Citation
Flood of September 20-23, 1969, in the Gadsden County area, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 79 )

Material Information

Title:
Flood of September 20-23, 1969, in the Gadsden County area, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 79 )
Series Title:
FGS: Information circular
Creator:
Bridges, W. C
Davis, D. R
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee Fla
Publisher:
Bureau of Geology
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v, 37 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Flood, 1969 -- Gadsden County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
City of Quincy ( local )
City of Apalachicola ( local )
City of Tallahassee ( local )
Ochlockonee River ( local )
Gadsden County ( local )
Gulf of Mexico ( local )
Rain ( jstor )
State highways ( jstor )
Storms ( jstor )
Floods ( jstor )
Precipitation ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Bibliography: p. 37.
General Note:
Prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Dept. of Transportation and Florida Bureau of Geology.
Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
Statement of Responsibility:
by W. C. Bridges and D. R. Davis.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
022159150 ( aleph )
02012098 ( oclc )
AFD1774 ( notis )

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Full Text
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Randolph Hodges, Executive Director
DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES
Robert O. Vernon, Director
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY C. W. Hendry, Jr., Chief
Information Circular No. 79
FLOOD OF SEPTEMBER 20-23, 1969 IN THE
GADSDEN COUNTY AREA, FLORIDA
By
W. C. Bridges
and .
D. R. Davis
Prepared by the
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION and the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 1972
i




Completed manuscript received February 1, 1972 Printed for the Florida Department of Natural Resources
Division of Interior Resources Bureau of Geology by Douglas Printing Company
Jacksonville, Florida Tallahassee 1972
ii




CONTENTS
Page
Abstract ---------------------------------------------------------1
Introduction ------------------------------------------------------2
Acknowledgments ----------------------------------------------5
Storm description ------------------------------------------------- 5
Synoptic discussion -------------------------------------------- 6
Radar observations-------------------------------------------- 9
Depth-area duration ------------------------------------------14
Description of the flood ------------------------------------------- 17
Flood stages and discharges ----------------------------------- 17
Flood frequencies ----- ----------------------------------------- 25
Flood profies ---------------------------------------------------27
Flood damage ------------------------------------------------------34
References --------------------------------------------------------- 37
ii




ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1. Total-storm rainfall map for September 20-23, 1969 ----------- 8
2. Map showing locations of road closures resulting
from September 1969 flood --------------------------------4
3. Surface-weather map for 7:00 a.m., September 21, 1969,
showing a tropical depression on the Florida gulf coast ..------ 7
4. Upper air 500-millibar constant pressure chart for
7:00 am., September 21, 1969--------- -------------------- 8
5. Photograph of radar scope at 5:50 a.m., September 20,
showing large precipitation area from 60 nautical
miles north-northeast to 150 nautical miles south
of Apalachicola. Range setting 250 nautical miles.
Range marker 50 nautical mile intervals. No
attenuation. Antenna elevation angle % degree --------------- 10
6. Photograph of radar scope at 2:30 p.m., September 20,
showing spiral lines with apparent center of curvature
about 80 nautical miles southwest of center of scope.
Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50
nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna
elevation angle % degree --------- ---------------------- 11
7. Photograph of the radar scope at 6:39 a.m., September
21. The bright rain area located approximately 58
nautical miles at about 24 degrees to the right of the
top of the scope was located over a recording rain gage at Quincy, Florida. Rainfall intensity at this
time was in excess of 6 inches per hour. Range setting
250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle
% degree---.....--------------------------------------- 12
8. Photograph of the radar scope at 9:12 p.m., September
22, showing two well-developed rain bands or lines
converging on an area over the Ochlockonee River basin.
Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50
nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna
elevation angle % degree --------- ----------------------13
9. Cumulative rainfall and selected rainfall-station
totals for September 20-23, 1969. ------ -------------------16
10. Map showing location of flood-measurement sites -------------19
11. Discharge hydrograph for selected gaging stations in
the Ochlockonee River basin, September 20-80, 1969.... ----------- 21
iv




12. Culverts at Rocky Comfort Creek (sta. 23) ----------------- 23
18. Lake Talquin inflow, outflow, and storage..... ------------------24
14. Relation of peak discharges to regionalized floodfrequency curves-storm of September 20-23, 1969 ------------ 26
15. Flood profile of Little River ----------------------------28
16. Flood profile of Quincy Creek ---------------------------29
17. Flood profile of Telogia Creek . --------------------------- 30
18. Culvert on State Highway 268 at Quincy Creek ------------- 31
19. Ochlockonee River at State Highway 20, 3,000 feet
downstream from Jackson Bluff Dam ----------------------32
20. Mobile homes at Bell's Trailer Park, U.S. Highway 20
west of Tallahassee -------------- -------------------- 33
21. Road washout at North Lake Drive between Old
Bainbridge Road and Lake Jackson -----------------------34
22. Salem Branch at State Highway 159 near Havana ------------ 35
23. Little River at U.S. Highway 90 ------------ -------------36
TABLES
Table Page
1. Rain gages and total rainfall, in inches, for
September 20-23, 1969, in the tri-state area of
Florida, Georgia, and Alabama shown in figure 1 -------------15
2. Maximum rainfall intensities at gage 7, Quincy,
September 20-23, 1969 ------------------------------------18
3. Summary of flood stages and discharges ------.. -------------20
V







FLOOD OF SEPTEMBER 20-23, 1969 IN THE
GADSDEN COUNTY AREA, FLORIDA
By
W. C. Bridges1 and D. R. Davis2
ABSTRACT
The center of low pressure of a tropical disturbance which moved northward in the Gulf of Mexico, reached land between Panama City and Port St. Joe, Florida, on September 20, 1969. This system was nearly stationary for 48 hours producing heavy rainfall in the Quincy-Havana area, 70-80 miles northeast of the center.
Rainfall associated with the tropical disturbance exceeded 20 inches over a part of Gadsden County, Florida, during September 20 through 23, 1969, and the maximum rainfall of record occurred at Quincy with 10.87 inches during a 6-hour period on September 21. The 48-hour maximum of 17.71 inches exceeded the 1 in 100-year probability of 16 inches for a 7-day period.
The previous maximum rainfall of record at Quincy (more than 12 inches) was on September 14-15, 1924. The characteristics of this historical storm were similar in path and effect to the September 1969 tropical disturbance.
Peak runoff from a 1.4-square mile area near Midway, Florida, was 1,540 cfs (cubic feet per second) per square mile. A peak discharge of 45,600 cfs on September 22 at the gaging station on the Little River near Quincy exceeded the previous peak of 25,400 cfs which occurred on December 4, 1964. The peak discharge of 89,400 cfs at Ochlockonee River near Bloxham exceeded the April 1948 peak of 50,200 cfs, which was the previous maximum of record, by 1.8 times. Many flood-measurement sites had peak discharges in excess of that of a 50-year flood.
Nearly $200,000 was spent on emergency repairs to roads. An additional $520,000 in contractual work was required to replace four bridges that were destroyed. Agricultural losses were estimated at $1,000,000.
1




INTRODUCTION
A small tropical disturbance moved northward from the Gulf of Mexico on September 20, 1969, and became quasi-stationary for about 48 hours in the coastal area between Port St. Joe and Panama City, Florida. Rainfall associated with the disturbance was in excess of 20 inches over an area bounded by the towns of Attapulgus, Georgia and Quincy and Havana, Florida.
Areas affected most by the storm were the Little River basin (southern part of Decatur County, Georgia, and Gadsden County, Florida) and part of the Ochlockonee River basin in Florida (Leon, Gadsden, Liberty, and Wakulla counties). This area is generally enclosed by the 10-inch isoyhet in figure 1, the total-storm rainfall map for September 20-23.
Rainfall intensities, at the Quincy National Weather Service Office, located just outside the area of maximum rainfall, for 2-, 6-, 12-, 24-, 48-, and 72-hour periods and the storm total, exceeded the 1 in 100-year probabilities of occurrence. Most of the rain fell on September 21, with 10.87 inches recorded during the 6-hour period ending at 11:10 a.m.
Although no lives were lost, the cost and inconvenience to the public owing to widespread road closures were substantial. The Florida Department of Transportation noted 51 sites where the roads were closed due to high water or to the washout of bridges or culverts. These sites are shown in figure 2.
Traffic was virtually at a standstill in Gadsden County on September 21 and 22. U.S. Highway 90, the main artery through the county, was closed from September 21 until September 23, when one lane was opened. Most of the traffic in the county was moving, with only minor inconveniences, by early September 23.
This report documents the magnitude and extent of flooding for September 20-23, 1969. It provides information for public and private agencies that are concerned with flooding, with planning of land development, and with road design and construction. The report describes flood damage, rainfall intensities, and storm characterization. It gives peak discharges at selected sites and flood pro1Hydraulic engineer, Dept. of Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Division.
2Meteorologist, Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, National Weather Service.
2




HIeland e aely
Dane v tr-l
31 0L C u- I AL A
FL RIDADEC TUR
rotriwood~ ~ ~ 9 abridge soCar if Thor esville
C vlle Aft Quitman
SHavana
Al -Ao oin en D Ikol A S EN nEaN nmon
L.i8E RT Y W A KU LL o Wakul
me llCrafod to&
F e1omoCfl ours u S etm rk $316 jerry
geSumraf
4 EXPLANATION Partso1 Joe -I5s"- isohyet, Inches
RApolochicolo Rain gage number IC IS 188 Rainfoll, Inches ,/ Ap 1?o Miles
Figure 1.-Total-storm rainfall map for September 20-28.,1989.




assun
EXPLANATION Water over the road AKU- L- CO. Culvert washed out B Bridge approach out
0 . ... 5 FO Mtites
Figure 2.-Map showing locations of road closures resulting from September
1969 flood.




files of selected reaches of three streams, and makes comparisons with previous flood peaks.
The report was prepared under the general supervision of C. S. Conover, District Chief, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, as part of the cooperative program with the Florida Department of Transportation.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The hydrologic data in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Transportation, the Florida Bureau of Geology, and the Florida Power Corporation. Rainfall and related weather and radar data were collected by the National Weather Service.
The authors gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the Florida Department of Transportation in furnishing damage estimates to roads and bridges and highwater marks for flood profiles; the assistance of Robert L. Smith, meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service Radar Station at Apalachicola, Florida, in the interpretation of the radar photographic records of the storm; and the assistance provided by J. F. Bailey, hydraulic specialist, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D. C., in the collection and computation of peak discharge data and preparation of the report.
STORM DESCRIPTION
Rainfall intensities of 5 to 6 inches in 24 hours are not uncommon throughout the gulf coastal area. Rains of 10 inches or more in 24 hours are rare, and the chance of having as much as 10 to 15 inches in 24 hours is 1 in 100 years (Hershfield, 1961, p. 105).
Excessive rainfall along the gulf coast may be associated with any one of numerous weather systems. Well-developed thunderstorms occasionally produce heavy precipitation. Cold fronts moving into the southeast frequently become quasi-stationary along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico and may produce rain for 2, 3, or more days; the total rainfall accumulation may be several inches. Extra-tropical lows may develop over Texas or the western Gulf in the spring and move eastward across the northern Gulf producing copious rains over the coastal areas of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida.
The heaviest rains, however, are generally associated with
5




cyclonic (low pressure) systems of tropical origin. The storms include:
(a) hurricanes with winds of 74 mph (miles per hour) or higher;
(b) tropical storms having closed isobars about a low-pressure center with a distinct counter-clockwise circulation and winds of 39 to 73 mph;
(c) tropical depressions having closed isobars about a low-pressure center, a counter-clockwise wind circulation with winds to 39 mph; and
(d) tropical disturbances with low-pressure centers that are low enough for a closed isobar and a poorly defined wind circulation.
SYNOPTIC DISCUSSION
The heavy rain of September 20-23, 1969 was associated with a tropical cyclone that was marginal between a tropical depression and a tropical disturbance. At times the central pressure was low enough for a closed isobar; at other times it was not. The circulation was counter-clockwise, but winds were light both at the surface and aloft.
The synoptic situation was similar to that associated with the previous record rainfall (1922-70) for the Quincy area which occurred September 14-15, 1924 (U.S. Weather Bureau). The tropical storm of September 1924 dumped over 12 inches of rain on Gadsden County within a 24-hour period causing flooding and extensive crop damage (U.S. Weather Bureau, September 1924, p. 39). The characteristics of the September 1924 storm were similar in path and effect to the September 1969 storm.
The first indication of the September 1969 tropical depression was on the surface-weather chart of September 19, when a ship report indicated the presence of a low-pressure area at about lat. 25.3oN. and long. 86.40W., about 150 miles west-northwest of Key West, Florida. The surface-weather analysis at 1:00 a.m. September 20, placed a low with a closed isobar about a central pressure of 29.70 inches of mercury centered at lat. 25.00N. and long. 88.40W. This low-pressure system moved northward during the day and reached land between Panama City and Port St. Joe, Florida, by 4:00 a.m. September 21. Figure 3 shows the surface-weather map for 7:00 a.m. September 21 with the low center positioned on the gulf coast.
A large high-pressure area at the surface (fig. 3) and weak
6




850 800 750 350
9o
L APALACHICOL
PANAMA PORT
300 CITY ST. Joe EXPLANATION oo250 S-- 2- Line of equal
1 pressure, millibars7
shows magnitude of
pressure at sea level.
Interval 4 millibars. .4 L. Low-pressure system
Stationary front
Wind-velocity symbol
250 90 850 80o
Figure 3.--Surface-weather map for 7:00 a.m. September 21, 1969, showing a
tropical depression on the Florida gulf coast. (Redrawn from U.S.
Dept. of Commerce, Daily Weather Maps, Weekly Series, September
15-21, 1969.)
wind circulation aloft (fig. 4) covered most of the eastern half of the nation. With the blocking action of the high at the surface and no pronounced wind pattern aloft to keep the system moving, the tropical depression stalled near the coast where it remained for about 48 hours.
The dynamics of a tropical depression blocked by a shallow dome of cooler air are favorable for heavy precipitation. The counter-clockwise circulation around the low-pressure center transported warm, moist, and unstable tropical air inland. Orographic lifting and forced upslope motion of the warm moist air over the cooler denser
7




?Ql 1 'W 160 ti 1 140 3 1;( 1O (1, 1' Vf QV 00' 0 all' k 4l,' ,11t
400
20'
/ -'
IS 500-MILLIBAR HEIGHT CONTOURS AT 7:00 A.M., E.S.T,
17;5, 1. 0 !.'1 .1 t, !04, to0 W'' ,
Figure 4.-Upper air 500-millibar constant pressure chart for 7:00 a.m., September 21, 1969. (Reproduced from U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Daily
Weather Maps, Weekly Series. SeDntember 15-21, 1969.




air of the high-pressure dome, in addition to the instability of the tropical air, was sufficient to produce torrential rains--most of the time that the low remained over the Panama City-Port St. Joe area. By September 23, the high-pressure system along the eastern seaboard weakened, and the low filled until it was discernable only as a weak inverted trough.
During the 48 hours the storm was stationary, heavy rain fell on the Ochlockonee River basin and on the lower Apalachicola River basin. Map analysis indicated periods when the storm weakened followed by periods of re-intensification. This was reflected in the variability of intensity of rainfall throughout the life of the storm.
RADAR OBSERVATIONS
The precipitation area associated with this tropical depression was under constant surveillance by the National Weather Service's radar located at Apalachicola, Florida. The radar is classed as Weather Search Radar-57. It has a range of 250 nautical miles". Photographs were made every 5 minutes during the storm. Because the radar station was near the storm path excellent picture coverage was obtained.
Radar detection of a large area of precipitation in the Gulf of Mexico was made late on September 19. The precipitation reached the Florida coast at 1:00 a.m., September 20. Figure 5 is a photograph of the radar scope at 5:50 a.m., September 20. This figure shows an area of precipitation from 60 nautical miles north-northeast to 150 nautical miles south of Apalachicola that varies from 50-150 nautical miles in width with nearly 100 percent coverage to the south of Apalachicola. The heaviest precipitation was over the Gulf.
As the area of precipitation progressed northward, it tended
to orient into lines or bands. Two bands were prominent at 9:25 a.m. One was 8-10 nautical miles wide, extending from 20 nautical miles northwest to 75 nautical miles southeast of Apalachicola, and the second band extended 125 nautical miles offshore. Cells (heavy rain centers) appeared to be moving north or northwest along the bands while the whole precipitation area moved slowly northward.
1All references to miles in this report are to statute miles except where
designated as nautical miles. One nautical mile equals approximately 6,076
feet.
9




Figure 5.-Photograph of radar scope at 5:50 a.m., September 20, showing
large precipitation area from 60 nautical miles north-northeast to 150 nautical miles south of Apalachicola. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range marker 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation.
Antenna elevation angle 1/ degree.
By noon, the bands were nearly spiral with the center of curvature about 95 miles southwest of Apalachicola.
Rainfall began at Havana early on September 20 and increased noticeably in intensity by 2:00 p.m. Destined to be in the area of maximum rainfall, Havana and Quincy are shown (fig. 6) on the northeastern edge of the precipitation area on the 2:30 p.m. radar
10




Figure 6.-Photograph of radar scope at 2:30 a.m., September 20, showing
spiral lines with apparent center of curvature about 80 nautical miles southwest of center of scope. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No. attenuation.
Antenna elevation angle 2 degree.
picture. The center of curvature is shown about 80 nautical miles southwest of the radar station (center of the scope). The intensity of rainfall is indicated by the brightness of the cells in the bands. Moderate to heavy rain was falling over most of the lower Apalachicola and Ochlockonee river basins at the time this photograph was taken. The rain continued during most of the remainder of the day.
After the center of the tropical depression reached the coast on
11




0a
Figure 7.-Photograph of the radar scope at 6:39 a.m., September 21. The
bright rain area located approximately 58 nautical miles at about 24 degrees to the right of the top of the scope was located over a recording rain gage at Quincy, Florida. Rainfall intensity at this time was in excess of 6 inches per hour. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation.
Antenna elevation angle 1/2 degree.
the morning of September 21, radar pictures indicated a tendency for the heavier precipitation to be oriented in northwest-southeast or north-south lines with the heaviest precipitation area virtually stationary over Gadsden and neighboring counties in Florida and south Georgia. Individual cells moved along the lines converging on the Gadsden County area while the lines moved little. At times, 2 or- 3 lines appeared to radiate out of a point centered over or near
12




Figure 8.-Photograph of the radar scope at 9:12 p.m., September 22 showing
2 well-developed rain bands or lines coverging on an area over the Ochlockonee River basin. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle degree.
a small area in north Gadsden County and the south part of Grady and Decatur counties in Georgia.
The two recording rain gages (7 and 8, fig. 1) nearest the center of maximum rainfall were located approximately 12 miles southwest, near Quincy. Figure 7 shows the precipitation pattern at 6:39 a.m., September 21, shortly after the start of rainfall that exceeded
13




