Citation
Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1967-68 ( FGS:Informational circular 68 )

Material Information

Title:
Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1967-68 ( FGS:Informational circular 68 )
Series Title:
FGS: Information circular
Creator:
Healy, Henry G
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Florida -- Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Publisher:
State of Florida, Bureau of Geology
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vi, 61 p. : illus., maps. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Groundwater -- Florida ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida ( lcsh )
Aquifers -- Florida ( lcsh )
City of Pensacola ( local )
City of Lakeland ( local )
City of Tallahassee ( local )
City of Orlando ( local )
City of Panama City ( local )
City of Jacksonville ( local )
Aquifers ( jstor )
Water wells ( jstor )
Geology ( jstor )
Pumping ( jstor )
Chlorides ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
"Prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Natural Resources, Division of Interior Resources, Bureau of Geology, and other State and local agencies."
Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Henry G. Healy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
79636022 ( LCCN )
00198276 ( OCLC )
020695467 ( Aleph )

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STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Randolph Hodges, Executive Director



DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES
J.V. Sollohub Director



BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Robert 0. Vernon, Chief



Information Circular No. 68



WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1967-68



By
Henry G. Healy
U.S. Geological Survey



Prepared by the
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND
OTHER STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES



TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
1971






























4B


Completed manuscript received
November 3, 1970
Printed for the Florida Department of Natural Resources
Division of Interior Resources
Bureau of Geology
by Designers Press
Orlando, Florida

Tallahassee
1971































CONTENTS


Introduction .....................

Well-numbering system .............
Principal aquifers ..................
Northwestern Florida ..............

Pensacola area ..............
Ft. Walton area .............

Panama City area ............
Northern and north-central Florida ...

Tallahassee area .............

Fernandina-Jacksonville area ...
Central Florida ..................

Tampa-St. Petersburg area .....
Lakeland area ...............

Orlando area ...............
Cape Kennedy area ..........
Sarasota-Bradenton area .......
Southern Florida .................

Ft. Myers area ..............
Stuart-West Palm Beach area ...
Ft. Lauderdale area ..........


Page

............................. 1
............................. 4

............................. 6
....................... ...... 8

............................. 10
............................. 12

............................. 17
............................. 20

............................. 20

............................. 24
............................. 28
............................. 29
............................. 33

............................. 39
............................. 45
............................. 45

............................. 46
............ ................ 48
.............................. 5(
............................. 55


M iami area ............................


.... .... ... 55






ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure Page
1. Observation-well network, December 1968, and the
extent of principal aquifers in Florida ........................... 3
2. Generalized change of water level in the Floridan
Aquifer, May 1967-May 1968 ................................. 5
3. Well-numbering systems ...................................... 7
4. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the
Floridan Aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 ..................... 8
5. Locations of observation wells in northwestern
Florida for which hydrographs are given ......................... 9
6. Total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, Florida ................. 10
7. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Escambia 45 at Cantonment, 46 near Ensley, and 62
at Pensacola, Pensacola area .................................. 11
8. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in
well Escambia 62 at Pensacola and departures from
monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola,
1967-68 ................................................. 13
9. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area ................... 14
10. Net change of ground-water level, Pensacola and
Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1966 ........................ 15
11. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and
Ft. Walton areas, May 1966 to May 1968 ........................ 16
12. Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida ..................... 17
13. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama
City, and Washington 4 at Caryville ............................ 18
14. Rise of water level at Panama City and vicinity,
1963-68 ................................................. 19
15. Locations of observation wells in northern and
north-central Florida for which hydrographs are
given .................................................... 21
16. Total yearly pumpage, City of Tallahassee,
Florida ....................................... .......... 22
17. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels
in well Leon 7 at Tallahassee and departures
from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee,
1967-68 ................................................. 23
18. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison,
Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near
Fernandina, Florida ........................................ 24
19. Total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville,
Florida .................................................. 25
20. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville,
Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and
Putnam 29 at Palaika, Florida ....:............................ 26
21- Net changes of ground-water levels in the
Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to
May 1966 and from May 1966 to May 1968 ..................... 27






22. Locations of observation wells in central Florida
for which hydrographs are given ............................... 28
23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Pasco 13 near Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near
Citrus Park, Tampa area ..................................... 29
24. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels in well
Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and departures from
monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1967-68 ................. 30
25. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon
Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater ......................... 31
26. Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592
at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg
area ......................... .............. .......... 32
27. Total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida .................. 34
28. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from monthly
normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1967-68 ...................... 35
29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near
Lakeland, Lakeland area ..................................... 36
30. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof
and Highlands 10 near Sebring ................................ 37
31. Trends and Flucutations of water levels in wells
Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in
the Kissimmee Valley ....................................... 38
32. Total yearly pumpage, City of Orlando ......................... 39
33. Total yearly pumpage, Winter Park ............................ 40
34. Total yearly pumpage, City of Cocoa well field ................... 41
35. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels in wells
Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from
monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1967-68 ................ 42
36. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels in well
Orange 47 near Orlando ..................................... 43
37. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels near Cape
Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida ..................'... 44
38. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area ........................... 46
39. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which
hydrographs are given ....................................... 47
40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal
monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1967-68 ..................... 48
41. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 in the
Everglades Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin
147 at Stuart, Florida ....................................... 49
42. Total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida .................... 50
43. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Martin 147 at Stuart and departures from monthly
normal precipitation at Stuart, 1967-68 ......................... 51
44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and departures from







monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach,
1967-68 ...................................
45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward G561 and
G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near
Miami ......................................


............. 52



............. 53


46. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Broward F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami,
Dade S196A near Homestead, Dade F179 at Miami, and
Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale ............................ 54
47. Changes in Chloride content of water in wells
Broward G515, G820 and S830 near Ft. Lauderdale,
and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami ........................... 56
48. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Dade S196A near Homestead, and departures from
monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experi-
mental Station, 1967-68 ..................................... 58
49. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Dade S19 and G10 near Miami ................................ 58
50. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells
Dade G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade
County .............................................. 59
51. Changes in chloride content of water in wells
Dade S68 at Miami Springs, Dade D151 at North
Miami Beach and Dade G469 and S529 in south-


eastern Dade County


....................................... 60


le


TABLES


Page


Well and water-level data for selected observation
wells in Florida ..................................... Appendix


Table
1.








WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND


NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS
OF FLORIDA, 1967-68
By
Henry G. Healy

INTRODUCTION

This report summarizes the trends and fluctuations of ground-
water levels in the principal aquifers in Florida during 1967-68 and
includes the following: (1) hydrographs of ground-water levels in the
several aquifers; (2) maps showing changes in ground-water levels
during specific periods; and, (3) a table summarizing the principal
data on selected observation wells. Observation wells for which
records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources Data
Collection Stations in Florida, 1961," Florida Geological Survey
Special Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U. S.
Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey,
(now the Bureau of Geology, Florida Division of Natural Resources),
includes the location, aquifer, and type and period of records avail-
able for 3,600 observation wells.
Since World War II, and.particularly during the last decade, the
demand for fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural
uses in Florida has increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies
have been adequate for the increased demand in most areas, water
levels have declined appreciably in some. Because demand for ground
water continues to increase, shortages will occur and may become
critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may
allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from
deterioration in quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of
water available. In order to prevent future shortages, the present
supplies of ground water must be properly appraised before they can
be effectively utilized. Records of trends and fluctuations of ground-
water have long formed a basis for such an appraisal.
The principal objective of the investigations of the Water
Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey is to appraise and
to evaluate the nation's water resources. Although many types of
ground-water investigations are carried out on a statewide basis
throughout the nation, the collection and compilation of basic
hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources
studies.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evalua-
tion of available ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of
water levels; and the delineation of present or potential areas of
detrimentally high or low ground-water levels. Water levels are used
to determine the base flow of streams, to portray the effects of
natural and man-induced forces that act on a water-bearing forma-
tion and to furnish information 'for use in basic research. The
hydrologic data program provides the foundation information neces-
sary for the successful and meaningful accomplishment of water
resources investigations.
The hydrologic data-collection program of the U. S. Geological
Survey is part of the cooperative investigations of the water resources
of Florida in cooperation with the Division of Geology, Florida
Board of Conservation, and other state and local agencies and
municipalities. The observation-well network in 1968 included about
920 ground-water data-collection stations in the 67 counties of the
state. Figure 1 shows the locations of selected ground-water stations
in the statewide network. Table 1 (see appendix) lists data on 348
observation wells selected from the statewide network of wells.
The hydrologic-data program consists of the collection, tabula-
tion, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of water-level and
related data. Water levels for selected wells are published, at present,
once every 5 years in the U. S. Geological Survey Water-Supply
Papers.
Information pertinent to ground water is also published in inter-
pretative reports of investigations published by the Florida Bureau of
Geology and the U. S. Geological Survey, Data collected during an
investigation and prior to publication are available from the District
Chief, U. S. Geological Survey, 903 W. Tennessee St., Tallahassee,
Florida, 32304, and from the Chief of the Bureau of Geology, Box
631, Tallahassee, Florida, 32302.
taken from automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and
made by tape. In general, water-level measurements made by tape
and stage recorder are shown to the nearest hundredth of a foot, and
those made with a pressure gage are shown to the nearest tenth of a
foot.
Table 1 (appendix) summarizes well-data and water-level
information for the several aquifers. Well data include theaquifer,
depth of well, and depth of casing. The items: "Year record began" .
and "Frequency of measurements" are included as part of the well
data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or June






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


87* 86. 85, 84' B3Y
3____ 7 ______ BV _8 ____ a4* ayr


7


EXPLANATION
Observolion well
Quoliy of waoer sample
PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
S- Sand-and-grovel

W Floridan

; Floridon and/or others

Biscoyne

----Approximate aquifer boundary
12
Quoality of water sample wells
or observolion wells

Central and Southern Florido
Flood Control Project

Southwest Florndo
Water Monogement District


0 0 20 30 40 50 miles


S 84' 83* 82" 81* 80*


Figure 1.. Observation wells and chloride sampling wells, Dec. 1968





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


are used because records are available for these months for a large
percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are
lowest during May or June in most areas and records during that
period constitute a base for comparison from year to year. The
annual change of water level in the Floridan Aquifer, May 1967-May
1968, is illustrated by figure 2. Highest and lowest water levels of
record prior to 1967 are given in the table. Generally, highest and
lowest levels are highest daily levels if taken from recorder charts.
The range of fluctuations for 1967 and 1968 are shown under
"Annual range."

WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEMS
Two well-numbering systems are used in this report: serially by
counties, and grid-coordinate, based on latitude and longitude of the
well location. Frequently both numbers have been assigned to the
well; e.g., a well number may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This af-
fords a tie-in with water-level data published previously under well
number 20 in Bay County with date that may be published for the
same well under number 008-537-2.
Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or
suffix. In Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and
NP denote Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and
National Park Service wells, respectively. In Dade, Escambia, High-
lands, Holmes, and Leon Counties, the letter suffix A denotes a
shallow well near a deeper well having the corresponding number
without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter suffixes B and
C denote shallow wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47.
The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived
from latitude and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude
prefix north and west and the first digit of the degree number are not
included in the well number. Two types of well numbers are used in
Table 1: a seven-digit numbering system and a nine-digit numbering
system.
The seven-digit well number is a composite of three numbers
separated by hyphens: the first number is composed of the last digit
of the degree and the two digits of the minute that define the
latitude on the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the second
number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of
the minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute
quadrangle; and the third number gives the numerical order in which
the well was inventoried in the 1-minute quadrangle. For example,
well number 835-105-1 is the first well inventoried in the 1-minute






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


*62 ft. e n
O I

















W Plus. 2-4 fen t
Plu, 1-2 feet.. /--.

LI, hon l fo,. Ut h/ f oo

M itres M -4* 2 Ie S o l ( ^ .


Minus 4* 6 t n t
Minus 6-8 feet 7
Minus 8-14 f eet
S0 3 0 O0 main ( ,le
Note: Chonge influenced by pumping In
cni organ b
t 2-ofett 0_ Ia re







84* as* f a* e8* /o*

Figure 2. Generalized change of water level in the. Floridan
Aquifer, May 1967-May 1968.





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


quadrangle north of the 28 35' parallel of latitude and west of the
81 "05' meridian of longitude.
The first two series of three numbers each of the nine-digit well
number denotes latitude and longitude as explained under the
seven-digit well number. The third series of numbers in the nine-digit
well number gives the location of the well in a 1-minute rectangle
which has been divided into quarters, sixteenths and sixty-fourths.
The first digit of the series locates the well within the quarter
numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4 in southwest and southeast. Similarly, the
second digit locates the well within the quarter-quarter tract
numbered in a like manner -1, 2, 3, and 4. Finally, the third digit of
the series gives the quarter-quarter-quarter tract in which the well is
located numbered likewise 1, 2, 3, and 4. The locations of wells with
seven and nine digit numbers are diagrammatically shown in figure 3.

PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS

Ground-water supplies for agricultural, industrial, and municipal
uses in Florida are available from three principal aquifers: the
Floridan Aquifer in central and northern Florida; the Biscayne
Aquifer in southeastern Florida; and the sand-and-gravel aquifer in
the extreme northwestern part of Florida. Th-geraizelr areal-
extent of the ag"
in figure 1.
The Floridan Aquifer, which underlies all of the state, is the
principal source of water in central, northern, and most of north-
western Florida. Areas of artesian flow and the potentiometric
surface of the Floridan Aquifer is illustrated by figure 4.. Highly
mineralized water precludes the use of the Floridan Aquifer as a
source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of
southern Florida. In these areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian
aquifers are the source of supply.
The Biscayne Aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source
of water supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This
aquifer, one of the most highly productive aquifers in the world,
underlies about 3,500 square miles of Broward, Dade, and Palm
Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne Aquifer is sharply
restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of
saline waters.
The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is
the principal source of water supply, yielding large supplies, of
ground water for industries and municipalities. The aquifer extends






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and part of western
Okaloosa County.
This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into
four sections as follows: (1) northwestern Florida; (2) northern,
northeastern, and north-central Florida; (3) central Florida; and (4)
southern and southeastern coastal Florida.


Figure 3. Well-numbering system.





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 4. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan
Aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961.


NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA

The northwestern section includes the Florida panhandle
extending from the Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-
Alabama line, figure 5.
The principal sources of ground-water supply in this section are
the sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and
the Floridan Aquifer in the rest of the section. Minor supplies of
ground water are obtained from shallow nonartesian aquifers.
The Pensacola, Ft. Walton Beach, and Panama City areas of the
Florida panhandle are growing rapidly in industry and population.





A L A B A M A


A C K S O N


AN TA ROSA


I



OKA LOOSA
031 025


Observatoln well and number


OF


MEXICO


AREA OF
MAP


0 10 20 30 40 MILES


Figure 5. Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida
for which hydrographs are given.


WAL T


BAY


C AL HO

I


GULF


A L


A B


A M A




10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

PENSACOLA AREA

The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties,
and like many others in the state, is undergoing rapid economic
development accompanied by increasing use of water by industry
and municipalities. Figure 6 shows that the total 1968 pumpage for





































SNOI VIO 10 SNOmlW: 39Vdwn~


Figure 6. Total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, Florida.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


ESCAMBIA 45 DEPTH 152 FT


CASED 129 FT SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)


66
70

74








90





102

100




Water level is offectedl by nearby wells
1101 --- --- ^ -------- --


ESCAMBIA 46 DEPTH 239 FT CASED 229 FT SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)
56



















68

71
'4 ---------------- -------------- ----








22 I- -l l -----I l


1945


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1960


Figure 7. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia
45 at Cantonment, 46 near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola,
Pensacola area.






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


the City of Pensacola was about four times that of 1945. Total
yearly municipal pumpage at Pensacola increased from about 1,500
million gallons per year (mgy) in 1945 to 5,970 mgy in 1968.

The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began in
1939 as part of the investigation to determine the adequacy and
permanency of ground-water supply in Escambia County. Figure 5
shows locations of observation wells selected from the hydrologic-
data network for which hydrographs are given in this report, and
table 1 (appendix) presents data on 13 wells in Escambia County and
3 wells in Santa Rosa County. Figure 7 shows fluctuations and long-
term trends of artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer in
the Pensacola area from 1960 through 1968.

Comparison of the hydrographs for the period 1967-68 reveals
that while water levels at the end of 1968 declined in some areas in
central and southern Escambia County they remained essentially at
1965-66 levels near Cantonment and at Pensacola. Declines ranged
from about 12 feet in well Escambia 46 near Ensley to about 4 feet
in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola. At the end of 1968, levels at
Ensley had declined to approximately those of the 1954-56 drought
while levels near Cantonment and at Pensacola remained 8/2 and 10
feet above those of the 1954-56 drought.

In the coastal area at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well
Escambia 62, at the end of 1968, was slightly below the 1941 level.
The trends and fluctuations of artesian ground-water levels in well
Escambia 62 and departures from monthly average rainfall at
Pensacola, 1967-68 are shown in figure 8.


FT. WALTON AREA

The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and
Eglin Air Force Base. The rate of growth of industry and population
is accelerating. Pumpage from the Floridan Aquifer for all uses is
about 10.0 million gallons per day (mgd). As a result of continuing
heavy pumping, water levels have declined in about a 640 square-mile
area.
The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach, figure
9, shows a maximum decline of 109.0 feet from 18.5 feet above land
surface in 1947 to 90.5 feet below land surface in July 1967. In







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


ESCAMBIA St
Son-d-WA ra- O 4xl (Afttow")
Depth 142 It.
COw 14 fII.





I F M AMJ JASONDJFM AMJ JASON IJ FMAMJ J ASONO J FMA M J AS ONI jrMAuJ JA SON




















19 1966 96 1968 19691 1 1 1

Figure 8. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well
Escambia 62 and departures from monthly normal pre-
cipitation at Pensacola, 1967-68.


August 1936, the artesian water level was 46 feet above land surface.
During the period from August 1936 to July 1967, the water level in
well Okaloosa 3 declined 136.5 feet, from 46 feet above land surface
to 90.5 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the decline in
artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net
change of water level maps, figures 10 and 11. Water-level changes
during 1951-66 are shown by figure 10. Changes of ground-water
levels for the current period, 1966-68 are shown by figure 11.








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 500 FT.


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


OKALOOSA 25 DEPTH 609 FT CASED 456 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER








Water level is affected by regional pumping
104 ..












OKALOOSA 31 DEPTH 690 FT CASED 527 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
1 -- 'f- ------- ---- --- --------

I16 ------- ,-- ^ 'C -- -----,---- ---------












Water level is affected by reglonol pumping
14
OKALOOSA 31 DEPTH 690 FT CASED 527 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER








-- WOter level is offcted by regional pumping -


92 -I I \ I i i l I Il li I I I I 1 1 1-1 I 1 1 I I I 1-
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 19
Figure 9. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa
3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area.


OKALOOSA 3


0

i- t
>0(







4I









BIA


Figure 10. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft.
Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1966.


A L A B A M A
F L 0 -R -I --T- ---

SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON .-
Li o. equal meo Cauw ot .u-
Suter lIel is the Florld- a igebr.
seI l aml 2 neet.

SLinM of eqUI t euw e ofL go"ad r
water 1vte la the sad**ad-rave l
I quitter. laurvl 2 lfeet. P

Observatieo wol1 sad













0 SCs MILES
1

on


-J











B

R
OKAL


L R o S
NTA ROSA


'\\ I


A M A -- rV l-l -
., L- ,of equ, a I s hewse .o groud,.
I LJ A w lr levels in the Florid4l aqulifr.
I In(erval 2 feet.
.OOSA WALTON ------
Line of equal MaI chea of grouaI d
wIter levels in the Uad*ad-gravel
I iaulier. InervalI feet,
erv *l
I Observicion wll ad maker. /""I'


t o.


II





0 1 10 s0 30 40
SCALE MWL






Figure 11. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft.
Walton areas, May 1966 to May 1968.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


PANAMA CITY AREA

The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County,
including Tyndall Air Force Base.
The Floridan Aquifer either indirectly or directly supplies
most of the water for municipal, industrial and military needs in the


SNO1nVO ~0 SNOI~~W N '3DVdamnd

Figure 12. Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Fla.








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


DEPTH 450 FT


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


WASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


WALTON 13


(u
















^1



a-r
;u


BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


1945
Figure 13.


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980

Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton
13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and
Washington 4 at Caryville.









INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


area. Springs from the Floridan Aquifer supply Deer Point Reservoir,
the principal source of water for municipal, industrial and military
uses. The total yearly pumpage from Panama City well fields at St.
Andrews and at Millville for 1944 through May 1967 is shown by
figure 12. After May 1967 the source of municipal water supply was


I- t


0,.





EXPLANATION

Observation well and number
Rise of woaer level 1963-68.
Doshed where Inferred. Contour
interval 25 feet.


003.-34-1


0 5 10 MILES

Fge 14. I 1

Figure 14. Risof-vater level at Panama City and vicinity, 1963-68.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


entirely from surface water from the Deer Point reservoir. Cessation
of pumping of ground water by Panama City and a change in the site
of the source of ground-water supply for the pulp industry allowed
ground-water levels to rise sharply during 1967-68 in spite of a rain-
fall deficiency of nearly 30 inches in the area. Levels at Panama City
rose about 42 feet, from 66 feet to 24 feet below land surface during
1967-68 in well Bay 7. The hydrograph of this well is shown on
figure 13. The areal rise of water levels at Panama City and vicinity is
illustrated on figure 14.
Regional rainfall deficiency in northwestern and northern
Florida, which began in the DeFuniak-Caryville-Marianna areas in
1966 and really intensified and spread as far south as Apalachicola
and eastward to Madison and Lake City during 1967-68, is
graphically reflected by the sharp decline of ground-water levels in
observation wells in much of the affected area.

NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA

The northern and north-central Florida section extends from
the Apalachicola River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean and from the
Georgia line southward to the latitude of Ocala, figure 15, and
includes 24 counties and parts of Levy, Marion, and Volusia
counties. This section includes two areas undergoing rapid expansion
in population and industry the Tallahassee area and the Jackson-
ville-Fernandina area.
The Floridan Aquifer is the principal source of ground-water
supply in coastal areas in eastern St. Johns, Flagler and Volusia
counties. Another important source of water in these areas is a
shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer.


TALLAHASSEE AREA

The Tallahassee area includes central Leon County and the City
of Tallahassee. The area is primarily residential with only sparse light
industry.
The principal water user, the City of Tallahassee, supplies water
for municipal use to the most rapidly growing residential and educa-
tional complex in northern Florida. Since 1945, annual municipal
pumpage at Tallahassee has increased about 457 percent from 850
mgy to about 3,888 mgy. Figure 16 shows pumpage for the City of
Tallahassee during 1945-68.











G E 0 R G


. .. o '
..1 1 ... "1 ,1 / 64

I-- NE J K F I' O
COL 8 1 A r
\ 10 40 MILE (L- -SUWANNEE I \V


LA E i ""' j /BRADFORD I




usSl ilA end Ia0r ( IP U T 1f A lt e ,
* MXICO [ # A \
D I Ia PALA
F MEXICO z
-. .......-"l L A L 1 S0


0 I0 VOLUSIA





Figure 15. Locations of observation wells in northern and north-
central Florida for which hydrographs are given.


S EXP


6'L F 0
o0 Ito .



























~OQ~
ep




















0


P-b0deb
eb


7000 -


6600 -


6200 -


5800 -


5400 -


z
0
.I
(A



z
:-


w

I







j ^ ________________l I I I____II __


l340


195


1965


1970


197S


iseo








INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


LEON \
Florldbn uiu \ \
Deplh 314 If.
SCod It ft




16 4 FNOAN AANA


1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
Figure 17. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Talla-
hassee, 1967-68.



ground-water levels in well Leon 7, at Tallahassee, are shown by
figure 18. The hydrograph shows no discernable long-term downward
trend for the entire period of record. The short-term trends corre-
spond closely to the areal rainfall with levels declining to the lowest
of record during the 1954-56 drought. During 1965-68, levels
declined to within less than 3 feet of those of 1954-56.
Although ground-water levels in Madison and Columbia
counties continued the decline that began in 1965, at the end of
1968 levels remained above those of the 1954-56 drought.


I
i


J F U AMJ JASONOIJFM AMJ J ASO N DIJFM AMJ JASON 0J F MAMJ J AS( N01JF MA M J JASOND







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


L -- ____ -- -_
17





COLUMBIA 9 DEPTH 836 FT CASED 680 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


[ Water level, on Mar. 28, 1939 was
40.9 ft. above land surface




C-






Woer level is ffecled by regional pumping
i l i l l I l i I I l I I I i I i l I IIl


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7
at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at
Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida.


1945
Figure 18.


FERNANDINA-JACKSONVILLE AREA

The Femandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest and most
rapidly expanding industrial areas in the state.


I

cu
-i -"
-rS


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


DEPTH 640 FT


NASSAU12







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


Since 1945, municipal pumpage has increased from 7,900 mgy
in 1945 to 14,279 mgy in 1968 with the greatest increase occurring
during the 1945-55 period. Total municipal and industrial pumpage
at Jacksonville in 1968 was about 22,000 mgy. Figure 19 shows total
yearly Jacksonville municipal pumpage 1945 through 1968.








21 ___000-----
20.00 ---------------- : -----------------------

19.(= -


41
017,00 -

16.000 -






, 3= -

scL1D

a-00


45 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 197
Figure 19. Total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville, Florida.


Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels
in the area are shown in figure 20. Ground-water levels, after a sharp
rise in 1964 from record 1963 low levels, declined to the lowest
levels of record in most of the area. New record low levels were
recorded in well Duval 164 near Mayport and in well Nassau 12 near
Fernandina in the coastal areas (figure 18). Maximum declines of
levels were recorded at Jacksonville and inland at Callahan during
1966-68. Declines of about 4 feet were recorded in well Duval 122 at
Jacksonville and about 2 feet in well Nassau 51 at Callahan. Changes
in water levels in the Floridan Aquifer in the Fernandina-Jacksonville
area are shown in Figure 21.


i9w0


19







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


NASSAU SI


Wa er level Is offeced b;
rh wowl pumpIng
26X--

22- ------------------------------


DEPTH 580 FT.


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


Figure 20. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau
51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164
near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at
Palatka, Florida.


DUVAL 164 DEPTH 840 FT. CASED 450 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


MARION S DEPTH 135 FT. CASED 135 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER


PUTNAM 29 DEPTH 300 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


La


a
>0
a3|

I












0 U V L6-s .1b 'PH AL
s/ / / *8
S3 u' I *

K! 'R.


I !l I *5 5 \
5==_..=. ". -. \. -\A. I .,


0 \ \/, eat ...I X .
C \7 CLAY 0 \ 2





PUTNAM PUTN M U y. ,
of I*"no o
r ? ~MIar ~k O ln.1



014
I.7.~


MAY 1961 MAY 1966


MAY 1966 MAY 1968






BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


CENTRAL FLORIDA
The central Florida section includes 20 counties and covers
about 18,000 square miles. The extent of this section and location of
observation wells for which hydrographs are given are shown in
figure 22.


OA MAR 1l 0 k
.1X (V 0 L U S 1 A AREA QP


C T U S
.I \" i--\ .
/ I OLE\ EXPLANATION

L -, --- I 1 -



Ig e 2 LMAN i O ob -.o ls n c r l i or..
SA N







h i L.-l. ._ -_ .____ co s
SI L 4 *lN IO "-,





















and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan Aquifer, while in the

source of water supply. In central peninsular Florida, the level in well
1954-56 drought levels. In contrast, the level in well Putnam 29 at
HLLS 8 0 R 0 U 6 OS C E O L A


6183 1 -- -
MCI 4o
Palatka declined to the lowest level of record in 1968, at which time
C ral F r a i I INDI ARRIVE
-iR -__ 2__ 1 5
03 -
I*92 I1 L 2
S--- j O OIC C 'ST LUC IE
o H I G H L A N 0 Sj

0 0 0-- S 0 -
SAROTA I Wwi
_II 0 to0 2 38 0 40 U ILIs
r--I~,,, __,_--

Figure 22. Locations of observation wells in central Florida for
which hydrographs are given.

The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal
and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan Aquifer, while in the
eastern coastal area the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief
source of water supply. In central peninsular Florida, the level in well
Marion 5 near Ocala declined about 2 feet but remained above
1954-56 drought levels. In contrast, the level in well Putnam 29 at
Palatka declined to the lowest level of record in 1968, at which time
this well ceased to flow for the first time in the period of record.
Central Florida includes four-rapidly growing centers of popula-






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


tion and industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area,
the Orlando-Cape Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton area.

TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG AREA

This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Peters-
burg, is undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and popula-
tion.
The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in
the Floridan Aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in
figure 23. Persistent drought conditions and increased pumping
PASCO 13 DEPTH 49 FT CASED 43 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT CASED 46 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER


1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13
near Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa
area.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


during 1967-68 caused water levels in Hillsborough 13 to decline to
the lowest levels of record in 1968. Rainfall recorded at Tampa and
the fluctuations of the water level in well Hillsborough 13 for the
period 1967-68 are shown in figure 24. Near Ruskin, in southern













Ocoth 47 H.
Coud .49.

3'
4


SAMJASONwJFMAMJ ONDJl m r






JI FIM JASOsJ D MAMJJ A*SONI DOJF MAMJ JASONDJi F MAMJJASO N0OJ rFMAMJ JA SONO


1965


1966


1967


1968


1969


Figure 24. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hills-
borough 13 near Tampa and departures from monthly
normal precipitation at Tampa, 1967-68.


Hillsborough County, water levels in well Hillsborough 30 declined
to the lowest level of record in 1968 (figure 25). This continuing
decline is part of an extensive regional lowering of water levels which







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


HILLSBOROUGH 30


DEPTH 500 FT


CASED 34 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER


IZ








8 N
6 -







6
CI






a

to

Water level is affected by fides




2C
2 -
PINELLAS 13 DEPTH 141 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER

















Water level is affected by tides
30

32J-1 1 1L W1 1 1111 II 1 1111 III1

Figure 25. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hills-

borough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs,
and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater.

extends from southern Hillsborough County into Manatee and
Sarasota counties. (See figure 38.)

Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246,
are shown in figure 25. No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13.
However, a slight downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be
noted for Pinellas 246. This downward trend was reversed during the
latter part of 1956 and levels continued to rise through 1959. During







32 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


1959-68 the downward trend of levels is again evident in well Pinellas
246.
Changes in chloride content of water from two wells that tap
the Floridan Aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 26. At






























I. .
-5-




















.



'co W V--- o




SCO C
J3i 1 U3d SMV~VS7Tmi '.LN31N03 3o010oH
Figure 26. Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay
Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


Dunedin, the chloride content of well Pinellas 166 increased during
1967-68 and reached the highest concentration since 1959. In
1967-68, the chloride content ranged from 130 mg/l (milligrams per
liter) in January 1967 to 700 mg/l in November 1968.
At Bay Pines, during 1967-68, the chloride content in well
Pinellas 592 decreased from 2,150 mg/l in September 1967 to 380
mg/l, the lowest concentration of record in May 1968. During 1968,
chlorides ranged from 380 mg/1 in May 1968 to 2,000 mg/1 in July
1968. Generally, chloride concentrations in both wells had a wider
range of fluctuations in 1967-68 than in 1965-66.

LAKELAND AREA

In the Lakeland area, ground water is being pumped at an
increasing rate commensurate with the economic growth of the area.
Municipal pumpage increased from about 1,250 to 4,378 mgy during
1945-68. From 1945 through 1955 pumpage increased 83 percent
with an average increase of 113 mgy. During 1956 through 1966
pumpage increased about 98 percent with an average rate of increase
of 206 mgy. Annual pumpage reached a maximum of 5,300 million
gallons in 1967, then declined to 4,738 million gallons in 1968.
Figure 27 shows the total yearly municipal pumpage at Lakeland for
1945-68.
The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan Aquifer in
the vicinity of Lakeland is shown in figure 28. A maximum decline
of about 20 feet. in well Polk 45 occurred during October 1960
through May 1962. During 1964-68, the decline was resumed with
levels falling to the lowest of record in 1968.
In northern Polk County, water levels declined to new record
low levels in many areas during 1960-62, rose shaIply in 1963, then
declined to new record low levels in 1965, 1967, and 1968. Levels in
the Floridan Aquifer declined nearly 31 feet during 1964-68 in well
Polk 45 in the heavily pumped area south of Lakeland. In contrast,
artesian levels in well Polk 44 near Davenport in northeastern Polk
County declined only about 3.0 feet during the same period. Levels
in well Polk 47 in the nonartesian aquifer near Davenport declined
about 2.0 feet to a new low of record in 1968. The continuing
downward trend of levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers was
accentuated by rainfall deficiency and increased pumping in northern
Polk County during 1967 and early 1968. Precipitation recorded at
Lakeland shows deficient rainfall in the Lakeland area during 1961
through early 1968. During 1967-68 water levels ranged from 4 feet







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


D




-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -






In





0
In














8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 88 8 0


%n V IT ;9
SNOTWO :10 SN0fl1-IN


n39dWd
30Vdwnd


cm 0V -


Figure 27. Total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida.


below 1960 highest levels in the Floridan Aquifer near Lakeland to
about 2.5 feet lower than 1960 levels in the shallow-sand nonartesian
aquifer near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of
ground-water levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 29.

Water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow sand
nonartesian aquifer in southern and southeastern Polk County are
shown in figure 30.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

Figure 28. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45
near Lakeland and departures from monthly normal
precipitation at Lakeland, 1967-68.


The decline of artesian and nonartesian water levels due to the
droughts of 1954-56 and 1961-62 and the well-defined downward
trend of artesian levels in the Hawthorn Aquifer are the prominent
features illustrated by the hydrographs in figure 30.
In general, post-drought levels rose to pre-drought levels in the
shallow nonartesian sand aquifer in southeastern Polk and northern
Highlands counties as shown by hydrographs of wells Polk 49 near
Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring. In sharp contrast, water
levels in well Polk 51 in the Hawthorn Aquifer near Frostproof








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


POLK 44


u
u
p
Y'i

Y

r,
IYP
C.
(I
L


DEPTH 195 FT


CASED 81 FT


FLORIDAN AQUIFER


2



a




S-4G
S-6 --------------



POLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT CASED 325 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER



J6





















72 ------- --- S--- -f fet ----- --------pn
72













Water evel is affected by regional pumping





1t2




POLK 47 DEPTH 67 FT CASED 60 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)

















3, --------- I---- II- I-l---l ------ II-ll li--l ---
47 i i i i i i i i i i


K


-1


C





6


194 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44

and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland,
Lakeland area.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68

POLK 49 DEPTH 17 FT CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER


37
(NONARTESIAN)


2


-2




-6

-10
POLK 3S DEPTH 319 FT CASED 208 FT HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN)














Water level is affected by regional pumping
37

41
.6 ----- ---- ----- -a ---- ---- ---
















o- 1 1 1 1 1 --I---1 I I I I I I---- i 11-- I I -i--







1945 1950 1955 1960 1919 191975 190

Figure 30. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49
near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof, and Highlands
10 near Sebring.
28igure- 3\ ---Trends -- --- f --ctuations-o f w ter --leve -------------------

nerFospofPl 5 tFrotrof=ndHghad
34 ~ ~ 1 near--- ----- ebring----------.---- ----







38 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


declined to new annual record low levels in 1965, 1967 and 1968.
During 1968 levels in well Polk 51 declined to the lowest level of
record 26.6 feet below land surface.

In central Highlands County near Sebring, levels rose about 2
feet in the nonartesian aquifer from May 1967 to September 1968.
During the same period, levels rose about 2 to 4 feet in southern
Osceola and Okeechobee counties. Figure 31 illustrates fluctuations
of water levels in the shallow nonartesian aquifer in Highlands,
Okeechobee and Osceola counties.


HIGHLANDS 13 DEPTH 20 FT.


CASED 16 FT.


SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)


32








22

20


OSCEOLA183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)










OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED 19 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)









56,


1945


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980


0

n


Figure 31. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells High-
lands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the
Kissimmee Valley.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


ORLANDO AREA


The Orlando area includes the cities of Orlando, Winter Park
and Maitland in north-central Orange County. The Floridan Aquifer
supplies most of the water for municipal and industrial needs in the
area. Total annual municipal pumpages at Orlando, at Winter Park
and for the City of Cocoa are shown on figures 32, 33, and 34. A













-----------------















--t


L.^ N N\- O N0
_______________ ------MR t"



-- -- -- "'o
----- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ N' ----- ---NO- --; --;;-- *--? --? --r;-- --o --0 --


0 0 0 0
S0 0 0
tn) Iq K) N


Florida.


0 8. 0 ~ 0
SN-OgVre9 O0 SNOyllly -N C9Vdlnd

Figure 32. Total yearly pumpage, City of Orlando,













...----------- '..... .. _- -,--, -- .. --- ,-,-- --------



990 ," ,,---- ---- -- ~ --- -'- ** J ,---
300
3





O

j

42

U)

S100




Ir-

15M


1300

0-1


1--9 5


1960


1965


19mo





.0 0.--




7000 ----------------------- ------------____

6000


z
0
-A//




-/5____///////////
. /___///___ ,
45C
z




IL _l lf l--
-A









O2'-
Oto~@


1 90


917W


1995








42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

























4AANA 47 A

Doom x i

-- A _






~~,~ANJJAS~p4J DIAU4ASNJ 47JASNOF







TI I T I I-T 1 I


4


AMJ S A 0 N O.J f M J a4 -J J SOI N J F MAN i MA MU J A S 0 N pJ r M A U JA A
W9S 1966 19 1968 1969

Figure 35. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange
47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly
normal precipitation at Orlando, 1967-68.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


( 0 t t4 To O N U)to
Raavdlns aGNV MOlaH (NV HAORv 13U3 1?l3A1 d3iVM


Figure 36. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47
near Orlando.

The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows water levels declined
to record low levels in 1962 and again during May 1965. Levels rose
in September 1966 to slightly above September 1964 levels which
were about average for the period 1950-66. Levels again declined to
new record lows from September 1966 through early 1968.








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


OLF RIDAN AQUIF R


SI Meosurement discontinued
___ ______ Moy 1968
water level is affected by
regional pumping


-3. .

BREVARD 148 DEPTI 206 FT CASED 105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
14


12








SWalr level S1 oectid by
regional pumping




BREVARD l5' DEPTH 210 FT. CASED A4 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER

A Woter level is oiffecd by regional pumping





r/ caurnment Discontlnucd
M--y 1968





1NDIAN RIVER 23 DEPTH 19 FT CASED 13 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)









ST LUCIE 15 DEPTH 18 FT CASED 13 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
31


1945 195 1955 1960 1965
Figure 37. Trends and fluctuations of water


1970 1975
levels near Cape


Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida.


4-.)

4
-.3)


5


BREVARD 79


DEPTH 160 FT.


ESAC D 85 FT






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


CAPE KENNEDY AREA

One of the most rapidly growing areas in the state is the Cape
Kennedy area, which includes the cities of Cocoa, Cocoa Beach, and
Titusville in Brevard County. In this area, water in the Floridan
Aquifer is generally brackish and is used primarily for irrigation.
Water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in Brevard, Indian
River and St. Lucie counties are shown in figure 37.
Hydrographs of wells in Brevard County generally show a
long-term downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan Aquifer.
From 1946 through 1968 artesian levels have declined nearly 10 feet
in well Brevard 79 in northern Brevard County and about 10 feet in
well Brevard 159 on the northern end of Merritt Island. Levels in
wells 79 and 148 declined to new record low levels in 1968. For the
first time of record well Brevard 79 ceased to flow during the first
five months of 1968. Near Cocoa, the artesian level in well Brevard
148 declined below land surface in May 1968, at which time the well
ceased to flow for the first time of record. In contrast, nonartesian
levels in the shallow sand aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie
counties have generally shown no downward trend during the period
of record. Levels in wells Indian River 25 and St. Lucie 42 declined
about 5 feet and 2 feet, respectively, during 1965-67. During 1968,
levels in both wells were about average for the period of record.
Increased water use for irrigation and deficiency of rainfall
during 1967 contributed to the 1967 decline of artesian levels in
many areas in Brevard County. During 1968, levels rose in response
to above normal rainfall. Annual rainfall at Titusville was 7.00 inches
below normal during 1967, and 8.41 inches above normal rainfall
during 1968.

SARASOTA-BRADENTON AREA

The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota
counties in southwestern coastal Florida. Principal economic
activities in the area are agricultural-truck and citrus farming and
stock raising. The coastal section, however, is rapidly developing as a
retirement and year-round tourist center.
Figure 38 shows trends and fluctuations of water levels in
observation well Sarasota 9.
The hydrograph shows a well-defined decline of artesian water
level in the Floridan Aquifer. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have declined
26.07 feet from 5.20 feet above land surface in March 1931, the






46 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

highest recorded level, to a new record low level of 20.87 feet below
land surface in May 1968. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have been declin-
ing at an average rate of about 0.5 foot per year since 1931.

The hydrograph of well Sarasota 9 shows the decline is con-
tinuing and that the range of fluctuations has increased, particularly
during 1967-68. The regional extent of the decline is shown by
hydrographs of well Hillsborough 30 (figure 25) and of well Sarasota
9 (figure 38).


SARASOTA 9


DEPTH 730 FT.


CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER


4












--


-14
-6 -


Water level is affected by regional pumping
-z2




-26


-30 1W I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


1945


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980


Figure 38. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Sarasota
9, Sarasota-Bradenton area.


SOUTHERN FLORIDA

The southern Florida section includes all counties south of a
line through DeSoto County and covers an area of about 17,500






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


square miles. The region and locations of selected observation wells
for which hydrographs are presented are shown on figure 39.


Figure 39. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydro-
graphs are given.

In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal
source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm
Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source
of supply; in Broward and Dade counties, the Biscayne Aquifer is the
principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland
areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are the main
sources.







48 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


FT. MYERS AREA

The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties, and
like the Bradenton-Sarasota area to the north, is developing rapidly
as a winter tourist and retirement center.
In the Ft. Myers area nonartesian aquifers are the principal
source of ground water. Figure 40 shows the seasonal fluctuations of
ground-water levels in well Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the
period 1967-68. Generally, seasonal fluctuations of water levels in
















I/ D.W.I Vn.
V Cur n.\
C a 19 ft
S I I I I 11 11 1 1 I I I I t I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
-FMAMJJASOMDJFAMJJASON J A JJASODJNDJFMAMJ JASON J FMAMJ JASOND


945 s19e6 1967 1968 1969
Figure 40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246
near Ft. Myers and departures from normal monthly
precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1967-68.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to seasonal fluctuations in
the amounts of rainfall. Figure 41 shows the trends and fluctuations
of water levels in rionartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern
Florida.


LEE 246 DEPTH 27 FT CASED 19 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION


(NONARTESIAN)


II I T



S Water level it offetded by pumping of nearby wells
I I 1 i
COLLIER 131 DEPTH 54 FT CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN)

28



2--




S1COLIER S4 DEPTH 9 FT CASED 8 FT. SAND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)



9 I


7
MARTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT. SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
16
14


s I4
16 ----- ------ ------ ---------- ---------







2 Water level is affected by pumping
of nearby wells __ ____ _____
I- l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l l I -


2

u.

J
r
I


1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 190

Figure 41. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246
near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 in the Everglades, Collier 131
near Immokalee, and Martin 147 near Stuart, Florida.





BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

STUART-WEST PALM BEACH AREA


This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach
counties and is a segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal
complex extending from Jacksonville southward through the Keys.
Average yearly municipal pumpage at Stuart has increased from an
average of 40 mgy during 1941-45 to about 360 mgy in 1968 as
shown in figure 42.


IN









o a 0 0 a a 0 a 1) )Q0 0


IW (4
q


a7 fD a


SNOIIV9 .O SNOI''w1 3ovdvvnd


Figure 42. Total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the
nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in well
Martin 147 at Stuart are shown in figure 41. The hydrograph of well
Martin 147 shows a slight downward trend of nonartesian levels.
Levels declined to a record low level of about 2 feet above mean sea
level in the springs of 1962, 1963 and 1965. The declines were
caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field.
Although pumpage increased during 1965-66, water levels declined,
then rose in response to above average rainfall during 1967-68.










MARTIN 147
Nonorlfsion Aquifer
SD th T4 ft.
C Coa 3 ft.

5

I (DMJJI9ONDJFMI N I NDJFI


*-- *;u t 1960 1969
Figure 43. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin
147 at Stuart and departures from normal monthly pre-
cipitation at Stuart, 1967-68.







BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


Figure 43 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at
Stuart, 1967-68.

The Biscayne Aquifer is the chief source of water supply in
southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 44 shows
the trends and fluctuations of end-of-month water levels in well Palm
Beach 88 and rainfall data at West Palm Beach. Fluctuations of water
levels for several selected wells are shown in figures 45 and 46.












I.-
SOWt I? it




[AJ 1 1 J JISOMOJFMAMJ J ASONIO j FMAMJ J A SONO 0 MAMJ JAS gNu JFMAMJ JA SOND


Figure 44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm
Beach 88 at Lake Worth and departures from monthly
normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1967-68.











PALM BEACH 88


INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68

DEPTH 17 FT CASED 16 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER


II



7







BREVARD G561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER














BROWARD 0617 DEPTH 29 FT CASED 28 PT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
10 ----- ----- ----- -----------------
I0































I I
a










-2








REWARD G617 DEPTH 29 FT. CASED 2 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
10








2


DADE GS-3 DEPTH 91 Fr. CASED 79 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER


















1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm
Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward G561 and G617 near
Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami.








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


BROWARD F291


DEPH 107 FT


BISCAYNE AQUIFER


8








DADE SIS DEPTH 52 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER










-I
DADE SIXA DEPTH 20 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER



to
I A ,A __, A /I A__AA_





0





-2
SDADE 1`, DEPTH 77 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER









BROWARD S329 DEPTH 68 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
I I I I
Water level is affected by pumping of nearby wells








iI 11 lI I IAl
_, _____________II I I I' I I I I I I I I


1980


1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975
Figure 46. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward
F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A
near Homestead, Dade F179 at Miami, and Broward
S329 near Ft. Lauderdale.






INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


FT. LAUDERDALE AREA
The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part of
Broward County extending from the Deerfield-Boca Raton area in
the northern part of Broward County to the Hollywood area in the
southern part of the county. Long-term downward trends of water
levels in the Biscayne Aquifer in and adjacent to the Ft. Lauderdale
area are shown by the hydrograph of well Broward S329 at Ft.
Lauderdale (figure 46).
The Biscayne Aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to
the coast and along tidal canals. Figure 47 shows graphs of the
chloride content of water in wells Broward G515, G820A, and S830,
all in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field. The chloride
content of water in well Broward S830 decreased from about 3,700
mg/1 in 1947 to about 50 mg/l in 1958. From 1958 through 1968,
chloride content increased to about 2,000 mg/1. The chloride, content
of well Broward G515 increased from slightly over 500 mg/1 to 750
mg/1 in 1955 then decreased gradually to about 700 mg/l in 1968.
The chloride content of well Broward G820A decreased from a high
of 85 mg/l in 1956 to 15 mg/l in 1961, then increased to 33 mg/l in
1967, and decreased in 1968 to 22 mg/l.

MIAMI AREA
The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the
most populous area in the state. The principal source of water supply
is the Biscayne Aquifer, the extent of which is shown on figure 1.
The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for
which hydrographs are given are shown by figure 39.
Water-level observations were made as early as 1933 at Home-
stead in well Dade S196A. The long-term record of water-level
fluctuations at Homestead is shown in figure 46. Figure 48 shows
trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Homestead Experi-
mental Station 1965-68.
Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the
Miami area is occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of ground-
water levels in the Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells
G596, G618, and G620, figures 49 and 50.
In the vicinity of Miami, fluctuations of ground-water levels in
the Biscayne Aquifer are illustrated by hydrographs of wells Dade
G10 about 5 miles west of Miami, Dade S19 at Miami Springs (figure
48), and well Dade F179 at Miami (figure 45). The water level in well
Dade S19 is affected by pumping in the City of Miami municipal well
field.








BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


BROWARD CIS


DEPTH 211 FT.


CASED 184 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER


300


0-

BROWARDGl-20 DEPTH 224 FT. CASED 215 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
90




3C\\


IC


BROWARD 5130 DEPTH 119 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER



















FiDADE F- DEPTs in c e4 FT co t of ISCAYter E AQUIFERo
16C00
^ES -















DADE F64 DEPTH 114 FT B1SCAYNE AQUIFER











1 945 1 -0 19-5 1960 1965 1970 9 -75 I00

Figure 47. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward
G515, G820A and S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade
F296 and F64 near Miami.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

Figure 48. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade
S196A, and departures from monthly normal precipita-
tion at Homestead Experimental Station, 1967-68.


In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the presence of salty
water in an aquifer is signalled by high chloride content of the
ground-water. Sea water is contained in the seaward reaches of the
Biscayne Aquifer and some encroachment of sea water into the
aquifer has occurred through the years. Water control measures have
checked the encroachment and as a result a freshening of the ground
water has occurred in some areas.


OADEC 196A
lcolm Aqvulfv
Dopth to ft.

.3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 AI I I I N F I I I I I ID I I N M I I A A Sl l
J MAMJJASON JFMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJ JAASONDS D J F MaAMM J J A S AIj F M J MA J JASoNt





0 DADI S'9


DMPT'l 05 FT,


CASEID 91 FT.


BISCAYNE AQUIFER


* A 1

I-.

pa







0
ii*


"d,




Ii'
l
IsW
Lz:u


9
Woter level is affected by pumping of nearby well


5
5 -A --- ---_______








DADE GIO DEPTH 6FT. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER



6

4


2
1 9- --5 1I |6 1| 1 7 |9--
8 -- A --------------------------


w m
0------ -------- ----- --- --------


1975 1980


1945 1950


1955 1960 1965 1970







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


DADE G596


DEPTH 13 FT.


CASED II FT.


BISCAYNE AQUIFER


DADE G613 DEPTH 21 FT CASED 18 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
7








-3



DADE G620 DEPTH 16 FT. CASED 6 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
10






4 I



h"i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I -


1945


Figure 50. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade
G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade County.


DEPTH 20 FT. CASED II IT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980


5-2
u.l o


i DADE G618
I1

g39 ---










DADE S68


BUREAU OF GEOLOGY

DEPTH 61 FT. CASED 1I FT.


BISCAYNE AQUIFER


DADE D151 DEPTH 176 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER


C c

S.lc Sept. 1960- 8750 mg/I
Oct. 1962-7500 mq/I




40





DD I ,4.')I 1 7 Ir I i 1 T (ASI 1) '2 1 IIIS(AYNI AQI'III R






300CC
70CC0----








----- --- -- .... _
___ V II
CCC ___
0 ____________ _________


DADI 55'9"


I)II'rII 1 I


IIIS(AYNI AQUIIFiR


1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975

Figure 51. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade S68
and D151 near Miami, and Dade G469 and S529 in
southeastern Dade County.





INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68


Generally, chloride content of ground water increased in most
areas of Dade County during 1967-68.
In northern Dade County, chloride content of ground water in
the Biscayne Aquifer in well Dade S68 at Miami Springs well field
near Miami increased from about 30 to nearly 50 mg/1. Chloride
content in well Dade D151, North Miami, increased from 59 to 105
mg/l in early 1968, then decreased to 31 mg/1 in September 1968.
Chloride content in wells Dade F64 and F296 remained essentially
the same as in 1965-66. However, chloride concentration in well
Dade F64 had a wider range of fluctuation than that of well Dade
F296 during 1967-68.
In southern coastal Dade County, chloride content generally
remained at low concentrations in most areas during 1967-68.
Chloride content decreased slightly in well Dade S529. In contrast,
the chloride content of well Dade G469 near the coast south of
Miami increased from 8,700 mg/l in 1967 to 9,400 mg/l in late 1968.
In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination
of the Biscayne Aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an
ever-present problem. Through intensive practice of water control
the problem of prevention of salty water contamination has been
solved. In many areas where contamination existed the situation has
been alleviated by water control. The effectiveness of the method of
control is graphically illustrated in figure 51 by the chloride graph of
well Dade S529.









able 1. Summary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells.

Well number: Well numbers are based on county numbering system, e. g., Bay County well Bay 20, or on the
latitudinal and longitudinal system e. g., well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given
where this well has been reported previously in a publication under the county number. Letters
prefixed to well numbers in Broward and Dade Counties; g, Geological Survey wells; S, supply wells;
F, fire wells; and NP, National Park Service wells. Letter suffix A, shallow well adjacent to deep well.
Aquifer: B, Biscayne; F, Floridan; G, sand-and-gravel; H, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand.
Depth of well: Measured unless otherwise noted. R, reported depth.
Frequency of measurement: Refers to current biennium. A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous; M,
monthly; S, semiannually; T, Triyearly; W, weekly.
Water level: To hundredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or taken from recorder chart; to
nearest tenth of a foot if measured by pressure gage or airline.
Remarks: A, annual measurements only; B, water level below measuring point; D, measurements discon-
tinued on date shown in Remarks; L, lowest water level; M, water level with reference to mean sea
level; P, water level affected by pumping of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in
Remarks; S, water levels affected by ocean tides; X, well in use.

Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)

Well Number Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual Remarks
Well Nlevel in May Range Remarks
S5 r May or June orJune
r I ( eHigh aLow 1967 1968 1967 1968
S (year) (year)



ALACHUA COUNTY

936-236-1 F 252 136 1958 C -20.49 -31.68 -24.86 -29.24 3.72 3.61
1965 1963
942-216-1 F 447R 175 1957 B -87.36 -94.19 -90.76 -94.73 2.98 3.53 P
1966 1963
949-235-2 F 300R 250 1960 B -36.30 -39.36 -37.46 -38.57 1.06 2.81 X
1966 1963
BAKER COUNTY
011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 B +0.17 -5.21 -2.76 -2.03 -
1959 1962
014-226-1 F 168 1957 B -94.14 -101.74 -98.28-103.46 5.82 1.50 A
1965 1963
016-207-1 F 595R 459 1945 B -55.4 -71.45 -67.71 6.72 P;D,1967
1945 1963
026-214-1 H 198 102 1960 B -14.98 -20.13 -19.45 -20.78 3.11 2.22 P
1964 1963
015-216-200 F 825 282 1963 B -94.29 -96.43 -98.17-102.42 4.19 1.81
1965 1964
026-217-300 F 905 417 1963 B -55.16 -56.78 -59.48 -63.57 4.42 1.94
1965 1966
BAY COUNTY
7 (010-541-1) F 253 1936 B -42.33 -78.36 -66.33 -24.10 *37.23 1.25 P;*,recovery
1947 1963 from cessation
of regional
pumping
12 (017-551-1) F 290R 1961 B +1.82 +0.50 0.09 D,1968
1964 1962
68 (023-526-1) F 160 161 1961 B +4.50 +1.6 +2.42 0.31 0.48 P
1965 1963
956-524-1 F 497R 424 1962 B -5.98 -12.0 -7.65 -7.22 7.70 4.85 X
1965 1953

















003-534-113 F 654R 345 1962 B


F 501R 219 1963 C -19.03-144.42 -24.52 -19.42
1965 1963
F 345R 326 1962 M -5.83 -10.56 -9.14 -1.02
1964 1963
F 590R 306 1962 B -25.71 -28.39 -30.06 -31.92
1962 1964
F 509 213 1962 B +3.7 +0.17 +1.74 +1.57
1964 1963
BRADFORD COUNTY
F 294 247 1959 B -69.22 -75.69 -73.28 -76.94
1959 1963
BREVARD COUNTY


006-536-142

012-541-213

012-550-331a

015-535-113


000-210-2


20 (795-043-2)

79 (347-051-1)

148 (821-045-1)

759-045-1

807-039-2

814-048-2

822047-2

822-046-7

822-05 -1

822-051-2

834-039-1

836-057-3

843-052-1


21.77

9.54

7.42

1.60


3.10 P;* recovery
from cessation
of regional
pumping
12.69 D, 1968

2.62

8.77

1.10


3.22 2.01


+28.7 +18.5 +19.5 +15.2 3.1
1947 1965
+5.1 -1.20 -2.19 -2.98 5.46
1947 1965
+10.9 +0.6 +0.61 5.8
1953 1965
-3.5 -7.2 -6.43 -4.78 3.02
1964 1962
-6.03 -8.4 -7.86 -7.18 2.51
1966 1962
-0.0 -3.1 *- 2.81
1964 1961
+7.82 +2.10 +1.08 +0.48 5.18
1960 1965
-3.81 -5.36 1.77
1966
+16.6 +13.8 0.5
1965
+17.9 +16.0 0.6


1965
+10.5
1965
+10.0
1965


+9.7

- +11.2 +9.2


1.1


- -17.02


5.8 S

2.89 S;D,1968

-S; X; D, 1968

2.33

3.17

-* well dry
May 1967
5.56

1.89

4.4

2.9

2.5

2.4

3.91


BROWARD COUNTY
- 1948 C +4.3 +0.4 +0.93 +2.36
1958 1952
20 1948 C +4.1 +0.2 +4.29 +3.79
1958 1956
19 1952 C +12.90 +8.72 +12.27 +12.50
1957 1956
& 1958


125 1934 B

85 1946 B

105 1946 B

10 1958 S

29 1958 C

8 1958 C

114 1955 C

30 1955 B

138 1955 S

138 1955 S

144 1957 S

98 1957 S

85 1967 B


447R

160R

206R

9

30

8

129

32

553

553

210

247

150


F29I

G561

G616


107

20

24


3.40

3.76

4.98


3.30 M

3.37 M

3.76 M


- -87.90 -25.12 *54.80


















B 29 28 1950 C


224

22

68


212

188R

147R


2


78

91


530R

144

43

250


+6.6 +2.57 +3.95 +6.22
1954 1962


G617


G820A

G853

S329


+5.43

+1.43

+4.15


-6.06

+6.7

+9.2


-19.14

-48.47


+19.7

-51.12

-34.97

-60.63


COLLIER COUNTY
54 B 9 8 1951 C +13.1 +8.05 +12.82 +12.25
1958 1962
131 B 54 22 1952 C +26.2 +20.90 +21.68 +24.52
1958 1962
271 B 38 1959 C +17.43 +14.50 +12.31 +14.96
1963 1965
296 B 45 1959 C +9.60 +7.35 +10.45 +11.91
1963 1962
COLUMBIA COUNTY
9 (010-238-1) F 836R 680 1942 C -79.60 -97.02 -87.69 -93.46
1948 1957
DADE COUNTY
F45 B 85 1939 C +5.90 +1.6 +6.05 +5.15
1966 1960
F179 B 77 1939 C +6.0 +0.9 +1.56 +3.46
1958 1945


Remarks


2.77 2.65 M


7.29 9.35 M; Prospect
well field
6.72 9.35 M; Pompano
well field
6.40 5.57 M; Dixie Well
field

1.75 0.35

0.9 1.9

0.9 0.5


3.83 4.22

3.80 4.50


15 1956 C +4.68 -3.15 -2.99
1966 1965
21 1960 C +6.20 +2.80 +4.90
1965 1962
1940 C +5.55 -0.28 +0.39
1955 1965
CALHOUN COUNTY
36 1961 S -0.43 -3.05 -3.97
1964 1962
64 1961 S +10.6 +7.4 +7.8
1964 1962
47 1961 S +13.9 +10.9 +11.0
1965 1962
CITRUS COUNTY
1935 B -8.62 -19.87 -14.95
1959 1963
1961 B -45.38 -48.58 -45.22
1964 1963
CLAY COUNTY
157 1940 S +35.5 +21.0 +22.2
1947 1957
80 1960 B -45.33 -51.06 -47.13
1960 1963
40 1960 B -28.21 -35.70 -29.94
1965 1963
193 1960 C -55.02 -59.80 -57.32
1961 1964


4.6

2.33

4.04

2.85


3.45 M

4.48 M

5.25 M

5.49 M


5.21 3.31


4.55 4.03 M

3.17 3.21 M


3.4

1.87

2.03

2.43


2.11

3.92

6.00

5.79


1 (026-502-1)

7 (026-509-1)

11 (014-511-1)


15 (902-228-1)

856-223-2


5 (006-148-2)

948-202-6

948-202-7

948-202-8


]




J


















F240

F319

F358

G3

GIO

G39

G553


B 60 1939 C +5.22
1966
B 17 13 1940 C +5.40
1958
B 54 1940 C +6.70
1954
B 20 11 1940 C +3.00
1958
B 6 6 1940 C +6.00
1958
B 6 6 1939 C +7.20
1958
B 91 79 1947 C +8.60
1958
B 22 4 1960 C +4.84
1961
B 13 11 1949 C +8.40
1958
B 21 18 1950 C +5.50
1954
& 1958
B 20 18 1950 C +8.20
1958
B 20 11 1950 C +8.40
1958
B 16 6 1950 C +7.0
1958
B 20 10 1957 C +9.30
1958
B 20 10 1956 C +7.30
.1958
B 20 10 1956 C +7.80
1958
B 18 11 1959 C +6.25
1966
B 20 10 1959 C +4.43
1966
B 20 10 1958 C -0.85
1966
B 19 14 1959 C +5.74
1966
B 20 11 1959 C +6.95
1966
B 20 11 1959 C +5.8
1960
B 20 11 1959 C +5.0
1960


G580A

G596

G613


G614

G618

G620

G757A

G789

G799

G851

0852

G855

G857

G85&

G859

G860

0861


+4.97

+1.74

+0.12

+1.34

+2.35

+1.41

+1.75

+1.64

+2.64

-0.10


+5.48

+3.04

+4.58

+4.10

+4.97

+4.55

+5.11


+1.23
1965
+0.47
1945
+0.04
1962
-1.42
1965
+0.50
1945
-0.94
1962
+0.97
1962
+0.95
1962
+2.11
1962
-0.98
1962

+0.37
1962
+2.56
1962
+3.21
1965
+1.47
1965
-0.04
1965
+1.65
1962
+1.80
1959
+0.40
1959
-5.60
1962
+1.30
1962
+1.82
1962
+0.45
1965
+1.10
1965


+0.48 +5.:

+5.80 +6.

+5.05 +5.

+5.18 +7.

+6.75


+3.76

+4.35

+5.05

-5.65

+4.80

+5.10

+3.67

+3.66


3.99

1.98

4.32

2.91

2.50

3.12

3.92


18 2.45

16 4.50

12 4.98


35 5.00

80 1.99

80 3.15

00 4.99

- 6.61


+5.70

+4.55

+5.08

-4.53

+6.90

+6.52

+5.42

+4.90


+6.30 +6.94


3.64

3.01

4.30

4.40

4.42

4.69

3.95

2.40


4.38 M

1.76 M

5.30 M

5.93 M;P

2.47 M

3.71 M;P

4.37 M; Casing
slotted to 79
2.90 M

5.56 M

3.73 M


6.70 M

1.75 M

4.56 M

6.22 M

M

3.96 M;P

3.07 M

5.54 M

4.88 B

5.00 M

4.57 M

4.60 M

3.46 M


5.17 5.14 M


Well Number


+4.

+6.'

+3.1


B 23 11 1961 C +6.25 +2.05
1966 1965


















G863 B 18 6 1961 C +5.08 +0.55 +6.41 +6.90 7.24 6.52 M
1966 1965
G864 B 20 11 1959 C +6.23 -1.00 +6.00 +6.20 6.47 6.71 M
1966 1965
G865 B 19 13 1959 C +1.85 +0.9 +2.14 +2.59 1.51 2.05 M
1964 1960
G968 B 50 1960 C +5.45 +3.05 +5.80 +4.25 1.65 2.62 M
1964 1962
G968A B 33 1961 C +6.57 +3.60 +6.57 +6.35 2.60 3.13 M
1966 1962
G970 B 15 10 1958 C +4.0 +2.18 +4.10 +4.82 2.07 3.17 M
1960 1962
G972 B 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +3.50 +5.38 +6.82 1.70 2.08 M
1960 1962
G973 B 15 10 1958 C +4.5 +1.68 +3.85 +3.87 2.25 2.34 M
1960 1962
G974 B 15 10 1958 C +5.44 +2.68 +5.40 +6.10 3.20 3.07 M
1966 1962
G975 B 15 10 1958 C +6.9 +4.10 +6.16 +7.15 3.11 2.38 M
1960 1965
G976 B 15 10 1958 C +6.37 +2.90 +6.83 +6.25 1.92 2.34 M
1966 1962
G978 B 15 10 1958 C +6.78 +2.90 +6.00 +7.10 2.88 3.39 M;D, 1968
1966 1962
G1165 B 12 11 1961 C +5.06 +1.45 +4.58 +5.19 2.63 2.71 M
1966 1962
G1166 B 11 11 1961 C +6.85 +3.99 +6.55 +4.02 2.47 2.45 M
1966 1965
G1183 B 25 1961 C +5.18 -1.00 +3.24 +4.17 4.97 4.44 M
1966 1962
NP44 B 33 1960 C +5.04 -1.43 +4.85 +5.03 5.77 6.11 M
1966 1965
NP46 B 25 1960 C +2.27 -1.45 +2.19 +2.03 3.29 3.47 M
1966 1965
NP62 B 20 9 1962 C +4.28 -1.17 +3.09 +3.28 4.34 4.67 M
1966 1965
NP67 B 20 6 1962 C +3.10 -1.75 +2.85 +2.62 4.07 1.64
1966 1965
NP72 B 20 6 1962 C +6.44 -1.50 +4.90 6.10 M
1966 1965
S18 B 52 1939 C +3.2 +0.10 +1.95 +1.88 2.10 2.95 M;P
1942 1945
S19 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30 -0.14 +3.41 3.29 4.74 M;P
1958 1962
S68 B 61 51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97 -2.13 +2.13 3.74 6.19 L;M;P
1958 1962
8182 B 51 1940 C +9.5 0.0' +1.62 +3.35 3.67 3.08 M
1958 1945
S196A B 20 1932 C +8.5 -1.0 -0.03 +5.16 5.45 7.08 M
1958 1945







Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)

W Numbr Pito 1967 Hihest water An l Remarks
e u e level in May Range
S 8 May or June or June
E (year) w (yea 1967 1968 1967 1968
(year) (year)


DESOTO COUNTY
189 1962 S +32.05 +25.0 +25.90 +22.60
1963 1962
112 1962 C +3.90 +2.73 +1.25 +2.99
1963 1965
137 1962 C -10.53 -21.41 -28.01 -23.27
1964 1965


4.15

4.25

19.77


0.10

4.94

20.41


DIXIE COUNTY
215R 105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12
1959 1962
96 90 1961 S -1.38 -4.29
1964 1962
DUVAL COUNTY


15 (937-306-1)

944-314-1


12 (019-140-I)

18 (018-140-I)

102 (019-I33-1)

107 (023-136-I)

115 (016-I42-1)

118 (018-143-I)

122(023-138-1)

123 (019-142-I)

129 (015-141-1)

145 (028-137-I)

149 (024-136-1)

151 (023-139-1)

152 (027-133-1)

154 (014-135-1)

160 (018-123-1)

164 (025-125-1)

206 (015-145-1)

262 (026-135-1)


- 1938 S +27.5 +15.1
1947 1962
1938 M +39.9 +20.1
1947 1962
00 1939 S +6.4 -20.94
1931 1962
1939 S +53.2 +34.4
1939 1962
76 1930 B +36.2 +11.6
1938 1962
1939 S +32.9 +11.9
1947 1962
71 1930 M +44.9 +25.6
1947 1962
-- 1930 S +39.0 +15.7
1931 1962
70 1940 S +40.4 +17.4
1947 1962
1940 S -24.2 +4.97
1947 1963
1940 S +25.7 +8.8
1947 1963
60 1940 S +43.4 +31.0
1952 1962
1940 S +29.9 +19.6
1952 1962
61 1940 S +29.6 +10.5
1947 1962
57 1934 B +41.7 +20.2
1934 1962
50 1930 S +43.8 +25.8
1931 1962
100 1941 S -2.06 -16.75
1948 1962


F 785R

F -

F 875R 4

F -

F 729R 4

F 900R

F 905R 5

F 1,075R

F 600R 4

F -

F 800R

F 700R 5

F 642R

F 625R 4

F 585R 3

F 840R 4

F 1,920R 1,0

F 1393R 5


+37.0 +23.4
1951 1963


-6.03 -7.80 1.66 1.55

-4.31 -4.42 2.90 1.69


+22

-22.0

+33

+14

+15

+26

+17

+20

+5.

+5.!

+32



+11

+19

+26


.4

)9


+23.2

-19.18


.5 +14.7

.2 +12.4

.2 +24.1

.9 +14.1

.6 +21.5

56 +2.98

95 +6.51

.9 +31.0

- +17.5

.8 +10.3

'.7 +21.3

.3 +23.7


7

6.

5

6

3

4

4

7

3.

4

3


6
4


.9

01

.3


2.


.9

.9

.8

\.3

'.9

74 3.

L.4

3.5
-- 2

i.1

i.8

.8


- S; D, 1967

1.3 S

06 S

- S;D,1968

1.7 S

5.0 S

3.8 S

1.9 S

5.1 S

92 S

2.5 S

1.3 S

3.8 S

1.9

4.7 S;T

1.9 S; T


- S;D, 1968


+23.7 +21.7


3.6 3.3 S; T


703-157-124

704-147-332

720-148-431


FH

FH

FH


84 1951


-







Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)


Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual
level in May Range
May or June or June Range


0
.1
'3 ^


263 (026-135-2)

264 (026-135-3)

265 (025-136-1)

DUVAL 76

DUVAL 126

DUVAL 148

DUVAL 155

DUVAL 157

DUVAL 254

DUVAL 275

DUVAL 279

DUVAL 282

DUVAL 298


39 (023-716-2)

45 (036-719-1)

46 (031-716-1)

62 (024-715-1)

62A (024-715-2)

73 (035-715-3)

74 (036-716-1)


83 (035-714-3)

026-713-5

026-713-6

032-724-1


F 1,025R

F 700R

F 556R

F 636R

F 403R

F 625R

F 1,005R

F 690R

F 750R

F 1,234R

F 1,005R

F 650R

F -


244

152

239

142R

18

306

352


301

149

65


850 1951

450 1951

1951

1939

252 1940

500 1940

380 1940

560 1940

433 1961

515 1960

467 1960

1961

1961


1940

129 1940

229 1939

142 1940

18 1940

198 1951

260* 1951


1954

144* 1959

60* 1959


G 170 165* 1959 M


S +35.5 +24.0 -
1952 1963
S +35.3 +23.2 +24.0
1952 1962
S +39.4 +19.4 +30.5
1952 1963
A +7.0 +1.0 +2.08
1966 1962
A +24.5 +15.8 +17.6
1964 1962
A +22.9 +17.0 +19.7
1964 1962
A +30.9 +26.0 +26.5
1964 1962
A +12.0 +6.8 +6.5
1964 1962
A -25.61 -29.60 -28.83
1966 1962
A +25.1 +21.3 +20.7
1964 1962
A -23.93 -28.84 -27.45
1965 1962
A +31.9 +18.6 +24.5
1964 1962
A +2.20 -1.34 -2.83
1964 1962
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
M -4.59 -12.00 -14.67
1940 1955
C -69.30 -111.82 -101.14
1941 1956
W -58.09 -82.12 -77.35
1948 1956
M -6.50 -23.84 -12.44
1949 1955
M -8.66 -13.05 -12.12
1964 1962
C -39.03 -56.66 -56.0
1953 1958
C -77.37 -90.20 -90.92


+22.0

+21.7

+28.8

+2.91

+16.5

+17.7

+24.3

+5.0

-32.86

+18.6

-30.58

+24.0

-4.16


-15.20

-102.48

-77.78

-12.88

-12.48

-57.9

-92.27


1952 1956

-36.10 -42.45 -42.97 -44.16
1955 1962
-58.15 -63.57 -65.29 -64.85
1960 1963
-51.78 -56.81 -60.13 -58.77
1960 1963
-91.18 -93.04 -93.90 -94.28
1960 1963


S; T

S; T

S; T


6.08 11.33


1.90

2.03

1.79

4.65

3.2

2.11


2.93

2.83

3.40


1.37

3.51

3.54

0.99

8.0

2.73


3.95

4.54

3.47


P







P

P; *Screen 260
to 270 ft & 310
to 350 ft
P

*Screen 144 to
149 ft
*Screen 60 to
65 ft


2.13 2.35 *Screen 165
to 170 ft


Well Number


High Low 1967 1968 1967 1968
(year) (year) I


I.
0


.0
*0P


c-
o e
*.
9t
I0
II


Remarks


- I I r







Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)

Wt Number Priorto 1967 Hi water Annual Remarks
o level in May Range
S May or June or~June

(yea (ye) I 1967 1968 1967 1968
(year) (year)


G 206 201* 1959 B -8295 -90.06 -88.15 -91.17
1962 1964
G 107 102* 1959 B -65.21 -76.15 -73.20 -76.75
1962 1964


1.67 2.34 *Screen 201
to 206 ft
5.55 2.60 *Screen 102
to 107 ft


FLAGLER COUNTY


F 417 1936 B


-3.4 -8.27
1937 1966


-9.10 -10.41


44 (928-122-1) F 159 1956 B -7.67 -13.42 -18.43 -18.36
1959 1962


F 380R


FRANKLIN COUNTY
- 1958 S -0.35 -4.45
1964 1962


-4.00


-3.81


F 1949 B +3.95 +0.40 +1.65 +1.49
1950 1952
F 1949 B +6.90 +6.0 +6.0 +4.81
1950 1953
& 1955
F 98R 1961 S -9.67 -11.35 -10.39 -10.99
1964 1963


- 1961 S +4.87 +2.97
1964 1962
GADSDEN COUNTY


F 406R


+3.67 +3.65


- 1961 S -85.13 -91.40 -88.00 -83.35
1966 1963


F 525R 381 1961 B -134.40 -143.96 -140.35 -148.19
1966 1962
GILCHRIST COUNTY


F 100 61 1961 B -28.64
1966


F 1,250

F 1,300


- -30.32 -38.91


GLADES COUNTY
- 1958 S -+29.0 +22.2 +21.4
1958
- 1958 S +32.0 +16.0 +16.0
1958


3.58 4.96

9.26 9.73 P


0.90 1.01

0.69 0.68

1.2 0.99


0.11 0.59

1.00 0.53


1.75

6.95


9.55

5.46


6.08 4.30


1.3

1.5


GULF COUNTY
30 (948518-1) F 522 475 1946 S -7.11 -27.22 -8.20 -10.75
1956 1950
33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B +1.29 +0.96 +1.59 +1.25
1962 1963
HAMILTON COUNTY
036-305-1 F 273R 60 1961 B -84.73 -107.05 -105.43 -110.64
1964 1963


F 267


HARDEE COUNTY
39 1962 C -29.56 -49.5
1964 1965
HENRY COUNTY


S 10 8 1941 C +0.3 -5.76
1958 1962


0.20 3.13 P, priorto
1954
0.85 0.13


15.66


4.37


-49.65 16.60 30.56


-3.19 -2.04 4.13 4.91


054-726-1

054-726-2


10 (950-439-1)

31 (943-458-1)

943-453-1


947446-I

957-443-1


035-434-1

039-425-1


936-249-220A


GL208

GL250


731-145-1


14 (9n--I 15-1)








Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)


HENDRY COUNTY
5 S 13 8 1941 C -0.81 -6.3 -4.10 -
1959 1956

HERNANDO COUNTY
838-215-132 F 140R 1961 B -16.30 -20.46 -18.72 -20.71
1964 1962
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0+126.28+129.97
1953 1949
10 S 45 41 1948 C +90.7 +83.9 +86.42 +85.08
1958 1956
11A S 16 13 1956 C +48.3 +43.71 +44.26 +43.74
1957 1962
13 S 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +20.57 +24.93 +26.14
1957 1962
14 S 35 29 1948 C +122.19 +114.7+118.82+116.88
1960 1951
15 S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +54.27 +56.31
1953 1956
440 S 22 18 1956 C +116.90+111.30+111.78+110.12
1958 1962
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
13 (807-230-3) F 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -19.18 -25.08 -26.28
1931 1966
30 (744-225-39) F 500R 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.66 +0.15 +2.59
1959 1952
751-203-113 F 211 65 1957 B 42.52 -64.60 -
1958 1966
801-213-213A F 413R 67 1958 C +0.55 -10.18 -11.28 -10.84
1959 1965
HOLMES COUNTY
4 (043-556-1) F 187R 1938 B +6.90 +1.82 +3.20 2.78
1964 1956
7 (058-535-1) F 205R 170 1938 B -8.09 -15.66 -12.75 -12.57
1949 1956
7A (058-535-2) NA 13 10* 1960 B -1.34 -8.34 -6.57 -5.03
1964 1963
050-548-1 F 1961 S +5.50 +1.40 +3.10 +3.45
1964 1963
051-556-1 F 260R 1961 S -205.20 -209.10-206.96 -206.55
1964 1963
052-545-2 F 300R 1961 S +17.6 +11.2 +10.0 +12.0
1964 1963
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
25 S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +25.75 +27.16


JACKSON COUNTY
23 (042-453-1) F 475R 100 1950 B -17.37 -38.15 -24.68
1964 1951


3.83


3.19 3.75


4.21 4.06 M

3.49 4.89 M

4.09 4.10 M

2.55 3.78 M

2.52 4.02 M

4.45 4.14 M

1.80 5.24 M


16.56 11.60 P

8.20 8.34 P

6.37 4.56

10.31 10.88


4.02

1.38 1.04 D,1968

8.85 5.78 *Screen 10 to
13 ft; D, 1968
0.50 0.45

2.40

2.3 2.6


4.67 4.99 M


- 7.35 3.50


Well Number


Remarks



















94 1961 S -62.98 -76.05 -72.65 -81.84
1964 1962
260 1961 S -71.57 -87.20 -78.55 -81.34
1965 1963
1955 S -14.98 -29.11 -28.25 -33.32
1964 1963
JEFFERSON COUNTY
169 1960 S -13835 -142.62 -142.46 -143.75
1965 1962
147 1960 S -13.33 -24.36 -22.84 -28.37
1965 1960
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
1961 B -26.19 -44.04 -39.74 -45.44
1965 1962
112 1961 B -4.23 -8.89 -7.92 -8.86
1964 1962


LAKE COUNTY
1936 B -50.52 -59.82 -58.17
1960 1957
1936 B +12.0 +5.45 +5.0
1966 1963
1936 B -0.72 -3.54 -4.43
1964 1962
100 1959 T -1.80 -5.25 -5.77
1960 1962
18 1959 T -0.36 -5.06 -4.43
1960 1963
63 1969 C -1.88 -5.47 -5.51
1960 1962
17 1959 C -1.60 -5.03 -5.23
1964 1962
112 1963 B +2.25 +1.92
1966
80 1964 B -43.60 -42.67
1966


4.00

2.2

-5.30 2.25

-5.95 3.34

-4.45 3.38

-5.26 4.44

-5.02 4.63

+0.02 1.88

8.95


D, 1968

D,1968

3.16

3.83

3.49

3.99

4.57 Gravel Pack
17 to 30 ft
3.82

5.66


246

414


7 (027-416-1)

36A (0374102)"


15 (031420-I) F


LEE COUNTY
19 1945 C +19.13 +10.5 +12.60 +19.01
1959 1949
60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1 +14.42 +16.64
1957 1955
LEON COUNTY
165 1945 M -149.05-16991 -162.80-166.60
1948 1955
38* 1935 M +0.66 -33.14 -4.90 -18.30
1965 1956


7.69 3.63 M

10.16 8.98 M;P


4.48 3.43 P

12.45 11.89 *Screen38
to 41 ft


194 104 1950 M -76.9 -93.3 -85.0 -88.7 5.0 3.0
1959 1957


Wel Number


044-506-1

053-527-I

058-503-1


022-356-1

038-336-1


008-317-1

958-312-1


210

341

83


216

183


106

146


2.17

0.32

2.87


0.98

0.86

0.58


0.96

1.22


3.64 4.13

5.18 6.17


18 (857-138-1)

20 (900-23-1)

22(909-131-I)

822-149-213

822-149-213A

832-154-334

832-154-334A

844-146-244

848-152-233


190R

252R

254R

192

23

160

30

200

89



















57 1960 B

12* 1960 B

146 1960 B

- 1960 S

100 1966 C
54* 1966 C


-7.88 -15.81 -15.88 -18.39
1960 1963
-4.98 -9.32 -7.36 -10.07
1960 1963
-74.40 -78.37 -78.25 -
1964 1963
-155.74 -173.24 -173.52
1965 1963
-84.20 -88.82
-30.83 -34.90


024-420-1

024-420-2

026-117-1

034-407-1

031-421-132
031-421-132A



902-240-343

902-241-1

912-259-431

915-243-431

918-254-331

921-242-431

923-227-430

926-238-241


MARION COUNTY
135 1933 C +11.01 +3.35 +8.95 +6.22
1965 1957
165 1936 B -13.84 -24.26 -19.77 -22.95
1960 1956


3.48

2.05

3.87

4.92

4.44
4.35



1.80

1.18

1.80

1.64

3.13

1.1

4.42

3.60


2.95

3.68 *Well point
12 to 15 ft
3.17

3.39

4.89
5.28 *Screen 38
to 41 ft


2.56

2.46

2.63

2.93

4.55

2.5

3.82

2.70


LEVY COUNTY
155 1961 B -5.15 -8.38 -9.71 -10.34
1964 1966
58 1961 B -5.80 -8.34 -7.63 -8.19
1964 1962
91 68 1961 B -4.18 -4.88 -5.86
1966
300 200R 1961 B -2.94 -4.18 -6.52
1966
72 54 1961 B -3.84 -4.96 -6.63
1966
679 203 1964 B +17.8 -10.0 +8.0
1966
190 90 1961 B -47.69 -49.29 -56.99
1966
270 240 1961 B -11.36 -14.14 -17.84
1966
LIBERTY COUNTY
1955 S -3.60 -7.12 -8.19 -8.51
1964 1961
118R 89 1961 B +13.3 +6.8 +10.7 +9.7
1965 1961
160R 1961 S +4.90 +2.8 +3.20 +1.29
1965 1961
360 1961 S -83.30 -85.64 -84.95 -86.26
1965 1962
MADISON COUNTY
320 300 1953 S -12.30 -38.12 -30.03 -35.74
1965 1955
322 307 1952 B -6.10 -34.87 -26.77 -31.40
1965 1955


3.68 3.33

1.7 2.3

0.40 1.86

0.13 0.58



0.33 1.12

6.26 3.52 P



2.65 4.63

3.24 5.45


14 (001-459-1)

010-440-1

023-447-1

028-456-1



17 (028-325-1)

18 (028-325-2)



'5 (911-159-1)

47 (902-156-1)


135R

179








Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)

Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual
level in May Range
May or June or June


48 (859-50-1) F 152 1936 B -0.82 -10.23 -5.47 -8.18
1961 1956

49(910-138-1) F 175 -1936* B -25.0 -31.19 -27.90 -29.37
1942 1957

51 (911-210-1) F 106 1935 B -26.04 -34.39 -29.75 -32.98
1960 1956
905-822-1 F 442 125 1964 C -80.27 -80.41 -81.37 -82.46
1965 1966
916-219-1 F 124 1961 B -101.28 -112.13 -105.32 -109.56
1965 1963
902-215-431 F 51 1964 B -29.39 -29.47 -31.99 -35.00
1965 1964
903-223-431 F 36 26 1964 B -6.36 -10.23 -14.49
1965
912-226-432 F 52 1961 B -6.72 -8.89 -9.66 -11.29
1965 1964
920-206-312 F 132 50 1961 B -42.32 -42.40 -44.93 -48.09
1965 1964
925-151-124 F 340 307 1964 B -117.47 -117.79-119.95
1965
MARTIN COUNTY
140 S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +15.77 +16.34 +18.85
1957 1961
147 S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +2.12 +2.73 +0.81
1958 1962
928 S II 10 1957 C +32.4 +28.40 +28.25 +27.78
1957 1962
933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.40 +19.60 +22.60 +23.20
1966 1965
NASSAU COUNTY
2 (035-127-2) F 580R 350 1939 S +42.0 +18.4 +18.5 +15.6
1947 1963
S(032-126-1) F 680R 1939 S +41.1 +20.6 +20.4 +18.3
1947 1962
12 (038-127-I) F 640R 1939 S +24.0 -18.3 -16.30 -19.46
1947 1963
27 (040-126-1) F 191 1939 B +10.1 -29.34 -25.25 -26.65
1946 1963
44(037-136-1) F 1,000R 450 1934 A +19.8 -2.13 -0.44 -3.53
1947 1963
50 (036-142-I) F 569R 1940 S +40.5 +19.8 +17.5 +16.0
1940 1963
51 (033-150-1) F 580R 1940 S +42.0 +25.2 +25.9 +23.1
1947 1968
& 1948
55 (037-130-1) F 540R 504 1940 S +33.1 +4.9 +6.8 +4.5
1947 1963


2.78 4.93 Well flowed
Apr 1960-
Apr 1961
2.02 4.22 Recorder
installed
8-17-67


3.92

1.50

5.89

3.60

2.69

5.59

3.02

1.82


4.49

2.27

4.16

5.26

5.30

5.00

5.20

1.51


4.27 4.79 M


5.09

4.70

3.75


8.42

6.52

4.06


2.7 2.9

3.6 3.0

8.92 10.50

12.64 11.48

3.23

5.4 5.2

2.3 2.3


M;P

M

M


S

P

P; X

S



S

S;X


3.0 2.8 S; X


Wel Number



















23

33

53

91


3 (024-636-1)

25 (038-631-1)

27 (030-635-2)

29 (035-637-1)

31 (037-645-1)

34 (028-629-1)


2

3

21
22
23
24
35


47 (832-128-1)

47B (832-128-3)

47C (832-128-4)


832-105-1


171

179

181


F 800R 550 1939 A +6.08 +3.64 +3.76 -0.79
1956 1962
F 1939 A +43.0 -39.74 -33.50 -34.15
1939 1966
F 1940 A +36.5 +15.4 +16.6 +13.6
1940 1962
F 700 405 1960 A -5.30 -8.06 -8.18 -11.67
1964 1962
OKALOOSA COUNTY
F 800R 500 1936 S +20.1 -72.19 -80.37 -85.12
1950 1963
F 609R 456 1947 B -108.1 -129.4 -131.6 -133.0
1949 1966
F 591R 422 1948 S -27.9 -65.2 -63.4 -
1951 1962
F 766R 524 1947 C -102.3 -129.6 -133.40-135.57
1948 1966
F 690R 527 1948 S -46.8 -71.8 -73.5 -75.2
1948 1966
F 540 1947 S +26.6 -9.22 -16.28 -16.90
1950 1962
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY
S 21 18 1949 C +46.7 +38.82 +40.31 +39.68
1957 1962
S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.19 +59.20
1959 1950
F 1,182 461 1967 S +6.00 +6.4
H 1,025 416 1951 S +10.0 +9.9
F 926 496 1951 S +5.4 +6.1
F 1,448 611 1953 S +8.0
F 1,327 1961 S +14.1 +11.3
ORANGE COUNTY
F 350 328 1930 C +2.20 -14.30 -13.53 -14.87
1960 1962
S 20 17 1948 M +3.04 -10.01 -9.94 -11.72
1960 1962
S 50 461948* M -27.47 -39.35 -35.47 -37.95
1960 1953

F 492 151 1961 M -26.47 -28.67 -30.57 -29.74
1966 1963
OSCEOLA COUNTY
S 19 13 1950 C +32.38 +27.8 +28.10 +28.67
1966 1956.
S 18 18 1949 C +47.1 +43.27 +43.26 +43.42
1960 1962
S 16 14 1948 C +77.9 +71.72 +72.98 +71.37
1957 1962


45.65

2.4

9.0

4.96

2.1

11.28


41.55 S

1.2 S

S;D,1967

7.97 S

0.2 S

10.95 S


3.03 8.13 M; Gravel Packed
12 to 21 ft
4.22 4.04 M

1.0
1.4
0.9
1.3
1.4


6.47

4.46

3.61


8.33

6.28

4.89 Continuous
record 4-1-67
to 6-12-68


5.46 9.39


5.11

4.57

4.79


4.35 M; Gravel Packed
11 to 19 ft
5.16 M

4.54 M








Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)
t Prior to 1967 Highest water Remarks
a Nube leve i May Annual Remarks
'% M u 2 May orJune orJune

a : H(e LW 1967 1968 1967 1968
(year) (year)


16 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.28 +59.14
1957 1950
22 1948 C +73.2 +68.3 +69.27 +71.68
1957 1956
PALM BEACH COUNTY
16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +4.60 +7.18
1948 1956
16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 +6.39 +8.15
1957 1956
9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +18.24 +18.30
1957 1956


23

27


17

18

14

8


49

227


141

195

208

299


195

643

67

62

17

319

710

463

311


4.13 4.06 M

4.68 5.06 M


4.15

2.57

2.09


7.39

5.13

2.54


-3.35 -2.55 3.71 3.45 B


-9.20 -9.22

-23.20


33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.79
1948 1950
1945 B -12.18 -18.34 -15.87
1951 1953
1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -27.45
1948 1956
81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -23.80
1959 1955
POLK COUNTY
81 1945 C -1.70 5.74 -4.93
1960 1962
318 1948 M -63.65 -92.10 -92.94
1948 1965
60 1948 C -54.8 -49.6 -48.96
1960 1962
59 1948 C -43.51 -48.11 -46.19
1954 1956
14 1949 C +0.23 -5.94 -4.98
1957 1962
208 1949 B -5.08 -17.25 -23.97
1958 1962
237 1955 C -15.88 -47.15 -60.80


13 (815-226-1)

826-211-214


13 (808-245-1)

166 (800-247-1)

246 (758-247-1)

665 (758-2444)


44 (810-136-1)

45 (759-I58-I>

47 (810-136-2),

48 (732-131-1)

49 (748-119-1)

51 (744-131-1)

753-158-3II

802-132-1

805-155-2


1958 1965


-7.65 -12.34 -14.51
1961 1966
-15.18 -25.64 -30.53
1959 1962


-9.27

-14.70

-27.59

-23.92


-4.98

-101.92

-49.49

-46.59

-3.60

-26.68

-56.80

-14.07

-29.49


4.69

5.85


1.75

6.34

1.82

3.09


3.21

11.37

3.92

1.94

4.97

13.29

20.45

5.25

9.28


4.33

6.30


1.59 T

0.94

2.32 T

2.98


3.15

24.93 S

3.87

3.22

4.73

16.75 P

28.93 P

4.14

11.08


H 72 62 1955 B -1252 -21.73 -25.16 -25.53
1959 1962


8 1951 C -2.40 -6.00
1966 1962
PASCO COUNTY
43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1
1959 1945
49 1959 C -9.97 -22.75
1960 1962
PINELLAS COUNTY


137 1959 .B

82 1956 B


3


805-155-3


7.41 10.49








Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)

Well Number IP rior to 1967 Hige Mter Annu Remaks
t s) May or June or June

SHiar Loa 1967 1968 1967 1968
(year) (year)


806-156-1

806-156-2



28 (925-138-1)

29 (939-138-1)


937-153-1

939-134-11

943-152-1



5 (007-123-1)

8 (005-129-1)

000-123-2

937-122-1

941-129-7

947-126-1



41

42



102 (021-709-8)

035-706-1

040-708-1


041-649-1


13

103


159

300R


303R

547

151



350R

336R

258

622

541

275



17

18



41

211

128


G 98


10* 1955 S -3.69 -9.73 -9.76
1959 1963
63 1956 S -16.89 -29.66 -32.34
1959 1962
PUTNAM COUNTY
1936 B -6.2 -9.81 -9.35
1944 1962
1936 B +10.8 +2.02 +1.35
1936 1962
& 1957
300 1934 S -29.51 -35.65 -29.42
1961 1957
113 1958 S +4.26 -1.75 -5.85
1959 1962
125 1956 B -42.45 -46.66 -44.70
1966 1957
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
180 1934 A +43.9 +33.8 +32.8
1951 1963
240 1934 A +36.5 +22.7 +22.0
1947 1963
1957 B +4.72 -0.57 -3.64
1959 1962
142 1958 C -17.30 -21.51 -23.13
1959 1963
118 1955 A +10.1 -2.01 -3.73
1959 1966
101 1956 A -1.55 -17.39 -18.31
1958 1966
ST. LUCIE COUNTY
13 1950 C +28.2 +24.45 +24.20
1957 1965
13 1950 C +26.9 +23.76 +24.02
1951 1961
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
31* 1950 A --4.43 -9.52 -7.66
1960 1955
206* 1959 M -82.84 -89.48 -
1961 1966
123* 1959 M +4.83 +1.28 -
1961 1963

93* 1959 B -56.34 -61.90 -63.19
1960 1963


-32.26


-10.36

-0.73


-31.68

-9.67

-46.71



+32.1

+20.7

-4.64

-23.13

-11.51

-31.63



+27.26

+25.46


-8.8

-94.


-68.'


2.31

8.76


5.12

11.55


2.42 3.86

4.49 7.23


1.00

7.80

1.49


1.69

10.32

2.06


* Screen 10
to 13 ft




S

S


X


4.95 6.31

P

P


3.26

2.78


5.10 M

3.27 M


5 -* Screen 31
to 41 ft
)5 2.80 1.13 Screen 206
to 211 ft
- Screen 123
to 128 ft;
D, 1967
70 3.82 4.03 Screen 93
to 98 ft


SARASOTA COUNTY
9 (719-225-1) F 730R 101 1930 C +4.51 -9.36 -18.03 -11.15
1931 1962


16.23 16.73 S








Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
(feet)


SEMINOLE COUNTY
F 146 63 1951 C -34.18 -42.60 -42.55 -42.65
1960 1962
F 206 1951 B +5.10 +0.27 -0.50 -0.74
1953 1962
SUMTER COUNTY
F 125 45 1961 B -29.94 -33.26 -31.81 -34.80
1964 1963
SUWANNEE COUNTY
F 138 135 1961 B -18.94 -35.31 -33.45 -38.06
1964 1963
TAYLOR COUNTY
F 230 189 1946 C -1.00 -30.9 -26.0 -33.4
1949 1962
S 35 1947 A -5.05 -23.95 -9.40 -14.95
1964 1957
UNION COUNTY
F 256 198 1960 B -89.54 -93.57 -90.67 -94.52
1961 1963
F 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -93.00 -91.06 -94.78
1959 1962
VOLUSIA COUNTY


125 (841-121-I)

257 (847-113-6)


852-201-1



019-249-1



35 (003-330-1)

36 (004-331-I)


001-224-I

007-222-1



29 (911-125-I)

30(917-128-1)

31 (856-105-1)

32 (919-125-I)


851-118-
905-113-3

909-106-1

909-106-9

909-123-1
910-105-1

911-104-4

911-104-9

919-105-1
I


-11.86 -18.73 -18.93 -19.97
1951 1963
+11.2 +6.7 +9.12 +6.61
1959 1948
-4.72 -8.60 -7.97 -8.23
1953 1962
-1.2 -5.11 -6.33 -7.07
1937 1963
& 1938
+1.06 +0.17
-0.22 -3.66 -2.57 -3.21
1958 1956
-5.25 -8.07 -10.87 -11.63
1959 1963
-6.62 -9.55 -11.61 -12.43
1958 1963
+1.98 +0.05
-12.84 -19.73 -20.30 -23.94
1958 1962
-15.72 -27.55 -25.83 -30.19
1955 1965
-10.26 -13.89 -15.75 -16.83
1948 1963
-5.00 -4.18
-11.99 -13.37


5.38 6.84

4.82 5.09



2.51 6.11



6.81 1.26


18.8 14.0 P

P



3.42 1.84

4.85 2.34



3.05 2.57


2.56

3.83

3.68


3.54
3.58

4.23

4.41

0.84
5.28

9.54

4.65

6.05
2.62


3.60

4.16

4.62


3.09
3.90

5.37

5.31

2.01
7.65

10.39

5.05

4.94
4.03


- 1936 B

- 1936 B

113 1936 C

- 1936 B


105 1956 B
94 1955 B

102 1955 B

480 1955 B

- 1953 B
152 1955 B

115 1955 B

483 1955 B

1967 B
316 1966 B


107

180R

121

138R


203
351

235

496

221
498

235

500

140
700


















WAKULLA COUNTY
22 1946 B -0.86 -3.05 -1.94
1958 1951
45 1946 A -5.58 -8.25 -6.58 -8.10
1955 1960
1961 A -1.13 -3.48 -4.00 -3.08
1964 1963
1961 A -0.12 -1.87 -2.13 -2.12
1964 1962
WALTON COUNTY
1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +11.1 +7.3
1950 1956
188 1961 B +14.7 +11.6 +9.0
1964 1963
1961 S +21.0 +19.5 +19.4 +15.5
1964 1963
323 1947 B -126.2 -154.4 -136.9 -144.0
1948 1949
323 1961 A -144.0 -148.2 -145.4 -146.8
1965 1962
WASHINGTON COUNTY
1935 B -7.20 -15.09 -12.75 -12.50
1964 1954
202 1961 B -13.72 -20.20 -19.60 -19.98
1964 1963
110 1962 C -2.4 -12.76 -6.85 -10.55
1965 1963
23* 1962 B -3.45 -6.56 -4.55 -6.49
1964 1962


1.43 0.66 T

T



-x
S- X


1.6 9.9

9.0

0.4 10.9 X

3.10 5.2 X

4.3 X


2 (009-412-1)

11 (000-426-1)

005-417-1

011-410-1


13 (022-606-1)

019-610-1

029-614-1

040-621-1

043-612-1


4 (046-548-1)

037-542-2

030-535-422A

030-535-422B


65

70

77

80


450R

615

160

630

509


785R

206

150

26


2.88

3.06

3.04

1.95


6.95 X

3.33

9.51

6.36 Screen 23
to 26 ft




Full Text

PAGE 1

STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES Randolph Hodges, Executive Director DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES J.V. Sollohub Director BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Robert 0. Vernon, Chief Information Circular No. 68 WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1967-68 By Henry G. Healy U.S. Geological Survey Prepared by the UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY in cooperation with the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF INTERIOR RESOURCES BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND OTHER STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 1971 i

PAGE 2

Bureau of Geology by Designers Press Orlando, Florida Tallahassee 1971 ii

PAGE 3

CONTENTS Page Introduction .................................................. 1 Well-numbering system .......................................... 4 Principal aquifers ............................................... 6 Northwestern Florida ........................................ .8 Pensacola area ........................................... 10 Ft. W alton area .......................................... 12 Panama City area ......................................... 17 Northern and north-central Florida ................................ 20 Tallahassee area .......................................... 20 Fernandina-Jacksonville area .............. .................. 24 Central Florida ............................................... 28 Tampa-St. Petersburg area .................................. 29 Lakeland area .............................................. 33 Orlando area ............................................ 39 Cape Kennedy area ....................................... 45 Sarasota-Bradenton area .................................... 45 Southern Florida .............................................. 46 Ft. Myers area ........................................... 48 Stuart-West Palm Beach area ................................. 50 Ft. Lauderdale area ....................................... 55 M iam i area .............................................. 55 111.

PAGE 4

ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Observation-well network, December 1968, and the extent of principal aquifers in Florida .......................... 3 2. Generalized change of water level in the Floridan Aquifer, May 1967-May 1968 ................................. 5 3. Well-numbering systems ...................................... 7 4. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan Aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 ..................... 8 5. Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given ......................... 9 6. Total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, Florida ................. 10 7. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45 at Cantonment, 46 near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensacola area .................................. 11 8. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1967-68 ................................................. 13 9. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area ................... 14 10. Net change of ground-water level, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1966 ........................ 15 11. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1966 to May 1968 ........................ 16 12. Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida ..................... 17 13. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville ............................ 18 14. Rise of water level at Panama City and vicinity, 1963-68 .................................................. 19 15. Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given .................................................... 21 16. Total yearly pumpage, City of Tallahassee, Florida ....................................... ......... .22 17. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at Tallahassee and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1967-68 ................................................. 23 18. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida ........................................ 24 19. Total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville, Florida .................................................. 25 20. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palaika, Florida ....:............................ 26 21Net changes of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1966 and from May 1966 to May 1968 ..................... 27 iv

PAGE 5

22. Locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given ............................... 28 23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area ..................................... 29 24. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1967-68 ................. 30 25. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater ......................... 31 26. Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area ......................... .............. .......... .32 27. Total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida .................. 34 28. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1967-68 ...................... 35 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area ..................................... 36 30. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring ................................ 37 31. Trends and Flucutations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley ....................................... 38 32. Total yearly pumpage, City of Orlando ......................... 39 33. Total yearly pumpage, Winter Park ............................ 40 34. Total yearly pumpage, City of Cocoa well field ................... 41 35. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1967-68 ................ 42 36. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47 near Orlando ..................................... 43 37. Trends anf fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida .................. '... 44 38. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area ........................... 46 39. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given ....................................... 47 40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1967-68 ..................... 48 41. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 in the Everglades Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida ....................................... 49 42. Total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida .................... 50 43. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1967-68 ......................... 51 44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and departures from V

PAGE 6

monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1967-68 ................................... ............. 52 45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near M iami .. .................................... ............. 53 46. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead, Dade F179 at Miami, and Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale ............................ 54 47. Changes in Chloride content of water in wells Broward G515, G820 and S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami ........................... 56 48. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1967-68 ..................................... 58 49. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami ................................ 58 50. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade County ............................................. ....59 51. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade S68 at Miami Springs, Dade D151 at North Miami Beach and Dade G469 and S529 in southeastern Dade County ....................................... 60 TABLES Table Page 1. Well and water-level data for selected observation wells in Florida ..................................... Appendix vi

PAGE 7

WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1967-68 By Henry G. Healy INTRODUCTION This report summarizes the trends and fluctuations of groundwater levels in the principal aquifers in Florida during 1967-68 and includes the following: (1) hydrographs of ground-water levels in the several aquifers; (2) maps showing changes in ground-water levels during specific periods; and, (3) a table summarizing the principal data on selected observation wells. Observation wells for which records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources Data Collection Stations in Florida, 1961," Florida Geological Survey Special Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey, (now the Bureau of Geology, Florida Division of Natural Resources), includes the location, aquifer, and type and period of records available for 3,600 observation wells. Since World War II, and.particularly during the last decade, the demand for fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural uses in Florida has increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies have been adequate for the increased demand in most areas, water levels have declined appreciably in some. Because demand for ground water continues to increase, shortages will occur and may become critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from deterioration in quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of water available. In order to prevent future shortages, the present supplies of ground water must be properly appraised before they can be effectively utilized. Records of trends and fluctuations of groundwater have long formed a basis for such an appraisal. The principal objective of the investigations of the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey is to appraise and to evaluate the nation's water resources. Although many types of ground-water investigations are carried out on a statewide basis throughout the nation, the collection and compilation of basic hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources studies.

PAGE 8

2 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evaluation of available ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of water levels; and the delineation of present or potential areas of detrimentally high or low ground-water levels. Water levels are used to determine the base flow of streams, to portray the effects of natural and man-induced forces that act on a water-bearing formation and to furnish information 'for use in basic research. The hydrologic data program provides the foundation information necessary for the successful and meaningful accomplishment of water resources investigations. The hydrologic data-collection program of the U. S. Geological Survey is part of the cooperative investigations of the water resources of Florida in cooperation with the Division of Geology, Florida Board of Conservation, and other state and local agencies and municipalities. The observation-well network in 1968 included about 920 ground-water data-collection stations in the 67 counties of the state. Figure 1 shows the locations of selected ground-water stations in the statewide network. Table 1 (see appendix) lists data on 348 observation wells selected from the statewide network of wells. The hydrologic-data program consists of the collection, tabulation, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of water-level and related data. Water levels for selected wells are published, at present, once every 5 years in the U. S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Information pertinent to ground water is also published in interpretative reports of investigations published by the Florida Bureau of Geology and the U. S. Geological Survey, Data collected during an investigation and prior to publication are available from the District Chief, U. S. Geological Survey, 903 W. Tennessee St., Tallahassee, Florida, 32304, and from the Chief of the Bureau of Geology, Box 631, Tallahassee, Florida, 32302. taken from automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and made by tape. In general, water-level measurements made by tape and stage recorder are shown to the nearest hundredth of a foot, and those made with a pressure gage are shown to the nearest tenth of a foot. Table 1 (appendix) summarizes well-data and water-level information for the several aquifers. Well data include the aquifer, depth of well, and depth of casing. The items: "Year record began" and "Frequency of measurements" are included as part of the well data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or June

PAGE 9

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 8786. 85, 84' 83Y E I / 4 P AIE /. 32' / . 29' -d EXPLANATION Observolion well * ...13 28 e QuoaIy of waer somple PRINCIPAl AQUIFERS Sand-and-grovel Floridan 82 8 8 2 S Floridon and/or ohers l o p BiscanPe ct ---Approximate oquifer boundary 0 269' T Quolity of water somple wells 8--0 or observatlion wells Cenrlol and Soutern Florida Flood Control Project Southwes Flaordo 27 Water Monogement District 9 126* 0 20 30 40 50 niles 84* 83* 82. 81* 80* Figure 1., Observation wells and chloride sampling wells, Dec. 1968

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4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY are used because records are available for these months for a large percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are lowest during May or June in most areas and records during that period constitute a base for comparison from year to year. The annual change of water level in the Floridan Aquifer, May 1967-May 1968, is illustrated by figure 2. Highest and lowest water levels of record prior to 1967 are given in the table. Generally, highest and lowest levels are highest daily levels if taken from recorder charts. The range of fluctuations for 1967 and 1968 are shown under "Annual range." WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEMS Two well-numbering systems are used in this report: serially by counties, and grid-coordinate, based on latitude and longitude of the well location. Frequently both numbers have been assigned to the well; e.g., a well number may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This affords a tie-in with water-level data published previously under well number 20 in Bay County with date that may be published for the same well under number 008-537-2. Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or suffix. In Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and NP denote Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and National Park Service wells, respectively. In Dade, Escambia, Highlands, Holmes, and Leon Counties, the letter suffix A denotes a shallow well near a deeper well having the corresponding number without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter suffixes B and C denote shallow wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47. The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived from latitude and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude prefix north and west and the first digit of the degree number are not included in the well number. Two types of well numbers are used in Table 1: a seven-digit numbering system and a nine-digit numbering system. The seven-digit well number is a composite of three numbers separated by hyphens: the first number is composed of the last digit of the degree and the two digits of the minute that define the latitude on the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the second number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of the minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute quadrangle; and the third number gives the numerical order in which the well was inventoried in the 1-minute quadrangle. For example, well number 835-105-1 is the first well inventoried in the 1-minute

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 5 87* 86* 85' 84" 83* 310 4 300. G, G Woater levels +4 to 1 29 *.62 ft. (1963-68 recovery from pumping) O 28 4 h 29* 270' EXPLANATION Plus 2-4 feet Plus 1-2 feet c Le, thon I foot. Minus 1-2 feel 027" W Minus 2-4 feet r Minus 4-6 feet o Minus 6-8 feel Minus 8-14 feel 0 10 20 0 40 50 mls Note: Changes influenced by pumping In local areas 840 83* 82* 81e 80* Figure 2. Generalized change of water level in the. Floridan Aquifer, May 1967-May 1968.

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6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY quadrangle north of the 28 35' parallel of latitude and west of the 81 "05' meridian of longitude. The first two series of three numbers each of the nine-digit well number denotes latitude and longitude as explained under the seven-digit well number. The third series of numbers in the nine-digit well number gives the location of the well in a 1-minute rectangle which has been divided into quarters, sixteenths and sixty-fourths. The first digit of the series locates the well within the quarter numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4 in southwest and southeast. Similarly, the second digit locates the well within the quarter-quarter tract numbered in a like manner -1, 2, 3, and 4. Finally, the third digit of the series gives the quarter-quarter-quarter tract in which the well is located numbered likewise 1, 2, 3, and 4. The locations of wells with seven and nine digit numbers are diagrammatically shown in figure 3. PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS Ground-water supplies for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in Florida are available from three principal aquifers: the Floridan Aquifer in central and northern Florida; the Biscayne Aquifer in southeastern Florida; and the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the extreme northwestern part of Florida. -e-gaeWpprafiz~e6areal extent of the ap in figure 1. The Floridan Aquifer, which underlies all of the state, is the principal source of water in central, northern, and most of northwestern Florida. Areas of artesian flow and the potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer is illustrated by figure 4.. Highly mineralized water precludes the use of the Floridan Aquifer as a source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of southern Florida. In these areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian aquifers are the source of supply. The Biscayne Aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source of water supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This aquifer, one of the most highly productive aquifers in the world, underlies about 3,500 square miles of Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne Aquifer is sharply restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of saline waters. The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal source of water supply, yielding large supplies, of ground water for industries and municipalities. The aquifer extends

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 7 beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and part of western Okaloosa County. This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four sections as follows: (1) northwestern Florida; (2) northern, northeastern, and north-central Florida; (3) central Florida; and (4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida. Morion Co. --S Volusio Co. S ., 29000 Lake Co. / a I a ---_ *F 28o0 28030' AREA A Orange Co. I 28040' L osceoo 1' Polk Co. Osceolo Co. ::_v __ 28000' ,0 -81030' 81O00' 28"30' 81010 8100 0 AREA A 81005' 28036' 2837' \ 2 28035' I 2 81008 07' 06' 81005' 3 | 12 3 4114 28o35' 81005' 83 Fiure .835 W 105 4eln 43, Figure 3. Well-numbering system.

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8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY ,-----"--;-----. 1---1-. al,. soa._ .___ .L I M -0 'S. 29* r -n Coa., w r u ."a hqd, 1W omfe s t s Figure 4. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan .. ......,. ....... Fi e4. sotntiome atr i Oe surfaw" tof hao th Flr Aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961. NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA The northwestern section includes the Florida panhandle extending from the Apalachicola River westward to the FloridaAlabama line, figure 5. The principal sources of ground-water supply in this section are the sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and the Floridan Aquifer in the rest of the section. Minor supplies of ground water are obtained from shallow nonartesian aquifers. The Pensacola, Ft. Walton Beach, and Panama City areas of the Florida panhandle are growing rapidly in industry and population.

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A L A B A M A ,/--,,-------, --, _' „r, .... .. ..„.........."7-"-----. \ .I 0 HO M E S J A C K S 0 N d CARYVILL L ( I I SSANTA ROSA I S \ ., OKALOOSA 0 0 / i J'l45, 1 31 025 W A L T 0 N I \ ----'/ Z / I 45 .WASH INGTON % < / 46 \ S.PENSACO ) I 1 0 0 0 0 I0 C A L H 0 UN N N---I A Y EXPLANATION .---PANAMA i, Observatolon well and number CITY1 t > G U L F O GULF OF i MEXIC O AREA. -OF \ MAP Figure 5. Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given.

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10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY PENSACOLA AREA The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, and like many others in the state, is undergoing rapid economic development accompanied by increasing use of water by industry and municipalities. Figure 6 shows that the total 1968 pumpage for SNOVY 10i0 SNOmlW 39Vdwn~ Figure 6. Total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 11 ESCAMBIA 45 DEPTH 152 FT CASED 129 FT, SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) 66 70 80 ^ ________________ 90 102 100 110 U. iWater level is affected l by nearby wells S SCAMBIA 46 DEPTH 239 FT CASED 229 FT SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) t \ 56 _6 07 9I I I liI l I I I li l l I I I I I I I lf ESCAMBIIA 62 DEPTH 142 FT. CASED 142 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) I-A 1945 1950 19s55 1960 1965 1970 1975 190 Figure 7. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45 at Cantonment, 46 near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensacola area.

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12 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY the City of Pensacola was about four times that of 1945. Total yearly municipal pumpage at Pensacola increased from about 1,500 million gallons per year (mgy) in 1945 to 5,970 mgy in 1968. The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began in 1939 as part of the investigation to determine the adequacy and permanency of ground-water supply in Escambia County. Figure 5 shows locations of observation wells selected from the hydrologicdata network for which hydrographs are given in this report, and table 1 (appendix) presents data on 13 wells in Escambia County and 3 wells in Santa Rosa County. Figure 7 shows fluctuations and longterm trends of artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the Pensacola area from 1960 through 1968. Comparison of the hydrographs for the period 1967-68 reveals that while water levels at the end of 1968 declined in some areas in central and southern Escambia County they remained essentially at 1965-66 levels near Cantonment and at Pensacola. Declines ranged from about 12 feet in well Escambia 46 near Ensley to about 4 feet in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola. At the end of 1968, levels at Ensley had declined to approximately those of the 1954-56 drought while levels near Cantonment and at Pensacola remained 8/2 and 10 feet above those of the 1954-56 drought. In the coastal area at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well Escambia 62, at the end of 1968, was slightly below the 1941 level. The trends and fluctuations of artesian ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly average rainfall at Pensacola, 1967-68 are shown in figure 8. FT. WALTON AREA The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and Eglin Air Force Base. The rate of growth of industry and population is accelerating. Pumpage from the Floridan Aquifer for all uses is about 10.0 million gallons per day (mgd). As a result of continuing heavy pumping, water levels have declined in about a 640 square-mile area. The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach, figure 9, shows a maximum decline of 109.0 feet from 18.5 feet above land surface in 1947 to 90.5 feet below land surface in July 1967. In

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 13 ESCAMSIA 8S Sond-.Ad-w £4v 4 (4rt.4o) DOeth 142 It. Cowd 14t II. oJFMAMJJASONDJ F M AMJ J AS ON DIJ F M A M J JA|SONDIJ F M M JJA S NLD ruA a Np Li tdflotl SF M AMJ J ASONDJFM AMJ JASONOIJ FMAMJ JASONO J FMAM J A S ONDIJ FMAMJ JA SION. 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 8. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1967-68. August 1936, the artesian water level was 46 feet above land surface. During the period from August 1936 to July 1967, the water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 136.5 feet, from 46 feet above land surface to 90.5 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net change of water level maps, figures 10 and 11. Water-level changes during 1951-66 are shown by figure 10. Changes of ground-water levels for the current period, 1966-68 are shown by figure 11.

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14 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY OKALOOSA 3 DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 500 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER a z -24 Water level on Aug. 19, 1936 was 46 fee oabove land surface -64 Water level is offected by regional pumping .96-I I OKALOOSA 25 DEPTH 609 FT CASED 456 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 104 f-t ^ 120 -------||| ,3 ________ -_ ----__ ^ ^ ---------Water levl is affected by reglonol pumping 44-----II-I1.1 IIII -I1-1 I!1 _I r._ Water level is aoffcted by rginol pumping 194 1950 955 1960 196 5 1970 197 I0 Figure 9. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area.

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A L A B A M A -F L 0 I DT-.ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON Lim of "t l eoa hea t of pu Sster level is the iwlrldsI gimer. \I Meal 2 ftt. Sq"utter. latervl 2 feet. Observatiom woll saa 0 s C to _o sos I z 0 SCALE 0 to 30 MILES Figure 10. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1966.

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A L A B A M A Arsel OL .-War of equal I shea f g romad I L 0 R ~D| A W Oer level in the Flridia aqulfer. ESCA 81 A SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON -.--. 2 z I | Line o equal Mae cuheaM f gread. 4 ueur levels L the lnd*aad-grovel Saq utter. Inerval I feet. Son 0250 Figure 11. Net change of ground-water levels, Pel acola and Ft. Waton areas, May 966 to May 968. 0 5 10 s0 30 40 Figure 11. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1966 to May 1968.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 17 PANAMA CITY AREA The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including Tyndall Air Force Base. The Floridan Aquifer -either indirectly or directly -supplies most of the water for municipal, industrial and military needs in the --------------------------------a .-w ___s N__
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18 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY WALTON DEPTH 450 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER l. -E ------_ 62 ta Water is affected by regonl pumpn I2 I I .... BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER 216, -----_ ~ --Wo er klvel affected by pumping of nearby wells 1946 throught May 1967 34 46 7 _---_-_._ _1WASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER 4 -.2 t ------A A 2-I-I-l-I I---------I----------I1 ------i -1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1990 Figure 13. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 19 area. Springs from the Floridan Aquifer supply Deer Point Reservoir, the principal source of water for municipal, industrial and military uses. The total yearly pumpage from Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and at Millville for 1944 through May 1967 is shown by figure 12. After May 1967 the source of municipal water supply was LYNN HAVEN PANAMA CITY % 003-634-1 EXPLANATION S Observatlon well and numbr.r -0-Rise .of water level 1963-68. Dashed where Inferred. Contour interval 25 feet. 0 5 10 MILES Figure 14. Rise of-ater level at Panama City and vicinity, 1963-68.

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20 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY entirely from surface water from the Deer Point reservoir. Cessation of pumping of ground water by Panama City and a change in the site of the source of ground-water supply for the pulp industry allowed ground-water levels to rise sharply during 1967-68 in spite of a rainfall deficiency of nearly 30 inches in the area. Levels at Panama City rose about 42 feet, from 66 feet to 24 feet below land surface during 1967-68 in well Bay 7. The hydrograph of this well is shown on figure 13. The areal rise of water levels at Panama City and vicinity is illustrated on figure 14. Regional rainfall deficiency in northwestern and northern Florida, which began in the DeFuniak-Caryville-Marianna areas in 1966 and areally intensified and spread as far south as Apalachicola and eastward to Madison and Lake City during 1967-68, is graphically reflected by the sharp decline of ground-water levels in observation wells in much of the affected area. NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA The northern and north-central Florida section extends from the Apalachicola River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Georgia line southward to the latitude of Ocala, figure 15, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy, Marion, and Volusia counties. This section includes two areas undergoing rapid expansion in population and industry -the Tallahassee area and the Jacksonville-Fernandina area. The Floridan Aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply in coastal areas in eastern St. Johns, Flagler and Volusia counties. Another important source of water in these areas is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer. TALLAHASSEE AREA The Tallahassee area includes central Leon County and the City of Tallahassee. The area is primarily residential with only sparse light industry. The principal water user, the City of Tallahassee, supplies water for municipal use to the most rapidly growing residential and educational complex in northern Florida. Since 1945, annual municipal pumpage at Tallahassee has increased about 457 percent from 850 mgy to about 3,888 mgy. Figure 16 shows pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1945-68.

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IG E 0 R G I A -,A t $ A-. .U ..-.. RNANDINA D S.DEN f /AM I 7lIL tON 7 i I SUWAN E / A E 9 ./ I NE 4 j W A M U L L A LA CITY I\ *y --.APAY T L 0C L A i LAFAYET E-ttL /BRADFORD *r ,, ST JJOH FI S A H L L C I U 0041 'LF OF, M EXICO '-, I -I 1--0 10 4MILE" (--.-.-.-f' _AG LC p!E DN / I .ALA ... ...i LW A -L 1" L g V Y JRI 00 j I" 'S V VC LusIA Figure 15. Locations of observation wells in northern and northcentral Florida for which hydrographs are given.

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7000----_------__ 6 6600S5800-* < L 0m o%0 ^. ____ ___ _------------------_ ___ __ Mol M 145 950 1955 190 195 1970 19 S g ^ 5' ~0 38000----------------7 -------ZZ-&t 0. d7% ebf (L ---92§0 "ill S s^_______-^ |^_2200

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 23 LEON 7 Florldbo f or>1 \ Depth 314 1f. j r Cow4 ft f N/ \ u168 jFMAMJJASONOJFMaMJJASONOJfMMJJ i F M a M O JASNDJMAMjjA NjMtaMJ IISON I r11 I I -Noffo*l nohly Perivitateo, pII I I II i l lc f___t I I I I I l l i t II m ofl-if Jf MAMJ J ASON J FMAMJJ ASON J F MAMJ J ASOND J FMA MJ J A S ONDJ FMAMJ J A SON 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 17. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1967-68. ground-water levels in well Leon 7, at Tallahassee, are shown by figure 18. The hydrograph shows no discernable long-term downward trend for the entire period of record. The short-term trends correspond closely to the areal rainfall with levels declining to the lowest of record during the 1954-56 drought. During 1965-68, levels declined to within less than 3 feet of those of 1954-56. Although ground-water levels in Madison and Columbia counties continued the decline that began in 1965, at the end of 1968 levels remained above those of the 1954-56 drought.

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24 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY LEON7 DEPTH 314 FT. CASED 165 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER COLUMBIA 9 DEPFh 836 FT CASED 680 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER SWo Water level affected an Mar. 2 b rgional a A4ISON 1 DEIH3 FT15 19 30 FLORIDAN 19AQUIFER Figure 18. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 FERNANDINA-JACKSONVILLE AREA The Fernandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest and most 3 g OUYI 96 --------------1 =/ -------------------------NASSAU12 DEPTH 640 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER \ Water Level. on Mar. 28.1939 woa I II40.9 t. obove tend surface F RNANDINA-JACKSONAILLE AREA The Ferandina-Jacksonvisle area is one of the largest and most rapidly expanding industrial areas in the state.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 25 Since 1945, municipal pumpage has increased from 7,900 mgy in 1945 to 14,279 mgy in 1968 with the greatest increase occurring during the 1945-55 period. Total municipal and industrial pumpage at Jacksonville in 1968 was about 22,000 mgy. Figure 19 shows total yearly Jacksonville municipal pumpage 1945 through 1968. 2100 ---------------------------------19.000 1 945 1950 1955 19 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 19. Total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville, Florida. Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels in the area are shown in figure 20. Ground-water levels, after a sharp 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 I980 Figure 19. Total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville, Florida. Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels in the area are shown in figure 20. Ground-water levels, after a sharp rise in 1964 from record 1963 low levels, declined to the lowest levels of record in most of the area. New record low levels were recorded in well Duval 164 near Mayport and in well Nassau 12 near Fernandina in the coastal areas (figure 18). Maximum declines of levels were recorded at Jacksonville and inland at Callahan during 1966-68. Declines of about 4 feet were recorded in well Duval 122 at Jacksonville and about 2 feet in well Nassau 51 at Callahan. Changes in water levels in the Floridan Aquifer in the Fernandina-Jacksonville area are shown in Figure 21.

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26 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY NASSAU 51 DEPTH 580 FT. FORIDAN AQUIFER LB regionl puming DUVAL 162 DEPTH 905 FT. CASED 450 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER -/' \. A /---------------------1 ) regional pumping W DUVAL 164 DEPTH 840 FT. CASED 450 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER 4S --------------------------------------s aear rl l i" ocl isd by regional pumping 945 1950 3955 1960 s965 1970 1975 1960 Figure 20. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 MARION S DEPTH 135 FT. CASED 135 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 16 -----/-------------------iUTNAM 29 DEPTH 300 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER -^ -Water level is oaffeted by regional pumping 19S0 19S5 -1960 '965 1970 1975 9 Figure 20. Trends and fluctuations of waterlevels in wells Nassau 51 at CaUahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida.

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N r N /'v*a 'N A /1 S' NA* SSAU 04 U S( NASSAU a r* ,5 o I s :ii 't_ o l" | CAY CLAY -. ,0 1. L A G Owl b46 -1 son 196 ..M 1 5o V \ MAY 1961 -MAY 1966 6CAY 19 MAY 196 2i CAY 1966 M

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28 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY CENTRAL FLORIDA The central Florida section includes 20 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles. The extent of this section and location of observation wells for which hydrographs are given are shown in figure 22. LE H 8 M A R 1 L0 k ,L .1X (V 0 L U S 1 A AREA QP I SI OLE\ EXPLANATION --_--,_ .C.. ../ R 1 \\. R SC C ... "" i \ c i'44 eggN4 I ... O 0 I M o. 0 j E-----1 NN .H .A.ND.V S A .AEE .... ...0 S 0 L A Figur 22. Locations of observation wells in central Florida for wh I hydrographs are given M o 5 n c e a 2 t and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan Aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the nonartesian shNl\ow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply. In central peninsular Florida, the level in well Marion 5 near Ocala declined about 2 feet but remained above IB\ INDIANRIVER this well ceased to flow for the first time in e period of record Central Florida include four.rapidly growing centers of populam *92 I0 42 \h 0 Cr-H 0 V0EE 1ST LUCEA SG------H L A N 0 S 13 rL to 2L I00 40 U4ILIt Figure 22. Locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given. The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan Aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply. In central peninsular Florida, the level in well Marion 5 near Ocala declined about 2 feet but remained above 1954-56 drought levels. In contrast, the level in well Putnam 29 at Palatka declined to the lowest level of record in 1968, at which time this well ceased to flow for the first time inithe period of record. Central Florida includes four-rapidly growing centers of popula-

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 29 tion and industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton area. TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG AREA This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Petersburg, is undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population. The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan Aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 23. Persistent drought conditions and increased pumping PASCO13 DEPTH 49 FT CASED 43 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT CASED 46 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER 6 IC __ _ _-----------------___ ___ -120 IWater level is affected by pumping 24 fror nearby wells 28 ------------------------------30 3 -" I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I l i l I I I I i I I ll 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area.

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SO BUREAU OF GEOLOGY during 1967-68 caused water levels in Hillsborough 13 to decline to the lowest levels of record in 1968. Rainfall recorded at Tampa and the fluctuations of the water level in well Hillsborough 13 for the period 1967-68 are shown in figure 24. Near Ruskin, in southern "ILLWSOAOUGH t5 f Flo',AqJulhr omth M7 H. SCoud 49n 3' S2J fMAMIJ JA SON 01 JFMAMJ JASONO JFMAMIJ JASOND JFMAMJ JAS OND JFMAMJ JA SON i ^ 1 SF AMJ J ASON J FM AMJJ A S F J J ON JO N J F MAMJ A O M J A S 0NDJ Fr MAMJ A SON 1963 196 1967 1968 1969 Figure 24. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1967-68. Hillsborough County, water levels in well Hillsborough 30 declined to the lowest level of record in 1968 (figure 25). This continuing decline is part of an extensive regional lowering of water levels which

PAGE 37

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 31 HILLSBOROUGH 30 DEPTH 500 FT CASED 34 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER C., 8C Water level is affected by tides PINELLAS 24613 DEPTH 141 FT. CASED 208 33 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 4 E -Water level is ffected by tides 3'-i i I 1__ 1_ Il_______ _______II I__1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 25. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, PINELLAS and Pinellas 246 at FLORIDAN AQUIFERClearwater. extends from southern Hillsborough County into Manatee and Sarasota counties. (See figure 38.) Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246, are shown in figure 25. No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13. However, a slight downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246.This downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956 affected by continued to rise throuh 1959. Durin and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater. Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246, are shown in figure 25.,No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13. However, a slight downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246. This downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956eand levels continued to rise through 1959. During

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32 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY 1959-68 the downward trend of levels is again evident in well Pinellas 246. Changes in chloride content of water from two wells that tap the Floridan Aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 26. At 0 I I. -5co W a. 00 J3I1 3d SMUSTfI,7 '.LN3LNO:) 3wooHJ Figure 26. Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area. nv or fl ___ n LL~oa I I i -J L ? Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 33 Dunedin, the chloride content of well Pinellas 166 increased during 1967-68 and reached the highest concentration since 1959. In 1967-68, the chloride content ranged from 130 mg/l (milligrams per liter) in January 1967 to 700 mg/l in November 1968. At Bay Pines, during 1967-68, the chloride content in well Pinellas 592 decreased from 2,150 mg/l in September 1967 to 380 mg/l, the lowest concentration of record in May 1968. During 1968, chlorides ranged from 380 mg/l in May 1968 to 2,000 mg/l in July 1968. Generally, chloride concentrations in both wells had a wider range of fluctuations in 1967-68 than in 1965-66. LAKELAND AREA In the Lakeland area, ground water is being pumped at an increasing rate commensurate with the economic growth of the area. Municipal pumpage increased from about 1,250 to 4,378 mgy during 1945-68. From 1945 through 1955 pumpage increased 83 percent with an average increase of 113 mgy. During 1956 through 1966 pumpage increased about 98 percent with an average rate of increase of 206 mgy. Annual pumpage reached a maximum of 5,300 million gallons in 1967, then declined to 4,738 million gallons in 1968. Figure 27 shows the total yearly municipal pumpage at Lakeland for 1945-68. The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan Aquifer in the vicinity of Lakeland is shown in figure 28. A maximum decline of about 20 feet. in well Polk 45 occurred during October 1960 through May 1962. During 1964-68, the decline was resumed with levels falling to the lowest of record in 1968. In northern Polk County, water levels declined to new record low levels in many areas during 1960-62, rose sharply in 1963, then declined to new record low levels in 1965, 1967, and 1968. Levels in the Floridan Aquifer declined nearly 31 feet during 1964-68 in well Polk 45 in the heavily pumped area south of Lakeland. In contrast, artesian levels in well Polk 44 near Davenport in northeastern Polk County declined only about 3.0 feet during the same period. Levels in well Polk 47 in the nonartesian aquifer near Davenport declined about 2.0 feet to a new low of record in 1968. The continuing downward trend of levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers was accentuated by rainfall deficiency and increased pumping in northern Polk County during 1967 and early 1968. Precipitation recorded at Lakeland shows deficient rainfall in the Lakeland area during 1961 through early 1968. During 1967-68 water levels ranged from 4 feet

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34 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY 0_ _ __ __ __ %on SNOTIVD dO SNOmI0IW 30VdWnd Figure 27. Total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida. below 1960 highest levels in the Floridan Aquifer near Lakeland to about 2.5 feet lower than 1960 levels in the shallow-sand nonartesian aquifer near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 29. Water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow sand nonartesian aquifer in southern and southeastern Polk County are shown in figure 30.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 35 Figure r d Aqfluu n f ODpth 643 ft 01MAMASOnear Lakeland and departures from monthly normalP I precipitation at Lakeland, 1967-68. JFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONO JFMAMJJASONOJFMAMJJA SOND JFMAUJJASONQ 1965 1966 1967 196 1969 The decline of artesian and nonartesian water levels due to the droughts of 1954-56 and 1961-62 and the well-defined downward trend of artesian levels in the Hawthorn Aquifer are the prominent features illustrated by the hydrographs in figure 30. In general, post-drought levels rose to pre-drought levels in the shallow nonartesian sand aquifer in southeastern Polk and northern Highlands counties as shown by hydrographs of wells Polk 49 near Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring. In sharp contrast, water levels in well Polk 51 in the Hawthorn Aquifer near Frostproof

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36 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY POLK 44 DETH 195 FT CASED 81 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER 2 -6 .. POLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT CASED 325 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER 72 z0 --3 Water kvel is oaffected by regionol pumping POLK 47 DEPTH 67 FT CASED 60 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 4, 43 4-*---'-945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 M190 Figure 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 37 POLK 49 DEPTH 17 FT CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) -0 -2 -4 -6 POLK 51 DEPTH 319 FT CASED 208 FT HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN) 29 S Waler level is offected by regionol pumping 37 47 HIGHLANDS 10 DEPTH 45 FT. CASED 41 FT. .SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) M 2a ----------------------------------------S241 26 30 34 _______--------------------------28 ----------T --t -----f ---------------to 1" I I I -1 I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I I I I i 1 I 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1900 Figure 30. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof, and Highlands 10 near Sebring.

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38 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY declined to new annual record low levels in 1965, 1967 and 1968. During 1968 levels in well Polk 51 declined to the lowest level of record -26.6 feet below land surface. In central Highlands County near Sebring, levels rose about 2 feet in the nonartesian aquifer from May 1967 to September 1968. During the same period, levels rose about 2 to 4 feet in southern Osceola and Okeechobee counties. Figure 31 illustrates fluctuations of water levels in the shallow nonartesian aquifer in Highlands, Okeechobee and Osceola counties. HIGHLANDS 13 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 16 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 32 OSCEOLA 183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 7S -OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED19 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 31. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 39 ORLANDO AREA The Orlando area includes the cities of Orlando, Winter Park and Maitland in north-central Orange County. The Floridan Aquifer supplies most of the water for municipal and industrial needs in the area. Total annual municipal pumpages at Orlando, at Winter Park and for the City of Cocoa are shown on figures 32, 33, and 34. A ---i 0 0 0 0 0 0 I -I -rI f-OD-I -I --I -I --I -I -SNO--17V9 "O1 SNOIlln--1 39VdN-ld Figure 32. Total yearly pumpage, City of Orlando, Florida.

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300 1002----------------1s;--------010 ew .....--------------.1-------1 019 0---I-------0 1-1 700,15i 1990 mm ow8 19 1970 197 .19m

PAGE 47

S S 7000 L z 00 0400024500' -______ 0 100 o ~ 500lolob 945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 9

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42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AA 47 A 'T-F T T T r rT 1 I I r I r T r 1 T I I T I I I T1T 1 1 -TTT VT I T V -1IF T,,T,, 1 -II .A S J a 4SO D0Jht A hoJ A1ON AJ JA 5O N OI J F M A MJ J ANN J!A M M AI N PI 5 ,,, .... ..... .... ..-r ...-_^ --t ...... ....... ... .. 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1967-68. i Si t i II L I III I l I T*"oje r N J I JJ 0 O J J 5 O N J A J 1 A 5Q 1P J r 1 A sJ JrA O Np WAS 964 1947 1968 1969 Figure 35. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal pnrecipitation at Orlando, 1967-68.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 43 TI1 F IFT T F TT F FTI FI I ~r N -O-I I I I i I£------------------------------3----------------------------------03 ----------------------------------------_---------------------00 U (L 0 (U k (0 Daav1dns aNv. MO.a. aNV oAO=v .L~33 '1Al LVM Figure 36. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47 near Orlando. The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows water levels declined to record low levels in 1962 and again during May 1965. Levels rose in September 1966 to slightly above September 1964 levels which were about average for the period 1950-66. Levels again declined to new record lows from September 1966 through early 1968.

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44 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY BREVARD 79 DEPTH 160 FT. CASED 85 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER Meosuremenl discontinued S_______ May 1968 Woar level is affected by S_ g-reqional pumping BREVARD 148 DEPTII 206 FT CASED 105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 14 12 0 SWater level is aftectid by Sregional pumping SBREVARD 15't DEPfI 210 FT. CASED 144 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER > % Woter level is offected by regionol pumping 1 -, 14 A ,, / Mcasurcment Discontinucd May 1968 7------------------------------_ __________ __________ ___________I__________ INDIAN RIVER 25 DEPTH 19 FT CASED 13 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) S*25-----------------_______ ____ 1'~____ S ST LUCIE 42 DEPTH 18 FT CASED 13 FT SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 1 5W 2 ill 1 1II 1 1 1 I I I IIII 1 1 1 1 1 I I I H 945 1950 195 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 37. Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 45 CAPE KENNEDY AREA One of the most rapidly growing areas in the state is the Cape Kennedy area, which includes the cities of Cocoa, Cocoa Beach, and Titusville in Brevard County. In this area, water in the Floridan Aquifer is generally brackish and is used primarily for irrigation. Water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in Brevard, Indian River and St. Lucie counties are shown in figure 37. Hydrographs of wells in Brevard County generally show a long-term downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan Aquifer. From 1946 through 1968 artesian levels have declined nearly 10 feet in well Brevard 79 in northern Brevard County and about 10 feet in well Brevard 159 on the northern end of Merritt Island. Levels in wells 79 and 148 declined to new record low levels in 1968. For the first time of record well Brevard 79 ceased to flow during the first five months of 1968. Near Cocoa, the artesian level in well Brevard 148 declined below land surface in May 1968, at which time the well ceased to flow for the first time of record. In contrast, nonartcsian levels in the shallow sand aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties have generally shown no downward trend during the period of record. Levels in wells Indian River 25 and St. Lucie 42 declined about 5 feet and 2 feet, respectively, during 1965-67. During 1968, levels in both wells were about average for the period of record. Increased water use for irrigation and deficiency of rainfall during 1967 contributed to the 1967 decline of artesian levels in many areas in Brevard County. During 1968, levels rose in response to above normal rainfall. Annual rainfall at Titusville was 7.00 inches below normal during 1967, and 8.41 inches above normal rainfall during 1968. SARASOTA-BRADENTON AREA The Sarasota-Bradcnton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in southwestern coastal Florida. Principal economic activities in the area arc agricultural-truck and citrus farming and stock raising. The coastal section, however, is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center. Figure 38 shows trends and fluctuations of water levels in observation well Sarasota 9. The hydrograph shows a well-defined decline of artesian water level in the Floridan Aquifer. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have declined 26.07 feet from 5.20 feet above land surface in March 1931, the

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46 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY highest recorded level, to a new record low level of 20.87 feet below land surface in May 1968. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have been declining at an average rate of about 0.5 foot per year since 1931. The hydrograph of well Sarasota 9 shows the decline is continuing and that the range of fluctuations has increased, particularly during 1967-68. The regional extent of the decline is shown by hydrographs of well Hillsborough 30 (figure 25) and of well Sarasota 9 (figure 38). SARASOTA 9 DEPTH 730 FT. CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 6 :I ------------N A------------------------S-4 S-14 S Woatr level is affected by regional pumping -22 -30 I I I I 1 1 L I I I I I I I I I I I I 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 38. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area. SOUTHERN FLORIDA The southern Florida section includes all counties south of a line through DeSoto County and covers an area of about 17,500

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 47 square miles. The region and locations of selected observation wells for which hydrographs are presented are shown on figure 39. MANATEE OKEECHOBEE I ST. LUCIE SI "------... sARASoT D O HIGHLANDS ---J--CHA R L O T TE GLA DEs OK CBO .._------i------" u_..., t 246I c r ,1 ILAKE 515 T L5 -----, AL NF ia E* i I A \ \ A HL x C 0 L L I E R I B ROW ARG a529 o 54L0 BGi R 0O W AR D G 3 1 G617 -656 In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade counties, the Biscayne Aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are the main sources. V S68C F64,1 N \ Ol 1 *G6W0 G596 G-S 4 G469CI EXPLANATION ( to -0D to so \. MILES Figure 39. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given. In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade. counties, the Biscayne Aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesianshallow-sand -and shell aquifers are the main sources.

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48 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY FT. MYERS AREA The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties, and like the Bradenton-Sarasota area to the north, is developing rapidly as a winter tourist and retirement center. In the Ft. Myers area nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of ground water. Figure 40 shows the seasonal fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the period 1967-68. Generally, seasonal fluctuations of water levels in o \ u! tic M€ IX 1 I I t I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I II ! I 1 t I I II Io IN I IF I IA IM Ij I IA I oI I I I I I I I I I I I me* I I t 1 I a tt I I I I I AI S I IN FI I A l i II J I F A I I I I A S O 1 I F I M A I l AI S 0R JF IMAMJJASON DJF iA J JASONDJFMAMJ ASO NOJ FMA MJ JASONOJ FMAMJ JASO N se1946 1( 967 1968 1969 Figure 40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1967-68.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 49 nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to seasonal fluctuations in the amounts of rainfall. Figure 41 shows the trends and fluctuations of water levels in rionartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern Florida. LEE 246 DEPTH 27 FT CASED 19 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN) -7 51 Water level it offected by pumping of nearby wells -_ -----II 15 1 19 19-19-19-19----COIER 131 DEPTH 54 FT CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN) 28 216 24 Ta > COLUER 54 DEPTH 9 FT CASED 8 FT. SAND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) .15 MARTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT. SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 16 14 --------------I ______v_ S Water level is oaffected by pumping of nearby well __ ____ _____ 94-15 9i5 1 .1LLLL 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 190 Figure 41. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 in the Everglades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 near Stuart, Florida.

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50 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY STUART-WEST PALM BEACH AREA This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach counties and is a segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal complex extending from Jacksonville southward through the Keys. Average yearly municipal pumpage at Stuart has increased from an average of 40 mgy during 1941-45 to about 360 mgy in 1968 as shown in figure 42. N SNO7IVD) .0 SNOI''II 30vdWnd Figure 42. Total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 51 The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart are shown in figure 41. The hydrograph of well Martin 147 shows a slight downward trend of nonartesian levels. Levels declined to a record low level of about 2 feet above mean sea level in the springs of 1962, 1963 and 1965. The declines were caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field. Although pumpage increased during 1965-66, water levels declined, then rose in response to above average rainfall during 1967-68. MARTIN 147 Nonorllsion Aquifer D thT 4 ft. Co.d 73 ft, i F MIAIMIJ JIA SIoIN1IJ F M AM J J 'AS ON D J F M A M J J J 0 A OND J F MA J J AS N 0 ---t--------J------------J____ _____________I ___ ______________ SI 1I I | | I I I i I i I _I ______________|_II_|Iit II Nwirrofl nm thff y preciplf tot i JF M AMJ J ASONDJ FM AMJ J ASOND J F MAMJ J A SONDJ' F''M'J'J'A'S O'N'OJ FMAMJ 1 A S ONO1 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 43. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Stuart, 1967-68.

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52 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Figure 43 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Stuart, 1967-68. The Biscayne Aquifer is the chief source of water supply in southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 44 shows the trends and fluctuations of end-of-month water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and rainfall data at West Palm Beach. Fluctuations of water levels for several selected wells are shown in figures 45 and 46. 41 ________-r \ ----f^ ---m U __ g i t | I I l i Iff l I I Il l l I iI I I I I I I I I I I I I IA i l I l .ApaMAUJ.JASONOJFMAMJ.ASONO.jrMAMJ.J ASOND FMAJONONOJ4FMAMJ A ON9 4 C 5 1 1969 [J r1 11 1 J ISO M 0 J F M AFMa u 'A'a 5 N N j 1 1 AMJ J A AS ONO J A JIJ FA SONFe d Figure 44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1967-68.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 53 PALM BEACH 88 DEPTH 17 FT CASED 16 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 9 kA s5 r ---.-.------' -----------I----________ 13 BREVARD G561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 10 I '3 2 AAA-I1945 1950 1955 190 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward 0561 and G617 near SG Ft. LauderdalePT FT. CASEand Dade T.55 near Miami. | 94 10 --------------------96---------------------DADE G5S3 DEPTH 91 Fr. CASED 79 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami.

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54 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY BROWARD F21 DEPTH 107 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 4d> DADE SIl DEPTH 52 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER -f-I^ ,jA A DADE SIaA DEPTH 20 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 1 0 DADE `79 DEPTH 77 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER BROWARD S329 DEPTH 68 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER Water level is affected by pumping of nearby wells 91945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 46. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead, Dade F179 at Miami, and Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale. 7' s,.v N ii:,kitvx l l : .: i i .' i i I I I i I I I I I 3 i94 90 15 90 {95 i7 95 Fiue4.Ted n futain fwtrleesi el rwr F21a olwoDd 18na imDd 16 nerloeted aeF79a im, n rwr

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 55 FT. LAUDERDALE AREA The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part of Broward County extending from the Deerfield-Boca Raton area in the northern part of Broward County to the Hollywood area in the southern part of the county. Long-term downward trends of water levels in the Biscayne Aquifer in and adjacent to the Ft. Lauderdale area are shown by the hydrograph of well Broward S329 at Ft. Lauderdale (figure 46). The Biscayne Aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to the coast and along tidal canals. Figure 47 shows graphs of the chloride content of water in wells Broward G515, G820A, and S830, all in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field. The chloride content of water in well Broward S830 decreased from about 3,700 mg/1 in 1947 to about 50 mg/l in 1958. From 1958 through 1968, chloride content increased to about 2,000 mg/1. The chloride, content of well Broward G515 increased from slightly over 500 mg/1 to 750 mg/1 in 1955 then decreased gradually to about 700 mg/1 in 1968. The chloride content of well Broward G820A decreased from a high of 85 mg/l in 1956 to 15 mg/l in 1961, then increased to 33 mg/l in 1967, and decreased in 1968 to 22 mg/l. MIAMI AREA The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the most populous area in the state. The principal source of water supply is the Biscayne Aquifer, the extent of which is shown on figure 1. The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for which hydrographs are given are shown by figure 39. Water-level observations were made as early as 1933 at Homestead in well Dade S196A. The long-term record of water-level fluctuations at Homestead is shown in figure 46. Figure 48 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Homestead Experimental Station 1965-68. Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the Miami area is occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of groundwater levels in the Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells G596, G618, and G620, figures 49 and 50. In the vicinity of Miami, fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Biscayne Aquifer are illustrated by hydrographs of wells Dade G10 about 5 miles west of Miami, Dade S19 at Miami Springs (figure 48), and well Dade F179 at Miami (figure 45). The water level in well Dade S19 is affected by pumping in the City of Miami municipal well field.

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56 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY BROWARD G15 DEPTH 211 FT. CASED 184 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 700 300 0C BROWARDG20 DEPTH 224 FT. CASED 215 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 90 %0 3C \ BROWARD 5S30 DEPTH 119 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 2 -500 -V_ I C ^ ac ------A ------/-------DADE F--6 DEPTH 47 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 10C 4100 = ----i--DADE F64 DEPTH 114 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 1600 j-kA o ---------1945 190 1955 1960 1965 1970 1917 IWO Figure 47. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward G515, G820A and S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 57 Biscorr Aqlfvr Dpth to ft. i i l 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 l i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i i i i' i 1 i i l J FMAMJ JASOND JFMAMJ JASOND JFMAMJ JASONDJ F MAM JJAS JFMAMJJASN 19 5 1 1967 1961 1969 3 A F M A M JMJ A S 0 N D0 JF M A M J J A S O N DO J FM A M J J A S O N J F M A M J A S 0 N 1965 1966 1967 968 1969 Figure 48. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1967-68. In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the presence of salty water in an aquifer is signalled by high chloride content of the ground-water. Sea water is contained in the seaward reaches of the Biscayne Aquifer and some encroachment of sea water into the aquifer has occurred through the years. Water control measures have checked the encroachment and as a result a freshening of the ground water has occurred in some areas.

PAGE 64

0 VDAI)i S19 DPTI'1 I 95 FT, CAS~ D 91 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 1------------------I----------|----|---Water level is affected by pumping of nearby well 7a > ________ w 7 ... ....----------_--..-,-----------------S-a 1. § DADE GIO DEPTH 6FT. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 0 S 4 2. 0 --1945 1950 1955 1960 965 1970 1975 19 Ill-1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 59 DADE G596 DEPTH 13 FT. CASED II FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 12 10 2 DADE G618 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED II FT. BISCAYNE AQUI-FER S2u. -DA"DE G618 DEPTI 20 IT. CASED 11 IT. B1SCAYNE AQUIFER 9 DADE G613 DEPTH 21 FT CASED 18 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER oi S-3 SDADE G620 DEPTH 16 FT. CASED 6 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER 4o------\-\---II1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 50. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade County.

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60 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY DADE S68 DEPTH 61 FT. CASED 51 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 390 330 270 ----210 0 c 0* A ^ .-----DADE D151 DEPT1H 176 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER IC Sept. 19608750 mg/I 5 Oct. 1962-7500 mq/I 40 0 = D DL .4.' DII'P I I 17 1 (CASI 1) 92 1 1 IIS(AYNI AQII'IiR 9CC i0CC 30 CC I -f\I A \ DADI S.rb" l)llr'III IT IIS('AYNI: AQIIIFOl iiR t945 1950 1955 1960 1955 1970 1975 1980 Figure 51. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade S68 and D151 near Miami, and Dade G469 and S529 in southeastern Dade County.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 68 61 Generally, chloride content of ground water increased in most areas of Dade County during 1967-68. In northern Dade County, chloride content of ground water in the Biscayne Aquifer in well Dadc S68 at Miami Springs well field near Miami increased from about 30 to nearly 50 mg/1. Chloride content in well Dade D151, North Miami, increased from 59 to 105 mg/1 in early 1968, then decreased to 31 mg/1 in September 1968. Chloride content in wells Dade F64 and F296 remained essentially the same as in 1965-66. However, chloride concentration in well Dade F64 had a wider range of fluctuation than that of well Dade F296 during 1967-68. In southern coastal Dade County, chloride content generally remained at low concentrations in most areas during 1967-68. Chloride content decreased slightly in well Dade S529. In contrast, the chloride content of well Dade G469 near the coast south of Miami increased from 8,700 mg/l in 1967 to 9,400 mg/l in late 1968. In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination of the Biscayne Aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an ever-present problem. Through intensive practice of water control the problem of prevention of salty water contamination has been solved. In many areas where contamination existed the situation has been alleviated by water control. The effectiveness of the method of control is graphically illustrated in figure 51 by the chloride graph of well Dade S529.

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rable 1. -Summary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells. Well number: Well numbers are based on county numbering system, e. g., Bay County well Bay 20, or on the latitudinal and longitudinal system e. g., well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given where this well has been reported previously in a publication under the county number. Letters prefixed to well numbers in Broward and Dade Counties; g, Geological Survey wells; S, supply wells; F, fire wells; and NP, National Park Service wells. Letter suffix A, shallow well adjacent to deep well. Aquifer: B, Biscayne; F, Floridan; G, sand-and-gravel; H, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand. Depth of well: Measured unless otherwise noted. R, reported depth. Frequency of measurement: Refers to current biennium. A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous; M, monthly; S, semiannually; T, Triyearly; W, weekly. Water level: To hundredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or taken from recorder chart; to nearest tenth of a foot if measured by pressure gage or airline. Remarks: A, annual measurements only; B, water level below measuring point; D, measurements discontinued on date shown in Remarks; L, lowest water level; M, water level with reference to mean sea level; P, water level affected by pumping of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in Remarks; S, water levels affected by ocean tides; X, well in use. Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Well Number Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual Remarks W N bt level in May Range Remarks S 5 5 May or June or June High Low 1967 1968 1967 1968 S (year) (year) ALACHUA COUNTY 936-236-1 F 252 136 1958 C -20.49 -31.68 -24.86 -29.24 3.72 3.61 1965 1963 942-216-1 F 447R 175 1957 B -87.36 -94.19 -90.76 -94.73 2.98 3.53 P 1966 1963 949-235-2 F 300R 250 1960 B -36.30 -39.36 -37.46 -38.57 1.06 2.81 X 1966 1963 BAKER COUNTY 011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 B +0.17 -5.21 -2.76 -2.03 -1959 1962 014-226-1 F 168 -1957 B -94.14 -101.74 -98.28-103.46 5.82 1.50 A 1965 1963 016-207-1 F 595R 459 1945 B -55.4 -71.45 -67.71 -6.72 -P;D,1967 1945 1963 026-214-1 H 198 102 1960 B -14.98 -20.13 -19.45 -20.78 3.11 2.22 P 1964 1963 015-216-200 F 825 282 1963 B -94.29 -96.43 -98.17-102.42 4.19 1.81 1965 1964 026-217-300 F 905 417 1963 B -55.16 -56.78 -59.48 -63.57 4.42 1.94 1965 1966 BAY COUNTY 7 (010-541-1) F 253 -1936 B -42.33 -78.36 -66.33 -24.10 *37.23 1.25 P;*,recovery 1947 1963 from cessation of regional pumping 12 (017-551-1) F 290R -1961 B +1.82 +0.50 --0.09 -D,1968 1964 1962 68 (023-526-1) F 160 161 1961 B +4.50 +1.6 -+2.42 0.31 0.48 P 1965 1963 956-524-1 F 497R 424 1962 B -5.98 -12.0 -7.65 -7.22 7.70 4.85 X 1965 1953

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Wea Number I prior to 1967 Highest water Annual Slevel in May Remarks -B b May or June or June 4___(ye) (year) 1967 1968 1967 1968 003-534-113 F 654R 345 1962 B ---87.90 -25.12 *54.80 3.10 P;* recovery from cessatiop of regional pumping 008-536-142 F 501R 219 1963 C -19.03 -144.42 -24.52 -19.42 21.77 12.69 D, 1968 1965 1963 012-541-213 F 345R 326 1962 M -5.83 -10.56 -9.14 -1.02 9.54 2.62 1964 1963 012-550-331a F 590R 306 1962 B -25.71 -28.39 -30.06 -31.92 7.42 8.77 1962 1964 015-535-113 F 509 213 1962 B +3.7 +0.17 +1.74 +1.57 1.60 1.10 1964 1963 BRADFORD COUNTY 000-210-2 F 294 247 1959 B -69.22 -75.69 -73.28 -76.94 3.22 2.01 1959 1963 BREVARD COUNTY 20 (795-043-2) F 447R 125 1934 B +28.7 +185 +19.5 +15.2 3.1 5.8 S 1947 1965 79(347-051-1) F 160R 85 1946 B +5.1 -1.20 -2.19 -2.98 5.46 2.89 S;D, 1968 1947 1965 148 (821-045-1) F 206R 105 1946 B +10.9 +0.6 +0.61 -5.8 -5; X; D, 1968 1953 1965 759-045-1 S 9 10 1958 S -3.5 -7.2 -6.43 -4.78 3.02 2.33 1964 1962 807-039-2 S 30 29 1958 C -6.03 -8.4 -7.86 -7.18 2.51 3.17 1966 1962 814-048-2 S 8 8 1958 C -0.0 -3.1 *-2.81 -* well dry 1964 1961 May 1967 822-047-2 F 129 114 1955 C +7.82 +2.10 +1.08 +0.48 5.18 5.56 1960 1965 822-046-7 S 32 30 1955 B -3.81 --5.36 -1.77 1.89 1966 822-05 -1 F 553 138 1955 S +16.6 --+13.8 0.5 4.4 1965 822-051-2 F 553 138 1955 S +17.9 --+16.0 0.6 2.9 1965 834-039-1 F 210 144 1957 S +10.5 --+9.7 -25 1965 836-057-3 F 247 98 1957 S +10.0 -+11.2 +9.2 1.1 2.4 1965 43-052-1 F 150 85 1967 B ----17.02 -3.91 BROWARD COUNTY F29I B 107 -1948 C +4.3 +0.4 +0.93 +2.36 3.40 3.30 M 1958 1952 G561 B 20 20 1948 C +4.1 +0.2 +4.29 +3.79 3.76 3.37 M 1958 1956 G616 B 24 19 1952 C +12.90 +8.72 +12.27 +12.50 4.98 3.76 M 1957 1956 & 1958

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Well Number k Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual Remarks Well Number Anna B. level in May Range 0 May or June or June ange SHigh Low 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) G617 B 29 28 1950 C +6.6 +2.57 +3.95 +6.22 2.77 2.65 M 1954 1962 G820A B 224 215 1956 C +4.68 -3.15 -2.99 +5.43 7.29 9.35 M; Prospect 1966 1965 well field G853 B 22 21 1960 C +6.20 +2.80 +4.90 +1.43 6.72 9.35 M;Pompano 1965 1962 well field S329 B 68 -1940 C +5.55 -0.28 +0.39 +4.15 6.40 5.57 M; Dixie Well 1955 1965 field CALHOUN COUNTY 1(026-502-1) F 212 36 1961 S -0.43 -3.05 -3.97 -6.06 1.75 0.35 1964 1962 7 (026-509-1) F 188R 64 1961 S +10.6 +7.4 +7.8 +6.7 0.9 1.9 1964 1962 11(014-511-1) F 147R 47 1961 S +13.9 +10.9 +11.0 +9.2 0.9 0.5 1965 1962 CITRUS COUNTY 15 (902-228-1) F 78 -1935 B -8.62 -19.87 -14.95 -19.14 3.83 4.22 1959 1963 856-223-2 F 91 -1961 B -45.38 -48.58 -45.22 -48.47 3.80 4.50 1964 1963 CLAY COUNTY 5 (006-148-2) F 530R 157 1940 S +35.5 +21.0 +22.2 +19.7 3.4 4.6 1947 1957 948-202-6 H 144 80 1960 B -45.33 -51.06 -47.13 -51.12 1.87 2.33 1960 1963 948-202-7 NA 43 40 1960 B -28.21 -35.70 -29.94 -34.97 2.03 4.04 1965 1963 948-202-8 F 250 193 1960 C -55.02 -59.80 -57.32 -60.63 2.43 2.85 1961 1964 COLLIER COUNTY 54 B 9 8 1951 C +13.1 +8.05 +12.82 +12.25 2.11 3.45 M 1958 1962 131 B 54 22 1952 C +26.2 +20.90 +21.68 +24.52 3.92 4.48 M 1958 1962 271 B 38 -1959 C +17.43 +14.50 +12.31 +14.96 6.00 5.25 M 1963 1965 296 B 45 -1959 C +9.60 +7.35 +10.45 +11.91 5.79 5.49 M 1963 1962 COLUMBIA COUNTY 9 (010-238-1) F 836R 680 1942 C -79.60 -97.02 -87.69 -93.46 5.21 3.31 1948 1957 DADE COUNTY F45 B 85 -1939 C +5.90 +1.6 +6.05 +5.15 4.55 4.03 M 1966 1960 F179 B 77 -1939 C +6.0 +0.9 +1.56 +3.46 3.17 3.21 M 1958 1945

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) l mb Prior to 1967 estwater Annual Remarks May or June or June S High Lo! 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) F240 B 60 -1939 C +5.22 +1.23 +4.97 +5.48 3.99 4.38 M 1966 1965 F319 B 17 13 1940 C +5.40 +0.47 +1.74 +3.04 1.98 1.76 M 1958 1945 F358 B 54 -1940 C +6.70 +0.04 +0.12 +4.58 4.32 5.30 M 1954 1962 G3 B 20 11 1940 C +3.00 -1.42 +1.34 +4.10 2.91 5.93 M;P 1958 1965 GIO B 6 6 1940 C +6.00 +0.50 +2.35 +4.97 2.50 2.47 M 1958 1945 G39 B 6 6 1939 C +7.20 -0.94 +1.41 +4.5 3.12 3.71 M;P 1958 1962 G553 B 91 79 1947 C +8.60 +0.97 +1.75 +5.11 3.92 4.37 M; Casing *1958 1962 slotted to 79 G580A B 22 4 1960 C +4.84 +0.95 +1.64 +4.18 2.45 2.90 M 1961 1962 G596 B 13 11 1949 C +8.40 +2.11 +2.64 +6.76 4.50 5.56 M 1958 1962 G613 B 21 18 1950 C +5.50 -0.98 -0.10 +3.12 4.98 3.73 M 1954 1962 & 1958 G614 B 20 18 1950 C +8.20 +0.37 +0.48 +5.35 5.00 6.70 M 1958 1962 G618 B 20 11 1950 C +8.40 +2.56 +5.80 +6.80 1.99 1.75 M 1958 1962 G620 B 16 6 1950 C +7.0 +3.21 +5.05 +5.80 3.15 4.56 M 1958 1965 G757A B 20 10 1957 C +9.30 +1.47 +5.18 +7.00 4.99 6.22 M 1958 1965 G789 B 20 10 1956 C +7.30 -0.04 +6.75 -6.61 -M .1958 1965 G799 B 20 10 1956 C +7.80 +1.65 +3.76 +5.70 3.64 3.96 M;P 1958 1962 G851 B 18 11 1959 C +6.25 +1.80 +4.35 +4.55 3.01 3.07 M 1966 1959 0852 B 20 10 1959 C +4.43 +0.40 +5.05 +5.08 4.30 5.54 M 1966 1959 G855 B 20 10 1958 C -0.85 -5.60 -5.65 -4.53 4.40 4.88 B 1966 1962 G857 B 19 14 1959 C +5.74 +1.30 +4.80 +6.90 4.42 5.00 M 1966 1962 G85& B 20 11 1959 C +6.95 +1.82 +5.10 +6.52 4.69 4.57 M 1966 1962 G859 B 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +0.45 +3.67 +5.42 3.95 4.60 M 1960 1965 G860 B 20 11 1959 C +5.0 +1.10 +3.66 +4.90 2.40 3.46 M 1960 1965 G86I B 23 11 1961 C +6.25 +2.05 +6.30 +6.94 5.17 5.14 M 1966 1965

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) C Pior "to 1967 Highest water Well Number | Priorto 1967Annual Remarks ; level in May Range May or June or June High Low 1967 1968 1967 1968 S(year) (year) G863 B 18 6 1961 C +5.08 +0.55 +6.41 +6.90 7.24 6.52 M 1966 1965 G864 B 20 11 1959 C +6.23 -1.00 +6.00 +6.20 6.47 6.71 M 1966 1965 G865 B 19 13 1959 C +1.85 +0.9 +2.14 +2.59 1.51 2.05 M 1964 1960 G968 B 50 -1960 C +5.45 +3.05 +5.80 +4.25 1.65 2.62 M 1964 1962 G968A B 33 -1961 C +6.57 +3.60 +6.57 +6.35 2.60 3.13 M 1966 1962 G970 B 15 10 1958 C +4.0 +2.18 +4.10 +4.82 2.07 3.17 M 1960 1962 G972 B 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +3.50 +5.38 +6.82 1.70 2.08 M 1960 1962 G973 B 15 10 1958 C +4.5 +1.68 +3.85 +3.87 2.25 2.34 M 1960 1962 G974 B 15 10 1958 C +5.44 +2.68 +5.40 +6.10 3.20 3.07 M 1966 1962 G975 B 15 10 1958 C +6.9 +4.10 +6.16 +7.15 3.11 2.38 M 1960 1965 G976 B 15 10 1958 C +6.37 +2.90 +6.83 +6.25 1.92 2.34 M 1966 1962 G978 B 15 10 1958 C +6.78 +2.90 +6.00 +7.10 2.88 3.39 M;D, 1968 1966 1962 G1165 B 12 11 1961 C +5.06 +1.45 +4.58 +5.19 2.63 2.71 M 1966 1962 G1166 B 11 11 1961 C +6.85 +3.99 +6.55 +4.02 2.47 2.45 M 1966 1965 G1183 B 25 -1961 C +5:18 -1.00 +3.24 +4.17 4.97 4.44 M 1966 1962 NP44 B 33 -1960 C +5.04 -1.43 +4.85 +5.03 5.77 6.11 M 1966 1965 NP46 B 25 -1960 C +2.27 -1.45 +2.19 +2.03 3.29 3.47 M 1966 1965 NP62 B 20 9 1962 C +4.28 -1.17 +3.09 +3.28 4.34 4.67 M 1966 1965 NP67 B 20 6 1962 C +3.10 -1.75 +2.85 +2.62 4.07 1.64 1966 1965 NP72 B 20 6 1962 C +6.44 -1.50 +4.90 -6.10 -M 1966 1965 S18 B 52 -1939 C +3.2 +0.10 +1.95 +1.88 2.10 2.95 M;P 1942 1945 S19 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30 -0.14 +3.41 3.29 4.74 M;P 1958 1962 S68 B 61 51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97 -2.13 +2.13 3.74 6.19 L;M;P 1958 1962 8182 B 51 -1940 C +9.5 0.0' +1.62 +3.35 3.67 3.08 M 1958 1945 S196A B 20 -1932 C +8.5 -1.0 -0.03 +5.16 5.45 7.08 M 1958 1945

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) N Pr ;Pior to 1967 Hihest water Remarks S. g 8May or June or June 5 1 I. Hi LOw 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) DESOTO COUNTY 703-157-124 F,H 468 189 1962 S +32.05 +25.0 +25.90 +22.60 4.15 0.10 1963 1962 704-147-332 F,H 460 112 1962 C +390 +2.73 +1.25 +2.99 4.25 4.94 1963 1965 720-148-431 F,H 478 137 1962 C -10.53 -21.41 -28.01 -23.27 19.77 20.41 1964 1965 DIXIE COUNTY 15 (937-306-1) F 215R 105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12 -6.03 -7.80 1.66 1.55 1959 1962 944-314-1 F 96 90 1961 S -1.38 -4.29 -4.31 -4.42 2.90 1.69 1964 1962 DUVAL COUNTY 12 (019-1401) F 785R -1938 S +27.5 +15.1 ----S; D, 1967 1947 1962 18 (018-140-1) F --1938 M +39.9 +20.1 +22.4 +23.2 7.9 7.3 S 1947 1962 102(019-133-1) F 875R 400 1939 S +6.4 -20.94 -22.09 -19.18 6.01 2.06 S 1931 1962 107 (023-136-1) F --1939 S +53.2 +34.4 +33.4 -5.3 -S; D, 1968 1939 1962 115 (016-142-1) F 729R 476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6 +14.5 +14.7 6.9 4.7 S 1938 1962 118 (018-143-1) F 900R -1939 S +32.9 +11.9 +15.2 +12.4 3.9 5.0 S 1947 1962 12(023-138-1) F 905R 571 1930 M +44.9 +25.6 +26.2 +24.1 4.8 3.8 S 1947 1962 123(019-142-) F 1,075R -1930 S +39.0 +15.7 +17.9 +14.1 4.3 4.9 S 1931 1962 129 (015-141-1) F 600R 470 1940 S +40.4 +17.4 +20.6 +21.5 7.9 5.1 S 1947 1962 145 (028-137-1) F --1940 S -24.2 +4.97 +5.56 +2.98 3.74 3.92 S 1947 1963 149 (024-136-1) F 800R -1940 S +25.7 +8.8 +5.95 +6.51 4.4 2.5 S 1947 1963 151 (023-139-1) F 700R 560 1940 S +43.4 +31.0 +32.9 +31.0 3.5 1.3 S 1952 1962 152 (027-133-1) F 642R -1940 S +29.9 +19.6 -+17.5 -3.8 S 1952 1962 154 (014-135-1) F 625R 461 1940 S +29.6 +10.5 +11.8 +10.3 5.1 4.9 1947 1962 I60 (018-23-1) F 585R 357 1934 B +41.7 +20.2 +19.7 +21.3 6.8 4.7 S; T 1934 1962 164 (025-25-1) F 840R 450 1930 S +43.8 +25.8 +26.3 +23.7 4.8 4.9 S; T 1931 1962 206 (015-145-1) F 1,920R 1,000 1941 S -2.06 -16.75 ----S; D, 1968 1948 1962 262 (026-135-1) F 1,393R 584 1951 B +37.0 +23.4 +23.7 +21.7 3.6 3.3 S; T 1951 1963

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Water level above (+) or below (-)land surface S(feet) Well Number Prior to 1967 Hihewater Annual Remark Eu >G levelin May Range So May or June or June r High Low 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) 263 (026-135-2) F 1,025R 850 1951 S +35.5 +24.0 -+22.0 2.9 3.5 S;T 1952 1963 264 (026-135-3) F 700R 450 1951 S +35.3 +23.2 +24.0 +21.7 3.3 3.4 S; T 1952 1962 265 (025-136-1) F 556R -1951 S +39.4 +19.4 +30.5 +28.8 0.1 2.4 S; T 1952 1963 DUVAL76 F 636R -1939 A +7.0 +1.0 +2.08 +2.91 -1966 1962 DUVAL 126 F 403R 252 1940 A +24.5 +15.8 +17.6 +16.5 -1964 1962 DUVAL 148 F 625R 500 1940 A +22.9 +17.0 +19.7 +17.7 -1964 1962 DUVAL 155 F 1,005R 380 1940 A +30.9 +26.0 +26.5 +24.3 1964 1962 DUVAL 157 F 690R 560 1940 A +12.0 +6.8 +6.5 +5.0 -1964 1962 DUVAL 254 F 750R 433 1961 A -25.61 -29.60 -28.83 -32.86 -1966 1962 DUVAL 275 F 1,234R 515 1960 A +25.1 +21.3 +20.7 +18.6 -1964 1962 DUVAL 279 F 1,005R 467 1960 A -23.93 -28.84 -27.45 -30.58 -1965 1962 DUVAL 282 F 650R -1961 A +31.9 +18.6 +24.5 +24.0 -1964 1962 DUVAL 298 F --1961 A +2.20 -1.34 -2.83 -4.16 -1964 1962 ESCAMBIA COUNTY 39 (023-716-2) G 244 -1940 M -4.59 -12.00 -14.67 -15.20 6.08 11.33 1940 1955 45 (036-719-1) G 152 129 1940 C -69.30 -111.82 -101.14 -102.48 1.90 1.37 P 1941 1956 46 (031-716-1) G 239 229 1939 W -58.09 -82.12 -77.35 -77.78 2.03 3.51 1948 1956 62 (024-715-1) G 142R 142 1940 M -6.50 -23.84 -12.44 -12.88 1.79 3.54 1949 1955 62A (024-715-2) G 18 18 1940 M -8.66 -13.05 -12.12 -12.48 4.65 0.99 1964 1962 73 (035-715-3) G 306 198 1951 C -39.03 -56.66 -56.0 -57.9 3.2 8.0 P 1953 1958 74 (036-716-1) G 352 260* 1951 C -77.37 -90.20 -90.92 -92.27 2.11 2.73 P; *Screen 260 1952 1956 to 270 ft & 310 to 350 ft 83 (035-714-3) G 301 -1954 B -36.10 -42.45 -42.97 -44.16 2.93 3.95 P 1955 1962 026-713-5 G 149 144* 1959 W -58.15 -63.57 -65.29 -64.85 2.83 4.54 *Screen144 to 1960 1963 149 ft 026-713-6 G 65 60* 1959 W -51.78 -56.81 -60.13 -58.77 3.40 3.47 *Screen 60 to 1960 1963 65 ft 032-724-1 G 170 165* 1959 M -91.18 -93.04 -93.90 -94.28 2.13 2.35 *Screen 165 1960 1963 to 170 ft

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) _clt lm 5 Prior tol 1967 Highest water Annual Remrks Wlt Number Priort1967 Remarks l levelinMay Range 5 a May o June or~June b High LOW a 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) 054-726-1 G 206 201* 1959 B -8295 -90.06 -88.15 -91.17 1.67 2.34 *Screen 201 1962 1964 to 206 ft 054-726-2 G 107 102* 1959 B -65.21 -76.15 -73.20 -76.75 5.55 2.60 *Screen 102 1962 1964 to 107 ft FLAGLER COUNTY 14 (927-115-1) F 417 -1936 B -3.4 -8.27 -9.10 -10.41 3.58 4.96 1937 1966 44 (928-122-1) F 159 -1956 B -7.67 -13.42 -18.43 -18.36 9.26 9.73 P 1959 1962 FRANKLIN COUNTY 10 (950-439-1) F 380R -1958 S -0.35 -4.45 -4.00 -3.81 0.90 1.01 1964 1962 31 (943-458-1) F --1949 B +3.95 +0.40 +1.65 +1.49 0.69 0.68 1950 1952 943-453F --1949 B +6.90 +6.0 +6.0 +4.81 1.2 0.99 1950 1953 & 1955 947-446-I F 98R -1961 S -9.67 -11.35 -10.39 -10.99 0.11 0.59 1964 1963 957-443-1 F --1961 S +4.87 +2.97 +3.67 +3.65 1.00 0.53 1964 1962 GADSDEN COUNTY 035-434-1 F 406R -1961 S -85.13 -91.40 -88.00 -83.35 1.75 9.55 1966 1963 039-425-1 F 525R 381 1961 B -134.40 -143.96 -140.35 -148.19 6.95 5.46 1966 1962 GILCHRIST COUNTY 936-249-220A F 100 61 1961 B -28.64 --30.32 -38.91 6.08 4.30 1966 GLADES COUNTY GL208 F 1,250 -1958 S -+29.0 -+22.2 +21.4 -1.3 1958 GL250 F 1,300 -1958 S +32.0 -+16.0 +16.0 -1.5 1958 GULF COUNTY 30 (948518-1) F 522 475 1946 S -7.11 -27.22 -8.20 -10.75 0.20 3.13 P, prior to 1956 1950 1954 33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B +1.29 +0.96 +1.59 +1.25 0.85 0.13 1962 1963 HAMILTON COUNTY 036-305-1 F 273R 60 1961 B -84.73 -107.05 -105.43-110.64 15.66 4.37 1964 1963 HARDEE COUNTY 731-145-1 F 267 39 1962 C -29.56 -49.5 --49.65 16.60 30.56 1964 1965 HENDRY COUNTY 3 S 10 8 1941 C +0.3 -5.76 -3.19 -2.04 4.13 4.91 1958 1962

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Wel Number Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual Remarks E level in May Range o 0-' Mayor June orJune S H~ H igh Low (year) (yar) 1967 1968 1967 1968 HENDRY COUNTY 5 S 13 8 1941 C -0.81 -6.3 -4.10 -3.83 1959 1956 HERNANDO COUNTY 838-215-132 F 140R -1961 B -16.30 -20.46 -18.72 -20.71 3.19 3.75 1964 1962 HIGHLANDS COUNTY 9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0+126.28+129.97 4.21 4.06 M 1953 1949 10 S 45 41 1948 C +90.7 +83.9 +86.42 +85.08 3.49 4.89 M 1958 1956 11A S 16 13 1956 C +48.3 +43.71 +44.26 +43.74 4.09 4.10 M 1957 1962 13 S 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +20.57 +24.93 +26.14 2.55 3.78 M 1957 1962 14 S 35 29 1948 C +122.19 +114.7+118.82+116.88 2.52 4.02 M 1960 1951 15 S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +54.27 +56.31 4.45 4.14 M 1953 1956 440 S 22 18 1956 C +116.90+111.30+111.78+110.12 1.80 5.24 M 1958 1962 HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY 13 (807-230-3) F 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -19.18 -25.08 -26.28 16.56 11.60 P 1931 1966 30 (744-225-39) F 500R 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.66 +0.15 +2.59 8.20 8.34 P 1959 1952 751-203-113 F 211 65 1957 B 42.52 -64.60 --6.37 4.56 1958 1966 801-213-213A F 413R 67 1958 C +0.55 -10.18 -11.28 -10.84 10.31 10.88 1959 1965 HOLMES COUNTY 4 (043-556-1) F 187R -1938 B +6.90 +1.82 +3.20 2.78 4.02 1964 1956 7 (058-535-1) F 205R 170 1938 B -8.09 -15.66 -12.75 -12.57 1.38 1.04 D, 1968 1949 1956 7A (058-535-2) NA 13 10* 1960 B -1.34 -8.34 -6.57 -5.03 8.85 5.78 *Screen 10 to 1964 1963 13 ft; D, 1968 050-548-1 F --1961 S +5.50 +1.40 +3.10 +3.45 0.50 0.45 1964 1963 051-556-1 F 260R -1961 S -205.20 -209.10-206.96 -206.55 -2.40 1964 1963 052-545-2 F 300R -1961 S +17.6 +11.2 +10.0 +12.0 2.3 2.6 1964 1963 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY 25 S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +25.75 +27.16 4.67 4.99 M JACKSON COUNTY 23 (042-453-1) F 475R 100 1950 B -17.37 -38.15 -24.68 -7.35 3.50 1964 1951

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) WetNuma 0 Prior to 1967 H ighestwater Annu Remarks E levelinMay RRmr .-. May or June or June 73 J5 3 3 'S __ SHigh Low 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) 044-506-1 F 210 94 1961 S -62.98 -76.05 -72.65 -81.84 2.17 0.98 1964 1962 053-527-1 F 341 260 1961 S -71.57 -87.20 -78.55 -81.34 0.32 0.86 1965 1963 058-503-1 F 83 -1955 S -14.98 -29.11 -28.25 -33.32 2.87 0.58 1964 1963 JEFFERSON COUNTY 022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -13835 -142.62 -142.46 -143.75 -0.96 1965 1962 038-336-1 F 183 147 1960 S -13.33 -24.36 -22.84 -28.37 -1.22 1965 1960 LAFAYETTE COUNTY 008-317-1 F 106 -1961 B -26.19 -44.04 -39.74 -45.44 3.64 4.13 1965 1962 958-312-1 F 146 112 1961 B -4.23 -8.89 -7.92 -8.86 5.18 6.17 1964 1962 LAKE COUNTY 18 (857-138-) F 190R -1936 B -50.52 -59.82 -58.17 -4.00 -D, 1968 1960 1957 20 (900-123-1) F 252R -1936 B +12.0 +5.45 +5.0 -2.2 -D, 1968 1966 1963 22(909-131-I) F 254R -1936 B -0.72 -3.54 -4.43 -5.30 2.25 3.16 1964 1962 822-149-213 F 192 100 1959 T -1.80 -5.25 -5.77 -5.95 3.34 3.83 1960 1962 822-I49-213A S 23 18 1959 T -0.36 -5.06 -4.43 -4.45 3.38 3.49 1960 1963 832-154-334 F 160 63 1969 C -1.88 -5.47 -5.51 -5.26 4.44 3.99 1960 1962 832-154-334A S 30 17 1959 C --1.60 -5.03 -5.23 -5.02 4.63 4.57 Gravel Pack 1964 1962 17 to 30 ft 844-146-244 F 200 112 1963 B +2.25 -+1.92 +0.02 1.88 3.82 1966 848-152-233 F 89 80 1964 B --43.60 -42.67 -8.95 5.66 1966 LEE COUNTY 246 S 28 19 1945 C +19.13 +10.5 +12.60 +19.01 7.69 3.63 M 1959 1949 414 H 94 60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1 +14.42 +16.64 10.16 8.98 M;P 1957 1955 LEON COUNTY 7 (027-416-1) F 314 165 1945 M -149.05 -16991 -162.80 -166.60 4.48 3.43 P 1948 1955 36A (037410-2) H 41 38* 1935 M +0.66 -33.14 -490 -18.30 12.45 11.89 *Screen 38 1965 1956 to 41 ft 115 (031420-I) F 194 104 1950 M -76.9 -93.3 -85.0 -88.7 5.0 3.0 1959 1957

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Water level above () or below (-) land surface S (feet) Well Number Prior to 1967 Highest water Annual Remarks Slevelin May Rangearks 0 0 May or June or Juneange (year (year) 1967 1968 1967 1968 024-420-1 S 57 57 1960 B -7.88 -15.81 -15.88 -18.39 3.48 2.95 1960 1963 024-420-2 S 15 12* 1960 B -4.98 -9.32 -7.36 -10.07 2.05 3.68 *Well point 1960 1963 12 to 15 ft 026-117-1 F 310 146 1960 B -74.40 -78.37 -78.25 -3.87 3.17 1964 1963 034-407-1 F 231 -1960 S -155.74 -173.24 --173.52 4.92 3.39 1965 1963 031-421-132 F 225 100 1966 C ---84.20 -88.82 4.44 4.89 031-421-132A A 54 54* 1966 C ---30.83 -34.90 4.35 5.28 *Screen 38 to 41 ft LEVY COUNTY 902-240-343 F 155 -1961 B -5.15 -8.38 -9.71 -10.34 1.80 2.56 1964 1966 902-241-1 F 58 -1961 B -5.80 -8.34 -7.63 -8.19 1.18 2.46 1964 1962 912-259-431 F 91 68 1961 B -4.18 --4.88 -5.86 1.80 2.63 1966 915-243-431 F 300 200R 1961 B -2.94 --4.18 -6.52 1.64 2.93 1966 918-254-331 F 72 54 1961 B -3.84 --4.96 -6.63 3.13 4.55 1966 921-242-431 F 679 203 1964 B +17.8 --10.0 +8.0 1.1 2.5 1966 923-227-430 F 190 90 1961 B -47.69 --49.29 -56.99 4.42 3.82 1966 926-238-241 F 270 240 1961 B -11.36 --14.14 -17.84 3.60 2.70 1966 LIBERTY COUNTY 14 (001-459-1) F --1955 S -3.60 -7.12 -8.19 -8.51 3.68 3.33 1964 1961 010-440-1 F 118R 89 1961 B +13.3 +6.8 +10.7 +9.7 1.7 2.3 1965 1961 023-447-1 F 160R -1961 S +4.90 +2.8 +3.20 +1.29 0.40 1.86 1965 1961 028-456-1 F 360 -1961 S -83.30 -85.64 -84.95 -86.26 0.13 0.58 1965 1962 MADISON COUNTY 17 (028-325-1) F 320 300 1953 S -12.30 -38.12 -30.03 -35.74 0.33 1.12 1965 1955 18 (028-325-2) F 322 307 1952 B -6.10 -34.87 -26.77 -31.40 6.26 3.52 P 1965 1955 MARION COUNTY '5 (911-159-1) F 135R 135 1933 C +11.01 +3.35 +8.95 +6.22 2.65 4.63 1965 1957 47 (902-156-1) F 179 165 1936 B -13.84 -24.26 -19.77 -22.95 3.24 5.45 1960 1956

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) S Prior tol 967 Hihest water Annual Apr 1 W49(90-38-) F 175 -1936 B -25.0 -31.19 -27.90 -29.37 2.02 4.22 *Remacorderks 1942 1957 ininMaystalle Range S $ ^ May or June or June 3 8-17-67 h igh LOW 967 1968 1967 1968 5 C E (year) (year) 48 (859-10-1) F 152 -1936 B -0.82 -10.23 -5.47 -8.18 2.78 4.93 Wellflowed 1961 1956 Apr 1960Apr 1961 49(910-138-1 F 175 -1936* B -25.0 -31.19 -27.90 -29.37 2.02 4.22 *Recorder 1942 1957 installed 8-17-67 51 (911-210-1) F 106 -1935 B -26.04 -34.39 -29.75 -32.98 3.92 4.49 1960 1956 90-8223-41 F 442 125 1964 C -80.27 -80.41 -81.37 -82.46 1.50 2.27 1965 1966 916-219-4 F 124 -1961 B -101.28 -112.13 -105.32 -109.56 5.89 4.16 1965 1963 902-215-31 F 51 -1964 B -29.39 -29.47 -31.99 -35.00 3.60 5.26 1965 1964 903-213-431 F 36 26 1964 B -6.36 --10.23 -14.49 2.69 5.30 1965 912-226-432 F 52 -1961 B -6.72 -8.89 -9.66 -11.29 5.59 5.00 1965 1964 920-206-312 F 132 50 1961 B -42.32 42.40 44.93 48.09 3.02 5.20 1965 1964 9285-15-24 F 340 307 1964 B -117.47 --117.79 -119.95 1.82 1.51 1965 MARTIN COUNTY 493 S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +15.77 +16.34 +18.85 4.27 4.79 M 1957 1961 14( S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +2.12 +2.73 +0.81 5.09 8.42 M;P 1958 1962 928 S II 10 1957 C +32.4 +28.40 +28.25 +27.78 4.70 6.52 M 1957 1962 933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.40 +19.60 +22.60 +23.20 3.75 4.06 M 1966 1965 NASSAU COUNTY 2 (035-127-2) F 580R 350 1939 S +42.0 +18.4 +18.5 +15.6 2.7 2.9 S 1947 1963 4 (032-126-1) F 68000R -1939 S +41.1 +20.6 +20.4 +18.3 3.6 3.0 P 1947 1962 12 (038-127-1) F 640R -1939 S +24.0 -18.3 -16.30 -19.46 8.92 10.50 P;X 1947 1963 27 (040-126-1) F 191 -1939 B +10.1 -29.34 -25.25 -26.65 12.64 11.48 S 1946 1963 44(037-136-1) F 1,000R 450 1934 A +19.8 -2.13 -0.44 -3.53 -3.23 1947 1963 50 (036-142-1) F 569R -1940 S +40.5 +19.8 +17.5 +16.0 5.4 5.2 S 1940 1963 51 (033-150ISO-I) F 580R -1940 S +42.0 +25.2 +25.9 +23.1 2.3 2.3 S; X 1947 & 1948 1968 55 (037-130-1) F 540R 504 1940 S +33.1 +4.9 +6.8 +4.5 3.0 2.8 S;X 1947 1963

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Well Number Prior to 1967 Highestwater Ann Remarks Eu level in May Range SC i May or June or June Sy a High Lo 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) 23 F 800R 550 1939 A +6.08 +3.64 +3.76 -0.79 -1956 1962 33 F --1939 A +43.0 -39.74 -33.50 -34.15 -1939 1966 53 F --1940 A +36.5 +15.4 +16.6 +13.6 -1940 1962 91 F 700 405 1960 A -5.30 -8.06 -8.18 -11.67 -1964 1962 OKALOOSA COUNTY 3 (024-636-1) F 800R 500 1936 S +20.1 -72.19 -80.37 -85.12 45.65 41.55 S 1950 1963 25 (038-631-1) F 609R 456 1947 B -108.1 -129.4 -131.6 -133.0 2.4 1.2 S 1949 1966 27 (030-635-2) F 591R 422 1948 S -27.9 -65.2 -63.4 -9.0 -S;D, 1967 1951 1962 29 (035-637-1) F 766R 524 1947 C -102.3 -129.6 -133.40 -135.57 4.96 7.97 S 1948 1966 31 (037-645-1) F 690R 527 1948 S -46.8 -71.8 -73.5 -75.2 2.1 0.2 S 1948 1966 34 (028-629-1) F 540 -1947 S +26.6 -9.22 -16.28 -16.90 11.28 10.95 S 1950 1962 OKEECHOBEE COUNTY 2 S 21 18 1949 C +46.7 +38.82 +40.31 +39.68 3.03 8.13 M;GravelPacked 1957 1962 12 to 21 ft 3 S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.19 +59.20 4.22 4.04 M 1959 1950 21 F 1,182 461 1967 S --+6.00 +6.4 -1.0 22 H 1,025 416 1951 S --+10.0 +9.9 -1.4 23 F 926 496 1951 S --+5.4 +6.1 -0.9 24 F 1,448 611 1953 S ---+8.0 -1.3 35 F 1,327 -1961 S --+14.1 +11.3 -1.4 ORANGE COUNTY 47 (832-128-1) F 350 328 1930 C +2.20 -14.30 -13.53 -14.87 6.47 8.33 1960 1962 47B (832-128-3) S 20 17 1948 M +3.04 -10.01 -9.94 -11.72 4.46 6.28 1960 1962 47C (832-128-4) S 50 461948* M -27.47 -39.35 -35.47 -37.95 3.61 4.89 Continuous 1960 1953 record 4-1-67 to 6-12-68 832-105-1 F 492 151 1961 M -26.47 -28.67 -30.57 -29.74 5.46 9.39 1966 1963 OSCEOLA COUNTY 171 S 19 13 1950 C +32.38 +27.8 +28.10 +28.67 5.11 4.35 M; Gravel Packed 1966 1956. 11 to 19 ft 179 S 18 18 1949 C +47.1 +43.27 +43.26 +43.42 4.57 5.16 M 1960 1962 181 S 16 14 1948 C +77.9 +71.72 +72.98 +71.37 4.79 4.54 M 1957 1962

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Ch g" Prior to 1967 Highest water Remarks wa, Number leve l in May Annual Remarks E level in May Range .May or June or June E (yea) H (yea) 1967 1968 1967 1968 182 S 23 16 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.28 +59.14 4.13 4.06 M 1957 1950 183 S 27 22 1948 C +73.2 +68.3 +69.27 +71.68 4.68 5.06 M 1957 1956 PALM BEACH COUNTY 88 B 17 16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +4.60 +7.18 4.15 7.39 M 1948 1956 99 B 18 16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 +6.39 +8.15 2.57 5.13 M 1957 1956 109 B 14 9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +18.24 +18.30 2.09 2.54 M 1957 1956 110 B 8 8 1951 C -2.40 -6.00 -3.35 -2.55 3.71 3.45 B 1966 1962 PASCO COUNTY 13 (815-226-1) F 49 43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1 -9.20 -9.22 4.69 4.33 1959 1945 826-211-214 F 227 49 1959 C -9.97 -22.75 --23.20 5.85 6.30 1960 1962 PINELLAS COUNTY 13 (808-245-1) F 141 33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.79 -9.27 1.75 1.59 T 1948 1950 166 (800-247-1) F 195 -1945 B -12.18 -18.34 -15.87 -14.70 6.34 0.94 1951 1953 246 (758-247-1) F 208 -1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -27.45 -27.59 1.82 2.32 T 1948 1956 665 (758-244-4) F 299 81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -23.80 -23.92 3.09 2.98 1959 1955 POLK COUNTY 44 (810-136-I) F 195 81 1945 C -1.70 -5.74 -4.93 -4.98 3.21 3.15 1960 1962 45 (759-I58-I> F 643 318 1948 M -63.65 -92.10 -92.94-101.92 11.37 24.93 S 1948 1965 47(810-136-2) S 67 60 1948 C -54.8 -49.6 -48.96 -49.49 3.92 3.87 1960 1962 48 (732-131-1) S 62 59 1948 C -43.51 -48.11 -46.19 -46.59 1.94 3.22 1954 1956 49 (748-1191) S 17 14 1949 C +0.23 -5.94 -4.98 -3.60 4.97 4.73 1957 1962 51 (744-131-1) H 319 208 1949 B -5.08 -17.25 -23.97 -26.68 13.29 16.75 P 1958 1962 753-158-3II F 710 237 1955 C -15.88 -47.15 -60.80 -56.80 20.45 28.93 P 1958 1965 802-132-I F 463 137 1959 .B -7.65 -12.34 -14.51 -14.07 5.25 4.14 1961 1966 805-155-2 F 311 82 1956 B -15.18 -25.64 -30.53 -29.49 9.28 11.08 1959 1962 805-155-3 H 72 62 1955 B -12.52 -21.73 -25.16 -25.53 7.41 10.49 1959 1962

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) WellNubePrior to 1967 Highest water Annu Remarks We Number Prir to 17 level in May Su May or June or June (Year)Hih Lw 1967 1968 1967 1968 (year) (year) 806-156-1 S 13 10* 1955 S -3.69 -9.73 -9.76 -2.31 5.12 Screen 10 1959 1963 to 13 ft 806-156-2 H 103 63 1956 S -16.89 -29.66 -32.34 -32.26 8.76 11.55 1959 1962 PUTNAM COUNTY 28 (925-138-1) F 159 -1936 B -6.2 -9.81 -9.35 -10.36 2.42 3.86 S 1944 1962 29 (939-138-1) F 300R -1936 B +10.8 +2.02 +1.35 -0.73 4.49 7.23 S 1936 1962 & 1957 937-153-1 F 303R 300 1934 S -29.51 -35.65 -29.42 -31.68 1.00 1.69 X 1961 1957 939-134-11 F 547 113 1958 S +4.26 -1.75 -5.85 -9.67 7.80 10.32 1959 1962 943-152-1 H 151 125 1956 B -42.45 -46.66 -44.70 -46.71 1.49 2.06 1966 1957 ST. JOHNS COUNTY 5 (007-123-1) F 350R 180 1934 A +43.9 +33.8 +32.8 +32.1 -1951 1963 8 (005-129-1) F 336R 240 1934 A +36.5 +22.7 +22.0 +20.7 -1947 1963 000-123-2 F 258 -1957 B +4.72 -0.57 -3.64 -4.64 -1959 1962 937-122-1 F 622 142 1958 C -17.30 -21.51 -23.13 -23.13 4.95 6.31 1959 1963 941-129-7 F 541 118 1955 A +10.1 -2.01 -3.73 -11.51 --P 1959 1966 947-126-1 F 275 101 1956 A -1.55 -17.39 -18.31 -31.63 --P 1958 1966 ST. LUCIE COUNTY 41 S 17 13 1950 C +28.2 +24.45 +24.20 +27.26 3.26 5.10 M 1957 1965 42 S 18 13 1950 C +26.9 +23.76 +24.02 +25.46 2.78 3.27 M 1951 1961 SANTA ROSA COUNTY 102 (021-709-8) S 41 31* 1950 A -4.43 -9.52 -7.66 -8.85 --Screen 31 1960 1955 to 41 ft 035-706-1 G 211 206* 1959 M -82.84 -89.48 --94.95 2.80 1.13 Screen 206 1961 1966 to 211 ft 040-708-1 G 128 123* 1959 M +4.83 +1.28 ----* Screen 123 1961 1963 to 128 ft; D, 1967 041-649-1 G 98 93* 1959 B -56.34 -61.90 -63.19 -68.70 3.82 4.03 Screen 93 1960 1963 to 98 ft SARASOTA COUNTY 9 (719-225-1) F 730R 101 1930 C +4.51 -9.36 -18.03 -11.15 16.23 16.73 S 1931 1962

PAGE 84

Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Wl Num r | Prior to 1967 Hige Mwater A Remarks E level in May May or June or June < (High LOw 1967 1968 1967 1968 SEMINOLE COUNTY 125 (841-121-1) F 146 63 1951 C -34.18 -42.60 -42.55 -42.65 5.38 6.84 1960 1962 257 (847-113-6) F 206 -1951 B +5.10 +0.27 -0.50 -0.74 4.82 5.09 1953 1962 SUMTER COUNTY 852-201-1 F 125 45 1961 B -29.94 -33.26 -31.81 -34.80 2.51 6.11 1964 1963 SUWANNEE COUNTY I09-249-1 F 138 135 1961 B -18.94 -35.31 -33.45 -38.06 6.81 1.26 1964 1963 TAYLOR COUNTY 35 (003-330-) F 230 189 1946 C -1.00 -30.9 -26.0 -33.4 18.8 14.0 P 1949 1962 36 (004-331-1) S 35 -1947 A -5.05 -23.95 -9.40 -14.95 --P 1964 1957 UNION COUNTY aOI-224-I F 256 198 1960 B -89.54 -93.57 -90.67 -94.52 3.42 1.84 1961 1963 007-222-1 F 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -93.00 -91.06 -94.78 4.85 2.34 1959 1962 VOLUSIA COUNTY 2 (911-125-I) F 107 -1936 B -11.86 -18.73 -18.93 -19.97 3.05 2.57 1951 1963 30 (917-128-1) F 180R -1936 B +11.2 +6.7 +9.12 +6.61 2.56 3.60 1959 1948 31 (856-105-1) F 121 113 1936 C -4.72 -8.60 -7.97 -8.23 3.83 4.16 1953 1962 32 (919-125-1) F 138R -1936 B -1.2 -5.11 -6.33 -7.07 3.68 4.62 1937 1963 & 1938 851-118F 203 105 1956 B --+1.06 +0.17 3.54 3.09 905-113-3 F 351 94 1955 B -0.22 -3.66 -2.57 -3.21 3.58 3.90 1958 1956 909-106-1 F 235 102 1955 B -5.25 -8.07 -10.87 -11.63 4.23 5.37 1959 1963 909-106-9 F 496 480 1955 B -6.62 -9.55 -11.61 -12.43 4.41 5.31 1958 1963 909-123-1 F 221 -1953 B --+1.98 +0.05 0.84 2.01 910-105-1 F 498 152 1955 B -12.84 -19.73 -20.30 -23.94 5.28 7.65 1958 1962 911-104-4 F 235 115 1955 B -15.72 -27.55 -25.83 -30.19 9.54 10.39 1955 1965 9I1-I04-9 F 500 483 1955 B -10.26 -13.89 -15.75 -16.83 4.65 5.05 1948 1963 919-105-1 F 140 -1967 B ---5.00 -4.18 6.05 4.94 I F 700 316 1966 B ---11.99 -13.37 2.62 4.03

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet) Well Number Prior to 1967 Highet water Annu Remarks e = E levelin May Range ,V J May or June or June Hih Lw E 1967 1968 1967 1968 04 4.E (5(year) (year) WAKULLA COUNTY 2 (009-412-1) F 65 22 1946 B -0.86 -3.05 --1.94 1.43 0.66 T 1958 1951 11 (000-426-1) F 70 45 1946 A -5.58 -8.25 -6.58 -8.10 --T 1955 1960 005-417-1 F 77 -1961 A -1.13 -3.48 -4.00 -3.08 -1964 1963 011-410-1 F 80 -1961 A -0.12 -1.87 -2.13 -2.12 --X 1964 1962 WALTON COUNTY 13 (022-606-1) F 450R -1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +11.1 +7.3 1.6 9.9 1950 1956 019-610-1 F 615 188 1961 B +14.7 +11.6 -+9.0 -9.0 1964 1963 029-614-1 F 160 -1961 S +21.0 +19.5 +19.4 +15.5 0.4 10.9 X 1964 1963 040-621-1 F 630 323 1947 B -126.2 -154.4 -136.9 -144.0 3.10 5.2 X 1948 1949 043-612-1 F 509 323 1961 A -144.0 -148.2 -145.4 -146.8 -4.3 X 1965 1962 WASHINGTON COUNTY 4 (046-548-1) F 785R -1935 B -7.20 -15.09 -12.75 -12.50 2.88 6.95 X 1964 1954 037-542-2 F 206 202 1961 B -13.72 -20.20 -19.60 -19.98 3.06 3.33 1964 1963 030-535-422A F 150 110 1962 C -2.4 -12.76 -6.85 -10.55 3.04 9.51 1965 1963 030-535-422B NA 26 23* 1962 B -3.45 -6.56 -4.55 -6.49 1.95 6.36 Screen 23 1964 1962 to 26 ft

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-FLORIDA-GEOLOGICAL-SURVEY COPYRIGHT NOTICE [year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text] The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder for the text of this publication. Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and 377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government, makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction. The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution. The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications. All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional information and permissions.


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