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Allen Lucas, or, youthful decision

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Allen Lucas, or, youthful decision
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Allen Lucas, or, youthful decision
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Judson, Emily C.

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The Baldwin Library











HOME LIBRARY
OF TALES FOR THE YOUNG



ALLEN LUCAS.







~
sg Wome Library of Tales for the Noung, |



ALLEN LUCAS;

OR,

YOUTHFUL DECISION.



BY

(MRS, E. 6. JUDSON.)



London:
THOMAS NELSON, PATERNOSTER ROW;
AND EDINBURGH,





)
|
|
PANNY FORESTER, |
|





« gains 8

29. oy. gk





CONTENTS,



Chap. Page
1, The Corners, ose eee eee ove 7

Il. The New Teacher, «+ ove eee ub
IIL The Eagle Aroused, ons eee ee
IV. Beginning Anew, nee oon on 39
V. Mr. Dawson's Pupils, eos eee ose 43
VIL. Mr, Dawson's Last Story, ove eee 55
VII. Summer Study, and the next Winter School, 67
VILL. More of Liph Green, - oo 81
IX. Choosing a Vocation, po one > ae
X. Lizzy Parker and her friend Nannie, ... 112
XI The Select School, ove ao ‘wo —
XII. Commonplace Incidents, ove eee 133
XIII. Disappointments the Portion of All, «

XV. A Scene at the Capital, ove an 136





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ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER 1.
THE CORNERS.

Axsour two miles from the little village of
Smithville, the turnpike is crossed by a road
not much travelled, but of sufficient import-
ance to give that district the name of the
Corners. Upon two of the four corners, fine
farm-houses are situated, and far beyond,
stretch fields of waving grain and meadows
of tall, rich grass, or the still richer clover,
the perfume of which can not be surpassed
by the rarest green-house exotic.

The turnpike leads along to other farm-
houses of rather humbler pretensions than
those on the Corners, and now and then
scattered among them, are little, low build-
ings, seemingly of dimensions too contracted
to accommodate more than one individual,
but literally swarming with the white-
headed, bare-footed inhabitants, all uncon-



8 ALLEN LUCAS.

scious of needing room. As we proceed
onward, we shall find the turnpike tra-
versed by a little stream, over which is
thrown a log bridge, for the superabundance
of timber furnished by the hills beyond,
bristling with evergreens, interspersed with
other trees bending gracefully beneath their
wealth of summer foliage, makes the people
cling to the extravagant economy of their fa-
thers, and save the trouble of sawing, at the
expense of the valuable material. Here we
shall find the impression made by bare feet
upon the sand, on each side of the creek,
and very likely we may see a half-dozen
boys, their linen trowsers rolled up to the
knee, wading about in the clear water, quite
as happy as the sleeping cow, standing so
quietly in the stream below, that you very
seldom can catch a tinkle of the bell hung
to her neck. Farther down the stream,
grow the ash, and elm, with some birch
trees almost stripped of the bark by the
fore-mentioned knights of the linen trow-
sers, and a few tall maples on each side
lean towards each other, almost interlac-
ing their branches, and casting an ever-
quivering shadow upon the waters below,



THE CORNERS. 9

which here grow broader and deeper, and
move quietly and lingeringly, as if in love
with the cool breezes wakened by the fan-
ning of the foliage. Nestled down in one
corner of a wood a few rods from this creek,
is the district school-house, with its large
uncurtained windows, and one small door
opening under a wood-house, which in win-
ter receives the drifting snow, and in sum-
mer cradles many a troublesome insect.
This school-house has been built for a great
many years, and is not so comfortable as
some of more modern date, but it has never-
theless been the nursery of talent and use-
fulness, as well as the scene of many an idle
freak of childish fancy, or the still more
idle plans and speculations of the book-
hater.

Upon that seat, far in the corner, once
sat Allen Lucas, and I believe those very
notches in the desk were made by his knife,
as he lolled upon his seat and wondered over
and over again if noon would ever come.
Allen Lucas was not the son of a poor
widow, who “had once seen better days,”
nor had he any of the other claims upon our
smypathy advanced by most heroes of story ;



10 ALLEN LUCAS.

he was only the third son of Reuben Lucas,
a plain, honest, simple farmer, who, by being
always watchful and industrious, contrived
at the end of the year to balance accounts,
without saving a penny. It made no differ-
ence with Mr. Lucas whether his crops were
plentiful or otherwise, whether ill luck or
good attended him in his family ; increased
expenditures never made him poorer, nor
an increased income richer. In truth, Mr.
Lucas was, “an easy well-to-do man,” who
cared only to be free from debt, with plenty
to eat and drink, and his expenses were
entirely regulated by his income without
a thought of the “rainy day” ahead. His
wife managed a small dairy, and sold butter
and cheese enough to keep herself and daugh-
ters in fineries, but this was so exclusively
pin-money, that it was never devoted to
anything but fineries. In short, Mr. Lucas
was only a farmer in a very small way, and
not considered a rich man even in his own
little neighbourhood, but his family lived
very comfortably, and were not accustomed
to deny themselves anything which hap-
pened to fall within the circle of their hum-
ble desires.



THE CORNERS, 11

Allen Lucas had few peculiarities, and
although he was usually considered a “ bright
boy,” evinced no superiority to the rest of
the family. He was somewhat taller and
stouter than boys of twelve generally are,
with broad shoulders and muscular limbs,
and on this he prided himself not a little:
then, he could wield the ball-club, skate,
run, leap, and wrestle as well as any of his
companions, and though not always at the
head of his class, he was very seldom, if ever,
at the foot. He had studied arithmetic for
three years, but never got beyond reduc-
tion, his success in geography was more
creditable to his talent, but grammar was
his detestation, and never would have been
attempted, but for the pleasure of attending
the evening grammar school. Allen was
generally very well liked by his teachers
and companions, for he carried a cheerful,
good-humoured countenance, and was not
what is generally considered a rebellious or
very lazy scholar. ‘True, his sister Mary,
though two years his junior, often excelled
him, but Mary had always been considered
a very bright little girl, and it was no un-
usual thing for the oldest members of the



12 ALLEN LUCAS,

school to yield to her. In spelling contests,
Mary Lucas was generally the victor, and
she was as familiar with every line of her
well-thumbed geography, as with the simple
furniture of her mother’s kitchen. Every-
body expected great things of Mary, but
they did not expect them of her brother
Allen, and so he passed on, envied by many
a dull boy who was obliged to labour for the
little he learned, often commended for the
good lessons which had cost him scarce
fifteen minutes’ study, and very seldom
censured. Allen never dreamed of anything
more than getting decently through with
the forms of the day, the final object to be
gained never once entered his mind, and
though his teachers often talked of the ad-
vantages of education, and the importance of
mental culture, this was all like Greek to him,
and he considered it the most favourable
time for planning some piece of amusement
to be broached to his comrades after school,
Such was Allen Lucas at the age of twelve,
and such he seemed likely to be for years
to come, a harmless, not particularly dull,
but very common-place character, Of what
he was capable no one knew, himself least



THE CORNERS. 13

of all, for he had never imagined himself
under any obligation to exert his powers
only when and where he liked. Allen had
never been told that his superior quickness,
instead of furnishing him with an excuse for
indolence, only rendered an indulgence in
it more criminal, and he would have thought
it the height of injustice to require more of
him than of others.

The school at the Corners had generally
been furnished with teachers, if not of the
first order, who at least enjoyed some repu-
tation, but they had been contented to pur-
sue the usual routine, measuring their duty
by what was expected of them, rather than
by what it was in their power to perform.
The teacher, who merely fulfills his con-
tract, may not suffer the upbraidings of
conscience for not doing more, and his sa-
lary is his reward. It is all he deserves.
But O how much richer the reward of him
who seeks a higher object, who labours to
accomplish what none but a teacher can
accomplish. When the man, who to-day
stands with a group of listening boys around
him, and marks the flushed cheek, the glis-
tening eye and the swelling bosom, has



o-

14 ALLEN LUCAS.

grown old, when the warm blood which
now animates his frame and makes his
tongue eloquent has become sluggish, when
his eye grows dim, his hand tremulous, and
he feels that he must soon lie down and
teach his last, great lesson, this will be far
from being the least pleasing of the remem-
brances that cluster around the heart, to
soothe him whose grave lies between him
and his only future. Then, when he looks
upon the glorious fruit, though the dew
of the last life-breath were freezing upon
his lip, and his heart were subsiding into
its last stillness, a delicious thrill must needs
be awakened by the thought, “the seed was
of my own hand’s planting.” To look around
upon a happy community, made happier by
the influence of the virtuous and gifted who
cement and make it strong ; to see the phi-
lanthropist employed in disseminating noble
principles, enlightening heavy hearts, and
elevating debased spirits, and be able to look
back upon the time when his intellect and
heart received the first impulse, and remem-
ber with how much difficulty his nature was
moulded ; even to mark the manly struggles
of the victim of misfortune, the self-sustain-



THE NEW TEACHER. 15

ing power which prevents his becoming a
vagabond, and remember that but for days
and days of unwearied effort, that man would
have been weak and helpless, is a priceless
reward which but one class of the many
devoted to doing good, can claim. It is of
more worth than all the yellow dust that
ever glittered before human eye, and ex-
haustless, because the sunshine that it casts
about the heart now, is only the shadow
of the treasure which is laid up in heaven.
Above all others, does the teacher need a
clean heart and active hand, but if that heart
be cold, or if but one finger of that hand pre-
fer self-service, let its owner stand aside, for
he is all unfitted for the holy work.

CHAPTER II.

THE NEW TEACHER.

Auten Lucas was in his twelfth year when
Mr. Thorn, who had taught the Oorners
school for several winters, and gained a
little purse thereby, concluded that engag-
ing in business at Smithville would be more



16 ALLEN LUCAS.

profitable, and therefore a new teacher was
engaged in his stead. Mr. Thorn was a
great favourite, and so his successor was
naturally enough regarded with suspicion,
and when he ventured to engraft a few
improvements upon the old tread-mill sys-
tem, he was met on every hand by the most
strenuous opposition. Mr, Dawson was a
thorough scholar, and had been self-edu-
cated: thus he knew how much the human
mind is capable of accomplishing by its
own unassisted efforts, and he felt more
anxiety to arouse the dormant faculties of
his pupils, than to urge them forward in
their studies. He wished to fit them for
action, at least sufficient for them to appre-
ciate in some degree the labour before them,
lest the labour should be but ill-performed.
The accomplishment of this purpose requir-
ed such a thorough revolution, that many
persons, among whom Mr. Lucas was not
the least formidable, regarded him with a
suspicious eye. If Mr. Dawson had been a
selfish man, he would not have mortified
the pride of Mary Lucas by making her
conscious that all her attainments were
mere parrotry, nor would he have incurred



THE NEW TEACHER. 17

the hatred of John Smith, whose father
owned the largest, if not the best improved
Corners farm, by putting him in a class
more suited to his actual attainments than
his years. Selfishness would have induced
an opposite course, but Mr. Dawson felt an
unfeigned interest in his work. Still Allen
Lucas lolled upon his desk, and watched the
shadow in the window and wondered if noon
would ever come, but he did not slide along so
easily as formerly, for his face often burned
beneath the glances of a reproving eye, and his
lessons failed to elicit one word of praise. After
a few weeks Allen began to dislike Mr. Daw-
son, and Mary was decided in pronouncing
him a “poor teacher,” proving her position,
by asserting that she did not know half so
much as when she attended Mr. Thorn’s
school. Still Mr. Dawson went on as if
unconscious of the petty storm about his
ears, and soon the suspicions of people were
laid, and their prejudices wore away, for
they found their children animated by a
new spirit, and were not long in discover-
ing that a richer vein was perceptible in the
young intellect than had before been touched.
Mr. Dawson had gone below the mere me-
B



18 ALLEN LUCAS.

chanical, and had put in operation the reason-
ing faculties. He had taught his pupils to
think, and they could not fail to remember.
Among those least benefited by this state of
things were Allen and Mary Lucas, for while
the former could skim over the surface and
avoid absolute disgrace, he was contented,
and Mary was too indignant at the thought
of relinquishing the honours she had worn
so long, and too anxious to mask her defi-
ciencies under a show of words, to set about
actual improvement. Mary supposed words
to be the actual substance, rather than the
vehicle for its exhibition; the mystery of
meaning beneath was to her an idle tale,
and she was positive that knowing anything
“by heart” was quite sufficient for all rea-
sonable purposes. Allen, however, did im-
prove a little, at least in outward seeming,
but it was only sufficient to escape the
charge of dullness, and maintain his former
standing in the school.

Mr. Dawson was very fond of visiting the
different families at the Corners, becoming
acquainted with the ordinary occupations of
the children, and mingling in their sports ;
thus, his influence was everywhere felt, and



THE NEW TEACHER. 19

he became familiar with the workings of
their hearts. His own feelings were yet
green within his bosom, and he did not affect
that coldness and distance of manner, nor
that indifference to innocent amusements,
which often passes for dignity, and rears
itself as the most formidable barrier to
improvement of any kind. He who loves
his fellow-men will sympathize in that
which interests them, however trivial, and
sympathy is the right hand of the philan-
thropist. One day, after skating for half an
hour upon the smooth surface of the mill-
pond, far up the creek, and getting up a
snow-balling party on the way back to the
school-house, for the sake of giving the little
fellows, who had been mere lookers-on, their
share of sport, Mr. Dawson sat down by his
desk, and, as usual on such occasions, his
pupils, one by one, gathered around him,
until not a loiterer remained without. Even
Allen Lucas was in this group, for Mr. Daw-
son’s stories were more interesting to him
than his books, and when he had become
animated by exercise, he always told his
very best.

“T shall not tell you a story to-day,” said



20 ALLEN LUCAS.

the school-master, and as he spoke there was
an expression of quiet humour, which his
pupils had at first mistaken for ill-nature,
or “something bad,” they could hardly
tell what, lurking in his fine, black eyes,
and playing about the corners of his
mouth.

“No story!” “no story!” repeated the
younger scholars, in tones of disappointment,
until the outer one being far enough off to
venture on such a remark, whispered, “I
think it’s too bad.” By what process of
reasoning it was decided to be too bad that
Mr. Dawson should withhold a gratification
he was by no means bound to grant, I cannot
say, so I will leave the matter to those
school-boys, who, from imagining that they
cannot do too little, come to the very natural
conclusion that their teachers cannot do too
much, and never dream of being grateful for
the most self-sacrificing favours. The older
scholars, however, knew Mr. Dawson too well
to believe that he would disappoint them, so
they winked knowingly at each other, and
remained silent.

“T will give you a fable,” resumed Mr.
Dawson, “ which, although it may not be so



THE NEW TEACHER. 21

interesting as our Indian story, may afford
some amusement.”

“A fable! why, that is a story, Mr. Daw-
son.”

“ Right, Liph,—now can you tell me how
it differs from the stories I have told you
before ?”

“Why, fables are big stories.”

“They are wrong stories,” said little Abby
Stillman.

«“ They are fish stories,” added Liph.

“No, animal stories,” said Julia May,
« for Adsop’s fables are all about wolves and
lambs, and foxes, and other animals. Fables
are stories that are not true.”

« Aye all stories that are not true, fables?”
inquired Mr. Dawson.

“No, sir, not the kind of fable that you
mean,” said Allen Lucas.

“ All stories that are not true, of course
may in one sense be considered fables,” said
a soft voice in low, measured tones, “but a
true fable always conveys a hidden moral.”

Mr. Dawson smiled on the speaker, one of
the boys whispered, “ Robert May thinks he
knows everything,” and the circle drew
closer together, and stood and sat in the atti-



22 ALLEN LUCAS.

tude of listeners. “I must forewarn you,”
said Mr. Dawson, “to look out for the moral,
for I shall leave the application to you.”
The boys looked at each other as though a
very little alarmed, for Mr. Dawson had his
own way of pointing out faults, and not an
individual who was conscious of doing wrong,
felt for a moment safe. Nor did his smiling
lip reassure them, for unless the fault were
of that class which requires a solemn and
pointed rebuke, he always wore that same
expression, as if utterly unconscious that
some poor offender was wincing beneath his
seeming playful touches, and choking in the
vain attempt to swallow his own blushes.
Mr. Dawson, however, did not seem to ob-
serve the looks of his auditors, but proceeded
with his fable.

“Down by a river’s side, a careful goose
had made her nest among the sedges and
ferns, and there, one sunny day in spring, she
left her helpless family in their bright yel-
low livery, and went away in search of food.
On her return she found a stranger nestled
among her little ones, which were all stretch-
ing out their long necks towards him, and
joining their shrill voices in a concert of



THE NEW TEACHER. 23

sounds that nothing not belonging to the
goose family ever conjured up. As soon as
the mother goose had an opportunity for
making observations, she found this stranger
had wings and a head and feet not altogether
unlike her own offspring, and was clothed in
a natural coat of feathers, which proved him,
beyond the shadow of a doubt, to belong to
the extensive race of birds, To be sure his
feathers were of an ugly gray, his beak was
hooked suspiciously, instead of extending
forward flat and honest, like the bills of her
own little ones, and his toes were divided
and furnished with long claws, instead of
being connected by that beautiful, fan-like
web, which would enable him to paddle
across the water, like a living fairy-boat.
Mrs. Goose did not at all like her visitor,
and she at once extended her curved neck in
a very snake-like manner, and hissed alto-
gether too powerfully for a snake, but just as
she was on the point of proceeding to ex-
tremities, she discovered that the poor
stranger, which was yet a nestling, had met
with some misfortune by which he had been
badly bruised, and in consequence was utterly
unable to move. Now the goose, notwith-



24 ALLEN LUCAS.

standing her noisy, bustling way, is really a
benevolent bird, and so she took the stranger
under her own wing, and fed him with her
own food, and made him so comfortable that
he felt quite at home in the family.

“The gray eaglet, when the eyry was bro-
ken up in which he had been lodged, was too
young to remember anything about it, and
not being at all aware that his destination
was the sky, he wandered around among the
green sedges, and through the tall meadow
grass, with his companions, trying his wing
only when he came to the clear stream on
which they floated, and then he would hover
about them, until they stepped upon the
sand, and were ready for another excursion.
True, when the fern was unusually tangled,
and his pathway became laborious, he would
show the admiring and curious goslings how
much more easily he could accomplish a short
journey than they, but otherwise he seemed
to be perfectly contented by equaling them.
The young eagle did not know what it was
to fly away in the pure, blue sky, as free as
the cloud that floated above his head, and
there was nothing to induce him to make the
attempt, so in time his nature became tame,



THE NEW TEACHER, 25

and he loved to crouch in the barn-yard, and
listen to the clamours of silly geese, and, al-
though conscious of being less earthly than
they, he had too long been accustomed to
groveling things, to feel that his natural
superiority only rendered his position the
more degrading. One day, after the eagle
had attained his growth, and become very
goose-like in his nature, as he was digging in
in the mud for worms, he was startled by
the whiz of a wing above his head, and, on
looking up, he discovered a bird above him,
so like himself, that he was obliged to look
back upon the ground to become assured that
it was not the reflection of his own form, as
he had often seen it on the water. Again he
looked at the bird, which wheeled and circled
above him for a moment, and then, as if dis-
daining such a near approach to earth, spreac
out his wings and mounted upward—up, up,
clear away—plunging into the liquid ether,
until he became a mere speck upon the blaz-
ing sun. Again he came a little nearer earth,
waved his wing in wild triumph, and went
careering through the air, now lost behind a
dark cloud that was hovering on the verge of
the horizon, and now far away in an opposite



26 ALLEN LUCAS.

direction, basking in the burning sun-beam,
and seemingly tossing the drifted clouds like
snow-wreaths on his wings. The eye of the
poor eagle kindled at the sight, and he felt
every feather bristle, and every muscle stretch
itself to its utmost tension, as he watched the
gyrations of the noble bird, and when at last
he saw him hovering over a wild, craggy
height, and then plunging into its bosom, as
though its darkest recesses were all familiar,
ne started, like a man awakened from a long,
night-mare dream. With a scream of joy he
expanded his wings and rose upward for a
little, but as a puff of wind came past him,
he veered from his course, and was nigh los-
ing his self-command ; making a strong effort,
however, he preserved his balance, fluttered
his wings again, struggled with another cur-
rent of air, then sank back to earth exhaust-
ed, and hid his head under his useless wing.
Poor bird ! he had been content to fold his
pinion, because his associates did not fly,
and now it was too weak to bear him up, and
though his eagle nature was so awakened that
he loathed the earth, and longed to track out
his way among the clouds, he knew that he was
doomed to crawl about likeacreeping reptile.”



THE NEW TEACHER. 27

“TJ should think that he might have
learned to fly yet,” interrupted one of the
listeners.

“Perhaps he might,” said Mr. Dawson ;
“being a young bird, very likely he might.”

“But an eagle could'nt be so kept down,”
said another ; “ you could’nt tame an eagle
and make such a goose of him.”

“Ts man then inferior to a bird ?” said Mr,
Dawson, with one of his peculiar smiles, “that
his high spirit can be kept down, his aspira-
tions tamed, his whole nature degraded, and
he made the slave of circumstances ?”

The boys too, smiled, and glances of intel-
ligence were exchanged among them, but as
Mr. Dawson said no more, they dropped
away to their seats, one by one, and soon the
ringing of the bell announced the arrival of
the school- hour,



28 ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER III.

THE EAGLE AROUSED,

Brrore the bell had ceased ringing, Allen
Lucas was at his usual seat in the corner, but
his books were untouched, and he sat, tracing
one after another parallel lines on his slate,
as though his life had depended on bringing
the art to perfection. Slowly the lines were
drawn, and if they curved or crooked in the
least degree, as slowly obliterated, while one
class, and then another, and another went
through with their usual exercises, and sat
down to their respective duties. The hour
for the afternoon recess came, and still Allen
Lucas was working away as industriously as
ever. The noise made by his companions as
they went out, partially aroused him, and he
allowed the pencil to slide from his fingers,
and then his head drooped, and he sat in a
posture of deep musing until they returned.

“You are getting quite too goose-like,”
whispered a lively little fellow, making a very
unsuccessful effort to stumble over his feet,
which were by no means in the way. Al-



THE EAGLE AROUSED. 29

len’s face coloured, but no smile came to an-
swer the quizzical grin of the boy, and he
again had recourse to the slate. The next
moment Mr, Dawson passed.

“T have no lesson, sir,” said Allen, with-
out waiting to be questioned, and as if deter-
mined to cut short the business of conversa-
tion as much as possible. Mr. Dawson smiled,
and leaning over the desk so as not to be
heard, remarked cheerfully, “ You at least
are not too old to learn to fly.” Again the
red blood mounted to Allen’s temples, and
he leaned his head forward until it rested on
the desk, while his thoughts came tumbling
on, one after another, disconnected and al-
most unintelligible even to himself. “I could
learn, yes, I know I could—a school-master
—no, I hate school-masters—doctor—pah !
Lawyers are all alike—all a pack of rascals,
so I’ve heard uncle Pete say—no, no, I
wouldn’t be a lawyer, and as for standing
behind a counter all day as poor Jack Dean
has to do, and grow pale and hump-backed—
dear me! I should tear those flimsy things
all to pieces. Then what’s the use !—far-
mers don’t want learning. A farm like
*Squire Smith’s, level as the floor, and not a



30 ALLEN LUCAS.

stone nor a bush—but ‘Squire Smith isn’t
anybody—great, cross—John ’ll get the
farm, but I wouldn’t be John Smith, that I
wouldn’t—just like one of our oxen. I'll go
out west, I’ll clear the land—I’ll—I’ll—yes,
just like the oxen; trudge, trudge, all day
long, thinking of nothing but work, work—
then supper and bed—provender and stable
—eat, drink, and sleep, that’s all—I don’t
care about being an ox. But what’s the use
of learning? I wonder what wise people
think about—I can learn, and if I can I
ought, may be—at any rate Mr. Dawson
thinks so, but I don’t care for that. I can
—yes, I can, and why should’nt I? I can
beat all the boys at ball, and I should be a
fool to throw like a girl—yes, I'll show them
what I can do, I'll go at it like Robert May
—to think of Bob May’s beating me, and he
never skated a rod in his life! I'll show
them !” and Allen threw back his head, and
his eye sparkled, and his cheek glowed with
a new and strange excitement, but how long
he might have gloried in his untried powers
can never be known, for just then a reading-
class was called, and he was obliged to join
in the exercise. Never did Allen Lucas



THE EAGLE AROUSED. al

make such blunders in reading before, never
did the boys laugh so heartily at mistakes,
for they sounded doubly grotesque from such
a source, and never were Mr. Dawson’s black
eyes so very brightly black, and the curl at
the corners of his mouth such a very decided
curl ; but above all, never, not even when
telling his best stories, was his voice more
entirely free from the severity of the school-
master than on this occasion. That day the
reading lesson was somehow very short, and
the class dismissed much sooner than usual,
and it so happened that Allen Lucas had all
the afternoon to make marks on his slate if
he had chosen that very simple mode of
spending time. But he did not choose it,
neither did he sit down to ruminate to little
or no purpose, but, picking up his arithmetic,
he turned to the very dry, comprehensive,
and I shall have all schoolboys on my side
of the question when I say incomprehensible
rule, heading the examples for practice in
reduction, and endeavoured to fix his atten-
tion upon it. Now everybody acquainted
with the book in question, the only system
of arithmetic used in common schools some
thirty years ago, knows that these rules, so



38 ALLEN LUCAS.

far from explaining the principles of the
science, seem placed there for the express
purpose of being explained by them, and
after the young student had managed by
his teacher’s aid, to get through with the
examples for practice, if he could discover
any connection between these and the rule,
or could discover that the latter had the least
bearing on the former, the credit was un-
doubtedly to be given to his organ of associ-
ation. As for Allen Lucas, he had never got
so far as that, though he had probably rattled
off the words of the rule as fast as his very
brisk tongue could move, more than a hun-
dred times. But why reduction ascending and
reduction descending required different pro-
cesses, was a question he would have con-
sidered utterly preposterous, for, had’nt he
tried the sums ? and did’t division bring the
answer when multiplication wouldn’t? To
be sure, his father, who had never studied
arithmetic, and knew nothing of figures, but
what he had picked up in the transaction of
his very circumscribed business, often puzzled
him with hard questions, but he considered
that there was a difference between book-
knowledge, and the knowledge gained by



THE EAGLE AROUSED. 33

trading off beef and corn, and concluded that
notwithstanding these puzzlers, he must
know a great deal more than his father. As
for the rules before-mentioned, his teachers
had always told him they were of no particu-
lar practical importance, which he inter-
preted, of no use except to show how far he
had studied, and he was sure that as soon as
he “could do all the sums,” even if he wes
obliged to look into his older brother's copy-
book for assistance, he should be a perfect
arithmetician.

Mr. Dawson felt the disadvantage at which
he laboured for the want of simpler text-
books, but he had long ago learned how “ to
make do,” and he succeeded in making these
do more than some men have been able to
accomplish with the help of our very excel-
lent improvements. Discovering it to be
impossible, in the state in which he found
his school, to form a class of arithmeticians,
and give his explanations verbally, he de-
voted his evenings to committing them to
paper, and each pupil was furnished with a
copy at the time of entering upon a new
rule, This simple plan saved much time,
which must otherwise have been devoted t

Cc



34 ALLEN LUCAS.

repetitions as innumerable as tiresome ; but
it was not allowed to take the place of those
verbal instructions, which add weight to the
best written rules. Allen Lucas, whose par-
tiality for reduction seemed to be directly in
the way of his advancement, had one of these
copies in his pocket, but, though it was
written in a round, fair hand, that nobody
but a schoolmaster could write, he had
failed to decipher it, and had expended on
excuse-making twice the amount of inge-
nuity and labour, that, otherwise directed,
would have sufficed to make him acquainted
with a whole system of arithmetic. In
truth, Allen had somehow gained an un-
accountable dislike for this little scrap of
paper, and so he sat puzzling his brain over
the words that were intended more as a
definition than explanation, until his brain
fairly ached with the unusual effort. When
at last night came and school was dismissed,
Allen Lucas was among the first to find his
way to the door, for he dreaded meeting Mr.
Dawson, a fear, by the way, utterly ground-
less, as he was never officious, and had as
much consideration for the feelings of a boy
as those of aman. He could not, however,



THE EAGLE AROUSED. 35

withhold an encouraging smile, as Allen’s eye
for a moment met his when he was passing
out the door, and there was something so
full of confidence and hope in the smile, and
earnest, unselfish interest in the whole ex-
pression of his face, that Allen’s fingers
involuntarily crept towards the pocket that
contained the neglected paper.

That evening, when Mr. Lucas’s family
had all gathered around the blazing fire,
Mr. Dawson’s explanation was introduced
by Allen, as if accidentally, and duly can-
vassed. Allen read and re-read it, and John
and William and Mary all talked it over and
found it so simple and yet so important, so
“just the thing,” as they said, that they
wondered they had never thought of these
things of their own accord. At last the old
farmer joined the group, who, slate and
pencil in hand, were rejoicing in their newly
acquired knowledge, and declaring that now
they could “see some sense in it.” The old
man stood for a few minutes, looking over
their shoulders, then taking the paper con-
taining Mr. Dawson’s explanations between
his thumb and finger, he adjusted his spec-
tacles with the other hand, and peered at it



36 ALLEN LUCAS.

very intently, his lips moving slowly all the
while, as if he were weighing the quantity
of the words, as well as scanning their
meaning. At last he seemed satisfied, for,
laying down the paper, he resumed his seat,
took a heavy draught of cider, lighted his
pipe, shook his head two or three times, as
if to assure himself of its safety, and was
ever after heard to declare that Mr. Dawson
was “a wonderful man—very wonderful,
smart enough *to make an arithmetic.” “T
should think,” said John Lucas, as he hung
his slate against the wall, “that Mr. Dawson
was a good teacher.”

“Yes, he must be,” said William.

“ 4 very good teacher,” chimed in Sophia,
a married daughter of Mr. Lucas, who was
home on a visit, and had been entertaining
her parents all day with the atrocities of the
schoolmaster at “ White’s Mills.”

“ Ay, ay !” said the father, “a wonderful
man—very wonderful man—could make a
*rithmetic—I know he could.” Allen said
nothing, and the two little boys had gone to
bed, so their testimony was lost, and Mary
seemed not to hear the remarks, for it is
never pleasant to be in the minority, and she



THE FAGLE AROUSED. 37

felt that the array against lier, backed by the
wonderful paper, was rather too powerful to
be fairly opposed by her single opinion.

“Don't you think he is almost as good as
Mr. Thorn, Allen ?” inquired George.

“Yes ; ten times better.”

“Why!” and “what!” and “dear me
Allen!” and “the boy is crazy!” were
among the exclamations that followed this
very decided opinion, for Mr. Thorn had
been considered the teacher par excellence
at the Corners, and others were called good
or bad, as they were like or unlike him.

“Yes,” repeated Allen in a low, thought-
ful tone, as if replying to some opposing
feeling within, rather than these exclama-
tions, “yes, I am sure he’s a good teacher,
and a good man.”

“We may be good enough,” said Mary,
nodding her head and shrugging her shoul-
ders, “ but one thing I know, I havn’t learned
anything this winter.”

“Not to-night ?”

“Q that is nothing, just what is on that
little bit of paper; Mr. Thorn could have
told it all in three minutes.”

«But Mr. Thorn sever did tell it, Mary.”



38 ALLEN LUCAS.

“Well, he knew it, I know he did—at
any rate he was a good teacher, everybody
liked him.”

“T suppose he was, but then you know
what made us like him so much better than
we do Mr. Dawson. Mr. Thorn didn’t like
the trouble of looking into things, and he
made the best of everything we did. You
know what uncle Pete said about his wink-
ing faculty—he winked at pretty hard doings
sometimes ; he always praised us too, whether
we deserved it or not, but Mr. Dawson don’t
make his praises so cheap.”

“No, he never praises those that deserve
it, but the real blunderheads, he coaxes up
to think they know everything. Yesterday
I never missed a word all day, and he looked
as cross at me—”

“ Mr. Dawson never looks cross, Mary.”

“ Well, he didn’t look very good-natured,
I can tell you. But when Julia May—
everybody knows Julia’s a poor scholar—
when she got up next me, he seemed as glad
as though something wonderful had happened,
and praised her to the sky.”

“ And for a very good reason; he knew
Julia studied and you did’nt.”



BEGINNING ANEW. 39

-All the better, I should think, to know
how to spell every word without studying.”

“All the easier for you, of course, but I
don’t see as you deserve any praise for it. I
believe Mr. Dawson is half right in his notions
about that, and I mean to study one week as
hard as John Smith, just to see what I can do.”

“John Smith has to study hard, or he
wouldn’t learn anything.”

“T know that, but it will be just as easy
for me to study as for him, and if I learn
more I shall get better paid for it.”

CHAPTER IV.

BEGINNING ANEW.

Auuen Lucas had not been accustomed to
making resolutions and breaking them, until,
like many young persons, he considered it
the merest trifle, so he did not fail to put
in execution his hastily formed purpose. If
we should set about examining Allen’s mo-
tive in forming this purpose, we might find
it difficult to fix upon one of sufficient im-
portance but we must remember that “ trifles



40 ALLEN LUCAS.

light as air” decide the destinies of millions.
It was not the love of knowledge, nor the
desire to be useful, nor was it altogether the
wish to excel, that influenced him. He had
always suspected that he was quite as well
endowed by nature as other boys, but now
the consciousness of possessing faculties that
had never been but slightly exercised, came
over him like a gleam of sunlight, and the
mere desire to employ those faculties, the
love of action, which had hitherto exhaust-
ed itself in a display of physical strength,
induced him to make a mental effort. As he
expressed it to Mary, he studied “just to
see what he could do.” The bird finds plea-
sure in the mere act of flying, independent
of any advantage to be gained by it, the boy
in the thousand feats of agility that he per-
forms even when alone, the man delights to
curb the steed, and, when not withheld by a
monitor within, to brandish the steel, and
the student exults in the free use of his
noble faculties, even when the end to be
attained is not in view. The love of using
our powers is almost inseparable from the
possession of them, and this is a kind provi-
sion, making every effort its own immediate



BEGINNING ANEW. 41

reward, and reserving the greater reward
for moments of calm thought, when we are
more capable of appreciating it.

Allen Lucas turned the leaves of his arith-
metic over, again and again, and fluttered
them between his fingers, and made a great
many more parallel lines on his slate, be-
fore he could conclude to go back and com-
mence with Simple Addition, and then he
sat a long time over the rule, which he could
repeat word for word, dreading to ask Mr,
Dawson for his explanation. Finally he
read it over, slowly and carefully, pausing
between the words to weigh well their
meaning, and as he proceeded, a smile stole
to his lip, and a look of intelligence shone
from his eye, for he saw nothing there be-
yond his own comprehension. All this time
Mr. Dawson had been watching his motions,
but he would not appear to do so, for he
knew that there was no surer way of effacing
a good impression, than by showing an ofli-
cious triumph, or even in some cases, gratifi-
cation, Very humble indeed must be the
man, who can bear being told, particularly
when the mind is in a course of revolution,
“T have succeeded in doing you the good I



42 ALLEN LUCAS,

intended—to me you are indebted for these
thoughts and feelings.” The boy is a man
in miniature, with as much pride, as much
sensitiveness, as much jealousy, and less
judgment to balance these qualities, and
therefore is there the more danger in en-
deavouring to play upon the delicate chords
of his mind, lest, by touching a wrong
one, the whole should be deranged. Some
teachers, thinking self-love a reprehensible
quality, never hesitate to mortify it; but
this is not a quality that can be crushed by
being trampled upon ; it grows the ranker
beneath the foot that would break it down,
and loses its poison only when hedged in by
virtuous feelings and principles. I would
not pretend to vindicate all the petty feel-
ings that find a resting-place in the bosom
of childhood, but he who does not respect
them, despite their whimsicalities, and sym-
pathize with them, even in their foolishness,
never can gain the key to their hearts, to do
them good. Even a child’s nature is a deep,
deep study, and he, who but partially under-
stands it, is liable to neglect the good, and to
make sad blunders in curing the evil. A
bad habit is not broken up by one lecture, or



BEGINNING ANEW. 43

one whipping, or one hour of calm reasoning
and kind expostulation. A diseased moral
nature can not be cured by outward means,
without corresponding action within. A fault
is cured, plucked up by the roots, when the
child’s own hand undertakes its extermina-
tion, but the teacher, unassisted, only lops
away the green, leaving it to spring up at
some future day, stronger than ever. The
best lesson a child can learn, is to examine
his own heart, and rely upon his own power
of self-control, assisted only by Him who
furnishes that power. He who would prop
up a character by other means than its own
internal strength, only weakens it, and sad
are the consequences, when these props are
taken away. I would not dwell so long on
this point, but for the fatal mistake com-
mitted, both by parents and teachers. Be-
cause children are capricious, impulsive,
always arriving at wrong conclusions, and
at the mercy of every one who chooses to
play upon their tender feelings, they are
often supposed to be utterly incapable of
self-government, and are forbidden to do one
thing, and commanded to do another, because
their elders know what will injure or benefit



44 ALLEN LUCAS.

them, better than they do themselves. The
child is set down to the study of dead lan-
guages, and is expected to comprehend, or
at least to remember difficult sciences at a
very early age, but when capable of this,
moral teaching is made mere baby-talk,
and no wonder that he turns disgusted from
these lessons, loses his regard for truth and
virtue, and is restrained only by the strong
arm. It is the duty of parents and teachers
to make children know and feel their faults,
to wateh carefully, and discover if reforma-
tion is attempted, to encourage and sustain
by delicate and cautious means, to show the
beauty of moral greatness in its true light,
and to point out the effects of the most
trivial incident upon the character, but the
child must be made to feel that the mighty
work is his own, and fully worthy of his
greatest exertions.

Mr. Dawson had studied the construction
of the human mind attentively, and he had
not one set of rules for the man and another
for the boy, for he knew that the same
springs of action are in both, Yet he was far
from bringing all down to the same standard,
as if every mind was cast in the same moula,



BEGINNING ANPW. 45

and differences were faults. When Allen
Lucas asked hesitatingly, and with evident
trepidation, if he might be allowed to review
his studies before proceeding any farther,
Mr. Dawson did not inquire why, nor raise
objections “for the sake of trying him,” nor
congratulate him upon discovering his defi-
ciencies, he merely gave his assent kindly,
made a few remarks upon the necessity of
being well grounded in the fundamental
principles of a science, offered his assistance
whether in school or out, in explaining diffi-
culties, and passed on, Yet Allen felt that
his new resolutions were understood and all
his efforts appreciated, and from that mo-
ment there was the most perfect confidence
established between the teacher and his
pupil. But this could not have been, if
Mr. Dawson had injudiciously interfered, for
Allen knew that the struggle had been in his
own bosom, the effort and triumph his own,
and however much credit he was afterward
inclined to give his teacher, the least appear-
ance of claiming it at this time*would have
alarmed his jealous self-love, and very likely
induced him to show that he was not so tame
and easily influenced as might be supposed.



46 ALLEN LUCAS.

That day Allen went through with his reci-
tations admirably, surprising even himself
by the wonders he performed: he asked ques-
tions and expressed opinions, not always
correct, but yet worthy of correction, and
exhibited so much real interest in the sub-
jects discussed, that Liph Green, the lively
little fellow before mentioned, very demurely
gave him to John Smith as an example of
a passive verb changed into an active one.
The week of trial passed away, and seve-
ral others followed it, and Allen Lucas began
to discover that though learning was a very
pleasant thing, nothing worth the posses-
sion could be gained without severe labour ;
that none who would obtain the real ore is
exempt from the drudgery of digging for it,
and sometimes he would grow tired, and feel
a strong temptation to relapse into his former
idleness. Mr. Dawson knew that such mo-
ments would come, and he watched carefully
for them, but not believing in the modern
mode of turning study into a mere amuse-
ment, he did not always present something
new, thus humoring the intellectual nature,
as some parents do the caprices of a petted
child. Sometimes he saw that a change of



BEGINNING ANEW. 47

employment was necessary, to prevent actual
disgust, but he always took every occasion to
deprecate this mode of treatment in general,
and Allen soon learned the danger of yield-
ing to feelings of weariness, as well as to
other difficulties. As he proceeded rapidly
and surely in his studies, it was plain to Mr.
Dawson, and others who took the trouble to
observe, that his whole character was under-
going a change, his perceptions were clearer,
his notions more correct, and his principles
firmer. Yet this natural result of the dis-
cipline to which he subjected himself, (it was
not the mere love of action that led him to
study now,) was only commenced, and Mr.
Dawson often laboured to show him, that
this winter did not close his efforts, and
that nothing less than a steady advance
through life, ought to satisfy an immortal
nature.



48 ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER Y.

ROBERT MAY, AND OTHERS OF MR, DAWSON’S
PUPILS.

Amona the boys who attended school at the
Corners, was a black-eyed, pale-faced strip-
ling of about the age of Allen Lucas, but
much smaller, and yet, from a certain sedate,
thoughtful expression of countenance, appa-
rently much older. Robert May was the
only son of a farmer in rather humbler cir-
cumstances than Mr. Lucas, but he was very
far from being the only child ; a fact well
known to all the gallant beaux and envious
belles in the neighbourhood. His six sisters
were all round, rosy-cheeked damsels, full of
fun and frolic, and not particularly noted for
talent or in any way ambitious of deserving
such notoriety. They were vain of their
personal appearance, and the ready inge-
nuity, the talent for invention, the activity
and resoluteness which characterized them,
was dissipated on vulgar or trivial pursuits.
They had early imbibed a fondness for dis-
play, and they exhibited it in decorating the
house, in their dress, and in all their actions,



MR. DAWSON’S PUPILS. 49

but it was a petty kind of vanity, and seldom
spoiled the smile on their lips, or the good
feeling in their hearts. To be sure, they
pouted to display their red, ripe lips, and
frowned just a little, to intimate how their
eyes might sparkle, if they should happen to
get angry ; but the cloud never lasted above
five minutes, and they were really generous
and obliging. As for taste and good sense,
people did not look for them in the May’s, but
they expected gaiety and mirth, and were
not disappointed, Robert had three sisters
older than himself to pet him, and his pa-
rents, like parents in general, who have but
one son, set them the example, meanwhile
wondering why the little fellow should be so
pale and puny. The sisters cared little for
wintry winds or deep snows on their own
account, but Robert was carefully guarded
against them, until he became old enough
to be ashamed of his girlishness, and throw
aside the cloak and muffler ; but even then
he preserved a settled disrelish for active
sports. Perhaps it was this peculiarity, com-
bined with a desire to distinguish himself in
some way among his companions, that led
him to set a higher value on mental attain-
D



50 ALLEN LUCAS.

ments, for he had always disputed with Mary
Lucas the title of “best scholar.” Robert
May was considered a prodigy of Jearning by
his parents and sisters, and they had talked
so much to him about being “a great man,”
that he was early convinced his destiny was
ahigh one. Quiet and studious, none dream-
ed of the ambitious feelings that lay beneath
this modest demeanor, and Mr. Dawson, ob-
serving as he was, suspected them least of any,
and took a peculiar interest in one who was
himself so easily interested. Robert was by
far the most promising of Mr. Dawson’s
pupils ; for he not only studied, but seemed
to understand and love his studies, and from
the books, which his kind teacher lent him
for perusal in the evening, he gained enlarged
views of life, and much useful information,
Yet he never became sufliciently interested
to forget himself, and never, in moments of
his greatest enthusiasm, did he lose sight
of that future elevation towards which he
believed himself surely advancing. It was
early decided by Mr. May, that Robert
should be a scholar, and so he was allowed
every advantage within their limited means,
and encouraged by praises, and the most



MR. DAWSON’S PUPILS. 51

flattering pictures of the proud future. Allen
Lucas had always been rather fond of quiz-
zing Robert, for what he considered his mop-
ishness, and on the other hand, the proud
student regarded with something very like
contempt the careless idler, who thought
more of being able to ride an unbroken colt,
than he would of being qualified to sit in the
presidential chair, They had never quarrelled,
but, the one shy, artful, and selfish, the other
bold, frank, and generous, they were too ut-
terly unlike in character, to be on terms of
intimacy. Even after Allen had overcome
his indolent habits, there were so many points
of difference between them, that, but for Mr.
Dawson’s inteference, they would never have
been friends. Mr. Dawson was a great pro-
moter of social happiness, and he always en-
deavoured to make his pupils feel how empty,
cold, and unsatisfying, is that heartless enjoy-
ment which results from mere selfish grati-
fication, unattended by kind acts and gener-
ous feelings.

Mary Lucas had no right to the name of
“best scholar ;” indeed, her memory was the
only quality that brought her in competition
with Robert, but this often gave her a tem-

?



52 ALLEN LUCAS.

porary advantage, which was the basis of her
reputation in school, and made her appear in
his eyes something very like a rival. This
winter, however, changed the face of things,
Mary took a retrograde motion, and the
whilom rivals were the best friends in the
world, at least when a third party was ab-
sent. Mary was much given to low conver-
sations with the grave student in the corner
opposite Allen’s, but she sometimes turned
off very suddenly at the sound of a certain
merry voice, for Liph Green (who would
think of calling such a complete embodiment
of mischief, Eliphalet?) had got a new hand-
sled, and a “brand-new” penknife, that would
eut up a quill admirably, and above all, could
write just the most comical three-cornered
notes, that no one but herself had the ingenu-
ity to open. Liph Green was never idle,
every moment was employed, for if nothing
better offered, he could make pewter six-
pences, and wooden jack-knives, but his
lesson was usually the farthest of anything
from his thoughts. No one bent over his
book more assiduously, and no one’s lips
moved faster, but there were no words upon
them, and the roguish little eye, over which



MR. DAWSON’S PUPIIS. 53

the lid drooped so demurely, instead of rest-
ing on the book, stole just a hair's breadth
below it, and watched the motions of the
truant fingers. The employment of those
fingers depended upon the materials with
which their owner supplied himself in the
morning, and never was a pocket so loaded
down with inventions of every kind as his.
For Liph, Robert had the greatest dislike,
even hatred ; for he was, like all shy per-
sons, peculiarly susceptible to ridicule, and
the irresistible drollery of the young jester’s
manner, and the good humour that was
always evident, even in his practical jokes,
could not atone for the impudence of making
our student the subject of them.

Such were some of the young minds over
which Mr. Dawson exercised control, and
whose whole after course might depend upon
his slightest word or action. To say that
Mr. Dawson was fully conscious of his re-
sponsibilities, with our knowledge of his
character, tells at once a tale of ceaseless and
untiring eflort; and to say that he was
amply rewarded by success, proves the ac-
complishment of a vast amount of good.
Yet he could not lay the spirit of mirth tuat



54 ALLEN LUCAS.

was bounding in every pulse of Liph Green ;
he could not create in Mary Lucas a love for
the labour of thinking ; he could not pre-
vent Julia May’s eyes wandering from her
book to the showy ribbon about her neck ;
and he could not add life to the snail-like
patience of John Smith, who would sit his
six long hours over a lesson in geography,
and then remember but a single fact. There
were Lizzy Parker, as sweet a creature as
ever breathed, and very teachable withal ;
and Fanny Blair, a notable devourer of
books ; and Richard Lucas, who, although it
was his first winter at school, evinced sur-
prising quickness ; and the amiable Joseph
Warren, so strictly conscientious, and loving
his books, because Mr. Dawson said he ought
to love them, and these relieved the shadow
that his want of success in other cases some-
times cast upon his spirits. Yet of all his
pupils, there was not one in whom he had
such perfect confidence, as Robert May. Per-
haps he loved Allen Lucas better, for there
was a tie between them, that no one who
has never given its first impulse to an im-
mortal nature, and no one who has not been
thus acted upon, can comprehend; yet he



MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 55

trembled for him, and dreaded to go away,
lest with him should depart his influence
also, But he had no need to fear! Allen
had tried his powers, and he never could
grow weary of exercising them ; he had
taken one draught of the waters of know-
ledge, and it had created a life-long thirst ;
he had given a little glance to the field
spread out before him, and his heart swelled,
and his hand even now longed to busy it-
self in doing.

CHAPTER VI.

MR, DAWSON’S LAST STORY,

Tus winter passed rapidly, and the day
before the school closed, Mr. Dawson sat
down to his desk to tell his last story ; for
the next day’s leisure was to be devoted to
advice and leave-taking. Allen Lucas, with
the hair flung back from his full, high fore-
head, his mild, but unshrinking eye fixed
upon the speaker, and his lips parted in the
attitude of a listener, was the most strik-
ing figure of the group; but next him, a



56 ALLEN LUCAS.

stranger would have turned to Liph Green,
perched high upon a writing desk, the very
position of his foot and curve of his fingers,
to say nothing of the rogue, twinkling in the
corner of either bright eye, and lurking in
every dimple of his face, indicating the
spirit within, and contrasting somewhat
oddly with the stolid figure of John Smith
below. Then there was Julia May, playing
with the soft, flaxen ringlets of Lizzy Parker,
and Joseph Warren, setting a fine example
of attention to the younger boys, who loved
him for his kindness and generosity, and
little Abby Stillman, sitting at Lizzy’s feet,
and looking up at her, instead of Mr. Daw-
son, and still beyond and around, rows of
faces of more or less intelligence and beauty.
But there was one, with little about him to
attract attention, who did not lose one word
of the interesting story. A little aside from
the others, with his elbow resting upon the
desk, making the stoop in his shoulders very
conspicuous, and his small, black eye some-
times raised to Mr. Dawson’s face, and some-
times falling, as if from sheer habit, upon
a large volume which lay open before him,
sat Robert May, his face growing every mo-



MR. DAWSON’S LAST 8TORY. 57

ment more thoughtful, and the pale red spot
in the centre of his cheek deepening, but
with nothing else to betray the ambitious
hopes that were swelling in his bosom. Mr
Dawson observed these tokens of interest,
but he mistook their source, or he would not
have added fuel to the flame that already
burned but too high.

“Of my first teacher,” said he, “TI have no
recollection, except that he used to pat me
on the head, when I had been good, but
some of my schoolmates I can remember
distinctly. Among these, William Edwards
was my favourite, because he was almost as
big as a man, and always took good care that
none of the little boys should be hurt. He
did not belong to the district, but had come
a weary way for the privilege of attending a
good school, and he found one of a first-rate
order. It was on one of the stormiest days
in January, that a lad, about sixteen years
of age, called at the house of a farmer in the
neighbourhood, and first making particular
inquiries respecting the school, the qualifica-
tions of the teacher, &c., asked to be directed
to a family where he might work for his
board, The stranger could not boast a robust



58 ALLEN LUCAS.

frame, but he spoke very confidently of his
strength, and so Mr. Gilbert, the old farmer,
concluded to give him a trial. I have some
slight recollection of William Edwards’ first
entrance into school, and can distinctly re-
member his calm, manly bearing, when some
thoughtless boys ridiculed his patched and
thread-bare coat. Indeed, I am sorry to say
that he met with more ridicule at first, than
kind consideration for his circumstances. He
heeded it but little, however, and pursued
his studies night and day, with an assi-
duity which would have worn out any one,
not finding variety in active employment.
The fresh morning air cooled the fever of
night study, and the care that he was re-
quired to bestow upon the sheep and cattle,
relieved his mind, and exercised his limbs.
He never spoke of his friends, and when a
little boy once asked where his mother lived,
he pointed one hand upward, and with the
other, dashed off the tear that sprang to his
eye. Questions about his father, he seemed
loath to answer, but the flush on his cheek,
and the drooping of the eye-lid, as if in
shame, when Mr. Gilbert produced the cider
mug, and urged him to drink, sufficiently



MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 59

betrayed his secret. He said that he had no
home, but when Mr. Gilbert offered him a
place at his table and fireside, he gently re-
fused; and when urged, he proudly answered
that he was no beggar, he would work for
his bread where he could do so, in pursuance
of the plan of Jife he had marked out for
himself, but he would accept of nothing that
his own hands had not earned, William
Edwards could not have found an individual
better calculated to further his plans than
our teacher, who lent him books, and de-
voted much of his leisure time to him, and
finally recommended him to an academy,
where he might soon be prepared for enter-
ing college. Here he remained about a year,
working his way day by day, and then he
slung his little bundle over his shoulders,
and again went out upon the world a stran-
ger. For years he struggled hard with for-
tune, now within the college walls, engaged
for a term or two in severe study, and now
teaching in some retired place, where his
services were far from being appreciated, and
bending over his books at midnight, striving
to keep up with his class. But his health at
last failed, and for many months he was



60 ALLEN LUCAS.

confined to a darkened room, and denied the
use of books, and the society of friends.
Then, when he slowly recovered, came a
heavy bill, for the homeless cannot be at-
tended in sickness without money ; and so he
taught, and studied, and struggled on, year
after year, and finally the goal was reached :
he graduated, crowned with honours. Dur-
ing all this time, William Edwards had not
been alone ; he had found a friend in every
acquaintance, and many, among whom were
the officers of the institution of which he was
a member, regarded his career admiringly.
It was by this means that he easily obtained
a situation in a boy’s seminary, but upon
the first vacancy, he gained the office of
tutor in the college where he was educated,
and was afterwards endowed with a professor-
ship. Since then, his love of active pursuits
has induced him to engage in public affairs,
and,” added Mr. Dawson, a smile lighting up
his whole face, “there are now but few men
in our country, that can boast a higher
station or prouder honours, than he whose
yeal name in my little sketch I have thought
proper to conceal under that of William
Lidwards.”



MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 61

“He must have had an unusual share of
perseverance,” said Allen Lucas, drawing in
his breath, as if fatigued by the mere act of
listening, “ I can’t see how a man could keep
up his courage so long.”

“ Perseverance will accomplish wonders,”
said Mr. Dawson; “ William Edwards arose
by a constant succession of efforts, some of
them no greater than several of you have
made this winter; decision is necessary in
such cases, for you will always find that it
requires a much greater effort to decide on
the performance of a difficult duty, than
really to perform it ; I don’t mean by this,
that it is more common to persevere than
resolve, for facts show directly the reverse,
but mountains diminish to mole-hills before
us when, spade in hand, we stand up deter-
mined to level them.”

“Then Robert May will have a pretty
easy job of it,” whispered Liph Green, loud
enough to be heard perfectly well by every-
body present, and yet with his forefinger
pressed mysteriously to his lips ; “he decid-
ed on being governor long ago.”

Robert May bit his lips, and turned his
back upon the group, muttering, as he took



62 ALLEN LUCAS.

up one book after another and examined the
title-pages, “he may be more than any ot
you dream.” Liph Green, with all his light-
ness and folly, seemed to be endowed with
the gift of second sight, as far as character
was concerned, and it was the consciousness
of being too well known, that made Robert
so exceedingly uncomfortable in his presence,
and added bitterness to his hatred.

“And what is your decision ?” inquired
Mr. Dawson, laughingly.

“Mine! OT hate ‘ great efforts,’ and always
look out for the easiest part ; so I do diffi-
cult things without deciding.”

“Jam afraid it is the only way you will
ever do anything,” Mr. Dawson thought, but
he did not say so, and merely answered,
“Frankly acknowledged, my boy, but this
looking out for the easiest part, never makes
sterling men.”

“J don’t see,” said Allen Lucas, “ how we
boys can decide on what we will be, till we
find out for what we are fit.”

“ You can not,” replied Mr. Dawson ; “ you
can decide now upon fitting yourselves for
taking a part in the world, and for this every
faculty of body, mind, and heart, requires the



MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 63

highest cultivation ; you can decide that your
lives shall be virtuous, that you will always
support good principles, and make yourselves
useful to your fellow-men ; then in a few
years you will decide upon a vocation ; but
not until you are old enough to discover what
is best adapted to your characters, tastes, and
circumstances, Nothing so injures a man’s
stability and firmness of character, as decid-
ing this matter when too young, and making
a mistake.”

“ Well, I shall be a farmer,” said a hale,
stout, square-shouldered fellow, who looked
as though the flail and sythe would be mere
toys in his hands.

