Citation
Line upon line, or, a second series of the earliest religious instruction the infant mind is capable of receiving

Material Information

Title:
Line upon line, or, a second series of the earliest religious instruction the infant mind is capable of receiving : with verses illustrative of the subjects
Alternate Title:
A second series of the earliest religious instruction the infant mind is capable of receiving
Creator:
Mortimer, Favell Lee ( Author, Primary )
Leavitt, Trow & Co ( Publisher )
Munson, Samuel B. 1806-1880 ( Illustrator )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Leavitt, Trow & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 10-254 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bible -- History of Biblical events -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Bible stories -- 1850 ( rbgenr )
Bible stories -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1850
Children's poetry -- 1850 ( rbgenr )
Christian education of children -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1850 ( rbbin )
Religious education of children -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Genre:
Bible stories ( aat )
Children's poetry ( aat )

Notes

General Note:
Plates signed: M and Munson (Samuel B. Munson?)
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "The peep of day"

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA1741 ( ltqf )
ALH5028 ( ltuf )
45259027 ( oclc )
002234595 ( alephbibnum )

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LINE UPON LINE;

OR, A SECOND SERIES OF THE

EARLIEST RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION
THE INFANT MIND 18 CAPABLE OF RECEIVING.

WITH

VERSES ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE SUBJECTS.

BY THE

AUTHOR OF “THE PEEP OF DAY.”

* Line upon line, line upon line; here a little and there a little.’’
Isa. xxviii. 10.

NEW YORK: .
LEAVITT, TROW & OO, 191 BROADWAY.
1850.














PREFACE.

Tue design of this little work is to lead
children to understand, and to delight in the
Scriptures.

If adults meet with difficulties in the sacred
text, which commentaries often remove, child-
ren must necessarily meet with many more,
some of which this little book may clear up.
Since it is evident that commentaries would
not suit the volatile minds of children, how-
ever simply they might be written, some other
kind of help ought to be provided for them.
The best assistance would no doubt be afford-
ed by the parent’s voice: for no book can so
forcibly arrest the attention, or touch the
heart, as the remarks of a tender parent. But



Iv PREFACE.

where children do not enjoy this advantage, a
book may in some measure supply its place;
and where they do possess it, may recall ta
mind parental instructions.

Many interesting histories have been omit-
ted, because the writer feared to swell the size
of the work, and judged it better to relate the
principal events in detail than to give an
abridged account of all.

But it is intended that these omissions
should be supplied, (if the Lord will,) and
that shortly the history of Job should be pub-
lished, and subsequently that of the Judges,
and of the kings of Israel and Judah.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE.

Tee, a kc is ke 9
CHAPTER II,

ee meer sk ws te ee be 15
CHAPTER III.

Cain and Abel. Gen. 4, Rik me eee 20
CHAPTER IV.

y ere ~ 4%
CHAPTER V,

Abraham, or the Promised Land. Gen.12:1-9, . 30
CHAPTER VI.

Abraham, or the Promised Child. Gen. 15; 18: 1-22;

21: 1-6, iat : +e
CHAPTER VII.

Abraham, or the Trial of Love. Gen. 22, se

CHAPTER VIII.

Jacob, or the Heavenly Dream. Gen. 23 ; 25; 27 328, 41

CHAPTER IX.

Jacob, or the Long Journey. Gen. 29,

CHAPTER X,

Jacob, or the Meeting. Gen. 31; 32;

33 ; 35: 1-7,

- 47

51



vi CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XI. aii

Joseph, or the Pit. Gen. 37: 1-24, war
CHAPTER XII.

Joseph, or the Slave. Gen. 37:24-35, . . .. - 60
CHAPTER XIII

"Joseph, or the Prisoner, Gen.39, . ... + + 64
CHAPTER XIV.

Joseph, or the Butler and Baker. Gen. 40, . . . . 68
CHAPTER XV.

Joseph, or the Release. Gen.41, ... +... 7
CHAPTER XVI.

Joseph, or the Lord of Egypt. Gen.42, ... . 78
CHAPTER XVII.

Joseph, or the Feast. Gen.43, . . . ~~~ + 85

CHAPTER XVIIL
Joseph, or the forgiving Brother. Gen. 44; 45:1-15, 94

CHAPTER XIX.
Joseph, or the long-lost Son. Gen. 45:16 to end; 46;
See. ee es et ee ee
CHAPTER XX.
Moses, or the Basket of Bulrushes. Ex. 1; 2:1-10, 110
‘CHAPTER XXI.
Moses, or the Pious Choice. Ex.2:11-15, . . . 116
CHAPTER XXII.

Moses, or the Burning Bush. Ex. 2:16 toend; 3; 4, 122

CHAPTER XXII.

Moses, or the first Plagues of Egypt. Ex. 5; 6; 7;
maa... ee ee



CONTENTS. vii

CHAPTER XXIV. ‘indi
Moses, or the last Plagues. Ex. 9:13 to end; 11;
Ws 1. WR, we
_ CHAPTER XXV.

Moses, or the Red Sea. Ex. 13:20 to end; 14; 15:22, 142
CHAPTER XXVI.

Moses, or the Manna and the Rock. Ex.16;17:1-7, 148
CHAPTER XXVII. i

Moses, or Mount Sinai. Gen. 19; 20; 24; 31:18, 154
CHAPTER XXVIIL

Moses, or the Golden Calf. Ex. 32, 6 gk CHAPTER XXIX.

Moses, or the Tabernacle. Ex. 35; 36; 37, . . 167
CHAPTER XXX.
Moses, or the Priests. Ex. 38; 39; 40, ... .1%8
CHAPTER XXXI,

Moses, or the Journeys of the Israelites, . . . . 178
CHAPTER XXXII.

Moses, or the Twelve Spies. Numb. 13; 14:1-40, 181

CHAPTER XXXIIL
Moses, or the Sin of Moses and Aaron. Numbers
Spt Es ae Ce oe oe. oe
CHAPTER XXXIV.
Moses, or the Serpent of Brass. Numbers 21:4-9, 193

CHAPTER XXXV.
Moses, or the Death of Moses. Deut. 32; 33; 34, 198

CHAPTER XXXVI
Joshua, or Rahab. Jos.2, . . ... +. + + 204



eR

vili CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXXVII.

Joshua, or the River Jordan. Jos. 3; 4; 5:1, 11, 12, "19
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
Joshua, or the Walls of Jericho. Josh. 5: 13-15; 6, 217
CHAPTER XXXIX.
Joshua—his Death, . - : sve
A few principal Questions for Children we ne read
this book, . . + > <2 ke ee
Questions on the Chapters, . . . + + ae
Verses of Scripture, . - + + + + + + . 250







LINE UPON LINE.



CHAPTER L*

THE CREATION.
Gen. i.

My dear children,—I know that you have heard
that God made the world. Could a man have
made the world? No; a man could not make
such a world as this.

Men can make many things, such as boxes and
baskets. Perhaps you know a man who can make
a box. Suppose you were to shut him up ina
room, which was quite empty, and you were to say
to him, “ You shall not come out till you have
made a box,’—would the man ever come out ?
No-—never. A man could not make a box, ex-
cept he had something to make it of. He must

* The teacher will generally find the proof of every statement,
either in the chapters of the Bible referred to at the beginning of
each chapter in this book, or in the notes affixed ; but in the opening
of this work the proofs are often withheld, because they have already
been given in those perts of the “ Peep of Day” in which the same

subjects are treated, e



10 THE CREATION.

have some wood, or some tin, or some pasteboard,
or some other thing. But God had nothing to
make the world of. He only spoke, and it was
made.*

Making things of nothing, is called “ creating.”
No one can create anything, but God.t

Do you know why God is called the Creator?
It is because he created all things. There is only
one Creator. Angels cannot create things, nor .
can men. They could not create one drop of wa-
ter, or one little fly.

You know that God was six days in creating
the world. I will tell you what he did on each
day.

I

On the first day, God said, “ Let there be light ;”
and there was light.

IL.

On the second day, God spoke again, and there
was water very high; that water is called the
clouds. There was also water very low. There
was nothing but water to be seen. God filled
every place with air; but you know the air cannot
be seen.

IIL.

On the third day, God spoke, and the dry land
appeared from under the water; and the water ran
* Things which are seen were not made of things that do appear...

Heb. xi. 3.
t Thou hast created all things.—Rev. iv, 11.



THE CREATION, ll

down into one deep place that God: had prepared.*
God called the dry land Earth, and he called the
water Seas. We walk upon the dry land. We
cannot walk upon the sea. The sea is always roll-
ing up and down; but it can never come out of
the great place where God has put it. God spoke,
and things grew out of the earth. Can you tell
me what things grew out of the earth? Grass,
and corn, and trees, and flowers.

IV.

On the fourth day God spoke, and the sun and
moon and stars were made. God ordered the sun
to come every morning, and to go away in the eve-
ning,t because God did not choose that it should
be always light. It is best that it should be dark
at night, when we are asleep. But God lets the
moon shine in the night, and the stars also; so
that if we go out in the night, we often have a lit-
tle light. There are more stars than we can count.

Vv.

On the fifth day, God began to make things
that are alive. He spoke, and the water was filled
with fishes, and birds flew out of the water, and
perched upon the trees.

VI.

On the sixth day, God spoke, and the beasts

came out of the earth: lions, sheep, cows, horses,
* Who shut the sea with doors, and brake up for it my decreed

place 1—Job. xxxviii. 8, 10.
t The sun knoweth his going down.—Ps, civ. 19.



12 THE CREATION,

and all kinds of beasts came out of the earth, as
well as all kinds of creeping things, such as bees,
ants, and worms, which creep upon the earth.

At last, God made a man. God said, “ Let us
make man in our likeness.”* ‘l'o whom did God
apeak? To his Son, the Lord Jesus Christ: his
Son was with him when he made the world. God
made man’s body of the dust, and then breathed
into him. The man had a soul as well as a body.
So the man could think of God. Afterwards God
made the woman of a piece of the flesh and bone
from the man’s side, as you have heard before.

God gave all the other creatures to Adam and
Eve; and he blessed them, and put them into the
garden of Eden, and desired Adam to take care
of the garden.

When God had finished all his works, he saw
that they were very good. He was pleased with
the things he had made. They were all very
beautiful. The light was glorious; the air was
sweet; the earth was lovely, clothed in green; the
sun and moon shone brightly in the heavens ; the
birds, and beasts, and all the living creatures, were
good and happy, and Adam and Eve were the
best of all, for they could think of God, and
praise him.

VIL.

You know there are seven days in the week.

Now, on the seventh day God did not make any-

* In the beginning was the word; and the word was with God
and the word was God. ll things were made by him—John 1. 1. 3



THE CREATION. 13

thing; but he rested from all his works. He call-
ed the seventh day his own day, because he rested
on it. This is the reason people rest on the sev-
enth day, and call it God’s day. Itis the sabbath
day. It is the great day for praising God.*

None of the creatures that God had made in the
six days could praise him with their tongues, ex-
cept Adam and Eve.

Angels in heaven can praise God, and men up-
on earth.

My little children, do you ever praise God?
You have learned little hymns in his praise. Per-
haps you know the hymn that begins,

“ And now another day is gone,
I'll sing my Maker’s praise.”

Does God like to hear you praise him? Yes;
when you think of him, and love him, while you
are praising him.

Angels always praise God with their hearts, and
so should we.

Let us now count the things that God made o1
each day:—

First day, Light.

Second day, Air and Clouds.

Third day, Earth and Sea, and the things tha

grow.
Fourth day, Sun, Moon, and Stars.

* I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and
praise, with a multitude that kept holy day.—Ps. xiii. 4.



14 THE CREATION,

Fifth day, Fishes and Birds.

Sixth day, Beasts and Creeping Things, and
Man.

Seventh day, Nothing; God rested.

All things the mighty Lord,

Created by his word ;

And all his creatures are,

From worm to brightest star ;
His wonders none can imitate,
Or out of nothing can create.

Were angels to unite
Their heavenly skill and might,
How vainly they would try
To make one little fly!
For life they never could bestow,
Nor cause the meanest flower to grow.

Angels so fair and strong

Unto the Lord belong ;

From him their beauty came ;

*Tis he sustains their frame :
They could not live one single hour.
Unless supported by his power.

And this the angels know ;
Around God’s throne they bow,
And humbly they confess
Their own unworthiness ;
And still the King of kings admire,
And praise him with their tongues of fire.
Far lower should J lie
Before the Lord most high ;
For how can I compare
With angels strong and fair !
I who am made of sinful clay,
And like the grass must fade away ?



THE SIN OF ADAM. 15

CHAPTER IL

THE SIN OF ADAM.
Gen. iii. ,

You remember that God put Adam and Eve in

a pretty garden. There they lived very happily,
They never quarrelled with each other: they were
never sick nor in pain. Adam worked in the
sweet garden; but not so hard as to tire himself.
His work was quite pleasant, for it was never too
hot nor too cold in that sweet garden; and there
were no weeds nor thistles growing in the ground.

You know there was one tree of which Adam
might not eat. The name of the tree was “The
tree of the knowledge of good and evil.”

God had said, that if Adam ate of it, he should
die. Adam and Eve might eat of all the other
trees in the garden.

Do you not think that they had fruit enough
without eating of the tree of knowledge of good
and evil? They did not wish to eat of it, as God
had told them not. They loved God. He was
their friend, and used to walk and talk with them
in the garden. Now you shall hear how Adam
and Eve grew wicked.

You know that there are a great many wicked
angels; one of them is called “Satan,” and he is
the prince of the wicked angels. Satar-knew that
if Adam and Eve grew wicked, they would die



16 THE SIN OF ADAM.

and go to hell. Satan hated them, and wished to
make them unhappy; so he thought, “I will try
and persuade them tv eat that fruit which God has
told them not to eat.” So Satan put on the body
of a serpent,* and came into the garden.

He saw Eve; he pretended to be kind, and said
to her, “ Why do you not eat of the fruit ?”

But she said, “God hes told us not to eat of
that fruit, and that if we do, we shall die.”

But the serpent said, “No; you shall not die;
but this fruit will make you wise, like God.”

The woman was afraid to eat; but she looked,
and thought the fruit nice ; she looked again, and
thought it pretty ;t and she thought “I should
like to eat it.” So she took the fruit and gave
some to Adam.

Sad was that hour! no more happy days for
Adam and Eve. They were grown naughty ;
they knew they had done wrong; they were afraid
of seeing God. Soon they heard his voice in the
garden ; they went and hid themselves among the
thick trees. They wished they had some clothes
to cover them; but they had only some leaves
that they sewed together.

God called Adam, and said, “ Adam, where art
thou ?”

Then Adam said, “I was afraid, because I was
naked, and I hid myself.”

* That old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiweth
the whoie world.—Rev. xii. 9.

t And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and
that it was pleasant to the eyes, &c.—Gen. tii. 6.



THE SIN OF ADAM. 17

Then God said, “ Who told you that you were
naked? have you eaten of that tree ?”

Then Adam said, “'The woman you gave me,
to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did
eat.”

God said to the woman, “ What is this that thou
hast done ?”

And she said, “ The serpent deceived me, and
I did eat.”

God was angry with them all, but most of all
with the serpent. God cursed him, and said,
“You shall always crawl on the ground, and eat
dust.”

Then God said to the Woman, “ You shall often
be sick, and Adam shall be your master, and you
must obey him.” ’

And God said to Adam, “ You shall work hard,
and dig the ground; thorns and thistles shall
grow; you shall have bread to eat; but you shall
be obliged to work so hard that drops of sweat
shall often stand upon your forehead ; you shall
be sad while you live, and at last you shall die;
your body was made of dust, and it shall turn
into dust again.”

What sad punishments these were! How sad
Adam and Eve must have felt when they heard
them,| But this was not all; they were not allowéd
to stay in the pretty garden. God drove them
out, and God would not let them come into the
garden again; so he desired an angel with a fiery
sword to stand near it; yet (iod showed his pity

2

Line upon Line.
«



18 THE SIN OF ADAM.

by giving them clothes made of skins of beasts.
‘They had tried to make clothes of the leaves of
the trees, but God gave them better clothes.

Where do you think the souls of Adam and
Eve must go when their bodies were dead? To
Satan? That was what Satan hoped. But the
blessed Lord Jesus had promised his Father to
come down and save Adam and Eve, and their
children, from hell.

Adam and Eve knew that a child should one
day be born, who should save people from go-
ing to hell* So they had some comfort in their
hearts, when they went out of the garden.

It was a long while before Jesus did make him-
self a little child, and did come into this world;
but at last he came, and died upon the cross.

My little children, was it not very kind in Jesus
to say that he would come and die for us?—ought
we not to Jove him very much ?

How pleasant once was Adam’s toil
In Eden’s cool retreat !

But now he tills a thorny soil,
And faints beneath the heat.

How lovely once (how altered now !)
Were Adam’s form and face!

Bright was that eye, and smooth that brow,
Now clouded by disgrace.

God said to the serpent, in the presence of Adam and Eve. “I
will put enmity between thee and tne woman, and between thy seed
and her seed ; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise ous heel
Gen. iii. 16,



THE SIN OF ADAM. 19

His hair turns gray, his body stoops
Beneath the weight of years ;

And Eve with pain and sickness droops,
And from her eyes flow tears.

Yet murmur not, O wretched pair,
Against the Lord Most High,

He made you happy, good, and fair,
And warn’d you not to die.

And now he kindly promises
To wash your sins away,
And let you taste of happiness
Which never shall decay.

This promise, too, will cost him dear;
(But, Oh! his love is great ;)

His only Son must suffer here,
And die ’midst scorn and hate.

A sweeter paradise is won,
Than you in Eden lost ;

There God shines brighter than the sun,
Amidst his heavenly host.

A few more years of suffering past,
Your souls shall reach that shore ;

Your bodies at the trumpet’s blast,
Shall rise to die no more.



20 CAIN AND ABEL.

CHAPTER IIL

CAIN AND ABEL.
Gen. iv,

Arrer Adam and Eve were turned out of the
garden, they had two little children; their names
were Cain and Abel.

Cain was wicked like Satan; but Abel was
good; for though he was naughty, yet God had
given him his Floly Spirit, so that he loved God.
Abel was sorry for his sins, and asked God to for-
give him ;* and God did forgive him.

Cain and Abel were obliged to work hard like
Adam: their father. Cain dug the ground, and
planted trees, and reaped corn. Abel took care of
sheep; he was a shepherd,

Now I will tell you how Cain and Abel behaved
to God.

God did not walk and talk with people then, as
he had done in the garden; but he did speak some-
times, and he allowed people to pray tohim. You
know that Jesus had promised to die for Adam
and his children, and that was the reason that God
was so kind to them.

God wished them always to remember that Je-
sus had promised to die for them ; so he taught
them a way of keeping it in their minds.

* All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God --Rom. iii
%8. (By faith) the elders obtained a good repor.. -Heb xi. 2



CAIN AND ABEL. 21

He told them to heap up stones, (this heap was
called an‘altar,) and then to put some wood upon
the altar; and to takea lamb, or a kid, and to
bind it with a rope to the altar; then to take a
knife and to kill the lamb; and then to burn it on
the altar. Doing this, was called “ offering a sac-
vifice.”

When people did this, God wished them to
think how he would one day let his Son die for
their sins.* When Jesus was nailed to the cross,
he was like a lamb tied to the altar.t

Abel brought lambs, and offered them up to
God ; and Abel thought of God’s promise, so God
was pleased with Abel, and with his sacrifice.
But Cain did not obey God, but brought some
fruit, instead of a lamb; and so God was angry
with Cain and did not like his sacrifice.

Then Cain was very angry, and hated Abel, be-
cause he was good, and because God loved him
best. Cain was envious of Abel.

Then God spoke to Cain, and said, “ Why are
you angry? If you will love and serve me, I shall
be pleased with you; but if not, you shall be pun-
ished.”

Still Cain went on in wickedness. Now hear
what he did at last—One day he was talking with
Abel in a field, when he rose up and killed him.

* By faith, Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than
Cain—Heb. xi. 4.

t Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sins of the world
Jobn i. 29.



22 CAIN AND ABEL,

Abel’s blood was spilt upon the ground. Abel
was the first man that ever died. So Cain began
by hating Abel, and ended by killing him though
he was his brother:

Soon Cain heard the voice of God calling him;
God said, “ Where is your brother Abel?”

“I know not,” answered wicked Cain; “am ]
my brother’s keeper ?”

But God said, “I have seen your brother’s blood
upon the ground; and you are cursed. You shall
leave your father and mother, and wander about
on the earth.”

Cain said, “My punishment is greater than I
can bear. let me not be killed !”

God said, “You shall not be killed; but you
shall wander about from place to place.”

So Cain went and lived a great way off, and
built houses for himself and his children. They
lived in wickedness; they were the children of
the devil, and cared not for God.

So Adam and Eve lost both their sons in one
day ; for Cain went a great way off, and Abel died.
How they must have wept as they put dear Abel
in the ground! But they must have wept still
more to think that Cain was so wicked.

Why did they eat the fruit when Satan bade
them? If they had not eaten the fruit, they would
never have been unhappy: Cain would not have
been wicked, and Abel would not have died. But
God had pity on Adam and Eve, and gave them



CAIN AND ABEL. 23

another son, who was made good by God’s Spirit:
he was called Seth.

The children of Seth feared God; and God lov-
ed them and called them his children.

Cain was the babe the first on earth
Rejoic’d a mother’s sight :

Now Eve laments the infant’s birth,
Once hail’d with fond delight.

O how could she foresee the day,
When she beheld her child,
As wrapt in slumbers soft he lay,

Or playfully he smiled!

But though so lovely to the view,
Evil lay hid within ;

And Satan watch’d him, as he grew,
And fann’d the sparks of sin.

At length Cain shed his brother's blood
Then sought the deed to hide;

Now banish’d from his parents’ God,
He wanders far and wide.

CHILD.

Guard me, O Lord from Satan’s power,
For he walks to and fro,
And like a lion would devour
The souls of men below.

Pride, hate, and envy, are the chains,
By which he holds them fast ;

Nor let them know what bitter pains
Their sins shall bring at last.



24 THE FLOOD.

CHAPTER IV.
THE FLOOD.

Cam had a great many children; Seth had a
great many children.

At last Adam and Eve died, and Cain died, and
Seth died; but still there were a great many peo-
ple in the world. Were the people good or wick-
ed?

At first some were good, but at last they all
grew wicked, except one man: his name was
Noah* The spirit of God was in his heart, and
he loved God.

God was very angry with the wicked people,
and he determined to punish them.

God said to Noah, “I will make it rain so much
that all people shall be drowned, except you, and
your wife, and your children.”

Then God told Noah to make a great ark.

What is an ark? It is like a boat, or a ship.
Noah made a very great ark, which would swim
upon the top of the water, when God should drown
the wicked people.

Noah made the ark of wood. Noah cut down
many trees, and cut boards, and fastened them to-
gether. He made one door in the ark, and one lit-
tle window at the top.

Noah told the people that God was going to

Noah, a preacher of righteousness.—2 Peter. ii. 6,



THE FLOOD. 25

drown the world and advised them to leave off
their wickedness.

But they would not mind. Still they went on
eating and drinking, and not thinking of God, nor
trying to please him.*

God did not choose that all the beasts, and birds,
and insects should be drowned ; so he desired No-
ah to get some birds of every sort, and some beasts
of every sort, and some insects of every sort, and
to bring them into the ark. God could make all
these animals go quietly in the ark. Noah put
corn, and fruit, and grass into the ark for them to
eat when they were in the ark.

So Noah got some birds of every sort; some
doves, some ravens, some eagles, some sparrows,
some larks, some goldfinches, and many others, and
they flew in at the window. Noah got some
beasts of every kind, some sheep, some horses,
some dogs: and he got some insects of every kind;
some butterflies, some ants, some bees.

All these went into the ark ; for God made them
gentle and obedient. Then Noah himself went in
with his wife, his three sons, and their wives.
How many people were there in the ark ?—eight
people. But Noah did not shut the door: God
shut the door, and Noah knew that he must not
open it till God bade him.

Then it began to rain. It rained all day and

E They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in
marriage until the day that Noah entered into the ark, and the flood
came and destroyed them all.—Luke xvii. 27.



26 THE FLOOD.

all night. What did the: wicked people think
now? How they must have wished that they
had minded Noah! If they climbed trees, the wa-
ter soon reached to the tops; if they went up high
mountains, as high as the clouds, the water rose
as high as they ; for it rained forty days and for-
ty nights. All beasts and birds, and men, and
children died, except those that were in the ark.
At last nothing was to be seen but water, and

the ark floating upon the top of the water. How |

long did Nosh live in the ark? Almost one whole

year.
A long while after it had left off raining, Noah
wished to know whether the waters were dried up. —

He went among his birds, and chose a raven, and

let it out of the window. A raven is a fierce bird. —
It did not like the ark; though there were no-

trees to be seen, nothing but water, yet the raven
would not go back to Noah, but went on flying
night and day over the water.

When Noah saw that the raven did not come —

back, he went among his birds, and chose a dove.
A dove is a very gentle bird. Noah put it out at




é

|

the window; and when it saw nothing but water, ©

the dove came back to the ark, Noah knew when
his bird came back, (perhaps it pecked at the win-
dow,) and he put out his hand and pulled it in.
Noah waited seven days, then Noah sent the
Jove out again; and this time the dove saw some

trees: yet the dove did not stay, but plucked off a

;



THE FLOOD. Q7

leaf with its beak, and came back to Noah. Noah
must have loved his good little dove.

Noah waited seven days more, and then he sent
out the dove again, and this time it did not come
back. Now Noah knew that the earth was dry,
but he waited in the ark till God told him to go
out.

At last God said, “Go out of the ark, you and
your wife, your three sons, and their wives, and
the birds, and the beasts, and the insects, and all
the creeping things.”

When the door was open, the beasts came out.
How glad the sheep must have been to lie down
again upon the soft grass, and the goats to climb
the high hills!

When the window was open, the birds flew out.
How glad they must have been to perch again
among the trees!

Noah saw all the green hills and fields again;
but where were all the wicked people? he would
never see their faces again.

Noah remembered God’s goodness in saving
him from being drowned. He made a heap of
stones for an altar; he took some beasts and birds,
and offered a sacrifice to God. God was pleased
with this sacrifice.

Then God made a very kind promise to Noah.
He said, “I will never drown the world again.
When it rains, do not think there will be a flood.
Look up in the sky after the rain, and you will



28 HE FLOOD,

see a bow. That shall be the sign that I remem-
ber my promise.”

Have you seen a rainbow, dear children? How
large it is! What beautiful colours it has! It
puts us in mind of God’s kind promise not to
drown the world any more.

You know why God made this kind promise.
It was because the Lord Jesus had promised one
day to die for people’s sins.

At last Jesus did come down and die: and one
day he will come again, and then he will burn the
world. I hope we shali then be saved as Noah
was; but if God should find us caring only for
eating and drinking, and playing, and not trying
to please him, we shall be burnt up.*

O tell me how the nations passed
The day before the flood :

O! did they know it was the last ?
And did they call on God ?

In merriment
Their time is spent ;
They sing and play,
And dance away ;
They eat and drink,
And little think
They stand on endless ruin’s brink.

Some rear the walls
Of sumptuous hulls ;

* Take heed to yourselves, lest at an7 time your hearts be over-
Charged with surfeiting, drunkenness, and cares of this life, and so
that day come upon you unawares.—Luke xxi. 34.



THE FLOOD.

Some join their hands
In marriage bands ;
Some sell and buy ;
All vainly try
To flee from God's all-seeing eye,

But God no more will silence keep;
He pours his wrath from high,
Unlocks the fountains of the deep,

And windows of the sky.

‘The clattering rain
Descends amain :
The rivers roar,
The torrents pour ;
The waters rise
Till piteous cries
No more are heard beneath the skies,
At first, in flocks,
Men climb the rocks ;
Nor fear to creep
Up mountains steep ;
But waters flow
Where’er they go,
And wash them to the depths below.

Behold just Noah safely ride
Upon the mighty deep ;

While all who once God’s word defied.
Beneath the waters sleep.

CHILD,

Sudden as that tremendous day,
The judgment hour shall come ;
Thousands shall then be swept away,

And meet an awful doom,

Let me not count these words a dream
And still refuse to hear ;



‘8C ABRAHAM, OR

However far the time may seent,
Each hour it draws more near.

When once the fire begins to burn,
Twill be too late to pray; |
Now from my cry God will not turn

His gracious ear away.



CHAPTER V.

ABRAHAM, OR THE PROMISED LAND.

Gen. xii. 1—9.

Noan’s sons had many children, and they had
many children, and at last there were a great many
people in the world. Were these people good or
bad? ‘They were bad. They did one very wick-
ed thing. They cut down trees, and made the
wood into little images, like dolls; then stuck
them up and kneeled down and prayed to the im-
ages and said, “ These images are our gods; they
made us, and they gave us food to eat.” ‘These
images were called idols,

Most of the people in the world worshipped
idols, instead of the true God. Sometimes the
idols were made of wood, sometimes of stone, or
silver, or gold,

How glad I am, my dear children, that your
mothers did not teach you to pray to idols!
When you first could speak, they told you about
the true God, and taught you to pray to him.



THE PROMISED LAND. 31

God looked down from heaven, and saw the peo-
ple worshipping idols, and God was very angry.*
But he did not kill them all, because Jesus had
said he would die for the sins of men.t

Then God said, “I will choose one man, and
teach him to love me, and to be my servant.”}
Now there was a man called Abraham. His fa-
ther and his friends worshipped idols. God said
to Abraham, “ Leave your own home and your
own friends and go to a country which I will show
you, and I will bless you and take care of you.

Abraham did not know where God would tell
him to go, yet Abraham went because God told
him to go, Abraham was obedient.

Abraham had a wife, called Sarah, whom he lov-
ed very much, Sarah went with Abraham. Abra-
ham took some sheep, and cows, and asses with
him, and some servants, who drove them and fed
them.

But where could Abraham sleep at night?

* The wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness.
They are without excuse ; because that, when they knew God, they
glorified him not as God.—Rom. i. 18, 20, 21.

t Iwill give thee for a light to the Gentiles ; that thou mayest be
my salvation unto the end of the earth.—Isa. xlix. 6.

And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now com-
mandeth all men everywhere to repent.—Acts xvii. 30.

t Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to
his foot.—Isa, xli. 2.

Your fathers dwelt on the other side of the flood in old time, even
— father of Abraham, &c. ; and they served other gods.—Josh,
xxiv.

_ art the Lord, the God, who didst choose Abram.—Nehem,
1x. 7.

1 (Abraham) went out not knowing whither he went.—Heb. xi. 8.



32 ABRAHAM, OR

There were very few houses to be seen; only
fields and trees. Abraham slept ina tent. He
made the tent with long sticks, and covered it over
with skins of beasts.

Abraham could move his tent from place to
place ; for he had to travel a great many miles
over high hills and wide rivers. At last he came
to a beautiful country, full of trees and flowers
and grass and corn. ‘I'his was the place that God
chose Abraham should live in. This place was
called Canaan.

Abraham still lived in a tent. Sometimes he
made a heap of stones, called an altar, and offered
sacrifices of beasts to God. Abraham never wor-
shipped idols; but all the people in Canaan did.

God often spoke to Abraham, and said, “I will
bless you, and take care of you, and no one shall
hurt you.” God was pleased that Abraham had
left his own home when he told him; and God
called him his friend.*

Dear children: I hope that you will be like
Abraham, and that you will mind what God says
in the Bible. God has not told you to leave your
home ; but he has told you to be good and gentle,
to speak the truth, and to love him, and he has
promised to take you to heaven. If you obey
God, he will call you his friend.t How pleasant
to be God’s friend ?

* (Abraham was called the friend of God.—James ii. 23.
‘= are my friends, if ye do whatsoever 1 command you.—John
xv, 14, *



THE PROMISED LAND. 33

Blest was the choice that Abraham made,
When he the voice of God obey’d,

And left his kindred dear.
‘What though he knew not where he went
And passed his days within a tent,

He knew that God was near.

And when he saw the heathen round,

Beneath each tree, upon each mound,
Before their idols, bend,

Could he enough his love express

For Him who promised still to bless,
And chose him for his friend ?

The friend of God !—The angels fair

No sweeter name than this could bear,
However high their state ;

Yet many a creature, made of clay,

Who will the Lord’s commands obey,
Obtains this honour great.*

=

CHAPTER VL

ABRAHAM, OR THE PROMISED CHILD.

Gen. xv. ; xviii. 1—22; xxi. 1—6.

Asranam and Sarah lived in a tent in the land
of Canaan. ‘They had no little child. Abraham
was a very old man, and Sarah was a very old wo-
man. ‘I'hey were both much older than your
grandfather and grandmother. Abraham was al-

* Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you.—John

xv. 14, 1
Line upon Line. 3



34 ABRAHAM, OR

most one hundred years old, and Sarah was almost
ninety.

One night God said to Abraham. “Come out
of your tent, and look up to the sky. What do
you see ?”

The sky,was full of stars, more than could be
counted. And God said, “ You shall have a great
many grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and
they shall have more children, and they shall have
more c:.ildren, till there are as many people as
there are stars in the sky: and they shall live in
the land of Canaan, and the wicked people shall
be turned out of it.”

Now Abraham had not even one little child;
yet he believed that God would do as he had pro-
mised. It was very right in Abraham to believe
all that God said; for God always speaks the
truth, and keeps his word.

One day, Abraham was sitting in his tent. It
was about twelve o'clock in the day, and it was
very hot indeed, but the tent was under a tree.
Abraham looked up, and he saw three men a little
way off. He ran to meet them, and bowed down,
and said to one of the men, “ My lord, pray come
and rest yourself, and let me bring a little water
to wash your feet, and a little bread for you to eat,
and then you can go on your journey.” And the
men said that they would rest themselves.

Who do you think these men were? They
were angels, though they looked like men. ‘They
had come from heaven with a message from God



THE PROMISED CHILD. 35

to Abraham. For you know that God sends his
angels on messages tomen. Angels are often near
us, though we cannot see them.

The angels sat outside the tent under the shade
of the tree. Sarah was in the tent. Abraham
said to Sarah, “ Take some flour, and make some
cakes, and bake them very quickly.” Then Abra-
ham ran to his cattle, and took a fat calf, and
said to one of his servants, “ Kill it, and roast it
quickly.”

When it was ready, Abraham brought some
butter, and some milk, and the cakes and the calf,
and spread the dinner under the tree. The three
men began to eat, and Abraham stood by them.

While they were eating, they said to Abraham,
“ Where is Sarah your wife?” And Abraham said,
‘She is in the tent.” Then one of the men said,
“Sarah, you shall have a son.”

Sarah heard what the angel said, and she could
not believe that she would really have a child now
she was very old: so she laughed to herself.

The angel said, “ Why did Sarah laugh? She
shall certainly have a son.” Then Sarah said, “I
did not laugh ;” for she was afraid. But the an-
gel said, “ You did laugh.”

Then the three men got up, and went on farther,
Abraham walked with them a little way, and then
came back to his tent.

Do you think that God remembered his promise ?
The next year Sarah had a son. His name was
Isaac. He was a good child, and God loved him.

.



36 ABRAHAM, OR

Abraham and Sarah were much pleased with their
little son.

So you see that God kept his promise. . He had
said that Abraham and Sarah should have a little
son, and he gave them a son. It was right in
Abraham to believe God’s promise, and God too
was pleased with Abraham for believing what he
said.* Sarah did not believe at first: but she
believed afterwards ;+ and God was pleased with
her too.

My little children, you should believe all God’s
promises. What has God promised? To give
you the Holy Spirit if you ask him. Do you be-
lieve his promise? Then pray to God to give
you the Spirit. He will keep his promise; you
may be sure that he will.

a

CHAPTER VII.

ABRAHAM, OR THE TRIAL OF LOVE.
Gen. xxii.

Ar last, Isaac grew up to bea man. He lived
in a tent as Abraham and Sarah did. They all
three loved God, and loved each other very much.
It was a happy little family.

* (Abraham) staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief ;
but was strong in faith, giving glory to God ; and being fully persuaded
that what he had promised. he was able to perform : and therefore it
was imputed to him for righteousness.—Rom. iv. 20—22,

t Heb. xi. 11.



THE TRIAL OF LOVE. 37

Now you know that Abraham had a great many
things. He had cows and asses, sheep and goats,
tents and servants, silver and gold. But he had
one thing that he loved more than these. What
was that? His son, his dear son Isaac. He lov-
ed him more than anything else he had. :

Yet there was one Being whom Abraham loved
even better still. Who was that? God. Why
ought Abraham to love God better than all?
Because God had given him all he had.

At last, God said he would try Abraham, to see
whether he loved him more than anything in the
world: more even than he loved his son Jsaac.

You have heard how Abraham used to burn
lambs upon altars. Now God said to Abraham,
“Take your dear son Isaac, and offer him up on
an altar in a place that | will show.

Was not this a very hard thing for Abraham to
do? But Abraham wished to do all God told
him; because Abraham loved God so much. So
Abraham cut down some wood to burn; he put
the wood upon an ass, and he told two of his ser-
vants and Isaac tocome with him. He left Sarah
in the tent at home. They all four walked on for
three days; at last they saw a high hill a great
way off.

Abraham knew that was the place where he was
to build the altar; so he said to his servants,
“Stay here with the ass, while Isaac and I go and
worship God on the top of the hill” He took
the wood off the ass, and bound it round Isaae



38 ABRAHAM, OR

with a rope. Then he took some fire in one of his
hands, and a knife in the other, and Abraham and
Isaac walked up the hill together.

Isaac did not know that his father was going to
offer him as a sacrifice; he thought that his father
* would offer a lamb. So he said, “Father.” Abra-
ham answered, “ Here am I, my son.” And Isaac
said, “Here is fire and wood; but where is the
lamb?” “My son,” said Abraham, “God will
find a lamb ;” but Abraham did not tell Isaac that
he was to be the lamb.

At last they came to the top of the hill. Then
Abraham took stones, and built an altar; and he
took the wood off Isaac’s back, and laid it.on the
altar. _Now the time was come, when Isaac must
know who was to be the lamb. The rope that had
bound the wood was fastened round the hends and
feet of Isaac, and he was laid upon the wood like
a lamb.

Then Abraham took the knife, and lifted up his
hand to kill Isaac, when he heard a voice calling,
“Abraham, Abraham.” It was an angel speaking
from heaven. The angel said, “ Do not kill your
son or hurt him at all; for now God knows that
you love him, because you have given him your
only son.

How glad was Abraham to untie the rope that
bound Isaac, and to find that he need not kill him,

Abraham saw a ram caught in the bushes by
the horns; and he went and took it, and offered it
up as a sacrifice instead of Isaac. Abrahamthanked



THE TRIAL OF LOVE. 39

God very much for having’ given hin back his
son, and the angel called to him out of heaven
again, and said, “ God is much pleased with you
for having given up your son; and God will bless
you and all your children and grandchildren, and
their children, and one of your children’s children
shall make all people happy.”*

Whom did the angel mean? He meant that
Jesus would one day be a child, and make people
happy, and take them to heaven. A very long
while afterwards, you know that Mary had a child,
who was the Son of God.

When the angel had done speaking, Abraham
and Isaac went down the hill together: there was
no wood now om Isaac’s back. Abraham now was
very glad.

They found the servants where they had left
them with theass; then they all went back together
to Sarah.

Are you quite sure that Abraham loved God?
How do you know that he did? Because he obey-
ed God, and was ready to kill his son when God
told him.”t

Ought you to love God better than every-
thing? Yes, you ought to love God best.

Why? Because God gave you everything.

* And now to Abraham and his seed were the promises made. He
saith not, And to seeds, as of many; butas of one, And thy seed which
is Christ. Gal. iii. 16.

t He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that
loveth me.—John xiv. 21,



40 ABRAHAM, OR

That is one reason why you ought to love him
best.

You love your father and mother very much :
but you ought to love God better still. You ought
to love God much better than you do your play,
or your pretty things, or nice things to eat.
Now, if you love God best you will do what he
tells you.

You will not tell lies, for God tells you not;
you will not fall in passions, and call people names:
but you will try and please God. ‘Then you will
be like Abraham.

Ah! weil may Abraham love the God
Who promised him the land ;

A thousand precious gifts bestowed,
His warmest love demand.

His cattle cover o’er the plain,
With gold his stores are fill’d ;

His servants form a numerous train
Prepared the sword to wield.

One gift, more precious than the rest,
Does most his heart engage ;

With a fair son is Abraham blest,
The solace of his age.

Does he this son more fondly love
Than his all-bounteous God ?
~ This point the Lord would fully prove,
So bids him shed his blood.

See Abraham labouring up the hill,
With Isaac by his side ;

The sorrows which his bosom fill,
He strives awhile to hide,



THE TRIAL OF LOVE 41

And now the fatal altar’s built,
And Abraham lifts the knife ;
O! must his darling’s blood be spilt

In the fair morn ‘of life ?

But hark ! an angel stays his hand,
And bids him spare his son !

For he has done God’s great command,
And faith and love has shown,

CHILD.

Like Abraham I am richly blest ;
O! let me grateful be,

And ever love that God the best
Who gave so much to me.

O! let me his commands obey °
With dutiful delight ;

And, when he takes those gifts away,
Think all he does is right.

My God has done far more for me
Than can be e’er repaid ;

His only son on Calvary
For me atonement made.

CHAPTER VIII.
JACOB, OR THE HEAVENLY DREAM.
Gen. xxni. xxv. xxvii. xxviii.

Asranam and Sarah were very, very old. At
last Sarah died, and Abraham wished to bury her,
but he had not a piece of ground in Canaan to



42 JACOB, OR

bury her in; so he gave some of his silver to the
people in Canaan, and bought a field.

The field was full of trees, and there was a cave
in it. Abraham took the dead body of Sarah, and
put it in the cave. At last Abraham died, and
Isaac his son buried him in the same cave where
Sarah lay.

Abraham will rise again out of that cave at the
last day, and live with God in heaven. Abraham
did not wish to have Canaan for his land; he
wanted to live with God in heaven, which is a bet-
ter country than Canaan.*

Abraham's spirit is not dead: it is with God
now ;t and at the last day his body will live too,
and you will see him; and if you love God as
Abraham did, you will sit down with Abraham in
heaven.t

Isaac married a good woman, called Rebekah.
She lived in the tent where Sarah used to live.

Isaac and Rebekah had two little sons. They
* were called Esau and Jacob. They were twins;
that is, they were the same age; but they were
quite unlike each other. Their faces were unlike,
and their hearts were unlike. Esau was wicked

* He looked for a city, which hath foundations, whose builder and
maker is God.

Now they (the patriarchs) desired a better country, that is a heaven-
ly.—Heb. xi. 10, 16

t Now that the dead are raised, even Moses showed at the bush,
when he called the Lord the God of Abraham, &c.; for he is not a God
of the dead but of the living ; for all live unto him.—Luke xx. 37. 38,

? Many shall come from the east and from the west, and shall sit
down with Abraham, &c., in the kingdom of heaven.—Matt. viii. 11.



THE HEAVENLY DREAM. 43

from a child; but Jacob was good, and loved God.
When Esau was a man he became a hunter. He
had a bow and arrows; and he used to go into the
woods, and shoot birds and stags; he used to bying
them home, and dress them for dinner; and he
used to give some of his nice meat to his father
Isaac.

It was not wrong in Esau to hunt, and to cook
the meat: but his heart was wicked: he did not
_ care for God; and he loved meat and drink more
than God.*

Jacob was a shepherd: he staid at home near
his tent with his father and mother, and his sheep
and goats. He loved God, and prayed to God
very often.

I am sorry to tell you that Isaac loved wicked
Esau better than he loved good Jacob. Shall I
tell you why? Because Esau brought him nice
meat. That was a very bad reason for loving
him best.

But Rebekah loved Jacob, and God loved Ja-
cob, and God did not love Esau.t Do you think
that Esau and Jacob loved one another ?

They did not; Jacob sometimes behaved un-
kindly to Esau; and Esau hated Jacob, and wish-
ed to kill him. One day Esau said, “My father
will soon die; and then I will kill my brother Ja-
cob.”

* Lest there be any profane person as Esau, who for one morsel of
meat sold his birth-right.—Heb. xii. 16.
t Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated. Rom. ix. 13.



44 JACOB, OR

Rebekah heard that Esau meant to kill Jacob
some day ; so she was frightened, and called Jacob,
and said to him, “ Your brother Esau means to
kill you. This is what you must do: go to your
uncle, who lives a great way off, and stay with
him. Soon Esau will leave off being angry; then
I will send for you home.”

Jacob did as his mother advised. He took leave
of his father Isaac, and Isaac blessed him before
he went. Jacob did not ask his father to give him
anything. He took no servant with him, no sheep,
nor goats—not even an ass to ride upon. He
only took a stick in his hand,* and he set out on
his journey: Jacob felt very sad. He was a poor
stranger, and he was going to a far country, which
he had never seen.

Should not you feel very sad, if you were to
leave your father and mother, and to go alone into
a country a great way off?

He had no tent, nor house to sleep in by the
way; so when night came, he took some stones
for a pillow, and lay down to sleep on the ground.
There were bears and wolves in that country; but
God took care of him. God knew how sad he
was; and God made him dream the sweetest
dream that you ever heard.

In his sleep Jacob saw a great many steps reach-
ing up to the sky; and on the steps beautiful
angels; some going up, and some coming down:
and at the top he saw God himself. Then Jacob

* With my staf’ I passed over this Jordan.—Gen. xxxii, 10.



THE HEAVENLY DREAM. 45

heard a voice, and God spoke to him, and said,
“JT am the God of Abraham and of Isaac, and I
will take care of you where ever you go: and [
will bring you home again; and your children
shall live in this land of Canaan, where you are
sleeping.” 5

Then Jacob awaked out of his sleep, but now
his heart was glad; he knew that God and his an-
gels were watching over him. He wished never
to forget the place where he had this sweet dream:
so he took the stones, which had been his pillow,
and made them into a heap. “Now,” he thought,
«J shall be able to find the place, when God lets
me come back to Canaan, as he has promised.”
He could not offer a sacrifice upon the stones, be-
cause he had no lambs, but he poured some oil
upon them,* and he prayed to the Lord; and said,
“Tf God will take care of me, and give me bread
to eat, and clothes to wear, and bring me home
again, he shall be my God, and this stone shall be
God’s house.

Jacob felt sure that God would take care of him,
and bring him home again, because he had prom-
ised that he would.

God takes care of you, my dear children. He
sends his angels down from heaven to watch over
you, as they did over Jacob.

On the bare ground the traveller lies,
The stones his pillow are ;

Jacob poured oi! upon the top of the pillar.—Gen, xxvii, 18



46 JACOB, OR

‘While slumbers close his weary eyes,
God sends a vision fair.

See on that wondrous airy way
‘What troops of angels move !

Their brightness turns the night to day,
Their faces beam with love.

And where the steps are lost in light
On heaven’s glorious coast,

There stands the Lord, more wondrous bright,
Than that angelic host.

Like rushing waters loud and soft,*
Sounds the Almighty’s voice,

Uttering sweet promises, which oft
Made Abraham’s heart rejoice.

“ Thy children shal] this land possess,
(In number like the dust,)

And.ONE all families shall bless,
Who place in him their trust.

“ And I myself will go with theo,
Where’er thy footsteps roam ;

Once more thy joyful eyes shall see
Thine own beloved home.”

Sweet consolation thus is given
A wanderer’s heart to cheer!

This house of God, this gate of heaven,
Shall be to memory dear.

CHILD.
And well I know that angels fair
E’en now from heaven descend,

heard the noise of thy wings, like the noise of great waters, as
the voice of the Almighty.—Ezek. i. 24.



THE LONG JOURNEY. 47

That day and night they fill the air,
And from all harm defend.*

And well I know that angels fair
E’en now to heaven ascend,

And blest departed spirits beart
To their Almighty Friend.

And angels too shall guard my way,
If I the Lord revere ;

In life and death, by night and day,
They still shall hover near.t

———__

CHAPTER IX.

JACOB, OR THE LONG JOURNEY.
Gen. xxix.

‘nex Jacob went on his journey. He trav-
elled for a great many days. At last he came to
a place where there was a great deal of grass.
In that place there was a well, and there was a
great stone upon the top of the well. A great
many sheep were round the well; and some men
were with the sheep. These men were shep-
herds. There was very little water in that coun-
try where Jacob was. He must have been glad
to have seen a well.

* Are they not all ministering spirts, sent forth to minister for them
who shall be heirs of salvation }—Heb. i. 14.

+ The beggar died and was carried by the angels into Abraham's
bosom.—Luke xvi. 22.

} Theangel of the Lord encampeth round about them that rear him,
and delivereth them.—Ps. xxxiv. 7.



48 JACOB, OR

Pacob said to the shepherds, “Do you know o
man called Laban?”--(that was the name of
Jacob’s uncle.)

* Yes,” said they, “we do.”

Then Jacob said, “Is he well ?”

The shepherds answered, “ He is well; and
nere is his daaghter Rachel coming with the
sheep.”

Jacob was very glad to hear this, for Rachel
was Jacob's cousin. He ran to her and kissed her,
and he sobbed and wept.

Why did Jacob cry?

I think he cried for joy; for people sometimes
cry for joy. Jacob had not seen a friend a long
while, and he was glad to see his cousin.

Rachel did not know who Jacob wai, till he
said “I am your cousin, and am come from a
great way off.”

Then Rachel ran, and said to her father La-
ban, “ My cousin Jacob is come; I found him sit-
ting by a well.”

Then Laban was glad, and ran out to meet
Jacob, and kissed him, and said, “ You must come
home to my house: 1 am your uncle.”

Jacob told Laban that he would take care of his
sheep; and so Jacob was Laban’s servant. Jacob
was a good shepherd, and sat up to guard the
sheep at night from lions and bears. He cared
not for the heat by day, nor the cold by night.*

* In the day the drought consumed me, and the frost by night ; and
my sleep departed from mine eyes.—Gen. xxxi.



THE LONG JOURNEY. 49

Laban had two daughters ; one was called Leah,
and the other Rachel; and Laban gave them to
Jacob to be his wives. So Jacob had two wives.
People must not have two wives now; but then
they might have two wives, and even more than
two.

God gave Jacob a great many little children. I
will not tell you their names, because they were so
many. Jacob lived a long while in some tents
with his wives and his little children. He took
care of Laban’s sheep; but Laban gave him some
sheep and goats of his own. Jacob had plenty of
bread to eat and raiment to wear, as God had
promised: for God always keeps his promises.

But Jacob could not forget his father and moth-
er, and Canaan, where he had lived when he was
a little boy. He knew that God had promised to
give the land of Canaan to Abraham’s, and Isaac’s,
cand to his own children;* and he wished to live
here again. |

I will now write down the names of the good
men who first lived in Canaan; and I will write
down the names of their wives.

Abraham,— Sarah.
|
Isaac,——-Rebekah.

|
Jacob,——Leah and Rachel.

* By faith Abraham sojourned in the land of promise, as in a strange
country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs witn
him of the same promisc.— Heb. xi. 9.

J.ine upon Line. 4



JACOB, OR

The Lord has been poor Jacob’s guide
Across the pathless desert wide,

‘And led him where his kindred dwell:
Lo! now he rests beside a well;

Its mouth is cover’d by a stone:
Around, the flocks are lying down.

For other flocks the shepherds stay,
Before they roll the stone away ;

Jacob inquires their country’s name ;

It is the land whence Abraham came ;
Behold fair Rachel leads her sheep,—
Why does the wanderer rise and weep ?

In stranger lands his feet have stray’d
And now he weeps to see the maid,
Who of his mother’s race is sprung,
‘Who speaks his own dear native tongue,
Who knows the God that he reveres ;—
From gladness flow the wanderer’s tears.

Now wipe those tears, and weep no more
For thee rich blessings lie in store ;

The Lord is with thee, as he said,
Raiment provides, and daily bread ;
‘With flocks and herds thy fields abound,
And lovely children sport around.

Nor will the Lord his promise break ;

He ne’er will leave thee, nor forsake,

His power from harm will guard thy head,
And Canaan’s land thy feet shall tread ;
O Jacob’s God ! the faithful, true,

Be thou my God, and bless me too,



THE MEETING. 51

CHAPTER X

JACOB, OR THE MEETING.
Gen. xxxi, xxxii. xxxiii. xxxv. 1—.

At last Jacob said to Laban his uncle, “ I have
been your servant a long while, and now I want to
go home.” But Laban would not let Jacob go
away; and he behaved very unkindly to Jacob;
so that Jacob wished more and more to go home.

Once, while Jacob was taking care of the sheep ~
in the field, he fell asleep, and he had a dream, |
and in his dream he heard God say to him. “ Go
home to your father, and I will be with you.”

When Jacob awoke, he sent a servant to fetch
Rachel and Leah, for he wanted to speak to them ;
and he said to them, “God has spoken to me in
a dream, and has told me to return home to my
father.” ;

Then Rachel and Leah said, “ we will go with

ou.” 7

Then Jacob packed up all his things—his tents
and his clothes and his furniture, and all he had.
He put his things on the backs of his camels and
asses. He placed his wives and his eleven child-
ren on camels too. He told his servants to drive
all his sheep, cows, goats, and asses and camels.
So they all set out.

Laban did not see Jacob go away ; for Jacob's
tents were not close to the place where Laban



52 JACOB, OR

lived. At last Laban heard that Jacob was gone:
then he was angry, and he went after Jacob, and
he begged Jacob to come back; but Jacob would
go back to Canaan.

Jacob was pleased to go back to Canaan; but
there was one thing that frightened him. He
remembered that Esau had once said he would kill
him ; he was afraid lest he should now come and
kill him and his children.

Soon Jacob heard that Esau was coming with
four hundred men. Jacob now thought that Esau
was coming to kill him. So he began to pray to
God, and said, “O God, thou hast been very kind
to me, and given me a great many things—do not
let Esau come and hurt me, and kill my wives
and my little children. Thou didst promise to
take care of me.” God heard Jacob’s prayer.

Jacob thought to himself, “I will send a pres-
ent to show Esau that I wish to behave kindly to
him.” So he took a great many goats, and sheep,
and cows, and asses, and camels, and told his ser-
vants to drive them on before, and to tell Esau
that he had sent them asa present. Jacob prayed
to God all through that night.

In the morning Jacob looked up and saw Esau
coming, and four hundred men with him. Jacob
did not run away; but he went up to Esau, and
as he walked, he stopped seven times, and bowed
down to the ground.

And what was it Esau did ?

He ran and put his arms round Jacob’s neck and



THE MEEs‘ING, 53

kissed him, and they both wept. God had made
Esau’s heart more kind.

How glad Jacob was to find that his brother
was grown kind! Jacob had prayed to God to
make him kind, and God had heard his prayer.

Esau looked up, and saw Rachel and Leah and
the little children; and Esau said, “Who are
these ?”

And Jacob said, “ These are my children, that
God has been so kind as to give me.”

Then Rachel and Leah bowed themselves to
the ground, and the maids bowed themselves, and
all the children bowed, even the youngest, who
was quite a little child, He was Rachel’s child,
and his name was Joseph.

Then Esau said to Jacob, “I met a great
many sheep, and cows, and goats—why did you
send them on before you?”

Jacob said, “ They were for a present for you.”

Esau answered, “I have enough, my brother;
keep what you have for yourself.” z

“ Pray take my present,” said Jacob, “for God
has given me a great deal.” And Jacob begged
Esau so much to take it that at last he took it.

Esau said to Jacob, “ Let us take our journey
together : and I will go on first.”

But Jacob said, “I cannot go as fast as you do,
for [have many little children with me, and young
lambs and goats; and if one day we were to drive
them too fast, they would die. So Jacob would
not go with Esau. é



54 JACOB, OR

Then Esau went home to his own house, which
was a great way off; for Esau did not live in Ca-
naan. But Jacob stayed in the land of Canaan,
for he wished to live there.

. You see that God had let Jacob come back to
Canaan, as he had promised. Jacob did not for-
get the sweet dream I told you of. He went to
that very place once more: he had made a heap
of stones to mark the place; so he could find
it again. here he built an altar, and offered sac-
rifices to God, who had been so kind to him. God
had given him food and clothes, as he had pro-
mised: and he had given him many more things
besides ; for God had given him wives and chil-
dren, and servants and cattle; and God had made
his brother kind to him, and had let him come
back to Canaan. Jacob loved God very much,
and thanked him for his kindness.

Has not God been very kind to you, my dear
children? Tell me what things he has given. Can
you think of ten or twelve things he has given
you? Food, clothes, &c. &c. Sometimes peo-
ple have been unkind to you, and God has made
them grow kind. How much you ought to love
God!

The Lord who all things did create,
Doth still his wonders show ;

See Esau’s heart once filled with hats,
With sudden love o’erflow.

An humble staff poor Jacob bore,
When first he left the land ;



THE MEETING. 55

But now behold his plenteous store,
And his sweet infant band.

Long since the voice of God he heard.
Foretelling days of peace ;

Now God fulfils his gracious word,
And bids his troubles cease.

Let every knee before Him bow,
Who can all wonders do ;

All hearts can change, all gifts bestow.
Make every word come true.

CHILD.

Sweet promises are made to me
If I serve God in truth ;

Thy wonders great, O let me see,
Guide of my tender youth ;

If any hate or wish me ill,
Lord fill their hearts with love,

And feed, and clothe, and bless me still ;—
Then waft my soul above.

CHAPTER XI.

JOSEPH, OR THE PIT.
Gen. xxxvii. 1-24.

Jacop saw his old father, Isaac, again; and
ten Isaac died, and Jacob and Esau buried him
in that same cave where Abraham and Sarah had
been put: they will rise together at the last day;



56 JOSEPH, OR

for Isaac wished to live in a country that is better
* than Canaan, that is, in heaven.

Esau, you know did not live in the land of Ca-
naan; but Jacob chose to live in Canaan, with
his children and his cattle.

All the sons were grown up to be men, when
Benjamin was still a little baby. Joseph was next
youngest to Benjamin. He was a big boy, and he
was the best of all the children. The ten eldest
were wicked men. They used to take care of the
sheep and goats; and when Joseph was with
them, they grieved him by their wicked beha-
viour ; they were also very unkind to him, and al-
ways spoke roughly to him. Jacob loved Joseph
the best; and this made the others envious. They
hated him, because he was the pet and the dar-
ling. ,

Toots loved Joseph too much. He gave him
a very pretty coat made of many colours, yellow,
blue, green, pink, red, purple ; and Joseph used to
wear it.

It is Satan that makes people envious. We
should pray-to God to keep us from being envi-
ous.

You will hear what wicked things these bro-
thers did, because they were envious of dear, good
Joseph.

One night Joseph had a very strange dream.
He thought he was in a field of corn with all his
brothers, and they were making up large bundles
of corn, called sheaves. He thought that each of



THE PIT. 57

his brothers made a sheaf, and that all his brothers’
sheaves bowed down to his sheaf. Joseph thought
this a very strange dream, and he told it to his
brothers.

But when they heard it they were very angry,
and said, “ We suppose you mean that we shall
bow down to you, though you are the youngest.”
And so they hated him more than they had done
before.

Soon after Joseph had another strange dream.
He thought he saw the sun, moon, and eleven stars
in the sky, and that they bowed down to him.
This dream was more strange than the other; and
he told it to his father as well as to his brothers.

His father was surprised, and said, “ Does the
sun mean me, and the moon your mother, and the
stars your brothers, and shall we bow down to
you?”

Yet Jacob thought that God had sent the dream
to Joseph, and would make it come true ; but the
brothers were more and more angry.

Now Joseph’s brethren had a great many sheep
and goats to take care of: and there was not
enough of grass for them all, round the tents; so
they took their flocks a great way off, that they
might eat fresh grass. Joseph staid at home with
his old father; and Benjamin staid at home because
he was quite a little child.

At last Jacob wished to know how his sons
were; so he said to Joseph, “Go and see your

.



58 JOSEPH, OR

brothers, and come back and tell me how they are
and how the flocks are.”

Joseph was always ready to do what his father
wished: so he set out on his way.—He took no
ass to ride upon, and no servant; but, putting on
his pretty coat, he wished his dear father good-bye.
He little thought how long it would be before he
should see again that dear father’s face.

Joseph went a great way, but could not find
his brothers. At last a man saw him, and said,
“ Whom are you looking for?”

And Joseph answered, “I am looking for my
brothers—can you tell me where they are feeding
their flocks ?”

Then the man told him which way they were

ne.

Joseph took a great deal of pains to find his
brothers.

Now the brothers saw Joseph coming when he
was very far off. They knew that it was Joseph :
and they said to each other, “ Here this dreamer
comes, let us kill hith, and throw him into a deep
hole, and tell our father that a lion or a bear has
eaten him up.”

So when Joseph came up to them, they seized
hold of him. He came to them full of love and
kindness; but they looked fiercely upon him; |
and he was indeed like a gentle lamb in the midst
of lions and tigers. He was like the Lord Jesus
when the wicked Jews seized him in the garden.

The brothers were going to kill him, when one



\

THE PIT. 59

of the brothers, named Reuben, said, “ Do not kill
him, but only throw him into a pit.” This bro-
ther was a little kinder than the rest, and meant
to take him out of the pit, and bring him back to
Jacob. The brothers agreed not to kill him.
But first they took off his pretty coat.

O how bitterly he cried when he saw what they
were going to do to him! how he begged them to
spare him, and to let him return to his father !—
but they would not hear;* for their hearts were
harder than stone.

They threw him into the deep, dark pit; and
there he lay hungry and thirsty and weary—
without one drop of water to quench his thirst.
How it must have grieved Joseph to think that he
should not return to his dear father; and his fa-
ther perhaps would think that he was dead !

The wicked brothers cared not for his groans,
but they sat down and began to eat their dinner.

God saw them from his throne in heaven, and
was much displeased.

* We are verily guilty concerning our brother, in that we saw the

anguish of his soul, when he besought us, and we would not hear.
—Gen. xiii. 21.



60 ‘JOSEPH, OR

CHAPTER XII.

JOSEPH, OR THE SLAVE,

Wurtz the brothers were eating their dinner,
they looked up and saw some people coming along.
As the people came nearer, they saw camels and
men riding on them. I will tell you who these
men were.

They lived in a country a great way off, and
had een to some hills where very sweet things
grew, called spice and balm. They had plucked
these sweet things and had put them in large bun-
dles on the backs of their camels. They were
going to carry them to a country a great way off,
and to sell them for money.

This was their way of getting their living, and
it was a good way; yet they were wicked men, as
you will see.

One of the brothers, called Judah, said, “ Let
us sell Joseph to those men ; for it would be better
to sell him than to kill him: we shall get some
money if we sell him; and it would be very cruel
to kill Joseph, as he is our brother.”

Yet was it not very cruel to sell Joseph? This
brother was not really kind. The other brothers
said that they thought it was a good plan to sell
Joseph. So they called to the men, and asked
them if they would buy a young boy.



THE SLAVE. 61

And the men said, “ Yes.” This was wicked.

“ How much will you give us for him?” said
the brothers.

“We will give you twenty pieces of silver,”
said the men.

Then Joseph’s brothers pulled Joseph out of the

it. Perhaps he thought that they were going to
let him return to his father.

Ah! poor Joseph! He soon found that his
brothers were not going to be kind. The men
and the camels were waiting outside the pit. The
men paid the money to the brothers, and then
took Joseph and carried him away with them.

When Joseph was gone, the brothers said,
“ What shall we tell our father when he asks us
where Joseph is ?—we will not say we have seen
Joseph, but we will say we have found his coat on
the ground.”

Then the brothers killed one of their young
goats, and dipped the pretty coat in the blood.
« We will show our father this bloody coat,” said
they. So they carried the coat home, all covered
with blood, and the money for which they had
sold Joseph.

Do you think they were happy in their hearts?
Ono! The wicked cannot be happy. God had
written down their wickedness in his book.

Poor Joseph with the wicked men was not so
unhappy as they: for God was his friend. Old
Jacob had been thinking of his sons while they
were gone. How glad he must have been when



62 JOSEPH, OR

he heard the bleating of their sheep, and knew
they were come home! He must have looked to
see whether Joseph was with them. But no. His
sons came up to him. In their hands they held a
bloody coat. They showed it to Jacob, and said,
“We have found this—Do you think it is your
son’s coat or not ?”

Jacob knew that coat, and said, “It is my son’s
coat; a lion or bear has eaten him up, and has torn
Joseph to pieces.”

How Jacob wept for his darling child! How
sorry he was that he had sent him alone to seek
his brothers! The wicked brothers tried to com-
fort Jacob, and said, “ Do not weep so much,” but
Jacob would not hear.

“No; I shall die; and then I shall be with Jo-
seph, for I shall never be happy any more.”

How sad it was for this old man, leaning on his
stick, his hair grey, and his face full of sadness,
while he thought that his dear boy was eaten up
by the lion or the bear! His little Benjamin was
a comfort to him. Jacob would never let him go
away, nor would he trust him with his brothers,
though he did not know how wicked they had
been.

These brothers first had envied Joseph, then
they had told'a lie to hide their sin.

Children sometimes try to hide their faults by
telling lies, and so they make God more angry
than he was before. My dear children, remember



‘THE SLAVE. 63

that God always sees you; and that he hates liars,
and will not let them live with him in glory.

What anguish once poor Joseph felt,

When he before his brethren knelt,
And loud for mercy cried !*

Refusing still to hear his pray’r,

In blood they dipp’d his garment fair,
And sought their guilt to hide.

Now by the heathen-stranger band,
Away from his dear native land,
The weeping youth is borne :
His father shall feel bitter pangs,
When he shall hear some lion’s fangs
Those tender lambs have torn.

A precious load the camels bear
Of balm, and myrrh, and spices rare,
Which scatter sweetness round :
But sweeter than the sweetest spice,
True piety beyond all price
In Joseph’s heart is found.

Blessings shall rest upon his head
Where’er his wandering steps are led,
For he to God is dear ;
And this same God shall with him go,
With heav’nly comforts soothe his wo,
And chase away his fear.

* We saw the anguish of his soul, when he besought us, and we
would not hear.—Gen. xlii. 21.



64 JOSEPH, OR

CHAPTER XIII.

JOSEPH, OR THE PRISONER.
Gen. xxxix.

Tue men who had bought Joseph, took him to
a country a great way off. It was called Egypt.

When they got to Egypt they tried to sell him,
as if he had been a horse or a cow. In some
countries men are sold, and are called slaves.
Poor Joseph was sold as a slave. Do you not
hope that a kind man bought hin? And it was
a kind man that bought him. There was a very
rich man who knew the king, and he bought Jo-
seph to be his slave. His name was Potiphar.
He took Joseph home with him. He did not send
him to work in the field; but he made him a ser-
vant in the house. So Joseph had not very hard
work to do.

Joseph tried to be a good servant. Though he
wished very much to be with his father, he did not
waste his time in fretting, but took great pains to
please his master. When his master told him to
do anything, he did it so well that his master was
quite pleased with him. It was God that made
Joseph able to do his work so well; and Joseph’s



THE PRISONER. 65

master knew that it was God that he!ped him to
do things well* I suppose that Joseph had told
him ; for his master did not know the true God
but worshipped idols.

His master liked him better every day. At
last, his master said to Joseph, “I can trust you
so well that I will give you the charge of the
other servants when I am out. Take care of the
house, and all the things in it, of the garden and
of the fields; for I can trust you.”

So Joseph had the care of everything, and all
the other servants minded what he said: and he
might do what he liked when his master was out,
But Joseph behaved the same as if his master
were watching him; for he knew the eye of God
was always upon him. ‘There are many children
who behave ill as soon as their parents go out of
the room: such children do not fear God.

Though Joseph had the care of nice things to
eat, and beautiful things to wear, he only took
what his master allowed him to take. He was al-
ways busy—sometimes in the house, and some-
times in the field: and God made the things grow
well in the field, and the work to go on right in
the house.

So that Potiphar had no trouble himself, but
found that Joseph would manage all for him.

So Joseph had now all he could wish for; but
he could not forget his father, and his little baby

* And his master saw that the Lord was with him, and that the

Lord made all that he did to prosper in his hand.—Gen. xxxix. 3.
Line upon Line. 5



66 JOSEPH, OR

brother Benjamin. As for his mother, Rachel,
you know that she had died some time before.

Now you shall hear what a sad thing happened
to Joseph.

Potiphar had a very wicked wife. She wished
Joseph to be turned out of the house: for Joseph
had found out how bad she was; so she did not
like to see Joseph.

This wicked woman said to Potiphar, “ Your
slave, Joseph, that you think so good, is very
wicked, and when you are out he behaves very ill”
Then she told Potiphar of bad things that she
said Joseph had done.

Potiphar was so foolish as to believe her, and
he fell into a great rage, and said, “ Joseph shall
be put into prison.”

So some men took Joseph, and brought him to
the prison, which was in Potiphar’s house.

Were you ever in a prison, my dear child? It
is a dark place, with very little windows, and bars
of iron before the windows, and iron gates and
bolts.

Joseph was put in prison; and his feet were
hurt by great iron chains, which were fastened
round them.*

There were a great many men in the prison,
and most of them had done very bad things, but
Joseph had done nothing wrong. God still loved

* Joseph was sold for « servant, whose feet they hurt with fetters.
Ps. cv. 17, 18.



THE PRISONER. 67

Joseph, and he could make him happy even in a
on. ‘

There was a man who kept the keys of the pri-
son, and took care of the prisoners ; he was called
the keeper of the prison. Sometimes keepers are
very unkind; but God put it into the keeper's
heart to love Joseph. Joseph had a very sweet
countenance or look, and he behaved well to the
keeper, and minded all he said.

At last, the keeper took the chains off Joseph's
feet, and allowed him to walk about the prison, and
take care of the prisoners. The keeper found that
he could trust him, and that Joseph managed things
well. It was God who made Joseph do everything
so well; for God was Joseph’s friend, and was al-
ways watching over him to comfort him.

Joseph hoped that God would some day let him
get out of prison.

See Joseph in a prison cast,
In darkness under ground
His feet within the stocks made fast,
With iron fetters bound ;
Can this be he (now clad in raiment vile)
Whao lately shar’d a father’s tend’rest smile ?

But in the prison shines a light,
Which none but Joseph sees ;
The promises of God are bright,
And give his spirit ease ; ‘
‘The day shall come, when he with honour crown’d
Shall see his brethren bending low around.

Yes, God shall clear his innocence,
And make it fully known,



68 JOSEPH, OR

Yes, God shall send and draw him thence,
And raise him to a throne ;
But first, like gold, his patience must be tried,
And (as by fire) his heart be purified.*

CHAPTER XIV.

JOSEPH, OR THE BUTLER AND BAKER.
Gen. xl.

Tue prison, you remember, was in the house of
Potiphar. One day, Potiphar brought two men to
Joseph, and said to Joseph, “Take great care that
these men do not get out of prison. I give them
under your charge.” So you see Potiphar thought
Joseph could be trusted: perhaps he had found out
that Joseph was not so bad as he had once
thought ; still he did not let Joseph out of prison.

I will tell you who these men were that Poti-
phar brought to Joseph. They were the servants
of the king of Egypt. The king of Egypt had a
great many servants to wait on him. One of his
servants used to bring him wine in a cup to drink.
This servant was called his butler. Another man
used to bake things for his dinner, and bring them
to the king. He was called the baker.

The butler and the baker had both offended the

* That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of
gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unte
praise, and honour, and glory, &c.—1 Peter, i. 7.



THE BUTLER AND BAKER, 69

king: I do not know what they had done, but they
had made the king so angry that he had said they
should be shut up in prison.

So the king had said to Potiphar, the great cap-
tain, “ Put these men in the prison.”

Then Potiphar brought them to Joseph, and told
him to keep them safe, Joseph shut them up ina
room together, and gave them bread and water
every day, and took great care of them.

One morning when Joseph came to see them, he
observed that they looked very sad indeed. So
Joseph said to them, “ Why do you look so very
sad ?”

Then they answered, “We have each had a very
strange dream to-night, and we think our dreams
have some meaning, but we cannot find it out:
and there is nobody in the prison who can tell us.”

Then Joseph said, “But my God knows all
things: he could tell me the meaning. Only tell
me your dreams.”

The butler told his dream the first. He said,
“T thought I saw a tree such as grapes grow upon
—avine. It had three branches, but no grapes.
While I was looking, I saw little buds, and they
turned into grapes, and they grew ripe. I picked
the grapes, and squeezed them into a cup, and
made wine, and then brought the cup’ to the king
for him to drink, as I used to do.”

. This was the butler’s dream, and God told Jo-
seph the meaning of it.

“You saw three branches,” said Joseph;



70 JOSEPH, OR

“something will happen to you in three days.
The king will send for you to be his butler again.”

When the baker heard this pleasant meaning, he
thought that his dream would be pleasant too: so
he began to tell it. The baker said, “I dreamt
that I was carrying three white baskets on my head,
the one on the top of the other. In the baskets
there were baked meats, and birds came and pick-
ed the meat out of the top basket.”

The baker thought thatJoseph would say, “ In
three days you shall be baker again to the king.”
But this dream had a sad meaning.

“Something will happen to you in three days,”
said Joseph. “The king will send for you, and
will hang you upon a tree, and the birds will pick
your flesh off your bones.”

So while the butler was pleased with what Jo-
seph had told him, the poor baker was very sorry,
because he knew that he must die.

_ Joseph had one little favour to ask of the butler.
You can guess what it was. “ When you are with
the king of Egypt,” said Joseph, “ giving him his
wine, will you tell him about me? Tell him how
Iam shut up in prison, and cannot get out. Ionce
lived in a land a great way off, and I was stolen
away, and now I am shut up in this prison, though
{ have done nothing wicked to deserve it. Beg
the king to let me out.”

You see Joseph did not tell of his brothers’
wickedness in having sold him.

In three days the king sent some men to the



THE BUTLER AND BAKER. 71

prison to fetch the butler and the baker. It was
the king’s birth-day, and he had made a feast for
his servants, and he had thought of the butler and
baker, and had said, “ Let the butler come back
to me, and let the baker be hanged; I will not for-
give him.” So now both the butler and the baker
knew that Joseph had told them the truth.

Did the butler remember Joseph when he was
with the king? No,heforgothim. I suppose he
was thinking of the fine things he saw, of eating
and drinking, of money and clothes, and forgot
that poor Joseph was in a prison. The butler was
unkind, and worse than unkind; he was ungrate-
ful. Joseph had been kind to him, yet he was not
kind in return; therefore I call him ungrateful.
Many children are ungrateful to their parents, who
were kind to them when they were little; and all
people are ungrateful to God, who has given his
Son to die for them. ;

Poor Joseph waited in vain. No one came to
let him out of prison. One day passed, and then
another: summer came, and then winter, but Jo-
seph was still shut up. Yet God had not forgot-
ten him. Why did God make him wait so long?
That he might learn to be patient. My dear child,
if God lets you be sick a long while, it is to make
you patient. You should think to yourself, “ God
will make me well when he thinks best: but per-
haps he means to take me to heaven instead.”

And has the butler, then, forgot
Poor Joseph’s last request ;



72 JOSEPH, OR

' Nor of the tender pity thought,
Shown to him when distrest ?

Why does he not of Joseph speak,
When he the cup presents,

Implore the king his bonds to break,
And show his innocence 4

Content, within the palace gay,
He lives on princely fare ;

While Joseph mourns the light of day,
And breathes the prison air.

But while the butler I accuse
Of hateful selfishness,

O let me not in pride refuse
My own sins tu confess.

Have I remembered all the good
My parents have bestowed,

And in their woes done all I could
To ease their heavy load ?

' And have I not ungrateful been
Unto the God of love,
And often griev’d him by my sin,
And with his Spirit strove 3+

Yet Jesus, since he left the grave,
To sit upon his throne,

Still intercedes with God to save
Us, who in prison groan.t

Grieve not the Holy Spirit of God.—Eph. iv. 30
t He is able also to save them to the uttermost, that come unto God
by him ; seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. —Heb
wii, 25,



‘THE RELEASE. 73

CHAPTER XV.
JOSEPH, OR THE RELEASE.

I nave told you of the great king of Egypt.
He was the king of the country where Joseph was.
His name was Pharaoh. He had a great many
servants, as I told you. He sat upon a throne,
wore beautiful clothes, a chain of gold round his
neck, a ring upon his hand, and a crown of gold
upon his head. He lived in a fine house, and rode
out in a chariot drawn by many horses; and as
he passed by, people bowed down to the ground.
One night, this great king had two very strange
dreams. I will tell you what they were.

He thought he was standing by a river, and that
seven fat cows came out of the river, and began
toeat the grass that grew near. This was a pleas-
ant sight; but, soon after, he saw seven very thin
cows, (more ugly than any cows he had ever seen,)
come out of the river; and they ate up the seven
fat cows; and yet, after they had eaten them, they
looked as thin as they did before. Then the king
awoke,

But soon he fell asleep, and dreamt that he saw
a stalk of corn with seven fine ears growing on it.
While he was looking, he saw another stalk with
seven very bad ears of corn on it; and these bad
ears ate up the seven good ears.

These were Pharaoh’stwo dreams. He thought



74 JOSEPH, OR

them very strange, and longed to know the mean-
ing of them. In the morning he told his servants
to find some people who said they could tell the
meaning of dreams. A great many men came who
pretended to be wise; but they could not tell the
king the meaning of his dreams. The king was
very unhappy, but what could he do?

At last the butler thought of Joseph. He had
not thought of him for a long while, and now he felt
sorry. He said to the king, “I do remember my
faults this day. You know, O king, that you were
once angry with me and with your baker, and you
shut us up in prison, in the house of the captain
Potiphar. While we were in prison, the baker and
Teach had a dream, and a young man, a servant,
told us the meaning of our dreams, and said that
the baker would be hanged, and that I should be
let out of prison; and so it was, the baker was
hanged, and you sent for me back to be your but-
ler, just as the young man had said.” Then Pha-
raoh told his servants to fetch this young man out
of prison. ;

So the servants came to the prison, and said to
the keeper, “We are come to fetch Joseph; the
king wants to speak to him.”

Joseph must have been glad to hear this. He
saw that God had heard his prayer. Joseph was
dressed in very poor clothes, not fit for a king to
see. So the servants gave him neat clothes, and
brought him to the king.

It was a long, long while, since Joseph had felt



THE RELEASE, 15

the sweet air blow upon his face, and since he had —
seen the green fields. I think he must have look-
ed pale and sick.

He came into the king’s fine house, and stood
before him. The king said, “ I hear that you can
tell the meaning of dreams.”

“Tt is not I myself,” said Joseph, “that can tell
the meaning, but my God can, and I know that he
will tell the meaning of your dreams.” Then
Pharaoh told Joseph his two dreams—the dream
about the seven cows, and the dream about the
seven ears.

When he had done speaking, Joseph answered,
“Both your dreams have the same meaning. This
is what is going to happen. The next seven years
a great deal of corn will grow in the fields; but
afterwards hardly any corn will grow in the fields
for seven years. The seven fat cows meant the
seven years, when much corn would grow; and the
seven thin cows meant the seven years when very
little corn would grow. God sent you these dreams,
that you might know what is going to happen.”

Now what could the king do? First there would
be a great deal of corn, then scarcely any. Could
you, my little child, advise the king what to do?
Joseph gave him some advice. He said, “Save
up some of the corn, when there is so much, that
you may have some, when there is none growing
in the fields. You should look for a very wise
man, who will save up the corn, and put it in large



16 JOSEPH, OR

barns; or the people will die when no corn grows
in the fields.”

Pharach was much pleased with Joseph for
telling him the meaning of his dreams ; he believ-
ed what Joseph said, and so did all Pharaoh’s serv-
ants. And the king Pharaoh said to his servants,
«Where can I find so wise a man as Joseph?
He shall save up the corn.”

Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “ You are so
very wise that you shall help me to manage all the
people in the land. Every one shall mind you as
they do me, and you shall be the greatest person
next to me.”

Then Pharaoh took the ring off his hand, and
put it on Joseph’s hand ; and he gave him beauti-
ful clothes like his own, and a gold chain to wear
round his neck. He gave him a fine chariot to
ride in, and desired people to bow down when
they saw him.

So Joseph was made a great Lord; but he
would not be idle. He went about all the country
in his chariot to get corn, and he built large barns
everywhere, and filled them with corn, and so he
did for seven years. He did not spend his time .
eating and drinking, but was always doing good
to people.

He was very glad he was let out of prison, and
he thanked God very much. He was not happy
because he wore fine clothes : but he was glad to
be able to do good to people, by saving up corn.
He married a wife, and he had two little boys; yet



THE RELEASE. 77

still he thought of his dear old father, and hoped
that he should one day see him again; and he
thought of little Benjamin, and hoped his brothers
had not killed him, nor put him ina pit, and he
hoped that his brothers were sorry for their wick-
edness. He did not feel angry with his brothers.
Joseph knew that it was God who had let them
sell him for a slave, and that God had let them do
it that he might save up corn in Egypt.

It is God that makes all things happen ;* and
God has wise reasons for all he does. If he lets
us be sick, it is for some good reason. One day
we shall know why God let us be sick, or let
wicked people hurt us, or take away our things.

You know why God let wicked people kill the
Lord Jesus. It was that he might die instead of
us, and save us from hell.

Behold him in a chariot riding,
Who lately in a prison lay ;

The king, to him all pow’r confiding,
Deck’d him with gold and white array.

Now hear the servants loud proclaiming,
“ Bow low the knee before his car !”

While ev’ry mouth is Joseph naming—
“ My Lord Zaph-nath paaneah.”

Through all the land he goes exploring,
Gath’ring the precious fruits of earth ;

* Shall there be evil in a city, and the Lord hath not done it~
Amos iii. 6.

t What I do thou knowest not now ; but thou shalt know here after
John xiii. 7.



78 JOSEPH, OR

In spacious barns the harvest storing,
Against the dreadful days of dearth.

How well is Joseph’s faith rewarded,

Which made him long in patience wai’
God has at length relief afforded,

And rais’d him to his glorious state,
And God will every soul deliver

That puts his trust in him alone ;
And wipe away his tears for ever,

And raise him to a heav’nly throne!



CHAPTER XVI.

JOSEPH, OR THE LORD OF EGYPT.
Gen. xiii.

You have heard, my dear children, how Joseph
was made almost as great as the king. A great
deal of corn grew in the fields next year and the
year after, and for seven years after the king’s
dream. But then scarcely any corn grew. The
poor people came to king Pharaoh, and said, “ We
have nothing to eat, and we shall die.” Then
Pharaoh said, “Go to Joseph ; he can help you.”
So the people went to Joseph and he opened his
large barns full of corn, and sold the corn to the
people. They brought money, and large bags or
sacks. Joseph took the money and filled the sacks
with corn, A great many people came to buy
corn. Some from a long way off; but Joseph had
enough corn for all



‘THE LORD OF EGYPT. 79

Among the people who came there were ten men
who had come from a far country. Each of them
had an ass, and on the ass a sack, and in their
hands they brought money. Who do you think
these were? They were Joseph’s brothers. When
Joseph saw them he remembered them, though he
had not seen them for twenty years. He knew
those cruel brothers, who had sold him for twenty
pieces of silver. If he pleased he might have
punished them. He might have told his servants
to kill them. Do you think Joseph will punish his
brothers, or do you think he will be kind to them?
Now you shall hear how he behaved to them.

