Citation
Production and utilization of water in the metropolitan area of Jacksonville, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 58 )

Material Information

Title:
Production and utilization of water in the metropolitan area of Jacksonville, Florida ( FGS: Information circular 58 )
Series Title:
FGS: Information circular
Creator:
Leve, Gilbert W ( Gilbert Warren ), 1928-
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Publisher:
[s.n.]
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
iv, 37 p. : illus., charts, maps. ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Groundwater -- Florida ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida -- Jacksonville ( lcsh )
City of Jacksonville ( local )
Duval County ( local )
City of Jacksonville Beach ( local )
City of Neptune Beach ( local )
City of Atlantic Beach ( local )
Water wells ( jstor )
Aquifers ( jstor )
Water utilities ( jstor )
Public water supply ( jstor )
Bodies of water ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
"Prepared by United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Jacksonville, Duval County and the Division of Geology, Florida Board of Conservation."
General Note:
"References": p. 37.
Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
Statement of Responsibility:
by G. W. Leve and D. A. Goolsby.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
022160176 ( aleph )
01748942 ( oclc )
AFD7465 ( notis )

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Full Text
STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Robert O. Vernon, Director
INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58
PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION OF WATER
IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
By
G. W. Leve and D. A. Goolsby
U. S. Geological Survey
Prepared by
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
CITY OF JACKSONVILLE,
DUVAL COUNTY
and the
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE 1969




Completed manuscript received
October 17, 1968
Printed by the Florida Board of Conservation
Division of Geology
Tallahassee
ii




CONTENTS
Page
Abstract . . . . . . . 1
Introduction . . . . . . 2
Purpose and scope . . . . . . 3
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . 3
Summary of water withdrawal . . . . . 4
Geographic setting . . . . . . . 4
Sources and quality of water supplies . . . . 5
Surface-water supplies . . . . . . 5
Ground-water supplies . . . . . . 7
Surficial sand aquifer . . . . . . 9
Limestone, shell and sand aquifer . . . 11
Floridan aquifer . . . .. . . 13
Water production and use . . . . . . 15
Public-water supplies....... .. 15
Jacksonville municipal supply . . . . . 15
Other municipal supplies . . . . . . 19
Privately or corporately owned water utilities . 19 Military water systems . . . . . . 20
Private supplies . ..... . . . .. .23
Industrial and commercial supplies . . . . 24
Lakes and ponds supplied by wells and uncontrolled flowing wells 28 Surface water supplies . . . . . 30
Generation of electric power . . . . . 30
Variations in the withdrawal and use of water . . . 30 Future water production . . . . . . 34
References. . . ............ . .. .37
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page 1 Map of Florida showing the location of the area covered by this report 6 2 Generalized geologic section and the aquifers in the Jacksonville area 7
3 Map of Florida showing the piezometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in feet
above sea level, July 1961 . . . . 14
4 Map showing the hardness of water from the Floridan aquifer in the Jacksonville
area . . . . . . Facing 14
5 Map of the Jacksonville area showing the location of the municipal, privately or
corporately owned utilities, and military water systems and the major public
supply wells . . . . . . Facing 14
6 Map showing the City of Jacksonville municipal water-distribution system and
the municipal water wells . . . . 16
7 Map of Jacksonville area showing location of major industrial and commercial
wells, wells supplying lakes and ponds and electric generating stations Facing 28
8 Graphs showing the total monthly production from Jacksonville municipal wells
and the total monthly temperature at Jacksonville . . .. 32
9 Graphs showing past withdrawals and projections of future water withdrawals by
municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area 33
iii




TABLES
Tables Page
1 Summary of water withdrawal in the Jacksonville area in 1966 . 5 2 Chemical analyses of ground water and surface water in the JacIsonville area 8 3 U.S. Public Health Service drinking-water standards . 9 4 Suggested water quality for industrial uses . 10 5 Suggested water quality tolerance for boiler feed water 11 6 Water quality characteristics and their significance 12 7 Pumping and storage facilities of the Jacksonville municipal water utility, 1966 17 8 Water withdrawals by the Jacksonville municipal water utility in 1966 18
9 Municipal -ater-supply facilities, number of metered connections and average
daily pumpage at Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach in 1966 19
10 Major nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area in 1966 21
11 Wells, water-storage facilities, average daily pumpage, and use of water at U.S.
Naval Stations in the Jacksonville area in 1966 . . 23
12 Major commercial and industrial water systems in the Jacksonville area in 1966 25
13 Lakes and ponds in the Jacksonville area that are supplied with water from
artesian wells in 1966 . . . . . . . 29
14 Electric generating stations in the Jacksonville area and water used for cooling
in 1966 . .. . ................ .30
iv




PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION OF WATER
IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA By
G. W. Leve and D. A. Goolsby
U. S. Geological Survey
ABSTRACT
Large quantities of water are available both from numerous surface streams and from underground aquifers in the Jacksonville area; however, the water in most of the surface streams is brackish at least part of the year and is used for limited industrial purposes. The potable water supplies in the area are obtained from wells drilled into one of three aquifers: surficial sand beds; limestone, shell and sand beds between 50 to 150 feet below the surface; and limestone and dolomite beds more than 300 to 600 feet below the surface and about 1,600 feet thick which comprise the Floridan aquifer.
The water in the surficial sand aquifer is commonly high in iron content and is subject to local contamination from septic tanks and from polluted or brackish surface streams. It is used primarily for lawn sprinkling. The limestone, shell and sand aquifer contains water suitable for domestic and- most industrial uses; however, it is hard and locally may be high in iron content. The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of potable water in the area. The water in the aquifer ranges in hardness from less than 150 ppm (parts per million) to about 400 ppm as CaCO3 and is suitable for domestic and most industrial uses.
The major source of surface water in the Jacksonville area is the St. Johns River; however, the chloride content ranges from less than 100 ppm to more than 10,000 ppm at the Main Street Bridge at Jacksonville. Because of its extreme variability in quality, its use is generally limited to cooling water for electric power generation.
The city of Jacksonville municipal water utility pumped an average of about 36 mgd (million gallons per day) in 1966 from 47 wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. The municipal utilities of Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach pumped a total average of about 3 mgd in 1966 from 11 wells in the Floridan aquifer.
Eighty-nine large, privately and corporately owned water utilities in the area produced a total average of about 22 mgd in 1966 from 105 wells in the Floridan aquifer. Two large naval bases produced a total average of about 5.5 mgd in 1966 from 8 wells in the Floridan aquifer.
Between 55,000 and 65,000 homes in the area are supplied water for all or a part of their domestic needs from small diameter wells. These private wells yielded an estimated 10 to 25 mgd from the limestone, shell and sand aquifer and about 5 mgd from the Floridan aquifer in 1966.
One hundred and fifty major industries and commercial buildings inventoried
during this investigation withdrew a total average of 67 mgd from wells in the Floridan aquifer in 1966. It is estimated that other industries and commercial




2 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
establishments that were not inventoried pumped an additional 5 mgd from wells in the Floridan aquifer.
Wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer are used to supply water to surface lakes and ponds. In 1966 these wells yielded an average of about 8 mgd to maintain 12 surface lakes and ponds. About 20 percent of all wells inventoried during this and previous investigations continuously yielded water for no gainful use. The amount of water flowing from these "wild" wells was estimated to be about 10 mgd.
Five municipal and industrial electric generating plants with a total capacity of 947,600 kilowatts used about 863 mgd of water from the St. Johns River and its tributary streams for cooling in 1966.
The city of Jacksonville water utility increased withdrawals of water from 6.5 mgd in 1921 to about 36 mgd in 1966. The average water withdrawals by all of the municipal and privately and corporately owned water utilities in the area increased from 27 mgd in 1947 to 60 mgd in 1966. Between 1950 and 1966 increased population and commercial and industrial development in the suburban areas caused the privately and corporately owned water utilities to increase water withdrawals at a much faster rate than the city of Jacksonville water utility.
At the present rate of increase in water withdrawals, the city of Jacksonville water utility will pump between 10 and 25 percent more water in 1980 than at present, and the total pumpage of all of the municipal and privately and corporately owned utilities in the area will be between 25 and 40 percent greater in 1980 than at present.
The commercial and industrial water systems are also expected to increase withdrawals in the future, but the rate of increase will depend on expansion of activities, on changes in pattern and amounts of use of water and on the number and types of industries that locate in the area.
INTRODUCTION
All potable water supplies in the Jacksonville metropolitan area and the eastern part of Duval County are obtained from wells. The surface streams in the area capable of supplying dependable quantities of water are affected by ocean tides and contain brackish water all or part of the time; however, abundant fresh water is available from the underground aquifers. This fresh ground water is one of the most important natural resources of the area and has been a prime factor in its economic and population growth.
The ground-water supply has met most of the needs of the population and industry in the area. However, there has been a constant increase in the withdrawals of water from the aquifers to meet the demands of expanding industry and increasing population. As a result, there has been a general decline in the water levels throughout the Jacksonville area with some slight increases in the salt content of the water in some localized areas (Leve, 1966).




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 3 PURPOSE AND SCOPE
Previous to this report there was little comprehensive information on the location of all of the various systems in the Jacksonville area or the amount of water being. withdrawn. Such information is needed before hydrologic conditions in the area, such as the relationship between withdrawals of ground water and declining water levels in the area can be analyzed. In addition, the information can be used as a basis for estimating future water requirements for the area.
This report lists and describes the major water supply systems in Jacksonville and adjacent parts of Duval County and includes estimates of the amount of water withdrawn for various uses in 1966. The report also includes projections of future water requirements for the area based on previous and present (1966) water withdrawals. This information should aid local and state officials, consultants, and planners to implement measures to properly develop and conserve water supplies to insure adequate fresh water supplies for the future.
The study was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, under the supervision of C. S. Conover, district chief, in cooperation with the city of Jacksonville, Duval County, and the Division of Geology, Florida Board of Conservation as part of an over-all study to appraise the water resources in the area.
Except for the municipal utilities and a few large non-municipal utilities and military and industrial water systems, the amounts of water withdrawn are estimated. These estimated amounts are based on:
(1) Reported production by water-plant operators, engineers and owners of the various water systems. (2) Water requirements of the various industries and commercial establishments. (3) Number and types of accounts serviced by various water utilities. (4) Number and types of wells that supply these utilities and private water systems. Field checks were made on many of the water systems to determine plant capacity and the actual yield from individual wells.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This investigation was greatly facilitated through the cooperation of many engineers and plant operators of industrial, municipal, military and private water systems in the area. Detailed information on Jacksonville municipal pumpage, distribution and use of water was obtained from the City Electric and Water Engineering Department. Mr. T. B. Prince, Water Utility Manager, Mr. Cyrus Washburn, Manager of Engineering and Chief Engineer, Mr. C. A. Blissitt, Engineer, Mr. D. C. Hendrickson, Associate Engineer, Mr. R. E. Elder, Assistant Engineer, and Mr. J. H. Bowden, General Supervisor all gave of their time to help compile this information.
Information on water withdrawal for the generation of electric power was obtained from Mr. T. W. Bostwick, Engineer Manager, and Mr. R. L. Thompson, Production Manager, City Electric Department, and various members of their staff.




4 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
Information on withdrawal and use of water at the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, was provided by Claude T. Madrin, Director of Utilities, Division of Public Works.
Much valuable data on industrial and private water systems was obtained with the help of Mr. T. B. Ard, Sanitary Engineer, City Health Department, Mr. T. J. Rousie Jr., Chief Sanitary Engineer, Duval County Health Department, and Mr. J. B. Miller, Director of Division of Water Supply, Mr. E. D. Hayes, Sanitary Engineer, and Mr. Nick Maestro, Acting Director, Division of Industrial Waste, Florida State Board of Health.
Background data on industrial trends and population growth in the area was obtained from Mr. R. L Kuroski, Planner, Jacksonville-Duval Area Planning Board and Mr. W. O. Parker, Research Director, Jacksonville Area Chamber of Commerce.
Appreciation is expressed for the support and cooperation of the following well drillers who aided by either furnishing file data or general information on different water systems: Duval Drilling Company; Earl Floyd and Son; Gray Well & Pump Company Inc.; Partridge Well Drilling Company; Ricketts Well & Pump Company; Riverview Pump & Well Inc.; O. E. Smith's Sons; and Trout Well Drilling Service.
SUMMARY OF WATER WITHDRAWAL A summary of the water withdrawal in the Jacksonville area in 1966 is listed in table 1. The estimated withdrawals by utilities and private industrial and commercial water systems are believed to be conservative because many of the reported production figures were found to be lower than actual production when they were field checked. All of the water systems in the area were not canvassed during this investigation so that the actual quantities of water withdrawn are somewhat greater than the quantities shown in table 1. However, the table summarizes the relative quantities of water withdrawn from the two major aquifer systems and the streams for various uses in the Jacksonville area.
GEOGRAPHIC SETTING
This report describes water use in a 625 square mile area in the eastern part of Dural County, which includes all of the corporate limits of Jacksonville before 1967 and the nearby coastal towns of Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach, figure 1.
Most of the area is a relatively flat plain less than 25 feet above sea.level. Between the St. Johns River and the coastline a series of long narrow sand ridges parallel the coastline and form the "coastal ridge." The coastal ridge is generally 40 to 60 feet above sea level but a few small hills on the ridge are more than 80 feet above sea level.
Surface drainage is poorly developed and many marshes and swamps occur along the stream courses. East of the coastal ridge,sluggish brackish water streams drain into tidal lagoons and into the intracoastal waterway. West of the




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 5 TABLE 1. SUMMARY OF WATER WITHDRAWAL IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966.
SUPPLIER SOURCE OF WATER
Limestone, shell Floridan Surface and sand aquifer aquifer streams (mgd) (mgd) (mgd)
1. Jacksonville municipal water utility 36 2. Other municipal utilities 3 3. Non-municipal utilities 22 4. Private domestic systems 10-25 5 5. Military water systems 6
6. Industrial and commercial water systems 72
7. Supplemental supplies for
surface lakes and ponds 8 8. Wild wells 10
9. Generating electric power 863
ridge the streams drain into the St. Johns River. As most of the major streams in the area are about at sea level and are directly connected to the ocean, the flow and quality of water are largely controlled by ocean tides. For example, the St. Johns River flows into the ocean during outgoing tides; but during incoming tides, the flow reverses and ocean water enters the river and moves upstream.
Before 1967 Jacksonville occupied about a 39 square mile area in central Duval County, which is in the northeastern part of Florida; however, much of the population and industry were located in adjacent unincorporated suburbs and nearby coastal towns within the county. In 1967 the city of Jacksonville annexed the entire county except the town of Baldwin in the western part of the county and the coastal towns of Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach.
SOURCES AND QUALITY OF WATER SUPPLIES SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES The principal surface streams in the Jacksonville area are the St. Johns River and its tributaries. These streams are tidal estuaries, and they contain highly mineralized ocean water at least part of the time. The chloride content of the St. Johns River ranges from less than 100 ppm to more than 10,000 ppm where it runs through downtown Jacksonville. The median value is about 2,200 ppm (written commun., Anderson and Goolsby, 1967).




6 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
Location of
Goarea
I
I0
F r olMayport
2 A INaval Air Station S 1966 Nov e tlantic coreetoteot u t h oNeptune
9J acsonville
1. 8 Beach
W
N.A.S
4 if DUVAL CO.
O0 4 6 MILES
Figure 1. Map of Florida showing the location of the area covered by this report.
During most of the year the St. Johns River is a good source of cooling water. From November through April the river water temperature is less than 75F., which is cooler than water from wells 500 to 800 feet deep. Water from wells greater than 1,000 feet deep has a temperature of about 81F., and river water i cooler except for the months of June through the middle of September.
The St. Johns River and its tributaries are not utihied as a source of potable water supplies or for most industrial or commercial supplies; however, large




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 7 quantities of water from the St. Johns River are circulated through condensers of steam turbines in electric generating stations.
GROUND-WATER SUPPLIES As shown diagrammatically in figure 2, ground-water supplies in the Jacksonville area are obtained mainly from three types of aquifers: surficial sand beds; relatively thin limestone, shell and sand beds between 50 and 150 feet below the surface; and thick limestone and dolomite beds below 300 to 600 feet deep. The thick limestone and dolomite beds comprise the "Floridan Aquifer" which is the principal source of potable water supplies in the area. The surficial sand beds and the thin limestone, shell and sand beds are utilized primarily for domestic supplies, some air conditioning, and for lawn sprinkling.
Chemical analysis of water from the three major aquifers in the Jacksonville area and the St. Johns River are given in table 2. Tables 2, 3, 4 and 5 list the U.S. Public Health Service drinking water standards, suggested water quality for
Age Strat c Lithology Water Bearing Properties
HP __.-.,"Surficial sand aquifer- supplies small amounts of water to small
PI diameter screened wells.
SLimestone, shell, and sand aquifer-supplies small to moderate S amounts of water to small diamel 200 E "rock" wells for rural domestic Relatively impermeable and lawn sprinkling supplies. U confining beds
400rI
0 CL
-z0
in Principal source of water
1000 supplies for municipal
O private utility and industrial
1200 w
0 <
Ain this report conforms to the usage of the Divisian of
Geology, Florida board of
1600 Conservation and not necessarily to that of U.S.G.S.
note: HIP= Hotocene or Pletstocene
SPliocene
EXPLANATION
1800 o Z
Send Silty clay
Shell ~ ~ tle
20--Fresh water- bearing zone, c Gpe Spenetrated by only onenclature oi deepen this report conforRelatively ieo //:/ the usage of the Division Of o /// / Geology, Florida bord o 1600-/ t Conservation and Z eessrily / / /-/ to that of U. S.G. S.
ablnote: HP=Holocene or Pleistocene
. / "PPI = Pliocene / / / ,EXPLANATION J/ / San d Silty clay
200MINERAZED WATER dolite
Figure 2. Generalized geologic section and the aifers n the Jacksonville area.
Figure 2. Generalized geologic section and the aquifders m tue J acksonville area.




TABLE 2. CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF GROUND WATER AND SURFACE WATER IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA (Results in parts per million except for color, pH and specific conductance)
- .
Surfdicial Sand Aqulfera
301922N0812634,.1 PrUate 09-21-66 2.3 1.6 1.9 2.0 .16 12 .3 8 0 .0 25 .1 .1 48 12 6 105 5.2 5 80 73 40
303535N0820034.1 Privat 06.07-66 4.9 .24 7.6 3.6 .20 6.1 3.6 12 0 .0 12 .2 33 71 34 24 118 5.1 5 31 73 15 0
Limaestoe Sand and Shell Aquifar
3008S7N0813444.2 Prvaite 05265 29 2.0 83 15 14 1.3 328 0 .0 21 .2 .0 326 268 0 533 7.3 0 26 74 92 0 302136NO814255.2 PIsats 05-27,65 18 2.8 73 12 13 1.1 236 0 38 18 .3 0.0 289 232 38 472 7.9 10 5 72 80 z 301340H0814754.1 Privnat 11.03-66 19 43 16 .19 6.6 1.2 213 0 .8 12 .5 .1 205 174 0 349 7.8 0 571 60 0
301817N0813749.2 Private 03.194-65 43 .31 39 16 15 6.1 204 0 4.0 18 1.4 .0 243 162 0 353 7.8 0 5 73
Floridan Aquffer
302033N0813945.1 CityofJaUksovfluC-10 08.0-65 21 .17 76 29 3.6 11 2.1 164 0 176 15 .8 .0 416 313 178 642 7.9 10 3 80 1270 301838N0813935,1 City of Jksoavilu e C-35 08.0.65 22 .09 65 27 3.6 11 2.0 166 137 i5 .6 .0 362 273 137 5646 LO 3 85 1280 301335N0813526.1 Private 09-2666 20 .19 65 33 4.2 12 2.7 152 0 180 13 .9 .0 402 302 178 642 7.6 10 6 77 625 301617N0814217.1 City ofJacksonvle 09-27-66 19 .19 41 22 2.7 II 2.4 148 0 81 12 .9 .1 262 196 74 440 7.7 10 5 78 729 301529N0813803.1 lAake Wood Utlities 09-27-66 21 .07 70 31 4.5 12 2.5 156 0 176 16 .8 .1 406 307 179 675 7.5 S 8 85 1187 St. Johns River at Main Stuet Brsdp
032465.00 St.JobasRIveatJa 11.034~ 4.6.0427 10 .55 71 2.640 0 34 136 .3 .2 306 109 76 6186.9120 -66
0a2465.00 SL John RIvr JstA 11-1646 2.5 .05 225 633 3.7 5520 200 109 0 1320 9720 11 17700 3170 3080 30000 7.1 60 69 -




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 9
TABLE 3. U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DRINKING WATER STANDARDS
Characteristic Limit Not to Cause for Rejection Be Exceeded
Physical
Color 15 units Taste Unobjectionable Threshold odor number 3 Turbidity 5 units Chemical mg/l mg/I Alkyl benzene sulfonate 0.5 Arsenic 0.01 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium
Chloride 250 Chromium (hexavalent) 0.05 Copper 1 Carbon chloroform extract* 0.2 Cyanide 0.01 0.2 Fluoridet 0.7-1.2 14.24 Iron 0.3 0.05 Lead
Manganese 0.05 Nitrate 45 Phenols 0.001 Selenium 0.01 Silver 0.05 Sulfate 250 Total dissolved solids 500 Zinc 5
*Organic contaminants.
tThie concentration of fluoride should be between 0.6 and 1.7 mg/l, depending on the listed and average maximum daily air temperatures. industrial water, suggested water quality for boiler feed water, and water-quality characteristics and their significance.
SURFICIAL SAND AQUIFER
The surficial sand aquifer is between 10 and 20 feet thick in the western and central part of the area and between 20 and 60 feet thick under the coastal ridge and along the coastline. The aquifer is recharged by local rain water or water from nearby streams and marshes that has percolated downward.
Water from this aquifer is characterized by its low dissolved solids content. The hardness is generally less than 60 ppm as CaCO3 and the total dissolved.solids content less than 100 ppm. This water may be somewhat corrosive to well casings and plumbing fixtures due to its slightly acidic character and high carbon dioxide content. In some areas this aquifer contains water with more than 1.5 ppm of iron and is subject to contamination from septic tanks and polluted surface drainage. Except for iron, water from unpolluted wells in this aquifer usually meets the USPHS drinking water standards.




