Citation
Never give up, or, How children may be happy

Material Information

Title:
Never give up, or, How children may be happy
Added title page title:
How children may be happy
Creator:
Adams, M. H. ( Author, Primary )
Usher, James M. (James Madison) 1814-1891 ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
J. M. Usher
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1848
Physical Description:
170 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill., port. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Biography -- 1850 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1850 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1850 ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1850 ( lcsh )
Oberlin, Johann Friedrich 1740-1826 -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Religion -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Religious life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
Preface indicates volumes published annually.
General Note:
Bound in dark brown cloth with gold embossed lettering and design on spine and blind embossed design on front and back.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Resource Identifier:
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ALH5308 ( LTUF )
02502921 ( OCLC )
026889517 ( ALEPHBIBNUM )

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NEVER GIVE UP;

HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY

EDITED BY
MRS. M. H. ADAMS,

Forth to the world, thou messenger of truth,
And peace, and love! Thy benediction breathe
On hearts now waiting for thee! Humbly speak
In Christ’s good name, and in his spirit’s power ;
And heaven shall own thy mission.



BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY JAMES M. USHER,
No. 37 Cornhill,

1850.





PBB PPP OA nnn nmnnnunmnmnnnâ„¢mnae
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, by
JAMES M. USHER,

In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of Massachusetts,
Onno





PREFACE.

Tue attention, encouragement and support, which
our little Annual has received from contributors, read-
ers and patrons, have called for another volume, with
improvements on the past. May it follow its predeces-
sors wherever they have gone, and go where they have
not been.

We fully appreciate the disinterested labors of
our contributors, and here express our thanks for the
assistance rendered. A glance at the names of these
contributors, and the assurance we can give of their
interest in the improvement of the youth growing up
around us, we hope will inspire our young friends and
the public with fresh confidence in the moral power of
the little book.

At the time of the appearance of the Annual for
1848, the editor had supposed her earthly labors ended ;
But it pleased the Father of mercies to delay the angel
of death, and restore her again to her humble place
with mortals, where she would consecrate her feeble
powers anew in the cause of his holy truth. May his
approving blessing rest on this effort !

M. He. Ae
1*






CONTENTS.

PAGS
Oberlin, . see eee eee eee eee eee

Scraps for Children, . 1... ee eee eevecee 24
The Little Adventurers,........-2e2+ 31
The Careless Dart). 2... eee eevee eeee 30
The Red and White Rose,. .... 2.2 eeeee Al
A Short Story for Little Readers,. ........ 44
The Brazen Serpent, ... 2.6 see eee eee OL
The Miracles of Christ... ... ++ eeeeee 5B
How do you know he ’shonest? . .... ++. 61
The Spirit Child,. . 2. eee ee eee ee ee 65
The Complaint, .. 1... ee eee ee eeee Th
How Children may be happy, .. 1... 2 eee + 76
EllenGrant,. . 2. see eevee erceeene B
Children in Trade, . 2. 2 ee ee ee eo © © 0 100
The Christian’s Reward, .... +++ ee 0104
Nature hath voices and speaketh wisdom, . . . . «106
Napoleon,. . 2. ee eee eee ree vee olld
Our Bibles, . 2 2s eee ee eee ee eee o LL
The Pool of Siloam, 1. +e eee eeveee 0 A383



x CONTENTS.

My Mother’s Voice, . 1... 6 eee ee wo 0 185
Saturday Afternoon, ....... eee ee e 6 137
Heaven Here... ......56- eee ee e LA
A Soldier of the right kind)... ....... .143
A Story of my Childhood, ........... «146

Sunday Morning, ....... see ee ew oe 2 152
Hymn, ... 1... ee ee eee we eee ne 159
The Declaration of Independence, ........ 161

Extract from an Address on the Death of a Child, . . 164
Sabbath Morning,



OBERLIN.
BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

To the boys who are striving for self-improve-
ment, the character of Oberlin will present a
beautiful and wonderful example of the excel-
lence to which young men and lads can attain,
by a steady perseverance, and firm trust in their
own power, attended by an humble reliance on
the assistance of God in every good enterprise.
You will learn, from his history, how by the
former you may be enabled to overcome difficul-
ties before which many falter and become dis-
couraged, and how, by a practical belief in the
goodness of God, you will be sustained and
borne through trials which cannot be avoided.
You will find in his life an example of purity,
holiness, piety, faith, and love, not often presented
to youth, worthy of your acceptance and imita-
tion. All that is taught us by the actual life of
a good man is as worthy of remembrance as
his words: the latter we call his precepts, his
theory ; the former his example, his practice ;
and you all know that theory without practice
cannot benefit you, that precept without example



12 OBERLIN.

is worthless information, a dead letter. In this
sketch you obtain only a glimpse of his right-
eousness, simply an inkling of thoughts, habits,
and feelings which I would willingly transcribe
at length for your benefit, had I room.

JOHN FREVERIC OBERLIN.

This worthy man was born at Strasborg, in
Germany, August 31, 1740. He was one of
seven boys, and had two sisters. His father was
an educated, respectable man, in comfortable
circumstances, but not rich. He loved his
children tenderly, and devoted all his hours of
leisure to their instruction. The book education
which John Frederic received was no more than
any studious boy may obtain in the Grammar
Schools of New England. With what he did
obtain, however, he set out in life, determined to
be a@ man. Perhaps the idea originated with
his parents, whose life and habits were intended
to influence their children in favor of virtue and
piety.

In the life of Frederic their wishes were
crowned with the most gratifying success. He
was an amiable, benevolent boy, noble in his
motives, and regardless alike of praise or censure,
when he knew he was doing right. Many
instances are given, in his history, where self-



OBERLIN. 13

denial seemed to be the ruling principle of his
life, which was in fact a series of the most decided
and commendable acts of self-denial and gener-
osity. In many little acts of his childhood we
see the beginning of that truly Christian dis-
position that produced such remarkable fruits in
his after life.

When Mr. Oberlin’s boys were small, he took
them every Thursday evening in summer out to
his family estate, not far from their residence in
Strasborg. He used to fasten an old drum
round his waist, while out there, and, preceding
the seven blooming boys as their drummer, exer-
cised them in military tactics. This kindled in
Frederic’s mind a strong desire to become a mil-
itary character. At every opportunity, he would
mingle with the soldiers, and march with them,
and really excelled in the evolutions, The
love for military exercises increased till checked
by his father, who told him it was time to
renounce child’s play for study and serious labor.
His father wished him to follow a learned profes-
sion. He readily coincided in his father’s views,
and devoted himself quite as earnestly to study
and books as he had done to his favorite amuse-
ments.

His biographers do not know what circum-
stances induced him to become a minister.



14 OBERLIN.

Probably the first inclination was awakened by
the devotional habits of his pious and accom-
plished mother. She was a truly admirable
woman; and Frederic often said he was indebted
to her for his love of “ things that are excellent,”
and his desire to be good to others. He was
ordained for the ministry soon after he was
twenty ; but it was several years before he was
settled as a pastor. His first engagement was at
the Ban de la Roche, situated in the north-east
part of France.

This ban or district was divided into two
parishes ; and one parish was made up of five
little hamlets, or clusters of houses. Oberlin
lived at Waldbach, the most central of these
little villages. I can give my readers but a very
meagre description of the condition of these
parishes when Oberlin became their minister, or
of the ignorance and obstinacy of the people
there. The barrenness of the land in some
parts of it may be understood, when you know
that the wife could carry home in her apron all
the hay which her husband could mow on a long
morning ; and the moral condition of the people
was equally deplorable. Surely no man would
have accepted this field of labor but one whose
singleness of heart would bid him forsake all for
Christ.



OBERLIN. 15

On his arrival at Waldbach, he occupied the
parsonage house, a tolerably commodious build-
ing, having a yard in front, a garden behind, the
church quite near, and woody dells and gray
mountains all around it. He was soon con-
vinced that no ordinary difficulties lay between
him and the salvation of his people. It was
then his confidence in God was beautifully man-
ifested. He said he knew that strength would
be given him, if asked in faith, and it was really
right that he should effect such a result; accord-
ingly, he employed all his attainments in science,
philosophy, and religion, for their improvement,
temporally and spiritually. Could you know one
half the difficulties that he encountered, you
would say that many men of any age of the
world would have forsaken the field and felt fully
justified. Preaching there was tod ; social in-
_ tercourse was toil; domestic improvement could
scarcely be effected by the most patient and
incessant toil; and all that seemed to offer itself
to the Christian Oberlin was a call for indefati-
gable toil.

From time to time he received letters from his
worthy predecessor, offering excellent counsel
and great encouragement to him to persevere in
his labors. These letters afforded him great joy,
for his friend could not but know how laborious

2



16 OBERLIN.

his efforts must be, and if he could urge him on
surely, then, himself might trust and go on.

For some months, or years it may be, his
younger sister, Sophia, superintended his domes-
tic affairs, aided by his mother frequently. But
they failed to bestow that sympathy and cordial
devotion to the good of the people which he
believed .he needed; therefore he sought a com-
panion in his labors. He married Miss Mada-
leine Witter, July 6th, 1768. Mrs. Oberlin
became an invaluable assistant to her husband in
all his labors. To the arduous work of uproot-
ing the prejudices of an ignorant peasantry, these
worthy Christians consecrated themselves by
prayer to God, and a written covenant with the
Holy Spirit.

I can give you but a single instance of Ober-
lin’s remarkable perseverance against the sus-
picions and resistance of the people in relation
to his plans. Their roads were actually impass-
able most of the year. He proposed to them to
build a new and substantial one to Strasborg.
He suggested, planned, answered objections,
proved its practicability ; but not a man in all the
parish would start, till he actually shouldered
his pick-axe, and with a faithful servant, broke
ground for the new road. Having, in repeated
instances, pursued a similar course, he at length



*

OBERLIN. v

established himself in their confidence, and could
the more effectually guide them in their spiritual
course. He felt an equal solicitude in all that
pertained to the pastoral office. His sermons,
his conversation, his Thursday lectures, his New
Year addresses, his Sabbath school labors, all
bear testimony to the scrupulously prayerful
devotion which he ever manifested for their
‘“‘ growth in grace,” and the knowledge of truth.

Oberlin was especially attentive to the children
and youth of his parish. He established infant
schools for the little ones, others for the older
children, a miscellaneous library for the use of
all, and reserved the religious education of the
children entirely to himself. He formed a
“Christian Society,” and presented twenty-seven
precepts for the observation of the members. I
can only present you a few, as a specimen of the
character of the whole. “Regeneration. We
are all one in Christ Jesus. Bring forth much
fruit. Nourish the inner man by the Word of
God, by continued prayer, by the frequent use of
the holy sacrament. All the members ought to
watch over each for good ; to exhort and to warn
each other, with sweetness, charity, humility and
patience. Lose no time. Honest and exact pay-
ment. No artfulness orcunning. Provoke unto
good works.” Its object was religious conversa-



18 OBERLIN.

tion and prayer. It effected considerable good
during its continuance.

Mrs. Oberlin died in 1784, having passed six-
teen years of married life with her beloved hus-
band, and leaving seven children. He was for
some time quite overcome by the intelligence of
her sudden death; but not for a moment did
he doubt the mercy of God. His patient
resignation in affliction was worthy the strictest
imitation. In 1793, his oldest son, Frederic,
entered the army, and was among the first who
were killed. Oberlin was strongly attached to
him, but his humble submissioh and even cheer-
ful resignation to this severe dispensation, seemed
fully equal to the love he cherished towards his
first-born, and his confidence in the unchangea-
ble goodness of God sustained him in this second
severe trial. The only change to be perceived
in his family, after these distressing events, was
an air of quiet seriousness, in place of that in-
spiring cheerfulness which before had place there.
Their usual manner of conversation was unin-
terrupted. They spoke of Frederic as one gone
before them to heaven, but not as of the dead.

During the rage of the French Revolution,
clergymen stood in jeopardy everywhere. Tal-
ents, property, popularity, could save none; yet
the benevolence, humility, and simple piety, of



OBERLIN. 19

the Christian Oberlin saved him and his little
flock from imprisonment and interruption in their
pursuits. Indeed, his home became the asylum
for the terrified of every rank and profession.
This sketch will not allow me to insert a very
interesting document, called forth by the circum-
stances of that alarming period, which this faithful
pastor addressed to the young men of his parish.
Thus he made every event profitable in some
view tu his dear people. During the Revolution
he was denied his customary fee from govern-
ment, and was supported by voluntary contmbu-
tions of his parishioners. The only uneasiness
he felt, was that his means of doing good were
limited. To enable himself still to devote three
tithes of all he possessed to religious purposes
and the poor, which he conscientiously believed
to be his duty, and that he might still aid the
institutions in his parish, he received into his
family several children of distinguished foreign-
ers to educate, and generously devoted his re-
munerations to those purposes.

He possessed much of the genuine missionary
spirit. At one time, in the early part of his
ministry, he learned that a pastor had been
sought two years, for a station in Pennsylvania ;
and, as he believed one might more easily be
obtained for the Ban de la Roche, he expressed

o*



20 OBERLIN.

a readiness to go, just as the war between Eng-
land and America broke out. From that time he
was proof against requests to leave, from any
source. This extreme devotedness to his flock
caused him to be revered as a father, and loved
as a faithful Christian, by all; his name was
affectionately called, his unexampled zeal in the
work of his divine Master applauded, in lands
far away from the quiet valley of the Vosges.

He entered with much delight into the plan of
operation of the “ British and Foreign Bible So-
ciety,” became a correspondent of it, aided in
distributing Bibles in the ban and vicinity, and
among Catholics. Happy would the event be
for humanity, if the tolerant spirit of the pious
Oberlin were more widely diffused among the
disciples of Christ! He administered the sacra-
ment to Catholics, Calvinists, and Lutherans, at
the same time, having different kinds of bread
on the plate, that all might partake and not be
offended. His only question was,—‘“ Are you
a Christian? If so, we are of the same re-
ligion. Follow the law of the Saviour; all
other laws are of little importance.” The same
spirit led him to extend Christian kindness to his
Jewish neighbors.

The population of the Ban de la Roche in-
creased from eighty families to five or six



OBERLIN. 21

hundred, or three thousand souls, while Oberlin
lived with them. Various employments were
introduced, which yielded ample support to the
inhabitants until the introduction of machinery.
This threatened gloom and despair for these
good peoyle. But such a consequence was
averted by the two kind-hearted sons of Mr. Le-
grand, who established a ribbon manufactory
there, distributing the looms about the cottages
for the children to work upon them, and still be
under the eye of parents.

As Oberlin became too infirm to discharge his
parochial duties, his son Henry came from Rus-
sia to reside near, and assist, his father. This
son died when Oberlin was seventy-seven years
old. Still the blessing of the God whom he
so faithfully served descended upon his parish ;
useful improvements increased, prosperity and civ-
ilization advanced. A traveller in the ban once
said he never before saw the people who were so
universally courteous and refined in their man-
ners, and at the same time so poor. He attrib-
uted it to the influence of the example of the
good old pastor. His son-in-law, Mr. Graff, suc-
ceeded Henry Oberlin, as assistant to the father.

His last illness attacked him suddenly, and
was short. On Sunday, May 28th, 1826, he was
seized with fainting and shivering. He was



22 OBERLIN.

conscious at intervals for several days. Ata
quarter after eleven on Thursday morning, June
Ist, he died ; and the solemn tolling of the chapel
bell told the people of that rural valley that their
pastor was dead. The whole people wept. His
funeral took place on the Sth of June. As the
funeral procession started from the house, a cler-
gyman laid the clerical robe of Oberlin upon his
coffin, another placed his Bible there, and a civil
officer affixed the decoration of the Legion of
Honor, which Oberlin always wore, to the funer-
al pall. Twelve young females, standing round
the bier, then sung a hymn. At two o’clock the
procession left the parsonage. The oldest inhab-
itant of the parish walked before the coffin,
bearing a wooden cross to be placed over
his tomb, on which was inscribed, — PAPA
OBERLIN.

He was to be interred at Foudai, one of the
villages of his parish. The first of the procession
reached the church there before the last left the
house, at a distance of two miles. A new bell
at Foudai, prepared by the proprietor of the
ribbon manufactory, was heard to toll for the first
time, as the sad procession entered the village.
The burial ground was surrounded by Roman
Catholic women, dressed in mourning and kneel-
ing in silent prayer Three fourths of the



OBERLIN. 23

people remained without the church in silence
and tears during the lengthy services.

A manuscript autobiography of the lamented
pastor was read in which Oberlin wrote most
affectionately of his family, his friends, and his
“dear parish;” expressed his faith in the good-
ness of God towards them all; and commended
all to the guidance and mercy of that God whom
he had preached. One clergyman then read a
part of the 103d Psalm, and the 14th verse of
the 7th chapter of Revelation, which Oberlin had
selected as texts for his funeral sermon. At
the conclusion of the sermon the whole congre-
gation kneeled and repeated in concert a beauti-
ful prayer. A. hymn was sung, and the body
taken to the grave-yard. He was buried under
the shade of a weeping willow, planted over his
son Henry. At the tomb aclergyman addressed
them most touchingly, and with much sincerity,
speaking at length of the virtues and untiring
devotion of the good old man. A physician then
pronounced a eulogy. The people turned sor-
rowfully and slowly away from the grave of one
so dear to them, whose whole life was an en-
deavor to get good from heaven, and do good to
men. Peace to thy spirit, sainted OpERLin!



SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

BY MRS. H. A. P. NYE.
NO. 1. —JESUS.

I HAVE a question to ask of the little ones,
whose bright eyes are glancing over the pages
of this new Annual, in search of pictures, or,
perhaps, of some pleasing story. I own a fear,
that such as like pretty stories only, will “ skip ”
these scraps of mine. It may be that they will
consent to read on, when I promise to write
nothing but what is true.

You may have heard from parents or teachers,
at some time, questions like these :—‘ Who
was the wisest man? Who was the meekest
man? The question I would ask, is this: —
Who was the perfect man? Can you tell?

He was born in Bethlehem of Judea, eighteen
hundred years ago, and in a manger, we are told.
Many good and great men have been born in poor
huts, and lowly homes. You have read, in
your father’s great Bible, or have heard from
your mother’s lips, of the star which guided the
wise men who went to worship the young child,



SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN. 25

and to offer him their gifts; of the angels who
sang of “ peace and good will,” to the shepherds,
as they watched their flocks by night.

Jesus was the perfect man. He was perfect
inlove. ‘He went about doing good.” Though
he had not where to rest his head, he sought
neither wealth nor ease, but the virtue and hap-
piness of those around him ; he healed the sick,
made blind men to see, the deaf to hear, and the
dumb to speak. Worn and weary, sometimes,
in his travels, he never refused aid to such as
desired his blessing ; poor men and sinful were
relieved by him. This kindness extended to all,
and no hatred ever changed his deep and univer-
sal love.

Jzsvus was perfect in virtue; many men have
been virtuous, yet all, to some extent, have
sinned, save Jesus. He was tempted, as we all
are, (and what child knows not what is meant by
being tempted to sin ?) but he never did a wrong
act, nor spake an evil word. He injured none,
even those who were unkind to him. And when
dying, he prayed his Father to forgive those who
put him to the cruel death of the cross.

Our Saviour, Jesus, came to this world, to
teach us to be perfect as he is perfect. He
came also to tell us of a world beyond this, where
he now lives, and where, when we are pure as



26 SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

he is pure, we shall also dwell. Jesus rose from
the dead to assure us that we, that our friends,
that all men, shall at last be as the angels are,—
sinless, spiritual, and forever happy. And now,
when we follow the bodies of our loved ones to
the tomb, we do not think them dead, but hope to
meet them again, to part no more forever.

NO. 2,— THE LITTLE CONSOLER.

“Mother, shall we not wish to see father
again?” asked a little boy, as he looked for the
last time on the father whom he had loved, who
lay sleeping in death, unmindful of those who
stood beside him with tearful eyes.

“Yes, my son, we shall wish to see father,
but we never can again, while we live in this
world.” °

“But will not father rise again? My Sabbath
school teacher told me that God raised up Jesus
from the dead. Say, mother, will he not raise
father too?”

The mother was deeply moved by the earnest
faith of her child, and her own heart was com-
forted, as she felt how blessed was that hope,
which could enable her to answer the anxious
look and question of her boy, by assuring him
of her firm belief that God would raise up his



SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN. 27

father, as he had raised his son Jesus, from the
dead.

“Father will not rise till the last day, will he,
mother?”

To this question the mother replied, that when
the breath left his father’s body, his spirit went
to God; that his father was then in heaven.

«Then, mother, if he is in heaven, he is an .
angel, is he not ?”

“Yes, George, your father is an angel now;
when we die, we shall be as the angels, children
of God, being children of the resurrection.”

“ Are not the angels around us, mother, and do
they not watch over us, and guard us when we
sleep? It may be, if we cannot see father, that
he can see us, and that he will be near us, and
near our beds, to love us and care for us.”

These were the words of a little boy of nine
years, as he stood with his mother beside his
father’s shrouded form, about to be borne to the
tomb. I never think of him, of his simple, ear-
nest trust, but with a softened heart.

You, children, may have lost, or may yet
lose, your father, mother, or friend. Remem-
ber, then, they are not dead; they are as the
angels in heaven; neither can they die any more.
They are changed, but their spirits can never

die.
3



28 SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

NO. 3.—SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME
UNTO ME.”

“Mother, mother, where is the baby ?” I heard
a child ask yesterday of his parent. Again and
again the question was repeated, but he could
not understand where the baby had gone, nor
what it was to de dead. It was hard, he thought,
that his little sister could not come to play with
him. He had seen her lying still and cold in
her white robe; she neither spoke nor moved ;
what could it mean? His little heart could not
tell, nor why they should put his sweet sister in
the ground. And still he asked, ‘Mother,
mother, where is the baby ?”

Do my little friends remember that when
our Saviour was upon the earth, some one carried
young children to him, hoping they might be
blessed by so good a man? His disciples bade
them go away, and not trouble their master ; but
Jesus said, “ Suffer litttle children to come unto
me, for of such is the kingdom of heaven; and
he took them in his arms and blessed them.

Jesus loves young children now, and when any
die, they are carried to his arms, there to be
blessed by his smiles and love. Children are the
. lambs of his flock, and one of your hymns tell
you, that the lambs of his flock are his tenderest



SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN. 29

care. The eastern shepherd leads his sheep to
the green pastures in the summer time, and
there remains to guard his flocks from wolves,
and prevent their going astray. His sheep know
his voice and follow wherever he leads. If the
young lambs are weary, he carries them in his
arms.

Jesus called himself the “good shepherd.”
The good shepherd, he said, layeth down his life
for his sheep. Jesus is our shepherd, now; he
still careth for his sheep; and now, in heaven, as
when he was upon the earth, the lambs of his
flock are taken in his arms; some, when sick
and weary, are borne to the spirit home, and rest
ever in the green pastures, and by the still waters
of that world of endless peace and love.



For those children who have followed me thus
far, I have a few more words to write. I have
told you that Jesus was perfect; that his life was
spent in doing good, in healing the sick, and
preaching the gospel to such as would hear. To
bless others was the happiness of his life; for
that only he lived, and for that only he died.

God the Father is also continually doing good ;
the Scriptures tell us that “he is good to all, and
that his tender mercies are over all his works.”
In deep silence, at midnight as at noon-day, he



30 SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

confers blessings upon the children of men. In
the goodness of God consists his highest glory.
When men wish to be like Jesus, and to be like
God, they strive to do good, to be kind, to relieve
and console those in suffering or sorrow, and to
improve all in knowledge and virtue.

And what, think you, can you do to become
the children of God? Commence by being obe-
dient to your parents. We read that Jesus, when
a child, was subject to his parents. Be kindand
obliging to your brothers, sisters, and companions.
Be ever gentle ; speak rio unkind nor evil words.
Begin, thus, to walk in the path which Jesus
trod. Forget not to pray to your Father in
heaven to aid you in becoming good. We read
that Jesus passed whole nights in prayer to God.
If Jesus, then, who was himself so good, needed
to pray, how much more should weak, erring
children ask the protection and guidance of him
who is ever near to help those who call upon his
name !

If, then, children, you wish to de good, and to
do good, try to be followers of Jesus, the perfect
man.



THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS.

BY MRS. E. A. BACON.

Ovr little Infant School vestry! how I wish
you could see it, my dear little readers. So snug,
so comfortable and cozy it is, cuddled under one
corner of our good old church, with the morning
sun streaming across its bright carpet, its pictured
walls and smiling faces, and its little red covered
table, adorned with a vase of flowers, the morn-
ing offering of happy children.

Well, our little infant school vestry, on one
bright Sabbath morning, was filled with goodly
rows of boys and girls, who had just folded their
hands and quietly arisen to repeat their morning
prayer, when the door opened, and two little
strange faces peeped in. They received a wel-
come, and were led to the seat. They were
poorly clad, but were neat and clean, and I felt
sure that a mother’s hand had done its best for
her darlings. Sunday after Sunday they came,
and their quiet, earnest faces drew our hearts
very near to them, and we resolved to know

more of them; so, after the lessons were recited
3%



32 THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS.

one day, we drew the little matronly girl into a
lively chat.

“Where do you live?” I asked.

“ Oh, a little way down from the church, in one
of the cross streets,” said she, pointing in the
direction.

“Do your parents attend church here ?”

“No, ma’am ! they are too poor to come.”

“ How did you find the way ?”

“Why, brother and I wanted to go to your
Sunday school dreadfully ; so mother worked hard
and got us ready, and she told us to come down
this street, and we should find the school.”

“Well, do you love to come?”

“Yes, indeed! we never want to stay at home,
and when brother isn’t well he cries to come.”

“Have n’t you little neighbors around you who
don’t go to the Sabbath school ?”

“Oh yes, ma’am, and I try to tease them to
come, for, don’t you think, they play all day
Sunday.”

“Oh, that is very bad; but why don’t they
come ?”

“ Why, they say their clothes are so bad.”

“ Well,” I replied, “I should like to find some
of your little neighbors, for we have a circle of
kind young ladies who would love dearly to make
clothes for them, so that they might come to



TNE LITTLE ADVENTURERS. 33

school. ut may I come and see your mother ?
and then she may tell me, perhaps, where I can
find them.”

“Oh yes, ma’am, do!” and then she described
the place of her residence as well as she could.
Tbe school commenced singing, and our conver-
sation was interrupted.

After school, I noticed these children lingering
behind the others, and the little girl wore an
anxious expression. I soon gave her an oppor-
tunity to speak to me, and she looked up with
a beseeching gaze, saying, “ Don’t pray come
Monday or Tuesday to see mother, will you?”

“Why not?” said I.

“Qh, because mother washes and irons on
thore days, and she ’ll feel bad because she will
not look nice.”

“No, my dear,” I replied, “I will come
Wednesday, if that is better.”

“Oh yes, Wednesday,” she said; “that is a
good day;” and her eyes brightened as she
walked away satisfied.

Wednesday came, and I started on my expe-
dition, and as I had threaded so many of our
lanes and alleys, I felt sure I could find our little
strangers; but “ deary me,” as the children say,
up this street and down that went I, through,
across, and every way in the direction she



34 THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS.

pointed out, knocked at door after door, made
the dogs growl, the children peep, and spoiled
many an afternoon nap, but none the wiser was
I. Nobody knew “Mrs. Martin.” At last I
gave up in despair, and returned home.

The next Sabbath the children were in their
places as usual, and I determined to take more
accurate directions to their home, but, before
I mentioned it, the little girl came to me witha
sad face, and holding out her school books, said,
“TI must give these up, ma’am, for we can’t
come any more.”

“ Why not?” I asked.

“We're going to move into the country next
week.”

To be sure we felt very sad to part with them,
but we made them each a presentof a little book,
and parted good friends.

Now, my little friends, who are reading my
story, you are no more disappointed than myself,
that I did not find their home, and perhaps you
have pictured it like myself,—a clean, but spare
apartment, with a busy mother, a rosy baby, a
cat, a dog, and a few flowers. It might have
been a garret, however. But then a garret is
sometimes pleasant, when cheerful hearts are
there, and I know these children have a cheer-
ful mother. Besides, perhaps you will not be-



THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS, 35

lieve me, but it is true,— one of the most tidy
and cheerful homes of the poor that I ever vis-
ited, was up in a garret, and I have thought a
hundred times, how neatly every household
utensil was arranged around that well scoured
room.

But you say it is too bad that I don’t know
more of that little girl and boy —those little
martin-birds that flew into our box so gayly one
morning. Why, I think I know a good deal
about them. I know they wish to learn good
and holy things. I know they will not play on
the Sabbath. I know they will try to persuade
others to be good. I know they are thoughtfu’
of their parents. I knowtheyare honest. Ana
is not all that a good deal? You think it is,
and so do I, and I wish I knew as much of every
one of you.





THE CARELESS DART.

‘ Come in, my daughter, close the door,
Shut out the driving storm,

Dry your wet garments — then drink tea, —
I’ve kept it nice and warm.

We'll have a pleasant time to-night,
I’ve had good luck to-day,

I’ve washed for Mrs. Francis Smith,
And see, besides my pay —

She ’s given me all this bread and meat,
And sent this cake to you ;

And at the store I bought this tea ;
A pound of candles, too.

When tea is over, sit by me,
Upon your little stool,
And I will read the pretty book
You brought from Sabbath school.

With three good places now to wash,
I’ve many things in view ;

And first — when rent is paid —1’ll buy
That spelling-book for you.

Then you will soon know how to read,
And when I cannot see,



THE CARELESS DART. 37

From age and weariness, my child
Shall read and work for me.’’

Thus spake a hopeful mother’s heart,
To little Mary Blane ;

But e’en the promised spelling-book
No cheerful smile could gain.

The cake of Mrs. Smith, untouched,
Upon the table laid ;

In vain, with many a winsome prank,
Her kitten frisked and played.

Now Mary was a gladsome child,
No bird more blithe and gay,
No gentler being spared the worm

That in the pathway lay.

But grief’s sharp arrow, barbed with shame,
Sped by a careless hand,

Was rankling in that little heart,
But late so free and bland.

Her mother marked the shade that dimmed
Those eyes so blue and mild,

Then took her to her heart and said;—
What ails my precious child?”

She whispered,—‘‘ Nothing, but ” — then swift
The gathering tear-drops tolled ;

Her voice was choked by stifling sobs,
That would not be controlled.



THE CARELESS DART.

Her mother paused, then asked, with grief
That mothers only know,

‘Will Mary to her mother tell
The cause of all this woe?”

She sobbed, ‘‘ Whate’er you can afford,
I know you don’t refuse ;

But, mother, if I could but have
A pair of nice new shoes!

To-day I entered the new school,
My feet were wet and cold,

And when I put them to the fire, —
You know my shoes are old, —

Rich Sarah Blanchard smiled and said,
‘ See there!’ to Ellen Wood,

Who said —‘ How awkward she does look,
Dressed in her mother’s hood !

Their home is in that mean old house, —
They ’re very poor and low ;

Her father here is never seen ;’—
Dear mother, is it so?

Oh, mother, if I could but die! —
You said the poor and mean,

Who loved the Lord, in heaven should have
New garments, white and clean.

I asked, if I a father had,
When I his face should see ;

You said, in heaven — perhaps — and cried,
And turned your face from me.



THE CARELESS DART. 39

If I should meet that father there,
Now say, do you suppose

He ’d kiss me, like the kind papa
Of little Lucy Rose?

And buy me clothing nice and warm,
That none might laugh at me,

And say that I was mean and low, —
Mother, where can he be ?””

A groan burst from that mother’s heart,
She prayed in accents wild,

‘¢ On me, great God! the vial pour,
But spare my sinless child !

For I have borne, and still can bear,
With want, neglect, and woe ;

But oh, let not my stainless flower
Their blighting influence know !

No! rather take her to thyself,
Thou just and holy One!

And I will school this breaking heart
To say, ‘ Thy will be done.’ ”

Her prayer was heard, — a few short months,
And little Mary laid

Close by her weary mother’s side,
Beneath the willow’s shade.

And when, around those lonely graves,
The village children stood,

They mourned the careless mirth that wrung
A a 80 kind and good.



THE CARELESS DART.

And promised never more in sport
The humble to deride,
Or judge, without compassion, those
For whom the Saviour died.
H. A. D.





THE RED AND WHITE ROSE:

A FABLE.
BY REV. A. HICHBORN.

A Rep and white rose, whose parent bushes
had for years grown peacefully side by side, and
put forth their fragrant flowers in harmony, at
length had a dispute as to the merits of each
other to be called beautiful.

“ How presumptuous you are, Mr. Red Rose,”
said the white, “to lay any claims to beauty!
Why, you are so gaudy I am ashamed of you;
you hold up your red face'#s bold as though you
were the king of flowers; there’ is no modesty
in you, or you would hide a face that: looks as
though ready to burst with wine. Your vanity
is intolerable, and, for my part, I cannot conceive
why you are allowed to grow, unless it be to
show, by contrast, how much more beautiful are
my own delicate leaves.”

“Stop there, Madame White Rose,” said the
red; “it is but fair that I should have a word to
say in a matter involving my reputation. De
you not know that the palm of beauty has al-



42 THE RED AND WHITE ROSE.

ways been given tome? Doth not the warrior
gather me to adorn his crest, while you think
yourself lucky if you can rest in the hair, or on
the bosom of some love-sick maiden? Were it
not so serious a matter, I would laugh at your
foolishness ; as it is, the crimson on my cheek
is deepened with blushes for your impudence.”

There was much dispute of this kind passed
between them, which we will not here relate;
but their disputing did not bring them one whit
nearer to agreement ; they even called each other
by harder names, and were on the point of set-
tling the dispute by a use of their thorns, when
a wise and modest lily, who was standing by
and listening to the controversy, thus addressed
them :

“T am pained that two friends whom I so much
esteem, and who, on other matters, manifest so
much sense, should be so foolish as to quarrel
about so insignificant a thing as their good
looks.”

Upon this, the disputing roses turned to the
lily, and begged that he would be an umpire to
decide upon their respective claims.

“Cheerfully,” replied the lily, “ for, blessed
are they who restore peace between those who
quarrel. Know, then, that you are both beauti-
ful, when you are not marred by envy or pride.



THE RED AND WHITE ROSE. 4B

The great Creator has given to each the color
that pleased him best, and you are both needed,
to perfect the plan of his wondrous creation.
You both derive your colors from the same source ;
and it is indeed vain for one to boast over the
other. Learn, then, to be wise; fulfil your mis-
sion by spreading the perfume and displaying the
colors which He who made everything beautiful
has given you; and the deep crimson of one
shall be softened by the light hue of the other,
while the pale cheek shall receive a delicate
blush, reflected upon it by the companion it now
despises ; and thus shall you both be more beau-
tiful than now.”

Morat. —Never despise the excellences, or
accomplishments of another, because they differ
from your own; remember they are all needful
to fill up the divine picture of life.





A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE
READERS.

BY MRS. SARAH W. DESMAZES.

‘*‘ Come, Helen and Adine, we have had a fine
ramble this morning. Your glowing cheeks
almost, if not quite, rival the roses that we have
just gathered from the garden. Sit you both
down beside me on this grassy bank, under the
shade of this beautiful cherry-tree, and while we
watch the little birds so busy building their
nests, we will have a pleasant chat.”

“ And will you tell us a story ?”

“ Yes, you little chatter-boxes, you shall have
a story.”

“A true story, cousin Sarah; let it be a true
story.”

“ Certainly, it shall be a true story, and I wish
you to be very attentive, so that you may remem-
ber it.”

“Oh yes, we will.”

“ Well, then ;:many years ago, and ina country
far distant from this, there lived a king, who was
neither a just nor a good king ; for he treated a



A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS. 48

part of his subjects very cruelly. He placed
task-masters over them, who compelled them to
do very laborious work, and often exacted of
them more than they had strength to perform.
In other ways he afflicted them grievously, so
that their lives became a weary burden.

“ It is very unwise, as well as unkind, for a king
to treat his subjects in this manner, because he
soon loses their respect’ and good-will, and they
are, in consequence, much harder to govern than
if they were treated kindly. But, notwithstand-
ing their toils and privations, these people in-
creased very rapidly, andthe king greatly feared
that they might rebel against him, and, uniting
with some other nation, take away his kingdom
from him ; but instead of pursuing a milder course
towards them, or even attempting to gain in
the least degree their love, he grew more cruel
and unjust. He made a law that all the male
children born among them should be thrown into
the river and drowned. By this barbarous act
he determined to reduce their numbers so as to
prevent them from ever making any successfu!
effort to regain their liberty.

“ Now there lived in that country a woman, who
had a little baby boy, whom she loved very ten-
derly. She concealed him three months in her
house, and when she found that she could not



46 a SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS.

safely keep him any longer, she devised a plan
by which she hoped to preserve him from the
cruelty of the king. She gathered some reeds
from the banks of the river, and wove a little
ark or basket, which she covered with pitch, to
keep the water from getting into it. This made
a little boat. She then dressed her little boy
very neatly, kissed his rosy lips, and pressing him
to her bosom, laid him in the ark which she had
prepared, and placed it in the river near which
she dwelt.

“Oh, how sadly she must have felt when she
left him there, and how fervently she must have
prayed that God would preserve him from
danger !

“Now it happened about this time that the
daughter of the king, with her maidens, came
down to the river to bathe; and when she saw
the little ark or boat, she sent one of her maids
to bring it to her.

“ How much surprised she must have been when
she found that it contained an infant! We may
suppose that the princess, when she looked at
the little child, whose eyes were filling with tears,
as he saw strange faces around him, felt her
heart yearn towards him, for with love and pity
she immediately exclaimed, ‘This is one of



A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS. 47

the Hebrews’ children ; I will adopt him for my
own!’

“‘ The little child’s sister, who liad lingered near
to see what would become of him, and who had
witnessed this proceeding, now ventured to come
forward and ask if she might bring a nurse for
the child from the Hebrew women. The prin-
cess replied that she might. So she went and
brought the little child’s own mother, and the
princess said to her, ‘Take him home and,
nurse him, and I will pay thee.’ With what joy
she must have received her babe again ; and how
grateful she must have felt to her heavenly
Father, that his life was not only preserved, but
that she was to be permitted to bestow upon him
a mother’s love and protection! So the child
remained with his mother as long as the princess
desired ; then she took him to her own home, and
he became her son, and she called his name
Moses.”

“Q, cousin Sarah, it was ‘Moses in the bul-
rushes!’ There is a picture of him in my little
Bible.”

‘“‘ Yes, it was; and when he became a man he
assisted his poor, oppressed countrymen, and
delivered them out of the hands of the cruel
king Pharaoh. Afterwards God made him a
ruler over his people, and gave him the ten com-



48 A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS.

mandments and many other laws to teach to the
people.”

“Well, what became of this wicked king?
Did he receive any punishment!”

“Yes; and I wish you to remember that the
wicked are always punished sooner or later for
their crimes.

“The Israelites asked permission to depart from
his country, but Pharaoh refused until God had
sent upon him very severe afflictions, when he
reluctantly consented; but after they had de-
parted he felt sorry that he had let them go, and
followed them with an army of men, to capture
them and take them back again. He overtook
them upon the borders of the Red Sea; and here
it was that God, in a very remarkable manner,
interposed in behalf of the Israelites. He com-
manded Moses to stretch forth his hands, and he
did so, and the waters of the sea were divided,
so that Moses and his countrymen passed
through on dry land; but Pharaoh and his host
following, the waters flowed back upon them, and
they were all drowned.

“The history of these events, and the journey-
ings of the Israelites through the wilderness, is
very interesting, and when you are a little older
you can read it from the Bible.”











BRAZEN SERPENT.



THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

BY MISS E. DOTEN.

‘And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even
so must the Son of man be lifted up, that whosoever believ-
eth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

Joum iii. 14, 15.

Sriut over wandering Israel’s way

The mystic pillar brightly glowed,
And still upon the holy ark

The presence of the Lord abode ;
And still, like drops of dew, there fell

The heavenly manna, pure and sweet ;
And still the golden cherubim

Watched o’er the blessed mercy-seat.

But faithless hearts and murmuring lips
Saw not the blessings round them shed ;
They mourned for Egypt’s pleasant land,
And cast aside the heavenly bread ;
They asked’@f im who led them forth,
A band of trembling, toil-worn slaves,
‘“* Why hast thou brought us here to die,
Far from our homies and fathers’ graves ?”’

Then, like the messengein of Wrath,
The hissing serpetits #éuind them came ;
They gathered o’er the Wanderer’s path,
In shining folds, with eyes of flame



62

THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

The mothers clasped their little ones
And wildly shrieked for aid, in vain ;

And aged men, and blooming maids,
Sank down to perish in their pain.

Then came their faithful leader forth,
And raised the brazen serpent high,
And whosoever looked thereon,

In trusting faith, he might not die.
As if the pitying heavens dropped down
Its blessed dews, like healing balm,
A rest unto that host was given, —

A rest from fear, a peaceful calm.

Oh, prophet-like that serpent seemed,
An emblem of our holy faith, —
A type of that which hath redeemed
Our souls from darkness and from death !
Dear Saviour! Blessed Lamb of God !
Since thou for us wast raised on high,
We turn our trusting eye to thee,
That through thy love we may not die.





THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.
A COLLOQUY.
BY REV. L. J. FLETCHER.

(Mother and eldest daughter upon the stage.)

Mother. Harriet, deem the scenes of yester-
day quite wonderful. I know not what to think
of them, unless I say that Jegus is indeed the
Christ which the prophets have promised. He
was present at the wedding of Zimron and Re-
becca, and when there was no more wine, they
brought water in vessels and set it before him,
and immediately they drew out and bare to the
guests, and behold, it was better wine than before
we had tasted !

Harriet. It was indeed wonderful. But,
mother, did you taste yourself, and know that it
was wine ?

Mother. Yes, child, we all drank and knew

‘there was no deception. }

Harriet. And are you sure that Jesus made
it from the water that was brought to him? °

Mother. Yes, for many of the guests stood
by, and as Jesus came and looked upon the

5



54 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

water, it changed to a beautiful claret hue, and
what we drank was drawn from the same
vessels,

Harriet. Truly, it is very wonderful. It
must be that he is the promised Messiah. Did
he do any other wonderful work ?

Mother. None at the wedding; but I was
told that he had healed the sick and cast out
devils.

Harriet. Where 1s he now, do you suppose ?
_ I would go far to look upon so wonderful a per-
sonage. Will he not pass this way, as he goes
up to Jerusalem on the great feast-day ?

Mother. He may, or he may not; for I am
told that the Chief Priests and Elders at Jerusa-
lem despise him, and have sought to slay him.

Harriet. Is he not a good man, then?

Mother. Yes, there is no guile found upon
his lips or evil in his life. He goes about doing
good ; and because he blesses all classes of peo-
ple with his instructions and wonderful works,
our rulers despise him, and call him the poor
Nazarene.

Harriet. The more :you speak of him the
more I wish to see him. How strange all this
seems to me! I am confident 1 should believe
on him as the Christ if I could witness his mira-
cles, as he is said to perform them. But here



THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. 55

come William and Martha. Why do they make
such haste? They must have news to tell.

(Enter William and Martha, in great haste.)

Mother. Children, why do you come in such
haste? Have you news to tell me?

William and Martha. Oh mother! mother!
Such a man as we have seen to-day! I am
sure there is not another like him in all the
world.

Mother. (Turns to Harriet.) Can it be they
have seen Jesus ?

Martha. Jesus! Yes, that is his name. I
heard the people call him Jesus.

Harriet. Do tell me what he did! Where
did you see him, children? Where is he now?

William. We saw him in the highway which
leads towards Jerusalem. He came from Jericho,
and a great multitude came with him; and what
do you think we saw him do?

Mother. I know not, children. He is a great
and wonderful man, and he may have done a
very wonderful work.

Harriet. Do tell us—Iam so anxious to
hear more of him.

Martha. You know old Bartimeus and Si-
mon, the blind beggars ?

Mother. Yes, they were Lorn blind.



56 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

Martha. Well, they can both of them see
now, just as well as you can.

William. Yes, mother, Jesus cured them in
a minute, by just saying, Be of good cheer, and
touching their eyes with his finger.

Martha. Yes; it was just so, mother, for I
saw it myself, — and such a shouting and rejoic-
ing as there was you never heard

Mother. Is it possible, children, that what
you say is true? Is it possible that old Barti-
meus and Simon are cured of their blindness ?

William. I tell you, dear mother, we saw it
done, not one hour ago. We were leading the
beggars up to the synagogue, when we saw Jesus
and the multitude coming; so we stopped by the
way-side while they passed by; and when the
beggars cried for help to the people, Jesus stopped
and opened their eyes —

Harriet. What did the people say when they
saw it done ?

Martha. Some cried, Hosanna! Some said
he must bea great prophet ; and I heard one say
that he must be the son of God.

William. Yes, I heard a great many say s0 ;
and I think he must be; just think of it. He
cured two men of their blindness, who never
saw before in all their lives —



THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. hy |

Harriet. Where is he now? Why do you
not tell, that I may go and see him also?

Martha. He is now on his way to Jeru- |
salem, and Bartimeus and Simon have followed
him.

Harriet. Oh, mother, I know that he must
be the Christ whom the prophets have promised. _
What would I have given to have seen him!

Mother. Go, children, retire to your rest, and
think of the wonder you have seen. To-morrow
we will talk more of it. There can be no doubt
but Jesus is the greatest personage that ever
lived. We shall doubtless hear more of him soon.

Martha. I think he must be a very good
man, as well as a great man, for he placed his
hands upon our heads, and dlessed us, and said
that all children who are kind to the poor, and
blind, and unfortunate, are beloved by God — :

William. Yes, mother, Jesus blessed us, and
said, “Of such are the kingdom of heaven.”
But here come James and Mary. They must
have met Jesus, as they have just returned from
Damascus with uncle Zebedee —

(Enter James and Mary.)

Mother. My dear children, I am happy to

welcome you home again. Do you bring us any

news ?
6*



58 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

James. News! news! Yes, I suppose it is
news, for we have to tell you the most wonderful
things you ever heard in all your life!

Mary. Yes, mother, the most wonderful, cer-
tain, that ever were in the world —

Mother. What have you to tell so very
strange? Iam sure it cannot be more so than
what William and Martha have just related.

James. Oh yes, I am sure it is, for we have
seen a man raised from the dead —

Mary. Yes, dear mother, a man the people
were carrying to his grave!

Mother. You surprise me, children, more and
more. But how was this marvellous work per-
formed, and who performed it ?

Mary. The people called him Jesus! He
was a very beautiful man, and when he saw the
mourners weeping, he went up to the bier, and
took the dead man by the hand, and he rose right
up, and spoke to his mother, and walked with
her to his home —

James. It was just so, mother; for we both
stood where we saw it done, and heard the peo-
ple shout when the dead man lived.

Harriet. We can doubt no more, I think, but
Jesus is the Son of God. No other being could
do. such works. Oh, mother, how I wish he
could see our little Samuel! I have no doubts



THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. 59

but if he could see him he would cure him of his
leprosy, by just looking at him.

Martha. Yes, ma,I know he would; for I
heard the people that were with him say that a
woman was healed by just touching the hem of
Jesus’ garment.

Harriet. Oh, do let us go to Jerusalem, and
carry Samuel, and bowing down and worship-
ping Jesus, ask him to bestow his healmg
power upon the child. Let us lose no time,
but go to-morrow, and see and know for our-
selves. For one, I can never rest satisfied until
I have seen that great, and, as I believe, holy
being.

Mother. Well, we will go. O how happy
we all should be, if Samuel could only be
cured of that dreadful disease! I feel already
that much has been done for my family in the
blessing pronounced upon William and Mar-
tha. I can but think it was a blessing from
Heaven.

(Enter little Samuel, led by a neighbor's
daughter.)

Jane, whose child bring you hither? Indeed,
he isa lovely boy! He is as fair as an infant.
Is he your brother’s child ?

Jane. Have you not seen this boy before ?



60 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

Mother. The form of his features seems
familiar, but I do not know that I ever saw him
before —

Samuel. Why, mother ! I thought you would
never forget your little Samuel !

Mother. My Samuel! my Samuel! Oh, it
is his voice, but it cannot be him. No, it can-
not be my Samuel !

Samuel. Yes, dear mother, zt is me! And
I have seen Jesus, and he has cured me and blest
me. Oh, is he not a good man, and ought we
not to love him ?

Mother. Samuel, my angel child, my blest
of Jesus, come to my arms! (Mother embraces
him and kisses him.)

Harriet. Mother! dearest mother! Is not
this enough ?

Mother. Yes, Harriet, it is enough. Jesus,
blessed Jesus! “ Thou art the Son of God, thou
art the King of Israel !”

Harriet. “Lord, I believe ; help thou my un-
belief.”

Mother. Children, all the blessings of this
day, as well as of all other days, come to us from
God. No being could do the works which Jesus
has done except God be with him. Kneel, there-
fore, with me, before the Author of all these
mercies, and let us in silence send up to him our
thanksgiving and our praises.



THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. 61

(All kneel, and remain in silent prayer for a
moment, after which the mother says Amen!
The children then say Amen, and all arise.)

Children, you have some of you received this
day the blessing of the Son of God. Perhaps you
need no more; still you shall have a mother’s
blessing as ever, and her prayer that this day’s
scenes may long be remembered. Come, Sam-
uel, my blessed child, let us go. Children; ’tis
time to retire, so I will bid you good-night.

All. Good-night, mother ; we all shall dream
of Jesus.





HOW DO YOU KNOW HE’S HONEST?

BY REV. HENRY BACON.

A uittLe boy was observed by his father to
have a new toy, and the father asked him where
he got it? The boy mentioned the name of one
of his schoolmates, and said he gave it to him.
This excited the father’s surprise, to think that
a plaything of that character should be bought
by a lad, and then immediately given away, and
he expressed his fear that the giver might not
have come honestly by the money he spent. The
circumstance was improved to impress on the
receiver of the gift, that if he should know or
think that another came dishonestly in possession
of anything, he ought not to receive it as a gift,
on any account.

“ But,” said the little boy who held the toy,
“T know he’s honest.”

“T should be glad to think so,” replied the
father, “and am ready to hear any reasons why |
should believe so. How do you know he’s hon-
est?”

“Well, in the first place,” said the young



HOW DO YOU KNOW HE’S HONEST? 63

philosopher, as though he were entering into a
grave debate in the old-fashioned style of
preaching. “In the first place, he never tells a
lie; and that shows he’s honest, don’t it ?”

The father readily allowed the inference, and
the boy declared that all his schoolmates might
be asked if Charley Bliss ever told a lie, and
“they ’d all say No, right off.”

“Well, then,” continued the young lawyer
making out his case, “he never steals anything
—not the deast thing; and that shows he’s Hon-
est, don’t it?”

“T’ve been with him,” he continued, “ many
a time in stores and other places, and when
other boys would hook a little here and a little
there, he’d keep his hands behind him, or in
his pockets. And then, father, I’ve known him
to go on errands; and he’s very good to oblige
folks, and folks like him; and I’ve seen him
saw wood and get shavings; and I’ve seen his
father, and folks round there, give him money,
and he take it to buy something to share with
the boys; and isn’t that honest?”

The father owned that a pretty strong case
was made out, and he felt relieved in his mind.

If all children could give as good evidence of
honesty in those from whom they take presents
at times, as this little boy gave, and take no gifts



64 HOW DO YOU KNOW HE’S HONEST ?

unless they could do so, parents would have far
less anxiety than they now have, respecting their
children who are exposed to pernicious influence
in the public town and city schools. Such
traits of character as were described by the little
reasoner, as he plead for the honesty of his
schoolmate, are admirable in any child. Where
such good qualities meet, there is a child with
whom any parent would be giad to have his son
asssociate. No matter if he isn’t dressed as
handsome as some others. Let a boy never tell
a lie; let him never steal anywhere, in reference
to the smallest things ; and let him be obliging,
generous, and willing to work as he is able, and
I cannot but think that he must be a happy
child, a joy in his home, a gladness to his par-
ents. “Even a child is known by his doings,
whether his work be pure, and whether it be
right.” Prov. xx. 11. Can your schoolmates,
my young readers, know as good things of you
as this young reasoner knew of the doings of his
friend ?





THE SPIRIT CHILD.

BY MISS E. DOTEN.

‘*To thee, sweet Eden, how dark and sad
Are the diamond turrets of Shadukiam,
Or the fragrant bowers of Amberabad !”
PaRADIsE AND THE PERt.

Weo has not heard of Fairy-land and the
fairies? of their beautiful cities, their pleasant
groves, their moonlight revels, and their love for
little children? We love to think of such bright
and beautiful things, and feel almost sad when
we remember it is all a fancy’; but yet, there was
a child in a far eastern country, who saw fairer
and more beautiful things than were ever heard
of in Fairy-land. Her father was what is called
aparia. All the people around him worshipped
idols, but he would not, and so they drove him
from among them. He came, with his wife and
little one, to a lonely but very beautiful valley,
and there he built his cabin of bamboo, thatched
with palm-leaves, and lived contented and happy.
The child had no little playmates, and no one to
speak to but her father and mother. She was
very simple-hearted and innocent, and grew more



66 THE SPIRIT CHILD.

gentle and lovely every day she lived. The
birds and flowers seemed like brothers and sis-
ters to her; and oh! it was a strange and beau-
tiful thing to see how her heart turned towards
God, and learned to love him, before she had
ever heard his name. Wherever the children of
the Great Father dwell, and however rude and
ignorant they may seem, they all have a sense
of something higher and holier than themselves,
and a desire to love and worship. Thus did the
spirit of this dear child, as if by instinct, see
strange beauty in all things around her, and
learned to love and worship God, although she
was never taught of him. She would often wan-
der away alone ; then it seemed as if the birds
and flowers talked with her, and the bright
waters smiled at the sound of her footsteps.
She felt so very, very happy —a joy that she
could not express — that she would lay her hand
upon her heart, and say, “ What is it? oh!
what is it?” for she did not understand that
it was the holy spirit that God had given her,
that always fills the heart with love and happi-
ness, when it meets with aught of a kindred na-
ture ; and all the beautiful creations of God around
her were as pure as the spirit within; therefore,
while she held sweet communion with these, she
was happy. The inhabitants of the surrounding



THE SPIRIT CHILD. 67

country would often come to the valley to gather
fruit, and when they saw her sitting under the
palm-trees, or kneeling beside the running waters,
they would pass her by in silence, for they said,
“She sees spirits, and is talking with them ;
we will not trouble her.” Therefore they called
her the Spirit Child.

One day, as she sat alone in the cabin, weav-
ing a little basket, a stranger entered. His gar-
ments were covered with dust, and he looked
very pale and weary. He wished to rest a while,
and begged her to give him a cup of cold water.
She brought him some fruit and water, and a
mat to lie down upon. After he was somewhat
refreshed, he began to talk with her. He said
he had travelled in many countries, that he had
known much suffering, met with many hardships,
and been in great danger; but, through the
whole, he had been sustained and protected by
God, the Father and Friend of all, who had
never forsaken him.

“Where is he now?” said the simple-hearted
child, as she looked around the cabin and out of
the door ; “what made him leave you?”

The stranger smiled, and told her that “ God
is a spirit.” Then, in simple and earnest words,
he explained to her how nearly her own soul was
allied to God. He told her that she was one of



68 THE SPIRIT CHILD,

the dear children of the great Father, and all her
moments of happiness, her holy thoughts and
pure impulses, came from the spirit of God
dwelling in her own little heart. The child lis-
tened to him with large and wondering eyes.
All the strange fancies and imperfect ideas, that
had long passed through her mind, now seemed
to come into beautiful and perfect form, and she
knew now what had often made her feel so
happy. But, oh! when he told her of the bright
and beautiful heaven, where the angels dwell, it
seemed almost too much for her to understand
clearly ; she only knew that she longed to go
there, and when the stranger left her, she sat
like one in a dream, wondering how she might
get to heaven.

The valley where she dwelt was surrounded
by mountains, some of which seemed to touch
the clouds, and the child thought if she could
only reach the top of one of these, she might
go directly into heaven, or, at least, hear the
sweet singing of the angels. She resolved, in
all the simplicity of her heart, not to say a word
to her father and mother, but the next morning
she would begin early to climb up the mountain.
She could scarcely sleep that night, her mind
was so wholly filled with this idea.

The next morning, at the first peep of day, she



THE SPIRIT CHILD. 69

sprang from her bed, and opened the door of the
cottage. But, alas! the rain fell in torrents, and
the heart of the child became very sad. Before
long the rain ceased, the sun came forth, and
high up in the heavens shone a beautiful rain-
bow. “Oh!” exclaimed the child, as she
gazed at it in wonder and admiration, “ what a
bright thing the Father has placed for me to come
up tohim on. I will go quickly; but first I will
gather some roses for little Zillah. I used to
play with her a long time ago, but she died and
is in heaven now. Fairer and sweeter roses
grow there, but she will be so glad to think that
I remember her. Far away, where the water
falls over the great rock, stands the end of this
beautiful arch; I shall reach it soon, and then
how gladly shall I go up to that blessed heaven
the good stranger told me of!” She gathered a
few half-blown roses, and hastened forward. So
earnest was she, and sure she should find where
the rainbow stood by the great rock, that she did
not once think to look up to the clouds; but
when she reached the wished-for spot, there was
no rainbow, or the least shadow of one, to be
seen, and above her wasa dark, frowning cloud.

Weary and disheartened, she sank down and
covered her face with her hands. Scarcely had
she done so, when she heard a soft, low voice say

6*



70 THE SPIRIT CHILD.

to her, “ Dear child, unto thee it is given to enter
into the kingdom of heaven. Ask and thou shalt
receive, seek and thou shalt find, knock and it
slfall be opened unto thee. The pure in heart
shall see God.”

The child raised not her head; she sat still
and motionless, but her spirit seemed to rise up
like a joyous bird in the clear sunlight. The
mists that lay around her slowly gathered them-
selves up and rolled away, as the soft air, moving
to the melody of the golden harps, gathered
around her in a bright silvery garment; and, lo!
she stood beneath the tree of life, that grows
beside the crystal stream, that runneth from the
throne of God, in the midst of the holy city.
The odors of Eden fell sweetly around her ; the
loving angels looked kindly upon her, while, by
her side stood the blessed Lord Jesus, of whom
the stranger had spoken.

“Dear lamb of my flock,” he said, ‘“ what
wouldst thou?” ‘“ Lord, that I may become more
like thee,” said the gentle-hearted child. “ Even
thus shall it be,” he answered ; “the Father hath
sent thee into the world to do his will. Thou
must bear the bread and water of life to the
hungry and thirsting souls around thee. Thou
must become eyes to the blind, ears to the deaf,
feet to the lame, and joy to the despairing.



THE SPIRIT CHILD. 71

Patient in sorrow, perfect in meekness, trusting
in God. By doing this shalt thou assimilate
thyself to me, heaven shall ever lie around thee,
and God shall dwell in thy heart.” Reverently
did the child kneel down at his feet, and clasp-
ing her hands, in all earnestness of spirit she
said, “I am ready to do the Father’s will, even
unto death.” Asshe uttered these words, a soft,
warm air, sweeter than the breath of roses,
seemed to rest upon her brow. Sensibly and per-
ceptibly came the presence of the Great Spirit
Father. She felt that he was near her, around
her, in her heart. There was joy among the an-
gels,and a song of praise was on every lip, for the
mighty hosts of cherubim and seraphim seemed
to be moved as one, by the all-pervading presence
of God. As if a new life and strength had been
given unto her, the child rose up. “Now am I
able to do all things,” she said, “since the Father
hath entered into my heart; and while his spirit
shall abide with me, I fail not, I faint not. I leave
you, bright angels, to do whatever I can of good
in the earth, and when my mission is ended, 1
shall come and dwell with you forever and ever.
Dear Father, strengthen me against temptation,
and deliver me from evil, and I shall yet do thy
will upon the earth, as it is done in heaven!”
Then, as if borne on the wings of a dove, she



72 THE SPIRIT CHILD.

floated away through the pure air, while the
music of the crystal waters, and the sweet voices
of the angels, seemed to follow after her to cheer
her onward in her mission ; and when she raised
her head, and found herself still sitting by the
great rock, in the shade of the palm tree, that
melody was still in her heart. But this was not
a dream —n0o, it was not a dream ; neither was the
child carried up bodily, beyond the sun and stars,
into an outward and visible creation ; but, when
she came with a spirit yearning after the holy
and beautiful, to seek for the rainbow, that she
might enter into the immediate presence of God,
and found it not, she heard the voice of the
Father calling her out of the depths of her heart,
to enter into that “kingdom of heaven” which
the Lord Jesus hath said 1s within us; and as she
held communion with the high and holy thoughts
that came to her like the voices of angels, she
received more of the spirit of all good, and thus
she became strengthened for the duties of life.
There is an Eden of quietness and beauty in
every gentle heart, that truly loves the Father,
and strives to do his will. It is more peaceful
than the land of dreams, more beautiful than
the regions of fancy. There come the pitying
and consoling angels, to minister unto us in our
hours of trial and temptation, and there dweils



THE SPIRIT CHILD. 73

the Spirit of the Great Father. , Oh, could we
oftener enter into this holy place, and when we
say “Our Father who art in heaven,” instead
of looking up to the blue ether, and the material
worlds above us, we could enter more truly into
this “ kingdom within” us, then would we never
wish to grieve away the blessed spirits that dwell
there, by our sin and unthankfulness. Not only
would there be a heaven within us, but around
us, and heart joining with heart, love would no
longer become worn and wearied by unkindness,
and auger and resentment would become only
words to express things that were.





THE COMPLAINT.

BY MRS. N. T. MUNROE.

Tuerk is no sign of clearing,
The sky is dark and gray,

And faster now ’t is raining
Than it has rained to-day. ,

All yesterday was gloomy,
To-day is worse by far ;

T fairly long to see the sun,
Or e’en a single star.

But this continual dropping
Is death to schemes of mine ;
The sun is surely crossing
The equinoctial line.

I wish it could have put it off,
Or crossed with better grace ;

I’m sure I do not see the use
Of such a cloudy face.

Some other time I should have liked
This long-continued rain,

But now I surely must confess
It gives less joy than pain.



THE COMPLAINT. 76

I ofttimes like a rainy day,
Or even two together ;

But now, I did not calculate
Upon this gloomy weather.

‘There is no sign of clearing,
The wind is out dead east ;

I know, I ’m sure, that it will rain
A week or so, at least.





HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

BY CHARLES W. SWASEY.

Tue song of the nightingale is not so musical
as the artless prattle of a happy child; and his
rosy cheeks and glowing countenance are more
lovely to gaze upon than the most beautiful
flowers of the garden. But children are not
always happy, and principally because they do
not always OBEY THEIR PARENTS. This is the
secret of many of their little crosses and vexa-
tions, and, indeed, of many of the greater mis-
fortunes of life. While, on the other hand,
those children who are obedient to their parents
in all things, generally grow up to be good men
and women. To illustrate this obvious, but im-
portant truth, we will tell our little readers a story
about the misfortunes of a lad who would not
mind his parents, and another about the good
fortunes of a boy who loved his father and his
mother, and was always ready to do their bidding.

Some thirty or forty years ago, there lived in
Frampton, in the county of Lincolnshire, Eng-
Jand, a lad named Wittiam L——n. He



HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 77

was the son of a farmer, and was at an early
age sent to the Sunday school, where he imbibed
a respect for the name and character of the Su-
preme Being, which, in after life, served to re-
strain him from crimes that he might otherwise
have committed. But he was indolent in his
studies, and excessively fond of amusement,
which often involved him in trouble, and ren-
dered him,amenable to the laws of the land,
besides subjecting him to his father’s displeasure.
His amusements were principally those of rob-
bing gardens and orchards, trapping game, and
hunting birds’ nests. To this last named evil
he was so much addicted as frequently to expose
himself to the most imminent danger of breaking
his limbs and losing his life; and he suffered
severely by climbing into thorn-hedges in pursuit
of his object, besides sometimes wearing his
clothes in rags.

I wish my young readers to remember that
William L n indulged these mischievous
propensities, as often and as far as circumstances
would permit, in defiance of the strictest in-
junctions of his parents to the contrary. Had
he obeyed them, and refrained from his sinful
pursuits, he would have escaped the censure and
severe punishment which he often received as
the consequence of his offences. These were

7





78 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

numerous, but we will not stop now to mention
them. Suffice it to say, that he became a
source of painful uneasiness to his parents, who
deemed it necessary to put him out to service, hop-
ing that the instructions of experience would make
him a better boy. He was, accordingly, sent to
live with a respectable farmer some twelve miles
from his home; but his master, not needing him
as a servant, William soon left and xeturned to
his father’s house.

William was again put out to live, ata greater
distance from home; but his master was a pas-
sionate man, and would censure him for the
slightest offence. He became dissatisfied with his
treatment, bv; darcd not utter a complaint. He
thought of home, yet feared to return there, for
he had offended his parents by his unruly con-
duct. Still he determined to leave this unpleasant
place of service, and seek employment elsewhere.
He engaged himself as a groom or horse-keeper,
to the landlord of a tavern; but here, as in the
former case, his employer proved to be an ill-
tempered and fault-finding man, so much so that
his servants never remained long in his employ.
William’s condition was now but little better than
that of a slave. Among his other toils, he was
obliged, on every Sabbath day, to take a horse to
a clergyman, four miles distant, and return on foot



HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPy,. 79

before breakfast; and in the evening to go on
foot and bring it back again. Besides this, his
food was unwholesome, consisting of a little meat
half boiled, and bread made of the coarsest ma-
terials, scantily baked, and full of coals. His
father, learning of his situation, sent to relieve
his wants and urge him to return home; but,
needy as he was, he was proof against both the
kindness of his friends, and the love of his par-
ents; and instead of obeying their request, he
went to work as a day-laborer in the outskirts of
the town. He remained in this occupation for
some time, but wages being low, and labor
scarce, it was with difficulty he procured a
scanty subsistence, which induced him to leave
the place and offer himself as a soldier. He
accordingly went to Horncastle, and requested
to be joined to the 2d regiment of Rifle Guards,
but was objected to as being too short. Deter-
mined not to be disappointed, he left this place
and went to Lincoln, where he offered himself a
second time, and was rejected on the same
ground as before, because he was not sufficiently
tall.

These repeated disappointments robbed Wil-
liam of his spirits, and made him the victim of
despondency ; hope forsook his bosom, and pros-
perity refused to smile upon him. In the lan-



80 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

guage of the prodigal son, he said, “I will arise
and go to my father.” The next Sabbath he
reached his home, where his parents received
him with joy and kindness, and his sorrows and
his wanderings were forgotten ; and had he con-
tinued to obey their loving counsel and advice,
many of his subsequent sufferings would have
been avoided. But, on the succeeding summer
he entered the employ of a gentleman in a neigh-
boring town, where his hard fortune followed
him. His master was passionate and cruel, and
twice whipped him most unjustly. He left;
but instead of going to his home, as he should
have done, he went to the town of Stamford, in
company witha dissolute youth, to gratify whose
intemperance he was obliged to sell his watch,
and expend his last shilling. William then aban-
doned this ungrateful companion, and again
offered himself as a soldier, but without success.
He was now without money, and compelled to
sell a portion of the clothing which he wore to
procure food to satisfy his hunger. He wandered
from place to place, with little to eat, with noth-
ing to do, and sometimes obliged to beg for food,
or starve Once more, and it proved for the last
time, he resolved to seek the shelter of his child-
hood’s home, where he arrived on the Sabbath
day. He had previously engaged himself to



HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 81

work with a gentleman in a town some miles
distant from Stamford, and returned the follow-
ing day, Monday, to fulfil his engagement. His
mother accompanied him as far as Boston, a town
adjoining his native village, where she purchased
him a suit of clothes. She then retired with
him to the solitude of the graveyard, and there
imprinted the last warm kiss of affection upon
his burning cheek — there took the last fond em-
brace of her wayward child —and there uttered
her last endearing words, — “ Farewell, my son,
be a good boy!”

William had lived at his new place but six
weeks, when his master called him one morning,
gave him one shilling, and dismissed him from
his employ. With this one shilling in his pocket
he left for Lincoln, where he sold such articles
of clothing as he could spare, to obtain means to
travel with. He vainly solicited employment in
several towns, until at last he was driven, by im-
perious necessity, to enlist as a soldier. After a
number of unsuccessful attempts, he succeeded in
joining a rifle regiment, stationed at Montreal,
on the river St. Lawrence, in Canada East.
Thus, on the 6th day of December, 1820, at the
age of only 15 years, William L——n enlisted
for life, as a soldier in the British service.

It would be interesting to my young readers to

7k





$2 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

enter into a detail of the hardships and sufferings
of a British soldier's life, at the time of which I
am speaking ; but I have not time to do this, and
can only tell you that they were subjected toa
round of unceasing toil, and never permitted to go
beyond the sound of the drum. Martial laws were
very strict, and the punishment for their infringe-
ment very severe. If a soldier was found guilty
of stealing, he was punished with three hundred
lashes upon the bare back ; and for some crimes the
unfortunate victims were doomed to receive seven
hundred lashes! These punishments generally
disabled the culprit for weeks or months, and
sometimes caused death. William, however,
was so fortunate as to escape the martial whip,
though he endured many other hardships, such
as hunger, fatigue, cold, &c.

Let us now follow our young hero across the
broad Atlantic, until he arrives in Montreal, on
the American continent. Here he was duly
joined to his regiment, and here he renewed and
continued his life of toil and suffering. Seeing no
reason to hope that his condition would ever be
more tolerable, in about two years he conceived
the design of deserting his regiment and running
away tothe United States. To effect this design,
he stole a horse from one of the officers, and
a small sum of money to obtain food on the



HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 83

way ; and on a cold night in the month of Feb-.
ruary, thinly clad, and without an outer gar-
ment, he commenced his escape on horseback.
The cold was so intense that he froze his hands
and feet, and, after travelling forty miles, he put
up at a tavern, and called for some refreshments.
While at this tavern, the landlord suspected him
of being a deserter, took effectual steps to ascer-
tain the fact, and reported him to his officers.
To us it seems cruel that the landlord should
have done this; but he was an unfeeling man,
and betrayed the young soldier because he should
receive for it the sum of thirty dollars, which the
British army then paid for the detection of de-
serters. William was now conveyed back to
Montreal, where he was tried for the crimes of
desertion and theft, and condemned to die. The
jury, however, recommended him to mercy, and
after lying in prison a few weeks, bound in irons,
the governor was prevailed upon to remit the
sentence of death, and to consign him to five
years’ hard labor in the jail at Quebec. And
here, immured within the massive walls of a cold
and cheerless prison, compelled to subsist on
coarse and scanty food, and to pick thirty pounds
of oakum per week, we will take leave of our
young and unfortunate hero.

I have said that William was “ unfortunate ;”



84 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

but have my young readers reflected that the
cause of all his misfortunes was disobedience to
his parents’ commands when a boy and living
at home? Such is the fact; and the story of his
sufferings I trust you will all remember, and be
warned by them to shun the example of his early
youth.

The other story which I promised to relate, is
of one whose name is familiar to every child.

At the age of fourteen years, Gzorce Wasu-
iNcTON felt a very strong desire to follow the sea,
and accordingly obtained a warrant as midship-
maa in the British navy. His then widowed
mother was grieved at the thought of parting
with her loved and only son, and entreated him
to relinquish his design and remain with her.
George was a good boy; he could not think
of acting contrary to his mother’s wishes, and,
therefore, resigned his commission, in obedience
to her request. ‘This act of duty,” says one of
his biographers, “ prepared the way for that
brilliant career of greatness which ended in free-
ing a nation, and earning for him the noblest of
all titles, that of ‘ Father of his Country.” Had
George Washington been a wilful and disobedient
boy, he would have entered the service of the Brit-
ish navy, despite the entreaties of his mother ; and



HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 85

then, instead of immortalizing his name and his

memory, by the greatness and the goodness of his

after life, and being the chief instrument, in the

hands of God, of freeing this now great and happy

country from British oppression, he would in all

probability have fought against our liberties, and

perhaps have died unhonored in a foreign land.

But now, ‘there is no speech nor language”

where the name of WasuineTon is not repeated
with reverence and respect. He is everywhere
regarded as a model of human greatness; and
no higher aspiration can-be cherished than to be
like Washington, the political saviour of his
country, unless we except a sincere desire to be
like Jesus, the spiritual Saviour of the world.
The secret of his greatness was his goodness,
and the secret of his goodness was filial obedi-
ence to his parents in his childhood, to his wid-
owed mother in his boyhood, and to his God in
manhood. On the 14th day of December, 1799,
at the age of 67 years, this good man died, and
was buried near his residence at Mount Vernon,
deeply mourned by millions of grateful and lov-
ing people. Should any of my young readers
ever be so happy as to visit the “Grave of
Washington,” I hope they will remember and
there repeat the following beautiful lines, written
by Marshall S. Pike :



86 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

‘* Disturb not his slun.bers ! let WasHINGTON sleep
*Neath the boughs of the willow that over him weep
His arm is unnerved, but his deeds remain bright

As the stars in the dark-vaulted heaven at night.

Oh! wake not the hero ; his battles are o’er;

Let him sleep undisturbed on Potomac’s fair shore ;
On the river's green border, so flow’ry dressed,

With the hearts he loved fondly, let Washington rest.

Awake not his slumbers ! tread lightly around !

*T is the grave of a freeman, ’tis Liberty’s mound!
‘Thy name is immortal — our Freedom it won —
Brave sire of Columbia, our own Wasuincton !

Oh! wake not the hero; his battles are o’er ;

Let him sleep, calmly sleep, on his dear native shore,
While the stars and the stripes of our country shall wave
O’er the land that can boast of a WasHINGTOoN’s grave.”

How lovely, how beautiful is this portrait of
Washington! ‘There are no stains to mar its
beauty, no shades of evil to dim its brightness.
Every feature is stamped with a dignity, and a
veneration which command our deepest respect.
And does it not induce a desire in my younz
readers to be like Washington — great, and good,
and beloved? The first step to be taken, then,
is to obey your parents, who love and care for
you so tenderly. Ancient history tells us of a
king who made a law against a certain crime, in
which it was enacted that the offender should be
punished with the loss of both eyes. The very



HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 87 |

first transgressor was the king’s own son. The
case was a distressing one, for the king was an
affectionate father, as well as a just magistrate.
After much painful reflection, the king com-
manded one of hisown eyes to be pulled out, and
one of his son’s. Here you see demonstrated the
power of parental love. To have taken both the
eyes of his son, would have rendered him blind
forever ; but, rather than bring upon him so great
a misfortune, and yet, to enforce the demands of
his own law, the king chose to share his son’s
distress. This was an act of affection which
none but a parent could perform. If, then, they
love you so tenderly, is it too much that you
should follow their direction and advice while
young, and unable to act wisely for yourselves ?





ELLEN GRANT,
THE DRUNKARD'S DAUGHTER.

BY MRS. MARY A. LIVERMORE.

Few children pass through as much trial and
sorrow as did Ellen Grant, during the first
twelve or fifteen years of her life. Few are as
heavily pressed with care as she was, or have
as many and as arduous duties to perform.
And yet few, with age and experience twice her
own, would have been more faithful in their dis-
charge, more uncomplaining, or more devoted.
Allow me, young readers, to narrate to you her
history, which, I assure you, is not fiction, but
with the exception of a few unimportant altera-
tions, is wholly true.

Ellen Grant and het young brother and sister
were so unfortunate as to have an intemperate
father. When not under the influence of ardent
spirits, Mr. Grant was a kind, industrious man,
and loved his little family, and sought to provide
for their wants — but when intoxicated, he was
unfeeling, indolent, and an object of fear. Mrs,





ELLEN GRANT.



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ELLEN GRANT. 91

Grant, the poor wife, was in feeble health, and
was compelled to toil so hard to assist in main-
taining the family, that every year found her
paler, thinner and weaker. Had her husband
been a man of sober, industrious habits, her
labor would have been comparatively easy ; for
then good food and clothing would have been
furnished for herself and little ones, and her
household duties would have been so lightened
by the careful, dutiful Ellen, as to have rendered
them very slight. But the wages earned by Mr.
Grant were chiefly squandered at the bar-room,
and in the dram-shop, and Mrs. Grant, feeble as
she was, was therefore obliged to go out among the
families of the town, to wash, iron, clean house,
or sew, as she was needed, leaving Ellen to
attend to affairs at home.

The family were necessarily poor and desti-
tute. Their food was coarse and scanty, their
clothing poor, and insufficient to keep them com-
fortable in the cold weather, while their dwelling,
a rough, old house, unfit to live in, was meanly
furnished. Not only did they suffer from pov-
erty, from cold and hunger, but they endured
much from Mr. Grant’s unkindness, when fren-
zied with liquor. Many an undeserved blow did
little Ellen, and her brother and sister, Susy and
Freddy, receive from the heavy hand of their bru-



82 ELLEN GRANT.

tal father; blows, whose dark marks were left
upon the tender flesh for weeks afterwards.
Even the pale-faced suffering wife, a slender,
broken-spirited woman, was sometimes confined
to her bed for days, by her husband’s ill treat-
ment.

Yet no word of complaint ever came from
their lips; no one ever heard them speak unkindly
or harshly of their drunken husband and father ;
and despite his ill-usage, both wife and children
dealt with him kindly. A sadness seemed
always to rest upon them, and tears might often
be seen in the eyes of Mrs. Grant and Ellen,
who, being older, realized more their wretched-
ness than the other children — but reproaches of
him who caused all their trouble were never
heard.

Hard labor, trouble, and anxiety, wore more
and more upon Mrs. Grant’s delicate constitution,
until she became reduced almost to a shadow,
and those who saw her, predicted that she would
soon depart from her cares and trials forever.
One morning, when Ellen was a little more than
ten years old, her mother rose as usual, to go
about her daily labor, but, as Ellen observed, with
a paler face, and more weakness than ever.
The dutiful child, ever awake to the cares and
sorrows of her feeble parent, assisted her as far



ELLEN GRANT. 93

as she could; but when she entered the rough,
ill-furnished apartment with a handful of sticks
she had gathered for the fire, she found her poor
mother extended upon the floor, apparently
lifeless.

Ellen did not scream, or run off for the neigh-
bors, leaving her mother alone, as many children
would, but opening the door that the fresh air
might come to her mother, and spreading
over her a blanket to prevent her taking cold,
she mingled camphor and water in a cup, and
tried to force some of it into the sufferer’s mouth.
This had not the desired effect ; and bringing a
piggin of cold water, she sat down upon a block
of wood, which answered the purpose of a stool,
and lifting her mother’s head into her lap, she
bathed her temples and forehead, and moistened
her pale lips until signs of life returned.

By this time, Susy, whom Ellen had despatched
for aid, returned with one or two kind women,
who summoned the doctor. He attended her for
a few days, but he could do her no good; and
ere a fortnight passed away, the poor children
were motherless. It was a sad, sad time for
them; she who had loved them dearly, and
whom they had loved, who had folded them to
her heart, and wept over them, was hidden from
their sight in the grave; and as the poor little



94 ELLEN GRANT.

creatures gathered closely together, and wept in
one another’s arms, they felt lonely indeed. Poor
Ellen was the most to be pitied; she was the
eldest, and realized their wretched situation, and
being very sensitive, it cut her to the heart.

The town’s people were now very desirous to
remove the children from their father’s tyranny
and bad example, and places would have been
provided for them in good families ; but Ellen
wept so bitterly when it was proposed to separate
Susy and Freddy and herself, and Mr. Grant
raved so fiercely at the proposal, that it was
abandoned. Ellen, young as she was, immedi-
ately stepped into her mother’s place, and dis-
charged her duties. She cooked the food, made,
repaired, and washed the clothing, kept the house
neat and tidy, and besides this, found time to
braid palm-leaf hats for the hat and bonnet man-
ufactory in the town, and to teach Freddy and
Susy to do the same, by which they earned a
small sum each week.

During the winter and summer months, when
only a school was taught in the town, Susy and
Freddy were regularly sent to school, and Ellen
herself, in the midst of all her cares, contrived
to pass an hour or two each day in the school-
room, which the teacher kindly sought to make
as profitable to her as possible. Every one



ELLEN GRANT. 95

praised the good girl’s industry and thoughtful-
ness, and every one also pitied her that she
should be debarred from all the joys of her age,
and be oppressed with care. Yet few girls would
have been as happy as she, severely as she la-
bored, if her father had béen a temperate man.

One — two — three — four years passed away,
and Mr. Grant became worse instead of better.
Every year he brought less and less of his earnings
to his family, and often came home at night so furi-
ous, that the children were obliged to flee for their
lives. Hard words and harder blows were con-
stantly dealt out to them by the unnatural father;
and yet the children, when questioned about the
bruises they bore on their arms, faces, and necks,
would always evade a direct answer, and simply
say “they had got hurt.”

Ellen was too sensitive to be willing that all
her father’s excesses should be known, and when
they had suffered the most from his cruelty, and
were weeping from the pain he had inflicted,
she would enjoin secrecy upon her brother and
sister, and charge them “not to tell anybody
about it.” Butoh, how the poor child thought of
her dead mother, and sometimes longed to lie down
beside her! Howshe wept day and night, her eyes
raining tears, tears, tears, all the time! How sad,
how very sad, grew her face, the tone of her

8*



96 ELLEN GRANT.

voice, and even her manners! , Everybody said
“ Poor Ellen Grant!” but no one seemed able to
relieve her. Her father would not reform, nor
would he suffer his family to be broken up—
and what could be done?

But about a year ago, a severe sickness came
upon the drunken father, which confined him to
his bed for many weeks, and so reduced him,
that no one expected his recovery. The physi-
cian came to see him, and some of the people of
the town, but, except his children, few hoped that
he would get well; they thought it would be a
blessing to his family if he did not live.

But his good child, his dutiful Ellen, hung
over him as if he were the best of fathers; she
bathed his swollen and painful limbs, cooled his
fevered brow, and spake kindly and gently to
him, even when he raved at, and cursed her.
But, by and by, the dreadful pain which
racked him was stilled; and then, as he lay
helpless in bed, he noticed his excellent child’s
industry, patience and forbearance, her gentle
attendance upon him, and her habitual sadness.
Every day he saw her going through a round of
duties, which would have fatigued an experienced
person, half a dozen years older, economizing,
laboring, guiding and advising Freddy and Susy
as a mother would, and attending to his wants



ELLEN GRANT. 97

like a skilful nurse —and this, when she was but
fourteen years old.

He was a kind-hearted man, as I have told
you, when not intoxicated, and one day, as her
pale, sad face was bending over his pillow, while
her hands gently bathed his brow, and smoothed
his tangled hair, a tear sprang to his eye, and
he said gently and tenderly, —

“Ellen, you are a good girl, and when I get
out again, I’ll buy you a handsome present.”

“Oh, no, father!” said Ellen sadly ; “I don’t
want any present; no, father, I’d rather —” and
she stopped, and her lips quivered.

“ Well, what, Ellen?” asked Mr. Grant;
“what were you going to say? Speak out.”

Looking into his face, and seeing the kind-
ness that beamed there, Ellen threw her arm
over her father, and burying her face in his
bosom, sobbed out, “ Don’t be angry, father, don't
be angry; but oh, I’d rather you’d sign the
pledge! That would make us all so happy!”
and the bed shook with heremotion. Mr. Grant
lifted her pale face to the pillow beside his own;
the tears of both father and child mingled
together. He pressed a kiss on her wan cheek
—the first he had bestowed on her for years —
but he said not a word. A few moments, and
Ellen lifted her head from the pillow, and left the



98 ELLEN GRANT.

room, to relieve her heart by a yet more copious
flood of tears.

That afternoon, when Susy and Freddy came
from school, he called the former to his bedside,
and in a low tone said, “ Susy, I want you to
go to Mr. Comstock’s, and ask him to come
up here this evening. Tell him to bring the
pledge with him.”

Now my young readers must know that Mr.
Comstock was President of the Total Abstinence
Society, and that he had often vainly endeavored
to get Mr. Grant’s name on the pledge. No
wonder, then, that Susy stared at her father as
though she thought him crazy, and that he was
obliged to repeat his request a second time.
Then, when she comprehended her father’s wish,
she bounded from the room like a wild fawn,
treading on pussy, who was asleep on the floor,
overturning a chair, and tearing her dress on a
nail which caught it, and actually jumping up
and down for joy as she communicated the news
to Ellen and Freddy. Freddy jumped up a good
way from the ground, and gave a loud “ hurrah !”
boy-fashion, and then away they scampered to
Mr. Comstock’s, hatless and bonnetless, outstrip-
ping horses and wagons in their joyful speed.
Ellen, poor child! who was left behind, burst
out afresh, and was weeping when the little
ones returned.



ELLEN GRANT. 99

Mr. Comstock came up, as desired, and Mr.
Grant, trembling with weakness, wrote his name
underneath the pledge. Oh, how happy were his
children! Susy climbed up on the bed to kiss
him, Ellen wept, and then laughed through her
tears, and Freddy flew round the room like a
spinning top, longing to “hurrah!” again,
catching up poor pussy, hugging Ellen round
the waist, and performing various other antics.

It is a year, nearly, since then, and Mr. Grant
has not broken his pledge ; and we now think the
reformation will be a lasting one. His family now
are comfortable, and happy ; and instead of fear-
ing their father, they love him. They have now
the comforts of life; they have better food, better
clothing, and better furniture, in their house.
Mr. Grant says every day that he is as happy
a man as there is in town, and that for his
reformation, and his present happiness, he has
to thank his good child, his excellent daughter,
Ellen.





CHILDREN IN TRADE.

BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

“Here, little boy ; I want to see you a min-
ute,” said a boy of ten years to a little boy of a
group of three. The boy to whom he spoke had
a tin whistle, a bird-call, enjoying its shrill
sound; and when the large boy called, he
took it from his mouth and went towards the
other.

“ What will you take for that? —I ‘ll give you
this,” said the large boy, taking something from
his own mouth.

“ Whatis it ?” said the little fellow.

“Pitch; pitch to chew,” said the crafty boy.

The articles were exchanged. A little boy
who was playing in a wagon near the boys, as if
he discovered the deception, began to cry out,
—“ Burgundy pitch! Burgundy pitch!” His
friendly caution was not understood. The large
boy walked away, well pleased with his bargain,
and the little one broke a piece for each of his
companions, and began to chew his own.



CHILDREN IN TRADE. 101

“Tt is bitter,” said he ; “I don’t like it; I don’t
want it.” He turned to look after the crafty big
boy, and walked on in silent sadness.

“ Are you sorry you traded?” said one of his
companions.

“Yes,Iam. Ihave lost my whistle, and got
nothing for it.”

Another large boy came up to the little trader,
and asked him what he had.

“Pitch,” said one of the boys.

“Where did you get it ?”

“T gave a bird-call to John Blake for it.”

“John Blake is a rascal to take it from you.
You have got cheated, Alfie. Be careful how
you trade with large boys,” said Alfred’s friend.

“T hope I never shall trade with a cheat
again,” said Alfred.

But alas! the world is full of cheats. There
are very many poor Alfreds in the mercantile
world, and crafty John Blake watches at many a
corner, to entrap the unsuspecting. When a
simple-minded young trader offers himself, the
deceiver cries —‘“ Here, young man; I want to
see youa minute.” The witnesses anxiously cry
out, “ Burgundy pitch! Burgundy pitch!” but it
avails nothing; for a novice in trade, or an hon-
est-hearted youth, believes all as innocent as him-
self, and he makes a bargain of which he repents



Full Text




NEVER GIVE UP;

HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY

EDITED BY
MRS. M. H. ADAMS,

Forth to the world, thou messenger of truth,
And peace, and love! Thy benediction breathe
On hearts now waiting for thee! Humbly speak
In Christ’s good name, and in his spirit’s power ;
And heaven shall own thy mission.



BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY JAMES M. USHER,
No. 37 Cornhill,

1850.


PBB PPP OA nnn nmnnnunmnmnnnâ„¢mnae
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, by
JAMES M. USHER,

In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of Massachusetts,
Onno


PREFACE.

Tue attention, encouragement and support, which
our little Annual has received from contributors, read-
ers and patrons, have called for another volume, with
improvements on the past. May it follow its predeces-
sors wherever they have gone, and go where they have
not been.

We fully appreciate the disinterested labors of
our contributors, and here express our thanks for the
assistance rendered. A glance at the names of these
contributors, and the assurance we can give of their
interest in the improvement of the youth growing up
around us, we hope will inspire our young friends and
the public with fresh confidence in the moral power of
the little book.

At the time of the appearance of the Annual for
1848, the editor had supposed her earthly labors ended ;
But it pleased the Father of mercies to delay the angel
of death, and restore her again to her humble place
with mortals, where she would consecrate her feeble
powers anew in the cause of his holy truth. May his
approving blessing rest on this effort !

M. He. Ae
1*
CONTENTS.

PAGS
Oberlin, . see eee eee eee eee eee

Scraps for Children, . 1... ee eee eevecee 24
The Little Adventurers,........-2e2+ 31
The Careless Dart). 2... eee eevee eeee 30
The Red and White Rose,. .... 2.2 eeeee Al
A Short Story for Little Readers,. ........ 44
The Brazen Serpent, ... 2.6 see eee eee OL
The Miracles of Christ... ... ++ eeeeee 5B
How do you know he ’shonest? . .... ++. 61
The Spirit Child,. . 2. eee ee eee ee ee 65
The Complaint, .. 1... ee eee ee eeee Th
How Children may be happy, .. 1... 2 eee + 76
EllenGrant,. . 2. see eevee erceeene B
Children in Trade, . 2. 2 ee ee ee eo © © 0 100
The Christian’s Reward, .... +++ ee 0104
Nature hath voices and speaketh wisdom, . . . . «106
Napoleon,. . 2. ee eee eee ree vee olld
Our Bibles, . 2 2s eee ee eee ee eee o LL
The Pool of Siloam, 1. +e eee eeveee 0 A383
x CONTENTS.

My Mother’s Voice, . 1... 6 eee ee wo 0 185
Saturday Afternoon, ....... eee ee e 6 137
Heaven Here... ......56- eee ee e LA
A Soldier of the right kind)... ....... .143
A Story of my Childhood, ........... «146

Sunday Morning, ....... see ee ew oe 2 152
Hymn, ... 1... ee ee eee we eee ne 159
The Declaration of Independence, ........ 161

Extract from an Address on the Death of a Child, . . 164
Sabbath Morning,
OBERLIN.
BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

To the boys who are striving for self-improve-
ment, the character of Oberlin will present a
beautiful and wonderful example of the excel-
lence to which young men and lads can attain,
by a steady perseverance, and firm trust in their
own power, attended by an humble reliance on
the assistance of God in every good enterprise.
You will learn, from his history, how by the
former you may be enabled to overcome difficul-
ties before which many falter and become dis-
couraged, and how, by a practical belief in the
goodness of God, you will be sustained and
borne through trials which cannot be avoided.
You will find in his life an example of purity,
holiness, piety, faith, and love, not often presented
to youth, worthy of your acceptance and imita-
tion. All that is taught us by the actual life of
a good man is as worthy of remembrance as
his words: the latter we call his precepts, his
theory ; the former his example, his practice ;
and you all know that theory without practice
cannot benefit you, that precept without example
12 OBERLIN.

is worthless information, a dead letter. In this
sketch you obtain only a glimpse of his right-
eousness, simply an inkling of thoughts, habits,
and feelings which I would willingly transcribe
at length for your benefit, had I room.

JOHN FREVERIC OBERLIN.

This worthy man was born at Strasborg, in
Germany, August 31, 1740. He was one of
seven boys, and had two sisters. His father was
an educated, respectable man, in comfortable
circumstances, but not rich. He loved his
children tenderly, and devoted all his hours of
leisure to their instruction. The book education
which John Frederic received was no more than
any studious boy may obtain in the Grammar
Schools of New England. With what he did
obtain, however, he set out in life, determined to
be a@ man. Perhaps the idea originated with
his parents, whose life and habits were intended
to influence their children in favor of virtue and
piety.

In the life of Frederic their wishes were
crowned with the most gratifying success. He
was an amiable, benevolent boy, noble in his
motives, and regardless alike of praise or censure,
when he knew he was doing right. Many
instances are given, in his history, where self-
OBERLIN. 13

denial seemed to be the ruling principle of his
life, which was in fact a series of the most decided
and commendable acts of self-denial and gener-
osity. In many little acts of his childhood we
see the beginning of that truly Christian dis-
position that produced such remarkable fruits in
his after life.

When Mr. Oberlin’s boys were small, he took
them every Thursday evening in summer out to
his family estate, not far from their residence in
Strasborg. He used to fasten an old drum
round his waist, while out there, and, preceding
the seven blooming boys as their drummer, exer-
cised them in military tactics. This kindled in
Frederic’s mind a strong desire to become a mil-
itary character. At every opportunity, he would
mingle with the soldiers, and march with them,
and really excelled in the evolutions, The
love for military exercises increased till checked
by his father, who told him it was time to
renounce child’s play for study and serious labor.
His father wished him to follow a learned profes-
sion. He readily coincided in his father’s views,
and devoted himself quite as earnestly to study
and books as he had done to his favorite amuse-
ments.

His biographers do not know what circum-
stances induced him to become a minister.
14 OBERLIN.

Probably the first inclination was awakened by
the devotional habits of his pious and accom-
plished mother. She was a truly admirable
woman; and Frederic often said he was indebted
to her for his love of “ things that are excellent,”
and his desire to be good to others. He was
ordained for the ministry soon after he was
twenty ; but it was several years before he was
settled as a pastor. His first engagement was at
the Ban de la Roche, situated in the north-east
part of France.

This ban or district was divided into two
parishes ; and one parish was made up of five
little hamlets, or clusters of houses. Oberlin
lived at Waldbach, the most central of these
little villages. I can give my readers but a very
meagre description of the condition of these
parishes when Oberlin became their minister, or
of the ignorance and obstinacy of the people
there. The barrenness of the land in some
parts of it may be understood, when you know
that the wife could carry home in her apron all
the hay which her husband could mow on a long
morning ; and the moral condition of the people
was equally deplorable. Surely no man would
have accepted this field of labor but one whose
singleness of heart would bid him forsake all for
Christ.
OBERLIN. 15

On his arrival at Waldbach, he occupied the
parsonage house, a tolerably commodious build-
ing, having a yard in front, a garden behind, the
church quite near, and woody dells and gray
mountains all around it. He was soon con-
vinced that no ordinary difficulties lay between
him and the salvation of his people. It was
then his confidence in God was beautifully man-
ifested. He said he knew that strength would
be given him, if asked in faith, and it was really
right that he should effect such a result; accord-
ingly, he employed all his attainments in science,
philosophy, and religion, for their improvement,
temporally and spiritually. Could you know one
half the difficulties that he encountered, you
would say that many men of any age of the
world would have forsaken the field and felt fully
justified. Preaching there was tod ; social in-
_ tercourse was toil; domestic improvement could
scarcely be effected by the most patient and
incessant toil; and all that seemed to offer itself
to the Christian Oberlin was a call for indefati-
gable toil.

From time to time he received letters from his
worthy predecessor, offering excellent counsel
and great encouragement to him to persevere in
his labors. These letters afforded him great joy,
for his friend could not but know how laborious

2
16 OBERLIN.

his efforts must be, and if he could urge him on
surely, then, himself might trust and go on.

For some months, or years it may be, his
younger sister, Sophia, superintended his domes-
tic affairs, aided by his mother frequently. But
they failed to bestow that sympathy and cordial
devotion to the good of the people which he
believed .he needed; therefore he sought a com-
panion in his labors. He married Miss Mada-
leine Witter, July 6th, 1768. Mrs. Oberlin
became an invaluable assistant to her husband in
all his labors. To the arduous work of uproot-
ing the prejudices of an ignorant peasantry, these
worthy Christians consecrated themselves by
prayer to God, and a written covenant with the
Holy Spirit.

I can give you but a single instance of Ober-
lin’s remarkable perseverance against the sus-
picions and resistance of the people in relation
to his plans. Their roads were actually impass-
able most of the year. He proposed to them to
build a new and substantial one to Strasborg.
He suggested, planned, answered objections,
proved its practicability ; but not a man in all the
parish would start, till he actually shouldered
his pick-axe, and with a faithful servant, broke
ground for the new road. Having, in repeated
instances, pursued a similar course, he at length
*

OBERLIN. v

established himself in their confidence, and could
the more effectually guide them in their spiritual
course. He felt an equal solicitude in all that
pertained to the pastoral office. His sermons,
his conversation, his Thursday lectures, his New
Year addresses, his Sabbath school labors, all
bear testimony to the scrupulously prayerful
devotion which he ever manifested for their
‘“‘ growth in grace,” and the knowledge of truth.

Oberlin was especially attentive to the children
and youth of his parish. He established infant
schools for the little ones, others for the older
children, a miscellaneous library for the use of
all, and reserved the religious education of the
children entirely to himself. He formed a
“Christian Society,” and presented twenty-seven
precepts for the observation of the members. I
can only present you a few, as a specimen of the
character of the whole. “Regeneration. We
are all one in Christ Jesus. Bring forth much
fruit. Nourish the inner man by the Word of
God, by continued prayer, by the frequent use of
the holy sacrament. All the members ought to
watch over each for good ; to exhort and to warn
each other, with sweetness, charity, humility and
patience. Lose no time. Honest and exact pay-
ment. No artfulness orcunning. Provoke unto
good works.” Its object was religious conversa-
18 OBERLIN.

tion and prayer. It effected considerable good
during its continuance.

Mrs. Oberlin died in 1784, having passed six-
teen years of married life with her beloved hus-
band, and leaving seven children. He was for
some time quite overcome by the intelligence of
her sudden death; but not for a moment did
he doubt the mercy of God. His patient
resignation in affliction was worthy the strictest
imitation. In 1793, his oldest son, Frederic,
entered the army, and was among the first who
were killed. Oberlin was strongly attached to
him, but his humble submissioh and even cheer-
ful resignation to this severe dispensation, seemed
fully equal to the love he cherished towards his
first-born, and his confidence in the unchangea-
ble goodness of God sustained him in this second
severe trial. The only change to be perceived
in his family, after these distressing events, was
an air of quiet seriousness, in place of that in-
spiring cheerfulness which before had place there.
Their usual manner of conversation was unin-
terrupted. They spoke of Frederic as one gone
before them to heaven, but not as of the dead.

During the rage of the French Revolution,
clergymen stood in jeopardy everywhere. Tal-
ents, property, popularity, could save none; yet
the benevolence, humility, and simple piety, of
OBERLIN. 19

the Christian Oberlin saved him and his little
flock from imprisonment and interruption in their
pursuits. Indeed, his home became the asylum
for the terrified of every rank and profession.
This sketch will not allow me to insert a very
interesting document, called forth by the circum-
stances of that alarming period, which this faithful
pastor addressed to the young men of his parish.
Thus he made every event profitable in some
view tu his dear people. During the Revolution
he was denied his customary fee from govern-
ment, and was supported by voluntary contmbu-
tions of his parishioners. The only uneasiness
he felt, was that his means of doing good were
limited. To enable himself still to devote three
tithes of all he possessed to religious purposes
and the poor, which he conscientiously believed
to be his duty, and that he might still aid the
institutions in his parish, he received into his
family several children of distinguished foreign-
ers to educate, and generously devoted his re-
munerations to those purposes.

He possessed much of the genuine missionary
spirit. At one time, in the early part of his
ministry, he learned that a pastor had been
sought two years, for a station in Pennsylvania ;
and, as he believed one might more easily be
obtained for the Ban de la Roche, he expressed

o*
20 OBERLIN.

a readiness to go, just as the war between Eng-
land and America broke out. From that time he
was proof against requests to leave, from any
source. This extreme devotedness to his flock
caused him to be revered as a father, and loved
as a faithful Christian, by all; his name was
affectionately called, his unexampled zeal in the
work of his divine Master applauded, in lands
far away from the quiet valley of the Vosges.

He entered with much delight into the plan of
operation of the “ British and Foreign Bible So-
ciety,” became a correspondent of it, aided in
distributing Bibles in the ban and vicinity, and
among Catholics. Happy would the event be
for humanity, if the tolerant spirit of the pious
Oberlin were more widely diffused among the
disciples of Christ! He administered the sacra-
ment to Catholics, Calvinists, and Lutherans, at
the same time, having different kinds of bread
on the plate, that all might partake and not be
offended. His only question was,—‘“ Are you
a Christian? If so, we are of the same re-
ligion. Follow the law of the Saviour; all
other laws are of little importance.” The same
spirit led him to extend Christian kindness to his
Jewish neighbors.

The population of the Ban de la Roche in-
creased from eighty families to five or six
OBERLIN. 21

hundred, or three thousand souls, while Oberlin
lived with them. Various employments were
introduced, which yielded ample support to the
inhabitants until the introduction of machinery.
This threatened gloom and despair for these
good peoyle. But such a consequence was
averted by the two kind-hearted sons of Mr. Le-
grand, who established a ribbon manufactory
there, distributing the looms about the cottages
for the children to work upon them, and still be
under the eye of parents.

As Oberlin became too infirm to discharge his
parochial duties, his son Henry came from Rus-
sia to reside near, and assist, his father. This
son died when Oberlin was seventy-seven years
old. Still the blessing of the God whom he
so faithfully served descended upon his parish ;
useful improvements increased, prosperity and civ-
ilization advanced. A traveller in the ban once
said he never before saw the people who were so
universally courteous and refined in their man-
ners, and at the same time so poor. He attrib-
uted it to the influence of the example of the
good old pastor. His son-in-law, Mr. Graff, suc-
ceeded Henry Oberlin, as assistant to the father.

His last illness attacked him suddenly, and
was short. On Sunday, May 28th, 1826, he was
seized with fainting and shivering. He was
22 OBERLIN.

conscious at intervals for several days. Ata
quarter after eleven on Thursday morning, June
Ist, he died ; and the solemn tolling of the chapel
bell told the people of that rural valley that their
pastor was dead. The whole people wept. His
funeral took place on the Sth of June. As the
funeral procession started from the house, a cler-
gyman laid the clerical robe of Oberlin upon his
coffin, another placed his Bible there, and a civil
officer affixed the decoration of the Legion of
Honor, which Oberlin always wore, to the funer-
al pall. Twelve young females, standing round
the bier, then sung a hymn. At two o’clock the
procession left the parsonage. The oldest inhab-
itant of the parish walked before the coffin,
bearing a wooden cross to be placed over
his tomb, on which was inscribed, — PAPA
OBERLIN.

He was to be interred at Foudai, one of the
villages of his parish. The first of the procession
reached the church there before the last left the
house, at a distance of two miles. A new bell
at Foudai, prepared by the proprietor of the
ribbon manufactory, was heard to toll for the first
time, as the sad procession entered the village.
The burial ground was surrounded by Roman
Catholic women, dressed in mourning and kneel-
ing in silent prayer Three fourths of the
OBERLIN. 23

people remained without the church in silence
and tears during the lengthy services.

A manuscript autobiography of the lamented
pastor was read in which Oberlin wrote most
affectionately of his family, his friends, and his
“dear parish;” expressed his faith in the good-
ness of God towards them all; and commended
all to the guidance and mercy of that God whom
he had preached. One clergyman then read a
part of the 103d Psalm, and the 14th verse of
the 7th chapter of Revelation, which Oberlin had
selected as texts for his funeral sermon. At
the conclusion of the sermon the whole congre-
gation kneeled and repeated in concert a beauti-
ful prayer. A. hymn was sung, and the body
taken to the grave-yard. He was buried under
the shade of a weeping willow, planted over his
son Henry. At the tomb aclergyman addressed
them most touchingly, and with much sincerity,
speaking at length of the virtues and untiring
devotion of the good old man. A physician then
pronounced a eulogy. The people turned sor-
rowfully and slowly away from the grave of one
so dear to them, whose whole life was an en-
deavor to get good from heaven, and do good to
men. Peace to thy spirit, sainted OpERLin!
SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

BY MRS. H. A. P. NYE.
NO. 1. —JESUS.

I HAVE a question to ask of the little ones,
whose bright eyes are glancing over the pages
of this new Annual, in search of pictures, or,
perhaps, of some pleasing story. I own a fear,
that such as like pretty stories only, will “ skip ”
these scraps of mine. It may be that they will
consent to read on, when I promise to write
nothing but what is true.

You may have heard from parents or teachers,
at some time, questions like these :—‘ Who
was the wisest man? Who was the meekest
man? The question I would ask, is this: —
Who was the perfect man? Can you tell?

He was born in Bethlehem of Judea, eighteen
hundred years ago, and in a manger, we are told.
Many good and great men have been born in poor
huts, and lowly homes. You have read, in
your father’s great Bible, or have heard from
your mother’s lips, of the star which guided the
wise men who went to worship the young child,
SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN. 25

and to offer him their gifts; of the angels who
sang of “ peace and good will,” to the shepherds,
as they watched their flocks by night.

Jesus was the perfect man. He was perfect
inlove. ‘He went about doing good.” Though
he had not where to rest his head, he sought
neither wealth nor ease, but the virtue and hap-
piness of those around him ; he healed the sick,
made blind men to see, the deaf to hear, and the
dumb to speak. Worn and weary, sometimes,
in his travels, he never refused aid to such as
desired his blessing ; poor men and sinful were
relieved by him. This kindness extended to all,
and no hatred ever changed his deep and univer-
sal love.

Jzsvus was perfect in virtue; many men have
been virtuous, yet all, to some extent, have
sinned, save Jesus. He was tempted, as we all
are, (and what child knows not what is meant by
being tempted to sin ?) but he never did a wrong
act, nor spake an evil word. He injured none,
even those who were unkind to him. And when
dying, he prayed his Father to forgive those who
put him to the cruel death of the cross.

Our Saviour, Jesus, came to this world, to
teach us to be perfect as he is perfect. He
came also to tell us of a world beyond this, where
he now lives, and where, when we are pure as
26 SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

he is pure, we shall also dwell. Jesus rose from
the dead to assure us that we, that our friends,
that all men, shall at last be as the angels are,—
sinless, spiritual, and forever happy. And now,
when we follow the bodies of our loved ones to
the tomb, we do not think them dead, but hope to
meet them again, to part no more forever.

NO. 2,— THE LITTLE CONSOLER.

“Mother, shall we not wish to see father
again?” asked a little boy, as he looked for the
last time on the father whom he had loved, who
lay sleeping in death, unmindful of those who
stood beside him with tearful eyes.

“Yes, my son, we shall wish to see father,
but we never can again, while we live in this
world.” °

“But will not father rise again? My Sabbath
school teacher told me that God raised up Jesus
from the dead. Say, mother, will he not raise
father too?”

The mother was deeply moved by the earnest
faith of her child, and her own heart was com-
forted, as she felt how blessed was that hope,
which could enable her to answer the anxious
look and question of her boy, by assuring him
of her firm belief that God would raise up his
SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN. 27

father, as he had raised his son Jesus, from the
dead.

“Father will not rise till the last day, will he,
mother?”

To this question the mother replied, that when
the breath left his father’s body, his spirit went
to God; that his father was then in heaven.

«Then, mother, if he is in heaven, he is an .
angel, is he not ?”

“Yes, George, your father is an angel now;
when we die, we shall be as the angels, children
of God, being children of the resurrection.”

“ Are not the angels around us, mother, and do
they not watch over us, and guard us when we
sleep? It may be, if we cannot see father, that
he can see us, and that he will be near us, and
near our beds, to love us and care for us.”

These were the words of a little boy of nine
years, as he stood with his mother beside his
father’s shrouded form, about to be borne to the
tomb. I never think of him, of his simple, ear-
nest trust, but with a softened heart.

You, children, may have lost, or may yet
lose, your father, mother, or friend. Remem-
ber, then, they are not dead; they are as the
angels in heaven; neither can they die any more.
They are changed, but their spirits can never

die.
3
28 SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

NO. 3.—SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME
UNTO ME.”

“Mother, mother, where is the baby ?” I heard
a child ask yesterday of his parent. Again and
again the question was repeated, but he could
not understand where the baby had gone, nor
what it was to de dead. It was hard, he thought,
that his little sister could not come to play with
him. He had seen her lying still and cold in
her white robe; she neither spoke nor moved ;
what could it mean? His little heart could not
tell, nor why they should put his sweet sister in
the ground. And still he asked, ‘Mother,
mother, where is the baby ?”

Do my little friends remember that when
our Saviour was upon the earth, some one carried
young children to him, hoping they might be
blessed by so good a man? His disciples bade
them go away, and not trouble their master ; but
Jesus said, “ Suffer litttle children to come unto
me, for of such is the kingdom of heaven; and
he took them in his arms and blessed them.

Jesus loves young children now, and when any
die, they are carried to his arms, there to be
blessed by his smiles and love. Children are the
. lambs of his flock, and one of your hymns tell
you, that the lambs of his flock are his tenderest
SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN. 29

care. The eastern shepherd leads his sheep to
the green pastures in the summer time, and
there remains to guard his flocks from wolves,
and prevent their going astray. His sheep know
his voice and follow wherever he leads. If the
young lambs are weary, he carries them in his
arms.

Jesus called himself the “good shepherd.”
The good shepherd, he said, layeth down his life
for his sheep. Jesus is our shepherd, now; he
still careth for his sheep; and now, in heaven, as
when he was upon the earth, the lambs of his
flock are taken in his arms; some, when sick
and weary, are borne to the spirit home, and rest
ever in the green pastures, and by the still waters
of that world of endless peace and love.



For those children who have followed me thus
far, I have a few more words to write. I have
told you that Jesus was perfect; that his life was
spent in doing good, in healing the sick, and
preaching the gospel to such as would hear. To
bless others was the happiness of his life; for
that only he lived, and for that only he died.

God the Father is also continually doing good ;
the Scriptures tell us that “he is good to all, and
that his tender mercies are over all his works.”
In deep silence, at midnight as at noon-day, he
30 SCRAPS FOR CHILDREN.

confers blessings upon the children of men. In
the goodness of God consists his highest glory.
When men wish to be like Jesus, and to be like
God, they strive to do good, to be kind, to relieve
and console those in suffering or sorrow, and to
improve all in knowledge and virtue.

And what, think you, can you do to become
the children of God? Commence by being obe-
dient to your parents. We read that Jesus, when
a child, was subject to his parents. Be kindand
obliging to your brothers, sisters, and companions.
Be ever gentle ; speak rio unkind nor evil words.
Begin, thus, to walk in the path which Jesus
trod. Forget not to pray to your Father in
heaven to aid you in becoming good. We read
that Jesus passed whole nights in prayer to God.
If Jesus, then, who was himself so good, needed
to pray, how much more should weak, erring
children ask the protection and guidance of him
who is ever near to help those who call upon his
name !

If, then, children, you wish to de good, and to
do good, try to be followers of Jesus, the perfect
man.
THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS.

BY MRS. E. A. BACON.

Ovr little Infant School vestry! how I wish
you could see it, my dear little readers. So snug,
so comfortable and cozy it is, cuddled under one
corner of our good old church, with the morning
sun streaming across its bright carpet, its pictured
walls and smiling faces, and its little red covered
table, adorned with a vase of flowers, the morn-
ing offering of happy children.

Well, our little infant school vestry, on one
bright Sabbath morning, was filled with goodly
rows of boys and girls, who had just folded their
hands and quietly arisen to repeat their morning
prayer, when the door opened, and two little
strange faces peeped in. They received a wel-
come, and were led to the seat. They were
poorly clad, but were neat and clean, and I felt
sure that a mother’s hand had done its best for
her darlings. Sunday after Sunday they came,
and their quiet, earnest faces drew our hearts
very near to them, and we resolved to know

more of them; so, after the lessons were recited
3%
32 THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS.

one day, we drew the little matronly girl into a
lively chat.

“Where do you live?” I asked.

“ Oh, a little way down from the church, in one
of the cross streets,” said she, pointing in the
direction.

“Do your parents attend church here ?”

“No, ma’am ! they are too poor to come.”

“ How did you find the way ?”

“Why, brother and I wanted to go to your
Sunday school dreadfully ; so mother worked hard
and got us ready, and she told us to come down
this street, and we should find the school.”

“Well, do you love to come?”

“Yes, indeed! we never want to stay at home,
and when brother isn’t well he cries to come.”

“Have n’t you little neighbors around you who
don’t go to the Sabbath school ?”

“Oh yes, ma’am, and I try to tease them to
come, for, don’t you think, they play all day
Sunday.”

“Oh, that is very bad; but why don’t they
come ?”

“ Why, they say their clothes are so bad.”

“ Well,” I replied, “I should like to find some
of your little neighbors, for we have a circle of
kind young ladies who would love dearly to make
clothes for them, so that they might come to
TNE LITTLE ADVENTURERS. 33

school. ut may I come and see your mother ?
and then she may tell me, perhaps, where I can
find them.”

“Oh yes, ma’am, do!” and then she described
the place of her residence as well as she could.
Tbe school commenced singing, and our conver-
sation was interrupted.

After school, I noticed these children lingering
behind the others, and the little girl wore an
anxious expression. I soon gave her an oppor-
tunity to speak to me, and she looked up with
a beseeching gaze, saying, “ Don’t pray come
Monday or Tuesday to see mother, will you?”

“Why not?” said I.

“Qh, because mother washes and irons on
thore days, and she ’ll feel bad because she will
not look nice.”

“No, my dear,” I replied, “I will come
Wednesday, if that is better.”

“Oh yes, Wednesday,” she said; “that is a
good day;” and her eyes brightened as she
walked away satisfied.

Wednesday came, and I started on my expe-
dition, and as I had threaded so many of our
lanes and alleys, I felt sure I could find our little
strangers; but “ deary me,” as the children say,
up this street and down that went I, through,
across, and every way in the direction she
34 THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS.

pointed out, knocked at door after door, made
the dogs growl, the children peep, and spoiled
many an afternoon nap, but none the wiser was
I. Nobody knew “Mrs. Martin.” At last I
gave up in despair, and returned home.

The next Sabbath the children were in their
places as usual, and I determined to take more
accurate directions to their home, but, before
I mentioned it, the little girl came to me witha
sad face, and holding out her school books, said,
“TI must give these up, ma’am, for we can’t
come any more.”

“ Why not?” I asked.

“We're going to move into the country next
week.”

To be sure we felt very sad to part with them,
but we made them each a presentof a little book,
and parted good friends.

Now, my little friends, who are reading my
story, you are no more disappointed than myself,
that I did not find their home, and perhaps you
have pictured it like myself,—a clean, but spare
apartment, with a busy mother, a rosy baby, a
cat, a dog, and a few flowers. It might have
been a garret, however. But then a garret is
sometimes pleasant, when cheerful hearts are
there, and I know these children have a cheer-
ful mother. Besides, perhaps you will not be-
THE LITTLE ADVENTURERS, 35

lieve me, but it is true,— one of the most tidy
and cheerful homes of the poor that I ever vis-
ited, was up in a garret, and I have thought a
hundred times, how neatly every household
utensil was arranged around that well scoured
room.

But you say it is too bad that I don’t know
more of that little girl and boy —those little
martin-birds that flew into our box so gayly one
morning. Why, I think I know a good deal
about them. I know they wish to learn good
and holy things. I know they will not play on
the Sabbath. I know they will try to persuade
others to be good. I know they are thoughtfu’
of their parents. I knowtheyare honest. Ana
is not all that a good deal? You think it is,
and so do I, and I wish I knew as much of every
one of you.


THE CARELESS DART.

‘ Come in, my daughter, close the door,
Shut out the driving storm,

Dry your wet garments — then drink tea, —
I’ve kept it nice and warm.

We'll have a pleasant time to-night,
I’ve had good luck to-day,

I’ve washed for Mrs. Francis Smith,
And see, besides my pay —

She ’s given me all this bread and meat,
And sent this cake to you ;

And at the store I bought this tea ;
A pound of candles, too.

When tea is over, sit by me,
Upon your little stool,
And I will read the pretty book
You brought from Sabbath school.

With three good places now to wash,
I’ve many things in view ;

And first — when rent is paid —1’ll buy
That spelling-book for you.

Then you will soon know how to read,
And when I cannot see,
THE CARELESS DART. 37

From age and weariness, my child
Shall read and work for me.’’

Thus spake a hopeful mother’s heart,
To little Mary Blane ;

But e’en the promised spelling-book
No cheerful smile could gain.

The cake of Mrs. Smith, untouched,
Upon the table laid ;

In vain, with many a winsome prank,
Her kitten frisked and played.

Now Mary was a gladsome child,
No bird more blithe and gay,
No gentler being spared the worm

That in the pathway lay.

But grief’s sharp arrow, barbed with shame,
Sped by a careless hand,

Was rankling in that little heart,
But late so free and bland.

Her mother marked the shade that dimmed
Those eyes so blue and mild,

Then took her to her heart and said;—
What ails my precious child?”

She whispered,—‘‘ Nothing, but ” — then swift
The gathering tear-drops tolled ;

Her voice was choked by stifling sobs,
That would not be controlled.
THE CARELESS DART.

Her mother paused, then asked, with grief
That mothers only know,

‘Will Mary to her mother tell
The cause of all this woe?”

She sobbed, ‘‘ Whate’er you can afford,
I know you don’t refuse ;

But, mother, if I could but have
A pair of nice new shoes!

To-day I entered the new school,
My feet were wet and cold,

And when I put them to the fire, —
You know my shoes are old, —

Rich Sarah Blanchard smiled and said,
‘ See there!’ to Ellen Wood,

Who said —‘ How awkward she does look,
Dressed in her mother’s hood !

Their home is in that mean old house, —
They ’re very poor and low ;

Her father here is never seen ;’—
Dear mother, is it so?

Oh, mother, if I could but die! —
You said the poor and mean,

Who loved the Lord, in heaven should have
New garments, white and clean.

I asked, if I a father had,
When I his face should see ;

You said, in heaven — perhaps — and cried,
And turned your face from me.
THE CARELESS DART. 39

If I should meet that father there,
Now say, do you suppose

He ’d kiss me, like the kind papa
Of little Lucy Rose?

And buy me clothing nice and warm,
That none might laugh at me,

And say that I was mean and low, —
Mother, where can he be ?””

A groan burst from that mother’s heart,
She prayed in accents wild,

‘¢ On me, great God! the vial pour,
But spare my sinless child !

For I have borne, and still can bear,
With want, neglect, and woe ;

But oh, let not my stainless flower
Their blighting influence know !

No! rather take her to thyself,
Thou just and holy One!

And I will school this breaking heart
To say, ‘ Thy will be done.’ ”

Her prayer was heard, — a few short months,
And little Mary laid

Close by her weary mother’s side,
Beneath the willow’s shade.

And when, around those lonely graves,
The village children stood,

They mourned the careless mirth that wrung
A a 80 kind and good.
THE CARELESS DART.

And promised never more in sport
The humble to deride,
Or judge, without compassion, those
For whom the Saviour died.
H. A. D.


THE RED AND WHITE ROSE:

A FABLE.
BY REV. A. HICHBORN.

A Rep and white rose, whose parent bushes
had for years grown peacefully side by side, and
put forth their fragrant flowers in harmony, at
length had a dispute as to the merits of each
other to be called beautiful.

“ How presumptuous you are, Mr. Red Rose,”
said the white, “to lay any claims to beauty!
Why, you are so gaudy I am ashamed of you;
you hold up your red face'#s bold as though you
were the king of flowers; there’ is no modesty
in you, or you would hide a face that: looks as
though ready to burst with wine. Your vanity
is intolerable, and, for my part, I cannot conceive
why you are allowed to grow, unless it be to
show, by contrast, how much more beautiful are
my own delicate leaves.”

“Stop there, Madame White Rose,” said the
red; “it is but fair that I should have a word to
say in a matter involving my reputation. De
you not know that the palm of beauty has al-
42 THE RED AND WHITE ROSE.

ways been given tome? Doth not the warrior
gather me to adorn his crest, while you think
yourself lucky if you can rest in the hair, or on
the bosom of some love-sick maiden? Were it
not so serious a matter, I would laugh at your
foolishness ; as it is, the crimson on my cheek
is deepened with blushes for your impudence.”

There was much dispute of this kind passed
between them, which we will not here relate;
but their disputing did not bring them one whit
nearer to agreement ; they even called each other
by harder names, and were on the point of set-
tling the dispute by a use of their thorns, when
a wise and modest lily, who was standing by
and listening to the controversy, thus addressed
them :

“T am pained that two friends whom I so much
esteem, and who, on other matters, manifest so
much sense, should be so foolish as to quarrel
about so insignificant a thing as their good
looks.”

Upon this, the disputing roses turned to the
lily, and begged that he would be an umpire to
decide upon their respective claims.

“Cheerfully,” replied the lily, “ for, blessed
are they who restore peace between those who
quarrel. Know, then, that you are both beauti-
ful, when you are not marred by envy or pride.
THE RED AND WHITE ROSE. 4B

The great Creator has given to each the color
that pleased him best, and you are both needed,
to perfect the plan of his wondrous creation.
You both derive your colors from the same source ;
and it is indeed vain for one to boast over the
other. Learn, then, to be wise; fulfil your mis-
sion by spreading the perfume and displaying the
colors which He who made everything beautiful
has given you; and the deep crimson of one
shall be softened by the light hue of the other,
while the pale cheek shall receive a delicate
blush, reflected upon it by the companion it now
despises ; and thus shall you both be more beau-
tiful than now.”

Morat. —Never despise the excellences, or
accomplishments of another, because they differ
from your own; remember they are all needful
to fill up the divine picture of life.


A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE
READERS.

BY MRS. SARAH W. DESMAZES.

‘*‘ Come, Helen and Adine, we have had a fine
ramble this morning. Your glowing cheeks
almost, if not quite, rival the roses that we have
just gathered from the garden. Sit you both
down beside me on this grassy bank, under the
shade of this beautiful cherry-tree, and while we
watch the little birds so busy building their
nests, we will have a pleasant chat.”

“ And will you tell us a story ?”

“ Yes, you little chatter-boxes, you shall have
a story.”

“A true story, cousin Sarah; let it be a true
story.”

“ Certainly, it shall be a true story, and I wish
you to be very attentive, so that you may remem-
ber it.”

“Oh yes, we will.”

“ Well, then ;:many years ago, and ina country
far distant from this, there lived a king, who was
neither a just nor a good king ; for he treated a
A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS. 48

part of his subjects very cruelly. He placed
task-masters over them, who compelled them to
do very laborious work, and often exacted of
them more than they had strength to perform.
In other ways he afflicted them grievously, so
that their lives became a weary burden.

“ It is very unwise, as well as unkind, for a king
to treat his subjects in this manner, because he
soon loses their respect’ and good-will, and they
are, in consequence, much harder to govern than
if they were treated kindly. But, notwithstand-
ing their toils and privations, these people in-
creased very rapidly, andthe king greatly feared
that they might rebel against him, and, uniting
with some other nation, take away his kingdom
from him ; but instead of pursuing a milder course
towards them, or even attempting to gain in
the least degree their love, he grew more cruel
and unjust. He made a law that all the male
children born among them should be thrown into
the river and drowned. By this barbarous act
he determined to reduce their numbers so as to
prevent them from ever making any successfu!
effort to regain their liberty.

“ Now there lived in that country a woman, who
had a little baby boy, whom she loved very ten-
derly. She concealed him three months in her
house, and when she found that she could not
46 a SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS.

safely keep him any longer, she devised a plan
by which she hoped to preserve him from the
cruelty of the king. She gathered some reeds
from the banks of the river, and wove a little
ark or basket, which she covered with pitch, to
keep the water from getting into it. This made
a little boat. She then dressed her little boy
very neatly, kissed his rosy lips, and pressing him
to her bosom, laid him in the ark which she had
prepared, and placed it in the river near which
she dwelt.

“Oh, how sadly she must have felt when she
left him there, and how fervently she must have
prayed that God would preserve him from
danger !

“Now it happened about this time that the
daughter of the king, with her maidens, came
down to the river to bathe; and when she saw
the little ark or boat, she sent one of her maids
to bring it to her.

“ How much surprised she must have been when
she found that it contained an infant! We may
suppose that the princess, when she looked at
the little child, whose eyes were filling with tears,
as he saw strange faces around him, felt her
heart yearn towards him, for with love and pity
she immediately exclaimed, ‘This is one of
A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS. 47

the Hebrews’ children ; I will adopt him for my
own!’

“‘ The little child’s sister, who liad lingered near
to see what would become of him, and who had
witnessed this proceeding, now ventured to come
forward and ask if she might bring a nurse for
the child from the Hebrew women. The prin-
cess replied that she might. So she went and
brought the little child’s own mother, and the
princess said to her, ‘Take him home and,
nurse him, and I will pay thee.’ With what joy
she must have received her babe again ; and how
grateful she must have felt to her heavenly
Father, that his life was not only preserved, but
that she was to be permitted to bestow upon him
a mother’s love and protection! So the child
remained with his mother as long as the princess
desired ; then she took him to her own home, and
he became her son, and she called his name
Moses.”

“Q, cousin Sarah, it was ‘Moses in the bul-
rushes!’ There is a picture of him in my little
Bible.”

‘“‘ Yes, it was; and when he became a man he
assisted his poor, oppressed countrymen, and
delivered them out of the hands of the cruel
king Pharaoh. Afterwards God made him a
ruler over his people, and gave him the ten com-
48 A SHORT STORY FOR LITTLE READERS.

mandments and many other laws to teach to the
people.”

“Well, what became of this wicked king?
Did he receive any punishment!”

“Yes; and I wish you to remember that the
wicked are always punished sooner or later for
their crimes.

“The Israelites asked permission to depart from
his country, but Pharaoh refused until God had
sent upon him very severe afflictions, when he
reluctantly consented; but after they had de-
parted he felt sorry that he had let them go, and
followed them with an army of men, to capture
them and take them back again. He overtook
them upon the borders of the Red Sea; and here
it was that God, in a very remarkable manner,
interposed in behalf of the Israelites. He com-
manded Moses to stretch forth his hands, and he
did so, and the waters of the sea were divided,
so that Moses and his countrymen passed
through on dry land; but Pharaoh and his host
following, the waters flowed back upon them, and
they were all drowned.

“The history of these events, and the journey-
ings of the Israelites through the wilderness, is
very interesting, and when you are a little older
you can read it from the Bible.”





BRAZEN SERPENT.
THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

BY MISS E. DOTEN.

‘And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even
so must the Son of man be lifted up, that whosoever believ-
eth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

Joum iii. 14, 15.

Sriut over wandering Israel’s way

The mystic pillar brightly glowed,
And still upon the holy ark

The presence of the Lord abode ;
And still, like drops of dew, there fell

The heavenly manna, pure and sweet ;
And still the golden cherubim

Watched o’er the blessed mercy-seat.

But faithless hearts and murmuring lips
Saw not the blessings round them shed ;
They mourned for Egypt’s pleasant land,
And cast aside the heavenly bread ;
They asked’@f im who led them forth,
A band of trembling, toil-worn slaves,
‘“* Why hast thou brought us here to die,
Far from our homies and fathers’ graves ?”’

Then, like the messengein of Wrath,
The hissing serpetits #éuind them came ;
They gathered o’er the Wanderer’s path,
In shining folds, with eyes of flame
62

THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

The mothers clasped their little ones
And wildly shrieked for aid, in vain ;

And aged men, and blooming maids,
Sank down to perish in their pain.

Then came their faithful leader forth,
And raised the brazen serpent high,
And whosoever looked thereon,

In trusting faith, he might not die.
As if the pitying heavens dropped down
Its blessed dews, like healing balm,
A rest unto that host was given, —

A rest from fear, a peaceful calm.

Oh, prophet-like that serpent seemed,
An emblem of our holy faith, —
A type of that which hath redeemed
Our souls from darkness and from death !
Dear Saviour! Blessed Lamb of God !
Since thou for us wast raised on high,
We turn our trusting eye to thee,
That through thy love we may not die.


THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.
A COLLOQUY.
BY REV. L. J. FLETCHER.

(Mother and eldest daughter upon the stage.)

Mother. Harriet, deem the scenes of yester-
day quite wonderful. I know not what to think
of them, unless I say that Jegus is indeed the
Christ which the prophets have promised. He
was present at the wedding of Zimron and Re-
becca, and when there was no more wine, they
brought water in vessels and set it before him,
and immediately they drew out and bare to the
guests, and behold, it was better wine than before
we had tasted !

Harriet. It was indeed wonderful. But,
mother, did you taste yourself, and know that it
was wine ?

Mother. Yes, child, we all drank and knew

‘there was no deception. }

Harriet. And are you sure that Jesus made
it from the water that was brought to him? °

Mother. Yes, for many of the guests stood
by, and as Jesus came and looked upon the

5
54 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

water, it changed to a beautiful claret hue, and
what we drank was drawn from the same
vessels,

Harriet. Truly, it is very wonderful. It
must be that he is the promised Messiah. Did
he do any other wonderful work ?

Mother. None at the wedding; but I was
told that he had healed the sick and cast out
devils.

Harriet. Where 1s he now, do you suppose ?
_ I would go far to look upon so wonderful a per-
sonage. Will he not pass this way, as he goes
up to Jerusalem on the great feast-day ?

Mother. He may, or he may not; for I am
told that the Chief Priests and Elders at Jerusa-
lem despise him, and have sought to slay him.

Harriet. Is he not a good man, then?

Mother. Yes, there is no guile found upon
his lips or evil in his life. He goes about doing
good ; and because he blesses all classes of peo-
ple with his instructions and wonderful works,
our rulers despise him, and call him the poor
Nazarene.

Harriet. The more :you speak of him the
more I wish to see him. How strange all this
seems to me! I am confident 1 should believe
on him as the Christ if I could witness his mira-
cles, as he is said to perform them. But here
THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. 55

come William and Martha. Why do they make
such haste? They must have news to tell.

(Enter William and Martha, in great haste.)

Mother. Children, why do you come in such
haste? Have you news to tell me?

William and Martha. Oh mother! mother!
Such a man as we have seen to-day! I am
sure there is not another like him in all the
world.

Mother. (Turns to Harriet.) Can it be they
have seen Jesus ?

Martha. Jesus! Yes, that is his name. I
heard the people call him Jesus.

Harriet. Do tell me what he did! Where
did you see him, children? Where is he now?

William. We saw him in the highway which
leads towards Jerusalem. He came from Jericho,
and a great multitude came with him; and what
do you think we saw him do?

Mother. I know not, children. He is a great
and wonderful man, and he may have done a
very wonderful work.

Harriet. Do tell us—Iam so anxious to
hear more of him.

Martha. You know old Bartimeus and Si-
mon, the blind beggars ?

Mother. Yes, they were Lorn blind.
56 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

Martha. Well, they can both of them see
now, just as well as you can.

William. Yes, mother, Jesus cured them in
a minute, by just saying, Be of good cheer, and
touching their eyes with his finger.

Martha. Yes; it was just so, mother, for I
saw it myself, — and such a shouting and rejoic-
ing as there was you never heard

Mother. Is it possible, children, that what
you say is true? Is it possible that old Barti-
meus and Simon are cured of their blindness ?

William. I tell you, dear mother, we saw it
done, not one hour ago. We were leading the
beggars up to the synagogue, when we saw Jesus
and the multitude coming; so we stopped by the
way-side while they passed by; and when the
beggars cried for help to the people, Jesus stopped
and opened their eyes —

Harriet. What did the people say when they
saw it done ?

Martha. Some cried, Hosanna! Some said
he must bea great prophet ; and I heard one say
that he must be the son of God.

William. Yes, I heard a great many say s0 ;
and I think he must be; just think of it. He
cured two men of their blindness, who never
saw before in all their lives —
THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. hy |

Harriet. Where is he now? Why do you
not tell, that I may go and see him also?

Martha. He is now on his way to Jeru- |
salem, and Bartimeus and Simon have followed
him.

Harriet. Oh, mother, I know that he must
be the Christ whom the prophets have promised. _
What would I have given to have seen him!

Mother. Go, children, retire to your rest, and
think of the wonder you have seen. To-morrow
we will talk more of it. There can be no doubt
but Jesus is the greatest personage that ever
lived. We shall doubtless hear more of him soon.

Martha. I think he must be a very good
man, as well as a great man, for he placed his
hands upon our heads, and dlessed us, and said
that all children who are kind to the poor, and
blind, and unfortunate, are beloved by God — :

William. Yes, mother, Jesus blessed us, and
said, “Of such are the kingdom of heaven.”
But here come James and Mary. They must
have met Jesus, as they have just returned from
Damascus with uncle Zebedee —

(Enter James and Mary.)

Mother. My dear children, I am happy to

welcome you home again. Do you bring us any

news ?
6*
58 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

James. News! news! Yes, I suppose it is
news, for we have to tell you the most wonderful
things you ever heard in all your life!

Mary. Yes, mother, the most wonderful, cer-
tain, that ever were in the world —

Mother. What have you to tell so very
strange? Iam sure it cannot be more so than
what William and Martha have just related.

James. Oh yes, I am sure it is, for we have
seen a man raised from the dead —

Mary. Yes, dear mother, a man the people
were carrying to his grave!

Mother. You surprise me, children, more and
more. But how was this marvellous work per-
formed, and who performed it ?

Mary. The people called him Jesus! He
was a very beautiful man, and when he saw the
mourners weeping, he went up to the bier, and
took the dead man by the hand, and he rose right
up, and spoke to his mother, and walked with
her to his home —

James. It was just so, mother; for we both
stood where we saw it done, and heard the peo-
ple shout when the dead man lived.

Harriet. We can doubt no more, I think, but
Jesus is the Son of God. No other being could
do. such works. Oh, mother, how I wish he
could see our little Samuel! I have no doubts
THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. 59

but if he could see him he would cure him of his
leprosy, by just looking at him.

Martha. Yes, ma,I know he would; for I
heard the people that were with him say that a
woman was healed by just touching the hem of
Jesus’ garment.

Harriet. Oh, do let us go to Jerusalem, and
carry Samuel, and bowing down and worship-
ping Jesus, ask him to bestow his healmg
power upon the child. Let us lose no time,
but go to-morrow, and see and know for our-
selves. For one, I can never rest satisfied until
I have seen that great, and, as I believe, holy
being.

Mother. Well, we will go. O how happy
we all should be, if Samuel could only be
cured of that dreadful disease! I feel already
that much has been done for my family in the
blessing pronounced upon William and Mar-
tha. I can but think it was a blessing from
Heaven.

(Enter little Samuel, led by a neighbor's
daughter.)

Jane, whose child bring you hither? Indeed,
he isa lovely boy! He is as fair as an infant.
Is he your brother’s child ?

Jane. Have you not seen this boy before ?
60 THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

Mother. The form of his features seems
familiar, but I do not know that I ever saw him
before —

Samuel. Why, mother ! I thought you would
never forget your little Samuel !

Mother. My Samuel! my Samuel! Oh, it
is his voice, but it cannot be him. No, it can-
not be my Samuel !

Samuel. Yes, dear mother, zt is me! And
I have seen Jesus, and he has cured me and blest
me. Oh, is he not a good man, and ought we
not to love him ?

Mother. Samuel, my angel child, my blest
of Jesus, come to my arms! (Mother embraces
him and kisses him.)

Harriet. Mother! dearest mother! Is not
this enough ?

Mother. Yes, Harriet, it is enough. Jesus,
blessed Jesus! “ Thou art the Son of God, thou
art the King of Israel !”

Harriet. “Lord, I believe ; help thou my un-
belief.”

Mother. Children, all the blessings of this
day, as well as of all other days, come to us from
God. No being could do the works which Jesus
has done except God be with him. Kneel, there-
fore, with me, before the Author of all these
mercies, and let us in silence send up to him our
thanksgiving and our praises.
THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST. 61

(All kneel, and remain in silent prayer for a
moment, after which the mother says Amen!
The children then say Amen, and all arise.)

Children, you have some of you received this
day the blessing of the Son of God. Perhaps you
need no more; still you shall have a mother’s
blessing as ever, and her prayer that this day’s
scenes may long be remembered. Come, Sam-
uel, my blessed child, let us go. Children; ’tis
time to retire, so I will bid you good-night.

All. Good-night, mother ; we all shall dream
of Jesus.


HOW DO YOU KNOW HE’S HONEST?

BY REV. HENRY BACON.

A uittLe boy was observed by his father to
have a new toy, and the father asked him where
he got it? The boy mentioned the name of one
of his schoolmates, and said he gave it to him.
This excited the father’s surprise, to think that
a plaything of that character should be bought
by a lad, and then immediately given away, and
he expressed his fear that the giver might not
have come honestly by the money he spent. The
circumstance was improved to impress on the
receiver of the gift, that if he should know or
think that another came dishonestly in possession
of anything, he ought not to receive it as a gift,
on any account.

“ But,” said the little boy who held the toy,
“T know he’s honest.”

“T should be glad to think so,” replied the
father, “and am ready to hear any reasons why |
should believe so. How do you know he’s hon-
est?”

“Well, in the first place,” said the young
HOW DO YOU KNOW HE’S HONEST? 63

philosopher, as though he were entering into a
grave debate in the old-fashioned style of
preaching. “In the first place, he never tells a
lie; and that shows he’s honest, don’t it ?”

The father readily allowed the inference, and
the boy declared that all his schoolmates might
be asked if Charley Bliss ever told a lie, and
“they ’d all say No, right off.”

“Well, then,” continued the young lawyer
making out his case, “he never steals anything
—not the deast thing; and that shows he’s Hon-
est, don’t it?”

“T’ve been with him,” he continued, “ many
a time in stores and other places, and when
other boys would hook a little here and a little
there, he’d keep his hands behind him, or in
his pockets. And then, father, I’ve known him
to go on errands; and he’s very good to oblige
folks, and folks like him; and I’ve seen him
saw wood and get shavings; and I’ve seen his
father, and folks round there, give him money,
and he take it to buy something to share with
the boys; and isn’t that honest?”

The father owned that a pretty strong case
was made out, and he felt relieved in his mind.

If all children could give as good evidence of
honesty in those from whom they take presents
at times, as this little boy gave, and take no gifts
64 HOW DO YOU KNOW HE’S HONEST ?

unless they could do so, parents would have far
less anxiety than they now have, respecting their
children who are exposed to pernicious influence
in the public town and city schools. Such
traits of character as were described by the little
reasoner, as he plead for the honesty of his
schoolmate, are admirable in any child. Where
such good qualities meet, there is a child with
whom any parent would be giad to have his son
asssociate. No matter if he isn’t dressed as
handsome as some others. Let a boy never tell
a lie; let him never steal anywhere, in reference
to the smallest things ; and let him be obliging,
generous, and willing to work as he is able, and
I cannot but think that he must be a happy
child, a joy in his home, a gladness to his par-
ents. “Even a child is known by his doings,
whether his work be pure, and whether it be
right.” Prov. xx. 11. Can your schoolmates,
my young readers, know as good things of you
as this young reasoner knew of the doings of his
friend ?


THE SPIRIT CHILD.

BY MISS E. DOTEN.

‘*To thee, sweet Eden, how dark and sad
Are the diamond turrets of Shadukiam,
Or the fragrant bowers of Amberabad !”
PaRADIsE AND THE PERt.

Weo has not heard of Fairy-land and the
fairies? of their beautiful cities, their pleasant
groves, their moonlight revels, and their love for
little children? We love to think of such bright
and beautiful things, and feel almost sad when
we remember it is all a fancy’; but yet, there was
a child in a far eastern country, who saw fairer
and more beautiful things than were ever heard
of in Fairy-land. Her father was what is called
aparia. All the people around him worshipped
idols, but he would not, and so they drove him
from among them. He came, with his wife and
little one, to a lonely but very beautiful valley,
and there he built his cabin of bamboo, thatched
with palm-leaves, and lived contented and happy.
The child had no little playmates, and no one to
speak to but her father and mother. She was
very simple-hearted and innocent, and grew more
66 THE SPIRIT CHILD.

gentle and lovely every day she lived. The
birds and flowers seemed like brothers and sis-
ters to her; and oh! it was a strange and beau-
tiful thing to see how her heart turned towards
God, and learned to love him, before she had
ever heard his name. Wherever the children of
the Great Father dwell, and however rude and
ignorant they may seem, they all have a sense
of something higher and holier than themselves,
and a desire to love and worship. Thus did the
spirit of this dear child, as if by instinct, see
strange beauty in all things around her, and
learned to love and worship God, although she
was never taught of him. She would often wan-
der away alone ; then it seemed as if the birds
and flowers talked with her, and the bright
waters smiled at the sound of her footsteps.
She felt so very, very happy —a joy that she
could not express — that she would lay her hand
upon her heart, and say, “ What is it? oh!
what is it?” for she did not understand that
it was the holy spirit that God had given her,
that always fills the heart with love and happi-
ness, when it meets with aught of a kindred na-
ture ; and all the beautiful creations of God around
her were as pure as the spirit within; therefore,
while she held sweet communion with these, she
was happy. The inhabitants of the surrounding
THE SPIRIT CHILD. 67

country would often come to the valley to gather
fruit, and when they saw her sitting under the
palm-trees, or kneeling beside the running waters,
they would pass her by in silence, for they said,
“She sees spirits, and is talking with them ;
we will not trouble her.” Therefore they called
her the Spirit Child.

One day, as she sat alone in the cabin, weav-
ing a little basket, a stranger entered. His gar-
ments were covered with dust, and he looked
very pale and weary. He wished to rest a while,
and begged her to give him a cup of cold water.
She brought him some fruit and water, and a
mat to lie down upon. After he was somewhat
refreshed, he began to talk with her. He said
he had travelled in many countries, that he had
known much suffering, met with many hardships,
and been in great danger; but, through the
whole, he had been sustained and protected by
God, the Father and Friend of all, who had
never forsaken him.

“Where is he now?” said the simple-hearted
child, as she looked around the cabin and out of
the door ; “what made him leave you?”

The stranger smiled, and told her that “ God
is a spirit.” Then, in simple and earnest words,
he explained to her how nearly her own soul was
allied to God. He told her that she was one of
68 THE SPIRIT CHILD,

the dear children of the great Father, and all her
moments of happiness, her holy thoughts and
pure impulses, came from the spirit of God
dwelling in her own little heart. The child lis-
tened to him with large and wondering eyes.
All the strange fancies and imperfect ideas, that
had long passed through her mind, now seemed
to come into beautiful and perfect form, and she
knew now what had often made her feel so
happy. But, oh! when he told her of the bright
and beautiful heaven, where the angels dwell, it
seemed almost too much for her to understand
clearly ; she only knew that she longed to go
there, and when the stranger left her, she sat
like one in a dream, wondering how she might
get to heaven.

The valley where she dwelt was surrounded
by mountains, some of which seemed to touch
the clouds, and the child thought if she could
only reach the top of one of these, she might
go directly into heaven, or, at least, hear the
sweet singing of the angels. She resolved, in
all the simplicity of her heart, not to say a word
to her father and mother, but the next morning
she would begin early to climb up the mountain.
She could scarcely sleep that night, her mind
was so wholly filled with this idea.

The next morning, at the first peep of day, she
THE SPIRIT CHILD. 69

sprang from her bed, and opened the door of the
cottage. But, alas! the rain fell in torrents, and
the heart of the child became very sad. Before
long the rain ceased, the sun came forth, and
high up in the heavens shone a beautiful rain-
bow. “Oh!” exclaimed the child, as she
gazed at it in wonder and admiration, “ what a
bright thing the Father has placed for me to come
up tohim on. I will go quickly; but first I will
gather some roses for little Zillah. I used to
play with her a long time ago, but she died and
is in heaven now. Fairer and sweeter roses
grow there, but she will be so glad to think that
I remember her. Far away, where the water
falls over the great rock, stands the end of this
beautiful arch; I shall reach it soon, and then
how gladly shall I go up to that blessed heaven
the good stranger told me of!” She gathered a
few half-blown roses, and hastened forward. So
earnest was she, and sure she should find where
the rainbow stood by the great rock, that she did
not once think to look up to the clouds; but
when she reached the wished-for spot, there was
no rainbow, or the least shadow of one, to be
seen, and above her wasa dark, frowning cloud.

Weary and disheartened, she sank down and
covered her face with her hands. Scarcely had
she done so, when she heard a soft, low voice say

6*
70 THE SPIRIT CHILD.

to her, “ Dear child, unto thee it is given to enter
into the kingdom of heaven. Ask and thou shalt
receive, seek and thou shalt find, knock and it
slfall be opened unto thee. The pure in heart
shall see God.”

The child raised not her head; she sat still
and motionless, but her spirit seemed to rise up
like a joyous bird in the clear sunlight. The
mists that lay around her slowly gathered them-
selves up and rolled away, as the soft air, moving
to the melody of the golden harps, gathered
around her in a bright silvery garment; and, lo!
she stood beneath the tree of life, that grows
beside the crystal stream, that runneth from the
throne of God, in the midst of the holy city.
The odors of Eden fell sweetly around her ; the
loving angels looked kindly upon her, while, by
her side stood the blessed Lord Jesus, of whom
the stranger had spoken.

“Dear lamb of my flock,” he said, ‘“ what
wouldst thou?” ‘“ Lord, that I may become more
like thee,” said the gentle-hearted child. “ Even
thus shall it be,” he answered ; “the Father hath
sent thee into the world to do his will. Thou
must bear the bread and water of life to the
hungry and thirsting souls around thee. Thou
must become eyes to the blind, ears to the deaf,
feet to the lame, and joy to the despairing.
THE SPIRIT CHILD. 71

Patient in sorrow, perfect in meekness, trusting
in God. By doing this shalt thou assimilate
thyself to me, heaven shall ever lie around thee,
and God shall dwell in thy heart.” Reverently
did the child kneel down at his feet, and clasp-
ing her hands, in all earnestness of spirit she
said, “I am ready to do the Father’s will, even
unto death.” Asshe uttered these words, a soft,
warm air, sweeter than the breath of roses,
seemed to rest upon her brow. Sensibly and per-
ceptibly came the presence of the Great Spirit
Father. She felt that he was near her, around
her, in her heart. There was joy among the an-
gels,and a song of praise was on every lip, for the
mighty hosts of cherubim and seraphim seemed
to be moved as one, by the all-pervading presence
of God. As if a new life and strength had been
given unto her, the child rose up. “Now am I
able to do all things,” she said, “since the Father
hath entered into my heart; and while his spirit
shall abide with me, I fail not, I faint not. I leave
you, bright angels, to do whatever I can of good
in the earth, and when my mission is ended, 1
shall come and dwell with you forever and ever.
Dear Father, strengthen me against temptation,
and deliver me from evil, and I shall yet do thy
will upon the earth, as it is done in heaven!”
Then, as if borne on the wings of a dove, she
72 THE SPIRIT CHILD.

floated away through the pure air, while the
music of the crystal waters, and the sweet voices
of the angels, seemed to follow after her to cheer
her onward in her mission ; and when she raised
her head, and found herself still sitting by the
great rock, in the shade of the palm tree, that
melody was still in her heart. But this was not
a dream —n0o, it was not a dream ; neither was the
child carried up bodily, beyond the sun and stars,
into an outward and visible creation ; but, when
she came with a spirit yearning after the holy
and beautiful, to seek for the rainbow, that she
might enter into the immediate presence of God,
and found it not, she heard the voice of the
Father calling her out of the depths of her heart,
to enter into that “kingdom of heaven” which
the Lord Jesus hath said 1s within us; and as she
held communion with the high and holy thoughts
that came to her like the voices of angels, she
received more of the spirit of all good, and thus
she became strengthened for the duties of life.
There is an Eden of quietness and beauty in
every gentle heart, that truly loves the Father,
and strives to do his will. It is more peaceful
than the land of dreams, more beautiful than
the regions of fancy. There come the pitying
and consoling angels, to minister unto us in our
hours of trial and temptation, and there dweils
THE SPIRIT CHILD. 73

the Spirit of the Great Father. , Oh, could we
oftener enter into this holy place, and when we
say “Our Father who art in heaven,” instead
of looking up to the blue ether, and the material
worlds above us, we could enter more truly into
this “ kingdom within” us, then would we never
wish to grieve away the blessed spirits that dwell
there, by our sin and unthankfulness. Not only
would there be a heaven within us, but around
us, and heart joining with heart, love would no
longer become worn and wearied by unkindness,
and auger and resentment would become only
words to express things that were.


THE COMPLAINT.

BY MRS. N. T. MUNROE.

Tuerk is no sign of clearing,
The sky is dark and gray,

And faster now ’t is raining
Than it has rained to-day. ,

All yesterday was gloomy,
To-day is worse by far ;

T fairly long to see the sun,
Or e’en a single star.

But this continual dropping
Is death to schemes of mine ;
The sun is surely crossing
The equinoctial line.

I wish it could have put it off,
Or crossed with better grace ;

I’m sure I do not see the use
Of such a cloudy face.

Some other time I should have liked
This long-continued rain,

But now I surely must confess
It gives less joy than pain.
THE COMPLAINT. 76

I ofttimes like a rainy day,
Or even two together ;

But now, I did not calculate
Upon this gloomy weather.

‘There is no sign of clearing,
The wind is out dead east ;

I know, I ’m sure, that it will rain
A week or so, at least.


HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

BY CHARLES W. SWASEY.

Tue song of the nightingale is not so musical
as the artless prattle of a happy child; and his
rosy cheeks and glowing countenance are more
lovely to gaze upon than the most beautiful
flowers of the garden. But children are not
always happy, and principally because they do
not always OBEY THEIR PARENTS. This is the
secret of many of their little crosses and vexa-
tions, and, indeed, of many of the greater mis-
fortunes of life. While, on the other hand,
those children who are obedient to their parents
in all things, generally grow up to be good men
and women. To illustrate this obvious, but im-
portant truth, we will tell our little readers a story
about the misfortunes of a lad who would not
mind his parents, and another about the good
fortunes of a boy who loved his father and his
mother, and was always ready to do their bidding.

Some thirty or forty years ago, there lived in
Frampton, in the county of Lincolnshire, Eng-
Jand, a lad named Wittiam L——n. He
HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 77

was the son of a farmer, and was at an early
age sent to the Sunday school, where he imbibed
a respect for the name and character of the Su-
preme Being, which, in after life, served to re-
strain him from crimes that he might otherwise
have committed. But he was indolent in his
studies, and excessively fond of amusement,
which often involved him in trouble, and ren-
dered him,amenable to the laws of the land,
besides subjecting him to his father’s displeasure.
His amusements were principally those of rob-
bing gardens and orchards, trapping game, and
hunting birds’ nests. To this last named evil
he was so much addicted as frequently to expose
himself to the most imminent danger of breaking
his limbs and losing his life; and he suffered
severely by climbing into thorn-hedges in pursuit
of his object, besides sometimes wearing his
clothes in rags.

I wish my young readers to remember that
William L n indulged these mischievous
propensities, as often and as far as circumstances
would permit, in defiance of the strictest in-
junctions of his parents to the contrary. Had
he obeyed them, and refrained from his sinful
pursuits, he would have escaped the censure and
severe punishment which he often received as
the consequence of his offences. These were

7


78 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

numerous, but we will not stop now to mention
them. Suffice it to say, that he became a
source of painful uneasiness to his parents, who
deemed it necessary to put him out to service, hop-
ing that the instructions of experience would make
him a better boy. He was, accordingly, sent to
live with a respectable farmer some twelve miles
from his home; but his master, not needing him
as a servant, William soon left and xeturned to
his father’s house.

William was again put out to live, ata greater
distance from home; but his master was a pas-
sionate man, and would censure him for the
slightest offence. He became dissatisfied with his
treatment, bv; darcd not utter a complaint. He
thought of home, yet feared to return there, for
he had offended his parents by his unruly con-
duct. Still he determined to leave this unpleasant
place of service, and seek employment elsewhere.
He engaged himself as a groom or horse-keeper,
to the landlord of a tavern; but here, as in the
former case, his employer proved to be an ill-
tempered and fault-finding man, so much so that
his servants never remained long in his employ.
William’s condition was now but little better than
that of a slave. Among his other toils, he was
obliged, on every Sabbath day, to take a horse to
a clergyman, four miles distant, and return on foot
HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPy,. 79

before breakfast; and in the evening to go on
foot and bring it back again. Besides this, his
food was unwholesome, consisting of a little meat
half boiled, and bread made of the coarsest ma-
terials, scantily baked, and full of coals. His
father, learning of his situation, sent to relieve
his wants and urge him to return home; but,
needy as he was, he was proof against both the
kindness of his friends, and the love of his par-
ents; and instead of obeying their request, he
went to work as a day-laborer in the outskirts of
the town. He remained in this occupation for
some time, but wages being low, and labor
scarce, it was with difficulty he procured a
scanty subsistence, which induced him to leave
the place and offer himself as a soldier. He
accordingly went to Horncastle, and requested
to be joined to the 2d regiment of Rifle Guards,
but was objected to as being too short. Deter-
mined not to be disappointed, he left this place
and went to Lincoln, where he offered himself a
second time, and was rejected on the same
ground as before, because he was not sufficiently
tall.

These repeated disappointments robbed Wil-
liam of his spirits, and made him the victim of
despondency ; hope forsook his bosom, and pros-
perity refused to smile upon him. In the lan-
80 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

guage of the prodigal son, he said, “I will arise
and go to my father.” The next Sabbath he
reached his home, where his parents received
him with joy and kindness, and his sorrows and
his wanderings were forgotten ; and had he con-
tinued to obey their loving counsel and advice,
many of his subsequent sufferings would have
been avoided. But, on the succeeding summer
he entered the employ of a gentleman in a neigh-
boring town, where his hard fortune followed
him. His master was passionate and cruel, and
twice whipped him most unjustly. He left;
but instead of going to his home, as he should
have done, he went to the town of Stamford, in
company witha dissolute youth, to gratify whose
intemperance he was obliged to sell his watch,
and expend his last shilling. William then aban-
doned this ungrateful companion, and again
offered himself as a soldier, but without success.
He was now without money, and compelled to
sell a portion of the clothing which he wore to
procure food to satisfy his hunger. He wandered
from place to place, with little to eat, with noth-
ing to do, and sometimes obliged to beg for food,
or starve Once more, and it proved for the last
time, he resolved to seek the shelter of his child-
hood’s home, where he arrived on the Sabbath
day. He had previously engaged himself to
HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 81

work with a gentleman in a town some miles
distant from Stamford, and returned the follow-
ing day, Monday, to fulfil his engagement. His
mother accompanied him as far as Boston, a town
adjoining his native village, where she purchased
him a suit of clothes. She then retired with
him to the solitude of the graveyard, and there
imprinted the last warm kiss of affection upon
his burning cheek — there took the last fond em-
brace of her wayward child —and there uttered
her last endearing words, — “ Farewell, my son,
be a good boy!”

William had lived at his new place but six
weeks, when his master called him one morning,
gave him one shilling, and dismissed him from
his employ. With this one shilling in his pocket
he left for Lincoln, where he sold such articles
of clothing as he could spare, to obtain means to
travel with. He vainly solicited employment in
several towns, until at last he was driven, by im-
perious necessity, to enlist as a soldier. After a
number of unsuccessful attempts, he succeeded in
joining a rifle regiment, stationed at Montreal,
on the river St. Lawrence, in Canada East.
Thus, on the 6th day of December, 1820, at the
age of only 15 years, William L——n enlisted
for life, as a soldier in the British service.

It would be interesting to my young readers to

7k


$2 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

enter into a detail of the hardships and sufferings
of a British soldier's life, at the time of which I
am speaking ; but I have not time to do this, and
can only tell you that they were subjected toa
round of unceasing toil, and never permitted to go
beyond the sound of the drum. Martial laws were
very strict, and the punishment for their infringe-
ment very severe. If a soldier was found guilty
of stealing, he was punished with three hundred
lashes upon the bare back ; and for some crimes the
unfortunate victims were doomed to receive seven
hundred lashes! These punishments generally
disabled the culprit for weeks or months, and
sometimes caused death. William, however,
was so fortunate as to escape the martial whip,
though he endured many other hardships, such
as hunger, fatigue, cold, &c.

Let us now follow our young hero across the
broad Atlantic, until he arrives in Montreal, on
the American continent. Here he was duly
joined to his regiment, and here he renewed and
continued his life of toil and suffering. Seeing no
reason to hope that his condition would ever be
more tolerable, in about two years he conceived
the design of deserting his regiment and running
away tothe United States. To effect this design,
he stole a horse from one of the officers, and
a small sum of money to obtain food on the
HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 83

way ; and on a cold night in the month of Feb-.
ruary, thinly clad, and without an outer gar-
ment, he commenced his escape on horseback.
The cold was so intense that he froze his hands
and feet, and, after travelling forty miles, he put
up at a tavern, and called for some refreshments.
While at this tavern, the landlord suspected him
of being a deserter, took effectual steps to ascer-
tain the fact, and reported him to his officers.
To us it seems cruel that the landlord should
have done this; but he was an unfeeling man,
and betrayed the young soldier because he should
receive for it the sum of thirty dollars, which the
British army then paid for the detection of de-
serters. William was now conveyed back to
Montreal, where he was tried for the crimes of
desertion and theft, and condemned to die. The
jury, however, recommended him to mercy, and
after lying in prison a few weeks, bound in irons,
the governor was prevailed upon to remit the
sentence of death, and to consign him to five
years’ hard labor in the jail at Quebec. And
here, immured within the massive walls of a cold
and cheerless prison, compelled to subsist on
coarse and scanty food, and to pick thirty pounds
of oakum per week, we will take leave of our
young and unfortunate hero.

I have said that William was “ unfortunate ;”
84 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

but have my young readers reflected that the
cause of all his misfortunes was disobedience to
his parents’ commands when a boy and living
at home? Such is the fact; and the story of his
sufferings I trust you will all remember, and be
warned by them to shun the example of his early
youth.

The other story which I promised to relate, is
of one whose name is familiar to every child.

At the age of fourteen years, Gzorce Wasu-
iNcTON felt a very strong desire to follow the sea,
and accordingly obtained a warrant as midship-
maa in the British navy. His then widowed
mother was grieved at the thought of parting
with her loved and only son, and entreated him
to relinquish his design and remain with her.
George was a good boy; he could not think
of acting contrary to his mother’s wishes, and,
therefore, resigned his commission, in obedience
to her request. ‘This act of duty,” says one of
his biographers, “ prepared the way for that
brilliant career of greatness which ended in free-
ing a nation, and earning for him the noblest of
all titles, that of ‘ Father of his Country.” Had
George Washington been a wilful and disobedient
boy, he would have entered the service of the Brit-
ish navy, despite the entreaties of his mother ; and
HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 85

then, instead of immortalizing his name and his

memory, by the greatness and the goodness of his

after life, and being the chief instrument, in the

hands of God, of freeing this now great and happy

country from British oppression, he would in all

probability have fought against our liberties, and

perhaps have died unhonored in a foreign land.

But now, ‘there is no speech nor language”

where the name of WasuineTon is not repeated
with reverence and respect. He is everywhere
regarded as a model of human greatness; and
no higher aspiration can-be cherished than to be
like Washington, the political saviour of his
country, unless we except a sincere desire to be
like Jesus, the spiritual Saviour of the world.
The secret of his greatness was his goodness,
and the secret of his goodness was filial obedi-
ence to his parents in his childhood, to his wid-
owed mother in his boyhood, and to his God in
manhood. On the 14th day of December, 1799,
at the age of 67 years, this good man died, and
was buried near his residence at Mount Vernon,
deeply mourned by millions of grateful and lov-
ing people. Should any of my young readers
ever be so happy as to visit the “Grave of
Washington,” I hope they will remember and
there repeat the following beautiful lines, written
by Marshall S. Pike :
86 HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY.

‘* Disturb not his slun.bers ! let WasHINGTON sleep
*Neath the boughs of the willow that over him weep
His arm is unnerved, but his deeds remain bright

As the stars in the dark-vaulted heaven at night.

Oh! wake not the hero ; his battles are o’er;

Let him sleep undisturbed on Potomac’s fair shore ;
On the river's green border, so flow’ry dressed,

With the hearts he loved fondly, let Washington rest.

Awake not his slumbers ! tread lightly around !

*T is the grave of a freeman, ’tis Liberty’s mound!
‘Thy name is immortal — our Freedom it won —
Brave sire of Columbia, our own Wasuincton !

Oh! wake not the hero; his battles are o’er ;

Let him sleep, calmly sleep, on his dear native shore,
While the stars and the stripes of our country shall wave
O’er the land that can boast of a WasHINGTOoN’s grave.”

How lovely, how beautiful is this portrait of
Washington! ‘There are no stains to mar its
beauty, no shades of evil to dim its brightness.
Every feature is stamped with a dignity, and a
veneration which command our deepest respect.
And does it not induce a desire in my younz
readers to be like Washington — great, and good,
and beloved? The first step to be taken, then,
is to obey your parents, who love and care for
you so tenderly. Ancient history tells us of a
king who made a law against a certain crime, in
which it was enacted that the offender should be
punished with the loss of both eyes. The very
HOW CHILDREN MAY BE HAPPY. 87 |

first transgressor was the king’s own son. The
case was a distressing one, for the king was an
affectionate father, as well as a just magistrate.
After much painful reflection, the king com-
manded one of hisown eyes to be pulled out, and
one of his son’s. Here you see demonstrated the
power of parental love. To have taken both the
eyes of his son, would have rendered him blind
forever ; but, rather than bring upon him so great
a misfortune, and yet, to enforce the demands of
his own law, the king chose to share his son’s
distress. This was an act of affection which
none but a parent could perform. If, then, they
love you so tenderly, is it too much that you
should follow their direction and advice while
young, and unable to act wisely for yourselves ?


ELLEN GRANT,
THE DRUNKARD'S DAUGHTER.

BY MRS. MARY A. LIVERMORE.

Few children pass through as much trial and
sorrow as did Ellen Grant, during the first
twelve or fifteen years of her life. Few are as
heavily pressed with care as she was, or have
as many and as arduous duties to perform.
And yet few, with age and experience twice her
own, would have been more faithful in their dis-
charge, more uncomplaining, or more devoted.
Allow me, young readers, to narrate to you her
history, which, I assure you, is not fiction, but
with the exception of a few unimportant altera-
tions, is wholly true.

Ellen Grant and het young brother and sister
were so unfortunate as to have an intemperate
father. When not under the influence of ardent
spirits, Mr. Grant was a kind, industrious man,
and loved his little family, and sought to provide
for their wants — but when intoxicated, he was
unfeeling, indolent, and an object of fear. Mrs,


ELLEN GRANT.
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ELLEN GRANT. 91

Grant, the poor wife, was in feeble health, and
was compelled to toil so hard to assist in main-
taining the family, that every year found her
paler, thinner and weaker. Had her husband
been a man of sober, industrious habits, her
labor would have been comparatively easy ; for
then good food and clothing would have been
furnished for herself and little ones, and her
household duties would have been so lightened
by the careful, dutiful Ellen, as to have rendered
them very slight. But the wages earned by Mr.
Grant were chiefly squandered at the bar-room,
and in the dram-shop, and Mrs. Grant, feeble as
she was, was therefore obliged to go out among the
families of the town, to wash, iron, clean house,
or sew, as she was needed, leaving Ellen to
attend to affairs at home.

The family were necessarily poor and desti-
tute. Their food was coarse and scanty, their
clothing poor, and insufficient to keep them com-
fortable in the cold weather, while their dwelling,
a rough, old house, unfit to live in, was meanly
furnished. Not only did they suffer from pov-
erty, from cold and hunger, but they endured
much from Mr. Grant’s unkindness, when fren-
zied with liquor. Many an undeserved blow did
little Ellen, and her brother and sister, Susy and
Freddy, receive from the heavy hand of their bru-
82 ELLEN GRANT.

tal father; blows, whose dark marks were left
upon the tender flesh for weeks afterwards.
Even the pale-faced suffering wife, a slender,
broken-spirited woman, was sometimes confined
to her bed for days, by her husband’s ill treat-
ment.

Yet no word of complaint ever came from
their lips; no one ever heard them speak unkindly
or harshly of their drunken husband and father ;
and despite his ill-usage, both wife and children
dealt with him kindly. A sadness seemed
always to rest upon them, and tears might often
be seen in the eyes of Mrs. Grant and Ellen,
who, being older, realized more their wretched-
ness than the other children — but reproaches of
him who caused all their trouble were never
heard.

Hard labor, trouble, and anxiety, wore more
and more upon Mrs. Grant’s delicate constitution,
until she became reduced almost to a shadow,
and those who saw her, predicted that she would
soon depart from her cares and trials forever.
One morning, when Ellen was a little more than
ten years old, her mother rose as usual, to go
about her daily labor, but, as Ellen observed, with
a paler face, and more weakness than ever.
The dutiful child, ever awake to the cares and
sorrows of her feeble parent, assisted her as far
ELLEN GRANT. 93

as she could; but when she entered the rough,
ill-furnished apartment with a handful of sticks
she had gathered for the fire, she found her poor
mother extended upon the floor, apparently
lifeless.

Ellen did not scream, or run off for the neigh-
bors, leaving her mother alone, as many children
would, but opening the door that the fresh air
might come to her mother, and spreading
over her a blanket to prevent her taking cold,
she mingled camphor and water in a cup, and
tried to force some of it into the sufferer’s mouth.
This had not the desired effect ; and bringing a
piggin of cold water, she sat down upon a block
of wood, which answered the purpose of a stool,
and lifting her mother’s head into her lap, she
bathed her temples and forehead, and moistened
her pale lips until signs of life returned.

By this time, Susy, whom Ellen had despatched
for aid, returned with one or two kind women,
who summoned the doctor. He attended her for
a few days, but he could do her no good; and
ere a fortnight passed away, the poor children
were motherless. It was a sad, sad time for
them; she who had loved them dearly, and
whom they had loved, who had folded them to
her heart, and wept over them, was hidden from
their sight in the grave; and as the poor little
94 ELLEN GRANT.

creatures gathered closely together, and wept in
one another’s arms, they felt lonely indeed. Poor
Ellen was the most to be pitied; she was the
eldest, and realized their wretched situation, and
being very sensitive, it cut her to the heart.

The town’s people were now very desirous to
remove the children from their father’s tyranny
and bad example, and places would have been
provided for them in good families ; but Ellen
wept so bitterly when it was proposed to separate
Susy and Freddy and herself, and Mr. Grant
raved so fiercely at the proposal, that it was
abandoned. Ellen, young as she was, immedi-
ately stepped into her mother’s place, and dis-
charged her duties. She cooked the food, made,
repaired, and washed the clothing, kept the house
neat and tidy, and besides this, found time to
braid palm-leaf hats for the hat and bonnet man-
ufactory in the town, and to teach Freddy and
Susy to do the same, by which they earned a
small sum each week.

During the winter and summer months, when
only a school was taught in the town, Susy and
Freddy were regularly sent to school, and Ellen
herself, in the midst of all her cares, contrived
to pass an hour or two each day in the school-
room, which the teacher kindly sought to make
as profitable to her as possible. Every one
ELLEN GRANT. 95

praised the good girl’s industry and thoughtful-
ness, and every one also pitied her that she
should be debarred from all the joys of her age,
and be oppressed with care. Yet few girls would
have been as happy as she, severely as she la-
bored, if her father had béen a temperate man.

One — two — three — four years passed away,
and Mr. Grant became worse instead of better.
Every year he brought less and less of his earnings
to his family, and often came home at night so furi-
ous, that the children were obliged to flee for their
lives. Hard words and harder blows were con-
stantly dealt out to them by the unnatural father;
and yet the children, when questioned about the
bruises they bore on their arms, faces, and necks,
would always evade a direct answer, and simply
say “they had got hurt.”

Ellen was too sensitive to be willing that all
her father’s excesses should be known, and when
they had suffered the most from his cruelty, and
were weeping from the pain he had inflicted,
she would enjoin secrecy upon her brother and
sister, and charge them “not to tell anybody
about it.” Butoh, how the poor child thought of
her dead mother, and sometimes longed to lie down
beside her! Howshe wept day and night, her eyes
raining tears, tears, tears, all the time! How sad,
how very sad, grew her face, the tone of her

8*
96 ELLEN GRANT.

voice, and even her manners! , Everybody said
“ Poor Ellen Grant!” but no one seemed able to
relieve her. Her father would not reform, nor
would he suffer his family to be broken up—
and what could be done?

But about a year ago, a severe sickness came
upon the drunken father, which confined him to
his bed for many weeks, and so reduced him,
that no one expected his recovery. The physi-
cian came to see him, and some of the people of
the town, but, except his children, few hoped that
he would get well; they thought it would be a
blessing to his family if he did not live.

But his good child, his dutiful Ellen, hung
over him as if he were the best of fathers; she
bathed his swollen and painful limbs, cooled his
fevered brow, and spake kindly and gently to
him, even when he raved at, and cursed her.
But, by and by, the dreadful pain which
racked him was stilled; and then, as he lay
helpless in bed, he noticed his excellent child’s
industry, patience and forbearance, her gentle
attendance upon him, and her habitual sadness.
Every day he saw her going through a round of
duties, which would have fatigued an experienced
person, half a dozen years older, economizing,
laboring, guiding and advising Freddy and Susy
as a mother would, and attending to his wants
ELLEN GRANT. 97

like a skilful nurse —and this, when she was but
fourteen years old.

He was a kind-hearted man, as I have told
you, when not intoxicated, and one day, as her
pale, sad face was bending over his pillow, while
her hands gently bathed his brow, and smoothed
his tangled hair, a tear sprang to his eye, and
he said gently and tenderly, —

“Ellen, you are a good girl, and when I get
out again, I’ll buy you a handsome present.”

“Oh, no, father!” said Ellen sadly ; “I don’t
want any present; no, father, I’d rather —” and
she stopped, and her lips quivered.

“ Well, what, Ellen?” asked Mr. Grant;
“what were you going to say? Speak out.”

Looking into his face, and seeing the kind-
ness that beamed there, Ellen threw her arm
over her father, and burying her face in his
bosom, sobbed out, “ Don’t be angry, father, don't
be angry; but oh, I’d rather you’d sign the
pledge! That would make us all so happy!”
and the bed shook with heremotion. Mr. Grant
lifted her pale face to the pillow beside his own;
the tears of both father and child mingled
together. He pressed a kiss on her wan cheek
—the first he had bestowed on her for years —
but he said not a word. A few moments, and
Ellen lifted her head from the pillow, and left the
98 ELLEN GRANT.

room, to relieve her heart by a yet more copious
flood of tears.

That afternoon, when Susy and Freddy came
from school, he called the former to his bedside,
and in a low tone said, “ Susy, I want you to
go to Mr. Comstock’s, and ask him to come
up here this evening. Tell him to bring the
pledge with him.”

Now my young readers must know that Mr.
Comstock was President of the Total Abstinence
Society, and that he had often vainly endeavored
to get Mr. Grant’s name on the pledge. No
wonder, then, that Susy stared at her father as
though she thought him crazy, and that he was
obliged to repeat his request a second time.
Then, when she comprehended her father’s wish,
she bounded from the room like a wild fawn,
treading on pussy, who was asleep on the floor,
overturning a chair, and tearing her dress on a
nail which caught it, and actually jumping up
and down for joy as she communicated the news
to Ellen and Freddy. Freddy jumped up a good
way from the ground, and gave a loud “ hurrah !”
boy-fashion, and then away they scampered to
Mr. Comstock’s, hatless and bonnetless, outstrip-
ping horses and wagons in their joyful speed.
Ellen, poor child! who was left behind, burst
out afresh, and was weeping when the little
ones returned.
ELLEN GRANT. 99

Mr. Comstock came up, as desired, and Mr.
Grant, trembling with weakness, wrote his name
underneath the pledge. Oh, how happy were his
children! Susy climbed up on the bed to kiss
him, Ellen wept, and then laughed through her
tears, and Freddy flew round the room like a
spinning top, longing to “hurrah!” again,
catching up poor pussy, hugging Ellen round
the waist, and performing various other antics.

It is a year, nearly, since then, and Mr. Grant
has not broken his pledge ; and we now think the
reformation will be a lasting one. His family now
are comfortable, and happy ; and instead of fear-
ing their father, they love him. They have now
the comforts of life; they have better food, better
clothing, and better furniture, in their house.
Mr. Grant says every day that he is as happy
a man as there is in town, and that for his
reformation, and his present happiness, he has
to thank his good child, his excellent daughter,
Ellen.


CHILDREN IN TRADE.

BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

“Here, little boy ; I want to see you a min-
ute,” said a boy of ten years to a little boy of a
group of three. The boy to whom he spoke had
a tin whistle, a bird-call, enjoying its shrill
sound; and when the large boy called, he
took it from his mouth and went towards the
other.

“ What will you take for that? —I ‘ll give you
this,” said the large boy, taking something from
his own mouth.

“ Whatis it ?” said the little fellow.

“Pitch; pitch to chew,” said the crafty boy.

The articles were exchanged. A little boy
who was playing in a wagon near the boys, as if
he discovered the deception, began to cry out,
—“ Burgundy pitch! Burgundy pitch!” His
friendly caution was not understood. The large
boy walked away, well pleased with his bargain,
and the little one broke a piece for each of his
companions, and began to chew his own.
CHILDREN IN TRADE. 101

“Tt is bitter,” said he ; “I don’t like it; I don’t
want it.” He turned to look after the crafty big
boy, and walked on in silent sadness.

“ Are you sorry you traded?” said one of his
companions.

“Yes,Iam. Ihave lost my whistle, and got
nothing for it.”

Another large boy came up to the little trader,
and asked him what he had.

“Pitch,” said one of the boys.

“Where did you get it ?”

“T gave a bird-call to John Blake for it.”

“John Blake is a rascal to take it from you.
You have got cheated, Alfie. Be careful how
you trade with large boys,” said Alfred’s friend.

“T hope I never shall trade with a cheat
again,” said Alfred.

But alas! the world is full of cheats. There
are very many poor Alfreds in the mercantile
world, and crafty John Blake watches at many a
corner, to entrap the unsuspecting. When a
simple-minded young trader offers himself, the
deceiver cries —‘“ Here, young man; I want to
see youa minute.” The witnesses anxiously cry
out, “ Burgundy pitch! Burgundy pitch!” but it
avails nothing; for a novice in trade, or an hon-
est-hearted youth, believes all as innocent as him-
self, and he makes a bargain of which he repents
102 CHILDREN IN TRADE.

He looks round for the old merchant, but it is too
late; he is gone. His friends tell him, what he
feels keenly enough already, that he has been
cheated; and he hopes, in his pure heart, that
he “never shall trade with a cheat again.”

There need not be —should not be, more of
craft, or fraud, or deception, or double-dealing,
in the commercial world than in any other de-
partment of business. But we are forced to
believe that a lie in trade is not considered
a departure from veracity, and that many re-
gard it as absolutely necessary to use some de-
ceit. How lamentable that such a state of things
exists !

The world is full of cheats. But where do
they come from? Ohio? Texas? Delaware, or
Maine? The Irish tell us in what county, “at
home.” their deceitful countrymen live ; where
the bold-faced liar comes from, and where the
licentious live ; but we will not go from our own
state to accuse the citizens of another. Let
us look at home, and cure the evil here.

Little children begin very early to deceive.
They make bargains, and by unfair words, and
even untrue ones, defraud one another. The
love of truth is not deep seated in their hearts.
The conscience is not kept sensitive to the least
deviation from strictest truth. They often act a
CHILDREN IN TRADE. 103

lie, and think it no harm. Let our young friends
take heed. Truthistruth. Less than the-whole
truth is not honest before God, and is worth but
little. Defile not your pure lips and hearts by
the dishonest word or dishonest thought.

9


THE CHRISTIAN’S REWARD.
BY JAMES LUMBARD.

Tuer is a glory which the warrior longs
To win, as to the battle-field he goes,
Where war's red banner floats above the throngs
Who meet, and perish mid convulsive throes ;
That glory may be his ; but it will die
As lightnings fade along the darkened sky.

There is a fame for which the statesman’s soul
Toils earnestly through years of anxious though*
Until at length away the shadows roll,
And all is his for which he long has wrought ;
But ah! how soon the hearts that he could thrill,
Are gathered to the charnel, cold and chill !

The poet sighs for honor and renown,

And fain would earn a never-dying name ;
And though he live to see the laurel crown

Placed on his brow, and hear the trump of fame
Yet, when a few short, changeful years are gone,
Where is the crown that once so brightly shone ?

The artist has such bright angelic dreams,
As fill his spirit with a strange delight,
And years of toil may bring a few faint gleams
Of what is real to his wistful sight ;
But all the brightness of his dreams shall fade
When time has mouldered what his hands have made
THE CHRISTIAN’S REWARD. 105

There is a glory that shall never die,

A glory that is not of mortal birth ;
{ts fountain is beyond the azure sky,

And yet it may be seen by those on earth ;
And if they taste it while sojourning here,
It gives them glimpses of a higher sphere.

It is for this the Christian nerves his heart,
And meets with calmness every ill and strife ;
It is for this he nobly acts the part
Assigned him in the changing scene of life.
It sheds a halo round him while he lives,
And when he dies a holier radiance gives.

And when admitted to that sinless sphere,
Which needeth not the brightness of the sun,

He sees with vision all undimmed and clear,
And finds existence has but just begun ;

And as the years of the Eternal move,

He grows in knowledge, blessedness and love!


NATURE HATH VOICES, AND
SPEAKETH WISDOM.

REV. L. J. FLETCHER.

“Come, Henry,” said Mrs. Elwin to her son,
a lad of twelve summers, whose mind had already
attained a singular maturity, beneath the genial
influences of an intelligent and devoted mother’s
care and culture; “come with me, and let us
have our morning walk, and read our morning
lesson.”

Henry needed but one invitation, and was
quickly prepared to accompany his mother ; for
he loved the sweet breath of morning upon the
hill-tops, and within the groves, where nature’s
songsters breathed their early orisons of praise
to God; and his soul was thirsting for new and
deeper draughts at the fountain of wisdom.
Nothing could satisfy that thirst like a morning
ramble, and a chat with nature, as he used to
say, could he but have his mother for a compan-
ion and interpreter.

The morning was beautiful, and hand in hand,
talking of many wonders which they saw around
NATURE HATH VOICES. 107

them, they soon were standing upon the sum-
mit ofa hill which they often visited, watching
the rising sun. Its prophecy had been upon the
sky since first they started from their home, and
now its orbed face of golden radiance arose
above the distant mountains, pouring a flood of
welcome light upon the joyful world.

“Sit down, my son,” said Mrs. Elwin, “ and
let us listen to a sermon from Nature’s greatest
preacher. Yonder rising orb has taught me
many great and thrilling lessons, and now, as he
comes forth in renewed brightness and beauty,
he will discourse most eloquently of truths we
all should learn.”

Henry was not surprised at this request, for
he had learned to talk with nature, until her
voice was quite familiar to his ear; and he sat
with eager joy to listen. For a few moments all
was silent; but when the mind was withdrawn
from all things else, the sun addressed them thus:

“ Mortals, my ways contemplate! I am an
emblem of the power that all things made; God
is my Creator. Like as his love distils impar-
tially on all, I send my rays of light and heat
upon surrounding worlds. I change not. I ask
not if those who bask in my reviving beams are
worthy to receive them; but upon the high and
low, the rich and poor, the bond and free, the

g*
108 NATURE HATH VOICES.

evil and the good, I shine the same. The world
is rolling round me, and every day some parts of
it are lost in darkness, and men do say of me,
‘The sun has set ;’ but set I never do. I shine the
same at all times ; and the cause of darkness on
the earth is that it daily turns away from me.

‘“‘ Learn, mortals, then, this lesson. Be constant
in the work by you to be performed, as I in mine.
And as ye see one sun to light the natural
world, remember in the moral there is the same.
Jesus in that, as I in this, doth shine. His rays
of gospel truth impartial are ; and if men live in
darkness, ’t is but because they, like the earth,
have turned away from light.

‘“‘ Then turn towards the Saviour ; welcome the
cheering light which shines from him upon the
world, and guided by its rays, pass quietly along
the sea of life until you land within the port of
everlasting peace, and take your harps of gold to
sing redemption’s song.”

Henry sprang upon his feet, and as he grasped
his mother’s hand in silence, an inexpressible
joy beamed from his countenance, and his heart
was full of the most gladsome emotions.

“That,” said he, after a moment’s thoughtful
silence, “that, dear mother, was the most en-
chanting sermon that I ever heard. How full of
instruction! how full of tenderness and love!
NATURE HATH VOICES. 109

O, I could sit forever and listen to such words as
those. Let us wait still longer, mother, for
should he speak again, I would not fail to treas-
ure up the wisdom of his teachings.”

Mrs. Elwin had listened with the deepest in-
terest to all the sun had spoken, and her heart
was not less joyful than that of her child; but
she knew what he had never learned to realize,
viz., that a short sermon, treasured up in faithful
remembrance, was of more value than longer
sermons half forgotten; she therefore turned
toward their home again, saying, “‘ Remember,
Henry, what you have already heard, and con-
sider it faithfully — we then will come and listen
to other lessons which the sun is daily speaking.
Meanwhile, ponder diligently the doctrine of
this morning lesson, and learn therefrom that
God is not a partial being, but loves his children
all alike, and blesses all with equal blessings.”

“ Mother,” said Henry, as they walked towards
their happy home, for such it was to all its in-
mates, “is not the moon a preacher also? Can
we not learn of that, som@ lessons of instruc-
tion?”

“ Yes,” said Mrs. Elwin; “there is not an
object in nature which does not utter words of
wisdom. All which God has made can speak
his love, and praise him for his goodness. But
110 NATURE HATH VOICES.

the moon has lessons full of richest interest to all
who give her audience.”

The day rolled on, and when the sun had sunk
to rest behind the western hills, and the full-
orbed moon sent forth its herald rays upon the
eastern sky, Henry was seen hastening with
nimble steps to gain the summit of the hill where,
in the morning, he had listened to the sermon
from the sun. He gained his station just in time
to see the queen of night arise to take her walk
amid the constellations. Never before had she
appeared so beautiful; and as he sat upon the
very mound where in the morning he had lis-
tened to the king of day, he loved not less the
milder beauties of reflected light, than the full
blaze of radiant glory.

The busy world was hushed to silence ; the
song of Nature’s warblers had ceased, and all
around there reigned a sacred stillness which
soothed the spirit and prepared the mind to talk
with nature.

An hour rolled past, and Henry joined his
mother in the parlor to rehearse his evening les-
son. It was the first he had sought to learn from
Nature, without his mother’s aid, and she had
waited anxiously to learn of his success. As he
entered, she saw the emotions of joy that filled
his heart, beaming forth from his dark blue eyes,
NATURE HATH VOICES. 111

and noble countenance, and she knew that his
communion had been sweet and full of interest.

“Sit down, my son,” said she, “and let me
hear the lesson which the moon has taught you.
What said the moon to you? Your looks declare
her sermon welcome.”

“Tt was, indeed,” said Henry, “although she
spake not all to me. She spake to all who love
to follow Jesus.”

“Can you remember all her words?” said
Mrs. Elwin.

“Yes, all of them,” replied the happy boy ;
“nor shall I ever cease to keep them in remem-
brance. This was her language :—

“¢T shine, ’t is true, and cheer the world when
the bright orb of day has disappeared behind the
western hills.

“But of myself, I shine not. The sun,
although not seen by you, still throws his rays on
me, and, ever faithful to my trust, I lend them to
the earth.

“ ¢And such should be the life of all who would
follow Jesus. To them my voice is speaking,
and those who hearken shall be blessed of God
and man.

‘¢ The light that cometh down from heaven ;
Reflect the gospel’s brightest ray,

And drive the gloom of night away.’ ”
112 NATURE HATH VOICES.

“ This lesson,” said Mrs. Elwin, whose heart
was rejoiced at what her son had accomplished,
“this lesson proves the truth of what I have so
often told you. The world is full of poetry,
which lives and speaks with every tongue that
God has given nature ; and those, and those alone,
who learn like you to hear and understand this
language, can ever claim, by right, the poet’s
name. The lesson you have learned is great and
good. You have said well, ‘ it shall not be forgot-
ten.’ Such remembrances are ever blessed — are
ever welcome to the faithful soul. But stop not by
remembering only ; this lesson should be prac-
tised. Strive to live near to Jesus, and allow no
intervening object to obscure the light you bor-
row from his gospel, and reflect on those who
walk with you amid the lights and shades of
time,

‘¢ ‘Shine with the light which Christ has given.’ ”’

Years have gone past, and Henry is a man.
He stands each Sabbath at the sacred altar, and
proclaims the lessons he has learned of nature,
and from the written word of God. He preaches
God’s impartial grace, and the full and free sal-
vation which is revealed in the light of Christ
Jesus. His mother is now quite old and feeble ;
but when she walks forth, leaning upon the arm
NATURE HATH VOICES. 113

of her faithful Henry, as she calls him, the
voices of nature revive her drooping powers, and
animate her spirit, until she seems to cast aside
her weight of years, and live again in the full
strength of life’s maturity. She does not doubt
but when her body dies, her spirit will commune
with nature still, and know, more perfectly than
now, of all the wisdom which her works display.

“T love to talk witlf nature,” said she to a
young friend a short time since, “for then I
know I listen to the voice of God. This voice is
truth. Man cannot alter, man cannot corrupt,
it.” And such, also, is the sentiment which her
son has learned to cherish, and which he gladly
proclaims to the world.

“Mother,” said he, while supporting her in
the garden walks, and listening to the language
of the flowers, “when you have passed away,
and I shall walk alone to talk with nature, I shall
believe your spirit near me still.”

“ You may,” replied the aged mother, “ you
may believe me with you always. As you walk
among these flowers, or in the open fields, or
climb the mountain heights, I shall be with you,

searching still for higher truth, and learning still
diviner lessons of the love of God.”

Let those who read this story know that na-
ture’s voices utter their instruction to the under-
114 NATURE HATH VOICES.

standing and spirit of man. The low, the grov-
elling, the sensual, do not hear them. He who
would enjoy the wisdom they impart, must purify
his thoughts, and lift his soul above the dust of
sensual things.


NAPOLEON.
A DIALOGUE.

BY REV. JOHN G. ADAMS.

Matthew. Aha! George, a book in hand again ?
Well, it seems to me you are getting to be quite
a reader in these days. What now so inter-
esting ?

George. O,a grand book, Matthew; a grand
book! I have been reading till my eyes and
head ache ; but I hardly knew where to leave off.

M. Well done! what is it ?

G. It is a book entitled “ Bonaparte and his
Marshals.” It is an American book. 1 have
often seen it advertised, and heard about it; so I
thought I would get it and read it for myself.
And it’s a grand thing, I do assure you.

M. A grand thing, indeed! Well, there is
where you and I differ. I do not wonder you
have the eyes-ache, and the head-ache, George.
I should think you might have the heart-ache, too.

G. Really, Matthew, what are you talking
about, so Quakerish and solemn ? Don’t you

10
116 NAPOLEON.

think the book an interesting one? for you
seem to speak as though you knew something
about it.

M. I do know something of it, George ; and
I must again say that I do not agree with you
in your estimation of the work.

G. Why, pray? It is one of the most popular
works of the day. I heard Lawyer Jones prais-
ing it the other day; and Captain Spear’s son
James, in our house a few evenings ago, said it
was one of the best things to stir up the military
spirit in a fellow that he knew of.

M. You did? Well, James Spear’s reason for
calling it best,is my reason for calling it worst.
I have just about the smallest opinion of this
military spirit.

G. Why Matthew, you don’t talk like most
folks. You never would make a soldier. Don’t
you think Bonaparte a noble man ?

M. What do you mean by noble ?

G. Mean? why, I mean a man who was
great like him; who could lay such plans —
bring together and keep together such multitudes
of men, and fight such battles, and get such vic-
tories as he did.

M. This is your idea of nobleness, is it?
Well, I have adifferent one. I have not thought
of questioning the great intellect of Napoleon ;
NAPOLEON. 117

but as to his nobleness, I think he was too much
of a man-butcher to be called noble. So I shall
be unpopular enough to say he was not noble.
You are welcome to make it out that he was, if
you can.

G. You seem to talk very confidently.
What is your great objection to the man ?

M. Why, that he gloried in war as he did;
that he caused so much misery among men ; that
he made such waste of human property and
human life. Only think of the numbers slain in
his chief battles! Six millions of human beings!
to say nothing of other evils, equal, if possible,
to the loss of life which he caused during his
mad career. I do not think much of such no-
bleness. I think we have called our great war-
riors noble men long enough. It is time we
were learning better fashions. I think there are
nobler men than warriors ever were or ever
can be.

G. Matthew, don’t you call Washington a
noble man ?

M. Surely, George; but do not, I pray you,
name Washington in the same hour with Bona-
parte, unless you mean to compare their charac-
ters. We donot most admire Washington because
he wasa great warrior. He had virtues which
Napoleon had not; and besides, he has given us
118 NAPOLEON.

his testimony against war, as Napoleon never
did. He loved peace far better than war. Na-
poleon loved war better than peace. So his life
says. And this is one great difference in the
men. Napoleon himself said, once, to an Amer-
ican, “ The name of your Washington will live
when mine shall be lost.” Washington was a
noble man; but his being a general did not
make him so.

G. But do you not denounce all warriors ?

M. I denounce all war, and that is enough.
And when you talk about a noble man, whose
whole life has been one great battle with his
race, I tell you I don’t think much of his noble-
ness. Folks may write books about him, and
you may admire them ; I cannot.

G. Well, Matthew, tell us what your idea of
a noble man is.

M. Certainly I will. A noble man is one who
uses the intellect and soul God has given him in
doing good to his fellow-men ; in leading them
to love and aid, and not to hate and destroy, one
another ; who keeps the truth in mind, that we
have all one Father, and that we should bless
and curse not, forgive rather than be avenged,
love even our enemies, and strive for the things
that make for peace; who would render earth a
heaven instead of a field of blood, and suffering
NAPOLEON. 119

and desolation. This is one idea I have of a no-
ble man. If Bonaparte had gone to work with his
great intellect to raise the means for relieving the
wants of the people of Europe that he raised to
destroy them, we might have had a better history
of his nobleness. Don't you think so, George ?

G. Well, Matthew, there is something, I con-
fess, in this view of the matter; but then, you
know, men do not think so. We have always
had war in the world, and I suppose we shall
have more of it, till men grow better; and so
we must have warriors. When mencall become
Christians there will be no more fighting.

M. This is a precious confession, George.
When men all become Christians ! Now I wish
just to ask you what is to make them Christians ;
preaching to them that they may practise war
till the millennium comes; or that war is @ sin
against God and man, and the millennium never
will come till men stop war — stop it in their
dispositions, in their talk, in their actions? It is
a strange idea that fire will put out fire — that
we may keep on encouraging and practising
war till men get convinced it is wrong. If they
would give as much attention to their Bible as
you have to “ Napoleon and his Marshals,” they
might be convinced now that war isa sin and an

10*
120 NAPOLEON.
abomination, and that so long as men use the
sword, just so long will they be destroyed by it.
G. We will talk again on this subject, Matthew.
M. I hope so, George ; and before we part,
let me say one word. You have spoken of Na-
poleon’s nobleness. Compare his disposition and
life with the disposition and life of the great
Master of Christians; and tell me, when next we
meet, which you think had the true nobleness
in him. They are opposites. If one was no-

ble, the other was not. Which was? That is
the question.


OUR BIBLES.

BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

Usvatiy there are more persons than Bibles
in a family ; but we are more blessed at this
home, and have more Bibles than people, for
there are but three of us and we have eight copies
of the sacred Scriptures in the house. Merely
possessing a Bible, however, is not a sure indica-
tion of true piety, and we who own many and
costly ones, may not possess as much religious
feeling as the poor man who owns but the smoked
and soiled fragment of an old-fashioned one, that
his father and grandfather used before him.
Neither can you safely judge by our having so
many, whether or not we read more, or obey the
precepts of the Bible better, than the sons and
daughters of the poor who have but a few scat
tered leaves of an old copy to divide among
them. No, my young friends, you cannot tell
who reads the Bible by knowing who has one in
the house; or who is a truly God-like person, by
knowing who owns one; for many Bibles lie
122 OUR BIBLES.

unopened on the table from day to day, and
month to month, where many persons go in and
out; and many fathers and mothers, sons and
daughters, read their pages without thinking that
the precepts thereio written, were so written for
their instruction iu goodness, that they might
read and go forth 1 practise. But I will tell you
of our Bibles, ana our lives will tell you what
use we make of them.

First, than, there is the little one, the parting
gift of a fanhful maid-servant, to the baby, when
she gave him her last kiss. ‘I have loved it,”
said she, “and learned it too; I hope lie will do
the same and practise what he learns.” Five
years have passed evay, and the boy is no longer
a baby. These years have borne the giver toa
home in the distant West, but with us she has
left a sacred memento; aud shov'd these words
meet her eye, she will know tnat she is still
remembered at our fireside, and her gift cherished
by her little friend.

And we have one which a younger sister used
as a school-book. It bears her name in the stiff
and precise hand-writing of an old and respected
teacher. I can tell little of its history, for we
were pupils in separate schools. I know, how-
ever, that she has been a learner of the Bible, and
hope that it was not used as a school-book alone,
OUR BIBLES. 123

but that she regards it in later years as her text-
book, on which she will found many sermons of
her life, her guide-book to the paths of peace and
holiness, to the river of life, to the covert from
the tempest, to the light that gleams through the
valley of the shadow of death.

We have the Bible of my oldest brother; a
gift from his pious grandmother in the year 1816.
It was his school-book then, and after he became
aman he laid it not aside. It had its place in
his trunk when he sojourned in the stranger’s
home, and was read when he remembered the
injunction of his mother, “ William, read your
Bible.” When his days of absence from the
homestead were over, and he came back to leave
us no more, it had its place in his chamber.
Early and late have I seen him studying its
pages, and his life told how deeply its precepts
were implanted in his heart. He had no other
gods but Gop, bore no false witness, coveted no
man’s goods, gave liberally to the poor. But he
is dead—and he died in the fulness of joy
which a knowledge of the Scriptures imparts,
and rested in its promises of life to all.

Next, I find one owned by a brother-in-law,
much worn and defaced. He is notas old as the
appearance of his Bible might indicate. But it
has been twice across the mighty deep, besides
124 OUR BIBLES.

being used asa school-book. It bears numerous
inscriptions of idle boys; the name of one, and
the marks of many. This book was the com-
panion of my brother when he left his native
land for a home in a foreign clime, an inexperi-
enced, unprotected youth, to start in the business
of life alone. There, for eleven years, this book
remained his companion ; a talisman of good, in
a land where the true God is ignorantly wor-
shipped by the zealous Catholic; where Christian-
ity has but a name. It has come back with him
to this happier land, where God is honored, and
his truth spread wide among the people. May
its truths, which have remained unaltered
through all the changes of his early life, be his
counsel in business, his delight in his home, his
blessing through the remainder of his life, his
hope and strength in death !

The fifth one has been the companion, the
friend, the study of my husband for nearly
twenty years; a little book, but full of mighty
truths ; a plain one, but through its teachings he
has beheld beauty and glory that exceed what
earth can give. He sought truth on its pages,
and God blessed him with knowledge. It was
his guide and instructor in his preparations for
the ministry, has furnished him with texts and
thoughts since he entered it. When life has
seemed dark, he has found light here; when
OUR BIBLES. 125

perplexities surrounded him, he has found by his
Bible the true path; when friends Have proved
false, its teachings have brought peace and com-
fort; and when life itself shall close upon him,
may its promises and doctrines bring “joy un-
speakable and full of glory !”

A sixth one is the “Family Bible, the dear
blessed Bible,” indeed. It was my mother’s, —it
was my father’s; and it folds within its leaves
the names of all my brothers and sisters. We
were a happy family when, with this same Bible
upon her lap, my gentle mother called us round
her on each returning Sabbath eve, and taught
us from its sacred pages. My father would sit
in silent joy by the side of his faithful companion,
with ten happy children before him, to hear our
Scripture lessons recited, prompting when we
hesitated, encouraging when we failed. But my
father’s voice can no longer prompt, my blessed
mother no longer teachus. They are gone, and
two sons and two daughters are gone too.

“This leather-bound Bible,—

It taught them to live, yea, it taught them to die ;

I stood by their death-bed when dim grew the eye,
And the pulse fluttered faint, yet, oh, how serene
They passed through the closing of life’s busy scene !
Like the angels they mounted in spirit on high,

This leather-bound Bible well taught them to die.”


126 OUR BIBLES.

But here are four brothers and four sisters left,
for we weré twelve in all, and here is the old
Bible, with its cover of plaid and its precepts
more precious than gold, with the self-same truths
that our parents taught, undecayed, unchanged.
The sweet voice of my angel mother still seems
to say, “ Son, daughter, take up the lesson where
I laid it down, and teach your children as I taught
you. Bind the truths to your hearts forever.
They are eternal!”

The seventh is my own precious Bible, the
gift of my oldest sister in 1830. It is a London
edition of the Polyglot Bible. Rich, indeed, are
the treasures it contains, and they are mine; they
may be thine, reader. May the instructions of
my mother, the example of my sister, and the
earnest solicitations of the pastor of my youth
be not lost upon me. May they still lead me to
study its pages and love its teachings. Its doc-
trines have given consolation and support in many
severe trials of life. They have spoken peace
to my soul when I mourned the departed from
the family circle, and cares accumulated on my
young hands in my early home, and when, by
the will of our Heavenly Father, a precious babe
was borne away from my own little family ; when
I myself lay at the brink of the grave, too weak
to read, and too feeble to hear its truths uttered ;
OUR BIBLES. 127

then was my spirit calm and happy in the belief
of them. God be praised! And thou, precious
book, still bless, instruct and guide me.

‘‘ When the morning is here, with its dew and its light,
When the star sparkles first in the blue arch of night,
I will turn to these leaves, and learn how to forgive
Each error in those who around me may live,
And pray that when death stills the throb of my heart,
I may smiling look upward, and sweetly depart.’

Lastly, I would mention what may indeed be
called the book of books, the Bible of Bibles; I
mean the large edition called Harper’s Pictorial
Bible. It is the property of my husband. It
was a gift from his people, a token of the esteem
they cherish for him for his fidelity as a minis-
ter, and his cordial attentions during his resi-
dence with them as a pastor. He will love it as
such ; and his family will respect and remember
to bless the warm hearts and generous hands
who jointly presented it. I cannot tell you all
the emotions that fill my soul when | open that
splendid book. There are beauty and taste dis-
played without, but within its covers I know
there are holiest truths and loveliest teachings.
There are some most elegant engravings in it;
but when I open it, I pray that the precepis of
those sacred writers may be as beautifully en-

11
128 OUR BIBLES.

graven on the heart of my innocent boy, who
loves to gaze upon them, indelible impressions
of all that is good and holy. The people of his
charge sent many good wishes and prayers with
it to him whom they would thus honor; and
they have sent also a silent admonition that he
and his forget not to love the Holy Bible, and see
that its inspired teachings be ever and purely
taught at the family altar, in the public sanctuary,
in the visits of the pastor among his people, and
in his walk before the world.

And think you I remember only the fathers
and mothers when I look into it? I can assure
you I remember most affectionately the children.
When I turn over its leaves, and see the pictures
of little children receiving instruction from pious
parents ; of little girls kneeling and being taught
to pray; of little boys being warned against
temptation and sin by gray-haired sires ; and read
that the commands of God should be talked of
when we sit in the house, or walk by the way, at
night and in the morning, — it is then I think of
Mary and Catharine, Josephine and Harriet, of
Willie and James, of Charles and Samuel, and
many others of my little friends. And while I
think, I hope they hear these commands day by
day, and remember them on their pillows, and
practise them in all their sports and visitings
OUR BIBLES. 129

together. [I pray that all the blessing which God
sends upon truly good children, may rest upon
these dear ones whom my soul so tenderly
loves.

As I pass along, I behold pictures of young
men bowing before the Lord, or humbly sitting
at the feet of venerable fathers for instruction, or
discharging the duties of their religion ; I see
young maidens, fair and beautiful, bearing the
sin-offering and burnt-offering, or gathered before
the public teacher of holy things, or listening to
the words of pious matrons, and cheerfully yield-
ing, for the honor and service of God, their mir-
rors, their bracelets, their rings, and all their
golden ornaments, and willingly ‘humbling
themselves in the sight of God, that they may
be lifted up of him.” Then it isI think of the
young men and women who have risen up from
children, during the ministry of this pastor whom
the parents have thus honored, and most ear-
nestly do I desire that Zion may be strengthened
and built up in our goodly town by many humble
Christians from among them — that they may
be fully instructed in Scripture knowledge, and
ready to stand before the Lord, when their
fathers and mothers leave the places they now
occupy.

These, my dear readers, are our Bibles, and
130 OUR BIBLES.

some of the pleasant thoughts that possess my
soul when I see and read them. And since
there are many young people whom I love, not
particularly referred to here, let me say that you
can give to your God no greater honor, to your
Saviour no stronger proof of discipleship, to our
world no better service, to yourselves no purer
pleasure, than by becoining devoted students of
the Holy Bible, and obedient followers of its
teachings.

We marvel that old men and women can repeat
so much of the Bible. They began in youth,
and have made it their study through life,—a
verse ora chapter, a sentiment or a sermon, at a
time ; for a moment in one day, an hour in the
next, a whole evening at another time,—with
prayerful attention, and a real desire for the kind
of knowledge which it imparts. Thus have our
old people become filled with knowledge of the
Scriptures, and thus only can our young people
obtain it. The Bible is not a narrative, it is nota
history, or a biography, or a poem, or a sermon,
a series of prophecies, or a book of laws; but a
grand collection of all these different kinds of
writing, sacredly uttered, sacredly preserved, and
worthy to be made the study of one’s life.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































lp



POOL OF SILOAM,
THE POOL QF SILOAM.

Who, that has become familiarly acquainted
with Scripture history, has not been interested
in what he has learned of this remarkable place ?
Ithas been sought by the pilgrim, noted by the~
traveller, sung by the bard of holy inspiration.
The fountain bearing this name came out under
the walls of Jerusalem, on the east, between the
city and the brook Kidron. It is supposed to be
mentioned in Josh. xv. 7; xvill. 16; 2 Sam.
xvii. 17; 1Kingsi. 9. Josephus, in his history
of the Jews, speaks of the waters of Siloam.
There was a custom of drawing water from the
fountain of Siloam, and pouring it out before the
Lord, in the temple, at the time of evening sac-
rifce. There is some allusion to this in John
vil. 37.

The following description of the fountain is
from the journal of Messrs. Fisk and King, of
date April 28, 1823. “ Near the south-east cor-
ner of the city, [Jerusalem,] at the foot of Zion
and Moriah, is the Pool of Siloam, (See Neh. ii.
15,) whose waters flow with gentle murmur from
under the holy mountain of Zioa, or rather from

11*
134 POOL OF SILOAM.

under Ophel, having Zion on the west, and
Moriah on the north. The very fountain issues
from a rock, twenty or thirty feet below the sur-
face of the ground, to which we descended by
two flights of steps. Here it flows out without
a single murmur, and appears clear as crystal.
From this place it winds its way several rods un-
der the mountain, then makes its appearance
with gentle gurgling, and forming a beautiful rill,
takes its way down into the valley towards the
south-east. We drank of the water both at the
fountain and from the stream, and found it soft, of
a sweetish taste, and pleasant. It was to this
fountain that the blind man went, and washed,
and came seeing. John ix. 7-11.”

Stephens, in his “ Incidents of Travel,” writes
of visiting this place. He says, “Hundreds of
pilgrims were stretched on its bank; and a little
above is the sacred pool issuing from the rock,
enclosed by stone walls, with a descent of two
flights of steps.” Bartlett, a still more recent
traveller, represents the steps as being worn, by
the feet of the numerous visiters there, to the
smoothness of polished marble.

KC we OD
MY MOTHER’S VOICE.
BY JONES VERY.

My mother’s voice! I hear it now—
T feel her hand upon my brow,
As when, in heartfelt joy,
She raised her evening hymn of praise,
And called down blessings on the days
Of her loved boy.

My mother’s voice! I hear it now —
Her hand is on my burning brow,
As in that early hour,
When fever throbbed through all my veins,
And that kind hand first soothed my pains,
With healing power.

My mother’s voice! It sounds as when
She read to me of holy men,
The patriarchs of old ;
And gazing downward on my face,
She seemed each infant thought to trace,
My young eyes told.

Tt comes — when thoughts unhallowed throng,
Woven in sweet deceptive song —
And whispers round my heart,
136 MY MOTHER’S VOICE.

As when at eve it rose on high,
T hear, and think that she is nigh,
And they depart.

Though round my heart all, all beside —
The voice of friendship, love — had died ;
That voice would linger there,

As when, soft-pillowed on her breast,
Its tones first lulled my infant rest,
Or rose in prayer.


SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

BY MRS. N. T. MUNROE.

Ir is Saturday afternoon. There has been a
shower, and the bright rain-drops still glisten
upon the grass, and a few clouds still lie around
the west, while the rest of the sky is of the deep-
est blue. And the water too is blue, stretching
far away in the distance; and blue, too, are the
far off hills, while those rising nearer, upon
which a flood of sunlight is falling, are of the
bright, mossy green of the young spring time.

Silent, and ever pointing upward, rise the church
spires, and villages are clustered around, and
quiet homes look out from the green trees ; pleas-
ant dwellings lay bathed in the gorgeous sunlight,
and thousands and thousands of beating hearts
and busy brains find a home in the places that
lie so quietly and pleasantly stretched before us.

There is a confused noise and bustle borne to
our ears. This is a working world, and this is
one of its working days. There is the rattling
of heavy wheels, the voices of impatient drivers,
138 SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

the shouts of merry boys, the blacksmith at his
forge, the hum of machinery, and blended with
these, the confused and indistinct noises from the
neighboring city, all rising to our ears, and seem-
ing to say that ‘this is Saturday afternoon, and
the great world has a deal to do ere the day of
rest comes.”

And, chiming in with these harsh, discordant
sounds, like the soft voice of childhood, and the
din of wrangling and confusion, come the sweet
notes of the birds, as they sit in their leafy
homes, and sing on while all the noise and bustle
pass unheeded. Short, soft, and broken, like the
tones of infancy, comes their music to our ears,
and cheerfully they sing, and the green leaves
tustle, and chime in with their melody, and their
bright wings glance from bough to bough. The
light breeze shakes a flood of snowy blossoms
from the trees, and the children clap their hands
in giee, and their glad laugh blends harmoniously
with the bird notes ; for it is Saturday afternoon,
and whole troops are at liberty, and they go run-
ing ovér the green fields; they pluck the butter-
cups and the violet, and make curls of the long
stems of the dandelions, and run about till their
little feet are weary, and a Saturday’s sun sets
upon many a little one, tired even of play.

A blessed time to our young hearts was Sat-
SATURDAY AFTERNOON. 139

urday afternoon, especially in the summer time.
Out in the meadows hunting strawberries and
wild flowers, over the hills where the honey-
suckles grew, but stepping carefully, and looking
around, lest we should chance to tread upon a
snake, — out under the shade of the trees, with
their leafy rustling in our ears, making our
young hearts dreamy and quiet,—all these
pleasant things come rushing upon usas we think
of Saturday afternoon. And oh! how tired we
were when darkness fell upon the earth, and the
birds sung their last twittering song, and the stars
came out in the clear summer sky. Yet tired as
we were, how reluctantly still did we leave the
freedom and freshness of the open air, for our
homes !

And then the morrow was the Sabbath. No
other morning was like that morning; it had its
own peculiar stillness and joy. The earth was
dressed in Sunday garb. The very light and
air were different from that of yesterday, and as
we took our books and prepared for our walk to
the Sabbath school, we, too, seemed different
beings from those who yesterday were shouting
and sporting in wild and untamed mirthfulness
and glee. Yet, just as happy were we, only
more quiet and subdued, for we looked forward
to the pleasant Sabbath school with an eagerness
140 SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

equal even to that of the long-wished-for Satur-
day afternoon. And ever when we see the hap-
py children roaming over the hills, ever when
we hear their merry shouts and boisterous glee,
and think what a joy to them is the free air, the
green earth and the sunshine, we say, blessed is
Saturday afternoon! And when the quiet, holy
Sabbath comes, and we see the same bright, hap-
py creatures, only more softened and subdued,
sitting in the house of God, listening to his words
who called little children unto him and blessed
them, we thank God, and say, “ Blesned be the
Sabbath and the Sabbath school !”


HEAVEN HERE.

BY REV. J. G. ADAMS.

“ What shall I do, then? Live wholly for this world? My
mind revolts at the idea. My spirit was not moulded to be
satisfied with such a life.’ —~ Lerrer From A Frienp.

Art thou not satisfied with earth—its transitory
light ;

Will it not yield thee happiness; or are there skies
more bright

O’er which thy spirit longs to cast its ever-watchful
eye,

And read the glory of a world where love can never
die?

Mount upward, then! but deem not that thy duties
here must end ;

Live to thy God, in spirit pure — yet thy free powers
still lend,

To make the way of others bright, and give them this
to know,

That duties all are best performed where God-like
virtues grow.

Mount upward! yet forget not that this earth is still
thy home ;
12
142 HEAVEN HERE.

And that thy God in peace to every humble heart will
come ;

And thou shalt see him, if to prayer and praise thy life
be given,

And know that here the Christian soul may find a
constant heaven.


A SOLDIER OF THE RIGHT KIND.

BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

A LiTTLE boy, dressed in a cap with a feather.
and a bright colored belt, with a wooden sword
and a stick for a gun, went marching over the
house “ too-too-tooing,” as full of war and fight-
ing as any Mexican. He came up close to his
mother to shoot her. She took no notice of
him. He pointed his gun, and hallooed to her
to take care or he should kill her. She kept
quietly sewing, and the little boy said, “ Why
don’t you fight, mother ?”

The mother replied, “Christ tells me not to
fight with the sword. He told his soldiers not
to use it; and I wish to be Christ’s soldier.”

“« What did Christ’s soldiers fight with, if they
did not have swords, mother ?”

“ With good and holy words, my son.”

“Well, what did they fight with? Good
words would not kill men, mother.”

“No, dear, they did not fight with men, but
with sin. Good words and good actions kill
sin â„¢
144 A SOLDIER OF THE RIGHT KIND.

“Who were Christ’s soldiers ? ”

“His disciples; those who believe and obey
Christ ; those who taught the people what Christ
had taught them.”

“Ts father Christ’s soldier ?”

“Yes; he teaches the people not to fight, but
to live in peace ; to love one another, and try to
forgive each other, instead of fighting and going
to war.”

“ How can I be Christ’s soldier, mother ?”

“By trying to do no sin yourself, and telling
your little playmates, when they sin, not to
do so again, but be good and love one another.
You may be one by speaking against what you
feel to be wrong, wherever you are; by being
good sete = yourself, and trying to make
others so.’

“Well, mother, I think I will not play fight
again, like the naughty men, but I will try to
do as father does.”

Will the war-spirit conquer the spirit of
peace in that child’s heart, if such teachings
go with him up to manhood ?

Will it prevail in any child’s heart, if it be
made to understand the spirit of Christ and his
gospel ?

If children be taught of Christ and the Holy
Spirit, will not many soldiers of the cross be
A SOLDIER OF THE RIGHT KIND. 145

raised up to bless the world in future years, by
the most peaceful and benignant influences ?

Mothers, shall we not do it? Fathers, are
you of the Christian band, and will you fail to
do it? Let us to the work!

12*


A STORY OF MY CHILDHOOD.

BY MRS. MARGARET M. MASON.

A story forthe Annual! Well, what shall I
write? A story for children? Yes, a story for
children, though older people, I find, read the
Annual with much pleasure. But, as it is de-
signed for children, I think I will write something
about childhood.

Many scenes of childhood I love to look back
upon. Whodoes not? Methinks there is room
in the heart of every human being for his birth-
place. Methinks, too, that there are some
flowers which blossomed on either side of the
pathway of childhood, which all consider well
worth preserving.

When Iwas about three years of age my
mother died. After this event, an old lady, who
had been much in our family, took care of me.
Being too young to feel the loss of my mother, it
was easily supplied by this aged woman. I be-
came much attached to her. My father was
poor, and toiled for a livelihood upon the sea.
At length he found it necessary to break up
A STORY OF MY CHILDHOOD. 147

house-keeping, and to put me under the care of a
friend of his, in whom he placed confidence.
After my removal to the house of this new guar-
dian, my old friend would not forget me. She
visited me often, and I loved her next to my
father. Being old and poor, she was supported
by the town. She had sustained herself. with
what little aid she could get from a few individ-
uals or families, as long as possible.

Mrs. M****, who had the care of the town’s
poor, was a good, kind-hearted lady. So I felt
that my old foster-mother would be properly
treated. Poor old lady! I never shall forget
how glad she was to see me the first time I vis-
ited her after she was settled in her new home.
How nice her little chamber looked! The low
but neat bed that stood at one corner of the room,
the small table over which hung a little looking-
glass, the fire-place with its clean red hearth,
and the closet into which the old lady was care-
ful I should look, —all these made me feel that,
although she was very poor, she was far from
unhappy, or without comfort. Oh, how many
happy hours I have spent with her in that little
chamber! I always, when the weather would
permit, spent the Sabbath with her; and the
friend with whom I lived, would often give me
some delicacy for her, or provide something, and
148 A STORY OF MY CHILDHOOD.

send it to her by me, for her comfort, and I
always selected such books as I thought she
would like, and would read them to her. Oh,
those were, indeed, happy hours! I delighted to
gaze upon that face, wrinkled as it was. It had
acharm to me that I could see in no other. She
always looked upon me in so kindly a manner,
and spoke to me with so mild and sweet a voice,
Icould not be happier than when by her, or hear-
ing her speak.

She never seemed tired of answering my
questions about my mother, —that dear one,
whose countenance I could not remember, whose
voice I had forgotten, but whose features and
tones were so familiar to her. Over and over
she would describe my mother tome. And then
how I wished that I could remember my mother,
that I had her image on my heart, to carry it
with me through life, as an invaluable treasure !

That mother slept in the grave-yard, not far
from where I lived. It was but a short distance
from the road on which I walked to school.
Whenever I walked alone, and was not fearful of
reaching school late, I visited my mother’s grave,
and kneeling beside it, asked her to watch over
me and teach me to do right. Several times I
was punished for arriving late at school, because
I would not deny that I had stopped or played on
A STORY OF MY CHILDHOOD. 149

the way, and could not tell the teacher that I had
been to my mother’s grave.

I always felt that my mother was very near
me, and could see me, though I could not look
upon her. And this feeling of mine was strength-
ened by the old lady, who often told me that she
believed that the spirits of the departed could
visit and watch over us.

One night, having fallen asleep while thinking
of my mother, I thought I awoke, and saw a
beautiful being rising before me. As it ap-
proached me, I raised my arms to clasp the heav-
enly form. It looked smilingly upon me, and
then vanished away. After the morning, I
thought the angel was my mother. I had be-
lieved that she was with me wherever I went by
day, but I had not thought that she watched
over me when I slept by night. I told no one
but the old lady of my vision. She, seeing it
made me so happy, did not tell me it was merely
a dream.

Oh, how I wished I had a home into which I
could lead the old lady, and watch over and wait
upon her through her remaining days! for
when I looked into her dim eyes, I knew her
sight was fast fading, that she would soon sink
into the grave, and [ feared that she would be
unhappy. But she did not become so. She
150 A STORY OF MY CHILDHOOD. :

became blind, and the light of our world was
shut out from her forever. Nevertheless, she
continued resigned and cheerful in God. When
she looked towards me with her sightless eyes,
or stretched forth her trembling hands to take hold
of something with which to support herself, I
could not keep from weeping. Then she would
try to sooth me, by telling me how much she had
left to herself to make her happy, and by speak-
ing to me of the beautiful home to which she
was fast hastening, where she would be no
longer blind, and pain and sickness would never
reach her more.
* * * * *

It was the season of winter. For some days
the snow had been falling lightly, and the earth
was deeply covered with it. Through these
days I could not see the dear old friend. At
length the snow ceased to fall, and near the close
of a very cold day, a friend of mine called upon
me to tell me that she was dying. Before many
minutes passed, I was on my way to her bed-side.
Oh, how my hand shook when I lifted the latch
of her door! But the hope of seeing her alive
gave me strength, and I soon stood near her.
She was alive, but she had not spoken for several
hours. Yet, at the sound of my voice, she ex-
A STORY OF MY CHILDHOOD. 151

claimed, “It is she —God bless her!” Those
were her last words.

Many years have passed since I stood by her
grave ; but I shall not forget her. Nor will the
many good lessons that she taught me be for-
gotten.

My little readers! listen to the teachings of
the aged and poor, and always be kind to such.
You cannot tell how acceptable your words of
love and your amiable manners will be to them.
It will be pleasant to you to hear them:say, *« God
bless you.”


SUNDAY MORNING.
BY MISS JULIA A. FLETCHER.

Dear Uncle Charles! How we children all
used to love him! I heard a young lady say
once, that nobody liked old bachelors, and I
thought if she had only seen Uncle Charles as
he used to sit in his library, and talk with the
little folks, she would have said something quite
different from that. Certainly all the boys and
girls in the neighborhood loved him, and they
would gather around him, listening and asking
questions many hours together.

One of these boys afterwards became an artist ,
that is, he learned to draw and paint pictures,
and a short time since, 1 saw one in his room,
that made my heart glad even to look atit. I
have persuaded Mr. Usher to have it engraved
and published in the “ Sabbath School Annual,”
so that all our good children can see it; for of
course they all read the Annual.

There is the very room where we used to meet,
and the same old-fashioned arm-chair, with its
high, broad back, and dear Uncle Charles him-
AE

SUNDAY MORNING.








on




SUNDAY MORNING. 155

self sitting in it. How natural he looks! I
kissed the picture again and again when I first
saw it, for it seemed as if it must be the good
old man himself. How well he has painted that
pleasant smile, and those kind eyes, and the high
forehead, with the baldness which never looks
other than well to us, because it reminds us of
Uncle Charles! Yet I remember, when I was a
very little child, he had light, soft, brown hair,
that curled all around his forehead, just as the
little boy’s does in the picture. I mean the
boy who is standing behind the chair, gazing up
into the clouds. Thatis our cousin Albert, the
very one who afterwards drew the picture.
There is William, too, pointing eagerly to a bird
that seems coming to look at us. The birds
might have looked in, and the angels too, with
gladness; for never were Sabbath mornings
spent more happily and holily, than in that little
library room.

We had no Sunday school to attend, for we
lived in a small village, and this was a great
many years ago, when there were very few Sun-
day schools, and those only in large places. So
Uncle Charles used to let us come to his room
every Sunday morning, and talk with us there.

You may be sure we used to come every Sab-
bath. a no staying away because it was
156 SUNDAY MORNING.

cloudy, or because we had the headache ; no, nor
even if it rained hard, for we used to put on our
over-shoes, and start off, with our old bonnets
and cloaks on. That is often the reason chil-
dren, and grown-up people too, are afraid of
going to church ina storm. It is not that they
are afraid of getting wet themselves, but they
are afraid of spoiling their nice clothes.

We always had a pleasant word and a kind
welcome from Uncle Charles when we arrived,
and then the happy hours we passed with him ! —
I grow a very child again, when I think of them.
He had many books, from which he used to teach
us, and he would tell us many things which had
happened in his own life, describing places he
had visited, and people he had seen. He would
teach us some good lesson from everything
around us, and from every little incident that
happened to us. The flowers we gathered on
our way, the sky that smiled through the library
window, the tree that threw a soft shade over it,
all were to him subjects for our Sabbath lessons,
and holy lessons they furnished, too.

All the while he was talking to us, his dog
Carlo — good, faithful Carlo! — would sit by his
side, and look up into our faces, as if he wished
us to understand it all, though he, poor fellow,
did not. And there, in the picture, is the very
SUNDAY MORNING. 157

cane Uncle Charles always carried. We all
knew the history of that cane. It was an orange-
tree stick, cut ftom the groves of Florida with
his own hands, and he had never allowed it to
be spoiled by paint or polishing. Very beautiful
did it seem to us, and very curious to our young
eyes, which had not seen so many things then
as they have now.

A happy group we were those pleasant Sab-
bath mornings. There was Thomas, with his
earnest, thoughtful look; and Charlie, the pet
namesake of our dear instructor ; and then there
was Mary, and George, and Harriet, and — why !
I declare, Cousin Albert has quite slighted me ;
he has not put me into the picture! He should
have painted me with my little chair close to
Uncle Charles’ knee, like Carlo, contented to
sit there, and look up lovingly into his face,
whether I understood his words or not. I could
at least understand the love-language that was
written all over his countenance as he spoke, and
I have never since forgotten it. Many years
have passed away since then, and our dear Un-
cle Charles has gone to dwell with the kind
Father of whom he so often taught us. They
buried him by the river side, within sight of the
window in that p.easant library room where we
used to meet. The blue waves pass calmly by
158 SUNDAY MORNING.

his grave, and the happy birds sing around it,
but, for many years after, youthful heads were
bowed upon it, and tears fell from youthful eyes
for “dear Uncle Charles.”

Even now that we have all become men and
women, and are dwelling far away from that
quiet village, and far away from each other, we
think often of him, and bless God for the lessons
he taught us. Every Sabbath morn, as we go up
to our places in the Sabbath school, — for we have
all become teachers there, though not in the same
school, — we remember how kindly and earnest-
ly he used to talk with us. And we pray, then,
in our hearts, that we may be able to do good to
our pupils, as he did good to us; that they, too,
may ‘have their hearts filled with holy lessons,
and in after years have many pleasant remem-
brances of Sunday morning.


HYMN.
BY MRS. 8. E. E. MAYO.

{1 sore this hymn will be very precious to the
young readers of the Sabbath School Annual,
as it came from one who dearly loved children,
and eagerly contributed to increase the pleasure
of our school-festivals. I found it in looking
over her letters since her death, it having been
sent me for use at an “exhibition,” but was re-
ceived too late, and afterwards was forgotten.
Mrs. Mayo, previous to her marriage, was a
teacher in the Sabbath school, and hallowed
must be the memories of her in the scholars who
were so fortunate as to have such a teacher. —

H. B N.]

O’r Zion’s hill we tread,
A bright and youthful band :

No slippery rock we dread,
While clinging to thy hand —
Thou God of love, thou holy One,
Our staff, our refuge, and our sun !

Distil thy gentle truth
Upon our hearts, dear Lord !
13*


160

HYMN.

And teach our wayward youth

The wisdom of thy word,
That we may meet the tempter’s wile,
And turn away and proudly smile !

Fondly we ’Il learn to love
Our Maker, and our God,

As through the path we move
Where his dear Son hath trod ;
And on our bended knees, will pray

For purer spirits day by day.

Then shall we see his face —
The holy One on high !
And feel his melting grace,
And know his presence nigh.
With joy we woo the chastening rod,
That makes us pure to see our God.


THE DECLARATION OF INDEPEN-
DENCE,

AND THE BELL THAT ANNOUNCED IT.

BY REV. HENRY BACON.

Ou, ’t was a noble sight to see
That grand, heroic band, ©

As there in Congress grave they met
To pledge each heart and hand!

Appalling were the scenes of blood,
Through which their course must lie;

Yet bold for freedom and their rights
They vowed to live or die!

To live or die as freemen all,
To burst the tyrant’s chain,

And wake from freedom’s harp and trump
The sweetest, loftiest strain.

Oh, ’t was a solemn hour for them ! —
Yes, for the world of men, —

As there the Instrument unrolled
Lay by the ink and pen.

And will they sign? aye, will they dare
To fling their banner out,

And wake through all the land around
Glad freedom’s glorious shout *
162

THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.

A Bellman on the turret high
Stood waiting for the call
That should assure the world the deed
Was nobly done by all.
*T was his to ring that olden bell,
That had a prophet’s tone, —
“ Proclaim,”’ it said, ‘‘ fair freedom’s gifts
Shall to the land be known.”’
“* Ah, will they sign?” the old man said,
As by the bell he stood ;
“T fear me they will shrink from paths
Of battle and of blood !”
Each moment seemed an hour then,
As fear was in his heart,
Until, at length, he left the bell,
Impatient to depart.
‘“‘ Hold on!”’ a little boy exclaimed, —
“Tm sure they'll sign it, all!
I see them, one by one, write now,
For God is in that hall!”

The boy was right — the deed was done!
America is free !

They ’ve plighted all beneath the sun
To God and Liberty !

The hero boy now clapped his hands,
And to the Bellman cried, —

‘Ring! Rinc!!” and lo! the old bell rang

The glory far and wide.

The music of that grand old bell
Went through the lands afar.
THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 163

And man and child looked out to see
The new-made nation’s star.

Oh, were there now a bell so high,
So loud, for worlds to hear,
I'd love to have the Bellman nigh
To ring it loud and clear,
When to the Temperance Piepce men give,
In earnestness of soul,
Their names, and vow to nobly live,
As did that valiant roll !

Sign! brother, sign! the Bell of God,
Shall ring it far and wide ;

A good deed goes unseen abroad,
As wind goes with the tide.


EXTRACT FROM AN ADDRESS ON
THE DEATH OF A CHILD.

BY REV. H. C. LEONARD.

No one lives alone and uncared for. The
most obscure individual in the land is loved and
prayed for by some of his kind. These behold
him as a kindred being; and, as a near relation.
some respect is cherished for him. No one can
depart from earth unnoticed and unaided. There
are always some who weep when a spirit ascends
to God who gave it. Rich and poor, the learned
and the ignorant, the aged, the youthful, and the
tender infant, pass away from the earth, and for
all is the tribute of tears sincerely bestowed.

That man is connected with man, and is not to
be separated from kindred, in this or the spiritual
world, is a great truth of the Christian religion,
There is no sword in the hand of God, which
cuts asunder the ties of relationship that bind

\and hold together the inhabitants of earth or the
spirits in heaven. And they are not only bound
by cords of relationship, but live, and move, and
have existence in God. They are all the off-
ADDRESS ON THE DEATH OF A CHILD. 165

spring of God, sustained and protected by his
spirit. They all share the blessings which come
from his bountiful hand. “No one liveth to
himself, no one dieth to himself. For whether
we live, we live unto the Lord, and whether we
die, we die unto the Lord. Whether we live,
therefore, or die, we are the Lord’s. For to this
end Christ both died and rose, and revived, that
he might be Lord both of the dead and the living.”

It is a great doctrine of the Christian religion,
that all souls are the subjects of God’s parental
government. ‘This doctrine is more likely than
any other to induce us to live good and holy lives.
It is better than any other to strengthen and
prepare us for the hour of death, and give us
hope when our friends are led away from us by
the hand of death.

We are conscious that a Father’s power will
do more than the largest human benevolence or
compassion will pray for. It is omnipotent.
There will be no opposing energy sufficient to
prevent it from accomplishing the great purposes
of the Most High. It will draw souls after souls
into the way of wisdom, goodness and heaven,
until the last child of God shall be brought into
the Father’s house.

A little child has recently departed from our
midst. We have here with us the fair form in
166 ADDRESS ON THE DEATH OF A CHILD.

which she moved. Its head is yet symmetrical
in shape, its face still wears a pleasant expres-
sion, and its dimpled arms and hands are still
beautiful. But these are dust. We shall affec-
tionately place the form into its grave, and cover
it with the mould and turf of the earth. In
coming days we shall visit its place of sleep,
and nourish the trees and-flowers that will grow
around its little mound. But we will not think
that the being that once dwelt in this form, is yet
with it. We will believe that the thought and
affection of the child are raised to heaven, and
are in the care of angels. The soul does not
die. The rose-bud that was just opening its
green, outside leaves, and showing its inner
loveliness and beauty, is not permitted to unfold
itself wholly on the earth. The hand of Love
has transplanted it in the land of richer soil,
more nourishing showers, and milder, balmier
airs. In that bright land it will perfectly and
beautifully unfold its leaves, and be an ornament
in the garden of God. —

When we shall contemplate the flowers around
the mound of this body’s grave, let us be re-
minded by them of the immortality of the soul.
The flowers will spring up, and show themselves
for a while, and then they will die. But, in fu-
ture years, the same element that formed and
ADDRESS ON THE DEATH OF A CHILD. 167

exhibited these flowers, will form and exhibit
flowers again. They will repeat their work of
love, and cheer the world with beauty, and fill
the atmosphere with fragrance. Thus, all that
has been really good and beautiful in the child
will continue to exist, and to be a blessing to us.
We have seen the child in our earthly year;
when we shall enter upon our eternal year, we
shall see her again in a more beautiful and
agreeable form.

The river will continually flow in its cours
by the enclosure in which this form will be laid
Its waters will flow into the sea, for the sea is
their great source. Thus the river will remind
us, that the dust returns to dust as it was, and
the spirit to God who gave it.

But the lessons of the Great Teacher will
comfort us in the most satisfactory manner.
They impart to us distinctly, a knowledge of the
greatness, worth, and immortality of human na-
ture. They impart to us a knowledge of the
value of the minds of children. Said the Sa-
viour: ‘“ Suffer little children to come unto me,
and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom.”
And he took little children into his arms and
blest them. Let the words of Christ be your
comfort and consolation, my friends, in this hour
of — grief. He, the truth, the way,
168 ADDRESS ON THE DEATH OF A CHILD.

and the life, will kindly teach and lead your
child in the bright paths of life, of holiness and
peace.

To the child, the days of sin, or danger, or
sorrow, or sickness, or pain, are not to be known.
She will live and unfold her faculties where
there are no temptations to lead astray, no dan-
ger to fear, no sickness to wear and take the life
away.

I beseech you, finally, to have confidence in
God, who is love, and whose ways are all benev-
olent. Everywhere and always he manifests
the spirit of mercy. He giveth and he taketh
away. Let us desire that his will may be done.


SABBATH MORNING.
BY REV. J. G. ADAMS.

SassatH morning! Holy time!
Let me hail thy presence now ;
In thy gospel light sublime,
At the Father’s footstool bow.

Morn of beauty and of love!

Opening heaven ’mid scenes of earth,
As we raise our hearts above,

To new glories giving birth !

Morn of peace! The world how still !
Only echoing far away,

Over forest, vale and hill,
Church bells speak of’ praise to-day.

Morn of rest! From toil and care
Bid our weary souls be free ;
Help us, if we would prepare
Thy great Source of light to see.
170 SABBATH MORNING.

Morn of Christian truth and grace !
Brighter shall thy radiance glow,

As God’s children learn to trace
Christ’s great mission here below


LUD STA


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'2012-04-22T00:30:36-04:00'
describe
'27507' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUMY' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
dd64c2fe23e113302f7d609717e263dc
e9f1a82179139efcd553f5bfa960d427219ab76b
'2012-04-22T00:32:24-04:00'
describe
'86013' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUMZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
ff4fb35dc694015d6f1cbf630cfaf711
0cee09d23631ecf9e193093047e9005e50c6a144
'2012-04-22T00:37:09-04:00'
describe
'45264' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNA' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
90bc3219b212a6c8b2b37c5de123f7bf
7a804187024ec2e0d91dfa554e6646bf62880255
'2012-04-22T00:30:18-04:00'
describe
'5061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNB' 'sip-files00003.pro'
d9b369937dc25921bd4bb9a0eb24d6b6
97bf938020e8cccebd28250e6459b6d64e77ce5a
'2012-04-22T00:34:25-04:00'
describe
'28518' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNC' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d8557de3304d61f55648026ac243f593
c718a181cabfcbc6db475003bc65fdfccf0a310a
'2012-04-22T00:32:22-04:00'
describe
'2055716' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUND' 'sip-files00003.tif'
b55d6fe97c7fb564b3482c8742e7605d
8a973e0736aa0360012167aead4dc153cbae9608
'2012-04-22T00:34:45-04:00'
describe
'265' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNE' 'sip-files00003.txt'
c68e4ee4bf81714c44510cad338e9673
80a0445d8ce8c0bed760f009822f3cc2637067ec
'2012-04-22T00:36:22-04:00'
describe
'22620' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNF' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
196ece9bd8d703747ae17d798bc77782
dc66755392d86833d4f40605c3f9aaab93717c95
'2012-04-22T00:28:20-04:00'
describe
'259184' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNG' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
caec79fbd9e69bd97d2c6d4cbe43faf8
90d098304c2bed6987fbaab81920ae35d13425df
'2012-04-22T00:33:45-04:00'
describe
'132912' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNH' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
0f7a6280c7308075be48208dba873fdf
9a71629752b635da4747ede11d61d26b3c71024e
describe
'26265' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNI' 'sip-files00004.pro'
5eccfdaaa66751e941c702f9255675fe
fc15f48fb774ed383bab1d2653f81bc651f96682
'2012-04-22T00:31:33-04:00'
describe
'65630' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNJ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
d5f95ba8cbd1cdb454cff5df172e331e
948e56f1c9f8385385c043f22c4beded7e70a985
'2012-04-22T00:27:49-04:00'
describe
'2095936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNK' 'sip-files00004.tif'
f4fa03104d0517b18be440e7e03320dd
2a333f5b07b3e25b2f5e110a88619567c0fce058
'2012-04-22T00:29:25-04:00'
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNL' 'sip-files00004.txt'
1a77e7ea75d39ffa71f62b10efdfd839
f731e4b16c89984e7f5b5f116b234a84a48022ab
'2012-04-22T00:30:41-04:00'
describe
'35814' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNM' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
c301f0c35ecbd909148ac13f7ab0328e
b7da42be0bb170e8d82206a6a477334de55336b7
'2012-04-22T00:33:00-04:00'
describe
'21361' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNN' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
992f8bc388079fd2910afff7ae55fd73
98af418411a1d983686ef070c409e4268aee3156
'2012-04-22T00:33:10-04:00'
describe
'23802' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNO' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
66bf2f74809bd3be501894c04a8ba757
108e1957f594c658baa551dcc261e615f62c1118
'2012-04-22T00:33:24-04:00'
describe
'20515' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNP' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
c68cd972dab7c51082e8a61dc28b0295
4b1f91bd0e64b0f467fe066f941368aa37603f97
'2012-04-22T00:31:53-04:00'
describe
'2095124' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNQ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
c73be50f0675ac8d91d2ed3c2e134424
2d575156c84bb7bd57ee9d041cafd6ef460021aa
'2012-04-22T00:33:42-04:00'
describe
'19472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
f1a6a7d0b25b7220820902d49b8f2c1f
262f20af723c0513df813ab91056ce4f49cfadec
'2012-04-22T00:30:29-04:00'
describe
'258771' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
ab6f5413b914954fa010617e233a9447
5bb05bd07b0c4a141d70ccf9c74e2de22f368725
'2012-04-22T00:31:12-04:00'
describe
'102722' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
4f08e2291b05ca6e391312fa057cd965
000170302fef9d43252e669d546f66fa157a8293
'2012-04-22T00:31:13-04:00'
describe
'21577' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNU' 'sip-files00006.pro'
63448b39bc8af060e404d3ad77e5512f
61a66b25a328236113b750d17a6f48963e40576e
'2012-04-22T00:30:03-04:00'
describe
'57323' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNV' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
ee8cb0713378252c93f6bbe9b9fe2350
d357a961fb0f3bf6629fe3c0d44be36acf279cb3
'2012-04-22T00:27:28-04:00'
describe
'2092616' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
49560c778d4324c9b9160ebf5aae6ff2
dba0a06b47134ee65615bee6a30cea1631ec94ed
'2012-04-22T00:32:51-04:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNX' 'sip-files00006.txt'
9a92c7a4c83d086e802cf54cdb926bcf
3b105582c0b132eb35142612405bc7f6deb5953b
'2012-04-22T00:30:51-04:00'
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNY' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
5b1b401eee85f52bf67561cd81f78d47
d3e6876a35506104beec4462fe851afdd2554565
'2012-04-22T00:37:11-04:00'
describe
'146799' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUNZ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
b6a2b412b1b678393beb7078c127a414
6ddb255a5058b271ba06b39cf3b390c1d42cb539
'2012-04-22T00:29:47-04:00'
describe
'65984' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOA' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
6b2c9638bb6524a3113681b1e6fc2d5d
f1fbe0a4fd2f61e81aef3bc75c4ae817f5d1b62d
'2012-04-22T00:29:53-04:00'
describe
'12806' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOB' 'sip-files00007.pro'
cfd2ee711450cca8a74a44d97ca4c037
e75c5f224d6de30f1d89b840d071569c8225ca20
'2012-04-22T00:38:25-04:00'
describe
'38800' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOC' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
bd7c3d9b968c76cbee3dc25f1c581592
bc2282b456df2429785a1f282d65dd5f8aa00d12
'2012-04-22T00:35:21-04:00'
describe
'2079528' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOD' 'sip-files00007.tif'
744ed384e10fede44582dec8e93e67ca
563288fdde3863aab5e9a8ec6e10808521856cd1
'2012-04-22T00:37:56-04:00'
describe
'541' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOE' 'sip-files00007.txt'
455c3c36ede1a990947749bae1e12f89
ff50417ba7388fa44c12e8be9fde7fa054997355
describe
'26546' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
e5afa4fb8b25daa7b1d4a712d0e1e946
f3e4dce37af73f15a20107c96994b7fec6325be3
describe
'253277' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOG' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
1b4cc6cd9dc300040c748c8f4b13293a
7945d313250a50529f5bbf82deb2eeca7a61c395
'2012-04-22T00:28:36-04:00'
describe
'152018' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOH' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
108739b52ecd9ceb11d2c814f641f1a2
4ccc771c603ecc7024a214f3464594781fe808c1
'2012-04-22T00:35:20-04:00'
describe
'28029' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOI' 'sip-files00008.pro'
59dd471f1fb1a379e28878cbc99de139
c2efb3b126cae8a23b347af658fdc673150b0e44
'2012-04-22T00:37:29-04:00'
describe
'68703' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOJ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
2093c0916d19520e0afa72499eed2661
ad8eb51bc73417d5007bbb60b5c77889d698b480
'2012-04-22T00:29:31-04:00'
describe
'2048628' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOK' 'sip-files00008.tif'
3fca2f801146f2344e660ffd2116becb
84b63eecdacee1370e97c3e8220d0084c080d7bb
'2012-04-22T00:27:58-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOL' 'sip-files00008.txt'
3c5e8ce11fbf172fb0ba332ac0f899c6
78738318cbde2d8e56fabfcce40d5ea1f2f17af2
'2012-04-22T00:36:16-04:00'
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOM' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
701ec2cd56966b8ae29b34783839e70d
02e9a61f94916b7259db612701b291ce75087b2a
'2012-04-22T00:33:12-04:00'
describe
'254194' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUON' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
1cb8da68cc83753e2469847691a1d647
45e8b09ac696fdae04301054ce257b3b06e7ae39
'2012-04-22T00:34:56-04:00'
describe
'160875' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
f5a0268d949f3a1ec75fe75cf26a23a8
71ac48195bb36f344798deb2263ec54461e95178
'2012-04-22T00:28:04-04:00'
describe
'31062' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOP' 'sip-files00009.pro'
478c314eab70f784bb57dd6e11d3dfbd
782a8ef676ff56e786996e963f4058df5b345c0f
'2012-04-22T00:36:40-04:00'
describe
'73241' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0982183975a6c15c1737845a918644cc
b2cf15acd508acfd7ece01a68a21f745a9d66c30
'2012-04-22T00:34:23-04:00'
describe
'2057028' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c2a094098731860ca6e5e1eacc971079
a6f9d121ccb32e5a4952b97c5ea4999572d62928
'2012-04-22T00:30:53-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
4fe722c4fb1e3197aaaf9ec3793a544f
763be524bb0c16b147a78b771f551e983c472378
describe
'39199' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOT' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
17886d6e5c81cffb44ce996bd039af34
c11729979b96d557e205915ceb4d28bd5839540f
'2012-04-22T00:36:18-04:00'
describe
'252894' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
56098239e477ee83fa9f5b544fbdc63c
4037c113ca252e5591aa865f5cdbff0be799fe38
'2012-04-22T00:31:40-04:00'
describe
'175127' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
2207832be07d09faf16dbd2fdf07a7cf
039abb475df44c39eb5b60ee248ce27372448f78
'2012-04-22T00:29:27-04:00'
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOW' 'sip-files00010.pro'
ab5b35ea8366b73f071acd15967f106f
8b0c10feaa31a4295255d2685779c5faf82a30bd
'2012-04-22T00:29:39-04:00'
describe
'78150' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
6079f9ca5ca1b8bf468d22ce3a458bba
47e8a3d503e6e7a2685c1d5ae41ac014e20cdc4d
'2012-04-22T00:35:42-04:00'
describe
'2046896' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOY' 'sip-files00010.tif'
7174a0244c7f450e662b9b821b191882
f4d257a08a476b7a1608a8cb35984208163df894
'2012-04-22T00:29:03-04:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUOZ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
073a6c6a058e0d5e9b931af3e2801078
17b842a2a142c29b02b236384aba3df5cfaae9c7
'2012-04-22T00:34:32-04:00'
describe
'39897' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
30fe0a72ec060717df2e7f02a5aacbb6
752d012c89add06b8a362462b8fb1b17f469ae72
'2012-04-22T00:28:31-04:00'
describe
'252313' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
9a51e767214a9fb714390fecfa39d7dc
7564fab14bcde1bbaf6ebf6ddd3c774f9f20410d
'2012-04-22T00:34:34-04:00'
describe
'168744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
36c06df7fc4136fb7182df35c9755072
6b2d64aa1a4e816d75dcd30b259bdc8f0cdc0ba4
'2012-04-22T00:34:05-04:00'
describe
'31620' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
693bffaa335a3015da0c6018e6ec62da
75ad984a4ed5074c60105c1dfc7a3a9a238caa61
'2012-04-22T00:38:09-04:00'
describe
'74653' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
950bba7470c760de4f434058f3a386c3
e7d817f8ab9968122dc38d97c9343eb0e9415ea4
'2012-04-22T00:29:17-04:00'
describe
'2041628' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
555be4b088b292cecf2388771eb65ef9
b2f9f82d187aaf92b9b7c0f5c18e5633f80546d5
'2012-04-22T00:32:53-04:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
0daca6efa1ac761d624e456d3053835e
bf986c26d2859e02fb359ae50184dedb2118947c
'2012-04-22T00:31:32-04:00'
describe
'39671' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
446376ce6201eea6148e640067f64953
50b212a564db7c12aab41fd71ef5b96c1356695f
'2012-04-22T00:36:10-04:00'
describe
'256135' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a7138e66231aebdfbad084850b24c016
7b0c307bee2f6cecbfbc932af0a95f54611b5513
'2012-04-22T00:34:12-04:00'
describe
'179859' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPJ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2f276b0af68f1f27c6c23fdf705f12cc
ca694ab22ccd49ea9a07f6c8b47c01508f5e3c7a
'2012-04-22T00:36:58-04:00'
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
d938624bcde29cb8135c73c531be7773
6646e18ffeaf8b8cbc91772765820a11942d6e85
describe
'79637' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPL' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
265dd30b410d8b2e7ce9a214b034065b
1cb7c463d58c1a86b9bc90dfb7f31232728269c3
'2012-04-22T00:28:11-04:00'
describe
'2072688' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPM' 'sip-files00012.tif'
c388dff1f70d6e31163e39fdf564f62e
cdf6e4801ab97905be2f247c5ca0985eb1c879f8
'2012-04-22T00:31:43-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
ac956c25c271db5c2943fae42176acef
d578a269e58e6c15d109aed9da6bc2857e0a4f6c
'2012-04-22T00:27:29-04:00'
describe
'40854' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPO' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
3a9e31bf6a0d8157afaec0d9455b008f
2cb5d5532819b6ac63a340f4d1b7b493dfed9597
'2012-04-22T00:34:42-04:00'
describe
'254239' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d979f09b6c50d18e2bcd394d5d0a2d27
c5cf61bed34e4e20d93690001597c3eb10ea0ca8
'2012-04-22T00:36:14-04:00'
describe
'175620' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
a1865d9350b34857e3939188d2cebec2
b227fa9dc46be27abb3940a2b08685d1cf7d01e3
'2012-04-22T00:36:41-04:00'
describe
'33947' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
3bfed7b25bc70a8593923f1c5cc954fd
465ac792b5d3c14997a8ea97f191975251c93e0f
'2012-04-22T00:30:11-04:00'
describe
'78143' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8a39c8dc73fce9b1831c7c6da894cc6d
5c1f719a64fde2627243f3881e7dec594188fb8e
'2012-04-22T00:29:55-04:00'
describe
'2057372' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPT' 'sip-files00013.tif'
382eb02487b844fd27e62f34da4fb7df
42b0c63a3a9a637f845ac87dbec013aa77354b21
'2012-04-22T00:37:15-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
04e622c34ba94d5887aaa5b6b027727a
61acb8ad73f0615c9f31c68b3926936fd9b81fff
'2012-04-22T00:29:09-04:00'
describe
'40365' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
4b4a2424879d7cd2fb184d5a71a88c3e
76c1de19847235c64a4aa6bbe6e99d9490ed7a1e
'2012-04-22T00:37:20-04:00'
describe
'257091' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
e298ec1c2be7d955b323f6cd5efcd4cd
d05152306e67bd82c71c71b25e1eaaca59a75965
'2012-04-22T00:33:07-04:00'
describe
'180978' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
483478c313a3ce09387f039df22b11da
8016b20918869c9986867b7e785bd0409eb3e382
'2012-04-22T00:29:33-04:00'
describe
'35178' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c3241382fb06a71299a794407e8d0c93
c861474706790b595c52f2ab73240f665054fdfc
'2012-04-22T00:32:05-04:00'
describe
'79804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUPZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
f5bc689e43106d0228b528ee55cfedb9
ad7b7d23044a5a4a52e4c5cc78d9f0a74302004c
'2012-04-22T00:27:56-04:00'
describe
'2080380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a40f03617f87ba6014475f4e99732d52
c09eb7bad941ddfcc92c0b2d2a6a5ceba7fe4cb0
'2012-04-22T00:30:59-04:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
14de739be545dc137ed3f6d5ab382371
25c342c67ee487de44358c15c8b42aa17701056a
'2012-04-22T00:28:48-04:00'
describe
'40722' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
0a9820aaec670034f87e9012dabf98f0
695c8b9afe7d378622a880b2bdccded2b9209160
'2012-04-22T00:37:17-04:00'
describe
'259465' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
f463dc7f7ed062118739bcfaf9022f09
5ffe528680abf27b842cdf94f1d776c06f0205bb
'2012-04-22T00:33:13-04:00'
describe
'173858' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
8885e54b1bd8e3455aeae70bfe0a90e0
9fd269b3323773d3858d8984200a72a9aad10f0f
'2012-04-22T00:29:37-04:00'
describe
'34240' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cc907ddd354e3b4c11162af1639a0b16
7fd6679f8c06f4d323af63646604858f885c4f78
'2012-04-22T00:27:22-04:00'
describe
'78661' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
8135f2854e73e92b34f471b5d630f030
735a7f6b40734331b79190535c7cb8e369269383
'2012-04-22T00:32:04-04:00'
describe
'2099212' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d7c8b768b1a8d6437a22a5aac520764f
952e28db16e7d6e9649e0bc8530f96466b7c299e
'2012-04-22T00:29:26-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
763edd13c9eafd9cfea4f539b615bc56
0ee339f9d8aada93b2ec03107c91878ada1dc97c
'2012-04-22T00:31:48-04:00'
describe
'39418' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ff6e24238c32ea1d222aef93538904c2
04c828e743056b3aad08a40f87182e47dd3ab8bc
'2012-04-22T00:33:43-04:00'
describe
'257742' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6e5896b655cc71c86da61e8146bc1c06
36ac98f533f50b8a348455e6857c13588270672e
'2012-04-22T00:32:49-04:00'
describe
'182357' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
45f5ca29a37d528c04e199189231349d
b0903ee0768ff83c14268af1f5c1994243529fbf
'2012-04-22T00:31:23-04:00'
describe
'34688' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
55ca593812269496fb4e0ea8e691dc34
eb21d83eeb421d1718bc064c15a1f35219c1d192
describe
'79812' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
fa279eb61715cbdd60190988c6f23f32
18b814736e3290be2cd684c3d8c3366d895cc292
'2012-04-22T00:33:53-04:00'
describe
'2086060' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
af9d303d196079254cc5adf4e0d06ad0
a0c3f75964101ef8dc2b66d28086bdd5455b206a
'2012-04-22T00:35:56-04:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
1717630954808e02a9fc34fb303080bf
2822994248012d55278c3d2f75bbfde4825d000c
'2012-04-22T00:30:16-04:00'
describe
'40287' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
0d285182e8fffed64ee9e1ced9c4b07c
e63024cdf0d097d5bcc9154ea1444d6b5a0a7ef1
describe
'252235' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
0d3e9d9eda534d25daf070fca2f61d58
fa3b77f5d4cdf2563dab9930a583d03687b066dd
'2012-04-22T00:32:39-04:00'
describe
'181715' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
f78ec291b472402c6534b2f16bc4161a
68432e06c4eaf36d71f44304fac59687f31d1f8e
'2012-04-22T00:36:11-04:00'
describe
'33582' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
b0598f824662d603c40cc94504c5fddb
4dbfd7ac8548035361aa12fb52a3306c23db0576
'2012-04-22T00:37:46-04:00'
describe
'83465' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c0f9656fd2c1d4ec70633df14dfadb97
3bb1fa4e303ab38da3cb7aff471212cd31719573
describe
'2042484' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
5514c1d517b5f8295afa1b8168944932
3e94a7085e4e45589efa5d48982620d2d871033c
'2012-04-22T00:37:06-04:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
7885731a7eed79610920fc7868cd593f
90b2bb0aa5193afbfb061429d7c45e39086fd7b7
'2012-04-22T00:35:45-04:00'
describe
'41849' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
27f5dc63c9ef99def94d5a3bb24c580e
a9d9db257ffd1c781fc0597d3db4ff70f447b321
'2012-04-22T00:36:55-04:00'
describe
'246867' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
983649def41cda499f0def0f7902bc39
709487c846126120c50ed11cc8dbb7950bab3014
'2012-04-22T00:32:08-04:00'
describe
'183830' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUQZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2a2cb0aa0d92fa2b73272ce0582e2ae9
23334422f6f6abb99378a8319da89a41bc7da908
'2012-04-22T00:34:35-04:00'
describe
'33676' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
3faf0ba38ad012ce177135a93f573049
0e3379ca1ae267e474fcc769b4eff3e3efe2cc80
'2012-04-22T00:35:40-04:00'
describe
'80717' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
f785be35525df42413c6e5e2c2db23b2
c65a90cd3787b6854be5e1a99917680f3d496c45
'2012-04-22T00:38:14-04:00'
describe
'1999024' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3915385522c4937d3c64b8731d645196
788485709ca4fc40ffc1d9ac4892d36a27925eb0
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
649478ac1fbd558b845f7202d200a83c
04b673b05ec47abb86c0970479382817b178690f
describe
'40996' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
ae8cda3d9f625f16aafeb473d84c462e
84e977917f5b560de058b06b5c57a187198303cc
'2012-04-22T00:27:59-04:00'
describe
'257255' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
24a7463b0c0db8920b9261a5c55df875
48bf98990a42812818fe9a578f2c42d0a2fa71c8
'2012-04-22T00:28:01-04:00'
describe
'171113' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
26d27f7352e49e6551f74302b69ac81e
c8f95c9df1af8676609f9d71864a285589afe7b0
'2012-04-22T00:31:22-04:00'
describe
'33899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a31c4aeec2099df7cdd39f0b7bec1d98
436e6679e8b56bd0d708d1dcbc71ade19e12395a
'2012-04-22T00:31:20-04:00'
describe
'77229' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
0a11522de09aec632cd2d5511087ba66
7af3ef8981a417e5d9a0fd75ab0b0ffecab43cae
'2012-04-22T00:36:33-04:00'
describe
'2081904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
a14dc5db0295ae4b775397cdc23a653a
474828a7f8a0a2b3ca7cf6017d562eea44d64673
'2012-04-22T00:36:54-04:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
0f113cc458619faeb3d471eb2663a6da
6c193364808670698896b77d9f7b089ccbe55bbf
'2012-04-22T00:28:12-04:00'
describe
'39641' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
dc902c7e0feaa25a564cac578a7af07f
5288b62e9a2d2c459277c94ccf0446ed37255e9f
'2012-04-22T00:36:04-04:00'
describe
'265260' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
48de1852c23a16a7b78491cb7c787c8b
5cb5a7e6cb3d1b45c9188e105331e85b3865a60a
'2012-04-22T00:27:57-04:00'
describe
'170629' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
405503f42116c7260cd94d908da7a629
930a6460210155007a895d46a8b2e8af02422c8a
'2012-04-22T00:33:04-04:00'
describe
'31427' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
449cb1f4533087fb0d13a018101c87db
aff8507ed542d0e7501db5d6f1376b1a0a71d90b
describe
'75520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6aeb11190fe74d4679c82ae975e399ca
177da958382dbd0b9f78349711ac253ac3c2553b
describe
'2146512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ed1f5cf0d69ec8117c29c42f5bd065e2
491c904393cadef6b4f16c986d4b56aae23c0065
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
9b66c880e8e53912235c2817f595cb39
63ec19ef0f3edfbfac73e8cc7ed960a8116847b0
'2012-04-22T00:32:55-04:00'
describe
'37811' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
74e4261060a453adf758bdf06d156f9c
04c2189055d7268ec4af777233b661fd891834b6
'2012-04-22T00:28:22-04:00'
describe
'265296' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
91b519137297c066a53ecb84ab946f3a
1c6e5c8e3fea255cba25f14203798352d2b3b346
'2012-04-22T00:36:45-04:00'
describe
'140903' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
7ebf526987676aa2307c9069fc23f6c0
3346290e7d9f9a2648eaf2c21ab4c45a41e061e2
'2012-04-22T00:33:11-04:00'
describe
'25004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
65ca588b803081922f0d9703cbd2d8d5
013cfb97a5555f4b1befd52b0b1e95a934ec567f
'2012-04-22T00:28:27-04:00'
describe
'64973' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
71aeff875a40b59551a57b711aa3e0d1
1fe32c14a00224beb484065b92417af659989d86
describe
'2145016' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
25c1a47fb39da3b797e0bbc31dea8e3c
30545dbe69d6feab0ad9e3c05095340cb1235eae
'2012-04-22T00:34:29-04:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
13c72a661ab043f866cba2e2e1321028
c8aef48d9c5746f6afbc3b542d683347f80e5258
'2012-04-22T00:29:08-04:00'
describe
'35283' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADURZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
fde43c5af830ec17b1b5f4dc9fd883d8
69498cf2cf1347cee7922217f855724bdaf32738
'2012-04-22T00:29:43-04:00'
describe
'265655' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
8db56079d0ba17bd76686852d3e49784
155f20bb5b35e4b67912eac4f83d4504ed5ad7b7
'2012-04-22T00:37:49-04:00'
describe
'171847' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
d836377ef0d395cf57ca804c3cdcee38
e254ef7a69b501504f1f3346df4ce71447cf0552
'2012-04-22T00:29:30-04:00'
describe
'33417' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
aa8547ac69e2770e99863c833ddc9239
3b8dd13c7b68f996daa5d954f69726674ecfc6d9
'2012-04-22T00:28:10-04:00'
describe
'77302' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c880292113557d4a006cc20424a9295b
123770a40108132dda31c518c6597e647c3e95cb
'2012-04-22T00:36:48-04:00'
describe
'2149084' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSE' 'sip-files00022.tif'
588a4a1af8dd527460350200da1337a5
888110b3fd0e41afd390b6772aaf8c9cfbe6852d
'2012-04-22T00:35:10-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
06f0aac3b55ad54d3bdb4defc6fc3b31
4756e1e9c649bf6f56c685a7b63f937744fed7b4
'2012-04-22T00:31:06-04:00'
describe
'39604' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
0ffc18461b2115c77361ba0cb9b73628
3a714803d46fe8417feca7d4f5e681f33eb5952e
'2012-04-22T00:36:39-04:00'
describe
'265155' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7d1e658d96a4a27dabaaa9eb482f2bd9
31f1da92d60aff442da6162a84156bcf86a6dbd0
describe
'157858' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2fa24bab236180c0e1aa30c36ba771ff
f8659f7cc61cea7c566b8d39a4467ae0c7ac3369
'2012-04-22T00:27:55-04:00'
describe
'29723' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
370ab7daaa102207375e5f140ac60984
93da1424225dfcb8f883db88efbeb5165424d8bf
'2012-04-22T00:32:37-04:00'
describe
'71817' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d2fafdab07759df68c04f3564c77d5a6
0f78c7c3d930ba200ce88d67835c0abd863de69d
'2012-04-22T00:35:53-04:00'
describe
'2145548' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
079b89ae45a694580991860935541ce5
b9faace6fa15e272031501d3ebd66331b12840e9
'2012-04-22T00:29:56-04:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
eeecbef09c3271644f2ea79612dad866
4bbdfb992c84ac7a2c4cf03075267a3101a1ce52
'2012-04-22T00:33:46-04:00'
describe
'37441' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ed1400e09d725e9d97cbccb2f6872c0e
c0a6f4013f52f1d1ba2a8b37f7214030af32bd3e
'2012-04-22T00:30:23-04:00'
describe
'265677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
dab001edc174a0dabcd6524cfe7bdb8c
a98611e9972ae02c7c65c7201763953b6af706af
'2012-04-22T00:35:22-04:00'
describe
'159858' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
cba59dfe607e8114f475b2ff3b9add09
1f5a476fe2dbc3f6f06579eb9cb068f962b1ecfc
'2012-04-22T00:30:38-04:00'
describe
'30871' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
fe91eed6b021bc3c28f9a2e75ce6a2c3
7c63899c33518f9f81582892aee11623d743e9c9
describe
'72957' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
3d5eefecd94b1046d4e270db6129f27e
3153b03aa5c85b58fd46781953b5ae9c335ea327
'2012-04-22T00:36:17-04:00'
describe
'2148452' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
81b0afd2265f680b6687f9a6771e6374
941a9100ed84da9c1cf2fdd67425fe3d9e450e6f
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUST' 'sip-files00024.txt'
14bdf508bba45e79fade1e85c37b0931
c739be987ae12a8161e2d0ad9b88e9c300d01f54
describe
'38074' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
36b0efae1995c005a559c822a2675e1b
4769b422e3b8d013fe39ce8ef28b64597b81553b
'2012-04-22T00:35:11-04:00'
describe
'248059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
805147c771bdb14f2ed136099fa55398
bf11e22ef7492ecfc5f7762132efa055f48f5d0b
'2012-04-22T00:31:18-04:00'
describe
'167267' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5b30e611ffec6b9dd541001b5ad3eea9
8f966589afc512c8dc1af0dac691ac4e213ac46e
describe
'32109' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
614f62393c2c0e8b3d89ae4c217e631c
ace370bd5b5233694a139584b84893a64b802fd2
'2012-04-22T00:37:44-04:00'
describe
'77303' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
cf3901e88935c44f737446dec2578421
96cd7199e1c5c9c276dd794dc65a23c7d8e35100
'2012-04-22T00:38:32-04:00'
describe
'2008312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUSZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
7b3b0d6af73d914992fa3d805534efe2
f39ad61846840e6574ffc7083574d6aae253face
'2012-04-22T00:36:49-04:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
180a3cb6f70518b26de0d63fba88763d
f9033ae025ce26f40c64f716ccb29b6180904cd0
'2012-04-22T00:36:59-04:00'
describe
'38715' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
bd9b9afd0854064ae350729b7f3f2fe8
6e384ea3a155a393fee7d58fe86000b491fe838b
describe
'265547' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
1a72ab6c592afe85dba9f29000114a95
7f995c085d2cc4fed3ed9210676268f4a6a4846d
'2012-04-22T00:36:52-04:00'
describe
'165904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTD' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
0c4d3a3e62d2e80770e9a5c37041d184
6747550efe740d62391455c266cdd3c4c065fa7b
describe
'32989' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
12f83b5a5545dd7542ca9e331bbd5c63
112c28e4a428db4321a3f7aadada436c92120af1
describe
'75249' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
66ae14adf4f063170b54774558317fd3
34c67d2cb075546ff49c51608fa390e1e43b4869
'2012-04-22T00:31:58-04:00'
describe
'2147604' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
8989a572ea2e937daf5d3d750d02a1fb
e936a255fe918aafcc4c702fa8c0739ef96334e7
'2012-04-22T00:29:02-04:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
4181116c59164f550d7e9b71e5ed4af9
67b0fb27008c4b8bdf225a3bbac59c40a64702da
'2012-04-22T00:30:45-04:00'
describe
'38681' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
85af8fe7cce6184a04178382cdf01184
79e6135b6515888327ae82fa900780525db11059
describe
'253736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5e1d6aa232376e7e2b3c8b722bd628e9
736ed198bbdf19820c61aface35ed39610545314
'2012-04-22T00:29:24-04:00'
describe
'148222' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
c9cea7ffb954cc507e9997586ebf3882
66a6a01e73c18a047da08f6eaf93ecd3df7ffa41
'2012-04-22T00:31:57-04:00'
describe
'27935' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f2dbc3ee8c91e67cdee0ee631fc26694
7e6db93501d97582a1f7bc03c48d4aa22dd8db2c
describe
'69659' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
220fedf35b9bd98408544127a92661dc
42493b51aa8205404975b39cfdedd512fd8ab783
'2012-04-22T00:33:40-04:00'
describe
'2052744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
feb913dead7c3187fc1aacf1eba11d64
0e4075b2b10a490f1f541417a3e89cb333f6c772
'2012-04-22T00:28:43-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
17b0b6658b4bd8bd8bde5d36141de584
6d9abf82da14b59f9857bd9a8fe88c00d51af021
'2012-04-22T00:28:14-04:00'
describe
'35428' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
2f8f64800c0941828dc24899e85db712
98544407c6b75c64f13ef924dac36bf9d595fd95
'2012-04-22T00:34:31-04:00'
describe
'263084' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
d4f3789b21a48376d1311890388a0e36
072d2d4aae16314da211649880066672f743962a
describe
'145844' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
0ee52b9282321226e92ee7b35ef416a8
5997f585a56d67f4573404c8dba503c499b61c36
'2012-04-22T00:32:38-04:00'
describe
'27219' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
464d6b4a8fae53ecebe7e614b2516d1b
e45025e2b5a0c01b0fbcd621d6335766780d76fe
'2012-04-22T00:34:06-04:00'
describe
'66638' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
25d6c0223030b44cfbddf43ad8eada69
ba1ea345e8b7d80205f1d70a4d63025d4439f7bc
describe
'2126980' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
cdd1f0a2ac95bbf25e9d077758442907
b173960dab3e3c08f60e482d11b47a22128d0fe7
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ceee0e5bbc7e86c08e53122bd6b24c99
c7e50f563836746acfd7c5cec38cc5ccb90e2629
describe
'34968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
31a498cccc8ccd23446c15c23825b9b4
290a92baaa2bb07760e92d7b2924acbacc3090c1
'2012-04-22T00:31:36-04:00'
describe
'256955' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
226ff021d4c98f76e1ac247c0b6a73d2
02b69df966f091acedc87e5b6b6fbe301f53b621
'2012-04-22T00:36:47-04:00'
describe
'151312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
2be3dc6f4680af07e0b279f472996ff8
871dd3e70200d982c5c057d3313b42abb8378b98
'2012-04-22T00:34:50-04:00'
describe
'29129' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUTZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
f8d8fda7c9e1d7789de790de5c5b8736
7b5b7de515c6fe95e7a1294039fa9da0ea49831c
'2012-04-22T00:38:29-04:00'
describe
'71755' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
4816044358fe35aa84ad1d88ad2cfd89
767aed5687bab9ddebda84d8e1de8d195cd1c6cb
describe
'2079016' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a587fa07934708a5724a82b7b54672a4
9b85aa2b3738359db770a9eeb3dcbe00927983f9
'2012-04-22T00:38:00-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
5fdb6f7903befba124258919a6001ea4
05baaf40550ebefcbd6ddfbfa5137f4ba614fe2b
'2012-04-22T00:34:22-04:00'
describe
'37809' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d24a6adc638126407e79d56e8f5bfe78
771bda649683c5f979e40a382803e8e5fa2f0508
'2012-04-22T00:36:35-04:00'
describe
'250925' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
b272eb145a19509f17c0d2373444afa7
48de77463784f8f282151dfd6cda58a14f60e021
'2012-04-22T00:28:24-04:00'
describe
'160507' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
890fad2f4fa1f3d20305f7b789a05967
6c7879464dd720a48bbc1049aab589c3f790d16a
'2012-04-22T00:35:33-04:00'
describe
'30338' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bc2332377b32d88df4b273b28e381c6d
4786ede4262883488bd02e16b809747f408685ec
'2012-04-22T00:32:52-04:00'
describe
'75283' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
fb11d7010a0d5c3b346fdbec708a0f94
bb0ad50d03a795ee9c6ea2e0609580c94ea18441
'2012-04-22T00:34:20-04:00'
describe
'2031232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
1d0335967a0ed5b232390a3b4b8b4564
79a427f6f673d470f98dfddd03c096565d656db8
'2012-04-22T00:29:29-04:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b33e3ac37a946a8abe39e58c8ae9daa7
1daa9e548273ed6332f58101c1ab7f81f9b12c2f
'2012-04-22T00:32:32-04:00'
describe
'39720' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7ec2f72d0ef484620ecd63f452111914
6078d432d5def970f7b4728ee71f68136144b0dd
describe
'260087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8a8e9acd92e2499dc4aa7f2593aa15b0
8a44ca48384d83943ffc828e2e3d306bbcd05f56
'2012-04-22T00:30:34-04:00'
describe
'162139' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
63b1718d08ad3829506bdb58e6576149
f670ec96c146f7489b344210beb4d297ebf71c23
'2012-04-22T00:35:02-04:00'
describe
'31685' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d086effa2cab58173121be39e081bce2
41f63c59c9f38883a1b1817b19d4246df390646e
'2012-04-22T00:31:00-04:00'
describe
'76410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c8ff4fc69e5ce39b09b124a3a16979c8
e402664a2c8803a737cd76d670a44c3013a51e60
'2012-04-22T00:37:30-04:00'
describe
'2104320' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
dd419e322b7dd9fab69198d528b3f533
5d3d89c37fb1a6bdd326eac36a551d6ab8ca2042
'2012-04-22T00:32:46-04:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
8385d4d71f01a4d8e38283106c3f80d7
c1544411054f8144482976ea0d0e93d6ccd060e3
'2012-04-22T00:27:52-04:00'
describe
'37813' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6a7b54116d0b1c19ec7c45f8ed20c46a
f13d0629443f1a7753d1abdef86ee9b16a4c3b46
'2012-04-22T00:31:21-04:00'
describe
'266306' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
06374273377568b599cbd0bdc4352658
6e2e034db684ef0cb3a8ea61847cf5ba03020ce3
'2012-04-22T00:30:56-04:00'
describe
'144619' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
743f057cea997dda5a2f1e234ee65d89
04845fc23bcfe0558051d0e5567a95574be56e32
describe
'20429' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9abeced58f2f05561039a75dcefeb60b
32544b3623687a77667a219fe8d078322e0044cc
'2012-04-22T00:33:22-04:00'
describe
'65582' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a8607307a8f6389402a01766dcd2f282
e21ab862c0cf7f48bff64340882a9ee7da1bbc01
describe
'2154000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a48fea3267577eb8703e51ba52847f75
e64c6f717679fb2f941610c19b65e943fb39198f
'2012-04-22T00:29:50-04:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
17950ea8efce8ff7960b0e9ddd57433d
d2c17731df7c6da504f3701da18ba5c4cc34c6b7
'2012-04-22T00:30:25-04:00'
describe
'34670' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
5641ed89a1880f022e0ca7d89279c556
20caa10720202447f4a5bc816983d6867b523521
'2012-04-22T00:35:43-04:00'
describe
'258928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUUZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d7f63e7e8b842a3f5dd53dfd0d8db7c9
e636ea076c76302a278a7988677cdbcacc412cc4
'2012-04-22T00:35:41-04:00'
describe
'100115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
9052b98fe072932b3b5abff75d3b0b1f
20ffe2788f3598a4ba864fbf8894651024eb79a0
'2012-04-22T00:37:33-04:00'
describe
'18593' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ad2db7f4ac3659ba773c58debd2afac1
ceabd4e232ddeb62863fd460d5d2869fd3a402e7
'2012-04-22T00:35:49-04:00'
describe
'51035' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
270121d7517028fc1e9868c95ef3fec8
e31609aaa2bab9274f01403f2608cb4bc1167e18
'2012-04-22T00:31:05-04:00'
describe
'2144824' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
49c154f9ff8c591f5957dc640f906426
d998e147e0f94ff63758a38014f1f2a9a7cd4372
'2012-04-22T00:37:02-04:00'
describe
'821' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a685ae0ef451c88b34ff097b5ab874d3
bee4c7c1eb84de093a077c0323163978b2c42f3e
'2012-04-22T00:35:26-04:00'
describe
'30691' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
704f2eb187d9aa4cbf2bac4d4df6cc29
2620bc5562a2c2cdda6a1ece85ea0585c825a16b
'2012-04-22T00:29:05-04:00'
describe
'265300' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
1baf224b420628c9907cfe620bca0961
d22c173d1e3b37218c784f5de8848597827e3a2b
'2012-04-22T00:31:02-04:00'
describe
'135997' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
7e8189c08f55042a75af1605e22750ce
f613ca2792c52f7cd8d37d2f869134e0d998b0bd
'2012-04-22T00:30:49-04:00'
describe
'21859' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
354e448511ab685b504729fe4e6bf288
fd607648bd5229f5f3c02c1194512eabb6f18ffe
'2012-04-22T00:34:17-04:00'
describe
'60754' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
5c09bc57e1511f729e5301c638004fd6
2546f667d994b83f1ae17a4f50109d0a2ed15c96
describe
'2144736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2d9ebe12055805e6cc1dec41e50764cf
6ed000444d7fbd86bd1ff4dcae281e83201e430d
'2012-04-22T00:29:49-04:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
8500fcb3451fd36e208a258db8fc06a2
a63515d42be367779cd5773b589544c3bef42a37
'2012-04-22T00:34:11-04:00'
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
d746d7be0c0acedffb2250c113abcf69
6e5b26e53db7fc5c6073229e90338f0d5511498b
'2012-04-22T00:35:58-04:00'
describe
'265560' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
92be30771a521ab64f5f07dd3b799acf
abb82f0f65d76933fe950f17d1562f0b8ae8ffbe
'2012-04-22T00:32:41-04:00'
describe
'127097' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4ddd36338c0935fd10a04a4cf94c0c69
df39fcd6448aac44ef8cdc003df599f5ad940a4a
'2012-04-22T00:37:23-04:00'
describe
'22917' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
39f279fa67c76382398491c8beb64717
f9237ce6a797766a8288235889679be042f07aae
'2012-04-22T00:31:24-04:00'
describe
'60014' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
ebc2089c1378543616c6a333128cb0d7
c37d1edfdea00e193fdb5296ebc719ee7ba44c85
'2012-04-22T00:35:17-04:00'
describe
'2146920' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8ad6b769c136d18338b4cfa6008f9bf1
96427c49094ad5de4395d5126ed3855c15a74d54
'2012-04-22T00:30:06-04:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
57bef5eddddc7cf9ffb85b248fabc611
45462f4234e2fffa9a9e845585335bd7792b1d37
'2012-04-22T00:30:04-04:00'
describe
'34281' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
eb139ebdc0d26acd55db721d5f08bc14
cd62fdf09ec5f00e7dbfb3b73a07275d7af5c8f9
'2012-04-22T00:37:32-04:00'
describe
'268988' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1e20017c40ae63d3736390bae62a6176
39f89b5eff01a09d7d126a742a90a87bb5011045
'2012-04-22T00:29:12-04:00'
describe
'130876' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1b480cf9cab3bea4b5c1363b079f1aa8
ac83bbf05ef035e0bed8b18c7704510c5c30d50f
'2012-04-22T00:35:15-04:00'
describe
'23023' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
51e8953b459d0757f2bc11fce869d7bc
98763436a313528322781687996b05575b6bda3e
'2012-04-22T00:27:54-04:00'
describe
'59940' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9712eeaa83f19b23128da549014169b0
7688fe69f61835c8e37bc0dcfc8df228d5606ec9
describe
'2174464' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
5a39a8328366579179b2fa2c0a140ac4
ea13a6aa0096a3c38e312ca2381ce785308eeb3b
'2012-04-22T00:36:50-04:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUVZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
0b3f6be5a1b97eb4f0b8354b2412ca52
e6dcd24c5424ce23cbad953d22c1b00bc78389fb
describe
'34174' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6bd2a8c3cc22c98f946277ca03f5f2d9
39ac322cd26effceaee15f50d82ff4a2480f02a4
'2012-04-22T00:36:29-04:00'
describe
'161507' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
55bafaf3e57f6208978d8fca12be4814
1c38b9d6f9dd98d521b759a13a87c34ce3db7110
'2012-04-22T00:34:07-04:00'
describe
'61323' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
84d7bb97b969d59f7d71a8c4c1d93d42
39c4592927bbbb4395476fa97ab7d399cdda7ee3
'2012-04-22T00:36:51-04:00'
describe
'3801' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
248f11dfd4862ad927fbf8442617b8df
487c0c25a551858f7af66525545e468e5f5c5314
'2012-04-22T00:36:15-04:00'
describe
'35683' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
8f5301acea89cc7b1956b337f1f2e090
a3afe6dbc24954208a5ffc6d6d3ce892006209f3
describe
'2285032' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ef7dc0dbead17334acd15276f661721f
34bdd0b688001a829243657d9b4e7801792e79af
describe
'202' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
8801a6c554c817a90b3c36ea3c51aa95
166caa636fdf0995a829790098dd677136db3de9
describe
'25087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
f1ce5b41266f73ade0887a0261e1a088
e4f7d8795edeb699db1d11cd469b9ddc23efa6c9
'2012-04-22T00:37:53-04:00'
describe
'269917' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
dcd8323548eb5ffd1b8ac8fd4f7bc5c8
81f2aef3337f03bbcaee2c1719c19e65f7fe4dda
describe
'155272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
153f05e5c763a440a354f5ecf13a5855
ca0b024c2063c16ba5403d9d7148c6dba67571a8
'2012-04-22T00:32:36-04:00'
describe
'24359' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
219a5e3f9eae0980b8cc8c2fefc31d92
5995c20e4d1c4b571437c7f4c7e850c9e3d0f2cf
'2012-04-22T00:31:44-04:00'
describe
'69341' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
fb1b43c9a10152dc947a4551d162712e
807be44df73d6abd00384836c438846e350cb7cc
'2012-04-22T00:31:08-04:00'
describe
'2182656' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7daa0fb5b1d35f9cdd50bcd70d6f58d7
4f6eeb725217b81ed6c75b69102b03afad706e05
'2012-04-22T00:28:28-04:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d8a75349acf8c9f8c3250da0989d501e
66f54f8b2de4d76cd6436d1da2ec2e596ff5409a
'2012-04-22T00:34:16-04:00'
describe
'35832' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
7657086cdcbeb28d5719aeabed1b11f9
21a4065e3c809dd2b9d59a0ccc97fd6a7feecd60
'2012-04-22T00:35:05-04:00'
describe
'265623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
bb7f08f8594dbd480df941706640b394
02c17f99afc5a9935681aea6c43c5308f8c40a50
'2012-04-22T00:28:30-04:00'
describe
'171812' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
8651ca58e661401788609979faf7bd11
d9c172ae640cc31687631c08b94079fa60412afe
'2012-04-22T00:33:18-04:00'
describe
'31697' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
e5a0c3eac9596b3091ba2b45e6f13310
cf20f5fb5f15b707f43d79cdb3a118430af3d815
'2012-04-22T00:31:39-04:00'
describe
'77501' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d963092f4597672f74120876beeb1bf7
03b6927a66d0d5297abf03d2a6ce4c18d4f56559
describe
'2149124' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
84005031d4758b59eb24e4c6e7e10a29
70ab6e0a6ea934fd072253b9576299266481e484
'2012-04-22T00:37:18-04:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
04dab7f075a3860e9c2dff280223cd8d
1d13bdd8f0cd421147d568eb5ba3f8c511435cda
describe
'39408' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
c75d26fcb8df693c5c41e55ada062723
f5719ac401c363d56993e462215d9e7eee410ea6
describe
'265320' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
2b169b81364c6300e82009a64e925855
5c2c1bda93e3fee532765334021fae792191beb8
'2012-04-22T00:33:34-04:00'
describe
'150446' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1cc4d052af796f3f31926bcc7a90fb66
e385d2f4d9b775bddf472402d2c5c5cb95884147
'2012-04-22T00:36:21-04:00'
describe
'22088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7a9afef9bc5043c5d5d2f2acf61eda90
6926d35affd9d1c4263bedcf38a2266665b03e33
'2012-04-22T00:30:46-04:00'
describe
'67757' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUWZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
24cc821d2f427019201a67a105358509
0e36744aea32d1ec36146d49d9045ef423204aef
'2012-04-22T00:28:02-04:00'
describe
'2145128' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1eda1bfda19e4b9af6f13700eab665cd
413315106a92db3af1d4054503baaf23fd146509
'2012-04-22T00:30:17-04:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
ad31ae099abc52dc8f6811baadcb6f39
19bad685d02435284b7ea18d6e5b7a6cd5bbf587
describe
'35989' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
729c664b8cd1b495249c35491f1e5618
77c9b95f367168deed7372a8ccab5139a9f16b2c
'2012-04-22T00:27:24-04:00'
describe
'257179' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
67bc7c7cf4c393a06c3025aafed1a25a
73549ad5d12a3979543b9ea959daf76f6776bb80
'2012-04-22T00:33:58-04:00'
describe
'134759' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
030a6f5adc6e8a1b1db01d6c7f6b874e
afe3fde51bd299c9517e643c6dad6fea42254be2
'2012-04-22T00:31:37-04:00'
describe
'22132' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ab7c0100570db64c18828e818f9e9f66
2438cd6640f0f54773bc0014d4f47e1f58a4adb7
'2012-04-22T00:27:48-04:00'
describe
'63329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1d08d79eb227e81331d012446babfaf2
97456181a6fa2316c712f0dfae164c96278290a3
'2012-04-22T00:29:46-04:00'
describe
'2080044' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
6dcee17eaf90dd0bb57e13c8ebbdaf14
7140fd5bf3fc8174c995ac4b4b436145a7b6d106
'2012-04-22T00:32:29-04:00'
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
cffc05a3cabf8f65f54560dd80c18d08
b24872f13cb869112760e4102e597696cc0837fb
'2012-04-22T00:35:37-04:00'
describe
'34700' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
32143f4bb1920fa2e5131e3c07368077
74dc7f30077a791e338411a00a72c0ac8628ab5c
describe
'258398' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
8ee3e863a8ac6a815df745dfae5eaa06
85811666905acf593a0f36c788e0c1b285a9d7f3
describe
'180525' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e0fd546b13cc175c53cc43be01452331
6062266de5a22b4792ad27043c222a886445799a
'2012-04-22T00:30:05-04:00'
describe
'33608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
4f743d10e66f9a1c632490de8235745c
7bde50820bb65766edaf70ce8a62e97f413d53c6
'2012-04-22T00:29:35-04:00'
describe
'79570' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e35f507de73058d3cb0d19d60a885f69
ff131dfeeedb9e65f6e261ebd2ff319c8a3e9af5
describe
'2091300' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3470ef98ee0a520d01407713e57b22ce
b756df6284b72dbafada6952e30cff6a6c10d331
'2012-04-22T00:37:08-04:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
53048531408108ddd83c679c9f9f43f7
47902dbd710ee19746c2662be21923b8263d5a63
'2012-04-22T00:27:47-04:00'
describe
'39875' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ef0152a6b032b9a9099550ce9d342db2
68f0e44b348b59ddab7c6a9bd05e51fc20117d24
'2012-04-22T00:32:23-04:00'
describe
'265459' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ea5ccf480a29174a8312d1f7fba7a754
a53decaf484503c512f2e410e632fb63890e0dd9
'2012-04-22T00:27:45-04:00'
describe
'164543' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
1fbf84e7af6d2741bef485f45d4b2cdf
7cb16b7081bbb89139eb26d8afc16e3f5e8f5b5f
'2012-04-22T00:36:27-04:00'
describe
'31122' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
45b6c3a1e807c603b8aae42013f5ac90
0639e97689f191f7e6f755974b1935c7c57849a7
'2012-04-22T00:27:42-04:00'
describe
'74379' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
88054e381d2b5b62b2a28e6b58837ac3
c1e9869a1fd3832b7fac448b4ba4d6a1db769e7a
'2012-04-22T00:29:57-04:00'
describe
'2146864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
6e5a9e9e2f12c3b09ece5224b85d67e6
80958c91a06d988e98b198f61b04322aca1fb34c
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
042d4aafcb0f052d4c22374fa9150619
3f738ff36284273c2eebba2e7b5f2f2cfd45629d
describe
'38590' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a6441acf13020ef85e566aab33aed086
b4334bde753ccba7d44d772850b996f38c631531
'2012-04-22T00:38:11-04:00'
describe
'265427' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
8fb6b1917a073bc21feafec48863f740
3e49a337bf349b166a2785c7727c054c9ee09e8e
'2012-04-22T00:30:47-04:00'
describe
'173325' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUXZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f848b43d7ae191a793afd39b0b87e649
47e21b92d2242ef65382dfb5765b51746bb1f07d
'2012-04-22T00:33:29-04:00'
describe
'31864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
13f7d9a777973a31e8b7ae27199d663b
e2cf4af2e5c586c158060b014c08c5f427b9b211
'2012-04-22T00:33:59-04:00'
describe
'76652' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2d0e00c0eaa87d57e647d14a3704a83a
efd8cba24e2a2844cc3adaba14f111049624624b
describe
'2147316' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
fa5188bc3a5b69478e32c1d72d4479f2
b27cc5ba4d3d8bb8f93fba4552e2fd9be900db7b
'2012-04-22T00:33:20-04:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
316b1748763b382ae0af7248b9e5db5f
7cb9429b0e94681da9ec1bd69538b389462af30a
'2012-04-22T00:33:30-04:00'
describe
'39399' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYE' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9971b73a4d295ef3dedefe20aef5a7b1
e700faa9d2de293495482eace10dc77b1631efdb
'2012-04-22T00:32:26-04:00'
describe
'263033' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6425287e5224f7506f78609c7b053eeb
f96e409acf67966a4b955e12e2c885b8d3fa83e8
'2012-04-22T00:34:01-04:00'
describe
'165924' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
0264c57eaa575326d100cbc98f770d37
23d2074eeaba6195f86feef158ffd3b5ec72e6e5
describe
'30761' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
411674e7ecdd71affc73aa34e4ffc36e
6fd65d9a822252b577df39927d817fe7b7c8bc99
'2012-04-22T00:32:01-04:00'
describe
'74250' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d39d0ccbbc244c63da614930b0fce498
755fa682010b444ecc29e79f00ecb4dde82fd9ac
'2012-04-22T00:29:41-04:00'
describe
'2127692' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
aafd7ed180f3b61f5ac0061babf54701
a774ff0489f3fe718a9503750fdfc3faba32f306
'2012-04-22T00:35:30-04:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
aa91830fe67578f6ade49b603d668bf8
acb77262b39e08e7da73314fe79d9c0ff8b4e37b
'2012-04-22T00:34:36-04:00'
describe
'38422' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYL' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
67da34b6d30be5011721d0945f8ec5b1
194edb68351325456dc81887ae469f728fece4df
'2012-04-22T00:28:41-04:00'
describe
'87581' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a19bbf31c918884fa3ff9930d04f0f12
adb5588d0ac4b5bc133e4c0f34177b5f0352293f
'2012-04-22T00:34:47-04:00'
describe
'34029' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
5fb9c16e4a85dbcddad5f6f841af424f
4c6d0804e3f62e277d46ecc7271eb8c59835be8e
'2012-04-22T00:33:38-04:00'
describe
'23668' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
58adf722a0af21ac676465c54b43144e
e72f26bfcbe9f169cd32c67e3ead31db3ec780c9
'2012-04-22T00:29:15-04:00'
describe
'2095208' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
3d594c1c553db85f33bc2abcb917896c
777d273d6d089b5a78736b8ab7a70a6c7c4017f1
'2012-04-22T00:32:47-04:00'
describe
'20464' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYQ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
5220335a996fc4387a6fd6bfdc705293
4d10c1ce311c5adbdc2cd4ee57e8d35fa068ed32
describe
'265592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9967e3d464fe4cb21da7b2ffb9251004
c7557b94b065d119ce2f295c5d81290cddfb2524
'2012-04-22T00:31:56-04:00'
describe
'146218' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYS' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
5c359ec96244876903e345290d42a01c
ded46fe1f355f54db8db2e596bc334140b61bc8f
describe
'58506' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYT' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
73c7af018eaa9a07f3ac82fa29dfa2fb
53d31986b9055726301ef5d2b824fbe2d34b50d9
'2012-04-22T00:30:22-04:00'
describe
'2146892' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYU' 'sip-files00047.tif'
afdbe431ed844b475b61e077f0c93d33
977c68816c556dc0475e2609380477cef751dc72
describe
'32439' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e8f3ef3eab8f2bf2b91309c797f7059b
5285088ab72451541076497488c3ac53068feea4
describe
'261399' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c9aa7f6fe0324ba2e537b12ae7f4edba
cfc206758d1054fb48124a2bd45091f63c0626fb
describe
'142271' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
9f1618ee0002ce3ae1575f25121db0b0
aabf95d8a1bfa6f3e760e951f69bf25aa4971693
'2012-04-22T00:36:38-04:00'
describe
'20415' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYY' 'sip-files00048.pro'
01dda67d4a33afd03982a3d7e0f5f4f0
6b4056501f571167536e55817e72620afa7591cd
'2012-04-22T00:28:21-04:00'
describe
'62445' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUYZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d57a8f5f5843f19d3781bd69d2493675
756a28236d1db44aecaec99d1e4d107e8e267c48
describe
'2114876' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7d4ce2ea7a27849b1ef04b093e96304c
361d3ba03afb098a95dcfbf02ee4c9ab7c853697
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
fa602f8c87eee4ea260d94d73ce958c9
b495d7a1e28b9dbf50ff626f8db7fceb3e3b1887
'2012-04-22T00:30:27-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34433' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
66b6367f9fa68cb4af5ce214ec8015b8
5b25deb2c8a859e9dc76ba586969acc3ecb8f417
'2012-04-22T00:27:51-04:00'
describe
'260559' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
011560240229404fe64bc89706bfc3ae
c162308222a840c032430bf0430c4b6974f52e22
'2012-04-22T00:37:07-04:00'
describe
'120559' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b9abdfa6455a073aab8a97e7ca88c82e
b68eb5c9ac521a992bd5bc354575b3eaed475641
'2012-04-22T00:31:09-04:00'
describe
'19073' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
35f6792f5ec3a3216be7c326318579ef
877ac783619a63d5a7a24ce66ee657d24ca8961c
describe
'56520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
417339db57cdacc5d2daa8d1b1f83682
0cb302216ca01164e23192cf2482e27664f14cbb
'2012-04-22T00:36:24-04:00'
describe
'2107272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c105620afab3466e8102c4ffda305a68
b496191ca1b9d0c2def63a7978daa22c30763358
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
94b61160b9d06db61310b9a831d97825
16eb263a3c5d3185deb5c2d04114e6cdf31421b0
'2012-04-22T00:37:39-04:00'
describe
'33106' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8b1243844c06efb6754f11b089eba2f7
f073716a44cb03e06bb89645227a9b1c7284fc48
'2012-04-22T00:30:40-04:00'
describe
'265230' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZK' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
93b4273dfa2d6b869feaa33ddd4420bd
95cca907e04d92edd91d15da5a850dd903988a7b
'2012-04-22T00:29:32-04:00'
describe
'153895' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
99daff76e968d77c66d86c715bda912e
5e6cc182cf8c75e65791fd8566a53ea2c18e35e7
describe
'22528' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZM' 'sip-files00050.pro'
bf5b5fab0151a06a43bb8ec4c0d5ad79
ff1df2f724de08feda74aa56d944a4a7ecc8da59
'2012-04-22T00:30:12-04:00'
describe
'67923' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZN' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f1dcdd4181fb5633fd03257b8ea99785
8a66d99a253ef4c98a628bacde96898032dcf0d8
describe
'2146368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a1ffb868a1bf4c21009f3e3a4ea75499
fae6f619dc870d9f4ff8e2044d0efc4a395095e6
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a5f3ef14b72324ee8235f24bf2e76632
f4fcf35c0280be04474ed924fdfb0cce4e0fc8da
'2012-04-22T00:33:54-04:00'
describe
'36353' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b786f4726df2cfacbd947d74c784ba78
7b2a73fd6c726703fba653f565f0a1a1ff10cd1e
describe
'282497' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
0bee26d8d1cf20caed43cdbfb483802b
416d818eca515240331aec36324dfb7d4c6233f6
describe
'181955' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8ccb235415da7e9dbebdc6734d179d75
284f56f4d5e93a4afe17ae1e0dc45c39f426c35c
'2012-04-22T00:31:17-04:00'
describe
'30181' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZT' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d8e907c47f3b1870beba61c784069af4
e5cce8f9dd78bbc14446bfee28995fcafc5de9c7
'2012-04-22T00:32:28-04:00'
describe
'78441' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
062ddb5a43f6af7167bd811958412841
a411105729822ac9cac24c735db85119e700af99
describe
'2284056' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZV' 'sip-files00051.tif'
beb034cdcedfb9867e33bf38baca8ae4
a536d92190ddcf70f79099b9aca234522d1458c5
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a23edf1476e8227ad358631bae5b8cae
7d5d680e59cea1083b3bbbda06199cfcfa46e412
'2012-04-22T00:35:36-04:00'
describe
'39455' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZX' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e4d12f0c93953d6727149153b0049f8c
38b649277ae12dc66c57d6487ece024b6fc1f9b2
'2012-04-22T00:36:34-04:00'
describe
'282949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2d4befa80b20b178c813f588ed783fd8
aa931ce4070b13b0a3dc7d4eec02aac59e08f122
describe
'153222' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADUZZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
816565895fb7cbfe0c67ab071650d5a4
39d6c0a0d8b7d59993836bf82a60a66dc2bf0f0e
'2012-04-22T00:36:06-04:00'
describe
'26664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
0f37340603b9820f39477389ba5ab5e8
9a045a93c3e097a6aab042ae375217a49f1c2f67
describe
'71499' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e96d25b03de1502ac7589587932d5509
ce642695ca02026116ea504930d2604247b5185b
'2012-04-22T00:31:19-04:00'
describe
'2286588' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f488e336793546e3708c87fbadec6a8a
544deef6a89e1ca2efe2993e05872a71f07b41d3
'2012-04-22T00:35:29-04:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
5f78ba9d37b926c4cdb0ce9db57e6c19
539946452613f4fb04eabb5eb18842dcedd3a0b3
describe
'37508' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAE' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b1c438470defc0d07773f0df514ccab5
a688533e997d01965e972e6d3610bc8993a6f4ec
'2012-04-22T00:34:57-04:00'
describe
'248754' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d40b9618dac829acbd515cf014a5a6dc
a29b9c6b5547f8a6026d6afc7db3da555dad05c6
'2012-04-22T00:37:35-04:00'
describe
'156088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
aa46d6f19dfd36a5c9e995681955e24b
45900ea40854121cf7f4d79ce5d1c866f355f726
'2012-04-22T00:32:13-04:00'
describe
'29677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3fb9bf2d715896af9d20c42bc9d6d508
a8551fa0c89ed98ba9c3c5b710680f3adc15393c
'2012-04-22T00:28:15-04:00'
describe
'73557' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5038c22d37a6bbceff75d758f64efe29
dd7d7d376e6d270f7467e437b01c7f736bb5d5de
describe
'2013052' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAJ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a71c5f5abf3a1d3ce9d0e7fe7f428273
26d2b367590e472bea03ad7d4254c8f066a7ce9f
'2012-04-22T00:35:52-04:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
a2280da9428c50a8af5488ef04654770
d34f21b90a5bf649d2a097e928812a7e90582648
'2012-04-22T00:34:41-04:00'
describe
'39770' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
46bc8cd2b48353f989b1e710d98c6b76
36744ec313510dbf9c84bd8e6f7fc535f57ce01b
'2012-04-22T00:32:19-04:00'
describe
'252878' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
841aab044840432861b21f51462b9915
093e79ce2d325e6ae6e754ba34e0424b047d52b7
describe
'159514' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAN' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
07954d6616c1ab66708657fb70e343e2
896ebe4eaf478fd8d5503959210d91e95b54e9b8
'2012-04-22T00:32:59-04:00'
describe
'27749' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAO' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0df0fe8e48179dd9ab73d4c3c52a1076
45dfa3e76d967b2b102a3ee9054797526941a5d5
'2012-04-22T00:36:02-04:00'
describe
'74629' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5905a17c648fd6e48eb08b74b9f8defc
07f26afbeb0bc7f3a6720f9dc9a6fd94d6808f4e
'2012-04-22T00:32:27-04:00'
describe
'2046684' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAQ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c4ba29addc3015126d3832ab1992ab54
ced78f48b5ea01c1bed8ec7e74bf7840d6db5958
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAR' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1ed26ccc8e3d7cc90d1ce13adc9f93d0
56e22507ac15315c1acbd1d711de8df7161b01ab
'2012-04-22T00:30:02-04:00'
describe
'39496' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAS' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6bb6d14696ccdc5580401dbec4c12a74
768e233a2411fdd954f2dcb2b222d5002032112f
'2012-04-22T00:30:37-04:00'
describe
'246803' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAT' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f65c96104e7cf7cc17097beb337031cc
2b9c62246f400fbded5e7c75325a698c2f80185a
describe
'157062' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAU' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f51af07cd8da97443a550e6a550a2ff2
c50e745b54579c2b6db8524b359470b88d9f159c
'2012-04-22T00:31:38-04:00'
describe
'31055' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
c38989f799bc47d2b959d957f477531b
df3bdee17511e39b3c7fbecec99e5e75016e5362
'2012-04-22T00:29:16-04:00'
describe
'74422' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
654513095861b443209ef76c360741aa
c815ad6206fbf9fa631096e8fc21f68b560dd412
describe
'1997864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAX' 'sip-files00055.tif'
c5959bc514f452f94496f3b3c888b88a
04f1718230c961f0d44d5ec652ce1ad43f7f300d
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAY' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0efb79df1ecc35996e5609f9d65bba99
05aed24ca9700342eccbb0d7863562fc703ba7bc
'2012-04-22T00:36:31-04:00'
describe
'40252' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVAZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
556e339b7526957f5627f83abff23fde
1d5135f7eb3d0b069e2fb6058893d3464495e6a8
'2012-04-22T00:28:44-04:00'
describe
'251793' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
249732214ee050d952504172ebad3059
b6182a3facc8a5ea9fd145ea071cddddb5793834
'2012-04-22T00:37:48-04:00'
describe
'149410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
078049a052ffa4073d55fb04359ea290
8aaa8b19dc493a50ab632c2e9bb0d3557ef01d42
'2012-04-22T00:29:38-04:00'
describe
'27677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a581dcce90b2b71ab48dc0d408ec7f1b
0912095591051ce0e8f669c8e0c967de9998ba63
'2012-04-22T00:30:39-04:00'
describe
'69694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
51a4c9084c0c6f0471d6b51842d7e9ce
0bf3cffad0cd26be9780f7aebaed307df8684a27
describe
'2037768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
e149fe29711164e5c80bbca07af868ed
59542992cca734b07a37f46ca2b3dc75fef3ef81
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a62781e3058406c3d7171918d668d88f
41d60abcba4ec44d23f29032b6e206dea6fa37dd
describe
'38680' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ea41729cebc0a05388ca35802123bbe9
ee1f1153a669cbccf4e731a5501f214d16ba1936
'2012-04-22T00:34:27-04:00'
describe
'248008' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5bdf3b740d91e16ce4d05dfb2895360f
28ef94f5176306149efa4209bb94ce2a567b15a8
describe
'148446' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
ffa8632edac118ccbc7dcf03a692f1c9
299647a4dfdeafa074ca0340ceb41455cb8fd737
describe
'28931' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
6228569fdd7977a14c940abd860ee98a
4f648a5e2ba23d72bff127423e7ef099e045f412
'2012-04-22T00:29:45-04:00'
describe
'69468' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBK' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c359f6813b328e3e278c4061e5ac8b7b
44671be81e459a7587a9aedf051396fc796eb912
describe
'2007496' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
211835c2cc9b8378321bec8fa9ce5ccf
1652223931f230fb0292e56cae8b179041ab6b79
'2012-04-22T00:35:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4f1c7c7be66c6100e9b367a704259d67
077dc9286918166330c3d5e143d14924ae505c44
'2012-04-22T00:37:47-04:00'
describe
'39879' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBN' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
7527e44380c08b86e341134a1531402e
88ed626fbceb27ccf266598dbd0b14357cb98b6b
'2012-04-22T00:30:24-04:00'
describe
'251232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f05c9d3edecd2950863c0658ef4c376c
84e45fadedac705a07f4e0426427628d8bc7027d
describe
'119310' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBP' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
bb6d3dddb138391e0a3f692ab639e51b
cfff384cf7ead44f504185da03442d857f9b3350
'2012-04-22T00:28:32-04:00'
describe
'14253' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c79da1b2204a06258c4710fd37d36398
8304036b5284b64c8477a2fa3aef94b407533036
'2012-04-22T00:30:55-04:00'
describe
'55335' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2f6de347c436bceaacf0b9efc4ef21b9
07b1b5575346b68c0c7455bec5d2555bba995d51
'2012-04-22T00:28:08-04:00'
describe
'2032424' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
4b6ce7c327e6fe9225a4d39575373536
f7b2c4b233b3cceba94f44cc2d4d4de4f044e18b
'2012-04-22T00:34:08-04:00'
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
cd518aee2ccfd9851952fa83ef5b2291
202cf843f93b080ae93a318d5f99529365e0d03c
'2012-04-22T00:33:19-04:00'
describe
'32746' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3aaaa4f327c2845f75819aa51e9d719c
24a3858efb405f9721278fefee4937e213fdfeae
describe
'256608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
2263aaa6c26bf75bcd23b23428d29b48
0a3759d36558727cf0eca5098a0c41e3e8d49c18
'2012-04-22T00:32:14-04:00'
describe
'133286' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBW' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a853a700aa70f409586ce337412a885e
5b2d383d831c4d8574bfa11522e98f6c7ee878a1
'2012-04-22T00:36:19-04:00'
describe
'24631' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
4275ed4e7777fc4e92165920e9fab1bb
1ad941c9103be48fe68f8deaeceed0615b1b2751
describe
'63260' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
28429d46edc11af13d4c90fe09163ce8
7022ab5924d74fa8743485ff387ee4c632f754eb
'2012-04-22T00:29:11-04:00'
describe
'2075112' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVBZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
7947350864e7103ab32ac2b581fa2884
20a533e9ffcb51d0a0716e59b8a1fe9280cbb7c7
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
48176b4eaf821c5b92689781976a0001
ad44457f214753d71f50d03c4d13267c247e72b1
describe
'34617' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCB' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3912c2d538c57d154e0efb9779660d9b
82e6cf0c8789ef5a107a0dd183044d8aa2b27404
describe
'245523' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCC' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
29473b82c14ab3a53fcb9503045b9841
839fab93aa0c9f1676ad599a5baa26c88036ecb0
'2012-04-22T00:29:48-04:00'
describe
'165027' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCD' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b6e422ce01a8b50d8cda23cf92889e09
8aebff739a50bb23a7deb2f528ab2926187fd7ef
describe
'32129' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCE' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f4450efdd953411020073c5cddd5554a
464aa54e1eb7df47fed4bee82cff9377b2f307f9
'2012-04-22T00:33:56-04:00'
describe
'75430' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCF' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d115a6a8ddb96b921789f3889873a7b4
5d6100a152c9021b64b85b42ff5992ef94ad5ee6
describe
'1988320' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCG' 'sip-files00060.tif'
75aff116acf8fee3bbbf4140cf6d8100
e05a0f6ee25a1db518142f5a6df293505d538d6a
'2012-04-22T00:37:58-04:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
ce2ea1dfa4088549650fbf689dcc6137
7235609b336ee1920be502ba30863253be42cc67
'2012-04-22T00:31:45-04:00'
describe
'40389' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
546df15244413df3d5d4b2ae99ab61f3
6620f3bae0fbef2fde6f5b17d4bcce599a663b44
'2012-04-22T00:28:05-04:00'
describe
'247323' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
5b27d264eeff2cc514d60512d1beae3e
de4c0ee03fc27c524f9559b9c272c988a8b8812b
'2012-04-22T00:35:27-04:00'
describe
'146986' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
93a65febba3d4a198cc90503e33c92e9
97643f5f99fbea8221fc0677f946f0d2e56f38e0
'2012-04-22T00:32:02-04:00'
describe
'26897' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCL' 'sip-files00061.pro'
bfeaf4488e03e25bf64a54ff89698836
c948172ae967e9e2d8a87e22427c931665339c21
describe
'67792' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ac6fe10c8359d04a26445a45e411777a
9e252457543bb92e46e247116640537a02163050
'2012-04-22T00:28:00-04:00'
describe
'2000972' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
66ff9970bb3338cd04ab89ec197ce8ee
6e1e51d6a6e974c09f80a7307fa46ae6951c95d5
'2012-04-22T00:32:54-04:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
df31420472190430b24a98287fcad0d1
81f6e97b1cf99b9cc2ddc50de4c810e66f90ad00
'2012-04-22T00:31:55-04:00'
describe
'36935' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCP' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
e9f29df699261acce5b5b69456f88c11
17d3929ab8510a867d247185052ef6f7a373a280
'2012-04-22T00:27:26-04:00'
describe
'255183' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
6596ac7c5d90bfd432f2a331fd7bfd44
dd111e7b6fd95c16a61482b7d6edf804f38e8035
'2012-04-22T00:36:03-04:00'
describe
'150658' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
9741d72e97bc1db8bee6289f8828817f
500db0a8610d28e051f94390f9a8951283ea779b
'2012-04-22T00:33:48-04:00'
describe
'27139' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCS' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0297c507d9aaa771be452bcde43d4ac5
5c054aaa45370ad783b9b7f52290ec3952df2d27
'2012-04-22T00:37:37-04:00'
describe
'66803' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCT' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
c6e7b12bff3e0d7f35c446b4bd2f2d81
ae47b0317b8b6130c2b206d5a15d7ca5225da1e5
'2012-04-22T00:30:21-04:00'
describe
'2063984' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCU' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3c89921447465078f091fbc4319357b0
a96e535432067c6649eadb2e603e40ce5bbd0e81
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8783093a4d922e98bdb3c18d2171a54b
855500eaf850ae4e18fa608d4e5ca5d078466d93
'2012-04-22T00:38:26-04:00'
describe
'36288' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3bcd40f4892f213d56917cd4cbd9f40d
b96b239d04aba6998bacdd7456c7a1722ff2ba0c
'2012-04-22T00:37:59-04:00'
describe
'251962' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
647dc0cdac8e1f178f7dbb6267719aeb
156d7aeae043db722fd2f53806d8825a752a9534
'2012-04-22T00:29:52-04:00'
describe
'171451' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
834de83528d89f262f3518b93b9eff73
5719b8ae3df72c01939479dba3e8eec4b4b6ebd1
describe
'34726' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVCZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e63b89dba2e48754bfc5893038145366
4628dea907193d55ea1bf9c81ee356c59342daf3
describe
'76778' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c276a8d4ab7234d7185a214088832cfa
9593aa8951ac483a7ecd5ef6106da23192c02a3e
describe
'2038680' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
791e6539e46b121248b4d0b87d6cace7
4fbe00fa5f65e31986556daf1fa26bbc692b2d71
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
199abf946caca0ec56f1e82a93228b49
c098cb4a221f96ac96f060fa13b69176448bfcb5
'2012-04-22T00:35:50-04:00'
describe
'39533' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDD' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
f7796ff472fd341ce410ca5133ceb5a4
8196c2c118e9710e3de43dd973eeb5bc02a2ea2c
'2012-04-22T00:33:03-04:00'
describe
'243514' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDE' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
421e84d57443341d59eae5a2e256856a
1bb20f43efcf426fa1f789f014d1adf464f65088
'2012-04-22T00:29:42-04:00'
describe
'170983' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
e43c38a9c57421de2b8479d2a9785595
448d1a4c1fead4a4295130118434420f1d85fe24
describe
'33329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDG' 'sip-files00064.pro'
1fd31512044e44ca5c86e4e5d364aca9
ae180bc36398799ca2b5d1d4ecc82f6c32c3195a
'2012-04-22T00:38:20-04:00'
describe
'77052' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
60c1fe5974ae29c82054588b73977131
13a9b66bc41e58e2dce1483d1191e8ee744ee045
'2012-04-22T00:30:33-04:00'
describe
'1972292' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDI' 'sip-files00064.tif'
d0949841f251c75ab4c10777923b3b44
0eeaa520510cac97b5d6cb4ceab483af873f6890
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
98b8b6912feee81f8b5b79579d818af1
d91f23659e318718b2355631183c0e7948055ec0
'2012-04-22T00:28:06-04:00'
describe
'40415' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e2f3e62fef32f64084438cdfea4c7abd
f81d706da9d8a9cf560e4351452a6aee73a3e6e5
'2012-04-22T00:36:28-04:00'
describe
'256625' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
aa3b72c86bb856cdadedad7e9711cd7c
2d63fa04aed21bb9dc1e2a8298064ab567062338
'2012-04-22T00:31:54-04:00'
describe
'170417' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDM' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
899086f655bd78b1fd85c32eed21b55b
91f96880b0147434399372f6834ed622c96a032d
'2012-04-22T00:31:30-04:00'
describe
'33427' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d75bb21b93fcce9423f2387b08bdfe9e
82e22ec2d53e3dc8ce631876797718085f5cd0bb
'2012-04-22T00:31:28-04:00'
describe
'77396' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f144fb0e8c6e3a046d1b0e4e67315694
59698f5f92567b6021f11f44fc037fa48d57eb62
'2012-04-22T00:33:28-04:00'
describe
'2076276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f0d26c686180d613fa778decb89940f2
4377ee9d52e41c2891bb86fdb4c8ce2bab7f6691
'2012-04-22T00:35:46-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f19b78abc57cc4add45bf0b51b6e36ed
945becbcaac08726ecd4f657277fe0749202b18b
describe
'39623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
d3c9d7426041f3bf638278c3902b8c14
05beff188a90368991048754fcc5e15bb28f0796
describe
'257815' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6c17cca3dea025ae509d1eff8f9a9a7e
e17c086abab25e75f6021a4239199f4fa19805ed
describe
'173995' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
a0faa8c42a787715772124ef408646d5
572a85afb0a7b6ea6d52a16ed9b80b9d1ea4b650
'2012-04-22T00:28:37-04:00'
describe
'35043' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
322bca89c3a43ac6b1f33beebeefe3f0
a6879bbba7076684ac45acff8839512c19a6ea95
'2012-04-22T00:33:35-04:00'
describe
'78000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
09ac55d0952f265579a63bf765620e2f
8b5fe39482bc815c0430ca9f1d2011af1362e8c4
describe
'2085864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
69ad4c515bf0bf918cc8fcfb0337ed7c
4f6f9822aaa2a43be801df25e0a7afdf46b3726b
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
4f9e52aeb96f9bee3d0dcf9b27e80bd9
80e01c1737a6e3ac776920aba049c389bbb06cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
27eb0c96a6824e5fd65b089eadad6155
35ab19279d4cd3f231526f505155fee5a77afd0d
describe
'253425' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVDZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
24d81fc2620a2912ec76bf77b6e65796
b154b1c4aefa562b385492247e4fe83515f88bd0
describe
'163312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
ecfe271912a2fb421f9f7bc9bef54289
ea7f0e312eb439113b29fe863491b7d425e42469
'2012-04-22T00:37:43-04:00'
describe
'32563' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b6a7bceb3ba39de1eb01284a09b62fad
de5f4fc39e26a31a29f491d6a55294eb64220160
'2012-04-22T00:28:59-04:00'
describe
'74735' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
16e59ee76ac293255815c7e442b7d21f
f5bf5a78c0e822d6f980221ace6c1c94490c55b7
'2012-04-22T00:37:03-04:00'
describe
'2050840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVED' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4c5675bef9ed9189461d6cbc1ac5a373
a39234d6c4dc87a98998ad12fe65ecd1ac6af14c
'2012-04-22T00:34:15-04:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
c4e0acb83daed4e98d57d40b45aa1216
49b717d68a9fa4e24cbc59b2ca819ece5c99f95a
'2012-04-22T00:33:31-04:00'
describe
'38797' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
74111f883b804d9dde665d7dd148bb32
699bb9eaa05a5858a5ca24e398f930be5e0df45d
'2012-04-22T00:29:44-04:00'
describe
'253356' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
063fdc2f5b6950acfce47edd90473d2c
f21dde9a3dfc26fd93c7a0096b4750b9fe8ea214
describe
'174564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
cb5b65fb51873b3951908aa565474f5f
4711809d5893197d8cb951dc31902ab1782a3dac
describe
'35583' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
03e1c2dec41ea5ce9ecd1e42e97d0dea
3c7c6cbca938de80c771574421d2511cf151ba15
describe
'78997' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
cb0b06f446f6dd3dec58d749cd8b0d10
41a06d75c62aa7c491db1694f0e3bd902481709d
'2012-04-22T00:35:03-04:00'
describe
'2049980' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
19c54200f081f70ae990f689d3912dd3
b1d90a343fafb6bc6cda48ed448531a5c7bcb711
'2012-04-22T00:33:41-04:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
081cf8038b50130af2f4d8169d1baa9a
618573d50ef3ed826758d1b4434533f766885466
'2012-04-22T00:36:44-04:00'
describe
'39702' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5622dc32847e8dc4b90f89afd09da5e5
c444aeff8ef3423c9cd3b59335c15a8ae86562a1
'2012-04-22T00:36:01-04:00'
describe
'251375' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
1c28f98e9b703014e02cf7eff88e2457
60d5caf8711091121e1fb9e44e5305e5bef4db57
'2012-04-22T00:36:20-04:00'
describe
'168553' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f1ca7d4e28bb398baa7c0986a5ecc3f5
8e429b5bae211a4fb3f534c6dd98779dca36ec0e
'2012-04-22T00:34:09-04:00'
describe
'35860' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
08af9ea698614e8090bedc47eb88c50a
4ce26adadf28edf38ce1c72e63b5fc28ebfb1adf
describe
'75251' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
dfb01ecc5d50f9e92520669c17e04974
53573da58f512412cfd51b70ecb4bf5439126aae
'2012-04-22T00:34:48-04:00'
describe
'2033660' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVER' 'sip-files00069.tif'
96ef8edabca1b3aa463dcb1704d8682d
be2372cb9add99f652bbfd781ac5413538f2363a
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVES' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c072e2e90923ef3a3621442a985fece6
59c973a62c53edaec51f89c940cb19e0f40581b6
'2012-04-22T00:32:45-04:00'
describe
'39133' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVET' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
95419387d41bcc57e7cf20505a7ab199
5a9c01e5cd8c83ed5b9a80239b17d38916e628a3
'2012-04-22T00:31:26-04:00'
describe
'247807' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
ea7573fca3c66411e175ffcf98e103c4
8e1b950c1bd8fa0a964bad5d59b5c820650d2132
describe
'109733' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
a23cef50084377826ef3d34b98f71917
8895f52337e5e5222b967d763327ed1b16ea4c2a
'2012-04-22T00:38:08-04:00'
describe
'15816' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
d60bf0c9a7781bab8fe88647e4576052
f125b923b272e94a9dbcb67ab118050a29490c7f
describe
'53863' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e016caa5eab2e15df506a533a46a338c
bf26ee91cf71d474bf1ab5e404f6b80b3ff0f047
'2012-04-22T00:29:23-04:00'
describe
'2004708' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5004659972bf681c368e5978fc64409e
ac2614be57e0fcd3f254698f74e3cb0340ea082d
describe
'672' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVEZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
37505550ed5930eacbbf730cbbf4f5b1
d71a0d5a4ff77263cfecef5de37a7e0c0e09f9c8
describe
'32524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
7c842dce3e927e43ce1322695f3bc7aa
6606e6dce813ea7e3458d85da7b1620e558e1887
describe
'220372' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
86089ea56e780c710ac98b22f67913bf
767b3a529ad25a9cc31acea1527234d436836c8c
'2012-04-22T00:33:39-04:00'
describe
'86582' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c0fbefc54b3299c5acdffa2e88e64624
4d993acb16968ab9e733e1a8a5a9379f34520c3f
describe
'15473' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
26a1651117c2c5f5659c9923bfba47ef
53f286939a159987c6b9525ca57a08c3bbb27236
describe
'43932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f748e9c5824604db6e136dfba35c43dc
5a5347e661b440d0253da71ae15982c2c8ef8cd5
describe
'2025936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8098754ea9a9f04edd120cd998783e76
db52009debd9a01740f439de29ea0aba84c7fe12
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
fdedfc6171201965da433d69278b4ca0
f3268e91890e8741efb0da47dfef77c0df0b9108
'2012-04-22T00:32:50-04:00'
describe
'29204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
ee1731111ee71dc4a5b60b4797532704
faf4ec88276dc87c6424eb48cc7f0cfc8b44657b
'2012-04-22T00:33:36-04:00'
describe
'252508' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
25a1154f5896890c35a9258f8434f0f5
b301ad1bce880abfa073e00f57c2cb9203cbbb11
describe
'102230' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
12661a81e3f77c682c87d38f8bda4647
600418e7b2432b94ee8347e1ff7b8a527d23908e
'2012-04-22T00:29:21-04:00'
describe
'6581' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c6fa09ea5cf2c0c085e98f3af15cce93
1a0b9d5443fbb94bf249994260f0e6ed49bf71ae
describe
'48121' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f2d8867fbf66a464df583e4c216e6f91
a3c0a6d228e9e4d7816e7447cdb6ac45301eef5c
describe
'2041096' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e0432faa0fa33fe2e7a627dc651fe1ad
17c45bc163f03eda729076c4c4501ce4b94c4381
'2012-04-22T00:28:40-04:00'
describe
'299' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
badbb609a647daa7cd2704a4c5f460ea
b20c7deabc023287ba9e8ea73545836c81c56c5b
describe
'30416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b76987dc1e48feeee48f0af829333aad
0e870661a63b580a671289472ba882fd9a25b02b
'2012-04-22T00:30:54-04:00'
describe
'252446' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
15d5fe9a18cbb2e0b7976917a94c38b4
422d7404c25e68589648bafde86ebd58f00dc62d
'2012-04-22T00:27:25-04:00'
describe
'141186' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
3373530dcc4d1c0bb493c16f2193495d
657ce9e75739933d8a5a315d96f058a829ac80ca
describe
'26963' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
b2e29e5d5158a29ac527a3a3c69e3d2e
7d5f4c8003744c527edba89abd341d9139382931
'2012-04-22T00:30:57-04:00'
describe
'65212' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFS' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f06bd99131fed8b12c0cbd492667dd54
4aa92585e5a876404fadea79f1ef1b9b9e6bfb95
'2012-04-22T00:30:58-04:00'
describe
'2042576' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f5dcd3b9b7f221a3f47ebe6f36b86ce5
089ff95a8ce7072e39cafb59413359e8b479b36b
'2012-04-22T00:30:07-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
1c3e4e961deb40e88cbb915d2e6398fa
aae32dc05a41ee1b2fa1ecf039d3f34b0768741b
describe
'35955' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
bdec6024ba8c8c404ec636413ce84f7c
82d44c37d1d5ad02e523349500c8ff2e15f08978
describe
'253051' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b4f1db523a49787908251874546e7f1c
8ccc9bf18b08dfe5c5bf98939cd3acb78435da19
'2012-04-22T00:32:20-04:00'
describe
'165980' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5a9561038f7234a7d3ccd7de76259462
22e4a932ec1618f7744b82d3fe71450f24e880ca
describe
'33734' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFY' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7855507e34dbba385f3bbb12f8fd016a
e31f3e6d7c5a0087995a3c2930f98b28cab4f8d9
'2012-04-22T00:38:23-04:00'
describe
'75446' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVFZ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
58b00bb19cd04336bf349e8eee014de9
4cc8e47c158a019aca310fc09540715f2267117a
'2012-04-22T00:28:42-04:00'
describe
'2046860' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0f85291d1c7e747ebec2c0f61f1003c0
045832002db4a1a4fba32fe4da959c61ad1642ef
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
a578a8515255083d9ca152112100e209
6b182f49c2d46f320fecbb927edfb298acd2b877
describe
'39134' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
3911150301c6fc51f671c145ef3f235e
4a240429d628d1fbe7ce88ecceca21e145499670
describe
'239966' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
21eb5a4d20883d868ca87c102785b391
e36281c58db106193116eb3bee57a2f9064e5b0b
'2012-04-22T00:33:33-04:00'
describe
'167961' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
0217c9667aac618c70e7bee0e154167e
a7db415fe57ff29668d773bc2d39198fb2bc2ced
'2012-04-22T00:33:50-04:00'
describe
'33924' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
73187b3a6e26dddd0493f338ca7af384
3fd104a645014d1c61514973717997be5e06f308
describe
'75771' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7b0d7fec57a05ff60b6614b715da8ebd
566dc58ba84564ce40be6073aa99f972051758ba
describe
'1942864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0ecf15a0611169006391ea0233699d67
5520bc3d8fe7ffb956746bb2177f2df980b2fb7f
'2012-04-22T00:28:45-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
5e0948c7237de0c585b00aae0c9a5f73
3466eaf383a30d413d909e4af72eaab262131954
describe
'39347' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGJ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c2cf3e8133b409c8d730360ac586ac45
ac78ec1f722addc01c56bbcc4428806684bf0576
'2012-04-22T00:32:40-04:00'
describe
'243831' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b09c9722fc14f6a373c239bac3654439
51bfb3a2f8474930895a31ce7b480c8db4592e5f
describe
'171490' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
f8e1f9c0f7ad61dc5eea917a29727f19
715380e69e409387aa3206143537bd543213adab
'2012-04-22T00:31:25-04:00'
describe
'32853' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
2044bb8080924c19f5d0697a531276aa
52d7378a208a3e2c22e49f02346e652d8a3f3188
describe
'76524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
2bba0336ada363d6bb2e092bb64ba625
29fe3709f57d429a5e95cee7eefea12491b30153
'2012-04-22T00:30:44-04:00'
describe
'1973648' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
9eec2a4107e02216a8d478fd8529b33f
7f6317a47704c9a3e60e70c6e9c0018af0ccd6c8
'2012-04-22T00:30:35-04:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
5fc69ae8199248ee1678ea9e6b73f442
48923a551efcc8a2666b52e4935ea2b2f3fe86d0
describe
'39551' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
eb6ad80767c5f9c51d2acd107c78c3e2
2bdb9d8cc52d2278764de2291dd342107b74af7c
'2012-04-22T00:30:43-04:00'
describe
'252293' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGR' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
aa6768db251a9b4067517b6bd1af6159
88fb2d3376294867ca6742baed8af8aeb92d695f
describe
'166921' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGS' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b48ba5f22d0cd22d48c49eaa4fea8e13
534727faf840315c0fbf7ebca13b0375e12bdde5
describe
'33863' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGT' 'sip-files00077.pro'
1806164efe0ce1fe4a7b144ae12601cd
ad2ef0a4d95e4715b312da8806e58722c8006b9f
describe
'76148' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
c33cde95906d2c82b47f8c9f84c8021b
37b43d96698d4fe0298c9bb535aa078f239a8c3d
describe
'2041420' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGV' 'sip-files00077.tif'
9428a92ad906b0cafdc0b3ca744a0b32
0314cbc6629f0d1f194798aa762560add7d40253
'2012-04-22T00:30:20-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ed885f1979902541068f49f655c21836
59a58aaf37043461dfb67e4389c9a16776f3ed90
describe
'39177' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGX' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
f6fac3ae0f41627126f1652af2866597
ae1ec83d2486659f5c99c47c8a887682946fb024
'2012-04-22T00:38:01-04:00'
describe
'246660' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGY' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
84b334c000ee35f5927583828577f658
4842c30f1b49a26e61fc182d3a7e32f968063a7c
'2012-04-22T00:28:23-04:00'
describe
'174345' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVGZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
1b4cf387e0fda5d4f76ee96c89f80107
0a830bf07fb4daf0414ee9e0c17d9c178f95ab3d
'2012-04-22T00:35:28-04:00'
describe
'33456' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHA' 'sip-files00078.pro'
d6815bca7bcfb188479983c06f2cfef5
d11a21f394318d552755f1856d45b7fe4cc04f84
describe
'77768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHB' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b57bf870452c135ba799c5470a824ab0
769afa489b51fde0d20adf221d4749a3df15369c
'2012-04-22T00:32:57-04:00'
describe
'1996652' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
99e53d7d77b6ee83856a0e398f7b50e1
9a724dcee3a0f44367b4c3e35d1e10a5da0aa17d
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
71be3deb962887f186e1bb5165e0750d
fc5fdabc48ea223e2a9d997cc1c23d49016b6968
describe
'39539' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHE' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
316a7407078ffd855759308a5bf37844
0d12e2566f586f036adbcfa795f1ee7f43f7825c
'2012-04-22T00:36:32-04:00'
describe
'257196' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a78a2e4dd3a32161c0f6de08f7d0fd8c
63e497c70b988e48480081688519ad1e14ba83ac
describe
'169539' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3e2890b1578b687b2bdfaec0b2bab040
cb29f619aab380eea790ef65bc36272f717091fd
describe
'35221' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
aeaac76de37766e3da7a864c1cd8dd26
158e371dd63e985609aa2d8e38a98816cffeb9ce
'2012-04-22T00:32:12-04:00'
describe
'76771' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d774e6a3771e363cc71c25aa2bf0e457
b32f4102bb615f8e00f37da1f84cba949a436ec9
describe
'2080576' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHJ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
b67efbe442ddba8ef85bcda857f78565
c5b204f9951253be6747aab2aab9fcade1ee8fef
'2012-04-22T00:38:15-04:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHK' 'sip-files00079.txt'
37b7d6daa69456f0894f122eaf3af06a
c26c7a1908232fb88eaea02b8b48ae5371ff8b19
'2012-04-22T00:31:59-04:00'
describe
'38316' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHL' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4417c05b34f17cfc27baf0a8d044683e
0ea07cbd4509277e030e471866b8dcb86ca7a632
'2012-04-22T00:31:03-04:00'
describe
'246767' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d90982f0ea61d2aceb226abede1f7876
0fcb046390237d683083bfa05f8857e51c3e39f9
'2012-04-22T00:31:47-04:00'
describe
'175385' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
92e8b950dd73e103dbf9f41b98442bc6
7c0b41f8aa16aa8076ca179cfa6aa193b7f478b7
describe
'34999' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHO' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f6143feeca01324f8d288e2ae9d3aebf
be4b24743eb3cfb2a11f4389117d33348a85ab7d
'2012-04-22T00:35:18-04:00'
describe
'79902' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
cacca9360657cb86f7f4f402e938ef34
fdba77377c430a8938cdf54650a7ec24f248cd6f
'2012-04-22T00:35:47-04:00'
describe
'1997560' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHQ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
74a964bc2e01078978d3b183e68cbd05
3f957ec713349ca7a23069be66d3a3cbf710f9bd
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHR' 'sip-files00080.txt'
8adc469497b299d9d0f1ba54a7087f22
cb1a741747d6d45930fb86d448afd808acd5a3b6
describe
'40421' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHS' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a40f9cce540c93d3ea7bfb731cf84d5d
08a81ce9e989f1fa4f80c4a403f541bf047e3966
'2012-04-22T00:31:42-04:00'
describe
'247936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHT' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
413169c217da1e6f3a8fbd4c00a3c48a
df80eb2a480315275fd9a7d8fa0271535b4e6fc9
'2012-04-22T00:33:27-04:00'
describe
'162324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHU' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
849df11910cedaf950a1e08d19326393
20beb5ed621b7bf226aed8fbe48fab0c9613190c
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHV' 'sip-files00081.pro'
ca2736550d558d5215b3f3c4a3ce36c8
ab559b53297df2101df6c82d2c79853b1d9b6d1c
describe
'72487' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHW' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
ae74828d9640371c1f8c294b01edfe25
1a9c73d867168f6ffd5cba272d52e8e8ee4fb3a9
describe
'2006428' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHX' 'sip-files00081.tif'
50711c14d7a23312e17d45ba0fb95522
2a9c579679070316a4fca52e79e55ebad3b09f8d
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHY' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f5f63fb5bc9e1ab3e050e45f32fce7f2
de786541645643da6a42d711264a25120153a131
describe
'39327' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVHZ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
ad7a17cc731a163b104a8ff451c07352
407625f08b0307ec87ebf2401d46777598c67fdf
'2012-04-22T00:35:08-04:00'
describe
'262492' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a3bd52e6caf27604f19041f88b33d3b2
ea04ad54eaebc5d49ad8a0116f40d9c8b7a583f9
'2012-04-22T00:31:10-04:00'
describe
'173501' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIB' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b5243c0641e5f2b1320285d5de8f67b1
fb070588d894de9c2df29ee4c2114488bc34f0de
describe
'34577' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIC' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6c34ade6f7b34c65fca7bbdb14f64147
7e88c63566b83d1e66e3f4294b9f6140a1fc365d
'2012-04-22T00:34:26-04:00'
describe
'77428' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVID' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
eff634e261e541934e91ad38a1aa996c
092691fc4b62151b4808c159c056809d83a2e6c4
'2012-04-22T00:29:00-04:00'
describe
'2122748' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIE' 'sip-files00082.tif'
da3efaf929ff29329e48a7a41e978330
37a5904b2359c42c1c824348c16bea49ae8bb2e9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
e311b0125b1fc9b059b84426f353f2c1
18534de5ff2a7231e330ccbde31bf256d3e3c296
'2012-04-22T00:38:24-04:00'
describe
'39675' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIG' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
214b641cf97b0bb58369dbbf84f5c1af
80c1c9fbc871f7782cb79bb4ce97da9b2fcba977
'2012-04-22T00:36:42-04:00'
describe
'247547' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6956a67970db0c748aec3fe3b4bbf1c5
e133ca6f5c661bee7602b0bbddbbcac147afef72
'2012-04-22T00:28:46-04:00'
describe
'165324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVII' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c0209b9fdc8460a55dce36ad40d9efd3
c2b34bd4f23586b3d2ba5fee87520d55738b0126
describe
'36295' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIJ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
cdc734753cbd8fe2a3f5409af5babb7c
563ded352226cc74709800e1edd74ac3a7c36bc7
describe
'74627' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIK' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
e2f751f525da2955a9cf61a1d750f223
5cfeb1f8d80f616229fc3f3d7370c77d35e387e8
'2012-04-22T00:29:34-04:00'
describe
'2003336' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIL' 'sip-files00083.tif'
d1644ed57c7df715a3e571528bc988bc
5fe9e6b35522c4a3aa029e84f6765e1e166b7497
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIM' 'sip-files00083.txt'
b9502fe372c5931d90383e0e560e8a8d
95e80137ced9b690ac349ec974e439777921ded0
describe
'39480' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIN' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
21f082d9423375c26dda3a1d7f8fce64
c84b7d7087d2a2958b5a65a4116f7b11e8922c96
'2012-04-22T00:34:44-04:00'
describe
'251100' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIO' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
0139546995d75d7c79a5918828b0d415
10e84248bee40c29eb5b5c4324a586d0dc7f66f1
'2012-04-22T00:30:10-04:00'
describe
'127556' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIP' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
26fef9bdc3363e7d3ccad6ca6a4b1d61
aaacb0523be536d25ef663465e972358ed433a4f
describe
'20197' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIQ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1f66b282c580447132fc969c6b9c5307
5743e5ada5c043b00f7796cce674636f0924bee6
describe
'59354' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIR' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e35fa26febdb4305fa903c09b6a0e5c2
ef3754555cb8352bff902da75665c1e7e9184fb7
'2012-04-22T00:28:19-04:00'
describe
'2031472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIS' 'sip-files00084.tif'
aedd88580ea3ec34ecaf7548b6dc447f
9594378699ff1c0a26c9d51684dd112240fbdd9e
describe
'840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIT' 'sip-files00084.txt'
470d7cf90cd04fdc428a6ff76e49e42e
3536884c2a226692ade5628a90c66fe6e067d422
describe
'33804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIU' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
02b765e8924ecaa2b186de16b0a5c7d0
0d949337c31fe6b761e411cd4656fcc447098627
describe
'252465' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIV' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
77efb4d7ea56956f9e5b7a202e848d06
84797f1ef6dd86e95819e119bd45815216e37bb4
'2012-04-22T00:31:34-04:00'
describe
'130850' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIW' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1e24a8fbc7ebbc8f5116f557f1923a5d
88d41add7241fb2d121a943d5d40f6104b3ef4a1
'2012-04-22T00:31:49-04:00'
describe
'23680' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d069b6cfb1a44b0c624dc8a58b61be44
ed707a7cd0b05c712882290c3bc90ad093c8f428
describe
'61370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1803d77d2ac0c982ca09109dfdb5f2ba
f243248e1eae20482e152ea0d0346e551f712792
'2012-04-22T00:34:18-04:00'
describe
'2042308' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVIZ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
69900c7822eb664e9243835ba1a7b589
cecc795dd81ccceb40ae331aab60680540ae250f
'2012-04-22T00:35:35-04:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJA' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ec17bcbc253629e91ace2dedbae52f77
a3a3328ac0139a1bc80302a8dd3719a6de2c0eeb
describe
'34768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJB' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
5d722c77716363afbd953c9b38fef018
823a356081539833c278cd74d75bd541030a855d
'2012-04-22T00:29:20-04:00'
describe
'258490' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJC' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
32b701d1df1c5eebea248ab720f9b3b9
817864c9660ff986a1c79f9d6d8986fd902214ef
describe
'105282' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJD' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
766f78727d22008d3f9bb8c0cb700aa7
3178ba1696013ddc1db1a9ec0974e646a6e3f17d
describe
'48370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJE' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
24bb4553758486b7d6d7c25a8079228f
fd31c64f88d28bafc9e7030002b2e69761f65e43
describe
'2090280' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
04549fb99c2d6af9017d4915fcdda67e
d895373914e3461ab02257dbd4db8c8f93a38d35
'2012-04-22T00:36:43-04:00'
describe
'30375' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJG' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
ffba5b971b56c83e2412c4345c3fc85d
a967590f7355a734ae12be74a9de4409c4de1aed
'2012-04-22T00:37:19-04:00'
describe
'58177' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJH' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
907dff2b28415dbd7f1e71fcba670c66
eda30d4ab95401a9ff0de8d2fd4ea82aebad4659
'2012-04-22T00:37:05-04:00'
describe
'29176' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJI' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a0c828cedff327f862c9f50ba26726b0
c59be8b9ca7bc21aeba3978716b415cf8152a648
describe
'22097' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
cfa0ffd4fb38efa2fbc8b7ee31d2bb17
0d8674ffc4698ae72ebe02258808d88e02b4e42f
describe
'2070904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
43d827b22ef8aeb84054bb07924a3e1d
75ff86898365da67915baf48703a1d68cfb8fc9a
describe
'20127' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJL' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
1179f4d2023f6b41828a6dcb26f6ba66
e19aa089ea139773327354f0e9e9ce6ab11f5c85
describe
'247775' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
b7410d95d0be499f7f6a36bb92b93b41
39505cd2713e5242fc88228f818fad3926299ac8
'2012-04-22T00:35:16-04:00'
describe
'170369' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJN' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
0762b842b010f38492484668cefeafa2
ffffa79de2002debe7369bcd01ebbaea5ab7b0bf
describe
'34392' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJO' 'sip-files00088.pro'
f2b9cb05286328612312291aec711832
f92a5c9d033b088f413836c3850bfb414e7877a8
'2012-04-22T00:29:40-04:00'
describe
'77923' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJP' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
b0978f5f6e7353e0b646e1fd33d3d01e
4ba41c7344446c5b64910709232814c47b06f87a
'2012-04-22T00:27:50-04:00'
describe
'2005408' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJQ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
5609c7e23c18ef3c6665e826a9a68c4e
ea192b802c473ca6c9b3b5c0a1e36adf88c9b4a2
'2012-04-22T00:36:56-04:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJR' 'sip-files00088.txt'
9be81a7dde80128afb97aaef3f3c9e14
d1e740fb94c7614b9d2a4f2bdf79bd241c6039f5
'2012-04-22T00:32:30-04:00'
describe
'40011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJS' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
6a343c763b226ddb8664522db4dc8c8c
917146866d35ec3033ac97f13e795699339ce541
describe
'272475' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJT' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7adff1cb81ad903503ab14b535b5caff
32ec1770e3117d2059c5ae85a6d4bb2d68522c0b
describe
'161056' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
ba3379d7311d63950568410a9295dee8
8179304031cca84a5cd00e93c4e529ffcef35e8f
describe
'32640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
4a514d8d1a18b087ace78cf148121868
50fab6816d7e6783cfb9084c8728ce63c1ae8571
describe
'73823' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJW' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f2d4bd2308e366d764e800a05336808a
108e7718ab36f0c6e11ca36c5586ead017a927b4
describe
'2202840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJX' 'sip-files00089.tif'
5231b1047ae18b866f4ae7307afa3efc
32322d990ed9cc806cec4583c6dbded524328a3f
'2012-04-22T00:37:27-04:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0ea8ae60abe8528c9744843c6a4f1bbc
14bf0494688b4d8bf9c04236a1d875c67d258c11
'2012-04-22T00:30:00-04:00'
describe
'38626' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVJZ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
2987b5aca2e6a887c4dcb9d5943b060f
3eb8d9029cb1bfb1eed9ab1dab6d00a8dac36385
'2012-04-22T00:32:06-04:00'
describe
'251555' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKA' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f5eda6732c035df8c0225562752eb228
174beab5bc46828b84a49ae7b9868238a12770ba
describe
'172578' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
739277a8a8c13e97d3f59016ca6787fe
a8a80c47404a9fdcdbee6eb901806049018ed711
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
3cf7528a86e525848d7645c17979ff49
a76a58dbf55e6b09d8d775475f55ac862ded4a81
describe
'76942' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKD' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
8e19cf201caa6e112d95a9b2f48d7a6f
48a26bb034a54cff44a1cd23037b549fb565b10f
'2012-04-22T00:33:55-04:00'
describe
'2035956' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKE' 'sip-files00090.tif'
25729fd1911063914a3d6f397aa98884
459e66cd975151f25b5258adc806cc4c1a19d34f
'2012-04-22T00:33:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKF' 'sip-files00090.txt'
31a75851604b71f78ce31354d99a1561
a6710a860fd18bbf8a30584f3331bdba89005ad4
describe
'39902' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKG' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
461725870bbba24faef6d33b2449e902
d238ad5749f3f50f9e1d9879c3528bacb2f04744
'2012-04-22T00:37:55-04:00'
describe
'253758' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKH' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
3b70a2647d6aa5d4473a8f5974ae79ac
c5d7af720d1273209070f3a904b1e74788353508
describe
'172511' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKI' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
52a74bf1cc538464da22e3d35af0e8ea
82c4892a3d05505fd6a20344b90dcd4b25b98688
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKJ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f814c3578debec0dcc4207bd32b55071
f6e4f20299a0290b8c0f4550fea08772e1132cf0
'2012-04-22T00:37:14-04:00'
describe
'78110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKK' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
931a327c340cda59f4d0ec194b535a1f
39b8c504c3ce485c93502f41b2fbdf9ad8b60202
describe
'2053064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKL' 'sip-files00091.tif'
20a8908874d3c71291b190d15dce08f6
45b127e5ae4939532a4541204296a159b1d5c37f
'2012-04-22T00:33:08-04:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKM' 'sip-files00091.txt'
69ea7db1dc8f180930cc6f05a3930bf1
2ec0582a33343c305da09364223360c88c09d2a2
'2012-04-22T00:37:13-04:00'
describe
'39769' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKN' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ffb7cc99fba78a98192c012d4c2e2500
4daa7ae6b6ea0dd91333850cb1d05141b99cc203
'2012-04-22T00:38:18-04:00'
describe
'253511' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
6ce3340c8dc548d208341fc9bbde55e9
f32a196f157006b21ea94de9f06e7481392890af
describe
'181367' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKP' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7912a3e43df6d5b1f29a8d8930928711
ca26b7f208c7948fc15dfd99e720f72d74a9cd59
'2012-04-22T00:33:01-04:00'
describe
'34991' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
7bd1f71d7f3c359ee1be765a5ed792f2
65998e2ff1cd428ebbedf6f9909d3b2fc9841ed2
describe
'80583' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKR' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
5e5418931b4dd00b66c347d30122595d
cd8c8def166f2a08f21d572dac9b5ccffcb8ca68
describe
'2051852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKS' 'sip-files00092.tif'
942ba57871a36d202f041c6166acc7fe
2e183aec397965d9e8b49a5392ae1043e976d010
'2012-04-22T00:31:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKT' 'sip-files00092.txt'
523b5bd1340558d2b7346331aaf2f41a
c3e4613f332ade5d40f4ec9e24f47b4ec860eb75
'2012-04-22T00:28:18-04:00'
describe
'40600' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKU' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
106b32045ab319e2ce596b758174af71
5e18404379b39886d44e556a74ea6bc17f34bd93
describe
'246473' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
5daf6bcf63419b6e3b35fbf73abc76cf
86e8acc2f81593898742b425eb578051a877d017
describe
'165121' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
e21b4fa5d86e68b81974987beed4e593
2a4d921f6fadafc62861123c647499c9b48185b7
'2012-04-22T00:35:57-04:00'
describe
'33811' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKX' 'sip-files00093.pro'
d21fdf6f9bd24bfa141548e1ce9b023b
94bb98c59df802b1aabc12febd195f12f61cbf26
describe
'74984' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
2d793bdfaaa9747c157653d589f8eca7
383e0b14f7f9e9f28d97e9d37a12c8f9f62f7fb0
describe
'1994764' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVKZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
121c5bc495bfaa2acfb58998470e0b69
6674c77bd1af80bb134847ef8c0a6017423b2c93
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
174f64bb9201d595301dfbea8a647cd7
6b23d036635edfb62687bf9ad447f0f591802242
describe
'39638' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLB' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
e0b0a548c475e9b823ab71b33e7cf125
94c7b30499860f6d7cbc1f8948f25d6ce612d338
'2012-04-22T00:33:44-04:00'
describe
'255776' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
788806bc273da10f6b4ca009822a1ea8
54d08e322d17aa1e3d9d3d59e18967aa57ce531e
'2012-04-22T00:27:43-04:00'
describe
'161721' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
bae6f32c225207bbcbf99744520f870b
e4ea1f2321296a2a2287c7ea20eaafd3572820c0
describe
'32632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLE' 'sip-files00094.pro'
7c278608147b302070440df1401dd48f
8622761cf109c5b05d6a8f31c02ddd695775a829
describe
'74906' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLF' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
efc7dc4bdfbec787650fe50fdccc5420
0922a5107c756d1ed37d2c71fe7fe7ece1b5d135
'2012-04-22T00:36:23-04:00'
describe
'2068924' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
98aecf0e7ece277d0b55f99fe75e2e29
e447719a7f6fb574d3b2fb9d8ae312db87b9e8bc
'2012-04-22T00:30:08-04:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLH' 'sip-files00094.txt'
7b5241d353c0140acc848768f4ad6ed9
37b3cd5d28d5a4d84b1a59079f51582ffaf4ebb1
describe
'38393' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLI' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
55215f90a69b898335e920e6f9bf9aa8
288fd4eeb58f5dafc7154f307adb5147700d463c
'2012-04-22T00:32:18-04:00'
describe
'247320' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLJ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
117dc3a03825c8c561df00241c903881
26aff2ecf056567523da453c70750e95b8ad4959
describe
'160958' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLK' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bcca0ee969a836c90f902f9be6b70886
befa5b940b8dc3c1ad1fd59d6b2280f26ba85eda
describe
'33017' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLL' 'sip-files00095.pro'
db7f0c48e80c38dc741b55f3ac2854ab
f26adc831c12a4b82b057e16357a43697b129749
describe
'74008' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLM' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
f00274427f67e2125a096ad797403694
2e879ce0dc0401e6cc797f5dd0816de1d2f50cc2
describe
'2001388' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLN' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c897bdfb8af16ef0b0ebc385afb53af8
03741ca03265cc81fe627fac2089bc800f612bf1
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLO' 'sip-files00095.txt'
342e87b5d85bb985e9623bd6ead75ea4
7b928979c157e2199614ac6a632fb02e300f33b5
describe
'39456' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLP' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
61c2103b240893b6d3b8baff6c691dc2
8ee4dd22464698e464ac7fcdc73241168d5ab502
'2012-04-22T00:30:14-04:00'
describe
'259249' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLQ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
c5fe73e944b8a759522c98b46e688cd7
c6a0e90811b8ff8eb52c5a566b09d9bbd06148a7
'2012-04-22T00:34:38-04:00'
describe
'141393' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLR' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
01e326a5f0a622629dfa8accfef85b49
83cbc64de8e05704540f548ef42df4b69ec7e380
describe
'25045' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLS' 'sip-files00096.pro'
d15bdb56cc5c7bd6ecd297f185544069
e6ef29ed4a549a81859bc8d931097af254764121
describe
'64125' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
2547be9ce99464ffc8bb49a1140cb42b
0b03ad9df08c3a2e4b0151cee7b3f69a7f11c815
describe
'2096032' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8820f58c74a7bce5a5d6a83c491b5b1c
8312136f8e0f7fd7ede76b3eb4f2512f82d2532c
'2012-04-22T00:37:26-04:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLV' 'sip-files00096.txt'
136e64b4a893b85c8d050dc3d061aa8f
398b57e28ea21a4d0a3bda54fb2ef81cc5125385
describe
'34881' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
885649d12555ee83e63d17daf3821bd5
df85769d31d83c8301f3abb08843bcde049608c4
'2012-04-22T00:36:57-04:00'
describe
'259669' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
6f7758651d19816fd8bf9d781703c70f
40d2267299b7ba7cdafcea008bbc1766ce725396
describe
'122680' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
cb19b75f40f2ac0f1210bc96f76972d7
1c97e73d6d278a389b7bacd6f43fb07471281d7d
describe
'23122' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVLZ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
1cc31e1710de63feca373b1cadb68ab3
efafa442ec6fdd20d9bee6ed0047f8fe6bd5128e
'2012-04-22T00:33:32-04:00'
describe
'58323' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMA' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d0be8ca32b638b42aedf46c5f385c7c0
aecd48ca9e1699ff2b4ad5a8b5aab29ac95ce9f7
'2012-04-22T00:27:30-04:00'
describe
'2099680' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMB' 'sip-files00097.tif'
95c063678afed640b669a0212f281997
9ed36b621de79c0081e6bd8848f9b33f406f51b8
'2012-04-22T00:30:09-04:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMC' 'sip-files00097.txt'
37d64e4dfa38fb38dafc2f356b3dbf72
1f97b7e4a8e262b26c57da054685b9398ce16932
'2012-04-22T00:34:59-04:00'
describe
'33331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
100d472a631c5c59080596c106b7b72a
3c42573002275d1e1499ac9e3bd84604e75eef91
describe
'256626' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVME' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
403e8a9987ff809a6fb662d64bab0c5c
a185850771c0b35bef7adcb41861ff9a6ec2440f
'2012-04-22T00:29:59-04:00'
describe
'151619' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMF' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a4e99fa67816bafc4517f17b5eaf7351
1bc22fe8866031986f230213c2dffbd182ec5d49
describe
'31006' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMG' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e6b2360441c38636efbe84f2a0c13d82
81013b607829ce31ac21c9a5b2c65c0303df9e83
describe
'69646' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMH' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5a9a92233040b018fa57ad68ae7f26ad
321d7f7aeae8a246f64e127b2a1bcfea863c3ffe
'2012-04-22T00:37:40-04:00'
describe
'13206324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMI' 'sip-files00098.tif'
6812252df38efa628e130ffcc3eec927
928c2309b952b4044d2a562a0cc4c7a163c2a3c8
'2012-04-22T00:37:28-04:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMJ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
f9764a08029a871b37efce9e5fb030eb
7b9a27a60eaae9405029e0b20023b5a0a0ecbc86
describe
'35893' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMK' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
66ccfdcfe58b5568b2f2c78db9bfc29d
424c7872d525ce47f48ca89534a4302aecc807fd
describe
'253134' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVML' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
875b96509ec5b8d9d28ecf2a16da4592
e40bf33da0625e99f2d345f8fb0808f43d2cdfc0
describe
'160517' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMM' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a0f4feb53f79db1d9a84de9e21d81d43
5f201f1ad9db60e819eceb9ab6c1d6e96c83b797
'2012-04-22T00:37:21-04:00'
describe
'33356' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMN' 'sip-files00099.pro'
b83739e9b7901a6c1dfbca3614f7d8e4
3847d78fca76b8fc7531438241495679da72ae1b
describe
'73364' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMO' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2652a2616890c744e74811a1d0c5619f
04324759677ed8dc57afc810699ea6368c27da02
describe
'2048152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMP' 'sip-files00099.tif'
ab01d0def2080c1fc70404983cb682c2
ef11df7f4b4b0cdd8160646abc0cf4ae3dd92e73
'2012-04-22T00:38:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMQ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
e182fa746912c52aac36b54f193c86c9
10e40fbc86ff0c021dfff2fdc88638522698c4a7
'2012-04-22T00:35:32-04:00'
describe
'38964' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMR' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5d016e88d172b994d5fe2d16952c4f31
671d06a1e1e759fd5a80330da2cbf23c15ee67de
describe
'249966' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMS' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2dea16d87f3196c7804f8aa0e61a4434
9afd00639ffd3bc0e4fb7194784c5bf3df768f66
describe
'110597' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMT' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ec30c1332e2563adee8c84b4d6c7c00a
200b4f4c817fe3cec202ee9b4197ffd0281b2143
describe
'6739' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMU' 'sip-files00100.pro'
f6ce833333a8fffbf0bb9f741a3f19a2
eebd25585178b0a9c2d90d1a2d1deb14f39facbd
'2012-04-22T00:32:11-04:00'
describe
'50724' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMV' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
172a7e67f88fb0c5c360b71e050e9e48
719a61cbc531bcb04ecd4da89b8f2b7b3d0a0315
'2012-04-22T00:38:07-04:00'
describe
'2022564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMW' 'sip-files00100.tif'
6efd337f5034be0d402d19df8067cec0
e74f6e4ba85276f5d4d03b77cf59b3b3d22b682a
'2012-04-22T00:31:11-04:00'
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMX' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5713a0560990df44b316dadb5acacc56
ec0fcbf3570f99de592afbba38212b9d75eec62e
describe
'31260' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMY' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
87f604efd612fd3c8c68109ac0792a4d
38cd09e9ad43a1bc59339e21da23ea865fbf8558
'2012-04-22T00:28:34-04:00'
describe
'244896' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVMZ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
133ea51a36cb9ee4cf714f3f3970900f
8fdf7baf0b12a3c4ccc10693c1a42065ee7177e5
describe
'132104' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNA' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
d7fc125eaf519332cb449bb8fe224e28
d0bfdb021d11982876d27351104d8880b1f885ca
'2012-04-22T00:38:30-04:00'
describe
'28072' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNB' 'sip-files00101.pro'
55fe5cf39648bcb8902065981b2222df
630a96ccb5b3b7a890f4dd576adeef4808780221
'2012-04-22T00:35:00-04:00'
describe
'59789' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNC' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
635d89e1fbcdf414c8637c1bad83b900
76b8795c1f365ad808b5940540963069672dddc1
describe
'1981324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVND' 'sip-files00101.tif'
058a40fb0636c2e5dea90f3f4220864f
fb4186da39c59c7ab71f71e14f1e0796c834060e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNE' 'sip-files00101.txt'
65dbac41dbc4dbe889ceeca427c5b435
7153d9a41e0d544d93a98fe2d498840b6b56d62d
'2012-04-22T00:38:28-04:00'
describe
'35199' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNF' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4812c8471f5ec8bfe2f39f534f93d082
865624d4b423ccdca734ca002bcec62285fafbf8
describe
'240238' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNG' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
671194461da1f10041d46c6f8e6c8f0e
eb478dec0a1eca68586b841f4a4f06ed3365f7d8
describe
'119289' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNH' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
1b377739e57dfdb41d093c31e2552994
7179c5342c97a6d3d86c3e4293e46a79cda47733
'2012-04-22T00:30:48-04:00'
describe
'19809' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNI' 'sip-files00102.pro'
4a26f948aa1d2393e173f02579606423
9bd28973771440073211e635b7e5062b26234e11
'2012-04-22T00:36:53-04:00'
describe
'55358' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNJ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
43dc2fc218fa0f4b443d37da193c7785
6084655dea5aba5d77d5f70bcc9f406651dd39be
'2012-04-22T00:32:07-04:00'
describe
'1943592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNK' 'sip-files00102.tif'
0054c56e5a06e398e2a897af88c61a36
4fd52e8bdd61d02954ccfc1db4e3687cc9142fef
'2012-04-22T00:35:06-04:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNL' 'sip-files00102.txt'
095c97aa7a5a25927a4889521dd5fe8f
c5a6a52f713e0ba2cd8f68f7c618e10f66ed6df4
'2012-04-22T00:32:33-04:00'
describe
'33154' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNM' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
7472af1b1aa0d5d0c4367f7c10c33073
eff816319e88b16748634610d90e86f718847490
describe
'245610' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNN' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
506a21025126c56c70e071303309fe97
84e890ca90f2b34673b26a3b8d7d6e8e4da24657
describe
'134064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNO' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
472bb9986b6ec1c59d28554e17a500b9
cc11d24291d5f0742d49855ad6dc9ba8efe62fc8
'2012-04-22T00:29:13-04:00'
describe
'23560' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNP' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b2fd91545762722d6e42c8a7cbd386c2
53aa88d16e590cbdd6538095fa929bf2322ca42e
'2012-04-22T00:32:03-04:00'
describe
'63585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNQ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
9cf8503afa32aca13c79707a61dc8c48
259bc2e87b1dcae09519d1ce6861f400701bebbc
'2012-04-22T00:37:42-04:00'
describe
'1987152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNR' 'sip-files00103.tif'
f54afa06c652371464538f9f62ba0dd3
a2c9f0d81672f7b8ce1956a64c3195edf9d1726e
'2012-04-22T00:32:35-04:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNS' 'sip-files00103.txt'
725afe85ace97d637bfb6254e7236a8c
7653564f1c5eb3bad2edec2884dc83aa8cbf1aad
'2012-04-22T00:29:04-04:00'
describe
'36115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNT' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
22776de971c20643edea6a134133e4a9
073d2e6fa06079b9c6169a3c057a895e6c3fd6e2
'2012-04-22T00:28:29-04:00'
describe
'248236' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNU' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
bd5dd184911847a1160459f38ca11504
609f23f3bc9c50558a72fbf4aba00e4025e91a23
describe
'167056' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNV' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
bd6ecc00f39e83eb1f3a4cf6f1f187e1
3b42df9c763742772497c539351a38dd5bfb0137
describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNW' 'sip-files00104.pro'
b2b4bdfecf169fbad7146245ac4add05
c286665f1ba46375386e0fc8178fc73c8e2ad0ee
describe
'75601' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNX' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
453a6aee64377cc53082d60dfd5b3715
14bcf7cc030b16a67d221d9dc04b4dcff1993aa3
describe
'2009156' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNY' 'sip-files00104.tif'
4b152a7bf65c466b60d69922be4239b5
0a4577ec0a81bdf4b8eff486fc090aff63636d01
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVNZ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
9164d7654b59f92224062c2100065043
646659ac60f2ecddce2f54fbc0b69a6c263d2308
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOA' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
44e76acf0102b830fbd47e02524610a5
ed653d16a1c38f793ff3695dbed7f6cc50b20666
describe
'231823' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOB' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
66de2da2d8f84e8340eaf3df613be6e5
d57418b20a199b80a08ac0d61d07ca920c12f1d4
describe
'166646' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOC' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
646bf7d51b8f49c745c93326970a6434
d34e315a9597b6efa8918357818f1835097c8d75
describe
'33071' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOD' 'sip-files00105.pro'
3882c707e81f978b276d00cda93850a9
7233d4b5d1af25c981eaf1a090932b56708b3437
'2012-04-22T00:38:10-04:00'
describe
'75561' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOE' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c4691309c5e97f4b4b2f05a82e434f05
38d526c53bbea6b7037eb14690bfeed7ff1b2146
describe
'1877936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOF' 'sip-files00105.tif'
461dea62b61edc76cce44853e0c6ba79
b346f51386fe11c15d79ce360216d1c0a5a32403
'2012-04-22T00:37:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOG' 'sip-files00105.txt'
f292bc8ae12e7d62f3808fb65446380f
a1793c05261322e5f4c7c3f629bd5fe97ffec52e
describe
'41818' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOH' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
18697c7ec750a7956b0f6d6b9d720bcc
3610b43e483fd172452df19e77963d947194008a
'2012-04-22T00:37:57-04:00'
describe
'252305' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOI' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
8983fc6878e8e191a9cdfbd1f4a7aede
208417d72a65a16409121281b2b40925bd9e802a
describe
'165515' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOJ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
6d66f9a9d0592e88fe61a2e3c19fac35
3c540ec8b82d7de88ab6b6663fbe762df61763fc
describe
'33764' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOK' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8455062220c48e1f4d23abe11eafcdcf
80ebc946f150130be3e508afb189a9c52884e4c2
describe
'75952' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOL' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
dda953791375756531f5913ace1ef50e
9488f34ea46d337afe1bf3bff6035cebc826787b
describe
'2041708' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOM' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8f7b2573a348e90bd94f2668a00cec73
ea2316531ff9b48db91adab10c003b3125e6aae0
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVON' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1621fb1cd3a1295caf2c777fedadcb76
5aa7a22c0e187bd79624e74964c386f9cbeb5c4b
describe
'39706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOO' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
8aea8426c0f0436ca318843d53555fd5
7763630b70825c8b2eecac9ce2239230f5edd6ed
'2012-04-22T00:27:53-04:00'
describe
'240665' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOP' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
f9230ec03d83b7aaafc3e9e469aa1b25
606ff8073320eae1e6a5e8bacc6a779b3ab04985
'2012-04-22T00:28:47-04:00'
describe
'169618' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOQ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9721e9a87ae12d9cf4e4cce5319af776
cba4da04e9b536393f47b40bf2f6ad26bd54e449
'2012-04-22T00:33:52-04:00'
describe
'33093' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOR' 'sip-files00107.pro'
08a2cb93ca61c749f65e9b0c73d1c6e8
57b1ee82f35fbe7e51359ec6c15eeb03da462f76
'2012-04-22T00:35:34-04:00'
describe
'78336' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOS' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
be0bae407f0e5a59d56280adb32b5a36
4c67088e64dab4beb609c71dc99cbc4a9a45fb78
describe
'1948904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOT' 'sip-files00107.tif'
43ffb37f9d72165c64e66620db5e4e20
6794700f5a4b5f6e39dce472ec1899e6de5c4cea
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOU' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0f30d47e541c80741e76bb4c1486c41d
38f1da645482264aad9d356369c9a2da75882a73
describe
'41569' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOV' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
83a5c665efc6ae84dd480074f4057204
99b2fdc4c821ac322df5022a4f04f0739e92ddd6
describe
'240943' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOW' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d57e23ce02360a66caca6a6f337c70c7
3e630908def3f81233d32335fb132c7f28b4c496
'2012-04-22T00:27:44-04:00'
describe
'151974' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOX' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f8276712b4a566a603be8d0c46ed848c
27f223af966aab967bbb909171c1e3a9d2e248b7
'2012-04-22T00:34:46-04:00'
describe
'29408' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOY' 'sip-files00108.pro'
9a042f0342d0a0cc4fbeafe8eae199f1
61e93293db0c255fe5bbc3940de8711df1519049
'2012-04-22T00:29:01-04:00'
describe
'71254' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVOZ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
53771e1d0ad55bc54429c894cbd5f043
d763c984b3cff61365fb778adeca05e8446b3b34
describe
'1950572' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPA' 'sip-files00108.tif'
588ef01324233cea01e877824b363631
de291b183c9bbf42b8d41e9005c7e5c5c0a53477
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPB' 'sip-files00108.txt'
7e47bddec8ee811f1875d5df63abf433
17864dca65f98cad4eba11bdc6139894f0d38f68
'2012-04-22T00:34:04-04:00'
describe
'39874' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPC' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
7d8bec979a6cdf626dc34cb6a3f20e2a
f28f5bf4ca3e45758cdeaf6ec61bdf3cac170368
describe
'245841' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPD' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
f8a70eed10b1f5503a460b481762cf90
a34b4125cb7403f8dd53dcc8389cb02b38846452
describe
'166939' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPE' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
574b0c919ff85013c511b826c225d48c
44ee780fc61ca4cb3ae3ad4a5a3d0a5f1194cefa
describe
'33064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPF' 'sip-files00109.pro'
3cb5bc96c2689d2041d2177329004151
9e913f45b8523c541102b0231b44190f2faa7bcd
describe
'76168' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPG' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b6d8e7a34a194545b5cd9a1d4bb27200
f6618b3f8fd589119bd2ed4b22e1ffa60daf442e
describe
'1989960' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPH' 'sip-files00109.tif'
30ee0ae198cd58638279e9cf3de6904f
5b198c75e8b51977c8bd2c5f847df0e682f4784c
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPI' 'sip-files00109.txt'
a066ea3d52a538f725784e9300ccad82
43e2d954b7a5847429d6f3e9318504cb5a537759
describe
'39791' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPJ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
8a91d1c365938bcd3278271b48cd058b
b063a7792e3fdea9c694903a29775723139a5199
'2012-04-22T00:28:25-04:00'
describe
'239913' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPK' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
7c43c456d2fdd0a75b0f7063959e3a47
c94400a4373c0414b29d3a8e70a2e910e9967eb9
describe
'163432' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPL' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
cf1842e2db061201e8d3b91e73c3473c
e764f5f04dbaf0d47e1e6bf3a3c9a4cdf24ae2c9
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPM' 'sip-files00110.pro'
f7158318ffe89195bea576826bd025da
a1c5fb24292732bfa9ebebffa0da965aafedf7df
describe
'73939' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPN' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
d84c1515de8cd64459700a3ce5273287
93aa4bddd897c5e0ff3c1d4b0b49f77c1e22bc1c
describe
'1942232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPO' 'sip-files00110.tif'
f6efe0a279b4ce329cde19b66ad50896
4f41e1bae5ddb4803174fac525c272909306ef4a
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPP' 'sip-files00110.txt'
277abe26bfc61bfde758010129c4593e
b0e0c93dc5fbb04741e66707c0b6e6e16089cc52
'2012-04-22T00:35:19-04:00'
describe
'40450' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPQ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
d928f1c47a22873c132ece4f5e3b7570
f2f8983bd5eec5553b9706c1f10d6f9728b984a1
describe
'153879' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPR' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
09a56b944a6fe90b89f2860dcf0a7d4b
0391fea1e826596450c9baa0c6d1a56cdedd8aab
describe
'65946' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPS' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
1ad7b5f3fdbb154fd63a71d6c09aeb3b
909026b89a33a3a62df5e52071445df372e5b056
describe
'6038' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPT' 'sip-files00111.pro'
c77b6e7beee3acffb3242544819fdcf0
4c8a4b9b36fbd0bf3170ce64390eb96ffc94af34
'2012-04-22T00:29:28-04:00'
describe
'36899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPU' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
6931b600eaf4c59e381ad9001f246f99
8b8fa0d62201bcda3bf5da57c67c44c4de35eebe
describe
'2022448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPV' 'sip-files00111.tif'
191ea0013d477835482106daca3acc3b
f2bed9de14664b534df4e613e790db4b4f577bc4
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPW' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8de12907cdd1c781bb2c3e0dc5be5225
a2b1a610664da6649d8a42621ca402d8d92c3f19
'2012-04-22T00:34:14-04:00'
describe
'26440' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPX' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
49b4cbbaaeba734935a096c8f1cc04f0
bf2af71ca40df398555bf365ad70f5bc24a111ed
describe
'241090' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPY' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1379ae75e5f1a9d1c0d5e3ebf61ae6e3
debcd9e8b7e524179de6c4264586b3c43284d634
describe
'125992' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVPZ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
5243c0252a2f8a931e53160c615d3c35
1daebdf465484385be917d475d8962d8387fc109
describe
'22094' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQA' 'sip-files00112.pro'
c791d282dfd23d28dc1c670e1603ea89
e0b3cb69f6d4642e82575673f44072ef90ef6ac3
'2012-04-22T00:34:30-04:00'
describe
'61119' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQB' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
1e212f36af3be2e321ab965284efceb7
0df939764f0bfd66623b0c0da1db8bce7419e809
describe
'1950600' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQC' 'sip-files00112.tif'
1614a17eb96c14eaadc6f0b0db7d6d7c
062f2fa5ad1a04bc0b234b951a8e4444c1e5bd08
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQD' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3c3e160f641139ab57b1b626f03e010f
d504e51aace63a7dcb87723ee72284641bdb0f46
describe
'35412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQE' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
4aff0204b2cad3b295f05333f3e05a4d
d2958912228814a07c115148a12943746e9e23f8
describe
'252433' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQF' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
eeefff3919f86db1341a76c52f71f3eb
4199566a1e9666cd21b9654480970e9be23b11c7
'2012-04-22T00:37:16-04:00'
describe
'150757' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQG' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
30c587982edbd4ae394672d6ba7a946d
46207f88ed72a85ae2214d11e48be660a0ad5a31
'2012-04-22T00:37:24-04:00'
describe
'30204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQH' 'sip-files00113.pro'
15345077cca4f20b323d2742bbb99eda
326d87c2356eef26730bd16a12a6e0e2dd67e4ff
describe
'70694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQI' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
e6af3a336253f3c2cce9e7c9f922b691
6f8f2daa24dda6900586ef2121d0dc0b79c09cb4
describe
'2042424' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQJ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
63394e6e737404dac25e5a940453d9b5
223b8c4a564547541221588566ebefc41c8eac13
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQK' 'sip-files00113.txt'
5f68a715ce842fff7563558a777daf09
04a1b44d5dbc9f9b194ac37d54241f00e9a4d450
'2012-04-22T00:33:23-04:00'
describe
'37837' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQL' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
f790cc6e2579a24e77e2790d6dda7a62
341286e901fa7eddc099098fdc774b8ec489dc02
describe
'256360' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQM' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
14a6ca13e5215f2845528264eabee744
ef192e214c5101fb4dfb808365a93d6b2b2222cf
describe
'156649' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQN' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4e4a5611f1b871b12770b9c340f32f9c
80cb619437e1b373883ae269aff16836d7daea9e
'2012-04-22T00:31:27-04:00'
describe
'30772' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQO' 'sip-files00114.pro'
f5cbdf04b2001276448b3a003a755116
35d5af2a4c0ae2d940b909a34873f444d01fbd9e
describe
'73585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQP' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
114cc897b7a52e3e9179425207c92e60
611b855fd6e9e0d42734941bf4423ecaaed68352
describe
'2074232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQQ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
e144cb15eb049b34a37aac91de44177c
a6c6974b72e366ca6aa4aa09d23ad7578e4ebd99
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQR' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2efe9d07a98aef08e861ddc508b15b64
4372ba94b1e0ae2f34ed2e9497d34d2f54942c3d
describe
'38750' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQS' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
4e8a221c6bb8c4245d63f9dc3611cec1
e9b9195b0534b93660dc47a89c489fb675a543f9
'2012-04-22T00:36:08-04:00'
describe
'250188' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQT' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
94c721c9b14d77d38f19dc7466d36fe8
497f6e2809cce25d0b07951c58a41a991adb1247
'2012-04-22T00:33:05-04:00'
describe
'176181' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQU' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0482056735c9cec5dc10ae7d65a663c3
fb9f691331a88b8e0e03655dc6181fec198a7632
'2012-04-22T00:28:33-04:00'
describe
'32007' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQV' 'sip-files00115.pro'
69e9bf11ee7b219df61ca676317ec7e8
b370b2e38f7075c5366faf2f74292659f97aa7e3
describe
'78246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQW' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
95bae1e719f1aac8e8bfd93321ff6b28
2d910271fe14513916a46892c847230fd4948f9b
describe
'2024504' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQX' 'sip-files00115.tif'
8880215836de58099a3d0f7d15f0a72d
dde6675b880fce418ff6212354ca18142f493eff
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQY' 'sip-files00115.txt'
9b632897e30d95fd8697a99f7ddaaa26
0c518658ab7665536e9c4a0aae2b1d73fdceb8d9
describe
'40623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVQZ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
2eb8aef7dbbe95579c5c3da60bcda43e
a8d91db9ca5978df68e2721a1e82f6ce44193704
describe
'257308' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRA' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
5f6994067f6bf9e8f4927193ec671149
0e66deb3860257d379f50504452ec2aa5db7e7be
describe
'164621' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRB' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ee1a3adc565bd2b363b426c260013877
ce5c621ae108e1b1c8ec3f138489fdbcca6dee17
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRC' 'sip-files00116.pro'
981b41063e5dcd39fea1b1c78721d8d0
cbcda93360a42fb941780392ea933828b80ac491
describe
'75318' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRD' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
656dba18726db3e290e2d785edede08f
b2b59db4f5a9e0746285c4f72e8985c515773f32
'2012-04-22T00:35:14-04:00'
describe
'2081648' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRE' 'sip-files00116.tif'
812e1677acf10bdea9d1c2c244f2827d
b3547968188e2b5383ad9ee44d5f63f137dc81b9
'2012-04-22T00:28:07-04:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRF' 'sip-files00116.txt'
465654b6a08d85e8553cb4b1d91f48d7
224ce8ece0216f17fc82ae3a55e6ed81ee7683f2
describe
'38022' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRG' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
594a68de8cd9e98784fcb9325f4afe04
8b42643a164913a9a690ec8e8281b53a31bd32fb
describe
'243001' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
aa07e84a2dff53e84917c9403fe89321
c6b353cd4d7c84357c644f5e5e52fe7dec08e573
describe
'99071' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRI' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
99551dbea17ea06cc6d185f2b4a88702
59db3476f4f53c69e0292da33b4ac32850171271
describe
'14123' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRJ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
989168258ea0b23b3c4b9f5505299a30
7e8655b033b3c9df97ffa711188b8f69c01e2983
describe
'49381' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRK' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
160d67a4a520308b4621da08f9076099
10eed03d8cf5a65c1a79a9e47735feb4efda22f9
'2012-04-22T00:35:54-04:00'
describe
'1964916' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRL' 'sip-files00117.tif'
8850e77a910c2a8ea75e8654b00cfd94
fdc8757434b93fe2136ee3d3b63cda0ad7c4a566
describe
'573' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRM' 'sip-files00117.txt'
637859065b36bbfd126dee12931b8bfe
2a5401d828d329195001022f383a32566c2caeb2
describe
'30461' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRN' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
00e9c49c316a4eaf5a7d2f4b7f44e975
1f3808b5ca9bbf45248d9b6e87a1d7188975ea5d
describe
'253693' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRO' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
19623c1339edd7fb0450b068412210ae
19acdda2c1bfed8fb62438375fa4dc4058dee42a
describe
'134761' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRP' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
4f5c6dedfb05050cc71c0dc7ba9dc3e6
93e2b1c5b3aa5aa5727e42eaa9ea67f7e013568b
describe
'25077' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRQ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
42c58914921288a1ee5b2e0d60e1b84c
c48fd2530f4a9f92d99ca7e6937926b0d3ad5579
describe
'62777' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRR' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d80d18616f26be9e962ced4f7cf0128f
12dac59a6e8e36c7181bd3a9dd8789f837d534b3
describe
'2052116' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRS' 'sip-files00118.tif'
3657e9e618c61130bae44e89c98ba598
b6f02c03e9236ab8fa0527e2978d02275cc72f3f
'2012-04-22T00:30:28-04:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRT' 'sip-files00118.txt'
e10368a77d7c5e1a0947e409962cc797
ec6734f35b5db827a4217e3761e2b82b52e6985c
'2012-04-22T00:33:16-04:00'
describe
'35035' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRU' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
0cfa3e568c77b6301ed8f2b9be5add9e
eaf717be939322f248185279c5869d4f17873ac1
describe
'239460' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRV' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
846c23be58d020e7295d2b552ae16fe4
713eabafd079a04818448df7b14f9e70e3df3a95
'2012-04-22T00:28:13-04:00'
describe
'164281' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRW' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c7b31234848480ee78a8763d63b67e25
c7a2c0f0b8c97bbc1ab60416ff24e7e254f36cde
'2012-04-22T00:36:07-04:00'
describe
'34063' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRX' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a10e0d6a1c8eae295749de522eec00e7
703625fd4d01c16307d87b49061a52ba9eea988e
describe
'75248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRY' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
dacb75a4bb8ef3bf1c526f4eadee5acc
20dfab988da6fc77c6f78b3508257c4093c5e299
describe
'1938736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVRZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c690a80c36890ffa7528ca60acf3290f
6f8ddd7bd5c9b2ee5ec3575e7f738d383b2a02d5
'2012-04-22T00:31:16-04:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSA' 'sip-files00119.txt'
4fc1a2d06b6625b9df3f410405959ecb
e24d656e519c6dfd422abe4e3fbd65c64535c8e0
'2012-04-22T00:38:13-04:00'
describe
'40266' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSB' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
2bdf28fa6b3f369f03d14a98d66313e9
5eaca6bfa7cef168cc17b534dfbfce837271c960
'2012-04-22T00:32:43-04:00'
describe
'257344' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSC' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ca9e32339e6b89ccb6f6a7fad3d676f3
c7b8dbea24a8af38dced0526cc111928e5db29e0
describe
'168938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSD' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
1544a3a8e91ac8bb2ebfef229c50f334
63c8f3ba964150d581eeecf9a29d7ee92f27f0c9
describe
'34260' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSE' 'sip-files00120.pro'
7a57f650230eb40d0efb27fe651c40bd
8014a6728bdf08acbcae3ad5b3f681d5b04179a2
'2012-04-22T00:28:09-04:00'
describe
'77479' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSF' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
4eda8de58525d863e5b7698037362232
8ad9e8809a6d5b0a85f0c00c86b7ab01e8ab71f2
describe
'2082000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSG' 'sip-files00120.tif'
4b81f1aeaa12ed70e442ed6414913a3d
dbe2338e509f3f2034c2499ad2c9af8bc2ee9518
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSH' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8f01e10517aaabf2bf65f7386c503c83
65d93314c33c8a93050b360f76b5a3af6635b15b
describe
'39072' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSI' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
d837ea04a8c30debe8120389916ccedd
32a9542fc6c98af83c93241c3d41c8659cb3fc09
'2012-04-22T00:34:03-04:00'
describe
'236740' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSJ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
26a06bbecd7b6d262775c4342825ef9a
13aa23cd808ef2100578f60be21b3c763a7bf98a
describe
'171713' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSK' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
be8760ced59bff68e54ec99de70a8511
18135c3f9d820839dd22f2fe310500c344d12372
describe
'35084' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSL' 'sip-files00121.pro'
09e77e68f9f9cfbb6c70f07f13f97eca
a2ad58e24dca5edfae4e9a5e3d91a747d5b34e2f
describe
'79090' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSM' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b1e19fbc2d6227df6d59d72b148d38e0
c405b241ae9f3b1d29cc520e4c740c3d5ef53a4b
describe
'1917368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSN' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ca53de2b27cd29830989c4e14226413a
549d6270698d30b35b31455b8ec4581b63f4a99f
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSO' 'sip-files00121.txt'
286c48d0c3a05e5c4598376d8760eacf
2f83ef9b6fd01dc14484fa9ad639193f822736bb
describe
'41541' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSP' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
ccb1cbc4d9a7dfb9358a3fa34cfaa62b
6294d50fb77ee1fa44d6b896e07c542d5bdb2666
describe
'255531' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSQ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
17658e32e0b6e28fe539f1a0d645d33d
ce755f1962b12a6c5736227f3985b95ae71d864a
describe
'167953' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSR' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
b8210af69c4b78dd1dc3cf098971d1ca
baca2ae33ab978ff57914c71ecb0efd0cc81caf0
describe
'34634' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSS' 'sip-files00122.pro'
e22142aee2fb56f34e8a4f4f70c77e77
12c683deab6a6f2b6a33a6a2dd13c3fc4c7c757c
describe
'75997' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVST' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
f85f082995ea724075de374ecbcef6f0
657c171ccaf436191e845049c657ac9d199d3d15
describe
'2067504' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSU' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f81897f1460021b12517cf621b02d79a
a791d07a87628b4e99a1d400dafecbbedaa17880
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSV' 'sip-files00122.txt'
572785f5e94bca6a91ff776e6040816f
38758f697dc28fc83443e6c5634f6adbe7d5d006
'2012-04-22T00:38:33-04:00'
describe
'38703' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3f90ac54f9a5286a003d5867ecd796f6
937c08cefa9123b812e508ac1e0e95d65a858b9b
describe
'241232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSX' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
9bf7d3718f45e367525f29e5f4bb5744
3af0f23c8ecad393853051847992177ac4da0385
describe
'167881' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSY' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
964ada22219c2bdeebd63b186d1a850a
81fdb0261200bc3aa3f9ac0e218246fa106ce858
'2012-04-22T00:34:28-04:00'
describe
'34597' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVSZ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
1877f3c2539bc8ab08ef552f76a7b1b1
ae74f6e90fda9ec2982b0c41cab97626c6a38b5d
describe
'77091' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTA' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
720dcc1b9fe181cd1509d807cb7f1af1
7aa1baa46d0c7f83f090bf3fdeb854d6e334bedc
'2012-04-22T00:29:18-04:00'
describe
'1952876' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTB' 'sip-files00123.tif'
23de05d6c410d4518302e2530afc80d9
6192fe7868278437f796bb5122bfb1c7173505c1
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTC' 'sip-files00123.txt'
eaba6f15facd3380612a4ae2fae74f4e
e50baaf04a9e4eece551dbf0f6ff7be37158b862
describe
'40681' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
d5d733affbc7e0884167c7771b96bbe2
ae7a14a94aa948730ab07887dabdcd4caa357db7
describe
'254216' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTE' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
1d0b8e7e64fb04a09fa816ab08c6d9d6
c9018aaca1972a838064ce9cd6f24493fadc2d04
describe
'161920' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTF' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
23736b89153d713063fa70fbcfebae46
b1b003634b41f05a60d4ee9f11edd9589c189576
'2012-04-22T00:32:34-04:00'
describe
'34358' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTG' 'sip-files00124.pro'
9c487e0088419d8e81925ba05831e545
2c7990ba075faef321f0aaccd11d39e72eeb9748
'2012-04-22T00:32:16-04:00'
describe
'73358' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTH' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d5b563524571390d5af3ae3e204a2e4f
3747d8c9a354ca8dc47cb15e221fa18aadf9d8fb
describe
'2056720' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTI' 'sip-files00124.tif'
a5d64a0c972279ceaae773debe17ae9c
fa4047585f15cd918ea57386058a0ef5dbeed34e
'2012-04-22T00:27:27-04:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTJ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
1840afdcc4f3dd2cdb86425a6cfea712
9a22d1c5e9419dcad152dfb601f9496137151a6a
describe
'38672' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTK' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
7509527c1645b3ea326872360038f48c
ebc1fca5f9349a5a7dd65766712213b46c3e4ea3
'2012-04-22T00:35:12-04:00'
describe
'262556' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTL' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
308f235fb5bb42ed84a4fe1f5f6d42c7
6a735d69fb035d46c1bf743c129bb0558fb9f3d0
'2012-04-22T00:37:50-04:00'
describe
'163677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
036b891bef831850e2b52c46a09aa336
e3d136b0c8ea5a3bd4dc781cb38da1d10c5c2440
describe
'33459' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTN' 'sip-files00125.pro'
58afff82ce977f3563a6ffad41f14280
102e4b7c047a32668c16fde0c64be3849d24364d
describe
'73390' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTO' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
42807bf219a1deb6803f951e0b50e3cb
690564cb0be498183fddd25891f791727bae7c83
describe
'2123496' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTP' 'sip-files00125.tif'
fc4fcb4700735d2f4944d5bff3eae177
5314faaf2faca7e4aaf13c532fd8a33b29cfbe58
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
2040abdd6983b80ac2e561d191df3784
1870877c57a0960996a90e1fba08512ff0acd023
describe
'39157' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTR' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
1080e60ab42adda0b2595bdc58c22907
16c2731a59e73108c2ac2054e6a95ffd265d559d
describe
'275437' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a5d060073cf047085de96abb3ca1fb14
9107c00b5f6161f22102d48e07bbf1e4cb8a4b54
'2012-04-22T00:31:51-04:00'
describe
'162115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTT' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e0c7123dcfd24d2ab71decb45f8da441
b9a9ed821c1060f98af00bbc7cdf343a9094f6f3
describe
'32670' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
fe84b4335f5f04b52730437823fe11c0
ec2b0c38dfe1b88b337bcecbc39c6306a025d7e4
describe
'73922' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
e1fb5eda93891224a053c63e07a44a08
087fb00e3cda73a099c6ae415fbec7e917438120
describe
'2226344' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTW' 'sip-files00126.tif'
7b50ee0bcbe250b86544b2f955016bfb
e3652d1e2b7f83f8d028bd6cf996eb1a8163814d
'2012-04-22T00:31:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTX' 'sip-files00126.txt'
624ec8bd1ea5bc7225b851aa91d3145c
92d62d1e9c9f80b94e782a91968742dec7b069b5
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTY' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
9960cd307cab689edddb8d1c9b0aaa46
6fdeeb2c13161fb9ca208ba380f1be4b826ebd35
describe
'256250' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVTZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
e20b731f2c6898cf8433353fa580cb6b
f6eb3eeca062b96c7a134c1b43246fbfe786d285
describe
'153402' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUA' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
594dcf25c88aa95c99b43ec125b661fb
1704a9d8fe84983edc5d0d559dabd1b421d91ce5
describe
'31677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUB' 'sip-files00127.pro'
284031f71460d44c2487855354638649
ac481c1263ac9600ee8558d97e728e2b12cb0c35
describe
'70692' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUC' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
60159a9f5a397cc87559085a81b7e71b
02c632e41210b1d15fd2555860bfef5e199ef6d8
'2012-04-22T00:37:12-04:00'
describe
'2072528' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUD' 'sip-files00127.tif'
3a9f8335463e233633cef80ed114c77a
4d9213c4d9b1a8bcd356640033506fcd532546ca
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c36e7ba7662f4f6f6412251cef5d14f7
2c2893121387ea038d8fe14a32b26de0d7bc5231
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUF' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
5ca57299d6304dd7a4c5db0e7becd5a1
4b42b98d77721b591e7660184c85f6b540d8811c
describe
'127195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
6c9735113a043bde8eded05c818db4c5
224f14905570b740d6995f5005664e1ded84b8b0
describe
'38396' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUH' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e27133a7d1dc920e184e9c5959ddaf42
28e32e319437fa0bddeacbc52ba253886187fd41
describe
'24947' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4f477caaf59ce65094eb1b59979ec85d
9c238cab63916bf10fc835e7b26d725c748d3da4
describe
'2232148' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUJ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
d9ee819d2f11fdaca920d4072353ee6e
9eb5d6babb722af8ee338a2b7d22a86af72a3b27
'2012-04-22T00:27:46-04:00'
describe
'251797' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUK' 'sip-files00128a.jp2'
dce43bb01578b9d769f07f0308436201
ea75f8349835299a4ab5f1e3eb0e555467a47451
'2012-04-22T00:32:17-04:00'
describe
'245247' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUL' 'sip-files00128a.jpg'
56080a5505b0a072ec7dfdbd0e28f2ac
98bcf69715f99a2c90a19f8910b2ef7900eda39f
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUM' 'sip-files00128a.pro'
7125547f515f88a765e144fd0b3bc8f1
826885fd2e652e2e94aa3bf8e27a20179b559ccf
'2012-04-22T00:33:49-04:00'
describe
'73491' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUN' 'sip-files00128a.QC.jpg'
254c81f08d85a0280b7f974eead985c3
02400f3c1fd21a99e37dfb595258548746128984
'2012-04-22T00:32:42-04:00'
describe
'2037024' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUO' 'sip-files00128a.tif'
bc5d77b1227b516ab57ab5c2c129cccc
0fbb70843367c3141e98b40650ce1eb90817c541
'2012-04-22T00:28:39-04:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUP' 'sip-files00128a.txt'
37f42f463a1e64a5f203831b1f3b262c
64a5d9db2339aa3b80c39b9bc3bb9ffcdd19710b
'2012-04-22T00:34:00-04:00'
describe
'35885' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUQ' 'sip-files00128athm.jpg'
c064c224df6342e58bc25b21433ec81d
c8d614bafd3a9ebfe8645d80ea409fd376a8eb2e
'2012-04-22T00:37:10-04:00'
describe
'249795' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUR' 'sip-files00128b.jp2'
5938325e15a04a271315ca0ee2f1bbea
84ff120820a935a27cd5e156d1b3fbf8b60251fa
describe
'158602' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUS' 'sip-files00128b.jpg'
8a9d7f432bfe5effdd896d3e3515ca1e
59e1988693da8319e6ab0245e17df50b5ed52836
'2012-04-22T00:33:21-04:00'
describe
'27179' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUT' 'sip-files00128b.pro'
0b582691b2c0a93f130ba6b312d7d342
70f0e40b7eab91b56f9151c38350ca97a406ef29
'2012-04-22T00:33:06-04:00'
describe
'65823' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUU' 'sip-files00128b.QC.jpg'
f178d384a3512a56f3de782b6b319fc1
191618d888dcb0680c41355c554afdb43ab8f815
'2012-04-22T00:28:26-04:00'
describe
'2019976' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUV' 'sip-files00128b.tif'
a22781f6912c69171d9990bd02dbd264
cc6a2e31a1c67fbcd7307478f28f1eb29b0e7ee7
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUW' 'sip-files00128b.txt'
ab9a7913b99255ddaede5da952e17059
f6286c069d57c79386bfbf82f1aae187720c3677
'2012-04-22T00:32:00-04:00'
describe
'33833' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUX' 'sip-files00128bthm.jpg'
82583008c84e643b0f444aff4c41f11c
bb96f108c746f2129cfec27775c91de92ff5b9aa
describe
'20934' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUY' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
66e66683e9c92072ca7bbe378042fb12
405fac7329f956979ce7e5de4a578e3103fdc9a0
'2012-04-22T00:30:26-04:00'
describe
'243404' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVUZ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ed2a850a6dd86120d4de53f714ca7c94
3ebe1f5f3ca72822a51c0ebe470ee54302e6aa90
describe
'164231' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVA' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4fc5d3f0671cde16da113b17a34deb80
3bc29e087714c100e52cba2c2aaf1eaf7204fd21
'2012-04-22T00:36:30-04:00'
describe
'29766' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVB' 'sip-files00129.pro'
0bb089bdbd64c447c7e5f138c52195b1
d0229e5d11c8bb0fe603d4da4deeb4086e8a634f
describe
'75646' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVC' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
68cb47eae812ab64a4a141e71a4d5f8d
6afd4d23df2481bb5a870c91f0ddfaa7764df774
'2012-04-22T00:37:38-04:00'
describe
'1970380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVD' 'sip-files00129.tif'
e3f7d913d3160e112f4b57e483293083
cb2fab865712ca2246594729763d84447641f0a1
'2012-04-22T00:31:46-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVE' 'sip-files00129.txt'
63730b4f3e561657c67c5064c21a4be4
bc11bb162f448216907a9ac2be5b737d607e8554
describe
'39771' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVF' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
38ddc1ac0c296d53a540f2ca624aa682
03f768715f97084193dfd88d01807d78eea33044
describe
'256578' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVG' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
9415058fb40c6a653e4b9e7cba1f8cd5
2db1abc89ba8b3edca22c36f31791cb396402ba5
describe
'99977' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVH' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
789dddb77c561a77392c2f01fde7bf94
f63f71fbb127a4599d641c2331ad73682ca02d28
'2012-04-22T00:29:06-04:00'
describe
'18061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVI' 'sip-files00130.pro'
da3c33edcf419902c183a6aacbcfc98e
67be0bfac9eafd5857f8959f8fe714b32eee443f
'2012-04-22T00:36:00-04:00'
describe
'49518' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVJ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
3dc18130d34144324c164b8b5f7cb23d
cfa9e1460d8ba8af5f432a948c56742d730e8a05
'2012-04-22T00:37:01-04:00'
describe
'2074060' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVK' 'sip-files00130.tif'
43b1baeaa6c7cc7f2c2fa8e995b6d910
94f01d90f38f20e4ebaaef535d5a996a48a88c51
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVL' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e3b15fece808bfe8d66069d899ca2a5b
14cf574a0cf8ffa9eecb7878d12330971dbb3a5f
'2012-04-22T00:38:22-04:00'
describe
'30860' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
535654b63dff93abb7ddea4365817bd7
582a3f6d35d2f6e8aec4b98575b664cb9893b20a
'2012-04-22T00:38:03-04:00'
describe
'188423' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVN' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
a8ad10750d3aeabc67688dd575f7feb0
db0c65483e22d34c7e33310bf31b2f137124a713
'2012-04-22T00:36:46-04:00'
describe
'76820' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVO' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
1214cf4f03433fea40462a41ea374a0e
bcb051e8af6aeabd5aee18dcce6665dea118c45e
'2012-04-22T00:32:58-04:00'
describe
'8366' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVP' 'sip-files00131.pro'
a622fbb8a42071070c47fa54c1ca8c75
edb91a0fa21fa310bd1086fd2c3572be7a60ceea
'2012-04-22T00:35:31-04:00'
describe
'39092' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVQ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
f0600b8164ea5cd2b970361c5344a9f5
e11aea51dc91a0762269e9755e462e037a8a32f8
describe
'1963972' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
137237cbba13416b49c05cb2323a8a59
2f518d46fc3c5e0b0b6c246d0fca8c532f2b96ba
describe
'425' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVS' 'sip-files00131.txt'
282d2dba682fdbce3d9d8c0b0000d802
0c56520d1ed578df608c2de36c08eeb0285285ef
describe
'26503' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVT' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
8c966e0256b9b2f121244ea3afffae48
047b976b6ba5654a61a6f91f18bd234b78db3dbb
describe
'239454' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVU' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
9c52cf747f01bcd8ad2c0492fb50be9a
fdbf03174344cdf273ddced8ad05a83a220b05cb
'2012-04-22T00:31:41-04:00'
describe
'140226' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVV' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
9a8a651ec85cb535ae2913f82e1c6699
d102ca0dd9ed1d3632ef9a6b8172b047d0e452c7
describe
'26324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVW' 'sip-files00132.pro'
4d61ceeb5335cf5aec8365a9decfffa5
de23b5ea16522e96a653583cf372c3057eb20646
describe
'65302' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVX' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
0186fc301f41885c659ef0b6d1dddb40
fa383c08bd4dbefe4b9eb8197bfcaa656903dfc4
describe
'1938904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVY' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6077ddf24c066505f707646ff1d3f54e
4ecf30a49b7e6c7a82a4d93906a7d4ba78393cdc
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVVZ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
424f7deaded70b6b03a7198d2d3baa58
35452453333764550b6f88d4fa231c4030d10d4c
'2012-04-22T00:35:07-04:00'
describe
'35575' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWA' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
e3c6cc6e96988fae68bc48f932b75e4e
547608ea7da4a5ad8ed949d192b403748aacd5fa
describe
'247244' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWB' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d941ff8b2ffed514560e3f9b4f59e5bf
c0f84b42cc4a6b4277361dc9b640b907594efa89
'2012-04-22T00:37:34-04:00'
describe
'168779' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWC' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
e97193080fcd8668b1b7870be9349204
d1a851d7138c912e1049f25d88bf9d6116abaea4
describe
'34014' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWD' 'sip-files00133.pro'
030a1e9c5b73e9c6e292c372209804ca
682698974cdb678b4c2f9cfc31bef6666da68f36
describe
'75694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWE' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
dad093693770cf1ea0d31f41c8902b58
5d0da83070af99fe5b5d61c2fb9adb7a0628b555
'2012-04-22T00:35:39-04:00'
describe
'2000852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWF' 'sip-files00133.tif'
d089646baa186c37e34d90de33057ada
f4469484a1ec8a8ffa86a53f1066c301c3589201
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWG' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c20226c331139700a4cec49a0b6f3624
18b8766fd60b01ba8cb4c2ffb10b2613e61f3ef8
describe
'39024' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWH' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
7dfab8c8547abf2b07228786c9d7317d
d542da10c69ffe9b1fb2488e6a510d932a226d92
describe
'255270' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWI' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
f78ac3198dddd6b3891fb1460a3bc845
0e9e7193b178695abcd46bf98efed4088d6c990f
describe
'171780' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
3fd00864fd2588a8ec1eedbe4bd90af4
96042ae0988c979c294a6cae31e4e4e3d87853ff
describe
'33606' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWK' 'sip-files00134.pro'
fcabc90ea3a84555a97aada849347dc2
fec9e3ae46c3f97afd3a5df67c70c5c63d014952
describe
'77179' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWL' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
9ed1774db764ef8d7a8dabfff43470b9
da92ad59b0a0fddec050004883f5ed8651fa1d71
'2012-04-22T00:35:44-04:00'
describe
'2065572' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWM' 'sip-files00134.tif'
6b1f2b63b985e100255ebddafa6131a1
441dc49422e66db42a12d66293ed3518ac91efec
'2012-04-22T00:29:22-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWN' 'sip-files00134.txt'
402a03a8c89126fb92f473f3b1aa519c
19e41bd5c6eaebe8743330ead19529e9b514527c
'2012-04-22T00:34:21-04:00'
describe
'39754' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWO' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
785a3d1139696565b835629b261a94c5
7c36039d7ffb21e9e90dc6c2b88e3fca20821683
describe
'263719' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
98c591b688550a533fc37f910ea9c517
dc86447767d4990d35fdee5ba3e06b99f9a6ac19
'2012-04-22T00:36:13-04:00'
describe
'109815' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWQ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
201914ff69a40558b6c1e84c14414d93
7d7674605ba51a47b900410dbc596398ba4b5724
'2012-04-22T00:29:58-04:00'
describe
'16136' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWR' 'sip-files00135.pro'
96ebc3d191f8bbc94a7114b73c9d0f4e
103a0544b210df35dd3274d4c08e5fa46dd64dc7
'2012-04-22T00:31:50-04:00'
describe
'53422' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWS' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
6d83aa1ccceb309c6706c9ec327cd53c
8167e2662981c71f580a3736a10988d4d568d613
describe
'2131740' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWT' 'sip-files00135.tif'
e5d2dce3ec6d4850efc6801f6e71f93e
68b00e6199c64faaf72877299e96f695ae634e97
describe
'665' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
9bfee589c261a478606cdf01b066b4f5
4b6681e4068c18f34c49c6cb3263749b3d8c379e
describe
'31125' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWV' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
3e7a2f0e36982d539640ed3b679f8e6b
983ebeb4ac07fbf0c9821c85329a1be4b99c9a5a
describe
'263787' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWW' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
8f87c0edff5a6a05fe6809215628611d
512836c7daf59efc8bdeaf2492570e005bab6c48
describe
'101548' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWX' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
0e8112cfe5c4cfd35ea17143e6fbf1bd
07defb91882f24bca7738bbe37d23e45a36d5107
describe
'19432' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWY' 'sip-files00136.pro'
ac675ee37d48102911329a6a03b8785f
73689373366b749c87910642cb96d8e932863c5b
'2012-04-22T00:33:09-04:00'
describe
'52180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVWZ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
2e5ca1d94d3d9c8d6639b373fbe5b94e
e8ab53d31903657b8c79c3cebf708a7f3b9de576
describe
'2132232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXA' 'sip-files00136.tif'
001c8397d788a5c2ac93336c19d0572d
cb93aa1802231d8b2e1552a40fbd9b4e94f5652e
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXB' 'sip-files00136.txt'
d7677a7aeb15ac55b0bb21e8c6cd23ee
bba8ec9d012a050ffadfb08d4a9825ce045e7db0
'2012-04-22T00:37:04-04:00'
describe
'33183' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXC' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
f9fa9ad3c34da7998721304df6ca7cfc
9c3dfaf022a0c348fb50cc0be7a4266751d4be63
describe
'146993' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXD' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
573ad5dce3285c7f7a88e0651d022c6a
a26c84246c6736a66669de0bbe8fe358428278fb
describe
'62797' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXE' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
fe495aeafe5060f6c3118817f3ecf0e4
f08cae4253b3fb086e0588770a8ebeeb98d2850b
describe
'5646' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXF' 'sip-files00137.pro'
d4550eb6f06928cabde394e818d599b1
98b413ca784607de87ec8e0300c60db859fa99f7
describe
'35197' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXG' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
fe857e3e05fe860c416d3c7917bec89b
de1cb609334adebf6155faee778c725454967f3c
'2012-04-22T00:35:48-04:00'
describe
'2098844' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXH' 'sip-files00137.tif'
70d304fe48eb959dfc59b7e7721ac464
22654fd722a5a99b9b8c2f376a1dfbccba955099
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXI' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a62e3f9969c5faf525fd267e9c7aed72
737afa083c1cd39be405ecf2080f6c3c7e2c3564
describe
'26020' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
392e43b5c538082c14758246e5df2ecc
53bc755333629ba83ccbd0aec8633e9d808da0e6
'2012-04-22T00:36:36-04:00'
describe
'261394' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
9c9592a96ba07a0d7f111866f5156706
2f45cade66a5d5ceab77e8564e081b2173ef225e
'2012-04-22T00:35:13-04:00'
describe
'127971' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXL' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
d5b86565a0b1edb7fcf4a578cbbc8f49
7fc12d9aa1481136d25a66c231f032d1b60c3546
describe
'24076' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXM' 'sip-files00138.pro'
0f475e011dd20cf792afcc878fd118f1
adcb328aa26dbfde414f7103b88a64f8268d28d3
'2012-04-22T00:34:51-04:00'
describe
'61607' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXN' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
fce4336af43487dc74d4576fd04eec4a
17c91b8ade6c48c34778e012aff0628d8472dd5c
describe
'2113292' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXO' 'sip-files00138.tif'
cee635ebcd97157415d5a56fc91c0abc
b06a23d482efcf9f26aeda853b84a684a9744974
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
10c49931076bb50f9cb5651f91156824
1700e93fdb64361a273ad69e5339a24b675374dd
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXQ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
d02fae0ee9426a2c1f04c6061349428b
f9356a1b38a319d1d48ea9eb684e91715e18ea5f
'2012-04-22T00:36:12-04:00'
describe
'260515' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXR' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
9e39f682ce2798a69318be6123ee7f82
292f8221eeaf2edf57298b68426dd85a27235eb7
'2012-04-22T00:33:47-04:00'
describe
'147635' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXS' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
757106dfa9664c44fe6517b5cc100da1
354716f4fa2b3a506550374c2476d73c683de156
describe
'28625' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXT' 'sip-files00139.pro'
1ea6d8f1c10285a7e7c7691f769307d6
c44c3ce01219d33da162d6548f77d7bb5bec0295
describe
'71234' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXU' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
01962f5fbcc500ff5e2deea993cf2f0a
4ce10aa377cd440c3986120189f73037f0efb8aa
describe
'2107312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXV' 'sip-files00139.tif'
dd73265f16b177cfc0488b901e868d6b
6045e1c8b99dccf5c5ea88c4274f053ec708c604
'2012-04-22T00:34:24-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXW' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6af02889457973182839791d558392a1
da7901024a0690123ab25080ce3a0dd152249c8f
'2012-04-22T00:32:31-04:00'
describe
'38309' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXX' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
e2f8415f6f4487df5bbc10cfd7fffef4
f4ebd7db39269d40263dcc294eb866aa99beb448
describe
'166770' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXY' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
bc8162963748e38d02ff3a0974f31bf8
02b0c307770b0c795dbcb8a9626c824634bccbab
describe
'67643' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVXZ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
10b529a94f4d684048a4452f53cbb22c
ff9506a9a648ead9a27df176f2fb1366cac660a7
'2012-04-22T00:29:51-04:00'
describe
'6462' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
fe566f1b5ed7b99ac39365b7a7713d3c
18e2589075d10d90e48783eb11f4f3e3aca56f6a
describe
'37678' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYB' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
34934b42458d797eb349473afdb61615
8798035ccd8b6cd3f8e1a3b2b3def7c4aed19cff
describe
'2111252' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
29de9bc7902e70119f7e5a1f3906e7ee
9fcce237c6013732fdf7bd9635aa6905522d1359
'2012-04-22T00:33:26-04:00'
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYD' 'sip-files00140.txt'
9f5a8f9046b88d36e8e591e32253da60
f3882806724c6f52430ed6f25509f331dd0164b0
describe
'26220' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYE' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
885eb6dbc892224157faf8890d114d7a
fcda19c5b9fc4bffec0143d781e085407bebbc55
describe
'257887' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
a44061a7c43fb517a6a539d3c8b4f6d1
edba504889fd9818bee75ec1aaa623ac970124d4
describe
'131568' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYG' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
16bdaaae2f10dfd6e86aa19ff8f0be57
09fa914908769d1e28b23a7b029962ed6a7d8c56
'2012-04-22T00:38:12-04:00'
describe
'25123' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYH' 'sip-files00141.pro'
cfd0a8fc5409c02613b7fa379d26d399
c14c80aa4c92c806b26dae8e1fa1c207c3602459
describe
'63675' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYI' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
e17a27f21204a72e0bdb6b50a72bc799
d34a46537878df8080b9218058e5b905baa7342e
describe
'2085408' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYJ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3a4f38778b2e7d34c6fd3c12d97a0dd6
771da4b706352563c5aeb30c8523a3034d19959d
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
5cf418d71125ecbfd5cb5fe9384b8abd
85ed115382423b9c7921c6239cb6628470cd01d5
describe
'34941' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYL' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
27224cd1b8d6486505d0c9cd3623a01c
7dac223640a4595fba4b921c1658e3a3e2c493b1
describe
'250302' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYM' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1b141e5202c23529c41e4c3060aff67d
510e0cfb85ac06c158cb014c4bb593dd2db840d0
'2012-04-22T00:33:14-04:00'
describe
'166331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYN' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
c628ff9c13b2f6921e5a9caab5b5a728
12d457d2aeb182fd81f62a20ba9b704bdd5f4f15
describe
'34630' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYO' 'sip-files00142.pro'
cf6538cc3ed97cbc515421fd731aec1f
197e11592034face2250ed2ed9cee0d60d0913de
describe
'75643' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYP' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
723e37d00c357c096c73b3ffe72f4e84
45bae1153ccc7afe154857f0a30acc235250d0cb
describe
'2025532' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b8709b1dbf843d4a72c0049b31c3ac7b
3c62dbc4c0d851dad52587119c2defc825ce14d7
'2012-04-22T00:35:04-04:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
8d1566b0689251998da8ed36a6e1b753
f4e2dc0e9e15937c25a87edd408bbd82ceea8054
describe
'39694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYS' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
303bbd00ae587808fe24461ec1f6b0ac
b612019c50b466138b6fe3c47fadbf17f5361b92
describe
'246844' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
37b39edcdef7366c2aa9e50268e159bf
967a7d3d15f256a92278902cc838d32a87c1bcbe
describe
'167531' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
5eccf86d4c330ac9c95ef9dc1bb59531
361d68b7dad8c7ee02b6dea7a76a2ef0f8510846
describe
'32736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYV' 'sip-files00143.pro'
796f582a69e7ae6efb88b4697474be19
8b421ef090ea63280390615255de98ed1a418321
'2012-04-22T00:29:36-04:00'
describe
'77327' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYW' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
a4eb48a5b3904a2813db7500538c2ed6
96c1cad8d1b12810784fbe15a6a95375ad084b94
describe
'1997928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYX' 'sip-files00143.tif'
b8402b0aaf11aa976f13b10d1b543735
772fd16c761de9d3a605481b96dfb1826dd2b6b6
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYY' 'sip-files00143.txt'
dc0165437dbcfdca9c6321ad4404cfdf
b4991762913332f4297c60d4a81a1687eeb60a80
describe
'39763' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVYZ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
10386bc1a66582c36018466b6f9db6c7
bb461390bcba1a2fb2a4ab1f07e4801248d477c3
'2012-04-22T00:34:19-04:00'
describe
'258541' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZA' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
65daf26cf46e4a400acab058bacf309a
980edcda187d2c191ecdbc6d0b09efd9283d3d76
describe
'160707' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZB' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
33ad64f6e0abb1f7287894a370aa4a91
ce8ea3d5748a3de7b17a9f4f1909bda1562a070d
describe
'32152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZC' 'sip-files00144.pro'
87b8839735b429828a48d5cfe2072003
6365ad364b791fee90d447b47b051597e63e104f
describe
'75293' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZD' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e98cfee4acdcffecec055a36a1a5cbfa
06a9c09f57bbface2d795971a792b16dbdf3d003
'2012-04-22T00:37:00-04:00'
describe
'2091376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b92a6215408a3ebbd0e202ba9d96ab2c
4420455b6bcf04e18b479623ef7a776023c25c61
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZF' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ac40e76dd89713b2bff9b91f37f47c3d
863f0ffe309bedff88dd4e5ae40dc33775904904
describe
'38474' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZG' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
cc273e6be22af79a2763f9045f7145ef
4b86760513cc92378233aa41f5351c069245055b
describe
'258344' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
62e6fb2d4099ac2aef961b3e7a005d11
737d5abad4d4f213507637ce5d2fd22d058fdc3c
describe
'158943' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZI' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
5ec1676f9db9fbf79b40b06d15349ab5
a3842a58979b513e524fb3d6ec482010f7274b31
describe
'31716' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZJ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
7836157c7f41103932ebfb9fae3dad8c
5d3d5e662b3aab2cc624c91679560a341c9cb968
describe
'72412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZK' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
f11afcc80b81b3b5e530a28a7b205108
dd7a52af34dd827b86d25bad1c356b3f54dcce8e
describe
'2089912' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZL' 'sip-files00145.tif'
3015beeabef4543006088df008990698
5f129ff0c2730b79046edbc684f2d4a62f5c7c97
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
8f77382a7bda462ec6820e4be3e31510
72bf1d3e85836fd120193a06435e8841faac0ba4
describe
'37547' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZN' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
ff0c991d9e09aeb1fa7cbbdbaeabb099
a514d7101c4630eba4b8392cde469438d37306ef
describe
'246424' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZO' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ebec8a8150de1334036ebfec8210432e
80070a7e0ccd59812a2256bca046e35e3440045c
describe
'124567' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZP' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
1a9193d7a8c12da6c53328649ad6650b
0c6f1634cb4af8fc106f6b0f0f946b9d40ca7122
'2012-04-22T00:31:29-04:00'
describe
'12782' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZQ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
4b9449aa4ca749e1a82f9fc884752c78
573994b1b54f2b0f1f9b1893b6a17c98511a21b0
describe
'60106' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
5b53c27e9fdb4daa78b7200fa2d0239c
22919d9b0a9c0c93a76d44881797c20e10e7a7af
describe
'1995988' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZS' 'sip-files00146.tif'
2511ba1192288576cbef5fce6f05e6e8
04588e2e7e968408fae51dc23abf746aae35c161
describe
'514' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZT' 'sip-files00146.txt'
79e51bbc6a82db9a6a4220c68f1a2686
b4d18d7270146b5c3160c30e1679114c26c00cb5
describe
'34803' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZU' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
dde8410607d823bd8352dc9786f00bc9
f85880246ae7e2d67deaf3bb70410dcef37c5824
describe
'250446' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZV' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
82422cfd132b860dff0429ff8e4f34ab
a0214f4fdbdcf417a0978e452b08d4bf755c53db
describe
'142167' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZW' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
9e478e4dd064a075e49d001748f16105
a7d0663956a58f177bb609ce5d5670b56e57c8b7
'2012-04-22T00:38:05-04:00'
describe
'26096' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZX' 'sip-files00147.pro'
7bfc969864171dacf58c06cfa5023d2d
3825470ee689cb8ffa263875a171d0644ea9c80a
describe
'66760' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZY' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
75ee2f134089af63c1e8686a1110d089
d4005de0890cf35c7a5a8e062dafda963ed297b9
describe
'2026592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADVZZ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
8199c195df6e86c626d17b4aca7a56b1
d756db546feebaf4908635514e57d3076d96cb28
'2012-04-22T00:29:54-04:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAA' 'sip-files00147.txt'
5c03fcc2b48dfef0d681b29a8543858f
124ce5525bee8171b3029a9f77b65f2413008a80
'2012-04-22T00:34:02-04:00'
describe
'35639' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAB' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
4e405494499b01c0fd94b9d511e1fdbb
22284991af5274c51d8deba55e71b7ea6eae992b
describe
'243360' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAC' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
e1ff20ea06a40d82c1f74d4c5cf86ee8
4046b26a0b4eb24c7cbb43f2e3ca253625bfdc22
'2012-04-22T00:36:26-04:00'
describe
'191254' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAD' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
02df3cd455342d5046b39d09869a6e41
d496fc2fb4b0b78651e953fedc57f482598e8761
'2012-04-22T00:31:35-04:00'
describe
'71634' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
2de61d86d1b110d88d4d77c1415192b4
49e1a1e9713ee245a895ed88a8f66ccefdca94ae
describe
'1969952' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAF' 'sip-files00148.tif'
60e87f1f8def4138f774a90da9862c68
25af5b718dfb873782bae1d6680fa5a1a07ae18d
describe
'37152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAG' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
1b64f2d47a70ef0213b7debd0cc46d86
cf50837d8a3ed26ee0e45b6316d33da5604ae77a
describe
'48442' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAH' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
638ad1e06169f7ce0bd047f7c1555725
8e2819a06da243bb2b17600dfbdf3f14d2ce77c7
describe
'26864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAI' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
ba99a313442689147d75b033d3ffe302
410c812d624542bf09e744104015106a3495c3bb
describe
'21501' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAJ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
0033f72d7cb3ce6eb4b470d0dc0a5903
49ecaccbc8db8b0baac5ad91aca58cfbb550d734
describe
'2163508' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAK' 'sip-files00149.tif'
adb574f2eecd09fb3f90a3962082e8d0
cb8ff78192d6409c83fb6be7e106f1ff9f204e07
describe
'19824' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAL' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
2bb474e218675c355678e97abf6506cb
04bc790c66227c2c3f02dd70c64964f24da4f708
describe
'248297' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
f3d20d8c529cf80a7d4c500da79dd5cd
88619c46440e5d3ec88dceed0cd7322844626c10
'2012-04-22T00:36:25-04:00'
describe
'172707' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAN' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
fcd0de41c487c36c8c897c852a8254a7
cc465e01fd6a7454793c4e728d0c2fba4bfe226b
describe
'32587' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
14cc55922270d698c11f2d565cfb4354
18c472dd19b737f4651a7b2a17b10a4258338065
describe
'80297' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAP' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
b1b7d68364048600238f4c719ca006dc
08df23f7c145567f53b3b688e30b7fa9aff0db01
describe
'2009896' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAQ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
661e5b0ddaf9aa604722852931d3a442
5f5b7c07d95f3e71c3763dbeabc2dc95ebdb40a0
'2012-04-22T00:36:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
e4585210b7719018ca980f6112d21e6c
f08265323c43555b37becfef423b95784c6e20a4
describe
'39625' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAS' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f5c1df68f451b22e1c578711b0d29c61
5aa951ca45e652e0ad0bc4f93facd93adbce6f25
describe
'247204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAT' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
20059a36e0f23f8faf25917317eb5e03
06e5cfecb69d177ffb04e43558cb0e532d63400a
describe
'170566' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
3c032897fd971ea75fb7ec9e25faddc8
1b372b4186640bad71228ed1e975d6247a281aa8
describe
'34518' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAV' 'sip-files00151.pro'
ec04191878005c75cc42a93adae3f587
1e491cc54f243f28693282c934cdffb50ca6a5e7
describe
'77407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAW' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
879bb70162b48edd284cc6010c48d99f
13c32e5c753fb6810cc911a257bb1054b4e0dcf4
describe
'2001524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
ce9cec9c40604fa16238a3248532567e
a3aea24302018ec025e8dba2d4e85de0fed9416e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
fa0cc2e00e128c4922a244850395521e
b72ff62857707088d25999e810b26d01e1fb431a
describe
'40329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWAZ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
3ba502894fc1e99c924c37be6c965340
b2ec0cbf92592a0adb0d12b3d9e0df8ed3907557
describe
'273849' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
65829360c748d066a39511e2a29fa9ff
dccd7b96f132c12773bb0ce9d7f6dc43f48f6873
describe
'171503' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2da631b379bff58fa7ae247b10785ff6
8cad5c0d3ef15c78124ff89d3afc875c4431a485
describe
'33850' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBC' 'sip-files00152.pro'
8bf73963e28c0b706649bf76e03801bf
e7106b0a730162b31dbd5b60e8b1e28cfff6e94e
describe
'76324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
6ce601ff795ce014a73876c3a8a73113
cb1f6545064408b254c0082760865cd0d70af13a
describe
'2214588' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBE' 'sip-files00152.tif'
35c1570b3eb1d765550bb478ff48ce1b
c22f601555b5910ab0d2b8be561c1299563b6dd3
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBF' 'sip-files00152.txt'
2f90af3f0ec509e2fffd85feba83ea39
7cb3ef2d092f67c032ab306753ee95cb6e9818ba
'2012-04-22T00:37:52-04:00'
describe
'39248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
44a3164c44f54989426fcff89a4e9805
58d6ae0bda97ee041653d55e6cdb0830dff7fb05
describe
'267593' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
c74cdb02c1631ff9f6d3d1840bc5221a
e69b6b75a959b00a62cc0de77e7d89afac841231
describe
'131573' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
2855d1dd295b23848a41acd9cbf3e3e9
984e45f715b315dac53e9d5c723ae00d1a0a0bd7
describe
'21773' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
0eddb7faaf0b6a0c2dd49024fe977c04
8a0d8d5c3fc2e79c132b9f697ec1dcfc94595fde
describe
'60483' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
b341a14035a46eb5cf8d958e0c2f0527
6d22e111004bd822f7423a40906abd5e0ac120ee
describe
'2162524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBL' 'sip-files00153.tif'
ed26d6b716838e1933084f440fd57b7c
9a296d9f34d47430c17c38c093d6d1699fbc0a0a
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBM' 'sip-files00153.txt'
3d10f21a41098500cbf2d558ee038fff
0a3282ea21138a12b36084846217e45218a4d7bd
describe
'34564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
a4a95d4992a2d015ebba1ab241961b96
534e5444daefe8812554b5d8f176904848854408
describe
'274082' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1895cfa55fc36372d71e53cf8bcdf71e
b451884c596f96d3c1a66b9a6a9711ef8fc15597
'2012-04-22T00:32:56-04:00'
describe
'120915' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
b57bc24b400d7ce429b754ec486a6b43
eb31ee90d86ea3b197428c6aa6bde30d15f7e7af
describe
'21925' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
e5bfe8c77a9792d5b1bdb79ead2907c9
759d28820e3302f3ad5184b1e8fd4cc665651478
describe
'57804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
d4216c5f93d716843ec7d55980a55b81
ca2cfe729f3e46dde528fcfbd5ec4648e33c0a0d
describe
'2215044' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
3f9bd30af0a0bbcb866dbff244da66cd
7f332b3b66e3f18aa875c933868fdf36672489b7
'2012-04-22T00:37:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
8f992772ab2b501d55a2a9ea9b6f7713
a8754b3feab15a9c117a7eddb1f4252648df9dda
describe
'32797' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
96c4f51ca9ece1b0f19a77b1c3a52ca6
f3913d661e2d639095386cebdb9272b6afca16d2
'2012-04-22T00:32:48-04:00'
describe
'236205' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
64f3041a1ebfee3d8e30dfbda2efa352
3905b993eac9033a6dd914a53663941d11ed7921
describe
'89602' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
492970bbea716343cab0cef1c2212627
3687f7e616879142fa9fd5fbc4457764733e872a
describe
'12514' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
109a10723f023a7baf4478f529ff1313
493b2bdf5e02e4f9bc06e34ccebfe24af53493c5
describe
'45666' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
46138d5c606f03ccd9108a11ed7ec6c4
04646a548ef508b80b1a1c2a8d7746b65d7042cb
describe
'1997480' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWBZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
1b45bdf9e40ddea553586e2f27bcb1ed
06480b4839029450c607a00f5c402afab6c534bd
'2012-04-22T00:32:09-04:00'
describe
'542' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
00bcd9381731eb87942fa18e9af2a185
e8b45ce8c9e3dafc089443bdfe59d86a99130b8d
describe
'30150' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
0edcfff64dcdad9f9516a358962eea80
872241997963ef8736e5f3bb60fdecbaff2eccc9
'2012-04-22T00:30:13-04:00'
describe
'259928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
48a50a35f8c4453bda30886c3c712747
7b0a09abbc998b5a88dd2d6ba562bcb23876dbb5
describe
'104844' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
9598148eebaa3a0a993cbf3d2e6c0eaa
eb080461317a4e012a53a2714b85346d491d871f
describe
'19074' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
4c22ca073f8e99257445878722c8c998
7b984dea5936923eaaa75824a8dcf2e822ad181e
describe
'52564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCF' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
5455e303875979cee702cc189ffd9479
9cac7d1611afdc3d1f8dddf676dcd0fd7eb4b751
describe
'2102124' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
b97ed528dc74f4ca6b7cea6be9d8ad27
4b3e881955504a1fbfb94d103b434d6803c2a578
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
2f41d675743594698eea861c16bc2dcb
6bbca9863a9320bd56088cdabb4aa1d833a96b66
'2012-04-22T00:36:05-04:00'
describe
'31669' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCI' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
98a7cdfcd18f0d5cf463040f26eb78d5
4de979c599f5b92e12281fbabff01b324b5ac8d0
describe
'244194' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCJ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d7530a79a03225dd3ed027de66c74b91
923867f0e487724308cfcff9d64772aa71d91f81
'2012-04-22T00:38:31-04:00'
describe
'120766' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCK' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
29a4b02a2ce71e2af40904be24049b21
9ee99378b3494c843865cee096425d63060a26c6
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCL' 'sip-files00157.pro'
78129f860cefbc1fcd1e8042fafe8442
fdd8aee15983b8400503a11eb7c89e7c835403ab
describe
'57842' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
fe6ad1bcf9ddedc99956b10f371257a8
8dd7505e9fcf52554c08fb11842ebca6488e80fa
describe
'1975744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCN' 'sip-files00157.tif'
502c36ae9516038e993bd6c539a7c013
2b2bcb217ef578f3904a69efb06eb618b72ee65a
'2012-04-22T00:38:27-04:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCO' 'sip-files00157.txt'
3908a29f8422416f7a205d51dafc4497
f5b690bffb83d14718b32d052df5dc98a4e97149
'2012-04-22T00:33:51-04:00'
describe
'34972' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
769e80936045ec9f24734fa8f31d3952
0b40961d445bd1ed781170698ce02c10f0502612
describe
'240113' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
9d8e8d6d848114cec7a4e89eff1df917
51d1ef4aa2cd87a08772c030f06b5858054e508e
describe
'88574' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
b39a46059a366b179d3469fd21f22e3f
aea642c977f09bf28e5b22e39d07c229cf13e299
describe
'12433' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
dd2cfaf91096a9db546867841a35adaf
73e43a90d8e3be43ca7133a8e91ce7bfeeb1f436
describe
'44916' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCT' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
5250944dffb777f80985352959d0e066
40bd3799d98735d0a16169058a724f4b07fd4acd
describe
'2056592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCU' 'sip-files00158.tif'
fbf601d742229c6ef3d9786ee91a38c0
eaf1401da2043183d1f3575e34980134e8df751a
describe
'567' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCV' 'sip-files00158.txt'
a481c131f2a0aeede2d5b3c7e0a8d6f0
9cde7abed2a02193db1c1e144bc8beac5f27a1ca
describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCW' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
319a23dd7f427e7ec00d989a22e932dd
3591dd2fe039932088b4639550b8a8afab691f7a
describe
'246702' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
fb5856199991a55540e522552007e83a
9ee1e17808b95f0b6b95520e79c20b9e1f4a8069
describe
'144938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
b7bd0f933de65b09af10924c153a8595
ea6533e159427fdec10e6108231aaa2a74d1a250
'2012-04-22T00:34:33-04:00'
describe
'26940' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWCZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
eed3f45ab3f108613e4a9149054a7698
d7ee7d52ab104387c06c1d9d69c839038b65de4e
describe
'68157' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
46a36a144c0a238252cb015bda4b36fd
55c0fb8d936905ad9ebe10eab0611fa82b2f4d2d
describe
'1996076' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
8f23a8c26a96d2d7db18873f281bfc70
432f838733d3a5cebf22d4c5dd9a3e2191af911e
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
eb6b0519a90e81fc27b7673676b1a8c5
cc94ebf9606fd2ff01d342e34cae821f84eeed96
describe
'37429' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDD' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
4574060b8b0361824087ef42bf771f81
41a917d41d1b8a8a8555bb05fa9dc95ce7cffa2b
'2012-04-22T00:30:42-04:00'
describe
'259429' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDE' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
1c5f16a808cfe677b0206205c42fc0f1
22eae7fb75e340057b52c420131868201acefa96
describe
'169005' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDF' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
9d8ac9ef035d50425d8c2756b64e3ea1
859bf70eb27978d0426f1562a86672af70e3f6a1
describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDG' 'sip-files00160.pro'
183cfd21319dad6eea79f8697022cea3
fc668233050cf3ab48e09e2f7146ae0d415220cf
describe
'76316' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDH' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
e93b3a7f46a89586b7597e536e70411a
e06c5c3cc356324267da557f4fe1c6d4d8df0ee7
describe
'2099056' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDI' 'sip-files00160.tif'
0b3f3e839904ed6f86d2afe7d5f13d27
7e79c9fddfff390076dd6a0347e0456197d4eeb3
'2012-04-22T00:34:43-04:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
e82c5a67d08065542acb013015f24a87
e832d9563ff7a46aa07ce5312c30a495cafd4080
describe
'39438' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDK' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7452975e4f617c0f4513cfffd24faa43
498488a2889130118ac2f0b0506eb7a67beeef65
describe
'254010' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
08c9cfe218562df7d057b041cb208423
90ff895987d4651ffe7b4a27f4866f187de0bcd3
describe
'169741' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
2dd194c8b7b930e28bcfe8fbce946682
17eceb3b34f65d6bc0725fba7c00d0b1aef86d21
describe
'34738' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDN' 'sip-files00161.pro'
3bb359e757f0a5d1aea7c20fc3992c99
e5cf2d5b217f42357ca1dbcd0e9c0d28b7306e0f
describe
'77550' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
10161d7e5139f14eec0ca13de921e648
fc179d61a7ba098a75417e3c29a0753708a64ee1
describe
'2055256' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
0b22e30adce76f695b34cc16ff3dc38a
e3230d812c6f00716d5339668dab5d0bbbcb125b
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
876dbd99e002d5a7c2fc2a1686e6cc31
60871ba2c1bdbcd79ad83e0771acf7ae6693215a
describe
'40732' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDR' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
256e70965f3ab4937b3299fa774f636f
856ca3a72ac55f3133eb2fa6fd89c263acb4eb31
describe
'264823' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDS' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
f25cc83cb66999cd05826cea0c16feb7
89ba9456ed81dc7e5839109a90b600613667f6eb
describe
'167700' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDT' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0c3234b1eb34414ec39d200bc3c803d4
7049cf862d615ea48c20d4d48259ac9394cac61e
describe
'32921' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
daf16c7d388e840c745f42627f1fc086
13809fcd34ba05f9acccfb2627d9779edc81519c
describe
'76536' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b88d7909bb3e6f5556a6d12a0f2ab183
284be28c660946123b852ef66de41f4ea40b24d6
describe
'2142252' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
f904e2603a5856f51026a5662f9a5ddc
16bce2399470b8141fd2a24847a9089502804c46
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
a545c93f398a2ad6acfe020fddff5925
9d361a546a70714b3d9784b77dddb0fa4e7c74ac
describe
'39724' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
18e01243d19e6ea48f2632edfe40f18b
ee6b69de97f7719c84e11bd4b17d2e546b26195d
describe
'250421' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWDZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
25edaa6ab5cf29803a2015c11070aba6
ce9cf0b434e24a6a547105f828026989fc0627ff
describe
'99181' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5f73275f8432b83d5b4ad72ad92d587f
a6f07866990e6601784a83f0a50e11289fd360e4
describe
'16069' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
9ca604a32e741900cb0fcc654c5fb56c
ce728307ac3ceff86ca7e6b6533bfdbb2e39330a
describe
'49651' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEC' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8dc1dca879cc5547bb20b610bfda5dbf
22aafc6fa377cfed088b44c358457d522b8ed4ff
describe
'2020640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWED' 'sip-files00163.tif'
f6124c15f11a41e68685f019a94ae3be
522a1185447808ee4a3b656dc60798888311cc24
describe
'650' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEE' 'sip-files00163.txt'
8eef08356ec9828c2a9ded8bf24b5041
5b2f1aff8b29247cce8e633b3c3c368759139273
describe
'28321' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
594e2b9050a544b180ebc7d9d7da9c56
5e2efcdec31553e543c44cec525b7ecc5dd49bdd
describe
'242450' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEG' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
54283d8a51078def29f18e23fcf6f483
3bce556ac93b4c83f169430e43562ee44dee42bb
describe
'82320' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEH' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
20868a39baa25a179d912e49683ba605
3fad70ef0295c693698b116137056711ef77d742
describe
'13665' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEI' 'sip-files00164.pro'
e98073b8e5ec34aae1d85df0f5c16201
a9ff16c0a2dd06aba3fa8273c536455395718bb8
'2012-04-22T00:34:39-04:00'
describe
'40810' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
8f0a5e4695abbf4f98ef722307c484b4
88c357a4038008e2e44d8ac4ae3f190ea49f43d9
describe
'2218092' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEK' 'sip-files00164.tif'
3bff269161c4f1f6fddec32c94de7f0d
b5328b5c84276c8b83d0ceea9f07b3b028887599
describe
'608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEL' 'sip-files00164.txt'
1cb60b2c565802e9211db839f616d785
7556658c761f9aabd43a361995c6f2c40fbbb5ca
describe
'26205' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
49f01acaf03cb64e79ba300c1a536314
2567df4a798775851c69ad9c9c9455ae43a56585
'2012-04-22T00:35:38-04:00'
describe
'150220' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
8a31117219c4a0eb06cd790cfb15cc1c
dc800863945f0a35ff38638f74cdb0f187243c32
describe
'59108' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
e292d5021bdb824930b67d75d4df5bcf
84d7db640a94694ca4ab8df7c902de799adf88a1
describe
'4331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEP' 'sip-files00165.pro'
4b4ab9f7abdd1fff2e4f75ad2720541e
6f0a010e7a57d5d5b7f2d684b430c7dd616c6bae
'2012-04-22T00:35:25-04:00'
describe
'33095' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
d0e0ec46dfec3b9517044d3eb4bb4bbc
9f9acf109f3c940b2418e65338549d1c3b81f91b
'2012-04-22T00:38:06-04:00'
describe
'2168540' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWER' 'sip-files00165.tif'
362a6402659ab45547ecf94ee3af37a5
02174df1efd0d3e51085cf0d6a7259a84aaebb5b
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWES' 'sip-files00165.txt'
0e7cd068d02005f7cbd830a750ec733f
b4f8a0cd45f771ed24f9a34e685e4a0b2eff14a5
describe
'24641' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWET' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
fe77c103065bd3fa5c155159b5ed6501
8ef374433aa3bc2ac8bbaf6e0a969028ed0a7687
describe
'48266' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
b5f426d34314e01a9b853a0deecf20b8
8051b050cccb6de5a5f12a6be6396b903c7c353c
describe
'28415' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
b409a4639d1f66dc1b3767ab87fd4194
ca2523d65635eb11c70ea09d795e07a60c3b536b
describe
'21635' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEW' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
aae32c25ee22d17c53ee3772b98458c7
04c7d706b9d5575d7eaa9b702c421e729f508980
describe
'2100852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEX' 'sip-files00166.tif'
d5bbcc359df16a2a35e09e41c33d1876
95f8a23802f688700fa9a59810edecdbf3b5a736
describe
'19909' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEY' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
f0bb27367ac84e0718f945edfb3e7816
11a7e32a0b13868e929f054bc168c7afb1e77e8d
'2012-04-22T00:32:44-04:00'
describe
'303395' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWEZ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6ca21b9c11083ce19e7b4a482d98d60e
f49863a9e54191439a9f6887ec7ecaef4bd50731
describe
'152067' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFA' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
7d464c6da98cbdfca331ebcc1d968d40
707a1cc60ed7f8e4b44cb9c0b8afef201dfef1ab
describe
'53690' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFB' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
31e4d9eec0548c26adc38f3f36d45eb8
9cf8538d00d93becdc206c76a573c4cab49970f1
describe
'7311824' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFC' 'sip-files00167.tif'
cc4fa76d77685dff207cf76487ba3ffb
a57abb5660e496172359733312f38320d466b80b
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFD' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
38efa4c50422e443d687467fa28be68d
db4d64022a3d74b343d258c64fb3df787e4e2106
describe
'309405' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFE' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
47894b93b565bf3095cb099e5cbdd99b
8221ef34035ba8ec0dfb1acfaea21cca14c2dbfb
describe
'279940' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFF' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
4581b34d5872059f460e72d8c4654b3a
f4d01dfba750bd64c75b51ddb5e44d62bce47d45
'2012-04-22T00:34:40-04:00'
describe
'86101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFG' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
880bcce089ea9469d106f173ee364184
777cdaf562d6ee3bfd9fbf571f4824f93ee6c767
'2012-04-22T00:28:38-04:00'
describe
'7448264' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFH' 'sip-files00168.tif'
811bf938441a6333f3287bb8139c3d00
5675098db4460746fb450e0b3cfe1cb0b72b2f70
describe
'35750' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFI' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
d56e790dbfb3dd0d69ffcec67abe3837
97b165ee3e7f9b8ab478f85364b90c8be3c2caa0
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFJ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
b56887b89742e057657b7b7391f6d4ae
174bbe34d6a8a5847a209e7366f3b25dc39ebf3e
describe
'225278' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFK' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
83f57f86c4382bac3db49b1d3aa58fe2
2034d61011da03ca001e7ce00a112ca5eb7634eb
describe
'65420' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFL' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
d7de6207299bf6e5868fd54869dce981
104707f3f95b860ebc90480130ce958d90c6a35d
describe
'17387' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFM' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
010773a179147146f57841216017096b
357b362013ee3352e4ee06afb0871c6f56e21c38
describe
'5412344' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFN' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
f98a3bea0234f8cff0141801c1cc381f
ad15bcf231b8cea6657f00021d69a6b7cefbc107
describe
'7135' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFO' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
ed6368287489956ffb473d4d7170e616
b13588c3a2435c90597068d7232c33f65f349c68
'2012-04-22T00:34:54-04:00'
describe
'196792' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFP' 'sip-filesUF00001717_00001.mets'
bf1e00c173770ce60ed3eaa1e2541eac
3ff2fcc4fe5952eb214308fdc6d1278f5f56543f
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T05:29:42-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'254247' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAALCfileF20091106_AADWFS' 'sip-filesUF00001717_00001.xml'
3e53089c44728ebb7782bb0ddabe3d6f
80013251237e415458141fa445e253371857238e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T05:29:45-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.