The brothers thought Joseph was a great lord,
and they did not know that they had seen him
before ; for he wore fine clothes, and he was grown
to be a man, and he had another name, which the
king had given him.

So when the ten brothers saw him they bowed
upon the ground before him. Then Joseph re-
membered his dream about the sheaves bowing
down to his sheaf, and he saw that God had made
it come true.

Joseph felt ready to forgive his brothers; but
he wished first to see whether they were sorry
for their wickedness, and whether they loved their
father and little Benjamin; Joseph did not tell
them who he was. He even pretended to be
unkind. He spoke to them in a rough voice, and
said, “ Where do you come from?”



80 JOSEPH, OR

“From the land of Canaan,” they said, “ to
buy food.”

But Joseph said he did not believe they spoke
truth. “You come,” he said, “to see what a bad
land this is, with no corn growing in it, and you
mean to bring some king with soldiers to fight
us,”

“ No, indeed,” said Joseph’s brothers, “ we do
not. We are ten poor brothers and we are come
to buy food.”

But Joseph said he would not believe what
they said.

Joseph’s brothers answered, “ We are all bro
thers, and once there were twelve of us, but one
is dead, and the youngest is with our father, who
is an old man.” ‘They tried to make Joseph be-
lieve what they said, but he would not; that is,
he pretended not to believe them.

At last Joseph said, “ I must see your youngest
brother. I shall send one of you to fetch him,
and I shall keep the rest in prison, till he comes
back with the youngest brother.”

The brothers were much frightened when they
heard this; for they knew their father would not
choose to part with Benjamin, lest he should be
killed. So not one of the brothers said he would
go and fetch Benjamin.

Joseph put them all in prison, and kept them
shut up together for three days. While they
were shut up, they had time to think of their
wickedness to Jogeph.



THE LORD OF EGYPT. 81

When people are shut up they have time to
think and to pray. I hope, dear children, when
you are shut up, as a punishment, that you pray
to God to make you good. The brothers were
very much frightened; they did not know what
Joseph twas going to do with them.

At last Joseph came to them in the prison, and
said, “ This is what you must do, and then you
shall live; for I fear God.”

How glad and surprised the brothers must have
been when they heard him say he feared God! for
the other people worshipped idols.

Joseph said, “I will only keep one of you shut
up in the prison, all the rest of you may go back,
and take corn home with you; but when you
come again, you must bring your youngest bro-
ther with you; or I shall think you have not
spoken truth; but, if you do bring him, I will
believe you.”

The brothers were glad to think they might go
back, yet it made them sad to hear that one of them
would be kept in prison. They remembered their
wickedness to Joseph, and they said one to another,
“Tt was very wicked in us to treat him as we did.
How he begged us to spare him, and we would not ;
and now God is punishing us for it.”

Joseph heard what they said, and it made the
tears run down his cheeks; so that he was obliged
to go out of the room to weep. He did not like to
see them unhappy ; but you know he wanted to
find out whether they were kind to Benjamin, and

Lins upon Line. 6



82 JOSEPH, OR

whether they loved their old father, and whether
they were sorry for all they had done.

When Joseph came back, he took one of the
brothers, called Simeon, and said that he would keep
him in prison till the others brought their youngest
brother with them. So Joseph had Simeon bound
with ropes, or chains, while the other brothers
stood round.

Then they must have remembered how once
poor Joseph had been bound, and sold for a slave.

Simeon was left alone in the prison, and he did
not know whether his brothers would ever come
back, and whether he would ever be let out.

Before the brothers set off to go home, Joseph
said to his servants, “ When you fill those men’s
sacks with corn, put back into their sacks the
money that they paid me for it, and give them
also some food by the way.” Joseph wished his
poor brothers to have something to eat by the way.
And the servant did as Joseph told him; but
Joseph’s brethren did not know what the servant
had done.

How glad these brothers where to get away
from Egypt, and to come back to their father, and
to their little children, who had scarcely anything
left to eat!

When they were come home, they told their
father all thathad happened. “There was a great
lord,” they said, “ who sold corn to the people ; and
he spoke very roughly to us, and said that we were
not come to buy corn, but that we only wanted to



THE LORD OF EGYPT. 83

see the land, that we might bring men to fight the
poor hungry people that lived there. He called us
‘spies.’ We told him that we were not spies, but
were twelve brothers;—that one was dead, and
that one was with our father in the land of Canaan.
But that lord would not believe us, and told us we
must bring our youngest brother with us; and he
took Simeon, and shut him up in prison, and said
that he would not let him out till we came back
with Benjamin.”

Poor old Jacob was very sad when he heard all
this. Then the brothers began to open their sacks
of corn, and they were quite surprised to find their
money at the top of their sacks; but they were not
pleased; they thought that some one had put the
money there to get them in disgrace, and that
when they went back to Egypt, they should be
punished for stealing; so they were very much
frightened.

They had not stolen this money ; but they were
thieves, for they once had stolen Joseph, and sold
him for twenty pieces of silver. God knew that
they were thieves. .

They were more afraid than ever of going back
to Egypt, and seeing the great lord; yet they
wished very much to go, for they had only bought
a little corn, and they wanted more: and they knew
that poor Simeon would remain in prison till they
went back to Egypt.

How could they persuade Jacob to let Benjamin
go? For Jacob said, “ No, I cannot trust Benjamin



84 JOSEPH, OR

with you, lest some harm should happen to him.
You have taken away two of my children, Joseph
and Simeon, and you would not bring Benjamin
back if I were to let him go. If any evil were to
happen to him, you would bring down my gray
hairs with sorrow to the grave.” Jacob felt that
it would break his heart to lose Benjamin, he
loved him so very much.

So the brothers were obliged to stay in Canaan ;
for they knew it would be of no use to go to Egypt,
except Benjamin went with them. What trouble
they now were in! God was punishing them for
their wickedness.

Famine had spread on ev'ry side,

And thousands flock’d from distant lands
To Joseph, who their need supplied

From stores as countless as the sands.

Amongst the rest a troop appear'd,—
Full well were they to Joseph known ;

Their cruel looks he once had fear’d,
‘When in the pit they cast him down.

Those features he could recollect,

Though worn by care, and scorch’d by heat :
But little did those men suspect

They bent around their brother’s seat.

The youthful bloom had left his cheek ;
Grave and majestic was his air ;

A language strange they heard him speak,
And splendid garments saw him wear.

He spoke to them in tone severe,
And made them all their hist’ry tell ;



THE FEAST 8

And glad was he no tale to hear
Of wo and death that had befel.

Yet Joseph would his name conceal,
Nor his own tender love express ;

Until he saw his brothers feel
Sorrow for their past wickedness.

But while he caus’d them grief and pain,
Compassion fill’d his gentle heart ;
His tears he could not long restrain,
But stepp’d aside, and wept apart.

CHILD.

Thus my dear Saviour felt for me,
Before I lov'd him as my friend ;—
Did then each tear with pity see,
To ev’ry sigh and groan attend.*

CHAPTER XVIL

JOSEPH, OR THE FEAST.
Gen. xiii.

As the brothers could not persuade old Jacob to
let Benjamin go with them, they were obliged to
stay in Canaan. Soon they had eaten up all their
corn, and none grew in their fields, and what
could they do for food ?

* It is said of rebellious Israel, “In all their affliction he was aflict-
ed Isa. Ixiii. 9,

God also says to Israel, “I have loved thee with an everlasting love.’
—Jer. xxxi. 3,



8F JOSEPH, OR

Jacob saw how hungry they’ were, and at last
he said, “ Go again, buy us a little food.”

Then they said, “ We cannot go without Ben-
jamin, for the man who sold corn said we should
not see him, unless we brought our youngest bro-
ther. If you will let Benjamin come with us,
then we will go.”

Jacob was very unhappy when he heard this,
and he said, “ Why did you tell the man you had
a brother? it was behaving very unkindly to me
to tell him.”

Then the brothers answered, “'The man asked
us so many questions. He said to us, “Is your
father alive? Have youanother brother? Could
we think that he would say, “ Bring your, young
est brother ?”

Still Jacob did not like to let Benjamin go.

One of the brothers (called Judah) said, “ I will
take care of Benjamin, if you will let him go. I
promise to bring him back to you; and if I do
not, I will take all the blame. For we and our
little children shall die, if you do not let him
come.”

Jacob saw it was of no use to refuse any more,
or they would all die, and Benjamin too. So he
gave Benjamin into the care of Judah.

But Jacob was afraid of the man being unkind
to them, and of his saying they had stolen the
money. So he said to them, “Bring the man a
present.”



HE FEAST, 87

What could they bring? They had gardens
with fruit and flowers growing in them.

“Pick some nuts and almonds off your trees,”
said Jacob, “and take a little of that sweet stuff
called balm and myrrh ; and take some spices, and
a little honey, and take them with you as a pre-
sent to the man.”

The man was very rich, and did not want any-
thing, but the present would show that they wished
to please him.

“ Besides,” said Jacob, “take the money back
that you found in your sacks—take more money
in your hands to buy more corn, and take Benja-
min, and go to the man.”

Jacob’s heart was full of pain when he said
this.

Then he began to pray to God. “May God
give you mercy before the man, and send home
Simeon and Benjamin.”

This was Jacob’s prayer.

“ Now,” said he, “if I must lose my children, I
must lose them.”

When Jacob wished his dear Benjamin good-
bye, he thought of how he once had parted with
his Joseph, the day he sent him to look for his
brothers, when he put on his pretty coat, but
never returned.

Now Jacob feared that he should never see
Benjamin again.

The brothers took the present, the sweet present,
with them, and they each took some money in



88 JOSEPH, OR

their hands, and they took their asses, and their
empty sacks; and Judah took care of Benjamin.

So they parted from their old father, and their
wives, and their little children, and they set out on
their journey.

They all felt very sad that day. The brothers
were frightened. ‘They were afraid they should
be taken up as thieves when they got to Egypt.

At last they came to Egypt. They went to
the place where Joseph was selling the corn, and
he saw them. He looked to see whether Benjamin
was with them. How pleased he was to see him!

Benjamin was a baby when Joseph had seen
him last, yet Joseph knew that it was Benjamin.

As soon as he saw his brothers, he called his
chief servant, who managed his house, and said to
him. “ Take those ten men to my house, and get
a great dinner ready, for they must dine with me
to day.”

The brothers did not hear what Joseph said to
the servant. The servant came to them, and told
them to come with him. So they came, and he
brought them to Joseph’s own house—a fine large
house. Yet the brothers were not pleased, but
very much frightened.

“ Ah!” said they to each other, “we are going
to be put in prison: and we shall be kept in
Egypt, to work hard, we and our asses.”

They thought of their poor father, and of what
he would do.

When they got to the door of the house, they



THE FEAST. 89

came up to the servant, and said, “O sir, we came
here once before to buy a little food, and we paid
money for it; but when we got home we opened
our sacks, and found the money in them, and here
we have brought it back; and we have brought
more money to buy more corn. We cannot tell
who put the money in our sacks.”

It was quite right in the brothers to bring back
the money; but once they had stolen money.
Now they were speaking truth, but once they had
told lies.

The servant answered them very kindly, and
said, “Fear not, God is your Father—God gave
you that money, and put the money in your
sacks,”

You see the servant knew about God. Who
could have taught him about God? The people
in Egypt worshipped idols. It must have been
Joseph who had taught his servant.

How happy the brothers were now! They
soon found that they were not going to be put into
a prison, but that they were to dine in a fine
house. What could make the man grow so kind ?
They did not know the reason.

While they were waiting, the servant went and
brought poor Simeon out of prison. He had been
shut up a long while. I hope when he was in pri-
son, that he had thought of his having once put
Joseph in the pit.

The servant told them that dinner would not be
ready till twelve o'clock ; and while they were



90 JOSEPH, OR

waiting, he brought them water to wash their feet,
and he gave some food to their poor, tired, and
hungry asses.

The brothers said, “Let us get our present
ready, while we are waiting for the lord to come
in.”

So they went out, and got ready the balm and
spices, the honey, and nuts, and almonds.

At last Joseph came in from selling the corn,
and the brothers came into the house, and brought
the present in their hand, and they bowed down
upon the ground. The eleven brothers bowed
down, as the eleven sheaves had done in the dream.

This time Joseph spoke very kindly to them.
He asked them how they were; but most of all
he wanted to know how his dear father was.

“Ts your father well?” he asked. “You said
you had an old father. Is he yet alive ?”

' They said, “ Yes, our father is well, and he is
alive ;” and as they spoke, they bowed down their
heads to the ground.

Then Joseph looked for Benjamin, and when he
saw him, he longed to throw his arms round his
neck, and kiss him, but he would not do it yet.
He only said, “ Is this your younger brother that
you told me of?” F

And then he made this little prayer, “God be
gracious to thee, my son.”

When Joseph had said this, he felt the tears
coming into his eyes, and he could not help ery-
ing; so he went quickly out of the room, and shut





91

himself up in his own room, and there he cried by
himself. He was a very tender-hearted man, and
he loved this young brother very much.

One reason why he loved him was, that Benja-
min was the son of his own mother, Rachel, while
all the others had another mother, Leah; for Ja-
cob, you know, had two wives.

Now the dinner was ready; so Joseph would
not stay in his room ; but first he washed his face,
that no one might see that he had been crying,
and then he tried to look cheerful, and he said to
his servants, “ Put the dinner on the table.”

In the room where they were to dine, there
were three tables. One was for Joseph’s servants,
another was for Joseph himself, (for he always
dined at a table by himself,) and the other table
was for the eleven brothers.

Joseph told them where to sit: he made the eld-
est sit first, and then the second, just according
to their age, and he made Benjamin sit last. The
brothers were surprised at Joseph’s knowing which
was eldest and which was second, for it is hard to
tell how old a grown up man is; but Joseph knew
them better than they thought he did.

Now they all sat down to dinner. It was long
since they had eaten such a dinner, and they had
made a great journey, and were tired, and hungry,
and thirsty. Joseph sent them nice things from
his table; but he sent five times as much to Ben-
jamin as to any of the others.

Were the brothers envious of Benjamin, because



92 JOSEPH, OR

Joseph sent him the most? No, they were not.
Once they had been envious of Joseobh—but now
they were not envious. ‘They ate and drank, and
they were merry.

Joseph could see them all—and it was a pleas-
ant sight to him. Once they had eaten their din-
ner, while he lay in the pit, and they had given
nim none. Yet he would not treat them so, but
would return good for evil.

You remember how kindly Jesus behaved te
people who were unkind to him. God is kind to
us though we do many things to offend him. If
a child is unkind to you, should you be unkind
too? If your brother has a cake, and will not
give you any—if you afterwards have a cake,
should you give him some, or should you not?
Oh! you should do as Joseph did, and be kind to
those who have been unkind to you.

Ah! what has caused this sudden change
In him, who lately seem’d so strange,
And on his brothers frown’d ?
And now their very beasts are fed,
For them a princely table’s spread,
‘With sumptuous dainties crown’d.

Young Benjamin is with them now,

And Joseph has unbent his brow,
And on his brothers smil’d :

For much he hopes that envious rage

No more those brother’s hearts engage
Against a favourite child,



What tenderness fills Joseph’s breast !

He sees the babe* whom he caress’d,
His own dear mother’s son :

His lips with blessings overflow,

And larger messes help to show
Which is the favour’d one.

But while he this distinction makes,
No hateful jealousy awakes,
But all the gladness share.
A little more will Joseph prove
The strength and fervour of his love,
And then his own declare.

CHILD.

Can I another bear to see
Preferr’d and honour’d above me,
And feel no inward pain ?
Then in my heart will Jesus dwell,
For these kind feelings please him well,
And shall his love obtain.t

But no such flowers by nature grow
Within the human heart below,
Since Adam’s shameful fall.t
Then, if I would my Saviour please,
I must, upon my bended knees,
For his sweet Spirit call.§

* When Joseph was sold into Egypt, it is supposed that Benjamm
was still an infant.

t Jesus answered and said unto him, “If any man love me he will
keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we wil. come unto
him, and make our abode with him.”—John xiv. 23.

Live in peace ; and'the God of love and peace shall be with you.”
—2 Cor. xiii. 11.

fn} aa dwelleth no good thing—Rom

16.
"§ The fruit of the Spirit is love.—Gal. v.



94 JOSEPH, OR

CHAPTER XVIII

JOSEPH, OR THE FORGIVING BROTHER.
Gen. xliv.; xlv. 1—16.

Tue biothers spent a happy day with Joseph.
They did not go home that day, but waited to set
out on the morrow.

You know that they had come to buy corn, and
they had brought empty sacks with them. Joseph
called his servant, and said to him secretly, “ Fill
the sacks of those eleven men with corn, and put
their money that they have given me for the corn
back into-their sacks. And put my silver cup into
the sack of the youngest.”

The servant filled the sacks with corn, and put
the money into them. And he put the silver cup
into Benjamin's sack: and then he gave the sacks
to the brothers. They did not know that the ser-
vant had put money or a cup into them.

The next morning, as soon as it was light, the
brothers rose up, took their asses and their sacks,
and set off, to return home to their father. How
glad they were to get away safely—not one left
behind !

What a pleasant history they thought they
should have to tell their father! How much sur-
prised he would be to hear of the great lord’s kind-
ness, and how glad he would be to see Benjamin

again !



‘THE FORGIVING BROTHER. 95

But soon was all their joy turned into grief.

‘They had gone but a little way, when some one
called them. It was Joseph’s servant; he came
running after them. :

«“ What has made you,” said he, “ behave so ill
to my lord, after all his kindness to you? Why
have you stolen his silver cup, out of which he
drinks ?”

The brothers were much surprised to hear that
the cup was stolen.

“Why should you think,’ said they, “ that we
have taken it? we would not do such a wicked
thing. Did we not bring back the money, when
we thought it had been put in our sacks by mis-
take? And now would we steal a silver cup out
of your lord’s house? None of us have taken it.
If one of us have taken it, let him die, and let all
the rest be slaves to your lord.”

They said this, because they were quite sure that
none of them had taken it.

“ No,” said the servant, “it shall not be so; the
one who has taken the cup shall not be killed ; he
shall only be a slave to my lord, and the others
shall not be slaves; they shall all go home.”

Then the servants told them to open their sacks ;
so the eldest brother took down his sack ; the ser-
vant looked in among the corn, but could find no
cup. Then the second opened his sack, but there
was no cup hid in it. The third showed his, and
each brother showed his in his turn. At last Ben-



96 JOSEPH, OR

jamin showed his. How much were they all sur
prised when they found the silver cup in it!

You know that Benjamin had not stolen it. You
know that the servant had put it in the sack when
he filled it with corn.

The servant said to Benjamin, “ You must come
back with me to my lord.” He was going to take
him for a slave, and never let him return home ;
but he said that his brothers might go home.

And would they go and leave Benjamin behind ?

“No,” said they, “ we will go back with Benja
min.”

' You see that they loved Benjamin, and they
would not leave him alone in his distress.

They put their sacks again on their asses, and
followed the servant to Joseph’s house. Their
hearts were bursting with grief, and they cried as
they went.

Joseph was in his house, waiting for them.

Joseph was very glad to see them all come back
with Benjamin, and to see them crying so much
lest Benjamin should be kept to be a slave. Now
Joseph saw that they loved Benjamin very much.

When they saw Joseph, they fell on their faces
on the ground.

Joseph spoke to them as if he was angry, and
said, “ What is this wicked thing that you have
done ?”

Do you remember that Judah had promised to
take care of Benjamin? So Judah began to beg
Joseph to forgive Benjamin.



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'11413' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBP' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
808a3e6841c557e7a53cceb95ad7ed61
dcb03c34d1972d1321743eac10fa2f1f95e72d67
'2012-03-31T08:00:36-04:00'
describe
'229464' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
6fe4c824ce58fc49c5df32ebb781a39a
0817530117a44a90bf5f670787a10e3fa380fdc0
'2012-03-31T08:05:02-04:00'
describe
'81306' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBR' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
3c4298469b9855c4e03055b63c10861c
0bd465ed03caaf215da311dadbee3ed80443043a
'2012-03-31T08:05:18-04:00'
describe
'21164' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBS' 'sip-files00010.pro'
62b1171714fcfbf68a1a3211b9d11627
8cfe099d4ca6271966155c77452addef75a900df
'2012-03-31T08:01:07-04:00'
describe
'30737' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBT' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
c3be432a51132f98cfd129e74501308c
ad7d536ccf4a06d3b578ea49ec6fb2b4b110a7c6
'2012-03-31T08:06:15-04:00'
describe
'1836387' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBU' 'sip-files00010.tif'
88611b04691e1a62b76645e3862ad9ab
e17ac24654d0d45750268dcb1ff7de7f6ee9eae9
'2012-03-31T08:06:02-04:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBV' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f61cfd660c0662935a6141d12aa62ac1
854f8577402c1b91b8b8b448be47dc33eb13301b
'2012-03-31T08:05:08-04:00'
describe
'12466' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBW' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
4b3857e70855b5404740aba32366ea9b
631deccfadcc2a8ce7851633d6dc6015fab243ea
'2012-03-31T08:03:07-04:00'
describe
'228399' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBX' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ccfcaa6a335dd0276a57272971eeb0ea
9c83c59791a7508152bd27297d71a54791c37a0b
'2012-03-31T08:06:21-04:00'
describe
'46521' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBY' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
b34c525c08fe08eb1185934d15c09a36
3c03a9753821837967d8b14f345c04d8e809d928
'2012-03-31T08:02:21-04:00'
describe
'10453' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELBZ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cffc5b4f187fb1c32047b6d132bd4582
fe41d9502daea6fa15798c4608bf370e08dd3e01
'2012-03-31T08:04:23-04:00'
describe
'16812' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCA' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
477cf1e67d153db43fdeebfdedc860c8
b4d5e5afc7115cb5be92e16c175d2b1c3a340fe5
'2012-03-31T08:03:03-04:00'
describe
'1828379' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
115df22ec21b5862e76549096aa452ca
2eabfa6e1a3989455f30a32849fc1c48334da2da
'2012-03-31T08:08:26-04:00'
describe
'533' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCC' 'sip-files00011.txt'
63804c32be98e15802674a8097bb60d4
626e76b12458de4ad51b3e40152e7490dad16269
'2012-03-31T08:07:52-04:00'
describe
'6063' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCD' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
c8fe5b4d9ddaae3eb0f95fd380a7bb3d
f950a83a2a659f7477ccc85c7e1986761dda2ab2
'2012-03-31T08:04:34-04:00'
describe
'249649' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
11fd6a7588b2faa3090880930fb66034
d7d587133c7188bd8187d15e275678fabbb928a8
'2012-03-31T08:01:25-04:00'
describe
'67546' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCF' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8baf2f191fead34473a2d0e625e01dfc
2a0ee0ce586ab61a4cb53a0798a109db735edf4a
'2012-03-31T08:06:48-04:00'
describe
'34366' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
7451c3129313ab03fcccf807db44e273
bb8b84c3e58d8b905c7cad0e02dfb199cf0cdd21
'2012-03-31T08:00:58-04:00'
describe
'2018396' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCH' 'sip-files00013.tif'
d47186585ed96892a82a66962bae0731
8d3696281a0fc36521b4177364a8a63c80f68398
'2012-03-31T08:02:02-04:00'
describe
'24763' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c44af67a55e6f87c897db94230f39790
4ed3fc8c6c4c74c0cc7dd635a8275ae6ce1237d9
'2012-03-31T08:01:36-04:00'
describe
'234114' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d1af881131409bd3b5ea0fcc079019ad
db3cb6c0226c40a0536dddab85fbe474862fab75
'2012-03-31T08:04:39-04:00'
describe
'82624' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
065c832719a76aa63b5689cec0ac4625
63d82e39dc20a79f6e42d275c9067517594cf686
'2012-03-31T08:08:56-04:00'
describe
'19182' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7c3ce301b6d8b5270bebdf17d55c94bd
bd5af561617d37e4fef5b32a21273a877bba99df
'2012-03-31T08:02:10-04:00'
describe
'30060' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
b740ea6bfc31800a6d5ff63c97edd5a4
fc144cf330be68d770d5e4db928eb42939f08248
describe
'1875283' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
cad7bda99cbf36f6811001db0dd6c60e
4042150eb2115a7304be7fcbaa8f3090ec557187
'2012-03-31T08:02:45-04:00'
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCO' 'sip-files00014.txt'
d9e06f74e97eda1c3b42a8ed801e2b09
7f69353c54484220649595457d1e7be6d8a5f0bf
'2012-03-31T08:03:35-04:00'
describe
'10459' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCP' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
5dc2e92e6b1418306c88600f1481f626
85e463cf04a192149492b84778eaf4632b965128
'2012-03-31T08:05:28-04:00'
describe
'232472' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCQ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
206f3c6ce58f7d111f0d538f7183818d
ef89f4e3c4dc59e2768d1671f16b31f65f14c7a2
'2012-03-31T08:07:45-04:00'
describe
'92775' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
0c34f35c531c50a12e00642679627825
1490951ec321801dcdaa0edbef7842ab80364add
'2012-03-31T08:07:02-04:00'
describe
'27787' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
4f5afab0396702828b88e3e17a4f3861
b36eb80d69b6e2176fed6285f89b3ae5b012f2f2
'2012-03-31T08:03:58-04:00'
describe
'34833' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCT' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d9f0f05ca0c73fadf7292e8a1b28a3b8
dc0480d53f515f430910b7eccee9b3d13d772397
'2012-03-31T08:04:29-04:00'
describe
'1860983' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7e3d630105c321d2f830d74fb220a149
da5b9feb7f6e352392c3627250a850f0690d54c9
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
cb4a55868c627aec319b23ccc91ee27b
ac2e72a39e013c0afe09c0ad2b46fe76933e1d33
'2012-03-31T08:03:14-04:00'
describe
'12982' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5575c92af29866fe35d940b62b581159
c327251edd9944fd7bae852a3584c04707e8c743
'2012-03-31T08:02:18-04:00'
describe
'228297' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
fa850c422a9a163f6847e28f04cd90d5
77a509bd1d22bcdff1e0444141ce2ff2e430bfca
'2012-03-31T08:08:45-04:00'
describe
'104087' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCY' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
798796132becfa62dbf530e239f8f04a
01ee989cc98669d0eb2175e29f370a169aa6442f
describe
'31343' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELCZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9a5f30cc82c9e4129125afcf7e69a066
8b379ef6caaaf240c27b33062c6f5088b3bda0d9
'2012-03-31T08:03:52-04:00'
describe
'39340' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
97244db6a60067ba87f1664a50310697
098e0fecb675aede08badb03959285a53fefe51d
'2012-03-31T08:05:47-04:00'
describe
'1827219' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
665a1d339653189a6719c8397d1267f3
5c62149e005155d01e52662a573e0fefe5443ee7
'2012-03-31T08:07:48-04:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f6d10db357255a286964da2f13752040
8d6efbb8167a7b3e3cad43a3b6c4fd9468a49872
'2012-03-31T08:07:29-04:00'
describe
'14329' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
973af1f9c6eaeff19ca5972487da2c0e
cd87742e1e25979184211c836c3f4522adabe885
'2012-03-31T08:02:05-04:00'
describe
'231503' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
405a087addf57c259422724af1e2169c
c47755c5134db0fd0a82ebf8453e375a31d08897
'2012-03-31T08:03:01-04:00'
describe
'109901' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
994ba3d896b5fb79cacdc267d45e2906
7f293c216f69bf31b2c2c2af5cbd544ae996c795
'2012-03-31T08:04:33-04:00'
describe
'34853' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDG' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e38eac8735cf2504ad9646cd4baf615e
65b6ef5ad934457095d715f0edbb5615d3b1f25b
'2012-03-31T08:04:45-04:00'
describe
'41458' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDH' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d9d4a52b465e16815932aaa64407392b
f5c6b67fab05ab7c146d12f196ec1c57ac524d9d
'2012-03-31T08:06:58-04:00'
describe
'1852999' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDI' 'sip-files00017.tif'
3f170c451012e8e25daf255410e67c08
4273c46ed812052177ed4c8f9214fe73efe3ed59
'2012-03-31T08:02:31-04:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDJ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cc0747608cc6f222e9c5879b24aaaebe
8b34b4e9d9f2f7d0c45a82ceb0187df09d567fd0
describe
'14603' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9a42c0dd490fbe1fcc164441183fbaf1
c35a0666efd28e52d051ae7e555df04a8e7dbefb
'2012-03-31T08:00:50-04:00'
describe
'236288' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDL' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6713a3c44cbab17634aa8dc1c7282daf
4ef0073225b83d92c3618e6662b459da0ea85262
'2012-03-31T08:04:07-04:00'
describe
'91806' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
fcb3864778fd9d6c794b2afa40e7b5e0
8a491bda70c46b55a766b3e1ab6baeded29fdce8
describe
'27566' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDN' 'sip-files00018.pro'
838f68f1d58f335c04434b52b9472919
21eb404f93212ec6d3555ddbfd533a7f06b42038
describe
'34720' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDO' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
1b4f4dd65508584155b83160e3e83119
7c2aaee5abf5e9f4559236e2ebca297876652392
'2012-03-31T08:01:16-04:00'
describe
'1891443' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4bd29db17b23c1c8e824863d3dd5e13d
d1b05fc6de7a5c528512d8fb0245326121a53bc5
'2012-03-31T08:00:53-04:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDQ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
6ba52ffae8e2c0fab2f7f04633ed1236
e17cb831cf8faa68e86d451b8215e969aad07e05
'2012-03-31T08:03:59-04:00'
describe
'12716' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2179b724d4388013c990b6a53d1ff0fa
1c6cbaf2c7a76cd8dc70c4b0c0fa25dd5dd3075f
'2012-03-31T08:06:47-04:00'
describe
'237746' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
c97c265409311d4d9606706bc8a91790
3836bd920ff7431a936f21627c9078049c8ec149
'2012-03-31T08:00:35-04:00'
describe
'78509' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d7dd6b414aa80ae02c09830e65d5eb60
11ed8f6d9589a497121832755c26da46c6bcfb79
describe
'25038' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
984cceaa84d0c02f9d4c53cf76f10b67
438e9f9c43151aad1881e0fdb69376b8367aa1b4
'2012-03-31T08:03:49-04:00'
describe
'27644' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
54f758164ab0ad2b66150cbce44fe36d
c0752bda621eda759fc400488d48d961d7b61b2d
'2012-03-31T08:00:25-04:00'
describe
'1902987' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
24586e7d2858bd4accbe907456200a3a
cd4cb545b83581ead48547e08022b0af8d305c40
'2012-03-31T08:08:49-04:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
98c4f6fdd0b15ce697ed7123b47d5159
a54f4c5df06eed566422c9715e4e9c81ec99616f
'2012-03-31T08:03:09-04:00'
describe
'9921' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
e257e58c696cf7677426f3605ab1778f
782107a03849f45e443466535f9ed8dc69054a44
'2012-03-31T08:03:54-04:00'
describe
'237209' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELDZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b1ed3de256b0cb3f62a1301c9d051a52
a002cadc3cef00df7042755ac35c56a83bca5aff
'2012-03-31T08:03:41-04:00'
describe
'100470' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
30277c2985ea869e3538c22a2f5ff8f8
5e5826f1e1777e2ba92cc7746317e342b769a8b3
'2012-03-31T08:03:15-04:00'
describe
'29369' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e5abdaf2690af734ec2435124b099add
47d19be668ba8056806c2abee8055afcdc1e0c89
'2012-03-31T08:05:56-04:00'
describe
'37887' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
588df66a8c139afedceb232e229cc7b3
a0bd0c6d6de39ba63007b10fdd17d183e498dfe8
'2012-03-31T08:01:32-04:00'
describe
'1898935' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELED' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e81372ec56c8799ff933c5cdb54e2d26
cdb0ba9c728490a8bc442753a399f13d254d6399
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
1e3f05fe9f0de3988a22248549c6d3d7
e6e5661f5684fb5ee50ad8c15aa31b21820812b4
describe
'12861' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b5f0d48b892f9532f64baff85caa435e
3c97d6485b0dda4dabf4c6fbe4584f08b1dbe38a
'2012-03-31T08:06:18-04:00'
describe
'227549' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
aa5a135eb3979e7fce668416f18058cc
17a50df45cac4b276643f0c095ced75f05275acb
'2012-03-31T08:06:44-04:00'
describe
'110564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
916c417dd6de59b11482ebc466603a0b
c0d8593edec0e7863652f7d9fd474d71a000a238
'2012-03-31T08:07:37-04:00'
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
2e80a0ce436d2edda60236c19f98a433
0cd4333e30bf4489c8b0dc3b99420db0a357509e
'2012-03-31T08:05:14-04:00'
describe
'42814' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e8a902afdf38d96f6b46dad73342b500
da2825c23b53f92670159653232e6ebeac9d5d5c
'2012-03-31T08:05:36-04:00'
describe
'1821079' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
85085571802833dffd1bb6ba3803c0c9
22ec524cf69cba84dff7f656673d100271e6c866
'2012-03-31T08:01:13-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
752aba10518878b4dbfeee1488ea9b89
e063aa4b31058ef324d33d98db351e6eade9c664
describe
'14065' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
eacf0ad5662443db75fe1e6a7b94fea4
f19e475e3a7714731e7e9ab9e55ae1905b5766e0
describe
'224285' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
663be8e2da33c7e283d9c7c7ff85e09b
df696a62bf9a9e3fc775bb931f6945d2abb8496e
describe
'106842' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f320dbb46623e673f61ad90346d67bd7
6b7c767c03e92cafcf3e0af23dacf0f1404bce8e
'2012-03-31T08:03:55-04:00'
describe
'30929' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d135a37bc279837d3e122a49abe60561
71610eb9b46537f05e54ea079a426fffb9306507
'2012-03-31T08:06:32-04:00'
describe
'41954' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
fe9e187132d5f5537f0645dc7973f5fb
7e0f7ecddd7574d70d883b4ce42e5f2be4bb6fc5
'2012-03-31T08:06:29-04:00'
describe
'1795231' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELER' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1831b7c8efa775f18fb8e5d982fc309b
d71a659829a5b155df68520eecdb9b600093548b
'2012-03-31T08:05:51-04:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELES' 'sip-files00022.txt'
f58df3ea56cfd556e7094e54a40c8b10
302dac4695b4b3e8ee993cd30bf2cd67eeae6710
describe
'14944' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELET' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
1e783f63d725eb0b3275fac809f71f20
45318805493d00634caffd39cdfe69298fb5ebb0
'2012-03-31T08:02:50-04:00'
describe
'231957' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3fe7f74bff8cd5dd0cd36a35fb704a2f
8e6c79e8dd3cb51ec95a5090b6a2963e560c9365
'2012-03-31T08:05:45-04:00'
describe
'101457' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
bd5dcee5f2e8f39e8cb11776ff489628
fd65249f4581d77a2a7c8478c414ba8eb62c5e2e
'2012-03-31T08:07:23-04:00'
describe
'32468' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c2fbfc844f5981259c3682435423950b
885072428316049c4e1d23b98715eecff3bbd333
describe
'38408' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
cef72fd9f7fbf8a071e25b2028e30475
73582f8379be1eae78848c1e6985813b8cf90d07
'2012-03-31T08:06:10-04:00'
describe
'1856703' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
4464487e436ac65aeb9abfb649fbbadd
df73f295ff60bb3e5473092cd8170869ce987592
'2012-03-31T08:06:53-04:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELEZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5e68ee602b2958f5192897b3cfe2bb0c
657f3b3bc0e6aec15c8badd96b1e36453e55b0a4
'2012-03-31T08:06:27-04:00'
describe
'12472' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFA' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fbfe25fd86ef213d093f11c50b2157aa
1c87d086413783700af7430bab1e16048443ba80
'2012-03-31T08:05:46-04:00'
describe
'225621' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
12b29ad5eacd61c0d0798bf0f697e90c
b52d2ab36d250a863f4f8d6f0dceb59c70efa8d1
describe
'64549' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
78b53b7175fda014cf395e25517534f4
f7dfe5a8f48263e36e93b0dfb2e310af34fcc863
describe
'18406' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFD' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ee436e90f9b18a76bd6a5ab61c6e791c
85b060431ae74210147a0215fc0fd2e42a8fb9e4
'2012-03-31T08:05:59-04:00'
describe
'22508' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c15715ad2e214fb8d7fee2960c7c4bf6
546c333e7fa88771cc1c3e722c2d0934ffb776b6
'2012-03-31T08:02:01-04:00'
describe
'1805827' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
48d2a75b91323f20f1bbf763eb290d97
d9d3a911aa3a16415c5f0d7e6072e6392014f095
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e25c69ced025368645bb41a03a76b583
d1ac4758ee64c9905e2e0507d2556be34c0f44c2
'2012-03-31T08:06:23-04:00'
describe
'8045' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6299390a9cd3ad281508999803c231cb
68d94f6e382ac960362d4e398ed386fd2e5caeea
'2012-03-31T08:03:30-04:00'
describe
'232009' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6ce7c1b7d0be402cea1531fdec9dfe44
96fdfd8db7030c577d1843c0320fd4b8bf55658f
'2012-03-31T08:02:27-04:00'
describe
'98731' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFJ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5c2ea2679664a67d763cf4c31dc2ea91
fccb8cc3af6087b8df0d2f0c88f5f81a380d602d
'2012-03-31T08:03:29-04:00'
describe
'27640' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
beb5692579e1d0775bc043c12fd1878c
da7468b0931a5d3df79f706ac38b686c1bc834ec
'2012-03-31T08:05:07-04:00'
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e7e1e8655fbd5fe7a6843f9cc9522bf9
9d0989578fbf4b766ceecf61b3ab0715d66a127f
'2012-03-31T08:05:37-04:00'
describe
'1857579' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
25fdc300f516e5ebd97e91bab471e82e
85603e181689ce599a45c0d48842a7b19d8b2f22
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFN' 'sip-files00025.txt'
8c421dcb85cfc483aecd2054bb034716
0862168705009a693e4c0e5c5f4be0c3e8bed719
'2012-03-31T08:08:59-04:00'
describe
'12798' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFO' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c79207c0b04fdf0544475fc1851ea9e8
fb8482b9aed5fcbd1fd94df053faec189156a04b
'2012-03-31T08:08:28-04:00'
describe
'226817' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFP' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c2ac58333004c9097492a15b9c924420
82fa822fa1fdc40a270aa2915d14bbe1ea26fbcb
'2012-03-31T08:01:27-04:00'
describe
'108358' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
14f371b977d757732d1b80f12258de37
e3583489dbc6014b4a4684f112b734328e5ab96f
describe
'32717' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFR' 'sip-files00026.pro'
11e43d4f4f8f8749dba7c845a9020b31
5376ec5dbec24336cd7c45c67803f808ca7e1eeb
'2012-03-31T08:08:40-04:00'
describe
'40934' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
461ae19fdceee791ebf380f466994f35
5598354b311a26edc7ee7baef8ca3b82ff1924f0
'2012-03-31T08:04:10-04:00'
describe
'1815439' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7e3c919240c4bb0cba8914a8359c0e65
aa190da1a3316cf944b6dcf44c8ec4758162f2cb
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
3e9a070f3bc5895918b1ad3565f901ab
0ac62dc4aa0d09e67eb6e4b34e6aa99d367e40b7
'2012-03-31T08:07:11-04:00'
describe
'15007' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
694be41a39f91139d517a91c7d23fb5d
1c04b34e0e2f77eca50d42080c69df80a6198188
'2012-03-31T08:04:40-04:00'
describe
'237121' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a1c9c87c438adb17b9dcc21554ddc6f6
7d3a245fbc1050fd314278a099d726aef2325124
'2012-03-31T08:01:44-04:00'
describe
'108784' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFX' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
653169cc79ad07f893372faa8b852c34
76dff0ecaa704c558bf107b54d0135aa4dfca2e1
'2012-03-31T08:03:10-04:00'
describe
'32266' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
166617e4f2b45392336dbb59899b3a35
31943c9841567707b4c1e7076fd2dee07da5079b
'2012-03-31T08:05:33-04:00'
describe
'41501' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELFZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
2c72468e977c5239a739456d4ed3cbf1
d0f712bcd87785c76edf4c61ccbd70a597d7e284
describe
'1898283' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ed01187ec3ff6d6895c199c0d60f17ce
1682b2d53d487677206f62f0c7aa4aabd5dd4a46
'2012-03-31T08:02:55-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a10b91216eea0d50760c688d9f2adbfc
a99497f1196c69a8f842daddfd284e94c70369c1
'2012-03-31T08:06:50-04:00'
describe
'14058' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
fcb3c2894595981fd473191b27828f14
fdd529226bbc5a9e7da26d97dfbeab7bc38bf459
describe
'237183' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGD' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
df6100d54b44b86e5a4bfb5928e97c37
8718ca91ae4527b40cf8076e40baa2890d6a428e
describe
'77749' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
f8202eb667536421abfebe64e614881a
825fc764c2491fccd2dc19aefd41c9f2233f07c2
'2012-03-31T08:00:26-04:00'
describe
'21716' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c3ee7cac3b96a4cbfbb64e33769956da
f52046a14e5ecbcaff07eedb89ad7a08061979ac
describe
'27535' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b5256a24f02a03bd74605cc76280d35b
0a018866e009e4e2c23fbd72cc1185e90360b61a
'2012-03-31T08:08:52-04:00'
describe
'1899515' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f5d68f40b5e3befa7f75b7ecb4737884
97f78132d487ebc86c28c2db797cd5adbe8c8dbf
'2012-03-31T08:04:48-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGI' 'sip-files00028.txt'
3df1ef323733ab798ccbf724a6786016
af978802209170c3e12ee5983d3d5889b2e70248
'2012-03-31T08:01:49-04:00'
describe
'10466' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
4266722c9fb6454ba71b21ed15b5246b
6ee298ae243d6b8c1bf4f003456696e5b6054776
'2012-03-31T08:05:55-04:00'
describe
'229782' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
fa3b5a77ffd6dcffc789f3f0a8023f81
559591c2b11e59d8b147488b238857cdd5c88ec1
'2012-03-31T08:01:33-04:00'
describe
'94367' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
c24e144da2dd1d85d674f071293c7472
64380d37220708691223d903d807477547247b44
'2012-03-31T08:05:50-04:00'
describe
'27045' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
d920ad773d9592facca6dd14690ee274
29e4a188321a0390b8c7b4914b6575faf7372a2f
'2012-03-31T08:07:54-04:00'
describe
'36133' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGN' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
02fbba863f9e6c7ee1ff2969af7d7390
47fd5bec4b2afba14838896c2b0ae7fb2780ae47
'2012-03-31T08:04:31-04:00'
describe
'1838935' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f7e40eb13df960a74a3bb5d5156fb0e8
14377e02d2c0c271325d3d46243a931a46cd67bd
'2012-03-31T08:06:38-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
9d1d0086badacc9c8239d8cd8f2c300a
533bba120bf6dfac727173c083ef8b06029a25db
'2012-03-31T08:03:43-04:00'
describe
'12769' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
95ad799fdc82ae58ff55b9210fbe5136
fdd5dd70c1400ae60055271a67e568db8f63f0d6
'2012-03-31T08:01:53-04:00'
describe
'233890' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGR' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6d114e5d30a1a94edfa78114259d023d
74e1f6af6aa3865d5c25b3041b5d87faf9716f2e
describe
'111082' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGS' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
01ab14a0097a7643246a3c9c1fffa6d1
30c19ab4c11f4b464485fe2dbcf3d254764a82b8
'2012-03-31T08:08:35-04:00'
describe
'33479' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGT' 'sip-files00030.pro'
fe5cdb37315678fd6072f7901116b292
d5549e900c2340e030f7b8a580fe062063b37c1a
describe
'42011' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGU' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1b514bd5994e3157d9ea0b2d965e28d7
e505a68913ecbc30ecdf35639982b63f59b41622
describe
'1872447' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGV' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f198507cc2b5a6092ce6604bfea6d473
81b6a59e0527126fe61daa314e442e92ccc10609
'2012-03-31T08:04:01-04:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGW' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ce84e75aa27d2d80e130acc987991967
5164d85e99b61ef684cd2031777286d83c60a459
'2012-03-31T08:06:12-04:00'
describe
'14629' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGX' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f810a699824f67910cd9726e3bda0e0c
0699bdfb7f157ecfe55cb92edb96aea98d693397
'2012-03-31T08:08:02-04:00'
describe
'231548' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
fe5417bf7608769c3411f8e5c5fdac8a
7c8db82ffc48c2f77776e445af58a4fc92890c13
'2012-03-31T08:02:56-04:00'
describe
'115222' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELGZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
76e2a1ae46fac28ca6eb87d00fc322fc
f4e74a3b0b39b46738dcd92fac3f49ef81fa35b3
'2012-03-31T08:00:39-04:00'
describe
'35152' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHA' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b82f1d1d5e185f27619b64607e413be5
0ce69f961177e426fe395cedc98f3c5f7aa891f7
'2012-03-31T08:06:43-04:00'
describe
'44447' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
8ad119f87e27027cb710cadc6772d55e
f3a0c2302bf25233c1353a878bc12dc92123ac6c
describe
'1853503' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9061ee9346a4e0c0e1f7daa7b55250f8
2993779d7fa60fddd1b4ad8092bca29d2d90b046
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHD' 'sip-files00031.txt'
ee0f2e0c3ea511a11876201cdbe0237d
73b6412908615012b7826797e0c10343e4a7f654
'2012-03-31T08:07:18-04:00'
describe
'14494' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
ec1d18fdcdd338b2bc39a2e1b3d4bff9
ea0381ccbf08f468e2f9aa5f9840151608e8aa54
describe
'240470' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
f532694d59befbdfb28f6dfa746ab2a9
f3f4cd80a078c2a9dd4ff1ef39473337c422efb1
describe
'104579' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
b56a5343c4f4b7b41fad344a3709237a
2f906f5588152c346b1e3d03758c80c667377a7a
'2012-03-31T08:02:32-04:00'
describe
'31667' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
08158004c69619b2859a2786f32e174f
a91f5cf7dea17c1a2721cbc2aa570c3af5534a73
'2012-03-31T08:07:01-04:00'
describe
'40081' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
9882e573139450c55a2e3ef55e64ce45
f0362334e8277b7a45edd42d22ed86b154ec06b9
'2012-03-31T08:02:28-04:00'
describe
'1924891' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
f4c272b9c1e667a14a6e0c9a3ec32b44
5ad80fc83bd07442783388fb89c5e174858ea266
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c603403ba955988808a946e491ae7a49
a580f11ff0403a6382f4a5d0596a44bfdcf376cf
'2012-03-31T08:04:47-04:00'
describe
'13460' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHL' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
beb8e61821e7171ce9e4a1373dcd2bc7
afda0db46837762e2804abbcdce993e24e13659a
'2012-03-31T08:03:27-04:00'
describe
'239173' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4a81732acc34c89ee026dcb97fe5f143
45be9d2804a9e598438de8a835227a2ebffa9eb0
'2012-03-31T08:04:42-04:00'
describe
'86257' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHN' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6812612e64ac00fe5d37369520cc637e
7e2b2062daa54742f8d0456b951968ed6049f5e8
describe
'29040' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHO' 'sip-files00033.pro'
4610ecff7c4de308601f320e653c911f
ddef71c74d027f0d125267b8bdc9f3901b458aee
'2012-03-31T08:06:14-04:00'
describe
'31757' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHP' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
82aef15c6b615a7c1bdb919acb877836
f7d7863fc7825cd40777ed1152b11ce6d51d503c
'2012-03-31T08:05:12-04:00'
describe
'1914563' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHQ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
200669405a2e90b766e08ab2c2798178
a59bfd393435dad0183c5d8a94c4c65ea2c96f5f
'2012-03-31T08:08:39-04:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHR' 'sip-files00033.txt'
b2f7e6866747d7afae35fc859d1d37a8
319e37e16ec701dd1bbbe16d26a98d2cd9c07be9
'2012-03-31T08:04:04-04:00'
describe
'11101' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHS' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
ad751c298ff98864389ffd708b83b5c9
cbdfe0e097c23f5b00d12ca4dfab05e8931a99e0
'2012-03-31T08:00:30-04:00'
describe
'236610' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHT' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
1252c5b682721cadda4242b5eeb81cd6
027e23182772dba279d1569465787a75290a544d
describe
'69860' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a5f7917005df7b94e030a5ae25ed61e4
520d71ae764dcd561c41351a60b811133c1869e0
describe
'19436' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
29c34836c30e8ba37aff606d86d84c2b
a377087d662804e6cffc4ac6a07d2dd7b375b224
'2012-03-31T08:01:52-04:00'
describe
'24502' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
47ce37cfa4903a0c8a67cadafd39a0f5
fc22a9a9dc5954518ce5b86073398d92dc2d80dc
'2012-03-31T08:07:47-04:00'
describe
'1894875' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c436679c80ed0665cf8fbc080823792b
1f75430fc055036a24fcbc7670b83db562b72a04
'2012-03-31T08:02:20-04:00'
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ca8e93c12e2bdba78522df857ae48c8c
15eb695065debbb5b08b9b026a2ec03cd5a9a6d8
'2012-03-31T08:05:15-04:00'
describe
'8648' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELHZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
1037c0deed75fc658016ef30a618e2b7
e42b18c48697d5a3cebae2e8a07541ff038594de
'2012-03-31T08:03:53-04:00'
describe
'237914' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
97c7776bcc0c84a58259cc3e3db0be43
c134234cd25ddc66928ac0f0cdc7315c0a8e3a63
describe
'86718' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
53739a49b85b0aadf4075f45b07e31e8
141b2e141ff07fc1661d64f151956ac494c95e0d
describe
'26730' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
400a151b944260c6f82f6b01d58dd3f5
219bc17a793f587e05cb50778dcd01ebd7c0dd43
'2012-03-31T08:02:26-04:00'
describe
'33735' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELID' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9ec6720df0241888755aa13392dca7f6
b501386b8c877deb68b182e70d524adb15e47396
'2012-03-31T08:04:26-04:00'
describe
'1904303' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
69eeccb00971f99584d7ba515bda8bfa
61b85456260a46221319a339fd97e89b8d68ccf3
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
91b20a1c886a92e38b2de44832ea0a8a
01491c6c09fbc9b544ac666ef0ae271cc7b6242e
'2012-03-31T08:07:55-04:00'
describe
'11434' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
be2bf7627a2528ebf50446c66234da4f
c337eceb88bc60c6efe51086e848801863f20dc2
'2012-03-31T08:06:59-04:00'
describe
'236701' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
91a180ceae8d9c30b45ed0e357fb38f0
ce07dc485149736e50566458c46f7afd54ad23de
'2012-03-31T08:06:55-04:00'
describe
'108872' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELII' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
550383bc02385f46d4e51a3a7d00338b
f605015134a84665c35b5945036af13f7b0b39bc
describe
'39652' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
aece58e00e13b1db0b95f8b021ab636e
3b8f7559faea54b201b9d1522bd3cde876d7c989
'2012-03-31T08:03:12-04:00'
describe
'40629' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
610018377ffb8a9e46ef63930ee0f7f8
30fadb76bf76d8e8ad1d4805ca4accbfe4e32342
'2012-03-31T08:01:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
9fdebb54b2530298138e6efe9899169a
79e609a04d3fac445d32fb5950e3d0eee04c3695
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
e9aadf4c2705311eba94fba024d98849
c9cf65dc7ca39bdf1099e4b97a947bb92e3b234a
'2012-03-31T08:07:27-04:00'
describe
'14299' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIN' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
905b27a3e37f5676a485b81cdb7db632
51cbf9b71b3c92c2bffba5cd525928e5ebbe6e84
'2012-03-31T08:01:06-04:00'
describe
'238797' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
115c83084825e397939e133dde5c81d2
0d7baef753bd57f6999e847de715da72c274dadd
'2012-03-31T08:04:53-04:00'
describe
'103753' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
29acb3a1405954e91ec61d0751eeff42
739e33f4a11e7a74d767442b1c6729f3dde8f510
describe
'34704' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIQ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9ffe38be09fd41d20bd11c12eb76a1d2
22662e7fd9818f64eb2bde9fa1942ce433cfc6af
describe
'40246' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a04e5ad9e73aec59dfc2b761aeb54446
4d960a00c580ddca127195fe1a61f2fbc8812332
'2012-03-31T08:05:20-04:00'
describe
'1911099' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c17f56988bef8dc1091c20f7622fea4c
4d377d5124a2b8d399877171e9b17e64215fe837
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIT' 'sip-files00037.txt'
bb4db339055645d026770eb9f7c4aea1
b596933c20af166d9f04b43a1eee221d66078d52
'2012-03-31T08:00:38-04:00'
describe
'13564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIU' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
262261d8cb65fd16fc690297d3552cdf
cf7efb542f349d070cca0b2b2fe53ae71fe17773
'2012-03-31T08:04:35-04:00'
describe
'236174' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIV' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
aec7e3b689c6237fba27dc394da82b0e
c3b4cb2f49d3f4c4170dc0c8018fb4d301c16a2e
'2012-03-31T08:01:58-04:00'
describe
'79730' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIW' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ea4bc5809aa10b07a0e07c17631b08fb
a2e284cf8c3c34f118885bf000f83406ffb0f517
'2012-03-31T08:08:15-04:00'
describe
'24830' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIX' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a23c5b3e8fc51af3ea14e81f5c8fcd4e
4f32294288d26ae27707b949dd6f8b31dce39705
'2012-03-31T08:03:37-04:00'
describe
'29103' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIY' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
620ee2630594455f155e5c02fba81b99
6c0099ec154dc51783e1dce79386466033c05895
'2012-03-31T08:06:07-04:00'
describe
'1890139' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELIZ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
a7932ae275886e34ad117a9010a8fbf4
7dee563439229f6b0a9d582ed67cbe7c07a45a31
'2012-03-31T08:03:34-04:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJA' 'sip-files00038.txt'
d689876affddc461535d3ab6e880c6d2
25c1a19490b06c68a9f5cec63c79c5797808e432
'2012-03-31T08:02:51-04:00'
describe
'10295' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJB' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
7117938bffc8f300bc5b7a1e107d1015
27840a082232928eb6381a0c7c592182f5f93e8f
'2012-03-31T08:08:01-04:00'
describe
'233392' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f6f93dc42616dcd7b868a72575a18bf7
22f718441c824ea67423969f2e263a72975bda38
describe
'108262' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJD' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
ad6adf4d99b585ee9a4cff4485963929
8be66cdd7ef8007262c5f302ff597b32ee6cabb7
describe
'35323' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJE' 'sip-files00039.pro'
414eb2c0c29718cd338da6c3d39b9810
936873f45ba3159635963bbae36cbaf81e1865c1
'2012-03-31T08:00:48-04:00'
describe
'41189' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
eddc1b5172dd083f7f2a52b62b621bd6
62301c01e2649d71c607ba3a09ae9d35d997b5b9
'2012-03-31T08:03:06-04:00'
describe
'1868967' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f6021459204e7ee2f2d8eb04bcdca6a6
fd31dd4d1fbe166d038b1b70acd38cb893df1fbf
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJH' 'sip-files00039.txt'
28aa335462e812721132955be381ef2d
e0188628429b63d989dbab1e9f53e9fe029000c8
describe
'14895' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJI' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
701a820e683de952ce7662968eadb083
1b9d11e2517c376b527fc86ee9c878f2c7cac4b6
'2012-03-31T08:01:40-04:00'
describe
'235234' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJJ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
8588f20a14d8501ee84992e585a501a1
72d139b43848995ce9d59136b758cbca7f574a58
'2012-03-31T08:07:19-04:00'
describe
'112400' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJK' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f229692750877ae8d84b31153bd3d2f1
8fd2682506fd183de83fd5582cb79a01f76d1856
'2012-03-31T08:07:09-04:00'
describe
'33774' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
9389ffbceb889657f6157e9de595c6bd
638cba842b4e001cfd23d14887e3fbd23662df90
describe
'42414' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9912ea490a926f3dd24893d82cf5fcb8
c6420711d04d3e44d78ddc36b1641a8479e9ed7c
'2012-03-31T08:04:43-04:00'
describe
'1882711' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJN' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f4e9b903c747645c62b05272062f8fa1
3c10b246320e1d115000ead5eac681f83f584c4d
'2012-03-31T08:08:17-04:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJO' 'sip-files00040.txt'
356cceec57288055ae6a7931a9472188
93ffdca218deb00af1047272156c8e920742ce27
'2012-03-31T08:02:04-04:00'
describe
'14587' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJP' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
40d2027badc21793c131e12d7ae44850
a1d227e23fe1961ae374ae64f9a11d9ed364217c
describe
'231163' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJQ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
07afa2041d27b69c56dfe2b92afb382a
07186f302f738997a4dd8811cc54069484c03ac7
'2012-03-31T08:02:35-04:00'
describe
'92353' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0375581e523520198b006a9882ef792c
b22d044eff53ece8a7606291ff616691ad604d9a
'2012-03-31T08:05:30-04:00'
describe
'28213' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJS' 'sip-files00041.pro'
399c9e804c3b938037b9fc9b89e92cd5
f5c89e278b6c912699cdb91115f9077b878a0d91
'2012-03-31T08:02:39-04:00'
describe
'34389' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJT' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1c90fb33cf6ee9cbd21d3a3a6332cf98
7cd1540170747749c70c2410ecc9038fa258a110
'2012-03-31T08:03:23-04:00'
describe
'1850431' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
29fd8195b80c6b2b4d8fb012d8c531d7
102f300897072713feb2757f2425c7a66ad8518f
'2012-03-31T08:07:36-04:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJV' 'sip-files00041.txt'
686a815de094943a9343ff611487a427
6580c48bdf376419f28aca0c770e8c0e8529355a
describe
'13050' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJW' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
b46fd163d8a645a109738714c6265be2
25bb0084592d6424a1af7900137f630271411c2d
describe
'240000' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
7b6cdefff74f4319fbe91b77a005747a
3be933a3cafccc74b8fb46efba6a7b148c88130a
'2012-03-31T08:01:03-04:00'
describe
'114215' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
fce6974937d9dd3c5444964c0c6e9ed3
23050066a98ad2485b46a4d484c5faea4e529d24
'2012-03-31T08:01:51-04:00'
describe
'35736' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELJZ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
82d57bd85f5f5a04f46b7c5d0a11e4c9
603a4a99fde3272550be9425185d05fce51a0bdc
describe
'43264' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
d272caa6fb862ea82d51358cff71e76a
57fb7b1b883daf91af753239708e4c51a93da3ea
describe
'1921523' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
43bdad2b6174e1340f1084c6b655ef87
15a193fc1d6f98eb076a962fcd13a0c649b0afc7
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKC' 'sip-files00042.txt'
d61732ca506b2a147ae3f05e4ef906e0
c73bdb4a31ef0c300f483da66114b36c2a7bd700
describe
'13828' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKD' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
1e31426571477f6bdc6607fd0f1bdec9
7371e412f4ab52438d83d1b02f38af63d1fc8891
describe
'241404' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKE' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
18201dab260f70aa902771102ba05253
17bec018dd8dbe4853e4132d7ccf254bc37398fe
'2012-03-31T08:02:44-04:00'
describe
'112219' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKF' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
020961ca00625c1cc790cf4bb9a37504
f339a1d734a591f1c7ba86162b45d161da50af78
'2012-03-31T08:06:24-04:00'
describe
'35928' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKG' 'sip-files00043.pro'
c99f77e291a9906837f71c9c3c430084
b50f2ae0ebc4727d2a4abfa9f8ea40a3a4b8602c
describe
'42666' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKH' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0c87c53641a831a2268c525716c4ef8e
9ed9dbc19187d63eb19e38642f0984599bb9ac32
'2012-03-31T08:02:43-04:00'
describe
'1933131' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKI' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ad5b986f834622cdadc8f666b25a2bd9
50bd8def13243e1ff0516a2e8e0dae4cdb7815dd
'2012-03-31T08:06:56-04:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKJ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
06691a0799b9ec8b862d21287fdb608d
d9a6bb4b3d9380048f3c3382442957f9200cfab2
'2012-03-31T08:08:36-04:00'
describe
'14226' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKK' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
e0904009bbe9e1689c9c6bfab7182f82
8901a5c740b368b244879c556d3a01f1b5461fca
'2012-03-31T08:04:20-04:00'
describe
'238672' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKL' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
e8211fedb5c563c976e8f0be7b7cc178
44d5199eccd2c43187897f06942cf5043d1328ff
describe
'103402' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f88a1526612a2996d1a7b70f98729907
dc25b49c232da216e63ccb7d2baa0ef87594e4a6
describe
'32385' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKN' 'sip-files00044.pro'
141db5beb188c7370729a7c605c19974
01bb8bed6a64613d00570d3e945e9daaa7598bab
describe
'39476' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKO' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ca753f28ebde74499f6847a9fc5ed2b9
3652b07f28896f6053a5f992f54e975da2f0b6a7
'2012-03-31T08:06:57-04:00'
describe
'1910495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
1c646fb7e08e2562fa0ef8ca0048b3d2
61adf29b513f7a90ab6c9b2542ec895f93944432
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKQ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
32cf71a98c1273bc2f0836b2181ef4ed
749fcbe29c6a09c94a33935def867016142ae9d4
describe
'13226' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKR' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f3cd5579637779efffe4c96f0ccbd963
b09319f515a1dfae5bfee648440519e4d06d13ef
describe
'241963' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKS' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
396409cd1c290000149309817cf4b231
275cdc39e4ab2b0321c5d817f808417f9dad6e83
describe
'82973' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKT' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8b39ad2798eb9d2fc35f3fcefb784b78
045b28a467a8f9a56536400001986c2fc53c73f1
'2012-03-31T08:00:24-04:00'
describe
'28536' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKU' 'sip-files00045.pro'
8f0b610d203454e63f65dc2f70da6c94
3c169e755b60c213a6ea0f096a98b769a2d10035
describe
'30522' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKV' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
4568dcc5433b362f668ecb8a04b1641e
682554c9a874e336723d556e14b4af2be4ac978f
'2012-03-31T08:06:30-04:00'
describe
'1937247' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKW' 'sip-files00045.tif'
5a4df50fe89ea5abec8d8a95084bc96e
727ac9a5b0e00c1ecf1d703a4cabf4cda4719568
'2012-03-31T08:05:34-04:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0062e8117eed0cc067df2e70620d5625
0d3de007d48ccec3aa48f51363b7c090630ec752
describe
'10662' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
1fc4a91c437b5f941b38a43a66bd3fd0
34952930abb128e5d77b86424dfc9a1dd4fb9848
describe
'238073' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELKZ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
174e58f3794d6fab345af403753ae6ad
b4fd3c7aa78cfaf7ddd253b0d1084e1ade1472d0
'2012-03-31T08:08:54-04:00'
describe
'70149' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLA' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
022424b87689d4e949577d18a2c2e439
158b72c211b7a46019fe2649a03abd40951b086d
'2012-03-31T08:01:41-04:00'
describe
'20046' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLB' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e02b63a2527ef0ac76f5e80717ba8ec6
e7bbdfba56cf911fd4d5b29dfc923d85a8f3c54d
describe
'24627' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLC' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
43b211c0336ced77a075b6dbba9e70a7
1f3311a60ed4c820d4aebe9e22b0f4962385c390
'2012-03-31T08:08:34-04:00'
describe
'1905743' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLD' 'sip-files00046.tif'
25a14b3efba4c70f77fe5ae206177224
ae842201f02251b8dd102ef134aa3e6b486e5a70
'2012-03-31T08:00:51-04:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
fe1f3838e4aa9c4bfbeaf2306bb944da
ab001e844c1a69d6083106a8e6007a6cb70eabc1
'2012-03-31T08:01:56-04:00'
describe
'9164' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
3151d9437c084cad777904120b3b0879
92db24618cd82e9884d11bb19a6cdcc0998778dc
describe
'244942' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
8e6e758028469224284561b5146f08f2
2c1e84724c84f712a96561b5615fb0af17d4c04d
describe
'108740' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c84dd01bc1d938c45c11887aaaa4c4b7
84d298fd028ae4edfa2561cd334512824244ede9
describe
'39464' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLI' 'sip-files00047.pro'
c349f3fa8734d52d5a6cf97a7407e3d9
3f2999cc0e1c65c65224da5f953561527aed170c
'2012-03-31T08:08:48-04:00'
describe
'40579' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLJ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9adaf32a662179f3bed6e774cf150101
5793e40e6d98702d2bd842d5596715c37450bd1e
'2012-03-31T08:08:14-04:00'
describe
'1961323' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLK' 'sip-files00047.tif'
87ae2ed29947f54ff3d058da9a0c1bb6
0b6a8d3bfd032740458e09ffd327f3b7f82ebe1f
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLL' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0877e492479f64894869354d89bc400b
6974152e2459dd37870b61e0e0fbbe0a0c9f49bc
describe
'12449' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
ef37733100f1e8b8af13c654ca549713
e8408279a53246964e729734b0738b279a0fbca4
describe
'244451' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLN' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c6657e5879c565d66d61cb046069f8a8
a374cdb4ef5319b1e36dc930cc028ecf4b6e1ec4
'2012-03-31T08:02:16-04:00'
describe
'103764' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLO' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a1f5d2188000ae1795f4626b999210f7
fc4911c691f9c72113959d92cb1d1f93e1334b5f
'2012-03-31T08:01:23-04:00'
describe
'32619' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
fc7ed063dfe25e31f78e0ae3a0a8a22d
158e1699ab030731657d9fbe211b00145cdfa4b4
describe
'39556' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
db70d94944e9a75e194220e9c92a459c
bec7b66923f718dabaf00d116ca14dcbc7680aed
'2012-03-31T08:02:09-04:00'
describe
'1956451' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLR' 'sip-files00048.tif'
3e2a0e59213e651cda8ddf226fa33683
3996c03a70073a88bf5bb9bb557d10b5f6c9a91c
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
468fa3428409c81e50f028e022fa7a79
7ed35edf200ccdf5b6e153c6d3ddf3c2d780d908
describe
'13417' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLT' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3b33a6241a9b3ad511c5f259a373c989
c1bb0d9f864a773ae199e994e1a043b3af070081
'2012-03-31T08:08:21-04:00'
describe
'246520' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c0992c7840e23efac8f2325e01325433
b7653405290102027eae50c082cdc50c645c3c4a
'2012-03-31T08:07:03-04:00'
describe
'111213' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
68163e6feb246d1bd66fb3ee21d72ace
f3df7ba7d4f77e0e82314936049888a395dc81ac
describe
'35883' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLW' 'sip-files00049.pro'
fa7b6d93a217190f4024f7120a12ef07
b10eb91bcd830d738c6011ce60a94e568dd0aa27
'2012-03-31T08:04:27-04:00'
describe
'43126' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLX' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7fed3ee0a1ff5e002f8e8a8530f4831d
b8e3dd81b097b4b583c1d72f47ee4636eaf5a933
'2012-03-31T08:08:33-04:00'
describe
'1972995' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLY' 'sip-files00049.tif'
6983f6ffb873302d4455582f7fbd47ea
37e2a280aef17d7f4fbe928288ff74a639d697d2
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELLZ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
8c288f57fbea60487cab55bfdf7d002f
42048e71dcfe96f84706fc97b7640619701ed481
'2012-03-31T08:07:16-04:00'
describe
'13380' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMA' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1ee179e972a8165c5f6b0144f18a383b
a67f0f7d434bdc03f2363ce6f4947906427e352e
describe
'248637' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMB' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
02dde0913a320badd6a447bc9f1ee4c3
f815e90f402077b0617c73cbd7f5ef875dd96133
describe
'105121' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
aafde07d4858d301ca02189a17c787a0
f8966109445eb1e9913406e5b0e66e897574f26f
'2012-03-31T08:07:05-04:00'
describe
'33887' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMD' 'sip-files00050.pro'
47b78f02d70b47599f2d4932f4539982
9123186d9cef8ca004db0c45feaa744b6c7c6ec0
describe
'39930' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELME' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
41911dada982b6ca7b4c75525aca55b9
cb7e4165079419788734c54e35c6d12cd2516a08
'2012-03-31T08:04:25-04:00'
describe
'1989915' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMF' 'sip-files00050.tif'
564748a8c8d350c3d8b35dc5171193c5
daa04e02f4cb8e56fdad6cc47ea2fdb6f8315390
'2012-03-31T08:02:22-04:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
41986510b145d271b3d900caecd21d6b
1714d770050e8c9d610ad4fcf37930e4aee7a3f8
describe
'12891' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMH' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
0314638afe29fa42e2c8633eb8c28eed
c817ab43d50fb5b68ce20919d467e01748650718
describe
'243821' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMI' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
89f800405fb1545fa645e3d2c1d13016
ace4d7f968997460e0991c511d21104ce030ac8d
'2012-03-31T08:07:06-04:00'
describe
'74158' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMJ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6be762987cb9c4a5d337becb002548d1
110c5752597068b505a0210308e4fde8b1542861
'2012-03-31T08:02:53-04:00'
describe
'24681' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMK' 'sip-files00051.pro'
cc05b64f461bf358577bb539bde963db
1a7b970d7631b10149df54a744c41f80d12de41b
'2012-03-31T08:07:12-04:00'
describe
'25928' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELML' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
c5ba2cab0a19ae6729fa0116465a5b00
cf3868dbb272ef9917a56cf08ce574a0101ead3e
describe
'1951491' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMM' 'sip-files00051.tif'
fc39ae697c1982534e6bacf99c2bc5a7
1f1282cc41b536e86353abb8a8399a55ee591bc4
'2012-03-31T08:08:55-04:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMN' 'sip-files00051.txt'
bc22324ff172940483254e548cf24a2f
8c976e046734359cd5e0dec33f1476d279e85a59
describe
'8919' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMO' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
22540ce883b3099c232728c5d0dd953d
bf5ad1c76dd993c01b34994539ece8768dbd76ad
'2012-03-31T08:08:18-04:00'
describe
'247685' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMP' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
a3e6da30e175969fcef782c282c9f28b
793bfd7c1ba4f3ea52b2a67442292f684cda5362
'2012-03-31T08:07:34-04:00'
describe
'84521' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMQ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a6cf7aa1e00323b637d0791f56d48da4
b19b15b798416c885046881180f05104be5242e4
'2012-03-31T08:00:29-04:00'
describe
'25601' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMR' 'sip-files00052.pro'
416c7c0016e2d12b6c381fe2f699bd64
7f17695f55ab542098729d14c49626b5cc02b16d
'2012-03-31T08:08:47-04:00'
describe
'30866' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMS' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
22bd911eda8623e9c582d4eac1e581a5
68a6c7fff061d60be679a79b84723cf009c53142
'2012-03-31T08:06:22-04:00'
describe
'1982391' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMT' 'sip-files00052.tif'
99369be8a38c44eec6fb5f43e2d2f616
cc319ad0247aef18077e67f73e6fbe9653350628
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMU' 'sip-files00052.txt'
15525ee8c4e4267f6d5c06d4f7538e6d
e3eb1d6062c65e17744f74a3602cd5fd1fc42764
describe
'10287' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMV' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
41f6c5ce015e605b41e39fc1020da3ff
e22f37c8b6b8e73f70e414c3468590dc83aac4ad
'2012-03-31T08:01:12-04:00'
describe
'241943' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMW' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
89fdc216ce16486c3e3bee515ad3b868
0592e83d6c16b4061d48828ea398bc690337c6dd
describe
'98773' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMX' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
569977bfeecb65f7bfb53a01ad90fd27
2ffb1e8dae3b93ba4b53d6b2e8a852f23a083de8
describe
'31652' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMY' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1527e9a3a16a103d58d21b2bee3ac1cd
f440acacefa1e3246e085163238add1acabc1c9c
'2012-03-31T08:02:30-04:00'
describe
'38255' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELMZ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
84841c169e9ef728965cdc4a8c426ffb
a409bc7f154975be802a3831861c37d8b11bd876
describe
'1936507' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNA' 'sip-files00053.tif'
201181afa4292cade55fcf6cecc19fb0
3d638e137bb2c257b0ca4074703e0d9b8408e4d6
'2012-03-31T08:04:12-04:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNB' 'sip-files00053.txt'
a77b9585f02ee0ab626e9c6356d6e3f1
86ec6c23cd08887db39b4c6e392ff9ce48870c19
'2012-03-31T08:01:22-04:00'
describe
'12764' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNC' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
9e258154165793c0b4c82aae25d1a19d
b121ae8bc24248e9d6cd27abf6e11557f8e07148
'2012-03-31T08:06:20-04:00'
describe
'243679' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELND' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a841c74a858cecf0aca9ba4e86844f24
e9d03b0278940e1837bf1568e7951375a7de88f3
'2012-03-31T08:08:23-04:00'
describe
'101879' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNE' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
09cd03a1cfa87488bf7f1dd325a021df
6ed39e31085f35d2f1b37bbea4c9d6285a20a3fb
'2012-03-31T08:07:04-04:00'
describe
'31944' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNF' 'sip-files00054.pro'
fd6d37bf64dafbdeeaff7aedc83ee87f
308d04870ebefea5764e1bb9163b0f6e966f674b
describe
'37971' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNG' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
587c697af9c60a13523a752334fc8217
5574272ffba5215eca79db8637ad679f99074c20
describe
'1950615' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNH' 'sip-files00054.tif'
6c31601447b559cf6a14a59a8254a3c0
19b546939474937b9d92b329f59317553a93cd81
'2012-03-31T08:06:26-04:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNI' 'sip-files00054.txt'
ba50d437a43bca169a92378c80a00b6f
7bb7fe3400b29c0ca49e89c6a18bc5d66ad5bdc2
'2012-03-31T08:04:56-04:00'
describe
'12184' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNJ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8b554d0eda52218c392ab55a983720e0
3e35239f21ba8ca6fbcfcd854b31ee0cb8f4f5b5
'2012-03-31T08:05:24-04:00'
describe
'239391' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNK' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
108002f0df4b5768a85c35998bd5e2b9
cdf02a56bef56f08aa71ac6692146707706fef08
describe
'80644' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNL' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d9e41b905ca08483efc5588d4aca962d
5ace06dac22d4a9dd79f53d737b0cc81e4cb989d
'2012-03-31T08:06:37-04:00'
describe
'27105' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNM' 'sip-files00055.pro'
026e7412882e9bf392cdcf8632627e85
76b3185e1fda0a7eaddc83333225b0366f1a488c
'2012-03-31T08:05:13-04:00'
describe
'28058' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNN' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
cf594638bba2c2f063f2835a1189deb8
d9eff871b0948cb3ef9d026a0d659afdd73e90ae
'2012-03-31T08:06:42-04:00'
describe
'1916659' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNO' 'sip-files00055.tif'
c2324f99c0295e25be906a34a1a4a743
16863e0d36152763de5f8ebf69798832122f1288
'2012-03-31T08:06:13-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNP' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ee07b04a58a8be9ec9a6b5632c7c9ba4
692d0ecd42f9a54f5127cb357689353c83b84147
'2012-03-31T08:08:20-04:00'
describe
'9228' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNQ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
35dfdcd560945df5d79325693e38df2d
c214db9d1360ae17809afc7153d1e4adcc8bc86e
describe
'245964' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNR' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
3633965e7f2eb24396db68329f67f9d4
1da0f2fbfc62809657aacb3acc058600cf7b11b6
'2012-03-31T08:07:00-04:00'
describe
'98959' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNS' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
2797e6e1369e4571ffc9249ff09db42c
b62829df06a63447c85ee027f959a662a384a2ad
describe
'29329' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNT' 'sip-files00056.pro'
41ccbfa0b3c0dccddaa0bca8ac97695c
bb495af4ff467c77a9e027724eff48640b6150f9
'2012-03-31T08:06:04-04:00'
describe
'37481' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNU' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6a66eaa1368d9b1b84ae9b84f27d6867
b2bdd99487320d340372f4d3c60590e0639020a3
'2012-03-31T08:07:46-04:00'
describe
'1968767' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNV' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d011d06fb5f66ecb5fb60123a74e921f
cd9af626739c7c2c52648fc9a7157ac07c47927e
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNW' 'sip-files00056.txt'
06791893e1c7189848023c3e9682f710
abbb11eecc19564fb63f954e118e1756627291cb
'2012-03-31T08:08:43-04:00'
describe
'11894' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNX' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
30a6eb091171f48cb643b6a53ab26876
7beb2bf7dea68227500fd40a29286753bd73b316
describe
'243200' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNY' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
d53b85c3d1e9a52672157588d4f91e8d
709204065d44c189bcf5552e72fb4d3c7c15c9dd
'2012-03-31T08:06:00-04:00'
describe
'136351' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELNZ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
1b274401f40b848701d619c157366fd2
692bfd0aec19b77ab264375a45cc8f17d3e57038
'2012-03-31T08:00:55-04:00'
describe
'35396' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOA' 'sip-files00057.pro'
72d695f3fa9c5aeb30e90ab5ebf5937e
95c0b1414f5096c2e7193d02c1de37dd438ae7d6
'2012-03-31T08:05:43-04:00'
describe
'65942' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOB' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
7a74204b493c817d4605b07f64717bc1
b20d8701c684afb19bc42f66edaa7ea3bc3faa7c
describe
'1968024' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOC' 'sip-files00057.tif'
dcef5a13e25b41e4abc01f08deeaf7ca
b2b4235c111d8564a49570b7e28e0e4492e3b526
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOD' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ac352ec38b3255949a4b4d7aac316bfc
d432682aa7a162607ba2a4ad4b83da95d3d1fe68
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'36167' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOE' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
2bbed6b4aa737c2d0aca1e938882b878
582224241aa065dbe7c424c568a6c7396c535c14
'2012-03-31T08:00:56-04:00'
describe
'243747' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOF' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
590fccf90847f5c648710a626a21f2e6
682a8e73678349cac595a512e57b0f9fe5e57f50
'2012-03-31T08:03:20-04:00'
describe
'110811' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOG' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
d23e886dbc7a2a2058411186d4c5e732
d8e890ae09ac7b94c3e1020f373438a5e7d15c5e
describe
'32694' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOH' 'sip-files00058.pro'
163bfe38c3553c373fc209e64b9f8c6c
d71d351c3e76ef9c422bdb4a1e8bbaf4e66fe6db
'2012-03-31T08:08:12-04:00'
describe
'41691' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOI' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
d23627461b9ef9e70d06a645b46de779
09dfb779bd7f5c98a0e467788045e0ed30e07fd5
'2012-03-31T08:05:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
8a8a712b0cc7b9a34371080d758c8fe4
a7bbd40e34f9435f3863de38f959ce3e937c950c
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOK' 'sip-files00058.txt'
8d0b40aa403f3ce94d7f316f259bfb3c
04c8996dea2dd5b28661347638cf964a502e1f40
describe
'13230' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOL' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
4baec90027c2ced7ac6f398df1355f8d
9a7358d434fc70f6927eb0325b2fa0beabeb9e2e
describe
'238012' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOM' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6239277edcda4fde14d839ed4afb5547
f0f44debb4f423311d0d459a8447a0e924ebe9f4
'2012-03-31T08:02:34-04:00'
describe
'128645' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELON' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
80a8bc4b8e85d70c6fa326e72e97385f
c4d4cf1e9c62b52481736cd960c0534fbad6a6f7
'2012-03-31T08:03:45-04:00'
describe
'33631' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOO' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c1ee788256216791f89b2ba10b3adbc1
3073669711937b107ac223fa94c473ccffc86d21
'2012-03-31T08:00:33-04:00'
describe
'62633' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOP' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
888d688ced583c2bb171c659ba64ea5c
d9e53024d25cbd7db88b5067844fbd51c981e3e3
describe
'1926516' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOQ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ecd100ab9fe9434ab988b570d0a98de9
99c8b625a5ad72ad0312265c0eded5fbb2e8251f
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOR' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d9833ac9eb70949b1192e571d424cbe1
39488fad6800b40f4d2fcf51695dfb465a257d08
'2012-03-31T08:04:06-04:00'
describe
'35382' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOS' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d16c66fa87eb756110fae791806148be
3b3377c9b002c881621f3f7516bfe679aaf8dbd4
describe
'242888' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOT' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
ecfb0927f1f5618711fae32c00f5934a
00c6bb63e885ca66dde672d570b997f72dd7546d
describe
'71444' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOU' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5f1573d4375f2a760efb89aafed0e1cb
74416a5f7ba0704b02d1381c855da6fc34a2a0bb
describe
'20109' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOV' 'sip-files00060.pro'
60894be1195761528256ae095594133f
d9837cc478c67d054f9439871bc95e8489643e8e
'2012-03-31T08:08:05-04:00'
describe
'25513' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOW' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6a0d603d62ae733c86c24dae3461d618
af19d42149f07592a4d96c88865314437a458b99
'2012-03-31T08:08:46-04:00'
describe
'1943999' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f783c3c66cb21064419e6cbeb2d51f10
a336e1682e49426760c36341c966a17cd3ff2f31
'2012-03-31T08:07:28-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOY' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7a6b22ecc08f5a1c0b4afa520a1cead5
34a11686e50577e289c6c1c35bd0cd9caf663029
'2012-03-31T08:05:35-04:00'
describe
'8804' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELOZ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
f6eab14b55336afe1462c163ef8ddbc8
0c01757e845a2c1564a2b393e7f68fe5a3867798
describe
'233577' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPA' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e48546e7981b38aed1cf9a2a1cf41f80
f9bef12c9d849bd7c014f8f85cbfdeb0053df540
'2012-03-31T08:05:25-04:00'
describe
'125893' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPB' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f606de2ae6c0df30b3c3fdf1d6b24268
491e63ecdc804a70e00753b097628052215f7add
'2012-03-31T08:06:45-04:00'
describe
'32957' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPC' 'sip-files00061.pro'
2d518daa52e23c327f89c2426bccf4d5
2a7af44e4da1c463d259c6a7fb05db2ee06bfabd
'2012-03-31T08:01:42-04:00'
describe
'62951' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPD' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
e0675f842c2041a43b989954eb2b2603
16507c1336ae73493b0bf93ff44552a9144a429a
describe
'1891092' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPE' 'sip-files00061.tif'
bab60a85731fa89e112c43736491af9a
93ab33446d508a13fc4063d2493e6e645bcc1ad2
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPF' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a5545eb92ccf12783e05f54dd8d7a2cc
490bf6a5b48e2ecd513fd13bfe6884486ef5f337
'2012-03-31T08:04:46-04:00'
describe
'37647' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPG' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fb5cb8593fea24d646942786dc9764c3
69dfb859003a58d6868c857899e726daf9633e7a
'2012-03-31T08:02:00-04:00'
describe
'244449' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPH' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
3176e2ff474c5fdb43370af09b367b75
9e1090cc05b9ad6b69af5b3622f08e13419d5204
describe
'104681' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPI' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e910b8f944883f60ef559b8ef62a9267
9872c83594a0a76b669f0f0d8cb9cc55bb79eda8
'2012-03-31T08:08:00-04:00'
describe
'33551' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPJ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
367eb27c939349bc5029651ad780184f
dd5f27d9aa52699fd389fdc162a00a56d9e6d2fb
'2012-03-31T08:07:20-04:00'
describe
'39264' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPK' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a03b0b70396cadcdb5e047426bf9e1b0
a9ab82ead13735eef90f2ec920d8077b1a7142a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPL' 'sip-files00062.tif'
8409ce13dfe0c26b8e70c958ba15b84c
e93a74e1834ddd50c9c24b02f46ab4f4c395975b
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPM' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4f9780f78b20837e4e60e68d77f3a956
265ab76d5fd4817f5c051b5c3b149227a1621e1d
describe
'13121' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPN' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
304d9368d3ecefbe327d5097d10366e8
00d1922150b394c7ebb367afba7571190a09c8bb
'2012-03-31T08:08:07-04:00'
describe
'233697' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPO' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
9a72071f8aa772967b6db0c3c33028f6
2e73874e16a1d3c293229e027c7ccf74348ad805
'2012-03-31T08:05:52-04:00'
describe
'128740' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPP' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5f3b4fe781151c4f65e902b032e3411d
7962b46e3e18a5793c5fd9f78f227e07d6ae1acf
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPQ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
c6b2b1ba403ac4a515486cc67d90edfd
ce68f4f00ab4c5d60e2da252905d01e69fa8724a
describe
'64059' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPR' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6c20afd53146bc086d113fd3bd3654fd
959275c77a01a540675c26e18768ad464ada0b76
describe
'1893376' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPS' 'sip-files00063.tif'
48164c8da5354b89755116f8d21400e8
bf576833c82940ac88092b66ad8cd4d8015883a1
'2012-03-31T08:06:39-04:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPT' 'sip-files00063.txt'
29549f251c319f42870619c81fd8230b
cce3be4edcf6323e4cee8076559e2965a4317192
'2012-03-31T08:02:48-04:00'
describe
'37269' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPU' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
f1792eae4de1a92363b589de15bbad60
0168d2fa7b68aee64a85ef0dad465d378d9b5c25
describe
'244630' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPV' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
01804dc251b2c1b1237138cfdd4d9109
961d1d9dbaf257738cd274112b0429811b4bd364
'2012-03-31T08:05:39-04:00'
describe
'92290' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPW' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b9dc567dfb1390d6a537168119e8d1fa
793a055e0200e8336f52c9beb719f32d9a7f96ba
'2012-03-31T08:06:36-04:00'
describe
'27108' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPX' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6da33e26b24d3e02e18802b50e4388a6
3968ee8b1735310147f8ccdf68e56d3dd76e9486
describe
'34799' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPY' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5cc48be7a5dae9716e8c4a49861086b7
bb2d98e9851d37fca7d8da6adf256cf220d1cb0d
'2012-03-31T08:03:31-04:00'
describe
'1958075' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELPZ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
ac43c1a04ffac7e5efc34ac138ba124c
144769e3ac67bdbcbe2a80fbfa1e641c14786a53
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQA' 'sip-files00064.txt'
2716c2b4e4631824f4162908303f99a0
a43ecad692ab3f6e11dae04ff0775153000cb38b
describe
'11181' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQB' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ff87b6d2a8f9fc24587786d44db45896
caa3071bfaa2cb132ccd7eac479fabf0062698cc
'2012-03-31T08:02:19-04:00'
describe
'233780' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQC' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
d81d77e4062784e868a2e7fa65f9e4c6
d615c1e5e88eb97d7f639458e488a5b9ee1bb9f2
describe
'118322' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQD' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
30cdfd560cdb9e8cc623ba27ea1a6447
2b22fa3de4708b018e7acd8983739d9c97de6c2f
'2012-03-31T08:04:03-04:00'
describe
'29702' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQE' 'sip-files00065.pro'
b9bd3caca5636d0b14fbd81ef3d7f50f
2672a14e4888828c22c4402cd8fa665f6beaa706
'2012-03-31T08:04:08-04:00'
describe
'59254' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQF' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
56a84693e6034fd1f0d0b8a3ceef1c1b
46a37e32bb0827ed566d70c3ad0864dff5c7cafb
'2012-03-31T08:02:15-04:00'
describe
'1892472' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQG' 'sip-files00065.tif'
a46bf59ad26a36f1f76ec4bbb3131d13
0ab5eb2a1eed819c77f3ac17a8c7268b1642bbad
'2012-03-31T08:03:32-04:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQH' 'sip-files00065.txt'
b0212ca502bd81b7166e66853ef8fb18
b49018071cb48776a615b7876b2143aed6d0a3c1
describe
'35385' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQI' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
96b17c00b95c0ada030d8aa8749bf040
b27f0e932e10a4b191a25c2e26588d46d8a0e1f4
describe
'245770' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQJ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
37378e84438c34d5ad56c4a82f6ea2c7
4314681242e278495f52885c2afb8373318cb387
'2012-03-31T08:07:57-04:00'
describe
'107201' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQK' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1981b7d5543cf4ee47fa8657f221c46e
0777bb2101c554ba7c599cc6b624c2416fe02214
'2012-03-31T08:05:16-04:00'
describe
'32811' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQL' 'sip-files00066.pro'
0f628f99e5b31ae81cd5d2fa8d1b7609
dfda2c15502993921bbb791388293bb65e08a313
describe
'40696' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQM' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8f797e5c39134e158195ea9ea4a87526
abb4ff3346fd5979573671a359b0ac4281bd8390
'2012-03-31T08:07:33-04:00'
describe
'1967343' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQN' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9e516dd571343378c0672fc7e643af32
c98e4510d5693ddc8843e99288414ae0027c3c82
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQO' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8a0da192a53761de984aaab0d08f1203
777eb9b8bb0730a4d6923e7138d23012874e037e
describe
'13319' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQP' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
432a2d88eb01250b8813648fc1f8c15d
d3b96c15cafc016142f2945ce39f57307215f8d8
describe
'238106' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQQ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
13d1e17fd426e36dc11a9a78f49ece93
eb5a3057095679ecf54342d624abb9b85c63417f
describe
'130873' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQR' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
4c079a03687107fcfcb7d74d0ebca52a
752d98125a20d66ca954e18939c0619f303a4771
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQS' 'sip-files00067.pro'
e305090e8ad125cf166392269f108330
f76a27c397d2d6f9b6fb36d7e71b5beb736d343d
'2012-03-31T08:00:54-04:00'
describe
'64385' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQT' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3f10ce44fe37d0a19f234ee52b0c00af
e82253c88a0cddc63e6e1e026cfcbdd4f642e041
describe
'1928380' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQU' 'sip-files00067.tif'
14acb4fcffbc048ca662da180d15ed56
6ab2d2e8914872aa149ff934aa19627a71e13f46
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQV' 'sip-files00067.txt'
fb3567124407fdd239c80c1004d81ad1
0488e744d1a10266dfbfc1cb18fa67fff5e56867
describe
'37185' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQW' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
a4c2d062582c56a4c2bb2ee9e70a7c55
8b57dd10e40e427be3856bf499688bfe1c587294
describe
'238027' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
7815917f20672fbbb09bd925d31d2aa3
d394fa42aa1b4e541ab9c45400c49b89b592454c
'2012-03-31T08:02:24-04:00'
describe
'76656' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQY' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
77b9c0d64b7eac5f0ad8fbf5a401493f
8a6952b8fcdcf61d82c12b1783f4cd3a27a2daac
'2012-03-31T08:04:17-04:00'
describe
'24210' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELQZ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9a4381dab59c9944abe6a0380da54f78
508e36e1efd84a572b13135daeda6f14a3bbd607
describe
'27085' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRA' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
0df2fcd3fe1897c6a548c8bd50fdd731
556ed270f987557d80719ef0e346d4af83195366
'2012-03-31T08:03:36-04:00'
describe
'1905107' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRB' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a8c7de8d0c1dfc88d8d334fb6e5a73c2
46568bdcafb3a16a8da26a54fb5f45e24c4f6fdb
'2012-03-31T08:06:46-04:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRC' 'sip-files00068.txt'
7add7b7ac64afc68e4e139f1b3491717
d01e967d9aabb210fb39de3cd16991d6724f7000
describe
'9195' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRD' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
28e416724a32af6e9b6943f6ccdc8261
3377ee6e8a4a5b45e97587d8dfb43e9b1a33d710
describe
'237530' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRE' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
5f8a0043ce2cdf4ae0be01d6dc3bbac4
335f48bfb94250969845a9629369e39f53061143
'2012-03-31T08:07:14-04:00'
describe
'108956' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRF' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
75569537383838020a5e53b93e9952b9
3871c66dc43da50466d4ac397d2a305824dcc0c9
describe
'26199' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRG' 'sip-files00069.pro'
1a7a4a570a41b576d2f00a39b34f7e75
1876f948767c6e27d2bd8ff4dfdb20e0aaeebcea
describe
'55655' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRH' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
93d16eec79e66338915b6559bab509a5
5957a4a0807056d744eb5c6530303480ffb958c4
'2012-03-31T08:03:46-04:00'
describe
'1923372' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRI' 'sip-files00069.tif'
846102d0325472b911b9cc1524bdb6da
fbd2efd1460756b6f346cac1d950245571111c9d
'2012-03-31T08:07:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRJ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6abf1b1b87ba603b4bf070f85de854bb
95dfb4bd112a0ed580d9b359cc23d8ab129ee9da
describe
'33844' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRK' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
2d89a7c3ed088d10c0c66216502efcbe
9be5fe9525c981d9239a4188cc43b72bc342304c
'2012-03-31T08:01:18-04:00'
describe
'240117' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRL' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
ff889c6f17c7d49dc448dbccf76260de
ecfcdcbb07918d47932475de9943a00c6a8be0ef
describe
'112418' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRM' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
620322836d1d000effa668316b490b0a
4e328ee2ed3caf353b75a9414c66ff24791f95ed
describe
'36870' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRN' 'sip-files00070.pro'
8e7a3b53dc782453d502f57979d998b2
9b5b648efcbfa2184f185ddf00ddbafda552d1fc
describe
'42995' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRO' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
34bc77d8210e21563c749316d69cfc15
ce0cff7657601cb3c7666c6b7c85be63082bf933
describe
'1923243' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRP' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a69971e5edcb7ea01ff0b5d9cae598b5
8ab987f84f26d71ed4ea6b079e8bbe28041579a0
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRQ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
2c1e1798217775cec7916b486270e3e0
c970963f5fa949b7837108b8b1dcde5ff7e88c7b
'2012-03-31T08:05:32-04:00'
describe
'13383' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRR' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
64fd45b270ab6494d6072d05bb08142f
ea27a4553c456eb008b9263a0b2f717fee14fb31
describe
'236227' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRS' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
9b7b4b1c9e8a0c66e0cea8f94790868e
e114a45f1b340cba61d273de5035f7db815724c9
'2012-03-31T08:03:39-04:00'
describe
'121602' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRT' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
edb21474922b2a35c1e044daa9a1e1fa
5417e4696af7ffd9b998693e6631d4f818a3ac6d
describe
'30917' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRU' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4aa5fb2a2fe612ffb76b3391f1fbf757
5a895b6cf66fa6d255082a8383453432601c13c0
'2012-03-31T08:03:16-04:00'
describe
'60821' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRV' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a3ed84e7e2fb8a5cd52043706241fb7d
4c5695f43d03df13a43550afc1433486e822cce1
describe
'1912232' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRW' 'sip-files00071.tif'
fc5bbec33db60e875efa358d4ca64af1
451ed46592f70aef3becb89994ed4fe534dae12a
'2012-03-31T08:06:33-04:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRX' 'sip-files00071.txt'
170384382cdff6f64dd5eaf3f8b71ccb
205e45427d2c7aa6eef51efba635b5b6c8ffb5de
'2012-03-31T08:03:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'35861' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRY' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e10b08486906321168fb736405c9b6d2
8be87d357ca3d8c1c6f0f31bb823e088981984bb
describe
'241913' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELRZ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
eaf289437d015e26e55b304003fa1001
975a1736fa6780e497aa0ab99c7b447d586f2786
describe
'99730' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSA' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
836e09b91931ed4ffaa8629bbff6c288
3660635b6c4cde977052bbb9bed819f7193e09aa
describe
'32041' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSB' 'sip-files00072.pro'
234136abb790c7073083beccf797246c
3f737d702ae77c9e492960c2928007010a5c64b7
'2012-03-31T08:01:43-04:00'
describe
'36702' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSC' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
6ef365f45aa50e9ea9522ef07eb162bd
f64535f88b6cd1341e55176596e1bf7fd68671e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSD' 'sip-files00072.tif'
18397121d368e8c9c53c8f29654e5d35
32a5e4dbcde587ac088bef38ec3d7e1503015113
'2012-03-31T08:08:38-04:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSE' 'sip-files00072.txt'
65d7d5aaa8c6ffb085267f31e4021f5d
d586e23e35e1d40394c0daaf2c192e34f257d9ce
describe
'12284' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSF' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
0777a09544273d92035caaa3c5ee8a14
03ebad88dc83a5f4fa22241b3be4b4eaaef2f957
'2012-03-31T08:05:03-04:00'
describe
'234464' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSG' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
824cd3d402f2938af51fb4759db10635
2412fd6cbce02a0bba577bf3babe366faf5aae23
'2012-03-31T08:03:48-04:00'
describe
'114677' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSH' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
3d6f305e5cb501ae46dae6e5ce13249e
192271a734ff020bdd54d23f71112ae762df1647
'2012-03-31T08:08:27-04:00'
describe
'31004' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSI' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1dc6eb02163d24eec28116ae172bfff5
866bb2395e5b2e533a18f63611809d2a3335a88a
describe
'56201' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSJ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
9e17f8c37cdfcc18dda339a29c3d93a6
92f3bab57b073fb7d765b38c9f149f72e08e6c6f
'2012-03-31T08:05:29-04:00'
describe
'1897288' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSK' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e19f3d3251dbc224b3aa7970a41dfaf5
6dcab4664892db2c5a1d59c89172e85a1b929996
'2012-03-31T08:04:28-04:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSL' 'sip-files00073.txt'
008e8456839ba7e6cecab4411c1ea04f
6fbb5274c8f59aa2ef042689314b75f0328fe7cd
describe
'34348' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSM' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
c33986a37d65c29c93a4995155b07631
c97632443814b025455c82067c849b5211dd8d42
'2012-03-31T08:05:41-04:00'
describe
'238229' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSN' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8824e867a61450d2eb3419b71be6cdcb
90f8afb77d48c09515c595aeecfade7aabaa666e
'2012-03-31T08:04:32-04:00'
describe
'132897' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSO' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
27eb8b6b4b0085994aba8ed5549082d1
80d4f07959727c78a5d3d27a85f8a0244b91398e
describe
'34225' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSP' 'sip-files00074.pro'
4f9b2dae14f4aa044e2f8bb85be8c550
8846788fcc9e700764036c02cdf190f15ca27975
describe
'65415' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6d61ce8ed7618dba1a30a97103942af0
8fd63f4f4de45acad2d917b670d35a85935ab931
describe
'1931048' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSR' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1371623a408053be509cc558ddcda5b3
f7f17ea7267a1724bd8d59622159b4c37e4f850a
'2012-03-31T08:04:14-04:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSS' 'sip-files00074.txt'
3ac8f94002cb3f330da83c8e64ccb5b9
b943c40e0a828ecd0208164b5c49f12240e5083f
describe
'37406' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELST' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
e0e38e7edf4b0a16a4e84510125c72c4
b0045f9cb897f11401dc0132389601d50fb89da1
describe
'237575' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSU' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
552f43a9e4feb0e8837330bafe1612bb
511c6dbc57a5a550183d7a46bb9ca13616a72371
'2012-03-31T08:02:37-04:00'
describe
'135485' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSV' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
9edaf64182a070295340eaa1d7f82289
2928112ec92a804bbf981ff9c200dc941e7acfb5
describe
'36633' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSW' 'sip-files00075.pro'
7430b434dda91295abd50256d1c06d04
5c35784687ed00ec0ca7898d260ae04389991b87
describe
'66072' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSX' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8651721cbc30f7ef3bd10678610ac6cf
ee3ef55b616ca19114ed6886fd2b234bde1a4224
describe
'1924072' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSY' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e97b86d085c84badbcad6d020890fc3d
f927ded09ccfba68e8c3be596b76da306d9dbba0
'2012-03-31T08:05:26-04:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELSZ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
76cdf61507a19e9d9fdd8c8fb718beb6
051f0ffe5ad896d13e39b1739d77491817901674
'2012-03-31T08:07:25-04:00'
describe
'37138' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTA' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
5747fbdf462750ec7a233c1f20d666c4
e2fe198958b2a53014aed4d8d610646ded891dd1
'2012-03-31T08:02:06-04:00'
describe
'242133' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTB' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
639b2c0f9f66256fd95020952f3f3498
9d5df3fdf3f1c72f6f8f5fb3604f6e3026f0a87e
'2012-03-31T08:01:57-04:00'
describe
'116193' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTC' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
3e75b5b1b7de3322cdd0af8bfc55e340
0a814490c48710c61ad7f5f4cd5f88b8a5c2ada8
'2012-03-31T08:07:50-04:00'
describe
'37488' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTD' 'sip-files00076.pro'
fd97cdc605bbff071018ce30926ff23e
e585fbb0bf6f4f0fa54d5c06f04bb63df7907268
describe
'44376' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTE' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b3290b1b2da9b1fa58fa0fac04145cfb
661f92a23ed26045b44569702f89236f53ab980a
describe
'1938067' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTF' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e6fbf99d041e6529985cef93f420ddaf
80807986d274e2ccd61fead2124a70b1e1fcde16
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTG' 'sip-files00076.txt'
33e042a97b8a37c0c2baf9af04dfc015
7525305dca119db278f21c2daf600dc7924227b3
describe
'13917' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTH' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
0e454658db81c41ce7d2d6984e073ccc
4868c8dae810bbd8a51412cc487bd9a415ff9719
describe
'235249' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTI' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b68a4dca4325cbc9ec98296396127019
9961af15b1322ae6ca4a2c8c42421a723af27369
describe
'91436' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTJ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
380b66bacb1e08913b306baa89817dbf
f90a0d8b3a5c3d35b3ba34cad1e074b941793434
describe
'24102' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTK' 'sip-files00077.pro'
33947e59177987fe9826014e3aa54c43
0c819abd9cded07cb81fe9090c74517c4bcdd410
describe
'45373' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTL' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
43350fcda61ee36c16d3d2b4977a69fc
fd7fab89d996989faf2696967701ec64a0ee709a
describe
'1902336' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTM' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e2b5d3d0ca9adc36e1ea2c131b50c9bf
97844bd50d55eb7e8d74ab09d6b4da3cbf1ab327
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTN' 'sip-files00077.txt'
93fe4d025381fa359aedd90b777e3683
654c38c275625f09380f9b5d28ff0f89c3b1af09
'2012-03-31T08:02:38-04:00'
describe
'29677' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTO' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
ac79f6a27b8af5bf787f577be89904e5
42b27cff1b390895ba89d6251db91ba6c9e85fea
describe
'240890' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTP' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
cf64d8f3fbfab2c4a6a10232f43b334f
7480eb14cac15a1def790cfb366896c5fb7c9b65
describe
'104397' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTQ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3b2f2f97f064c515f1a5cba11528a25a
5f3c9731dc66fa9fd817bdcb2b9e8fcc475f742a
'2012-03-31T08:04:24-04:00'
describe
'31285' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTR' 'sip-files00078.pro'
cc05b630388213fe43d981ad0ac01d63
36d6fff843d41b30c51b01564ba3b18249a6ee1d
'2012-03-31T08:07:15-04:00'
describe
'38690' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTS' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
72e9f84fbda4fa2bdc2fd2963c9dd5f5
abce950a5ff3f2ffe6eb480dc27eeb903875c07f
describe
'1928235' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTT' 'sip-files00078.tif'
1f9e0e7a0e827ef40692c1f9c01f5caf
bb563b8517f5a5760e85e7b4c9bbd1fd89379f76
'2012-03-31T08:04:15-04:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTU' 'sip-files00078.txt'
5e7ed68283375e025e24fbea111e2b0c
08299969393eab607bc1fa626ae6558dbf347f41
describe
'12795' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTV' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
759275a75b68d5674bf1b6dbf1ea3009
2154528289512f20edacb212696726f90efa11b9
'2012-03-31T08:00:28-04:00'
describe
'239477' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTW' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
64f05b6390d40625fd46154e2e5a9e9b
5867773a9b605b92232dff73116d900ff88d9779
describe
'137977' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTX' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3282d8a812fcf679bb4876b3532f0629
c83199c33d1ab8cfecb560ac4d3b7e5520892b2a
describe
'36503' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTY' 'sip-files00079.pro'
071180da1754d2b12c3c51ec8aa5051a
2960390e62d09db9853836dce8aecea2ad9ce0cb
'2012-03-31T08:05:40-04:00'
describe
'67142' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELTZ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b291cf657a61fb68365381c2fbba617e
ba9ccddfa1a3bdeeff2ec1740ccf698e4672a455
'2012-03-31T08:05:54-04:00'
describe
'1938460' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUA' 'sip-files00079.tif'
8e3264d0ae71afb9a99e7c33a32c74d3
3a55f8ff149a037c798356f3c28ec6be762928c6
'2012-03-31T08:01:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUB' 'sip-files00079.txt'
85d100c7dd54607821ac044496abe265
07ef49158b63d55129457b302ac960aaacf61485
describe
'37179' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUC' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5a4a807a7337e0384b3d10aa7c294bf2
3db36d554779d53c1721e67261d79321e79b9fb3
'2012-03-31T08:03:33-04:00'
describe
'245522' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUD' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
10c5a1efbe6cc6188dbe8aefc1059356
dad553006f2f9c2beb0ce01f60fb401723b8c38d
describe
'111561' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUE' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c426439124150aeba8c68387488bf678
37795309e9ffe72393e52d832016ac8fcc6d7339
'2012-03-31T08:05:27-04:00'
describe
'35293' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUF' 'sip-files00080.pro'
59d0a597b782cc23265249b54468d490
fb300a4fb97cb748d5b518fa386f14f4cdf55e67
'2012-03-31T08:08:10-04:00'
describe
'42259' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUG' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
6382a97d3b01475bfcf0af0a233e2f57
c56906447f413915b069b336432ae3cc58331a1e
describe
'1965535' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUH' 'sip-files00080.tif'
5563820b0fb5f884677360dd5d3c3346
c38842fa93719989bbf1146c73faab05b95ffb8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUI' 'sip-files00080.txt'
fec1fadb6b77398ed5ee7a725c3e0655
a1686f8dfdfd03a53b2d4ed1dbcae849d84767f2
'2012-03-31T08:00:31-04:00'
describe
'13469' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUJ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6b7436a1869c49430356969b9ef33fec
5a8e15ba3fe72cda542476fadb37a8cf807d357a
describe
'237075' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUK' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
a171e6b6be9a79a15acbba5ea8313c99
e752cc682cf6ae8407a2fae979c83a565153d665
'2012-03-31T08:08:11-04:00'
describe
'107736' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a5bc33f8b0a0112e27faf19c8b0d2912
77f3fb865676fe0b9ed4920e036f768196b763be
'2012-03-31T08:05:31-04:00'
describe
'34380' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUM' 'sip-files00081.pro'
be4194ba4511bbf921ed66d63cfe5d9e
020e598b6aa5c9180daa25604abc79e512358fad
describe
'41716' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUN' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
8fa5667227537936cd651b094f0f2011
f7dc14b9ee2259128bce80f3c41c9a6a02cad375
describe
'1897567' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
3ca8c3b3b17834770e79f49599aa9900
f2ba6e4ce3ed3388a07a6d3c0a76f9458432e363
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUP' 'sip-files00081.txt'
e72a9a5d20ab6fa3641749cb4fb9bb8c
4f66796dff7535ad6e6686b3292f2d0a2bfe34da
describe
'13970' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUQ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
fcfa16d89918a31141f0d5118df63214
bc6be591d8bc75ae1d9bf5dc522de4993ddab951
describe
'246073' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUR' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a89dede2e8da6bac07a31d929df05bbd
83d3f58d611f088d1729349250f4f00168b7a857
describe
'123883' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUS' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a7614c33947ae1e66570c6f7986a52ed
fca5f97a9f47563fb18c171c7f7b48c1d46348db
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUT' 'sip-files00082.pro'
17f04483944c3c08af1f86e054e751e9
369f7b2c1aa7b1520d2fdcdb3f951a38ada07beb
describe
'59767' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUU' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
eb152d5dfe1ecb265160ce8d4e948e6d
c0cf1b4224cf8c6d97b4de2dc4fc40a1b3e89856
describe
'1991140' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUV' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2f2195f32f99b30461c37f682472d600
54eff95663359cdd946b0540737425d79b46ea03
'2012-03-31T08:01:59-04:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUW' 'sip-files00082.txt'
dec6e720464ae66de48dfa0a864d3f09
eab5a3de68c086aa22d8bc244a3f88ab59e271cf
'2012-03-31T08:04:30-04:00'
describe
'34819' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUX' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
f62d841b0dae8564d9aa8ba93a01ea09
ba13e1ae8ce0952eeb2c328641deebfe349cf260
'2012-03-31T08:03:18-04:00'
describe
'235102' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUY' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
e222d27030ffbf8338f25d3e5134c93c
837721d2bebe65a67d43f66287fea88effd41364
describe
'113766' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELUZ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
6a36c0843f6ab422e7f69a47a7d091e2
2135890f1214a1513d0b6a8cc3fd4e568d2b3d67
describe
'28467' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVA' 'sip-files00083.pro'
34aaebec9516f29a129f678f6d58c316
99beb5dc38872cbff3ffaf3e7d600502853758b7
'2012-03-31T08:01:08-04:00'
describe
'57014' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVB' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2eda79cb4d1b99c14bd7731f1936089a
9f6f48d953d535f4acc6072aa7b93fbbc6a37fb6
'2012-03-31T08:08:32-04:00'
describe
'1903020' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVC' 'sip-files00083.tif'
3bfa7080089b9c23fadba59e2a28de02
a2d7d85296e28aa693efde448ca6e3e29f949cee
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVD' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1bcf9190379ab214efcf5c757965d553
fea6ddf5b20f74c5930c74fc4a76b8152655f488
describe
'33956' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVE' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
aaa3511566d39a3053422f05bb79818e
68fe0a436e767f6a9c4407cd719a21475a5be9c5
describe
'238732' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVF' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
3b19a99d48f154d8562b26c5cf508179
e03d6dcc71a28863b2471b18ac8b215cdf0c73f2
'2012-03-31T08:03:40-04:00'
describe
'113406' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVG' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
931ca7f28577c2aecc2a3b68402bbcab
7225b5432f39c3253406e001c6fd934af4e4bbcb
describe
'34656' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVH' 'sip-files00084.pro'
9f241c48408ca952d2b749a8df842651
7887e0ac68e264c3e65cd9d1ce3e1d0c7517232d
'2012-03-31T08:02:58-04:00'
describe
'42501' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVI' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
200fc9d8008b0226a8b4bfff668e3c1b
f6f6ecbbc0cd39337c2ef15f02db18169df1f9f3
'2012-03-31T08:03:04-04:00'
describe
'1911699' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVJ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
0810d88380578b527c5e5c856af8a20f
be7607c7ecc320e23c1923dbb7b28f5b1183b959
'2012-03-31T08:08:24-04:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVK' 'sip-files00084.txt'
317d33a0165a07cf23b596efeb3a72f7
d952176f10df680cf23e43dd710296e73153459f
'2012-03-31T08:06:52-04:00'
describe
'13639' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVL' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
bbd6608cb2c79432d3d416039f505d56
0b3894c096d056aa05c919e9074ed8d37ea9f850
describe
'239087' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVM' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
6a5db2aa58edf530f5d988dd47a45df4
755fa23cf20900b9b75aaaf240cb54f35f2fa528
describe
'101934' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVN' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
877263fdbfe26368a8a88a1a03e0acba
1bbe31b17b896db0dddf7e1cf65442fa3a5c25de
'2012-03-31T08:07:08-04:00'
describe
'32617' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVO' 'sip-files00085.pro'
029390a13d18f5bfdf648b1b5e6172f9
6ed197d890698852faf4a397d5d36a521956324d
'2012-03-31T08:07:24-04:00'
describe
'39347' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVP' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
51cfecb9168ec12189c79f7248b173ad
5f294d4323788227c1b7d3673b966ffe9ddcb5f0
'2012-03-31T08:07:56-04:00'
describe
'1913919' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVQ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
8174a0cbf911621ae7d4281e2f212ff2
2157ad000404271faae8c7ea52268240318fe1e3
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVR' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a359a561f5c3c4c358d3a0b42439396d
d1dde329227336783ab140418f3f01f2fea31ecf
'2012-03-31T08:05:49-04:00'
describe
'13527' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVS' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1ca7a15e9b009f49d0babd511f9bc296
a6f20056966666a40b0666751fc104055f50d865
'2012-03-31T08:03:19-04:00'
describe
'246397' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVT' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
5421dfcaa2ede106c36a7c8ff7e78d77
9ad4cd539f20608aed5afc7e5c015bc5a627e2f5
describe
'113777' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVU' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
1573ee83fed40de4b000082b22e40e8a
0ad8e3373a766581fabf2b43520c370f1a66ba22
'2012-03-31T08:01:11-04:00'
describe
'36618' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVV' 'sip-files00086.pro'
d079f15a8bc99886846ab3f8cd6d2c1d
943b2335ee9adb5fb7ad5db2a2b76d5ccc636c41
'2012-03-31T08:07:49-04:00'
describe
'43195' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVW' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
088f4bf6b688726d40b2720643fa89ea
ee77e5d257e91cd5b5cce9edd21a76f0b6fceab3
'2012-03-31T08:05:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVX' 'sip-files00086.tif'
790ddc86bd791e2a584d5ff685b0b14b
c1eb0231eecd15e9c055d6a281d4ae847666df7d
'2012-03-31T08:03:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVY' 'sip-files00086.txt'
a5aaf5ae367526d8d397c647dd17b0e2
b959b2f05344e655db2c8b10a222ff2d1c5ce5ca
describe
'13387' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELVZ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
1c385376ef333b86c36da35c479e8466
36f55b9c5d86d3c7f6228958d490339836a9563e
'2012-03-31T08:02:52-04:00'
describe
'246310' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWA' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
e38cd77d9d2f359573dd11abe0281c44
d55f95becc3486e93e5757204b1634e908018689
describe
'108718' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWB' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
c28987e870bbbbe8350aa86519c5d331
0359748d4b7da6b87c0840c1d56dd254f43d9d10
'2012-03-31T08:04:38-04:00'
describe
'36144' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWC' 'sip-files00087.pro'
34611122b03d2da07d4ffcbbda315ccd
b94bc350fa8e4396909c5537c98c91959b717914
describe
'40797' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWD' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
54d6efac4f2d3890faefabbfdf4aac82
5dd0df89311fb1801a0ab71970eca55c5a12d41a
describe
'1971531' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWE' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a33475208157bbd0eb7b80119e0075b4
19ed231d653b4d421acaa0ba7179e14e88e1ad58
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWF' 'sip-files00087.txt'
5e242e6f16fa5578532b2379e46fe333
0994c38c3cb2e7910c7ac5d5d4e51c479131d937
describe
'13605' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWG' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
dc626948a9e315e42f05fe6251a79410
f51db9ad54abd9e481f5c19d924260645ad57c68
describe
'247935' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWH' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
60eb0df5def94cd07b88b677283ce082
880e6aa21e1276a02dca76ecef39372aa1093ea9
'2012-03-31T08:01:26-04:00'
describe
'136618' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWI' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
6e2fd677a0ef6e903159918b61746816
6ea3dc65d8e653a0bf2dda3d4255d71da89ee7ed
'2012-03-31T08:05:10-04:00'
describe
'35712' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWJ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
91349ccd10d531f8fe0cee8bf04aa523
be3b551edae5b88bfa82a022b10e8210705a6c5b
'2012-03-31T08:02:25-04:00'
describe
'65807' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
001b073fafad8d6c4d2ee70839f37f08
bf40fa78a0427896bb09e6c48fc2cba584797f76
'2012-03-31T08:01:37-04:00'
describe
'2006360' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWL' 'sip-files00088.tif'
dae1f5d6bf864b90de0931dc53b4548b
db3210c6c143685d72bbd09513da251b0b008e40
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWM' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d485eb2ab8d24e1199c65351afdb6900
cd9008aec6f1008098c4a8765f236b6cb4208902
'2012-03-31T08:01:04-04:00'
describe
'36202' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWN' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
448fba7b0c88373dc158e14fb4ed8dd0
cf0e87e367d554c32fb7057ad3412fd831fdb867
'2012-03-31T08:09:00-04:00'
describe
'239933' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWO' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
0377eacca237fa78485242cdb7b3e1cd
540e2f2c45361855d6de31835cb6c193881c0803
describe
'94568' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWP' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e8df2d9a4109cbbed3d952c9ad56f5a9
7ef295df072b2422e47140f64a51d0d7eec665b6
describe
'31372' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWQ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
1c583815cbb53de848c653076a013ea5
924e66e1ebc2430141afcdc4a9bf4d13e65a6132
describe
'34744' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWR' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
301afe89880d2b441aa5ed1d356dff7e
21fdbc0f82529298fee593c6e38dfe2b7892fb31
'2012-03-31T08:02:12-04:00'
describe
'1920775' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWS' 'sip-files00089.tif'
d7b1a88202659b3dfe26f041d680e6ec
f20a8a8a723de94af826c53ae3e316ca6edf3421
'2012-03-31T08:01:48-04:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWT' 'sip-files00089.txt'
1ee2e1cd537abb8a6f0421d830e2b9c8
537bac0a5c32e2201c98a80176367fccda6b6f20
describe
'11765' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWU' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
c71c0fb5418e69a416bb5a7941fdb6e0
3b7dc0c3b2a922ff7aa0a7960ffe07b06e011d89
describe
'245826' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWV' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
b95dd72071a3f7fba566903f097c7d39
ba079c273033eb749b916a5f84374f06b815a7a2
describe
'96861' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWW' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
43b070a7538b3137679e88779d7c736f
b8643ff85fa111c272c1a3e03687700409203d22
describe
'20600' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWX' 'sip-files00090.pro'
744cb23439b7fe5ff29abb9047ebc5a3
a96164c3d1519b5e1aa7c931c8cbbe89dde26ded
'2012-03-31T08:02:17-04:00'
describe
'48073' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWY' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
09e92aae95ec3ca4228889a0c1bc2944
befc43f9d54c18940a196440e47fc26794e0933d
describe
'1987820' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELWZ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
dc3b204a5a0971d1e14537bf664f079b
ca48d20ed5cb500241cf1b88c931bc5a622d69e5
'2012-03-31T08:05:00-04:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d2df5339e89951181d3d62bb73813516
4f3c42a6f363e395e6961b1ebcba7c0914872889
describe
'30199' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXB' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
3818cee1e5d61a73011b2f9ff7c4e38f
0eaf58559409e16fefd70ce223400792903a71d4
'2012-03-31T08:06:19-04:00'
describe
'242335' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXC' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ca1e195f1669007402646fe43c0106c3
8c73fe1df69946c697b496426b5cb67df302094d
describe
'124694' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXD' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
85569208e4c235089fc3edf9df5cc6a0
4e4f28f43a7bd155ee3e0879091e3c10de88dab3
describe
'31891' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
18c05038bd8331ce53fb0462ba783639
41b8b4433afc850b108c81c6cf5ed95ed3953a17
describe
'61602' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXF' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
b5e5d34bc7b4157c33d2ccea14624561
30eed83017b57d826d4658652c64ea3d0f130fd9
'2012-03-31T08:08:09-04:00'
describe
'1961236' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXG' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c05236caeaa690396d3e54c61ef78e46
19a02145674e35cfa760afb0209ab85e7e65b272
'2012-03-31T08:08:51-04:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXH' 'sip-files00091.txt'
14d164d97a4eec412b6bfcc6e18a819c
f532f36fe11a4b5375a43ad56d9c3e9a912c049c
describe
'35589' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXI' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
e33aca3b73c6e8bf20fd6685b5f84a35
4fa031be44d810d334184fbed3bca77e75d44356
describe
'247158' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXJ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
aae52cb1b9678b710f4e0e661588152f
2994ecfcc8ba14be2e606a29db5042970aed60e1
describe
'104377' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXK' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
59c1174a62085bd759db153d1284eb46
561318c25fd93c80a3258a1b68daa358fd0904f0
describe
'30148' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXL' 'sip-files00092.pro'
4321f8f2caa706506dacb1b18211b806
76f5a35be95ebcda87be79f075a6bfbc0a39d22b
describe
'40415' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
325a5c1638cc5596e1d28ad29967b024
c9fe7ddaf5a9a1f491ba15a4590dc13ad0a3dad4
describe
'1978263' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
18fded6b96f8af6d91f169b343194122
7cc62ff2206d415a9f183abf3f46d6343f4cce58
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXO' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b993d59995210c0ef038af306eacbc60
1255f3b3991f6f0aebadc2ce5aa797e6bda21507
describe
'12593' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXP' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
baf3128dd9daa0b475f71f35fe462ed5
e3a66a1bc02c8b493fd2b93fc977cfbfb64aabbd
describe
'242465' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXQ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
fc4c5f6b9a77428a9c71cbd7428801df
d3f61b5e2b0e932752631fd06e7614a501452d07
describe
'109253' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXR' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
5e7c2999bc31b33066c97a19034fc098
028ce6d6955cbade7ad891d51986253327f0d9ed
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXS' 'sip-files00093.pro'
341a3a0ff717b1985efe3e38d31a3676
1098b93f74a95c68f641f821150b7f387325efe5
describe
'42394' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXT' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
aabac016558e1e292fcf42fcc819715b
39befff9b31d8d905256fa0655d59ac53caf7c49
describe
'1941283' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
ad8a2ddc39209999dbebc6c4cf9e659a
b5426277d1132b4ebf02a932cbab989ea27b7ceb
'2012-03-31T08:05:58-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXV' 'sip-files00093.txt'
468f65c50e7e87ebcba59eb12502f737
fc417117c3a57d1cff754ce57cd6d952716797b1
describe
'13124' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXW' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
ab6bb9c10c1d5db85103afbbdb74784f
b3f3d9395dc5e39956e002711c48f063cc9e552e
'2012-03-31T08:00:49-04:00'
describe
'252271' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
988c216e3fdc729c7cdc368fc783c1d0
3344217e46e946236ffcfa0e0b5b746df7d4d3b8
describe
'112106' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5e91795d11673ae8c9d861f88c7b63b9
51b0d08ba0329421771b0d68000f7d9de50bedde
describe
'33250' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELXZ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
72532abe7f809e7bf88e1b66007884aa
3eeabf2e713a688a12702c574d1698729c06ea78
describe
'42824' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
daabe17875db428b22c5c166aa3ee808
01960c1035d125615a3bb189733d231efbb8c75a
describe
'2019599' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
7c6a49d549a8fec81cfa6af93f0d3c34
46f220b7b3461c36bfe8a9321b5adb8505380a1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYC' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a0b3f52af4f4c4112d4fa38acc038ba2
f67d81665c920befa7b690aadbb24558cd420bee
'2012-03-31T08:00:57-04:00'
describe
'12819' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYD' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
bd04603c6b99ea5f12dd77f1d02fc9c9
35ad3602b3fbaa2b9edc1d8bc4df51eef658124e
'2012-03-31T08:06:06-04:00'
describe
'244408' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYE' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6a54b35459f44377f6daacee3644b57f
56ad63fcdf17921ee4a71c6d2efea6725a7f59cd
describe
'110236' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYF' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
5a80ebcf26361c33c9a4b00aee770891
fe3dd217779af47703fd69e6d8d707c51e9b2def
describe
'32788' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYG' 'sip-files00095.pro'
dc66f3a79a769a82913326d067619602
38ef638f358156939f591c9d35646d76efbc5dae
describe
'42128' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYH' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
e54c4e39c7ab45b8d493cb7fd5a2da61
6d06f96e648dddda0de450deeb21f476fd35971f
'2012-03-31T08:08:44-04:00'
describe
'1957103' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYI' 'sip-files00095.tif'
48f97679bccfe5f086a103062a36f503
2e0cd987bbe0d18b263e740e616d1a6e7909bf40
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYJ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
7e0d3077b42abf1639fa7494a643da2b
929a0db598d734acc17a6181228bc4b59ddf0974
'2012-03-31T08:05:05-04:00'
describe
'13456' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYK' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
b9b4c556f3d56022dbc7f124a7b30dfb
d825b954c001fb8c43a2f5de4c60e2a715297e64
describe
'249256' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYL' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
7abc7dfd9984bd411e0eea26ff89d2b9
054c30b972be8395bc6fa06264b49be0b02043b4
describe
'142460' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYM' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
5b2528df4daf40980ea2aa86b3b79399
00e760d152023c6f7692ac2be33f0a7bd7f6f4bc
'2012-03-31T08:07:32-04:00'
describe
'36001' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYN' 'sip-files00096.pro'
07177f43ffd58cecd20bd90f904e0a31
508fa6a3c463e37536c6b25ea1e6502ada05bb60
describe
'68315' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYO' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
5517b66de66772fe280d801a28fdf3f7
11eeb06295d06493169ed26e546bd6cb16632c2c
'2012-03-31T08:05:53-04:00'
describe
'2018300' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYP' 'sip-files00096.tif'
531ab2ad8331619814a18ce841429bf8
1a48a2a9cab298704fb1fc31428d6f381fb5c920
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
fe0b9aaec365aeafe08278b8ab917c63
4ac9922fc5806921284f5380cadcb3162b687d87
'2012-03-31T08:08:04-04:00'
describe
'36827' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYR' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
d3e20410eafa47d777a0819d3ff91c32
4dbb6a6a1b6adc389a4ecd4369d647c0361ab9d2
describe
'247533' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a6f0c2fc189e2b49a587d2179ac1e133
90e13db1ac2d243478ae8f2d36d0d2e2571df17f
'2012-03-31T08:05:48-04:00'
describe
'117915' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
19bb711c042a8e1136487d3379a1bc06
4d26ab385222ad8e3b0e076373387c962830109f
'2012-03-31T08:01:21-04:00'
describe
'30818' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYU' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2feedf5ff8ee376686d83756fb93d73c
c8c9e375ba277154024abbfcc8d28fd32f6c1e1b
describe
'57767' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYV' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
461684df56e77aac9380c0c3851084f3
967ab9d6f39c99ef253eb0a03bb17f4cb06caead
describe
'2002316' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYW' 'sip-files00097.tif'
743b804e34cfaa0880686732789d36aa
4697173d56e94fa80a970aabe45a86c5abeea517
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYX' 'sip-files00097.txt'
56a84aef0db411fcd17842da57abc1ec
1210bbdcc9b0242169aa9b5364b909fd77232d77
describe
'33497' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
bf76654179e6f8fa7e60a140244833b1
c14f1132e1084fc472b0a9ef01e361c740dd18c4
describe
'242995' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELYZ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
36db0dec118c725926109e1b5f53afe9
c3a03834a50263296656fdc931aa200100afff76
describe
'83543' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZA' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
abefe9fb5889245798515ba174d9f7f2
569f893078c0807d5e3370928409b8171a266f6a
describe
'28637' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZB' 'sip-files00098.pro'
5665bb8f99e46677e0b3444781d6f822
5d43fb48d4c8caeeb59c60952e7858e1eaaa131f
describe
'29205' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZC' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
f5b9d2d977f2d1e72c5f3990d644b20c
6e889b0e0e9dd2768797529dc9a8eb4cd0199daa
describe
'1945479' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZD' 'sip-files00098.tif'
17d4ff780d2a09b08538f58b255ae878
3560fbcab23d65d3524623e101ece7aed1b991e9
'2012-03-31T08:04:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZE' 'sip-files00098.txt'
e33e516aa188a63afd635fe6a20c9550
47025a5be6cf4e1ccc13ac6d1fb4615e1e60b777
describe
Invalid character
'9461' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
b17cd35ae46af53d8f07e27f6a5aef38
4f578e2f0d51b8ba963e0ccf4d50fbd925f16d75
describe
'247848' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
e956e3a56f5bfe758b2434d0e0bcf55e
9290a8c78cd497eb698431b5d885d59635381930
describe
'99054' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZH' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
628499b20134f0f3df228961a1db2cd0
19c696d3e0056557297dd1ba57b85ffd1072d0fa
'2012-03-31T08:05:01-04:00'
describe
'29775' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
e0f2b885fec5f1c81aeb3f8bf80a264c
f22671abc6367106ebb82eb7a4328a6bda0948c2
describe
'37312' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZJ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
e3a20f7a519e7c1563f6b8b89a0fe6a8
7569a7de6c1ef53b1e683b300612a64065cc0241
'2012-03-31T08:03:44-04:00'
describe
'1983655' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZK' 'sip-files00099.tif'
bcda28bcc9f0343dfb3b9613e35d30ce
602a3416b5a6850d3cc32ee317630f9c93e6e099
'2012-03-31T08:06:09-04:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZL' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1a132eebe669935b3c2d2dd84b38f84d
7e172c7179cf03a4da3b75e4b33c03dcd1207de7
describe
'11796' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
e00f849b99f393f4111ddd0b97e4ec70
c2f4ba55fe7547390718cd7cad74ae79e79de76f
describe
'245948' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZN' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
c348713717fc795db46d302fca216845
e15e0d6f9a82b947da9187dc6240f7466507f1ce
'2012-03-31T08:01:39-04:00'
describe
'109900' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
6c07a6f2e6192e4f35f5bb8d33e761a0
d8b27cda0801d53f3d5158a7abaf4cba1bf2bef7
describe
'33658' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZP' 'sip-files00100.pro'
11d625b2a97675f0892005cd4756f252
f7490775847d0e778dbde1fd0fd0105ecb2b7356
describe
'41488' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZQ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
121ec4a1123183158fb3d1b5f87f1517
553e2230217e5df6526e745ea8cb4d04975cce02
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZR' 'sip-files00100.tif'
7fa6846a311f6574e97d8e5053e61062
aba6356f969392e4b5f8f7b2c72f1280f8fb0c5b
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
41370ee89c5ac4a47889657e36d0bb98
85cd5c6437a278cb0a8342a6074494277d78ac3a
describe
'12897' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZT' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c8aeb0e4347d34290186d2925cdf02fb
fe1f52e99a558769ac4e7b4faf52e7f7de84fbaf
describe
'238615' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
8efc2d32d67f4bf4877ce1b9108d887d
11217e5dd0462de01850ce038d550508b8ee4a45
describe
'106374' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZV' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
78dd1bc2599a8272f43c2be1728c58ce
42f81900448d738d9f47e1611788dfa04e9db2d9
'2012-03-31T08:06:16-04:00'
describe
'31263' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZW' 'sip-files00101.pro'
12fded69f60cf6a65d92c85dde69f672
30286933b9239ce2f553021c93e31f247269cba2
describe
'41700' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZX' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8e56e53a950d6130b2ef9ec8f6eff74b
db08ee2ca605bdbfce07792869575af51fddc3f3
describe
'1909827' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
8832a7a3ed162d3f8e79001895892700
db06a542415ab45c2db6cde9b7f3ca6aa1c983a6
'2012-03-31T08:02:41-04:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAELZZ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
e3fd8a09241694ca5a5eca245e4286b2
3f995d846414fff2214b3af0b33ec183dd4329e5
describe
'13760' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAA' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e133e6a8a0f4c953700fe3770033878e
3ba306a697ea3ac73cc7a7776a6264683db5d443
'2012-03-31T08:02:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAB' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
4f7cdeb93a976a12622d5b6082c467fc
bbedb2c723082dba1f82995de7bd158d1b8ed6c5
'2012-03-31T08:07:21-04:00'
describe
'113128' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
1e0e5e47dae3717df65020b3c1d084f7
c6c3540d56163b1698fd40006a0acd9e2b1b63c8
'2012-03-31T08:07:13-04:00'
describe
'34714' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAD' 'sip-files00102.pro'
a576c2e4cb5ab8a083d2f12a4bc56853
8502c395d5005b8fd411d97ffe0ae679f2888c8b
describe
'43035' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAE' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
c5decdd121a98fb4f0ff5fc53cf7b6e6
657e62f612356970360404f6b22e9bba7746ef58
'2012-03-31T08:03:24-04:00'
describe
'1973967' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAF' 'sip-files00102.tif'
c521aba037d358d8a89e414a7784ce39
3d9d4f88e581451c4cf91fe2727a82d20eb00b70
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAG' 'sip-files00102.txt'
f7ba56dfcc9a4d445156258b7644d118
fa178c367ccf867e14e76d8e6a1afcde92284083
describe
Invalid character
'13703' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAH' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
e5d3fd2381b30a3f61e43d2ee8499514
2b15ca7a780a8fce5796b534437cf2dbc633a995
'2012-03-31T08:07:22-04:00'
describe
'246183' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAI' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
544c52ecd41e6c584257157db3442ca2
36cf6e4d10861f8c6a5ea17f9a9ea55a1a6869d3
describe
'107524' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3c2b55a9b5ffcf982dfe882581b76e8d
ea926050f0e094c1afd0da0728ebad61c8b787bb
'2012-03-31T08:02:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAK' 'sip-files00103.pro'
8771a1516912ab1876bbe935911935ef
e1d22306efc9e7b785b03e7ba7119e5edf6a7d56
'2012-03-31T08:07:51-04:00'
describe
'41063' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAL' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
cce71d51e96c76feffb1d08431dee957
cd013b03e9a897b643bd0f621c56683fa724ce1c
'2012-03-31T08:03:00-04:00'
describe
'1970671' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAM' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e0c1eae582fabcdbf38c1ff08f7f8ac5
b826c4dfb796009535d0a87c81e85cb9caa0f157
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAN' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6a4b897111355df1b1cbe12339d17795
834ed7628fdca7cd9bcd35ba81442d8321ed0a50
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAO' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
6a488155e8c8bd2ec74b4093ee6ad59d
ad4ad01363ffd9e62d98197a5bf69d0c915aa1f5
describe
'246489' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAP' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
14c84ca5338fb45c941e30112aec6af0
7bb14bcc26df4be59a98461d838ef235ea130cd2
describe
'134782' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAQ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
d2aeab8dbece70b9cd153694340957d8
162a6e253a67230f9811f83f276c1ca2c3ff6805
'2012-03-31T08:04:19-04:00'
describe
'35154' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAR' 'sip-files00104.pro'
f02b1f3e18814ef3692e687d824699cf
f6f695630a9c3ca9f33610c79c9e647f148e920d
'2012-03-31T08:08:03-04:00'
describe
'65931' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAS' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
77acd8823b96203fae94b394a1e3c40a
f168ef8dcc10b57b49da6279f2f250bf4e934898
describe
'1995120' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAT' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e07531586f96e014cbd8b99860f3f49b
b3c2a19893901dece8131f8cb0ba78d7010be1d2
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAU' 'sip-files00104.txt'
79c40ccfba6b6c4ea2013bed3d15eef8
b968831d7e891ccd1330a67c8496e5239905b784
'2012-03-31T08:05:11-04:00'
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
94a5262d9cebc4ee7fcd1b769fba5b7d
aea499e376b394077519203d4a889319f116e9da
'2012-03-31T08:07:17-04:00'
describe
'238016' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAW' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f5ea9baea266af2eb0963ce3422ad4a7
496e7b5e2bf7cf705e2af53fdf95a05e895d06b0
'2012-03-31T08:08:06-04:00'
describe
'82829' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAX' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
29a04ad3e0964e203a7253a225013e9c
414a4e31ef44a5d84d1d6e3af68d5eba0834be44
describe
'28196' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAY' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8ce17296d556bab341ce5aefeea60cce
55671339ced962ca3113258cff214a064ac80c1e
describe
'28970' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMAZ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
532b73398a1214587d6740528c5ab6f1
b40b4f55747a91993b4c277c662234d2002fab4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBA' 'sip-files00105.tif'
462bc9930077d7d2cba81546ba63cba3
315f57498859713fdc792d7503b34ec34e06ba7a
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBB' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ece52ffff365c143024d10c9620a95cf
f255b7e20136c3dd0905b22bec84de00da3dab69
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBC' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
e535a681287b230e4f23c4ed8cdb3c4b
58f6cc79fd573c1e2ed573cd870cdd1c74332155
describe
'240887' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBD' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
4baa4e6d6a8a6ffe925a0682abfa61ea
5bc09520e53220ff91c005a5242518f43256116b
'2012-03-31T08:08:19-04:00'
describe
'76316' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBE' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
cf869f5e9538a42e43d858ab3ed886c1
efd875762891a4bae0d4a4ff28f0aa3871dcb43e
'2012-03-31T08:08:16-04:00'
describe
'22387' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBF' 'sip-files00106.pro'
1f95b97ff0718974645836d515b1e879
156b7877fceec180d0c77fa65400dda94a30862e
describe
'27242' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBG' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ae0af6d0d5ae3d91c7a5557d7fb1bd94
f5f20136495538162aecce5adb1e83e15533c644
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBH' 'sip-files00106.tif'
9ba81d033f152a057345dee4483964bb
f6242c6a3279c8a68af2cd4566dfa893747a8b1d
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBI' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1b47be5048a3d183c2cda980dcc1e08c
7728d403dfcdc0f96d0d2c65ffbe9d48c8308dac
describe
'9291' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBJ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e2ed185481ac27e2c5d56faee1eb966f
15c623b9342aaf3b847ed1015305e82f99c4a996
'2012-03-31T08:03:57-04:00'
describe
'235821' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBK' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
7ec7198f1c135062ed2f19cf634fc143
8b2c5cb3f0784918ae2d855bdeabf8ed1836b134
describe
'111677' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBL' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4a425f082160fdf4c87d01410493d7aa
8d24f64f13a526752da3b52e5e8e3aef775ce283
'2012-03-31T08:05:22-04:00'
describe
'37386' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBM' 'sip-files00107.pro'
c6b2ae0aff61df039a8ea37fc4f129be
31a5b342976f792540100ca10efcb558b08487e6
describe
'42780' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBN' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
6e924f11c90c6f2604fd3a823f8737d4
0f1e3974f838a30237a6b8a26afacb3ea34685d4
describe
'1887399' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBO' 'sip-files00107.tif'
87234909e2a5a05603c806ab71e2439d
44ca30abe3e47d3e7c18b82c48f076198efce6b6
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBP' 'sip-files00107.txt'
44d9983f5ef5afc8aa61149c38cf69f5
ed54bf015581481b182932bad3b1c765c1949a5c
'2012-03-31T08:04:11-04:00'
describe
'14272' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBQ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
d365392c8f8231630a8a3e8303ba747a
8e92e0dfa6404df662f1e4155d5a2daf5b2364eb
'2012-03-31T08:01:17-04:00'
describe
'239117' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBR' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d67568def08efdd10c92792123cf6824
03a0c3b7a6725359368d32c10563746aa6233e11
describe
'99349' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBS' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
7d01824fdc733c9b652466831b4171ae
02bd0b0f0a6de3abbff298c920b01bc3431e4f94
'2012-03-31T08:06:01-04:00'
describe
'30626' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBT' 'sip-files00108.pro'
fe2dc8222603c13f961e02dd91e50beb
28fdc60263fed32ce57b76172c4d67dae952b45a
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBU' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
8510460ce4e0e00bf293083685e91de4
1340199fe8d5f5e60d585658438fa1a6b13360c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBV' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c4836b1d9d593df0d6a965793d444519
e79fb258893b36d707f112a6e4813636a54bbbb9
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBW' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f3b9830a02687a33366f94465886f9ac
bb57d540d93a495c7c0f7cf322d6cca8b2e202e6
describe
'13224' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBX' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3072b60b4f6343c5c33f98bd564d61a0
84121337d43bb038abb6b0f0c0c14ca4f7685d14
'2012-03-31T08:07:44-04:00'
describe
'247161' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBY' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
8b1cb99b5839a770fa8b136359f429ee
ac83eafc5728bea1b2c18178b2bf15decf32605b
describe
'110390' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMBZ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
10ae810a3dd56d85a1c1be6c05c3d2db
a0fe6d383bfbd659967d96d9efb4f85259d47dee
describe
'36171' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCA' 'sip-files00109.pro'
982ed4756b2725bd248be3f3013aeb93
82aaf5ef833b45e0abd62e7c6d8d49e8e3911d4a
describe
'42218' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCB' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
6b7f66f8b23dd4c66e959560229f0f26
7400ceb4697d2637bfb8343abfe0b0502876f36e
describe
'1978179' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCC' 'sip-files00109.tif'
2e7021a646b4f18b21737c04be0d8792
21e3f5819e1cb22cd68248ddd954e8c2dd015c37
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCD' 'sip-files00109.txt'
f43b4dade6ae3e92eba4b55f0c1cc406
a86b9c396376a41b294604cfa8751f892347d210
describe
'13320' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCE' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1529ae8caee706e82b929eaa7cad81a4
b4ab213336957cdf9f42be3b1175aefe9f081f2c
'2012-03-31T08:06:25-04:00'
describe
'241886' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCF' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
91f54855e3e925fdcb3d94e6498582bf
be5f203903bbadd7352d9fde1f9cb1cd2a324d18
describe
'111738' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCG' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
bae7ed0478a73accd9a66f2bb00f20dc
631e6c130798008fb9cf9dd284dad712c99fe613
describe
'34886' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
12ee14959ba2f47cd89f8c1e7b10b409
239d13c82c15b98a38a53019d5dd1d9b0f8cfa72
describe
'41985' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCI' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
581aabdea95475e4ddec9bc4a8f74c41
4e056ee62b56186269e420de1a48a1233c59e9aa
describe
'1936027' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCJ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e6a4e6321646d2162a7ec8b543439a7f
8a74c28e3474bff95828d8bac3e4db91244f8b16
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCK' 'sip-files00110.txt'
d5f3a9ce10806d9e8082b382c43bb6c9
c089b3e72d807a552dd3bc1e8e860bcfe0fc0534
describe
'12731' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCL' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f8f62abf830462891707f6abf927b97a
4c1f2746a22de707aa55e36600114bf20f496407
describe
'236862' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCM' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
db2356327bde633d4b28872b8874d7a0
789e4d39d428664e6864cf5aa43b21181175758b
describe
'133330' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCN' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
2fd8bbb26424a0e1ba519c701c9453e5
d530544537f084a7ff95f0be0b86ae4d37b46c9a
describe
'33130' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCO' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5813edc39d005acded32f99e46584022
8c4fe3be62e2897fdc765333964cbcd989f45289
'2012-03-31T08:08:53-04:00'
describe
'65294' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCP' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
998882372c2f58f371b9652031d133f9
4330247ba9b046e8cf3e3b0748c3fae58ad1353c
'2012-03-31T08:04:00-04:00'
describe
'1917864' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCQ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
647afdea06cd356154cedc99daec7229
5f56f54e40476d44b40b098dc99cd07169a03cd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCR' 'sip-files00111.txt'
a28235e67cc74b725e24d1686bdd903e
390aa2a5b6a1ed572234e65dbacb416c954c9854
'2012-03-31T08:06:28-04:00'
describe
'36889' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCS' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
c561286042e9f0bd19499aa766a9eec3
53e937a5f5ddb1dbee28681b73cf2950ca8976c7
describe
'236468' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCT' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
e4a848fb5e9745c4b4a4be7bb604ef78
5626b1eb4993a72834199de48b879f1d3d8682ba
'2012-03-31T08:01:29-04:00'
describe
'111385' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCU' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
096d401147fef67d22302684f4d47523
74b20044f51ed9d376c53a5719acde82261dc81b
describe
'34659' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCV' 'sip-files00112.pro'
2ceeb22a4f9462427c52230c27d50e9b
64e1a2a37883159945b907ce936d952e13c89d88
describe
'42047' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCW' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f64207052fcf2cce705c7c89d2e9085f
db123ad296410e420cc2493b778fb56b55a7b109
'2012-03-31T08:02:46-04:00'
describe
'1894215' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCX' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7e733914aac61507565cf304018b8927
cf845db8792cd4da0761b60174c5b322d1c11f12
'2012-03-31T08:04:21-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCY' 'sip-files00112.txt'
62b930bc2b59d8279128184610ec6be6
45548fe50630f6e91b95ca6e9e95653f54fa4dc1
describe
'14001' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMCZ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
0a94cd4a2465b7e42d0b5da4f75a563d
21f895b7997903fe7e97d15793dcc8cd0ba458c4
describe
'242127' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
6bb7f826180a040bbebc0317ee150337
2abaace44ef6b5ca129e4c023ef18ae4e7188835
describe
'118139' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
b4ad7b7f284331b1696da2aa2b93e502
24bf250fcbece939a9060c6c075b78af763af349
describe
'35482' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3fa6bf6157d1bc5938483686a2228d8f
71d524264fc71752c9783cf8ca0eb25baf6062d6
describe
'56928' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
de687d3e78566ea135ad5f0a00c799dd
4d880fe9f647512ab3c5b30862d013c8b0024d47
describe
'1958828' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDE' 'sip-files00113.tif'
2b3f685cb43cec1127b7e92b7ccee86a
bb1a8c1da131c13ca88116232bb032a801edfe70
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
6fd807d012aab9b9693606ac476f2130
3ee750edf01fb1383589bb8a83ba2f427802bd2d
'2012-03-31T08:04:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34573' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDG' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
7ad3354536f8192d0949e1b6944ed643
a4751a1d444688cabf4ca2b92939383e63121dba
'2012-03-31T08:01:45-04:00'
describe
'232842' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
d24b510621b510efb8fea3e7c875bfbb
658b086f15b3feebc0b706544a740d9f5fdefe7f
'2012-03-31T08:00:52-04:00'
describe
'80451' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
60c78dd04574b702c943c82f95f459b7
fb34990982f8a71ec4bd12d6b0e4b6bdb98abd07
describe
'25311' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDJ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9622e5eabf64ddf9a11f0550d4937f5b
a3101558273ff4eaec14cd572aedf2474e0ced0d
describe
'27759' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
355271050dbab82fb983299aaf9189bf
6be61c1ab93c7c0c7f9de3e1d91ac2de76e245a8
describe
'1864439' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
d9eb119ef6fbdff5ece78d2c0915fe2c
2392578b86bb880cc51442009337321eb64fcfa6
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDM' 'sip-files00114.txt'
236276bbd024f1b2075ce3aa9944c218
345f962d39f2186d22ad4d8a8d22b99998f10d84
'2012-03-31T08:04:57-04:00'
describe
'9935' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
f6235bee822c66e566880ba149bb82c4
b159227004ed133389d076427567a04fbc5e4ee4
describe
'236720' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDO' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d1e34e916f445d9e41a44cb545730be2
a6c375933f0209aed8fcf19c3c83d57dfdae019d
describe
'76564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDP' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
f3539843b41b91af25a44d690ef69d4b
a6752b47814b2fd5b3eb3f6e2843b04c8b0012bf
describe
'22532' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDQ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
cecd419fc05353cdc55357a652550c2d
e1ca3408e171e83aee768f02021def83d399e0e2
describe
'27366' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDR' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
eafdbb167dc9ecc8c235fdbc9f796017
d7fa6c530279565492248f8060c1800734e872f4
describe
'1895479' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDS' 'sip-files00115.tif'
754fd3655c76d277a6b82f99774ec878
5bcc4cbc867f34aae02295084311e2cc65882866
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDT' 'sip-files00115.txt'
65c6582d946e9498acda866704f48a72
824776177b6e254537293344165981a24531b5ff
describe
'9791' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDU' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
cb73cbf7314fa711df4baf73b7465fa2
028e74cb892a97781d63536f9507294cef6d7092
describe
'238156' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDV' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
fa542e26d85736f58b7040e15bc36cb8
efa16fbe8c2e0209ad782fc108c9ef4948655b61
describe
'114149' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDW' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b1cf00166d3d45096c2b3c93a3c37aba
e8e70169ede3f5bcecb772866231b664b4fe09eb
describe
'35780' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDX' 'sip-files00116.pro'
59af4d4e3df9929189f6c8f11e00ccb3
4f94337824ff1d0e08bb6a9158e57ffa934e2522
describe
'42517' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDY' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7eca859020aeddaed3c3ba5328b44d8f
3e72ca316a3d68fc079f963f09e1928014ddbd67
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMDZ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
be398999a88d231080fb4b7322d3b465
3be6c870e38730c9c2377fda9be89d91cadf217c
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEA' 'sip-files00116.txt'
6bd96e6e0e2e07ceb7995ae2074be681
d67c905b1e96e2e68609a1faf39c0ab5cbf1a048
describe
'14713' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEB' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
0dad94f6ad4bcde9e073b876a9f3189f
cacb574b8c39f226bbd66111c95883274c453910
describe
'234901' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEC' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
e0718aeb326d50d1084fbb300c199827
e257c0098eff554e8723048a7e0b749399655a5a
describe
'115614' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMED' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
0088c24ff8db53b1d827f0073461b25a
ac66b957fb4227cd99892bc000b61c61cd089570
'2012-03-31T08:02:33-04:00'
describe
'35788' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEE' 'sip-files00117.pro'
d5c66d1a46f499908ef0cd508d851de0
41ce92324f46e224bcffb0b344306b9093f56b8d
describe
'43926' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEF' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d7900b609d1ec79baf07b98e71d30375
dcd6340b2155e5941cb951fb20daab0a9831b400
describe
'1881223' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEG' 'sip-files00117.tif'
ef3c98c2c6607c11fabacc3b6897736d
4a99bb3018e81942211d14ce55dbd35ed6539f99
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEH' 'sip-files00117.txt'
78210e8dc6821ab7d2a9ac65cec83dc3
6fdc4d3bc6aa66cebe14c5d3236671b1908b6c37
describe
'14367' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEI' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
338875b30f6669160527783ec37f1629
57d2ba644f427cbf53669c34f57194e96bde6510
describe
'236957' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEJ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
cc059e9a80312bf577e100d33421da18
3a463965b3fa6956bd97a2a947593f8892254b4f
describe
'117223' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEK' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
561e72e10500b4a710ce62917e8f3509
0f1f109d1d0254572e39ece9875ddc10f506dbe3
describe
'36739' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEL' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ee5cb529cb642e854640034cdae10b13
574613efd1a64593d9ab94196a5af8b678112497
describe
'44337' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d6a4c41ff1b3e0095a8de37f333fc0ed
e34cbc26f63f8e7dad9018272baf28a3589d9a34
describe
'1896907' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEN' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d18b77594038b43133bbb524befb0307
c3269489cc6501ee345eb304274d3537e7fe4aca
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEO' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3bbca69279145ee4bba125701bea7cfe
3172c7d8f9257fae11f71d1a5222835601283b34
describe
'14357' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEP' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
dc7365c074b0d42d685346b1f6da5b22
fc4f71f4c3a34a48d85749f5f8e9b6666fa53b04
describe
'239461' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEQ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
57178f9b547d085ce071a7bd1e22e74c
2cc82ed7e496e6b3fbc791dbf0886aac069fd52f
describe
'114657' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMER' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
0cc2a1ecd054e26dbe1da01009aa4bef
9e8dde63cf5ec61a3b539b7fb5ba22477401a9af
'2012-03-31T08:08:29-04:00'
describe
'35437' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMES' 'sip-files00119.pro'
ee0dbe6b785b69d00363f69969546c0c
1fc7deaaa463c5b809bd52272b0ad11e81337108
describe
'43027' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMET' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
17d90a00db348ee3990b76ea9d47cf22
aec140a010e61aebf4f58ae33bef5c1077d3e685
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEU' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3bd8b65271f379b0188decd421e828f7
819542a270f6bd318c5742232adc34bf932d4f75
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEV' 'sip-files00119.txt'
8ad5d4b5ee5421df15d126acbdc0971e
e17433a55b9c5ba2faa9f31da1f9d3fc9b470a95
'2012-03-31T08:04:59-04:00'
describe
'14278' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEW' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
48845f15cd6f1cb450a193f4d79f9f82
6c50b15c365b076338832655e46c7c0336c9638d
describe
'235673' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
f6364b1d5075b2a2fed2cd7fdacf0791
0691e863c8c24af90c03d8e412f307ba1c5f98f4
describe
'101776' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
2b4aebdbaa8c3ee585886ca7c78961c8
0f2c2fb60f26c92a06e1e5d855312da6d2280ba5
describe
'31851' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMEZ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
775e11011641aabae3aea1b9e8fde3b5
21932ae45a1748a3d0886e87c8193cf31c87533a
'2012-03-31T08:04:16-04:00'
describe
'36886' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFA' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
e21550d00061b42a8ed474c740762e39
e9ed1e479009a2641b1c1791b972a0db83e9bf3c
'2012-03-31T08:08:22-04:00'
describe
'1886071' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFB' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c181c0af59d2331699d01166387cc38f
8987dfa78bb9c90544bd0c90c6544f211e1e2343
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFC' 'sip-files00120.txt'
7ae4f7d41498bf31e678155e301e5cd5
53f6f2d19ce63b5a91f809ab8e90cf5d719891c1
describe
'12121' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFD' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a479511cf181a1bf47dc7c9ac5129832
2c65171211961500cfa130f70dc533707c16095d
describe
'241626' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFE' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
7181e8fbad00c136430c7aa25c1ae32d
14071b3822011e8f206925d7680650211468886d
describe
'81851' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFF' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
2024b83452cc2188b626ea30d4c38f74
f4cc97791ca7a0c1f17d58fb5dd3701b5750f669
'2012-03-31T08:01:24-04:00'
describe
'23029' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFG' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c5b46f30498e48b3516a78194348f5b6
966ab49a47798ee33511f4f72e1cc5ac665c5031
describe
'29271' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFH' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
89699b501660720a49b52159af02ce8e
e97eb9805b382657d1110086dc7c08be77f2e334
describe
'1933887' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFI' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ef926f4c842248836469b089d719504b
49023438ce77701f65d1aef0314f5fa809523a90
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFJ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
8e3b563a9051234ecd73fe212e4395af
5fcfc126065a96bf48582e2c896716a8d600210d
describe
'9708' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFK' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
16d598cdd5e01b94bddb87ed1cc96507
a4b0778dbbc41015a9d8100a406cfa3ce2bafe31
describe
'233379' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFL' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
109902a365baa09c0b3b9d93bd543007
fb27f60cfa8e446688f3b4b5865e1a4410001caf
describe
'136147' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFM' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
a88d804df7458dd5b1e5d5721b4d5291
fe3ce9a88117ab84e88de60e038b93984fcfe4bc
'2012-03-31T08:03:47-04:00'
describe
'33353' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFN' 'sip-files00122.pro'
5ae06f50e630da7abec5332494ddc16b
751cd55879dea98c4eabd62de09df16b956a69fb
describe
'66056' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFO' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e12d4eac6f1f9f84bfb0a787cb17bf35
71db99f2327ee15b853ff213112c4ecea7a9eac1
describe
'1889840' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFP' 'sip-files00122.tif'
b447240df0e78f37b9cc28a82fc079bb
ef5c49c3956e7d396d55b94c2c6c71da66d9ea08
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFQ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
9d632c17852514ceb720677eae9967ab
adffff3dda4451207849dbb0ebc1c88a86d82a21
describe
'37848' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFR' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
b307b04d60b74f5c9e71188261355011
0f9956e7b40a0595bd6311064c555789f8ddc491
'2012-03-31T08:00:37-04:00'
describe
'237046' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFS' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
c179acda2f99f33ad9d1050e65841cb2
13c995aed097d6fe0c2648987d2ae422f579e39f
'2012-03-31T08:01:09-04:00'
describe
'135714' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFT' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
0c565790cb831864f990061fc69ce2a3
7773dabdc726220f39182318d3ed56dd9014b395
describe
'34737' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFU' 'sip-files00123.pro'
040e1e65a44f0daf97dfd1e9bf8149ac
b214599feba0b1798a4c230160e3a5bb3625edc5
describe
'66591' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFV' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
7cbd4209a71ff6541b14b0fbd0007097
033759744e12153dc0496e4731309c52cde47d31
describe
'1919552' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFW' 'sip-files00123.tif'
c82431628d205e90d016cc54deb60d5a
9be36331358ba1d6ba64e8e4bd981e19c9032115
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFX' 'sip-files00123.txt'
5e90aa17b3a61e611db02484f6b666a0
441771a45e0941624c3da593afc0d544ae1f9b93
describe
'36799' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFY' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
7d516ecbfdb1ef7c096ee44bb4ad85bd
4e7a7b8060dcffde0a99f4a976ad9a7cda2d4332
describe
'232485' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMFZ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2776bfc74e28fcf8a3359be42c704527
83fb60b2fb52e98ea75123e76cd73bfc3f60de55
describe
'105992' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGA' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
a6e14757c650408edc8d720f8fc41fbb
255deb51a89c36163528a4f0b5f95c4490250531
describe
'31495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGB' 'sip-files00124.pro'
3579d49800c5357bcfd589a923b34ff5
6c4eaabcb46f1163da1d532e1489527e05b4a743
describe
'39674' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGC' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
9c6e30c36dfefacb71ac01d450318411
1450c360610d915a1b92bc52f87c481fae2a1320
'2012-03-31T08:05:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGD' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f44a8b359e3250d60621e41787591bca
2ccc2171b4c81911888bccccfa3abcfa2601f97b
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGE' 'sip-files00124.txt'
2900a134fa661d82de206bef18c3dfb8
9787b025f2f42ff0e045e5225691fb73d0150e77
describe
'14117' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGF' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
bb687dc39d6ea9391bf3de86c95573c4
8ed7e03df288f3467a8d97909b19862cb2822aad
'2012-03-31T08:00:47-04:00'
describe
'235330' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGG' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
90518ae8f40a46c50b999c264ee2ddc9
8ae319497e16c0a32dfb74f11d8b7622ae41da0d
describe
'108902' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGH' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a7a203e929d241fc9275d1d6c8aeda32
e9a09339a5a1fe83f9951e03abd5ad502214a8ee
'2012-03-31T08:06:35-04:00'
describe
'35319' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGI' 'sip-files00125.pro'
453646360ec6464e3b7343343c4d3885
0f68cb8d57c6f16b05bf4e5999dc269d31f5f574
describe
'39856' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGJ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
bb10149b7f39e6d84cb12cc00179d63f
b79ca7b1b3661cd7424d5cb0145fbce720383928
'2012-03-31T08:03:28-04:00'
describe
'1883363' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGK' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a2f2c97d0c50f8d5d367762393973298
38d92be00d54bb400850add20ce3fc04f77eb6e7
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGL' 'sip-files00125.txt'
1a71fa48ed53976c9c62b906b35ac003
dbfd0ab6bf8a93940b5b13e8a550b547a4505256
describe
Invalid character
'13568' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGM' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
983cd7d7541e7765e05036ad43103ea4
44c427ee59caba897b3331ce16d166b2e88b4818
'2012-03-31T08:07:42-04:00'
describe
'236580' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGN' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
293413649deed215ac1cbee0b779e0d7
b70abea8468d64a6d8c4cc7f449fb87ccee6e250
describe
'68188' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGO' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
edfbbc0b6f1f1397adfaeafbd3b81ee4
e0f88e06c2db1361356b150cae728e5894d2cbc3
describe
'15952' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGP' 'sip-files00126.pro'
c6fd88e1812a8c337c2c9070f4d69c7d
ec5cf8d0703c61ad589dfdff4d0c10c05b8333a1
describe
'23312' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGQ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
13c293c9dca0ca3fd083eeb895cca67e
c42813fa0e82a6b9a78b336bcc6c4065e885871b
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGR' 'sip-files00126.tif'
5153b116af303c88d1ee394613869ec1
523f43111d0c69a7b127bd4651cf2b2bc60bae57
'2012-03-31T08:06:40-04:00'
describe
'686' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGS' 'sip-files00126.txt'
82158f4139dc2a3804adfce27455b407
99427e95883207af910a8c256fcfb6d244b11529
'2012-03-31T08:05:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8113' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGT' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
d468e940326a377a71c21114cb0eba0a
42d467578c09dd7f02f896a99b18ea7acc1ddb5e
'2012-03-31T08:02:40-04:00'
describe
'239144' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGU' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
98596f8689263830998dce088f366195
516eaf2769a30f491e18806fc7cca66ebf579a01
describe
'102313' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGV' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
2daafb06db53c0360ce4e8823ef3a7d8
35d5a52fbd5c1455a3566cd332589ac98a999448
describe
'31761' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGW' 'sip-files00127.pro'
a419680ad75f845e695dcbd159404213
8e8eba35e7abca1c9a7a99c998017e1307b0a5e5
describe
'38373' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGX' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
27eecaf87a0e00925d1734cf0af46564
cdefdfcfadf09a4a58ebdc258abb5de6b9d1f458
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGY' 'sip-files00127.tif'
74392ba635caf03700ce9d6c5d5c30d6
112f59bda59a7644f7ae33fc020e334df009024a
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMGZ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
9214d2428eed5907425abe5966157385
f1a7f00b9354aafd6f96456c05e602f34ac080e8
describe
'13378' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHA' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
d5feaf2f504b3a3006a6ae5915b5b0d8
6ba486f954367675e7131fee6be54192ceaa5ab1
describe
'239264' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHB' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a9a46fbe7fdef38e2b9be05203200c4a
06b5524be81c66d912bae7ec85d72fb30697cec9
describe
'111357' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHC' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
d979b27c2cc67694d1bd39dd19870e7b
8df340caf0d88049b2788d95f2560ce9f7397f79
describe
'33702' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHD' 'sip-files00128.pro'
3bc8069b693a8329bae15e7446028d26
36b31920d15fe3b3f505547ee2934a7b00d61b8d
describe
'42642' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHE' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
85203193137805674c658a7f0173d979
956ec53961a142f1eff8c072e74cb09792819e34
describe
'1917415' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHF' 'sip-files00128.tif'
958c9a4a8b15ee6d408bf3944ed9d3de
aac6c0ded77d7c0130dbea22c104bf0288c253e5
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHG' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1a5e29082e985a4e00a6ea3bd0a26242
d22d3d7bb7b8bcc22c8c84f043adf4a9482b0f5a
describe
'14049' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHH' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
95c293cb89202c0a74102c4d64e02757
f95926cff7d12107e697e32b7fcab7d15075a3ff
describe
'233318' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHI' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
92513214979f5ab3ba6c4be4fbf9f3c5
09facdf8f88f32069938375b7cfce0d7c211a7c9
describe
'111412' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHJ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a49ac582dd627cec4a1a7113e443d155
a96f3458ee496b88ffa3de2c28a35c0a06b6d4df
'2012-03-31T08:08:57-04:00'
describe
'35006' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHK' 'sip-files00129.pro'
6fd200c900b801bccbd3b2d0c4b625f1
f4efa3401b35aaaa78aa6568cd1971b132e17a40
describe
'41902' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHL' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
94b1e219023ec83ef6dd0d034e9af2a0
f7a32bec524e30f77078907014b83b713a1a2def
describe
'1868443' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHM' 'sip-files00129.tif'
9684918eca8c2d93ea455a843fe06af6
829cfff5e90bf30fabb2044999a9035e2275ef91
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHN' 'sip-files00129.txt'
8775c6ede1fe7a1ba0ecc332a0f28749
f4600adefaa530cf66a2118c09bf056a85aac89b
describe
'14276' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHO' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
553348d4e42463fe8b4c33e5d072c6c6
82943a304bc2c34ef2e96d75b4002dea73f69e24
'2012-03-31T08:02:13-04:00'
describe
'230514' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHP' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
c8a66dd9ee5d4ddb81532a50609e5ff7
ae6f9a1287616d2607d3975da8d519f283ca3b6b
describe
'106502' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHQ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
cf6f48087edb6652fafa0ca82b17492f
7bf36494721ba4f974c945b825eb5600695c2eba
describe
'31619' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHR' 'sip-files00130.pro'
c21191eb5b707c7896ac22c2d5842458
eed76959fc6b19852ac8e50f08da03831d7df0d6
describe
'40270' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHS' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
1603d3782c7365888db2778f22d8cf84
ba9ef08f1d5aa90a149b422576b79babf8f37354
'2012-03-31T08:00:32-04:00'
describe
'1845023' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHT' 'sip-files00130.tif'
7e11dfb48a2cdb6004fdd85667c2a194
3ec1df7b9b81baf43538bb55217ccdcec80437d6
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHU' 'sip-files00130.txt'
69d292a56ca4db64bafee02915e27c99
2d52a781b88b7e0febda987f39e7f02a62bb12a8
describe
'14012' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHV' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d5f5b6335b9e9a038803dec9486fb1bc
98c92fc0415d72e1db6f248d778498b45f68af79
describe
'228724' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHW' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
09e071e05773ed168ea4e5680b9e7db5
c020acbde4c43a36fb07dd7739a226e410eda1ab
'2012-03-31T08:01:35-04:00'
describe
'102776' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHX' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
4df43ab1081dc2c3c4bc977395bbe462
c20e203784b8bec5df117b82542238a7eb0da71f
'2012-03-31T08:08:58-04:00'
describe
'31165' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
799460d0b436b99531a7dbb33915aa2e
1b656b982a314458360b6ba15e7a21bc239eb9b7
describe
'40341' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMHZ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
70dd11accf1adfdf920aef7aa5be0f7c
46d44b977972d40bb79906cb175fbb8d2925535d
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIA' 'sip-files00131.tif'
9ad2fa4b98c23ca9487e005f803627df
6a1553a8f767835b1b4e93c865b81a810bd53965
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIB' 'sip-files00131.txt'
273f6fa1ab8b4a5e3ac8a8b3494df7ec
44bf167cf336a4eb6c7935df7a556634a39218ee
describe
'14858' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIC' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
08a9dba55d62b614144aa6554b1c9cb1
9b6ecd4406b3ff5dd0c467a4ec8bd77a5ace7431
describe
'236789' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMID' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
cdc7256b59cae45dcbe2159e2c4acd04
282218548c81b0f90c5cc9738309dcf86cdc269e
describe
'94676' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIE' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
7e68d4c6398fd2129cb5e7b2d4d9d252
cf6a85a277cfd7966fc68441ea0216f6ac8f3243
describe
'28262' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIF' 'sip-files00132.pro'
2e3b769dbb90e1519d6f0de2e9b20a89
4aba3005e71a7997868b79fb5db5cedd7d623bd1
describe
'34687' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIG' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
38d4b7e529614cf657555d4578b2ec14
08d2553b7f3fb670c1ac466890dddf48b1852165
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIH' 'sip-files00132.tif'
5482a9ffce20bddd9bea9ce2d226d2e1
cdd104999e086c3cc902322a56a2b85c44d7e6fd
'2012-03-31T08:01:31-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMII' 'sip-files00132.txt'
64f2e7435f9968e9ba59aa9d79602b17
d4d4a98f32c41f7f42f24b80cb6c576f61263d31
describe
'12538' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIJ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
be2c50d119a8c49ea87bb48e5fe1e376
8ab15a663a8d3dabcc3a2bda8af2e119e7315eae
'2012-03-31T08:00:46-04:00'
describe
'231004' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIK' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
4529d509c315b9facfdbb01cac3c2dfa
7aa6a0f2cbb7608bef1f0e32b2395b1bf5ed0235
describe
'92694' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIL' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
6807b45bbdf78551905d41a0fbca7302
d3fa26f501c513f0fbf71488970e7a52ff4c2e77
describe
'27619' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIM' 'sip-files00133.pro'
48f11c3433402a2edb02a0c7c7b8d8f6
9ba0bbb4e64481f06f57f61431235cdc84d087ae
describe
'34707' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIN' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
45d34a6f865fb06cfa8d0c2f6fadf270
af5d015774fc29b2cc83b8283804c36766f8c8a6
describe
'1849011' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIO' 'sip-files00133.tif'
d479c5df00d18df9ef120fa2db4b9eee
21cd5023ef2a1e0b4212d0a305a72fc428323e1c
'2012-03-31T08:07:31-04:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIP' 'sip-files00133.txt'
3327099425f0421c7e9401a012519cae
cbd1d8c869ab600027350ad4c5637ea6009216fc
describe
'12688' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIQ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
feb35beb183bf2033229dfc9aa628ac1
58d2297774ec0d77b330b3094befacb36b8339f2
describe
'233191' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIR' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
faca1bcb0cc061082a700c1875fb56d3
ac8714e60de1af6b0fd56d3a41191cf30eb6d348
describe
'108844' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIS' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
1e5cc1384393371d8e24c7e4d6b73e56
4998bbf7dcd243a5a00bd9ee89d2dd2266808b4f
describe
'33495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIT' 'sip-files00134.pro'
59f4842e958fb3ae56c55b7f2a92c923
f17b83279683da0e21914fdffecc46db14176cd7
describe
'41443' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIU' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
c5f09363411f876f6c4d9768c0f7b55a
5b0685e9797fdae035235a263eb8defbac966134
describe
'1867855' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIV' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c64534093067a9d7589b6a3c4d3eef14
6f1450fad6e393d66eced3d3bd2d94b248cab8e6
'2012-03-31T08:06:05-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIW' 'sip-files00134.txt'
5253c42f0c56e7a0ef8009cf24456385
50595a27baa69a10375d367b2c46de62407a170d
describe
'14241' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIX' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
31855a2ba1cdddf452e686c29bd7f9c2
1afed1a4a70dc8bf1855c6d713becc8ea748fd98
'2012-03-31T08:01:10-04:00'
describe
'237558' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIY' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
f245b9e790a5f3d065089986b1b99c02
0cba194a6893c2aa3bf93792fb4479a461b66aeb
describe
'105574' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMIZ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2b42a3ed0d4a971ea29ea948096b7ec2
c276fe1e1c97378cca3484b2167b8f3f946221ac
'2012-03-31T08:04:50-04:00'
describe
'32242' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJA' 'sip-files00135.pro'
4b64a408a74647913c3f91eb5c23f949
ea6a1d67465d7124931da05442746f287cf574de
describe
'40105' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJB' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
e33d9732994d81220ffc79a2debbefaf
3b4afcf0d7499288f1f3f35b1db8037d41b2b7e2
describe
'1901659' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJC' 'sip-files00135.tif'
0b0b7a7e18d7e49ba354608831c37320
71ce37e7f82694d4c13955c59938edbef9d1d6dd
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJD' 'sip-files00135.txt'
f4459aaef3d5c72801894f4923545e6c
7bf44be53ad219e8c60f410d357229f72dfe0fd1
describe
'13129' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJE' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
1e167bee6873335b3497c14b75000f81
1addcb473a8cc544959af6d9d9ecf85fd1495f93
describe
'239982' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJF' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
866f1f1563105aecff2b876211faeac7
f17770888a0c351902081cd25717bd0371d25bc2
describe
'97650' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJG' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
da1c32d9897c966d8a5cf60da597f610
431350a21299d5638a9b8059943d7f4a00449726
describe
'27294' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJH' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e5ab62b6663aaf6ca0ae396167ccbee1
a1858c6d5f652fe9b08a223021230c872bd020f7
describe
'36871' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJI' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
afb7c977eff156851f548620bb0d732d
82cb6ba17135437570e6425add6c35e3df75de01
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJJ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
8fe51749b6bc6aaf8d08857f1fd10295
60f230c0aea367da4e5cf1f5fec8ec8641d54f05
'2012-03-31T08:02:36-04:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJK' 'sip-files00136.txt'
5b0661d75f093389ee98d51b97fd053a
0cb62682fda3bcabaa46452ae8ba661e3c91fbd9
describe
'11926' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJL' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
3e933e5936c654237bc78a050fe37b28
0062f3a9b910f51d7a4707f74c1ce81845310244
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJM' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
a49fba9a9dd0e539f4372f62fa70fcee
ca492eef7820e4a42ec32067e5e534995f55dce5
describe
'120539' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJN' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
82f597ecfb5d92bb223467c8a46465ae
762a7c31e051306506920e8dce02e55e34f2e0a9
describe
'26939' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJO' 'sip-files00137.pro'
9e0ccae32feb53d90e097b577c4f1522
84c37d76cb6d00738adb7f4ac50b33ba1b6e0ed9
'2012-03-31T08:02:54-04:00'
describe
'59021' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJP' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
e1d51484a5fa304dc914b6bbde27bb28
fc0ff8889fa024bc61dc0d567344fc7bcf05da04
describe
'1961780' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJQ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
b4604696f9bd1e0faf3e30e444d00435
ec34b8bb772cd7b61028aa45f342d000b06b07e1
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJR' 'sip-files00137.txt'
07b0ed02a1b973a528903c927ba8ea4a
e4759c1179a84aba6bd229f01b5d1906b43fa417
describe
'34698' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJS' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
9010b4467ccde8239da05a7ecaefaf60
d316292a3f517ad6376134c5ba99d02193eecbf8
'2012-03-31T08:05:44-04:00'
describe
'242266' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJT' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
56d93718bf593e39fa0e61dc4e8f54dd
1932d35f1d78c87c097e247553bb7481cfb8b696
describe
'113343' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJU' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
da96188f8497e25a17799ba3098bdfc4
e4ccd83127d8c66cbf6407f786d5ab7626dbe879
'2012-03-31T08:04:22-04:00'
describe
'33147' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJV' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e7209681cc612a764e5387234bbd4bf5
05ae4fd43fd2cefd2d4c635d01ab6262c592999b
'2012-03-31T08:02:47-04:00'
describe
'42272' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJW' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
e5ec876608ffeebbf35d4d0647e40de7
b7073ed4b14bef6a189abc65c63e4b493cacdb36
describe
'1938991' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJX' 'sip-files00138.tif'
fdefa13d7757b49602e17ed79ff7ec7a
2bcadb649382666fc369a4a2cd20fbee672acb11
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJY' 'sip-files00138.txt'
10aab09d6bd855ed64579582883b5589
b71a3c1c2a83db8004b678f48cdc9fdbf136f115
describe
'13709' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMJZ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
84dc4748f6a97c86a97d98832f2d86b4
8bafe6c82343bdfcd8f965773c3159bde85e71c8
describe
'238534' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKA' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
72cef2fc9fc65922b60b8153f0142379
01d63187332155a735f76cace8b4bdd56f4f49f4
describe
'114057' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKB' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
33ba331e1097869e9b8ed98b3020d565
2a80a2c86e9d6eaede3e66ee0df813c4a082cd26
describe
'35611' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKC' 'sip-files00139.pro'
229f1b48a35c5e0b7836734ebd376f33
01228c6fca836a20301fce3243331e7444277153
'2012-03-31T08:01:46-04:00'
describe
'43536' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKD' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
0250a4ecfc1331164cd2b81712c36821
63c2bf0e4b66a7687b1d93b8bf1ca158a01505b9
describe
'1909215' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKE' 'sip-files00139.tif'
650b70d3281f63e919c59e0d001df64e
a14684fe791ce05b7d2992e3c8b6cc4ce41ed799
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKF' 'sip-files00139.txt'
e7a047e0300a6b1eca148c642aed78a2
e24da9ef68701a1d1e2a9681974b792c07c3463e
describe
'14076' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKG' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
aee2a519747ccf13560fb75ec0baead3
a843a949a88829a7b0d2ce69c6b6fa006478f7b7
'2012-03-31T08:01:05-04:00'
describe
'236768' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKH' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
ed8bd55054c108553e83878e2aa74bf5
1f1bd62f255973ef0ff5e403e06a4bc8c0fed24e
'2012-03-31T08:06:51-04:00'
describe
'108253' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKI' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
7cd3d29de09a9b1bb16522f8ace1adcf
bdfda747bfbfcdfcf8f28f830cf96cad5ae3f3d3
describe
'32997' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKJ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
b3afe23396e1d77422b6a9afc42c91db
7dbf98ca8fc96b461dab533045068f9ded140cb0
'2012-03-31T08:03:50-04:00'
describe
'40791' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKK' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6a02f23fa989c477618ea392ff3d95c5
d7d7b59c601cc586a9b00ffcae7641822f7061fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKL' 'sip-files00140.tif'
3a49f4f093616706d48c9e8ababafe5f
7b98cdaab2cf88304ccb4b26ebcac696b9e497b4
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKM' 'sip-files00140.txt'
630dbfd08fb9e899520c203a701c8322
04c2696e1dea4a9620f5e6b0f8e1b3b9607ce2ec
describe
'13720' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKN' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
a87c17711c91058fa02fd101633538c7
8542b2dd9a340f783d7d29766c0cdbdb1d419984
'2012-03-31T08:00:34-04:00'
describe
'231190' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKO' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
0cebfb837ce8561c9e3867cb5237eb14
fbf25004d4aff49cc89f81fd13a2fff968dfa906
describe
'112344' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKP' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
0ee6d52f0447c0df1c9411de765e4b41
7d0f076df8376cc917a81bdda1790b5ff7519f3e
describe
'36841' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKQ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
078ccedc0bceb71689ba6ebe62221f99
2fa6593af5e4e44f7163b0a5b289f32feba90fd5
describe
'42527' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKR' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
d6c463d156b19a8743f43d562ff1612b
16dc316df8a9bd52aa7fe6bb8848aca51b67dbfc
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKS' 'sip-files00141.tif'
482a80e1d846d0e565d2bf820f0577fb
c28d9df99bdfbbf2187cccafa5b3895a3038b268
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKT' 'sip-files00141.txt'
8a2fc4b6884b3c07a5c8c11e989cf12f
741ad635060bc6aed498710f05534526fd5250b4
describe
'15177' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKU' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f941acfae19bbbd41cd4c0732c3f8a6a
b55289b3b3ee3be09f51d317f25aa1dee8b9a11a
describe
'235812' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKV' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
625f4ae9eb18e600116fb5f597c9a472
945cd1a6a3270a20912905062a68b0cde35389bc
describe
'108259' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKW' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
73825b67aa169055deccf304279e84d0
3d47154c507825c3d1c29bab0e66a0f8381d6ecc
describe
'33489' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKX' 'sip-files00142.pro'
fd4069631637273980a998fddba17928
d80222f677e4a3035221cc2ae56c89feeef8e989
describe
'40944' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKY' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5233cd4ac568005008025fa298400311
1d30cd9738a1efaf95d4b8de4b8506fdea8c296d
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMKZ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0aa63910d62ecb01fb952e942ff471ef
4e7e8c3bf1a8391abd50f4893b9195bca4769588
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLA' 'sip-files00142.txt'
455e892db2b9fc01718c03be8782e6a4
9bf379f772fd2ee54a7fd8a1ca5546069a62e960
describe
'14252' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLB' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
74f8d054ea4eb843faface007bc5c559
b6056a65016694d02474e9f6f5b4f86d29883296
describe
'236337' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLC' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c72e6bd1827e0723cbf25a6baf9300a1
25163c4276dacce05d948777bc9ef7320f81008f
describe
'96807' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLD' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
08a2763469aefc3c327156ee42c1d7ea
5f4dffba9ce6388af748b1fe691095bf2d9e7eb6
'2012-03-31T08:03:26-04:00'
describe
'28382' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLE' 'sip-files00143.pro'
31889fa2864cee281bae5843fbc73e2a
95c2daf53f3ec2acb7f27404c41bee10a69ac654
describe
'35787' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLF' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
53fc2d0396a94014c35bcd70353c36ce
ad171679915c8e527727051a234977cd693fed7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLG' 'sip-files00143.tif'
109822594af9b8bb3bb4e0a984c154d0
c04e13ff4b24ce15167b6709ef58d91f9ff5d8b8
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLH' 'sip-files00143.txt'
2f0412da8430bf697c2dbda2375366f1
c309bd45c5f9fb562b7035d2a92a78830911c612
describe
'12140' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLI' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
f2e64bb3cb85b8ce91c593be0fee1ded
c6ad4baaf9a9f7614d653bba997bb62631112eb5
describe
'235156' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLJ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
e70c07111f2461ba0fab29f1d48efc83
0f187501b458ad07a4bcd78fefe62f8569459ba2
describe
'85702' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLK' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
edb70db0a25e6c69c273177a4f9a602b
72dcd933dce84afe7bd851ec19812ae197ab2bc2
describe
'26869' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLL' 'sip-files00144.pro'
d25363f416ced47be8e06c2171a319f5
cb351fa2caa83d9cee8253be6e02f209067f0563
describe
'30123' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLM' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
5482fed972853b023728b6656869c0d6
9c92dbd839fb8b923d8f662e703818135bcc31bb
'2012-03-31T08:02:23-04:00'
describe
'1882003' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLN' 'sip-files00144.tif'
7fcad4752229942856453c7fb9f53b51
b153a2d8edcccb213674dbadaa2ea9849e3e995a
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLO' 'sip-files00144.txt'
a308a6ea6023e8a078d7a4ab52b0ff7d
62c64c07b6f97e7f732a1926318b24038a8cd4c4
describe
'10445' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLP' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
992ba133ba985515b69cff51fd7c0160
fad78a4f3f08d83cae6efbfd005e6337518235a5
describe
'232434' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLQ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
8382d896c6dccdab33b1ff7f5d6ec888
89d8bdc98fa2ddb0e7f520eb3b5f4295f9549a17
describe
'71713' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLR' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
86fe86bc8c11f7810e5ed48b38c4ae67
75d10d77027aa5b2f6e944cd1b886c204add9e60
describe
'22877' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLS' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e6c92704c063158066b614a2c461ea0c
40f56c600af448f7662fb456b27992a230469c31
describe
'25461' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLT' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
50526f90b6e49dffed28b0875119ba4b
093c16fd3782dd413392a365a0876918cfe0aa06
describe
'1860427' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLU' 'sip-files00145.tif'
1b0fa14cfb62db00459368916569b17c
79d45de73a094fe23cf4c629d01fd1ab6c290506
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLV' 'sip-files00145.txt'
8367678801e9acc312c2b82144ee29fe
3c8033e47e15dceab2765c3f0772917fda6b95a6
describe
'9104' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLW' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
839d372ec09288420b319af37ebb74cf
cf20d57bfba21905f1c9d0cddcd567c881b47be1
describe
'237938' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLX' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
17ca5aae18f928bfaf0773ba6405d7ad
6810276b201b2279b99a193142eb72a4179826df
describe
'87710' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLY' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
1d3a9352918d36d98064c2217c0f0a34
d8f911bc1963d4059711c5099799b59fe7c37489
describe
'25819' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMLZ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
bc566656c4698f35d4834aa521f0e825
f433d2bb225fd456c8507b0951ba600accc4fc3c
describe
'32285' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMA' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
6e300be2482e952a5b4da4e0afb8c06b
7244489eeaccf7ae85757998e478f8aca6247d83
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMB' 'sip-files00146.tif'
c6e459a79a542aea2d6f3498bbf236b9
4a17841e6e2bf18e9904afac8101ae02091fd75d
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMC' 'sip-files00146.txt'
6131d31ff1f51578874745deb15e3071
162c2ced0effbe35614908deee1af8345373150f
describe
'11137' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMD' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6edb4a8dc390edc7d06d1e8c4f2d0d98
26c87b593f5cb75c54fb8605e807b3000b74674d
describe
'234817' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMME' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7054521f0cef5b52e04756ba2204959f
707bc41fba81964ab0d93da5bea58f4770aeb31a
'2012-03-31T08:06:03-04:00'
describe
'113539' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMF' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
7fd335398bb0125a9c7a241d8a80a64a
d7823438dc18b0a454d9f51f508369b0ae183cd7
describe
'36346' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMG' 'sip-files00147.pro'
45da98043266373f854726c7b4f08384
eb66c0e2f3975e0b79d77af885bdedbbaaa5b431
'2012-03-31T08:01:54-04:00'
describe
'43338' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMH' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
e01710ff3505c61150d42575c1543a39
c37bd04a46b4efdb1adad7bab828f9fdce3d3eba
describe
'1880463' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMI' 'sip-files00147.tif'
96d70ab754e4205480d4059b5bec4e2f
6833d229a439e84ceebb34087479eb5369bde435
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMJ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
9a95d5b8eecf77c9eb0c54f7462926a1
92e42530df9a4cd77ace3c8fbf7ad696b0bf19b4
describe
'14932' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMK' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
6f226d800a836fcb123b852d68ffa75e
95055c451a007580a84eb8beb6ac693b5d9d624d
describe
'237067' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMML' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
67dfe52ebb12a100151822897c4b026e
3ca4eff2ee842247c741232ea69af42dddb39e21
'2012-03-31T08:01:30-04:00'
describe
'114913' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMM' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
492343999cfaccca9a06006674867985
985fe515ebede7bc1911cea6de9a1b8d40a9f1bc
describe
'34480' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMN' 'sip-files00148.pro'
c1e0bac28e1499ca6fc88e54f4243de5
8648c15c993b24d65a208700022d12fd25798aa5
describe
'43747' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMO' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
fd1001f4ea5de1b766f4e5374e3d7986
b7c7eaf8733dad3387434d0cf2631dc9be077361
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMP' 'sip-files00148.tif'
9682336616ec5d3a4fb7a4feca1ae43f
7b7c496c629c829972e4c7e24a6d9d6a6ea3dbbb
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMQ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
7ae7a4a6949d418446b0589ada0afd17
017ed79be604ccb8554a066733ff189d8b39c94e
describe
'14605' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMR' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
759ef2f555150f198db3aba651d44604
aa4bc6a1ed55aaa8c7eb68bd781b4e9b9374eb83
describe
'236688' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMS' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
c79f4f1f58536d878f7118ee10f0c7c1
d7611dc33c0c7213246cafc0c13a243953de146f
describe
'112599' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMT' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
e37e37322d412d3be58340afa850a17d
d76610bf5f32f57b7c39603263aac5b4ba3031cc
describe
'35211' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMU' 'sip-files00149.pro'
20c458743a5ec23f214e14a9eae9cda2
f9376ed957ebccb422ac406e827cfecdf0dfb44c
describe
'42497' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMV' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
6393fff70b3fe96106c339644a5a3b15
ded171f8e1219f89f9e560437156934344101905
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMW' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e06ea5c7211eebc0a713b5d657a3823f
965c2bfc5fcae7c963570c0f4080a760331dc893
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMX' 'sip-files00149.txt'
d48a467dcdd448a9900d396652b09b78
76177d2ce8793f6f591224856a406cb4d9560b99
'2012-03-31T08:04:09-04:00'
describe
'14103' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMY' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
98fa349a7141a9dfd23070fa10c191ac
2230a9e38314ecadb7a7dcfaf5b1e3c59068f6fb
describe
'238945' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMMZ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
8220828b53535e04e353f7c99b926f1a
ee1f8c4926d00fb7e84c6a9fed699b0f8e412877
describe
'114235' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNA' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
545d7dc5456aa52468596339e77821a4
48ad325d1e16c134e5e5a9b6a5dcd1d31f4e18df
describe
'35328' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNB' 'sip-files00150.pro'
f4a3057d732cf1eb6c6294e9daab3616
f78ec823f3d35722d6d041f681cea82a679553bf
describe
'43216' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNC' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
814e1136b6f0d7881eaaf1b602f3adea
8f6e4540857473474ef9e9b0b127156c0b1c2c2f
'2012-03-31T08:00:40-04:00'
describe
'1913315' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMND' 'sip-files00150.tif'
097d16c68a6bb9791a970938d0e753cb
3c2a6cb4da56ccd943955c5341526cd16717741a
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNE' 'sip-files00150.txt'
516cb77242c116aaad1f475d23459c4a
324bca19e76a76417b6d11f65b8404b625a9fbb3
describe
'13873' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNF' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
89db61108c8744e2059f54506d1df6d0
c0ed9540c1b8072c30e68b684d21a3e1b9276681
describe
'230441' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNG' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
f2612d2e25d489a33c806acf35408056
0eae2ed900550478466611bc59366b79d74ab45f
describe
'97818' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNH' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
762c085f9e24cdd93dc1d930d8090c4a
283457e596c83039546d68d8dd8035ef7ac49183
describe
'34016' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNI' 'sip-files00151.pro'
a037e10a1f08abe4831f9717caf17d15
a2b3e902f376d33cbe81de7024efd228513020b9
describe
'35056' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNJ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
4e0385cc693d42fbadb0d5807520f7ed
ad65618b95088deadcc33afc6f77a60603870f90
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNK' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f575e421bf875d423eff23e3622cfaaa
b199d79957262fd7c14886134c1acd6f11de6601
'2012-03-31T08:04:55-04:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNL' 'sip-files00151.txt'
4d1d30072e22a8fb5c4a7b182956de58
1ec73227523baba5df3b85612edbb84586194d9c
describe
'12358' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNM' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
c3d40efd51553c70cd67c0962c163e14
9c446b35b9323ef7430c8dd4ba38140215aa7bf6
describe
'233792' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNN' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ae518597268b3638275c8c0a8ed4269d
32f8898b2621e212cd1755e732fb5317c1b99d23
describe
'84969' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNO' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
b24ab7fc7de8671bd5b48f371a4ec20a
007386846d52e01da9bf261de93f79189339eab3
describe
'30160' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNP' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9bd110be8f39d91d6a7959bc2f9870d4
3b65a5f2eec8f791e5193bd558e510db1dd5837b
describe
'28801' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNQ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
c9271b69f1220fa79aa13226b7cbc123
5a3c830e5c62f2a7a674425188ca7c9898ec6567
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNR' 'sip-files00152.tif'
0286aa0192dd0c66d33a083fe66ec7c5
0fd5ec66b458eedc7a4d1154e1b5b8250062208f
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNS' 'sip-files00152.txt'
d1d32a7b1b70260ae0474d7d94e83fda
42c730d200900955c3c38c5d1b44912c8cf41375
describe
'10050' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNT' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
23df160099579031f54d9d17adc5c450
9b929d82fd62f07a24b73d85dd2b920199a25577
describe
'240759' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNU' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
65282bf7053e060322deef049258a2e5
00f79fa0e4e6c890285f2095b07320e1cb5850fa
describe
'100109' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNV' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
ced25607bca1cc36e024d14a33945972
5e67934cfc3513315bace126ec56cc67f455c2a8
describe
'33481' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNW' 'sip-files00153.pro'
4145878662b3f855b52e05f44d63aaee
445e7b603208be55d95cc5a463babac7b9e20e3f
describe
'37081' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNX' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
8d9f0095ef2f5f2001558a3ca5e6606d
f9634b309157aa10e3067d57bdb345da63c0d084
describe
'1927391' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNY' 'sip-files00153.tif'
f74d1b1f3180b0d46d9baa98fc1f4b0d
560861b852972e009ff625d559e5c160db363510
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMNZ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
f064c98d21abba9ce44fda8c8cef958d
514d9ef62cb545b72cd58352d6309bd803b3ecb0
describe
'11883' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOA' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
4e49b9ea09109403ecb3943ac98561a5
342ac0bdb5e9f5ed90ae4a7bf9d32a1eb4b65704
describe
'242530' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOB' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
2ef958736fc8301d17f7994e608f520e
d6fe139740c949f1ed493c3aedec40e358d94203
describe
'110343' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOC' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
2449745665f46e8a31ef49ca2d20bd19
2a9a5a861bec109064ca1aa7e445a886c5209aff
describe
'32935' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOD' 'sip-files00154.pro'
5899eee4a69f4419c080b4503bf6d8a0
48a673659c6ca3b1723164327e400cbd28dcd718
describe
'41803' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOE' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
2ebd49e144c83d75a17fbba3aafc5ce7
b6810b2fac6e72b1260d2673f21e28bc6f89b81e
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOF' 'sip-files00154.tif'
cceb1c060a7b1a84fa0b316ce3042e45
e13ec68187840f8b1ae398bf0d6a91b3c980d317
'2012-03-31T08:07:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOG' 'sip-files00154.txt'
a7c8c3b14b47e58f6287d3ce19828896
8d2c2398fba92ef89df351ecc4f914b32e745750
describe
'13429' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOH' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
819f298e52906711d69059723f29a4f6
59014c81468965eee0144adae16ec7a36cdc0bf0
describe
'240507' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOI' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
e3256e1fd97a25d2df5725e21553f22e
eab11932d567283e044a64a89ddfc480c4b1f602
describe
'108957' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOJ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
5d958526b932bd708ffe6e0d9c254ec6
60b81d9ff173782cec04292337cc4c172199265e
describe
'36892' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOK' 'sip-files00155.pro'
953937d49a1f8d7c4f3a218c4c82fd72
38b0d1f6a8a91edd387109b5c0fe24b1f909ac2d
describe
'41112' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOL' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
3434662aa305d5666b059f6d468f7b59
dd0c7781fd0286dd766d590e984dc0d815082bb6
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOM' 'sip-files00155.tif'
0faf72ec8540435ad26082d16e8b9290
ae5ed31985aeb5d1f5a88d3a14f44e14c6772f0a
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMON' 'sip-files00155.txt'
da8f25e00a6f0b2d6ee1ee587ea42c23
0c3137b0eb317f3b5d2cd8e5c0002308c130a38e
'2012-03-31T08:03:17-04:00'
describe
'13280' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOO' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
abdf1a83030b827820d319d14c949c69
79e39fddbbfa2ef7d61cd711f7cc07b1017b5a72
'2012-03-31T08:06:34-04:00'
describe
'239970' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOP' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
d1449b45227639a7d866f30b41c3b0f1
9ba6b4ba575557e06c0e4e4eb5a3c41e24c58db7
describe
'107588' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOQ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
845132095d0230372b5e36dfb2e3252d
30cc5cf7b2e799d127c10abebc71fffed2ac9c5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOR' 'sip-files00156.pro'
ef4116a8c026dd7a4cc047f888d7a77c
e56ee85ed1efca98168c95abba0a869785248b06
describe
'41294' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOS' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
88893d0f52b62b5172d0214d8eef0e25
0d2f75d7e186813d346e3ab2726db9dd1ea19edf
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOT' 'sip-files00156.tif'
5785f64dd4c2eb567c89d3558db5350e
bf3848f3b2221e42f8f01c8309d49221cead16f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOU' 'sip-files00156.txt'
bcf9bb76408bb8d548ff29f525ad4c28
81e2d49cda3802ce24e9e7ef36beb67c03c529dc
describe
'13806' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOV' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
a16b39ea86db909dbf2c3754b3406ffe
744562886bd805ca95cb2c7de21a60a1a5fb5183
describe
'225614' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOW' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
addd8ee8253cffd9c8401323563ba5c5
3023dff123df49d25312f2325900046b3cf1c4f2
describe
'80492' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOX' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
7f2d09b4d0e7254f57959750a2ccc176
30b514dc354f3d929e000d12a36f602b2bb66393
describe
'23993' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOY' 'sip-files00157.pro'
506ea8a814f9f8518c1b6a50fc48c70c
bb9c6202f4dc305f0102b6cf363cd2e782a5fe90
describe
'29810' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMOZ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
4db30a38f0f97b383f51a9a07967ca56
b60f579582e9dfffe0626298eadc2420e40c9457
describe
'1807583' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPA' 'sip-files00157.tif'
1bfc4b7289fb9f681b631db170f95559
a288c53f8c8ddf9f697a5a2ad3699b5e99b89dd4
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPB' 'sip-files00157.txt'
33656c6d7619a3944a479e5818cb7ddc
5e59ea410c5e6ddd4916500ee0e8e1d6ca60f2aa
describe
'10720' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPC' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
a8f9d3a6da58c02cd212adecafbd30d4
8d7ef3e0b269ce7468ec33ee2265ff55af444a0a
describe
'225028' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPD' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
9c901b3d590652f3c0cfd73252036bae
4c2b6ab2095ad1b95e2e9f8b92ff3f590557efe7
describe
'71541' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPE' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e358ce034c00593c10e360968d0c6b9e
b7783fa0430f9373a0ab404332ad39446246c498
describe
'19783' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPF' 'sip-files00158.pro'
0a0c3359a24fecc4e6742ab2112d3c08
c0901de6e4539f9525245edcdd90fce33af3d668
describe
'25109' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPG' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
2f29c68d103eab47bfd0220d0b36a628
8fff9684e82a2ae8deb887735bf4e90c2556cc53
describe
'1801855' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPH' 'sip-files00158.tif'
dc70771e42bd12b2405a46c455ca6e5a
7cf4fe459b2f25bbd388096f1d508105bedb048d
'2012-03-31T08:08:30-04:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPI' 'sip-files00158.txt'
a8bfc31e10f959d28d7a054fe46cc1f4
ce63537aa1ad1dfc706b314ea5b1848ebd1aa195
describe
'8683' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPJ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
7655e6e55ed41bb0a75da75aaa5b0dc9
6661b1d4b28d278f1768d0fe85bb37668741ac4e
describe
'227610' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPK' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
3e4232efd1b1f93dd90d7d5edc5ae9d7
61a734e5cfab0148884ed967a711680ec4eb360e
describe
'118278' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPL' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
f63965c845be953d032975439100668d
897d11837242684a6d17f6002613a6dd9c711eaa
describe
'28796' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPM' 'sip-files00159.pro'
2de4846fe3a5637c7e419b7199c7cc16
98438fab669baba74ab869aca0832be1919582d4
describe
'59089' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPN' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
85cc7e4034c9a8bb29b4686de25f357c
0124cb74a297558d6c95cd11958a4ba7db34d30b
describe
'1844516' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPO' 'sip-files00159.tif'
f5b1ac78f89e085e562f2356e4cb77aa
a7bc06bc773c25bd856a0db7af414ce45cb6c21b
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPP' 'sip-files00159.txt'
9029d4216f82c14646229c712bac832b
40b4aa89c3d1892a13b333301f339fc5cd91eb52
'2012-03-31T08:08:42-04:00'
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPQ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
97cadf6b6f4e2429885de790602f39fd
b399fdadb84019e2cde40e124f291fbd49213a37
describe
'228160' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPR' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
41a2e9fc8a75b2b37e7a5688fce7737e
0053a437d1fd02499e20d3806517eb9009e79153
describe
'110620' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPS' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
1aadfd5142b0fd433db0f2dc99c285d4
13789cf16deeb4fffa7e236c1653bab269e53e98
describe
'32315' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPT' 'sip-files00160.pro'
2fdb24454aeed8d17a2ac98dfe51a4c5
7844a3c5c8e093a554748645f5063e90974ac26a
describe
'42970' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPU' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
f2986546c9d03a0fa4fb402cdbd8d154
e90afe3affde490c689a8974ae2502cbbbadefc5
describe
'1825951' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPV' 'sip-files00160.tif'
8f32fc09714d21afcda3e4ad3841e25b
8d850a91c55e8681154ff705d5dba75c261452e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPW' 'sip-files00160.txt'
0a5157ec616edaf978ac38f02985e265
20730093da6618cbdf40cba4fc2b5e8526725cf4
describe
'13790' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPX' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
538b6c3d08fbaca88f95e9ea30555c1d
535af1c566b0e6ba708946bb6f400fa8a3d4c05e
describe
'226495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPY' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
b70c35aa5e153cf3e2f0a935d82323fa
58efe29e426e70695268e7cfec8be55058c3a450
describe
'104732' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMPZ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
81b458eadedff20c7f31be3cc4b6033d
4ca6f487ea2af59f540792e595ae8767e17d74c5
'2012-03-31T08:03:51-04:00'
describe
'30817' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQA' 'sip-files00161.pro'
d98e9c842bc455099f5339c26697acf8
0d2f90ad3504a5b5e6e763634b7771ce6c115335
describe
'40342' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQB' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
84f31ce3a28fdbdfa56b911e2546dfe6
86ec640ebe3b19686a6edd74178bbca15e45006c
describe
'1813095' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQC' 'sip-files00161.tif'
e4e16a577ee431f6ef1d471b1ecb8f72
7ccff869f03c21d9d1a6603880909fe9946d0551
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQD' 'sip-files00161.txt'
192d6cfeb0125368cd45f5395afb27cd
fcad136bedb7a103753ae2dcad0fd2539d2e4d3c
describe
'14163' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQE' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
db7e27e2d6e3676e3d89539577434306
db98ec158fe7e57f92d0f16a45b7c679c687fee0
describe
'227522' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQF' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5ffcadc948dd8be1af291c93c52e8936
c4ba37aaca8bfcbf35cdf216cdafdf8c6e5d9385
describe
'103765' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQG' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
12e684e02d651811daf2f73cc1bce623
9bf7426465a3d315b8c3e838f3e825bce9b36d56
describe
'30205' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQH' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a91dfc4cd5fbd2defe3d7b707517f537
732aab84a25a7234201b46ebc565f2fd18a8b245
describe
'39180' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQI' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
27a062447ee7722f4a33b37673cb46cd
4afbeba5c2c355d944175184e3d2b0ff26c5051f
'2012-03-31T08:01:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQJ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
5021f05953d9b0dd380f87a6ae2b127e
ff5864695183e6d1d9a7ee8ab8948b3973d2e367
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQK' 'sip-files00162.txt'
e6ee5c826e25880c2a57040eae0bfddd
338f17e9a533d081b4117a3e7f7ae86c30f770e1
'2012-03-31T08:03:02-04:00'
describe
'13652' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQL' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
f0ffdc37c428f67860a58f4abc859aed
bbaf618ad80e65af4cba7230f1887d4aaa7ae541
describe
'222428' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQM' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
5769e7fd42a5846bbe6bde9b72584fa8
fe318209cb40bf5061951be5b117d17885dcac53
describe
'108990' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQN' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1cb08b652414e00f8b9ce3f3bda1dac3
66283ccc0366edb5101fd94232df438c97d34c36
describe
'34333' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQO' 'sip-files00163.pro'
5e1a7390875ca2251ac5027f2a246ed9
154a825457293411a452d8b49b84f2ff80aabcc5
describe
'42572' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQP' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
02863e1d547fc7d7d927e847a3807e7f
906539259d1654fab00f7cab7bb30d35ada319dc
describe
'1780099' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQQ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
ee4bec5fdc3138c9d740991f7a6017ec
a0b4922a7c5757faff3b3e21bc4104cf7e161d26
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQR' 'sip-files00163.txt'
b850c3614fd3f4c1e5ee04356d428878
1835bd0a3edb395d26b6ec13fae3f90637ff21f7
describe
'14444' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQS' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
0948b8128dad5375886b55df33dfbb9b
e5a78409fa22f9537c248642719c6482a9e09217
describe
'232068' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQT' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
764ea7416e80e674d51969a56c837c20
483b46c2ff805f311319b0c9c9e56ae75f928573
describe
'96099' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQU' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
b02b3ec277217ac8e894ca231e22f48a
9fc8e7437450b348f024f1611d312dc46da2293f
describe
'28528' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQV' 'sip-files00164.pro'
50ce3aa188465f5cc9cbba9660699b32
40cd12812ebffe980e2e98f3e16b1e4c5fa63296
describe
'35494' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQW' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
d5270bbc1bd7121d41781d192f7ae312
c527030231492b31c8d07f344258949e4e3673f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQX' 'sip-files00164.tif'
355796f212191e236f85bd4d324d6d0b
6426558c249f841e0752bb309e04728fde2dc889
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQY' 'sip-files00164.txt'
da468ea1f900b3b8d09cb5e2d0e2f992
f3f6eacdcc6a33b8911b5e4712941de87394e65f
describe
'11840' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMQZ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
f5ad71b61e5f9a1ca7a7531ac697b324
a32e5d1cc6530691d752aff51540840ba0449276
describe
'226004' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRA' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
829a8c89123382340b543815f0ace785
d90e11fc0017c6c32ca521afc355d8daede0ca32
describe
'78056' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRB' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
d51d3638a8a349fd26cac5a8fbc3c48e
514458c114af343eeedde95e1fdc21ea0af243f9
describe
'23263' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRC' 'sip-files00165.pro'
5ad0c24f9f0a09621a0fdd0a6884332f
7a533d3e797c0a505b265f932eefc8920f34da30
describe
'27493' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
5f89d00effc3100d8dc5a5a3873e0c6b
24641afc280b4f010e524c306e7ab7b6243dbb64
describe
'1810435' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRE' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6bb344e5e05ad5d6629eecc003afc646
e96d488e0e16b899db727c6030df12972a573c70
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRF' 'sip-files00165.txt'
2309b5deda93d7b740ee7403fd7bb352
257a37e8e061a49eaf3b661806300e73834c8d52
describe
'10066' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRG' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
1a490ef8a88bde5bc113fd12b013dcd4
23a8ebb0444f40d3204218a8c5dc7b7fcd4f619d
describe
'232230' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRH' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
15fecc1ce21c8e34f8fc14b241a79e46
3dedc042b7215eefd2fc198ee2cf7e1abfa89c8c
describe
'112568' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRI' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
41f4595dff77469d27582351fcbf3ffe
9eaced9d1218b6f3c693a9fb441f151cf604b1f4
describe
'33342' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRJ' 'sip-files00166.pro'
9c43df47b3b44feacc995c11db9c7d9f
cf76849c73e9f9dffe8dbca6bffeb20c89cc298b
describe
'42722' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRK' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
6d61364fe527b08637c90304ffe4aa3b
328613083131af21e7f0de8838230b9da0ca0abb
describe
'1860787' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRL' 'sip-files00166.tif'
66d17a31271c036b823cfed5d293add8
17e0df7a267a833b002f5fa2b40712db157a734d
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRM' 'sip-files00166.txt'
c4580653b2a1f6e5467234a450ead44d
8472bdc330e21282aa357543988200b74557e0de
describe
'13882' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRN' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
be9493341b083093a2691ef7dd70f6b7
8547a92b9aeeb71dbb65e9bac70ea5aaf4e3dee3
describe
'222292' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRO' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
ad9e55d1c92857239c9bb6efc3d841b7
a73010cabcc5a089abda17b7cd48a9ea66dee634
describe
'114544' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRP' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
dd2a4e2243d1c5635ae8056fe5afe676
74325383d64e73f22c0580354c0ce372062e0047
describe
'35388' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRQ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
956595f914a9c38b92829d2d8673b9ae
e084ab27886f4f463d0a68884f3da0787c77a403
describe
'44183' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRR' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
ece0601547a77918af54317dc50ba79e
b4d144ea6e049ba9b3eaaa9668a36316a7ae4732
describe
'1779463' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRS' 'sip-files00167.tif'
d0329e23fe89eea37593f79ccde7d2a2
d7728ef57680380e0e77f9ee77896499eff093f8
'2012-03-31T08:02:29-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRT' 'sip-files00167.txt'
85b0ccbf1c23a8f82ffd5e138afe868e
ba5f4e62ccd69b09df3f3a09c136cc92b1063409
describe
'15042' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRU' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
1307aa6027d6d11ff1d58b891b6df06b
afc409c9ade0be80661e3b19698016611df2259f
describe
'227862' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRV' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
bc9de7f5932746feea3c0c77ac6a6af1
861a0e0011db830d18048ec991270dbc53372dc7
describe
'135473' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRW' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
c62dce85d1b7b1ae1885fcece5475d5a
26a41fe36edd40348dc29c89656b8110bef6ac50
describe
'33879' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRX' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4ec4dd9e70c928db3fc5e8c618f59949
241ce4dbb323f55a8809beaef75ea3b02bfa2d69
describe
'66858' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRY' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
9f444a281072d86c107e8521f2fca69e
cc2ab7552f65c19d7cfa4da1d16d6fba9c214feb
describe
'1846388' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMRZ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
fa8cd665ac29d0c78ca2b4971d2fd440
70dd0d38ffc9cf86e13d8cae4c355976f812ee7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSA' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ca994c1c26b2d5187d7b52fada0c6fe5
a2a68e0735b5319dfee4fc5dc8fb2c4ba6aacab9
describe
'37668' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSB' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
452cc331f14f28edccceb91da0687c81
6b36f265db475c2f1ad3526bea1193e49530aab3
'2012-03-31T08:07:39-04:00'
describe
'224319' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSC' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
82993bb2e1b71e3671a102c31b5fea1c
fa9f0606d016bdb5fb7e016758fb54ec12a5b34c
'2012-03-31T08:07:10-04:00'
describe
'112906' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSD' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
add998f66ab68f5157ff0ac1ca7dd470
4d3f32179a3963b822d62df985f422c2d4ad913e
'2012-03-31T08:02:03-04:00'
describe
'35257' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSE' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ff4efefccaa9c402584d685c391948e8
01aebd9c9470f150de4c23f62841eb2860c0e78b
describe
'43307' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSF' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
2e1bc77834f71b5753f20bc4c17735b6
5e59e34763bada360a2948af1ee001af5de6001a
describe
'1795803' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSG' 'sip-files00169.tif'
60b9a27e00211d674713208615502b3b
970e8b37d8e385d69e21e41e3f1d7fa2e0aaaec8
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSH' 'sip-files00169.txt'
25e61898db263fb7d35355acc1b56b76
0ca6c653805ce569db15421795b32ecd49283edc
describe
'15089' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSI' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
370667c78d1d9686fbd75fd4a12c3db4
13e5f35b9ba2d1e7af52c32958037d9fd39376c0
describe
'231777' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSJ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
c20db55937986c48a35abe6725eec3d5
e48937761aa543206bedf2bda175c69f901b69e4
describe
'129624' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSK' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
91e69735141062e74bda284d22d7e321
3fa7bd4da1ad831cc07139d03fb435f937bd9964
describe
'33906' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSL' 'sip-files00170.pro'
77dfc097972898d7f07b63b1c2c462bf
03b0901749c6775bc1e348e0b8da10a71550f3de
describe
'63348' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSM' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
ccf89e5ab371b9f3f1730e98bcba4888
7c2f9aebeb353802e3cfbfc41efed1bfd08ebcc2
describe
'1876756' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSN' 'sip-files00170.tif'
c259626600966b116b6579efd50730cd
348ce640d56d32d90bfe0de6b8f2832a60679f88
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSO' 'sip-files00170.txt'
6213440f12370d7efeb8f98e053eaee3
0dcc91a790b1ba14b71c4054c82ef7bc4c77b7c5
describe
'36204' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSP' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
ddf2a5598537a2679d9c226111dc4915
220536c3d136870d1802d9871b82044fca916f73
describe
'220155' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSQ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
94c1a78edd437563022cab6ee681aa03
82563069ed5ffb2a33af9c5346b1813d97162889
describe
'63804' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSR' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
81e6f73a763cbefa073468c405b6bb1d
7fa3140fa489f426924b2653ac5d7b1e5cff97f8
'2012-03-31T08:04:51-04:00'
describe
'16482' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSS' 'sip-files00171.pro'
65a39a4b76b808cae9cacdc15d700afb
24711b446ef6afbc166bd669e1c2ff18d76bd6d0
describe
'22411' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMST' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
39c9d0af753ecf4fb4bb4e6a1d3e1389
bde4d32a25f9f3694b90f6e4fed582c87a62dec8
describe
'1762219' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSU' 'sip-files00171.tif'
56e19f5db8ee8abd5714438deee3bd3f
b9ac093cea27f97dab96904aa4a6584de04e244f
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSV' 'sip-files00171.txt'
afa3f30d276d83b5930ef2a94e337154
80e2814a3586da75effb9cf6dd6ca61a03d8680c
describe
'8000' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSW' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d213d289ebf277038020b86f9f143b1b
57297ae2d7b23764d0c82f688ad0a8c370292f25
describe
'229381' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSX' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
5a80b1926647aa0c367bd363fba62b85
51bb243c9595361a9c3d7ea4718900ecf2d49fec
describe
'123560' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSY' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
20fec2502ce8f27a3292472d6347618a
8b5c9a5e2e90cc99186b3b68bf1e8649738da91d
describe
'26968' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMSZ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
f1f9cac560164d549844d7d2a49f9e50
d4c2d0b431ea91e34ed7457961785dd4a4729eba
describe
'60617' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTA' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
15251f4d3f9b62fe14c9e4ba7f39acf7
7eaf397edb74a0ed2d493bc85487d300c69073e5
describe
'1858012' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTB' 'sip-files00172.tif'
2e8babbb3578b80cb261624017047f9d
a9bb40b65a9ae9885312784ff9da4828ab84eb7f
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTC' 'sip-files00172.txt'
ef933742e5989b7cc64661c1aad4a0f6
9adfd4873cf91ac95e9b19a0509fdc86e3a92da3
describe
'36205' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTD' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
af55545c9ab0d2524f267710a5f9d79e
b330c1fc62509071fdb173beb6b14718ba40c985
describe
'229141' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTE' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
69cb46fb94c2c23a0a1ee3d9f02b2755
84b2e3d4e01d01168de38cf7971c764a1d76cd77
describe
'113552' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTF' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
f2fdfc312d6320da0312eba1b726d333
f444134439f899fae28b61575a42b47b9d547117
describe
'35791' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTG' 'sip-files00173.pro'
bda15cd2844481382304ba4fa562122d
fecdcc7f771ad22da37e1dfc8f2b88b3306507f4
describe
'42709' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTH' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
c70361720a7b7ceee5a5d69aff3b0fe2
567ccfc0cb74d75963daffbca90f1fb9daf77754
describe
'1834187' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTI' 'sip-files00173.tif'
44744fb037b12a910f7ceae2b651fef9
3f8fc97b60878ed3748ff2d8647c658a5013f0e7
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTJ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
979fbac47f8beb51edae0b3710be4593
5a8b220c08c5fce64e37a163ccbcd5dbfee2641e
describe
'15129' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTK' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
d18950cd7604f4157da024f586346327
aabc12799407e2ab9b5fd7ac6b40a21abbf5b819
describe
'229023' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTL' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
f508cabe1ac5bfe9087d47da95da6c8c
c29baa25983a7d019a6cdaa1b0701238d7d020e4
describe
'130902' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTM' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
7147e77de69e3272a07d2affb85169e8
6bb0c4d60e6c46b93b32fa42c794ab2bf5ed983d
describe
'30876' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTN' 'sip-files00174.pro'
1006c81e9e2ce1e481cc7c3ac4addc2b
0d7573f8da39f90149b265fb9369056f094d0b6b
describe
'64403' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTO' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
1a5781b146caf5efd2f0cbf6506b57ce
2e007ba7595a3efb6049749ef1b2ad88838c516a
describe
'1855164' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTP' 'sip-files00174.tif'
726cb4870ebd2732e10b74b2d9194c71
875c49ecf298df640ae8e8ae6f907e3f6d9d2e8d
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTQ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
2af5bb66e2b7e7e4cada42a82cadcd74
a25f1ad54698ddc3c0266f1ee81d127ef0fe6679
describe
'37511' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTR' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
3489c59304df4737b9e085e870dcdd48
43b9bd81e90130c0560cbf58b00e62470567f41c
describe
'228178' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTS' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
9c7287d19a72f9894195cde43daa509d
8a48f747a6ac149d65ab04fe06a13ca0a15d9342
describe
'106614' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTT' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
08df3270af646f759e008ec45ac167aa
70cea148b75293e68c53f507f77bad3b57498b2f
describe
'32799' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTU' 'sip-files00175.pro'
cfed2d68a755b12cdc821145451c4a4f
3e75a60c9ae54729abe1b70c5c28d0615368340d
'2012-03-31T08:03:13-04:00'
describe
'41839' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTV' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
bd99f94ac04ca950996b4f9134abb4a1
04ce919c913e624d200ab0a6f62cfc25fe53fd2e
describe
'1826267' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTW' 'sip-files00175.tif'
375d1c1da1c8caf3fae31534dbddcb41
c5a171b110c72cb6940efe6f940117ba585e8ad5
'2012-03-31T08:08:13-04:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTX' 'sip-files00175.txt'
6bedfc95865ebe95de5db77c8da6b020
bd62b3012d41cec818b812a53034b19631833d84
describe
'14819' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTY' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
a54ebcf9d4ff76e8667f4c2bd3556821
8e325ca1036431f64510f891417ba29e52e4170c
describe
'226675' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMTZ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
a57355065b2f9124765d0df667b1ac10
92dfd221db246fad98262518431b3bea98c80415
describe
'115913' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUA' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
5180e2b1b2fa1748b6c81cb4a300bbfd
10b940a66acf501288efad86a5f217d8213e21b9
describe
'35111' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUB' 'sip-files00176.pro'
370b24bcc0fff509c2d2681e09cdb594
f94fc0141cc585638530ce1258f1cffbd5d9e465
describe
'44627' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUC' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
c13d9371abb55f22f325c36878dc9ee7
def16bbc874620380928b788d63a1fea6bd35bf1
describe
'1814703' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUD' 'sip-files00176.tif'
ef51bee4b94e34f7283a3e061e13c19e
15dd10ce049e662f345c100634c7cee1f0de9b0c
'2012-03-31T08:06:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUE' 'sip-files00176.txt'
1537a7bffc83a563f2cdc480b4c47fd9
64daa90c4fd650235463a75c255a5fe8d6369129
describe
'14375' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUF' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
e1cf014a9d46b830e4d2a7af8f369e4e
82c6b9d2f8093fe567e1a160fff5631749c6dbc2
describe
'226128' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUG' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
1ac0600077522415003a200328cf2ba3
62cf04229730e1880702468a4ce579543ad6cd61
describe
'85897' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUH' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
0361a36e15d022df13b84f4ddb9ac7b9
41a5aed20eb28a62bc031a81c7d6505942a39bcf
describe
'25384' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUI' 'sip-files00177.pro'
89ec69ad71bad5318cd8a051f09aba5f
80e28e8b20749ebdc1b86cebfc0b35d4ae3cc549
describe
'30965' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUJ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
0e23f76ece9d701b0a09f57479210078
77493b01ca8fffde4c8b19e03601d00f4fdc38bc
describe
'1809799' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
1e4d7e60c29f816651f05938b9d7f1ae
f4bb991f0cd1541a9aee92a49ee7f0eddf94b527
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUL' 'sip-files00177.txt'
c11708325563f93d04cbef775466c5d0
11fb14a89d1943c98d1890d9c2c03a546dfbfb36
describe
'10789' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUM' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
1f5bd25ee3732afbfb0b8ffb6b6f8c1b
50b70bb6b105c7768a1ad0438bfad9d5d176d4d4
describe
'227707' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUN' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
424a36f9dc3d3c44fd86007bca75926b
a7b932eb01f05237128a82b7d5f2c5aa9ae786a8
describe
'102287' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUO' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
4f81f4a6d14b2e0c50bc80b6f49d440e
1329c9efda6936bb45a94d09f4fc4756db4c83a1
describe
'29290' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUP' 'sip-files00178.pro'
91bda881cce6af3d0921103938e96046
952f41a1cab7367fe061ae1207cf4e68abbb37d1
describe
'38824' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUQ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
1c7a1da696cdb731bb50b60d0dffb83d
d0a8b555b62398353c20b2d4c058973fcd42d8af
describe
'1822783' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUR' 'sip-files00178.tif'
a9102cb0273da3fa3132e4f01caee94d
33ebd1768229af2a52d72f55b22f04f490102766
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUS' 'sip-files00178.txt'
4bda1b9dced9c8f628fc8755ce92c074
f121873558cae9412838ba80bb051fe4c68633d4
describe
'13022' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUT' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
c696cf6d0275e758055d8f2d8492de4a
3e4c562b4f753cc8455d9690056a9f2df71e2a3c
describe
'222657' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUU' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
bbb69781a0281497965b75a1bcaae526
8451c23a1a803b9349f5aa850c37f60bcac40365
describe
'107790' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUV' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
bb0096eaf075f967ed75abecabdee0ac
061fe04dc2caeb754cfa64e99a2cdfb0a889ddb1
describe
'32885' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUW' 'sip-files00179.pro'
6239d9a74206ec2a822907232e3fcff9
fef4000961ae76baa06f6800cf57c6e6d78d6d0a
describe
'41887' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUX' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
710582f4e7599a42e7f983e38d2a3f08
74bb4c3bf26ced49bde5406a24e469e5af126b38
describe
'1781979' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUY' 'sip-files00179.tif'
7a2adf191f768bf95b96d156f2c224cf
1c9facee3a2ac6b60079232a846690fdf60871fa
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMUZ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1c0292c9f98af4238c8d239a5b2f1c2d
b28b421d74f24f99ea26074eac1fea40a6f2e235
describe
Invalid character
'14215' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVA' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
6ee23b7ea6c74341ec94246771e8b04e
39f94bb41e245fe69f5e4f009fd03171708b2ae8
describe
'233532' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVB' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
10632e828ed8b799df159c232454e09b
2618126398f5966b492de658d63548abbc64831b
describe
'106695' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVC' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
ca0f3fedc1fe6b6eeee766bf98b388d9
71c7af319884ad11c56ca3309efd86531f85dea7
describe
'31544' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVD' 'sip-files00180.pro'
85d4d91a8b17ea813f2391275aff2fef
e0bfeafeb6a037dfaa3c713fcba98229d970fa14
describe
'40619' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVE' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
539047d274e02225c242428beac7a284
de0089af1ad99172fd0b5b072c344a3eb523c689
describe
'1869791' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVF' 'sip-files00180.tif'
2a584e8a48f271d22f96ba7153771a25
3b4af85b2f0baa59dd31de1e19a3a866482f2d09
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVG' 'sip-files00180.txt'
ec28246af2e7a0080ad22d72d979a522
59580cf0704ec9e3ac19519a86ddd2a97b28d7ef
describe
'13251' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVH' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
b818b082bb21fc08ca4c51538f5a6007
b837792af383d714543f04b8211b664d405a8939
describe
'230522' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVI' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
21319a8885d0d84b59774857b82c5d60
f624528f8c8b363a172dbeae2d9e7d48387ffbb7
describe
'112307' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVJ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f6eebee88c6a2b17ed93dfbf394b6315
12530c84b5c0cc8f8cc8b3d51b6db0329eb140c1
describe
'35548' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVK' 'sip-files00181.pro'
a36b3d10853501d8b2866e9f7bd5ee39
5fff56c5635ef6b9ee9ec8ff2d00dfab480bc822
describe
'42943' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVL' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
67d9aea9b82ea8c5499d0e0a203a250d
1c474b12b1124ff19e4f84c3cfdc020325c66614
describe
'1846219' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVM' 'sip-files00181.tif'
e1d034a3913af3846f04392599dce9a4
35c67f26ad20c2bb81491b5f3365a26e72fccf54
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVN' 'sip-files00181.txt'
fb9f4b57bc34a2338ac482c4c0e47a70
1ac83b0e14d1ee9b58038166af9bef5812962717
'2012-03-31T08:01:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVO' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
1368da38642542f1bd865dc06e716226
55821740498080066c6a680fd9292fed91609db7
describe
'232085' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVP' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
1f7b0496a04bfb1d2fd18c5b2668a7f7
01d4f6cf9bbba109d0f618cce203c21b4c0e21b6
describe
'103640' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVQ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
27d13f1c8c8a59fbe2edb141d0dc5e86
008a65c8b125de114908e387062e348227554bb9
describe
'23578' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVR' 'sip-files00182.pro'
a9e4f0414075938149f3d704c62ceb7d
53b1bebb5bd020bec7ee608b1218fbb3670cbc5b
describe
'51639' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVS' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
76c0fb76d3c28deb3444b6d787d73329
518edac359f2546c65b7e5ec2aecc8c34f641350
describe
'1878872' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVT' 'sip-files00182.tif'
5a587b1fbe3618773d911017de2bdb82
ea11b55887d418902cebcafe7b42b434d541ee02
'2012-03-31T08:00:23-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVU' 'sip-files00182.txt'
d22b51d000dbe5376f114b304dc01d79
05498a28a0b284fbeef2d716dcd86fbbb942a3bc
describe
'31856' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVV' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
ff3678dae69ef9aff93e36a08de7be83
7c9f0aca6ff636517487cbef535dbd157e35c343
describe
'232123' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVW' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
a937aae0d23b3ff90095bde2d38f8839
eb2bb6566947a0805f2099a927e0bc2b8b3df0fd
describe
'117533' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVX' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
625b637192fd09c73157ec6c53a3772f
f3fccfad8aeecd966aa7c17f3252553f6be1a693
describe
'28231' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVY' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5fcec76a241caec75fc9fef5e176ba46
2f4100881756678b20d99127a389491d33bdb27b
describe
'58053' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMVZ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
10c27981be1e3d1f5a8b1891ae7b06d5
40e19075011d8512c0dbeb5ac93d160d03df0af7
describe
'1879624' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWA' 'sip-files00183.tif'
c6596e47464e2325b0124736a4ebc9e7
99b972cd3d65178de5bdfb75d058c28615c9af59
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWB' 'sip-files00183.txt'
c0d818f777606244b630c06e06b290b1
2f1bef85a7b19ef4edbdea89e040677107c7b023
describe
'34526' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWC' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
7e76cdf11c91d487a9357c297a162878
adbcba551d518f26a32c759140f4ed34ada3c4c7
describe
'234420' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWD' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
1f0edea35220562f31ff53ad52406db5
2b1ef8aab3ce4cb829923e36e7fd5c2180ff5a01
describe
'109675' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWE' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
b836ee2f8dd2a76ae5c63795de0457f7
6f7c538efc4302817496bc9f7035cb7ff203d99e
describe
'33443' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWF' 'sip-files00184.pro'
32c9d6c583189827b77dca61a5c024fb
6a8e88c72cd4cbf3d84cbc9b2bb7156f53b13b89
describe
'42149' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWG' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
5511bd8f0562198c070b3706408947d8
4f9ec6f10aa2a94ca47140bb1b2e6daab7c8771a
describe
'1876391' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWH' 'sip-files00184.tif'
8c9ec9c5061d4efb9ebb328a36a86dfd
4e3e942fbaae96a3dfdef15b4081eab045a581df
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWI' 'sip-files00184.txt'
34b3844a25048b7adff8531491c8f163
fb1dbae5c2069194583079ff10db9323cf7abfac
describe
Invalid character
'13609' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWJ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
52bbc150bc41e1365c5582154c14059a
d4517802525971d6cd1b96a3fa22782fb00d803f
describe
'225439' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWK' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
9cb7720446b801cb636ffc49947bbce4
fee163013ad7f32476e350c8b89294eb95939f8e
describe
'98829' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWL' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
389d0e1aee52a38dcece0e82344482e6
4c4fe62b2c6a72eaa8d68844a6582cc8cfb36d1c
describe
'30139' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWM' 'sip-files00185.pro'
78047be2c5fcfd9ca86129946b42940e
49b05c4870fd3f5424d71021f9cd7395844e04c1
describe
'37937' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWN' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4c50d5dec3460b052161718d3caf0c95
328f3ed9dce6e6569dd84361c5a95b0d2bdbf3ea
describe
'1804339' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWO' 'sip-files00185.tif'
79e8e7e19d5057baea7b441bfbb1b684
8c366dceccc871325c27647fdd8fb332de89c766
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWP' 'sip-files00185.txt'
10edbcaca685ce658e566520ca6be443
1e7dace70bb378307a81cf37d59434dcc6a6112a
describe
'12678' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWQ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
7b76757801ffbd1adf029ac3653f09c0
cb47c3ca987680a87035ea7146e96195ce5cc0da
describe
'237339' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWR' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
cd5ec42afcfbbd6a244f048794360ca4
1d29f0bc5368761b1d9d21256199cf735865f1c2
describe
'80390' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWS' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
c2f8e492d608d0d703044716d8c2f1e7
3479c04add4c34df12000bcfe06c2ccbeeff5e36
describe
'18228' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWT' 'sip-files00186.pro'
077c628551cafb49f9a5b5574fdf21e9
bcf0dffa8d9b8b4b10847e51b061fc4d652274f1
describe
'28985' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWU' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
497a92ebd9c18a8688549224d6650061
8979438f18ff79743490f6fc4e9074170df3734d
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWV' 'sip-files00186.tif'
b0ca8a5291317c218d0c03695dee2487
b8979e185c36e05a2d3bac8fbccc94da1fd2fc18
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWW' 'sip-files00186.txt'
595586c7750ee0fd0e2debae09c201be
2ca20398787c38d4cbf00a00b154f362ad1b9270
describe
Invalid character
'10095' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWX' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
56487cf0215feaeed6b384bfc24b6e14
13b05b339bb42aa05a95cb4c67824a0b899407b9
describe
'229427' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWY' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
36fd5bb270f09a48b699d94481f1c783
e82e433ee54de05b268ec23e024f9803b0a6469d
describe
'132283' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMWZ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f0a36799f2458912a4a64e288a8aef36
e4c0bcdfcf3cbe4291afddac76cfb0c6f6016624
describe
'33065' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXA' 'sip-files00187.pro'
dcc722787e7ceeda0890616de2499516
920964255544252a644d434c05b95f9a47335750
describe
'65197' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
b8b78d65d3fe9c25e90ea0db96c30746
18a526eaaaffcf44b6ff95a29fc76dde89f1ae70
describe
'1858404' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
30ce9864ad7996428d3d246e20db972e
1696d34bfb80dba9a3f668a44b705e6adfee57c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXD' 'sip-files00187.txt'
09ae8b95301d21e41eef3acfe30f065b
97c268445946ddc8a1921472987d2c297eea8b02
describe
'37149' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXE' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
fc9fd7441f44e119baf37d4d8d5f54d6
472d2ac0a8e239771eca4f28512c3f4aa023a2cf
describe
'231233' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXF' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
24ee0e9c1cb2d13adf959d50a9bc7768
15eee1cd46254d7b7bea6e6a2f2d4b9ec98b2287
'2012-03-31T08:07:07-04:00'
describe
'110261' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXG' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
4295e1b126951e0f92f1c08d3d288176
805719ce1d20dcffdb9ca1a32775a61171148ffa
describe
'33815' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXH' 'sip-files00188.pro'
ba726eca4ee66134cae1c1673a5fc83a
2e5c4fc5d9ee62655b8591cadeb328d51e9faa5e
describe
'41949' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXI' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
7ddb4f9a9ce6c0265e57f7c3de1cfc6f
9d8518e8aa7aa63d848713b11c72c41ff14c73a3
describe
'1851767' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXJ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
86a2454ac28964ed8199a7ffea6ca2c0
d9c244c52c0bca46a1ff444c77cafcde7ad884fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
a3b0f4213dad4c6576e715008140626a
2dbe2f7c1a48d5ea2be0114bad1440ee20064e17
describe
'13915' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXL' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
92dc48f89723f864906e9770115d2b72
ab2cb899176de046bdadfb4834227ddfafcaeddb
describe
'224129' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXM' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
88336cd2629ef228088fa29acdbebf38
0f5b57ae1654e3e9178d17bd7a9c38f5c7fdb734
describe
'111893' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXN' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
8aec9e28897c596ba050d3eb311376e5
6d511a62bcf9f607a4216d26f85cdff54cfb1112
describe
'33184' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXO' 'sip-files00189.pro'
4600895346fbb7c02620ddbcb67603b4
f5cdcfc524b55c92e5cc634b67b95d86e905fc6a
describe
'43807' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXP' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
047e670848a637f183fe3abb4835e343
4fbc8cd5e9023598cc8fd2fd7ed59fe8298be447
describe
'1793903' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXQ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
a53d1c6549ccf0ba4f0d22068dc60d92
34b332f990d3519cc1ada5ba232d601aa0107b65
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXR' 'sip-files00189.txt'
2010dd698d571d2d4b487963050186d6
8af75befd1758da82e1c5cf4de9536c9c23e6a33
describe
'14656' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXS' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
0c5ea16534b4e1d004a7cb2ec199abb2
b422e018cf6b730322de641dbb4d357b644b73e8
describe
'221364' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXT' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
7cacee91d120980a9be6ec21bf5b663b
50308119b2930702846e5a20dd0bdf94640373e1
describe
'111175' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXU' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
3fcc41da5dbff8d4950f5b22ebbb9ecc
4e43708fbbbec4ef2157069429d1edd9b9273ebc
describe
'33287' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXV' 'sip-files00190.pro'
b1516e8a8d1f14ada79ce310e4be68c7
581bae879bd46ef53d486587d7b7a48e60028e27
describe
'42500' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXW' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ecff3660d30531f4e7571437d7bc2447
98070881f7c63e2449343adf4581b0080df3b043
describe
'1772847' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
7e1bf15665d0e47b32e4b5b1f21a6eff
6aaec3391ba0b21312efc7cbbc5ac596accc74c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXY' 'sip-files00190.txt'
010929b861608d0706890e7bb52143a8
355d075bce8f53637a82247d66f0f2274427122f
describe
'14785' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMXZ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
c347b4d6ee5a32e088a072046bd693d8
7ab980f9b48f79eca36b8fc947e5bd31b17aa937
describe
'225429' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYA' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
9193f928ce4bf9d1c86162e956dff586
d2518180c1e04dbe4c3ba7d9b4fa97099c5e3cb1
describe
'112738' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYB' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
f8c4bb0b8ef696b3b573253f24528bea
1df358c0133cbb5d056ab131a57042680e93b4f5
describe
'25770' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYC' 'sip-files00191.pro'
f68b42fc73d396a630e0a93eb9e8e1b7
ca6b13dee8a80cce61ea792a52dbce60784bac2f
describe
'54853' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
4582b0fc8674f34415def511bc70f8b2
d4a3badc69103c8a992762d3d34c531086ea5d24
describe
'1825188' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYE' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6ac2e350e98d3769a0a2d38c75984ae1
be4d445d84848636e241315ab2526d64da0b9a8a
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYF' 'sip-files00191.txt'
e3f9c06e9aa6c7ed38cd7e55e855fdb1
f8ec15460241d8763e0b5fa91631c87d6d7af620
describe
'34440' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYG' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
0c58b211294e4b39948410d93166b588
41438264fd4858e09d8db61247d661a4e8c3f8c4
describe
'227632' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYH' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
419563f2db937583be8a8bb681f4847c
2eb6be828314ae0a2d4ce1708c86bb3c87346b8d
describe
'79029' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYI' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
608d075ac22a7f93544a4b3bcf6e1470
deee86726ff6aebf72f9d4f90b31cb54d25fd999
describe
'22378' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYJ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
09669cd63a6f9bcab7c579f6ef17809c
de272d3ca46cc8cc5e14706064e67e2e84a0c6dc
describe
'27561' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYK' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
2509c59d7398708b796a8b001df3d2cf
4aa7ff17e903ebf7a4a438706bbafd44277637cc
'2012-03-31T08:00:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYL' 'sip-files00192.tif'
bda7ff5ec4b468810439fedf0b70b09f
59db69b65ca8171965928e764bac06586341d06d
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYM' 'sip-files00192.txt'
b73a6164004397e2ecbc8df675105f7a
922624a53dc46b00ed699ca79f8391d04d0488b9
describe
'9350' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYN' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
662fa554a9e5ce452b1261f204b136a0
17c2435710f70384b383aeb908c2d160611c8e4a
describe
'231793' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYO' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
d505f44db61efb01193667ded055e6d9
a62a61cfcf7cb11a279201a35ea378b983782072
describe
'77568' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYP' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
f97909867e711714460d36acbc5543fb
9fed4ee8c42ec404ddc43deee765a04580dc578a
describe
'22208' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYQ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
88b89788d897cef35dba688351b5f90f
7b3592b1c09f73f9e55deaa9ac10fe1b31af3658
describe
'29269' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYR' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
1da6d0263377a40d6013ca938eeea9d2
a7a7b4ba27132ce2f1faf63a920ef2a4b3d01f5c
describe
'1855095' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYS' 'sip-files00193.tif'
c9ee0cd6f38759a235e35ad74e5dc548
7773c416477c735d6e9aef6b29b61dcc88f9ff45
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYT' 'sip-files00193.txt'
869ed6f93429288157a47a8661888188
f8b0bffca3bf3cc2baab73805b9b7abf349f3e80
describe
'10482' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYU' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
91023925c9ad75fdbf79b52c00fe1cfd
9f06a863ee5577e12302a721385ca77a10f72ce6
describe
'233723' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYV' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
65a86d8ff49b5491de50beb56c43e402
58a610ff4a8ba0751082339dca87f27b93dbd8af
describe
'106777' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYW' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
7fcdd7eda37ffd708dae2423a7fc10bf
52745e3c22377ae878b94f85a855ece8d2ba8d2a
describe
'30757' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYX' 'sip-files00194.pro'
bd0bea022395512870533b6d967975e7
f340d8544c9d46d391d1e0901a7acb7c9624678e
describe
'40822' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYY' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
8ee4c316e21850bb1a354bf4448661d3
61222b89ff786f9f9f0009ff2c798053bb3c2542
describe
'1871351' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMYZ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
f24d25bddb113c3748641410cc9477e6
7d17b4b8f6d1d1465e0b8a0714d725c2e630cf5e
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZA' 'sip-files00194.txt'
a3bc2ad457c77f406b27ca6861a1ab49
81de123632a2069b2d86e0dc013c91eaf0dbd071
'2012-03-31T08:01:55-04:00'
describe
'13769' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZB' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
409464036427c85f4e76d72ffc943151
89485cd06214161873fc4772572c53662cd15fe3
describe
'226211' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZC' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
07a55bbf30a37f2a08bd5a96794f378a
8084e3b11379bdb515487b7abd9ccb7aaa2c13d7
describe
'110083' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZD' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
534567b3268124f20764060edd8f7f09
e4a05cdc6c7b6f290e6ca774f64eb739f78e259f
describe
'34238' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZE' 'sip-files00195.pro'
ad499bf258a2c26dee74aed277953c19
f9be77db5f85b9abe5d4b79a36b9348a377e6dfa
describe
'42129' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZF' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
b667563c5d903e09ff4ae6e9a45ea030
765db2a68a73e94f8b3fb8b815ba988bf6069744
describe
'1812347' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZG' 'sip-files00195.tif'
9588ab3a3108195db7fd2f3428bcaa1c
1f710f09507ef0ed797a39a06e40f1baf605698c
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZH' 'sip-files00195.txt'
1dfeb118e97b1e91da9515c39cd27f23
869a29d4a0ba1ea1035d68d26633c62b5dbd8b43
describe
'13965' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZI' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
a91ba5a64ade7b5ae0ba8fbe5b11daa5
c9b7221372b5dbf5269e368e089ee8b54fd6e10d
describe
'235793' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZJ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ba51fa0a54f0c981f9dbcdb9c2873120
4583a62a68c15349e3bd1bfb06a7fd95c9f9f48f
describe
'139694' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZK' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a7f10fcd7ea4cbcb15878bcc8deef757
3958647509208254ffbead14341fe68a356b0ed9
describe
'36521' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
9345eb33130fc984d91b16045918db1f
46d28e90af4fd95720181513c78bdc6955125bf1
describe
'68149' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZM' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
3e7affe38808d2e49373c65f924f6a0c
89851a0935a5a1fb0d5ee522b137328da9889a54
describe
'1909968' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZN' 'sip-files00196.tif'
a97f5b47d9e050304e9f25771c30a824
206cee48ec2be5909ba5c6976897f22834143260
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZO' 'sip-files00196.txt'
91b11462dcdf9eabbef1a69898aab149
492ac5343648b2b1e3ea12a1d1f0cbc26191cd0e
describe
'37221' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZP' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
26908f49d37846bdcdedfa8dc1560bf1
a53ada44f93d4f3d75b73f32ca6d79bb580a394e
describe
'223758' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
35a85595a864ba1bb329bcc5144e80a1
7fab7b5c63015fb4c80e5a2961b80e6ad233eb21
describe
'124598' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZR' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
62e3bfa0fb7e0c919ac218da69708592
a68e44cd209c2afd16cd7de694a6489b1cf32cb7
describe
'31405' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZS' 'sip-files00197.pro'
e5869b6c1b467beefacddc2cbe3eb331
c1e2c805d836a981e50efc564022a43731a6c794
describe
'61373' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZT' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
634c056ce74a7e40fc1cfca10554eeea
729e9e129b4ce5a4c15ae784755d24fa6d4ad72c
describe
'1812680' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZU' 'sip-files00197.tif'
6f764165be4a242b75877f0f5eaeb1ec
38d963ee0b3d4dea48198d096026ac9a19583b11
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZV' 'sip-files00197.txt'
b765316ce219a817aaa2a6d24fd0c971
539460690af5ec46eeffea0cce4f36e8cb24ed46
'2012-03-31T08:05:21-04:00'
describe
'35992' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZW' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
3903520358c7a068e2ef90b20a25097b
ff488310be2d522f555465284fd3e3db6c1793e5
describe
'222783' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZX' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
889cc380990efe35368e51c6834c896d
95960db99ccfc118d7a12029b8180811d452d56a
describe
'86564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZY' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
caaadfcb802c582afc0c8313b92cf4c7
973251caaf6f7fb3300df790c1eb21226b19829f
describe
'22814' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAEMZZ' 'sip-files00198.pro'
5d57bfc49459989ef2d9b91b7000c2a4
e8be5994730eb58e432a07adf37f788c8436b2b8
describe
'31889' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAA' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
050c3241e95d1325347a83e41b7d85f9
735154b05253c498e8c96812b33a51c355a5e706
describe
'1783403' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAB' 'sip-files00198.tif'
b95afa51c536a71712f131a27913f2d0
4061f74825b5cd2ccdd896d50a3d4524f5998a26
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAC' 'sip-files00198.txt'
57dbe5968c0eb7df45daba5bd09aaeb5
a9b643e14e95df2785ff891f0a7168937e32607d
describe
'11220' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAD' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
d514d71d999f0c9770abb9a539607783
844391f01ef71be1707ff0cc3503f48f7e0a458e
describe
'224839' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAE' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
7a473be32a25e3f2e2e4317f6de8076b
b2463f8e98385dfe3367185add408d7b8511f9d2
describe
'112385' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAF' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
9f09cf20a9e1555f9785491897f7eb81
897daeb4ca274553b44b7abe76f01ca1fd225bde
describe
'35495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAG' 'sip-files00199.pro'
f51d7d151c4b8a0cb5632b928021da6a
f2d2ff7fdd4a8459a8cdb2aad94054b511b74c90
describe
'44293' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAH' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
662c9aa81eec76a812dad729b4c0a164
38e912bdf01907e0e1df0013ebbc149892ab8f70
describe
'1799727' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAI' 'sip-files00199.tif'
fdd7334bef4324b0d671bc937df0ae82
bec104d3519c2985a1a437e3538738820044f1ab
'2012-03-31T08:03:11-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAJ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
ec82b5e26645a90b5fd115141eeaa924
ad4903ddfa781d5a98d23f8050ace615e1bb3c27
describe
'15450' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAK' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
a9800c1897d73bf00239a4b7288ef3ec
ce909db4c3640f56e70244a81aadff20acc2fa16
'2012-03-31T08:04:52-04:00'
describe
'232804' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAL' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
bc7f086708b5f3ecdebac12dcf3375be
21daba19be0c5f562c5286825e959db52c044e05
describe
'110175' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAM' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
461925b7f8b10611a6f4d768b9937b49
6fbf7e6a5b4ca63ec42f5782eecad2880d0e3c1d
describe
'32270' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAN' 'sip-files00200.pro'
6356f9ba572b8c4c1bc612494c298ff7
6f0dc27c2aab80c0f1e287a68617adba334f1e17
describe
'42562' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAO' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
e6dce7a5dc472474bf5004600ae91996
587029b90fd19bd656e1e6f923dde15873d568e3
describe
'1863167' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAP' 'sip-files00200.tif'
395bec106323ac4eebcfc33ec28e9176
4cf85e96a92c5abbb3162656e7dab866c9dda3f0
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAQ' 'sip-files00200.txt'
5f263f6f01d1d4f4d60e440064552a89
1cc8071bc80f87fe8bc96c0cadfd235a47c0a7fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAR' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
5522ce1d505aa8fb31bdeb5ebffdba6c
7822fa28b3817ba7e47546fb46a3b825d4e756f7
describe
'208694' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAS' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
10789a88dcc732db1682a78c3f5bd7e4
0ab0a3fb00d7e90a1d42a43c9acdbc8c2e37564d
describe
'113538' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAT' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8acc543c2b799d02b0b581cf1f9da37b
1752132e7219cb2561390eaeda12624465c11962
describe
'35432' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAU' 'sip-files00201.pro'
2566d9c83ed063a98f113b414f09719a
764e27254399da3134971ad1bb7cc62a4dddf818
describe
'44171' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAV' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
995d9f164cade95f459d25746225b958
73488b1df96cbfea51dabea3d0355e8641a3a0a1
describe
'1671223' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAW' 'sip-files00201.tif'
a715ab8a34c744554c6f338c6f322c3b
6e9105da5000a94e899c014670a9924c766ce640
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAX' 'sip-files00201.txt'
4554bdb8f95410adb2b21e75431d82a4
daf18c4eb3c3737faf7ed13ec85b666db4d870ea
describe
'17271' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAY' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
a163b6073419e8f9f5f4681b88f14139
8ccb4412dc8e01193c40e7e4c183dcd8e8ce88fa
describe
'216132' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENAZ' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
67362df714ca11eac46e7b79960491d7
eff08b2a938139d33f56b0b53ebc96c4a54339b3
describe
'113097' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBA' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
54e067db236a6b08accf18fab04a932a
432ff123e3a15c0b43624b91f42c88a93822abb1
describe
'27119' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBB' 'sip-files00202.pro'
a459b9105ea414d26398464c64213f80
b30e60c449c573ad8313d2cb9b727a45e0b9b2eb
describe
'55886' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBC' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
ba529487dc57444bee0c7ca0e83af6bd
5da6bf256a36e0bf840f22e07af00c1490215777
describe
'1751020' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBD' 'sip-files00202.tif'
6e62182ce85ae44864250236908c6caa
07179d7eb542a76f6e1e886657474cef51742f1e
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBE' 'sip-files00202.txt'
7f95bdb10663d67797a4b8326eb98d32
875df39c0f532b6e6a8c03503dc14a935957c98a
describe
'33993' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBF' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
288cf2033c28b908230c1d549428bfb5
1524291afb11acf5d585efd329c5f97ed3dc6f09
describe
'214265' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBG' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
455e0a6784c021c05bf4ff05e5689952
e79efdd990404a2952537b56d55ce81c981ceb8d
describe
'85554' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBH' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
a86bb2c2e976a05a7c2e1bdd91d20f17
182ceaaa2497a5b3822ae7f87d63fb89a5388146
describe
'24634' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBI' 'sip-files00203.pro'
9c0fb5e0b8261bdea0ee7b5e316f933a
379c97b8985eb6a09e3c7cb1ab09331063f74907
describe
'31742' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBJ' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
bdf7f983c19e8be9da44a0bdba763614
c7442f7924a36aa920bc256764ba5d2c266f4095
describe
'1715019' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBK' 'sip-files00203.tif'
cb86cba6842639c54ef8025ea85420d8
ec2701ba73c6818fcd176ba46b577f6d95f1fdf8
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBL' 'sip-files00203.txt'
692f1ad1acf01a79a97bc2271bba301c
7d1e7308cee99de758bcd46af06de83128d47123
describe
'12461' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBM' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
4a3e02772a119ebeddf699445c2bd826
d3fab659459eb12e7038e6f5f3307a2933f13f4c
describe
'232746' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBN' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
7cec10978c3f68df4540ebd133b29ddf
b107613424cca6a8131217751128735233439462
describe
'112287' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBO' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
2698d7319db7f42367c4063d9845b021
e52548174e59ecd6d6f108927387a2a530a98488
describe
'33055' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBP' 'sip-files00204.pro'
4fdd9ad9ce04f4860bb793015974221f
3e5b62f9cde351311192fabdbde6e32bc1772ca0
describe
'42907' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBQ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
04bf0b3acf0242882cb849bc5613afab
df1ae7a72d082390c68ac1ea8a05b3b6c803b330
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBR' 'sip-files00204.tif'
c13962f7a3fceca55dedee206ecd8032
102d82cdbf8c927d1c48e8a2e6b82ea9e7991dc5
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBS' 'sip-files00204.txt'
8d3083264e079a6e12a94bdf0e8c38fb
2219855a90e103f12cf57835e05574c833ef0168
describe
'14365' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBT' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
26f34e0e70376aab310e66db8e828b91
b977601b0880906292568916512e3b991a0c783d
describe
'221605' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBU' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
c2be25926538485f2a7306d1e4bf32bf
599f8da35a3083640b02a035b0130b18017bf223
describe
'135534' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBV' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
0c54a371c6a7aa57bd8a7585f41b3cb3
f972925484316941b1f3e32122017a1865c8ee61
describe
'32010' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBW' 'sip-files00205.pro'
b6274ad6f8acb35f2f1bad4fb5b4d3d8
d25bebefbcc54c5b2ade7d65cd12c1245ce4efdc
describe
'66826' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBX' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
637a5b15953506ecffdda8008e1e396d
8512e7a9646b981713117ca6bf638d8e16b254a7
describe
'1796224' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBY' 'sip-files00205.tif'
e479415dcb47a7dc0f9ba859b598a642
5cafa9cd30ed6ac8613fd872ce4e623ba9b30d64
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENBZ' 'sip-files00205.txt'
65580a2f3dd599d700f605e524a4829c
9a95574a8592e5aabddf3def2d591363239f321c
describe
'39564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCA' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
39e98b2d6a75a59d4d6f2d6e4e84bbcd
f2a4a0716142d2f1071e1b08731734156e5d5c95
describe
'223236' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCB' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
8ca389909ab548f5109a9832436fba99
3a06d9356c43fe97ecdbb9c4b7b49b397c6fcc18
describe
'115339' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCC' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
f6f25349234745636def2fa519415de4
39d67575c8b125bbdd6d1ae83771ae5855bcded8
describe
'32457' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCD' 'sip-files00206.pro'
652a803f961f2d6bd71e251a36060766
2936e16ecb184eff508d9a577d39df02cf5fd761
describe
'43277' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCE' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
66e941a856809dcaa9e20a2ef96a2de2
2b574c5b1d8e013ac3cdafb2ecc8dd6848861d7a
'2012-03-31T08:01:20-04:00'
describe
'1787947' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCF' 'sip-files00206.tif'
25665e24677edfff26968c0758ad3579
e32eeceb4ec8abe67bf4ef53a8791425ea9b4a3c
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCG' 'sip-files00206.txt'
ae8b74a2666bc764d49d35a5491aaee1
3480d82bd80a4378fd3a9b8b56fbf3f042b56bcf
describe
'15112' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCH' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
8c7add24a1bc729ea29db7371e6333f8
199fd61edc6b906486809e07fcff418d37668e95
describe
'221848' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCI' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
d719bc7296c9cea5aa8cb8403ede940f
01ac8e96bc0ee6f13ba82b3c573594748dfa5e04
describe
'134231' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCJ' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
af783316139dd050d4c6beb0440792f7
0b3b16a7b806b565bccdb1e7e43e16e41b612a11
describe
'32755' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCK' 'sip-files00207.pro'
7e8f12c87666011d52a26149a61e7e16
e63575869a17657f0d55279cd26ff86542e7e212
describe
'67239' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCL' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
c7138d7070ea1ab379cecf7fbfc280af
b9bde6262e3f759a2d59f8c9377cfbccbfcab2d0
describe
'1798644' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCM' 'sip-files00207.tif'
9c80c52115eb98f0abea2a06d1202d19
63a2cd65c761d25d07f34b2815fdb49ec9963828
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCN' 'sip-files00207.txt'
95ef005532d9f5f20cea48fa293ecec1
3108a8d14abd01be5812502c44c508acf0bbff86
describe
'38779' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCO' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
f4ee95bcd9215b061fc4ca847c8e6b83
c8afb482d69d464f245c49b03c96fe4777a18db9
describe
'228653' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCP' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
02669550b4068ed5e7edf85f876b120a
f128fbb31959ee2f1ab9217be627f7c619443821
describe
'122368' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCQ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
ad0a498bcc2f71ac2eb7eb0324eee303
25feca895f447637a160efb0916cb4279e7e761f
describe
'28967' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCR' 'sip-files00208.pro'
c8ef28b88c6e7c1bff97b196af27c111
7d76a649a261dbd7f4cb8a32e826bae802122bd9
describe
'59935' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCS' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
c7ee4084f7970733f177b315143ccec6
ef5e3f76dfed01bfa72e17c1fd1a03fa92e88199
describe
'1851816' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCT' 'sip-files00208.tif'
425a520a162185e29bb592cb02277f05
8bd5327b8d4239b607405ae8954f8ecb86f10b5b
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCU' 'sip-files00208.txt'
2a2084ceefacfb2f72903edb986eb82f
8ef608970a6881c0a20706204ae3608a7e5ee112
'2012-03-31T08:03:42-04:00'
describe
'35815' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCV' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
b21a6305e2505cbf18a1d348be833f5d
cb2f50b09395709e714a496563364269335214e2
describe
'240399' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCW' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
a92ee1b9fa865242dceef4d306640f34
7fe60f457f173823076d2f9d15a351061516af06
describe
'98047' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCX' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
9aa2fdee97c16c45440eb0f574bdb01d
8011bb7f3a974bc47c3725f3c5c37e9bb0ced525
describe
'18444' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCY' 'sip-files00209.pro'
bd270df306036dd9d7cf5976e8e03bb7
a96bb1bd37902a367ef869820a60b15967293166
describe
'49457' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENCZ' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
83b7987e94c88f54061e70e7e98330e6
bc76160276c1af13da033a7e7252f3740fce5be4
describe
'1944368' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDA' 'sip-files00209.tif'
2d1554d1619e000d29c017669af74e7c
6a394679ffcd32a2d756465432c03befcd9258fa
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDB' 'sip-files00209.txt'
da25b0269b4c57ded6ea16e643b16782
bed19c7d4189a7aa3f177975f1c648fe14dff17b
describe
'31174' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDC' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
cb9ddf3f2fd8e8a8ad8366673b7c82b6
876b9178cd12ca9a11dc8e12eabca8fd54543bb6
describe
'228452' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDD' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
91442c8ea43b4efddb3667dcb92147e0
b5d82c8aeb0bfe07d72806522964d8d116da5cfa
describe
'117701' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDE' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
5d55234a98fdac9b2a7e39fdeb160b3b
8f103e565e412dd1f49c1faa6758605f3d4e7960
describe
'36220' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDF' 'sip-files00210.pro'
f73bc7d48681a25714202b964da0bf7f
0861f07eed8ffc87dd92e03f782dc62574da4ef7
describe
'46155' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDG' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
08e3b8bdaeb79e5433673b9b26d5b6c8
cb84ad2b0d0b73487fc5dda9401a6ada05cf5266
describe
'1829079' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDH' 'sip-files00210.tif'
2240e643b2df9288d079da0f2e0ba3cc
95168450cd690d588b6d87d3d6358be302f9e369
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDI' 'sip-files00210.txt'
fcdaa25592daa7d014877b94e5b20dab
8e86329d776d0d587493260c6fe68dcb67dc66fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDJ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
5b94b1204bf4cc1db105d9d5097eda0b
21a90cd06c588c38a1f43f971c6f61bb284c79eb
'2012-03-31T08:03:08-04:00'
describe
'239921' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDK' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
631ca394ea59a1642097e469e94fb856
6b5924572fe9bd59b5a32b4c2ccf3ad0df33484d
describe
'114895' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDL' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
99454cfcb0450c81ac506438507c2b18
f1f0b9dfcca3e53c7c278c1a5804205c946b4f7b
describe
'34741' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDM' 'sip-files00211.pro'
05525ad1762983173a1779c31100f90e
bceac495d3a988ac46ccb16032baabc20ecdcbaf
describe
'44450' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDN' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d48491699e0f5004d286dcfb59b200df
81d258e2cca8f6f928c4e1e948e3a78af614f43e
describe
'1920287' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDO' 'sip-files00211.tif'
8826127d3486f79cb87209586d39e257
ea542b04af5d811c6649919835f5f52e4ac1f072
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDP' 'sip-files00211.txt'
8820219f0e17cada4de4efecb2114fe6
2a689ed599a916c463c3007cd48683d71292b395
describe
'13674' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDQ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
f6c5a3fd408ffa6b2bc65fea51f459b4
de551a7526c60610c6c0e802e95a99cf5a3c31d9
describe
'233453' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDR' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
4e3c6719635f5edf6b7b5c181a5bb728
5dd8221039faa1b2e307be6651d1e835a1652b4b
describe
'142650' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDS' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
4e2ca749922de8c9e383513c8951600f
f58ebe83fa7c68e2e345b5cff9e36e9fd6b08419
describe
'35255' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDT' 'sip-files00212.pro'
02e1b159bb6b4b1cc08764c760a4694c
b9693e28d53a3157328b91acb3c31d07800b70c4
describe
'70650' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDU' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
4512064b53e5b30d5ac845580b201a00
051c2df09b9878ae1d2dcad919db2237676104d6
describe
'1891804' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDV' 'sip-files00212.tif'
c5461285026fb30a005853b7943dafe3
a8fa8940b15a92cc4d67d3600edbfd7b088a9b1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDW' 'sip-files00212.txt'
c66dd7d17ab284cb17bc610f40d6c247
1a7398404ab9d825ab4d1a4a98ef729778c680d0
describe
'37729' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDX' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
af822511bca43ec971eae1099e48bfc5
e648fa86c2b7ae6715f47875f768f94a7aab3317
describe
'231564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDY' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
75700552a33997270c144a0b471d07e8
eedc810af5f5cdeec5e4b0cb3107ba2c06b72c43
describe
'140049' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENDZ' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
99604844ee597d226307e90f8dd349c7
8d56760ae0e74dcb591d4f3c66f809636c9eaa67
describe
'36836' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEA' 'sip-files00213.pro'
9feb461f588cf8e5647acc9eb2333046
b242fb1db5c45c9a0c2baef8f8626ec5e4156378
describe
'68974' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEB' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
405a013dbb800db1672f61fa04fbf9fd
ddb57204cba17f09962a698c7c4a4588490a0251
describe
'1875940' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEC' 'sip-files00213.tif'
8ec22c19e030886a9cb474ca9d9d0eee
3544948ec6fa21719a470fd180b7170aec9d50ec
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENED' 'sip-files00213.txt'
4f3ec15e0e4534a1e09f33953f28d417
a276b618236808ec4d472dfce6391e56d0332cf8
describe
'38405' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEE' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
3a6887a5875981ea507a468dbe9a61f6
748b3338f6fbfee325394a34d746dafa899de01a
describe
'230219' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEF' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
dde428db8f5ad0564806fd894ecb7305
06ba84dc86bce56953cb47dc1d497c6a7db2d1d7
describe
'139260' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEG' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
6f55537cc99ca201071c138d3c979e43
c6b6665dd4bc012794618027f63f6b7eedbea665
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEH' 'sip-files00214.pro'
ec4de21e62a85fde7f1e58dde1044b2d
3ad94b928c86935bdf2361e9784ede25217921a3
describe
'67753' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEI' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
187d90a14319b50bf7856b2480ca4642
f2b8ef00e43816146ec8e757ecb2e67a8e3f3c1e
describe
'1865052' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEJ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
a5073c5ed9cca93574a4464cc5ccf07b
f7f19465d28363edd13b656744431b41391fa7b6
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEK' 'sip-files00214.txt'
a64eb99df82ea5a5ff210beb2935fb8b
611f8022459926e46a5ad83dd5c3a7dbe5d532bf
describe
'38097' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEL' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
7d90d95a59b761096e65f5582011a733
9142db61238b3b9fc0c7e3890cb601b148da109a
describe
'226450' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEM' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
565df2e47cfd49f346d9cd245168d13e
bb3ebf021db47fffcc8411c4d9916bac46d0935f
describe
'115274' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEN' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
f14f8cf32955c7fff6ab39c345bf00ce
6a33dacf8a72f9850091ee25e8de1969487a5db9
describe
'29610' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEO' 'sip-files00215.pro'
6269455032902090906d71e4bb66b41f
50b8af6711530a0a9a51f4d360f1af8056c6d68f
describe
'57152' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEP' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
d614abd631daa202bb4c8b1a7c70e905
e72e12ca6f9a79295ad655646dbf09f657bafc3f
describe
'1833412' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEQ' 'sip-files00215.tif'
21ccd18fe5b075535464d32e87d77110
e638e3d5c9ca54bba5558d337660de494b8ae370
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENER' 'sip-files00215.txt'
9c69284c1039daccc61ef0deee91759d
524c58acbb278125b9117fd4c3eefad0b14288ce
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENES' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
b8afe0983e031b5cb5f4bf7169bf25ba
43e4ea30b488ba596176a426fd35011d3c3326b8
describe
'231289' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENET' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
18e1a3d8656cf92a6854e98199532baa
793c8a26ec3de77092b07be64281c85e483e4b74
describe
'90083' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEU' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
f1a270d0214d52bfd773489a06ace5af
3ce172f6f685e83236eadc713fc63960676fc787
describe
'30375' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEV' 'sip-files00216.pro'
499f766763b684ad94300851a8920189
d0f1a5958231234de487505de49f3d201037fb47
describe
'31749' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEW' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
9779d97bf071eb5761dcdfbe8c93a388
cc0251f18edf8334d61cd2fec5ede041a73053ef
describe
'1851051' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEX' 'sip-files00216.tif'
35fe0ec1f7c81de8d1b331b8c2cd9fae
64894c55f2d1ad9098be997a54749e9758fc1651
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEY' 'sip-files00216.txt'
bd0487eeb1425a6ea376eea2bc9ac724
5a661829255ebab761f905f1d85833e3b6ad6f97
describe
'10946' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENEZ' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
855e5e49793be3ae034fe088b2c72168
8a1c65e92bd6b571ed6a8938cdf22928e084464a
describe
'222076' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFA' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
0b57d4c4dade10c0f7daa31f30e5ecfe
d989af057f2296051a00338711482d3e446b40f7
describe
'86117' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFB' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
5fef17c4565162101fea7b8ef38104f3
b843cd24fcf9f3e60a0d164fed562363e3402965
describe
'25376' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFC' 'sip-files00217.pro'
992c131ee24c3321681d170cb32e1cba
3873efcfced174a52a716693c48b68de179727bc
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFD' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
48548d671d3b62d39f193fb35ef72334
8b8fa61ac654db526c7796dde27a4592ade7370c
describe
'1778007' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFE' 'sip-files00217.tif'
3c71d6c794d51979e635f6f0cb53c4de
09de6ed4033d6afe638e499debbfb591bdec02f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFF' 'sip-files00217.txt'
ab3c9d77318054b92062c2821515b918
cbc8526ec2e5dd20ed3927d06e182ec6395a06f9
describe
'11531' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFG' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
b92bda68b29e3d0be3513ab0cf262b3b
8bfdd45570d33db0de39404c8b1ea9d85e2056ca
describe
'222931' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFH' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
1fa444f7e2964e7395bea33147cf01ef
431b0922f2c9d8f76ca70a6b3b8d393ca3c168d6
describe
'109650' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFI' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
289ee143279cb3fe0d682c9716fc14d6
cc943f05e76021c71c1a0b390d86b8398293cd57
describe
'32686' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFJ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
1ca32cbe66f6d85841e8a770017c239b
0035ba1d72f4637805e155c70c53d5b78ae49f6e
describe
'42770' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFK' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
5f48791077616be41aae42f949782866
854dead67c5b177175962062f782a2e820b6dcc0
describe
'1784579' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFL' 'sip-files00218.tif'
93e47d7fb0c8cd64ba8e04b21d7f3a88
bbf82cfe6d1cccec16e5a23fc34071a7943735d5
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFM' 'sip-files00218.txt'
a74602673d98c531138a24b9a410fe47
a6085f4ee77373bb41a21ec11943b617a09dc7ae
describe
'14816' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFN' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
3a21b5496889b99acce7375a3b10765e
57fc536bc1f46c0523dbc657bc1559142f37d359
describe
'228320' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFO' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
4b53277917f0dc491d4c75d3405aeb50
b6bc0d7c35707a0bee05a0fccca51012f03f3932
describe
'132685' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFP' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
32796e7446a2990813ffbb99951dcf96
2fe87693f356538eeb3407307561ace52d5fac80
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFQ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
a75f3fc3e95499e987b756789a92d543
1932b85ce8ea662428084439b7272b7956835c8c
describe
'65625' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFR' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
78ec689c54cbd96ca02cd2bd6e77485f
98e041d73c6dccc61afe5cfa7d754da94b6d29b0
describe
'1849960' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFS' 'sip-files00219.tif'
be8b291183ef0fa1cf4af6652b6bf348
bff260952be3fb25071a04921ba3f38a511c4378
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFT' 'sip-files00219.txt'
c3691534001eefe15a8289d929029e84
f6c700ac0fb49673859d113385260dcd4bc081ca
describe
'38026' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFU' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
9f93860602fbfa827788bb9b5d0fc258
1e021b58bded6f7fd8998c5aa7be257fed73e2b8
describe
'235965' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFV' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
411d05a0ebc96665e6d8db0523186277
e30b95c1f33361554839f873c1842800a1120d69
describe
'133034' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFW' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
41f5e4eaa4b79fd7867ad34572b35c1d
7cf393cb977b0060a7a16dd8ae43d4b465c50309
describe
'31797' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFX' 'sip-files00220.pro'
956f1ba57e0a54b7978898328c6cab86
f322f497a5ccc132f49352ab1ac81652a557301a
describe
'66135' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFY' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
753be2a1085499ec81d941350493ace1
e864f2c1840271c7faf11192b71d2991b7c91ccf
describe
'1911996' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENFZ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
4b6e043ac53c978a6de95f41392bd3dd
90d9015022efc31d800d885b4897336f3c175cf7
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGA' 'sip-files00220.txt'
c08222b1141a604efe6d0b9071841efd
4bec286300f91a9382983af365ac270852d43a95
describe
'36922' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGB' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
e2b685ec89fe775408a748dc60f62b96
cbde6a016d3ee090a9ea27146788de628179ce52
describe
'233197' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGC' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
9fb4e991814ced75c2d73b90d4c83246
d1d3e37af64bfe83aaae572e103f8f856fa76cae
describe
'88568' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGD' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
bd5fae17aa6ab37d610e1f29621548e7
ea9cb10271db36ae11dd1f8537ae68e5d6bcf221
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGE' 'sip-files00221.pro'
1a4545194053aa8563acb4ae2626cf5a
e88b89701aca104d9314dff47dea151267f785f2
describe
'33131' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGF' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
fa67e98fbe27eacf2a18cb33da06bcaa
dbff81401dafcf6e321b3438f991817e245806e7
describe
'1866495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGG' 'sip-files00221.tif'
dc2ab39ec25436119a6d12fdf008650c
902681aed869e795a543af776ab5975c5ddc32d4
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGH' 'sip-files00221.txt'
60e9c1f6d51af5443bf9d044b9b0c3c0
afc907074f6fa1dd12ead84aad7a59ab05192df7
describe
'11272' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGI' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
eac5b1d3b7a7b430ad431428bd7de300
49f7f2c398f72cba48add7dd12efbd1d29516a50
describe
'225322' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGJ' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
84f27e8c54bd8e3c23551243010fb4e0
09f3fa228aeed465e189d173b5d311ac3836b84e
describe
'85719' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGK' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
d02f880988683a5512313db474480382
913f8147ce550dd75dda4d84d1627a8f7ccbcdb8
describe
'22612' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGL' 'sip-files00222.pro'
9da87b65cc57aa7bccfe145690a3050e
39c15ca00aedd1ec63fb4e4632f25532dd4ebcd5
describe
'30948' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGM' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
d53a603fa310c957a355be984ae851ee
672e625c9f3eca1a948a6f272058b7404610af7e
describe
'1803495' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGN' 'sip-files00222.tif'
66bd63fff24d427c8b0851b688dd322d
994f335cf7eb58a433c1c9a1164c03e3282f7f3a
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGO' 'sip-files00222.txt'
e4d802dbb497391a36be0f596b571c59
b4f7243515416eec79c7b3428a8e78c020c766b4
describe
'10740' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGP' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
1bdb6195901ed4a017a99341addadc75
68499d7ffd8aa60abba67354ffbf0a5ae98c202b
describe
'228379' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGQ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
fce0b2159bc36f158256e00f29343794
570352e213dc5f38c97bd3f78f9dce8814c501f1
describe
'99758' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGR' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
3fc735b05b6fee4783b6b30a6812c3c7
135620791b69120aaf795fb8009afb9d21cd8426
describe
'31829' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGS' 'sip-files00223.pro'
cb5f545629520942c923125f89ea2fb3
a0b087b5d66c90276e79dff45a56945f47116258
describe
'38102' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGT' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
74bddc196314b9c361944a7d40dcab9a
ce46b62fef72f62353f77c92e29082aa0bc3e0be
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGU' 'sip-files00223.tif'
d3c32d962e824c6fef9f171f4069511f
d1d74e726ef6e11200167d825770f588c3909c60
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGV' 'sip-files00223.txt'
ab9c8e44e751011104ca7c355afc6957
51cdd7cec3e3d57c4ff60a7f3906095b3d0d1aa6
describe
'13216' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGW' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
e4e2bf67800818f546d24b870f7fc917
51e822227ffc160dc24e28f4df8ec25f91c786f4
describe
'231696' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGX' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
0b94d8ee5987ff9d633c356eaffa510d
ee92b736dccf4981d5a9fe58756f4bb06275ef5a
describe
'106633' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGY' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
898d7b003cf06729a6374b7c04a1eabe
62efba0f6ebb527bd0439c9fbe6278f6a16825db
describe
'32924' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENGZ' 'sip-files00224.pro'
75fbff3f34b7d59751c7aa74d119c4ee
38fdb2b281abbf15ca2b5ce43b2d768ea535c69c
describe
'40515' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHA' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
fbd3129f0b01e43a9d58b7f8480ec1d9
a41a79654e00246d7a7b2a4a0533a1740457caf6
describe
'1854331' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHB' 'sip-files00224.tif'
e81b10c14c952753cd1b8c8ffa561a86
92e2f81afc4978a5e531436c7d460897ee88681b
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHC' 'sip-files00224.txt'
bd608df5e248a7af73ee0d84581c4727
f16b582400bd34562e3f88318ea4b18ace195329
describe
'13097' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHD' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
894eeb982551860f7f4437d68041f473
49dc9114e5e0da562b3d1df799d89d60221b5f28
describe
'221230' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHE' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
fe4936eaf5ecfc48c80a0fb1a6b4cd32
c11d83c8e597a53ae432f88e0a2446a13556ab67
describe
'104780' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHF' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
58815326792d03c37f5f0a5b214bf024
2b578527d6d6e8dba89a2a4dd972253685c304f8
describe
'33850' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHG' 'sip-files00225.pro'
fba9ad84d024747b15c8336b7be52ffc
884bd7e2e3d650aad89c1ded46a7ee2c8b5f2665
describe
'40751' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHH' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
ddff9ff3d517918c249a291b666f67b8
fad29133cfc83f9c219c92ad93a634e038d2ff86
describe
'1771063' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHI' 'sip-files00225.tif'
f380ecdc661d0546d7a3ed397263b49c
027f64e8056323ff12fb536fa4228cec4b20cd9d
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHJ' 'sip-files00225.txt'
6d4e8dd9c1ee3f4b79bd34198b87c981
e6346669e562f2cf315e3fc26ba3fcce60f46011
describe
'15080' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHK' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
1dbda7bfc29701ae25e5c5c6932c1bb3
dcd1e050a64564aa5f2072c53f9b756a051bf276
describe
'224736' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHL' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
20bc11741a2e52b38b08e0ac00de77e4
e4febf19d6db1a4dc139bf4b4b3a1fddc3f0b71b
describe
'135834' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHM' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
18dab41f17260f7b83dfebb93aa36862
1ddf7e8dee6e50fc9be76be8cfa62edb02c302db
describe
'36238' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHN' 'sip-files00226.pro'
a8994743d539e487a69204ec50887275
9dd02fb2a52521910a121f3efe203a0153ffb8bd
describe
'66496' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHO' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
793b7cb673946200892dcfc642cba006
b9adacfe2970858b8c5a49a07130613c219d8ecf
describe
'1820620' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHP' 'sip-files00226.tif'
1c7143ecdcb8da05b38418c2512dd6a6
de387f00980e0a6517d02da239a6f15bef6e2aa8
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHQ' 'sip-files00226.txt'
09b4597ddedcacc98595633d9e0a6feb
54b9a151060af4c625fc41289681996872c6164f
describe
'37433' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHR' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
8544ec87c3add4481f9dcccbd3cfe6ee
d3e66732a40ca3a968f7215c2dcf96bc06871914
describe
'234181' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHS' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
802a9af4553955acca051398ddd2f142
5b4efe8415b4014ce0f79ec235fd17723f848c03
describe
'136347' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHT' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
664f061b3e144d757da28db354a59526
23f682c11f5c047d5808201c2d6e2935923ee0f6
describe
'37056' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHU' 'sip-files00227.pro'
4287fa1b5f9b2b7f0e827e96a3290e77
6d7614a4bc03c1a38f66d9064dc3446ed505892c
describe
'67272' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHV' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
96623e4293d09eba48551d25c331e178
c036606ac65b1a1c8da0168eaf8a8ec39af03bc8
describe
'1896776' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHW' 'sip-files00227.tif'
e71dd5ee5f042a76d3083cbb67d66af6
4ba954e5bc640ce82fa895e6dedfd369b79b4656
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHX' 'sip-files00227.txt'
58ecb38e4e217b2a849f5b77b095d777
5addcc18d6f064e3d5ba91024d6e1fc43de9e0d3
describe
'37909' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHY' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
2032b757c87f5f8d6f0492cc65a7f348
e0157cc71e0000e33a429b9468f0746815db0256
describe
'230341' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENHZ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
40969b13216df3e8a285dda376cd92ab
c2c3c6baf66f1bfbf520c20b45258df12a9f2349
describe
'84972' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIA' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
c8b9537ae993e9a7961e4c9e3398abf8
53d5d2e74128c23748175cc9193754d5548f7431
describe
'26979' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIB' 'sip-files00228.pro'
30ced5972cd11c048a82ea4c1a5e1ea4
0d151d817bb2967ccb93eeb0f5c33311d4aa9e7e
describe
'30885' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIC' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
5dacc8ab0778de3497869bdb14dc0335
aad4b8825fd268445a00ba88062ae3dac1f006cb
describe
'1844403' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENID' 'sip-files00228.tif'
96ad6ad6ffa7ddd5c0024da99330f6c3
464bf8862ee9aa7307ecb93f6763e95a314fd427
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIE' 'sip-files00228.txt'
e75df24f30ba481673b5ae1b33a888bb
6aa366fe87f681cbb5151d34530b8a89e4186b4c
'2012-03-31T08:06:49-04:00'
describe
'10592' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIF' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
d51eb1d85959cedd54f790e7d65a0882
eb479c67be4cbe74b24e767507c014101e1dd468
describe
'220263' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIG' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
5aa634ed2880aba39e7f1f13f326cb3a
21a478ab0730cae1969cce6de72ff96de34999ba
describe
'96789' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIH' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
022ee401d12b6ca658aafa8c3a85e0dd
3aaef113838c74c89faea185e184cfeef245e5ad
describe
'23571' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENII' 'sip-files00229.pro'
913099799a00e1a58700addb9810bfa0
3aae6dfe3733fe61cb9c04eca76f67c13908f819
describe
'49378' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIJ' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
69c46ae6ae7e8b29add16ec1c25e1cbc
dcfb86959af28a8a21d0ba616afc7e4a14be0daf
describe
'1783908' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIK' 'sip-files00229.tif'
b22245534260afe15c48edc6e0e996a0
061a880be0430291a8bea93849657789c9defc82
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIL' 'sip-files00229.txt'
04833ba0522f508eaa28825239e7c7ce
ee32ae5ac10722811aabd1b28a61290c156294ff
describe
'30854' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIM' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
415ea3561c32489f07d983e459e76962
f81a6529211dc32d271732deede43532cc7ab479
describe
'223247' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIN' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
bd829e3adddcb03eee50cd02af4ca0e6
c40e16231aceefee3e7109896582a3909aa3e2a6
describe
'143079' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIO' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
9838550097f1946f17a27d3fab41bef0
7af916cf09d7a3e37b943fe0d5bccb6e5daa4d17
describe
'39967' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIP' 'sip-files00230.pro'
52eb7d654ce9a0ce602ccbea51ff74ff
b49fc33df0ce97f4491ba2a00890e2bca31ec07f
'2012-03-31T08:03:05-04:00'
describe
'69202' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIQ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
e93a1ec43b1c7e2c39f8eab05ccd28e8
57e2cb52ac46e74e7df90157153943cd24645a52
describe
'1809712' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIR' 'sip-files00230.tif'
79b9fec5202e2d96c193b10c88aa9a0d
ef55daa7978cca8576749505a6aec717d0e400c9
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIS' 'sip-files00230.txt'
67d68fd4d1236020a64f46ab16a8a284
bc11f4d5e95865f23243e7c0731dbad54d096af9
describe
'38906' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIT' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
da4a4e2e6d682c2c4733a231887ba695
a50133f95feae801056fb687d32e1bb8ffa29270
describe
'227545' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIU' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
8b9db743d237bd57ccc77421bdb68ae1
8059d94b9f5d06f2714fc6690639615b44cd8543
describe
'134667' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIV' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
f3266a83bb79fce8dbd2ea7feaa4182b
f6d37dceccebae047e015bb98920acc14bd75a15
describe
'35568' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIW' 'sip-files00231.pro'
32ada1fb076664c6ea510920961d23bb
ac3054f4159b86b95bd0c3dd41ec9a21ca687b9d
describe
'66125' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIX' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
aa6e6822baea4b2414a90f268994c60c
15d2fa16a8782f90fa0f179f33d6d589c3c6c300
describe
'1843104' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIY' 'sip-files00231.tif'
630f41e6ebcb3b0b880cdb23fa88305e
cedb57e586de4a5b58745b30711a13128ebde4a4
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENIZ' 'sip-files00231.txt'
dcc829e1bebf7e28d3c04ece232e5a39
2e36a5c2cebafb72f11206c292156264905ee69a
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJA' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
5e2705f1364b52c6a42cb74a16c16e8a
cb81c26b7aabfea47650307620ea944d37c1dd9a
describe
'225704' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJB' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
f48d416ed03a32e36ad9ae32a2b64689
c0b431df4df70ed53d000cf50f73b9d222af5a8e
describe
'136465' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJC' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
911c1a1165bada9355de751eed007dc9
6515904e41d2dcaf509ccbc90a61ccd48a944b70
describe
'34851' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJD' 'sip-files00232.pro'
f89b35c50d3ddc3fb69fc43169aae455
d189087a6158015c3d35b48abe78988a54065e66
describe
'66482' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJE' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
dc83dfedd340a5dbd729ec2f8b6b43d6
37c9900014ee1aa1a7b001b138f7b5c1fc56d74d
describe
'1828340' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJF' 'sip-files00232.tif'
8b79caabaf3a0e9b064d8aa7c8b7d8b1
82deb9090545933cfb641ea7d1ec06ec2588db17
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJG' 'sip-files00232.txt'
6a897bd2c1af48cbd48e5d553e51ce36
90559ce7910f6416d990b0447900912574ec7930
describe
'37522' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJH' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
30be41468b812c00135beb28bc09225c
bb3d0a8aa4e6e1b12a80d5dd8c8164f0070baf30
describe
'229043' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJI' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
a2fee7f4135120889d083d99615dc4bb
cfdde9da13a45d2c74ec0bf989229a3184e1f4b3
describe
'126027' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJJ' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
8866dbeeccbd14ebc9fda039011dd769
bf25af6d95a9e52258d938f695fd041c2379397e
describe
'33777' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJK' 'sip-files00233.pro'
236d35be307edc8aa8ad02a8e04964a2
549fe21e02cd38f832c311df736ca59d671384fb
describe
'62848' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJL' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
638dbde4ff6fcf47927fcc344693866c
92efa30013a302f4f1fd1372cf74dc76b55855a3
describe
'1854820' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJM' 'sip-files00233.tif'
f34d119a2106c32ecfac6559c6c01155
e9d12ee5999b7b5dab6f2b751d19d2e6656b52e8
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJN' 'sip-files00233.txt'
5ec30b9b50cca814795157c0fb970109
7ba6c64414262f340158aa67da6751ee2520997a
describe
'35502' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJO' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
e158ac0ecef39ff33d526e54553389f7
f3a264c7116f82c6c5f95ee9aca436f04924a461
describe
'227380' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJP' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
9bb7630a99edaa26c844fa737aac721e
c6698204e05b79c854273a385deac65c1e90d71b
describe
'76352' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJQ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
1291d970a770972766288db945ce26e7
9bd3fcc0170f91b88c865009ea1ef5e6fffad52f
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJR' 'sip-files00234.pro'
f9bbc5e178ce5788dc256511dafef596
cbc40af71eb9bd22c9bdae0c97187f3b756a8cb9
describe
'26998' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJS' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
9595b854acdff657e19154f33ab60caf
e8f9fe1a88e1b8ec91c433095b3be15c906e7b56
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJT' 'sip-files00234.tif'
f0f2c26fa28cef640f407d86a7eb7a2e
8eaa4fb23e2ffc468482584ecc369364a6431c55
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJU' 'sip-files00234.txt'
e0d33e7b20ad95ae8ff66e64a792c7a7
7b3d50565ec344d20db2b215e3c23063b7f0a1e0
describe
'9186' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJV' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
051e0446711544b2dcd43b021fc86c2a
857806d1e9380a417118ac002a557e54c387f23b
describe
'193195' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJW' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
c9664b674f9e5c59ef710f310b29259c
22ee36846b21b3de00720f62ad48abb5f07dc015
describe
'30087' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJX' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
442453967c4cb09747d9131eadc9ffd1
7b25ca91737c0071fb11b9276fda6fb936c873e4
describe
'5760' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJY' 'sip-files00235.pro'
5c3f95158d88e658a8f4e1663d4c64f8
2a2b489c235ada0ce1f922d86616453218b602f4
describe
'9848' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENJZ' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
a028a0013709ee07edebcd2c98da5fdd
1e3b1911c4e5d6dcb607187da98a040d416dc1e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKA' 'sip-files00235.tif'
c2c0fba87402ce74fdad82c2b87a8e18
52043b6199b5afdf4e75249e83e514330ba34f1b
describe
'355' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKB' 'sip-files00235.txt'
642c404e7b5ab7b21d8e8c3d7b7d0984
27023e8b4af33ba75143d9f9525442ecdb17f6aa
describe
'3669' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKC' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
f4c4d1de5ca11a91b828c68bb6893f23
68c0c67b023700bed597473c5344563fe4d9a2b9
describe
'233091' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKD' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
78756d135231240345b5fd3a1e7a41e6
ed1eed111b5dd68681b105354cad0cd4ec0b2c45
describe
'120129' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKE' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
a5e6e05ebc810366d2526f90d6ab4c41
9a82d45785635e3d5dcc9658e893f22aef4e4d3a
describe
'30856' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKF' 'sip-files00236.pro'
f5cff9af64bfa4c94a3f45d9e7c15fb6
c9c71548a6708578c3a8020788ee13914768ab37
describe
'57435' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKG' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
11698f6500944cfe60adeccd55a53596
2e9808e5539451944a5401c9d6683af6b31f93d8
describe
'1886980' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKH' 'sip-files00236.tif'
25cc041f69393cf701e5e9a8290544fd
e0ccdb0dcfd8120d46ed035b8f48585fc23a0060
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKI' 'sip-files00236.txt'
eed2c9d022d55b122ba712abb21fca20
73532a3334c02dab003800de8bb63881c7f6bd4b
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKJ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
3bf3f734619b73e7db5a94b93098c2d6
8e07088610bb3b12f310a7182c4775e4c18e58c1
describe
'222817' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKK' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
b72d787636d49a536bff10063640c172
c1d91ca62ae37256a4575d51eb6c174e33ab2ed9
describe
'112359' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKL' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
3102c86792f9c87f8695234f3c7627d7
0acf6623c61fc9834dbf6f080073b63f13d81bc1
describe
'27826' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKM' 'sip-files00237.pro'
a3a84ab8ac4ec7a1abdd5ec1a849fb49
29bceda84889da902f1074a584fbb2583351480f
describe
'55109' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKN' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
da3969239d5e29f7f8f0e0b1d7824bc6
1c699460184cbf5d7a433f2cc74f4b8e417f8c41
describe
'1804416' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKO' 'sip-files00237.tif'
e2818e39016dd96e9dc4ebb2e445cadd
44b78fd76983f58ebdf58935ae37466573e0860e
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKP' 'sip-files00237.txt'
dc6bab5f0a9812699179be84d7c168a8
a23a1752dc8abbaa7a58392572577a48e2cdbadd
describe
'33751' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKQ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
dc337f7c691ea5f82993072a78531fe5
17aba4bf520bd6be4ab2b6c6576ca70e6b575a12
describe
'228963' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKR' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
2465dc67ba6b38bcf98a687a362f550b
8d1daee643ac36455fe055d63aaa4b3eb23a3beb
describe
'76882' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKS' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
017ff1b02bf3aebcc544d3b6d3c27705
d3d5d4339e7ad914c8d19c50fd70235d9748b1d2
describe
'19287' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKT' 'sip-files00238.pro'
6d51420fc04d0778ec1bca7206954ee1
91483a827883b0a1f950f33657696721ab7246d5
describe
'26479' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKU' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
be961a4e7c8237080d8f8f0951d7f5b4
4210ec38c1e709c9961e4a4c8cbc6ec2650c4bf2
describe
'1834663' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKV' 'sip-files00238.tif'
9bab53df667333aa22eca66b678f0cda
484042d1fa533a64f63ca1bab6e03cc2ce520f38
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKW' 'sip-files00238.txt'
40376f3e92e0960e6dbd17edbb959a8c
b9e28e6a9a2eebd7cd54fc61cad85334c09748e6
describe
'9919' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKX' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
e31f1b923b99d9856d87bacacb84dbc2
a66b99a7138138b564fb24c341a6c605125dbf69
describe
'224105' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKY' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
040df5a787722728e3c41c4ade3927cb
2b601ea46c4bb97d913ede60126d08c50885ea1f
describe
'84564' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENKZ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
971327cfa5139fdebceadf188a13220c
20a98cd7997bfb6ada4c716f448c81694b632747
describe
'26988' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLA' 'sip-files00239.pro'
f9bedb6b3feafa898e3402291456c02a
771e244df5de697fa311162ccfa9c7c556543876
describe
'30886' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLB' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
7de2c097da2429cc1822dd1f612c8367
2ee2442c10d14797b5cfb93908c24e000659cc8f
describe
'1793575' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLC' 'sip-files00239.tif'
a12bed48d7d0f781da8da52429908a02
15be6649b897e406386f1a543a50e73e7811fa89
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLD' 'sip-files00239.txt'
c74a48309ced29b59440fe4720b03d5d
b8527d0d15f314a60be1af73b1a43ce64b43620c
describe
'11919' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLE' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
39542e2f4c3d3d459d65b2dede79fbee
6117cfb1a1507b40ac3a58f4ad1cf6d388b2e3d5
describe
'223659' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLF' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
68a11dc7b8cff9be28100b258c373b5d
1892cd4e27742c6cda65d0977f077f9a997fc139
describe
'81291' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLG' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
d4daf34de9b03d1dcaef10bec1d7a339
6e01c240b3cf918e33fc4f0bac70e13660ad9060
describe
'23646' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLH' 'sip-files00240.pro'
55a457b37017f130c28823bbf1dbb01b
0321b1002181772b17e9352e6aef6bbb64d7c52f
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLI' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
75769db9f67ff31cbc1fd2c47f56d7f7
fca4ba3a78c1dc0bce75088edf03c585f9264494
describe
'1789999' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLJ' 'sip-files00240.tif'
7bbe3034a7a3581e308395f6890c5b6a
a024717d04d4f6541ad64b3afc177689360e55a3
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLK' 'sip-files00240.txt'
c9cf38f61ef93268a915ebd032b3d379
ba719094c27e0d41731f63d77bf43cf15e2192bf
describe
'11721' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLL' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
b9b461297685c3d3cf732830f2a2774b
2ac33d32736ac2b95d6d875624c86af628f228f2
describe
'227542' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLM' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
7dd0034014d559f4e558b2fe6a5bbd82
87f96cd58403246b784213586a57ff7225ddbd32
describe
'105537' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLN' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
09fa38e7fd54a9a837bb72a4735e5e8c
f27e9e9eb30a22a7d2234fdd463114441b99adfc
describe
'24796' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLO' 'sip-files00241.pro'
715971a6c80396e3e8d7b111698745b1
af09cbe4c7e2f827320358ff59e8ad0f29cd6450
describe
'51880' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLP' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
f8f320606181c8da7084a03064c37f70
fde4a1a98f0d187bce630d7d1bfe25c502596f58
describe
'1841740' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLQ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
950a4106d2f505678b6707cf5f803485
2bf9ca9f0cba9c3f696c283ee4d73565cbae72e5
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLR' 'sip-files00241.txt'
3906186565515a948ca8f1a2ad9bd2cd
65e28e5194e6ab398d9f44d8d6bc6334c221ba0c
describe
'32761' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLS' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
b71fb6b31276dce6588b411c6e806e7f
6361f2ac3b6b5bb2e3f65f26df2a386370ecf3eb
describe
'225929' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLT' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
62e27205177456dd28cdc4dfe0b33168
5684c99cf48a472793fdc98b28203621ed04bf80
describe
'86582' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLU' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
06d59e71425cbe1ae22ccb8635812575
67618fa5f603dde40fe208145a3c85a25b878c24
describe
'24363' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLV' 'sip-files00242.pro'
97d8670d00f10526368170827a3fe41e
6c95c4f5d17a3ee3912838a614b157423216c24d
describe
'30353' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLW' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
335c005a186fb0e07f3a76e3bc1be9c3
36642f282c5420c7050a9cde458ee3cc663fdc86
describe
'1808431' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLX' 'sip-files00242.tif'
84a0fc2112ea1c72b5a1643bfb1018b0
3af5af686f248e66fdd67b845448b1de5f9fb1c4
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLY' 'sip-files00242.txt'
b773b8097476257c1502c8416196d6f3
ae70198bca1a474675b2921318b671e4fdbfc1ca
describe
'11486' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENLZ' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
6deb65e8ebd44502eed6dddc049226f4
57a434fca071ebdb3f0cb1e327a62ee9f0a430e8
describe
'225665' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMA' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
f805cf5d04c6462fa9dc85c4f2ad7d46
e169e9ac8fc180e255a7f0265034e52f1d42af26
describe
'121137' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMB' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
35c46d885ca2c4aa452d10d3c80f769c
fdf66b3ea18b0bd122abe12796d3222fc6557280
describe
'32945' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMC' 'sip-files00243.pro'
0a245168ffd5220391b77190a9ae5b6a
6bf9179fb7209022f7359b86b90e31bb5220ae39
describe
'57929' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMD' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
b335e7c79c1d96113b59a3cb9371c326
e4bef19b4aa21bd4fb5c0666eead33ee6f7c28df
describe
'1828480' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENME' 'sip-files00243.tif'
77448edfaa8902e1eb3844e47c1463b3
80b6488ff68ef1c4e322121001985be78a7da363
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMF' 'sip-files00243.txt'
226434cb4b5a90da9aa1f2fd1d2f2587
47a6cad00745941539adb00ec82ab617fc669962
describe
'35302' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMG' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
f23b96b77c81b6c1702f76418524c50f
39456a86781238f025e9942c32e45359fd4fea0e
describe
'219869' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMH' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
a3a4676aba45d6efa7d65f4b2fd5341a
1e5907e4ebbd545da4056d7f58747f0f80079d9f
describe
'95103' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMI' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
b9bbe3b97a7cf5b1e7b9e72e87895be6
a8f4bb04c9824994eba6dd04b6dc135dd80dcf8a
describe
'26902' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMJ' 'sip-files00244.pro'
4a078227966146dc5823cb3813f89776
e64e3bb020559e4c5a4eea8972846196aad4030a
describe
'33907' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMK' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
3e3634bddfd9b4b69aca4673e2ae95fb
beb539483e2e08ab8e5cbd993c2d1c7ce9d83fc3
describe
'1759847' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENML' 'sip-files00244.tif'
ec245abbcda855b9ef5c44993053b3a7
3645ba227024e90cf3da4e0887bd7bde4bebb4f7
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMM' 'sip-files00244.txt'
18a5540aee94d1445a88539b2fd130f9
56e0d71bb2a6f1908adc20065b0d7f8849b8f002
describe
'13151' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMN' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
bd4cec5fe03b07d280c713deaa72d353
f369a5d1fa3e2cfeb911c48890ebcab4c6c8c62e
describe
'230538' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMO' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
068d6cb2ab51fd0ae08faef673004ec5
cafd14e520ade832da7d6f30fd4a3429fef15927
describe
'89902' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMP' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
1cb30774618adf8ee98369f2ffa0b1a6
5843030527bf464836c0eed9978117cb81ceb3cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMQ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
8f2da9c33e9508591f207b786088536f
9299bef760fd1bd963ccb977566c3a9b52a0e63a
describe
'32163' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMR' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
29bb19b70d5c027c22a0d9a611b4e096
dea16fc15542520157d386f50f895f21e3e00874
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMS' 'sip-files00245.tif'
633ac8016a584243feae18d25ca3c258
789eeef3dd6ea1c2ad6a2aa0c23959117c8a9c34
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMT' 'sip-files00245.txt'
6b3dc678af67fd0101e9c4638fbce3eb
1bdca51d3bcd3884726dfaba22e7db8b82b77888
describe
'11365' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMU' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
c78cd22058634a645d9a88d9488a555c
bb4b3d6c39852b2004f483f8a960ffd7d9f08965
describe
'230001' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMV' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
671cc08be9d56b01db476839b37ae135
057c0ad2d5d34f463a52277cd7c229c427b1da46
describe
'95859' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMW' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
cf3bee5bf3986a909230393e905e9dd2
db64d6fc87b2820c5f77a3eb0088d8e315ea70dc
describe
'30790' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMX' 'sip-files00246.pro'
f80e8194c3bccedebeb06e90330bb5e2
b0019a508db194d0ca62d779696f1982bac7c3a4
describe
'34235' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMY' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
4eec56a41878748cc09a1559e52a8a4c
98608b447632815db82dad2b8d9eb60e7b0d172b
describe
'1841027' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENMZ' 'sip-files00246.tif'
cba9394fd6a0100405ea9662c1a1cc4a
72934ace55f084c5a32503fb90ad29ef7ad77f1d
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNA' 'sip-files00246.txt'
a178126fd4eed6b7f8d8375e5a22bdf4
3b40b6c8af700a476271d792bdbdb7fd7129802d
describe
'12202' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNB' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
9e466f28312505ffc8f61a3160156f28
e77a223ce56c3da86c674c3183201611b41a7f0a
describe
'223883' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNC' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
408bdfd99e61f94d25782453b6c49c44
60b90c9c7c6babc490f7482d0dd2c8a3c4d3dd19
describe
'89501' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENND' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
6e8862c9615e0413379620c397da52ca
437df4f0e2e86cb625a01018174f611004830987
describe
'27671' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNE' 'sip-files00247.pro'
a5b06a3c5075913ad90d086e139d3e3f
3e5106caa0a268d2f67810363e1012bf3c626826
describe
'32598' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNF' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
b2bf11bc18df28a643a900cd29c954d9
c84fd65dacf02ca01e13355a09ef1b60f2ecffc1
describe
'1793843' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNG' 'sip-files00247.tif'
2f9f6ff2a06bcc3fcb866c8946098aff
8d2c2374be99970fe372d01301569f95aaa4b784
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNH' 'sip-files00247.txt'
ef2ca85d997fb29799c18aa49d44c14a
6b352286f5a35d87636659078c2c916f45fce4f0
describe
'12857' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNI' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
185222e07122a3930219bb77c6b7858d
39264c37c3e849ef13fe96bacece5d3e8d3028b8
describe
'228199' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNJ' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
414bfbd895fb44c30a465e6c5971bca4
68a41599e39d2a5cb0665142d18efb094468a0ea
describe
'92464' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNK' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
8a701c485a0a2b87af36155bcd2bbd0c
d2564e763375d68459b8b743d026d273c1b57c31
describe
'27491' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNL' 'sip-files00248.pro'
609f4beae0b737b6e8397382c9e88421
621137f9a7568d639f59b21887387c24162a3513
describe
'33962' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNM' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
8870d761cb3523d2baa37a1f78e35a86
da0923d602810ae75cce794115ea80c1af263f27
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNN' 'sip-files00248.tif'
ece6203e244a974e23dbbe6c5756b3c7
831069bd769ae6641cd19eeda38b5ca35959468f
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNO' 'sip-files00248.txt'
0edcb6d357f36100b7330c559d77d58a
482f2aa7549ac3216adf579e56f51082711fcf0c
describe
'12707' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNP' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
3313d9826d50a1fab997730b52be3593
90482c4e2914ace191a4ad1cd9853bba725a07f0
describe
'220833' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNQ' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
5a1c92c11fc3ae9f2dfb632e52850b4f
80b269e7b7776b025c7f53b9f12565663f35e939
describe
'113037' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNR' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
95fcf06273c8e7aed7f601d42b877bd7
63ed1e5db2dadd3312a53203fca7fc37f7d22aec
describe
'31778' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNS' 'sip-files00249.pro'
70bab0e9706db4bd412b4060d4db9d25
b33a459cdd704e4f9cec6ad7ab4bb9f64d30c2a8
describe
'54614' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNT' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
f4a78ab53e7f28c4443eb2ea9c5974ee
b5188961c8befc28df2e5b07e96cd5bd69ea10f0
describe
'1788240' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNU' 'sip-files00249.tif'
1e9a44e076b248bb5f441c9b2cd2a3c8
e54050f0babcfaa71058380d739ece669659498f
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNV' 'sip-files00249.txt'
42363719f7cb706ff775f0f78506b82f
7a8d29e288e08e0679ce5fbb74443ca89cdc5861
describe
'34960' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNW' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
ea06ddc5c9db11488018038a5551ae86
41e9377635e33cdf8713c966d5edd6fbf59c4cb5
describe
'234900' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNX' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
4cd3baf896fa7574f4700e4c4ba78eb4
12c1355c72fb7ab2ec84085deeff9a627750f6d9
describe
'86337' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNY' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
ab1dce0b1341e32b47295c71d7d4c7f0
daa2496d662f933d8d3018c6672414991a301240
describe
'28377' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENNZ' 'sip-files00250.pro'
25f2dd905d0d497e5af7a025518105c7
4d94cc634062bf8d72d97a5872378d669c22125c
describe
'29920' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOA' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
a5071d2e5965e68ee4e435433ab3a6ca
a5ed7160e495594f836a1d369a23d4edaf2599f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOB' 'sip-files00250.tif'
d529b74adc24eb9f760403da1e8904cf
41ad971570f9f3d23034e373eecf54c73debe5c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOC' 'sip-files00250.txt'
8cc0f5c74c6586f2026e05f196e08875
28441cc832184366a9121c99b652f94b5d6ed475
describe
'10574' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOD' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
42b9c48f18165a2a5bab918bda8aca71
989545598d9959f53254f4fd51db5b254a971909
describe
'211853' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOE' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
4c73da7e2543b850f00b615a8af3f878
8755a0b042392ce1e88fae0960b6d727fdcaf5ca
describe
'116774' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOF' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
63e779271b3dbcdfc142cb8ee248292e
e6bb7539000a0bb707e10a316fbb66330b706a7c
describe
'32675' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOG' 'sip-files00251.pro'
266d1e1c5c666ad9c5e2ddc6a10ed5ff
3934dc15c18813f73cc5675d56f9bc08822b4602
describe
'58108' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOH' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
7b97e7e6176c35bd8a808acab5d429b3
31296c3644d8e1b09cb65a4fbae0e94800bc7d32
describe
'1716856' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOI' 'sip-files00251.tif'
d4907ea4bef1f406abc90dfeccab81ee
62310d4b4d9ae0ceb52fafaf6a5643907b7706e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOJ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
5511f0c3d0c7244ab37192758a1eeb35
18b9b55b07d3982f2d12ac101524757d2a325700
describe
'35875' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOK' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
5f5b24a7e1a86a50b30b07a011955b0d
d28c69876415c5890a9cb82c490f7650c10bbcdf
describe
'234744' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOL' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
d55df299178d38cf2fcc35fc280fbc6c
a36381bb276eef902b4e09eb133d55259c3da5a7
describe
'88470' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOM' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
ddf3d8aee6d49846da7b646697b3aa18
1ae0af4df0b1c5a13ea5c61b7c31c7bc9e254a4f
describe
'28431' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENON' 'sip-files00252.pro'
0c8cbe8908247fac47e47daab4ebafc7
f892328ca39b88331ba0dd784ff5c22d5b0ef633
describe
'31598' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOO' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
7e43b626914c91b584977630bfdf14a7
8bd076495bcb2fb105b1b9adfd2a01e2a3779d38
describe
'1879327' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOP' 'sip-files00252.tif'
bc3c0548c7115e6d3a78fde360f1503f
12b59b906a1eaa303688adc633f85932349286cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOQ' 'sip-files00252.txt'
29393a4fbedf23848ac61300ab16589f
c6f1399dd218910220252f0cb3c3e21bc1a77c36
describe
'11545' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOR' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
fb7254e24b9f3503d9c50264ff0b8572
8e528a4b4fa64da28d269cb015ed0af69066fd05
describe
'220996' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOS' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
a63f2ab7dcce61117f1a270cf68d6623
c8f5c1af65bf078194d5b2897f4b0ef01d7baef2
describe
'114945' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOT' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
dc7da5e0059e7fdfda66cc0ff52d75db
e5ba7099d95caa7ea986d3143a6eb79586f40179
describe
'30162' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOU' 'sip-files00253.pro'
637f57dd7fa686010d1c8af6273016fb
7f818ba7bf8061a266a4384126a34886d23104e7
describe
'56925' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOV' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
a741e3fb7840c3abdb46a15b80140db1
3b6c0ff55a35544d4bc0dbf5bff8818bf239638e
describe
'1790616' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOW' 'sip-files00253.tif'
3556051715a9b78b27098731fcafcbe5
24aec595ae502a9d5e540fa22e73ff91a96aca63
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOX' 'sip-files00253.txt'
a4bd3f26fbeb1cf77e4643fed732b9c3
cf5005cf74c0ea86120544d2b970f6fee6007eb4
describe
'34734' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOY' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
50108d23c0628e37e8737840cac9d703
06eef32c88d8b35125c75d61f133c21a586c3898
describe
'229893' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENOZ' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
864dcb44e756e17ed9f2c0b69501a866
424a0433f5a7b98dc1c9b64b744337cb137b23db
describe
'53500' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPA' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
ba8ddda20c7a385815b2e708d9a70bb9
4ea1a59a625040795dabb79d3f94f20e206a961f
describe
'7626' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPB' 'sip-files00254.pro'
11218646bbe75a30ea35cab71f33dec9
a6b2cba84dbe5492688de096858610996fc50aeb
describe
'18125' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPC' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
83b58cb591ae62bda449515c1a323f82
7e6d5603e8a190488055e540895046e7c6d4c8ba
describe
'1841291' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPD' 'sip-files00254.tif'
0fa0ba09dae0f85c0467ae03ac50f264
e1047ecf8c9c268e8f2919fcd9cf935e4177db2f
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPE' 'sip-files00254.txt'
385987ed34362a50bd3c690a77122d2a
dd7d473168df91f4f0fa39e50bb7ee8b3c2faf24
describe
'5938' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPF' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
18ce7de6ab6c51c5ba08ab282ef7bcca
4682708bf3066753c3ffa53a61b47322f6e71747
describe
'237849' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPG' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
12fa21f2e3051ee1b4b9dccafa7ff523
5c6d9e8256b2ffd1c2e469f6f52d62f4bba4a723
describe
'92802' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPH' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
a40061f20e697871a1e4582b3d2007d7
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describe
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describe
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088c4c2fd7ca7d9bcde3b730226e1775
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describe
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describe
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dbb30090e3237bb2f5b63fc359c4d16f
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describe
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f32e46a844049a10d8675897ccce08cb
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describe
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4adecbbdadb062072eef3d766345a0d8
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describe
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cc94a013b6ebb548dc91db721b51f062
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describe
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4db9246f9cb1fe17db162b0aa9eb669b
0fe3c1f96f4fbf6b26c3425a6734184f96a4993d
describe
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92d9bdc9bb6c2eaad374669e4a5fd8af
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describe
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6763c69cdef7011546bab0dc8a42ffef
8e487051f3af1deaa2ea709cfa1bda65ac0f55fe
describe
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d2125fd15f6ce3f5a7d31918280d08eb
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describe
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f705347aa7cd01e8b4478d228263729f
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describe
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2ec0da7d4253f9d4b324bf7757d17afc
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describe
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73a9d8cc74f3e3c7b78204f8996fc53d
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describe
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2bd67509451d95b42e83ec06a14f7f02
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describe
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d1615658aef986d3ad92b454d851ec47
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describe
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59aa8bf68d351e88e04433d61024a49e
037d817524752d276cebc6b52966ea7d5b4ca0be
describe
'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENPZ' 'sip-files00257.txt'
c1045371f3c1a52084fc1be892a7dd08
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describe
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4926d0684a47b954260aa7ff3968a452
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describe
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96366ec13297cbeb30c8f4f9b3aefe5d
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describe
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9016b10a1eb0afb215d1e3a27e446fe4
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describe
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831694da4e523d52b10e015fde9a988e
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describe
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describe
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describe
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c022793071d15362e386f14a80d1a7d6
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describe
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9b986faa8b78d406263ee005b2752a3e
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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e3e3190039b53ef96ca0747eb4b04eaf
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T19:37:08-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'501566' 'info:fdaE20090910_AAACDFfileF20090910_AAENRP' 'sip-filesUF00001694_00001.xml'
1455e9fefc01e99db2295c23f37d2543
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T19:37:04-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


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LINE UPON LINE;

OR, A SECOND SERIES OF THE

EARLIEST RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION
THE INFANT MIND 18 CAPABLE OF RECEIVING.

WITH

VERSES ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE SUBJECTS.

BY THE

AUTHOR OF “THE PEEP OF DAY.”

* Line upon line, line upon line; here a little and there a little.’’
Isa. xxviii. 10.

NEW YORK: .
LEAVITT, TROW & OO, 191 BROADWAY.
1850.


PREFACE.

Tue design of this little work is to lead
children to understand, and to delight in the
Scriptures.

If adults meet with difficulties in the sacred
text, which commentaries often remove, child-
ren must necessarily meet with many more,
some of which this little book may clear up.
Since it is evident that commentaries would
not suit the volatile minds of children, how-
ever simply they might be written, some other
kind of help ought to be provided for them.
The best assistance would no doubt be afford-
ed by the parent’s voice: for no book can so
forcibly arrest the attention, or touch the
heart, as the remarks of a tender parent. But
Iv PREFACE.

where children do not enjoy this advantage, a
book may in some measure supply its place;
and where they do possess it, may recall ta
mind parental instructions.

Many interesting histories have been omit-
ted, because the writer feared to swell the size
of the work, and judged it better to relate the
principal events in detail than to give an
abridged account of all.

But it is intended that these omissions
should be supplied, (if the Lord will,) and
that shortly the history of Job should be pub-
lished, and subsequently that of the Judges,
and of the kings of Israel and Judah.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE.

Tee, a kc is ke 9
CHAPTER II,

ee meer sk ws te ee be 15
CHAPTER III.

Cain and Abel. Gen. 4, Rik me eee 20
CHAPTER IV.

y ere ~ 4%
CHAPTER V,

Abraham, or the Promised Land. Gen.12:1-9, . 30
CHAPTER VI.

Abraham, or the Promised Child. Gen. 15; 18: 1-22;

21: 1-6, iat : +e
CHAPTER VII.

Abraham, or the Trial of Love. Gen. 22, se

CHAPTER VIII.

Jacob, or the Heavenly Dream. Gen. 23 ; 25; 27 328, 41

CHAPTER IX.

Jacob, or the Long Journey. Gen. 29,

CHAPTER X,

Jacob, or the Meeting. Gen. 31; 32;

33 ; 35: 1-7,

- 47

51
vi CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XI. aii

Joseph, or the Pit. Gen. 37: 1-24, war
CHAPTER XII.

Joseph, or the Slave. Gen. 37:24-35, . . .. - 60
CHAPTER XIII

"Joseph, or the Prisoner, Gen.39, . ... + + 64
CHAPTER XIV.

Joseph, or the Butler and Baker. Gen. 40, . . . . 68
CHAPTER XV.

Joseph, or the Release. Gen.41, ... +... 7
CHAPTER XVI.

Joseph, or the Lord of Egypt. Gen.42, ... . 78
CHAPTER XVII.

Joseph, or the Feast. Gen.43, . . . ~~~ + 85

CHAPTER XVIIL
Joseph, or the forgiving Brother. Gen. 44; 45:1-15, 94

CHAPTER XIX.
Joseph, or the long-lost Son. Gen. 45:16 to end; 46;
See. ee es et ee ee
CHAPTER XX.
Moses, or the Basket of Bulrushes. Ex. 1; 2:1-10, 110
‘CHAPTER XXI.
Moses, or the Pious Choice. Ex.2:11-15, . . . 116
CHAPTER XXII.

Moses, or the Burning Bush. Ex. 2:16 toend; 3; 4, 122

CHAPTER XXII.

Moses, or the first Plagues of Egypt. Ex. 5; 6; 7;
maa... ee ee
CONTENTS. vii

CHAPTER XXIV. ‘indi
Moses, or the last Plagues. Ex. 9:13 to end; 11;
Ws 1. WR, we
_ CHAPTER XXV.

Moses, or the Red Sea. Ex. 13:20 to end; 14; 15:22, 142
CHAPTER XXVI.

Moses, or the Manna and the Rock. Ex.16;17:1-7, 148
CHAPTER XXVII. i

Moses, or Mount Sinai. Gen. 19; 20; 24; 31:18, 154
CHAPTER XXVIIL

Moses, or the Golden Calf. Ex. 32, 6 gk CHAPTER XXIX.

Moses, or the Tabernacle. Ex. 35; 36; 37, . . 167
CHAPTER XXX.
Moses, or the Priests. Ex. 38; 39; 40, ... .1%8
CHAPTER XXXI,

Moses, or the Journeys of the Israelites, . . . . 178
CHAPTER XXXII.

Moses, or the Twelve Spies. Numb. 13; 14:1-40, 181

CHAPTER XXXIIL
Moses, or the Sin of Moses and Aaron. Numbers
Spt Es ae Ce oe oe. oe
CHAPTER XXXIV.
Moses, or the Serpent of Brass. Numbers 21:4-9, 193

CHAPTER XXXV.
Moses, or the Death of Moses. Deut. 32; 33; 34, 198

CHAPTER XXXVI
Joshua, or Rahab. Jos.2, . . ... +. + + 204
eR

vili CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXXVII.

Joshua, or the River Jordan. Jos. 3; 4; 5:1, 11, 12, "19
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
Joshua, or the Walls of Jericho. Josh. 5: 13-15; 6, 217
CHAPTER XXXIX.
Joshua—his Death, . - : sve
A few principal Questions for Children we ne read
this book, . . + > <2 ke ee
Questions on the Chapters, . . . + + ae
Verses of Scripture, . - + + + + + + . 250

LINE UPON LINE.



CHAPTER L*

THE CREATION.
Gen. i.

My dear children,—I know that you have heard
that God made the world. Could a man have
made the world? No; a man could not make
such a world as this.

Men can make many things, such as boxes and
baskets. Perhaps you know a man who can make
a box. Suppose you were to shut him up ina
room, which was quite empty, and you were to say
to him, “ You shall not come out till you have
made a box,’—would the man ever come out ?
No-—never. A man could not make a box, ex-
cept he had something to make it of. He must

* The teacher will generally find the proof of every statement,
either in the chapters of the Bible referred to at the beginning of
each chapter in this book, or in the notes affixed ; but in the opening
of this work the proofs are often withheld, because they have already
been given in those perts of the “ Peep of Day” in which the same

subjects are treated, e
10 THE CREATION.

have some wood, or some tin, or some pasteboard,
or some other thing. But God had nothing to
make the world of. He only spoke, and it was
made.*

Making things of nothing, is called “ creating.”
No one can create anything, but God.t

Do you know why God is called the Creator?
It is because he created all things. There is only
one Creator. Angels cannot create things, nor .
can men. They could not create one drop of wa-
ter, or one little fly.

You know that God was six days in creating
the world. I will tell you what he did on each
day.

I

On the first day, God said, “ Let there be light ;”
and there was light.

IL.

On the second day, God spoke again, and there
was water very high; that water is called the
clouds. There was also water very low. There
was nothing but water to be seen. God filled
every place with air; but you know the air cannot
be seen.

IIL.

On the third day, God spoke, and the dry land
appeared from under the water; and the water ran
* Things which are seen were not made of things that do appear...

Heb. xi. 3.
t Thou hast created all things.—Rev. iv, 11.
THE CREATION, ll

down into one deep place that God: had prepared.*
God called the dry land Earth, and he called the
water Seas. We walk upon the dry land. We
cannot walk upon the sea. The sea is always roll-
ing up and down; but it can never come out of
the great place where God has put it. God spoke,
and things grew out of the earth. Can you tell
me what things grew out of the earth? Grass,
and corn, and trees, and flowers.

IV.

On the fourth day God spoke, and the sun and
moon and stars were made. God ordered the sun
to come every morning, and to go away in the eve-
ning,t because God did not choose that it should
be always light. It is best that it should be dark
at night, when we are asleep. But God lets the
moon shine in the night, and the stars also; so
that if we go out in the night, we often have a lit-
tle light. There are more stars than we can count.

Vv.

On the fifth day, God began to make things
that are alive. He spoke, and the water was filled
with fishes, and birds flew out of the water, and
perched upon the trees.

VI.

On the sixth day, God spoke, and the beasts

came out of the earth: lions, sheep, cows, horses,
* Who shut the sea with doors, and brake up for it my decreed

place 1—Job. xxxviii. 8, 10.
t The sun knoweth his going down.—Ps, civ. 19.
12 THE CREATION,

and all kinds of beasts came out of the earth, as
well as all kinds of creeping things, such as bees,
ants, and worms, which creep upon the earth.

At last, God made a man. God said, “ Let us
make man in our likeness.”* ‘l'o whom did God
apeak? To his Son, the Lord Jesus Christ: his
Son was with him when he made the world. God
made man’s body of the dust, and then breathed
into him. The man had a soul as well as a body.
So the man could think of God. Afterwards God
made the woman of a piece of the flesh and bone
from the man’s side, as you have heard before.

God gave all the other creatures to Adam and
Eve; and he blessed them, and put them into the
garden of Eden, and desired Adam to take care
of the garden.

When God had finished all his works, he saw
that they were very good. He was pleased with
the things he had made. They were all very
beautiful. The light was glorious; the air was
sweet; the earth was lovely, clothed in green; the
sun and moon shone brightly in the heavens ; the
birds, and beasts, and all the living creatures, were
good and happy, and Adam and Eve were the
best of all, for they could think of God, and
praise him.

VIL.

You know there are seven days in the week.

Now, on the seventh day God did not make any-

* In the beginning was the word; and the word was with God
and the word was God. ll things were made by him—John 1. 1. 3
THE CREATION. 13

thing; but he rested from all his works. He call-
ed the seventh day his own day, because he rested
on it. This is the reason people rest on the sev-
enth day, and call it God’s day. Itis the sabbath
day. It is the great day for praising God.*

None of the creatures that God had made in the
six days could praise him with their tongues, ex-
cept Adam and Eve.

Angels in heaven can praise God, and men up-
on earth.

My little children, do you ever praise God?
You have learned little hymns in his praise. Per-
haps you know the hymn that begins,

“ And now another day is gone,
I'll sing my Maker’s praise.”

Does God like to hear you praise him? Yes;
when you think of him, and love him, while you
are praising him.

Angels always praise God with their hearts, and
so should we.

Let us now count the things that God made o1
each day:—

First day, Light.

Second day, Air and Clouds.

Third day, Earth and Sea, and the things tha

grow.
Fourth day, Sun, Moon, and Stars.

* I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and
praise, with a multitude that kept holy day.—Ps. xiii. 4.
14 THE CREATION,

Fifth day, Fishes and Birds.

Sixth day, Beasts and Creeping Things, and
Man.

Seventh day, Nothing; God rested.

All things the mighty Lord,

Created by his word ;

And all his creatures are,

From worm to brightest star ;
His wonders none can imitate,
Or out of nothing can create.

Were angels to unite
Their heavenly skill and might,
How vainly they would try
To make one little fly!
For life they never could bestow,
Nor cause the meanest flower to grow.

Angels so fair and strong

Unto the Lord belong ;

From him their beauty came ;

*Tis he sustains their frame :
They could not live one single hour.
Unless supported by his power.

And this the angels know ;
Around God’s throne they bow,
And humbly they confess
Their own unworthiness ;
And still the King of kings admire,
And praise him with their tongues of fire.
Far lower should J lie
Before the Lord most high ;
For how can I compare
With angels strong and fair !
I who am made of sinful clay,
And like the grass must fade away ?
THE SIN OF ADAM. 15

CHAPTER IL

THE SIN OF ADAM.
Gen. iii. ,

You remember that God put Adam and Eve in

a pretty garden. There they lived very happily,
They never quarrelled with each other: they were
never sick nor in pain. Adam worked in the
sweet garden; but not so hard as to tire himself.
His work was quite pleasant, for it was never too
hot nor too cold in that sweet garden; and there
were no weeds nor thistles growing in the ground.

You know there was one tree of which Adam
might not eat. The name of the tree was “The
tree of the knowledge of good and evil.”

God had said, that if Adam ate of it, he should
die. Adam and Eve might eat of all the other
trees in the garden.

Do you not think that they had fruit enough
without eating of the tree of knowledge of good
and evil? They did not wish to eat of it, as God
had told them not. They loved God. He was
their friend, and used to walk and talk with them
in the garden. Now you shall hear how Adam
and Eve grew wicked.

You know that there are a great many wicked
angels; one of them is called “Satan,” and he is
the prince of the wicked angels. Satar-knew that
if Adam and Eve grew wicked, they would die
16 THE SIN OF ADAM.

and go to hell. Satan hated them, and wished to
make them unhappy; so he thought, “I will try
and persuade them tv eat that fruit which God has
told them not to eat.” So Satan put on the body
of a serpent,* and came into the garden.

He saw Eve; he pretended to be kind, and said
to her, “ Why do you not eat of the fruit ?”

But she said, “God hes told us not to eat of
that fruit, and that if we do, we shall die.”

But the serpent said, “No; you shall not die;
but this fruit will make you wise, like God.”

The woman was afraid to eat; but she looked,
and thought the fruit nice ; she looked again, and
thought it pretty ;t and she thought “I should
like to eat it.” So she took the fruit and gave
some to Adam.

Sad was that hour! no more happy days for
Adam and Eve. They were grown naughty ;
they knew they had done wrong; they were afraid
of seeing God. Soon they heard his voice in the
garden ; they went and hid themselves among the
thick trees. They wished they had some clothes
to cover them; but they had only some leaves
that they sewed together.

God called Adam, and said, “ Adam, where art
thou ?”

Then Adam said, “I was afraid, because I was
naked, and I hid myself.”

* That old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiweth
the whoie world.—Rev. xii. 9.

t And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and
that it was pleasant to the eyes, &c.—Gen. tii. 6.
THE SIN OF ADAM. 17

Then God said, “ Who told you that you were
naked? have you eaten of that tree ?”

Then Adam said, “'The woman you gave me,
to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did
eat.”

God said to the woman, “ What is this that thou
hast done ?”

And she said, “ The serpent deceived me, and
I did eat.”

God was angry with them all, but most of all
with the serpent. God cursed him, and said,
“You shall always crawl on the ground, and eat
dust.”

Then God said to the Woman, “ You shall often
be sick, and Adam shall be your master, and you
must obey him.” ’

And God said to Adam, “ You shall work hard,
and dig the ground; thorns and thistles shall
grow; you shall have bread to eat; but you shall
be obliged to work so hard that drops of sweat
shall often stand upon your forehead ; you shall
be sad while you live, and at last you shall die;
your body was made of dust, and it shall turn
into dust again.”

What sad punishments these were! How sad
Adam and Eve must have felt when they heard
them,| But this was not all; they were not allowéd
to stay in the pretty garden. God drove them
out, and God would not let them come into the
garden again; so he desired an angel with a fiery
sword to stand near it; yet (iod showed his pity

2

Line upon Line.
«
18 THE SIN OF ADAM.

by giving them clothes made of skins of beasts.
‘They had tried to make clothes of the leaves of
the trees, but God gave them better clothes.

Where do you think the souls of Adam and
Eve must go when their bodies were dead? To
Satan? That was what Satan hoped. But the
blessed Lord Jesus had promised his Father to
come down and save Adam and Eve, and their
children, from hell.

Adam and Eve knew that a child should one
day be born, who should save people from go-
ing to hell* So they had some comfort in their
hearts, when they went out of the garden.

It was a long while before Jesus did make him-
self a little child, and did come into this world;
but at last he came, and died upon the cross.

My little children, was it not very kind in Jesus
to say that he would come and die for us?—ought
we not to Jove him very much ?

How pleasant once was Adam’s toil
In Eden’s cool retreat !

But now he tills a thorny soil,
And faints beneath the heat.

How lovely once (how altered now !)
Were Adam’s form and face!

Bright was that eye, and smooth that brow,
Now clouded by disgrace.

God said to the serpent, in the presence of Adam and Eve. “I
will put enmity between thee and tne woman, and between thy seed
and her seed ; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise ous heel
Gen. iii. 16,
THE SIN OF ADAM. 19

His hair turns gray, his body stoops
Beneath the weight of years ;

And Eve with pain and sickness droops,
And from her eyes flow tears.

Yet murmur not, O wretched pair,
Against the Lord Most High,

He made you happy, good, and fair,
And warn’d you not to die.

And now he kindly promises
To wash your sins away,
And let you taste of happiness
Which never shall decay.

This promise, too, will cost him dear;
(But, Oh! his love is great ;)

His only Son must suffer here,
And die ’midst scorn and hate.

A sweeter paradise is won,
Than you in Eden lost ;

There God shines brighter than the sun,
Amidst his heavenly host.

A few more years of suffering past,
Your souls shall reach that shore ;

Your bodies at the trumpet’s blast,
Shall rise to die no more.
20 CAIN AND ABEL.

CHAPTER IIL

CAIN AND ABEL.
Gen. iv,

Arrer Adam and Eve were turned out of the
garden, they had two little children; their names
were Cain and Abel.

Cain was wicked like Satan; but Abel was
good; for though he was naughty, yet God had
given him his Floly Spirit, so that he loved God.
Abel was sorry for his sins, and asked God to for-
give him ;* and God did forgive him.

Cain and Abel were obliged to work hard like
Adam: their father. Cain dug the ground, and
planted trees, and reaped corn. Abel took care of
sheep; he was a shepherd,

Now I will tell you how Cain and Abel behaved
to God.

God did not walk and talk with people then, as
he had done in the garden; but he did speak some-
times, and he allowed people to pray tohim. You
know that Jesus had promised to die for Adam
and his children, and that was the reason that God
was so kind to them.

God wished them always to remember that Je-
sus had promised to die for them ; so he taught
them a way of keeping it in their minds.

* All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God --Rom. iii
%8. (By faith) the elders obtained a good repor.. -Heb xi. 2
CAIN AND ABEL. 21

He told them to heap up stones, (this heap was
called an‘altar,) and then to put some wood upon
the altar; and to takea lamb, or a kid, and to
bind it with a rope to the altar; then to take a
knife and to kill the lamb; and then to burn it on
the altar. Doing this, was called “ offering a sac-
vifice.”

When people did this, God wished them to
think how he would one day let his Son die for
their sins.* When Jesus was nailed to the cross,
he was like a lamb tied to the altar.t

Abel brought lambs, and offered them up to
God ; and Abel thought of God’s promise, so God
was pleased with Abel, and with his sacrifice.
But Cain did not obey God, but brought some
fruit, instead of a lamb; and so God was angry
with Cain and did not like his sacrifice.

Then Cain was very angry, and hated Abel, be-
cause he was good, and because God loved him
best. Cain was envious of Abel.

Then God spoke to Cain, and said, “ Why are
you angry? If you will love and serve me, I shall
be pleased with you; but if not, you shall be pun-
ished.”

Still Cain went on in wickedness. Now hear
what he did at last—One day he was talking with
Abel in a field, when he rose up and killed him.

* By faith, Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than
Cain—Heb. xi. 4.

t Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sins of the world
Jobn i. 29.
22 CAIN AND ABEL,

Abel’s blood was spilt upon the ground. Abel
was the first man that ever died. So Cain began
by hating Abel, and ended by killing him though
he was his brother:

Soon Cain heard the voice of God calling him;
God said, “ Where is your brother Abel?”

“I know not,” answered wicked Cain; “am ]
my brother’s keeper ?”

But God said, “I have seen your brother’s blood
upon the ground; and you are cursed. You shall
leave your father and mother, and wander about
on the earth.”

Cain said, “My punishment is greater than I
can bear. let me not be killed !”

God said, “You shall not be killed; but you
shall wander about from place to place.”

So Cain went and lived a great way off, and
built houses for himself and his children. They
lived in wickedness; they were the children of
the devil, and cared not for God.

So Adam and Eve lost both their sons in one
day ; for Cain went a great way off, and Abel died.
How they must have wept as they put dear Abel
in the ground! But they must have wept still
more to think that Cain was so wicked.

Why did they eat the fruit when Satan bade
them? If they had not eaten the fruit, they would
never have been unhappy: Cain would not have
been wicked, and Abel would not have died. But
God had pity on Adam and Eve, and gave them
CAIN AND ABEL. 23

another son, who was made good by God’s Spirit:
he was called Seth.

The children of Seth feared God; and God lov-
ed them and called them his children.

Cain was the babe the first on earth
Rejoic’d a mother’s sight :

Now Eve laments the infant’s birth,
Once hail’d with fond delight.

O how could she foresee the day,
When she beheld her child,
As wrapt in slumbers soft he lay,

Or playfully he smiled!

But though so lovely to the view,
Evil lay hid within ;

And Satan watch’d him, as he grew,
And fann’d the sparks of sin.

At length Cain shed his brother's blood
Then sought the deed to hide;

Now banish’d from his parents’ God,
He wanders far and wide.

CHILD.

Guard me, O Lord from Satan’s power,
For he walks to and fro,
And like a lion would devour
The souls of men below.

Pride, hate, and envy, are the chains,
By which he holds them fast ;

Nor let them know what bitter pains
Their sins shall bring at last.
24 THE FLOOD.

CHAPTER IV.
THE FLOOD.

Cam had a great many children; Seth had a
great many children.

At last Adam and Eve died, and Cain died, and
Seth died; but still there were a great many peo-
ple in the world. Were the people good or wick-
ed?

At first some were good, but at last they all
grew wicked, except one man: his name was
Noah* The spirit of God was in his heart, and
he loved God.

God was very angry with the wicked people,
and he determined to punish them.

God said to Noah, “I will make it rain so much
that all people shall be drowned, except you, and
your wife, and your children.”

Then God told Noah to make a great ark.

What is an ark? It is like a boat, or a ship.
Noah made a very great ark, which would swim
upon the top of the water, when God should drown
the wicked people.

Noah made the ark of wood. Noah cut down
many trees, and cut boards, and fastened them to-
gether. He made one door in the ark, and one lit-
tle window at the top.

Noah told the people that God was going to

Noah, a preacher of righteousness.—2 Peter. ii. 6,
THE FLOOD. 25

drown the world and advised them to leave off
their wickedness.

But they would not mind. Still they went on
eating and drinking, and not thinking of God, nor
trying to please him.*

God did not choose that all the beasts, and birds,
and insects should be drowned ; so he desired No-
ah to get some birds of every sort, and some beasts
of every sort, and some insects of every sort, and
to bring them into the ark. God could make all
these animals go quietly in the ark. Noah put
corn, and fruit, and grass into the ark for them to
eat when they were in the ark.

So Noah got some birds of every sort; some
doves, some ravens, some eagles, some sparrows,
some larks, some goldfinches, and many others, and
they flew in at the window. Noah got some
beasts of every kind, some sheep, some horses,
some dogs: and he got some insects of every kind;
some butterflies, some ants, some bees.

All these went into the ark ; for God made them
gentle and obedient. Then Noah himself went in
with his wife, his three sons, and their wives.
How many people were there in the ark ?—eight
people. But Noah did not shut the door: God
shut the door, and Noah knew that he must not
open it till God bade him.

Then it began to rain. It rained all day and

E They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in
marriage until the day that Noah entered into the ark, and the flood
came and destroyed them all.—Luke xvii. 27.
26 THE FLOOD.

all night. What did the: wicked people think
now? How they must have wished that they
had minded Noah! If they climbed trees, the wa-
ter soon reached to the tops; if they went up high
mountains, as high as the clouds, the water rose
as high as they ; for it rained forty days and for-
ty nights. All beasts and birds, and men, and
children died, except those that were in the ark.
At last nothing was to be seen but water, and

the ark floating upon the top of the water. How |

long did Nosh live in the ark? Almost one whole

year.
A long while after it had left off raining, Noah
wished to know whether the waters were dried up. —

He went among his birds, and chose a raven, and

let it out of the window. A raven is a fierce bird. —
It did not like the ark; though there were no-

trees to be seen, nothing but water, yet the raven
would not go back to Noah, but went on flying
night and day over the water.

When Noah saw that the raven did not come —

back, he went among his birds, and chose a dove.
A dove is a very gentle bird. Noah put it out at




é

|

the window; and when it saw nothing but water, ©

the dove came back to the ark, Noah knew when
his bird came back, (perhaps it pecked at the win-
dow,) and he put out his hand and pulled it in.
Noah waited seven days, then Noah sent the
Jove out again; and this time the dove saw some

trees: yet the dove did not stay, but plucked off a

;
THE FLOOD. Q7

leaf with its beak, and came back to Noah. Noah
must have loved his good little dove.

Noah waited seven days more, and then he sent
out the dove again, and this time it did not come
back. Now Noah knew that the earth was dry,
but he waited in the ark till God told him to go
out.

At last God said, “Go out of the ark, you and
your wife, your three sons, and their wives, and
the birds, and the beasts, and the insects, and all
the creeping things.”

When the door was open, the beasts came out.
How glad the sheep must have been to lie down
again upon the soft grass, and the goats to climb
the high hills!

When the window was open, the birds flew out.
How glad they must have been to perch again
among the trees!

Noah saw all the green hills and fields again;
but where were all the wicked people? he would
never see their faces again.

Noah remembered God’s goodness in saving
him from being drowned. He made a heap of
stones for an altar; he took some beasts and birds,
and offered a sacrifice to God. God was pleased
with this sacrifice.

Then God made a very kind promise to Noah.
He said, “I will never drown the world again.
When it rains, do not think there will be a flood.
Look up in the sky after the rain, and you will
28 HE FLOOD,

see a bow. That shall be the sign that I remem-
ber my promise.”

Have you seen a rainbow, dear children? How
large it is! What beautiful colours it has! It
puts us in mind of God’s kind promise not to
drown the world any more.

You know why God made this kind promise.
It was because the Lord Jesus had promised one
day to die for people’s sins.

At last Jesus did come down and die: and one
day he will come again, and then he will burn the
world. I hope we shali then be saved as Noah
was; but if God should find us caring only for
eating and drinking, and playing, and not trying
to please him, we shall be burnt up.*

O tell me how the nations passed
The day before the flood :

O! did they know it was the last ?
And did they call on God ?

In merriment
Their time is spent ;
They sing and play,
And dance away ;
They eat and drink,
And little think
They stand on endless ruin’s brink.

Some rear the walls
Of sumptuous hulls ;

* Take heed to yourselves, lest at an7 time your hearts be over-
Charged with surfeiting, drunkenness, and cares of this life, and so
that day come upon you unawares.—Luke xxi. 34.
THE FLOOD.