TABLE 4. SUGGESTED WATER-QUALITY TOLERANCESa 0 (Allowable limits in parts per million)
Man
Tur- Hiardness Iron ese Total Alkalinity Odor Hydrogen Industry or use bldity Color ,%ese OTotaFe nne a
Industry or use bidity Color as CaCO3 as Fe n Solids as CaCO3 Taste sulfide Other requirementsb
Air conditioning - 0. Sc 0.5 - low I No corrosiveness, slime formation Baking 10 10 .2c .2 - low .2 P. Brewing:
Light beer 10 - .1c .1 500 75 low .2 P. NaCI less than 275 ppm
(pH 6.S 7.0)
Dark beer 10 .1- c .1 1,000 150 low .2 P. NaC less than 275 ppm (pH 7.0 or more) 0
Canning: Legumes 10 25-75 .2c .2 - low 1 P. General 10 - .2c .2 - low 1 P. Carbonated beverages 2 10 250 .2 .2 850 50-100 low .2 P. organic color plus oxygen consumed less than 10 ppm
Confectionary - .2c .2 100 low .2 P. pH above 7.0 for hard candy Cooling 50 0 .Sc .5 - 5 No corrosiveness, slime formation Food: General 10 - .2c .2 - low P. Ice 5 5 .2c .2 - low P. SIO2 less than 10 ppm Laundering - s0 .2c .2 - Plastics, clear uncolored 2 2 .02c .02 200 - Ph~er and pulp:
undwoo 50so 20 180 1.00 .s - No grit, corrosiveness Kraft pulp 25 15 100 .2c .1 300 - Soda and sulfite s15 10 100 .1c .05 200 - High-grade light papers S 5 50so .1c .05 200 - Rayon (viscose):
Pulp production 5 5 8 .05c .03 100 total 50; - A203 less than 8 ppm, SiO2 less hydroxide 8 than 25 ppm, Cu less than S ppm Manufacture .3 55 .0 .0 - - pH 7.8 to 8.3 Tanning 20 10-100 50-135 .2c .2 total 135; hydroxide 8
Textiles: General 5 20 .25 .25 - Dyeing 5 5-20 .250 .25 200 - Constant composition. Residual Wool scouring 70 1.0c 1.0 - - alumina less than 0.5 ppm Cotton bandage 5 5 .2c .2 - low aMoore, E. W., Progress report of the committee on quality tolerances of water for industrial uses: Jour. New England Water Works Assoc., vol. S4, p. 271. 1940
bp Indicates that potable water, conforming to U.S.P.H.S. standards, is necessary.
Limit sVAn .. an .pples to both iron alone nand the surm orf Iron and mansms e.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 11 TABLE 5. SUGGESTED WATER-QUALITY TOLERANCE FOR BOILER FEED WATER' (Allowable limits in parts per million)
Pressure (psi)
0-150 150-250 250-400 Over 400
Turbidity 20 10 5 1 Color 80 40 5 2 Oxygen consumed 15 10 4 3 Dissolved oxygen2 31.4 .14 .0 .0 Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) 5 3 0 0 Total hardness as CaCO3 80 40 10 2 Sulfate-carbonate ratio (A.S.M.E.)
(Na2SO4: Na2CO3) 1:1 2:1 3:1 3:1 Aluminum oxide (A1203) 5 .5 .05 .01 Silica (Si02) 40 20 5 1 Bicarbonate (HCO3)2 so50 30 5 0 Carbonate (COa) 200 100 40 20 Hydroxide OH) 50 40 30 15 Total solids 3,000-500 2,500-500 1,500-100 50 pH value (minimum) 8.0. 8.4 9.0 9.6
SMoore, E. W., Progress report of the committee on quality tolerances of water for industrial uses: Jour. New England Water Works Assoc., vol. 54, p. 263, 1940.
Limits applicable only to feed water entering boiler, not original water supply.
Except when odor in live steam would be objectionable.
4Depends on design of boiler.
LIMESTONE, SHELL AND SAND AQUIFER The limestone, shell and sand aquifer occurs in most parts of the area at the base of the Pliocene or upper Miocene deposits at between 50 and 150 feet below the surface. At places, it is absent or not sufficiently thick to supply usable quantities of water; however, in most of the area, it ranges from between 10 to 40 feet thick and will yield an average of 20 gpm (gallons per minute) and as much as 80 gpm to small diameter wells.
The aquifer is hydraulically connected to the surficial sand aquifer and is recharged locally by downward percolation of water from this aquifer. At places, some recharge also may occur by upward leakage of water from the underlying Floridan aquifer. The water level in cased wells completed in this aquifer is a few feet below the surface in most of the area. In some low areas immediately adjacent to the St. Jolmhns River and its tributaries the water level is above land surface.
Water from the limestone, shell and sand aquifer is classified as hard to very hard (see hardness, table 6) and contains from 150 to 400 ppm of dissolved solids. The water is slightly alkaline, and the principal dissolved constituents are calcium and bicarbonate. The iron content is highly variable from place to place, ranging from a few hundredths to more than 2.5 ppm. Wells in some areas, particularly southwest and northwest of Jacksonville, contain trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide, giving the water an odor characteristic of "rotten eggs."
Except for slightly high fluoride in two wells and iron and hydrogen sulfide in localized areas, water from this aquifer meets USPHS standards for drinking




12 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
TABLE 6. WATER-QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS AND THEIR EFFECTS
Constituent Source and/or solubility Effects
Silica (SiO2) Most abundant element in Causes scale in boiler and deposits earth's crust resistant to on turbine blades. solution.
Iron (Fe) Very abundant element, readily Stains laundry and porcelain, bad precipitates as hydroxide. taste.
Manganese (Mn) Less abundant than iron, Stains laundry and porcelain, bad present in lower concentrations. taste.
Calcium (Ca) Dissolved from most rock, especially limestone and dolomite. Causes hardness, forms boiler scale, helps maintain good soil
Magnesium (Mg) Dissolved from rocks, industrial structure and permeability.
wastes.
Sodium (Na) Dissolved from rocks, industrial Injurious to soils and crops, and wastes. certain physiological conditions in man.
Potassium (K) Abundant, but not very soluble Causes foaming in boilers, in rocks and soils. stimulates plankton growth.
Bicarbonate (HCO3) Abundant and soluble from Causes foaming in boilers and Carbonate (CO3) limestone, dolomite, and soils. embrittlement of boiler steel.
Sulfate (SO4) Sedimentary rocks, mine water, Excess: cathartic, taste.
and industrial wastes.
Chloride (Cl) Rocks, soils, industrial wastes, Unpleasant taste, increases sewage, brines, sea water. corrosiveness.
Fluoride (F) Not very abundant, sparingly Over 1.5 ppmn causes mottling of soluble, seldom found in children's teeth, 0.88 to 1.5 ppm industrial wastes except as aids in preventing tooth decay. spillage, some sewage.
Nitrate (NO3) Rocks, soil, sewage, industrial High indicates pollution, causes waste, normal decomposition, methemaglobanemia in infants. bacteria.
Hardness as CaCO3 Excessive soap consumption, scale in pipes interferes in industrial
processes.
up to 60 ppm soft
60 to 120 ppm moderately hard
120 to 200 ppm hard
over 200 ppm very hard




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 13
water and is suitable for most industrial uses; however, softening and removal of iron and hydrogen sulfide would be necessary for some industrial purposes.
Most small domestic water supplies are obtained from wells completed in this aquifer in areas not serviced by municipal or private water utilities. It also supplies water to wells for lawn sprinkling and for some industrial purposes such as cooling condensers in water exchange units and for boiler make-up water.
FLORIDAN AQUIFER
The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of potable water supplies in the Jacksonville area; accordingly, it has been studied in detail during this investigation. The hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the aquifer are described in detail in other reports (Leve and Goolsby, 1966) (Leve, 1966).
The Floridan aquifer extends throughout all of peninsular Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama. In the Jacksonville area, it is comprised of limestone and dolomite formations of Eocene and Paleocene age. Water is obtained from a series of relatively permeable zones that are separated by relatively impermeable zones within the aquifer. The top of the aquifer in the Jacksonville area is between 300 to 600 feet below sea level. Overlying beds of relatively impermeable silty clay, marl and dolomite confine the water under artesian pressure within the aquifer.
Only one deep test well in the area has completely penetrated the aquifer. In this well the aquifer is about 1,600 feet thick, extending from about 500 feet to 2,100 feet below the surface. Within this interval, there are four separate fresh water producing zones. Three of these zones are above 1,400 feet below land surface and are the source of water for most of the deep wells in the area. The fourth zone is between 1,900 and 2,050 feet below land surface and has only been penetrated by the test well. Below 2,100 feet, the well penetrated relatively impermeable limestone and gypsum beds containing highly mineralized water.
The aquifer is recharged by rainfall and by downward infiltration of water from surface lakes and streams primarily in areas where it is exposed at the surface or where the overlying confining beds are relatively thin or are breached by sinkholes. Most of the recharge to the aquifer in northeast Florida occurs in an area about 30 to 60 miles southwest of Jacksonville. Water moves laterally away from the recharge area through the aquifer toward Jacksonville and other areas in northeast Florida where it is discharged by springs, upward leakage through the overlying confining beds and by wells.
Figure 3 is a map of Florida showing the generalized piezometric surface of the Floridan aquifer. The piezometric surface is an imaginary surface of the artesian pressure head in the aquifer as measured in tightly cased wells completed in the aquifer. The relatively high piezometric surface in western Putnam and Clay counties and eastern Alachua and Bradford counties indicates the recharge area for the aquifer in northeast Florida, and the depression of the piezometrice surface within the 40-foot contour line in the vicinity of Jacksonville indicates the effect of numerous discharging wells on the artesian pressure.




14 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY. I 1
EXPLANATION
-40
Shows altitude of pleOzmlds surteae. Ceateir Inwtervl 10 fat. Datum Is mesa GEORGI A0
% NASSAU
40
A K E-R -NOL USaIA 0
04
e. O~
CLA0 0 10 20 MILES 20
P U T N
GILC"alST A LA H A !/
LL L
UMAER C
OLSINOL
P A SCO0
Figure 3. Map of Florida showing the piezometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in feet above sea level, July 1961.
The variability in quality of water from this aquifer is illustrated in figure 4. This figure shows the hardness of water from wells in the greater Jacksonville area. Wells west of the St. Johns River and south of Ortega River entrance yield the best water. This water has a hardness contents CaCO3 of 200 ppm or less. Elsewhere in the county, the hardness ranges from 200 ppm to about 400 ppn. The hardest water is produced from wells in southeastern Duval County and on




W 1"30" R4E R25E R25E 45 R26E 40' R26E R27E 35' R27E R28E 30 25' 81*22'30" 3c 3d 30- 30'
17 T1 -250
EXPLANATION 250 T ISI
- 3w-- Line of aquc! hardness
(as CaCO3) in mIlligrams per 0
Idter of water a the Floridan Z,
for. Dashd where inferrd.
0 Q,
rAI
25 .JACKSONVILLE
CO ATLANTIL B BEACH
250 JAISONVILLE BEC
90
o IA AIA DVAL. COUN TY
1.T JOHNS ouNTY
a. A. a o
1500
Zo~ctao"
T.35 R25EL 30UTY 7 T0 3 R47 I 2 ERtE R 9 8 2 3
Figur 4.MpsoigOhUadesNfwtrfoTteFoiaYaufri heJcsnil
area.




RE R25E 0 R5E 4 26E 40 R26E R27E R27E R28E 25 812230 II3030'
I
11
I
11
_ EXPLANATION
T iS 0 Public water supply well.
Municipal water utility.
Privtely or copoately anod wat
an table 10.
25tlitary water systent 6 AI
72I
IAI
T 35 Duv4L Co0UN TY T-3S T43
T 2S 0 T 45
CLATvACOUNTY
C R27E R29E R ~2BE R29E 2230E
Figure 5. Map of the Jacksonville area showing the location of the municipal, privately or corporately owned utitilies, and military water systems and the major public supply wells.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 15
Ft. George Island. It is interesting to note that wells northeast of Jacksonville yield slightly softer water than wells in many other parts of the area.
Water from only 3 of more than 60 wells sampled in Duval County exceeded the USPHS drinking water standards for total dissolved solids. Water from one of these wells also exceeded the recommended limit for sulfate. Two of these wells were in extreme southeastern Duval County; the third was on Ft. George Island. All wells had objectionable taste and odor due to hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide concentration ranges from 1.0 to 3.0 ppm. Fluoride is present in concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 0.9 ppm. This is very near the optimum concentration of 0.8 ppm recommended by the USPHS (1962) for similar climatic areas. The dissolved iron content is less than 0.3 ppm.
Water from this aquifer used for public supplies is treated by aeration to remove hydrogen sulfide, then chlorinated.
The suitability of water from the Floridan aquifer for industry depends on the intended use. In some industrial uses, softening and removal of hydrogen sulfide would be necessary. This water would also require treatment for use as boiler feed water.
WATER PRODUCTION AND USE
Before 1884 water supplies in the Jacksonville area were obtained from surface streams and from a few wells drilled into the surficial sand aquifer and the limestone, shell and sand aquifer. In 1884 the city of Jacksonville drilled two wells in the Floridan aquifer and obtained fresh artesian water for public supplies. At present, all major water supplies in the area are obtained from wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. Numerous smaller water supplies are also obtained from wells drilled into the limestone, shell and sand aquifer.
PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES
There are three categories of public water supply systems in the Jacksonville area: municipally owned water utilities, privately or corporately owned water utilities, and military water systems. All three furnish water for residential, commercial, and industrial use. Figure 5 shows the distribution of the municipal, privately or corporately owned, and military water systems in the area and the location of the major public supply wells. As shown, Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach each have municipally owned water systems that furnish water to customers both within the municipal limits and in some adjacent areas outside of the municipal limits. Most of the areas outside of the municipalities obtain water from more than 150 privately owned water utilities. A number of the privately owned utilities supply water to only a few private residences or commercial establishments and are not included on figure
5.
JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL SUPPLY
The largest water utility in the area is owned and operated by the city of Jacksonville. Figure 6 shows the wells and the distribution system of the




16 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
-Are.
:7 f
-NOW
4k EXPLANATION
* Well
O Elevcated stoma tcmk g round staage tank
- Distribution lns 12" to 20
- Distritiem lines 10w
- Distrilbutlo lies 8"
Figure 6. Map showing the City of Jacksonville municipal water-distribution system and the
municipal water wells.
Jacksonville municipal utility. As shown in the figure, water is presently obtained from 47 wells which are located in seven well fields throughout the city. At each well field the water is pumped from the wells into ground storage reservoirs and then into the various distribution-ines. The pumping and storage
facilities at each of the well fields is shown in table 7.




TABLE 7. PUMPING AND STORAGE FACILITIES OF THE JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL WATER uTILITY, 1966.
Facilities Main Street McDuff Fairfax Lakeshore Norwood Hendricks River Oaks Total (rounded)
WELLS
Number 14 7 8 4 3 4 7 47 Pumping Capacity
-GPM 17,450 14,900 8,250 11,400 6,750 5,000 7,550 71,000
--4GD 25.13 21.5 11.9 16.42 9.72 7.2 10.87 103
RESERVOIRS Ground storage
capacity (MG) 4 6 2.5 2.5 1.5 0.79 1.76 19
Elevated storage
capacity (MG) None 1.0 None None 1.5 None 1.0 3.5
STATION LOADS Max. pumping
rate (MGD) 14.5 14.5 9.7 11.26 8.64 3.75 8.88 71 o00
Peak pumping
rate (MGD) 18.75 18.75 17.2 13.0 8.64 7.12 10.88 94
..




18 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
TABLE 8. WATER WITHDRAWALS BY THE JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITY IN 1966.
Total Daily
yearly average
Metered water connections Number withdrawals withdrawals
(mg) (mg)
Inside city
Single commercial, industrial & business 4,090 2,229.8 6.100 Multi-commercial, industrial & business 524 216.8 .600 Monthly services:
Commercial, industrial, residential & municipal 115 1,737.3 4.800 Single family residential 35,847 2,749.3 7.500 Multi-family residential 7,950 1,251.4 3.400 Automatic sprinkler service 414 7.4 .020 Charitable institutions 49 322.7 .880 Public & parochial 118 100.4 .280 Municipal 470 474.2 1.300 TOTAL INSIDE CITY 49,577 9,089.3 24.880
Outside city
Single commercial, industrial & business 713 307.8 .840 Multi-commercial, industrial & business 94 24.6 .070 Monthly services:
Commercial, industrial, residential & municipal 3 .5 .001 Single family residential 13,366 1,171.6 3.200 Multi-family water service 457 67.8 .190 Automatic sprinkler service so50 2.9 .010 Charitable institutions 6 11.8 .030 Public & parochial 19 34.3 .100 TOTAL OUTSIDE CITY 14,708 1,621.3 4.441 TOTAL TO METERED ACCOUNTS 64,285 10,710.6 29.321 TOTAL UNMETERED WITHDRAWALS 2,447.3 6.700 TOTAL WITHDRAWALS 13,157.9 36.000
As shown in the table, the total maximum pumping capacity from the wells is 101.45 mgd, and the storage capacity of the ground reservoirs is 19.05 mg. An additional 3.5 mg of water is stored in five elevated storage tanks in the distribution system (figure 6).
The amount of water produced by the Jacksonville municipal utility in 1966 is shown in table 8. As shown, the City produced a total of about 13.158 billions of gallons or an average of about 36.0 mgd. It supplied water to 64,285 metered water connections both inside and outside of the city, including 49,213 single-family residences.
The water is treated at each distribution station before and after it enters the distribution lines. It is aerated to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas before it enters the ground storage reservoir. After the water enters the distribution lines,




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 19 it is chlorinated to eliminate any bacteriological contamination from the aeration tanks and the ground storage reservoirs.
OTHER MUNICIPAL SUPPLIES
Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach have separate municipally owned and operated water supply systems in the area (figure 5). Each of these municipalities produce water from two or more wells completed in the Floridan aquifer. The water is pumped from these wells into ground storage reservoirs and elevated storage tanks and then into distribution systems. All the water is aerated and chlorinated and at Jacksonville Beach the water is softened by zeolite before it enters the distribution system.
Table 9 shows the number of wells and water storage capacity at each of these municipalities and number of metered connections and average daily pumpage in 1966. As shown in the table, in 1966 they produced a total average of about 3.0 mgd to supply 6,350 domestic, commercial, and industrial metered connections. The estimated total population supplied by these municipal utilities was about 21,000 during that year.
TABLE 9. MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES, NUMBER OF METERED
CONNECTIONS AND AVERAGE DAILY PUMPAGE AT JACKSONVILLE BEACH,
NEPTUNE BEACH, AND ATLANTIC BEACH IN 1966.
Number of Average
Number Ground Storage Elevated storage metered water daily
Municipality of wells capacity capacity connections pumpage
(mg) (mg) (mg)
Jacksonville Beach 6 1.4 0.45 3,700 1.9 Neptune Beach 3 .2 .3 1,250 .5 Atlantic Beach 2 .2 .1 1,400 .6 TOTAL 11 1.8 0.85 6,350 3.0
PRIVATELY OR CORPORATELY OWNED WATER UTILITIES
Many urban areas surrounding Jacksonville are supplied water by privately or corporately owned utilities.
There are probably more than 150 nonmunicipal water-supply systems in the area, but many supply water to only a few domestic or commercial services. They each obtain water from one or more wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. All of the larger water utilities are operated according to Florida State Board of Health standards; the water is treated before it is pumped into the distribution systems, and there are adequate ground or elevated storage facilities. Some of the smaller water systems have no water treatment or storage facilities, and the water is pumped directly from the well into the distribution systems.




20 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
Each of the nonmunicipal utilities supply water within specific areas such as suburban housing developments, apartment houses, trailer parks, and shopping centers. The larger utilities provide both water supplies and sewage disposal service to these areas.
Table 10 lists the 89 largest, privately or corporately owned water utilities in the Jacksonville area. The table also lists the number of production wells that supply each utility, the approximate number of connections, and the estimated average daily pumpage of each utility in 1966. The utilities that supply more than 40 services (except apartments and trailer parks) and the production wells that supply these utilities are located on the map in figure 5.
About 41,500 homes, commercial and industrial establishments are supplied with water by the 89 nontmunicipal water utilities shown in table 10. The largest utility supplies water to about 3,600 connections. Eleven utilities each supply water to more than 1,000 connections, 52 utilities each supply water to between about 100 and 1,000 connections, and 26 utilities each supply water to less than 100 connections. At least 60 other smaller water supply systems in the area, not listed in the table, each supply water to a few homes or commercial establishments.
The estimated average daily pumpage of the utilities listed on table 10 ranges from about 0.002 to 4.0 mgd, and the total average daily pumpage is about 21.5 mgd. If all of the smaller water systems not listed on the table were included, it is estimated that the total average daily pumpage from nonmunicipal water utilities in the area would be about 22 mgd.
MILITARY WATER SYSTEMS
Two large naval bases in the area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, and U.S. Naval Station, Mayport, each withdraw and distribute water for domestic, cooling, irrigation, and various other uses. Both naval stations obtain water from wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. The water is treated and distributed in a manner similar to that supplied by the municipal and large nonmunicipal utilities in the area. It is pumped from the wells into aeration tanks and ground or elevated storage reservoirs, and it is then chlorinated and pumped into the various distribution lines. The location of these water systems and the production wells that supply each system are shown on the map in figure 5.
The number of wells, water storage capacity, average daily pumpage, and percentage use of water at each naval station in 1966 is listed in table 11. As shown in the table, in 1966 the Naval Air Station at Jacksonville withdrew about 3.5 mgd from 6 wells in the Floridan aquifer, and the Naval Station at Mayport withdrew about 2.0 mgd from 2 wells. About 40 to 50 percent of the water was used for domestic supplies, 30 percent was used for cooling, 20 percent was used for maintenance and repair, boiler feed, washing equipment, supplying ships, and various other uses on the stations.
A number of wells at each naval station are not included in table 11 and are not located in figure 5 because they are not part of the water systems; however,




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO.58 21
TABLE 10. MAJOR NON-MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITIES IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966.
Approximate Estimated daily
No. on Name or area No. of no. of average pumpage figure 5 served wells connections (mgd)
1 Alderman Park 1 586 .274 2 Arlington Community 4 2,000 1.200 3 Arlington Hills 2 2,000 1.500 4 Arlington Manor 2 605 .146 5 Arlingwood 2 790 .175
6 Beachhaven 1 75 .080 7 Beechwood 1 165 .037 8 Beacon Hills & Harbor 1 200 .075 9 Beaucleric Gardens 1 82 .017 10 Brackridge 1 160 .070
11 Brookview (Arlington East) 1 800 .400 12 Cedar Forest 1 77 .015 13 Cedar Hills 3 3,600 4.000 15 Cedar Shores 1 175 .043
16 Center Park 1 150 .150 17 Clifton (Arlington Bluff) 1 212 .060 18 Edenfield Terrace 1 71 .016 19 Fleetwood 1 95 .034 20 Floradale 1 243 .090
21 Forrest Brook 1 130 .040 22 Ft. Carolyn Club Estates 1 570 .250 23 Glenlea Annex 1 44 .010 24 Greenfield Manor 1 120 .040 25 Grove Park 1 150 .048
26 Harbor View 1 443 .113 27 Highlands 2 1,660 1.000 28 Holiday Hills 1 500 .800 29 Holly Oaks Forrest 1 234 .080 30 Hyde Grove Acres 1 183 .070
31 Killarney Shores 1 70 .030 32 Lake Forrest 1 752 .200 33 Lake Lucina & St. Johns Utilities 1 2,400 1.000 34 Lake Shore 1 450 .150 35 Lakewood 1 1,276 1.000
36 Leon Terrace 1 112 .022 37 Lovegrove Acres 1 124 .042 38 Lynwood 1 150 .050 39 Magnolia Gardens 1 750 .275 40 Mandarin Terrace 1 121 .040 41 Milmar Manor 1 100 .040 42 Normandy 1 590 .136 43 Normandy Hills 1 90 .040 44 Normandy Village 1 1,000 .500 75 Oceanway Manor 1 143 .046
45 Oak Harbor 1 320 .090 46 Oak Hill 1 520 .250 47 Oak Hills Manor 1 980 .750 48 Ortega Hills 1 450 .140 49 Pablo Keys 1 77 .022




22 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
TABLE 10. CONTINUED
Approximate Estimated daily
No. on Name or area No. of no. of average pumpage figure 5 served wells connections (mgd)
50 Queen Acres 1 275 .070 51 Ribault Heights 2 411 .100 73 Ribault Hills 1 186 .070 52 Ridgeland Gardens 1 130 .070 53 Riverview 1 200 .50
54 Rodgers Construction Company 1 569 .250 55 Roosevelt Gardens 1 786 .300 56 Sandalwood 1 408 .100 57 San Cleric Estates (Brierwood) 1 100 .040 58 San Jose 2 2,000 1.000
59 San Jose Shores 1 67 .030 60 San Mageo 1 610 .160 61 San Souci 1 1,354 .700 62 Santa Monica 2 1,100 .400 63 Sherwood Forest 1 1,600 .500
64 Southside Estates 3 2,080 1.100 65 Springdale 2 733 .153 66 Thompson's Riverview 1 240 .080 67 Tidewater 1 161 .042 68 University Park 1 315 .150
69 Venetia Terrace 1 230 .100 70 Washington Heights 1 200 .075 71 Westgate (Rolling Hills) 1 395 .110 72 Westwood 1 70 .030 74 Isle of Palms (N.) 1 123 .040
NOT PLOTTED ON FIGURE 5
Acadie 1 35 .010 Allenby Apartments 1 108 .030 Biscane Terrace 1 25 .010 Bishop Homes 2 25 .010 Bon Air 1 10 .003 Cedar River Forest 2 33 .008 Duclay 1 30 .010 Fairmont 1 10 .003 Julington Hills 1 12 .003 Loretto Springs 1 10 .002 Maybrook 1 102 .030 170
Morningside-on-St. Johns 1 25 .010 Ortega Shores 1 15 .003 Pickwick Park 1 35 .015 Southwood 1 12 .003
1 TOTALS (rounded) 100 42,000 21.
2 apartments
3 homes
trailers




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 23
TABLE 11. WELLS, WATER STORAGE FACILITIES,
AVERAGE DAILY PUMPAGE AND USE OF WATER AT U.S. NAVAL STATIONS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966.
Station Number Storage Average Water use
of wells capacity daily (percent)
Ground Elevated (mg) Domestic Cooling Irrigation Other
Naval Air Station, Jacksonville
Water Plant No.1 3 1.3 .25 1.40 Water Plant No.2 1 .3 .25 1.15 Water Plant No.3 1 .3 .65 Hospital 1 .2 .25 .30
TOTAL 6 2.1 .75 3.50 50 30 10 10
Naval Station,
Mayport 2 .05 .25 2.00 40 30 10 20
they are used irregularly for auxiliary supplies, fire protection and for irrigation. These wells yielded an estimated 0.2 to 0.4 mgd so that the total amount of water withdrawn by the naval stations in the area in 1966 was about 6.0 mgd.
PRIVATE SUPPLIES
Many parts of the Jacksonville area are not served by any water utility (figure 5), and water supplies are obtained from privately owned wells. There are about 150,000 private dwellings in the Jacksonville area (Jacksonville-Duval Area Planning Board, 1967), and about 100,000 of these are served by municipal or nonmunicipal water utilities. About 50,000 homes in the area obtain all of their domestic supplies from privately owned wells.
In areas served by municipal or nonmunicipal water utilities, many homes have privately owned wells to supplement the supplies from the water utilities. Estimates made from field observations, drillers' records, and records from the City Health Department indicate that there are between 5,000 and 10,000 wells at private dwellings served by water utilities.
Most of the privately owned domestic wells are completed in the limestone, shell and sand aquifer; however, about 2,000 to 3,000 are completed in the Floridan aquifer. Wells in both aquifers are generally less than 2 inches in diameter, and the water is pumped from the wells into pressure tanks by small capacity jet pumps. Most of these domestic supplies are not treated except locally where the water in the limestone, shell and sand aquifer has a relatively high iron content.




24 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
The average yield of these small diameter domestic wells in the limestone, shell, and sand aquifer is between 200 and 400 gpd for household use; however, some of the wells completed in the Floridan aquifer yield more than 10,000 gpd, particularly during the spring and summer months when they are used for lawn sprinkling and swimming pools. It is estimated that between 55,000 and 65,000 private domestic wells in the Jacksonville area produce a total of between 10.0 and 25.0 mgd from the limestone, shell and sand aquifer and about 5.0 mgd from the Floridan aquifer.
INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES
Many industries and commercial buildings in the Jacksonville area obtain all of their water supplies from municipal or privately or corporately owned water utilities; however, others obtain all or a part of their supplies from their own wells. A few of these wells tap the limestone, shell and sand aquifer but most tap the Floridan aquifer.
Drillers' records and inventories of wells made by the city of Jacksonville and the Geological Survey indicate that there are between 500 and 1,000 industrial and commercial wells completed in the Floridan aquifer throughout the Jacksonville area. Many of these are small diameter wells that supply limited amounts of water for washing, toilets, drinking, and swimming pools to stores, motels, fishing camps, gasoline stations, and other small commercial buildings. Some of these wells supply relatively large amounts of water to industries and large commercial buildings for processing, cooling and heating, washing equipment and materials, and various other uses.
During this investigation, an inventory was made of 150 major industries and large commercial buildings that have their own water wells. Of the 150 industries and commercial establishments that were inventoried, 76 withdrew at least 0.1 mgd from their own wells. The remainder obtained most of their supplies from municipal or nonmunicipal utilities and withdrew less than 0.1 mgd from their own wells.
Table 12 lists the 76 inventoried industrial and commercial water systems in the -area that produce at least 0.1 mgd. The table also lists the number of wells supplying each system, the use of water, and the estimated average daily pumpage of each system in 1966. The location of the wells that supply each industry and commercial building listed in the table are shown by corresponding numbers on the map in figure 7.
The 76 industrial and commercial water systems listed in the table withdrew about 62 mgd from 165 wells in the Floridan aquifer in 1966. Two paper manufacturers pumped about 26 mgd for the processing of wood pulp. Fifty various other industries withdrew about 26 mgd primarily for cooling, processing, and washing equipment and materials. About 2.4 mgd was withdrawn by cemeteries and golf courses in the area for irrigation; however, there was considerable seasonal variation in the amount of water pumped. Considerably more water was withdrawn during the relatively dry winter and




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 25
TABLE 12. MAJOR COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL WATER SYSTEMS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966.
Number Average daily Name of Water pumpage in 1966
(No. on figure 7) wells use (mg)
MANUFACTURE OF PAPER
1. Alton Box Works 5 cooling-20% process-75%
boiler feed-5% 7.00
2. St. Regis Paper Co. 7 cooling-30% process-65%
boiler feed-5% 19.00 TOTAL 26.00 MANUFACTURE OF CHEMICALS, PAINTS, & FERTILIZERS
3. Allied Petro 1 cooling-85%
Products boiler feed &
other-15% .10 4. American Norit 1 process & boiler feed .12 5. Apperson Chemical 1 cooling & boiler feed .10
6. Armour Agricultural 1 cooling-30%
Chem. process-60%
boiler feed-5% .60
7. Glidden Co. 7 cooling-90% process-8%
boiler feed-2% 5.70 8. Jones Chemical 1 cooling & process .15 9. Liquid Carbonic 3 cooling & process 1.50 10. Nat. Cylinder Gas 1 cooling & other .40 11. Nelio Chemical 2 cooling-90%
(Union Bag-Camp) boiler feed-5%
other-5% 2.00 12. Reichold Chemical 1 cooling & process .30 13. Wilson & Toomer 3 cooling-50% process-48%
boiler feed-2% 1.00 TOTAL 11.97 WIRE & METAL PRODUCTS 14. Buffalo Tank 1 cooling & process .30 15. C. I. Capps Co. 1 cooling .20 16. Container Wire Prod. 1 cooling & process .20 17. Fla. Machine & Foundry 1 cooling & process .30 18. Fla. Wire & Cable 1 cooling & process .20 19. Ivy Steel & Wire 2 cooling & process .90 TOTAL 2.10 BUILDING MATERIALS & CEMENT MANUFACTURE 20. Capitol Concrete 4 process & washing equip. .10 21. Houdaille-Duval-Wright 2 process & washing equip. .10 22. McCormick Concrete 2 process & washing equip. .10 23. Moore Dry Kiln 1 process & boiler feed .10 24. Southern Materials 5 process & washing equip. .20 25. U.S. Gypsum 2 cooling-2% process-98% 1.50 TOTAL 2.10




26 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY TABLE 12. CONTINUED
Number Average daily Name of Water pumpage in 1966
(No. on figure 7) wells use (mg)
DAIRY PRODUCTS
26. Alpine Dairy 1 cooling & washing .10 27. Berriers Ice Cream 1 cooling & washing .30 28. Holly Hill Dairy 2 cooling-40% washing-60% .50 29. Meadowbrook Dairy 1 cooling & washing .20 30. Perrets Dairy 3 cooling, washing & irrigation .70 31. Southern Dairy (Sealtest) 1 cooling & washing .30 32. Skinners Dairy 3 cooling, washing & irrigation .60 33. Superior Dairy 2 cooling & washing .30 TOTAL 3.00 FOOD PACKAGING & PROCESSING
34. Gold Merit Packing 1 cooling & washing .30 Company
35. Jones Chambliss 1 cooling & washing .20 Meat Packing Co.
36. Lewis Crabmeat Co. 1 washing .10 37. Mullis Poultry Co. 1 cooling & washing .10 38. Painter Poultry Co. 2 cooling & washing .80 TOTAL 1.50 ICE MAKING & COLD STORAGE
39. All Seasons Ice & Fuel 1 cooling & process .10 40. Atlantic Co. 1 cooling & process 1.40 41. City Products Corp. 1 cooling & process .50 42. Duval Ice & Coal Co. 1 cooling & process .50 43. Jacksonville Ice 1 cooling 1.50 & Cold Storage
44. Patternson Cold Storage 1 cooling 1.10 45. Public Quick Freezing 1 cooling & Cold Storage Co. .70 TOTAL 5.80 LAUNDRIES
46. Duval Laundry 1 washing .30 47. Independent Laundry 1 washing .10 TOTAL .40
MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES
48. Jacksonville Shipyards 3 cooling & washing .40 49. Jacksonville Terminal 1 cooling & washing .20 50. King Edward Cigar 1 cooling & irrigation .10
Company
51. Seaboard Airline 2 washing & other .10 52. Wooten Fibre 1 process .20 TOTAL 1.00




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 27
TABLE 12. CONTINUED
Number Average daily Name of Water pumpage in 1966
(No. on figure 7) wells use (mg)
CEMETERIES & GOLF COURSES
53. Beaucleric C. C. 2 irrigation & swimming pool .20 54. Brentwood Golf Course 2 irrigation .30 55. Deerwood C. C. 1 irrigation & other .20 56. Evergreen Cemetary 5 irrigation .40 57. Greenlawn Cemetary 1 irrigation .20 58. Jacksonville Beach 1 irrigation .20
Golf Course
59. Oaklawn Cemetary 1 irrigation .20 60. Pine Tree Golf C. 1 irrigation .30 61. San Jose C. C. 2 irrigation & swimming pool .20 62. Timuquana C. C. 1 irrigation & other .20 TOTAL 2.40 COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS
63. Ambassador Hotel 1 cooling & other .20 64. Blvd. Center Industrial 7 cooling
Park .60 65. Floridan Hotel 1 cooling & other .30 66. Food Fair & Fields Stores 4 cooling & other 1.50 67. Kings Dept. Store 1 cooling .50 68. May-Cohens Dept. Store 1 cooling & other .10 69. Mayflower Hotel 1 cooling & other .40 70. Murry Hill Barnet Bank 1 cooling .20 71. Prudential Bldg. 1 cooling & irrigation .10 72, Seminole Hotel 1 cooling & other .40 TOTAL 4.30 PUBLIC FACILITIES & SCHOOLS
73. Duval County Schools 25 irrigation .50 74. Imeson Airport 2 irrigation, washing & other .30 75. Jacksonville 6 boiler, irrigation,
Elec. Gen. Sta. other .20 76. Jacksonville 2 irrigation, domestic,
University swimming pool, & other .30 TOTAL 1.30 TOTAL WELLS 165 Total 76 inventoried indus 62.00
Total 75 indus not listed 5.00 Total (Estimate) other indus
not listed 5.00 TOTAL 72.00




28 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY spring months than during the summer and fall months when there was an abundance of rainfall. Ten commercial water systems withdrew about 4.3 mgd primarily for air conditioning during the sumner months, and various schools and public facilities withdrew about 1.3 mgd for irrigation, boiler feed, and various other uses.
Seventy-four other industries and commercial buildings that were inventoried during this investigation each pumped less than 0.1 mgd from their own wells and are not listed in table 12. These smaller water systems were either used infrequently for auxiliary supplies or for fire protection or only pumped limited amounts of water for air conditioners, lawn sprinkling, or toilet facilities. It is estimated that these 74 smaller industrial and commercial water systems pumped a total of about 5 mgd from wells in the Floridan aquifer.
Although most of the industrial and commercial water supplies in the Jacksonville area are withdrawn by the 150 water systems that were inventoried during this investigation, the hundreds of smaller water systems that were not inventoried also withdraw some water from the Floridan aquifer. Most of these smaller systems have wells that are less than three inches in diameter and can withdraw a maximum of about 0.5 mgd; however, many of these wells are either not in use or yield less than 0.01 mgd for small air-conditioning units, lawn sprinkling, or toilet facilities. Assuming that there are 500 such wells in the area yielding an average of about 0.01 mgd, then the total average daily pumpage from these smaller industrial and commercial water systems would be about 5 mgd. This would probably be the minimum amount of water withdrawn because some of these systems are probably withdrawing more than 0.01 mgd, and there may be as many as 1,000 wells yielding water from the aquifer.
LAKES AND PONDS SUPPLIED BY WELLS AND UNCONTROLLED FLOWING WELLS Relatively large quantities of water are available from wells completed in the Floridan aquifer at most locations in the Jacksonville area by gravity flow (Leve, 1966). One use of this readily available supply of fresh water from the Floridan aquifer is to supplement water in various lakes and ponds in the area. Water flowing from wells helps maintain a constant level of fresh water in these lakes and ponds so that they may be utilized for watering stock, irrigation, mosquito control, recreation, or improvement of real estate by their scenic value. The wells are allowed to flow continuously in some of the lakes and ponds, and the excess water is drained off through surface streams. In other lakes and ponds, the wells are allowed to flow only during dry periods when the surface water levels become excessively low.
Figure 7 shows the location of the major wells in the area that are utilized to supplement surface lakes and ponds. The type and use of each lake and pond, the number of wells and the approximate average daily flow from these supply wells are listed in table 13. As listed in the table, 13 wells produce about 7 rngd from the Floridan aquifer to supplement the water in various lakes and ponds in




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EXPLANATION 17 A
73 Commerdal or industrial well.
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n table M 24 22
2 35
Electric generating station. Number 74 75
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Figure 7. Map of Jacksonville area showing location of major industrial and commercial wells, wells supplying lakes and ponds and electric generating stations.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO.58 29 TABLE 13. LAKES AND PONDS IN THE JACKSONVILLE
AREA THAT ARE SUPPLIED WITH WATER FROM ARTESIAN WELLS IN 1966.
Type of Approximate Number surface average daily Number on of lake or Use pumpage or figure 7 wells pond flow from wells
(mg)
1. 1 small lake on stock, irrigation 0.5 private farm
2. 1 small lake on stock, irrigation .05 private farm
3. 2 about 8 moats scenic, recreation 1.5 and lake at
City Zoo
4. 1 fountains and scenic, recreation 0.8 small lake at
City Zoo
5. 1 small lake in scenic, recreation 0.8 residential area
6. 1 Lake Lucina scenic, recreation 0.2 7. 1 Lake San Jose scenic, recreation 0.8 8. 1 fountain and scenic 0.4 scenic gardens
at private home
9. 1 Spanish pond scenic, mosquito 0.5 at Ft. Caroline control
Nat Monument
10. 1 pond at stock, irrigation 0.8 private farm
11. 1 lake at scenic, irrigation, 0.1 Jacksonville mosquito control
Beach
12. 1 Lake Casa Linda scenic 1.0 at Naval Air
Station
TOTAL (rounded) 8.0
the Jacksonville area.
About 20 percent of the Wells completed in the Floridan aquifer that were inventoried during this study were abandoned or not properly maintained and water from the aquifer was continuously flowing at the surface from the casing or broken or faulty well fittings. There is no gainful use of this water, and it either sinks into the surrounding soil or is drained off through surface streams.
The amount of water that flows from each of these wells varies from less than 10 gpm from 2-inch diameter wells with faulty valves that cannot be closed to more than 300 gpm from 4- to 6-inch diameter wells that have no fittings to stop the flow of water from the wells. The total amount of water flowing from all of




30 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
the uncontrolled wells that were inventoried during this study is estimated to be about 10 mgd. However, there are undoubtedly many more uncontrolled wells that were not located during this investigation, and the total flow of water from all of these wells may be as much as 15 mgd.
SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES
GENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER
All electric power in the area is generated by steam-driven turbines. The steam is derived from water from the Floridan aquifer that is carefully processed to remove most of the mineral content. Water from the St. Johns River is used to cool and condense the steam so that it can be reused. The cooling water is taken directly from the river through large intake pipes and circulated through cooling condensers and then discharged back into the river. The temperature of the water that is discharged back into the river is between 80 and 100F. warmer than the intake water. In some of the electric generating stations, a portion of the pumped river water is also used to cool bearings in the various generating machinery.
Three municipally owned and two privately owned electric generating stations exist in the Jacksonville area. Table 14 lists the approximate electric generating capacity and the average amount of surface water used for cooling by each of these stations. As listed in the table, the five plants have a total electric generating capacity of about 947,600 kw, and they use about 863 mgd from the river for cooling of condensers. The location of each of these generating stations is shown on figure 7.
TABLE 14. ELECTRIC GENERATING STATIONS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA AND WATER USED FOR COLLING IN 1966.
Plant Amount of
Number on capacity cooling water
figure 7 Owner and location (kw) (mgd)
1. City of Jacksonville-Northside 275,600 216
(Began operation November 13, 1966)
2. City of Jacksonville-Kennedy 310,000 248 3. City of Jacksonville-Southside 320,000 317 4. St. Regis Paper Company-Eastport 30,000 60 5. Alton Box Company 12,000 22
TOTAL 947,600 863
VARIATIONS IN THE WITHDRAWAL AND USE OF WATER
The amount of water that is withdrawn in the Jacksonville area is constantly changing to meet the demands of the population and industry in the area. Continuous records of pumpage of municipal water supply wells indicate hourly, daily, weekly, and seasonal variations in the rate of withdrawal because of




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 31
variations in demand. For example, withdrawal of water from municipal wells is greatest on weekdays and during the afternoon and evening hours when domestic, commercial, and industrial water use is at a maximum. Withdrawal is much less on weekends and during late evening and early morning hours when domestic, commercial, and industrial use is at a minimum. However, these hourly and daily variations are relatively small compared to seasonal variations and long-term trends in the withdrawal and use of water in the area.
The use of water varies considerably because of seasonal changes in temperature and rainfall. Much more water is used for lawn sprinkling, air conditioning, swimming pools, and domestic consumption during warm, dry periods than during cool, wet periods. Figure 8 shows the monthly and total annual pumpage of water from the city of Jacksonville municipal wells, the monthly and total annual precipitation and average monthly temperatures at Jacksonville from 1962 to 1966. A comparison of the monthly pumpage and temperature graphs on the figure shows that the withdrawal of water is much greater during the relatively warm late spring and summer months than during the relatively cool late fall and winter months. The highest monthly pumpage was during May, 1962, and May, 1965, when the temperatures were high and the rainfall was excessively low. The lowest monthly pumpage was during February, 1963, and February, 1964, when the average temperatures were low and the rainfall was excessively high for these months. The difference between the maximum and minimum monthly pumpage for each year shown on figure 8 ranged from 345 mg in 1966 to 840 mg in 1962.
A comparison of total annual rainfall and pumpage in figure 8 shows that more water is produced during years of relatively low rainfall than during years of relatively high rainfall. About 728 mg more water was pumped from municipal wells in 1962 when the annual rainfall was only 43.9 inches than in 1964 when the annual rainfall was 65 inches, even though the 1964 potential demand due to increased population and industrial growth was greater.
The average annual withdrawal of water in the Jacksonville area has continuously increased over the past years to meet the demands created by increased population and industrial growth. Figure 9 compares the volume of water pumped from the Floridan aquifer by the city of Jacksonville municipal utility from 1921 to 1966, the estimated total pumpage from the aquifer by all of the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area from 1947 to 1966, and the population of Duval County from 1920 to 1966. The figure also shows projections of future population and water withdrawal to 1980.
A comparison of the graphs in the figure show that withdrawal of water generally increased in direct relation to the population. The withdrawal of water by the city of Jacksonville municipal utility increased from 6.5 to 36 mgd during the 45-year period of record, and the total withdrawal of water by all of the municipal and non-municipal water utilities in the area increased from about 27 mgd to 60 mgd from 1947 to 1966.
The graphs show that the total withdrawals of water by all of the municipal




I 05 Temperature, degree
IS -fohrenhelf 8 0
- 10 - - *- --- -- 75
8070
6 - - -- -- --- 65
4 60
21 I 196 19650 50
Figure( 8. Gr aphs showing the total monthly production froni Jaoksonviflo municipal weUs
00and th oal monthly tmprtu at ksonvlU.
1200 *-Total- otlWtl- ota tol-01 IS 90 I 1174 m11 MI1 5
JIPIMIAIMIJI 01NID J MIAIM S101NID J MIA Mi 1 INIDIJ II AIM J IA I INIDJ' M AIMIJI II N D
1921931964 1965 1966
Figure 8. Graphs showing the total monthly production from Jacksonvillo municipal walls
and the total monthly temperature at Jacksonymol.




90- 700
so EXPLANATION $,00
o Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census 1.0
0 Projections, University of Florida, Bureau of
S70 Economic and Business Research, -500
* Estimates, University of Florida, Bureau of Economic and Business Research,
- Dashed where Inferred
. o - soo,"
30 tilites 100
20 City of Jacksonville 00
10 I
I I I I I I I I i I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I ~ lII Il l I I i I 1 1 1 1
Figure 9. Graphs showing past withdrawals and projections of future water withdrawals by municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area.




34 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY and nonmunicipal water utilities has increased at a much faster rate than withdrawal by the city of Jacksonville municipal water utility. This was caused to some extent by slight declines in domestic and commercial water services with the city; however, the principal reason was an increase in population and commercial and industrial development in suburban areas which are primarily served by nonmunicipal water utilities.
The increase in total pumpage of water by all of the numerous individual domestic, industrial, and commercial water systems in the area is indicated by the number of private wells drilled in the area each year. Records of drillers and permits issued by the city of Jacksonville show that between 1,000 and 1,500 new wells were drilled each year between 1946 and 1966. Most of these were small diameter wells drilled into the limestone, shell and sand aquifer to provide relatively small quantities of water for domestic supplies. However, each year between 100 and 150 wells are drilled into the limestone, shell and sand aquifer and between 50 and 60 wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer to provide relatively large quantities of water for new and expanding industries and commercial establishments. The rate of increase in withdrawals by these individual domestic, industrial, and commercial water systems over the past years is probably similar to the rate of increase of withdrawal by the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area.
FUTURE WATER PRODUCTION
According to estimates made by the University of Florida, Bureau of Economic and Business Research (Beller, 1967; personal communication), there will be about a 30-percent increase in the population in Duval County from 1966 to 1980. In addition, according to present trends, many of the industries in the area will expand and new industries will move into the Jacksonville area. As a result, there will be an increased demand for water from both municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities and from military, private domestic, industrial and commercial water systems. As a result, many of the existing wells will be required to supply more water and new wells will be drilled for additional supplies.
Projections of future water withdrawals of municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area to 1980 are shown in figure 9. As shown in the figure, at the present rate of increase of pumpage, the amount of water that will be pumped by the city of Jacksonville water utility in 1980 will be between 40 and 45 mgd, which is an increase of between 10 and 25 percent over the pumpage in 1966. The total amount of water that will be pumped by all of the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area in 1980 will be between 75 and 80 mgd, which is an increase of between 25 and 40 percent over pumpage in 1966.
The projections in figure 9 show that the future water withdrawals of all of the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area will increase at a much faster rate than the city of Jacksonville municipal water utility. However, Z-




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 35 the future withdrawals by the city municipal utility may vary considerably depending upon any expansion of services in the future. For example, in 1967 the city municipal water utility served most of the area within the 1966 corporate limits of Jacksonville and most of the areas outside those corporate limits were served by nonmunicipal utilities (figure 5). If the city municipal water utility were expanded to supply water services to more areas that have recently been annexed by the city (1967), the projected rate of future water production by the city municipal water utility would be much higher than shown in figure 9 and that of the other suppliers would be accordingly lower.
The rate of increase in future water withdrawals by private domestic and commercial water systems will depend on the future expansion of municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities. Many of the present private domestic and commercial wells would be abandoned and fewer private wells would be drilled in the future if municipal or nonmunicipal water utilities were expanded to supply services in areas where all water supplies must presently be obtained from private wells.
The rate of increase of pumpage by industrial water systems will depend largely upon the number and types of industries that expand or move into the Jacksonville area. Considerably more water will be withdrawn if large paper or chemical manufacturing industries rather than other types of industries move into the area.







INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 37 REFERENCES
Beller, R. E
1967 Projections of the population of Florida counties for July 1, 1970 and July 1,
1975: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Univ. of Florida, Population
ser., Bull. 16.
Goolsby, D. A. (see Leve, G. W.) Leve, G. W.
1966 Ground Water in Dural and Nassau Counties, Florida Florion Geol. Survey Rept.
Inv. No. 43.
1966 (and Goolsby, D. A.) Driling of Deep-Test-Monitor Well at Jacksonville: U. S.
Geol. Survey open-file report.
1967 (and Goolsby, D. A.) Test hole in an aquifer with many water-bearing zones at
Jacksonville, Florida: National Water Well Assumation, Ground Water Journal,
V.5, no. 4.
1967 The Floridan Aquifer in Northeast Florida: National Water Well Association;
Ground Water Journal, V.6, no. 2. U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare
1962 Public Health Service drinking water standards: U.S. Public Health Service Pub.
No. 956 (1963).




Full Text

PAGE 1

STATE OF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Robert O. Vernon, Director INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION OF WATER IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA By G. W. Leve and D. A. Goolsby U. S. Geological Survey Prepared by UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY in cooperation with the CITY OF JACKSONVILLE, DUVAL COUNTY and the DIVISION OF GEOLOGY FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION TALLAHASSEE 1969

PAGE 2

Completed manuscript received October 17, 1968 Printed by the Florida Board of Conservation Division of Geology Tallahassee ii

PAGE 3

CONTENTS Page Abstract .................1 Introduction ................2 Purpose and scope ..............3 Acknowledgments ..............3 Summary of water withdrawal ............4 Geographic setting ..............4 Sources and quality of water supplies ... ........5 Surface-water supplies ..............5 Ground-water supplies .. ............7 Surficial sand aquifer .............9 Limestone, shell and sand aquifer ...........11 Floridan aquifer ..............13 Water production and use .... .........15 Public-water supplies. .........15 Jacksonville municipal supply ... ........15 Other municipal supplies ............19 Privately or corporately owned water utilities ........19 Military water systems ... ..........20 Private supplies .............. .23 Industrial and commercial supplies ...........24 Lakes and ponds supplied by wells and uncontrolled flowing wells ....28 Surface water supplies ..............30 Generation of electric power ... .........30 Variations in the withdrawal and use of water .........30 Future water production ... ..........34 References ................ .37 ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1 Map of Florida showing the location of the area covered by this report ..6 2 Generalized geologic section and the aquifers in the Jacksonville area ..7 3 Map of Florida showing the piezometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in feet above sea level, July 1961 ............14 4 Map showing the hardness of water from the Floridan aquifer in the Jacksonville area .... .......... .Facing 14 5 Map of the Jacksonville area showing the location of the municipal, privately or corporately owned utilities, and military water systems and the major public supply wells .... .........Facing 14 6 Map showing the City of Jacksonville municipal water-distribution system and the municipal water wells ............16 7 Map of Jacksonville area showing location of major industrial and commercial wells, wells supplying lakes and ponds and electric generating stations Facing 28 8 Graphs showing the total monthly production from Jacksonville municipal wells and the total monthly temperature at Jacksonville .......32 9 Graphs showing past withdrawals and projections of future water withdrawals by municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area ...33 iii

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TABLES Tables Page 1 Summary of water withdrawal in the Jacksonville area in 1966 ....5 2 Chemical analyses of ground water and surface water in the JacIsonville area .8 3 U.S. Public Health Service drinking-water standards ....... 9 4 Suggested water quality for industrial uses ..........10 5 Suggested water quality tolerance for boiler feed water .... ..11 6 Water quality characteristics and their significance .... ....12 7 Pumping and storage facilities of the Jacksonville municipal water utility, 1966 17 8 Water withdrawals by the Jacksonville municipal water utility in 1966 ..18 9 Municipal v.ater-supply facilities, number of metered connections and average daily pumpage at Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach in 1966 19 10 Major nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area in 1966 ..21 11 Wells, water-storage facilities, average daily pumpage, and use of water at U.S. Naval Stations in the Jacksonville area in 1966 .. ......23 12 Major commercial and industrial water systems in the Jacksonville area in 1966 25 13 Lakes and ponds in the Jacksonville area that are supplied with water from artesian wells in 1966 .. .............29 14 Electric generating stations in the Jacksonville area and water used for cooling in 1966 ................... 30 iv

PAGE 5

PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION OF WATER IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA By G. W. Leve and D. A. Goolsby U. S. Geological Survey ABSTRACT Large quantities of water are available both from numerous surface streams and from underground aquifers in the Jacksonville area; however, the water in most of the surface streams is brackish at least part of the year and is used for limited industrial purposes. The potable water supplies in the area are obtained from wells drilled into one of three aquifers: surficial sand beds; limestone, shell and sand beds between 50 to 150 feet below the surface; and limestone and dolomite beds more than 300 to 600 feet below the surface and about 1,600 feet thick which comprise the Floridan aquifer. The water in the surficial sand aquifer is commonly high in iron content and is subject to local contamination from septic tanks and from polluted or brackish surface streams. It is used primarily for lawn sprinkling. The limestone, shell and sand aquifer contains water suitable for domestic and-most industrial uses; however, it is hard and locally may be high in iron content. The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of potable water in the area. The water in the aquifer ranges in hardness from less than 150 ppm (parts per million) to about 400 ppm as CaCO3 and is suitable for domestic and most industrial uses. The major source of surface water in the Jacksonville area is the St. Johns River; however, the chloride content ranges from less than 100 ppm to more than 10,000 ppm at the Main Street Bridge at Jacksonville. Because of its extreme variability in quality, its use is generally limited to cooling water for electric power generation. The city of Jacksonville municipal water utility pumped an average of about 36 mgd (million gallons per day) in 1966 from 47 wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. The municipal utilities of Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach pumped a total average of about 3 mgd in 1966 from 11 wells in the Floridan aquifer. Eighty-nine large, privately and corporately owned water utilities in the area produced a total average of about 22 mgd in 1966 from 105 wells in the Floridan aquifer. Two large naval bases produced a total average of about 5.5 mgd in 1966 from 8 wells in the Floridan aquifer. Between 55,000 and 65,000 homes in the area are supplied water for all or a part of their domestic needs from small diameter wells. These private wells yielded an estimated 10 to 25 mgd from the limestone, shell and sand aquifer and about 5 mgd from the Floridan aquifer in 1966. One hundred and fifty major industries and commercial buildings inventoried during this investigation withdrew a total average of 67 mgd from wells in the Floridan aquifer in 1966. It is estimated that other industries and commercial

PAGE 6

2 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY establishments that were not inventoried pumped an additional 5 mgd from wells in the Floridan aquifer. Wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer are used to supply water to surface lakes and ponds. In 1966 these wells yielded an average of about 8 mgd to maintain 12 surface lakes and ponds. About 20 percent of all wells inventoried during this and previous investigations continuously yielded water for no gainful use. The amount of water flowing from these "wild" wells was estimated to be about 10 mgd. Five municipal and industrial electric generating plants with a total capacity of 947,600 kilowatts used about 863 mgd of water from the St. Johns River and its tributary streams for cooling in 1966. The city of Jacksonville water utility increased withdrawals of water from 6.5 mgd in 1921 to about 36 mgd in 1966. The average water withdrawals by all of the municipal and privately and corporately owned water utilities in the area increased from 27 mgd in 1947 to 60 mgd in 1966. Between 1950 and 1966 increased population and commercial and industrial development in the suburban areas caused the privately and corporately owned water utilities to increase water withdrawals at a much faster rate than the city of Jacksonville water utility. At the present rate of increase in water withdrawals, the city of Jacksonville water utility will pump between 10 and 25 percent more water in 1980 than at present, and the total pumpage of all of the municipal and privately and corporately owned utilities in the area will be between 25 and 40 percent greater in 1980 than at present. The commercial and industrial water systems are also expected to increase withdrawals in the future, but the rate of increase will depend on expansion of activities, on changes in pattern and amounts of use of water and on the number and types of industries that locate in the area. INTRODUCTION All potable water supplies in the Jacksonville metropolitan area and the eastern part of Duval County are obtained from wells. The surface streams in the area capable of supplying dependable quantities of water are affected by ocean tides and contain brackish water all or part of the time; however, abundant fresh water is available from the underground aquifers. This fresh ground water is one of the most important natural resources of the area and has been a prime factor in its economic and population growth. The ground-water supply has met most of the needs of the population and industry in the area. However, there has been a constant increase in the withdrawals of water from the aquifers to meet the demands of expanding industry and increasing population. As a result, there has been a general decline in the water levels throughout the Jacksonville area with some slight increases in the salt content of the water in some localized areas (Leve, 1966).