“J think—I should like—to be a—a school-
master,” remarked Joseph Warren, with
much timidity, and casting a furtive glance
at Mr. Dawson, as if to discover whether
such a predilection was considered too great
presumption.

“J mean to be a circus-rider,” said Liph
Green, springing from the desk like a
monkey, and vaulting on the one oppo-
site.

“Liph!? “Why Liph Green !” were the
simultaneous exclamations.



64 ALLEN LUCAS.

“ Qircus-riders are very bad men,” re-
marked Mr. Dawson, seriously.

“No, a sailor—I would rather be a sailor,
after all—now see me climb the shrouds,”
and much more to hide his confusion than
display his activity, he caught hold of the
bell-rope and disappeared in the loft.

“ Poor boy!” sighed Mr. Dawson involun-
tarily.

“He don’t mean it, sir,” said Allen Lucas,
in a low tone; “it is all fun, and he is one
of the best hearted boys in the world. He'll
be steadier when he gets older.”

Mr. Dawson looked up with a pleased
smile, but he was more encouraged for the
pleader, than him for whom he pled ; for
Allen observed that the next moment he
shook his head sorrowfully. Our young
student had looked sufficiently into the
future, to understand the source of this sor-
row; and from that time forth, as if to re-
pay the kindness that the school-master had
shown to him, he exercised the care of an
elder brother over his wild and reckless
friend.

The last day of school is usually made up
of smiles and tears. Even those who have



MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 65

anticipated it with the greatest pleasure, are
the first to weep at the reality; for then
comes a full realization of past enjoyments—
all past—little associations broken up—the
connecting links between young hearts
marred, if not dissevered. The school-boy
does not say all this, but he feels it, and
hence his sadness; yet he knows little of
disappointment, he thinks upon the change,
and hence the counteracting joy. He would
not tell you so, but he feels that the brother-
ly tie between him and his school-mates, is
a brotherly one no longer, and during the
summer, when they meet in the field, or by
the road-side, there will be an awkward shy-
ness between them, for the summer school,
being for the little ones, does not gather
them all into one family again. But sadder
than usual, and much more quiet, was the
last day of the school at the Corners this
winter. Mr. Dawson was loved and respect-
ed by his pupils; he was not above the
weakness of feeling himself, and feeling is
very infectious. Some of the older boys,
who thought it beneath their dignity to show
anything like softness of heart, put a bold
face upon the matter, and although almost
B



66 ALLEN LUCAS.

choked with the effort of keeping down a
something, that felt very much like a nut-
meg grater in the throat, they did keep it
down, until Mr. Dawson’s voice showed that
he too was suffering under the same inflic-
tion, and even then they did not wholly
yield, till his face was entirely lost in the
folds of his pocket-handkerchief. Then there
was such a time! Oh, you never saw the
like ! and poor Lizy Parker—how she sobbed,
until it seemed as though her little heart
would break, and how Allen Lucas, with a
self-control quite new to him, comforted her,
telling her that Mr. Dawson had promised to
write him letters, and she should see every
one of them. And then how gentle and
sorrowful Mr. Dawson’s face looked, when
the handkerchief was taken away ; how soft
and low was his voice, and how affectionate
the very touch of his hand, as he bade them all
good-bye. Then each, without a whisper, pass-
ed slowly out the door, and the faithful teacher
was left alone, to review the past, and to feel
that the book was sealed, that not one line could
be dashed out or added to its pages. Thrilling
thought to him, whois acquitted by conscience,
but to the self-condemned how awful !



WINTER SCHOOL, 67

CHAPTER VII.
SUMMER STUDY, AND THE NEXT WINTER SCHOOL.

Tug spring is a busy time with farmers, and
Allen Lucas found but little leisure to devote
to his books, after leaving school. He arose
carly in the morning, as he had always been
taught, but the whole family were up as
early, and this was no time for study. As
soon as breakfast was dispatched, each re-
paired to his station in the field, from whence
he was called only by the dinner horn, and
then he again returned, and continued his
labour till sunset. Guiding the plough, or
laying fence all the day long, meanwhile
breathing the cool, pure air of spring, is
doubtless healthful employment, but one
who has been thus employed, until every
limb and muscle feels the consequent fatigue,
is ill fitted for mental labour; and it must
be a high purpose that will prevent his scek-
ing that rest, which to the labouring man is
so sweet. When Allen sat down in the
house at night, he felt a drowsiness creeping
over him, and then it required his strongest



68 ALLEN LUCAS.

effort to turn to his school-books. Every
Saturday night he trudged off to the village,
to look for letters from Mr. Dawson, and it
was a proud moment to the whole family
when one of these arrived. After the first
letter, came a pamphlet, treating of different
soils, and a variety of other things connected
with farming, and this aroused Allen’s in-
terest, which had begun to flag, giving new
employment to his evenings, and supplying
him with subjects of thought during the day.
He compared his own observations with
what he read, and talked over these subjects
with his father and brothers, and often asked
the old men of the neighbourhood questions,
gathering from their conversation much
practical knowledge. Next, Mr. Dawson
sent a small treatise on geology ; it con-
tained only the first rudiments of the science,
but it was very useful to Allen, for he carried
out the subject beyond the information given
in the book, raising the cover of the green
sod upon the hill-side, and reading the lesson
as God stamped it there. That summer,
Allen felt that a new world was around, and
a new sky above him; his soul was animated
by new emotions, his mind was unshackled,



WINTER SCHOOL. 69

and his eye unsealed. He discovered that
earth is one vast book, and every page of it
presents a lesson rich in its simplicity, yet
reading on, on, to infinity ; its simplest thesis
limitless and incomprehensible. Allen had
been awakened to the study of this vast book
by looking into those made by men ; and he
knew that he needed all the aid which they
could give in comprehending it, yet he loved
to study this the best. V

When the next winter came, Allen was
better prepared to appreciate the blessings
which it brought, and he entered upon his
studies with a high relish. Mr. Dawson’s
successor was well versed in all he professed
to understand, and fully qualified to teach,
not only the branches required in a district
school, but many higher ones, With the
whole theory of teaching he was familiar,
and having an agreeable address, and a
polished exterior, he promised to equal, if
not excel, his predecessor, In childhood, he
had attended a school much like that at the
Corners, but afterwards, his parents remov-
ing to town, he had received instruction in
an academy, designed expressly for boys.
Here he had made no mean use of his time



70 ALLEN LUCAS,

and opportunities ; and in consequence, had
gained an education superior to the gener-
ality of young men in his circumstances.
Emerging from this school, and without a
definite object in view, he had turned to
teaching, as the most respectable and lucra-
tive manner of filling up this niche of time,
and had found his way to the Corners,
where, by under-bidding Mr. Dawson, he
obtained his situation.

Mr. Leonard did not conceal his object in
teaching, and professed to believe no man
would pursue such a calling but for money,
pronouncing all who professed a higher mo-
tive, hypocrites. He was not idle, during
the six hours a day which he had engaged to
devote to his school, but when they were
over, he felt like a freed prisoner, and, turn-
ing as soon as possible to other subjects, did
not allow the duties of the day to trouble his
thoughts till nine the next morning. The
difference between the two teachers was felt
by the whole school ; it was evident, even to
the dullest, that Mr. Leonard did not care for
their actual advancement, that he was more
pleased to see the hand of his watch pointing
at four, than to hear the best lesson that ever



WINTER SCHOOL, 71

was learned ; and soon, the most of the chil-
dren grew listless and idle. Mr. Leonard
was, however, stricter in some respects than
Mr. Dawson; for it is much less trouble to
flog a boy than to reason with him ; and the
latter mode of treatment is generally of suf-
ficient efficacy to exact obedience. Physical
strength should be the last resort in govern-
ment, for although a very convincing mode
of argument to the weak, the truths thus
inculeated are strangely evanescent. Mr,
Leonard would have been the gainer, as well
as his pupils, if he had chosen to exert his
moral power instead, but he adopted the
course that seemed easiest for himself, and
poor Liph Green was not the only sufferer.
Mr. Dawson had always made a wide dis-
tinction between errors resulting from acci-
dent or carelessness, and those which evinced
a lack of principle ; but Mr. Leonard had no
severer punishment for a deliberate falsehood,
than for an involuntary laugh. Poor Lizzy
Parker, whom nobody had ever found guilty
of intentional offence, was one day convicted
of whispering, and obliged to sit one whole
hour on a block of wood, like a criminal in
the stocks, because she had ventured to take



72 ALLEN LUCAS.

the head of a little girl, crying from home-
sickness, upon her lap, and attempt to soothe
her. How her face glowed with shame, and
drooped upon her bosom, as she found her-
self subjected to the same punishment, and
seated beside a rude, coarse girl, who in a fit
of passion, had struck a little sister in the
face. Lizzy never broke a rule again ; yet
her loving heart had received a check that
frightened, though it could not chill it.
Simple and guileless, she trembled at her
own kind feelings, supposing there must be
something wrong in exercising them, and yet
impelled to do so by their irresistible strength.
But the influence, which on the gentle Lizzy
was only temporary, was differently felt by
others. The older scholars were indignant ;
for the sweet child, who never thought of
herself while anything remained to be done
for others, was under the particular care and
protection of each member of the school ;
and no one could be injured half so easily in
person as through Lizzy Parker. The older
scholars lost confidence in Mr. Leonard,
and the younger ones confounded the two
offences, and lost the distinction between
actual wrong done from a bad motive, and a



WINTER SCHOOL. 73

trivial error, made error by circumstances
and the result of mere thoughtlessness. Yet
Mr. Leonard was not a cruel man, he never
punished unmercifully, and he would have
been shocked at the idea of breaking down
the distinction between right and wrong, or
between pardonable folly and actual crime.
Liph Green improved but little this winter
in knowledge, and still less in moral strength.
His volatile spirits continually carried him to
extremes, and between rejoicing over a new
resolution, and breaking an old one, he re-
ceived floggings enough to tame any nature
that was tameable. Though his feelings, ex-
citable as the mercury of the thermometer,
indicated the state of the moral atmosphere
about him, yet the wild partridge is not more
free and tameless, than was the boy, who,
even while suffering for one of his ridiculous
freaks, could not resist the opportunity ‘to
perform another. Under Mr. Leonard’s in-
structions, Mary Lucas regained some of her
Jost reputation, and Robert May made rapid
progress, for he needed books more than an
instructor, and the opportunity to study more
than assistance in his studies, This was very
much the case with Allen Lucas, also ; yet



7A ALLEN LUCAS.

he often felt the need of that sympathy for
the pleasures as well as difficulties of his pur-
suits, Which, as it was no part of his contract,
Mr. Leonard did not feel himself bound to
accord. Perhaps the self-dependence which
Allen was obliged to exercise this winter,
strengthened his character ; but Robert May
did not need it, for he had already too little
sympathy with others. Mr. Leonard, how-
ever, was a competent teacher, as far as in-
struction was concerned ; and as Allen had
imbibed a fondness for mathematical sciences,
he made such a beginning as enabled him
afterwards to pursue them without assist-
ance.

“ How I wish Mr. Dawson was here to tell
usa story!” said Liph Green, one day after
the morning school had closed.

“Mr. Leonard would tell one, I dare say,
if he didn’t go home to dinner,” replied
Mary Lucas.

“Tt is lucky for us that he does go,” an-
swered Liph ; “if he was here, we shouldn’t
have the privilege of speaking a loud word.”

“ Well, I wish Mr. Dawson was here all
the time,” said Julia May, pouting her rosy
lip, “ he always let me make figures on Ro-



WINTER SCHOOL. 75

bert’s slate after I’d learned my lesson, and
used to tell me sometimes that they were
almost as handsome as Robert's.”

“And he didn’t call you up, did he, Julia ?”
said little Abby Stillman, looking coaxingly
into her face, as if to say, “ see how sorry I
am that Mr. Leonard did.”

“No, indeed, he didn’t call me up for such
a little thing as marking on a slate—Mr.
Dawson wouldn’t do that.”

“He would, if marking on a slate was
against the rule,” said Mary.

“But he wouldn’t make such a silly rule,”
was the reply.

“For my part I think it is a very good
rule,” said Mary, who was freed from the
observance of it by studying arithmetic ; “I
don’t see what all the little girls want of
slates.”

“JT am almost as old as you are,” said
Julia, drawing up her shoulders with a
wonderful attempt at dignity ; but before
she could proceed farther, she was inter-
rupted by Allen Lucas,

“{ think they are of a great deal of use,
Mary, and I wish all the younger children in
school had them. It is a good way of em-



76 ALLEN LUCAS.

ploying their time ; for they cannot study to
much advantage, and they get very tired and
forget almost as much as they learn, when
confined to their books constantly. Then
they make by this means a good beginning
in writing.”

“Then you would have them all scribble
on a slate, I suppose,” interrupted Mary,
“whether Mr. Leonard allows it or not.”

“Oh no, Mr. Leonard sees both sides of
the question, and we only one, so we cannot
tell how many good reasons he has for act-
ing as he does. At any rate, he has a right
to make as many rules of that kind as he
chooses, and we ought to obey them.”

“ Of course you'll say so,” said Julia, pet-
tishly, “for you can make as many figures
as you please.”

“ And sometimes more,” said Allen laugh-
ing. “But it is of no use, Julia, to complain
of Mr. Leonard, and find fault with his rules,
and it only makes us unhappy. We couldn’t
expect to find another Mr. Dawson, and
whoever comes to teach, or whatever he
does, we must take care that our part is well
done, and then we shall never suffer much
wrong.”



WINTER SCHOOL. 77

“J don’t think that Lizzy Parker was a
bit to blame, when Mr. Leonard made her
sit on the dunce-block,” interrupted one of
the older girls. Allen hesitated, for he did
not like to condemn Lizzy Parker, but he
soon cleared his voice and proceeded. “Lizzy
was not to blame, for she didn’t think any-
thing about the rule, but her whispering was
a violation of it, and Mr. Leonard was bound
by his word to punish her.”

“ But,” continued the girl, “ what use was
there in making such a promise? Mr. Daw-
son never did.”

“No, Mr. Dawson made the punishment
discretionary, and that was doubtless the
best way ; but it caused him a great deal of
trouble.”

“Why, I am sure he kept as orderly a
school as we have now.”

“Yes, but he used to inquire into every-
thing that was wrong, and find out all about
it ; and that must have been a very difficult
task, and taken up a great deal of time.”

“Mr, Dawson never was afraid of his
time,” said another of the boys, “and would
have staid in the school-house all night, if he
could have helped anybody by the means.



78 ALLEN LUCAS.

But Mr. Leonard must clear the house at
four o’clock, and the minute the last boy
gets out he follows and locks the door.”

“Well, one thing I know,” said Liph
Green ; “I can cheat Mr. Leonard, and will,
every time I can get a chance.”

“Cheat him? how ?”

“Why, he don’t believe a word I say, so
there is no use in telling him whether I did
a thing or not. If he catches me at it, he
will whip me, and if he don’t I will have the
fun of cheating him.”

“How do you know he don’t believe
you ?”

“Why he don’t believe any of us; he
asks questions, and tries to make us cross
ourselves, and yesterday when I got so
sleepy, and promised I wouldn’t step my foot
out of the shed if he would let me go and
cut wood, I could see him peeping out the
window every time I stopped for breath, as
though he thought I would be gone. I de-
clare I’d a great mind to run with all my
might.”

“Why didn’t you?” asked Julia May.

“And so prove him in the right,” said
another.



WINTER SCHOOL. 79

“J did scare him some, making motions,
and I stopped so often to make him come to
the window, that at last he called me in.”

“Jo you gained vastly by scaring him, as
you tell about,” said Allen.

“Yes, but I’ll make up another time. I
can look on my book and whisper, and he
never would find me out in the world. I
didn’t dare do that when Mr. Dawson was
here, for you know he always asked at night,
and denying it would be a downright lie ;
but Mr. Leonard never thinks of asking, be-
cause he says boys are not to be believed.
Oh, I can cheat him in a thousand ways.”

“ Well, what good will it do you ?” asked
Lizzy Parker.

“Tt will be serving him right.”

“ But it will do you no good,” said Allen
seriously, “and, even if you wished it, which
Tam sure you do not, him no harm. I own
that it is not pleasant to be watched every
minute as though we couldn’t be trusted, but
that is no reason why we should make our-
selves unworthy of trust. Let us remember
what Mr. Dawson used to tell us so often,
that our actions here will have an influence
which we shall carry out into the world with



80 ALLEN LUCAS.

us ; and when we act we should not merely
decide what will serve our present purpose,
annoy this person or please that one, but
what is right, and will help to fit us for the
part we shall have to act in the world. Just,
think of it, Liph—you must neglect your
books to deceive Mr. Leonard, act against
your conscience, and in the end gain nothing
but evil ; for such a course would make you
sly, artful, and false, and neither you nor I
can tell where it would end.”

“ How well you remember what Mr. Daw-
son said !” answered Liph, “ now I had for-
gotten every word about it ; but you are
right, I know, and I wish I could be so good
and sober. It is such fun to plague Mr.
Leonard though !”

Conversations like the foregoing were very
common in school this winter, and they were
not without a good tendency, for the influence
of Mr. Dawson’s precepts was not lost, and
there was a self-rectifying principle at work
in some minds, that communicated itself to
others, and if it could not reform, did much
to check the dangerous feelings and princi-
ples, that otherwise would have gained the
ascendency.



MOKE OF LIPH GREEN 8)

CHAPTER VIII.

MORE OF LIPH GREEN.

Tue ensuing summer, as Allen was older
and more trustworthy, he was allowed many
privileges that he had not before enjoyed ;
and he found that by laying out his work
regularly, and paying great regard to punctu-
ality and order, he could gain a great deal of
time for study. This time, as may well be
supposed, was not wasted. He now read a
great many books, particularly those recom-
mended by Mr. Dawson, with whom he still
kept up a correspondence, and whose hints
were invaluable. Robert May, much to the
expense of his sisters’ ribbons and laces, was
sent away to a seminary of learning, and
poor Liph Green, light as his spirit had ever
been, was well nigh sunken in troubles.
Close by the creek, or river’as it was usu-
ally designated, and nearly a quarter of a
mile from the road-side, was a pile of logs,
flung together something in the shape of a
house, with a little enclosure on one side,
bounded by a zigzag fence, closely resem-
P



82 ALLEN LUCAS.

bling an old fashioned mammoth bow, round-
ing out from the crown of a bonnet. There
was but one window in the house, and that
had no glass in it, but was covered with a
white muslin cloth during the day, and
boarded up at night, if the weather was cold,
but if not, it was left open. The floor was
made of loose boards, that rattled at every step
in summer, but in winter they were carefully
corked with old rags. ‘The door was low and
narrow and everything about the premises
had such a diminutive appearance, that this
might have been mistaken for a residence
belonging to the famous Lilliputians. In the
enclosure before mentioned, were, at the
proper season for them, a few hills of beans,
a few more of potatoes, a little bed contain-
ing beets and carrots, then beyond these
some young cabbage plants, and mingling
here and there, might have been discovered
the whitish green leaves of the poppy, and
now and then a bursting bud arose or a crim-
son blossom flaunted in the morning sun, and
cast its honours to the earth at evening.
Close by the door, a thrifty bean vine had
been trained upward, till it had reached the
eaves, and on the other side was a cluster of



MORE OF LIPH GREEN, 83

hollyhocks ; and still further along, arose
some giant sunflowers, towering high, and
wagging their heads to every breeze, as if in
mockery of the seeming toys around them.
A little while before this rude dwelling-
place was constructed, a poor creature had
come to the Corners, witha baby in her arms,
and leading by the hand a little boy, who
clung to her side and hid his face in her
gown when strangers were near, but bounded
before her like a playful kitten, turning back
now and then to laugh and clap his hands in
the face of the baby, as soon as they were
out again in the free streets. She told a saa
story. She spoke of plenty and happiness
in a far-of land, of the restless spirit which
had made this seem not enough, then of a
dreary voyage across the seas to a goal that
to her unenlightened imagination was an
earthly paradise, of folding him who had
guided her thither in his shroud, and laying
him in a stranger’s grave, and then of an-
guish, followed by want and loneliness, by
sickness and anxiety, until the bitterness of
death was passed, and nothing but thoughts
of her children prevented her from lying
down beside her husband and ending her



84 ALLEN LUCAS.

sufferings there. But these kept the moth-
er’s heart from breaking, and she had toiled
along from door to door, bearing her infant
on her bosom, until at last she had penetrat-
ed into the heart of the country. She did
not beg for anything but work, and though
the people at the Corners were little aceus-
tomed to having their labour performed by
others, they could not resist the eloquence of
real sorrow, and poor Mrs. Green went from
house to house washing and ironing, and per-
forming many other services in which the
wives and daughters of the farmers were by
no means ashamed to join, But sometimes
she had nothing do, and then of necessity she
had nowhere to stay, so some kind-hearted
men of the neighbourhood concluded to roll
together some logs from the hills, and give
the stranger a home. The spot by the river's
side was selected because the materials might
be more easily conveyed thither, and as it
was much more picturesque than a place by
the dusty road, the poor widow gained in
tastefulness what she lost in convenience.
But once settled in her humble abode she
eared little for inconveniences, and soon her
cheerful temper triumphed over all her sor-



MORE OF LIPH GREEN &5

rows, and merry as the lark that she always
saw rise from his nest in the morning, she
caroled her songs all through the day, and
at night lay down beside her two children,
contented and happy. She did not suffer
from cold nor hunger, for the broken wood
from the neighbouring forests kept her fire
blazing brightly, and she earned enough by
her labour to obtain decent support for her-
self and children, The eldest of these chil-
dren, the fun-loving Liph Green, was old
enough to be useful in a variety of ways ;
and little Nannie in one, at least, for the
pretty lisper drew the neighbouring children
to the hut by the river-side, and their mirth
served to beguile its mistress of many a weari-
some hour. Thus passed almost two happy
years, happy enough to be envied by some of
the most favoured children of fortune, but
before the last was completed, there opened
upon the earth a beautiful spring ; the trees
budded, the birds came back to their old
haunts, and the strong winds died away into
gentle breezes, but these were all unnoticed
by poor Liph Green. Alas ! that childhood
should not be exempt from sorrows! Heavy
indeed must have been the burden that could



86 ALLEN LUCAS.

make a young heart unmindful of the beauti-
ful things of this bright earth, and benumb-
ing the influence that could quiet the pulses,
in which the tide, bursting from the foun-
tain of a joyous heart, coursed but too ra-
pidly.

Mrs. Green had gone out one warm spring
morning thinly clad, and before night, the
the sun was hidden, a slow, drizzling rain de-
scended, and the wind grew cold and piere-
ing, but she was unconscious of the change,
until made aware of it by the chill that made
her whole frame shiver, on emerging from
Mr. Smith’s heated kitchen. She, however,
hurried home as fast as possible, thinking all
the time of the blazing fire upon her humble
hearth ; but this time Liph had neglected his
duty, and not a fragment of the broken wood,
which he usually obtained from the adjoining
fields had been gathered. Covering his sleep-
ing sister with a rug, he had seated himself
on the hearth beside her, and was straining
his eyes over the few glowing embers, to
shape the arms of a miniature wind-mill,
with which he intended to astonish his mother
the next morning.

“ Aye you cold mother ?” he inquired as



MORE OF LIPH GREEN, g7

she crouched beside him on the hearth, anda
then, without waiting for an answer, he drew
the few coals together, and, crossing the pine
sticks upon which he had bestowed so much
Jabour, over them, he ran out the door, and
soon returned with a heavy armful of wood,
But the rain that had fallen, had made every-
thing too wet to burn; so poor Mrs. Green
was obliged to go to bed wet and cold, with
no unusual share of covering to atone for lack
of fire. In the morning when she attempted
to rise her flushed face and blood-shot eye
alarmed poor Liph, and when he saw her fall
across the foot of the bed, and laugh, and shriek,
and jabbar unintelligible things, and sing
wild snaches of songs, that he had never heard
her sing before, he took little Nannie in his
arms, and without daring to look behind him,
ran with all his might to the nearest dwell-
ing, screaming at every step, that his mother
was going to die, and he had killed her.
Mrs. Green was sick only two days, but dur-
ing that time she had the kindest of treat-
ment, and as much attention as the wealth-
iest in the neighbourhood could have com-
manded; for her cheerfulness, her good-hum-
our and faithfulness, had gained her many



88 ALLEN LUCAS.

friends, and even if it had not been so, this
was not a place where the poor were left to
suffer. But no care can stay the failing breath,
when the spirit has been called away, and
soon the mother of poor Liph Green was
stretched cold and still upon the bed, with
her icy hands folded on her breast, her white
lips moveless, and her eyelids pressed down
by weights under the glazed lid beneath.
Little Nannie clambered up by the old chair
that stood beside the bed, to kiss her, and
went whimpering away because her kiss was
not returned ; and the passionate Liph, be-
side himself with grief, sobbed and shrieked
aloud, telling every one that spoke to him, it
was his own work, he had done it all. Liph
Green never thought of his own fate, or little
Nannie’s, when he saw his mother laid in the
grave, and all that night and the succeeding
day, some one of the kind neighbours staid at
the hut and took care of them, but finally,
they began to talk of removing the children,
and spoke to each other in whispers, of which
poor Liph could only guess the meaning.
He soon, however, found that they talked of
removing him and his little sister to the
county poor-house, and he told them he



MORE OF LIPH GREEN. 89

would not go, he would not be shut up in
that dreary building, when he could work
for his bread, and he would go hungry and
cold, and take his earnings to support, little
Nannie, before he would part from her ; at
any rate, he would try, and if he failed, they
would starve together. Allen Lucas encour-
aged Liph in this determination, and went
all over the neighbourhood in search of some-
body to take charge of the helpless little one,
who laughed and prattled, all unconscious of
her lot, It was towards evening that the
two boys, each holding a hand of Nannie,
yentured to stop under the trees that shaded
the door of Mr. Moreton, an English gentle-
man, who had within a few weeks purchased
the corner farm opposite Mr. Smith’s. They
knew little of Mr. Moreton, except the name
and the few other unimportant particulars
that country neighbours will always glean ;
but they had seen no little children on the
premises, and so concluded that he could not
make the objection urged by others to receiv-
ing poor Nannie. W hile they were hesitating
whether to make the application, they were
accosted by a fine, intelligent looking man,
and Liph entered at once upon his sad story,



90 ALLEN LUCAS.

He spoke with the simple pathos of true feel -
ing while the unconscious Nannie put out her
dimpled hands to catch the tears that rolled
from his cheek, or played with the crape
about her own neck, and, before he had finish-
ed, the gentleman had drawn nearer, and
placed his hand upon her curly head, holding
with the other the head of his cane for her
inspection. It needed only a few words from
Allen Lucas to make Liph’s account intelli-
gible, and Mr. Moreton, who seemed to feel
a deep interest in the orphans, perhaps more
so for being their countryman, promised Liph
that while he made himself useful, neither of
them should want a home. Oh how grateful
was poor Liph Green for such a promise !
and how he hugged little Nannie, and laugh-
ed and wept at the same moment, and talked
of his mother and of the poor-house, and then
threw up his arms and boasted of his strength,
and declared he would work as long as he
lived, for whoever took care of Nannie. The
family of Mr. Moreton consisted only of him-
self, his wife, and a widowed sister, and so
the pretty child was a welcome inmate, and
would have been spoiled by the two ladies,
if she had not possessed that happy elasticity



MORD OF LIPH GREEN, OL

of temperament, that makes all dangerous
influences rebound perfectly harmless. As
for Liph, he could not carry a clouded heart
in the midst of so much sunshine ; so though
he went often to his mother’s grave and wept
over it, yet he was usually as joyous as ever,
and often made the walls of the farm-house
ying with his merry shout. Allen Lucas
loved Liph Green as a brother, and went
often to his new home to see him, and Liph
told so much of the wondrous knowledge of
his young friend, and Allen was always so
modest and sensible, that Mr. Moreton re-
garded him with no small degree of interest,
and often joined in the discussions of the two
boys for the mere purpose of drawing out
his talents. He soon discovered the bent of
Allen’s mind, and brought him books from
his own library, the contents of which were
eagerly devoured ; and after awhile, the li-
brary door was thrown open, and Allen pass-
ed in and out, as though it had been his own.
Mr. Moreton’s library contained a choice
selection of books, and Allen, after touching
upon a few lighter things, turned to the Eng-
lish classics, and entered at once upon a new
and a glorious field. By slow degrees, lis



92 ALLEN LUCAS.

mind had been prepared for just such works
as these, and it is no strange thing, if the
plough and hoe were a very little neglected,
and the pillow sometimes untouched, as his
whole soul was absorbed in his new pursuits.
But after awhile he received a letter from
Mr. Dawson, warning him against the state
of feverish excitement which his mind be-
trayed, and with a strong effort, he calmed
himself, read less and thought more, and
finally became as orderly and industrious as
he had ever been. The winter following,
Allen Lucas did not attend school, for he
found that he could learn more in Mr. More-
ton’s library ; and as that gentleman had dis-
covered Liph Green’s peculiarities, he was
glad of the opportunity thus offered to carry
on his education without exposing him to
temptation. At first Allen overlooked Liph’s
lessons, and studied with him, but every day
he became more and more interested in his
task, and before another spring, he was duly
installed in the office of private tutor to his
heedless friend, and little Nannie.



CMOOSING A VOCATION. 93

CHAPTER IX.

CHOOSING A VOCATION.

“Seventeen years old to-day!” said Allen
Lucas, as he seated himself on a large stone,
half embedded in the thick golden moss, and
the other half extending out into the water.
For nearly three years he had spent most of
his time in Mr. Moreton’s family, devoting
only the early morning to labour on his fa-
ther’s farm, and an hour each evening to the
instruction of his little brothers, but now,
Liph was to throw aside the books which he
did not love, and Nannie was old enough to
require other teachers. Allen sat for a long
time, resting his forehead on his folded hands,
then breaking a fragment from the stone, he
threw it into the stream, and gazed intently
on the bubbles that rose to the surface and
disappeared.” “ Very like, very like !” he
muttered, rising with a half impatient ges-
ture, then’slowly shaking his head and com-
pressing his lips, he stood gazing down upon
the waters, as they glided smoothly over the
white sand, or leaped, and foamed, and spar-



9-4 ALLEN LUCAS.

kled in miniature anger, when they met with
an obstruction. “ Seventeen years !” he re-
peated musingly, “and in seventeen more I
shall be a man, my character formed, my
habits fixed, my destiny in this world de-
cided—a busy man in this busy world ! in-
dependent of control or guidance, doing what-
ever I list, and answerable for everything.
Thirty-four years | the very meridian of life,
the time when men most glory in their
strength and power! as many more years
will bring me to this, or—” Allen’s tongue
faltered with the alternative, but his eye
wandered across the adjoining field to a green
spot of earth newly encircled by its simple
white fence, and already pillowing two or
three who but a year since walked forth
among the living. The face of the youth
grew solemn, but not sad, as his thoughts
took a different course, and dwelt for a mo-
ment on his own dissolution. But the being
whose foot is just pressing upon the verge
of proud manhood, whose every pulse bounds
with a consciousness of strength, and whose
veins thrill with the rushing of the red
life-current within, can not long listen to
thoughts of death and the grave ; he snows,



CHOOSING A VOCATION, 95

but he can not feel, that the strong arm and
the true foot will ere long fail him, and that
the thoughts and feelings, which raise him
above the other living things he sees around,
will go away, and leave the form in which
he nowglories, less than the idiot, less than the
reptile crawling at his foot, in no wise supe-
rior to the coffin which contains it, and the
mould with which it shortly mingles. Allen’s
eye rested for a moment upon the humble
church-yard, and his thoughts upon the
grave, and his own dissolution, but it was
only for a moment, and he again repeated,
“a man ! a busy man!—ay, I will be a
busy and a useful one.”

So wrapt had the youth been in his mus-
ings that he did not hear a quiet step, nor
know that any one was near, until a light
hand was laid upon his shoulder, and a voice
low and melodious, but strangely cold, said,
“T have been at your house looking for you
—whete have you been hiding all day ?”
The speaker was a tall stripling, with a
frame very unlike the muscular one beside
him, a step light and undecided, a small,
white hand, and stooping shoulders. Ilis
face, but for its extreme pallor, would have



96 ALLEN LUCAS.

been handsome; his forehead was broad
and already marked with scarce perceptible
lines that a few years would in all proba-
bility cut into deep wrinkles, his eyes were
deep-set, bright, black, and piercing, his
mouth small and feminine, and his thin lips,
when not speaking, were always drawn close
together with an expression particularly un-
inviting.

“T have been very idle to-day,” was Allen’s
reply, as he again seated himself upon the
stone. Come sit down, Robert, and I will tell
you what I have been thinking about. A
fine seat this, and handsomely cushioned,” he
added, pressing his hand on the soft moss.

“J suppose you have been thinking of the
one grand subject,” said Robert May; “it
wouldn’t require a magician to read either of
our thoughts at present.”

-+ “Do you know that this is my birth-
day ?’ asked Allen.

“ No, [leave such matters to Aunt Biddy,”
said Robert, sneeringly.

“ But our ages are so near the same that
we can always tell each other’s by our own
—three weeks ago yesterday, you were se-
venteen.”



CHOOSING A VOCATION. 97

“ Shall you be ready to enter college with
me ?” asked Robert impatiently.

“Then you have decided on going ?”

“Yes, that was a settled point long ago,
but I have been fretted to death in making
the arrangements—no books, no money, no
nothing. I declare it makes me angry when
I see rich people wasting their thousands—
what under the sun is Mr. Moreton to do
with that Liph Green ?”

“Liph is a pretty good scholar for such
a happy, don’t-care sort of a fellow as he
is, but he lacks application, and Mr. More-
ton thinks it is best to cast him on his
own resources for a while. He has pur-
chased a large tract of western land, and
Liph is to earn his title to it by cultivat-
ing it.”

“ Qultivating land! but no matter, it will
be all one to him. Cobbler or statesman—~
he never would know the difference.”

“You do Liph injustice,” said Allen, warm-
ly, “he Jacks strength and stability of cha-
racter, but he has correct views of life—at
least Mr. Moreton thinks so—and there is so
much romance in his disposition, that he will
always move in a sunny little world of his

a



98 ALLEN LUCAS.

own, and find beauty in what to others is
stale and common-place.”

“Very likely,” said Robert, sarcastically,
“and for that reason, I would advise him to
be acobbler. He could sing at his stall all
day long, happy as cobblers always are, and
make himself very useful too, undoubtedly.”

“Par more useful than those who despise
him !” said Allen indignantly.

Robert was about to retort, when there
came a short, musical laugh, from the wild
cherry-tree above their heads, the leaves
rustled, and a shower of white blossoms
descended upon the ground and stream, and
then an agile figure came swinging down
upon one of the branches, and dropped him-
self at Allen’s feet. Both of the conversa-
tionists were startled a little by the unex-
expected vision, both attempted to speak,
stammered, coloured, and were silent.

“Qh, go on,” said the new comer, “ don’t
let me interrupt any sport—pick up the
glove, Bob. Ha, ha! an interesting subject
for young gentlemen to fall out and quarrel
about.”

“Not a very important one, Liph, to be
sure,” said Allen Lucas, smiling, and laying



Full Text


The Baldwin Library





HOME LIBRARY
OF TALES FOR THE YOUNG



ALLEN LUCAS.

~
sg Wome Library of Tales for the Noung, |



ALLEN LUCAS;

OR,

YOUTHFUL DECISION.



BY

(MRS, E. 6. JUDSON.)



London:
THOMAS NELSON, PATERNOSTER ROW;
AND EDINBURGH,





)
|
|
PANNY FORESTER, |
|


« gains 8

29. oy. gk


CONTENTS,



Chap. Page
1, The Corners, ose eee eee ove 7

Il. The New Teacher, «+ ove eee ub
IIL The Eagle Aroused, ons eee ee
IV. Beginning Anew, nee oon on 39
V. Mr. Dawson's Pupils, eos eee ose 43
VIL. Mr, Dawson's Last Story, ove eee 55
VII. Summer Study, and the next Winter School, 67
VILL. More of Liph Green, - oo 81
IX. Choosing a Vocation, po one > ae
X. Lizzy Parker and her friend Nannie, ... 112
XI The Select School, ove ao ‘wo —
XII. Commonplace Incidents, ove eee 133
XIII. Disappointments the Portion of All, «

XV. A Scene at the Capital, ove an 136


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PN ee oe late




ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER 1.
THE CORNERS.

Axsour two miles from the little village of
Smithville, the turnpike is crossed by a road
not much travelled, but of sufficient import-
ance to give that district the name of the
Corners. Upon two of the four corners, fine
farm-houses are situated, and far beyond,
stretch fields of waving grain and meadows
of tall, rich grass, or the still richer clover,
the perfume of which can not be surpassed
by the rarest green-house exotic.

The turnpike leads along to other farm-
houses of rather humbler pretensions than
those on the Corners, and now and then
scattered among them, are little, low build-
ings, seemingly of dimensions too contracted
to accommodate more than one individual,
but literally swarming with the white-
headed, bare-footed inhabitants, all uncon-
8 ALLEN LUCAS.

scious of needing room. As we proceed
onward, we shall find the turnpike tra-
versed by a little stream, over which is
thrown a log bridge, for the superabundance
of timber furnished by the hills beyond,
bristling with evergreens, interspersed with
other trees bending gracefully beneath their
wealth of summer foliage, makes the people
cling to the extravagant economy of their fa-
thers, and save the trouble of sawing, at the
expense of the valuable material. Here we
shall find the impression made by bare feet
upon the sand, on each side of the creek,
and very likely we may see a half-dozen
boys, their linen trowsers rolled up to the
knee, wading about in the clear water, quite
as happy as the sleeping cow, standing so
quietly in the stream below, that you very
seldom can catch a tinkle of the bell hung
to her neck. Farther down the stream,
grow the ash, and elm, with some birch
trees almost stripped of the bark by the
fore-mentioned knights of the linen trow-
sers, and a few tall maples on each side
lean towards each other, almost interlac-
ing their branches, and casting an ever-
quivering shadow upon the waters below,
THE CORNERS. 9

which here grow broader and deeper, and
move quietly and lingeringly, as if in love
with the cool breezes wakened by the fan-
ning of the foliage. Nestled down in one
corner of a wood a few rods from this creek,
is the district school-house, with its large
uncurtained windows, and one small door
opening under a wood-house, which in win-
ter receives the drifting snow, and in sum-
mer cradles many a troublesome insect.
This school-house has been built for a great
many years, and is not so comfortable as
some of more modern date, but it has never-
theless been the nursery of talent and use-
fulness, as well as the scene of many an idle
freak of childish fancy, or the still more
idle plans and speculations of the book-
hater.

Upon that seat, far in the corner, once
sat Allen Lucas, and I believe those very
notches in the desk were made by his knife,
as he lolled upon his seat and wondered over
and over again if noon would ever come.
Allen Lucas was not the son of a poor
widow, who “had once seen better days,”
nor had he any of the other claims upon our
smypathy advanced by most heroes of story ;
10 ALLEN LUCAS.

he was only the third son of Reuben Lucas,
a plain, honest, simple farmer, who, by being
always watchful and industrious, contrived
at the end of the year to balance accounts,
without saving a penny. It made no differ-
ence with Mr. Lucas whether his crops were
plentiful or otherwise, whether ill luck or
good attended him in his family ; increased
expenditures never made him poorer, nor
an increased income richer. In truth, Mr.
Lucas was, “an easy well-to-do man,” who
cared only to be free from debt, with plenty
to eat and drink, and his expenses were
entirely regulated by his income without
a thought of the “rainy day” ahead. His
wife managed a small dairy, and sold butter
and cheese enough to keep herself and daugh-
ters in fineries, but this was so exclusively
pin-money, that it was never devoted to
anything but fineries. In short, Mr. Lucas
was only a farmer in a very small way, and
not considered a rich man even in his own
little neighbourhood, but his family lived
very comfortably, and were not accustomed
to deny themselves anything which hap-
pened to fall within the circle of their hum-
ble desires.
THE CORNERS, 11

Allen Lucas had few peculiarities, and
although he was usually considered a “ bright
boy,” evinced no superiority to the rest of
the family. He was somewhat taller and
stouter than boys of twelve generally are,
with broad shoulders and muscular limbs,
and on this he prided himself not a little:
then, he could wield the ball-club, skate,
run, leap, and wrestle as well as any of his
companions, and though not always at the
head of his class, he was very seldom, if ever,
at the foot. He had studied arithmetic for
three years, but never got beyond reduc-
tion, his success in geography was more
creditable to his talent, but grammar was
his detestation, and never would have been
attempted, but for the pleasure of attending
the evening grammar school. Allen was
generally very well liked by his teachers
and companions, for he carried a cheerful,
good-humoured countenance, and was not
what is generally considered a rebellious or
very lazy scholar. ‘True, his sister Mary,
though two years his junior, often excelled
him, but Mary had always been considered
a very bright little girl, and it was no un-
usual thing for the oldest members of the
12 ALLEN LUCAS,

school to yield to her. In spelling contests,
Mary Lucas was generally the victor, and
she was as familiar with every line of her
well-thumbed geography, as with the simple
furniture of her mother’s kitchen. Every-
body expected great things of Mary, but
they did not expect them of her brother
Allen, and so he passed on, envied by many
a dull boy who was obliged to labour for the
little he learned, often commended for the
good lessons which had cost him scarce
fifteen minutes’ study, and very seldom
censured. Allen never dreamed of anything
more than getting decently through with
the forms of the day, the final object to be
gained never once entered his mind, and
though his teachers often talked of the ad-
vantages of education, and the importance of
mental culture, this was all like Greek to him,
and he considered it the most favourable
time for planning some piece of amusement
to be broached to his comrades after school,
Such was Allen Lucas at the age of twelve,
and such he seemed likely to be for years
to come, a harmless, not particularly dull,
but very common-place character, Of what
he was capable no one knew, himself least
THE CORNERS. 13

of all, for he had never imagined himself
under any obligation to exert his powers
only when and where he liked. Allen had
never been told that his superior quickness,
instead of furnishing him with an excuse for
indolence, only rendered an indulgence in
it more criminal, and he would have thought
it the height of injustice to require more of
him than of others.

The school at the Corners had generally
been furnished with teachers, if not of the
first order, who at least enjoyed some repu-
tation, but they had been contented to pur-
sue the usual routine, measuring their duty
by what was expected of them, rather than
by what it was in their power to perform.
The teacher, who merely fulfills his con-
tract, may not suffer the upbraidings of
conscience for not doing more, and his sa-
lary is his reward. It is all he deserves.
But O how much richer the reward of him
who seeks a higher object, who labours to
accomplish what none but a teacher can
accomplish. When the man, who to-day
stands with a group of listening boys around
him, and marks the flushed cheek, the glis-
tening eye and the swelling bosom, has
o-

14 ALLEN LUCAS.

grown old, when the warm blood which
now animates his frame and makes his
tongue eloquent has become sluggish, when
his eye grows dim, his hand tremulous, and
he feels that he must soon lie down and
teach his last, great lesson, this will be far
from being the least pleasing of the remem-
brances that cluster around the heart, to
soothe him whose grave lies between him
and his only future. Then, when he looks
upon the glorious fruit, though the dew
of the last life-breath were freezing upon
his lip, and his heart were subsiding into
its last stillness, a delicious thrill must needs
be awakened by the thought, “the seed was
of my own hand’s planting.” To look around
upon a happy community, made happier by
the influence of the virtuous and gifted who
cement and make it strong ; to see the phi-
lanthropist employed in disseminating noble
principles, enlightening heavy hearts, and
elevating debased spirits, and be able to look
back upon the time when his intellect and
heart received the first impulse, and remem-
ber with how much difficulty his nature was
moulded ; even to mark the manly struggles
of the victim of misfortune, the self-sustain-
THE NEW TEACHER. 15

ing power which prevents his becoming a
vagabond, and remember that but for days
and days of unwearied effort, that man would
have been weak and helpless, is a priceless
reward which but one class of the many
devoted to doing good, can claim. It is of
more worth than all the yellow dust that
ever glittered before human eye, and ex-
haustless, because the sunshine that it casts
about the heart now, is only the shadow
of the treasure which is laid up in heaven.
Above all others, does the teacher need a
clean heart and active hand, but if that heart
be cold, or if but one finger of that hand pre-
fer self-service, let its owner stand aside, for
he is all unfitted for the holy work.

CHAPTER II.

THE NEW TEACHER.

Auten Lucas was in his twelfth year when
Mr. Thorn, who had taught the Oorners
school for several winters, and gained a
little purse thereby, concluded that engag-
ing in business at Smithville would be more
16 ALLEN LUCAS.

profitable, and therefore a new teacher was
engaged in his stead. Mr. Thorn was a
great favourite, and so his successor was
naturally enough regarded with suspicion,
and when he ventured to engraft a few
improvements upon the old tread-mill sys-
tem, he was met on every hand by the most
strenuous opposition. Mr, Dawson was a
thorough scholar, and had been self-edu-
cated: thus he knew how much the human
mind is capable of accomplishing by its
own unassisted efforts, and he felt more
anxiety to arouse the dormant faculties of
his pupils, than to urge them forward in
their studies. He wished to fit them for
action, at least sufficient for them to appre-
ciate in some degree the labour before them,
lest the labour should be but ill-performed.
The accomplishment of this purpose requir-
ed such a thorough revolution, that many
persons, among whom Mr. Lucas was not
the least formidable, regarded him with a
suspicious eye. If Mr. Dawson had been a
selfish man, he would not have mortified
the pride of Mary Lucas by making her
conscious that all her attainments were
mere parrotry, nor would he have incurred
THE NEW TEACHER. 17

the hatred of John Smith, whose father
owned the largest, if not the best improved
Corners farm, by putting him in a class
more suited to his actual attainments than
his years. Selfishness would have induced
an opposite course, but Mr. Dawson felt an
unfeigned interest in his work. Still Allen
Lucas lolled upon his desk, and watched the
shadow in the window and wondered if noon
would ever come, but he did not slide along so
easily as formerly, for his face often burned
beneath the glances of a reproving eye, and his
lessons failed to elicit one word of praise. After
a few weeks Allen began to dislike Mr. Daw-
son, and Mary was decided in pronouncing
him a “poor teacher,” proving her position,
by asserting that she did not know half so
much as when she attended Mr. Thorn’s
school. Still Mr. Dawson went on as if
unconscious of the petty storm about his
ears, and soon the suspicions of people were
laid, and their prejudices wore away, for
they found their children animated by a
new spirit, and were not long in discover-
ing that a richer vein was perceptible in the
young intellect than had before been touched.
Mr. Dawson had gone below the mere me-
B
18 ALLEN LUCAS.

chanical, and had put in operation the reason-
ing faculties. He had taught his pupils to
think, and they could not fail to remember.
Among those least benefited by this state of
things were Allen and Mary Lucas, for while
the former could skim over the surface and
avoid absolute disgrace, he was contented,
and Mary was too indignant at the thought
of relinquishing the honours she had worn
so long, and too anxious to mask her defi-
ciencies under a show of words, to set about
actual improvement. Mary supposed words
to be the actual substance, rather than the
vehicle for its exhibition; the mystery of
meaning beneath was to her an idle tale,
and she was positive that knowing anything
“by heart” was quite sufficient for all rea-
sonable purposes. Allen, however, did im-
prove a little, at least in outward seeming,
but it was only sufficient to escape the
charge of dullness, and maintain his former
standing in the school.

Mr. Dawson was very fond of visiting the
different families at the Corners, becoming
acquainted with the ordinary occupations of
the children, and mingling in their sports ;
thus, his influence was everywhere felt, and
THE NEW TEACHER. 19

he became familiar with the workings of
their hearts. His own feelings were yet
green within his bosom, and he did not affect
that coldness and distance of manner, nor
that indifference to innocent amusements,
which often passes for dignity, and rears
itself as the most formidable barrier to
improvement of any kind. He who loves
his fellow-men will sympathize in that
which interests them, however trivial, and
sympathy is the right hand of the philan-
thropist. One day, after skating for half an
hour upon the smooth surface of the mill-
pond, far up the creek, and getting up a
snow-balling party on the way back to the
school-house, for the sake of giving the little
fellows, who had been mere lookers-on, their
share of sport, Mr. Dawson sat down by his
desk, and, as usual on such occasions, his
pupils, one by one, gathered around him,
until not a loiterer remained without. Even
Allen Lucas was in this group, for Mr. Daw-
son’s stories were more interesting to him
than his books, and when he had become
animated by exercise, he always told his
very best.

“T shall not tell you a story to-day,” said
20 ALLEN LUCAS.

the school-master, and as he spoke there was
an expression of quiet humour, which his
pupils had at first mistaken for ill-nature,
or “something bad,” they could hardly
tell what, lurking in his fine, black eyes,
and playing about the corners of his
mouth.

“No story!” “no story!” repeated the
younger scholars, in tones of disappointment,
until the outer one being far enough off to
venture on such a remark, whispered, “I
think it’s too bad.” By what process of
reasoning it was decided to be too bad that
Mr. Dawson should withhold a gratification
he was by no means bound to grant, I cannot
say, so I will leave the matter to those
school-boys, who, from imagining that they
cannot do too little, come to the very natural
conclusion that their teachers cannot do too
much, and never dream of being grateful for
the most self-sacrificing favours. The older
scholars, however, knew Mr. Dawson too well
to believe that he would disappoint them, so
they winked knowingly at each other, and
remained silent.

“T will give you a fable,” resumed Mr.
Dawson, “ which, although it may not be so
THE NEW TEACHER. 21

interesting as our Indian story, may afford
some amusement.”

“A fable! why, that is a story, Mr. Daw-
son.”

“ Right, Liph,—now can you tell me how
it differs from the stories I have told you
before ?”

“Why, fables are big stories.”

“They are wrong stories,” said little Abby
Stillman.

«“ They are fish stories,” added Liph.

“No, animal stories,” said Julia May,
« for Adsop’s fables are all about wolves and
lambs, and foxes, and other animals. Fables
are stories that are not true.”

« Aye all stories that are not true, fables?”
inquired Mr. Dawson.

“No, sir, not the kind of fable that you
mean,” said Allen Lucas.

“ All stories that are not true, of course
may in one sense be considered fables,” said
a soft voice in low, measured tones, “but a
true fable always conveys a hidden moral.”

Mr. Dawson smiled on the speaker, one of
the boys whispered, “ Robert May thinks he
knows everything,” and the circle drew
closer together, and stood and sat in the atti-
22 ALLEN LUCAS.

tude of listeners. “I must forewarn you,”
said Mr. Dawson, “to look out for the moral,
for I shall leave the application to you.”
The boys looked at each other as though a
very little alarmed, for Mr. Dawson had his
own way of pointing out faults, and not an
individual who was conscious of doing wrong,
felt for a moment safe. Nor did his smiling
lip reassure them, for unless the fault were
of that class which requires a solemn and
pointed rebuke, he always wore that same
expression, as if utterly unconscious that
some poor offender was wincing beneath his
seeming playful touches, and choking in the
vain attempt to swallow his own blushes.
Mr. Dawson, however, did not seem to ob-
serve the looks of his auditors, but proceeded
with his fable.

“Down by a river’s side, a careful goose
had made her nest among the sedges and
ferns, and there, one sunny day in spring, she
left her helpless family in their bright yel-
low livery, and went away in search of food.
On her return she found a stranger nestled
among her little ones, which were all stretch-
ing out their long necks towards him, and
joining their shrill voices in a concert of
THE NEW TEACHER. 23

sounds that nothing not belonging to the
goose family ever conjured up. As soon as
the mother goose had an opportunity for
making observations, she found this stranger
had wings and a head and feet not altogether
unlike her own offspring, and was clothed in
a natural coat of feathers, which proved him,
beyond the shadow of a doubt, to belong to
the extensive race of birds, To be sure his
feathers were of an ugly gray, his beak was
hooked suspiciously, instead of extending
forward flat and honest, like the bills of her
own little ones, and his toes were divided
and furnished with long claws, instead of
being connected by that beautiful, fan-like
web, which would enable him to paddle
across the water, like a living fairy-boat.
Mrs. Goose did not at all like her visitor,
and she at once extended her curved neck in
a very snake-like manner, and hissed alto-
gether too powerfully for a snake, but just as
she was on the point of proceeding to ex-
tremities, she discovered that the poor
stranger, which was yet a nestling, had met
with some misfortune by which he had been
badly bruised, and in consequence was utterly
unable to move. Now the goose, notwith-
24 ALLEN LUCAS.

standing her noisy, bustling way, is really a
benevolent bird, and so she took the stranger
under her own wing, and fed him with her
own food, and made him so comfortable that
he felt quite at home in the family.

“The gray eaglet, when the eyry was bro-
ken up in which he had been lodged, was too
young to remember anything about it, and
not being at all aware that his destination
was the sky, he wandered around among the
green sedges, and through the tall meadow
grass, with his companions, trying his wing
only when he came to the clear stream on
which they floated, and then he would hover
about them, until they stepped upon the
sand, and were ready for another excursion.
True, when the fern was unusually tangled,
and his pathway became laborious, he would
show the admiring and curious goslings how
much more easily he could accomplish a short
journey than they, but otherwise he seemed
to be perfectly contented by equaling them.
The young eagle did not know what it was
to fly away in the pure, blue sky, as free as
the cloud that floated above his head, and
there was nothing to induce him to make the
attempt, so in time his nature became tame,
THE NEW TEACHER, 25

and he loved to crouch in the barn-yard, and
listen to the clamours of silly geese, and, al-
though conscious of being less earthly than
they, he had too long been accustomed to
groveling things, to feel that his natural
superiority only rendered his position the
more degrading. One day, after the eagle
had attained his growth, and become very
goose-like in his nature, as he was digging in
in the mud for worms, he was startled by
the whiz of a wing above his head, and, on
looking up, he discovered a bird above him,
so like himself, that he was obliged to look
back upon the ground to become assured that
it was not the reflection of his own form, as
he had often seen it on the water. Again he
looked at the bird, which wheeled and circled
above him for a moment, and then, as if dis-
daining such a near approach to earth, spreac
out his wings and mounted upward—up, up,
clear away—plunging into the liquid ether,
until he became a mere speck upon the blaz-
ing sun. Again he came a little nearer earth,
waved his wing in wild triumph, and went
careering through the air, now lost behind a
dark cloud that was hovering on the verge of
the horizon, and now far away in an opposite
26 ALLEN LUCAS.

direction, basking in the burning sun-beam,
and seemingly tossing the drifted clouds like
snow-wreaths on his wings. The eye of the
poor eagle kindled at the sight, and he felt
every feather bristle, and every muscle stretch
itself to its utmost tension, as he watched the
gyrations of the noble bird, and when at last
he saw him hovering over a wild, craggy
height, and then plunging into its bosom, as
though its darkest recesses were all familiar,
ne started, like a man awakened from a long,
night-mare dream. With a scream of joy he
expanded his wings and rose upward for a
little, but as a puff of wind came past him,
he veered from his course, and was nigh los-
ing his self-command ; making a strong effort,
however, he preserved his balance, fluttered
his wings again, struggled with another cur-
rent of air, then sank back to earth exhaust-
ed, and hid his head under his useless wing.
Poor bird ! he had been content to fold his
pinion, because his associates did not fly,
and now it was too weak to bear him up, and
though his eagle nature was so awakened that
he loathed the earth, and longed to track out
his way among the clouds, he knew that he was
doomed to crawl about likeacreeping reptile.”
THE NEW TEACHER. 27

“TJ should think that he might have
learned to fly yet,” interrupted one of the
listeners.

“Perhaps he might,” said Mr. Dawson ;
“being a young bird, very likely he might.”

“But an eagle could'nt be so kept down,”
said another ; “ you could’nt tame an eagle
and make such a goose of him.”

“Ts man then inferior to a bird ?” said Mr,
Dawson, with one of his peculiar smiles, “that
his high spirit can be kept down, his aspira-
tions tamed, his whole nature degraded, and
he made the slave of circumstances ?”

