Citation
Ground water in the lake Okeechobee area, Florida ( FGS: Report of investigations 2 )

Material Information

Title:
Ground water in the lake Okeechobee area, Florida ( FGS: Report of investigations 2 )
Series Title:
( FGS: Report of investigations 2 )
Creator:
Stringfield, V. T ( Victor Timothy ), 1902-
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Place of Publication:
[Tallahassee]
Publisher:
[s.n.]
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
3 p.l. 31 numb. l. : incl. illus. (map) tables ( 1 fold.) ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Groundwater -- Florida ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida ( lcsh )
Lake Okeechobee ( local )
City of Ocala ( local )
City of Tampa ( local )
City of Okeechobee ( local )
The Everglades ( local )
City of Moore Haven ( local )
Water wells ( jstor )
Limestones ( jstor )
Marl ( jstor )
Lakes ( jstor )
Mineral water ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Bibliographical foot-notes.
General Note:
Prepared by the Florida survey in cooperation with the United States Geological survey.
General Note:
Mimeographed.
Statement of Responsibility:
by V. T. Stringfield.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
030418432 ( aleph )
01725012 ( oclc )
AER8194 ( notis )
gs 39000217 revised2 ( lccn )

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FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
George W. Davis
Supervisor of Conservation
GEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT
Herman Gunter
Assistant Supervisor

*** ********* ****-****X****5**


REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS

NO. 2


* ****** **** **#*# **# x *x


GROUI WATER IN TIE LAKE OIKECHOBEE AREA

FLORIDA

By

V. T. Stringfield


*********** ***** ***********








Prepared in cooperation between the Florida
Survey and the United States Geological
Survey





1933


Third mimeographed
edition, August 1, 3.951











AGRI-
CULTURAL
LIBRARY









CONTENTS


Introduction * * * *

Location * * *

Purpose and scope of investigation

Topography *. * *

Outline of the geology . .

General features . .

Geologic formations . .

Eocene and Miocene rocks .

Ocala limestone .

Tampa limestone .

Hawthorn formation .

Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Re

Caloosahatchee marl .

Fort Thompson formation

Water supplies . . .* .

Surface water . .

Ground water . .

Wells . .

Artesian conditions .


Page

I


. . 1




. S S 900 *14













. 15. .
. . . 6

. . . 13

. . . 13







cent rocks 16


. . . 17

. . . 17

. . . 19

. 0 0 19


* S 0

* 9 0


* 0 5 0

* 0 9

* 5 0 9


Relative resistivity of the water at different depths

Chemical composition of the water . *

Summary and conclusion . . .

Records of wells in the Lake Okeechobee area . .

Analyses of water from the Lake Okeechobee area .


I & a I


* *

* *


* *

* *


* S 0

* 9 0



















GROUND WATER IN THE LAKE OKEECOBEE
AREA, FLORIDA


By


V. T. Stringfield


Shaded portion indicates location
of Lake Okeechobee area.


FLORIDA


SCALE W -O R MSLES


Index Map











Ground water in the Lake Okeechobee area, Florida

Introduction



Location.- The area covered by this report is in the southern

part of the Florida peninsula and consists of parts of Okeechobee, Martin

Palm Beach, Hendry, and Glades Counties that border Lake Okeechobee. It

lies in the northern part of the Florida Everglades.

Purpose and scope of investigation.- The investigation that

forms the basis of this report was made during the latter part of April

1933, in order to obtain information regarding the available ground water

-suitable for domestic and public supplies. This work was undertaken as

a part of a comprehensive investigation of the gound-water resources of

Florida provided by a cooperative agreement between the Florida State

Geological Survey and the United States Geological Survey. The work

is under the direction of Herman Gunter, State geologist, and 0. E. Meinzer,

geologist in charge of the division of ground water of the Federal Sur-

vey. Several reports on the work done in other parts of the State have

been prepared.


Thompson, D. G., and Stringfield,V. T., Ground-water resources of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey Press Bull. 13, April 4, 1931.

Thompson, D. G., Problems of ground-water supply in Florida: American
Water Works Assoc. Jour., vol. 23, no. 12, pp. 2085-2100, December 1931.

Stringfield, V. T., Ground-water resources of Sarasota County, Florida,
and Exploration of artesian wells in Ssaseota,:County, Florida: Florida
Geol. Survey Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Ann. Repts., 1933.

Stringfield, V. T., Ground-water investigations in Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Bull. 11, 1933.










Within the Lake Okeechobee area there are several towns --

Okeechobee (north side of Lake Okeechobee, in Okeechobee County), Pahokee

and Belle Glade (southeast side of Lake Okeechobee, in Palm Beach County),

Clewiston (south side of Lake Okeechobee, in Hendry County), and Moore

Haven (southwest side of Lake Okeechobee, in Glades County). According

to the Federal census of 1930 the population of Okeechobee was 1,795 and

the population of Pahokee was 2, 256. The other towns had a population of

less than 1,000 each.


There are comparatively few wells in this area, and most of

these yield highly mineralized water. The ground-water supplies available

from wells at the State farm near Belle Glade and several other localities

are not entirely satisfactory, and there is a demand for the development

of most desirable ground-water supplies or systems whereby water may be

obtained from Lake Okeechobee.


In the course of the field work well data and information in re-

gard to the formations penetrated by wells were obtained. The electric

resistance of the water was measured at different depths in several wells

to determine differences in the amount of mineral matter dissolved in the

water and thus to ascertain the depth at which highly mineralized water

enters the wells. Field tests were made of the chloride content of

samples of water from all the wells visited. Samples of water were ob-

tained from representative wells and analyzed in the water-resources labo-

ratory of the United States Geological Survey by S. K. Love.











The writer is indebted to the citizens who have contributed

information to this investigation. Thanks are due especially to Messrs.

A. R. Richardson and R. V. Allison and other state officials at Belle

Glade. Mr. J. Clarence Simpson, of the State Geological Survey, gave

effective assistance in the field work.


Topography

The area slopes gently southward from an altitude of about 35

feet above sea level at Okeechobee and merges into the Everglades. As

stated by Cooke and Mossom-. "The Everglades form a level grassy plain

that slopes gently southward from an altitude of about 18 feet above

sea level near Lake Okeechobee and merges into the mangrove-covered keys

in Florida Bay. This plain is floored with Pliocene shell marl and lime-

stone (Caloosahatchee marl), which is generally covered by 6 or 8 feet of

peaty muck or by a thin layer of Pleistocene limestone. Before their

artificial drainage was undertaken the Everglades were usually flooded,

but now so much of their water is carried off by canals that their higher

parts stand above normal water level."


Lake Okeechobee is a fresh-water body about 35 miles across and

not more than about 15 feet deep. It lies in an original depression in

the floor of the sea that once covered that part of the peninsula. The

Kissimmee River and Taylor Creek flow into the lake on the north side, and

^-....-.... .........m~i----------------------.....-. ^ -.-.-.-^-----------.----

Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., p. 143, 1929.


-3-











Fisheating Creek empties into the lake on the west side. St. Lucie, West

Palm Beach, Hillsborough, North New River, and Miami Canals extend from

Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic Ocean. On the west the Caloosahatchee

Canal connects the lake with the headwaters of the Caloosahatchee River,

which drains westward into the Gulf of Mexico. On the northwest side of

the lake the Indian Prairie Canal drains into it. The St. Lucie and

Caloosahatchee Canals are normally the chief spillways for the lake. A

sand ridge or natural levee a few feet above the general land surface forms

a rim around the lake except in several places at the southern edge, which

are natural spillways during flood stages.


Outline of geology

General features

The geologic formations of the Florida peninsula consist of

several thousand feet of sedimentary rocks that overlie a basement of

metamorphic rocks.


The formations exposed at the surface in different parts of the

peninsula include the Ocala limestone, of Eocene age, and younger forma-

tions of Miocene, Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Recent age. The most recent

complete description of the geology of the State is given in a report by

Cooke and Mossoml/ which includes a geologic map showing the distribution

of the geologic formations at or near the surface.

^ ----------------------., .- -.--.------------------

Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., pp. 29-228, 1929
-----mm M M ~ m m w em m m ue1e e w a m m mu e ~ e m e e e o e m e e


.4-











Florida forms the emerged part of a peninsula of the continent

of North America, known as the Floridian Plateau, which includes not only

the State of Florida but also part of the adjacent floor that is less than

300 feet below sea level. In the Gulf of Mexico the edge of the plateau

lies from somewhat less than 75 miles to more than 100 miles west of the

present coast of the peninsula of Florida. Along the south and east coast

of the peninsula, from Key West to Palm Beach, the edge of the plateau is

less than 20 miles off the coast.


The sedimentary rocks that overlie the basement rocks of the

plateau are arched into a broad anticline or elongated dome. As described

by Mossoml/, the arch trends northwest and plunges toward the southeast

in the southern part of the Florida peninsula. In the northwestern part of

the peninsula the crest of the arch is eroded and the Ocala limestone lies

at or near the surface. On some parts of the crest the Ocala limestone is

more than 120 feet above sea level, and dips under the younger formations,

which are exposed on the flanks of the fold. This large fold forms a struct-

ural feature that is favorable for the occurrence of water under artesian

pressure in the Ocala and Tampa limestone and the Hawthorn formation.


In the Lake Okeechobee area the Ocala limestone dips in a general

southerly direction, and the formations that overlie it become thicker to-

ward the south.



Mossom, Stuart, A review of the structure and stratigraphy of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey Seventeenth Ann. Rept., pp. 171-268, 1926.


-5-







Geologic formations in the Lake Okeechobee area


The geologic formations that are believed to underlie the Lake

Okeechobee area are represented in the following table:



'Thickness
Age Formation (feet) Character


Recent and 0-20 Undifferentiated
Pleistocene sand, soil and muck
I 1 t
mmmm mmmmmmmmmmm m w mm memememinm mmme mttmWinMMUmi mememmmem memmmememm

Pleistocene Fort Thompson 10+- Marl, limestone,
Formation and sand. Yields
water to shallow wells
mmmmm-mmmminminmmmmmminmin -mmi------------m --------mi----m-mm m m m m m m m m m m m--

Pliocene Caloosahatchee 50-100 Marl, shells and
Smarl '' sand. Yields,..wter
S -- to wells.
meemmem mnnelmemmemememmeemm meommememememmm omeememm meme memmmm memmemem
t t t
SHawthorn formation 400-500 Interbedded clay, marl,
S(of Alum Bluff sand, and limestone.
'group) Contains water.
memmmmmemmemmmesmemememmmm memmmemmem m mtmmmmssmmenememememem

'Tampa limestone 150-250 Limestone. Yields
water to wells
I I

I I I

Eocene Ocala limestone 500+- Limestone. Yields
S(of Jackson age) water to wells.
I I B
t t !

t t B
Eocene and Undifferentiated
Cretaceous sediments.


.1 I I
Paleozoic or '' Mica, schist, etc.,
older metamorphic basement.







mmm mmmm m m.. m mmmmmmm
6-







Log of well 5 at Everglades Yxperiment Station of the

University of Florida near Belle Glade, Florida

(FSG8. No. W-20)


Thickness j Depth
(feet) (feet)

Muck 8 8

Fort Thompson formation and Caloosahatc1ee marl:

Limestone, white, hard and soft, with broken
shell material . .... . .... 24 32

Caloosahatchee marl:

Limestone, gray-white, broken shell material;
some gray-green marl .... . .. 20 52

Limestone, gray-white, with blue hard limestone,
Chione cancellata, Phacoides multilineatus,
Corbula barrettiana, Ostrea sp., Arca sp.,
Turritella sp., and other fossil fragments ....... 13 65

Dark-gray jagged semicrystalline material, much
broken shell matter cemented with crystalline
calcium carbonate. Same material as above and
masses of broken shell, Plicatula marginata,
Chione cancellata, Phacoides waccamawensis,
Dosinia sp., Olivella mutica, Turritella sp.,
Ostrea sp., Area sp., and other forms as
fragments. . . . .. 18 105

Marl, light-colored, gray-green and broken shell
(top sample)
Limestone, white, soft, with broken shell (middle
sample). . . . . . 70 175

Hawthorn formation:

Sand, mostly drab, micaceous; small amount of
shell (bottom sample)
Sand, dark-green, micaceous. . ... . 200 375

Marl, gray with greenish cast, earthy, very
calcareous; some shell . . 165 540

Marl, same as above with Ostrea sp .. . 10 550

Marl, same as marl at 540 feet . 20 570

Clay or shale, dull green, slightly calcareous '5 575
-7-









f
Thickness Depth
(feet) (feet)


Limestone, white, fairly hard; some gray-green
marl (2 samples) . . . . 20 595

Limestone, same as above, with considerable gray-
green marl and some shell. . .. ..... 10 605

Limestone, white, soft, pure; some shell
m r10 615
material . . . . . 10 615

Limestone, light-colored, and gray-green clay. 10 625

Limestone and clay, same as above, with black
pebble. . . 15 640

Limestone, same as limestone at 625 feet
(3 samples). . . . 32 672

Tampa limestone:

Limestone, similar to that above but lighter-
colored and more calcareous (9 samples). . 88 760

Limestone, light-colored, with green calcareous
clay (3 samples) . . . . 30 790

Gray-white, very calcareous material .. 10 800

Light-yellow calcareous material .. 10 810

Gray-white, very calcareous material . 10 820

Light gray-green, very calcareous material
(3 samples).. . . .. 30 850

Limestone, light gray-white; some clay . 10 860

Gray-green, very calcareous material (4 samples) 40 900

Ocala limestone:

Limestone, white soft. . 25 925

Limestone, white, soft and hard; Lepidocyclina
p., Operculina sp., and mollusk fragments 45 970

Limestone, similar to above but slightly browner;
finely powdered by drill .... . ... 30 1,000
I Iak


-8-










'Thickness Depth
(feet) (feet)

Limestone, white, hard; many small Laganu sp.
cf. L. dalli, Dictyoconus sp. and orbitoids 190 1,190

Limestone, white powdered fine. . . 15 1,205

Limestone, white, hard and soft, contains some
blue limestone and smaller Foraminifera . 127 1,332

-.m------------------------------------------------ ------------- .-.--- --

The log of this well 5 to a depth of 900 feet is published in a report by

Mossom. With reference to the probable stratigraphy he states:1/

"The first diagnostic material is the Caloosahatchee marl (Pliocene)

at 52 feet. Above this the Pleistocene limestone and marl had

probably been-passed through. The Caloosahatchee is present at

105 feet, and the shell in the first two samples of 105 to 375

seems to represent this formation also. The micaceous green sand

or marl is probably of Miocene age, and the limestone toward the

bottom from 585 feet down seems also to be of this age, possibly

the equivalent of the Tampa limestone, though no fossil evidence

is present. The material from 625 to 900 is much the same. As

the samples are powdered fine by the drill it is difficult to

determine the true nature of the rock. At 625 feet the material

is very calcareous -- possibly an impure limestone or very calca-

reous marl. At 640 there are some semierystalline pieces of

^ --.-.-.---------------------------------------------------...

Mossom, Stuart, A review of the structure and stratigraphy of Florida:
Florida Geol. Survey Seventeenth Ann. Rept., p. 251, 1926.

mmr* merrrmrerremelreemrre mearome ewm nwo eworrm wom men ome mon wom


-9-







limestone, and these are found intermittently in the succeeding

samples. Some samples contain more impurities than others, but

the whole should probably be regarded as an impure limestone.


The material from 925 to 950 feet is certainly the Ocala

limestone. The sample Just above may belong to this formation

and probably does. The material from 1,000 to 1,190 also is

Ocala; the echinoid Laganm sp. cf. L. dalli is characteristic

of the Ocala limestone. Apparently all the material to 1,332

feet should be placed in the Ocala. Thus at this location we

have a thickness of over 400 feet for the Ocala with none of

the brown limestone usually encountered."'i


Log of well 1 at Okeechobee, Fla., on lot 5, block 134,

at site of old water plant of Okeechobee.2/



Thickness Depth
(feet) (feet)
*memamommemmeemm------------mewmm-------------------------------------------------

Caloosahatchee marl and younger material: 2 2

Sand and soil, fine gray sand, chbcolate-
colored, fine, some of it indurated organic
matter, ordinary hardpan . . 10 12

Sand, gray or slightly brownish, indurated 3 15

Sands, gray.. . . . .. 23 38


Idem, p. 252, and unpublished nptes.

2-Mossom, Stuart, op. cit. p. 236.


-10-








,Thickness Depth
(feet) (feet)
-------------------------------------------- ----------- ----------
The sample preserved consists chiefly of black
clay containing considerable sand, one fragment
of shell, but aside from this no indications of
marl . . . . . 3 4

Marl, shell, sandy; shells much broken .. .15 56

Shell marl, pecten, barnacles, etc., marine
shallow-water marl ... .......... 6 62

Marl, gray, sandy, similar to material at 41-56
eet . . . .. 65

Coarse, clear grain sand and broken shell
Ostrea sp., Turritella sp., Bryozoa. . 16 81

Hawthorn formation:

Sand, light gray, incoherent . . 58 139

Marl, light-colored, sandy, with shell fragments,
pecten sp., occasional phosphate pebbles, black
and shiny... . ...... 19 158

Sand, olive-green, or very sandy marl. . .. 17 175

Clay, olive-green, with black, smooth shiny
pebbles, phosphatic.. . .. 37 212

Marl, dark-colored, very sandy, or calcareous
sands; some broken shells. . . 28 240

Clays, olive-green, very sandy and calcareous,
or clayey sands.. .............. 5 245

Marl, dark-colored, very sandy, with shell
fragments. . . . .. 31 276

Clay, calcareous and very sandy, or clayey sand. 24 300

Sand, dark-colored, broken rock and shell
fragments. . . . . 80 380
O o @ ,


-11-











Thickness Depth
(feet) (feet)


Marl, dark-colored, very sandy; small sand
grains . 23 403

Sand, light-colored, broken rock and shell
fragments. . . . . 55 458
I 1
Clay, dark, and broken shells. .. . 10 468
a a
Tampa limestone:

Clay, drab ......... ... ............ ......... 32 500

Limestone, white, with fragments of
echinoderm spines. .. ... ... 10 510

Limestone, white, with fragments of
echinoderm spines; also pieces of dark-
colored rocks with small phosphate
pebble. The dark rock is probably from
above the light rock . .. .. ... 510

Chiefly white sand ... . .... 608

Ocala limestone:

Limestone, white, with Operculina sp.,
Gypsina sp., Lepidocyclina sp. . . 7 615

Limestone powdered fine by the drill . 160 775
mememm memmmmmeasumewmmemmmmemmemmem mm mmm mmmemewmememememm mm mmewa

In a discussion of the probable stratigraphy of the material penetrated by

well 1 at Okeechobee, Mossomi- states:



Mossom, Stuart, op. cit., p. 237.
Mem-memmmmemW ~ememmme memmeeemmmmemmememmmmemmm e emmem mnmemqmine m m e


-12-









"The material from the surface down to the samples marked

94-139 represents the Pleistocene and Pliocene; the con-

tact of the Pliocene and Miocene seems to be in the inter-

val from 94 to 139, for the material from 139 to 500 feet

represents the Miocene. From 500 to 608 feet the rock is

probably of Oligocene age or basal Miocene, and from 608

to 775 feet is the Ocala limestone, of Eocene age."


Eocene and Miocene Rocks

Ocala limestone


The Ocala limestone, of Eocene age, is the oldest and most deeply

buried of the formations that are penetrated by wells drilled for water in

this area. The logs of only two wells (see pp. 7-12) penetrating this for-

mation are available. The Ocala is present at a depth of about 600 feet

below the surface at the town of Okeechobee, in the northern part of the

area, and at about 900 feet below the surface 40 miles to the south, at

Belle Glade. It is exposed about 150 miles north of this area in Citrus,

Sumter and Marion counties.


The formation consists essentially of limestone but in places con-

tains beds of chert. The material penetrated by well 1 (see p. 10) and well
white
5 (see p. 7) is chiefly hard and soft/limestone, part of which is

fossiliferous.


The maximum thickness of the Ocala limestone in the Florida penin-

sula has not been definitely determined. The contact with the older Eocene


-13-









rocks in Florida is not exposhd4, and no complete section of the formation

has been described. It is estimated to have a thickness of about 500 feet

in the northern part of the peninsula and possibly is somewhat thicker in

the Okeechobee area.


The limestone is one of the chief water-bearing formations of the

peninsula. In the southern part of Florida, however, the formation is deep-

ly buried and yields mineralized water. The chemical composition of the

water from the two wells penetrating the Ocala is shown on page 31. The

fresh water of the Ocala limestone enters the formation in the area where it

is at or near the surface, in the central part of the State, or in areas

where it is overlain by permeable material that permits free downward perco-

lation. The water in the Ocala limestone is under artesian pressure, and

wells penetrating the formationn.normally overflow at the surface.


Tampa limestone


In the southern .part of the State the Tampa limestone, of Miocene age,

overlies the Ocala and is overlain by the Hawthorn formation. It is pene-

trated by many wells drilled for water northwest of the Lake Okeechobee area

in a large area that includes Sarasota, Manatee, Hillsborough, and Pinellas

counties. It lies at or near the surface in an area that includes all parts

of Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Sumter, and Citrus counties. Well records

indicate that in the eastern and northeastern part of the peninsula the

Tampa limestone is absent, although no diagnostic fossils of the Tampa lime-

stone have been found in cuttings from wells in the Lake Okeechobee area, the


-14-









material overlying the Ocala probably represents the Tampa limestone. Nor-

mally the 1hmpa limestone ranges in color from white to brown. The texture

and hardness of the formation are variable; some parts may consist of loose

masses of fossils, and other parts may be dense, compact, and silicified.

The material referable to the Tampa limestone penetrated by wells 1 and 5

is essentially limestone with calcareous clay or marl. The formation has

an estimated thickness of 150 to 250 feet in this area. Apparently the

greatest thickness is in the southern part of the area.


The Tampa limestone is an important water-bearing formation in the

west-central part of the peninsula and yields large quantities of water to

wells in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties. In the Lake Okeechobee area,

however, although water under artesian head may be found in the formation,

it is likely to be highly mineralized, especially in the southern part of

the area. The water from well 9, at Moore Haven (see analyses on p. 31),

is probably in part front the Tampa limestone.


Hawthorn formation


The Hawthorn formation, of Miocene age, is one of the most ex-

tensive formations of Florida and is present throughout the peninsula

except in areas where it has been removed by erosion and older formations

are exposed. It occurs at or near the surface in an extensive area which

includes all or parts of Hardee, Manatee, Polk, and Hillsborough counties,

northwest of the Lake Okeechobee area. The formation overlies the Tampa

limestone in the southern part of the peninsula and is overlain by the


-15-









Caloosahatchee marl or younger material.


It is estimated to have a thickness of 400 to 590 feet and con-

sists of interbedded clay, sand, sandy phosphatic limestone, and marl. As

indicated by cuttings from well 1, much of the material penetrated in the

northern part of the area is green-gray marl or sandy marl. Cuttings from

well 5 indicate that in the southern part of the area the upper part of the

formation is chiefly gray-green marl and sandy marl and the lower part is

chiefly limestone.


The formation contains water under sufficient artesian head to

produce flowing wells. Some of the water, however, is highly mineralized.


Pliocene, Pleistocene and Recent rocks


Surficial materials representing the Pliocene, Pleistocene and

Recent series overlie the Hawthorn formation and are present at or near the

surface.


Caloosahatchee marl


The Caloosahatchee marli/probably includes all the known marine

Pliocene deposits in Florida. According to Cooke the marl probably rests

unconformably on the Hawthorn formation and is overlain by Pleistocene

material.


The formation underlies the entire Lake Okeechobee area and is


-/Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol.
Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., p. 152, 1929.
mmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmemm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm









exposed at or near the surface in the northern half of the area. It con-

sists chiefly of sand, shells, limestone, and marl and ranges in color from

white to gray, blue, or yellow. The thickness of the formation is estimated

at 50 to 100 feet. According to Mossomlthe contact with the Miocene rocks

at Okeechobee (see log of well 1, p. 10) seems to be in the interval between

94 to 139 feet below the surface. At Belle Glade (see log of well 5, P. 7)

the contact of the Caloosahatchee with the Miocene rocks is probably between

105 and 150 feet below the surface.


The Caloosahatchee yields moderate amounts of water to shallow

wells but some of the water is highly mineralized.


Fort Thompson formation


The Fort Thompson formation, of Pleistocene age, consists of alter-

nating deposits laid down in fresh-;.asd brackish-water and marine shell, and

is present in the southern part of the Lake Okeechobee area. It overlies

the Caloosahatchee marl and is overlain by 8 to 10 feet of peaty muck in most

of the area.

According to Cooke and Mossom:;

"The marine beds in the Fort Thompson consist chiefly of

great quantities of Chione cancellata in sand. The beds

deposited in brackish-water are similar but contain also

Rangia cuneata (Gray) and other shells whose favorite


SMossom, Stuart, op. cit. p. 236.
2/ Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, op. cit., pp. 211-212.


-17-










habitat is in bays or estuaries. The fresh water origin of

certain gray limestone is shown by the abundance in them of

shells of Planorbis.

"The Fort Thompson formation is generally less than 10

feet thick but may be somewhat thicker in parts of the Ever-

glades. The individual beds range in thickness from a few

inches to about 3 feet.

"The formation covers an area occupied by Lake

Okeechobee at a time when it was much larger than it is now.

The northern boundary of the lake was probably not far from

its present shore line, but the lake extended westward as far

as LaBelle and southeastward probably to the eastern border of

the Everglades. The lake was separated from the Atlantic Ocean

by barriers that at times were swept away or overflowed so com-

pletely that salt water penetrated inland to the farthest part

of the lake. The alternation of marine and brackish-water de-

posits with beds deposited in fresh water records several in-

vasions of the sea.

"The surface of the Fort Thompson is a plain that ranges

in height from a foot or two below mean sea level at the deep-

est places in Lake Okeechobee to a maximum of little more than

10 feet above sea level in the Everglades."


This formation supplies water to shallow driven wells. Some of the most

suitable water obtained from wells for domestic use at Pahokee apparently

comes from this formation. Recharge of the formation is in part local,


-18-










and in some localities the formation yields water with a swamp coloring. Water

from well 11 (see analysis, p. 31) is probably derived from the Fort

Thompson formation.


The surficial sands of Recent age supply shallow wells. The water,

however, is subject to pollution from contaminated surface water.


Water Supplies

Surface Water


Water supplies in the area are obtained from both surface and

ground water sources. The surface water is drawn from Lake Okeechobee or

from canals connected to it. Water from the lake is suitable for public

and domestic use after is has been decolorized, filtered, and chlorinated.

However, owing to the shallowness of the lake the intake pipe line must be

laid and maintained to a distance of several hundred yards into the lake.

The public water supply of Okeechobee is obtained from the lake. The pub-

lic water supplies of Clewiston and Moore Haven are obtained from canals

connected with the lake.


Ground Water

Wells


The record of 12 representative wells are shown in the table on

page 29. Except at Okeechobee there are only three deep flowing wells

(Nos. 2, 5, and 9) in the area. There are 6 or more deep flowing wells in

Okeechobee, the record of one of which is shown on pages 10 to 13. Probably

all those wells penetrate the Ocala or Tampa limestone.


-19-










The public water supply of Belle Glade is furnished by a 3-inch

well, 26 feet deep (well 6, p. 29). A 6-inch well 810 feet deep (well 1, p.

10) formerly furnished water for the public supply of Okeechobee. A 6-inch

well 804 feet deep (well 9, p. 30) is used for emergency purposes for the

Moore Haven public supply.


There are numerous driven wells 10 to 15 feet deep that draw water

from the ridge or natural levee of the lake. Some of these wells, as well

11, p. 30 are in the muck areas and penetrate the Fort Thompson formation.


Another group of wells that probably yields most of the ground

water in the area are 25 to about 150 feet deep and about 2 to 6 inches in

diameter and draw water from the Caloosahatchee marl or the upper part of

the Hawthorn formation. Wells 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8 belong to this group. The

static water level in these wells is from a few inches to a few feet below the

surface. Wells of this type are found along the natural levee bordering the

lake, at the field camps of the United States Sugar Corporation, and in most

of the towns of the area.


Artesian conditions


Water in the Ocala and Tampa limestones and in the Hawthorn forma-

tion is under artesian pressure, and wells penetrating these formations over-

flow. Well 1, at Okeechobee, has sufficient artesian head to raise the water

12 feet above the surface, or about 50 feet above sea level. Measurements

of the artesian pressure on wells 2 and 5 indicate that the artesian head in

the southern part of the area is probably slightly less than that in the north-

ern part of the area. This suggests that there may be a circulation of arte-

sian water toward the south.
-20-










Water in wells terminating in the Caloosahatchee marl or in the

upper part of the Hawthorn formation rises to levels ranging from a few

inches to a few feet below the surface.


Relative resistivity of the water at different depths


The resistance of the water at different depths was measured in

representative wells (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, and 10) to indicate differences in

the concentration of dissolved mineral matter in order to determine the depth

at which the most highly mineralized water enters the wells. The resistance

of the water was measured between a pair of electrodes with a slide wire

bridge using a 1,000-cycle alternating current obtained from an audio-oscil-

lator operated by four 1 -volt dry-cell batteries. A reel operated by hand

and a wire cable with an insulated wire core were used for lowering the

electrodes into the well. The insulated wire and the outer steel strands

served for the leads from the bridge to the electrodes/. The electrodes

were lowered a few feet at a time into the well, and a measurement of the

resistance was made. An odometer consisting of a trip counter and a grooved

brass wheel with a circumference of 1 foot, over which the cable passed,

was used for recording the distance the electrodes were lowered into the well.

The electrodes were not calibrated to furnish a basis for calculation of the

actual resistivity.



Stringfield, V. T., Exploration of artesian wells in Sarasota County:
Florida Geol. Survey Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Ann. Rept.,
pp. 215-216, 1933.


-21-









The resistivity of the water in the wells that were examined in

this area decreased with increasing depth, but the decrease was probably no

more than can be attributed to the increase in the temperature, indicating

that there was no appreciable difference in the concentration of the water

at different depths. In wells 1, 2, 3, and 5, which yield highly mineral-

ized water, the records of the measured resistance indicate that the mineral-

ized water comes from strata penetrated in the lower parts of the wells. If

fresh or less concentrated water were entering the lower part of the wells,

there would have been an appreciable increase in the resistivity of the

water in that part of the well.


A record of the resistance of the water as measured with the

electrodes used in well 5 is shown in the following table. This well was

drilled 10 inches in diameter to a depth of 300 feet, and 10-inch casing was

inserted to that depth, below which it was drilled 8 inches in diameter, and

8-inch casing, extending from the surface, was seated at a depth of 900 feet.

The total depth of the well is 1,332 feet. At the present time the well

yields water from both the 10-inch and the 8-inch casing. The water from

the 10-inch casing is more highly mineralized (see analyses, p. 31) than

that from the 8-inch casing, and prior to the examination of the well it

appeared that water from the 10-inch casing might be leaking into the 8-

inch casing and thereby causing the high mineralization of the water from

that source. The resistance record, however, indicated that there is no

appreciable difference in the concentration of the water at different depths

in the 8-inch hole and therefore that there is no transfer of highly mineral-

ized water from the 10-inch hole to the 8-inch hole. The records also


-22-










indicate that no water of low mineralization enters the lower part of the

well. The construction of the well prevents exploration to determine the

source of the water in the 10-inch casing. However, the head of water in

the 10-inch casing was about 2 feet less than that in the 8-inch casing,

indicating that the water comes from some source above 900 feet. The 8-inch

casing doubtless was tightly seated, and there was no subsurface leakage of

water, because lowering the head as much as 30 feet in that casing had no

effect on the head in the 10-inch casing. The water from the 8-inch casing is

from the Ocala limestone and that from the 10-inch casing probably from the

Hawthorn formation.


-23-











Apparent resistance of water at different depths in


Well 5, near Belle Glade.



Depth Resistance Depth Resistance' Depth 'Resistance' Depth 'Resistance
(feet) (ohms) feet) (ohms) (feet) (ohms) (feet)' (ohms)


10' 81 350 77 725 72 '1,100 67

28 81 375 77 750 71 1,125 67

51 81 400' 76 775 71 '1,150 67

75 81 4'25 76 800' 71 1,175 67
SI I I t I
100 80 450 75 825 71 '1,200 66

125 80 475 75 850 71 1,225 66

150 80 500 74 875 70 1,250 66

175 79 525 74 900 70 '1,275 65

200 79 550 73 925 69 1,300 65
I t I I I I
225 79 575 73 950 69 1,325 65
II t I I
250 79 600' 73 975 69 1,320 65

275 78 625 72 '1,000 68

300 78 650 72 '1,025 68
I I I I I I I
325 77 675 72 1,050 68
I 1 I I I I
700 72 1,075 68
.......... .r.... .*...i. -...... -. ...*w......


-24"









Chemical composition of the water


Analyses of water from 10 representative wells and Lake Okeecho-

bee are shown on page 31. All the ground water analyzed except that from

wells 7 and 12 is excessively hard or otherwise highly mineralized and is

unsatisfactory for domestic or public supplies. With proper treatment,

however, such water as that from well 6 may be made suitable for domestic

use.


The chloride content of the water may be referred to as an indi-

cation of the relative saltiness of the water. It has little effect on the

suitabilityof the water for domestic purposes unless there is enough to

cause a disagreeable taste. Water containing as much as 1,000 parts per

million of chloride is undesirable for drinking, and to be acceptable to

most people it should not contain more than about 250 parts per million.

All the samples of water collected from wells penetrating the Ocala and

Tampa limestones and the Hawthorn formation contained more than 400 parts

per million of chloride. Some of the samples from the Caloosahatchee for-

mation were high and some were comparatively low in chloride. There are

variations in the quality of the water with reference both to horizontal

distribution and to depth. For example, well 7, near Clewiston, yields

water with a chloride content of 135 parts per million from the Caloosa-

hatchee formation, and a few miles north of that area salt water is encounter-

ed at about the same depth. Variations in the quality of water with depth

is shown by a comparison of analyses of water from wells 3, 4, and 6. Al-

though the water from wells 3 and 4 is relatively soft, it is high in sodium


-25-








afd bicarbonate and therefore undesirable for domestic use. All the samples

of water collected from the Fort Thompson formation and the younger over-

lying material were low in chloride. Samples of water from the Fort Thomp-

son and upper part of the Caloosahatchee formation had a swamp color.


Water from Lake Okeechobee is moderately soft and is satisfactory

for domestic or public supplies after decolorization, filtration, and chlori-

nation. Analyses of the lake water are shown on page 31 and published in

a report by Collins and HowardI/. The report also includes analyses of

water from the lake 3 miles north of Ritta Island and from the mouth of the

Kissimmee River, which flows into the lake.


Summary and conclusion


Flowing wells that yield large quantities of water from the Ocala

and Tampa limestones may be obtained in this area, but all the water from

these formations is hard and is likely to be high in chloride. According

to the available information it appears unlikely that water supplies sat-

isfactory for domestic or public use can be obtained from these formations

in the southern part of the area. In the northern part of the area wells

that are not drilled too deep may obtain water similar to that from well 1,

(see analysis, page 31) which is usable although of poor quality, whereas

water from deeper sources is likely to be still more highly mineralized.


The Hawthorn formation also yields water to wells, but although

the composition of the water may not be the same throughout the formation,

the water is likely to be too highly mineralized for domestic or public


JCollins, W. D., and Howard, C. S., Chemical character of waters of Florida:
U. S. eol. Survey Water-Supply Paper 596, pp. 222-224j 1928.


-26-








use, except possibly in the northern part of the area.


In some localities the Caloosahatchee formation yields water rel-

atively low in mineralization that is fairly satisfactory for domestic use

(see analysis 7), but in other places the water is excessively hard or other-

wise highly mineralized (see analyses 3, 4, and 6). With proper treatment

the hard water from well 6, derived from the upper part of the Caloosahatch-

ee at Belle Glade, could be improved. There is a possibility, however,

that with heavy draft from the well the water would become more concentrated

in dissolved material.


Wells 3 and 4, at the Florida State farm No. 2, near Belle Glade,

yield water from the Caloosahatchee formation that is unsatisfactory for

domestic use. Probably hard water similar to that from Vell 6 (26 feet

deep) at Belle Glade may be obtained from wells of similar depth at the

State farm, but with heavy draft water similar in quality to that from

wells 3 and 4 may be drawn in from below. There are no wells yielding

water from the lower part of the Caloosahatchee formation in this area,

and the quality of the water is undetermined. However, the presence of

mineralized water at a depth of only 40 feet below the surface suggests

that the prospects are poor for obtaining water of low mineralization in

the lower part of the formation in this locality.


It appears that although large quantities of ground water are

available, the poor quality of the water offers little encouragement for

the development of water supplies from either deep or shallow wells, although


-27-











in some localities in the northern part of the area it may be possible to

obtain small supplies of usable water from shallow wells. In view of the

fact that satisfactory water can be obtained from Lake Okeechobee, it

appears advisable to develop water supplies so far as practicable from the

lake or from the canals connected with it.


-28-





Records of wells in Lake Okeechobee area
(For analyses see following table)
............................................................ .........----.....-------------------------....


Owner or name


Depth of
well
(feet)


Diameter
of well
(inches)


Depth to
which well
is cased
(feet)


Pressure head
or altitude of
water level
above or below
surface


Remarks


(feet

1 Lot 5, block 134 City of Okeechobee 718 8-6 484 +12 Original depth
Okeechobee was 810 feet.
(Okeechobee Co.) See log p. 15.


SW 1/4 Sec. 12
T. 42 S. R. 18 E.
south of Conners
Highway, 3 miles
SE of Canal Point
(Palm Beach Co.)


United States Sugar Corp.


958


800+


+32


Yield from
Tampa & Ocala
limestones.


3 Florida State Farm Florida State Farm
No. 2, near Belle
Glade
(Palm Beach Co.)

4 do do

5 University of Fla. Everglades Experiment
Everglades Experi- Station Univ. of Fla.
ment Station, near
Belle Glade
(Palm Beach Co.)


6 Belle Glade
(Palm Beach Co.)


20+


37

1,332


3

10-8


20+

957


-1.5


-.9

+35


Town of Belle Glade


Yield from
Caloosahatchee
marl.


do

See resistance
record on p. 27
& log on p. 10
10-inch casing
to depth of
300 feet. Yield
from Ocala
limestone.

Yield from
Caloosahatchee
marl.


No.


Location


2






No. Location Owner or name Depth of Diameter Depth to Pressure head Remarks
well of well which well or altitude
(feet) (inches) is cased of water level
(feet) above or below
surface
(feet)
mllm~e memme-m ameem- -e-m mmmmm-em-em-ee-emamem-e-mmemmeemmemme eememmmmmememememem ee eeeemm


S7 Dairy about 1
mile west of
Clewiston
(Hendry Co.)

*8 Essambee Farms
Sec. 30, T. 42 S.
R. 34 E, east
side of Moore
Haven Rd.
(Glades Co.)


Clewiston Dairy Company




T. P. McBride


9 Moore Haven
(Glades Co.)


10 West of Brighton
south side of
St. Ed. No. 8
(Highlands Co.)

11 Torry Island
(Pa3nBeach Co.)


12 La Belle Everett
Hotel


Town of Moore Haven


Brighton


H. A. Braddock



Everett Hotel


804


219


700


15



650


-3



+30 +


Yield from Tampa
or Hawthorn.

Test well for
oil. Plugged at
219 feet.


Yield from Fort
Thompson forma-
tion.

Yield from
Hawthorn and
Tampa formations.


107


100+


142




Analyses of water from the Lake Okeechobee area.
yi (Parts per million. Numbers in first column refer to corresponding numbers in preceding table. S. K. Love, analyst).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~)~)e emm emmw m ))elmmllm e
mem~~~~~Lmm ew m m m m9 m m m w l I mm e


No. : Location or
source


: Depth
:(feet) :


Date of
collection


: Total : : : : : : : : Total
: dissolved :Calcium:Magnesium:Sodium and :Bicarbonate:Sulphate:Chloride:Nitrate: hardness as
: solids : (Ca) : (Mg) :Potassium : (HC03) (S) : (Cl) : (NO3) : (CaCO3)
: (calculated): : :(Na +K) : : : : (calculated


1 :Okeechobee City :
:Fla. Near Canal :
2 :Point State Farm:
3 :near Belle Glade:


b
3-i
lI.


718 : Apr. 24,1933

958 : Apr. 11,1933
42 : Apr. 17,1933


: do


S do

S do


5 :Experiment Sta- :
:tion near Belle
:Glade
/ do

6 :Belle Glade

7 :Clewiston

9 ::oore Haven

11 :Torry Island

12 :La Belle


: do :


: 37 : May 8, 1933 :


1,332 :


do


May 17, 1933 :


26 : May 5, 1933

107 : Apr. 20,1933 :

800 : May 1, 1933


15 :


Apr. 18,1933 :


650 : Apr. 24,1933 :


1,344

1,941
2,740

2,757

2,311

3,470


4,530

1,162

678

2,660

1,058

1,282


111 :

108
29

30

57


86
42

43

72


1,

1,


144 : 138


lo4


230

146

136

217

57


150


80

12

105

66

47


1,

1,

1,


294

495
011

o013

758

948


,375

64

105

694

26

342


--A|


I


-k %1


124 :

157
323

313

186

151


37

615

518

22

427

120


248

233
170

179

192

516


630

398

25

426

244

312


13/ :Lak Okeechobee Aug. 17,193 : 272 : 37 11 : 34 128 19 58 ;(trace): 138 ;o 1
~ ~ 11~------ &L hk _^_ ^^ ^ ^27,e 37 I: 11 ------------m


-- ^


1,


2,





1,


570 (a)

942 : (a)
838 : ()

845 : (a)

648 : (a)

650 (a)


255 (a)

87 : (a)

135 : (a)

290 (a)

45 250

465 : (a)


524

623
245

251

438

926


875

903

414

770

813

335


00
0 ) :H

0 14
0 cl

k 0
OHO
0 WO I
;ri C
0 N~
PH H OH
14 CHO0Hr
to O
P4 4)O (D

-P4)0 :

(1\ ) 0u 0.
:0 H H 1-i kON
0 0 0)

A *u1 l 0)
:P~aP a a)
to Cd -P
s M D <9m\l


:


1i


--f -




Full Text

PAGE 1

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION George W. Davis Supervisor of Conservation GEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT Herman Gunter Assistant Supervisor *** * ********* ****-****X****5** REPORT OF INVESTIGATIONS NO. 2 GROUWI WATER IN TIE LAKE OTKECHOBEE AREA FLORIDA By V. T. Stringfield **************************** Prepared in cooperation between the Florida Survey and the United States Geological Survey 1933 Third mimeographed edition, August 1, 3951

PAGE 2

AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY

PAGE 3

CONTENTS Page Introduction ........................1 Purpose and scope of investigation ... ....... 1 Topography .* * ..* * ....* * * * * -. .* * * * 3 Outline of the geology ........* * * * * * * * * * General features ............* * * * * * * Geologic formations ... ......* * * * * .6 Eocene and Miocene rocks ...........13 Ocala limestone ...... ... .* ..13 Tampa limestone .. ...........14 Hawthorn formation .........15 Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Recent rocks ....16 Caloosahatchee marl ... .... ......16 Fort Thompson formation ..........17 Water supplies ............a .* .o. .o 19 Surface water ............* ........19 Ground water .... ...............19 Wells ....................19 Artesian conditions .......... ....20 Relative resistivity of the water at different depths ....21 Chemical composition of the water ..............25 Summary and conclusion ............ ......26 Records of wells in the Lake Okeechobee area ........29 Analyses of water from the Lake Okeechobee area .....31

PAGE 4

'fGROUID WATER IN TEM LAKE OKEMCHOBEEAREA, FLORIDAByV. T. Stringfield Cof Lake Okeechobee area. (FLORIDASCAME W 40MmLES ^'Index Map

PAGE 5

Ground water in the Lake Okeechobee area, Florida Introduction Location.The area covered by this report is in the southern part of the Florida peninsula and consists of parts of Okeechobee, Martin Palm Beach, Hendry, and Glades Counties that border Lake Okeechobee. It lies in the northern part of the Florida Everglades. Purpose and scope of investigation.The investigation that forms the basis of this report was made during the latter part of April 1933, in order to obtain information regarding the available ground water -suitable for domestic and public supplies. This work was undertaken as a part of a comprehensive investigation of the gound-water resources of Florida provided by a cooperative agreement between the Florida State Geological Survey and the United States Geological Survey. The work is under the direction of Herman Gunter, State geologist, and 0. E. Meinzer, geologist in charge of the division of ground water of the Federal Survey. Several reportsY on the work done in other parts of the State have been prepared. Thompson, D. G., and Stringfield,.V. T., Ground-water resources of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Press Bull. 13, April 4, 1931. Thompson, D. G., Problems of ground-water supply in Florida: American Water Works Assoc. Jour., vol. 23, no. 19, pp. 2085-2100, December 1931. Stringfield, V. T., Ground-water resources of Sarasota County, Florida, and Exploration of artesian wellis in SS!asota,:County, Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Ann. Repts., 1933. Stringfield, V. T., Ground-water investigations in Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 11, 1933. ' .' e * e'". " "m *-1-.

PAGE 6

Within the Lake Okeechobee area there are several towns -Okeechobee (north side of Lake Okeechobee, in Okeechobee County), Pahokee and Belle Glade (southeast side of Lake Okeechobee, in Palm Beach County), Clewiston (south side of Lake Okeechobee, in Hendry County), and Moore Haven (southwest side of Lake Okeechobee, in Glades County). According to the Federal census of 1930 the population of Okeechobee was 1,795 and the population of Pahokee was 2, 256. The other towns had a population of less than 1,000 each. There are comparatively few wells in this area, and most of these yield highly mineralized water. The ground-water supplies available from wells at the State farm near Belle Glade and several other localities are not entirely satisfactory, and there is a demand for the development of most desirable ground-water supplies or systems whereby water may be obtained from Lake Okeechobee. In the course of the field work well data and information in regard to the formations penetrated by wells were obtained. The electric resistance of the water was measured at different depths in several wells to determine differences in the amount of mineral matter dissolved in the water and thus to ascertain the depth at which highly mineralized water enters the wells. Field tests were made of the chloride content of samples of water from all the wells visited. Samples of water were obtained from representative wells and analyzed in the water-resources laboratory of the United States Geological Survey by S. K. Love. -?-Z

PAGE 7

The writer is indebted to the citizens who have contributed information to this investigation. Thanks are due especially to Messrs. A. R. Richardson and R. V. Allison and other state officials at Belle Glade. Mr. J. Clarence Simpson, of the State Geological Survey, gave effective assistance in the field work. Topography The area slopes gently southward from an altitude of about 35 feet above sea level at Okeechobee and merges into the Everglades. As stated by Cooke and Mossom"The Everglades form a level grassy plain that slopes gently southward from an altitude of about 18 feet above sea level near Lake Okeechobee and merges into the mangrove-covered keys in Florida Bay. This plain is floored with Pliocene shell marl and limestone (Caloosahatchee marl), which is generally covered by 6 or 8 feet of peaty muck or by a thin layer of Pleistocene limestone. Before their artificial drainage was undertaken the Everglades were usually flooded, but now so much of their water is carried off by canals that their higher parts stand above normal water level." Lake Okeechobee is a fresh-water body about 35 miles across and not more than about 15 feet deep. It lies in an original depression in the floor of the sea that once covered that part of the peninsula. The Kissimmee River and Taylor Creek flow into the lake on the north side, and ^-....«-.... .........m~i----------------------.....-. ^ -.-.-.-^-----------.---Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., p. 143, 1929. -3-

PAGE 8

Fisheating Creek empties into the lake on the west side. St. Lucie, West Palm Beach, Hillsborough, North New River, and Miami Canals extend from Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic Ocean. On the west the Caloosahatchee Canal connects the lake with the headwaters of the Caloosahatchee River, which drains westward into the Gulf of Mexico. On the northwest side of the lake the Indian Prairie Canal drains into it. The St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee Canals are normally the chief spillways for the lake. A sand ridge or natural levee a few feet above the general land surface forms a rim around the lake except in several places at the southern edge, which are natural spillways during flood stages. Outline of geology General features The geologic formations of the Florida peninsula consist of several thousand feet of sedimentary rocks that overlie a basement of metamorphic rocks. The formations exposed at the surface in different parts of the peninsula include the Ocala limestone, of Eocene age, and younger formations of Miocene, Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Recent age. The most recent complete description of the geology of the State is given in a report by Cooke and Mossom/ which includes a geologic map showing the distribution of the geologic formations at or near the surface. ^ -----------------------.,„ .-.--.-----------------Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., pp. 29-228, 1929 -4,

PAGE 9

Florida forms the emerged part of a peninsula of the continent of North America, known as the Floridian Plateau, which includes not only the State of Florida but also part of the adjacent floor that is less than 300 feet below sea level. In the Gulf of Mexico the edge of the plateau lies from somewhat less than 75 miles to more than 100 miles west of the present coast of the peninsula of Florida. Along the south and east coast of the peninsula, from Key West to Palm Beach, the edge of the plateau is less than 20 miles off the coast. The sedimentary rocks that overlie the basement rocks of the plateau are arched into a broad anticline or elongated dome. As described by Mossoml/, the arch trends northwest and plunges toward the southeast in the southern part of the Florida peninsula. In the northwestern part of the peninsula the crest of the arch is eroded and the Ocala limestone lies at or near the surface. On some parts of the crest the Ocala limestone is more than 120 feet above sea level, and dips under the younger formations, which are exposed on the flanks of the fold. This large fold forms a structural feature that is favorable for the occurrence of water under artesian pressure in the Ocala and Tampa limestone and the Hawthorn formation. In the Lake Okeechobee area the Ocala limestone dips in a general southerly direction, and the formations that overlie it become thicker toward the south. Mossom, Stuart, A review of the structure and stratigraphy of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Seventeenth Ann. Rept., pp. 171-268, 1926. -5-

PAGE 10

Geologic formations in the Lake Okeechobee area The geologic formations that are believed to underlie the Lake Okeechobee area are represented in the following table: ' 'Thickness Age Formation ' (feet) ' Character Recent and ' ' 0-20 ' Undifferentiated Pleistocene ' ' sand, soil and muck I 1 t mmmm mmmmemummmmmm ma mmemmem mininmmm mmWt WeMMm memeimmei-mm m mem mmmem Pleistocene ' Fort Thompson ' 10+' Marl, limestone, Sformation ' ' and sand. Yields ' ' ' water to shallow wells -----------m--------m----m-----m---m--minminmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmm Pliocene ' Caloosahatchee ' 50-100 ' Marl, shells and Smarl '' sand. Yields,..wter S ' to wells. meemmem mn mmmemmmmememmememmmmmemmmm mememmememmmmmmemmemmmmmmemme memmmmmmmmm memmmmmemm t t t SHawthorn formation ' 400-500 ' Interbedded clay, marl, S(of Alum Bluff ' ' sand, and limestone. 'group) ' ' Contains water. memmmmmemmemmmesmemememmmm memmmemmem m mtmmmmsmmenemememem I I I 'Tampa limestone ' 150-250 ' Limestone. Yields ' ' ' water to wells * .I I I I I Eocene ' Ocala limestone ' 500+' Limestone. Yields S(of Jackson age) ' ' water to wells. m-mminmtm-m-mmemem mem-m m mamm mtme m mm-mm-m-m m w memamemm m e'mn mm-mmm t t I Eocene and ' ' Undifferentiated Cretaceous ' ' ' sediments. .1 I I Paleozoic or ' ' Mica, schist, etc., older * ' ' metamorphic basement. memmmmmm mmmmmmm mm .. m mmmmm. mmmmmmm "6-

PAGE 11

/ I Log of well 5 at Everglades Yxperiment Station of the University of Florida near Belle Glade, Florida (FSG8. No. W-20) Thickness j Depth (feet) (feet) Muck 8 8 Fort Thompson formation and Caloosahatc1ee marl: Limestone, white, hard and soft, with broken shell material ........ ......... 24 32 Caloosahatchee marl: Limestone, gray-white, broken shell material; some gray-green marl .... ......... 20 52 Limestone, gray-white, with blue hard limestone, Chione cancellata, Phacoides multilineatus, Corbula barrettiana, Ostrea sp., Arca sp., Turritella sp., and other fossil fragments ....... 13 65 Dark-gray jagged semicrystalline material, much broken shell matter cemented with crystalline calcium carbonate. Same material as above and masses of broken shell, Plicatula marginata, Chione cancellata, Phacoides waccamawensis, Dosinia sp., Olivella mutica, Turritella sp., Ostrea sp., Area sp., and other forms as fragments. .............. .8 105 Marl, light-colored, gray-green and broken shell (top sample) Limestone, white, soft, with broken shell (middle sample). ....................70 175 Hawthorn formation: Sand, mostly drab, micaceous; small amount of shell (bottom sample) Sand, dark-green, micaceous. ...... ....200 375 Marl, gray with greenish cast, earthy, very calcareous some shell ...........165 540 Marl, same as above with Ostrea sp .. .....10 550 Marl, same as marl at 540 feet .........20 570 Clay or shale, dull green, slightly calcareous ..5 575 -7-

PAGE 12

Thickness Depth (feet) (feet) Limestone, white, fairly hard; some gray-green marl (2 samples) .................20 595 Limestone, same as above, with considerable graygreen marl and some shell. ...... ...... 10 605 Limestone, white, soft, pure; some shell m r10 615 material .....................10 615 Limestone, light-colored, and gray-green clay. ..10 625 Limestone and clay, same as above, with black pebble. ................... .15 640 Limestone, same as limestone at 625 feet (3 samples). .................32 672 Tampa limestone: Limestone, similar to that above but lightercolored and more calcareous (9 samples). .....88 760 Limestone, light-colored, with green calcareous clay (3 samples) ................30 790 Gray-white, very calcareous material ......10 800 Light-yellow calcareous material .....10 810 Gray-white, very calcareous material ......10 820 Light gray-green, very calcareous material (3 samples).. ............. 30 850 Limestone, light gray-white; some clay .....10 860 Gray-green, very calcareous material (4 samples) .40 900 Ocala limestone: Limestone, white soft.. ....25 925 Limestone, white, soft and hard; Lepdocyclina sp., Operculina sp., and mollusk fragments ...45 970 Limestone, similar to above but slightly browner; finely powdered by drill .... ....... 30 1,000 -8-

PAGE 13

-amimeM IIII nlmm m i, Iw III mmi mm~ 'Thickness Depth (feet) (feet) Limestone, white, hard; many small Lagan p sp. cf. L. dalli, Dictyoconus sp. and orbitoids ..190 1,190 Limestone, white powdered fine. .........15 1,205 Limestone, white, hard and soft, contains some blue limestone and smaller Foraminifera .... .127 1,332 * ---------------------------------------------------------------------The log of this well 5 to a depth of 900 feet is published in a report by Mossom. With reference to the probable stratigraphy he states:1/ "The first diagnostic material is the Caloosahatchee marl (Pliocene) at 52 feet. Above this the Pleistocene limestone and marl had probably been-passed through. The Caloosahatchee is present at 105 feet, and the shell in the first two samples of 105 to 375 seems to represent this formation also. The micaceous green sand or marl is probably of Miocene age, and the limestone toward the bottom from 585 feet down seems also to be of this age, possibly the equivalent of the Tampa limestone, though no fossil evidence is present. The material from 625 to 900 is much the same. As the samples are powdered fine by the drill it is difficult to determine the true nature of the rock. At 625 feet the material is very calcareous -possibly an impure limestone or very calcareous marl. At 640 there are some semierystalline pieces of ^ --.-.-.---------------------------------------------------... Mossom, Stuart, A review of the structure and stratigraphy of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Seventeenth Ann. Rept., p. 251, 1926. -9-

PAGE 14

limestone, and these are found intermittently in the succeeding samples. Some samples contain more impurities than others, but the whole should probably be regarded as an impure limestone. The material from 925 to 950 feet is certainly the Ocala limestone. The sample Just above may belong to this formation and probably does. The material from 1,000 to 1,190 also is Ocala; the echinoid Laganm sp. cf. L. dalli is characteristic of the Ocala limestone. Apparently all the material to 1,332 feet should be placed in the Ocala. Thus at this location we have a thickness of over 400 feet for the Ocala with none of the brown limestone usually encountered."'i Log of well 1 at Okeechobee, Fla., on lot 5, block 134, at site of old water plant of Okeechobee.2/ Thickness Depth (feet) (feet) Caloosahatchee marl and younger material: 2 Sand and soil, fine gray sand, chbcolatecolored, fine, some of it indurated organic matter, ordinary hardpan .......... 10 12 Sand, gray or slightly brownish, indurated .....3 15 Sands, gray.. ................ .23 38 Idem, p. 252, and unpublished nptes. 2Mossom, Stuart, op. cit. p. 236. -10-

PAGE 15

,Thickness Depth (feet) (feet) The sample preserved consists chiefly of black clay containing considerable sand, one fragment of shell, but aside from this no indications of marl ......................3 41 Marl, shell, sandy; shells much broken ....15 56 Shell marl, pecten, barnacles, etc., marine shallow-water marl .. ............ 6 62 Marl, gray, sandy, similar to material at 41-56 feet .....................65 Coarse, clear grain sand and broken shell Ostrea sp., Turritella sp., Bryozoa ........ 16 81 Hawthorn formation: Sand, light gray, incoherent ... .......58 139 Marl, light-colored, sandy, with shell fragments, pecten sp., occasional phosphate pebbles, black and shiny..... ..... ........ 19 158 Sand, olive-green, or very sandy marl. ......17 175 Clay, olive-green, with black, smooth shiny pebbles, phosphatic. ............. 37 212 Marl, dark-colored, very sandy, or calcareous sands; some broken shells. .......28 240 Clays, olive-green, very sandy and calcareous, or clayey sands................. 5 245 Marl, dark-colored, very sandy, with shell fragments ..................31 276 Clay, calcareous and very sandy, or clayey sand. .24 300 Sand, dark-colored, broken rock and shell fragments. ...................80 380 -11-

PAGE 16

'Thickness Depth (feet) (feet) Marl, dark-colored, very sandy; small sand grains ...................23 403 Sand, light-colored, broken rock and shell fragments ...................55 458 Clay, dark, and broken shells. ..........10 468 Tampa limestone: Clay, drab ........ ... .... ...... ........ 32 500 Limestone, white, with fragments of echinoderm spines. ... ... .... .10 510 Limestone, white, with fragments of echinoderm spines; also pieces of darkcolored rocks with small phosphate pebble. The dark rock is probably from above the light rock ....... ..... 510 Chiefly white sand .. ............. 608 Ocala limestone: Limestone, white, with Operculina sp., Gypsina sp., Lepidocyclina sp. .......7 615 Limestone powdered fine by the drill ...... 160 775 meme memmm mmmeasumewomemmm e mmm emm mm mmmmm mmmmm memmmmmmeemmews In a discussion of the probable stratigraphy of the material penetrated by well 1 at Okeechobee, Mossoml/ states: Mossom, Stuart, op. cit., p. 237. mem-mmmemWmWmWmmmmmm imm mmmmmmemmem emememem memm emmememmmimm-12"w -12-

PAGE 17

"The material from the surface down to the samples marked 94-139 represents the Pleistocene and Pliocene; the contact of the Pliocene and Miocene seems to be in the interval from 94 to 139, for the material from 139 to 500 feet represents the Miocene. From 500 to 608 feet the rock is probably of Oligocene age or basal Miocene, and from 608 to 775 feet is the Ocala limestone, of Eocene age." Eocene and Miocene Rocks Ocala limestone The Ocala limestone, of Eocene age, is the oldest and most deeply buried of the formations that are penetrated by wells drilled for water in this area. The logs of only two wells (see pp. 7-12) penetrating this formation are available. The Ocala is present at a depth of about 600 feet below the surface at the town of Okeechobee, in the northern part of the area, and at about 900 feet below the surface 40 miles to the south, at Belle Glade. It is exposed about 150 miles north of this area in Citrus, Sumter and Marion counties. The formation consists essentially of limestone but in places contains beds of chert. The material penetrated by well 1 (see p. 10) and well white 5 (see p. 7) is chiefly hard and soft/limestone, part of which is fossiliferous. The maximum thickness of the Ocala limestone in the Florida peninsula has not been definitely determined. The contact with the older Eocene -13-

PAGE 18

rocks in Florida is not exposhd4, and no complete section of the formation has been described. It is estimated to have a thickness of about 500 feet in the northern part of the peninsula and possibly is somewhat thicker in the Okeechobee area. The limestone is one of the chief water-bearing formations of the peninsula. In the southern part of Florida, however, the formation is deeply buried and yields mineralized water. The chemical composition of the water from the two wells penetrating the Ocala is shown on page 31. The fresh water of the Ocala limestone enters the formation in the area where it is at or near the surface, in the central part of the State, or in areas where it is overlain by permeable material that permits free downward percolation. The water in the Ocala limestone is under artesian pressure, and wells penetrating the formationn.normally overflow at the surface. Tampa limestone In the southern part of the State the Tampa limestone, of Miocene age, overlies the Ocala and is overlain by the Hawthorn formation. It is penetrated by many wells drilled for water northwest of the Lake Okeechobee area in a large area that includes Sarasota, Manatee, Hillsborough, and Pinellas counties. It lies at or near the surface in an area that includes all parts of Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Sumter, and Citrus counties. Well records indicate that in the eastern and northeastern part of the peninsula the Tampa limestone is absent, although no diagnostic fossils of the Tampa limestone have been found in cuttings from wells in the Lake Okeechobee area, the -14.

PAGE 19

material overlying the Ocala probably represents the Tampa limestone. Normally the ~nmpa limestone ranges in color from white to brown. The texture and hardness of the formation are variable; some parts may consist of loose masses of fossils, and other parts may be dense, compact, and silicified. The material referable to the Tampa limestone penetrated by wells 1 and 5 is essentially limestone with calcareous clay or marl. The formation has an estimated thickness of 150 to 250 feet in this area. Apparently the greatest thickness is in the southern part of the area. The Tampa limestone is an important water-bearing formation in the west-central part of the peninsula and yields large quantities of water to wells in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties. In the Lake Okeechobee area, however, although water under artesian head may be found in the formation, it is likely to be highly mineralized, especially in the southern part of the area. The water from well 9, at Moore Haven (see analyses on p. 31), is probably in part fror the Tampa limestone. Hawthorn formation The Hawthorn formation, of Miocene age, is one of the most extensive formations of Florida and is present throughout the peninsula except in areas where it has been removed by erosion and older formations are exposed. It occurs at or near the surface in an extensive area which includes all or parts of Hardee, Manatee, Polk, and Hillsborough counties, northwest of the Lake Okeechobee area. The formation overlies the Tampa limestone in the southern part of the peninsula and is overlain by the -15-

PAGE 20

Caloosahatchee marl or younger material. It is estimated to have a thickness of 400 to 590 feet and consists of interbedded clay, sand, sandy phosphatic limestone, and marl. As indicated by cuttings from well 1, much of the material penetrated in the northern part of the area is green-gray marl or sandy marl. Cuttings from well 5 indicate that in the southern part of the area the upper part of the formation is chiefly gray-green marl and sandy marl and the lower part is chiefly limestone. The formation contains water under sufficient artesian head to produce flowing wells. Some of the water, however, is highly mineralized. Pliocene, Pleistocene and Recent rocks Surficial materials representing the Pliocene, Pleistocene and Recent series overlie the Hawthorn formation and are present at or near the surface. Caloosahatchee marl The Caloosahatchee marl-/probably includes all the known marine Pliocene deposits in Florida. According to Cooke the marl probably rests unconformably on the Hawthorn formation and is overlain by Pleistocene material. The formation underlies the entire Lake Okeechobee area and is i/Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, Geology of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Twentieth Ann. Rept., p. 152, 1929. -16-

PAGE 21

exposed at or near the surface in the northern half of the area. It consists chiefly of sand, shells, limestone, and marl and ranges in color from white to gray, blue, or yellow. The thickness of the formation is estimated at 50 to 100 feet. According to Mossomlthe contact with the Miocene rocks at Okeechobee (see log of well 1, p. 10) seems to be in the interval between 94 to 139 feet below the surface. At Belle Glade (see log of well 5, P. 7) the contact of the Caloosahatchee with the Miocene rocks is probably between 105 and 150 feet below the surface. The Caloosahatchee yields moderate amounts of water to shallow wells but some of the water is highly mineralized. Fort Thompson formation The Fort Thompson formation, of Pleistocene age, consists of alternating deposits laid down in fresh-;.ard brackish-water and marine shell, and is present in the southern part of the Lake Okeechobee area. It overlies the Caloosahatchee marl and is overlain by 8 to 10 feet of peaty muck in most of the area. According to Cooke and Mossom:; "The marine beds in the Fort Thompson consist chiefly of great quantities of Chione cancellata in sand. The beds deposited in brackish-water are similar but contain also Rangia cuneata (Gray) and other shells whose favorite SMossom, Stuart, op. cit. p. 236. / Cooke, C. W., and Mossom, Stuart, op. cit., pp. 211-212. -17-

PAGE 22

habitat is in bays or estuaries. The fresh water origin of certain gray limestone is shown by the abundance in them of shells of Planorbis. "The Fort Thompson formation is generally less than 10 feet thick but may be somewhat thicker in parts of the Everglades. The individual beds range in thickness from a few inches to about 3 feet. "The formation covers an area occupied by Lake Okeechobee at a time when it was much larger than it is now. The northern boundary of the lake was probably not far from its present shore line, but the lake extended westward as far as LaBelle and southeastward probably to the eastern border of the Everglades. The lake was separated from the Atlantic Ocean by barriers that at times were swept away or overflowed so completely that salt water penetrated inland to the farthest part of the lake. The alternation of marine and brackish-water deposits with beds deposited in fresh water records several invasions of the sea. "The surface of the Fort Thompson is a plain that ranges in height from a foot or two below mean sea level at the deepest places in Lake Okeechobee to a maximum of little more than 10 feet above sea level in the Everglades." This formation supplies water to shallow driven wells. Some of the most suitable water obtained from wells for domestic use at Pahokee apparently comes from this formation. Recharge of the formation is in part local, -18-

PAGE 23

and in some localities the formation yields water with a swamp coloring. Water from well 11 (see analysis, p. 31) is probably derived from the Fort Thompson formation. The surficial sands of Recent age supply shallow wells. The water, however, is subject to pollution from contaminated surface water. Water Supplies Surface Water Water supplies in the area are obtained from both surface and ground water sources. The surface water is drawn from Lake Okeechobee or from canals connected to it. Water from the lake is suitable for public and domestic use after is has been decolorized, filtered, and chlorinated. However, owing to the shallowness of the lake the intake pipe line must be laid and maintained to a distance of several hundred yards into the lake. The public water supply of Okeechobee is obtained from the lake. The public water supplies of Clewiston and Moore Haven are obtained from canals connected with the lake. Ground Water Wells The record of 12 representative wells are shown in the table on page 29. Except at Okeechobee there are only three deep flowing wells (Nos. 2, 5, and 9) in the area. There are 6 or more deep flowing wells in Okeechobee, the record of one of which is shown on pages 10 to 13. Probably all those wells penetrate the Ocala or Tampa limestone. -19-

PAGE 24

The public water supply of Belle Glade is furnished by a 3-inch well, 26 feet deep (well 6, p. 29). A 6-inch well 810 feet deep (well 1, p. 10) formerly furnished water for the public supply of Okeechobee. A 6-inch well 804 feet deep (well 9, p. 30) is used for emergency purposes for the Moore Haven public supply. There are numerous driven wells 10 to 15 feet deep that draw water from the ridge or natural levee of the lake. Some of these wells, as well 11, p. 30 are in the muck areas and penetrate the Fort Thompson formation. Another group of wells that probably yields most of the ground water in the area are 25 to about 150 feet deep and about 2 to 6 inches in diameter and draw water from the Caloosahatchee marl or the upper part of the Hawthorn formation. Wells 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8 belong to this group. The static water level in these wells is from a few inches to a few feet below the surface. Wells of this type are found along the natural levee bordering the lake, at the field camps of the United States Sugar Corporation, and in most of the towns of the area. Artesian conditions Water in the Ocala and Tampa limestones and in the Hawthorn formation is under artesian pressure, and wells penetrating these formations overflow. Well 1, at Okeechobee, has sufficient artesian head to raise the water 12 feet above the surface, or about 50 feet above sea level. Measurements of the artesian pressure on wells 2 and 5 indicate that the artesian head in the southern part of the area is probably slightly less than that in the northern part of the area. This suggests that there may be a circulation of artesian water toward the south. -20-

PAGE 25

Water in wells terminating in the Caloosahatchee marl or in the upper part of the Hawthorn formation rises to levels ranging from a few inches to a few feet below the surface. Relative resistivity of the water at different depths The resistance of the water at different depths was measured in representative wells (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, and 10) to indicate differences in the concentration of dissolved mineral matter in order to determine the depth at which the most highly mineralized water enters the wells. The resistance of the water was measured between a pair of electrodes with a slide wire bridge using a 1,000-cycle alternating current obtained from an audio-oscillator operated by four I1 -volt dry-cell batteries. A reel operated by hand and a wire cable with an insulated wire core were used for lowering the electrodes into the well. The insulated wire and the outer steel strands served for the leads from the bridge to the electrodes/. The electrodes were lowered a few feet at a time into the well, and a measurement of the resistance was made. An odometer consisting of a trip counter and a grooved brass wheel with a circumference of 1 foot, over which the cable passed, was used for recording the distance the electrodes were lowered into the well. The electrodes were not calibrated to furnish a basis for calculation of the actual resistivity. Stringfield, V. T., Exploration of artesian wells in Sarasota County: Florida Geol. Survey Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Ann. Rept., pp. 215-216, 1933. -21-

PAGE 26

The resistivity of the water in the wells that were examined in this area decreased with increasing depth, but the decrease was probably no more than can be attributed to the increase in the temperature, indicating that there was no appreciable difference in the concentration of the water at different depths. In wells 1, 2, 3, and 5, which yield highly mineralized water, the records of the measured resistance indicate that the mineralized water comes from strata penetrated in the lower parts of the wells. If fresh or less concentrated water were entering the lower part of the wells, there would have been an appreciable increase in the resistivity of the water in that part of the well. A record of the resistance of the water as measured with the electrodes used in well 5 is shown in the following table. This well was drilled 10 inches in diameter to a depth of 300 feet, and 10-inch casing was inserted to that depth, below which it was drilled 8 inches in diameter, and 8-inch casing, extending from the surface, was seated at a depth of 900 feet. The total depth of the well is 1,332 feet. At the present time the well yields water from both the 10-inch and the 8-inch casing. The water from the 10-inch casing is more highly mineralized (see analyses, p. 31) than that from the 8-inch casing, and prior to the examination of the well it appeared that water from the 10-inch casing might be leaking into the 8inch casing and thereby causing the high mineralization of the water from that source. The resistance record, however, indicated that there is no appreciable difference in the concentration of the water at different depths in the 8-inch hole and therefore that there is no transfer of highly mineralized water from the 10-inch hole to the 8-inch hole. The records also -22-

PAGE 27

indicate that no water of low mineralization enters the lower part of the well. The construction of the well prevents exploration to determine the source of the water in the 10-inch casing. However, the head of water in the 10-inch casing was about 2 feet less than that in the 8-inch casing, indicating that the water comes from some source above 900 feet. The 8-inch casing doubtless was tightly seated, and there was no subsurface leakage of water, because lowering the head as much as 30 feet in that casing had no effect on the head in the 10-inch casing. The water from the 8-inch casing is from the Ocala limestone and that from the 10-inch casing probably from the Hawthorn formation. -23-

PAGE 28

Apparent resistance of water at different depths in Well 5, near Belle Glade. Depth 'Resistance Depth 'Resistance' Depth 'Resistance' Depth 'Resistance (feet) (ohms-) ' feet) (ohms) ' (feet) ' (ohms) (feet) ' (ohms) 10 81 350 77 725 72 '1,100 67 28 81 375' 77 750 71 1,125 67 51 81 ' 400 76 775 71 1,150 67 75 81 4'25 76 800 71 1,175 67 100' 80 ' 450 75 825 71 1,200 66 125 80 ' 475 75 850 71 1,225 66 I I 150 80 500 74 875 70 1,250 66 175 79 525 74 900 70 1,275 65 200 79 550 73 925 69 1,300 65 I t I I I I 225 79 575 73 950 69 1,325 65 II t I I 250 79 600' 73 975 69 1,320 65 275 78 625 72 '1,000 68 300 78 650 72 1,025 68 325 77 ' 675 72 1,050 68 700 72 1,075 68 S24

PAGE 29

Chemical composition of the water Analyses of water from 10 representative wells and Lake Okeechobee are shown on page 31. All the ground water analyzed except that from wells 7 and 12 is excessively hard or otherwise highly mineralized and is unsatisfactory for domestic or public supplies. With proper treatment, however, such water as that from well 6 may be made suitable for domestic use. The chloride content of the water may be referred to as an indication of the relative saltiness of the water. It has little effect on the suitabilityiof the water for domestic purposes unless there is enough to cause a disagreeable taste. Water containing as much as 1,000 parts per million of chloride is undesirable for drinking, and to be acceptable to most people it should not contain more than about 250 parts per million. All the samples of water collected from wells penetrating the Ocala and Tampa limestones and the Hawthorn formation contained more than 400 parts per million of chloride. Some of the samples from the Caloosahatchee formation were high and some were comparatively low in chloride. There are variations in the quality of the water with reference both to horizontal distribution and to depth. For example, well 7, near Clewiston, yields water with a chloride content of 135 parts per million from the Caloosahatchee formation, and a few miles north of that area salt water is encountered at about the same depth. Variations in the quality of water with depth is shown by a comparison of analyses of water from wells 3, 4, and 6. Although the water from wells 3 and 4 is relatively soft, it is high in sodium .25-

PAGE 30

afd bicarbonate and therefore undesirable for domestic use. All the samples of water collected from the Fort Thompson formation and the younger overlying material were low in chloride. Samples of water from the Fort Thompson and upper part of the Caloosahatchee formation had a swamp color. Water from Lake Okeechobee is moderately soft and is satisfactory for domestic or public supplies after decolorization, filtration, and chlorination. Analyses of the lake water are shown on page 31 and published in a report by Collins and Howardi/. The report also includes analyses of water from the lake 3 miles north of Ritta Island and from the mouth of the Kissimmee River, which flows into the lake. Summary and conclusion Flowing wells that yield large quantities of water from the Ocala and Tampa limestones may be obtained in this area, but all the water from these formations is hard and is likely to be high in chloride. According to the available information it appears unlikely that water supplies satisfactory for domestic or public use can be obtained from these formations in the southern part of the area. In the northern part of the area wells that are not drilled too deep may obtain water similar to that from well 1, (see analysis, page 31) which is usable although of poor quality, whereas water from deeper sources is likely to be still more highly mineralized. The Hawthorn formation also yields water to wells, but although the composition of the water may not be the same throughout the formation, the water is likely to be too highly mineralized for domestic or public JCollins, W. D., and Howard, C. S., Chemical character of waters of Florida: U. S. eol«. Survey Water-Supply Paper 596, pp. 222-224J 1928. .26.

PAGE 31

use, except possibly in the northern part of the area. In some localities the Caloosahatchee formation yields water relatively low in mineralization that is fairly satisfactory for domestic use (see analysis 7), but in other places the water is excessively hard or otherwise highly mineralized (see analyses 3, 4, and 6). With proper treatment the hard water from well 6, derived from the upper part of the Caloosahatchee at Belle Glade, could be improved. There is a possibility, however, that with heavy draft from the well the water would become more concentrated in dissolved material. Wells 3 and 4, at the Florida State farm No. 2, near Belle Glade, yield water from the Caloosahatchee formation that is unsatisfactory for domestic use. Probably hard water similar to that from Vell 6 (26 feet deep) at Belle Glade may be obtained from wells of similar depth at the State farm, but with heavy draft water similar in quality to that from wells 3 and 4 may be drawn in from below. There are no wells yielding water from the lower part of the Caloosahatchee formation in this area, and the quality of the water is undetermined. However, the presence of mineralized water at a depth of only 40 feet below the surface suggests that the prospects are poor for obtaining water of low mineralization in the lower part of the formation in this locality. It appears that although large quantities of ground water are available, the poor quality of the water offers little encouragement for the development of water supplies from either deep or shallow wells, although -27-

PAGE 32

in some localities in the northern part of the area it may be possible to obtain small supplies of usable water from shallow wells. In view of the fact that satisfactory water can be obtained from Lake Okeechobee, it appears advisable to develop water supplies so far as practicable from the lake or from the canals connected with it. -28-

PAGE 33

Records of wells in Lake Okeechobee area (For analyses see following table) No. Location Owner or name Depth of Diameter Depth to Pressure head Remarks well of well which well or altitude of (feet) (inches) is cased water level (feet) above or below surface (feet 1 Lot 5, block 134 City of Okeechobee 718 8-6 484 +12 Original depth Okeechobee was 810 feet. (Okeechobee Co.) See -log p. 15. 2 SW 1/4 Sec. 12 United States Sugar Corp. 958 6 800+ +32 Yield from T. 42 S. R. 18 E. Tampa & Ocala south of Conners limestones. Highway, 3 miles SE of Canal Point (Palm Beach Co.) 3 Florida State Farm Florida State Farm 42 4 20+ -1.5 Yield from No. 2, near Belle Caloosahatchee Glade marl. (Palm Beach Co.) 4 do do 37 3 20+ -.9 do 5 University of Fla. Everglades Experiment 1,332 10-8 957 +35 See resistance Everglades ExperiStation Univ. of Fla. record on p. 27 ment Station, near & log on p. 10 Belle Glade 10-inch casing (Palm Beach Co.) to depth of 300 feet. Yield from Ocala limestone. 6 Belle Glade Town of Belle Glade 26 3 26 -Yield from (Palm Beach Co.) Caloosahatchee marl.

PAGE 34

0mmNimn memmnmmmi--emnwmmwm emmmmmNo. Location Owner or name Depth of Diameter Depth to Pressure head Remarkswell of well which well or altitude(feet) (inches) is cased of water level(feet) above or below surface(feet)em mmu m ememmmmm ----N--m-e---mm-m--am--mm-,m--m-m-m-om-m-m-em-m-mm m , m-mem em-mmNm ammmm em-m m elommmemem emmmS7 Dairy about 1 Clewiston Dairy Company 107 3 100+ -3 domile west ofClewiston(Hendry Co.)8 Essambee Farms T. P. McBride 142 6 --3 doSec. 30, T. 42 S.R. 34 E, eastside of MooreHaven Rd.(Glades Co.)9 Moore Haven Town of Moore Haven 804 6 700 Yield from Tampa(Glades Co.) or Hawthorn.10 West of Brighton Brighton 219 12 --3 Test well forsouth side of oil. Plugged atSt. Ed. No. 8 219 feet.(Highlands Co.)11 Torry Island H. A. Braddock 15 6 --3 Yield from Fort(Pa3nBeach Co.) Thompson forma-tion.12 La Belle Everett Everett Hotel 650 6 -+30 + Yield fromHotel Hawthorn andTampa formations.

PAGE 35

Analyses of water from the Lake Okeechobee area.ii (Parts per million. Numbers in first column refer to corresponding numbers in preceding table. 8. K. Love, analyst).--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Total : : TotalNo. :Location or : Depth Date of dissolved :Calcium:Magnesium: Sodium and :Bicarbonate:Sulphate:Chloride:Nitrate: hardness assource : (feet) :collection solids : (Ca) :(Mg) :Potassium (HC03) (S04) (ci) (No3) : (CaCO )(calculated): ::(Na + K) (calculated-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------M---------------------1 :Okeechobee City : 718 : Apr. 24,1933 : 1,344 : 111 : 60 : 294 : 124 248 570 (a) 524:Fla. Near Canal :: : : F *: 2 :Point State Farm: 958 :Apr. 11,1933 1,941 108 : 86 495 157 233 942 : (a) 623 :3 :near Belle Glade: 42 :Apr. 17,1933 2,740 29 : 42 :1,011 1,323 170 : 838 (a) : 245 :3 do do do 2,757 30 43 1,013 1,313 179 845 (a) 251 :4 do 37 May 8, 1933 : 2,311 : 57 72 : 758 1,186 : 192 648 : (a) 438 : 35 :Experiment Sta: 1,332 : May 17, 1933 : 3,470 144 : 138 948 151 : 516 : 1,650 :(a) 926 ::tion near Belle : : : ::Glade : : : :Sdo : do do : 4,530 : 104 150 1,375 : 37 : 630 :2,255 :(a): 875 Op• aQ) a o6 :Blle Glade : 26 :May 5, 1933 : 1,162 230 : 80 : 64 : 615 : 398 : 87 : (a) : 903 .C J7 :Clewiston : 107 :Apr. 20,1933 : 678 : 146 : 12 : 105 : 518 25 : 135 (a) : 414 : P9 :;oore Haven : 800 : May 1, 1933 : 2,660 : 136 : 105 : 694 : 22 : 426 : 1,290 :(a) : 770 :o* oo 0)11 :Torry Island 15 :Apr. 18,1933 : 1,058 : 217 : 66 : 6 : 427 : 244 : 45 :250 : 813 : H12 :La Belle : 650 : Apr. 24,1933 : 1,282 : 57 : 47 : 342 : 120 312 : 465 (a) : 335 :13/ :Lake Okechobee Aug. 17,1923 272 37 11 34 128 : 19 : 58 (trace) 138 "---.-&L p hoke ^_^ _1 ^ _^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^^ ^_^ ^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^ ^^,^ ,^, .^ ^ ..^


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EVENT '2017-03-09T13:34:57-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'35836' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUWX' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
5bacb2a861c131435a0450f27471b8ca
b709bf0e303a6cd3f506d982b5bfc8e6c0a1e703
'2017-03-09T13:35:23-05:00'
describe
'21894' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUWY' 'sip-files00002.pdf'
ec378fa841a3a364779a726115d751b2
a8bb823c5bc244b9aea49457add6eec3780e21ba
'2017-03-09T13:34:17-05:00'
describe
'35577' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUWY-norm-0' 'ARCHIVE' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUWY-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
'2017-03-09T13:36:02-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:19-05:00'
normalize
'13288' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUWZ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
8271f703db8ef31c0ae45eb0e77e2bd1
4cc5b923b33da113062f11e575bda999fc45a0ee
'2017-03-09T13:35:03-05:00'
describe
'11467' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXA' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
07c2e1887538b19ea2bb7fb9f50d0dc0
2b359c1170739e153f15ea510e5863e8c71d634c
'2017-03-09T13:34:38-05:00'
describe
'1480220' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXB' 'sip-files00002.tif'
9aba20e6a53d543c8d4ba2d4d804b7f6
531716a4db0c07fc69a8381ff0f2d3e12d18d5d5
'2017-03-09T13:34:47-05:00'
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXC' 'sip-files00002.txt'
dd586740cf070b7545596bf70c4a8f5b
a3cb73e3b6a5115d10a4b2bc3c87981d723e4cfa
'2017-03-09T13:35:06-05:00'
describe
'3620' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXD' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
9813a04a21caf80e3364d19f4ce88774
db53a114a8301440f52b753ebbd85aa12f4f082a
'2017-03-09T13:34:06-05:00'
describe
'13207' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXE' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
dde851d30bd4b16350809b9c297b2ae5
73e48dc9ef75732ee67be6b97f98a536a92ef8dd
'2017-03-09T13:35:35-05:00'
describe
'14454' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXF' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
b8722597d6a9b4fa68ab2e47368c72ad
0ef4fe04fc1b54ce1aa8414240310e2d796b5388
'2017-03-09T13:34:39-05:00'
describe
'5820' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXG' 'sip-files00003.pdf'
ed5398d8d3f9d7b44e2ca6b7e03db7bf
ea6d589e8f4e9dc10d7de2ebc4e68fdb309c1be5
'2017-03-09T13:35:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUXG-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
'2017-03-09T13:36:00-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-09T13:35:08-05:00'
normalize
'908' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXH' 'sip-files00003.pro'
c44c6cac64ea0efc3a7a8e5c540f6dcd
6093571b6443a372a1b13fb9650765e44bce89cb
'2017-03-09T13:35:45-05:00'
describe
'4732' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXI' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
ea1890a1e1b0926211ffa47530eb2bd9
876af0bdfda971014a0b513c2a99a7aca406f803
'2017-03-09T13:35:42-05:00'
describe
'1444312' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXJ' 'sip-files00003.tif'
2c34ad67ed72a75a521ae70ca1ce3d88
852b3e4633f6347b8fcd3ced8163af5e9591374d
'2017-03-09T13:35:15-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXK' 'sip-files00003.txt'
d6adc629557de653bc48d68af3517874
8baa60d3f53d4b86237fceee22aa92a3ae1d631f
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXL' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
262d7aa027f601290002dc6551936a2a
d2717b53d6ebccc29f7656cb3ef03f1724bdf406
'2017-03-09T13:34:55-05:00'
describe
'89172' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXM' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
f4b34f7727d23d5f5426a2ef9dee28fc
ac7f264e83b3467ea5978060f1186926324a3a04
'2017-03-09T13:35:09-05:00'
describe
'66573' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXN' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
588512cdea8128686e6f7982d5707843
ffffe9b94ca79ab087b6090d7b3be8f7ce673fef
describe
'32408' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXO' 'sip-files00004.pdf'
463313a04fc93a7f47f42b10f2c60ecd
955b9ecf51b6faf7c3c0920373bed44bf6d870fb
'2017-03-09T13:34:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUXO-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
'2017-03-09T13:36:03-05:00'
describe
normalize
'36274' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXP' 'sip-files00004.pro'
a7dbe37bca74b7c918d0c838ac587c7f
fa8c2ff77f8f0340ed9148196d10961c91b998a5
'2017-03-09T13:34:20-05:00'
describe
'26479' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXQ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
a157c47db7b58ad631d43e7560ae79d2
8335315e51501448558fdff14a03f0cd8a014656
'2017-03-09T13:35:48-05:00'
describe
'1433080' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXR' 'sip-files00004.tif'
ca750c2d48abb9a7f54693b552a831f6
19ae66401bf3e8e5ded1842fc3d0ed75bfff0d19
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXS' 'sip-files00004.txt'
48a3c5e12902ba2dc0afcc52518a79ba
a9d5db9ea2374d6c2ee3ba5363e217873fe3b36f
'2017-03-09T13:35:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'8326' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXT' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
287d1d8084bd9a57189163cd9c428908
b785bc039abb43eaa30db608c8841f018f5a99df
'2017-03-09T13:34:44-05:00'
describe
'1299915' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXU' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
9c78263a8324a2feae4a1203727c8a3c
d164fd5d46a8b76ae8ba3320d902eeff14b25146
describe
'43545' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXV' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
25af7c63abd975964f5c0f660b188b2b
f9bf79061090e25c1e3967d2d175fc706464af0c
describe
'560823' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXW' 'sip-files00005.pdf'
5f245793cb76af89ff3360efbc2e2329
d03363ae2cd1a7d9b8c781a7e9b8b2e61f7e3649
'2017-03-09T13:34:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUXW-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
'2017-03-09T13:36:01-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:35-05:00'
normalize
'5076' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXX' 'sip-files00005.pro'
74406620c8898336dcb3af574b162504
8e4501ef305e259fec3c33f2f1f85566a7b61a4a
'2017-03-09T13:34:48-05:00'
describe
'13607' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXY' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
161497e88dd055ca3aec1a6e065ef7c9
41153c806bc231de2ee03a50f440b026b6c84a48
describe
'12442672' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUXZ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
15f4a112c37a830fd287c3aec4e9b0c0
e4195710ac2241393cb1a578904895ac840338f8
'2017-03-09T13:35:49-05:00'
describe
'245' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYA' 'sip-files00005.txt'
a5b5d8de126f25ca257626a03fa5eb94
5edef5d77e7ddbb0a2f15078f3fd5a890166aac6
'2017-03-09T13:35:47-05:00'
describe
'4544' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYB' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
b664e4a7d934c09f84199237c91cc240
ed32b456479496b3a839bec250e6d1d7ccb93725
'2017-03-09T13:35:14-05:00'
describe
'160470' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYC' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
c4f94cf48e39c77f12599ffb091b982a
117e76894f5fbedaf5e946a2830137ba6a45f53f
'2017-03-09T13:35:56-05:00'
describe
'99766' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYD' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
5e34970f3e642823fd507ff1f43ca121
274c088450831cdc9f846c86b8a7422e39d68a11
'2017-03-09T13:35:43-05:00'
describe
'60937' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYE' 'sip-files00006.pdf'
65ddce74587c4f02883dc87d64afc215
ef5be0f40dcc0df9b2d418f6ba58b36674853d25
'2017-03-09T13:34:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUYE-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:08-05:00'
normalize
'43486' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
a0875fb541a14fa3f0c41c9c6509a322
03c3bba83663dd519bc601a6b7bc548ba9d40eeb
'2017-03-09T13:35:22-05:00'
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
7548e95679aeee61554b6b8683d7395d
66d645cd46c947b75092e1fda688c1c554c2df90
describe
'1520552' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYH' 'sip-files00006.tif'
fd50d9ee10446908e9369cc32ae7bc96
de8c81461a4a0436c1f783241fae3dd16f6c286c
'2017-03-09T13:35:51-05:00'
describe
'1810' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYI' 'sip-files00006.txt'
cf86136983d6051749df6e6b5161cd37
2ad14f8f996264ace0e2ef3cc54600208370e58c
'2017-03-09T13:35:00-05:00'
describe
'9512' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYJ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
8850590a143d5c7933cb7aa2f21d0aec
e433b86f30aee34e37ce5d296d1c90f09d86ee25
describe
'147609' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYK' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
0fdbc8a8901c0d8c2a19b3d44b430f1a
595833ddf7ec84afa3b5e7129517386fe802a4e0
describe
'91797' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYL' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
daf40d901a1e3124228ac578d04da328
67d26539ff8816f9d3c5d5cc07f6dc2a1ad42450
'2017-03-09T13:34:05-05:00'
describe
'55423' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYM' 'sip-files00007.pdf'
ce2da4ecdd1ad1ac3e19915ef006b3bf
74a03b3ef980aea73a3b3cca904b157c90cb9b15
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUYM-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'40711' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYN' 'sip-files00007.pro'
45177a912432ca97bce956ca4a2197a7
aca8109c199f0967a6561a6738209aa78dac9bce
'2017-03-09T13:35:16-05:00'
describe
'32556' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYO' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
e8ddbf6cf8c512eabe311c25fefd7030
7391de85c82d95e057d6e0f2004c7f39df112eee
'2017-03-09T13:35:12-05:00'
describe
'1520392' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYP' 'sip-files00007.tif'
fb1b42370648ae13cdd87206f3b7d6b3
aebcb66b2bc25832103694c4455e4b4a07832160
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYQ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
2228bc8746d1a1c02462a1a4e228d07d
7fe392c5b81db08df6d1894d02891e6b13f80e37
'2017-03-09T13:34:21-05:00'
describe
'9310' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
3a0c42f399f9dcd45926205e7a8c24f3
49a302c620d01d9615e11054b9d7cc86147c214e
describe
'147929' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
c095718ee7ba06432c941dc924412249
43cd5a0072bb13eb7f61a65139e16221e735f91f
'2017-03-09T13:34:15-05:00'
describe
'92567' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
d7b9dd17055845fce96882c15cda6f6a
10d0a84cc79a6407af1fc36fa71c2dee484b505a
describe
'54852' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYU' 'sip-files00008.pdf'
648c0f5f4700e60d1bcbe157f299ffe9
4d723202a5f497859e67793f9321e5928536f462
'2017-03-09T13:33:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUYU-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'41468' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
c4f572d001f36fd5f2749bf0d0124d47
18b7c0f96e6ea879a81847ac0688ddd0c0a1c1d5
'2017-03-09T13:35:19-05:00'
describe
'32588' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
21025e2b853e32cbe68319d938d25a96
eec3f3b68b08487137b640de5f9dccd38038a122
'2017-03-09T13:34:24-05:00'
describe
'1520320' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
993eb45bd3ce70dc98540ffe40739791
30e9cdb6d11f926051527317102ce248b4f85525
'2017-03-09T13:35:26-05:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYY' 'sip-files00008.txt'
02a755ba466d329cfa393a3ceeb70fcb
6c8debe775271cd793aa6d1d3d733a107504270f
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'9027' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUYZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
9019bd924e2d1ff62cca8dedec4d6c1a
69e16cea804ec6e8d8114bb1b6d9af67ed88a084
describe
'141193' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
fb736a21e6d35ab254be2f2d1dad7fbe
7ebcee406e998e34fa417b3f5df3b9a48c1f88c4
'2017-03-09T13:35:33-05:00'
describe
'88406' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
902b6451aa8b402d621161440735f8c3
bf2976a387bed638f55e816f9b450f7aaf72feb1
describe
'52609' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZC' 'sip-files00009.pdf'
a96e5160d25c87ac68f5350dcf773c24
d1f2ad451abe7fe6209b4ce4d610faa5975dad78
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUZC-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'41638' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZD' 'sip-files00009.pro'
bf87c2bf69219bec0acb614959189528
3ad4d3c2324adca579ab44545080b5e9fe117ba4
describe
'30718' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZE' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
26fd2bf432c39f31aeae6fae401cc074
863906b4a38d15fff5dd753645d5903f9a38d550
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZF' 'sip-files00009.tif'
5c2f03da18f25633d68d33da31166c74
5d0d2936289598dc64c3d243d6b553bf4f692e38
'2017-03-09T13:34:09-05:00'
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
7e5016af1f6f7557f968f33fd6486b52
2d78594e0f7ffac3677e2efae8fde7d59d66cb8e
'2017-03-09T13:34:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8777' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZH' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e8435ccf2e836b1dcd0faa6b03c1c6ac
ac5c64998f8c2dca17a4ab3634029f0e315e6f61
describe
'152497' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZI' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
91dde6aa3eab5cc667ccadc4aa3e319e
8da3211751fb5bc89369b19badcb23d3d9fbeb6f
'2017-03-09T13:35:46-05:00'
describe
'93890' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZJ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
766573c0301547fe7704ebaa98336944
f3c2b9c8dc1240179939abf4d4f02ec5370a812e
describe
'57533' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZK' 'sip-files00010.pdf'
b640767cfb16f05b676ce8b976752256
33a400fe012912e3a1fe4c9b1605e99682eb0caa
'2017-03-09T13:34:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUZK-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:13-05:00'
normalize
'41582' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZL' 'sip-files00010.pro'
286d949e3cb92b55e6ac67ee13c90124
626cc375232cc52c34331ffa6e7951fd872fcdce
describe
'30867' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZM' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
cad67fca4e460c92643e5460db9ce12a
f95fdbea6b463e2ec70562a413fb2014df6b85f9
'2017-03-09T13:34:52-05:00'
describe
'1593904' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZN' 'sip-files00010.tif'
bf36288001a0ff48fb567eb04cd8dfdd
6634e66841a53cdd2a5b38a069f6151910a3e005
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZO' 'sip-files00010.txt'
cf2dd4f3f9f44f27fd42ed55e017dc49
f521686689bc30e3291609a16245fddabbcdfca6
'2017-03-09T13:35:41-05:00'
describe
'9083' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZP' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
1a92072957c32fed6953ffbf63487c5a
9353cbe232317c551b6dc8e72d6ff4fd660fbf27
describe
'124547' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZQ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f0da650b4bfbcb50e84189d9fd5e0d17
27d2a1aae2fd036f5c684c5705adacbd90de6b31
describe
'80650' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZR' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a987263bd15b9f275e4b67d1ef2af003
39787b0a292121740e4ee05eb1d82476f5e93211
'2017-03-09T13:35:59-05:00'
describe
'45011' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZS' 'sip-files00011.pdf'
28179ddaca8993e5bcf72c85682e67b6
6942de2abfb6698779bcc404bfc71e444f0f72b3
'2017-03-09T13:35:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABUZS-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
'2017-03-09T13:36:04-05:00'
describe
normalize
'45381' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
6df167db58f907ec36154226649a13ef
cc5ff223e3bba482076db324f53fad8aa73adfe4
describe
'27669' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
6d533c22df8b5b87e8ab4c3ace36c2e5
817c6ec402e29e8a8bc23df01185765f5ab630f7
describe
'1567320' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2f7fd319358f3661df43bc7fcfb7449d
2c0a16cbdd204f4d1ff5d88db5cdb9e1f1cc1601
'2017-03-09T13:35:10-05:00'
describe
'2396' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
657c0215676eefcb040c22cf18527723
6cc5f662b19d369f0cd3c4d5738ab900af7a8771
'2017-03-09T13:35:34-05:00'
describe
'8256' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZX' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5a5b59d49ee21fc7d559c105a2f8a38a
19f5e088aa4037bd6e6c4b0151a245fe031697fc
describe
'154251' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZY' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
7cf2580baa75eafa97e2f3961fb4348c
c05c7b1fd1d9025da922e29bfbd73ae2563e81a5
describe
'93426' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABUZZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
61d886cbbb40fb24b82cb72d9d1289b4
99a55e78d7def493b406542044c946aa862a18dc
describe
'58555' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAA' 'sip-files00012.pdf'
a963b00ecc0890d255eb025e85d31248
d6b6aab24b9839c45290017564f50b7d5b6e77a1
'2017-03-09T13:34:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAA-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVAA-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'45027' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAB' 'sip-files00012.pro'
39f633d4eebfad1f8ea006c2c7ddd046
c888adda896f39be7f34d332f936a63193c7d832
describe
'31709' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9078a71ba880d810cbad03af5cf47ffb
66656e43eb97cd0d484a1324f1c355572dbadc8a
describe
'1568712' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
c821bba4835446dfce027f6c2a5b76fa
773539ce06d6dd120060cfc1bb9e142db9f96eea
describe
'2150' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
6e7b613ea28ace74c34cd55a224f0a5f
50ef853400af2371b03eb3771b76afca94c4e73d
describe
'8707' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
b311a39534c5be33a7b8d063708ad36d
78eb850bbcd7214ca6e25ed64df7010ae2a7ad72
'2017-03-09T13:34:59-05:00'
describe
'136854' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e30c795738d791587e3deb8aa75bb3de
02dc20ada11da79d1ea5976d8ef91927dd479b7d
describe
'84476' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
6bf5949b82d6f7dd5c06598251159f55
e8e11dc358303c1b0154062882af2a0b8feba97d
describe
'50288' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAI' 'sip-files00013.pdf'
252c3b547db16212e970963d6d49230c
7064e4da518509a0af9c1ad347dc0d4a3f62a7b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAI-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVAI-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'43384' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAJ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
31b6c911f3f69e61918e193e75aaec28
05c90d2c3aedf73119b1d187370c273e6ccac15b
describe
'30086' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAK' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
638309f931e697f91e4bf3f4c4637335
434a5517eb3ef25568e28c5334f591c60b3e533f
describe
'1618656' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAL' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1e59bc37ee4aba158500c740950e010d
76f944b7be16ba709d0a0d66b94498cbb9508bac
'2017-03-09T13:35:57-05:00'
describe
'2226' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAM' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7a9167178da3f85dc0ecf022b6d8dab4
4988d3fae6d7da3e214bb29b5495759f8e58e4aa
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAN' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
9dd75eebf8dfb32f6e55564b7ca888d4
1c443a70e7dbfc993858ee4f7940bf52d7c36a66
describe
'150172' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d4afe5bdfe3822550159cc5e235c9c44
3be5b4e82c475256a4ba45f75b301e3f3b23a3df
describe
'96769' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e9f2cd79bd8429ec69b947a3afc750d9
b28d04f9193fcbfb93d18e602200e4ee1db2bb8f
describe
'56107' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAQ' 'sip-files00014.pdf'
e9c42dee3c52d191779868d2c96180da
7b41f31795d3ca4074ef67dc764c50edd24c3352
'2017-03-09T13:34:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAQ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVAQ-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'44563' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
61a968e76da89a64588ef9275f758cd3
2881af00f04316d6e8c3b42db6051161f23eec3f
describe
'34617' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ed3feb3a7143f663056c288534845bf6
bd810053a1eeecb522caf48cb5d8367106b9d219
'2017-03-09T13:35:28-05:00'
describe
'1519952' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
057fc6f7336cb4235c37faa00378c68c
bd42315bfd8957dd33d2a9e9fd1e2cd2d7767f08
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
d94f1df4d0191ebb9d342c36835b16fc
cc6920b022c36d10f6a59063bde4da82c716158c
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'9722' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
420162bf2e4f2284f52b94265110c660
8b5f622778cbe8b84ada6fc598118e0fdb5fe608
describe
'126732' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5961676ca549a9a8e82482686353ad20
5422afd87745a2eb8a14f586b985c185cbab8a32
'2017-03-09T13:35:30-05:00'
describe
'81226' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
eedde0ad6ac3e6bb6fa7469e8804f117
9c5f0b0586f64bfe538d04afd0da415625606c01
describe
'46801' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAY' 'sip-files00015.pdf'
820b2241439fbaae65aa9e7d6b178ac0
26866a5c66595317956633cb32d00f0702ddb500
'2017-03-09T13:34:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVAY-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'34199' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVAZ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
0a4fd20654fa6ac851956c5379391460
9148d7883748065cb067d52d7a6e0d362027308d
describe
'28620' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
30a037abbd0b481c7865f9e60f2ca219
4e71cb1c2e1e56e946f7589f3a9d87b4bbde3073
describe
'1567900' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
78cecb23340c533e70219fbc91021378
da3a6917a217176c9bcf19bcd6edba368d59596d
'2017-03-09T13:34:33-05:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
0320c46787f978508987454c3e247afb
602b75ccca601c4b6576763d3b3f71c4d5cf14c6
describe
'8617' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBD' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
279193dfb8d47a111ab6e4331fb32988
deeecb43aee674925bb6d0d069431e7c0d95b4fa
describe
'125689' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9443cb06afa42f483cbd28ad10f7dfe9
16a2757b3d9a156d09aced81b4093cbe15612a51
describe
'80947' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
994b25c5acf9cb19b8c811f6a1a947d8
9dc931cd26ef0ae8cc0d594160f041f06e436e4c
describe
'46169' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBG' 'sip-files00016.pdf'
d992003216e0840a32325275a739090e
fd76610b4bc6e187941d45490c4259e8ca1b8166
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVBG-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'45374' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBH' 'sip-files00016.pro'
7e12dcb106bed582c1eb23615ebaf799
74052ee5e6c806620bfb512b9d050de7ac276c82
'2017-03-09T13:35:13-05:00'
describe
'28764' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
4c1b652ae54864adce42961a0b724458
c57b5b8124a9f84d70ad694dd6989a9479245d96
'2017-03-09T13:35:01-05:00'
describe
'1521580' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
4ead66aab94f711d37facc953c7f7376
670cad0f3eb9522f66f00fa4c25116d7845de4ea
describe
'2115' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
9264f04d9c65e932191fee7b5e0a7318
aff9981433f78cc58d261c4c10d5ef609f0c5c4b
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8162' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
2ae418729ca5ff384ae5e92649c31474
39555168716aa88a7204ee424220f72f4a991548
describe
'108384' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a89b63524912b653ab2f709603add311
34011bd35dca745142007d8e59bf0f6a89d1f985
describe
'72349' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBN' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
4212a0318832beb9a01caccbc1539d44
6aca06ee782c4209747c6c17dbba9a595765b24a
describe
'39776' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBO' 'sip-files00017.pdf'
f1d2eae791460ef1bd90d18873088e5a
cac5672995ab4bca0423092b6bcdfddfcf799caf
'2017-03-09T13:35:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVBO-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'34251' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
60987c8a17028144e9806fb4c80a5781
ed1ac011a2b3e3e34ef524d3adbe2ba3a78e9cc3
describe
'24725' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
fdfa348d2fceda272c8e504147e43761
27aa688c43e6dbcc8e30d9f33ec8ade0e5dd5b9e
'2017-03-09T13:35:18-05:00'
describe
'1519164' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBR' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d57544eac884fa53d582d7e83b701a30
25125fb82fed9a90ee605c9b97cc21b085cd228a
'2017-03-09T13:35:50-05:00'
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
8d7dd3d4277e651a79b8bb71a7f93f4a
ecf90db9361fc0e1a703ebc1d92a7b1a79fe8c95
describe
'7293' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBT' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
45c800ae2648b5e2f215ab9542bfd834
9aec5334060dd7b88f4226ca5a91e9337926bef8
describe
'127706' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
0a64ff1afca7c919aafb770aeadd8115
03697b21ff8ba408d64f0decb6545927c1bda9f9
describe
'76370' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBV' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
cf92f8a1c473349212f22637b1863e57
3efb271eeba16740a4dfc85a3289cc42fb26832b
describe
'48109' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBW' 'sip-files00018.pdf'
93744374c7ccbc31c24629a9a335178b
a5626f97631e1fa6a6b6cedc1d444341fac5da5f
'2017-03-09T13:35:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVBW-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:35:32-05:00'
normalize
'36030' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ef5895b79bda73a07561aa4accd4094a
3e65efe8af11350c5b12cceeb07a5f5b6f00b5bc
describe
'27529' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
6a0caca455ee6fc51c3098d0f6f6c6b7
a61aee4aebf0a42fd056e5bee9aff4dcfd1167c9
describe
'1558296' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVBZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7f95fcdb64f4b2bc1b2ad274d7b175b9
c7fcd55fb064dd5c27fc1374d59fb24299dbcae9
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
6bbe5c381d0e5e211145218485e6369d
3d69366f3c3186cd4bb43b6fb2c7830123a7c484
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2704302aef9a559c5ff917fa3e6e5b4f
57522220f6dffc0f41fb5ff9d498a3d98fc9f4a8
describe
'149332' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
61d21f7a6fd163ad96e5d1d2b8bfb982
f6ce18bfa1d429e3458f5f0b45c471c25115184a
describe
'91901' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f11fafd106490c5939dde17315321b90
fe8dff4b022bf9c3dac328602e8d902b22058deb
describe
'56072' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCE' 'sip-files00019.pdf'
7ea4494a931ce82ce915157e9b015c12
646b20f7c3588d2e6530755e3bd65a411734069a
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVCE-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:35:37-05:00'
normalize
'42388' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCF' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d37ba17295a025602ac96676ae87acd3
188acf487b46e3f8b3daa7b25cd0d7ebd67682b0
describe
'32968' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCG' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
28e6dac96100695bd21b0ee3190c80cf
4a1b049ac387f933d0b5eef974780ef60a7664e8
describe
'1535484' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCH' 'sip-files00019.tif'
7073852b874add60fd7fb6adc7cc1d84
8a4a9240ca4e6a009f0bf5359d5f960f7ae2ab24
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCI' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2a055f851641258fe6870da11fae4ed0
a31641de58e125e65245ac43d22347b0ba8ccd10
describe
'9458' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCJ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
931b755ea1a8cb9881d489dd21e1eb3c
ebb628a46a101999628533c3cb6e70e705d06011
describe
'148720' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCK' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
82308b8a8495a3b2623b5eaa06423c1a
f635e78f04cad805dc905d6c5550b66c3b9fff35
describe
'90181' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCL' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
fa141201207c477d19301f3f07e67ade
d8afe563b2c137baf92fa312c99c85fc45d6da33
describe
'56653' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCM' 'sip-files00020.pdf'
de62f85157ecbf32341542619dfa112b
99ecc7a25ce9072c53d539ff26d6853322922f6d
'2017-03-09T13:34:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVCM-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:41-05:00'
normalize
'42010' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
bda220d0390555ee7c72fcd460cef77c
56e7d6b6a48a6de7244cad7fc13da594be3f1d1a
describe
'32038' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
537a9addb26e832337512faf452092e7
cb9978cfaf5ea5b8a68f9f4ffe2aaf69c91285e0
describe
'1523528' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
6356914df9195751bb5f3d11b3816fca
49cfc72e0ac5725b40d5b94986b9fa5a40cdb6c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
804ec790e72d728be73e1d67b4e1fdfc
017e4075b9363f3b9cf7226fccca57443e593703
'2017-03-09T13:34:31-05:00'
describe
'9289' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCR' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ea7cbca6a1b1f638a6866f92e9c09879
1e6a420b75d063cc63b1c739d2bdca824ff896b2
describe
'126950' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCS' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
7ab7754881498faf04aeece4c0981027
1179c51412fe9d414c53c3647b504021f0821bf5
describe
'81447' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCT' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
7ad045dfa775bc84581a9c17fbfd9824
34f9bf866d59600baf26606a1a80681c4cfa91f5
describe
'47241' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCU' 'sip-files00021.pdf'
18216be20855b59dc1e53668c43a39aa
43f5ab8ac40548444df17b25d667895b584a8162
'2017-03-09T13:34:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVCU-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:28-05:00'
normalize
'35210' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
58cd1a5b14c55853f6f41f3fdfb8fb34
296aa7aaa206dc5170ee71210916a0e8ccbf5c00
describe
'28443' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d2a0ead3c1a50efe3f667bae6d290ff3
ad170a12bcbcd8a956d787b9f2272526a359b2e5
describe
'1495632' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ed2f2229fb5a10b73958da8cecbc4a39
3acc7abd277b1e771afd17d54a79464cf4ecac8a
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
555d6f7aa270d18ad1f078203f24253f
709dc659511d3635593496e96283ecb730c8b93f
describe
'8612' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVCZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d1c8229a7bca6e184227edfd521f95f9
19a5ef3cb1ec3a65babfd92cda31b1eb9d954922
describe
'137305' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c18a5257dc8b258c79ef7269bbfb088c
0418f86f1f78e642d540563ac58fcda673ba5e50
describe
'83589' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
08d51693e3a29960396e634de70811b2
9018b1a98c732242036fdf1c93637274dda36299
describe
'51842' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDC' 'sip-files00022.pdf'
1f5c4b1d17865aa49d0d246c51affce0
103fd995815ade2330c61ed5c4ec669df799d5d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVDC-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'36438' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
e57cba13c0250a837f4f4fd38326d314
7c4cc265de09c510a10d4b75be9a5978691b66b6
describe
'29152' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
14154dabec6349622843be634a508a76
f8781f5edcfa9388b7a48f6ae2c77e3c4cb70613
describe
'1581124' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
3ac0b532de4aecbc85394ca168e8666a
6ed2185c102d093af4c30693e060a46f3f9c0cbe
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b6d22fcc8e28cdf5df65bc96f199e30f
c1d87ec3407596d13c0b99870e664f093b409b0e
describe
'9069' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDH' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
343dba30240959f2bf5786d3571678c9
c644ca91dfd6f2b8ed6f844b37d0efc2e82e0be0
describe
'133890' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bfffb4d76f6cebf84f579b17688ff1f6
493850dfb600c469a0e5f8e8c365a7cd1a0452bb
describe
'80156' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f5b7513466b2ebbed91e6fbb1d573bf8
7558b8bae35aa5454ae031cfa97ab1ae6bcdc8f6
describe
'51088' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDK' 'sip-files00023.pdf'
66fb1c6f7af2bed39aa126904c7f9c5f
3fdd1825c060e42616949993849bb8f85d2f1ba1
'2017-03-09T13:34:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVDK-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:37-05:00'
normalize
'37917' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f244208dee1849650c0e11d0c57349ca
b86172143b1ba6d8767a702b4f196204962de5ba
describe
'27920' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
87db5d2a6eb30a68fb8a9722763e606f
89b03bf31c8126734a3785001daad4e4ab293ad9
describe
'1546020' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
ba9b80ce011455925127fbdeb3764650
62420caab54ccef9f90aefdec1f596f6c59ebae1
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
81986041d4531d74b8d7139720908e08
874214139d063b6274f8f642e1f3bf7a3c30a475
describe
'8439' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDP' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
016c0ee467684eb1975a390948fc72a7
d737142ec82bc7306222b7d20e3b34f23a170562
describe
'123798' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDQ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
febf95b7e69cf67e1d84b7fa2731e955
6f5cf9805d78ad4ff8639400c52bd026d72a23ab
describe
'75595' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDR' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
89c7c046c03431c79c1e7180ccaa29c9
49cedee142332870df42ee4a9e0e8d5350b4d774
describe
'46532' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDS' 'sip-files00024.pdf'
e37927653fe40054850a117e9d9ca9a5
8b1be9a599f26033bd2c1844cc25afbbbaae57ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVDS-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'34877' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDT' 'sip-files00024.pro'
091d2ea6563fbd9e9880bcbd736574d1
ec2fa47f71a6ec76767c156e1b0cabaa8b3d2a36
describe
'26977' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
cf592a345463e0be9bb25db5fba701fa
4fb6f4e0d4e2b17c097f1fed9c0d95f107b16a5b
describe
'1533052' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
48c32b5fa946edc73d11c89898a60c6b
2469dc6722f1cc98ef8f6fcf839f20c6a7f3a955
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
8defeb54523ae6ab3b7131c6bd11c08e
a1c1a29610a5cfaf46f45accce030be35db816ac
describe
'8029' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDX' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
45bc5a9143f91ad32a8690236091a48d
c0108e586f99ea89a87600301243b3bc5b704add
describe
'154627' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
5f87d7d72da1c643ca542757c1b9583f
7056821e1b5eb933f558a87033785e5251dad794
describe
'94623' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVDZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
1de82be9005663252ca3b0b0d42fb83b
050cdb9a9281011fa4d53067a63fc7490f956999
describe
'58112' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEA' 'sip-files00025.pdf'
b70e9dc3926b15baf59e794eb5654906
b27d000a43fbb7906cd8fa23036827f929e279c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEA-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVEA-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'44444' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEB' 'sip-files00025.pro'
7179572292a0c45181c5a4f7f9e74c08
d830385e67ad3dabfc2c410cfd4f6c6374f7bd3f
describe
'33247' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5732d68a6d9cf0e74987e9407191cf4d
3c6ffc605072b400ea7d4d8f55f2f30c15e2672b
describe
'1557692' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVED' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4e24e222b8cb206f06f90ea00cf271a1
ac9987c29c5f5c96d135d71a7041ed589f764210
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6392a31a0dc45eedfc7cbe4a96a6c58e
6526b1b5fb9752184d8e6db5a186a4aa4a81f7a8
describe
'9650' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
0008a5189a63cb1b06bed97e44f8d474
85aaed3b0e3b2111d562f8de8f71e300a940bd65
describe
'149954' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a84e5ae05f624ff2579c17d976e45fb4
bb98a0119b8fcfbb2905b43ddd8f032c94265e84
'2017-03-09T13:33:57-05:00'
describe
'90947' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
81506b6814168ea53cdedd83f5a51b12
c228b6171bc4e2ef099ed98c45726570a7af792b
describe
'56172' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEI' 'sip-files00026.pdf'
89eb456c21d28d42d88b38b27951eaf8
d3866addfc53f8191dcdee321b515094ed8fa352
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEI-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVEI-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:34:46-05:00'
normalize
'40471' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a4fb49b00a56b653435d3c8e7845b635
9a161181ddedacff3e658cc274b9629134587335
describe
'31135' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d83be41a75989ecdd29d6e46c9599b52
c315728c573592f52a42c3d9ef43cb9b881c16c3
describe
'1555992' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a0270c644b010e8192c31255c283a9ec
41f2f85a182382eb508f74a5e1e87af0c846dc2b
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
02ddee116d7407bcceec1735573b0c5d
e0eb4132231652eb2c4a1b42ee35b7758dc33b5c
describe
'8901' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
71f0849515d8adf3557aed983c8c351d
92a22023690fbe2ea0010d689c2a8f9a4c8f8cd7
describe
'165938' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f834c681b3b28522cb79a9405dfe9564
777cafd0dc1db97fac0b519f9d3669b9a5218a6d
describe
'101182' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1b221bbd5a3f0aad83ab1fcd6a2e1641
6a9e7e814330bdfe11a8c58f3498c6c3761ed9f4
describe
'62508' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEQ' 'sip-files00027.pdf'
883f5292b88a4e45ae8fe30c677ca6cd
244b3d7b325287122ba3b1b51ea9208ae88cc148
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEQ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVEQ-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'48065' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVER' 'sip-files00027.pro'
8b5d88ce2ad7c68111ab5893e0d49bff
3b8bbcbbcfd646766d068bf0251047ed48e9eef3
describe
'36006' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVES' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
30424e766b943a316ddc4e39d0d26b18
19b08358d0359e7ec3f333ba4255bb3081f93257
describe
'1557936' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVET' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fdd8619f1f4426f4ca1090d68c4e85f3
bd1b3e071f293a33cf2f6e98bc5b0299392e1434
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6bdb3447e241fc5488c112b8f695d1fe
d187749d331f60a3e81e7cc63b80838585e60f1c
describe
'10011' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f0429108af93a32c224005a258997958
fc69a6b92945f16ec36e82cec314f8d7dde5e7a0
describe
'69955' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEW' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e39d68508b544ecb149c202680ac279b
b23716031cf0a91bf4043b8f03ca21118b4f7c13
describe
'45852' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b422487c7bdbefebd1b34dd6459a46d3
d792d1af9a8ce7dd155f59c44a6c33b0a7dfb919
describe
'26741' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEY' 'sip-files00028.pdf'
f40adb91b2ab946eeae0c32140aca496
895b4bf02309674322243c50f7ed449d6a1130ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVEY-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'18555' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVEZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
5ec1db611ab8b909db13e360c5384723
e4c252c3e4e6adfcaa5b63f9fc4355c8a267d05e
describe
'15171' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c08ef2f332669dda73a45c0b4baf30fb
4ee624c98f867ec8c79c78f611e1cb8ee95862de
describe
'1504068' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
5697e502788bd25c90d9194948149257
098d07d943baacdb2af4932ef72baf552743ad9c
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
db788ef9f6eec0d352e20af153901752
efe5dd49a74d9a395b963a89a96d283aa811ca93
describe
'4746' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6af8fda63a5acf124ef9b5ce0a650474
3a880c35629224c36f0834284a1e03514d307cfa
describe
'94229' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
de88915ae08577fb9592c45c38151e9f
4abd612886929e77387dd608cfd721c3b3c56816
describe
'63274' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
03c817ce21cfdf4784e6b772961b52fc
2f5f1fc9a8c68bc86758f6718609233a2f1fb461
describe
'32127' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFG' 'sip-files00029.pdf'
68b990309bf76585d48f07c80f02321a
9fe1106c8a428f1e3cdb673b56f8fdb55a02d6bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVFG-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'35246' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFH' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e439323817935e640c4817679dfcbbf9
453b858ba722583b278bdc0bcb9a2a48cd00a5e3
describe
'24373' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFI' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1c925340c1d13f63f2bf2ecdccd57d3a
8b3ffcb1b34b53f8acbbd6b5723a64bd5f9b01af
describe
'1578448' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
aed12b6aaa65bc98b7f3722cda00a175
6840753bd2455c043729f955ef277960d3ceb199
describe
'1830' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
5876d82f24156db2b8aa34970be75735
a05ccbfd62dca3340ea93ae5eb267719c4a307d1
describe
'7180' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFL' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
c66082f3ec32f38b876bfb1e5261432c
0e533cb9ae78b46adcb8c47b8416fc36cbe74f0b
describe
'153906' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
650176b8748ffbe0951c7586c1a062b5
8a257bb7db1b87f387a895db6683e0e3c700eada
describe
'93857' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5090e488e29014d95c5b7c801d3c5cfa
7bcef19ea22165966013c34e0590e29f2c3fdec4
describe
'58380' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFO' 'sip-files00030.pdf'
bea5894a4855ec6e8b6f3b67d47d55e1
c25a4193fe06630b17c9725d4e7073fa001e0f9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVFO-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'43859' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
37b2761797b708da3bf561a1692d0357
18a4876991b88268eccb4e815358e8bcf915d1dd
describe
'32270' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a6d28224c35de9ce808dc16df02057a6
842e4d82d0386016c5c7cbc41259758889bb33f8
describe
'1554116' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
465cb7238ba0b916107358cff42ffec0
a9594fa8d03e0edb17c6dc7a1403b0e7108473fe
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
fa2e6994fea85f60e574687312f15a1a
b30cbd3c7d6e61abf202693d37bd114156274680
describe
'9221' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7b25d5c657b5f1a842a2a64b24dc878e
ff6e657ef1cf5a0ddee753ecda9612b7bf621526
describe
'172057' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c2f97a2ed0adf59afb0832351a05689b
acac5ba1325a65b6644b38513e71e76c913b3b9e
describe
'102575' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2fe91e51d1f52f268ebaf1b44154bbf2
6b69694c67cebaa2bd72573fd7e9f1904726c744
describe
'64899' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFW' 'sip-files00031.pdf'
ead8c5d99b91759c68254b444c06570d
50b1b35a450da2b3d35569abb0651366c292c186
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVFW-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'46429' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFX' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a73d5323832f71b5ae903218f1cd50fa
c654d610f35d47312c3a908b51b3e06bd92307a2
describe
'35657' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFY' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a8cfff35dfe88a0e972d5083d5443d2e
8924eac047674a6e64eb4f55b37ae98e76864572
describe
'1584776' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVFZ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b8506a4544dacefbd10ebd76f8e503c2
e749d4a1b81421bb7aabf4ed0707d58ef78e8f01
describe
'1930' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGA' 'sip-files00031.txt'
3b0422ec3fed017c05bfe9e9be3a5307
f745bffe53c2cfb268acd0983af17f52d924f239
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'9802' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d4f0e092648dca50122de3521ef1e233
15d41d9475824a3f2a87c2bcb6760485f9544754
describe
'147141' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGC' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
7d76b774579bbd7cbef808168d4c635f
225cb201f14c8e90b761f14d6eaa07e0e3a9a7bd
describe
'87114' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGD' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fb46c4f9fbb8b259cdd2aeb458a16ee0
1587df715b519d77e1963cbcf09d062870c2fb6c
describe
'56005' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGE' 'sip-files00032.pdf'
a1571be766a131aa58fcc83346c23e65
681a8e480e0ee0012ade187fc0aaf3621a953bf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVGE-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'41939' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
358f673b7fefd9eb2e4f095d2f1019c7
47b8e8ca345b4d47e93a0f9fbac6bb8d04cb8740
describe
'30883' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
5ce33bb100733336a8d54a01ef75b475
2eddbcf23b8f1afa397528bed06ba5b73fd22316
describe
'1580428' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
bb5e4695f99036f6c07cc12389211475
90daa0a8d3d750243dcc85423a3ab79e0371d60f
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
de8c7ccef9fa7437242148dd2450ef11
365bd9982f431a7ddf6c5f2500e4a26fff4e7e68
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1907e345111b3ee1c306d9325ba21406
d7a247b8c6c2b9e1190689da2cbf94c811e55aa1
describe
'37949' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4429c313ea199e09e502ab7c18d10951
fc4bf8d94262e79f7dc7aadc00a24f0551103a6c
describe
'27681' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ecc3f9f255967df5b53c9134f655e211
57b7e02dc2a37f033b263ccd9afa5c5498968ff4
describe
'15083' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGM' 'sip-files00033.pdf'
882bceee39d0521b2e3201bd2360670a
b826b78d1e289476d98c799a61610ea59cab6668
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVGM-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
'2017-03-09T13:35:25-05:00'
normalize
'9214' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
37d568cb8735585b915e9346b800beea
f46d75412039ed2212f5cac840c7e4f5cbdd8f0a
describe
'9387' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
044ff441e8dd254bb44fd0a7ea339937
8dd5e37dc2657dfbe1f842691df374597b2d2e81
describe
'1550904' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0e2a89dcb1aa9abc76740dd53713ae90
2c82918186ff4b4dff3971902fe0bb8db5d27952
describe
'377' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9bc47535ca716c075229004c93f5e597
ee720af2d764737d115d23909ac5ab85b26c4777
describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
74d0d3f0f3fede7b47308d505e4d1d62
29e308f059f04a8787ed22fbc1ce765d0f345d3a
describe
'114304' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
86d60cffda1879849a421bf28cbf14c4
f1d6fd8d00ebdca8e2a9df3012940224b5f89228
describe
'39830' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
cd8abefbebd73bbb2589269c0354162c
6e8433820d3fc48e000727decde8651c3deca99b
describe
'43134' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGU' 'sip-files00034.pdf'
3c261f56aeb99e5ec43d6e88066ece78
fcc8056e29c413d7867fc7bf4bf92a73cb8f148a
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVGU-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'37426' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
b65660f1a5ef98f184d1ee3f3e26a0cd
1fb615ce6f51f7434ee5bcffe212bb845589917d
describe
'12944' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ce846c379932b1cc3830b48b5c508e57
6b2fcab0dc76259c839d5f260c8ec1aa1dc4aeb1
describe
'1554580' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ab7a46dd5659a38615584060d3e75472
4d6e01252d5875322562475909671b155c4b074f
describe
'1891' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
eaf8d9fdcdaebe4d536c09abee166b82
707eee0c714febb06d913cd5cd5fb73be80b9052
describe
'4046' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVGZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
344cc430b43a48d5971799b34766faaa
56c131dbbf8f5aa07f68ca3b9502d4a45164cacd
describe
'929645' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
3d0a8a0bc0385611c5005972e781999d
2d32960415fcc8ad8459bc93d67d6a7582fd6676
describe
'35849' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a2dc236f080319201f0a204db423e383
e85b0cbbe5e3d0911a2f3f4bb3fe89d6e10734fb
describe
'411824' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHC' 'sip-files00035.pdf'
f827a9505e0c81a4818b5577c28de2bf
a6b306bd77fba7b417253c687edfeec305e061a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVHC-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'26200' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
88252e7307c132977d87294f38390d39
3a4eda0c34fccabc50a3e03342f093a00fb44fd4
describe
'12487' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
16d6bb821f9d52eb32edc185d1e67a07
c99c174163440e9d8c1e2d1a9b5ed54228b9699e
describe
'11874440' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
c3ad2ed2e00691562061246e32feeb15
f4e0ffc3e94795c6e53abb24595ffeb2f9bdbe40
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8223274e23d1210891612575aff706ac
f91626b705429af81cf99a0637b4965ad9e77d8d
describe
'4689' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
d6a41dba3a642cd09f3c55408c85e59e
c334b93203f7c9312f97ddf39772282f0cd37e0e
describe
'1848133' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b343748ece9fa55a82870f8339360ffb
dcdb1884a4aa6b1e7076ac6b2c295d1d2333af39
describe
'59075' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
29692fceaaa658decc89684414389ea1
e331f5e5e4699c8015a2d7efec513facfb441f48
describe
'796589' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHK' 'sip-files00036.pdf'
050386453ca46f796fd4d4372ea33b48
9a31937d7fc0a6b0ecdb289043a66f23241ab9da
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVHK-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'60719' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHL' 'sip-files00036.pro'
92bad6bbd8f8966778688632f21206f4
2f0491ff7e51e1d36ff2441a1074b88d002ec062
describe
'17248' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHM' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
cf831e3f77de462846bdd7b7c8225218
d71a4cd5d12f4d082b2ee12b03ccba3633078d40
describe
'14807264' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHN' 'sip-files00036.tif'
17f187c69fdadef0f5fd4eeac5946ce3
10ad54f4d5f96f1f71342b08b9bc294312360d2f
describe
'3061' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHO' 'sip-files00036.txt'
59c0ea883d970eab31d0c81a27bd04e0
fad419fba86da7af0f4ec019bd333661de82297b
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'4897' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHP' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2af10b71607940efc24180880eea32da
02b9c8cb8045a91223760e0b0083e0fdc10fcf19
describe
'153168' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHQ' 'sip-filescopyright.jp2'
cd965abaafb5da42dc6c8def20d374f4
b811824c94aa0ae5a5f04cfb64b27e9e0927243a
describe
'103670' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHR' 'sip-filescopyright.jpg'
d028360928b6690b49cfe8211e6bb6a5
db68f5028a78f337081c164d3478ffd3e30a8a09
describe
'71620' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHS' 'sip-filescopyright.pdf'
a377f4a856deccdc90290fe366701090
55dfcabead7416bdf662b459443da70e1fb97e8a
'2017-03-09T13:34:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVHS-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'35669' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHT' 'sip-filescopyright.pro'
03760baf0f78e5460eb682a05b7cba0d
d49278077716f388c2b285b92049dac851e32016
describe
'35083' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHU' 'sip-filescopyright.QC.jpg'
28180ee8185b27af4702a664eb2b5d1b
f0e1d4e0f0dcb1a265ec575f3d87a525ada2ad6d
describe
'1069752' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHV' 'sip-filescopyright.tif'
8c6f1b6df8af1c1b0e0c58ed6b1219a7
eaf918ac1a91d1f2429dff4c4f66adc7988a8799
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHW' 'sip-filescopyright.txt'
15f2bbd34b776d39b92ffb1c4f760b27
b0251f2ed30996bc7ed3d8efa687abc9a6800fa9
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'10085' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHX' 'sip-filescopyrightthm.jpg'
b0566b6a6e9b9bfb3fa924203ff11cf8
63d705588c1580afc86f43138330df2fe31f906d
describe
'1931911' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHY' 'sip-filesUF00001186.pdf'
0c74356c7010bba4a5e14db3a628e178
39a7d78fcd99836efa28929d4da1626b5882f26f
describe
'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080904_AABVHY-norm-0.pdf'
8cbf40949b8b639101cd4e2c803d9b62
6e3842fc6d7fb92b4cf6a2346c8099c7289050d2
describe
normalize
'67405' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVHZ' 'sip-filesUF00001186_00001.mets'
d4432182722e435713e5e1caf9e03840
376d2f9ad907b7a2b3bd3c49fb45da2d25d09540
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2017-03-09T13:36:11-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
BROKEN_LINK schema http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'91990' 'info:fdaE20080903_AAACDHfileF20080904_AABVIC' 'sip-filesUF00001186_00001.xml'
7739db9c12f7e050b738ec9cb0c92979
3cfcba1b2ee76e49d7945fcdad033d07618c5ae4
describe
'2017-03-09T13:36:10-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd