-soldiers, I don’t know exactly
how it is with the rest of you, but for me, I
will no longer serve a king that murders my
own countrymen ;” and tearing the paper in a
hundred pieces, he trod it under foot. Sober
as were the people by nature, they could not
restrain a loud wild Laat as he stepped for-
ward and took his place in the ranks. G. still
faltered, and made a feeble endeavor to restore
order; but they heeded him as little as the
wind. The company was summarily disband-
ed, and a reorganization began on the spot.
The gallant Stacy was unanimously chosen
captain, and with a prouder commission than
was ever borne on parchment, he led a small
but efficient band to Cambridge. He continu-
ed in service through the war, reaching, we
202 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

believe, before its close, the rank of lieutenant
colonel, under the command of Putnam.

ooo

THE FIRST MARTYR OF BUNKER HILL.

From the battle of Bunker Hill, sprang the
protection and vigor that nurtured the tree of
liberty, and to it, in all probability, may be as-
cribed our independence and glory.

The name of the first martyr that gave
his life for the good of his country on that day,
in the importance of the moment was lost,
else a monument, in connection with the gal-
lant Warren, should be raised to his memory.
The manner of his death was thus related by
Col. Prescott.

“The first man who fell in the battle at
Bunker Hill was killed by a cannon ball which
struck his head. He was so near me that
my clothes were besmeared with his blood
and brains, which I wiped off in some degree
with a handful of fresh earth. The sight was
so shocking to many of the men, that they left
their posts and ran to view him. I ordered
them back, but in vain. I then ordered him
to be buried instantly. A sabaltern officer
expressed surprise that I should allow him to
be buried without having prayers said. I re-
a ‘This is the first man that has been

illed, and the only one that will be buri
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 203

ed to-day. I put him out of sight that the
men may be kept in their places. God only
knows who, or how many of us will fall be-
fore it is over. To your post, my good fellows,
and let each man do his duty.’”

“The name of the patriot who thus fell is
supposed to have been Pallard, a young man
belonging to Billerica. He was struck by a
cannon ball, thrown from the line-of-battle-
ship Somerset.”



GENERAL PUTNAM FIGHTING A DUEL.

General Putnam is known to have been de-
cidedly opposed, on principle, to duelling. It
once happened that he grossly affronted a
brother officer. The dispute arose at a wine
table, and the officer demanded instant re-
paration. Putnam being a little elevated, ex-
pressed his willingness to accommodate the
gentleman with a fight ; and it was stipulated
that.the duel should take place on the follow-
ing morning, and that they should fight with-
out seconds. At the appointed time, the gen-
eral went to the ground, armed with a sword
and pistols. On entering the field, Putnam,
who had taken a stand at the opposite extrem-
ity, and at a distance of about thirty rods,
levelled his musket and fired at him. The
gentleman now ran towards his antagonist,
204 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

who deliberately proceeded to reload his

n.

a What are you about to do?” exclaimed he.
«Js this the conduct of an American officer,
and a man of honor !”

“« What are you about to do ?” exclaimed the
general, attending only to the first question :
“a pretty question to put to a man whom you
intended to murder. I’m about to kill you;
and if you don’t beat a retreat in less time
than it would take old Heath to hang a tory,
you are a gone dog ;” at the same time re-
turning his ramrod to its place, and throwing
the breech of his gun into the hollow of his
shoulder.

This intimation was too unequivocal to be
misunderstood ; and our valorous duellist turn-
ed and fled for dear life. :

It is believed that this was the only single
combat in which Putnam was ever engaged—
a circumstance the more to be wondered at,
as he was exceedingly fiery and impetuous in
his disposition. However well his reputation
for courage might have been, association with
officers of all descriptions during a war of
eight years’ continuance, must have brought
him into situations in which it required a
great degree of forbearance to avoid personal
combats.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 205

“ YoU CAN BETTER SPARE ONE MAN THAN Two.”

The following anecdote, says a correspond-
ent of the American “ Village Record,” comes
from a source entitled to perfect credit.

During the revolutionary war, two British
soldiers, of the army of Lord Cornwallis, went
into a house, and abused the inmates in a
most cruel and shameful manner. A third
soldier, in going into the dwelling, met them
coming out, and knew them. The people ac-
quitted him of all blame, but he was imprison-
ed because he refused to disclose the names
of the offenders. Every art was tried, but in
vain ; at length he was condemned by a court
martial to die. When on the gallows, Lord
Cornwallis, surprised at his pertinacity, rode
near him—

“ Campbell,” said he, “ what a fool you are
to die thus! Disclose the names of the guilt
men, and you shall immediately be released,
otherwise you have not fifteen minutes to
live.”

“ You are in an enemy’s country, my lord,”
replied Campbell; “ you can better spare one
man than two.”

Firmly adhering to his purpose, he died.

Does history furnish a similar instance of
such strange devotion for a mistaken point of
honor ?

18
206 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

AN AMERICAN GENERAL,

In the American revolutionary war, two
young subalterns, who had been wounded,
were taken prisoners, and on parole took up
their residence on a place called Dobb’s Farm.

One day, as they were sitting down to din-
ner, a swaythy man, of bold and full counte-
nance, entered the room where they sat, and
without announcing himself, asked how they
liked their situation, and how they were treat-
ed? They answered in such a manner as gave
pleasure to their good host and hostess. The
stranger expressed his satisfaction also; and
begging leave to dine with them, seated him-
self at the table without waiting for an an-
swer.

When dinner was over, a couple of horse-
men made their appearance, and desired to
know the stranger’s commands. “ You will
bring the wine hither,” said he ; “ get some re-
freshment yourselves, and saddle at five
o'clock.” The yagers withdrew, and their
commander, seeing the surprise of the officers,
said, “ Gentlemen, my name is Morgan, a major-
general in the service of America.” They in-
terrupted him with apologies for the uncere-
monious reception he had met with, which he
begged not to hear, saying that he had come
on purpose to see them, and to render any as-
sistance they might require ; adding, that he
ANECDOTES OF THE. REVOLUTION. 207
was very glad to see them so well accommoda-

ted.

Then filling a glass of wine, to which the
had been for some time strangers, he gave, “
speedy peace,” in which he was pledged most
cordially. The bottle was quickly circulated,
and the healths of the principal commanders
in both armies were drunk in succession. .A
song was proposed, and after one of the offi-
cers had complied, the general won the hearts
of his auditors by singing, in allusion to his
former profession, “ When I was driving my
wagon one day.”

It was now five o’clock, the horsemen pre-
sented themselves, and General Morgan took
his leave in a most friendly manner, assuring
them that he would use his best efforts for a
speedy exchange, although saying, “I have no
desire to see such men in arms against me.”
He left two hampers of wine, which had been
brought for the prisoners, and which proved
of infinite service to them in aiding the re-
covery of their health.



LOOKING FORWARD TO THE GALLOWS.

A short time before the battle of Trenton,
in 1776, the prospects of America were ex-
tremely gloomy, and many among her people,
began to look forward to the consequences of
208 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

an unfavorable result to their struggle for
freedom. The inveteracy of Great Britain
was too well understood, to admit of any
doubt as to the course of revenge which they
would pursue against those, who had been
most active in the contest. William Williams,
William Hillhouse, and Benjamin Huntington,
met at this crisis at the house of the first
named gentleman ; and as usual, their conver-
sation turned upon the signs of the times, and
the probable result of the war. At last, they
began to consider what might be their re-
spective fates.

“ As for me,” said Mr. Williams, “1 shall, in
all human probability, be hung among the
first ; because | have written much, talked
more, and done all I could do in favor of inde-
pendence.” Hillhouse said, that he too would
most certainly follow Williams in his career,
for the same reasons. Huntington then said,
that as for his part, he had kept pretty quiet ;
and that as he had neither signed the declara-
tion of independence, nor wrote any thing
against the mother country, that he would, at
all events, escape the gallows. “Then, sir,”
said Williams, starting up with much violence
of feeling, “ you ought to be hung for not hav-
ing done your duty.”
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 209

PATRIOTISM OF GEN. NELSON,

General Nelson commanded a large bod
of militia at the siege of Yorktown, whic
was his native place. One of the most con-
spicuous objects from the American lines, was
his own house’; and in the cannonade which
daily took place, he was astonished to see that
it escaped uninjured, while its neighbors were
crumbling under the fire of the American ar-
tillery. At last he suspected that the men
would not fire at it out of respect to his own
property ; and on asking if such was not the
case, he found out that it was.

«“ Don’t spare the house, my friends, because
it is mine; the English know that as well as
you do, and accordingly have taken up their
quarters in it. They shall not escape, how-
ever, under my protection; so fire at it di-
rectly, and let us see if you can hit it.” Two
pieces were then pointed at the dwelling,
The very first shot went through it, and killed
two of a large company of officers, who were
indulging in the pleasures of the table. Suf-
fice it to say, that it was not a great while
before the hostile tenants were dislodged from
their hiding-place, by the means of the patri-
otism of Nelson. . :

18
210 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

COLONEL JOHN LAURENS AND THE FRENCH KING,

Colonel John Laurens was sent by Congress
to negotiate a loan of money from France, dur-
ing the revolution. The Count de Vergennes,
the French minister, received him kindly, and
promised that the loan should be made. He
contrived excuses, however, from day to day ;
so that at the end of a month, Laurens found
himself as far from the object of his visit as
when he arrived in Paris. Fully aware of
the immense importance of the loan to Ameri-
ca, Laurens resolved upon a novel and almost
daring procedure.

In defiance of all etiquette, he determined
to make a personal appeal to the king himself.
Dr. Franklin, the American minister at the
court of France, endeavored to dissuade him ;
but finding him determined, refused to bear
any part of the responsibility of such conduct.
Laurens was not to be deterred; but at the
first levee, walking directly to the king, he
presented him with a memorial, and after ex-
plaining briefly its object, concluded as follows.
“ Should the favor asked be denied, or even
delayed, there is cause to fear that the sword
which I wear may no longer be drawn in de-
fence of the liberties of my country, but be
wielded as a British subject against the mon-
archy of France.” His decision was reward-
ed; delays no longer opposed him, and his
negotiation was immediately successful.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 211

BENEDICT ARNOLD, A TRAITOR.

No instance of treachery perhaps ever pro-
duced so strong an excitement, as the deser-
tion of General Benedict Arnold from the
American cause ; yet this moment was mark-
ed by the display of almost chivalrous gener-
osity to the near friends and relatives of the
traitor. When the capture of André was
made known to Arnold, he knew that he was
discovered, and hastening to the apartment of
his wife, he exclaimed, “ All is lost ; André is
a prisoner. Burn all my papers! I fly to
New York !”

The unfortunate lady fainted and fell, and
when she recovered found that her husband
had departed. She remained in momentary
expectation of hearing that he had been ar-
rested in his flight, and punished as a traitor,
and in wild distraction frequently called out
upon Washington for pardon. Washington
knew her to be a tender mother and an affec-
tionate wife. Arnold, and not she, was the
object of his resentment ; and anxious to re-
lieve the agonizing suspense which he felt
she must endure, he informed her, with the
most delicate kindness, that her husband had
escaped his pursuers, and was on board the
Vulture, sloop of war.

At the same time he offered her safe con-
duct to the British lines, or to her relatives in
212 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION,

Philadelphia. She said “she would share
the fate of her husband,” but before joining
him she was anxious once more to see her pa-
rents. Her desire was gratified ; and on for
way to Philadelphia, the inhabitants of a town
through which she passed, learning she was
there, with a delicacy rarely found in moments
of high excitement, by magnanimous consent
suspended their preparations to burn Arnold
in effigy, and treated her with the most re-
spectful attention, as if they sympathized with
her in her sad and irretrievable misfortune.



GENEROSITY OF AN AMERICAN LIEUTENANT.

At the battle of Stono, in South Carolina,
when the detachment of the British 71st regi-
ment had been nearly annihilated by a charge
of the American light infantry, a British cap-
tain, who had behaved with the most intrepid
bravery, was so severely wounded as to be
unable any longer to exert himself; and sup-
porting himself against a tree, he remained a
spectator only of the termination of the com-
bat.

In this situation a continental soldier had
already raised his musket, to thrust the bayo-
net through him, when the weapon was turn-
ed aside, and his life saved by an American
lieutenant, who upbraided the soldier for his
intended slaughter of an unresisting foe.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 213

At this moment, one of the chief American
officers rode up, and exclaiming, “ That is too
brave a fellow to die,” committed the English-
man to the care of the very soldier who would
have deprived him of life, with the strictest
injunctions to protect him.

COLONEL SMALL.

Among the officers of the British army, who
came to America during the revolutionary
war, and took an active part against the in-
dependence of the country, was Colonel Small.
But although an enemy, no one was more es-
teemed by the: Americans. His generosity
and kindness to his prisoners were almost
proverbial ; and his constant exertion was to
mitigate, as far as possible, the inevitable suf-
ferings and horrors of war.

At the battle of Bunker Hill, he turned
aside the bayonet which was directed at the
breast of the expiring Warren, and was him-
self most probably indebted for life to the
generosity of an old acquaintance. “Take
good aim,” said Putnam to his troops, “ kill
as many as you can, but spare Small ;” and
the sturdy republican actually turned aside
many rifles, that were aimed at his friend.
214 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

BENEVOLENCE OF COLONEL WM. WASHINGTON.

During the revolution, when the conse-
quences of a suspended commerce and a de-
preciated currency were severely felt by every
member of the American community, and
want stared those in the face who had al-
ways before been accustomed to affluence, the
celebrated continental officer, Col. William
Washington, heard that the writer of “Com-
mon Sense” was in distress in Philadelphia.

It was this work which did so much towards
opening the eyes of the Americans to the en-
croachments of England, and bringing about
the revolution. Washington immediately said
to a friend, “I cannot bear the idea that the
man who by his writings has so highly benefit-
ed his country, should feel the want of bread
while I have the power to relieve him ;” and
without a sentence more on the subject, re-
mitted, by the first conveyance, a bill for a
hundred guineas.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 215

PATRIOTISM OF BENJAMIN WEST.

Mr. West met with munificent patronage
in England, but “ he always retained a strong
and unyielding affection for his native land.”
The countenance which the king nobly be-
stowed upon this highly gifted American,
could not fail to excite envy among his cour-
tiers. A malicious individual, knowing his
partiality for the land of his birth, resolved to
make him give some unguarded proof of it
which would be unpleasant to his majesty, in-
censed as he then was against the American
colonies. With an air of much satisfaction,
he one day informed the king that the Ameri-
cans had lately met with a most disastrous
defeat; and turning to Mr. West, he exulting-
ly asked, “ How do you like these tidings, sir?”
Mr. West, bowing low to his majesty, answer-
ed, “I am a loyal and grateful subject to my
king, but I can never rejoice at any misfortune
which befalls my native land.” “ A noble re-
ply,” said his sovereign ; “and I assure you,
Mr. West, no man will ever fall in my esti-
mation, because he loves his country.” Mr.
West retained his love of America to the day
of his death; and he refused immense sums
for some of his most magnificent pictures,
which he painted as affectionate gifts to the
public institutions of his native state.
216 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

THE RUNAWAYS BECOME CAPTORS,

At the battle of Guilford, two battalions of
North Carolina militia were very advanta-
geously posted behind a rail fence. General
Greene rode up to them before the action, and
told them that if they would only remain firm,
and deliver two fires with deliberate aim, he
would give them permission to retire from the
fight. They promised to do so, in cheerful
accents. In a short time, however, they saw
the whiskered Hessians and the stout guards
advancing ata rapid pace. One volley would
have checked them. They did not wait to de-
liver it; but turning round, went off in full
and disorderly retreat.

As a punishment for their shameful conduct,
they were placed under continental officers,
and ordered into regular service for eighteen
months. Here they were drilled and disci-
plined. They became aware of their united
power, and panted for an opportunity of en-
gaging the enemy. They at last obtained it,
and the runaways of Guilford were the heroes
of Eutaw. In this last action, of the three
hundred that entered it, one hundred and
ninety were left dead or wounded on the
field.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 217

. THE BRITISH AFRAID OF A LOG OF WOOD.

A considerable British force were made _
oners, at a place called Rugely’s, in Carolina,
during the revolution, by Colonel William
Washington, in a novel manner. They occu-
pied a large house, which was completely
musket proof, and in which they might have
made a perfect defence against Washington’s
cavalry. This officer, however, mounted a
pine log upon a pair of wagon wheels, man-
ned his wooden battery with the usual com-
plement of men, lighted the match beside it,
and planted it in full view, but at some dis-
tance from the house. He now summoned
the English to surrender, and pointing to his
field-piece, threatened them with the conse-
quences of refusal.

His threat was effectual. They marched
out and gave up their arms, without firing a
shot, and obtained a nearer and mortifying
view of the strength of the American artil-

lery.

AN EXAMPLE OF FORTITUDE.

In an expedition from Charleston against
the British, Lieutenant Moon, of the partisan
troops, was dangerously wounded, and it be-

19
218 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

came necessary to amputate a limb, which
was much shattered. He had fallen into the
hands of the enemy, and the operation was
performed by British surgeons.

When it was finished, the lady in whose
house he was, remarked, when they were
alone, “I am happy that you have suffered so
little pain. I was constantly in the other
room and did not hear a groan.” “My kind
friend,” he answered, “ I felt not the least ago-
ny; but I would not have breathed a sigh in
the presence of British officers, to have secured
a long and fortunate existence.”



DECEPTION OF TARLETON,

Colonel Tarleton went to the house of an
American, during the revolution, and passed
himself off to his host and family as Colonel
Washington of the continental army.

The American was proud of having so dis-
tinguished an officer in his house, and paid
him every attention which the most unbound-
ed hospitality could dictate, at the same time
informing him, confidentially, as he thought,
of the plans of himself and neighbors, to rise
in arms against the British. Tarleton played
the part which he had assumed to admiration,
and finally induced his host to become his
guide to a place in the neighborhood. On
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 219

their arrival, Tarleton’s soldiers appeared in
full view, and the unsuspecting American, for
the first time discovering his mistake, was
made a prisoner, and conveyed to Camden.

Here he was frequently forced to ride in a
cart to the gallows, to witness the execution
of his countrymen and friends, and was each
time told to make his preparations for death,
as his time would certainly come next.

“ Let it come as soon as it may,” he used to *
reply on such occasions, “I am ready and will-
ing to die in the cause of my country. But
remember, I have many friends in General
Marion’s brigade, and my death will occasion
a severe retaliation.”

Owing to his firmness, his known virtue, or
his threats, his life was preserved, but he
was for a long time cruelly kept in chains.
The scars of these he carried to his grave ; and
in showing them, as he sometimes did, to his
young friends, he used to tell them, “that if
the good of their country required it, they
should suffer imprisonment and death in her
cause.”

COLONEL OWEN ROBERTS,

Colonel Owen Roberts, of the American
army, fell mortally wounded in the battle of
Stono, during the revolution. His son was in
220 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the same action, and hearing his father’s situa-
tion, hastened to find him. The expiring sol-
dier observing the anguish of his son, address-
ed him with the greatest composure, “I re-
joice, my boy, once again to see and embrace

ou. Take this sword, which has never yet

een tarnished by dishonor, and let it not be
idle, while the liberty of your country requires
it.”

MR. JOHN ADAMS.

In the year 1776, about the time of the
declaration of American independence, Lord
Howe arrived in Long Island with a large
army of British and Hessian troops, and a
short time after, the disastrous battle of Flat-
bush took place. The defeat of the Ameri-
cans presented, in the opinion of Lord Howe,
a favorable opportunity for conciliation, and
he made some advances towards negotiation
with Congress. A committee of that body
was appointed to treat with the English gen-
eral, consisting of John Adams, Dr. Franklin,
and Mr. Rutledge. They met Lord Howe at
Staten Island ; and when they landed on the
shore, they were conducted to the commander-
in-chief, through the ranks of an army of
twenty thousand men, placed in such order as
to produce the most striking effect. Aware
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 221

of this intention of military display, the Ameri
can commissioners did not manifest the slight-
est appearance of surprise. Desirous to avoid
compromiting the fancied dignity of the Eng-
lish crown, the English commander told the
commissioners, that he could not so far recog-
nise the existence of a Congress, as to treat
with them as its accredited agents, but that
he was at liberty to consult with any gentle-
men of character and standing, upon the
means of a pacification between the mother
country and her colonies. The committee re-
plied, that as they came to hear, he might ad-
dress them in any character which he chose:
but they would certainly consider themselves
a committee of the Congress of the United
States. “ You may view me in any light you
—. said Mr. Adams, “save in that of a

ritish subject.” This was not the spirit
which promised any accommodation, on terms
agreeable to England, who, at that time,
would have been contented with nothing less
than the return of the colonies to subjection ;
and the conference was therefore broken up,
without any result to either party.

In 1777, Mr. Adams was appointed com-
missioner to France, to take the place of Si-
las Deane, and embarked on board the Boston
frigate. In the course of the voyage, the com-
mander of the Boston saw a sail, which car-
ried the flag of the enemy, and the temptation
to engage with her was so strong, that, al-

19*
*
222 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

though contrary to his orders, which were
limited to carrying Mr. Adams to France, he
determined, if possible, to capture her. Hav-
ing obtained the permission of the commission-
er, he made sail in chase ; and when coming
up with the enemy, he represented the dan-
ger of remaining on deck, and insisted upon
Mr Adams’ retiring below, out of gun-shot.

Having seen his charge safely deposited
with the surgeon, the captain returned to the
deck ; the courses were clewed up, all hands
beat to quarters, bulkheads down, decks sand-
ed, matches lit, and the fight begun. In the
midst of it the captain saw, to his surprise,
that Mr. Adams had escaped his confinement
below, and, with musket in hand, was doing
the duty of a marine with great dexterity and
composure.

He immediately went to him, and said, “ My
duty, sir, isto carry you unhurt to France, and
as you are unwilling to go under hatches of
your own accord, it is my duty to put you
there ;” and seizing the future president of the
republic in his arms, he had him conveyed to
a place of safety, and took measures to keep
him there, which were effectual.

Mr. Adams was the member of the conti-
nental Congress, who nominated Washington
to the place of commander-in-chief, and did
much to secure his election. He was one of
the committee which drafted the Declaration
of Independence.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 223

SITUATION OF THE AMERICAN ARMY.

The virtues of patience and resignation in
cases of suffering and misfortune, were per-
haps never more nobly exercised than in the
war of the American revolution. Without
the comforts of life, and often without its
most common necessaries, the republican army,
from the highest general to the common sol-
dier, continued to battle with unabated vigor
in the cause of their country.

It was of these men that De Kalb wrote to
the Chevalier de la Luzerne: “ You may
judge of the virtues of our small army, from
the following fact,—we have for several days
lived upon nothing but peaches, and I have
heard no complaint, and there has been no
desertion.”

MEETING AN EMERGENCY.

On one occasion during the revolution, Lieu-
tenant-colonel Lee encamped, late in the even-
inc, near the forks of a road, one of which
led to Cornwallis’s camp, six miles distant.
His object was to interrupt some tory com-
panies, which he understood were about join-
ing the royalist forces. His orders were to
march before dawn from the spot; and this
224 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

was done with such silence, that an officer
named Manning, on awakening at daylight,
found himself entirely deserted, with the ex-
ception of an orderly soldier, who was fast
asleep ona portmanteau. This man he roused
up, and mounting immediately, they rode rapid-
ly to the forks, intending to overtake his regi-
ment. Both roads appearing equally travel-
led, he took the wrong one.

At a short distance down it, he saw a log
hut, before which a rifleman was standing as
sentinel. He went up to him, and asked, if
he had seen a body of troops pass within the
hour. “Oho!” said the fellow, who was one
of the tories, “so you are one of Greene’s
men, are you!” These words emptied the hut,
and Manning found himself surrounded by his
enemies. “ Hush, you fool,” answered he, to
the sentinel, “I have got that in yonder port-
manteau,” pointing to the one carried by the
soldier, “which will ruin Greene. So hold
your tongue, and show me the way to Corn-
wallis’s army, that I may lay the papers before
him.” “Well done for an honest fellow,” cried
a dozen voices ; “ you have left the rebels in
good time. Colonel Pyle will raise the set-
tlement to-night, and Tarleton is to meet us
and conduct us to the English army; so your
neck is well out of the noose. Yonder is the
road, and one of us will go with you, lest
you lose it.” “By no means,” said Manning,
“that will double the risk. If the rebels
ANECDOTES OF ''HE REVOLUTION. 225

should meet us, they will hang me for a de-
serter, and you for leading me to Cornwal-
lis.”
This caution had the desired effect, and af-
ter riding a short distance towards the Eng-
lish camp, Manning cut across the country,
gained the right road, and overtaking Lee, in-
formed him of the intended meeting of the
tories. It is almost needless to say, that their
night meeting was a fatal one. e was up-
on them, and before morning had destroyed
and made prisoners the greatest part of them.



THE RELIGIOUS FEELING OF THE REVOLUTION.

The men of ’76, I am firmly persuaded,
when compared with any other body of men
who have brought about important political
changes, will appear eminent for general pu-
rity of character, for the absence of egotism
in all its shapes, for a self-renouncing love of
country, and for that deep sense of religion
which lies at the bottom of all really noble
qualities. In illustration of this, I will men-
tion an incident in the life of one of them,
who is scarcely known out of his own state,
and far too little in it.

The governor of Virginia, at the time of
the siege of Yorktown, was a gentleman who,
at the commencement of the revolutionary
226 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

struggle, possessed, in addition to other advan-
tages, the largest fortune in that then wealthy
colony. He not only took his part in the or-
dinary dangers of that era, he not only peril-
led his life in the high places of the field, but
he likewise laid his ample fortune as an offer-
ing on the altar of his country. The close of
the war left that country free, and him im-
poverished and contented. This forgetfulness
of self, this loftiness of spirit, was not the char-
acteristic of a few distinguished men, it was
the temper of the people at that day. The
common soldiers marching to battle, might be
tracked by the blood issuing from their naked
and lacerated feet.

Duty was the watchword. There was a
fervent religious spirit existing, more than
their descendants generally understand or
acknowledge. Religion did not use the same
dialect, or wear the same garb, as at present ;
she did not make broad her phylacteries, and
enlarge the borders of her garments as at
present, but it may well be questioned whether
her principles were not as deeply seated in
the minds of men, whether her practical in-
fluence was not as powerful and happy, wheth-
er her results were not as acceptable to God,
and as profitable to man. How solemn and
how frequent are the recognitions of Divine
Providence in the public documents of that
day! Days of humiliation for national sins,
and of national thanksgivings for national
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 227

mercies, were solemnly appointed and devout-
ly observed.

I have reason to know, that during the revo-
lutionary war, Mr. Jefferson, then a member
of the house of delegates of Virginia, from
the county of Albemarle, wrote to the minis-
ter of the parish in that county, urging upon
him the most solemn observance of a fast,
then recently appointed by the Legislature.
This proves either that ‘Mr. Jefferson’s own
sentiments on religious subjects were, at
that time, more sound than they became after
his residence in Paris, and intercourse with
the French encyclopedists, or that he knew
the strength of the religious feelings of the
people, and wished them enlisted in favor of
the cause in which he was embarked. In
either point of view it is significant.

Of this religious feeling there was a re-
markable expression in the convention which
framed our present constitution. Their de-
liberations were not proceeding happily, and
there seemed to be danger that they would
break up without effecting the object for which
they had met. Under these circumstances,
Dr. Franklin, a man not considered remarka-
ble among his cotemporaries for a devotional
spirit, rose and said, “ that he had lived a long
time, and the longer he lived the more convin-
cing proofs he saw, that God governed in the
affairs of men. He firmly believed what
was taught in the sacred writings, that except
228 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the Lord build the house, they labor in vain
who build it. That he attributed their ill suc-
cess to their not humbly applying to the Father
of Lights, to illuminate their understandings ;
and he moved that prayers, imploring the as-
sistance of heaven, and its blessing on their
deliberations, be henceforth held.”

How sublime and affecting was the sight,
when, according to his proposal, that assem-
blage of world-famous men, gallant warriors,
eminent statesmen, illustrious sages, knelt in
prayer and asked for the wisdom which they
confessed they had not. It was indeed a char-
acteristic and memorable scene. ‘Those mag-
nanimous men, that had recently braved the
fury of the most powerful monarch upon
earth, that had never feared the face of mortal,
now humbled themselves like little children,
before Almighty God, acknowledged their
weakness, and craved his fatherly help and
blessing! And shall we not believe that
they received it? Nothing could make us
doubt it, but the degeneracy of their descend-
ants. Who could now say of an American
Congress, what Lord Chatham said of the
Congress of his day, that, “compared with a
Roman senate, it deserved the preference for
dignity and for wisdom.” How bitter a sar-
casm would such an observation be, after one
of those scenes of personal altercation and
reviling which disgrace every session, and
which make the cheek of a true-hearted
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 229

American to burn with shame and indignation
when he reads them.

GENERAL PUTNAM’S ENTRANCE INTO THE ARMY.

When the intelligence of the battle of Lex-
ington, which took place on the 19th of April,
1775, reached General Putnam, he was en-
gaged in ploughing on his farm, at Brooklyn,
in Connecticut. He instantly unyoked his
cattle, left his plough standing in the unfinish-
ed furrow, in the midst of the field, and with-
out stopping to change his dress, immediately
set off for the scene of military transactions,
in the vicinity of Boston. Upon entering the
army, he was appointed to the rank of major-
general.

On the conclusion of the war, General
Washington wrote a letter to General Putnam,
in which he warmly expressed the sense he
entertained of his services. “The name of
Putnam,” says he, “is not forgotten; nor will
it be, but with that stroke of time which shall
obliterate from my mind the remembrance of
all those toils and fatigues through which we
have struggled, for the preservation and es-
tablishment of the rights, liberties, and inde-
pendence of our country.”

20
230 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

A FABLE, BY SAMUEL ADAMS.

A meeting was called in Boston, in conse-
quence of some new inroads upon the rights
and liberties of the people. Adams, who sat
silent, listening to all their violent harangues,
at last arose, and after a few remarks con-
cluded with saying,—* A Grecian philosopher,
who was lying asleep upon the grass, was
roused by the bite of some animal, upon the
palm of hishand. He closed his hand sudden-
ly, as he awoke, and found that he had caught
a field mouse. As he was examining the lit-
tle animal that had dared to attack him, it
unexpectedly bit him a second time. He drop-
ped it, and it made its escape. Now, fellow-
citizens, what think you was the reflection |
made upon this trifling cireumstance ? It was
this ; that there is no animal, however weak
and contemptible, which cannot defend its own
liberty, if it will only fight for it.”

The cause of American independence owed
much to the zeal and intrepidity of this indi-
vidual. In comparison with the politicians of
expediency and intrigue, his love of liberty, his
sincerity, his honesty, and his consistency of
character, raised him into true dignity. The
memory of this distinguished patriot is enroll-
ed among the defenders of his country, and re-

eated with gratitude and respect, by the
Samablest citizen of that state which he con-
tributed to render free.
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 231

NOBLE CONDUCT OF THE EARL OF EFFINGHAM,

When the unhappy contest broke out be-
tween Britain and American colonies, the
Earl of Effingham, who commanded the 22d
regiment, was one of those who thought and
declared that the Americans only contended
for that freedom which was their birthright.
The 22d being one of the regiments which
were afterwards destined to reduce the colo-
nies to obedience by force of arms, his lord-
ship had no alternative, but either to resign
his command, or take the field against his
principles. The choice could not be for a
moment doubtful. His lordship sent in a re-
signation, characterized by his own eloquent
integrity. The king was so well convinced
of the conscientious motives of Lord Effingham,
that, while he regretted the loss of his servi-
ces, he was pleased to declare, that he should
not lose the benefit of his rank upon any fu-
ture occasion.

In a subsequent debate in the house of lords,
alluding to his resignation, he thus feelingly
expresses himself: “ Ever since I was at an
age to have any ambition at all, my highest
has been to serve my country in a military
capacity. If there was on earth an event [
dreaded, it was to see this country so situated,
as to make that profession incompatible with
my duty as a citizen. That period is, in my
232 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

opinion, arrived ; and I have thought myself
bound to relinquish all the hopes | had form-
ed, by a resignation ; which appeared to me
as the only method of avoiding the guilt of
enslaving my country, and imbruing my hands
in the blood of her sons.”

DE KALB’S ACCOUNT OF HIS FAMILY.

His excellency, Horatio Gates, was the
commander-in-chief; but as he had not yet
arrived, the command rested on that brave
old German general, the Baron de Kalb.
Colonel Semp introduced us in very flattering
terms; styling us “continental colonels, and
two of the wealthiest and most distinguished
patriots of South Carolina !”

I shall never forget what I felt when intro-
duced to this gentleman. He appeared to be
rather elderly ; but though the snow of win-
ter was on his locks, his cheeks were still red-
dened over with the bloom of spring. His
person was large and manly, above the com-
mon size, with great nerve and activity ; while
his fine blue eyes beamed with the mild radi-
ance of intelligence and goodness.

He received us with great politeness, say-
ing, “I am glad to see you; especially as you
are the first Carolinians that I have seen,
which has not a little surprised me. I thought
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION, 233

that British tyranny would have sent great
numbers from South Carolina to join our
arms; but so far from it, we are told they are
all running to take British protection. Surely,
they are not already tired of fighting for li
erty.”

oj assure you, sir,” replied Colonel Marion,
“that though kept under by fear, they still
mortally hate the British ; and will, I am
confident, the moment they see an army of
friends at their doors, fly to their standard, like
a generous pack to the sound of the hunting
horn.”

“| trust it will prove so,” answered De Kalb.
After some general conversation, while we
were comfortably enveloped in fragrant clouds
of tobacco smoke, he said to Colonel Marion,
“Can you answer me one question ?”

“ A thousand, most gladly, if I can, general.”

“ Well, colonel, can you tell me my age ?”

“ Why, truly, that is a hard question, gen-
eral.”

“ A hard question! How do you make that
out ?”

“ Why, sir,” replied Marion, “ there is a
strange January and May sort of contrast be-
tween your locks and your looks, that quite
confuses me. By your locks you seem to be in
the winter, by your looks in the summer of your
days. You may be about forty.”

“ Good heavens! no more than forty ?”

“ Not a day more, upon a soldier's honor.”

20*
234 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

“Ha! ha! ha!—Well, colonel, I would not
for a thousand guineas that your riflemen shot
as wide of the mark, as you guess. Forty-
two years I have been in the service of the
king of France ; and I am now sixty-three.”

“ Impossible !” we both exclaimed at once.
“Such youthful bloom at sixty-three !”

“If you are surprised at my looks, gentle-
men, what would you have thought, to have
seen my father, at the age of eighty-seven !”

“Is your father yet alive, general ?”

“ Alive! yes, thank God; and I trust he
will be for many a good year yet to come.
The very christmas before | sailed for Ameri-
ca, I went to see him. It was full three hun-
dred miles from Paris. On arriving at the
house, I found my dear old mother at her
wheel, in her eighty-third year, while one of
her great-granddaughters carded the wool,
and sung a hymn for her. Soon as the first
transport of meeting was over, I eagerly in-
quired for my father. ‘ Do not be uneasy, my
son, said she; ‘your father has only gone to
the woods with his three great-grandchildren,
to cut some fuel for the fire, and they will all
be here presently.’

Ina short time I heard them coming. My
father was the foremost, with his axe under his
arm, and a stout billet of wood on his shoul-
der; and the children, each with his little
load, staggering along, and prattling to my
father with all their might. Be assured, gen-
“ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 235

tlemen, it was a most delicious moment to me ;
thus, after a long absence, to meet a beloved
father, not only alive, but enjoying health and
dear domestic happiness above the lot of kings.
Also to see the two extremes of human life,
youth and age, thus sweetly meeting and min-
gling in that cordial love, which turns the cot-
tage into a paradise.”

While telling this story of his aged father,
the general’s fine countenance caught an ani-
mation which perfectly charmed us all.

—__—_——

GEN. MARION’S ADDRESS TO HIS SOLDIERS.

After the destruction of the American army
at Camden, Colonel Marion, with his little
band of volunteer troops, being in the imme-
diate neighborhood, were in imminent danger.
When he heard the dreadful tidings of defeat,
he retreated to the woods, and ordering his
company to halt and form, he addressed them
as follows. “Gentlemen, you are aware of
our situation—so widely different from what
it once was. Once we were a happy people !
Liberty shone upon our land, bright as the
sun that gilds yon fields; and we and our fa-
thers rejoiced in its beams, as gay as the birds
that enliven our forests.

« But, alas ! those golden days have fled, and
the clouds of war now hang dark and lower-
236 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

ing above our heads. Our once peaceful land
is filled with uproar and death. Foreign ruf-
fians invade our very firesides and altars, and
leave us no alternative but slavery or death.
Two gallant armies have marched to our as-
sistance, but both are lost. That under Gen-
eral Lincoln, duped and butchered at Savan-
nah; and that under General Gates, impru-
dently overmarched, is now cut up at Camden.
Thus all our hopes from the north are at an
end ; and poor Carolina is left to fight for her-
self. A sad alternative indeed, when her own
children are madly uniting with the enemy,
and not one in a thousand will rise to take her
part.

“My countrymen! I wish to know your
minds on this momentous subject. As for my-
self, I consider my life as but a moment ; and
to fill that moment with duty, is my all. To
guard this innocent country from the evils of
slavery, now seems my greatest duty: and I
am therefore determined that while | live she
shall never be enslaved. She may come to
that wretched state,—but these eyes shall never
behold it. She shall never clank her chains in
my eyes, and pointing to the ignominious badge,
exclaim, ‘ Jt was your cowardice that brought
me to this.’”

One and all, they answered, “ We will con-
quer for our country, or die with you !”

“Then, my brave friends,” said he, “ draw
your swords! Now for a circle, emblematical
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 237

of our eternal union ; and pointing your blades
to heaven, the bright throne of Him who made
us free, swear you will never be the slaves of
Britain!” It was all devoutly done.

The reader will be pleased to hear that this
brave man rose to a high rank in the army,
and lived to enjoy the peace and prosperit
of the country he so ably defended. His wife
survived him ; and as long as she was able to
ride, the poor people of Carolina used to press
round her carriage, and bless her, as they ex-
claimed, “ That is the widow of our glorious
old Marion |”

REV. THOMAS ALLEN.

Rev. Thomas Allen was the first minister
of Pittsfield. When the American revolution
commenced, he, like the great body of the
clergy, ardently espoused the cause of the
oppressed colonies, and bore his testimony
against the oppression of the mother country.
When, in anticipation of the conflict which
finally took place at Bennington, the neighbor-
ing country was roused to arms, he used his
influence to increase the band of patriots, by
exciting his townsmen to proceed to the bat-
tle ground. A company was raised in his
parish, and proceeded. Some causes, however,
were found to retard their progress on the
238 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

way. Hearing of the delay, he proceeded im-
mediately to join them, by his influence*quick-
ened their march, and soon presented them to
Gen. Stark.

Learning from him that he meditated an at-
tack on the enemy, he said he would fight,
but could not willingly bear arms against
them, until he had invited them to submit.
He was insensible to fear, and accordingly
proceeded so near as to make himself distinct-
ly heard in their camp, where, after taking a
stand on a convenient eminence, he com-
menced his pious exhortations, urging them to
lay down their arms. He was answered by a
volley of musketry, which lodged their con-
tents in the log on which he stood. Turning
calmly to a friend who had followed him un-
der cover of the breast-work which formed
his footstool, he said—* Now give me a gun ;”
and this is said to be the first American gun
which spoke on that memorable occasion. He
continued to bear his part till the battle was
decided in favor of the American arms, and
contributed honorably to that result.

—_——-

THE AMERICAN SOLDIER.

In the battle of , Colonel Jesup, sus-
pecting that his troops had expended nearly
all their cartridges, passed along the rear of


ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 239

the line, to make inquiry as to the fact. Sev-
eral soldiers who lay mortally wounded, some
of them actually in the agonies of death, hear-
ing the inquiry, forgot for a moment, in their
devotion to their country, both the pain they
endured and the approach of death, and call-
ed out, each one for himself, “ Here are car-
tridges in my box—take and distribute them
among my companions.”

A soldier in the line exclaimed to his com-
mander, “ My musket is shot to pieces.” —His
comrade, who lay expiring with his wounds at
the distance of a few feet, replied, in a voice
scarcely audible, “ My musket is in excellent
order—take and use her.”

It is no extravagance to assert, that an army
of such men, commanded by officers of corre-
sponding merit, is literally invincible.

—_——_

BENEDICT ARNOLD, THE TRAITOR.

Everybody knows, we presume, that Bene-
dict Arnold was the object of scorn and con-
tempt in England, after his treachery, and
that he was often grossly insulted in that
country. The following anecdote, however,
may be new to some of our readers.

Shortly after the peace of ’83, Arnold was
presented at court. While the king was con-
versing with him, Lord Balcarras, a stately
240 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

old nobleman, who had fought under Gen.
Burgoyne in the campaigns of America, was
presented. The king introduced them with,

“ Lord Balearras—Gen. Arnold.”

“What, sire,” said the haughty old earl,
drawing up his lofty form, “the traitor Ar-
nold!” and refused to give him his hand.

The consequence, as may be anticipated,
was a challenge from Arnold. They met, and
it was arranged that the parties should fire
together. At the signal, Arnold fired; but
Lord Balcarras, throwing down his pistol,
turned on his heel, and was walking away,
when Arnold exclaimed,

“ Why don’t you fire, my lord ?”

« Sir,’ said Lord B., looking over his shoul-
der, “1 leave you to the executioner.”

—_—_———

GEN. ANDREW PICKENS.

In September, 1776, General Andrew Pick-
ens, being then a major, belonged to an army
of two thousand men, composed of regulars
and militia, commanded by Colonel William-
son, which was sent on an expedition against
the Cherokees, who had been instigated by
British emissaries to wage a war of extermi-
nation against the frontier inhabitants of the
country, now composing Abbeville, Laurens,
and Spartanburgh districts. When this army
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 241

had eee into the Indian country, as far
as the upper part of what is now Pickens
District, it was halted for a day or two, either
for rest or to gain intelligence.

During this time, Major Pickens obtained
permission to take twenty-five choice men, to
scout and reconnoitre the adjacent country.
He had not proceeded more than two miles,
when early in the morning, after crossing a
stream, now called Little River, in passing
through an old Indian field, along the margin
of the stream, which was covered with a thick
grass, four or five feet high, more than two
hundred Indians, painted for war in the most
hideous manner, were seen rushing down the
point of a ridge, directly upon them, with
their guns swinging in their left hands, and
their tomahawks raised in their right ; their
leader animating and exhortirg them not to
fire a gun, but to tomahawk the white men,
for they were but a handful. ‘

Brennan, a half-breed, was one of the
twenty-five, and he understanding them, told
what they said. Major Pickens and all his
party were on foot, and he, as well as every
other, had his trusty rifle. He ordered his men
not to fire until he did, to take deliberate aim,
and fire two at a time in succession, and to
fall in the grass and load. Brennan was by
his side in front, and when the Indian chief
approached within about twenty-five yards,
he and Brennan fired, and two Indians fell ;

21
242 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the fire of his other men was in succession,
as directed, and equally effective.

This invincible firmness, in so small a band,
astonished and struck terror into the savage
ranks, and they immediately recoiled upon
each other, dropped their tomahawks, and re-
sorting to their guns, gradually fell back, and
were picked out at leisure by the steady and
unerring aim of this small band of firm mi-
litia. After the first or second fire, Brennan
was shot down. But few were killed or
wounded of the whites; if they had not been
brave men and true, not one would have es-
caped. Major Pickens, in loading in a hurry,
soon choked his gun, when he picked up
Brennan’s, and continued to use it while the
Indians were in reach. How many of them
were killed, could not be known, as the In-
dians, in those times, always carried off their
dead, whenever they could, to prevent their
enemies from acquiring their savage trophy,
the scalp; but it was believed a great number
were killed, in proportion to the number of
combatants opposed to them.

During the action, one of the men observed
that there was a constant firing from behind
a tree-root, and watching his opportunity
when its occupant had to expose Himself to
take aim, shot him in the head ; and when one
of his comrades had taken up the dead body,
and was making off with :., shot him also,
with as much coolness, as if he was shooting
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 243

at a target, and they fell one upon the other.
The firing was heard at Williamson’s cam

when Major Pickens’ youngest brother, Joseph,
(killed at the siege of ’96,) who was a captain,
immediately summoned his followers, and
hastened to his brother’s assistance. But be-
fore he could reach him, the Indians were
beaten back, and dispersing, and fleeing to
the neighboring mountains, Captain Pick-
ens was a man of great animation and zeal,
and was often bold and loud in his abuse and
crimination of men, who were tardy in their
movements for the deliverance of his brother,
accusing them of cowardice ; but Major Pick-
ens pacified and rebuked him for his warmth.”



GENERAL STUART.

General Stuart, of Maryland, who served at
Eutaw, as a lieutenant, under Colonel Wm.
Washington, and who in the action was se-
verely wounded, being recently called upon to
read the Declaration of Independence, before
a numerous assemblage of citizens, celebra-
ting the birth-day of our liberty, appeared in
full military costume, fashioned according to
the times in which he served.

A friend familiarly commenting on the sin-
gularity of his appearance, and the improved
style of modern military dress, drew from him
244 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

the following observations :—“ Our regiment-
als, in former days, were fashioned according
to the exigencies of the times, and were
made more for use than show. I admire the
ancient garb exceedingly, and but for the death
of my venerated mother, should this day have
appeared before the public clad in the very
waistcoat I had on when shot through the
body at Eutaw.

“The good lady regarded it as a trophy, and
earnestly requested that at her death | would
allow her the privilege of carrying it with her
to the tomb. I was sensible how much the
affectionate feeling of parental love glowed in
her bosom, and of the pride she felt that I had
bled in my country’s service. To have denied
her request, would have evinced an insensibili-
ty which I could never experience. Consent,
on my part, was instantaneous and decided,
and she actually wore the waistcoat in ques-
tion beneath the shroud in which she was in-
terred.”

LA FAYETTE AND AN OLD SOLDIER, AT MONTGOMERY.

When on his last visit to America, while at
Montgomery, in the state of Alabama, he
was visited by a veteran who had served un-
der him in many battles, whom he immediate-
ly recognised as an orderly and most gallant
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 245

soldier. After much interesting and familiar
conversation, the old man said, “ There is one
thing, general, which it puzzles me to account
for—when we served together, I believed my-
self to be the youngest man of the two. But
my locks are now perfectly gray, and you do
not appear to have a gray hair in your head.”
“ My good friend,” replied the general, “you
are altogether in error, the advantage is to-
tally on your side. The hair of your head is
gray—while I cannot boast a single hair on
my head—I wear a wig !”

—_—_——

RED JACKET.

It happened during the revolutionary war,
that a treaty was held with the Indians, at
which La Fayette was present. The object
was to unite the various tribes in amity with
America. The majority of the chiefs were
friendly, but there was much opposition made
to it, more especially by a young warrior, who
declared that when an alliance was entered
into with America, he should consider the sun
of his country as set forever.

In his travels through the Indian country,
when lately in America, it happened at a large
assemblage of chiefs, that La Fayette referred
to the treaty in question, and turning to Red
Jacket, said, “ Pray tell me, if you can, what

21*
246 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

has become of that daring youth, who so de-
cidedly opposed all our propositions for peace
and amity? Does he still live—and what is
his condition ?” “I myself am the man,” re-
plied Red Jacket, “ the decided enemy of the
‘Americans, as long as the hope of opposing
them with success remained, but now their
true and faithful ally until death.”



THE RETORT COURTEOUS.

The first American vessel that anchored in
the river Thames, after the conclusion of the
revolutionary war, attracted great numbers to
view the stars and stripes in her colors. A
British soldier hailed, in a contemptuous tone,
“From whence came ye, brother Jonathan ?”
The boatswain immediately retorted, “ Straight
from Bunker’s Hill and Yorktown :—do you
understand 1”



THE BEST ROAD IN AMERICA.

A Bostonian, shortly after the conclusion
of the revolutionary war, met a British officer
at a coffee-house in the city of London, when
the conversation turned on America. The son
of Mars observed, that there was nothing in
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 247

America like St. James’ Park. “Oh yes,” said
the Yankee, “ we have as fine a common, and
as elegant a mall in Boston, as any you can
boast of, P’ll assure you.” “ Well,” asked the
other, “is the country thickly inhabited, and
have you good roads ?”, “Yes.” “ Well, which
do you call the best?” “ Why,” replied the
American, “ we reckon the road leading from
Saratoga in New York, to Yorktown in Vir-
ginia, the best road in America.” No further
inquiries on the subject were made.

BRITISH INGRATITUDE,

A British frigate sailing up Delaware
in the spring of 1777, descried a vessel mak-
ing towards them as if they had been friends,
which, when within reach of the frigate’s
guns, obeyed the signal and came to. She
was the schooner Raven, of Nantucket, com-
manded by Capt. Jenkins, a Quaker. Scarce-
ly had the British officer, with the boat’s crew,
boarded and taken possession of the Raven,
when the frigate struck on the Brandywine
shoals. Every means was resorted to, to
lighten her and get her off';*the water was
started from the butts of the upper tier, and it
was proposed to throw the guns overboard.

In this extremity, the boat’s crew returned
on board the frigate, where their presence
248 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

was required ; the officer only remaining on
board of the prize. Jenkins, the master of
the schooner, a powerful man, raised the prize-
master in his arms, and held him up, as if he
had been an infant: “Friend,” said he, “I
have only to throw thee overboard, and re-
turn to Philadelphia ; but I will not take ad-
vantage of thy distress. I will go on board
the frigate, and act the part of a friend, by
using my best endeavors to free her of her
peril.” He went, and by his assistance and
intelligence, the frigate was once more brought
into deep water; which, without his aid,
could not have been accomplished.

Captain Jenkins was a man of an uncom-
monly large stature and athletic make ; but
mild and gentle in his deportment. He dis-
played feats of strength on board the frigate,
which entitled him to a place in the foremost
rank of those whose surprising muscular pow-
ers have acquired them celebrity. Coffin, the
mate, possessed a more vigorous mind, and of
the two, was the most interesting. This man,
without money in his pocket, had landed in
Boston, in his early youth, and penetrating in-
to the interior, Sada several years among
the Indian tribes of both Americas, studying
their manners, and conforming himself to their
usages. He had visited the greater portion
of those tribes; and his details respecting
them, and what he had seen besides, were a
constant fund of entertainment to his ene-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 249

mies, while he, as a prisoner, was pining in-
wardly of griefs. He wore an air of tranquil
content, and stifled his sorrows in the efforts
he made to contribute to their amusement.

Their schooner had been to Philadelphia
with a cargo of dried fish, and was returning
with a lading of flour, then much wanted at
Nantucket, which is too barren to raise corn.
Friend Jenkins, in the simplicity of his heart,
supposed that he had merely to relate his art-
less tale, of the necessities of his fellow-
islanders, when he would be allowed to pro-
ceed. He did not remind them of the services
he had rendered ; nor did they think, that but
for him, they would have been obliged to be
contented with the scanty accommodations of
a few small boats. The schooner was old and
crazy, and would bring little or nothing in
New York, already glutted with prizes of this
description ; and the gift would have been of
minor importance, even with the addition of a
part of her cargo, if a feeling of gratitude had
existed in their minds.

But the barbarous usages of war ordered it
otherwise. She had carried a supply to an
enemy's port, and was to be delivered over to
the court of vice-admiralty at New York.
The captain and crew were confined as pris-
oners of war; and before the frigate returned
from her next cruise, were all swept off by
the contagious fever, which then raged in the
jail of New York !
250 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

MRS. M’KAY AND COLONEL BROWN.

In the beginning of June, 1781, the British
garrison at Augusta, Georgia, capitulated to
the American forces, under the command of
Gen. Pickens and Col. H. Lee, of the partisan
legion: Col. Grierson, who was obnoxious to
the Americans, on account of his barbarities,
was shot down by an unknown hand, after he
was a prisoner. A reward of one hundred
guineas was offered to any person who would

oint out the offender, but in vain. Colonel
Rees the British commander, expecting the
same fate, conscious that he deserved it, from
his unrelenting and vindictive disposition to-
wards the Americans, was furnished with a
guard, although he had hanged thirteen Ameri-
can prisoners, and had given others into the
hands of the Indians to be tortured. On his
way to Savannah, he passed through the set-
tlements where he had burnt a number of
houses, and hung some of the relations of the
inhabitants.

At Silverbluff, Mrs. M’Kay obtained leave
of the American officer, who commanded his
safeguard, to speak to him; when she thus
addressed him: “ Colonel Brown, in the late
day of your prosperity, I visited your camp,
and on my knees supplicated for the life of my
only son; but you were deaf to my entreaties,
you hanged him, though a beardless youth, be-
ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION. 251

fore my face. These eyes have seen him
scalped by the savages under your immediate
command, and for no better reason than that
his name was M’Kay. As you are now a
prisoner to the leaders of my country, for the
present I lay aside all thoughts of revenge;
but when you resume your sword, I will go
five hundred miles to demand satisfaction at
the point of it, for the murder of my son !”

———__

YANKEE INDIGNATION,

When Arnold’s treason was known at Phil-
adelphia, an artist of that cit constructed an
effigy of him, large as life, an seated in a cart,
with a figure of the devil at his elbow, hold-
ing a lantern up to the face of the traitor, to
show him to the people, having his name and
crime in capital letters. The cart was para-
ded the whole evening through the streets of
the city, with drums and fifes playing the
rogue’s march, with other marks of infamy,
and was attended by a vast concourse of peo-
ple.

The effigy was finally hanged for want of
the original, and then committed to the flames
Yet this is the man on whom the British be-
stowed ten thousand pounds sterling, as the
price of his treason, and appointed to the rank
of brigadier-general in their service. It could
252 ANECDOTES OF THE REVOLUTION.

scarcely be imagined that there was an officer
of honor left in that army, who would debase
himself and his commission by serving under
or ranking with Benedict Arnold |

—__

MAGNANIMITY OF M. DE BOUILLE.

While M. de Bouille was commandant gen-
eral of the French West India Islands, during
the American revolution, a British transport
was cast away on one of them, which had on
board several hundred men; who being in a
most deplorable situation, supplicated the mar-
quis for relief, and to make them prisoners of
war. “No,” replied the general, “the king
my master does not make war with the ele-
ments. Had you been taken in battle, you
should remain his prisoners ; but your case is
otherwise. I have ordered you clothing and
refreshments, and directed a ship to be got
ready to transport you to the dominions of
your sovereign.”

THE END.



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'2012-03-31T16:14:06-04:00'
describe
'4547' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBR' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
65aabed6a9ff99d32527d833b49c8814
a19c9010584f58794b64b6ecf3fb3b95d31719aa
'2012-03-31T16:08:50-04:00'
describe
'130881' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBS' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
999d08a1e341e135a713395ac9dec6d9
18c434662237f2c9b9b578148532228ae1b139ae
'2012-03-31T16:17:09-04:00'
describe
'54175' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBT' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
aa6517858faa6454bc334f4a328fbde0
47b0e31b4ea4e27aa0872861345e771bed14ff24
'2012-03-31T16:12:14-04:00'
describe
'9301' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBU' 'sip-files00002.pro'
50430c57adc141c03196b8c1737eeec9
1ee1b2a54099caec489e3efde52724d2936e445c
'2012-03-31T16:16:53-04:00'
describe
'33906' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBV' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
3837edecb32ad6c0dd631a93f45cb3db
17a1e75af276a067090931fa9d1046b513219ca5
'2012-03-31T16:12:51-04:00'
describe
'1734612' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBW' 'sip-files00002.tif'
a2408047fa7b2178c270336d96eb1e95
0b2672df7f0eb91fda0b8a1506fb498c6df24e7d
'2012-03-31T16:12:07-04:00'
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBX' 'sip-files00002.txt'
10130603d52fa3d474a66eebdf9908db
ef047b778448885d6f361a007efe31a2ae77d313
'2012-03-31T16:11:20-04:00'
describe
'25384' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBY' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
888240c6dbd2648a71b536ba1a5c2a03
2871403bd860fa1296cc59a229c496be0a4edd16
'2012-03-31T16:13:07-04:00'
describe
'57971' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBBZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
d93d33d464c9bc9928995eb5e71b5390
14860a8fbd7b9a150db937066833d0634fcc4bf2
'2012-03-31T16:08:49-04:00'
describe
'35462' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCA' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
5d49e0bbc3e4ab0774756104d1d963b8
c5baa1e994e9a1c6fd7d2fa280469907d95987dc
'2012-03-31T16:09:19-04:00'
describe
'5752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCB' 'sip-files00003.pro'
b1e93897c188aba4669fcb43f87834a0
ed6be07abc0463292ec87b0bc693811bec107c59
'2012-03-31T16:11:36-04:00'
describe
'25481' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCC' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
3f012e4630e3f101eeb2db5300dcdd30
43fafec1e429c1311fcea848272f42ae1177e2aa
'2012-03-31T16:10:32-04:00'
describe
'1703996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCD' 'sip-files00003.tif'
c289241128217bbcfed6ea04fc72df3c
c7d4d0afd1bafc37a7eb6f89539f7a1e05fe370f
'2012-03-31T16:11:22-04:00'
describe
'363' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCE' 'sip-files00003.txt'
04befb77369b2038d065e5098d76f0a9
7a6771fd4ef332655299e0735f1a710c627e7938
'2012-03-31T16:15:45-04:00'
describe
'21345' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCF' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
3902e7327ec4e3e30c9b34b230217a5a
908fb8a9220dab0ce78cb32018289bf082cae9fd
'2012-03-31T16:12:24-04:00'
describe
'220956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCG' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
f8e3d54a406ee79e2b937889ec21a8e3
2b8dc1ec3c8621ffb38989be50096bf3f924321b
'2012-03-31T16:16:23-04:00'
describe
'101692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCH' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
1e4df32a8a221a3e68de925ea5a0ab48
3c5a2a68c25a399016e18a9149229bde4851ea1b
'2012-03-31T16:15:34-04:00'
describe
'41262' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCI' 'sip-files00004.pro'
bf385841de8591c1cb55ad4bdf73afa5
534447553181402e597183600fd8ac3eb32d5eec
'2012-03-31T16:08:53-04:00'
describe
'54606' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCJ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
b879f798dc7fd614191629a3e84986a4
709759bbdd3a49627fd1f50d4a46fc5f36780674
'2012-03-31T16:14:30-04:00'
describe
'1789224' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCK' 'sip-files00004.tif'
2bd95506f8f8fc2c1bf8c886da2545dc
078b38b866abc2a1b2a98e67b198c01bf13d173e
describe
'1874' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCL' 'sip-files00004.txt'
e13c9f08c5d8f0b7eeeeb5702c6c0dc6
c6735ee4ac406fd137ca8a0f4c2ec1e0ff8a8a6e
'2012-03-31T16:14:48-04:00'
describe
'33099' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCM' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
aca3c4701ce049ead3ceda11cef7c816
45bca0cf03a0632df9c2eb92f5a659b4e95db626
'2012-03-31T16:12:31-04:00'
describe
'223221' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCN' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
38e25a4648c6989c8c2072e16252dfe3
1f07f119dfb256ef8e84dacc358de37f008e3eb6
'2012-03-31T16:14:16-04:00'
describe
'117849' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCO' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
2e9332f269328946eec837d72994df65
798b1332bf5456ab8c5d687a858257fef8eee05e
'2012-03-31T16:14:37-04:00'
describe
'48361' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCP' 'sip-files00005.pro'
c455a5e12ccfecfa2bad01c1a9bc721e
fc9121848c459c305e5b8ab21c5c4e93cd29bb58
'2012-03-31T16:12:10-04:00'
describe
'61106' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCQ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
ed453d22bbf8d36374a178094cd212db
7d0e77ec71d7f16d67fbd1d0c7518aeab798a463
'2012-03-31T16:14:39-04:00'
describe
'1808424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCR' 'sip-files00005.tif'
396a6ec201e6ad8714cbe149e0c89739
d040e2fffdd6c1621badc750ebebad071a6552b3
'2012-03-31T16:12:08-04:00'
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCS' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5e124814543bf30ee4b0d12caf83d88f
0f3c50f8efdda4e14ebf45b089a301de5ceca14b
'2012-03-31T16:15:13-04:00'
describe
'36079' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCT' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
c2e8feba9eb4565cb2da4bfff90b38a8
ba605d3060a5e705d22684485f32e92497ed33ab
'2012-03-31T16:11:50-04:00'
describe
'217852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCU' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
5e50dbff9265310175fbb5824ebfbec6
715f7081927259d3470377978d1cc585a43a1c7e
'2012-03-31T16:15:19-04:00'
describe
'125474' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCV' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
bb034e883b2a5e770ab792b8a75a5abb
cfd517f2057e6c964d886c136a3c9fa8bbdb29d0
'2012-03-31T16:09:34-04:00'
describe
'49588' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCW' 'sip-files00006.pro'
ec9867fc1c8f6a59a79ad47df17884bd
6d26fff9c83644ee06daecec2a4cbf264e071ba6
'2012-03-31T16:13:33-04:00'
describe
'62606' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCX' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
cf22595520efd78900b31dea3373e9b7
2df6ab13af29821ba1f574a26260c7fe00ee1eca
'2012-03-31T16:15:37-04:00'
describe
'1765720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCY' 'sip-files00006.tif'
a898ea46150faa13a677a536a0f03e59
cbcb0bdcec79698f793b4da1f6cbd763347268d8
'2012-03-31T16:13:39-04:00'
describe
'2289' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBCZ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
70bcc545aeb0d2fa5822f30c2e3eaa41
5334c731045f02a1133f3d6e400cf9c9e04ba15d
'2012-03-31T16:16:12-04:00'
describe
'37039' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDA' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
ede8010aef0d9147295b987e2e3f90f4
7f67fc587d19c4bf5268aaf7b01335b0d1b971c7
'2012-03-31T16:15:16-04:00'
describe
'217698' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDB' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
800da37898cac6f38b8901bc5982a1af
73ea747be84d1d27f6a2ad286876686241bacd38
'2012-03-31T16:10:28-04:00'
describe
'104033' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDC' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
f0afe1662178c971215883a8aba88840
967460c1caace4c2daff8c103b68a0fc6cb9d28e
'2012-03-31T16:15:30-04:00'
describe
'40616' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
0f6e5e1913b8c17053458e20fca1c49d
deddcc0458d6c8dee3664dda54a8b77b5725f050
'2012-03-31T16:10:06-04:00'
describe
'55355' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
91a0fb27542b370139203057e775dd81
e05bfa4dd2a5e085984c0e5a17c5008ab4c45c45
'2012-03-31T16:10:31-04:00'
describe
'1763232' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDF' 'sip-files00007.tif'
c629fc9c6b17c2a0d5a41dc064708694
e3a3cadf4532ee69a7a620b7568ccbcd73b99ef8
'2012-03-31T16:13:48-04:00'
describe
'1928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDG' 'sip-files00007.txt'
3e3c32cccf68a9385e1e7a352369f0ae
d69ed258c466029d9613514161ad752b72505c6c
'2012-03-31T16:09:40-04:00'
describe
'33017' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDH' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
7c0eb3d4c37290665f252f6768279493
f24cac2d629f75a19701cf3715d4bec155bd28ae
'2012-03-31T16:08:37-04:00'
describe
'216224' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
eb2d8f6b76a74c6e6dbc2e0a7c030664
930aace6683f32cad6ff56f6e37a04175dae83ae
describe
'124362' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1070845b6d8a67ab7b41047e25f34982
d84c1f10827c488c381de185e7ce51e2164e7da7
'2012-03-31T16:12:00-04:00'
describe
'34077' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDK' 'sip-files00008.pro'
e155774cabeb25f37ac24b6071191070
4603eb956b382bdbaa7bf54628de8c694e11ed52
describe
'61601' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDL' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
163fadf69177dea82f1c44134a2dbe8b
d3d2b6b8006c3b3749c6d41b585b71f10710e2a0
'2012-03-31T16:14:54-04:00'
describe
'1751732' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDM' 'sip-files00008.tif'
9f60dd652fa04fa6447599acbcf9e81f
6c01b8c424039c0ad618b4ec472944a3ba23abe6
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDN' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e71fb4c4b46fd4295c8b38a2cfee1431
6362b326f052e68ccc03b1a7cfb7c7e06fa0f3d7
'2012-03-31T16:15:07-04:00'
describe
'34988' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDO' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
006c626a84d71d795d6f95633358c4e2
210602a959d4425d36fb1d3cd347e37fd66ab180
'2012-03-31T16:14:45-04:00'
describe
'217891' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e94ca9a184d072d75485c591a3b579d2
94e2fff9f9e7215882b92c719b88929c1f971f06
'2012-03-31T16:15:14-04:00'
describe
'108440' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
542b9d9aecb9d6997691c485cab47e1e
c274554ddebc25a1e1fa02a8a9ebeb44265f2df8
'2012-03-31T16:16:39-04:00'
describe
'30081' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDR' 'sip-files00009.pro'
2cac402b59dc37ebcb342f55cfdcaca0
62ac58d5633517b1f01d94a105c1979930430060
'2012-03-31T16:08:30-04:00'
describe
'56117' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDS' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
9d15c62598956160a0ad0c00547d6de9
4064e016ccf1185f1e2e793e949187fe19d82244
'2012-03-31T16:10:52-04:00'
describe
'1764816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDT' 'sip-files00009.tif'
97f7e0ae429b5288465a6cbffe63b6b0
e4244c0c6457e90f32c0d317e32596fa80a21480
'2012-03-31T16:15:57-04:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDU' 'sip-files00009.txt'
28208a289a351d7460dd00ba2e252b79
2dcaab246f3d06f970b07108181e7e3c7b058389
'2012-03-31T16:10:38-04:00'
describe
'32541' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDV' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
40fe2c48470767782d9f5e7df5b42320
e708c76bf11ea575070e6108350a260e655e9f21
'2012-03-31T16:10:43-04:00'
describe
'221152' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDW' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
dba60dcc704472adb4a5657e9041a75a
4cf9a2eded28931c1fb8fdfeb4d6d61c5bb48336
'2012-03-31T16:14:33-04:00'
describe
'121659' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
c47e91cb11134cbe3418b8461f655fd4
075a8603e4efd22b6b0da3972760c3d1add2d298
'2012-03-31T16:08:31-04:00'
describe
'32901' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDY' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e73a1740669d54d2cca432889d1083e4
a3abe74eae2dd857adebdda1d83b554b2ab48b26
'2012-03-31T16:16:09-04:00'
describe
'61045' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBDZ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ce073deb7726b3382b42ae2fc37dd764
67f371679e8131c642a78641e543e4ccab5d7669
'2012-03-31T16:09:59-04:00'
describe
'1791316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1e3e8fc0fb0859180674b45311865f39
3bed8978305b7dc9a0e97fbff02dd5cc7f31d378
'2012-03-31T16:15:02-04:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEB' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f0ab80f11fb7df46928e1de6cdf3bd9e
990de2b92095ac4b0ab2afba043b73d57c7ea8b7
'2012-03-31T16:14:09-04:00'
describe
'34341' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEC' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
00b860394d490a0df26ea014d8f31f01
47418b0718e6b3e023f10fdf55f8222efecf497c
'2012-03-31T16:09:10-04:00'
describe
'215726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBED' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ed3ff5d7401f8bc3ed2cfde673a8050b
8396d55eb07bb0e30362a58c5bc2cf7785b0ace5
describe
'138135' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6931033bf5b487a20db771ee2054a630
9cde2746e43f31b0fd7576be3785e81c3913e9fa
describe
'40956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
9c3406dbae2ae281f64938ffa996a1ab
949503b541f5d52b644da7a0493313f024d1c6b1
'2012-03-31T16:14:58-04:00'
describe
'69141' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
e7779ad654a9d15ad996a43786541c4f
a79724f9519b485e70eb9047284120826f74ca5f
'2012-03-31T16:16:28-04:00'
describe
'1748776' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
111b44b7549084eb1b92ab8129646968
cc3495bf183c9a77efe855ff3cf22940639a2aba
'2012-03-31T16:09:21-04:00'
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3c2cc9dbc903761532156b529447d5aa
e10f8c5d96784c9e1e45bf64963042df4d2ac3d6
'2012-03-31T16:13:17-04:00'
describe
'37902' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
b0a2670c8c6b2ca8bdccae35675170a6
9401291fc73847c437f0995537fe9f7c196b0eee
'2012-03-31T16:09:44-04:00'
describe
'218391' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
656f6729556ab010c0766d0f4aa1852b
60895968b3259c48b40ab5be99da95bea66bdbaa
describe
'141292' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2007a9d9d520da8c0974ff4cd271c614
ce41e6f14fe9af4866fbb19149b12f7f84e2b674
'2012-03-31T16:13:12-04:00'
describe
'41090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEM' 'sip-files00012.pro'
d0742fded31e1a6fee07c3ee7aa8479f
1c82dded38af2dc016ca844a8e7c339cc9903feb
'2012-03-31T16:10:00-04:00'
describe
'69394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEN' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5759b6e08ece6bc8b7b39575da4f7212
7555344e0bf18ae2eb8c2eda28ff866418ff2893
'2012-03-31T16:15:05-04:00'
describe
'1769952' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
5e318c39b6f37884a65abef6b504f898
bef6f4f804012def40b34268446473d7de6b232c
'2012-03-31T16:10:25-04:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEP' 'sip-files00012.txt'
2e52009d730be852b96d28b10e15cb8e
1ce72c47979d8b45b613b0c2657c98af35368968
'2012-03-31T16:09:51-04:00'
describe
'37837' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEQ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
595460259651869e7e197345e0cb3ddb
f64fdb3e9c789a388cda51e329022c713f115c88
'2012-03-31T16:15:59-04:00'
describe
'221620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBER' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
517726d1afd7e3d56b5cbed082b8b3a1
5dd993c6bbe36b83fc724b09ee0c994632d6ef2f
describe
'140672' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBES' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
18bd1dbbcc66ad3e1dc65cafc3b8ee84
8d792fd35c829083855bcf85c972c87b80792ba2
'2012-03-31T16:15:25-04:00'
describe
'41285' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBET' 'sip-files00013.pro'
ad776897994559c001b96720523a4dd9
d4cfbeb5533df3ab294e114d2aba769ed0318e59
'2012-03-31T16:14:05-04:00'
describe
'69236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEU' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
ed6db1df6999701ec4d6bc66f046eed2
8ed0af17806bb05eff8a9393b12c52fcb0ffdb67
'2012-03-31T16:15:55-04:00'
describe
'1796276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
eac64ac9ba7ae57bf686bfa3255cde1c
b4e2af9216e8de29985ace480699f93e5835e68f
'2012-03-31T16:12:23-04:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEW' 'sip-files00013.txt'
eca86500723c0603ac7e70f556fe5a2d
f7504be5658fff3985595e9ebd861cc1379a609a
'2012-03-31T16:11:18-04:00'
describe
'37928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
26006a4e9e2b4dca191f368e1e97d04e
7ba7c01ba096ac3b07739ed4863a96f76991607c
'2012-03-31T16:15:42-04:00'
describe
'221898' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
2770e99a37497b698764c4d73a2e9872
44f97873e57223ed22833e43e66a5377436a0474
'2012-03-31T16:11:41-04:00'
describe
'94770' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBEZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d6f371cc3e2b9baadda9b126fbe96665
bc6e0256ea006ca86e530829daf29547c9d3702b
'2012-03-31T16:10:19-04:00'
describe
'23991' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFA' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ed716a9ed848a1c4cc45d3b6c878be23
b69946579b75febac03b901e9f2ca08073433d94
'2012-03-31T16:09:04-04:00'
describe
'50115' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
7f5fa6aada3fa00f2e84c99a7063cc6c
3a5339e2834af491701817a699e9d857c153cf6c
'2012-03-31T16:16:45-04:00'
describe
'1796476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
80409e8326c99732a9c861191829c956
7c21a81ca666fdfdebcad5fba2a82cff47ac9587
'2012-03-31T16:13:23-04:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFD' 'sip-files00014.txt'
f8f8117ff51adfa9e3e2273ed442a953
885e317a475da16add9e804a555c578755dc07b6
describe
'30085' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFE' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
8b2ecaca5fe820ad5af2e13c8203a49a
a26d52c312e1e8529dac3edbc83910cc9f165937
'2012-03-31T16:10:21-04:00'
describe
'51106' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
07b3bfdedc5be1b88f2bf6dae5f2e6db
d3cbf64988a9f2412a45b957e52843fe544ce34f
'2012-03-31T16:09:31-04:00'
describe
'26844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
2eb65da938279147ff50c0a70b98e1f6
f3daf900cba700e221c46ff0459dfb9559978e0d
describe
'20881' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFH' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
8e47659d4b71d88d3d5c66e4090f0653
0bcd409f670ac80d5b70cea4f203956bb9ff58cc
'2012-03-31T16:13:56-04:00'
describe
'1672916' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFI' 'sip-files00015.tif'
23da3980f66403aa31caa79965cb016f
de04a2bdf7d8c468cbb8cd4d1757f4efdfac6063
'2012-03-31T16:15:39-04:00'
describe
'19412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
d82c99025fe7e767bd5c49f3b00ba968
827195cbe3278528c51aa9207d1e81f3cadc9ae4
'2012-03-31T16:16:32-04:00'
describe
'216615' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
afc186f8df45d14c7a9c36aa3c5fb934
c3d53574ab4402d4ff4036e48fb8ea7dcce6c391
'2012-03-31T16:15:41-04:00'
describe
'124988' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
77ea8d81af8c22f510328ef4a36ab371
969dc3d5af97a438654ba9fcdbce34f39d00a3d3
describe
'26476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
6a74a8e787fc31ef2d2d1bc659631f66
5bb8de61b2774f2c5593e4254a793b15a699b503
'2012-03-31T16:13:35-04:00'
describe
'61654' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
21175acc9b0c1bfc56b153cb97e087a1
87ee27d493ed45ae75fbe50564505af1aabac188
'2012-03-31T16:12:48-04:00'
describe
'1755084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
adc190c159e8b83c6b291a32fb9f8d17
f2d8501011b6730f65e0b3deab76d93be0686332
'2012-03-31T16:12:12-04:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
0dc82b45cf0180e567091a8b33ec9073
716e42306356c137082ef4447ffca9e4ebfc1804
'2012-03-31T16:09:08-04:00'
describe
'34947' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
896952b97ac3b24b82471ef02196c58f
276c1388efa77f8b8ae31e9a43e34aff8e636991
'2012-03-31T16:12:17-04:00'
describe
'219419' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
fe710026c7960b6bbed9d522452d99e4
e2417b6a02cd84b45f928f285deed4724df8b1f9
'2012-03-31T16:14:46-04:00'
describe
'154481' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
16d005485dd62a7061a05eca5e0cdf8b
21b7668bf78e3bdd08c9f7c7dde4026ac2294183
'2012-03-31T16:13:22-04:00'
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
939d7f3ec68c6277546b305865fbedd4
846f6b4fd79a75568d1d8cbe0ee9199ec67bd448
'2012-03-31T16:10:23-04:00'
describe
'75587' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
1cbe7dbf1f5a5d5a6321ec4e0fb50190
d0b5b7ed043075dc9cd9368471474aeda4914427
'2012-03-31T16:13:45-04:00'
describe
'1779456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
46f6ae3deae486c7bc5ede2ecefa1f8b
7706ce83eb59578bb9b9874ae932928bc96883d2
'2012-03-31T16:11:26-04:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
5ad31cbf3923c8e0c68d89b12336042e
c9c0d9a8331cbf0d391b5433e050f29e37a44b0b
'2012-03-31T16:17:10-04:00'
describe
'39833' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4bf59516dda2b2852ef7530e2da8425b
04a8f19de80594d363d7f6e62ea79105f5039e20
'2012-03-31T16:15:09-04:00'
describe
'217712' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2b6ed8c418b80fe58829adee1aef396a
5d6471b0acfa2fc0ee87328fae8aab01d44c40ae
'2012-03-31T16:09:33-04:00'
describe
'143780' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBFZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6645600ee02bee42bf7c67ac09c37d15
a421e8ddcd5ee97675acca0090491dd1b32a6d22
'2012-03-31T16:09:37-04:00'
describe
'32051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
666e9536080b44620696de30bb7a9af2
0481b1136c5e7a6279e4e98221deb2073b6bad81
'2012-03-31T16:14:03-04:00'
describe
'69005' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c033cc465fb327ab2c375daa83a1a3a8
0d621f4a29eb06e89dddaf973d23e4fcbdeeb9af
'2012-03-31T16:17:01-04:00'
describe
'1765136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
adc211af0570c0ae2cabf419454df1fe
3a1885d099c64b8b207fe77262c5fb573619ed3c
'2012-03-31T16:10:12-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
6764f9ff420a94dc86cf2330d2f049d7
7affd35a21bb8ad597a948b7512b315902df2392
'2012-03-31T16:16:19-04:00'
describe
'37591' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
362542fec933be401f6efa665002e85c
94d226a70080c72ed45b79ee32dd29969dcbce8b
'2012-03-31T16:12:35-04:00'
describe
'218896' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8cbd040fd8a5e26d593f7cbe80aec4f4
ab2eb83a0576f48d481e68b0f744f3b9efd11dca
'2012-03-31T16:16:30-04:00'
describe
'153644' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
7f00ef74b92797bc0d5e257404663d97
4db4d8142f372b59964362862eb0fd6272875c01
'2012-03-31T16:14:43-04:00'
describe
'36074' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0d8d2146e439f4f853670fc15ff94f1a
850ab98db195018dd5d242c339f7b869b119e288
'2012-03-31T16:10:30-04:00'
describe
'73519' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
c777f4cb7052e7f92305b11435d1c961
f7ff7876aa33507590fb6e5a6b801c6d43c3a71d
'2012-03-31T16:08:40-04:00'
describe
'1775416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
91c5a428312c1e60ed3876cc382d189b
2eef2bdc169b777a12bb7cf7fc0e6cb17dd7f33b
'2012-03-31T16:15:15-04:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
f0a8f9038aff70cda5576d493efb1969
4b7fb77fa9068146747abc4fa6ca728d31b4b976
'2012-03-31T16:10:51-04:00'
describe
'40466' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
ab36b550f9586c0f3dcd3df396c5fe89
3c0a0ff48970f6ed64138e4c660e16f7992d280f
'2012-03-31T16:13:08-04:00'
describe
'216602' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
214e2de4639ec0fa486e879c13e84935
1462dcce95e2cbb62c2b9aca19af91ad8d018a59
'2012-03-31T16:08:58-04:00'
describe
'138510' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
61a7324cda323003291a2b20e6670b20
b96faac19cd7d65eb2b300a8e379fe669af3602d
describe
'29186' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
39f2adfe6919c731baa9ea031f316112
40fcf33722b72069b331509635b3b7ed94ff1a0f
'2012-03-31T16:11:11-04:00'
describe
'67567' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
068dd5a028e4fa1fa2bf2aaf996457f3
d433be69cd1d2a91764680cbb291ac15b7f21003
'2012-03-31T16:13:10-04:00'
describe
'1755616' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
bfe196e51e1fe2caee647fb39c8f91d4
95d0edfc97c836d8044a0d90659819f9b662ed96
'2012-03-31T16:10:08-04:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
23ad9b047e879a196b2bb7db6f8cad7f
1f2ffca6d46d6503e56e008d1673c20b3450a67c
'2012-03-31T16:15:51-04:00'
describe
'37581' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5d57cced1a6c8aa6c5dc94d41be30e88
0ce282ea9c2c0c4665fc7f00ed0300e64bbd55ac
'2012-03-31T16:15:03-04:00'
describe
'217580' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
0029945957aad76586b969978ab7559a
abc1d5f1938acbae57631e5599d55249ebdb906a
describe
'153148' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
9e31a98468d5de084214a020e7174d6a
201ba2754632827a83dd777f83a1a67038f3cce8
'2012-03-31T16:09:56-04:00'
describe
'37066' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
b7be1a102273b6d19d10d78301b61e3f
cb4be966bc1ac7d5cd9a2abe0025a9c5548fdcaf
'2012-03-31T16:13:49-04:00'
describe
'73164' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e8d50dac6c6251718801d5d23145fc6e
838773e1d1c9f153039ea9e931b54ad813984682
'2012-03-31T16:09:57-04:00'
describe
'1764168' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
52efa31aca7406a4daff7f59e03cd351
98d145e0c61edd17ec05c5d960cb66dad68ea514
'2012-03-31T16:15:26-04:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e160d55b4c254a61215d9ec4e938fe37
909c1d26ef8a4de6866bb057425d5c40217577ed
'2012-03-31T16:16:49-04:00'
describe
'39980' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBGZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5755c778f70ef0901bae0155321a9356
9c6fef30361ba5c8822a0c05a169d148ff56a90b
'2012-03-31T16:12:41-04:00'
describe
'217507' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d2b5ba6cbb44ef071c8439524d7cdc65
ea181fccd58942d9831e758d61c1a6c25d62dd8b
'2012-03-31T16:11:48-04:00'
describe
'138569' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
1cec915d469b18090319e7350b970983
d17247999ca73174751989b33a7677ea4ada611b
'2012-03-31T16:10:59-04:00'
describe
'30684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
9b7e34784c17c7ec02d0bf3b690146a8
b4878b675dc292bc868caa1d28bb8b119e4d4523
'2012-03-31T16:12:56-04:00'
describe
'67940' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
82a157acf8954b5d0fbafd27438a609e
bf8d7910cc6178c61a65523e70e5c9828f7e45ca
'2012-03-31T16:09:45-04:00'
describe
'1763140' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHE' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0ee5b0ba099b1cdd5342cb8eeda7a5f1
303bb7d37a4ec60154a5e5e4f9ce99e47c4f36bd
'2012-03-31T16:12:49-04:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ccc2f4acb3c8182ea47dee096336c8af
360808b0ea6917e557f56b92147a3291ffac877c
'2012-03-31T16:08:45-04:00'
describe
'37840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
11a87456222c591d1c1b7375cfd00b2e
8dc521952da4a92e576904c777d1ae21c15e84eb
describe
'215307' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
84a4e8bd3ed623f3893595d7e061190e
49bb84fd85ada685e65b0aeda91aa1ee2aa832bb
'2012-03-31T16:11:43-04:00'
describe
'152895' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c20204b271f4b8d479e31bced66f9a70
852507cab778d2f59dc027dd8387ecfbb28adb0e
describe
'36962' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
2f0c40c48bf6239656422367626eda37
95c924fb4b2c3672fef590bc62098c84813bc0e7
'2012-03-31T16:12:28-04:00'
describe
'74087' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0522a5249d1d6d2412e1bd683e2873d7
5947a77bb25400125b162fee79e9540f7a1b1cbc
'2012-03-31T16:13:46-04:00'
describe
'1746172' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9e1a4772a19dd72d16da970602764d49
be3a15fb723c1038d71c92e7e66d6a323b078ce2
'2012-03-31T16:12:45-04:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
e1addaa63b1e062e5443a419ce4a271e
5c9cbe67dd426d846b9f9113d3793eeb7b0ced98
'2012-03-31T16:11:12-04:00'
describe
'40198' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
7b255bf9b67178ce405988a3a9e01635
02cad1fa0d324e7d4a1e693a519a15cd48ab53eb
'2012-03-31T16:10:50-04:00'
describe
'221243' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
43e58fbd0d32288fe3a0b4918dacb1ef
3c1d566db1564d3702c8c6f8c372eecc4ff89672
'2012-03-31T16:14:34-04:00'
describe
'151923' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
7c44ab4c1475c01a27321afc11da007a
1a0b8656e59d9beb93519af764f2512d6a009cec
'2012-03-31T16:08:36-04:00'
describe
'35639' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
477a3005bf7eebb432e2f5d224ad6027
01100df3bbe85db2c12517b3d75d803c42500c44
'2012-03-31T16:14:04-04:00'
describe
'73084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e73a1bd617bcd9502e8780d55ca35bd3
6a8d5390d00192a71b932c20e29f1e063edd36c5
'2012-03-31T16:13:31-04:00'
describe
'1793240' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c7ab59fa65eb0c98943e6bbaa6b9b479
0f983dc9b8d6f764fa28790cfde015db1f322953
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHT' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e57ae62362de9b730411481fb3eee53f
775c01cbb36d8b9818d8acb18174559545aef04d
'2012-03-31T16:13:21-04:00'
describe
'39150' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
e7f8ea6f761f9a93bd9f2cc46238ee72
4dabff5d96df5fc2c4ded21cbebc6db9610451b4
describe
'222321' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a18363d4e2258023d015cd4df11b61cf
ef34220b3cc7bbebc2200227f91fab37cc13373c
'2012-03-31T16:12:46-04:00'
describe
'137274' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
c71030f56c53bbd6854d0700d1c5625b
78626cb2b493f1e17484983ddedb3f030ada13d1
'2012-03-31T16:11:06-04:00'
describe
'31803' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
bfa53acdb7c3aaaa2a56c58a660bb4f0
e1ad9f62fc28fa6c0029981772fce5a0d3d1a1f5
'2012-03-31T16:16:10-04:00'
describe
'67532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
27786e40cab31c32584c337de404015a
eb6035461e9ecf52e32439eba296532cea7fe9a9
'2012-03-31T16:12:16-04:00'
describe
'1801656' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBHZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
7202a195b6acef73848c2ab4569149f2
0e49803b25672f0bd1298d7da4007fb9df6bf9e4
'2012-03-31T16:12:20-04:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fc66e163820d15a40b446d28add8061e
20e92d3ea3df4093970a9cc152443edc48ffeb4d
'2012-03-31T16:14:02-04:00'
describe
'37962' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
0eb71e09b20ecf25f44ad4d6c9454281
64968b9a78720365cc765b9574bfb90ab4915769
'2012-03-31T16:10:24-04:00'
describe
'220064' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c7bc306425dfa58cc91908ab88d13d75
f914ad78384f7b3e0ebcbbae89ed608d8f7ddb9d
'2012-03-31T16:08:52-04:00'
describe
'152820' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBID' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b6cd61c1ffc32ddb06ebbbc4e11fe65a
0e1b742ec114f7e1b218b5f2d63bcf0e868c4908
'2012-03-31T16:14:01-04:00'
describe
'36076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
5b586366a733fdeff2f5885e3222bca6
d3288ee497dce984874b396c63e41fd5dc08f041
'2012-03-31T16:09:01-04:00'
describe
'72492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
04eac7edcb75512e1b3219fede3f30eb
8cf1cc470aa831d9e8e6c666703761fb1afe03a5
'2012-03-31T16:17:17-04:00'
describe
'1784552' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
75939f3d1ceb33c098341a3575805cb0
9c132de056de7dc6ec7cdf42e5f80e809cc5756b
'2012-03-31T16:12:06-04:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
5576c65be825dd3b075e958ba76c51b5
496cfd0cd8498756d4e3d150ba1bd14fc7137678
'2012-03-31T16:11:14-04:00'
describe
'39027' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBII' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
643374612f436ae3e5a3e8dd421821f5
ee4aaecf60e234c9315be92ca837c5dee4eaecb4
describe
'221927' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
df8d230ab6a991f51abeea657870e620
36811c78de5178fdb6753f259c243ba7b41224cc
'2012-03-31T16:14:38-04:00'
describe
'142848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
de5a9d2d01f6c648cd2dadd36534fbe7
822fe59efd91ee6d5472726359c831a099b6d886
'2012-03-31T16:11:21-04:00'
describe
'32928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
b754cb80f8b1fbb153a3e7544342dfd4
e17a931e10fdc273b09f09e9e503c5b0168dcf87
describe
'69521' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
3a2c2e611ccd75f3f78d91b4c7379942
d6a3f183ea3d13f0c35f04706a9e33a78eb1925c
'2012-03-31T16:10:53-04:00'
describe
'1799612' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
47cdac0b23f6eb37869a49e59eacc9f6
7f8414f68887def3a1b0b02e6343538e22540774
'2012-03-31T16:16:15-04:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1b49dbc7a235baf60c657bcc99ac0154
530675f4a7c3bc43ad4de31af0513146e652c9c1
'2012-03-31T16:13:20-04:00'
describe
'37865' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
6429a411aa8c6a74df3523dacf38203b
0bde3b1b5cd6ec7cf45004fbc4ce7850b0dfbc53
describe
'220088' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6146e2ce55fba60c3dbf532215c04ca0
26fe22c86e14c8ac2c2243a1e717b99e3bcc8097
'2012-03-31T16:11:03-04:00'
describe
'139475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
94614c37b0256c797bc34bd8290080c8
bbf0d72451d7f7fbc09dabcb488a6bd41283a76f
'2012-03-31T16:14:12-04:00'
describe
'31913' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
41980da50f51353ba3f02091821bc996
72cb1b8508014462d76a11875891e99f8c3ea4b1
'2012-03-31T16:15:56-04:00'
describe
'67987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
50f43ac14a6503fde424374167b1d6dd
e45a45e1df129381e4c6ab00e766040266b8aced
describe
'1784096' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
5cee95989947c44fed3564962eb4205f
c58eca5fd5e584d9dd02ff00adb818f21672b4e2
'2012-03-31T16:14:42-04:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
a2cc2f9899b134802cbe30d7cba91a57
1ac50e1ee056a32ed870b77dd89a936923cad03d
'2012-03-31T16:15:32-04:00'
describe
'37237' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
3ddb2c949bb4e834b8a78d532dc18e9b
657abcd322b374b116104b8185da8a4dac4b45b2
describe
'221723' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
0bb03f518d88606bb56c467efa37bdae
12062a1352d32c89f5caa9e64a6ceebdfeeca653
describe
'137869' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
05086783ddccf058b19fd5ca2a883305
6fe870353a98cc4d8f13ba61daad1ae1cf59972a
describe
'32349' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBIZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
42d9aad8063a52b4ebd3c4e9efde64b5
5c67a9da5f4457a7b606a436117de78bb41f1919
describe
'67867' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
6186b1ce4f5f022bd3b70ebd2bd4ae28
5cf5e9c637f44b9e6f427c7a9cf98415692e8143
describe
'1797800' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
05c71ed28da566b44ba1b959295d09a8
57c9a7552bfdc2f5ff952e6cafa0d8502350f6d1
'2012-03-31T16:16:16-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
16f79609df5a70bfe4db725b00746410
6234cde4e9f51f3b61f6e20c48069d3aceea09c6
'2012-03-31T16:17:14-04:00'
describe
'38009' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
87704ec4c1c985e458654d7d2e9ed3b2
948ff2a96d5a1777a65a760432490a208fed918b
'2012-03-31T16:12:39-04:00'
describe
'220681' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
943ddf73132cd8ba1019f7ffa44512d8
4ee8aac87014e4245be99c053b86b9bcf01c54c2
'2012-03-31T16:09:06-04:00'
describe
'143453' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
7cfe2ad29de1bae7e1e1cc5c5d6232fc
0e7718cf6265dae103fe673fcd60fd59644b69e6
'2012-03-31T16:10:10-04:00'
describe
'32082' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
0405d587d1668a677eb4103d2e0c3cda
179f741b6ac40e36059ab8dd958e97a1c7aac020
'2012-03-31T16:10:29-04:00'
describe
'68713' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
483432399f94447a0f5c8bb622bf0ac6
b78fda58c4c0b7fe6e15b4e55a6d73031ef8553b
'2012-03-31T16:13:03-04:00'
describe
'1788172' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
06f6a04a8a6225dd0446b6c327ba418d
a25a38cc103869798eef7320cdf91c1d62575d1b
'2012-03-31T16:11:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
80e1651ce09b6f74c7771c9788c5ff45
a4f655aef468139ac9db6a5906e59ff4d1d5f3bd
'2012-03-31T16:13:11-04:00'
describe
'37289' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
724b5b217cd581b1b9d4a766c5cef126
c075647d330221c5a344c67bab3e5f6f153de560
'2012-03-31T16:16:46-04:00'
describe
'222121' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
643882a63b726364ce0b91c2ac6f2a1d
951ea9b87385ceb88bfe3418500902932518a9f5
describe
'140415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
88ebff8eeac3f2c1194e09d817d2d275
ed55ba1fd1870427112d0787efbcc79c5c5f1cf0
'2012-03-31T16:11:07-04:00'
describe
'31642' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
853d4a286334e515b5457ed65ed99e32
9f9fa34aeb911d95398c7af475d7953c52cbd818
'2012-03-31T16:12:58-04:00'
describe
'68384' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
69fa8f4718ef15bea0a60eb31673ef3b
7f735a98b652a440141fdeff6f5ff7c1b8821800
describe
'1801044' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
3fe107e903e64c8114702e9b130a5a0f
2035b57214a9dc1a1fe8579dbc3d74f79d5084eb
'2012-03-31T16:16:13-04:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
fff5e4eb6fe64447f88836903dc04c5d
1f65e83ec4bb1fd12fd03bb2e62ff234e151373d
'2012-03-31T16:16:01-04:00'
describe
'38165' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
e8f77c6e1ed60e1cbf0e8fcf042edda5
dc8c2353c1e8e35ff6d8ed5cd5a4fdd4427b72a0
'2012-03-31T16:14:47-04:00'
describe
'218849' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c38c9bc8c68cbb15a5c3ea9e81fc2d36
0b9bca45b950ea6d8c70fa7f1ccf60f7b90951cc
'2012-03-31T16:10:42-04:00'
describe
'140922' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e4391489820bc1fe7fe2ba79a76e67a6
59f2af9e849d8e61aa0bcf40294ca84edd61087b
describe
'30424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
6c8b8d924b6da152429363100a7fe6b6
4648f39c737dcf998719f66a957f006fc6556c66
describe
'68590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3068304bbd493a8aaa921ffb0bf051c3
c3cfe072666cd52a8de9344a0d5b01c0e08097af
describe
'1774308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
53d301f9b71055594da053a98b65725d
b8a761c154ed1dcab5e8b59372521667bfb2e735
'2012-03-31T16:13:30-04:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
62371080632a4d7722c4ed9210c36b1d
acee96d97ca497d5c842d257a3acb050e934fb04
'2012-03-31T16:12:26-04:00'
describe
'37533' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4d957742138541387337d89ec72e6280
ec7aaf5a42bb7d58fb066ccacc02764a17a42e59
describe
'219966' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBJZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
6159a9627e68cb80cd92c1ac54f4e684
61702b58eddf0816649629043c9571a02d31f5bd
describe
'153586' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
35aa6706a313ab1f3df9d31731b7065a
6dc9fb1e41c1dce6a687596a23fbf69f42b6b3fa
'2012-03-31T16:10:56-04:00'
describe
'35953' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
398cb7ebef4bc0d8f5d31b211d22dc83
446ec9698c189c6a3cf4ca94a668b57f8c75b4b7
'2012-03-31T16:09:22-04:00'
describe
'74318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7e5fc0e9fad3a8a5228485471d992b2a
f3c6c8544869ab2fbf4fbd04135758f75a2b523c
'2012-03-31T16:09:54-04:00'
describe
'1783352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
d8ad5113717f5b3d5245a825bbe02da6
4e39d62050ab281ddf42365d47b03041c59c1716
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
61579c50b700ed268e97b0c36511b99c
ff27f50654852d048602fb79dab1146d55f9fc64
'2012-03-31T16:16:50-04:00'
describe
'40169' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1d1be837e2220f54a300ef57b06404fb
69d4c495946042356d38a778dddb4987dcfa5cb1
describe
'218989' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0d9fe4a66b29d293d034c8baba564694
cc87aeff5d259192bd901d2543363fc04c96b1e1
'2012-03-31T16:13:24-04:00'
describe
'140795' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
fbf426110587e61ee0966787fc63d1a2
3251fb6863465951169b049f6d917b816a0ab4bf
'2012-03-31T16:14:10-04:00'
describe
'31251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
ba423ae30f15422064a5ba3aa41ff5f5
03ea165beb4e4f6a7abfa67ae2f0a41ce183617f
'2012-03-31T16:14:00-04:00'
describe
'68741' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
805d491eb59b03e2f606d150f57bad2d
dc6f7b7ec013852bb7b0d446da4771a3180c5619
'2012-03-31T16:08:32-04:00'
describe
'1774760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
da70e84d0c17a279ebcb2dcf7dbfcbfe
fe681a29a9f3db68fa10464ad8a9f9c446edb36d
'2012-03-31T16:16:11-04:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
016500e8bd9de5a6bc23d41f7248918f
15d39c18f8eb11ad2cc536be40470fbd34df5ac8
'2012-03-31T16:13:32-04:00'
describe
'37981' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
6d966c0eca1cd1c020df825a6b649b59
fed4d808fc1ac92b9f116e03900d79b3c5772343
describe
'221161' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
30ebee6c89013da6ef7dcd3f75a2b967
d4ddcec54d957d1f8f7fa1b01a54fa81b93e519e
'2012-03-31T16:13:16-04:00'
describe
'143350' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e6298c54d55de2a23b93c35dd962e692
f1b53e47d3c631e80121c1d5467e0f64e742bab7
describe
'31942' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
08de6e3a437d31caf7ad7e40c704daad
a5a1a825b25326fc05d0892ab175dac0f6c399a8
describe
'69126' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a2b95f7e73b2f27afc5f296f07fc2fb4
24059509bbaf7c076b1284c451bdeaec0ac1fbc7
'2012-03-31T16:11:02-04:00'
describe
'1792500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b163a74d1bcd899ac0c26a3b987393ca
8e57cda1eaf0ff0cb6bd3e0ef9e29dedbe8eef39
'2012-03-31T16:14:20-04:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9c56470c57d8a476f58d393b6a29310a
4ab1bbc336fb2be0fc4f470c980fa397d0f76a28
'2012-03-31T16:15:35-04:00'
describe
'37832' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
f9ca67c0d8410fa3fdb791d7a6c9d1fb
8e0adc4d31629c785bdc7743c22e78c8d5342290
'2012-03-31T16:09:32-04:00'
describe
'215332' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f1e6937657b6f0f5690f3028e9b924c8
ad85b6a8cca28aa420ca2c9b3aaf9897a1084a01
'2012-03-31T16:17:00-04:00'
describe
'133620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
63517ad2ed3d271973b974ed739f427a
b22962b98ca36287cc8095d924c15a83c8e7e8bb
'2012-03-31T16:10:44-04:00'
describe
'27299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d0e13820a2345be5d5bdb9f80d59c77f
83b557b0bb5f17ed1fd89fc36bb831dab954a4a1
describe
'64044' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
72be1e19b185b31a34acf0e0655432c7
3aaa43bb3919873e6ba80a3b1bd604f8dcefe25f
'2012-03-31T16:09:15-04:00'
describe
'1746584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ce6f8174156c79380191d102b308ad61
7065713320a6b4f908f7408413fc1f66048caf4d
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBKZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6e6e163ce9ee259e612a109b96a21eac
11611d6d97c1437e396c479a394cd203c2814330
'2012-03-31T16:08:35-04:00'
describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d0eb9ae59e4f3a64b4858319bb5092dc
d106fb859aafe994af465ae35acc005efaa8671f
describe
'222256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3b70034237fbd480723496928e257f26
39c266340cc54f83e589ab2275a36193c77dd352
describe
'135238' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c494248fb921c586722d1feab71612f7
1a56b92ce4951a0d08e913bbbcfa0b48bedd9c22
describe
'29114' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9870837bcf1b2e7121761362b9798fb3
b6c57d520a08835c765c08ff8b91df99b9a955a6
describe
'65235' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
bac99cef6d2f1fc1d553923f1aec1045
f6e6e58367c8dc10883bb58b98a23052fcbedfc2
'2012-03-31T16:13:19-04:00'
describe
'1800572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
bde85ff1fd222aed60cff10bcd236071
f4308002ca01c45193fde0f899cc3565aa5e5681
'2012-03-31T16:11:38-04:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dde660b57b345bdb5b5d85e2e56e808d
ffc011b5059224c74f2cde4038139c66ce0dadb0
describe
'36794' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
f50a0df9de9b8fda7059b85f7b716f2d
7a605a28de5b5b6a226133f125dc59426e7caec4
'2012-03-31T16:09:27-04:00'
describe
'220019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
a1a39b4c84adcbba0737919b9317d131
509572081488f62e042543f409f48b2e9f04fbbb
describe
'144768' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
41b545f2a5500f3b0db38e0c7b95060f
6017738f13365bf76b33fe0773cd5887d82e2fd0
'2012-03-31T16:10:33-04:00'
describe
'33200' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6e4d31cf4115e80f0cfea685033c9215
311d965f6f2a5c65495fffa13fcb9ce054215533
'2012-03-31T16:14:14-04:00'
describe
'70472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
cc9385945920363304401311ae32a1b5
d7542bf9f492880dbc478a9a24455c9078c46df1
describe
'1784564' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0cbeefecda74a5ca7899d3a4cc2de24a
4b99e4b62cee8ef24d484e709e96b1291f352674
'2012-03-31T16:10:55-04:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1ac8a3c86b8fa0e5b389cf031f6e3336
17f583487cb81d44ab6b65959cb07f2c6903a849
'2012-03-31T16:11:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
45cabd4d718a4bcc9baa8a97de411357
09aff6a773961a1bb61091bcd52b31d1d9491fb6
describe
'219443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
0ccb3d6a574a69d367da75d441426007
1e19e8818fecea784e063bbc6eab053a2284afb9
'2012-03-31T16:12:01-04:00'
describe
'133027' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
48567a5cb8c18fb92d0335b561347cfb
99192bcfd7852292b35976dd47a6fa4a989674d6
'2012-03-31T16:09:09-04:00'
describe
'29985' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
5c5d7c9adcd74b1a834e0fb38b8c2841
f2ff3e106db44296817b652658c56c16e2def1b3
'2012-03-31T16:11:25-04:00'
describe
'64271' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1f2d4ad4f176c3e8e2dc3124d0184eda
6d3d956d321a5872a7b0b47f73271e53f6a21fed
'2012-03-31T16:08:57-04:00'
describe
'1779188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
65d318555081be24bd42d7b33cf95e58
5ca97cf660fc68569bfc3a5d8c7d6bd4294a965f
'2012-03-31T16:11:57-04:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
bccc55d301dd0dc8f09ab9a834b8b1b6
b747b6f83550ce0ec5a84a9181bf4a65219ba3d5
'2012-03-31T16:09:39-04:00'
describe
'37000' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
34b00425179d5836d16ae788338ad6d9
63e991c82fe240a15e8cbea801b34a661c20423c
describe
'217902' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
77a43bfdfb82383d33584d9a38e91c00
74755cc29f2956b656032e7d22f04f78ae95a65f
describe
'137892' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4563060b41ab8d3bd0c9c51aed8edb9d
3ae598599593f1d63418f21934a1dcd319507af9
'2012-03-31T16:15:43-04:00'
describe
'31742' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
06e36e8ccd71d4032cf4c508211cfdc5
5bff2b648f616709ee863ac2d3166733d23b22c4
'2012-03-31T16:13:29-04:00'
describe
'65425' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBLZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
88daa8fccbaa9138e0c073be8c0761a3
597438a78f0fbd51854939674af09c73dccea6db
describe
'1765804' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a39c77bb0bcb2f8a7a9ceed22880b70d
d32cc6f61914ca32d819957aae1a965322d734bd
'2012-03-31T16:13:43-04:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
140613c1153bf8318880b61a5c1ae336
63209303e44012ebb7b6161a5cdef5d142f8f159
'2012-03-31T16:14:49-04:00'
describe
'36592' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
039609c78127baf5b9a10406598ad5ed
b3a9f1def3bb15a567b68dc807adc1740fba6fb3
describe
'219818' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8c7a4d613bbb4cdbf11613d1c8556974
a63850f45f23da4222ca74c2d6e05fdf5db899bb
describe
'150571' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBME' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0fbd59ebd32bf91337fecfdd0192e3e7
d77fcb66c6cf54a972073e1010a3f2a2c2b270e7
describe
'35015' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
6a7f97775d6bf15bc732523f464fbfbd
9def3dcb0bede05e1749b309639b2aa8c96503cc
'2012-03-31T16:11:52-04:00'
describe
'72559' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1925b1ede23b294932d5397ea48b5533
ef62a6c1d39d9e416f9e9b4ef2b83dfdc9af4cb8
'2012-03-31T16:16:58-04:00'
describe
'1782396' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1c37426a983c49952f79327cc2308470
e8836a3211b323159d11b515b696d977f7f8643b
'2012-03-31T16:11:28-04:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
64db88bc6b9e3b2af7898e3a83a17da9
5832f347db6cba967d4acbec485692e46daaa2ee
describe
'39279' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
8c077c56c12198b4040426101b2216a1
715674a6128a17407e4a58dadc95802bcb4ca623
'2012-03-31T16:11:16-04:00'
describe
'219840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
862ae5800857b6685d3dcefae7114ede
c9c5db7b558452f801e80236fe29498e68e7bcd1
'2012-03-31T16:11:00-04:00'
describe
'138103' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBML' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ad0d7c9344409b92d53fc672fcf6abdf
d19765bef401b6c7a0f2fd447431d268641ef836
describe
'30060' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b422882bc3a67e031a0b057d0225c6c9
9f2517d71184c19a8472c47d9014a631d2c75967
'2012-03-31T16:14:29-04:00'
describe
'66110' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
437a0d4401c602478388f814a7c22756
48847e4c75570b4ac07a90e7ac9bdb6234975d56
'2012-03-31T16:15:22-04:00'
describe
'1781604' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
56d25a4c03aca97e3241992bdf5dd20f
b9cdca3c33ec58b0206cee11c41cac6f6ed9dce8
'2012-03-31T16:12:55-04:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
13db4167dec78f69568db5eb769e90a4
a46d624ab5f8b7593e63f80e56a2177387fc821e
'2012-03-31T16:11:19-04:00'
describe
'37202' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
133bdac980192b509592db9c7484c043
2cad311d53e00c3c51014960fd852c91a18b77fb
'2012-03-31T16:16:54-04:00'
describe
'220156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2e18622e751ec144a3d4a14c993b7b18
69eeba7db212dbe3e72f1e3970300ae3b7f7d882
describe
'140950' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
bac7b4f5558d58a53c644014c5d96aa2
bdf23dc8091c82a3bea2f189349d6876d2731796
'2012-03-31T16:09:42-04:00'
describe
'31658' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
4e9a5343361ce1429b27a3e7dbacc261
a80fc9af2a29b14054470952835428afe635530a
'2012-03-31T16:08:43-04:00'
describe
'67975' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
b852d68af647fc32806617df50856e5d
5b3df772a206e6aa5f0e4041fdc8897d0fb5b02e
describe
'1784396' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
cc1fa7b7b5649c639b56230672a55887
311f70839d01cf7b1e27eb119666d88d2fc46c20
'2012-03-31T16:11:42-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a6213507fc0fa5d926bd8f7387b54441
61e68b1fbe0d96f37c016c41756f7ff8c63058bf
describe
'37565' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
042650af614ca777bec8bd8bb9b882cd
86bb0a91ab4bba089067c8e9bd285ee527742950
'2012-03-31T16:12:11-04:00'
describe
'221013' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
49f82910a639dcf24cb7235985fe936f
b4f2d48be4db0fb8bc8d91f47e6d6a21c055805f
'2012-03-31T16:09:07-04:00'
describe
'140346' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBMZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
91b467928506860a91595446e9b0aa87
ff93f179731e142e9c7dfc92f51f345a471b264b
'2012-03-31T16:16:37-04:00'
describe
'31572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
8948db40c2e82db3fb5dbf2ddba4b829
9a0cb0ebde9266a5f38ca216d7ad7bac3617148e
describe
'67809' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
7f03552993d130af1ee194d7598217bb
faecc03e54b6f99473c456661aad77649c67e0c2
'2012-03-31T16:15:52-04:00'
describe
'1791252' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d98212cc2f6a7cd8adfb7b0f3ccac1e6
66751c7f79af59d855614f54e03b2e731c9431d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBND' 'sip-files00044.txt'
17cbae1c64fd3be6154818198062b88c
00265dd3a2eef02fdd69370fb6124bf4167692ac
describe
'37300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNE' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
624cdb94f59f9423228df46bcbd5bc0d
08838751a3bfce8079ffa149a482829a3b264d69
describe
'218805' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7f698d9be54bf22acbf1f51a894dbe7d
4913a57132577acf461a72972e2f5d4a42c6d2db
'2012-03-31T16:11:04-04:00'
describe
'142027' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ef296fc7a7ccfaceabdcafd351a8aa14
5a268e46ebf2f95d28abc65fcf058e42de90e2c1
'2012-03-31T16:11:49-04:00'
describe
'31849' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
63a1d7c197c69c7f1346ec71ef174d33
75b2a2b93f4e29284374f7da430c01912b46f505
describe
'68325' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a06538a5c813ae595d2897f3b721d209
18c5a8e1ccbc7aa41ffb7448951fa27e9a540902
describe
'1774024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
c6aa6fd58925f874da6097ebaaa10e69
24d3ec03cdab61b6a2cee5c2b441592faba9d6c6
'2012-03-31T16:14:07-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1a463f311107251f7f805bcb1377200c
815c5f922e0dc190d87daa12cbee86c050b7d52c
'2012-03-31T16:10:14-04:00'
describe
'37463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNL' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b46de48c4f87120929342844749b4e1f
134864c6a571e4b84b95ad3657de0fd91dcff1fa
describe
'219244' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
15399a137b7ce145df90330304304ceb
5146e1b0c14618a03b9e9f77f95792a0c20d08d7
'2012-03-31T16:09:05-04:00'
describe
'144363' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
05e2c182088f5949f854b6f8d4ad6ad6
bf95c5c17487741a00eab6ad6627ce365b640822
'2012-03-31T16:10:07-04:00'
describe
'33744' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNO' 'sip-files00046.pro'
47f8630a09e2dc17f1d8366839019544
7791f53f35649be9b47d9e139656aa488311aa8c
describe
'69206' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
9b17b9119a43951413e778008f6c8884
87f84ede8ba3c81991fa5bee5f20e5fcdbb3e7a6
'2012-03-31T16:10:04-04:00'
describe
'1777172' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNQ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
6939b540bb88beef002064dbcddbb502
05f02857826a7076394b27b5bc62909abfce5fdf
'2012-03-31T16:13:59-04:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
4acf26b8cb5b149992eee9a0974fca2f
4e2b6db89bfa002cc24d034a7639d04489d706d5
describe
'37924' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNS' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
a0040c3767172aefb39f102953ef782f
81a5ce37747cdad4c14b4e3213a62f41aa56d23c
describe
'218982' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNT' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
40b9d872d4340988b2094f91ad2a741e
cb32b9e8c817999b462a8c35de0536c16d252a0c
'2012-03-31T16:09:38-04:00'
describe
'141045' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2a78b8bc2155fb13969692d0410ae7c7
ca142a1a95e5f86776e6332800dab438fb39f875
describe
'33349' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8036abfb599f8deaa93105cf2c100a2c
7465065eb250e08ef895d184c1bb625744bc4e5d
describe
'67170' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNW' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
3ac9d6fc4db35558b3598648cdf5464e
f81dcf36a43b300556ec6f8a7d50d75123cef161
'2012-03-31T16:16:48-04:00'
describe
'1774768' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
ba6672e9c3eca55f914d51ed38e8bd6e
c63d6d3cd7a91b4a6c05c0caeb520fda60991f21
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
7e4423da2d2f2d3753ae13164a9467e3
22a3458292b37b33ace899e72bdf8db2f64948c8
'2012-03-31T16:09:14-04:00'
describe
'37207' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBNZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2f5cf930a924e4b4f01b842fe4bd9018
a40c172040abb3b935b69e562b0bfcde7d21827c
'2012-03-31T16:09:18-04:00'
describe
'222290' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
5ee12fc7944fa18fb5310f96dd33fa54
8ef6ab02a9b70f62085977923818682f71a69a42
describe
'144095' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
52b70c8d0ce3bc29d3916ba1616c4746
c68d33a50b699b46e65ad2293164cadec73bd6d9
'2012-03-31T16:08:39-04:00'
describe
'32989' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b2c99296959d426e1a024115e6739f6d
cba0f93c7a11d39f545157dc30ce1d5132729b18
'2012-03-31T16:16:57-04:00'
describe
'69038' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
609160c138d3539fb7269379f3604cd6
2d44917e2d6d9ef5a597384bd6778bfa78cf50ed
'2012-03-31T16:15:10-04:00'
describe
'1802180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOE' 'sip-files00048.tif'
1ebf4da9bbeea8bdc37b0fa9cccfd31b
e818c38799bdc09c2816f2a89f17349ebdfca3df
'2012-03-31T16:13:34-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOF' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5dc797349df53fe6cf50136adb30a2e7
e17d6836499995497bde81aaa66ef94e5f90e51f
'2012-03-31T16:10:47-04:00'
describe
'36901' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b5b65b0d5af3f82c8266510d291c4e12
86bb9e8a0e6693d5e53a7354d2f134dfda889a8c
describe
'221419' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
625fc5570fd434189da54687bb11b59e
fa5b5c0a84fb5ff774422ab6a87d61b115e1f2af
'2012-03-31T16:15:00-04:00'
describe
'143929' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2a14d99d34010a0bad608b0e0e5a3e1c
3713e5a324ec115487c3a54f6f28531cfc41a202
'2012-03-31T16:11:53-04:00'
describe
'32983' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
162d084b0b081d02d16c7be37c928048
87e989915f98b0732550ba0c0bc8396cfcbbb195
describe
'69164' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
89e4b3687de909686e1eb7cc9c4731d6
a1104933e0910c9a5a83084047973d0596132440
describe
'1795692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOL' 'sip-files00049.tif'
931fdaf2d51337d63001c32423b47110
8224a1a4ff90c0de346594aed78b1670013b1d7a
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0165a29738003df4bf82a839cfef5c22
032874196aa6b5552f02bbc536b14d80e5e60fb5
'2012-03-31T16:15:36-04:00'
describe
'37874' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBON' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
c138e3e1efed820bd2f90744c9e5177b
bcec13b2dd6ebee5d28aa8fef9c31b04453d0249
'2012-03-31T16:09:53-04:00'
describe
'220492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOO' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
12029cfc6fe1d059ad5e4e035977a461
107b3c5ec85fcff87f4b92bb95104f5e46eef1b5
'2012-03-31T16:12:38-04:00'
describe
'153639' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOP' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
869f79bd2ef8a49ef5dfd70fcd59e184
35ee687954dbf648e887068df8815be78b3957dd
describe
'37335' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3e0a95e1b6935a7593242a859bee5cb4
6a49a47db8691b29a8da356cbf58e15e679aba4b
describe
'71806' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOR' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
5f1c3441d6c415b715c1ad39fdbcfcf6
5932b816daa10747598d01b5c11de6531ee49ea7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOS' 'sip-files00050.tif'
28c77e047f24230e7759d40d1e72f98f
9f02926df5de12244f0005b370aa90d3b4f20d26
'2012-03-31T16:16:03-04:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOT' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c22f0f97b49575e761bcc38fe09d2a58
2155d2b23b4f9d740bcd69c001d842f73292bdd1
'2012-03-31T16:11:55-04:00'
describe
'38494' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOU' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6c73810f41c97eedc776390d9098e9f4
0014e0e55b9e5881599db76d9b61a8ac7dea3fb8
'2012-03-31T16:15:01-04:00'
describe
'223533' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
90a4266151be0542acd2bdf796e7c9a3
675667c39575553fea2029c23c1f1e34eee6c685
describe
'138065' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOW' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
fe25d4d290643d04b965856fcf2c4c9a
f69bca6282b74482d5c4de0baeaabe6069915747
'2012-03-31T16:10:45-04:00'
describe
'31486' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
44824bde4ac3355996a9e062f70b30b7
36b3f00571b94b9437e9722e0b74231e5d03d2df
'2012-03-31T16:10:26-04:00'
describe
'66359' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOY' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
eaab849553f3fbc2ee85641f0efbc640
5ab2d5fb78760d559120af56db71af813ce6d2b9
'2012-03-31T16:16:26-04:00'
describe
'1811872' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBOZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
a730f1ae4471b665ae0410fcb164c133
b5f63858321b1c3ce698525b3f904f9394773a48
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPA' 'sip-files00051.txt'
bb673544181549658926daa0d108c479
b4e9319f902b31d8040f9fac2f3421f85a0fdae9
describe
'37276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPB' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
02e6322167b52ceca767b405ad8e1f91
b250e43e6f5b80b0e7c9420927ded3fa55641de0
describe
'223369' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
4d5baaa85255ce9b279f54177f6b9711
d642accef24cc69672f210b8131893d0ff796e5e
'2012-03-31T16:16:51-04:00'
describe
'142792' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPD' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c213504cb98d181e8f0435b4efb33103
95ea7081371b4cdf05ec6a3651399a1fe6395826
describe
'31432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
77d87c1387b28015205f4ef7d8e0df91
9d2cda9ad31bf8333e9c912ccb710c2c0f81aed4
describe
'67972' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
227d5ac1f30dd3ad822b6d0774ce94c6
3bb8e0a01b251452bf6fa9cdc12fd9c3908f9f9f
'2012-03-31T16:09:17-04:00'
describe
'1810356' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
eb2ce19de4bbfc6bad1b85f22f714b2d
3feb18bebbb714c0633e491956c00641df5eb6c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
6b2145399649d5a3915d51ab895213b0
1cdca71974e68b1b57b44677fada98ce1f756b31
'2012-03-31T16:09:24-04:00'
describe
'37159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPI' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f3c9103634e283f41cba154174ca0c44
a3880d0b151f5aa2b89c8d2e0bf104dfd12615c6
describe
'223117' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b8f10efebec65a0fe41d3ce6e225f0c4
c802a3bc3000109097061db0ab76dd846e0e1503
describe
'139912' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPK' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cc8e2758103d8ae21427d78fba30e155
8c7f0461e142dc750ad46ed5b62c987a61561971
describe
'31274' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPL' 'sip-files00053.pro'
73762d6344ddcbc66f3b4e17e26d2ad7
3ba261b06ba504888aff194ef6b4a36178edbcb1
'2012-03-31T16:16:52-04:00'
describe
'66106' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
93b3731bfcdcaf29309cbecee65f82b7
9662e343fa12382e6c1f83ca0c997d6e96d98b26
'2012-03-31T16:09:48-04:00'
describe
'1807744' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
b7e2fbdb648fc2b2661bc1c0ad3fb962
baa4e232fc3b017abb90ec75e35d0f217183396e
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4b244925006b01994eb22d9bae36f6af
740ba88df2366d4922c4b9a18f092204968688cd
'2012-03-31T16:10:36-04:00'
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
29588e621850eff442639437c479e7c1
d5e6c2b2def44dd1bce3807cab8345fea4dc94e6
'2012-03-31T16:08:34-04:00'
describe
'220924' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
88c95e42c69e5f9e0721f4e245025918
a0c4313357bb43b948004b4e78df8e772ddbf2c8
describe
'144728' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e4f931b448297c91c0955b895114249c
f66b824f8dd935403ef05f9e4823e43639520049
'2012-03-31T16:12:53-04:00'
describe
'31390' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
a5f059d7b18dc9da7fb8f085d8f5a543
eb644382d19cbcc7ecf72fff148fd2b569e56e50
'2012-03-31T16:14:17-04:00'
describe
'68987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
32436ed35ca56081d9cac05b29006919
8d5cb6badf17d0637f279edcf4b5196656e41123
'2012-03-31T16:12:32-04:00'
describe
'1791564' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
79cfd41ffa3fc48318b25a8cc81e5719
0ffd5b3dd27b8ce0edeb4dd1fbeff5ef1991db89
'2012-03-31T16:12:37-04:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
588d01a5f87aa9555fad46653ca4e090
b12f62829978c9b105659f176d8bdbeb18f754e0
'2012-03-31T16:12:03-04:00'
describe
'38342' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
19564321cbd57439eb34beb353460835
3266ebc7579f47652fb023e90252172e6a339f16
'2012-03-31T16:14:44-04:00'
describe
'224339' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
bfbf4531b2d8321806e7fe738944a5b9
b438c20d1ef80b720fa3bcadb3fce7c8906b4011
'2012-03-31T16:16:21-04:00'
describe
'132320' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ef368a0d58c2e312b17c66e6edbf9dd0
32a9747e0a0f854d2594a81851f3885c7cfcd54e
'2012-03-31T16:09:36-04:00'
describe
'28591' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBPZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f24090a16fd0d8669fbd2627d2bf13fd
59f38b3659b57c89422aedb959179f7155f1452f
'2012-03-31T16:14:11-04:00'
describe
'63952' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bb4d87fa9601d3ce08826931c2d54a05
e7218fb67e8b10e20a986f0ce5c35aac990fa77a
'2012-03-31T16:10:37-04:00'
describe
'1817204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2c23ab13b0460327f618bcbae0d12484
ecb985ab87bf223aafb19e5bf514af25b7a68d91
'2012-03-31T16:15:08-04:00'
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
984cd895c8a02e653afc4c841232fad6
e8ba5ca0af0e1bcf83bc6c1d1fe074a4d13490ca
describe
'35861' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQD' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
4130b0a807e24b7835aa7dc8f7ca2b70
166e749147ac02952e738a8098ba93082dd4c5f7
'2012-03-31T16:13:14-04:00'
describe
'223537' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1c680c2956582de2e6aeddcc3ff57e26
24d4a50e32521f564b7fd0c981dddbca96fd8088
describe
'141702' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
4fed8e2890bf35e2e0d4a078aa287ee7
bd9e65c5218b3cbe57687a401e8c99371c122684
'2012-03-31T16:10:16-04:00'
describe
'31007' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQG' 'sip-files00056.pro'
5cd3ec39c7aaaea852f6e035b51da8a7
6e462e1fba15cd49b1f460b81f33c78546a9abfe
describe
'68323' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6f9cda6d2de120f028f960212d01465e
7c32a644c381f73708e7461ae70330369e8a54a2
describe
'1812584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f22af89776d238e0f02ad4bf836b2c1c
4ba6f7b3f561b1d74e25d4758cec857f7543d114
'2012-03-31T16:14:13-04:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
89ead02d2174389033b35c1ce28a7bc1
7d24b4fc8129617567d905bb42e271c5a6dfb0a3
'2012-03-31T16:09:23-04:00'
describe
'36935' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQK' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
8a62c868f8899228d4a8c3deb339eab3
867b4192ce5d1a8d2dc4b972c6c3a235a42542ea
'2012-03-31T16:15:29-04:00'
describe
'221554' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
3e10c8d313600f100b59d5d3aa506edb
f753e53765f41bbc74e37890866c2b81e912f472
describe
'141005' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
a90ac68dd81bbb443044f9f0453a3e1c
f39ef2c5b7f63b9fb82c5a62f49b67814f13e410
describe
'33049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQN' 'sip-files00057.pro'
714759e6545ff94e73259d112955f282
95d9f539f46c59ffeb3bf43590f4880ca3240101
describe
'67728' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQO' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
34e062fb1b10b4211a7ae1aa4891b3a2
f1fb57db2ab5eae3a263afe6f3992ae5fb7ec0b0
'2012-03-31T16:16:02-04:00'
describe
'1796076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQP' 'sip-files00057.tif'
d2eb3b1120ef53c36c234d8e574392c1
bece731dfc4335ab8e563b5e2b6469a15a4749ed
'2012-03-31T16:16:35-04:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
0532bb7d34ba131542fd49438a9ff01a
ec1f0a63bb3fbc580b68fef4909e181423f150c0
'2012-03-31T16:14:40-04:00'
describe
'37376' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQR' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
8803006a156a8850610259070f425931
b0be5bb9b70594b9a3b2bb83a679c0139f4e13d0
describe
'223357' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQS' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f19f16a3d1e42fc46760c2b67dd9b8fb
2ecb4a452334ccba8458fb3c2d0e72cab8ae3662
describe
'143987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQT' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
5af58e1115dcf2b012dc6aa8b3962b63
f7012ecbc4894716dc3d8cc0257c55f2f4a0dd21
describe
'32004' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQU' 'sip-files00058.pro'
88bdae5edd678a3e31631f0a12f46ce8
aacda70002a85eabce1ec640c3a7bed95712f72f
'2012-03-31T16:14:26-04:00'
describe
'67865' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
cc4d729656d6f364a6a5f4139302387f
e4bfce4f98abe1f2fef277cc7f8df109766ff51f
describe
'1810436' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
e6ac5c486dbbcef436091d48613823e5
c86127872380b41cbbb8a544fbec4ba209814213
'2012-03-31T16:14:52-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQX' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e381905516c92584197578b796f93322
a11972954858c92e7a4e4842d6e9620e837282ce
describe
'37014' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c9703c0d396e645bf9d6ca4949ba81fa
a8a3599be28640777b9e7e3b39d2d8dbc1d40933
describe
'221630' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBQZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a193ce160aff371abb04a29074c32f0e
1a7f99e35e18ae5dffcff9b55f929c873db198cc
describe
'153999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
18850d3d28ac1c7ec6566ab036fa76e1
95263671e851a562d9516ca34476f777089f1a0a
describe
'37415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
9a0b1500877dff12b982df2e2cb64fec
6e1ee1c41d9fcccd3097cf94ff064f1485b68224
describe
'72318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
4f343a9ba7170143d386952795a62ef5
402778502c767d9f539405bd431ea7c78accefe3
'2012-03-31T16:11:10-04:00'
describe
'1796360' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2e78b83faead69ac300393dddc1a9b2d
5926b6af60c00bd6d033247d60f04d8f4be55eb2
'2012-03-31T16:12:57-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
86b0b87532f4934e735ab1100a2bee35
da4f1853d86adf9d2dad787e6ef94c6f3af5b6e9
describe
'38102' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
5cc568b89e04c7e614278749feebd78e
6fabf748c4e3c6101e64b114d9b9a49a8700a35a
'2012-03-31T16:16:05-04:00'
describe
'225454' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
ba8b2c717b52d3de8dc6c94112f67b3d
a4e019648e6dde6261b44a63024fed1853e4f82a
describe
'142428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
85f64607e479e24c7fb58b6278941cc7
135b11eb383bdc40e4c11ca1cb73feeb1f2b88e3
'2012-03-31T16:09:13-04:00'
describe
'30669' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRI' 'sip-files00060.pro'
83e3f50dfc0407a8b74e888cba419210
353b330da6a4538d8c72eddad98eed9f015aba60
'2012-03-31T16:09:49-04:00'
describe
'67835' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRJ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
09ce42aa7e7f223ec79b14ed8479a031
e81c9a3dc81db6bb1591434f0263897d5e4e3220
describe
'1827852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c208a4710b8565507518d9d8294aa835
270164fa5821281bef34941ea5752fc861bca343
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRL' 'sip-files00060.txt'
0dbe76ea8c0da79fd7e8186203ae10bb
8c3fd01dc4228bb84e4c49b101f8f771042d00bc
describe
'36887' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
5226182ae95c8b17e2888161eae7263d
1696e6be61b54bb691ff501cd3c78a49ed1934b7
'2012-03-31T16:12:42-04:00'
describe
'220629' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRN' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
d1e413a55799976387730a0475138aee
0cf9d1a810f60365b70e040b324927d5d187ce52
describe
'151098' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRO' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e0596308e948713bcfc3599fcae5e135
90fcf75fcaafa492f46d34afe552381a7316e8cd
'2012-03-31T16:16:38-04:00'
describe
'36276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRP' 'sip-files00061.pro'
8c095ba2d51e7cde94282d0f5bd0eea9
4123ce4b1bdc44ce16685b1a13677a4c75cc33d1
describe
'71368' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
7f4cbdace409803511302510b44e00ca
839e245161bd7300ee70cb6f8ded74472de7d610
describe
'1788508' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRR' 'sip-files00061.tif'
7033c7d88d84d8203f78ba9bfffbff9c
4e292421b5f86129359a4c1888e77dbd134b0253
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRS' 'sip-files00061.txt'
9b430b23f8d3c7aa0fdc46c049f0ceb1
c84d05c05d8220784ccef40b12ffd703378f5328
'2012-03-31T16:16:55-04:00'
describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRT' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
622c522f6632b3bc8333ad6750145e1a
897309d9b0037e9a4ba6e9f4d0a6e0181ef25e5f
'2012-03-31T16:12:02-04:00'
describe
'224526' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRU' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5c1a817a88197a3c704a5b20cf0d0100
0f0799ad4f54649aa75e5847876975c6b6adb9d3
describe
'143047' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
688141f9a9e175f34054d3a8ea994f27
a351b7478996cd2396efaa35d9bc0ffe23187540
describe
'30826' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRW' 'sip-files00062.pro'
318eb9209a86f0071ec2b73bb1fff174
0b1b1fc106c687838d9c4a7613072718c89af421
describe
'67167' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRX' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
95c54685e2f801db4768fd90f6bf7453
57010e65c7cb372d6f706c84f0d997cd71e25ce3
'2012-03-31T16:15:44-04:00'
describe
'1819712' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRY' 'sip-files00062.tif'
ba31fc259aed29314e93f34419e6d0cf
05b617830ecdd5a7b7629d942f095174f6b5b1f6
'2012-03-31T16:13:50-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBRZ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4f9964561282c809204b2d597f56759d
67ca0f442182dde7d72fb3457487ae3ea0aec41f
describe
'36668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSA' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
83dfe85cdf33a28fc1bd56db5d97c95c
884ccab3d68d3eb143caae28ddae9ceb0dd37def
'2012-03-31T16:13:40-04:00'
describe
'222876' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSB' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2eb99dfe45fd4372e04e66b10f1b66d0
b109d78767624c516add07f873e60ff0bb8b5e0f
describe
'141223' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSC' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
b5cc73a6b1b268bc3189cf3d5d348d90
d94f299d45d603cb1db042d6ee9b0063061dac0c
'2012-03-31T16:14:08-04:00'
describe
'31305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSD' 'sip-files00063.pro'
8346b24e2c467e4722ea514a34af8b72
367c968a0ee1ccd847b81e6337f7cbb5cd51c39b
describe
'68049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSE' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
9928f3eaa5956fc5f80fa6f085341a26
5e008a6da45942020a2fed34cc0e2791f543c12b
'2012-03-31T16:14:19-04:00'
describe
'1806352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSF' 'sip-files00063.tif'
390afa72163d404e47abbf0f3de39526
fccc163f4cf7e3a7decf86b73fa5887a89cf87ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
194c41911570ecdc525004dd4c262e5d
9beb57a31192ba7fc73fbb27edd39144b9bcc56e
'2012-03-31T16:09:50-04:00'
describe
'36485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
99b498f38e708cb7f095146b71760e10
912bee1c733007d6b62bc856b06430a65adac661
'2012-03-31T16:10:20-04:00'
describe
'223405' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSI' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
061c5734182da33299cffd16fb1061cd
ee049103745da259edfddecb05b56217f22d11d5
describe
'148496' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSJ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ce6756a0245d67b95a56522264e2003a
47b15211281bbce640776aa910cdb64922166d5b
describe
'33686' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSK' 'sip-files00064.pro'
03f1eb7bd5ef305e722ed316bfd1025d
ec86cd92f1cc097a186c4a645fa6ae48cd44a233
'2012-03-31T16:10:58-04:00'
describe
'69997' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSL' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
461d0a54a917112570635bc545a5a568
ba8e687c90b482bf9f7e5e6f196009e1d3773304
describe
'1810816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSM' 'sip-files00064.tif'
391db3cd3117cd0f97a5c111e7b12750
b8aab8c343cbec123b4e4c1a56c563d8f582bac7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSN' 'sip-files00064.txt'
6b15011f30130d35fe4996f752a57325
67294911a8b40cfa72b08a0419d90296c160ac92
'2012-03-31T16:17:03-04:00'
describe
'38160' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSO' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
cc310458665b5f30b557374b457ca0ec
7fcefb7b1a6a505388bef91fd2835fc86673567d
describe
'222475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
d27f56a5412fdb26aba4f79594ea71e2
e4073a0af8c3dd5212709d2c50d356413e70308c
describe
'138866' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSQ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b25efdde5432ffd1cebf9d5a6804b775
1bb9fdb8677f8d0fff3b9166f2052c2287dee841
describe
'31891' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSR' 'sip-files00065.pro'
37f92c1e04f9b148d09da26bc2522f3c
aee1517afa490af5eb0e66bebbfed990630738cc
'2012-03-31T16:13:02-04:00'
describe
'65779' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9b60fd14b3a41b07d031ec6e7beb913d
c4c0fb4f7b86e4edc2f84621d13fa0ed9858a9f4
'2012-03-31T16:12:15-04:00'
describe
'1802908' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBST' 'sip-files00065.tif'
33210d6ec78d9bc43007a75c5a8c4561
9ef984d569d92be33e3efcec18faf4bc12739773
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSU' 'sip-files00065.txt'
fbe1fc26999a533bf137f473ba891f9c
5cb208d1491d30b51c3a790aae574871b27ba9f0
'2012-03-31T16:13:04-04:00'
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSV' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
0e9fa330db5e521f57c9b38b62b27469
b546cb593afe34d9742b856903b12664ac79cae9
'2012-03-31T16:13:15-04:00'
describe
'228404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSW' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
254fd814f5b5feda6775eadbdc853840
e6aa13df68f059ca9889cec033da49c3841b51c4
'2012-03-31T16:11:40-04:00'
describe
'146373' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSX' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
824779a07124f80687ed0ab9abb38623
889aa6204ab441e6aa723ad84153516a1b44f02a
'2012-03-31T16:15:20-04:00'
describe
'33258' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b67a779b159a7b15d053467fb9384678
9e37b2e626963a7fd1b411af8dcbdcd4661fabdd
'2012-03-31T16:10:48-04:00'
describe
'69670' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBSZ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
720a4ac1d760a512ce767b0294b3f449
695553398d0afd8ee82daa8bc2e7f973685b6f63
describe
'1850488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTA' 'sip-files00066.tif'
f7ff2d15b473bdb265b3e2d0727a6144
d7e581bc4f49a1bb55bb6cef309dc372ad6f2a4a
'2012-03-31T16:09:00-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e4b602dac9e288762896da8b530fce1d
df934d493f224e4cef935670d8386b216c3e6526
describe
'37092' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTC' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
28a5b61f37ef94bef940a7f91ed094ca
158096336f99802000e1147c3e5eb8ef5704d629
'2012-03-31T16:15:06-04:00'
describe
'221919' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTD' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
25f1b291551de801280df7f389679b9e
61d10cb544cbd131e81f0a0704f0006d82ba48e8
'2012-03-31T16:14:55-04:00'
describe
'138712' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
647d24f3fe38bfc66ba02dccf7357fae
6a2f56c11ccdfe185be23b9a46f11b12a6d767bf
'2012-03-31T16:11:29-04:00'
describe
'31728' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
422ff7fa20d5c70de1a72aafd7877c65
cdc06bc9badd624a96757d1690e250843745b4cc
describe
'65973' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e4f823ea1328e7eb3db475580a299782
8d9182ffac22b8f01ed6d111fe4bc5b3a5d4fcd7
'2012-03-31T16:12:19-04:00'
describe
'1798892' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
af39e151bd12a5723706df6d82421c8f
7f8fd6ed4ea4f327fd56e35327a8d632dc6a893c
'2012-03-31T16:15:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3784abb217a671d3dc07606d85d378cf
03e2d8f40a275f47440b5b3e445d34d50e4cb456
'2012-03-31T16:13:27-04:00'
describe
'36116' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTJ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
906df8e133a54ac5f5981c539aebb652
b148affa7c980557af721fd59acba78669b18617
describe
'226725' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTK' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
585efa588d5a14c1e1176e835b3940e6
67cee45898c54507db61a548b666ea71c79d3621
describe
'147563' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
0afda673316b5a58b0c5f4deed678680
1a5356c2a33f15430f0f6da8608a0e877f1d43c4
'2012-03-31T16:12:44-04:00'
describe
'33571' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTM' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9852b2f42ce5f50b4fd1fe272b5d9b16
460b254da886ffbd1f6f278d0c2aaf1ec449d319
describe
'68682' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
842331d3c4af757e56bbb3405412566f
d8c14748b101fc0bbc28f1901c90a4227e764f24
'2012-03-31T16:16:04-04:00'
describe
'1837880' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ec3b05a1e8b8cdbe9c4e72ffbf7e94c8
425d98ccfa3cc0728abd581142266b57ed2b0153
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a471574c2fa5bd8c6bf3363d5d325058
64dcf15b2598f50598644bf52ec4009fe4100db1
describe
'36711' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTQ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7e200aa26fba1f4caccf434a86bb7efa
c81aa2f7485e0c56c8a068f9806c8ae84d7e54ac
describe
'222001' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTR' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f27b60055d5866337d77547f83a36371
2299294a59c8e5f05c60c04ec16980f61fabbd04
'2012-03-31T16:12:47-04:00'
describe
'153026' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTS' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
2fa7946f004dd85f3e965b30d5c65b7a
13968f7b4c2ca503d45897655601bfbe5295577e
describe
'36491' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTT' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7ffad9c56435155da31dbca0f3816a3c
cb6d6356a0deab04706a330de4bcad6403886f74
describe
'72966' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTU' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c239742025a4ca1a7c24a5948d2578e6
6f7ef39fe3792cdb743550ce06643f1fa04a6a54
'2012-03-31T16:12:36-04:00'
describe
'1800632' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTV' 'sip-files00069.tif'
3c0146de835ab344ab3ccc49a4436a8d
4f3ff1564d4d329363cdbeb88bc2de581c35c831
'2012-03-31T16:16:06-04:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
63aec0caa390cb4a91197273d1ec4524
2337a153bb2fba6413a40629988cc25435bb8a7f
describe
'39249' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTX' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a9c076157ac296d861d181b91368209f
c91f779d686e59b9d3adf2274a2d5a3633ec45e4
'2012-03-31T16:16:33-04:00'
describe
'225968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTY' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7ca85731347e621ecc2adaf42e70bcc0
805cdd8b66a73bd3adb897529e27b162d14ca601
'2012-03-31T16:13:18-04:00'
describe
'155155' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBTZ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
0bb75286741cc8dc5fb244e49ea8b984
f57d90a975c564ff2cb3d0344c5dd6ff54021289
describe
'35688' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUA' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a14dc9a54fe6be85bb3b94c9692f01e8
69186205558125cac27dfc71cf686be58e63e24d
describe
'71996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUB' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
7ec94e386f662a18f33d296dbd1c26d8
4c4c6efefdcbd6ba5a5069e76e93034c5c132d71
'2012-03-31T16:14:25-04:00'
describe
'1831156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUC' 'sip-files00070.tif'
09052bb039bd285600202cb3f5c3ea4a
ef8517479de67787bf4d1e27ff9cc7651aa51d79
'2012-03-31T16:12:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUD' 'sip-files00070.txt'
47d62c63e05ce9656068c41237ea94d6
e7d81734517942cd44b8eabe0683cf975bddb0b9
describe
'37984' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUE' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
37a5f0df9bd6558a6850f0a6a03850f9
be2541eb6fe328052bf4b2c0362dcac8ae4ff031
'2012-03-31T16:09:03-04:00'
describe
'223572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUF' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
fbda2b461e516b555a87eae3f41596ea
e4f9e6699de737fbcafb8fe7a5c7a40795b96df5
'2012-03-31T16:11:17-04:00'
describe
'154514' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUG' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
da5f1349e3760e66c1d9267e70456068
838bca4ac65aa2c0c0597bb00248c7ee3a28bdeb
describe
'36548' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUH' 'sip-files00071.pro'
685b56d136c470bfbcfd085f0a22074b
f8447532050a270547b6620f5165b1e4a781804d
describe
'71918' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUI' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d2b0933ccf736d9f1aff8270e5ba3739
554776687eadaa7ad1190292833d537ec5d954bd
'2012-03-31T16:11:33-04:00'
describe
'1812748' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
f28801fc1f0feab2cd2e2ba9ef16ab27
9fed00a5f298544ad0b362dfe40a82af052e2176
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUK' 'sip-files00071.txt'
44e38296cf5fb4d44cd6925f0837d1b3
dc35309ecd2934621673ba988daf5e7c663a8692
describe
'37828' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUL' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
eeba063c100cda0ec850a3a861721a30
beb9b0c67d8ee3196217615cd20bb75e23994e45
describe
'227022' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUM' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
fd28be96b7dd9b52a23dcee5067f9e2a
29a2c39de6cb318508bbf487f5d60889d7cf3609
'2012-03-31T16:17:11-04:00'
describe
'150403' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUN' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
0d703ca2d993037106b1ed52aafb293d
ede9d452fe1a7b8142d0adb4b5096c32b2e28496
describe
'33790' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUO' 'sip-files00072.pro'
3e6361996844a971ba5918d0d10614a7
db36cf38475b979729207b2b17e5288ac1295480
describe
'70382' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUP' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
7723f123c59066b07f9faea278f8f712
75ce95510ce00e6bc13aa4c090d4c6d68e9e3650
'2012-03-31T16:12:33-04:00'
describe
'1839140' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUQ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
107edba973bce4882e9ad12f2d9a0055
25c4fdf40601c2dc1c697fa9ec6920733154d6a2
'2012-03-31T16:09:29-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
e88ccb21c6109e428e57184042404b78
9ebdf15f4947a99a036d317b553b42b2c9665002
describe
'37452' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUS' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9ecd9572a79609bb67e467410f6e878a
2e240df9b17f06474e2c7aa811f71c020a697740
describe
'221904' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUT' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
39a122948f3f98f1bc6d724708b58f61
0c088c2ed16288f23a186289bd68fd78653da931
'2012-03-31T16:11:45-04:00'
describe
'155643' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUU' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
9c7fcf8d6e66aa98a81ded1de27171cd
b5192d5e0799eb6b7b76fd414b0e86f92b3b2ef5
'2012-03-31T16:09:12-04:00'
describe
'36975' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUV' 'sip-files00073.pro'
db6601191a399664638dadf94d8f5b7f
e0c1acb1e891d41a60f8960eff1ff3918251eb2c
'2012-03-31T16:09:52-04:00'
describe
'72352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUW' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
1daec326d9c2ee0cd1159f4c52f4a300
33370ca6e79d43c52866f26133e4181827af63d9
describe
'1798668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a691a823e299c622ade79207e8f5c476
936e8b68e7148b2c8f7c8a810e92919e82e18f09
'2012-03-31T16:17:16-04:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUY' 'sip-files00073.txt'
3ece6e5f25fcfcc233b36c184efc0e69
7a413e28a6a4f5bf34eca58765855447ca949018
describe
'37827' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBUZ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
7fef5454cd7c01d31dc74488eee92edf
112a639295882d90eb8cc19ed552d7a8dae8de8e
describe
'227485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVA' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
ec61a1e5e41130e5fc1dd671f94e497f
dd08d77cdf046cad2ec54b3580b2d6fba7acc898
'2012-03-31T16:13:05-04:00'
describe
'146892' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVB' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f82e2b1383aa9eb943e6649e4c58ee93
49f3d279db89b58a43ba0627a4145a94a90dd420
describe
'35267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVC' 'sip-files00074.pro'
58194fd768c7efef828db5ae6a8274d3
5a886207849d64a86186bbde9ad62dc67660d7ba
'2012-03-31T16:16:29-04:00'
describe
'72234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
94ac3f525ef3cbcce98f19b227ec3a67
cd48d592d28d873f4a834e16c0fb711cc8771c79
'2012-03-31T16:15:12-04:00'
describe
'1844664' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVE' 'sip-files00074.tif'
dc25b601e825845386259d39fb4a8adf
fb7f6b7458199080dd967ac35ac766377d3fa1a5
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVF' 'sip-files00074.txt'
cee288326d4a165a8ae06d0e6f564c33
afe196e935bee925c7e39c660bd3ead0eb72e96a
'2012-03-31T16:17:12-04:00'
describe
'38065' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVG' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
8e2f5f0e4c27f42c101ade5dc75ae963
e99c9f0abe99b56090fc4c5dead6cda57e07f4cf
'2012-03-31T16:16:56-04:00'
describe
'221268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
dee04d322d2f34bf90d67efac86957e6
18ad70bad4a7ccffe6e4924044459e56192fd871
describe
'131833' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVI' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
08c6404d73d6262bfba0a6f513df5491
595937d7c27f7b46a49f1cc57de5a8dd77c7c23d
describe
'30812' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
0bcbd29290802a1240223a85635b7e26
bb5b736f4a878d0d823840f86062439356d40a07
'2012-03-31T16:08:46-04:00'
describe
'66518' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fd3675426ae8b9ae172015b003e84901
d15dcaea24f0c17ae06b2de6d3c5360d4b988077
describe
'1793216' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVL' 'sip-files00075.tif'
29b541864a411a2f1bee2959ef0073f1
cc81302a848783d64e81eba3e5d37192660932e0
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e7370022763bf42002dac68a92b32707
e4ddabb7607776b91249353e6b2b4dbc30ae28e2
describe
'36118' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVN' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
854d97bebf2b7bf86efc39928515c3fe
9f8275075f3cce8b9007509bfbe6ba65ec15be4f
describe
'226385' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVO' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3cfc16b5b3a911731ea57e5aa023f835
055819234de616d27ca38e403d7e623d9ee5962f
'2012-03-31T16:14:22-04:00'
describe
'149298' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVP' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
ddd9cc5573a6ea197d6badc00b4ef515
394f34f098f967671940288a24214af42cb14e79
'2012-03-31T16:14:36-04:00'
describe
'36312' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
9a0c7d5ec03f1e537f1cfe8f01c65e26
bdee3caba86e816b44f964c3c47512966f28872c
describe
'72497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
4cac3038f16894fb24d8c8e430c63f77
595c4721bbc190aee7ea0655a7ed8260a3218380
describe
'1834068' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVS' 'sip-files00076.tif'
88ef08558141eae401e13ce51faa3e0f
e3d2351af4d8d5d9ebc1985e85542acfc1bf3f15
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a7efa1223293835fdf1554d4f5af8caf
6c9df199b49e4f388704e7634ad424e002695b50
'2012-03-31T16:13:47-04:00'
describe
'37517' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
25fdb5a3c928d9c670a9ca8cfce3023c
0e0f211867a8b4a0c1916ff645eccf3b4d0c09f0
describe
'225341' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
31e288cc843fc6ab72be2954ae7db303
710e13fe028dea27aa44abf9937103c3522062c3
'2012-03-31T16:16:36-04:00'
describe
'145730' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
c570231d1ecf2f7406648f29125480e7
850e1d957e4d31e50fc100ff2ee9c2868716838c
'2012-03-31T16:15:40-04:00'
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
dfe46b401f539d0df789c6899bf19592
0d1c8a1ab35931b7a3070d49b27f57e6143ca5e3
describe
'71869' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVY' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
02133ccffc94e4afd6020eb783e51f23
89e5ad8d2b36b5db9994a14bbda5435e82b1d6be
'2012-03-31T16:14:57-04:00'
describe
'1825932' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBVZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b38b83594e15a8b3fe51d476f8da28ab
b14f42c1529fd4b3085e5bc8fdec1cb54795d1ba
'2012-03-31T16:11:32-04:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
4cb07f2d9d85d8ad819c62fdc8dd5501
7b6dba62d3879cb0bb05eebbf33f92492f121dad
describe
'38490' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
125980237494bae699fae666e6a379b1
10ab8a7711914e64cce65379d6cff78691878717
describe
'226023' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
390a58f9040194c5ca28e94eb1d5f194
5a86dee50793c640ca02e98d581b91a29088ce28
describe
'146343' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3777e5681e2f1974027586c3f60027c1
c6081ec4ae86bdeaeb52e2329d712ff2ff441041
'2012-03-31T16:11:05-04:00'
describe
'36489' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a54b7e4ef14e9cbd2eeb3693aa75d6c7
d2e0cc91d280405343321f3d2a593e686cdbfd4b
describe
'72447' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
796adb1385840e5b0fa6b2aa9dba0d6f
936d08e3268d2a85f1c81c470802e980db80dd96
'2012-03-31T16:12:52-04:00'
describe
'1831784' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d6038d515d7c8307dd2f0d9ec4b31c8c
704fcaf0acb29cd07b5b52d433e5c6edc85cc39f
'2012-03-31T16:08:51-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
94cf265f9b2ad30ff0f09627bc42c9a3
0160cabbfd1caeb8b7081aa86587a6e2fd6233fc
'2012-03-31T16:15:11-04:00'
describe
'37122' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWI' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
1b932f937cd946f62fe633513b92db36
63ae29d172f6daf14e70bbbb0fbb48c94911ff37
describe
'221432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
43264081cb3f594202a769ae1d85d857
5aea8bea5711ddf0829f150e637bea5838545619
describe
'129395' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
97fcc505f4582dec7cddfb7921504ecd
f403245174e7593241a6e4e86231d5fe6e2e0289
describe
'31844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
b94e016929ecbff7d48f04230af5a56f
77911b8c9c9349eb935f07b4a83aff41bdd92221
describe
'65119' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ea9fe73b965dfa10ce0e94ed0fd6d541
43cf4177fa4ac0714b362b0a813e826f99a030cc
describe
'1794028' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
bf36b73a28f1283951f213316bf0a34a
eaf56c86bbc228c23c3116f9e3db546f8ab5b6ce
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4375c4155c76b32a26dbda2e21b54267
b20588b99f50605127ce5e1c1a8351b56c2dc799
describe
'35806' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4298e0aa839dddb4c5c30e59aef13d50
9623db50df1945b3c96339273289ff307612632d
describe
'223603' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
1e3320222258cd3addbf81cc2aa7075c
023e2585a91c02a5a88ef2bdbe6c0325a5795eb9
'2012-03-31T16:09:58-04:00'
describe
'119415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
1dbdfb963e8f4f8bba7067dc49c27a8f
6e8b4eb15769c9e4eb5ac4df4692c5ec023e02ef
describe
'25824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
0029ac259bb9311a33f8bd6e375970b7
13e5b2b81c1ebdf0c44b713b0e20e2f4b7ab7ebc
describe
'60750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
239a89a5e9ff765111b11d4ef037a7b4
c5625756530aa18cc113abe311a47846c7c03163
'2012-03-31T16:14:35-04:00'
describe
'1811020' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWU' 'sip-files00080.tif'
677e87bb457d7c6d1acdb3ffdb48fa0b
46eae1c9f061285958131886a0610e311505c04f
'2012-03-31T16:10:54-04:00'
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
5be47073122929917cdb27026219999f
158cf2a56e75a45477ae5d91bf0008fc9f8bb9a3
describe
'34134' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
b6750b297b2c523065c38d2517adaf1b
89a0ccf70c4ce8509064fb190015cb67e31d72c5
'2012-03-31T16:11:27-04:00'
describe
'221019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
801e9054c4e09aabaf04af9e21ebbf5e
d1f6a7ae3788d541e74b87e96e6961f015cc7c60
'2012-03-31T16:11:58-04:00'
describe
'132953' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
9825f87221086394ec1584fafb0323c1
575a75cbf0531763b114815363823ad30f1a85e7
describe
'32203' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBWZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
753d3a684d6cb74bde466b787a496c01
bd773c4409f0d7da31c674fb4688e99cad82a7b4
describe
'66524' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e459ba86ff9392a7cfaa849d9061226b
4ba029edb2a4ecdc43623dec50c4bd861ccd8719
'2012-03-31T16:14:21-04:00'
describe
'1791076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
d4ee93976fd8721a3fb5a279beb4b9af
a658e83f8102b827a5f907ed9fd5e82378f0eeb1
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a01e24caf57c6863994349959673472f
91af3fb5e0f79a013a289e4fa225edb80b0b1c02
describe
'36325' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXD' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
964a1882346947fc237dc7ade0c697a3
82ed831bbd3116a622abad5b969c844c5b5db899
describe
'223990' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
7cbcc5c784a41077f39693860ee4ddea
2b3b7486feff7d278b66b65b39656f4817fec7a6
describe
'134394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
168680a51568fafcd387aa4c6f977c63
79fc51193a48416a88edb3c86b3f5627f44ceb68
describe
'32046' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXG' 'sip-files00082.pro'
aaf33fc69dfb593ffdc330552cf7b584
b0ef19bb7b05929961e4f7d793e09169fa9f2bc6
'2012-03-31T16:11:30-04:00'
describe
'66149' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
6178bab6ea9b51759ba41af1de6b89c2
de91309396871c382122d4cb5baec96c3ef60a13
describe
'1815684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
fe66aff61f40edd9f3837976074801ee
e9c57db2fa8b6785b92b9c1050c0f945f20c84c6
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4d81889eacff25129cab19f5f6e2e9e0
75ac471b2fe9994df3a2d4284fba6e3d0976569b
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXK' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
901fbce909eadae544520ab8e9a8f570
0ca90a1becb6fe26e877f80132b7db0775ed8cd8
describe
'227084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
45feae12af0f93625a48cf8a9c34c67e
732e7e2ba003c3c30913b0524f681c9ddfe1f9fb
describe
'137724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d332f471de2db645a5c8c4554ead2c72
cceb9470891b6b3f381ebdde610b3979aa30e1e7
describe
'34327' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXN' 'sip-files00083.pro'
aa8082db26fde1067ace391e82272749
1d9d412c6296052633b8b9e2e4aa4e4af3263e1a
describe
'66743' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0666a645a0103f52557ef1ab2e97a151
2735cefadddcefb4a3f8887adc60b1342e0e23ca
describe
'1839568' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
eab0d6a06474a049f46e327410b850c3
929843364d1080e71132dae5bb745c3c4e6e79eb
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
7acf6dfeff045dfc5164df66bdca95bb
f5f5af4477e7b426e92f4d4872f35b59a852acbb
'2012-03-31T16:11:37-04:00'
describe
'36197' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXR' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
41ad227c719ca99ad9e0144b28bc8346
b0c0e3d0049c245eb2855e7129e30fcffc679e33
describe
'222805' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXS' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7dd8c48ec228288ece551a129850e078
5f9b428790c443a60f3a8adde9ad180e1c42091d
describe
'151936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXT' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
fe7de781f725608b98a6ebcce0b26296
6a27a3afac9b806694d634c8c4be80e15b5e438f
'2012-03-31T16:13:09-04:00'
describe
'36515' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXU' 'sip-files00084.pro'
3a2bed059e268212d6ab4071e2da40f9
334e175efae7533cc34d4a229fe85508838d9534
describe
'72773' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1db88c0b74963e0895b59624adffdf7e
d8d6fefe82eefc43f92002bcaa00ee11d85159d0
'2012-03-31T16:15:04-04:00'
describe
'1805928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
23a4014fe184233e7588cebab07cc37a
e75387abe089f8c3388c4fb0a439e718c4eb8759
'2012-03-31T16:14:15-04:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXX' 'sip-files00084.txt'
63d6bb1a70ad96528583b752a4040993
afaf50970a4a4a8b7a01f632557f2bbdf6df8e36
describe
'38067' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
3f43a7c3c719e2566c16edfd30cc916a
ea4cc033dc61ba856808ad0de2299b3aba807416
describe
'224852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBXZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
515ef57aa4506969713d28af710a9ce4
c94818981c923f048c2511f3818ccc6d20dd5fc5
describe
'139329' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYA' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
6ebf8a7e9121c834a616c2f56c03232e
54a7f0db0d90157b9ad270bf5a54fcb7f2169a34
'2012-03-31T16:09:16-04:00'
describe
'33812' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYB' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a2adb72e4c9be625112f20f8f5b7ba1b
7dfd69617e2ad6dd74959d9293e8dbbf53763d75
describe
'68399' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYC' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5ac4f6f216382af1b23409d7868a02f6
6a4419259309bb972dc679d74c1ec8c8753519b1
describe
'1821560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
40b6cf80462db61746116b5570a0a70e
c45a45d6e4ed1d7364cd2bba2ae6f870b82e6927
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b0393aed721e69a5f20906dc847e4d2c
d2c085c1a7cd1dd365c03e792f47cb6e1a00cb4e
describe
'37141' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1260a02e697fe4d4391d440839940682
26accf0e85e7803a5951d7ea8d62069a028b2be5
describe
'225333' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
6505c5868c5992d0fb1a7c45eb83f7ba
cbec61a3cfe1227202b0bcc5e4a351b609d52e26
describe
'151754' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
fc2875de5c5b6efcfabb3d01c46bb603
c6c0feaa2ad1990f477c4730c211fb273bee2c4a
describe
'37407' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYI' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b6d4b8c69396bc9dea0ece3971791808
59a3e06955073f56efbff9d85f6e74ad194405ce
describe
'73359' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
eedcbd220b31022a407cfed535c78f8f
1a8cfdcf100c16d4243db3689fe9d1e6da676880
describe
'1826236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e500d65fd6a1dbd5b51bf5b17affcde7
f13af02607a2b085d7562244b0eda5f36f588967
'2012-03-31T16:13:42-04:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
4412aa466534f20562408d7624964431
82138bf2a30de36e7bf89194aed3f53a4e2f1681
describe
'37693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
bdff4c32b24528ffe4564640a3fb2cb3
891cc584de87f1dd3e0525d38f89d7c44dffefd6
describe
'223415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYN' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9948bfd94e36fa5ec207eba0bcc6707e
6e8505151c8f88d9ec6c116ede9ac89cf6e1b964
describe
'135288' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9e6f5642e8ad37c0d0b7bbbaa0fc5a9a
387a3795c02e10dddead8336ada14f32eea477a7
'2012-03-31T16:09:20-04:00'
describe
'32939' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYP' 'sip-files00087.pro'
99f22bf46d91ee1b47a7c3054a5e0bf6
b01d3524e47bbfb23ad0af3684a1714d5de262b9
describe
'66427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
43152bee19081c54f1b2c66a6e4949a8
89cb054a512270dac734773f1ed1913b2f6f1931
describe
'1810136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYR' 'sip-files00087.tif'
732d962d08b7f3d0944e42144b8e9e8d
9e32e0f86c8a5a3ea50f4b715df417ca47e1fbe8
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYS' 'sip-files00087.txt'
1f1710d173e3181716efe30ce7657fd9
1f3369c91a72c49badcdaadf617b47e3e067c5d8
describe
'36440' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
5a579fa5421b7fe063aec720a7502e18
413024319b44878f3aaf8c98f74909281031c565
'2012-03-31T16:14:28-04:00'
describe
'224667' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYU' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e39506d914f99d17c949d7276e5b0a08
02f40bd6239e85f577d0b032b72987c03a0d3da9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYV' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
18d0110ca4345bfaf7df1a9224c0b887
b6d85b5d83e91d6b3708562e4bc3267df1e699fd
describe
'33008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYW' 'sip-files00088.pro'
f5971f0bde657dc5181d3b2da0de598f
42a3a3558a2313085f3bf45d7c2abff50592294f
'2012-03-31T16:12:40-04:00'
describe
'68008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYX' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0a9d793914ac3540590961c5180962d8
dee05f4d3e4ec624f8838d3d78285bf6b55e7051
describe
'1820872' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYY' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cff1453d84dd242154e41dd1a1e6eb3f
6996a541977a0804b70a6e9a52bfa6c20e5447fd
'2012-03-31T16:16:07-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBYZ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
1f2133a5f3db615d1a880e4ca24e6d64
f841ceded08855bf0fecceda941775b2ca851f15
'2012-03-31T16:08:47-04:00'
describe
'36754' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZA' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
98b694880076caaeecb23d1368f9e45a
17bc2eed4a9428a97d33c6ac27f2d9f167a8233b
'2012-03-31T16:10:03-04:00'
describe
'221069' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
bcd8791de8ca8e0b2f7cd9a38c87f58b
8250002c5fcf4f2d907e6108958687707e73c0ca
'2012-03-31T16:08:44-04:00'
describe
'133897' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZC' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
d588a006d8b107bb4407aff7b8b24b13
a8bee95211ef8a4eee06500e58e54696c7b01226
'2012-03-31T16:12:34-04:00'
describe
'31463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
b09bfd0e43f2053cc0a2effddbdd59da
f9edda4cdf6f462dfb1f0fe3930cd01f49070423
describe
'66848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
389c0ae73505e5ddaeddef5812929886
58e9efb59917054f7007a7f19259f0dcb4c628bf
'2012-03-31T16:14:18-04:00'
describe
'1791308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZF' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2dce0a6cd17b035f8dcf43dfab60ec86
ab2a40355e0e065bcbd42746ffbf684ac15f1e9a
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0f8bc44f9900aa7d0c9dbdf003625055
dd6c3cf1ae6680310f6182513d2d5029c5fb917d
'2012-03-31T16:10:13-04:00'
describe
'36933' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
851faa96d276fee36fd0acf97d4d53f0
ec651362192c5e40179d705453146fe2ee269ba1
describe
'222278' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZI' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
61aac2a126a9589cd8f20b64b475c43d
2782b0ee939fc201e50d11983c787481cad75c42
describe
'148435' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZJ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
9accc8e7a40fa080e31b32c6b819aed5
21700fb34a39a99149bb1e11185fd7e90f6f411c
'2012-03-31T16:10:09-04:00'
describe
'35784' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZK' 'sip-files00090.pro'
a9f4a7e36355286787b3673349d03f39
29cd2d10a9d8a45a8f73bb7f886827035c65c073
describe
'72357' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZL' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
9daa9ada3b77629e0502ca678aeeae3a
452e6bccdff398329021659216bbc41437a46de5
'2012-03-31T16:13:57-04:00'
describe
'1802132' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
930b3de4da852de2164cea88f8ed4678
eb603ffc5834ad596e2199f0a56b1276c563f42a
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e128eb703365cf6ecc7a1832271e413f
bce47b3a131ae1fe6d2598f303d65085b7640286
describe
'38039' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZO' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
896cd22ecaade5aa88610777b3d6b45c
1dd208791c2521f8ed6db46d127b17e7d060e435
describe
'224713' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
06ff5bc089992fb4d4d90595348c905e
ce6f379a2308166a4b05aab24f33ca5d6332e90e
'2012-03-31T16:08:55-04:00'
describe
'136301' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
45f3382e36d1bec5e689f9ff09083213
f7a4c3bd0c94ab6bd0f1c335d9537e11d760e922
describe
'31831' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZR' 'sip-files00091.pro'
97709130e048893deeb42ab29116d596
1f4c76a11ea3543fc90b70d7ebdf334a4ac29233
describe
'67916' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6b83bff4b93f77ec2348260a95d47d29
f0f6a73dd9a966b9e534a9fc156025f44f886f9e
describe
'1820724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c93a5e2d61a1002269d7d2b0c51cd056
22e23b0107323333715cc46ba547781f1068c219
'2012-03-31T16:09:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
069802a249bf7b278561049e2eae01f4
573872cd758864dbdc7d8e5e59048bff6b12ca39
'2012-03-31T16:11:47-04:00'
describe
'36800' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
55d53870cf442c4112b3a2b21db6143b
80a90dff1977602a265631f73dede094cc2ebc12
'2012-03-31T16:11:39-04:00'
describe
'226596' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZW' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
be387fb9f279210d79b27174a4bed8f6
45e69e39ea5528c5dc374911ece8eafb941311fd
describe
'131733' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZX' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7d753dd166e1a30d2d86d3af575840b8
2321dbb13b0274f3d5889aeeeb922f54460c6079
describe
'30556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZY' 'sip-files00092.pro'
221af9af16a7d5037af7cf5ed4b5eeb2
74f7a718946a927a5788e22625548453da7babd5
describe
'65379' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACBZZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
3243b7bfaae035630f8d8a2ea9dca541
1757667210747e5844ddeee1fd75b44596d2c387
describe
'1835836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAA' 'sip-files00092.tif'
16f6b1bea516a3cebdf0d584d3119fcf
f8cd2c753705d42f205447041d35911177290aa2
'2012-03-31T16:09:35-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1342787e87e291a2f735c22c0fae051c
4e4dcdbdea76100e06abe1087930d98340ab95a0
describe
'36063' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAC' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
3be1b94e3022758d60582bd3ff15045d
7bfd85943367dd483953ad5933fbb815671f0a7d
describe
'224156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAD' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
a6e9d01cda5fd5ae7f3668f3b6ce6a7c
edd94be3e227889ac1f72a0bdf7ea33c1ec7713c
'2012-03-31T16:17:05-04:00'
describe
'149532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAE' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
88d053c5d3c0b7608dc21db48eb5b234
53739b89a25a44aa145191b38c9ed66f50b4eb05
describe
'37689' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
e4b92aba54505a97b8316bc62dc23b2b
3151d7a5d8cf9316914a5d35cf26fb9442567f2a
describe
'73558' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAG' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
0b9c4dfadadd5d5e0140110a41f42c8b
2a913f4991cc0265edb8163d58940fe4f73994b0
describe
'1816900' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAH' 'sip-files00093.tif'
98d923ef766f025dc922823be89fee89
b4b43b8c19315e59d2b7775b8b635679dd98e71b
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAI' 'sip-files00093.txt'
99bf6d46413cde01d56e9c1a350a7ad2
da2c414533374a6b226165b512e89e057bbeb5f7
describe
'38305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAJ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
573e78b6229e9f5dc9a3f929101c28e8
5e64b7cd861604f8c512673e2ff4c9ebc2c84217
describe
'222297' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAK' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
76d34eeadd99dd20a4998ad3410a8ec5
b5d62cbb4e9cc42072a421d6e007e2ae484b37e7
describe
'134085' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAL' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
2ca84a4ad9ffef1df1c3db35bfe7e8e2
8670cfd2a9e5eda4e23c7e443a97b2d755f74faa
'2012-03-31T16:10:18-04:00'
describe
'31434' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAM' 'sip-files00094.pro'
4f8256874e9064ea273110bcb8616253
1c80b57c7b28e8909ea230fa504df13885f223c0
describe
'66596' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAN' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
02da1df89e9b1913714a3d56555250c4
3df5336ddadca71711b4f75db1a02097dbd4657c
'2012-03-31T16:13:37-04:00'
describe
'1802592' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ce7f069140bb653fa071eecd7559b368
e18dabfab7262c7e0458380a9af9656e77825d15
'2012-03-31T16:15:50-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAP' 'sip-files00094.txt'
d9c92b673245c5c78fb63ff5cb19723c
2054a32121d341865d2c8352a4fb4e2c3b88f98d
describe
'36656' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAQ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
764f8eb2e0853bdbde6b2650d0372131
1fddb1b0c4154f7142a7f01298b72536316dc191
describe
'224747' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAR' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
7d608c2a30104528d9b3f5c2051609b2
eeda857e110b4a10e438a89d60e0de55757fe921
'2012-03-31T16:16:14-04:00'
describe
'132179' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAS' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
07635bccda82843c4c4a19be3a4f8004
157bd2441ba1a607bc6795d62d8c8a395a3b4f4e
describe
'32462' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
4e81ebd482ef37ad2301212db1af889b
dff0020e2ff3cdaa13e00b21d94171db989459c1
describe
'65798' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAU' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
b1bdadbdaca3f4e08c0b0e76368fae69
adcbe163999a2acd91d2c2e711267c5b406912b4
describe
'1821340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAV' 'sip-files00095.tif'
b8dc327dc0be1fe8122700572ce6068c
7074a6bef5b872a90d03b2f2c76a57c6a537d552
'2012-03-31T16:11:51-04:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
2e51798f78537f05dd8888843f9ce5ee
3a63e79c6ead7f9f0f61edcbd7348a5bed689a3a
'2012-03-31T16:12:59-04:00'
describe
'35951' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAX' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0f834393fdb497e5d166e8dda72fe48a
47da7505760f53e235574e85cdc1e1c97fb2f6ac
describe
'226248' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
6af0976f9466467eaad0ba356610c97b
f2dd20507579072b99b1a7a6399ec57c9f28024b
describe
'114213' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCAZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
9325cc73cc05d53051b1386467a2bd62
8877c514d7f2c85cd581734ad671513a70065d08
describe
'25612' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBA' 'sip-files00096.pro'
f244a431720d1b976a67e59f0e2214c6
f970ca07da94403e3258efb83f7b2363b4c5b80c
describe
'57425' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4c6f54b123fbfeb066ef5b89ca051ea5
98aa38d8ac8acf54a7d3ef3db91d3eeca2ed274b
describe
'1831760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
93309ec9491d6a7d6e530fe06a144e42
b415e289cd6bdca2fd1ec968b295cc5a63bb1542
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBD' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a9ea68a336794c085b02c6a635bbb736
e45ed2995f7414a3bba3d240064dc391a1f0f408
'2012-03-31T16:13:36-04:00'
describe
'33921' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
d3915e29e6e9076b1a0110c3ea39c3dc
2426afa3046b6eab76bd477d147037992bb735ce
describe
'225236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBF' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
dbd0d5b6d3e66fdd044dc7e5adf74453
7d75014ec2e906d8a2d5f9478c3a0b004a03037d
describe
'131129' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBG' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
d4dba93af5e27097e98e62f62273eee4
b6bc315f9c4fc869e8400c48cd0c28bf58f57bc8
describe
'33156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
1526aadd4dab71687c71204b1e31dbf0
564957438ba3ac227760b0908c15ce159a88cc9d
'2012-03-31T16:14:51-04:00'
describe
'66674' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
cd0881b377731f2b5bb0be258f690b09
668b9933edd683c4f2604f94a6f95f37c261708f
describe
'1824444' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
4bc39e7fd24780ea7208d7c767731552
bef53c25bc6db2b4e123e021e2dd548fd156ff0d
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
cd9eb38c69cf70b726830cb176e6e624
b9ec7c89f823ec369d2f019a9a0f2ea3d3c26455
describe
'35758' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBL' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
045d6371bfdf4258feb6c1db11cb17d4
20e36b4195c8b629392deceba1b66b0095177ef2
describe
'224207' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f165d2dd624c037156f42e9ffd3524a1
2c07d7d5e6c876e32d0a215fc61ea4133db3ca12
'2012-03-31T16:08:59-04:00'
describe
'142342' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBN' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9fb627e16107506d2f687c45d69b7e88
a33896ee3437657cc1e799166e6b1dcf26b61256
describe
'32319' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBO' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6ca9267caaf65e94e4a0d9779a2359c0
c7fe0a7a6a10af5af7775bd4da0d73237fcf3f5e
describe
'68343' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBP' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
a8f8196f8bae63dd6c1eb631f58c09f4
0c0fe14f3562e405fde9c945fca41488c9a7ea3f
'2012-03-31T16:16:41-04:00'
describe
'1816864' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBQ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
dbc235d6c45e4c2663b3701aef8ed0fb
39817d921152e1a41bf9c05d82160216727f599c
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
fafcb0092e7e8c2a81fdb4f3697f8b32
1cf515c013b41b3490a06afe9294f99fe8a2d956
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'37024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBS' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
2bee80ca9639d5c5266d566bf76410c1
dbf6017673fc92967db9a23d65566293b54a4557
describe
'224335' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBT' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
8bb44ef3f3f033b5e1b44d2f4a81c95a
10d734585ac2f8e1d1a1b4b022bc94ad112d67c1
describe
'129945' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBU' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
c0fae018f6efc299fe803ab3db503672
c76e06e0b86f1c5c07a5b5e403fc7f4188b83666
describe
'28024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
49571c0874998afbf91532694249a9f5
7f87712f10f92cb6ed4834752f48278d23757ad1
'2012-03-31T16:14:23-04:00'
describe
'64284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBW' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c9daf79ba9f792317bb6310589f82cec
df5456114f22c8f7b32aafcfedf07384ca75675c
'2012-03-31T16:16:20-04:00'
describe
'1817364' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
3b91264f697748cc553c3c4e5d5221dc
6433f620537dbb5256e0980d65ede85bf497c606
'2012-03-31T16:09:11-04:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
ab8cf32ec04fac16bbeb410b363ddda8
79cf02744c6599d3ef3ae4c39c9362731561c7f9
'2012-03-31T16:09:02-04:00'
describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCBZ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
f4af73d94e0b61201f7be74f7abf92fd
7ecfc1d8c45f75af10a4edd8099978bf7d151029
'2012-03-31T16:15:31-04:00'
describe
'223716' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCA' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
0b345b09da86b26dddcf79e942a2f02d
4e578a11f05dd3d234d990c1a7c21355197c0c3f
'2012-03-31T16:10:34-04:00'
describe
'155181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5084f215f27d7dc8049e8a190568f3cc
ff7f823987ee898f01b9302967f332c19e4295a0
describe
'36180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCC' 'sip-files00100.pro'
c9c886ab6550d4ab47a6bf20c102f789
da5116a8af52fa488745ff7d74a9c26de6c95ab0
describe
'74424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
7bc298ebd3c74f6d0dba590dfc998253
f1bb40a121da607aed215ad551092a439d913876
'2012-03-31T16:17:06-04:00'
describe
'1813468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCE' 'sip-files00100.tif'
a795aa501b738134d31b201a5a76065e
120986cc1758036a4be080c502cd882ddcb09f51
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCF' 'sip-files00100.txt'
f4dc56c72a4bf3d5b940566e68342307
8507e337c7176d10e730c93431408d77f40fe8e9
describe
'38921' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCG' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
dba655bb50c71d33102173f3da61b0af
d874b17033dec47df2bfc410d09f264854ab6520
describe
'224338' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c0848cd4ee254d91a324f96696d6f2ac
8b9510699463ef80b21e82f1c98bc9d44fc6852c
describe
'151546' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCI' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
19516ae9dfdf8ee87713b105877e3f18
7ef77733514ec9a85dc2f7f8806750fc010c8907
describe
'36903' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d8066d032efd0f9e41160cb8f864437b
7de4f723181f9b07aeaa44ed1b769c3d740c2081
describe
'72259' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
0b744c868ab46a88bff48f31d8e417eb
989f19cfb3bc701ba17e5761852ff86e7b368289
describe
'1817912' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
faf3e14aa419acfe1a9ee71712874c59
a454db21cdde193e6201d6ab5a66642e1e86469d
'2012-03-31T16:17:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCM' 'sip-files00101.txt'
a984bddd8b890322aa343e4c7de4e83d
476e27b06660c4903f8da69fac1f62b209e91cc4
describe
'38685' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCN' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4d37ca3288207289a5b0c27865fe70b3
aed0918f7201186967e0c59e82a7a4b3b7916a04
describe
'226597' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCO' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7ea8c085ae8659e481750d78dd04a292
33dbca925fa0debaa1279b9dc98a6b841e21cd58
describe
'144046' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCP' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
4cd1dbc47d22034e7db6b773e5f81de3
e12e5b53813bb4898278555e768268e0d4a7807f
describe
'33414' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f85ab786e32c9e69d89c7c6ebb52b245
eaee1b7929a4c5a174a9b12ae513f88a09899bd8
'2012-03-31T16:15:49-04:00'
describe
'69124' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3efa75ae5063878bb74b844c41f5b935
4cb019b4e12ab08865c5caed97f071275030fe8f
describe
'1835864' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCS' 'sip-files00102.tif'
abbf7a1ecf95d2e6223ff2c75a9cf99b
c6a0084cedf637374a8dec61fde2e1765032adc5
'2012-03-31T16:12:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCT' 'sip-files00102.txt'
901ad0bc92fcd90566ca8c055da8cf6c
f8f46a43b7f61ba38ddd4f0e18973447e2e81942
describe
'37377' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
d9675aedfc13c2300ef2fa00a8041a52
ee5759457ed00247c2b0a7ea8310fc95fab1daac
describe
'220747' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b934851a6a909bbf323cc0d723cc3793
8b1853f8acc41f338e81219c85019fa40e884a26
describe
'151918' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCW' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
dad3d1c4cf349f5a991f163a4071c4d0
66ec8c77354717546610fb1fcac5a8eb7e425d6d
describe
'36894' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
5a2f6e0428f6926470d2ac00c6033454
f8d2e93a11f68286d74b1fc0cc1e09a62bd3fad9
'2012-03-31T16:12:30-04:00'
describe
'73061' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCY' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
348d35d4996fe83b96d6140928d395e3
bc78ddf29c53f37477194932437d14690d20749f
describe
'1789400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCCZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
59c78dde266e97b5da94eb420c0e7388
03aaffad2955c6af485d7c3be8e62367b1bd8ee8
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDA' 'sip-files00103.txt'
aa40ae1bde82dfc1b45287f9f9ec3880
08643f4652779550d49ed5cc6cc12efe93fa1ca6
describe
'39091' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDB' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
2b6aeb584150784d2f29b8cd8ac8b9c7
dde4c42c56e343bae931fd048cb17662d977ceb3
describe
'223206' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e1748742f2406645e0b1cca85c63e6db
4ea74f52f76e0ce3460ee8b678f7f1c572789c36
'2012-03-31T16:13:38-04:00'
describe
'142811' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDD' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
06ea8e387219e4721e32e42de5a190bb
e6a1f00b4fd800f83306531ebd934dec4e098b0b
describe
'31113' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDE' 'sip-files00104.pro'
dd114c624defb876c75c4ccf59b9b20b
b7f4161f1b6ad2c531fe8813583c746c78d3241c
describe
'68716' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
666cd0e5d57bbd573ae736f1b039f836
aab9f009b02883185d3a08c0b4851636244cb164
describe
'1808756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDG' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e30e0f54b7788767203089599016e243
9b52c81b2a752dec55d444fc888e9e0d34b1af74
'2012-03-31T16:16:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
f9d193bf955b4a09d3166bbcc9394b8a
308af9623607785f893626574d3416a22576074b
describe
'36869' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDI' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
8da6b17a18bef22b148e44e014dfc572
793d948f221b88f78e45593638b7b9623f37ca6e
'2012-03-31T16:15:48-04:00'
describe
'222188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDJ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2182f40e83057d071d6214dbb7f0bdb5
2e3983ad8123e7fd0a08231f8cb57771ca3ea562
'2012-03-31T16:10:02-04:00'
describe
'151061' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDK' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
afba53ecba24544c1c381fa4ceb0a0fa
66fadbe665fb09791e13b7afd3fb1678ee7eb794
describe
'35675' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDL' 'sip-files00105.pro'
90a878a1248692130dab3e09576cd21f
fd8fcf6ab5a8957f1cb7d511ca96c28bb06db3d0
describe
'73135' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
ffd2703c5553bb56653b28c19c3e56e7
93789e0cdae5c33733fcaa77e5575356d7717a3f
describe
'1801048' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDN' 'sip-files00105.tif'
7ede9e3da887d37ad203ae85516cf9e9
e9ef9572a41c16e9788b57f2702ce9efaf9dc06a
'2012-03-31T16:11:09-04:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
16d06e56250c4044ed51b6607c5c4cbe
64973e1b9312717beaf03d265e249380ce9188f6
describe
'38215' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
d48e505f61c74c48ee61f3bb76497c54
ddc5009d2b3fe6a6b51c73f56a99a693db4fa646
describe
'222892' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
d677333f5b6f92e1694eef7955741cfb
bad578290d0f9dc60116e39463017d431a22e50c
'2012-03-31T16:14:41-04:00'
describe
'126082' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDR' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
529f51532c50432b3a3eeb3f9809dc67
2d07fef8d0c2c09fb5b7a700f6789a97d8ce5c4e
describe
'26305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
bf3b5dd8a99ccdd78a57bd40c4d1e2c8
31607401f19decb491e6846f31d258ad563d3958
'2012-03-31T16:13:13-04:00'
describe
'62183' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
68cf4231e580b8d23ec7ba2fc1ea2ade
b31d72a3c92b58a1d880116a1ed6187adcaa256b
describe
'1805904' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDU' 'sip-files00106.tif'
72c7244c22ea9b89f92c32602810ed9e
85f3d202e4abe65faf3b6c575fb1b35b6b64abb4
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDV' 'sip-files00106.txt'
772c0b7d11306c1148affa21f90bb62f
8c32a57065ec3d5e1eb8b2d033ff484b67c7efa5
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDW' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
c751c69c6fc23c8536b1a4efd7d060c3
8b3e0c31589e31ed6973a812e0bf7f7a463bf94b
describe
'222654' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
69e582805bb6c7970ce5797d8fd10fe2
b8ae1c25c20a24ad5e5c722bc73f3d477ae22c37
describe
'127886' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
5e60ddaa381646fea1751c0d1cf91c50
3e982eeeb57120e4c624e5251cb74b0a0627f97f
describe
'30036' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCDZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
8532debd98261c31f1f2a562b6fec1e4
387c3f2a6c6bbdaaebcd14917fa07dc7a3ef147e
'2012-03-31T16:10:41-04:00'
describe
'62579' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
01eef28fb827589ed3fa748ffa53cfe7
d6d1dccc80fdaba10b0ceb10b1ee2b98d9898745
'2012-03-31T16:13:25-04:00'
describe
'1803712' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
f747c79ed24380213f578b24e0f0f2cf
806ee208e2f5c10865c36aee6cf4bbc0cffd35a2
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEC' 'sip-files00107.txt'
7ae1dcefe2db4c05d230e5e140aa4c38
41381f3795abec3ed72c511c7274484fcb5775de
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCED' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
5378175d886b24689271fc83abe39ea6
16437da18f282fa5980c1cd73831eccf0f8929a3
describe
'223748' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
619d7b9d7ef641e87a4819e6893fda55
47980a18a906bb8cf4225619982b361737eb5c6f
describe
'140407' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEF' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
99d9f3f0cea9ec032b6a52204737d9cc
b11622bee54ea7665cf43383cdf7f33953afa223
describe
'31614' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEG' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b1c275655c786523fe4f0c2ec50f1837
5d62cb617c790f2e84fa07038ff38b4fb2bd7aab
'2012-03-31T16:12:29-04:00'
describe
'68032' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c35d7570510ef9b4eccfea111be71a1e
c36e5eaa9991f33ac00769f64687f12284fce308
'2012-03-31T16:10:35-04:00'
describe
'1813584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEI' 'sip-files00108.tif'
ad5256ad12e1b1c42039df5df2c3534d
c8c1fe1a554b89f9b7a58860a45aa88ed21c1e78
'2012-03-31T16:08:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d5250119b4ee04e4037b39e0825743a0
f5b8347cb547de78c7209c8a3ce99bb6a7076531
describe
'36594' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEK' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
a403f9a0ec8816db1ee9a3da154079c4
bd8bb02dcf6830bf8d8a1d59384614b1cabbefc7
'2012-03-31T16:13:26-04:00'
describe
'222116' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a95f6bf137176eb76fb1d001d9aeae5d
76ea0f109935f9f6ef45d5b50a7f9b8607a0c656
describe
'135566' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e688e0d1330d68636c7dd17052ebbb27
038825b22842b40e58d2c700633d4933aad1f026
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEN' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d136f727cecc98a878cb52674d4ace07
673566146d8c2fee48c88d19da6df76a2f98f065
'2012-03-31T16:10:01-04:00'
describe
'66036' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEO' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
17719afd01c04be21542f17b9aa42f7a
c837365dd8d066db1de6f4f44f95263d23238c29
describe
'1800724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEP' 'sip-files00109.tif'
af3c6f7b3c9683b1a6b16ab299fbf92c
635bf73072d5b0f0a56bd8998bdf105857ce8bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
6cd2121b1e912d667037973be358eb93
404e357f1ab6b662f45040fb7571aaec819713cd
describe
'37021' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCER' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b7f43dd59415dc3862268838c631277d
01dfa10e46112599cd48237649fdcfff5b5cf32e
describe
'225630' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCES' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
ce2f7a47547d62b1a6ef0dffbcc37ba8
24aa6f60f456f9fd1f4fb81cac210066793a56bb
describe
'130517' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCET' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
225cd8fcb17a5631b75256524765aa46
52465bee41fe914c4a79e8ee43efc21f89547106
'2012-03-31T16:15:23-04:00'
describe
'31083' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEU' 'sip-files00110.pro'
cf927f7305bc6cd5b1c832dc8029f3c0
5a3203bbf57638eb121137087c3aab65893e5c1b
'2012-03-31T16:10:46-04:00'
describe
'65495' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
4a35d5109ea38ecc1382d7d4d2d32697
a4e89984813737eea13847ad8641d0bd8d73768e
describe
'1827528' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
6329188ef27ed7871f19ab78a05caa4d
a5fbcc12f318032281c94a3354a1fbd0989ecfb4
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8e8bbbbceef2003fee8fe763da785ee9
b7b1d719c9edfd0d8906664a3449d2822245cbc9
'2012-03-31T16:16:34-04:00'
describe
'35969' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
1bae1204884bd84751c28663a4ba633b
460157ec6fda0fe24b51cfa7020c1de12659b8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCEZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
16aa6bf5d521e36f583af396e02da41d
2a9a1fe7077aaca9c7141b0ef7f43425471328db
describe
'146018' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
34261a482f464012c3c3af8ec406c33a
9f854f95ae8d52d3920e4ee163941d41544d3a9b
'2012-03-31T16:17:08-04:00'
describe
'37236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFB' 'sip-files00111.pro'
f344c319038b93d4262a17b1484b64e3
cfdee4da28eda82ca8e881200a52aa7902bf1536
'2012-03-31T16:09:28-04:00'
describe
'71313' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
3320040916c3fbf7ba5b5b9811bc80c3
d31e37e76de711e2b661fd4c9fdb190d8914a84e
'2012-03-31T16:08:42-04:00'
describe
'1811344' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFD' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ef57aede26b64f08ae30881e3a8094d9
b1d44abceab0389b8e7b24014463d0511b740a9d
'2012-03-31T16:14:31-04:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8f04ce15983970777b2b333c90b7daf4
94c23e34bdccf63c48a04a1a42926c1adb95b28e
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
bce0a55ade2372496b9335cbed9eb8ba
24d5d8a3fa1df35b2216ad3f74861fcc7429f045
describe
'224629' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFG' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
96d23c5094a244a5c2ee490d0db18d4e
ee619e45b1a34d7a226cef0a1418f0c32a350069
'2012-03-31T16:16:00-04:00'
describe
'130657' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFH' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
03ce15a31ee6337251d881d75580f218
191649e2f61a0e5c0e4cb99532da3750b8f75e56
describe
'30925' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFI' 'sip-files00112.pro'
99183f6ec450cf9c7ee1836c256483fa
b43ab0756a99d772f6215b889ca578917bdf4c3f
'2012-03-31T16:16:08-04:00'
describe
'64855' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
7962f9b38a60be6a40b1fa4272ddad9a
63a631f531616b301b6b1e14b46127f62729e9b1
describe
'1820764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
6b7fd583385e2082b0a391b9a76eef0b
c7aa21bb7fdb34bfe1697fa4d305dbdbab05ffb0
'2012-03-31T16:15:24-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
cc3c58207e5a0ce87a0b2b7c679b9dff
ce01a46126ce71907fd9a241ef67a32ac878a4f6
describe
'35991' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
a6c3088edb893ddfc3d168a01211a330
5649be66bb53a799089a3df058c914e2263efae5
describe
'224330' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
afe1aa7253cc6e6ad3eff71509d4c3e6
a9d006b1c85fb699277f5e08fda10c2be0231830
describe
'111412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
89f6818c523f5db8b805bbd9276ad577
9bd7d92e70170186b6d862e722426c33eff7b442
describe
'26100' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
4dc279fc99b0bad14599a92e84117b10
99cb5e233ed01897676e24a850dba09c71b7a0c4
describe
'58791' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0422c196a4cba4ed029b37ce3036acb5
2bac159b1021a6e71664533c50cbd624285eb8f4
describe
'1816956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
1da5869d8101b83d634990b3a3c85a81
b00987fb5678ddde159e7cb3c7d6d628caf5087c
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9a079a2401cd3601e64ec8a7b37ac018
a96b047584f000205ff74b5d9f84f1c049b357a0
describe
'33998' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
15ffd50748de14ce34a2f5480d0e4ccc
c3a774f85ba5df41122f65d55f037d8024a99ab2
describe
'226802' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
199a171361bcbf679a916188ba3f6ab6
e744de09e8fd9efdd0db6248a979a2d3be0f109a
describe
'124846' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
679f5edc55e60a1bd94b32c7d3f4c0b0
7431ff1c6f9a8bf98573dbc2f7486e8af9144e9c
describe
'27919' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
886db465bc90709ad94dca6489e4c79f
f0d199169d6b23be27b40ac01f6f71b93e40e740
describe
'61488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFX' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
87621fc648ff9a9bbb0bfb3508b9e64f
d2cf3500baa6d559775abd431943bc7102638903
describe
'1837464' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
563c40eec062f49470e598a7b36dafe6
088205d783673f4b25ea5de367eb10bb71839a4b
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCFZ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d39b7991fbe72aafec73bdd76685c7ee
053b163414db43516e681e228c5cbb3e4b1e76ee
describe
'34702' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGA' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
b6beba5db82bbabb78cee4b2279179b6
1eb638edaedf595f5102947015b88f377b249661
describe
'223454' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGB' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d15863399068e9915d01043df94f512c
dedf3d26e3b0f6d34303c0aae31169cad5f7e426
describe
'145669' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
651314656936e792ec3686d4f36d2230
80cbf125fe88f48a816643886b24bef15f51b1c5
describe
'36505' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
55f3ed38495387f32e0a3892f8530451
c2066b3320c50be3d30877b247f451bc06634e1c
describe
'71256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
b0761a9c1b559b21fe249a89cd2823a8
68301b06c71914c7ff6da6ec05bfba36223080d0
'2012-03-31T16:14:53-04:00'
describe
'1810500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
97075d34e520d2e1bd529606564c1bb5
d25722f112dea06f63e4ecbdeb7ae5082321028e
'2012-03-31T16:12:25-04:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGG' 'sip-files00115.txt'
f371a510b5203d13a073187bd66352ce
268f728c0fb7217569953e7d3d32e54ff2b3c4d1
describe
'37746' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
4cbb4154a7513c8591e51a1cdcb10039
7e498880903c3d287b1f6841e229226e16833d37
describe
'224276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
d3d353d43f6165dcc8270565099e83e4
f22ba4c464d28d727dc896b7941a01d72bda03d4
describe
'134831' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9805efc1527f546c97da9b029260e9bc
a9ee8b4f01e9a02715a18c0abf439b07050dcad9
describe
'31630' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
805c70cdb5b6e7fe80505cd8f56784ad
b406bdd95060518d64017e93b522ece2a27d2d95
describe
'66333' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
6d78d063da24c2e0cd4c3902d5360a05
9c3876c9d554bd0b76ec7ba59840ac1445890cf9
describe
'1817400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGM' 'sip-files00116.tif'
9779b2be63b776d73d00a9f762052857
3e9908f02831787c82fc076b98c10843db7f387c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGN' 'sip-files00116.txt'
dff055df9ef1419abc4055e8b2c4e16d
cc4353f20338c31fe22af572216d070d3298c736
describe
'36008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGO' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d2a5b63739deab07dafdeea361493062
5f52c0e959b467861505eefe0875505e94611790
describe
'226230' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
af8743a45a159832cc85e24b8f37693d
d8149c0e77ab3dbeb57f273f25d33271b4e8fd58
describe
'129563' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8e13fdbe17859c2a2010b8ba90d21a9e
239f6e8191d9ee168537797deac8f73ca114a460
'2012-03-31T16:10:22-04:00'
describe
'31593' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGR' 'sip-files00117.pro'
872dc744070d96045f5e5f967df91222
6330ab0ce9f81cdd68d21cc2761b1e79e089fcc8
describe
'65047' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGS' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ab861a3d3ef816abdcec5f81ade397fd
7314130fe66fb62af56e9aaa680a6cd81040096e
'2012-03-31T16:15:18-04:00'
describe
'1833312' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGT' 'sip-files00117.tif'
3108d68bcc4cf0c0aa610d73209c0006
108f127eb96c069b51a21aac1087695a06890091
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
a0d53549d9146ab67bdbcf7074476c05
f468fe116726f7d842e86089d5e7e9be74684eec
describe
'36029' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ff2686fd80f2de19e034698df83b15d2
bf3406229de17d121e8fe517d23ea7373f62cf66
describe
'223168' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGW' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f0b39168d9ffb7478c6d09490a2d9b69
c97f8b28d588a04859f5377f78d2529f331dc49b
'2012-03-31T16:13:28-04:00'
describe
'144737' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGX' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c964d46629238c113298d0f2b55e4332
3de3b958da2b2049238c675f5337b44d9dcb5deb
describe
'35680' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGY' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b344450b65895ccb4f8723723b2a69b6
05c935749ff468e1da443f7379ec5132ec219cc8
describe
'71202' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCGZ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
969a1d20691757940e4c2645d7b9d191
45a93b916317a5100dfdf56d1bb7ec08986ad0bd
describe
'1808932' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHA' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4d6afd96bebe5f8154445d1b67800db2
115720f9c1058eba3731c8418e082277b847cfa0
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHB' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b406dd6c8950d0e572e8f79143664b76
4fb77afbc2e32d23a22ffff98b081b87e128ac6d
describe
'37537' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
89ca8f1135f91395ec3c172b6b07478d
490055634b14edc50952b2983a92009cee29a30d
describe
'224921' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHD' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
7fb207bdaf279b0464a22d93fd85aba7
3507b394592b7fa35c4aaa6d1b1b1cca99b18c26
describe
'129605' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHE' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
70a6dc9abca091885bbc2e16b6d68569
d4f8bec0d3443b02f1d27aac330df41a2f48e7ab
describe
'32045' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
34a4a8aa4c18dead45eec6a2212c481d
8711cc3700e07853b69971e01c55e41256976045
describe
'65333' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHG' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
a9e2f5163fe5f0c033a7c7363824b36c
59d1690a8fabd402d1989672806699a2be2b4aa9
describe
'1822180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHH' 'sip-files00119.tif'
674973899a54d2eac82221147a7a4f25
db1317617e9d7c7f1e98b5754ae10d1805d48bd0
'2012-03-31T16:10:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHI' 'sip-files00119.txt'
d5b7cd96a9c85a5a0d11c95d3a66b3aa
548393e20cfb6a858e0b27cf16864c7613640d74
describe
'35841' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHJ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
195521d4c6ef573193d504556ac47846
530cc3d468a288a957d63f82bf798c9c84583b61
describe
'223841' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7bed548439ae61a8f0979081b9663db2
80a19ebc0f2d1b527765d0d324dfc135a30657f4
describe
'141856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
3d13534814368669587b2c8545d9e45c
424d9b6836478e9ea156e55d5c1b0a8784dca1bc
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHM' 'sip-files00120.pro'
0c50d2a4d8d1df03494579f1de293e83
86fcc70e2ddc0ca2bd0f4006e2c92e5fa713c6f3
'2012-03-31T16:08:41-04:00'
describe
'69086' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHN' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8691d73a85ba2d05b0009cb8f43a8390
d372a06911bc666d85da573bc851f8eeca5da27c
describe
'1813576' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
2cb6590c9f9d977e7226da8a57825689
7776335148c683409f0d3c0d55dbf8ea4e22b42a
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
4cabd20d5e5a402affa96c40dcd88ab3
57826c6c31621e661b2adb38ffdaf0a3fb01cf65
describe
'37331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHQ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f01c9ebb9467ab2c6b0ea6f5c22b1479
8df03b46fbde05a8b320712735d6443a1ca77fec
describe
'221996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHR' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
49537ecfaa334580695168fea31b3bed
025c689091af6a523ec31056d166809437ae9da1
describe
'142411' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHS' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
2dcb0f4c9df3935871a587384ae0e51d
354eee5a0c56e38d1059a4d35ebfa363e6ca81c0
'2012-03-31T16:16:24-04:00'
describe
'35703' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHT' 'sip-files00121.pro'
97e6a64f0938a5d21207d6d30e647adf
ad9c9e5a6fc53a9766e48aa09c37c07474af1efb
describe
'70000' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHU' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
19c3d2480f6c0c7fc5bc4bb5d7da73de
9d02c3efb177d64161a1125b788a2fb73a155c56
describe
'1799292' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHV' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d86190d6be40ec104cfb9ca6f470d480
51993e1d79c49d28f067c9c19e21eec38011eccb
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a56db1706b6e050212682ea59e2758b3
2be8d54f5f9841fd1f465c422b632c149f954579
describe
'37888' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHX' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
5222b436e90cc2aac9c5861ed432645e
e17593c6a77c449ebd24c73ab42ad4530c5d612a
describe
'226360' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHY' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
878d0430c701855f7258c7e2a9accb0f
1ce060e31e0c34c81c0c092f9863b6cf36ad43b2
describe
'133395' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCHZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
24467d3b760e11334cbbfd5e3ef2f170
9aeec1b6a6850723a74535d2465e4c564d50030f
describe
'31394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIA' 'sip-files00122.pro'
5c4f86f71332368d963df41ade5825fd
ed30a87493e3c035eb042901943b59e6ca00d828
describe
'65265' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIB' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
027744be1bfd1cf50a1163bb8a53ba8f
a5eeb92882cd0ee467425427191852baa28314e3
describe
'1834604' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIC' 'sip-files00122.tif'
529700bc8b9d94054b303f3dcadad4de
b1eecdb1f955307136d300c9eeaac27854f05001
'2012-03-31T16:12:43-04:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCID' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2cad121a927a288e83458184fb4c3bdc
2986f0b34f90de1f9446f583e1a53437b7cd74bf
describe
'35721' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIE' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
b08e18639b68aef288b730b20512e9a6
b6705f4f0f2950ca70e6014a4d92a5ba8074f8f5
describe
'222437' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIF' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
7ca9fea906e058a16dd964e47f6c0c55
d5c96d95304c98f4faac78c2151c6a6ec3e2bafd
describe
'142529' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIG' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6b814455881750ba108e57471d1d8a43
e09474e766d392d84aca6e4850af8e618614bb6f
describe
'35679' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
d3203914979097187d7934b834a7d7f6
759c44a86af1fc73bf70ab592581e1410ee2770f
describe
'70899' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCII' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
40e5465a17b3034aa34694ec6be10164
8d3edf6e1290d26c4f366ab8e29a4f5fcb588eca
'2012-03-31T16:11:54-04:00'
describe
'1802556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
b8fb003924d16d9aee2d715632dfd2de
24f7461bead793efc2071e7cf465e8416bc7b451
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
906275beac2831b7551c7a438e835b8c
11d8627970a962bfa18777daf86971026b5d1f3f
describe
'37551' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIL' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
03dc09316aa6409231b1bcc220cdd02c
0e95343e01c04a1c7b382017edf7bddace5bca43
'2012-03-31T16:09:25-04:00'
describe
'225863' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIM' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
989dba055074e56352ea4aed92c585e8
97a8b2b702ce81808df6fbe19ffb63ee0e2adbe4
describe
'133366' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIN' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
281d8017e6d8dc2771060f28685ed9e8
51212bbbd86372c6932e1fab39fcf21848967fb6
describe
'31159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIO' 'sip-files00124.pro'
74a8997996960b97e2090911622f8418
c41da0e53477bd1c1ccecd95bed6f252e8c030ce
'2012-03-31T16:16:22-04:00'
describe
'65793' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIP' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
c81ac09dc6ac711fad093c1dab07f425
b65b6841bc0d12bfb856a8fe22391dbf323ca5a1
describe
'1830640' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIQ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
0ce7f2abeb4e2054752cb1704cd9c5cf
5875a7dd2e0e5aaad085b65963a80d918f952688
'2012-03-31T16:15:21-04:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIR' 'sip-files00124.txt'
5e940e7c4869c8fb2ccdc670d6b128e9
682da9e1e0ff84c12f04b85abd5ddfb8a083968a
describe
'35692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIS' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
2c3f5fb88b1dcf3c48aa0a4f7841bc5d
0f0dd5b9585921e10c42a2e1bb77af7fcbc09c2d
describe
'224848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIT' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8caa320d8266cf323e64ed9a765a02cf
75eacce80e535e9d60d6dfc381ddf07d5db38676
describe
'143818' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIU' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
3c7dc4dfcaaab8bf436f7e0a57b785f2
a5e4ff61c2191d38c31e904e08df6fe6a2d945fd
describe
'36339' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIV' 'sip-files00125.pro'
857be3bfb7bd7a80fb7fac7be81ebd9c
87ea573f17e60894905e673923bf014d6d30f8e5
'2012-03-31T16:16:47-04:00'
describe
'70350' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIW' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
096dc6031d7eb82c44cce4fca0977262
ac46b7ad8f2c1db43a5fd0c6fd4f9c2282e7ab71
describe
'1822464' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIX' 'sip-files00125.tif'
25249bd32e7d509ca948b5eac57b6adf
a981b4c7d54c2ab8840f72eed79e7da5ce3f0afc
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
6dddcb7319efd561772b5abcb50991bd
78c4f6992306dd42bcf13e59324431abb898f1e2
'2012-03-31T16:17:07-04:00'
describe
'37897' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCIZ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
5388e043a6d7f7fc2a618f7cbc07326e
e92c8467319688096925e553d006b57cdc5fcffb
describe
'222670' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJA' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
018ed8bfce4236174b9c8a9aaae21657
d9c5100574ce37ad5a65ecb3826498e9791243b7
describe
'149349' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1527c4b5541f9cfd143e230a185b488e
e3964558bdebddee24e191b6be02e4c92a485050
'2012-03-31T16:08:54-04:00'
describe
'36108' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
0c3b603d7f7135c6fedde60537080860
09a39d6fff3b3cfef7132407e6abc1785c5dbf80
describe
'71372' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
249a563f715b7ab2cd62d7494c517d83
ff233d021caf7bbeeb3611f6bbe20de950762f7d
describe
'1804772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJE' 'sip-files00126.tif'
e7e2b419ec507191b52f0e2c92d11978
a2d37b678dd251bad18d2de54a25fcd94ce3868f
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJF' 'sip-files00126.txt'
c4006351faf9d8cd2b234a2e58e2353d
0b3e5c3051593fd2e3627fe8fcfa9a1b7c36b062
describe
'38232' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJG' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
be4b780261a9e5850afac0aa3413c67d
b3424fe565f654d5a6e8518b17586c41abab9ac6
'2012-03-31T16:12:54-04:00'
describe
'225835' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9f99ec1a1d35c304ff46b71ff4dd5587
459d1d43ca387a254c85d5492ac6b34076f161fe
describe
'144750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJI' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
f2bc3ff2d807ca1fbbbb5ac54bde4ad7
cd68ee5924961e59f0ba50c6872c8d88c3a917d1
'2012-03-31T16:14:24-04:00'
describe
'35840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJJ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
308157c5e72a2d1b618ac2410bc97c52
4e05c59b4ce105c1b872fdaf24bef06c411325a3
describe
'70981' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
40bc9467323e6729720fcb0d1d274679
5bc2ad88ebd4de8937081003457891478cd09e90
describe
'1829624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJL' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c18a3c00ff90deb8b66c6d07cf9bb643
e0cb1e84fd4c9773e85f55f05377f8aba26cc60d
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
1df42e44f6f6a725e350862e62e2630c
ffc513fbb2d437f981695b6cd92af8fcbfcb051f
describe
'37883' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
eeb4327a6f7fc9996bb40c0bd96f26ea
219c842547e82c2c5983c76a3c392874893b49a9
describe
'220149' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJO' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
76597913340e39f3f33b19e7f870f5c9
a3aa7fb5ec42e76d774482b55d9fe1ce6bafc979
describe
'144766' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e9ddb007d42352ca08d13a5f73a8bf26
eebfeb7f47c2a2461cefbb874ec73c7d84bf0ce9
describe
'35524' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c597d41a1e4cbdddf47b348206c8b9b8
f79619b72777c53cdfff74e5d8bfeba5d203b5f1
describe
'70489' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJR' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
1a852fb47bad6c7e7808071e52b74047
ed8f1173e9f2457c26c1a42e59d3efe0f6c32550
describe
'1784528' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7f585df09b2cac2b81e85e5146eb5c09
517114fd639693cb1f995d2da5f6e0e5f7fe0c9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJT' 'sip-files00128.txt'
0e65b6185a37c466c7234410e3c19a43
67d8c98a01427c1217c2541d40f3d38820d738ab
describe
'38228' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
b6f84ba32f9f52497b01b81a06b841cf
7d0bfa7c02020fd284d2fe6fbddb988320c90afa
'2012-03-31T16:11:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
209ae335477a462f5c607dfe156d727c
f3228682fe3aded9fe2f0cb449cccf0b7d6f918f
'2012-03-31T16:12:05-04:00'
describe
'127371' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJW' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
45f97c34c7b46c35a20517d2204ede38
d3d79a337c06242cff742d20a2bf74ef1de93061
describe
'30416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJX' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ad67f01ae97439014e69584bb13c6214
6c01148a7431f2796bbc73aec548a80dd209ce0d
describe
'64017' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJY' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
d68e83efd3f8a112a48a1dd2af8cec21
d9dcda3f2256866d3dc34b7f1a5806fff6f53637
describe
'1810028' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCJZ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
ddd1746bcd3eed3b34241789ba026a0b
e762fa2d3749b5535419eafcacd31728e81d41b6
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKA' 'sip-files00129.txt'
fceef6b08696433536c4e0c52366897e
aadc27fede8f475106bd5310a6c3800cb45c7a27
describe
'35978' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKB' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
7154f4e9217111da20ad13ee50d8e7d1
da6128f7ebf0361c1a45616e6a9fd8e9625865e8
'2012-03-31T16:15:53-04:00'
describe
'218017' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
8d80ca9a922b67e122927abb8912e4ae
24525dcc6ad79f9c71a955726139e71c01aa93fd
describe
'149280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKD' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
fc12e215bfa6c1b961754d510a71f077
69be2e29b456b6fe6865e352496240e72b3c116c
'2012-03-31T16:16:43-04:00'
describe
'36089' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKE' 'sip-files00130.pro'
31be7d3b0e45d3df371d961dfc7b3fac
64b626781c38a8aea170ca6b20a86ada1a6cb3b1
describe
'72417' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKF' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
62ed277ab73abf30d1c998556ae5055e
d435fb8472676b187cb0b5dd6fbec16ae3e4ae5e
describe
'1767624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKG' 'sip-files00130.tif'
fa3e3a70a48403482b92aca5d3e8ebda
b28bcf318858383d4da55a27d621345089cf7508
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
b8ff489192b6fcbdbc60a22317ed784f
56d748bf929b44b83ce3369ce3a3497036e2ecc4
describe
'37825' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKI' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
81fef5b2a225894e31cd4bced95653b0
1ee74968a46f630f90d6c765affb0930ac15cdd4
describe
'223249' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKJ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b5f4dfec83f7aee0e1891bc0945b5c55
3be2885bdfce3eaea1d404ffce614c2f7f175870
describe
'138840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKK' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
94d692358d130d4f4c4f971b2c7dc23a
0712cf7169452c9495133fe1252c1d372efb9bdf
describe
'35023' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
e5c2ca5839fdf78b21dffb195d014790
aae9e0591d99f2857c7def1b05065a1510aed9e6
describe
'68408' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKM' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
6e3b5b59aee20d6fec6d3ffbb5d04788
a57dbe95a5492aea8a62898e7099151a95e65511
describe
'1809424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKN' 'sip-files00131.tif'
ed551bf27d696e8b933776e68d2357ab
5f0bfc73e25542ef85be0fd517f16b4d780b7741
'2012-03-31T16:15:28-04:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKO' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d8c887e7175825f5aac7fbeb563bda79
9f3b5770249e743a94266de45aa691cbd1870236
describe
'37389' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
0895d976f3337e4995ba9ba3f88ac2a8
ab7093adb5009497d54a9581c8b756a99fb069f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKQ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f0f1d9993f89499bbe576bea3fad3701
0c32cecbf7bcadd91dea0fe8d044f41b29155c96
describe
'124931' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKR' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
458c1663f25b7129fdb2d43d098d7998
70054ac34a1c7d16d57c6d96e04602302dcaf9b2
describe
'27913' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
53661741043f288fe1c67aa6d7f07b11
671ffede4a6b6d9066cda52bd6738e0dc4123069
describe
'62671' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKT' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
9b23b123d81a5a9f3fb8c20591a9979b
f835c771d5efd9f170631e0bacbf770579d310da
describe
'1777736' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKU' 'sip-files00132.tif'
caa5eda4752d845fa54605a782b16d50
429a91be8ff7e5870496874cd4102cdaa1436728
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKV' 'sip-files00132.txt'
652dac3b6f5dca71b2e3a01c4321ff3f
f20574e608af387e5af0f495060aec4f0a234bbb
describe
'34540' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKW' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
fe5be039a48d2fbf6a34d1593dd6e2be
7d1c9ac387ff2ebcc5e18185a34a823368f5b1f0
describe
'222389' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
01da0219adcc24fd13be715ba53f9a18
ca663cf8c3d438a7284eca408ea082a80a6b2412
describe
'136018' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
9105c3e3705de6c7afe4552b416c1c51
8705a196d4b81a1b23601c2ab54a4e2b1425f227
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCKZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
0d13e563c17a82996a8b41b00f80f3df
ab8ec4bae9b9c17767b4a8f3098e26d471957824
'2012-03-31T16:11:35-04:00'
describe
'67191' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f2181eca25685ff9acd6bdb3293b1b3f
83ad21e987050ca324b1f5b52c6d191b66c50ea2
'2012-03-31T16:09:47-04:00'
describe
'1803112' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
ee79681f894a122f4600ee95e126f2e8
9a8c0134b8b8164feee98cb63b6917213f0e9c45
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
56e14c5be615c88d129e6c5ea1d17f30
036b164c837c48dbc15b3404300901dfdce8126a
describe
'36844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLD' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
f916dd7eac1f0660c7a7d1abe04fd0f1
5009f37f3a826ca0966f74b5f3de075ff47aee6e
describe
'223441' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLE' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
55d079565c04be6b921b488361c12b85
61f56f8c275e620ab0265c18849963dbdb64fc55
describe
'139818' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
9c869ee6f1f55db2c52936a9b1a94597
b920fcfd8d4c67e57c575d06632a059bccbcef25
describe
'32251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLG' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e1f635cce48a2a7ec791f6bd3842935b
1ed3e69f3fa6cffecf1c8803131b942180307cf1
describe
'68169' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLH' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
fddde70774054f7d1b84de31056cd7ca
f7f0b1af8f6658e583aa9f3121366900583b0d7a
'2012-03-31T16:10:40-04:00'
describe
'1811556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
6b72796f0fd2d6a27bbc424c3bbec6ff
1341fe066d5fc0751ae5c97082617fef8dd6b190
'2012-03-31T16:15:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
0237bf7a14284ad5eb61c2ebba7c9d30
a11186a1922eff8f042a9e8068dc1b02ef1c4b97
describe
'36381' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
da4c65eadc626531c017c8f13e6b929a
4f462947dde690b5965caaa4e21c8682c788ec61
describe
'223316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e0d261e32cffdbdc1e5f59aeb1873b8b
f786144ada323ea2be2d89c88fa3ccd1344caf6e
describe
'148408' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5436958c9234decc72bbb4e7f132c239
bcbf62d7d84a02b7ed25e0ef01af733cf9c04d8b
describe
'36267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLN' 'sip-files00135.pro'
05c71699432b15663874ed85f4e5e79a
2c8a819bd6d723cafb6008dc64008e3d99fce52f
describe
'72458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLO' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
a774e7a8898cba655885adc7d6e746ed
eb5bf07bade2af9520828020235eb198d22841a7
describe
'1809880' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLP' 'sip-files00135.tif'
51510bacc7e17584a6caec697f068820
bb1be55f287d05c0017e3cba7c8def9acab5b543
'2012-03-31T16:13:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLQ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
b5dfd8307f4a18227ea834c5d2a3e562
fc701a975694915918c99780ac7bb5080c196f5c
describe
'38859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLR' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4255d65f488b060d3110928830b69eff
46e347254ad807a4c8226a475abff233f3a0d603
describe
'221826' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLS' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
a5ac0c7f722dbd499847bdec78c4627e
b458fdf93f3b426f1b8e7807a3312e8aa1112a55
describe
'138823' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLT' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
cb885dc166f023a1c504350772a42df1
56efdbdd41ac42fcd29c7872b67d832a1ce00d43
describe
'31726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLU' 'sip-files00136.pro'
0156ad2bd3dd9f8a99542a6ace78b097
b7b5f75fc93eafe8da19de88c8d2ecd74368ac45
describe
'68731' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
0a11b8b325f13b58b92ccc3cc4af57aa
a5eadf8564071543597122ab9062890271982526
describe
'1798156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
22c551b1aed947f2e61485057ffc7036
e391e478f68fcd4845a0024703c9a20e0e2a9dda
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLX' 'sip-files00136.txt'
cd869e131d2ce9c219dc20431b824f03
e2d32d236bf65861f94d2a13eb316f52a573ac8e
'2012-03-31T16:08:38-04:00'
describe
'38096' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
d6dd1c6fea1a748663096c57ea9c0f8a
2c0805aa906949a1dad11d7e4cf47568d707203a
describe
'224122' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCLZ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
2bcb57c7994da4bcf443333141356813
5879e0d470cd8bdb1f55a6a7dee14637ec584c2d
'2012-03-31T16:09:30-04:00'
describe
'131061' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMA' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
be1d7e864a292943a19231847eb91de7
f8eacd0b4d69a71cfe068154fde31acc412663ee
describe
'31017' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMB' 'sip-files00137.pro'
205547a4ca5ff64fc00ed15cf93d60a1
51d8bcd470455aa7cdc7d200cc9c95bb9b071f77
describe
'65183' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMC' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
36aa0f2c80016da0efa05167cebe755f
8dcf60ae31ea5868552110823015f34eac545402
describe
'1816472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMD' 'sip-files00137.tif'
ef8a5f88c5f1b4064d79e164c1859d90
4dac271af8cff18f0197eb0883e5c139234ac760
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCME' 'sip-files00137.txt'
af0c5ede9823d4a5796c83c10cc14aff
8619ad166b5ab18476af2525551123b68bc390dc
describe
'36246' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
b77fa3f462b1e03590976d787bc8a502
1208d6278a865cc2ea972eb7cda3cce5e4c8eb61
describe
'224945' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMG' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
4153f1825f0644db251cb2d28962e5cb
04442f44ac9f28d5dc647565675c315be140fc50
describe
'136579' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
eb5e04fb9e7c34cf2551c0ca2a826c3b
e17bd80b49e8548ed709aa748e7fcd52b7138f6d
describe
'32109' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMI' 'sip-files00138.pro'
3f81b6c237d138de5afec0add82c7c21
0e594aaca83aa58dade24bf8b93fffd6e864245f
describe
'67262' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMJ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
9f1fda21f01069a70d4b5d2af97205e5
0d6d775875d52fe0ad8cda82ea4f8aff7a733d3d
describe
'1822848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMK' 'sip-files00138.tif'
605d702621b3f098355fd33d82e95b87
c76087125799221542ef951c8c5cce7c89803539
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCML' 'sip-files00138.txt'
e44b6d2bf95aa3afddd5820ee3538b3d
69fc86a82d9c39cce8f68c9adef949ea25e81c55
describe
'36351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
ff68558a14d129fd5da7053edd807ed6
e92ec1a36bae08ef2d5c9a478c52c1bf6b5ab00e
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMN' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
fdc1b3cb1aef5d5395200b3a94298908
37088ff401f9acfef1d585e8f0f6188d231c0758
describe
'147197' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
1e335d4c23a2e1c3b6a5dd8edfddd2f7
0295f91f4513947a55c61715d76a16c64aa2c92c
describe
'36330' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMP' 'sip-files00139.pro'
fc6d0baa57098d46d11463cb0257e1eb
46380386dec2e9dfa631860d98a7b02493084dc4
describe
'72051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
03be7a08c7c47402df558c1fb4fe0b62
c50e9071d9188e01efe7b27f92dfce4ad4d202ec
'2012-03-31T16:13:01-04:00'
describe
'1851204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMR' 'sip-files00139.tif'
325b03eb2e9c849b389d2ebdc89dcbc6
d837a30b36547abf4581a72d69c9e7d229652e08
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMS' 'sip-files00139.txt'
3c1f66cb100bb2b91ca5b4f72c54eff1
72c6468209897fc4a0b6a6487ea08d64a338e557
describe
'37171' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMT' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
5fe8f40dbdad53dab12e37b84055c218
18bb576b3c5d7862d2f1b3193ee4a05b20010add
describe
'226367' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
c206abe057b979081055d4de63202500
1cea8be16c36b7980b0673fd1587dcace72d337c
describe
'136829' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
6287f775afb4c3c2ff60a243894136b0
f41f38f7eda3b16dbf43da90a4e23a554b3a35a3
describe
'32253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMW' 'sip-files00140.pro'
04cd65d534297c7f53030e1cc0a52ddc
aa14a9204855453509f9bf6758d0044e9d14192e
describe
'66227' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
070861a8e9ad5bb0fb7c22aa34c9bf16
72bbfc9bd0c1ba20403ee9352f7a87f94c19871b
describe
'1833592' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMY' 'sip-files00140.tif'
f328b4384006e69b47a0cc4abd09e683
0afbdb4e794f39d74a5dfecbe66259042bba2a9d
'2012-03-31T16:09:43-04:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCMZ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b092055867c175534e66d15d4c64116d
faec6bf518f7b1965301b3e389725476d5330b94
describe
'35582' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNA' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
d018968f8b79bc915f983094f5329c0f
7229af0ff035e98b1b126f2d58e49b4e28ff883a
describe
'221782' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNB' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f6d98306d39653787d0dc5a2d6b780f6
061a05a7afe2f85fea47e0e14eafe9f282f5316c
describe
'140475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNC' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
badea477b9154a1dcd8d05540125e636
c025486f3576fc259fa2aa98a8bddca1d105b704
describe
'33714' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCND' 'sip-files00141.pro'
26c4bb1dd85c3808cbd0a7bcaf2a2c6b
afc4ba49b72909f7979bbd7bcf4f7596c5a1afdb
describe
'69377' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNE' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8867025f2037505d00c9e386094b711c
97442bb1c095a04290373656f3d50b7694cc01c2
describe
'1797668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNF' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3b30813cc5e48e5e56bcc7fd91a50538
dcb3709d8121dc32fb6b01ce61d1915fce4f847d
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNG' 'sip-files00141.txt'
5c435e7b41acdc6db464f594081990d8
7bc7c3340cece4738e7e6b1d7d72a21cded25c60
describe
'37203' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNH' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
967d12c60ae989d0deb81bf9e3dc0c41
7cb00b66f3b4b3a48c28f29390dbbc645481c6db
describe
'223989' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNI' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
fad0a646500008f4375854c238deed42
01e1ab42b495bd796e1bd1771bba43653f9d1253
describe
'146626' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNJ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
bd7fbb5c25c89bfe12788b46a0460dec
e6d81cc756d9567d1444b0267c7186050a9735bc
describe
'34771' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNK' 'sip-files00142.pro'
39152b8c7ef60aa6d7332c0cb26d7515
18605b9f3735ac7fb467df5b579da817a76069bc
describe
'70414' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNL' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
485a343a314adc0fd829af5e70ded52f
d3c987d69c0b01adf3b8d6d7cca367afec371420
describe
'1816024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNM' 'sip-files00142.tif'
3460690beb0f02eb80154645fb1e7997
bdaba23ce7f973dd87b348694b83a36f2ff67090
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNN' 'sip-files00142.txt'
878461e07f53cfb10f4fa87fe0ffc250
bd63e47422149706b5dcb572ca338f222e4347b0
'2012-03-31T16:11:23-04:00'
describe
'37620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNO' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
301ff7bd89b7688dfc3d7bf657b8f389
f39394a48429165d3c269458d2a7365ed42eb198
describe
'217681' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
3af10168afb90646eb6faca23d6d8a6a
f5cc766d5dc99f0590167556aec0c2a4352d1496
describe
'137359' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNQ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
cd85ad0b434fb4e0b3f2d38829490e69
f84b573119e8addee7908f78ab489690638e4c27
'2012-03-31T16:14:32-04:00'
describe
'31977' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNR' 'sip-files00143.pro'
06349f80e9794821c6f63b8ed900fa05
e8b68f4ff55ea39fbd80478a4ccb5804e5be136f
describe
'68383' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNS' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
40c7977628774ec9951a4307f1486c59
9c9085fc151cecb1e7a9f4333fd48445ac6b3f13
describe
'1764492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNT' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f1d9ee1b5f5153414174a1831839367c
dd905c60ee81a7896987f1cf8c54f09d0db4bf3c
'2012-03-31T16:09:26-04:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
ec67e1fdcf004b59b482e5c2f737c906
6e7a81cc9a71a42ebcba5c3cc87d869e4e1d10e0
describe
'37152' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
e9bcecea61460e15e0862cbd572b5167
55a493a28df639b923d4d70f886ad6ff6ce267ec
'2012-03-31T16:14:50-04:00'
describe
'225420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNW' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f3168fc85405211d4fa4ab3dd05d082a
1af1f4f194b6a0a9a6f01bee3e8f88bbf866ab48
'2012-03-31T16:14:56-04:00'
describe
'138708' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNX' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
811f1c4c4404eb01d698b362422b4352
dae288c489f5087bae3c96e18b244517c64a9636
'2012-03-31T16:11:01-04:00'
describe
'32596' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNY' 'sip-files00144.pro'
18431e3b6f69ef61e9d13af5f2bfde7d
e815b50972f4f2ebad1dbf85f88407e824a0dff9
describe
'68606' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCNZ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
a65443fa8369322c447570490a22e4c0
e54d532ad3e31ce995b02a442faa12026a663138
describe
'1826968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOA' 'sip-files00144.tif'
7e5badfe7cddbea6f63b53a27e557c34
a0db68d310b28c7eea8f4d1fb615720d18865bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOB' 'sip-files00144.txt'
2073c8cf41dc07320883b52121804739
6598f100d047510aad4239e1f475135a90dbc892
describe
'37051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOC' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
a70b1bfa51fce79b99be1fa69c4a382c
96d40f1e375d0c73c3119b60b1014d5d819306c8
describe
'224582' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOD' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
d11e7d1ebad26cb0859d6af841749fc2
8ba6021e0a96882634b701356d15a259b5d8d1a7
describe
'135373' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOE' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
13c80a339f868ebb4ed81ad999928321
0731ac9839c4b20b355be93259706a9144792695
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
63aa003f4b524d3d28cb87a46f7575e0
84714c9cc10f92af6b1ead879c2e5430cd6c6deb
describe
'67392' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOG' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
1e11ecd0445eaee536a112e3744d9ee6
8c691a90b47acb85fc0b2008f972508ff5a14bf9
describe
'1819732' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOH' 'sip-files00145.tif'
db93a764cb2f4e58d24f32f6bd9c746a
7c8fc11fb0d0be2839191d2fcf5e99067111cbe1
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOI' 'sip-files00145.txt'
e964d7ee98fe61753f292c56805030a6
46ca7ca24c9235ad545b8a6d654096839f736f91
describe
'36841' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOJ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
b91a6201f7d630860540f4b9e3df41a2
2303f706495735fa34bd64dc606eb40ac8bf431a
'2012-03-31T16:10:39-04:00'
describe
'217828' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOK' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
fd0ab58e31082e1b5bfdd2bec7f8cb51
9f498aa9a58bdd4a7adbcb4f100e1ac0ead1e1df
describe
'132909' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOL' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
107867343bf39c29e2e6dd885bc8c0ae
8fb2781d15ecc509376ceb56417bda9a8cb4aa3c
describe
'31042' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOM' 'sip-files00146.pro'
4677c39ac59dee53dc43d0cf15fad6da
f3a98e542a818ae0dbaacddf94267477a7a0a37c
'2012-03-31T16:16:42-04:00'
describe
'65601' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCON' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
798f27f3e85c516cf035f160d59ba9a6
85e882f2801cdc163e42c213df57aecf14fcc61c
describe
'1766288' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOO' 'sip-files00146.tif'
038362427bc71b6ec3ee9053ae22414a
6c2b622c98d9d594c9e14613776ba233d11b7abf
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
5875cba472f59c3a0a769e6060bcf4db
f25aace8f70dc708d8d7062e4f74e901946382d9
describe
'37380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOQ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
35c90ececc6fe98a940d171c5efdfe05
d7f513e75f0a7e3e3b3752421cdbe0f6c2b3da40
describe
'221559' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOR' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
9d7210141c10424c6cdbe6ae8e134f59
357ad3a65caed02b8cacb6da93da6b6a7fe888fd
describe
'149691' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOS' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
181badf6a102f6f83193f9768e72a4b9
cbb50e2eba886f46b10508eedd8a6bc412bfc918
describe
'37881' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOT' 'sip-files00147.pro'
efc43eca0eefaec6ff2dcd80c6e3885e
fb45fbed52c1062398a77e120b6a7669c353e939
describe
'72873' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOU' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
b08d3ba850657664f7c6b225e8b00b80
729c12e30c27c917b3c65865d8dfcecfad00ae5a
describe
'1795424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOV' 'sip-files00147.tif'
66820b3ee867756e68597a22d3616ee8
114471986d6cf816daed76acb3b3e2aa3b86e149
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d3233a4484a9eacd25e5e32529920d86
6fddb69340bcf1c8b986697f8f38a486d29cd9c5
describe
'38689' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOX' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
d6044a6ff92ca8354dca7227c133f569
919ca7698e35af7808cf6eef1712ba12da5f3bd5
describe
'225469' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9ec257a874d92a87673806e5e288e1d3
aecaadff0db6653960bbe2f4de36ada01e8c7329
describe
'143862' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCOZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5dfeb5fabb5a5a0adfe1bf6f2896e628
d8a19692f2e4d951fea0eddaff747c007ef5536e
describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPA' 'sip-files00148.pro'
f71258176db7b7d61745d5fda88b8a9c
87df5aad1d637e23d2be59f02c4313b97ede6ef9
'2012-03-31T16:10:49-04:00'
describe
'71526' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
c10b94d2e150e1644eb72b91bfd9af85
f9afd842a226d719d61762447affc33b0acbbfb9
describe
'1826844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPC' 'sip-files00148.tif'
041a8883087b32930d66ee7f8402a80b
1b0855d42546f76800a4af7b15ebd7a6fe89a3fc
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPD' 'sip-files00148.txt'
e458686d6aa2bead85fd6f6b5d077427
b68fc8a180fe1ba3d4a9a22182f64c6874da4ace
describe
'37302' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPE' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
ff4f23bcb0d47bb0b59c85b84d01392a
a0bd67099c328f5fe4b9075a23caa104bc58ba32
describe
'221520' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
53be5da812107af1ce06bc2f525fd728
19c096a9d9a6cb89e8e4db3844d342e14dd89771
describe
'141054' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPG' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
9f68f5625ce2cc65a1c9d89459f1c7a1
b6b3ab1089dec446a840de98cab2edb07e80cef7
'2012-03-31T16:15:27-04:00'
describe
'35795' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
fe551471ad77e47fa95e26d1ab161327
8cc962691891b8e32e17326c5bcc0fd0029f3e5b
describe
'70195' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
526c9fb3d323fe1b1ec68d14ede48fa6
f6da110602ca8a8d6d532a3e43d70ed858addf7f
describe
'1796048' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e981f3d63e20414287f429d042c6a5da
ecbcb7b06d370360571d94824859662bdc795c4f
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
90c894453527ce05555b3fd3e89462fc
4a23f725c591b06d737b2d898777d8e30f13519a
'2012-03-31T16:12:50-04:00'
describe
'38023' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPL' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
37c8cfe9a9ccc8e2ea53de20339a18f4
e8e05d6cf60c7914ac3086bd713633fdf82fb7e2
describe
'219217' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
b9239226fde93e9fdb4932c6660a9d85
d2a83d3e518b8570e59600da78285532a46cce3a
describe
'133647' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPN' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
cb67a5a7291f9bfa7b633e43f7fc8225
8ac0b5329cb9c086c7a6bf4954cb89b1bdc19c5b
describe
'30818' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
7407756c7bfe72a63c9af51d8f5b5415
4b82955fe5893babbcfa6e3c16540c4b8f9b69cb
describe
'66159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPP' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
bc33bc3fc994d39b8647d5f993d36206
9308949d396f8e7e9f7195d51b31e61b4a7f6519
describe
'1776948' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPQ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a33db68596851e1cffa5343df21ebb6a
36379c88152945162a2b839b06791d75c6a41fa6
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
fd34cfccee75d866c8ac779c05f1d2c9
43fbb1e290d1f7cafd5930f0d66b0500c993bb33
describe
'36895' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPS' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
9c127c27052f7d520ccc207d52f28089
a4cb1c3f459413e9a0514f8e160cab07ced66b1a
describe
'220281' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPT' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
833f43dd5c184bc6541bcff2770cdeea
8e34a855d8614cca7ec78fd47f90fda65e967ae2
describe
'123757' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
037258bd17cedcc46a801491fb6c6f59
29dcc6290daeb58d49b28a89d41bd85e81bcecba
describe
'29290' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPV' 'sip-files00151.pro'
29341f4ead4672183b2c120720e4f264
7a11a0a176cf708eafe78f01c2b2a4573418be94
describe
'62977' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPW' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
93a4e1eb85404e228d80a270572975ae
118887d62af330952c7dcaa1f397208e37e95276
describe
'1784844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
605044dae62e00f5bff72b968247b43c
d3d9fce920ec63fba5257315ded9d9b207a40968
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
17537cdc6e6cde0186cdf7044222b228
3b73b2069a26b39deb4a9ff736ae43401152e0b9
describe
'36071' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCPZ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
9b5d633f55bf6513f7b8825d87f8fadd
9bb5dbab2b24fe8990c1b3f9b057540a0edb7402
describe
'218693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
257ed0afd460dfedf0b6e29b51690c18
c93d97ccfdc190f0a0f2d7f6237ada0a6f10b918
describe
'136799' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2e4b81fa797f3bd97c42776e612f257f
d806d677b616facc5bdb26f7e7715534cc8832bb
describe
'33497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQC' 'sip-files00152.pro'
3f6aee95ca11171d8c857ab43e2de4a9
a621d3ac091f47a598cb4b79be7aad53006ded82
describe
'67120' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
7e1730ffe83f3a962c9afdb167bbb6b3
2620461024f77264eebbf1836b1c4ad9e0b89d7a
describe
'1772880' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQE' 'sip-files00152.tif'
6a6e77ac163f677ce5f9069ceadbaaca
ef07481f3b06455d95b254521165e44d97be1795
'2012-03-31T16:16:31-04:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQF' 'sip-files00152.txt'
12fa852142c264bc49c8c6c38d6cd04e
4fe982cade3d57009cd8b4ec819a37ad43b85c4d
describe
'36999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
7a6380aa81093af28cc9288cee3648f0
cdc5f16a3ee5e32dee4608e8d7b133c5614a5929
'2012-03-31T16:12:22-04:00'
describe
'220657' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
c92891f9eb3389d05d88e3a0db58626b
39500489f8acd8631cccb45e7a8f651df9f317b5
describe
'125128' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
a076bec6f47be6993546fa09c28f1968
d6f0c72c993a3f2d606415cee050dcffb02cf086
describe
'29841' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
ad9d6a834e5875b2b6476005da380c75
1266516cc814115b68038e1f0b34d336e7e7d7c6
describe
'64006' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
6fce8077d888f7443b36d0f62a67a1e6
d54111d742f26b9aa1c47661017961f0872eddca
describe
'1788564' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQL' 'sip-files00153.tif'
238d9a08f783cd02c3638ceef249558e
137990cde5fcc4f552b7c16a4eb9949969006a08
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQM' 'sip-files00153.txt'
c8e2185a720a6ec07612cc51de6ba7e9
f084ad5b8e1862267dbc29f4811db26a1f594a49
'2012-03-31T16:11:15-04:00'
describe
'35540' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
7545e0d13ca7af5956fec15d51ab1f42
0bd795d8e222a13e391d9171432d512e6f5e4208
describe
'223724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9ff8d521d97629b3cd5b626311e85e61
7bef7a923e328a216ded986bd77218aff6234a8c
describe
'147388' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
bdde46211138ec8d28ee0ad1c2df27ff
8cabaf40c4d006b6aa5f12d9f214a374e0706601
describe
'35879' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
f4d812e83388845198320354b6a099f1
9a61fb050cdf19661d6aa9cc2f0435ce116d7234
describe
'72608' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
a3c123fc3cf2a5a86b4e77efea839b1b
afe93bb290fa1e75c0134be31720b16d77d27786
describe
'1812640' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
1ff6efc1d488706223c6c1b1a3a0d15e
21ebe64b293c2b5d1071ebd8058c7ed47f0a4957
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
95faa86a306aa4ab4dfd58c3016eca23
6b5a0b0cb2b04ffcdc00c41a34db422db4195524
describe
'38272' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
c7bfa93ca4c8c0a6cf65e1b43ed1f063
54a06242990047ea1a05242c73f6014a52561a56
describe
'222590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
957a114d22461d344cf4ef6cf7ba01c2
956cb1afd5ec95c3eb2e9bfc742fa042690d8169
describe
'135302' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
3332c58b7a0e328d4d821a294dbbb0d8
1ed0e2cddbc2438c1cd0bc3725bc360e3f5f8608
describe
'32686' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
bbcd0172a6c0ca94f55ff9217c1e86fe
1b3e41be91419c61293866f27bdde932386d0955
describe
'67859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
26a8250514c22e2ebfd811e1fb2de8ab
e1d3d301eb1c27807b24befa7c44347aeca76446
describe
'1804128' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCQZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
f46d2c4db5327f6bf2d63482e54556ad
19760c2ead55fa4d31769e420a5ba989132a905c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
668c2d09d3c3d8f44d7dc6da97135acd
1414c7a4173524b1baa49e9c5d195faf0bbe2574
describe
'37222' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
821e84b16fca0b0c72192cfedf66d9c5
2225471e0165160273986275d81077960c745740
describe
'224442' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
c664816fc189eae3c03c821fa809a75c
9e6f773f6279631d91c8178f0f770610843ded02
describe
'149969' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
4c0e6679152a888ba566fe0e6dbfdf40
2975905df5a6cedaf530d9fbc7d8eac33b828495
describe
'37792' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
3e6ed47a7c69f930c8c573fb78316f89
7501f07ef3697e5ba1f19c6babb3a145d12c8a6c
describe
'72817' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRF' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
f86a067ef03b09914cd686aa3bd15564
547f424cde4508b0f567fa1c4749998f4ceeafaf
describe
'1818688' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
a0346c346851761992a61e7bb4479569
63e205a7c735f5168183b1b78ef177c36d573b25
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
90069999708db0743033483743231ebe
76ac6dd1eb2d75ab5416c26de7b214b4def82703
describe
'38737' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRI' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
592a2748618ca5242032bef3d8b1ba58
4b1e8032ac79e5b1b74a6bfce56f36f427907c2e
describe
'221667' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRJ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3251ca1c58fa491f913b7507b346c019
c9a5ffe68bb8a3ac2efdf85dbdbb8fa3491ba1a7
describe
'143196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRK' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
fd00c8d863481348e24cc984a6f631ad
e82eab25dc25319f5d178407673d8a5111625110
describe
'34672' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRL' 'sip-files00157.pro'
f3cbe2a5e079e8d95daf8ff297ea2fe6
22b15d49135ad426f0ab74491a0a05aa5f70fbc4
'2012-03-31T16:13:06-04:00'
describe
'69881' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
de53759714b2c6e161602e903a2c54c0
5ac9fdca8bd34aeb05137c9e137ffee2669708ac
describe
'1796284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRN' 'sip-files00157.tif'
b14a401415cfb5c9cbff9d2a58e9a1f4
b558a2d12400579fa11e88fdda24ba75e62cbfae
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRO' 'sip-files00157.txt'
62fa19f7e8241847367bc97ae3b0b5e4
a80d8d26f370d66dac6486cf53abe77f1d2d144c
'2012-03-31T16:10:15-04:00'
describe
'38188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8cd2eeaa4fc0a0cbb060348776c29ffd
86e32634d024d4e77714eb44c5ef549df674d371
describe
'219776' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
94e0777b63386b23472c74c29476450a
1f499d6a4059eb7df35ade49553f4c4b541189d4
'2012-03-31T16:08:33-04:00'
describe
'153474' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
25fb6769d29e0ebbfb98ddd976b2f556
af406729dd254157a8cdf0a85e6a8f200a4a2eeb
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
1bd62fb63dd92f69324260aef6ec9057
444b328f6d18c703cf04c5a9b111e7e2dbe99fb2
describe
'73390' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRT' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
88733d61ab4e343da04533bdb8055dce
9806c8a0cea74b82e7022131b5d0e0bbd161a411
describe
'1781760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRU' 'sip-files00158.tif'
c9b5df93e84d034b689536e90733a9d7
52a6787e85dfdbe0e28c5cde01637f5b76dabf0a
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRV' 'sip-files00158.txt'
0066b6db8585103c283a31085a407816
18d6423392f2e4de9eaf489f027f4672484bcba1
describe
'38618' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRW' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
0c8ef97096ba6ab2a75c93c9dbabdb5a
4cd13dfe2074fc7e55686e142a341ab739c62a7a
describe
'216778' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
9fed517f373d6409608edb9334d64c9c
3a20e43b7edbb0c9025539ec2ff6c1707aa0a5f7
describe
'135189' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
66d0b60ca974e79db8fd8c2531193891
ed8116467433516a9ad890bc43396d6ac8d0dd25
describe
'32280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCRZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ac069db38bea986d58c14c3d3cb3300d
96b0b4c39daa5cf0e17dd7d8f336688569c66a33
describe
'67022' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
98da587170549e28be1e414342866a74
f5bf7d4859d33820d4e6d5d5e137a4c718e100c1
describe
'1757084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
a2874141309ec8406e042b86d6d03498
a269818db46adb533b233cc04b354db381ef6585
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
a7a640e512fad0afc9f91e429400965a
fa5b54f1e2dd5909614c870ff979f08fcab516b5
describe
'37651' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSD' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
646735d9effe301340931c0cf5f6f998
7ff06225031f80f72c25ef86ade3bb15a9b88fc8
describe
'219678' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSE' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
b95eafbc3175e4d5d5021e5c8e3b99b0
b0f6d3cc79cb13c4eeddb625771198770204fcfa
describe
'139886' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSF' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
3a1f49773315994328f81aedc08c2964
f0fbb7108e01f67d01a584c5b21e987de4944cfa
describe
'32769' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSG' 'sip-files00160.pro'
211a89e3003aa0688577c81b6161ccf9
cc98c99410d7f21dc8e09e87a266ac283ea1bf45
describe
'67489' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSH' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
83ebc539fa33629689e96c0695f699cc
30763ac8be4a05833b0a3124bceb62b022f9e9a9
describe
'1781000' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSI' 'sip-files00160.tif'
f6bb6e923fe624d7587169014aa1e2e9
c0a23bf55d6eb3fb41ec76a79e3e3780e90a9b9f
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
040b563b9dd5179a2fbea6f22b1ecb13
6196a505cda4f7457275bcae29c10d034b76a10f
describe
'37784' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSK' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
fe7a9d15179173629166459d5f05f48a
fbd40d696bf05a12eb51a31b46246d2fe6896af7
'2012-03-31T16:11:31-04:00'
describe
'219497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
29d913efe99d15570f4652e58edcc0f2
fce721ee0e84b21f0697ab42f6b71cd89da89232
describe
'134922' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
a807ca069c6643c8e26ce744c1d4979b
dd77ab4d96338d6f1798810b2ccfd7facd1115ef
describe
'32714' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSN' 'sip-files00161.pro'
ea24784a48c4d1ba185b5a8ad9c436ec
bef43c24e77acc34a4c0b1cd36afe65537abfde5
describe
'67079' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
435edd07d5be5b21bedeaa3648072595
cddf8bb4b54b12703066520401eedabfa747049b
describe
'1779196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
74b3cb252367dcd92c245751e337f8e0
600c11f317d9b040cb170ad799d4a8a3ae340396
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4ae2d2675b86ebc2ea8cb036decbab81
4657735212f6c8c7057ce29ac0d613afab11a2b8
describe
'37449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSR' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
d2501dab1c29e480786170c5cdac9ad8
59fe4f994f1610810f72d9f0073f2a0e32e2904c
describe
'215310' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSS' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
352fcf6f9a9f50d88623a1d85c986c3d
d5bdaaf2c5141ee5fafbe5a91df6a192ca9566e7
describe
'147198' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCST' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0db9631e31625cba2087176da74df8f3
68c846d909a2e9dfcfc143cace4e03885d04a4fa
describe
'35159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
4042d9a6565029f804f5880745a59167
357f437755afcc383cb97b96577b6839adec995f
describe
'70540' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
447b721dc1ccb0952514771de587d553
4150697aa7ae934649da55a080db3db3bb8ba8fc
describe
'1745668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
bebe0b848fec002cfd286ec82ef3e8b6
c71e067bd46aae01f65b0263212b348cf1a31db7
'2012-03-31T16:17:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f97cbbb145b9ab0ddb398629861aa33b
531166139916c4930edba730c21519c118515ec3
describe
'38600' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
380c7114f8248707b8ce09b59f83eed3
ee3ecc7a31e343e263281cac5705a9a080ad11ce
describe
'216712' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCSZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
913a9f20f38c0ccc14e9bf7f55011e14
3f5265527fa774aed845e36a9af06f4ea449edd9
describe
'146703' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
e51183d7d628ac8af8f656eeaedd6eb2
8b0665a8f0c3257a7df69b3e0357364ddfd63bc4
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
710dcf3cf07c2cef94d4d69d64e3aa75
e3dcbd299a00548405fdf510f77e8d9bd943b265
describe
'71585' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTC' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
f960852ed12111b6e0041ddb392b4bb7
6f1c61a0016640d92d0041bc6fbae1fc71f1ca34
describe
'1757468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTD' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c5af464aad20f777a104f096801fe579
4b59486d1cd4d907ad9eae211a2c161e57ac9f0c
'2012-03-31T16:13:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTE' 'sip-files00163.txt'
f54cb04618b5ba1d0f504b89ccbbe7da
d3d3cef56977d45866c1e32670a7cf412d514fda
describe
'39332' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a9d7ccc20355d440062271d0a6c1848b
959f91aefa8c22a19edca6ec1e6548e3cbfb2aec
describe
'222888' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTG' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
b945a32f63cf1788a1586d25eb492924
a94c7cd425f0d0f94d8f38261881533a179ee3df
describe
'147456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTH' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
191983ab90d1e074312b50d1d7f853f0
6912cf5e87409a1a85628d63d8a6d6e91ddefbfa
describe
'36456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTI' 'sip-files00164.pro'
d1852729efacaafcf27125f1dea8e1ca
87366250b9b66c4f76259a0f14c5a2c4821fe35c
describe
'71251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
10318580a0ddd10eb9e137cc762c4e9f
cd261a7181f808983fa6a108efa157c83dab9342
describe
'1806496' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTK' 'sip-files00164.tif'
e908ddfdeabef55c381abdfc49dfa03d
1f2b00e671fc0dd5a2366aff9b18eeb4e356c566
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTL' 'sip-files00164.txt'
6eec992be51c94be9db3b77f3a0c975e
6898253fa22bebb1052663bfb50e075a7c2b6e46
describe
'38400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
7a8aa91d72c7a792bd5d210884f41bbf
ec136a13c041840cf2cb22495f163e8d5508e530
describe
'222280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
792288698433f17a633bd0dcc5e44097
d35299d0acc04c5819c82f00cad12681b8e83f05
describe
'130577' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
3b2b7a0ca91d5d9a10395ce25688e959
856f8180d062088d804126dc5d61cd28ca6296f9
describe
'30021' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTP' 'sip-files00165.pro'
46e5f2ea05be0f0fe15baec649b37ba5
c32375e39c3bcd59bd74ad84cd39fe5a1f823b33
describe
'65851' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c790a0bcc381c9fc50fd3da638b7b9f1
389e4024c3633d9a637e4ad62a23c950a0b66875
'2012-03-31T16:16:17-04:00'
describe
'1802172' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTR' 'sip-files00165.tif'
866773fde251fd0384e43b0dfdc7997a
ddb96e56feeb7cfde19d1c6bf48be966d008cdf9
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
d16e88dd77384a761076e963e8fb31ef
42397d8ec785960c09607fe17186ddb959e21ad2
describe
'36362' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTT' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
512890e3730fe491eab1adfe8961b55a
b60c6c7e29e9e537ecdaa2dfdc287897b3161a04
describe
'219349' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
0636423f2ceb3a4eb1007ff64213a99e
3b015607a4dd21c6a1da4d69d3027027a317facb
describe
'154049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
ee2200744a6a26da495158425c1352bf
c9bd4d80aa9dcd2e259a8516a6ee54ed0c2d2f14
describe
'37660' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTW' 'sip-files00166.pro'
cdf067a4c43477e16f319c5d7ba543f5
208105d60b8b4b3c37b4d5260246433ddd037a7a
describe
'74793' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTX' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
129da5f74f6fdb5a531c81bdc7e6c0c3
328ca8d18e26f56362d6bced027aa6b9bb791fe7
describe
'1780104' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTY' 'sip-files00166.tif'
06a8e6c6a5cdbb86814a55518affdc3d
2983e5b6dca05848393b4a6ca053ff992047e96b
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCTZ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
89b8883a400286cd22e8003981cf91d4
115ec9ed040fc34d4e9784d52724fb43996c293a
describe
'39438' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUA' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
b9af32d43539982a5f36a1bb6bd8020b
28dd74fc244822c7fe61a64ba15f0266e368598f
describe
'220175' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b209c52002b5a9e25452dace7a04cf5a
529e63fee02156e9569a43a32e84655fdf3c7443
describe
'134243' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUC' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
97de4103a7b7b0c63659ae62a108dc00
a1a5d0da76928a2e408ab289e52a57ffaca381c2
describe
'31255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
c1381876c866cf621bc8216fd8e2937a
eab7e0a73b5b063561bae81119bd5b0573843f6a
describe
'66813' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUE' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
f0de107d6b59420adc20385587689582
20801af3dc07a6d909468b2c1970d676080b5721
describe
'1784184' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUF' 'sip-files00167.tif'
5f9270783d1302207a707691a72937b7
70d83eb1c02ece219827f62d4db5312c3ca2513a
'2012-03-31T16:13:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUG' 'sip-files00167.txt'
18b7045358c4a2d4b6665543617fad86
cb1b9a1744194924418f9e3e7e2fcef7ed6a5d3e
describe
'37049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
a69df7367cbe09111ad251fb1972f32e
3e4e7676e5407145dcd66976ec2221fde3cd6b8d
describe
'225980' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUI' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
fa9626b8fc850f0567cc8ac1ed7f6a26
2855c9ea5a56518ad8296520d7354caf29936dd3
describe
'150724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUJ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
e18b0eefa68dc15188ecf52a47d20616
af92cfd402cf49759389f112e06b0466d4ebe391
describe
'35686' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
180b406368f3e321c289be19e003ea59
504cfe0dada39e2f861c1702c854587051cdb7cb
describe
'72179' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUL' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
a72ce3b5aa5bc6ef35005a62b40514b4
f17addf88db76fe7e44b48fe3cd8530cf4c6763d
describe
'1831232' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUM' 'sip-files00168.tif'
9b63d86453030f4b72bd26cf68124565
55a0220d0a1447c78d286fd5ec9f2a74dddf5588
'2012-03-31T16:10:57-04:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUN' 'sip-files00168.txt'
4414646c41e11eaac88eda6692fbec6a
7f5107fa03fbda8796611c3c83b71cedcc2e262b
describe
'38541' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUO' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
d3fa5290f8cc2e9fe7bb0e092033dd42
e68f6eb5c410c88f8e78b4f60fd0a04db86de7aa
'2012-03-31T16:17:04-04:00'
describe
'218830' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
a33bc62ad8ca9515220654ae19992cda
74a3a8249b10457f46587071e0db27b1e0edd737
describe
'132834' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
f568124c0227e1e7fd7d9e6852a3abfd
d9bfe4ee456cb7b907bf8ac17b648934e3593c2a
describe
'31548' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUR' 'sip-files00169.pro'
7fd52d9fa37e11e1c30bfe6eb611e531
77e8008bedafb99043792e987bf7fcc627d0a4b9
describe
'66748' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
032d8d1bff7f32376bba438ce6caaeae
79e7964cda7241b42845e213e5b165dd544a64ec
describe
'1774136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUT' 'sip-files00169.tif'
74320a21ad61599e8fe6108d84ae5dd2
b6b3e1c94a3a861291a66cea14b62bc59eea20da
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
044f44ddd7bc444a97d2b5838ef06d4c
fb21f1555750cf235c07f7f2fe0ce4b4cea2198c
describe
'37519' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
3ccbfd99ce88f5331de5709935059f16
cbdcd6cfaa5d67fd1fd12b8711e9059222274cba
describe
'216394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUW' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
fb862679c04cdf1c5aea1916ab65e0cc
ab9f6ddc42ccdc3e300a099ac7a7e41a4243279f
'2012-03-31T16:08:56-04:00'
describe
'133546' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
77bbe9f35fbf15965e44b12c4082b6e8
01231d60eef3b9cb69fe5c9745ddbf167612cb68
describe
'31706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
20e82a25263f213aa3b3ea926c06a67e
a50ee3934ab9d41f1aa779161caef527613671b7
describe
'66699' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCUZ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
fa4de6a2c31605057367515d4c1b02fc
322a9a03ff4aaad1248baf63eda7220b30dd00dd
describe
'1754348' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVA' 'sip-files00170.tif'
442f66e0b13cc485bb659f6d8cac4d3b
cd4f2aaebc1787da1557e500df44ccab403aa1f1
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVB' 'sip-files00170.txt'
f34956202a2227a3d2b7919deb076b23
64c3e95c16afc7309fad48d63b7a7bd4940ced24
describe
'36871' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVC' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f083e065ca3befe04e04ff1e198540e9
c18e92fbc36f4c9f9e256c2c3272484ae0027e09
describe
'216090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVD' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
f1fc96bcee7e0c8f38c431c9f7177dbf
cf6f58119d2b2203b53972e87c000a66849cd74a
describe
'145810' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVE' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
af78303c22497670e1a7e07710cb69d7
635340b787c1c67e63127a597c9756040aa7068b
describe
'36219' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
817f47de50bc54fa3ff47b43d3e03574
77a465cc565e9424c669df9b80d4b615f9977ae3
describe
'72094' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
8a093664178a96951962b25708f3c51a
180c1e1af3b43e182351030f75e284234969d82d
describe
'1752104' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVH' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e95da6ef738ce3147cdcc4a3f5840179
76802c501655f848b1a88316379d7e3848f58a56
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
7cd9cd5ccaf8df3796a131278393def6
ba8a211adab825165a1bd3fe9097a819eea7df75
describe
'38626' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVJ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
7ca7bf055b583b4ea27fd6c35504f77a
e4adc1b98aadd6b45a1a7820359f594adfbc3f82
describe
'213210' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVK' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
102b00826845400d1b275aaeb65a59a9
6fdaecabb9be728edf95caf55ae42008ddad06ad
describe
'135169' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
ceb691913f15dca668f865d70ab189de
64f68d2ab2cbeb85afbad48c4b0fab8555acf4a6
describe
'32279' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVM' 'sip-files00172.pro'
2ff3ce5699b6373437e1cfa9cb9853b2
f373ce25056e7ed6f8d1a48fdf1b5a60e7ec64f4
describe
'66967' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVN' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
2904cc8056b7c72e084fab638c6c7409
b6d9fcd6549e9a00441e3e2839640926d827a6d4
describe
'1729400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
e57ee6a815a0984e8a1913e46fd1a2d4
7cd82409b4edcef6d2ca721907af86a21ff88975
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
8b0f01a3855fd9c6c3e6c255508c4f1a
f154ce0d5ebb5b2b396e44066395fab1cd3d510f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
ee122c989d9056e2cef61cde883acd09
db51c1c034db90ed4a74ac77d6e04124eaeaee70
describe
'215525' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVR' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
40d055e29bfe89bf8e47790fc0dfa5fe
959d8b72675ea853beca5bc1ddf05e7960ec4b8e
'2012-03-31T16:11:59-04:00'
describe
'149318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
ea4afad1add0a7b9275bd358e92788c0
48ddbd62ff646a2a3394f26c22705c8b275de1c3
describe
'36948' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVT' 'sip-files00173.pro'
8fb759d13bf9a86e8125d12d59e1c08d
8ce899a93fa468493167937c7ee2edd2f0f667db
describe
'73144' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVU' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
5935a48f6f68c8b4281719a8cc629c65
e6302e2f70d68f751b876a31a98372c32ea02638
describe
'1747720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVV' 'sip-files00173.tif'
7456a2549a9d67cae1ce094f7722382d
59c8b99e316cadfb7133d05805fd201c06852b09
'2012-03-31T16:12:09-04:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
e98c2fc46dad6864355ca7e64d27afee
494c2950f816e76fcb451230f17d46030a20de76
'2012-03-31T16:12:04-04:00'
describe
'39247' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVX' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
c2488f93163f1768f1995d29b9770e43
0380e7ac8e2968ed81676d49123df928f806b96b
describe
'214902' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b0a25e2853e3030506e3bcca50a2412c
a790182767e1dd14011132ac1b4706e92ec5f81a
describe
'149178' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCVZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
6de0891ccbec03cbbb312a4a3aa007bb
7bc2df94690251c5cd51bbedbb29b81d435af3b8
describe
'36556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWA' 'sip-files00174.pro'
bf4458ea67ac3f8f9cd30c6e012aba2b
48df030cb2d96308e804241a728bec24fae34417
describe
'72720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
e0aacaedccb257060f11412a55c414e2
1a8b89cf60e7b5fe5cec7760cd652c5e2506a315
describe
'1742784' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWC' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d7300c5d88bef7104bcc9d31b00d8abf
bf2ebe9bdf07223705ce002a0e171b08159c5a0c
'2012-03-31T16:16:44-04:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
8b80702208e8d3a5c752babf3c36f619
fa4b47c3dd1b55b7cbbd69df9875f71ead637d65
describe
'38610' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWE' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
2177cf122e0ffba01ebe85ba478b10c6
a70707903c33077af62a7220be5681cc05d2713e
describe
'218680' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWF' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
d687cf525562e9d49e76974a8a21e7f0
9059ad8f91c2e7ea2120b58b778c0f5b341c9cb1
describe
'152247' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWG' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
34ea60a07306e8b917093abd31f8e5da
fe7d17f21499f60a8baddc94c0361216af7b103b
describe
'37783' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWH' 'sip-files00175.pro'
3ac486b7d8b81a08e4f3b8c753e21468
3137143d74052e50d599602cabb8d8e8b536f7c0
describe
'74384' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWI' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
56aa16f0c4c22df40748fa38e6fec8bd
f0580dad9d258f7bc5d2c03694d0db4f9c67b43f
'2012-03-31T16:13:58-04:00'
describe
'1772704' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
e546ec59795adeb9c51ce43819a4dde0
6d3c9e0a84c4a1c822a867ffe68bfc6652b37c61
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
4952bd53bd98f3872b270c5df89676c1
464dfd8812c5f2e16144d009a8e36fa5955ba2a6
'2012-03-31T16:09:55-04:00'
describe
'38973' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWL' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
3bbcda2f780bb3b4ee62c02d7f28c86e
967d98e2fc16be2450d738b6cb091ff571440441
describe
'222836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
63d5eb86fcf9ae5a79e226218ce783c9
501e8ac6e26cb9bc9688d77809b7a7d17da0e4c6
describe
'139564' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWN' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
657b674a49115195944507bcc20c0366
f2253f5ceac18fa5f0c31c345bb13660434f8238
describe
'32195' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWO' 'sip-files00176.pro'
9ff4c2f2dce45e1e0b273eaf665ddb7c
cbbab150995bcc3a23831d29497d7341ec65fca2
describe
'68527' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWP' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
d9e33268d699d3a275054b57c5a4f87a
200ae7bd6a901f362e4aa5685dd2046832c17a80
describe
'1806432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWQ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
aaee55f5c1d881d3af752959ab679286
4c8a3750ee9e448a11053629ee9afc74fe4da694
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWR' 'sip-files00176.txt'
6d2c3472eed732dfad04e19cd1162ac4
13cce86332e3f603dbee567bc7736e91fc69ab00
describe
'36595' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWS' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
32f37e77f6fbe472e481ad0dc27b309b
1fcd38cb1468d4dba4a99fb789b4ec04631543f9
describe
'220073' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWT' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
f6bef1202ae7f266a5ac85e3a920d0d3
04e127abe81a7fcc496498c05e4f25c2f70f1154
describe
'136311' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWU' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
ce1fc30922cdea5261047aa150a529a3
2dfa00bc9fd42648102c5dd04872418ae12a411b
describe
'32305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWV' 'sip-files00177.pro'
10bc5274500f93e339f431152a3d2560
c6f79bb52ed6059f5c72c4675d38f99a876a3123
describe
'69033' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWW' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
84c1620eda90f302228f61db467a68a3
7b8c2d6e25ced924086af61d677ea42cd03ff5a5
describe
'1783520' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWX' 'sip-files00177.tif'
9358d42adc17446e6507457c8c2cdf9d
580040b7205aeea25389823e0dbf0edf47640fb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWY' 'sip-files00177.txt'
7ad1bfffa32fde811de7f22e484cf4a1
67b9412e9319e90fd774486288d1ce685e34e505
describe
'37630' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCWZ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
3fec8e2c6dbe93249100a73cba487704
3f6e2ede68317272d2fa080a40133779a7eb6c5f
describe
'221037' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
65d73753755b60d05af698be67500853
3b34e46c9eb4144efbdfb5476cd619b3106e3337
describe
'154102' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
a912f69e1b71be074410fae7ebf578fc
5110cc9fb6a9b26daa29e5b52a49289ed226e5a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXC' 'sip-files00178.pro'
5e3f0d9b4acfd254dd473bae027c1d22
1ff22e4522ae20cc1e009d25ca6fbbd5f0f01d9e
describe
'73601' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
0f3f7527a8c0539c70a3e2698ad30425
c8fe90d5b377d0747257e3cffea74d07f5f8c7ca
describe
'1792784' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXE' 'sip-files00178.tif'
c1f67325f49cc80ff9d1a930c3eb1c4f
0f733f11a8645ad6adfea570c341c59bc1111714
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXF' 'sip-files00178.txt'
87992966a98c6500ad11bb86b0d26be6
c6f2a1267ad1e655b6a97c5be54603f7c504533b
describe
'38202' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXG' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
07167289576530f89dea62d0ad3cf3b3
cb5c3627fa1ee2fe9590ae4929cc6c38ac28f6d9
describe
'213490' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXH' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
55a5f02d58576557db46bb4986f90603
02b4ec21e3ed3145be7607abc13413cc686120ee
describe
'137738' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXI' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
21cc0d545fbeb71ea6d29a0e896f3a72
c802bf65e706727e0d9b01be7cac9a287a79d81e
describe
'32418' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXJ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
9ce6c7b8407fedd81e73881780ad25cb
803b61c2aad8fc085647fbf5ed51322194d9daf0
describe
'67516' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXK' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
595984779aeaa873338bc56c57d6d80f
4ea79937f9776c8f4d7822a6d965090beaa07e53
describe
'1730672' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXL' 'sip-files00179.tif'
42c59e3b1f12f2b75ae807cb4cffe708
e0d06948d763bd6656e03d6cc910eebc2e6e37a4
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXM' 'sip-files00179.txt'
5c2521a533f93a568bf43a04fba83973
ef5efeea45ced4685847f5f5b9d8e0ce7f11a992
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXN' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
359909ef1de59c4102129418e282463a
fdcffa0bc961eafa4dc651d0ce0cea66debf2571
'2012-03-31T16:12:13-04:00'
describe
'222392' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXO' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
5d504cd5e711f5ad8adcfb716a46ca9f
b7efecf67d8bceb1d9d6638f8a32ed11fedc0c12
describe
'142524' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXP' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
831d1342611c4857c653581b36a8778b
5325ec989167c6d63d6397015d5cbc62d3ce0348
describe
'32489' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXQ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
d6f19931b4ffd68f2510268af9418130
bd4371d0bd4fdacb37455b247a553aa5c3a50b22
describe
'67893' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXR' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
f84c82b2fbbca7ec9ee03a9b314d6340
e2dd53267fc051818b801ee95249826258b8f9fb
'2012-03-31T16:09:46-04:00'
describe
'1802192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXS' 'sip-files00180.tif'
256ea31879bd184abfc10ac4aab85529
ab3fe0d93b9e42e366a61881a043a17aec032f68
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXT' 'sip-files00180.txt'
21ec1b896870216e9bcd0de7de7d81e7
9f32b74e6c7003542442481ca3f5387b3415fb4e
describe
'36831' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
5c9b22ac630239f1bafd054076232952
411da9654ea8db824517125b78015bc241b797b6
describe
'217756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXV' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
443f55597c472dec0cd44d76dca8e7df
dbe2554cb5ef1ab18f00196832ee0630b712bde6
describe
'148614' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXW' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
5dc032a511f87ae73ce549db9a6637ea
9f18b7d58e66a8068f40c6a1ba4a78d639dad719
'2012-03-31T16:12:21-04:00'
describe
'35075' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXX' 'sip-files00181.pro'
ed36d546838215faa1b9ebdd9a200e94
bdf087b8794ca08813382a6a1e76dd4a801e9cc1
describe
'70975' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXY' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
227ed6df1078bacceb33fdcc1d5d2386
498ff4c282f89e96fd264ca7dcdffd689d6e2349
describe
'1765684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCXZ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
309941d4840b66fb30b4eb77292eca7c
29394474a33a377854557b1e31d39453f87b28ea
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYA' 'sip-files00181.txt'
0a206e9c63e96d541e62806266eacb25
058040202f4b9266a1fb22e2bbe4667db4ef63ab
describe
'38419' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYB' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
064e07239245a8323328db291ab8fff9
b206a381a33ba876c14dc369667d5cc923d30ad5
describe
'218030' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
c6c30d0c72d062be08f83962156bfd4f
020cddee608cea43e739ab519da7a8e6207b9565
describe
'151534' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYD' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
b80e7aab885b77c9ad17bd6e5042b648
5320c1d7ac3598d7aa65fd9d28bfd9705330fdba
describe
'37417' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYE' 'sip-files00182.pro'
748ffdd86e37ac9d19b3cff147344fee
c59e0fca95772143134d7bcb149ebba6ed9f5226
describe
'74453' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYF' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
6d9d9ed652c6b3afe43fa6f0539dec4e
27a9be1d3e306820b9df0ccce9e8a7550c8a2913
describe
'1768752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYG' 'sip-files00182.tif'
1f2afd385dc6b31616e9b0a5a3989bc6
28664a82fb012e77498f3215e64e7891649402b8
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
2512629e22170a5d0af6ba8f2a800c7b
3038e0626c2929f4a72e5ecce3829446b9c14a56
describe
'38817' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYI' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
fb3bcebe2a610463e2406caebb81e872
c6debca7566d62ca6ed3943df465f7998e5e5761
describe
'217687' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYJ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
5c66992cbd84a10c5d2a0b6eecbe1400
5390d76f575d4b7dfb7d5d47bd76fbe0f9ea40cc
'2012-03-31T16:16:40-04:00'
describe
'149043' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYK' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
dcbacf239989a86976a88e6c5ddff012
75c3b51c645ac1a5656d60fa24fec46bf3d757e0
describe
'36434' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYL' 'sip-files00183.pro'
b71ce8d22f582340cc5bd0a76c106fed
fd28f1eb7b9b6f5780e7e1f82b17c8c8881ae9bf
describe
'74982' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYM' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
70fd5d13b6ea4a149809d344bc0c3bad
34c5bd81c2b86c661f4e32dcf43a40f08ac7fa94
describe
'1765216' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYN' 'sip-files00183.tif'
2669c4e486cd674681c81bbf4271d265
2e3f264cc2ec16a1974fd5508f6fe58253903ac4
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYO' 'sip-files00183.txt'
fcd22d25ade54bc0e5d32bca2451673f
7ec8ff1207c4bfb013081ded6d937352d4e8d9cc
describe
'39333' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYP' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
efc9926ffb83a99a8b883c161132920e
9150b3fdce66ecea045542b6aca74cd3b1bc3f29
describe
'215638' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYQ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
6de12c3a4545da0c9230785a88d453ee
732cd0b449a392469a7e796661b1f2598003bdc0
describe
'148999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYR' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
8c30c2ffca145e79d94e77d436c8569b
89bce9351027421d6cd5311beffb0611ea3158e2
describe
'37418' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYS' 'sip-files00184.pro'
ec6c9efd73db332efce93b46c7562a82
fbd4ad8787268142281f7efdcc99d7ad3a944c74
describe
'73541' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYT' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
f0dfb341048768cf30bbb56d8ddc3852
b2a0d9ed4adf9aa87e35aad2edbfef23662fe00d
describe
'1748576' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYU' 'sip-files00184.tif'
31d05ab294aeb8c656d8599241105e48
2c8516e616712cdedb64de2be93bbd0f1b5c7a6c
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYV' 'sip-files00184.txt'
5a39f5e515f5b1d9a70cc7c825fdb569
a186c161485101d1b0dd14f048b8892f86761477
describe
'38706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYW' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
defc5f69e104bfa03919deb559458eed
ead4035679ece285327dd08581b2857a1580c632
describe
'218049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYX' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
ae6d27e28528baffd62ca3185c80f52f
0a94e618099b5ca5ac1b2f037ba29e5b4933a011
describe
'137500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYY' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
0e76148629459771bea17678e74fe1c4
8043786405b8c6155e3a292638a62c083f0c40fc
describe
'32041' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCYZ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
b81487b564bb08f9bbfef5ca329bf3e0
05e4d82915da80e1e61036f520dcbfaff14576fa
describe
'69477' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZA' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
6c8fd9c316e7c5cfbdda0006288a8a12
723a8093702abfe07f385e92b495d1c416bf51d6
describe
'1768676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZB' 'sip-files00185.tif'
fcb28568912a28a340c1f23fbebf828f
3ebb9b1d64d743ea6bd5694e8e12345ad73fd8f1
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZC' 'sip-files00185.txt'
929446273c02a679c75df2207bb8cea3
06193fd4edf91d0fadf25657f6e674500d9d74db
describe
'37680' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZD' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
0261bf6a49f70db08dd7cad207487244
33616d59de2fb0bf4295efffb1f68b0e3ee3a2de
describe
'215641' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZE' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
2771ede1401c00df3d89e0f7d29abeb2
d0517ae3380bb53a7c9ddd4390dfaa1b112521f5
describe
'152268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZF' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
148ea931c6233d0858a2602aeec53d6f
e41344e9b3b76423595ec8f545f47dfaa1422b73
describe
'38019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZG' 'sip-files00186.pro'
b396569846bfb48e5ea021e1d90bc33d
d897efdb30d185039535e90ac4d25e84b10fea69
describe
'74114' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZH' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
b1735d68e14a8246056f8f626d860f39
ec6e2c87e666239d56357ad110814708b1d2e68d
'2012-03-31T16:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1748572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZI' 'sip-files00186.tif'
26daa143f4bf80a3ce110510327091c0
f5af6dcb6f2eb4fbf6dd6c05660f01dd218c0629
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZJ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
eb783e718e7bd86e5912a100e9a158cf
229e7fa29ff6b7d8c78bb9985ee1076cab712e29
describe
'39230' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZK' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
f9875921afcc577d7029e71b46c8a438
a84e70362cf780483907bb3a13bddf5dc091e9e7
describe
'216479' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZL' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
58131c1d9ad2d6e4955be2b6296763c7
2d40dddc024964485dda6b0712212ac777e9eba6
describe
'138803' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZM' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
eeea28f7ec1650bb5d7365f4ee011bf0
932076efedcf7367ae546ebd276d3c164bce8d54
describe
'32984' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZN' 'sip-files00187.pro'
6e037d2e49321c0a6d21f338558e2694
56092c2596ba9f27a190d47368ac554116a98856
describe
'69380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZO' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
45c4a493e1246609ad5a0a1fd7df37e3
cc5ebcbb491285a011287a1c26c610cc5e367ab8
describe
'1755872' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZP' 'sip-files00187.tif'
224cbc95de32abc9f859c25b10f43d36
3165dac7655f8010a29e6137956db1149a4825f2
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZQ' 'sip-files00187.txt'
ad658b8a90e045d4f9a02c93126d5045
44218dc2921f4dc57e9ef2acaccd3f6bd94416c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZR' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
fe1d77cecd63b02328955b88dfa03da1
f3082668d022f49319e914731f4dce7c1407a5e5
describe
'217164' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZS' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5fb1cf43774d963a506c1928f69902a9
384245aac0b6a475406021a13980c5708ef4cc03
describe
'152920' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZT' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
0ba4b0c8d79c917be8309805a113e3df
09158929b0574cd7d5d47e141917c2004640fe52
describe
'36873' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZU' 'sip-files00188.pro'
4e8f3bbcfb250e7fa82c0f9c8449c561
bb0814def457c60b47db51269896e25bb02b5a7b
'2012-03-31T16:15:58-04:00'
describe
'73973' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZV' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
754bde5d4e6b204835127c516b3275b3
00cd73344fc9931c16751133124029ab47f03b79
describe
'1760940' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
ed2d5d8a0080b464463e49ed70a39b4f
b858ab779ddb17c67772ac06a51e4dc9bb8e95b4
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZX' 'sip-files00188.txt'
c901e9cfab7e4f8b4e0ce088cc39e145
2c7b033712ed2f0f3cbd51579855da68db3083d9
describe
'38599' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
9d82881f87d09ae54a5ef78e612bb59a
f4977ac4299a93bdf75c2dace37ba20ceee5a6b4
describe
'217462' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACCZZ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
c914dbf5c10e5942d086201b54dbc5cd
4358ffc718c5440ba29a5332422c51f57c047228
describe
'138706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAA' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
437dc767fc6df70f6bb8900e8febfbdc
432cee6fd39cd4c10a1e19fc1ace2beffc6a62dc
describe
'31936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAB' 'sip-files00189.pro'
e1050f7718fa01cf99766e34b9016f8a
9c15e3bbe6fbc6c8474f8ec43961de88eb32d920
describe
'68890' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAC' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
4199de4f48dc35d28966df3b3018f392
432dfe98e2e9ac63ee21e8b004f1522004eceb6d
describe
'1763196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAD' 'sip-files00189.tif'
937278973b943fde742dcf8abc7c47af
8ef3ffca8c4f72a44a4c73eee16b4f4804823b6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAE' 'sip-files00189.txt'
7fb205bfeb1867b017d52c85e108d4f9
fdcb2a743335f4c1eeab79052a6c8784c1ac32c2
describe
'37745' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAF' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
2011b0bc960895c2c297d43cccc6c328
9d51b1aa75c5b797d9822f304df31b80e0ddcc4b
describe
'220992' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAG' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
c2cb748a603434e3700bc3ac6a34e8f3
e5429f21e7b6dfa481914665471d0bd9622e69d0
describe
'148589' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAH' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
505707b9a87c5ded47363ea4fa09ec39
f287a0b26868b4d1b8bd0d0950355ce9562eac63
describe
'37166' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAI' 'sip-files00190.pro'
8c8c1eea6b79c70f1ed4f9a3e8034f0b
ecaf85481f6e973981d2d85282e4d4e6b8702c56
describe
'72298' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAJ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
125757b9c30d91d4908a35b13a9c218f
192ccae81049f8df408fbc6e13737b9119f627a7
describe
'1791568' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAK' 'sip-files00190.tif'
11b48b5aa71c8abc0532b25c2e4f20c1
8165e13b3fb2a7bd29e40b967f028319ff670a6f
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAL' 'sip-files00190.txt'
d9d9d53205e10b05686116a5ab238742
e0eed50773b273e86e8953f58d052b9f6cbf74ca
describe
'37886' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAM' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
1d4159a4643d578701e7fd9584fe124e
d5ea7cc4411dba107de91a9dc103e1a31c05df31
describe
'220616' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAN' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e62fa0d9057ebc34b01ecf8f69eb16b3
092e23f70ea1819eb0c386f01e8b5605c1823de5
describe
'141918' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAO' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
b5074f33634336ccdc98bded1ec3493d
031341529c8a940aa8f786680b5e62d95f337561
describe
'34588' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAP' 'sip-files00191.pro'
85838a29e36f24eb6a24d0540c844906
d07bf08987a53971fcf246fb2a302222e5819ab9
describe
'69563' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAQ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
4fe5d8bd4ee5e4278e152ca0609df4c8
fd4007852d0da7c50e035ee1dbf4460fa41dbeb7
describe
'1788324' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAR' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6d104f4600779b4e080976186c3db196
dd4662d81ffbed35069d78699b200507f54cac0c
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAS' 'sip-files00191.txt'
e05430de93070b1f0c335822e346001d
8a8a971b68966abd84485ccea5bd3e34589999ab
describe
'37773' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAT' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
2de391b24da5544867763381684803e9
1d6b19ef61eb857a2e32d278441a2e16b1270f58
describe
'218678' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAU' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
ff33ce6e2cff1bf9f327da30ccc7d2ab
cc461496e8e583a83b5f5bc096c16af21fbd75b1
describe
'150056' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAV' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
21d4c9fa0b4f9193b9e2e1727619a9a9
7fe7e372a86d74b85cf3d5fd81354b1ea17cb9b9
describe
'36815' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAW' 'sip-files00192.pro'
af94d074a0a62819e5b33a493c2184b7
abb9b0c298eff2f19251f8d5fd49bb5ce9439b65
describe
'72868' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAX' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
70ca008e39dac2064baccad617cbed75
3b6ac542cd688ca805821a7234e5a1f9f2ff8bfe
describe
'1772688' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAY' 'sip-files00192.tif'
5ce64d40046a72efa1cdb7936c516694
9957618a2aa03c3e47ef2b0334beff509334c44d
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDAZ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
bc198d0e64cf61ec9750b72dea495bd0
c9f3e39659b2ae9d81e47ec79baad6fd9ef402c9
describe
'38301' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBA' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
d0bf6f5e38b327ece207aa5a12068458
d56393091aeb1c5b1eb05c4cdc8d35f63b813a18
describe
'217127' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBB' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
21821e01cd0c80256e4ac9bae039d7cb
0ee53b7d1633170655fcc0e64abd94fdc93bedcf
describe
'147914' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBC' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
03a798920e149b283e9b893f300c6ddd
d493c1994d07d057cb9d668aca3ee22fb5ae6b80
describe
'37531' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBD' 'sip-files00193.pro'
e62889cd26d0df1eda9ba58b49dbd148
a9bd87e6f9ded86329c0d1cedfe4126be41b0ce3
'2012-03-31T16:17:13-04:00'
describe
'72442' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBE' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
2948ca8bf39cfa73a9bf96706676019f
35492dc422483e4e53d00585bef335896a59f876
describe
'1760080' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBF' 'sip-files00193.tif'
f02ed8e7ed0dedcc10223f0f042b7f7d
914c65c2a616ac91bfe504e106671a56c7d2c011
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBG' 'sip-files00193.txt'
4eb28893138407908bc7aeae6c62fa75
d6519dfcb7bf460252d5946af1001466bd2243ff
describe
'38874' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBH' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
5ea750487dd28fbcc89e34262efea5fe
d75eac6b8bf2b7cdcfa192bfd5ffeefb3bd0cb13
describe
'223439' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBI' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
8a939f4c8af1c0c60e7d7c343d6b0c60
4e84cecba6e6b770081f4112c641266a51616e87
describe
'138882' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBJ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
e08db73b8bcbf1c5802fcd2710039deb
b36db5b857444b237f3d5a54b73b27e5f445a81e
describe
'31775' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBK' 'sip-files00194.pro'
5b280edce8bc97eb7a1f45085035a334
da00045d68e5415dc37d687ee5bdf761fac5b841
describe
'68128' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBL' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
001b5678139a3906a6f624fe78f1f786
2c14bebff87d577d8be1999c03da1ed3c731f5eb
describe
'1810628' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBM' 'sip-files00194.tif'
7d2a7f6e3784060d04345e3a6c5e23e9
3dee7f686210904493402f591c90c18f7bf10ab7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBN' 'sip-files00194.txt'
dbb104a5a47a370b69a170137be8cbe8
b0250dcc8d889fdfbc4557f53866b779463ce75e
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBO' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
4cfb47cacc707aefc3fa878996620a74
4807fa821ce7324e20114600a89129c8d27a18d2
describe
'217007' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBP' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
64193bd2b51b5cdf2a330c1235e88654
d91cb2d0ac29a8af8a92779ed733cfba7031d553
describe
'138051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBQ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
7f349ffd1239d7ab128b5e738b634a70
3f86f189ea0a89495773b74bbe77d624107f8538
describe
'32801' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBR' 'sip-files00195.pro'
169e93c4a6b645fa207a4d7a865d5a65
7a8b9ad977249633a398e7ff1d17a31346d2dda3
describe
'68019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBS' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
fb6428393d7182a4f8ba1bc390903e6e
e6ef9700e2b898ae722a97357988c3df1dc9cff2
describe
'1759176' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBT' 'sip-files00195.tif'
b983678f1067e3600ce69240a0e9227e
e67f7475c47f25befcfd058a397c3657a034a2df
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBU' 'sip-files00195.txt'
04fcd9ad76e9d61bc3e52297580f96f0
00401337458d298a194e1d72f117ce540334a47b
describe
'37750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBV' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
74fbbd53e34f5f6f256f23fe1df58df1
c87a7857723a841f924738243fcc8b16c1574725
describe
'220283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBW' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ffeea5b7b7b548042e6e59a1fab5b40b
1eef0ea3f3f2d862156be01aee1d9487d5d88ff2
describe
'150758' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBX' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
0092b8aabdf6997743f651cda59ea8bc
2aed343d11c714630c0aa4df1f27b0121cfc0fd1
describe
'36731' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBY' 'sip-files00196.pro'
5f44c9644b118624cfb6d93981553466
bed7432e7351f05208f22fa63abb80f3c842e8aa
describe
'72552' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDBZ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
6ab6a901e331429b97fea4f09f629c4f
ab142af5226b6797d74fcc5b6c1de11dca6d5833
describe
'1785472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCA' 'sip-files00196.tif'
0866c268ee17882386df80f26bd1c74e
6d9132f8c44016fa9717acedbd9754bd35f8cf51
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCB' 'sip-files00196.txt'
1007022e0eeece4573e26798a252b5b0
0481d2edbc5288d03924e052a6fdb24415bd8597
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
2562a7f924ecf50c43bfbfd894e3c401
f93dd20ed233eaec0fd4ddc702cf344e37a66e08
describe
'218300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCD' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
840fc1449b13795b00113abe15fded7d
30f612844e8b932bb9753d7908914a9bac1ac441
describe
'155834' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCE' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
2da799e62503f3dc951f6407d55dd3d2
ae11b6566206cf66000af9e7f0c05c837f37adcc
describe
'37877' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCF' 'sip-files00197.pro'
42d76caa08826823dbbc213934388634
8c9e1d8fcf3a2814169d96d57d8059425b706347
describe
'75503' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
130a7ae9b0de5f767109bf59d0c2a32b
88a01cb9dcc528d9d8cdd01f1892acad77c5da22
'2012-03-31T16:14:27-04:00'
describe
'1770036' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCH' 'sip-files00197.tif'
48fdc210776f36b51c681d20f0e79e5a
fe92b34a7ff409095733af608f64cf23d0cc3808
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCI' 'sip-files00197.txt'
a8ff169c0eb7add832ae62e75bc06700
05de16ae646971d9db54f277f056f470f9bf9b80
describe
'38727' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCJ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
bf8303e1bfc6349460c6487cf7f735d2
389fc85d89556166e66172bfa196324f7b951933
describe
'219405' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCK' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
eed9a793f7424e97525b687569ec6ea8
b748f4e4db17d1a2fafc31317e304daa19ecb6f3
describe
'140918' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCL' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
9d60214ccea0b7c4b0d4fae5ab57f468
283889d3e0b05f7b5a9588ebec3e209a7f9d59ae
describe
'31981' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCM' 'sip-files00198.pro'
6ba459be6e73af66e39f7025da198e78
4e0f1e6b07e94996219328590f0caaadb7244a5c
describe
'68393' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCN' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
c1b737eb99b1d20803b806f21b34ec98
0cf9ef605ee544ee636ae2b5678dfce618ac03da
describe
'1778484' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCO' 'sip-files00198.tif'
f19ab460e608bda66d6f9a6a1d95681c
612117a5e819168074c57dd219c8d924dcf8c9c3
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCP' 'sip-files00198.txt'
29f04be5b6bf11c4b046554892aeed82
b4720b823acd81862cf3ac17655442a561254f4c
describe
'37020' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCQ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
5d48ae0b31d39099c142c16f3f59126f
f71a95e5342c06d8ff64a4187776d533cf0d7d64
describe
'220677' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCR' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
4b492f838759e0980a4fcac2f858090d
61dc5a4cd1be2249d0ad6f4d5a422004a66de0dc
describe
'144684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCS' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
dca203d62b321a02e64f27fa613d4fec
1b453a72cf602197996f648109f696d677d1ba20
describe
'34246' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCT' 'sip-files00199.pro'
8b69c49f08e344a1c1070a11f1f8c79f
2b7920f3eed84fbb435458179f3417c1782aa630
describe
'70115' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCU' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
61bc899d60f672a0853fabccf20ff962
d3d83567d04d660cae4e04f34500e7c3675066e7
describe
'1788328' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCV' 'sip-files00199.tif'
22e366740e2296b36125ab6782104cb1
1f5c106ee1ce9d993b310adf512921403eef6f65
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCW' 'sip-files00199.txt'
4511d7bde4329c37d3e1fce69027fb3c
9b3059c6c6f3fa09980697e6e630d6af25a8ca58
describe
'37189' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCX' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
003c33b79892be62a0c42c997d21e805
aa42a8099d753ca09450103887f794edfe076301
describe
'224201' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCY' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
a927e9493112411d6ca7aac9f11c8473
9fff010382488e4e21a1f7e33ea71225c23cbd09
describe
'152149' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDCZ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
8d5166d0b9ddd04dc28b9a50158d8a5a
65f63676e8ba1db07a55478674aba1f9ca761f79
describe
'37481' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDA' 'sip-files00200.pro'
012927476f0f550f2220b6ab520b22bb
41a082afcfc0de11dcbb844cda74e355eba4e7ae
describe
'72508' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDB' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
d48e325b7d9598dc74b372a7521500de
59de7fd5e987a0a2721f111b14cd54fb40577bc0
describe
'1818004' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDC' 'sip-files00200.tif'
bf417273fe7c0587c3c24cc7b36c9518
818d84b47b06d3c9f053bb10002a46f03323521e
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDD' 'sip-files00200.txt'
24e03d2b96c9383b831b80595a31a530
bf5bc2cdb7cac8eb544ee2dfba28c713bcaab9f4
describe
'38348' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDE' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
a719ec5876e6c583a9e89bcdc27e8fba
98d8dc33c01a736edb8942d06464c1f5e062e6c5
describe
'221750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDF' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
fdb92445accda5495d2e5da4890ebc35
c095cc52a308abef6cc6e42d34bc177702c60e2b
describe
'138458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDG' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
59b0e4a7d5c1405f57438e93f22b6f00
308ee88d481f4b82a48b98be9ea9871717fc6fd5
describe
'32910' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDH' 'sip-files00201.pro'
8f7cbafaab90561d646797d811f5063e
e23367be207296df81b4c18bdd8bf949c75e7640
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDI' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
1441d67e10e51c616df2e6800f905925
5b28d2da1f78aae7aa70c73d07f3ad3f101a0243
describe
'1797444' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDJ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
582e7358987a96616a03f855ba72624a
dd28b843331e351973243f9fad16ff6e3116e01c
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDK' 'sip-files00201.txt'
01c76603c2a4fde8b9a58514900890e8
f1075630020db23908f6d7b22abd34a636fb1671
describe
'37110' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDL' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
08a08d2c0c1dc78f6a3a80caadde6666
c4f05584ba57b5abc1af36d9955729b7908cbbe1
describe
'222945' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDM' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
993490146a947474b406fe674ac0a9a9
27829e14a15e0fe584ac3d0f4a8cf71a84cc2d2c
describe
'151693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDN' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
dfd51208c2ac8b8c18425d5707216408
45bda0eee8cd01bdfec52ed817234b3a42d33689
describe
'36796' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDO' 'sip-files00202.pro'
f5bbf4e280faf3927799fe5fc00f8345
1fa58ce9455f3e103cb2fa5cbafc6b9c2fa7d519
describe
'72622' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDP' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
affb36ede9821a599c996f13d66dce17
2cc3e76362a10cd5d78d5e39fca7e95c6ca4ceb7
describe
'1806864' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDQ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
a3760ce38fd929fa4eb69a4657d0af13
967160843556f1820d7045d4993500eaae5cec95
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDR' 'sip-files00202.txt'
8ca260a0d36adafd676676f859d14635
0d6b9be5c2bbb100190433f13af2d80f4911b87b
describe
'38597' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDS' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
6135dcde0782cf4363f88699fcb5667e
575b5d1eb4022ae3d7c3976610bd18b2bc6824df
describe
'221954' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDT' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
078f5b83aec5f3dab9cd222807944fb1
4f360743f5c2bf2cb2b05c9215aa3442ee12ad9b
describe
'134334' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDU' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
5b6457fde7d9d512f3051f291006a0c7
f3333bab8e7e7845b0f0c197141d3ab621840613
describe
'31751' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDV' 'sip-files00203.pro'
89c1689c24253d0bcdacc30a620c3023
5163c6e4b38aa282a07c15e9351eeffb1ffdb948
describe
'66442' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDW' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
2b8e0f5e645930173acef4b61f92246a
00e9cc3ea06da686a4ae534268383d7d64432fe9
describe
'1798560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDX' 'sip-files00203.tif'
724dd1dc08371d7a4a4704101a292147
f1f9b1bb7adfd278659bff58c6e6faf7ddb71e06
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDY' 'sip-files00203.txt'
865474e34db113cc1ab5b62c870d3ff4
5bb1f5efd509d290dd810d44d3cc143bcea954cb
'2012-03-31T16:11:46-04:00'
describe
'36883' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDDZ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
750c71f5b3d1f04bb2ba950b838f3a5b
e6a4803aba5398c1fc33d0cae7aebe02684a0c7f
describe
'220383' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEA' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
9cb1f382783e08cf3216bb4c4b76fd0e
9481df29b9aab288f8222849bdf3182dcb8b8c45
describe
'138417' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEB' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
69badef62104bcf70e7b8d24c0c08334
5556aaa6faa484dc8b14ba2da076138c710c4441
describe
'31411' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEC' 'sip-files00204.pro'
b2f381a4c1aa938c675b49b36767de09
2425ea8dfb0014200f368e6cdb2699bf7060df91
describe
'67624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDED' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
f8f606310ef54c978cafbde76b1b8b60
14230ca67d5a5607db8783e349f5a0dac35123e3
describe
'1786444' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEE' 'sip-files00204.tif'
e2a1c13406a89abbbb795bd6521f1e15
6507082d0dca5d99c7844aa8de3349f9dabea376
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEF' 'sip-files00204.txt'
4641b256f103ccb9110f7bb0851e210c
98a3aeaebcba6ddc89fa41f48c3202ab1d2f3033
describe
'36551' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEG' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
a634c560ce6ef2a73d9547e9d6f4f720
b8e59517d63fe2269067b85d0f205cf543e3cc57
describe
'212814' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEH' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
15db9b0a96878a6214129215e91764fa
9dc7d4bbf752e69115842cc08eab522ba7426ffe
describe
'130250' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEI' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
7813112e667f64a3f2fb27aad1d3ff65
cf1937e87d0d0ba123b0272461a32480e6c2e3ae
describe
'30432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEJ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
e5cf083b03f5789609cd6cc0ccfb8842
1b32d50df29ccfee71dc56f0183fe02b49379289
describe
'65635' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEK' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
5a1284b0a7ce02c508505d7432561045
7ce79a8fb2a16792012c1e6a71e84c429e83b6c7
describe
'1725204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEL' 'sip-files00205.tif'
2477febafa724e5166495f50ce68e342
4f806708856a5a638a1edc2c2b087a7c7dbb159f
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEM' 'sip-files00205.txt'
6dd0d6af0876367813b03f4c06de0f0d
bee5b7d16c86bb93e9f23230e048a03c55401add
describe
'36868' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEN' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
600fb2f5546813c29e448ccda227ff81
45c53abc877a5d40f382d0020d9aab7022ac6870
describe
'222276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEO' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
9b0f8f03a05fd3c2d535136df16e9c7b
ea76a5f4bfe9915c7548ff09b2a64462233f0e44
describe
'135755' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEP' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
75e13e10306cb1c562699ccd626330a1
f0bd124f131d74e694d3748c21587b88626068bd
describe
'30211' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEQ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
dcda7d80e3c6e30d3843e820c83ecc0f
f8964c6c777f65fee6e17329e30b23413d23a4d2
describe
'66885' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDER' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
351985dff3a273a0ed078745359c1248
5dcbcdd07f8185f16b7acff6f81f7725f42060cd
describe
'1801736' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDES' 'sip-files00206.tif'
49d04ba93eb671b485ca05aece94089c
158c660a512332f7ae28fa9616902bc2458d57ce
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDET' 'sip-files00206.txt'
02239ea0551763dc4e0f9d901edaf2fe
11af2ec2ec8f516ff5ac558da83a4e86683608be
describe
'36936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEU' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
4c9511c8092b40a5e1aee798ace25a1d
7deee23845ea39ea428c40fa5850e6620b722c36
describe
'218839' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEV' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
be450eaaa2dbc8f0e5306e887e7a7f6f
2d5e74df98f8d0193c534f86833cb598259d70e6
describe
'142766' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEW' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
be1d77cc9a12ce15d07ce97a85aaaaa2
052ff7bb738ea1a4a82de1ca36def6716655ee1f
describe
'33834' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEX' 'sip-files00207.pro'
2c202b92f0c89da15754310803bdcdac
3b69b98a296b005c9abc05b1295852c9486d6b21
describe
'70036' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEY' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
59fa9708b42b16c7c782109bf7fc6413
3fb9b86f3979ac6707a72df6d9ea26f78037d390
describe
'1774108' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDEZ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
7a2c56aabe8edd289feee2b297eb0851
3461395facb41de23a0a9e6cb592d361b0966527
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFA' 'sip-files00207.txt'
e60b2c4d8d224772b238af872bb429b5
f7ef7605c9679f2ebb969693fe5dd7eed819bff2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFB' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
ff2f96317b80bf6fba0422e6b21d7824
e5a5fd782ac353163303f6516bf07e230d968bab
'2012-03-31T16:16:59-04:00'
describe
'222021' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFC' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
77e8c15f892868eff9e7e6931701f138
ccf83a8606bb497f5f498a89d21bba833ae5e148
'2012-03-31T16:10:05-04:00'
describe
'141207' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFD' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
fdb808cd1ff36a0c43cd7bb03ad5578a
b2c6d05c43adccb7f4985fefe628a1e44707897c
describe
'30507' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFE' 'sip-files00208.pro'
63d615584e66d0593a5b9d53ded052b1
64f9ca2c26be66a342b67b7eaf0da6cafb0086be
describe
'69049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFF' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
4440c45dd2ada24f8675d877d49397d1
56fc4cad6306858657208d68f6a4e2c91ecb5a7b
describe
'1799772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFG' 'sip-files00208.tif'
627f42ec0da97785d5da9518ad6487a0
2a389eeface54d2643ff82a546aab6086169f9cd
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFH' 'sip-files00208.txt'
8611205c88784f7c65a6b7a5992b330f
64cfa801846bcead1b0223347d14383e6c68ca69
describe
'37595' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFI' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
fb30dd3311fc863f41e28fe6226086a8
ab3c2e998b61a5094fa23f58deada98e316d9698
describe
'215664' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFJ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
5356dc225656287c50dd2e3203b3ba95
c4beb8722e5fb6c673e4b801b3b00bcc42d2a5a0
describe
'135235' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFK' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
30d53ed3cd811bf30fc66fa079457127
b63c4a2745462f6288b2e2bbeb37f38a88d88ffe
describe
'31963' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFL' 'sip-files00209.pro'
b785722dfd8bdd33cd7ed6c810dd8adb
8d8383370ca16acbf7d8de9c194fa9fb406f3246
describe
'66629' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFM' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
75182ff11bbc5b59dd3de294a3856fb2
fc26c64d846ec708ded2f57ef79d76727507ae8d
describe
'1748528' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFN' 'sip-files00209.tif'
65de9e3661cbdf6b41b9bcc956786548
2cd2e0c59cf03b6042b2839fcd4b221cc28ef972
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFO' 'sip-files00209.txt'
8eac49d21e4a881d25f1d165e49f02ed
ea625889ab4d84081a7f2b93d2c30138bca7c5d1
describe
'36846' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFP' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
89403d73562046ad981ff6ad5e5e707a
642a2e18024716d4747dd93b657303da2edb53a8
describe
'223811' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFQ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
a14100555186b4f311222c8277f2c80e
a1515a4fdf72e1277846327eb988591f3c479ef8
describe
'140856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFR' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
38c3342ba58e8de78ff717329c62ad2a
12204e8ae71f5c59521f37537909dbd92c1af367
describe
'30750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFS' 'sip-files00210.pro'
150e7a2f2f0ec2bb4c58c9d84cc80cee
e6397cb20fe8efd3cfa586c0d2e09c60392ad1dc
describe
'67734' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFT' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
75747b0e73e4487d6b1ff5832ebc2495
81bb777b89d07240dc12547c0a52d482a521a417
describe
'1813780' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFU' 'sip-files00210.tif'
b5a49a2d9887a2aade1523d7836d8d44
2d6da5df2d19c03528ad66f08a9ea9b97f15f4f4
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFV' 'sip-files00210.txt'
62f554a9235719b3e8a8098955c0539e
c3d22d2b6bc977a2fe94dde7bf4dbbf5ae118507
describe
'36919' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFW' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
f6e7f429d0c784279ba3417a27302583
e92b3c035519c0c86436480a2a5c44fc60af2e84
describe
'219886' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFX' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
e9417f6fc85747a7124278e53e59226e
7ff5e4e57b0a2b508b889a7608f14b831c2e988e
describe
'149022' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFY' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b8a0b13d7c5d9baa4e787de8d46f0471
99ec48f959c9e8ecbd34a1cefd491bbab843edba
describe
'36085' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDFZ' 'sip-files00211.pro'
9aee3f84c578fcb0b881f141e8e145af
27c8537971cda29d7c8b2779349576910b4c1ca3
describe
'72240' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
79f40098a53f73fef88fac1fa16ca100
7a2fa64c68c93a3be6075d226571ff062cc76655
describe
'1782328' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGB' 'sip-files00211.tif'
db54618da0965207d8c99ea41efc6534
9f107b698c0aa22ff3f857dc5b9b103e629131ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGC' 'sip-files00211.txt'
875b9d0905a075ffc3e39df8e53266dd
1baa9b2910e2446fa2889f4d15039a8f2c2330a2
describe
'39273' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGD' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
ed1495d537938dc6bdb159d5f0da5bbd
5801e92351c16a99a406a2bfb507aec63a1aab0e
describe
'221821' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGE' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
dbff7dde74a42f853d91c7c1d0f050f8
1521fd0e93b8293e1a5657f4cc3edc10306e7430
describe
'144253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGF' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
b56c279dc4748647e73a02715ac6c139
346c5220ece7265b2a6a5d83b36c734c21c7e4ad
describe
'33100' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGG' 'sip-files00212.pro'
6e12f52f56ef3da7bac35e7e944a91ae
063c18d57ac7b6a5d89443585bf6d70985e5d973
describe
'69614' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGH' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
c4219c834dee106963b2b43180bf37ac
3508b331be68031c8902e519d5213a02ef9c0dcd
describe
'1798624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGI' 'sip-files00212.tif'
23472c1c7e7b231e758f88a6a64fdc98
a6e89293d49dd3845e2259be5bcc2960b11234da
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGJ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
afce0bd8bd79d014366b87f7a825de69
505b60660a96a1e432bb9cbbef155a867af4b906
describe
'37772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGK' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
83e21812a0df570d7b4bcd2d92dcc7f7
a664f3bea582e48c45eaeb4f20547fc22c49b347
describe
'221119' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGL' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
8e4aab250e4df266d4822eb6a51cdab7
7815a6b90f83ba294ec810cb7359e153511704be
describe
'141471' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
db035f7cda5f988edafe9154ee4e2d55
f4b6364d4cc3b918e52a2e90bd23258907e1bb14
describe
'33422' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGN' 'sip-files00213.pro'
439cc362f76442891efa655a1f5d50ce
1b7301633ceccc93a911d00f0924e72855476156
describe
'68739' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGO' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
1221e450f9f5028435e45b59cfcdac5d
2bb9596751014334be78222630f9ccde9b3df5e4
describe
'1792080' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGP' 'sip-files00213.tif'
538aaea529d89760f179b0a1a22ee877
a20704dbe492bb2d277a993db5a0882b8cb3a66d
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGQ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
d0e659a666dd1e76f7dc30f0b31ee76c
c888f9b72bf12825fcfd2cfea1618a05ec00417c
describe
'37617' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGR' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
a6042d159b4d5a059ff016b52e843cf6
0c5795caf35d148b78860ab4c38187f100f3f25d
describe
'224055' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGS' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
653983892cc9743dccd78f00e7388a28
29585474a78e161a3979c1c65c10502dc496f261
describe
'132308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGT' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
82061049c5fa8b95d8cbf861e6165ebd
a88dbaffe15fa2b01b9d4e017854e8aba0bac924
describe
'28813' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGU' 'sip-files00214.pro'
46000e272956f63230b016e83f01d0a4
f6cdeb3e4ffcf7a4d82bb0b9cf004a4be31b2758
describe
'63999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGV' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
89edc18791e78620c155b7998de0e56e
dcb396ac94de444e31ede1d0f4dcc9b468bdc83b
describe
'1815404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGW' 'sip-files00214.tif'
35af777d74a59b9fc43c26d0e79e2e0b
954a032b82d89caac3bbda94f7eeb6b27860178e
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
189ff8d200afacdf0f3a33c3c51f29f3
dd498b50464cca7260bd5f08cc03b1ca9c841934
describe
'35202' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
7d842aa3fbb24d7131f187c991abe2d1
e719e6ce16abe1108946cec1f31066dce02b8957
describe
'217794' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDGZ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
d405b8f75218fb036fa4e09611450a25
191b35e9efa25652c053425be7a099049af8cf51
'2012-03-31T16:14:59-04:00'
describe
'109328' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHA' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
1dd8347061ed1eda7c2e30e46e386298
cfc9cfb046f31e186c89dacab6e9750e25ac1ca9
describe
'24180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHB' 'sip-files00215.pro'
e54e9efde3db4fe039d44ed0dbc6f973
1071f8ddcc90ed6e72b1faf177e49337e0d1723b
describe
'55835' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHC' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
3d387d00b5821124e0132f644f473f34
ead0590176bfeae198cdd389bb5f3519ff6d573b
describe
'1763924' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHD' 'sip-files00215.tif'
2bc77a8feacb856a1c475f256b053311
b579fc36e2a80cef65816abf49d3f9c11ae6a9bd
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHE' 'sip-files00215.txt'
98e6aaa625f0ccb8c5b33ffa8ffc9a3c
3f06036e6e22c059428a3e81e1a6e24f878bd90f
describe
'32747' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHF' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
b3cd3ccd80acd6cf7a1a6690d22e2486
3926668ba2a3bd5fe38d650528217c88f84f4a9e
describe
'223413' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHG' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
1ef4da0c71e468719feb6062454503ad
9dc6e482131fbee2af57cbc62f373f09ee4bdeff
describe
'140688' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHH' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
51aff8f22b82feeb91286e3e06005600
ff3b8c06ec35aad47a2e3c835bb78b6d318de971
describe
'33779' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHI' 'sip-files00216.pro'
2401e256c959b60de0eb0c1086343979
2eaa34a00977777b12dbbca79620bf2bb0d020f1
describe
'68912' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHJ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
a7a05f09f87d7671ee2ae18024731ea8
d3596780f43931fca2fa41c04d45c9bea625ab96
describe
'1810548' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHK' 'sip-files00216.tif'
320c6f340e0a8ee3cf05539f27524fea
6cf6bb33999e8118d81c1d610fc0ac284d2126b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHL' 'sip-files00216.txt'
a4c8c644aa055fa49fb91cca31d171fd
6da94af426cf89de60ff3032c3cd3adce0063e89
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHM' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
79536ec5d42b0d0045f0d42a8e235267
e7a01ff066eb5d890831574e726c6ade46bf486a
describe
'217450' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHN' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
a3b4a394ae4a63113aebb95260dd52e9
e3d86abc286bea7b50352f08f021771db38b926b
describe
'126234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHO' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
46e35cb215d7f889b1c33375e9fcda49
cff31d0e63aa41bb919060e18484a88c683529c6
describe
'29984' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHP' 'sip-files00217.pro'
dabdfa861b16347b379f4e26db63ba11
18f4f1a3128ff43eb2648a972a5df54587f39346
describe
'63857' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHQ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
d293a69785cdd1d8a320a76cf1e7b491
4b0b5aa1483f8436861e296fafe8a709557e5fee
describe
'1762532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHR' 'sip-files00217.tif'
30504b6d5681558866640a995401ddad
4893dcb7efa0cd7ff847180fc3f5b6fe21715e7e
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHS' 'sip-files00217.txt'
f7699eee9394c74ac6861aba6db3972e
0c93ad31460c793da311efdcda366910c2a972d4
describe
'35181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHT' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
87ed45abac405de8fd388fc8a4e9abfb
d60a2a00a8e1bb4343fa131aee2710931b4bd854
describe
'224161' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHU' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
8cf687e7476a42b5b4eaba21dd15d1c1
972f612a0744410b120d66a600c68729309972d9
describe
'130441' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHV' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
f1ab7d26f06f6e292b399587e473b61b
8f3b8c60a1ea8b353b13bd0fd27ba6ac06f1e17f
describe
'27902' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHW' 'sip-files00218.pro'
6c3e4c85d2fe588c306c10623661f4e0
6013b8bddc6192e95c4cf96c2f12ae53e0331182
describe
'64111' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHX' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
e640c8c74d5aa336f9b2f9602c4fb3c9
93d344d2b6ce952c1d7878df265831bf6b30d697
describe
'1816220' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHY' 'sip-files00218.tif'
b005230f9e3d1a0b1bd4e337b3ed695e
ac108aa2c0fd5807f1b462e927169f51880746bc
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDHZ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
bc6fe4f0fd627066411804550265fb03
7b6e0c3a69ff4d78b6f8f3870c5242a3cd4be785
describe
'35588' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIA' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
76e9939a3a8ffc84a8fe0ae6016c57d7
1f6a8005e3a165e487823381799c13f9f6c1768e
describe
'225577' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIB' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
8d5fcba0f152ef024ff4ea1f15401264
f0e22ccd86d2a34e32875bee3669f87f5f181f6f
describe
'136390' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIC' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
c54433e3571ef69581b0e2599f0372e1
806a55e7b58071f77b6aee2291720d5bfd8656ac
describe
'31552' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDID' 'sip-files00219.pro'
5ad9d74dd58a2b39389aed2dd2e53cd4
b0664149a1049dcbcf48b88ba1caec59a231229a
describe
'67539' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIE' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
10fbc6476e9ef1bcaa7d26adc580dc05
b6efc31cfb34064aaa0a3426cbf6638319d93f34
describe
'1828836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIF' 'sip-files00219.tif'
4b29450cd2cae8c5b4ba027dec651a31
2ff7eaf2dd1139ff87e3f6e29d0cfd2743f726f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIG' 'sip-files00219.txt'
a5d7d5d9167f824bacd96e0bdd64f5a3
c9f6aeafa81814c73eaa1c7b41e57bf726fd47b4
describe
'36810' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIH' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
41852f2518ababb97729fbdc44afbec6
269163a3ebae6fc243bb96d54839c0a1321fcd64
describe
'219974' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDII' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
15764b694e06fc9289fc2c2bb42ec2a3
7e649b852e21e74a98f5081cb62a06f3c7ef6276
describe
'135989' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIJ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
6cc3b584dfa5bd40c18afbce3431f644
39a968e8d75a705d4c38d76e7d10a4cde644d431
describe
'30816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIK' 'sip-files00220.pro'
5ad0605344c21593c7485165d68de5dc
a3e187055108f4e9f835507e9be4e4d43236f68c
describe
'65692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIL' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
4fe398e004783b314b217e094f42f60a
94ee08440312aace98401ad47e19a162ab6fc811
describe
'1784236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIM' 'sip-files00220.tif'
b31e3031d0821ea55637c7d3f2d9df60
e8e2b189553a026d5614e2706402baa4337b9cd6
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIN' 'sip-files00220.txt'
0bcdddc191c3df6b9d578457f496d8ee
a394e609e7fcffedd152e6d35c624b70bf323ebd
describe
'36481' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIO' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
3667d86cdcdbc8fe2bac7167d1d9433a
32ffe65470ef1ddb5d1d1d5acf4f6f9a58dfb2ce
describe
'222449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIP' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
1b1e0735e0a285fd951136f186f04dd7
5bdc27cb665118bbe43fcaa869295cf45c3b61cf
describe
'136809' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIQ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
5d85324fb505e6474eb43facb39d78a0
2388e669a0b3e437f6a2f5ef5f92aafa22e7f138
describe
'31289' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIR' 'sip-files00221.pro'
0fad65249b78734e019b90c871b63a2b
06277b3e837a3935a62bfea481be821e856b434d
describe
'68001' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIS' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
ae110d3f3ce70562c721ae14e3759c1f
9bb3d65b067a92f6cb49a4d6245274fbeafe8c5c
describe
'1802340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIT' 'sip-files00221.tif'
70b901c46b20dddb00d7db2ac0496e45
2efbe31789584fb24a3de79ff10ab37c6457b607
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIU' 'sip-files00221.txt'
d5e3ca35ec440cf8c871923be19e6385
91c913c7ab4992e45fc7d8077501cd2ffc993c73
describe
'37257' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIV' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
d134137418a0b5e9f422c4f0063f25ca
a78f0c7dee1cebc79197e7e60baeaef83ce33740
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIW' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
886f7205038d979a1ca7418daf9f5d65
18d68a61be92707d42faf8e3c4e34c1d2b440c3d
describe
'152897' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIX' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
5f317201a3a59b436e239762bb08f828
e56dbc502016de60951f4f976304b84c9d8d4a2a
describe
'37618' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIY' 'sip-files00222.pro'
1bee73beec387b383418d4bb532f5730
2c099304bded76611742f84b1edade22f9d9815a
describe
'72846' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDIZ' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
5a70422b1087f46f32781cbde5ab2b3e
7a4d7b2d88625d487895383f4a9122bcb8550b86
describe
'1799720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJA' 'sip-files00222.tif'
62ebb13186012ce905e63f9157769722
a7d30cee32cf0534afcb9eaf82b78b4576eb4fd7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJB' 'sip-files00222.txt'
f3fdf539ee55b19ed19eda5901a3c864
bd5d2a482d660096e64e5277503da74f35476131
describe
'38900' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJC' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
99a7e9a4ecd94e2e419f9e76e44ce9ea
3290500aa8c40fad79755957b994826d3969d2d2
describe
'220377' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJD' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
65cf07cb042c2de85cfc3c19e34dc8b0
c2d5368fd8cf900882ac2511a90baa1c6af2e9f9
describe
'144700' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJE' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
6cf78a36a9fef954c2c1c9e7c504844d
b6e7f98d88a33a79abd61217e92cf22fc19a6879
describe
'35764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJF' 'sip-files00223.pro'
40b13c29b92da868235a1b767d16f363
597579560aacd20a16aff4c128019d593f5fd6a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJG' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
92d844590a45b6fb185c49ca46c7031c
10f3846115f4f54b348fce46a5d16e44bae77914
describe
'1785916' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJH' 'sip-files00223.tif'
338f3f514451debffe5308bc26c18f91
cccf02adf81c5b60604c0a1f829742d9e79701dd
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJI' 'sip-files00223.txt'
0d847f839ba26d22e03ce95c6e9e61a1
4d960119c2d0557e00f63feb3a954c57187a25b4
describe
'38394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJJ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
a70cd7ff405cc15a33f49c8a4891636d
591ce5267317992e92839411402984df68a77765
describe
'220347' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJK' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
cb9f2a8c22abba21e41a429b99972ea6
9f0aa57510bf79cb40cb52e8d3b11ef99ce363b1
describe
'129248' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJL' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
532c6057c96691ba1cfb37944242cb2a
b8ea1e6d2352eddf0a7ba5b7f46fd5ec6892d336
describe
'28340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJM' 'sip-files00224.pro'
4c0663ca5fd9228712f16e1aaf088b8c
3a2c4279cbfe13db2203bb041750736c0fb87706
describe
'63544' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJN' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
7a071f202d0cab3e9ea5b5b5a32d6bb1
7659d0a21de65180b4d9fe90bcbc7ffc9400a4c9
describe
'1785816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJO' 'sip-files00224.tif'
7c43808873e80238eb0a832bd6f0f59a
c8bcf4ad445958c7f368a7d42a70665bfe633b69
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJP' 'sip-files00224.txt'
20565069e0f347d53d451d9c88273273
5340d230c9e92045739288177e694e233aba7dd3
describe
'35165' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJQ' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
10d1caf1c0b07f603a4541d95a84e6f0
7f0c1caabca04eb9bd66e0faf77ad4eeb6ae2690
describe
'222653' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJR' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
d9dd0a4568343f7fb2b10a6cabec6032
09ad2af9fd9df6d39b637263ef1702d5c0b75d31
describe
'149087' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJS' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
dd7c247f2d2f57a74d056a67db25bbf1
ec4a3960dd14d4565b2a4e7bcff5036dc20f7355
describe
'37594' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJT' 'sip-files00225.pro'
7dacc291fb03311d75723e1d1fcc5664
8e1adb59eff6b60e21758dba6aa6d568ba9ebb37
describe
'72746' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJU' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
57444e17e51a95ef32d9ebdeb3a758b4
ce59de9383733daf666d3c8601ebf901f515db87
describe
'1804432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJV' 'sip-files00225.tif'
1504b323d8945d6be454a0b1a283959b
99ba10e7d8704b388697dca72a69189ca7123cf1
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJW' 'sip-files00225.txt'
f25fb0a7261fc334516f0ca2c2be3e03
45c4338ed99b4077e0054c71b2677b220da1ef3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJX' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
9b192c8de41879bc8b015334b778f711
505ac7e2921ccf2bd75737c43d37bff6d4261e15
describe
'220994' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJY' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
5defaf51ffb4318234acbe48d1863a3b
fee4579c013c857d8421228c3c29f0743ee2994f
describe
'135585' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDJZ' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
5555abad942da797429b84f285ab8998
02dd326b3b34d019dd1b5d774fc0e5d5596f8f39
describe
'31253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKA' 'sip-files00226.pro'
d6c4877bfd6f821c6ca19c7678e1f023
440001a84ece983c6e28ed8586d4fc6132e5dd23
describe
'67144' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKB' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
36a8d269d6ff5a3c59c595b8f304a16d
a573486a9eead02230fde0c1e3fb1d8bbd9eb455
describe
'1791396' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKC' 'sip-files00226.tif'
b66e62977742f2a7e14742da71dcc4e8
07a425be88b63989c3c33f851a9bafad6adb6bab
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKD' 'sip-files00226.txt'
9a4a66557e57b983585e30dbe2135cd7
514c8948b2c64c275683bbcc6612b1ce302eb74a
describe
'36806' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKE' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
aa8c9f50fb034dfc9581f7760cb50b6c
081f7edd5f6d5c097c3e9133d3ebf807bf92e00e
describe
'223056' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKF' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
832f55ccb6fcff7c482e1d07d1f11d91
9e4cd99f96296a25823cf986882de85dbe03ed5a
describe
'148797' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKG' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
3a8c899f0e95c8f216e91d99630a9a83
513375db343611688812f9d3a16949c406274f54
describe
'37726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKH' 'sip-files00227.pro'
d03fe661c4453a6dbc3e9a66fe57f845
1f80f3588ac153991873da038ac2edd6ecc62578
describe
'72335' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKI' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
f3aedbab4ce68e73aceee156af5aa8c8
734a578837320f0e77999bfdf71d740ca1d82ba3
describe
'1807560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKJ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
cb2d81e3e3b63a86532ac89c79a70944
a172e9adf73f85d9ceb5473cccd98c732a473a75
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKK' 'sip-files00227.txt'
edf6a9dd185fd19c4498459a14cd4a16
2a7d3702cb469fbbebfe461fdbe9bc4ed80e08d0
describe
'38472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKL' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
732ebe823371480e3dce879d66b2c09a
7c9e95c1cc9eb77787f643db1f5c2251cc52ce2d
describe
'220147' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKM' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
b00eca77cf30e13efd78141d45c0a8af
d036987b729f46da4989f99b1816dc09a25bbec6
describe
'152822' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKN' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
fe885fa78e820a8c8b8526242b459888
20be5ee30e3fccdfb1f01a7715cdcabe5f13a95a
describe
'36535' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKO' 'sip-files00228.pro'
f16b3b2654ce90679f3beef15a510d3d
86ead0d1f4e1e1708dbbe9eb042f425ef844bb4c
describe
'72347' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKP' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
f970f595b6a5ffc1962768f73229dcbe
f27ffbc3aa1e18eb1d8a0c8da782edb87ee22853
describe
'1784676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKQ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
55c85b460f305ce136ca89b688d242de
0e6f3eda005d654f5042c4d34827322a1c2ae2c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKR' 'sip-files00228.txt'
b0f5be6dc11b6dd9e0cd82ce058e617c
58e9b48272bcce6fb310a3915ed532e0c9303cbd
describe
'38362' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKS' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
03c5be0e0203cc2e9e69f5eb9783b931
eebd9b038fe5b199c537363937794c003d4b6fad
describe
'216970' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKT' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
83e54ef36c7e266c1f0754a95d881af7
0b7c55eef77cc3129c90220d967597e13112178d
describe
'151528' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKU' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
31a5f042359c524111a5577f6e1d5aa5
ad5d2a5364076cffb8257a350c4af40afec03620
describe
'37095' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKV' 'sip-files00229.pro'
cdd9d873de73604d9bb3b949872d98ae
387ed91a841ad9c11fdffbc79927f9b7f65fdf9b
describe
'73468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKW' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
1810559ac1677fc7db4c690d4469d976
1a16466804c86e2a9682e58d98877a82a77ace89
describe
'1759488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKX' 'sip-files00229.tif'
3b5447114ded6140ddc526b69124bfdd
aadc40d7085d94ba522ea822ed37ea732c7a5f48
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKY' 'sip-files00229.txt'
ca7ff332bc685952575f48c5af1b3881
3a6bbd7fe4c2497fdb878b8ffa449f7c84defb07
describe
'39305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDKZ' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
d43b198aeab3b3271320de59cd2974dc
86de75f5e90ca55895295a9b2f3030c7db80796e
describe
'218113' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLA' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
6296673c245a09843474b4200bcd1a31
cbd7d6c391fd133f5efb6ad4b896c98f9b114ad1
describe
'131640' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLB' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
17d6add064d89e4fe337bb2698059753
d7fc26181ec797bf419bd039f341bdc3369c7329
describe
'28932' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLC' 'sip-files00230.pro'
141293ebcb3e3f382c32447467a1fa40
4100c4a8a23136c8ec7b4c5a619498bfb68307ec
describe
'64824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLD' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
2586d33fa3dab45d84907ba2126089e6
687cae6f87859d73a30bd17a5f41238c8a84a177
describe
'1768068' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLE' 'sip-files00230.tif'
b15b8ffb8ca1062e605f7e545ecf436c
f79f6e08c24cbe9b70ca440f9cdb653fc92a72f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLF' 'sip-files00230.txt'
8e38e0168a59bbebee451e98590e76f9
21c0d76ef50c63199188b6eef459b200b97b0866
describe
'35676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLG' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
f4fd4bad2c2ecb35101b43f5289f7881
cb0a06e509aa2110a2b18c0c35ee0c2cf3654930
describe
'221177' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLH' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
dcf2cc0393dd896fa8e517244db67fce
6a70947845e4657089e2408461229f702e16dff2
describe
'147416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLI' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
ed9f8d46d6729755942686ed1b94b94a
367889119444007cb02414c7cddca6a57c40e360
describe
'36208' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLJ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
d595f264e76a29556dd13a76151bcae7
9b6325b3fa56e0098df2523851a33b7a4ca1d85a
describe
'71625' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLK' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
502eef377baa0957fa27949ac12af075
7c89cac00d6b87381186944e79c5feabfdb93411
describe
'1792340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLL' 'sip-files00231.tif'
2810510b1ba0b9b20ed01ff454203e3a
8beedfdc91ef3c350046d80b2f15ff2cf480615a
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLM' 'sip-files00231.txt'
e296895d176e20a718569f0011a3ebb6
14e57f6de3767b024488499409cca4b0a5f0b21c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLN' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
f13853ce642c0478d24a84fe5841714f
7f0b73da39c85c95ba13d5bb58dc6ff5672d6342
describe
'222706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLO' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
4588ae347e684792435b9ee33a348cd0
e4436f346792a431fae6ccb360270dbf5dd815e3
describe
'148083' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLP' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
f6db3dc60f78f5df13f1c233de647dbd
ec06d0ddf246a3c6a4b003d641c6206ef9b4f131
describe
'34484' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLQ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
28cdf4c5ff1f8048ea0a399dfd85e66c
1d9d9d443759f207b4fd4448c42be9a845dedeab
describe
'70924' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLR' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
7b2beb84dc7bc996632700e27b56dcec
e764cfa393a49d5ca477f4fc7cb700215b9eeb2c
describe
'1804908' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLS' 'sip-files00232.tif'
8752bb0908db7ed96a6e89e3f4cec73a
fc8cf48e661ec740352a164414dfb4d5522d9d76
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLT' 'sip-files00232.txt'
dd68d3f11d6b4bda8c756ff9fe585ec7
07a31e4090563078535abe691bb2c5f09b5def0a
describe
'37706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLU' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
f835d0ede039190d345159f1a69f02c1
b77fd104f16a2c9cb686580f9a4b847506f7cb62
describe
'216633' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLV' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
ea0793373314e042e23dc66e95a99eb2
f99e26ba3c8ed9ecae80ad703a8ce5be34b96c5e
describe
'132560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLW' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
40c7b0997d1e07e443b99ba0576a0112
dc8df6ae950ce3118f233cc7cd45d861fa9bc6d0
describe
'31734' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLX' 'sip-files00233.pro'
0b5d65a57eb7ab17aa14621a8221055d
e40f7a19db35a002b6e5a82551d341eba58b5fac
describe
'66400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLY' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
de472763c2c643308ace87def449ef19
12559326894dedf29e32abe8bf7887d8aab9fd86
describe
'1755516' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDLZ' 'sip-files00233.tif'
a14e13edb9e17a2c1968394663b69446
6401eb84dfbf5c4a508cf87561749298874690b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMA' 'sip-files00233.txt'
74c990b5eef0034cc1f952157a5d5c31
878647c8175e4675e21dcea98403de923be26e90
describe
'37103' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMB' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
5f82d87fdc9f8e7ecb690e01537e40ea
27a567e4244a3a15fa6dd94e8172f0300f1882db
describe
'219545' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMC' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
bdd6ed13d2734eaffb8fba140a5f6e33
2885c159d599bf83434ff73aab74061e460cad91
describe
'144659' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMD' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
6d5f8040a374840d8979c319b9b8cb36
c3ab49e30afc82010ff09208dbd51ed8d7a1b85d
describe
'33211' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDME' 'sip-files00234.pro'
3df1c7f88b7729d6e9961d1f8df8b3d3
831a62e9db2de8e95019f671fcf01d2fd8e06cde
describe
'69967' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMF' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
77ff5d35b2b6b5c0b8818c9bc625d139
3eac7e9096d5c70d40674ae99b2d47c96c9f6b2b
describe
'1779864' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMG' 'sip-files00234.tif'
588321ecf7ad129810dfdf6f9c1d61ab
f4cf1bbadc527dd19991a1d6c96bb2b9a4b3f227
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMH' 'sip-files00234.txt'
e487f6bc5b38a8e4251416d130fa386e
5b3733d62dddff33516baec9e44fed0e52f52152
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMI' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
bca5d2631dc3f9497b630c6485c768b7
a94904975825e22814376b94c619abe62509abd6
describe
'220476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMJ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
9bd27d08ea86abbbf64baa5b9d63a709
9aa8395483d72d3520733553af0878d45769b239
describe
'147662' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMK' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
5c91d7e30740b08cd74b522220464a82
128bc26cac89ffabcf22ee3072c49055d92fec68
describe
'36941' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDML' 'sip-files00235.pro'
c74a3d2b7bb7d39df58d7fdafa4f4c84
6d0d1e4138e96251d028d4379f9cbd5ea95ba7aa
describe
'72707' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMM' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
9a3deadbe7c692e364f45f484b0b8e4b
6ab0a1499f14f02ee4846c038c346c267e56a09e
describe
'1787664' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMN' 'sip-files00235.tif'
ba9607b783975a010145f1d647b567bf
24f001324ef6acb05ed1d2e716b0b43a3a14e0ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMO' 'sip-files00235.txt'
6165014ef3a559fde7eb8de4e264e278
6b7afecd521f9432dbbe897c55d74d7eba960436
describe
'38528' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMP' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
35927ad0cd41e9c5c11eb9e54de35790
f8ecbff67b5205f7e54f8f12cf459ca3ec437930
describe
'216763' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMQ' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
059c3a55186666924650688925e14e91
9cc9e4936f3324648866c6d4e3432d27d1dcd3c1
describe
'140073' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMR' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
7d3a504d19decb981a3e7e300404493e
084538a828e82a65c74cae8fd42b8cf20f0d3981
describe
'32166' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMS' 'sip-files00236.pro'
4979800576e6d30121370adf3f9348e1
cbc33d72bd33458e1bbe8ba2fb0c030db32743ab
describe
'68188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMT' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
bd786b25f0e687e400d5dea0c1efa4f6
75671d73f29cf5743280697de85999b522f9398b
describe
'1757460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMU' 'sip-files00236.tif'
96e64920d93b8e320999b80026f6fbb2
096c07aeb47107da10b97a63873514f7b5ba4474
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMV' 'sip-files00236.txt'
c2eb97bc182e265a135fdaf8ed78ea43
dbe686dd2229263a4a6fcae2a01c929c77faef2e
describe
'37423' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMW' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
d553ef7a125580771958b2cc28fb8e4a
22ad9b89361cd71bb532d327d1dae84da78442d8
describe
'213244' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMX' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
1024944499df48629d6fe6decd477740
848fe933343734429fc65f619fa3c700ccaaac1b
describe
'146494' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMY' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
3dbd6dab154c6876da584c8ea264ef12
77023bfd5af9bbb5f8950e433294aa95fdd55bce
describe
'36221' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDMZ' 'sip-files00237.pro'
222affe33a2a551cba557e693fee8faf
b21c3cedc8dc658a4886bb86e69022800d5f7893
describe
'72937' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNA' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
49119913b1c12548656ba6164b0ba163
1f255b331228dc2a9328beba3c99915788e474f9
describe
'1729840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNB' 'sip-files00237.tif'
7f7a59c1127d18b917fe8556c6125aea
7c9fab0b0400c4b968aacc1021ceb39095acff99
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNC' 'sip-files00237.txt'
798669192069197d393d6eb01dd255ec
713a6445f9f10fa8b4db81b6564f1b0e40ffc2e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDND' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
103b4ae10a28150a4f7818a71641a72d
1a9a83d61c5e1f5ed2c835b75a115bd95d8bae4e
describe
'221860' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNE' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
caeec97c1fe65bac6e3e5384260844a2
81c7629861bbc1b96844def28acfac23544254aa
describe
'139090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNF' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
af194228e78c53d4adcf580e77bc15cb
782bceb3b97a0411afbff85b2ed3e8d61377cbf1
describe
'31531' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNG' 'sip-files00238.pro'
cb94858986b2d220b6b644a20c42cce4
59344e8f2d08975dd10824427683cb170dce6013
describe
'67423' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNH' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
6fa29458b0747583b1de4181c149697e
ad86db52010a75c89bd8939021d2c59d8dab83e5
describe
'1798328' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNI' 'sip-files00238.tif'
8acf7d79138b1ce2e267467b5f0eee4f
141e4677da3a0c989ad36ae1343d9bf09aa199a4
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNJ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
353b356f7b1be1390113e457aa01a1e4
50ff0ec57fb83ef40a4091fcd42968ad1f613abb
describe
'36654' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNK' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
c85d1a5f3fc25fa19de8747a5cbb4a91
20452a6803e62d1f7956d19f27d62dc7da540c59
describe
'221242' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNL' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
6ae548a8db1db97609e59cd636b83d49
d6ecde30db32ded569453edc1195fc0b65e16a37
describe
'133889' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNM' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
de46f210deb365697e8bbf1365d025a1
78976bc0ee76a75bfeeae309d4e66c0cda179612
describe
'31466' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNN' 'sip-files00239.pro'
b2782d5df12b57efa6d93d52445e063b
4ae4fe0fefe5dad20586add3bd0e76cc201c3c20
describe
'65193' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNO' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
7a3597391c098bdd7c04f93dd38b6a98
a7506569e8a19aed7f6fba2e21f41fe05e09db89
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNP' 'sip-files00239.tif'
cd35dae826064325ce2af987fd3e9a17
49c48d8bde43015548ec7589dc2605743607453b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNQ' 'sip-files00239.txt'
fb69f532f64f5dbc658d01ec5a2ec3a8
c5628c1e4e3935b8021b7918c44deae4b0528817
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNR' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
da456d58fad6fc9fb7ace25486d83606
53c668665b6a15d319a7c5cda6b07f8ff31d5796
describe
'219582' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNS' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
728fca3706f5d033293a7e64e734c770
d91fb84f05315a1d05d4c22d11b5c1d909e1dbf7
describe
'138943' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNT' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
642a06aa4395a0694b7879ddab3a5b99
5dc8d52ab2e0238ea6e3ef8aad79840bd338deb6
describe
'31291' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNU' 'sip-files00240.pro'
32a04dc794c934b1d1e8bc8c77be195b
42bc05a15c3dfc4099f5312aebe8e55b09b2892c
describe
'67832' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNV' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
6036e87298f3fe7b8ed3d012c6cb5166
ce433ec8ac61380a9860fe7be84f7d73697de428
describe
'1780380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNW' 'sip-files00240.tif'
f97c5700793f9b8cea866f8cbc541a08
cf3be3c339908c510b315de19dc590a6fced1ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNX' 'sip-files00240.txt'
ba01db6f38314ec65ab79b688c48fc2c
999a06765c74231df142b326ae7baa1210af495f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNY' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
b4da20e8302bcc9332a53d7cab3437a2
f83f8d5f72e8565039acd95144e1b555178bc5e8
describe
'220496' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDNZ' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
6afc0bb7a8dba4f1d0b3f98053ef68f0
d98e552718ec2886dd09505655b30bb55aa7d133
describe
'136525' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOA' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
be40ac3f0141ccdcfb0f8e15c24ec72a
f5ba80d41a408518481a44059f19a902138e7b10
describe
'30415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOB' 'sip-files00241.pro'
e4be572218fceac8d502abc022d6482e
74b45a31e142fe41f81c3295d43c958a9c119f89
describe
'65937' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOC' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
c8e02b2d9b24c75a7f8fa6ed330cb084
4dc9c2db7e2c892559f069f2c0c09bf6b0659bb6
describe
'1788120' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOD' 'sip-files00241.tif'
fc02a15b03bdb3dbd175c10a2343563e
d47cf3c965b285ee843786d614b2d0f2b6a6a9dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOE' 'sip-files00241.txt'
a61c9177d1319d7f7d5f2066c10c9b7c
c4822f756839be52e52aaefc92bfe5870ca60d04
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOF' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
1bfc7375269205adcc2d329df4863b0d
140dac899458c65e286d95d751b4bc3bba5ffd9c
describe
'219574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOG' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
c54a9f43d7241c0eebee2752382515dc
b869ff8977543c9702d873fce2d54f1925568e90
describe
'156175' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOH' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
f0c076c63d0e0b77059b55d005d30e58
7836a0727a4c3658df54540c922005e434c06fc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOI' 'sip-files00242.pro'
40f3d878f6a70e4545ac27167dfe37d7
dc6df2b55554fa9887ceb1ea6399249f63967c7e
describe
'74132' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOJ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
b01172ba93a48f5d30680de81fe6bc8c
f09327b8372f60d92e46d1a55a684bead634e164
describe
'1779940' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOK' 'sip-files00242.tif'
e06edeae1b7927a2a8bc3ecf32671d4e
fed2750e2be2b0cf44c8c09a977479df3660f9d6
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOL' 'sip-files00242.txt'
4823671649d123c4551d7a403fc3fc1e
fa0317115696f99fd5591c026dc2e309228ddd04
describe
'38999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOM' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
10f6389b053e241c97bd2a84c0fc9cb8
567f65a50d483ebca4668dd863b751155b57880d
describe
'215256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDON' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
66137b96dcf57745648f65ab42cd28eb
c3e174d0df8586baeceefe130bdcbe6cf2b7b29b
describe
'151805' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOO' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
26acb2a9b3d55ed9c3bd27d713e34f7b
b9eb5337983742c65204e405846da2226ce82839
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOP' 'sip-files00243.pro'
ee13812d5857f257b90018b2c8fc3844
867e100d5c22b24b337fa166507dac744f24eca3
describe
'73726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOQ' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
e1f1908410c9c38f7203cc533f152b09
8ebc89d660c316ad8b6a2cbaef4c7d296410d4c2
describe
'1745404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOR' 'sip-files00243.tif'
a0e23f3068c1b1126a216fc1249c591a
a8cea7e17882c54ee10d5e7b648cd10d30dd4cc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOS' 'sip-files00243.txt'
af0647939ea3fb44a72e664c04c554a1
564e4891fd538a1ce8d1630542d3aea3e159a92d
describe
'40064' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOT' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
eb8a3687f862347e9855098d4db64fb1
e093d7164e90a4dd216313ab5407f38fbbb8733b
describe
'221682' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOU' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
6b53f7736d107367cf52f27fadb06ffc
f0f520cf4dd871260ff23762be056bf66bfd8f7e
describe
'144711' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOV' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
0269280bc5570187534087c09003ea5d
39a8bfe288b0136fb94e7109b39db7caf9203741
describe
'31898' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOW' 'sip-files00244.pro'
e117c3c24e6769a5f52704ebebc66ac6
b23cbd1b33decfe464743cdbca94ef40da210c76
describe
'69640' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOX' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
93ef98aa672cc023daa22db7a7a04ac5
f7435612de1405bc653ba2a44649c5c41c20b953
describe
'1796792' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOY' 'sip-files00244.tif'
7fa543625bd2552c494caeab2200d9f7
d8502365e91fe4438073aff026a2b3c8ae35b5ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDOZ' 'sip-files00244.txt'
4d5d1cc72a207bc6238d4d334d3a5d86
ceed9faffa5f99eed65b6d489622cb26f0b7b898
describe
'37498' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPA' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
4ed1f6b1c0bf7038a13afc120b830e89
c03b16c309f564c2e123d3bfef71a135309550c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPB' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
656785272c734ad48016fe838928e4c8
624ff66809069fe74d7c21ff54e2c787f87d186f
describe
'134380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPC' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
fa0abece42f01a5f1dbbec7d2f091c99
175386b930a6de020f8953966d4ceea5b7e666d0
describe
'31691' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPD' 'sip-files00245.pro'
de45154c53a88bb57a155d931cfef968
b2b4a2eda95a85dd31f9ceb63af2311860da66f0
describe
'66242' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPE' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
f214d62663d09b02895cabc19b24b847
c67d0095bdb3aa7471fb8d03fab54c431956f8a6
describe
'1784092' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPF' 'sip-files00245.tif'
30c6070ac8cda18da0af134afba8ebc9
836ae93abe86df2507c766d6a5578cebc491ec6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPG' 'sip-files00245.txt'
c2cef28029d2c655b9b2ecba2d2f8dec
07501bbe4bc04277da8c87244e27f2b6660463d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPH' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
fda288c52e5efec56eb1d394dd2a01c5
cc2b87a99c2b28f4bb890cf9c4029eb5560e9252
describe
'220797' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPI' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
88ea9f0cc6802bbefa585addbd9b1b72
e64f20141e70fd018f34f00fc4ba82d5e50f00d9
describe
'140105' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPJ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
2651ef89f886270b70ce89a281af01b2
48c4e186da49f40c2dd34e356265f987b4c66d87
describe
'31631' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPK' 'sip-files00246.pro'
0f29756bb56a82a72be57d70472d2af1
86c7d3225d64a6ad40081163a376763f5d4ebfe2
describe
'68175' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPL' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
1148eaced331f17f3fd76515b1d403c1
99785dc8c7623b65ba150232ec57516dcf4dccb6
describe
'1789620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPM' 'sip-files00246.tif'
171e80a164474823e54a880925196774
9081e41f360aff45920a58d69dac59057b7faa24
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPN' 'sip-files00246.txt'
6b4620248d32fc81b242c38d5f261d82
071be3e40743493bded7f199b7d0c0809b148c70
describe
'37244' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPO' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
5bea4200d84eee15b3eb269ddaea71ff
d4609376f803e1ade0267b0bcc7685e3925c9581
describe
'218010' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPP' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
981b020b78bf90a37866560f856110df
6fb078a73ec7f641d8082801070becbd98a86768
describe
'120531' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPQ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
7d48fac4a497f8029b7fc9fa553e01ea
8cc26462c83977958f845b5afe0d9ccae9bf9425
describe
'26475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPR' 'sip-files00247.pro'
d6e97d750e4b452fc3dac8e0d7be4d76
9faa6d52d2ee6d995298a7af972c917d24bafba7
describe
'60932' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPS' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
9498e76f32a71417e6669b39a6d4f92b
f2fee2fa2789c666f5dae93f674fc46ca0ede85e
describe
'1766260' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPT' 'sip-files00247.tif'
eee84ce38ae33ff6903acf9ba44872fc
e16708d788908ff09e8f8c624f9278aabca8ca13
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPU' 'sip-files00247.txt'
7aa6f79885cdf9dc452398191652036b
f32a6bb7f28c987826e640268fb40dc9ff405fe6
describe
'35427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPV' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
b5106b3818d3de88f26a9fed22c52624
0ab4c4820cfe75c3aa8adf7de03bbe8089ef19e4
describe
'218192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPW' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
0ed612c98b646ef3b21cd59debfbd088
b825a2aca3a64303a03f2c22868a6386c72a5002
describe
'139692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPX' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
967d8430a4cbb6a793ac1cdc3b8db1fc
329de1dcf110008ea0321c51be932a4654340a21
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPY' 'sip-files00248.pro'
d8c01376b78eec44a512bfb4100736d3
0a6cab4e03796860c4e88479452c881bccf8c4f7
describe
'68298' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDPZ' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
99a788f9f42b8b63a999b0e4986c807e
772114e736fa273b1afdeffa710c6baa45690495
describe
'1768416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQA' 'sip-files00248.tif'
6cf91bce755cdb1daf32dcba21f15ca6
33804c8359da083c9377ae3df7424161df5c7fa4
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQB' 'sip-files00248.txt'
006cf5eadc1d40462262bacc74de126c
b2a93d626ee9d1bff2717556b2a3292b95a36b1e
describe
'36934' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQC' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
320ef541851f302398c781ed07a67fbe
c588161f698d3e14859d70f5282998d5d79c3590
describe
'216143' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQD' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
3cd6c985e896670c95e32f9a2729cc20
22e0c64e9a1b1c2ac78e1d9627332f1bffffd1f6
describe
'151990' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQE' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
01ef46fc78f01ff4f2077001bfafa882
3ce8f8a6eadd0eadeac3f2190510d33661ac6b5d
describe
'37408' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQF' 'sip-files00249.pro'
44140a0259773a564f07c66f27cc0555
2002808a9242752273d20374f3cdcd2346f28a8f
describe
'73933' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQG' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
c46400138a4d5c158c695339863935fd
72d969d127a2946ee1c0397dd4463a8a67d0ca22
describe
'1752620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQH' 'sip-files00249.tif'
a432fb8bb6610bcaf85188b9e2498e40
02ad045cbc3103f6691d79c73d70676aaa23407f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQI' 'sip-files00249.txt'
333f3162a55e684dc91e045d20dcc502
bd1562f6ad639c94c7c27799835420aedac5b5a2
describe
'39942' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQJ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
ac75da8cafaedc31448143f930596f60
717184a3a83446122fc09a9a8a7434643b9cdb33
describe
'223845' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQK' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
a2b9951220c47279b5e8228d62295664
a607840f019023f25f1d9bf83716acfeebbeb644
describe
'152983' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQL' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
b835974aa0cbd1324dad7c9ae78e5801
06d762fbd8e683c4bf4284868068fb5683c02943
describe
'36849' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQM' 'sip-files00250.pro'
0070be72f71c474de88fdedd31646330
cdef6c0770b7182871bebc20c4679e3223487e69
describe
'72452' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQN' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
2fcb2a610060ed715b9d876ce2f9dfe3
c61e0aa60660acd35f215f8d82010ac746bee2c1
describe
'1813844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQO' 'sip-files00250.tif'
d11ace4933ba5acd6f4dc25b80e3dfef
94c705b0ea09dc5f56a4e000a3dc81e5a4ff1308
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQP' 'sip-files00250.txt'
4b40b3409ead7295be6953b314a05c17
8b3e2e26634e982945e0f29818e5cd3c188449df
describe
'38700' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQQ' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
dda06837eca9239c2e59033779266e60
18e677c695f6d781b7627f9af3f0de03acc31e64
describe
'216041' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQR' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
5938a119e96876051ed190c5a0a6dcae
fed1852441bae80b1d690af5362ffad305d6de21
describe
'144787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQS' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
5d3cdf7a3a64dd1d8d360c4c7fa68cd6
d89ff211ffe1f41b994beeb6e51088e0eb954870
describe
'34339' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQT' 'sip-files00251.pro'
1723a1dcc2ac9211054921975869c435
4fcccd4fd8006d6325eae60a0781727baf6e75cd
describe
'71337' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQU' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
068492f22f1bfceb9a5bb917da1d53fe
e8deec49b0e0c14d7473206c2e910ca9b22db861
describe
'1751464' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQV' 'sip-files00251.tif'
e1f52985471b11493bcc84e31763c8ba
170546a3feacf0d15ec0cc969ad446c8e7eda360
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQW' 'sip-files00251.txt'
c39eabadc18993c16e20c00bebecc278
e8500827a6d0a23e30d465a3289851e6c63eec09
describe
'38797' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQX' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
842461c8725b24eec367ab90bec6031a
b6df80a968847c35f417a270b6148616077f8421
describe
'223081' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQY' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
d0f815b8a831e4f2abd7cb63d48d0c68
b0e8cfbfabfe4fe281b855acd83a7715ec057439
describe
'138492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDQZ' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
c1718501029211aab3f5c5cab35ef237
9162143e20824c38f8ae607373d59ca39b576761
describe
'31563' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRA' 'sip-files00252.pro'
5619fa8e058bad6b5c048a51a7fc8662
9d0ab8249bdef191e10e47eff8a859732437a6f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRB' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
b474983e8e04dcce5739ce5a23ca0394
a535017b672e86933a74ab0df336f39fa913e80a
describe
'1807676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRC' 'sip-files00252.tif'
ac419e301f02ed31a8ff742d2807b39f
34325d96c7a98ad3c86812e0e6fdafc92960a5ea
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRD' 'sip-files00252.txt'
75fde9f3d3747352fe2a403605f8d265
7571bf9c2d3d3be4ce11315991d65a33655e732d
describe
'37093' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRE' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
7da631db2ef4c10084cc25eb22c349b2
c4644d01685427463d71e650b92ebf49a6015feb
describe
'218773' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRF' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
a74e069e53d778fce918b3078e739b03
25fccb84b2932b7dda7e802a22a96e3412b1884d
describe
'105440' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRG' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
75978e175846416957e5be4f1de8dc39
4beca84d740d22f404e5ae9c863b364b29e160f6
describe
'22730' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRH' 'sip-files00253.pro'
4b8facc75b6bd53fde879e0bba07cdb1
a1181653061ecf12a036717a101efd92ce01e291
describe
'54331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRI' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
b079b3c6d8b743ebb59421b3caf7a74e
8a25ff5bedf2c62537c068eafe1e465fa43656c6
describe
'1771744' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRJ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
1171096ed049d7b6df397e4a2789410e
df9ae3b1b0a9de752c98ef53c5839e345eb08a47
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRK' 'sip-files00253.txt'
2855cb5905a2c88264bfc952b36c069a
eb5f2e755b7ea4eced2ec5668b5c8b0ddfc384fc
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRL' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
8f31ce2825f50894a92bba55de3e5bf8
df4dd9a29aef0b0f1090ed287990114ca487b80c
describe
'1061061' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRM' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
d6feaab782b69f422a5a57c5ae2b8fb6
2fe2e81bd895b003022c46c895fc34475a353323
describe
'43023' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRN' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
65e57c5df39086fd2f0ec0ff0b465658
7115862b356f765cd6bd355a8532f7b35d1b240e
describe
'11385' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRO' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
193880e81fe8e8d7e6350972613ad9b3
cc8c53d5adcaadfdcb696fef894c86d9abbc7816
describe
'25466944' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRP' 'sip-files00254.tif'
fdd5453166e505cc5b08628d6649ee69
2f1bccf3b67c0a3fccb6dba7031eab342820c419
describe
'3754' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRQ' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
7514fc8be360507694bccac7942fb393
e93cc943f36ef4ccf02b82e841f24df89163b500
describe
'1108736' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRR' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
1e2d4963e48cbace67aa7160169fd1ac
5c62112962c144a37274f41ece677e08af4e5753
describe
'114709' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRS' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
accf02f49a3a71c18b4e4d4b203ce30d
560742e462d29b82c4459205d47e01082c92d984
describe
'23027' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRT' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
a9be1eb38963d270fd58e9beef046797
7c0a59610ef799a4cdf0e896be3a524572bceed7
describe
'26615152' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRU' 'sip-files00255.tif'
39bd7e8032eca79113c6ac445a79dc6a
e7d63ee97cbe3976c84b6126e8bb7d2baebe20f5
'2012-03-31T16:16:18-04:00'
describe
'4937' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRV' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
4bccef2239aa71e3a27495470220159b
5914c8311cc419a9fee86e0cbefbd0750759f24c
describe
'327910' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRW' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
6528b5db19f6c4452bd0a4b5cd39a7e4
1e3d7339949c6a6a36ab35e3ad2f8b0c468a02d4
describe
'62903' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRX' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
a35d5a6fb948a04742ed9d15fae2c1ab
d85c89ade819a5dfcafc40f6d519d2dc64017960
describe
'504' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRY' 'sip-files00256.pro'
c47fd77fcafe26eee23330d3704b4088
f275ef72c00e4b8542243dcd3c934904f59b3e8d
describe
'17492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDRZ' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
9af5e5ee00a4ac472bba03a9f04c17ff
72d954c42e85faa0f23c9a35bc05f707e5007920
describe
'7877202' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDSA' 'sip-files00256.tif'
101882f225f87cdf13e7d7ecca0b238f
9e69351fe6c0967ee494015e28943649d5a71fe9
describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDSB' 'sip-files00256.txt'
a0d7ed4efd0d0692e021f168d3dc0fd5
8878a442af1ccc6ca29b460d34b7c04df251a65d
describe
'7000' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDSC' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
dab8a3b575dffdc7b9aa416006e6ae7b
83b528e66ea760fdd1d0f33bc88b465fcdf0d5b1
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDSD' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
9e0d693cb81c60af814beb1890abf8e5
48ce9a6b1b5e1f56e6dc256ad6698fe5bdd755fd
describe
'373416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDSE' 'sip-filesUF00001736_00001.mets'
41e40dd737843748c9645eed39aa60dd
60ae5c9c66c52db95e4fb16e0ad685e526121c47
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T18:32:35-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'490857' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAABZLfileF20090911_AACDSH' 'sip-filesUF00001736_00001.xml'
c1ea954412ace76a345f5eec36d73684
01f5cc9ac0098ff433949535b688b39d84b39ee6
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T18:32:39-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.