The boys too, smiled, and glances of intel-
ligence were exchanged among them, but as
Mr. Dawson said no more, they dropped
away to their seats, one by one, and soon the
ringing of the bell announced the arrival of
the school- hour,
28 ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER III.

THE EAGLE AROUSED,

Brrore the bell had ceased ringing, Allen
Lucas was at his usual seat in the corner, but
his books were untouched, and he sat, tracing
one after another parallel lines on his slate,
as though his life had depended on bringing
the art to perfection. Slowly the lines were
drawn, and if they curved or crooked in the
least degree, as slowly obliterated, while one
class, and then another, and another went
through with their usual exercises, and sat
down to their respective duties. The hour
for the afternoon recess came, and still Allen
Lucas was working away as industriously as
ever. The noise made by his companions as
they went out, partially aroused him, and he
allowed the pencil to slide from his fingers,
and then his head drooped, and he sat in a
posture of deep musing until they returned.

“You are getting quite too goose-like,”
whispered a lively little fellow, making a very
unsuccessful effort to stumble over his feet,
which were by no means in the way. Al-
THE EAGLE AROUSED. 29

len’s face coloured, but no smile came to an-
swer the quizzical grin of the boy, and he
again had recourse to the slate. The next
moment Mr, Dawson passed.

“T have no lesson, sir,” said Allen, with-
out waiting to be questioned, and as if deter-
mined to cut short the business of conversa-
tion as much as possible. Mr. Dawson smiled,
and leaning over the desk so as not to be
heard, remarked cheerfully, “ You at least
are not too old to learn to fly.” Again the
red blood mounted to Allen’s temples, and
he leaned his head forward until it rested on
the desk, while his thoughts came tumbling
on, one after another, disconnected and al-
most unintelligible even to himself. “I could
learn, yes, I know I could—a school-master
—no, I hate school-masters—doctor—pah !
Lawyers are all alike—all a pack of rascals,
so I’ve heard uncle Pete say—no, no, I
wouldn’t be a lawyer, and as for standing
behind a counter all day as poor Jack Dean
has to do, and grow pale and hump-backed—
dear me! I should tear those flimsy things
all to pieces. Then what’s the use !—far-
mers don’t want learning. A farm like
*Squire Smith’s, level as the floor, and not a
30 ALLEN LUCAS.

stone nor a bush—but ‘Squire Smith isn’t
anybody—great, cross—John ’ll get the
farm, but I wouldn’t be John Smith, that I
wouldn’t—just like one of our oxen. I'll go
out west, I’ll clear the land—I’ll—I’ll—yes,
just like the oxen; trudge, trudge, all day
long, thinking of nothing but work, work—
then supper and bed—provender and stable
—eat, drink, and sleep, that’s all—I don’t
care about being an ox. But what’s the use
of learning? I wonder what wise people
think about—I can learn, and if I can I
ought, may be—at any rate Mr. Dawson
thinks so, but I don’t care for that. I can
—yes, I can, and why should’nt I? I can
beat all the boys at ball, and I should be a
fool to throw like a girl—yes, I'll show them
what I can do, I'll go at it like Robert May
—to think of Bob May’s beating me, and he
never skated a rod in his life! I'll show
them !” and Allen threw back his head, and
his eye sparkled, and his cheek glowed with
a new and strange excitement, but how long
he might have gloried in his untried powers
can never be known, for just then a reading-
class was called, and he was obliged to join
in the exercise. Never did Allen Lucas
THE EAGLE AROUSED. al

make such blunders in reading before, never
did the boys laugh so heartily at mistakes,
for they sounded doubly grotesque from such
a source, and never were Mr. Dawson’s black
eyes so very brightly black, and the curl at
the corners of his mouth such a very decided
curl ; but above all, never, not even when
telling his best stories, was his voice more
entirely free from the severity of the school-
master than on this occasion. That day the
reading lesson was somehow very short, and
the class dismissed much sooner than usual,
and it so happened that Allen Lucas had all
the afternoon to make marks on his slate if
he had chosen that very simple mode of
spending time. But he did not choose it,
neither did he sit down to ruminate to little
or no purpose, but, picking up his arithmetic,
he turned to the very dry, comprehensive,
and I shall have all schoolboys on my side
of the question when I say incomprehensible
rule, heading the examples for practice in
reduction, and endeavoured to fix his atten-
tion upon it. Now everybody acquainted
with the book in question, the only system
of arithmetic used in common schools some
thirty years ago, knows that these rules, so
38 ALLEN LUCAS.

far from explaining the principles of the
science, seem placed there for the express
purpose of being explained by them, and
after the young student had managed by
his teacher’s aid, to get through with the
examples for practice, if he could discover
any connection between these and the rule,
or could discover that the latter had the least
bearing on the former, the credit was un-
doubtedly to be given to his organ of associ-
ation. As for Allen Lucas, he had never got
so far as that, though he had probably rattled
off the words of the rule as fast as his very
brisk tongue could move, more than a hun-
dred times. But why reduction ascending and
reduction descending required different pro-
cesses, was a question he would have con-
sidered utterly preposterous, for, had’nt he
tried the sums ? and did’t division bring the
answer when multiplication wouldn’t? To
be sure, his father, who had never studied
arithmetic, and knew nothing of figures, but
what he had picked up in the transaction of
his very circumscribed business, often puzzled
him with hard questions, but he considered
that there was a difference between book-
knowledge, and the knowledge gained by
THE EAGLE AROUSED. 33

trading off beef and corn, and concluded that
notwithstanding these puzzlers, he must
know a great deal more than his father. As
for the rules before-mentioned, his teachers
had always told him they were of no particu-
lar practical importance, which he inter-
preted, of no use except to show how far he
had studied, and he was sure that as soon as
he “could do all the sums,” even if he wes
obliged to look into his older brother's copy-
book for assistance, he should be a perfect
arithmetician.

Mr. Dawson felt the disadvantage at which
he laboured for the want of simpler text-
books, but he had long ago learned how “ to
make do,” and he succeeded in making these
do more than some men have been able to
accomplish with the help of our very excel-
lent improvements. Discovering it to be
impossible, in the state in which he found
his school, to form a class of arithmeticians,
and give his explanations verbally, he de-
voted his evenings to committing them to
paper, and each pupil was furnished with a
copy at the time of entering upon a new
rule, This simple plan saved much time,
which must otherwise have been devoted t

Cc
34 ALLEN LUCAS.

repetitions as innumerable as tiresome ; but
it was not allowed to take the place of those
verbal instructions, which add weight to the
best written rules. Allen Lucas, whose par-
tiality for reduction seemed to be directly in
the way of his advancement, had one of these
copies in his pocket, but, though it was
written in a round, fair hand, that nobody
but a schoolmaster could write, he had
failed to decipher it, and had expended on
excuse-making twice the amount of inge-
nuity and labour, that, otherwise directed,
would have sufficed to make him acquainted
with a whole system of arithmetic. In
truth, Allen had somehow gained an un-
accountable dislike for this little scrap of
paper, and so he sat puzzling his brain over
the words that were intended more as a
definition than explanation, until his brain
fairly ached with the unusual effort. When
at last night came and school was dismissed,
Allen Lucas was among the first to find his
way to the door, for he dreaded meeting Mr.
Dawson, a fear, by the way, utterly ground-
less, as he was never officious, and had as
much consideration for the feelings of a boy
as those of aman. He could not, however,
THE EAGLE AROUSED. 35

withhold an encouraging smile, as Allen’s eye
for a moment met his when he was passing
out the door, and there was something so
full of confidence and hope in the smile, and
earnest, unselfish interest in the whole ex-
pression of his face, that Allen’s fingers
involuntarily crept towards the pocket that
contained the neglected paper.

That evening, when Mr. Lucas’s family
had all gathered around the blazing fire,
Mr. Dawson’s explanation was introduced
by Allen, as if accidentally, and duly can-
vassed. Allen read and re-read it, and John
and William and Mary all talked it over and
found it so simple and yet so important, so
“just the thing,” as they said, that they
wondered they had never thought of these
things of their own accord. At last the old
farmer joined the group, who, slate and
pencil in hand, were rejoicing in their newly
acquired knowledge, and declaring that now
they could “see some sense in it.” The old
man stood for a few minutes, looking over
their shoulders, then taking the paper con-
taining Mr. Dawson’s explanations between
his thumb and finger, he adjusted his spec-
tacles with the other hand, and peered at it
36 ALLEN LUCAS.

very intently, his lips moving slowly all the
while, as if he were weighing the quantity
of the words, as well as scanning their
meaning. At last he seemed satisfied, for,
laying down the paper, he resumed his seat,
took a heavy draught of cider, lighted his
pipe, shook his head two or three times, as
if to assure himself of its safety, and was
ever after heard to declare that Mr. Dawson
was “a wonderful man—very wonderful,
smart enough *to make an arithmetic.” “T
should think,” said John Lucas, as he hung
his slate against the wall, “that Mr. Dawson
was a good teacher.”

“Yes, he must be,” said William.

“ 4 very good teacher,” chimed in Sophia,
a married daughter of Mr. Lucas, who was
home on a visit, and had been entertaining
her parents all day with the atrocities of the
schoolmaster at “ White’s Mills.”

“ Ay, ay !” said the father, “a wonderful
man—very wonderful man—could make a
*rithmetic—I know he could.” Allen said
nothing, and the two little boys had gone to
bed, so their testimony was lost, and Mary
seemed not to hear the remarks, for it is
never pleasant to be in the minority, and she
THE FAGLE AROUSED. 37

felt that the array against lier, backed by the
wonderful paper, was rather too powerful to
be fairly opposed by her single opinion.

“Don't you think he is almost as good as
Mr. Thorn, Allen ?” inquired George.

“Yes ; ten times better.”

“Why!” and “what!” and “dear me
Allen!” and “the boy is crazy!” were
among the exclamations that followed this
very decided opinion, for Mr. Thorn had
been considered the teacher par excellence
at the Corners, and others were called good
or bad, as they were like or unlike him.

“Yes,” repeated Allen in a low, thought-
ful tone, as if replying to some opposing
feeling within, rather than these exclama-
tions, “yes, I am sure he’s a good teacher,
and a good man.”

“We may be good enough,” said Mary,
nodding her head and shrugging her shoul-
ders, “ but one thing I know, I havn’t learned
anything this winter.”

“Not to-night ?”

“Q that is nothing, just what is on that
little bit of paper; Mr. Thorn could have
told it all in three minutes.”

«But Mr. Thorn sever did tell it, Mary.”
38 ALLEN LUCAS.

“Well, he knew it, I know he did—at
any rate he was a good teacher, everybody
liked him.”

“T suppose he was, but then you know
what made us like him so much better than
we do Mr. Dawson. Mr. Thorn didn’t like
the trouble of looking into things, and he
made the best of everything we did. You
know what uncle Pete said about his wink-
ing faculty—he winked at pretty hard doings
sometimes ; he always praised us too, whether
we deserved it or not, but Mr. Dawson don’t
make his praises so cheap.”

“No, he never praises those that deserve
it, but the real blunderheads, he coaxes up
to think they know everything. Yesterday
I never missed a word all day, and he looked
as cross at me—”

“ Mr. Dawson never looks cross, Mary.”

“ Well, he didn’t look very good-natured,
I can tell you. But when Julia May—
everybody knows Julia’s a poor scholar—
when she got up next me, he seemed as glad
as though something wonderful had happened,
and praised her to the sky.”

“ And for a very good reason; he knew
Julia studied and you did’nt.”
BEGINNING ANEW. 39

-All the better, I should think, to know
how to spell every word without studying.”

“All the easier for you, of course, but I
don’t see as you deserve any praise for it. I
believe Mr. Dawson is half right in his notions
about that, and I mean to study one week as
hard as John Smith, just to see what I can do.”

“John Smith has to study hard, or he
wouldn’t learn anything.”

“T know that, but it will be just as easy
for me to study as for him, and if I learn
more I shall get better paid for it.”

CHAPTER IV.

BEGINNING ANEW.

Auuen Lucas had not been accustomed to
making resolutions and breaking them, until,
like many young persons, he considered it
the merest trifle, so he did not fail to put
in execution his hastily formed purpose. If
we should set about examining Allen’s mo-
tive in forming this purpose, we might find
it difficult to fix upon one of sufficient im-
portance but we must remember that “ trifles
40 ALLEN LUCAS.

light as air” decide the destinies of millions.
It was not the love of knowledge, nor the
desire to be useful, nor was it altogether the
wish to excel, that influenced him. He had
always suspected that he was quite as well
endowed by nature as other boys, but now
the consciousness of possessing faculties that
had never been but slightly exercised, came
over him like a gleam of sunlight, and the
mere desire to employ those faculties, the
love of action, which had hitherto exhaust-
ed itself in a display of physical strength,
induced him to make a mental effort. As he
expressed it to Mary, he studied “just to
see what he could do.” The bird finds plea-
sure in the mere act of flying, independent
of any advantage to be gained by it, the boy
in the thousand feats of agility that he per-
forms even when alone, the man delights to
curb the steed, and, when not withheld by a
monitor within, to brandish the steel, and
the student exults in the free use of his
noble faculties, even when the end to be
attained is not in view. The love of using
our powers is almost inseparable from the
possession of them, and this is a kind provi-
sion, making every effort its own immediate
BEGINNING ANEW. 41

reward, and reserving the greater reward
for moments of calm thought, when we are
more capable of appreciating it.

Allen Lucas turned the leaves of his arith-
metic over, again and again, and fluttered
them between his fingers, and made a great
many more parallel lines on his slate, be-
fore he could conclude to go back and com-
mence with Simple Addition, and then he
sat a long time over the rule, which he could
repeat word for word, dreading to ask Mr,
Dawson for his explanation. Finally he
read it over, slowly and carefully, pausing
between the words to weigh well their
meaning, and as he proceeded, a smile stole
to his lip, and a look of intelligence shone
from his eye, for he saw nothing there be-
yond his own comprehension. All this time
Mr. Dawson had been watching his motions,
but he would not appear to do so, for he
knew that there was no surer way of effacing
a good impression, than by showing an ofli-
cious triumph, or even in some cases, gratifi-
cation, Very humble indeed must be the
man, who can bear being told, particularly
when the mind is in a course of revolution,
“T have succeeded in doing you the good I
42 ALLEN LUCAS,

intended—to me you are indebted for these
thoughts and feelings.” The boy is a man
in miniature, with as much pride, as much
sensitiveness, as much jealousy, and less
judgment to balance these qualities, and
therefore is there the more danger in en-
deavouring to play upon the delicate chords
of his mind, lest, by touching a wrong
one, the whole should be deranged. Some
teachers, thinking self-love a reprehensible
quality, never hesitate to mortify it; but
this is not a quality that can be crushed by
being trampled upon ; it grows the ranker
beneath the foot that would break it down,
and loses its poison only when hedged in by
virtuous feelings and principles. I would
not pretend to vindicate all the petty feel-
ings that find a resting-place in the bosom
of childhood, but he who does not respect
them, despite their whimsicalities, and sym-
pathize with them, even in their foolishness,
never can gain the key to their hearts, to do
them good. Even a child’s nature is a deep,
deep study, and he, who but partially under-
stands it, is liable to neglect the good, and to
make sad blunders in curing the evil. A
bad habit is not broken up by one lecture, or
BEGINNING ANEW. 43

one whipping, or one hour of calm reasoning
and kind expostulation. A diseased moral
nature can not be cured by outward means,
without corresponding action within. A fault
is cured, plucked up by the roots, when the
child’s own hand undertakes its extermina-
tion, but the teacher, unassisted, only lops
away the green, leaving it to spring up at
some future day, stronger than ever. The
best lesson a child can learn, is to examine
his own heart, and rely upon his own power
of self-control, assisted only by Him who
furnishes that power. He who would prop
up a character by other means than its own
internal strength, only weakens it, and sad
are the consequences, when these props are
taken away. I would not dwell so long on
this point, but for the fatal mistake com-
mitted, both by parents and teachers. Be-
cause children are capricious, impulsive,
always arriving at wrong conclusions, and
at the mercy of every one who chooses to
play upon their tender feelings, they are
often supposed to be utterly incapable of
self-government, and are forbidden to do one
thing, and commanded to do another, because
their elders know what will injure or benefit
44 ALLEN LUCAS.

them, better than they do themselves. The
child is set down to the study of dead lan-
guages, and is expected to comprehend, or
at least to remember difficult sciences at a
very early age, but when capable of this,
moral teaching is made mere baby-talk,
and no wonder that he turns disgusted from
these lessons, loses his regard for truth and
virtue, and is restrained only by the strong
arm. It is the duty of parents and teachers
to make children know and feel their faults,
to wateh carefully, and discover if reforma-
tion is attempted, to encourage and sustain
by delicate and cautious means, to show the
beauty of moral greatness in its true light,
and to point out the effects of the most
trivial incident upon the character, but the
child must be made to feel that the mighty
work is his own, and fully worthy of his
greatest exertions.

Mr. Dawson had studied the construction
of the human mind attentively, and he had
not one set of rules for the man and another
for the boy, for he knew that the same
springs of action are in both, Yet he was far
from bringing all down to the same standard,
as if every mind was cast in the same moula,
BEGINNING ANPW. 45

and differences were faults. When Allen
Lucas asked hesitatingly, and with evident
trepidation, if he might be allowed to review
his studies before proceeding any farther,
Mr. Dawson did not inquire why, nor raise
objections “for the sake of trying him,” nor
congratulate him upon discovering his defi-
ciencies, he merely gave his assent kindly,
made a few remarks upon the necessity of
being well grounded in the fundamental
principles of a science, offered his assistance
whether in school or out, in explaining diffi-
culties, and passed on, Yet Allen felt that
his new resolutions were understood and all
his efforts appreciated, and from that mo-
ment there was the most perfect confidence
established between the teacher and his
pupil. But this could not have been, if
Mr. Dawson had injudiciously interfered, for
Allen knew that the struggle had been in his
own bosom, the effort and triumph his own,
and however much credit he was afterward
inclined to give his teacher, the least appear-
ance of claiming it at this time*would have
alarmed his jealous self-love, and very likely
induced him to show that he was not so tame
and easily influenced as might be supposed.
46 ALLEN LUCAS.

That day Allen went through with his reci-
tations admirably, surprising even himself
by the wonders he performed: he asked ques-
tions and expressed opinions, not always
correct, but yet worthy of correction, and
exhibited so much real interest in the sub-
jects discussed, that Liph Green, the lively
little fellow before mentioned, very demurely
gave him to John Smith as an example of
a passive verb changed into an active one.
The week of trial passed away, and seve-
ral others followed it, and Allen Lucas began
to discover that though learning was a very
pleasant thing, nothing worth the posses-
sion could be gained without severe labour ;
that none who would obtain the real ore is
exempt from the drudgery of digging for it,
and sometimes he would grow tired, and feel
a strong temptation to relapse into his former
idleness. Mr. Dawson knew that such mo-
ments would come, and he watched carefully
for them, but not believing in the modern
mode of turning study into a mere amuse-
ment, he did not always present something
new, thus humoring the intellectual nature,
as some parents do the caprices of a petted
child. Sometimes he saw that a change of
BEGINNING ANEW. 47

employment was necessary, to prevent actual
disgust, but he always took every occasion to
deprecate this mode of treatment in general,
and Allen soon learned the danger of yield-
ing to feelings of weariness, as well as to
other difficulties. As he proceeded rapidly
and surely in his studies, it was plain to Mr.
Dawson, and others who took the trouble to
observe, that his whole character was under-
going a change, his perceptions were clearer,
his notions more correct, and his principles
firmer. Yet this natural result of the dis-
cipline to which he subjected himself, (it was
not the mere love of action that led him to
study now,) was only commenced, and Mr.
Dawson often laboured to show him, that
this winter did not close his efforts, and
that nothing less than a steady advance
through life, ought to satisfy an immortal
nature.
48 ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER Y.

ROBERT MAY, AND OTHERS OF MR, DAWSON’S
PUPILS.

Amona the boys who attended school at the
Corners, was a black-eyed, pale-faced strip-
ling of about the age of Allen Lucas, but
much smaller, and yet, from a certain sedate,
thoughtful expression of countenance, appa-
rently much older. Robert May was the
only son of a farmer in rather humbler cir-
cumstances than Mr. Lucas, but he was very
far from being the only child ; a fact well
known to all the gallant beaux and envious
belles in the neighbourhood. His six sisters
were all round, rosy-cheeked damsels, full of
fun and frolic, and not particularly noted for
talent or in any way ambitious of deserving
such notoriety. They were vain of their
personal appearance, and the ready inge-
nuity, the talent for invention, the activity
and resoluteness which characterized them,
was dissipated on vulgar or trivial pursuits.
They had early imbibed a fondness for dis-
play, and they exhibited it in decorating the
house, in their dress, and in all their actions,
MR. DAWSON’S PUPILS. 49

but it was a petty kind of vanity, and seldom
spoiled the smile on their lips, or the good
feeling in their hearts. To be sure, they
pouted to display their red, ripe lips, and
frowned just a little, to intimate how their
eyes might sparkle, if they should happen to
get angry ; but the cloud never lasted above
five minutes, and they were really generous
and obliging. As for taste and good sense,
people did not look for them in the May’s, but
they expected gaiety and mirth, and were
not disappointed, Robert had three sisters
older than himself to pet him, and his pa-
rents, like parents in general, who have but
one son, set them the example, meanwhile
wondering why the little fellow should be so
pale and puny. The sisters cared little for
wintry winds or deep snows on their own
account, but Robert was carefully guarded
against them, until he became old enough
to be ashamed of his girlishness, and throw
aside the cloak and muffler ; but even then
he preserved a settled disrelish for active
sports. Perhaps it was this peculiarity, com-
bined with a desire to distinguish himself in
some way among his companions, that led
him to set a higher value on mental attain-
D
50 ALLEN LUCAS.

ments, for he had always disputed with Mary
Lucas the title of “best scholar.” Robert
May was considered a prodigy of Jearning by
his parents and sisters, and they had talked
so much to him about being “a great man,”
that he was early convinced his destiny was
ahigh one. Quiet and studious, none dream-
ed of the ambitious feelings that lay beneath
this modest demeanor, and Mr. Dawson, ob-
serving as he was, suspected them least of any,
and took a peculiar interest in one who was
himself so easily interested. Robert was by
far the most promising of Mr. Dawson’s
pupils ; for he not only studied, but seemed
to understand and love his studies, and from
the books, which his kind teacher lent him
for perusal in the evening, he gained enlarged
views of life, and much useful information,
Yet he never became sufliciently interested
to forget himself, and never, in moments of
his greatest enthusiasm, did he lose sight
of that future elevation towards which he
believed himself surely advancing. It was
early decided by Mr. May, that Robert
should be a scholar, and so he was allowed
every advantage within their limited means,
and encouraged by praises, and the most
MR. DAWSON’S PUPILS. 51

flattering pictures of the proud future. Allen
Lucas had always been rather fond of quiz-
zing Robert, for what he considered his mop-
ishness, and on the other hand, the proud
student regarded with something very like
contempt the careless idler, who thought
more of being able to ride an unbroken colt,
than he would of being qualified to sit in the
presidential chair, They had never quarrelled,
but, the one shy, artful, and selfish, the other
bold, frank, and generous, they were too ut-
terly unlike in character, to be on terms of
intimacy. Even after Allen had overcome
his indolent habits, there were so many points
of difference between them, that, but for Mr.
Dawson’s inteference, they would never have
been friends. Mr. Dawson was a great pro-
moter of social happiness, and he always en-
deavoured to make his pupils feel how empty,
cold, and unsatisfying, is that heartless enjoy-
ment which results from mere selfish grati-
fication, unattended by kind acts and gener-
ous feelings.

Mary Lucas had no right to the name of
“best scholar ;” indeed, her memory was the
only quality that brought her in competition
with Robert, but this often gave her a tem-

?
52 ALLEN LUCAS.

porary advantage, which was the basis of her
reputation in school, and made her appear in
his eyes something very like a rival. This
winter, however, changed the face of things,
Mary took a retrograde motion, and the
whilom rivals were the best friends in the
world, at least when a third party was ab-
sent. Mary was much given to low conver-
sations with the grave student in the corner
opposite Allen’s, but she sometimes turned
off very suddenly at the sound of a certain
merry voice, for Liph Green (who would
think of calling such a complete embodiment
of mischief, Eliphalet?) had got a new hand-
sled, and a “brand-new” penknife, that would
eut up a quill admirably, and above all, could
write just the most comical three-cornered
notes, that no one but herself had the ingenu-
ity to open. Liph Green was never idle,
every moment was employed, for if nothing
better offered, he could make pewter six-
pences, and wooden jack-knives, but his
lesson was usually the farthest of anything
from his thoughts. No one bent over his
book more assiduously, and no one’s lips
moved faster, but there were no words upon
them, and the roguish little eye, over which
MR. DAWSON’S PUPIIS. 53

the lid drooped so demurely, instead of rest-
ing on the book, stole just a hair's breadth
below it, and watched the motions of the
truant fingers. The employment of those
fingers depended upon the materials with
which their owner supplied himself in the
morning, and never was a pocket so loaded
down with inventions of every kind as his.
For Liph, Robert had the greatest dislike,
even hatred ; for he was, like all shy per-
sons, peculiarly susceptible to ridicule, and
the irresistible drollery of the young jester’s
manner, and the good humour that was
always evident, even in his practical jokes,
could not atone for the impudence of making
our student the subject of them.

Such were some of the young minds over
which Mr. Dawson exercised control, and
whose whole after course might depend upon
his slightest word or action. To say that
Mr. Dawson was fully conscious of his re-
sponsibilities, with our knowledge of his
character, tells at once a tale of ceaseless and
untiring eflort; and to say that he was
amply rewarded by success, proves the ac-
complishment of a vast amount of good.
Yet he could not lay the spirit of mirth tuat
54 ALLEN LUCAS.

was bounding in every pulse of Liph Green ;
he could not create in Mary Lucas a love for
the labour of thinking ; he could not pre-
vent Julia May’s eyes wandering from her
book to the showy ribbon about her neck ;
and he could not add life to the snail-like
patience of John Smith, who would sit his
six long hours over a lesson in geography,
and then remember but a single fact. There
were Lizzy Parker, as sweet a creature as
ever breathed, and very teachable withal ;
and Fanny Blair, a notable devourer of
books ; and Richard Lucas, who, although it
was his first winter at school, evinced sur-
prising quickness ; and the amiable Joseph
Warren, so strictly conscientious, and loving
his books, because Mr. Dawson said he ought
to love them, and these relieved the shadow
that his want of success in other cases some-
times cast upon his spirits. Yet of all his
pupils, there was not one in whom he had
such perfect confidence, as Robert May. Per-
haps he loved Allen Lucas better, for there
was a tie between them, that no one who
has never given its first impulse to an im-
mortal nature, and no one who has not been
thus acted upon, can comprehend; yet he
MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 55

trembled for him, and dreaded to go away,
lest with him should depart his influence
also, But he had no need to fear! Allen
had tried his powers, and he never could
grow weary of exercising them ; he had
taken one draught of the waters of know-
ledge, and it had created a life-long thirst ;
he had given a little glance to the field
spread out before him, and his heart swelled,
and his hand even now longed to busy it-
self in doing.

CHAPTER VI.

MR, DAWSON’S LAST STORY,

Tus winter passed rapidly, and the day
before the school closed, Mr. Dawson sat
down to his desk to tell his last story ; for
the next day’s leisure was to be devoted to
advice and leave-taking. Allen Lucas, with
the hair flung back from his full, high fore-
head, his mild, but unshrinking eye fixed
upon the speaker, and his lips parted in the
attitude of a listener, was the most strik-
ing figure of the group; but next him, a
56 ALLEN LUCAS.

stranger would have turned to Liph Green,
perched high upon a writing desk, the very
position of his foot and curve of his fingers,
to say nothing of the rogue, twinkling in the
corner of either bright eye, and lurking in
every dimple of his face, indicating the
spirit within, and contrasting somewhat
oddly with the stolid figure of John Smith
below. Then there was Julia May, playing
with the soft, flaxen ringlets of Lizzy Parker,
and Joseph Warren, setting a fine example
of attention to the younger boys, who loved
him for his kindness and generosity, and
little Abby Stillman, sitting at Lizzy’s feet,
and looking up at her, instead of Mr. Daw-
son, and still beyond and around, rows of
faces of more or less intelligence and beauty.
But there was one, with little about him to
attract attention, who did not lose one word
of the interesting story. A little aside from
the others, with his elbow resting upon the
desk, making the stoop in his shoulders very
conspicuous, and his small, black eye some-
times raised to Mr. Dawson’s face, and some-
times falling, as if from sheer habit, upon
a large volume which lay open before him,
sat Robert May, his face growing every mo-
MR. DAWSON’S LAST 8TORY. 57

ment more thoughtful, and the pale red spot
in the centre of his cheek deepening, but
with nothing else to betray the ambitious
hopes that were swelling in his bosom. Mr
Dawson observed these tokens of interest,
but he mistook their source, or he would not
have added fuel to the flame that already
burned but too high.

“Of my first teacher,” said he, “TI have no
recollection, except that he used to pat me
on the head, when I had been good, but
some of my schoolmates I can remember
distinctly. Among these, William Edwards
was my favourite, because he was almost as
big as a man, and always took good care that
none of the little boys should be hurt. He
did not belong to the district, but had come
a weary way for the privilege of attending a
good school, and he found one of a first-rate
order. It was on one of the stormiest days
in January, that a lad, about sixteen years
of age, called at the house of a farmer in the
neighbourhood, and first making particular
inquiries respecting the school, the qualifica-
tions of the teacher, &c., asked to be directed
to a family where he might work for his
board, The stranger could not boast a robust
58 ALLEN LUCAS.

frame, but he spoke very confidently of his
strength, and so Mr. Gilbert, the old farmer,
concluded to give him a trial. I have some
slight recollection of William Edwards’ first
entrance into school, and can distinctly re-
member his calm, manly bearing, when some
thoughtless boys ridiculed his patched and
thread-bare coat. Indeed, I am sorry to say
that he met with more ridicule at first, than
kind consideration for his circumstances. He
heeded it but little, however, and pursued
his studies night and day, with an assi-
duity which would have worn out any one,
not finding variety in active employment.
The fresh morning air cooled the fever of
night study, and the care that he was re-
quired to bestow upon the sheep and cattle,
relieved his mind, and exercised his limbs.
He never spoke of his friends, and when a
little boy once asked where his mother lived,
he pointed one hand upward, and with the
other, dashed off the tear that sprang to his
eye. Questions about his father, he seemed
loath to answer, but the flush on his cheek,
and the drooping of the eye-lid, as if in
shame, when Mr. Gilbert produced the cider
mug, and urged him to drink, sufficiently
MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 59

betrayed his secret. He said that he had no
home, but when Mr. Gilbert offered him a
place at his table and fireside, he gently re-
fused; and when urged, he proudly answered
that he was no beggar, he would work for
his bread where he could do so, in pursuance
of the plan of Jife he had marked out for
himself, but he would accept of nothing that
his own hands had not earned, William
Edwards could not have found an individual
better calculated to further his plans than
our teacher, who lent him books, and de-
voted much of his leisure time to him, and
finally recommended him to an academy,
where he might soon be prepared for enter-
ing college. Here he remained about a year,
working his way day by day, and then he
slung his little bundle over his shoulders,
and again went out upon the world a stran-
ger. For years he struggled hard with for-
tune, now within the college walls, engaged
for a term or two in severe study, and now
teaching in some retired place, where his
services were far from being appreciated, and
bending over his books at midnight, striving
to keep up with his class. But his health at
last failed, and for many months he was
60 ALLEN LUCAS.

confined to a darkened room, and denied the
use of books, and the society of friends.
Then, when he slowly recovered, came a
heavy bill, for the homeless cannot be at-
tended in sickness without money ; and so he
taught, and studied, and struggled on, year
after year, and finally the goal was reached :
he graduated, crowned with honours. Dur-
ing all this time, William Edwards had not
been alone ; he had found a friend in every
acquaintance, and many, among whom were
the officers of the institution of which he was
a member, regarded his career admiringly.
It was by this means that he easily obtained
a situation in a boy’s seminary, but upon
the first vacancy, he gained the office of
tutor in the college where he was educated,
and was afterwards endowed with a professor-
ship. Since then, his love of active pursuits
has induced him to engage in public affairs,
and,” added Mr. Dawson, a smile lighting up
his whole face, “there are now but few men
in our country, that can boast a higher
station or prouder honours, than he whose
yeal name in my little sketch I have thought
proper to conceal under that of William
Lidwards.”
MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 61

“He must have had an unusual share of
perseverance,” said Allen Lucas, drawing in
his breath, as if fatigued by the mere act of
listening, “ I can’t see how a man could keep
up his courage so long.”

“ Perseverance will accomplish wonders,”
said Mr. Dawson; “ William Edwards arose
by a constant succession of efforts, some of
them no greater than several of you have
made this winter; decision is necessary in
such cases, for you will always find that it
requires a much greater effort to decide on
the performance of a difficult duty, than
really to perform it ; I don’t mean by this,
that it is more common to persevere than
resolve, for facts show directly the reverse,
but mountains diminish to mole-hills before
us when, spade in hand, we stand up deter-
mined to level them.”

“Then Robert May will have a pretty
easy job of it,” whispered Liph Green, loud
enough to be heard perfectly well by every-
body present, and yet with his forefinger
pressed mysteriously to his lips ; “he decid-
ed on being governor long ago.”

Robert May bit his lips, and turned his
back upon the group, muttering, as he took
62 ALLEN LUCAS.

up one book after another and examined the
title-pages, “he may be more than any ot
you dream.” Liph Green, with all his light-
ness and folly, seemed to be endowed with
the gift of second sight, as far as character
was concerned, and it was the consciousness
of being too well known, that made Robert
so exceedingly uncomfortable in his presence,
and added bitterness to his hatred.

“And what is your decision ?” inquired
Mr. Dawson, laughingly.

“Mine! OT hate ‘ great efforts,’ and always
look out for the easiest part ; so I do diffi-
cult things without deciding.”

“Jam afraid it is the only way you will
ever do anything,” Mr. Dawson thought, but
he did not say so, and merely answered,
“Frankly acknowledged, my boy, but this
looking out for the easiest part, never makes
sterling men.”

“J don’t see,” said Allen Lucas, “ how we
boys can decide on what we will be, till we
find out for what we are fit.”

“ You can not,” replied Mr. Dawson ; “ you
can decide now upon fitting yourselves for
taking a part in the world, and for this every
faculty of body, mind, and heart, requires the
MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 63

highest cultivation ; you can decide that your
lives shall be virtuous, that you will always
support good principles, and make yourselves
useful to your fellow-men ; then in a few
years you will decide upon a vocation ; but
not until you are old enough to discover what
is best adapted to your characters, tastes, and
circumstances, Nothing so injures a man’s
stability and firmness of character, as decid-
ing this matter when too young, and making
a mistake.”

“ Well, I shall be a farmer,” said a hale,
stout, square-shouldered fellow, who looked
as though the flail and sythe would be mere
toys in his hands.

“J think—I should like—to be a—a school-
master,” remarked Joseph Warren, with
much timidity, and casting a furtive glance
at Mr. Dawson, as if to discover whether
such a predilection was considered too great
presumption.

“J mean to be a circus-rider,” said Liph
Green, springing from the desk like a
monkey, and vaulting on the one oppo-
site.

“Liph!? “Why Liph Green !” were the
simultaneous exclamations.
64 ALLEN LUCAS.

“ Qircus-riders are very bad men,” re-
marked Mr. Dawson, seriously.

“No, a sailor—I would rather be a sailor,
after all—now see me climb the shrouds,”
and much more to hide his confusion than
display his activity, he caught hold of the
bell-rope and disappeared in the loft.

“ Poor boy!” sighed Mr. Dawson involun-
tarily.

“He don’t mean it, sir,” said Allen Lucas,
in a low tone; “it is all fun, and he is one
of the best hearted boys in the world. He'll
be steadier when he gets older.”

Mr. Dawson looked up with a pleased
smile, but he was more encouraged for the
pleader, than him for whom he pled ; for
Allen observed that the next moment he
shook his head sorrowfully. Our young
student had looked sufficiently into the
future, to understand the source of this sor-
row; and from that time forth, as if to re-
pay the kindness that the school-master had
shown to him, he exercised the care of an
elder brother over his wild and reckless
friend.

The last day of school is usually made up
of smiles and tears. Even those who have
MR. DAWSON’S LAST STORY. 65

anticipated it with the greatest pleasure, are
the first to weep at the reality; for then
comes a full realization of past enjoyments—
all past—little associations broken up—the
connecting links between young hearts
marred, if not dissevered. The school-boy
does not say all this, but he feels it, and
hence his sadness; yet he knows little of
disappointment, he thinks upon the change,
and hence the counteracting joy. He would
not tell you so, but he feels that the brother-
ly tie between him and his school-mates, is
a brotherly one no longer, and during the
summer, when they meet in the field, or by
the road-side, there will be an awkward shy-
ness between them, for the summer school,
being for the little ones, does not gather
them all into one family again. But sadder
than usual, and much more quiet, was the
last day of the school at the Corners this
winter. Mr. Dawson was loved and respect-
ed by his pupils; he was not above the
weakness of feeling himself, and feeling is
very infectious. Some of the older boys,
who thought it beneath their dignity to show
anything like softness of heart, put a bold
face upon the matter, and although almost
B
66 ALLEN LUCAS.

choked with the effort of keeping down a
something, that felt very much like a nut-
meg grater in the throat, they did keep it
down, until Mr. Dawson’s voice showed that
he too was suffering under the same inflic-
tion, and even then they did not wholly
yield, till his face was entirely lost in the
folds of his pocket-handkerchief. Then there
was such a time! Oh, you never saw the
like ! and poor Lizy Parker—how she sobbed,
until it seemed as though her little heart
would break, and how Allen Lucas, with a
self-control quite new to him, comforted her,
telling her that Mr. Dawson had promised to
write him letters, and she should see every
one of them. And then how gentle and
sorrowful Mr. Dawson’s face looked, when
the handkerchief was taken away ; how soft
and low was his voice, and how affectionate
the very touch of his hand, as he bade them all
good-bye. Then each, without a whisper, pass-
ed slowly out the door, and the faithful teacher
was left alone, to review the past, and to feel
that the book was sealed, that not one line could
be dashed out or added to its pages. Thrilling
thought to him, whois acquitted by conscience,
but to the self-condemned how awful !
WINTER SCHOOL, 67

CHAPTER VII.
SUMMER STUDY, AND THE NEXT WINTER SCHOOL.

Tug spring is a busy time with farmers, and
Allen Lucas found but little leisure to devote
to his books, after leaving school. He arose
carly in the morning, as he had always been
taught, but the whole family were up as
early, and this was no time for study. As
soon as breakfast was dispatched, each re-
paired to his station in the field, from whence
he was called only by the dinner horn, and
then he again returned, and continued his
labour till sunset. Guiding the plough, or
laying fence all the day long, meanwhile
breathing the cool, pure air of spring, is
doubtless healthful employment, but one
who has been thus employed, until every
limb and muscle feels the consequent fatigue,
is ill fitted for mental labour; and it must
be a high purpose that will prevent his scek-
ing that rest, which to the labouring man is
so sweet. When Allen sat down in the
house at night, he felt a drowsiness creeping
over him, and then it required his strongest
68 ALLEN LUCAS.

effort to turn to his school-books. Every
Saturday night he trudged off to the village,
to look for letters from Mr. Dawson, and it
was a proud moment to the whole family
when one of these arrived. After the first
letter, came a pamphlet, treating of different
soils, and a variety of other things connected
with farming, and this aroused Allen’s in-
terest, which had begun to flag, giving new
employment to his evenings, and supplying
him with subjects of thought during the day.
He compared his own observations with
what he read, and talked over these subjects
with his father and brothers, and often asked
the old men of the neighbourhood questions,
gathering from their conversation much
practical knowledge. Next, Mr. Dawson
sent a small treatise on geology ; it con-
tained only the first rudiments of the science,
but it was very useful to Allen, for he carried
out the subject beyond the information given
in the book, raising the cover of the green
sod upon the hill-side, and reading the lesson
as God stamped it there. That summer,
Allen felt that a new world was around, and
a new sky above him; his soul was animated
by new emotions, his mind was unshackled,
WINTER SCHOOL. 69

and his eye unsealed. He discovered that
earth is one vast book, and every page of it
presents a lesson rich in its simplicity, yet
reading on, on, to infinity ; its simplest thesis
limitless and incomprehensible. Allen had
been awakened to the study of this vast book
by looking into those made by men ; and he
knew that he needed all the aid which they
could give in comprehending it, yet he loved
to study this the best. V

When the next winter came, Allen was
better prepared to appreciate the blessings
which it brought, and he entered upon his
studies with a high relish. Mr. Dawson’s
successor was well versed in all he professed
to understand, and fully qualified to teach,
not only the branches required in a district
school, but many higher ones, With the
whole theory of teaching he was familiar,
and having an agreeable address, and a
polished exterior, he promised to equal, if
not excel, his predecessor, In childhood, he
had attended a school much like that at the
Corners, but afterwards, his parents remov-
ing to town, he had received instruction in
an academy, designed expressly for boys.
Here he had made no mean use of his time
70 ALLEN LUCAS,

and opportunities ; and in consequence, had
gained an education superior to the gener-
ality of young men in his circumstances.
Emerging from this school, and without a
definite object in view, he had turned to
teaching, as the most respectable and lucra-
tive manner of filling up this niche of time,
and had found his way to the Corners,
where, by under-bidding Mr. Dawson, he
obtained his situation.

Mr. Leonard did not conceal his object in
teaching, and professed to believe no man
would pursue such a calling but for money,
pronouncing all who professed a higher mo-
tive, hypocrites. He was not idle, during
the six hours a day which he had engaged to
devote to his school, but when they were
over, he felt like a freed prisoner, and, turn-
ing as soon as possible to other subjects, did
not allow the duties of the day to trouble his
thoughts till nine the next morning. The
difference between the two teachers was felt
by the whole school ; it was evident, even to
the dullest, that Mr. Leonard did not care for
their actual advancement, that he was more
pleased to see the hand of his watch pointing
at four, than to hear the best lesson that ever
WINTER SCHOOL, 71

was learned ; and soon, the most of the chil-
dren grew listless and idle. Mr. Leonard
was, however, stricter in some respects than
Mr. Dawson; for it is much less trouble to
flog a boy than to reason with him ; and the
latter mode of treatment is generally of suf-
ficient efficacy to exact obedience. Physical
strength should be the last resort in govern-
ment, for although a very convincing mode
of argument to the weak, the truths thus
inculeated are strangely evanescent. Mr,
Leonard would have been the gainer, as well
as his pupils, if he had chosen to exert his
moral power instead, but he adopted the
course that seemed easiest for himself, and
poor Liph Green was not the only sufferer.
Mr. Dawson had always made a wide dis-
tinction between errors resulting from acci-
dent or carelessness, and those which evinced
a lack of principle ; but Mr. Leonard had no
severer punishment for a deliberate falsehood,
than for an involuntary laugh. Poor Lizzy
Parker, whom nobody had ever found guilty
of intentional offence, was one day convicted
of whispering, and obliged to sit one whole
hour on a block of wood, like a criminal in
the stocks, because she had ventured to take
72 ALLEN LUCAS.

the head of a little girl, crying from home-
sickness, upon her lap, and attempt to soothe
her. How her face glowed with shame, and
drooped upon her bosom, as she found her-
self subjected to the same punishment, and
seated beside a rude, coarse girl, who in a fit
of passion, had struck a little sister in the
face. Lizzy never broke a rule again ; yet
her loving heart had received a check that
frightened, though it could not chill it.
Simple and guileless, she trembled at her
own kind feelings, supposing there must be
something wrong in exercising them, and yet
impelled to do so by their irresistible strength.
But the influence, which on the gentle Lizzy
was only temporary, was differently felt by
others. The older scholars were indignant ;
for the sweet child, who never thought of
herself while anything remained to be done
for others, was under the particular care and
protection of each member of the school ;
and no one could be injured half so easily in
person as through Lizzy Parker. The older
scholars lost confidence in Mr. Leonard,
and the younger ones confounded the two
offences, and lost the distinction between
actual wrong done from a bad motive, and a
WINTER SCHOOL. 73

trivial error, made error by circumstances
and the result of mere thoughtlessness. Yet
Mr. Leonard was not a cruel man, he never
punished unmercifully, and he would have
been shocked at the idea of breaking down
the distinction between right and wrong, or
between pardonable folly and actual crime.
Liph Green improved but little this winter
in knowledge, and still less in moral strength.
His volatile spirits continually carried him to
extremes, and between rejoicing over a new
resolution, and breaking an old one, he re-
ceived floggings enough to tame any nature
that was tameable. Though his feelings, ex-
citable as the mercury of the thermometer,
indicated the state of the moral atmosphere
about him, yet the wild partridge is not more
free and tameless, than was the boy, who,
even while suffering for one of his ridiculous
freaks, could not resist the opportunity ‘to
perform another. Under Mr. Leonard’s in-
structions, Mary Lucas regained some of her
Jost reputation, and Robert May made rapid
progress, for he needed books more than an
instructor, and the opportunity to study more
than assistance in his studies, This was very
much the case with Allen Lucas, also ; yet
7A ALLEN LUCAS.

he often felt the need of that sympathy for
the pleasures as well as difficulties of his pur-
suits, Which, as it was no part of his contract,
Mr. Leonard did not feel himself bound to
accord. Perhaps the self-dependence which
Allen was obliged to exercise this winter,
strengthened his character ; but Robert May
did not need it, for he had already too little
sympathy with others. Mr. Leonard, how-
ever, was a competent teacher, as far as in-
struction was concerned ; and as Allen had
imbibed a fondness for mathematical sciences,
he made such a beginning as enabled him
afterwards to pursue them without assist-
ance.

“ How I wish Mr. Dawson was here to tell
usa story!” said Liph Green, one day after
the morning school had closed.

“Mr. Leonard would tell one, I dare say,
if he didn’t go home to dinner,” replied
Mary Lucas.

“Tt is lucky for us that he does go,” an-
swered Liph ; “if he was here, we shouldn’t
have the privilege of speaking a loud word.”

“ Well, I wish Mr. Dawson was here all
the time,” said Julia May, pouting her rosy
lip, “ he always let me make figures on Ro-
WINTER SCHOOL. 75

bert’s slate after I’d learned my lesson, and
used to tell me sometimes that they were
almost as handsome as Robert's.”

“And he didn’t call you up, did he, Julia ?”
said little Abby Stillman, looking coaxingly
into her face, as if to say, “ see how sorry I
am that Mr. Leonard did.”

“No, indeed, he didn’t call me up for such
a little thing as marking on a slate—Mr.
Dawson wouldn’t do that.”

“He would, if marking on a slate was
against the rule,” said Mary.

“But he wouldn’t make such a silly rule,”
was the reply.

“For my part I think it is a very good
rule,” said Mary, who was freed from the
observance of it by studying arithmetic ; “I
don’t see what all the little girls want of
slates.”

“JT am almost as old as you are,” said
Julia, drawing up her shoulders with a
wonderful attempt at dignity ; but before
she could proceed farther, she was inter-
rupted by Allen Lucas,

“{ think they are of a great deal of use,
Mary, and I wish all the younger children in
school had them. It is a good way of em-
76 ALLEN LUCAS.

ploying their time ; for they cannot study to
much advantage, and they get very tired and
forget almost as much as they learn, when
confined to their books constantly. Then
they make by this means a good beginning
in writing.”

“Then you would have them all scribble
on a slate, I suppose,” interrupted Mary,
“whether Mr. Leonard allows it or not.”

“Oh no, Mr. Leonard sees both sides of
the question, and we only one, so we cannot
tell how many good reasons he has for act-
ing as he does. At any rate, he has a right
to make as many rules of that kind as he
chooses, and we ought to obey them.”

“ Of course you'll say so,” said Julia, pet-
tishly, “for you can make as many figures
as you please.”

“ And sometimes more,” said Allen laugh-
ing. “But it is of no use, Julia, to complain
of Mr. Leonard, and find fault with his rules,
and it only makes us unhappy. We couldn’t
expect to find another Mr. Dawson, and
whoever comes to teach, or whatever he
does, we must take care that our part is well
done, and then we shall never suffer much
wrong.”
WINTER SCHOOL. 77

“J don’t think that Lizzy Parker was a
bit to blame, when Mr. Leonard made her
sit on the dunce-block,” interrupted one of
the older girls. Allen hesitated, for he did
not like to condemn Lizzy Parker, but he
soon cleared his voice and proceeded. “Lizzy
was not to blame, for she didn’t think any-
thing about the rule, but her whispering was
a violation of it, and Mr. Leonard was bound
by his word to punish her.”

“ But,” continued the girl, “ what use was
there in making such a promise? Mr. Daw-
son never did.”

“No, Mr. Dawson made the punishment
discretionary, and that was doubtless the
best way ; but it caused him a great deal of
trouble.”

“Why, I am sure he kept as orderly a
school as we have now.”

“Yes, but he used to inquire into every-
thing that was wrong, and find out all about
it ; and that must have been a very difficult
task, and taken up a great deal of time.”

“Mr, Dawson never was afraid of his
time,” said another of the boys, “and would
have staid in the school-house all night, if he
could have helped anybody by the means.
78 ALLEN LUCAS.

But Mr. Leonard must clear the house at
four o’clock, and the minute the last boy
gets out he follows and locks the door.”

“Well, one thing I know,” said Liph
Green ; “I can cheat Mr. Leonard, and will,
every time I can get a chance.”

“Cheat him? how ?”

“Why, he don’t believe a word I say, so
there is no use in telling him whether I did
a thing or not. If he catches me at it, he
will whip me, and if he don’t I will have the
fun of cheating him.”

“How do you know he don’t believe
you ?”

“Why he don’t believe any of us; he
asks questions, and tries to make us cross
ourselves, and yesterday when I got so
sleepy, and promised I wouldn’t step my foot
out of the shed if he would let me go and
cut wood, I could see him peeping out the
window every time I stopped for breath, as
though he thought I would be gone. I de-
clare I’d a great mind to run with all my
might.”

“Why didn’t you?” asked Julia May.

“And so prove him in the right,” said
another.
WINTER SCHOOL. 79

“J did scare him some, making motions,
and I stopped so often to make him come to
the window, that at last he called me in.”

“Jo you gained vastly by scaring him, as
you tell about,” said Allen.

“Yes, but I’ll make up another time. I
can look on my book and whisper, and he
never would find me out in the world. I
didn’t dare do that when Mr. Dawson was
here, for you know he always asked at night,
and denying it would be a downright lie ;
but Mr. Leonard never thinks of asking, be-
cause he says boys are not to be believed.
Oh, I can cheat him in a thousand ways.”

“ Well, what good will it do you ?” asked
Lizzy Parker.

“Tt will be serving him right.”

“ But it will do you no good,” said Allen
seriously, “and, even if you wished it, which
Tam sure you do not, him no harm. I own
that it is not pleasant to be watched every
minute as though we couldn’t be trusted, but
that is no reason why we should make our-
selves unworthy of trust. Let us remember
what Mr. Dawson used to tell us so often,
that our actions here will have an influence
which we shall carry out into the world with
80 ALLEN LUCAS.

us ; and when we act we should not merely
decide what will serve our present purpose,
annoy this person or please that one, but
what is right, and will help to fit us for the
part we shall have to act in the world. Just,
think of it, Liph—you must neglect your
books to deceive Mr. Leonard, act against
your conscience, and in the end gain nothing
but evil ; for such a course would make you
sly, artful, and false, and neither you nor I
can tell where it would end.”

“ How well you remember what Mr. Daw-
son said !” answered Liph, “ now I had for-
gotten every word about it ; but you are
right, I know, and I wish I could be so good
and sober. It is such fun to plague Mr.
Leonard though !”

Conversations like the foregoing were very
common in school this winter, and they were
not without a good tendency, for the influence
of Mr. Dawson’s precepts was not lost, and
there was a self-rectifying principle at work
in some minds, that communicated itself to
others, and if it could not reform, did much
to check the dangerous feelings and princi-
ples, that otherwise would have gained the
ascendency.
MOKE OF LIPH GREEN 8)

CHAPTER VIII.

MORE OF LIPH GREEN.

Tue ensuing summer, as Allen was older
and more trustworthy, he was allowed many
privileges that he had not before enjoyed ;
and he found that by laying out his work
regularly, and paying great regard to punctu-
ality and order, he could gain a great deal of
time for study. This time, as may well be
supposed, was not wasted. He now read a
great many books, particularly those recom-
mended by Mr. Dawson, with whom he still
kept up a correspondence, and whose hints
were invaluable. Robert May, much to the
expense of his sisters’ ribbons and laces, was
sent away to a seminary of learning, and
poor Liph Green, light as his spirit had ever
been, was well nigh sunken in troubles.
Close by the creek, or river’as it was usu-
ally designated, and nearly a quarter of a
mile from the road-side, was a pile of logs,
flung together something in the shape of a
house, with a little enclosure on one side,
bounded by a zigzag fence, closely resem-
P
82 ALLEN LUCAS.

bling an old fashioned mammoth bow, round-
ing out from the crown of a bonnet. There
was but one window in the house, and that
had no glass in it, but was covered with a
white muslin cloth during the day, and
boarded up at night, if the weather was cold,
but if not, it was left open. The floor was
made of loose boards, that rattled at every step
in summer, but in winter they were carefully
corked with old rags. ‘The door was low and
narrow and everything about the premises
had such a diminutive appearance, that this
might have been mistaken for a residence
belonging to the famous Lilliputians. In the
enclosure before mentioned, were, at the
proper season for them, a few hills of beans,
a few more of potatoes, a little bed contain-
ing beets and carrots, then beyond these
some young cabbage plants, and mingling
here and there, might have been discovered
the whitish green leaves of the poppy, and
now and then a bursting bud arose or a crim-
son blossom flaunted in the morning sun, and
cast its honours to the earth at evening.
Close by the door, a thrifty bean vine had
been trained upward, till it had reached the
eaves, and on the other side was a cluster of
MORE OF LIPH GREEN, 83

hollyhocks ; and still further along, arose
some giant sunflowers, towering high, and
wagging their heads to every breeze, as if in
mockery of the seeming toys around them.
A little while before this rude dwelling-
place was constructed, a poor creature had
come to the Corners, witha baby in her arms,
and leading by the hand a little boy, who
clung to her side and hid his face in her
gown when strangers were near, but bounded
before her like a playful kitten, turning back
now and then to laugh and clap his hands in
the face of the baby, as soon as they were
out again in the free streets. She told a saa
story. She spoke of plenty and happiness
in a far-of land, of the restless spirit which
had made this seem not enough, then of a
dreary voyage across the seas to a goal that
to her unenlightened imagination was an
earthly paradise, of folding him who had
guided her thither in his shroud, and laying
him in a stranger’s grave, and then of an-
guish, followed by want and loneliness, by
sickness and anxiety, until the bitterness of
death was passed, and nothing but thoughts
of her children prevented her from lying
down beside her husband and ending her
84 ALLEN LUCAS.

sufferings there. But these kept the moth-
er’s heart from breaking, and she had toiled
along from door to door, bearing her infant
on her bosom, until at last she had penetrat-
ed into the heart of the country. She did
not beg for anything but work, and though
the people at the Corners were little aceus-
tomed to having their labour performed by
others, they could not resist the eloquence of
real sorrow, and poor Mrs. Green went from
house to house washing and ironing, and per-
forming many other services in which the
wives and daughters of the farmers were by
no means ashamed to join, But sometimes
she had nothing do, and then of necessity she
had nowhere to stay, so some kind-hearted
men of the neighbourhood concluded to roll
together some logs from the hills, and give
the stranger a home. The spot by the river's
side was selected because the materials might
be more easily conveyed thither, and as it
was much more picturesque than a place by
the dusty road, the poor widow gained in
tastefulness what she lost in convenience.
But once settled in her humble abode she
eared little for inconveniences, and soon her
cheerful temper triumphed over all her sor-
MORE OF LIPH GREEN &5

rows, and merry as the lark that she always
saw rise from his nest in the morning, she
caroled her songs all through the day, and
at night lay down beside her two children,
contented and happy. She did not suffer
from cold nor hunger, for the broken wood
from the neighbouring forests kept her fire
blazing brightly, and she earned enough by
her labour to obtain decent support for her-
self and children, The eldest of these chil-
dren, the fun-loving Liph Green, was old
enough to be useful in a variety of ways ;
and little Nannie in one, at least, for the
pretty lisper drew the neighbouring children
to the hut by the river-side, and their mirth
served to beguile its mistress of many a weari-
some hour. Thus passed almost two happy
years, happy enough to be envied by some of
the most favoured children of fortune, but
before the last was completed, there opened
upon the earth a beautiful spring ; the trees
budded, the birds came back to their old
haunts, and the strong winds died away into
gentle breezes, but these were all unnoticed
by poor Liph Green. Alas ! that childhood
should not be exempt from sorrows! Heavy
indeed must have been the burden that could
86 ALLEN LUCAS.

make a young heart unmindful of the beauti-
ful things of this bright earth, and benumb-
ing the influence that could quiet the pulses,
in which the tide, bursting from the foun-
tain of a joyous heart, coursed but too ra-
pidly.

Mrs. Green had gone out one warm spring
morning thinly clad, and before night, the
the sun was hidden, a slow, drizzling rain de-
scended, and the wind grew cold and piere-
ing, but she was unconscious of the change,
until made aware of it by the chill that made
her whole frame shiver, on emerging from
Mr. Smith’s heated kitchen. She, however,
hurried home as fast as possible, thinking all
the time of the blazing fire upon her humble
hearth ; but this time Liph had neglected his
duty, and not a fragment of the broken wood,
which he usually obtained from the adjoining
fields had been gathered. Covering his sleep-
ing sister with a rug, he had seated himself
on the hearth beside her, and was straining
his eyes over the few glowing embers, to
shape the arms of a miniature wind-mill,
with which he intended to astonish his mother
the next morning.

“ Aye you cold mother ?” he inquired as
MORE OF LIPH GREEN, g7

she crouched beside him on the hearth, anda
then, without waiting for an answer, he drew
the few coals together, and, crossing the pine
sticks upon which he had bestowed so much
Jabour, over them, he ran out the door, and
soon returned with a heavy armful of wood,
But the rain that had fallen, had made every-
thing too wet to burn; so poor Mrs. Green
was obliged to go to bed wet and cold, with
no unusual share of covering to atone for lack
of fire. In the morning when she attempted
to rise her flushed face and blood-shot eye
alarmed poor Liph, and when he saw her fall
across the foot of the bed, and laugh, and shriek,
and jabbar unintelligible things, and sing
wild snaches of songs, that he had never heard
her sing before, he took little Nannie in his
arms, and without daring to look behind him,
ran with all his might to the nearest dwell-
ing, screaming at every step, that his mother
was going to die, and he had killed her.
Mrs. Green was sick only two days, but dur-
ing that time she had the kindest of treat-
ment, and as much attention as the wealth-
iest in the neighbourhood could have com-
manded; for her cheerfulness, her good-hum-
our and faithfulness, had gained her many
88 ALLEN LUCAS.

friends, and even if it had not been so, this
was not a place where the poor were left to
suffer. But no care can stay the failing breath,
when the spirit has been called away, and
soon the mother of poor Liph Green was
stretched cold and still upon the bed, with
her icy hands folded on her breast, her white
lips moveless, and her eyelids pressed down
by weights under the glazed lid beneath.
Little Nannie clambered up by the old chair
that stood beside the bed, to kiss her, and
went whimpering away because her kiss was
not returned ; and the passionate Liph, be-
side himself with grief, sobbed and shrieked
aloud, telling every one that spoke to him, it
was his own work, he had done it all. Liph
Green never thought of his own fate, or little
Nannie’s, when he saw his mother laid in the
grave, and all that night and the succeeding
day, some one of the kind neighbours staid at
the hut and took care of them, but finally,
they began to talk of removing the children,
and spoke to each other in whispers, of which
poor Liph could only guess the meaning.
He soon, however, found that they talked of
removing him and his little sister to the
county poor-house, and he told them he
MORE OF LIPH GREEN. 89

would not go, he would not be shut up in
that dreary building, when he could work
for his bread, and he would go hungry and
cold, and take his earnings to support, little
Nannie, before he would part from her ; at
any rate, he would try, and if he failed, they
would starve together. Allen Lucas encour-
aged Liph in this determination, and went
all over the neighbourhood in search of some-
body to take charge of the helpless little one,
who laughed and prattled, all unconscious of
her lot, It was towards evening that the
two boys, each holding a hand of Nannie,
yentured to stop under the trees that shaded
the door of Mr. Moreton, an English gentle-
man, who had within a few weeks purchased
the corner farm opposite Mr. Smith’s. They
knew little of Mr. Moreton, except the name
and the few other unimportant particulars
that country neighbours will always glean ;
but they had seen no little children on the
premises, and so concluded that he could not
make the objection urged by others to receiv-
ing poor Nannie. W hile they were hesitating
whether to make the application, they were
accosted by a fine, intelligent looking man,
and Liph entered at once upon his sad story,
90 ALLEN LUCAS.

He spoke with the simple pathos of true feel -
ing while the unconscious Nannie put out her
dimpled hands to catch the tears that rolled
from his cheek, or played with the crape
about her own neck, and, before he had finish-
ed, the gentleman had drawn nearer, and
placed his hand upon her curly head, holding
with the other the head of his cane for her
inspection. It needed only a few words from
Allen Lucas to make Liph’s account intelli-
gible, and Mr. Moreton, who seemed to feel
a deep interest in the orphans, perhaps more
so for being their countryman, promised Liph
that while he made himself useful, neither of
them should want a home. Oh how grateful
was poor Liph Green for such a promise !
and how he hugged little Nannie, and laugh-
ed and wept at the same moment, and talked
of his mother and of the poor-house, and then
threw up his arms and boasted of his strength,
and declared he would work as long as he
lived, for whoever took care of Nannie. The
family of Mr. Moreton consisted only of him-
self, his wife, and a widowed sister, and so
the pretty child was a welcome inmate, and
would have been spoiled by the two ladies,
if she had not possessed that happy elasticity
MORD OF LIPH GREEN, OL

of temperament, that makes all dangerous
influences rebound perfectly harmless. As
for Liph, he could not carry a clouded heart
in the midst of so much sunshine ; so though
he went often to his mother’s grave and wept
over it, yet he was usually as joyous as ever,
and often made the walls of the farm-house
ying with his merry shout. Allen Lucas
loved Liph Green as a brother, and went
often to his new home to see him, and Liph
told so much of the wondrous knowledge of
his young friend, and Allen was always so
modest and sensible, that Mr. Moreton re-
garded him with no small degree of interest,
and often joined in the discussions of the two
boys for the mere purpose of drawing out
his talents. He soon discovered the bent of
Allen’s mind, and brought him books from
his own library, the contents of which were
eagerly devoured ; and after awhile, the li-
brary door was thrown open, and Allen pass-
ed in and out, as though it had been his own.
Mr. Moreton’s library contained a choice
selection of books, and Allen, after touching
upon a few lighter things, turned to the Eng-
lish classics, and entered at once upon a new
and a glorious field. By slow degrees, lis
92 ALLEN LUCAS.

mind had been prepared for just such works
as these, and it is no strange thing, if the
plough and hoe were a very little neglected,
and the pillow sometimes untouched, as his
whole soul was absorbed in his new pursuits.
But after awhile he received a letter from
Mr. Dawson, warning him against the state
of feverish excitement which his mind be-
trayed, and with a strong effort, he calmed
himself, read less and thought more, and
finally became as orderly and industrious as
he had ever been. The winter following,
Allen Lucas did not attend school, for he
found that he could learn more in Mr. More-
ton’s library ; and as that gentleman had dis-
covered Liph Green’s peculiarities, he was
glad of the opportunity thus offered to carry
on his education without exposing him to
temptation. At first Allen overlooked Liph’s
lessons, and studied with him, but every day
he became more and more interested in his
task, and before another spring, he was duly
installed in the office of private tutor to his
heedless friend, and little Nannie.
CMOOSING A VOCATION. 93

CHAPTER IX.

CHOOSING A VOCATION.

“Seventeen years old to-day!” said Allen
Lucas, as he seated himself on a large stone,
half embedded in the thick golden moss, and
the other half extending out into the water.
For nearly three years he had spent most of
his time in Mr. Moreton’s family, devoting
only the early morning to labour on his fa-
ther’s farm, and an hour each evening to the
instruction of his little brothers, but now,
Liph was to throw aside the books which he
did not love, and Nannie was old enough to
require other teachers. Allen sat for a long
time, resting his forehead on his folded hands,
then breaking a fragment from the stone, he
threw it into the stream, and gazed intently
on the bubbles that rose to the surface and
disappeared.” “ Very like, very like !” he
muttered, rising with a half impatient ges-
ture, then’slowly shaking his head and com-
pressing his lips, he stood gazing down upon
the waters, as they glided smoothly over the
white sand, or leaped, and foamed, and spar-
9-4 ALLEN LUCAS.

kled in miniature anger, when they met with
an obstruction. “ Seventeen years !” he re-
peated musingly, “and in seventeen more I
shall be a man, my character formed, my
habits fixed, my destiny in this world de-
cided—a busy man in this busy world ! in-
dependent of control or guidance, doing what-
ever I list, and answerable for everything.
Thirty-four years | the very meridian of life,
the time when men most glory in their
strength and power! as many more years
will bring me to this, or—” Allen’s tongue
faltered with the alternative, but his eye
wandered across the adjoining field to a green
spot of earth newly encircled by its simple
white fence, and already pillowing two or
three who but a year since walked forth
among the living. The face of the youth
grew solemn, but not sad, as his thoughts
took a different course, and dwelt for a mo-
ment on his own dissolution. But the being
whose foot is just pressing upon the verge
of proud manhood, whose every pulse bounds
with a consciousness of strength, and whose
veins thrill with the rushing of the red
life-current within, can not long listen to
thoughts of death and the grave ; he snows,
CHOOSING A VOCATION, 95

but he can not feel, that the strong arm and
the true foot will ere long fail him, and that
the thoughts and feelings, which raise him
above the other living things he sees around,
will go away, and leave the form in which
he nowglories, less than the idiot, less than the
reptile crawling at his foot, in no wise supe-
rior to the coffin which contains it, and the
mould with which it shortly mingles. Allen’s
eye rested for a moment upon the humble
church-yard, and his thoughts upon the
grave, and his own dissolution, but it was
only for a moment, and he again repeated,
“a man ! a busy man!—ay, I will be a
busy and a useful one.”

So wrapt had the youth been in his mus-
ings that he did not hear a quiet step, nor
know that any one was near, until a light
hand was laid upon his shoulder, and a voice
low and melodious, but strangely cold, said,
“T have been at your house looking for you
—whete have you been hiding all day ?”
The speaker was a tall stripling, with a
frame very unlike the muscular one beside
him, a step light and undecided, a small,
white hand, and stooping shoulders. Ilis
face, but for its extreme pallor, would have
96 ALLEN LUCAS.

been handsome; his forehead was broad
and already marked with scarce perceptible
lines that a few years would in all proba-
bility cut into deep wrinkles, his eyes were
deep-set, bright, black, and piercing, his
mouth small and feminine, and his thin lips,
when not speaking, were always drawn close
together with an expression particularly un-
inviting.

“T have been very idle to-day,” was Allen’s
reply, as he again seated himself upon the
stone. Come sit down, Robert, and I will tell
you what I have been thinking about. A
fine seat this, and handsomely cushioned,” he
added, pressing his hand on the soft moss.

“J suppose you have been thinking of the
one grand subject,” said Robert May; “it
wouldn’t require a magician to read either of
our thoughts at present.”

-+ “Do you know that this is my birth-
day ?’ asked Allen.

“ No, [leave such matters to Aunt Biddy,”
said Robert, sneeringly.

“ But our ages are so near the same that
we can always tell each other’s by our own
—three weeks ago yesterday, you were se-
venteen.”
CHOOSING A VOCATION. 97

“ Shall you be ready to enter college with
me ?” asked Robert impatiently.

“Then you have decided on going ?”

“Yes, that was a settled point long ago,
but I have been fretted to death in making
the arrangements—no books, no money, no
nothing. I declare it makes me angry when
I see rich people wasting their thousands—
what under the sun is Mr. Moreton to do
with that Liph Green ?”

“Liph is a pretty good scholar for such
a happy, don’t-care sort of a fellow as he
is, but he lacks application, and Mr. More-
ton thinks it is best to cast him on his
own resources for a while. He has pur-
chased a large tract of western land, and
Liph is to earn his title to it by cultivat-
ing it.”

“ Qultivating land! but no matter, it will
be all one to him. Cobbler or statesman—~
he never would know the difference.”

“You do Liph injustice,” said Allen, warm-
ly, “he Jacks strength and stability of cha-
racter, but he has correct views of life—at
least Mr. Moreton thinks so—and there is so
much romance in his disposition, that he will
always move in a sunny little world of his

a
98 ALLEN LUCAS.

own, and find beauty in what to others is
stale and common-place.”

“Very likely,” said Robert, sarcastically,
“and for that reason, I would advise him to
be acobbler. He could sing at his stall all
day long, happy as cobblers always are, and
make himself very useful too, undoubtedly.”

“Par more useful than those who despise
him !” said Allen indignantly.

Robert was about to retort, when there
came a short, musical laugh, from the wild
cherry-tree above their heads, the leaves
rustled, and a shower of white blossoms
descended upon the ground and stream, and
then an agile figure came swinging down
upon one of the branches, and dropped him-
self at Allen’s feet. Both of the conversa-
tionists were startled a little by the unex-
expected vision, both attempted to speak,
stammered, coloured, and were silent.

“Qh, go on,” said the new comer, “ don’t
let me interrupt any sport—pick up the
glove, Bob. Ha, ha! an interesting subject
for young gentlemen to fall out and quarrel
about.”

“Not a very important one, Liph, to be
sure,” said Allen Lucas, smiling, and laying
CHOOSING A VOCATION. 99

his hand upon the curling locks of his friend
and pupil.

“You are the only one that would say it
to me,” answered Liph Green, acknowledg-
ing the caress by a gentle inclination of
the head, “and yet you think it least of any
one.”

Robert May, his thin lip curling, and his
small, black eyes glittering like those of a
snake, folded his arms, and struck into the
path that led to the turnpike.

“Stay, Robert,” said Allen, extending his
hand in token of peace, “ you havn't heard
a word of my plans yet, and they are all
changed since our last conversation.”

“ How changed ?”

“But first tell me about yourself—what
has troubled you ?”

“ Want of what some folks are fools enough
to throw away—means.” Liph Green sprung
tohis feet, provoked more by the contemptuous
glance thrown upon him, than by the words ;
but receiving a look of disapprobation from
Allen, he contented himself with shaking
down another shower of blossoms, then fold-
ing his arms, he stood leaning against the
tree, and kicking the turf with his heel.
100 ALLEN LUCAS.

“hat is a common want,” said Allen,
with a good-humoured smile, “the gifts of
fortune are as unequally distributed as other
gifts, and for wise ends, undoubtedly.”

“Tt may be wisdom to give money to men
whose highest thoughts are of gilded car-
riages and fine establishments, while those
who are thirsting for knowledge—”

“Ave endowed instead with the supe-
rior power of obtaining it without money,
and making themselves worthy of the posses-
sion by the process,” interrupted Allen,

“Umph! the process of getting I should
think hard enough, without any additional
labour.”

“We find, however, that the additional
labour makes strong men—the more we do,
the more we are capable of doing.”

“ Well, I shall have enough to do, I can
tell you. Father isn’t quite sure that he can
furnish me with the needful, but I think if
he and the rest of the family are economical,
they can save enough, particularly as Fanny
has agreed to teach.”

“Why, I didn’t know as Fanny was pre-
pared to teach,” interrupted Allen.

“Prepared !” said Robert, sneeringly, “ fe-
CHOOSING A VOCATION, 101

male teachers are not required to be very
blue now-a-days.” Allen made no reply, but
nis mind, accustomed to examine conse-
quences, did not stop at the sacrifice that
the sister would make, and he wondered how
Robert dare, merely for his own sake, put in
motion such a train of evils. “ At any rate,”
resumed Robert, after a moment’s pause, “ it
is decided that I shall go to college, for no-
body can be educated without, but the point
that remains yet to be settled, is what pro-
fession to choose afterwards. However, that
must depend upon circumstances, and, (be-
tween ourselves,) what seems to offer the
best opportunity for rising in the world.
Because my father is a farmer and a poor
man, I am not bound to follow the plough all
my days—the greatest men have arisen from
nothing, and I know that what others have
done, I ean do.”

“Our circumstances are very similar,”
said Allen thoughtfully, “ and I can sympa-
thize with you with all my heart.”

“ What did you mean just now, when you
said you had changed your plans ?”

“T have concluded to forego the advan-
tages of a collegiate education.”
102 ALLEN LUCAS.

“That is the last thing I would do,” re-
marked Robert quietly, “every young man
in our country can be well educated if he
chooses.”

“And I mean to be well educated,” said
Allen ; “I have been looking too high, how-
ever, and must now strike out a humbler
path.”

“What need is there of it, Allen? Iam
sure you are better off than] am. Here you
have been earning money these three years,
while I have been spending it, and now you
are as well—yes, better educated than I am.”

“T should like to finish—may be I shall
sometime, but I can not go forward as you
will.”

“Why not? I thought you more lion-
hearted than to shrink from a task, because
there are some difficulties in the way.”

“T have not been much accustomed to
shrinking,” said Allen, raising his head with
a proud consciousness of self-dependence,
that no manly nature will bear to hear ques-
tioned ; “ I have already overcome some dif-
ficulties, and am prepared to combat more,
but it is ill-judged to make sacrifices greater
than the object to be gained will warrant.”
CHOOSING A VOCATION, 103

“Tn this case it would be impossible to do
so—no sacrifice is too great to make in such
a cause,”

“Not even a poor old father’s comfort,”
said Liph Green, who had been for a Jong
time biting his lips, and twisting himself into
various shapes, longing to interpose a word,
and yet afraid of displeasing Allen. “ You
needn’t shake your head at me, Allen, every-
body knows that old Mr. May is working
himself to death, for the sake of sending his
lady-son away to school.”

Robert curled his lip sneeringly, and, as if
disdaining to answer, continued addressing
Allen. “No man has ever attained to any
degree of eminence that halted and trembled
even before great sacrifices—”

“T do not tremble,” interrupted Allen,
“before any sacrifice but that of principle,
but there are others I would not make—I
halt only to examine.”

“Mary says your father is willing to de-
fray your expenses at college.”

“Yes, willing, but not able. My parents
are kind, and would do anything in the
world for me ; and my brothers are all gen-
erosity.”
104 ALLEN LUCAS.

“Then do tell what romantic notion makes
you throw away such opportunities.”

“Tt is a very unromantic one, I can assure
you. Think of my father, at the time of life
when he ought to be sitting at his ease, cared
for by his sons, sweating in the hay-field, my
brothers denying themselves the just reward
of their own industry, my mother and sister
bringing in their hard-earned mite, and my
younger brothers removed from school, and
sent out in the field to dig—do you call that
a romantic picture ?”

“Mary says they would willingly do all
in their power for you, and surely the sacri-
fice is small, in comparison with the good
result.”

“Tf the self-denial were my own, it would
be, but justice forbids one of a family to appro-
priate what belongs to the whole. Although
my father does not see it, and would not
knowingly do wrong, yet this would be rank
injustice to his other children, particularly as
two of them are yet in school, and would be
obliged to leave it if he should give all to
me.”

“Quite a hero, I declare !” said Robert,
laughingly, “but there’s one thing yet re-
CHOOSING A VOCATION. 105

mains. Such an independent, industrious
young gentlemen as yourself, can have no
objection to working your way along, as
many a fine fellow has done, who got to the
very top of the hill at last.”’

“ Not in the least, Robert, if such a course
were best. It is what I always intended to
do, and I have not yet quite abandoned the
intention. I have decided on going to a
trade, and hope I shall be able to employ
private teachers; but if not, a judicious
course of reading, and a knowledge of man-
kind will do much towards fitting me for my
sphere.”

“A trade, Allen! and so you have been
studying year after year, and gained the
reputation of being the best scholar of your
age in the town, for this. To what branch
of mechanics do you intend to apply your
wondrous knowledge? shoeing horses, or
making ladies’ dressing-tables ?”

“J might be more useful, and perhaps, co
myself as much honour in either, as I should
to crowd myself into a place for which I am
unfit ; an incompetent lawyer is vastly in-
ferior to a good blacksmith.”

“You are very modest. Though, perhaps
106 ALLEN LUCAS.

you did not mean to insinuate that the science
of law is above your comprehension ?”’

“No, I did not. I do not suppose it to be
above my comprehension—at least, more
than every other science—but I might be a
thorough student, and still, a very unsuccess-
ful lawyer.”

“And so, doubting your other abili-
ties—”

“Pity some other people wouldn’t doubt
their abilities,” interrupted Liph Green.

“No, Robert, my other abilities are un-
tried, and it is no fear of failure that has
induced me to become a mechanic. It is
simply choice; a taste for the arts, and a
love of active pursuits, with strong muscles
and industrious habits, particularly a love for
manual labour, would do much towards in-
ducing even you, with all your prejudices, to
abandon your high plans for a trade.”

Robert shook his head. “No, I would
correct such a taste, I would have self-con-
trol enough to make myself whatever I
thought best to be.”

“So would I, but my judgment goes with
my taste in this matter. The learned pro-
fessions seem to me to be full ; a young man
CHOOSING A VOCATION. 107

of mere ordinary talents I think, can suc-
ceed better elsewhere.”

“ And one of superior talents ?”

“lad better follow the bent of his inclina~
tions. If there is nothing to prevent his
studying a profession, and he prefers it, let
him do so; or if he has a taste for the me-
chanical arts, I see no reason why it should
not be gratified.”

“ But, Allen, think—if you take this fool-
ish step now, it will be a great many years
before you will amass a fortune, however
successful you are, and you will be an old,
worn out man, before you rise above your
business.”

“never intend to rise above it, I hope to
rise in it.”

“ And take it up with you,” said Robert,
laughingly.

“No, I have chosen an art too high for me
to ennoble.”

“So ho, Mr. Modesty! I begin to see
more clearly—an artist, eh ? which is it,
painting or sculpture oe

“Neither, and yet it was a favourite art
with Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians.

“ Architecture, eh 1”
108 ALLEN LUCAS.

“Yes ; do you think I shall be disgraced
by it?”

“Oh no, not by architecture, but to come
away from Greece and Rome, and talk plain,
every-day English, I must say, I do not
think Allen Lucas, the poor carpenter,
will ever arrive to a station of very “—
honour.”

“But everybody shall say he is a good
carpenter. I tell you, Robert, we need skill-
ful mechanics, and there is no class of men,
next our statesmen, that can do their coun-
try so much honour as these ; if they will
but improve their talents. Think of what
mechanical genius has done for us, and then
think what remains undone. If I learn the
art of building, I do not intend to be satisfied
when my term of service expires, that will
only be the introduction, and I intend to
practise and study, and study and practise ;
until I see if something cannot be done to
improve our anomalous style of architecture.”

“What ever put this wild notion into your
head ?” asked Robert May.

“T have read a great many works on
architecture of late, and Mr. Moreton is quite
enthusiastic on the subject—he has de-
CHOOSING A VOCATION. 109

scribed to me St. Paul’s and Westminster
Abbey, and a great many other European
buildings. I should like to visit the Capitol,
at Washington.”

“T mean to visit it before a great many
years,” said Robert with a covert smile.

“J hope you will,” was the reply, “but I
suspect it will be well for both of us to re-
member our liability to disappointment.
We have set our marks high, and it would
be very singular if we should both reach
them.”

“T, at least have one encouragement,” said
Robert, “more than you; mine is a well
trodden path, and you will have to break
your road, if you go beyond the great
thoroughfare.”

“Be it so,” said Allen Lucas, rising, y
should delight to be a pioneer.”

“ Just what I was thinking of,” said Liph
Green. “I have a great fancy for the far
west, and if you will go with me, you shall
try your hand at cutting down trees, and
then upon a nice log-house. O how we would
‘ennoble the art’ there, in the wilder-
ness!” Allen smiled, and cast upon his
volatile friend very much such a glance, as
110 ALLEN LUCAS.

a mother would bestow upon a child, whose
very faults were rather pleasant to her ; for
he had been more than a brother to the
orphan boy, and felt still more than a bro-
ther’s interest in his success and happiness.
“Mr. Moreton has fixed the matter just
right,” continued Liph; “I shall be ‘mon-
arch of all I survey,’ on my farm out west :
and in a few years, you will be hearing of
‘Eliphalet Green, Esq., of Greenville’—no, I
leave castle building to you and Bob May—
but just give me a start westward, that’s all.
I’ve a great fancy for farming, and should
like living in the woods, and hunting, of all
things.

“ But hunting wouldn’t clear your land,”
said Allen.

“No ; what do you think of that, though ?”
exclaimed Liph, extending his arm, and dis-
playing a fist, a trifle heaver than Robert
May’s. Allen laughed, and placed his own
beside it. “What! do you mean to say
it isn’t strong? just try it then! come, I
can—”

“No matter what you can do, Liph, the
question is what you will do. I have no
doubt but steadiness of purpose and perse-
CHOOSING A VOCATION. 11)

verance will make your hand as powerful as
a sledge-hammer.”

“here you are right, Allen, and I shal]
have a little log-house, all grown over with
eglantine, and a nice garden around it—I
shall take all sorts of plants with me—and
then I shall cook my own venison—”

“What of your wood-land and fallow,
Liph?”

“QI shall hunt all day, and fish in the
lake—”

“But who will clear and break up your
land ?”

“Who ?” myself of course. The old axo
will ring there, I can tell you, and the scared
birds will sail off in the air, and the beasts
will scamper—I shall always keep my rifle
by me, Allen.”

Allen smiled, but made no reply, for the
party had now arrived at a little brown
house, the entrance to which was familiar,
and where they were sure to meet Allen’s
sister, and Julia May, and may be other
visitors of the general favourite Lizzy
Parker.
112 ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER X.

LIZZY PARKER, AND HER FRIEND NANNIE.

Tue white-violet of early spring, blooming
in the lowliest nook, is not more truly a child
of nature, than was Lizzy Parker. She was a
gentle and dependent creature, always need-
ing support, and always finding it, carrying
peace and love wherever she went, and pos-
sessing a heart so full of sympathy, that even
feelings too deep for her to appreciate, were
soothed by it. Lizzy was an orphan girl, but
she had never known an orphan’s loneliness,
for the dear old grandmother, whose silvery
hair she braided in the morning, had from
infancy, knelt beside her pillow every night
to ask heaven’s blessing on the last, frail
blossom, that lingered after all the hardier
ones had been swept away. Favourite as
Lizzy was among the children, it was not
merely to see her, that they applied them-
selves so industriously to their tasks, in order
to spend a Saturday afternoon at Grandfather
Parker’s, They used to love to gather around
the old lady, as she sat with her knitting in
LIZZY AND NANNY. 113

the corner, and listen to her stories of the
olden time, or make their mock tea-parties,
and invite her to be a guest at the board, or
when the boys were present, to follow the
old man to his garden, and learn to play the
hero, while he “fought his battles over
again.” There were many attractions to
draw young hearts to Grandfather Parker’s,
but it was happy age returning to its first
childhood, with all the human feelings which
have been garnered up during a long and
blameless life, as fresh as when first awakened,
and all the softened affections, which are the
portion of those made better by bereavement,
clustering around the gentle and pure of this
world, that made this almost a paradise for
little children. As Lizzy grew older, her
visitors did not leave her, for although the
good old grandparents became less necessary,
they were not overlooked, and many were
the muslin caps, or yarn mittens, that found
their way into the little ‘square room,’ nobody
but the donor knew how. Many a time, too,
would dear old Grandmother Parker wonder
‘what made people so good to her,’ for she
seldom leaned on Lizzy’s arm alone when
walking, and never did a Sabbath pass, but
rp
114 ALLEN LUCAS.

some one of her wealthier neighbours called
before the door, to drive the old people, and
their pretty pet, to church. I do not say
but the evident pleasure they gave Lizzy,
might have had some share in winning such
attentions ; but nobody that witnessed the
old lady’s singleness of heart, simple piety,
and universal love, could wonder why people
were good to her. The little brown house,
which Lizzy called home, was a model of
simplicity and neatness, from the old side-
board on which shone the row of polished
pewter, down to the hearth-rug, wrought with
many a quaint device, or the three-cornered
pin-cushion, hanging below the very diminu-
tive looking-glass. The two pictures, and
yellow canvass sampler that adorned the
walls, were stiff and old-fashioned, but Lizzy
,oved them, for the former were subjects of
more vivid pictures in her mind, and the
latter she had been told, was the work of her
own mother in her girlhood. It was evident,
that poverty had taken up its abode in the
little mansion, but not want, for economy
and order keep such a visitant at a dis-
tance, and bring that comfort to the poor,
not always to be found where plenty reigns.
LIZZY AND NANNY. 115

Indeed, the old man’s pension was their all,
but it was enough; so said the pious old
lady, and so said the contented Lizzy, but
Grandfather Parker shook his head and
sighed, then laid his hand on Lizzy’s head,
and begged God to take care of the poor lamb
when he was gone. In such circumstances it
is not strange that Lizzy felt a peculiar
interest in little Nannie Green, and Mr. More-
ton’s adopted child was allowed free inter-
course with a family, whose every impression
must needs be pure and refined.

When they were all children together, it
had always been a contested point among
the boys, which had the best right to be
Lizzy’s champion, break a path through the
snow for her, or draw her on the hand-sled,
but as they grew older, the right of attend:
ance was gradually conceded to Allen Lucas,
and, for more than a year before he left
home, it was decided by all, save, perhaps,
the parties, or one of the parties most nearly
concerned, that ‘the lamb’ would be cared
for. But Lizzy, at least, whatever might
have crept into the brain of a dreaming boy,
never looked beyond the happy present, and
Liph Green, and his little fairy sister, and
116 ALLEN LUCAS.

Mary Lucas, and Julia May, were usually
with them, so that none but sharp-sighted old
ladies, and anxious grandparents, would
have seen anything more in their childish
intimacy, than they did a few years previous.
True, Lizzy shed some tears when Allen
went away to learn his trade, but this break-
ing up of old associations, causes as many
tears as ever were shed by parted lovers.
About the time that Allen entered on his
apprenticeship, Robert May commenced his
collegiate course, but the loss of the latter at
the Corners was trifling, compared with the
void that the absence of Allen Lucas made
in every circle. Robert had lived for and
within himself, but Allen’s first thought was
always for others, he was social and sympa-
thetic, and he found his reward in three-fold
returns of all he gave, being ever sure of the
good wishes of both old and young.

Little Nannie was obliged to bear a double
portion of the sorrow occasioned by these
changes, for she parted with the kindest, and
most faithful of tutors, and the most affec-
tionate of brothers, at nearly the same time.
Liph was a daring, enthusiastic fellow ; full
of warm fancies, and susceptible of deep
LIZZY AND NANNY. 117

emotions, but lacking some of the weightier
characteristics of manhood. The world to
him, was a wide field in which to revel all
his life long, and his foot could slip most dex-
terously along side the thorns, to tread on
the ever-blooming flowers. True, he was
not a man yet, and his character might
undergo a revolution, and it was for this,
that Mr. Moreton induced him to endeavour
to shape out his own fortunes, hoping that
self-dependence might give stability to his
character. Liph always looked on the
sunny side of an enterprise, talking of its
accompanying pleasures, to the exclusion of
everything less agreeable, and hence his
steadiness and perseverance were very apt to
be undervalued. Mr. Moreton, however,
knew his capabilities, and did not hesitate to
place him in a situation, which the people at
the Corners thought quite too important, for
one so trifling and wayward. Perhaps the
suspicion of a little secret, which Liph
thought all his own, might have aided Mr.
Moreton in forming his estimate of the boy’s
character, for he knew that there is nothing
like the prospect of some far-off good, some
star on which the whole future centres, lo
118 ALLEN LUCAS.

give singleness of purpose, and steadiness of
action. And such a star had arisen, when,
he could not remember, in the heaven of
Liph Green. Young as he was, and careless
and volatile, there was one lesson which had
sunken deeply into his heart, and the teacher
of it was Lizzy Parker. He never walked
beside her from the evening lecture, or
grammar-school, never talked with her when
there was any one else to talk, and never
showed his face at the cottage, save when
surrounded by a bevy of young misses, and
yet he liked no eyes but blue, no ringlets but
flaxen, and no face that did not resemble
Lizzy Parker’s. Even his sister, beautiful as
a little Hebe, suffered in his imagination,
when compared with his model, for rosy
cheeks though ever so full of bewitching
dimples, and lips that could pout, though
constantly wreathed in smiles, which were
as her breath to Nannie Green, and eyes,
danced they ever so joyously, or shone they
with ever so much soul, that could not boast
‘the heavenly blue,’ in his estimation, could
Jay no claim to beauty, And Lizzy—what
thought she of Liph Green? It is very pos-
sible, nay, very probable that she seldom
LIZZY AND NANNY. 119

thought of him at all, for there was not a boy
in the neighbourhood, that showed her so
few attentions, or did not come oftener under
her notice. True, she laughed heartily at his
witticisms when she heard of them, and al-
ways agreed with Nannie, when she called
him the best brother in the world, but Lizzy
thought everybody all goodness, until she
received proof positive to the contrary, and
even then she consoled herself with the
thought, that they “meant nothing wrong.”
She loved Nannie, because she was an orphan
like herself, and the friendship was advan-
tageous to both parties. Nannie had all the
faults that accompany superior talents, and
quick, intense feelings ; she possessed a proud
consciousness of her own powers, firmness
and decision of character and a high spirit,
the curbing of which occasioned her kind
guardian much anxious solicitude. Yet,
stubborn and self-willed as she was, Lizzy
Parker could lead her wherever she listed,
for gentleness always gains a power over
such natures; and, though several years
younger, Nannie’s natural superiority was
lost upon her meek and timid friend. Mr.
Moreton spared no pains in extending every
120 ALLEN LUCAS.

advantage within his reach, to his promising
protegé, and Nannie in her turn, dispensed
her new acquirements, as far as in her power,
to Lizzy Parker. The departure of Allen
Lucas opened a new era in the life of Nannie
Green, or as she was now called, Miss Anna
Moreton, for he was succeeded by music, and
drawing, and dancing, and language masters,
and instead of sitting on Allen’s knee, she
was obliged to play the young lady, and sit
bolt upright by the side of a tall, prim gover-
ness. Our little heroine did not, however,
allow her accumulated duties to dampen
her spirits ; she romped with the kitten in
the winter, and chased the butterflies and
birds in summer, and surprized her governess
by loving her books as well as she did the
free air, and the thousand attractions of the
out-door world. Mr. Moreton too, was sur-
prized at the depth as well as quickness of
intellect which she exhibited, and he took
the whole direction of her studies upon him-
self, and became her constant companion in
her walks and rides, By this means, her
physical education was not neglected, while
her understanding was cultivated to the ut-
most, her perceptions quickened by being
LIZLY AND NANNY. 121

trained to constant observation, and her
principles carefully guarded against the en-
croachments of thoughtlessness, as well as the
new theories so dangerous to inquiring minds.
There was but one fault in Mr, Moreton’s
system of education: domestic training, he
thought a matter of no moment, and could
not bear to see his little paragon busying
herself in the kitchen, or pricking her pretty
fingers with a needle. Nannie’s activity,
however, made up in part for the deficiency,
and after puzzling her brain over her books,
until she had won the usual applause, she
would trip across the lawn to Grandfather
Parker’s cottage, and sit down by Lizzy under
the shady elm tree, to be initiated into the
mysteries of back-stitch, cross-stitch, hem-
stitch, and the thousand other stitches, as
familiar to Lizzy as the A B OC. At other
times, she would try her hand at some simple
cookery, and when Grandmother Parker
declared her gruel and toast quite as good as
Lizzy’s, the pleasure that sparkled in her eye,
was not a whit less apparent, than when she
had effected the solution of some difficult pro-
blem, or obtaineé the perfect control of her
spirited jennet.
122 ALLEN LUCAS.

CHAPTER XI.

THE SELECT SCHOOL.

Srorriy after the departure of Allen and
Robert, there came a young lady to the Cor-
ners, and proposed opening a select school,
as a more fitting place for the education of
young ladies, than the district school. Mary
Lucas was delighted with the proposition,
and used all her influence to further the plan,
but this was an innovation for which few
were prepared, and it was accordingly dis-
cussed morning and evening ; at the black-
smith’s shop, in the hay-field, and at the
corn-husking, till at last winter set in, and
nothing had been done. Now the young
ladies grew importunate, and the fathers
were more puzzled than ever. As a relief
to their minds, a meeting was called, and
the question examined in all its bearings.
Some thought it would injure the district
school, others said that a knowledge of geo-
graphy, grammer, and arithmetic, was quite
enough for any girl, others talked of the
impossibility of sustaining two schools in such
THE SELECT SCHOOL. 123

a small neighbourhood, while another class
deprecated the niggardly spirit and con-
tracted views of their opponents. The de-
bate waxed warm, and the meeting was dis-
missed without coming to any decision,
Those in favour of the new school, however,
were determined to carry their point, and
immediately started a subscription for that
purpose.

“My, Moreton will be in favour of it, of
course,” said Mr. May, “ he is a great friend
to education, and he’ll sign a pretty round
sum too, I’ll warrant me.”

Mr. Lucas shook his head. “ Mr. Moreton
is a friend to education, but he is a thorough-
going man, and won’t believe in this baby-
work, You'd better not go to Mr. More-
ton.” Mr. Lucas had voted for the school,
but he was not at all backward in telling that
it was “only to please the women,” and his
plain common sense proved more powerful,
than the arguments of all the others. Mr.
May was suspicious that his neighbour might
be right, but there could be no harm in ask-
ing, and accordingly he waited on Mr. More-
ton, intending to give him the honour of
heading the subscription paper. Mr. More-
124 ALLEN LUCAS.

ton listened patiently to all the arguments
in favour of a select school, and agreed to
the propriety of establishing one. “If a
few families will unite, and obtain a first-
rate teacher,” said he, “I will not be back-
ward in assisting.”

“We have a teacher in view, that I think
will give general satisfaction, Mary Lucas
knows her well, and she says she under-
stands all the higher branches, The truth is,
the girls are crazy after French—I don’t
think much of this outlandish gibberish
myself, but it’s well enough to please the
girls—and painting flowers, theorem-paint-
ing they call it, and working in worsted, and
such-like trash; and they never will be satis-
fied with any common teacher.”

“Om ! a very common teacher, I should
think, would answer the purpose;” said Mr.
Moreton, “ does the young lady you purpose
obtaining, understand all these things ?”

“Yes; I have heard Julia talk about her
Jamp-mats, and cushion-covers, and other
fineries, by the hour, I don’t pretend to
know anything about these things myself,
but girls will be girls, you know; children
will be children.”
THE SELECT SCHOOL. 125

“Yes, but that is no reason why men
should make themselves children too, It is
ours to suppress folly, Mr. May, not encou-
rage it.”

“To be sure, but then I see no harm in
indulging our girls a little ; other places
have schools, and such girls as Abby Still-
man, and Mary Lucas, and Lizzy Parker,
ought to carry their heads as high as the
Smithville misses.”

“ Education never elevates an empty head,
Mr. May, and I am proud to believe that our
daughters have more practical knowledge
and sound sense, and withal more general
information, than many of their more showy
neighbours. It becomes us now, however, to
see that they do not retrograde. I am the
last one to condemn real accomplishments,
where they can be obtained without a sacri-
fice of the more important branches of learn-
ing ; but the less we have to do with these
make-believe accomplishments, the better.”

“ But sir, I thought Nannie—”

“ Nannie takes lessons of the best masters
that can be found, and pursues the solid
sciences at the same time, and I take parti-
cular care that she goes over no more ground
126 ALLEN LUCAS.

than she investigates, that she is thoroughly
acquainted with what she professes to under-
stand.”

“But I heard her saying the other day,
that she wished she could remember all she
had ever read—that people can never be
thorough in any thing—that they never
understand so much of any subject, but
there is more still to be learned.”

‘Nannie is a very little girl,” said Mr.
Moreton, “to make such sage remarks, but
she was right. Our thoughts and concep-
tions are limited, and when I speak of ob-
taining a thorough knowledge of a subject, I
use the phrase as others use it, compara-
tively. Nannie’s great fault, since she was
first able to spell out words, has been read-
ing too extensively, to read what we call
thoroughly; but you will perceive that,
young as she is, she has gone one step
beyond the superficial scholar ; she is con-
scious of her own ignorance and impotence.”

We don’t expect to give our children
such an education as Nannie will have.”

“Then let me advise you to secure the
really valuable part, and leave these super-
ficial accomplishments to those who are
THE SELECT SCHOOL. 127

foolish enough to spend time and money in
securing them. There can be nothing more
disgusting than to hear young persons talk-
ing conceitedly of sciences with the first
rudiments of which they are totally unac-
quainted; and this is rendered still more
painful by the air which they are very apt
to assume towards those they consider their
inferiors.”

“Yes, yes,” said Mr. May, “it was one of
Robert’s favourite sayings, when he was home,
‘a little learning is a dangerous thing,’ but
are we to conclude from this, that people
who can not know everything, must know
nothing ?”

“0 no, I would have people constantly
learning, the old as well as the young—you
and I, as well as our children—but I would
not have them catching the shadow of a
thought here, believing, meanwhile, that they
have the substance, and the caricature of an
accomplishment there, and after all their
trouble, know less than the man who has
stood in the field all his life time, and learned
only from his own observation. I would
have them understand thoroughly what they
attempt.”
128 ALLEN LUCAS.

“T hope you don’t think as Squire Smith
does, that nothing is necessary but the com-
mon branches.”

“T think everything is necessary that can
be obtained—everything, I mean, calculated
to make us wiser, or better, or happier; every-
thing that will elevate our characters, extend
our influence, or improve our social qualities.
This you will see, embraces a very large field,
and one that cannot be compassed in a life
time. But I would secure the nearest and
most important first, and look to it, that we
have all that we imagine ourselves to possess.”

Mr. May shook his head. “ You might,
perhaps, convince the girls, if they could
hear you talk, but I am sure nobody else
can ; they have got their hearts set on this
school, and I’m of a mind that it would be
best to gratify them for a few months. Julia
says she can learn French in two quarters—
don’t you think she can ?”

“Tf she has a phrase-book, she may learn
to say ‘bon soir,’ and ‘comment vous portez-
vous,’ in that time,” said Mr. Moreton, “and
very likely, rival her teacher.”

“Then you don’t approve of the school at
all 7”
THE SELECT SCHOOL. 129

“No, not of such a school. I have seen
something of this worsted-work, and theorem-
painting—neither require so much skill and
talent as are necessary to make a shirt, and
are about as improving to the taste, as mak-
ing cloth rabbits, or counting a hundred all
day. As for French and drawing, they are
very necessary to an elegant education ; but
I very much doubt the abilities of your pro-
posed teacher, and I assure you, young ladies
can have a very excellent education, without
knowing anything of either.”

“ What then would you advise us to do ?”

“If you think there are children and
means enough here to support two schools,
you had better obtain a first-rate teacher—
not one who makes the greatest professions,
but one who acknowledges with equal readi-
ness, What she can and what she cannot
teach—and establish a permanent school.
If, however, this should prove too great a
tax, and I’m afraid it will, I will be the first
to aid in establishing a young people’s library
as a substitute. These select schools are in-
creasing very fast of late, and I am glad to
see people waking up to the subject of edu-
cation, but at the same time, they should be

I
130 ALLEN LUCAS.

looked to very carefully. We are in great
danger of encouraging superficial acquire-
ments through these, by employing incom-
petent teachers. While we deprecate quack-
ery in medicine, we should be careful not to
allow quacks to prescribe for the intelleet.
The itinerating character of teachers, except
in our highest schools, lays us open to impo-
sition, and hence we should be doubly care-
ful whom we employ. Individuals and states
may do all in their power, and yet we never
shall have good schools, until men study the
profession of teaching as they do that of law
or medicine; until a good teacher can obtain
a situation that will be permanent, where he
can know that no successor will step in to
undo what he has done well, or take the re-
sponsibility of what he has done ill. Let a
teacher remain, year after year, where he
can watch each new development of the
mind to which he gave its first impulse, and
he will need no stronger incentive to exer-
tion.”

“This would be difficult to bring about, in
district schools. There are always some that
are dissatisfied, and would be glad to get a
new teacher, even before the winter is out ;
THE SELECT SCHOOL, 131

besides, good teachers are in a hurry to get
at some other business, and there isn’t one in
fifty, that would be willing to stay two years
in the same place.”

“ And scarce one in a hundred that is fit,”
returned Mr. Moreton, “ but that one should
be so well sustained, that he will not be in a
hurry to get at other business ; think what
would have been the result, if Mr. Dawson
had staid here till this time.”

“T wish he had ; we might have kept him
as well as not, for he always said, he meant
to spend his days in a district school. There
were two or three of us that did try our best
to get him back again, but Mr, Leonard
offered to come two dollars a month cheaper,
and we had to give up. Do you think we
are in any more danger of getting poor teach-
ers in select, than in district schools ?”

“Yes, rather more. District school teach-
ers have at least a form of examination to
undergo, and trustees are responsible for the
kind of teacher they engage ; besides, their
professions are not so high, and they are
therefore less likely to dazzle the ignorant.
I would not, however, have you understand
me to disapprove of private school:—good
132 ALLEN LUCAS.

ones are of inestimable value, but they may
be rendered very mischievous. - Such an one
as you propose establishing here, I am cer-
tain, would encourage folly and vanity.”

Mr. May turned away, perplexed. By
“ratifying the girls,” he might also gratify
his own ambition, but he was now well con-
vinced, that in pursuing the scheme, the
money wasted, and time misspent, would not
be the greatest evils. He communicated
the substance of his conversation with Mr.
Moreton to Mr. Lucas, and, as Mary was the
prime mover in the aflair, and Julia her
second, it proved to be an easier matter to
overthrow the plan, than the school-meeting
men had imagined. A very small, but well
selected library was soon after established,
under the superintendence of Mr. Moreton ;
this was afterwards increased until it became
quite extensive and valuable. “ Have you
read this book?” or “what do you think
of that one?” were questions oftener asked
than, “have you heard this ?” or “seen that
one’s new dress?” and there was, especially
among the young people, but very little gos-
sip and slander at the Corners.
COMMONPLACE INCIDENTS. 133

CHAPTER XII.

COMMONPLACE INCIDENTS,

Auten Lucas, with his established character
and cultivated mind, formed a striking con-
trast to the apprentices with whom his lot
was cast, but he was too frank and courteous,
too unaffectedly kind and generous, to be-
come the mark for malice or envy. He
never made them feel their inferiority, and
by heartily seconding any scheme for amuse-
ment which was right, and as honestly giv-
ing his disapproval of what was wrong, he
won their confidence, and gained over them
almost unbounded influence. Although la-
bouring hard from morning till night, his
books were still the companions that he best
loved, and he went on, improving slowly and
surely as he had done, when the thought of
Mr. Moreton’s library quickened his step, as
he hurried homeward from the field. Yet
there were many things to discourage him in
his new employment, he found that the
knowledge he had gained from books, was of
less use to him than he had supposed it would
154 ALLEN LUCAS.

be, in the art as it is now practised, and he
could but see that his master often set both
taste and convenience at defiance. Yet he did
not repent ‘going to learn a trade,’ for he
became an ardent lover of his craft, and at
every visit he made the Corners, he left
upon the little farm-house, still oceupied by
his father, some remembrancer, until there
was an air of simple elegance thrown about
it, quite foreign to the original structure. In
truth, the Lucas family scarce appeared the
same as formerly, for a refined intellect casts
its sunlight upon all with whom it comes in
contact. Everything about the house, in
spite of Mary’s high notions, was perfectly
plain and simple, and yet any one would have
preferred the little parlour with its neat mus-
lin curtains and rag-carpet, to all the gaudy
finery that decorated that of the wealthier
proprietor of the Corner farm, ‘Squire Smith.
These little matters make more in-door sun-
shine than anybody imagines; indeed, the
reciprocal influence of inward and outward
beauty would never be doubted, could every
one take a peep at Mary’s little private libra-
ry, and see how the beauty of the spirit was
nurtured, and then how it expanded on the
COMMONPLACE INCIDENTS. 135

bright world without. Still Mary had her
dreams of greatness, and her vanity peeped
forth not seldom, but she had grown gentle
and lovable, and withal, sensible and mo-
dest.

Since Allen had decided on learning a
trade, he had secretly cherished a plan for
his two younger brothers, and indeed, his
decision was influenced in no small degree
by this same generous plan. The assistance
that he had refused from the family, he was
resolved to give them, and he commenced
the education of Richard and James, even
before the term of his apprenticeship expired.
His future intentions, however, were not made
known to them, and their strongest induce-
ment to study, beside love for the subject,
was to accomplish this before Allen came
home, or attempt that because Allen thought
it useful.

To all appearance, Robert May sailed
smoothly along, and, maugre his reiterated
complaints of the coldness and selfishness of
the world, his letters to Alien were full of
bright anticipations for the future. But Allen
was not the only one who shared in these
auticipations. To Mary, they came as golden
136 ALLEN LUCAS.

links in the chain of every-day life—love and
ambition both pointed to the same object, and
much as she owed her brother, and much as
she loved him, there was something very like
contempt for him in her heart, when she
compared his humbler aspirations with those
of Robert May. It was Mary’s one fault—
who has not more? Ever since Mr. Daw-
son came to the Corners, Mary had been the
confidante of the sly student, and no plan for
future aggrandizement could he suggest, but
enlisted all her sympathies. In every airy
castle builded by the imagination of Robert
May, Mary took the deepest interest, twining
all the flowers around it, and frequently put-
ting on the top-most stone, till, how neither
of them scarcely knew, their interests became
identified, and before the young student had
spent more than one vacation at the Corners,
jests and smiles, and meaning glances met
them at every turn, and they were, as by
general consent, left to each other’s society.
As to the young people themselves, the J and
you were turned into we, and brighter than
ever, danced hope’s gilded meteors in their
far-off future. To fit herself to become the
wife of Robert May, was now Mary’s sole
COMMONPLACE INCIDENTS. 137

object, the one dream of her nights and days,
and to this, everything was brought to con-
tribute. Books and society, and the world of
nature, were all laid under contribution ; if
she went to the neighbouring villages, it was
to observe with an immediate view to her own
improvement, if she read a book, it was to
prepare herself for his companionship, and if
she looked out upon a beautiful scene, her
pleasure was heightened by the reflection
that she could be pleased, and the evidence
thus afforded of a taste refined, and worthy
of him. Mary’s ambition was all turned into
anew channel. The hopes that were cramp-
ed and shackled when self was their object,
now found a limitless field, and, expanded
on a second self, they became more refined,
higher and holier.

While Allen Lucas had become master of
his craft, and by his daily toil, was assisting
his brothers to a thorough education, and the
rest of the family were economizing all in
their power, to furnish Mary with a respect-
able dowry, Robert May was still bending
over his books with a perseverance worthy
of all honour, but with a heartless disre-
gard for the sacrifices others were making
138 ALLEN LUCAS.

for him, that+could not be too much con-
demned.

Years dally not for pleasures or for pains,
and at last Robert May gained the point on
which, for eight long years, his eye had been
fixed. Ere this, however, he had seen the
kind indulgent father, who had toiled and
sacrificed all for him, within his coffin ; his
glad, gay sisters had become all unlike them-
selves, and want, and sorrow and misery, had
taken up their abode in his once happy home.
His mother, who had been an invalid for
years, was now entirely dependent on his
sisters, and he could do nothing for them.
Worse still, Mr. May, who, until a father’s
pride had made him a recreant to his prin-
ciples, had boasted that he owed no man a
penny, for two or three years past had con-
tracted debts that swallowed up the value
of the little farm, and he had left his family
entirely destitute of the means of subsistence,
farther than their own hands could gain it.

Robert bore his examination well, and was
admitted to the bar, but when Allen Lucas,
without waiting for the congregation to dis-
perse, grasped his hand, the congratulatory
words died upon his lips, for now that the
COMMONPLACE INCIDENTS, 139

fever of excitement was passed, what had
that pale, anxious, care-worn face to do with
joy ?

“J havn’t heard of any place for me, yet,”
he said in reply to Allen’s looks rather than
words, “and I am tired to death, with hoping
and being disappointed. I hear of a fine
situation here, and when I think it almost
secure, some puppy, who has money or influ-
ential relations, steps in before me, and takes
it away.”

“You must be patient—’ Allen com-
menced.

“ Patient ! ay, be patient and starve ! you
needn’t look at my threadbare coat, Allen,
I don’t care for that, and maybe I shan’t
change it these five years, but I can’t live on
air.”

“T have no doubt but you will gain a
situation, Robert, but you must not wear
yourself out with anxiety ; talent will dis-
cover itself, and sooner or later, its possessor
will be appreciated.”

“No, Allen, talent has little to do with
making great men now-a-days. Money buys
rank, and consideration, and respect ; but I
am friendless and poor—ay, poor—without a
140 ALLEN LUCAS.

single penny to keep me from starving. This
day has been the very sun of my life. Fool !
how I have longed for it, and lived over and
over again all its incidents and—no matter
—only wait a little, and I will teach these
gray-beards that I am not so insignificant as
they suppose.”

“Who ? what do you mean, Robert ?”

“Do you see that fair-haired fellow yon-
der, he with the opera-glass ? There! now
he is quizzing us, the impudent puppy! You
heard his answers—do you believe I should
have been admitted, if I had given them ?””

“Would you change places with him,
Robert ?”

“No, no! but you see what it is to carry
one’s brains in the pocket, and how those
venerable judges—”

“Come, come, Robert, you’re in a murder-
ous humour to-night, and T’ll not hear an-
other word. Mary has been waiting for us
this half hour—”

“T can’t see Mary to night—let her be
happy if she can, my murderous humour
would not make her more so.”

“ But her gay one will make you more so;
come, I shall carry you off, in spite of your-
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 141

self,” and drawing the young misantrophe’s
arm within his own, Allen hurried him away
to the hotel, unheeding all remonstrances.

CHAPTER XIII.

DISAPPOINTMENTS THE PORTION OF ALL.

«“ Jysr twenty-four !” said Allen Lucas, as
the stage-coach whirled him towards his na-
tive place, “just twenty-four | and how I
have been prospered! I have obtained my
degree without studying a single day within
college walls, and have put Dick and Jemmy
in a fair way to rival me. They are fine lit-
tle fellows, and not a penny expended on
them will be thrown away. And now for
Robert and Mary, poor things! This forever
looking on the dark side, is the bane of their
life. I wish they were not quite so ambi-
tious, and would be content to begin the
world with the little we can give them. The
few hundreds father has saved, is a fair por-
tion for one whose first lesson was economy,
and I can well afford to set them up in house-
keeping—” at the word housekeeping, Allen
142 ALLEN LUCAS.

Lucas became suddenly thoughtful. It was
evident that he was thinking of Robert and
Mary no longer, for the disturbed look passed
away, and a calm, quiet smile settled on his
handsome features. “TI will see her to-night,”
he at last said, starting up, and crushing his
hat-crown against the top of the coach :
“there is no use in waiting any longer, for
my business is prosperous far beyond my ex-
pectations, and she is not so aspiring as Mary.
I have at last put everything in the right
train, and this is all that is wanting to make
me happy.” The stage-coach neared the
Corners, but Allen did not wait for it to draw
up before his father’s door. He caught a
glimpse of a white muslin dress by the river
side, and in a few minutes, he stood within a
stone’s throw of Lizzy Parker. Lizzy was
not alone. A slender, graceful youth, with a
face brimming over with mirthfulness, was
bending one knee before her, and in a tone of
mock gallantry, begging some favour. If the
stranger’s careless and somewhat outre cos-
tume, al] corresponding with the green hunt-
ing-frock, had not called to Allen’s mind the
returned Westerner, the face, the figure, and
the attitude, could not have been mistaken.
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 143

Lizzy did not enact the queen very well, for
she laughed confusedly, and finally, tearing
off the velvet band that confined her luxuri-
ant tresses, she threw it towards him, and
retreated a few steps, laughing more heartily
than before. The youth seized at once upon
the treasure, at the same time leaving a hasty
kiss upon the fair hand that granted it so un-
graciously, and then busied himself with
knotting it around a wreath of flowers that
lay upon the ground, “That is for her head,”
thought Allen, “and she is evidently well
pleased with the offering,” and he drew him-
self more within the shadow of the friendly
elms. Allen waited until the fair violet was
crowned with sister flowers, and, arm in arm,
the youthful lovers, for such they evidently
were, had disappeared among the trees, and
then he turned away, and with a slow step,
proceeded homeward. “Yes, it is true,” he
murmured, “ I am respected, but no one loves
me, and I have toiled and toiled my life long
for this—she cares more for his folly than—”
Allen paused. Words of bitterness were for
the first time for years, hovering on his lips,
but he did not speak them. “ No, no,” he
exclaimed with energy, “I will not be un-
144 ALLEN LUCAS,

just! I love him too, as a brother I love
Liph Green, and this shall not destroy our
friendship.”

Allen made no haste to reach home, for
his mind was entirely occupied by another
subject. He knew that his early friend had
yet a touch of his former recklessness, but the
goodness of his heart was unquestionable,
and when he remembered his never-failing
vivacity, the peculiar grace which character-
ized his every word and action, the headlong
impetuosity with which he would rush into
danger, and sacrifice everything for the sake
of his friends, together with his warm-hearted
generosity, delicacy of feeling, and character-
istic integrity, he did not wonder that he had
stolen so successfully into the heart of Lizzy
Parker. Liph Green, even when a boy, never
did or said anything as other people would,
and he possessed the art of winning the love
of even those who most condemned his actions,
He doubtless owed much of this power of
fascination to the dash of chivalry in his
composition, and his unceasing flow of spirits ;
but the warm fountain within, which gush-
ed forth despite of coldness and unkind-
ness on every human being, was the strong-
DISAPPOINTMENY’S. 145

est magnet to draw around him kindred
hearts.

“ Yes, Lizzy has done well,” Allen at last
repeated, “I ought not to wish it otherwise—
they will doubtless be very, very happy.”
He stood at his father’s door. He placed his
hand upon the latch, and then withdrew it
—he could nor bear to meet the happy faces
within, for he had for the first time brought
to those who loved him, a heavy heart.
There was a rustle behind him, and imme-
diately a light scarf was thrown over his eyes,
a little hand all quivering with agitation
grasped his wrist, and he was commanded in
a whisper to “ stand still and guess.” He
turned and caught in his arms, not Mary,
but Nannie Green.

“ow dare you ?—don’t kiss me !—there,
if you do again—I,—I tell you I am a young
Jady—almost fourteen, yes, almost— sweet
sixteen’ in two years, think of that.”

“ Not fourteen these six months yet—don’t
think to cheat me, Nannie ; why you would
be glad now to sit in my lap, and be rocked to
sleep as you used to be. Now don’t open those
big eyes of yours, such airs are very unbecom~-
ing in a young lady, and these long curls—’

K
146 ALLEN LUCAS.

“ Wa, ha, how I should look with my hair
strained up into a comb. I’ve got some news
for you, Allen. Liph has come home, and
he is going to marry Lizzy Parker, and they
will stay here as long as the old people live
—I hope they will live forever ! Just think
of a wedding—next week it will be, and you
have come just in the nick of time—don’t be
so fidgety about going in, there’s nobody at
home, they’ve all gone to Smithville.”

«So when I come back, lonely and tired,
I find the house empty, and my little pet
metamorphosed—”

“No, I will be a little girl to you, Allen,
because you played school-master to me once,
and you teally seem old and demure, but to
nobody else I protest. Yes, now I think of
it, Allen, you look very old, ten years older
than when you were here last, and so sober !”

“Jam not very happy, Nannie.”

“Not happy !” and every dimple fled from
Nannie’s face, and her sparkling eye became
soft and humid. “ Now don’t be frightened,
my good little girl, I am not at all miserable,
I assure you.”

“Q don’t try to take it back—you are not
very happy.—that is strange for you, Allen.
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 147

Come, we will go into Mary’s parlour, and
you shall tell me all about it.”

“T have nothing to tell, Nannie, I am only
a little sad as men will sometimes be, you
know, without cause.”

“Other men will be, but you are never sad
without cause, Allen ; if I am a little girl, I
know you too well to believe that. You
wouldn’t make so good a schoolmaster as
you did, when you told me how wicked it
was to equivocate.”

“ Perhaps not—we will let it pass now—”

“Yes, that is the best way, let it pass.
You should have said, though, I am unhappy,
Nannie, but I can not tell you why, and then
I should have pitied you without asking a
single question.”

“Well, pity me, now; yours is the only
pity I would have, but dont say anything to
Mary, of my dull spirits.”

“No, it would make her very unhappy.
Brothers are not very often loved as you are,
Allen.”

The young man’s face brightened, and he
murmured half unconsciously, “Yes, I am
loved—Mary shall at least be happy—I can
give them all now.”
148 ALLEN LUCAS,

“ Allen,” whispered Nannie Green, “ for-
give me if I am officious, but I feel as though
I had a right to say one word to you. You
carried me in your arms from my mother’s
grave, and I sobbed myself to sleep upon
your shoulder. You encouraged Liph, when
everybody cried out against him for his hor-
ror of pauperism, and you have done more
towards making him a man—don’t interrupt
me, Allen, you know it is true—or, if you
don’t, everybody else does ; father speaks of
it every day. What I owe to you—”

“Excuse me, Nannie, you have said enough
of these things.”

“ Well, then, I have proved my right to be
very impertinent.”

“Say what you please,” Allen began hesi-
tatingly, for he felt sure that all this prelude
could introduce but one subject, “ yet remeim-
ber that there are some things—”

“No, dear Allen, nothing that your little
pupil, your pet, your sister, can not say to
you,” and Nannie clasped her little hands
together, and lowered her voice. “ You are
doing wrong, very, very wrong, to wear
yourself out for those who will only ask more
—those who will never thank you, and never
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 149

give a thought to your weary limbs, and
lonely heart. Robert May is a heartless,
bad man—he don’t deserve Mary, though, if
she will marry him, let her; but, Allen, don’t
kill yourself for them, don’t care for every-
body but yourself, and then when your health
is destroyed, and your hair grows gray with
toil and sorrow—” Nannie’s picture was a
little too much for her, and again she sobbed
herself to sleep on her old tutor’s shoulder.
When she awoke, it was to find the other
arm occupied by Mary, and the room made
a very Babel, by the confusion of a multitude
of voices. Her first glance was into Allen’s
face, but the shadow had passed away, and
the expression there was one of heartfelt
happiness. “Yes,” said she, “it makes him
happy to see others so; he will kill himself
for them.”

At the first opportunity, Allen whispered,
“You guessed all wrong, but, Nannie, don’t
try to guess again.”

A proud flush overspread the child’s face,
and she drew her hand from his. “ Guess,
Allen! how can you think me so mean! I
know it was not proper for me to say what
I did, but I hate propriety when it interferes
150 ALLEN LUCAS,

with better feelings. To think I tried to
guess! You have changed, Allen, grown
suspicious, and you don’t understand me.”

“J do understand you, my own darling
pupil, I read that kind heart of yours like
an open page, and you must not mind one
thoughtless word ; I do understand you, and
am grateful for the unselfish interest—now,
do not stand back, biting your red lips, and
playing the young lady to me. Nannie,
Nannie, I am sad and lonely, my head aches,
and my heart is weary—”

“J will be your own little girl again, and
always, whatever you say to me. Put your
head on the pillow, Allen, and dream of all
the good you have done, and that will rest
your heart.”

“Js that your own remedy, my sweet phy-
sician ?”

“©, I never need it—I shall always be
happy where you, and father, and Liph, and
Lizzy are.”

“There is such a mixture of the child
and woman about her,” thought Allen, as, a
moment after, Nannie was tumbling on the
floor, in company with Mary’s kitten, “ that
] believe she is half right in saying I don’t
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 151

understand her. She startles me by her
shrewdness, and yet she is as true and
simple-hearted as when she used to sit on
my knee, and read baby-stories. I wonder
where she picked up that notion about Ro-
bert—he is ambitious, selfish it may be, but
not heartless—no, not heartless—O, if he
should prove so!” Allen’s own disappoint-
ment had made him distrustful, gloomy fore-
bodings hovered over his mind, and it was
with difficulty that he could bear his part in
conversation, Early the next morning, he
announced his intention of limiting his visit
to one day, for he could not bear to meet the
faces of those he loved best, and employment
was better suited to his state of feeling than
leisure.

“Then let us make the most of this short
time,” said Mary, “we will send for Julia,
and Nannie, and Lizzy—”

“Let us spend it by ourselves, dear Mary.”

“Why, how strange you have grown,
Allen ; for Robert, it would be nothing un-
usual, but you are so fond of company.”

“ My mother and sister are the best com-
pany in the world within doors, and it will
take me a great while to go over the farm
152 ALLEN LUCAS.

and see what has been done, and hear what
is going to be done.”

“But, unless you have serious objections,
Allen, I should like to make a small tea-party ;
it would please our friends, you know.”

“Do as you please, Mary ; but lest I have
no opportunity to see you alone, here is a
trifle which I wish you to use in any way
you think proper. I will also add something
to your little—”

“ Allen, brother, this is too much—keep
your own hard earnings to yourself—I will
not rob the whole family for my benefit.”

“T{ do not need it, Mary—no one has been
robbed for you ; it is ail a free-will offering.”

“This more than compensates,” thought
Allen, as he felt his sister’s heart throbbing
against his own—“ they must be happy.”

Allen went out to view the farm, and Mary
sat down to write to her lover. A few
months only had passed, since Robert had
received his diploma; but to the impatient
young barrister they were ages. He was a
thorough student, and a fine pleader ; but he
lacked those more shining qualities, the tact
and insinuating address, which win at once
the favour of the public ; and he had not as
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 153

yet been favoured with business. “Be patient,
stay where you are best known, and in time
you will be appreciated,” was Allen’s advice
to him. But Robert May could not be pa-
tient ; he had toiled long enough, and it was
time he reaped some reward. ‘This was the
burden of his letters to Mary, and hers were
full of encouragement and hope. Now, her
heart was light indeed, for she had good news
to communicate, and her little hand quivered
like a bird as it glided rapidly over the paper.

“ How excited you are, Mary,” said Allen,
who had entered unperceived, and stood by
while she made two or three unsuccessful
attempts to seal the letter.

“Tf you knew how much trouble he has
had, and how this will relieve his mind, you
wouldn’t wonder that I am so happy. He
will get it to-morrow evening. How I wish
Jim was back !”

“He has come—what will you give me—”
and Allen held a letter far above his head.

“0, I was sure it would come to-day—it
has been so long—give it me! do, dear Allen,
quick. May be there is something in it I
ought to answer.”

“A true lover’s letter,” said Allen, as he
154 ALLEN LUCAS.

saw the letter unfolded ; “ no, nothing on the
margin; I thought that was the place for
sweet things. But what is this! look, Mary ;
look, my love, at this paper! Robert May
married to Isabel B.! What does it mean ?
It must be a false report! What says the
letter ?”

Mary did not move a muscle! her face
grew pale as she read, but she stood proudly
and firmly until she had finished the last line.
The announcement in the paper was only too
true. Isabel B. was the daughter of a certain
Judge of high standing and extended influ-
ence, but she was an ignorant, narrow-minded
woman, whose peculiarities Robert had often
ridiculed, and whose weakness he despised.
The young barrister was capable of appreci-
ating a character like that of Mary Lucas; he
loved her better than any one but himself,
and it required a strong effort to pen the
words of separation. Yet his ruling principle
must be gratified, influential friends he must
have to give him consequence, and he chose
rather to be the son-in-law of Judge B., than
the husband of Mary Lucas. “We both
have talents,” said his letter, “ and that is all
—we are both ambitious, but together our
DISAPPOINTMENTS. 155

ambition cannot be gratified ; it is better for
both that we part and form some other
connection, that at least one of our young
dreams may be realized. I know your pride
is equal to my own, and your aspirations are
as high, and so you will be able to appreciate
my motives, though Allen and others may
blame me for what I have done.” Mary
crushed the letter beneath her feet, and
thanked Heaven that he had made himself
known before it was too late. But the next
day the red spot had faded from her cheek,
and the fire in her eye was dim. Well was
it for Mary that her brother was by to sym-
pathize with and soothe her.

“You must never leave me now, Allen,”
she said, and the young architect at once
concluded to make his father’s house his
home, where, if his business, which might
extend into the neighbouring villages,was not
quite so profitable, he could at least have the
satisfaction of making himself useful. There
are some persons whose especial office it
seems to be to soothe the afflicted, and remove
the difficulties that beset the pathway of life ;
and one of these was Allen Lucas. The
Mays. in particular, owed many little kind-
156 ALLEN LUCAS.

nesses both of word and deed to his care, for
Robert was out in the busy world winning
golden opinions from the multitude, and he
had but little time to bestow on a worn-out
mother, peevish and garrulous from long
sickness, and sisters whose minds were un-
cultivated, and whose gay spirits had been
bowed to the very earth with trouble.

“Tf we had more to give him, he would
not neglect us so,” Julia often said, and
Allen Lucas had reason to believe it was
true. Robert May received empty honours
from men who cared not whether he rose or
fell, and was unloved even by the wife of his
bosom, while Allen Lucas was respected by
all his acquaintances, loved by a large circle
of friends, and almost idolized by those who
knew him intimately.

CHAPTER X1Y.
A SCENE AT THE CAPITAL.
I was ona fine, clear morning, during the
winter session of Congress, that a party of

travellers, somewhat striking in their appear-
ance, and yet entirely free from ostentation,
SCENE AT THE CAPITAL. 157

drew up before the door of one of the princi-
pal hotels in the city of Washington. The
gentleman, a fine, intellectual-looking man,
in the summer of his days, appeared a com-
fort-seeker of the better order, for all his
arrangements were made with a view to ease
and convenience, and there was something so
simple and unpretending about the whole
party, as to prove them quite above the ne-
cessity of pretence. He was accompanied by
two ladies, the elder of whom mirrored his
own features in her face, softened and sub-
dued by a pensive, thoughtful expression,
that stole from the depths of her large, dark
eyes, and lingered in a sad, loving smile,
around a mouth remarkable for nothing but
the exquisite beauty of that strange, sweet
smile. This lady had evidently seen more
than thirty summers, for the smoothness of
her cheek, and roundness of her form, had in
a measure disappeared, though she still pre-
served much freshness and bloom, her bear-
ing was graceful and dignified, and, in all
respects she had probably never been so in-
teresting or even so beautiful, as at this
period, when the flowers of her spring-time
lay withering on her brow. If the soul had
158 ALLEN LUCAS.

been wanting, the mechanism of the face
might have served as a foil to many of the
gay belles constantly passing and re-passing,
but there was an angel in that face, and its
charm was unrivalled. The other lady was
several years younger, in the very heyday of
life and bloom, the glory and pride of beauti-
ful womanhood. Care had never laid its
cankering finger on her heart, and if she had
ever looked on sorrow, it was in days long
agone, when every impression is like letters
traced on sand. Her step was stately, and
even proud, as she passed along the line of
gazers that seem as necessary to the piazza
of a hotel, as the columns that support it ;
but once within the door of a private parlour,
and her manner assumed the playfulness ot
childhood.

“And so this is the far-famed Washing-
ton,” she exclaimed with affected pettishness,
as she flung herself on a sofa, “the head-
quarters of that great nation of which we
were so proud only a little while ago; I de-
clare, it looks like a Swiss village.”

“4 fair challenge, Nannie,” said the gen-
tleman, laughing, “but an entire failure, not-
withstanding. Not a word will I say, even
SCENF AT THE CAPITAL. 159

for Washington, until I have had some din-
ner.”

“Then patience help me,” exclaimed the
lively lady, throwing off her travelling hat,
and in the act, unloosing a comb, that sent
an immense volume of hair curling in wavy
lines, and floating almost to her feet, “ for if
I should die of ennui among these scattered
hamlets, not a word of sympathy should I
get from Mary.”

“Your impatience comes too late,” said
the elder lady with a smile. “When we were
in a real hamlet, and completely drenched
with rain, you did nothing but laugh.”

“O that was so ludicrous: I laugh every
time I think how we all crawled under one
umbrella, like a parcel of scared chickens,
and how that square-shouldered Englishman
with the red bandanna, fumed and fretted.”

“There was nothing ludicrous, however,
about the dark den that we stumbled into the
first night we spent in Florence, and yet you
did not complain, but kept up your courage
and spirits bravely.”

“Ah! that was the certainty of being in
Florence, Italy. Who would think of com-
plaining in that cradle of the Muses ?”
160 ALLEN LUCAS.

“ And who would think of complaining in
this cradle of Liberty ?” echoed the gentle-
man.

“ Conclusive !” said the lady, “I am of
course convinced, but somehow, you have
said a word for Washington, even before
dinner.”

“A more heartfelt word, notwithstanding
its playfulness,” said the elder lady, “ than
some of those self-styled patriots, that come
here to give us laws, would pronounce, I
have no doubt.”

“Self-styled, Mary !” was the earnest, re-
ply, “if not to them, where shall we look for
patriotism ? they are elected by free men,
and stand up before the nations of the earth,
to give wholesome laws to a free people.
World-styled patriots, you might with more
propriety call them.”

«T believe politicians generally,” remarked
her companion, “use patriotism as a varnish
merely, to gloss over and give smoothness to
their schemes—there is but very little of it
in the original composition.”

“ One too severe, a very little prejudiced, I
should imagine, and the other too enthusias-
tic,” said the gentleman. “ Bad men climb
SCENE AT THE CAPITAL. 161

to power, and good men are elevated to it.
The frailties and virtues of human nature
mingle in the hall of legislation, as they do
everywhere else, but while the nation is in-
telligent and moral, virtue must predomi-
nate.”

“T plead guilty to prejudice,” said the
elder lady, “though I believe I have no very
unreasonable share of it. Did you recog-
nise the apparation that I pointed out to you,
as we passed this morning ?”

“That old man on the side-walk ?”

“He is not a month older than you,
Allen.”

“You must have been mistaken, Mary,
that man was sixty years old.”

“Tt was Robert May.”

“Nonsense! why, he was as crooked as
Grandfather Parker. Robert May is a mem-
ber of the lower House, however, and if you
have no objections, I should like to see him
once more—in public, I mean ; of course, we
should not seek his acquaintance.”

“T am certain that I was not mistaken.
Allen, though I cannot tell how I recognised
him, every trace of our quondam friend has
disappeared. I should be very glad to look at

L
162 ALLEN LUCAS.

him once more too, for although I think I
am completely cured of undue ambition, I
should like to see the lesson written out full
and plain, as I know it will be on his face.”
Before this time, our little party has proba-
bly been recognised, and we have but a word
to say in explanation, Allen Lucas had re-
mained a bachelor until he was more than
thirty years of age, and by industry and
economy, he had amassed a little fortune.
It had early been his intention to visit
foreign countries, for the sake of improve-
ment in his art, but now that he had the
wherewithal to put his scheme into execu-
tion, his consideration for others stood di-
rectly in the way of its accomplishment.
Since the day that his sister had thrown
herself on his sympathies, she had been his
constant companion, and it seemed selfish to
divide their sources of enjoyment now. -Then
there was another, Allen would fain have
associated with her, for his betrothed bride
was the orphan, Nannie Green, and there was
almost a fatherly care mingling with his love
for her, something like that he felt when he
first led her to Mr. Moreton’s door, To in-
clude these two in his plans, he must defer
SCENE AT THE CAPITAL. 163

the execution of them yet several years, and
the more he thought of it, the more difficult
it seemed to leave them. The thought of
Nannie Green’s bringing a fortune with her
had never occurred to him, for in spite of the
great change in her circumstances, she had
always been to him the helpless orphan,
deserving of all care and sympathy. He
still toiled on, success attending his efforts,
and when he wedded, instead of the little
beggar girl, Miss Anna Moreton the heiress,
the aspect of his affairs was so changed, that
his contemplated excursion was merged into
a bridal trip to England, and the tour of the
continent. Allen’s devotion to his art, led
him to examine every foreign structure of
note attentively, and he had returned richly
laden with information that would be invalu-
able to him in after years.

“That is he,” whispered Mary Lucas to
her sister, as they looked from the gallery of
the House of Representatives, upon the
venerable men of whom that body is mostly
composed.”

“Not that,” said Nannie, “you must be
mistaken.”

Mary shook her head. “ Look at those
164 ALLEN LUCAS.

thin, closely-pressed lips, Nannie, and those
small, black, hard-looking eyes—even in his
best days I was afraid of them—and then,
that wavering. undecided motion of the hand
—he is the caricature of his former self, but
don’t you recognise him now, Nannie ad

“Tt may be—ye—s—yes ! now I do! his
little eyes glitter, and he gives the chair just
such a look as I have seen Liph get from
him many a time.”

It was not strange that Nannie found so
much difficulty in recognising Robert May,
for he was indeed, as Mary said, “ the carrica-
ture of his former self.” His hair was griz-
zled by premature age, his eyes had sunken
deeply into the shadow of his projecting eye-
brows, his cheeks were hollow and bloodless,
and his bended form, and yellow, shriveled
hand, could not have been considered the
property of youth, or even of middle age.
But superadded to this, were forbidding exhi-
bitions of the enclosed spirit, that had made
this wreck of its fair casket. Sometimes he
assumed a listless air, and a vacant expres-
sion took possession of his countenance, but
this was usually transient, and gave place
to a care-worn, anxious manner, like one
SCENE AT THE CAPITAL. 165

harassed with difficulties, and wearied by dis-
appointments. Again, his look was eager,
greedy and malignant, his eye rolled from
side to side with the rapidity of hurried
thought, and his teeth were buried in the
flesh of his nether lip; then, in @ moment
his chin would be resting on his bosom, his
eye-lids would droop, his eye peep out aslant,
his finger creep along the table before him,
and the low cunning and petty malice of the
fox, appear written in every feature.”

“Oh, he must be a terrible man !”” said
Nannie, with a shiver, as she clasped both
hands around Mary’s wrist.

“No,” was the quiet reply, “he is a selfish-
ly ambitious man. He is disgusted with his
success, and maddened by every obstacle—
he would change our form of government
into an absolute monarchy if he could, and
seat himself on the throne ; but when there,
he would be more dissatisfied than he is now.
Self, is the centre and circumference of his
desires, and they will gnaw deeper and deep-
er, until they have eaten the very life from
out his heart.”

“ow different from Allen ! he has no
time to be selfish, for every minute is cl-
166 ALLEN LUCAS,

ployed in thinking of somebody else. Don’t
you remember how he spent one whole night,
laying plans for the beggars at Rome, and
how the old monk laughed at his enthu-
siasm ?””

“Yes, but he afterwards acknowledged, if
there were half a dozen men like Allen, in
the city, his plans might be carried into
execution.”

“Allen never waits to inquire who is in
distress, but wherever the distress is, whether
in foreign lands or his own neighbourhood,
there go his heart, and head, and hand. The
millionaire, who doles out his money ever so
yenerously while he lives, and leaves the
aggregate of his wealth to charity at his
death, can seldom accomplish as much good
as Allen will in his life time, for his whole
soul is in what he does, and his advice is
often worth more than his money. We shall
never be rich, in gold and lands, I mean, but
© if we can together walk a Christian life
here and lay up treasure in heaven, a thou-
sand times happier shall we be than if pos-
sessed of all that this world’s wealth could
give.”

Mary smiled a reply, and clasped more
BCENE AT THE CAPITAL. 167

closely the hand of the young wife, but now
the confusion that had enabled them to hold
this little dialogue had passed away, and
Robert May was the next speaker. He was
eloquent and subtle, and he wove a web of
sophistry, that it required all the skill of
Allen Lucas, as he gazed intently from his
stand in the gentleman’s gallery, to unravel.

“That man’s mother and sisters, were left
to receive a burial at the hands of charity,”
whispered Allen in his sister’s ear, as they
passed from the House, “and but for our
dear Nannie’s kindness in encouraging, and
good sense in advising, his only remaining
sister would have been irretrievably lost. I
have always wondered at Nannie’s energetic
interference on that occasion, and at her
practical wisdom in giving the poor girl a
trade.”

“¢ Her husband also, and he praiseth her,’”
said Mary Lucas, aloud, while a look of
pleased affection beamed from her eyes, “the
world has no higher happiness for me than
this.”

“Nor for me,” said Allen, as he dropped
some coin into the extended palm of a blind
beggar.
168 ALLEN LUCAS.

« Nor for me,” echoed Nannie, looking into
jer husband’s face.

The crowd jostled them, and the rich and
the poor, the wise and the ignorant, passed
by them in quick succession, all unconscious
that there were individuals in their midst,
who bore in their hearts a heaven, made by
the union of benevolence and contentment.

THE END.



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12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:09 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:10 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:11 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:12 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:01:13 PM












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DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090911_AAAAUG' PACKAGE 'UF00001708_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-09-10T23:28:33-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:02:31-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300086; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-11T19:05:05-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '143318' DFID 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVGU' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 63d647697c05eee9146ab7b94a3b13e6
'SHA-1' 902761f9d13590a9082b49bb2ff5567c696c3bb3
EVENT '2012-03-31T15:45:26-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'30136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVGV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
f6a7e59bb537718755f9d8e8f8bb610f
04f2b5be0061146a6965fc0c9be644982c3da0a6
'2012-03-31T15:47:38-04:00'
describe
'9620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVGW' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
59350538920fad302079ef774a255a4d
ce3fb4a64ff78449f0e9995d0ce1bc714e4bdb67
'2012-03-31T15:47:19-04:00'
describe
'1484119' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVGX' 'sip-files00001.tif'
5561e8f15cc3430640aa33f9696ff38f
d4b333a1d876f264c4aba852f3a382c68f153f6d
'2012-03-31T15:43:47-04:00'
describe
'3253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVGY' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
74ebd325ba828fcc560fe899ae6841f7
1bfa58b7f55f777322fe673079e5631e62b27e01
'2012-03-31T15:42:55-04:00'
describe
'166382' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
bb9eebe507b46861e6792598babaf290
f123d3d5dc75fa8d0b553ddac10dc7486af34811
'2012-03-31T15:42:59-04:00'
describe
'39477' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHA' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
5e9e92290fcf2f541d46b5e29afd1446
7fa56cb69369f8810d498bec7b4bbc1b128e8662
'2012-03-31T15:43:53-04:00'
describe
'13140' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHB' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
0220f61176d430e320d30fed385c911d
a750d5144b04865eee4def8068b7be577804bbdc
'2012-03-31T15:46:37-04:00'
describe
'1482703' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHC' 'sip-files00002.tif'
2f09ab7a7b17186c4dc5c3656ff88156
414cb690cabeec4c943751e4e5734299de08555e
'2012-03-31T15:46:14-04:00'
describe
'4578' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHD' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
61aaeaa7dcb743d27f8f81e38ee6c103
8c549b4e3459e5c38786db19fd66b68146555319
'2012-03-31T15:43:45-04:00'
describe
'111607' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHE' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
c8106e71deac357a023679af40296911
d4f0e1b64e50fed6409cf763097a26978761fb05
'2012-03-31T15:42:51-04:00'
describe
'23102' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHF' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
1cae0d3a9f1589cc9a582520c8d841ff
0d3c3d5d5ff4b0d7cdcc830ef1d535978a9acbad
'2012-03-31T15:47:34-04:00'
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHG' 'sip-files00004.pro'
f08d6c4a3089cc969b6b5f8f4c1e2d25
cef8f3129354abee407f3dde590a84ed755a011e
'2012-03-31T15:44:40-04:00'
describe
'7195' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHH' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
21a177f08a581b417f515f19fb33f2f1
9c931fdd2788682b88fa0a82d05312412ebbbfc8
'2012-03-31T15:43:57-04:00'
describe
'1316867' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHI' 'sip-files00004.tif'
874e0292cbda8200be1248ec69f5840e
121ca6af684ce6ff637a5fe1c20f7b125556a26e
'2012-03-31T15:43:54-04:00'
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
6753482d2b07a819e8e1410a0935f417
e491e1780ea8abcd186ac038fe2ba9731d6fe2df
'2012-03-31T15:47:11-04:00'
describe
'2531' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHK' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
ea016945da5024772be653780c01a709
572be7d4ea459d5b37cd9a0a08d31e19b20074f3
'2012-03-31T15:45:21-04:00'
describe
'187975' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
379fec1481ad6b84b0cfe27c3ea22a49
49c024487e546c8cd09cc072fa0696b93f0b4a5a
'2012-03-31T15:43:38-04:00'
describe
'126590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHM' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
8a4ec9a6cb5a5420a5c7d5b45c3f6e19
ccc9a973d0504c3efcce3fabc4c0fca959699b2c
'2012-03-31T15:43:03-04:00'
describe
'45707' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHN' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
e9b4fbac412f34cb38f4b0ef3b3419a2
0bce7792a05fa3ccc1421ed3af5904b075c16135
'2012-03-31T15:42:45-04:00'
describe
'1504455' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHO' 'sip-files00005.tif'
25d0e23e68ba851da0aa2abc0891bd15
3b281571dbf768d172f1eb9780c79b2daa749693
'2012-03-31T15:47:45-04:00'
describe
'16079' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHP' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
f6a3e97963b5175e4594f438ec9adcf4
361d507ea98c1be2de80ede27bbb9c73d0a5c11b
'2012-03-31T15:44:51-04:00'
describe
'171749' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
029e0d89880f35eb4ad65e700d03ed14
979945731403cc00d125f5c4d35e34a66ba47e0a
'2012-03-31T15:47:36-04:00'
describe
'73324' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHR' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
630bb48584ab7d3716bf9b897f5021df
1579350061c2417e976362279a0c724540e14251
'2012-03-31T15:46:19-04:00'
describe
'4360' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHS' 'sip-files00008.pro'
c1f3008f68f0e7c008a0dc5b9ffe6cd1
83eb7b6b0ce5917ce8f377b995807345fa4bb00d
'2012-03-31T15:45:04-04:00'
describe
'39437' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHT' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
7dfd96bdb4bb71127b4eb4be6a093e89
3209bef56c8c7cb1f5c8fee96ce1726ef5c49776
'2012-03-31T15:42:54-04:00'
describe
'1394432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHU' 'sip-files00008.tif'
e823d6eb10c1b719fea0ab942b71656b
4046f1123df8a024f52fdc02fefebccf4cd32dbb
'2012-03-31T15:43:32-04:00'
describe
'280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHV' 'sip-files00008.txt'
371862a1c8641ce83c528b56b33fa02e
9b456f65e457046d5ec7b582892881634ec014b3
'2012-03-31T15:42:40-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'27412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHW' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d8b7ba4c590e5fa158e18266283f4b2b
f516536c96f2ea475cdb993f154cdea316adb184
'2012-03-31T15:42:41-04:00'
describe
'89750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHX' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
d2a864318244e75b1ae44d959e72e64d
f3f13978e23c7070f8d24fa8107f9b37134e5dbe
describe
'13210' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHY' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4b1f9a1edc0a3d298a753dd06421fcf8
9133056f543c70ce6f26b3ae7bb1adb2c47eb7b9
'2012-03-31T15:45:42-04:00'
describe
'3395' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
770f3a6ca02437f528969167d3456077
ee5927c0a1acd164b7a59dd5d2ecbef0ba3decbe
'2012-03-31T15:46:49-04:00'
describe
'1422831' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f1ca5b3321523f6c0e715bb1dd2ce542
141418020524ddd3322cebe06680d42b6ea43d37
'2012-03-31T15:45:36-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2d0af8635dafb9e128b2d1dcd9ad7a39
d2ecada1220e86a6ba9704f7d8ffc340f1df5589
'2012-03-31T15:42:36-04:00'
describe
'169093' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
4594aa37c3399f597b94c602b4a30099
c65326f39e1a9b7621a5f94c6abec363b8445cc2
'2012-03-31T15:47:09-04:00'
describe
'45065' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVID' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
68eab3f4d02eb7c04d2b2696f40c2a1e
663225cefd569d147640c926a9dd055691aa13ed
'2012-03-31T15:43:20-04:00'
describe
'17350' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIE' 'sip-files00010.pro'
ec2f6b0fc630782fd83fccbd5c18b04d
3bf0c5f995b842fa48666ce7b988c03ae66d2c6e
'2012-03-31T15:46:25-04:00'
describe
'17119' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1f50a76a29fdda36b2e55d028afb126f
f3cca3afcb1846e213c76ac5c284c0b58ce1649c
describe
'1353495' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
10d8791eb832fc97099281ca472e295b
46ccd40377f617f7fa50d8598cdb74635329fc55
'2012-03-31T15:43:31-04:00'
describe
'754' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIH' 'sip-files00010.txt'
5ef019404df376f9dd8e778d9f74810f
8c711dc1848d21a30127c62ef89db29b509b8db5
'2012-03-31T15:43:46-04:00'
describe
'5774' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVII' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
df54f5cd131227fa6c10dece1d52ed9e
462b0ca3e06733d9ce139c00de02cdad56441c9d
'2012-03-31T15:44:25-04:00'
describe
'81876' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d0d673979565f6c673e645e3f08f4e39
f61da9e98828f659f67fc6baf290cd2b8ea9af1b
'2012-03-31T15:44:52-04:00'
describe
'11774' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6886aadbef4c92794176758a5ec12b62
7c982b3ea658429e8fb52e6deed7231a7e21e1a4
'2012-03-31T15:43:13-04:00'
describe
'3156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
50bf664a9185a624107e1751e131b111
21d3a6591ee8f82974c3e5ceedcf39c7b48945db
'2012-03-31T15:47:58-04:00'
describe
'1401515' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
86d7f930145be7e26ab19da9297c18b5
b84e53e203dcc2046e5b12b06298700b0d52345a
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7d6e04a9fb95bf7570b057a983859141
461f7a7b6f65a1ea89cbc37d46e8796e0f194153
'2012-03-31T15:45:15-04:00'
describe
'170347' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
e08f4c228fb81bda63e8af6f807f85a2
dbf4a0db711fef1b3d270787c13d77a04b91ec0c
'2012-03-31T15:46:47-04:00'
describe
'106006' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
4efdd19588a94e0199b293d8169c66be
47cea8bc2d2531e34ff88931126f2bbf02bf2f77
'2012-03-31T15:47:20-04:00'
describe
'20314' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
58c6ff0fe38adadb2da954114446e784
bae29159587c146b1084804b8b171330573d4d91
'2012-03-31T15:47:53-04:00'
describe
'54582' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIR' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
ba2eedef92114fafced4454ede4d6dc2
e9efbc0d007a4af2a1a24aad942359ec78e5cda5
'2012-03-31T15:45:56-04:00'
describe
'1384076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIS' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2b6f8d1b16293fceccc72c5abe35f98d
13feefad2e0a68d46b5ef80bdfa8b089e4ff311d
'2012-03-31T15:43:41-04:00'
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIT' 'sip-files00012.txt'
4e8068a225b184c14a44b2527efa77a2
d76622cf7695cdcebd385d9a58dc5103cd66f95e
'2012-03-31T15:46:27-04:00'
describe
'32126' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
bea8c9aa2d7838b8e73b60aa95fac99d
00a64a5216f372e367f335cc7267116dde054977
'2012-03-31T15:46:55-04:00'
describe
'174022' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
2fe4712fe73fe56b31cc34d65e29f08a
eed155a068a8331e57919b903ddfb9e6c570c4c2
'2012-03-31T15:45:52-04:00'
describe
'105621' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
6abf85afbdbb46ebac61759bb818b4ec
9c637a235143c1033029677bfb36b1648e937794
'2012-03-31T15:42:33-04:00'
describe
'29136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
f862afae12798bb916cfa95fc7a83187
127f86dc85371db9a86f2629977be2ebbb26e445
'2012-03-31T15:44:02-04:00'
describe
'41923' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
b2f37853bfbd1b16d83e3fcb6806402f
2bb1fb61041f4a7ec95cb6102231eb284324bc9d
'2012-03-31T15:43:26-04:00'
describe
'1393327' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
292f1e66bd70333bfe882d1dc2e91166
f66dcdf1a725112deaa08621dc215c6efb5c4fd8
'2012-03-31T15:43:33-04:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
5f64a448d270d1a9afd463544c407283
fbd3a2b3ab6db8a784ecd86e5ae744cc9abb9b60
'2012-03-31T15:45:32-04:00'
describe
'12051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJB' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
143affc896b5609c96019f4f2fca8a9a
1b5ef8201e3026eeeabac7a45b2afe55d08095d2
'2012-03-31T15:45:16-04:00'
describe
'170225' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJC' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
9de7352f6668e362f88fb29fb867aed5
f5061ea4c0acdb601713126772e8b76deba1ef82
'2012-03-31T15:43:49-04:00'
describe
'126169' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
846ad273b99d3dc8cd0639ad7d9d2374
a1761fa275ac91f1da878d2182e17469e961ec95
describe
'28241' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
251cbbb5517749b61aedead5549bae80
6a6b89f4007eec5236a8ce203165a08177721f78
describe
'64078' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
1e054e33549895324db8a58fa01814d1
02d257d52303dd44ea145d859b5ec6ad6169d12e
'2012-03-31T15:44:49-04:00'
describe
'1384316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJG' 'sip-files00014.tif'
adc8679ab94363b60c22ff896253ce88
d71191712e934d25694bd72a7423c5003eed76a8
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
7a99db16055bf468fe4b38ee7999339a
f10044fd8909f15a1cc37044b0fa120d877305e9
'2012-03-31T15:43:17-04:00'
describe
'35824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
f3ecb453eb5b092a0231df16c7cd295b
defd0713357dea0c129e1f278b2fa4034fa92620
describe
'173609' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
e317f977a3e06680278c8319965bdb24
18e29030dd196444e922d4d25ddb6b50806f48d5
'2012-03-31T15:44:16-04:00'
describe
'106458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
cac3d8cfdc9c51186e2eb662ad08cfa0
0b717a47385f8dcd4890449a4e399c51d7573bd5
'2012-03-31T15:46:51-04:00'
describe
'28719' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
4e8bf21034ebd7b3570b4b8011648493
16bef87ca2a63d0d0cea810ec46fd122c6c609a7
'2012-03-31T15:46:59-04:00'
describe
'41557' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d605bf7f12b424b1cd3df1dabaa118a3
8a71b9db10b9045253fa3f28f51fb37f8b5a589a
'2012-03-31T15:43:01-04:00'
describe
'1389863' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJN' 'sip-files00015.tif'
073369bac17bff1690b6e49837ff0fe5
4bb0b6148de78a948954dadb2da1ccfa13148561
'2012-03-31T15:46:33-04:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5af6bf5b51b1f6793580377217c9db7e
8ff9498744eac0ca3c4400251f276ef61013668c
'2012-03-31T15:45:24-04:00'
describe
'12562' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
34d0dd638436a85daa1de7d5fb6580cd
a5c912fcd07f140f4681cf9bba1dd1327a6b3908
'2012-03-31T15:47:21-04:00'
describe
'169753' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
16358fe7f920f70b4738a8e954018fae
59e3925f6abf49f30c13a975f22135b880912967
describe
'126331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJR' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
5c0a95e101d2ba831578ca9930955b10
bab821a9d68454cbb76b2eca2e71ea7a5d9fcf4b
describe
'29183' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
1363f5345ade5ab1db3443881316da45
71932340fc57a07b3ee69659ae92a7e4a844f4b5
'2012-03-31T15:46:09-04:00'
describe
'65265' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f1fa564632d48637a8e361a64dc88a9f
bbc8d6fbde5408dd7e3535c85308119d54c2e353
'2012-03-31T15:44:43-04:00'
describe
'1380300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJU' 'sip-files00016.tif'
56faf1375b2f16be41eaeb5af300d524
97ceb5e514e311dc89fc62e0af9be804f223bb50
'2012-03-31T15:42:46-04:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJV' 'sip-files00016.txt'
8476f388c4916445b4af666221f09de9
f6c4d9c6715486d47036edec049e0453e4739dbf
'2012-03-31T15:46:30-04:00'
describe
'36865' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJW' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
04018345976a672f9399ac346058e3e2
7e9370ea5c453539e37c18f6bc39b90030ffa6d1
'2012-03-31T15:44:57-04:00'
describe
'171427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
09a86163dbfc4b3ba6ec793fec8a4092
c3fcc035bd58448814c49c27e1d95bc0004033eb
'2012-03-31T15:45:02-04:00'
describe
'107458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
64afe31acd9227724aca02e3d574da1e
0bb744cd444dee162cf65f22305f0154d0d25862
'2012-03-31T15:46:50-04:00'
describe
'29277' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f2a3feb01cb8c7a22354285a1a4c960a
fbbc63861fd1a401c2f7ffe29ab3efbf3e4e5985
'2012-03-31T15:43:07-04:00'
describe
'43225' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
890e3018f83fa97a1882542eb37c64a3
c8d7428ee6a9ed068a01d0c510749110c81e4e84
'2012-03-31T15:47:16-04:00'
describe
'1372155' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
ca341db20046b10164a0031c4c20b97c
0ce83739da16cd58487218ff860540a460a6edc3
'2012-03-31T15:45:18-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
240734a5281b2e82ef6f41908792cd35
c39f1106477944017046f6a76aacbd8ee25ed874
'2012-03-31T15:44:41-04:00'
describe
'12699' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKD' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
abf49a5050a4a0a48d9db3141b0e870a
a718b8b016e4642ded87358cba5c5e52d5d6ddda
'2012-03-31T15:47:41-04:00'
describe
'167481' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKE' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b2a97c86b5b1434c5c6d6a30ed5922f4
7c979bd7fb9f56da914cfe59558e70545ff1f7ad
describe
'129768' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKF' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
85e2299a61486eac7fdeb815a1c4d6e1
225208ad0949e67d5461197bd5175e0f4f193d3e
'2012-03-31T15:47:30-04:00'
describe
'28443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKG' 'sip-files00018.pro'
a5fc943b3e05c2be2860fa615635a491
559c47539725b5f6150e91f9516f31fa8c404345
'2012-03-31T15:46:11-04:00'
describe
'66255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
16e1a6f3e03965059f6231fd6bc27a5b
18fe0327e5ff023359bea27c2d2b2f50c099b84c
'2012-03-31T15:45:23-04:00'
describe
'1362292' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
83bf28e091aef939c4ff68849748f243
ad30c48d0747df3b892b5080e16cafb35773ea49
'2012-03-31T15:47:27-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e06d2e481702fab39f56764cff3b5fbb
5101681ea22ea02ac7fc81fbd4ffb56871114bae
describe
'36105' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKK' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
bf30c4899064afb84b56f78ea738a875
24b89ebd40fd4062dace659eafe7c4de037d0314
'2012-03-31T15:43:22-04:00'
describe
'172681' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKL' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
4fc560f8c23524fe0cc12580bb9e57e2
29367c66d854b7eb8eddaae342c441e9a78fe189
describe
'110338' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKM' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
bede499a6960c8158339d8f1ad658473
c7787a69922f08de78e805b4c205a8e20d685981
'2012-03-31T15:44:48-04:00'
describe
'29521' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
5673f5ed0da4ba8bce0b22de241a6fe5
99e5a6c240d1ddcdf63385df75507790ea3f77a6
'2012-03-31T15:44:44-04:00'
describe
'43092' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKO' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
256337d4a22fc00f9016a664959fd2b2
b873259ca5f105ec3ff986f14220785f63c03deb
'2012-03-31T15:42:35-04:00'
describe
'1381907' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKP' 'sip-files00019.tif'
a8bd0f4f0312c621fff63a721a121be4
7622711475124921cffbce78e5a5e74deee7f95c
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKQ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
57a6a3b66c838b6f0fdc1483f8860a94
13d4e920b3427c01fedf206a9c5ec650e0d751ff
describe
'12962' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKR' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
26b3a30db637912e56c2042827dd4b0d
d45f755e3b276d56560fe3dd476a341a347c76d5
'2012-03-31T15:44:20-04:00'
describe
'166860' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKS' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
844773374fbb19b2a687a1d6770986c8
e51a50bf1b7217ac6caa1940b632ea459e0a8f03
'2012-03-31T15:46:46-04:00'
describe
'112883' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1e467450c63a8ae2cd0aa367726f3d27
ba3d9e1125d4f87d01126e78029ac3b7634b118d
'2012-03-31T15:46:57-04:00'
describe
'23568' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKU' 'sip-files00020.pro'
69de97c75c46b9f433297ca8e90e91fb
6cc9039ab8085183ac59ac4ce3e887ad0c58b38c
'2012-03-31T15:46:43-04:00'
describe
'58816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKV' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
93753d8decf05d4be5a19a705ed1580b
d9b79848430b7287695acf1b174683392d8bf74f
'2012-03-31T15:44:34-04:00'
describe
'1356952' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
10b5893c394ac7d05f6a5e76e01d58bc
b1d095d3b9bd6fb6b87496303236b0ab266e964e
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKX' 'sip-files00020.txt'
87a8ebd9ec6cd961232b65f80e981919
bcedf9c7d5ba4ab08c2328a36151851691877086
'2012-03-31T15:46:26-04:00'
describe
'34754' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
f24825a71f90364e1dce7e73cc11069b
c5ba5420f605e69070704baffa78f394ac2921e3
'2012-03-31T15:44:28-04:00'
describe
'168231' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVKZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
84af99546441be469a3a51935b874b25
74b705f8b9e623badab73604c799e5d1b7c55c25
'2012-03-31T15:46:06-04:00'
describe
'106525' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLA' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
92dece8ae80f45d6d95e3379229ad98c
520a7bf4e13676457cde98b4363a877737b828c6
'2012-03-31T15:47:33-04:00'
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLB' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f9e385bcf5f1f765053916bb080f1321
f469705f01f3448d005b6e051e1000157bc2e08b
'2012-03-31T15:48:02-04:00'
describe
'42389' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLC' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
62a4fc2aea8455476e658eb5982757f2
20665917a04cb42ca0d60bee3287684c077ecee3
'2012-03-31T15:44:38-04:00'
describe
'1346511' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLD' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c747c25019a4ab2384b6e7af6478a72a
d1f3c0be619907c6cfbf94253d7768451ac88c15
'2012-03-31T15:46:04-04:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLE' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5757c948bf486361a81dae8175aec0a6
4e0d870fb28ced824e8ede982959826ff455b89c
describe
'13222' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLF' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6a292b13c917f14af6f3a893bd3f64a1
579f74a60afe53034931ff5da17b0bd2218a94ea
'2012-03-31T15:46:07-04:00'
describe
'166443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLG' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d0c6d3233aa37975952f90ad25d22b91
41ff0258b2a2cb39ae775ae7886d53a04ae976e1
'2012-03-31T15:45:09-04:00'
describe
'111964' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLH' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8d5fdebaad616b951b7bf130e9717dbb
613cd00ce86519d31cfbf515f2017df58ba9f846
'2012-03-31T15:45:17-04:00'
describe
'29503' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLI' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b1545814b83fa969503a03f53a6b2d57
50acfcedc02f11cb43907593c42e274f6b8b0585
'2012-03-31T15:43:51-04:00'
describe
'44044' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLJ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
763fccbf10d958ba132237b627d0d9c0
cc0b32564bedce629bf5e0be2c3bd0b4ec64edfb
describe
'1332139' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLK' 'sip-files00022.tif'
b97261d34a3eb4337e1169ca79bcc512
208de3c10672f0ced131679413f89c5076354857
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLL' 'sip-files00022.txt'
c5eb1af4f9db5d744434a35e213b842c
91ea25b91f4acb19babe9822fa59861f7a4d231c
'2012-03-31T15:42:34-04:00'
describe
'14283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
988cb6f9f61ae14427f9619b185feb90
2a0fb9c8343df68452642cef94066ab9f944ef30
describe
'167682' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bd94834cb991c2f1227fa5a7b7235e9d
2b924807b513a07f20ed9ef061e8a7e5a1b8c6b4
'2012-03-31T15:47:31-04:00'
describe
'130437' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLO' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
11ff49250eee42f6265861c1e8eaa30a
4760e099223869003656947d577b8b77ad7c939a
'2012-03-31T15:46:52-04:00'
describe
'29320' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLP' 'sip-files00023.pro'
e53d8c39a6e23ab3192dcf62640d43c2
2781b2475c009280c33cbcf0d4e2c44939ed36b7
'2012-03-31T15:47:12-04:00'
describe
'64859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ee06ae4afd0589def619296d4373b714
bcaacee8bd22be3112466340795a73f30ab1cc91
'2012-03-31T15:43:37-04:00'
describe
'1363972' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
fee6473ca032f5f75debfa71127aee8c
077f6302c114a78bad4f7c6f13744be873b7367d
'2012-03-31T15:46:10-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c724f376b43933f901dea124205818f2
2a8a895f65de32e19878f99970259c4ca70e61e3
'2012-03-31T15:44:33-04:00'
describe
'37226' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d4eafca53c1f05094fc5f42bf293f05e
fa8b71b993e1f9b641abc6a3b636cb5788308ec8
'2012-03-31T15:45:05-04:00'
describe
'168876' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ded4ef6857b86a57e687b0eb89fd3725
28d49f5613d08b6e982791db10748ba0737ba55a
'2012-03-31T15:44:22-04:00'
describe
'108829' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
52a5a05a90f17e38e46887a8c54344d3
035bf96913958ab99cb2801b612a92e0a9a0c8c3
'2012-03-31T15:46:08-04:00'
describe
'28143' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
b3963fa84e25d70a9f101eb574a61b6d
193aea34cbe2be5f16d133ddfbab3c5098a3fc09
describe
'42365' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLX' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
5357f56f8a0867a7bb3faa295296f7a3
59a8cd6c5395cce9223081f7cf1f32bbdacefe34
describe
'1351491' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLY' 'sip-files00024.tif'
5470645bc7bf3ff3232636f252c87ab4
e84f121b7304bb4cc71216880f5a35a3c019832a
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVLZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
4bc1b5f19c4a0a3002a298dfa4f5fca8
eb93cac579dced6abd2bd490560bd7abab77dccc
'2012-03-31T15:45:01-04:00'
describe
'13833' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMA' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c99139b740fcfef83390bf9e3b24cca4
64885702df0a1f0af0aebb9c1730b24c6c9aa135
'2012-03-31T15:47:28-04:00'
describe
'170573' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
5f0e92e567bc9017c49fa047ba48e064
f94cb9c57364ec014014702cb3257e47138aea05
'2012-03-31T15:44:30-04:00'
describe
'132466' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
c58035c89dda7c2d9bce6c3c68f372d9
e51df2b28f44e73a4e359342245b0c5ff40b0df5
'2012-03-31T15:45:35-04:00'
describe
'27958' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMD' 'sip-files00025.pro'
9bfaf863b139263aac026b3768be3220
161f3216fcc9f746a566f5c4168e5be1329edc08
'2012-03-31T15:45:30-04:00'
describe
'66548' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVME' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2500ea1a78f0d9c2ea4a1c14adde486c
936b405f7fee5c839a697746efa98a969d088e0a
'2012-03-31T15:48:01-04:00'
describe
'1387280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
d89fc2eafab97f8d8ede88bb4d76e496
0c2b25bd98453bc37e5b0303583fd88087986259
'2012-03-31T15:46:22-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
560625385ff9f1ee5eec00617e5fd302
04c7dfda6113e284cc9fc9a4f325303a46cf58e0
describe
'36402' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
3273022f94479d094bfa1a7f124d8c89
a5760be8e5a27883ab032ab736fd4179b9628045
'2012-03-31T15:44:21-04:00'
describe
'166407' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d81f39d7adc0595fbe4982baa52f88de
ac84c71318782f6e521179f1f0ea948cedd6e92f
describe
'98410' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMJ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d9e6bd3d4443eff604cf814c52140047
e678b2beb3c9f49364b8cca91c9af8a4860ae39a
'2012-03-31T15:46:32-04:00'
describe
'24503' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMK' 'sip-files00026.pro'
22badca5755463d04db1446eb24b8ed8
2ab7f21ac0ad88425ec223c1d14c00a7cb847bc1
'2012-03-31T15:47:48-04:00'
describe
'37561' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVML' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
755dbff15fdf78cb8253fdbfb40e95fb
febea466ebeb299ba646b8e1f8b16f92b5d7b3f2
'2012-03-31T15:47:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMM' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e48749daa6efe512ef74e714368bf6f4
2a40d4e12cb08214fdb49be3b9cedd057c28d585
'2012-03-31T15:43:30-04:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMN' 'sip-files00026.txt'
f6318de87f29be0baea679c0315e8b42
4fcd4f943b201d968e910fde506ece55b0159395
describe
'12916' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMO' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
cabaf44aae7c8334d309c260f39c62cb
adaa7257da4249d8bd50c3bdc970c96301a11890
'2012-03-31T15:44:01-04:00'
describe
'170543' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMP' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f5de32a9e0c098cb413afd5ec005788d
e40fff80a94d38a71a0272d6f66d8d28cb7bc604
'2012-03-31T15:43:11-04:00'
describe
'129318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
24566f22f87ecd34cc358b897ffcac27
c309e65586e1342ee60175d71b69b2dfc8385eed
'2012-03-31T15:45:22-04:00'
describe
'29289' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
b274a6417e5ce2afb8eeef785403d380
54b01e47b8408b71a68daa4613a3775ad79e8ca0
'2012-03-31T15:47:26-04:00'
describe
'63995' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
db45f02d4d6420ae18fb0ef335f9935c
6fa2298d99ab3464cf8478b4f2feab2ea6ae6b5f
describe
'1386604' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c266922172084dcc61012eb422aaacad
e846514672b018b447425b6cea635d33f67afb5c
'2012-03-31T15:48:00-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ec803be8d2aa76a3132c89963a08a842
f3e9329a00cc3f77a1af1c3bc1d3bbc0c2fb98cb
'2012-03-31T15:47:43-04:00'
describe
'36328' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
9b40b1dd778db7540b34527572f7f295
58aa40399229dd238cda50fdadacc2720a886f66
describe
'164896' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMW' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
2148058320f1581f71b1bba99f13f74c
a035c1a9c6d232dd86b9c0b25970e0f8e4e80e79
'2012-03-31T15:47:14-04:00'
describe
'129931' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9dfa6b5ac9ce8d964e693644616fc6f0
b52a2ac561c5bf122fdd24889cf3d2ca2f02de00
'2012-03-31T15:47:23-04:00'
describe
'29693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMY' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2192a43dfd3ac53358f4384e4c18d441
cfecc31f29711f8ddcf8d0f576b5bd650e815d88
'2012-03-31T15:46:18-04:00'
describe
'65584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVMZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6298f17051b94fc89119601b8f529440
af1d2230d76fc56c870c7369914579e68341034c
'2012-03-31T15:47:54-04:00'
describe
'1341752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNA' 'sip-files00028.tif'
cfbf43a43522d7137ff045ba4ecbc088
c2af3d63b2ecebecb378703565b2e2c57f4941ba
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNB' 'sip-files00028.txt'
45be882b7393c8f72758a847e2d6b1fb
6e30bf0d6be7c9fc48e7a4df463a5c7486a04a28
describe
'37053' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNC' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
d13b15b09a296d0b65b95155826c9ab0
9e85a2f640834dc4c6993ce780f86cc4d10717a6
'2012-03-31T15:46:34-04:00'
describe
'171523' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVND' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c3eb0242514f5c5686cf25b59cfded76
efe490d3138862303b269c404aaa62468fa43204
'2012-03-31T15:46:29-04:00'
describe
'115318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNE' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
05764d8b934164ce50e084d168c57898
15ee954b02a56884db0e90aa6e41838ceb1b6775
'2012-03-31T15:42:57-04:00'
describe
'29562' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNF' 'sip-files00029.pro'
42520cec192612c62c96cff1d6f5b3db
8476c409ac51fc6d8d32f4ef5429a020da2b4538
'2012-03-31T15:44:14-04:00'
describe
'44156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
27fc00ae4c7c896000604483e01b2770
f0d9524b9bda0ac03c6c5e92e5ce046ec93adc14
'2012-03-31T15:45:33-04:00'
describe
'1373007' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
932553fb4ccd72c74c4530b46498047c
f5bbdec21bdf2bffda777b2095c080b0c4a12fd3
'2012-03-31T15:46:16-04:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3bf031df03387e973460ef17a1228879
b0b222751e938569517cb6c870b3fb78c2533424
'2012-03-31T15:45:58-04:00'
describe
'13369' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
7b1209e2a1f0d4afe44c53aeb5f1086f
f9a61bffa2db484b81c09c7bc05d35cc25a4a9e3
'2012-03-31T15:43:04-04:00'
describe
'165615' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6970aadee81ade872a437b6c27b48f06
0a0aead9e3df2c8086e83dadd306db3c367dcdeb
'2012-03-31T15:44:31-04:00'
describe
'139810' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
568b9ee91655278ea8450db8cda58b5d
cd7489ca8f3607a6bd4515f40a05e890d8bf3265
describe
'30059' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
025f7aefa9f0d817750c8449d7366942
c55d14c2396063c89c476184dd30506e331726cd
'2012-03-31T15:47:00-04:00'
describe
'67399' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3140bc60cee3decb2cb4197cbdf328ee
e5c396c1ef0d3f4d7a7175bfd2fad9d96e19640a
'2012-03-31T15:46:54-04:00'
describe
'1347624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNO' 'sip-files00030.tif'
5d72d42f663c8ff89e6791befd3aaba5
498f31ac27943c18b2448d8c1c5763463d556daf
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
0dbf65c2456373d04933276b71bd08dc
741e4ce5c97246fe6035cf9e86289af3d335bf83
'2012-03-31T15:43:56-04:00'
describe
'37429' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNQ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
fe175b0c62ff83a507f6a4e48628fc40
4a15e20b3ff50bedcf27db0a744eb6649ebae8a0
'2012-03-31T15:47:05-04:00'
describe
'169475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNR' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
62a93bc5722cda4aa40ede8ba451933b
a8c38416ca632f19ad745221911931497342bd67
describe
'112066' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
83c445ec90477f23bc32f4007fc1a698
9c42d5ef1d1ee831da6ebad369e84a066f5f479d
'2012-03-31T15:42:31-04:00'
describe
'30819' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNT' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c7c0a77ab473006f80398f30db096755
876726cb9623a9902a93d136de2088c076860888
'2012-03-31T15:47:01-04:00'
describe
'43741' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b2536dce65e7de1c853e338cd2415013
447616494572656659cb930198fad8b9f5c59580
describe
'1356183' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1e30213b36e945b3576c9945c25d7261
ca94a7a07b773e6e3c3576ccd0108d73896dc17e
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNW' 'sip-files00031.txt'
68bd48b450944a57d08205217e5c245d
6ef2c8f83bf299e1302aa45d6a089bc1f8644b9e
describe
'13283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
97968f9db25f448c4e20e6f8c0381323
825d4a78ce68408e898d08aa9cd81b3c195cfced
describe
'165782' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNY' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
4c27730dd598f8fa8739b1453ca53ef7
1ff47c9609bdb7da0d50889bf67993bafdfa48cd
'2012-03-31T15:42:42-04:00'
describe
'103267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVNZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
185e24e00b3ea28a95eab08683ee4770
607c9557138b0c483ddb4f613f72df6bdc973549
'2012-03-31T15:46:38-04:00'
describe
'19065' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOA' 'sip-files00032.pro'
360741f84f2f0897ba08babe6da55ea8
8ed9c3c8086119ff6746e106163a43f222d8725d
'2012-03-31T15:44:15-04:00'
describe
'52614' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
626d9e3352c7d91064fa04f9442279aa
0486d377d50693f4004a76caae051cf60a177e9d
describe
'1347936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOC' 'sip-files00032.tif'
00f582dc9808165eb970599cc33e70c7
46546cab64cf0f9f4fb9c11b472cba7e24101576
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOD' 'sip-files00032.txt'
32584c862859a6b95facfa0e4f5a29cb
146f4974a92e17853fee807717ac96e82e83c0de
'2012-03-31T15:43:59-04:00'
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOE' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
67b595b0f6f18d0e273d919ba88c3e7a
59dfee756767dab48650a954ed94321447af54ea
'2012-03-31T15:47:59-04:00'
describe
'169735' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c9fc76e3b90527fc31cb4f98093e6d81
8e7dcb8c4fa0f8876740e57b07e4597bd8fa458f
'2012-03-31T15:44:10-04:00'
describe
'97339' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOG' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
fb71bfbcc1ffc19a6d1e87706f8b5590
5a1248d827c6b0c597eebad8dcc3fbd8bf1bad9e
'2012-03-31T15:44:53-04:00'
describe
'25783' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
86dc84de76e5543ff58e1e34178a3024
af7382484c46743ed32044e2e21b3854c4d612e2
'2012-03-31T15:44:06-04:00'
describe
'38299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ad2001af2253729a6cb0fecf38867617
d8ef2db23d59038a10777138d31c2b5e6e159a1b
describe
'1358903' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ae2b5011b43e3092aa87a25d483c514d
11dddc46d68a364cbcf53e77ec319b5f02387841
'2012-03-31T15:45:27-04:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOK' 'sip-files00033.txt'
f1b3e19fc49cc76c70095d94f289d2ea
4ca7e5cee7bf0b94e266a0fbdb04b8613c65262f
describe
'11378' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOL' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
dacc099c16627fc428a28e32634ab1b3
35725d4db76e6419fee23fcec73358dc28f0feda
describe
'166394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOM' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
04cc17be80025950de3bf73d032d4230
fb62dda233674148d10f1ba7eca7200c1b8cd95d
'2012-03-31T15:43:00-04:00'
describe
'135450' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVON' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ea78fd30b6d0f63ae646bae939fe1fdf
232b07d2353adc969e3ed0432fca7f8f024b0aef
'2012-03-31T15:47:08-04:00'
describe
'29373' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOO' 'sip-files00034.pro'
02037ced2d5674b5ce9290ff70a7e0cb
8d03a39bcd36012ac0217e8fb03116b71bff2a63
describe
'68012' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOP' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
bdc18f61b4c8ed04bc474bb2d0837e45
4fc25869201f2c7d6f2c42907df000378fa2da78
describe
'1354024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e98d2673c6d098a362f85f34e8253474
f4634288faee202a94c11135ed058cb099fa2329
'2012-03-31T15:44:39-04:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOR' 'sip-files00034.txt'
be5d61b5da2d0bf6348beb94504550f1
3786d7b0a3e1ff18e7dacdbaa8fc2a3d4e0b1b72
describe
'36821' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOS' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
343836224f3144d6287b9b2ca8b41db4
981650a9e9d14e0a8934f82f609b8005171a0b95
'2012-03-31T15:47:35-04:00'
describe
'165529' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOT' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8e762efae0a57e0925f1b793bece2bd0
133d51f42439ac2d8bcd21785728d79bcb53e0e3
'2012-03-31T15:45:13-04:00'
describe
'106367' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOU' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c02bb432bd53c3e3b62693352d32b833
3ef5e8fa749c92b990c93f5f8436460438f42c1c
describe
'29304' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOV' 'sip-files00035.pro'
2beceb20f2937cb9435c4876ef003fa0
9cdd81019ca362d494955a6acb83dbab15e33641
'2012-03-31T15:47:22-04:00'
describe
'41888' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOW' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3e5e535c033f9b49e67d80f225943a93
5766b139ab5f4ab3aa4e6a9653a5e8973d9901be
'2012-03-31T15:47:39-04:00'
describe
'1325283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOX' 'sip-files00035.tif'
7220aeefba55c1fac72545fe320f6236
ce788c690463c83eb33ff593c296f7007ef90017
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOY' 'sip-files00035.txt'
0e3ff20a91ad1dc260b345fe5ef97554
bf8d2d728cc6288022d651b724a8071925b25796
describe
'14314' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
51f0b333e4988e01694770953ec05f11
2ea3274735de4b7ac257220c5a748d917c9243c2
describe
'163375' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPA' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
290f7a543167d909beb7d4e110f71cc5
03c047ece6c86b1dd4fdecb159cd62d335f24cb5
'2012-03-31T15:44:07-04:00'
describe
'134517' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPB' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2246e1b35729408dfe325be0517cc445
b22d2bb9863627769cb9bacf167925adb6ecd11c
'2012-03-31T15:45:57-04:00'
describe
'29852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f421e9d66c5f27442c4e1a415cd0d2e6
f9ed6c0a88edeea970dace72eef27d5e8c454a8a
'2012-03-31T15:47:04-04:00'
describe
'67527' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
afd76095c7435b77f20416e3052bd6ef
a4285c8e154bb1baeb814ffbc5d0949c69c10d05
'2012-03-31T15:44:36-04:00'
describe
'1329500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPE' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4dc42d13fccf6e14ff1efa6d03790094
369f9691090480f7cd90c383d1a3375b1c494115
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPF' 'sip-files00036.txt'
989c4661b37428042e9c1fd7081b3393
69df3375bcdff5e2af119f4fc3086086adb384a4
'2012-03-31T15:45:00-04:00'
describe
'36508' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
7e3d78fdeddcea8e9054099491006c43
b054287f1b7ca56bb55263de17353220ecfbe52b
'2012-03-31T15:43:14-04:00'
describe
'167798' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPH' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
2451d196b02220afbba86d13246d1bf4
ddd3efdd11011c23be032d96110d8e515322413c
describe
'138173' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e99721fbb447620696fa37b50b7bf475
272ee4377ef2deecdc58b6fe18218ba120f29420
'2012-03-31T15:46:40-04:00'
describe
'29924' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c08a0538e46465f8b170c47fdeb07d4e
bfe5eda70627a74e9345723668f2e8f0657b051a
describe
'68864' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPK' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
22c3156243775f7443b48c3af78902b1
8a6ca624fd3e4a8f98f56ec51b9d269c2364ae67
describe
'1365580' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPL' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5b4650f67c438aff700652494157374d
fbe771e72f681dd0465729e69fefe3dd57ad0252
'2012-03-31T15:43:19-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPM' 'sip-files00037.txt'
27930f0c4ae35a5d97e06e906281acf8
103e6683fbd4d11c4cc0baa3f6371611f69430e8
'2012-03-31T15:45:14-04:00'
describe
'37623' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
c3c68354a349fcc62aefac50af85fa3b
927cd675f4c99406322d82bb5694d590bfd46c29
'2012-03-31T15:44:08-04:00'
describe
'168697' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
210dfe38739e72d911fab233edb7431b
1e9ae8feb725aa880098f4e60d94d404e910f1dc
'2012-03-31T15:44:09-04:00'
describe
'105251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPP' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8472d282ce030dc5fbaa1f72f6a0102c
42cdbe2f15cc5d04809b44c41756e0d330e7214e
describe
'28927' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e8974afaaa65fdb1bd1b47f127551a4f
e1aa1d1b26483fe698ce114bdddd65493e1a8128
'2012-03-31T15:42:39-04:00'
describe
'41813' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPR' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
f5d1d91e75b31ece49cb084ca47036b6
68ab21c266206d3bce983e1310838ce5ae563caf
describe
'1350003' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPS' 'sip-files00038.tif'
bd0a89506ecc2f31ce7b91e5ec2cfef4
a9f4b6f9e4e6201218941ace274395ac9791fe41
'2012-03-31T15:43:23-04:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
bded40373057e7a72d632dc66852b1ea
bba61299d3ea4ec523dbe31788a5c743f5600c30
'2012-03-31T15:47:42-04:00'
describe
'13032' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPU' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e77155fe910a2ac56340b1e5d454b0c0
ec44ec5652e22eeea0b310ff8c5fec2dc7558eab
'2012-03-31T15:44:46-04:00'
describe
'172314' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPV' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
32a8026fb1525cbb3f2ed24c987229b0
b6afcdef23aa675da32578ecc55e344e5370c7e8
describe
'129949' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPW' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5d98be27ee5822e036fe363fc39779f6
69ac37ffa25ba4c46db2c6ca0338d2c153dd37e8
describe
'29624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
4e5359bbbf417ab270136ebcdcda4e5f
8636283a5dde24721121ecd7a2f7dd1fd49e654c
describe
'65109' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
4f1860a4ea0571da25bfc497548a665c
0f3b6d8cdf197da9e124d0107a3f405e6fa854f9
describe
'1402048' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
67b15867c224a8a369f88d4e6ce0d6ba
f9f44820dd35bf4c9a6612aa4ce65db021b19173
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
1a9d107e0f10e77e4a2dba58a97689e7
d4784a7407769e1fff263ce09a3bb53c4bca18f1
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQB' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5847e83cd59b31a3c5a00c3ec1e1a94f
9c39f72aa3f263b1b41bee163958a03d5991675b
'2012-03-31T15:44:17-04:00'
describe
'167498' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQC' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
4f15cf75439af4c50e1a429675344dd6
e396eaa0be01d3bb96512f23ec0344ad9d5c6fb8
describe
'131558' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQD' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3253defe27b09db65fd8ca748666dfe3
108280c3192fb4d36b35822c07b2c38946e40795
'2012-03-31T15:47:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
51297b72a33ae07bf160506b6d7b2ddf
af3dd252b04eb9912f86a3349a8e1d38c5f564c6
'2012-03-31T15:47:47-04:00'
describe
'65446' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQF' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c1814a568721620e856c9815713f436b
532bd4d596b0997cdd68d573cd9fd678ed32e571
'2012-03-31T15:43:24-04:00'
describe
'1362400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQG' 'sip-files00040.tif'
b8dc6b6ad7ffbf577f79c33e0383f493
58bef5a570ecf1c17ea26f33473c6500f4cdd74f
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a629c2e299d324ed4d8f75d6d8b6eec0
8ecb138cd90fa73af469c6ec99bf09be9ac5b486
'2012-03-31T15:43:44-04:00'
describe
'36258' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQI' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
88925c5677f41beb8c0c5f5ed5a64641
c53819f4841d4637022914e3c8fa6daf6ead17bb
describe
'172447' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
afc9ec4b5285e9d757b1b1b04b39c01d
615ac71f4d9c1442e7165ef0c0ee805fd4d4b43c
'2012-03-31T15:47:07-04:00'
describe
'129028' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
7d943e93cd8f2d6bb8b176935f8b2380
686ba916682f6affbc4c328f3d74c6d1b7ccf72c
describe
'28479' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ad7a60a5952a4d3a7696503c6c1f810f
dd0664215d7ad537fa66a90bd53aa3da08631e5e
describe
'64539' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
3c227566fa0acae1e0085c4de1909c53
f264a23742b237304d02735cddaa01912f5b8176
'2012-03-31T15:46:24-04:00'
describe
'1401884' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQN' 'sip-files00041.tif'
83f58a8b1aeaa0945169ae5970c42db0
27cf5780edd440a42f2c2aa4cc627621326a630b
'2012-03-31T15:46:23-04:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
42777cd81534e1d5f5ca9decf91af4c3
4f2a68ffe1fbe9a6dae8bed7974294cf6a9469db
describe
'35080' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQP' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
91f130d60d1b85d401874a93d4d22a53
cb6adc56cc8f2ff31463b275f4bf97a5e7f5e94c
describe
'163521' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
462f321c7b6815deda882267eb958df2
c905de9734470b0e41bbc69ad2b3669c4b5af25c
'2012-03-31T15:44:19-04:00'
describe
'97551' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQR' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5067b9aae1ad586e20114fa04ae1b99b
93c19de0e4abde781b0ddfd2ac38a78c964742aa
describe
'26285' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQS' 'sip-files00042.pro'
4cc363ce75f6f111c91ae762153ba304
848788ba433f5d05250c009f5b4ac0999c23eab1
describe
'38867' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQT' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
681bda49dfc0f372376136e9dd35143c
8f82322f957fa91c2474f4dbd2f67b2dca4c0bc2
'2012-03-31T15:43:58-04:00'
describe
'1308859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQU' 'sip-files00042.tif'
eb407cf8befebacbd026f22724de389b
6d183ea9bd87626813ebaf393b3f64d3c81a6670
'2012-03-31T15:45:03-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQV' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1d817f2cffe52101f676251f10dd5c75
61ba037c17abcd7baff41fbbbbfcbfa16f07990f
'2012-03-31T15:46:53-04:00'
describe
'12665' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQW' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
4f01547048b7359487ef862b0e0cc16a
d0eb0df8cfc235128cbfc458ec40ce14c09059ad
describe
'168929' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
be5021db4228994d3ed58df6f60ac40f
68f04e66f8b69708231196fccb9b0b5075abe14d
'2012-03-31T15:44:37-04:00'
describe
'123009' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
3db3b033d1ed9e2bd07ad69eeac9962b
813c5a28835269b4cd754de9c677a9270eebfaa3
'2012-03-31T15:46:13-04:00'
describe
'26239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7cf7242151f36792a5dc5374dba3e675
23affb0032b3530d6aa2168af79586d3a877964f
'2012-03-31T15:43:27-04:00'
describe
'62345' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
61dbadfe40bf5f1ba1239025713c507a
8ac7a63028edddf3701cdc019bf2b61fd4d1701c
describe
'1373788' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRB' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f0e5ef1a28c0ebe6757d96918050534f
aca3f7b2b28af927888810165bfc4979d9c55137
'2012-03-31T15:44:50-04:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
70d6b337e1982e9659bb79200cdd6594
b9191f0d9dd8920f3b0cf5b4d17de12b75c6ddf3
describe
'35567' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRD' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
0bd18e18aad8064123d4d1c20b6dd8e1
b00b44c7699c82cf53a0741643a0f327503e5d50
describe
'169099' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRE' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
146e49dcb82b77c9664830f6b3d5a868
ef35c87c2137b883d21bae46ac1f7aeae764fbd3
describe
'109087' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRF' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
76b3e450a93d74e4374cdc4335239646
f6a5f32979a3a151bc8faae276cb3fe3700f8fd4
describe
'23593' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRG' 'sip-files00044.pro'
eeed181d30f2fd133840c54c088fa3b5
a7aee0580c53de06f04747ac48b4d1e382587e86
describe
'55668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRH' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
a4315c2b56414044efc6848eb78a0705
7cff71f5af028646f01c2b3f991ff8c6daaaeb4f
describe
'1374560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7044a4b94251bf78dcd1351c15778498
994c4d00382157459cb73c4fd58fb03f9b7ecdd5
'2012-03-31T15:44:42-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f83eb658f4add6542a29997e498c7cf4
01307ed3e70504162fa1f2c33f976ac690446f20
'2012-03-31T15:44:00-04:00'
describe
'32711' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRK' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
19707a307d3915fc9fd117fd7c78f989
bb817bb024f24ea5427a491896ca54342bd96058
'2012-03-31T15:43:39-04:00'
describe
'168112' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRL' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
868fffb9460d2735f9f08a68a66c59fa
d4d877f8f080b1321e9da9d91f8918d324d27ac8
describe
'126869' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRM' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
591af3b4722ff5063ca984caa610d288
f3c28e39aef065277a200347a2e7a041de56d1d9
describe
'30027' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRN' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c8f91b4f9f352d687993efa21bfe39cc
61db54b9b7c59d836e9538ea36214ea919e9d002
'2012-03-31T15:46:56-04:00'
describe
'63847' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRO' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
03c96a61efb6d1943828456116e497b6
3c74c33dcc36fd7538fea55ec447c4f7d269fade
'2012-03-31T15:46:35-04:00'
describe
'1366936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRP' 'sip-files00045.tif'
46b1be5fef27375c4caff38111b27f8d
00e21617239ea44d32a8b50573fbca82094ed5a8
'2012-03-31T15:45:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
c871ca3da0e97240e64a53443d654146
9f0c13ba615b7b216ddae851b7761991d0c61b8b
describe
'35759' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRR' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9b2a865aad5928dbe08f883cd9bf94e2
32027f6ceb86a47df60549eb3daa2a39cbf514d0
describe
'166700' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRS' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
6fed6284100a51d402fd9a0fd4d271bc
bc5fb073a355fd0a8562601ee8dc2b237f0ce22a
describe
'103867' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRT' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e58dca960fc878896cbee4534a1af258
75ddbf73bba3db98550301a1e14c15fdbe8d348f
describe
'29030' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRU' 'sip-files00046.pro'
fb1146f58393cb1c798cc5d9c9e63a2d
60dc0fb09687536148f313ac5a04a22bd1405000
'2012-03-31T15:42:37-04:00'
describe
'40959' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRV' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
5962626151e24aa80a55cff87bf82c42
c64ef01a0292d42b915e82d4662076f73c260971
'2012-03-31T15:46:44-04:00'
describe
'1334183' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRW' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2988b1df1fad08e26d63d75fc8b32fd8
d271f925828d7f72e94e2c080ee95011f2932fc1
'2012-03-31T15:46:45-04:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRX' 'sip-files00046.txt'
560dae7d240d0f18c6e4f4eaf8bfc81d
4778eb04d167c3b902105dc5f1b9f3fb9fdf6972
describe
'12841' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRY' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
a18ff020c74f2fd70305e66ffc6f829e
2636429a09f6dfe77ceb08cbe12616cf0e140e41
describe
'169908' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
faf14dfba41df9923ac9a7f0bf0349c1
04473263db22364fea7a01968d8a11f0dba77fcb
'2012-03-31T15:44:47-04:00'
describe
'131265' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSA' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
efe41c563e2ddccaebb1ee2dcbb5f355
79cf6a32e5f56a8f836e3e745b2613d9de04b520
describe
'29822' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSB' 'sip-files00047.pro'
3a77673ef9629761e79815e182687a62
088c8819ffca5d0b5996eeaa36a002adb33d2274
describe
'65981' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSC' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
48ca013b7ae846bfef85b9bd5e32b8d1
239ccce2724a955ae2f59b7f381f5c44f4dd966f
describe
'1381808' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSD' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c98f0334f9be9cabb789c5d8570f4053
ac671b4bf00180700745170ca20d50519ab13cf5
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSE' 'sip-files00047.txt'
6624abf2cb02e8ef262f780550ed2386
3f5b60eeaa95af0de7b74c66cb6a006658acf23a
'2012-03-31T15:43:50-04:00'
describe
'36443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSF' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
203f755905cd3aa213700234f22526a9
3a45cc1cf257a8af06fbd525c7f09702d464cd0d
describe
'169351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSG' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f6d47ab60e2fc0bf85928bdec1d61c4a
a46a33f1b8e37913d9292d4599b22e62fd87e0a0
'2012-03-31T15:45:41-04:00'
describe
'108632' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSH' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
eb5e18dc3b09dfe2a5714b29c2c376a7
6f43402f11e3a3fe95fd300a7194c15eedaaa65d
describe
'29431' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSI' 'sip-files00048.pro'
186f0a658316a15af67d10826f7deda0
f4a4d77672d2b093d0e35feda38580c3ace125f2
'2012-03-31T15:44:59-04:00'
describe
'43117' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
1677aa0a47f48b1e1ee714f7cadaaf8e
76e3b1720d23511b9d54162b054034f1e530dd75
describe
'1355379' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSK' 'sip-files00048.tif'
6c487ac8a709e8d3f8620e7773ea9cee
a0137322f1af9022f6d3e3e06ca6b26f97affae0
'2012-03-31T15:43:05-04:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSL' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c17653343b74350b1bb7b726fa5b0d4e
6d2b3c0540daba703520ba90e0d213d63b6e8eeb
'2012-03-31T15:47:40-04:00'
describe
'12806' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSM' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9652274a0b45817c585db1cfec860d71
d6dc2b1ce97197ce6bf06dd0862757e45ef5c3d1
describe
'162497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSN' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
605972bdc6f05ea8350ea390c39202cc
b6d1f61ee95935a61a2ef96a892c6d37f93f1e3a
describe
'105418' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSO' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
72a18be4a3841de687763a940774b8e9
edf2b640936592414f183460f2ea2b063a8ef209
describe
'29192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3a4d45d53968751ceda663fc1acd897e
6e097f764d1dd197c77e1331147a174f4660130f
'2012-03-31T15:44:23-04:00'
describe
'41507' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
54eaed3e6fc225fb79d05f98b2d56fd3
93d6ccc9d52e7ad08648cc5b773b2cafe0f9aaaf
'2012-03-31T15:43:35-04:00'
describe
'1300443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSR' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9226c08c0091d7b30141a9626435fa36
24f40bcd7785630b4dbb7545f28347218dfcb992
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSS' 'sip-files00049.txt'
dc9270d8807cbfbfb6ac4bd1a537e170
414cdffdf9b05b3cb19a6259b6c3986c0e062345
'2012-03-31T15:43:08-04:00'
describe
'13089' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVST' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e9bdae34233fb2d9046768bf796e647d
aa64374cf7860ffd6dc021f40e6c5aa859176363
describe
'166814' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSU' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
55010200d92ed9b48b7852c726e75225
5b3eabd2e8d65bb2f79de2d3c53d885a06111900
'2012-03-31T15:44:13-04:00'
describe
'109170' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSV' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
70ad329d635011ab16855a27a24dfb70
e38531e5964e2e6635245bbf21671cd667987eba
'2012-03-31T15:46:21-04:00'
describe
'29808' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
2777e473320b4adf44c738d3235aebbf
754d06b88cbc3b36c44a30b3c1162deb8cd73f0c
'2012-03-31T15:45:59-04:00'
describe
'43278' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSX' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
68c0f9e0db2dbee0d2a8f33bc9ea3934
0bd9eefe4c8bb6ef58a7184542eab87982564793
'2012-03-31T15:45:25-04:00'
describe
'1334907' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6ea356429e6bad315b49c32230f8d348
4d5fac730eaafd556ec601b3acfa317cac92b8b8
'2012-03-31T15:42:56-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
4f0b39b3a000ea13859968c8d547b9cd
acc1712b5d0959828b83a009b184c8f9f5cb3837
describe
'13557' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTA' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c00287dff5c9d1b79d29faabf4ad9317
61c14862e32badcba2dc8ea982848f331f4402dd
describe
'166209' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
04e5b4fd37cd9c06dd0ecdce7b343a04
27f0d5c9af3d41c0d21686aaf2071f010d28d7a2
describe
'132599' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTC' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f4b097a27e77276606622ff522b6fa5b
bf5f6cc377dedc2944563ca83f587c1abeb8f210
describe
'29586' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTD' 'sip-files00051.pro'
b6c795dd62955edfca430f11b91d6faa
58c580ff7465bb0f1392e76ad2ae17b6137c1a7c
describe
'66509' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTE' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
0c9390dbc64ae725c842cb7065ac863e
677cad5948b292fb5bdb557d9c76b00e60e7dc8a
'2012-03-31T15:44:35-04:00'
describe
'1352856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTF' 'sip-files00051.tif'
3532625d59935d62c6f8e21feede4668
50fda062b8b716384519b2d1ffb178a2642412b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTG' 'sip-files00051.txt'
cab025d32e577974dba745e3e9cc2fb5
77149cb48b16d497bb1a00d96537424147cb1a0a
'2012-03-31T15:47:49-04:00'
describe
'36518' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTH' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
45c9770b1e5dfdf6ad63a18928d7ca07
3f1294dc65d024f8ef45bd9c5e2e55a4d879918f
describe
'172756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTI' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
7d320d7a10f38b7d410c192d3cca86b7
1a62e2e01bbed7881aeba85003957c6c6dfc118e
'2012-03-31T15:46:01-04:00'
describe
'82129' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
013f4739369bddb00607de3d017e6f47
aa9e379f5f8f2aa2ae27782a55a8b7e0aeda122c
describe
'21453' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTK' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1e46b6346a7759a615a5d79cc8a6792c
fc402831c44d07f36d84879ee812419313bd376d
'2012-03-31T15:47:29-04:00'
describe
'31566' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
1f7a710974b39b895e38e89a5c4d227a
7bd9b476e71492eedc91194d45538cf97372db7c
describe
'1382783' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTM' 'sip-files00052.tif'
c3db8a16e6f222e6a3dca2d71064dfc2
7e27a1f68cd87df536058bc992cb83b289a6af02
'2012-03-31T15:42:50-04:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTN' 'sip-files00052.txt'
438c03168709b9ffe44533b9eece1f77
cdc0229451cbd18d0b018ab49aaab3198d24a804
describe
'9914' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTO' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6d0f2b1122e5f0a6154c0d29a65abc29
b1ee49ecf776af5fce2870433b5a9e318330e092
describe
'163261' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTP' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
5dbc822ec842db13dee15c7f97e9db5d
994714aefdd4cfb5438fa804ab8ef1cf486ede71
describe
'118726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f20e6103605c9390cdbd84b2bd257242
cbd8528c2dafa3fec3e6e02acde661982ffdfe91
describe
'26245' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
35cf5dd25dc2443c757b897504c21201
e951593d5712109dbaac92a31a214464ae3f5f45
describe
'60265' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
280615a59de3713dcf44e9c30fa265fb
0d031e2c8607a2871e45619df5fc7326950dcbfc
'2012-03-31T15:43:16-04:00'
describe
'1328968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
28a09bc31a8801028c3b604bd3d736c6
9d53b75f0de49dd0de2a47c37317cbcb57b61ee9
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
8249b59746c694a51e3f5df1c431a942
e2054d4f3ee176b96694644957e95b92fbdc7b3b
describe
'34309' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e1bbccc4c63734a05c55deb3a3f2b26d
ba073dd24e308d3ddf91bdbac367b6e51194a653
'2012-03-31T15:45:38-04:00'
describe
'171674' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3e687601af54a59ed049bb390be472ec
a9b7e747559882eccf0e3509b196ef7aa4777ae8
'2012-03-31T15:46:20-04:00'
describe
'112170' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d57fcfadea8eb8d32a94b199f699a88b
0e0531b381a2448818e572628ce7d4396fb0405b
describe
'29969' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ccfa8363733450d70ff54ec2987478f2
de959e07202f2e6ad1c07cd881ee07e7b087fdeb
'2012-03-31T15:43:12-04:00'
describe
'43522' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
b5388860c4c21c7de36e2db76cc5e528
2d9b6ba32021fb81d4d8927d9645a772376238be
describe
'1373823' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUA' 'sip-files00054.tif'
57b1cb15f0051d96738d15853c41d859
7e03089266641f0e81b230b60ccc3e430720ed6e
'2012-03-31T15:43:42-04:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUB' 'sip-files00054.txt'
fd2109c1b77dfcb0ab20dc0ed0206cbb
7b77d8245c5933e31ef040dbe3941d49af46a895
describe
'13043' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUC' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
511abb100449c8f509e91ba210c9fa47
cd9302f529070c51770f9ea90084e7513b7c0b88
describe
'166299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUD' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
316d6fe0f220ad559a71b3f1f3235f1c
6d6c87a13ba86dd26f9b52de676fc1da563662cf
'2012-03-31T15:45:07-04:00'
describe
'134136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUE' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
31ff245e893d469fcaaa966d209683fd
c825ae97c754266bf027a42e048a3ae9735bdf8d
describe
'29714' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUF' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f2867c871d9220df7435778137184c94
add6975d26e1f5d8c734b61c1fdb9a93ca852f0a
describe
'67108' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUG' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3ff57c0f473108aef06a5cd9468e93c1
d5f9cac1e227b000069d4690918b15df1a34b1c5
describe
'1352920' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
25375d1bacbf677e04a2ad21e0b00dfb
1962595adfa49e91092575cb924ff161f3a959fd
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
fbd8af3c6843af265621a22b81ca0fd2
dae98781dd5b0c46f5b1b4d730d43bbb4a2823b8
'2012-03-31T15:46:42-04:00'
describe
'36601' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
89ac682c03741693262a57c5549f8bd1
a631c924bb2e9d49fbef45e1fa0e8adaf1af6e67
describe
'170012' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
770605e050bf315156a6b10b8fd55945
da0740c3936f227afcc9cf5a65145743f59ee64d
describe
'133055' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
1f67808423bcb2eda3b91de6c3702acb
4deaa0dfed776f27d3686b899422974315954220
describe
'29836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUM' 'sip-files00056.pro'
0415457f691a1ee4897bf3e5470ae011
16b8a0b8e3172e43f36c5449bd49c67aaf593fbd
describe
'66117' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUN' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
dfbc472ad00b9c6fe2d48293d97e235e
b97cca0a43783804e603a21b74af401fdab84e37
describe
'1382524' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUO' 'sip-files00056.tif'
40ec96c06930f3f6519f30b0427ab8c3
72afb5a420db7fe98a35fc310b5c896d032fd388
'2012-03-31T15:42:52-04:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
305f897b983f7cda80a08f5e2d70db5f
7de4023aca4896ef45d142efe4aa7aade403ecc9
'2012-03-31T15:46:17-04:00'
describe
'35834' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
9ee6f89dd9fa84bee672a64ba11a4d4d
4ec243a96915da872a9451e45252c72aef7a413d
'2012-03-31T15:45:12-04:00'
describe
'168908' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUR' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
cb17179964d3e2ad24331f9ea9490e02
f44a6c13a137df98f36753bbc826a979575d7d90
'2012-03-31T15:44:03-04:00'
describe
'132670' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUS' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
794e78e7460468565559becd400ae4b7
46611d61c33ffb0b096fe12fc84825cbbc05bc6c
describe
'29543' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUT' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d0f8f0ef3edc1bea371f06db935adae7
61ce2d093d5ce03dc0a112c234207a759b8fe578
describe
'67044' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUU' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
339a69bc1a8460befbe07dcc8898449d
9f19da2272377c7e351204695bcc495f87e7b5b8
'2012-03-31T15:45:28-04:00'
describe
'1374084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
c131c9c50c09a5b6f25af0c9769f5b6c
0b94425904d6ec812def727a20969a9e956b9683
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUW' 'sip-files00057.txt'
12c64abbf794b1a717ae0beb108ce331
b978701ed6762551cdf9e826fc31a6e2545d9433
describe
'36331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUX' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
9b086128b7e10bc3ffcbb1fb76af418f
4f2df18763550305e57ae48530fbd40af7e315d8
describe
'175009' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
5ac1e293f73dcb56a84083d3b7b53cfe
8fd743653e8112fd6d9b3db258742b006970f22d
describe
'106205' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
60f9048de72e19a9386e05f31e122e3b
7c8065bd02589b098d3c0d4d2cfcbd6e6c8fb9d8
'2012-03-31T15:45:39-04:00'
describe
'29107' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVA' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a63adf163186ce71632561dea2bcd55b
7e1300352ecf17d7f9569d6a5a76de5778e1b492
describe
'41918' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVB' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b1ffbabf562dd05c440a0fe72742ec5d
3df324c71fe346877e7181a5092ea03c73b7b61d
describe
'1400543' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVC' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ed7713783a3525b48fffe5f1fd319418
c2d2f46d3d535775904f3ef86c0cbad132a5de12
'2012-03-31T15:42:49-04:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
65b9c194af77b37fc7d782632f2fc41c
ec109496ea4990882fd0135be3410ee6f1cf2ce2
'2012-03-31T15:46:15-04:00'
describe
'12428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVE' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
80e74c839c730fc60ce9cf54c5c0100b
6afa2d2d0e0c098e581453cc40dea77e92682203
describe
'172750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVF' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
2f2533908b5e0526567f9211a4213937
48b4deb348215d9bbb695918fcd064c84a539754
describe
'127530' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVG' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f82bfca77a0bc7c62f58806df4065f6d
86b617e8b724377b832a771dde830c0c6b97cee1
'2012-03-31T15:46:48-04:00'
describe
'29578' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVH' 'sip-files00059.pro'
73cef9d293a09ee2cc2d621dd3855b88
ec72ed88bdd8147d62b07cc4afa1e9d1bcec4ea9
describe
'64432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
217b3cac71c758533e2e63e4cc46791c
5c437dfad0c9ca589aae05c195431f98c0db7d3b
describe
'1404688' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b53bc0d2b69def453025d348a8f72206
7666b3f5b64b36f7e58944cc31c7d77cb7018f51
'2012-03-31T15:44:05-04:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVK' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5a56589ad8822e4fa4abc4e92c7b108c
c53b878bec3328effc0be9b812caf1dfa5568630
'2012-03-31T15:46:00-04:00'
describe
'35531' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVL' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
825b93b491cdefb9036a367b9f53d203
f4b2c04dc1453565d552bfe97ca5c9908dfe5b34
describe
'171554' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVM' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
19e66393fe83ada830dfb42ec172a0cd
dbde1f0533b30e15336f163c16ba4de064c5c4ed
'2012-03-31T15:43:21-04:00'
describe
'88878' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVN' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
d28e13cb853c2c8b6fde3eed5b7cfdd7
54285147f6bb30f8a33ce414a4503e88cf22a293
'2012-03-31T15:43:02-04:00'
describe
'23205' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVO' 'sip-files00060.pro'
5446b08e278f65651840b23f0803a0e9
b0084bf8eed605e6bd5f6730ed7bb8f866822f75
'2012-03-31T15:47:18-04:00'
describe
'35485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVP' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
2739f2a3ef3b84512cb85381931d314b
ddef080192da0edd2257a61a4946c1a1c577b6c2
'2012-03-31T15:46:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f843efb456f64ff28db1b794c4f62d73
ec280a7aaa09c6b68e94f0f1e3c474c7d9385b05
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVR' 'sip-files00060.txt'
fa07892a25f22683492bcedaf9ebabfc
cb25ecbad4b5feaeea66cc98dfb132aef67feb51
'2012-03-31T15:45:20-04:00'
describe
'11584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVS' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
1cc60aab664d595fa179335553022f9f
92b36b14aa0ca5210a9aa230a137c354b4997650
'2012-03-31T15:45:11-04:00'
describe
'164830' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVT' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6c4e2f96518f3a81e995d1fb614c73a2
81c9d1bb9898402c97999486461eeaf57e74b751
describe
'143606' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
df681a2552612c57acd468b14ab89561
760b4b7c19f3dafc70364f9ec303bed015864fc1
describe
'30089' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVV' 'sip-files00061.pro'
14986a0e4242d1dc4c5a627f0d94a29f
2202a048c766bd8536bfeeab6e7b605b4a7244d9
describe
'70512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVW' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
6c67f80d0742db6724350e7d8df6f86f
71a9a675eddc44ef7e8d3b5f1d5000582a13c39f
describe
'1342248' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVX' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e194a51949d4301e07d105d432ffbe76
7db01b375eb6d17d89d6726872e780d99105f70a
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVY' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e549ff1a1d9ac973061d032cacfa5154
68f0158dcfa2a6bdf4fd05fb2e7f00dd3c13f7fc
describe
'38254' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ebdc7620949523cd09cd42609119f877
95306115b515cbb11e1b803ede322ef61aa9f324
describe
'170901' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWA' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1cb128cbda19e99d82a27186c9e2d5b3
a24c21578fc9e0388b998f33ae851f7d7a935b9b
describe
'107767' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWB' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c656f24c99b1c2d1509622a9359c9dee
1a749a59a7b2771697d70ba84f4b5a9dafb1c362
describe
'29416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3e5ddef987be125a4729a335ac2b47cb
74aa566dcda5c76a2118d122c7e7f27f1456d44f
describe
'42303' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
869d23995eaa361dcac392e1d98524ba
da1a08575bce69362c71eee7f29023ac1497696f
'2012-03-31T15:42:53-04:00'
describe
'1367675' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c2171a1e83d4244541de610f14abc322
293e67e6e2d0b44f373282176bf746eb83426849
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWF' 'sip-files00062.txt'
42d9d92feb340875dba33ba7cace15e9
ff89a37b483293a7e2666294e0d47109d4cfccdb
'2012-03-31T15:47:51-04:00'
describe
'12752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c93b2959de132726a8cdf868843a3b07
48e9a950484136691032b9b3f58ce64a003c4f27
describe
'165819' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
24723b57a5192af76c335bf4d049918c
c205aae7f42c5f0a1eddf54641ff42d02670314c
describe
'108769' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWI' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
f1310f186d44fa4dd4f1fd39a73ccb17
87b9e673c837f5fbd0846288c2072b562af5ac31
describe
'29858' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
bd78f30e49c001163636be79a53c80c9
bc83c4e7da4332b71380c63776473a86bb22270f
describe
'43159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWK' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
74256b106320b7aa9dfb1bfaee56fd36
f2aba7eb08b580248ab633ab4a84f354e8927022
describe
'1327255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWL' 'sip-files00063.tif'
b1429bb87cc8a20ca3d3cf836f3261b0
a4a3791470d787a34206eff9662c5a578437266b
'2012-03-31T15:44:55-04:00'
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWM' 'sip-files00063.txt'
fde9726354d230197838034bc3d83c29
ac781348af9077c32bffa8700d409fd6eeb66ecd
describe
'13590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
132bf3ef62d46298bcc34ad5f16d06f7
eaa77573b6307353b7a527553a62bb46848f6ad3
'2012-03-31T15:45:10-04:00'
describe
'167247' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
2d9310cedfedf28a09130c41d0e39b57
5a9835b3bb7624e705c03059e52453584ac1d114
'2012-03-31T15:42:32-04:00'
describe
'109420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWP' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b8ec9827290c0d15787687b3c9e7345f
de1750624e8245ae398d5de0180a7f05822c411b
describe
'29533' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
81f767d0d3e000de64923df8f8cea4f6
c6404852c87878df9cf80ea51b7df9fefbb91184
describe
'43648' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWR' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1bdf5f5719798dea640bac41d684a506
eadbbb0ea4622aadedcfc321b5391a6e0e5792ae
'2012-03-31T15:42:58-04:00'
describe
'1339519' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWS' 'sip-files00064.tif'
da37de019afa6d50fec7ff47a3b79b41
7583d9c522a64cf193efb22bbf1b839d4bc040dd
'2012-03-31T15:47:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWT' 'sip-files00064.txt'
27996013c89924e4d0d32648013541b2
df8b2064cdb47045d8e84b8f6e9601053db75ec6
describe
'13221' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWU' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2782372663bf0ab82063547532f9a0b3
d315a2411df9e60f43cc99aefaffa3a16c70e08d
describe
'166460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWV' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
89a41bb2f2b10341732c7f6238ddcba4
40cdc108099e14143a32934e26323331e75a9538
describe
'126337' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWW' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
aa419b533b28fba0fb2a44d62fbd2641
7656f1b88d05db56321ddea618bc5ce092a629f1
'2012-03-31T15:48:04-04:00'
describe
'28917' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWX' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ba284fd79b30c170a9bcfd6574e2e5b7
be0c3ca4dcc47fe765009bc154c036749fd392a6
describe
'65456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWY' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
10db27563fd3245689832a0dc676a8be
6dbd151cdcf2626d3937841c46ba5b1231553087
describe
'1354816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e9b81892466232158977cc965d3b2330
3b585ff6c76ff9ee40a95d8fc625dfe4e86e1801
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXA' 'sip-files00065.txt'
be41821e7b541f19041f16d80a9f4e30
b105264e56cae4285e296f257da62da64317ac08
describe
'36175' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXB' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
d1ea42e6ff77201d9d9ce162947546e6
e34142d25e3e162c0ebc553c90e58d39e68048c8
describe
'169367' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXC' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0dc198ec5843a86ef5c0bd1309d4fe0a
3cfcfe3f711cad21ba494b1a4cfc521fcfadd603
'2012-03-31T15:43:34-04:00'
describe
'130315' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXD' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
821410f55bc52293a03ae556ac947b03
600117da07011daef921f5d1754da915542464f2
describe
'28380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXE' 'sip-files00066.pro'
254beb056fcf65784adcf895949c0385
dbd7f618e67904f4c3fb22c9fdc4e05d42a0d8ef
describe
'65530' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXF' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
39f19c5c05fda00c4655eea1fd821da0
3516aebf1307f31429c70de889f11c3f6b3ab85b
describe
'1377380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXG' 'sip-files00066.tif'
da0d77c92758c42aa3bd7cdf0b07cfc1
d2758190d72f3a19dc99ea3759cc6ca29e969043
'2012-03-31T15:47:44-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXH' 'sip-files00066.txt'
744fa1f695223120dc6a7faaf65e95c2
955ae3c5f1ddc9e9ee1866c5bcba33074c95ddfc
describe
'36034' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXI' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
40a771631f8730f304cd30ea5a602de3
12181030f6f76f5977795443205837741077e806
'2012-03-31T15:42:48-04:00'
describe
'166522' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9b73c652e4bb313da70d9acb492e6f41
0b69f24f6c53647f0107429089c794691ef12df6
describe
'101191' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
1d12bc655296eb8c0cb73d0d688a0552
5f9d312a74dcb12c127138959e35833e2c551728
describe
'27857' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXL' 'sip-files00067.pro'
1355152ac0d26e265c2dd9c1302cefbb
02c44291a970cd5ed394c2aaf9c2525b514f66a9
describe
'39819' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXM' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
f6a03335c911aec3d56b7d148409e374
0d3db333b00945927848eedc40dc549e22742e5d
'2012-03-31T15:42:29-04:00'
describe
'1332527' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXN' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4c5a4d1a457c8bd770da807009034eeb
14333b07dd828e49f79cf206d40fbfa4b2779f68
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3ff17b41d4566919060f9b03d52d4f59
9c3c31d5fb771a9726d7ca189b893807e96c9fba
describe
'12423' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
24ecba7100a3b82e4b6597321189d4af
6334969eb116c6e9c076a42d65df104bd8fb78e7
'2012-03-31T15:46:02-04:00'
describe
'171678' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0ad42d265532128227cf4c0fa5797301
ed18324d3f1f1aeb08c2735f4bec9dd6ccd90496
describe
'98338' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
6ae15819f5ab54a58f355241b25f14d4
fe3a2bb47cfdae1751599d11c69441af770c25ed
'2012-03-31T15:43:43-04:00'
describe
'26141' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXS' 'sip-files00068.pro'
73325abab558a54bcfcb6f9bbd40e7c8
80b1dbb4e3f6677fbd2b569f30c5b3fbc7e49a02
describe
'38404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
239be13b48e63e1fa5e24b238ff3c6a3
81ab5a587da0957022093420f7d981395c2f97fd
describe
'1374787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXU' 'sip-files00068.tif'
627d53a7781e5ce2c58bd7a0dd3455b0
69b22fe436964ae49e0eddb9d339d46a8d1988fc
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
ce4ac8ac834137e849e49db1d2cadf5c
126a81617ae39c0958e0c4f4e09250c987ab0059
'2012-03-31T15:47:03-04:00'
describe
'12313' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXW' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
0e3d45459b84b8e3db2e510c08c066ff
44ab582ca12d43e10f1ceaad967ca9204d774c5c
describe
'167589' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
68092d43b7385c74dcfdbd2a73238da1
f9966c2a7497f05c4f0b1eaaa452d264b00fac23
'2012-03-31T15:45:44-04:00'
describe
'126698' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9a3b4430e6e0b7c01a5ef1ff3c8f7330
b75199a60e85a1dd36691a2d64b779defd2dfa7d
'2012-03-31T15:45:55-04:00'
describe
'26553' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
5b2b9123188ffb44df963e8656e46860
78b5ff5931c71ba1951e2589a8614820ee12c383
describe
'64762' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
e47d2438fe6942e8ce9d54de31b983c1
18e8af771bc1bfba24af6f3fdb3cccebd430538c
'2012-03-31T15:44:32-04:00'
describe
'1363640' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8e8949cb4f14d199834b9239469dae99
4fbd9b0f9a5d80eebc2bbbde6ee321a2bab532de
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a3f31edb4cc332eede669b3cf05a6aed
8f620d347aa59b3b1e20af6a7a185ab6b66b9076
describe
'36412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYD' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e3c7252ad983bd262717b01d0500d0c1
246f6d41c07c832478486c23fd8010e762fce6b6
describe
'170693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYE' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
b2bf0b592da633d2540660e84b940ca2
e2e2d25941a6a6f28c9e9c828c51b1e0136d37ac
describe
'110648' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
fc8faa878ec4b997a9fee3beac086f07
150a67ed44b9fc1d641499d122dc3fc163a00797
'2012-03-31T15:43:09-04:00'
describe
'29650' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYG' 'sip-files00070.pro'
755532053efa24a69a03ff5fd26b36eb
dddd0e3b3c91129356b7042a186c4b4b0574a3fc
describe
'43938' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ff2e257d0c7b9d8270999dae2c215f50
6044929b2498a73dbdcb13c6bbc702c91081efa4
describe
'1365959' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
244f0ced6be348018e743d90947e4319
acb0dff62c1e2db4a93eb810f310a5afbe1c1232
'2012-03-31T15:47:46-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ad58ad2d74c2dd20981b7ae9d5644cf9
c756d88ac53290d8d316ef0fc3c83a04b089a560
describe
'13485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYK' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
cf0f73c016bb8bc1f7819ff17506c45d
50c69f99254381685ea2c93ea3cd508cb0275f93
'2012-03-31T15:47:15-04:00'
describe
'166184' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
7a55f5f812e8a27d6b1a82bf43b1dcdf
c4667736d9eadc93616580427504b2cef8725c3d
describe
'139489' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
51715ca3d2e211ed79c9ec4a60312b64
8a4ddd9785d415334f8326fcd3227400380c7c51
describe
'30084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
e648556b5cb5550edafc326a4dda9699
a026fe8b5eec1831531180386b53ae4ab9e55475
describe
'69610' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYO' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5d2d1f4335c008209a3946dcd7455351
f66463f7ad7167144d7bd5fdbf3c75376bd2a158
describe
'1352408' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYP' 'sip-files00071.tif'
1533d05326780c7bd180d2294fad6f4b
480406df1535d1d2465460075047995748c1d539
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
5c93bab796a81d093a892a4af043eccf
25b60008c9883d47af618654cbb96831063d57a9
describe
'37498' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYR' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
c618ce0c626aa9c5abdd7a4d85f77d0b
9a8e1eed81177c828d61ea45fd9c6de872b01860
'2012-03-31T15:45:06-04:00'
describe
'173791' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYS' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
1dedbedee9b09506e543f049838764a4
d6810698edbf8198df6eb86137f633e21245b2b4
'2012-03-31T15:46:36-04:00'
describe
'99543' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c28b59455f6df71c5eee4d5b40a8661b
8cf0d87480f9890f56fbf7db49890e19c3a07944
describe
'25782' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYU' 'sip-files00072.pro'
381c0ea763bdf5d0da76dff6014991d4
dcdf32a27f9d6e3c7c80a2d2713f1ef6270a803a
describe
'38788' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8d20dfcc25d0ca0455a2b6922974bb60
047dd602ce28202415dad1168b7a2482b8a0f79d
describe
'1390743' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
3c530840262c43bd061b4b6d6436e376
d575188af72e3415fda88d6be0bfc19343212976
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
c43bd89325850fba5d63c0f0b6010623
b17cfee5c83205fe643a38c117903f6d709b109e
describe
'11655' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
2a05eb4c456c109f74f7a061b708a663
fba55b938e757b0ec7864dd572907e203be1c3c2
describe
'169368' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3c86eb84a7fb9fbe302625d5830510bb
ad3cc925bba4927244a43fa8e96418aa75a80f9d
'2012-03-31T15:45:19-04:00'
describe
'138443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0a4b6f92e4096a3a50d86ad19fd97789
d847fcb51c63684634aa9db9f9e6b4e901ab290b
'2012-03-31T15:47:17-04:00'
describe
'29844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZB' 'sip-files00073.pro'
7df0c2e67ef40b0841de61a916535faa
165f150d5f555e44255c9336152355d23f29c90e
describe
'68955' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZC' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
5e76d2f712d41b2f5e52fa215cb52c08
36b3f625e5d5cce5ff0fc9ed033a45dc53ffbd54
describe
'1377772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZD' 'sip-files00073.tif'
d51178693701df6eb8ae4e453b62cd62
53bc218d39c8c01655d3e12899cea5facb4c811b
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZE' 'sip-files00073.txt'
04969eb4947872f5af39bbdd12b42382
68102d3f938dd8ece63ae5969ea346688e888eca
'2012-03-31T15:44:56-04:00'
describe
'36967' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZF' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
749f06d0a071b58994cbbba7d185110c
5dfb8f3e0f3bfdd7e4ceafc05682c9502c8fe30b
describe
'175693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZG' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9033368dcd8f95d580ae298e91fb09a0
f74b297d30b92292710af6a4a29f3c050325b19c
describe
'105125' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZH' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
7830f3d247b1bd097fc9aeb6df5fa00d
e9fe0200cf7c486bb1c0e27c4cee42a4c1e88d4a
describe
'29153' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZI' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ac7131f8ea31265fa63d039ba2490d87
7b46f156f47db75325963075b2b3151d1117f893
describe
'41007' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
0dda9fdb2e63d9db11ad90f375bdc1e5
8c9c59784d600bc6b7f72e2115470c127942b9db
'2012-03-31T15:42:47-04:00'
describe
'1405987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZK' 'sip-files00074.tif'
ab8d1be94a9d023f9b7258a4cc7c1d93
bb7d589730c93e1f57181a80956ccdbb4c2774c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZL' 'sip-files00074.txt'
93b193874b58a58d3fc0baf5a20176af
dbdcbfae0d637ada2aedb4c1ee5f5e74ff120f48
describe
'12589' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZM' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
08c8f27399bf9ed45f4e989be5c6f635
67edfca85a2c8cf6191ff972e7efc684da004fcc
describe
'167915' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
acc5cf8b8b8d18a9ff7407249e5393b5
7e8fb75aace43f249da728de21003fa5e1accbc6
describe
'132155' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
8074ed17bd013d1b182d8c5ec670ed74
9911e4fc951cb869054c9de4a105e0d826a73456
describe
'29389' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
5d2ceefab00ca1d6d2b2111cb1b4a3a8
31e1e4271fdce422d3b9e37c8c080bde620d2c39
describe
'67231' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
75429b375959b1b31c40b23716639cd4
dc6f0f3e67b7bf92bbd581cbd741fa6d5e96b507
describe
'1366084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZR' 'sip-files00075.tif'
59bfcfe44f079eecde473a911e745b68
32063f3d9ec7fe62a868b87b9805c9c8110e22dd
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZS' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b3f661a2c7850af6add2366859a7c306
135eb43d3c4ee12151da8a7ccae317728cba113d
describe
'36697' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZT' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9307d6e2268aeb44a7d9973b960020a7
e22b09a9694f7baa68fe328d3ce7f6d9543ab67b
describe
'171859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
f833b3ce438b86649b1093d8ca13cfaa
9ca728a7db55a8e8a56526810ca27dd970e2fc76
'2012-03-31T15:42:38-04:00'
describe
'110753' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZV' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
8a9fa60ba8f44fa8c0f910e135a5f119
86f3071e65cb43df6e15f967e803fe4ffb4c41d0
'2012-03-31T15:47:25-04:00'
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
45fed08bb1f49478354378b5fff43c13
d4c0a66c1669971754dbaf07a86daee0991d7699
'2012-03-31T15:43:28-04:00'
describe
'42968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZX' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
9c5d166aaf93dc56e870f30374ffea9a
b7243d01384912bd564d4adffa9bafd477d57705
describe
'1375695' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e7afef786258c5246c4b10b51d3bde92
8ba43a5e0356ca4290139f54de95db968026fc09
'2012-03-31T15:43:36-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
26004f11d782b96189e28aca91635a50
40effaa4d941ac4ddb09134acc59645cb8a618a5
describe
'13152' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAA' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9f5bb00e01a395d94b11237580e89f0e
918cdd9e286a59ebfe6c5d724686a19d5319f4cd
'2012-03-31T15:43:55-04:00'
describe
'165304' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
bf09801faed4f3fd4cbdc4baca4b4aa2
2a957f4c86718fac10d95a042c5528282e716ee4
describe
'112721' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
0d374cc9d01e331f8bfbc4875f15f7d6
36395e030d9e740e2bc3e877a7294e25ee73db17
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2530abe34467303822521b5178a783fe
0790418cfa5d37051a490c9e8529716326ef78c9
describe
'44351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
dcf9472a87b94dc7992fed6e1029bbcd
5b154c7f724e1897cd62580ad1e2b8db25a995ef
'2012-03-31T15:44:04-04:00'
describe
'1322951' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAF' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e6fceee291220989ee159f28bab518e4
269b682f566d85692856b3767cb1b4d652a84f64
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
5c53e92199087f8cf6300f5c7700e602
39bad53287e759432c4aeb06bb9f9fb8a1a5eade
describe
'13632' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
820cda19e2f7a55388d44d9e51549309
1a0789b6a16161803af35555020224addaa84384
describe
'172234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAI' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b903c25451406cb79cc5cbf2e94189b2
5e6cb1016ecbff096795843b04faab268624fa8a
describe
'111026' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
438318b98e5c3070a5de432a4449da1f
ff685e71a5eca1338a4524ea79b2fcafbf347874
describe
'30049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAK' 'sip-files00078.pro'
86627d030ff1e0a79a054eda4ef61b43
23f8d9953b5b963b4e5c9dbb4ae54fd6cb062374
describe
'42832' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
a9fe9efa4fceca5e9417ce3ed46d1bc1
e897b7ae82f749a04628efa34a37c298aa83fed3
describe
'1378351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAM' 'sip-files00078.tif'
1fa253bfd6e6ebbb046ffef224c962a1
242575101ca8553d296ef0d47cda7f11926176bd
'2012-03-31T15:45:37-04:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
01f8654802116a72a34cb84cfea2966f
500c99b8e8e2f28af9d765b17ea2a6ed4312b6db
describe
'12643' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAO' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
7493cf32857aa731ed565225cbfc35da
ebe2436b1590de35c4766ba79c13441d030d5065
describe
'167963' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAP' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c52e0daf0c1f0370d71f90f0e4e73e1c
b997699045edccd3f2a8d7d28108b0eaa6504241
describe
'99592' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
597e329afdfac427e6f1e30dad8a8a4c
c6b0c87bf307abe2df333d980cb9585b46b5cf63
describe
'27931' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
e78eeb2927b056c03ada52043e40e751
6c38ab927a3848d6fa00ae395b95ca43a70b82a6
describe
'39075' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
411ac8302a36262366dfa95d51bb634e
ac34c08cb288cf0429c303e5200b5389b0dff186
'2012-03-31T15:45:53-04:00'
describe
'1344563' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAT' 'sip-files00079.tif'
d05930af591d15e3d63e2098a16f0dfc
78ce8affe6edfa6bf262ce491524c2ce67fa407d
'2012-03-31T15:47:57-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
21debe6cc9504b059c3814200d2dadb8
51bdc1ec6d73cb2f66b13e7b9f65eb2bce7fac88
'2012-03-31T15:47:02-04:00'
describe
'13326' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAV' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
edd6cf15faa65858098a270ed6b576a4
aa1968a35b6c8626e99fdd34f0b4cdc38412a5d4
describe
'169356' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAW' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
7feb3c3b9559cb6dca613886d8ccea9d
178312074ee54c7879f8e90b9f0d5a265489fb85
'2012-03-31T15:46:12-04:00'
describe
'94033' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
7d71968007e077df404a06bde92a40f3
5448cb4cd42201891f868f3dccf66cf49623097e
describe
'25772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAY' 'sip-files00080.pro'
3d45f3cdb8c802d8f9ec312d56183385
833ca1f58d32c2c5189f98ded610959c3ed52f33
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
36d098efc2c56b55e9a8c8cb0bccbb24
12e06f4050f1eea1375b25d2063e44db6c3c26af
'2012-03-31T15:44:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
5ca62f69538bad2fbf21ae9429e4d309
ca1efd26f7adaa6c43b7557439655070bdb2878e
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBB' 'sip-files00080.txt'
56936f41723acd88afab7ad49d3c1045
ffcb2392e1bc779703c1cee5e6ba8d07fa075b4b
describe
'11744' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c942a9b127511a6ce8caab929720459e
3397fc4bfe1812910e1a3321c151c05f43074e6b
'2012-03-31T15:43:10-04:00'
describe
'165398' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBD' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e5c3d56e696c1eb568c57a0b0fb0baef
095e477acea63061996dc6ab7ec6fd4e831ba37e
describe
'99411' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBE' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
e184f6005c5bcc0be51730bab1855181
a466f37e2e96bd8a2557ee1923c56ef2f5baf07c
describe
'26761' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBF' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c9e65d46be25e1d4870c26bd2f57a3b8
39f25d2a76350552b0229a55b99afb8a1e18a61f
describe
'39720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBG' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
ffa3321f6cc1460295dbabbb767b62f7
562d14e35bfb02752fcb2d0dd9c440af06972f01
describe
'1323795' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
67459bdb391fc5202e4e96e493a5d278
23ff5bc558aab1c5e6859b0cb561b4729735d261
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
db4854a669dc6d9bbf148368b0a2f7b2
e9dd728cf50857b1371324b4758d868882cd8633
describe
'12885' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
cd40c8efe1433b4e88044a3f4ad914ea
96b4d394654322d9f34819f4f5ccfdf6570cadf4
describe
'170327' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
176180a1ea30480dbaab39fbfa6e2d29
a9786e1d47c412bb2dcf8a725c663d700d187a10
describe
'101819' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
7739cef10fe1679c3fcf19d43babb4c2
89d5936f1ec415a9e714c54afad759dc9c8cd1df
'2012-03-31T15:43:25-04:00'
describe
'26814' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBM' 'sip-files00082.pro'
3eacadb7651f5d17984e1a30f5e9c1af
313d580b7f5a565150e727b3c4de9cc54ecab6c0
describe
'40227' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBN' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
9aa2dc334f8f11cc3a346887b5e69074
35a32ba461a2cb127764abbe83af7f11d44882d2
describe
'1363099' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBO' 'sip-files00082.tif'
66a8fe5a035a9c066a848b018620ca0a
5faf9b4b23dd7577aae1bc0c0a3bcd5cca496206
'2012-03-31T15:46:05-04:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
e30d0544fff08dbbe27f4872b81154b7
4025f1aa37d0d1443b9354c60e4fa20278587901
describe
'11736' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
9129c785b5880acc8b7be1dcb65bb57c
cb500a16049e47fce276d1257e6b87b9ecbd88b9
describe
'166411' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBR' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
8e6616a4bd3b6d1c10ab93e5258ac81f
26848ad5e14f1e0b27bcf3afa4f239bfded743d1
'2012-03-31T15:42:30-04:00'
describe
'93428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBS' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
6eacc6cfce3a747f033d6e825cb5f3ea
2ee10f9f1dac65c39cfae159afd80bcd462dce2f
describe
'24616' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBT' 'sip-files00083.pro'
62e91983081cf2f52604ae4aafebd22e
0cd6227a943b0f0a421a469d58058e659f63c9c2
describe
'37073' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
dd5d52b93e15809c3a57903f3774ab40
2cd8369a9370869d6f92197db22e519872e3ec9c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
7ce687b5aa4f9cf2beccd297699e0c35
843e9eaf46c14b6ff7e60b89f12dd783942187b2
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
712d2cbaddd76f669fc4356ba3ea0753
9e6b91aba70358a41d6489aafe0bb133641c988d
describe
'12141' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBX' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
567431e72b88b05f8a2f9f8f8dc907e8
59179e79fe693195816fb1046834283b7dea97fd
describe
'172683' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
17a06ea38361bca4aaac62f236e684b9
04df936d5724e3350268e523f1b909a1ff50bdf0
'2012-03-31T15:46:39-04:00'
describe
'103275' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
27193db834d78616bace8cd994ba0691
a6cf00953f5ec2f9e795ae2d460533c83df5d13b
describe
'27831' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCA' 'sip-files00084.pro'
ed6fd7e4219c0ed345b9b472a3960c01
8e536e5df71b6a5e63b9b5c3a9f4e40541d799dc
describe
'40928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
b8d853796d105308e59e13f9f7186a98
375e16c895ad4f135f8863107eb463cf72f57135
'2012-03-31T15:43:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
44f0af66b8f870a07cbcf7724001bb8a
481604e7509015d70158424a371042819c4584a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCD' 'sip-files00084.txt'
91cff446ed88ec8358735b694c513f99
3660f1d56fb6c46e94b98b1c52fee6a9a3e4bf95
describe
'12574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCE' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
83549c70f3842cd1d4971c1ede83c8b6
8782b7960fd0f470dcba3327e9163c68c70c0c42
describe
'165067' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a57a9ddcdd5069c9085eead38ffd4f80
92e8f729aafb0d5221a60bc6787f3a1666f54d47
describe
'102726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCG' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ed0f530fd79632979db8acdafbb84e72
7673f2d8eac1fe07e15dea3cfc70fbfd24357478
describe
'28059' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
4c99885b4bc39d68a7ce9e785d151e94
d8285501fab5936bc1d16e746899355fc79bc392
describe
'40795' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCI' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7857cd7ce00aae915c867d1add77137c
222791201395231f2ed29318a1e2e70cfac3c5e1
describe
'1321123' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
7a5eae36bb05989042e00a2ed62beb26
d6c38d851a12809b6a8d6d64af0d2a299c46e981
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCK' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ac0ac0f976f467e199a738d1ac69404e
473a4bf49c90ac73729e3354ef627d579bc57073
describe
'12788' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCL' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
25341e8c9682b4849e0e0a26ec41fb91
b497be5a8e14525db31e6a04b74ab0c2824b24f3
describe
'173020' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCM' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
69ef686c6e7a19b085f3f97306239f92
c6b40d753202185d8f61d37aa4b76097309962e4
'2012-03-31T15:46:28-04:00'
describe
'92995' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7f8a324336e28134ad024fa9a00313a6
9d32dd179496cffc25cf744800c54a9d5be744d9
describe
'25066' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCO' 'sip-files00086.pro'
88447e36ee2707b574534bc856ef0900
9599f75cb26ad49fe32675de132a86d35ea65208
describe
'36491' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
a092baa3c695529d543733d8853d9bc2
4055600a24fd7fb203b518e2fcc577e1701422db
'2012-03-31T15:44:29-04:00'
describe
'1385463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e2b7b1305d0a098cb0494ec6cdfbfb6e
70563cbe66d23686e8f49d97d86f9d52d25ddecf
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCR' 'sip-files00086.txt'
677a51dc135fbcb4bcc6c038171099c7
0462c5d569656ab478de29bd15399094468e2692
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCS' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
d480c6bb96a6106759cb280b56f4b1ee
372addc34f1fdb34164323ff3595b19ab726b25e
describe
'165523' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCT' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
23c9c1bc3efd16618e28dd19d53da213
d3954be0add68f5482a9b464ece28365258fdda5
describe
'132016' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCU' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
56b109096749fe0a73a25ca16d0e9835
602d9d260d8702993aecfb514dce9013d97a9fcc
describe
'29724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCV' 'sip-files00087.pro'
8162a3ac1d9057baaa7e392bfe843e19
27ae6578210b42545700108eaffa0deeebc777f8
describe
'66219' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCW' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
6c68203fee16a057dc3bf1beb1287afc
41d7578fc7a3c6488d07c85d7af98fb891bca2a7
describe
'1346612' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCX' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7c5f3369ff242cac4053420dc2a67b2a
2fd17f181e34861b744b4d64249e5cea67604b9d
'2012-03-31T15:46:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCY' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9169b44398cd8e409a8d66e16dee67c1
0fe26d2115d9d6278f00d43e0cfb7786d52f22a2
describe
'36541' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWCZ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
85d543f35b435680d04a1f98fa1f42ce
8da0110bd80f1ee0efac8ccd18f626660565adfe
describe
'171014' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDA' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
04844cb1a2ed1d83d81a1ea4fe9e749f
1bba981ed0d5f8c813889d3f3435adbd81ed68ce
'2012-03-31T15:44:58-04:00'
describe
'106858' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDB' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
0c1f73abb901bd7b7c9e3e487b7bb6a0
07bd275a8a039ffc87ec1cb6827cc6648164dc04
describe
'29691' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDC' 'sip-files00088.pro'
39ac3f6b83a26b67fbb8f984e99c8f7a
39246c60e0feedb69434832f05e181be1810acb5
describe
'42450' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0898fd714d52806d6d50348305401a83
c9adb5f00fb544ee9fdb6a34830e8b0b77594ade
describe
'1368607' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDE' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1e43069febdea998f23c100de6e4fdda
ae735ef4b50d6eb247bcf67d8e191f8cbfea378b
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDF' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d9a5fe951602c90e41f5c06abc5d3347
0af9a912a00fb8de6f260572b24e6a1d4681d54d
describe
'12612' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
a6ee5eada4d125293c523a4e95347158
3575ee16eea6831e44d90de4d41c3077bb62d8b7
describe
'167249' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1ef3a138493bf9bb7327ffe2b0748612
81fd44ea4b4a39f1f79789e98039a2afbf62a6db
describe
'105518' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDI' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
80f555174c1d41790d8e139789df73c2
2ecaf79acc3fa49317db3f68ae6bfd34eae9fc4c
describe
'29824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDJ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
dd5ae1717fc5dae9d6d392e04bb10186
9cb937c2d10da4f186b6310087a5d4e67966400c
describe
'41930' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDK' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
32c702998587b3da44b9311706358b3e
a4c4f80577bdfae2fbc788c9ba37f6eb485e0505
describe
'1338351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
35f6cf3554d15a2951e91104207e4271
be73c58b2a9fb51b0fa778b549dddeafa102b431
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
8697ea76ebebb04042c81c36e87e141e
bee6256518c43357f139fa5bf737acbae578f7fa
describe
'13306' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
fa32229812a2b109220e1fe380a64636
76d3b85843cb218d8279813e4e9f9bb49b1cbf25
describe
'171681' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
25b655a347f6a17f3d4ab2df01ccc2eb
6f98735e3858b27b010327d1222e40bfffee5c92
describe
'107533' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6620565b649a338d9c2b5e0dccdd075e
efadd518bf776eb97817c5bcb29e813a5f019a9a
describe
'29902' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDQ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
f4250b995daea9b75bfecb50bf64dbe7
938ca4d26aa8dbffc2545cb756e269a373e672e7
describe
'42659' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDR' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
452ef90ad68fb1fc1f27b3cfde15e85d
1482713f18386f8104fa69db84e79fc27e353eb2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDS' 'sip-files00090.tif'
56c4d24a7b220c7fcfe5893eaf5c0c3e
1debe3394a7925fe73d57e47179b4a737dcbdb08
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDT' 'sip-files00090.txt'
79385aa0add019a8d8dfa9df870c76c4
feea4fcca964186684c6129b0d5eff2d1ce84519
'2012-03-31T15:43:06-04:00'
describe
'12475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d24bbf973b8e3298cf5ce8904eeacf21
779a1b994afefed7dd2f1aeb068c5d8a936423bc
describe
'167501' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
3386731d1371216c2b87cd9ebbc49e99
cf2e69f584425d61ecb8de4b204a4909b4effdd7
'2012-03-31T15:46:58-04:00'
describe
'129237' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDW' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
35a28f77f2b73e283170493399e814db
3513097f038f6070b6e8b9998158b97799c6b3c2
describe
'28586' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e3bc596aafa16ef33a5a41356603c8ce
3272953df3d7deca8c3895b78f2cdc7a6b0c7b3f
'2012-03-31T15:47:50-04:00'
describe
'65076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
95d12ea4925c4ca93a51252e9cebd4d6
0783db87b524711da2cdc5848e826686e2bf0e2d
'2012-03-31T15:43:18-04:00'
describe
'1362316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWDZ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d984af3facf3e514b1c8efb95dcbae61
65b12fe50398e1b3b0b51c00cbc0dac164637e99
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
0e53b1768c7372ed2ccca75e39b1e35c
b53d6f6b0b704af08036afbaabc1ba8d6ba59c9f
describe
'35949' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
b277670deb447165b1c68753b3d48633
236ac370752d9b480469782e650da58985ed398b
describe
'167357' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEC' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
eabf8aea2826e22a23490c9338c059b2
6ec45af67cea79ee3eaba306e319a335f59a2e31
describe
'111398' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWED' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
aacc3c2eab22ff0dea176502e73c4dce
23b4576e2c0141f1810610d335fda9cf6cbeede4
describe
'30441' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
69f9c4955ef62cc36c6ff0173f1b7396
62ce69735206a8dd20fb2c61ff8ba313ff3f085d
describe
'43992' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEF' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2942ac28b617a67350c012c9f82451a5
7834315fe5a8957db4ea37a291bd7c028b83bcd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEG' 'sip-files00092.tif'
17ee635e23cbd604e068adc50eb13d49
03395add7ceab84ead45f25491fbf5afbc9c51ce
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
ff8408b2d993476f2da9cebe2936b304
f7aa2f8650c9a2743fccc6f718d571fb0f5a5004
describe
'13428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEI' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
0042745899aa25cb9baabaa1f3d9d070
de5306e91c9a552c5d36c4aced752364d00cd9f8
describe
'166706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEJ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
a3cdfe690b818ebeb3ded64392dd5543
685f7e55229c915b4d0538a65780e7be68d50f30
describe
'105504' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
886580c51807253c7967fc74e7467935
5fefca07bf49d56b536f0ea31826a6475e5bdd53
describe
'30197' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEL' 'sip-files00093.pro'
800d434e33fbd5726fd61f9e9b4ea0ab
7193a7b105568cfca536f3c95671510a0fb3d8e7
'2012-03-31T15:46:31-04:00'
describe
'41834' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEM' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
eb8bc4c8b06cd0811b68608d092c242f
7cf76542443146cd314a6e2b3da88c2e279d141b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEN' 'sip-files00093.tif'
5fd358b0c2ac59d0e9d7fa13c8b54455
1f7f09646e6e207d128aafb7a4c972fa9b6be402
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
dfb632c045f8b7dab3e38f87c8758570
60327355d2da89001d50c85c719cea269a752172
describe
'13243' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7f9d34e90363c2f3c6bb428a035492ca
0ee61766ce8c3248c7825896794407aa9d7c7073
'2012-03-31T15:43:48-04:00'
describe
'170101' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEQ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
188005a41de47f2a68cc957c98e93a34
e0d61c3f8644b671f1270e944ada2316e33cfdbd
describe
'109588' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWER' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
586c25f3d06771dbe26916e3af8486fa
55ca34256e8b95d56b606318de3d3994d699c4a2
describe
'30104' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWES' 'sip-files00094.pro'
f8b2920ce5dc09979fa39f7b1ebef413
b5c62dac52f22ba16a5909d0ad03c484898fa7c4
describe
'43057' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWET' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
1f0d6375a466a49408fb69c4d4307e82
2ff1e3a2fdc21d1e3051fe1ee00e4ea2a5469bb7
describe
'1361527' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEU' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ad6d776718760815de4680c1e540204c
2555f781b5f1a53aeb5b8146399f6466a5089503
'2012-03-31T15:45:08-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
79e0c7faa34567d8364fa2763c96538c
56c165cabc266c7c243938a43e19f7ccb8fa6274
describe
'12851' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEW' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
b43140401cb0b5c3b55b6fd7671f5e6e
30c68ee04d7212844285fa4c31c9c740f133148c
describe
'165512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
f446c7f4cd7926db9d7b47479af7ccce
665c43b0225b71c298ae3378ec88a0efcde8e104
describe
'107949' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
67d74c7fbea86d1b81716e2706ca4c42
73570b667f229b4084dc5f49bac57976c35107b0
describe
'30213' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWEZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
5d2237fbf8644c56a6d77477c69c93bd
42b05127d1a6bda769aa47737d48f0672f4718e7
'2012-03-31T15:44:24-04:00'
describe
'42522' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
0b9813bc0e976a8c8c6415fa5e09d66f
9af18544e7eed01ce714a577dce55caa682da15d
describe
'1324567' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
49f6ad076a7ee160593b72a203159c30
548445c11f491e9256725acef1788c106b799291
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
5f9baf0305c9300585afbed53799bd8a
26ab04c785a583637ac26cc60dc6a6c667b5f3b0
describe
'13582' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
993b8dbfd4d4599c86d5222f2d9cc731
1f254320764925479b290f5e4b5618f0485d8d47
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFE' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
b2964409926994e99c3f4ef15d190300
66902b6a00837d89f368fa43535ffedc02ef7447
describe
'110637' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
8be15c09fe8c24be5aad3bd280f6d265
ebce2512a7a15ed467510886c268f1d9c92cef4c
describe
'29925' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
93f86b9c3830f9ab52293d60bd99a6cc
edc2cd038e821ac4aadbc007fd668bcd5d814e1d
'2012-03-31T15:44:54-04:00'
describe
'43804' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
a01b59f3b94486caa7eaed36f0c81c45
9627a8e0b62ab04463c1b8187ce9ebbfb6044e5a
describe
'1358427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
569194ccebe803768c6e414a62c360f2
9c8ab81094f35d41aca3f2b5a58f22ddcb9a75a7
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c338c39ff0d085fa471cf1787c07a0a0
e7495d325bc5632f71492cb6970bf8888712340a
describe
'12491' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFK' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
d876d4fd1e0ff17757b0de7ede8a4ea6
d36ea7232ea696c00618258789fdd1634dcee23a
'2012-03-31T15:45:31-04:00'
describe
'163915' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
b9ccb37b45f2a42703ed04481a3ab1cf
cb6e5281bb7d3ff365f2f4b9d179b7e3d8d4faf9
describe
'98500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
f23932123caa1192eec34fc1c81cccb5
21bd2ab6f00d20d19ca276c0a17a2269795654b3
describe
'26642' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
92929279aca3aee78cbe52d2b8290e15
adff6966035648181ebd48d85ac81ff2d49a7023
describe
'38904' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFO' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
bdf709304d484bee6bcd0acba421b568
6f5dba78c38323b27bbdb6ebbc836e958312d816
describe
'1312515' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFP' 'sip-files00097.tif'
aa00424c728947a1457a9e6953064011
2806f5125abf35327b376f5ae2944973fc866cbd
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
465a79faab54aa47eb927275c88f7835
686b5d40cb0104cf048e6a1f5452ad558fa64f5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFR' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a24695687f42b132f802ade2fea70618
7e7f3da48feceb5fb8c5e63c31481a414588f098
describe
'166267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFS' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
8378788bdb17ea164555f3c84fa0bb53
135075ab50e36843118e868d7fad1b0529c76a7a
'2012-03-31T15:43:15-04:00'
describe
'97263' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFT' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
02d463bdae9a12ddc27ad047b393dd2f
6fb6fe0cc271d7eb21727a7254e7e4315772cd85
describe
'25830' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
b5bbedd1c00c7cb9f8693dead3fd4c65
bdb3f02ad1919f2a4b2456d76df170e128023bc3
describe
'37398' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
af7bf3389fc5af729c3f5312a2d59e77
a375fb58a8c865ab0b162a43a2e958acbff87a23
describe
'1330715' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
0f83fb5a2b5b4f0e5efe6161ca9c23bd
dcad909863c1a9c13c4054db6c3f304e4c7e8f40
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
aa15a63f357790ea62039c945353440d
14cfd7747f63634f5d0836a6507f5bf6373f1d80
describe
'12004' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
9a0cf4222139565f6bf8bd51dbcd8803
a4dc65e094983d64446ca56a705f3e92594b986e
describe
'171132' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWFZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c48e27c02a64905baac3ce18b20ab1fd
9a197426f3500c1679064bab3d8686c9fa36be26
describe
'130460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
71c7189a6d8034fb9bc3e5450d12d807
915896354da33ed1decf1f89901a0c2da05356c3
'2012-03-31T15:42:44-04:00'
describe
'29446' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGB' 'sip-files00099.pro'
43079bf150a09fd8e6f212b5d9d54aa0
88082520fa7c564a8636226a92ddb3464ee77c2e
describe
'65914' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGC' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4e1d5b82b2a33e4a831ba129c6c5b7f5
4787f4be4b5131e47e3deb40f3d070a4273cb417
describe
'1391532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
9c161b7751b6cf019b48d7f1c587be7c
c6a40bd34e3493e25c356047fe380c21d5ecf1d8
'2012-03-31T15:44:26-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGE' 'sip-files00099.txt'
45e127ca55e28a2157dd2d2b497fd335
0437c9bae823701f77891cc48330cd18f5d0a3ca
describe
'36273' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGF' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7d10de67fe74fc77e84e051602538cd1
c5fe191fb0ae338b8b3017b356f585a0169290a7
describe
'166168' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8030ced2135c1378119852a3687d3999
25524045aac649c0343698a9db0e0b595c39305e
describe
'104812' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
da77367ca25cc993e214d0d40548c009
a9f9bc89af56bce8a9dafd11d673f6bad5ba9b3f
describe
'29181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
0fede49974d4820fd363f690e6e9e64e
b78c0e657df06084b2b6f365da03ac376e85c6f8
describe
'41789' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8035e194cc0badc8b9430aadfed3c9e7
4d1e0ecf5fb28702a7db184436d190270be98474
describe
'1329911' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
e5e04715502cdb87b1938b2e90dc78e6
99329c7bab4706371e6ce2df20e757d248ca6685
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGL' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5584798b76ec0cae3120771882d1fd2f
78ddf37f6949bc687b03e19dca810984b0e541f6
describe
'12990' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c94dc09557c9c56f0e0d9a032038e147
becd87c84bd5d3df214ba9acc9f454338e1b2bd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e8dd25b68aaaedd0b13afbea15b35121
874a567fab3870745024ffc637852743f84adbd8
'2012-03-31T15:47:37-04:00'
describe
'122106' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGO' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
ae49d776b5459a931390f4ed4a98f3c6
71209a86779244ae7401a15279932b066043b885
describe
'26358' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
2dd6b7bb6f130bbb7a3cd71c874141c3
7a95747efc26fa8e46249905384119a37d72cda9
describe
'61187' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d723e3e150deeaf3348d4dbcf2320ce2
e2e514a09aac97b80fe543b6ac240e68ff5a304a
describe
'1384992' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGR' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fba9e3056f8da0ec43ab3305b3e0e6d1
76255be2470acf9b65f4bfc1b12c502473254298
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
dcd210282b6dfe336b470623d5458aa3
64484335827eabcd9d2e7ea5fee0023999eccf43
describe
'35320' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
dcb4d6ea0220f8e649e320521f91384d
cf12d44aff0e72c6e48fa389f663f2b97c796e2f
'2012-03-31T15:47:13-04:00'
describe
'168586' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7dbae2797f8d4eb0cb190a4989c2efa9
e61ecdcc56476965366e497a82f91cc67ea87370
describe
'105533' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGV' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d2f7bf87a34cdbfde2852afcb2a32ded
fb8fee10e4a1ab6578776e59a54b82d4b7ca4c5b
describe
'27620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f4c33b6eac1e80b6ab9bc781621876f6
d2587ce1060cf08216841de3d2ac919734b0f06b
describe
'41246' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
fba28a56a811ed287e33a0b6dd393758
64bb6111cef1958feb2a82975310c16ad44c312a
describe
'1349159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
e9982870cde212fd2ebc3a396116d7e1
fbc6a5acc4290bf807fe0eab9ff402ca5992f0d5
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWGZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
4db303d86f57eae6b72ea4b7d8f897aa
efa9aa0dd914f202271231597f84b53c07a7ad94
describe
'13198' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
37562dc786f3d0d5e32c1673bafbe170
b6b0dbf0c282e5537a773c7233d672a304cb5a1f
describe
'169574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
bdda0d1f724d99e1d1f4b57bc95ead53
d30a49be3270186984df944529138656e804a2a2
describe
'103257' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
0192f73a42212bcc71871b3ae09bceb1
15bb8a2ec3679279786394bd3e0b0946f98b2d31
describe
'27549' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHD' 'sip-files00103.pro'
7a11d72bce71b2672bcaed1b83caf53a
0fe393084bd27e13f0eeb8d0fbdf3dd7de793c6f
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
4a7dd27b537ffe4f8720bfff0b91a3a2
5959e140c44a5e104839c8927b6326b2849107ba
describe
'1356987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a03f30c87fb0ba0cc99fabc813c3197e
f19b5628a4dcc7873918c074cf54bcf8897dc29d
'2012-03-31T15:47:56-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
fe169cacd7f42ddc7a25855a58b27bf8
4c4bfcf56803079e84ea166a5f8c637aa85b26f5
'2012-03-31T15:44:45-04:00'
describe
'13216' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
6ef0077cd87c15a8def7ee9eee73e6f3
8cfed05be95c57672d15f055f870aad7c41915f5
describe
'168473' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
b8475935e3d1f0dcba9cbf1facfba149
6aa5018555b0c9a94806755470b73876d3c5871b
describe
'103194' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c652d46c0c603997dcd38025357ca868
b6b669ab44b72ae2683aee7d67961f9fa596107a
describe
'26104' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
1da5afd32344a4b85cf8e05980146a38
ae813763e2f1f99314e15b050f4deebdd0be4b75
describe
'40173' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
8cec79bf4b1d13d8fd3a90ff58faaf99
d66296890b73c69f5c12b47321f69c9d56cc174c
describe
'1348323' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHM' 'sip-files00104.tif'
664d34c42ac5e106cd02b4e450cfb8b7
56c049b6ae1e8018156b4a6aff4f79a1b045e80f
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
ec50c4606ce9b21d864006c9ce84c629
ff281b47e5ae6fc0303135ea9beebca4a1a17404
describe
'12554' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
dfcd57f23addb849ec7fb00bfeeb7b94
d1f2646dd9d3bdae3fc2dc82bb6f7cade057fb36
describe
'170980' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
82fc9980231349bf4cfa4d2e7e3bdd28
b0311785c0b8daa071e27c3c060c70d45c2e5a0e
describe
'102223' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
653422a6a1f62e262a001f6863010605
197212c5515b9cf1fd48c9de41d3c5481597047f
describe
'27045' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d503998ac4a96b0d681c20a693796b1d
c03d9de2278fb4fde55d4f5dc26cbb7a53e2cc49
describe
'39885' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
8632475f880ca5d73c07a1b33655d13e
2e3074eccdd7099bad4766cf9f1bef328a3f1b08
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e4a276f6f8124f3a256c14bad62b840c
46e8d83e61ed78e90289de331312a6a558e66197
'2012-03-31T15:47:55-04:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
7fbbc8782836eccaddbb0675cfcfe9d6
513c9d42d275805011af07f5da8ac5558a56152d
describe
'12275' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
4d0a55ad7e4c5fa86ddda34b32855834
3dbfc31471053fea843d07a55f2fa0767f1483e2
describe
'171338' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
f5bc51532d36745ee9b3ce4a278a6460
043118b2105151923788d6b3f4157cee4e111890
'2012-03-31T15:47:10-04:00'
describe
'129412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
9c6ab0f89a9dab92deffb0d569c3ac61
79131bc6c533d63e9082c315e37fa6dcb5c67a43
describe
'28311' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
7c0d5393538c0f7eaca4c8c4ebfd1e04
18fa37a288681584bb774dbfb4cc0c293df7bcb3
describe
'64430' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWHZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
25f12f56e9331e1c786ef2aee16ab169
e3f428cc5da84f25e8b6f2cdf84453456720b6d3
describe
'1393300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
2d83e1ac9580fffff726074a74065cc8
d4da78e7cc3b4cae1a721404b7c4ae3f86b7c0f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
bb440324f1bf208bc6ab7e2228a63996
0856c5d36b7d00406c3806bc513bcbab2cee5127
describe
'35793' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
ce40f99fc4a909f80e339487ca4c6a6a
e72d26d3925894b0c07e1d7d5be7ff7e31007d17
'2012-03-31T15:43:29-04:00'
describe
'165950' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWID' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
4bbd0956a91ba5f00d2180814b85dcbb
0db0ecd89fcb7434bdb5520411b49491503ede06
describe
'94989' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
288d581c66bad87291688944167b1e5f
0b69dbd8351bb4b377f8f2f2f4568be16476dab2
describe
'26544' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
3695451255adaf66e4fd463efdaf82a9
59754f21d77ac1ca98592f8e0ef3d8312531b531
describe
'37182' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
e7ae8ae2bfeb415258d048fe3253834f
61caa92a61ce9623b780a38ff7a5a8d8b50c50e0
describe
'1328019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
a4ec06fe54cccf9130e1709080078351
69888c7ec864e93acd46f488e3073001d70c7039
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWII' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1832ad6b4c91cb10322b6dfccf853d0c
d253fe12ab0fd03fb55aa3ffbc5310a915e6ea69
describe
'12277' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7463960677926a81a6cc9d6a67183bd5
28a6eeb4256aa18bdcdb73d68f41aaaffb96b5d2
describe
'169465' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
a5de3899a20525dfae4c1a8effc8c3ce
853e868e282ea65b3b6899c1864fbdcc6a8f6e72
describe
'122226' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
3aa29b7a41ffb52fb61461c5aba89beb
ad1bd98eb8cce845c0af9bb195b351f671e4d566
describe
'26468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIM' 'sip-files00108.pro'
72ca4883d3e5f7c63e390f02bf63532d
a9efdd1d883fb43250a0bb2d7787d3e3bde02aeb
describe
'62811' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
bfddad6b2aaa1474a66f46b9f1b4301d
f3c05d336dbe6f9e57d9ffa0915e0388be57bee5
describe
'1378192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
e103acdad9c741d06765e7e7130e46d0
4939223dc51abaa393661edbec8575c6d673a46e
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIP' 'sip-files00108.txt'
4ffdd09be4ab048150d3f0266269faaa
aa73699991e233d408fa3fe2736d1bc70ea8f650
describe
'35429' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIQ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
4ef40363eac7858a43ecd4f4a0e776ae
9825bf6b3303bac9e594ae96b8396e0002fcfc7f
describe
'167983' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIR' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
88fb10315e3a1c251e7a304ce0d17cfc
9b0c958e9d536d78cb5bbf008323a5855b817417
describe
'101404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIS' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5ed04966ad031e3263b28b0dfde6f412
d1db70c8d8a7159593b987b6828182421a37e6a4
describe
'27777' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIT' 'sip-files00109.pro'
f8be599cad76a2826e0252d297cc8504
3b92b7148d8104f45847a92bd0f6b50f0d359c42
describe
'39728' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
2da176533c571c710a3f801e4c1bcdf2
314e68c20d91907965cf10ff06c8d3172146abe9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f86fc45b74cfdfa6c8f5c30a4b6367c3
d0af31b75dae57f3e0cc286b87ffaad5bc809901
'2012-03-31T15:48:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
42deadaf5364397b4660af423bc36e0e
440d47b9dbe4c4bf545ba048428b960353d20c16
'2012-03-31T15:45:40-04:00'
describe
'12969' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
6da6a19fd6aaf2c8c54f31d605953010
e67be10d699d75f5275b6ebdcc2127475dd10f83
describe
'173458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
ef6a3819b848e0f7c3a563ce25ccc6d7
0142eb240838bc840219a2f74ce10b218216aa74
describe
'127890' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWIZ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
89f9443f47eebbd852a773dd6ed6236c
41c2369766fb8058782a2c43861ce5b68dc39cf2
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
758e1cabce5eb8f53e17e87894058c70
3ae71c21a57278162cc649bee78af6bdc12f7bc0
describe
'64199' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8df671c3066b1eabfdb897ef2133aea0
49555108de4f7dcdff98294910159165ef27850d
describe
'1409960' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
3e47e9c73ef7437a48a1a6eef8891d1c
85c67b7a5f2d242ba2f8186daff4a147a1f46293
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJD' 'sip-files00110.txt'
26a5a27f44086082f5974281f80fd274
99dd0c422f4f34608ef440f0b8e0156f2ae4d2f7
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
34c829e3bcf2948907b94aa01784b52f
2bc8b47d236d02799f315544faf0df61571e0e96
describe
'164463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJF' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
0b0eb3ee60a96135f592648fb23c2b5f
43d7897d4bda372358267d1015ce9022a89b9399
describe
'97842' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJG' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
14c1ea6254d57de98841a83676faef83
1287551f345e980a34be92bc16bc4d1be26a1a76
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
35fd65211bf795f51267a227ee3dfbbd
ccbc475278a881739f2184a7bad21d83e26708a1
describe
'38852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
8b2d1ab3287c08ccf583e82740d68c7c
2c0e42cfb73c9345de044c4b8e9d746f0ead5bba
describe
'1316319' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
b50d7a4e05b1f144f8a8c889403ddaa3
2c79e859b649d51f0778cd360097b3921b6a4a48
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
aa816501c31c5ec6a01ce10764d4ba37
0b665777f404cc6d3af7d8e0cec87086db7e4ca6
describe
'13331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJL' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
57a31576301717ace01a37fe12be28ba
64bebcabad363b2d77dbd9786725caead1fb1ab6
describe
'172616' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
7c3172d24035d5b9234d974bac9ee87f
be8f4fa4d8fe89bcbed95fff7e849fc80271d01b
describe
'88092' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
a4f10abe0e52e2545c804d2a781742e3
dfd35550a419fa98aa7ee53675d8953244751135
describe
'23961' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
bbfc4f7e12880a9f26720d2bb58aa6ce
8899c716ffa8154d78a21f84f21e4cd67441c120
'2012-03-31T15:42:43-04:00'
describe
'34533' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJP' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
a26a3c637a24eb25ce95be03f581a58b
54be01f38bdde3e41c7633a467b7402cf825fe51
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
54e9609561d112872c733af772401ea5
c2b0b52781c3c708cc3c8e364c3ead462d07eace
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJR' 'sip-files00112.txt'
8625cadb4e1da95b52129a53e58fcd2b
4d4047bce821a6cf929e812394a7f5d1e496d782
describe
'11450' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
745a651bc63a6f9dc320f2397c1794e2
0beb217b6ba10522ced9edae8a77cb03f5ae4419
describe
'167451' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJT' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
e0af03032cfa797ef5824310312c4c4f
2daaca0e53e249b56d3f077f24914c8f6ed53278
describe
'99905' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJU' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
f60655ae8d9d8048d23d053cbabaf747
a91d1f6c578e6a8039978d6b9243a1ac5013d098
describe
'27418' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
dc2f19467575512ddc6d9b52bbee7944
a68b4b6ce10b3a90877c7a21d60f60dfc5187b04
describe
'40256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJW' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
e907f468a9f73a309891e43c874c7b6e
3cada2dcf30136e599bd1414e0d9c02033c5da75
describe
'1340347' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
37ccd86cd5c60c4fd536ce17bc8e810e
d68146bc70e2835d437f01280f2f89f9d37f40bf
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJY' 'sip-files00113.txt'
22612fc184fee297951c58d07e2ed5e6
34a5247a5ca5f60aa6204ac2285caf434b820aaf
describe
'12882' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWJZ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
a4439eff8574bfe5619f5aa4ced4c952
d5d3629f7a2ce89e02facb2b2ba1d445526b48bd
describe
'170416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKA' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
428234d157b9f0937a9d4dde5b5ca4fe
7785e0e0c34a4a3e907ff4a7ba5a73d1cd18f8c0
describe
'99380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
0304f75ad63fc9225aa14da3bdea1286
e35025b79efefc3bae8ee89f972eca3630e93488
describe
'26364' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKC' 'sip-files00114.pro'
17e49177fc2769600d00fad0f002e76b
934f6374472d1ec5d15cdb5a94360cbad87b46ce
describe
'39519' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKD' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
89a632832509215e71437e497b6ae8fb
d7009cf7a7c20be3db461c85ebd6ce962f1ca005
describe
'1363979' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKE' 'sip-files00114.tif'
2a2c39e2be184c5fcfab34837bcfd1f7
e5e578cb2784c8627c240561d0654bc63ed29fd6
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKF' 'sip-files00114.txt'
8a3a5a6c8be8b2d48b719a90eea43d0c
c74676f2d65c5d8f8bb14cd79b967b7a9798c1b9
describe
'13105' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
a2d9b9079999cecc026050c868bf7bae
88bcf089a7070c3d7bf304a79b4246b68de1461a
describe
'170958' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKH' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b3de89e3de989aad067235a8a7d6cfc3
a3ae937eb86d9debddda7f75bb8244debcf54c0b
describe
'97983' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKI' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
11e35c4bf3332cb28c8ef8e4ed8da345
272dc4e6046f1160d2161f38a31e2c474e58524a
describe
'26821' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
4650114d127fd8a2911b3ef6eefbd912
3699cb1d06a80e7c8c2c325b6f21dc31545deb0c
describe
'38581' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKK' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
8d1a5aab383950d7c84ff31d9bb1a0ae
e1a4addee228d2a54a7939a99cf7d9cfb4c77b25
describe
'1368171' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKL' 'sip-files00115.tif'
03f90cb374400e805cc63715b8bed8fd
64cf9066d1ca9e5c64ffdd7e019a297396dffabd
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKM' 'sip-files00115.txt'
31667e63ec3512274c86ac37cfee98b6
c9324ca6161e9fe843555208a27128acdc84e09c
describe
'12909' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
5b556b8ed35b6210c8b5c73c25dc1e3d
6f722b6f2a0b7ff707f93dfc1e3186cd7fccd6cd
describe
'167015' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
532165da923f3f37f3da97a56249ca42
62f25c19283457a52d17080fd5e2012b3abc6e9c
describe
'87752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
e28151f12834a8ad8827c5803a4a4ff6
f0abe63297d76913717948267df94e11a3f0f3dd
describe
'21843' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKQ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
33de677a774fa1b85d061547126c5f40
e72eb4978fb0d7121d151a1a7d757d2754b0dd7e
describe
'34638' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKR' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
8d05067744b0ab56b65da94758006270
9efc070aebfb246f5222bf005ce8a4ab04251e95
describe
'1336863' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
460ee235e83e465f41de2c6ffe85f90c
6e7dadef601e07c63f46a44f4a73946243d40183
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
2782f68e9ccca76da02c7cc3cb7a8618
0140003756d78983933cc1d6b737883b507de9e8
'2012-03-31T15:44:11-04:00'
describe
'11925' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKU' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
9c15ba4c41d7601444f232a2521d32a6
a1460002ca47ae8883fac1a41aed6994230a6a77
describe
'168365' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKV' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
9d99b3c6ad722b018df256bbd9637977
f06480ca3bc82ef668c93fdf374d4f14a43a976a
describe
'98917' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
ad516b902a7bf372f8b5a29bf1215ac6
ce00779b410d83155029e3ab2518919b690239f8
describe
'26291' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
d9806cd1c629d4f8b13636eacd7116b6
77572be622818629abe5a096cbb0f4b96934b3a3
describe
'38513' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKY' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
2133520806d11a353c1dfc0962b241c9
3f5a2d5aa1556ac1c254ae124cc3f144af143409
describe
'1347299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWKZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
733af2f2f5a84c1cb4230f6941f2b595
19c42fdca0667b16a5e92698f4c0bddbb7747595
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
310625d806fa2908b4aaca35804ba77d
6db7b84c539d863f8a35a09c12d1e41c05ef881d
describe
'12284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLB' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
4d30f5fc7f9f964dcb1f213ca1392f5b
3f64ef9290133b533957f11db81eccd24d7672d4
'2012-03-31T15:45:51-04:00'
describe
'173408' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLC' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
df7e5848daae1bb97e37967ffb396e83
60aabf856aa845ccfad2ef3b72430ba5d1186df5
describe
'112758' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLD' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d666eb000c4feac1f6ec4a34cb6c431d
555d03776c3da40c0e6c30fe48c119fc1ff94781
describe
'29911' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
06fef9b6813319e7ab5e68dc06225e5a
fb54a8e115e455bb6291c09614fc02bfa6fb428b
describe
'43071' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLF' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9b5ea610991237c3557567c29b1cf5ae
4935ba2bdfab70bb155ee2349c7ad29b45a641cc
describe
'1388119' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLG' 'sip-files00118.tif'
f742eea571cd03afbfab9614adb31ac7
8ee571cf4903097ad3804703ccd1e75eb384b232
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
83dda292894e31c3c8e399599b6c9280
fd1989f1b8e01b0f6b354760a3019c308f7d61e8
describe
'13102' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLI' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
59b89ba20bb2c09c4b6c3e6fbcf0fc87
9a5e0bb940e95b9149f031a5c108ace22cbd3bd6
describe
'168260' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
4e79092e2e89a6512ef6187aeee40fec
bb1719a6c475b8062beed80cd75c8c87af3383ff
describe
'111898' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
f8de85ddbdc806f4a980764ac32085f5
306e4d56f40fe1eb0a509e62b8dfc7e3933581d3
describe
'29700' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLL' 'sip-files00119.pro'
d6f83508a020434e01b1b8b2569dda0b
1e6e0c7340d216a9f51cfe83e6aa74361fc92d8c
describe
'43253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLM' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
98ca5b4104d8ca7a302ddb24c8979f33
ed58d7f163bd085981a1bdb13c9bcc26456716b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
b7911a27b7651cf0be425339760fdb52
1f098229e60168a97dd8b823ef59ed5d81173b5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLO' 'sip-files00119.txt'
be2422b53e316786df3aaf43cc27e59f
6eafae9237fde68482db51bfc1c023a7bb086b6d
describe
'13651' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
4c14770f3a6856da0a1bad4bc013f0ae
a63c5b9df07d6df0d4ffb4beea21ee891c873be3
describe
'169472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLQ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1f5b704d14b50b459d17f2c227a7cc78
e2ae4b6dafce441a1a5ba02a03bcb3294d59ffc6
describe
'134250' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
6522d4154b0fdca3de174ba1b82b6f72
3f84931362519b693252b414bd9bda549898db98
describe
'29473' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
cd00bd611c7a0b9eb132e349ccbabda4
d3eea35fc7a82e44407ae85586ca9f0102a1d877
describe
'66670' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
a689c3955ffc3a7eb412497b2d10f340
60d79899d6004f576f4bc3c6d3bcb7c8b5e6ddf6
describe
'1378480' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b06bf0a7ba9079e62dc9e6082cd882c1
4c318604e40df2a6d3f181be88b1582074df4682
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1f58db575e945cdbb2f13276a82595d9
e6f6ba5e701b1a2aa38dbe0b9e7789991b1102ac
describe
'36459' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
2cb4cff4a60d39b6b48da4503ed3e95a
9a837f74339209da6153888ed57cf659a452c4b2
describe
'164881' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3ca7842e0f5d0eae19fd311101e76186
c3b89e32a0ba4a1b2a35206a503bc2123d1e5907
describe
'113192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
374c5c25963a466697baa240ba6ab3e2
e6b31e3422a1ac66d58728eb3d6cdd08aefee532
describe
'29763' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWLZ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
a21a14581fcdd6f9849d3d423e4ac307
f87d594cdde822a83e6e1b6240fd2f2976bcc3c7
describe
'43866' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMA' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
e6f2f383c4062d182d55e295e16e6b2b
4d7a96b4cc026469269b3a5126b3fd993d1d0601
describe
'1319475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
7d0b0488ebc2c5a07afa78b1301a728c
471d68490628797850d432ca453a206de3df4da0
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMC' 'sip-files00121.txt'
39546158fa1696e226f93660be532f16
163374c50712c9e77bc54cfb83babf58f19f423f
describe
'13673' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMD' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
e0f97697d940a0dfca4032eccb144fde
1a422c250a2b1b93908e3ff4421b681bf6ce95b4
describe
'170412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWME' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
f013e5ff9f01b5cc578497378da8cb59
1f65966e8b26b34552ff91fab577d2f4e4945e15
describe
'136799' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMF' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
ac8e881af877edf00432216cf2ee6670
3a55b08e7e94b2b84dc48d483c84a0e5dc7bfcf0
describe
'29705' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMG' 'sip-files00122.pro'
de1efe10de979cc3185b52e40695ecb8
06678bbe6d2d64f18091f8a8826b289c76f021f2
describe
'67374' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMH' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
aac057ba1099b4a996879c2b4b655ee6
7fb2a52b6e3016c86dd2c186011cf2b10d0a3d2d
describe
'1386512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMI' 'sip-files00122.tif'
946f1a508908da776d113f49773dde35
5063d5eaf16a7f1c1edee2c8afc8c1f5e2ea43ff
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMJ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
ac4a0692bf8523f66006961e556084ef
ec13188177ffd875e50718cdc730876497ac1a63
describe
'36575' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMK' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
22766b481252dba38ce881b48f79f627
d1d40b53f05441af1cfe1e52ad20b6a67c8b0989
describe
'176006' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWML' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a01764d5f341ab116ee4148d6de27922
33d573250ca54d986ae926730e563790c5cf627e
describe
'105573' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMM' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
49ac71ecf71b9db98779f5728a079667
497d57a8bdba15ef524bcaa829d59dbbc882bf2e
describe
'29492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMN' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e76d310def62dd8118ca2d48e80cdbee
2d923b5b1232f649d07dc68bad5e20681d6f0c69
describe
'41375' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMO' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
261cf99cae98dd10ea5546566495c590
c5d0c8f05c6a75b5a3424d109539264757cf3671
describe
'1408691' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMP' 'sip-files00123.tif'
22fae7ee14ea16202af0e345ac14052e
0ac537236bccfe7ec16efc26bb6f8b22972edc0b
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMQ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
99f2e6da8fb835a1543b1a02e4c6c3c6
59962c0dcfb16a5ad9e312976bc90cc2813cc5be
describe
'12279' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMR' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
8e8997c65dbba8000779e3441bd1779c
1f1e4d183ef7d4908ab101058b7b4f019ab9a124
describe
'172147' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMS' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
cc6292b4306addb4de3d1fc6e64f725f
95cef67c557a8a24237d4911117c6464da97db67
describe
'116774' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMT' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
da89e4272be5dcc6e46111a42645fe0f
bcb7d04357b08ae507f9036dc06d2ecf44288841
describe
'29530' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMU' 'sip-files00124.pro'
b6b47291cba4a88785b6ee5a5eea7338
1acb0388c540ca6b13d259f2bf848027e5a9aede
describe
'45527' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMV' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
81ad6a7e819b146e1918b1848cf58ca5
6c3f033b7bb07f76312e010057010c4ae13a6a69
describe
'1377771' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMW' 'sip-files00124.tif'
6d68101e45425dfc434bd870ab6f3e29
cf74f7bca4be1de734ab582407df8c57f55656e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMX' 'sip-files00124.txt'
006f643a2cb3f1b176f566e3820c8e44
4cd0995fd47babcaae65a0fe03a0ef304d1d7c6e
describe
'12778' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMY' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b9020ca6731e7cfdd64228c5663dc7ee
660689d29247d6c1e7d2c5ea5827a87a6d46c622
describe
'176558' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWMZ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
2f05ae0255a1cc2dacad7f368fa74468
985b4054355bb40f2d6df73d66b34922d0784775
describe
'108787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNA' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
682f3ba162d3e3b586ba9bf4ba9abd80
0096ba6da04aaffaa952f2f7ccd469a30b91e143
describe
'29900' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNB' 'sip-files00125.pro'
f0c890ff3ae72635b679738e2105c871
b20466a18dabece58842977a49f10b56e5f93e76
describe
'42109' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNC' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
9db2d925b1485d9dd80ff395cee363a5
b9e23561ab9a78073a9cbd250238e54a3a5abf97
describe
'1412967' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWND' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6bcd23a6a1e66aabb7b7de73b680a3c3
cc8e2836abc05ea5ade736fabb0502dceb0fb381
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNE' 'sip-files00125.txt'
89a6496f03ab73fa36f834409ada3bbc
4cbd9e1b2e91fe556a1d9e129c9cd18a352d297d
describe
'11891' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNF' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
95f8f483a69390e3dbe5611d8748045b
ccfa8a5c4d5a6990f52e7bc40a280424c523ef24
describe
'172572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNG' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
11baec1b88ffb1148f77e99a9e9c2493
79d45236a65c7318c12516cffb12b73865091a58
describe
'138048' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNH' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
9020c332812d06d45de70e7fc20a21a5
5737718a20747ee2c923adc5804a00ad50a40357
describe
'29644' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNI' 'sip-files00126.pro'
4000f1246b5bc6b33cb76daa1297801b
ce16dca4cb36024d135a6ea33c33b31ef1cdd827
describe
'67682' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNJ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
228e9508acbd1894323030543b6c4b3d
535596796311101cd3ac71214f5d690d57cb5ca4
describe
'1403676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNK' 'sip-files00126.tif'
c1c4fb8d68f728291df8b587a667e90b
3979c35a205d8a493ea717d558a8d652ac055e3c
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNL' 'sip-files00126.txt'
7fd3e68cd75bbb7548c50829a721585f
80b5b76bdb0a6b43c4d8ce160601f1cf9d331def
describe
'35806' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNM' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
98cedea90dde3cd6c30c3999b8ca21ae
21eb8816ca58ebacd603d4d71de7ddb346871bce
describe
'174547' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNN' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
809ade795fde631a78b0f60f327d0864
10e3a3dbabd7aef70c4790af93fc2352a2f782e6
describe
'99663' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
97d9c0d262abdd56e7e0d1e1c3f664e8
75dd17e9b4c8f8f133869d1740799dfbec0426e5
describe
'25220' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNP' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3a7825d0120820db858ffb66e58b269e
98cf3ac460d5cdfab288048d3b8f12a112366a23
'2012-03-31T15:48:05-04:00'
describe
'38300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNQ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
f5a62ca0fbe00d7cd2b5846ab15d4802
501097c5c19e869f3d07104cb21b9c1c46e1a82e
describe
'1397251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNR' 'sip-files00127.tif'
89874f7588291f2bdc560a930cdbbe2b
b470a450f5e372c491982b3d0356b81a042b5f76
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNS' 'sip-files00127.txt'
278abba6796cf9ef963d3465843ecfac
77b4f73f77355cd209a3568812b8a47d8585c01b
'2012-03-31T15:45:29-04:00'
describe
'11122' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNT' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
92366f6281803049644ff6d1371fa1ab
133fccfbee5b9d2f44ca88d28cc497d0e6bab943
describe
'170574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
925cc64d749b246d1a550d752790c589
a10ad94c38cd1ecbd585169242aa0ed003251b2d
describe
'110315' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNV' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
8072d796461cc66bc9b5620caa096a35
863dd5ac6f9f67cfe353aa87b0b3e2283b9c044e
'2012-03-31T15:45:54-04:00'
describe
'28162' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNW' 'sip-files00128.pro'
cb770e129576691a7ce62589aef17956
f7eb770d2116899369d32389cee6e1babe370b6b
describe
'43264' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
ea95d21f5c4ed87ba2562ac91d3cfa60
c35e138a65e4d25acf31d95376da138eb696b0cd
describe
'1365603' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNY' 'sip-files00128.tif'
cadf7c53ea6f65e5bb8453ef7f8fa666
41951c8468ebf940227f2afd002b667fd5bd5581
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWNZ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
cd9afc1b35ff257ee029a76f48bae97c
070bdd9756057d027b2da154aedb8bba544ca4bf
describe
'12484' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
c0d9934e97e0f7ab7391e16fef8c7307
09ed2cf375df410c46e7d6f135375e960f59581a
describe
'171004' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
bfb0f8bcb9c248e57daef408644c62f1
0756ac21c65995e8eee36c80cc0202a0785bbd63
describe
'103497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOC' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
29d0b619c47dbf94f8e92f066b921c5a
a39772f87f6ea955c9836e4059be850c4f0f62b3
describe
'28074' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOD' 'sip-files00129.pro'
8cda3b31f157907c467a1321423e274c
c6247bf9e36c08c22ed9e313fb19fe844464943c
describe
'40300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOE' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e04b4cbe5491a48cc0af8d832cbb2019
ae89652b615a8084392e1a7eecc204b25a882006
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOF' 'sip-files00129.tif'
47e7ab2c0f9977ca0753d4c8548a315b
d171c6ceb30a8cd78876a0d0f7185cb9111fb895
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOG' 'sip-files00129.txt'
8e156ea28110d90e6ce7e20a18dc4f1e
f3850c1f35db1697f025a9969c9e7598d84d4d37
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOH' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
92f64cdafc7fe727f011bef112edfac6
be5dd6f81eaf2723bf7674222ce71dc74f9d33a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
25f87311011e231b0623064b97a3e12f
372e88e98c2b9277c83228389b42d5e4b9584e39
describe
'128043' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOJ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
f999b7f81a4f3104dbff96b91d25d9c1
18f904018b9a7182e1402f2c10609085cf8318c0
describe
'27581' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOK' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e51997088723dd5d3246635946bde666
8e355aa280b4dd6957c468f27e3421a0c5ba1c18
describe
'64273' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
7798b83c961a4a31d089e25c468d1456
769ff6650385c557fd47c60816b1c8cfbe30557d
describe
'1370488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOM' 'sip-files00130.tif'
5f8ce1518ba49db902abc57751891df3
1393a581a7c5e945df5dfd5ffd900c0f3225b03a
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWON' 'sip-files00130.txt'
65fe3315d9cddc69c100ea80a39477cd
2d428518ce2d7b7b85fa5f778acf014d9e569b23
describe
'35942' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOO' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
190c3e90ba06977a759e5bc5ebd35ca4
6d7e4f25bb6de03b35a31bb9e7f757d8b19979b5
describe
'172789' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOP' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
f3445117a9048418dabde4328225e5c0
49169738fc84a6932879f71f8b9a7c8ac3e45304
describe
'100764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOQ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
58c54d34238f09af90ca9289cfc9d4b2
7abe293441a4e8390d59e7076c6ebdde36bafb8e
describe
'27868' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
327fafe31e39225ba32db8c158d0f3a1
ce809436513b36c889c01528ed660640ab5cb290
describe
'40309' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOS' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a1cb889129a708aa32b1e8856d5ba121
88395a40dd395932bb26b8e2da4dbf481afc8c9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOT' 'sip-files00131.tif'
5c073f99015172838bcebc8ee9d330be
8f6c5a457bb036220c969d7a91d15bd3fdd6db89
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOU' 'sip-files00131.txt'
dc92353dc7022ac8b2912d9529ce05b8
a5b2230de95c9e427ca2133d703e197ce081db71
describe
'12505' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOV' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
9485eb79ded43f624cb7e09f0a77567b
a0bcd3c4d42f5fe8fd77e44e37ef66b629defaf1
describe
'166698' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOW' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
1b4a9c00367fa2f3b8f9ab3a8d64418f
d1d4576873827ac27892542ec8ba0632c938d8b2
describe
'126222' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOX' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
15a5b40762f92cfedc0fe3ea95be6183
bfbc0f412aa89c599a96ff196a521e65ada35c46
describe
'27018' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOY' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3f3f87ca0a023c2f2ab70f33ed6c36f9
fe31c0f1101640d8e2efaf80aec82b22b565d8bd
describe
'63956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWOZ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
c39caaa2c6310be5cf647f2ed062a0fc
1dfbca49560f90f434187914d1343e991569305c
describe
'1356276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPA' 'sip-files00132.tif'
e36cf1816493cc5ebee3779a9f6edfea
0bd9a8e63de2915ce50c06743abf971fa1773725
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPB' 'sip-files00132.txt'
bdc77bf9a3c640500a9303256ecc7d6a
af1bb1c7719f3d3e02df96c75c21f494e431274a
describe
'35996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPC' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
51571f00bfc139d382db11fc6e4eaaf3
a5a8eeaf0bf65084cbd01ab44e955f1639a86086
describe
'169689' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPD' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e3d54ce5a63bb5d9ea2bb9d89b39e882
ff39a96699ec9c461ea43da234694d4161358b1a
describe
'101897' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPE' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
8bba2b90d398aaf70420c61f73a8baea
5cdaf0861298e244d60076eb2003abf506725e2f
describe
'27979' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPF' 'sip-files00133.pro'
01c0b46f6a5aee557db52f872c23649e
d13b373256a50a7549fd99ffad13cff05246a902
describe
'40315' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPG' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
05b4b8708f072ce74f6f33192ac790ec
e07d8f55deff704b41c924d3b6c0ef3f9f4388cb
describe
'1357979' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPH' 'sip-files00133.tif'
046c47f56d8a055c2f86feec5d20f5f9
fa13dfd7d1655d231c588b88372dfabf9b80f382
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
6f217c259afc72c2376e0fb92742365d
abd4bd94d3c0be9ef6e84af95b0582786ec34767
describe
'11986' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPJ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
164b29c114494b1185d004f0ac14d050
c90ca84e12e01b6897c6964632a9c18db5389231
'2012-03-31T15:44:27-04:00'
describe
'168042' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPK' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
abd26838141af241af8734ca622be940
610253ae7e84b9962e886863204858c8e59c4c7f
describe
'135087' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPL' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
0f63a29d885e07dda8eeef5c6bab2742
47279e41029bb2bc9eb719098b8e7becad0a8d08
describe
'29710' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPM' 'sip-files00134.pro'
4c152f499e358a8c82ecf1619b1ac074
9441e62f51a3ef94bc2da9cc20fe1fb4fe8886ef
describe
'67309' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPN' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
45c64e01ce03f289b1367c4cd3818dc3
5bd99d66de5af2d3a651cb4852370390992f81a0
describe
'1367196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPO' 'sip-files00134.tif'
543830666f25d75dc0244f25ae68762e
670c48e1a41ed069c642340f1a22f1bbf113b57e
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPP' 'sip-files00134.txt'
bfc634cd7aa8194c990bc19d26f60b0c
962812c71bb2305d394ede0f839603ac35a33f0a
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPQ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7ddca63b3fbe291ab8baffd350987f31
44e2ceb47dd308e4ff3c72db2965f8311fd0590a
describe
'173561' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPR' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
0d2f44725acd6683cae0ade5e1660dd6
f06c18af3fbf10d77d8685b22a409098ba4a0138
describe
'105892' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPS' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
740c5cc2f99d68b9635d8c3890ecfb0d
b4c18cf0e09e4fe7f76093cab4dc7f863e62fe21
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPT' 'sip-files00135.pro'
585ea239a1c9bdc0aa15ace262e6868d
d7ac08c421dc2544b4a1f6305e0404ab5eac26cb
describe
'42144' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPU' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
77fa44b3f110c5808ceb77ab3baea2bf
9da1c7651f5a44990dfac335cc31decb24c18362
describe
'1389027' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPV' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a95585fd166ec190d29b1ad5c8f62029
37d84692a61cc5eebf4a87ab0c21b26af8bd3354
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPW' 'sip-files00135.txt'
74602d21687e94b571f63e6bf00647e3
4c6e8b421702ff1228a846300f4a2167f789f0c3
describe
'12255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPX' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
cd6b702a79652e801a8dfd3f81022fd9
18dadc47d7638450a94e27ba89e97eaf700dd1cc
describe
'168483' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPY' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
6d929aa262af4d6a77eb2d3007419f53
e6df4305542402b75248649dd1e4e22d36251277
describe
'132092' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWPZ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b51e156559600f80096ef446d829e2e6
3f4cd1971fd44cc6f71fab6b9ec18f4cd60ba9af
describe
'29203' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQA' 'sip-files00136.pro'
72f1779b3267c43b2cacb2f37b39147f
7162dabba8f78bf19ceb410f6d8867453a0044b8
describe
'66070' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQB' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
95a05acc3889122733b8904b850cc209
995bbaf7bcd527c19bb6dc7ca16c7b1ebfb62b35
describe
'1370392' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQC' 'sip-files00136.tif'
dfe119cc46f4cd4228bbb50831aab682
eb2b0311e72822dec3c650b5f647deb755a6e3dc
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQD' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ecbe16d637c246ed8e5aa6b471386fd5
5e17f28b44a7ec968c34f2ef4d5229228652f2e0
describe
'36186' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQE' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
adad65a94764cbfb4924047f467f963b
e0ba6ca633a1b93652f71a56ad7b789b6f5d45ff
describe
'175003' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQF' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
f92b7b3ed7f523b9ac709bd7f1de1106
6cd3133f77f8f1d685500c06a54adfbc77a524c1
describe
'104667' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQG' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
c00f11b796dccfd88a1116ef39ff678d
df67e50f45f832eccc6861920c9737328c05410e
describe
'28145' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQH' 'sip-files00137.pro'
841aad9551639111963709b3f0244a1b
31d99e033731deaba27e90e4b16051f690fdd31b
describe
'40765' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQI' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
fd49119117cabb86ed3be2488a108240
75bf5c38eaa7d7e9cca229aeb66865138671a0a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQJ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
db310baadcaac5562b2c98908e4bd29f
ff1243215e04900edb6e1da91b929426ce997f57
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQK' 'sip-files00137.txt'
0f9c7a3490514caaea3d481e953aa4eb
43c1f7113d3d5ccf39b83c646d4e2c497a05dce0
describe
'12057' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQL' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
fb36fd42d97fa313b871ebdfb399f3fe
c0f1e8179a4fe274840970e1b431fe00fbbb76e2
describe
'166683' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQM' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
66d5b703e82bcc4248a3cb97cbf9f487
8500c1837d8460846151d5397c3eb16e74f815e6
describe
'122493' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQN' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
111c32cd183217e5eeac8fb2248dce6e
40a3166879e43f1091a6e0aad012f21e47615753
describe
'25298' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQO' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e50f96b24d8a5678ed43c99de71f8243
d3ac04f9dc5b646d7c570f0f6daab0c71ae3d810
describe
'62075' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQP' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f56cd43dcab35658bd7240b689d98289
d634d8c43649fce3b35ed2c65341294a45be79a0
describe
'1355928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQQ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
999ea0da7e1d7ff120e4fc9dbf1f6b4a
311a84b33d08478a8a4fa57ddfa0dd19029a06ea
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQR' 'sip-files00138.txt'
bff0fdf0e7681b0863e3e22bb57a975a
b79d7ad1a29d32946d7c92c95048af23580e981e
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQS' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
789cb77bdffafd9878e63f5735988919
81c720158f2ef5237bd26c346837f78cd6fc9ee6
describe
'171025' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQT' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
3d5502b07a8a53acfae15dfe87c4e5fb
0ecd55b1280560b395bc860af2bc7adcf61bb40f
describe
'111770' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQU' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b4baebb8e6eda20203a79c93ad270974
aef5c474e0f4d7827e5147556d3ada0612c1224b
describe
'30672' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQV' 'sip-files00139.pro'
082a361eebfc2a7ba65aefa883d7eb75
741b466db466a5da11f7ea898e7981ea7a78f158
describe
'44069' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQW' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
a4bcd39f1bff028ffecb4cc78058f62a
1fe9ebae5b47f7578143036536d50f1f929d9d5f
describe
'1369199' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQX' 'sip-files00139.tif'
776a301c32eee2240d13341dd0c18036
4146fcb689e4709b3db9d3d95fed356200164983
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQY' 'sip-files00139.txt'
d2d059f51cbcdf7ec481f6bd7c5f6f76
d7d59ccd9f2d7a8c24a226e8aae2191c955c28ff
describe
'12773' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWQZ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
98a8314533d895d292b344d924a1342a
0c0e8c39c74698751d90f343a4cc3ebf108e24d4
describe
'167475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRA' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
7f1d9dcbcbbebe4ebd09204bbf18e848
65105d58049aeab31b630fc39490dd5dd0ce2330
describe
'132771' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRB' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
a8e2b29016868af8f0cce5e5a3d365bc
637d2b9f9133d9b10d882b9ebc878dd533e77560
describe
'27936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRC' 'sip-files00140.pro'
cb2d3e0c41086ff0901de8c129cc90c5
f1967a12637ca953546de27e74923a8726398207
describe
'66089' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRD' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8047de74be47aa6a9dc217234d4c9e77
165ba608d3526d4f26a06d716c59609372520bbe
describe
'1362724' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRE' 'sip-files00140.tif'
695aa9426ef76e02ed58b5beb2fa0458
c4ad95e87b2cb98c0afc2fce98094a03b4528306
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRF' 'sip-files00140.txt'
8d4db4174df67e877def6f92c7b73d64
1859eebfd37e05ae45b15a61d9f277b8df785a7a
describe
'36338' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
41fe6b84af5180c03f8b4ebdce83d8ca
e16012fd05d1372239715dbfafa5f02f0301959b
describe
'171866' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRH' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
28181ba3aa79817d494a190bf4fad67e
b348e06b1a62b76fd4d191a455ecb387bb49b2f5
describe
'111857' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRI' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
788692da4124814808b70c3d8bf07995
0f4957624211545f1ab932586edec62672f292f9
describe
'30093' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRJ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
eb02fa56e289a1cefca06011b2deb52a
1542a35dd85c1a3067f761e756114cd6bd7eb5e7
describe
'43512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRK' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
39fd3afe14dad9b30316429f65412f80
b4fedc878039503636e6014e185c283fa509f8f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRL' 'sip-files00141.tif'
cec7f18076173a30f0011f87857ce3e3
cd95d58a007471cb317b93f96df008ffefb2f731
'2012-03-31T15:47:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRM' 'sip-files00141.txt'
f0cab53bf75659a82fdbca87a0a14584
8db721e8383d1df6f2151bd7427cd83a6a8b9d92
describe
'13301' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
314aa370f7424f8a972f77f87732372d
7cc969a2265a6cabe3165dd144c1c7890fe038c0
describe
'166890' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
0daf4422f497d8e02c14687a2446e1f7
3f2c6307c93eabc14a37a212ae1cf113bcb96e11
describe
'134799' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRP' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
5e8cca4d6a214823cbda794c5aa34f4e
126dc80bad358933af8ec1061f740f8294f8ac28
describe
'29611' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRQ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
4bb75d1bb1ccd7e27ca878dd44435954
c85d7f828e98f04dd70d54c7f0b07c4d4dc960e5
describe
'67021' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRR' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
6a4e8669c99e65b73c9f8d14c5e051c0
c27b01b4e515353cd0178fda10247ddf0da5d9b9
describe
'1358340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRS' 'sip-files00142.tif'
62835fdb781beb6b28f174c7ff742bff
b1f5d9051c4df65b01804995802937912c623181
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRT' 'sip-files00142.txt'
b798ebe94e64b98a583364bcfc2caade
6d8694693d674ac3880a0105e321f38df5946813
describe
'36572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRU' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
cc388e028e9b6ce2b8c5b728e4551c78
6efae88333490914ba1f3438540dd4d52bddff31
describe
'169447' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRV' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
1357a51f8993e835bb7fe5921e55e066
14b30e23d7de68b32cd3db330ab2a5cd0d8cc458
describe
'107384' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRW' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
ea63c74c5557fde863630d51fa1a3e89
79497520607748b86d8714820ffcf9fd9b3ff023
describe
'29241' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRX' 'sip-files00143.pro'
41ecba5a7dd2f23a82d22c85ca125567
0e115102859fd6fce75ee781789b9058f04b4d72
describe
'42812' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRY' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
2cb3cb8601732092827060ea62a0927d
2689df2d0983f24649e4460ed22f5bc6938a7763
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWRZ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
4dc6058136313b58429421cd6b0d3068
6ee72e859ffa2e204c6fe09ad08c31cc515397da
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSA' 'sip-files00143.txt'
55f03809d183e0cdd4f578746d9c0fb5
80e13b88a5484f35c63793e1a531f9f6394f0e2c
describe
'13071' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSB' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
157a9e97d261100f96324a3b87136606
f3cfc4090398abc80def38025b0331cf6ae363da
describe
'168125' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSC' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f28b2df5ef2f05271ccad944c429e9af
34a79624a2eb7397b89a0a20f91f753646e3efcc
describe
'97589' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSD' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
882ad4e6673660e7e330e3bbbeb58d67
e9c7c66c5e233e53d2d2914338c71f7ec7362253
describe
'25678' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
ddc4abc2a6d016ce2b663edc7ccbd99a
11c70dee361ae1784054335af86e7de3f944d821
describe
'38969' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSF' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
a5632411b6530714d340f52af7b06208
8f679b0d1b7ac9c164d4b15b99b70a025bb945c9
describe
'1345651' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSG' 'sip-files00144.tif'
e87672c7ccb34561744d46fc247c211c
2cade48bc41b7a514b1cceb78a8a912d888af343
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSH' 'sip-files00144.txt'
7a8bd75cd7b2a1c2aee85d8ece6e2a20
1ab765c49df8530b5c65623f4cbdf498849f9e3e
describe
'12426' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSI' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
905fb46f7243e2567672bb280088cadd
dfa4c9354a141c4fdd0cce1e3045728e7e4bb612
describe
'177024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSJ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
04913847fa97b6f7b9b1a30b643f95b6
b53e80018f7da070aaf17eeca723e3303035d386
describe
'97123' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSK' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e3dedb3e88d437b085f3f31e2a9245b9
20668131460e84634469c063e666e51b4c587f7c
describe
'26149' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSL' 'sip-files00145.pro'
204cf92dcb1c8039066bd47d32c0d57f
1b9b2442c6d56002d369f3b17d465a579a60e470
describe
'37869' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSM' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
0d36323b0e33b82aecffdd58bb6a733b
96a26a335fec333ac8c079d60bc51ed6dfc84ee0
describe
'1416603' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSN' 'sip-files00145.tif'
5efc109eee94003b4a27b1d1199d1c2f
c201a18d235fb5e33ad2b2f1981fe1a42e723ed4
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSO' 'sip-files00145.txt'
4131f4f5c601c4f2ac4600025243a0d3
0c92a76f37e898db91efc1413e511aa7a79784a7
describe
'11434' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSP' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
1884a1a1d47e9c93f4b5716f0f31aaa9
be2848bab64db6cc44201a9ce2d1273c1cc35464
describe
'169292' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSQ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
e968feea22181ebd03c2abd9f4b69d37
00168400bfea7be9f0fea0634820e0ca0aa57442
describe
'96432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSR' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
aef1787ce768e38376b1095011164b20
b1aab868f4034cea96197ee122294560338d91a5
describe
'24502' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSS' 'sip-files00146.pro'
047768c860c49b3c8fc0c6fddfbfe788
4294465b3841ccef4b884fcbe405307ca28d89d9
describe
'37791' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWST' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
ae2f1a9700fe5a95260a84df16647065
3ba364f353743540c7f73ed746bcd0a555f19748
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSU' 'sip-files00146.tif'
b334a29c32241fc2522879a3d0d952f2
fe54fbb627bfac984a62adede7d1102adca4a390
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSV' 'sip-files00146.txt'
1703cd4c7fc76306d4aeefb80a08c25b
149aa7802bbe8d69c5855517031979f7bc7ef1e0
describe
'11740' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSW' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
a99f763e7816b02ade81049ef9c61492
686497152ac70087f3ff3b54940ea6ad43f05678
describe
'167474' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSX' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
9388775b15d7fd4b19e568d4da1942d2
df58710db946a80410c12b73a54fe557bdc6aa0b
describe
'110474' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSY' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
bf9f34b3a24a82535c994171abd0e4fd
40a57d3184a6ef776aa66e81d9b02c901165fbbc
describe
'30430' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWSZ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
d2e7286ba5e026f29491e61eda2f4b15
5e5ebf124ab411b67f3d2a0cadafff4455046149
describe
'42745' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTA' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
685423bd87f389d9c0fd4079df71edb2
f59709436bf1f0bf65f1311df1f59a80794b524e
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTB' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ddba0fada774f01dfbe5aee1de955bd2
5fec21a3e951b726a7646b3a2a473e61cddb587d
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTC' 'sip-files00147.txt'
0d57e43c31a1eee254227ef0321f3cf6
556d6d64205436117b70a90a06ebe0e071f1184f
describe
'13643' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTD' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
d0bd8c5e175190a2af0de331f8d4638c
1de45acfbb4d6a00dd9284945b7781b888442cad
describe
'172650' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTE' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
fa88ef13813bc21100ca0ec41fe48f71
203454e632eb4098e72c2f2621d89ef77d99a91f
describe
'112919' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTF' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3b92cf1ff9e4f4b2f9d6ec99e09035af
0ce8c20a6e84ecc528b473b78488633234755f36
describe
'30417' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTG' 'sip-files00148.pro'
c6bc92c9fd4343a6b91671fe3cda8d1b
0568ecf3232baf653a9125a03dd276b93351ef6d
describe
'44058' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
129e47df88dcf2b16436f1129e3cbf10
d7df6f0e90e6bc3ba0463ca6f40dee5c02f6e8f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
e9bfd6eea5e6b5a05e4833da2830f20d
b9fc5ac7fe85c9d272aae52d7e153633ebc81e18
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
c22cb804314010fbedc0c600262f46a5
c969d91ca0114e2906135d562c76438e18c4cc37
describe
'13268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTK' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
c0e775e169c40ba171835762689fb447
96a1ee1d5f40cebc989b6896e5d1eec0a6607fda
describe
'170217' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTL' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
d5fb7adb613a9cb979868a5f2738fe1f
4ffb6ab0a2b76866c4cbc6ee4d1df41dc69043e7
describe
'109378' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTM' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
31c707ef12f7b10776a1c29f02eb85c7
5881cac9f6dd55debf01d24a8c1e3b37f68dc0a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTN' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d33404e23e1887db7bf5bd70d32a94a5
4771f40beb442c566533f6614dad9cb36a5e35b5
describe
'42570' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTO' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
b6df92f85ad75b541c93c7bfb962effb
a49155d7e203318ee0c5147bcc3a27e388006e17
describe
'1362427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTP' 'sip-files00149.tif'
28905b2f476d900795fd9690f9f5c51d
21a99a6cf7b4b47a09c7fba2ed9cecbbc4642661
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTQ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
8e62faf57fd2dba3cf5e29dec4b296bf
ac6fbd7ee9e73d41255477810a7467e522cc8335
describe
'12846' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTR' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
5561ac4ed3d47b1b9abe566377abc2c2
28d291ab9dab18c7d45d0f31719ce0446ec005ad
describe
'170677' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTS' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
60a1b37470fef204b7c4b51c1e15e514
f2c485afdbbb49e6f7b88f466c67a74573678886
describe
'106826' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTT' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
2232ea6aec072893bab1348e27676a32
e5ebb74e774eda3f9d2315152a96d2b66aee6e46
describe
'28002' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTU' 'sip-files00150.pro'
aada873c83e4e7c995bea96ae5806b93
a843e20b25aa252988a8563005d926240f293cd1
'2012-03-31T15:45:34-04:00'
describe
'41917' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTV' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
93dd9ae2aa97d8669524f5b2975a5f0a
1a7b37ee8cf8cda6774e8d462d56fd32905a804f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTW' 'sip-files00150.tif'
257b75214654a21fe316891327bf695a
0182223117f8f3cf2f8d9d205f08be54a46b6faf
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
cf1a65c3cc7ff26ee89444cbb3c4af88
5418d98d228b33ba9be55faa35e50f47ad9e1100
describe
Invalid character
'13189' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
c04089a9b2cda16cb8c75ecb64423968
b4951cbe3016022caad59bf997674817fcb6ff8d
describe
'167609' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWTZ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
6c9a6d1f95f2864c5a6243b8d53fd992
3dd5dc0897812e1e8183474fa6574afafb387c7e
describe
'106910' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
c707770afd72fd3a3e712949d46775d5
c4145be8e00bb3e6c997b1ecfd0c7a1c38c39a63
describe
'28319' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUB' 'sip-files00151.pro'
d6004f43a9f97c7758adc4096a233015
0ac6c88d5af01652663089afd4355cccd878928a
describe
'42388' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUC' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
6a2d82417c9a46846cec49c8c9d686f1
89dcddfa5d17f681a30adc2724c3fdd6bf1cdf5b
describe
'1341267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUD' 'sip-files00151.tif'
ad4160903d1ae4cc3318ade52fb7c8fb
968ebeffe7eb0592d223eb32f1d84e4a65c99507
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUE' 'sip-files00151.txt'
06823c1e939f6dc4387f9d54954dcbbb
edf53ffa31272be1c41b9d187f18d478b3e79ae5
describe
'12858' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUF' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
7370e8b454a67fb37a4ed6c9dc976a64
27b3ff7d00ba13e789f79f6c5efe0a703a02f48d
describe
'170309' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUG' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
5a65fbf398a2719a45800f5108034f81
5e0c35d7e134450ffec9334419b5a30d8c981219
describe
'99620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUH' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
da46867d978305aa1f60de7aa3ca864b
f2dea6d9d75ca431946eddc68ad01a83f8efd175
describe
'25251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUI' 'sip-files00152.pro'
8a83f4eaaca97cfee21917a35fb422ad
49db7e507b42efadc25648b95a165e1bd461053e
describe
'38245' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUJ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
1c6608f4fddf8b81cf828699d1e1f1f9
06cae9c26b32ba161a2f309cfd53ac8bb218bad5
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUK' 'sip-files00152.tif'
bf04390f3c607747c445f5d22c0e43ef
3d02544364d163ae998182ace0efbe845e66fc55
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUL' 'sip-files00152.txt'
3496b187b882c20176fa7a3fe020014f
9d2e8269acc90e6eb886f5d4084f36604c9cb0f1
describe
'12019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUM' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
32d89d3107f666880e2cb168ca5c49e5
10910f19786dbcab8d4c6593ff4a4488a3f42eb8
describe
'163770' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUN' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
e1a02e379df361c0d6e354eef2db4ed7
fd3000c7b9b1b70abf3170c44be703fead33a089
describe
'107783' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUO' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
d5d1892c0cdc16203e1d8932ce622189
2aed49f6b84a291b9c38e6b9785059a7e4afe1e3
describe
'27922' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUP' 'sip-files00153.pro'
2511ce1a7e00f8f48e1954f41daed849
9e967700f664c60bcb2bb2f2a7372494fb95749f
describe
'43066' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUQ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
b9c03fe8ee9f33e825663213a9673c08
db7cddd7b06d7234ab54c5b65dce8e339b5aff8b
describe
'1310547' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUR' 'sip-files00153.tif'
580173b00a728026cf8dc16a3d095e58
8b3a12490825ac1fc70f9f9e960a5f122e490361
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUS' 'sip-files00153.txt'
1d09c931e945cf452298e8da803eb5e5
a85298c61c63d934faf11b0bd7ee3dcb6d1fa871
describe
'12995' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUT' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
c0e1255b665f05f5bb2c2796c3931c5a
b235ee5c41e17fc1644d7dd0832c55f179b9bbfe
describe
'170646' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUU' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
6723316c3856c9f263bcddfd00370f11
b618b254caab117b65078c9e5c0f1785f1e87e97
describe
'107565' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUV' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
276bc1ab9150b389e10f51a9112fdee0
a76e5dfcb597200c8f5ce5dee27d39097d4064b4
describe
'28461' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUW' 'sip-files00154.pro'
63f7615502f35bfa53047b92af2cb347
48aa85e056e1693126eb066dfcee9da9302189f7
describe
'42523' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUX' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
a45eb7ade1fdf7f9ddff94fce7158719
ecb093abada108fe571c6166865674add665c74b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUY' 'sip-files00154.tif'
8ea8da86c058f00522d6f786b5846b92
0087e5884423c6c26529d471fc9479a55c3ba7a1
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWUZ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
f7efba6ef57f2f6f1fbf29a621b635ba
39b44cbe9faa29bd94329f0f6021ea7f1d3d898d
describe
'12496' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVA' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
5f6bcb1ea0d634a47d74eb7231bf82a9
c40abba60dd50dde54bca970c8cd2369746242a0
describe
'170161' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVB' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
4c0d8c25fd6b3bd71d03e2375bb2b7df
161a14889add7d548606f69f5efcb60489ff0f2c
describe
'100409' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVC' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
9fbcd2e70175d8f4516fff667ee347f4
495d0c6efc17ec50f5961e8055a91a16e327ddd4
describe
'26308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVD' 'sip-files00155.pro'
b1f0c7637fed69c2fa6701d168f4a951
f3dfddf00ea79e03e6cc0c88afa3029d51856eb9
describe
'39744' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVE' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
9f2c86af9813ca1099aaab9693596294
d96a5fc09329eacbf91b11c02f8418737df229f4
describe
'1362015' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVF' 'sip-files00155.tif'
928fd9af0595ab68cf6c44f14b0af78c
20952e00f0a4890c47ca4434e20e2be6815c44b7
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVG' 'sip-files00155.txt'
8f31471a5bcb33d5edc6d80424031f2f
49f4fe5bd7e475ff1ac240a48c7aa91c5c4d7e1e
describe
'11856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVH' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
cf1a09544809991323a9d3f6da26120f
1ceb39242241742f3f2bc0a95005c0f8a4629e1e
describe
'165834' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVI' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
5f231f360b7b466057453fb3b3970d01
a289d5366b7c391e45ff80d4c2d28e268e48b220
describe
'109155' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVJ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
3a810351d364f8e699c82b729ca31c62
c31be295c1814e5e1d9d5f8a35675718c3423793
describe
'27966' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVK' 'sip-files00156.pro'
acf15f082803c4afce4d7d7161eca012
7b0f2331d6ab26f93e20c38c5ba68d65c4189dfd
describe
'43454' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVL' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
177405c4281340537929b45b7d8ffdc6
bc4ae43a705431efd67ea1c9955f1de4119fbaee
describe
'1327163' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVM' 'sip-files00156.tif'
cf4c6f409b4f4589f49986d381afc697
3627b26f7554bd61823cd4666acec4e90279afc0
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVN' 'sip-files00156.txt'
1cfebd46ad2ac58318209d0917bb96bc
c0fe951d1e4764168a802c3d415175f863ca7287
describe
'12946' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVO' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
923bda4e0e98bda02859394b53f3c091
ab565f208003abc26a5fdf5e3f46dd2fcdec8298
describe
'167719' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVP' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
058d938307fbbc11a425b5b1fada8d5d
30233873595b069bed543f8af8c3152ac0c16e31
describe
'108449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVQ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
02974103185b2b18c5638a74cc6bbb1b
ca964b08ac3d0a116279ff748f6ea9f0c81b3cc7
describe
'28266' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVR' 'sip-files00157.pro'
58aa93ad5ba8bc6dfceb4ba82e8ace94
0366ec61674fe9d911a45d83842a98635a652795
describe
'42984' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVS' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
7d21ad3727eb0ca889ace9dc4b80f66d
0f2498da9e6c04ccfc8adc7f4891bff905014886
describe
'1342767' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVT' 'sip-files00157.tif'
f5d2f1824669687b64bb579e3d11d91d
8a48ad848a1b09dbe6738995cd72542bfc4ab03d
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVU' 'sip-files00157.txt'
05d66e301b73c2a40379c2dd220d24a5
fddd274591efe0b40179d9d3de1d5092f79c6021
describe
'12991' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVV' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
9d47851495e0b6f0a6fdfe4f3a26cd44
b344579f710056819f459e42a4781600ec4bc648
describe
'165463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVW' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
42d0d81e3a0369f249e18ff6da8faeb2
b85032804658920c97175d2fc2438534c6c31e40
describe
'132515' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVX' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
5d1cb2bb3988a3e7604be6272ba7ba0c
dd9e092f0b2fb3a13eea8ff074f34d0c2d41c392
describe
'27859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVY' 'sip-files00158.pro'
62a1b2be881d03ac054a26899a09a85c
3e6bd23db1a2746ee8da8baaf3367ccf89ea8972
describe
'66241' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWVZ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
b0505cbf69805ed68f40aab9302c4430
2062383ac6424c2c72b2c7ffc9b52f20ef151a7d
describe
'1347216' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWA' 'sip-files00158.tif'
00678bf2c9a83352dc1e891c8b43af79
c186868c7c313fff04409fad9032c19b95f559f7
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWB' 'sip-files00158.txt'
60f2c140933a5256891cfbe280673a2b
45ee03f71ad54f03e22375dbd91aaaf792031b97
describe
'36451' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWC' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
eb3bc4efafaa5990788db6a9e1f6dc86
cb37ccc77aa50d75ff51c0d0b1fbe89e40b6ece7
describe
'165663' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWD' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
783d79aa11f5d8058a36f1d63d5509fd
5527d43a56616f3fd142ba661872c350cf7e5075
describe
'112500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWE' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
3b9ce09bd333a904118423f073cb9ef7
a3f0aec8a311ae513a7d722131dc1c708baf4800
describe
'29224' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWF' 'sip-files00159.pro'
4468326da0db73b7ffc20528efb48b73
06d9e7da918aeadad96b344b3a36e806e6df079b
describe
'44361' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWG' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
4ece7f6a703b6e3930f13e402546236b
445e8e7a055006fbb7b7b3b3117170fd6212a07b
describe
'1326103' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWH' 'sip-files00159.tif'
9634cb24fdbdbffbea5d87ab0462093f
97c64061c05aa0d3bf1352c64235601cdb98bdda
'2012-03-31T15:44:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWI' 'sip-files00159.txt'
29d095111b9416d5dce36162d3272d99
55f2876c720eadb7a9d6eb38894deecff75c29c8
describe
'13233' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWJ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e361a9b750fcb25f911aaaea5b70623e
009fccf8130ffbdc8d2f0e3e60756b657aebf6af
describe
'168239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWK' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
3e54ebee67962e65287cad66f6a7ebd8
fa09e5698d4de8bf77a5beff8d947c9b8ce291a0
describe
'112012' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWL' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
27f1657e7d73789a12161c0355295f01
949783c59844b21a9581eed9bbf4b4b9b4f1c447
describe
'29161' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWM' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ca06003a5187d126f59834f9efdc913e
476af2092d26e852037163aa822ce3e131ca42b2
describe
'44368' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWN' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
49a718f59b510270cce4b80445604101
03387befd30885f7b1cefbbbd21ec8b3c0dcc91e
describe
'1346323' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWO' 'sip-files00160.tif'
27dd7dbe2474e59aef46195f18926f90
3fb3e7171e36b523e2094a1d52d701c2c2a624dd
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWP' 'sip-files00160.txt'
5259c9bf882e23544f6db6d06c5778c3
f9c768ef2b6361265339f93d4d099abee25ccdef
describe
'12945' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWQ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
20349070450041437516e6023d5b44b3
16dc28ef7f214a2abdfb07b458224fddf60b25de
describe
'167769' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWR' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
40715694d224eae0a3d3090af97f9783
d2a8f77e2625b06d25394a3de4a3f97d13b2df32
describe
'116349' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWS' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
e7c86ab0a7a3fd1a083ac32d210f01d0
660de72af80ff039c3c73cad2e3fc12581a64db3
describe
'24615' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWT' 'sip-files00161.pro'
54f85095f75e7f1b7e8e61fbdbfc6d5f
5f468eebb1dcbef0c22b8fd0f9c077b4d5ae0a85
describe
'60332' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWU' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
02de0ea6faf2a8da18b00051de73ed2d
224ae222ac176e0121e588230e5cce82cb4ed0ed
describe
'1365176' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
1bbf7ab90a805c755191570bc1974bf0
acd92a38eb32da32e0e865e7166b1aa0ec6b9f96
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWW' 'sip-files00161.txt'
041d46d7a79454971a2ccb0c720d0314
a537a68739d9c4b0a7302f8ec21e81fb5d1b98c5
describe
'33702' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWX' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
75ed94236d2cb540ce578fca796a7399
5614dd3d888a752b1045429de53948147177eb07
describe
'166348' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWY' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
f212dce5a43e9dec022c236f1bd30ee2
6b1178566a259c2cdbe1a02c73ef2e833202f85b
describe
'136242' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWWZ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
dd93576929abd4c69656274cc8e8f16d
be5abd6b8e172c594e04a4f54ea45ce95bd23f33
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXA' 'sip-files00162.pro'
fb56c45e9951033bdf45353e7b055261
eee3e6d7ce8425a9a31e557d26478ba57c498796
describe
'68696' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXB' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
8c18e8eae29f4c724e3dfbc2fffea73a
f59ccbf749e281f3ebfcb6614aaa16213978134d
describe
'1353968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXC' 'sip-files00162.tif'
295051351ff8db71dd4a58113b7363a9
e00c4c51c34cd632046703f76487764af0e498a9
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXD' 'sip-files00162.txt'
3e323bd3acfe90c2f8cbe4c29219837a
3172228ca9c1f7a76baddbebc41ad593335b0cfa
describe
'36607' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXE' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
6d2a59a552b8ec5c7904c7817f6876fe
90bd55f36164ee066ea5e6ca14ada222dc2d15cd
describe
'170650' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXF' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
48384832fe6673b998c10ddc667dcb98
c318e0a6d84203a9fc9ab8959743e4c4e9c71b43
describe
'132261' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXG' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
268824cf0a9022ba0bf22babe688a7a1
918307b8b23d2242defa819cc7f175930d647bb7
describe
'29061' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXH' 'sip-files00163.pro'
efd428a930ecfb0d71fcb1965d2e608d
5346347ce8624f11eb09708c6400a81b1e154d02
describe
'66706' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXI' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
c2556ed60a3c90bd02b0a5130bb49927
c465ae23564ffa87e8486d16043e3ddeac59f49e
describe
'1387840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXJ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
7ee8e2ce1e0ed6b516171e4c954b7244
08f5127731e5663801a8a5973b7f2ed6b6372cdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXK' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c2f738ce3d5ce305cb5d67db68233432
170fcbf1993cb238a7e9e34fb80b3227e62c95ba
describe
'35732' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXL' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
c55324ec8ca8ebdff313983e05a5f464
f4632f7d611009f51f4c21ea496473fb306dda2b
describe
'170068' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXM' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
d7ae1d701e422c908bcb3dda1cb4d2f1
86f8657ad10297b094e98c9e365632cae93c2b6c
describe
'126733' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXN' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
b651324e875030b3e9ce82c689b6c8f2
b9fc6e7ba0270d4c4ef5a73b2e44dbb837450203
describe
'27363' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXO' 'sip-files00164.pro'
4812245196f3f961aebaa02061268821
af2b129b78bd62532760840a3b6a8a390ac8028b
describe
'63255' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXP' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
b216fe626e0c108accf0365397437e82
2d56c958cb3a34e0c33a5dc864efc6f7d619d201
describe
'1383304' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXQ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
7ef59595762c3ceffe81958b3e3970cf
866c925e0f2a3f3b32393b3a062914bfedd7a52b
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXR' 'sip-files00164.txt'
45f029a71c722e38d1da4b9330fb521c
6ea3ad91ea0e7fb4f0b0eeb8ebdd11ad782f9904
describe
'35056' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXS' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e705e410bccc7122a7e1bbc13f5e0ef0
7be9b5e17e732cf7c04f93b8747220eb0d51bbac
describe
'171992' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXT' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e79a19be49c9a62fa75eadd09fd3b5bb
c217d67e35a370b78800926024f7f896c8409e76
describe
'127899' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXU' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
3c184eb996b892c608034662e4aa21ab
9a9736ba34e729d9800b9fc27da383c77da0ebb9
describe
'26306' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXV' 'sip-files00165.pro'
deb232fd0da54df9ec3b1d383b5e1e7f
ed28cdac1c1d08669d4ab36d1f785ca85c715a6a
describe
'64825' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXW' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
9d8849fe80fa21fa599f6977a05a3b32
b3c7e05175b42f6fd9c6af9eb7004d4976b02255
describe
'1398872' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXX' 'sip-files00165.tif'
39ad972113bdb763418893724d837322
04e60c9428f0e820c5644c3050092a6a1c64a5f0
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXY' 'sip-files00165.txt'
dcfa4219e529ef0e71a7f34e85eaad64
9913f61a37b4465482f8849d77e9e2ffbc6e0eaf
describe
'36071' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWXZ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
a75969309b463c74cb133a2ae44af38e
a581dd5320dcd93f766a8b4056e64a3e6d4045b7
describe
'170464' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYA' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
e4f6dcc791c3a5b4bd30730abaf34a77
d9f14a5ae03df9a3f7a72f3771232bba2c4173ec
describe
'106642' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYB' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
f750301817850d90a2f5247516ee97ed
504df5a65191d2d239f9bb02ed88eb98fe098d8c
describe
'25922' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYC' 'sip-files00166.pro'
2ef163f5c2a430daae5f2b40df8a139f
f6d9d3a366ecc2a71672e0970b94a0dcfec23628
describe
'40898' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYD' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
d5b500a34728ae98a3471b1d2c77c7d9
0998669da9458d947a8f1801237dde384153063b
describe
'1364111' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYE' 'sip-files00166.tif'
a96ad561f2fa1f3ecbb5e92d0f45a33f
5e848f55dcb58b9c3509a6691cc051f66032cc73
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYF' 'sip-files00166.txt'
8584b591ccb92be5f07f173003307e66
b06592297e1bbc06764763b62fb8ee2b53189f92
describe
'12374' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
3fd55bdad488c67d0c92dcd1da1a290c
02ac4c18d3d2642e7ca07a40f68ba6367072e0ee
describe
'170280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYH' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
55f8e41db12c0338617a6d55ca5937d1
54aa3f74fa8411e3a33b16ea185bebc7637989cb
describe
'135702' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYI' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
edf700b983041620aca310fe95408f63
655288c9d636f484716e50f2b822e4db7340e06d
describe
'29654' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYJ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
d86710cfdb23656c5d15b6623714bfcb
d693b3c2c4c6428e4d5a369fc66347038a952d43
describe
'68469' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYK' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
55b91924e95acc8e0262f0ff9ded32db
81660303069136ce33e58cf1070113be4b28b509
describe
'1385476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYL' 'sip-files00167.tif'
589d3ce88f3e468abc57b35568f85b34
b283b497e52d1cc35b1cd50cfd36a2e45cc0b6e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYM' 'sip-files00167.txt'
bda4fae1d0375da5347194029dfee190
99c375bbef08ea054d9ad473d9347fc1eb03a260
describe
'36391' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYN' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
1ca24622afa1775c67f8969563fd16a0
f0cad19f22af05e2a3dad60267308138bf277762
describe
'169159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYO' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
57b8152be157c6c619ee7030cfdd5895
c1129a3e776b0fbed78a0484f8e375803b95ab11
describe
'107594' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYP' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
df75f0e808f5f03e7b7c42f1b8621acf
05b0c72ef54b198e3bbd2057eca418503499d41e
describe
'27472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYQ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
e6f85242fc3325088fed2ab46542bd3d
54e7633f68fedaf6926855cf470500f174638fb1
describe
'42464' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYR' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
38108ed2eb65df2723b9b85675b85697
18ac001b4411415310f96c1e1f790257826bf1bf
describe
'1353659' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYS' 'sip-files00168.tif'
0f1e5b99c20a7147fcee2adc9eff3b64
d8ad53c273631a8d0cf44b2990a43f37bf48c9a2
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYT' 'sip-files00168.txt'
02123e4cc5666576b4dabacd23c5dc19
b1c82121a97dc73eca45f17cf12e0f058dd76ed1
describe
'12366' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYU' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
82d8080edafab327e4937c8a4784bbc6
67b96fdaa25a79e3371f656e3500e6165e4254d0
describe
'172158' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYV' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
b99c7f445ad8c775371a1208bd573d9d
b619b9ae43326294e5bb62fc24668f53184bd922
describe
'130419' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYW' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
aa33b5b4669c13a3a5d1773b5c51eb7b
68858cac357952c8a36e908b50d96b357e4c5763
describe
'29286' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYX' 'sip-files00169.pro'
19f79df7788f374506d6adb7a8360a89
78c85cf4ebcdee6345d03ac6930a63850ef85b09
describe
'65493' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYY' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
83f2345be089ac5d600b759b71c88a58
9d9a2bc816da1399f75ae886b64a7e72aa6323a4
describe
'1399880' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWYZ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
298528e1b5824eb9ecb6b25c5b1dfed3
645e08864681b3d911aa0ddcba3e569787d49ae8
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZA' 'sip-files00169.txt'
62f64de01a6a42deb5d80695931fc10c
a017694aeecd15fa385b41fff2c1897fcfb8fa17
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZB' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
e5c9c3d50837206100ef3e7534e5281c
75ae0f4cae37eae6081b55261c518b15283ff2f7
describe
'169136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZC' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
fce689745e93ae4601219d34701f52c1
1f03808d7138d2f9bb4d8a3d22ef4b380dc511e5
describe
'104227' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZD' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a90e0b629295985c7132dd0d838f24fa
200307fc57088c0184cebfd3205fe07bab23a3bf
describe
'28608' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZE' 'sip-files00170.pro'
6fb525701c3323cfca68f1ce6f183c38
bc267d7e8e82343ddd4e56d22d6d3b16413a0c08
describe
'40523' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZF' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
b3b666c167dc8cec7dfdf319ab4298a6
255d9269e662eb0f4212a703dfdbf0b1268dfa60
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZG' 'sip-files00170.tif'
19044cab4d9699143740ea061967ff6f
eb9fcb3797f0ca251c1d14c27b83f8d506d3219e
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZH' 'sip-files00170.txt'
e165556b004e018c96b2fc3bcb961627
8bab1a91cc0aa9a6525684718048b185e3b2c829
describe
'12678' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZI' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
1e94935c799e69d391087dc9912ad66d
25e1aebe9f415233213efdb90d5d54786cb4ce80
describe
'170858' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZJ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
2bf5f30128ca04b18bbea9972079cad9
093509798cdc5df956652adf7b0df708cd29a2bb
describe
'126154' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZK' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
5239240adadb2ea71e8c8a64769effaa
c036be8594d40aa4250bcaad27ee0d711945c490
describe
'26987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZL' 'sip-files00171.pro'
8f0792eef7959e1e6b6717347aee7079
1f9d889c6c1fd00cf89cbb98b9eb59c13c4bf89f
describe
'63758' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZM' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
b01bacc6fb6d8a4965ee9fa3e22a7e8c
3ece818c7ff199ca60c6ca78c2ba88bfcd07f812
describe
'1390364' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZN' 'sip-files00171.tif'
c355e90f4b1bae578b4347610e099c8c
a8f245ea2da97c97b02938e022588183fef50f4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZO' 'sip-files00171.txt'
ad3cd33c5a28c897154438e5a216a347
f8dcc68c7db9ac90621c7b02a07ea0bf7d1f157d
describe
'35525' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZP' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
496f0795379edfec1949edad029f4eaa
7275e4916978d6b146d3e074c5c34bf4f36a8a96
describe
'171450' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZQ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
a56046f13177199ecbc9da1c5cfb6bb9
834f28855c0b6b6b5d71ba894ae45c53fc4b837c
describe
'123204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZR' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
f3c8306487c8124728313fbe9a68586f
4d968e2e43ae8953581363430a1f0d202b8acfc8
describe
'27128' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZS' 'sip-files00172.pro'
95abb422fad8a32250ac9cdad2a2af08
9cc025ad8d2c466376869fed02521c5971ca3f63
describe
'62048' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZT' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
3699a78bea71f7ac5b99ef1c205121eb
41f4b8dcb1e7ca0233875f36c0d49f26469b8232
describe
'1394028' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZU' 'sip-files00172.tif'
022b41a57e6f399108f7f7106becdf08
4d569b67e992d671f2af69e3266423ef46e1530d
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZV' 'sip-files00172.txt'
949fd5bc57219799ada520f18b54a110
30a795fc55bd6ea8d5d7211a3e17d06f4b0575a6
describe
'35376' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZW' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
2471fb97458434984910d5e5b0d07f8c
3f818b1430f9d02b0eb0fb361cf6ac5ae7eb1581
describe
'173206' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZX' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
45cbb939407991b314d06946a07b94ce
628e485190ef7361fff7795fb8aec00668aafc7a
describe
'47173' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZY' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c4a059ac86422ff1d9a7348a6fc41753
ffff4768e93828df42aa0e20d569048423eecc24
describe
'9802' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAWZZ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
c956ee524effe3ce7d9349f4e1772629
7f1767aed46107d126c75e5abe0d25db60bcfc4e
describe
'17218' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAA' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
421411cdb23621316d1717f4e6df8133
b93ea411f090e3a73fa0fc0ab4f7d8a7403f7033
describe
'1402051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAB' 'sip-files00173.tif'
8f01f9a1ec62d94185324790456ec31d
84a33fe4737838c851e5dc089d0f0cc0e8d28133
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAC' 'sip-files00173.txt'
350aa350d8da7dad6554622acd07bef8
9c5c3b90abf150a3041931f7b97189a14913754a
describe
'5399' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAD' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
46469b1006ea56b5e4a50fbbfc69a47d
0aa154540b492ed1e7bc2e6b0f46645f392717eb
describe
'182035' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAE' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
abed963229121eedc41aa433e023c0ca
d8ea786f4d5bb697e878bffe890978383400d7c2
describe
'127586' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAF' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
9b72ddff71ef34c3cf56e745d72c58bc
41f87f61533fcba0fc956771c7c8818b9c0db37d
describe
'27861' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAG' 'sip-files00175.pro'
4b4e8248714a0d64ff6b38a2ba36cb2d
1a175ba75f00f64c22cc46633e2a417e1da31eb1
describe
'60860' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAH' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
3cf12fb8a26c3e5c77147b3fdd2774cd
d0478ed5eb3156a207b79242360ad20172ea1912
describe
'1479556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAI' 'sip-files00175.tif'
06c0a7a8b58cf1e0440a52eb07733be1
5559684a61d3a18888385fabefc961f123118ed9
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAJ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
0ef408c472a2ee4f9a4c2fd8fa27b2b9
d4cec4be2074f19e9afd81591019cc779ec199b4
describe
'34240' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAK' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e85feb8c5babbd8981f7d30d0098e352
79c53ba15ab481428a3a500c5a92f6e69195b114
describe
'173843' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAL' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
9f1b2b47b80ec2c74a6490b8c969b572
6d0ade64e3abf741caa8c1adbd02e17f323f8366
describe
'128283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAM' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
7a8a363ee963df8626bc8acb9c1cdafd
02d5741fffd8d3d60c6e5160ef92bc0eec98303c
describe
'34820' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAN' 'sip-files00176.pro'
42a2d318bd88b34fc2e1da1520ec10da
3742c21d94c11aba784ec5151178660f29190b62
describe
'60320' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAO' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ef05e2d1e3085cd9f29494a8559e8e95
1630d0186e84482c1b34da7de8818ccf98642e1e
describe
'1412768' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAP' 'sip-files00176.tif'
d3045ae9659d0772c643c9e760799d27
0ac25edcbb4e0f8c0a8435d49e7d20b479ea5cd5
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAQ' 'sip-files00176.txt'
9078b4882cfca649669689254937e7bc
bb3087320e0ed8d468327dd4df63b9463263e84e
describe
'33899' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAR' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
266b9f0f78f0ae8c588e7a7ca6471fdb
ed4d0605f81384fa37950b3e2380d339d7aa4d27
describe
'180865' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAS' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
d63e7a059260032618d616c5c876a15c
5dba38ed05ca422e2f6426434617b66f05a7d6fc
describe
'113253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAT' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
1574335bb3af0a542d8b6b0c269dc148
8786ce0fe597737c7def0bf4d4890ccf10f25fe4
describe
'25341' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAU' 'sip-files00177.pro'
dbe26aa69f8b179ff0b0870faaea0214
5b606a184a942211a0f90e78c2c6475823a3d224
describe
'55460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAV' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
8a7e80668a6e8da1e73e730c9718d5b9
900cc3b52c4818682dd70af3c01e2f8cfdfceb71
describe
'1468920' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAW' 'sip-files00177.tif'
5a3017cf939c5b821ff30375cc64eda6
c0af5c8ae32db948d18a07fc3d5d41a73e59250b
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAX' 'sip-files00177.txt'
dadada67db749391fadf4e2dca155cc6
8ce112d940d2f4120f09efa1f7ba566a92db1845
describe
'31319' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAY' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
cf4fb5591a17fa621a4f72ca692bd243
ca62a8066165fba6763ec1bfd66010a7d752f18a
describe
'179781' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXAZ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
bbc227d3e6280b8afebd4328ea8e7948
a19dbe4cc8d1350c60d2a196ac107881dc6c77c0
describe
'96166' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBA' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
f8f3c682bc298c8be040c419e3d8a658
0a23f619e5ac25f74709ca4af4942a858a0d6d1c
describe
'29941' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBB' 'sip-files00178.pro'
977dd567b11eedb132cce1e22a0d52d2
3131831bfd86ddb2c334eeb2e47ef38c50ecad3b
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBC' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
311d50a9ffab589c6adcc0f596a729b2
90ff0796141cdb61616832b6af253e68a65c0d6e
describe
'1438979' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBD' 'sip-files00178.tif'
e1cc9fe52c0dc6bf786e7f21206bfc76
757627a5528b8669bd8ec9968390c8e5e2e83fae
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBE' 'sip-files00178.txt'
f610011525d9164fb0a67a81a3c93730
74b7f016ebc05606634294228b8f6f62e0670e1e
describe
'10479' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBF' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
0bbf5445e7d76c91a0c3027211715cc5
1a717a4f0ab1c76b289b63326eb55e7b2b96e48d
describe
'181876' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBG' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
61997d7cc32db08339f8fcb4ab71c9dd
394f2534a69031bf848910094a4b588ce2984324
describe
'119248' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBH' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
b602b3019fc9b9b6a4951d842e49e39f
5a7260b73cd47464a20ba6954f587841913ad913
describe
'29931' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBI' 'sip-files00179.pro'
67cfe3d423e43d833dce183725ad355a
e4b40ae15be38ba8932ce2cafadb466d81bb1d94
describe
'56796' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBJ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
9a9c33daa7c45d99cd5a08505e664dab
0360ff50523dfa33d3149ef8e705ecec4fa45fc3
describe
'1477740' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBK' 'sip-files00179.tif'
a67f12c776c6fa2f9d77540778ebbcdd
bcc485ae9591414c8d600425e6dd8c77b869801a
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBL' 'sip-files00179.txt'
e613f5448a1e3a63e113ab932034b3bd
da683df847de924559b521243583f1ff02f5b615
describe
'32626' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBM' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
5b713fd9e0a9f7225e82f6b153b8ba09
4cd4ef0bfd02a6e06660558336c2ca615905d091
describe
'182938' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBN' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
796a73b32e323f610f2b85df20adeb48
a56d1541f3edce61a0300225d89fffdb5de8d893
describe
'82943' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBO' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
0bf34f656db5a14180c31a61af4bffbb
25c532190901244ec3c00038311acc19b3f187d5
describe
'21033' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBP' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b574020ddb3545b5ec4799a11ba41fe0
ed46e12e5a2098e0ef83ad1ba25030bd0002e92e
describe
'29786' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBQ' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
d7fecc47f0ed6f532793af75db968b5a
855ec2ba7bd4bea36bc47b2ee522ddd6ed63f5bd
describe
'1463955' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBR' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9ff3947b39d08d2ce2c08e021ffa1e3c
a589c693ecf3354ad8dcfde9cd1d6ff4c6c352b0
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBS' 'sip-files00180.txt'
f1aa5d522a7321e14f8c5a7ffcc0d948
2ecc9e5a0ce59dd6d828b677d0383be9d676b9f2
describe
Invalid character
'9261' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBT' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
87cc67e5e07093e17ac25fb416e6f156
f13c6b3b37809025edd0d56fa444e55ae68e6eb0
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBU' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
c21144276cd12def2dbcdf97f3fd338e
69fa8085bbee4c9b11291a0ac5ef9def68b276ae
describe
'257298' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBV' 'sip-filesUF00001708_00001.mets'
e0dfcb8f4af59140615be9c704e83345
9c851481bfafe5a6d3fa5e7340fe783207f2cbda
'2012-03-31T15:43:52-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T18:58:52-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'337957' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAAAUGfileF20090911_AAAXBY' 'sip-filesUF00001708_00001.xml'
9c07fb72830dc28408ea79d91b51865c
292d8f32dab6a0e97041b89df9d2d1917d55a2fb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T18:58:55-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.