6 inches per hour at Quincy. The recording gages showed very heavy rainfall continued for nearly 3 hours. At times during the day on September 21, the heights of the radar echoes exceeded the 40,000-foot level.
Precipitation bands continued to converge on the Ochlockonee River basin with individual cells in the bands moving up to the Ochlockonee River basin where they become stationary. Figure 8 is a photograph of the radar scope taken at 9:12 p.m. on September 21. Through that night and the following morning, the precipitation patterns were similar to that shown in figure 8. The precipitation lines slowly disintegrated into non-orientated cells during the afternoon of September 22 and regrouped again into well-defined lines after 5:30 p.m. By early morning on September 23 the precipitation area began to show signs of eastward movement, and by 9:00 a.m. the lines broke up into individual cells which moved rapidly out to the east and northeast.
DEPTH-AREA DURATION
This storm occurred in an area having an unusually large number of rain gages. Those which collected 2 inches or more during the storm are listed in table 1 in descending order of inches of rain caught. Most of the gages were the official National Weather Service types. Of these, 2 were recording tipping-bucket gages, 2 were recording-weighing gages, 1 a Fischer-Porter recording gage, and 32 were the standard 8-inch gages. The latter is a compound, 10 to 1, can-gage with a capacity of 25 inches. Four standard gages that were in the center of maximum rainfall received 20 inches or more. Three of these were owned by the Englehart Chemical and Mineral Company and were located at company mines.
Twelve of the rain gages listed are owned by the Florida Division of Forestry. Of these, four were of the compound type with a 7-inch capacity. The others were a plastic tube-type with a 5-inch capacity. The accuracy of the plastic gage is questionable, especially for periods of intense rain. The Division reported that some of their rainfall reports were in excess of gage capacity. Havana tower gage 4 did overflow. The U.S. Geological Survey's gage (17) is a Stevens
Type QA continuous recorder, with a capacity of 25 inches.
The maximum rainfall of 23.40 inches was measured at the National Weather Service's Agricultural Weather Reporting Station located on State Highway 12 near the west edge of Havana. (See
14




STable 1.-Rain gages and total rainfall, in inches, for September 20-23, 1969, in
the tri-state area of Florida, Georgia, and Alabama shown in figure 1.
Gage No. Name and Location Gage Type Ownership' Rain(fig. 1) Gage fail
1 Havana, Fla. Standard 8 in. NOAA.NWS 23.4 2 La Camelia mine, 7 miles NNE, Quincy, Fla. do. EC and M 22.5 3 Attapulgus mine, 1 mile S. Attapulgus, Ga. do. do. 22.0 4 Hairana Tower, 3 miles W, Havana, Fla. 7-in. Capacity FDF 221.9 5 Lock N mine, 5 miles NNE, Havana, Fla. Standard 8 in. EC and M 20.0 6 Quincy Tower, 4 miles W, Quincy, Fla. 7-in. Capacity FDF 19.8 7 Quincy, 3 miles SSW, Fla. Tipping Bucket NOAA-NWS 18.8 8 Tobacco Station, Quincy, Fla. Weighing do. 18.3 9 Hosford Tower, 3 miles E, Hosford, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 18.1 10 Wewahitchka, Fla. Standard 8-in. NOAA-NWS 17.4 11 East Bay Tower, 14 miles S, Sumatra, Fla. 5-in Capacity FDF 15.8 12 Attapulgus Exp. Sta., 1 mile NW, Attapulgus, Ga. Standard 8-in. Univ. Ga. 15.0 13 Tallahassee WB, 5 miles SW, Tallahassee, Fla. Weighing NOAA-NWS 13.8 14 Cape San Bias, S. Port St. Joe, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 13.8 15 Tallahassee Tower, 3 miles SE, Tallahassee, Fla. 7-in. Capacity do. 12.9 16 Woodruff Dam, Chattahoochee, Fla. Fischer & Porter NOAA-NWS 12.0 17 Otter Camp, 5 miles S, Bloxham, Fla. Stevens USGS 11.7 18 Rosedale Tower, 3 miles S, Chattahoochee, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 11.4 19 Bristol Tower, 3 miles E, Bristol, Fla. 7-in. Capacity do. 11.3 20 Crawfordville, Fla. 5-in. Capacity do. 11.0 21 Tall Timbers, N side Lake lamonia, Fla. Standard 8-in. NOAA-NWS 310.4 22 Blountstown, Fla. do. do. 10.4 23 Colquitt, 2 miles E, Ga. do. do. 9.1 24 Bainbridge, Ga. do. do. 9.0 25 Donalsonville, Ga. do. do. 8.7 26 St. James Tower, 3 miles S. Panacea, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 8.2 27 Cairo, 2 miles NW, Ga. Standard 8 in. NOAA-NWS 8.2 28 Sanborn Tower, Sanborn, Fla. do. do. 8.1 29 Apalachicola, Fla. Tipping Bucket do. 7.8 30 St. Marks. Fla. Standard 8 in. do. 6.7 31 Panama City, Fla. do do. 6.5 32 Wacissa, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 6.3 33 Newport Tower, Wakulla, Fla. do. do. 6.0 34 Blakely, Ga. Standard 8 in. NOAA-NWS 5.9 35 Headland, Ala. do. do. 5.9 36 Camilla, Ga. do. do. 5.6 37 Carrabelle, Fla. do. do. 5.4 38 Greenwood, Fla. do do. 4.9 39 Fountain, 3 miles SSE, Fla. do. do. 4.8 40 Thomasville, 4 miles SE, Ga. do. do. 4.7 41 Monticello, 3 miles W, Fla. do. do. 4.6 42 Chipley, 3 miles E, Fla. do. do. 4.0 43 Caryville, Fla. do. do. 3.8 44 Moultrie, 2 miles ESE, Ga. do. do. 3.7 45 Perry, Fla. do. do. 3.5 46 Dothan, Ala. do. do. 3.2 47 Quitman, Ga. do do. 2.8
48 Geneva, Ala. do. do. 2.7
49 Valdosta, 4 miles NW, Ga, do. do. 2.4 50 Madison, Fla. do. do. 2.1
2NOAA, National Weather Service (NOAA-NWS), Englehart Chemical and Mineral (EC and M), Florida Division of Forestry (FDF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
-Gage overflowed-total does not include overflow. 3Average of four gages.
fig. 1, gage 1.) The 20-inch isohyet enclosed an area of about 160
square miles in which the average precipitation was about 22 inches.
The 15-inch isohyet enclosed an area of about 2,000 square miles
and the average of all the rain gages within this area was 19.8
inches. Rainfall amounts and area depths are probably biased to the
low side due to the intensity of rainfall and the limited capacity of
some of the gages.
Figure 9 shows accumulated rainfall-curves for Havana, Quin15




I I I I I I I I I 1I
24- EXPLANATION
(SELECTED RAINFALL-STATION TOTALS) e t 2- Locomelio mine
3- Attoputgus mine 5
4. Havano tower, Florida Forest Service 5
5. Lock N mine 866. Quacy tower, Florida Forest Service /
9. Hostord tower,Florido Forest Service / 10. Wewohitchko '- 0/10
,o.- i, oI I .. .. ...
16
-z
4
t r GAGE 13 LL.,SEE .-----I/ /.Daily cumulative totals, for Havano
01
o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 V v S It M U) V V Lo It to Nu f 0 - 0 N 0 4 0
September 20 September 21 September 22 Sept. 23
Figure 9.-Cumulative rainfall and selected rainfall-station totals for September 20-23, 1969.
16




Table 2.-Maximum rainfall intensities at gage 7, Quincy, September 20-23,1969.
Rainfall
Rainfall Duration (inches)
5 minutes 0.62 10 minutes 1.17 15 minutes 1.61 20 minutes 1.98 30 minutes 2.50 45 minutes 3.24 60 minutes 3.76 2 hours 6.23 3 hours 7.90 6 hours 10.87 12 hours 12.07 24 hours 15.06 48 hours 17.71 72 hours 18.84 Storm Total 18.85 inches
Storm Duration 72 hours and 16 minutes Rain Began 4:10 a.m., Sept. 20 Rain Ended 4:26 a.m.. Sept. 23
cy, and Tallahassee; and total rainfall for other selected stations. The Havana curve was estimated from the daily rainfall reports and from the Quincy curve.
There were no recording gages in the maximum rainfall center, that area receiving 20 inches of rainfall or more (fig. 1). Rainfall intensities for the area between Quincy and Havana, however, were probably similar to those recorded by tipping-bucket gage 7 at the National Weather Service Office located 3 miles southwest of Quincy. Although that gage overflowed for a few minutes, a quantity adjustment was made using the recoid from the adjacent gage 8.
Rainfall intensities for the. Quincy area are shown in table 2 which presents the maximum amounts of rainfall recorded for designated time intervals. The intensities for 2-, 6-, 12-, 24-, 48-, and 72-hour periods, and for the storm total, exceeded the 1 in 100year probability of receiving such rainfall amounts (Hershfield, 1961 and Miller, 1964). The 2-day maximum of 17.71 inches exceeded by 1.71 inches the 1 in 100-year probability of a rainfall of 16 inches for a 7-day period for Quincy (Miller, 1964).
The maximum 6-hour rainfall at Quincy (gage 7) was recorded
between 2 and 8 hours after the storm center reached land on the morning of September 21. The center of maximum precipitation was 60-65 miles to the east of where the center of low pressure made
landfalland some 50 miles inland.
17




DESCRIPTION OF THE FLOOD
FLOOD STAGES AND DISCHARGES
The damaging floods that occurred in September 1969 were mainly confined to the Little River basin and the lower Ochlockonee River basin (south of U.S. Highway 27, fig. 2). Areas affected were the southern part of Decatur and Grady counties, Georgia, and all or parts of Gadsden, Leon, Liberty, Wakulla, Franklin, Bay, and Gulf counties, Florida (fig. 10).
Current-meter measurements of peak discharge were not obtained at the sites shown in figure 10 because the flood peak was of short duration, because it occurred during the night, or because the gaging station was inaccessible due to flooded roads and washouts. In cases where water-stage recorders malfunctioned or were damaged by the flood, high-water marks and direct readings on nonrecording gages were used to determine flood peaks.
Indirect measurements of peak discharge were made at 15 sites--3 regular gaging stations and 12 miscellaneous sites. Indirect measurement techniques used included: slope-area method; contracted-opening method; flow-through culvert method; and over road-embankment method. Indirect measurements based on field surveys of high-water profiles, channel geometry, and geometry of the bridge or culvert were computed in accordance with established methods of the Geological Survey.
Maximum stages and discharges at 19 continuous-recording and crest-stage partial-record stations, the maximum contents for Lake Talquin, and peak discharges for 13 ungaged sites are summarized in table 3. These sites are located on the map in figure 10.
Flood peaks at selected stations on several streams in the Ochlockonee River basin during September 20-30 were generally of short duration (fig. 11). Most of the streams peaked on the 22d and receded to base flow in 48 to 72 hours. Small streams such as Rocky Comfort Creek (sta. 23) peaked on the 21st and receded to base flow in 12 to 18 hours.
Figure 11 shows that the peak for Ochlockonee River near Havana (sta. 8, fig. 10) was relatively low compared to peaks of nearby streams. The total rainfall decreased rapidly in the upstream part of this 1,140 square-mile basin and the peak discharge was only 17,000 cfs or 14.9 cfs per square mile. Most of the flooding on the lower Ochlockonee River was downstream from station 8 and was the result of runoff from Little River and from small tributaries around Lake Talquin.
Gaging station 13, Little River near Quincy, was located near
18




GRADY
FL RtA ~\ Boinbridge 4
SlmtP sr0 alro D CATUR l oThomosville
2hofahoche FLORI A
GADSD
counts ristol A OTollahassee ohom L E 0 N
BAY
.n re a 3 0 I1 is
Pnom City Lsh Y oWAKULLA +, pchoippy 300- GULF sumous F0
FRANKLIN
EXPLANATION
poloehicolo Flood measurement sites.
0 Number corresponds to that g l in table 3. ies
igumre in.-Man showing location of flood-measurement sites.




Table 8,-Summary of flood stages and discharges
Maximum flood previously known Maximum during September 19860 flood
Discharge
Drainage Gags
Sta, No. Permanent Stream and place of area Gage height Cf.
(fir, 10) Sta, No, determination (sq ml) Period height Discharge (ft) Recurrence of Date (ft) (efs) Day Cfs per interval Record eq mi (yr)
Ochlockonee River basin and coastal area
1 3270,5 Sopahoppy River near Arran, Fla. 48.2 1964.69 Dec. 4, 1964 58.88 4,740 22 56,88 2,350 48,8 4 2 8271. Sopchoppy River near Sopchoppy, Fla. 07,9 1961-69 Dec. 6, 1964 88.78 4,880 28 80.60 8,440 85,1 4
3 82756, Ochlockonee River near Thomasvlle, Ga. 550 1987.69 Apr. 2, 1948 929.1 72,000 28 8,67 872 1.6 91.1 4 3277. Uarnetts Creek near Thomasville, Ga. 104 1951.09 Dee, 5, 1964 '20,4 17,700 22 10,86 680 6.5 1.2
5 3279. Wolf Creek near Whigham, Ga. b 19 1948, 1951-69 Dec. 4, 1964 10.02 21 7,56 1,800 68.4 8 6 8280. Tired Greek near Cairo, Ga. b 60 1948.69 Apr, 1, 1948 416.8 28,100 21 8.80 2,940 49,0 4
7 8288.59 Ochlockonee River tributary near Havana, Fla. 1.84 21 ... 1,700 1,270 ) S 8290. Ochlockonee River near Havana, Fla. h1,140 1926-69 Apr, 4, 1948 85 ,08 56,900 21 80.00 17,000 14.9
9 8292.6 Midway Branch near Midway, Fla. 1.88 ....... .... .... 21 2,180 1,540 (a)
10 8298.52 Attapulgue Creek at Jamieson, Fla, 95.6 ..... ... 21 22,200 282 A .28
11 8294.04 Swamp Creek at Jamieson, Fla. 58.0 ... .... .... 21 18,800 8565 d 2.56
12 3294.81 Willacoochee Creek tributary near Quinay, Fla. 1.26 .... 21 ... 642 510. (c)
t 18 38295. Little River near Quincy, Fla. 287 1950-69 Dec. 4, 1964 20,81 25,400 22 '24.65 45,600 192 2.99
0 14 8295.16 Quincy Creek near Quincy, Fla. 6.16 .... 21 4,840 786 a
15 8295.88 Hollman Branch near Quincy,Fla. 8.09 .... .... .... . 21 1,050 840 a
16 8295.46 South Prong Tanyard Branch near Quincy, Fla. 2.29 .. ... .... 21 .... 1,480 646
17 8295.48 Tanyard Branch near Quincy, Fla. 4.91 ..... .... 21 .... 2,430 405
18 8295.58 Hubbert Branch near Quincy, Fla. 4.68 ....... .... 21 .... 2,860 504
19 8295.56 Winkley Branch near Quincy, Fla. 1.64 ....... .... 21 1,000 610 (a)
20 8295.65 Little River near Littman, Fla. 292 ........ .... 222 .... 47,400 167 d289
21 8295.82 Hurricane Creek near Havana, Fla, 8.81 .... .... 21 .... 7,450 896 (0)
22 8296. Little River near Midway, Fla. 805 1965-69 Dec. 5, 1964 88.27 27,800 22 A88.25 49,200 161 4 2.85
23 8297. Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy, Fla. 9.46 1964-69 Dec. 4, 1964 41.00 2,140 21 '42.5 7,610 804 (a)
24 8299. Lake Talquin near Bloxham, Fla. 1,720 1980-69' Sept. 24, 1982 70.90 f96,820 22 71.60 t105,800 ....
26 8800. Ochlockonee River near Bloxham, Fla. 1,720 1926-69 Apr. 5, 1948 28.50 r50,200 28 a29.2 89,400 52.0 d 2.129 26 8800.5 Telogla Creek near Greensboro, Fla. 28.1 1965-69 Apr. 27, 1965 986.86 4,410 21 '99.9 12,000 427 d 2.26 27 8801. Telogia Creek near Bristol, Fla. 126 1950-69 Dec. 5, 1964 11.11 8,280 22 a16.65 20,600 148 d 1.49
28 8802. New River at Vileas, Fla. 28.2 1961-69 Oct. 16, 1964 6.86 675 22 8.78 2,670 111 8 29 8808. New River near Wilma, Fla. 81,7 1964-69 Sept. 20, 1966 46.82 2,720 22 60.67 8,790 108 46 80 8804. New River near Sumatra, Fla. 157 1966-69 Dec. 7, 1964 24.68 8,620 28 27.88 6,670 42.5 8 Apalachicola River basin
81 8586. Flat Creek near Chattahoochee, Fla. 24.9 1961-69 Apr. 26, 1965 11.48 8,990 21 '18.6 8,450 889 d 1.70
32 8590. Chipola River near Alths, Fla. 781 1921-27, Sept. 20, 1926 88.56 25,000 21 14.88 8,100 4.0 1.8 1929-81,
1948-69
Coastal area between Apalachicola River
and Choctawhatchee River
88 8698. Sandy Creek near Panama City, Fla. b 25 1961-69 Oct. 15, 1964 17.06 2,260 21 18.24 1,180 47.2 1.18
'From floodmark d Ratio of peak discharge to 50-year storm 'Exceeded by undetermined peak discharge on Sept. 80, 1957, which
b Approximately Includes Hurricane Creek was caused by failure of earth embankment of Jackson Bluff dam,
ONot defined r Contents, are feet




90
80
70
0
z
0 6C
U
w
U)
J Ochlockonee River near Bloxhom (Sto.25)
w 50i.
C-
u
U' 1Little River near Quincy (Sto. 13) UL
o
S40
O
0
10I
I
C-)
Cl j Telogia Creek near Bristol (Sto.27)
Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy(Sto.23)
k \Ochlockonee River near Hovona(Sto. 8)
0 --------..
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
September 1969
Figure 11.-Discharge hydrograph for selected gaging stations in the Ochlockonee River basin, September 20-30, 1969.
21




the center of greatest rainfall. At this station the stage rose 21 feet between 6 a.m. September 21 and 6 a.m. September 22, and rainfall during the same period was 13 inches at the recording gage 3 miles south-southwest of Quincy. The peak discharge of 45,600 cfs occurred about 7 a.m. September 22. This discharge was 2.99 times greater than that of a 50-year flood and 1.8 times greater than the 19-year record peak discharge of 25,400 cfs which occurred in December 1964 (table 3).
Runoff for the flood was 9.7 inches or approximately 61 percent of the total rainfall on the basin.
At the Little River gage (sta. 13), on State Highway 12, the left bank (looking downstream) is steep and the highway enters a deep cut approximately 300 feet east of the bridge. The rain saturated the pipe clay banks causing both banks to slide and piled clay, trees, and telephone poles across the highway, blocking it for about a week. The sparse development along the relatively narrow Little River valley limited damage mostly to bridges and highway embankments.
At Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy (sta. 23) the peak discharge was 7,610 cfs. Runoff from the 9.46 square-mile drainage area was 14.0 inches which was 74 percent of the 18.8 inches of rainfall.
The drainage structure at Rocky Comfort Creek station consists of four 8-foot x 10-foot box culverts. Near the time of the flood peak the culverts were undermined and the center section (fig. 12) settled approximately 3 feet. The road was breached around both wingwalls leaving 10-foot openings on each side.
About 8 miles downstream, at the next road crossing at State Highway 267, two sets of arch culverts were washed out and collapsed due to the head on the road fill and culverts.
Lake Talquin is the reservoir formed by Jackson Bluff Dam on the Ochlockonee River and is used primarily for hydropower. Its area is 6,890 acres (10.7 square miles) at elevation 60.0 feet.
As rain spread over the Ochlockonee River basin, Lake Talquin began to rise. By midnight September 20, after 3.17 inches of rain had accumulated at the Quincy weather station (gage 7), the lake elevation had increased 0.3 foot. Between midnight September 20 and 7 p.m. September 22, the lake level rose from 68.30 feet to 71.60 feet or 0.70 foot above the previous maximum recorded on September 24, 1932.
The contributing drainage area to the lake is 1,720 square
22




Figure 12.-Culverts at Rocky Comfort Creek (sta. 23).
miles. The inflow was gaged at station 8 (fig. 10), Ochlockonee River near Havana, 1,140 square miles; station 13, Little River near Quincy, 237 square miles; and station 23, Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy, 9.46 square miles. The inflow from the ungaged 334 square-mile area was estimated on the basis of runoff from Rocky Comfort Creek and Little River and verified by a comparison of total runoff values. Storm runoff from Rocky Comfort Creek and Little River drainage basins were 74 and 61 percent, respectively, compared to 64 percent runoff from the ungaged area.
Figure 13 is a graph of Lake Talquin inflow and outflow, in cfs, and storage, in acre-feet, for September 20-30, 1969. The inflow graph (solid line) represents the combined flow past station 23 (Rocky Comfort Creek), station 13 (Little River), station 8 (Ochlockonee River), and the estimated flow of the ungaged area. It was not adjusted for time lag. The storage graph (dotted line) represents storage in Lake Talquin as measured at station 24 and the outflow graph (dashed line) represents the flow below Lake Talquin at station 25 (Ochlockonee River).
The initial inflow increase, as shown in figure 13, resulted from runoff from Rocky Comfort Creek and other small tributaries that
23




oo100 INFLOW
90- -110
S80- 105
Z
0 \
La
Cul
(n 70 -100
o. i \OUTFLOW
6 0 - 9 5
60- '_I '.1 _o
II
S50 90
-II
IL .1
m 40- 85 z I
30 - 80
0
O -- 65
S I I I I I I I I I I 60
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 September 1969
Figure 18.-Lake Talquin inflow, outflow, and storage.
24




surround Lake Talquin. This concentration of inflow is reflected by an increase in storage and outflow. The inflow graph shows a second peak which was the result of the flood runoff from the Little and Ochlockonee Rivers. Usable contents in the lake increased from 67,800 acre-feet, at midnight September 20, to a maximum of 105,300 acre-feet, at 7 p.m. September 22.
Gaging station 25 on the Ochlockonee River at State Highway 20 (3,000 feet below Jackson Bluff Dam) gages the outflow from Lake Talquin. The peak discharge of 89,400 cfs at this station, which occurred at 5 a.m. September 23, was 2.19 times greater than that of a 50-year flood.
The Ochlockonee River overflowed State Highway 20 just west of the main channel bridge and kept the road closed to traffic for approximately 48 hours September 22-23, 1969. At peak flow the road-overflow section was approximately 4,800 feet wide and carried approximately 20 percent of the discharge.
On September 30, 1957, a portion of the earth embankment of Jackson Bluff Dam failed thereby releasing much of the water stored in Lake Talquin. Although the peak discharge was not determined, the flood crest at the gaging station at State Highway 20 was 3.44 feet higher than that of the more recent September 23, 1969, flood.
At gaging station 27, on Telogia Creek, the peak discharge on September 22, 1969, was 20,600 cfs or 1.49 times greater than that of a 50-year flood and 2.5 times greater than the previous maximum of 8,280 cfs in December 1964. Runoff resulting from the September 1969 flood was 10.4 inches, which was about 65 percent of the total rainfall on the basin.
The highest peak discharge per unit of drainage area during the September 1969 flood occurred on Midway Branch where the peak runoff was 1,540 cfs per square mile from a 1.38 square-mile area. See station 9 (fig. 10 and table 3).
FLOOD FREQUENCIES
The recurrence interval, applied to flood events, is the number of years, on the average, during which a given flood peak will be exceeded once (Dalrymple, 1960, p. 5). It is inversely related to the chance of a specific flood peak being exceeded in any one year. For instance, a flood having 1 chance in 50 of being exceeded in any one
25




100 025
o I20
z
0
u =2o23 got
o
cc e
-- OONe
0,0
Lg6 ISt
dl6

I 9 U 9
070
12 EXPLANATION
.
oIO IO IOOOO
110 100 1000 10.060
DRAINAGE AREA, SQUARE MILES
Figure 14.-Relation of peak discharges to regionalized flood-frequency curves--storm of September
20.230 199. Flood-frequency curves adapted from Barnes and Golden (1966).




year is said to have a recurrence interval of 50 years and is commonly referred to as the 50-year flood.
Barnes and Golden (1966, p. 7-13) present a method for determining the magnitude of floods of selected frequencies. Their regionalized method is applicable to drainage areas of greater than 10 square miles.
In figure 14 peak discharges of September 1969 are compared to the 10-, 25-, and 50-year flood-frequency curves. Many of the peak discharges were in excess of the 50-year flood and are considered to be rare occurrences. The enveloping curve shown in figure 14 may be derived from the equation: Q = 2,800 A0.52
where Q is the peak discharge in cfs and A is the drainage area in square miles.
All of the flood-measurement sites (stations 1-31, fig. 14 and table 3) are in the same flood-frequency region and hydrologic area, as defined by Barnes and Golden (1966, plate 1), except for Flat Creek near Chattahoochee (sta. 31). However, a comparison of the unit runoff of available peaks for Flat Creek near Chattahoochee (sta. 31) and Telogia Creek near Greensboro (sta. 26) indicates that Flat Creek does belong in the same flood-frequency region and hydrologic area as stations 1-30. Chipola River near Altha (sta. 32) and Sandy Creek near Panama City (sta. 33) are in a different region and area and therefore are not plotted in figure 14.
FLOOD PROFILES
Profiles of the flood crest of September 1969, along selected reaches of Little River, Quincy Creek, and Telogia Creek are presented in figures 15-17. The approximate channel profiles, which were constructed from the contour crossings taken from topographic maps, are also shown.
The upstream end of the Little River profile shown in figure 15 begins at the State Highway 159 crossing of Attapulgus Creek (the main headwater tributary of the Little River) and ends at Lake Talquin. Although the head loss at State Highway 159 was 1.5 feet, only minor damage occurred to the grassed shoulders of the highway embankment. The right (west) bridge end showed considerable scour as did the main channel below the bridge. At State Highway 12, only minor damage occurred to the shoulders
27




ELEVATION, FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL
/ STATE HIGHWAY 159
SWAMP CREEK
- //
WILLACCHEE CREEK
STATE HIGHWAY 12
//
C QUINCY CREEK C U.S. HIGHWAY 90
PROPOSED INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10 U /
S.SEABOARD COASTLINE RAILROAD
'o
o
LAKE TAUI SATE HIGHWAY 268FDA
02
o /
z
02 0= I I.
a. 00
0.
Iii W
I0
/3
US I
LAKE TALQUIN AT JACKSON BLUFF DAM
0
Figure 15.-Flood profile of Little River.
28




ELEVATION, FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL
o-
STATE HIGHWAY 268..
/- /0
ZTATE HIGHWAY 267
HOLMAN BRANCH
/STATE HIGHWAY 65
< STATE HIGHWAY 12
-- //
P71
/ SEWAGE DISPOSAL PLANT
-4i
rt/ TANYARD BRANCH O//
0 / HUBBERT BRANCH 1I z / /l
/ WINKLEY BRANCH I rr //_ 8. -_.
... j
,- LITTLE RIVER 2
-0 a D
'
I I 1 1
--.0
Figure 16.-Flood profile of Quiney Creek.
29
0 C
0
0 LITTLE RIVER
Figure 16.-Flood profile of Quincy Creek.
29




DISCHARGETHOUSANDS OF CURIC FFFT PFR SFrNfn
P3ajo ut~olajjJ o alpUaUd IpOOlil-'Ll aanln1[iJ
H.NOVm iNOWi MV3UISdN S31IV1 '83AI8
O10 G Z O gto O G 9g 09
001
I
---Lo_~09 Z +Io
'n
--i
0
-rm (11
M N
OOG
oO I .L0Ni"d Xw
-02
(do IiVoaNdVaWOJ) P
WOQJS ~U!S~~ .flO~O) -04005




Figure 18.-Culvert on State Highway 268 at Quincy Creek.




Figure 19.--Ochlockonee River at State Highway 20; 3,000 feet downstream
from Jackson Bluff Dam-Photo by Tallahassee Democrat.
although the road was under approximately 0.5 foot of water. No damage to the bridge ends and no major scour took place in the main channel other than a few blow-holes downstream from the bridge.
Figure 15 shows a 3.9-foot head drop in the Little River at U.S. Highway 90. This was a result of the west-bound lane of the highway being about 4 feet higher than the older east-bound lane. The west-bound lane was submerged to a depth of 6 inches. Considerable damage occurred to the bridge ends and the embankment in the area of the relief culvert.
The water was approximately 2 feet deep on the Seaboard Coastline Railroad but damage was insignificant. At State Highway 268 the bridge and highway were submerged. Twelve hundred feet
32




'0 ir
7 rsr'- .:
I-I It i P
Figure 20.-Mobile homes at Bell's Trailer Park, U.S. Highway 20 west of
Tallahassee-Photo by Tallahassee Democrat.
east of the bridge and just east of the relief culvert the road fill was breached leaving an opening 60 feet wide.
Quincy Creek flows around the north side of Quincy in an easterly direction to the Little River. The reach of the Quincy Creek flood profile shown in figure 16 extends from State Highway 268, northwest of Quincy, to the Little River. At State Highway 268 there was a 5.3-foot drop in the water surface, the road was breached at the culvert, and the entire triple box culvert was undermined and settled approximately 3 feet (fig. 18).
State Highway 267 was overtopped by about 2 feet of water but was not damaged. The head drop in Quincy Creek at State Highway 65 was about 3 feet. The flood plain widens below the bridge which accounts for the flatter slope downstream.
The Telogia Creek flood profile shown in figure 17 extends from
33




A,."
Figure 21.-Road washout at North Lake Drive between Old Bainbridge Road
and Lake Jackson-Photo by Tallahassee Democrat.
U.S. Highway 90 to State Highway 65. The break in profile upstream from State Highway 268 was due to a farm pond just upstream. Although its earthen dam was not topped there was considerable scour of the spillway around the right (west) end. At State Highway 12 a grist mill was flooded and its concrete dam was washed out. State Highway 274 was flooded to depth of about
0.7 foot and 850 feet in width.
The lower chords of the bridges at State Highway 20 and 65 were submerged, but the bridge decks and approaches remained above water.
FLOOD DAMAGE
Although no loss of life resulted from the flood, several houses, weekend cottages, and mobile homes were severely damaged-espe34




Figure 22.-Salem Branch at State Highway 159 near Havana.
cially those along the Ochlockonee River valley below the Jackson Bluff Dam. As shown in figure 19, only the roofs of several mobile homes are visible in the lower left of the picture. Bell's Trailer Park on U.S. Highway 90 between Tallahassee and Quincy was flooded when a low area filled and the outlet was inadequate to remove the excess water. Many mobile homes were removed but those pictured in figure 20 were flooded to depths of 6 inches over floor level.
Roads, highways, and bridges received the greatest damage. According to Charles Scruggs, maintenance engineer, the Florida Department of Transportation spent $198,000 for emergency repair work in Gadsden, Leon, and Liberty counties. Approximately 80 percent of the amount was used in Gadsden County. Emergency work included repairing bridge ends and culverts, and backfilling washed-out road fills. Contractual work to replace four bridges that were destroyed amounted to $522,832. Three of the bridges were in
35




Figure 23.-Little River at U.S. Highway 90-Photo by H. P. Goodling, Portland Cement Association.
Gadsden County and the other in Liberty County. Estimated damage to streets in Quincy totaled $30,000.
Figures 21-23 show typical scenes of roads that were washed out, culverts destroyed, and highways and bridges inundated.
Railroad damage was mostly confined to temporarily-submerged tracks, land slides, and washed-out culverts along the Seaboard Coastline Railroad. Mr. J. G. Jarriel, roadmaster for the railroad, reported rail traffic at a standstill for approximately 36 hours due to submerged tracks. A work-train required about 60 days to restore damaged and washed-out fills. No dollar estimate of damage was obtained.
The Apalachicola and Northern Railroad had six washouts in its 90 miles of track between Chattahoochee and Port St. Joe. The major washout was at Big Creek near Hosford, in Liberty County (fig. 2). A papermill in Port St. Joe, dependent on pulpwood hauled
36




by the railroad, was shut down for about 10 days resulting in the layoff of about 1,200 employees.
The Quincy Telephone Company reported approximately 2,000 telephones affected by the storm.
Agricultural losses in Gadsden County were estimated at $1,000,000. Of this amount, $659,000 were crop losses-mostly soybeans. Other losses included washed-out spillways or retaining dams for farm ponds, irrigation reservoirs, and grist mill reservoirs which were valued at approximately $350,000.
REFERENCES
Barnes, H. H., Jr.
1966 (and Golden, H. G.) Magnitude and frequency of floods in the United
States, Part 2-B: U.S. Geol. Survey Water-Supply Paper 1674, 409
p., pl. 1.
Dalrymple, Tate
1960 Flood-frequency analyses: U.S. Geol. Survey Water-Supply Paper
1543-A, 80 p.
Davis, D. R.
1971 (and Bridges, W. C.) A blocked minimal tropical depression becomes
a storm of rare occurence: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Technical Memorandum NWS SR-59, 18 p. Hershfield, David M.
1961 Rainfall frequency atlas of the United States: U.S. Weather Bur.,
Tech. Paper 40, 61 p.
Miller, John F.
1964 Two-to ten-day precipitation for return periods of 2 to 100 years in
the contiguous United States: U.S. Weather Bur., Tech. Paper 49,
29 p.
U.S. Weather Bureau
1922-70 Climatological data (Florida section): monthly and annual summaries.
37




Full Text

PAGE 1

STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES Randolph Hodges, Executive Director DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES Robert O. Vernon, Director BUREAU OF GEOLOGY C. W. Hendry, Jr., Chief Information Circular No. 79 FLOOD OF SEPTEMBER 20-23, 1969 IN THE GADSDEN COUNTY AREA, FLORIDA By W. C. Bridges and D. R. Davis Prepared by the UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY in cooperation with the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION and the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES BUREAU OF GEOLOGY TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 1972 i

PAGE 2

Completed manuscript received February 1, 1972 Printed for the Florida Department of Natural Resources Division of Interior Resources Bureau of Geology by Douglas Printing Company Jacksonville, Florida Tallahassee 1972 ii

PAGE 3

CONTENTS Page Abstract ---------------------------------------------------1 Introduction ------------------------------------------------2 Acknowledgments ---------------------------------------5 Storm description ------------------------------5 Synoptic discussion ------------------------------6 Radar observations ----------------------------9 Depth-area duration --------------------------------------14 Description of the flood ------------------------17 Flood stages and discharges ----------------------------------17 Flood frequencies -5---------------------------------------25 Flood profiles -----------------------------------------27 Flood damage ----------------------------------------------34 References -------------------------------------------------37 m

PAGE 4

ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Total-storm rainfall map for September 20-23, 1969--------8 2. Map showing locations of road closures resulting from September 1969 flood -------------------------------4 3. Surface-weather map for 7:00 a.m., September 21, 1969, showing a tropical depression on the Florida gulf coast-----7 4. Upper air 500-millibar constant pressure chart for 7:00 am., September 21, 1969---------------------------8 5. Photograph of radar scope at 5:50 a.m., September 20, showing large precipitation area from 60 nautical miles north-northeast to 150 nautical miles south of Apalachicola. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range marker 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle % degree--------------10 6. Photograph of radar scope at 2:30 p.m., September 20, showing spiral lines with apparent center of curvature about 80 nautical miles southwest of center of scope. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle % degree ----------------------------11 7. Photograph of the radar scope at 6:39 a.m., September 21. The bright rain area located approximately 58 nautical miles at about 24 degrees to the right of the top of the scope was located over a recording rain gage at Quincy, Florida. Rainfall intensity at this time was in excess of 6 inches per hour. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle % degree..---------------------------------12 8. Photograph of the radar scope at 9:12 p.m., September 22, showing two well-developed rain bands or lines converging on an area over the Ochlockonee River basin. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle % degree------------------------------13 9. Cumulative rainfall and selected rainfall-station totals for September 20-23, 1969.-----------------------16 10. Map showing location of flood-measurement sites-----------19 11. Discharge hydrograph for selected gaging stations in the Ochlockonee River basin, September 20-30, 1969.---------21 iv

PAGE 5

12. Culverts at Rocky Comfort Creek (sta. 23) --------------23 18. Lake Talquin inflow, outflow, and storage .. .------------. 24 14. Relation of peak discharges to regionalized floodfrequency curves-storm of September 20-23, 1969---------26 15. Flood profile of Little River---------------------------28 16. Flood profile of Quincy Creek-----------------------29 17. Flood profile of Telogia Creek ---------------------30 18. Culvert on State Highway 268 at Quincy Creek---------31 19. Ochlockonee River at State Highway 20, 3,000 feet downstream from Jackson Bluff Dam-------------------32 20. Mobile homes, at Bell's Trailer Park, U.S. Highway 20 west of Tallahassee ----------------------------33 21. Road washout at North Lake Drive between Old Bainbridge Road and Lake Jackson ---------------------34 22. Salem Branch at State Highway 159 near Havana --------35 23. Little River at U.S. Highway 90-----------------------36 TABLES Table Page 1. Rain gages and total rainfall, in inches, for September 20-23, 1969, in the tri-state area of Florida, Georgia, and Alabama shown in figure 1 --------15 2. Maximum rainfall intensities at gage 7, Quincy, September 20-23, 1969 ------------------------------18 3. Summary of flood stages and discharges -----.------------20 V

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FLOOD OF SEPTEMBER 20-23, 1969 IN THE GADSDEN COUNTY AREA, FLORIDA By W. C. Bridges1 and D. R. Davis2 ABSTRACT The center of low pressure of a tropical disturbance which moved northward in the Gulf of Mexico, reached land between Panama City and Port St. Joe, Florida, on September 20, 1969. This system was nearly stationary for 48 hours producing heavy rainfall in the Quincy-Havana area, 70-80 miles northeast of the center. Rainfall associated with the tropical disturbance exceeded 20 inches over a part of Gadsden County, Florida, during September 20 through 23, 1969, and the maximum rainfall of record occurred at Quincy with 10.87 inches during a 6-hour period on September 21. The 48-hour maximum of 17.71 inches exceeded the 1 in 100-year probability of 16 inches for a 7-day period. The previous maximum rainfall of record at Quincy (more than 12 inches) was on September 14-15, 1924. The characteristics of this historical storm were similar in path and effect to the September 1969 tropical disturbance. Peak runoff from a 1.4-square mile area near Midway, Florida, was 1,540 cfs (cubic feet per second) per square mile. A peak discharge of 45,600 cfs on September 22 at the gaging station on the Little River near Quincy exceeded the previous peak of 25,400 cfs which occurred on December 4, 1964. The peak discharge of 89,400 cfs at Ochlockonee River near Bloxham exceeded the April 1948 peak of 50,200 cfs, which was the previous maximum of record, by 1.8 times. Many flood-measurement sites had peak discharges in excess of that of a 50-year flood. Nearly $200,000 was spent on emergency repairs to roads. An additional $520,000 in contractual work was required to replace four bridges that were destroyed. Agricultural losses were estimated at $1,000,000. 1

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INTRODUCTION A small tropical disturbance moved northward from the Gulf of Mexico on September 20, 1969, and became quasi-stationary for about 48 hours in the coastal area between Port St. Joe and Panama City, Florida. Rainfall associated with the disturbance was in excess of 20 inches over an area bounded by the towns of Attapulgus, Georgia and Quincy and Havana, Florida. Areas affected most by the storm were the Little River basin (southern part of Decatur County, Georgia, and Gadsden County, Florida) and part of the Ochlockonee River basin in Florida (Leon, Gadsden, Liberty, and Wakulla counties). This area is generally enclosed by the 10-inch isoyhet in figure 1, the total-storm rainfall map for September 20-23. Rainfall intensities, at the Quincy National Weather Service Office, located just outside the area of maximum rainfall, for 2-, 6-, 12-, 24-, 48-, and 72-hour periods and the storm total, exceeded the 1 in 100-year probabilities of occurrence. Most of the rain fell on September 21, with 10.87 inches recorded during the 6-hour period ending at 11:10 a.m. Although no lives were lost, the cost and inconvenience to the public owing to widespread road closures were substantial. The Florida Department of Transportation noted 51 sites where the roads were closed due to high water or to the washout of bridges or culverts. These sites are shown in figure 2. Traffic was virtually at a standstill in Gadsden County on September 21 and 22. U.S. Highway 90, the main artery through the county, was closed from September 21 until September 23, when one lane was opened. Most of the traffic in the county was moving, with only minor inconveniences, by early September 23. This report documents the magnitude and extent of flooding for September 20-23, 1969. It provides information for public and private agencies that are concerned with flooding, with planning of land development, and with road design and construction. The report describes flood damage, rainfall intensities, and storm characterization. It gives peak discharges at selected sites and flood pro1Hydraulic engineer, Dept. of Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. 2Meteorologist, Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, National Weather Service. 2

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I-"-" H' --T-'---It--1-l -ago -" D' ACom lll Scoluit M t 310 ALA JMA\ -* DEC TUR Sf 1 ir* Bwood al~aie Coiro wThomostill SoADS EN LE N LI 8 ERTYo r mWAKULL wr p 2 //^--., --N"Sumatra 4EXPLANATION t --.jo, )e -15"Isohyet, Inches lApoloChil Raingagenumber C 18.8 Rainfall, Inches / I to L Miles 0o F I I I Figure -Total-storm rainfall map for September 20-28, 1969.

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19 1f 0641su ras am V Water over the road AMACO._ Culvert washed out _ ` Gridge approach out Figure 2.--Map showing locations of road closures resulting from September 1969 flood.

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files of selected reaches of three streams, and makes comparisons with previous flood peaks. The report was prepared under the general supervision of C. S. Conover, District Chief, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, as part of the cooperative program with the Florida Department of Transportation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The hydrologic data in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Transportation, the Florida Bureau of Geology, and the Florida Power Corporation. Rainfall and related weather and radar data were collected by the National Weather Service. The authors gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the Florida Department of Transportation in furnishing damage estimates to roads and bridges and highwater marks for flood profiles; the assistance of Robert L. Smith, meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service Radar Station at Apalachicola, Florida, in the interpretation of the radar photographic records of the storm; and the assistance provided by J. F. Bailey, hydraulic specialist, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D. C., in the collection and computation of peak discharge data and preparation of the report. STORM DESCRIPTION Rainfall intensities of 5 to 6 inches in 24 hours are not uncommon throughout the gulf coastal area. Rains of 10 inches or more in 24 hours are rare, and the chance of having as much as 10 to 15 inches in 24 hours is 1 in 100 years (Hershfield, 1961, p. 105). Excessive rainfall along the gulf coast may be associated with any one of numerous weather systems. Well-developed thunderstorms occasionally produce heavy precipitation. Cold fronts moving into the southeast frequently become quasi-stationary along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico and may produce rain for 2, 3, or more days; the total rainfall accumulation may be several inches. Extra-tropical lows may develop over Texas or the western Gulf in the spring and move eastward across the northern Gulf producing copious rains over the coastal areas of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. The heaviest rains, however, are generally associated with 5

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cyclonic (low pressure) systems of tropical origin. The storms include: (a) hurricanes with winds of 74 mph (miles per hour) or higher; (b) tropical storms having closed isobars about a low-pressure center with a distinct counter-clockwise circulation and winds of 39 to 73 mph; (c) tropical depressions having closed isobars about a low-pressure center, a counter-clockwise wind circulation with winds to 39 mph; and (d) tropical disturbances with low-pressure centers that are low enough for a closed isobar and a poorly defined wind circulation. SYNOPTIC DISCUSSION The heavy rain of September 20-23, 1969 was associated with a tropical cyclone that was marginal between a tropical depression and a tropical disturbance. At times the central pressure was low enough for a closed isobar; at other times it was not. The circulation was counter-clockwise, but winds were light both at the surface and aloft. The synoptic situation was similar to that associated with the previous record rainfall (1922-70) for the Quincy area which occurred September 14-15, 1924 (U.S. Weather Bureau). The tropical storm of September 1924 dumped over 12 inches of rain on Gadsden County within a 24-hour period causing flooding and extensive crop damage (U.S. Weather Bureau, September 1924, p. 39). The characteristics of the September 1924 storm were similar in path and effect to the September 1969 storm. The first indication of the September 1969 tropical depression was on the surface-weather chart of September 19, when a ship report indicated the presence of a low-pressure area at about lat. 25.30N. and long. 86.40W., about 150 miles west-northwest of Key West, Florida. The surface-weather analysis at 1:00 a.m. September 20, placed a low with a closed isobar about a central pressure of 29.70 inches of mercury centered at lat. 25.00N. and long. 88.40W. This low-pressure system moved northward during the day and reached land between Panama City and Port St. Joe, Florida, by 4:00 a.m. September 21. Figure 3 shows the surface-weather map for 7:00 a.m. September 21 with the low center positioned on the gulf coast. A large high-pressure area at the surface (fig. 3) and weak 6

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850 800 750 350 -0 IT..S.T ... // SLine of equal S1' 'f"' -'300 CITY ST. Jo3 350EXPLANATION 250 '1, 0 pressure, millibars shows magnitude of pressure at sea level. Interval 4 millibars. .4 L Low-pressure system Stationary front Wind-velocity symbol 250 90o 850 80o Figure 3.-Surface-weather map for 7:00 a.m. September 21, 1969, showing a tropical depression on the Florida gulf coast. (Redrawn from U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Daily Weather Maps, Weekly Series, September 15-21, 1969.) wind circulation aloft (fig. 4) covered most of the eastern half of the nation. With the blocking action of the high at the surface and no pronounced wind pattern aloft to keep the system moving, the tropical depression stalled near the coast where it remained for about 48 hours. The dynamics of a tropical depression blocked by a shallow dome of cooler air are favorable for heavy precipitation. The counter-clockwise circulation around the low-pressure center transported warm, moist, and unstable tropical air inland. Orographic lifting and forced upslope motion of the warm moist air over the cooler denser

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11 II~W 10 'o 14 Ir 130 10;( Il1' 10I W 0 Q l' i 4 10 750 0 500-MILLIBAR HEIGHT CONTOURS L;s, 0' iC '0' Ole 40a 000E. Figure 4.-Upper air 500-millibar constant pressure chart for 7:00 a.m., September 21, 1969. (Reproduced from U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Daily Weather Maps, Weekly Series. Sentember 15-21, 1969. IS MILIBA HEIGT COTOUR Weather Maps, Weekly Series. Senternber 15-21, 1969..

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air of the high-pressure dome, in addition to the instability of the tropical air, was sufficient to produce torrential rains-most of the time that the low remained over the Panama City-Port St. Joe area. By September 23, the high-pressure system along the eastern seaboard weakened, and the low filled until it was discernable only as a weak inverted trough. During the 48 hours the storm was stationary, heavy rain fell on the Ochlockonee River basin and on the lower Apalachicola River basin. Map analysis indicated periods when the storm weakened followed by periods of re-intensification. This was reflected in the variability of intensity of rainfall throughout the life of the storm. RADAR OBSERVATIONS The precipitation area associated with this tropical depression was under constant surveillance by the National Weather Service's radar located at Apalachicola, Florida. The radar is classed as Weather Search Radar-57. It has a range of 250 nautical miles1. Photographs were made every 5 minutes during the storm. Because the radar station was near the storm path excellent picture coverage was obtained. Radar detection of a large area of precipitation in the Gulf of Mexico was made late on September 19. The precipitation reached the Florida coast at 1:00 a.m., September 20. Figure 5 is a photograph of the radar scope at 5:50 a.m., September 20. This figure shows an area of precipitation from 60 nautical miles north-northeast to 150 nautical miles south of Apalachicola that varies from 50-150 nautical miles in width with nearly 100 percent coverage to the south of Apalachicola. The heaviest precipitation was over the Gulf. As the area of precipitation progressed northward, it tended to orient into lines or bands. Two bands were prominent at 9:25 A a.m. One was 8-10 nautical miles wide, extending from 20 nautical miles northwest to 75 nautical miles southeast of Apalachicola, and the second band extended 125 nautical miles offshore. Cells (heavy rain centers) appeared to be moving north or northwest along the bands while the whole precipitation area moved slowly northward. 1All references to miles in this report are to statute miles except where designated as nautical miles. One nautical mile equals approximately 6,076 feet. 9

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Figure 5.-Photograph of radar scope at 5:50 a.m., September 20, showing large precipitation area from 60 nautical miles north-northeast to 150 nautical miles south of Apalachicola. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range marker 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle 1/ degree. By noon, the bands were nearly spiral with the center of curvature about 95 miles southwest of Apalachicola. Rainfall began at Havana early on September 20 and increased noticeably in intensity by 2:00 p.m. Destined to be in the area of maximum rainfall, Havana and Quincy are shown (fig. 6) on the northeastern edge of the precipitation area on the 2:30 p.m. radar 10

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Figure 6.-Photograph of radar scope at 2:30 a.m., September 20, showing spiral lines with apparent center of curvature about 80 nautical miles southwest of center of scope. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No. attenuation. Antenna elevation angle % degree. picture. The center of curvature is shown about 80 nautical miles southwest of the radar station (center of the scope). The intensity of rainfall is indicated by the brightness of the cells in the bands. Moderate to heavy rain was falling over most of the lower Apalachicola and Ochlockonee river basins at the time this photograph was taken. The rain continued during most of the remainder of the day. After the center of the tropical depression reached the coast on 11

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Figure 7.-Photograph of the radar scope at 6:39 a.m., September 21. The bright rain area located approximately 58 nautical miles at about 24 degrees to the right of the top of the scope was located over a recording rain gage at Quincy, Florida. Rainfall intensity at this time was in excess of 6 inches per hour. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle 1/2 degree. the morning of September 21, radar pictures indicated a tendency for the heavier precipitation to be oriented in northwest-southeast or north-south lines with the heaviest precipitation area virtually stationary over Gadsden and neighboring counties in Florida and south Georgia. Individual cells moved along the lines converging on the Gadsden County area while the lines moved little. At times, 2 or 3 lines appeared to radiate out of a point centered over or near 12

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Figure 8.-Photograph of the radar scope at 9:12 p.m., September 22 showing 2 well-developed rain bands or lines coverging on an area over the Ochlockonee River basin. Range setting 250 nautical miles. Range markers 50 nautical mile intervals. No attenuation. Antenna elevation angle degree. a small area in north Gadsden County and the south part of Grady and Decatur counties in Georgia. The two recording rain gages (7 and 8, fig. 1) nearest the center of maximum rainfall were located approximately 12 miles southwest, near Quincy. Figure 7 shows the precipitation pattern at 6:39 a.m., September 21, shortly after the start of rainfall that exceeded 13

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6 inches per hour at Quincy. The recording gages showed very heavy rainfall continued for nearly 3 hours. At times during the day on September 21, the heights of the radar echoes exceeded the 40,000-foot level. Precipitation bands continued to converge on the Ochlockonee River basin with individual cells in the bands moving up to the Ochlockonee River basin where they become stationary. Figure 8 is a photograph of the radar scope taken at 9:12 p.m. on September 21. Through that night and the following morning, the precipitation patterns were similar to that shown in figure 8. The precipitation lines slowly disintegrated into non-orientated cells during the afternoon of September 22 and regrouped again into well-defined lines after 5:30 p.m. By early morning on September 23 the precipitation area began to show signs of eastward movement, and by 9:00 a.m. the lines broke up into individual cells which moved rapidly out to the east and northeast. DEPTH-AREA DURATION This storm occurred in an area having an unusually large number of rain gages. Those which collected 2 inches or more during the storm are listed in table 1 in descending order of inches of rain caught. Most of the gages were the official National Weather Service types. Of these, 2 were recording tipping-bucket gages, 2 were recording-weighing gages, 1 a Fischer-Porter recording gage, and 32 were the standard 8-inch gages. The latter is a compound, 10 to 1, can-gage with a capacity of 25 inches. Four standard gages that were in the center of maximum rainfall received 20 inches or more. Three of these were owned by the Englehart Chemical and Mineral Company and were located at company mines. Twelve of the rain gages listed are owned by the Florida Division of Forestry. Of these, four were of the compound type with a 7-inch capacity. The others were a plastic tube-type with a 5-inch capacity. The accuracy of the plastic gage is questionable, especially for periods of intense rain. The Division reported that some of their rainfall reports were in excess of gage capacity. Havana tower gage 4 did overflow. The U.S. Geological Survey's gage (17) is a Stevens Type QA continuous recorder, with a capacity of 25 inches. The maximum rainfall of 23.40 inches was measured at the National Weather Service's Agricultural Weather Reporting Station located on State Highway 12 near the west edge of Havana. (See 14

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Table 1.-Rain gages and total rainfall, in inches, for September 20-23, 1969, in the tri-state area of Florida, Georgia, and Alabama shown in figure 1. Gage No. Name and Location Gage Type Ownership1 Rain(fig. 1) Gage fall 1 Havana. Fla. Standard 8 in. NOAA-NWS 23.4 2 La Camelia mine, 7 miles NNE, Quincy, Fla. do. EC and M 22.5 3 Attapulgus mine, 1 mile S. Attapulgus, Ga. do. do. 22.0 4 Havana Tower, 3 miles W, Havana, Fla. 7-in. Capacity FDF 221.9 5 Lock N mine, 5 miles NNE, Havana, Fla. Standard 8 in. EC and M 20.0 6 Quincy Tower, 4 miles W, Quincy, Fla. 7-in. Capacity FDF 19.8 7 Quincy, 3 miles SSW, Fla. Tipping Bucket NOAA-NWS 18.8 8 Tobacco Station, Quincy, Fla. Weighing do. 18.3 9 Hosford Tower, 3 miles E, Hosford, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 18.1 10 Wewahitchka, Fla. Standard 8-in. NOAA-NWS 17.4 11 East Bay Tower, 14 miles S, Sumatra, Fla. 5-in Capacity FDF 15.8 12 Attapulgus Exp. Sta., 1 mile NW, Attapulgus, Ga. Standard 8-in. Univ. Ga. 15.0 13 Tallahassee WB, 5 miles SW, Tallahassee, Fla. Weighing NOAA-NWS 13.8 14 Cape San Bias, S, Port St. Joe, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 13.8 15 Tallahassee Tower, 3 miles SE, Tallahassee, Fla. 7-in. Capacity do. 12.9 16 Woodruff Dam, Chattahoochee, Fla. Fischer & Porter NOAA-NWS 12.0 17 Otter Camp, 5 miles S, Bloxham, Fla. Stevens USGS 11.7 18 Rosedale Tower, 3 miles S, Chattahoochee, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 11.4 19 Bristol Tower, 3 miles E, Bristol, Fla. 7-in. Capacity do. 11.3 20 Crawfordville, Fla. 5-in. Capacity do. 11.0 21 Tall Timbers, N side Lake lamonia, Fla. Standard 8-in. NOAA-NWS 310.4 22 Blountstown, Fla. do. do. 10.4 23 Colquitt, 2 miles E, Ga. do. do. 9.1 24 Bainbridge, Ga. do. do. 9.0 25 Donalsonville, Ga. do. do. 8.7 26 St. James Tower, 3 miles S, Panacea, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 8.2 27 Cairo, 2 miles NW, Ga. Standard 8 in. NOAA-NWS 8.2 28 Sanborn Tower, Sanborn, Fla. do. do. 8.1 29 Apalachicola, Fla. Tipping Bucket do. 7.8 30 St. Marks. Fla. Standard 8 in. do. 6.7 31 Panama City, Fla. do do. 6.5 32 Wacissa, Fla. 5-in. Capacity FDF 6.3 33 Newport Tower, Wakulla, Fla. do. do. 6.0 34 Blakely, Ga. Standard 8 in. NOAA-NWS 5.9 35 Headland, Ala. do. do. 5.9 36 Camilla, Ga. do. do. 5.6 37 Carrabelle, Fla. do. do. 5.4 38 Greenwood, Fla. do do. 4.9 39 Fountain, 3 miles SSE, Fla. do. do. 4.8 40 Thomasville, 4 miles SE, Ga. do. do. 4.7 41 Monticello, 3 miles W, Fla. do. do. 4.6 42 Chipley, 3 miles E, Fla. do. do. 4.0 43 Caryville, Fla. do. do. 3.8 44 Moultrie, 2 miles ESE, Ga. do. do. 3.7 45 Perry, Fla. do. do. 3.5 46 Dothan, Ala. do. do. 3.2 47 Quitman, Ga. do do. 2.8 48 Geneva, Ala. do. do. 2.7 49 Valdosta, 4 miles NW, Ga, do. do. 2.4 50 Madison, Fla. do. do. 2.1 'NOAA, National Weather Service (NOAA-NWS), Englehart Chemical and Mineral (EC and ; M), Florida Division of Forestry (FDF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). -Gage overflowed-total does not include overflow. 'Average of four gages. fig. 1, gage 1.) The 20-inch isohyet enclosed an area of about 160 square miles in which the average precipitation was about 22 inches. The 15-inch isohyet enclosed an area of about 2,000 square miles and the average of all the rain gages within this area was 19.8 inches. Rainfall amounts and area depths are probably biased to the low side due to the intensity of rainfall and the limited capacity of some of the gages. Figure 9 shows accumulated rainfall-curves for Havana, Quin15

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24EXPLANATION •Cutr* *"S -, o (SELECTED RAINFALL-STATION TOTALS) .-g c t_ 2. Locomelio mine 3Attpugus mine 5n 4. Havano tower, Florida Forest Service 5 5. Lock Nmine I6. Quincy tower, Florida Forest Service / 9. Hostord tower,Florido Forest Service / /10 S4SAGE 3. LLAS.SEE_.---SI e totls for Hvno I / / o o o 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0o o 0 0 S o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 S 0 --e --N 0 ~ Nn 0 -September 20 September 21 September 22 Sept. 23 Figure 9.-Cumulative rainfall and selected rainfall-station totals for September 20-23, 1969. 16

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Table 2.-Maximum rainfall intensities at gage 7, Quincy, September 20-23,1969. Rainfall Rainfall Duration (inches) 5 minutes 0.62 10 minutes 1.17 15 minutes 1.61 20 minutes 1.98 30 minutes 2.50 45 minutes 3.24 60 minutes 3.76 2 hours 6.23 3 hours 7.90 6 hours 10.87 12 hours 12.07 24 hours 15.06 48 hours 17.71 72 hours 18.84 Storm Total 18.85 inches Storm Duration 72 hours and 16 minutes Rain Began 4:10 a.m., Sept. 20 Rain Ended 4:26 a.m.. Sept. 23 cy, and Tallahassee; and total rainfall for other selected stations. The Havana curve was estimated from the daily rainfall reports and from the Quincy curve. There were no recording gages in the maximum rainfall center, that area receiving 20 inches of rainfall or more (fig. 1). Rainfall intensities for the area between Quincy and Havana, however, were probably similar to those recorded by tipping-bucket gage 7 at the National Weather Service Office located 3 miles southwest of Quincy. Although that gage overflowed for a few minutes, a quantity adjustment was made using the recoid from the adjacent gage 8. Rainfall intensities for the. Quincy area are shown in table 2 which presents the maximum amounts of rainfall recorded for designated time intervals. The intensities for 2-, 6-, 12-, 24-, 48-, and 72-hour periods, and for the storm total, exceeded the 1 in 100year probability of receiving such rainfall amounts (Hershfield, 1961 and Miller, 1964). The 2-day maximum of 17.71 inches exceeded by 1.71 inches the 1 in 100-year probability of a rainfall of 16 inches for a 7-day period for Quincy (Miller, 1964). The maximum 6-hour rainfall at Quincy (gage 7) was recorded between 2 and 8 hours after the storm center reached land on the morning of September 21. The center of maximum precipitation was 60-65 miles to the east of where the center of low pressure made landfall and some 50 miles inland. 17

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DESCRIPTION OF THE FLOOD FLOOD STAGES AND DISCHARGES The damaging floods that occurred in September 1969 were mainly confined to the Little River basin and the lower Ochlockonee River basin (south of U.S. Highway 27, fig. 2). Areas affected were the southern part of Decatur and Grady counties, Georgia, and all or parts of Gadsden, Leon, Liberty, Wakulla, Franklin, Bay, and Gulf counties, Florida (fig. 10). Current-meter measurements of peak discharge were not obtained at the sites shown in figure 10 because the flood peak was of short duration, because it occurred during the night, or because the gaging station was inaccessible due to flooded roads and washouts. In cases where water-stage recorders malfunctioned or were damaged by the flood, high-water marks and direct readings on nonrecording gages were used to determine flood peaks. Indirect measurements of peak discharge were made at 15 sites--3 regular gaging stations and 12 miscellaneous sites. Indirect measurement techniques used included: slope-area method; contracted-opening method; flow-through culvert method; and over road-embankment method. Indirect measurements based on field surveys of high-water profiles, channel geometry, and geometry of the bridge or culvert were computed in accordance with established methods of the Geological Survey. Maximum stages and discharges at 19 continuous-recording and crest-stage partial-record stations, the maximum contents for Lake Talquin, and peak discharges for 13 ungaged sites are summarized in table 3. These sites are located on the map in figure 10. Flood peaks at selected stations on several streams in the Ochlockonee River basin during September 20-30 were generally of short duration (fig. 11). Most of the streams peaked on the 22d and receded to base flow in 48 to 72 hours. Small streams such as Rocky Comfort Creek (sta. 23) peaked on the 21st and receded to base flow in 12 to 18 hours. Figure 11 shows that the peak for Ochlockonee River near Havana (sta. 8, fig. 10) was relatively low compared to peaks of nearby streams. Ths total rainfall decreased rapidly in the upstream part of this 1,140 square-mile basin and the peak discharge was only 17,000 cfs or 14.9 cfs per square mile. Most of the flooding on the lower Ochlockonee River was downstream from station 8 and was the result of runoff from Little River and from small tributaries around Lake Talquin. Gaging station 13, Little River near Quincy, was located near 18

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GRADY FL R-~\)A SBoinbridge D CATUR i O Thomosville | hofahoche I FLORIaA Ai* s 0 Nber GADSD _l Bounits sto1l ^i I 1 y ADi OTolahaosee Soxhom LE 0 N Panomo City LI B RTY AKULLA G30GULF sumao-0 FRANKLIN Jr n l o EXPLANATION ploichicolo, Flood measurement sites. O Number corresponds to that F -gl in table 3. Figure 10.-Map showing location of flood-measurement sites.

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Table 8,-Summary of flood stages and discharges Maximum flood previously known Maximum during September 1981 flood Discharge Drainage Gag Sta, No. Permanent Stream and place of area Gae height Cf. (fig, 10) Sta, No, determination (sq ml) Period height Discharge (ft) Recurrence of Date (ft) (clf) Day Cfs per interval Record eq mi (yr) Ochlockonee River basin and coastal area 1 3270,5 Sopahoppy River near Arran, Fla. 48.2 1964.69 Dec. 4, 1964 58.88 4,740 22 56688 2,350 48,8 4 2 8271. Sopchoppy River near Sopchoppy, Fla. 07,9 1961-69 Dec. 6, 1964 88.78 4,880 28 80.60 3,440 85.1 4 3 8275, Ochlockonee River near Thomasville, Ga. 560 1987.69 Apr. 2, 1948 '29.1 72,000 28 8.67 872 1,6 91.1 4 3277. Uarnetts Creek near Thomasville, Ga. 104 1951.09 Dec, 5, 1964 '20,4 17,700 22 10,86 680 6.5 1.2 5 3279. Wolf Creek near Whigham, Ga. 19 1948, 1951-69 Dec. 4, 1964 10.02 21 7,56 1,800 68.4 8 6 3280. Tired Creek near Cairo, Ga. b 60 1948.69 Apr. 1, 1948 416.8 28,100 21 8.80 2,940 49.0 4 7 8288.59 Ochlockonee River tributary near Havana, Fla. 1.84 21 ... 1,700 1,270 (e) S 8290. Ochlockonee River near Havana, Fla. h1,140 1926.69 Apr, 4, 1948 8508 56,900 21 80.00 17,000 14.9 9 8292.6 Midway Branch near Midway, Fla. 1.88 ... .... ... 21 2,180 1,540 (a) 10 8298.62 Attapulgus Creek at Jamleson, Fla. 95.6 ..... .... 21 22,200 282 A 2.28 11 8294.04 Swamp Creek at Jamieson, Fla. 58.0 ... ..... ... 21 .18,800 865 d 2.56 12 3294.81 Wlllacoochee Creek tributary near Quincy, Fla. 1.26 .... 21 .. 642 510. (c) t1 13 8295. Little River near Quincy, Fla. 287 1950-69 Dec. 4, 1964 20.81 25,400 22 24.66 45,600 192 2.99 0 14 8295.16 Quincy Creek near Quincy, Fla. 6.16 ... ...... .21 4,840 786 a 15 8295.88 Hollman Branch near Quincy,Fla. 8.09 ... .... .... 1 ... 1,050 840 16 8295.46 South Prong Tanyard Branch near Quincy, Fla. 2.29 .. ... .... 21 ... 1,480 646 17 8296.48 Tanyard Branch near Quincy, Fla. 4.91 ..... ... 21 ... ,430 4095 18 8295.53 Hubbert Branch near Quincy, Fla. 4.68 ........ ... 21 ... 2,860 604 19 8295.56 Winkley Branch near Quincy, Fla. 1.64 ....... ... 21 1,000 610 () 20 8295.66 Little River near Littman, Fla. 292 ........ .... 22 .47,400 167 d 289 21 8295.82 Hurricane Creek near Havana, Fla. 8.81 .... ... 21 .... 7,450 896 (e) 22 8296. Little River near Midway, Fla. 806 1966-69 Dec. 5, 1964 88.27 27,800 22 .86.25 49,200 161 a 2.86 23 8297. Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy, Fla. 9.46 1964-60 Dec. 4, 1964 41.00 2,140 21 '42,6 7,610 804 (c) 24 8299. Lake Talquin near Bloxham, Fla. 1,720 1980-69' Sept. 24, 1982 70.90 '96,820 22 71.60 '105,800 26 88300. Ochlockonee River near Bloxham, Fla. 1,720 1926-69 Apr. 5, 1948 28.50 r50,200 28 '29.2 89,400 62.0 d 2.19 26 8800.5 Telogia Creek near Greensboro, Fla. 28.1 1965-69 Apr. 27, 1965 96.86 4,410 21 *99.9 12,000 427 d 2,26 27 8801. Telogia Creek near Bristol, Fla. 126 1960-69 Dec. 5, 1964 11.11 8,280 22 16.65 20,600 148 d 1.49 28 8802. New River at Vilas, Fla. 28.2 1961-69 Oct. 16, 1964 6.86 675 22 .8.78 2,670 111 8 29 8803. New River near Wilma, Fla. 81,7 1964-69 Sept. 20, 1966 46.82 2,720 22 60.67 8,790 108 46 80 8804. New River near Sumatra, Fla. 157 1966-69 Dec. 7, 1964 24.68 8,620 28 27.88 6,670 42.5 8 Apalachicola River basin 81 8586. Flat Creek near Chattahoochee, Fla. 24.9 1961-69 Apr. 26, 1965 11.48 8,990 21 *18.6 8,450 889 d 1.70 32 8590. Chipola River near Alths, Fla. 781 1921-27, Sept. 20, 1926 8.566 26,000 21 14.88 8,100 4.0 1.8 1929-81, 1948-69 Coastal area between Apalachicola River and Choctawhatchee River 88 8698. Sandy Creek near Panama City, Fla. b 25 1961-69 Oct. 16, 1964 17.06 2,260 21 18.24 1,180 47.2 d 1.18 SFrom floodmark d Ratio of peak discharge to 60-year storm 'Exceeded by undetermined peak discharge on Sept. 80, 1957, which SApproximately Includes Hurricane Creek was caused by failure of earth embankment of Jackson Bluff dam, o Not defined r Contents, are feet

PAGE 27

90 80u l LOchlockonee River near Bloxhom (Sto.25) 750z 0 6Cw I :U J Ochlockonee River near Bloxhom (Sito.25) 5C-,U1 1 Little River near Quincy (Sto. 13) UL 0 gu j' Telogia Creek near Bristol (Sto.27) 20Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy (Sto.23) i Ochlockonee River near Hovono(Sto.8) 10 -..... 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 September 1969 Figure 11.-Discharge hydrograph for selected gaging stations in the Ochlockonee River basin, September 20-30, 1969. 21

PAGE 28

the center of greatest rainfall. At this station the stage rose 21 feet between 6 a.m. September 21 and 6 a.m. September 22, and rainfall during the same period was 13 inches at the recording gage 3 miles south-southwest of Quincy. The peak discharge of 45,600 cfs occurred about 7 anm. September 22. This discharge was 2.99 times greater than that of a 50-year flood and 1.8 times greater than the 19-year record peak discharge of 25,400 cfs which occurred in December 1964 (table 3). Runoff for the flood was 9.7 inches or approximately 61 percent of the total rainfall on the basin. At the Little River gage (sta. 13), on State Highway 12, the left bank (looking downstream) is steep and the highway enters a deep cut approximately 300 feet east of the bridge. The rain saturated the pipe clay banks causing both banks to slide and piled clay, trees, and telephone poles across the highway, blocking it for about a week. The sparse development along the relatively narrow Little River valley limited damage mostly to bridges and highway embankments. At Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy (sta. 23) the peak discharge was 7,610 cfs. Runoff from the 9.46 square-mile drainage area was 14.0 inches which was 74 percent of the 18.8 inches of rainfall. The drainage structure at Rocky Comfort Creek station consists of four 8-foot x 10-foot box culverts. Near the time of the flood peak the culverts were undermined and the center section (fig. 12) settled approximately 3 feet. The road was breached around both wingwalls leaving 10-foot openings on each side. About 8 miles downstream, at the next road crossing at State Highway 267, two sets of arch culverts were washed out and collapsed due to the head on the road fill and culverts. Lake Talquin is the reservoir formed by Jackson Bluff Dam on the Ochlockonee River and is used primarily for hydropower. Its area is 6,890 acres (10.7 square miles) at elevation 60.0 feet. As rain spread over the Ochlockonee River basin, Lake Talquin began to rise. By midnight September 20, after 3.17 inches of rain had accumulated at the Quincy weather station (gage 7), the lake elevation had increased 0.3 foot. Between midnight September 20 and 7 pnm. September 22, the lake level rose from 68.30 feet to 71.60 feet or 0.70 foot above the previous maximum recorded on September 24, 1932. The contributing drainage area to the lake is 1,720 square 22

PAGE 29

Figure 12.-Culverts at Rocky Comfort Creek (sta. 23). miles. The inflow was gaged at station 8 (fig. 10), Ochlockonee River near Havana, 1,140 square miles; station 13, Little River near Quincy, 237 square miles; and station 23, Rocky Comfort Creek near Quincy, 9.46 square miles. The inflow from the ungaged 334 square-mile area was estimated on the basis of runoff from Rocky Comfort Creek and Little River and verified by a comparison of total runoff values. Storm runoff from Rocky Comfort Creek and Little River drainage basins were 74 and 61 percent, respectively, compared to 64 percent runoff from the ungaged area. Figure 13 is a graph of Lake Talquin inflow and outflow, in cfs, and storage, in acre-feet, for September 20-30, 1969. The inflow graph (solid line) represents the combined flow past station 23 (Rocky Comfort Creek), station 13 (Little River), station 8 (Ochlockonee River), and the estimated flow of the ungaged area. It was not adjusted for time lag. The storage graph (dotted line) represents storage in Lake Talquin as measured at station 24 and the outflow graph (dashed line) represents the flow below Lake Talquin at station 25 (Ochlockonee River). The initial inflow increase, as shown in figure 13, resulted from runoff from Rocky Comfort Creek and other small tributaries that 23

PAGE 30

100 INFLOW 90-110 c 8 \ -105 n 70 -t-100 70 I \ OUTFLOW l 60-95 Ue 50 -\ 'I o I \\ m 40--85 30-80 o \ o-: \STORAGE 20--75 S 10 -70 0 .--65 I ! I I I I .I I 60 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 September 1969 Figure 13.-Lake Talquin inflow, outflow, and storage. 24

PAGE 31

surround Lake Talquin. This concentration of inflow is reflected by an increase in storage and outflow. The inflow graph shows a second peak which was the result of the flood runoff from the Little and Ochlockonee Rivers. Usable contents in the lake increased from 67,800 acre-feet, at midnight September 20, to a maximum of 105,300 acre-feet, at 7 p.m. September 22. Gaging station 25 on the Ochlockonee River at State Highway 20 (3,000 feet below Jackson Bluff Dam) gages the outflow from Lake Talquin. The peak discharge of 89,400 cfs at this station, which occurred at 5 a.m. September 23, was 2.19 times greater than that of a 50-year flood. The Ochlockonee River overflowed State Highway 20 just west of the main channel bridge and kept the road closed to traffic for approximately 48 hours September 22-23, 1969. At peak flow the road-overflow section was approximately 4,800 feet wide and carried approximately 20 percent of the discharge. On September 30, 1957, a portion of the earth embankment of Jackson Bluff Dam failed thereby releasing much of the water stored in Lake Talquin. Although the peak discharge was not determined, the flood crest at the gaging station at State Highway 20 was 3.44 feet higher than that of the more recent September 23, 1969, flood. At gaging station 27, on Telogia Creek, the peak discharge on September 22, 1969, was 20,600 cfs or 1.49 times greater than that of a 50-year flood and 2.5 times greater than the previous maximum of 8,280 cfs in December 1964. Runoff resulting from the September 1969 flood was 10.4 inches, which was about 65 percent of the total rainfall on the basin. The highest peak discharge per unit of drainage area during the September 1969 flood occurred on Midway Branch where the peak runoff was 1,540 cfs per square mile from a 1.38 square-mile area. See station 9 (fig. 10 and table 3). FLOOD FREQUENCIES The recurrence interval, applied to flood events, is the number of years, on the average, during which a given flood peak will be exceeded once (Dalrymple, 1960, p. 5). It is inversely related to the chance of a specific flood peak being exceeded in any one year. For instance, a flood having 1 chance in 50 of being exceeded in any one 25

PAGE 32

100 25 o I20 0 U 23 101 30 4 9S gd6 )*5 12 4 EXPLANATION V) 03 Numbers refer to flood measurement sites in figure 10 and table 3. 0., I 10 100 1000 10,000 DRAINAGE AREA, SQUARE MILES Figure 14,-Relation of peak discharges to regionalized flood-frequency curves-storm of September 20-23, 1909. Flood-frequency curves adapted from Barnes and Golden (1906).

PAGE 33

year is said to have a recurrence interval of 50 years and is commonly referred to as the 50-year flood. Bares and Golden (1966, p. 7-13) present a method for determining the magnitude of floods of selected frequencies. Their regionalized method is applicable to drainage areas of greater than 10 square miles. In figure 14 peak discharges of September 1969 are compared to the 10-, 25-, and 50-year flood-frequency curves. Many of the peak discharges were in excess of the 50-year flood and are considered to be rare occurrences. The enveloping curve shown in figure 14 may be derived from the equation: Q = 2,800 A0.52 where Q is the peak discharge in cfs and A is the drainage area in square miles. All of the flood-measurement sites (stations 1-31, fig. 14 and table 3) are in the same flood-frequency region and hydrologic area, as defined by Barnes and Golden (1966, plate 1), except for Flat Creek near Chattahoochee (sta. 31). However, a comparison of the unit runoff of available peaks for Flat Creek near Chattahoochee (sta. 31) and Telogia Creek near Greensboro (sta. 26) indicates that Flat Creek does belong in the same flood-frequency region and hydrologic area as stations 1-30. Chipola River near Altha (sta. 32) and Sandy Creek near Panama City (sta. 33) are in a different region and area and therefore are not plotted in figure 14. FLOOD PROFILES Profiles of the flood crest of September 1969, along selected reaches of Little River, Quincy Creek, and Telogia Creek are presented in figures 15-17. The approximate channel profiles, which were constructed from the contour crossings taken from topographic maps, are also shown. The upstream end of the Little River profile shown in figure 15 begins at the State Highway 159 crossing of Attapulgus Creek (the main headwater tributary of the Little River) and ends at Lake Talquin. Although the head loss at State Highway 159 was 1.5 feet, only minor damage occurred to the grassed shoulders of the highway embankment. The right (west) bridge end showed considerable scour as did the main channel below the bridge. At State Highway 12, only minor damage occurred to the shoulders 27

PAGE 34

ELEVATION, FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL S-/ STATE HIGHWAY 159 SWAMP CREEK / WILLACOOCHEE CREEK o / STATE HIGHWAY 12 C1 QUINCY CREEK C U.S. HIGHWAY 90 ca/ SPROPOSED INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10 CSEABOARD COASTLINE RAILROAD o S-4 STATE HIGHWAY 268 cu I I 1 II. S/ z 3 0 ol l bs -0 o I l 0 l Figure 15.-Flood profile of Little River. 28 28

PAGE 35

ELEVATION, FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL o -STATE HIGHWAY 268.0 /^ / a)/0 STATE HIGHWAY 267 ( _I HHOLMAN BRANCH STATE HIGHWAY 65 S I -STATE HIGHWAY 12 a/ S/ 0 / / SEWAGE DISPOSAL PLANT -4i r / TANYARD BRANCH O / z / WINKLEY BRANCH r '11 ITr 29 20 -0 0 O LITTLE RIVER Figure 16.-Flood profile of Quincy Creek. 29

PAGE 36

SEXPLANATION 300g 0 x z Floodmork elevation 5 s Z -Floodwater profile I> l --0-Contour crossing stream w9 (from topographic mop) S250-= m X0 hJ 20C-. 4co w z 1501 I -s U. z 150 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 RIVER, MILES UPSTREAM FROM MOUTH Figure 17,-lood profile of Telogia Creek. UNU;J-I UI.J i3. o31ignD .O aNV\SnOH1'39:1tVH3Sl (JNLJJSb ujd 1Ajj olafl3 jo sONVsnloH1'3DyAvH~sl

PAGE 37

Figure 18.-Culvert on State Highway 268 at Quincy Creek.

PAGE 38

Figure 19.-Ochlockonee River at State Highway 20; 3,000 feet downstream from Jackson Bluff Dam-Photo by Tallahassee Democrat. although the road was under approximately 0.5 foot of water. No damage to the bridge ends and no major scour took place in the main channel other than a few blow-holes downstream from the bridge. Figure 15 shows a 3.9-foot head drop in the Little River at U.S. Highway 90. This was a result of the west-bound lane of the highway being about 4 feet higher than the older east-bound lane. The west-bound lane was submerged to a depth of 6 inches. Considerable damage occurred to the bridge ends and the embankment in the area of the relief culvert. The water was approximately 2 feet deep on the Seaboard Coastline Railroad but damage was insignificant. At State Highway 268 the bridge and highway were submerged. Twelve hundred feet 32

PAGE 39

'0 ir -I It? i Tallahassee---Photo by Tallahassee Democrat. Figure 20.-Mobile homes at Bell's Trailer Park, U.S. Highway 20 west of Tallahassee-Photo by Tallahassee Democrat. east of the bridge and just east of the relief culvert the road fill was breached leaving an opening 60 feet wide. Quincy Creek flows around the north side of Quincy in an easterly direction to the Little River. The reach of the Quincy Creek flood profile shown in figure 16 extends from State Highway 268, northwest of Quincy, to the Little River. At State Highway 268 there was a 5.3-foot drop in the water surface, the road was breached at the culvert, and the entire triple box culvert was undermined and settled approximately 3 feet (fig. 18). State Highway 267 was overtopped by about 2 feet of water but was not damaged. The head drop in Quincy Creek at State Highway 65 was about 3 feet. The flood plain widens below the bridge which accounts for the flatter slope downstream. The Telogia Creek flood profile shown in figure 17 extends from 33

PAGE 40

Figure 21.-Road washout at North Lake Drive between Old Bainbridge Road and Lake Jackson-Photo by Tallahassee Democrat. U.S. Highway 90 to State Highway 65. The break in profile upstream from State Highway 268 was due to a farm pond just upstream. Although its earthen dam was not topped there was considerable scour of the spillway around the right (west) end. At State Highway 12 a grist mill was flooded and its concrete dam was washed out. State Highway 274 was flooded to depth of about 0.7 foot and 850 feet in width. The lower chords of the bridges at State Highway 20 and 65 were submerged, but the bridge decks and approaches remained above water. FLOOD DAMAGE Although no loss of life resulted from the flood, several houses, weekend cottages, and mobile homes were severely damaged-espe34

PAGE 41

Figure 22.-Salem Branch at State Highway 159 near Havana. cially those along the Ochlockonee River valley below the Jackson Bluff Dam. As shown in figure 19, only the roofs of several mobile homes are visible in the lower left of the picture. Bell's Trailer Park on U.S. Highway 90 between Tallahassee and Quincy was flooded when a low area filled and the outlet was inadequate to remove the excess water. Many mobile homes were removed but those pictured in figure 20 were flooded to depths of 6 inches over floor level. Roads, highways, and bridges received the greatest damage. According to Charles Scruggs, maintenance engineer, the Florida Department of Transportation spent $198,000 for emergency repair work in Gadsden, Leon, and Liberty counties. Approximately 80 percent of the amount was used in Gadsden County. Emergency work included repairing bridge ends and culverts, and backfilling washed-out road fills. Contractual work to replace four bridges that were destroyed amounted to $522,832. Three of the bridges were in 35

PAGE 42

Figure 23.-Little River at U.S. Highway 90-Photo by H. P. Goodling, Portland Cement Association. Gadsden County and the other in Liberty County. Estimated damage to streets in Quincy totaled $30,000. Figures 21-23 show typical scenes of roads that were washed out, culverts destroyed, and highways and bridges inundated. Railroad damage was mostly confined to temporarily-submerged tracks, land slides, and washed-out culverts along the Seaboard Coastline Railroad. Mr. J. G. Jarriel, roadmaster for the railroad, reported rail traffic at a standstill for approximately 36 hours due to submerged tracks. A work-train required about 60 days to restore damaged and washed-out fills. No dollar estimate of damage was obtained. The Apalachicola and Northern Railroad had six washouts in its 90 miles of track between Chattahoochee and Port St. Joe. The major washout was at Big Creek near Hosford, in Liberty County (fig. 2). A papermill in Port St. Joe, dependent on pulpwood hauled 36

PAGE 43

by the railroad, was shut down for about 10 days resulting in the layoff of about 1,200 employees. The Quincy Telephone Company reported approximately 2,000 telephones affected by the storm. Agricultural losses in Gadsden County were estimated at $1,000,000. Of this amount, $659,000 were crop losses-mostly soybeans. Other losses included washed-out spillways or retaining dams for farm ponds, irrigation reservoirs, and grist mill reservoirs which were valued at approximately $350,000. REFERENCES Barnes, H. H., Jr. 1966 (and Golden, H. G.) Magnitude and frequency of floods in the United States, Part 2-B: U.S. Geol. Survey Water-Supply Paper 1674, 409 p., pl. 1. Dalrymple, Tate 1960 Flood-frequency analyses: U.S. Geol. Survey Water-Supply Paper 1543-A, 80 p. Davis, D. R. 1971 (and Bridges, W. C.) A blocked minimal tropical depression becomes a storm of rare occurence: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Technical Memorandum NWS SR-59, 18 p. Hershfield, David M. 1961 Rainfall frequency atlas of the United States: U.S. Weather Bur., Tech. Paper 40, 61 p. Miller, John F. 1964 Two-to ten-day precipitation for return periods of 2 to 100 years in the contiguous United States: U.S. Weather Bur., Tech. Paper 49, 29 p. U.S. Weather Bureau 1922-70 Climatological data (Florida section): monthly and annual summaries. 37

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-FLORIDA-GEOLOGICAL-SURVEY COPYRIGHT NOTICE [year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text] The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder for the text of this publication. Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and 377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government, makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction. The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution. The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications. All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional information and permissions.


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'2017-03-03T13:59:08-05:00'
describe
'23414' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWT' 'sip-files00004.pro'
fd301a8a6bfae46d2e26db095d321a13
c456b41d1edf526d8b0fe22b2735c6e3686be8ec
'2017-03-03T14:00:57-05:00'
describe
'16640' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWU' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
8085fb72f57326b209e7a0a35aa0982d
5b6a36ad6cd4f639921d60aba1d165df9def3a06
'2017-03-03T13:59:05-05:00'
describe
'966064' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWV' 'sip-files00004.tif'
625e8ad21b6c9ad02a1b2928ea5b611b
ba983ea9759cb26ce9e0549ad849376a77793759
'2017-03-03T14:00:39-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWW' 'sip-files00004.txt'
50110faac28c943e3311f88e41d02f63
11138e2ba17f4c52e5ef9f3d14c526a66e46a119
'2017-03-03T14:00:10-05:00'
describe
'5021' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWX' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
eaf5f427d10dbf7c3d6dfb921eeb1edf
330eb5c590e16f85b5516068edc5c856d53c2966
'2017-03-03T13:59:19-05:00'
describe
'137114' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWY' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
bce7cf1832f5ff0a118d93909e732806
c30e530e7bde6c3fa7afa6465a8403cd71d53d49
'2017-03-03T14:00:27-05:00'
describe
'126386' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHWZ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
6b27480a92c5773cdc14f9bffab26599
daf9342f740359c7bafb34a9c77e558269776684
'2017-03-03T13:59:14-05:00'
describe
'56497' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXA' 'sip-files00005.pro'
e0f426e9e5b854b268a53ff61480869b
33d58b8cfb14d659eb9ef0a21ef20cad9bbd3e04
'2017-03-03T14:01:12-05:00'
describe
'39712' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXB' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
5b80f172fbe0f94ac00ce0319ca71f18
19ff5129a6dca7db1a758e799e15f4361ae8b76f
'2017-03-03T14:01:47-05:00'
describe
'936156' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXC' 'sip-files00005.tif'
b19d5735edcb7ef995c643b5f8ecd3a5
fc5a35de839f5df0015d7150d7b200533f7a023b
'2017-03-03T13:59:32-05:00'
describe
'2500' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXD' 'sip-files00005.txt'
ed1ff5c0ac339b2469cf2106751de342
e9f6e666909fe0a7f8db371be41821ee70f22523
'2017-03-03T13:59:07-05:00'
describe
'10227' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXE' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
1e387c0ce681051a1906f5269c3d8914
224afbfc5e254edd20b3bfbc23fa4e81f0fe0ec1
'2017-03-03T14:01:22-05:00'
describe
'87163' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXF' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d6d6354cb78a042cf33eef732f701bd5
edadc47dadf6525583ac5383c6b56980c8f56dad
'2017-03-03T14:01:29-05:00'
describe
'76800' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXG' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
8a7cce92fa976be2ec72cb1ef864e5cb
4356a6630ade89f347c5b40ed474779d36b3cd4a
'2017-03-03T13:59:12-05:00'
describe
'34575' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXH' 'sip-files00006.pro'
852394ecf3be4596a250cfddd950551b
677d0ae666850eaa2b228a9fd9fdac6e5dbffeca
'2017-03-03T13:59:21-05:00'
describe
'26955' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXI' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
e1e197bfd6d7d2dac7f8390a3147abb2
de85f7c2c5d31ca1123de4772525f88b0201dca1
'2017-03-03T14:00:23-05:00'
describe
'974720' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXJ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
4c11bec77f8e67571905826f3cfe4f43
f276dbc5813c06ebcc3a122d819856580de58160
'2017-03-03T13:59:22-05:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXK' 'sip-files00006.txt'
5525e67dfdc4357e8b40d356815f15af
cc669ede84883fb566282a1dc92de1303a3f637a
'2017-03-03T14:01:30-05:00'
describe
'7114' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXL' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
8bb43d56a6452a54636627f99dce65ef
0a32337f30fbb3604dd30c356b75ca4f4caa0590
'2017-03-03T14:00:42-05:00'
describe
'3845' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXM' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
e9bafdaab15b6620215818f02661dc48
bac385603d63efd6a530b3eeba814554d90ade9a
'2017-03-03T13:59:30-05:00'
describe
'10826' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXN' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
b3668f7d7abae990680f9ffd9b11ad47
a74d247e55ff5c708ac0eb0d7f3338bc49ca7d33
'2017-03-03T14:00:14-05:00'
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXO' 'sip-files00007.pro'
da0af4fc6bbd078d66b12c3b44f5e497
828349fb022d54f28f5deb9aa772a4f4d4ae51da
'2017-03-03T13:59:23-05:00'
describe
'3398' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXP' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
959d0829aa0a973d2d851dc157694f00
b4bd13ea118a831315f5620711128c1f5bf3f748
'2017-03-03T13:58:59-05:00'
describe
'859552' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXQ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ddee2bd8080394635b235f94346f8d64
dfb404b8bb0f2dd463372d72b3141649df0d22a4
'2017-03-03T13:59:57-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXR' 'sip-files00007.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2017-03-03T14:01:45-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXS' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
869b4cef6e7ad7c52fa5398ce4ad43d7
1637374a247f61c69d1d3f7b6fc022d0553d7e91
'2017-03-03T13:59:27-05:00'
describe
'157269' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXT' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
a716c8539219ee1fddb78cbe3701c63c
c66122f08816d1d512f9e81b552c9cfd81bcbc4a
'2017-03-03T14:01:06-05:00'
describe
'142701' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXU' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b7cc319af014a1af392dcaae0f29dda6
b9d1913e92b66df38aa49ef8204ba293bb547b86
'2017-03-03T13:59:55-05:00'
describe
'46475' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXV' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f10ccd9855afa0c564242594286b763a
d8cf24363a9d5d3d5aec08b611fa285203ec1856
'2017-03-03T14:00:07-05:00'
describe
'43838' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
dd76f41c6cbd246e699ef91135383eeb
0bc2123fdbe28fe24c11227f4705db75030a065b
'2017-03-03T13:59:29-05:00'
describe
'943392' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5b762a4270a8747869016cd8af65ef7b
7f7af186d4312446848069308cd1da31e027d593
'2017-03-03T14:00:58-05:00'
describe
'1976' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXY' 'sip-files00008.txt'
d1d09c9c7c31aa0380dc2e1ac42ccfe9
d00358dccba5d9572fa10770ab0df8d3a9a48349
'2017-03-03T14:02:02-05:00'
describe
'10762' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHXZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d96b408fcf2db9e046cce01bbe557c04
7785a1b1cd3bee309ae3c43daa763af565359b44
'2017-03-03T14:01:24-05:00'
describe
'183318' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
735230e62ce073126789e8e7dc6ce9e1
4cec97b62a13a1cb402fc27c8f96b9fe23757468
'2017-03-03T13:59:18-05:00'
describe
'167345' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYB' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
68741c7d3af3a453e3459ae43c805884
991721c2062775a5781af2b095e73dd484aa2c82
'2017-03-03T14:00:06-05:00'
describe
'58429' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
f08799a76658d6280f69a0cedaa1d39a
f592147ad76dfe31c224a1d0eb2aaaeb87f209d1
'2017-03-03T14:00:31-05:00'
describe
'54201' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
bae531233ee52daf4701fb355798e7f3
83f788cf073f195a03c975c9e48c98fc353ea641
'2017-03-03T13:59:04-05:00'
describe
'937976' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
3f5f0b1c766b422fb6658554d7c2237a
a955d0b28bcef735d347af75fc135b405403b5df
'2017-03-03T13:59:13-05:00'
describe
'2381' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c256278bd63ba0aa0b0ebad4df72d6d0
ba976398f92f9cfb0e194eb06f4a54c2f938501a
'2017-03-03T14:01:34-05:00'
describe
'13645' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
efe94ce17a7aaa237d7075ac05b0cb2e
93a6d9c24ae0d7fe69e101f23b211f48c383a1fe
'2017-03-03T13:59:24-05:00'
describe
'902409' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
91784107d3a39c4133ece34476c46edd
7c7bb7aacefde696b60a913817d7896f2df929de
describe
'48143' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
945c3ee640a8ecb29b1afe1e499844ab
f5074d8fa054b9d9da9954df766f91da1045241e
'2017-03-03T14:01:08-05:00'
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
8124f5a5f2b0d6d03852d588d61f0eb0
28366b524f7c01f6d0a8a7b31f93a0e0ecf913f6
describe
'14971' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
0056df3bbc2e1e8df1b0f8b7d1bd60a7
2e465bc86499b5ca73f8982dc1295e49bc46b363
'2017-03-03T14:01:28-05:00'
describe
'7232268' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f6eedda57dd25dc412b660504d434f22
73348449f4937ed0f64fe88694de576ec308c140
'2017-03-03T13:58:39-05:00'
describe
'132' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
203fc21de3e85fe8d158b59aefac726e
6bbbb30088b8a8f9eef71e212e228c12d4190076
describe
'4148' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
2169a98e7736b5a399b000b31ee57c65
1d3fe86ba109345759849aab3f6acd298ab6a147
'2017-03-03T13:59:56-05:00'
describe
'1007569' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
abe9eea512f98ea5996b0fed11c1fc03
35c0f9e230bcb0fcc69f2beeb9506d006af10059
'2017-03-03T13:59:33-05:00'
describe
'55922' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
8ee11d61ed682fc3914465dfd6719f19
0cf1c44a310e8380666ab908be231de582655408
'2017-03-03T14:01:33-05:00'
describe
'6407' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
ad0d588cd2c7eaccdf6e917ed72afbd7
30e49a8eec24c2828f2cf8b2d1a93a7ada9ab55f
'2017-03-03T14:01:03-05:00'
describe
'17156' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
4191a2f92a94fe730d9fae9a691085b4
26597b794cc659c96256ead1d7d37308131e9752
'2017-03-03T14:01:41-05:00'
describe
'8074440' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
01561efdee1196272374e7c8c385ffae
35b83e3859a610ad2d3f9fb46432780ea20b47ec
'2017-03-03T13:59:48-05:00'
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
38da9739eb451e201b951299aacaf81e
96ddfd446f00aa17203aea051eead113698039f0
'2017-03-03T13:59:51-05:00'
describe
'4730' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
3ff4e2cdccc7746a42ea039d2ead384c
78e71cc40ae91845630ba41052e7911e09dd2cb4
'2017-03-03T14:02:04-05:00'
describe
'184357' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
bf67346bca50130c9956f11e4dc6785e
53218f8881d49dc1ae2e32dbcba039588b93a52c
'2017-03-03T13:59:17-05:00'
describe
'158865' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
0684ebfb497cdd8fc338381101111191
2209ccbaff3839241d0477f3e6eb55d329e3560a
'2017-03-03T14:01:59-05:00'
describe
'56490' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
7516297c810fc074abe8a96d567cb051
82ab12767e89a749bb80a6ab4b5cf5d46f70e599
describe
'48469' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7e39f2dd5c4b333fb9c07ff58a6b6742
0a74fafd80a1d76661e1b84cc54f1251c0c6629d
describe
'905980' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHYZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
efdfd26faee287ddd588ad36f36ddc42
4b34ebe3ccc733e6d4a2ab09506915d74b55bb88
'2017-03-03T14:00:16-05:00'
describe
'2316' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
3d273041147bb4d00e08a7c98c81b7f1
664b6c3c78bbc8e6f56d154dccd8189070e03944
'2017-03-03T14:01:54-05:00'
describe
'12140' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZB' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d3a107d9b11b96c610451eae9b61d1cb
4cd36fc48801e8fc872c8d26daba507165760c4d
'2017-03-03T14:01:40-05:00'
describe
'180185' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
09ddbee6d94604f5796ee770a736428f
d26724e3b66ac1a316d4141f43c1a05dd281de39
'2017-03-03T14:01:21-05:00'
describe
'159994' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e8778014888ffe0230035880da381629
e2a8f25685bf8062e4e1d15313aa366133991418
'2017-03-03T14:00:01-05:00'
describe
'57098' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
bd4bfddc3025c404382414acd71ba058
1844fd930f494a6e6ae54ed6dbb6a38dfed972b7
'2017-03-03T14:01:25-05:00'
describe
'50865' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
e313aecf757d194265a141eab31ce7fe
89639c1303f4532ec6a06b28f33f21b51abc12bc
'2017-03-03T14:02:03-05:00'
describe
'932312' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3337b67542b18cef2389247100728762
025e7bba504abb5b5d6c9f513b4266fbfbbb8a54
'2017-03-03T13:58:36-05:00'
describe
'2287' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0fbc42d8767966985402f492d52b9a0b
d27653c7e71af7f6da5d4e61924ee5530a2194f9
describe
'12970' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
62226ab517294c8092907c197d6cade3
26b327497a6259e42afb8aa0dc643fec3218c33c
'2017-03-03T14:01:27-05:00'
describe
'128041' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
e21e4638469c7a2241033b1bbac7ecdd
fca2a42d4ca491243030fc401e6615523a9d8706
describe
'116454' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7b0bedcb8bfc548d09fffa29604620b6
505bcd783e457877d419e66e90b08bdad7f134e0
'2017-03-03T14:00:47-05:00'
describe
'21771' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c0f1ea1bc08c626f250a06b492f33e08
d4274d7a20fc9656184bbc8a75d085dbacb83ab2
'2017-03-03T13:59:37-05:00'
describe
'39813' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
061496a1c32a7bdca98148e227961ff9
b6aeb1bb6eb93e836f51d2f68019e3bba7d8274a
'2017-03-03T14:01:56-05:00'
describe
'915992' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f8d852771a4ee1a30ea677cd0a9e7c5d
446503892615391e668f7f8fe871616b23044ccd
'2017-03-03T14:00:08-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZO' 'sip-files00014.txt'
0d41e12d0d089be39494a4a97373510b
219132be5ef6e60141ae8614daea3c4f2b7d39c3
'2017-03-03T13:59:15-05:00'
describe
'11442' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZP' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
3e982689cbaa890d4451b4ade382286b
56a5007ea918a4f53307b8f8f9592c5b38c66624
'2017-03-03T14:01:37-05:00'
describe
'906751' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZQ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
617457e57489f9fab6df76149599f330
36b5f44cdacf40415089c1917668a48a96b1b645
'2017-03-03T13:59:36-05:00'
describe
'78698' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a9a26257df80a203238e763cf4418303
7efd5c68dc2c9f85b3055f2c646383dab31e4433
describe
'8331' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
28928ab60ff52259b9cb891dc440ddc8
98cfcaba86b335b6135b74f2a6ef3e2fc58e9136
'2017-03-03T14:00:32-05:00'
describe
'21570' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZT' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4836d2f66dc96434f49bf24b8ffc1617
78457f767534332afb7b9c07baacbb050649de97
'2017-03-03T13:58:34-05:00'
describe
'7268856' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
36271bc61c19e60b19a871ea1cf25ee9
64c887f48f88db789262c3385c6b1003ffd65c7d
'2017-03-03T14:01:49-05:00'
describe
'457' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e5e90f3499d05236045ce30834243df4
c401e56f4451adfec9423f55f6c2e2d4a25e6a0a
describe
'5240' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ec58c7d7b5a49c515762b63339bfefb2
9474677afaf50fb66c447a52b7872d52050d7f87
'2017-03-03T13:58:41-05:00'
describe
'201126' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZX' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
66c090b7146ae4be3485107f5ac0a8c4
cfcaaae38b6388423c5503d60592922a65e8479c
'2017-03-03T13:58:42-05:00'
describe
'158804' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZY' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
1ad79308b194ea6b942bdd58cda2806b
a711d08c020cd69cf7c71ee9005734d89792923f
describe
'58655' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAHZZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
0fa17f217c7693812eaa32ed80e28345
c67a3e94a5746dcd493dd443cac06de237f3a6c5
'2017-03-03T13:59:28-05:00'
describe
'48495' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
8c18e5a53de6b3d989103cf100be7448
97c7be00891374610e83572061e3db63277cfd74
'2017-03-03T13:59:34-05:00'
describe
'979428' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
da1bd0c0d18d80c29d15b0c6e84b5b82
95affc1533372e917c5dc639835ae10f9f53ec81
'2017-03-03T14:01:13-05:00'
describe
'2393' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
359d3d3045973683ba12c2263263bee9
1d15fc81a18c3a9268f230f04435f39910575a73
'2017-03-03T13:59:38-05:00'
describe
'11867' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
39b7ed2093aa53b421b1faf1b3624003
f3e4853167e90bf670bc6d731403d5edc771d728
'2017-03-03T14:02:01-05:00'
describe
'83473' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
dcab17fda4e026628c6058bd71a5990b
03b940238ab88f6e636d6746316265a082e4100f
'2017-03-03T14:00:52-05:00'
describe
'73143' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b3c225500c3affced48e394d7d9c8008
3ba44397f5e4a3ce6744275c8a89d27aafb8f662
'2017-03-03T14:01:19-05:00'
describe
'17680' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAG' 'sip-files00017.pro'
369120eee64a1c056a25100638bf8e56
2c67243e5a754c87ac256a9288d17a80974830e4
describe
'23296' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAH' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
3e9962f297f3508a9734d82db7d75b4e
56e25c64ec6463d18bdf9b34d304182173f13b58
'2017-03-03T13:59:10-05:00'
describe
'959208' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAI' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4bf0cbd426e1f503b7aa1c99b9888f9b
5396501bfd3f2222b2de8ba455e5570230c86236
'2017-03-03T14:01:18-05:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAJ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e19801f4da35fbd3efcf961a328355dd
74d410a987da611c740105579c2eed4514eba727
describe
'6903' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
47e94d869a3b8fcb29d9afaafdc322d1
eaa29c9061c07b22e9bf5b1aa09718f00076e7ff
'2017-03-03T13:59:54-05:00'
describe
'137989' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAL' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
41a7695457456fd138d2513a50f391bd
8a5c41e6e070fdcaf08e939159e5e34010489461
'2017-03-03T14:00:19-05:00'
describe
'120220' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAM' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2762f9bd1d02175786af22d16346b9bc
cf8b57f947ec899b56f86842c643c9303e7bb71a
'2017-03-03T14:01:14-05:00'
describe
'20083' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAN' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b93c38e032a5fb3e0dca9539005da6bf
e8db7b0ba837d8c0e4ed920e90de01c4f13c1b50
'2017-03-03T14:00:05-05:00'
describe
'31359' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAO' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
f0ca76305f071553e9890471222b47a9
21cce5cbc58e5d86e7016a6d588faa34fd7eba9c
describe
'927484' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9e47c82678d67cf0711f7e52958b204c
717331bde7635f15685212ab04f8d1b2610066a5
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAQ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
3028784686eacfed6cccdf7ca62e496c
3ff97927d80759dd98849f571fdb56b52a42303a
describe
'7841' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAR' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
74b9b64bf7d5e08bd684693f0f0baafd
eee45ef7c122c02e236354152bac6c2b4462f72c
'2017-03-03T14:00:35-05:00'
describe
'100712' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a9ed473efb7ac2cf391273d0c52323d2
6e0abf17d96bb4883685b06aa22fa94c01f0e654
'2017-03-03T13:58:44-05:00'
describe
'95303' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
6498befc49a080c96c4ec5ffc3763aed
d68a06a85f23ece25e748ca2bf4141ace5e0e28a
'2017-03-03T14:01:35-05:00'
describe
'23614' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
62c63ecb8d791f75ff463504eddabd38
926436648587d31d8a3e750c10096bf2ec4d99fd
describe
'29948' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b63f7cc8437bbe2381d57527e8877116
b1e888023d6bc5f1532421d9867e33952640e217
'2017-03-03T13:59:09-05:00'
describe
'907020' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f7f46a8053b49003535f929f6a544b69
67cdf8cdfa2a9e659ea8ac71f977c0fda74f4874
'2017-03-03T14:01:39-05:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
511c8ee3d9f4f708f8fa82d8f853eba9
0c6ae0b4b61afee84518a6a3bd759d85680c5d04
'2017-03-03T13:58:38-05:00'
describe
'8356' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
c51912c0797db30c5ce93ee9ccfa2109
0402b214fa381cfbcd85a47f249178c81446f57f
'2017-03-03T13:59:31-05:00'
describe
'119027' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIAZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
496881ae4a913f8c39ddb8e497f04c0f
c0ddc57155f760bfd1c33f21ac4f2eae0bc1a536
'2017-03-03T14:00:11-05:00'
describe
'110515' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4d72e7d87a3e267eff7dc8e0f7e05433
b973f4006aba8fe2af415f558c3edb01e0068994
describe
'17267' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
268b0ecd7b42abfe92753e0d91866a99
8c38d10325a82b980d528e889681011f0420d9f2
'2017-03-03T14:00:29-05:00'
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
3b4f66ae78a52167094d108bc7f64f24
d3e10c7064551d8ead59b1dc474b9ca581309650
describe
'927028' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
4229c31fdb32c3e1ad7e3b86e15840ee
d1a726677d2fbb08998d0243e5606186861b622b
'2017-03-03T14:00:50-05:00'
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
8e3d9c16ddedf27e56ce8860fb70af9d
28228dc009932488a81fb23ce372549b64d52cae
describe
Invalid character
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
Invalid character
'7425' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
098341a533506bea0b1ef002f585795a
82347124551fb00f4148f82b15c1340c1c9d9483
describe
'194756' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
c9d26a9b3ac6b01969814cf3776d6c56
f6f0c9f85a66104eb3860d194acbf84a68077d67
'2017-03-03T13:58:43-05:00'
describe
'167644' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3a0077c5c090b0fc1bd6e9e2aad99864
3e84b1ad053e311e3450df67d2963f6eab0e1a4b
describe
'62724' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
395ca57854ef0e48a66925f4cb24bd37
17e416c117ba9fdcf2f0ea64cb47787c1eb32e97
'2017-03-03T13:59:26-05:00'
describe
'51641' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
f61dac57aaf0f07666a1e67dd168b528
69971b6dbdb1de3c07381cdb6d624727fd4e88be
'2017-03-03T13:59:39-05:00'
describe
'966544' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
d35338f5e09430592d013842d00fe639
b73a1b946dbd839bda514d005f97ff38102677ad
describe
'2523' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
a6d35c645b10473639aba28454c66fc7
c7a9c06a6b4f64fc6a6646fcca2a33ee0dffa418
'2017-03-03T13:59:01-05:00'
describe
'12052' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d0a59600f92a4cc266c4e1a71e7093a5
102751e7c966edf451c9160932932407dbaccbfd
'2017-03-03T14:00:02-05:00'
describe
'188537' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
41d385b5141e0b250d99caa604bee641
5af2e9d3bb84cf35b2bd4bc87d6aeff06b5ecaeb
describe
'135833' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8c89f2e475f056f132fe4c27de7f5a6b
0845093de839cdcba2d0a969c5337072ce4f0d73
'2017-03-03T14:01:10-05:00'
describe
'84977' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
0bcf874b7a5d0bcefef84d94771bc022
ab95d43425aeab78d2d1bb236897fb8e867f60c4
describe
'39941' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
0c7be30457bf62fdfbf67b7d7d7ce69a
83ef030e0c6fcd59d767516c44d130057e809e4e
describe
'968720' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1add000ab112041a54d4258c43d85167
0230765dae3f344ba70c7507472a24e39f9c1d74
'2017-03-03T13:59:16-05:00'
describe
'3844' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
a6b4998da91d989480651651bb904077
dec607e9f48b6faec6de4dcda0148677e118da92
describe
'10542' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBT' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
0f8cdf35da2a96a93cab1902e7dcd98d
e9ad012f6b7f1f7ad3b202689a61302c9ea58062
'2017-03-03T14:00:43-05:00'
describe
'53213' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
baa3ba1fab07bb6c5cc270cfe4ec5680
5a9c417b7ab3da59f7dd3200f506b22e6fb8daf2
describe
'52248' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
df432b67e5dba01911f93b62b66fdacc
9952c608885a2163b572e963ac6ffc25184664e3
'2017-03-03T14:00:33-05:00'
describe
'26209' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
06d064e125b6aed946764f227e471052
4a95900cf9f61b2739feafc54d0755f89d8c19db
'2017-03-03T14:00:55-05:00'
describe
'18782' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBX' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
52d91ed4af097109487ec8d198ade67f
96c25f9a33a6a18541108117817f8f4bac3b3b5f
'2017-03-03T14:00:03-05:00'
describe
'884852' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
033d60b5b5baf4b32196e154f5a8e94a
2cd736c60d00aebf6b79be6c3965dc12862daf5f
'2017-03-03T13:59:41-05:00'
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIBZ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
83039d16b45d32004100250e2a251fd8
f9dbabace3a5f1fa5b6c4cc4daef8cbeb4637d64
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'6151' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICA' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
2f15edfe9c57930dd8d8df2fe94f8205
25c6700aa86382af71c126b4bc3ce96ad646de82
'2017-03-03T14:01:15-05:00'
describe
'146037' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICB' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
362bb323940035afc654fb2639427b8f
36ff0febdd11d94510a68208e961cb5bc16b6ab4
'2017-03-03T13:59:00-05:00'
describe
'133765' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9db45d7f1e465274958bb867b561b9a1
22ef77edbc3bca48ccd0dc7df4d7f2b2819d573a
'2017-03-03T14:01:16-05:00'
describe
'52699' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICD' 'sip-files00024.pro'
0f8ad63a31b1ba98e11a0794267aeef3
fd9ef73d22110d4131f314379f23d0e8a5564164
'2017-03-03T13:59:42-05:00'
describe
'42040' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2477cb6db03b798ad34d401aa6cc5666
124b7503cb8fa38403b6705765f68ef2e318d4e3
'2017-03-03T14:01:26-05:00'
describe
'910860' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICF' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ed9b43b1a0c8e00e02a11715e2f69657
1d1644765ed491b16c97398c90569e6a1780b42d
'2017-03-03T14:00:00-05:00'
describe
'2604' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
41effcd30055e6e8bf20ac035ec03492
1c942dfe839acdc36eb1d6041debb83493a93050
describe
'10493' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
4b3014d5b5582ee18ea360d0af5278ae
0837dfbcfbb7d3ede02bd63930fb5f85b91a2121
'2017-03-03T13:59:40-05:00'
describe
'202065' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a65594573b5a49b6f3cae5aba9df9f6c
198adec20e12eb256e6dc35318a17c9678ad63e2
'2017-03-03T14:00:25-05:00'
describe
'189310' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICJ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5529f2a5a86cb0e37465cc67fb5ef813
96922af8325d036d79d83a94e4ec5fcad89a3f7a
'2017-03-03T14:00:59-05:00'
describe
'64534' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
346f910cc00bdab145618f5e5137161e
9a39fb1a767f4a1933bfe980906113385d3c685e
describe
'59384' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
3b6e1d078ae693220d5a53e9a46a167a
f83b43237e23156c2824f2c1b07f9dcfb560cc24
'2017-03-03T14:01:32-05:00'
describe
'909904' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b13e28045f9ad129b5f01e37794782c2
280009c5770957035b7c3ac4baee59491e965b62
'2017-03-03T14:00:21-05:00'
describe
'2605' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICN' 'sip-files00025.txt'
59cce771f585a84d872e7b28b15d9ec8
c19b2ad1b681f102b943ebb13c6342a8480043a2
'2017-03-03T14:00:13-05:00'
describe
'14182' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICO' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
404ee8c76d1be920d961512c70b2694f
24e37401d097eea2158541845ab197c5781f38df
describe
'69608' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICP' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4431460d1d13623e9869e228beecb0e7
16f4ff59f1ece17154577cd31b1ce65fc200afa9
'2017-03-03T13:58:35-05:00'
describe
'36893' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fdfb991dbeac310fd84ac2da8dadc33b
97879f3d8ec3684fe006990f1e6c90e6934c6f29
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICR' 'sip-files00026.pro'
37aa8b41c93c69431de33dcea1a3cceb
547dd36dc3b614f9dafa31ea23c59356b5fbcaad
'2017-03-03T14:01:05-05:00'
describe
'12788' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
f2584be52decd215b187dc4d756b0670
88bf05e1692c2039df675c1b1d4f2b8163ad481f
describe
'843632' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
26d6be2a9e041f8dd23dee3e1bfaf04b
33d410be9c0ad7c131d992e628c3645f4f4aee65
'2017-03-03T14:00:54-05:00'
describe
'130' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
0f2dc2b05fd384791cb3c13e448b1bc3
7a463eb3b83bab69c8fe2e9c56012b40505f81fc
describe
'4016' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6351aeede0e3661aa1f60178be6814ff
52c4802d646cd283f654942c785787a04b2b5e48
'2017-03-03T13:58:40-05:00'
describe
'183492' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2e2b0f7cf9d93841a919a3ce405ec94a
fcbb3b92a4639901e1cca74d6f57ad34f2dd9613
'2017-03-03T13:59:49-05:00'
describe
'67529' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICX' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
3cb55358c0cf7db41874e3f95d313bee
bdd9a0e5e35905180e236e72d086069b4e2a64c3
describe
'99287' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
b91f10512ebc9f076bbd705e0a7f612e
566b5c007099087b6df8180b566f3325879f837f
describe
'20201' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAICZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
89f1d4608c4f37dcfcad96f5163e7e44
614ee555f4e5951bd5fe947342a1d0785ef70479
'2017-03-03T14:00:51-05:00'
describe
'958108' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d78e019a53dfe219441cc5aab2e18928
eecc2ca45e8aab989a28cd103e25328178d7c102
'2017-03-03T14:01:17-05:00'
describe
'5050' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1820e6b1c4dcfa884dfe47011a602f73
a483641f9ba2e424e63845078d752dc38c1b46c0
describe
'5889' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
509af0c7b089695129a76ea39517acd6
4e166a8d7778d5cb07719dcd7940f7c911625e47
describe
'59284' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDD' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e0f551921d47abad9febc17e4b234331
e4c29af3948f85da0da3bf00a0517d4175cc2624
describe
'58029' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b31c6b6733f6b6f4cdb404ac380d612f
bcf7545c8af417b852bbe64c8e9ed84b3fa4b0e1
'2017-03-03T14:01:46-05:00'
describe
'10051' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c308cf21c935ead40b9b2b069b852dd3
2b3c57640b432b87a3d23ac9ab24f3b839b3059c
describe
'20627' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
541a72481bdb05b407a0ff63235dcae1
32e1925974db7a4cc9a89442511e690007514e20
'2017-03-03T14:00:53-05:00'
describe
'946296' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c6f1b6bb1e7a37443568f79e17c29b0a
69772084964de9642666b7523c3d05e9e6211150
'2017-03-03T14:00:36-05:00'
describe
'584' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDI' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b0909ebd10b798c39970e3fd934d27ab
1e6171052f413c05693760f08a33dabb73538061
'2017-03-03T14:00:17-05:00'
describe
'7118' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
71e1e348e3babe5ff56020863c330617
0a91eb7b90fc41ebb51b1ce2b5870597d2bdc9eb
'2017-03-03T13:59:44-05:00'
describe
'193865' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a3b114efa1b6c32b136cf5b88dbd941a
ea73dd232e46971957bab5a4ccb5c3cab063bb4f
describe
'173052' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
2e5a7545fe169f0fb16de732b8075f9d
0ea18b9c5dae0f18d8456a264722e40a7558aebb
describe
'62814' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e8fcd6c6f0e3a9130e29128afcb7c0c0
0abdfa4508643b3df5666c68710b945eda52d2a9
describe
'52818' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDN' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f34d6b6fdc51b5f9a0383f5382ec081a
5171f14bbaad7f0dbd464ae958449fcfcbf121fa
'2017-03-03T14:00:20-05:00'
describe
'956632' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0dc062af1cb50616b032adf21a449478
631e761099bb5091af0442f408a59d034d1474db
'2017-03-03T14:00:44-05:00'
describe
'2515' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d2dbc1bd1b74a32b41d9c42103bbf173
807489661c02e68efe313be73ca9065e2ebae2cc
describe
'12800' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
bc6b287525bc362d54f9bde35d35e12f
5b6b2b1e61017c4c42f499f84a391a53aeefdd87
describe
'211782' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDR' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
01b6257b825d69d8ee196db3b8556960
7accb42ac503577184bfb77d313ad277a9b3870a
'2017-03-03T14:01:51-05:00'
describe
'164122' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDS' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b97d943d238d982249f6c33653f0b715
81874d395460f92a7ab6c4b7d1c5dd3df7d25ce8
describe
'34485' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDT' 'sip-files00030.pro'
4401b532e4a0a7ba25aba43e7887347f
7335fe99254a81e34290d38b0c74980018125690
'2017-03-03T14:00:15-05:00'
describe
'45829' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDU' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ba0e05d915643f7d5b6be4b2ff41d7bd
83795e53544d1ef1d7699adbb31e6613c9105896
describe
'923372' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDV' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f7d66a918c3dc3da1223d9f85d3047da
a1900dcfcf923eefff528ecc6d49dc103c564001
'2017-03-03T13:59:03-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDW' 'sip-files00030.txt'
da08be241e2243f20b62577932ab0a5c
41d14ab4dd569b96054320f1e5711c83feae941e
describe
'11294' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDX' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
471eccc0c94047027e5c9dcdaa28c9c1
ebae0341243eddedbfcc83267c7e3ba2540a30f5
'2017-03-03T14:01:58-05:00'
describe
'430450' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5a581edacd8ef3882a014028ad04bf37
5ab0ad8f02012c1f9a85ce006c18f8d47a463ede
describe
'38749' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIDZ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
0830ba4f682c97b7ae273223df9da281
f7d16f4db75940be296f6dc7c05689ff4e667628
'2017-03-03T13:58:37-05:00'
describe
'8793' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEA' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c7c583074c12863a17bae526f887eceb
43e73deb3e35179d0291567b590006578a29e8d8
'2017-03-03T13:55:16-05:00'
describe
'13809' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e38520b49d316b48ab8b77785d1a06e9
c4bef2d4a8b1b530affe7d1cbbdda2c6d61abcee
describe
'7723532' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
cec5b9949b169871e2a82d515d825710
ce313215327badd0215bccdce65c5a97a7f1a3a0
'2017-03-03T14:01:02-05:00'
describe
'588' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIED' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b1d1138238da73f9969ef3a16ca93c4f
0859a6777f8783e3eae9fb24867d91cd9cefe971
describe
'4618' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
41cb4450a3656e696c58edffe4d82314
20dd0e3e0cbb679eb48a8ba6294b9b9bfdbed70a
describe
'183290' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
eaede93c15674129398c44895e3819c8
277e716876b965fc7569ec0bbae7e45e74ae32c5
describe
'170567' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
5729a8e022dbadde863f7f23ad671124
7741bf85a0048cb81290e8355c346200463fe03f
describe
'57626' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
370baffd5eb23f2057d8caa88ec06204
6352eb5dfc83a5242cc3adf58c69b410bc58fafc
'2017-03-03T14:00:49-05:00'
describe
'53516' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
876683505aa560179194e31f23079ccd
72df94ef8a2b37a365901eddc69a182e37d1390d
'2017-03-03T14:01:55-05:00'
describe
'894236' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
40efd87b60640185329fad9d3c02339c
f1a53d442987bc89a4025da1bfb16f9b94e6be1e
'2017-03-03T14:00:24-05:00'
describe
'2350' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
ba71371a546a0426b76d3488c97a44bb
7fb8ade3de8fa603e52c2957a8d6e1fef54ad2b5
'2017-03-03T13:59:58-05:00'
describe
'13074' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEL' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
6e139ba440962840c5a7fde18f775e3e
24caacc21ecf09cd9b07122529e5a211b79f4d83
'2017-03-03T13:59:59-05:00'
describe
'56395' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9dbeafb350247d59a9f9a5400f9b92f2
96913ec43aa15c936c10b1451fbdf9a3acac679b
describe
'28681' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEN' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f8a9a8881382d3056e2f10bb3cb3604e
b4557236f4e105f5965b323cbb8bac45632f5e93
'2017-03-03T14:01:43-05:00'
describe
'15225' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEO' 'sip-files00033.pro'
f06e96a26599034a165681326483e93f
3126a96382fbfe03c583034ba40a35bc44c3d62d
'2017-03-03T14:00:26-05:00'
describe
'10321' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEP' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
e9e35350c7441adce233889aa3f33945
643076fc599c06632e81bbee3020a007e9955bd5
'2017-03-03T13:59:20-05:00'
describe
'901324' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEQ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
912b5628585abace7211b36af048b25a
334807fda561c248743de1a75253e64ff7fcd13d
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIER' 'sip-files00033.txt'
32fe5623ca9a1a75c974c5066db8b273
62375e406ec22ac94ac70f95baa964a76b33f025
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'3714' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIES' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
0f471dc47fc6b6cdabf8d4ff028a84c2
7037386318c2835d67772b6002fbf255cb450ef4
describe
'182775' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIET' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8af826afbb218e69fcd927c9a35ad934
1e009d09a0b27d3bd3122cbd4c889c8e52a6e3b3
'2017-03-03T14:01:38-05:00'
describe
'169100' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3b0a386d88c96a711b005de2a5822c10
121859ac87906af10f5935225c1f9d46420e1a04
'2017-03-03T14:00:34-05:00'
describe
'56221' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
004f1514ea609a55b9f1bc71f834e17e
5c468cfe138e23867e1b50e8f561223981a12c08
'2017-03-03T13:59:11-05:00'
describe
'54383' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
e465bca847d554bc9b10b7d8b03e89c8
c06fdc3513bcc487bed77ab39b460c4508ef6fe9
'2017-03-03T14:01:20-05:00'
describe
'899360' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
73512686b7593b25ec0a464c14bf21de
916eca8b54be0b91a46eeba1b6efa1c14a67c930
'2017-03-03T14:00:40-05:00'
describe
'2305' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6ce6ec4bbd1c5c525c7b0f9234177ca1
5fe868c384891baeddffd9d9d634a2ba6279bc3d
describe
'13520' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
0ef593943166bab34605dc1b7e522507
1cb8e1303f3cd88ae201a57b39427cd1d6171acb
'2017-03-03T13:59:43-05:00'
describe
'51408' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
060c4215c86af99454d89fb55ceebad7
90203954f99b94b9d187b5d75e311e3a255f99d8
'2017-03-03T13:59:02-05:00'
describe
'43390' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
96417d686d30af03d059060c29894603
11ad7c34765b1089a4de981ac2f1bb752de8e640
describe
'8801' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
63766b854d1303ec5fe4149b5acbe431
61c007f1770e2d075b84dc61b446f56e5fd984db
describe
'15781' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a074cd340c1a8a5b8a3ee634bbc62d89
e8bc7e39472557fe939b7a07f24d40e366e8b99c
'2017-03-03T13:59:45-05:00'
describe
'956240' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
77b74a331337a9704415b131d460f1b8
fc0f53ef492269c7bd623bde3090b615408745ae
describe
'406' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d23df4f2e009aea50fc42f7523439be2
a3cdc472fe13f10e44228bd7d6ec87b518ceb5a4
'2017-03-03T14:00:04-05:00'
describe
'5639' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
5ec464336270a33155f5824695d63447
b6b54c5ebe1b0c6ccf895b96ae8d13b48d430ecb
describe
'50113' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3424aa46d72f2eb58bb0fc02d682f051
df64f4f89a0996df3c5c90adeebb5ff08cbe70bf
describe
'49937' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0c891b2c9cba69cc334ed09d1c6dfa94
caa1e45091be12aaf5e8c8c42ac86babd34de969
'2017-03-03T13:58:58-05:00'
describe
'9433' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d23e6263d6aec184cd36c5180dc924cc
b97e243da73b9403554c8be5e37ca4ab1c227061
describe
'18952' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
949efe2fc26e561c4ee0a7d63bb9962c
8008db298a72e2bfed314783395492f52f491a9e
'2017-03-03T14:01:04-05:00'
describe
'850840' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b025f3f69bae9417c8b58d5871a05457
1a5c0b7bd8683b7fbbfa668129e96dd41bf823eb
describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
08fc623af3f5b495830ac074b5fb5caa
7508075d1fe2ca52949270431e22c10df87d6a59
'2017-03-03T14:02:00-05:00'
describe
'6331' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
e2897868c49cbabc8e232e2aeba7abad
9316566271018ddae65c73b174dce693e98a4959
'2017-03-03T13:59:50-05:00'
describe
'460666' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
09fefa3738a614b8e102c8736a24a56d
5e1f0b52aa2f3a01633493290ac1252a4ef9df63
describe
'26897' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
cac02111d1e7caf27cdfce9b35096ba0
6f1532450b22798f270263d8306250260f6e184d
describe
'11950' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b6b8ee043314d39e0209abd393aabca7
54779856a219c8c92df34fc9ac0cee76889c67d6
describe
'9209' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
9ec8a9a18de97444cd1755ec29243104
bcd68b14793b39efd220ea37b4976363b2cc33ae
'2017-03-03T14:00:22-05:00'
describe
'7723772' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00037.tif'
dacbeb35517a4e845aa97cfd9c5e2c52
468d019d57e4f10205a26f1d1fd56a6d57497bfb
describe
'662' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b01b9a2fad090c159120bc5e4b85d77e
81ab82cbfebd9cf4cdbdad047acc9690d93b8a0e
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'2902' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
4784ea5c93a7162112d8582bf0209ef6
4824bf738ce7145f42084f7755af6c0b032a279f
describe
'101844' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c785acb9007a305be32e0a725b9f504b
3d5fcc9229f613af67a3f4a9be1043a3d00f7ff3
describe
'38172' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
7e58b15cf5ab999f6030bdb21fdef289
0e52c51aaa5a1f85c3db67a473e79c18fb1f218e
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00038.pro'
879b2a9e6ee0e6f1caf9f16ceb69b77a
3312694766a892f7e877aec18980265245db01dc
'2017-03-03T13:59:35-05:00'
describe
'10647' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
7bc5f5868f013429599f224c525d6863
625eb702509aca6e6268104c15980cacd4beb689
describe
'843912' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ef5ffb24a14a2eff9521de5cfdcead17
e25dabe15c87b38c8068982165e6b519eaa1a25e
'2017-03-03T14:01:23-05:00'
describe
'129' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00038.txt'
5f124d8856f25eda78b115e3fac863dc
8f163f8a978cb596bc26249f31ea9ea4558d454e
describe
'3531' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
162a0dca68fecb341716e2d0189ac5b1
6776782639289442fcf4c6e921b815110d1e032e
describe
'146084' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
c5c96bd5cdfba8ae9e3d6ec7de120d96
d3c02577f3ad999fe43f73176a1fe0c80a3f8c0e
describe
'98467' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b284647927452a8b51edca9dc5c7d3dd
270bd5b155aa3f20a49c20a3da7c2514c48ee636
describe
'22916' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00039.pro'
8e0a3310d1b12fd2ddf96b341084d7c6
a85fbfaf91153d229246773461e2aac58dfb1205
describe
'29381' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
8acb492f52f7292f847b8d5427e80c3a
3ee10e553ea7ed9d4354e3c6435d8d21c2672d93
describe
'972016' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
675b967484bb78e6eb0af15867f27c9c
d6713ec9f713bdeef204056ee531cbf87a2fed69
'2017-03-03T14:00:46-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00039.txt'
68c7178c5afdb912ced2d5b6306c65f4
20fd0b93812900cbd0fb10529952623ad80c561f
describe
'8062' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
84c947e549ad47f078deaebbeb571289
849419de2af92d1fb2525773827596d3011108de
describe
'191800' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
72a3057f0ece096ddf4c177dfb6b16f0
7faec91e8d231019e738bfe968c37c624695c999
describe
'163872' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
931cf6050b3d9e91c351b4e0f1f92406
62b1d124bde5124d3c48ad0ca4233679e398b969
describe
'26956' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d48a9c59e61b79528cd069d9ed310ebd
6d7212c42bcffb3c4093abd4d2e54bb3b2ab6c46
describe
'49445' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
873e677b3be4e6f7595f70493777b063
097a5f634adfee04c02f55b29ba4e3f4c5944aab
'2017-03-03T13:59:25-05:00'
describe
'854236' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00040.tif'
74912a6409bbe964f4c54c8b34a30176
297bf1a6fa768f366faada3427cf369f1b98f2e2
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00040.txt'
3a818f8846002491cdaf5fdbcfff1fb3
6d87d2e19f0a4e5fb494f9ca8607e3e42f567530
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'12833' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
232360302663c82bb8c06160209ab370
09b70221802bc2b69a6cf74741b5c050a4cd5fd0
describe
'174184' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
27683065852ddd67db1ef946b8690c96
e3166a1a84eaa9f62d93d0bff5bd4eb216d385e9
describe
'124180' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c83e5fb7e22d0c1050f51171766f3bc6
0e7fa772f40d2c4bf298cd941012bfe1b15582fd
'2017-03-03T14:01:36-05:00'
describe
'21462' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00041.pro'
51c0a69fcb859da230e3b81156bc8908
332c9be2ecca660997649fcc550726bbe5c55516
describe
'36641' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5dee0c54b7ed7a3ad3963c957f91a85b
6106bba2cf0b6e92b73006b6cb1dc965d351c9de
'2017-03-03T14:00:38-05:00'
describe
'971404' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
0a5658df3ba7e5ff1cb7ada685b3b9f2
41e84a6b3bb76fdcfb52d911b36643d69e738916
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00041.txt'
7ee32e652ab97fe678af926b89135e56
a79f5d248b8b014a82b1c419d13192539306ba61
describe
'10014' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
33777095f2e8fb30610b21ca1a4f3c76
d2f4b7ccfc068605bf73d7c0be6e4d3570ac8255
describe
'218692' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
1880dde48555eacb27ffefba9a9823fa
e3b3d4b8c7e1b119e7cfe479a95d2a55ae0d3dcd
describe
'165371' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
05484709675e863ade1965960236a5de
eb41ce51570f9a95daaf9531a12a40dd9cd6f0ec
'2017-03-03T14:01:31-05:00'
describe
'27169' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e5abc72f5b5813624e9c9f6bb3ac4962
ee55ede32fddd4ffa0111d1e355f89d448164d40
describe
'47430' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
35f1f3b31de484922959cabf9648bd5f
19041bf3b9d8d517b223a6af3e75253da62a6604
'2017-03-03T14:00:18-05:00'
describe
'880316' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c476ddeef7763c9ecc497f8c2f772ff9
948375f1373af60042b53c878f700172db6cd1ef
'2017-03-03T13:58:46-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00042.txt'
66d393c5ab0733396c211d9a2c25e664
74d3e9a7977d664e111f62cd9399c664ff516a12
describe
'12157' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
eb9afee721fdc0b0eb7703a031ebe8cd
f2a783ce4abd7e547979cb46a98373f4b7f8f4f9
describe
'147332' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
9a2fff4ac4ce9b14f272ad93a5e86c5e
badbe0c0b81c26958e9d4122416604069731cbdb
'2017-03-03T14:00:30-05:00'
describe
'105476' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ed5efaafb9136d5d59d83909caaae8ea
6517ad8784a8081645917628bfaa5f87d30bccaa
describe
'26232' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00043.pro'
86206ebb958513a85e43db6d93908ac2
550f3cb9e47c91e2fa87418d567af7eadec21a0e
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a956a2dd49b04c765b1eebb2cf360e3b
02b5068f4df02b1cd536d8dab08f6c6f1e34f979
describe
'971028' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00043.tif'
31d59962ab65d219ccd6729cd69aa970
fca46e2244b7e7be2295e1e5654204771fee8773
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b73e31ad15065de48e56eaa31564879c
eb4f7e889a7169e7e42747b37defc8744dae5231
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8754' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
1b207acbf613288e645afab377230e07
051d7ebd82a122ed7fde70efeeb8d278526225eb
describe
'104345' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
5afc4083399a1038ed60ceda4004150c
dd5f5727a837ef7050a9f0607b6eeeb757f26955
describe
'88166' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
097bd7ec8b6861cfc63fde5b71e840ec
14dc245e7254b3cdbe0ece9b05da365fe53ff66d
describe
'34293' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00044.pro'
cca86e1e2af7aa1f8ad094ee3a4bcede
6ef91e64a9bd4adfdb7a9182d5a8179bbc15c3c0
describe
'27691' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
293be396b08acc454933d2bb198a23c2
babb1829b44569aa0a5ea24aed530c80bbcb7e34
describe
'910684' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0b2c5a05abe541ed6d3ba74f6c2b9b3e
bc56f8aa9f157d4b37e43c83269d077ed553fed9
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
fb378ac9f7394c64b79d4882600ec10f
628b20582a46886a4d389db467f5a3f491d714f7
describe
'7855' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
adf7e9522c44c44717a8a725f33c3de6
690d0bbbe0e99db0236e89fb684e5388fb6245b8
describe
'153168' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHS' 'sip-filescopyright.jp2'
cd965abaafb5da42dc6c8def20d374f4
b811824c94aa0ae5a5f04cfb64b27e9e0927243a
'2017-03-03T14:00:48-05:00'
describe
'103670' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHT' 'sip-filescopyright.jpg'
d028360928b6690b49cfe8211e6bb6a5
db68f5028a78f337081c164d3478ffd3e30a8a09
describe
'35667' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHU' 'sip-filescopyright.pro'
cc33c37bea8de466d4d045eca577d695
9c5da3714f57ddac030cdc94ce8f4795493d2d93
describe
'35083' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHV' 'sip-filescopyright.QC.jpg'
28180ee8185b27af4702a664eb2b5d1b
f0e1d4e0f0dcb1a265ec575f3d87a525ada2ad6d
describe
'1060612' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHW' 'sip-filescopyright.tif'
ff794e749f05b8c096eeeda1ac4701fd
7c9e5a2805f8c85731ce4274609a127b59686597
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHX' 'sip-filescopyright.txt'
15f2bbd34b776d39b92ffb1c4f760b27
b0251f2ed30996bc7ed3d8efa687abc9a6800fa9
'2017-03-03T13:59:52-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'10085' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHY' 'sip-filescopyrightthm.jpg'
b0566b6a6e9b9bfb3fa924203ff11cf8
63d705588c1580afc86f43138330df2fe31f906d
describe
'2784343' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHZ' 'sip-filesUF00001139.pdf'
3a94c97dbd18d78f3a2b1d52a0c7bef4
1b124b4768bf183e2e244040796bb78f9ba2a207
'2017-03-03T13:58:47-05:00'
describe
'42175563' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIHZ-norm-1' 'ARCHIVE' 'aip-filesF20080608_AAAIHZ-norm-1.pdf'
ab92bc7b95132df6b771de6e1f9fe4cb
4bc7f3aa53c9da826f8f5450316b9604368a6b31
'2017-04-07T14:00:02-04:00'
describe
Too many fonts to report; some fonts omitted.
'2017-04-07T13:59:16-04:00'
normalize
Too many fonts to report; some fonts omitted.
'80367' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIIA' 'sip-filesUF00001139_00001.mets'
60a0da191ab34e4d87394a7e5a92d425
e58693eb72e705164189b0a0d572857ed9de3b2d
'2017-03-03T13:59:06-05:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2017-04-07T14:00:08-04:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
BROKEN_LINK schema http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'99938' 'info:fdaE20080606_AAAAOKfileF20080608_AAAIID' 'sip-filesUF00001139_00001.xml'
2c0dac8bddebc95c0bc012dfc253b9ce
389f759797768969f9aaaf7e897ca53f3976e0f3
describe
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd