Citation
Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1965-66 ( FGS: Information circular 61 )

Material Information

Title:
Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1965-66 ( FGS: Information circular 61 )
Series Title:
FGS: Information circular
Creator:
Healy, Henry G
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Florida -- Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Publisher:
State of Florida, Bureau of Geology
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v, 55 p. : ill., maps. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aquifers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida ( lcsh )
City of Pensacola ( local )
City of Lakeland ( local )
Water wells ( jstor )
Chlorides ( jstor )
Beach ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Bureau of Geology and other State and local agencies.
Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
General Note:
Series Statement: Bureau of Geology. Information circular no. 61
Statement of Responsibility:
by Henry G. Healy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
022159465 ( ALEPH )
04677367 ( OCLC )
AFD1779 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES




STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Robert O. Vernon, Chief
INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61
WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1965-66
By
Henry G. Healy U. S. Geological Survey
Prepared by
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
BUREAU OF CEOLOGY
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
TALLAHASSEE 1970




557!, ,5 9 F ri1
f)O. 41 1 yg
Completed manuscript received
November 11, 1968
Printed by the Florida Department of Natural Resources
Bureau of Geology Tallahassee II




CONTENTS
Page
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Well-numbering system ........................... 2
Principal aquifers . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 4
Northwestern Florida .. .. ... ... .. .. ... .. .. .. .. 6
Pensacola area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Ft. Walton area .. .. .. .. .. .. ............. 8
Panama City area ........................ ... 15
Northern and North-Central Florida . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Tallahassee area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Fernandlna-Jacksonville area . . . . . . . . . . 20
Central Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 22
Tampa-St. Petersburg area ......... ............... 22
Lakeland area . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 27
Orlandoarea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Cape Kennedy area ....................38
SaataBtd no are . . . . 40
SarasOta-Bradenton area ........................ 40
S Southern Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . 40
Ft. Myers area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Stuart-West Palm Beach area ....................... 45
Ft. Lauderdale area . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Miami area ................ .. .................. 45
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1 Observation-well network, December 1966, and the extent of principal aquifers in
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .3
7r 2 Well-numbering system ........................ 5
3 Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July
6-17, 1961 . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .6
4 Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are
given . . . . . . . . ... ...... . ...... 7
5 Total yearly pumpage, city of Pensacola, Florida . . . . . . 9
6 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Eseambia 45 at Cantonment, 46
near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensacola area . .. .......... . 10
7 Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1965-66 11
8 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft.
Walton Beach area . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
9 Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to
f") May 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
10 Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1964 to
May 1966 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
11 Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida . . . . . . . 16
iii




ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
12 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington,
Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville . . . . . 17
13 Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which
hydrographs are given ....................... 18
14 Total yearly pumpage, city of Tallahassee, Florida . . . . . 19
15 Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at Tallahassee and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1965-66 . 20
16 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18
near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida21
17 Total yearly pumpage, city of Jacksonville, Florida . . . . . 23
18 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122
at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida ............ ...... ...... 24
19 Net changes of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May
1951 to May 1964 and from May 1964 to May 1966 . . . . 25
20 Locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are
given ................. ................ 26
21 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehren and
Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park. Tampa area . .... ........... 27
22 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1965-66 . . 28
23 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin,
Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater . . . 29
24 Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at
Dunnedin, St. Petersburg area . . . . . . . . . . 30
25 Total yearly pumpage, city of Lakeland, Florida . . . . . . 31
26 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1965-66 . 32
27 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport
and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area . . . . . . . 33
28 Trends and fluctuations of water levels ih wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51
at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring . . . . . . . 34
29 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and
Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley . . . . . . . . 35
30 Total yearly pumpage, Orlando, city of Cocoa and Winter Park, Florida . 36 31 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1965-66 . 37
32 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 45 near Orlando . 38 33 Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern- central
coastalFlorida .......................... 39
34 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9,
Sarasota-Bradenton area . . . . . . . . . . . 41
35 Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given . 42 36 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and
departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1965-66 . 43
37 Trends and fluctuations of water leels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54
Everlades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida 44
38 Total yearly pumpage, city of Stuart, Florida . . . . . . 46
39 Trnds and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and
departmues from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1965-66 . . 47
IV




ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
40 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1965-66 48
41 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth,
Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami 49
42 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood,
Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead,tDade F179 at Miami, and Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale . . . . . . . . . 50
43 Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward 5830 near Ft. Lauderdale,
and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami . . . . . . . . 51
44 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead, and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1965-66 . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
45 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami,
and Dade G72 northwest of Opa-locka . . . . . . . . 53
46 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and
G620 in central Dade County . . . . . . . . . . 54
47 Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 near Miami and Dade
G469 and S529 in southeastern Dade County . . . . . . 55
TABLES
Table Page
1 Well and water-level data for selected observation wells in Florida . Appendix
v







WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1965-66 by
Henry G. Healy
INTRODUCTION
This report summarizes the trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the principal aquifers in Florida during 1965-66 and includes the following: (1) hydrographs of ground-water levels in the several aquifers; (2) maps showing changes in ground-water levels during specific periods; and, (3) a table summarizing the principal data on selected observation wells. Observation wells for which records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources Data-Collection Stations in Florida, 1961," Florida Geological Survey Special Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey, (now the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources), includes the location, aquifer, and type and period of records available for 3,600 observation wells.
Since World War II, and particularly during the last decade, the demand for fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural uses in Florida has increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies have been adequate for the increased demand in most areas, water levels have declined appreciably in some. Because demand for ground-water continues to increase, shortages will occur and may become critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from deterioration in quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of water available. In order to prevent future shortages, the present supplies of ground-water must be properly appraised before they can be effectively utilized. Records of trends and fluctuations of ground-water have long formed a basis for such an appraisal.
The principal objective of the investigations of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey is to appraise and to evaluate the nation's water resources. Although many types of ground-water investigations are carried out on a statewide basis throughout the nation, the collection and compilation of basic hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources studies.
Objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evaluation of available ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of water levels; and the delineation of present or potential areas of detrimentally high or low ground-water levels. Water levels are used to determine the base flow of streams, to portray the effects of natural and man-induced forces that .act on a water-bearing formation and to furnish information for use in basic research. The hydrologic data program provides the foundation information necessary for the successful and meaningful accomplishment of water resources investigations.




2 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
The hydrologic data-collection program of the U. S. Geological Survey is part of the cooperative investigations of the water resources of Florida in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, and other state and local agencies and municipalities. The observation-well network in 1966 included about 850 ground-water data-collection stations in the 67 counties of the state. Figure 1 shows the locations of selected ground-water stations in the statewide network. Table 1 (see appendix) lists data on 307 observation wells selected from the statewide network of wells.
The hydrologic-data program consists of the collection, tabulation, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of water-level and related data. Water levels for selected wells are published, at present, once every 5 years in the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers.
Information pertinent to ground water is also published in interpretative reports of investigations published by the Florida Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey. Data collected during an investigation and prior to publication are available from the District Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, P.O. Box 2315, Tallahassee, Florida, 32304.
The water-level data used in this report represent measurements taken from automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and made by tape. In general, water-level measurements made by tape and stage recorder are shown to the nearest hundredth of a foot, and those made with a pressure gage are shown to the nearest tenth of a foot.
Table 1 summarizes well-data and water-level information for the several aquifers. Well data include the aquifer, depth of well, and depth of casing. The items: "Year record began" and "Frequency of measurements" are included as part of the well data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or June are used because records are available for these months for a large percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are lowest during May or June in most areas and records during that period constitute a base for comparison from year to year. Highest and lowest water levels of record prior to 1965 are given in the table. Generally, highest and lowest levels are highest daily levels if taken from recorder charts. The range of fluctuations for 1965 and 1966 are shown under "Annual range."
WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEM
Two well-numbering systems are used in this report; serially by counties or by a grid-coordinate system based on latitude and longitude of the well location. Frequently both numbers have been assigned to the well; e.g., a well number may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This affords a tie-in with water-level data published previously under well number 20 in Bay County with data that may be published for the same well under number 008-537-2.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 3
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
87r* 86 85* 84* 83' 31 :
4
/..-. 4:
0!
/ 32'
29'* .
EXPLANATION 3
30'30P
. Observation well 2' Chloride sample PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
Sand-ond-gravel
Floridon
121
7 929
Floriden and/or ohers
Biscayne District
-Approxi e oquier boundary
2128
26F Chloride wells
Control and Southern Floridoaa *
Flood Control Project
E11 *4
Southwest Florida o27
Waler Monogement District
2'f 845*8' ~ 8 d~
*
---ofoimt paincipa aqoundanrForya
12O 2*
0~~~ ~ 10200405 ie
F6 hoigue 1.ebserainwl newrDcme96,adteetn
ofeincina annifhrs in Florida.




4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or suffix. In Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and NP denote Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and National Park Service wells, respectively. In Dade, Escambia, Highlands, Holmes, and Leon Counties, the letter suffix A denotes a shallow well near a deeper well having the corresponding number without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter suffixes B and C denote shallow wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47.
The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived from latitude and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude prefix north and west and the first digit of the degree number are iot included in the well number.
The well number is a composite of three numbers separated by hyphens: the first number is composed of the last digit of the degree and the two digits of the minute that define the latitude on the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the second number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of the minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute quadrangle; and the third number gives the numerical order in which the well was inventoried in the I-minute quadrangle. For example, well number 835-105-1 is the first well inventoried in the I-minute quadrangle north of the 28035' parallel of latitude and west of the 81005'meridian of longitude. The location of well 835-105-1 is shown diagrammatically in figure 2.
PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
Ground-water supplies for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in Florida are available from three principal aquifers: the Floridan aquifer in central and northern Florida; the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida; and the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the extreme northwestern part of Florida. The generalized areal extent of the aquifers supplying most of the ground water is shown in figure 1.
The Floridan aquifer, which underlies all of the state, is the principal source of water in central, northern, and most of northwestern Florida. Areas of artesian flow and the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is illustrated by Figure 3. Highly mineralized water precludes the use of the Floridan aquifer as a source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of southern Florida. In these areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian aquifers are the source of supply.
The Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source of water supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This aquifer, one of the most highly productive aquifers in the world, underlies about 3,500 square miles of Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne aquifer is sharply restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of saline waters.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 5
-I I
Marion Co --- J Valusia Co.
29"00'
I I,.,o .\
Lake Co. -. I r- 11 1-I tI
I- 28030'
Orange Co.
28040' -I SI Polk Co. Osceola Co. ''" I L \
I 's 28*00' 81030' 8I100'
28030'
81010 8100'
28037'
II
28035' 6
81008 i07 06 8105'
Figure 2. Well-numbering system




6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Figure 3. Potentiometric surface and areas o flow of the A loridan
aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal source of water supply, yielding large supplies of ground water for industries and
gar -NI 4
EXPLNATIO N
Cmunipalitis. The aquifer extends beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa N
counties and part of western Okaloosa County.
This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four sections as follows: (1) northwestern Florida, (2) northern, northeastern, and north-central Forida; (3) central Florida; and (4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida.
NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA The northw:tern section includes the Florida Panhandle extending from the Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line (Figure 4).




I, L A A M A.
HOLM ES .--... .J AC KSON SANTA ROSAA I
A, N'7 0 S" I I
iJWSI 0 K A L 0 0 SH A 7N
*31 025 W A L T 0 W S IT0N
*461 FPT WALTON INA
Fg!re 4 t ,a C A i.. H 0 N 01 WINTON BA Y
EXPLANATION PAAM ol"IS3 Oblermlaen well ad mber
G UL F OF AIEXICO G u OF "
1i9ff MAP SAE0 5 10 s0 30 40MIE
Figure 4. Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given




8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
The principal sources of ground-water supply in this section are the sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and the Floridan aquifer in the rest of the section. Minor supplies of ground water are obtained from shallow nonartesian aquifers.
The Pensacola, Ft. Walton Beach, and Panama City areas of the Florida panhandle are growing rapidly in industry and population.
PENSACOLA AREA
The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, and like many others in the state, is undergoing rapid economic development accompanied by increasing use of water by industry and municipalities. Figure 5 shows that 1966 pumpage for the city of Pensacola was about six and one half times that of 1940.
The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began in 1939 as part of the investigation to determine the adequacy and permanency of ground-water supply in Escambia County. Figure 4 shows locations of observation wells selected from the hydrologic-data network for which hydrographs are given in this report, and table 1 presents data on 13 wells in Escambia county and 4 wells in Santa Rosa county. Figure 6 shows fluctuations and long-term trends of artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the Pensacola area from 1960 through 1966.
Comparison of the hydrographs for the period of record reveals that while water levels at the end of 1966 declined in central and southern Escambia county, they remained above the low levels of the 1955-56 drought. Declines of artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer ranged from nearly 30 feet in well Escambia 45 at Cantonment to about 10 feet in well Escambia 46 near Ensley during 1941-66.
In the coastal area, at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well Escambia 62, at the end of 1966, was about the 1941 level. The trends and fluctuations of artesian ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly average rainfall at Pensacola, 1965-66 are shown in figure 7.
FT. WALTON AREA
The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and Eglin Air Force Base. The rate of growth of industry and population is accelerating. Pumpage from the Floridan aquifer for all uses is about 10.0 mgd (million gallons per day). As a result of continuing heavy pumping, water levels have declined in about a 640 square-mile area.




5,000.
,00.
380cL _ __ _ U,
o 3400
-J
-J
,..o. AY///AVA
Figure 5. Total yearly pumpage, city of Pensacola. Florida .
4
2CL
13,000
0 .
Fiue5 oa erl u pgct f esclFoia




10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
ESCAMIBA 45 DEPTH 152 FT CASED 129 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)
7o 72
74 i f
76
96
10
1 4
ESCAMBIA 46 DEPTH 239 FT CASED 229 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)
S62 ---<64
s
968-- - --
az
70--------------------------------------. .
84
.ESCAMBIA 6 DEPTH 129 FT CASED 1429 FT. SAND-AND-6RAVEL AQUFER_ (ARTESIAN)
72
10 1945 195 195 1 960 196
<~ 6I
Fig4 n 6.TedW ndfutaio so aer levels in wellse Escambia4 at Cantonments = n E n I I P Pso arIa
68
< 84 --- -
- ESCAMA 62 DEPTH 142 FT. CASED 142 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)
"~ t
S l .- -- ---v ----14
16- j_.--- -- -/21940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975
Fgure 6. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escmbia 45 at Cantonment, 46 near Ensicy, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensaola area -. '" .




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 1
ESCAMBIA 62
Sond ad g.rtd AWfW (Artesnr)
Depth 142 ft.
Cd 142 2.
is 1JIF II I J I1 1 A I I OIII III I J I I0N1 I I tM j I I S l I D JI'''i I J1 I A I 01 JI I M I I I I 1 1 NID 24
d FMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONQJiFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND
z
2f
to
4'M Normal monthly
Oil
I
0 II I I I I1. 1 1 l l i 1
J F M AMJ JASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDjJFMAMJ J A S ONDJ FMAMJJASOND
1965 1966 1967 196 1969
Figure 7. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1965-66
The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach (figure 8) shows a maximum decline of 107.0 feet from 18.5 feet above land surface in 1947 to 88.5 feet below land surface in July 1965. In August 1936, the artesian water level was 46 feet above land-surface datum. During the period from August 1936 to July 1965, the water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 134.5 feet, from 46 feet above land surface to 88.5 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net change of water levels map, figures 9 and 10. Water-level changes during 1951-64 are shown by figure 9. Changes of ground-water levels for the current period, 1964-66 are shown by figure 10.




12 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
OALOOSA 3 DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 500 FT. FLORIDAN .AQUIFER
12 -4 .
I1 I I]
z- 1 6- - - -
c 6 Wt l Iee I on Ag 1,96
46 ft b l surface
U - I ------ -;
-4
LL -52; :
-6
>. O4 S:A 25 609 FT CASE 4561FT F D E
0
120
I 24
W-40 ater l is offecd by region pumping44
OKAL005A 35 DEPTH 69 FT. CASED 4527 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER i04 I I !1 1 I I I-48- --52-"--56--------------::;, 1ii A i
S60-----------------64 Water level is affected by regional pumping
88
- -68 -------------LU 7 - -
1945-- 1950--1955--1960--1965--1970---975---980
F iguWater level s affected by regional pumping
and 31 Ft W III 11 I r e
q- IIIII IIII I I I -r T DF
OKALOOSA 25 DEPTH 609 FT. CASED 456 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER LU 4
19452 190 15 90 165 1795 18
p 1 40mds Wled level iso ffacted by regianw pumping
OKALOSA 31 DEPTH 690 FT. CASED 527 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
44 --~
8
'4 56--- -- tr----i- afcedb rqonlpupn
8.Wte evli aftd b reand pumpain fwae eein wells Okaloo-a-3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach aiea.




A L A B A M A
- F -- 0 R I D- - -EEIAATIOW
*ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON -- (Line of equal not change of groundvater levels in the paori"n aquifer. II I nterval 2 feet.-+2
Line at equal not cheap of groundwater levels in the sand-and-gravel aqui er. Interval 2 feet.
g23
0srvation well and
S 5 20 30 40
SNet cne o oun-water levels Pensacola and Ft. Walton aeas M 1951 to MaY 1964z va SCALE MILESLS
Figure 9. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1964.




A L A B A M A ,',I"A"O
FL Linle of equal net change of ground*
I"- F, o R D A .... s.".."s ". m-"".-."
Fcer levels i n th Fl. rtdon .quitst]
SESCA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON e
.2- LLne o equ-i nec change of groufnd.I I
4, usur Ilevls inr hel sand'nd-iravel
qu te n .*3
1 03
59 t
0
10 t"'
( o 8
0 5 0 20 30 40 9'. SCALE MILD
Figure 10. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1964 to May 1966.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 15
PANAMA CITY AREA
The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including Tyndall Air Force Base.
The Floridan aquifer-either indirectly or directly-supplies most of the water for municipal, industrial and military needs in the area. Springs from the Floridan aquifer supply Deer Point Reservoir the principal source of water for municipal use. Wells that tap the Floridan aquifer supply the paper and pulp industry and military needs at Tyndall Air Force Base. Figure 11 shows total pumpage from Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and Millville for 1944-66. Pumpage of ground water for municipal use declined from an average of 1,200 mgy (million gallons per year) in 1961-62 to an average of 865 mgy in 1963-66. To some extent, reduced pumpage by Panama City wells and a change in the site of the source of water supply for the pulp industry allowed water levels to rise sharply during 1964-65. During this period, levels rose about 24 feet from 78 feet to 54 feet below land surface in well Bay 7 (figure 12).
The rise of water levels in wells Walton 13 and Washington 4 during the same period indicates that the rise of water levels at Panama City reflected a major regional fluctuation or trend, as well as a reduction of pumping.
NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA
The northern and north-central Florida section extends from the Apalachicola River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Georgia line southward to the latitude of Ocala, figure 13, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy, Marion, and Volusia counties.
The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply in coastal areas in eastern St. Johns, Flagler and Volusia counties. Another important source of water in these areas is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer.
TALLAHASSEE AREA
The Tallahassee area includes central Leon County and the city of Tallahassee. The area is primarily residential with only sparse light industry.
The principal water user, the City of Tallahassee, supplies water for municipal use to the most rapidly growing residential and educational complex in northern Florida. Since 1945, annual municipal pumpage at Tallahassee has increased nearly 430 percent from 850 mgy to about 3,650 mgy. Figure 14 shows pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1933-66.
Water-level fluctuations in the Floridan aquifer at Tallahassee are shown by the hydrograph of well Leon 7, figure 15. The upward trend of levels of 1964 was continued into 1965-because of above average rainfall during that year.




II
I,400
(n
1,20Qa 1100Q
90Q
0
700
Figure 11. Total yearly pumpage, Panama City. Florida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO.61 17
WALTON 13 DEPTH 450 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
26 --24
W 22 Uw U
UJ<20 S 18
Cr N I I I I I I I I I I I I
- ) 16 z 14
- 12 --w> I10---0
6 Water level is affected by regional pumping
4 j 111111.
BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
3G6 38
40 42
44 46
48 50
52
54
56----S58
60
62
64 k
66 z 68 70 72
>II
L, 74
, 76
78 80
82
84 86
S Water level affected by pumping of nearby wells
88 I I 1946 through 1963 1 1 1 190 II II I I I I I I III I
92
S WASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
0 0
2
14
n 6L
z20
48
a 26
28
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 12. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point
Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville.




A I. Af ~ -- O
AL AA
N o S A
s ) A 0 5 D 6 N 7(* "***.*"*... ....
E 0 N M A DI O0N H1A M IL TONI
I' I or
ift J-098 j 164
.. ...s ) M,,, uCO L U M I A "v L
WA U LLA U SUWANNEE .-9-.-*
U, A L 611 NiNr
" "" T A Y L. 0 R LAAYETTE U I N C L A Y FRANKLIN / " /RADFORD
*AL A r~. T. J 0"" IC, oH N0
EXPLANATION 0GI.CHRIST "
OF (PU"T HAM.7". ... T"ti .." k
-.' F- OF MXICO
- MEXICFO -0 L It ~ A06
-____ I I '<' V LU SIA
Fire 13. Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given.




3 | I1 I I I I" I r I I I
3,4003,000.
z
0
(D
1,00
F -il Figure 14. Total yearly pumpage, city of Tahahalssee, Florida.




20 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
i1
01 F___________ ?A______ A___J___Q__I___JJ_'5_______II__j-S''NDJ' MA iA
Ii i II
A- i
05 0 0 JLF MIAM L A S 0 N F W I A M J iA S 0 IJ F M A M J J A S 0 N J F M A MJ J A S 0 N D
'1aV 3J SaSOND JPMAVJJ*SOND JFMAMJJASONDJFS MAMJJASONDJSFMAMJJ3.3A SOND
1985. 1 t 7 1 1969
Figure 15. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at
Tallahassee and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1965-66.
However, during 1966, levels declined. The long-term record of ground-water levels in well Leon 7, at Tallahassee, are shown by figure 16. The hydrograph shows no discernable long-term downward trend for the entire period of record. The short-term trends correspond closely to the areal rainfall with levels declining to the lowest of record during the 1954-56 drought.
FERNANDINA-JACKSONVILLE AREA
The Fernandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest and rapidly expanding industrial areas in the state.
Since 1945, municipal pumpage has increased from 7,900 mgy in 1945 to 13,158 mgy in 1966 with the greatest increase occurring during the 1945-55




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 21
LEON 7 DEPTH 314 FT. CASED 165 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
149
1 52 le < 155 ,-, [ VA z W 158 m i "1 / I 61,, Ii ---)
z 164
167
ql 4- --- -170
S173leel is a afec ted by pumping of nearby wells
MADISON 18 DEPTH 322 FT. CASED 307 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER
14
z3 17
20-n
- z-23- -- t ) A
-26 --wo 29
Lu32
35
66COLUMBIA 9 DEPTH 836 FT. CASED 680 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
69
72 75
U 78
81
0cn
.-j 9 84 -- - ----
30 ASSAU 12 DEPTH 640 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
W+27
-J I
24 %LWater level on Mar. 8, 19:9was
-1 949 fee boveland 'surface
9 -15
+12 --O+9
o +-3
z
-21
c-27 Water level is affected by regional pumping_-30 -33
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975
Figure 16. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida.
nerMdsn oubi tLk1iy2adNsa 2na FradnFoia




22 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
period. Total municipal and industrial pumpage at Jacksonville in 1966 was about 21,100 mgy. Figure 17 shows total yearly Jacksonville municipal pumpage 1921 through 1966.
Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels in the area are shown in figure 18. Ground-water levels, after a sharp rise in 1964 from record 1963 low levels, remained about the same during 1965-66 in well Duval 164 near Mayport and in well Nassau 12 near Fernandina in the coastal areas (figure 16). In contrast, levels at Jacksonville and inland at Callahan declined slightly during 1965-66. Declines of about 3 feet were recorded in well Duval 122 at Jacksonville and in well Nassau 51 at Callahan. Changes in water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Fernandian-Jacksonville area are shown in Figure 19.
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Central Florida includes 20 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles. The extent of this section and location of observation wells for which hydrographs are given are shown in figure 20.
The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply. In central peninsular Florida, levels in well Marion 5 near Ocala and in well Putnam 29 at Palatka remained about the same in 1965-66 after rising about 6 feet near Ocala and 4 feet at Palatka during 1963-64.
Central Florida includes four rapidly growing centers of population and industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton area.
TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG AREA
This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Petersburg, is undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population.
The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 21. Persistent drought conditions and increased pumping during 1965-66 caused water levels in Hilsborough 13 to decline to the lowest levels of record in 1966. Rainfall recorded at Tampa and the fluctuations of the water level in well Hillsborough 13 for the period 1965-66 are shown in figure 22. Near Ruskin, in southern Bilsborough County, water levels in well Hillsborough 30 declined to the lowest level of record in 1965 (figure 23). This decline is part of an extensive regional lowering of water levels which extends from southern Hillsborough County into Manatee and Sarasota counties. (See figure 34.)
Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246, are shown in figure 23. No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13. However, a slight




PUMPAGE, IN MILLIONS OF GALLONS
o o b b o 0 8 0 0 0 0
19210 t
1925
1930-,
S1935 1940 1945
J 1950
0 -- _- --1955 1960
S 1940 c.1 O u0~la OLWO




24 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
ssaU aI EPTH W fT. FLOIAN AUI EE z 4o __ L_-;] ~~ 4 A'
39
~34
32
30 A
"-"J" l l l2 DET 90 FT CSE 1F __ i_-LR A _IvFE v
9 A_ .. ...
f l Ed __ I 1.
29
vat 122 DEPTH 905 FT CA$o O11 Ft oAN AUI'
cUMAL 64 DEPTH 840 FT CASED 450 FT. rtonDAN
tr e is fec by -e
PUA 13 DEPTH 30 FT. CASED LORIDAN AQUIF
5 -L 1 -. - ...
: - -.-. .......
'%3 ....
;40
1930 T35 1940 1945 19 0 19 5 19 0 1989
Figure 18. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau S1 at Callahan,
Dural 122 at Jacksonville, Dual 164 near Mayport, Marlon S near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka. Florida.
L I I I , I,- L 1_4:
0% Tq 3; DEPTH 135 FT.CSD 3 FL.ORIDAN AQUIFER
16.. t Li l"'[i l 1 ti:' 1 i :ii i Lri7_-C L ---_i_--[: _i::l 12, fll1l!1 11l ik.,!_.~~ !1I1__ILII ~~~.
t I~ I I I I~~ 11 I I I f fi-It-i!!1I IIIII-
190 W5 1940 194 5 1950 195)5 1960 loss
Figure I&. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wels Nassau S I at Callahan,
Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport. Marlon 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida.




NASSAUIN
*
,I o
, t / U,
DU AL l / -,
- Ii Igo
/ JiAl1 i 'K' / Vialli~IlLLW#' iS% ,
--- MI*,
*- e
"0w LUne ch equid not abange of
ground-woaltr lel in hI Ffloln
lateaai 26ee.
eli1s,
I n 0I3' OhiT,
QCAeer!vation well and number CLAY
VW I_1811
-- \ ST JOHNS
L.. \._4 .< ,.. O
0 .sI" \ ',< T KoMMI ,, N PU TNAM o MI --rseLO
FLAGLER' .LA RT
I ae ese **LZ~E
MAY 951 MAY1994MAY 1964 MAY' 1966
and from May 964 to May 1966.




26 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
RA UN L
79
I ~ SEMINGLE
- EI
-,0 R A N G E
S- --- --- -
P \ L K f,
F, \,
\*
*49
INDI AN RIVER
*3
NAT1E~ E H A R D E E
O T L UOKEECHOCEE E S- HI G H L AN VS 13
i orh DE S OT 0
Figure 20. Locations of observations wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given.
downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246. This downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956 and levels continued
to rise through 1959 and were about average during 1965-66.
Changes in chloride content of water from two wells that tap the Floridan
aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 24. At Dunedin, the chloride content of well Pinellas 166 was higher during 1965 than during 1966. In 1965, the chloride content ranged from 76 mg/1 (milligrams per liter) to nearly 500 mg/l in June. In 1966, chloride content ranged from 120 mg/1 in January to 38
mg/il in May in the well at Dunedin.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 27
PASCO 13 DEPTH 49 .FT. CASED 43 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
10 I
1 2 -.-- --HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT. CASED 46 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
1
2 4
Z
Ehe- adHilbog 1 nr C s P
t B," d th c i w P l 5 ranged
r om 1,3 g1i Janar to 2,220mg1 in. Jue Duin 196 chloide 12-i
_j0
HILSORUG 1 EPH 47FL AKELD AREA LOIANAUI
'rowt ofthe-akeln l p -r u 26
: I C -- ....- - - - -
duI 194-. From,1945,through-1955-pumpage inceasd- 83pe t w Uj r i ao 98 pc i an a g r i o m
6 45BOcUr re D ,T Ot 16. thrug May.. FL DN 194-5,th
d7 w resumed It leve In t t l
8 A k ." N I I I I I I Ai
0
_j 13--I- -I
IsI
,,W 22 I I I I J.\
!Wter-level is offecteO b y pumrn .oa 'nearby w ,ls :
3: i
1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 21. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near
Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area.
At Bay Pines, during 1965, the chloride content in well Pinellas 592 ranged
from 1,730 mg/I in January to 2,220 mg/1 in June. During 1966, chlorides
ranged from 2,050 mg/1 in October to 2,265 in May.
LAKELAND AREA
Ground-water pumpage is keeping apace with the economic development and
growth of the Lakeland area. Municipal pumpage increased about 264 percent during 1945-66. From 1945 through 1955 pumpage increased 83 percent with an average increase of 113 mgy. During 1956 through 1966 pumpage increased about 98 percent with an average rate of increase of 206 mgy. Figure 25 shows
the total yearly municipal pumpage at Lakeland for 1928-66.
The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of
Lakeland is shown in figure 26. A maximum decline of about 20 feet in well Polk 45 occurred during October 1960 through May 1962. During 1964-65, the
decline was resumed with levels falling to the lowest of record in 1965.




28 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
ftok W ft
Casd 46t
I I I I I [d I I I I I I I I I I I j IFI I I ~ !j F M A M
s i S 0A J F AMJJ A SON DJ0 MAMJJASON JFM MJJAS ONDJ FMAM J AS 0 NO
J
14 F W a W-J J As a0 DiJ'M. Ir A J J. 01 0jNOJV A. M J'JI' 0$N'0J' FM AM J J A SO N DIJ'FM'AM'JJ ASO ON D
1 965 M 9 9 1969
Figure 22. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1965-66.
In northern Polk county, water levels declined to new record low levels in many areas during 1960-62, rose sharply in 1963, then declined to new record low levels in 1965. Levels in the Floridan aquifer declined nearly 20 feet during 1 964-65 in well Polk 45 in the heavily pumped area south of Lakeland. Levels in well Polk 44 near Davenport in northeastern Polk County declined about 2.5 feet in 1964-65 then rose slightly during 1965-66. Levels in well Polk 47 in the




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 29
I HILLSBOROUGH 30 DEPTH 500 FT. CASED 34 FT. FLOFIDAN AQUIFER
14--------------13
12 ,
f2
LL 9
, g I i l 'li l l
: 0 PINELAS246 EPT 20 FLORIAN AUIFE
-j
LLJ>
0
23
24
S,0
l--- --_- -
5INELLAS 1 DEPTH 141 FT. CASED 33 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
_jJ 9I____ [
<1
Ruskin Pnla13aTapnSrnsadinllas26a lawtr
20 _ __
I- o
9 Waer levelisfectedoby w ides ar trend-of l i a a nonartesian
3
24
_Jt ,- 25
Of 23 "."-,. V4
aqifr wa acc ~oentul saeted by ranalieiiecdndiceaeeumigi
30- I1 IIII
1945 1950 1955 i kn196 t965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near
Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater.
nonartesian aquifer near Davenport declined about 2.5 feet to a new low of record during 1964-66. The downward trend of levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers was accentuated by rainfall deficiency and increased pumping in northern Polk County. Precipitation recorded at Lakeland shows deficient rainfall in the Lakeland area during 1961 through 1966. During 1965 water levels ranged from 11 feet below 1960 highest levels in the Floridan aquifer near Lakeland to about 3 feet lower than 1960 levels in the shallow-sand nonartesian
levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 27.
Water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow sand nonartesian aquifer in southern and southeastern Polk County are shown in figure 28.




30 INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61
1400iW a so( I I.I.I
1200
Floridan Aquifer Depth 195ff. 1000 800
600
. 2CCz
20
8100
SC
Floridan Aquifer Depth 280 ft. 400
0
!PINGILLAS 592
1957 195 195 190 16 I 962 196 1 964 19651 1966"
Figur 24. Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St Petersburg area.




4,400 _ _ _ _ _
3,600____ _U)
Z. ________o ,0
0
7j 2,400o
-J z
1,600
1,200
400
120 I& 113 I1551 19a
Figure 25. Total yearly pumpage, city of Lakeland, Florida.




32 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
a I I I S J. i I I, N J F M M I IS I J I I I O I J J A N J M A .
Ic
31
n
S | I l 1 I s i l I I I I II I I I l lI l i t t i I I I I I I I | It t i l il i i t I l l I I tII I
P i AJ A*SOm0 JFAJJAS 1 ONDJFMAMJJASONOJ FMAMJJASONOJFMAMJJAS OND
ses Me e 968 1969
Figure 26. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1965-66.
The decline of artesian and nonartesian water levels due to the droughts of
1955-56 and 1961-62 and the well defined downward trend of artesian levels in the Hawthorn aquifer are the prominent features illustrated by the hydrographs
in figure 28.
Generally, post-drought levels rose to pre-drought levels in the shallow
nonartesian sand aquifer in southern Polk and Highlands counties. In sharp contrast, water levels in well Polk 51 in the Hawthorn aquifer near Frostproof declined about 2.5 feet from the 1958 high level. In addition, a perceptible downward trend of artesian levels is shown by the hydrograph of this well.
During 1965, levels in this well declined to a new record low of 20.92 feet below
land surface.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 33
POLK 44 DEPTH 195 FT. CASED 81 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
+2
Lj -3 I I I - - --
z 3 ---4 I IL I 1 I
-6 -5
, -7
8
POLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT. CASED 325 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
6 t I I I I I I III I I II I I
I I I
684
172
116 W vo t I um i n
En B/o I N
1 2
e-- ---------3:
9 0
z 43- - - - - -
m 4
9
LU
104-
16 le afecedbyrei
POLK 47 DEPTH 67 FT. CASED 60 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
38 ------------------39 -I
50 51
Figure27.4Trnds-an-fluctationsof-watr-leves-in-wll-olk44-and45-nea
DaerIve oorfet and Peoolk 45onea Laead Laead ra
43
44
LU 0
aU: 47
9m 49
2o -. 6
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 27. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in weli~ Polk 44 and 45 near Davenport and Polk 45 near, Lakelancj, Lakeland area.




34 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
POLI( 49 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
O
UJA 11 III
-- 2
us
-5
3
-7
29
0 PK 51 DEPTH 319 FT. CASED 208 FT. HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN)
34
0
Fue 28rnsadfutaiosfwaelvlsi welsol 49 nea Frspof
P II
f is affected b yo ---- -'22
22 IH-LANDS 1I DEPTH 45 FT. CASED 41 FT, SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
29 - - -
3 - -- I!1-
-~~ AN A! I III
37 -- - - - -
945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 28. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof,
Polk 59 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 35
In central Highlands County near Sebring, levels rose about 3 feet in the nonartesian aquifer from May 1965 to September 1966. During the same period, levels rose about 3.5 to 4 feet in southern Osceola and Okeechobee counties. Figure 29 illustrates fluctuations of water levels in the shallow nonartesian aquifer in Highlands, Okeechobee and Osceola counties.
ORLANDO AREA
The Orlando area includes the cities of Orlando, Winter Park and Maitland in north-central Orange County. The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the water for municipal and industrial needs in the area. Total annual municipal pumpages at Orlando, at Winter Park and for the City of Cocoa are shown in figure 30. Municipal pumpage at Orlando increased about 586 percent from 1941-66.
H2 IGHLANDS 13 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 16 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
31
30
29
LU ::- 625
- 27 -A -- A 26
>w 2
W 7
21 20
"I I I I 68--- -1- -- ---- W ---OESCEOLA 183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
-J 69
j-62 6 - ---8-
W s
S67
GG
6OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED 19 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
60
65
LL > 74 ----
z 71, t' V ll MAI I/
w57 -
58
52
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley.




10,000 9,000 6,000 ORLANDO
CITY OF COCOA ui7,000WINTER PARK
6,000 C
3,000
C
3 0
C
2,0000
1.0000
S1941 1945 1950 1955 1960 19i Figure 30. Total yearly I~pumoue. Orlando. city of'Cocon and Winter Park. IFlorida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 37
Hydrographs of artesian and nonartesian water levels are shown in figure 31. The long-term trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Orlando area is illustrated in figure 32.
The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows water levels declined to record low levels in 1962 and again during May 1965. After declining to a record low in May 1965, levels rose in September 1966 to slightly above September 1964 levels which were about average for the period 1950-66.
o
C
ORANGE 47 8
j Depth 20 ft
Cased 17 ft 1
ORANGE 47
~(Artesion)
Deph 350 f
U- Cased 328 ft. a:
JFMAMJ JIASOND J FMAMJJAISOIND JFMAMJ J ASONDIJ FMAMJ J AS OND J F MAMd JASOND
24 I I I I I i I I i i I I I I i I
0 r
_cL
I
Norml monthy precdpilothio
0
! i tfI I I I I It I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I I ij I i i i i t i i
JFMAMJ J ASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDIJFMAMJJASONDiJFMAMJJASONDN
1965 1966 1967 196B 1969
Figure 31. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1965-66.




38 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
+ ORANGE 47 DEPTH 350 FT. CASED 328 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
0I I
-20
,-6 I I Al I .
7 -1I0
- -I- -1--11-111- -I - - - 11
193 1 935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 32. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47 near Orlando.
CAPE KENNEDY AREA
One of the most rapidly growing areas in the state is the Cape Kennedy area, which includes the cities of Cocoa, Cocoa Beach, and Titusville in Brevard County. In this area, water in the Floridan aquifer is generally brackish and is used primarily for irrigation. Water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in Brevard, Indian River and St. Lucie counties are shown in figure 33.
Hydrographs of wells in Brevard County generally show a long-term downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer. From 1946 through 1965 artesian levels have declined about 7 feet in well Brevard 79 in northern Brevard County about 28 miles northwest of Cape Kennedy and about 14 feet in well Brevard 148 at Cocoa. Water levels in both wells declined to new record lows during 1965, then rose in 1966 to about 1963-64 levels.
Increased water use and deficiency of rainfall contributed to the sharp decline of water levels in Brevard County in 1965. Annual rainfall in 1965 at Titusville was 8.69 inches below normal. In contrast, nonartesian levels in the shallow sand




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 39
BREVARD 148 DEPTH 206 FT. CASED 105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
1 4
to
9
8-
z 1 - --- -- - -- ---------m 7
+ 6
Il I1

z
+3
-J
32 IREVARD 79 DEPTH 160 FT. CASED 85 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER > w 7
0
j I - +- --V-
, 4-(n \1 A 1 r I-- AA-ST LUCREAR 792 DEPTH_160 FT. CASED 85 FT. SHALLO SANRD AQUIF(ONRTEIN
LL0+ IV V1", t I'i!
~W +7 - - V
I~ +6
32 NDIAN RIVER 25 DEPTH 19 FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
I I/ A
30
r U)26-
_(n A9 ,'IA ,0N A I
0jj29
28 -- w
,.,5\I ME ITF I.i I '^
C 27
2.> 261 1
1945T. LUCIE 42 DEPTH1950 19558 FT. CASED 1903 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)1980
Figure 33. Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and
eastern-central coastal Florida. .Zn 28
Wr 26 -5
W- 24. .
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 33. Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida.




40 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties have generally shown no downward trend during the period of record. Levels did decline to the lowest May level since May 1961 in well St. Lucie 42 (figure 33). In 1966, rainfall was 14.58 inches above normal at Titusville.
SARASOTA-BRADENTON AREA
The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in southwestern coastal Florida. Principal economic activities in the area are agricultural-truck and citrus farming and stock raising. The coastal section, however, is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center.
Figure 34 shows trends and fluctuations of water levels in observation wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9.
Hydrographs of both wells show well-defined declines of artesian water levels in the Floridan aquifer. Levels in well Manatee 92 have declined about 18.2 feet from a May 1947 high level of 37.1 below land surface to a new record low of 55.3 feet below land surface in May 1965. Water levels in well Manatee 92 have been declining at an average rate of 0.65 foot each year since 1941. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have declined 13.58 feet from 0.95 foot above land surface in May 1947 to a new record low level of 12.63 feet below land surface in May 1965. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have been declining at an average rate of about
0.5 foot per year since 1931.
A comparison of hydrographs of levels in Manatee 92 to those of well Sarasota 9 shows the decline is continuing and that the range of fluctuations is increasing in both wells. The regional extent of the decline is shown by hydrographs of well Hillsborough 30 (figure 23) and of wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9 (figure 33).
SOUTHERN FLORIDA
The southern Florida section includes all counties south of a line through DeSoto County and covers an area of about 17,500 square miles. The region and locations of selected observation wells for which hydrographs are presented are shown on figure 35.
In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade counties, the Biscayne aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are the main sources.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 41
MANATEE 92 DEPTH 600 FT. CASED 154 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
35 36 37
38
= 38------------- "- "-/ -/ ....---- ---Ir39 -.
D- 1 1
in40
41
4 I j42
43
9 44 L ED 45 ,:
F WMeasurement discontinued S 46 iov. I, 96 i i 47.
ZI
48
w;49
S50 ,I 51
52 Water level is affected by regional pumping
53
54
567# ff I I I I I I I I 11 I I
55
SARASOTA 9 DEPTH 730 FT. CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
6 I +5 I I I
n +3-- - --42
-10
1930 193 194 1945 195 19590 16 J; 0 i : :
-oW SL 'n L 4 11 11 I A I I
ZF-3 TME AREA ad rtrmn center.
l -4-W-7
2 - - - I -n
ID briolm
Water level is affect by regional p i" '
_j j 11t
W _14- 1 1 I I I I I Ii - - -
1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 34. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wels Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area.
FT. MYERS AREA
The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties, and like the Bradenton-Sarasota area to the north, is developing rapidly as a winter tourist and retirement center.




42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
OKEECHOBEE ST. LUCIE ,DESOTO HIGHLANDS r--- --MAR TIN LLAKE
RLo A E LA S
246
LEE H E N D R Y P BEAC
B R\ 0 W A R D S329
C C L L I E R "6-% \617 .
F291
"7 2s., F 2%c .64c
0D E Gi7 O GC20 G596 g G553 N 0 G469dI
0 S196A 6E 3 a mass3 3529c
i fwihdrsein
Figure 35. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs 4re, given.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 43
The principal source of ground water in the Ft. Myers area is the nonartesian
aquifers. Figure 36 shows the seasonal fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the period 1965-66. Generally,.seasonal fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to seasonal fluctuations in the amounts of rainfall. Figure 37 shows the trends and fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern
Florida.
t ,
pth 27 ft.
C d f1 it
JFM AM J JASOND JFMAMJ JASON J FMAMJ J ASON 0 DJFMAMJ J A S 0 NDJFMAM JASOND
24
g
IF
JF4M AMJ JASONDIJ FM AMJ JASONODJ F MAMJ J ASONDJ FMAMJJ AS ONDJ FMAMJ J A S OND
1965' !966 1967 1968 1969
Figure 36. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near FLt. Myers and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1965-66.




44 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
0 LEE 246 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 19 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION NONARTESIAN
I I.nl 111 I I IAr AF IA I 1. 19 d 1 1 1 II I 1
2 I
L-U 3 -h~ll r~lll l I ll
u 31 A5L -1V
12 Water level is affected by pumping ofnearbywells
COLLIER 131 EPTH 54 FT. CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN)
12- ----Wtrlvlsfetdb -upn of nerb -el I I--- ---24
.U-- - - -r 1 1111L 22
16
COLLIER 54 DEPTH 9 FT. CASED 8 FT. SAND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
o
1 4
138
1
COLLIER 14 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT. SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
11-111 Nater ev i oc b narb I
II I I
5 1
17 ITIT-1i flV
1 6 .I-- -- I
Fignze 37. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 Evergdades, Collier 131 near Inunokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart. Florida.
U L
$3-1 7 -- - - -- - -
-~ 8- ---- --- - --4
LULU r A Al -I
-J 7
Vide; ee is affected by n~ping. Qf neaby- jels-
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 37. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 Everglades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 45
STUART-WEST PALM BEACH AREA
This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach counties and is a segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal complex extending from Jacksonville southward through the Keys. Average yearly municipal pumpage at Stuart has increased from an average of 40 mgy during 1941-45 to about 260 mgy in 1966 as shown in figure 38.
The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer at Stuart are shown in figure 37. The hydrograph of well Martin 147 shows a slight downward trend of nonartesian levels. Levels declined to a record low level of about 2 feet above mean sea level in the spring of 1962, 1963 and 1965. The declines were caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field. Although pumpage increased during 1965-66, water levels declined then rose in response to above average rainfall during 1965-66. Figure 39 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Stuart, 1965-66.
The Biscayne aquifer is the chief source of water supply in southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 40 shows the trends and fluctuations of end-of-month water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and rainfall data at West Palm Beach. Fluctuations of water levels for several selected wells are shown in figures 41 and 42.
FT. LAUDERDALE AREA
The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part of Broward County extending from the Deerfield-Boca Raton area in the northern part of Broward County to the Hollywood area in the southern part of the county. Long-term downward trends of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in and adjacent to the Ft. Lauderdale area are shown by the hydrograph of well Broward S329 at Ft. Lauderdale (figure 42).
The Biscayne aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to the coast and along tidal canals. Figure 43 shows graphs of the chloride content of water in well Broward S830 in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field and in wells Dade F64 and F296 in North Miami Beach and Miami. The chloride content of water in well Broward S830 decreased from about 3,700 mg/1 in 1947 to about 50 mg/1 in 1958. From 1958 through 1963, chloride content increased to nearly 2,000 mgfl. In 1964 the chloride content decreased to about 1,700 mg/l and remained at 1,700 mg/l during 1965-66.
MIAMI AREA
The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the most populous area in the state. The principal source of water supply is the Biscayne aquifei, the extent of which is shown on figure 1.




310
270 250
a
.00 230
210
0 1I50 w 0
90- ..
700
1941 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 38. Total yearly pumpage, city of Stuart, Florida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 47
9MAR9N 147
Noesroimon Aqnfe r
DWI% 74 ft.
CO se I7 .
Thel II I locto s o IIIelecel bsrolels in1111 111 Miami111 area 1f 111111c
ate-levelf obselrvaion wer llifasalyl II 1 l33at Hoeteinfell
191 196 16 196 1969 I
shwF igure .Trendseand fluctuations of water levels inwlartnd ainftallcrded
atHmsedepermemntly nomprcptation atat 1965-66.
Exep othe ofreletiey nroobsrast strip, mosno the Miami area wih
JIFIM AIM iJ jA SI01No 0 1FIM A M J JIA SI0 1ND J IIMAMj IA S 0IND j'F I MIA'M'J' JIA I S01 D J I F I MIA!I A sl 1
24 1 I I I I I T_ I I
X
1965 196" 1967 1%68 19,59
Figure 39. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and
departures from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1965-66.
The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for which hydrographs are given are shown by figure 35.
Water-level observations were made as early as 1933 at Homestead in well
Dade S196A. Long-term record of water-level fluctuations at Homestead are shown in figure 42. Figure 44 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Homestead Experimental Station 1965-66.
Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the Miami area is occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells Dade G72, G596, G618, and G620, figures 45 and 46.




48 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
PA"M 8E0N 6
1I l
Aqwk
31t~
TT
I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i
t J A S 0iNDJ F MAMJJASO 0 DJ F M AIMJJASONOJ FUAUJJAS 0 NO DJFMAMJJAIS 0N DI
965 1966 1967 1968 1969
Figure 40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1965-66.
In the vicinity of Miami, fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Biscayne
aquifer are illustrated by hydrographs of wells Dade G10 about 5 miles west of Miami, Dade S19 at Miami Springs (figure 44), and well Dade Fl179 at Miami (figure 41). The water level in well Dade S19 is affected by pumping in the city
of Miami municipal well field.
In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the presence of salty water in an
aquifer is signalled by high chloride content of the ground-water. Sea water is




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 49
PALM BEACH 88 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 16 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
13 1 1 1- - - - 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I
81 -1- 1 V
z 7 f I z 5
ru6
4
2 Prior to 1951 records were blish ed with reference -1 it I lo nd surface 14.44 ft. above mean ea level ]
0
0 I I I I II-I I I I I I
+.10 BROWARD G561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
S +9 I9_I I III
8 -Prior to 1951 recods were published with reference >. +7 : --
Sto nd. urfoce. 8.15 ft. above mean sea level. < 6~
b.U +E - I I I II-l i l i i I
- W +5" 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 .1 1
Lz +4 1 11 1
- 3 -; IUjh I I I I II II
wm +? .,
BROWARD G617 DEPTH 29 FT. CASED 28 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
12 -Ji
-a 9
_j
uLLJ 7
o 6o
4:
5AD 65 DEPTH 9 FT. CASED 9 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
to lnoufc 1.1t aoe men sa lvl > 10
+9
+8 u
I1 : -- - - - - - -
,>
+7
0 -
D 5H+4 9/ F C 7B A
oj All I2L
- < 5 : '1
+1 w ui w
> w I iL X ..rI
I
0
1 +3-- G55 DET 91 FT. CAE 7 T ICEAU R-
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 41. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth,
Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami.




50 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
BROWARO F291 DEPTH 107 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER L UA
4
i! !I !|I /II 1 tI1h 1 I IV A- IIIII
0
OE SIS DEPTH 52 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
O
Lu U
z6
5
LU4
tu 2----------- -4- -DACE SI96A DEPTH 20 FI BISCAYNE AQUiI FER I
8
5
-2
DACE F79 DEPTH 77 F BISCAYNE AQUIFER BROWARD S329 DEPTH 68 FT. BIISCAYNE AQUIFER
u II
Lu 4
BROWARD S329 DEPTH 68 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
10 !ee is affecI b
9
,.- W, ..>
<,--- II IIN
I_, L i
: 5 nearillwIl.s
1950 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figuze 42- Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood,
Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead, Dade F179 at Miami, and Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 51
BROWARD S830 DEPTH II9FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
4000
a:
350C
5000
o 150
t=
-3 WOo
-oo
o
lOD--2 DADE F296 DEPTH 47FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
0
I1200
800
wo I Ii l
6007 - -
4007 -- - - - -
200--- -
0
It I,.' I" I-I I I I I I I I I I I I I
0 46 0 55 60 965 190 975
Figure 43. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward S830 near
Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami.
contained in the seaward reaches of the Biscayne and some encroachment of sea water into the aquifer has occurred through the years. Water control measures have checked the encroachment and as a result a freshening of the ground-water
has occurred in some areas.
Generally, chloride content of ground-water decreased throughout most of
Dade County during 1965-66. Chloride content of ground water in the Biscayne aquifer in well Dade F296 on the coast north of Miami declined sharply from
500 to 100 mg/I during 1965-66.
In northern Dade County, chlorides decreased from 900 mg/I in 1946 to less
IAE r 6 IDEPTH" t 1 14FT 1IAN 1OIE
4W _i 1 I I 1,1 1
2OW
19than 50 mg in 1963 in well Dade G354 and remained less than 50 mg/ during190
1963-66.
FgIn southern coastal Dade Countyin chloride content of ground-water in thewells Broward 830 near
Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami.
contained in the seaward reaches of the Biscayne and some encroachment of sea
water into the aquifer generally remained through the years. Water low concentration in most arol meas duringes have checked the encroachment and as a result a freshening of the ground-water
has1965-66 although inoccurred in some areases were noted in some areas. Chloride content increased
Generally, chloride content of ground-water decreased throughout most of
Dade County during 1965-66. Chloride content of ground water in the Biscayne
aquifer in well Dade F296 on the coast north of Miami declined sharply fromS529. In central coastal
500de County 10 chlo duringde content in well Dade G469 decreased from about 86001965-66.
In northern Dade County, chlorides decreased from 900 mg/l in 1946 to less
than 50 mg/l in 1963 in well Dade G354 and remained less than 50 mg/1 during
1963-66.
In southern coastal Dade County, chloride content of ground-water in the
Biscayne aquifer generally remained at low concentrations in most areas during 1965-66 although increases were noted in some areas. Chloride content increased from 250 mg/l to more than 1,000 mg/l in well Dade S529. In central coastal Dade County, chloride content in well Dade G469 decreased from about 8,600




52 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
D E S 196 A
iane" Aqmfor
O.Pth 20 ft.
3 AMAJi j A SO D F1 MI !!!(I AMJJASONDJ I IIJ JAI I O IN JFIMIAIM JI JASO N I J I MJJ AS O
j .- J J A SO N F N A M JJ A S 0 N 0 1 F M A J J A 0 0 J F N A NOJ J A S0O J F N A N J A 0 N
1 1 s i t 1 1 l l i l ll[f i l l l f i l l i f illf i l l i ffii l l i l l i f t i
i
-4 /
[FRAl M J JASO NO)J FMklAMJ JAS OND)J FMAMJ JA SO NOlJFMA MJ JA SOND JFMAMJ JA SON[
196I 1966 1967 196 1969
Figure 44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead,
and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1965-66.
mg/I in 1965 to about 7,700 mg/i in late 1965 then increased slightly in 1966.
In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination of the Biscayne aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an ever-present problem. Through intensive practice of water control the problem of prevention of salty water contamination has been solved. In many areas where contamination existed the situation has been alleviated by water control. The effectiveness of the method of control is graphically illustrated in figure 47 by the chlorographs of wells Dade G212, G354, and S529.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 53
1DADE SI9 DEPTH 95 FT. CASED 91 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
+10 9 < +8
,, Water levelis offected b pumping of nearbywells >j + -- - ---W +l l I V ,
Wi U)
Li ;o +4- --
Z-< AiIUI
+10 DA DE I IP 6 FT D F wz +4
zi +2- T I
+1
I 1 II I I I I
mJO
I- -I- ---------------DADE GIO DEPTH 6 FT. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
<- +8- --1 D ADE G72 DEPTH 5 FT. CASED 4 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
_W= # 11 l "11 IP I 1A 11 1 1 1 f' A L 1 IA IT V
II - I A
.. 9. .
z 4
w 1 0 14 119 I 19601 1 1965 19701 1 975 ,o W .i; I I I I I I I I I
,_, 9U). .
OfIIIaII
5-,
Figure 45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G1l near Miami,
and Dade G72 northwest of Opa-locka.
i iii,
7> N llllf @
CL W
1 94 94 95, 1590 9619655 97
Fiur 45



54 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
DADE G596 DEPTH 13 FT. CASED II FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
12:
If
DAE G 1 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED I FEET BISCAYNE AQUIFER
10
1
>- 4 1950 1951960 16 197 95 18
2< .1 -1| L / II I t 1W LL L J -L 1
DADE 618 EPTG613. nd E G62 in E centralE Dadeounty
4 11
- U 4 1 F I I I =1
-- I
to
-r
DADE G613 DEPTH 2I FT. CASED l8 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
6~~ ~ I' t I!I/
U.' : .3 A, A,
-A-- -1 N J
D7 DE G620 DEPTH 16 FT. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
94.. 5 95 1955 196 196 190l75 98 G6o3, a-i D ,.," I I
, E G6O G61, and G6SE0 in cetra Dade County.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 55
DADE G354 DEPTH 91FT. CASED 88FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
1200----------IwoI
1100
KOM
oo
600
DADE G469 __ DEPTH 137FT CASED_92 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 00--
x 100
0
7oo MC C -- Ik
z
gooo
DADES52 DEPT 19TBSCYEAQIE
2000
1500
Iii 4IDC- I
---
1000
__DADE S529 DEPTH 19FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER
3500 1-- - 1- 1 -
2500
200
MISD --- I--------500 ,.,
0
*6 0 IW O00 6 80 19?5 1960
Figure 47. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 near Miami
and Dade G469 and S529 in sQutheastern Dade County.







APPENDIX




Table l.-Sunary of well data and water levels in selected observation vells.
Well amber: Well umbers are based an county nambering system e.g., Bay County well Bay 20, or on the latitudinal nd laugitd lal system e.5., well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given where this
well has been reported previously in a publication under the county umber. Letters prefixed to well mbers in Boward and Dade Counties; G, Geological Survey wells; S, supply wells; F, fire wells; and
UP, National Park Service wells. Letter suffix A, shaflow well adjacent to deep well.
Aquierf: B, Biacayne; F, Floridan; G, sand-and-gravel; 8, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand. Depth of well: Measured unless otherwise noted. R, reported depth. Frequency of measurement: Refers to current biennim. A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous; H, monthly;
S. semiannually; T, Triyearly; W,' weekly.
Water level: To hundredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or taken from recorder chart; to nearest
tenth of a foot if measured by pressure gage or airline,
Remarks: D, measurements discontinued on date shown int Remarks;
L, lowest water level; N, water level with reference to mean sea level; P. water level affected by
pumping of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in Remarks; S, water level affected by
seasonal or regional pumping; T, water levels affected by ocean tides; X, wpgl in use.
Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface 0(feet)
. s m 0 Prior to 1965 Righest water Remarks well number level in Hay Annual a a a s May or June or June Range
0. su 0* High LOW
S (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
ALACHUA COUNTY
936-236-1 P 252 136 1958 C -23.48 -31.68 -20.49 -20.58 4.17 2.96
1960 1963
942-216-1 F 447R 175 1957 B -88.52 -94.19 -87.72 -87.36 1.55 1.69 P
1961 1963
949-235-2 7 300R 250 1960 B -37.34 -39.36 -36.41 -36.30 1.60 3.35 X
1960 1963
BAKER COUNTY
011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 B 40.17 -5.21 -2.29 -2.37 2.15 2.56
1959 1962
014-226-1 P 168 1957 B -100.48 -101.74 -94.14 -95.07 3.64 3.75 1
1962 1963
016-207-1 F 595R 459 1945 B -55.4 -71.45 -65.01 -64.82 2.44 6.30 P
1945 1963
026-214-1 H 198 102 1960 B -14.98 -20.13 -17.05 -17.04 2.51 2.86 X
1964 1963
015-216-2 F 825 282 1963 B -- -96.43 -94.29 -95.37 2.52 1.84
1964
026-217-3 F 905 417 1963 B -56.71 --- -55.16 -56.78 3.26 4.42
1964
BAY COUNTY
7 (010-6541-1) F 253 1936 B -42.33 -78.36 -61.28 --- 10.90 10.20 P
1947 1963
12 (017-531-1) F 290R 1961 B +1.82 +0.50 +1.35 --- 0.96 0.82
1964 1962




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface 00-- '(eet) Well number . Prior to 1965 Highest water Remarks
Wel nube Remark
0. .. level in May Annual Sa a May or June or June -Range
LW 1965
C (year) (year) 965 1966 1965 196
BAY COUNTY (continued)
956-524-1 F 497R 424 1962 B --- -12.0 5.98 3--- 3.77 6.05 X
1953
68 (023-526-1) F 160 161 1961 B +3.30 + 1.6 -4.50 --- 0.42 1.50 P
1964 1963
MBRADFORD COUNTY
000-210-2 F 294 247 1959 B -69.52 -75.69 -70.36 -70.65 2.09 1.17
1959 1963
BREVARD COUNTY
20 (795-043-2) F 447R 125 1934 B +28.7 + 19.8 +18.5 +20.0 4.7 3.3 S 1947 1962
79 (847-051-1) F 160R 85 1946 B +5.1 -0.55 -1.20 +1.05 4.20 2.95 S 1947 1962
148 (821-045-1) F 206R 105 1946 B +10.9 44.3 +0.6 +5.30 8.6 3.9 S; X 1953 1962
759-045-1 S. 9 10 1958 S -3.5 -7.2 -4.5 --- 1.7 --1964 1962
807-039-2 S 30 29 1958 C -6.1 -8.4 -8.3 -6.03 1.8 1.84
1964 1962
814-048-2 S 8 8 1958 C -0.0 -3.1 -2.0 --- 2.4 --1964 1961
822-047-2 F 129 114 1955 C +32.6 +29.9 +26.6 +29.3 5.2 3.65 M 1960 1960
BROWARD COUNTY
F291 B 107 --- 1948 C -44.3 +0.4 +0.83 +1.67 5.73 2.89 M 1958 1952
G561 B 20 20 1948 C 44.1 40.2 +0.77 +1.57 6.18 3.69 M 1958 1956
G616 B 24 19 1952 C +12.90 4+8.72 +8.70 49.94 5.62 4.66 M 1957&58 1956
G617 B 29 28 1950 C +6.6 +2.57 +3.51 44.08 3.19 3.46 M 1954 1962
G820 B 224 215 1956 C +1.15 -0.70 -3.15 -44.68 3.15 7.44 M; Prospect 1962 well field & 63
0853 B 22 21 1960 C +3.75 +2.80 0.00 46.20 11.28 5.45 M; Pampa6o 1964 1962 well field S329 B 68 --- 1940 C +5.5 +0.5 -0.28 +2.97 6.09 5.26 M; Dixie well 1955 1954 field




- Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
2 a Prior to 1965 Bishest water m o a level In Kay Annual any or .Tun ler Remarlang A Il! nabejw LOWSe (year) ) 965 1966 1965 1966 CAS CO0U
I (026-502-1) 7 212 1961 S -0.43 -3.05 -0.80 -1.43 0.10 1.42
1964 1962
7 (026-509-1) 188 R 64 1961 S +10.6 +7.4 +10.3 +9.0 0.6 0.4 1964 1962
11 (014-511-1) 1 1471 47 1961 S +13.6 +10.9 +13.9 +12.0 1.3 5.4 1964 1962
CIrUS COURTt
15 (902-228-1) 7 78 -- 1935 B -8.62 -19.87 -10.60 -11.37 2.91 2.40
1959 1963
856-Z23-2 7 91 1961 B -45.38 -48.58 -39.64 -40.17 5.16 15.95
1964 1963
CIAY COMrlY
5 (006-148-2) F 530R 157 1940 S +35.5 +21.0 +25.7 +25.5 2.2 1.4 1947 1957
9648-202-6 a 144 80 1960 8 -45.33 -51.06 -46.15 -45.57 1.46 1.00
1960 1963
96.8-202-7 WA 43 40 1960 B -28.38 -35.70 -28.21 -28.70 1.27 0.65
1960 1963
948-202-8 F 250 193 1960 C -55.02 -59.80 -56.72 -55.54 2.82 1.42
1961 1964
COLL Coutry
Sa 9 8 1951 c +13.1 + 8.05 --- +11.16 1.32 4.99 M 1958 1962
131 B 54 22 1952 C +26.2 +20.90 +21.73 +24.38 4.34 3.98 m 1958 1962
271 B 38 -- 1959 C +0.869 -2.50 -3.81 +0.01 4.30 5.41 1963 1960
296 8 45 1959 C -6.4 -7.65 -10.95 -7.51 5.60 5.80
1963 1962
COLUMMA COUNTY
9 (010-238-1) 7 836& 680 1942 C -79.60 -97.02 -85.30 -85.10 2.75 2.71
1948 1957
DADE COMllT
745 3 85 1939 c +3.9 +1.6 -1.40 +5.90 3.75 4.16 H 1960 1960
nL79 B 77 1939 C 46.0 40.9 +1.45 +2.69 3.85 4.09 M 1958 1945
r20 B 60 1939 C +2.42 -- +1.23 +5.22 3.38 3.69 M 1964
13135 17 13 1940 C +5.40 40.47 +2.05 +2.47 2.83 3.38 H 1958 1945




SWater level above (+) or below .(-) land surface
Prior to 1965 Highest water Well number level in May Annual A May or June or June Range S MS 0. 0 16 n~e Hi8gh -, LOW (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
DADE COUNITY (continued)
F358 B 54 --- 1940 C 46.70 -0.04 40.03 +2.68 6.56 4.69 H 1954 1962
G3 B 20 11 1940 C +3.00 -0.50 -1.42 +2.44 6.27 3.59 M; P 1958 1951
610 B 6 6 1940 C 4+6.00 +0.50 +2.83 +3.99 3.58 2.43 H 1958 1945
G39 B 6 6 1939 C +7.20 -0.94 +2.15 +3.52 3.60 3.20 M; P 1958 1962
G72 B 5 4 1940 C 46.50 +1.20 +3.95 --- 2.74 --- M; D, 1966 1958 1945
G476 B 24 19 1947 C +5.50 40.40 +1.24 +1.73 4.43 1.13 D, 1966; M 1958 1950&56
G553 B 91 79 1947 C +8.60 +0.97 +2.45 +5.75 6.89 4.96 M; Casing 1958 1962 slotted 36 to 79 ft
G580A B 22 4 1960 C 44.84 40.95 +1.89 +3.70 3.80 2.84 M 1961 1962
G595 B 14 11 1949 C +8.50 -1.88 -1.92 --- 6.14 --- D; 1966;
1958 1962 M; P G596 B 13 11 1949 C +8.40 +2.11 +3.47 +5.85 5.51 3.96 H 1958 1962
G613 B 21 18 1950 C +5.50 -0.98 -0.67 +2.37 6.52 4.34 M 1954&58 1962
G614 B 10 18 1950 C +8.20 40.37 +1.46 +3.10 7.21 5.58 M 1958 1962
G618 B 20 11 1950 C +8.40 +2.56 46.06 46.81 2.27 1.42 H 1958 1962
0619 B 12 6 1950 C +8.30. 44.07 +7.43 +8.08 1.99 --- M; D, 1966 1958 1956
G620 B 16 6 1950 C +7.0 +3.6 +3.21 46.04 4.09 1.95 M 1958 1952
G757A .B 20 10 1957 C +9.30 +1.50 +1.47 +8.20 6.05 5.52 H 1958 1962
G789 B 20 10 1956 C +7.30 +1.15 -0.04 46.95 6.69 5.08 M 1958 1962
0799 B 20 10 1956 C +7.80 +1.65 +1.80 +5.90 3.75 3.10 M; P 1958 1962
0851 B 18 11 1959 C 44.15 +1.80 +1.75 46.25 3.27 4.49 M 1964 1959
G852 B 20 10 1959 C +2.87 40.40 40.75 44.43 4.37 3.25 M 1964 1959
0855 B 20 10 1958 C -4.20 -5.60 -4.85 -0.85 5.05 4.35 1964 1962
G857 B 19 135 1959 C +3.70 +1.30 +1.64 +5.74 4.40 5.07 H 1960 1962
G858 B 20 11 1959 C 46.30 +1.82 +2.20 46.95 5.00 4.08 M 1960 1962




a Water level above (+) or below (*) land surface Prior to 1965 Rihat water
* lpvel In May hna ortun orJn an"e (tear) I(year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COUMT (continued)
859 a 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +1.20 0.45 +2.18 7.45 7.53 M 1960 1962
Ga60 a 20 11 1959 C- +5.0 +1.15 +1.10 +3.35 6.60 2.48 H 1960 1962
1861 8 23 11 1961 C 44.05 +2.25 +2.05 46.25 4.92 3.50 H 1964 1962
1863 a 18 6 1961 C +3.90 +1.49 40.55 +5.08 6.30 4.60 H 1964 1962
Ga64 a 20 II 1959 C +5.3 40.45 -1.00 46.23 8.23 5.28 H 1959 1962
G865 8 19 13 1959 C +1.85 40.9 +1.44 +1.65 4.74 3.40 H 1964 1960
G968 8 50 1960 C +5.45 +3.05 44.12 --- 2.52 2.85 H 1964 1962
G968 B 33 1961 C +5.80 +3.60 44.20 46.57 4.15 2.02 H 1964 1962
G970 8 15 10 1958 C 44.0 +2.18 +2.34 +2.67 2.50 2.21 H 1960 1962
972 a 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +3.50 +3.83 +5.47 2.39 1.27 H 1960 1962
c973 8 1.5 10 1958 C 44.5 +1.68 +1.95 44.05 2.45 2.20 H 1960 1962
G974 B 13 10 1958 C +5.4 +2.68 +2.70 +5.44 2.95 1.83 H 1960 1962
G975 B 1i5 10 1958 C 46.9 -44.20 44.10 46.55 3.10 1.32 M 1960 1962
G976 a 15 10 1958 C +6.0 +2.90 +3.43 46.37 2.44 1.19 H 1960 1962
G978 a 15 10 1958 C +6.7 +2.90 44.12 +6.78 2.40 2.33 H 1960 1962
G1165 B 12 11 1961 C +3.65 +1.45 +1.90 +5.06 3.27 2.48 H 1964 1962
GL166 8 1i 11 1961 C +5.80 44.75 +3.99 446.85 2.82 2.82 H 1964 1963
1.183 8 25 1961 C +2.35 -1.00 -0.63 +5.18 5.31 4.30 H 1963 1962
24 8 33 1960 C 44.50 40.2 -1.43 +5.04 7.30 4.18 H 1961 1960
166 a 25 1960 C +1.55 -0.30 -1.45 +2.27 3.79 1.01 H 1964 1962
3962 3 20 9 1962 C +2.58 --- -1.17 +44.28 3.14 2.6 H 1963
S67 8 20 6 1962 C +2.88 +1.70 -1.75 +3.10 4.50 2.73 H 1962 1964
3272 8 20 6 1962 C 44.05 -- -1.50 46.44 5.15 3.57 H 1963




Water level above (+)or below (-) land surface P. Prior to 1965 Highest water Wel u me level in May Annual Remarks may or June or June Range
(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COUNTY (continued) 818 B 52 --- 1939 C +3.2 40.10 +1.75 +2.49 4.06 2.17 M;P 1942 1945
S19 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30 -0.18 +0.60 4.00 4.33 M; P 1958 1962
S68 B 61 51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97 -2.19 -1.38 4.15 4.73 L; M; P 1958 1962
S182 B 51 --- 1940 C +9.5 0.0 +2.17 +3.28 5.07 2.52 M 1958 1945
S196A B 20 --- 1932 C +8.5 -1.0 40.32 +2.84 6.56 5.53 M 1958 1945
DESOTO COUNTY
703-157-1 F,H 468 189 1962 B +32.05 +25.0 +28.15 +27.75 3.00 3.00 1963 1962
704-147-1 F,H 460 112 1962 C + 3.90 + 3.44 + 2.73 +2.84 2.88 2.43 1963 1964
720-148-1 F,H 478 137 1962 C -10.53 -14.7 -21.41 -16.97 13.70 8.95
1964 1963
DIXIE COUNTY
15 (937-306-1) F 215R 105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12 -4.87 -4.76 0.77 0.15
1959 1962
DUVAL COUNTY
12 (019-140-1) F 785R --- 1938 S +27.5 +15.1 --- +22.8 --- 3.2 S
1947 1962
18 (018-140-1) P --- --- 1938 S +39.9 +20.1 +26.1 +29.0 7.2 3.1 S
1947 1962
102 (019-133-1) F 875R 400 1939. S 46.4 -20.94 -17.56 -13.66 6.40 2.46 S
1931 1962
107: (023-136-1) F --- --- 1939 S +53.2 +34.4 + 38.2 +37.5 3.2 2.3 S
1939 1962
115 (016-142-1) F 729R 476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6 + 17.6 +20.1 6.4 3.7 S 1938 1962
118 (018-143-1) F 900R --- 1939 S +32.9 +11.9 + 19.0 +19.0 2.8 1.6 S
1947 1962*
122 (023-138-1) F 905R 571 1930 M 444.9 +25.6 + 29.5 +30.2 4.6 2.4 S 1947 1962
123 (019-142-1) F 1,075R --- 1930 S +39.0 +15.7 +22.5 +22.1 2.4 1.2 S
1931 1962
129 (015-141-1) F 600R 470 1940 S 440.4 +17.4 +24.0 +26.4 6.2 3.2 S 1947 1962
145 (028-137-1) F --- --- 1940 S +24.2 44.97 + 8.7 + 9.3 2.8 0.5 S
1947 1963
149 (024-136-1) F 800R --- 1940 S +25.7 +8.8 +11.2 +12.1 3.0 0.5 S
1947 1963
151 (023-139-1) F 700R 560 1940 S 443.4 +31.0 +36.2 +37.1 2.6 0.6 S 1952 1962
152 (027-133-1) P 642R --- 1940 S +29.9 +19.6 +22.6 +23.3 3.0 0.9 S
1952 1962




- Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
S r Prior to 1965 Highest water el number M y J level in ay Annual k
nubra U Remarks orMay or Jun r June Range
(year) (ye) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COUNIT (continued)
3359 B 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +1.20 +0.45 +2.18 7.45 7.53 H 1960 1962
G360 8 20 11 1959 C +5.0 +1.15 +1.10 +3.35 6.60 2.48 M 1960 1962
G361 a 23 11 1961 C -44.05 +2.25 +2.05 +6.25 4.92 3.50 M 1964 1962
2363 3 18 6 1961 C +3.90 +1.49 40.55 +5.08 6.30 4.60 H 1964 1962
G364 8 20 11 1959 C +5.3 40.45 -1.00 46.23 8.23 5.28 M 1959 1962
G363 8 19 13 1959 C +1.85 40.9 +1.44 +1.65 4.74 3.40 M 1964 1960
G963 8 50 -- 1960 C +5.45 +3.05 44.12 --- 2.52 2.85 M 1964 1962
3%'96A 8 33 1961 C +5.80 +3.60 44.20 46.57 4.15 2.02 H 1964 1962
G970 B 15 10 1958 C -4.0 +2.18 +2.34 +2.67 2.50 2.21 M 1960 1962
3?97 3 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +3.50 +3.83 +5.47 2.39 1.27 M 1960 1962
o973 3 15 10 1958 C +4.5 +1.68 +1.95 44.05 2.45 2.20 H 1960 1962
G974 3 15 10 1958 C +5.4 +2.68 +2.70 +5.44 2.95 1.83 M 1960 1962
3 3 15 10 1958 C +6.9 44.20 +4.10 46.55 3.10 1.32 H 1960 1962
3975 3 13 10 1958 C 46.0 +2.90 +3.43 +6.37 2.44 1.19 M 1960 1962
G973 3 15 10 1958 C +6.7 +2.90 44.12 46.78 2.40 2.33 M 1960 1962
21165 3 12 11 1961 C +3.65 +1.45 +1.90 +5.06 3.27 2.48 M 1964 1962
G1166 8 I1 11 1961 C +5.80 44.75 +3.99 46.85 2.82 2.82 H 1964 1963
11i3 H 25 1961 C +2.35 -1.00 -0.63 +5.18 5.31 4.30 H 1963 1962
TP" 3 33 1960 C 44.50 40.2 -1.43 +5.04 7.30 4.18 M 1961 1960
E4a 25 1960 C +1.55 -0.30 -1.45 +2.27 3.79 1.01 H 1964 1962
MPS62 20 9 1962 C +2.58 --- -1.17 44.28 3.14 2.56 M 1963
iF67 3 20 6 1962 C +2.88 +1.70 -1.75 +3.10 4.50 2.73 H 1962 1964
MF72 B 20 6 1962 C 44.05 --- -1.50 46.44 5.15 3.57 M 1963




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
0 0 to 0 .0 w Prior to 1965 Highest water Well number 0 e 4 4 level in May Annual Remarks S W W = May or June or June Range
0 0. 0~ us as I < 11.u1st High o (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
DADE COUNTY (continued) 818 B 52 --- 1939 C +3.2 +0.10 +1.75 +2.49 4.06 2.17 M;P 1942 1945
519 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30 -0.18 +0.60 4.00 4.33 M; P 1958 1962
S68 B 61 51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97 -2.19 -1.38 4.15 4.73 L; M; P 1958 1962
8182 B 51 --- 1940 C +9.5 0.0 +2.17 +3.28 5.07 2.52 H 1958 1945
S196A B 20 --- 1932 C +8.5 -1.0 +0.32 +2.84 6.56 5.53 M 1958 1945
DESOTO COUNTY
703-157-1 F,H 468 189 1962 B +32.05 +25.0 +28.15 +27.75 3.00 3.00 1963 1962
704-147-1 F,H 460 112 1962 C + 3.90 + 3.44 + 2.73 +2.84 2.88 2.43 1963 1964
720-148-1 F,H 478 137 1962 C -10.53 -14.7 -21.41 -16.97 13.70 8.95
1964 1963
DIXIE COUNTY
15 (937-306-1) F 215R 105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12 -4.87 -4.76 0.77 0.15
1959 1962
DUVAL COUNTY
12 (019-140-1) F 785R --- 1938 S +27.5 +15.1 --- +22.8 --- 3.2 S
1947 1962
18 (018-140-1) F --- --- 1938 S +39.9 +20.1 +26.1 +29.0 7.2 3.1 S
1947 1962
102 (019-133-1) F 875R 400 1939. S +6.4 -20.94 -17.56 -13.66 6.40 2.46 S
1931 1962
107. (023-136-1) F --- --- 1939 S +53.2 +34.4 + 38.2 +37.5 3.2 2.3 S
1939 1962
115 (016-142-1) F 729R 476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6 + 17.6 +20.1 6.4 3.7 S 1938 1962
118 (018-143-1) F 900R --- 1939 S +32.9 +11.9 + 19.0 +19.0 2.8 1.6 5
1947 1962A
122 (023-138-1) P 905R 571 1930 M +44.9 +25.6 + 29.5 +30.2 4.6 2.4 S 1947 1962
123 (019-142-1) F 1,075R --- 1930 S +39.0 +15.7 +22.5 +22.1 2.4 1.2 S
1931 1962
129 (015-141-1) F 600R 470 1940 S 440.4 +17.4 +24.0 +26.4 6.2 3.2 S 1947 1962
145 (028-137-1) F --- --- 1940 S +24.2 44.97 + 8.7 + 9.3 2.8 0.5 S
1947 1963
149 (024-136-1) F 800R --- 1940 S +25.7 +8.8 +11.2 +12.1 3.0 0.5 S
1947 1963
151 (023-139-1) F 700R 560 1940 S +43.4 +31.0 +36.2 +37.1 2.6 0.6 S 1952 1962
152 (027-133-1) F 642R --- 1940 S +29.9 +19.6 +22.6 +23.3 3.0 0.9 S
1952 1962




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
a Prior to 1965 Bighest water level in ay Annual flaWet t r *j Mao~
0-~nn Range ak
~~ ~ ~ High oI (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
DUVAL C0NY (continued)
160 (018-123-1) F 585R 357 1934 B 441.7 +20.2 +23.1 +24.5 5.8 3.7 S; T 1934 1962
16 (025-125-1) F 840k 450 1930 S 443.8 +25.8 +28.9 +29.4 3.6 2.4 S; T 1931 1962
206 (01.5-145-1) P 1,9201 1,000 1941 8 -2.06 -16.75 -13.62 -14.23 3.36 --- S
1948 1962
26Z (026-135-1) F 1,3931 584 1951 B +37.0 +23.4 +26.8 +27.5 3.4 1.5 S; T 1951 1963
263 (026-1L35-2) F 1,025R 850 1951 S +35.5 +24.0 +27.4 +28.0 3.0 0.9 S; T 1952 1963
266 (026-13-3) Y 700R 450 1951 5 +35.3 +23.2 +27.0 +27.7 3.0 0.3 S; T 1952 1962
2Z5 (02-136-1) F 556R 1951 5 +39.4 +19.4 +33.0 +34.0 2.8 3.2 S; T 1952 1963
ESCAMBIA COUN Y
39 (023-716-2) G 244 1940 X -4.59 -12.00 -11.03 -11.82 6.51 6.56
1940 1955
45 (036-719-1) G 152 129 1940 C -69.30 -111.82 -103.58 -102.70 2.22 2.16 P
1941 1956
46 (031-T716-1) G 239 229 1939 V -58.09 -82.12 -69.43 -72.90 5.14 4.04
1948 1956
62 (024-713-1) C 142R 142 1940 N -6.50 -23.84 -13.24 -11.30 2.68 2.91
1949 1955
62z& (024-715-2) G 18 18 1940 M -8.66 -13.05 -12.14 -11.38 2.52 2.15
1964 1962
73 (035-71.5-3) C 306 198 1951 C -39.03 -56.66 -52.78 --- 4.51 4.57 P
1953 1958
74 (036-716-1) a 352 260* 1951 C -77.37 -89.52 -89.10 -90.20 2.78 2.15 P; *Screen
1952 1959 260 to 270 ft & 310 to 350 ft
83 (035-714-3) G 301 1954 B -36.10 -42.45 --- --..- 6.25 4.38 P
1955 1962
026-713-5 G 150 145* 1959 V -58.15 -63.57 -62.04 -61.61 1.64 2.99 *Screen
1960 1963 145 to 150 ft
026-713-6 G 65 60* 1959 W -51.78 -56.81 -55.68 -55.44 2.98 4.68 *Screen
1960 1963 60 to 65 ft
02-724A-1 G 170 165* 1959 M -91.18 -93.04 -92.58 -92.66 1.09 1.77 *Screen
1960 1963 165 to 170 ft
054-726-1 G 206 201* 1959 B -82.95 -90.06 -87.85 -88.88 1.20 0.97 *Screen
1962 1964 201 4o 206 ft
054-726-2 C 107 102* 1959 8 -65.21 -76.15 -72.27 -71.08 2.02 3.77 *Screen
1962 1964 102 to 107 ft




Water level above(+) or below (-)'land surface 40 A Prior to 1965 Highest water e ar 0 0 a level in May Annual Remarks
WellX =er- Remarks
number M ay or June- or June Range
m Ifl igh. Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966
FLIGLER.COUNY
14 (927-115-1) F 417 --- 1936 B -3.4 -8.19 -7.20 -8.27 2.29 3.30
1937 1962
44 (928-122-1) F 159 --- 1956 B -7.67 -13.42 -12.34 -10.94 4.80 2.94 P
1959 1962
FRANKLIN COUNT
10 (950-439-1) F 380R --- 1958 S -0.35 -4.45 -3.80 --- --- --1964 1962
31 (943-458-1) F --- --- 1949 B +3.95 +0.40 +2.30 --- 0.90 1.10
1950 1952
947-446-1 F 98R --- 1961 S -9.67 -11.35 -10.30 --- 0.44 0.50
1964 1963
957-443-1 F --- --- 1961 8 44.87 +2.97 44.09 --- 0.18 1.10
1964 1962
GADSDEN COUNTY
035-434-1 F 406R --- 1961 S -90.76 -91.40 -85.16 -85.13 2.64 0.17
1964 1963
039-425-1 F 525R 381 1961 B --- -143.96 --- -134.40 --- 3.35
1962
GULP COUNTY
30 (948-518-1) F 522 475 1946 S -7.11 -27.22 -8.62 --- 0.93 1.43 P, prior to
1956 1950 1954 33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B +1.29 40.96 +1.28 --- 0.57 0.80 1962 1963
HAMILTON COUNTY 036-305-1 F 273R 60 1961 B -84.73 -107.05 -90.31 -99.43 21.29 18.27
1964 1963
HARDEE COUNTY
731-145-1 F 267 39 1962 C -29.56 -33.60 -49.5 -40.02 21.01 13.48
1964 1962 HENRY COUNTY
3 S 10 8 1941 C 0.3 -5.76 -3.11 -2.35 4.17 3.52 1958 1962
5 S 13 8 1941 C -0.81 -6.3 -3.44 -2.99 3.07 3.15 1959 1956
HERHANDOCOUNTY
838-215-1 F 140R --- 1961 B -16.30 -20.46 -17.19 -16.68 5.15 2.78
1964 1962
HIGHLA MDS COUNTY
9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0 +127.64 +128.61 3.08 3.53 M 1953 1949
10 S 45 41 1948 C +90.7 +83.9 +85.17 +88.46 4.77 3.82 M 1958 1956 11A S 16 13 1956 C 448.3 443.71 444.93 445.82 3.14 3.30 M 1957 1962




j Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface SPriorto1965 Highest vater at level in May Annual R r
- = 0 ReHg Lo wi"
wo M ay or June or June Range
( ear) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 HICGHLANDS CONrrT (continued) SS 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +20.57 +25.01 +26.30 1.82 3.71 H 1957 1962
L S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +54.60 +57.70 4.25 3.13 H 1953 1956
e s ZZ 18 1956 C +116.9 +111.3 +111.3 --- 5.7 --- H 1958 1962
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
13 (307-230-3) r 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -15.76 -16.59 -19.18 10.02 12.86 P
1931 1964
30 (744-2Z5-39) F 500R 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.66 +2.29 +2.34 6.16 6.61 P 1959 1952
500 (742-219-1) F 330 97 1951 B -50.82 -57.98 -56.88 --..- --- D, 1965
1958 1956
751-203-1 F 211 65 1957 B -42.52 -61.35 -63.91 -64.60 5.50 6.50
1958 1963
301-213-15 F 413R 67 1958 C +0.55 -10.04 -10.18 -6.90 1.08 5.75
1959 1962
HOLMS COUNrY
(043-556-t) F 187R 1938 B +6.90 +1.82 --- --- 2.85 3.51
1964 1956
7 (058-53-1) F 205R 170 1938 8 -8.09 -15.66 -9.95 --- 2.12 2.48
1949 1956
TA (Od-535-2) NA 13 10* 1960 B -1.34 -8.34 -3.05 --- 6.27 7.68 *Screen
1964 1963 10 to 13 ft ,)50-54d-1 F .--- 1961 S +5.50 +1.40 +5.20 --- --- 1.50
1964 1963
051-556-1 F 260R 1961 S -205.20 -209.10 -204.68 --- --- --1964 1963
052-345-2 P 300R 1961 5 +17.6 +11.2 +16.7 --- 2.1 1.5
1964 1963
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
5 S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +26.35 +28.05 5.78 3.67 H 1957 1956
.TACXSON COUNTY
23 (04-2453-L) F 475R 100 1950 8 -17.37 -38.15 -20.77 -23.33 5.60 8.89
1964 1951
36-506-1 7 210 94 1961 S -62.98 -76.05 -66.40 -68.00 3.65 6.72
1964 1962
046-515-1 F 180 1961 B -86.82 -102.95 -91.37 -95.83 --- 5.17 D, 1966
1964 1963
053-527-1 P 341 260 1961 S -77.72 -87.20 -71.57 --- 2.09 1.04
1964 1963
058-503-1 P 83 1955 S -14.98 -29.11 -17.25 -21.15 --- 5.75
1964 1963




W Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface U a Prior to 1965 Highest water o -o level in May Annual Well number a ...
0ll number May or June or June Range Remarks Z ww High LO
_.__.__. (year), (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 JEFFERSONCOUNTY
022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -139.57 -142.62 -138.35 -140.24 --- 1.87
S1964 1962 038-336-1 F 183 147 1960 5 -19.10 24.36 -13.33 -17.17 4.16 6.00
1960 1960
LAFAYETTE COUTNY
008-317-1 F 106 --- 1961 B -35.53 -44.04 -26.19 -33.80 11.07 3.64
1964 1962
958-312-1 F 146 112 1961 B -4.23 -8.89 -5.91 -6.02 3.34 2.77
1964 1962
LAKE COUNTY
18 (857-138-1) F 190R --- 1936 B -50.52 -59.82 -56.63 -55.73 2.58 2.78
1960 1957
20(900-123-1) F 252R --- 1936 B +9.9 +5.45 +7.5 +12.0 5.0 5.0
1942 1963
22 (909-131-1) F 254R --- 1936 B -0.72 -3.54 -1.92 2.61 1.29 1.48
1964 1962
822-149-1 F 192 100 1959 T -1.80 -5.25 -4.71 -4.09 --- 1.58
1960 1962
822-149-2 S 23 18 1959 T -0.36 -5.06 --- --- --- 2.69
1960 1963
832-154-334 F 160 63 1969 C -1.88 -5.47 -3.78 -3.00 3.33 2.02
1960 1962
832-154-334A S 30 17 1959 C -1.60 -5.03 --- --- 0.74 0.76 Gravel Pack
1964 1962 17 to 30 ft
LEE COUNTY
246 S 28 19 1945 C +19.13 +10.5 +13.13 +14.11 6.80 5.52 1959 1949
414 H 94 60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1 +16.01 +15.69 3.49 7.12 H; P 1957 1955
LEON COUNTY
7 (027-416-1) F 314 165 1945 M -149.05 -169.91 -154.62 -155.98 5.45 7.39 P
1948 1955
36A (037-410-2) H 41 38* 1935 M -1.42 -33.14 +0.66 40.15 3.99 3.94 *Screen 1948 1956 38 to 41 ft 115 (031-420-1) F 194 104 1950 M -76.9 -93.3 -75.0 -77.2 6.1 6.9
1959 1957
024-420-1 S 57 57 1960 B -7.88 -15.81 --- 9.75 1.97 5.75
1960 1963
024-420-2 S 15 12* 1960 B -4.98 -9.32 --- 4.28 1.63 2.21 *Well point
1960 1963 12 to 15 ft 026-417-1 F 310 146 1960 B -74.40 -78.37 -67.95 --- 5.09 5.28
1964 1963
034-407-1 F 231 --- 1960 S -163.92 -173.24 -155.74 --- 5.98 7.08
1960 1963




SWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface P ?rior to 1965 Highest water ell ero a level in May Annual _May or June or June Range Hie
(year) I (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 IW Cauff
902-2 6L-1 7 58 1961 8 -5.80 -8.34 -6.23 -6.86 2.61 2.42
1964 1962
919-Z45 -L F 96R 1961 8 -0.55 -0.68 -0.69 -0.70 --- --- D, 1966
1962 1964
LIEME COUNT
14 (001-459-1) F -- -- 1955 S -3.60 -7.12 -5.18 --- 0.26 2.20
1964 1961
010-440-1 7 1181 89 1961 B +13.0 +6.8 +13.3 --- 2.3 5.8 1964 1961
023-*47-1 F 160R -- 1961 S 44.80 +2.8 44.90 44.10 0.70 0.20 1964 1961
028-456-1 F 360 1961 S -83.82 -85.64 -83.30 -83.95 0.60 0.49
1964 1962
MADISON COUNTY
17 (028-325-1) F 320 300 1953 S -20.16 -38.12 -12.30 -21.05 11.94 6.13
1959 1955 13 (028-325-2) F 322 307 1952 B 17.16 -34.87 -6.10 -18.92 14.88 7.74 P
1964 1955
MANATEE COUNTY
92 (726-213-1) F 600 154 1941 B -37.10 -52.65 -55.33 -54.15 11.40 8.45 D, 1966; S
1947 1962 MARION COUNTY
5 (911-159-1) F 135R 135 1933 C +13.62 +3.35 +11.01 +11.32 3.73 1.74 1960 1957
4.7 (902-156-1) F 179 165 1936 B -13.84 -24.26 -18.05 -16.95 4.21 1.73
1960 1956
48 (359-150-1) F 152 -- 1936 B -0.82 -10.23 -4.23 -3.17 3.56 2.31 Well flowed
1961 1956 Apr 1960 Apr 1961
49 (910-138-1) F 175 1936 B -25.0 -31.19 -27.46 -26.38 2.71 0.93
1942 1957
5. (911-210-1) F 106 -- 1935 B -26.04 -34.39 -27.32 -27.40 4.03 2.26
1960 1956 905-822-1 F 482 125 1964 C --- --- -80.27 -80.41 2.08 1.51
MARTIN COUNTY
14a S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +15.77 +16.74 +19.45 4.30 1.94 M 1957 1961
147 S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +2.12 +2.62 +5.01 5.20 7.52 H; P 1958 1962
928 S 11 10 1957 C +32.4 +28.40 +27.10 +32.35 5.97 4.08 M 1957 1962
933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.4 +20.40 +19.60 +23.40 3.78 3.07 H 1960 1963




.~ ~- Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
. Prior to 1965 Highest water Wer a oW level in Nay nual Remarks Well number ay or June or June Range Remarks "V o '0 n 4e u
. ni Low
. (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 NASSAU COUNTY.
2 (035-127-2) P 580R 350 1939 S -42.0 +18.4 +21.8 +20.8 3.0 4.2 S 1947 1963
8 (032-126-1) F 680R --- 1939 S 441.1 +20.6 +22.6 +22.3 2.8 2.3 P
1947 1962
12 (038-127-1) P 640R --- 1939 S +24.0 -18.3 -15.42 -17.73 4.01 5.27 P, X
1947 1963
27 (040-126-1) P 191 --- 1939 8 +10.1 -29.34 -18.72 -24.68 9.86 8.10 5
1946 1963
44 (037-136-1) F 1,000R 450 1934 A +19.8 -2.13 --- +1.26 --- --1947 1963
50 (036-142-1) F 569R --- 1940 S 440.5 +19.8 +23.0 +21.3 1.8 0.5 S
1940 1963
51 (033-150-1) F 580R --- 1940 S 442.0 +25.2 +30.0 +28.9 1.2 0.3 S; X
1947&48 1963
55 (037-130-1) F 540R 504 1940 S +33.1 + 4.9 49.7 +6.9 1.2 4.0 S; X 1947 1963
OKALOOSA COUNTY
3 (024-636-1) F 800R 500 1936 S +20.1 -72.19 -78.77 --- 51.10 26.48 S
1950 1963
23 (034-026-1) F 652R 409 1947 S -93.3 -125.2 -116.4 --- 1.4 3.47 D, 1966; S
1948 1963
25 (038-631-1) F 609R 456 1947 8 -108.1 -127.5 -128.3 -129.4 2.8 2.2 S
1949 1963
27 (030-635-2) F 591R 422 1948 S -27.9 -65.2 -62.2 -64.6 7.4 7.9 S
1951 1962
29 (035-637-1) F 766R 524. 1947 S -102.3 -127.0 -128.1 -129.6 2.8 5.40 S Recor1948 1963. der installed May 6,1966
31 (037-645-1) F 690R 527 1948 S -46.8 -68.8 -70.4 -71.8 1.7 2.6 S
1948 1963 & 64
34 (028-629-1) P 540 --- 1947 S +26.6 -9.22 -5.40 --- 6.45 14.39 S
1950 1962
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY
2 S 21 18 1949 C -446.7 +38.82 440.92 443.15 3.55 4.89 M Gravel 1957 1962 Packed 16 to 21
ft
3 S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.98 +59.85 4.00 2.79 M 1959 1950
ORANGE COUNTY
47 (832-128-1) F 350 328 1930 C +2.20 -14.30 -12.19 -9.72 5.11 6.75
1960 1962
47B (832-128-3) S 20 17 1948 M +3.04 -10.01 -9.72 -6.44 3.58 5.31
1960 1962
47C (832-128-4) S 50 46 1948 M -27.47 -39.35 -35.93 -34.94 2.53 4.59
1960 1953
832-105-1 F 492 151 1961 H -26.51 -28.67 -26.96 -26.47 4.30 2.87
1961 1963




Water l w. above vor bel, l( a end surface SPrior to 1965 Highest water or Rayo en ay1 Remarks lee asa Ror (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 OaCoA CouN!! 171 S 19 13 1950 C +32.1 +27.8 +28.40 +32.38 4.42 3.23 M; Gravel 1957 1956 Packed 11 to 19 ft
179 S is 18 1949 C +47.1 -443.27 445.57 -46.95 3.31 2.79 M 1960 1962 131 S 16 14 1948 C +77.9 +71.72 +73.83 +75.55 4.66 4.18 H 1957 1962 t182 23 16 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.45 +58.5 3.90 3.58 H 1957 1950 133 S 27 22 1948 C +73.2 468.3 469.81 +71.05 4.41 3.53 N 1957 1956 PAIM BZACH COUNTY 88 8 17 16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +5.35 +6.50 5.80 5.24 H 1948 1956 99 18 16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 46.42 +7.46 4.70 4.19 H 1957 1956 109 5 14 9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +15.70 +18.65 4.33 1.42 H 1957 1956 110 B 8 8 1951 C -2.60 -6.00 -5.80 -2.40 3.50 1.50 8 1962 1962 PASCO COUNT U (315-226-1) F 49 43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1 -7.98 -7.36 4.51 3.26
1959 1945 826-21U-L F 227 49 1959 C -9.97 -22.75 -19.16 -17.40 3.17 4.80
1960 1962 PDITLIAS COUNTY
1.3 (808-245-1) F 141 33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.80 -8.73 1.38 1.56 T
1948 1950 16 (800-247-L) r 195 1945 B -12.18 -18.34 -14.86 -13.79 7.18 8.35
1951 1953 266 (758-247-t) F 208 1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -27.64 -26.94 2.41 1.86 T
1948 1956 365 (238-24-4 ) 7 299 81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -22.33 -22.53 1.93 3.29
1959 1955
P011 COURT 24 (810-136-1) F 195 81 1945 C -1.70 -5.74 -4.60 -3.31 3.26 1.69
1960 1962 45 (759-1.58-1) 1 643 318 1948 x -63.65 -84.82 -92.10 -89.73 15.36 9.44 S
1948 1962
7 (813-136-2) S 67 60 1948 C +111.7 +106.9 +107.85 +107.67 2.21 1.62 M 1960 1962




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface I Prior to 1965 highest vater Well number or ..level in May Annual Remarks a a oW we su e2 ni3h I ow
(year) (year) 1965 I 1966 1965 I 1966 POIK COUNTY (continued)
48 (732-131-1) S 62 59 1948 C +100.8 496.2 +98.23 +99.93 2.97 1.99 M 1954 1956
49 (748-119-1) S 17 14 1949 C +104.7 +98.99 +101.07 +103.86 4.07 3.12 H 1957 1962
51 (744-131-1) H 319 208 1949 B -5.08 -17.25 -13.51 -15.71 11.78 7.29 P
1956 1962
753-158-311 F 710 237 1955 C -15.88 -38.57 -47.15 -44.45 17.37 14.02 P
1958 1962
802-132-1 F 463 137 1959 B -7.65 -11.68 -11.81 -12.34 1.24 3.14
1961 1963
805-155-2 F 311 82 1956 B -15.18 -25.64 -23.79 -22.75 4.55 3.25
1959 1962
805-155-3 H 72 62 1955 B -12.52 -21.73 -20.07 -18.92 4.19 2.91
1959 1962
806-156-1 S 13 10 1955 S -3.69 -9.73 -9.43 -7.02 3.07 1.94 *Screen
1959 1963 10 to 13 ft 806-156-2 H 103 63 1956 S -16.89 -29.66 -27.50 -24.57 6.87 4.86
1959 1962
PUTNAM COUNTY
28 (925-138-1) F 159 --- 1936 8 -6.2 -9.81 -8.40 -7.99 2.48 1.80 S
1944 1962
29 (939-138-1) F 300R --- 1936 B +10.8 +2.02 44.42 44.33 2.67 2.87 S
1936&57 1962
937-153-1 F 303R 300 1934 S -29.51 -35.65 -28.70 -27.85 0.81 0.18 X
1961 1957
939-134-11 F 547 113 1958 S 44.26 -1.75 +0.48 -1.16 3.41 4.81 1959 1962
943-152-1 H 151 125 1956 B -43.20 -46.66 -43.40 -42.45 0.90 0.26
1961 1957
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
5 (007-123-1) F 350R 180 1934 A 443.9 +33.8 +37.0 +36.1 --- --1951 1963
8 (005-129-1) P 336R 240 1934 A +36.5 +22.7 +25.7 +27.4 --- --1947 1963
000-123-2 F 258 --- 1957 B 44.72 -0.57 +1.13 -0.50 --- --1959 1962
937-122-1 F 622 142 1958 C -17.30 -21.51 -21.10 -19.56 4.01 2.92
1959 1963




aWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface S 4 Prior to 1965 ighest water etnumer level in Kay Annual
WeL1 nmbe MT a Rmak
a .y or June or June Range R rk
A... b we ear) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 ST. JOHNS COUNTY (continued)
9-'-7 l41 118 1955 B +10.1 +1.52 +3.29 -2.01 --- --- P
1959 1962
47-?2b-1 F 275 101 1956 B -1.55 -10.86 -13.11 -17.39 9.48 --- P
1958 1962
ST. LUCIE COUNTY
41 8 17 13 1950 C +28.2 +25.2 +24.45 +26.04 3.81 3.05 M 1957 1956
Z S 18 13 1950 C +26.9 +23.76 +24.16 +25.05 3.40 3.06 14 1951 1961
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
10Z (021-709-8) S 41 31* 1950 A -4.43 -9.52 -6.92 --- --- --- *Screen
1960 1955 31 to 41 ft 035-706-1 G 211 206* 1959 K -82.84 -89.10 -86.76 -89.48 3.89 1.57 *Screen
1961 1963 206 to 211 ft ').4-708-L C 128 123* 1959 14 44.83 +1.28 +2.83 +1.70 4.41 2.05 *Screen 1961 1963 123 to 128 ft 041-o44-t G 98 93* 1959 8 -56.34 -61.90 -58.27 --- 1.23 2.74 *Screen
1960 1963 93 to 98 ft SARASOrA COUNTY
S(72-225-l) F 7JOR 101 1930 C 44.51 -9.36 -8.55 -7.51 8.91 6.88 S
1931 1962
SEMINOLE. COUNTY
125 (.1-121-1) F 14 63 1951 C -34.18 -42.60 -41.48 -39.32 4.20 3.87
1960 1962
257 (34,7-113-6) F 206 --- 1951 B +5.10 40.27 +1.15 +3.19 3.47 1.73
1953 1962
SUMMER COUNTY
S52-201-1 P 125 45 1961 B -29.94 -33.26 -29.42 -28.52 4.55 3.81
1964 1963
SUWANNEE COUNTY
319-Z49-1 F 138 135 1961 8 -18.94 -35.31 -29.43 -30.80 8.00 13.24
1964 1963
TAYLOR COUNTY
J5 (003-130-L) F 230 189 1946 C -1.00 -30.9 -19.1 -21.3 9.9 7.0 P
1949 1962
36 (004-331-1) S 35 --- 1947 B -5.05 -23.95 -6.01 -7.41 1.69 2.52 P
1964 1957
UNION COUNTY
001-224-1 F 256 198 1960 8 -89.54 -93.57 -87.91 -88.18 2.12 1.45
1961 1963
F7-22-1 P 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -93.00 -87.52 -87.80 3.73 3.81
1959 1962




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface
bPrior to 1965 Highest water Wall number Malevel yn Hor Jl Remarks .U ~ *'~~5 May or June or June Range
0.5 0 US
S HI High Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 VOLUSIA COUNTY 29 (911-125-1) F 107 --- 1936 B -11.86 -18.73 -17.23 -17.20 1.53 1.56
1951 1963 30 (917-128-1) F 180R --- 1936 B +11.2 46.7 +9.0 +9.22 1.6 1.50
1959 1948 31 (856-105-1) F 121 113 1936 C -4.72 -8.60 -6.83 -5.35 2.95 1.43
1953 1962 32 (919-125-1) F 138R ---. 1936 B -1.2 -5.11 -4.26 -3.99 2.25 1.84
1937&38 1963 905-113-3 F 351 94 1955 B -0.22 -3.66 -1.78 -0.52 --- 0.91
1958 1956 909-106-1 F 235 102 1955 B -5.25 -8.07 -8.39 -6.68 2.73 1.13
1959 1963 909-106-9 F 496 480 1955 B -6.62 -9.55 -9.33 -8.80 2.51 2.02
1958 1963 910-105-1 F 498 152 1955 B -12.84 -19.73 -16.67 -16.04 2.03 2.27
1958 1962 911-104-4 F 235 115 1955 B -15.72 -25.85 -27.55 -20.25 8.38 5.25
1955 1963 911-104-9 F 500 483 1955 B -10.26 -13.89 -13.17 -12.62 2.68 2.10
1948 1963 WAKULLA COUNTY
2 (009-412-1) F 65 22 1946 B -0.86 -3.05 -1.38 -1.62 1.39 0.88 T
1958 1951 11 (000-426-1) F 70 45 1946 A -5.58 -8.25 -7.10 --- --- 0.97 T
1955 1960 005-417-1 F 77 --- 1961 B -1.13 -3.48 -2.35 --- --- 1.61
1964 1963 011-410-1 F 80 --- 1961 B -0.12 -1.87 -0.73 -1.23 0.27 0.56 X
1964 1962
WALTON COUNTY 13 (022-606-1) F 450R --- 1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +12.4 --- 0.8 2.0
1950 1956 019-610-1 F 615 188 1961 B +14.7 +11.6 +14.2 --- 0.8 3.4 1964 1963 029-614-1 F 160 --- 1961 S +21.0 +19.5 +18.3 --- 2.4 2.3 X
1964 1963 043-612-1 F 509 323 1961 A -144.2 -148.2 -144.0 --- --- --- X
1964 1962 WASHINGTON COUNTY
4 (046-548-1) F 785R --- 1935 B -7.20 -15.09 -10.25 --- 4.25 8.15 X
1964 1954 037-542-2 F 206 202 1961 8 -13.72 -20.20 -16.25 --- 2.95 5.78
1964 1963




Full Text

PAGE 1

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES

PAGE 2

STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Robert O. Vernon, Chief INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1965-66 By Henry G. Healy U. S. Geological Survey Prepared by UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY in cooperation with the BUREAU OF GEOLOGY FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES TALLAHASSEE 1970

PAGE 3

55 7, 9 F i36 1 )no. 41 Completed manuscript received November 11, 1968 Printed by the Florida Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Geology Tallahassee --

PAGE 4

SCONTENTS Page Introduction ......................... ....1 Well-numbering system .... ............. ......... 2 Principal aquifers .......... ................. .... 4 Northwestern Florida .. ........ ... ........... ... .6 Pensacola area ...... ........................ 8 Ft. Walton area ............................8 Panama City area .............. ...... ... ... ... 15 Northern and North-Central Florida ....................15 Tallahassee area ......................... ... .15 Fernandina-Jacksonville area ...... ................ .20 Central Florida ..............................22 S Tampa-St. Petersburg area ...................... ..22 Lakeland area .............................27 Orlandoarea ............................. .35 Cape Kennedy area ... ....... ...... .38 Cape Kennedy area ...............I ..........38 SarasOta-Bradenton area .......................... ..40 1Southern Florida ...... .............. ........ ... .. 40 Ft. Myers area .............................41 Stuart-West Palm Beach area ....................... 45 Ft. Lauderdale area ............... .......... .45 Miami area ............... .............45 ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1 Observation-well network, December 1966, and the extent of principal aquifers in Florida .. .................. ...........3 2 Well-numbering system .. .. .. .. ... .. ..... ....... 5 3 Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 .... ......................... 6 4 Locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are y given ......... ...... ... ........... ..... 7 S5 Total yearly pumpage, city of Pensacola, Florida .............9 6 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45 at Cantonment, 46 near Ensley, and 62 at Pensacola, Pensacola area ..........10 7 Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1965-66 .11 8 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area .........................12 9 'Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to !f) May 1964 .......... ...................... 13 -10 Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1964 to May 1966 ..........................14 S11 Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida .............. 16 iii

PAGE 5

ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 12 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville .......... 17 13 Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrgraphs are given ............ ........ ...18 14 Total yearly pumpage, city of Tallahassee, Florida .......... .19 15 Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at Tallahassee and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1965-66 ...20 16 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida21 17 Total yearly pumpage, city of Jacksonville, Florida ........... 23 18 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida ......... ...... .............. 24 19 Net changes of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1964 and from May 1964 to May 1966 .........25 20 Locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given ....... .. ........................ .26 21 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park. Tampa area ...... .....27 22 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1965-66 ....28 23 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater ....... .29 24 Changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunnedin, St. Petersburg area. ..................30 25 Total yearly pumpage, city of Lakeland, Florida ............ .31 26 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1965-66 ...32 27 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area .............. .33 28 Trends and fluctuations of water levels ih wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring .............. 34 29 Trends and fluctuatiohs of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley ................ .35 30 Total yearly pumpage, Orlando, city of Cocoa and Winter Park, Florida ..36 31 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1965-66 ..37 32 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 45 near Orlando ..38 33 Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and easterncentral coastal Florida .......................... 39 34 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area ....................41 35 Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given ..42 36 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departues from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1965-66 ...43 37 Trends and fluctuations of water leels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 Evergades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida .44 38 Total yearly pumpage, city of Stuart, Florida ............ .46 39 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and departues from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1965-66 ....47 IV

PAGE 6

ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 40 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1965-66 48 41 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami .49 42 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Homestead,tDade F179 at Miami, and Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale ................ .. .50 43 Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami ................. 51 44 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1965-66 ...... ........... ...... ..52 45 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami, and Dade G72 northwest of Opa-locka ............... .53 46 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade County ....................54 47 Changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 near Miami and Dade G469 and S529 in southeastern Dade County ............. .55 TABLES Table Page 1 Well and water-level data for selected observation wells in Florida ..Appendix v

PAGE 8

WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1965-66 by Henry G. Healy INTRODUCTION This report summarizes the trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the principal aquifers in Florida during 1965-66 and includes the following: (1) hydrographs of ground-water levels in the several aquifers; (2) maps showing changes in ground-water levels during specific periods; and, (3) a table summarizing the principal data on selected observation wells. Observation wells for which records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources Data-Collection Stations in Florida, 1961," Florida Geological Survey Special Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey, (now the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources), includes the location, aquifer, and type and period of records available for 3,600 observation wells. Since World War II, and particularly during the last decade, the demand for fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural uses in Florida has increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies have been adequate for the increased demand in most areas, water levels have declined appreciably in some. Because demand for ground-water continues to increase, shortages will occur and may become critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from deterioration in quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of water available. In order to prevent future shortages, the present supplies of ground-water must be properly appraised before they can be effectively utilized. Records of trends and fluctuations of ground-water have long formed a basis for such an appraisal. The principal objective of the investigations of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey is to appraise and to evaluate the nation's water resources. Although many types of ground-water investigations are carried out on a statewide basis throughout the nation, the collection and compilation of basic hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources studies. Objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evaluation of available ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of water levels; and the delineation of present or potential areas of detrimentally high or low ground-water levels. Water levels are used to determine the base flow of streams, to portray the effects of natural and man-induced forces that .act on a water-bearing formation and to furnish information for use in basic research. The hydrologic data program provides the foundation information necessary for the successful and meaningful accomplishment of water resources investigations.

PAGE 9

2 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY The hydrologic data-collection program of the U. S. Geological Survey is part of the cooperative investigations of the water resources of Florida in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, and other state and local agencies and municipalities. The observation-well network in 1966 included about 850 ground-water data-collection stations in the 67 counties of the state. Figure 1 shows the locations of selected ground-water stations in the statewide network. Table 1 (see appendix) lists data on 307 observation wells selected from the statewide network of wells. The hydrologic-data program consists of the collection, tabulation, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of water-level and related data. Water levels for selected wells are published, at present, once every 5 years in the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Information pertinent to ground water is also published in interpretative reports of investigations published by the Florida Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey. Data collected during an investigation and prior to publication are available from the District Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, P.O. Box 2315, Tallahassee, Florida, 32304. The water-level data used in this report represent measurements taken from automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and made by tape. In general, water-level measurements made by tape and stage recorder are shown to the nearest hundredth of a foot, and those made with a pressure gage are shown to the nearest tenth of a foot. Table 1 summarizes well-data and water-level information for the several aquifers. Well data include the aquifer, depth of well, and depth of casing. The items: "Year record began" and "Frequency of measurements" are included as part of the well data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or June are used because records are available for these months for a large percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are lowest during May or June in most areas and records during that period constitute a base for comparison from year to year. Highest and lowest water levels of record prior to 1965 are given in the table. Generally, highest and lowest levels are highest daily levels if taken from recorder charts. The range of fluctuations for 1965 and 1966 are shown under "Annual range." WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEM Two well-numbering systems are used in this report; serially by counties or by a grid-coordinate system based on latitude and longitude of the well location. Frequently both numbers have been assigned to the well; e.g., a well number may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This affords a tie-in with water-level data published previously under well number 20 in Bay County with data that may be published for the same well under number 008-537-2.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 3 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 87* 86' 85o 8483' *^ ;. s,^ 4 / 32 .Observaoion well 28' Chloride somple PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS * I7 Sand-ond-grovel *.*SFloridon '*/ 97 29 27* Floridon and/or others -a **;, I Biscayne ---Approximole oquifer boundary 12 28 26* Chloride wells Centrol ond Southern Florida Flood Control Project Souhwest Florida 27 Water Monogement District 25 5 --19 -26 0 10 20 30 40 50 miles 21 S84' 83* 82. 81* 80" Figure 1. Observation-well network, December. 1966, and the extent of principal aquifers in Florida.

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4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or suffix. In Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and NP denote Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and National Park Service wells, respectively. In Dade, Escambia, Highlands, Holmes, and Leon Counties, the letter suffix A denotes a shallow well near a deeper well having the corresponding number without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter suffixes B and C denote shallow wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47. The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived from latitude and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude prefix north and west and the first digit of the degree number are hot included in the well number. The well number is a composite of three numbers separated by hyphens: the first number is composed of the last digit of the degree and the two digits of the minute that define the latitude on the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the second number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of the minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute quadrangle; and the third number gives the numerical order in which the well was inventoried in the I-minute quadrangle. For example, well number 835-105-1 is the first well inventoried in the I-minute quadrangle north of the 28035' parallel of latitude and west of the 8105'meridian of longitude. The location of well 835-105-1 is shown diagrammatically in figure 2. PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS Ground-water supplies for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in Florida are available from three principal aquifers: the Floridan aquifer in central and northern Florida; the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida; and the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the extreme northwestern part of Florida. The generalized areal extent of the aquifers supplying most of the ground water is shown in figure 1. The Floridan aquifer, which underlies all of the state, is the principal source of water in central, northern, and most of northwestern Florida. Areas of artesian flow and the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer is illustrated by Figure 3. Highly mineralized water precludes the use of the Floridan aquifer as a source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of southern Florida. In these areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian aquifers are the source of supply. The Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source of water supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This aquifer, one of the most highly productive aquifers in the world, underlies about 3,500 square miles of Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne aquifer is sharply restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of saline waters.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 5 -I I Marion Co.\ '----\Volusia Co. j 29"00' Lake Co. --. \ ~r" \ r-I 28030' Orange Co. --4 28040' \ 8 I, Polk Co. Osceoloa Co. 2\ \\" 28 00' S81030' 8100' 28030' 81010 81 000 28037' II 28035' 81008 07 06 81005' Figure 2. Well-numbering system

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6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY que.n Fo4 oil 6 7 S-N-_______ f a 3 ; w m---A ---^ ---N----v--i. Figure 3. Potentiometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal source of water supply, yielding large supplies of ground water for industries and municipalities. The aquifer extends beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and part of western Okaloosa County. This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four sections as follows: () northwestern Florida, (2) northern, northeastern, and north-central Florida; (3) central Florida; and (4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida. NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA The northwetern section includes the Florida Panhandle extending from the Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line (Figure 4). Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line (Fignire 4).

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A. L A 8 A' M A -T -..! ... .... "..-.-"7 .... ."1 \ i H L Mi E S (---J A C K S 0 N I S., L -i" 0 K A L 00,A S' A7 S ROS WALU N r WAS.H I NGTON F| = i ..,,. .o .-CA ... H 0 UN 045'W N' SHIN ON G BA Y *IS Obarvallwn well W id nmb I -, ,, ,--.--_. i G PULF OF IEXICO L G u L .0 5 0 30 40IN Fire 4. Loations of observation wells innorthwestern Florida for which hydrorhs re iven Figure 4. Locations of observation welts innorthwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given

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8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY The principal sources of ground-water supply in this section are the sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and the Floridan aquifer in the rest of the section. Minor supplies of ground water are obtained from shallow nonartesian aquifers. The Pensacola, Ft. Walton Beach, and Panama City areas of the Florida panhandle are growing rapidly in industry and population. PENSACOLA AREA The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, and like many others in the state, is undergoing rapid economic development accompanied by increasing use of water by industry and municipalities. Figure 5 shows that 1966 pumpage for the city of Pensacola was about six and one half times that of 1940. The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began in 1939 as part of the investigation to determine the adequacy and permanency of ground-water supply in Escambia County. Figure 4 shows locations of observation wells selected from the hydrologic-data network for which hydrographs are given in this report, and table 1 presents data on 13 wells in Escambia county and 4 wells in Santa Rosa county. Figure 6 shows fluctuations and long-term trends of artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the Pensacola area from 1960 through 1966. Comparison of the hydrographs for the period of record reveals that while water levels at the end of 1966 declined in central and southern Escambia county, they remained above the low levels of the 1955-56 drought. Declines of artesian water levels in the sand-and-gravel aquifer ranged from nearly 30 feet in well Escambia 45 at Cantonment to about 10 feet in well Escambia 46 near Ensley during 1941-66. In the coastal area, at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well Escambia 62, at the end of 1966, was about the 1941 level. The trends and fluctuations of artesian ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly average rainfall at Pensacola, 1965-66 are shown in figure 7. FT. WALTON AREA The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and Eglin Air Force Base. The rate of growth of industry and population is accelerating. Pumpage from the Floridan aquifer for all uses is about 10.0 mgd (million gallons per day). As a result of continuing heavy pumping, water levels have declined in about a 640 square-mile area.

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0 5,000 3)80cL_ ____ _________| 3 ,2 O Q 3,4 0 0 _ _ _ -J ,000. .-/ ,, Figure 5. Total yearly pumpage, city of Pensacola, Florida.

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10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY ESCAMBA 45 DEPTH 152 FT CASED 129 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) 70 72_---------------------------------------1 72 74 i f 76--------------------------------1 ------6 86---------------------------76 -3 8----------------------------------------------LU 9------------------------------------------S82--------------------------24 -: 3C --------^--_ -----_ -0 94S62----<64 98-----------------------ice-----------------72I 74--------------------r-~-----'----------|, 0---------------------------------------101----------------------€--------------U 8 = --' I I I ION I I I ESCAMBA 46 DEPTH 239 FT CASED 229 FT. SANO-AND-6RAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) S6 S 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 -1965 1970 -197
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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 1 0 i , , i, l l l 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i | J J ] S J 1 1 , J 1 I I N J 1 , J 1J , I -, m nt SESCAMIA 62 SdSnd aded gmotl Aifn l (aArteiopre SDpth 42 f1t to July 1965,Cd 142 ft.water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 134.5 feet, from 46 is "1I AI J I J I A I S I I I I '' 1 1 11 1 N1 I M I At I I A I S I D iiI J I A I S 0 I I 11 I I I 1 0 1 1 J FMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFM AMJ JASONDJFMAMJ J AS ONODJFMAMJ JASOND feet aboveland surfaoel to 88.5 feet below land surface. The areal extent of thehly decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net change of water levels map, figuees 9 and 10. Water-level changes during 1951-64 are shown by figure 9. Changes of gound-water levels for the current period 16466 are shown fure 10. a lad sa to 88.5 fet bo ld s T J F M AMJ JASON DIJ FM AMJ J ASOND J F MAMJ J'ASONDJ FMA MJ J A S 0N DJ FMAMJ J A S ON1 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 7. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 at Pensacola and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1965-66 The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach (figure 8) shows a maximum decline of 107.0 feet from 18.5 feet above land surface in 1947 to 88.5 feet below land surface in July 1965. In August 1936, the artesian water level was 46 feet above land-surface datum. During the period from August 1936 to July 1965, the water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 134.5 feet, from 46 feet above land surface to 88.5 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net change of water levels map, figures 9 and 10. Water-level changes during 1951-64 are shown by figure 9. Changes of ground-water levels for the current period, 1964-66 are shown by figure 10.

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12 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY ONALOOSA 3 DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 500 FT. FLORIDAN .AQUIFER *---------------------HH-------------------------12 c, Ii: : \i1 11 ::: , !J----E-----------E-= S-4-----------------------Cf.--------------_-----------------------------------S-42 --52-60 J46 feet above land surface -_y Water level is affected by regional pumping OALOOSA 25 DEPTH 609 FT. CASED 456 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER ZU-1~------------------------*-------------------------------------1 -24 1-08-------->------------------------------------------------L A _j , ; -t24--------------------------=^--------------------^ -2--------------------!------_ ----_ 1442-------,--: --II' I IT T_ _____--I 1 I I --KAL--A 31 DEPTH 690 FT. CASED 527 F. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 48 -52 S-56 0 -------" 1945 1910 195 I III5 1 11 1980 J -76 sI I I I I I I I I I I IIII! 1 -64 9 Waer levels offecd by re19 1iono93 1as7 -96 & Tds and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3 25 LOS 25 DEPTH 609 FT CASED 45631 FT. WaltFLORDAN AQUIFERBeach area. --85 -6 --------------LU647 -----------. -_ _ _ _ _ -647------------------------------------------^^----__ _-_-----3-; .8------------------------------------------8-------------------------^--^ -_----_ -a88-------------------------------: n^ l, _, Water level is affected by regional pumping 94 I t1 9 11 1960 196 19 i7 198 LU.h F 14 0 -Waler level is affected by regional pumping o9oos 31 DEPTH 6905. CASED 527 FT. FLORIDA7N A UIER nW 52e and 31, Ft.Walton Beach mica.

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A L A B A M A --F "L 0 IR -D---EEIAMATION 'ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON -SLie of equal not chIage of grouadSvter levels in the tloridan aqul. r. SII I ntrval 2 feet. -+2Line of equal pnt can of groundwater levels in the sand-and-avel aquifer. Interval 2 feet. 3 .z S 102 2 v I 3 IQ 20 30 40 S SCALE o Q 10 o0 e0 40MILES Figure 9. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1951 to May 1964.

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A L A B A M A ,PNUATI" N F L0 R DI A wrater lievvl in the lurldun oquir.l ESCA B SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA I WALTON -.2 LLne oL' quil ntc change of groufilw4, tiir l ievils Lin the snd-'l* d-gravrl Soquit.r, niter vil 2 feet. SOboorvacion well and number, to l4 % S0 2 30 40 *3 /0 0t SCALE I MI Figure 10. Net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1964 to May 1966.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 15 PANAMA CITY AREA The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including Tyndall Air Force Base. The Floridan aquifer-either indirectly or directly-supplies most of the water for municipal, industrial and military needs in the area. Springs from the Floridan aquifer supply Deer Point Reservoir the principal source of water for municipal use. Wells that tap the Floridan aquifer supply the paper and pulp industry and military needs at Tyndall Air Force Base. Figure 11 shows total pumpage from Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and Millville for 1944-66. Pumpage of ground water for municipal use declined from an average of 1,200 mgy (million gallons per year) in 1961-62 to an average of 865 mgy in 1963-66. To some extent, reduced pumpage by Panama City wells and a change in the site of the source of water supply for the pulp industry allowed water levels to rise sharply during 1964-65. During this period, levels rose about 24 feet from 78 feet to 54 feet below land surface in well Bay 7 (figure 12). The rise of water levels in wells Walton 13 and Washington 4 during the same period indicates that the rise of water levels at Panama City reflected a major regional fluctuation or trend, as well as a reduction of pumping. NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA The northern and north-central Florida section extends from the Apalachicola River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Georgia line southward to the latitude of Ocala, figure 13, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy, Marion, and Volusia counties. The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply in coastal areas in eastern St. Johns, Flagler and Volusia counties. Another important source of water in these areas is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer. TALLAHASSEE AREA The Tallahassee area includes central Leon County and the city of Tallahassee. The area is primarily residential with only sparse light industry. The principal water user, the City of Tallahassee, supplies water for municipal use to the most rapidly growing residential and educational complex in northern Florida. Since 1945, annual municipal pumpage at Tallahassee has increased nearly 430 percent from 850 mgy to about 3,650 mgy. Figure 14 shows pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1933-66. Water-level fluctuations in the Floridan aquifer at Tallahassee are shown by the hydrograph of well Leon 7, figure 15. The upward trend of levels of 1964 was continued into 1965-because of above average rainfall during that year.

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I,400 I,20Q 0 1100Q Figure 11. Total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 17 WALTON 13 DEPTH 450 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 26 26-----------------------------------24 i 22 UL 20 S18---------------------------------N I I I I -16 z 14 S12 ----------------------w> -10----S 6 < Water level is affected by regional pumping BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 36 38 36------------------------------------p-----------------------385-----------------------------------------------40 42 44 46 46----------------------------\y------------------------------S48 S50o -52 54 z56----S58 -60-------------------62 64 S66 z 68 ^i6--:-----------------------------------------------------I5 ^ ---7--------------------------^------e7---------------------^---------------82-----------------j 4 --------70 I L 72 82 > 81946 through 7963 92 90 -1 1--19461) h1 1 throug 1963 1 1 I-92 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 SWASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 2 ___--_---------------------U 012 V 14 n 16 z20 z24 a 26 428 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 12. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville. fc 16 -----I-^ ------------ILL 18 ------------------K 20 ----------------->W 24 ---------L-----Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville.

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UA 0A *1LA,J W,", rJEi"N \A "1 S NN S S A S A 0 5 N A M I LT 0 N I I 0 N M ON H0 I A l ift J-098 164 ... r COLUMVBIAu v I S IE R T Y I1 .". -'-IS WA--. N N E E 9 / WA KU L L A SUWANNEE .(T N 1 0 N,/ C-i /BRADFORD fRANK LL 'N/ A r T. J --0 -N EPLANATIO N o aILCHRISTd oi O(eken onq .A A L A C It A P U t N M f~~~~--I'^ S W N E -----4 0 A I .E GULF OF MEX COAM -MEXICO 1-.--^ - -L E FLA LER _I' V OLU SIA Figure 13. Locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given.

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" | I I* I l I I I I I I I I 3,400 3,000. :. 2200 r-J4 oootal 0 -00 SII I I I I I I I Figure 14. Total yearly pumpage, city of Tahahassee, Florida.

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20 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY -i A I LI 1 J M IaSO A DJ FMAM JJ S0 FOND AMJJ A SON DJ FMA M JJASOND J F MAMJ J A S O ND 15 1W t9M 9969 Figure 15. Trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Leon 7 at Tallahassee and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1965-66. However, during 1966, levels declined. The long-term record of ground-water levels in well Leon 7, at Tallahassee, are shown by figure 16. The hydrograph shows no discernable long-term downward trend for the entire period of record. The short-term trends correspond closely to the areal rainfall with levels declining to the lowest of record during the 1954-56 drought. FERNANDINA-JACKSONVILLE AREA The Fernandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest and rapidly expanding industrial areas in the state. Since 1945, municipal pumpage has increased from 7,900 mgy in 1945 to 13,158 mgy in 1966 with the greatest increase occurring during the 1945-55

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 21 LEON 7 DEPTH 314 FT. CASED 165 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 149 ,h 152 leg 155,-[ \V I 158------------------z 164 167 q164----I--170 S173 te level is afected by pumping of nearby wells MADISON 18 DEPTH 322 FT. CASED 307 FT FLORIDAN AQUIFER --w II----------Z 17 20-n S23 --26 --------wo 29 COLUMBIA 9 DEPTH 836 FT. CASED 680 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 66-----------------69 72 72 78 _cn j081-------^-------------------------------84-WC3 1.1 ---1/^ ---h 1--------------87------------------=;-------_ -99------------------------------99 102 105 SNASSAU 12 DEPTH 640 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER w+27-I Wafer level on Mr. 28 1939 wo W 21 ----40.9 -feet above land 'surface 6 +18------------------------------J W+12------^----------------------------S+-15 U +12 o -3 z -15 I-9----------------------------^ §L 12 -------} o--l-7---------------21 c -27 Water level is affected by regional pumping -33 1-30 -----j | --14 ---------_ 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 Figure 16. frends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida.

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22 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY period. Total municipal and industrial pumpage at Jacksonville in 1966 was about 21,100 mgy. Figure 17 shows total yearly Jacksonville municipal pumpage 1921 through 1966. Trends and seasonal regional fluctuations of ground-water levels in the area are shown in figure 18. Ground-water levels, after a sharp rise in 1964 from record 1963 low levels, remained about the same during 1965-66 in well Duval 164 near Mayport and in well Nassau 12 near Fernandina in the coastal areas (figure 16). In contrast, levels at Jacksonville and inland at Callahan declined slightly during 1965-66. Declines of about 3 feet were recorded in well Duval 122 at Jacksonville and in well Nassau 51 at Callahan. Changes in water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Ferandian-Jacksonville area are shown in Figure 19. CENTRAL FLORIDA Central Florida includes 20 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles. The extent of this section and location of observation wells for which hydrographs are given are shown in figure 20. The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply. In central peninsular Florida, levels in well Marion 5 near Ocala and in well Putnam 29 at Palatka remained about the same in 1965-66 after rising about 6 feet near Ocala and 4 feet at Palatka during 1963-64. Central Florida includes four rapidly growing centers of population and industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton area. TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG AREA This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Petersburg, is undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population. The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 21. Persistent drought conditions and increased pumping during 1965-66 caused water levels in illsborough 13 to decline to the lowest levels of record in 1966. Rainfall recorded at Tampa and the fluctuations of the water level in well Hillsborough 13 for the period 1965-66 are shown in figure 22. Near Ruskin, in southern Bfilsborough County, water levels in well Hillsborough 30 declined to the lowest level of record in 1965 (figure 23). This decline is part of an extensive regional lowering of water levels which extends from southern Hillsborough County into Manatee and Sarasota counties. (See figure 34.) Water levels in two Pinellas County wells, Pinellas 13 and 246, are shown in figure 23. No apparent trend is noted for Pinellas 13. However, a slight

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1640 '--I I I I I -I I I I I I I I I---I-----I----------I -1 1 14,000 0 -JJ Fc 2,000 Figure 17. Total yearly pumpAge, city of Jacksonville, Florida. w

PAGE 31

24 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY nassru 1 DEPTH S0W FT. tFLO iAN AQUIJE 3 39 o34 > 32 ouva 12-------PT90-----CAS LO ^t A3 4 -_ _ _ _PT _S -A_ L_ w 29 CUVaL 122 DEPTH 95 FT. CASED 51 F. ___ LORIDAN AQF S-,--i----..-. ---"---------LL "-. ll l I l _^_ _ -----.--_ -i__--v -v Sf7 -o -, .._ ._. .. .l .3? -^ ---_, -i .... .... .... .......... ..'"r -... ..-f -..... ..-.. "29 "t Pala ...-lo-.. .------.. ...... %3 .. .. a tw2 levl is afaakcted ly iid L I I I l l l l l 4: ... L .... 0%rln 3 DEPTH 135 FT CASED 135 FT. MFLORIDAN AQUIFER --" -.31 -. .-' i , ._ ... ... .... ...... ......--. ? .! ..... ...... .. € Figure I& Trends _! and 1ca 1 of w lev I__elsinw -I Nassa.u .SI_. a., CllaaI PUli" 3 6T 0 T________FO1A QIE .Ig:3:i:: iiiLL:::|pT ,| ,G. -. -^ ^et ^a ^ ^ p --. . 29a alta Foia

PAGE 32

UI ASSA U INI*; U a' p.A1 I al !r 6Sot 04,1 IIgo /0 4 sa \ / Igo 92" MI, le In 013'4:H OLT VW I a118111 i;\ kEXPLANATION 2 I, r~I Ia"0 Una ofi.equal, not, change of qwdYliwdar lawls in,~ Ina 171cidon cqTUlW..W tr0bha i 0 h i em himaft I rir Oaslid' whwa opprooimottN Intlw li 2 Irmt, I CLAY %, ObearvulloV0 wall and numb. CLA .Y STJONSJOHNS 0r rr~ I' .UTN*I ea PUTN A M MILK ITV NIXr M erg FLAGLE R' FL E R1: ell, oil$~ MAY 1951 -MAY 1964 MAY L9i64MAY' 1966: Figure 19. Net changes of ground-water levels in. the JacksonviIfe and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to, May L964 and from May 1964 to May 1966.

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26 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY A. .... -=\\ % "~--^ u o3 -'\ ,,, E IN L E-b I x l" .... -->....... .. .--EY O ....... E ,a \ /\ I hI *l Na'J ..II 5 SK A N E S44 *-*.--"," -----------, -i P \ L K f (j .. i .' \ i \*90 0UG H SCE 8OL 51. L. S iI I 'IND I A N RIVER ~*3 I > NAN*E iH A R D E E O OKEECHO EE T L U C I E I -*„ 0 , 1 ^ ---------I H IB L A-N S \x| \, SHI G H L AN VS orL-. -_ DE S O T 0 Figure 20. Locations of observations wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given. downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246. This downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956 and levels continued to rise through 1959 and were about average during 1965-66. Changes in chloride content of water from two wells that tap the Floridan aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 24. At Dunedin, the chloride content of well Pinellas 166 was higher during 1965 than during 1966. In 1965, the chloride content ranged from 76 mg/1 (milligrams per liter) to nearly 500 mg/I in June. In 1966, chloride content ranged from 120 mg/1 in January to 38 mg/i in May in the well at Dunedin.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 27 PASCO 13 DEPTH 49 .FT. CASED 43 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 2----------------------------------------------_-10 I 1 M 4 5Z 12-i c^ 03------------_ q -'------------------_ ___ -_ HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT. CASED 6FT. PLORIDAN AQUIER w if---------------------------------------------------^ I5 -..------------------.._ ---U' Z f6----------------------------------------------------^-----.---J 219-------------------------------------------------------------U-w 20------Io p -I Io 26 p 125 --"!Et Figure 21. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehren and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area. At Bay Pines, during 1965, the chloride content in well Pinellas 592 ranged from 1,730 mg/I in January to 2,220 mg/i in June. During 1966, chlorides ranged from 2,050 mg/i in October to 2,265 in May. LAKELAND AREA Ground-water pumpage is keeping apace with the economic development and growth of the Lakeland area. Municipal pumpage increased about 264 percent during 1945o66. From 1945 through 1955 pumpage increased 83 percent with an average increase of 113 mgy During 1956 through 1966 pumpage increased about 98 percent with an average rate of increase of 206 mgy. Figure 25 shows the total yearly municipal pumpage at Lakeland for 1928-66. The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of Lakeland is shown in figure 26. A maximum decline of about 20 feet in well Polk 45 occurred during October 1960 through May 1962. During 1964-65, the decline was resumed with levels falling to the lowest of record in 1965. Ehe n ilbrog 3na irs ak ap ra Atiynns uig16, h hoiecneti wl iels52rne 0rm170m/ nJnayt ,2 a/ nJn.Drn 96 hoie ragdfo ,5 rg1i2coe t ,6 nMy LAELN 13REA G"In:wte 1umag -s -epn -pc -ihteeooi eeomnn grwh9 h aeadae.Mncpl upg nrae bu 6 ecn duin 194-67rm14 hog 95pupg nrae3pretwt

PAGE 35

28 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Ca di 46 I j r JaSO0 F AMJJ N 0DJ F AM A JAOM J J S0N 0JFMAMJ JAS ONDJ FMAM JJAS ONO iLi I I I 1965 M 19 1969 Figure 22. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 near Tampa and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tampa, 1965-66. In northern Polk county, water levels declined to new record low levels in many areas during 1960-62, rose sharply in 1963, then declined to new record low levels in 1965. Levels in the Floridan aquifer declined nearly 20 feet during 1964-65 in well Polk 45 in the heavily pumped area south of Lakeland. Levels in well Polk 44 near Davenport in northeastern Polk County declined about 2.5 feet in 1964-65 then rose slightly during 1965-66. Levels in well Polk 47 in the

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 29 HILLSBOROUGH 30 DEPTH 500 FT. CASED 34 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 14-------------------------------L 104 f2 g i II LL 9 ..f 8------------------------------------------j i PINELLAS 13, DEPTH 1 FT SE 3 FLORIDAN AQUIFER >g 7----------------------------jJ 6-------------_ --_ _ _ LL> 2 I-----------------031 ------------------------INELLAS 1 DEPTH 141 FT. CASED 33 F. FLORIDAN AQUIFER5 -J 9 ______ Lkln to about 3 fet lowrthn 1960 le vl intell slo-sandnonr. ts Wr r Wter level is affected by tides _aqu _ife no uth e rn Polk Countys ae shcwtations o e nrlev in fwelue 2s8o 3 near P INELLAS 246 DEPTH 208 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER I--oesan fr nea Depor eie t .e o a new 2e29d a 2 Wateowr level iseand ffectednbyotidesnartesian 301 111111 Figure 23. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near nonartesian aquifer near Davenport declined about 2.5 feet to a new low of record during 1964-66. The downward trend of levels in artesiafi and nonartesian aquifers was accentuated by rainfall deficiency and increased pumping in northern Polk County. Precipitation recorded at Lakeland shows deficient rainfall in the Lakeland area during 1961 through 1966. During 1965 water levels ranged from 11 feet below 1960 highest levels in the Floridan aquifer near Lakeland to about 3 feet lower than 1960 levels in the shallow-sand nonartesian aquifer near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 27. Water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow sand nonartesian aquifer in southern and southeastern Polk County are shown in figure 28.

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30 INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 1400----r 1200 Floridan Aquifer Depth 195ft. 1000 S PI-NELAS --6 400 800 Foridn Aquifer DepCh 280Cf. 800 Figre 2 Chane F in chloride content in wells Pinella 592 at BaY Pine and 166 at Deth 280 fdinSt. Petburarea 40C 8 2 0 0 -------A -------400 -----------------------Dunedin, St. Petersburg area.

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S,3200 -JL L,000 4600 Z 4r 2,400( i 1o--i--nFid 1,600 1,200 800 Figure 25. Total yearly pumpage, city of Lakeland, Florida.

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32 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY POLu 45 Own 643 Mi asjF a i M A II OMD J i 1 MI As 1 OD F M M J J A S i i NJ F MAi i i j i jA S N w Z Ili s t i l l i i sI I I I i I I l l i l l l it i i i ti l l 7i-i it I _1 j~. iJ aJSOM0 JF1AMJJ SON0JFAMJ JASONOJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJ JASOND s"es ew 1969 Figure 26. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1965-66. The decline of artesian and nonartesian water levels due to the droughts of 1955-56 and 1961-62 and the well defined downward trend of artesian levels in the Hawthorn aquifer are the prominent features illustrated by the hydrographs in figure 28. Generally, post-drought levels rose to pre-drought levels in the shallow nonartesian sand aquifer in southern Polk and Highlands counties. In sharp contrast, water levels in well Polk 51 in the Hawthorn aquifer near Frostproof declined about 2.5 feet from the 1958 high level. In addition, a perceptible downward trend of artesian levels is shown by the hydrograph of this well. During 1965, levels in this well declined to a new record low of 20.92 feet below land surface.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 33 POLK 44 DEPTH 195 FT. CASED 81 FT. FLORIDAN .AQUIFER +2 S +1 6 0---------S--------------^---------------C6 -6--5V------8 -----I---------------------]-----_---______ ^s -L---11-111-1----L---_--__-___-_____-10 0POLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT. CASED 325 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 111A-----1-1-1-1-----1--------------------I 0 4 I---------------------------z 4-----------I 46 LLJ Q E -/-I N 0 VN 5 1945 1950 1955 19-0 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 27. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well -olk 44 and 45 near 3-------Daven----ort and Polk 45 nearLakeand--------Lakeland area. 40-----------------------------------------------.---, 41--------------------------------------------------------------ffi 42-------------------------------------------------------------ga:43-------------------------------------------------*-j>f44-----------------------------------------lU 0 4----------------46--l--------------------------PL 49---------/F-----I ---^-------------50-----------------------------------5I------------------_--___---81945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Davenport and Polk 45 near LakelanI, Lakeland area. Davenport and Polk 45 near, Lakelancj Lakeland area.

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34 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY POLK 49 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) So ----------------O .e----------------------us 4 -10-----*--*----------------t-*--*--*--*-----------1-*-*---*--*--'-'-POLK 51 DEPTH 319 FT. CASED 208 FT. HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN) 0 4----------------------------------------------1, -_---------_-I.----------------.----_---_4 I S1==11--:-----=-lll= 7I 23 --24 0 -----------------, r .v I! li ,| -,24L! I AN A I 1 S G NDS 10 DEPTH 45 FT CASED 41 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 39-----------------------40 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 28. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 59 at Frostroof and Hilands 10 near Sebring. z 4 -1 t 1 1 1 1 I I I4I I-I-.-'.--I--,37 -----lJ---J ---t -" -------_£ 3B4 -----='--------i-

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 35 In central Highlands County near Sebring, levels rose about 3 feet in the nonartesian aquifer from May 1965 to September 1966. During the same period, levels rose about 3.5 to 4 feet in southern Osceola and Okeechobee counties. Figure 29 illustrates fluctuations of water levels in the shallow nonartesian aquifer in Highlands, Okeechobee and Osceola counties. ORLANDO AREA The Orlando area includes the cities of Orlando, Winter Park and Maitland in north-central Orange County. The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the water for municipal and industrial needs in the area. Total annual municipal pumpages at Orlando, at Winter Park and for the City of Cocoa are shown in figure 30. Municipal pumpage at Orlando increased about 586 percent from 1941-66. HIGHLANDS 13 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 16 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 31 30 .29 L": 27 S ------I -------------------26 > 25 g,-,, --------W----I------_21 20 OSCEOLA 183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 76 -J 75 5-7 ----------573-------------------------52 ---" z 7 1 V / I I I 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 !a 69 < 67 66 Figure 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, anKEECHOBEE 3 DEP22FT. CASED in the Kissimmee Valley. NONRTESAN) 63 .w 59 53 52 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 29. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley.

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10,000 9,000 8,000 -ORLANDO F^ CITY OF COCOA SWINTER PARK 6,000 -C 2,0000 2.0000 1941 1945 1950 1955 1960 1985 Figure 30. Total yearly pumnpage, Orlando, city ol'Cocoa and Winter Park. IFlorida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 37 Hydrographs of artesian and nonartesian water levels are shown in figure 31. The long-term trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Orlando area is illustrated in figure 32. The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows water levels declined to record low levels in 1962 and again during May 1965. After declining to a record low in May 1965, levels rose in September 1966 to slightly above September 1964 levels which were about average for the period 1950-66. ORANGE 478 Cied 17 tt ORANGE 47 i (Artesion) Depwh 350 n. j 6 Cased 328 ft. JFMAMJ JSONDJFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJ JASONDIJFMAMJJJASOND JFMAMJJASOND 24 V I I I I I i I I I i i I I I I i I SJF M AMJ J fSOND J FMf MJ J S ON DIJ F MAMJ J ASONDJ FM LMJ J A S OND[J FMAMJ J f SON 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 31. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1965-66.

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38 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY ORRANGE 47 DEPTH 350 FT. CASED 328 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER -4.,------------------------------------p-S.I IIIII I I ,-6 -I I__ I I_ _ --0I < -4 ---------------------. 93C 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 32. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47 near Orlando. CAPE KENNEDY AREA One of the most rapidly growing areas in the state is the Cape Kennedy area, which includes the cities of Cocoa, Cocoa Beach, and Titusville in Brevard County. In this area, water in the Floridan aquifer is generally brackish and is used primarily for irrigation Water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in Brevard, Indian River and St. Lucie counties are shown in figure 33. Hydrographs of wells in Brevard County generally show a long-term downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer. From 1946 through 1965 artesian levels have declined about 7 feet in well Brevard 79 in northern Brevard County about 28 miles northwest of Cape Kennedy and about 14 feet in well Brevard 148 at Cocoa. Water levels in both wells declined to new record lows during 1965, then rose in 1966 to about 1963-64 levels. Increased water use and deficiency of rainfall contributed to the sharp decline of water levels in Brevard County in 1965. Annual rainfall in 1965 at Titusville was 8.69 inches below normal. In contrast, nonartesian levels in the shallow sand

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 39 BREVARD 148 DEPTH 206 FT. CASED 105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER to 8-^l 1-----T------F j ----TT I-II ~----~ 4 +4 1 -----------------------------W i3--------------------_---_------_1 ----_ ___ I-* 6 ----------_-----L_-_______w--------------------------------------_--^--_--_--____tj ------------,--> ----------. -_ z 32 INDIAN RIVER 2579 DEPTH 160 FT. CASED 1385 FT. SHALLOWFLORIDAN AQUIUFER (NONARTESIAN) -J n'L l w27 <26 IST LUCIE 42 DEPTH 18 FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) ,, 7-, 3 -\1-_ -S +6 -3 j 2::: 29 > w i'z 27 W o2 ---ST. LUCIE 42 DEPTH 19 FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 1945 1950 1 1 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 33. Trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cae Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida. 2BT 28----O
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40 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties have generally shown no downward trend during the period of record. Levels did decline to the lowest May level since May 1961 in well St. Lucie 42 (figure 33). In 1966, rainfall was 14.58 inches above normal at Titusville. SARASOTA-BRADENTON AREA The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in southwestern coastal Florida. Principal economic activities in the area are agricultural-truck and citrus farming and stock raising. The coastal section, however, is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center. Figure 34 shows trends and fluctuations of water levels in observation wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9. Hydrographs of both wells show well-defined declines of artesian water levels in the Floridan aquifer. Levels in well Manatee 92 have declined about 18.2 feet from a May 1947 high level of 37.1 below land surface to a new record low of 55.3 feet below land surface in May 1965. Water levels in well Manatee 92 have been declining at an average rate of 0.65 foot each year since 1941. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have declined 13.58 feet from 0.95 foot above land surface in May 1947 to a new record low level of 12.63 feet below land surface in May 1965. Levels in well Sarasota 9 have been declining at an average rate of about 0.5 foot per year since 1931. A comparison of hydrographs of levels in Manatee 92 to those of well Sarasota 9 shows the decline is continuing and that the range of fluctuations is increasing in both wells. The regional extent of the decline is shown by hydrographs of well Hillsborough 30 (figure 23) and of wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9 (figure 33). SOUTHERN FLORIDA The southern Florida section includes all counties south of a line through DeSoto County and covers an area of about 17,500 square miles. The region and locations of selected observation wells for which hydrographs are presented are shown on figure 35. In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade counties, the Biscayne aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are the main sources.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 41 MANATEE 92 DEPTH 600 FT. CASED 154 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 35 36 37 38 i 40------':':141 _j 42 3t43 9 44 45 F Measurement discontinued 4w 4 PNov. I, 96I -47 48 S49 W 50 ----,, 51 W Water level is offected by regional pumping -52 53 54 55 56 I I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I 56 SARASOTA 9 DEPTH 730 FT. CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER S+6 +3 4-:i ------------------SA A T --------------------------------6 + -8 3 -2 2 ----L ---------------------------------------S-63All ll W -7 S-3-------------------------------------I -EM S.2-e----------------------------L4 --,9----------------------------------------^-----------------4--I -7 Water level is affected ional umei W -10 _j -11 -14 I I I I I I I I I I I I I .I 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 34. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area. FT. MYERS AREA The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties, and like the Bradenton-Sarasota area to the north, is developing rapidly as a winter tourist and retirement center.

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42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY SM r~-n E OKEECHOBEE ST. LUCIE DESOTO HIGHLANDS r-----MAR TIN \ I LAKE \ R i i I OREECHOBE R L rrE GLA DES L EE H E N D R Y P BEA CH -(-----\ \ -' LA; -_ \ A_ _\ SB R\ 0 W A R D S329 C N L L I E R e.r_ 539 ; \ G6I7 SI 291 .72slao F2%-cl SG596 53 0 3S96A 6E 3 am'a63 3529c Figure 35. Locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 43 The principal source of ground water in the Ft. Myers area is the nonartesian aquifers. Figure 36 shows the seasonal fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the period 1965-66. Generally,.seasonal fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to seasonal fluctuations in the amounts of rainfall. Figure 37 shows the trends and fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern Florida. Is Non Aqifer 1965 !966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 36 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near FL Myers and departures S from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1965-66. Spth 27 ft. Cos.ad 19 It a

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44 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY 0 LEE 246 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 19 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN I n 11 I I I A A II1 II I 1 2 I -U 3ll L AL l 511 V -1 12 Water level is affected by pumping of nearby wells 4 4 ~\ : 1111 1I1 1 11111 :1 COLLIER 131 DEPTH 54 FT. CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN) 26 iS218-------------------------------------------I I) 12 e--------r llisffed by pumpin---ofnerby well26-------------------------------------t*2-------------_---_--------.-----_----------_-~ 14 i'21-------------------------------------------------------------16 -----------------------------------------COLLIER 54 DEPTH 9 FT. CASED 22 FT. S AND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 28 27 MARTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT. SAND__ NSANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 26 f 25 -)/111 N 2e IVI i ,I I i !aIb v' rMRTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT,. SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN U 21--2I fl 17 ITIT-11 6 .I--I • 14 der e is offected by nmping. Qf neorbyjwells 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figur 37. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier 54 Everglades, Collier 131 near Immokalee, and Martin 147 at Stuart, Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 45 STUART-WEST PALM BEACH AREA This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach counties and is a segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal complex extending from Jacksonville southward through the Keys. Average yearly municipal pumpage at Stuart has increased from an average of 40 mgy during 1941-45 to about 260 mgy in 1966 as shown in figure 38. The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer at Stuart are shown in figure 37. The hydrograph of well Martin 147 shows a slight downward trend of nonartesian levels. Levels declined to a record low level of about 2 feet above mean sea level in the spring of 1962, 1963 and 1965. The declines were caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field. Although pumpage increased during 1965-66, water levels declined then rose in response to above average rainfall during 1965-66. Figure 39 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Stuart, 1965-66. The Biscayne aquifer is the chief source of water supply in southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 40 shows the trends and fluctuations of end-of-month water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and rainfall data at West Palm Beach. Fluctuations of water levels for several selected wells are shown in figures 41 and 42. FT. LAUDERDALE AREA The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part of Broward County extending from the Deerfield-Boca Raton area in the northern part of Broward County to the Hollywood area in the southern part of the county. Long-term downward trends of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in and adjacent to the Ft. Lauderdale area are shown by the hydrograph of well Broward S329 at Ft. Lauderdale (figure 42). The Biscayne aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to the coast and along tidal canals. Figure 43 shows graphs of the chloride content of water in well Broward S830 in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field and in wells Dade F64 and F296 in North Miami Beach and Miami. The chloride content of water in well Broward S830 decreased from about 3,700 mg/1 in 1947 to about 50 mg/1 in 1958. From 1958 through 1963, chloride content increased to nearly 2,000 mgfl. In 1964 the chloride content decreased to about 1,700 mg/l and remained at 1,700 mg/1 during 1965-66. MIAMI AREA The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the most populous area in the state. The principal source of water supply is the Biscayne aquifei, the extent of which is shown on figure 1.

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3103 -290I5010 230-0 210 I 1941 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 38. Total yearly pumpage, city of Stuart, Florida. 150

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 47 J M O MARI'N 147 Nomnrion Aqdfer DWI% 74 ft. COa 73 It. 196 66 1967 1968 1969 Figure 39. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Martin 147 at Stuart and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Stuart, 1965-66. The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for which hydrographs are given are shown by figure 35. Water-level observations were made as early as 1933 at Homestead in well Dade S196A. Long-term record of water-level fluctuations at Homestead are shown in figure 42. Figure 44 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Homestead Experimental Station 1965-66. Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the Miami area is at Homestead Experimental Station 1965-66. occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells Dade G72, G596, G618, and G620, figures 45 and 46.

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48 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY -n I is 31t T 1 1 1 1 1 1 I -1 1 1 1 1 1 t F J A D F JM AM J JAS ON0 DJ F Ma AIUJ J JAS ONDJ FUAUJJAS 0 NoDJ F M AM J JAIS 0N J F M A J aSO DIJ F J I aMJ J ASON0OJ F MAMJ JASONO J FMAMJ J A S ONDJ F a M J JA SON 96 1966 1967 196 1969 Figure 40. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1965-66. In the vicinity of Miami, fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Biscayne aquifer are illustrated by hydrographs of wells Dade G10 about 5 miles west of Miami, Dade S19 at Miami Springs (figure 44), and well Dade F179 at Miami (figure 41). The water level in well Dade S19 is affected by pumping in the city of Miami municipal well field. In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the presence of salty water in an aquifer is signalled by high chloride content of the ground-water. Sea water is

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 49 PALM BEACH 88 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 16 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 125 11 -1 >s 3--I I I 2 ? Prior to 1951 records were published with reference UI I lo nd. surface 14.44 ft. above meon sea level 0 --I I 0 .0BROWARD G561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER S .*U 7 +| ----wo 1 I to nd, urfo ce 8.15. ft. obove .rpeon eo vel. + 5 -4 w Q -4= I -I I I I IIl l i l l il i I I I-E < A 1riorto I I I I I I _I_ fh I reference j "" I I I nd. lurce tl Ive mea se level. BROWARD G617 DEPTH 29 FT. CASED 28 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 12 -----------------------i It -------------__-_-__-_-__ -_ ----_ h 80------------------------------------------------------------9 hfi 8-----------------------------------------------------__J_ M 7 5 w ----------------.-i_----------5 DADE G555 DEPTH 91 FT. CASED 79 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER +14 cc3-----------------------------.u8 1 :l-~| : ~--------------0d .-------------_ __ ____ o i 2I w ,, > + ---I -. X .' +1, 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 41. Trends Prio ns o water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami. wUl------------+---------_-j+8 01945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 41. Trends and fluctuatons of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 at Lake Worth, Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami.

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50 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY BROWARO F291 DEPTH 107 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 4 -IIIII!!pp 1h I I AI I 0 U Luw 3 E F -S31 9 DEPTH 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER S-4Cf --7------------------------Lu4 19.0 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figaze 42 Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood, -2 DadE S 1 8n9 DEPTH 20 FT ISCAYNE AQUIFER LLand Broward S329 near Ft. Lauderdale. -> c7 L 4 ..> 55 I i 190 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 and Broward 329 near Ft. Lauderdale. QUIER 8 ..! 1 !. -w i t l l l lI I l l ru I I I I I I I I I I ,. bro .,., ol, k w IIl, I I ,, ., III4i rr6 Ii igllb IiIi .. t allllIlllll ,Ii -> II! IIIII Ill ll I! 1 11 1 1 11 <=,. € l V I iI I / iI IU II "I ll = l i l llr i n l ll ll ll v i ..= z 6,1 IIlII I!N II :! W-= o ~ ~ .. i9-3 195 14 95 150 15 90 = F-r 4.T'd n lcutoso ae lvl nwlsBoadF9 tHlyod Dade SI erMai aeS9Ana oetaDd 19a4ai

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 51 BROWARD S830 DEPTH II9FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 4000 23 -=^ --------------------w* 0---^ --Jf-------------350C 5000 DADE F296 DEPTH 47FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER Iw :iIIIIIIh:IMIHI DADE" F64 DEPTH 114FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER o 1400 ----------------a: C-W S1200---------800 60o40---------"---200 1946 1950 55 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 43. Changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami. contained in the seaward reaches of the Biscayne and some encroachment of sea water into the aquifer has occurred through the years. Water control measures have checked the encroachment and as a result a freshening of the ground-water has occurred in some areas. Generally, chloride content of ground-water decreased throughout most of Dade County during 1965-66. Chloride content of ground water in the Biscayne aquifer in well Dade F296 on the coast north of Miami declined sharply from 500 to 100 mg/l during 1965-66. In northern Dade County, chlorides decreased from 900 mg/l in 1946 to less than 50 mg/l in 1963 in well Dade G354 and remained less than 50 mg/1 during 1963-66. In southern coastal Dade County, chloride content of ground-water in the Biscayne aquifer generally remained at low concentrations in most areas during 1965-66 although increases were noted in some areas. Chloride content increased from 250 mg/1 to more than 1,000 mg/1 in well Dade S529. In central coastal Dade County, chloride content in well Dade G469 decreased from about 8,600

PAGE 59

52 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY 3 SDAOE S196 A 3'i j A ,J 1 J Ia SO lO J11 FM AMJ JASOND JFMAMJ J AS O N D JFMAM J J AS O IND JFMI IMJ JA l SON1 J F 1,AM J J AS O N F 0 A J ASN 0 1 F M A M J J A S 0 N 0 J F NA N J J A S 00 N DIJ F A A 0 J A 0 N I II 19 1966 1967 1968 1969 Figure 44. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A near Homestead, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1965-66. mg/I in 1965 to about 7,700 mg/i in late 1965 then increased slightly in 1966. In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination of the Biscayne aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an ever-present problem. Through intensive practice of water control the problem of prevention of salty water contamination has been solved. In many areas where contamination existed the situation has been alleviated by water control. The effectiveness of the method of control is graphically illustrated in figure 47 by the chlorographs of wells Dade G212, G354, and S529.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 53 1DADE S19 DEPTH 95 FT. CASED 91 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER +10 < +8 ,," Woter levelis offected b* pumping of nerbywells S+---W +9 z +2 wo +1--',.,M a u e I Ii \ 1c I I I I s ti I-I----------------DADE GIO DEPTH 6 FT. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER +10 Figure 45. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami, -and D e +8northwest aII -ro 0 l -2I > o .I w 10 Figure 45. Tres and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S1 and Gl near Miami, and Dade G72 northwest of Opa-locka.

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54 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY DADE G596 DEPTH 13 FT. CASED II FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER L 4 O A O E 41L ME1 2 0I I C A S E IF 2 .1 -I1 I I I t L L J -L iUA DADE G618 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 11 FEET BISCAYNE AQUIFER 10 10 M S-----------I 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 J Figure 46. Trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, < Ir 0 94 019----9-5---960--965--1----1975 198DE 3 EPTH G613, FT. and CASED G620 in FT. BISCAYNE AQCountyUIFER S,.3 ---1-----------a -----------/----su ) 10 4.Ted n ~tztoso atlvl nwlsDd 56 68 G63 n 60i enrlDd ony

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 61 55 DADE 6G354 DEPTH 91 FT. CASED 88FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER 1200--------800 CT------------------00 600 I --O--O----------------------_ 7ooD----------"----------200--4 000 -----------------SI-8000---2 7000_-----I-l CC00 ----------------S1000--------------2500 --------2 C---------------------------___ 2000 500-----I-------1000-4 V ----------------0and Dade G469 and S529 in sQutheastern Dade County.

PAGE 64

APPENDIX

PAGE 65

Table l.-Sunary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells. Well nmber: Well umbers are based on county nmbering system e.g., Bay County well Bay 20, or on the latitudinal a lnauitudlnal system e.g., well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given where this well has been reported previously n a publication under the county number. Letters prefixed to well ambers in roward and Dade Counties; G, Geological Survey wells; S, supply wells; F, fire wells; and HP, National Park Service wells. Letter suffix A, shallow well adjacent to deep well. AquLfer: B, Biscayne; F, Floridan; G, sand-and-gravel; 8, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand. Depth of well: Measured unless otherwise noted. R, reported depth. Frequency of measurment: Refers to current biennium. A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous; H, monthly; S. semiannually; T, Triyearly; W,'weekly. Water level: To hnndredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or taken from recorder chart; to nearest tenth of a foot if measured by pressure gage of airline, Remarks: D, measurements discontinued on date shown in Remarks; L, loaest water level; N, water level with reference to mean sea level; P, water level affected by pmping of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in Remarks; S, water level affected by seasonal or regional pumping; T, water levels affected by ocean tides; X, well in use. Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface S(feet) Ss m 0 Prior to 1965 Highest water eRemarks well mber .level in May Annual a n a HMay or June or June Range 0. su 0* High Low I year (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 ALACHUA COUNTY 936-236-1 P 252 136 1958 C -23.48 -31.68 -20.49 -20.58 4.17 2.96 1960 1963 942-216-1 P 447R 175 1957 B -88.52 -94.19 -87.72 -87.36 1.55 1.69 P 1961 1963 949-235-2 7 300R 250 1960 B -37.34 -39.36 -36.41 -36.30 1.60 3.35 X 1960 1963 BAKER COUNTY 011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 B 40.17 -5.21 -2.29 -2.37 2.15 2.56 1959 1962 014-226-1 P 168 -1957 B -100.48 -101.74 -94.14 -95.07 3.64 3.75 X 1962 1963 016-207-1 F 595R 459 1945 B -55.4 -71.45 -65.01 -64.82 2.44 6.30 P 1945 1963 026-214-1 H 198 102 1960 B -14.98 -20.13 -17.05 -17.04 2.51 2.86 X 1964 1963 015-216-2 F 825 282 1963 B --96.43 -94.29 -95.37 2.52 1.84 1964 026-217-3 F 905 417 1963 B -56.71 ---55.16 -56.78 3.26 4.42 1964 BAY COUNTY 7 (010-541-1) F 253 -1936 B -42.33 -78.36 -61.28 --10.90 10.20 P 1947 1963 12 (017-531-1} F 290R -1961 B +1.82 +0.50 +1.35 --0.96 0.82 1964 1962

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface 00: (feet) el nmber Prior to 1965 Highest ater Remarks S a o a a May or June or June Range S_ J (year) (year) 65 1966 1965 1966 BAY COUNTY (continued) 956-524-1 F 497R 424 1962 B ---12.0 5.98 3--3.77 6.05 X 1953 68 (023-526-1) F 160 161 1961 B +3.30 + 1.6 +4.50 --0.42 1.50 P 1964 1963 BRADFORD COUNTY 000-210-2 F 294 247 1959 B -69.52 -75.69 -70.36 -70.65 2.09 1.17 1959 1963 BREVARD COUNTY 20 (795-043-2) F 447R 125 1934 B +28.7 + 19.8 +18.5 +20.0 4.7 3.3 S 1947 1962 79 (847-051-1) F 160R 85 1946 B +5.1 -0.55 -1.20 +1.05 4.20 2.95 S 1947 1962 148 (821-045-1) F 206R 105 1946 B +10.9 +4.3 +0.6 +5.30 8.6 3.9 S; X 1953 1962 759-045-1 S. 9 10 1958 S -3.5 -7.2 -4.5 --1.7 --1964 1962 807-039-2 S 30 29 1958 C -6.1 -8.4 -8.3 -6.03 1.8 1.84 1964 1962 814-048-2 S 8 8 1958 C -0.0 -3.1 -2.0 --2.4 --1964 1961 822-047-2 F 129 114 1955 C +32.6 +29.9 +26.6 +29.3 5.2 3.65 M 1960 1960 BROWARD COUNTY F291 B 107 --1948 C -4.3 +0.4 +0.83 +1.67 5.73 2.89 M 1958 1952 G561 B 20 20 1948 C 44.1 +0.2 +0.77 +1.57 6.18 3.69 M 1958 1956 G616 B 24 19 1952 C +12.90 +8.72 +8.70 +9.94 5.62 4.66 M 1957&58 1956 G617 B 29 28 1950 C +6.6 +2.57 +3.51 +4.08 3.19 3.46 M 1954 1962 G820 B 224 215 1956 C +1.15 -0.70 -3.15 +4.68 3.15 7.44 M; Prospect 1962 well field & 63 G853 B 22 21 1960 C +3.75 +2.80 0.00 +6.20 11.28 5.45 M; Pcampao 1964 1962 well field S329 B 68 --1940 C +5.5 +0.5 -0.28 +2.97 6.09 5.26 M; Dixie well 1955 1954 field

PAGE 67

SWater level above (+) orbelow (-) .lad surface 3 o a level In Kay Annual Pror9 to e 1965 2 ihet war man -b ad ^ r or Re maune l am Remarlk (year)
PAGE 68

SWater level above (+) or below .(-) land surface S Prior to 1965 Highest water Well number level in May Annual SMay or June or June Range n< e ,* ^ 5 8aHigh Low (year). (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COOITY (continued) F358 B 54 --1940 C 46.70 -0.04 40.03 +2.68 6.56 4.69 M 1954 1962 G3 B 20 11 1940 C +3.00 -0.50 -1.42 +2.44 6.27 3.59 M; P 1958 1951 G10 B 6 6 1940 C +6.00 +0.50 +2.83 +3.99 3.58 2.43 M 1958 1945 G39 B 6 6 1939 C +7.20 -0.94 +2.15 +3.52 3.60 3.20 M; P 1958 1962 G72 B 5 4 1940 C 46.50 +1.20 +3.95 --2.74 --M; D, 1966 1958 1945 G476 B 24 19 1947 C +5.50 +0.40 +1.24 +1.73 4.43 1.13 D, 1966; M 1958 1950&56 G553 B 91 79 1947 C +8.60 +0.97 +2.45 +5.75 6.89 4.96 M; Casing 1958 1962 slotted 36 to 79 ft G580A B 22 4 1960 C 44.84 +0.95 +1.89 +3.70 3.80 2.84 M 1961 1962 G595 B 14 11 1949 C +8.50 -1.88 -1.92 --6.14 --D; 1966; 1958 1962 M; P G596 B 13 11 1949 C +8.40 +2.11 +3.47 +5.85 5.51 3.96 H 1958 1962 G613 B 21 18 1950 C +5.50 -0.98 -0.67 +2.37 6.52 4.34 M 1954&58 1962 G614 B 20 18 1950 C +8.20 +0.37 +1.46 +3.10 7.21 5.58 M 1958 1962 G618 B 20 11 1950 C +8.40 +2.56 +6.06 +6.81 2.27 1.42 H 1958 1962 0619 B 12 6 1950 C +8.30. 44.07 +7.43 +8.08 1.99 --M; D, 1966 1958 1956 G620 B 16 6 1950 C +7.0 +3.6 +3.21 +6.04 4.09 1.95 M 1958 1952 G757A .B 20 10 1957 C +9.30 +1.50 +1.47 +8.20 6.05 5.52 M 1958 1962 G789 B 20 10 1956 C +7.30 +1.15 -0.04 +6.95 6.69 5.08 M 1958 1962 0799 B 20 10 1956 C +7.80 +1.65 +1.80 +5.90 3.75 3.10 M; P 1958 1962 C851 B 18 11 1959 C 44.15 +1.80 +1.75 +6.25 3.27 4.49 M 1964 1959 G852 B 20 10 1959 C +2.87 +0.40 +0.75 44.43 4.37 3.25 M 1964 1959 0855 B 20 10 1958 C -4.20 -5.60 -4.85 -0.85 5.05 4.35 1964 1962 G857 B 19 135 1959 C +3.70 +1.30 +1.64 +5.74 4.40 5.07 M 1960 1962 G858 B 20 11 1959 C +6.30 +1.82 +2.20 +6.95 5.00 4.08 M 1960 1962

PAGE 69

SWater level above () or below () land surface S .Prior to 1965 Rittbat water *rl m-ar t S I* ------lpvl In May hnral S ..orJ or an a as s~ a0 Rl u h IAYS (t ar) I(yar) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADN COGUT (continued) 859 B 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +1.20 +0.45 +2.18 7.45 7.53 M 1960 1962 G860 a 20 11 1959 C+5.0 +1.15 +1.10 +3.35 6.60 2.48 N 1960 1962 (861 B 23 11 1961 C 44.05 +2.25 +2.05 +6.25 4.92 3.50 M 1964 1962 GS63 1 18 6 1961 C +3.90 +1.49 +0.55 +5.08 6.30 4.60 H 1964 1962 Ga64 20 11 1959 C +5.3 40.45 -1.00 +6.23 8.23 5.28 H 1959 1962 G865 8 19 13 1959 C +1.85 40.9 +1.44 +1.65 4.74 3.40 H 1964 1960 G968 8 50 -1960 C +5.45 +3.05 44.12 --2.52 2.85 H 1964 1962 G968 B 33 -1961 C +5.80 +3.60 44.20 +6.57 4.15 2.02 M 1964 1962 G970 B 15 10 1958 C 44.0 +2.18 +2.34 +2.67 2.50 2.21 M 1960 1962 972 B 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +3.50 +3.83 +5.47 2.39 1.27 H 1960 1962 G973 B 15 10 1958 C 44.5 +1.68 +1.95 44.05 2.45 2.20 H 1960 1962 G974 B 13 10 1958 C +5.4 +2.68 +2.70 +5.44 2.95 1.83 H 1960 1962 G975 B 15 10 1958 C +6.9 +4.20 44.10 +6.55 3.10 1.32 M 1960 1962 G976 B 15 10 1958 C +6.0 +2.90 +3.43 +6.37 2.44 1.19 M 1960 1962 G978 B 15 10 1958 C +6.7 +2.90 44.12 +6.78 2.40 2.33 H 1960 1962 G1165 B 12 11 1961 C +3.65 +1.45 +1.90 +5.06 3.27 2.48 H 1964 1962 G1166 8 11 11 1961 C +5.80 44.75 +3.99 +6.85 2.82 2.82 H 1964 1963 11.83 8 25 -1961 C +2.35 -1.00 -0.63 +5.18 5.31 4.30 H 1963 1962 24 8B 33 -1960 C 44.50 40.2 -1.43 +5.04 7.30 4.18 M 1961 1960 6A26 B 25 -1960 C +1.55 -0.30 -1.45 +2.27 3.79 1.01 M 1964 1962 3962 3 20 9 1962 C +2.58 ---1.17 +4.28 3.14 2.56 1963 SM67 B 20 6 1962 C +2.88 +1.70 -1.75 +3.10 4.50 2.73 M 1962 1964 P77 8B 20 6 1962 C 44.05 --1.50 46.44 5.15 3.57 H 1963

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.ater level above (+) or below (-) land surface S, Prior to 1965 Highest water Well numbe level in May Annual e 5ae S? I? N May or June or June Range t r., High Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COUNTY (continued) 818 B 52 --1939 C +3.2 40.10 +1.75 +2.49 4.06 2.17 M;P 1942 1945 S19 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30 -0.18 +0.60 4.00 4.33 M; P 1958 1962 S68 B 61 51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97 -2.19 -1.38 4.15 4.73 L; M; P 1958 1962 S182 B 51 --1940 C +9.5 0.0 +2.17 +3.28 5.07 2.52 M 1958 1945 S196A B 20 --1932 C +8.5 -1.0 +0.32 +2.84 6.56 5.53 H 1958 1945 DESOTO COUNTY 703-157-1 F,H 468 189 1962 B +32.05 +25.0 +28.15 +27.75 3.00 3.00 1963 1962 704-147-1 F,H 460 112 1962 C + 3.90 + 3.44 + 2.73 +2.84 2.88 2.43 1963 1964 720-148-1 F,H 478 137 1962 C -10.53 -14.7 -21.41 -16.97 13.70 8.95 1964 1963 DIXIE COUNTY 15 (937-306-1) F 215R 105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12 -4.87 -4.76 0.77 0.15 1959 1962 DUVAL COUNTY 12 (019-140-1) F 785R --1938 S +27.5 +15.1 --+22.8 --3.2 S 1947 1962 18 (018-140-1) P ---1938 S +39.9 +20.1 +26.1 +29.0 7.2 3.1 S 1947 1962 102 (019-133-1) F 875R 400 1939. S +6.4 -20.94 -17.56 -13.66. 6.40 2.46 S 1931 1962 107: (023-136-1) F ----1939 S +53.2 +34.4 + 38.2 +37.5 3.2 2.3 S 1939 1962 115 (016-142-1) F 729R 476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6 + 17.6 +20.1 6.4 3.7 S 1938 1962 118 (018-143-1) F 900R --1939 S +32.9 +11.9 + 19.0 +19.0 2.8 1.6 S 1947 1962. 122 (023-138-1) F 905S 571 1930 M +44.9 +25.6 + 29.5 +30.2 4.6 2.4 S 1947 1962 123 (019-142-1) F 1,075R --1930 S +39.0 +15.7 +22.5 +22.1 2.4 1.2 S 1931 1962 129 (015-141-1) F 600R 470 1940 S +40.4 +17.4 +24.0 +26.4 6.2 3.2 S 1947 1962 145 (028-137-1) F ---1940 S +24.2 44.97 + 8.7 + 9.3 2.8 0.5 S 1947 1963 149 (024-136-1) F 800R --1940 S +25.7 +8.8 +11.2 +12.1 3.0 0.5 S 1947 1963 151 (023-139-1) F 700R 560 1940 S 443.4 +31.0 +36.2 +37.1 2.6 0.6 S 1952 1962 152 (027-133-1) F 642R -1940 S +29.9 +19.6 +22.6 +23.3 3.0 0.9 S 1952 1962

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-Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface 0 Prior to 1965 Highest water e anmber .level in ay Annual na Remarks L ,u ET i May or Jmne or June Range (year) (yer) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COUNIT (continued) 3359 3 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +1.20 +0.45 +2.18 7.45 7.53 H 1960 1962 G360 8 20 11 1959 C +5.0 +1.15 +1.10 +3.35 6.60 2.48 M 1960 1962 G361 a 23 11 1961 C +4.05 +2.25 +2.05 +6.25 4.92 3.50 M 1964 1962 3363 3 18 6 1961 C +3.90 +1.49 +0.55 +5.08 6.30 4.60 M 1964 1962 G364 B 20 11 1959 C +5.3 +0.45 -1.00 46.23 8.23 5.28 M 1959 1962 G363 8 19 13 1959 C +1.85 +0.9 +1.44 +1.65 4.74 3.40 M 1964 1960 G963 8 50 -1960 C +5.45 +3.05 44.12 --2.52 2.85 M 1964 1962 3963A 8 33 -1961 C +5.80 +3.60 44.20 +6.57 4.15 2.02 H 1964 1962 2970 B 15 10 1958 C +4.0 +2.18 +2.34 +2.67 2.50 2.21 M 1960 1962 397" 3 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +3.50 +3.83 +5.47 2.39 1.27 M 1960 1962 o973 3 15 10 1958 C +4.5 +1.68 +1.95 44.05 2.45 2.20 H 1960 1962 9G74 3 15 10 1958 C +5.4 +2.68 +2.70 +5.44 2.95 1.83 M 1960 1962 373 3 15 10 1958 C +6.9 44.20 +4.10 +6.55 3.10 1.32 M 1960 1962 0975 3 13 10 1958 C +6.0 +2.90 +3.43 +6.37 2.44 1.19 M 1960 1962 G973 3 15 10 1958 C +6.7 +2.90 +4.12 +6.78 2.40 2.33 M 1960 1962 G1165 3 12 11 1961 C +3.65 +1.45 +1.90 +5.06 3.27 2.48 M 1964 1962 G1166 B II 11 1961 C +5.80 44.75 +3.99 +6.85 2.82 2.82 M 1964 1963 113i3 3 25 -1961 C +2.35 -1.00 -0.63 +5.18 5.31 4.30 H 1963 1962 IPM 3 33 -1960 C 44.50 +0.2 -1.43 +5.04 7.30 4.18 M 1961 1960 4P6 B 25 -1960 C +1.55 -0.30 -1.45 +2.27 3.79 1.01 M 1964 1962 M1P2 3 20 9 1962 C +2.58 ---1.17 +4.28 3.14 2.56 M 1963 iF67 3 20 6 1962 C +2.88 +1.70 -1.75 +3.10 4.50 2.73 M 1962 1964 MY"7 B 20 6 1962 C 44.05 ---1.50 46.44 5.15 3.57 M 1963

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we Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface 0 S to 0 u .0 .Prior to 1965 Highest water Well number a 0 0 4 level in May Annual Remarks .4 "c WWbe 0 May orJune or June Range < IS Ist .High Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DADE COUNTY (continued) 818 B 52 --1939 C +3.2 +0.10 +1.75 +2.49 4.06 2.17 M;P 1942 1945 519 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.30 -0.18 +0.60 4.00 4.33 M; P 1958 1962 S68 B 61 51 1939 C +3.2 -2.97 -2.19 -1.38 4.15 4.73 L; M; P 1958 1962 8182 B 51 --1940 C +9.5 0.0 +2.17 +3.28 5.07 2.52 H 1958 1945 S196A B 20 --1932 C +8.5 -1.0 +0.32 +2.84 6.56 5.53 M 1958 1945 DESOTO COUNTY 703-157-1 F,H 468 189 1962 B +32.05 +25.0 +28.15 +27.75 3.00 3.00 1963 1962 704-147-1 F,H 460 112 1962 C + 3.90 + 3.44 + 2.73 +2.84 2.88 2.43 1963 1964 720-148-1 F,H 478 137 1962 C -10.53 -14.7 -21.41 -16.97 13.70 8.95 1964 1963 DIXIE COUNTY 15 (937-306-1) F 215R 105 1957 S -2.77 -9.12 -4.87 -4.76 0.77 0.15 1959 1962 DUVAL COUNTY 12 (019-140-1) F 785R --1938 S +27.5 +15.1 --+22.8 --3.2 S 1947 1962 18 (018-140-1) F ---1938 S +39.9 +20.1 +26.1 +29.0 7.2 3.1 S 1947 1962 102 (019-133-1) F 875R 400 1939. S +6.4 -20.94 -17.56 -13.66. 6.40 2.46 S 1931 1962 107. (023-136-1) F ---1939 S +53.2 +34.4 + 38.2 +37.5 3.2 2.3 S 1939 1962 115 (016-142-1) F 729R 476 1930 B +36.2 +11.6 + 17.6 +20.1 6.4 3.7 S 1938 1962 118 (018-143-1) F 900R --1939 S +32.9 +11.9 + 19.0 +19.0 2.8 1.6 S 1947 1962A 122 (023-138-1) F 905R 571 1930 M +44.9 +25.6 + 29.5 +30.2 4.6 2.4 S 1947 1962 123 (019-142-1) F 1,075R --1930 S +39.0 +15.7 +22.5 +22.1 2.4 1.2 S 1931 1962 129 (015-141-1) F 600R 470 1940 S +40.4 +17.4 +24.0 +26.4 6.2 3.2 S 1947 1962 145 (028-137-1) F ---1940 S +24.2 44.97 + 8.7 + 9.3 2.8 0.5 S 1947 1963 149 (024-136-1) F 800R --1940 S +25.7 +8.8 +11.2 +12.1 3.0 0.5 S 1947 1963 151 (023-139-1) F 700R 560 1940 S +43.4 +31.0 +36.2 +37.1 2.6 0.6 S 1952 1962 152 (027-133-1) F 642R --1940 S +29.9 +19.6 +22.6 +23.3 3.0 0.9 S 1952 1962

PAGE 73

5 Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface S ,. Prior to 1965 ighest water B | 8level in may Annual a r e" mS e r 2 orJun or Ju neMmyo *? 5S 5 ( N2 igh8 Low Hi (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 DUVAL C00. Y (continued) 160 (018-123-1) F 585R 357 1934 B 441.7 +20.2 +23.1 +24.5 5.8 3.7 S; T 1934 1962 16& (025-125-1) F 8401 450 1930 S 443.8 +25.8 +28.9 +29.4 3.6 2.4 S; T 1931 1962 206 (015-145-1) P 1,9201 1,000 1941 8 -2.06 -16.75 -13.62 -14.23 3.36 --S 1948 1962 262 (026-135-1) F 1,393R 584 1951 B +37.0 +23.4 +26.8 +27.5 3.4 1.5 S; T 1951 1963 263 (026-135-2) P 1,025R 850 1951 S +35.5 +24.0 +27.4 +28.0 3.0 0.9 S; T 1952 1963 26 (026-135-3) 7 700R 450 1951 S +35.3 +23.2 +27.0 +27.7 3.0 0.3 S; T 1952 1962 265 (025-136-1) F 556R -1951 S +39.4 +19.4 +33.0 +34.0 2.8 3.2 S; T 1952 1963 ESCAMBIA COUINT 39 (023-716-2) G 244 -1940 M -4.59 -12.00 -11.03 -11.82 6.51 6.56 1940 1955 45 (036-719-1) G 152 129 1940 C -69.30 -111.82 -103.58 -102.70 2.22 2.16 P 1941 1956 46 (031-716-1) G 239 229 1939 W -58.09 -82.12 -69.43 -72.90 5.14 4.04 1948 1956 2 (024-715-I) G 142R 142 1940 N -6.50 -23.84 -13.24 -11.30 2.68 2.91 1949 1955 62z (024-715-2) G 18 18 1940 n -8.66 -13.05 -12.14 -11.38 2.52 2.15 1964 1962 73 (035-715-3) C 306 198 1951 C -39.03 -56.66 -52.78 --4.51 4.57 P 1953 1958 74 (036-71A-1) C 352 260* 1951 C -77.37 -89.52 -89.10 -90.20 2.78 2.15 P; *Screen 1952 1959 260 to 270 ft & 310 to 350 ft 83 (035-714-3) G 301 -1954 B -36.10 -42.45 ----6.25 4.38 P 1955 1962 026-713-5 G 150 145* 1959 W -58.15 -63.57 -62.04 -61.61 1.64 2.99 *Screen 1960 1963 145 to 150 ft 026-713-6 G 65 60* 1959 W -51.78 -56.81 -55.68 -55.44 2.98 4.68 *Screen 1960 1963 60 to 65 ft 032-724-1 G 170 165* 1959 M -91.18 -93.04 -92.58 -92.66 1.09 1.77 *Screen 1960 1963 165 to 170 ft 054-726-1 G 206 201* 1959 B -82.95 -90.06 -87.85 -88.88 1.20 0.97 *Screen 1962 1964 201. o 206 ft 054-726-2 C 107 102* 1959 B -65.21 -76.15 -72.27 -71.08 2.02 3.77 *Screen 1962 1964 102 to 107 ft *<.f

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-Water level above (+ or below (-)'land surface S A Prior to 1965 Highest water S -r a § level in May Annual ear number May or June or June Range s. f a la High Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 FIAGLECRCOUNTY 14 (927-115-1) F 417 --1936 B -3.4 --8.19 -7.20 -8.27 2.29 3.30 1937 1962 44 (928-122-1) P 159 --1956 B -7.67 -13.42 -12.34 -10.99 4.80 2.94 P 1959 1962 FRANKLIN COUNH 10 (950-439-1) F 380R --1958 S -0.35 -4.45 -3.80 -1964 1962 31 (943-458-1) F ---1949 B +3.95 +0.40 +2.30 --0.90 1.10 1950 1952 947-446-1 F 98R --1961 S -9.67 -11.35 -10.30 --0.44 0.50 1964 1963 957-443-1 F ----1961 8 44.87 +2.97 +4.09 --0.18 1.10 1964 1962 GADSDEN COUNTY 035-434-1 F 406R --1961 S -90.76 -91.40 -85.16 -85.13 2.64 0.17 1964 1963 039-425-1 F 525R 381 1961 B ---143.96 ---134.40 --3.35 1962 GULP COUNTY 30 (948-518-1) F 522 475 1946 S -7.11 -27.22 -8.62 --0.93 1.43 P, prior to 1956 1950 1954 33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B +1.29 +0.96 +1.28 --0.57 0.80 1962 1963 HAMILTON COUNTY 036-305-1 F 273R 60 1961 B -84.73 -107.05 -90.31 -99.43 21.29 18.27 1964 1963 HARDEE COUNTY 731-145-1 F 267 39 1962 C -29.56 -33.60 -49.5 -40.02 21.01 13.48 1964 1962 HENDRY COUNTY 3 S 10 8 1941 C +0.3 -5.76 -3.11 -2.35 4.17 3.52 1958 1962 5 S 13 8 1941 C -0.81 -6.3 -3.44 -2.99 3.07 3.15 1959 1956 HERHANDO COUNTY 838-215-1 F 140R --1961 B -16.30 -20.46 -17.19 -16.68 5.15 2.78 1964 1962 HIGHBLODS COUNTY 9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0 +127.64 +128.61 3.08 3.53 M 1953 1949 10 S 45 41 1948 C +90.7 +83.9 +85.17 +88.46 4.77 3.82 M 1958 1956 11A S 16 13 1956 C 448.3 443.71 444.93 445.82 3.14 3.30 M 1957 1962

PAGE 75

SWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface 2 1Prior to 1965 ighest water a-t level in May Annual R r -=a 0 a High Lowr I wo May or June or Jun Range (yaer) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 HICHIANDS CONTrY (continued) 3 S 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +20.57 +25.01 +26.30 1.82 3.71 M 1957 1962 L S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +54.60 +57.70 4.25 3.13 H 1953 1956 LO s ZZ 18 1956 C +116.9 +111.3 +111.3 --5.7 --M 1958 1962 HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY 13 (307-230-3) P 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -15.76 -16.59 -19.18 10.02 12.86 P 1931 1964 30 (744-225-39) F 500R 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.66 +2.29 +2.34 6.16 6.61 P 1959 1952 500 (742-219-1) F 330 97 1951 B -50.82 -57.98 -56.88 -----D, 1965 1958 1956 751-203-1 P 211 65 1957 B -42.52 -61.35 -63.91 -64.60 5.50 6.50 1958 1963 30I-213-15 F 413R 67 1958 C +0.55 -10.04 -10.18 -6.90 1.08 5.75 1959 1962 HOLMS COUNTY (043-556-t) F 187R -1938 B +6.90 +1.82 ----2.85 3.51 1964 1956 7 (058-53-1) F 205R 170 1938 8 -8.09 -15.66 -9.95 --2.12 2.48 1949 1956 7A (O5-535-2) NA 13 10* 1960 B -1.34 -8.34 -3.05 --6.27 7.68 *Screen 1964 1963 10 to 13 ft ,)50-54d-1 F ---1961 S +5.50 +1.40 +5.20 ----1.50 1964 1963 051-556-1 F 260R -1961 S -205.20 -209.10 -204.68 ---1964 1963 052-345-2 P 300R -1961 5 +17.6 +11.2 +16.7 --2.1 1.5 1964 1963 INDIAN RIVER COUNIY :5 S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +26.35 +28.05 5.78 3.67 M 1957 1956 JACXSON COUNTY 23 (04--453-L) 475R 100 1950 B -17.37 -38.15 -20.77 -23.33 5.60 8.89 1964 1951 36,-506-1 7 210 94 1961 S -62.98 -76.05 -66.40 -68.00 3.65 6.72 1964 1962 04-515--1 180 -1961 B -86.82 -102.95 -91.37 -95.83 --5.17 D, 1966 1964 1963 053-527-1 f 341 260 1961 S -77.72 -87.20 -71.57 --2.09 1.04 1964 1963 058-503-1 P 83 -1955 S -14.98 -29.11 -17.25 -21.15 --5.75 1964 1963 rf^'

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SWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface S. Prior to 1965 Highest water alla nmber or level in May Annual Wellnuber -May or June or June Range s ww. High LoW ,____.____. (year),, (year) 1965 11966 1965 1966 JEFFERSON COUNTY 022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -139.57 -142.62 -138.35 -140.24 --1.87 1964 1962 038-336-1 F 183 147 1960 S -19.10 -24.36 -13.33 -17.17 4.16 6.00 1960 1960 LAFAYETTE COUTNY 008-317-1 F 106 --1961 B -35.53 -44.04 -26.19 -33.80 11.07 3.64 1964 1962 958-312-1 F 146 112 1961 B -4.23 -8.89 -5.91 -6.02 3.34 2.77 1964 1962 LAKE COUNTY 18 (857-138-1) F 190R --1936 B -50.52 -59.82 -56;63 -55.73 2.58 2.78 1960 1957 20 (900-123-1) F 252R --1936 B +9.9 +5.45 +7.5 +12.0 5.0 5.0 1942 1963 22 (909-131-1) F 254R --1936 B -0.72 -3.54 -1.92 -2.61 1.29 1.48 1964 1962 822-149-1 F 192 100 1959 T -1.80 -5.25 -4.71 -4.09 --1.58 1960 1962 822-149-2 S 23 18 1959 T -0.36 -5.06 ------2.69 1960 1963 832-154-334 F 160 63 1969 C -1.88 -5.47 -3.78 -3.00 3.33 2.02 1960 1962 832-154-334A S 30 17 1959 C -1.60 -5.03 ----0.74 0.76 Gravel Pack 1964 1962 17 to 30 ft LEE COUNTY 246 S 28 19 1945 C +19.13 +10.5 +13.13 +14.11 6.80 5.52 1959 1949 414 H 94 60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1 +16.01 +15.69 3.49 7.12 H; P 1957 1955 LEON COUNTY 7 (027-416-1) F 314 165 1945 M -149.05 -169.91 -154.62 -155.98 5.45 7.39 P 1948 1955 36A (037-410-2) H 41 38* 1935 H -1.42 -33.14 +0.66 +0.15 3.99 3.94 *Screen 1948 1956 38 to 41 ft 115 (031-420-1) F 194 104 1950 M -76.9 -93.3 -75.0 -77.2 6.1 6.9 1959 1957 024-420-1 S 57 57 1960 B -7.88 -15.81 --9.75 1.97 5.75 1960 1963 024-420-2 S 15 12* 1960 B -4.98 -9.32 --4.28 1.63 2.21 *Well point 1960 1963 12 to 15 ft 026-417-1 F 310 146 1960 B -74.40 -78.37 -67.95 --5.09 5.28 1964 1963 034-407-1 F 231 --1960 S -163.92 -173.24 -155.74 --5.98 7.08 1960 1963

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SWater level above (+) or below (-) land urface S. 1 1 Prior to 1965 Highest water Sll ber o level in May AnnualS3 May or June or June Range Rerk S 2 -High (year) I (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 IU9 COOffy 902-241-1 F 58 -1961 B -5.80 -8.34 -6.23 -6.86 2.61 2.42 1964 1962 9L9-Z45-L F 96R -1961 B -0.55 -0.68 -0.69 -0.70 ---D, 1966 1962 1964 LIEBET COUNTY 14 (001-459-1) --1955 S -3.60 -7.12 -5.18 --0.26 2.20 1964 1961 010-440-1 7 1181 89 1961 B +13.0 +6.8 +13.3 --2.3 5.8 1964 1961 023-447-1 F 160R -1961 S +4.80 +2.8 44.90 44.10 0.70 0.20 1964 1961 028-456-1 F 360 -1961 S -83.82 -85.64 -83.30 -83.95 0.60 0.49 1964 1962 MADISON COUNTY 17 (028-325-1) F 320 300 1953 S -20.16 -38.12 -12.30 -21.05 11.94 6.13 1959 1955 13 (028-325-2) F 322 307 1952 B 17.16 -34.87 -6.10 -18.92 14.88 7.74 P 1964 1955 MANATEE COUNTY 92 (726-213-1) F 600 154 1941 B -37.10 -52.65 -55.33 -54.15 11.40 8.45 D, 1966; S 1947 1962 MARION COUNTY 5 (911-159-1) F 135R 135 1933 C +13.62 +3.35 +11.01 +11.32 3.73 1.74 1960 1957 4. (902-156-1) F 179 165 1936 B -13.84 -24.26 -18.05 -16.95 4.21 1.73 1960 1956 4M (359-150-1) F 152 -1936 B -0.82 -10.23 -4.23 -3.17 3.56 2.31 Well flowed 1961 1956 Apr 1960 Apr 1961 49 (910-138-1) F 175 -1936 B -25.0 -31.19 -27.46 -26.38 2.71 0.93 1942 1957 5L (911-210-1) F 106 -1935 B -26.04 -34.39 -27.32 -27.40 4.03 2.26 1960 1956 905-822-1 F 482 125 1964 C -----80.27 -80.41 2.08 1.51 MARTIN COUNTY 14L S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +15.77 +16.74 +19.45 4.30 1.94 M 1957 1961 147 S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +2.12 +2.62 +5.01 5.20 7.52 M; P 1958 1962 928 S 11 10 1957 C +32.4 +28.40 +27.10 +32.35 5.97 4.08 M 1957 1962 933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.4 +20.40 +19.60 +23.40 3.78 3.07 M 1960 1963 4,.

PAGE 78

S-Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface .o a Prior to 1965 Highest water Sell ar a level in ay Annual Remarks Well number ay or June or June Range Rearks '0 e 0 ua S .s High Low __(year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 NASSAU COUNTY 2 (035-127-2) P 580R 350 1939 S -42.0 +18.4 +21.8 +20.8 3.0 4.2 S 1947 1963 8 (032-126-1) F 680R --1939 S 441.1 +20.6 +22.6 +22.3 2.8 2.3 P 1947 1962 12 (038-127-1) P 640R --1939 S +24.0 -18.3 -15.42 -17.73 4.01 5.27 P, X 1947 1963 27 (040-126-1) P 191 --1939 B +10.1 -29.34 -18.72 -24.68 9.86 8.10 S 1946 1963 44 (037-136-1) F 1.000R 450 1934 A +19.8 -2.13 --+1.26 1947 1963 50 (036-142-1) F 569R --1940 S +40.5 +19.8 +23.0 +21.3 1.8 0.5 S 1940 1963 51 (033-150-1) F 580R --1940 S 442.0 +25.2 +30.0 +28.9 1.2 0.3 S; X 1947&48 1963 55 (037-130-1) F 540R 504 1940 S +33.1 + 4.9 49.7 +6.9 1.2 4.0 S; X 1947 1963 OKALOOSA COUNTY 3 (024-636-1) F 800R 500 1936 S +20.1 -72.19 -78.77 --51.10 26.48 S 1950 1963 23 (034-026-1) F 652R 409 1947 S -93.3 -125.2 -116.4 --1.4 3.47 D, 1966; S 1948 1963 25 (038-631-1) F 609R 456 1947 B -108.1 -127.5 -128.3 -129.4 2.8 2.2 S 1949 1963 27 (030-635-2) F 591R 422 1948 S -27.9 -65.2 -62.2 -64.6 7.4 .7.9 S 1951 1962 29 (035-637-1) F 766R 524. 1947 S -102.3 -127.0 -128.1 -129.6 2.8 5.40 S Recor1948 1963. der installed May 6,1966 31 (037-645-1) F 690R 527 1948 S -46.8 -68.8 -70.4 -71.8 1.7 2.6 S 1948 1963 & 64 34 (028-629-1) P 540 --1947 S +26.6 -9.22 -5.40 --6.45 14.39 S 1950 1962 OKEECHOBEE COUNTY 2 S 21 18 1949 C 446.7 +38.82 +40.92 +43.15 3.55 4.89 M Gravel 1957 1962 Packed 16 to 21 ft 3 S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +57.98 +59.85 4.00 2.79 M 1959 1950 ORANGE COUNTY 47 (832-128-1) F 350 328 1930 C +2.20 -14.30 -12.19 -9.72 5.11 6.75 1960 1962 47B (832-128-3) S 20 17 1948 M +3.04 -10.01 -9.72 -6.44 3.58 5.31 1960 1962 47C (832-128-4) S 50 46 1948 M -27.47 -39.35 -35.93 -34.94 2.53 4.59 1960 1953 832-105-1 F 492 151 1961 N -26.51 -28.67 -26.96 -26.47 4.30 2.87 1961 1963

PAGE 79

Water l*l l above or below (-) land surfac S" Prior to 1965 Highest water or S Rgayon 1 Remarkso l a as ay Aua Re ar ky10s S(yar) (yar) 1965 1966 1965 1966 OSC9OUA comOtN 171 S 19 13 1950 C +32.1 +27.8 +28.40 +32.38 4.42 3.23 M; Gravel 1957 1956 Packed 11 to 19 ft 179 S 1i 18 1949 C +47.1 443.27 +45.57 +46.95 3.31 2.79 M 1960 1962 131 S 16 14 1948 C +77.9 +71.72 +73.83 +75.55 4.66 4.18 H 1957 1962 182 3 23 16 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.45 +58.55 3.90 3.58 H 1957 1950 133 S 27 22 1948 C +73.2 +68.3 +69.81 +71.05 4.41 3.53 N 1957 1956 PALM BEACH COUNTY 88 8 17 16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +5.35 +6.50 5.80 5.24 H 1948 1956 99 a 18 16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 +6.42 +7.46 4.70 4.19 H 1957 1956 109 5 14 9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +15.70 +18.65 4.33 1.42 H 1957 1956 110 B 8 8 1951 C -2.60 -6.00 -5.80 -2.40 3.50 1.50 8 1962 1962 PASCO COUNrI U (315-226-1) F 49 43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1 -7.98 -7.36 4.51 3.26 1959 1945 826-2Il-L F 227 49 1959 C -9.97 -22.75 -19.16 -17.40 3.17 4.80 1960 1962 PITMnIAS COUNI 13 (808-245-1) F 141 33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.80 -8.73 1.38 1.56 T 1948 1950 136 (800-247-L) 195 -1945 B -12.18 -18.34 -14.86 -13.79 7.18 8.35 1951 1953 26 (78-247-t) F 208 -1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -27.64 -26.94 2.41 1.86 T 1948 1956 665 (278-24A-4) 299 81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -22.33 -22.53 1.93 3.29 1959 1955 P011 COURTy -A (810-136-1) F 195 81 1945 C -1.70 -5.74 -4.60 -3.31 3.26 1.69 1960 1962 45 (759-158-1) 643 318 1948 M -63.65 -84.82 -92.10 -89.73 15.36 9.44 S 1948 1962 W3 (31-L36-2) S 67 60 1948 C +111.7 +106.9 +107.85 +107.67 2.21 1.62 M 1960 1962

PAGE 80

* § Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface SPrior to 1965 Highest water Well number or .level in May Annual Remarks eei n e I 1 e B Annual emarks a 0 Ws -si 2 & 3 Higgh Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 I 1966 POIK COUNTY (continued) 48 (732-131-1) S 62 59 1948 C +100.8 +96.2 +98.23 +99.93 2.97 1.99 M 1954 1956 49 (748-119-1) S 17 14 1949 C +104.7 +98.99 +101.07 +103.86 4.07 3.12 M 1957 1962 51 (744-131-1) H 319 208 1949 B -5.08 -17.25 -13.51 -15.71 11.78 7.29 P 1956 1962 753-158-311 F 710 237 1955 C -15.88 -38.57 -47.15 -44.45 17.37 14.02 P 1958 1962 802-132-1 F 463 137 1959 B -7.65 -11.68 -11.81 -12.34 1.24 3.14 1961 1963 805-155-2 F 311 82 1956 B -15.18 -25.64 -23.79 -22.75 4.55 3.25 1959 1962 805-155-3 H 72 62 1955 B -12.52 -21.73 -20.07 -18.92 4.19 2.91 1959 1962 806-156-1 S 13 10 1955 S -3.69 -9.73 -9.43 -7.02 3.07 1.94 *Screen 1959 1963 10 to 13 ft 806-156-2 H 103 63 1956 S -16.89 -29.66 -27.50 -24.57 6.87 4.86 1959 1962 PUTNAM COUNrt 28 (925-138-1) F 159 --1936 B -6.2 -9.81 -8.40 -7.99 2.48 1.80 S 1944 1962 29 (939-138-1) F 300R --1936 B +10.8 +2.02 44.42 44.33 2.67 2.87 S 1936&57 1962 937-153-1 F 303R 300 1934 S -29.51 -35.65 -28.70 -27.85 0.81 0.18 X 1961 1957 939-134-11 F 547 113 1958 S +4.26 -1.75 +0.48 -1.16 3.41 4.81 1959 1962 943-152-1 H 151 125 1956 B -43.20 -46.66 -43.40 -42.45 0.90 0.26 1961 1957 ST. JOHNS COUNTY 5 (007-123-1) F 350R 180 1934 A +43.9 +33.8 +37.0 +36.1 1951 1963 8 (005-129-1) P 336R 240 1934 A +36.5 +22.7 +25.7 +27.4 1947 1963 000-123-2 F 258 --1957 B 44.72 -0.57 +1.13 -0.50 1959 1962 937-122-1 F 622 142 1958 C -17.30 -21.51 -21.10 -19.56 4.01 2.92 1959 1963

PAGE 81

SVWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface S .Prior to 1965 Bighst water l nmer level in Kay Annual -5 t= .or June or June Range mk A I. b ih Lo A euI(y ) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 ST. JOHNS COUNI1 (continued) 9W-t-'-7 P 541 118 1955 B +10.1 +1.52 +3.29 -2.01 ---P 1959 1962 F'-I2b-L I 275 101 1956 B -1.55 -10.86 -13.11 -17.39 9.48 --P 1958 1962 ST. LCIE COUNTY 41 S 17 13 1950 C +28.2 +25.2 +24.45 +26.04 3.81 3.05 H 1957 1956 Z 3S 18 13 1950 C +26.9 +23.76 +24.16 +25.05 3.40 3.06 M 1951 1961 SANTA ROSA COUNTY LI0 (021-709-8) S 41 31* 1950 A -4.43 -9.52 -6.92 -----*Screen 1960 1955 31 to 41 ft 035-706-1 G 211 206* 1959 n -82.84 -89.10 -86.76 -89.48 3.89 1.57 *Screen 1961 1963 206 to 211 ft ).-70T8-L C 128 123* 1959 M 44.83 +1.28 +2.83 +1.70 4.41 2.05 *Screen 1961 1963 123 to 128 ft 41l-644-t G 98 93* 1959 8 -56.34 -61.90 -58.27 --1.23 2.74 *Screen 1960 1963 93 to 98 ft SARASOTA COUNTY S(71~-2-5-l) F 71OR 101 1930 C +4.51 -9.36 -8.55 -7.51 8.91 6.88 S 1931 1962 SEMINOLE. COUNTY 125 (1-l21-l) F 14b 63 1951 C -34.18 -42.60 -41.48 -39.32 4.20 3.87 1960 1962 257 (347-11-6) F 206 --1951 B +5.10 +0.27 +1.15 +3.19 3.47 1.73 1953 1962 SUMIER COUNTY S52-201-1 P 125 45 1961 B -29.94 -33.26 -29.42 -28.52 4.55 3.81 1964 1963 SUWANNEE COUNTY 319-Z49-1 F 138 135 1961 B -18.94 -35.31 -29.43 -30.80 8.00 13.24 1964 1963 TAYLOR COUNTY JS (003-130-1L) 230 189 1946 C -1.00 -30.9 -19.1 -21.3 9.9 7.0 P 1949 1962 36 (004-331-1) S 35 --1947 B -5.05 -23.95 -6.01 -7.41 1.69 2.52 P 1964 1957 UNION COUNTY 001-224-1 F 256 198 1960 8 -89.54 -93.57 -87.91 -88.18 2.12 1.45 1961 1963 007-222-1 F 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -93.00 -87.52 -87.80 3.73 3.81 1959 1962

PAGE 82

S Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface -I '8 -----------Prior to 1965 Highest vater ll numbr level In Hay nual Remarks Sube Ma *S My or June or June Range 5 sb a .I Haigh Low (year) (year) 1965 1966 1965 1966 VOLUSIA COUNTY 29 (911-125-1) F 107 --1936 B -11.86 -18.73 -17.23 -17.20 1.53 1.56 1951 1963 30 (917-128-1) F 180R --1936 B +11.2 +6.7 +9.0 +9.22 1.6 1.50 1959 1948 31 (856-105-1) F 121 113 1936 C -4.72 -8.60 -6.83 -5.35 2.95 1.43 1953 1962 32 (919-125-1) F 138R --1936 B -1.2 -5.11 -4.26 -3.99 2.25 1.84 1937&38 1963 905-113-3 F 351 94 1955 B -0.22 -3.66 -1.78 -0.52 --0.91 1958 1956 909-106-1 F 235 102 1955 B -5.25 -8.07 -8.39 -6.68 2.73 1.13 1959 1963 909-106-9 F 496 480 1955 B -6.62 -9.55 -9.33 -8.80 2.51 2.02 1958 1963 910-105-1 F 498 152 1955 B -12.84 -19.73 -16.67 -16.04 2.03 2.27 1958 1962 911-104-4 F 235 115 1955 B -15.72 -25.85 -27.55 -20.25 8.38 5.25 1955 1963 911-104-9 F 500 483 1955 B -10.26 -13.89 -13.17 -12.62 2.68 2.10 1948 1963 WAKULLA COUNTY 2 (009-412-1) F 65 22 1946 B -0.86 -3.05 -1.38 -1.62 1.39 0.88 T 1958 1951 11 (000-426-1) F 70 45 1946 A -5.58 -8.25 -7.10 ----0.97 T 1955 1960 005-417-1 F 77 --1961 B -1.13 -3.48 -2.35 ---1.61 1964 1963 011-410-1 F 80 --1961 B -0.12 -1.87 -0.73 -1.23 0.27 0.56 X 1964 1962 WALTON COUNTY 13 (022-606-1) F 450R --1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +12.4 --0.8 2.0 1950 1956 019-610-1 F 615 188 1961 B +14.7 +11.6 +14.2 --0.8 3.4 1964 1963 029-614-1 F 160 --1961 S +21.0 +19.5 +18.3 --2.4 2.3 X 1964 1963 043-612-1 F 509 323 1961 A -144.2 -148.2 -144.0 -----X 1964 1962 WASHINGTON COUNTY 4 (046-548-1) F 785R --1935 B -7.20 -15.09 -10.25 --4.25 8.15 X 1964 1954 037-542-2 F 206 202 1961 B -13.72 -20.20 -16.25 --2.95 5.78 1964 1963

PAGE 83

-FLORIDA-GEOLOGICAL-SURVEY COPYRIGHT NOTICE [year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text] The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder for the text of this publication. Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and 377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government, makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction. The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution. The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications. All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional information and permissions.


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