Some join their hands
In marriage bands ;
Some sell and buy ;
All vainly try
To flee from God's all-seeing eye,

But God no more will silence keep;
He pours his wrath from high,
Unlocks the fountains of the deep,

And windows of the sky.

‘The clattering rain
Descends amain :
The rivers roar,
The torrents pour ;
The waters rise
Till piteous cries
No more are heard beneath the skies,
At first, in flocks,
Men climb the rocks ;
Nor fear to creep
Up mountains steep ;
But waters flow
Where’er they go,
And wash them to the depths below.

Behold just Noah safely ride
Upon the mighty deep ;

While all who once God’s word defied.
Beneath the waters sleep.

CHILD,

Sudden as that tremendous day,
The judgment hour shall come ;
Thousands shall then be swept away,

And meet an awful doom,

Let me not count these words a dream
And still refuse to hear ;
‘8C ABRAHAM, OR

However far the time may seent,
Each hour it draws more near.

When once the fire begins to burn,
Twill be too late to pray; |
Now from my cry God will not turn

His gracious ear away.



CHAPTER V.

ABRAHAM, OR THE PROMISED LAND.

Gen. xii. 1—9.

Noan’s sons had many children, and they had
many children, and at last there were a great many
people in the world. Were these people good or
bad? ‘They were bad. They did one very wick-
ed thing. They cut down trees, and made the
wood into little images, like dolls; then stuck
them up and kneeled down and prayed to the im-
ages and said, “ These images are our gods; they
made us, and they gave us food to eat.” ‘These
images were called idols,

Most of the people in the world worshipped
idols, instead of the true God. Sometimes the
idols were made of wood, sometimes of stone, or
silver, or gold,

How glad I am, my dear children, that your
mothers did not teach you to pray to idols!
When you first could speak, they told you about
the true God, and taught you to pray to him.
THE PROMISED LAND. 31

God looked down from heaven, and saw the peo-
ple worshipping idols, and God was very angry.*
But he did not kill them all, because Jesus had
said he would die for the sins of men.t

Then God said, “I will choose one man, and
teach him to love me, and to be my servant.”}
Now there was a man called Abraham. His fa-
ther and his friends worshipped idols. God said
to Abraham, “ Leave your own home and your
own friends and go to a country which I will show
you, and I will bless you and take care of you.

Abraham did not know where God would tell
him to go, yet Abraham went because God told
him to go, Abraham was obedient.

Abraham had a wife, called Sarah, whom he lov-
ed very much, Sarah went with Abraham. Abra-
ham took some sheep, and cows, and asses with
him, and some servants, who drove them and fed
them.

But where could Abraham sleep at night?

* The wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness.
They are without excuse ; because that, when they knew God, they
glorified him not as God.—Rom. i. 18, 20, 21.

t Iwill give thee for a light to the Gentiles ; that thou mayest be
my salvation unto the end of the earth.—Isa. xlix. 6.

And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now com-
mandeth all men everywhere to repent.—Acts xvii. 30.

t Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to
his foot.—Isa, xli. 2.

Your fathers dwelt on the other side of the flood in old time, even
— father of Abraham, &c. ; and they served other gods.—Josh,
xxiv.

_ art the Lord, the God, who didst choose Abram.—Nehem,
1x. 7.

1 (Abraham) went out not knowing whither he went.—Heb. xi. 8.
32 ABRAHAM, OR

There were very few houses to be seen; only
fields and trees. Abraham slept ina tent. He
made the tent with long sticks, and covered it over
with skins of beasts.

Abraham could move his tent from place to
place ; for he had to travel a great many miles
over high hills and wide rivers. At last he came
to a beautiful country, full of trees and flowers
and grass and corn. ‘I'his was the place that God
chose Abraham should live in. This place was
called Canaan.

Abraham still lived in a tent. Sometimes he
made a heap of stones, called an altar, and offered
sacrifices of beasts to God. Abraham never wor-
shipped idols; but all the people in Canaan did.

God often spoke to Abraham, and said, “I will
bless you, and take care of you, and no one shall
hurt you.” God was pleased that Abraham had
left his own home when he told him; and God
called him his friend.*

Dear children: I hope that you will be like
Abraham, and that you will mind what God says
in the Bible. God has not told you to leave your
home ; but he has told you to be good and gentle,
to speak the truth, and to love him, and he has
promised to take you to heaven. If you obey
God, he will call you his friend.t How pleasant
to be God’s friend ?

* (Abraham was called the friend of God.—James ii. 23.
‘= are my friends, if ye do whatsoever 1 command you.—John
xv, 14, *
THE PROMISED LAND. 33

Blest was the choice that Abraham made,
When he the voice of God obey’d,

And left his kindred dear.
‘What though he knew not where he went
And passed his days within a tent,

He knew that God was near.

And when he saw the heathen round,

Beneath each tree, upon each mound,
Before their idols, bend,

Could he enough his love express

For Him who promised still to bless,
And chose him for his friend ?

The friend of God !—The angels fair

No sweeter name than this could bear,
However high their state ;

Yet many a creature, made of clay,

Who will the Lord’s commands obey,
Obtains this honour great.*

=

CHAPTER VL

ABRAHAM, OR THE PROMISED CHILD.

Gen. xv. ; xviii. 1—22; xxi. 1—6.

Asranam and Sarah lived in a tent in the land
of Canaan. ‘They had no little child. Abraham
was a very old man, and Sarah was a very old wo-
man. ‘I'hey were both much older than your
grandfather and grandmother. Abraham was al-

* Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you.—John

xv. 14, 1
Line upon Line. 3
34 ABRAHAM, OR

most one hundred years old, and Sarah was almost
ninety.

One night God said to Abraham. “Come out
of your tent, and look up to the sky. What do
you see ?”

The sky,was full of stars, more than could be
counted. And God said, “ You shall have a great
many grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and
they shall have more children, and they shall have
more c:.ildren, till there are as many people as
there are stars in the sky: and they shall live in
the land of Canaan, and the wicked people shall
be turned out of it.”

Now Abraham had not even one little child;
yet he believed that God would do as he had pro-
mised. It was very right in Abraham to believe
all that God said; for God always speaks the
truth, and keeps his word.

One day, Abraham was sitting in his tent. It
was about twelve o'clock in the day, and it was
very hot indeed, but the tent was under a tree.
Abraham looked up, and he saw three men a little
way off. He ran to meet them, and bowed down,
and said to one of the men, “ My lord, pray come
and rest yourself, and let me bring a little water
to wash your feet, and a little bread for you to eat,
and then you can go on your journey.” And the
men said that they would rest themselves.

Who do you think these men were? They
were angels, though they looked like men. ‘They
had come from heaven with a message from God
THE PROMISED CHILD. 35

to Abraham. For you know that God sends his
angels on messages tomen. Angels are often near
us, though we cannot see them.

The angels sat outside the tent under the shade
of the tree. Sarah was in the tent. Abraham
said to Sarah, “ Take some flour, and make some
cakes, and bake them very quickly.” Then Abra-
ham ran to his cattle, and took a fat calf, and
said to one of his servants, “ Kill it, and roast it
quickly.”

When it was ready, Abraham brought some
butter, and some milk, and the cakes and the calf,
and spread the dinner under the tree. The three
men began to eat, and Abraham stood by them.

While they were eating, they said to Abraham,
“ Where is Sarah your wife?” And Abraham said,
‘She is in the tent.” Then one of the men said,
“Sarah, you shall have a son.”

Sarah heard what the angel said, and she could
not believe that she would really have a child now
she was very old: so she laughed to herself.

The angel said, “ Why did Sarah laugh? She
shall certainly have a son.” Then Sarah said, “I
did not laugh ;” for she was afraid. But the an-
gel said, “ You did laugh.”

Then the three men got up, and went on farther,
Abraham walked with them a little way, and then
came back to his tent.

Do you think that God remembered his promise ?
The next year Sarah had a son. His name was
Isaac. He was a good child, and God loved him.

.
36 ABRAHAM, OR

Abraham and Sarah were much pleased with their
little son.

So you see that God kept his promise. . He had
said that Abraham and Sarah should have a little
son, and he gave them a son. It was right in
Abraham to believe God’s promise, and God too
was pleased with Abraham for believing what he
said.* Sarah did not believe at first: but she
believed afterwards ;+ and God was pleased with
her too.

My little children, you should believe all God’s
promises. What has God promised? To give
you the Holy Spirit if you ask him. Do you be-
lieve his promise? Then pray to God to give
you the Spirit. He will keep his promise; you
may be sure that he will.

a

CHAPTER VII.

ABRAHAM, OR THE TRIAL OF LOVE.
Gen. xxii.

Ar last, Isaac grew up to bea man. He lived
in a tent as Abraham and Sarah did. They all
three loved God, and loved each other very much.
It was a happy little family.

* (Abraham) staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief ;
but was strong in faith, giving glory to God ; and being fully persuaded
that what he had promised. he was able to perform : and therefore it
was imputed to him for righteousness.—Rom. iv. 20—22,

t Heb. xi. 11.
THE TRIAL OF LOVE. 37

Now you know that Abraham had a great many
things. He had cows and asses, sheep and goats,
tents and servants, silver and gold. But he had
one thing that he loved more than these. What
was that? His son, his dear son Isaac. He lov-
ed him more than anything else he had. :

Yet there was one Being whom Abraham loved
even better still. Who was that? God. Why
ought Abraham to love God better than all?
Because God had given him all he had.

At last, God said he would try Abraham, to see
whether he loved him more than anything in the
world: more even than he loved his son Jsaac.

You have heard how Abraham used to burn
lambs upon altars. Now God said to Abraham,
“Take your dear son Isaac, and offer him up on
an altar in a place that | will show.

Was not this a very hard thing for Abraham to
do? But Abraham wished to do all God told
him; because Abraham loved God so much. So
Abraham cut down some wood to burn; he put
the wood upon an ass, and he told two of his ser-
vants and Isaac tocome with him. He left Sarah
in the tent at home. They all four walked on for
three days; at last they saw a high hill a great
way off.

Abraham knew that was the place where he was
to build the altar; so he said to his servants,
“Stay here with the ass, while Isaac and I go and
worship God on the top of the hill” He took
the wood off the ass, and bound it round Isaae
38 ABRAHAM, OR

with a rope. Then he took some fire in one of his
hands, and a knife in the other, and Abraham and
Isaac walked up the hill together.

Isaac did not know that his father was going to
offer him as a sacrifice; he thought that his father
* would offer a lamb. So he said, “Father.” Abra-
ham answered, “ Here am I, my son.” And Isaac
said, “Here is fire and wood; but where is the
lamb?” “My son,” said Abraham, “God will
find a lamb ;” but Abraham did not tell Isaac that
he was to be the lamb.

At last they came to the top of the hill. Then
Abraham took stones, and built an altar; and he
took the wood off Isaac’s back, and laid it.on the
altar. _Now the time was come, when Isaac must
know who was to be the lamb. The rope that had
bound the wood was fastened round the hends and
feet of Isaac, and he was laid upon the wood like
a lamb.

Then Abraham took the knife, and lifted up his
hand to kill Isaac, when he heard a voice calling,
“Abraham, Abraham.” It was an angel speaking
from heaven. The angel said, “ Do not kill your
son or hurt him at all; for now God knows that
you love him, because you have given him your
only son.

How glad was Abraham to untie the rope that
bound Isaac, and to find that he need not kill him,

Abraham saw a ram caught in the bushes by
the horns; and he went and took it, and offered it
up as a sacrifice instead of Isaac. Abrahamthanked
THE TRIAL OF LOVE. 39

God very much for having’ given hin back his
son, and the angel called to him out of heaven
again, and said, “ God is much pleased with you
for having given up your son; and God will bless
you and all your children and grandchildren, and
their children, and one of your children’s children
shall make all people happy.”*

Whom did the angel mean? He meant that
Jesus would one day be a child, and make people
happy, and take them to heaven. A very long
while afterwards, you know that Mary had a child,
who was the Son of God.

When the angel had done speaking, Abraham
and Isaac went down the hill together: there was
no wood now om Isaac’s back. Abraham now was
very glad.

They found the servants where they had left
them with theass; then they all went back together
to Sarah.

Are you quite sure that Abraham loved God?
How do you know that he did? Because he obey-
ed God, and was ready to kill his son when God
told him.”t

Ought you to love God better than every-
thing? Yes, you ought to love God best.

Why? Because God gave you everything.

* And now to Abraham and his seed were the promises made. He
saith not, And to seeds, as of many; butas of one, And thy seed which
is Christ. Gal. iii. 16.

t He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that
loveth me.—John xiv. 21,
40 ABRAHAM, OR

That is one reason why you ought to love him
best.

You love your father and mother very much :
but you ought to love God better still. You ought
to love God much better than you do your play,
or your pretty things, or nice things to eat.
Now, if you love God best you will do what he
tells you.

You will not tell lies, for God tells you not;
you will not fall in passions, and call people names:
but you will try and please God. ‘Then you will
be like Abraham.

Ah! weil may Abraham love the God
Who promised him the land ;

A thousand precious gifts bestowed,
His warmest love demand.

His cattle cover o’er the plain,
With gold his stores are fill’d ;

His servants form a numerous train
Prepared the sword to wield.

One gift, more precious than the rest,
Does most his heart engage ;

With a fair son is Abraham blest,
The solace of his age.

Does he this son more fondly love
Than his all-bounteous God ?
~ This point the Lord would fully prove,
So bids him shed his blood.

See Abraham labouring up the hill,
With Isaac by his side ;

The sorrows which his bosom fill,
He strives awhile to hide,
THE TRIAL OF LOVE 41

And now the fatal altar’s built,
And Abraham lifts the knife ;
O! must his darling’s blood be spilt

In the fair morn ‘of life ?

But hark ! an angel stays his hand,
And bids him spare his son !

For he has done God’s great command,
And faith and love has shown,

CHILD.

Like Abraham I am richly blest ;
O! let me grateful be,

And ever love that God the best
Who gave so much to me.

O! let me his commands obey °
With dutiful delight ;

And, when he takes those gifts away,
Think all he does is right.

My God has done far more for me
Than can be e’er repaid ;

His only son on Calvary
For me atonement made.

CHAPTER VIII.
JACOB, OR THE HEAVENLY DREAM.
Gen. xxni. xxv. xxvii. xxviii.

Asranam and Sarah were very, very old. At
last Sarah died, and Abraham wished to bury her,
but he had not a piece of ground in Canaan to
42 JACOB, OR

bury her in; so he gave some of his silver to the
people in Canaan, and bought a field.

The field was full of trees, and there was a cave
in it. Abraham took the dead body of Sarah, and
put it in the cave. At last Abraham died, and
Isaac his son buried him in the same cave where
Sarah lay.

Abraham will rise again out of that cave at the
last day, and live with God in heaven. Abraham
did not wish to have Canaan for his land; he
wanted to live with God in heaven, which is a bet-
ter country than Canaan.*

Abraham's spirit is not dead: it is with God
now ;t and at the last day his body will live too,
and you will see him; and if you love God as
Abraham did, you will sit down with Abraham in
heaven.t

Isaac married a good woman, called Rebekah.
She lived in the tent where Sarah used to live.

Isaac and Rebekah had two little sons. They
* were called Esau and Jacob. They were twins;
that is, they were the same age; but they were
quite unlike each other. Their faces were unlike,
and their hearts were unlike. Esau was wicked

* He looked for a city, which hath foundations, whose builder and
maker is God.

Now they (the patriarchs) desired a better country, that is a heaven-
ly.—Heb. xi. 10, 16

t Now that the dead are raised, even Moses showed at the bush,
when he called the Lord the God of Abraham, &c.; for he is not a God
of the dead but of the living ; for all live unto him.—Luke xx. 37. 38,

? Many shall come from the east and from the west, and shall sit
down with Abraham, &c., in the kingdom of heaven.—Matt. viii. 11.
THE HEAVENLY DREAM. 43

from a child; but Jacob was good, and loved God.
When Esau was a man he became a hunter. He
had a bow and arrows; and he used to go into the
woods, and shoot birds and stags; he used to bying
them home, and dress them for dinner; and he
used to give some of his nice meat to his father
Isaac.

It was not wrong in Esau to hunt, and to cook
the meat: but his heart was wicked: he did not
_ care for God; and he loved meat and drink more
than God.*

Jacob was a shepherd: he staid at home near
his tent with his father and mother, and his sheep
and goats. He loved God, and prayed to God
very often.

I am sorry to tell you that Isaac loved wicked
Esau better than he loved good Jacob. Shall I
tell you why? Because Esau brought him nice
meat. That was a very bad reason for loving
him best.

But Rebekah loved Jacob, and God loved Ja-
cob, and God did not love Esau.t Do you think
that Esau and Jacob loved one another ?

They did not; Jacob sometimes behaved un-
kindly to Esau; and Esau hated Jacob, and wish-
ed to kill him. One day Esau said, “My father
will soon die; and then I will kill my brother Ja-
cob.”

* Lest there be any profane person as Esau, who for one morsel of
meat sold his birth-right.—Heb. xii. 16.
t Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated. Rom. ix. 13.
44 JACOB, OR

Rebekah heard that Esau meant to kill Jacob
some day ; so she was frightened, and called Jacob,
and said to him, “ Your brother Esau means to
kill you. This is what you must do: go to your
uncle, who lives a great way off, and stay with
him. Soon Esau will leave off being angry; then
I will send for you home.”

Jacob did as his mother advised. He took leave
of his father Isaac, and Isaac blessed him before
he went. Jacob did not ask his father to give him
anything. He took no servant with him, no sheep,
nor goats—not even an ass to ride upon. He
only took a stick in his hand,* and he set out on
his journey: Jacob felt very sad. He was a poor
stranger, and he was going to a far country, which
he had never seen.

Should not you feel very sad, if you were to
leave your father and mother, and to go alone into
a country a great way off?

He had no tent, nor house to sleep in by the
way; so when night came, he took some stones
for a pillow, and lay down to sleep on the ground.
There were bears and wolves in that country; but
God took care of him. God knew how sad he
was; and God made him dream the sweetest
dream that you ever heard.

In his sleep Jacob saw a great many steps reach-
ing up to the sky; and on the steps beautiful
angels; some going up, and some coming down:
and at the top he saw God himself. Then Jacob

* With my staf’ I passed over this Jordan.—Gen. xxxii, 10.
THE HEAVENLY DREAM. 45

heard a voice, and God spoke to him, and said,
“JT am the God of Abraham and of Isaac, and I
will take care of you where ever you go: and [
will bring you home again; and your children
shall live in this land of Canaan, where you are
sleeping.” 5

Then Jacob awaked out of his sleep, but now
his heart was glad; he knew that God and his an-
gels were watching over him. He wished never
to forget the place where he had this sweet dream:
so he took the stones, which had been his pillow,
and made them into a heap. “Now,” he thought,
«J shall be able to find the place, when God lets
me come back to Canaan, as he has promised.”
He could not offer a sacrifice upon the stones, be-
cause he had no lambs, but he poured some oil
upon them,* and he prayed to the Lord; and said,
“Tf God will take care of me, and give me bread
to eat, and clothes to wear, and bring me home
again, he shall be my God, and this stone shall be
God’s house.

Jacob felt sure that God would take care of him,
and bring him home again, because he had prom-
ised that he would.

God takes care of you, my dear children. He
sends his angels down from heaven to watch over
you, as they did over Jacob.

On the bare ground the traveller lies,
The stones his pillow are ;

Jacob poured oi! upon the top of the pillar.—Gen, xxvii, 18
46 JACOB, OR

‘While slumbers close his weary eyes,
God sends a vision fair.

See on that wondrous airy way
‘What troops of angels move !

Their brightness turns the night to day,
Their faces beam with love.

And where the steps are lost in light
On heaven’s glorious coast,

There stands the Lord, more wondrous bright,
Than that angelic host.

Like rushing waters loud and soft,*
Sounds the Almighty’s voice,

Uttering sweet promises, which oft
Made Abraham’s heart rejoice.

“ Thy children shal] this land possess,
(In number like the dust,)

And.ONE all families shall bless,
Who place in him their trust.

“ And I myself will go with theo,
Where’er thy footsteps roam ;

Once more thy joyful eyes shall see
Thine own beloved home.”

Sweet consolation thus is given
A wanderer’s heart to cheer!

This house of God, this gate of heaven,
Shall be to memory dear.

CHILD.
And well I know that angels fair
E’en now from heaven descend,

heard the noise of thy wings, like the noise of great waters, as
the voice of the Almighty.—Ezek. i. 24.
THE LONG JOURNEY. 47

That day and night they fill the air,
And from all harm defend.*

And well I know that angels fair
E’en now to heaven ascend,

And blest departed spirits beart
To their Almighty Friend.

And angels too shall guard my way,
If I the Lord revere ;

In life and death, by night and day,
They still shall hover near.t

———__

CHAPTER IX.

JACOB, OR THE LONG JOURNEY.
Gen. xxix.

‘nex Jacob went on his journey. He trav-
elled for a great many days. At last he came to
a place where there was a great deal of grass.
In that place there was a well, and there was a
great stone upon the top of the well. A great
many sheep were round the well; and some men
were with the sheep. These men were shep-
herds. There was very little water in that coun-
try where Jacob was. He must have been glad
to have seen a well.

* Are they not all ministering spirts, sent forth to minister for them
who shall be heirs of salvation }—Heb. i. 14.

+ The beggar died and was carried by the angels into Abraham's
bosom.—Luke xvi. 22.

} Theangel of the Lord encampeth round about them that rear him,
and delivereth them.—Ps. xxxiv. 7.
48 JACOB, OR

Pacob said to the shepherds, “Do you know o
man called Laban?”--(that was the name of
Jacob’s uncle.)

* Yes,” said they, “we do.”

Then Jacob said, “Is he well ?”

The shepherds answered, “ He is well; and
nere is his daaghter Rachel coming with the
sheep.”

Jacob was very glad to hear this, for Rachel
was Jacob's cousin. He ran to her and kissed her,
and he sobbed and wept.

Why did Jacob cry?

I think he cried for joy; for people sometimes
cry for joy. Jacob had not seen a friend a long
while, and he was glad to see his cousin.

Rachel did not know who Jacob wai, till he
said “I am your cousin, and am come from a
great way off.”

Then Rachel ran, and said to her father La-
ban, “ My cousin Jacob is come; I found him sit-
ting by a well.”

Then Laban was glad, and ran out to meet
Jacob, and kissed him, and said, “ You must come
home to my house: 1 am your uncle.”

Jacob told Laban that he would take care of his
sheep; and so Jacob was Laban’s servant. Jacob
was a good shepherd, and sat up to guard the
sheep at night from lions and bears. He cared
not for the heat by day, nor the cold by night.*

* In the day the drought consumed me, and the frost by night ; and
my sleep departed from mine eyes.—Gen. xxxi.
THE LONG JOURNEY. 49

Laban had two daughters ; one was called Leah,
and the other Rachel; and Laban gave them to
Jacob to be his wives. So Jacob had two wives.
People must not have two wives now; but then
they might have two wives, and even more than
two.

God gave Jacob a great many little children. I
will not tell you their names, because they were so
many. Jacob lived a long while in some tents
with his wives and his little children. He took
care of Laban’s sheep; but Laban gave him some
sheep and goats of his own. Jacob had plenty of
bread to eat and raiment to wear, as God had
promised: for God always keeps his promises.

But Jacob could not forget his father and moth-
er, and Canaan, where he had lived when he was
a little boy. He knew that God had promised to
give the land of Canaan to Abraham’s, and Isaac’s,
cand to his own children;* and he wished to live
here again. |

I will now write down the names of the good
men who first lived in Canaan; and I will write
down the names of their wives.

Abraham,— Sarah.
|
Isaac,——-Rebekah.

|
Jacob,——Leah and Rachel.

* By faith Abraham sojourned in the land of promise, as in a strange
country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs witn
him of the same promisc.— Heb. xi. 9.

J.ine upon Line. 4
JACOB, OR

The Lord has been poor Jacob’s guide
Across the pathless desert wide,

‘And led him where his kindred dwell:
Lo! now he rests beside a well;

Its mouth is cover’d by a stone:
Around, the flocks are lying down.

For other flocks the shepherds stay,
Before they roll the stone away ;

Jacob inquires their country’s name ;

It is the land whence Abraham came ;
Behold fair Rachel leads her sheep,—
Why does the wanderer rise and weep ?

In stranger lands his feet have stray’d
And now he weeps to see the maid,
Who of his mother’s race is sprung,
‘Who speaks his own dear native tongue,
Who knows the God that he reveres ;—
From gladness flow the wanderer’s tears.

Now wipe those tears, and weep no more
For thee rich blessings lie in store ;

The Lord is with thee, as he said,
Raiment provides, and daily bread ;
‘With flocks and herds thy fields abound,
And lovely children sport around.

Nor will the Lord his promise break ;

He ne’er will leave thee, nor forsake,

His power from harm will guard thy head,
And Canaan’s land thy feet shall tread ;
O Jacob’s God ! the faithful, true,

Be thou my God, and bless me too,
THE MEETING. 51

CHAPTER X

JACOB, OR THE MEETING.
Gen. xxxi, xxxii. xxxiii. xxxv. 1—.

At last Jacob said to Laban his uncle, “ I have
been your servant a long while, and now I want to
go home.” But Laban would not let Jacob go
away; and he behaved very unkindly to Jacob;
so that Jacob wished more and more to go home.

Once, while Jacob was taking care of the sheep ~
in the field, he fell asleep, and he had a dream, |
and in his dream he heard God say to him. “ Go
home to your father, and I will be with you.”

When Jacob awoke, he sent a servant to fetch
Rachel and Leah, for he wanted to speak to them ;
and he said to them, “God has spoken to me in
a dream, and has told me to return home to my
father.” ;

Then Rachel and Leah said, “ we will go with

ou.” 7

Then Jacob packed up all his things—his tents
and his clothes and his furniture, and all he had.
He put his things on the backs of his camels and
asses. He placed his wives and his eleven child-
ren on camels too. He told his servants to drive
all his sheep, cows, goats, and asses and camels.
So they all set out.

Laban did not see Jacob go away ; for Jacob's
tents were not close to the place where Laban
52 JACOB, OR

lived. At last Laban heard that Jacob was gone:
then he was angry, and he went after Jacob, and
he begged Jacob to come back; but Jacob would
go back to Canaan.

Jacob was pleased to go back to Canaan; but
there was one thing that frightened him. He
remembered that Esau had once said he would kill
him ; he was afraid lest he should now come and
kill him and his children.

Soon Jacob heard that Esau was coming with
four hundred men. Jacob now thought that Esau
was coming to kill him. So he began to pray to
God, and said, “O God, thou hast been very kind
to me, and given me a great many things—do not
let Esau come and hurt me, and kill my wives
and my little children. Thou didst promise to
take care of me.” God heard Jacob’s prayer.

Jacob thought to himself, “I will send a pres-
ent to show Esau that I wish to behave kindly to
him.” So he took a great many goats, and sheep,
and cows, and asses, and camels, and told his ser-
vants to drive them on before, and to tell Esau
that he had sent them asa present. Jacob prayed
to God all through that night.

In the morning Jacob looked up and saw Esau
coming, and four hundred men with him. Jacob
did not run away; but he went up to Esau, and
as he walked, he stopped seven times, and bowed
down to the ground.

And what was it Esau did ?

He ran and put his arms round Jacob’s neck and
THE MEEs‘ING, 53

kissed him, and they both wept. God had made
Esau’s heart more kind.

How glad Jacob was to find that his brother
was grown kind! Jacob had prayed to God to
make him kind, and God had heard his prayer.

Esau looked up, and saw Rachel and Leah and
the little children; and Esau said, “Who are
these ?”

And Jacob said, “ These are my children, that
God has been so kind as to give me.”

Then Rachel and Leah bowed themselves to
the ground, and the maids bowed themselves, and
all the children bowed, even the youngest, who
was quite a little child, He was Rachel’s child,
and his name was Joseph.

Then Esau said to Jacob, “I met a great
many sheep, and cows, and goats—why did you
send them on before you?”

Jacob said, “ They were for a present for you.”

Esau answered, “I have enough, my brother;
keep what you have for yourself.” z

“ Pray take my present,” said Jacob, “for God
has given me a great deal.” And Jacob begged
Esau so much to take it that at last he took it.

Esau said to Jacob, “ Let us take our journey
together : and I will go on first.”

But Jacob said, “I cannot go as fast as you do,
for [have many little children with me, and young
lambs and goats; and if one day we were to drive
them too fast, they would die. So Jacob would
not go with Esau. é
54 JACOB, OR

Then Esau went home to his own house, which
was a great way off; for Esau did not live in Ca-
naan. But Jacob stayed in the land of Canaan,
for he wished to live there.

. You see that God had let Jacob come back to
Canaan, as he had promised. Jacob did not for-
get the sweet dream I told you of. He went to
that very place once more: he had made a heap
of stones to mark the place; so he could find
it again. here he built an altar, and offered sac-
rifices to God, who had been so kind to him. God
had given him food and clothes, as he had pro-
mised: and he had given him many more things
besides ; for God had given him wives and chil-
dren, and servants and cattle; and God had made
his brother kind to him, and had let him come
back to Canaan. Jacob loved God very much,
and thanked him for his kindness.

Has not God been very kind to you, my dear
children? Tell me what things he has given. Can
you think of ten or twelve things he has given
you? Food, clothes, &c. &c. Sometimes peo-
ple have been unkind to you, and God has made
them grow kind. How much you ought to love
God!

The Lord who all things did create,
Doth still his wonders show ;

See Esau’s heart once filled with hats,
With sudden love o’erflow.

An humble staff poor Jacob bore,
When first he left the land ;
THE MEETING. 55

But now behold his plenteous store,
And his sweet infant band.

Long since the voice of God he heard.
Foretelling days of peace ;

Now God fulfils his gracious word,
And bids his troubles cease.

Let every knee before Him bow,
Who can all wonders do ;

All hearts can change, all gifts bestow.
Make every word come true.

CHILD.

Sweet promises are made to me
If I serve God in truth ;

Thy wonders great, O let me see,
Guide of my tender youth ;

If any hate or wish me ill,
Lord fill their hearts with love,

And feed, and clothe, and bless me still ;—
Then waft my soul above.

CHAPTER XI.

JOSEPH, OR THE PIT.
Gen. xxxvii. 1-24.

Jacop saw his old father, Isaac, again; and
ten Isaac died, and Jacob and Esau buried him
in that same cave where Abraham and Sarah had
been put: they will rise together at the last day;
56 JOSEPH, OR

for Isaac wished to live in a country that is better
* than Canaan, that is, in heaven.

Esau, you know did not live in the land of Ca-
naan; but Jacob chose to live in Canaan, with
his children and his cattle.

All the sons were grown up to be men, when
Benjamin was still a little baby. Joseph was next
youngest to Benjamin. He was a big boy, and he
was the best of all the children. The ten eldest
were wicked men. They used to take care of the
sheep and goats; and when Joseph was with
them, they grieved him by their wicked beha-
viour ; they were also very unkind to him, and al-
ways spoke roughly to him. Jacob loved Joseph
the best; and this made the others envious. They
hated him, because he was the pet and the dar-
ling. ,

Toots loved Joseph too much. He gave him
a very pretty coat made of many colours, yellow,
blue, green, pink, red, purple ; and Joseph used to
wear it.

It is Satan that makes people envious. We
should pray-to God to keep us from being envi-
ous.

You will hear what wicked things these bro-
thers did, because they were envious of dear, good
Joseph.

One night Joseph had a very strange dream.
He thought he was in a field of corn with all his
brothers, and they were making up large bundles
of corn, called sheaves. He thought that each of
THE PIT. 57

his brothers made a sheaf, and that all his brothers’
sheaves bowed down to his sheaf. Joseph thought
this a very strange dream, and he told it to his
brothers.

But when they heard it they were very angry,
and said, “ We suppose you mean that we shall
bow down to you, though you are the youngest.”
And so they hated him more than they had done
before.

Soon after Joseph had another strange dream.
He thought he saw the sun, moon, and eleven stars
in the sky, and that they bowed down to him.
This dream was more strange than the other; and
he told it to his father as well as to his brothers.

His father was surprised, and said, “ Does the
sun mean me, and the moon your mother, and the
stars your brothers, and shall we bow down to
you?”

Yet Jacob thought that God had sent the dream
to Joseph, and would make it come true ; but the
brothers were more and more angry.

Now Joseph’s brethren had a great many sheep
and goats to take care of: and there was not
enough of grass for them all, round the tents; so
they took their flocks a great way off, that they
might eat fresh grass. Joseph staid at home with
his old father; and Benjamin staid at home because
he was quite a little child.

At last Jacob wished to know how his sons
were; so he said to Joseph, “Go and see your

.
58 JOSEPH, OR

brothers, and come back and tell me how they are
and how the flocks are.”

Joseph was always ready to do what his father
wished: so he set out on his way.—He took no
ass to ride upon, and no servant; but, putting on
his pretty coat, he wished his dear father good-bye.
He little thought how long it would be before he
should see again that dear father’s face.

Joseph went a great way, but could not find
his brothers. At last a man saw him, and said,
“ Whom are you looking for?”

And Joseph answered, “I am looking for my
brothers—can you tell me where they are feeding
their flocks ?”

Then the man told him which way they were

ne.

Joseph took a great deal of pains to find his
brothers.

Now the brothers saw Joseph coming when he
was very far off. They knew that it was Joseph :
and they said to each other, “ Here this dreamer
comes, let us kill hith, and throw him into a deep
hole, and tell our father that a lion or a bear has
eaten him up.”

So when Joseph came up to them, they seized
hold of him. He came to them full of love and
kindness; but they looked fiercely upon him; |
and he was indeed like a gentle lamb in the midst
of lions and tigers. He was like the Lord Jesus
when the wicked Jews seized him in the garden.

The brothers were going to kill him, when one
\

THE PIT. 59

of the brothers, named Reuben, said, “ Do not kill
him, but only throw him into a pit.” This bro-
ther was a little kinder than the rest, and meant
to take him out of the pit, and bring him back to
Jacob. The brothers agreed not to kill him.
But first they took off his pretty coat.

O how bitterly he cried when he saw what they
were going to do to him! how he begged them to
spare him, and to let him return to his father !—
but they would not hear;* for their hearts were
harder than stone.

They threw him into the deep, dark pit; and
there he lay hungry and thirsty and weary—
without one drop of water to quench his thirst.
How it must have grieved Joseph to think that he
should not return to his dear father; and his fa-
ther perhaps would think that he was dead !

The wicked brothers cared not for his groans,
but they sat down and began to eat their dinner.

God saw them from his throne in heaven, and
was much displeased.

* We are verily guilty concerning our brother, in that we saw the

anguish of his soul, when he besought us, and we would not hear.
—Gen. xiii. 21.
60 ‘JOSEPH, OR

CHAPTER XII.

JOSEPH, OR THE SLAVE,

Wurtz the brothers were eating their dinner,
they looked up and saw some people coming along.
As the people came nearer, they saw camels and
men riding on them. I will tell you who these
men were.

They lived in a country a great way off, and
had een to some hills where very sweet things
grew, called spice and balm. They had plucked
these sweet things and had put them in large bun-
dles on the backs of their camels. They were
going to carry them to a country a great way off,
and to sell them for money.

This was their way of getting their living, and
it was a good way; yet they were wicked men, as
you will see.

One of the brothers, called Judah, said, “ Let
us sell Joseph to those men ; for it would be better
to sell him than to kill him: we shall get some
money if we sell him; and it would be very cruel
to kill Joseph, as he is our brother.”

Yet was it not very cruel to sell Joseph? This
brother was not really kind. The other brothers
said that they thought it was a good plan to sell
Joseph. So they called to the men, and asked
them if they would buy a young boy.
THE SLAVE. 61

And the men said, “ Yes.” This was wicked.

“ How much will you give us for him?” said
the brothers.

“We will give you twenty pieces of silver,”
said the men.

Then Joseph’s brothers pulled Joseph out of the

it. Perhaps he thought that they were going to
let him return to his father.

Ah! poor Joseph! He soon found that his
brothers were not going to be kind. The men
and the camels were waiting outside the pit. The
men paid the money to the brothers, and then
took Joseph and carried him away with them.

When Joseph was gone, the brothers said,
“ What shall we tell our father when he asks us
where Joseph is ?—we will not say we have seen
Joseph, but we will say we have found his coat on
the ground.”

Then the brothers killed one of their young
goats, and dipped the pretty coat in the blood.
« We will show our father this bloody coat,” said
they. So they carried the coat home, all covered
with blood, and the money for which they had
sold Joseph.

Do you think they were happy in their hearts?
Ono! The wicked cannot be happy. God had
written down their wickedness in his book.

Poor Joseph with the wicked men was not so
unhappy as they: for God was his friend. Old
Jacob had been thinking of his sons while they
were gone. How glad he must have been when
62 JOSEPH, OR

he heard the bleating of their sheep, and knew
they were come home! He must have looked to
see whether Joseph was with them. But no. His
sons came up to him. In their hands they held a
bloody coat. They showed it to Jacob, and said,
“We have found this—Do you think it is your
son’s coat or not ?”

Jacob knew that coat, and said, “It is my son’s
coat; a lion or bear has eaten him up, and has torn
Joseph to pieces.”

How Jacob wept for his darling child! How
sorry he was that he had sent him alone to seek
his brothers! The wicked brothers tried to com-
fort Jacob, and said, “ Do not weep so much,” but
Jacob would not hear.

“No; I shall die; and then I shall be with Jo-
seph, for I shall never be happy any more.”

How sad it was for this old man, leaning on his
stick, his hair grey, and his face full of sadness,
while he thought that his dear boy was eaten up
by the lion or the bear! His little Benjamin was
a comfort to him. Jacob would never let him go
away, nor would he trust him with his brothers,
though he did not know how wicked they had
been.

These brothers first had envied Joseph, then
they had told'a lie to hide their sin.

Children sometimes try to hide their faults by
telling lies, and so they make God more angry
than he was before. My dear children, remember
‘THE SLAVE. 63

that God always sees you; and that he hates liars,
and will not let them live with him in glory.

What anguish once poor Joseph felt,

When he before his brethren knelt,
And loud for mercy cried !*

Refusing still to hear his pray’r,

In blood they dipp’d his garment fair,
And sought their guilt to hide.

Now by the heathen-stranger band,
Away from his dear native land,
The weeping youth is borne :
His father shall feel bitter pangs,
When he shall hear some lion’s fangs
Those tender lambs have torn.

A precious load the camels bear
Of balm, and myrrh, and spices rare,
Which scatter sweetness round :
But sweeter than the sweetest spice,
True piety beyond all price
In Joseph’s heart is found.

Blessings shall rest upon his head
Where’er his wandering steps are led,
For he to God is dear ;
And this same God shall with him go,
With heav’nly comforts soothe his wo,
And chase away his fear.

* We saw the anguish of his soul, when he besought us, and we
would not hear.—Gen. xlii. 21.
64 JOSEPH, OR

CHAPTER XIII.

JOSEPH, OR THE PRISONER.
Gen. xxxix.

Tue men who had bought Joseph, took him to
a country a great way off. It was called Egypt.

When they got to Egypt they tried to sell him,
as if he had been a horse or a cow. In some
countries men are sold, and are called slaves.
Poor Joseph was sold as a slave. Do you not
hope that a kind man bought hin? And it was
a kind man that bought him. There was a very
rich man who knew the king, and he bought Jo-
seph to be his slave. His name was Potiphar.
He took Joseph home with him. He did not send
him to work in the field; but he made him a ser-
vant in the house. So Joseph had not very hard
work to do.

Joseph tried to be a good servant. Though he
wished very much to be with his father, he did not
waste his time in fretting, but took great pains to
please his master. When his master told him to
do anything, he did it so well that his master was
quite pleased with him. It was God that made
Joseph able to do his work so well; and Joseph’s
THE PRISONER. 65

master knew that it was God that he!ped him to
do things well* I suppose that Joseph had told
him ; for his master did not know the true God
but worshipped idols.

His master liked him better every day. At
last, his master said to Joseph, “I can trust you
so well that I will give you the charge of the
other servants when I am out. Take care of the
house, and all the things in it, of the garden and
of the fields; for I can trust you.”

So Joseph had the care of everything, and all
the other servants minded what he said: and he
might do what he liked when his master was out,
But Joseph behaved the same as if his master
were watching him; for he knew the eye of God
was always upon him. ‘There are many children
who behave ill as soon as their parents go out of
the room: such children do not fear God.

Though Joseph had the care of nice things to
eat, and beautiful things to wear, he only took
what his master allowed him to take. He was al-
ways busy—sometimes in the house, and some-
times in the field: and God made the things grow
well in the field, and the work to go on right in
the house.

So that Potiphar had no trouble himself, but
found that Joseph would manage all for him.

So Joseph had now all he could wish for; but
he could not forget his father, and his little baby

* And his master saw that the Lord was with him, and that the

Lord made all that he did to prosper in his hand.—Gen. xxxix. 3.
Line upon Line. 5
66 JOSEPH, OR

brother Benjamin. As for his mother, Rachel,
you know that she had died some time before.

Now you shall hear what a sad thing happened
to Joseph.

Potiphar had a very wicked wife. She wished
Joseph to be turned out of the house: for Joseph
had found out how bad she was; so she did not
like to see Joseph.

This wicked woman said to Potiphar, “ Your
slave, Joseph, that you think so good, is very
wicked, and when you are out he behaves very ill”
Then she told Potiphar of bad things that she
said Joseph had done.

Potiphar was so foolish as to believe her, and
he fell into a great rage, and said, “ Joseph shall
be put into prison.”

So some men took Joseph, and brought him to
the prison, which was in Potiphar’s house.

Were you ever in a prison, my dear child? It
is a dark place, with very little windows, and bars
of iron before the windows, and iron gates and
bolts.

Joseph was put in prison; and his feet were
hurt by great iron chains, which were fastened
round them.*

There were a great many men in the prison,
and most of them had done very bad things, but
Joseph had done nothing wrong. God still loved

* Joseph was sold for « servant, whose feet they hurt with fetters.
Ps. cv. 17, 18.
THE PRISONER. 67

Joseph, and he could make him happy even in a
on. ‘

There was a man who kept the keys of the pri-
son, and took care of the prisoners ; he was called
the keeper of the prison. Sometimes keepers are
very unkind; but God put it into the keeper's
heart to love Joseph. Joseph had a very sweet
countenance or look, and he behaved well to the
keeper, and minded all he said.

At last, the keeper took the chains off Joseph's
feet, and allowed him to walk about the prison, and
take care of the prisoners. The keeper found that
he could trust him, and that Joseph managed things
well. It was God who made Joseph do everything
so well; for God was Joseph’s friend, and was al-
ways watching over him to comfort him.

Joseph hoped that God would some day let him
get out of prison.

See Joseph in a prison cast,
In darkness under ground
His feet within the stocks made fast,
With iron fetters bound ;
Can this be he (now clad in raiment vile)
Whao lately shar’d a father’s tend’rest smile ?

But in the prison shines a light,
Which none but Joseph sees ;
The promises of God are bright,
And give his spirit ease ; ‘
‘The day shall come, when he with honour crown’d
Shall see his brethren bending low around.

Yes, God shall clear his innocence,
And make it fully known,
68 JOSEPH, OR

Yes, God shall send and draw him thence,
And raise him to a throne ;
But first, like gold, his patience must be tried,
And (as by fire) his heart be purified.*

CHAPTER XIV.

JOSEPH, OR THE BUTLER AND BAKER.
Gen. xl.

Tue prison, you remember, was in the house of
Potiphar. One day, Potiphar brought two men to
Joseph, and said to Joseph, “Take great care that
these men do not get out of prison. I give them
under your charge.” So you see Potiphar thought
Joseph could be trusted: perhaps he had found out
that Joseph was not so bad as he had once
thought ; still he did not let Joseph out of prison.

I will tell you who these men were that Poti-
phar brought to Joseph. They were the servants
of the king of Egypt. The king of Egypt had a
great many servants to wait on him. One of his
servants used to bring him wine in a cup to drink.
This servant was called his butler. Another man
used to bake things for his dinner, and bring them
to the king. He was called the baker.

The butler and the baker had both offended the

* That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of
gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unte
praise, and honour, and glory, &c.—1 Peter, i. 7.
THE BUTLER AND BAKER, 69

king: I do not know what they had done, but they
had made the king so angry that he had said they
should be shut up in prison.

So the king had said to Potiphar, the great cap-
tain, “ Put these men in the prison.”

Then Potiphar brought them to Joseph, and told
him to keep them safe, Joseph shut them up ina
room together, and gave them bread and water
every day, and took great care of them.

One morning when Joseph came to see them, he
observed that they looked very sad indeed. So
Joseph said to them, “ Why do you look so very
sad ?”

Then they answered, “We have each had a very
strange dream to-night, and we think our dreams
have some meaning, but we cannot find it out:
and there is nobody in the prison who can tell us.”

Then Joseph said, “But my God knows all
things: he could tell me the meaning. Only tell
me your dreams.”

The butler told his dream the first. He said,
“T thought I saw a tree such as grapes grow upon
—avine. It had three branches, but no grapes.
While I was looking, I saw little buds, and they
turned into grapes, and they grew ripe. I picked
the grapes, and squeezed them into a cup, and
made wine, and then brought the cup’ to the king
for him to drink, as I used to do.”

. This was the butler’s dream, and God told Jo-
seph the meaning of it.

“You saw three branches,” said Joseph;
70 JOSEPH, OR

“something will happen to you in three days.
The king will send for you to be his butler again.”

When the baker heard this pleasant meaning, he
thought that his dream would be pleasant too: so
he began to tell it. The baker said, “I dreamt
that I was carrying three white baskets on my head,
the one on the top of the other. In the baskets
there were baked meats, and birds came and pick-
ed the meat out of the top basket.”

The baker thought thatJoseph would say, “ In
three days you shall be baker again to the king.”
But this dream had a sad meaning.

“Something will happen to you in three days,”
said Joseph. “The king will send for you, and
will hang you upon a tree, and the birds will pick
your flesh off your bones.”

So while the butler was pleased with what Jo-
seph had told him, the poor baker was very sorry,
because he knew that he must die.

_ Joseph had one little favour to ask of the butler.
You can guess what it was. “ When you are with
the king of Egypt,” said Joseph, “ giving him his
wine, will you tell him about me? Tell him how
Iam shut up in prison, and cannot get out. Ionce
lived in a land a great way off, and I was stolen
away, and now I am shut up in this prison, though
{ have done nothing wicked to deserve it. Beg
the king to let me out.”

You see Joseph did not tell of his brothers’
wickedness in having sold him.

In three days the king sent some men to the
THE BUTLER AND BAKER. 71

prison to fetch the butler and the baker. It was
the king’s birth-day, and he had made a feast for
his servants, and he had thought of the butler and
baker, and had said, “ Let the butler come back
to me, and let the baker be hanged; I will not for-
give him.” So now both the butler and the baker
knew that Joseph had told them the truth.

Did the butler remember Joseph when he was
with the king? No,heforgothim. I suppose he
was thinking of the fine things he saw, of eating
and drinking, of money and clothes, and forgot
that poor Joseph was in a prison. The butler was
unkind, and worse than unkind; he was ungrate-
ful. Joseph had been kind to him, yet he was not
kind in return; therefore I call him ungrateful.
Many children are ungrateful to their parents, who
were kind to them when they were little; and all
people are ungrateful to God, who has given his
Son to die for them. ;

Poor Joseph waited in vain. No one came to
let him out of prison. One day passed, and then
another: summer came, and then winter, but Jo-
seph was still shut up. Yet God had not forgot-
ten him. Why did God make him wait so long?
That he might learn to be patient. My dear child,
if God lets you be sick a long while, it is to make
you patient. You should think to yourself, “ God
will make me well when he thinks best: but per-
haps he means to take me to heaven instead.”

And has the butler, then, forgot
Poor Joseph’s last request ;
72 JOSEPH, OR

' Nor of the tender pity thought,
Shown to him when distrest ?

Why does he not of Joseph speak,
When he the cup presents,

Implore the king his bonds to break,
And show his innocence 4

Content, within the palace gay,
He lives on princely fare ;

While Joseph mourns the light of day,
And breathes the prison air.

But while the butler I accuse
Of hateful selfishness,

O let me not in pride refuse
My own sins tu confess.

Have I remembered all the good
My parents have bestowed,

And in their woes done all I could
To ease their heavy load ?

' And have I not ungrateful been
Unto the God of love,
And often griev’d him by my sin,
And with his Spirit strove 3+

Yet Jesus, since he left the grave,
To sit upon his throne,

Still intercedes with God to save
Us, who in prison groan.t

Grieve not the Holy Spirit of God.—Eph. iv. 30
t He is able also to save them to the uttermost, that come unto God
by him ; seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. —Heb
wii, 25,
‘THE RELEASE. 73

CHAPTER XV.
JOSEPH, OR THE RELEASE.

I nave told you of the great king of Egypt.
He was the king of the country where Joseph was.
His name was Pharaoh. He had a great many
servants, as I told you. He sat upon a throne,
wore beautiful clothes, a chain of gold round his
neck, a ring upon his hand, and a crown of gold
upon his head. He lived in a fine house, and rode
out in a chariot drawn by many horses; and as
he passed by, people bowed down to the ground.
One night, this great king had two very strange
dreams. I will tell you what they were.

He thought he was standing by a river, and that
seven fat cows came out of the river, and began
toeat the grass that grew near. This was a pleas-
ant sight; but, soon after, he saw seven very thin
cows, (more ugly than any cows he had ever seen,)
come out of the river; and they ate up the seven
fat cows; and yet, after they had eaten them, they
looked as thin as they did before. Then the king
awoke,

But soon he fell asleep, and dreamt that he saw
a stalk of corn with seven fine ears growing on it.
While he was looking, he saw another stalk with
seven very bad ears of corn on it; and these bad
ears ate up the seven good ears.

These were Pharaoh’stwo dreams. He thought
74 JOSEPH, OR

them very strange, and longed to know the mean-
ing of them. In the morning he told his servants
to find some people who said they could tell the
meaning of dreams. A great many men came who
pretended to be wise; but they could not tell the
king the meaning of his dreams. The king was
very unhappy, but what could he do?

At last the butler thought of Joseph. He had
not thought of him for a long while, and now he felt
sorry. He said to the king, “I do remember my
faults this day. You know, O king, that you were
once angry with me and with your baker, and you
shut us up in prison, in the house of the captain
Potiphar. While we were in prison, the baker and
Teach had a dream, and a young man, a servant,
told us the meaning of our dreams, and said that
the baker would be hanged, and that I should be
let out of prison; and so it was, the baker was
hanged, and you sent for me back to be your but-
ler, just as the young man had said.” Then Pha-
raoh told his servants to fetch this young man out
of prison. ;

So the servants came to the prison, and said to
the keeper, “We are come to fetch Joseph; the
king wants to speak to him.”

Joseph must have been glad to hear this. He
saw that God had heard his prayer. Joseph was
dressed in very poor clothes, not fit for a king to
see. So the servants gave him neat clothes, and
brought him to the king.

It was a long, long while, since Joseph had felt
THE RELEASE, 15

the sweet air blow upon his face, and since he had —
seen the green fields. I think he must have look-
ed pale and sick.

He came into the king’s fine house, and stood
before him. The king said, “ I hear that you can
tell the meaning of dreams.”

“Tt is not I myself,” said Joseph, “that can tell
the meaning, but my God can, and I know that he
will tell the meaning of your dreams.” Then
Pharaoh told Joseph his two dreams—the dream
about the seven cows, and the dream about the
seven ears.

When he had done speaking, Joseph answered,
“Both your dreams have the same meaning. This
is what is going to happen. The next seven years
a great deal of corn will grow in the fields; but
afterwards hardly any corn will grow in the fields
for seven years. The seven fat cows meant the
seven years, when much corn would grow; and the
seven thin cows meant the seven years when very
little corn would grow. God sent you these dreams,
that you might know what is going to happen.”

Now what could the king do? First there would
be a great deal of corn, then scarcely any. Could
you, my little child, advise the king what to do?
Joseph gave him some advice. He said, “Save
up some of the corn, when there is so much, that
you may have some, when there is none growing
in the fields. You should look for a very wise
man, who will save up the corn, and put it in large
16 JOSEPH, OR

barns; or the people will die when no corn grows
in the fields.”

Pharach was much pleased with Joseph for
telling him the meaning of his dreams ; he believ-
ed what Joseph said, and so did all Pharaoh’s serv-
ants. And the king Pharaoh said to his servants,
«Where can I find so wise a man as Joseph?
He shall save up the corn.”

Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “ You are so
very wise that you shall help me to manage all the
people in the land. Every one shall mind you as
they do me, and you shall be the greatest person
next to me.”

Then Pharaoh took the ring off his hand, and
put it on Joseph’s hand ; and he gave him beauti-
ful clothes like his own, and a gold chain to wear
round his neck. He gave him a fine chariot to
ride in, and desired people to bow down when
they saw him.

So Joseph was made a great Lord; but he
would not be idle. He went about all the country
in his chariot to get corn, and he built large barns
everywhere, and filled them with corn, and so he
did for seven years. He did not spend his time .
eating and drinking, but was always doing good
to people.

He was very glad he was let out of prison, and
he thanked God very much. He was not happy
because he wore fine clothes : but he was glad to
be able to do good to people, by saving up corn.
He married a wife, and he had two little boys; yet
THE RELEASE. 77

still he thought of his dear old father, and hoped
that he should one day see him again; and he
thought of little Benjamin, and hoped his brothers
had not killed him, nor put him ina pit, and he
hoped that his brothers were sorry for their wick-
edness. He did not feel angry with his brothers.
Joseph knew that it was God who had let them
sell him for a slave, and that God had let them do
it that he might save up corn in Egypt.

It is God that makes all things happen ;* and
God has wise reasons for all he does. If he lets
us be sick, it is for some good reason. One day
we shall know why God let us be sick, or let
wicked people hurt us, or take away our things.

You know why God let wicked people kill the
Lord Jesus. It was that he might die instead of
us, and save us from hell.

Behold him in a chariot riding,
Who lately in a prison lay ;

The king, to him all pow’r confiding,
Deck’d him with gold and white array.

Now hear the servants loud proclaiming,
“ Bow low the knee before his car !”

While ev’ry mouth is Joseph naming—
“ My Lord Zaph-nath paaneah.”

Through all the land he goes exploring,
Gath’ring the precious fruits of earth ;

* Shall there be evil in a city, and the Lord hath not done it~
Amos iii. 6.

t What I do thou knowest not now ; but thou shalt know here after
John xiii. 7.
78 JOSEPH, OR

In spacious barns the harvest storing,
Against the dreadful days of dearth.

How well is Joseph’s faith rewarded,

Which made him long in patience wai’
God has at length relief afforded,

And rais’d him to his glorious state,
And God will every soul deliver

That puts his trust in him alone ;
And wipe away his tears for ever,

And raise him to a heav’nly throne!



CHAPTER XVI.

JOSEPH, OR THE LORD OF EGYPT.
Gen. xiii.

You have heard, my dear children, how Joseph
was made almost as great as the king. A great
deal of corn grew in the fields next year and the
year after, and for seven years after the king’s
dream. But then scarcely any corn grew. The
poor people came to king Pharaoh, and said, “ We
have nothing to eat, and we shall die.” Then
Pharaoh said, “Go to Joseph ; he can help you.”
So the people went to Joseph and he opened his
large barns full of corn, and sold the corn to the
people. They brought money, and large bags or
sacks. Joseph took the money and filled the sacks
with corn, A great many people came to buy
corn. Some from a long way off; but Joseph had
enough corn for all
‘THE LORD OF EGYPT. 79

Among the people who came there were ten men
who had come from a far country. Each of them
had an ass, and on the ass a sack, and in their
hands they brought money. Who do you think
these were? They were Joseph’s brothers. When
Joseph saw them he remembered them, though he
had not seen them for twenty years. He knew
those cruel brothers, who had sold him for twenty
pieces of silver. If he pleased he might have
punished them. He might have told his servants
to kill them. Do you think Joseph will punish his
brothers, or do you think he will be kind to them?
Now you shall hear how he behaved to them.

The brothers thought Joseph was a great lord,
and they did not know that they had seen him
before ; for he wore fine clothes, and he was grown
to be a man, and he had another name, which the
king had given him.

So when the ten brothers saw him they bowed
upon the ground before him. Then Joseph re-
membered his dream about the sheaves bowing
down to his sheaf, and he saw that God had made
it come true.

Joseph felt ready to forgive his brothers; but
he wished first to see whether they were sorry
for their wickedness, and whether they loved their
father and little Benjamin; Joseph did not tell
them who he was. He even pretended to be
unkind. He spoke to them in a rough voice, and
said, “ Where do you come from?”
80 JOSEPH, OR

“From the land of Canaan,” they said, “ to
buy food.”

But Joseph said he did not believe they spoke
truth. “You come,” he said, “to see what a bad
land this is, with no corn growing in it, and you
mean to bring some king with soldiers to fight
us,”

“ No, indeed,” said Joseph’s brothers, “ we do
not. We are ten poor brothers and we are come
to buy food.”

But Joseph said he would not believe what
they said.

Joseph’s brothers answered, “ We are all bro
thers, and once there were twelve of us, but one
is dead, and the youngest is with our father, who
is an old man.” ‘They tried to make Joseph be-
lieve what they said, but he would not; that is,
he pretended not to believe them.

At last Joseph said, “ I must see your youngest
brother. I shall send one of you to fetch him,
and I shall keep the rest in prison, till he comes
back with the youngest brother.”

The brothers were much frightened when they
heard this; for they knew their father would not
choose to part with Benjamin, lest he should be
killed. So not one of the brothers said he would
go and fetch Benjamin.

Joseph put them all in prison, and kept them
shut up together for three days. While they
were shut up, they had time to think of their
wickedness to Jogeph.
THE LORD OF EGYPT. 81

When people are shut up they have time to
think and to pray. I hope, dear children, when
you are shut up, as a punishment, that you pray
to God to make you good. The brothers were
very much frightened; they did not know what
Joseph twas going to do with them.

At last Joseph came to them in the prison, and
said, “ This is what you must do, and then you
shall live; for I fear God.”

How glad and surprised the brothers must have
been when they heard him say he feared God! for
the other people worshipped idols.

Joseph said, “I will only keep one of you shut
up in the prison, all the rest of you may go back,
and take corn home with you; but when you
come again, you must bring your youngest bro-
ther with you; or I shall think you have not
spoken truth; but, if you do bring him, I will
believe you.”

The brothers were glad to think they might go
back, yet it made them sad to hear that one of them
would be kept in prison. They remembered their
wickedness to Joseph, and they said one to another,
“Tt was very wicked in us to treat him as we did.
How he begged us to spare him, and we would not ;
and now God is punishing us for it.”

Joseph heard what they said, and it made the
tears run down his cheeks; so that he was obliged
to go out of the room to weep. He did not like to
see them unhappy ; but you know he wanted to
find out whether they were kind to Benjamin, and

Lins upon Line. 6
82 JOSEPH, OR

whether they loved their old father, and whether
they were sorry for all they had done.

When Joseph came back, he took one of the
brothers, called Simeon, and said that he would keep
him in prison till the others brought their youngest
brother with them. So Joseph had Simeon bound
with ropes, or chains, while the other brothers
stood round.

Then they must have remembered how once
poor Joseph had been bound, and sold for a slave.

Simeon was left alone in the prison, and he did
not know whether his brothers would ever come
back, and whether he would ever be let out.

Before the brothers set off to go home, Joseph
said to his servants, “ When you fill those men’s
sacks with corn, put back into their sacks the
money that they paid me for it, and give them
also some food by the way.” Joseph wished his
poor brothers to have something to eat by the way.
And the servant did as Joseph told him; but
Joseph’s brethren did not know what the servant
had done.

How glad these brothers where to get away
from Egypt, and to come back to their father, and
to their little children, who had scarcely anything
left to eat!

When they were come home, they told their
father all thathad happened. “There was a great
lord,” they said, “ who sold corn to the people ; and
he spoke very roughly to us, and said that we were
not come to buy corn, but that we only wanted to
THE LORD OF EGYPT. 83

see the land, that we might bring men to fight the
poor hungry people that lived there. He called us
‘spies.’ We told him that we were not spies, but
were twelve brothers;—that one was dead, and
that one was with our father in the land of Canaan.
But that lord would not believe us, and told us we
must bring our youngest brother with us; and he
took Simeon, and shut him up in prison, and said
that he would not let him out till we came back
with Benjamin.”

Poor old Jacob was very sad when he heard all
this. Then the brothers began to open their sacks
of corn, and they were quite surprised to find their
money at the top of their sacks; but they were not
pleased; they thought that some one had put the
money there to get them in disgrace, and that
when they went back to Egypt, they should be
punished for stealing; so they were very much
frightened.

They had not stolen this money ; but they were
thieves, for they once had stolen Joseph, and sold
him for twenty pieces of silver. God knew that
they were thieves. .

They were more afraid than ever of going back
to Egypt, and seeing the great lord; yet they
wished very much to go, for they had only bought
a little corn, and they wanted more: and they knew
that poor Simeon would remain in prison till they
went back to Egypt.

How could they persuade Jacob to let Benjamin
go? For Jacob said, “ No, I cannot trust Benjamin
84 JOSEPH, OR

with you, lest some harm should happen to him.
You have taken away two of my children, Joseph
and Simeon, and you would not bring Benjamin
back if I were to let him go. If any evil were to
happen to him, you would bring down my gray
hairs with sorrow to the grave.” Jacob felt that
it would break his heart to lose Benjamin, he
loved him so very much.

So the brothers were obliged to stay in Canaan ;
for they knew it would be of no use to go to Egypt,
except Benjamin went with them. What trouble
they now were in! God was punishing them for
their wickedness.

Famine had spread on ev'ry side,

And thousands flock’d from distant lands
To Joseph, who their need supplied

From stores as countless as the sands.

Amongst the rest a troop appear'd,—
Full well were they to Joseph known ;

Their cruel looks he once had fear’d,
‘When in the pit they cast him down.

Those features he could recollect,

Though worn by care, and scorch’d by heat :
But little did those men suspect

They bent around their brother’s seat.

The youthful bloom had left his cheek ;
Grave and majestic was his air ;

A language strange they heard him speak,
And splendid garments saw him wear.

He spoke to them in tone severe,
And made them all their hist’ry tell ;
THE FEAST 8

And glad was he no tale to hear
Of wo and death that had befel.

Yet Joseph would his name conceal,
Nor his own tender love express ;

Until he saw his brothers feel
Sorrow for their past wickedness.

But while he caus’d them grief and pain,
Compassion fill’d his gentle heart ;
His tears he could not long restrain,
But stepp’d aside, and wept apart.

CHILD.

Thus my dear Saviour felt for me,
Before I lov'd him as my friend ;—
Did then each tear with pity see,
To ev’ry sigh and groan attend.*

CHAPTER XVIL

JOSEPH, OR THE FEAST.
Gen. xiii.

As the brothers could not persuade old Jacob to
let Benjamin go with them, they were obliged to
stay in Canaan. Soon they had eaten up all their
corn, and none grew in their fields, and what
could they do for food ?

* It is said of rebellious Israel, “In all their affliction he was aflict-
ed Isa. Ixiii. 9,

God also says to Israel, “I have loved thee with an everlasting love.’
—Jer. xxxi. 3,
8F JOSEPH, OR

Jacob saw how hungry they’ were, and at last
he said, “ Go again, buy us a little food.”

Then they said, “ We cannot go without Ben-
jamin, for the man who sold corn said we should
not see him, unless we brought our youngest bro-
ther. If you will let Benjamin come with us,
then we will go.”

Jacob was very unhappy when he heard this,
and he said, “ Why did you tell the man you had
a brother? it was behaving very unkindly to me
to tell him.”

Then the brothers answered, “'The man asked
us so many questions. He said to us, “Is your
father alive? Have youanother brother? Could
we think that he would say, “ Bring your, young
est brother ?”

Still Jacob did not like to let Benjamin go.

One of the brothers (called Judah) said, “ I will
take care of Benjamin, if you will let him go. I
promise to bring him back to you; and if I do
not, I will take all the blame. For we and our
little children shall die, if you do not let him
come.”

Jacob saw it was of no use to refuse any more,
or they would all die, and Benjamin too. So he
gave Benjamin into the care of Judah.

But Jacob was afraid of the man being unkind
to them, and of his saying they had stolen the
money. So he said to them, “Bring the man a
present.”
HE FEAST, 87

What could they bring? They had gardens
with fruit and flowers growing in them.

“Pick some nuts and almonds off your trees,”
said Jacob, “and take a little of that sweet stuff
called balm and myrrh ; and take some spices, and
a little honey, and take them with you as a pre-
sent to the man.”

The man was very rich, and did not want any-
thing, but the present would show that they wished
to please him.

“ Besides,” said Jacob, “take the money back
that you found in your sacks—take more money
in your hands to buy more corn, and take Benja-
min, and go to the man.”

Jacob’s heart was full of pain when he said
this.

Then he began to pray to God. “May God
give you mercy before the man, and send home
Simeon and Benjamin.”

This was Jacob’s prayer.

“ Now,” said he, “if I must lose my children, I
must lose them.”

When Jacob wished his dear Benjamin good-
bye, he thought of how he once had parted with
his Joseph, the day he sent him to look for his
brothers, when he put on his pretty coat, but
never returned.

Now Jacob feared that he should never see
Benjamin again.

The brothers took the present, the sweet present,
with them, and they each took some money in
88 JOSEPH, OR

their hands, and they took their asses, and their
empty sacks; and Judah took care of Benjamin.

So they parted from their old father, and their
wives, and their little children, and they set out on
their journey.

They all felt very sad that day. The brothers
were frightened. ‘They were afraid they should
be taken up as thieves when they got to Egypt.

At last they came to Egypt. They went to
the place where Joseph was selling the corn, and
he saw them. He looked to see whether Benjamin
was with them. How pleased he was to see him!

Benjamin was a baby when Joseph had seen
him last, yet Joseph knew that it was Benjamin.

As soon as he saw his brothers, he called his
chief servant, who managed his house, and said to
him. “ Take those ten men to my house, and get
a great dinner ready, for they must dine with me
to day.”

The brothers did not hear what Joseph said to
the servant. The servant came to them, and told
them to come with him. So they came, and he
brought them to Joseph’s own house—a fine large
house. Yet the brothers were not pleased, but
very much frightened.

“ Ah!” said they to each other, “we are going
to be put in prison: and we shall be kept in
Egypt, to work hard, we and our asses.”

They thought of their poor father, and of what
he would do.

When they got to the door of the house, they
THE FEAST. 89

came up to the servant, and said, “O sir, we came
here once before to buy a little food, and we paid
money for it; but when we got home we opened
our sacks, and found the money in them, and here
we have brought it back; and we have brought
more money to buy more corn. We cannot tell
who put the money in our sacks.”

It was quite right in the brothers to bring back
the money; but once they had stolen money.
Now they were speaking truth, but once they had
told lies.

The servant answered them very kindly, and
said, “Fear not, God is your Father—God gave
you that money, and put the money in your
sacks,”

You see the servant knew about God. Who
could have taught him about God? The people
in Egypt worshipped idols. It must have been
Joseph who had taught his servant.

How happy the brothers were now! They
soon found that they were not going to be put into
a prison, but that they were to dine in a fine
house. What could make the man grow so kind ?
They did not know the reason.

While they were waiting, the servant went and
brought poor Simeon out of prison. He had been
shut up a long while. I hope when he was in pri-
son, that he had thought of his having once put
Joseph in the pit.

The servant told them that dinner would not be
ready till twelve o'clock ; and while they were
90 JOSEPH, OR

waiting, he brought them water to wash their feet,
and he gave some food to their poor, tired, and
hungry asses.

The brothers said, “Let us get our present
ready, while we are waiting for the lord to come
in.”

So they went out, and got ready the balm and
spices, the honey, and nuts, and almonds.

At last Joseph came in from selling the corn,
and the brothers came into the house, and brought
the present in their hand, and they bowed down
upon the ground. The eleven brothers bowed
down, as the eleven sheaves had done in the dream.

This time Joseph spoke very kindly to them.
He asked them how they were; but most of all
he wanted to know how his dear father was.

“Ts your father well?” he asked. “You said
you had an old father. Is he yet alive ?”

' They said, “ Yes, our father is well, and he is
alive ;” and as they spoke, they bowed down their
heads to the ground.

Then Joseph looked for Benjamin, and when he
saw him, he longed to throw his arms round his
neck, and kiss him, but he would not do it yet.
He only said, “ Is this your younger brother that
you told me of?” F

And then he made this little prayer, “God be
gracious to thee, my son.”

When Joseph had said this, he felt the tears
coming into his eyes, and he could not help ery-
ing; so he went quickly out of the room, and shut


91

himself up in his own room, and there he cried by
himself. He was a very tender-hearted man, and
he loved this young brother very much.

One reason why he loved him was, that Benja-
min was the son of his own mother, Rachel, while
all the others had another mother, Leah; for Ja-
cob, you know, had two wives.

Now the dinner was ready; so Joseph would
not stay in his room ; but first he washed his face,
that no one might see that he had been crying,
and then he tried to look cheerful, and he said to
his servants, “ Put the dinner on the table.”

In the room where they were to dine, there
were three tables. One was for Joseph’s servants,
another was for Joseph himself, (for he always
dined at a table by himself,) and the other table
was for the eleven brothers.

Joseph told them where to sit: he made the eld-
est sit first, and then the second, just according
to their age, and he made Benjamin sit last. The
brothers were surprised at Joseph’s knowing which
was eldest and which was second, for it is hard to
tell how old a grown up man is; but Joseph knew
them better than they thought he did.

Now they all sat down to dinner. It was long
since they had eaten such a dinner, and they had
made a great journey, and were tired, and hungry,
and thirsty. Joseph sent them nice things from
his table; but he sent five times as much to Ben-
jamin as to any of the others.

Were the brothers envious of Benjamin, because
92 JOSEPH, OR

Joseph sent him the most? No, they were not.
Once they had been envious of Joseobh—but now
they were not envious. ‘They ate and drank, and
they were merry.

Joseph could see them all—and it was a pleas-
ant sight to him. Once they had eaten their din-
ner, while he lay in the pit, and they had given
nim none. Yet he would not treat them so, but
would return good for evil.

You remember how kindly Jesus behaved te
people who were unkind to him. God is kind to
us though we do many things to offend him. If
a child is unkind to you, should you be unkind
too? If your brother has a cake, and will not
give you any—if you afterwards have a cake,
should you give him some, or should you not?
Oh! you should do as Joseph did, and be kind to
those who have been unkind to you.

Ah! what has caused this sudden change
In him, who lately seem’d so strange,
And on his brothers frown’d ?
And now their very beasts are fed,
For them a princely table’s spread,
‘With sumptuous dainties crown’d.

Young Benjamin is with them now,

And Joseph has unbent his brow,
And on his brothers smil’d :

For much he hopes that envious rage

No more those brother’s hearts engage
Against a favourite child,
What tenderness fills Joseph’s breast !

He sees the babe* whom he caress’d,
His own dear mother’s son :

His lips with blessings overflow,

And larger messes help to show
Which is the favour’d one.

But while he this distinction makes,
No hateful jealousy awakes,
But all the gladness share.
A little more will Joseph prove
The strength and fervour of his love,
And then his own declare.

CHILD.

Can I another bear to see
Preferr’d and honour’d above me,
And feel no inward pain ?
Then in my heart will Jesus dwell,
For these kind feelings please him well,
And shall his love obtain.t

But no such flowers by nature grow
Within the human heart below,
Since Adam’s shameful fall.t
Then, if I would my Saviour please,
I must, upon my bended knees,
For his sweet Spirit call.§

* When Joseph was sold into Egypt, it is supposed that Benjamm
was still an infant.

t Jesus answered and said unto him, “If any man love me he will
keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we wil. come unto
him, and make our abode with him.”—John xiv. 23.

Live in peace ; and'the God of love and peace shall be with you.”
—2 Cor. xiii. 11.

fn} aa dwelleth no good thing—Rom

16.
"§ The fruit of the Spirit is love.—Gal. v.
94 JOSEPH, OR

CHAPTER XVIII

JOSEPH, OR THE FORGIVING BROTHER.
Gen. xliv.; xlv. 1—16.

Tue biothers spent a happy day with Joseph.
They did not go home that day, but waited to set
out on the morrow.

You know that they had come to buy corn, and
they had brought empty sacks with them. Joseph
called his servant, and said to him secretly, “ Fill
the sacks of those eleven men with corn, and put
their money that they have given me for the corn
back into-their sacks. And put my silver cup into
the sack of the youngest.”

The servant filled the sacks with corn, and put
the money into them. And he put the silver cup
into Benjamin's sack: and then he gave the sacks
to the brothers. They did not know that the ser-
vant had put money or a cup into them.

The next morning, as soon as it was light, the
brothers rose up, took their asses and their sacks,
and set off, to return home to their father. How
glad they were to get away safely—not one left
behind !

What a pleasant history they thought they
should have to tell their father! How much sur-
prised he would be to hear of the great lord’s kind-
ness, and how glad he would be to see Benjamin

again !
‘THE FORGIVING BROTHER. 95

But soon was all their joy turned into grief.

‘They had gone but a little way, when some one
called them. It was Joseph’s servant; he came
running after them. :

«“ What has made you,” said he, “ behave so ill
to my lord, after all his kindness to you? Why
have you stolen his silver cup, out of which he
drinks ?”

The brothers were much surprised to hear that
the cup was stolen.

“Why should you think,’ said they, “ that we
have taken it? we would not do such a wicked
thing. Did we not bring back the money, when
we thought it had been put in our sacks by mis-
take? And now would we steal a silver cup out
of your lord’s house? None of us have taken it.
If one of us have taken it, let him die, and let all
the rest be slaves to your lord.”

They said this, because they were quite sure that
none of them had taken it.

“ No,” said the servant, “it shall not be so; the
one who has taken the cup shall not be killed ; he
shall only be a slave to my lord, and the others
shall not be slaves; they shall all go home.”

Then the servants told them to open their sacks ;
so the eldest brother took down his sack ; the ser-
vant looked in among the corn, but could find no
cup. Then the second opened his sack, but there
was no cup hid in it. The third showed his, and
each brother showed his in his turn. At last Ben-
96 JOSEPH, OR

jamin showed his. How much were they all sur
prised when they found the silver cup in it!

You know that Benjamin had not stolen it. You
know that the servant had put it in the sack when
he filled it with corn.

The servant said to Benjamin, “ You must come
back with me to my lord.” He was going to take
him for a slave, and never let him return home ;
but he said that his brothers might go home.

And would they go and leave Benjamin behind ?

“No,” said they, “ we will go back with Benja
min.”

' You see that they loved Benjamin, and they
would not leave him alone in his distress.

They put their sacks again on their asses, and
followed the servant to Joseph’s house. Their
hearts were bursting with grief, and they cried as
they went.

Joseph was in his house, waiting for them.

Joseph was very glad to see them all come back
with Benjamin, and to see them crying so much
lest Benjamin should be kept to be a slave. Now
Joseph saw that they loved Benjamin very much.

When they saw Joseph, they fell on their faces
on the ground.

Joseph spoke to them as if he was angry, and
said, “ What is this wicked thing that you have
done ?”

Do you remember that Judah had promised to
take care of Benjamin? So Judah began to beg
Joseph to forgive Benjamin.
THE FORGIVING BROTHER. 97

Judah knew that it would be of no use to say
that Benjamin had not taken the cup, so he only
begged Joseph to take pity on them.

“ God is punishing us for our sins,” said Judah,
* and we can say nothing: we must all be your
slaves.

“No,” said Joseph, “not all, only he who stole
the cup; he shall be my slave ; let the others go
back to their father.”

Joseph wanted to see whether the brothers
would go back, and leave poor Benjamin to be a
slave.

Judah then came nearer to Joseph, and began
to beg for Benjamin with all his heart.

“Let me speak a word to my lord,” said he,
’ ¢and do not be angry with me, for I am as afraid
of you as I am of the king. When we first came
to buy corn, you asked us if we had a father and
a brother, and we said, Yes; we had an old father,
and a little brother that he loved very much in-
deed; and then you said that we must bring our
brother to show you. Then we said we could not,
because our father could not part with him; but
you said we inust bring him. So when we went
back to our father, we told him what you had said,
. but he would not let Benjamin go. ‘No,’ said he,
‘I had a dear child that I think was eaten up by a
lion or a bear; if I let Benjamin go, perhaps some
harm will happen to him, and then I shall die of
grief, and these gray hairs will go down with sor-

row to the grave.’
Line upon Line. 7
98 JOSEPH, OR

Then 1 promised my father that I would take
care of Benjamin. I cannot go home without
him. It I were to go back without Benjamin, we
should see our father die. Let*me be your slave
instead of Benjamin, and let him go home to his
father: for I could not bear to see my father die
of grief.”

Was it not kind in Judah to say this ?

Now Joseph saw that Judah did indeed love
Benjamin and his old father.

Now Joseph would tell his brothers who he was,
and would tell them that he had forgiven them.

Joseph felt ready to burst into tears, yet he did
not go out of the room to weep as he had done be-
fore ; but he said to all his servants, “Go out of
the room,” and Joseph was left alone with his bro-
thers. He cried so loud, that all his servants heard
him though they were not in the room.

At last he said, “I am Joseph. Is my father
yet alive.”

Were his brothers pleased? No, they were
frightened ;—they could not speak, and they dared
not come near him.

Joseph did not wish to frighten them ; he longed
to put his arms round them and kiss them.

He saw that they were unhappy at the thoughts
of their wickedness in having sold him; so he tried
to comfort them.

“ Do not grieve because you sold me,” said Jo-
seph; “ God let you do it, that I might save corn
to feed your children. 1 wish you all to come and
THE FORGIVING BROTHER. ~ 99

live with me here. You must bring my old father
with you, and your children and I will feed you
all. Look at me and you will see that I am indeed
your own brother Joseph. It is my mouth that
speaks to you. Go and tell my father what fine
things I have in Egypt, and bring him here to live
with me.”

This was the loving way in which Joseph spoke.
Then he threw his arms around Benjamin’s neck,
and wept as he kissed him; and Benjamin wept
too upon Joseph’s neck. Afterwards Joseph kiss-
ed all his brothers, and wept as he kissed each;

and then his brothers no more felt afraid of him,
but began to talk tohim. They saw Joseph had
quite forgiven them, and that he loved them with
all his heart. They could not have expected such
kindness, and it made them the more sorry for their -
own wickedness.

You see that Joseph did not make his brothers
happy till he found that they were really sorry, and
had left off their wickedness.

How like is Joseph to Jesus Christ, who forgives
us all our sins when we are really sorry! You
remember how he forgave that poor woman, who
washed his feet with her tears, and wiped them
with the hairs of her head. She was sorry for all
her sins, and Christ forgave her. My dear child,
_ if you are sorry for your sins, Christ will forgive
you.*

an on and be converted, that your sins may be blotted
out.”—Acts iii.
100 JOSEPH, OR

“ Let him with whom the cup is found,
His blood to Joseph pay ;
And let the rest as slaves be bound,
And here for ever stay.”
These words the guiltless brethren said,
And on the ground each sack was spread.

* Not so,” the servant straight replied,
“ For this no blood shall flow !

But he who dar’d the cup to hide,
Shall into slavery go.”

They searched the sacks that lay around, -

In Benjamin’s the cup is found.

How bitterly the brothers grieve !
What anguish they express!
Dear Benjamin they will not leave
Alone in his distress, ,

But with him to the city go,
And there unfold their tale of wo.

Now for the youth hear Judah plead !
“ Long since, a favourite son
My father lost ; his heart would bleed
To lose this youngest one.
Such grief would bring him to the grave :
Let me instead become a slave.”

‘What generous love! Can this be he,
Whose heart was once like stone,

And Joseph’s pangs unmov'd could see
When in the pit cast down ?

‘What transport now sweet Joseph feels

His name no longer he conceals.

Strangers may not the scene behold
When Joseph says, with tears,
“T am the brother whom ye sold ;—

Yet calm your rising fears.”
THE LONG LOST SON. 101

And while each shares his fond embrace,
The voice of weeping fills the place.

With anguish sore their hearts must melt
Who Joseph’s kindness share,

To think they had so basely dealt
With such a brother rare :

‘While each forgiving word they hear

Must make their crimes more black appear,

CHILD.

Yet one there is more lovely far
Than aught on earth can be,

One brighter than the morning star,—
Yes ;—one who died for me ;

And oft have I his grace refus’d,
His name forgot, his love abus’d.

The more I of his goodness know,
The deeper is my shame,
That I so little love should show
To his most blessed name.
How great my wonder then will be,
When his bright face in heaven I see!

x

CHAPTER XIX.
JOSEPH, OR THE LONG LOST SON,
Gen. xlv. 16 to end; xlvi.; xlvii, 1—12; 1.

Brrore Joseph told his brothers who he was,
he had sent the servants out of the room; yet he
had sobbed so loud that the servants had heard,
102 JOSEPH, OR

and soon they knew the reason why Joseph had
sent them out. The servants were glad to hear
that Joseph had found his brothers. Joseph had
not told the people of Egypt of his brother's wick-
edness.

Pharaoh, the king, heard of the brothers being
found: and he too was glad, for he loved Joseph.

He called Joseph, and said to him, “ Your bro-
thers must come and live near you, and you must
send for your old father, and for all the little child-
ren; and they shall have the best food in all the
land to eat. We will give them houses, fields, and
gardens, and they shall live together. We must
send wagons to bring the little children, their mo-
thers, and your old father: but they need not
bring their things, for we will give them everything
they want.” :

You see how kind the king was.

Joseph got wagons with some beasts to draw
them, and he gave his brothers some food to eat
as they travelled home. He also made them some
handsome presents, for Joseph was very rich. He
gave them each two suits of clothes; but to Ben-
jamin he gave five suits of clothes, besides a great
deal of money. He sent a present to his father ;
ten asses that carried all kinds of govd things; and
ten asses more that carried a great deal of bread
and meat for his father to eat by the way.

When all the things were ready, Joseph told his
brothers to go to Canaan, and to come back quick-
ly. He gave them one piece of advice before they
THE LONG LOST SON. 108

went. “Take care,” he said, “that you do not
quarrel by the way.”

They must have had a pleasant journey.

Old Jacob had been longing to see them, much
fearing lest Benjamin should not come back safely.
At last they came, and he saw that not one was
missing.

They told him quickly the joyful news. “Jo-
seph is alive: and he is the great lord that sells
corn in the land of Egypt.”

Perhaps you think Jacob was delighted; but
no, he would not believe them.

“No,” said he, “my son has long been dead.”

« But we have seen him,” said they.

“ It cannot be true,” said Jacob.

Then the brothers told him what Joseph had
said, “ He desires us all to come and live with him,
and he sends for you.”

Still Jacob could not believe them.

“ Only come and see the wagons he has sent,
and then you will believe us,” said they.

So they took old Jacob to see the wagons, and ,
when he saw them he did believe; and then he was
glad.

“Tt is enough,” said old Jacob. “Joseph, my
nv yet alive; I will go and see him before [

ie. :

The brothers told their wives and their children
that they must leave Canaan, and take a long jour-
ney. They got into their wagons, and set out.
104 JOSEPH, OR

Jacob was lame* and old, and he rode in a wag
on, but the brothers were stréng enough to walk.
And they took their sheep and cows, and goats, and
camels, and asses with them, and all their things.
They had to travel a very long way. .No doubt
the little children were much pleased, for children
are fond of making journeys.

At last they all came into the land of Egypt.

Long before they came to Joseph’s house, they
saw a fine chariot coming towards them. It was
Joseph’s. It stopped, and Joseph got out of it.

Old Jacob stepped out of his wagon. His hair
was gray, his legs were weak, and he could hardly
walk. Joseph was a fine and glorious lord. He
ran to meet his father, and threw his arms around
his neck ; and then he wept for a long while.

The last time Joseph had kissed his father was,
when he was a boy dressed in his pretty coat, and
was going to look for his brothers to see how they
did. How many sad days had Jacob spent since
that time, in thinking of him! And now at last
had found him again.

The brothers did not feel envious now, when
they saw Jacob and Joseph folded in each other's
arms.

“ Now,” said old Jacob, “let me die since I have
seen your face, Joseph, once more.”

Then Joseph said to his father and brothers,
“T will go and tell Pharaoh that you are come.”

So Joseph went to Pharaoh the king, and said,

* (Jacob) halted upon his thigh.—Gen. xxii. 31.
THE LONG LOST SON. 105

“ My father, and brothers, and their flocks, and all
that they have, are come.”

And then he brought five of his brothers, and
showed them to Pharaoh. And Pharach said to
them, “ What is your employment ?”

“We are shepherds; but there is no grass in
Canaan for our sheep. Will you give us some
fields where we can feed them?”

Pharaoh said that he would give them a great
many fields, and that they might live there al-
together, with their children and their flocks.

Joseph wished them to live all together, because
the people in Egypt worshipped idols.

Joseph wished the king to see his dear old father:
so he brought him in to the king. The king treat-
ed him with great respect, because Jacob was a
very old man. Even kings should pay respect to
old men.

Should not children pay great respect to an old
man? When they see a grey-headed old man, they
should be ready to wait upon him, and to do what
he bids them.

Old Jacob lifted up his hands over Pharaoh's
head, and prayed God to show himkindness. This
was called blessing him. Jacob blessed Pharaoh,
because he had been very good to his dear Joseph.
Jacob must have loved Pharaoh very much.

Pharaoh said to Jacob, “ How old are you?”

Jacob said, “I am one hundred and thirty years
old, but I am not as old as my fathers were; and
my life has been full of troubles.”
106 JOSEPH, OR

Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh again, and went
away to the place Pharaoh had given him to live
in. There he lived, with all his children round
him. Joseph did not live with him, but he often
came to see him.

Jacob ‘at last fell sick, and knew that he soon
should die, He sent for all his sons, that he might
bless them before he died. Jacob had been lame
a long while, and now he was almost blind, and
very weak, and sick.

When his sons came, he sat upon the bed, and
called them one by one, that he might give a bles-
sing to each. After he had blessed them, he said,
“JT am soon going to die; bury me in the cave in
Canaan where Abraham my grandfather is buried,
and Isaac my father.” He said a great deal more,
and at last he gathered up his feet into the bed, and
died.

His spirit went to God, and he.is still with him
in heaven. His body will rise from the cave at the
last day. #4

Joseph fell upon his father’s face when hé.was
dead, and wept upon him, and kissed\him. Those
gray hairs had not gone down in sorrow to the
grave, for God had comforted Jacob\ before he\
died. \

Joseph took his father’s body to Cana
it in the cave were Abraham and Isaac were.
the brothers went with Joseph, and a great
servants, and chariots, and horses. Afterw

they came back to Egypt.




THE LONG LOST SON. 107

A very sad thought came into the minds of the
brothers. They said to each other, “ Perhaps Jo-
seph has only been so kind to us to please his
father; perhaps he has not really forgiven us ;
and now perhaps he will punish us.” So they
sent a servant to Joseph, and told the servant to
say to Joseph, “ Your father, before he died, told
us to beg you to forgive us our great wickedness.
So pray forgive us.”

When Joseph heard this message, he began to
weep. Why did he weep? Because he was sor-
ry that his brothers should think he could be so
unkind to them. Soon the brothers came and fell
down before him and seemed much afraid: Joseph
said, “Fear not: it was wrong in you to sell me,
yep God made it turn out for good ; because when
I was in Egypt I saved the corn, and so you were
kept from dying of hunger. I will still feed you
and your little children.” He spoke very kindly
to them, and comforted them.

Joseph lived to be a very old man, and at last
he died.

This is the history of Joseph. He is now in
heaven with.his dear Lord Jesus Christ. Joseph
forgave his brothers, and Christ has forgiven him;
for Joseph committed sins, though they are not
written down in the Bible.

You have heard the history of Abraham, Isaac,
and Jacob. God loved them all three. Abraham

was the grandfather, Isaac the father, and Jacob
the son.
108 JOSEPH, UR

God had promised the land of Canaan to the
children of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob: that is,
to their great-great-grandchildren. God would
not forget that promise. But he had made them
a better promise than that: he had promised them
that Jesus Christ should one day be born into the
world, and should save them from their sins,*
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacobt often thought of that
promise.

At last Christ did come, and now Christ is in
heaven with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as well
as Abel, Noah, and Joseph, and all good men,
whose sins Christ has forgiven.§

Oh, my dear children, may you be with them
one day !

Full twenty years are pass’d away,

Yet Jacob still laments the day
He lost his dearest one.

Nor evermore can hope to see

That face of innocence and glee
Until this life is done.

* The Scripture preached before the gospel unto Abraham.—Gal.
hi. 8.

t Jacob’s dying ejaculation was, “I have waited for thy salvation,
O Lord.” —Gen. xlix. 18.

t These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but
having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and embraced
them.—Heb. xi. 13

Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision for the truth of God
to confirm the promises made unto the fathers.—Rom. xv. 8.

§ Ye are come unto mount Sion . . . to the general assembly and
church of the first-born, whose names are written in heaven .. . to
the spirits of just men made perfect.—Heb. xii. 22, 23.
THE LONG LOST SON. 109

Though nought can give his spirit ease,
One infant, cherish’d on his knees,
Has sooth’d his bitter wo.
To part with him he gave consent —
Now trembles lest some accident
Has laid his darling low.

How vain are all his fond alarms

Again he clasps him in his arms,
And gazes on his face.

And hark! he hears a strange report

That Joseph lives, and in a court
Maintains the highest place.

Yet can he not the news believe
Until his aged eyes perceive
The things that Joseph sent.
Then Joseph’s words to him are told :
He cries “I shall his face behold,
And I shall die content.”

Mothers, and babes, and maidens fair,

A joyful, numerous train, prepare
With Jacob to proceed.

These in the wagons safely ride,

‘While men and striplings, by their side
The flocks and cattle lead.

Now Canaan’s mountains disappear,—
Lo! Joseph’s chariot’s drawing near,
Which princely honours deck :
Before his father, Joseph bows,
His arms around him fondly throws
And weeps upon his neck.

Another name sweet Joseph bears,
Another garb indeed he wears,
His eart no change has known ;
Ilo MOSES, OR

T'rue piety his youth adorn’d
When by his cruel brothers scorn’d,
And in the pit cast down :

And still his father’s God he fears,
His aged father still reveres
And sinful ways abhors :
And by his words and actions shows,
With love his heart still overflows
For God’s most holy laws,

CHILD.

In early youth I would begin,
As Joseph did, to flee from sin,
And God’s commands obey :
And though, awhile, I may be sad,
My God at length will make me glad
In heaven’s eternal day.

—

CHAPTER XX.

MOSES, OR THE BASKET OF BULRUSIES.
Exod. iii: 11—10.

You have heard how Joseph and his brothers
tived happily in Egypt for a long while. At last
they grew old and died, but they left a great many
children; and their children had a great many chil-
dren ; till at last there were hundreds and thou-
sands of people. These people were the grand-
children of Jacob, and his great-grandchildren and
their children.
THE BASKET OF 3ULRUSHES. 1ll

Did you know that Jacob had two names?

His other name was Israel. It was a name that
God had given him.

All the sons of Jacob were called the children
of Israel, or the children of Jacob, and the grand-
children of Jacob were called by this same name,
“children of Israel.” ‘There were some men, and
some women, and some children, and all of them
together were called “ children of Israel.”.

The grown-up people were called “children of
Israel.”

They did not live in Canaan, you remember;
they had left Canaan, because no corn grew there
for a long while ; they lived in Egypt, and took
care of theirsheep. While the good king Pharaoh
lived, they were very happy. At last he died, and
there was another king of Egypt: he was called
Pharaoh. You shall hear what he did, and then
you shall tell me whether you think he was good.

He knew that the children of Israel had come
from a great way off, and he said, “there are so
many of them, perhaps they may some day fight
against me with swords, and kill me and my ser.
vants. I will make them work hard, and I will try
to kill them with hard work.”

So he desired that they should make a great
many bricks, and build very high walls. He sent
some of his men to make them work hard.

The children of Israel were used to taking care
of sheep, and that isa pleasant employment. Shep.
herds lead their flocks to the green fields, and by

“7
112 MOSES, OR

the side of the quiet waters, and they sit under the
shade of a tree when the sun is hot. Is not this
pleasant? But now the children of Israel were
obliged to dig up the clay, and tomake bricks, and
to dry them in the sun; and if they did not make
a great number of bricks, the men whom Pharaoh
had sent, beat them. So now they were very un-
happy: they often sighed, and groaned, and shed
tears.

Yet all this hard work did not kill them; so the
king thought of another plan. “ He said Let every
boy-baby be thrown into the river.” He did not
order the girl-babies to be drowned, because they
would not be able to fight with swords when they
nr @

Whenever the king heard that one of the child-
ren of Israel had a little boy-baby, he sent his men
to throw it into the river.

There was a very good woman, who had a little
boy-baby ; she was one of the children of Israel.
This woman knew that God would take care of
her child, and she prayed to God to take care of
it. She hid her baby, so that Pharaoh’s men
could not find it. I do not know where she put it,
but God taught her to hide it ina very safe place.

When the baby was three months old, she found
that she could not hide him any more. What
should she do with her baby ?

You have heard of the great river of Egypt.
Close by the river there grew a great many reeds
and bulrushes, whch are like very high thick grass.
THE BASKET OF BULRUSHES. 113

She took some bulrushes, and made them into a
large basket. She wished to make a basket into
which the water could not come; so she got some
pitch, and covered the basket with pitch. ‘I'hen she
put her little baby inside, and took the basket in her
arms, No one could tell what was in the basket.

She went to the river side, and laid the basket
among the great rushes, close by the water. She
knew that God would not let the child be killed,
and so she left it, trusting in Him.

She had alittle girl much older than the baby.
This little girl was the baby’s sister. She stood
a great way off, to see what would become of her
baby-brother. Soon she saw some ladies walking
by the river-side. One of these ladies was king
Pharaoh’s daughter. She was a princess. The
other ladies were her maids, and they were going
with the princess to some place where she could
bathe; (for Egypt is a very hot country, and peo-
ple bathe in hot countries.)

The princess was looking at the rushes, when
she saw something very strange peeping out
amongst them. When she saw it, she said to one
of her maids, “ Go and see what that is.” So the
maid went, and found the basket. She took it up
and brought it to the princess. The princess
opened the basket, and saw a sweet babe. It was
fair and lovely.*

It began to weep. Poor infant! it was used to
lie in its mother’s arms, but now there was no one

* (Moses) was exceeding fair.—Acts vii. 20. *
Line upon Line, 8
to feed it or to comfort it. The princess pitied the
child. She had heard of how her father had de-
sired that every baby should be thrown into the
river, and she said, “I suppose this’ is the baby
of one of the children of Israel.” She did not wish
it to be thrown into the river.

The baby’s sister had come nearer, and had seen
what the princess had done. She saw that the
princess pitied it; so she said, “If you want a nurse,
I could find you one who would nurse the child for
you.” The princess said, “Go,”

Whom did she call? The baby’s mother. When
she was come, the princess said to her, “Take
this child, and nurse it for me, and I will give you
wages,”

How glad the mother was to take care of it!
She saw that God had heard her prayers, and
saved her child from being drowned.

The mother could teach it about God as soon as
he could understand. But she was not allowed to
keep it always. When it was a big child, the prin.
cess sent for it to come and live with her, and she
ealled it her son. She gave ita name. “I shall
call it ‘ Moses,” she said; which means, “drawn
out,” for he was drawn out of the water.

The princess lived in a fine house, and had a
great many servants. Moses had beautiful clothes,
nice things to eat, and servants to wait upon him.
He had no hard work to do: yet he was not idle,
but learned a great many things. The princess
told wise men to teach him,

114 MOSES, OR
THE BASKET OF BULRUSHES. 115

He knew the names of the stars; the names of
the beasts, birds, and plants. He learned about
all these things, and grew very wise. One thing
these wise men could not teach him—even about
God, for they worshipped idols. Yet Moses did
know about God, for his father and mother knew
the true God, and, when he was little, Moses lived
with them. Of all the things Moses knew this was
the best. He was wiser than all the men in Egypt,
for he knew the true God.

He was brave as well as wise, and the people in
Egypt praised him, and paid him respect. Was
Moses happy? No; and I will tell you why in
the next lesson.

“My child 1 can no longer hide thee :
So to my God alone confide thee.”

Thus spake a mother, broken-hearted
As from her darling child she parted.

Once more with tenderness embracing
And in an ark the infant placing,

She to the river’s side conveyed it,
And ‘mong the flags in secret laid it.

The princess near her course is bending,
A train of maids her steps attending.
She cries, ‘ What is it lying yonder ?”
Then views the curious ark with wonder.

Within it lies a little creature,

Of fairest form and lovely feature ;—
Behold, the Hebrew babe is weeping,
It needs a mother’s tender keeping.

With pity mov’d, great Pharaoh’s daughter
Resolves to save the child from slaughter ;
116 MOSES, OR

To her kind heart its tears endear it,
And now she seeks a nurse to rear it.

A little maid has watched her brother ;
She runs and tells the baby’s mother,
Whom for its nurse the princess chooses,
Nor she the office sweet refuses,

Oh! who can tell the mother’s pleasure,
Again to find her infant treasure !
Again beneath her roof behold it,
Again within her arms enfold it

Nor will she lose this precious season
To teach him many a holy lesson ;
But use her every fond endeavour
To make him serve the Lord for ever.

Soon in a palace gay residing,

And in a heathen court abiding,

And every earthiy good possessing,
He chiefly craves a heavenly blessing.

CHAPTER XXI.

MOSES, OR THE PIOUS CHOICE.

Exod. ii, 11-15,

I nave told you how very hard the poor chil-
dren of Israel worked, in making bricks. When
Moses was grown to be a man, this thought came
into his mind ;—“] live in a fine house, and am as
great asa prince. 1 have no work to do; but my
THE PIOUS CHOICE. 117

poor cousins, the children of Israel, they are work-
ing like slaves. Cruel men are beating them.
Cannot I help them?” This thought made him
sad.

Do you remember the promise God made to
Abraham about his great-great-grandchildren ?
These children of Israel were the great-great-
grandchildren of Abraham.

Abraham’s child was called Isaac: Abraham's
grandchild was Jacob; and Abraham’s great-
grandchildren, were Joseph and his brothers.
Now Joseph’s children were Abraham’s great-great-
grandchildren. and their children were his great-
gteat-great-grandchildren. The children of Israel
called Abraham their great-great-great-grandfa-
ther; only they had never seen him; he died
before they were born. :

You, my little child, have a great-great-grand-
father. I do not know what his name was, but I
know he has been dead a long while. If he were
alive he would call you his great-great-grandchild,

I am now going to tell you about these great-
great-grandchildren of Abraham, and Isaac, and
Jacob, and about their children, and their chil-
dren ; and I shall always call them the children
of Israel.”

What promise had God made to Abraham about
them? He had said that they should live in the
land of Canaan—that sweet land, full of hills and
rivers, grass and flowers, sheep and cows, milk

and honey. God had said to Abraham, “I will
118 MOSES, OR

give this land to your children.” Not to Isaac,
but to his great-great-great-great-grandchildren
and to their children, and to their children.

Moses had heard of this promise; perhaps his
mother told him of it. He had heard how he had
been saved from being drowned when he was a
little baby, and he believed that God would let
him bring the children of Israel into Canaan. He
wished to save them from being slaves among the
wicked people of Egypt, and to make them happy
in that pleasant land of Canaan. It was kind in
Moses to wish to help the poor children of Israel.

Moses left the king’s fine house and all-his fine
things, and he went to the place where the poor
Israelites were working hard. (The children of
Israel were sometimes called Israelites.)

He wished to see whether they remembered
God’s promise to Abraham, and whether they
wished to go to Canaan.

When Moses came to the place in Egypt where
the children of Israel were working, how sad was

.the sight he saw! They were labouring in the
heat of the sun. They worked from morning to
night. They dug up the clay to make bricks :—
that was hard work. When they made the bricks,
they put them in heaps to dry in the sun. Then
they carried them to build the great walls for
Pharaoh.

They were forced to make a great many bricks,
and the cruel men that Pharaoh had sent, beat’
THE PIOUS CHOICE. 119

them when they were tired. ‘They groaned and
cried, but still they were made to do their tasks.

For the men set them a task ; not such a little
task as you have to do, but a great task. The
men said, “ You must make so many bricks.” 1
do not know how many they told them to make,
but a great many. If they did not do their task,
the men would beat them.

It is a sad thing to be aslave. Did you ever
hear this hymn ?—

“T was not born a little slave
Tolabourinthe sun,
~ And wish I were but in my grave,
And all my labour done.”

Moses was very sorry to see how the poor chil-
dren of Israel were treated.

One day he saw one of the task-masters (the
cruel men were called task-masters) beating one of
the children of Israel. Moses could not bear to
see the poor slaves treated so cruelly. Moses
looked to see whether there were any more task-
masters near ;—he saw no one. So he killed tho
task-master, and then duga hole in the ground,
and covered it over with the earth.

Do you think it was wrong in Moses to kill the
task-master? It is very wicked to kill people, for
God has commanded people not to kill each other.
But God may have people killed if he chooses.

Moses had been sent by God to kill this wicked
man, that he might show the poor Israelites that
120 MOSES, OR

he was come from God to make them happy. So:
it was not wrong in Moses to kill the man, because
God had sent him to do it.*

One of the Israelites saw him, and soon king
Pharaoh heard of it, and Pharaoh was very angry
and tried to find Moses, that he might have him
killed. So Moses was obliged to go into a country
a great way off, where the king could not find him.
I will tell you another time what happened to
Moses in that country. God loved Moses and
took care of him wherever he went.

Moses might have lived always in a fine house,
and ridden in a chariot, and had many servants ;
but you see how much he loved the poor children
of Israel. Do you not think that he was like the
Lord Jesus, who left his throne in heaven to save
us from going to hell ?

Moses wished to please God more than te be
called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter.t He knew
that God loved the children of Israel, and he knew
that God would one day help him to take them

into Canaan.

‘In vain for me are tables spread
With costly meats and wine ,
In vain upon a silken bed
At noon-day I recline ;—

* For he supposed his brethren would have understood how that
God by his hand would deliver them.—Acts vii. 25.

t By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called
the son of Pharaoh’s daughter; choosjng rather to suffer affliction
with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season ;
esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures of
Egypt.—Heb. xi. 4—26.
‘THE PIOUS CHOICE. 72]

‘In vain on prancing coursers mount,
In warlike chariots ride ;
Treasures of gold and silver count,

In palaces abide;—

“Tn vain am I for learning famed,
For courage and for strength ;

And, son of Pharaoh’s daughter named
May wear a crown at length ;

‘In slavery my brethren groan,
And eat their bread with tears ;

Beneath a cruel master’s frown
They spend their bitter years.

“Yet God our father Abraham bless’d,
And promis’d to bestow

Upon his seed a land of rest,
Where milk and honey flow.

“O1 willingly would I forsake
This court and palace fair,
The glorious work to undertake

Of leading Israel there.

*O1 happy day when we should see
The hills our fathers trod,

And, as our numerous family,
Worship our fathers’ God.”
122 ; MOSES, OR

CHAPTER XXII.

MOSES, OR THE BURNING BUSH.
Exod, ii. 16, to end; iii. ; iv.

Moses was grieved to leave the poor children
of Israel groaning in Egypt; but he was forced to
hide himself from Pharaoh.

He took nothing with him on his journey ;—no
servant, no ass! But God was with him. Though
he could not see him, Moses knew he was near
him, and this was his comfort.

At last Moses came to a place where there was
much grass, and a great many sheep. Here, also,
there was a well, and Moses sat down by the side
of it; for he had taken a long journey.

He had no house, no bed, and no friend. He
was like Jesus, who had nowhere to lay his head.
But you will see that God will take care of him.

Soon there came seven girls to the well. They
were sisters, and they took care of their father’s
sheep. They brought their sheep with them to
give them water. First they let down some pails,
or buckets, into the well, and then poured the water
into some great troughs that stood near. And the
sheep drank out of the troughs. While they were
doing this, some shepherds came to the well, and
tried to drive them away, that their own sheep
might drink water out of the troughs; but the poor
girls had filled the troughs with water, and it would
‘THE BURNING BUSH. 123

have been very unfair to have taken the water from
their sheep. But the men were stronger than they
were, and often behaved in this way to them.

Moses did not like to see weak people ill treated ;
and he was very strong; so he stood up, and would
not let the shepherds send the girls away, but helped
them to draw water for their sheep.

The poor girls thought that Moses was very
kind, because he was only a stranger, and yet he
had helped them.

When they came home to their father, he said,
“ How is it that you are come home so soon to-
day?” And they said, “A stranger was by the
well, and he would not let the shepherds drive us
away, and he drew water for our sheep.”

Then the father answered, “ Where is the man?
Call him, and ask him to come and eat bread with
us.” So the girls called Moses, and asked him to
come to their house.

It was God who putit into the man’s heart to be
kind to Moses.

The old father asked Moses to live with him and
his daughters ; and Moses said he would. Moses
took care of the old father’s sheep, and he married
one of the seven girls. Then the old father was
called Moses’ father-in-law; because he was the
father of his wife.

Moses had once been a fine prince, and had
ridden in a chariot ; but now he led his sheep to
eat grass among the green hills.

There was one thing that must have made Moses
124 MOSES, OR

/

sad. What was that? He knew that the children
of Israel were still groaning at their hard work.
Could he be happy while they were so miserable?
You know that he could not, because Moses loved
those poor people.

The children of Israel were indeed working hard.
King Pharaoh had died; but there was another
king Pharaoh as wicked as he had been.

At last the children of Israel cried to God to help
them, and God heard their prayers; and he remem-
bered the promise made to Abraham, and he de-
termined to save them. Now you shall hear what
God did to help them.

One day Moses was with the old father’s sheep,
among the high hills. He was quite alone. He
looked up, and saw a bush on fire. He went on
looking, and the bush was still burning, but was
not more burnt away than at first. This surprised
him very much, and he said, “I will go and look
at the bush, and see why it is not burnt up.”

He was just going up to it, when he heard some
one speaking to him. The voice came out of the
bush. Whose voice could it be? it was the voice
of God, who said to him, “ Moses, Moses!”

He answered, “ Here am I.”

Then God said, “ Come not near this place, for I
am here. I have heard the children of Israel ery-
ing to me in their trouble, and I remember that 1
promised Abraham that his children should live in
Canaan, and I am going to send them to Canaan.
“THE BURNING BUSH. 125

Moses, you must go to Pharaoh, and tell him to
let them go.”

Was not this a hard thing for Moses todo? But
Good said, “I will be with you and help you.”

Then Moses said, “ But perhaps the children of
Israel will not choose to come out of Egypt. They
will say, ‘We will not go with you, Moses; you
are not speaking the truth; God has not really
spoken to you.’ What shall I do then?” said
Moses,

Then God said that he would teach him to do
wonderful things. God said, “ What do you hold
in your hand ?”

Now Moses had a long stick in his hand, called
arod. He used to help his sheep to get out of
holes with his rod, and when he climbed high hills,
he leaned upon his rod. So when God said,
“ What do you hold in your hand?” Moses an-
swered, “ A rod,”

“Throw it upon the ground,” said the Lord.
And Moses did so, and it was turned into a ser-
pent. Moses was afraid of the serpent, and be-
gan to run away from it.

Then God said, “ Take hold of it by the tail.”
So Moses took hold of it, and it was turned again
into a rod.

God said to Moses, “ When you go to Egypt,
do this wonderful thing before the children of
Israel, to show them that I have sent you; butif
they will not believe you, do this thing, too, that I
126 MOSES OR

will show you. Put your hand into your bo-
som.”

So Moses put in his hand, and then he drew it
out, and it was leprous, that is, it was all covered
over with white spots. What a frightful sight
this was!

Then God said, “ Put your hand in again ;” and
he put it in, and pulled it out again, and then it
was as well as it was before. it

Then God said to Moses, “If the children of
Israel will not believe that I have really spoken
to you, let them see you do this wonder.”

“But,” said Moses, “I cannot speals well ; I do
not know what words to say.”

Then God told Moses that Aaron, his brother,
should go with him, and speak for him. You
have not heard of Aaron before. He could
speak well, and he was a good man, and loved
God.*

Moses went back to his father-in-law, and told
him that he must go back to Egypt, and he took
his wife, and his two little sons with him upon an
ass.
As Moses was going to Egypt he met his bro-
ther Aaron, and Aaron was glad to see him and
kissed him. Then Moses and Aaron went together
to the land of Egypt.

They found the poor Israelites at their hard
‘work, crying and groaning, Aaron said to them,
“God has sent us to tell Pharaoh to let you go to

* Aaron, the saint of the Lord.—Ps, evi. 16.
THE BURNING BUSH 127

the land of Canaan.” Then Aaron did the won-
ders that God had shown Moses when he spoke to
him from the bush. You know what wonders I
mean.

Did the people of Israel believe what Aaron
said? Did they wish to go to the land of Ca-
naan? Yes, they did; and they thanked God for
having heard their prayers.

I have often told you my dear child, that God
hears people’s prayers. I hope that you, my dear
child, will always pray to him when you are un-
happy.

The children of Israel did believe, and they said,
“ We will go;” and they bowed their heads, and
thanked the Lord for his goodness.

But Moses could not take them out of Egypt
till Pharaoh had given him leave.

'

Moses no more in courts abides,
*Midst noisy mirth and strife ;
Within a stranger’s tent he hides
From those that seek his life ;

The stranger’s daughter for a wife obtains.
And in that distant land he long remains,

Unable Israel to redeem,
Now patiently he waits ;
Watching his flock beside the stream,
On God he meditates ;
On His great love to Abraham of old,
And on the glorious things to him foretold

Lo!. In the desert God appears,
Cloth’d in a rube of flame—
128 MOSES, OR

Bids Moses dr; his brethren’s tears,
And liberty proclaim.
A court he once forsook to serve his God,
Soon Egypt’s king shall tremble at his rod.

CHAPTER XXIIL

MOSES, OR THE FIRST PLAGUES.
Ex. v.; vi. ; vii. ; viii. ; ix. 1—12.

Tue next day Moses and Aaron, and some of
the children of Israel with them, went in to speak
to king Pharaoh. He was a proud and wicked
man, and he worshipped idols.

It was Aaron who spoke to Pharaoh. He said
“The Lord God desires you to let the children of
Israel go.” ‘

Do you think Pharaoh did let them go? No;
he spoke proudly, and said, “ Who is the Lord,
that I should obey his voice? I know not the
Lord, neither will I let Israel go.” This was his
proud answer.

He was now more unkind than before to the
children of Israel, and ordered the task-masters to
make them work harder; so that the children of
Israel cried still more bitterly.

As Moses and Aaron came out from king
Pharaoh they saw some of the children of Israel
waiting for them. These men said to Moses and
Aaron, “ You have only done us harm by asking
THE FIRST PLAGUES. 129

Pharaoh to let us go. He makes us work harder
than ever.”

It was ungrateful in the children of Israel to
speak in this manner to Moses, who had tried to
help them. Moses was very meek and gentle, and
he did not answer angrily but he went and prayed
to God, and asked God what he must do now.

God told him to go in to king Pharaoh, and to
show him the wonder of the serpent. So Moses and
‘Aaron went in. Moses said to Aaron, “ Take
this rod and throw it on the ground ;” and Aaron
threw it down, and it became a live serpent; then
afterwards it was turned into a rod again.

Would Pharach now say he would let Israel
go? No, he would not; his heart was very hard,
and he cared for nothing.

So God told Moses to do another wonderful
thing, and I will tell you what it was.

Moses and Aaron went early in the morning
down to the side of the river, and waited there till
Pharaoh came: for he came there very often to
bathe. Then they said to him, “Because you
would not do as God desired, and let Israel go, now
you shall see what God can do.”

Then Aaron took the rod, and lifted it up over
the waters: and, in a moment the water was turned
into blood.

When Pharaoh saw this wonder, did he say that
he would let the people go? No, his heart was
very hard, and he would not obey God. Pharaoh

Live upon Line. 9
130 MOSES, OR

turned back, and went into his house, and would
not obey God.

The people of Egypt had nothing to drink, for
all the water in the ponds was turned into blood,
and all the water in jugs, and basins, and cups, was
turned into blood. The fish in the river died, and
a very bad smell came from the river. The people
dug holes in the ground to get water. The water
was blood for a whole week.

As Pharaoh would not mind, God sent him an-
other plague.

Aaron stretched out the rod, and frogs came run-
ning out of the river, and out of the ponds, hun-
dreds and hundreds of frogs. They ran into the
streets, and into the houses, and into the bed-rooms,
and into the beds ; they went into kitchens, and got
among the food ;—they went even into Pharaoh's
house and into his bed.

Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron, and
said to them, “Pray to God to take away the
frogs. I will tell the children of Israel to go.”

Moses went and prayed to God, and God made
all the frogs die, so that the people swept the dead
frogs into heaps, and these heaps had a very bad
smell,

But still Pharaoh said, “I will not let the peo-

”

So God sent another plague.
Aaron stretched out the rod, and turned all the
dust into nasty little insects, that crawled over men
THE FIRST PLAGUES. 131

and over the beasts; but Pharaoh would not mind
this plague.

Then God sent swarms of flies, that came in at
the windows, and spoiled everything, in doors and
out of doors. But no fliés came near the children
of Israel.

Then Pharaoh said, “I will let the children of
Israel go, if God will take away the flies.” Then
Moses prayed to God, and God took all the flies
away, and did not even leave one. Then Pharaoh
said, “ I will not let the people go.”

So another plague was sent.

Bhe beasts fell very sick—the horses, and asses,
the camels, the cows, and the sheep—and a great
many of them died. Yet Pharaoh would not let
the people go.

Afterwards God made a great many boils come
upon all the men, and women, and children, but not
upon the children of Israel, only upon Pharaoh’s
people. They were so sick that they could not
stand: yet Pharaoh would not mind, for his heart
grew harder and harder.

I have now told you of six plagues. Try and
remember what they were.

1. -Water turned into blood.

2. Frogs.

3. Small insects.

4. Flies.

5. Death ot the beasts.

6. Boils., ’
132 MOSES, OR

1 shall soon tell you of some more plagues that
God sent to Pharaoh.

God was much stronger than Pharaoh, and was
able to make him do what he commanded him to do.
Was it not very wicked in Pharaoh not to mind
God? and was it not very foolish in Pharaoh not
to mind so great a God ? ‘

God will punish everybody - who does not obey
his commands.

My dear children, God has given you many com-
mands. He has told you not to tell lies, not to fall
into passions, not to be unkind. I hope you will
try to obey God’s commands. For if you thirtk in
your heart as Pharaoh did, “ Who is the Lord that
I should obey his voice ?’—will not God be very
angry with you ?

CHAPTER XXIV.

MOSES, OR THE LAST PLAGUES,
Ex. ix. 13.; x.; xi.; xii

Owe morning, Moses and Aaron rose up very
early and came to Pharaoh and said to him, “ To-
morrow God is going to rain great hailstones from
the sky,—such hailstones as were never seen in
Egypt before, They will kill all men and beasts
that are out of doors. Therefore you must keep
your cows, and horses, and asses, in the stables, or
they will be killed.”
THE LAST PLAGUES. 133

A great many of the men of Egypt heard Mo-
ses and Aaron say this. Some of them believed
their words. They kept their beasts in their sta-
bles, and told their servants to keep indoors. But
some of the men who heard did not believe, and
let their beasts remain in the fields, and their ser-
vants with them.

The next day Moses stretched out his rod to-
wards the sky, and God sent thunder and hail, and
fire which ran along the ground. It was a most
dreadful storm. Such a storm was never seen be-
fore. The noise of the hailstones and of the
thunder must have made every one tremble who
heard it. But how glad those must have been
who were in their houses! Many beasts and
men were killed, the grass and corn were burned
up by the fire, and the trees were broken. Yet
there was no hail where the children of Israel
were.

This storm frightened Pharaoh, and he sent for
Moses and Aaron, and said, “I have sinned; only
pray the Lord to send no more thunder and hail,
and I will let the children of Israel go.”

Moses said, “I will go out of the city, and I
will stretch out my hands to God, and he will not
send any more thunder and hail: but still I know
you will not obey God yet.”

So Moses went out of the city, for he did not
fear the storm. Then he stretched out his hands,
and God made the hail and thunder stop, and he
made the rain leave off.
184 MOSES, OR

Did Pharaoh let Israel go? No; when he saw
that the storm was over, he would not. All Pha-
raoh’s servants were wicked too; for they did not
wish him to let the Israelites go.

Then Moses and Aaron went to king Pharaoh
again, and said, “ God will now send locusts into
your country.”

What are locusts? . They are insects about the
size of a child’s thumb. Thousands of them fly
close together in the air, and they perch upon the
trees, and eat up all the leaves and fruit.

Pharaoh and his servants were very angry when
they heard that the locusts were coming, and they
spoke roughly to Moses and Aaron, and drove
them out of the house.

Moses stretched out the rod, and God made the
wind blow very hard, and next day the wind blew
a great number of locusts into Egypt. The lo-
custs made the sky look black as the wind blew
them along; but they did not stay in the air:
they perched on the trees, and ate up the fruit that
the hail had left—they covered the grass and ate
it up, and they even came into the houses.

Pharaoh and his servants thought that they
should soon have nothing to eat. Pharaoh sent
quickly for Moses and Aaron, “TI have sinned,”
he said, “ against the Lord, and against you. Only
forgive me this once, and pray to God to take
away the locusts, and I will let Israel go.”

Sa Moses prayed to the Lord. God sent ano-
ther wind, and it blew the locusts away, and they ©
THE LAST PLAGUES. 135

fell into the sea, and there was not one locust left
in Egypt.

But Pharaoh still said, “ 1 will not let Israel go.”

How sad it must have been to have walked in
the fields after the locusts had been there! It was
the pleasant spring, but it looked like winter.
There were no leaves on the trees, there was no
tender grass, all was bare as in winter. What
misery had Pharaoh's wickedness brought upon
the land !

The next time Moses did not tell Pharaoh what
God was going to do. Moses stretched out his
rod towards heaven, and in one moment God made
it dark. It was darker than ever it is at night.
There was not the least light, except where the
children of Israel lived ;—there it was quite light.

The people of Egypt were very much frightened.
They were doing their work, or eating, or walking,
when all at once this darkness came on. They
stopped, and sat down in the place where they
were, and never moved, night nor day. Now they
had time to think of all their wickedness.

It was dark for three days and three nights, and
then it grew light.

But was Pharaoh sorry for his wickedness ¢
No; his heart was harder than ever. He said to
Moses, “ Get away, you shall never see my face
again. If you come in to me any more, you shall
die.”

Then Moses said, “ You shall see my face no

more,”
136 MOSES, OR

God spoke to Moses again, and said, “I am go.
ing to send another plague. At night I shall come
into every house in Egypt, and kill the eldest son
of every person. But this is what I desire the
children of Israel to do, Let each man take a
lamb, a lamb without spot, and kill it, and eat it
that night with his family ; and let him take the
blood of the lamb, and put the blood outside the
door, and when I pass I shall see the blood, and I
will not kill the eldest son in that house. Let the
people in the house stand round the table while
they eat the lamb. Let them all be dressed ready
for a journey.

So all the children of Israel killed young lambs,
roasted them, and ate them at night. They stood
round their tables with their staves in their hands,
They ate some bread with the lamb, and some bit-
ter herbs. They did not forget to put some blood
on the posts of the door, for then they knew they
were safe.

The men of Egypt went to bed that night as
usual, but in the middle of the night the eldest son
in each house died. No one saw God’s angel enter
in, but yet he did come. No bars nor bolts could
keep him out; but when he saw the blood on the
door, then he passed over the house.

What a dreadful cry the fathers and mothers
made in Egypt when they found their eldest sons
were dead! They rushed out of their houses weep-
ing. “Our darling son isdead,” saidone. “And
so is mine,” said another. “And mine.” “And
THE LAST PLAGUES. 137

mine.” ‘There never was such dreadful crying
heard in Egypt before.

Even Pharaoh's eldest son was killed, as well as
the sons of poor people. Pharaoh rose up at night,
and called for Moses and Aaron, but it was dark,
so that they did not see hig face.

“ Go,” said Pharaoh, “and take the children of
Israel with you; they may take their sheep and
cows with them, and all that they have.”

And all the men of Egypt begged the children
of Israel to go away as fast as possible, for they
were afraid that God would kill them all.”

Then the Israelites said to the women of Egypt,
“ Do give us some gold and silver before we go.”*

And they said, “ We will give you what you
want; only go.”

The Israelites had done a great deal of work in
Egypt, and it was right they should have some
money given to them.

So they gave them a great many beautiful things
to take with them.

The Israelites went away in a great hurry. They
took their things just as they were. They put
bread in their bags—they drove their sheep, cows,
camels and asses, before them, and so they set out
in the night.

There was a great crowd of people. More peo-
ple than live in any great town, except London.
No little child could have counted them.

* The woid “ berrow” might equally well be translated “ask for,”
according to the testimony of the best commentators,
133 MOSES, OR

So at last they came out of Egypt, where they
had been slaves so long. God had remembered
his promise to Abraham, and Abraham’s children
were on their way to the land of Canaan.

God'said to Moses, “ They must never forget
my kindness in bringing them out of Egypt. They
must eat a lamb every fear, as they have done to-
night. Eating the lamb shall be called eating the
Feast of the Passover.” Why was this supper
called the Passover? Because God passed over
the doors where the blood was seen.

OF whom does the lamb that each family killed,
make you think? Of Jesus.

That lamb’s blood saved the eldest son in the
family from being killed: and Jesus’ blood saves
all people who love him from being punished in
hell. How kind it was in Jesus to shed his blood
for us! We ought never to forget his kindness.

Now count how many plagues God had sent to
Pharaoh, and the people of Egypt. 1

1. Water turned into blood.

2. Frogs.

3. Small insects from the dust.

4, Flies,

5. Death of the beasts.

6. Boils.

7. Hail and thunder.

8. Locusts.

9. Darkness.

10. Death of the eldest sons.
THE LAST PLAGUES. 139

What dreadful plagues these were! But there
will be much worse plagues in hell.

I hope, dear children, that you will obey God,
and not make him angry with you. You know
why God does not send its such dreadful plagues
now. Jesus is praying for us,and God is waiting,
that we may repent.*

PLAGUE 1,
How crimson now that mighty flood,
That late like silver shone ;
How dreadful too those draughts of blood,
In troughs of wood and stone !

PLAGUE 2,
What troops of frogs the room infest,
And mount the royal bed,
* Defile the food for Pharaoh drest,
The bak’d meats, and the bread !

PLAGUE 3,
The dust that lay so thick around,
Now stirs and seems alive ;
On men and beasts vile insects bound,
And constant torment give.

PLAGUE 4,
What swarms of odious flies appear,
And settle on the walls ;
Their hateful buzz the king can hear
Within his palace halls.
PLAGUE 5,
The flocks and herds now droop and die,
Beneath the murrain’s power :
Upon the open fields they lie,
While vultures fierce devour.

* God is long-suffering to us-ward, not willing that any’ vuld pe
tish, but that all should come to repentance.—2 Pet. iii. ..
140

MOSES, OR

PLAGUE 6,
See pain is mark’d on every brow :
Hear moans from every breast ;
A painful boil has laid each low,
And robbed his fleshsof rest.

PLAGUE 7.
Now loud the mighty thunderings sound,
Torrents of hail-stones fall :
While streams of fire along the ground
The stoutest hearts appal.

PLacuE 8,
Driven before the eastern breeze,
A cloud obscures the air ;
The locusts cover o’er the trees,
And leave the branches bare.

: PLAGUE 9,
Lo, sudden darkness spreads around,
And every face conceals ;
None leaves the spot where he is found ;
O’er all such horrors steals.

PLacue 10,

Ten thousand doors wide open fly,
Though daylight long has fled ;
Ten thousand frenzied parents cry

“ My first born son is dead.’

At length our God the victory gains
O’er Pharaoh’s stubborn heart ;

At length poor Israel leave obtains
From Egypt to depart.

CHILD.

*Tis vain against that God to strive,
Who heaven and earth commands ;
THE RED SEA. 141

How can a feeble sinner live,
‘Who falls into his hands!

O Lord! this stubborn pride remove,
That would resist thy will,
And make me with a child-like love,

Obey thy precepts still.

—_

CHAPTER XXV.

MOSES, OR THE RED SEA.
Ex. xiii. 20; xiv.; xv. 22.

Tur children of Israel had begun their journey
to Canaan. But they had to travel a long way be-
fore they could reach that pleasant place. How
would they find their way ?

God himself showed them the way. He went
before them in a dark cloud. The cloud moved,
and they moved after it. But a black cloud could
not be seen at night, so at night God made the cloud
shine like fire. In the day the cloud was a shade
from the sun, and in the night the fire gave light to
the Israelites, When the cloud or the fire stopped,
then Moses desired all the people to set up their
tents on the ground. This was called “encamp-
ing.” .

And as soon as the cloud moved, the people

* He — acloud for a covering, and fire to give light in the night
Ps, ev.
\ 142 MOSES, On

folded up their tents, and placed them on the backs
of their camels and asses, and went on their journey.

The children of Israel went very fast till they
came to the sea-side. Then the cloud stopped,
and they set up their tents close by the sea. This
sea was called the Red Sea. Perhaps you think
that the water of this sea was red like blood: but
the water was like other water, though it was called
the Red Sea.

They had not been long in their tents, before
they heard a great noise: it was a noise of wheels,
and a noise of horses. They looked, and saw, a
great way off, Pharaoh and a number of soldiers
in chariots, and on horses. Pharaoh had been
sorry that he had let them go, and he was coming
after them to bring them back.

The Israelites were very much frightened.
What could they do? They could not get over the
sea, for they had no ships: yet, if they staid where
they were, Pharaoh and his men would soon over-
take them, and fight against them, and Pharaoh’s
men could fight far better than they could. What
could they do? They cried to God to help them,
This was right ; but they did something else that
was not right ; they began to speak angrily to Mo-
ses. “Why have you brought us up out of Egypt?
We would rather have died there than come here:
for we shall certainly be killed.”

It was ungrateful to say this to Moses: but he
answered them meekly. “ Do not be afraid: God
THE RED SEA. 143

will fight for you, and you shall never see the
aces of Pharaoh and his men again.

Then Moses went and prayed to God: for Mo-
ses knew that God would save the children of Is-
rael.

Then God said to Moses, “ Lift up your rod
over the sea, and I will make a dry path for the
Israelites to walk upon.”

So Moses lifted up his rod, and the waters
obeyed him ; and part of the waters were lifted up
on one side, and part on the other, and seemed like
two walls of water, while a dry path was seen be-
tween.

The Israelites walked in the path, and all their
cattle with them, It was the evening when they
began to cross thé sea, and they were walking
across all the night: yet it was not dark.

I will tell you why it was not dark. Youknow
that the cloud in the sky shone brightly in the
night, and gave light to the Israelites. But God
did not choose that Pharaoh should see the light ;
so God made the bright cloud to move backward ;
and it stood in the sky between the Israelites and
Pharaoh: the bright side was turned towards the
Israelites, and the dark side towards Pharaoh, so
the Israelites saw a bright light: but the armies of
Pharaoh were in the dark, and they could not go
fast because it was so dark: but the Israelites
walked quickly along the dry path, and by the
morning they got to the land that was on the other
side of the sea. They had not yet got to Canaan, »
144 MOSES, OR

but they had got over the sea, and they were on
their journey to Canaan.

Now I will tell you whether Pharaoh and his
men got over the sea or not. When they came to
the edge of the sea, they saw a dry path through
the sea, and the walls of water on each side: so
they went along the dry path. When they had
gone about half way across the sea, and were
hoping soon to overtake the Israelites, God look-
ed at them through his cloud. Pharaoh and his
men heard dreadful noises, and they were very
much frightened. It was God who made them
afraid.

They could not make their chariots go on, and
they thought that God was going to help the
Israelites to kill them: so they said to each other,
“ Let us turn back.”

Ah! it was now too late; God was going to
destroy those wicked men: they drove as fast as
they could, that they might get out of the water,
but it was too late; for the walls of water fell down
and covered them all, and they lay like stones at
the bottom of the sea.

This was the end of Pharaoh and of his wicked
servants. The Israelites had got safely over to
the other side of the sea. As soon as they got
over, God had desired Moses to lift up his rod, and
to make the walls of water fall down and cover the
dry path. Moses had done as God told him; and
so Pharaoh and his men, who were in the middle
of the sea, had been drowned,
THE RED SEA. 145

In the morning the Israelites heard no sound of
chariot-wheels coming after them, but they saw
some of the dead bodies of Pharaoh’s men lying
on the edge of the sea: for the sea, which moves
up and down, had tossed them upon the land.

Now the Israelites saw that the cruel men could
hurt them no more: God had punished them for
their wickedness, and had saved the poor children
of Abraham as he had promised.

This was a happy morning for the Israelites.
They thanked God for his goodness in saving
them, and they sang together a beautiful song of
praise.

The song began with these words: “I will sing
unto the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously :
the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the
sea.” This sea was called the “ Red Sea.”

The women made sweet music, and sang these
same words. Moses’ sister Miriam, who had
watched him when a baby, played the music, and
the women sang with her.

How pleasant it must have been to have seen
the poor Israelites singing and rejoicing! A little
while before they had been working hard in the
sun, they had been beaten by cruel men, and had
cried and groaned: now they were slaves no more,
but they were on their way to a sweet land, where
they might live happily.

Dear children, there is a sweeter land than Ca-
naan. Ihope we shall live there someday. Ought

not we to praise God for telling us how we may
. Mangan ine 10
146 MOSES, OR

get to that sweet land? God will help you, dear
children, to get there, if you ask him very often
Satan, you know, is trying to get your souls: but
God is stronger than Satan. God did not let Pha-
‘ raoh hurt the Israelites, and God can prevent Sa-
tan hurting you.*

In deepest gloom of darkest night,
Between two walls of wondrous height,
Pharaoh, with all his men of might,
Poor Israel’s host pursue.
The wind is high—the path is dry,
Horsemen and chariots swiftly fly :
“We'll overtake,” they loudly cry,
“ And kill that slavish crew.” +

But sudden—drag their chariot-wheels,

A sudden horror o’er them steals,

While God on high his wrath reveals
From yonder fiery cloud.

The lightnings play—the thunders roar,

The skies a mighty torrent pour:t

Were e’er such lightnings known before,
Or thunderings so loud ?

The sound, the sight, o’erwhelm with fright,
Horsemen and chariots take to flight.
“Does not their God for Israel fight ?”

The horsemen trembling cry.

* The God of peace shall bruise Satan under your feet shortly.—
Rom. xvi. 20.

t The enemy said, I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy
them.—Ex. xv. 9.

+ The 77th Psalm refers to the passage across the Red Sea, and thus
describes the storm attending Pharaoh's destruction : “The clouds
poured out water; the skies sent out a sound: thine arrows went
abroad. The voice of thy thunder was in the heaven: ths lightnings
lightened the world: the earth trembled and shook, ’
THE RED SEA. 147

But while with furious speed they go,

God makes the western wind to blow,*

And o’er their heads the waters flow:
Like stones the horsemen lie.

Beneath the deep their bodies sleep—

And they shall rise to wail and weep,

And God upon their heads shall heap
Hailstones and coals of fire.

‘What piercing cries shall rend the skies,

When ail who were God’s enemies,

Shall meet the Judge’s angry eyes,
Flashing with terrors dire !

How vain to try from him to fly,

Who made the sea, the earth and sky,

Whose arm can reach the mountains high,
And deepest pits beneath !t

How vain to try from him to fly,

Who can all secret things descry,

Whose power no angels dare defy,
Whose word can blast with death!

* Thou didst blow with thy wind, the sea covered them.—Ex. xy.
10. As it was by an eastern wind that the sea was made to go back,
(Ex. xiv. 21,) it is evident that it was by a western wind it was made
to overwhelm the enemy; which fact is proved by the circumstance
of the dead bodies of the Egyptians being washed upon the eastern
shore the following morning.—Ex. xiv. 30.

t Though they dig into hell, thence shall my hand take them ;
though they climb up to heaven, thence will I bring them down; and
though they hide themselves in the top of Carmel, I will search, and
take them out thence.—Amos ix. 23
148 MOSES, OR

CHAPTER XXVI.

MOSES, OR THE MANNA AND THE ROCK.
Ex. xvi. ; xvii. 1—7.

Tue children of Israel were very glad that they
had got away from their cruel masters. Now they
had no hard work to do, and they had a kind mas-
ter, even Moses. Ought they not to have been
good and happy ?

They were now in a very large wilderness. I
will tell you what sort of a place this wilderness
was. There were no men nor houses in it; but
there were lions and bears, who roared and howl-
ed ;* and there were serpents which bite, and scor-
pions which sting; there were no rivers nor brooks,
but there were high hills, and dark pits. There
were scarcely any fruit-trees or corn-fields, so that
there was very little to eat:+ and the Israelites
could not sow corn, nor plant fruit-trees, because
they were travelling. What could the poor Is.
raelites do for food ?

There was such a number of people that they
wanted a great deal of food to feed them. They

* The waste-howling wilderness.—Deut. xxxii, 10,

t That great and terrible wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents and
scorpions, and drought, where there was no water.—Deut. viii, 15,
Where is the Lord that led us through the wilderness, through a land
of deserts and of pits, through a land of drought and of the shadow of
death, through a land that no man passed through, and where no man
dwelt —Jer. ii. 6.
THE MANNA AND THE ROCK. 149

had taken a little bread with them in their bags,
when they had left Egypt; but they ate it up very
soon.

What ought they todo now? They ought to
pray to God. He loved them, and would not let
them starve. But these naughty Israelites began
to grumble. They went to Moses and Aaron, and
said, “ We wish we had died in Egypt. At least
we there had bread and meat, as much as we could
eat: but now we shall bestarved. You have only
brought us out of Egypt to kill us.”

How ungrateful they were to Moses and to
God! s

Yet Moses did not answer roughly. He knew
that God heard their wicked words: and God did
hear them. God called to Moses, and said, “I
have heard them, and I will feed them.”

Did they deserve to be fed? O no! How do
you think God would feed them? He would rain
down bread from heaven. Was not this kind ?

Next morning the children of Israel, when they
looked out at their tent doors, saw the ground was
white. They lcxked to see what made the ground
white, and they saw little round white things on
the ground. They ‘said to each other, “ What
can this be? We never saw anything like it be-
fore.”

Then Moses said, “ This is the bread that God
has sent you from heaven; gather it, and take it
to your tents.”

So all the men got jugs, and baskets, and gath-
150 MOSES, OR

ered the manna for themselves, for their wives,
and for their little children: and there was enough
for them all: not too much, nor too little, but just
enough. ‘They tasted it, and found it was as sweet
as honey, and they called it “ manna.”

Then they took it home, and their wives cooked
it for dinner: they crumbled it, and baked it, and
made it into cakes.* They had manna for break-
fast , for dinner, and for supper; nothing but man-
na. It was very nice, and wholesome. It was
more fit for angels than for men to eat, because it
came from heaven,} and did not grow out of the
ground, as corn does. God sent it very early, be-
fore it was light, and every one was obliged to get
up early to gather it, because, when the sun was
hot it melted away, so that if the Israelites did not
get up soon, they had no food.

Moses said to them, “ Do not save any of the
manna, for God will send you some every day. If
it is all gone at night, do not be afraid: trust God.
He will send you more.

But some of the people chose to save some of
the manna. They were disobedient and ungrate-
ful. They looked at their manna next morning,
but it was full of worms. They could not eat it,

* And the people went about and gathered it, and ground it in mills,
or beat it in a mortar, and baked it in pans, and made cakes of it.—
Num. xi. 8,

t He had rained down manna upon them to eat, and had given
them of the corn of heaven. Man did eat angels’ food.—Ps, Ixxvii.
2A, 25.
‘THE MANNA AND THE ROCK. 151

but were obliged to throw it away. How foolish
it is not to mind what God says !

Soon afterwards the people had no water to
drink. ‘There was no river in the wilderness, and
very few wells, or ponds. Do you think God
would let them die of thirst ?

These naughty Israelites thought God would.
So they went to Moses, and spoke very angrily.

«Why did you bring us up out of Egypt ?
You mean to kill us, and our little children, and
our cattle with thirst.”

They were so very angry, that Moses thought
they would soon throw great stones at him and
kill him. Yet Moses did not answer, but began to
pray to God, “ What shall I do for these people?”
said Moses.

Then God said to Moses, “ Take your rod, and
go up a hill, and let some of the people go with
you. Then, when you are come to a high place
close by a rock, strike the rock, and water shall
come out.”

So Moses took some people with him, and struck
the rock, and water came running out.

‘A rock is a hard dry place, yet God made water
come out of it. The water came running down.
The people at the bottom of the hill saw the water
running down like a river, and flowing upon the
dry ground.

What a pleasant sight for the thirsty people !
Their mouths were dry, and their tongues were
stiff, their throats burning; but now they might
152 MOSES, OR

stoop down and drink, or they might fill their jugs
with water. The poor cows, and sheep, and ass
es, ran to the water to drink,

You see how kind God had been to them in
their distress. Ought they not to trust him al-
ways—and to feel sure that he would help them ?

God is very kind to you, dear children. You
ought never to murmur like the Israelites, but to
thank and praise God.

Israel must cross the desert wild,
Where craggy rocks on rocks are piled ;
No waters flow,
No flowers grow
Upon that barren ground,
The pits are deep,
The scorpions creep,
And wild beasts howl around.

But Israel need no evil fear,

For Israel’s God is ever near.
His cloud by day
Points out the way,

And shades them from the heat ;
In robes of light
God shines at night,

And guides their wandering feet,

‘What though no golden ears of corn
The barren wilderness adorn,
Yet angels bread
From heaven is shed,
Like dew upon the ground;
Ten thousands eat
This manna sweet,
And still enough is found.
THE MANNA AND THE ROCK. 153

What though no river winds its way
Where travellers may their thirst allay,
At Moses’ touch
The waters gush
Fast from the rock they stream ;
And rush, and roar,
As down they pour,
And like a river seem.

CHILD.

They say this world’s a vale of tears,
(Although so pleasant it appears, )
That all on earth
Is little worth,
And cannot make us blest:
That pleasures fly,
Friends droop and die,
And sickness breaks our rest.

So let them say, for well I know,
From God the sweetest pleasures flow,
And he could be
A friend to me,
Should all besides depart :
In sickness soothe
My pillow smooth,
And cheer my fainting heart.

While through this world my footsteps stray,
This blessed God shall be my stay,
My manna sweet,
My.shade from heat,
My light in deepest gloom -
His love shall flow
Where’er I go,
Until I reach the tomb.
154 MOSES OR

CHAPTER XXVIL

MOSES, OR MOUNT SINAI.
Gen. xix. ; xx. ; xxiv. ; xxxi. 18.

Tue Israelites went on travelling through the
wilderness. The wilderness was very large, and
it would be a long while before they could get to
Canaan.

They soon came toa very high mountain. It
was called Mount Sinai. It was the same moun-
tain where Moses had seen the bush on fire when
he was keeping his sheep. Now he had brought
the children of Israel to that very place where God
first had spoken to him.

The Israelites placed their tents near the bottom
of the mountain; for the cloud had stopped, and
so the Israelites knew that they ought to wait in
that place.

God told Moses to come up to the top of the
mountain, for he had something to say to him.
So Moses went up. Then God said to him, “ You
see how kind I have been to the children of Israel
in bringing them out of Egypt: go down and
ask them whether they will do what I desire them;
for if they will, they shall always be my own dear
people.”

So Moses went down and asked them if they
would obey God. And they said, “ 4 we will
do all that the Lord tells us.”
MOUNT SINAI. 155

Then Moses went up to the top of the mountain
again, and told God what the people had, said.
“They say we will do all that you command
them.”

Then God said, “I am now going to let the peo-
ple hear my voice, and they shall see me speak-
ing to you Moses. Go down and tell them to get
ready.”

So Moses went down and said, “In three days
you will hear God’s voice, and see him in a cloud
at the top of the mount. Get ready and wash
your clothes.”

So the people washed their clothes, that they
might all stand in clean white clothes before the
Lord. Moses desired men to put rails all round
the mount, that no one might go up the mount, or
even touch it. No, even the sheep must not eat
the grass upon that mount, for it was the mount
of God.

In three days, early in the morning, the people
heard a loud voice, and they all trembled. Moses
desired them to come out of their tents, and to look
upon God.

What a dreadful sight they saw! The moun-
tain was shaking and moving up and down. On
the top a great fire was seen, and a thick cloud,
and such a smoke went up, as filled the sky with
blackness and darkness. There were thunders
and lightnings, and a sound came out of the fire.
It was like the sound of a trumpet, and every mo-
ment it grew louder and louder. Even Moses
156 MOSES, OR

himself was frightened, and said, “ I tremble, and
am afraid.”*

The Lord said to Moses, “Come up to me on
the top of the mount.”

So Moses went up, and all the people saw him
go. He went upon the shaking mount, and into
the midst of the smoke.

When Moses came up, God said to him, (but
God did not speak very loud,) “ Go tell the people
not to come up after you, for they must not come
up this mountain.”

And Moses said, “I have put rails round the
mount.”

But still God said, “Go and tell them not to
come near,” for God knew how bold and disobedi-
ent the people were.

So Moses went down and said, “ Do not dare
to touch the mountain or you will be killed.”

Then God spoke very loud indeed, so that all
the people heard; and as they heard, they trem-
bled. Could you have seen that mountain, you
would not wonder that they trembled as they stood
round it.

What did God say in that loud voice? You
have often heard the words at church. These are
the words that God said: “I am the Lord thy
God, that brought thee out of the land of Egypt,
out of the house of bondage, (or from the place
where you were slaves.)

* And so terrible was the sight, that Moses said, lexceedingly fear
and quake.’—Heb. xii. 21,
MOUNT SINAL 157

I. Thou snall have no other gods before me.

IL Thou shalt not make images, and worship
them, (such things are called idols.)

III. Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord
thy God in vain.

IV. Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy,
because in it God rested from his works.

V. Honour thy father and thy mother.

VI. Thou shalt not kill.

VIL. Thou shalt not commit adultery, (that is,
aman must not take away another man’s wife nor
must a woman go away from her husband, and
have another husband.)

VIIL. Thou shalt not steal.

IX. Thou shalt not bear false witness against
thy neighbor, (that is, no one may tell lies of other
people.)

X. Thou shalt not covet,’ (or wish for other
people's things.)

This was what God said on the mount, and then
he said no more.

The people were glad when God had left off
speaking, for they could not bear the sound of that
terrible voice; but while he was speaking, they had
gone farther and farther away.

Soon they came to Moses, and they said to him,
“Ask God never to let us hear his voice again,
it frightens us so much. We wish God to tell
everything to you, Moses, and you can tell us what
he says.”

So Moses went up again to the dark cloud at the
158 MOSES, OR

top of the mount, and told God what the people
had said. ‘“ They do not wish to hear thee speak
to them again,” said Moses.

And God said they have done well in not wish
ing to hear my voice. I shall speak to you, and
you shall tell them; and O that they would obey
me, and that I might bless them always !”*

You see that God wished the people to be good
and happy; but he knew that they did not love
him in their hearts.

Moses did really love God. God talked to him
a great deal. God told Moses to come up to him
quite alone, and to stay with him at the top of the
mountain; and so Moses stayed with God forty
days and forty nights, and all that time he neither
ate bread nor drank water; but God kept him alive,
and talked to him out of the thick cloud.

At the end of the time God gave Moses a book.
What kind of book? It was not made of paper
like the books you have seen. It was made of
stone. It had only two leaves, and on those leaves
very little writing. God had made this stone book,
and God had written in it with his own finger.

You would like to know what was written in it.
God had written in it all the words he had spoken
in the loud voice from the cloud. The ten things
God had told the Israelites, are called the Ten
Commandments.

He had written them down that Moses might

* Deut. v, 2-29,
MOUNT SINAL 159

read them to the children of Israel, so that they
might never forget God’s commandments.

Neither ought we to forget God's command-
ments, They are written up in some churches, that
we may read them. Did you ever see them ?
I should like you, my dear children, to learn these
commandments; and I will tell you the meaning
of them over again.

One of these commandments was, “ Thou shalt
have no other gods but me.” God wished the
Israelites to love him better than any thing else.
But they did not. We shall hear of their wicked-
ness. We ought to love God better than every-
thing else; for there is no one so kind and so good
as God.

O God, how terrible wert thou,

When from the mountain’s burning brow
Thy voice was heard !

Thunders and lightnings with thee came,

And thickest smoke and raging flame
Around appeared.

‘Well might each heart with terror thrill,

As loud—more loud—and louder still
The trumpet grew.

‘Well might a thousand lips implore

To hear thine awful voice no more,
Lest death ensue.

And yet the voice they could not bear
Is heard above,—by angels fair,
With great delight ;
‘When Adam dwelt in Eden’s ground,
He heard that voice, nor did the sound
His soul affright.
160 MOSES, OR

But when thy law he disobey’d,
For fear of thee—in deepest shade
He hid his head.
Thy thunderings’ roar, and lightningy’ blaze,
‘Would thus no righteous soul amaze,
Nor fill with dread.

And Israel too had broke thy law—

So trembled when they heard and saw
Thy dreadful power :

The God who made the thunders roll,

They knew could plunge each sinful soul
Where flames devour.

And have I not deserved to die ?

How shall I dare to venture nigh
Thine awful throne!

My sins would fill my soul with dread,

Did not the blood that Jesus shed,
For all atone.

CHAPTER XXVIII

MOSES, OR THE GOLDEN CALF,
Ex. xxxii.

Moses stayed in the mount forty days and forty
nights. How did the Israelites behave when he
was gone ?

At first they behaved well, but at last they grew
tired of waiting—they grew impatient. They
wanted to go on to Canaan quickly, but the cloud
stopped at the top of the mountain, and they were
THE GOLDEN CALF. 161

not allowed to go on unless it moved, and unless
Moses told them to move: and now Moses was
on the top of the mountain, they began to think
he would never come back; so they went to
Aaron, and said to him, “Make us some gods to
go before us, for we do not know what is become
of Moses.”

How wicked a thing to ask! But you know
they had lived in Egypt, where they had seen
people worship idols, and they had learned to do
the same.

Aaron was afraid that they would kill him, if he
did not make an image to please them. So he said,
« Bring me your gold earrings.” And the people
brought him their golden earrings.

How did they get so many golden things ?

The women of Egypt had given them gold be-
fore they set out on their journey.

Aaron melted all the earrings in the fire; then,
when the gold was soft, he took a knife and cut it
into an image. He made it in the shape of a calf.
The people in Egypt worshipped calves.

As soon as the Israelites saw it they began to
praise it, and say, “ This is he who brought us out
of Egypt.” Then Aaron put it ona high place,
and built an altar before it, and said that they
would have a great feast the next day.

The next day they rose up early. They spent
the day in worshipping the calf. They took their
lambs and goats, and offered them gn the altar of

iaeiine 11
162 MOSES, OR

sacrifices to the calf, and then rose up to sing and
dance, all the while praising the calf.

You remember that they had promised a little
while ago always to obey God, but they did not
keep their promise. One of the ten command-

. ments was, “ Thou shalt not make an image, and
bow down to it.” Howsoon they broke that com-
mandment !

Moses was at the top of the mountain talking
with God. He did not know what they were do-
ing, but God knew: and he said to Moses, “ Ge
down; the people you brought out of Egypt have
made a golden calf, and are worshipping it. Iam
very angry with them, and I will kill them all;
but I will save you, Moses, and your children.”

Moses was grieved to hear that the Lord was
angry, and he entreated God to forgive the peo-
ple. “Remember,” he said, “how you have
brought them out of Egypt, and how you pro-
mised Abraham that you would bless his children.”
And the Lord heard Moses’ prayer; and deter-
mined that he would not kill them all. How kind
Moses was to pray for the people; How kind
God was to say that he would not kill all the peo-

le |
: Then Moses went quickly down the mount, with
the book of stone in his hand. When he had al-
most come to the bottom of the mount, he heard
the noise of singing, and he knew that it was the
Israelites praising their calf. At last he came to
the tents, and he saw the calf, and the people dane
THE GOLDEN CALF. 163

ing round it, like mad or drunken people. It was
a dreadful sight for Moses to see. He grew more
angry still, and he threw down the stone book
upon the ground, and broke it'\into pieces. The
Ismpelites had broken God's laws, and Moses broke
the book in his anger and his grief. Moses would —
not ggve that stone book to these wicked people.

Do you not think the people must have been
afraid when they saw Moses again ?

They had thought they should never have seen
him again: but he had caught them in their wick-
edness.

He took the calf—(and no one tried to hinder
him)—he threw it again in the fire: then after-
wards he ground it into powder, and threw it into
some water, and made the Israelites drink that
bitter water.

Moses was very angry with Aaron for having
made the calf. Moses said to him, “ Why did
you let the people be so wicked ?”

Aaron said, “do not be angry with me: the
people chose to be wicked, and they asked me to
make the calf; I did it to please them.” y

This was a bad excuse. It was very wicked in
Aaron to make the calf. We should not do wick-
ed things, even when people ask us.

Moses told some of the men to take swords,
and to kill a great many people; and they killed
three thousand men with swords. And God made
a great many other people fall very ill.

These were the punishments that God sent to
164 MOSES, Ok

the wicked Israelites. They deserved to be killed
for worshipping the golden calf; but God listened
to Moses’ prayer, and did not kill them all.

You have heard how the stone book was broken.
God did not make a new one himself, but he teld
Moses to make a book of stone, and then God
wrote the ten commandments in it, as he hadglone
in the other book.

God called Moses up into the mountain again,
and then God wrote the ten commandments in the
stone book. God told Moses to stay alone with
him on the mountain forty days and forty nights.
God talked to Moses as friends talk to one another.
He did not speak in that loud voice which had
frightened the Israelites, nor did he make it thun-
der, and lighten, and smoke when he talked to
Moses. Moses liked being with God upon. the
mountain. Why was not Moses afraid of God ?
Because God’s Spirit was inhim. Dear children,
you will love God like a father, if God’s holy Spirit
isin you. God let Moses see some of his glori-
ous brightness; but God would not let him see
his face, because Moses would have died had he
seen God’s face. The angels and the people in
heaven* see God’s face, but men upon earth could
not bear such brightness,

I will tell you soon what God said to Moses
when he was alone with him on the mountain.

Moses ate no bread, and drank no water, while
he was alone with God.

* They shall see his face.—Rey. xxii. 4,
THE GOLDEN CALF. 165

At last Moses came down again to the people,
with the stone book in his hand. This time the
Israelites were not worshipping an image; they
came up to Moses to speak to him; but when they
looked at his face, they were afraid to come near
him; even Aaron, Moses’ brother, was afraid.
What could the reason be ?

The reason was, Moses’ face shone like the sun,
and they could not bear such brightness. And
what had made his face shine ?

He had been talking with God and looking upon
his glory, and this had made his face so bright.
For God is brighter than the sun, and the angels
who look upon God are bright like him.

When Moses knew why the people could not
come near him, he took a thick veil, and covered
his faee, and then he called them, for he wanted
to tell them what God had said to him.

Then Aaron and the people came to him, and
now they could look at him. Moses kept the veil
on his face all the time he talked to them.

I hope, dear children, that your faces will one
day shine bright in heaven.* If you love God
now, I am sure one day you will see him in heaven,
and then you will be like the angels.

Is that the conqueror’s cry,

Or voice of those that fly ?

It is the merry sound

Of those that dance around
Some frightful idol god.

* And they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firma
ment.— Daniel xii. 3.
166

MOSES, OR

The feast was lately spread ;—

Their cheeks with wine are red ; ~

They fling their robes away,

And sing, and dance, and play,
And praise their idol god.

Can this the people be,

From Egypt just set free ?

Have they so soon forgot

The wonders for them wrought
By their own fathers’ God ?

O conduct mean and base !
Foolish, ungrateful race !
How can they thus reward
The goodness of the Lord,.
And serve an idol god ?

While I thus Israel blame,
Let me not do the same ;
O ne’er would I be found
Amidst the giddy round
Of those who serve not God,

Whilst I remain on earth,

In dance, and song, and mirth,
My days I would not spend,
For fear I should offend

My own All-gracious God.
THE TABERNACLE. 16

CHAPTER XXIX.

MOSES, OR THE TABERNACLE,
Ex. xxxv. ; xxxvi.; xvii.

Moses had been with God upon the mount a
great many days. I have not told you what God
was teaching him, but now you shall hear. God
was showing him how to make a beautiful house.

Whose house was it to be? The house of
God. God did not need a house, for his throne
is in the sky ; but he was so kind as to say that
he would let the Israelites make him a house in
the wilderness. ’

When Moses came down from the mount, he
called all the people round him. He wanted to
speak to them. He wore his veil over his face
while he spoke.

He said first, “ God desires you to do no work
on the sabbath-day, but to worship him, and he is
going to have a beautiful house made, where you
can come and pray to him. Who will bring me
things with which to make the house ?

Had the children of Israel any beautiful things
that they could bring to Moses ?

You remember that the women of Egypt had
given them a great deal of gold, and silver, and
cloth and linen. They had made a calf with some
of their gold, but they had a great deal more be-
side.
But do you think they would give these things
to God ?—or would they say, “ We cannot spare
our things; we mean to make fine clothes, and to
make our tents look pretty inside?” Do you think
they would part with their pretty things? Yes
they would. They all went to their tents after
Moses had spoken to them. They opened their
boxes and their baskets, and they took out gold
and silver rings and earrings, and they took out
beautiful pieces of cloth; some were blue, some
were purple, and some were scarlet; and a great
deal of fine white linen, and skins of sheep and
goats, and beautiful kinds of wood. They
brought all these things to Moses. What a large
heap there must have been !

Some of the rich men had beautiful shining
stones, and sweet spices, and oil: and they brought
them to Moses.

Moses was pleased to see that the people would
give their things to God, and most of all he was
glad that they liked to give them. They did not
feel sorry when they gave them, but they were
glad that they had something to give. If we feel
sorry when we give things, God is not pleased.*

Who was to make the beautiful house? It was
very hard to make such a beautiful house as God
would choose to have.

Moses called the children of Israel, and said,
“God has got two men very clever in cutting
stones, in carving wood, and in making all kinds

* God loveth a cheerful giver.—2°Cor. ix. 7

168 MOSES, OR
THE TABERNACLE. 169

of curious things, and he has told me their
names.”

Then Moses called these two men, and he gave
them all the beautiful things, and said, “ Now
begin to make the house, and I shall tell you what
you shall make.” And Moses called every one to
help them: and he told the two clever men to
teach the others.

It is God who makes people clever: so that
when people can make beautiful things, they
should not be proud; but they should thank
God.

So all the people began to work. The women
spun blue, and purple, and scarlet thread and
worsted. The men made the thread into linen and
cloth: they cut the wood with saws and hammers ;
they melted the gold and silver in the fire, and then
made altars, and candlesticks, and shovels, and
tongs, and basins, and many other things. They
worked hard for many months till all the things
were finished.

I will now tell you what sort of a house God
had told Moses to make.

It was not a house made of bricks nor stone;
because this house would be moved from one place
to another: so it was not fastened to the ground,
but it was made like a tent and it could be moved
very easily.

You never saw so large a tent as this was. It
was as big as a very large room. It was called
“ The Tabernaclg.”
Â¥e 3
170 MOSES, OR

There were a great many boards that were plac-
ed upright on the ground, and close together.*
These boards were the walls of the house ; but
there were no boards at the top; curtains were
thrown over the house to cover the top. There
was no door to the house, but a curtain hung
down in front, and that curtain was instead of a
door.

There was no floor to the house: green grass
was the only floor.

The house was very beautiful; for the boards
were covered with gold, and the curtains were
blue, purple, and scarlet, and there were five posts
of gold in front, over which a curtain hung down
for the door, of which I told you before.

The house had two rooms inside. The first
room was the largest. I will tell you about the
beautiful things that were placed in it.

In the first room there were three very beautiful
things.

1. In the middle an altar of gold; but no lamps
were burned upon it, only sweet spices, which made
the tabernacle smell most sweet. The burning spi-
ces were called “ incense.”

2. On one side there was a golden table, and on
the table twelve loaves. They were called the
shew-bread, or holy bread. There was fresh bread
put there every sabbath-day.

* The mode of joining the boards may be explained to some chil-
dren. Rings were placed in the boards, and long poles were rua
through these rings. .
THE TABERNACLE. 171

8. On the other side there was a golden candle-
stick with seven lamps. There was no window
in the tabernacle, but these lamps made it light.

This room was very beautiful and sweet, but
there was another room still more beautiful.

It was the inner room, on the other side of the
curtain. There was a curtain between the big
room and the little room, This curtain was in-
stead of a door. It was called “ The Veil.”

In the little room there was a golden box, with
golden angels on the top. This box was called
“The Ark.” Inside the box the book of stone was
placed. But what made this room so glorious was,
that God used to come down in his cloud, and fill
this little room with his brightness.

The cloud rested between the golden angels on
the top of the box.

The top of the box was called the mercy seat,
because God sat there, and God is full of love and
mercy. ‘This little room was called “The Holy
of Holies.”

It had no window in it, and no candle, but yet it
was light. The glory of God made it light, for
God, you know, is brighter than the sun. What
a sweet place this little room must have been! It
makes me think of heaven, for there God lives, and
there he shines. But heaven is not a little place.
It is a very large place, and it will hold all the peo-
ple who have loved God on earth, besides all the
angels,

I will not tell you any more about the tabernacle
’

now: but I will write down the names of the things
in the tabernacle. Can you remember what they
were ?
In the first room,
1. The golden altar.
2. The table of shew-bread.
3. The golden candlestick.
In the little room, or Holy of Holies, the Ark.

Where the angels’ golden wings
O’er the ark together meet,
Sat enthroned the King of kings,
On his glorious mercy-seat.
Curtains all around were spread.
Shutting out the light of day :
Neither lamp nor candle shed,
In its stead their feeble ray.

Yet there shone a fairer light
Than this earth could e’er afford ;
Can the sun be counted bright,
When compared with the Lord ?

Tis his face makes heaven so fair ;
With fond rapture angels gaze,

Sweetest smiles for ever wear,
Joyful songs for ever raise.

The bright sun shall cease to shine,
Lamps and candles shall expire;
But the glorious face divine
Still shall bless the heavenly choir.*
Soon shall earthly pleasures die,
Like the candle’s feeble flame ;
God can brighter joys supply,
Through eternal years the same,

172 MOSES, OR

* A band of singers. The heavenly choir are saints and angels.
THE PRIESTS 173

CHAPTER XXX.

MOSES, OR THE PRIESTS.
Ex. xxxviii. ; xxxix. ; xl

I nave now told you what kind of a place the
tabernacle was. I am now going to tell you of
some things that were placed outside of it. You
know that houses often have a garden round them.
The tabernacle had no garden round it, but there
was a large piece of ground near it, called the
court: and there were posts round the court.
These posts were placed at a little distance from
each other, and curtains were hung between the
posts: so there was a wall of curtains round the
tabernacle. ¥

In this court there were two things, of which I
shall speak to you.

1. A brass altar.

This altar was very large. It was not like the
little altar of gold inside the tabernacle. This al-
tar was not for the burning of spices, but for the
burning of beasts, such as sheep, goats, bulls, and
calves. You know that God had desired people
to offer beasts to him as sacrifices. Do you re-
member the reason? What promise had Jesus
made to his Father a long, long while before? He
had promised to die for men. God wished people
always to remember this promise, so he told them
to kill beasts, and to sprinkle their blood, and to
174 MOSES, OR
burn their bodies. Abel, Noah, and Abraham

offered sacrifices.

This brass altar was for the sacrifices.

The lamb was to be killed, and its blood would
flow all round the altar, and the smoke of the burn-
ing would go up to the sky.

2. A brass basin was placed in the court. It
was very large, and it was filled with water for peo-
ple to wash in. I shall soon tell you who washed
in this basin.

Who was to offer the sacrifices? Aaron. God
said that Aaron should be the “High Priest.”
Aaron was to offer the sacrifices, to burn the in-
cense, and to light the lamps of the candlestick.

God said that Aaron might go into the little
room, the Holy of Holies; God would not allow
any person but Aaron to go in there, and he only
allowed him to go in once every year. Aaron
might lift up the veil, and see the cloud‘upon the -
mercy-seat. Moses might go in as well as Aaron:
and God promised to speak to him in that little
toom.*

I am glad, my dear children, that there is a
brighter place where we may go one day, and hear
God speak to us.

God desired Moses to have some beautiful
clothes made for Aaron to wear. The two clever
men, of whom I told you before, knew how to
make them.

* There will I meet with thee, and I will commune with thee from
above the mercy-seat.—Ex. xxv. 22, Also Numb. vii. 89.
THE PRIESTS. 175

These were the clothes Aaron was to wear.

1. He was to wear a white dress with long
sleeves.

2. A robe of blue. He was to wear this over
the white dress. Little golden bells were hung
round the edge of it: and they would sound sweet-
ly as Aaron moved along.

3. An ephod made of white linen, worked all
over with purple, scarlet, and gold. Aaron was to
wear the ephod over the blue robe.

4. A band round his waist called a girdle. It
was made of white linefh, and was worked with
purple, scarlet thread, and with gold wire.

5. A breastplate. Aaron was to wear this in
front. It was made of linen, covered with twelve
shining stones. It was to be fastened to Aaron’s
shoulders by gold chains.

6. A mitre. Aaron was to wear a high white
cap upon his head, called a mitre. A’ piece of gold
was on the mitre, and on the gold was written,
«“ Holiness to the Lord.” Aaron ought to be holy
because he was to offer sacrifices to God.

Aaron was to wear no shoes upon his feet : but
he was often to wash his feet and his hands in the
brass basin.

Aaron had four sons. God said that they should
help him to offer sacrifices. Aaron’s sons were to
wear white clothes, but not the same beautiful
clothes as Aaron. They were to be called
“ Priests,” ond Aaron was to be called ‘ High
Priest.”
176 MOSES, OR

It was a long while before the tabernacle was
made. Though all the people worked very hard,
yet the things were not finished for almost a year.

At last God desired Moses to set up the taber-
nacle,

Moses set up the boards for the walls of the tab-
ernacle, and covered the top with curtains: and he
placed the ark in the Holy of Holies: and he put
the table, and the candlestick, and the golden altar,
in the largest room: and he set up the posts, and
the curtains, all round the court: and he put the
brass altar and basin init. Then Moses poured,
sweet oil upon all the things: this pouring oil,
was called “ anointing.”

Then Moses put upon Aaron his beautiful,
clothes, and put the white clothes upon Aaron’s
sons: and he poured sweet oil upon their heads,
and anointed them.

Then God came down in his cloud, and his
brightness filled the whole place: and so God
showed that he would have it for his house.

Was it not pleasant for the Israelites to think
that God lived in a house in the midst of them?
The cloud could be seen outside the tabernacle as
well as inside: and in the night it shone like fire.
How kind it was in God to let the people see some
of his brightness! God wished them to be very
good, and to obey all he said. God is very near
us, too, though we cannot see him; but we hope
to see him some day.

What place is much more beautiful than the tab-
THE PRIESTS. 177

ernacle was? Heaven. If we get to heaven, we
shall be much more glorious than Aaron was, and
we shall see God’s face for ever and ever, and so
we shall be quite happy.

THE HIGH PRIEST'S DRESS.

1, The white coat, with long sleeves.
2. The blue robe.

3. The ephod.

4, The girdle,

5. The breast-plate.

6. The mitre.

How fair was Aaron to the view,
When in his splendid garments drest,

He wore his robe of heavenly blue
Above his long and snowy vest.

His ephod and his girdle white

‘Were wrought with purple, gold, and red:
Upon his breast shone jewels bright,

A costly mitre on his head.

No priest like him dwells now on earth,
But there is one beyond the sky ;
Ah! who can set his glories forth,
Or who with him in beauty vie ?

O fairer than the sons of men,*
O fairest of the hosts above,t

What tongue can tell, what eye hath seen,
The glories of the God of love ?

* Thou art fairer than the children of men.—Ps. xlv. 2
t Who in the heaven can be compared unto the Lord ?—Ps.
txxxix, 6.
178 MOSES OR

O! may I thy sweet image wear,

When from the tomb my flesh shall rise,
And on the fairest of the fair

Forever fix my loving eyes!

CHAPTER XXXI.
MOSES, OR THE JOURNEY OF THE ISRAELITES.

Now the Israelites had a place in which to wor-
ship God, and to offer sacrifices.

Every morning the priests offered up a lamb on
the brass altar,* and burned incense on the golden
altar in the tabernacle.t And every evening they
offered another lamb, and burned some more in-
cense.

God sent some fire down from heaven to burn
the sacrifices with,t and the priests never let the
fire go out ; and the priests always kept the lamps
burning in the tabernacle. Every sabbath-day the
priests placed some fresh bread on the golden ta-
ble; and when they put the fresh bread on it, they
took away the old bread, and ate it themselves.

The people went into the great court of the tab-
ernacle to worship God, and to see the lamb killed
and burned on the altar. Afterwards they saw Aa-
ron go into the tabernacle to burn incense. The
people stood in the court while Aaron was in the

* Exodus xxix. 38—41. t Exodus xxx. 7, 8
} Leviticus ix. 24. § Leviticus xxiv, 5—9.
THE JOURNEY OF THE ISRAELITES. 179

tabernacle praying for them. They waited till he
came out again to bless them. He lifted up his
hands and said, “The Lord bless thee, and keep
thee.”*

Who prays for us in heaven? Who will come
one day, and bless us?

The Lord Jesus Christ. He is our High Priest.

While the people had been making the taberna-
cle, they had stayed in one place near the great
mount, Sinai; but soon after it was finished, the
cloud of God moved. Then the priests blew two
silver trumpets.

Why did they blow these trumpets ?

To tell the people that they were to move to
another place.

Then the people packed up their tents and fur-
niture, and put them on the backs of their camels
and asses.

Then the priests went into the tabernacle, and
covered all the things in it with blue cloth. No
one might look while they were covering the things.
Then they gave them to some men to carry upon
their shoulders :+ but the priests covered the ark
with the beautiful veil, and they carried it them-
selves.t There were two long golden sticks fast-
ened to it, the priests held the ends of the sticks,
and so they carried it.

Then the priests desired some men to carry the
curtains, and the posts, and the boards of the taber-

* Numbers vi. 23, toend. t Luke 1. 9, 10,22. Numbers iv. 5—165.
4 The priests (the sons of Levi) which bare the ark.—Deut xxxi, 9
180 MOSES, OR

nacle.* The priests went first t with the ark, and
all the people followed them, and God in the cloud
showed them the way.

When the cloud stopped, the priests and the peo-
ple stopped, and set up the tabernacle and the
tents.t

In this manner the Israelites travelled all through
the wilderness.

What a happy people they were, to have such a
God to show them the way to Canaan! They
ought always to have been praising Him for his
goodness. He fed them with manna, and gave
them water from the rock ; and he had promised to
bring them toa sweet land. Besides all this, he
had promised to send his Son to die for them; and
the lambs were killed, you know, to make them re-
member that promise.

I hope we shall not forget how Jesus died upon
the cross. And I hope we shall get to that sweet
land, called heaven. God wishes us to get there,
and Jesus Christ is praying for us.

While Israel in the desert stray,
They feel God’s tender care ;—

For heavenly blessings day by day
Are shed upon them there.

At earliest dawn they gather bread,
New fallen from the skies ;

And next the holy courts they tread,
And view the sacrifice.

* Numbers v.23—33. t Numbers x. 33. { Numbers ix, 16 to end
THE TWELVE SPIES. 18]

‘t is for them the spotless lamb
Is to the altar led !

It is for them the purple stream
Is on the altar shed.

And Aaron lifts for ‘hem a prayer,
“As he the incense burns ;

Filling with odours sweet the air,
To bless them he returns.

Those days are past: Aaron no more
For Israel intercedes ;

The skies no more sweet manna pour,
The lamb no longer bleeds.

But we partake of heavenly bread,
In God’s sweet word of grace:

For us the heavenly Lamb has bled ;
For us a Saviour prays.

O that we may more grateful be
Than Israel was of old,

And sweeter days we yet shall see
Within God’s heavenly fold.



CHAPTER XXXIL

MOSES, OR THE TWELVE SPIES.
Numbers xiii.: xiv, 1—40,
Ar last the Israelites came quite near tho land
of Canaan.
They couldgsee the tops of the high hills that
were in Canaan, and they wished to know what

sort of a land it was, and what sort of people lived
in it,
182 MOSES, OR

So the Israelites came to Moses and said, “ We
wish to send some men to look at the land, and we
wish them to come back and tell us what kind of
a land it is.”*

Would Moses send some men ?

Moses waited to know whether God would
like some men to go.

Soon God said to Moses, “Send twelve men
into Canaan to see the land.” So Moses called
twelve of the children of Israel, and said to them,
“Go into Canaan, and walk up among the high
mountains, and look at the land: see whether there
are many people living in the land, and what kind
of people they are; whether they are strong or
weak: see whether there are many trees, and
much corn and grass in the land; and bring back
some fruit, to show us the kind of fruit that grows
in the land.”

So the twelve men set out on their journey.
These men were called the twelve spies. They
walked up and down the hills, and by the side of
the water. They saw sweet gardens, and some
fields covered with sheep, and some fields full of
corn, and trees laden with fruit, and they saw holes
in the trees, which the bees had filled with honey.
so that honey dropped to the ground. They
saw large towns with high walls around them, and
they saw many strong men and some of them were
giants.

At last they came to a brook or pond. A vine

* Deut. i. 22.
THE TWELVE SPIES 182

grew by it, and on the vine there were ripe
grapes—one of the bunches was very, very large.
They said, “ Let us bring it back, to show to the
children of Israel,” One man could not carry this
bunch by himself. So they took a staff or stick,
and fastened the bunch of grapes to the staff, and
one man held one end of the staff and another held
the other. The rest of the men picked figs and
other fruit and carried them back to the tents.

The spies were forty days looking at the land
of Canaan.

When they came back, the people saw the beau-
tiful bunch of grapes. There were no such grapes
in the wilderness. The spies then said, “ The
land of Canaan is a fine land, full of milk and
honey: but we cannot get into it, for the people
live in great towns with high walls: they are very
strong, and some of them are giants, and when we
saw them, we felt'as if we were as little as grass-
hoppers.”

Then the children of Israel were very much
frightened, and they began to murmur and to weep.

“ Ah!” said the people, “ we shall be killed if
we try to get in.”

It was wicked to say this, because God had pro-
mised to help the Israelites to get into Canaan.
It is wicked not to believe what God says.

Two of the spies were very good men; their
aames were Joshua and Caleb. They did not
wish to frighten the people; and Caleb stood up
184 MOSES, OR

and said, “ Let us go into the land, for we can con-
quer the people that are in it.”

But the ten other spies said, “ No, we cannot,
because the people of Canaan are stronger than
we,”

These ten spies were very wicked men, because
they knew that God had promised to help the Is-
raelites to conquer the men of Canaan, and they
ought to have told the people to trust in God.

The Israelites cried all night long, and they
were angry with Moses and Aaron for bringing
them out of Egypt, and said, “O that we had died
in Egypt, or in the wilderness! The pedple of
Canaan will kill us with their swords, and they
will kill our wives and our little children.”

They spoke in this way all night long, instead
of praying to God to help them.

At last they said, “ Let us go back into Egypt.”

They knew that Moses would not take them
back. So they said, “ We can make another man
captain over us, and he will take us back to
Egypt.”

Moses and Aaron heard these wicked words:
they were full of grief, and they fell down on the
ground upon their faces.

What had grieved Moses and Aaron ?

They were grieved to see the people so wicked.

Then Joshua and Caleb stood up and said to
the people, “we have seen the land, and it is a
very beautiful land; and if we trust in God, he
will help us to fight; but the people of Canaan
THE TWELVE SPIES. 185

nave no God to help them; therefore we ought not
to be afraid of them.”

The children of Israel would not listen to Joshua
and Caleb, but were going to kill them with stones,
when God shone brightly upon the tabernacle, so
that the people saw that he was angry. ;

Moses was lying on his face on the ground, but
God spoke to him, and said, “ How long will this
people provoke me? I will kill them with a
plague.”

Then Moses prayed to God for the people.

“© pardon this people,” he said, “their great
sin. Thou hast forgiven them many times, and |
thy mercy is very great.”

God heard Moses’ prayer, and said, “I have
pardoned them. I will not kill them all now, but
they shall not come into Canaan ;—only their chil-
dren shall come in. They shall stay in the wil-
derness forty years, and they shall all die in it;
and when their children are grown up, they shall
go into the land of Canaan, But there are two
of the men who shall go into Canaan,—they are
Caleb and Joshua.”

Moses told the children of Israel what God had
said, and when the people heard it, they were very
unhappy, and they murmured:

The ten wicked spies soon fell sick and died,
but Joshua and Caleb lived still.

How sad it was for the people to think that they
should never see that sweet land of Canaan, but
should die in the wilderness! Yet they deserved
186 MOSES, OR

to die, because they had not believed what God
had said.

God has promised to give us his Spirit if we ask
him, and to take us to heaven. Do you believe
this promise, dear children? Then you will ask
God for his Spirit. But if you do not care about
heaven, then you will not pray to God for his Spi-
rit. Then God will be angry, and at last he will
say that you shall never get to heaven.*

“Ts that fair Canaan’s coast %
Are those her mountains high ?”
Cry Israel's eager host,
As in the camp they lie.
“ Let’s send a little band
Of brave and faithful men,
To search the pleasant land,
And bring us word again.”
The chosen band departs :
‘What scenes before them rise,
To charm their anxious hearts,
And their astonished eyes!

They climb the mountain's side,
Whence cooling waters flow :
They cross the valleys wide,
‘Where golden harvests grow ;
Pass through the woods, where bees
Sip honey from each flower,t
And in the hollow trees
Hide their delicious store ;

* Let us therefore labour to enter into that rest, Jest any man fol!
after the same example of unbelief.—Heb. iv. 11.

t All they of the land came to @ wood, and there was honey upom
the ground.—Samuel xiv. 25.
‘HE, TWELVE SPIES. 187

View gardens where the vine
And olive tree are seen,

The sheep and lowing kine
Amidst the pastures green.

But while the beauteous land

They view with great delight,
They see where cities stand

With walls of wondrous height,
And towers tall and strong,

And gates of iron and brass :
And ’midst the countless throng,

Some who the rest surpass :
Men of enormous size,

Who wield the sword and spear,
And in whose sight the spies

Like grasshoppers appear.

But why should such a sight

Fill Israel with dismay %
Their God for them shall fight,

And they shall win the day :—
For idols are adored

By Canaan’s wicked race,
And cups of blood are poured

Before each idol’s face,* ~
And helpless babies bleed

Amongst the thickest trees,
And every wicked deed

Is done, those gods to please,t

CHILD.
There is a land more fair
Than any land below,

* Their drink offerings of blood will I not offer—Psalm xvi 4.
t Every abomination to the Lord, which he hateth, have they done
anto their gods.—Leviticus xii. 31.
183 MOSES, OR

And I would enter there,
In spite of every foe.
Then let me now begi
To strive with ae might
To overcome all sin,*
However hard the fight.
The Lord will give me strength,
And fill my soul with grace,
And I shall reach at length
His heavenly dwelling-place.

a

CHAPTER XXXIIL

MOSES, OR THE SIN OF MOSES AND AARON.
Numbers xx. 1—13, 22-29,

Tue children of Israel lived in the wilderness a
great many years. They moved about from place
to place. ‘

At last they came to a place where there was no
water.

How do you think they behaved? Did they
pray to God, or did they murmur ?

They murmured against Moses and Aaron, as
they always did when they were unhappy.

They said, “O that we had died before this
time! Why did you bring us out of Egyyt into
this wilderness? Here there are no figs, no grapes,

* If ye through the Spirit, do mortify the deeds of the body, ye
sna} ‘ive.—Romans viii. 13, :
THE SIN OF MOSES AND AARON, 189

no kind of nice fruit, and now there is no water to
drink.”

They forgot that it was because of their own
wickedness that they were still in the wilderness ;
for if they had obeyed God, they would then have
been sitting under their own trees, eating their own
~ fruit in Canaan.

Moses and Aaron were very much grieved to
hear them murmur, and they went away from the
people, and fell on their faces before the taber-
nacle ; and soon God spoke to them.

He said “ Take the rod and call the people, and
go to the rock and speak to it, and water shall
come out of the rock, and then the people and the
beasts shall drink.”

So Moses took the rod, (the rod was kept near
the ark.) Then Moses and Aaron called the peo-
ple together, and told them to look at what they
. were going to do.

Moses and Aaron felt very angry with the peo-
ple, and they said, “ Hear now, ye rebels! (which
means grumblers,) must we fetch water for you
out of this rock ?”

Then Moses lifted up his hand and struck the
tock twice with his rod; and the water came flow-
ing out in streams, and the people and the cattle
began to drink.

Do you think that Moses and Aaron had be-
haved right? Had God told them to strike the
rock 4

God had said, “speak to the rock.”
190 MOSES, OR

Was it right to speak so impatiently, and to say,
“ Must we fetch water for you, rebels ?”

Moses and Aaron had been in a passion. God
was displeased with them.

Do you think that God will punish them? God
loved Moses and Aaron; yet he would punish
them when they did wrong. He would forgive
them and take them to heaven, but he would give
them some punishment.* You shall hear what
the punishment should be.

Soon afterwards, God said to Moses and Aaron
“Because you have done this, you shall not go
into Canaan ; you shall die in the wilderness.”

What a great punishment this was! Moses had
often longed to see that sweet land of Canaan; he
had often wished to see the Israelites happy in
their own houses and gardens; he had longed ta
see the place where Abraham had built altars and
worshipped God; but now he must die in the wil-
derness. He prayed to God to excuse him this
punishment, but God would not. God said “ Ask
me no more to do this.” Then Moses knew that
he must bear this punishment.t

Moses was the meekest man in all the world.
The Israelites had often spoken ungratefully to
him, and he had made no answer. Yet at last he
himself fell into a passion.

You see how much God hates passion. God

* Thou wast a God that forgavest them, though thou tookest ven
geance of their inventions.—Psalm xcix. 8.
t Deuteronomy iii. 23 -26,
THE SIN OF MOSES AND AARON. 191

wishes us to be very meek, like the Lord Jesus
Christ, who never spoke an angry word.

Are you meek, my dear child? Can you bear
to be pushed, and slapped, and not push and slap
again? If a child takes your place, can you ask
him gently to let you have it; and if he will not,
can you take another quietly? When children
call you rude names, can you be gentle, and not
call them rude names too? A meek child can do
all these things. God can make you very meek,
my dear child. Will you pray to God to make
you meek, like Jesus? Moses, too, was very
meek, though he fell into a passion once.

Was it unkind in God to punish Moses and Aa-
ron?

God cannot be unkind, but he will punish peo-
ple for disobedience. God wished to show the
Israelites that he would not allow any person to be
disobedient, not even Moses.

At last the time came for Aaron to die: for God
chose Aaron to die first. God said to Moses, “ Go
up to the top of the hill with Aaron, and take Aa-
ron’s eldest son with you; and Aaron will die on
the top, and you must put his clothes upon his
son.” God chose Aaron’s son to be high priest
instead of Aaron, so he was to wear Aaron’s clothes.

So Aaron put on his beautiful high priest’s
clothes ; his blue robe with golden bells, and his
shining ephod over it, his shining breastplate, and
his white mitre, with the golden writing upon it.
Then Aaron walked with Moses and his son to the
192 MOSES, OR

top of the hill, and all the people looked at thera
as they were walking up. Aaron knew that he
should never walk down that hill, but still he
obeyed God, and bore his punishment meekly.

When they were come to the top, Moses took
the beautiful clothes off his brother Aaron, and put
them upon Aaron’s son.

Moses parted from his brother Aaron on the top
of that hill: for there Aaron died. Moses and the
son left him dead upon the top, and came down
the hill together. Then the people saw that Aa-
ron was dead, and that there was another high
priest.

Aaron’s soul went up to heaven, for God had
forgiven him. If he had not spoken so angrily,
he would have lived to see the land of Canaan.
Moses knew that he should die very soon: but
God did not choose him to die yet.

The mountain steep see Aaron climb,
While two alone his journey share.
How bright his splendid garments shine !
What charming fragrance fills the air !
How sweetly sounds each golden bell,
Oft heard within the holy place !
Listen! It is the priest’s farewell :—
Israel no more shall see his face.
The aged priest shall ne’er return,
Ne’er lift his holy hands to bless,
Nor trim the lamp nor incense burn,
Nor Israel’s sins with blood confess.
Upon the mountain’s height he stands :
And Moses now, with pious care,
THE SERPENT OF BRASS, 193

Loosens the breastplate’s golden banis,
And strips him of his garments fair.

Then Aaron yields the breath he drew,
And sleeps upon that mountain’s brow ;

His girdle bright, and robe of blue,
Adorn young Eleazer now.

It is for sin that Aaron dies ;
O had he still obeyed his God,
Nor let his hasty passion rise,
Sweet Canaan‘s fields he should have trod.

But though a sinful priest must die,
That none may on his prayers depend :

, Our sinless Priest still lives on high,

And his fair days shall never end,

His glorious robes he ever wears,
Still lifts his holy hands to bless; _
Like incense sweet presents our prayers,
Perfum’d in his own righteousness.



CHAPTER XXXIV.

MOSES, OR THE SERPENT OF BRASS.
Numbers xxi. 4—9,

Tue children of Israel travelled in. the wilder-
ness a great many years. Sometimes ‘when they
Were close to Canaan, the cloud moved the other
way and the Israelites were obliged to go on trav-

- elling in the wilderness. This made them very
unhappy, for they longed very much to get into
Line upon Line. 13
194 MOSES, OR

the sweet land of Canaan. If they had ‘not be-
haved so ill in the wilderness, they would soon
have got to Canaan: but God punished them by
not letting them get in.

How do you think they bore their punishment ?
You know that they were always ready to mur-
mur. They spoke against God and against Moses.
They said, “Why have you brought us out of
Egypt? We shall die in the wilderness. There
is no bread, nor any water here, and we do not
like this manna.”

Was the manna nice food? It was fit for
angels, spotless, white, and sweet as honey; it
came down from heaven and did not grow out of
the ground, as corn does. Yet these ungrateful
Israelites said that they hated it, and were tired
of eating it.

God sent them a dreadful punishment this time.
You know that there were wild beasts and horrible
serpents and scorpions in the wilderness ; but God
took care of the Israelites, so that they were not
hurt by them; but now God sent serpents, whose
mouths burned like fire. These serpents came
rushing among the tents. The Israelites could
not get away from them. Ifthe Israelites climbed up
a high place, the serpents could climb after them
and they could get through the smallest places.

Many, many of the Israelites were bitten by
these serpents. After they had been bitten they
grew sick, and were full of pain, and got worse
and worse, till at last they died. There was no
THE SERPENT OF BRASS, 198

medicine could cure these bites; no plaster would
make them well; every person who was bitten
was sure to die.

The Israelites came to Moses, and said, “ We
have sinned: we have spoken against the Lord,
and against you; pray to the Lord that he take
the serpents from us.” For the serpents were
still among the tents.

Did Moses pray to God for the people ? or did
he say, “ You deserved to be punished, and I will
not help you?” Moses was kind and forgiving,
and he prayed for the people.

The Lord heard Moses’ prayer, and he did more
than Moses asked, for God not only called away
the serpents, but he told him how to cure the peo-
ple who were bitten by the serpents.

What do you think God told Moses to do?
Did he tell Moses to give them some medicine, or
to put a plaster to the bites? You will be sur-
prised to hear the strange things that God told Mo-
ses to do.

He said, “Take some brass, aud make it into
the image of a serpent, and put it on a pole, and
tell the people who are bitten to look at it, and
those who look shall be made well.”

Was not this a strange way of making them
well ?

Moses believed God. He took some brass, and
made it soft in the fire; and then made it like one
of the fiery serpents, and put it on a pole, and lift-
ed it up, where every one could see it, and called
196 MOSES, OR

to the sick people to look quickly at the serpent,
and be made well.

The people who were bitten could crawl to the
door of their tents, and lift up their dying eyes
towards the serpent. After they had looked, their
pain went away ; they felt well and strong: they
could walk and praise God.

Did all the people who were sick look at the ser-
pent? I do not know. Perhaps some said, “ How
should looking at a serpent make us well Y If
there were any such people, they must have died.
But I hope that all looked at the serpent.

‘And now dear children, do you know that a ser-
pent has bitten us? A serpent has bitten our
souls. What serpent dol mean? The old ser-
pent, the devil. He has bitten our souls; that is,
he has made us naughty. You have heard how
he made Adam and Eve naughty in the garden of
Eden. We are naughty too, because we are
‘Adam’s children. Who can make our souls well of
this bite? Who can make us good? If we are
not made good, our souls will die ; they will go to
hell. Jesus can make us good by sending his Spirit
into our hearts.

The serpent of brass was lifted on a pole,—Je-
sus was lifted up on the cross:—now we must
look at Jesus. What do I mean by looking at Je-
sus? I do not mean looking at him with our eyes:
it would not make us good to see Jesus on the cross.
A great many wicked people saw him die, and were
not made good. The “ looking ” | mean is think-
THE SERPENT OF BRASS. 197

mg of him, and loving him. When you think of
Jesus having died for you, and when you love him
for it, then you look at him with your soul.

I hope, dear children, that you will all think of
Jesus, and that God will send his Holy Spirit into

your hearts, and make you good, and let you live
forever in heaven.

Hear a poor Israelite complain,

“Qh, can no med’cine then be found
To ease my agonising pain;

No balm to heal my festering wound!”

This earth no med’cine can supply,
No balm to heal the serpent’s bite :

But lift once more thy dying eye,
And thou shalt live, poor Israelite.

He looks on high, and sees a pole,
Round which a brazen serpent coils ;

No more his eyes with anguish roll,
No more his blood with fever boils.

Nor does the sight heal one alone :
A thousand dying sufferers gaze,
And every shriek, and every groan,
Are turn’d to joyful songs of praise.

CHILD.

This history seems to me a glass,
In which I can my Saviour see,
As Moses rear’d that form of brass,

So Christ was lifted on the tree.

Full well I know the reason why
Upon that tree my Saviour hung;

He saw us at the point to die,
‘Wounded by Satan’s lying tongue.
198 MUSES, OR

He saw the serpent’s poisonous fangs
Make pride to swell, and rage to burn,
Fill us with envy’s gnawing pangs,
And spotless hearts to devils turn.
He saw—he pitied—and he bore
Our sins upon the bloody tree ;
He bade us look, that evermore
From sin and death we might be free.

O Lord! ’tis not with fleshly eyes
That I am bid on thee to gaze ;
My inward eyes can pierce the skies,
Those inward eyes to thee I raise.
If on thy death I meditate,
And pardon for thy sake entreat,
My soul’s disease will soon abate,
‘And groans be changed to praises sweet,

—_—-

CHAPTER XXXV.

MOSES, OR THE DEATH OF MOSES.
Deut. xxxi. xxxii. xxxiii. xxiv.

Tue time was almost come for Moses to dic.
The Israelites were very soon to go into Canaan,
but Moses was not to go there with them.

Moses had written a great many books while he
had been in the wilderness: and now he had al-
most finished them. Should you like to know what
Moses had written about in these books?

He had written about how God made the world,
how Adam ate the fruit, how Cain killed Abel. He
THE DEATH OF MOSES, 199

had written about Noah, and Abraham, and Isaac,
and Jacob; he had written about sweet Joseph
and his wicked brethren: he had written about
himself, how he had been saved from the water
when he was a baby. He had written about the
ten plagues, and the ten commandments, and the
tabernacle; he had written about his own sin.
All I have told you Moses had written down in
five books; they have all been copied in other
books, and we can read all Moses wrote, for it is
in the Bible.

But how did Moses know all these things? He
was not born when God made the world. How
could he write about things he never saw? Could
anybody have told him how God made the world?
No one was born when God made the world: no
one but God could tell him, and God did tell him.

God spake to Moses by his pirit: while Mo-
ses was writing with his pen, God was putting
thoughts in his mind; so he always knew what to
write.

Moses did not write in such books as you have
seen, His paper was rolled up like a piece of
cloth in the shop. He wrote five rolls; and these
he called his books. If you had read in Moses’
book, you must have unrolled it as you read it.

When Moses had done writing his books, he
called the priests, and told them to take care of his
books. Moses said to them, “You must read
these books to all the Israelites, to the men, the _
200 MOSES, OR

women, and the little children, that they may know
how to please God.”

Moses knew that he must soon leave the Israel-
ites. He wished very much that some good man
should take care of them after he was dead; for
he loved them very much, though they had beha-
ved so ill to him. So Moses begged God to give
them to the care of some good man ;* and God
heard his prayer, and said to Moses, “I have
found a man, who will take care of the children ot
Israel after you are dead.”

Who do you think this man was? It was
Joshua, one of the good spies ; he had helped Mo-
ses to do God’s work for forty years;t so that
Moses had taught hima great deal. Moses was
very glad that Joshua would take care of the Isra-
elites when he was dead.

Moses called Joshua, and said to him, “ God
will let you take the children of Israel into Ca-
naan: you must be very brave, for you will have
to fight against the wicked people; but God will
help you: so do not be afraid. God will never
leave you, nor forsake you.

Moses wished to.speak to the people before he
died, and advise them to be good ; so Moses called
all the people together, and told them he was
going to die. “Iam very old,” said he; “I am

* And Moses spake unto the Lord, saying, “Let the Lord, the God
of the spirit of all flesh, seta man over the congregation,” &. Nam.
bers xxvii, 15, 16.

t Joshua was Moses’ Minister, when God spake from Mount Sinai
forty years before his death. Ex. xxiv. 13.
THE DEATH OF MOSES. 201

ahundred and twenty years old this day. I of-
fended God, and I must not go into the land of Ca-
naan; but Joshua will take you there. Remem-
ber to obey God, and to love him, and he will al-
ways bless you: but if you worship idols, and are
wicked, God will punish you.”

God told Moses to teach the people a song, that
they might sing it after he was dead. This song
was about God’s kindness to the children of Israel.

My dear children, you learn pretty songs or
hymns about God. Do you know why you are

taught to repeat them? It is to help you to think

of God, that you may love him. Some children
repeat their hymns as soon as they awake in the
morning,

After Moses had taught the people the song, he
blessed them, and then he left them for ever.

God said to Moses, “ Go up that high mountain
alone. I cannot let you go into Canaan, but I
will let you see the beautiful land of Canaan from
the top of that mountain.”

Moses was glad that he might see Canaan,
though he might not goin. So Moses went up
the mountain quite alone. He was very old, yet
he was not weak; he could walk as well as when
he.was young, and he could see as well; for his
eyes were not dim ;—he read, and wrote, and saw
things far off. God had not let him grow weak
or blind.

I think the Israelites must have felt very sad
when they saw Moses go up that mountain all
202 MOSES, OR
alone, and when they knew they should see him no

more.

I hope they felt sorry for having behaved so ill
to him, and for having so provoked him at the
rock. What a kind friend Moses had been to
them !

When Moses was at the top of the hill, he look-
ed and saw the land of Canaan a great way off.
It was a beautiful land, and full of green hills, and
rivers, of fields ripe with-corn, and of trees laden
with fruit. Moses was glad that the children of
Israel would live in such a sweet land, where they
might worship God.

When Moses had looked at the land, he died.
No friend was near to close his eyes, or to hear
his last sigh: no brother's hand was there to wrap
him in his grave-clothes, or to cover him with the
green earth.

Would God leave Moses’ body to be eaten by
the wild beasts, to be picked by the birds of the air ?
No; God himself buried Moses, not upon the top
of the hill but in some secret place under the hill.
No one knows where Moses lies, but the angels,
who carried his soul to God: they know, for they
watch over God’s dear children in the dust.
When the last trumpet sounds, Moses will rise
from that grave, and shine like the stars in the
sky.

Thus Moses died. He was the only man to
whom God talked as to a friend: God spoke to
Moses face to face, as friends talk to each other.
THE DEATH OF MOSES. 203

T shall tell you no more of Moses; but you will
see him in heaven if you go there. You remember
that he might have been a prince in the land of
Egypt. King Pharaoh’s daughter saved him from
the water, and she gave him fine things, and called
him her son. But Moses wished to help the poor
children of Israel, and he did not choose to be a
prince in Egypt.

Was it not much better that Moses should help
the poor children of Israel, than that he should be
rich and grand ?

You see that God loved Moses, and made him
his friend, and took him to heaven when he died.

Now my dear children I hope you will be like
Moses. I hope that when you are grown up, you
will not try to get fine things, but that you will
try to help poor people, and teach them about God.
Think, dear children, how kind Jesus has been to
you. He left heaven that he might save us, and
that we might know God.

“O beauteous land! of cooling streams,
And mountains crowned with flowers ;

flow oft have I, in pleasant dreams,
Worshipp’d within thy bowers !

“T love the land where Abraham rear’d
The altars to his God;

And where the Lord has oft appear’d,
Where angels’ feet have trod ;

“T see from far a joyful morn
Dawn on that land of rest ;
204 MOSES, OR

For there a Saviour shall be born,
To make all nations blest.*

“ Though now I die at God’s command,
This hope sustains my heart;

And to a fairer, purer land
I joyfully depart.”

What though no earthly friend was near,
To close the prophet’s eyes ;

No children laid him in his bier,
With loving tears and sighs.—

A heavenly train his soul convey’d
To mansions of the blest,

His precious body gently laid
Where none should break his rest.

No eye has seen the grassy bed,
Where now the prophet lies ;

But when the trump shall wake the dead,
How glorious shall he rise!

CHAPTER XXXVL

JOSHUA, OR RAHAB.
Joshua ii.

Tue Israelites were now come close to the land
of Canaan. They were sorry that Moses was
dead; but Joshua was now to take care of them
instead of Moses. Joshua was to tell them what

* Had ye believed Moses, ye would have believed me, for he wrote
of me.—John v. 46.
JOSHUA, OR RAHAB. 205

todo. God would speak to Joshua, and Joshua
would tell them what God said.

The Israelites would soon have to fight a great
deal. Whom would they have to fight against ?
The wicked people who lived in Canaan. God
chose that they should be killed to punish them
for their wickedness, and God chose that the Isra-
elites should live in their land instead of them.

There was a great river that rolled between the
wilderness and Canaan. The Israelites would be
obliged to cross the river before they could get in- _
to Canaan. The Israelites could see the green
hills of Canaan on the other side of the river, and
they saw a great town also, with high walls all
round it. This town was called Jericho. It was
in Canaan, and wicked people lived init. The Is-
raelites knew that they would soon have to fight
against the people who lived in this town.

Joshua told two of the Israelites to go to the
town, and to look at it, and to come back, and tell
him about the town, and about the people who
lived in it. These men were called ‘spies, because
they were sent to spy, or to look at the town.

Joshua did not wish the people of Jericho to
know when these two spies came into the town,
lest the wicked people should kill them. So they
went to the town when it was almost dark. The
spies got over the river: there was one place in
the river where the water was not very deep, and
where people could get over. This was called a
ford. ;
206 JOSHUA, OR RAHAB.

The gate of Jericho used to be shut when it was
dark ; but the spies came just before the gate was
shut. They went to the house of a woman named
Rahab, who kept an inn. Her house was built
upon the wall of Jericho. The spies hoped that
nobody had seen them come into Jericho; but
some people had seen them, and these people went
and told the king of Jericho that two Israelites
were in Rahab’s house. The king of Jericho
knew that the Israelites meant to come and fight
against him ; so he wanted to kill these two spies,
and he sent some men to Rahab’s house to bring
them to him.

What could the poor spies do? where could they
go? But God took care of them. He put it into
Rahab’s heart to be kind to them. Rahab had ta-
ken the spies, when they first came, to the top of
her house to hide them. The roof of her house
was not slanting like the roof of this house ; it was
flat like the floor. On the roof of Rahab’s house
there were a great many stalks of flax. What
is flax? Flax is a plant; and the stalks of flax
are made into thread. Rahab had spread these
stalks upon the roof of her house to dry them.
When the spies had climbed up the stairs to the
top of the house, she told them to lie down ; and
she covered them all over with the stalks, so that
nobody could see them.

The men who were come to bring the spies to

the king of Jericho, could not find them in Rahab’s
JOSHUA, OR RAHAB, 207

house ; so they went to look for them outside the
city, among the hills, and by the river-side.

When the king of Jericho's men were gone, Ra-
hab crept up the stairs to speak to the spies. It
was night, so she could talk to them on the roof
without being seen. The men came from under
the heaps of flax. Rahab had been taught to wor-
ship idols; but you will see that she now believed
in the true God, and not in idols. She had a great
favour to ask of the spies. She was very much
afraid lest, when the Israelites should come over
the river to fight against Jericho, they should kill
her and her friends ; so now she begged the spies
to promise to save her, and those she loved.

Poor Rahab said, “ I know that God will let the
people of Israel come and live in Canaan. Every-
body is very much frightened lest you should kill
them. We have heard how your God helped you
to pass through the Red Sea. I know that your
God is the only true God. Now promise that
when you come to this town, you will not kill me,
and my father, and mother, and brothers, and sis-
ters. Ihave been kind to you, and will you be
kind to me?”

Do you think that the spies would promise to
save Rahab and her friends? O yes! How kind
she had been to them in hiding them! Besides
this, Rahab feared God. The spies promised that
they would not let her be killed, or her father, or
mother, or brothers, or sisters.

How glad Rahab must have been when thoy
208 JOSHUA, OR RAHAB.

made her this promise! There was one thing the
spies desired her not to do; that was, not to tell
anybody about their having been to Jericho, The
spies said, “ If you will not tell anybody about our
having come here, we promise to save your life,
and the life of your father, and mother, and broth-
ers, and sisters.”

Then Rahab helped the spies to get out of the
town. Could the spies go out at the gates? It
was night, and the gates were shut. If the spies
waited till the morning, the people of Jericho
would see them going out, and would kill them.
But Rahab found a way of letting the spies go.

Her house was built on the wall of Jericho, one
of the windows in her house looked towards the
green hills outside of Jericho. This window was
high; so Rahab took a rope, and tied the rope
round one of the men, and let him down from the
window; and then she tied the rope round the
other man, and let him down.

When the men were standing on the ground out-
side the wall of Jericho, they called to Rahab, who
was looking out of the window, and they said,
“Take that red rope, and bind it to your window;
bring your father, and mother, and brothers, and
sisters, into your house. If they stay in it with
you, we promise that they shall not be killed when
the Israelites come to fight against this town ; but
if you or any of your relations are walking in the
streets when we come, then, perhaps, you or they
may be killed. Neither may you tell any other
JOSHUA, OR RAHAB. 209

person about our having come here: you must
keep it a secret.” When the spies had said this,
they went away, and they hid themselves among
the hills for three days, lest the men of Jericho
should be watching by the river to kill them. At
the end of three days they got over the river, and
came back to Joshua, and told him all that had
happened. Joshua was glad to hear that the peo-
ple of Jericho were so much frightened, and he
felt sure that God would help him to conquer all
the people in Canaan.

The spies told Joshua about Rahab. They said,
“You will know which house is Rahab’s, because
she has bound a red rope to the window.” Joshua
desired that nobody would kill the people in the
house with the red rope on the window.

Do you think that Rahab forgot to bind the red
rope on her window? Ono! she bound it there,
and she brought her father, and mother, and broth-
ers, and sisters, into her house; and she did not
tell any of the wicked people of Jericho about the
spies. Nobody knew why she bound a red rope to
her window.

Do you think that Rahab felt frightened now?
Could she not trust the spies? Would they break
their word? How Rahab must have thanked God
for promising to save her, when the people of Jer-
icho would be killed !

My dear children, is there a day coming when a
great many wicked people will be killed and burn-
ed in the fire? You have heard of the judgment

Line upon Line. 14
210 JOSHUA, OR RAHAB

day. Do you not hope that God will save you in
that day? Then do as Rahab did. Ask God to
promise to save you. He will save you if you ask
him. If you are really afraid of God, as Rahab
was, you will not do wicked things to make him
angry; but you will often pray to him to make
you good and to forgive you for Jesus Christ's
sake.

God will hear you, and he will remember his
promise in the judgment-day, and he will not let
you be hurt.

With softest step and troubled air,

In silence Rahab climbs the stair
Screen’d by darkness of the skies
Upon the roof, with Israel’s spies,

She trembling stands; before them falls,
And earnestly for mercy calls.

“O people, whom the Lord has led,

Your deeds have fill’d the earth with dread ;
We've heard how once you crossed the sea,
And how you made two nations flee.

‘What pangs of terror then we felt!

How did the hearts of warriors melt!

Against your God what can we do?
The only God, the great, the trae—
Your armies soon will tread this shore,
O now for mercy I implore!”

Thus Rahab pours her humble prayer;
Nor do the spies refuse to swear
Their kind deliverer’s life to spare,

How gratefully poor Rahab hastes
To bind a cord around their waists;
JOSHUA, OR RAHAB 211

The spies observe its scarlet hue,
And choose it for their token true ;
Gently to earth they both descend,
Then cry, “ Let Rahab now attend ;
This cord unto your window bind,
So you and those you love shall find
Beneath that roof a safe retreat,
When all besides destruction meet.”

How gladly Rahab binds the thread
Which shall from danger shield her head !
How quickly bids her kindred come,

And find a refuge in her home!

CHILD.

Is there no thread that I may bind,
And in the judgment mercy find ?
Ah! yes, the blood that Jesus shed,
‘Was imag’d by that scarlet thread,
O1 may this blood my soul adorn,
In the tremendous judgment morn.

Let none mistake me while I sing:

I speak not of an earthly thing ;

This blood is sprinkled upon all

Who on their dying Saviour call ;

By angels shall the mark be seen ;

That sign from death their souls shall screen *

And I would join in Rahab’s prayer,
And ery, “ O God, my kindred spare!
My father, who protects my youth,

O let him know, thy power and truth ;

* Let us draw near with a true heart, in full assurance of faith,
having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience.

Elect ...... unto obedience, and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus
Christ.—1 Peter i. 2

And he shall send his angels with a great sound of a trumpet, and
they shall gather together his clect from the four winds.—Matt,
xxiv 31
212 JOSHUA, OR

And her who nursed my infancy,

‘And those who share her love with me,
Within some secret chamber hide,
When thousands fall on every side.”*

ee

CHAPTER XXXVIL

JOSHUA, OR THE RIVER JORDAN.
Joshua iii. iv. v. 1, 1, 12

Tue people of Israel were now close to Ca-
naan; but a deep river ran between the wilderness
and Canaan. It was called the river Jordan
How were the Israelites to get over it?

Could they go over in boats?

How could wood be got to make boats for so
many people ?

Could they make a bridge? The people in
Canaan would have shot arrows at the Israelites
while they were making @ bridge.

Could they swim over?

How could the children and the women swim ?
and how could they take their tents over ?

God could help them to get over. How had
they got over the Red Sea?

You shall hear what God told Joshua to do.

Joshua rose up early in the morning, and he said

* Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers ; hide thyself

as it were, for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast. -
Isaiah xxvi. 20.
THE RIVER JORDAN. 213

to the people, “Look and see where the priests
take the ark, and do you follow them, but do not
go too near.”

Then Joshua said to the priests, “ Take up the
ark, and walk on.”

The ark (which was a golden box) was covered
with a blue cloth, that none might see it, or see the
golden angels on the top. ‘T'wo long sticks were
run through little rings joined in the ark, and the
priests held the ends of the sticks.

The priests took up the ark when Joshua bade
them. They went to the edge of the water, not
knowing what they were todo. They were dres-
sed in white, and their feet were bare.

Joshua called to them, and desired them to.
stand still. Then he spoke to all the people.
« Now,” he said, “ you will see a great wonder that
God is going to do; when the priests put their
feet in the water, a dry path shall be made.”

All the people were come out of their tents, they
had got all their things ready for their journey, and
were looking at the priests.

Then Joshua desired the priests to put their feet
into the water.

‘As soon as they touched it, the water stood up
like a wall on each side, and there was a dry path
made through the river. The priests walked
along, till they came to the middle of the river;
then they stopped, and Joshua said to the people,
“ Now do you pass over Jordan.”

While the people were crossing, the priests stood
214 JOSHUA, OR

quite still in the middle of the river. At last, all
the people had got over into the land of Canaan,
except twelve men that Joshua had desired to stay
on the other side.

Why had Joshua desired them to stay ?

Joshua said to them, “See where the priests are
standing: there are great stones lying near them;
take up twelve great stones, and bring them over
with you into Canaan.” These twelve men walk-
ed through the dry path; each took up a great
stone in his arms, and carried it to the other side.
Then Joshua said to them, “ Put the twelve stones
by the side of the river in Canaan.”

Why do you think the stones were to be put
there ?

It was that people might never forget this great
wonder of making a path in Jordan. God knew,
that a long time afterwards, little children would
see the twelve stones, and would say to their fath-
ers, “ What are these stones for ?”

Then their fathers would say, “ These stones
were once at the bottom of the water: but God
made a path for us, and we have put the stones
here, to keep God's kindness in our minds.”

God is pleased that children should wish to
know the meaning of what they see. God wishes
little children to know about his goodness, and the
wonders he has done.

All the time the twelve men were walking
through with the stones, the priests were standing
still in the river.
THE RIVER JORDAN. 215

At last Joshua said to the priests,“ ome up
out of Jordan:” so the priests came up out of the
river. As soon as the priests put their feet on the
dry land in Canaan, the water rolled back again,
and the river looked as it had done before.

How happy the Israelites must now have been.
They had wandered forty years in the wilderness,
but at last they were safely arrived in Canaan.
God had been very good to them, and he would

. help them to fight against the wicked people of
Canaan.

Why did God desire that the people in Canaan
should be killed? Because they went on worship-
ping idols, and doing a great many wicked things,
so God chose to punish them.

The king of Jericho saw the Israelites come
over the river. He could look at them over his
high walls. He was very much frightened, and so
were all the people in Jericho. Only Rahab was
not frightened: she knew she was safe: she be-
lieved in the true God.

The priests put down the ark; all the Israelites
set up their tents, and waited outside Jericho.
Rahab’s red cord could be seen upon her window
on the wall. .

So the Israelites knew which was her house, and
Joshua told them not to hurt the people who were
in it.

The gates of Jericho were kept fast shut, that
the Israelites might not get in: no one in Jencho
216 JOSHUA, OR

went out, and no one came in, but every body
kept inside the town.

Those wicked people would never again walk
by the river side: the day of their death was very
near. Ah! why did not they turn to God before
it was too late?

My dear children, the day of judgment will
come to us all at last. Now is the time to be sor-
ry for our sins, and ask God for his Holy Spirit.
If children will go on telling lies, quarrelling, and
fighting, being bold and disobedient, they will come
to a sad end.

But I hope, dear children, that you will love
God, and that you will be saved.

The priests just dip their feet
In Jordan’s rapid stream:
The waters quick retreat
Like walls of silver seem ;
O! why do Jordan’s waters fly,
And leave the stony channel dry?

The priests in Jordan stay,
While Israel’s mighty host
With haste pursue their way
To Canaan’s pleasant coast.
What power restrains the flowing tide,
While in the deep the priests abide ?

Full long the white rob’d band
Wait in the depths below;
But when they reach the land,
Once more the waters flow:
‘What hand has broke the unseen chain,
That did the waters’ force restrain ?
THE WALLS OF JERICHO. Q17

It is the Lord restrains
The rapid river's tide;
It is the Lord unchains
The walls on either side;
It is the Lord who thus would mark
His love to those who bear his ark.

CHILD.

O bless me, Lord, like those
Who in the river stood ;
A way for me unclose,
Through this world’s dangerous flood ;
And lead me with thy numerous host
From lowest depths to heaven’s high coast.*

————

CHAPTER XXXVIIIL.

JOSHUA, OR THE WALLS OF JERICHO.
Joshua v. 13—15. vie.

Tue children of Israel had placed their tents all
round the city of Jericho, but they waited till God
told them what todo. They could not get through
the strong gates, unless God helped them.

Joshua was the captain of the Israelites. He
was avery brave man. He trusted in Giod to help
him, and that made him brave.

I will now tell you a very wonderful thing that
happened to Joshua while he was on the outside
of Jericho.

* will bring my people again from the depths of the sea.—Ps
xviii 22
218 JOSHUA, OR

One day he looked up, and he saw a man stand-
ing before him a little way off. The man looked
as if he was a soldier, and he held a sword in his
hand. Joshua knew that this man was not one of
the Israelites; but he could not tell who he was.

Joshua went up to the man and said, “ Are you
come to help us to fight? or are you come to help
the people of Jericho ?”

Then the man answered, “I am come as cap-
tain of the army of the Lord.”

Now Joshua knew who this man was. Can you
tell who he was?

He was greater than a man, greater than an
angel. He was the Lord from heaven, even Jesus
Christ.

Jesus did not become a little baby for a long
while afterwards: but he always lived in heaven
with his Father, and sometimes looked like a man,
and came down upon the earth.*

Was it not very kind in the Lord Jesus to come
down from heaven and to speak to Joshua?

When Joshua knew who the man was, he fell
down with his face upon the ground, and wor-
shipped him, saying, “ What will my Lord say to
his servant?”

Joshua called himself God’s servant.

Then the great captain of God’s army said,

* And the form of the fourth is like the Son of God.—Dan. iii. 25.
Whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting.-
Mic, v. 2
THE WALLS OF JERICHO. 21

“Take your shoe off your foot, because this is
holy ground.”

Then Joshua took it off, and waited to know
what the Lord would say to him.

Why was the ground holy? Because God was
there. You know the priests wore no shoes when
they walked in God’s house.

The Lord told Joshua how he was to fight
against Jericho.

Such a way of fighting was never known before.
You shall soon hear what the Lord told Joshua
to do,

When the Lord was gone back to heaven,
Joshua called the priests, and all the people of Is-
yael, and showed them what they must do. Joshua
told some of the priests to take up the ark.

Then he called seven more priests, and said,
“Each of you must take a ram's horn, and blow
with it, like a trumpet, and walk before the ark.

(You know that @ ram is a sheep, and that it has
crooked horns.) Then Joshua called all the soldiers,
and told them to go before the priests, and he told
the rest of the people that had no swords or spears,
(that is, the women and children,) to walk behind
the priests.

Where were they all to walk? Joshua desired
them to walk round the city of Jericho. The sol-
diers with their swords and spears went first; next
came seven priests dressed in their white clothes,
blowing with the rams’ horns. Then came the
220 JOSHUA, OR

priests carrying the ark, and behind them all the
people that had no swords or spears.

. You never saw such a great number of people
walking along.

Before they set out, Joshua told them not to
make any shoutings, but to wait till he said,
“Shout.”

What is shouting? Calling outloud. Soldiers
shout when they have conquered. The Israelites
were not to shout till Joshua told them.

They all walked once round Jericho.

The people of Jericho heard the trumpets blow-
ing, and they saw the men with swords and spears.

I dare say they thought the Israelites were
going to shoot their arrows over the walls, and try
and beat down the walls. How much frightened
they must have been! Rahab took care to keep
in her house, with all her dear friends. The Isra-
elites walked once round, and then Joshua brought
them back to their tents.

Are you not surprised to hear this? What was
the use of walking round? You will hear what
happened in the end.

The next day, Joshua made the people and the
priests walk round once more, and then brought
them home. Then, next day after, they went
round again; and the next day, and the next day.
Six days, one after the other, they walked round
Jericho, and came home to their tents again, with-
out having fought.

The Israclites behaved well in doing as Joshua
THE WALLS OF JERICHO 221

told them, instead of asking why they must walk
round without fighting.

Do you not think that the people of Jericho be-
gan to laugh at the Israelites, and to think that
they would never get into the city ?

At last, after six days, Joshua told the Israelites
to get up very early in the morning, as soon as it
was light. He told them to walk all round as be-
fore ; but when they had walked round, he did not
tell them to go back to their tents, but to walk
round again, That day they walked round seven
times: they spent the whole day in walking round
and round the city of Jericho.

When they had just finished walking round the
seventh time, Joshua said to the people, “ Now,
when the priests blow again with the trumpets, you
may shout ; for God has given you the city. You
will soon get in; you must kill all the people ex-
cept Rahab and her friends that are in her house ;
you will find many beautiful things in Jericho: but
you must not keep anything to yourselves; but
you must bring the cups of gold, and silver, and
brass, and iron, to the Lord; and you must not
keep anything for yourselves. Bring all you find
to the house of the Lord; for God has cursed Jer-
icho, and everything in it.”

When Joshua had done speaking, the priests
blew again with the trumpets, and the people gave
a great shout. At the same moment, the walls of
Jericho fell down. How horrible was the crash
QU2 JOSHUA OR

of those great walls! Now the men of Jericho
saw that the day was come when they must die.

The two spies ran quickly to Rahab’s house,
and brought her out, and her father, and mother,
and brothers, and sisters, and led them to a safe
place near the tents of the Israelites. Rahab and
her friends brought all their things with them out
of the house: so they could make tents, and live
together. Ohappy Rahab! Now she could learn
more about the true God; she could see God's
priests offering sacrifices on the altar, and could
hear how her sins might be forgiven by the blood
of Jesus, the Lamb of God, who would come into
the world.

But what happened to the people in Jericho?
They were all killed; the men, the women, and
the children—even the sheep, and cows, and all
the beasts, were killed; not one was left alive.
The Israelites killed them with their swords.
Then they set fire to the houses, and burnt them
all up; but the cups and basins, made of gold, and
silver, and brass, and iron, they brought to the
priests for God’s house. What would the priests _
do with the basins? They would put in them the
blood of the sheep and goats that they sacrificed
on the altar.

Allthe other people in Canaan heard about Jeri-
cho, and they were, more frightened than before.
They said, “ What a great captain Joshua is!”

But you know who was the captain that fought
for Joshua. Who was it threw down the walls?
THE WALLS OF JERICHO. 223

Was it not the man whom Joshua had seen. He
was a captain over thousands of angels, that filled
the air, and obeyed all he said. The angels are
stronger than men; and Jesus is their captain, and
he is God himself. He can break down walls, and
he can build them up; he can kill, and he can
make alive; he can shut us up in hell, and he can
lift us up to heaven. nq

Which do you wish him to do for you, my dear
children? Let us pray to him to save us when the
world is burnt up; as he saved Rahab when Jeri-
cho was burnt up.

The trumpets seem to sound in vain;
For still the walls upright remain,
Can those within,
Who hear the din,
Once apprehend -
How all will end?

The seventh time the priests walk round ;
The walls no more resist the sound,
They totter now,
They crack, they bow:
Their sudden fall
All hearts appal.

Some take to arms, some flee away ;
God is more swift and strong than they ;
And vain is might,
And vain is flight ;
For God pursues,
And all subdues.

CHILD.

A trump shall sound, (“twill be the last,)
And loud shall be that trumpet’s blast ;
JOSHUA, “1S DEATH,

The dead shall wake,
The mountains quake,
The sea shall roar,
The fire devour.

co)
©
_

God yet prolongs the day of grace,
That all may turn, and seek his face.*
Still parents teach ;

Still pastors preach ;
And still I may
For mercy pray.

But should I this sweet season lose,
And God’s repeated calls refuse,
I fear to think
Where I should sink
When that loud blast
Should sound at last.



CHAPTER XXXIX.
JOSHUA, HIS DEATH.

You have heard what the Israelites did to Jeri-
cho. There were a great many other cities in
Canaan besides Jericho. The Israelites fought
against the other cities of Canaan.

All the people in Canaan heard of it, and were
much afraid of Joshua; but still they took their
swords and spears, and fought against him.

* The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men

count slackness; but is long-suffering to us-ward: not willing that
any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.—2 Peter
ui. 9.
JOSHUA, HIS DEATH. 2295

And who do you think conquered? God always
helped the Israelites; so they always conquered,
They went all through Canaan. First they went
to one city, and killed the people in it; then
they went to another city, and killed the people in
it; so they went to hundreds of cities, till they had
killed almost all the people in Canaan. God did
not make the walls of the other cities to fall down,
like the walls of Jericho; but the Israelites were
obliged to fight very hard before they could get in.

At last Joshua said to the children of Israel,
“ Now the people of Canaan are dead, I wilt give
you places to live in.” So he gave to each of the
Israelites a house, full of nice and beautiful things,
and a garden, and a field, and a well of water.

Now the Israelites rested. They sat down
under the fig-trees and vines in their own gardens,
and ate the figs and grapes that grew on them, and
they drank water out of the wells in their gardens.

Did the Israelites build their own houses? No;
they lived in the houses of the people of Canaan.
The wicked people had built the houses, and they
had dug the wells, and planted the trees in the
gardens:* but God had taken them away from
these wicked people, and had .given them to the
Israelites.

Might God give them to whom he pleased?
Yes: God made everything and everything be-

* To give thee great and goodly cities, which thou buildest not;
honses full of good things, which thou filledst not; and wells digged
which thou diggedst not ; vineyards and olive-trees, which thou plant

edst not.—Deut. vi. 10, Ll.
. Line apen Line, 1 5
226 JOSHUA, HIS DEATH.

longs to God; and he may give things to whom
he pleases. Sometimes he takes his things away
from wicked people.

When the Israelites sat in their gardens, they
ought to have thought to themselves, “ How kind
in God to give ussomuch! How much we ought
to love him!” Has not God given you a great
many things, my dear child? Ought not you to
love him very much?

Why did God give so many things to the Israel.
ites? Were the Israelites good? No; they were
naughty. Then why was God so kind to them?

You remember the promise God had made to
Abraham. God had said that he would give
Canaan to his children’s children, And did God
keep his word? O yes! he remembered his prom-
ise, and he brought the Israelites into Canaan.*
So the reason God was so kind to the Israelites
was, because he had promised Abraham he would
be kind to his children.

There was one thing which Joshua did not forget
to do; that was to place the tabernacle in Canaan,
He set it up in the middle of Canaan, at a place
, called Shiloh. Now the Israelites would not be
obliged to move it about any more.

Joshua told them all to come up and worship
God in the tabernacle; but some lived so far off
that they could not come often. So they came
only sometimes to the tabernacle.

* When the Lord thy God shall have brought thee into the land,
which he sware unto thy fathers.—Deut. vi. 10.
JOSHUA, HIS DEATH. 227

God desired the Israelites not to worship the
idols that the wicked people in Canaan had made.
The Israelites would find their idols in the fields
and gardens; and some of these idols were made of
silver and gold; but the Israelites were not to keep
them, even if they were pretty images: they were
not to take the idols into their houses: but they
were to burn them in the fire; because God hated
these idols.*

At last Joshua grew very old; and he knew that
he must die. So he called a great many of the
Israelites together, that he might speak to them
before he died.

Joshua stood near a great oak-tree while he
spoke. He said to the Israelites, “I am soon
going to die. Whom will you worship after I am
dead? ‘Will you worship idols, or will you wor-
ship God who has been so kind to you ?”

Now which do you think the Israelites chose to
worship? They all said, “ We will worship God.”

Then Joshua said, “If you choose to worship
God, you must not worship idols too.”

Then they answered “ We will serve God.”

“ Now,” said Joshua, “you have promised to
serve God only. You must keep your promise.”

Then Joshua took a book and wrote down what
the people had said. Afterwards Joshua took a
great stone, and put it under the oak, and said,
“See this stone; I have put it here, to make you
remember your promise always.”

* Deut, vii. 25, 26.
228 JOSHUA, HIS DEATH.

Then Joshua told all the people to go home.

Very soon afterwards Joshua died. He was
more than a hundred years old when he died.

Did the Israelites keep their promise? Did
they worship idols, or did they not ?

At first they did not worship idols. But at last
they grew tired of serving God, and began to
worship idols, and to do other wicked things.

My dear children, your. parents have not taught
you to worship idols, but you have done other
naughty things. Have you never been disobedi-
ent, nor told lies, nor fallen into passions ?

What can you do to please God?* Speak the
truth, obey your parents, and be very kind to each
other. These are things that please God.

Do you not wish to please God, who has been
so kind to you, and has given you food, and clothes,
and a house, and kind friends, and a body, and a
soul, and who has even given his Son to die for
you? Ask God to make you love him, and wish .
to please him. i

The Israelites no more
Dwell in the wilderness ;
Their wanderings are o’er
Blest Canaan they possess;
And, shaded from the heat,
Beneath the spreading vine,
They eat the finest wheat,
And drink the choicest wine.t

* Ye have received of us how ye ought to walk, and to please God.

Thes. iv. 1.

t Amongst the provisions of Canaan is enumerated “ the fat of the
5
JOSHUA, HIS DEATH. 225

The Lord could not forget

How he did condescend,
His wondrous love to set

On Abraham, his friend ;+
And how he promised,

That with a mighty hand
His children should be led

To Canaan’s pleasant land.t

And God has brought him there
By his own arm alone;

O let them never dare
To worship gods of stone.

If midst the thickest trees
To idols they shall bend,

At length the Lord will cease
His people to defend.

CHILD.

The Lord will bless me too,
If I serve him alone,
His mercies, like the dew,
Shall still be poured down;
But Satan stands by me,
And seems an angel bright,!
And promises that he
Will fill me with delight.

kidneys of wheat :” and it is added, “ thou didst drink the pure blood
of the grape.”—Deut. xxxii. 14.

* Because he loved thy fathers, therefore he chose their seed after
them.—Deut. iv. 37.

t And he said unto Abraham, Know of a surety, that thy seed shall
be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them. . . . .
And also that nation whom they serve will I judge; and afterwards
shall they come out with great substance. —Deut. xv. 13, 14.

+ _ himself is transformed into an angel of light.—1 Cor,
x. 1
230 JOSHUA, HIS DEATH.

O, if I now attend
‘Yo Satan’s promise fair,
I shall to hell descend,
And Satan’s torments share.
My God deserves my love,
And he deserves the whole;
Then to his house above
He'll take my happy soul.
QUESTIONS. 231

A FEW PRINCIPAL QUESTIONS \
FOR THE EXAMINATION
Of Children who have finished reading this Book.

1, What promise did the Lord Jesus make to his Father
a long while before Adam and Eve had sinned ?

2. How used people to offer sacrifices ?

3. Why did God desire people to offer sacrifices? .

4, Why did Cain kill Abel?

5. Why did God drown the world?

6. Whom did God save when the world was drowned ?

7. Whom did God desire to leave his own country, and
go to a land that he would show him ?

8. What land did God promise to give to Abraham’s chil-
dren’s children ?

9. What was the name of Abraham’s son ?+

10. What were the names of Isaac’s two sons ?

11, How many sons had Jacob ?

12, What cruel thing’did Joseph’s brothers do to him?

13. Why did the king of Egypt make Joseph a great
lord 4

14. How did Joseph save people from starving, when
scarcely any corn grew in the fields?

15. Where did Joseph ask his brothers to come and live?

16. What was Jacob’s other name 3

17. Who were the Israelites ?

18. Who desired the babies cf the Israelites to .be
drowned ?

19. Who found Moses in the river, and called him her
own son ?

20. When Moses was grown up, where did he wish to
take the Israelites ?

21. Where did God desire Moses to go, when he spoke
to him in the burning bush?
232 QUESTIONS.

22. Why. did God send ten plagues to king Pharaoh ? »

23. On the night that the eldest sons were killed, wha
did the Israelites eat, and what did they sprinkle on then
doors ? :

24. What was the name of that supper ?

25. How were Pharaoh and his servants killed?

26. How did the Israelites know which way to go to Ca-
naan 4

27. How were they fed in the wilderness ?

28. What words did God speak very loud from Mount
Sinai?

29. When Moses was alone with God on Mount Sinai,
what did God desire him to make ? t

30. Who was to be the high priest ?

31. What was the ark of God ?

32. Why did the Israelites send twelve spies into Ca-

naan ?
33. Why did the Israelites say they would go back into
1

34. What punishment did God give the Israelites for
murmuring at what the spies had said ?

35: Why ought the Israelites not to have been afraid of

‘the strong men in Canaan ?

36. How did Moses and Aaron offend God ?

37. Whom did God desire to take care of the Israelites
after Moses was dead ?

38. What was the first city in Canaan that the Israelites
conquered ?

39. Why did God bring the Israelites into Canaan ?

40. Why did God desire the Israelites to kill the people
of Canaan?
QUESTIONS ON THE CHAPTERS



I

Why is God called the Creator ?

Can men or angels create things ?

What did God create on the first day ?
On the second day ?

On the third day 4

On the fourth day ? y
On the fifth day ?

On the sixth day *

‘What was the last thing God made ?
What did God do on the seventh day *
Which of the creatures can praise God ?

II.

Of what tree was Adam forbidden to eat ?

Who asked Eve to eat of it?

Why did Eve eat some *

To whom did Eve give some of the fruit?

‘What punishment did God give to the serpent ?

What punishment did he give to Eve?

‘What punishment did he give to Adam ?

Why did not God allow Adam and Eve to stay in the
garden of Eden?

What had the Son of God promised to his Father ?

. Ill.

What were the names of the two eldest sons of Adam
and Eve ?
Had Adam’s children naughty hearts?

/
t
234 QUESTIONS ON

How did God make Abel good ?

What used Cain to do?

What used Abel to do?

How did people offer sacrifices ?

‘What was the heap of stones called, on which the lamb
or kid was burnt?

Why did God desire people to offer sacrifices ?

Why did God like Abel’s sacrifice better than Cain’s?

Why did Cain kill Abel ?

How did Cain answer God when he asked him where
Abel was?

‘What punishment did God give to Cain ?

‘What was the name of Adam’s youngest son ?

EV.

Why did God determine to drown the world?

How was Noah saved ?

Did God let the wicked people know that the world was
soon to be drowned ?

What birds did Noah send out of the ark to see whether
the earth was dry ?

What promise did God make Noah ?

Of what should the rainbow make us think when we
see it?

V.

Whom did most of the people in the world pray to ?
Whom did God choose to be his servant and friend?
‘What was the name of Abraham’s wife ?

In what did Abraham sleep when he travelled 1

To what land did God take Abraham ?

What kind of people lived in Canaan ? +

Why was God pleased with Abraham? —

‘What did God call him ?

Might you be God’s friend ?
THE CHAPTERS. 235
VI.

How many grandchildren and great-grandchildren did
God promise to give Abraham?

Why did three angels come to Abraham's tent ?

How did Abraham treat them ?

How soon did they say that Abraham and Sarah should
have a son ?

Did Sarah believe at first ?

Did God keep his promise ?

What was the son’s name?

Why was God pleased with Abraham ?

VIL.

Why did God tell Abraham to offer up his son as a sac

Tifice 4
, Would Abraham do as God told him ?

What did Isaac say to his father as he walked up the
nill ?

‘What was it Abraham did when he was on the top of
the hill?

How was Abraham hindered from killing Isaac ?

‘Why ought we to love God better than every one else?

VIII.

Who buried Sarah?

‘Where was she buried ?

Who was Isaac’s wife 3

‘What were the names of Isaac’s children ?

‘What were their employments ?

Did they love God ?

‘Why did Jacob leave his home and go to a country a great
way off?

‘What dream did he have as he slept on the ground ?

eam and what did he say
to 4
236 QUESTIONS ON .

IX,

Who was Rachel ?

Where did Jacob first see her ?

‘What was the name of Jacob’s uncle ?

What did Jacob do for Laban ?

Who were Jacob’s wives ?

Had Jacob any sheep and goats of his own?
Why did Jacob wish to live in Canaan again *

x.

Who told Jacob to go home to his father ?
What was Jacob afraid of when he was on his way

- nome ?

What was it Jacob did when he was afraid ?

How did Esau behave to Jacob when he met him?

Did Jacob ever go again to the place where he had seen
the angels ?

‘What kind things had God done for Jacob since he had
last been there ?

XI.

How many sons had Jacob?

Which was the best ?

Which did Jacob love the best 3

Why did not Joseph’s brothers love him ?

What did Jacob give to Joseph ?

What two dreams did Joseph have? '

Why did these dreams make the brothers angry with
Joseph ? F

Why did Jacob send Joseph to his brothers when they
were keeping sheep ?

Where did the brothers throw him %

XIL

Who passed by Joseph’s brothers while they were eating
near the pit? ;

}
THE CHAPTERS. 233

, What did Judah advise the brothers to do with Joseph ?
For how much did they sell him?

What did the brothers do with Joseph’s coat ?

Why did they dip it in blood ?

‘What did Jacob think when he saw it?

How do wicked people try to hide their faults ?

XII.

Where was Joseph taken by the men who bought hm
of his brothrers ?

To whom did they sell Joseph?

How did Potiphar treat Joseph ?

‘Who spoke against Joseph to Potiphar ?

How did Potiphar punish Joseph ?

How did the keeper treat Joseph ?

‘ XIV.

What two men did Potiphar place under Joseph’s care?

What made them look sad one morning when Joseph
came in?

‘What was the butler’s dream ?

‘What was the meaning of it?

‘What was the baker’s dream ?

‘What was the meaning of it?

‘What was it Joseph asked the butler to do for him?

Did the butler remember Joseph ?

‘What is it ‘to be ungrateful 2”

‘Who begs for us in heaven?

XV.

‘What two dreams did Pharaoh king of Egypt have one
night ?

‘Who advised him to send for Joseph ?

Why was Joseph able to tell him the meaning of the
dreams ?

‘What was the meaning of the dreams t
238 QUESTIONS ON

What did Joseph advise the king to do, to prevent the
people from being starved when no corn should grow ?
Why did Pharaoh make Joseph ruler over the people ?

XVI.

When no corn grew in the fields, to whom did the people
go for corn ?

Did Joseph know his brothers again when he saw them %

Did they know him ?

Why did not they know him again ?

How did Joseph’s dream about the sheaves come true?

Why did Joseph speak unkindly to his brothers.

What did he say they were come to see? <

‘Where did he keep them for three days ?

‘Whom did Joseph desire them to bring with them the next
time they came ?

Which of the brothers did Joseph keep in prison while
the others went to fetch Benjamin ?

What did Joseph desire his servants to put into his
brother’s sacks with the corn ?

Why were the brothers frightened when they found the
money in their sacks ?

Why would not Jacob let Benjamin go with his brothers
to Egypt ?

XVII.

‘Who promised Jacob to take care of Benjamin, it Seiad
would let him go into Egypt ?

What dia Jacob advise his sons to take with them ?

When the brothers were come to Egypt, where did Jo-
seph’s servant bring them ?

Why were the brothers so much frightened ?

Who told them at last who had put the money in the
sacks %

When Joseph came into the house, how did the broth.
ers show their respect for him ?
_ ‘THE CHAPTERS. 239

What did Joseph say when he saw Benjamin %

Why did Joseph cry?

‘Who sat at each of the three tables ?

To'which of the brothers was Joseph the most kind ?

‘Were the brothers envious of Benjamin ?

Whom was Joseph like to, when he was kind to his un-
kind brothers

XVIII.

‘What did Joseph’s servant ask the brothers whether they
had stolen ? ‘

‘What did the servant say should be done to that one who
had stolen it ?

In whose sack was it found ?

Who had put it in Benjamin’s sack ?

Did the servant allow Benjamin’s brothers to go home to
their father ?

Why did the brothers return to Joseph with Benjamin ?

“Why was Joseph pleased to see that they.came back with
Benjamin 4 ,

What did Judah ask Joseph to do, instead of keeping
Benjamin ?

‘Why did Joseph then tell his brothers who he was 4

Why were they frightened at hearing he was Joseph? ~

How did Joseph behave to them ?

XIX.

Whom did Pharadh invite to live in Egypt?

‘Why was not Jacob pleased when he first heard that Jo-
_seph was alive ? ;

What made Jacob believe at last that Joseph was alive

How did the little children make such a long journey into
Egypt 3

‘Who met Jacob on his coming into Egypt ?

To whom did Joseph show his old father ?

How did Pharaoh behave to Jacob ?
240 QUESTIONS ON

Where did Jacob and his sons live ?

Where did Jacob desire his sons to bury him ?

‘What were the brothers afraid of after Jacob was dead ?

‘Was Joseph as kind after Jacob’s death as he bed been
before ?

What was the name of Joseph’s father ?

And of Jacob’s father ?

And of Isaac’s father ?

‘What was the name of Abraham’s wife ?

Of Isaac’s wife ?

Of Jacob’s wives %

How many sons had Jacob ?

What promises had God make to Abraham, Isaac, and
Jacob ?

xx.

What was Jacob’s other name ?

What name was given to all the children, and grand-
children, and great-grandchildren of Jacob ?

When the Pharaoh, who loved Joseph, was dead, who
was the king of Egypt ?

Why did that Pharaoh make the children of Israel work
so very hard in making bricks ?

What did he desire to be done to the boy-babies of the
children of Israel ?

‘What was it that one of the women did with her baby ?

‘When she could no longer hide it, where did she put it ?

Who watched to see what would become of the baby *

Who found the baby ?

‘What did the princess call it ?

‘Whom did she hire to be his nurse?

‘Whose son was Moses called ?

Was Moses rich and great ?

What promise had God made to Abraham about his
children’s children ?
THE CHAPTERS. 241

XXI.

When Moses was grown up, where did he go?

Where did Moses wish to lead the children of Israel?
What did Moses find them doing ?

Who were the taskmasters ?

What did Moses do to one of these cruel men ?

Was it right in Moses to kill him?

Did anybody see Moses kill him ?

Why did Moses go into a country a great way off?
What might Moses have been if he had chosen it?
‘Why did he choose rather to help the children of Israel ?
Who once left his throne in heaven to save us from Sa-
tan? :

XXIl.

When Moses ran away from Egypt, where did he at
length rest himself?

‘What kindness did Moses show to seven girls?

‘What kindness did their father show to him ?

How used Moses employ himself? d

‘What wonderful sight did he see while he was leading
his sheep ?

Where did God tell Moses to go?

Why did God determine to bring the children of Israel
into Canaan ?

‘What two wonderful things did God make Moses able
to do?

Why did God make Moses able to do those wonderful
things ?

Who did God tell Moses should speak for him when he
got to Egypt?

When Moses and Aaron were come to Egypt, what did
they say to the children of Israel?
- Did the Israelites believe that God had really spoken to
Moses 7

Did the children of Israel wish to go to Canaan ?

Line igen Line. . 16
242 QUESTIONS ON

XXIII.

‘When Moses and Aaron asked Pharaoh to let Israel go
to Canaan, what did Pharaoh answer ?

What was the first thing Moses and Aaron did to show
Pharaoh that God had sent them ?

Why did God turn the water into blood ?

Repeat the six plagues I have told you of.

XXIV.
When the dreadful storm came, how did some people
escape being hurt ?
What are locusts ?

‘When the three days’ darkness came, where was it light ?

When Pharaoh wished the plagues to be taken away,
who asked God to take them away ?

What was the last plague ?

Why did the Israelites mark their doors with blood ?

What were they doing when Pharaoh sent them away ?

Why did God desire the Israelites to eat a lamb in the
night every year ?

What was that supper called ?

Why was it called the Passover ?

Why was the lamb of the Passover like Jesus ?

Can you repeat the ten plagues 4

Is there any place where there are worse plagues than
those ten plagues ?

XXV.

How did the Israelites know which was the way to Ca-
naan ?

Who tried to overtake the Israelites after they had left
Egypt?

How did they cross the Red Sea ?

Why could the Israelites see their way clearly in the
night ? ’

Why could not Pharaoh and his men see well also?
THE CHAPTERS. 243

‘Why were Pharaoh and his men frightened when they
were in the middle of the sea ?

‘What became of Pharaoh and his men 4

‘What did the sea toss up the next morning on the side of
the sea where the Israelites were *

How did the Israelites show that they were thankful to
God for saving them ?

‘Who wishes to keep our souls from going to heaven ?

XXVI.

‘What sort of a place was the wilderness ?
How did the Israelites behave when they had nothing to

eat ?

How did God feed them?

Why were the Israelites obliged to pick up the manna
very early ?

‘What became of the manna if it was kept to the next
day ?

How did the Israelites behave when they had nothing to
drink ?

How did God give them water ?

XXVII.

‘Whom did God desire to come up the mountain, that he
might speak to him?

‘Why were rails put round the mountain ?

‘What was seen upon the mountain when God came down
upon it?

‘What words did the people hear God speak in a very loud
voice ?

Why did the people wish never to hear that voice again %

How long did Moses stay’ on the top of the mountain,
alone with God?

What did God give to Moses when he had done talking
with him ?

‘What did the Israelites do when they were tired of waiting
for Moses?
244 QUESTIONS ON

Who made the calf?

Who told Moses what the Israelites were doing *

Who begged God not to kill them?

Why did Moses throw down the tables of stone ?

What did Moses do with the calf?

What did he desire some,of the people to do with their
swords 3

Did God give the people any other punishment

‘When Moses stayed with God on the mountain forty days
more, what glorious sight did God show him?

Why were the Israelites afraid to come near him when he
came down again ?

Why was his face bright ?

When do you hope to shine, as Moses did?

XXIX.

‘When Moses was on the top of the mountain, what did
God tell Moses to make ?

‘What did the Israelites give to Moses to make the house
of?

How did two men know how to make so beautiful a house?

‘Why was not this house fastened to the ground +

What was this house called ?

What were the walls of the house made of?

‘What was thrown over the top of the house ?

What kind of a door was there +

How many rooms were there in the tabernacle?

Tell me three things in the first room.

‘What was burnt on the golden altac?

What was placed on the golden table?

How many lamps were there in the candlestick ?

What was the little room called ?

What was there in it ?

‘What was inside the ark

‘What was the top of the ark called ?

Where did the cloud of God sit in this little room %
THE CHAPTERS. 245

What made this room light ?
‘What made the other room light ?
‘What makes heaven light ?

XXX,

‘What was placed round the court of the tabernacle?
‘What two things were placed in the court ?

‘What was to be burned upon the altar of brass 4
Who was to wash in the brass basin ?

Who was to be high priest ?

Where might the high priest go only’once a year?
What clothes was Aaron to wear?

‘What was to be written on Aaron’s mitre?

Who was to help Aaron to offer sacrifices ?

What sort of clothes were they to wear?

Who set up the tabernacle ?

On what did Moses pour oil ?

What was this pouring of oil called?

What was seen upon the tabernacle after it was set up’
Why ought the Israelites to have been very happy ?

XXXI.

What sacrifice was offered every morning and every
evening on the brass altar ?

‘What was it the priests never let go out?

‘Who ate the shew bread when it was taken from the
golden tablet

Who might go into the tabernacle ?

Who is our high priest ?

What is he doing for us in heaven?

‘When did the priests blow the silver trumpets ?

Who carried the ark ?

What sweet land do we hope to reach

XXXII
‘Why did Moses send twelve men into Canaan?
‘

246 QUESTIONS ON

What aid these men bring back with them .

What sort of a land did the spies say that Canaan was?

What sort of people did the spies say lived in Canaan ?

What were the names of the two good spies ?

Why ought not the Israelites to have been afraid of the
people of Canaan ?

What was Moses doing when God spoke to him from the
tabernacle ?

How did God say that he would punish the Israelites for
their wickedness ?

Would the little children die in the wilderness ?

Would any of the grown-up people be allowed to go into
Canaan ?

How many years would it be before the Israelites would
go into Canaan?

XXXIII.

How did the people behave when they had no water to
drink ?

How did God desire Moses to bring water out of the rock 4

What was it Moses did instead of speaking to the rock 1

What did Moses and Aaron say as they stood by the rock 4

How did God say that he would punish them ?

Was Moses often angry ?

‘Was Moses meek ?

How would a meek child behave if he were ill treated ?

Who went with Aaron to the top of the hill when he was
to die ?

What clothes did Aaron wear?

Upon whom did Moses put the clothes just before Aaron
died 4

Why did Moses put the clothes on Aaron’s son 3

“Who was the high priest when Aaron was dead ?

XXXIV.

How did the Israelites behave when God made them stay
a long while in the wilderness ?
THE CHAPTERS. 247

What living creatures did God send to punish them?

What did God desire Moses to do, to cure the people who
were bitten ?

Who has made our souls ready to die?

When did Satan first make people’s souls naughty %

At whom must we look that our souls may live ?~

Are we to look at Jesus with the eyes of our body?

‘What do you mean by “looking at Jesus ?”

XXXV.

‘What did Moses write down in five books?

How did Moses know what to write ?

‘Whom did Moses desire to read his books to the children
of Israel ?

Who was to take charge of the people when Moses was
dead ?

Why did God desire Moses to go up to the top of a high
mountain before he died ?

Who buried Moses ?

How used God to talk to Moses?

If you are like Moses, what shall you like doing when
you are grown up ?

XXXVI.

‘What city did the Israelites see on the other side of the
river ?

Why did Joshua send two spies to Jericho?

To whose house did they go?

Who sent to Rahab’s house to look for them ?

‘Where had Rahab hid them ?

‘What promise did Rahab ask the spies to make her?

How did the spies come out of Jericho?

Why did they desire Rahab to bind the red rope to her
window ?

In what way do you hope God will save you ?
248 QUESTIONS ON
XXXVII.

‘What would the Israelites have to cross before they could
get into Canaan ?

‘What did Joshua desire the priests to do?

‘What happened when the priests put their feet into the
river Jordan ?

‘Where did the priests stop while the people were crossing
the river ?

Why did Joshua desire twelve men to take up twelve
stones from the river, and to place them in Canaan ?

‘When did the water of the river cover up the dry path
again ?

How long had the Israelites been travelling through the
wilderness ?

Who were the only persons in Jericho whom God meant
to save ?

Why did God desire the Israelites to kill the other people.
in Jericho ?

XXXVIIL

Who was the man with a sword that Joshua saw near
Jericho ?

‘Who told Joshua how to conquer Jericho ?

‘Who was to blow the ram’s horns?

How many days did the Israelites walk round Jericho %

How many times did they walk round on the seventh day ?

What did the people do just before the walls fell down ?

‘What did the priests do just before the walls fell down ?

‘What became of the people of Jericho ?

. What became of the city of Jericho ?
‘What day does the burning of Jericho make you think of?

XXXIX.

What did Joshua give to the Israelites after the people in
Canaan were killed ?
THE CHAPTERS. 249

Why did God give so much to the Israelites 4

Why did God desire the Israelites to kill the people in
Canaan’?

Where did Joshua place the tabernacle ?

What had God desired the Israelites to do with the
wicked people’s idols ?

‘What question did Joshua ask the Israehtes before he
died ?

‘What promise did the Israelites make to Joshua?

Why did Joshua place a stone under the oak-tree 3

Why ought we to love God, and to try and please him %
VERSES OF SCRIPTURE.



‘Tue following verses are applicable to the preceding les-
sons, and one of them may be learned by heart after each
lesson has been taught to the little pupils.

The titles prefixed may be useful in reminding the chil-
dren of the subjects of the verses.

It is recommended that the pupils should not be required
to name the parts of scripture whence the verses are taken.



1. How long God was in making the world,
In six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and
all that in them is, and rested the seventh day.—Ex. xx. 11,

2. Who are the devil’s children.
He that committeth sin is of the devil; for the devil sin-
neth from the beginning. —1 John iii. 16.

3, About Cain.
Cain was of that wicked one, and slew his brother.
1 John iii, 12.

4. About the flood.
(God) spared, not the old world, but saved Noah, the
eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the
flood upon the world of the ungodly.—2 Peter ii. 5.
VERSES OF SCRIPTURE. © 251

5. Who are God's friends
Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you.
—John xv. 14,

6. How Abraham pleased God,
(Abraham) believed in the Lord; and he counted it to
him for righteousness.—Gen. xv. 6.

1. Who loves God?
He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he
it is that joveth me.—John xiv. 21.

8. How safe the righteous are.
The eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears
are open unto their prayers.—l Peter iii. 12.

9. How happy the righteous are.
Blessed is every one that feareth the Lord; that walketh
in liis ways.—Ps, exxviii. 1.

10. Jacob’s thanks to God for keeping his kind promise.
I am not worthy of the least of all the mercies, and of all
the truth, which thou hast showed unto thy servant—Gen.
xxxii. 10.

11. What a wicked man thinks when he is doing wickedness.
‘He hath said in his heart, “God hath forgotten: he hideth
his face ; he will never see it.”—Ps. x. 11.

12. How God will punish liars.
All liars shall have their part in the lake which burneth
with fire and brimstone.—Rev. xxi. 8.

13. What the Lord promises to do for the righteous.
I will be with him in trouble: I will deliver him and
honour him.—Ps, xci. 15
~

252 VERSES JF SCRIPTURE.

14, The Lord likes men to be patient. }
The Lord is good unto them that wait for him, to the soul
that seeketh him.—Lam. iii. 25.

15. Who is it that makes all things happen ?

The Lord maketh poor and maketh rich: he bringeth low
and lifteth up.—1 Sam. ii. 7.

16. How God saves the righteous and punishes the wicked.
The righteous is delivered out of trouble, and the wicked
cometh in his stead,—Prov. xi. 8.

â„¢

‘11. Aboiit forgiving others.
If any man havea quarrel against any; as Christ forgave
you, 80 also do ye—Col. iii. 18.

18, About the kindness of the Lord.
Thou, Lord, art good and ready to forgive; and plenteous
in mercy unto all them that'call upon thee,—Ps, Ixxxvi. 5,

.

19. How the Young should behave to tha old.
Thou shalt rise up before the head, and honour the
face of the old man, and fear'thy God Lav, xix. 32:

20. What the righteous man does in his trouble \
As for me I will call upon God, and the Lord shall save_
me—Ps, lv. 16. .

21. The choice of the righteous,
I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God,
than dwell in the tents of wickedness.—Ps. Ixxxiv. 10,

22. Why God sent Moses to bring the children of Israel out of
Egypt.
He remembered his holy promise, and Abraham his ser-
vant.—Ps. cv, 42
VERSSE OF SCRIPTURE. 253

23. Whom we should fear.
Thou, even thou, art to be feared; and who may stand
in thy sight when once thou art angry 1—Ps. Ixxvi. 7.

24. How terrible God is to the wicked.

It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living:
God.—Heb. x. 31.

25. How God destroyed Pharaoh and his servants.

Thou didst blow with thy wind, the sea covered them:
they sank as lead in the mighty waters.—Ex. xv. 10.

26. How God relieved the thirsty Israelites.

He clave the rocks in the wilderness, and gave them drink
as out of the great depths.—Ps. Ixxviii. 15.

21. What God wished the Israelites to do,

O thet there were such a heart in them, that they would
fear me, and keep all my commandments always !—Deut
v. 29,

28. How the Israelites behaved to God.

They forgat God their Saviour, which had done great
things in Egypt.—Ps. evi. 21.

29. About the glorious light of heaven.
And there shall be no light there; and they need no can-

dle, neither light of the sun; for the Lord God giveth them
light.—Rev, xxii. 5.

30. Where God promised to dwell.

I will dwell among the children of Israel, and will be their
God.—Exod. xxix. 45.

31. About the Lamb who died for us.

Behold the lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the
world.—John i, 29.
32. How the Israelites behaved when the spies came Lack from
viewing the land,

They despised the pleasant land, they believed not (God’s)

word: but murmured in their tents, and hearkened not unto
the voice of the Lord.—Ps. cvi. 24, 25.

33. A prayer to be kept from sinful words.
Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; keep the door of
my lips.—Ps. cxli. 3,

34, Why the serpent of brass was like Christ.

And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness,
even so must the Son of Man be lifted up: that whosoever
believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life.—
John iii. 14, 15.

35, How God shows his love when people sin.
As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten.—Rev. iii. 19.

36. What we must now do, if we hope to be saved in the judg-
ment-day.

Seek righteousness, seek meekness: it may be, ye shall
be hid in the day of the Lord’s anger.—Zeph. ii. 3.

37. When we ought to seek for mercy from God.

Seek ye the Lord while he may be found; _— upon
him while he is near.—Isa, lv. 6.

38. What shall become at last of the wicked.

Let sinners be consumed out of the earth, and let the
wicked be no more,—Ps. civ. 35,

39. Pravse to God for his goodness,
Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits:

who forgiveth all thine iniquities who healeth all thy
dens —Ps ciii, 2, 3, ;



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