PAGE 7

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 3 PURPOSE AND SCOPE Previous to this report there was little comprehensive information on the location of all of the various systems in the Jacksonville area or the amount of water being. withdrawn. Such information is needed before hydrologic conditions in the area, such as the relationship between withdrawals of ground water and declining water levels in the area can be analyzed. In addition, the information can be used as a basis for estimating future water requirements for the area. This report lists and describes the major water supply systems in Jacksonville and adjacent parts of Duval County and includes estimates of the amount of water withdrawn for various uses in 1966. The report also includes projections of future water requirements for the area based on previous and present (1966) water withdrawals. This information should aid local and state officials, consultants, and planners to implement measures to properly develop and conserve water supplies to insure adequate fresh water supplies for the future. The study was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, under the supervision of C. S. Conover, district chief, in cooperation with the city of Jacksonville, Duval County, and the Division of Geology, Florida Board of Conservation as part of an over-all study to appraise the water resources in the area. Except for the municipal utilities and a few large non-municipal utilities and military and industrial water systems, the amounts of water withdrawn are estimated. These estimated amounts are based on: (1) Reported production by water-plant operators, engineers and owners of the various water systems. (2) Water requirements of the various industries and commercial establishments. (3) Number and types of accounts serviced by various water utilities. (4) Number and types of wells that supply these utilities and private water systems. Field checks were made on many of the water systems to determine plant capacity and the actual yield from individual wells. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This investigation was greatly facilitated through the cooperation of many engineers and plant operators of industrial, municipal, military and private water systems in the area. Detailed information on Jacksonville municipal pumpage, distribution and use of water was obtained from the City Electric and Water Engineering Department. Mr. T. B. Prince, Water Utility Manager, Mr. Cyrus Washburn, Manager of Engineering and Chief Engineer, Mr. C. A. Blissitt, Engineer, Mr. D. C. Hendrickson, Associate Engineer, Mr. R. E. Elder, Assistant Engineer, and Mr. J. H. Bowden, General Supervisor all gave of their time to help compile this information. Information on water withdrawal for the generation of electric power was obtained from Mr. T. W. Bostwick, Engineer Manager, and Mr. R. L. Thompson, Production Manager, City Electric Department, and various members of their staff.

PAGE 8

4 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Information on withdrawal and use of water at the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, was provided by Claude T. Madrin, Director of Utilities, Division of Public Works. Much valuable data on industrial and private water systems was obtained with the help of Mr. T. B. Ard, Sanitary Engineer, City Health Department, Mr. T. J. Rousie Jr., Chief Sanitary Engineer, Duval County Health Department, and Mr. J. B. Miller, Director of Division of Water Supply, Mr. E. D. Hayes, Sanitary Engineer, and Mr. Nick Maestro, Acting Director, Division of Industrial Waste, Florida State Board of Health. Background data on industrial trends and population growth in the area was obtained from Mr. R. L Kuroski, Planner, Jacksonville-Duval Area Planning Board and Mr. W. O. Parker, Research Director, Jacksonville Area Chamber of Commerce. Appreciation is expressed for the support and cooperation of the following well drillers who aided by either furnishing file data or general information on different water systems: Duval Drilling Company; Earl Floyd and Son; Gray Well & Pump Company Inc.; Partridge Well Drilling Company; Ricketts Well & Pump Company; Riverview Pump & Well Inc.; O. E. Smith's Sons; and Trout Well Drilling Service. SUMMARY OF WATER WITHDRAWAL A summary of the water withdrawal in the Jacksonville area in 1966 is listed in table 1. The estimated withdrawals by utilities and private industrial and commercial water systems are believed to be conservative because many of the reported production figures were found to be lower than actual production when they were field checked. All of the water systems in the area were not canvassed during this investigation so that the actual quantities of water withdrawn are somewhat greater than the quantities shown in table 1. However, the table summarizes the relative quantities of water withdrawn from the two major aquifer systems and the streams for various uses in the Jacksonville area. GEOGRAPHIC SETTING This report describes water use in a 625 square mile area in the eastern part of Duval County, which includes all of the corporate limits of Jacksonville before 1967 and the nearby coastal towns of Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach, figure 1. Most of the area is a relatively flat plain less than 25 feet above sea.level. Between the St. Johns River and the coastline a series of long narrow sand ridges parallel the coastline and form the "coastal ridge." The coastal ridge is generally 40 to 60 feet above sea level but a few small hills on the ridge are more than 80 feet above sea level. Surface drainage is poorly developed and many marshes and swamps occur along the stream courses. East of the coastal ridge,sluggish brackish water streams drain into tidal lagoons and into the intracoastal waterway. West of the

PAGE 9

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 5 TABLE 1. SUMMARY OF WATER WITHDRAWAL IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966. SUPPLIER SOURCE OF WATER Limestone, shell Floridan Surface and sand aquifer aquifer streams (mgd) (mgd) (mgd) 1. Jacksonville municipal water utility 36 2. Other municipal utilities 3 3. Non-municipal utilities 22 4. Private domestic systems 10-25 5 5. Military water systems 6 6. Industrial and commercial water systems 72 7. Supplemental supplies for surface lakes and ponds 8 8. Wild wells 10 9. Generating electric power 863 ridge the streams drain into the St. Johns River. As most of the major streams in the area are about at sea level and are directly connected to the ocean, the flow and quality of water are largely controlled by ocean tides. For example, the St. Johns River flows into the ocean during outgoing tides; but during incoming tides, the flow reverses and ocean water enters the river and moves upstream. Before 1967 Jacksonville occupied about a 39 square mile area in central Duval County, which is in the northeastern part of Florida; however, much of the population and industry were located in adjacent unincorporated suburbs and nearby coastal towns within the county. In 1967 the city of Jacksonville annexed the entire county except the town of Baldwin in the western part of the county and the coastal towns of Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach. SOURCES AND QUALITY OF WATER SUPPLIES SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES The principal surface streams in the Jacksonville area are the St. Johns River and its tributaries. These streams are tidal estuaries, and they contain highly mineralized ocean water at least part of the time. The chloride content of the St. Johns River ranges from less than 100 ppm to more than 10,000 ppm where it runs through downtown Jacksonville. The median value is about 2,200 ppm (written commun., Anderson and Goolsby, 1967).

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6 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Location of 'N Lanrea IA 1I S Mayport c tan wI Noval Air Station S 1966Atlantic N W 111 a coole e t t of SeptNeptuner 9 S cksonville 1_ Beach N.A.S / \ 1 DUVAL CO. 0 2 4 6 MILES Figure 1. Map of Florida showing the location of the area covered by this report. During most of the year the St. Johns River is a good source of cooling water. From November through April the river water temperature is less than 75F., which is cooler than water from wells 500 to 800 feet deep. Water from wells greater than 1,000 feet deep has a temperature of about 81F., and river water is cooler except for the months of June through the middle of September. The St. Johns River and its tributaries are not utilized as a source of potable water supplies or for most industrial or commercial supplies; however, large

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 7 quantities of water from the St. Johns River are circulated through condensers of steam turbines in electric generating stations. GROUND-WATER SUPPLIES As shown diagrammatically in figure 2, ground-water supplies in the Jacksonville area are obtained mainly from three types of aquifers: surficial sand beds; relatively thin limestone, shell and sand beds between 50 and 150 feet below the surface; and thick limestone and dolomite beds below 300 to 600 feet deep. The thick limestone and dolomite beds comprise the "Floridan Aquifer" which is the principal source of potable water supplies in the area. The surficial sand beds and the thin limestone, shell and sand beds are utilized primarily for domestic supplies, some air conditioning, and for lawn sprinkling. Chemical analysis of water from the three major aquifers in the Jacksonville area and the St. Johns River are given in table 2. Tables 2, 3, 4 and 5 list the U.S. Public Health Service drinking water standards, suggested water quality for Age Shtiqropc Lithology Water -Bearing Properties HP i:::.______ :: Surficiol sand aquifersupplies small amounts of water to small PI diameter screened wells. SLimestone, shell, and sand aquifer-supplies small to moderate S -amounts of water to small diame 200E rock" wells for rural domestic SRelatively impermeable and lawn sprinkling supplies. Sa confining beds 4000 I -z > Avon Park S800metone -Ji SPrincipal source of water 1000 -supplies for municipal O I private utility and industrial : -" ; ; I wells. 1200w SI I < g I I I / I I I ,,,L I I | / S14003SNote: The stratigrophic nomenclature uo in this report conforms to the usage of the Division of SGeology, Florida board of 1600/ / Conservation and not necessarily to that of U.S.G.S. ,note: HP= Holocene or Pleistocene SPI = Pliocene S/ / EXPLANATION 1800-o SSand Silty cloy Shell P lle. 0 Fresh water-bearing zone, N= pa Sr i penetrated by only one Cy deep test well. Relatively impemeSvable Ihoesto a 2 l IU .MINERALIZED WATER doloite Figure 2. Generalized geologic section and the aquifers m the Jacksonville area.

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TABLE 2. CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF GROUND WATER AND SURFACE WATER IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA (Reults in pats per million except for color, pH and specific conductance) -a Numba Lcatio Surflcil Sand Aqulfe 301922N0812634.1 Prrte 09-21-66 2.3 1.6 1.9 2.0 .16 12 .3 8 0 .0 25 .1 .1 48 12 6 105 5.2 5 80 73 40 303535N0820034.1 Priat 0607-66 4.9 .24 7.6 3.6 .20 6.1 3.6 12 0 .0 12 .2 33 71 34 24 118 5.8 5 31 73 15 0 Limastoe Sand and Shell Aquoifa 300857N0813444.2 Prainte 052045 29 2.0 83 15 -14 1.3 328 0 .0 21 .2 .0 326 268 0 533 7.3 0 26 74 92 0 302136N0814255.2 Prirat 05-27-65 18 2.8 73 12 -13 1.1 236 0 38 18 .3 0.0 289 232 38 472 7.9 10 S 72 80 301340N0814754.1 rivnt 11-03-66 19 -43 16 .19 6.6 1.2 213 0 .8 12 5 .1 205 174 0 349 7.8 0 5 71 60 0 301117N0813749.2 Priate 03-1945 43 .31 39 16 -15 6.1 204 0 4.0 18 1.4 .0 243 162 0 353 7.8 0 5 73 Floridd Aquffer 302033N0813945.1 Cityof Jduoavf2 C-10 0805-65 21 .17 76 29 3.6 11 2.1 164 0 176 15 .8 .0 416 313 178 642 7.9 10 3 80 1270 301838N0813935,1 City of Juoavie C-35 080645 22 .09 65 27 3.6 11 2.0 166 -137 15 .6 .0 362 273 137 566 LO 5 3 85 1280 301335N0813526.1 Prite 09-2666 20 .19 65 33 4.2 12 2.7 152 0 180 13 .9 .0 402 302 178 642 7.6 10 6 77 625 301617N0814217.1 CityofJ*suoakile 09-27-66 19 .19 41 22 2.7 II 2.4 148 0 81 12 .9 .1 262 196 74 440 7.7 10 5 78 729 301529N0813803.1 Lake Wood Utlities 09-27-66 21 .07 70 31 4.5 12 2.5 156 0 176 16 .8 .1 406 307 179 675 7.5 S 8 85 1187 St. Johns River a Main Street Brdp 022465.00 StLJobhsRreruatJa 11.0346 4.6 .04 27 10 .5 71 2.6 40 0 34 136 3 .2 306 109 76 618 6.9 120 -66 02-2465.00 SL John Rlvra t Ja 11-1646 2.5 .05 225 633 3.7 5520 200 109 0 1320 9720 3 11 17700 3170 3080 30000 7.1 60 -69

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 9 TABLE 3. U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DRINKING WATER STANDARDS Characteristic Limit Not to Cause for Rejection Be Exceeded Physical Color 15 units Taste Unobjectionable Threshold odor number 3 Turbidity 5 units Chemical mg/1 mg/1 Alkyl benzene sulfonate 0.5 Arsenic 0.01 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium Chloride 250 Chromium (hexavalent) 0.05 Copper 1 Carbon chloroform extract* 0.2 Cyanide 0.01 0.2 Fluoridet 0.7-1.2 14.24 Iron 0.3 0.05 Lead Manganese 0.05 Nitrate 45 Phenols 0.001 Selenium 0.01 Silver 0.05 Sulfate 250 Total dissolved solids 500 Zinc 5 *Organic contaminants. tThe concentration of fluoride should be between 0.6 and 1.7 mg/l, depending on the listed and average maximum daily air temperatures. industrial water, suggested water quality for boiler feed water, and water-quality characteristics and their significance. SURFICIAL SAND AQUIFER The surficial sand aquifer is between 10 and 20 feet thick in the western and central part of the area and between 20 and 60 feet thick under the coastal ridge and along the coastline. The aquifer is recharged by local rain water or water from nearby streams and marshes that has percolated downward. Water from this aquifer is characterized by its low dissolved solids content. The hardness is generally less than 60 ppm as CaCO3 and the total dissolved-solids content less than 100 ppm. This water may be somewhat corrosive to well casings and plumbing fixtures due to its slightly acidic character and high carbon dioxide content. In some areas this aquifer contains water with more than 1.5 ppm of iron and is subject to contamination from septic tanks and polluted surface drainage. Except for iron, water from unpolluted wells in this aquifer usually meets the USPHS drinking water standards.

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TABLE 4. SUGGESTED WATER-QUALITY TOLERANCES8 (Allowable limits in parts per million) ManTurHardness Iron ese Total Alkalinity Odor Hydrogen Industry or use bldity Color asCaCO3 asTotal Fe a Industry or use bidity Color as CaC as Fe n Solids as CaCO3 Taste sulfide Other requirementsb Air conditioning ---0,c 0.5 --low 1 No corrosiveness, slime formation Baking 10 10 -.2c .2 --low .2 P. Brewing: Light beer 10 --.1 .1 500 75 low .2 P. NaCI less than 275 ppm (pH 6.5 7.0) Dark beer 10 --..1 1,000 150 low .2 P. NaCI less than 275 ppm (pH 7.0 or more) Canning: Legumes 10 -25-75 .2c .2 --low 1 P. General 10 --.2 .2 --low 1 P. Carbonated beverages 2 10 250 .2 .2 850 50-100 low .2 P. organic color plus oxygen consumed less than 10 ppm Confectionary ---.2 .2 100 -low .2 P. pH above 7.0 for hard candy Cooling 50 -0 ..5 ---5 No corrosiveness, slime formation Food: General 10 --.2c .2 --low -P. Ice 5 5 -.2c .2 --low -P. SO2 less than 10 ppm Laundering --0S .2c .2 ---Plastics, clear uncolored 2 2 -.02c .02 200 --Paper and pulp: oundwood 50 20 180 1.00 .---No grit, corrosiveness Kraft pulp 25 15 100 .2c .1 300 --Soda and sulfte 15 10 100 .1c .05 200 --High-grade light papers 5 5 50 .1c .05 200 --Rayon (viscose): Pulp production 5 5 8 .05c .03 100 total 50; --A1203 less than 8 ppm, SiO2 less hydroxide 8 than 25 ppm, Cu less than 5 ppm Manufacture .3 -55 .0 .0 ----pH 7.8 to 8.3 Tanning 20 10-100 50-135 .2c .2 -total 135; hydroxide 8 Textiles: General 5 20 -.25 .25 ---Dyeing 5 5-20 -.250 .25 200 ---Constant composition. Residual Wool scouring -70 -1.0c 1.0 ----alumina less than 0.5 ppm Cotton bandage 5 5 -.2c .2 --low aMoore, E. W., Progress report of the committee on quality tolerances of water for industrial uses: Jour. New England Water Works Assoc., vol. 54, p. 271, 1940 bp Indicates that potable water, conforming to U.S.P.H.S. standards, is necessary. 0Limit Anv..apn plnttes to both iron alone nnd the surn orf ron and mrrgsnere.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 11 TABLE 5. SUGGESTED WATER-QUALITY TOLERANCE FOR BOILER FEED WATER' (Allowable limits in parts per million) Pressure (psi) 0-150 150-250 250-400 Over 400 Turbidity 20 10 5 1 Color 80 40 5 2 Oxygen consumed 15 10 4 3 Dissolved oxygen2 1.4 .14 .0 .0 Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) 5 3 0 0 Total hardness as CaCOa 80 40 10 2 Sulfate-carbonate ratio (A.S.M.E.) (Na2S04 : Na2CO3) 1:1 2:1 3:1 3:1 Aluminum oxide (A2O03) 5 .5 .05 .01 Silica (Si02) 40 20 5 1 Bicarbonate (HC03)2 50 30 5 0 Carbonate (COa) 200 100 40 20 Hydroxide (OH) 50 40 30 15 Total solids 3,000-500 2,500-500 1,500-100 50 pH value (minimum) 8.0. 8.4 9.0 9.6 1Moore, E. W., Progress report of the committee on quality tolerances of water for industrial uses: Jour. New England Water Works Assoc., vol. 54, p. 263, 1940. 2Limits applicable only to feed water entering boiler, not original water supply. 3Except when odor in live steam would be objectionable. 4Depends on design of boiler. LIMESTONE, SHELL AND SAND AQUIFER The limestone, shell and sand aquifer occurs in most parts of the area at the base of the Pliocene or upper Miocene deposits at between 50 and 150 feet below the surface. At places, it is absent or not sufficiently thick to supply usable quantities of water; however, in most of the area, it ranges from between 10 to 40 feet thick and will yield an average of 20 gpm (gallons per minute) and as much as 80 gpm to small diameter wells. The aquifer is hydraulically connected to the surficial sand aquifer and is recharged locally by downward percolation of water from this aquifer. At places, some recharge also may occur by upward leakage of water from the underlying Floridan aquifer. The water level in cased wells completed in this aquifer is a few feet below the surface in most of the area. In some low areas immediately adjacent to the St. Johns River and its tributaries the water level is above land surface. Water from the limestone, shell and sand aquifer is classified as hard to very hard (see hardness, table 6) and contains from 150 to 400 ppm of dissolved solids. The water is slightly alkaline, and the principal dissolved constituents are calcium and bicarbonate. The iron content is highly variable from place to place, ranging from a few hundredths to more than 2.5 ppm. Wells in some areas, particularly southwest and northwest of Jacksonville, contain trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide, giving the water an odor characteristic of "rotten eggs." Except for slightly high fluoride in two wells and iron and hydrogen sulfide in localized areas, water from this aquifer meets USPHS standards for drinking

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12 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY TABLE 6. WATER-QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS AND THEIR EFFECTS Constituent Source and/or solubility Effects Silica (SiO2) Most abundant element in Causes scale in boiler and deposits earth's crust resistant to on turbine blades. solution. Iron (Fe) Very abundant element, readily Stains laundry and porcelain, bad precipitates as hydroxide. taste. Manganese (Mn) Less abundant than iron, Stains laundry and porcelain, bad present in lower concentrations. taste. Calcium (Ca) Dissolved from most rock, especially limestone and dolomite. Causes hardness, forms boiler scale, helps maintain good soil Magnesium (Mg) Dissolved from rocks, industrial structure and permeability. wastes. Sodium (Na) Dissolved from rocks, industrial Injurious to soils and crops, and wastes. certain physiological conditions in man. Potassium (K) Abundant, but not very soluble Causes foaming in boilers, in rocks and soils. stimulates plankton growth. Bicarbonate (HCO3) Abundant and soluble from Causes foaming in boilers and Carbonate (CO3) limestone, dolomite, and soils, embrittlement of boiler steel. Sulfate (SO4) Sedimentary rocks, mine water, Excess: cathartic, taste. and industrial wastes. Chloride (Cl) Rocks, soils, industrial wastes, Unpleasant taste, increases sewage, brines, sea water, corrosiveness. Fluoride (F) Not very abundant, sparingly Over 1.5 ppm causes mottling of soluble, seldom found in children's teeth, 0.88 to 1.5 ppm industrial wastes except as aids in preventing tooth decay. spillage, some sewage. Nitrate (NO3) Rocks, soil, sewage, industrial High indicates pollution, causes waste, normal decomposition, methemaglobanemia in infants. bacteria. Hardness as CaC03 Excessive soap consumption, scale in pipes interferes in industrial processes. up to 60 ppm -soft 60 to 120 ppm -moderately hard 120 to 200 ppm -hard over 200 ppm -very hard

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 13 water and is suitable for most industrial uses; however, softening and removal of iron and hydrogen sulfide would be necessary for some industrial purposes. Most small domestic water supplies are obtained from wells completed in this aquifer in areas not serviced by municipal or private water utilities. It also supplies water to wells for lawn sprinkling and for some industrial purposes such as cooling condensers in water exchange units and for boiler make-up water. FLORIDAN AQUIFER The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of potable water supplies in the Jacksonville area; accordingly, it has been studied in detail during this investigation. The hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the aquifer are described in detail in other reports (Leve and Goolsby, 1966) (Leve, 1966). The Floridan aquifer extends throughout all of peninsular Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama. In the Jacksonville area, it is comprised of limestone and dolomite formations of Eocene and Paleocene age. Water is obtained from a series of relatively permeable zones that are separated by relatively impermeable zones within the aquifer. The top of the aquifer in the Jacksonville area is between 300 to 600 feet below sea level. Overlying beds of relatively impermeable silty clay, marl and dolomite confine the water under artesian pressure within the aquifer. Only one deep test well in the area has completely penetrated the aquifer. In this well the aquifer is about 1,600 feet thick, extending from about 500 feet to 2,100 feet below the surface. Within this interval, there are four separate fresh water producing zones. Three of these zones are above 1,400 feet below land surface and are the source of water for most of the deep wells in the area. The fourth zone is between 1,900 and 2,050 feet below land surface and has only been penetrated by the test well. Below 2,100 feet, the well penetrated relatively impermeable limestone and gypsum beds containing highly mineralized water. The aquifer is recharged by rainfall and by downward infiltration of water from surface lakes and streams primarily in areas where it is exposed at the surface or where the overlying confining beds are relatively thin or are breached by sinkholes. Most of the recharge to the aquifer in northeast Florida occurs in an area about 30 to 60 miles southwest of Jacksonville. Water moves laterally away from the recharge area through the aquifer toward Jacksonville and other areas in northeast Florida where it is discharged by springs, upward leakage through the overlying confining beds and by wells. Figure 3 is a map of Florida showing the generalized piezometric surface of the Floridan aquifer. The piezometric surface is an imaginary surface of the artesian pressure head in the aquifer as measured in tightly cased wells completed in the aquifer. The relatively high piezometric surface in western Putnam and Clay counties and eastern Alachua and Bradford counties indicates the recharge area for the aquifer in northeast Florida, and the depression of the piezometric surface within the 40-foot contour line in the vicinity of Jacksonville indicates the effect of numerous discharging wells on the artesian pressure.

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14 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY. U. 1 EXPLANATION surtace. CiCeatr Iltervl 10 fat. Datum Is meax ase level1 GEOR GI A40 e e % NASSAU S A K ER --NOL USIA 0 e. O AcLa 0 0 10 20 MILES 20 0L S 0 SUM TR C M ERk 0NDO Figure 3. Map of Florida showing the piezometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in feet above sea level, July 1961. The variability in quality of water from this aquifer is illustrated in figure 4. This figure shows the hardness of water from wells in the greater Jacksonville area. Wells west of the St. Johns River and south of Ortega River entrance yield the best water. This water has a hardness contentds CaCOs of 200 ppm or less. Elsewhere in the county, the hardness ranges from 200 ppm to about 400 ppi. The hardest water is produced from wells in southeastern Duval County and on

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52 50' 4 40' 2E R7E35' 30' 25' BI22' 30'' 130 R2E R2'E RE 4540'E R26E R26E R27E 35 R27E R28E 25 81*2230" 3c 3d 30-30' I I 17 AI TINI I \/ \ I .~ T -2 50 EXPLANATION 250 T IS -300---Line of auc! hoardness (as COCO3) in milligramsr per dler of water n the Floridan Z, afor Dashd what# inferrd. 0 Q nC'% rA 95 25S JACKSONVILLE O ATLANTL 0 BEACH 10 BEC 0JcAISONVILLE BEACH 90 o IAyAIA SDUVL COUNTY 1.F.T JOHNS oNTY SA. Sa o 150 T 3S T.35 OUVAL COUNTY T.4 CLAY COUNTY, 74 area. 100 3 ILES ;~ 30*07'30" -24 R25E L30*07'30.. 91*5",3c"` R27E P29E R 29E R 29E 61W, V3i` Figure 4. Map showing the hardness of water from the Floridan aquifer in the Jacksonville area.

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R40E R2E 45 R26E R26E R27E R27E R28 3 25 82230 F 30 30 S2I SI EXPLANATIONb T IS Public wat sup well. Pitely or corSorotely aaood w Ion coitoy. Nur cospo nds toe Q nbr n table 10. 66 AIA 15 : T st JACKS CA COL, NTY T 3 ...... 76 UVA CONT ,ly T. JONS COUNT : :P : 4S : 69f corporately~ owned utitilies, and military water systems and the major public supply wells.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 15 Ft. George Island. It is interesting to note that wells northeast of Jacksonville yield slightly softer water than wells in many other parts of the area. Water from only 3 of more than 60 wells sampled in Duval County exceeded the USPHS drinking water standards for total dissolved solids. Water from one of these wells also exceeded the recommended limit for sulfate. Two of these wells were in extreme southeastern Duval County; the third was on Ft. George Island. All wells had objectionable taste and odor due to hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide concentration ranges from 1.0 to 3.0 ppm. Fluoride is present in concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 0.9 ppm. This is very near the optimum concentration of 0.8 ppm recommended by the USPHS (1962) for similar climatic areas. The dissolved iron content is less than 0.3 ppm. Water from this aquifer used for public supplies is treated by aeration to remove hydrogen sulfide, then chlorinated. The suitability of water from the Floridan aquifer for industry depends on the intended use. In some industrial uses, softening and removal of hydrogen sulfide would be necessary. This water would also require treatment for use as boiler feed water. WATER PRODUCTION AND USE Before 1884 water supplies in the Jacksonville area were obtained from surface streams and from a few wells drilled into the surficial sand aquifer and the limestone, shell and sand aquifer. In 1884 the city of Jacksonville drilled two wells in the Floridan aquifer and obtained fresh artesian water for public supplies. At present, all major water supplies in the area are obtained from wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. Numerous smaller water supplies are also obtained from wells drilled into the limestone, shell and sand aquifer. PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES There are three categories of public water supply systems in the Jacksonville area: municipally owned water utilities, privately or corporately owned water utilities, and military water systems. All three furnish water for residential, commercial, and industrial use. Figure 5 shows the distribution of the municipal, privately or corporately owned, and military water systems in the area and the location of the major public supply wells. As shown, Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach each have municipally owned water systems that furnish water to customers both within the municipal limits and in some adjacent areas outside of the municipal limits. Most of the areas outside of the municipalities obtain water from more than 150 privately owned water utilities. A number of the privately owned utilities supply water to only a few private residences or commercial establishments and are not included on figure 5. JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL SUPPLY The largest water utility in the area is owned and operated by the city of Jacksonville. Figure 6 shows the wells and the distribution system of the

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16 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY --^ ,% r-----------mom -Are. -" \ \ 4k EXPLANATION Well O Elevcated stoma tcmk g Oround storage tank WDistribution llns 12to 2 -Distrinoitiom loes 10w -Distribution llns $" Figure 6. Map showing the City of Jacksonville municipal water-distribution system and the municipal water wells. Jacksonville municipal utility. As shown in the figure, water is presently obtained from 47 wells which are located in seven well fields throughout the city. At each well field the water is pumped from the wells into ground storage reservoirs and then into the various distributionhnes. The pumping and storage facilities at each of the well fields is shown in table 7.

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TABLE 7. PUMPING AND STORAGE FACILITIES OF THE JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITY, 1966. Facilities Main Street McDuff Fairfax Lakeshore Norwood Hendricks River Oaks Total (rounded) WELLS Number 14 7 8 4 3 4 7 47 Pumping Capacity -GPM 17,450 14,900 8,250 11,400 6,750 5,000 7,550 71,000 --MGD 25.13 21.5 11.9 16.42 9.72 7.2 10.87 103 SRESERVOIRS Ground storage capacity (MG) 4 6 2.5 2.5 1.5 0.79 1.76 19 Elevated storage capacity (MG) None 1.0 None None 1.5 None 1.0 3.5 STATION LOADS Max. pumping rate (MGD) 14.5 14.5 9.7 11.26 8.64 3.75 8.88 71 oo Peak pumping rate (MGD) 18.75 18.75 17.2 13.0 8.64 7.12 10.88 94 *.

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18 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY TABLE 8. WATER WITHDRAWALS BY THE JACKSONVILLE MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITY IN 1966. Total Daily yearly average Metered water connections Number withdrawals withdrawals (mg) (mg) Inside city Single commercial, industrial & business 4,090 2,229.8 6.100 Multi-commercial, industrial & business 524 216.8 .600 Monthly services: Commercial, industrial, residential & municipal 115 1,737.3 4.800 Single family residential 35,847 2,749.3 7.500 Multi-family residential 7,950 1,251.4 3.400 Automatic sprinkler service 414 7.4 .020 Charitable institutions 49 322.7 .880 Public & parochial 118 100.4 .280 Municipal 470 474.2 1.300 TOTAL INSIDE CITY 49,577 9,089.3 24.880 Outside city Single commercial, industrial & business 713 307.8 .840 Multi-commercial, industrial & business 94 24.6 .070 Monthly services: Commercial, industrial, residential & municipal 3 .5 .001 Single family residential 13,366 1,171.6 3.200 Multi-family water service 457 67.8 .190 Automatic sprinkler service 50 2.9 .010 Charitable institutions 6 11.8 .030 Public & parochial 19 34.3 .100 TOTAL OUTSIDE CITY 14,708 1,621.3 4.441 TOTAL TO METERED ACCOUNTS 64,285 10,710.6 29.321 TOTAL UNMETERED WITHDRAWALS 2,447.3 6.700 TOTAL WITHDRAWALS 13,157.9 36.000 As shown in the table, the total maximum pumping capacity from the wells is 101.45 mgd, and the storage capacity of the ground reservoirs is 19.05 mg. An additional 3.5 mg of water is stored in five elevated storage tanks in the distribution system (figure 6). The amount of water produced by the Jacksonville municipal utility in 1966 is shown in table 8. As shown, the City produced a total of about 13.158 billions of gallons or an average of about 36.0 mgd. It supplied water to 64,285 metered water connections both inside and outside of the city, including 49,213 single-family residences. The water is treated at each distribution station before and after it enters the distribution lines. It is aerated to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas before it enters the ground storage reservoir. After the water enters the distribution lines, V .,.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 19 it is chlorinated to eliminate any bacteriological contamination from the aeration tanks and the ground storage reservoirs. OTHER MUNICIPAL SUPPLIES Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach have separate municipally owned and operated water supply systems in the area (figure 5). Each of these municipalities produce water from two or more wells completed in the Floridan aquifer. The water is pumped from these wells into ground storage reservoirs and elevated storage tanks and then into distribution systems. All the water is aerated and chlorinated and at Jacksonville Beach the water is softened by zeolite before it enters the distribution system. Table 9 shows the number of wells and water storage capacity at each of these municipalities and number of metered connections and average daily pumpage in 1966. As shown in the table, in 1966 they produced a total average of about 3.0 mgd to supply 6,350 domestic, commercial, and industrial metered connections. The estimated total population supplied by these municipal utilities was about 21,000 during that year. TABLE 9. MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES, NUMBER OF METERED CONNECTIONS AND AVERAGE DAILY PUMPAGE AT JACKSONVILLE BEACH, NEPTUNE BEACH, AND ATLANTIC BEACH IN 1966. Number of Average Number Ground Storage Elevated storage metered water daily Municipality of wells capacity capacity connections pumpage (mg) (mg) (mg) Jacksonville Beach 6 1.4 0.45 3,700 1.9 Neptune Beach 3 .2 .3 1,250 .5 Atlantic Beach 2 .2 .1 1,400 .6 TOTAL 11 1.8 0.85 6,350 3.0 PRIVATELY OR CORPORATELY OWNED WATER UTILITIES Many urban areas surrounding Jacksonville are supplied water by privately or corporately owned utilities. There are probably more than 150 nonmunicipal water-supply systems in the area, but many supply water to only a few domestic or commercial services. They each obtain water from one or more wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. All of the larger water utilities are operated according to Florida State Board of Health standards; the water is treated before it is pumped into the distribution systems, and there are adequate ground or elevated storage facilities. Some of the smaller water systems have no water treatment or storage facilities, and the water is pumped directly from the well into the distribution systems.

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20 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY Each of the nonmunicipal utilities supply water within specific areas such as suburban housing developments, apartment houses, trailer parks, and shopping centers. The larger utilities provide both water supplies and sewage disposal service to these areas. Table 10 lists the 89 largest, privately or corporately owned water utilities in the Jacksonville area. The table also lists the number of production wells that supply each utility, the approximate number of connections, and the estimated average daily pumpage of each utility in 1966. The utilities that supply more than 40 services (except apartments and trailer parks) and the production wells that supply these utilities are located on the map in figure 5. About 41,500 homes, commercial and industrial establishments are supplied with water by the 89 nonmunicipal water utilities shown in table 10. The largest utility supplies water to about 3,600 connections. Eleven utilities each supply water to more than 1,000 connections, 52 utilities each supply water to between about 100 and 1,000 connections, and 26 utilities each supply water to less than 100 connections. At least 60 other smaller water supply systems in the area, not listed in the table, each supply water to a few homes or commercial establishments. The estimated average daily pumpage of the utilities listed on table 10 ranges from about 0.002 to 4.0 mgd, and the total average daily pumpage is about 21.5 mgd. If all of the smaller water systems not listed on the table were included, it is estimated that the total average daily pumpage from nonmunicipal water utilities in the area would be about 22 mgd. MILITARY WATER SYSTEMS Two large naval bases in the area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, and U.S. Naval Station, Mayport, each withdraw and distribute water for domestic, cooling, irrigation, and various other uses. Both naval stations obtain water from wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer. The water is treated and distributed in a manner similar to that supplied by the municipal and large nonmunicipal utilities in the area. It is pumped from the wells into aeration tanks and ground or elevated storage reservoirs, and it is then chlorinated and pumped into the various distribution lines. The location of these water systems and the production wells that supply each system are shown on the map in figure 5. The number of wells, water storage capacity, average daily pumpage, and percentage use of water at each naval station in 1966 is listed in table 11. As shown in the table, in 1966 the Naval Air Station at Jacksonville withdrew about 3.5 mgd from 6 wells in the Floridan aquifer, and the Naval Station at Mayport withdrew about 2.0 mgd from 2 wells. About 40 to 50 percent of the water was used for domestic supplies, 30 percent was used for cooling, 20 percent was used for maintenance and repair, boiler feed, washing equipment, supplying ships, and various other uses on the stations. A number of wells at each naval station are not included in table 11 and are not located in figure 5 because they are not part of the water systems; however,

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 21 TABLE 10. MAJOR NON-MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITIES IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966. Approximate Estimated daily No. on Name or area No. of no. of average pumpage figure 5 served wells connections (mgd) 1 Alderman Park 1 586 .274 2 Arlington Community 4 2,000 1.200 3 Arlington Hills 2 2,000 1.500 4 Arlington Manor 2 605 .146 5 Arlingwood 2 790 .175 6 Beachhaven 1 75 .080 7 Beechwood 1 165 .037 8 Beacon Hills & Harbor 1 200 .075 9 Beaucleric Gardens 1 82 .017 10 Brackridge 1 160 .070 11 Brookview (Arlington East) 1 800 .400 12 Cedar Forest 1 77 .015 13 Cedar Hills 3 3,600 4.000 15 Cedar Shores 1 175 .043 16 Center Park 1 150 .150 17 Clifton (Arlington Bluff) 1 212 .060 18 Edenfield Terrace 1 71 .016 19 Fleetwood 1 95 .034 20 Floradale 1 243 .090 21 Forrest Brook 1 130 .040 22 Ft. Carolyn Club Estates 1 570 .250 23 Glenlea Annex 1 44 .010 24 Greenfield Manor 1 120 .040 25 Grove Park 1 150 .048 26 Harbor View 1 443 .113 27 Highlands 2 1,660 1.000 28 Holiday Hills 1 500 .800 29 Holly Oaks Forrest 1 234 .080 30 Hyde Grove Acres 1 183 .070 31 Killarney Shores 1 70 .030 32 Lake Forrest 1 752 .200 33 Lake Lucina & St. Johns Utilities 1 2,400 1.000 34 Lake Shore 1 450 .150 35 Lakewood 1 1,276 1.000 36 Leon Terrace 1 112 .022 37 Lovegrove Acres 1 124 .042 38 Lynwood 1 150 .050 39 Magnolia Gardens 1 750 .275 40 Mandarin Terrace 1 121 .040 41 Milmar Manor 1 100 .040 42 Normandy 1 590 .136 43 Normandy Hills 1 90 .040 44 Normandy Village 1 1,000 .500 75 Oceanway Manor 1 143 .046 45 Oak Harbor 1 320 .090 46 Oak Hill 1 520 .250 47 Oak Hills Manor 1 980 .750 48 Ortega Hills 1 450 .140 49 Pablo Keys 1 77 .022 117.2

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22 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY TABLE 10. CONTINUED Approximate Estimated daily No. on Name or area No. of no. of average pumpage figure 5 served wells connections (mgd) 50 Queen Acres 1 275 .070 51 Ribault Heights 2 411 .100 73 Ribault Hills 1 186 .070 52 Ridgeland Gardens 1 130 .070 53 Riverview 1 200 .50 54 Rodgers Construction Company 1 569 .250 55 Roosevelt Gardens 1 786 .300 56 Sandalwood 1 408 .100 57 San Cleric Estates (Brierwood) 1 100 .040 58 San Jose 2 2,000 1.000 59 San Jose Shores 1 67 .030 60 San Mageo 1 610 .160 61 San Souci 1 1,354 .700 62 Santa Monica 2 1,100 .400 63 Sherwood Forest 1 1,600 .500 64 Southside Estates 3 2,080 1.100 65 Springdale 2 733 .153 66 Thompson's Riverview 1 240 .080 67 Tidewater 1 161 .042 68 University Park 1 315 .150 69 Venetia Terrace 1 230 .100 70 Washington Heights 1 200 .075 71 Westgate (Rolling Hills) 1 395 .110 72 Westwood 1 70 .030 74 Isle of Palms (N.) 1 123 .040 NOT PLOTTED ON FIGURE 5 Acadie 1 35. .010 Allenby Apartments 1 108 .030 Biscane Terrace 1 25 .010 Bishop Homes 2 25 .010 Bon Air 1 10 .003 Cedar River Forest 2 33 .008 Duclay 1 30 .010 Fairmont 1 10 .003 Julington Hills 1 12 .003 Loretto Springs 1 10 .002 Maybrook 1 102 .030 170 Morningside-on-St. Johns 1 25 .010 Ortega Shores 1 15 .003 Pickwick Park 1 35 .015 Southwood 1 12 .003 1 TOTALS (rounded) 100 42,000 21. 2 apartments Shomes trailers

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 23 TABLE 11. WELLS, WATER STORAGE FACILITIES, AVERAGE DAILY PUMPAGE AND USE OF WATER AT U.S. NAVAL STATIONS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966. Station Number Storage Average Water use of wells capacity daily (percent) Ground Elevated (mg) Domestic Cooling Irrigation Other Naval Air Station, Jacksonville Water Plant No.l 3 1.3 .25 1.40 Water Plant No.2 1 .3 .25 1.15 Water Plant No.3 1 .3 -.65 Hospital 1 .2 .25 .30 TOTAL 6 2.1 .75 3.50 50 30 10 10 Naval Station, Mayport 2 .05 .25 2.00 40 30 10 20 they are used irregularly for auxiliary supplies, fire protection and for irrigation. These wells yielded an estimated 0.2 to 0.4 mgd so that the total amount of water withdrawn by the naval stations in the area in 1966 was about 6.0 mgd. PRIVATE SUPPLIES Many parts of the Jacksonville area are not served by any water utility (figure 5), and water supplies are obtained from privately owned wells. There are about 150,000 private dwellings in the Jacksonville area (Jacksonville-Duval Area Planning Board, 1967), and about 100,000 of these are served by municipal or nonmunicipal water utilities. About 50,000 homes in the area obtain all of their domestic supplies from privately owned wells. In areas served by municipal or nonmunicipal water utilities, many homes have privately owned wells to supplement the supplies from the water utilities. Estimates made from field observations, drillers' records, and records from the City Health Department indicate that there are between 5,000 and 10,000 wells at private dwellings served by water utilities. Most of the privately owned domestic wells are completed in the limestone, shell and sand aquifer; however, about 2,000 to 3,000 are completed in the Floridan aquifer. Wells in both aquifers are generally less than 2 inches in diameter, and the water is pumped from the wells into pressure tanks by small capacity jet pumps. Most of these domestic supplies are not treated except locally where the water in the limestone, shell and sand aquifer has a relatively high iron content.

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24 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY The average yield of these small diameter domestic wells in the limestone, shell, and sand aquifer is between 200 and 400 gpd for household use; however, some of the wells completed in the Floridan aquifer yield more than 10,000 gpd, particularly during the spring and summer months when they are used for lawn sprinkling and swimming pools. It is estimated that between 55,000 and 65,000 private domestic wells in the Jacksonville area produce a total of between 10.0 and 25.0 mgd from the limestone, shell and sand aquifer and about 5.0 mgd from the Floridan aquifer. INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES Many industries and commercial buildings in the Jacksonville area obtain all of their water supplies from municipal or privately or corporately owned water utilities; however, others obtain all or a part of their supplies from their own wells. A few of these wells tap the limestone, shell and sand aquifer but most tap the Floridan aquifer. Drillers' records and inventories of wells made by the city of Jacksonville and the Geological Survey indicate that there are between 500 and 1,000 industrial and commercial wells completed in the Floridan aquifer throughout the Jacksonville area. Many of these are small diameter wells that supply limited amounts of water for washing, toilets, drinking, and swimming pools to stores, motels, fishing camps, gasoline stations, and other small commercial buildings. Some of these wells supply relatively large amounts of water to industries and large commercial buildings for processing, cooling and heating, washing equipment and materials, and various other uses. During this investigation, an inventory was made of 150 major industries and large commercial buildings that have their own water wells. Of the 150 industries and commercial establishments that were inventoried, 76 withdrew at least 0.1 mgd from their own wells. The remainder obtained most of their supplies from municipal or nonmunicipal utilities and withdrew less than 0.1 mgd from their own wells. Table 12 lists the 76 inventoried industrial and commercial water systems in the-area that produce at least 0.1 mgd. The table also lists the number of wells supplying each system, the use of water, and the estimated average daily pumpage of each system in 1966. The location of the wells that supply each industry and commercial building listed in the table are shown by corresponding numbers on the map in figure 7. The 76 industrial and commercial water systems listed in the table withdrew about 62 mgd from 165 wells in the Floridan aquifer in 1966. Two paper manufacturers pumped about 26 mgd for the processing of wood pulp. Fifty various other industries withdrew about 26 mgd primarily for cooling, processing, and washing equipment and materials. About 2.4 mgd was withdrawn by cemeteries and golf courses in the area for irrigation; however, there was considerable seasonal variation in the amount of water pumped. Considerably more water was withdrawn during the relatively dry winter and

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 25 TABLE 12. MAJOR COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL WATER SYSTEMS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA IN 1966. Number Average daily Name of Water pumpage in 1966 (No. on figure 7) wells use (mg) MANUFACTURE OF PAPER 1. Alton Box Works 5 cooling-20% process-75% boiler feed-5% 7.00 2. St. Regis Paper Co. 7 cooling-30% process-65% boiler feed-5% 19.00 TOTAL 26.00 MANUFACTURE OF CHEMICALS, PAINTS, & FERTILIZERS 3. Allied Petro 1 cooling-85% Products boiler feed & other-15% .10 4. American Norit 1 process & boiler feed .12 5. Apperson Chemical 1 cooling & boiler feed .10 6. Armour Agricultural 1 cooling-30% Chem. process-60% boiler feed-5% .60 7. Glidden Co. 7 cooling-90% process-8% boiler feed-2% 5.70 8. Jones Chemical 1 cooling & process .15 9. Liquid Carbonic 3 cooling & process 1.50 10. Nat. Cylinder Gas 1 cooling & other .40 11. Nelio Chemical 2 cooling-90% (Union Bag-Camp) boiler feed-5% other-5% 2.00 12. Reichold Chemical 1 cooling & process .30 13. Wilson & Toomer 3 cooling-50% process-48% boiler feed-2% 1.00 TOTAL 11.97 WIRE & METAL PRODUCTS 14. Buffalo Tank 1 cooling & process .30 15. C. I. Capps Co. 1 cooling .20 16. Container Wire Prod. 1 cooling & process .20 17. Fla. Machine & Foundry 1 cooling & process .30 18. Fla. Wire & Cable 1 cooling & process .20 19. Ivy Steel & Wire 2 cooling & process .90 TOTAL 2.10 BUILDING MATERIALS & CEMENT MANUFACTURE 20. Capitol Concrete 4 process & washing equip. .10 21. Houdaille-Duval-Wright 2 process & washing equip. .10 22. McCormick Concrete 2 process & washing equip. .10 23. Moore Dry Kiln 1 process & boiler feed .10 24. Southern Materials 5 process & washing equip. .20 25. U.S. Gypsum 2 cooling-2% process-98% 1.50 TOTAL 2.10

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26 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY TABLE 12. CONTINUED Number Average daily Name of Water pumpage in 1966 (No. on figure 7) wells use (mg) DAIRY PRODUCTS 26. Alpine Dairy 1 cooling & washing .10 27. Berriers Ice Cream 1 cooling & washing .30 28. Holly Hill Dairy 2 cooling-40% washing-60% .50 29. Meadowbrook Dairy 1 cooling & washing .20 30. Perrets Dairy 3 cooling, washing & irrigation .70 31. Southern Dairy (Sealtest) 1 cooling & washing .30 32. Skinners Dairy 3 cooling, washing & irrigation .60 33. Superior Dairy 2 cooling & washing .30 TOTAL 3.00 FOOD PACKAGING & PROCESSING 34. Gold Merit Packing 1 cooling & washing .30 Company 35. Jones Chambliss 1 cooling & washing .20 Meat Packing Co. 36. Lewis Crabmeat Co. 1 washing .10 37. Mullis Poultry Co. 1 cooling & washing .10 38. Painter Poultry Co. 2 cooling & washing .80 TOTAL 1.50 ICE MAKING & COLD STORAGE 39. All Seasons Ice & Fuel 1 cooling & process .10 40. Atlantic Co. 1 cooling & process 1.40 41. City Products Corp. 1 cooling & process .50 42. Duval Ice & Coal Co. 1 cooling & process .50 43. Jacksonville Ice 1 cooling 1.50 & Cold Storage 44. Patternson Cold Storage 1 cooling 1.10 45. Public Quick Freezing 1 cooling & Cold Storage Co. .70 TOTAL 5.80 LAUNDRIES 46. Duval Laundry 1 washing .30 47. Independent Laundry 1 washing .10 TOTAL .40 MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES 48. Jacksonville Shipyards 3 cooling & washing .40 49. Jacksonville Terminal 1 cooling & washing .20 50. King Edward Cigar 1 cooling & irrigation .10 Company 51. Seaboard Airline 2 washing & other .10 52. Wooten Fibre 1 process .20 TOTAL 1.00

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 27 TABLE 12. CONTINUED Number Average daily Name of Water pumpage in 1966 (No. on figure 7) wells use (mg) CEMETERIES & GOLF COURSES 53. Beaucleric C. C. 2 irrigation & swimming pool .20 54. Brentwood Golf Course 2 irrigation .30 55. Deerwood C. C. 1 irrigation & other .20 56. Evergreen Cemetary 5 irrigation .40 57. Greenlawn Cemetary 1 irrigation .20 58. Jacksonville Beach 1 irrigation .20 Golf Course 59. Oaklawn Cemetary 1 irrigation .20 60. Pine Tree Golf C. 1 irrigation .30 61. San Jose C.C. 2 irrigation & swimming pool .20 62. Timuquana C. C. 1 irrigation & other .20 TOTAL 2.40 COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 63. Ambassador Hotel 1 cooling & other .20 64. Blvd. Center Industrial 7 cooling Park .60 65. Floridan Hotel 1 cooling & other .30 66. Food Fair & Fields Stores 4 cooling & other 1.50 67. Kings Dept. Store 1 cooling .50 68. May-Cohens Dept. Store 1 cooling & other .10 69. Mayflower Hotel 1 cooling & other .40 70. Murry Hill Barnet Bank 1 cooling .20 71. Prudential Bldg. 1 cooling & irrigation .10 72, Seminole Hotel 1 cooling & other .40 TOTAL 4.30 PUBLIC FACILITIES & SCHOOLS 73. Duval County Schools 25 irrigation .50 74. Imeson Airport 2 irrigation, washing & other .30 75. Jacksonville 6 boiler, irrigation, Elec. Gen. Sta. other .20 76. Jacksonville 2 irrigation, domestic, University swimming pool, & other .30 TOTAL 1.30 TOTAL WELLS 165 Total 76 inventoried indus 62.00 Total 75 indus not listed 5.00 Total (Estimate) other indus not listed 5.00 TOTAL 72.00

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28 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY spring months than during the summer and fall months when there was an abundance of rainfall. Ten commercial water systems withdrew about 4.3 mgd primarily for air conditioning during the summer months, and various schools and public facilities withdrew about 1.3 mgd for irrigation, boiler feed, and various other uses. Seventy-four other industries and commercial buildings that were inventoried during this investigation each pumped less than 0.1 mgd from their own wells and are not listed in table 12. These smaller water systems were either used infrequently for auxiliary supplies or for fire protection or only pumped limited amounts of water for air conditioners, lawn sprinkling, or toilet facilities. It is estimated that these 74 smaller industrial and commercial water systems pumped a total of about 5 mgd from wells in the Floridan aquifer. Although most of the industrial and commercial water supplies in the Jacksonville area are withdrawn by the 150 water systems that were inventoried during this investigation, the hundreds of smaller water systems that were not inventoried also withdraw some water from the Floridan aquifer. Most of these smaller systems have wells that are less than three inches in diameter and can withdraw a maximum of about 0.5 mgd; however, many of these wells are either not in use or yield less than 0.01 mgd for small air-conditioning units, lawn sprinkling, or toilet facilities. Assuming that there are 500 such wells in the area yielding an average of about 0.01 mgd, then the total average daily pumpage from these smaller industrial and commercial water systems would be about 5 mgd. This would probably be the minimum amount of water withdrawn because some of these systems are probably withdrawing more than 0.01 mgd, and there may be as many as 1,000 wells yielding water from the aquifer. LAKES AND PONDS SUPPLIED BY WELLS AND UNCONTROLLED FLOWING WELLS Relatively large quantities of water are available from wells completed in the Floridan aquifer at most locations in the Jacksonville area by gravity flow (Leve, 1966). One use of this readily available supply of fresh water from the Floridan aquifer is to supplement water in various lakes and ponds in the area. Water flowing from wells helps maintain a constant level of fresh water in these lakes and ponds so that they may be utilized for watering stock, irrigation, mosquito control, recreation, or improvement of real estate by their scenic value. The wells are allowed to flow continuously in some of the lakes and ponds, and the excess water is drained off through surface streams. In other lakes and ponds, the wells are allowed to flow only during dry periods when the surface water levels become excessively low. Figure 7 shows the location of the major wells in the area that are utilized to supplement surface lakes and ponds. The type and use of each lake and pond, the number of wells and the approximate average daily flow from these supply wells are listed in table 13. As listed in the table, 13 wells produce about 7 mngd from the Floridan aquifer to supplement the water in various lakes and ponds in

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R{' R.4E R25E A; 2 ? 35' 30' 25' b 22'30" 291 1 -w-e"l s pyi sfce t or n I73 EXPLANATION 17 A -73 ComaetmOl or nt'uldriol wll. \ /5 NuWer coresonds to number (I 2: a oble12. 3 0 0 U wepll**l solac. l a ped. 1 Pn W7 [* 024' ?Figure 7. Map of Jacksonville area showing location of major industrial and commercial wes wells supplying lakes and onds nd electri atin stations. @73 Gigj wgde T2S 0 0 7 3 0 6 i'~_ u2f upl r~yC ;to Fiur .da f aksnvle te ~oilg loaio f ajrinusra!a~icomr0a wdq els rup a'at Ao Slot-is *55ti~ gneatagtaios:.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 29 TABLE 13. LAKES AND PONDS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA THAT ARE SUPPLIED WITH WATER FROM ARTESIAN WELLS IN 1966. Type of Approximate Number surface average daily Number on of lake or Use pumpage or figure 7 wells pond flow from wells (mg) 1. 1 small lake on stock, irrigation 0.5 private farm 2. 1 small lake on stock, irrigation .05 private farm 3. 2 about 8 moats scenic, recreation 1.5 and lake at City Zoo 4. 1 fountains and scenic, recreation 0.8 small lake at City Zoo 5. 1 small lake in scenic, recreation 0.8 residential area 6. 1 Lake Lucina scenic, recreation 0.2 7. 1 Lake San Jose scenic, recreation 0.8 8. 1 fountain and scenic 0.4 scenic gardens at private home 9. 1 Spanish pond scenic, mosquito 0.5 at Ft. Caroline control Nat Monument 10. 1 pond at stock, irrigation 0.8 private farm 11. 1 lake at scenic, irrigation, 0.1 Jacksonville mosquito control Beach 12. 1 Lake Casa Linda scenic 1.0 at Naval Air Station TOTAL (rounded) 8.0 the Jacksonville area. About 20 percent of the Wells completed in the Floridan aquifer that were inventoried during this study were abandoned or not properly maintained and water from the aquifer was continuously flowing at the surface from the casing or broken or faulty well fittings. There is no gainful use of this water, and it either sinks into the surrounding soil or is drained off through surface streams. The amount of water that flows from each of these wells varies from less than 10 gpm from 2-inch diameter wells with faulty valves that cannot be closed to more than 300 gpm from 4to 6-inch diameter wells that have no fittings to stop the flow of water from the wells. The total amount of water flowing from all of

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30 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY the uncontrolled wells that were inventoried during this study is estimated to be about 10 mgd. However, there are undoubtedly many more uncontrolled wells that were not located during this investigation, and the total flow of water from all of these wells may be as much as 15 mgd. SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES GENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER All electric power in the area is generated by steam-driven turbines. The steam is derived from water from the Floridan aquifer that is carefully processed to remove most of the mineral content. Water from the St. Johns River is used to cool and condense the steam so that it can be reused. The cooling water is taken directly from the river through large intake pipes and circulated through cooling condensers and then discharged back into the river. The temperature of the water that is discharged back into the river is between 80 and 100F. warmer than the intake water. In some of the electric generating stations, a portion of the pumped river water is also used to cool bearings in the various generating machinery. Three municipally owned and two privately owned electric generating stations exist in the Jacksonville area. Table 14 lists the approximate electric generating capacity and the average amount of surface water used for cooling by each of these stations. As listed in the table, the five plants have a total electric generating capacity of about 947,600 kw, and they use about 863 mgd from the river for cooling of condensers. The location of each of these generating stations is shown on figure 7. TABLE 14. ELECTRIC GENERATING STATIONS IN THE JACKSONVILLE AREA AND WATER USED FOR COLLING IN 1966. Plant Amount of Number on capacity cooling water figure 7 Owner and location (kw) (mgd) 1. City of Jacksonville-Northside 275,600 216 (Began operation November 13, 1966) 2. City of Jacksonville-Kennedy 310,000 248 3. City of Jacksonville-Southside 320,000 317 4. St Regis Paper Company-Eastport 30,000 60 5. Alton Box Company 12,000 22 TOTAL 947,600 863 VARIATIONS IN THE WITHDRAWAL AND USE OF WATER The amount of water that is withdrawn in the Jacksonville area is constantly changing to meet the demands of the population and industry in the area. Continuous records of pumpage of municipal water supply wells indicate hourly, daily, weekly, and seasonal variations in the rate of withdrawal because of

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 31 variations in demand. For example, withdrawal of water from municipal wells is greatest on weekdays and during the afternoon and evening hours when domestic, commercial, and industrial water use is at a maximum. Withdrawal is much less on weekends and during late evening and early morning hours when domestic, commercial, and industrial use is at a minimum. However, these hourly and daily variations are relatively small compared to seasonal variations and long-term trends in the withdrawal and use of water in the area. The use of water varies considerably because of seasonal changes in temperature and rainfall. Much more water is used for lawn sprinkling, air conditioning, swimming pools, and domestic consumption during warm, dry periods than during cool, wet periods. Figure 8 shows the monthly and total annual pumpage of water from the city of Jacksonville municipal wells, the monthly and total annual precipitation and average monthly temperatures at Jacksonville from 1962 to 1966. A comparison of the monthly pumpage and temperature graphs on the figure shows that the withdrawal of water is much greater during the relatively warm late spring and summer months than during the relatively cool late fall and winter months. The highest monthly pumpage was during May, 1962, and May, 1965, when the temperatures were high and the rainfall was excessively low. The lowest monthly pumpage was during February, 1963, and February, 1964, when the average temperatures were low and the rainfall was excessively high for these months. The difference between the maximum and minimum monthly pumpage for each year shown on figure 8 ranged from 345 mg in 1966 to 840 mg in 1962. A comparison of total annual rainfall and pumpage in figure 8 shows that more water is produced during years of relatively low rainfall than during years of relatively high rainfall. About 728 mg more water was pumped from municipal wells in 1962 when the annual rainfall was only 43.9 inches than in 1964 when the annual rainfall was 65 inches, even though the 1964 potential demand due to increased population and industrial growth was greater. The average annual withdrawal of water in the Jacksonville area has continuously increased over the past years to meet the demands created by increased population and industrial growth. Figure 9 compares the volume of water pumped from the Floridan aquifer by the city of Jacksonville municipal utility from 1921 to 1966, the estimated total pumpage from the aquifer by all of the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area from 1947 to 1966, and the population of Duval County from 1920 to 1966. The figure also shows projections of future population and water withdrawal to 1980. A comparison of the graphs in the figure show that withdrawal of water generally increased in direct relation to the population. The withdrawal of water by the city of Jacksonville municipal utility increased from 6.5 to 36 mgd during the 45-year period of record, and the total withdrawal of water by all of the municipal and non-municipal water utilities in the area increased from about 27 mgd to 60 mgd from 1947 to 1966. The graphs show that the total withdrawals of water by all of the municipal

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fohrenhelf 80 10 -----7 .. .. ----i -.75 I' S i87 ------------------65 4 60 2192 1964 1965 IFIMAM I AISM0ND JN MIAIMI SA 0NID J MI AM| 1 I S INID N IFI D MI J IFINI J | M AIMIJ |A|S 0 N D 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 Figure 8. Graphs showing the total monthly production from Jacksonvillo municipal wells and the total monthly temperature at Jacksonvlln

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90-700 so --EXPLANATION -00 o Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census o 0 0 Projections, University of Florida, Bureau of i 70Economic ond Business Research, -500 E Estimates, University of Florida, Bureau of 0 Economic and Business Research. s-Dashed where Inferred ai( STotol municipol 40 utilities 2 1 t00 30 100 20 City of Jacksonville O 00 L0 I Figure 9. Graphs showing past withdrawals and projections of future water withdrawals by municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area.

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34 DIVISION OF GEOLOGY and nonmunicipal water utilities has increased at a much faster rate than withdrawal by the city of Jacksonville municipal water utility. This was caused to some extent by slight declines in domestic and commercial water services with the city; however, the principal reason was an increase in population and commercial and industrial development in suburban areas which are primarily served by nonmunicipal water utilities. The increase in total pumpage of water by all of the numerous individual domestic, industrial, and commercial water systems in the area is indicated by the number of private wells drilled in the area each year. Records of drillers and permits issued by the city of Jacksonville show that between 1,000 and 1,500 new wells were drilled each year between 1946 and 1966. Most of these were small diameter wells drilled into the limestone, shell and sand aquifer to provide relatively small quantities of water for domestic supplies. However, each year between 100 and 150 wells are drilled into the limestone, shell and sand aquifer and between 50 and 60 wells drilled into the Floridan aquifer to provide relatively large quantities of water for new and expanding industries and commercial establishments. The rate of increase in withdrawals by these individual domestic, industrial, and commercial water systems over the past years is probably similar to the rate of increase of withdrawal by the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area. FUTURE WATER PRODUCTION According to estimates made by the University of Florida, Bureau of Economic and Business Research (Beller, 1967; personal communication), there will be about a 30-percent increase in the population in Duval County from 1966 to 1980. In addition, according to present trends, many of the industries in the area will expand and new industries will move into the Jacksonville area. As a result, there will be an increased demand for water from both municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities and from military, private domestic, industrial and commercial water systems. As a result, many of the existing wells will be required to supply more water and new wells will be drilled for additional supplies. Projections of future water withdrawals of municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the Jacksonville area to 1980 are shown in figure 9. As shown in the figure, at the present rate of increase of pumpage, the amount of water that will be pumped by the city of Jacksonville water utility in 1980 will be between 40 and 45 mgd, which is an increase of between 10 and 25 percent over the pumpage in 1966. The total amount of water that will be pumped by all of the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area in 1980 will be between 75 and 80 mgd, which is an increase of between 25 and 40 percent over pumpage in 1966. The projections in figure 9 show that the future water withdrawals of all of the municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities in the area will increase at a much faster rate than the city of Jacksonville municipal water utility. However, L

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 35 the future withdrawals by the city municipal utility may vary considerably depending upon any expansion of services in the future. For example, in 1967 the city municipal water utility served most of the area within the 1966 corporate limits of Jacksonville and most of the areas outside those corporate limits were served by nonmunicipal utilities (figure 5). If the city municipal water utility were expanded to supply water services to more areas that have recently been annexed by the city (1967), the projected rate of future water production by the city municipal water utility would be much higher than shown in figure 9 and that of the other suppliers would be accordingly lower. The rate of increase in future water withdrawals by private domestic and commercial water systems will depend on the future expansion of municipal and nonmunicipal water utilities. Many of the present private domestic and commercial wells would be abandoned and fewer private wells would be drilled in the future if municipal or nonmunicipal water utilities were expanded to supply services in areas where all water supplies must presently be obtained from private wells. The rate of increase of pumpage by industrial water systems will depend largely upon the number and types of industries that expand or move into the Jacksonville area. Considerably more water will be withdrawn if large paper or chemical manufacturing industries rather than other types of industries move into the area.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 58 37 REFERENCES Beller, R. E 1967 Projections of the population of Florida counties for July 1, 1970 and July 1, 1975: Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Univ. of Florida, Population ser., Bull. 16. Goolsby, D. A. (see Leve, G. W.) Leve, G. W. 1966 Ground Water in Duval and Nassau Counties, FloridaFlorio Geol. Survey Rept. Inv. No. 43. 1966 (and Goolsby, D. A.) Drilling of Deep-Test-Monitor Well at Jacksonville: U. S. GeoL Survey open-file report. 1967 (and Goolsby, D. A.) Test hole in an aquifer with many water-bearing zones at Jacksonville, Florida: National Water Well Assmuiation, Ground Water Journal, V.5, no. 4. 1967 The Floridan Aquifer in Northeast Florida: National Water Well Association; Ground Water Journal, V.6, no. 2. U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare 1962 Public Health Service drinking water standards: U.S. Public Health Service Pub. No. 956 (1963).

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-FLORIDA-GEOLOGICAL-SURVEY COPYRIGHT NOTICE [year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text] The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder for the text of this publication. Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and 377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government, makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction. The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution. The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications. All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional information and permissions.


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FILES
FILE SIZE '42176' DFID 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSO' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00002.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' ab53634a7176f91f3eb72a0733e392e3
'SHA-1' a54d331e6cd7795e733710f57152b86f51ed6122
EVENT '2017-03-10T10:05:18-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'44004' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSP' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
3bab26ca9876683d31a1df0b06cfbc4a
61496bf84517e405b130bc0d31daf3ca315d5530
'2017-03-10T10:05:23-05:00'
describe
'17792' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSQ' 'sip-files00002.pdf'
3f911e01bd3d1a120faa55a828799757
28cdc56588e4ce655bbbec85b2429e01ca9d8073
'2017-03-10T10:03:50-05:00'
describe
'55323' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSQ-norm-0' 'ARCHIVE' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOSQ-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
'2017-03-10T10:05:42-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-10T10:03:52-05:00'
normalize
'11758' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSR' 'sip-files00002.pro'
221a5f9afe6757711595277449b26f1b
f353be116a335fe87ca9a8979341b769b9851056
'2017-03-10T10:03:57-05:00'
describe
'14028' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSS' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
8c15360d82cbcb4c4e0da65137ec1eed
7c387dbb0d0fa491bdacaee09b5052f8d5368414
'2017-03-10T10:04:35-05:00'
describe
'842512' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOST' 'sip-files00002.tif'
bafde94d3289378288c272f9d9ef2749
74391e9b1b78128bd62f296d2adf6b6c0d72de60
'2017-03-10T10:04:44-05:00'
describe
'740' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSU' 'sip-files00002.txt'
05703118377a2d69f52db19071036b98
fabcb8bef0851486fd201c9372f1208ac56c9d45
'2017-03-10T10:05:38-05:00'
describe
'5333' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSV' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
e50dc60fd4a20c0bbc32e35a365dcc9c
c29aa80ad1de203bf3dd989edac07adb016209ee
'2017-03-10T10:03:47-05:00'
describe
'11196' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSW' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
d10df94a23ca8dea2b89c3f9a1e6af3e
d467633231ce46f86095df437f2e87148d9ff7e4
'2017-03-10T10:03:49-05:00'
describe
'17264' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSX' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
10a4fd4f923497fbe566096d0a60d090
59908b018c93db013ae2b5bab8add1c6378e6ec7
'2017-03-10T10:04:57-05:00'
describe
'6823' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSY' 'sip-files00003.pdf'
5d24ef58b242a7a1c34609842371b8d3
2ba1850edddd2fd0b30d73132eff5ad5a6131c08
'2017-03-10T10:03:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOSY-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
'2017-03-10T10:05:46-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-10T10:03:55-05:00'
normalize
'3496' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOSZ' 'sip-files00003.pro'
f32fb745e39aeb0dc7c8fefa5ce71ee3
86dcf1faf34101f06f64b18d859924606a73037c
describe
'5668' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTA' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
e7ffdd18040450d69da73f9c74385863
28e0314da0c8c86a8d1a996b2826ba04db4b7e03
'2017-03-10T10:03:32-05:00'
describe
'862404' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTB' 'sip-files00003.tif'
9b32aaf8ce9316661a993377547e33cc
e75e8033b8aee84923a3343b74723cd96994a6b5
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTC' 'sip-files00003.txt'
c9caad5d40a13b7207de79f2204131f9
75a40cdff1476e659d405b3160ec7d33700f5ada
'2017-03-10T10:05:41-05:00'
describe
'1962' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTD' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
a35b331a4d63267f3e64bcd8161f450c
effac93ca960878ff4be6e86202ef3b078b88424
'2017-03-10T10:04:37-05:00'
describe
'124029' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTE' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
378b6bff2e0215c43791ff052708bbd4
739fbfca0210a94581229bcbe4045a70437bc942
'2017-03-10T10:03:24-05:00'
describe
'121386' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTF' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
24464c6be30a60bced41ae5fe7578bb3
b0f63fda3982d8bcc9eb7b3bdd47891bd783f915
'2017-03-10T10:03:29-05:00'
describe
'52509' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTG' 'sip-files00004.pdf'
ee485fc95456dde416c63c1b4afc96f0
1de8a3fec7529d9033d6da625f5c76f6dc0072ca
'2017-03-10T10:04:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOTG-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
'2017-03-10T10:05:43-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:18-05:00'
normalize
'65567' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTH' 'sip-files00004.pro'
8bc2fb02b2f0ecc8f7244a511641c36e
88f735fcbcc31b75e55ffba66d60214915482ee8
describe
'43011' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTI' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
a809a6837eb3bef88a1743376053ab7c
2c2103e3a1c674676cc62d7d023ce0393696214c
describe
'850248' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTJ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
130389bc7aa39ce46c99ed7b13ebf285
2a56bc525faec041e1bbbd36a2fefb2af04a0bb7
'2017-03-10T10:03:38-05:00'
describe
'3161' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTK' 'sip-files00004.txt'
54dcb599049785b597e45961ead36a1f
888ef759e74e8301c11f0942959d29ffa73bbf6f
describe
'11533' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTL' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
5b62260e8a3dacc7ddfc85a6d09ac76c
1acd465c5b2133127f3d782ec83d3359d2fe78fd
describe
'71626' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTM' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
f273412eac0a3f1f4a1b54cf90497a12
4048dca1024e99350eed99cf63da91bf1e1abe3f
describe
'69553' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTN' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
2c536dd2a6dd990fb92b869bcd2bc49f
f2bd4659d9bdc585e49db61fa3ef3bddc078cf25
'2017-03-10T10:04:59-05:00'
describe
'31941' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTO' 'sip-files00005.pdf'
e6adb59bc8ef6de961be228167e57da8
b34cd917d95e560fe0804ca6eb2ade3bb1818f13
'2017-03-10T10:03:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOTO-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:03:37-05:00'
normalize
'36772' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTP' 'sip-files00005.pro'
027cde06e25d6e7b961e8f0c9ae281f0
3c1fe20d9ad078cb17f37451b284794722ca9f50
'2017-03-10T10:03:25-05:00'
describe
'20468' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTQ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
2529658098a573679293692374afc141
cecb2031512db85fcc9c4a34e611c140442cb27d
'2017-03-10T10:03:39-05:00'
describe
'923636' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTR' 'sip-files00005.tif'
cc4e218a2fe66893f23f077a196ac600
d1e53cc376d049f1ca4514d26a462fb3d1540f06
'2017-03-10T10:04:23-05:00'
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTS' 'sip-files00005.txt'
0e2e41850adf7badffa9d5ee4e318c68
f7ff6a3480191e0b0fcdbd9c2fec56ca7f9806e4
'2017-03-10T10:04:54-05:00'
describe
'5513' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTT' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
70dadf2010be701f086a0777f5febf4b
73053a223d4519f4011dc9a174016137ca2f343e
describe
'196679' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTU' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
0a813358661865b5ec884ab65fef1283
dabdcf95382a8d10a6a132b5bafaeb4f94257b4f
describe
'163749' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTV' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
0b4d1abef1bd546a26c957e00723d350
00f8cc40c5fdfd2432e7cc04d81fa8d449eb50a4
'2017-03-10T10:04:06-05:00'
describe
'82273' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTW' 'sip-files00006.pdf'
e6b1e3080cfb09dcc4b31878ac998fdf
b57dcef1fc1ce245a33d42e981d615bd0bf9b82d
'2017-03-10T10:04:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOTW-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:51-05:00'
normalize
'73728' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTX' 'sip-files00006.pro'
6ff89ac4988764773000ace6e2cb2573
a52d7c19250ea3c2768bc84d47b12c6cc70ee927
'2017-03-10T10:03:26-05:00'
describe
'49493' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTY' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
31e4e769183cd2916ca9c3d20d528b24
39353299d68d6c95cfaa8120313b13b1d5ae634c
describe
'984864' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOTZ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
a152b2290daace914eea815330a3302d
f064c4fa48aca4300a6f9a9beb467a288014db08
describe
'3070' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUA' 'sip-files00006.txt'
9db1b3430c277f850cb200bbb3b4355e
6655b1d929156b0a11b46d61253cdc39e49f22d4
'2017-03-10T10:04:01-05:00'
describe
'11875' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUB' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
67f3e5021f1741f0f2886fe41dde295c
89f6bfb5653e214b6349e650e8b18869cf18c0d2
'2017-03-10T10:05:31-05:00'
describe
'186607' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUC' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
59ca59b13c74bf5b8617e30f095ed727
a8093bd640f2cc3aeb6d664852075211a02db109
'2017-03-10T10:04:40-05:00'
describe
'174315' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUD' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
189ab7f0683ea8a9265e1de4926a7ee9
05fa4607ebcc7aad6762d6e1af3c0ef76bd7db4d
describe
'77146' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUE' 'sip-files00007.pdf'
bf8d0a439d3d70ca40dfaeabafc4f8ad
58f00348d9d6fa84a82aa0ba236b82e8f6aa829a
'2017-03-10T10:04:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOUE-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:09-05:00'
normalize
'75021' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUF' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f244d43483e954f30ece51c8c5def279
6815710be28085138640f3f7169fa07c9f484edf
'2017-03-10T10:03:17-05:00'
describe
'55125' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUG' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
c62fd14705930567a4b08d75e7176f34
c3340802f054a6a5c1fa07d734d404edd8b2a4be
describe
'885896' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUH' 'sip-files00007.tif'
06b3852e5ab009e0238c8871bf36078e
acd2ddaaebfd73a7cb4eef1898142563ffc8370d
'2017-03-10T10:03:20-05:00'
describe
'2974' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUI' 'sip-files00007.txt'
52bfe5d9ce5d994dc7db401ab7209a8d
87a6868aaba69c6de5a95cb7a178bd47e1252bf2
describe
'14230' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUJ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
08e8babcfefe31231233bc95a572ccd0
b87e2de4667cc4e27186520f6c32a814de94c5fc
describe
'197970' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
2a155075b7c505853c134c6b8473a7c3
13f51cc21af3e443516a4509b6270db0a5123095
describe
'180690' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
14bb449932902533a33a114e3d4949fc
fe3ce49ad6f6c26e435cf1121dc0049b10b04ee7
'2017-03-10T10:05:00-05:00'
describe
'81982' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUM' 'sip-files00008.pdf'
e7db9a7482cf13fac26bf1e620d0572d
b399753927e8342c42cd958024aeeb8f189ede20
'2017-03-10T10:05:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOUM-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
'2017-03-10T10:05:45-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-10T10:05:03-05:00'
normalize
'76504' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
7daff2a0ae253ae8404504aed0c22d0d
de7dd9aad1fb6158dc1e93c5e76e7cf29ae3f0c9
describe
'56075' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
0f2d6cbb56dcc78df491b227ecd8ad91
3e27cb98eea5bdc173f9082aaf89b24e6c05cd86
'2017-03-10T10:03:16-05:00'
describe
'906628' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
e6b47450aeff3ecbb0777b281926978d
ffeff7e1e2f019c44aba23ad857b0c50279ade90
'2017-03-10T10:05:21-05:00'
describe
'3107' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUQ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
ca5a35ccb9b172a8dcc99a0a884a0947
4da3bda32e394860119e2059297e0cf8a619a5b8
'2017-03-10T10:05:37-05:00'
describe
'13225' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUR' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
fb2a36c70c6882bf5de1ecc7afc02263
d8b5bc31cca84e65432c2a1d3d09298c38b2c783
describe
'190087' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUS' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
cc4be6e6fce4876dfdabb5a09da76e81
baac63bf4e19fdc56c20912882e73f64f2f9c1e0
'2017-03-10T10:03:33-05:00'
describe
'186451' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
05632669fa3e8c08d01ac44b4c744e46
6aae3884fa40fc1cc9d8ce4a146604dfbd8a6008
describe
'78952' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUU' 'sip-files00009.pdf'
cabd9c87b25463aaddadd09e5463e921
500610446ce17d68ad9066f363cf6bac7a68cf30
'2017-03-10T10:05:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOUU-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'73856' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUV' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e2d4521145ee13a19821c696990cee20
5a040729f3824dd0c2d1cfda0d3a5318c676c05b
describe
'60063' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUW' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0ce2f9ca7dc48aa0196edcf9e5624283
edeba43232fba6cdc64ae2977b51158054dce1f2
'2017-03-10T10:04:41-05:00'
describe
'890632' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUX' 'sip-files00009.tif'
72468ab00272607e0beea15f04440218
346fb4883ea9b291ea473d33635e84b251a8f731
'2017-03-10T10:05:08-05:00'
describe
'2991' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUY' 'sip-files00009.txt'
f2ff1033837ba7c654045c83f6ec1116
74d1b05022cc79ea4216ecf385be0ecc546a854b
'2017-03-10T10:03:46-05:00'
describe
'15427' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOUZ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
91ee671b4a67c62ece91042904cf47e3
a8ab1758f99742f5517af807b64cfb0d77223566
describe
'130282' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVA' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a0b190a27eb5846e295fb9b50ae58d73
78df068456ce4cb459f873109d74c24e5e486de8
'2017-03-10T10:04:52-05:00'
describe
'119988' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVB' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
7c2c4d25700bc0e8b7e6d88dd032f7dc
f06da79412d8c87512fb09d709e8aa025dd681f2
'2017-03-10T10:03:43-05:00'
describe
'54351' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVC' 'sip-files00010.pdf'
ee2465070b45d0ce27be9ff357bf3467
d11b60f458fee86fb8bc6cfd963b1ca7162cf308
'2017-03-10T10:04:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOVC-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:47-05:00'
normalize
'53394' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVD' 'sip-files00010.pro'
cc2d04ef14c0a61e107bee36a08554d4
f42438698ea95733d922a6a88d268f80fe912fdd
describe
'37881' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVE' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1e94beb1bf4c3b3d71ae92cb31851fc7
e6bfe0b585ccbb08dd008c08c4b88f1a9659bff7
'2017-03-10T10:04:15-05:00'
describe
'906448' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
bf30fe64278a01e1acb820612abacea5
408290341704b99e41af6c1e901bad2e9e5dcd22
describe
'2505' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
75f580e31324694813619d1a13eb7764
0f549fd844cba5a143620ae304b15145ee5d92bc
'2017-03-10T10:03:10-05:00'
describe
'9784' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
3d7b944fa646227d1e36900fa4dade6a
a2c515a5fb2b2eb15e9375eeb022a19c660be953
describe
'106040' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d0ccd76bedddd30ff6e8c84aa75b5978
a632008267177bae6fffa1496a1a6cc6846cc43e
describe
'99653' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
dfe78e6af18b01e78f555afd12fe65e9
955c7e47bf4ba23fbd36f66c76da727147966395
'2017-03-10T10:03:30-05:00'
describe
'44197' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVK' 'sip-files00011.pdf'
34ee5175577df820b78f7b27fdb0faa3
e5a908aeeb62feb6e0741c6eec5ecf534b4650ce
'2017-03-10T10:04:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOVK-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:33-05:00'
normalize
'18379' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
6aeeee15eb7b3b366c97352263cad61e
a6535c8777512e563dab4efdad958264e20238ac
describe
'34182' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
36a6e9958b11919ffb9c3929cc34425a
46488442746b7516849f433d28637e4163ed5ead
'2017-03-10T10:05:34-05:00'
describe
'877088' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
ebae64c9edebb2357fb23b64d6ae51e4
dbc46f123439b8eb5e12675d60c72421d8d43ed2
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
a709fad6f0bb58d95cb4886e0518ae1f
a2b9345d7f034277ff2ee961967f70f750b1e575
describe
Invalid character
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'10341' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
eeb6d287492a5832760c57e9a59a5606
d04d9e9f1f6175948aa5f6142206cfc9f27cfa65
describe
'149068' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2d3d06b0832a0ffb1ff7f6d7b0219285
538123d8c5321d7f3eaaae5ee801f7270e2ad105
describe
'139154' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVR' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
33f8c6c3c0209925f17d0640f2969318
e476ff63d8bf9ac03e6104090d632d1bec97a48b
describe
'64162' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVS' 'sip-files00012.pdf'
eb0bc811f06925e0bd2818381469a250
381cedd054c731cf75fa5a5892dd0afb52a34ba7
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOVS-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
'2017-03-10T10:05:47-05:00'
describe
'2017-03-10T10:03:28-05:00'
normalize
'53112' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVT' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9bd00f67699a8c1877aea7f011e1d680
5f1dbc1943f2ce6805ca0678ab2592608208bed5
describe
'42900' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVU' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
409e1e71485f3d46cab35d86cebebd85
910679a480e20ba16d2ed8f9d1b5eb013a886b51
'2017-03-10T10:03:56-05:00'
describe
'878484' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVV' 'sip-files00012.tif'
389dba3631cfe95f219c593368b2b681
6026819e1ccd21a343377bd9c0ca9fc1a3a2646e
describe
'2639' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVW' 'sip-files00012.txt'
61afc5a6309ce176f97dea8a2a663dd1
1f01f80e4757269f6b694483386b8479733c7dc5
'2017-03-10T10:04:34-05:00'
describe
'12407' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVX' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8a972bd76b529fe7993a8edbddb0e7aa
afa99d32089c7f0192b7345b555a07db116b1956
describe
'98997' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1206252b72f9f8ab20d2c999a4240cb6
ace4291792e0b3135c294f6991cec99cda19f6ca
describe
'43272' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOVZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
19f78231fb758672517b0ee12627063f
0f7ce699790eb138eee69d1acfdffefee5c33077
'2017-03-10T10:04:36-05:00'
describe
'40349' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWA' 'sip-files00013.pdf'
493049762ecc4385964dc421dfbc7678
eafad6589a1f6a5e5d0054b6345da0b97e085810
'2017-03-10T10:05:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWA-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOWA-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
'2017-03-10T10:05:44-05:00'
describe
normalize
'46776' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
525413bb6921e0ca8e2be7970ab2c1b8
4f0c91c132b4278b0324d0a613a61d060eeed182
describe
'14641' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWC' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
604e9487cbb7f93ea546a91b777642d5
09b4ea587adaeec7fc078c1ac802df852a039b0a
'2017-03-10T10:04:13-05:00'
describe
'897404' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
6128e38e7aebcfb27f7e9b5c860732f8
84288cd2554c550e6ac6a494e0e140613b346d79
'2017-03-10T10:04:14-05:00'
describe
'2347' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWE' 'sip-files00013.txt'
caba5eb7cd22e127d22e84e0e60b6723
1b19337d3a2b523abd09362cdb08a59abd783b02
describe
'4641' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWF' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1621201d7f7642311b4c412638373e86
fcc2885aa7271a2873a305f1c987a0ec05b35dd5
describe
'123345' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWG' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a3065dbb08232b631276bf6eae7fb7f1
f9545366a4621a8112565e413a2c302bc62094d5
'2017-03-10T10:03:41-05:00'
describe
'110866' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWH' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
ed8390f51b25c7ae257fad839a1124f8
c5698f355ec8b0f100c1471e8972f2732c81239a
describe
'51440' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWI' 'sip-files00014.pdf'
935446790f2050012cbfeab14d70a3e4
38a614dc1a777f6e47f64e4cc3c250538a813ea5
'2017-03-10T10:04:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWI-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOWI-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:05-05:00'
normalize
'59879' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ba1a7337ccb289f2397b760ea6ca4462
58d1341ba407d801ba963871c9160097a5168717
describe
'36343' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8a40fd003ce47afebd18ef10c110518a
a3e68b01dc23f18a2c3fa95e6c8e7a6e969e549e
describe
'891216' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
944c2ca37d35db98b2ee5a722023ce87
06bdfcc3733fc681324de352871a30689d5cf0db
describe
'3079' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
f34fe5a50c9f4c7c112dab5a16cb8e8f
a7104b889e0bc98077dd41da901525d93cff5b57
describe
'9733' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b9a3fe88890a42fcdceea7a43d0c1e9a
ed86daac0fe4ee08f615712295e1f3da3a8eb065
describe
'103321' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
081d7587c00e4ca9acf50a85f3ad5ead
a5dab9697290b68fcca280a32cf1b77861b39022
describe
'47722' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
164ae5f1201c04ad9505c62972407cc7
e09205c80914ae005ae7842b2990ec4c8818730a
describe
'42003' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWQ' 'sip-files00015.pdf'
52550bf1844ee25a634eaa89bbabc90b
0057109c6cdf4d6d73588ac7d410836d1a2b960f
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWQ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOWQ-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'56253' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
eea695530696462404aada73ceb8e4d5
054f1aa79ab54ea9f00c8e113f017eaa1d78603c
describe
'16386' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d0fb1d417221ec4cd3c5c1dfe04aac56
56f844518c633bfcfb96badf974c1163f724099d
describe
'873220' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
cf60af692425892262450ed6a04728ab
d3db1ab4c511b8e187fe6c794268093ea4970221
describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
79c155a314ceae686bdeec9e6771206c
413ac25b41fa3fb967c056860801e762eb4e1745
'2017-03-10T10:04:10-05:00'
describe
'5037' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
eeaa9f3171da5ffc5ff069b93e8e9bc1
976f2a281225f970afb1f2b1d8adb42bcb0d1ac2
describe
'174098' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6749dc6df48417e61ca239cc345a1cda
4b9f00be28436b833551ed946fd7ba99ef41d572
describe
'156293' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
bb3f98b9ddd017a4847716fe893695d8
3ee4cfd90bb9a962362ae4f37f5c341f7c421028
describe
'72870' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWY' 'sip-files00016.pdf'
26333506eb3c7a33d270c45086190cda
b44bb219be0f978bcceef39211e171e7036ea137
'2017-03-10T10:04:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOWY-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:26-05:00'
normalize
'75941' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOWZ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
4963baef19b09a12cb622df8d2be7a9d
fa4cd2565a7e9d258f8487d1197773ba0872aedb
describe
'48763' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bb4b58e38d4c54936bb3e142148117fd
0d2b38e8533c73f0a5b3e311e6d3ac5058bf69cc
describe
'894752' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
fde9f116ba2a75bc60db8a7e6d438f35
cee1d91b202f4222b8206ec71051b1a9fe3342d0
describe
'3573' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c62d17ca6991d2aabca887dc0e687e03
ae057276ae2d1bee192a059a5ef197b4eafa7f11
describe
'12817' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
6ceca1bd2c881d7b6be7fdf623378d2b
24b6efcca8c618b212e127d515941d8ce46d1ce0
describe
'126897' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
ebbb9e0c2c9c96a947e5505e13a5eb17
7de334332e3225b614b7cd61708190dfa9d52983
describe
'121898' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b19132b4a653c2847e30ca0e59793a05
e3f73969bdc998335e6714e4e18cee71a1d71698
'2017-03-10T10:05:32-05:00'
describe
'51607' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXG' 'sip-files00017.pdf'
c0b02384f74d7066716899fa7ac13f88
f1f0f1feb033a62acaa4d4e31fdcf1b1d03f4eaa
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOXG-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'50822' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
1b864309e59fc47d429d5b4ea66a07b0
367b6788571007ba5d0e849999a42f0b4c1cc9d1
describe
'38861' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
06730a6502e881ae9db2b26156743400
204662486417e34b8671326db0526da24faa3849
describe
'888368' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d5c430f7a956b530dcb2683abeaedc7f
a5ac5e6d33866b171901974fcf3d41fc21e9db6a
describe
'3033' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
fd8193504407ff1968eb68af50cf1545
26eac8bbbec737b3474339f62d4a1d7471e3e4fa
describe
'10757' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
5eef7824ad88afb5c54262afcaf83a98
4efd47ff8644044807b9016293c16236971ef412
describe
'217871' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
9c3939d30b621cbf76cf141b056c2515
8d5285242b66e4cadce5b5be55fee5c57c565bd9
describe
'194834' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
38ba35ab1f347520772cbee1e6cb304c
dc6f611fdca9653ad8604d972f3bac06c3ba7d1a
describe
'91452' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXO' 'sip-files00018.pdf'
fbbb11cf341f1a336c3b62c40d8f9c6f
09073cc5ad9a692db35fb9ea2835e0fd55194c18
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOXO-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'85007' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ff27793934bd69c84251df98a524b9e3
6239c35431e5734b3e69e4b2f614ba965f1aec17
'2017-03-10T10:05:20-05:00'
describe
'58685' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXQ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a3db69eec5ff99e56ceddc69ab92f4a3
613d9ef874aab5c038da9909a6efc02eb1fe5f92
describe
'929880' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXR' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b44aa3c64583f477febd379a467dd829
7785311745f34a93628f9447fb21acd3341cd2ef
describe
'3447' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXS' 'sip-files00018.txt'
5aad84b000374af2e6dd953f341f6393
42ef1a5691cfa449fdd1e8e4b61db6c4c11fdae2
describe
'13632' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
d2a2194b77aa097c358798dcf5d6d51f
af6aca2f284692845bca28930ad25712c8b4e0bb
describe
'154611' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
81319c224b942dc6652b8e2d5b28cf64
178a2c60c48d53a75bb1e74289441afe26904928
describe
'149686' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ee297d2f7fe92bef3c66ef17101e64da
2e987d25943e1a04f1a36a3088d9e1c97d486e1a
describe
'63436' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXW' 'sip-files00019.pdf'
2a6c820709005eed28003460847771a9
eeb82848bc6b6e4a947036f89879579183018868
'2017-03-10T10:03:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOXW-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:03:19-05:00'
normalize
'16119' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
4e4d7cc0708a1d86c0b04ac1b70bab08
222d320aa15c8a7db7b3472df49fd6caf0396505
describe
'49253' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
9ff96c821f930ecda79760877b01daea
675b3fe440bce67e8ed390ea91276e19ea320f99
describe
'858368' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOXZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
6b675e436e9c46d64b32e82d25b0b484
7d7e041bd487620b4ae8a7520a5ee144574d50da
describe
'636' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ceed66a675197ee0f9bb35a61cf7d1c6
0a0be5a8cbcf3460b661385633a757be9530a932
describe
'14221' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
b15403bd787288574e07a49a391c3dd6
2154a94d847764a1a9b6ee26a7406380c08f9468
'2017-03-10T10:04:53-05:00'
describe
'179902' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
97ef502a960837b8717220c915977ec7
15ff1fa3e69835d18b97c817b4598e3f8adf7d6c
'2017-03-10T10:05:30-05:00'
describe
'54668' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3cf5ce072f0251065a33e0cd50787639
4bba9319d97d3592c7dd7a8b625cf717ee96f849
describe
'71608' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYE' 'sip-files00021.pdf'
7279caca16b1ad81cd7a9e8ead161515
bb150a9a168a29af6491df676b2d1ef2e69287a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOYE-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'29304' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYF' 'sip-files00021.pro'
1aa020f804f8d7dbc9733e1b64415aba
d99f9f52bda037d9b1495428fb04eafdea98cd7e
describe
'17029' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYG' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e76ffe6994ad73b90ca20e4c8f7f6891
6408ee4ba77f87d8ca127be4c64adcb2d7f16248
describe
'1658524' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYH' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7de14418439d5184b087ccacfafc974c
c26506cbda2cbea771c1d39361ce173a16b3634c
describe
'2172' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYI' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e3ffc4186fc5edcfe4e53b0941e11946
8fa13cadc65ac8faa50f14879f18175e53658ddb
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'5193' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYJ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
43af907e3322dc658642d2e679404db5
449b6d118aa69d7c2377bea306a86b558851aaa3
'2017-03-10T10:04:28-05:00'
describe
'1653721' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYK' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
62d44faa75f74dcd38a897a3c03a5e99
e2ea9a9da264276dbe070fb9113658ffa7d478ab
describe
'64207' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYL' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f409a9d6b0fe7c520ae49097c39c7278
b4cfdc0af0201ce622c204998943f25498f81a28
describe
'932638' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYM' 'sip-files00022.pdf'
663b1611cf03e8b1a7cf9792ca9fe1aa
4f3565b843feeddfafd8833191de6b0aac6bf2b2
'2017-03-10T10:05:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOYM-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'15400' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
dec52ff931a384842e7296263393c683
9fde5c9adae0f864a57d65b5d602abc553eb9e97
describe
'18535' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
35eb92a717908512f40dae0658788ed7
0782b28e595e7083e845449e5d31c56fc6550ec3
describe
'13243536' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
94d60d56e627dae9e9a8cda7b20fbc84
8968dbba4607ea54b8cce919ba9084d6834b6cb8
'2017-03-10T10:04:11-05:00'
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
a9a7be5c82378ca12e53aec211bb95f1
2c500de1e8527ae563a2bed607b2e8f69dbf5fe3
describe
'5119' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f1abc5cee69a6be4a0993379bb72e6cd
a9a4c7c91f6c7b607f3811b1a9b98f25389b876e
describe
'199382' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYS' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2d6607c0afb2e233861415c4d9769887
0ddd24461e71747aa5dedf1fd46757602d2be4c0
describe
'184731' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
40e2e639e8300eaece66a8f03905b315
e1e37d007823a635d70e82de38b2978e83e77f2d
describe
'82828' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYU' 'sip-files00024.pdf'
840ec827ce4def71dabd353f86464870
9cda35504cf0984fd8cd18a73a373373969721a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOYU-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:20-05:00'
normalize
'76505' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7f92a9c35f81783dd99b2696ad16dab6
d0d6bcc2e734ac40d990cac4ad8f2cd093438b46
describe
'58441' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9339b6f85fbdcca5e0a1988603816ad5
baed3077ccddeed3566b1ef5e34bf039ab598452
describe
'879700' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9c2c5b93cc3fe4ad85cc450acc731d66
8fcf6c409b3ba455ad927ecaf4146788f6e657fc
describe
'3083' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
63bfb617b7b979c82d617b9977cfeb93
46fdb3ee57105d9ab631bbafe884d112be438774
describe
'14156' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOYZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c089880697a0084495e5ad1003d4dbc2
1a288333c1d8f5b984ec8a758d4ac5ffd77f3098
describe
'103264' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
47101e2f0f37aba93b8622ead359def2
83690c28a035f4aefee922b92742cae42e7637a1
describe
'101083' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
122c39cd7a67632ca66a6152694e9a7b
472eac214b502a0b4063ebb837927f6a2fcfda5c
describe
'41949' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZC' 'sip-files00025.pdf'
a9cfeab24546221034f28e9bdbb14a02
d7e3b7cd4f99da4c38c7443d5e33788e52324a50
'2017-03-10T10:03:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOZC-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'13320' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZD' 'sip-files00025.pro'
4af9e25c220fa57a74597c17dcda57d6
4f8f7d28d650c4e500aee5ed0188617dadae624a
describe
'35386' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZE' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f4c185e9d620660bf088e2974cb51024
2959a020531f246c22d488a0166c9a575fd8b405
describe
'883264' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
490e1c543a0be40f4e728c480879ea4c
b88480023080cebf6c450ff517f87efbba07c87e
describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
0522d1f45ee94258dcf23ceb6fe78b68
c55fb93b4166ae6e72cb4b09c0741458051a7aed
describe
'9774' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
837b92c1e5a466b98136e19bef6f2a2e
d9972caa8ba1a18f4f6d726e577b03787de57eea
describe
'57128' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
1b09874e3f2404259d19d3eaa1e06fa7
0136e9c5e9b9b45f28bb7d2b2dba4092b02f945d
describe
'27229' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZJ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f7028fae572282a2592fc0a0b2cf2859
d4be5c060fed6785b66e98ebb9cb5ebf80b69569
describe
'22637' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZK' 'sip-files00026.pdf'
c744ba769c7620424816b461e609bf49
b2d55f856795ec2060bab340bbd6f8520b196d46
'2017-03-10T10:03:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOZK-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'18829' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZL' 'sip-files00026.pro'
f3046f994362999d97de802cc6044168
9d4947049207e6165b37e857bd95e1a9f54740e6
describe
'9658' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
df7468d20585e30fd46ced5f430ec7a3
6048c9dfac26f08ca318347dd5601e0dfea73b10
describe
'894428' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b65761b2c097d37eabad95dd12668f59
7e5ce4d8a6584b2d07e2a8ddc93cd32afc2a47af
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
5b8f59185e9b511df8d28f00b3369e94
3cbbbc791baf470a88c1c1f2dae862d0d68f0b70
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'3599' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZP' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
bf5b4946e5b5687644b195d2f0614b4f
75fe3e09d3230ca9a5f80ad00fdbd03c78606ad5
describe
'137982' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
70001c2ad5c523f64ea20b465068f2ba
463fcfe7289ec605d737c3446553595d6b1b84f8
describe
'116820' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZR' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d8b8941144b20e369fc67ddefaf2edcf
5c5a77095be752b94f1a37363a721394cb508ddd
describe
'56215' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZS' 'sip-files00027.pdf'
a6d0682854e4e5259bc3b1902a590948
710cf8ea898cd480837f7adc9d45ab961b2c38c2
'2017-03-10T10:04:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACOZS-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:56-05:00'
normalize
'55360' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZT' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f6c5d16e06965a97c4023ed64ee7c177
21a4941c9239dc53f87383f987fc9aa2133ae5fb
describe
'37562' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
20b0165e12f6a4e3628730b093406e80
76367cc10d482151fbed06e83b51461323d15489
describe
'937440' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c95e8c7b3ecd566ad42cd88a2813da26
f3cfa2be9834c62bfaafcf78886a1d411e301381
'2017-03-10T10:05:07-05:00'
describe
'2489' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a39744bf2834f3474d742f03f2cad6a7
a0d6cd130e5423caefedb178372ebb9ee47591ff
describe
'10300' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
9d18bf3623b31072287a8fcdff52ba85
ec4d67942c8d9d943d975863c9bfd3fa1fe4b8d1
describe
'169101' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f07359e54a70031b1f9abc06d3bb6cdb
fb219186a8d6b4679b5cd4e8b6cadba72bd3b7a6
describe
'153259' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACOZZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
94b5edb3140b282db5e5bb7d0a28049c
5b33fcf89cc37d168a85c7255544ed8134f09176
describe
'70003' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAA' 'sip-files00028.pdf'
8b6f3685fcf2373fbee517488572380d
7cd48af31641db120a17799cd3106329bbfeb422
'2017-03-10T10:05:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAA-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPAA-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:05:11-05:00'
normalize
'63561' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
17625f6221d7b84146ee2506004b08ee
ec3471878820223986cc59a22b527f14da38f143
describe
'48240' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
15f58f25313825b043f5e9aa264a3cfb
e4246a0283b43f00cb93d0505fd405a1227c9237
describe
'911328' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
b89a09fcedcdcb47b0676c1d3c91216f
5e9b3520ae18583f2848a8d8d9a40ec01e4bf996
describe
'2818' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAE' 'sip-files00028.txt'
f5fdeb8bed84ac4ec5b47d940186bb4d
16eb7e42c83eccd7722431616dfbc7f1a2855c32
describe
'12360' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
02dc2132ee796caccfdfddeed0be3fe4
cd71f6d69e0a60dc7eda936d92d2b92b46e4dcea
describe
'204684' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
3625f68d2259c7e9587b71462f8cfca4
be82e1ee020f3ae2c7839c227d5c7439a894e37b
describe
'179518' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
90047f8b3d596fdc0a8ff7bda6ae2cb9
8444f319a51b6df6266ea6daf48313471912a085
describe
'84753' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAI' 'sip-files00029.pdf'
0c763f6835e31905d01ccf02dee0ba7c
ef5296d1c1ab4d3a3e672440830b18d588588f9b
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAI-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPAI-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:39-05:00'
normalize
'82113' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAJ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
061f79fd70763f43d40bb36d6f561e91
3a2017587c558790b57d4b71aabba9b5875382e4
describe
'55089' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAK' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
aab2419eefa9fc74ca22275fd74b4f2d
8fb6e0124a801248495d6a5c2e104daa66ac57f3
describe
'938108' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ea3b007b6cd0b52e9abe512b9a4af942
bb71c1ad66da57342de13f337e3d9492549eaa4b
describe
'3286' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAM' 'sip-files00029.txt'
41744bb5236c70c2989633b978c4bf94
40f33d1649e0b20e4aa83cd6cb8878fef4756377
describe
'13068' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAN' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d623d74319e759d6cc6554032dccd320
d1b26a73d8ec128b031a58e33c53262a355fa75f
'2017-03-10T10:03:58-05:00'
describe
'100729' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAO' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
20e25ef11e2579cc8f4ed331b39cb3f7
f9ee7bb34853cb739e49325e04884f0ace07e6ed
describe
'90870' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAP' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
48521250280e91f6eafc5c0981d5e0da
1f4093bdc07cee60ee32017aea758f41910a102c
describe
'41224' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAQ' 'sip-files00030.pdf'
c5e6cf815448a5c3fb4254cbfb7e0746
33e63d76a7165167c3911825fb85646abb3adf37
'2017-03-10T10:03:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAQ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPAQ-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'66319' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
495607460a9948989fef0bf46809b22c
f400bd7f49bd9e35e533a33bc7b25449a232fa82
describe
'29043' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
20edb356ba6023d08c04726eb7a3cab1
f8b3ab13dea1cb29e617e2546e017e16dd744f80
describe
'868520' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f1aa908cb209b856f8947d451bee08f9
240199a7930683daf64f039cc7caeeef966ff367
describe
'4025' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ef0a0edbcbe047de6a808af5fdfbe928
1cb542d403a8cce33debc0a3eed8a7ea532093b8
describe
'9193' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
24043c9b4092f9e554a50decaa144c15
4ea1512eec1a11d4c82dfff8b804b4cfb103b0ea
describe
'83554' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1a56059f83fe15688d8f7848dff87b12
9758ac57ea46af36bb8f67ca2c078446e8fe6013
describe
'70187' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d583124911c9c7c387b1ab93ee5182c8
f33e0d5e1fc7213ea0055f6fcf94d28178ccb469
describe
'33282' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAY' 'sip-files00031.pdf'
7646eb18274f642271916fc8c1e59391
1364c2075b093d9d498802bcb2a9d8d76917c6b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPAY-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'55799' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPAZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
de50856b2de47fbfd372ac602dc0303d
57fdc19bcc3891063bea74e25dff32e0af25555d
describe
'22682' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
8f54f454abbb5cc08267cf0f35ce44f2
0c7b7cd884693c8b689a4a370f6c3df233b2059b
describe
'929980' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e1ef5c976982ef8a1efb0b9d98335320
35cf12d62a45cd6e23ac494c8f842e28865c4dda
describe
'3557' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b6547524c0027a32938100f882eea135
306308f073f78b53b353f6e8f4d56373ed6a5cee
describe
'7449' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
cafbe8cc41d6fd1f4b943180fef54e3a
b4b84ed5b402e605cf9957a73ea140bb8cf3439d
describe
'144403' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
cad17f6473863b509f138c9f9e2f941d
4a3066ab0c56f072df22c583a5e4196d7a052711
describe
'128731' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2ffcdeea8fd12c4bfb50a0c7bfd881b3
e14566f56136e5f4a6ab442a0f63811ebb0ee8b5
describe
'59555' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBG' 'sip-files00032.pdf'
e5df367f81cbf8942b5cc460275487c5
cc7493d9880427986615905df9ea1353a5bd8a1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPBG-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:05:13-05:00'
normalize
'56236' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fafc70e0f19280536950da6c8b10939e
1040509dc89e75c7e936a51609f5cc62ccac3e2f
describe
'40942' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6bc8a106fcf9bbc7a78893f67a8a506e
47b4781cfee1def4464b9c6342c43f52e07d84be
describe
'921184' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
1a6744c1afd9624154c92fe07dded4f4
599d0b8c8dd50cc5d0e77706ee940971c22552d4
describe
'2487' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
901bcb823e0edec35776d235d164b82e
76674d1ec29e44b2ede27d85a11548a50b1e64ea
describe
'10741' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBL' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
174a194c5bbc339d56fbade741a72b49
9e85ae3dc5f9faca671540c05847699e8934a3e2
describe
'203571' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a68a8f6cfeff01bb46d84f9db4c3a1bb
12b6ccd4d971585ff2ce4b03cd198b90cc39f47a
describe
'179688' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBN' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
69906c917436f1cad137487c006b845e
767faa7a90188e988c31fa236ddf82b36b604102
describe
'85004' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBO' 'sip-files00033.pdf'
6f3458fe685779f878336a5dca7002ad
0b1b7a81d112416766dca5870920b2962d1d46eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPBO-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'79960' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5fa82a5ab29492ed9cbf3949eede38eb
3248f27c22222cf7bb512887d8a3323c0e1a8e86
describe
'54877' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
1ae86c05eb94303058b19f2762d62cd4
323a0f64ea77bf2609e2a7b033fba71a975870ed
describe
'965168' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f328bf76a6f20f92beb8457e2940d5f0
b8e3daa74705341b4455b2e46470ac18f18c9ff8
describe
'3184' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6ba44721cf6c40818b4f5a34aee1cbc8
2d35fc200b49177215acc103dec2971fc3907b46
describe
'12735' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
bd25a329657181e77b7e5798e79fe4bd
b1c38bd5e1212f326bd31cbdc24b7363443c322a
describe
'949869' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
dcf2c41d0ac3e0c6a73e4105e106956f
5135b208fd90badff9a25bb818c75571ea0e3205
describe
'102710' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
c0f962dc6efec0d2e6116d0b46e16609
f312346b8f2b48540984fa1003cfe9cdd8c259db
describe
'487766' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBW' 'sip-files00034.pdf'
79e9000d6482e270b7fa14512f2e433c
47329b8552986a948f54148cc16339bb5d9fcb01
'2017-03-10T10:04:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPBW-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:22-05:00'
normalize
'56796' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBX' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f57d547ef3aa609296833589c5d8f43d
fdb4704d07c8429bf10cd42f6b9d156679d883d0
describe
'31716' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0b968576a78fb96ccb08e8f9d3e001a7
54369431a4b92c06433ca4ca13a744495d366d0c
describe
'7612948' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPBZ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
58927b22fc3c3ff21db0cb37b7128d31
ac5d9d814914e3075be345f922aa3997e16fe508
describe
'3520' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCA' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6f5a6794585f5352fb8de05cc9a91fa9
15a3947f79093901a8c0975bdb065cd0d87d208c
describe
'8332' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCB' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
994ea3680b0e5452958f84ae99be2be3
5b31b77e77e35b63dfef75e4402906c826c8a642
describe
'100329' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCC' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2c9c1a70c62e82137216af21ff897342
3073f8200162c71dfe66645e24dc706c777259f7
describe
'90048' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCD' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
210ab84fb29b0d2a3dac24369c8ee36a
9b3b5d5773e22cafbb7a41a0c048db15220077cb
describe
'40886' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCE' 'sip-files00035.pdf'
d74e456a30e169525f132dfb5bafdc6f
ad483040e8aee69dcfe169467d33c82e66290ac2
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPCE-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'41075' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
9865fb228df9922a70a812f00c673776
04b0c3b7bb0abcdcbe737465f2f076a3c9ae3081
describe
'30012' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
54b0f6d6639647d696a4242842ee3693
c0e9d83cd8672e21e74e490dca201f84af26d88c
describe
'916084' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a7d120e6534ba9d682999b7ed725084f
e2eef54badd6ce9ce8645b4d4704757a939cc471
describe
'1882' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
44bc5ad3b3f5ec53549dbd779dcf4d01
92164c003428297aeaaeaf9c3ecf493086a2fc42
describe
'8966' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c98737f1c3054647a3e47fb0abee5db5
e74c2d48bdf2d6232a50abfd736a91d0fa4e7f1a
describe
'99622' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
61830a5130e7186f17e5549ee3fdfa1d
da8f6dd7ca67f866c67415e2b40ad53d23678e92
describe
'83275' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e5cda4aabe8083374d3ad212eade7bc9
87fc2c74401ca982fb27862569ac6365bd296723
describe
'40356' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCM' 'sip-files00036.pdf'
7cb973d57bdfe0d83b98dd9cbcfbd5fe
aff0622095215d588999b1bfb87a51e3b589d1a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCM-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPCM-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'39495' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
b54aa2f01d7a06d1906cbba22f66b9b8
18869c3408d29502733df3d3eb67d5d62e6721cc
describe
'27598' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d6a2f515b5043d14a723646c190063a7
dd1cf45507ee70fcbce6408479eab8afdc4d4f99
describe
'958464' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b13cc22436d3b78cd59a7172511e47c9
3bb78e0698211c53c044e9b7b6a894d36f1185ae
describe
'2103' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
42c88f12304d0c73d542c3deb4a1abaa
a1d5e8cb50b5f2e4f4253df04277ed5499e2aa9d
describe
'7550' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0247b90e13b3b610934a2b2d6ce91822
3b615b679e84347c42c929bba33af2a38888331f
describe
'206573' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
037fe59544c9be22eea28ed8f2e6c179
e9a9cbc374de57c19cf711a7b45082b6a4d68527
describe
'194697' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
60696fe0e9a7620309917976ec3b7404
c60964d8f881d5870540629b9c8397341f04f936
describe
'86661' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCU' 'sip-files00037.pdf'
60dfc5ec4e6c4e385ac6cbc684afbbd2
1e6f559f1040efb0d8341697da98ed6f48d25548
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCU-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPCU-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:05:15-05:00'
normalize
'82777' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCV' 'sip-files00037.pro'
beab6fed5c334faee37ceff97a046e3d
b443451c9952c0fee77891ef6d84ea97bb13b038
describe
'61003' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCW' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
83f834860cb6c5290fa87d50fafe9480
628fcc169d76711f10f42b6bc457f1b16995859e
describe
'899872' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCX' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3cf7527026c2b3fdf9a123e5c2e5fbd5
ae65e36195f5e19402cc67803c297c8a40e82e35
describe
'3295' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCY' 'sip-files00037.txt'
260ca6f32deb2294f41c5fc3e14d8643
b11209bd112c9430cc6680f56ac0c7bc64748f5d
describe
'14341' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPCZ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1da0e729bd03f2e6b84f41234a592130
2e623d56b2cf32be86d0188a49cfc5222533f06a
describe
'1425424' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
25e4884de09fe47a5a48533dfa7b14d7
15807b25b24a6a5217e0d3114ecaa3f2af951eb5
describe
'65640' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
dc5bdea8c16e225534a0b343af6924e1
dcd167db5a61163281e906ced96811e05e9adba5
describe
'689991' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDC' 'sip-files00039.pdf'
be34de71c4df7cbbd7e0f62c3413f72d
1b4783dd5e17c8a14d0d32db488d5e77e95aa8e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDC-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPDC-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:05:05-05:00'
normalize
'16089' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f5d64b413f1e24659da8128475b2e1ff
3eb7672eda809ed4cd88e41931b3421743c7aa9f
describe
'19707' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
007242d97287b9f7971e4339e6f7ef85
bc78ef5634a9d5a83bfb21d3a88a53a135434b9e
describe
'11417744' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
bb3b74e43903dc91e1940c91e66007f5
244a90ac78f5c0c130823d1cc0d5efc8239dfed2
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
26e37b944a13ead59100565320c3b675
9acef9c393ba35225d8a1f7fe574143e4cdb73d7
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'5316' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3ef4b175cb520077b130753ee68ec86c
a97bf3173f8639d14ddb8c21b9b94cb2513e45c2
describe
'116828' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
982218dd9a8c7d3641ef2755ffbac082
d54fec7a06437273b0f6a113ec4a754a2aca33b0
describe
'106579' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4c7a4e6436ebe14c771f6701ea06278d
f7b4b3a5b31fab8abde9b4cb8cc19aff38e2e2a5
describe
'47988' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDK' 'sip-files00041.pdf'
0e878deaf5983c6e6eebdcdf68f520ec
3023e748186f6e9b2f9b725cd1ca480765d426e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPDK-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'45316' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
435e3ee6cee7b0b676d908b913c74bd2
c761cdd2345fe95a37f18ac14e657163543c239f
describe
'35523' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
3f0d7743d2e1e0236f568f00947d00e5
3119e70942f10520afd00cb096901784c887c432
describe
'897576' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDN' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e5a207dbe56418ef10a7f0fce5ddee73
24fc55d1a51e69cf78e76e3dd1729913aad2cd18
describe
'2286' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
70a7ecc31c7be5c1af332f5448da3810
ae80d23052aacb9cfe820edd7fe81256c44122f7
describe
'9378' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDP' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
4470c2e9b35a9d5e7c036e637489b1ef
e8ff8d8385d0ee9f18b8846ce2638ecd088347ac
'2017-03-10T10:04:29-05:00'
describe
'158835' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDQ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
74d22c880bc1c1a0da4f4c7ffb05d7f4
4c0465a139e1b55423cef6921c336bb0fab82fb0
describe
'145435' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDR' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
bf62ed23c68f606f0118e1b5e986536d
70fb619b651d19a0003a3b649cdc5ea03dd36afe
describe
'64984' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDS' 'sip-files00042.pdf'
c1d3881be67185f6c338b058e36da949
5646bc3f529adc412128717a61f5198f3137ebf1
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDS-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPDS-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:03:22-05:00'
normalize
'64796' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9be8d94eba3cb3ac7134f2b81398301f
e9b6bee6229f821b2cbf403059900d855b3e525a
describe
'46346' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4f1809bc6198a3944bf544b4ba7da78a
455f86cf88fe75386a2cd9c3211052d5a4a89ff0
describe
'916060' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c225836298a3370bb259893641ff96cd
b505bf9f9e2c387ce0a6bf3e84e94808b76768a8
describe
'2878' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1ab0ec17277659166aa3d01cc5dd49b1
e5fde60da96653e7308d674bcbaac8bd256e88c8
describe
'11220' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
3ad726f2d981fd81eb47baebc1fc9dfc
d761a935402b3bb12b239393bba2256a93894306
describe
'225110' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4a7e0b185035227a705b9ea50e6b5976
83b51a510f087f0101611676be2954436e9681ca
describe
'207981' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPDZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
5975ee84cb1677fc77fc8833cb602205
c9d58d60329d8b8fe438982028686122bd177253
describe
'94148' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEA' 'sip-files00043.pdf'
86e04dd51e7ce9b5c6fc5f9b4be334d2
6dfd0bb802859eb6d0910dc19956b602c99ec910
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEA-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPEA-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'84691' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
ba2480914be14d14d50d609357570bef
3dab2bb78d1abd1e1cdf4431215b9ac08f242cc6
describe
'63688' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
1361a439d940c0bb3a298d62c55f246e
e65ee92d18a9652fa2f9204743224dd53db92b00
describe
'918412' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPED' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d8049383856a40f7e6064d52cd9dc8da
b4573a0664446d7a73c06dc1d70bd5cb25bdf3be
describe
'3375' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a8d27e7011321d5923c674b59c930ed9
9a5d97cb5709230dea5f1862b4c30cec38229475
describe
'15340' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEF' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
4b052576589ed9411f097d5b542ad20a
117c70b918dcc9318900974fe6a42d9de7c4fc85
describe
'128270' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d06c11db7dcb4d075d2736eb5a2c33b2
0854425349c1b053935dd745f462736444ae93d7
describe
'55230' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEH' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4014f2fae9d39b0bf333f4f3beb76213
ba4a0d8b0464622f71c4d2d4c13accdcf7295b61
describe
'52004' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEI' 'sip-files00044.pdf'
84a69406affe73af56a8b844d8797c4b
c1f841291b84b2a6cf8794d8d6da0bed9501ff1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEI-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPEI-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
'2017-03-10T10:04:43-05:00'
normalize
'3976' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
dd9ae8476304fca5d0861552e41b74b6
84c6c60f8bec8bceeb6bcaa6b58f6b6df05184f7
describe
'17373' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
da3ea28cba1f02a92a04a709ec64088a
edda91d29f1dbf0271940065920bdca7e66367b8
describe
'960040' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
409f672f69c965f154c42adc44ac73fc
53547d4ff1a62a780eb4b01120690d6a2e3fe16c
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
16c8a2635902e77169dd45417cff3ad8
f8ede5ba8eac5c014a44ada8c57ffeadf633741e
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'4858' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
0eb1264880ce902b44651bedb367897a
a732792d871c64720d099595a25088e6886720fa
describe
'102525' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c763204d0ab872dc62789d8740e638dc
daf00acadda3f79294063380c0d1ec1053b43604
describe
'47598' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
65ecc46494efe0b8e96871fc29b1cd06
8ad6974c5cd9e9b0cb55df1ea6053a1407d68f6c
describe
'42976' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEQ' 'sip-files00045.pdf'
69fa7b591e2d75c41367c0be7a18df29
6443d15399c2c534770a6124f180883722124c09
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEQ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPEQ-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'25417' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPER' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e70a1a018f377088072e5ed34af94b61
0f1e7eaa08bb27022f2cf69ba4fbeadc2fbd1193
describe
'14635' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPES' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
067e5a7b9a0cd3ebaeb727bb2ff9d620
4930cdf6bbec66f1f51ca6ae0556a5bdeaca49ac
describe
'959688' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPET' 'sip-files00045.tif'
f69fd24ee08859b07b4b911e430a3cad
f56e9eda62bbfc6a18000e701c9133c861b98cf5
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
9cb655d9470cd8a9ff8426259bb73938
d8b7f637000024c961178752e8c984925d83c475
describe
'4377' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
3bba50f303ea92fa48a63f7450b01ab4
07d2a0b0a8630433f8177860f5761f9d3de44d0e
describe
'218838' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0edaa14f3a1702b922417562bcdc8aaa
db2cf59f08adf9581325bf58d749317e65ea34a3
describe
'162508' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEX' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
d41373b536cde6ea00606f04db7ca017
848ddb7864d7fe3647ec0c67ef80b9b8cc28f108
describe
'93392' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEY' 'sip-files00046.pdf'
5d56d915dcbee1f623b5cc6aa1ef2f8c
6d5028682efa9b1f90f2fc632622545e9a9265de
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEY-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPEY-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'81227' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPEZ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
cfd4e00124f7422283e068f7c9fda0d5
b416cb4d54c7569e0edbec6a409ab8f2ef013db5
describe
'48925' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFA' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f96cebc8726b5fa8f7f113fcdafc9e39
03c9229d6862c50d07e24bbf8884459906bf0a17
describe
'1067024' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
67ebfdddae34ad1dfc123e1e3eb1e6b5
20194b7bf99912cf4a8732a50ff8c3d974a6cdbd
describe
'3222' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFC' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f821ccd157ea43c740c8b8f041ff581b
d9cb7c96a5c943b06f3f94ac48534a9f61daa81b
describe
'11448' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFD' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
46330c124a5a3d79434d23debf24d5e1
5054c41439d1f607c037b40d5d1f7ecbc39bcf02
describe
'111298' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFE' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
de3b8d0937106bba89fda4895d2371c3
025f4f9e73022423eeb57405b1fdc021c100c0d8
describe
'93246' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
dba688b90c817c1db6520d8771459070
2490e60c3fdd83af901832d8d678ef0cc31703d5
describe
'48044' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFG' 'sip-files00047.pdf'
31cd5e33f496f377685b3ed35b00adb0
85900b6e0063874a7e62c1f0d037c6731a68942d
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFG-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPFG-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'39723' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
82dc2c41763ece01c268653a8ac3f5a5
558fc7353d8c0fefeb31453ca686dff9785b8c35
describe
'27486' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
01f8aef7e553378a3908265112775f43
c5231c7df04e5126dd4d220e0c5c4bf0906d0f7b
describe
'1009500' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
22d78e08e9c36f7288ca3835781feb84
b3c794e9843ef5f586297a653004239d7f48c859
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
fb755b4da4d9681db51e735b96753565
5ab8e875d9b88b47b2560223082c6a18ffc6a69d
describe
'7052' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
fbd2fef0da638071d120c94cb5f66295
3469096e2d2f5cb80f5059cb96c438f885cc50b5
describe
'3115' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
00be6de28e6b768061aa49b977283fb8
3dc55e5fda90464559db808bc70c017d6c0aa310
describe
'9618' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
08976f9d9d0544025a158fa00b13526c
eeb0c3c49a4889c8b7512c24e663e5ba3835205c
describe
'3561' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFO' 'sip-files00048.pdf'
6d05d040d02e9eeb6b5c9d3174e91ad6
5cdd27efb4297a456d9eb77479cd84ab6d7f83bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFO-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPFO-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'214' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
94f0dd6f8f55ef44f46e1d646907c0fa
171289595505425f426e3ecf00c6707e848ba8ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f6748a5b2bebb08e5a3d9eb6e5c48fa6
9e6b7c846ef913bef32e89e88d10a5ce4e5aadcf
describe
'755396' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFR' 'sip-files00048.tif'
3130deb410517485a9d117d71f056f27
843b4fa162764eeaa13ffdf83e9e88b22f5f4814
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFT' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9aad8845939604c3ed3506cce786906a
0b4291e289a539f6bce88d2e3e7a50e583882cab
describe
'61074' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
221d9da3770dedcbdc78daf1c7b6aefc
a7330856784e951db03454bb137ab0bb315d0cb6
describe
'58670' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b48c9aef6f77371a1c73e10a4cfc6d34
d3a8acf97d460785b858a3954ef8142db0c98dbc
describe
'26137' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFW' 'sip-files00049.pdf'
f874107eef1b766ab683f30fe8c487f4
b850d9f2389415268503d942269b9b1f7e24d5c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFW-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPFW-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'23634' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f5a8fc1935b2b948920284fc7b3cc9ba
7fe7e357409fd43453c182f256229cd14dc4080a
describe
'20582' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e3ac502c192e30dba3502e7c9e9b1dba
2b38d423a0d8c3827809bc23286789d24fdb249e
'2017-03-10T10:05:24-05:00'
describe
'776616' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPFZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
90350c0d1509a59963e6c4388f203a8b
430e9821785ad79f9f4cde8e7608e8d21fec84d7
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5e51b65e80464295f26dea10f63b3ffe
bf78f38edea41ddff334020d82a0c3048a9400bd
describe
'6139' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e5920f0d08a2c6fc3bd7c900e38c945b
4187794456234b3a84869527443693ac12778d71
describe
'153168' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGC' 'sip-filescopyright.jp2'
cd965abaafb5da42dc6c8def20d374f4
b811824c94aa0ae5a5f04cfb64b27e9e0927243a
describe
'103670' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGD' 'sip-filescopyright.jpg'
d028360928b6690b49cfe8211e6bb6a5
db68f5028a78f337081c164d3478ffd3e30a8a09
describe
'71620' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGE' 'sip-filescopyright.pdf'
733d2c5394c0042fa36954a9aaeb90fa
602ef648ffcba438c3f5b70cb0746bd1c66bc605
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGE-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPGE-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'35669' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGF' 'sip-filescopyright.pro'
d58940384e68c9d0e1f855cf6927e8aa
e156fb4d8732e51ac1935725044ce159fef358c5
describe
'35083' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGG' 'sip-filescopyright.QC.jpg'
28180ee8185b27af4702a664eb2b5d1b
f0e1d4e0f0dcb1a265ec575f3d87a525ada2ad6d
describe
'1060568' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGH' 'sip-filescopyright.tif'
fe377daf456a90e5c0dd4c321086da89
bd431ed35641fda540ba460b64d0f75e9420da55
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGI' 'sip-filescopyright.txt'
15f2bbd34b776d39b92ffb1c4f760b27
b0251f2ed30996bc7ed3d8efa687abc9a6800fa9
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'10085' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGJ' 'sip-filescopyrightthm.jpg'
b0566b6a6e9b9bfb3fa924203ff11cf8
63d705588c1580afc86f43138330df2fe31f906d
describe
'2839567' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGK' 'sip-filesUF00001118.pdf'
9db54af546dcc512c6a67bf8fdbe5e3b
40d207d4ff05e056fc232c2183776a766768da27
describe
'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGK-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20080506_AACPGK-norm-0.pdf'
f2acbeb56504ca4fa5ec5da176e8d271
54a2b28148d6aa293a27a1cb8763b1272b98f3dc
describe
normalize
'83819' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGL' 'sip-filesUF00001118_00001.mets'
1d4d7e2f14ae4aa1146001110146289e
c450c4b05d12ae9de4ad228ab4b4e6f4418390c2
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2017-03-10T10:05:57-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
BROKEN_LINK schema http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'115258' 'info:fdaE20080506_AAABEZfileF20080506_AACPGO' 'sip-filesUF00001118_00001.xml'
d904761ba7e8956a08a03f1327d64680
9c22772f09d39a826b5d90dc9c3181b19519a568
describe
'2017-03-10T10:05:56-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd