Citation
Geology of the upper Cretaceous clastic section northern peninsular Florida ( FGS: Information circular 60 )

Material Information

Title:
Geology of the upper Cretaceous clastic section northern peninsular Florida ( FGS: Information circular 60 )
Series Title:
FGS: Information circular
Creator:
Babcock, Clarence L ( Clarence Lloyd ), 1904-
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Publisher:
<Florida> Division of Geology
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vi, 44 p. : ill., maps, charts ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Geology -- Florida ( lcsh )
Suwannee County ( local )
Columbia County ( local )
City of Vernon ( local )
Levy County ( local )
Sandstones ( jstor )
Geology ( jstor )
Shales ( jstor )
Rocks ( jstor )
Quartz ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
"Selected bibliography": p. 27-29.
Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Clarence Babcock.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
022160209 ( aleph )
07114933 ( oclc )
AFD7463 ( notis )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Robert 0. Vernon, Director
INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60
GEOLOGY OF THE UPPER CRETACEOUS
CLASTIC SECTION
NORTHERN PENINSULAR FLORIDA
By
Clarence Babcock
TALLAHASSEE
1969




















V\i (o 0


Completed manuscript received
November 4, 1968
Printed by the Division of Geology
Florida Board of Conservation
Tallahassee




PREFACE
The lower sediments of the Upper Cretaceous section of northern peninsular Floridacoiisist predominantly of sands and shales. These sediments are present over most of southern Georgia and peninsular Florida. The sands have good porosities and probably would form good oil reservoirs; Ihe shales are dark and appear to have high organic content that could have made them sources of petroleum. The penetration by wells in the area is considered to be insufficient to condemn the land area as a petroleum prospect, and the adjacent ocean bottoms hold even greater promise.
The report presents a number of geologic cross sections and maps upon which broad interpretations of correlations, stratigraphy and regional structures are based. The Upper Cretaceous clastic section of the Atkinson Formation is shown to pinch-out upon the underlying Lower Cretaceous sediments elevated along the Peninsular arch. Younger, less permeable sediments overlap the Upper Cretaceous clastics.
A basal sand in the Austin interval, which the Applins (1967, p. 19) referred to as the "chalky sandstone facies in the lower part of the unit of Austin age," is described and named the LaCrosse Sandstone.
oiom




I




CONTENTS
Page
Preface ............... ................................ i
Introduction ................................................. 1
Purposes of report and method of study ....... .................. 1
Acknowledgements .......... .......................... 1
Upper Cretaceous (Gulf) Series ........ ........................ 1
La Crosse Sandstone .......... ..................... .... 1
Stratigraphy............ .......................... 2
Description ......... ......................... 2
Lithology ......... ........................ 2
Thickness and extent ....... .................... 5
Overlying rock ........ ...................... 5
Underlying rock . ... ............ 5
Age .......... .......................... 5
Source rock ........ ....................... 7
Discussion .......... .......................... 7
Structure .......... ............................. 7
Atkinson Formation ......... ........................... 7
Stratigraphy .......... ............................ 7
Previous work ......... ......................... 7
Florida ........ ......................... ..11
Georgia ....... .......................... .12
Usage in this report ....... ...................... ..12
Criteria for recognizing the top of the Atkinson Formation . 13 Criteria for recognizing the top of the basal sand unit, Atkinson Formation ....... ................... 13
Criteria for recognizing the sediment underlying the Atkinson Formation ....... ................... 20
The Lower Cretaceous section ....... ............ 20
An oolitic limestone facies of Upper Cretaceous Age . . 20 Paleozoic rocks ..... ................... .22
Structure ........ .......................... ..22
Bibliography ........... ............................... 27
Appendices .......... ................................
I. Data on Florida and Georgia wells in the report area ... ....... . .31
II. Bureau of Geology well and locality designation system .... .......... 41
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1 lOutline of the report area ......... ........................ 2
2 Electric-lithologic log representing the type section for the La Crosse Sandstone,
Tidewater, No. 1 Parker well (Sec. 33-T7S-R19E, Alachua County) ... ...... 3
3 Isopach of the La Crosse Sandstone ............................... 6
4 Stratigraphic-structural cross section (A-A) of Upper Cretaceous strata, Dixie
County to Suwannee County ..... I .............. Facing p. 6
5 Stratigraphic-structural cross section (B-B) of Upper Cretaceous strata, southern
Suwannee County and Columbia County ... ............. .Facing p. 6
6 Stratigraphic-structural cross section (C-C) of Upper Cretaceous strata, northern
Suwannee County and Columbia County .... .............. Facing p. 6
7 Up-gradient limits of the mapped units of the Atkinson Formation, and of Lower
Cretaceous beds .......... ............................ 8
v




ILLUSTRATIONS, continued
Figur Page
8 Corelations of the Atkinson Formation, and of the La Crosse Sandstone, northern peninsular Florida ........................... 9
9 Structure map on top of the LaCrosse Sandstone .............. 10
10 Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Tillis well, Suwannee County ....... ..14
11 Electric-lithologic section, Gulf, No. 1 Brooks-Scanlon, Block 33 well,
Taylor County ...... ... .. ............................ 15
12 Electric-lithologic section, Coastal, No. 1 Ragland well, Levy County ...... ..16 13 Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Camp well, Marion County ........ ...17
14 Cored sections, basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation ............ .18
I5 Isopach of the basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation .... .......... 19
16 First lithology indicative of the Lower Cretaceous section .... .......... 21
17 Structure map on top of the Atkinson Formation ... .............. .23
i8 Structure map on top of the basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation . .. 24 19 Structure map on top of the Lower Cretaceous section ..... ........... 25
20 Structure map on top of Paleozoic rocks ..... ................. ...26
vi




GEOLOGY OF THE UPPER CRETACEOUS CLASTIC SECTION
NORTHERN PENINSULAR FLORIDA
Clarence Babcock
INTRODUCTION
The report area, figure 1, encompasses 29 counties and approximately 20,000 square miles in northern peninsular Florida, and about 15,000 square miles in southern Georgia. Georgia is included to show the relationship of the geology in adjoining area to that of northern Florida.
There -is relatively little relief in the area, and the maximum elevation is only about 175 feet. The area is traversed by many streams. It is bounded on the west by the Gulf of Mexico, the western boundary of Jefferson" County, and generally longitude 84 degrees west; on the east by the Atlantic Ocean; and on the north by the approximate northern limit of the shallow-water marine facies of the Atkinson Formation (the Applins, 1947, map No. 5). To the south the study area extends to the southern boundaries of Pasco, Sumter, Lake, and Orange counties; thus the main part of the Peninsular arch is included within the geologic setting.
PURPOSES OF REPORT AND METHOD OF STUDY
The primary purposes of this report are: 1) to describe a new formation for which the name the LaCrosse Sandstone is suggested, 2) to map, and briefly describe for the report area, the lithologic units of the Atkinson Formation, and the uppermost beds of the underlying Lower Cretaceous section.
In this study, lithologic and other geologic data were obtained by examining well cuttings, cores and electric logs from 78 selected wells. The locations and data on these wells are shown on the figures of this report, and in appendix 1, respectively.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The writer is indebted to personnel of the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, for stimulating discussions, data, review of the manuscript, proof of copy and preparation of illustrations.
UPPER CRETACEOUS (GULF) SERIES LA CROSSE SANDSTONE
The sandstone unit for which the name the La Crosse Sandstone is suggested was described by the Applins in 1967 in text (p. 19, including table 4), and by an isopach map (plate 4 B). The Southeastern Geological Society cross sections (1949) showed sand in the lower part of an undifferentiated section of Austin Age, and logs in the open file of the Bureau of Geology contain descriptions of this unit.




2 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
I
:_ (Approxim ate) known underground distribution of shallow-water marine facies of upper member of Atkinson formation (the Applins, 1947, Map No.5\
1 1'
A TLAN TI C
of
MEXICO PACOEN
AREA OF REPORT
d~e
Figure 1. Outline of the report area. The unit is formally named in the present report primarily because of its
significance in clarifying the correlation of the lower part of the Upper Cretaceous section, and in some wells the unit has good reservoir characteristics.
The type well for this unit is the Tidewater, No. 1 Parker test, located in Sec.
33-T7S-R19E, Alachua County; figure 2 is an electric-lithologic log of this well.
STRATIGRAPHY
Description
Lithology
This description is from cores of the type well. A short section of the rocks
overlying and underlying the La Crosse Sandstone has been included in the
description.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 3
A:-.- ;:-: 0 0
- .:..oo ...... i i 1
- C4 U] I,
z 1 i
- 0. LIGHT TAN
'..........
:........ ...,,
:T T! ......... u zj( i; i : i ... ........ FISSI.. .LE i i
--'---.....- TAN7 .. ..
M I
0 P
LL CLEAR_ I I-
> -DDISH I RIM
C.. EISNIHLE ____CAK__-m1veyMIAEOS4
SANSTNE Fin MAR MICCEOUS CORKED
*SNSOEMdu QURTCLEART
-Rj REDDS T MoeatlSF
CHALD
Figure 2. Electric-lithologic log representing the type section for the La Crosse Sandstone,
Tidewater, No. I Parker well (See. 33-T7S-R19E, Alachua County).




4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
UPPER CRETACEOUS AUSTIN CHALK 2860 2870 Chalk, white, slightly sandy, soft. 2870 2877 Marl, light tan, slightly sandy, medium soft. 2877 2880 Chalk, white, soft.
2880 2890 Chalk, white, slightly sandy, soft. UPPER CRETACEOUS LA CROSSE SANDSTONE 2890 2920 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, very calcareous, soft. 2920 2930 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 2930 2945 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, very calcareous, soft. 2945 2950 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 2950 2980 Sandstone, fight tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 2980 2990 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 2990 3030 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 3030 3060 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3060 3070 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, medium grained, medium hard. 3070 3095 Sandstone, clear, quartz, fme grained, medium hard. 3095 3100 Shale, olive green, fissile, soft. 3100 3110 Sandstone, tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3110 3120 Sandstone, tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 3120 3130 Sandstone, white, quartz, fine grained, very calcareous, soft. 3130 3140 Sandstone, clear, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3140 3150 Sandstone, white, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3150 3155 Sandstone, clear, quartz, medium grained, very hard. 3155 3160 Sandstone, tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 3160 3163 Sandstone, brown, quartz, fine grained, micaceous, soft. UPPER CRETACEOUS POSSIBLE ATKINSON FORMATION
3163 3170 Shale, gray, non-calcareous, medium soft, slightly sandy. 3170 3172 Shale, light gray, fissile, micaceous.
Sediments that are typical of the La Crosse Sandstone were penetrated by 14 wells. Also, a slightly less typical accumulation of the unit was recognized in two wells located east and west, respectively, and downgradient of the main body of the formation. These two tests are the Gulf, No. 1 Kie Vining well, in west central Columbia County, and the National Turpentine, No. 1 Fee well, in the southwestern corner of Baker County. In these wells the La Crosse Sandstone is pale yellowish brown to very pale orange in color, and it is more calcareous, as well as generally more uniformly fine-grained, than it was in the type well. Finally, a sandstone that is of very pale orange color, and much less calcareous than is the sandstone of the type well, was penetrated by the Sun, No. 1 Williams Brothers well in northern Gilchrist County and by the Sun, No. 1 Odom well in southeastern Suwannee County; this sand is assigned to the LaCrosse Sandstone.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 5
Thickness and Extent
This unit, which the isopach map of figure 3 shows to have a maximum thickness of 273 feet, occurs in the central part of northern Florida, where it is concentrated high on the western flank of the Peninsular arch. The La Crosse Sandstone thins in all directions away from the center of deposition, and it is overlapped by younger sediments.
Overlying Rock
The rock overlying the La Crosse Sandstone is of Austin Age, and in the type well it is chalk, as it is in most wells in the report area; but in some wells this overlying rock is marl, sandy limestone, or very calcareous shale, as revealed by the stratigraphic-structural cross sections of figures 4, 5, and 6.
Underlying Rock
In the type well the rock underlying the La Crosse Sandstone is light brown, sandy shale which questionably belongs in the Atkinson Formation. In most other wells the underlying rock has been assigned to the Atkinson Formation, and it is typically a gray, calcareous, "poker-chip" shale, which is often micaceous.
Two tests located near the axis of the Peninsular arch found the La Crosse Sandstone underlain by Paleozoic rock. These wells are: Depth (and
Description of sub-sea depth)
Well Paleozoic rocks in feet Reference Nat'l. Turpentine Sandstone, white 3040 Bridge and No. 1 Fee and locally red (-2885) Berdan, 1950
Sun Oil Co. Quartzitic sand- 2813 Applin, Paul L. No. 1 Bishop stone and shale (-2639) 1951, p, 23 Age
The Applins (1967, p. 20) reported that a core of this unit from the National Turpentine, No. 1 Fee Well, located in southwestern Baker County, contained specimens of Pseudofrondicularia lanceola (Reuss) var. bidentata (Cushman) which, they state, has not been reported from beds older than Austin Age. The assignment of -the La Crosse Sandstone to an Austin Age is generally substantiated by electric log and sample correlations which indicate that the unit is the stratigraphic equivalent of a gray marl or chalk section of Austin Age. The stratigraphic-structural cross section C-C (fig. 6), however, shows that the lower part of the La Crosse Sandstone in the Gulf, No. 1 Kie Vining well is the stratigraphic equivalent of sediments of the Atkinson Formation in the Sun, No. 1 Tiis well which are included in the Eagle Ford microfaunal zone by the Southeastern Geological Society (1949, cross section D-D').




6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
LON
L d rt )'Y \
~ ~ Y LC419 J /MCINTOSII
h---)!M04N CAMSASC.5500C
N CAMDENO
~ '4
-s LOW CUR03 5 09
*~~~~~~~~c 06 FII 11u~**?~
S 3 On;
3 5 PLOIA#
- ~ Tf.2-
+ CLAY
r0 4 .~
-~ ~; N. Uz.
TALR I k .
N),- -0
Fiue .Iopch fth a rs.adsoe




1 2 3 4 5 i SUN SUN COASTAL SUN SUN S p.- No.1-A Crapps No.1 Crapps No.1 Sapp No. 1 Odom No.1 Russell
-D.F.Eev.41 D.F. Elev.70' D.F. Elev. 44' D.F. Elev. 73' D.F. Elev. 96'
..t ,18 Miles -- 7'~------ Miles 7 Miles 4 Mile
0O Sea level less 1900 --z C
00
-l o
0 oe lee les 1
<< ~
" NIT
CALCILUOCATIOMETAMORPHI
' I CALCARENITEj OUARTZITIC SANDSTONE LAFAYETTE "" 5 L g
O'/T. D. 4127 Z ----SHALE CALCAREOUS ZVIIGLAUCONITIC W--soFT !.
LJ! ...... i, F':--:- :':1SNOSTON DOLOMITE F M "lMICACEOUS F--Modertely SOFT GLCRS iAAHU
T. D. 5104 CHALK MARL Z '- REDDISH EZIHARD DIXE I
Figure 4. Stratigraphic-structural cross section (A-A') of" Upper Cretaceous strata, Dixie County to Suwannee-County.




SUN
No.1 Bishop MICHAELS Oz D.F. Elevation174' No.1 Riley OB, O SUN D.F. Elevationl57'
- No.1 Russell No.1 Johnson ,es Miles
- D.F.Elevation 96' D.F.Elevation 87'
-7-- 8MesN 7J 1
i ~SEA L/'-- L
less 2150' --- '- "tP -41- -4- --r-t
I 4 T
IT T F HO NI
T.D F1-8 -T'- I i
0MARL DIXIE ----T--D.I-------SHALE HL CALCILUTITE I G jGLAUONITIC LOCATION of CROSS SECTION
SANDSTONE '1i CALCARENITEI R REDDISH L---ll-Moderately SOFT ITh C-JALCAREOUSl IMETAMORPHIC I HARD
Fcu
L Fgr, .S-'--4'-t Y a oosnton(c,) f 6p4 rb. ,n tta oten uaae ony {' o:mh ony




FIELDS and RANDALL SUN GULF SUN
,.- -No1 Crawley No.1 Tillis No.1 Kie Vining No.1 Bishop (~n D.F. Elevation 118' D.F. Elevation 162' D.F. Elevationll7' D.F. Elevation 174'
-- 15 Miles I Miles -II Miles 4 ~~~~~~- - -- ----- -- -- ----00
0,SUANE p
Egle 2000'd Lo- T- sP.,o N, O oC o
0 ,
-" : f -:A CO II :----Ier SOF LO CAIO "f AP
0 -4
.10
"-O ANH iHAouM .D 57'LSLTCACLUIE L]IGII
PL 0
rrr '- ANSON i II]-I iCLCREISIANO NES -'LAFAeTtel SOF F,, ?GLHRS 0 L'CHU
- =--- ccnse, feitioI modified TOD380'*7As [determinTNedCAC bNIyF thCACOe
.!er .'he Southeastern Geological Southeastern Geologico, Soo,.ty ,,949, I[-. 1 CALCAREOUSLi---POROS TY [- ]"HARD
Figur 6. Stratigraphic-stauctural cross section (C-C') of Upper Cretaceous strata, northern Suwannee County and Columbia County.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 7
Source Rock
The La Crosse Sandstone is an isolated unit. It may have been derived from Paleozoic and perhaps Lower Cretaceous 'outcrops exposed during the time it was deposited, as indicated by figures 3 and 7. Possibly, also, transport of material from these older beds through a depositional interface (Krumbein and Sloss, 195, p. 5) may have contributed to the accumulation of the La Crosse Sandstone.
DISCUSSION
It will be noted in the correlation chart of figure 8 that the La Crosse Sandstone is the stratigraphic equivalent of either the entire interval of the Eutaw Formation, as depicted in the Alabama surface section, or the upper part of that formation, as shown on the subsurface section for Mississippi and Alabama. However, the La Crosse Sandstone is lithologically different from the Eutaw Formation, the approximate southeastern limit of which is in southwestern-Alabama (the Applins, 1947, map No. 1). Certainly the lithologic character of the La Crosse Sandstone differs from that of the Eutaw Formation in that this northern Florida unit is composed of uniformly fine quartz grains, and it is predominantly light tan to very pale orange in color, calcareous, soft, rarely fossiliferous, and almost entirely without shale associations in most wells. The Eutaw Formation, on the other hand, is described by Monroe, Conant and Eargle (1946, p. 207-210) as sandstone which is gray and reddish tan, cross-bedded, highly glauconitic, carbonaceous, macrofossiliferous, and with disseminated clay and clay laminae. Sharks teeth are present in the Eutaw Formation, especially in its upper (Tombigbee) member, and locally in a basal member.
STRUCTURE
The top of the La Crosse Sandstone is contoured on figure 9.
UPPER CRETACEOUS (GULF) SERIES
ATKINSON FORMATION
STRATIGRAPHY
PREVIOUS WORK
A comparison of the members and faunal zones into which the Atkinson Formation of northern Florida, southern Alabama, and southern Georgia has been divided by different authors, and the relationship of the formation to stratigraphically equivalent units in bordering areas, are presented in the correlation chart of figure 8.




8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
+ri
)OL-E__ LAi CA --
L ( .KI
,,.bBjm 8O
2A A K
, C__ ,H k /
Z 51.3 2 n ..
.2 Al
, 3-.. 8 4 A I +% T,>M )
EXPLANAT.ON 2" I 6 7
26 ? -=, I' "" o.' .~ ~ ...... 74, !-2 1I
25~~ Uu R
i .31 I_ I _'
2' h- .,LA- I i 1 t .-22
I- F7i Ari
EXPUMAT101 11It 1 we ... .
OREG -T
Flgie 7. Upgrdent limits of the mapped units of the Atkinson Formation, and of
Lower Creacou beds.




ALABAMA MISSISSIPPI and ALABAMA SOUTHERN ALABAMA SOUTHEAST ALABAMA SOUTHEASTERN (Surface Section) MISSISSIPPI GEOLOGICAL SOUTHERN GEORGIA SOUTH GEORGIA GULF REGION
NORTHEAST TEXAS MONROECONANTandEARGLE SOCIETY and and (Subsurface) NORTH FLORID PRE'SELMAUP-CRETACEOUS CRETACEOUS COMMITTEE NORTH FLORIDA FLORIDA (Subsurface) Esther R.Applin 1955 (Subsurface) (Surface Section) STRATIGRAPHYof WESTERN and ALABAMA,AARG.BULLETIN (Subsurface) (Subsurface) SOUTHEASTERN GEOLOGICAL SOUTHERN GEORGIAand PRESENT REPORT SOCIETY NORTH RN F'LORIDA
VOL.30, pp,187-212,1946 CHART, FEBRUARY,1946 The APPLINS,1947 1949 h .R.l IA67
SELMA GROUP UP- DOWNand (LOWER PART) ~ MOEIL E I I
EQUIVALENT EU a EUTAWFORMATION( IC
FORMATIONS EUTAW FORMATION 4 UPPER EUTAW *M INWCENTRALALA < LACROSSE SANDSTO
INMAIOS W. CENTRA ALJL RSESNSO!
0
MaSHAN ,, LOWER FORMATION w EUTAW
x z
. O 0 0
U GORDO UPPER 0
FORMATION U.PPER 0 CC C Z TUSCALOOSA o U c o O EAGLE z o ,c U. U
w a. w 0J. E
%.~ z0 wU 1L
FORD 0. 2 w BD < 05
SHALE 2 0 4 ICi
WOO ,, NU,..ASS ...
FRTOCOKER nam 0
FORMATION T O 9'L I Q. '
MIDDLE U C no
0 0*
Co JOIN 20 ..
Q. I
COIN MARINE BEDS 4 M FORMATION 01 w0 w
WOft!N E MARINE FACIES E BASAL SAND UNIT
FORMATION COTTONDALE LOWER 2. In W, FLORIDA1 00
and ~0 E.W ( mostly coarser Lwan S.W No oloells, wIlh FORMATION TUSCALOOSA A. /"LITTORAL UmioSaeq
____________ ____________ ________ 9-- FACIE$ 9 slt string ers LOWER CRETACEOUS PAEZI OK OACEN LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CREAEU (Undifferentiated) CUndlltfarent latsd) (Undifferentiated) (Undifferentiated) The APPLINS,
Figure 8. Correlations of the Atkinson Formation, and of the La Crosse Sandstone, northern peninsular Florida.




10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
LOW$
iv: "".
1 I .0. ''. u. '-c. I \ '
A -- i Ay L 'T
Im~~ .P!!NTLE
_ lIO -- .
I C ARLO
\ l .,!L .J i l IA________ 7
ECHLS 200 IJ 0rLOE
r2
t tA 3 I s 1E I s32 0 1 !1.3 J
Figuxe 9. Stnictuxe map on top of the La Crosse Sandstone.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 11
Florida
Paul L. Applin and Esther R. Applin (1947) named the Atkinson Formation, and showed it to be roughly the equivalent of the Tuscaloosa Group and McShan Formation of Alabama. As proposed by the Applins in 1947, the Atkinson Formation consisted of three members. The upper member,
"...(contains) three depositional facies ..which in down-dip wells merge vertically and laterally into each other. These are 1) a littoral or possibly nonmarine unfossiliferous facies characterized by red shales, poorly sorted sand, and some gravel; 2) A shallow-water marine facies composed chiefly of sand with lesser amounts of greenish-gray shale and containing fragments of molluscan shells; 3) a deeper water marine facies composed chiefly of dark-green flaky shale with some fine-grained sandstone, and containing, in addition to fragments of macrofossils, a microfauna which is closely similar to
that of the Eagle Ford shale of Texas."
The middle member,
"...was evidently deposited in a rather shallow-water marine environment and contains a sparse but diagnostic microfauna of arenaceous foraminifera that is related to the microfauna of the outcropping Woodbine formation of Texas.
Lithologically the member is composed chiefly of dark-gray to greenish-gray flaky shale and dark brownish-gray to black splintery shale with some irregular lenses of white speckled shale. The shale is usually micaceous (biotite and
muscovite), carbonaceous, silty and glauconitic." The lower member,
"...is generally an unfossiliferous littoral or nonmarine deposit...that gradually merges with an equivalent marine facies in which scattered lenses of shale contain arenaceous species common in the microfauna of the overlying middle
Atkinson."
The Southeastern Geological Society (1949) published four cross sections which included 16 northern Florida wells that were located in the area of the present report, and in which the Atkinson Formation was divided into the Eagle Ford and Woodbine microfaunal zones, rather than the three members designated by the Applins in 1947. Some of these zonal determinations were used in the present report.
Vernon (1951, fig. 16) followed the zonal divisions used by the Southeastern Geological Society, but separated the two zones into shale and sand units; five wells used in his report are included in this study.
Esther R. Applin (1955, p. 187), in order "To clarify the correlation of the Atkinson Formation of the subsurface in the Southeastern gulf region with the Eagle Ford and Woodbine formations of Texas," redefined the Atkinson Formations "to consist of two members, an upper member of Eagle Ford age as formerly used, and a lower member of Woodbine age consisting of the former lower and middle members."'




12 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
The Applins (1965, plate 10) published a cross section which shows for several wells the depths from which diagnostic Woodbine fossils occurred in an oolitic limestone facies which they describe, and which occurs in the lower part of their lower member of the Atkinson Formation; they also show depths at which a Washita fossil was found in rock which underlies the Upper Cretaceous sequence. Four of the wells on this cross section are included in the present report area. Other figures presented by the Applins in their 1965 report which pertain to the present study area included 1) a structural cross section showing the top of the Atkinson Formation, and of the Lower Cretaceous section, in three wells (plate 9, cross section Y-Y), 2) a structural stratigraphic section depicting the Applins' lower member of the Atkinson Formation, and the Lower Cretaceous section, in two wells (plate 6, cross section V-V), and 3) a map showing the approximate areal distribution of the lithofacies of the basal part of the lower member of the Atkinson Formation (1965, fig. 45, p. 67).
Maher (1965, plates 2 and 8) published two cross sections that contained five wells located in the area of this study.
The Applins (1967, plate 7) published two cross sections showing 13 wells located in the area of the present report in which the Atkinson Formation was divided into an upper and lower member as redefined by Esther R. Applin (1955, p. 187). Also, the Applins' report (plate 3) presented maps showing the areal distribution of the various lithofacies within their upper and lower members, respectively, and the thicknesses of each of these members.
Georgia
Authors who have published on the stratigraphy of the southern Georgia area included in this report are: the Applins (1944; 1947; 1967), the Mesozoic Committee of the Southeastern Geological Society (1949), Hurst (1960), Herrick (1961), Hull (1962), Herrick and Vorhis (1963), and Maher (1965).
USAGE IN THIS REPORT
In the area of study the Atkinson Formation is composed essentially of shale, shaly sand, or shaly limestone in the upper part, and sand with minor shale stringers in the lower portion. Thus, on the basis of predominant rock character, the formation roughly divides into a shaly unit, and a basal sand unit, as shown on the correlation chart of figure 8.
Assignment of the upper sediments of the Atkinson Formation to an Eagle Ford Age, and the lower sediments to a Woodbine Age, was accomplished by the Southeastern Geological Society (1949)in 16 Florida wells, by Vernon (1951) in 5 wells, and by the Applins (1965;1967) in 6 and 13 wells, respectively. The upper shaly unit of the present report, which is mostly of Eagle Ford Age as determined in the previous reports, includes an interval at its base of from 11 to 159 feet of sediments that were included in the Woodbine zone by the earlier




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 13
workers. For example, in the Sun, No. 1 Tillis well, as depicted in figures 6 and 10, the upper shaly unit and the basal sand unit of the present study are separated at a depth of 3,260 feet, whereas the Southeastern Geological Society places the upper boundary of the Woodbine microfaunal zone at 3,240 feet, which is 20 feet into the upper shaly unit as used in the present report.
Separations of the Atkinson Formation into the shaly unit and the basal sand unit in relatively difficult up-gradient areas is shown in figures 4, 5 and 6. Figures 10, 11, 12 and 13 illustrate lithologic separations for four down-gradient areas which are widely spaced, and within each of which local correlations are fairly clear.
Criteria For Recognizing The Top of the
Atkinson Formation
For most of the report area the shaly lithology of the upper part (shaly unit) of the Atkinson Formation is overlain by chalk, or marl, of Austin Age. The contact between these distinctive lithologies is easy to recognize in cores or well cuttings, or on electric logs.
---In up-gradient wells located high on the western flank of the Peninsular arch, however, the La Crosse Sandstone (fig. 3) overlies the Atkinson Formation. The La Crosse Sandstone is predominantly composed of quite uniform fine quartz grains, and is light tan to very pale orange in color, calcareous, soft, rarely fossiliferous, and almost entirely without shale associations in most wells. There is a marked contrast, easily recognized in cores and well cuttings, between this sandstone and the Atkinson Formation, which consists of shale and sand which often is micaceous, glauconitic and phosphoritic, and in which the sandstones commonly are of non-uniform grain size.
Criteria For Recognizing The Top of the
Basal Sand Unit, Atkinson Formation
As shown in figure 14, the lower part of the Atkinson Formation is a quartz sandstone, fine to coarse grained, poorly sorted, soft and typically glauconitic, phosphoritic and micaceous. Minor shale, silt and limestone stringers are present. Figure 15 shows that the sand ranges from zero to 379 feet in thickness. The eastern limit of this basal sand unit is in the southeastern part of the study area. Beyond this line the stratigraphic equivalent of the unit consists of the shaly unit of the Atkinson Formation; or (lower in the section) of the oolitic limestone described by the Applins (1965, pl. 10). The contact between this unit and the predominately shaly upper part of the Atkinson Formation is typically marked by a sharp spontaneous potential excursion to the left on the electric log, and by a corresponding increase in resistivity. Even in up-gradient areas in which the contact between the upper shales and lower sands becomes somewhat gradational, these electric log characteristics usually are apparent, though to a less pronounced extent (figs. 4, 5, and 6).




14 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
0
"3123
- DARK GRAY
_________LIGHT TAN : : _...-.
LIGHT TAN
CLFAR
LIGHT BROWN
O)GRAY, FISSILE
GRAY, iSSILE
-_(,..T LRSWI
-~ -"3260
7
-7* Vj: z I ra
0. <1< L Cl) G p LIHT GREEN Cl L I I I 333FISSI.EPLATY'
333WHITE
INTERBEDDED
RED SHALE
LOCATION of SECTION
The interval 3240- 3323 is shown to contain ,HWoodbine microfouna by the Southeastern Geological ......... Society (1949, cross section D- D)
UTHOLOGY
SHALE CHALK [ GLAUCONITIC
SILT CALCILUTITE slightly GLAUCONITIC SCORED
]SANDSTONE, Fine CALCARENITE F '- Slightly LIGNITIC SOFT
SANDSTONE,Medium CALCAREOUS [ MICACEOUS [Z ,]Moderately SO S,]SANDSTONE.Coaa, [--i" Slightly PHOSPHORITIC HARD
Figure 10. Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Tillis well, Suwannee County.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 15
0 -39 LI-GHTM0 GRAY.FISSILE KLATY, FISSILE1
- OLIVE GREEN 0
- - -- 0 BROWN
o -- EL OLIVEAREEN 1~
-- - o -.=...BROWN
TAN t I-- OLIVE GREEN I
- - -LI)TAN
BROWN I
OLIVE GREEN -IFERONLASS
341LIGAT BRON
M:: --3481LIGHT CRAY>
07 M R M anI__sSL
- .- ..s.- LIGHT GREEN.- _- zTAN
OGWI 0LEAT BBOWRI} .G. Z TAN
4 - --------- ......1_v30
30 LIAHT GREEN
0
L I
-I- u LIITRBY - LOCATION O SETO
LITHOLOGY
SSHALE P:-jMARL GG Very GLAUCONITIC
~SILT 9 CALCILLTITE LiG-iJ GLALICONITICIk
L=ISANDSTONE. Fine PP9CALCARENITE EZ-9IiI Slightly GLAUCONITIC I
SANDSTONE, Meium FZ;DOLOMITE LIM I1 MICACEOUS
FE CALCAREOUS FEm-ZSlightly MCAEOUS FCRED P Slightly PHOSPHORITIC imiSOFT [IZ--REDDISH [IiiMedium SOFT
Figure 11. Electric-lithologic section, Gulf, No. 1 Brooks-Scanlon, Block 33. well, Taylor County.




16 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
ZC
417 AR GRAY -SLGHL FISSIL
_ z
DARK GRAY.- [GAY PLATY
- S L IG T L.V F S S tU E
__ z
- 0 L.-..-P--U.,t i ).
D. .GDAR -RA
EROWNPYRITIC -. GRA Y. PLATY -
-- I -- --
-. BROWN, PLATY
BR dCATEO 43OCONGLOMERA1E *
DOLOMITE -'24"
00 0 : < SILI:EOUS
Z TAN
. . . . LIGHT GREEN gn
m _m -o4400
----7 -u
M
LOCATION at SECTION
LuL
LITHOLOGY LEVY SSHALE CALCILUTITE L GLAUCONITIC SILT CALCARENITE L MICACEOUS p L777 SANDSTONE, Rn. CALCAREOUS L-] PHOSPHORITIC IZIZSANDSTON,Medium I REDDISH L----'-SOFT FIZISANDSTONE.Coase CORED L i Moderately SOF' a ) CONGLOMERATE -- IHARD
Fgr 12- Ectzichologic action, Coasta. No.1 Ragbnd wel Lev Count




p P I Z : i ~i~--
-4038-
-P s 4079
o *p~qp* ~<~ DARK GRAY-- to < M CLA -S ---- 0
mC :p 1 0 GRAINS of --( .JJ :o.~~ ,,"-- 0oR-gN e.- ----.
* Io -u C@.q53 \ Of
I LUcmesz
-Iw-44 J -7rC1
LOCATION of SECTION
,.o
LITHOLOGY:
- SHALE CHALK J-GG Very GLAUCONITIC
M SILT FECALCILTITE GLAUCONITIC ~ CORED
= SANDSONE,Fini CALCARENITE SIIghtlyGLAUCONITIC =-SOFT
~ SANDSTONEMedium CALCAREOUS E Slightly PHOSPHORITIC ___Moderately SOFT
=T'. SANDSTONE, Coarse CONGLOM- I" TQUARTZITIC ] HARD ERATE
Figure 13. Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Camp well, Marion County..




[ 8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
- .p ,-x r tShot$
nddt3 IF slite
- -,- -. S a d to e fl,' n.e-- L _. if.,i, "
(Sondstonimdiwqgrined SSlndllO tl, coa" grind r"- 0 Conglomerate
I L 2 ~ ~o s~
- ---- SPi- ht- I isIcpeh o l r--i Slightly gI lau3 tI lgly a llct urlllAkrl F' F~I 64 T lb a Ind unit Atknon
M ~'~ 2 ~iterwval not tored
HARDNESS of CORED LITHOLOGY
soft
- ~ -~ -Medium wall VERTICAL. SCALE
FOR COLUMNS
Mr j0
LO
Figun 14. Cored sections, basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 19
I lLLt 0',' 1 IBE.RTY 765
"----- "-. o
TIF8 \LPPINt ~ N
COO, A T 6 N. ,,\HP tI CE 89 7(4
l ., L4 I I I L ,.. 460rANI 10:00 J7 RANTLE~ 460
*.1U2 -I -'-JA -A rt,,, r,, ana -~ 2 .4 -J -! -j -i -, (290) <
A Xr5s i 1 i .4 ? .....W-.IDE
+4 J '' 5
F----- t - -,,- .C0LU 81 M297 .. 7 1 4 / -- 6 0
".255 1 8 .,y 4.4 I o t. z: : t 2 .
"0 5 0H--O (i60)
l e i -I
02450 I6059
tsa -36 5 (~ -( ....... b. .I
-4-65 E3 ..11 ~5J C
406 t ,.0< .i2-\9, i :
5 \H6 L '1 TS L AS ,A'D
o 4~4LJ 60 40 -SA6EN S4
.5" Abs. O Ak. iL24~ f\ I O

S--- .. .i- I .-,,.__J
470 LO
41 -10 IT
kid 6 N 13 14 ~ 3 ZJL 25 ze ZI I02
A 1 17 _1..
36.o of the basal s ui
45d9_ Ip 5-1 59
0j(56 ~ ~ i
63 32 14 Wis 9-A- -IOUEVAL
47 ~ ~~~ I IS.ON
NI40CI Oeal 3 ..,oN -0
1 154 A ,IIR4 96444IS r''-- L J IT
so'60 346 5 /I-Il,, oze SA L SA
Figure~~~~~ ~ ~~~~~ 15 spc fteBAlsnuntothAkionFrao.




20 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Critez For Recogaidg The Sediments Underlying The Atkinson Fomation
Over most of the report area the Atkinson Formation is underlain by Lower Cretaceous sediments, but in a few wells the underlying sediments are either rock of Upper Cretaceous Age, or Paleozoic rock. These underlying lithologies will be discussed as a guide to determination of the bottom of the Atkinson Formation.
a) The Lower Cretaceous Section
The top of this section usually must be determined from sample examination alone, since it cannot be recognized on the electric log, and since it is rarely cored- For these reasons it commonly is difficult to pick the top of this section with exactness. Recognition of the Lower Cretaceous section is facilitated by figure 16, which shows for selected wells the first lithology indicative of these beds.
In the northern part of the Florida report area, and where most of the well control of this study is located, the upper sediments of the Lower Cretaceous section -which underlie the Atkinson Formation consist of clastic rocks which are slightly calcareous to non-calcareous. These sediments include pastel colored sandstones; red, white and pastel colored siltstones or shales; clear and pastel colored quartz pebbles; and light purple quartzite.
In the southern part of the report area light colored limestones or dolomites are present at the top of the Lower Cretaceous section. However, here these sediments do not immediately underlie the Atkinson Formation of the present study, but rather are separated from it by the intervening oolitic limestone facies of Upper Cretaceous Age, as discussed in the next paragraph.
b) An Oolitic Limestone Faces of Upper Cretaceous Age
Four wells in the southern part of the report area contain a sequence of white and light gray oolitic limestone of Upper Cretaceous Age, having a maximum thickness of 125 feet, as described by the Applins (1965, plate 10). This sequence underlies the predominantly clastic Atkinson Formation as used in the present report. These wells are:
Thickness Of The
Well County Qolitic Limestone Facies Grace Drilling Co. Volusia 125 feet No. 1 Retail Lbr.
Company.
Sun Oil Co. Volusia 45 feet No. I Powell
Ohio Oil Co. Hernando 20 feet No. I Hernasco
Oil Developmet Co. Lake 10 feet No. 2 Gulf Exploration
-opy -




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 21
*1-*' jCIT S
! J... 7 i -- .79 -'.. . ,-LI W1!u
--' ) 3----'P3 '- X"- 8O- -- '
Lc~rrE7 F*3RE-laACOO ).N
*~~~ *J i >4o
-) ~""'20333 3j ", IERCE r-(.
-LAWret/ T HO NAS 67~OLJ J ~ 332 LCARLTON
:L WARE OW
' + -, /
2HO NM 03
I M BOSICHOSA dtoere h t o %T
4 2 a -322 41 32 N5- 3 034 i 2
LIIOLG SM O so 332 -1
in uarzie, lg tr pl
SSaldstons, red, whlte or 36
Q pastel colored
Shate,color as above
Z 7 Dolomite, pink "Ei ~ t W Limenlone, Ian- 3*'*
EXPLANATION 3
-04 CretocoouS buds "Figure 16. First lithology indicative of the Lower Cretaceous section.




22 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
c) Paleozoic Rocks
Near the crest of the Peninsular arch, the Atkinson Formation is underlain by quartzitic sandstones and shales of Paleozoic Age, as reported by Paul L. Applin (1951, table 3) in the following wells: Depth (and sub-sea depth)
to quartzitic sandstones and shales
Well County of Paleozoic Age
Tidewater Alachua 3135 feet No- I Cato (-3023)
Tidewater Alachua 3170 feet No. 1 Parker (-3002)
Tidewater Alachua 3217 feet No- I Phifer (-3085)
Tidewater Bradford 3140 feet No. 1 Wiggins (-2999)
STRUCTURE
The structural top of the Atkinson Formation, and of the basal. sand unit of. that formation, are presented in figures 17 and 18. These maps are similar in configuration to the structure of the top of the Lower Cretaceous section as shown on figure 19, which incorporates the results and interpretations of many other workers, including Jordon (1952, fig. 8) and Herrick and Vorhis (1963, figs. 16,17 and 18).
Figure 20 is reproduced from Paul L Applin (1951, table 3) and shows that the Palezoic structure of the Peninsular arch is reflected in the up-gradient lmits, and general configuration, of Lower Cretaceous rocks as mapped in figure 19.
Offshore from the report area, mainland contours of the Lower Cretaceous map are integrated with the results of seismic refraction surveys. Opposite the east coast these contours are taken from a map by Sheridan, Drake, Nafe and Hennion (1966, fig. 10, p. 1985) drawn on top of the Lower Cretaceous section. The contours opposite the Georgia east coast were suggested by a map of the pre-Cretaceous basement by Antoine and Henry (1965, fig. 12, p. 608).
The Lower Cretaceous contours offshore from Dixie County in the Gulf of Mexico were suggested by maps drawn on top of the Upper Cretaceous section by Antoine and Harding (1963, figs. 6 and 7) on the basis of seismic refraction studies. The Antoine and Harding maps reflect an isopach of Cenozoic sediments preparedby Toulmin (1955, fig. 1,p. 1166).




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 23
41IRERTT\
I f'- (-LONG) L~
~ r~ ~ ~ AYNE 5
%L TU. LIBERTY \~ePIR~j/ MINTOSH J / OFFE H) AREk.BACON 9PEC''1
- AAl
-.24 0'T LdTIN 02 r \,"ITS
--26 ~ RANELO L.. I AN OETLEY ,
2400 So 40
CeN~F RATO 33 4 Q '
81i1 OR CHOS 7
I I OAIIER
- 34 -20200/
7R1
NO)-!N5E 4 A
20 0 -o '(5 T 0 11. 2 7 217
142 I -4- 'f. 3~ft j
j 30 4 '23; -37 -0 t
I0I
A 5- KE
4XINIO - 4031" '1I
-383 0 31~o 5dOOIb
+ STTON
COO3364 -290N 20k 15OANE
59LAIHR 0 20
'000
Figr17.Srutr map on top of th Atkison Frmain




24 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
a$AYL 3."" P
L~LJ~+64~uN j400+ i Sf' "'-'L * ) "Y
- ,--
t- a 0 AZA I tiV
4p- stm a?
LA44M BRNT 44~
L +" ..... o
6 ~ E j 43 4P4 r CMAPLON
-0 I -43 4 '
Y- ----~--4 + ~ AILTO ___
C~~lt~~~l0 mtlvl IQ aut .
6- JLUV-
3 l CL Y
Fi 4e te p t o e aan I ati
IT - f 0
3 a.3
- 'a
toa 6S. 3~ '40 S6. 6 3.1 D
F
Figure~~ L8 tutr a ntopo h aa adui o h tisnFrain




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 25
' -: ,'--f ,! / 0
WI.o /
,,I oo ../ / o,
" 400 9" 0 / I /
" 6 .. ... s...J1:33u3 L/
RA,-F/ /
A /
I ifi
_3r oo- 0
E A'i FLRIA-GE RG1 44T i 48 MB4MEN 0
.. ... ...... ... ...... -- 0B < h oooJI
OR... To ....I -1 A
Figure 1. Stutr ma _ntpo h oe rtcosscin
A -Rle CU.C
~' ~ 404 L
-3800
-40 3qo
A28.I0,.I~
A d DoI.L
Figue 1. Srucuremap n tp o th Loer Cetaeou setio




26 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
!r-,, ""F- 'my J C...K" "K..
N ON
r-' I01
K CAMDEN
$36
- I -. : .. .- o fJ .4
a CAMDEN
A
-- -_-- 1
F I
I L
, i
. L ,L A O'
03p p o
k"We'l
Figaro20. S1tm n on tp o a eoocok 91...




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 27
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHV
American Geophysical Union
1964 (and the U. S. Geological Survey) Bouguer gravity anomaly map of the
United States: (G. P. Woollard, Chairman). Scale 1:2,500,000
Antoine, John W.
1965 (and Harding, James L.) Structure of the Continental Shelf, northeastern
Gulf of Mexico: Reference 63-13T Texas A and M Univ.
1965 (and Henry, Vernon J., Jr.) Seismic refraction study of shallow part of
continental shelf off Georgia: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 49,
no. 5, p. 601-609, 12 fig., 1 table.
Applin, Esther R. (see Applin, Paul L.)
1955 A biofacies of Woodbine age in southeastern Gulf Coast region: U. S. Geol.
Survey Prof. Paper 264-1, 11 p., 1 fig.
Applin, Paul L.
1944 (and Applin, Esther R.) Regional subsurface stratigraphy and structure of
Florida and southern Georgia: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 28,
no. 12, p. 1673-1753, 1 table, 32 fig., 5 pl.
1947 (and Applin, Esther R.) Regional subsurface stratigraphy, structure, and
correlation of Middle Cretaceous rocks in Alabama, Georgia and north Florida: U. S. Geol. Survey Oil and Gas Preliminary Chart 26 (in 3 sheets).
1951 Preliminary report on buried pre-Mesozoic rocks in Florida and adjacent
states: U. S. Geol. Survey Circ. 91, p. 1-28, 5 fig., 5 tables.
1965 (and Applin, Esther R.) The Comanche Series and associated rocks in the
subsurface in central and south Florida: U. S. Geol. Survey Professional
Paper 447, 84 p., 11 pl., 53 fig., 2 tables.
1967 (and Applin, Esther R.) The Gulf Series in the subsurface in northern Florida
and southern Georgia: U. S. Geol. Survey Professional Paper 524-G, 34 p., 8
pl, 4 fig., 6 tables.
Berdan, Jean M. (see Bridge, Josiah)
Bridge, Josiah
1952 (and Berdan, Jean M.) Preliminary correlations of the Paleozoic rocks from
test wells in Florida and adjacent parts of Georgia and Alabama (included in a guidebook for the field trip of the 44th annual meeting of the Assoc. Am.
State Geologists): Florida Geol. Survey, p. 29-38, 1 table, 1 fig.
Bonini, W. E. (see Woollard, G. P.)
Chen, Chih Shan
1965 The regional lithostratigraphic analysis of Paleocene and Eocene rocks of
Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 45, 105 p., 44 fig., 1 table.
Conant, Louis C. (see Monroe, Watson H.)




28 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
Conant, Louis C. (see Monroe, Watson H.)
Drake, C. L (see Sheridan, R. E.)
Eargle, D. Hoye (see Monroe, Watson H.)
Ewing, John
1966 (and Ewing, Maurice, and Leyden, Robert) Seismic profiler survey of Blake
Plateau: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., V. 50, no. 9, p. 1948-1971,
17 fig., 2 tables.
Ewing, Maurice (see Ewing, John)
Harding, James L (see Antoine, John W.)
Hennion, J. (see Sheridan, R. E.)
Henry, Vernon J., Jr. (see Antoine, John W.)
Herrick, Stephen M.
1961 Well logs of the coastal plain of Georgia: Georgia State Div. of Conservation,
Dept. of Mines, Mining and Geology Bull. 70, p. 1-462.
1963 (and Vorhis, Robert C.) Subsurface geology of the Georgia coastal plain:
Georgia State Div. of Conservation, Dept. of Mines, Mining and Geology
Information Circular 25, 12 tables, 28 fig., 78 p.
Hull Joseph P1. D., Jr.
1962 Cretaceous Suwannee Strait, Georgia and Florida: Am. Assoc. Petroleum
Bull., v. 46, no. 1, p. 118-122.
Hurst, Vernan J.
1960 O1 tests in Georgia: Georgia State Div. of Conservation, Dept. of Mines,
Mining and Geology Information Circular 19, 4 fig., 14 p.
Jordan, Louise
1952 Preliminary notes on the Mesozoic rocks in Florida: A summary of the
geology of Florida and a guidebook to the Cenozoic exposures of a portion of the State (included in a guidebook for the field trip of the 44th annual meeting of the Assoc. American State Geologists): Florida Geol. Survey, p.
39-45, 2 fig.
Krumbeim, W. C.
1953 (and Sloss, L L.) Stratigraphy and sedimentation: W. H. Freeman and
Company, San Francisco, California.
Leyden, Robert (see Ewing, John)
Maher, John C.
1965 Correlations of subsurface Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks along the Atlantic
Coast: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists, p. 1-18, 9 pL, 1 fig., 1 table.
Meyer, R. P. (see Woollard, G. P.)




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 29
Monroe, Watson H.
1946 (and Conant, Louis C., and Eargle, D. Hoye) Pre-Selma Upper Cretaceous
stratigraphy of western Alabama: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v.
30, no. 2, p. 187-212, 30 figs.
Nafe, J. E. (see Sheridan, R. E.)
Puri, Harbans S.
1964 (and Vernon, Robert 0.) Summary of the geology of Florida and a
guidebook to the classic exposures: Florida Geol. Survey Special Publication
5, 4 tables, 37 fig., 11 plates, 312 p.
Schuchert, Charles
1955 Atlas of Paleographic maps of North America: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.,
New York.
Sheridan, R. E.
1966 (and Drake, C. L., Nafe, J. E., and Hennion, J.) Seismic refraction study of
continental margin east of Florida: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull.,
V. SO, no. 9, p. 1972-1991, 13 fig., 1 table.
Sloss, L. L. (see Krumbein, W. C.)
Southeastern Geological Society Mesozoic Committee
1949 Mesozoic cross sections A-A', B.B', C.d, DD', and E-E', prepared by the
Mesozoic Committee of the Southeastern Geological Society.
Toulmin, Lyman D.
1952 Volume of Cenozoic sediments in Florida and Georgia: Geol. Soc. American
Bull., v. 63, p. 1165-1176, 1 pl., 8 fig., 1 table.
Vernon Robert O. (see Pur, Harbans S.)
1951 Geology of Citrus and Levy counties, Florida: Fla. Geol. Survey Bull. 33,
256 p.
Vorhis, Robert C. (see Herrick, Stephen M.)
U. S. Geological Survey (see American Geophysical Union)
Woollard, G. P.
1957 (and Bonini, W. E., and Meyer, R. P.) A seismic refraction study of the
sub.surface geology of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and continental shelf between Virginia and Florida: Tech. Report, contract no. N 7 onr 28512,
Geophysics Section, Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Wisconsin.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 31
APPENDIX I




APPENDIX L DATA ON FLORIDA AND GEORGIA WELLS IN THE REPORT AREA.
No. on the Division Total maps of of Goo, Wel Depth Elevation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fog Name (eet) (feet)
FLORIDA WELLS PROVIDING SUBSURFACE CONTROL USED IN THIS REPORT
ALACHUA COUNTY
1 W.36341 09-001-10004 The Texas Co. I Creighton 3,527 77 DF
(WA&-I 1-19E-16 cc)2
2 W-1465 09-001-10001 Tidewater Assoc. Oil I Cato 3,150 112 DF
(WA&-8S&lSE23-dc)
3 W-1486 09-001-10003 Tidewater Ausoc. Oi1 1 Parker 31220 168 DF
(WAa-7S-19E-33 ad)
4 W-1472 09,001-10002 Tidewater Assoc. Oil I Phlfer 3,228 132 DF
(WAa-9S-21E-24 cb)
BAKER COUNTY
S W-1 500 09003-10002 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Fee 3,349 130 DF t"
(W k-1N-20E-21 ab)
6 W-2187 09-003-10003 Nat'! Turpentine and 1 Fee 3,043 155 DF
(WBk-4S-19E-7 as) Pulpwood Corp.
BRADFORD COUNTY
7 W-1466 09007-10001 Tidewater Assoc. Oil 1 Wiggins 3,167 141 DF
(WBf-6S-20E-1S bd)
CITRUS COUNTY
8 W-7534 09-017-10003 Socony Mobil Oil Co. 1 Camp 4,491 115 DF
(Wa4I7S-18E-12 dc) Phos. Co.
9 W-7534 09-017-10001 Socony Mobil Oil Co. 1 Garby 5,564 13 DF
1(W019S-17E-8 be)
s Acquiieon number. 2This system, which designates the well location, is described in Appendix ML




APPENDIX L Contized
No. on the Division Total ms of of Geo. Wel Depth aeration thi report No. API No. Opertor No. Fee Name (feet) (feet)
10 W-7538 09-017-10002 Socony Mobil Co. 1 Harbond 4,794 22 DF
(WCI-17S-16E.25 bs)
CLAY COUNTY 11 W-1590 09-019-10001 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Foremost 5,862 115 DF 0
(WCy-6S-25E-4 bc) Properties
COLUMBIA COUNTY
12 W-2164 09-023-10006 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 K1e Thing 3,470 117 DF
(WCo4s54F,2)
13 W-1789 09-023-10001 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Cone 4,444 141 DF
(WQC-1N-17E-22 d#) I
14 W-7108 09-023-10009 Michael 1 Ripley 4,078 156 DF
(WCo-4S-1 SB-iS bd)
15 W-1981 09-023-10005 Sun Oil Co. I Bishop 2,828 174 DF
(WCo.4S.17E-10 ob) z
16 W-1915 09-023-10003 San Oil Co. 1 Johnson 3,0S1 87 DF 0
(WCo-4S-16E-27 cb),
17 W-1923 09-023-10004 Sun Oil CO. I Lloyd 2,929 129 DF
(WCo-SS17E-11 ac)
18 W-1832 09-023-10002 Son Oa Co. 1-A Sapp 3,311 138 DF
(WCo-2S.16E-24 bb)
19 W-7163 09-023-10008 Thayer-Dais 1 Ripley S,055 173 DF
(WCo-4S.17E-23 bb)
DIXIE COUNTY
20 W-636 09-029-00001 FI. Oil Development 1 Putnam Lumber 4,780 26 DF
(WDx-1 1S-12E.-7) W
21 W-1114 09-029-10001 Stanolind Oil & Gas Co. 1 Nerpetual Forest 7,510 33 DF
(WDx-11S-l1E-$ as)




APPENDIX I, Continued
No. on the Division Total maps of of ceo. WeU Depth Elevation tis report No, API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet)
22 W,1863 09-029-10003 Sun Oil Co. I-A Crapps 5,104 41 DF
(WDx.8S-I0E-36 ab)
23 W,1405 09-029-10002 Sun Onl Co. I Lanpton 3,671 33 DF
(WDx.8S-14E,$ sc)
FLAGLER COUNTY
24 W-1473 09-035-10002 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. Campbell 4,632 31 DF
(WFg- I S-28E.8 do)
GILCHRIST COUNTY
25 W-1003 09-041-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Adams 3,753 93 DF
(WGr-9S-1 SE-1 S) 0
26 W-1 819 09-041-10002 Sun Oil Co. I Williams 77 DF
(WGr-&S-1 sE-1 2)
HERNANDO COUNTY
27 W-994 09-053-10001 The Ohio Oil Co. I Hernasco 8,477 47 DF
(WHr-23S-I 8E-1 9 a)
JEFFERSON COUNTY
28 W-1854 09-065-10001 Coastal Fetroleum Co. I Lamb 7,913 51 DF
(W!" -2S-3 ]155 bc)
-29 W-19 09-065-00002 Southern States Oil Corp. I Miler & Gossard 3,838 220 DF
(WJf-2N-SE-17)
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
30 W-1 866 09-067-10003 Coastal Petroleum Co. 1 Sapp 3,507 44 DF
(WLf-6S-14E-1 8 de)
31 W-2000 09-067-10004 Gulf Oil Corp. B rooks-Scanlon 4,512 DF
(WL-S-IOE-36 aa) Block 49




APPENDIX L Contimed
No. on the DivMon Total maps of of Geo. well Depth Elevation tJs reort No. API No. Operator No. Fee NIme (feet) (feet)
32 W-1696 09-067-10002 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Henderson 4,235 52 DF
(WLf-4S.IE-20 bb)
33 W-968 09-067-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Crapps 4,133 70 DF
(WLI-6S-12,-25 cb)
LAKE COUNTY 0
34 W-275 09-069-00001 All Florida Land Co. 2 Gulf Exploration Co.6,129 120 DF
(WLk-24S-25E17 dd) > LEVY COUNTY
0
35 W-1537 09-075-10003 Coastal Petroleum Co. 1 Ragl nd 5,850 14 DF z
(WLv-ISS-13E-16 m)
36 W-166 09-075-00004 H1l and Lentjes 2 Cedar Key 4,010 25 DF
(WLv-15S-13-16 da),0
37 W-2012 09-075-10005 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. I Robinson 4,609 56 DF C
(WLv-16S-17E19 bb)
38 W-3342 09-075-10008 Sphynx Syndicate 1 Prudential 3,557 26 DF
(WLv-13S-16E-31 ad)
39 W-1007 09-075-10001 sun Oil Co. 1 Goethe 3,997 34 DF P
(WLV-t'4S-17E-31 ac)
MADISON COUNTY
40 W-2357 09-079-00001 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Gibson 3,380 86 DF
(WMd-1S-11.16 ba)
41 W-1 596 09-079-00002 Hunt Oil Co. 2 Gibson 5,385 107 DF
(WMd- IS-10E-6 Cd)
42 W-1 597 09-079-00003 Hunt Oil Co. 3 Gibson 3,667 89 DF
(WMd-2-1E-18 cc)
43 W-1598 09-079-00004 Hunt Oil Co. 4 Gibson 4,096 73 DF
(WMd-2S-lI i.S bb)




APPENDIX I. Continued
No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo, WeU Depth Elevation this report No, API No, Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet)
MARION COUNTY
44 W.901 09-083-00001 Coden I Lawson 4,334 165 DF
(WMr-13S-20E-2S ab)
45 W-1 8 09-083-00003 Ocala Oil Corp. I York 6,180 77 DF
(WMr-16S-20E.-10 ad)
46 W-1482 09-083-10001 Sun Oil Co. I Camp 4,637 74 DF W
(WMr-16S-23E-16 cb)
47 W-1 904 09-083-10002 Sun Oil Co. 1 Parker 3,845 79 DF
(WMr-14S-22E-24 bd)
NASSAU COUNTY 0 48 W-336 09-089-00001 St. Marys River Oil Corp. I HXiard 4,824 110 DF
(WNa-4N-24E-19 ad) LI
ORANGE COUNTY 0 49 W-3673 09095-10001 Warren Petroleum Corp. 1 Terry 6,589 100 DF
(WOr-23S.31E-21 cd)
PUmNAM COUNTY
so W-1514 09-107-10001 Sun Oil Co. I-A Roberts 3,328 206 DF
(WPu-9S-25E-19 am)
51 W-1838 09-107-10002 Sun Oil CO. I Westbury 3,892 32 DF
(WPu-11S-26E-37)
SUWANNEE COUNTY
52 W-2255 09-121-10005 Fields and Randall I Crawley 3,840 118 DF
(WSw-2S-13E-6 cc) Drilling Co.
53 W-2784 09-121-10007 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Taylor 3,684 110 DF
(WSw-3S-13E-25 cb)




APPENDIX L Contimued
No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo. Well Depth Eleation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet)
54 W-1 827 09-121-10003 McCobd I-B Starling 3,80 90 DF
(WSw-3S-12E-28 aa)
$$ W-1450 09-121-10001 Sun Oil Co. I Odom 3,161 73 DF
(WSw-SS-SE-31 bb)
56 W-1924 09-121-10004 Sun Oil Co. 1 Russell 3,139 96 DF z
(WSw-S-I SE-S bb)
57 W-1 548 09-121-10002 Sun Oil Co. 1 TMos 3,572 162 DF I
(WSw-2S-1 $E-28 dc)
TAYLOR COUNTY 58 W-2106 09-123-10003 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Broobs-Scanlon 5,243 96 DF z
(Wry-4S-9E-1s dd) block 33 0
59 W-2161 09-123-10004 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Brooka-Scanlon 4,877 67 DF
(WTy-6S-9E-17 bd) block 37
60 W-2099 09-123-10002 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Brooks-Scanlon 5,517 41 DF
(WTy-S-9E-9) block 42
61 W-1 877 09-123-10001 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. I Hodges 6,254 36 DF
(WTy-SS-6E-12 bb)
62 W-650S 09-123-10006 Mattaliano 2-A Buckeye Cellulose 4,150 14 DF P
(WTy-4S-4E-11 ad)
VOLUSIA COUNTY
63 W-1746A 09-127-10002 Grace Drilling Co. 1 Retail Lumber Co. 5,425 44 DF
(WVo-1 5S-30E-2 ab)
64 W-1118 09-127-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Powell Land C. 5,958 48 DF
(WVo-17S-31E-11 cc)
-.1




APPENDIX 1, Continude lNo, on the Division Total maps of of Ge, Well Depth Elevation this report No, API No, Operator No, Fee Name (feet) (feet)
FLORIDA WELLS OMITTED FROM ORIGINAL LISTING LAFAYETTE COUNTY(lop not released for publication as of August 15, 1967) 93 W-7440 09.067.1000S Jett-Phillips 1 Buckeye Cellulose et al OFFSHORE CITRUS COUNTY (permit not drilled as of August 1, 1967) 94 W- Mobil 1 St. Lease 224-A to
(wci-offshore) Form A OFFSHORE LEVY COUNTY (permit not drilled as of August 15, 1967) 95 We Mobl 1 St. Lease 224-A
(WLv-offshore) Form B GEORGIA WELLS PROVIDING SUBSURFACE CONTROL USED IN THIS REPORT ATKINSON COUNTY 65 W-887 Sun Oil Co. 1 Doster and Ladson 4,282 222 BROOKS COUNTY
66 W-1888 Hughes I-B Rogers 3,850 133
CAMDEN COUNTY
67 W-1 732 The California Co. 1 Bule 4,969 65
CHARLTON COUNTY
68 South Penn Oil Co. 1 Mizell 4,579 3S
CLINCH COUNTY
69 W-1757 Sun Oil Co. 1 Barlow 4,232 177




APPENDIX L Continued
No. on the Division Total maps of of Goo. Wel Depth Elevation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet)
COLQUITT COUNTY
70 W-1814 Arrington 1 Adams 4,910 270 ?
ECHOLS COUNTY
71 W-1603 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Superior 3,850 181 Pine Products
72 W-1600 Hunt Oil Co. 3 Superior 4,000 144 Pine Products
73 W-2109 Hunt Oil Co. 4 Superior 3,913 155
Pine Products 0
z
GLYNN COUNTY 74 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 2 Union Bag 4,642
75 La Rue 1 Massey 4,615 0
LIBERTY COUNTY
76 La Rue 1 Jelks-Rodgers 4,264 26
MITCHELL COUNTY 0 77 Stanolind Oil and Gas Co. 1 Pullen 7,490 338
WAYNE COUNTY
78 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Union Bag 4,551
OTHER GEORGIA WELLS IN THE MAP AREA APPLING COUNTY
79 WGI-474 Felsenthal-Weatherford 1 Bradley 4,098 231 ?
'.0




APPENDIX L Contimod
No, on the Division Total map of of Gec, Well Depth lvmtlon this report No. API No. Operator No, Fee Name (feet) (feet) BRANTLEY COUNTY
so Humble 00 and Ref. Co, I Hellemn 4,512
CLINCH COUNTY
81 W-3982 Ba lard I-A Timber 4,232 213 Products Co.
82 Drady-Belcher at a1 1 Griffis 4,588 1107
83 WGI-541 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Musgrove 4,088 148 84 W-1638 Hunt Oil Co. 2 Musgrove 3,410 171
COFFEE COUNTY
85 Carpenter Oil Co. I Knight 4,151
CRISP COUNTY
86 Kerr-McGee Oil 1 Pate 5,010 364
ECHOLS COUNTY
87 W-21 10 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Bennett & Lan dle4,182 179 88 W-1 599 Hunt Oil Co. 2 Superior 4,066 142 ?
Pine Products
GLYNN COUNTY
89 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 McDonald 4,740 23
PIERCE COUNTY
90 Hlnton-Clark 1 Adams-McCasidll 4,355' 75 ?
91 Pan Am. Pet. Corp. 1 Adarns-McCaskill 4,315 75 ?
WAYNE COUNTY
92 Calco 1 Brunswick Peninsula4,625 73




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 41
APPENDIX II




42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
BUREAU OF GEOLOGY WELL AND LOCALITY DESIGNATION SYSTEM The locality and well numbering system is based on the location of the locality or well, and uses the rectangular system of section, township, and range for identification. The number consists of five parts. These are: 1) a prefix of three letters designating L for locality or W for well and county abbreviation, 2) the quarter/quarter location within the section, 3) the section, 4) the township, and 5) the range.
The basic rectangle is the township which is 6 miles square. It is consecutively measured by tiers both north and south of the Florida base line-an east-west line that passes through Tallahassee. This basic rectangle is also consecutively measured both east and west of the principal meridian-a north-south line that passes through Tallahassee. In recording the township and range numbers, the T is left off the township numbers, and the R is left off the range numbers. Each township is divided equally into 36 square miles called sections, and are numbered I through 36 as shown on the attached diagram.
The sections are divided into quarters with the quarters labeled "a" through "d" as shown on diagram. In turn, each of these quarters is divided into quarters with these quarter/quarter squares labeled "a" through "d" in the same manner. The "a" through "d" designation of quarters may be carried to any extent deemed useful.
The location of the well WLn-2N-2E-21 db shown on the diagram would be in the center of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 21, township 2 north, range 2 east.
When there is more than one well or locality in a square 40-acre tract (quarter/quarter section) they are identified by either an additional quarter designation or by a sixth arbitrary accession number at the end of the range unit. The abbreviations used for counties are: Alachua Aa Escambia Es Baker Bk Flagler Fg Bay By Franklin Fk Bradford Bf Gadsden Ga &rev. d Bv Gilchrist Gr Broward Bw Glades GI Calhoun Cn Gulf Gf Charlotte Ch Hamilton Hn Ctrus Ci Hardee Hd Clay Cy Hendry Hy Collier Cr Hernando Hr Columbia Co Highlands Hi Dade Dd Hillsborough I DeSoto Ds Holmes Ho Dixie Dx Indian River Ir Duval Iu Jackson Jk




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 43
Jefferson Jf Pasco Ps Lafayette Lf Pinellas Pi Lake Lk Polk Po Lee Le Putnam Pu Leon Ln St. Johns Sj Levy Lv St. Lucie SI Liberty Lb Santa Rosa Sr Madison Md Sarasota Sa Manatee Mn Seminole Se Marion Mr Sumter Sm Martin Mt Suwannee Sw Monroe Mo Taylor Ty Nassau Na Union Un Okaloosa Oa Volusia Vo Okeechobee Oe Wakulla Wk Orange Or Walton W1 Osceola Os Washington Ws Palm Beach Pb




44 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY
R 2 E
6 5 4 3 2 ,aIb a .....-- ........
It 17 16 15 14 13 C d
2
19 20 21 22 23 24
Division of a section into quarters of approx. 160 N 30 29 28 27 26 25 acres and division of a quarter section Into quarters of approx. 40 31 32 33 34 35 36 acres.
SECTIONIZED TOWNSHIP
NOTE:
A well in Leon CountyTownship 2 North,
Range 2 East, Section 21, located in the
center of the southeast quarter of the
northeast quarter would be designated
thus:
WLn-2N-2E-21 db







Full Text

PAGE 1

STATE OF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Robert O. Vernon, Director INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 GEOLOGY OF THE UPPER CRETACEOUS CLASTIC SECTION NORTHERN PENINSULAR FLORIDA By Clarence Babcock TALLAHASSEE 1969

PAGE 2

Completed manuscript received November 4, 1968 Printed by the Division of Geology Florida Board of Conservation Tallahassee B

PAGE 3

PREFACE The lower sediments of the Upper Cretaceous section of northern peninsular Floridaconsist predominantly of sands and shales. These sediments are present over most of southern Georgia and peninsular Florida. The sands have good porosities and probably would form good oil reservoirs; the shales are dark and appear to have high organic content that could have made them sources of petroleum. The penetration by wells in the area is considered to be insufficient to condemn the land area as a petroleum prospect, and the adjacent ocean bottoms hold even greater promise. The report presents a number of geologic cross sections and maps upon which broad interpretations of correlations, stratigraphy and regional structures are based. The Upper Cretaceous clastic section of the Atkinson Formation is shown to pinch-out upon the underlying Lower Cretaceous sediments elevated along the Peninsular arch. Younger, less permeable sediments overlap the Upper Cretaceous clastics. A basal sand in the Austin interval, which the Applins (1967, p. 19) referred to as the "chalky sandstone facies in the lower part of the unit of Austin age," is described and named the LaCrosse Sandstone. iii

PAGE 4

-F ir -·-·.d C

PAGE 5

CONTENTS Page Preface ................................... iii Introduction ............................... 1 Purposes of report and method of study ..................1 Acknowledgements .......................... 1 Upper Cretaceous (Gulf) Series ........................ 1 La Crosse Sandstone ................... ... ... .1 Stratigraphy ...........................2 Description .........................2 Lithology ........................2 Thickness and extent. .................5 Overlying rock ..... ... .. .. ..... .. ... 5 Underlying rock ..... ........... .. 5 Age ..........................5 Source rock ...................... .. 7 Discussion ........................... 7 Structure .............................7 Atkinson Formation ...........................7 Stratigraphy ............................7 Previous work ..... .... ... .. .. ...... ...7 Florida .........................11 Georgia .................... ......... 12 Usageinthisreport ...................... 12 Criteria for recognizing the top of the Atkinson Formation ...13 Criteria for recognizing the top of the basal sand unit, Atkinson Formation ................... 13 Criteria for recognizing the sediment underlying the Atkinson Formation .................. .20 The Lower Cretaceous section .. ...........20 An oolitic limestone facies of Upper Cretaceous Age ....20 Paleozoic rocks ................... 22 Structure ..........................22 Bibliography ...............................27 Appendices ................................ I. Data on Florida and Georgia wells in the report area ........ .. ....31 II. Bureau of Geology well and locality designation system .......... 41 ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1 Outline of the report area ........................ 2 2 Electric-lithologic log representing the type section for the La Crosse Sandstone, Tidewater, No. 1 Parker well (Sec. 33-T7S-R19E, Alachua County) ......3 3 Isopach of the La Crosse Sandstone .................. 6 4 Stratigraphic-structural cross section (A-A) of Upper Cretaceous strata, Dixie County to Suwannee County .................Facing p. 6 5 Stratigraphic-structural cross section (B-B) of Upper Cretaceous strata, southern Suwannee County and Columbia County .............. Facing p. 6 6 Stratigraphic-structural cross section (C-C) of Upper Cretaceous strata, northern Suwannee County and Columbia County .............Facing p. 6 7 Up-gradient limits of the mapped units of the Atkinson Formation, and of Lower Cretaceous beds .. ..... .. ... ...... ..... ... .. 8 V

PAGE 6

ILLUSTRATIONS, continued Figure Page 8 Corelations of the Atkinson Formation, and of the La Crosse Sandstone, northern peninsular Florida ...............* * * 9 9 Structure map on top of the LaCrosse Sandstone .............10 10 Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Tillis well, Suwannee County ...... 14 11 Electric-lithologic section, Gulf, No. 1 Brooks-Scanlon, Block 33 well, Taylor County .. ................... ........ .15 12 Electric-lithologic section, Coastal, No. 1 Ragland well, Levy County ..... .16 13 Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Camp well, Marion County ....... .17 14 Cored sections, basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation .......... 18 15 Isopach of the basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation .......... 19 16 First fithology indicative of the Lower Cretaceous section .......... 21 17 Structure map on top of the Atkinson Formation .............. 23 18 Structure map on top of the basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation .... 24 19 Structure map on top of the Lower Cretaceous section ........... .25 20 Structure map on top of Paleozoic rocks ................. .26 vi

PAGE 7

GEOLOGY OF THE UPPER CRETACEOUS CLASTIC SECTION NORTHERN PENINSULAR FLORIDA Clarence Babcock INTRODUCTION The report area, figure 1, encompasses 29 counties and approximately 20,000 square miles in northern peninsular Florida, and about 15,000 square miles in southern Georgia. Georgia is included to show the relationship of the geology in adjoining area to that of northern Florida. There is relatively little relief in the area, and the maximum elevation is only about 175 feet. The area is traversed by many streams. It is bounded on the west by the Gulf of Mexico, the western boundary of Jefferson County, and generally longitude 84 degrees west; on the east by the Atlantic Ocean; and on the north by the approximate northern limit of the shallow-water marine facies of the Atkinson Formation (the Applins, 1947, map No. 5). To the south the study area extends to the southern boundaries of Pasco, Sumter, Lake, and Orange counties; thus the main part of the Peninsular arch is included within the geologic setting. PURPOSES OF REPORT AND METHOD OF STUDY The primary purposes of this report are: 1) to describe a new formation for which the name the LaCrosse Sandstone is suggested, 2) to map, and briefly describe for the report area, the lithologic units of the Atkinson Formation, and the uppermost beds of the underlying Lower Cretaceous section. In this study, lithologic and other geologic data were obtained by examining well cuttings, cores and electric logs from 78 selected wells. The locations and data on these wells are shown on the figures of this report, and in appendix 1, respectively. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writer is indebted to personnel of the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, for stimulating discussions, data, review of the manuscript, proof of copy and preparation of illustrations. UPPER CRETACEOUS (GULF) SERIES LA CROSSE SANDSTONE The sandstone unit for which the name the La Crosse Sandstone is suggested was described by the Applins in 1967 in text (p. 19, including table 4), and by an isopach map (plate 4 B). The Southeastern Geological Society cross sections (1949) showed sand in the lower part of an undifferentiated section of Austin Age, and logs in the open file of the Bureau of Geology contain descriptions of this unit.

PAGE 8

2 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY I S(Approximate) known underground distribution of shallow-water marine facies of upper member of Atkinson formation (the Applins, S1947, Map No.5\ IO GIA ATLANTIC GULF ORA GE MEXICO PAScO OCEAN g^AREA OF REPORT Figure 1. Outline of the report area. The unit is formally named in the present report primarily because of its significance in clarifying the correlation of the lower part of the Upper Cretaceous section, and in some wells the unit has good reservoir characteristics. The type well for this unit is the Tidewater, No. 1 Parker test, located in Sec. 33-T7S-R19E, Alachua County; figure 2 is an electric-lithologic log of this well. STRATIGRAPHY Description Lithology This description is from cores of the type well. A short section of the rocks overlying and underlying the La Crosse Sandstone has been included in the description.

PAGE 9

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 3 LITEA 7-' --.----TEaa -1 _ _, -A 0o -."-. ., i WHITE 1 L0T LIHT TAN ------IU LIGHT: AN _ :J i : ! i EIGHTTN T MdriSO :T T ......... 3u 3 T7R19E A lach u: _ _-. I A IR i K ~_ __ 0 PC LEA ^^=^ 3172 ==L= CLEAR T[IO LITHOLOGY LIGHT I SHALE CHALK -M Very MICACEOUS _SANDSTONE Fine MARL ['MMICACEOUS "CORED-r >REDDISH [ MI oderateyMSOFT II H I HARD LITHOLOGY _ I R 1 REDDISH | ModeratelySOFT Figure 2. Electric-lithologic log representing the type section for the La Crosse Sandstone, Tidewater, No. 1 Parker well (Sec. 33-T7S-R19E, Alachua County).

PAGE 10

4 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY UPPER CRETACEOUS -AUSTIN CHALK 2860 2870 Chalk, white, slightly sandy, soft. 2870 2877 Marl, light tan, slightly sandy, medium soft. 2877 2880 Chalk, white, soft. 2880 2890 Chalk, white, slightly sandy, soft. UPPER CRETACEOUS -LA CROSSE SANDSTONE 2890 2920 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, very calcareous, soft. 2920 2930 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 2930 2945 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, very calcareous, soft. 2945 2950 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 2950 2980 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 2980 2990 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 2990 3030 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 3030 3060 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3060 3070 Sandstone, light tan, quartz, medium grained, medium hard. 3070 3095 Sandstone, clear, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3095 3100 Shale, olive green, fissile, soft. 3100 3110 Sandstone, tan, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3110 3120 Sandstone, tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 3120 3130 Sandstone, white, quartz, fine grained, very calcareous, soft. 3130 3140 Sandstone, clear, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3140 3150 Sandstone, white, quartz, fine grained, medium hard. 3150 3155 Sandstone, clear, quartz, medium grained, very hard. 3155 3160 Sandstone, tan, quartz, fine grained, soft. 3160 3163 Sandstone, brown, quartz, fine grained, micaceous, soft. UPPER CRETACEOUS -POSSIBLE ATKINSON FORMATION 3163 3170 Shale, gray, non-calcareous, medium soft, slightly sandy. 3170 3172 Shale, light gray, fissile, micaceous. Sediments that are typical of the La Crosse Sandstone were penetrated by 14 wells. Also, a slightly less typical accumulation of the unit was recognized in two wells located east and west, respectively, and downgradient of the main body of the formation. These two tests are the Gulf, No. 1 Kie Vining well, in west central Columbia County, and the National Turpentine, No. 1 Fee well, in the southwestern corner of Baker County. In these wells the La Crosse Sandstone is pale yellowish brown to very pale orange in color, and it is more calcareous, as well as generally more uniformly fine-grained, than it was in the type well. Finally, a sandstone that is of very pale orange color, and much less calcareous than is the sandstone of the type well, was penetrated by the Sun, No. 1 Williams Brothers well in northern Gilchrist County and by the Sun, No. 1 Odom well in southeastern Suwannee County; this sand is assigned to the LaCrosse Sandstone.

PAGE 11

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 5 Thickness and Extent This unit, which the isopach map of figure 3 shows to have a maximum thickness of 273 feet, occurs in the central part of northern Florida, where it is concentrated high on the western flank of the Peninsular arch. The La Crosse Sandstone thins in all directions away from the center of deposition, and it is overlapped by younger sediments. Overlying Rock The rock overlying the La Crosse Sandstone is of Austin Age, and in the type well it is chalk, as it is in most wells in the report area; but in some wells this overlying rock is marl, sandy limestone, or very calcareous shale, as revealed by the stratigraphic-structural cross sections of figures 4, 5, and 6. Underlying Rock In the type well the rock underlying the La Crosse Sandstone is light brown, sandy shale which questionably belongs in the Atkinson Formation. In most other wells the underlying rock has been assigned to the Atkinson Formation, and it is typically a gray, calcareous, "poker-chip" shale, which is often micaceous. Two tests located near the axis of the Peninsular arch found the La Crosse Sandstone underlain by Paleozoic rock. These wells are: Depth (and Description of sub-sea depth) Well Paleozoic rocks in feet Reference Nat'l. Turpentine Sandstone, white 3040 Bridge and No. 1 Fee and locally red (-2885) Berdan, 1950 Sun Oil Co. Quartzitic sand2813 Applin, Paul L. No. 1 Bishop stone and shale (-2639) 1951, p, 23 Age The Applins (1967, p. 20) reported that a core of this unit from the National Turpentine, No. 1 Fee Well, located in southwestern Baker County, contained specimens of Pseudofrondicularia lanceola (Reuss) var. bidentata (Cushman) which, they state, has not been reported from beds older than Austin Age. The assignment of -the La Crosse Sandstone to an Austin Age is generally substantiated by electric log and sample correlations which indicate that the unit is the stratigraphic equivalent of a gray marl or chalk section of Austin Age. The stratigraphic-structural cross section C-C (fig. 6), however, shows that the lower part of the La Crosse Sandstone in the Gulf, No. 1 Kie Vining well is the stratigraphic equivalent of sediments of the Atkinson Formation in the Sun, No. 1 Tillis well which are included in the Eagle Ford microfaunal zone by the Southeastern Geological Society (1949, cross section D-D').

PAGE 12

6 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY LON L d rt .)'Y M\ ~ ~ Y LAC4199 I J /MCINTOSII II, 4"'" jj ~o \, CAMSCSa 3.550MAR I I ! CS*MIDEN 1 '4 -s LOW CUR03 5 09 cc 0 ~ r , *r I6 ¾4F'I2 1 1u rl4*H* ?r i E so. IT ana r 4 r C, -. £YTt3 T.J54 DS 3% CLAY S TAIOR OLOIIk#3 N, -00O4. CY1 3 I' Ii A. I 1*C 13 37 ORAWR C. iARI i-N LIPLANIWN 0su ANT m9wk~ww0bot) C If1*s PCSCJ* FontCagu 3 iIso10c of: the L o Sandstone. t-lF-Wwr 3. Isopach of the la Crosm Sandstone-

PAGE 13

1 2 3 4 5 ij z SUN SUN COASTAL SUN SUN _ _l -No.l-A Crapps No.1 Crapps No.1 Sapp No.1 Odom No.1 Russell : < D.F.Elev.41' D.F. Elev.70' D.F. Elev. 44' D.F. Elev. 73' D.F. Elev. 96' .-1 tn :3 ~^~^18 Miles 7 Miless 7 ---7 Miles --4 Miles --4 -M SSea level less 1900 C C) LA CROSSE ESANDSTONE < < Cretaceous T.0.3139 STNIT C TA D-514CHALK MARL REDDISH HARD DIXIE .S. D 1 T.D. 3507 LOCATION ofC CROSS SE A oi U Figr 4CArLCILUTITEM s tETAMORPHIC__ of CtORcEDeo s.a.taMETAO RIC ,-FI--3CALLCRENITEIQUARTZITIC SANDSONE LAFYETTE 0! T.S. HL7 --IsH A'E CALCAREOUS I,GLAUCONITIC [-so ....F:::::SANoSTONE DOLOMITE M' MICACEOUS -Moderotely SOFT LCR IS' i T. D. 5104 CHALK M ARL R--REDDISH EIHARD DIXIE Figure 4. Stratigraphic-structural cross section (A-A') of Upper Cretaceous strata, Dixie County to Suwannee-County.

PAGE 14

SUN No.1 Bishop MICHAELS O D.F. Elevation 74' No.1 Ripley S SUN SUN D.F. Elevation 57' i No.1 Russell No.1 Johnson ,je ---->, 3 =D.F.Elevation 96' D.F.Elevation 87' ,,.-7-O 7 --B \ --|V S -es L C less 2150 ---tP -41-4--r -L IT.ID. 2827 ISHALE i ~cALCLUTITE | jGLAUCONITIC 1LLOCATION of CROSS SECTIONCOSS TD3 3.UI .E l M D -xiE C ! I I TSANDSTONE | ALCARENITE| R IREDDISH L---ModeratelySOFT I" CALCAREOUS F-T METAMORPHIC HARD Figure 5. Stratigraphic-structural cross section (B-B') of Upper Cretaceous strata, southern Suwannee County and Columbia County.

PAGE 15

Z FIELDS and RANDALL SUN GULF SUN .No.1 Crawley No.1 Tillis No.1 Kie Vining No.1 Bishop (n) D.F. Elevation 118' D.F. Elevation 162' D.F.Elevationll7' D.F. Elevation 174' 15 Miles I Miles II Miles 4 -... --__ = , -----------------------P, SSEA LEVNEL7 0 less 2000' o p S 0 , p E U-2 C U -L HA T. D 470OATONEC SCO CMANCHE .D.3572 SILFAYETTE T CALCILUTITE LIGNITIC LLOCATION of CROSS SECTION

PAGE 16

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 7 Source Rock The La Crosse Sandstone is an isolated unit. It may have been derived from Paleozoic and perhaps Lower Cretaceous 'outcrops exposed during the time it was deposited, as indicated by figures 3 and 7. Possibly, also, transport of material from these older beds through a depositional interface (Krumbein and Sloss, 195, p. 5) may have contributed to the accumulation of the La Crosse Sandstone. DISCUSSION It will be noted in the correlation chart of figure 8 that the La Crosse Sandstone is the stratigraphic equivalent of either the entire interval of the Eutaw Formation, as depicted in the Alabama surface section, or the upper part of that formation, as shown on the subsurface section for Mississippi and Alabama. However, the La Crosse Sandstone is lithologically different from the Eutaw Formation, the approximate southeastern limit of which is in southwestern-Alabama (the Applins, 1947, map No. 1). Certainly the lithologic character of the La Crosse Sandstone differs from that of the Eutaw Formation in that this northern Florida unit is composed of uniformly fine quartz grains, and it is predominantly light tan to very pale orange in color, calcareous, soft, rarely fossiliferous, and almost entirely without shale associations in most wells. The Eutaw Formation, on the other hand, is described by Monroe, Conant and Eargle (1946, p. 207-210) as sandstone which is gray and reddish tan, cross-bedded, highly glauconitic, carbonaceous, macrofossiliferous, and with disseminated clay and clay laminae. Sharks teeth are present in the Eutaw Formation, especially in its upper (Tombigbee) member, and locally in a basal member. STRUCTURE The top of the La Crosse Sandstone is contoured on figure 9. UPPER CRETACEOUS (GULF) SERIES ATKINSON FORMATION STRATIGRAPHY PREVIOUS WORK A comparison of the members and faunal zones into which the Atkinson Formation of northern Florida, southern Alabama, and southern Georgia has been divided by different authors, and the relationship of the formation to stratigraphically equivalent units in bordering areas, are presented in the correlation chart of figure 8.

PAGE 17

8 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY -1--, -. ." / I S... ."LAI M A-A Ei +H j . A7 j -A. i £X L O .. _. 8 ' S82 clman on ,-. i i ( ,^,, ', y i -" ^ --. \ ' .-j Ji S^_i ""^ , Fu .ri units o F a o "4SEA c.o'I L ! C _ retaeu be d.i .i t DUVA iow it eo .eds CL. i .INS r ^^ffALAGL EEll ^^ -"~I _reto .EAXI bed ^^--tU --^ -^-5--LTj ^^«.owe Creacou beds. ^ -iS l

PAGE 18

ALABAMA MISSISSIPPI and ALABAMA SOUTHERN ALABAMA SOUTHEAST ALABAMA SOUTHEASTERN (Surface Section) MISSISSIPPI GEOLOGICAL SOUTHERN GEORGIA SOUTH GEORGIA GULF REGIOND ONROECONANTand EARGLE SOIETY and and (Subsurface) NORTH FLORIDA NORTHEATTEXAS E P-RETAEOS CRETACEOUS COMMITTEE NORTH FLORIDA FLORIDA (Subsurface) Esther R.Appln, 1955 (Suburface) (Surface Section) STRGRAPHYof WESTERN and AuLABAMA,AAaG.ULLETIN (Subsurface) (Subsurface) SOUTHEASTERN GEOLOGICAL SOUTHERN GEORGIand PRESENT REPORT SOCIETY IDA VOL.30, pp.187-212,1946 CHART,FEBRUARY,1946 The APPLINS,1947 1949 The 0.1?67 AUSTIN CHALK SELMA GROUP w UPDOWN nd (LOWER PRT) MOOREVILLE z DIP DIP and (LOWER PART) 0 !w < ° EQUIVALENT EUTAW POiRATINi I U EUT, EUTAWFORMATION § V NT EUTAW FORMATION UPPER EUTAW i .ACROSSNDS ORMATION FORMATION UPPER EUTAW INW.CENTRALALA oI m 4 LA CROSSE SANDSTONE MoSHAN .LOWER FORMATION j EUTAW § S -o -0-I. 0 U 0 a Z 4 w4 cE G ORDO UPPER v 4 a 4 a ,r U. ,< SMIEALE z , , , T TUSCALOOSA u , I a-.. « 4I-EOLINE 0TN 13 MARINE BEDS 1 ' 1 N w, FORMATION CO DAE LOER In W FORIDA motly oarer 16 n cc w ,s u FORMATION c L Y t S MIDDLE j , < t J 0 5. FORMATN TUSCALOOSA d L TORAL al , wI t MAA / LIminor shale ?r S FACIES slt strng era LWER CRETACEUS PALEOZOIC ROCKS COMANCHEAN LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS EoLINC O |MARINE BEDS w )FORMATIUnd eren ated Undiffrentatd) (Un dfferenti atd) WOOfBIN E |MARINS FACIE8 Y * BASAL IAND UNIT LOWER Sz w I (mostly coa"rsI FORMATION TUSCALOOSA A I /IL. I X TTORAL J m e sltholccr FACIES Si _____ »"«lt strlngs rs) LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS LOWER CRETACEOUS PALEOZOIC ROCKS COMANCHEAN LOWER C A ER CRETACEOUS The APPLINS,Figure 8. Correlations of the Atkinson Formation, and of the La Crosse Sandstone, northern peninsular Florida.

PAGE 19

10 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY 4"~~~ .\l*1i/r 1i* I' LI £1.0'. qP~ f~l' ) I LOW iv: i I A W ý '00Ay., LjNMý!IMT0SN -,.mTmI \5P!NTLEY 'L .J5 i 4. #2 4o;4r 7 IkL.,.t >Ii; 293 RO UlORO Id~r '' 9Oma 4r.C 41120 IJ rLALE ~aCA~aMO~5E* 3 __ 5 6 AU A coo% T-o ale, INAI Ap0LUSIAo3 ECHOLS 9f i 4~~*1·CWIILT2 i sT~ 4ý " -53 -274 4 1 AL ;-~r 4 7. a, 314 655 .1A RZB 28 -73 TJON 's1' 1 1 22 -29 2994 5 51 1 4I** "'"~; tALACHUA9 .co~25L ýa %-cx OF i -A 3 1 4 s s 6 1 12 2 2 2 2 'SR il~ i : riic13 36 V~OLUSIA I LE mL~nA~-CITRUS 0 j ~rrr l ~i(7 / /I I L KE !Zl~ 279 Fw-mr 9. structure map on top of the La Crosoe Sandstone.

PAGE 20

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 11 Florida Paul L. Applin and Esther R. Applin (1947) named the Atkinson Formation, and showed it to be roughly the equivalent of the Tuscaloosa Group and McShan Formation of Alabama. As proposed by the Applins in 1947, the Atkinson Formation consisted of three members. The upper member, "...(contains) three depositional facies...which in down-dip wells merge vertically and laterally into each other. These are 1) a littoral or possibly nonmarine unfossiliferous facies characterized by red shales, poorly sorted sand, and some gravel; 2) A shallow-water marine facies composed chiefly of sand with lesser amounts of greenish-gray shale and containing fragments of molluscan shells; 3) a deeper water marine facies composed chiefly of dark-green flaky shale with some fine-grained sandstone, and containing, in addition to fragments of macrofossils, a microfauna which is closely similar to that of the Eagle Ford shale of Texas." The middle member, "...was evidently deposited in a rather shallow-water marine environment and contains a sparse but diagnostic microfauna of arenaceous foraminifera that is related to the microfauna of the outcropping Woodbine formation of Texas. Lithologically the member is composed chiefly of dark-gray to greenish-gray flaky shale and dark brownish-gray to black splintery shale with some irregular lenses of white speckled shale. The shale is usually micaceous (biotite and muscovite), carbonaceous, silty and glauconitic." The lower member, "...is generally an unfossiliferous littoral or nonmarine deposit..that gradually merges with an equivalent marine facies in which scattered lenses of shale contain arenaceous species common in the microfauna of the overlying middle Atkinson." The Southeastern Geological Society (1949) published four cross sections which included 16 northern Florida wells that were located in the area of the present report, and in which the Atkinson Formation was divided into the Eagle Ford and Woodbine microfaunal zones, rather than the three members designated by the Applins in 1947. Some of these zonal determinations were used in the present report. Vernon (1951, fig. 16) followed the zonal divisions used by the Southeastern Geological Society, but separated the two zones into shale and sand units; five wells used in his report are included in this study. Esther R. Applin (1955, p. 187), in order "To clarify the correlation of the Atkinson Formation of the subsurface in the Southeastern gulf region with the Eagle Ford and Woodbine formations of Texas," redefined the Atkinson Formations "to consist of two members, an upper member of Eagle Ford age as formerly used, and a lower member of Woodbine age consisting of the former lower and middle members."

PAGE 21

12 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY The Applins (1965, plate 10) published a cross section which shows for several wells the depths from which diagnostic Woodbine fossils occurred in an oolitic limestone facies which they describe, and which occurs in the lower part of their lower member of the Atkinson Formation; they also show depths at which a Washita fossil was found in rock which underlies the Upper Cretaceous sequence. Four of the wells on this cross section are included in the present report area. Other figures presented by the Applins in their 1965 report which pertain to the present study area included 1) a structural cross section showing the top of the Atkinson Formation, and of the Lower Cretaceous section, in three wells (plate 9, cross section Y-Y), 2) a structural stratigraphic section depicting the Applins' lower member of the Atkinson Formation, and the Lower Cretaceous section, in two wells (plate 6, cross section V-V), and 3) a map showing the approximate areal distribution of the lithofacies of the basal part of the lower member of the Atkinson Formation (1965, fig. 45, p. 67). Maher (1965, plates 2 and 8) published two cross sections that contained five wells located in the area of this study. The Applins (1967, plate 7) published two cross sections showing 13 wells located in the area of the present report in which the Atkinson Formation was divided into an upper and lower member as redefined by Esther R. Applin (1955, p. 187). Also, the Applins' report (plate 3) presented maps showing the areal distribution of the various lithofacies within their upper and lower members, respectively, and the thicknesses of each of these members. Georgia Authors who have published on the stratigraphy of the southern Georgia area included in this report are: the Applins (1944; 1947; 1967), the Mesozoic Committee of the Southeastern Geological Society (1949), Hurst (1960), Herrick (1961), Hull (1962), Herrick and Vorhis (1963), and Maher (1965). USAGE IN THIS REPORT In the area of study the Atkinson Formation is composed essentially of shale, shaly sand, or shaly limestone in the upper part, and sand with minor shale stringers in the lower portion. Thus, on the basis of predominant rock character, the formation roughly divides into a shaly unit, and a basal sand unit, as shown on the correlation chart of figure 8. Assignment of the upper sediments of the Atkinson Formation to an Eagle Ford Age, and the lower sediments to a Woodbine Age, was accomplished by the Southeastern Geological Society (1949)in 16 Florida wells, by Vernon (1951) in 5 wells, and by the Applins (1965;1967) in 6 and 13 wells, respectively. The upper shaly unit of the present report, which is mostly of Eagle Ford Age as determined in the previous reports, includes an interval at its base of from 11 to 159 feet of sediments that were included in the Woodbine zone by the earlier

PAGE 22

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 13 workers. For example, in the Sun, No. 1 Tillis well, as depicted in figures 6 and 10, the upper shaly unit and the basal sand unit of the present study are separated at a depth of 3,260 feet, whereas the Southeastern Geological Society places the upper boundary of the Woodbine microfaunal zone at 3,240 feet, which is 20 feet into the upper shaly unit as used in the present report. Separations of the Atkinson Formation into the shaly unit and the basal sand unit in relatively difficult up-gradient areas is shown in figures 4, 5 and 6. Figures 10, 11, 12 and 13 illustrate lithologic separations for four down-gradient areas which are widely spaced, and within each of which local correlations are fairly clear. Criteria For Recognizing The Top of the Atkinson Formation For most of the report area the shaly lithology of the upper part (shaly unit) of the Atkinson Formation is overlain by chalk, or marl, of Austin Age. The contact between these distinctive lithologies is easy to recognize in cores or well cuttings, or on electric logs. -In up-gradient wells located high on the western flank of the Peninsular arch, however, the La Crosse Sandstone (fig. 3) overlies the Atkinson Formation. The La Crosse Sandstone is predominantly composed of quite uniform fine quartz grains, and is light tan to very pale orange in color, calcareous, soft, rarely fossiliferous, and almost entirely without shale associations in most wells. There is a marked contrast, easily recognized in cores and well cuttings, between this sandstone and the Atkinson Formation, which consists of shale and sand which often is micaceous, glauconitic and phosphoritic, and in which the sandstones commonly are of non-uniform grain size. Criteria For Recognizing The Top of the Basal Sand Unit, Atkinson Formation As shown in figure 14, the lower part of the Atkinson Formation is a quartz sandstone, fine to coarse grained, poorly sorted, soft and typically glauconitic, phosphoritic and micaceous. Minor shale, silt and limestone stringers are present. Figure 15 shows that the sand ranges from zero to 379 feet in thickness. The eastern limit of this basal sand unit is in the southeastern part of the study area. Beyond this line the stratigraphic equivalent of the unit consists of the shaly unit of the Atkinson Formation; or (lower in the section) of the oolitic limestone described by the Applins (1965, pl. 10). The contact between this unit and the predominately shaly upper part of the Atkinson Formation is typically marked by a sharp spontaneous potential excursion to the left on the electric log, and by a corresponding increase in resistivity. Even in up-gradient areas in which the contact between the upper shales and lower sands becomes somewhat gradational, these electric log characteristics usually are apparent, though to a less pronounced extent (figs. 4, 5, and 6).

PAGE 23

14 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY [S' I SP I Z RE SISy -Y 07-U I U I I -3 3123 RK-GRAY _______LIGHT TAN 3 2 <'---r i^^-^-L^ 1RAY,SHAG. i SL " L ..iT LR owN 0 3260 )3323 F ISSILE .. .I J GRAY.FISSILE > , LOCATION of SECTION The inera 3240-3323 is shown to contain Woodbine microfouna by the Southeastern Geological -_-,4 LROW -N Z, r.--3260Society (1949, cross section DD) --7 (l W / z I 4n UTHOLOGY *G G' -< C LEAN FISSI-E.PLATY 3323 WHITE SHALE CHALK RE SGLAUCONITICL SILT CALCILUTITE Slightly GLAUCONITIC CORED ]SANDSTONE,Fine CALCARENITE i Slightly LIGNITIC SOFT SANDSTONE,Medium CALCAREOUS [ MICACEOUS [Z ,]Moderately SO -j SANDSTONECATIONSlightly PHOSPfORITIC SECTIHARD e Fiin 10 Elctric-lithown tlogic section, Sun, No. 1 Tillis well, Suwannee County. Woodbine microfauna by the Southeastern Geological ......... Society (1949, cross section D-D) ^^^""°^,~' L1THOLOGY / T~] SHALE |CHALK |G IGLAUCONITIC SILT CALCIWTITE | 1SlightlyGLAUCONITIC WCORED j i SANDSTONEFine 1 CALCARENITE| I |Slightly LIGNITIC I ISOFT ! iSANDSTONE.Medium |^-^| CALGROS IM IMICACEOUS | |Moderately SO | *. -|SANDSTONE.Coar»« Slightly PHOSPHORITIC I IHARD Figure 10. Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Tilis well, Suwannee County.

PAGE 24

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 15 UA < .. --... . SULIGHTS N M) GRAY.ISSILE I OLIGREEN pKATY FISSILE S'-A OLIVE GREEN 0 -0----BROWN T C-LCLU OLI VA GLAREEN -H-I -. gBROWN AN T IA E -C LOLIVE GREEN I SREDDISH IMeum SOF Figure 11. Electric-lithologic section, Gulf, No. 1 BrookScanlon, Block3 wel Tay County. OLIVE GREEN IFERONLASL 3 LIGAT BRONL M:: --3481 LIG HT CRAY > .Gm. Z TAN SOLIVE GREEN B 3 eo _U I IT" LITHOLOGY Uy ~SILT 9CALCILLUTITE L J GLAUCONITIC Ik LI SANDSTONE.Fine PLP9CALCARENITE EZ-II Slightly GLAUCONITIC IZISANDSTONE.Medium FZT7DOLOMITE I-II MICACEOUS FEý9CALCAREOUS F mSlightlyMICAtEOUS F RED P Slightly PHOSPHORITIC I SOFT [IZR REDDISH IIi Medium SOFT Figure 11. Electric-lithologic section, Gulf, No. 1 Brooks-Scanlon, Block 33 well, Taylor County.

PAGE 25

16 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Te Sfl RE I TI ST -^----~ ~ ~ _irr----4-~s SI Ii _ z z --| -, 1. = X ---r. 4137-. -?-T" ^ SY.~LTY FRSAPL TY r -._, -YP ----" . m I S; I BROWN.PLATIY -1. -B sRECCIATED ---SCON3LOMERATE . z IDOLO--ITE FRAGIEN TS I SLIGHTLY 63 0 cp 0 zPYR'TIC 00 ! 00 SILIcEOUS Z TAN LIGHT GREEN 1 I 44S^00 ----F-44LOCATION ot SECTION LITHOLOGY A SHALE * CALCILUTITE LI GLAUCONITIC s SILT ;] CALCARENITE I MICACEOUS Lli SANDSTONE. Rine CALCAREOUS I PHOSPHORITIC Zi SANDSTONE.Medium | REDDISH I SOFT [ S-ANDSTONE.Coane CORED I IModerately SOF So CONGLOMERATE -IHARD FigFe 12. Ectriclithologic section, Coastal, No. 1 Ragland we~ Levy Count-

PAGE 26

p PI. ---> .sir _ _--t 4038 .--0 --4078 ---WP -.) t -__4079 ----~ *DI * " < CARK -----S--..--0 M LOCATION of SECTION' I<. .( CLE AR 0 ORN--GI LITHOLOGY: SSHALE l CHALK JGG Very GLAUCONITIC SILT sCALCILUTITE OG GLAUCONITIC SCORED C :: SANDSTONE,Fine CALCARENITE I SlightlyGLAUCONITIC I ISOFT r " SANDSTONE,Medium P CALCAREOUS Slightly PHOSPHORITIC I IModerately SOFT I .' SANDSTONE, Coarse I CONGLOMITT QUARTZITIC IHARD ERATE Figure 13. Electric-lithologic section, Sun, No. 1 Camp well, Marion County.,

PAGE 27

1S BUREAU OF GEOLOGY -74 -.p iLITHOLOGY 2Shot$ _ J ,.J _ r4/ , *\ .-, , ,-" -n IF"" s l I L"-co.i, 3 SSandsto ne. fnagroinid SondstoneC medium grained r 'S dstoe \coal" graned -" -d mConglo merate S. At F i ----I » ..os.. ,oi r-91 Slightly glaucnifi ' Slightly alcacteoul a Slilghl l phoshO_ tic T fM isendunit. Atkinso Fn m mla nd LOW. Alkdndal SHARDNESS of CORED LITHOLOGY 8 0 Soft --.k I&Mt .L.. .. Figue 14. Cored sections, basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation. ffifl WiS^T " i"" '** ^ ^t ' ^ rT Xs...l^J ,^ i t'°l*""'"'"". *""""'''*" c i ·t--f--Ci -HiN-t-fBv YIC^-Jc,-^. TBW "r' ^.-^J j tM"'| i ^ ) " ^e^ "^' gl yt 'B
PAGE 28

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 19 U6RSONLONG ICLL ¾ AER6Y P6IEC TV 4 4 COLOQlIT T aJ. 6060 \,PltftCE 8 I~ L I 84L1 ,OAR L074~ 60A I 10:00 JRANTLE 5 'ECHO1 L 8 14MAS ~R U6oSo f1A 104 4 ...2 F-I--~S ---CL Vg4 a8L6110 -0 0 -~ 0249AS L 8 2 604. tsei¶ 0 8, -(.J 0Ab I~r, o 160 0 -SS 0)0~ 9 F ( RSO AS NL_ 72 __ ( 42F, v.064 COLMBI 50 `\I ~%~ 69~ CI'GIO/' ` BASAL~.rx SAND r44J 6 1 0A6S7 ~4 11f-10ITI 1 1~ ki N 13 1 -4 .dIA s ZJ 2 ebZIsYR0 4 1 17 1 1 7 ' I (435 42 F i OS2 52i49 124 54 I 4446, 0s jw'--o 03 04 ~lI H 63 42 '42 44, 9. AT -IOUVAL 6 15 1 406s 47 If T .. 140C el19)3 As. NI 0 "9 69I 54JEOC6 36 135, 9) -WA IIT W so' 7 I/jI~,,R 93 59OL UNIT AOSsaa~e ENTS1N (F ,I O so, -.. S U F Ipo5, -Abs Ab,+,OSO 21 20 '24 L~i A ..Q. 12 0 14 15 (263) ~ ~ I 24,14ka0 (Is EoI) Atilol FI4IIIiI IP (1644 ( I I ,,. i -f ' Esi C460 EI N 3 0 3 i44 13 co 39 ti1~0~3 Lo #3 41114 A~IIR4 I4444I'.r' ' ?I Ib -10'8660 346 I 244 EXPLFNAig .s of te b n i the Well Name 04 9 U Ab-Abu~ni 4 90 20 BREVA Thi k eu (In ("I): t, Iu unld unit I " 1 EI 1. !\ Thi=,=( Ifc tcn l) Alinson rono-ti-o i. ,, Conlout inleml 50 feelO ·::2 ; Note: .2 tt -t ll" -Ittot,, lilIIll uf ther b..l und2ii ~ 1 Unit Alkiown Fatmation. 190) 2 7 22j Figure 15. Isopach of the basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation.

PAGE 29

20 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Criteia For Recogniing The Sediments Underlying The Atkinson Formation Over most of the report area the Atkinson Formation is underlain by Lower Cretaceous sediments, but in a few wells the underlying sediments are either rock of Upper Cretaceous Age, or Paleozoic rock. These underlying lithologies will be discussed as a guide to determination of the bottom of the Atkinson Formation. a) The Lower Cretaceous Section The top of this section usually must be determined from sample examination alone, since it cannot be recognized on the electric log, and since it is rarely coredFor these reasons it commonly is difficult to pick the top of this section with exactness. Recognition of the Lower Cretaceous section is facilitated by figure 16, which shows for selected wells the first lithology indicative of these beds. In the northern part of the Florida report area, and where most of the well control of this study is located, the upper sediments of the Lower Cretaceous section which underlie the Atkinson Formation consist of clastic rocks which are slightly calcareous to non-calcareous. These sediments include pastel colored sandstones; red, white and pastel colored siltstones or shales; clear and pastel colored quartz pebbles; and light purple quartzite. In the southern part of the report area light colored limestones or dolomites are present at the top of the Lower Cretaceous section. However, here these sediments do not immediately underlie the Atkinson Formation of the present study, but rather are separated from it by the intervening oolitic limestone facies of Upper Cretaceous Age, as discussed in the next paragraph. b) An Oolitic Limestone Facies of Upper Cretaceous Age Four wells in the southern part of the report area contain a sequence of white and light gray oolitic limestone of Upper Cretaceous Age, having a maximum thickness of 125 feet, as described by the Applins (1965, plate 10). This sequence underlies the predominantly clastic Atkinson Formation as used in the present report. These wells are: Thickness Of The Well County Oolitic Limestone Facies Grace Drilling Co. Volusia 125 feet No. 1 Retail Lbr. Company. Sun Oil Co. Volusia 45 feet No. I Powell Ohio Oil Co. Hernando 20 feet No.1 Hernasco Oil Development Co. Lake 10 feet No 2 Gulf Exploration Company.

PAGE 30

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 21 S"r-/ 1 TS B ELBER Y R ---, cs • , .G"N, ". --...Lj y O -L " -.._ .*.._. IRU r I •' . .-.. 2u '" +-",'' .I3I_3 B 8O ST 9 2 A CINTOSH At on t %o ).^ i 32033393 \ IEOCEC J^9 ( *,. 1 ,\. ; , --. o a 7 aI a .4 If 1 r t 2 XLAATO I J r i '* i I -/ Of 2o L 34 .7 _2914 3 17 27TR?8E L AE455 1 I N 1 N Ei-S 1.9 4O--R 61 1 4T LEVYto F GL:LITHOLOGY SYMBOLS If 11 13 s a IS IS I s 2 l33 at 1 1'4 916 2o 30 3 P Small perbles,coars egiined in sizer,c ar7 AL ER Sandstone, red,white or 36 S paostel colored Quartzite, light purple .. Siltstone, red,white or 4 5 A RIONT-5E22 ? postel colored G Shale,color as above 44 LAXE VOIu H0 EN ,NOR E E I Z Dolomite, pink N O"E" ' W Limeslone· .In -1,\ EXPLANATION PA OI 34 46 Well number $295 -at4 Douof top ofLow r -4044 Celoceous beds «Figure 16. First itoog indicative of te Lower Cretaceous section. Figure 16. First lithology indicative of the Lower Cretaceous section.

PAGE 31

22 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY c) Paleozoic Rocks Near the crest of the Peninsular arch, the Atkinson Formation is underlain by quartzitic sandstones and shales of Paleozoic Age, as reported by Paul L. Applin (1951, table 3) in the following wells: Depth (and sub-sea depth) to quartzitic sandstones and shales Well County of Paleozoic Age Tidewater Alachua 3135 feet No. I Cato (-3023) Tidewater Alachua 3170 feet No 1 Parker (-3002) Tidewater Alachua 3217 feet NoI Phifer (-3085) Tidewater Bradford 3140 feet No. 1 Wiggins (-2999) STRUCTURE The structural top of the Atkinson Formation, and of the basal sand unit ofthat formation, are presented in figures 17 and 18. These maps are similar in configuration to the structure of the top of the Lower Cretaceous section as shown on figure 19, which incorporates the results and interpretations of many other workers, including Jordon (1952, fig. 8) and Herrick and Vorhis (1963, figs. 16,17 and 18). Figure 20 is reproduced from Paul L Applin (1951, table 3) and shows that the Paleozoic structure of the Peninsular arch is reflected in the up-gradient imits, and general configuration, of Lower Cretaceous rocks as mapped in figure 19. Offshore from the report area, mainland contours of the Lower Cretaceous map are integrated with the results of seismic refraction surveys. Opposite the east coast these contours are taken from a map by Sheridan, Drake, Nafe and Hennion (1966, fig. 10, p. 1985) drawn on top of the Lower Cretaceous section. The contours opposite the Georgia east coast were suggested by a map of the prCretaceous basement by Antoine and Henry (1965, fig. 12, p. 608). The Lower Cretaceous contours offshore from Dixie County in the Gulf of Mexico were suggested by maps drawn on top of the Upper Cretaceous section by Antoine and Harding (1963, figs. 6 and 7) on the basis of seismic refraction studies. The Antoine and Harding maps reflect an isopach of Cenozoic sediments prepared by Toulmin (1955, fig. 1,p. 1166).

PAGE 32

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 23 I -(-LONG) ' / i -4!9 Appii. / 9 r -J i /' 2 '^ fo / .,./O2 . -320 33, -2/ .. .' wriI S TUR ER UBERTY Lnt: Avt-340 M f \%3I~ /_ MCi" ^^INTOSH 9 '* 0 k onG --",1 :,,' 1 " AiRA .', Fge1.S. ct m o t of -et-4ooo -3LdAN r. A rLTON _3 -\ 2 'iT ' -IANE\Q\ 1 -+JFC RSJ .o CMEN --_ 7 20 5 09 3' f NOeIS/N AItgIS.V 4ar A3. Fi0ue 1 t 'a o Fi r -1709 '2 -30 -30 00 _C794 IN, JI O S IR LAKE Fi e 1. S t A -JB~r nr9 14-FLAGLERIII6 .4 EvyiFCaýKjS CoMA ION -.605~ abr-lbrt ~ s·~:~·~,~r~r11/P3T 5 7· Fiue 7 Srcur apo opo teAtisn omain

PAGE 33

24 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY , .." L .%'i , so "is TUCYT / OWN ^ L l4L nt4l 7j0t0. * -Mr -C -4 00 -, " v "k L4EBAT4 C4 P4 of Ci PId ONr Figre 18. Structure map on top of the basal sand unit of the Atkinson Formation. 403 # 4 I I 8 -^-.ITI IT.JOHN_ -~ 3 UNI.„«,s;^ ! ^"'^^\ "Y ----*.£:p AD a.4„ f-~ ^^ tl;^ T^ *, ._ -I "^> -Af rBA' ~ i AN ^JUNIJ ASSENT Figme 8. Stuctur map n topof th basa sandunit f theAtInsnFrain

PAGE 34

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 25 ., n / ,o -./ / 'O "I r0 -4. 0 (6 a -ifY " 's.. ... ..... ':rm -o -13600 ? 500 s jo J ·r ! /0a\'I /93 i f---3800 \ -3qo + ý,Cl O -,Fr i : 13 . 3"6_4 .l ,4400 . )LP25 45 11 f~ 9' '"""' ~ r me~~,; 37. 46-'"1 -4,: Iluc*.Tyt 400 Iiue1,Srcuempo o o h oe rtcosscin

PAGE 35

26 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY -*~ --1T TZ ,,, Jirrmr +r-ry rC>K K N? O $36 Kr'-~: C'~ h0~~~0f a '~ r'~ ~9 CAMDEN 4 )\ fbn~ +'w 0 9 .0 Loo( F IF A n om -3 , P 4 i t l e I a * \1 _I_ a 9101 ~~LA a; 10 o~~ ¾' I LO AWO 4 -5 20p p + -00 m ram-I". d Pad AV f r Sr ~ -~IH Fift2. tucummp nto f alooicocs

PAGE 36

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 27 SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHV American Geophysical Union 1964 (and the U. S. Geological Survey) Bouguer gravity anomaly map of the United States: (G. P. Woollard, Chairman). Scale 1:2,500,000 Antoine, John W. 1965 (and Harding, James L.) Structure of the Continental Shelf, northeastern Gulf ofMexico: Reference 63-13T Texas A and M Univ. 1965 (and Henry, Vernon J., Jr.) Seismic refraction study of shallow part of continental shelf off Georgia: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 49, no. 5, p. 601-609, 12 fig., 1 table. Applin, Esther R. (see Applin, Paul L.) 1955 A biofacies of Woodbine age in southeastern Gulf Coast region: U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 264-1, 11 p., 1 fig. Applin, Paul L. 1944 (and Applin, Esther R.) Regional subsurface stratigraphy and structure of Florida and southern Georgia: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 28, no. 12, p. 1673-1753, 1 table, 32 fig., 5 pl. 1947 (and Applin, Esther R.) Regional subsurface stratigraphy, structure, and S correlation of Middle Cretaceous rocks in Alabama, Georgia and north Florida: U. S. Geol. Survey Oil and Gas Preliminary Chart 26 (in 3 sheets). 1951 Preliminary report on buried pre-Mesozoic rocks in Florida and adjacent states: U. S. Geol. Survey Circ. 91, p. 1-28, 5 fig., 5 tables. 1965 (and Applin, Esther R.) The Comanche Series and associated rocks in the subsurface in central and south Florida: U. S. Geol. Survey Professional Paper 447, 84 p., 11 pl., 53 fig., 2 tables. 1967 (and Applin, Esther R.) The Gulf Series in the subsurface in northern Florida and southern Georgia: U. S. Geol. Survey Professional Paper 524-G, 34 p., 8 pL, 4 fig., 6 tables. Berdan, Jean M. (see Bridge, Josiah) Bridge, Josiah 1952 (and Berdan, Jean M.) Preliminary correlations of the Paleozoic rocks from test wells in Florida and adjacent parts of Georgia and Alabama (included in a guidebook for the field trip of the 44th annual meeting of the Assoc. Am. State Geologists): Florida Geol. Survey, p. 29-38, 1 table, 1 fig. Bonini, W. E. (see Woollard, G. P.) Chen, Chih Shan 1965 The regional lithostratigraphic analysis of Paleocene and Eocene rocks of Florida: Florida Geol. Survey Bull. 45, 105 p., 44 fig., 1 table. Conant, Louis C. (see Monroe, Watson H.)

PAGE 37

28 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY Conant, Louis C. (see Monroe, Watson H.) Drake, C. L (see Sheridan, R. E.) Eargle, D. Hoye (see Monroe, Watson H.) Ewing, John 1966 (and Ewing, Maurice, and Leyden, Robert) Seismic profiler survey of Blake Plateau: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., V. 50, no. 9, p. 1948-1971, 17 fig., 2 tables. Ewing, Maurice (see Ewing, John) Harding, James L (see Antoine, John W.) Hennion, J. (see Sheridan, R. E.) Henry, Vernon J., Jr. (see Antoine, John W.) Herrick, Stephen M. 1961 Wel logs of the coastal plain of Georgia: Georgia State Div. of Conservation, Dept. of Mines, Mining and Geology Bull. 70, p. 1-462. 1963 (and Vorhis, Robert C.) Subsurface geology of the Georgia coastal plain: Georgia State Div. of Conservation, Dept. of Mines, Mining and Geology Information Circular 25, 12 tables, 28 fig., 78 p. Hull, Joseph P. D., Jr. 1962 Cretaceous Suwannee Strait, Georgia and Florida: Am. Assoc. Petroleum BulL, v. 46, no. 1, p. 118-122. Hurst, Vernan J. 1960 Off tests in Georgia: Georgia State Div. of Conservation, Dept. of Mines, Mining and Geology Information Circular 19, 4 fig., 14 p. Jordan, Louise 1952 Preliminary notes on the Mesozoic rocks in Florida: A summary of the geology of Florida and a guidebook to the Cenozoic exposures of a portion of the State (included in a guidebook for the field trip of the 44th annual meeting of the Assoc. American State Geologists): Florida Geol. Survey, p. 39-45, 2 fig. Kmrmbeim, W. C. 1953 (and Sloss, L L.) Stratigraphy and sedimentation: W. H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco, California. Leyden, Robert (see Ewing, John) Maher, John C. 1965 Correlations of subsurface Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks along the Atlantic Coast: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists, p. 1-18, 9 pL, 1 fig., 1 table. Meyer, R. P. (see Woollard, G. P.)

PAGE 38

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 29 Monroe, Watson H. 1946 (and Conant, Louis C., and Eargle, D. Hoye) Pre-Selma Upper Cretaceous stratigraphy of western Alabama: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 30, no. 2, p. 187-212, 30 figs. Nafe, J. E. (see Sheridan, R. E.) Puri, Harbans S. 1964 (and Vernon, Robert 0.) Summary of the geology of Florida and a guidebook to the classic exposures: Florida Geol. Survey Special Publication 5, 4 tables, 37 fig., 11 plates, 312 p. Schuchert, Charles 1955 Atlas of Paleographic maps of North America: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York. Sheridan, R. E. 1966 (and Drake, C. L., Nafe, J. E., and Hennion, J.) Seismic refraction study of continental margin east of Florida: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., V. 50, no. 9, p. 1972-1991, 13 fig., 1 table. Sloss, L. L. (see Krumbein, W. C.) Southeastern Geological Society -Mesozoic Committee 1949 Mesozoic cross sections A-A', B-B', C, DD', and E-E, prepared by the Mesozoic Committee of the Southeastern Geological Society. Toulmin, Lyman D. 1952 Volume of Cenozoic sediments in Florida and Georgia: Geol. Soc. American Bull., v. 63, p. 1165-1176, 1 pl., 8 fig., 1 table. Vernon Robert O. (see Puri, Harbans S.) 1951 Geology of Citrus and Levy counties, Florida: Fla. Geol. Survey Bull. 33, 256 p. Vorhis, Robert C. (see Herrick, Stephen M.) U. S. Geological Survey (see American Geophysical Union) Woollard, G. P. 1957 (and Bonini, W. E., and Meyer, R. P.) A seismic refraction study of the sub-surface geology of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and continental shelf between Virginia and Florida: Tech. Report, contract no. N 7 onr -28512, Geophysics Section, Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Wisconsin.

PAGE 40

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 31 APPENDIX I

PAGE 41

APPENDIX L DATA ON FLORIDA AND GEORGIA WELLS IN THE REPORT AREA. No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo, Well Depth Elevation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) FLORIDA WELLS PROVIDING SUBSURFACE CONTROL USED IN THIS REPORT ALACHUA COUNTY 1 W-36341 09-001-10004 The Texas Co. 1 Creighton 3,527 77 DF (WAa-11S.19E-16 cc) 2 W-1465 09-001-0001 Tidewater Assoc. Oil 1 Cato 3,150 112 DF (WAa-8S18E-23-dc) 3 W-1486 09-001-10003 Tidewater Ausoc. Ol1 1 Parker 31220 168 DF (WAa-7SI9&E33 ad) 4 W-1472 09-001-10002 Tidewater Assoc. Oil 1 Phifer 3,228 132 DF (WAa-9S-21E24 cb) BAKER COUNTY 5 W-1500 09-003-10002 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Fee 3,349 130 DF t (WBk-1N-20E-21 ab) 6 W-2187 09-003-10003 Nat'! Turpentine and 1 Fee 3,043 155 DF (WBk-4S19E-7 a) Pulpwood Corp. BRADFORD COUNTY 7 W-1466 09-007-10001 Tidewater Assoc. Oil 1 Wiggins 3,167 141 DF (WBf-6S-20E1S bd) CITRUS COUNTY 8 W-7534 09-017-10003 Socony Mobil Oil Co. 1 Camp 4,491 115 DF (WC-17S.18E-12 dc) Phos. Co. 9 W-7534 09-017-10001 Socony Mobil Oil Co. 1 Garby 5,564 13 DF (WC-19S-17E-8 ba) SAcqusition number. 2This system, which designates the well location, is described in Appendix IL

PAGE 42

APPENDIX L Contimed No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo. Wen Depth Elevation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) 10 W-7538 09-017-10002 Socony Mobil Co. 1 Harbond 4,794 22 DF (WCI-17S-16E.25 b) CLAY COUNTY 11 W-1590 09-019-10001 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Foremost 5,862 115 DF (WCy-6S-25E4 bc) Properties COLUMBIA COUNTY 12 W-2164 09-023-10006 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Kie Vining 3,470 117 DF (WCo-4S-15E2) 13 W-1789 09-023-10001 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Cone 4,444 141 DF (WCo-1N-17E.22 d) ) 14 W-7108 09-023-10009 Michael 1 Ripley 4,078 156 DF (WCo-4S18& 15 bd) 15 W-1981 09-023-10005 Sun Oil Co. 1 Bishop 2,828 174 DF (WCo.4S-17BE10 cb) z 16 W-1915 09-023-10003 San Oil Co. 1 Johnson 3,051 87 DF 0 (WCo-4S-16E27 cb ), 17 W-1923 09-023-10004 Sun Oil Co. 1 Lloyd 2,929 129 DF (WCo-S-17E-11 ac) 18 W-1832 09-023-10002 San Ol Co. 1-A Sapp 3,311 138 DF (WCo-2S-16E-24 bb) 19 W-7163 09-023-10008 Thayer-Davis 1 Ripley 5,055 173 DF S (WCo-4S-17E23 bb) DIXIE COUNTY 20 W-636 09-029-00001 Fa. Oil Development 1 Putnam Lumber 4,780 26 DF (WDx-1 -1.2E-7) 21 W-1114 09-029-10001 Stanolind Oil & Gas Co. 1 Perpetual Forest 7,510 33 DF (WDx-llS11E-S aa)

PAGE 43

APPENDIX 1, Conlinued No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo. WeU Depth Elevation this report No, API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) 22 W.1863 09-029-10003 Sun Oil Co. 1-A Crapps 5,104 41 DF (WDx-8S-0E-36 ab) 23 W.1405 09-029-10002 Sun Oil Co. I Langston 3,671 33 DF (WDx.8S-14E&8 c) FLAGLER COUNTY 24 W-1473 09-035-10002 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. I Campbell 4,632 31 DF w (WFg.l IS-28.8 de) GILCHRIST COUNTY 25 W-1003 09-041-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Adams 3,753 93 DF (WGr-9S-1 E-1 ) 0 26 W-1819 09-041-10002 Sun Oil Co. 1 Williams 77 DF (WGr-8S-1 SE12) HERNANDO COUNTY 27 W-994 09-053-10001 The Ohio Oil Co. 1 Hernasco 8,477 47 DF (WHr-23S18E-19 aa) JEFFERSON COUNTY 28 W-1854 09-065-10001 Coastal Fetroleum Co. I Larsh 7,913 51 DF (W!"-2S-3 1 bc) 29 W-19 09-065-00002 Southern States Oil Corp. I Miler & Gossard 3,838 220 DF (WJf-2N-SE-17) LAFAYETTE COUNTY 30 W-1866 09-067-10003 Coastal Petroleum Co. 1 Sapp 3,507 44 DF (WLf-6S-14E-18 de) 31 W-2000 09-067-10004 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Brooks-Scanlon 4,512 DF (WOL-S.10E-36 aa) Block 49

PAGE 44

APPENDIX L Contimed No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo. Well Depth Elevation tins report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) 32 W-1696 09-067-10002 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Henderson 4,235 52 DF (WLf-4S-lE.20 bb) 33 W-968 09-067-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Crapps 4,133 70 DF (WLf-6S-12-25 cb) LAKE COUNTY 0 34 W-275 09-069-00001 All Florida Land Co. 2 Gulf Exploration Co.6,129 120 DF g (WLk-24S-25E$17 dd) LEVYC OUNTY 35 W-1537 09-075-10003 Coastal Petroleum Co. 1 Ragland 5,850 14 DF Z (WLv-I5S-13E-16 mc) 36 W-166 09-075-00004 Hll and Lentjes 2 Cedar Key 4,010 25 DF (WLv-15S-13E-l6 da) 37 W-2012 09-075-10005 Humble Oil & Ref. Co. 1 Robinson 4,609 56 DF C (WLv-16S-17E-19 bb) 38 W-3342 09-075-10008 Sphynx Syndicate 1 Prudential 3,857 26 DF (WLv-13S-16E-31 ad) 39 W-1007 09-075-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Goethe 3,997 34 DF (WLv-14S-17E31 ac) MADISON COUNTY 40 W-2357 09-079-00001 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Gibson 3,380 86 DF (WMd-IS-11E16 ba) 41 W-1 596 09-079-00002 Hunt Oil Co. 2 Gibson 5,385 107 DF (WMdS-10E.6 cd) 42 W-1597 09-079-00003 Hunt Oil Co. 3 Gibson 3,667 89 DF (WMd-2S-1E-18 cc) 43 W-1598 09-079-00004 Hunt Oil Co. 4 Gibson 4,096 73 DF (WMd-2S-I i.S bb)

PAGE 45

APPENDIX I. Continued No, on the Division Total maps of of Geo, Well Depth Elevation this report No, API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) MARION COUNTY 44 W.901 09-083-00001 Cosden I Lawson 4,334 165 DF (WMr-13S20E-25 ab) 45 W-I 8 09-083-00003 Ocala Oil Corp, I York 6,180 77 DF (WMr-6S-20E.10 ad) 46 W-1482 09-083-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Camp 4,637 74 DF W (WMr-16S-23E-16 cb) 47 W-1904 09-083-10002 Sun Oil Co. 1 Parker 3,845 79 DF (WMr14S-22E-24 bd) NASSAU COUNTY O 48 W-336 09-089-00001 St. Marys River Oil Corp. 1 Hlliard 4,824 110 DF (WNa-4N-24E-19 ad) t, ORANGE COUNTY 49 W-3673 09.095-10001 Warren Petroleum Corp. 1 Terry 6,589 100 DF (WOr-23S.31E-21 cd) PUTNAM COUNTY so W-1514 09-107-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1-A Roberts 3,328 206 DF (WPu-9S-25-19 aa) 51 W-1838 09-107-10002 Sun Oil Co. I Westbury 3,892 32 DF (WPu-11S-26E-37) SUWANNEE COUNTY 52 W-2255 09-121-10005 Fields and Randal 1 Crawley 3,840 118 DF (WSw-2S-13E-6 cc) Drilling Co. 53 W-2784 09-121-10007 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Taylor 3,684 110 DF (WSw-3S-13E-25 cb)

PAGE 46

APPENDIX L Contimed No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo. Well Depth Elevation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) 54 W-1827 09-121-10003 McCord 1-B Starling 3,80 90 DF (WSw-3S-12E-28 aa) 55 W-1450 09-121-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Odom 3,161 73 DF (WSw-SS-15E-31 bb) 56 W-1924 09-121-10004 Sun Oil Co. 1 Russell 3,139 96 DF (WSw5S-I15E-S bb) 57 W-1 548 09-121-10002 Sun Oil Co. 1 Tilis 3,572 162 DF I (WSw-2S-15E-28 dc) TAYLOR COUNTY 58 W-2106 09-123-10003 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Brooks-Scanlon 5,243 96 DF z (WTy-4S9E-18 dd) block 33 0 59 W-2161 09-123-10004 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Brooks-Scanlon 4,877 67 DF (WTy-6S-9E-17 bd) block 37 60 W-2099 09-123-10002 Gulf Oil Corp. 1 Brooks-Scanlon 5,517 41 DF (WTy-8S-9E-9) block 42 61 W-1877 09-123-10001 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Hodges 6,254 36 DF (WTy-5S-6E-12 bb) 62 W-650S 09-123-10006 Mattaliano 2-A Buckeye Cellulose 4,150 14 DF (WTy-4S-4E-11 ad) VOLUSIA COUNTY 63 W-1746A 09-127-10002 Grace Drilling Co. 1 Retail Lumber Co. 5,425 44 DF (WVo-15S-30E-2 ab) 64 W-1118 09-127-10001 Sun Oil Co. 1 Powell Land Co. 5,958 48 DF (WVo-17S31E-11 cc) -.1

PAGE 47

APPENDIX 1. Continued No, on the Division Total maps of of Geo Well Depth Elevation this report No, API No, Operator No, Fee Name (feet) (feet) FLORIDA WELLS OMITTED FROM ORIGINAL LISTING LAFAYETTE COUNTY(logs not released for publication as of August 15, 1967) 93 W-7440 09.067.10005 Jett-Phillips 1 Buckeye Cellulose et al OFFSHORE CITRUS COUNTY (permit not drilled as of August 15, 1967) 94 WMobil 1 St. Lease 224-A (WCi-offshore) Form A OFFSHORE LEVY COUNTY (permit not drilled as of August 15, 1967) 95 WMobll 1 St. Lease 224-A (WLv-offshore) Form B 0 GEORGIA WELLS PROVIDING SUBSURFACE CONTROL USED IN THIS REPORT ATKINSON COUNTY 65 W-887 Sun Oil Co. 1 Doster and Ladson 4,282 222 BROOKS COUNTY 66 W-1888 Hughes 1-B Rogers 3,850 133 CAMDEN COUNTY 67 W-1732 The California Co. 1 Bule 4,969 65 CHARLTON COUNTY 68 South Penn Oil Co. 1 Mizell 4,579 35 CLINCH COUNTY 69 W-1757 Sun Oil Co. 1 Barlow 4,232 177 '.

PAGE 48

APPENDIX L Continued No. on the Division Total maps of of Geo. Well Depth Elevation this report No. API No. Operator No. Fee Name (feet) (feet) COLQUITT COUNTY 70 W-1814 Arrington 1 Adams 4,910 270 ? ECHOLSCOUNTY 71 W-1603 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Superior 3,850 181 Pine Products 72 W-1600 Hunt Oil Co. 3 Superior 4,000 144 Pine Products 73 W-2109 Hunt Oil Co. 4 Superior 3,913 155 Pine Products z GLYNN COUNTY 74 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 2 Union Bag 4,642 75 La Rue 1 Massey 4,615 LIBERTY COUNTY 76 La Rue 1 Jelks-Rodgers 4,264 26 MITCHELL COUNTY P 77 Stanolind Oil and Gas Co. 1 Pullen 7,490 338 WAYNE COUNTY 78 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Union Bag 4,551 OTHER GEORGIA WELLS IN THE MAP AREA APPLING COUNTY 79 WGI-474 Felsenthal-Weatherford 1 Bradley 4,098 231 ?

PAGE 49

APPENDIX L Contined No. on the Division Total map of of Go, Well Depth Elevation thi report No. API No. Operator No, Fee Name (feet) (feet) BRANTLEY COUNTY 80 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Hellemn 4,512 CLINCH COUNTY 81 W-3982 Ballard 1-A Timber 4,232 213 Products Co. 82 Brady-Belcher t at 1 Griffia 4,588 110 ? 83 WGI-541 Hunt Oil Co. 1 Musgrove 4,088 148 84 W-1638 Hunt Oil Co. 2 Mugrove 3,410 171 COFFEE COUNTY 85 Carpenter Oil Co. 1 Knight 4,151 CRISP COUNTY 86 Kerr-McGee Oil 1 Pate 5010 364 ECHOLS COUNTY 87 W-2110 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 Bennett & Langdale4,182 179 88 W-1599 Hunt Oil Co. 2 Superior 4,066 142 T Pine Products GLYNN COUNTY 89 Humble Oil and Ref. Co. 1 McDonald 4,740 23 PIERCE COUNTY 90 Hinton-Clark 1 Adams-McCasldll 4,355 75 ? 91 Pan Am. Pet. Corp. 1 Adams-McCaskill 4,315 75 T WAYNE COUNTY 92 Calco 1 Brunswick Peninsula4,625 73

PAGE 50

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 41 APPENDIX II

PAGE 51

42 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY BUREAU OF GEOLOGY WELL AND LOCALITY DESIGNATION SYSTEM The locality and wel numbering system is based on the location of the locality or well, and uses the rectangular system of section, township, and range for identification. The number consists of five parts. These are: 1) a prefix of three letters designating L for locality or W for well and county abbreviation, 2) the quarter/quarter location within the section, 3) the section, 4) the township, and 5) the range. The basic rectangle is the township which is 6 miles square. It is consecutively measured by tiers both north and south of the Florida base line-an east-west line that passes through Tallahassee. This basic rectangle is also consecutively measured both east and west of the principal meridian-a north-south line that passes through Tallahassee. In recording the township and range numbers, the T is left off the township numbers, and the R is left off the range numbers. Each township is divided equally into 36 square miles called sections, and are numbered I through 36 as shown on the attached diagram. The sections are divided into quarters with the quarters labeled "a" through "d" as shown on diagram. In turn, each of these quarters is divided into quarters with these quarter/quarter squares labeled "a" through "d" in the same manner. The "a" through "d" designation of quarters may be carried to any extent deemed useful. The location of the well WLn-2N-2E-21 db shown on the diagram would be in the center of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 21, township 2 north, range 2 east. When there is more than one well or locality in a square 40-acre tract (quarter/quarter section) they are identified by either an additional quarter designation or by a sixth arbitrary accession number at the end of the range unit. The abbreviations used for counties are: Alachua Aa Escambia Es Baker Bk Flagler Fg Bay By Franklin Fk Bradford Bf Gadsden Ga Brevard By Gilchrist Gr Broward Bw Glades GI Calhoun Cn Gulf Gf Charlotte Ch Hamilton Hm Citrus Ci Hardee Hd Clay Cy Hendry Hy Collier Cr Hernando Hr Columbia Co Highlands Hi Dade Dd Hillsborough HI DeSoto Ds Holmes Ho Dixie Dx Indian River Ir Duval Du Jackson Jk

PAGE 52

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 60 43 Jefferson Jf Pasco Ps Lafayette Lf Pinellas Pi Lake Lk Polk Po Lee Le Putnam Pu Leon Ln St. Johns Sj Levy Lv St. Lucie SI Liberty Lb Santa Rosa Sr Madison Md Sarasota Sa Manatee Mn Seminole Se Marion Mr Sumter Sm Martin Mt Suwannee Sw Monroe Mo Taylor Ty Nassau Na Union Un Okaloosa Oa Volusia Vo Okeechobee , Oe Wakulla Wk Orange Or Walton WI Osceola Os Washington Ws Palm Beach Pb

PAGE 53

44 BUREAU OF GEOLOGY R 2 E 6 5 4 3 2 1 a b a---------........ T 7 8 9 10 II 12 ------2____, t 17 10 15 4 13 4 d 19 20 21 22 23 24 Division of a section into quarters of approx. 160 N 30 29 28 27 26 25 acres and division of a quarter section into quarters of approx. 40 31 32 33 34 35 36 acres. SECTIONIZED TOWNSHIP NOTE: A well in Leon County,Township 2 North, Range 2 East, Section 21, located in the center of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter would be designated thus: WLn-2N-2E-21 db

PAGE 54

f

PAGE 55

-FLORIDA-GEOLOGICAL-SURVEY COPYRIGHT NOTICE © [year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text] The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder for the text of this publication. Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and 377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government, makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction. The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution. The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications. All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional information and permissions.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EOWS275ZV_3SLXS6 INGEST_TIME 2017-04-19T19:10:24Z PACKAGE UF00001120_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES