Citation
Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida ( FGS: Information circular 48 )

Material Information

Title:
Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida ( FGS: Information circular 48 ) 1961-62
Series Title:
FGS: Information circular
Creator:
Healy, Henry G
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Publisher:
[s.n.]
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v, 53 p. : maps, diagrs. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Groundwater -- Florida ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Florida ( lcsh )
City of Lakeland ( local )
City of Miami ( local )
Water wells ( jstor )
Observation wells ( jstor )
Groundwater ( jstor )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
"Prepared by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey and other state and local agencies."
Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Henry G. Healy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
022160326 ( ALEPH )
01824250 ( OCLC )
AJA4816 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
STATE OF FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Robert O. Vernon, Director
INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48
WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1961-62
By
Henry G. Healy
Prepared by the
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in cooperation with the
FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY AND OTHER STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES
TALLAHASSEE 1966




Completed manuscript received
October 25, 1965
Printed by the Florida Geological Survey (116)
Tallahassee 1966
ii




CONTENTS
Page
Introduction ............................................ ....... 1
Well-numbering system ............................................ 4
Principal aquifers .............................................. 5
Northwestern Florida........................................... 8
Pensacola area............................................... 8
Ft. Walton area .............................................. 11
Panama City area............................................. 15
Northern and North-Central Florida ............................... 15
Tallahassee area ............................................ 15
Fernandina-Jacksonville area .................................. 20
Central Florida ................................................. 21
Tampa-St.. Petersburg area.................................... 26
Lakeland area .............................................. 29
Orlando area................................................... 36
Cape Kennedy area .......................................... 37
Sarasota-Bradenton area .................................... 39
Southern Florida .............................................. 39
Ft. Myers area ............................................. 40
Stuart-West Palm Beach area.................................. 42
Ft. Lauderdale area ......................................... 44
Miami area .................................................. 49
Appendix ..................................................... 53
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Page
1 Map showing observation-well network, December 1962, and
the extent of principal aquifers and sources of ground-water
supplies in Florida ...................................... 3
2 Diagram of explanation of well-numbering system ........... 6
3 Map showing piezometric surface and areas of flow of the.
Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 ............... 7
4 Map showing locations of observation wells in northwestern
Florida for which hydrographs are given ...................... 8
5 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola,
Florida .. ............................. .................. 9
6 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Escambia 45, 46, and 62, Pensacola area .......... 10
7 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels
in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly normal
precipitation at Pensacola, 1960-62 ....................... 11
8 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area....... 12
iii




9 Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola
and Ft. Walton area, May 1951 to May .1960 ................. 13
10 Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola
and Ft. Walton areas, May 1960 to May 1962 ............... 14
11 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida .. 16 12 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama
City, and Washington 4 at Caryville ........................ 17
13 Map showing locations of observation wells in northern and
north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given ....... 18 14 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Tallahassee,
Florida ............................................... 19
15 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels
and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tallahassee,
1960-62................................................ 21
16 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina,
F lorida ............... ................................ 22
17 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville,
Florida ................................................. 23
18 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville,
Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29
at Palatka, Florida............ ..... .................... 24
19 Maps showing net change of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1960 to May
1962 ................................................ 25
20 Map showing locations of observation wells in central Florida
for which hydrographs are given ......................... 26
21 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in
wells Pasco 13 near Ehrin and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park,
Tampa area ............................................ 27
22 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in
well Hillsborough 13 and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tampa, 1960-62 ............................ 28
23 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon
Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater .................. 29
24 Graphs showing changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas
592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area ... 30 25 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland,
Florida ............................................... 31
26 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well
Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from normal monthly
precipitation at Lakeland, 1960-62 ................. ...... 32
27 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near
Lakeland, Lakeland area................................. 33
28 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof and
Highlands 10 near Sebring ............................... 34
iv




29 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in
the Kissimmee Valley .................................. 35
30 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in
wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from
normal monthly precipitation at Orlando, 1960-62 ........... 36
31 Hydrograph showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in well Orange 47, near Orlando.......................... 37
32 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida ...... 38 33 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area. 40 34 Map showing locations of wells in southern Florida for which
hydrographs are given .................................. 41
35 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in
well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal
monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1960-62 ............... 42
36 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier C54 and 131 Everglades, and Martin 147 near Stuart, Florida ................ 43
37 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida.. 44 38 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in
well Palm Beach 88 and departures from monthly normal
precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1960-62 ................ 45
39 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Palm Beach 88 near West Palm Beach, Broward G561
and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami ... 46 40 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami,
Dade S196A near Redland, Dade F179 at Miami, and Broward
8329 near Ft. Lauderdale ............................... 47
41 Graph showing changes in chloride content of water in wells
Broward G514 and S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296
and F64 near Miami .................................... 48
42 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in
well Dade S196A, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1960-62 ........ 49 43 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami, and Dade G72 northwest of Opalocka ...................................... 50
44 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade
County ............................................... 51
45 Graphs showing changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 and G580 near Miami and Dade G469, 8529, and
G212 in southeastern Dade County ....................... 52
,able
1 Well and water-level data for selected observation wells in
Florida .................. ............................ 53




ERRATA
Florida Geological Survey Information Circular 48
"Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1961-62"
Pave iv -- Figure 21 -- Ehren not Ehrin Page 5 -- Paragraph 3, line 5, Broward not Brevard Page 11 -- Paragraph 1, line 4, 10 million not 100 million Page 11 -- Paragraph 2, line 3, 98 feet not 58 feet Page 11 -- Paragraph 2, line 12 (p. 17) not (p. 19) Page 15 -- Paragraph 4, line 7, 77 feet not 76 feet Page 20 -- Paragraph 2, line 6, 1945-62 not 1946-62 Page 20 -- Paragraph 6, line 4, 15 feet not 16 feet Page 20 -- Paragraph 6, line 6, 13 feet not 14 feet Page 25 -- Figure 19: Left figure: May 1951-May 1960 Right figure: May 1960-May 1962 Page 27 -- Paragraph 1, line 4, Ehren not Ehrin Page 30 -- Paragraph 1, line 3, 65000 million gallons Page 31 -- Paragraph 3, line 9, Highlands 13 (fig. 29) Page 37 -- Paragraph 1, line 4, maximum fluctuation of about 22 feet Page 39 -- Paragraph 1, line 1, three not four Page 39 -- Paragraph 4, line 3: 0.3 foot Page 39 -- Paragraph 5, line 3: shown on page 41 Page 49 -- Paragraph 3, line 3, at Redland




WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN
AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1961-62
By
Henry G. Healy
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this report is to summarize the trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the principal aquifers in Florida during 1961-62. The report includes the following: (1) hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the several aquifers used as a source of water; (2) maps showing changes in ground-water levels during specific periods; and, (3) a table summarizing the principal data on selected observation wells. Observation wells for which records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources Data-Collection Stations in Florida, 1961" Florida Geological Survey Special Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey includes the location, aquifer, and type and period of records available for 3,629 observation wells.
Since World War II, and particularly during the last decade, the demand for fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural use in Florida has increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies have been adequate for the increased demand in most areas in Florida, water levels have declined appreciably in some areas where industrial and municipal use of ground water has increased. The supply of ground water is limited though generally adequate. Because demand for ground water continues to increase, shortages will occur and may become critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from deterioration in quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of water available. In order to prevent future shortages, the present supplies of ground water must be properly appraised and utilized. Records of trends and fluctuations of ground water have long formed a basis for the appraisal of ground-water resources.
The principal objective of the investigations of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey is to appraise and to evaluate the Nation's water resources. Although many types of ground-water investigations are carried out on State-wide basis




2 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
throughout the Nation, the collection and compilation of basic hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources studies.
Other principal objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evaluation of available ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of important ground-water supplies in the future and the delineation of present or potential areas of detrimentally high or low ground-water levels. Water levels are used to predict the base flow of streams, to determine the several forces that act on a water-bearing formation or aquifer, to demonstrate the interplay of those forces in the ground-water environment and to furnish information for use in basic research. The hydrologic data program is an important adjunct of the several types of geologic and hydrologic methods of study used in waterresources investigations.
The hydrologic data-collection program of the U.S. Geological Survey is part of the cooperative investigations of the groundwater resources of Florida, in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey and other state and local agencies and municipalities. The observation-well network in 1962 included about 1,000 observation wells in the 67 counties of the Stale. Figure 1 shows the locations of the observation wells in the Stale-wide network. Table 1 lists data on 335 observation wells selected from the State-wide network of wells.
The water-level data used in this report represent measurements taken from automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and those made by wet tape. In general, water-level measurements made by tape and stage recorder are shown to the nearest hundredth of a foot, and those made with a pressure gage are shown to the nearest tenth of a foot.
Table 1 summarizes well-data and water-level information for the several aquifers. Well data include the aquifer, depth ofwell, and depth of casing. The items: "Year record began" and "Frequency of measurements" are included as part of the well data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or June are used because records are availafle for these months for a large percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are lowest during May or June in many areas and records during that period constitute a base for comparison from year to year. The highest and lowest levels of record for May or June prior to 1961 are given in the table.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 3
5 8Be 83' 31*
4
.....*
LL \ *j-" .
EXPLANATION *
30* Observotion well/nurber
PRINCIPAL AOUaFERS ,
SSund-ond-grovel
4
.29
&Z,'3,- Y"- ,,0
SBiscoyne ,l/ ' x
---- Approximate oquifer boundary
30Fho. Obse.lion 111 299
'igre 1. Map swing balserainwelntokDcme 1927 n h
exen Saprncpad-rvlaqiesadsuesogrn-wtrupls
iFl44
SBiscayne %CJ
Approximate aquifer boundary ~0
28*
26
840 8382 8t
Bose flone Maiom 1933 edit ion of MMn of
Flrrida b* as .olog*cal Sur*ey
Figure 1. Map showing observation-well network, December 1962, and the
extent of principal aquifers and sources of ground-water supplies in Florida.




4 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
The hydrologic data program consists of the collection, tabulation, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of waterlevel and related data. Water levels for selected wells are published, at present, once every five years in the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers.
Information pertinent to ground water is also published in interpretative reports of investigations published by the Flori'd'a Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey. Data collected during an investigation and subsequent to that published are available from the District Chief, U. S. Geological Survey, P. O. Box 2315, Tallahassee, Florida 32304.
WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEM
Two well-numbering systems are used in this report. Observation wells in Florida may be numbered serially by counties and/or by a grid-coordinate system based on latitude and longitude of the well location. Frequently, where wells have been renumbered both numbers have been assigned to the well e.g. a well number may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This affords a tie-in with water-level data published previously under well number 20 in Bay County with data that may be published for the same well under number 008-537-2.
Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or suffix. In Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and NP denote Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and National Park Service wells, respectively. In Dade, Escambia, Highlands, Holmes, and Leon counties, the letter suffix A denotes a shallow well near a deeper well having the corresponding number without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter suffixes B and C denote wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47.
The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived from latitude and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude prefix north and west and the first digit of the degree number are not included in the well number.
The well number is a composite of three numbers separated by hyphens: the first number is composed of the last digit of the degree and the two digits of the minute that define the latitude on




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 5
the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the second number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of the minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute quadrangle; and, the third number gives the numerical order in which the well was inventoried in the 1-minute quadrangle. For example, well number 835-105-1 is the first well inventoried in the 1-minute quadrangle north of the 28035' parallel of latitude and west of the 81005' meridian of longitude. The location of well 835-105-1 is shown diagrammatically in figure 2.
PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
Ground-water supplies for industrial, agricultural, and municipal use in Florida are available from three principal aquifers: The Floridan aquifer in central and northern Florida; the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida; and, the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the extreme northwestern part of Florida. The generalized areal extent of the aquifers supplying most of the ground-water is shown in figure 1.
The Floridan aquifer, which underlies all of the State, is the principal source of water in central, northern, and most of northwestern Florida, as shown in figure 3. Highly mineralized water precludes the usefulness of the Floridan aquifer as a source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of southern Florida. In those areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian aquifers are the source of supply.
The Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source of water supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This aquifer, one of the most highly productive of the shallow nonartesian aquifers in the world, underlies about 3,500 square miles of Brevard, Dade, and Palm Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne aquifer is sharply restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of saline waters.
The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal source of water supply, yielding large supplies of ground water for industries and municipalities. The aquifer extends beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and part of western Okaloosa County.
This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four parts as follows: (1) Northwestern Florida, (2) northern,




& FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
L Volusie Cai
' 2900' i Lake C"
I-J
* I 28*3 Orange Co.
28*40 __.r_2840 "Osceolo Co.
,,28600 81030' 81'd
28*25'
890d 80055'
28037'
36'
eI
35'
28*34'
8108' 07' d6' 05' 81004
835 105 "1
Figure 2. Diagram of explanation of well-numbering system.
northeastern, and north-central Florida; (3) central Florida; and,
(4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 7
87* 86 85- 84' 83"
', ~- 4f .- "
,4 I
a0 32.
300
aG
coc
!4
29.
"29
27
228*
26* .
EXPLANATION
Conrour represents the hight, in feet refer to nom sea
fevel, to which wote would have risen in tightly cased
wells that penetrote the major miar-Iearing formarins
in the Florid an aquifer, July 6-17, 1961.
Cwtour interval 10 and 20 feet, changing o mean sea level.
2 5* C Area af oresto flow
Extent and distribution of flow areas vary with fluctuations
of the plezon~i'ric surface, particularly in are of heavy pumping. Relatively small areas of artesian flow or not included inmediately infjacere to and parellaling th
coast and ooy of the malor rivers and springs. 1
to
26*
0 I0 2 30 40 50 miles
Taken from Map Series No.4 by H.G. Healy, 196).
i~~~~~~ tl.9 t.. I
84" 583 82* 810 80
Figure 3. Map showing piezometric surface and areas of flow of the
Floridanaquifer. in Florida, July 6-17, 1961.




S FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA
Northwestern Florida as used here includes the Panhandle area extending from the Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line, as shown in figure 4.
A L A B A M A4
/ r I 2 :
H LM ES d AC K S 0 N
saRTA RosA OKALOOSA
*ZE w AL To0XnO?
i~ASHINGTON ;'
W A I N r.]
---CALHOUNI BAY "
G/L OF MEXI CO u
Figure 4. Map showing locations of observation wells in northwestern
Florida for which hydrographs are given.
The principal sources of ground water supply in the section are the sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and the Floridan aquifer in the rest of the area. Minor supplies of ground water are obtained from shallow nonartesian aquifers.
The Florida Panhandle includes three rapidly growing areas of industry and population: the Pensacola area, the Ft. Walton Beach area, and the Panama City area.
Pensacola Area
The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. This area, like many others in the State, is undergoing rapid economic development. Industrial and municipal water use are increasing. Pumpage in the Pensacola area in 1962 was about five times that in 1940. Figure 5 shows pumpage for the City of Pensacola 1933-62.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 9
4,60a. . . . .
oo.

0 C
z
3,00Q
0
(1)
oo
W ,800 0 ca
Figure 5. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, Florida.
The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began in 1939. As part of the investigation to determine the adequacy and permanency of ground-water supply in Escambia County, the present program includes wells in the artesian and nonartesian parts of the sand-and-gravel aquifer. Figure 4 shows locations of the observation wells selected from the hydrologic data network for which hydrographs are given in this report, and table 1 presents data on 13 wells in Escambia County. Figure 6 shows fluctuations and long-term trends of water levels at Pensacola from 1940 through 1962.
Comparison of the hydrographs of the three wells reveals that while water levels at the end of 1962 declined inland in the Pensacola area, the water level near the coast was above the 1940 level. Declines of artesian water levels in the sand-andgravel aquifer ranged from a maximum of 32 feet in well Escambia 45 to a minimum of 15 feet in well Escambia 46 in the period 194062.
In the coastal area, at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well Escambia 62, at the end of 1962, was about 3 feet above the 1940 level. The trends and fluctuations of artesian ground-




10 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
ESCAMBIA 45 DEPTH 152 FT. CASED 152 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)
68 70
72
74
86
8z 8
go 96.
.100
_z
--1104---------------------
rom
108
114 Wa-er level is affected by pumping of nearby wells
1 16
S11-lIzIzILIzII I I
ESCAM SIA 46 DEPTH 239 FT CASED 239 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUlFER (ARTESIAN)
D6 - --
56
66
0 66a
70 -- - - -- - -
76
so
ULu74-------------82
M 84 < 86:as t+
ESCAMBIA 62 DEPTH 142 FT. CASED 142 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN)
8
Z'
1 r "o I L
34
9 1- 1945 15 1955 190- 1965- 970 --9
0
'a --- --v
-
'a I
20
28
3Z1940 945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975
Figure 6. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45, 46, and 62, Pensacola area.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 11
water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly average rainfall at Pensacola, 1960-62 are shown in figure 7.
JFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONrDJ\MAMJJASOND
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
-V V -/
18 . . . .
JFMAMJJAS 0NDJMAMJJASODJ rMAMJJASONDJFMAM JASNDJFMFAMJJASOND
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
Figure 7. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Esoambia 62 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1960-62.
Ft. Walton Area
The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and Eglin Air Force Base at Niceville. The rate of growth of industry and population is accelerating. Pumpage from the Floridan aquifer for all uses is about 100 million gallons per day. As a result of continuing heavy pumping, water levels have declined in about a 640 square-mile area.
The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach, as shown in figure 8, shows a maximum decline from highest water level in 1947 to the lowest level in 1962 of about 58 feet from 1947-62. In August 1936, the artesian water level was 46 feet above land-surface datum. During the period from August 1936 to July 1962, the water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 124 feet, from 46 feet above land surface to 78 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net change of water levels map, figures 9 and 10. The hydrograph of well Walton 13 at Point Washington, about 30 miles east of Ft. Walton Beach, shows the trend of decline in water levels during 1947-62 (p. 19).




12 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
OKALOOSA 3 DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 500 FT. FLORIDAN .AQUIFER
+24
* 12
-4
W" I II I I II
-24 - ---- -- - ---------+16
-20-
-24
Uj 11 11 1 ,
-a 11 JI "II I
-36
o N
40
,-361 - - - -- -- --=
a
-44
_ -48 l l 4
La -52--56,
- Water level on Aug.19, 1936 was
li""76-- -'"
L46ft aosln ufc
-681 L - _
-80
-84
Wate level is affected by regionot pumping
-96
-100
104 OKALOOSA 25 DEPTH 609 FT. CASED 456 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
104----------- --- -
108
tua 112 -- -f 116
S120 - -
c124
:-< 128
Water level isaffected by regional pumping
144 tzz1L :~--148: 1 1
OKALOOSA 31 DEPTH 690 FT. CASED 527 FLORIDAN AQUIFER
48 --------------------1-1--jC 56 -5
a64
Ua
-- Water let l is affected by regional pumping <88
92
so Ift le I III I
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 8. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area.




A L A B A M A
F L 0 R I D A
ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON Net change of ground-water levels Ln the Floridan aqui fer I .----12- .Not abange of ground-water levels in' the sand-andgravel aquifer
I23
Observation well
number 23
PENSACOLAi
313
45 02
10 2 0 40 SSCALE MILES
Figure 9. Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensaoola and Ft. Walton area, May 1951 to May 1960.
0 27




A L A 8 A M A F L 0 R I D A
ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON
0>
( (X
_j >
P ENSACI.A
39 W. -1 o. 1
and Ft. Walton areas, May 1960 to May 1962.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 15
Panama City Area
The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including Tyndall Air Force Base.
The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the water for municipal industrial, and military needs in the area. Figure 11 shows total pumpage from the Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and Millville for the period 1944-62. Additional industrial supplies for the pulp industry are obtained from the nonartesian aquifer; however, the amount is minor compared to that obtained from the Floridan aquifer.
Ground-water supplies for municipal, industrial, and military use have increased considerably since the end of World War II. Panama City municipal supply increased from about 870 mgy (million gallons per year) in 1944 to about 1,200 mgy in 1962.
The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels at Panama City are shown by the hydrograph of well Bay 7, shown in figure 12. The decline of water level in well Bay 7 represents the maximum known decline in the area and is caused by pumping in near-by wells. In August 1936, the water level in well Bay 7 was about 36 feet below land surface, while in June 1962, it was about 76 feet below land surface or a decline of 41 feet for the period 1936-62.
NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA
Northern and north-central Florida as used in this report extends from the Apalachicola River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean, as shown in figure 13, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy, Marion, and Volusia counties. The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply except in areas along the coast in central and eastern St. Johns, Flagler, and Volusia counties where the principal source of water is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer.
Tallahassee Area
Pumpage in the Tallahassee area in 1962 was three times that of 1945, increasing at an average rate of 108 mgy. Figure 14 shows pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1933-62.




" -I I I I I I I I I .lI 1,400
1,300
(I)
z 1,200
, 0
-J
1/100
zFl
700
Figure 11. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 17
WALTON 13 DEPTH 450 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
26 -
24
i-W22
< 20
- W
U) 18
14 -.c 12
,,, > 10
6 Water level is affected by regional pumping
4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I
1L1111111111.11..------------BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
3638
40
42
I2 F I
44---46
48 IV-50 52
- 54 56
58 ,
60
62
M
64 -- -
66
z 68
-70
72
74
76
78
80 82
84
L''
86
88 Water level is offected by pumping of nearby wells
90 "
9z I I II IIL I ILI i I
WASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
0
1 4
16
S18
20
4 2 -~
26-
< --
"'28
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 12. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama C.ity, and Washington 4 at Caryville.




ALP
U E 0 R G I A
Np4
-} A S I*N A 5 8 A U
)L E 0 N MA D 1 N HAMI LfQN I '
("ne F FESON m n / 164 / LIBE FITY 1 f"-- -- "i sq6 M / jausem I "
(U~ ~ U CLA
-10 co us1
"L A 9 R L AATT N I N C L Y 9 1" 1 6 R 0 LBRADORD
19 r
IW2 A -U. sA NoNL G P T N AM
GULF OF MEXICO 7'-.
.--.d. 1." FLAGLER r L E V N M
Figure 18. Map bowing loations of observation wells in northern and
north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given.




(C,'
0- I I0
o _ __m _m
A0000 U)
o 2.00. bm z. rI/r/
-J0
a-,
200
Figure 14. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Tallahassee,
Florida.




20 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
The observation-well program in the Tallahassee area began in 1936 and currently includes seven observation wells.
Fluctuations of water levels in the Floridan aquifer at Tallahassee are shown by the hydrograph, figure 15, of well Leon 7, which shows a downward trend for 1960-62. The graph shows characteristic seasonal trends with high levels in the spring and low levels in the fall. Figure 16 shows water levels in well Leon
7 for the period 1946-62.
Fernandina-Jacksonville Area
The Fernandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest industrialized areas in the State, with water use increasing as a result of the rapid economic expansion. Figure 17 shows total yearly municipal pumpage for Jacksonville from 1921-62.
The observation-well program in the area began in 1930 and has gradually expanded and currently includes 29 observation wells.
Ground-water levels in the Fernandina-Jacksonville area have been declining for a considerable period of time. Trends .and seasonal fluctuations of the water levels in the Floridan aquifer at Jacksonville are shown for well Duval 122 and for well Duval 164 near Mayport. Hydrographs of wells in the Floridan aquifer in Nassau and Duval counties are shown in figure 16 and 18.
The maximum decline of water levels in the Fernandina area occurred in the coastal area in well Nassau 12 (fig. 16), where water levels declined 44 feet from 28 feet above mean sea level to 16 feet below mean sea level during the period 1946-62. However, water levels in well Nassau 51, approximately 20 miles inland, declined only about 14 feet during the same period.
Water levels in well Duval 122 at Jacksonville declined about 17 feet from 1930 to 1962, while along the coastal areas in Duval County water levels generally declined about 10 feet. These declines are part of the broad regional decline of water levels as may be seen in figure 19, which shows the net change of groundwater levels in several counties.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 21
S154
LEON
160160
162
J FMAM J ASONDJ FMAMJ JASONDJ FMAMJ JASO0NDJFMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJ JASOND
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
-1 11 1 T 1 l F T1 T
+8
Iormot monthly
+4 precipitation
z
JFMAMJ JASONDIJ FMAMJ JASOND J FMAM J JAS 0 N D J FMAMJJ ASOND JFMIAMJJ JASOND
1960 1961 1962 1 3 19
Figure 15. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1960-62.
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Central Florida includes 17 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles. The extent of this Section and location of observation wells for which hydrographs are given are shown in figure 20.
The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply.




22 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
LEON 7 DEPTH 314 FT. CASED 165 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
149
t52
_ 155
15a
- 161
> 164
-'-i 67I .,. l ,70
Ater level is affected by pumping of nearby wells
7- -1 #
17 i I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1
MADISON 18 DEPTH 322 FT. CASED 307 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
z z, 23
>fn 26
-j C3
COLUMBIA 9 DEPTH 836 FT. CASED 680 FT. FLORIDAN AOUIFER
41 8411
!02
NASSAU 12 DEPTH 640 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
231
15
-30
I I A 1 1
4 In -l
S 1 945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 A 1975
Figure 16. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison,
1Columbia at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina Florid.
S4
!05 -2
u-24 ..
6 I "' "
.-o I I I I I
U oj mb" 91 at Lak Iiytn asu 2na enndnFoi




14,00___ _,,12,000 0
2
0
zi 10,00 0
4000
N// X/ 0
0) 0) 0
Figure 17. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville,W Florida.




24 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
4SSA 51 DEPTH 580 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
42 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
- 34-------1 -1-- -
24 - - -----
32
2s
24
DUVAL 122 DEPTH 905 FT. CASED 571 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
45
43
LU 35
>. 2 32
39 -x-
W 29
Water level is affected by tides I
25
23-------------------UAL 14 5 DEPTH 135 FT. CASED 135 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
14
43L
IT 4PUTNAM 29 DEPTH 30 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
U- I
I ....,
.>- z
12
oo
IL 4
1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 18. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164
near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Paltka, Florida.
45 ALOt 16 DEPTH 835 FT. CASED 350 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
IL41
Z Z>
;ra 303 -
U.1
234
PUkA 29 DEPTH 1300T CD FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
LL- 1 32- f -- --I r
393 B 0 L1945 390 35 6 36
Fiure 18 yrgah hwngted n lcutin fwtrlvl
in weV Nasu5 %tClaan ua 2 tJckovle ua 6
nr Ma ot Main5na4cladPta 9a aakFoia




N
NASSAU .* NS
/ *
DUA c ,/DU AL a. o EXPLANATION
tNet chane f gr.und.ter r4) levels in the Flordon aquifer.,. CLA Y JA*KONVILeE De l A umb 12!3
/ D VAST JOHNS ." I\ST JOI NS 140 r /--kJ 1 ,-/- -,II .
I, I ""'i . .
,.-- --- Go
OsAL. R ..4 ...---- FL G E-..-a- L G E
see .. __ ,,4 \e o
tilo
Figure 19. Maps showing net change of ground-water levels in the
Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1960 to May 196.
01 67levels In the Floridan aquifer. 1 2....
oC L AY as C L A -2 ~Observation well number 021 123
\ST JOHNS ST JOHN
PUTNAM ego- 6N6M~fIES r I PUTNAM eagg0
FLAGLER ne of A L G L E R
Figue 1. Mps howig nt cang ofground-water levels in the C Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1960 to May 1962.




E FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
LE~~~ I V L U S I A
" ..
P A C
M, 47 jig
- - --
p Ai S C -- - . '
*sSOO S I s O C OL
, *'
____ 44W\N
- L-- e--s t \
- i oIL L S ,R, !0S C E LA A P 0 L K
-'<-,.i =i 'v...-'
I INDIAN RIVER
--025
M ANATEDE
10 OKEECHOBEE STLU I
I T L I _so 1-- 6 HL A N DS L0 DE SO0T O0(
S A R AS 0 T A 0 T
Figure 20. Map showing locations of observation wells in central Florida
for which hydrographs are given.
Central Florida includes four rapidly growing centers of population and industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton
-area.
Tampa-St. Petersburg Area
This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and St. Petersburg, is undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population.
The observation-well program in this area began in 1930 with one well in Hillsborough County, and currently includes 30 observation wells in the Floridan aquifer.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 27
The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 21. The hydrographs show a similarity of water-level fluctuations in well Pasco 13 near Ehrin and well Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, during the period 1945 through 1962. Drought conditions and increased pumping during 1961-62 caused water levels to decline in well Hillsborough 13 to the lowest levels of record. Rainfall recorded at Tampa and the decline of water level in well Hillsborough 13 for the period 1960-62 is shown in figure 22.
Water levels in two Pinellas County wells are shown in figure 23 and a slight downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246. This downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956.
PASCO 13 DEPTH 49 FT. CASED 43 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
0 I
4
" 5
12
HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT. CASED 46 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
0
ran
7 A -----Figure 21. Hyrgah showin trnsI n f-luctuations ofwteevl
0I
12 I.!
213 '15
6 1 L
S
20
190 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 21. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehrin and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area.




28 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
. ....,, ,...... ..... .. .. '' I' '"' . .I. .
HILLSBOROUGH 13
FAMJ AS ND FMAMJJASON JFMAMJJJASONJFMAMj JAS JMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJJASOND
960 1961 1962 1963 1964
+6
S-2
SFMaM' Jsa S DJ' '. J''s'o'D J FMAMJ JJAS ON JFA J ASO ND JF MAMJJ ASOND J FMAMJ J A SOND
w60 161 1962 163 1964
Figure 22. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tampa, 1960-62.
The chloride contents of water from two wells in the Floridan aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 24. The chloride of well Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines ranged from 1,000 ppm (parts per million) to 2,200 ppm from 1957-62. The chloride content of




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 29
HILLSBOROUGH 30 DEPTH 500 FT. CASED 97 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
14
13
12
I I
tW U 10
oz 9
9- -- - -- - -
.JCn 8 -
Gi0
>z 7-------- I - --
5PINELLAS 13 DEPTH 141_FT. __CASED 33 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
5 6 Wo < I J" %
_j 6 -- -
J J PINELLAS 246 DEPTH 241 FT. CAE___T LOIA A _UIFE
3 Water level IS affected by tides
oj:::23
20 - INLA 13 DET 14 FT CAE- T FLORIDAN AQUIFER
2 6
,W ter level is affected by tides .
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 23. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hlillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs,
and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater.
well Pinellas 166 at Dunedin ranged from about 20 ppm to 1,000 ppm during the same period. The chloride content in both wells decreased during 1957-61. During 1962 the chloride in well 592 increased nearly to the 1959 concentration. In contrast, the chloride in well 166 remained low during 1962 and at the end of the year was well below the 1959 concentration.
-akeland Area
In the Lakeland area, like owners in Florida, ground water is bein ume at an increasin rate commensurate with the> "--0 24 --1%. H .' LU Wa8 ~ ter level is affected by" tidlesI 29 -- I I I I II3l
30
andr 3-ela 27 tCeawtr
wel 29 ellis 16afet byunies i agdfo bu 0pmt ,0
decrase 1950n 1955-1 r 196 1965 1970id 197 wel1980
Figue 23. well 6reained show uing d and atn the waerd leve ina wls Hillbrog 30hea Ruskin conc nllason.apnpins eand Piels26arCearwtr
Sin the aen priod. he cher lorid a, cotntirond wael
ide bing welu66raied lon16 and atrasn rtcmeste endth the




30 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
in20C 1__ __00 J
[boa 600
1200 _______1400
4 a _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _I V.PILS 52 PLLA 166
j95 t Me t659 P60 1961 1 6V2 1163 19641 1965 95 45 15180 96 119621196311964119651
Figure 24. Graphs showing changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area.
growth of the area. Municipal pumpage at Lakeland' increased about 55 percent during the 10-year period 1953-62, and annual industrial pumpage in Polk County is presently (1962) about 45,000 million gallons. Figure 25 shows the total yearly pumpage at
Lakeland for 1928-62.
The observation-well program began in 1945 in the eastern
part of Polk County and the network as of 1962 contains 34 wells
in the artesian and nonartesian aquifers in the county.
The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan aquifer
during 1960-62, in the vicinity of Lakeland, is shown in figure
26 with a maximum decline about 20 feet in well Polk 45.
The precipitation record at Lakeland shows rainfall deficiencies in the Lakeland area during years 1961 and 1962.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 31
4,2004300-3,600.
Figure 25. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida.
Water levels declined to record lows in both artesian and nonartesian aquifers in the Lakeland area during 1960-62. Declines in artesian levels ranged from 6 feet in well Polk 44, near Davenport, to 20 feet in well Polk 45, south of Lakeland. Declines in the nonartesian, shallow-sand aquifer ranged from 6 feet in well Polk 49 to 9 feet in well Polk 47, near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 27.
Water levels in the artesian aquifer, in southern Polk County, and in the shallow-sand aquifer, in southeastern Polk County, and in central Highlands County, are shown in figure 28.
The most prominent features in the hydrographs in figure 28 are the declines of water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow-sand aquifer caused by the droughts of 1950-51, 1955-56:, and 1961-62. -Comparison of the effects of the drought on water levels during the latter part of 1960 through 1962 shows
z
0
that: maximum declines occurred during the 1961-62 drought in southern Polk County:, in well Polk :51,- and in central and in southeastern HighlandsCounty in wells Highlands 10 and Highlands 13 re2Setiv .
0
(a 2440Q.
z
1,000LF
0
L,200
~40O 2
Figure 25. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida.
Water levels declined to record lows in both artesian and nonartesian aquifers in the Lakeland area during 1960-62. Declines in artesian levels ranged from 6 feet in wpll Polk 44, near Davenport, to 20 feet in well Polk 45, south of Lakeland. Declines in the nonartesian, shallow-sand aquifer ranged from 6 feet in well Polk 49' to 9 feet in well Polk 47, near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 27.
Water levels in the artesian aquifer, in southern Polk County, and in the shallow-sand aquifer, in southeastern Polk County, and in central Highlands County, are shown in figure 28.
The 'most pr6minent features in the hydrographs in figure 28 are the declines of water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the -shallow-sand aquifer, caused by the droughts of 1950-51, 1955-56, and 1,961-62. -Comparison of the effects of the drought on Water levels during the latter- part of 1960 through 1962- shows that -Maximum I.decli nes occurred duinA the 1961-62 drought in southern Polk County, in well Polk'Z1i; and in central and in--southeastern. Highlands County in wells Highlands 10 and Highlands respectively. -




32 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
190 1961 1962 1963 1964
C
-4
-6 . L-. -- L__ tJF I M I A I M I i J A I S 1 0 'N 'D j ,F ' M J J A _S ''N I, ,**
r PoLK 45
8""
1,; .__________ F F k SlMA JJ 0'A J FM AM A S 0N 0J F MA MJ A S 0 ND J F M AM JASON0
FMSaMJJASCODJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJtASONDJFMrAMJJASONDJ.FMAMJJASOND
960 1961 1962 1963 1964
Figure 26. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1960-62.
During the 1961-62 drought, 'water levels declined 10 feet in central Highlands County and 9 feet in the southeastern part of the county. In central Highlands County the decline of water levels in the shallow-sand aquifer was about 10 feet during the 1955-56 and the 1961-62 droughts. In the southeastern part of the county, in lower Kissimmee Valley, nonartesian water levels declined 3 feet lower than the lowest water level of the 1956 drought. In contrast, decline of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer in




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 33
POLK 44 DEPTH 195 FT. CASED 81 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
+2
L.,-,%- -2 /
W m -6 Lzf -7
-8 I
8 POLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT. CASED 525 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
59 60
61
62 I
63
64 W 65'
66 67
- 5 70 IVI 67 I I ijiI
68 69
--' 7 1
0
w 72 .73
z 74 - -I75I-----0' I I-/L.
76---, 78 I II 79
81 ---82 I Ilf
84
85
86-- III
8788I
89 +1
POLK 47 DEPTH 67 FT. CASED 60 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
38
39 40
43
m 44
W < 45
46
-3 47 MA4
- 8---- Vw
8 9-------------------- --- -50
51 52
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 27. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland,
Lakeland area.




34 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
POLK 49 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
*2
3 -u
F OLK 51 DEPTH 319 FT. CASED 208 FT. HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN)
3
4
5
15
7
20
HIGLAND 10 EPTH 459 FT. CASED 408 FT. HALLHOWNSANDATIFE ARTESIANA) 24
4 - --26
34
35
U3 7
= I
U 38
Ui
40 20 21
2?
IGHLANDS 10 DEPTH 45 FT. CASED 41 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
23ns0nrS in
Z4
S26
S27
29 I \ B
32
4
S36 - 37 -----UA 398 :i I 39( 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 28. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 35
wells Osceola 183 and Okeechobee 3 did not exceed declines in these wells caused by the drought in 1955-56. Figure 29 shows fluctuations of water levels in the shallow nonartesian aquifer in Highlands, Okeechobee, and Osceola counties.
HIGHLANDS 13 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 16 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
32
31 1 1 1 1
30
S29 j
>'28 -J 27
Uw26
j 25
19
18---------- -OSCEOLA 183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
', 24 Ili l llllll LI ll
I- 75~ --
S71- "-- -
8 1 112I2I I I I I I
70
69
68
OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED 2219 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
76
W-J 75 Iu.{ U> 74I IIW- 72 I I II I ,I I N IV V 11 > 71 V 1
Ujw 69
ta b 68 < 67III
66
6OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED 19 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
60
-60 1 V
-W 59
53
~J 6
< 54
.jW, 57 -- - -- -- - - - - -
53
521 1
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 29. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley.




36 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Orlando Area
The Orlando area includes Brevard and Orange counties.
The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the ground water for municipal and industrial needs in the area. The trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer near Orlando are shown in figure 30.
+~4
_2
t
'_W10r'q 47
I)V
Fr ... . N
S a J AsoNO'F'AMJ JASONDJFMAMJ JA SOND!JFMAMJ J ASONDIJFMAMJ JASOND
IJA
10191 1924 1963 1964
PA I. =1 I
4A
WIN a
__.....___..... _______ ..... .... I . . . .
JFb\M J 0J AS0ODJ FMA M JJA0SN0 JFMAMJ J A S OND J FMAMJ J AS ON' JFMAM J J AS OND0
Mo r1 M" e636
Figure 30. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1960-62.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 37
The long-term trend of artesian water levels in the Orlando area is shown in figure 31.
+10 ORANGE 47 DEPTH 350 FT. CASED 328 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER +9 +8
+7
+6 +5
+4
+1
+2
0
-4
-5 [Ul
-6 1 i I k
No record 0vaible
-8 1 A
-9
-10
>-II
W
S-'3 --
~-14 : - -- - - -: - ----
-15:
-16- ---17---18 -19
-20
1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965
Figure 31. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47, near Orlando.
The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows ground-water levels declined from the highest level of record in the spring of 1960 to the lowest level of record in 1962, for a maximum fluctuation of 22.96 feet.
Cape Kennedy Area
One of the most rapidly growing areas in the State is the
Cape Kennedy area.; Water in the Floridan aquifer in the area is generally brackish and is used primarily for crop irrigation. Figure 32 shows water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in
19Brevard, Indian River, and St. Lucie counties.1
Figure 31. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47, near Orlando.
The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows ground-water levels declined from the highest level of record in the spring of 1960 to the lowest level of record in 1962, for a maximum fluctuation of 22.96 feet.
Cape Kennedy Area
One of the most rapidly growing areas in the State is the
Cape Kennedy area. Water in the Floridan aquifer in the area is generally brackish and is used primarily for crop irrigation. Figure 32 shows water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in
Brevard, Indian River, and St. Lucie counties.




38 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
BREVARD 19 DEPTH 413 FT. CASED 80 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
30
18
~29--------------- 1z7
25 24 23
z
- 1
19
17 16 15
14
32 IDIREVARD 79 DEPTH 160 FT. CASED 85 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
SU 4 LUC. 4 DET 18 FT A. SA(.
+3 IV!
28
BZREVARO 148 DEPTH 206 FT. CASED 105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
13
126
2------------- i -----------,4 ------------------------------2u3
950 195 95 61-96
0-- ,-Ii --1
cr W
SRV AIRE 24 DEPTH 1 FT. CASED I5 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
14- --- ---
U 30 uj -t. 3
Le(0 C Aa v I Kn and Ie I c
S29
2
t- 0 A-- N ~- --~--ISIA RUIER 25 DEPTH IS FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER- (NONARTESIAN)
.. 3194 1950 1 955 1 zj I 30 -U
U26
-to
27
S26 ca 254
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 19T5 I9pr'
Figure 32. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 39
Hydrographs of four wells in Brevard County show a longterm downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer. Since 1946, artesian water levels have declined about 7 to 10 feet near Melbourne and Eau Gallie and a minimum of 7 feet at Cocoa. Levels have declined about 8 feet on Merritt Island about 10 miles northwest of Cape Kennedy.
Hydrographs of wells in the shallow-sand aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties indicate only a slight downward trend of ground-water levels has occurred during the period of record.
Sarasota-Bradenton Area
The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in southwestern coastal Florida, and the principal economic activities in the area are agriculture and stock raising. The coastal section is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center.
Figure 33 shows the water-level fluctuations in observation well Sarasota 9, in the Floridan aquifer, have been declining at an average rate of about 0.5 foot per year since 1930. Water level records for several wells in southwestern Florida indicate that the decline is regional and that the rate of decline is accelerating.
SOUTHERN FLORIDA
The southern Florida area includes all counties south of Lake Okeechobee and covers an area of about 17,500 square miles as shown on page 45. The locations of selected observation wells in southern Florida are shown on figure 34.
In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade counties, the Biscayne aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are the main sources.




40 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
MANATEE 92 DEPTH 600 FT. CASED 154 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
34 35
36 -- -- --37 & A
38--- -
Cr 39
,-4, -- - -I
S40
z741
42
43I
C, 45 I U I "'W 46
47
54
ir 51----------- - --- -SARASOTA 9 DEPTH 730 FT. CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER
I Ia I I FI I I I
+2
1 No rf
-14
05 1 5 1 16 U4
0
U.1 2
Figure 33. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area.
Ft. Myers Area
-= -3---------------------------- I- -' i-The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties and like adjacent counties to the north and is developing rapidly as a winter tourist and retirement center.
J'l -II- - - -- - -
1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 33. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels
in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area.
Ft. Myers Area
The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties and like adjacent counties to the north and is developing rapidly as a winter tourist and retirement center.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 41
IMANATEE OKEECOBEE ST LUCIE
saR A DESOTO HIGHLANDS
SA A 1 _tb I U, T 4 MAR TIN
CAR LOTTE GLA DES OKEECHO
\ 246
LEE H E N R Y PAL BEACH
" L 3 R 0 W A R D 5 329
SHAA-=I \ OGAH of
Figure 84. Map showing locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given.
The observation-well program in the Ft. Myers area began in 1943. The program was part of the investigation of the trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the nonartesian and Floridan aquifers in the area. Currently, water levels are being measured in eight wells in Lee County. The principal source of ground water is the nonartesian aquifers. Figure 35 shows the seasonal fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the period 1960-62. Generally, seasonal fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to fluctions in the amounts of rainfall. Figure 36 shows the trends and




42 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
'O
LEE 246
S JFMAMJ JASOdO JFMAMJJASONDJJ FMAMJ JASONDJ FMAMJ JASONDJ FMAMJ JASOND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
*2
0
.. . . . .
JFMAMJ JASON DJ FMA MJ J A SO NDJFMUAMJJ A S 0 NDJ F M AMJJ A S 0 N 01Ji FMAMJ JAS ND
960 6 862 196 664
Figure 35. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1960-62.
fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern Florida.
Stuart-West Palm Beach Area
This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach counties and is a segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal complex extending from Jacksonville southward through the Keys. Municipal pumpage at Stuart increased about 250 percent between 1941-45 and 1955-60 as shown in figure 37T.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 43
SLEE 246 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 19 FE TAMIAMI PORMATION NONARTESIAN
2 V I r l J A Il I"
UV IV . . 1 1
, I I LLr:
2
6
6 8-wr 9
19
Wter level is affected pupnging of arby wells
14
COLLIER CI31 DEPTH 54 FT. CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FORMATION (NONARTESIAN)
27
-j 26
W .25
I W
3 4I II
-W 23
21
Wj U)
hzo
19
c r 2 0- - - - - - -
18 17
161
-= III-----------II I-
C14OLLIER C54 DEPTH 9 FT CASED 8 FT. SAND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN)
12
W I U I I 1I -1 -1I
"
W 10 R 1
_jW 9 l~J 8
6
+6 MARTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT CASED 73 FT. SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN
+15
+14IIIl--
+ 13
5---------- < -j +1
c>
z +7-!- - - - --I- - < o --I I-----a:-+5--j J +4
cm +3
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 195 190 Figure 36. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier C 54 and 131 Everglades, and Martin 147 near Stuart, Florida.




44 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
I30

4f 7
o 3 IzzLb
Figure 37. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida.
The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer at Stuart are shown in figure 36. The hydrograph of well Martin 147 shows a downward trend of nonartesian levels. Levels declined to a record low of less than 2 feet above mean sea level in the spring of 1962. The declines are caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field:
The Biscayne aquifer is the chief source of water supply in
southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 38 shows the trends and fluctuations of end-of-month water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and rainfall data at West Palm Beach.
Fluctuations of water levels for several selected wells are shown in figures 39 and 40. The hydrographs indicate that there are downward trends of water levels in some wells for the period of
record shown by the graphs.
Ft. Lauderdale Area
The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part
of Broward County, extending from Deerfield-Boca Raton area in




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 45
10
PALM BEACH 88
JFMA M J J A S 0 N 0 4 F MA M J 4A S O N 0 4 F M A M J J2 A S'0 N 0 4 F M A M J J A S 0 N'0 4 F M AM 4 4 A S O N DI
MAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONOJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
-,,.12
+4
-4
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
Figure 38. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1960-62.
the northern part of Broward County, to the Hollywood area in the southern part of the county. Water levels in this area have declined during the past decade. Long-term downward trend of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in, and adjacent to, the Ft. Lauderdale area are shown by hydrographs of wells Palm Beach 88 (fig. 39), Broward F 329 at Ft. Lauderdale (fig. 40), and Broward G 617 about 15 miles northwest of Ft. Lauderdale (fig. 39). Water levels in these wells declined to new record-low levels during 1950-51, 1955-56, and 1961-62.
The Biscayne aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to the coast and along tidal canals. Figure 41 shows graphs of the chloride content of water in wells Broward G 514 and S 830 in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field and in wells Dade F 296 and F 64 in North Miami Beach and Miami.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
13 PM BEACH 88 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 16 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
'2
I II -'
M~ 7 -- - - - --1 l A
+I O B0ROWARD 6561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
12BROWARD 67 DET 29 FT CAE 28 .- -B-SCAYNE AQ -FER
9
z3
,,5DAE 55 DEPT, 91.TCSED,,F. BISCAYN, AQlFE
ca ~ >. I7 1 L Nt f
< +5
1z t -Irl
L LCE IIt 6
4 I II I--1
- -3
--------- -- - - - - -
5 I 1 16 1 1 1 9
Figurel 39 Hyrorah showing r end an lctain oaerlvl
12BR nARD G617 DEPTH 29 FT. CASED 28 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER ,, I I I I I I I
0 0
15-
J --
Z' I I
" I5 D -] D9
, DADEZ DET. .T AED7it ICYE QIE
-14 -------------- - -
L o I---------------------------- -- - -
SLii
< 7 L
_iL i 6 i L
M
111965 197 1975 5980 Figre 39. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in welts Palm Beach 88 near West Palm Beach, Broward G 561 and G 617
near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G 553 near Miami.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 47
SBROWARD F291 DEPTH 107 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
6
wd> 7-----------------
ww --.
-J U I l
5
A n
-----UrI- JE
DADE SI8 DEPTH 52 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
DAE A0 A
_z 6
> 4
0
_r 6- P
- 6
~J+5-2 +4-ll l \ I
-
DADE F196A DEPTH 2077 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER W II Al1 I
0 7 -M- Il l li : I IIIl il iiN A I A A
<. 6
- < i ll I II n I P I I I~ l II I I I l
W w +5
z 4
11 BROWARD S329 DEPTH 68 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
1 0
-j ~- -- - -"-Figure 40.--I-- Hydrograph showing trends fu atn o w
in wells Broward F 291 at Hollywood, Dade S 18 near Miami, Dade
-2E II I' 1 I I
S 196A near Redland, Dade F 179 at Miami, and BrowISCAYNE AQUIFERd 329
near Ft. Lauderdale. 8j
-i 0n I
-> lll< IA.
< 0
I" RO R S32 DEPT 68il FT ISCAYNE AQ I
10 / l 1 1 1 II lllll
U- oi -A N ,- o, 1I I I
< 90 15 940 145 15- 15 90 16
Fiure4.Hdorpssoigted adfutain fwtrlv (n 5 el rwr 9 tHlyooDd 8na imDd W 196 4 erRdad ueF19atMai n rwr
ne> -:zauedae




48 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
BROWARD G 514
-D ., -BISCAYNE AQUIFER
--*~-DEPTH 177 FT 4000 3000
3000 2500
2000,
000 \- BROWARD S 830
1500 BISCAYNE AQUIFER DEPTH 119 FT
i00 I = 500C- ,
1000
1000
PTH 47 F .
20 0 No Record %ale
-- DADE F 2964 1200 BISCAYNE AQUIFER
DEPTH 114 FT 1000 AI-A;L
8 00 y -v I
600
400
200
Figure 41. Graph showing changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward G 514 and S 830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F 296 and F 64 near Miami.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 49
Miami Area
The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the most populous area in the State. The principal source of water supply is the Biscayne aquifer, the extent of which is shown on figure 1.
The observation-well program began in the Miami area in 1939 and currently includes 125 wells in Broward County and about 350 wells in Dade County. The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for which hydrographs are given are shown by figure 34.
Water level observations were made as early as 1933 at Homestead in well Dade S 196A. Long-term record of water-level fluctuations at Homestead are shown in figure 40. Figure 42 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Homestead Experimental Station 1960-62.
WS
DADE SI96A
2
0 IrAMJJA ON JFMA ASON JFMA JAONDJ MAMJ ASO IJF AM J JFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJJASOND
11960 1961 1962 1965 1964 4416
A 0 MAIM 9 A S O N D J F MA MJ A S O ND F M A M J J A S ON D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MAM J J ASON O'D
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
Figure 42. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S 196A, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at
Homestead Experimental Station, 1960-62.




50 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the Miami area is occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of groundwater levels in the Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells Dade G 72, G 596, G 618, and G 620, figures 43 and 44.
Fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of Miami are illustrated by hydrographs of well Dade G 10 about 5 miles west of Miami, Dade S 19 at Miami Springs (fig. 43), and well Dade F 179 at Miami (fig. 40). The water level in well Dade S 19 is affected by pumping in the municipal well field of the City of Miami.
DADE 519 DEPTH 95 FT. CASED 91 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
9 *i-- ---- ---- - - I I I II II I II,I II I I
--- I I-- - Wa ter levelis offected b pum ng ofnearbywells
DA E 6 1 D 6 F CASE 6I I SCAYN A
IC
5 3:94 190 1 19 1 197 1 9
0A -- 1..UL / 1 11 I I I L!
DADE GIO DEPTH 6 FT CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
-_ w ReL D 19land G 10 ar i, an jp o
_ +< -- 1 1 1J-- 1I a-- T
-C o I I Al I
- +
3: I I I
DWE 672 DEPTH 5 FT. CASED 4 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
I I ti I L
9------II I PaI I I ,
2I .. I I
.UJ
-T I
c- -=
40 1945 1950. 855 1960 195 1970 1975
Figure 43. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S 19 and G 10 near Miami, and Dade G 72 northwest of Opa-Locka.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 51
DADE G596 DEPTH 13 FT. CASED 11 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
+12 1 - - 1 1 1- -r 1
+11
Ll j +10
> +9
w I
- +8 E
< iA9 I I
LI-W + 7- - ..IIS+67
LL 6 ANJ UvFl "Z +5
+4 I- >5
LJ +3-- 2
oT
-I I
DADE G618 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 11 FEET BISCAYNE AQUIFER
+110
+9
o ,
+7
S+5
2 +4
Id +3.r.. . .. . .. . .
S+2
I
DADE 6613 DEPTH 21 FT. CASED 18 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER
0
-W + 4.mo
>5
1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980
Figure 44. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G 596, G 618, G 613, and G 620 in central Dade County .
In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination of the Biscayne aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an ever-present problem. Through intensive practice of water control, the situation in many areas has been alleviated. The effectiveness of water control is graphically illustrated in figure 45 by the decrease in chloride content of ground water in many areas.
ID-- -- -
Id>
WI +5 --
194 095 +95 196 -96 -90 158
Fiur 44+ yrgah2hwngted n lcutin fwtrvl in wel+ aeG56 1,G63 n 2 ncnrlDd ony
W InteMaiaeainohrcatlaesthcotmnto of th icyeaufrb h nraheto at ae sa evrprsn prbe.Truhitniepatc fwtrcnrl the siuto nmn ra a en leitd h fetvns of wae- oto2sgahclyilutae nfgr 5b h e cras inclrd otn fgoudwtri ayaes




52 FLORIDA GEOLUOGICAL SURVE.
so --- --- - - ---eac - - - -
toC D IVA ADE G354
M U DEPTH 91Fr.
L
0
locoOA G 580 e' --4DEPTH 22 FI
I 0A0EG469 4- -BMiFER DEPTh 137 FT
0 i.
00 -
--/}: .. .. .
3000
2500
500 [ DADE S529
BSCA QLFER 10 DEPTH 1 FT I
0
ICCC
DADE 6212
0 M11EPH 79 FA
- 4
0t
less w a e,
Figure 45. Graphs showing changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G 354 and G 580 near Miami and Dade G 469, S 529, and G 212 in Dade County.




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 53
APPENDIX
Table 1.--Summary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells.







Table 1.--Summary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells.
Well number: Well numbers are based on county numbering system e.g. Bay County well Bay 20, or on the latitudinal and longitudinal
system well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given where this well has been reported previously in a publication under
the county number.
Aquifer: B, Biscayne; F, Floridan; 0, sand-and-gravel aquifer; H, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand.
Depth of well: Reported unless otherwise noted; M, measured by U. S. Geological Survey.
Frequence of measurement: A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous;.D, daily; I, intermittently; M, monthly; Q, quarterly; S, semiannually; W, weekly.
Water level: To hundredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or if taken from recorder chart; to the nearest tenth of a foot if
measured by pressure gage or'airline.
Remarks: B, water level below measuring point; M, water level with reference to mean sea level; P, water level affected by pumping
of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in remarks; 5, water level affected by seasonal pumping;, T, water levels
affected by ocean tides.
rWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet)
Well number Prior to 1961 Highest water lxium Remarks S. a 0 0 r_ ri level in May range -a- 03. May or June
= B tE$ (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962
ALACHUA COUNTY
936-236-1 F 252 136 1958 C -23.48 -24.88 -23.85 -29.74 4.50 4.51
1960 1959
942-216-1 F 447 175 1957 B -89.55 -93.04 -88.52 -91.84 2.89 3.15
1958 1957
949-235-2 F 300 250 1960 B ---- ---- -37.68 -39.17 0.63 3.83
BAKER COUNTY
011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 C +0.17 -3.00 -2.21 -4.01 4.24 4.68
1959 1960
014-226-1 F 168 --- 1957 B --- ---- -100.48 ---- 1.53
016-207-1 F 625 400 1945 B -55.4 -56.53 ---- -71.27 ---- 3.03
1945 1945
026-214-1 R 198 102 1960 B ---- ---- --- -18.95 ---- 5.76
BAY COUNTY
7 (010-541-1) F 253 --- 1936 B -42.33 -66.69 -72.79 -77.58 11.16 9.98 P
1947 1960
8 (016-538-1) F 435 300 1936 B +1.80 +1.08 +1.20 +1.80 1.10 1.47 1952 1955
10 (014-536-1) F 300 --- 1936 B -6.76 -9.53 -9.79 -10.67 2.56 3.11
1950 1957
12 (017-551-1) F 290 --- 1961 B ---- ---- +0.72 +0.50 1.55 0.73
20 (008-537-2) F 457 140 1951 C -117.81 -139.0 -132.5 -124.6 37.3 23.2 P
1952 1955
43 (004-535-1) F 645 238 1946 B -62.8 ---- -92.6 -128.7 18.5 48.0
1948
53 (012-552-1) G 134 114 1961 B ---- ---- --- -8.97 0.58 0.70
62 (956-525-1) F 63 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -11.50 1.43 1.13
65 (006-525-1) F 200 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- 44.30 2.3 5.6
68 (023-526-1) F 160 158 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +1.81 ---- 1.76
69 (025-525-1) G 153 136 1961 B ---- ---- -13.76 ---- 1.67




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface s (feet)
0 l el nmer Prior to 1961 Highest water Maxim Remarks r. on a ao ee i a ag a.. n.e au Ri g Low "19 S -' (ea) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962
BAY COUN1Y--Continued
012-541-213 F 345 326 1962 M ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 2.71
BRADFORD COUNrY
000-210-2 F 294 247 1959 B ---- ---- -70.84 -73.96 1.86 2.11
BREVARD COUNTY
19 (305-045-1) F 413 80 1934 B +27.3 +20.2 +19.6 +20;6 7.0 1.2 P 1950 1956
20 (795-043-2) F 4-7 125 1934 B +28.7 +21.0 +20.4 +19.8 3.4 3.2 S 1947 1956
79 (347-051-1) F 160 85 1946 B +5.1 +0.14 +1.9 -0.55 2.8 2.92 S 1947 1956
L4A3 (321-0!5-1) F 206 105 1946 B +10.9 +5.7 +7.1 +4.3 4.4 3.8 S 1953 1955
L39 (334-039-1) F 210 144 1946 B +14.9 +8.2 +11.5 +9.1 3.0 3.2 S 1953 1958
759-045-1 S 9 4 1958 C -4.4 -6.2 -5.7 -6.4 0.4 0.6
1958 1959
307-039-2 S 50 4 1958 C -6.5 -7.3 -7.2 -8.2 1.1 0.2
1959 1960
814-048-2 S 9 4 1958 C -0.9 -2.9 -3.1 ---- 0.1 ---1959 1960
322-046-7 S 32 4 1958 B +21.5 +20.3 ---- ---- ---- ---- M
1959 1958
822-047-2 F 129 4 1960 C +32.6 +29.9 +29.5 +28.1 0.9 1.2 M 1960 1960
BROWARD COUNTY
291 B 107 --- 1939 C +4.3 +0.4 +2.2 +1.2 2.1 2.6 H 1958 1952
G56L B 20 20 1948 c +4.1 +0.2 +2.2 +1.1 2.1 3.0 M 1958 1956
G616 B 25 19 1952 C +12.9 +8.7 +11.6 +10.7 5.1 3.9 M 1957&58 1956
G617 B 29 28 1950 C +6.6 +2.8 +6.1 +3.8 3.0 3.7 M 1954 1956
0820 B 224 215 1956 C ---- ---- -2.5 -0.8 4.5 6.2 M; Prospect
well field
0853 B 22 21 1960 C ---- ---- ---- +2.8 ---- 4.0 H; Pompano
well field
s329 B 68 --- 1940 C +5.5 +0.5 +3.3 +2.2 3.9 4.6 H; Dixie well 1955 1954 field




s I Water level above (+) or below () land surface A 0 o .(feet) I
-l l m Prior to 1961 Highest water Max Remarks Well number 44 44 .0 u r Maxirks 'a level in May
4 = a May or-June inay range U. n 0si 0 1s High Low
1 (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962
CALHOUN COUNTY
1 (026-502-1) F 212 --- 1961 B ---- ---- -2.27 -3.05 1.39 2.85
7 (026-509-1) F 188 64 1961 B ---- ---- +8.0 +7.4 1.2 1.6
11 (014-511-1) F 147 47 1961 B ---- ---- +11.7 +10.9 0.5 2.6
crITRUS COUNTY
15 (902-228-1) F 78 --- 1933 B -8.62 -19.83 -11.88 -18.38 4.13 4.35
1959 1956
856-223-2 F 91 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -48.36 7.57 4.71
CLAY COuNTY
5 (006-149-2) F 530 157 1940 B +35.5 +21.0 +24.0 +21.6 3.1 2.6 ; 1947 1957
7 (958-139-1) F 650 276 1940 B +16.4 +11.8 +16.2 +15.2 2.9 2.9 1952 1953
948-202-6 H 144 80 1960 B ---- ---- -45.67 -47.72 1.71 3.04 -45.33 feet only
May measurement
prior to 1961
948-202-7 NA 42 40 1960 B ---- ---- -29.38 -30.94 2.80 3.62 -28.38 feet only
May measurement
prior to 1961
948-202-8 F 250 193 1960 C ---- ---- -55.02 -57.56 1.63 2.74
COLLIER COUNTY
54 B 9 8 1951 C +13.1 +8.6 +9.7 +8.5 4.1 5.5 M 1958 1956
131 B 54 22 1952 C +26.2 +21.9 +21.5 +21.2 4.9 6.2 M 1958 1955
164 B 51 20 1958 C +5.5 +1.3 +2.4 +1.8 4.9 7.2 M; Naples well 1959 1960 field 271 B 38 --- 1959 C -3.8 -4.9 -5.1 -4.5 3.1 4.5 B
1960 1960
296 B 45 --- 1959 C -9.4 -10.3 -11.0 -11.1 3.3 4.2
1960 1960
COLUMBIA COUNTY
9 (010-238-1) F 836 --- 1942 C -79.60 -97.02 -88.99 -92.55 3.71 2.72
1948 1957
DADE COUNTY
F45 B 85 --- 1939 C +3.9 +1.6 +2.1 +1:5 1.4 3.4 M; R, 1959 1960 1960
F179 B 77 --- 1940 C +6.0 +0.9 +2.5 +1.6 1.9 2.7 M 1958 1945
F240 B 60 --- 1939 C ---- ---- ---- +1.2 ---- 2.6 M; R, 1961
F319 B 17 13 1940 C +5.4 +0.5 +3.3 +1.5 1.5 1.3 M 1958 1945




water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (feet)
Pal nmer PrIor to 1961 1Hghest water Maximm WeI m er a a a.level In hay ~6 0 n I
( y 9 9 6 1962 c' a (year) (jear
DADE COU R--Continued
P358 B 54 --- 1940 C +6.7 -0.8 ---- +0.4 ---- 5.8 H
1954 1945
G3 B 20 11 1940 C +3.0 -0.5 +1.5 -1.3 2.4 4.8 M; P 1958 1951
GLO B 6 6 1940 C +6.0 +0.5 +4.3 +1.4 3.2 3.6 M 1958 1945
c39 8 8 6 1939 C +7.2 +2.2 +3.3 +1.3 2.8 1.8 H; P 1958 1955
G72 B 5 4 1940 C +6.5 +1.2 44.8 +2.5 3.2 3.4 M 1938 1945
C476 B 24 19 1947 C +5.5 +0.4 +2.1 +1.2 1.6 1.7 H 1958 1950&56
G553 8 91 79 1947 C +8.6 +1.7 +4.8 +1.4 3.7 4.1 M 1958 1956
G580 B 22 4 1960 C 44.2 +2.4 +5.3 +1.3 3.8 2.9 M 1960 1960
G395 B 14 11 1949 +8.5 +1.3 +2.3 +1.0 4.1 5.5 H; P 1958 1960
C596 8 13 11 1949 C 4+8.4 +3.2 +6.3 +2.6 3.9 5.7 H 1958 1952
G6L3 B 21 18 1950 C +5.5 -0.5 +3.6 4+0.1 4.8 5.6 H 1954&58 1956
G614 B 20 18 1950 C +8.2 +0.9 +3.9 +1.0 3.9 6.2 H 1958 1956
G613 B 20 11 1950 C +8.4 +3.7 +6.5 +3.9 3.6 4.2 M 1958 1956
G619 B 12 6 1950 C +8.3 44.3 +7.5 +7.4 2.2 3.6 H 1958 1956
G520 B 16 6 1950 C +7.0 +3.6 +6.0 +5.5 1.1 3.5 H 1958 1952
G757 B 20 10 1957 C +9.3 +2.1 +4.9 +1.5 4.9 6.0 H 1958 1956
G789 B 20 10 1956 C +7.3 +2.0 +6.6 +1.2 4.8 6.4 M 1958 1956
G799 B 20 10 1956 C +7.8 +2.0 44.1 +1.7 2.8 3.4 H; P 1958 1956
G850 B 22 11 1959 C +2.3 +1.2 +1.8 +1.4 0.9 2.2 H 1960 1959
G851 B 18 11 1959 C +2.9 +1.8 +3.3 +1.9 1.8 3.3 H 1960 1959
G852 B 22 10 1959 C +2.4 +0.4 +1.4 +0.7 1.5 3.7 H 1960 1959
C855 B 20 10 1958 C ---- ---- ---- -9.1 ---- 5.0 B
57 19 115 1959 C +3 +18 +3.5 +1.3 2.6 3.0 H 191 1960
G858 B 20 11 1959 C +6.3 44.2 +5.1 +1.9 4.5 6.9 H 1960 1959




Water level above (+)or below (-) land surface
Q to .a(feet)
0e or Prior to 1961 Highest water Maimum Well number ro Hig t vamu Remarks o a a J level In ay range
- = *0 01 M ay or June
4, 0 S 0 o 0I
us as Htigh Low
U4 ( eW ) (y i ear 1961 1962 1961 1962 %. 61 =(yar 196
DADE COUNTY--Continued
G859 B 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +1.9 +3.5 +1.2 4.1 5.1 H 1960 1959
G860 B 20 11 1959 C +5.0 +2.4 +3.0 +1.2 5.0 3.6 M 1960 1959
G861 B 23 11 1961 C ---- ---- ---- +2.3 2.5 5.0 M; R, Nov. 1961
G863 B 18 6 1961 C ---- ---- ---- +1.5 ---- 6.2 H; Do
0864 B 20 11 1959 C +5.3 +1.0 +3.7 +0.4 5.8 6.0 M 1959 1959
G865 B 19 13 1959 C +1.8 +0.9 +2.0 +1.6 1.4 1.4 M 1960 1960
G968 B 50 --- 1960 C ---- ---- +4.1 +3.1 2.5 3.3 H
G968A B 3 --- 1961 C ---- ---- ---- +3.6 0.7 3.2 M; R, Nov. 1961
G970 B 15 10 1958 C +4.0 +2.4 +4.3 +2.2 2.5 2.8 M 1960 1959
G972 B 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +4.5 +5.3 +3.5 3.0 4.3 M 1960 1959
G973 B 15 10 1958 C +4.5 +2.3 +3.4 +1.7 2.5 2.1 H 1960 1960
G974 B 15 10 1958 C +5.4 +3.3 +4.7 +2.7 3.6 3.6 H 1960 1959
G975 B 15 10 1958 C +6.9 +5.5 +5.4 +4.2 5.1 4.4 H 1960 1959
G976 B 15 10 1958 C +6.0 +4.2 +5.6 +2.9 3.2 3.7 M 1960 1959
G978 B 15 10 1958 C +6.7 +4.9 +6.1 +2.9 3.9 4.1 M 1960 1959
G1045 B 20 12 1960 C +2.3 +1.5 +1.7 +1.5 1.6 3.0 H 1960 1960
01165 B 12 11 1961 C ---- ---- ---- +1.5 1.2 3.4 M; R, Oct. 1961
01166 B 11 11 1961 C ---- ---- ---- +5.6 0.5 1.9 M; Do
01183 B 25 --- 1961 C ---- ---- ---- +1.0 4.0 0.9 M; Do
NP44 B 33 --- 1960 C +2.9 +0.2 +4.5 +0.8 4.5 4.2 M 1960 1960
NP46 B 25 --- 1960 C +1.3 +0.3 +0.3 -0.3 2.4 3.4 M 1960 1960
NP57 B 54 --- 1961 C ---- ---- +1.9 +0.1 2.2 2.9 H
NP62 B 20 9 1962 C ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- M; R, Oct. 1962
NP67 B 20 6 1962 C ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- M; Do
NP72 B 20 6 1962 C ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- M; Do
S18 B 52 --- 1939 C +3.2 +0.10 +2.4 +1.4 1.4 1.8 M; P 1942 1945
S19 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.2 +1.9 -0.5 2.5 4.4 M; P 1958 1945
S68 B 61 51 1939 +3.2 -2.1 +0.3 -3.0 2.7 4.9 M; P 1958 1945




Water level above (+) or below (*) land suiface (feet) taa
WeLt number Prior to 1961 Highest water Maxim Remarke U ey or June level in May range c 0may or Junerag High LOW
A- (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962
DADE COUNEY--Continued 31.82 B 51 --- 1940 C +9.5 0.0 +3.5 +0.7 3.6 3.1 H 1958 1945
SL196A B 20 --- 1932 C +8.5 -1.0 +3.9 +0.4 4.1 7.5 H 1958 1945
DE SOTO COUNTY
703-157-1 F 468 189 1962 B ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 6.95
704-147-1 F 462 --- 1962 C ---- ---- ---- ---- --- 0.93
720-148-1 F 470 --- 1962 C ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 1.32
DIXIE COUNTY
15 (937-306-1) F 215 105 1957 C -2.77 -5.15 -6.55 -8.20 3.26 1.86
1959 1960
DUVAL COUNTY
12 (019-140-1) F 785 --- 1938 B +27.5 +15.9 4+21.0 +15.1 9.8 9.8 P
1947 1957
18 (018-140-1) F --- --- 1938 B +39.9 +22.5 +26.4 +20.1 8.0 10.2 P
1947 1957
102 (019-133-1) F 875 400 1930 B +6.4 -17.95 -15.02 -20.941 4.82 8.00 P
1931 1960
L07 (023-136-1) F --- --- 1939 B +53.2 +35.3 +36.8 +34.4 4.8 4.5 P
1939 1959
115 (016-142-1) F 729 476 1930 B +36.2 +14.7 +17.2 +11.6 7.0 8.4 P 1938 1957
118 (018-143-1) F 900 --- 1939 B +32.9 +16.4 +17.6 +11.9 4.5 7.2 P
1947 1957
122 (023-138-1) F 905 571 1930 H +44.9 +27.9 +28.8 +25.6 4.7 3.7 P 1947 1957
123 (019-142-1) F 1,075 --- 1930 B +39.0 +20.3 +21.7 +15.7 4.4 6.2 P
1931 1957
129 (015-141-1) F 600 470 1940 B +40.4 +21.2 +23.5 +17.4 7.8 8.9 P 7 1957
145 (028-137-1) F --- --- 1940 ,.2 +8.3 +9.1 +5.58 4.5 3.3 P
1947 1957
149 (024-136-1) F 800 --- 1940 B +25.7 +12.4 +11.4 +9.8 4.6 4.3 P
1947 1956
151 (023-139-1) F --- --- 1940 B +43.4 +34.1 +34.9 +31.0 6.3 5.3 P
1952 1956
152 (027-133-1) F --- --- 1940 B +29.9 +22.1 +21.5 +19.6 4.5 5.8 P
1952 1957
154 (013-135-1) F 625 461 1940 B +29.6 +14.8 +14.1 +10.5 5.2 5.6 P 1947 1960
160 (018-123-1) F 585 357 1934 B +41.7 +26.2 +25.5 +20.2 6.1 8.5 P 1934 1960




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface a .s. (feet) numbe Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximum Remarks Well nba level in Hay range La o' ) May or une,
4j LU Si. M~ z SHigh ) yLow 1961 1962 1961 1962
*' 4 N (year) (year) 16
DUV/AL COUNTY--Continued
164 (025-125-1) F 840 450 1930 B +43.8 +29.0 +29.3 +25.8 3.8 4.5 P 1931 1956
206 (015-145-1) F 1,920 1,000 1941 C -2.06 -15.58 -13.55 ---- 3.85 2.62 P
1948 1956
262 (026-135-1) F 1,393 584 1951 B +37.0 +25.6 +26.2 +23.5 3.7 3.7 P 1951 1957
263 (026-135-2) F 1,025 850 1951 B +35.5 +26.1 +26.9 +24.2 3.7 3.8 p 1952 1957
264 (026-135-3) F 700 450 1951 B +35.3 +25.9 +25.9 +23.2 3.5 4.1 p 1952 1957
265 (025-136-1) F 556 --- 1951 B +39.4 +29.0 +25.3 +22.3 6.6 7.8 P
1952 1957
ESCAMBIA COUNTY
39 (023-716-2) G 247 --- 1940 M -4.59 -12.00 -7.89 -10.95 3.04 4.24
1940 1955
45 (036-719-1) G 152 152 1940 C -69.30 -111.82 -103.27 -101.71 2.79 1.94 P
1941 1956
46 (031-716-1) G 239 239 1939 W -58.09 -82.12 -67.54 -68.66 2.86 3.75
1948 1956
62 (024-715-1) C 142 142 1940 C -6.50 -23.84 -14.34 -15.22 3.97 5.72
1949 1955
62A (024-715-2) C 18 18 1940 W -10.22 -12.53 -11.35 -12.02 1.55 2.91
1944 1954
73 (035-715-3) G 306 198 1951 C -39.03 -56.66 -50.94 -51.76 5.90 4.10 P
1953 1958
74 (036-716-1) C 352 350* 1951 C -77.37 -89.52 -86.67 -86.30 3.06 2.70 *Screened from
1952 1959 260 to 270 feet and from 340 to
350 feet
83 (035-714-3) C 301 --- 1954 C -36.10 -41.99 -37.05 -37.53 7.37 6.48 P
1955 1956
026-713-5 G 149 144* 1959 W -58.15 -58.90 -59.15 -59.57 1.63 5.08 *Screened from
1960 1960 144 to 149 feet 026-713-6 G 65 60* 1959 W -51.78 -51.98 -52.46 -52.14 1.90 5.77 *Screened from
1960 1960 60 to 65 feet
032-724-1 C 170 165* 1959 H ---- ---- -91.22 -91.93 1.25 1.61 *Screened from
165 to 170 feet;
-91.18 feet only
Hay measurement
prior to 1961
054-726-1 G 206 201* 1959 B -86.40 -89.48 -85.64 -82.95 3.75 2.75 *Screened from
1960 1959 201 to 206 feet 054-726-2 G 107 102* 1959 B -70.88 -74.92 -69.68 -65.21 5.62 3.64 *Screened from
1960 1959 102 to 107 feet
FLAGLER COUNTY
14 (927-115-1) F 417 --- 1936 B -3.4 -7.38 -7.12 -8.19 2.30 2.67
1937 1956
44 (928-122-1) F 159 --- 1956 B -7.67 -11.41 -9.16 -11.44 5.60 6.87 P
1959 1956




Water level above (+) or kelow () land surface (feet)
Prior to 1961 Righest ater axu rk r .o a a level In Hay- eak 'Bell unaber- May or 'June leern a angel.
0 ig c LOW
S(ear) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962
FRANI S COUTY
10 (950-439-1) F 380 --- 1958 B -1.86 -2.47 -1.80 -4.45 1.42 3.45
1959 1958
31 (943-458-1) F --- --- 1949 B +3.95 +0.40 +2.20 +1.55 1.00 1.30
1950 1952
947-446-1 F 98 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -11.26 1.23 1.09
957-443-1 F --- --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +2.97 0.93 2.20
GADSDEN COUNTY
035-434-1 F 406 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -90.96 13.68 1.40
039-425-1 F 525 381 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -143.96 3.00 4.07
GIICBRIST COUNTY
953-251-1 F 65 42 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -22.11 8.27 10.95
GULF COUNTY
30 (948-518-1) F 522 475 1946 C -7.11 -27.22 -7.50 -8.93 2.14 3.06 P, prior to
1956 1950 1954 33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +1.29 0.75 0.45
34 (006-511-1) F 578 248 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -10.0 3.0 22.5 P
HAMILTON COUNTY
036-305-1 F 273 60 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -101.78 0.87 11.04
HAR DERS COUNTY
731-145-1 F 450 --- 1962 C ---- ---- ---- -33.60 ---- 8.88
ENDRY COUN17
3 S 10 8 1941 *9D, +19.5 +14.3 +18.0 +14.2 4.7 6.6 K; *D, 1941-44;
*C 1958 1956 *C, 19505 S 13 8 1941 C -3.5 -6.3 -5.0 -6.2 2.8 4.0 B 1952 1956
HERNANDO COUNTY
838-215-1 F 140 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -20.28 2.50 3.51
RIGHLANDS COUNMTY
9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0 +128.2 +136.8 3.2 4.2 H 1953 1949
10 S 45 41 1948 C +90.7 483.9 -88.6 +84.9 4.1 7.7 H 1958 1956
11Ak S 10 8 1956 C +48.3 444.5 4+47.1 +44.2 2.9 4.9 H 1957 1956
13 S 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +22.7 +24.6 +21.6 5.1 7.8 H 1957 1956




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface S 4w(feet) S U bo r ell number Prior to 1961 Highest water Maxim Remarks g V w May or June range a'. m s (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962
HIGHLANDS COUNTY--Continued 14 S 35 29 1948 C +22.2 +14.7 +21.5 +17.0 8.0 8.2 H 1960 1951
15 S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +57.3 +55.3 3.8 4.5 14 1953 1956
440 S 22 18 1956 C +116.9 +112.6 +114.3 +111.4 2.7 5.9 M 1958 1956
.HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
13 (807-230-3) F 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -11.05 -10.74 -11.91 4.47 5.82 P
1931 1956
30 (744-225-39) F 500 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.63 +3.01 +3.98 5.87 6.26 1959 1952
500 (742-219-1) F 330 97 1951 B -50.82 -57.98 ---- ---- 9.42 5.89
1958 1956
751-203-1 F 759 65 1957 B -42.52 -47.04 -54.60 -61.05 11.24 8.97
1958 1960
801-213-15 F 417 --- 1958 C +0.55 -2.89 -5.64 -8.06 7.57 10.62
1959 1960
HOLMES COUNTY
4 (043-556-1) F 187 --- 1938 B +4.92 +1.82 +3.10 +3.60 2.60 3.10
1960 1956
7 (058-535-1) F 205 170 1938 B -8.09 -15.66 -9.94 -12.45 3.72 2.17
1949 1956
7A (058-535-2) NA 13 10* 1960 B ---- ---- -5.99 -5.77 8.50 10.61 *Screened from
10 to 13 feet
-3.83 feet only
May measurement
prior to 1961
050-548-1 F --- --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +3.90 1.00 4.86
051-556-1 F 260 --- 1961 B ---- ---- .-- 205.76 5.03 4.40
052-545-2 F 300+ --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +13.8 5.1 5.8
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
25 S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +27.7 +26.9 3.2 4.7 M 1957 1956
JACKSON COUNTY
23 (042-453-1) F 475 100 1950 B -22.54 -38.15 -31.38 -25.20 9.68 7.19
19518 1951
044-506-1 F --- 94 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -76.05 4.03 6.25
046-515-1 F 180 --- 1961 B ---- --- ---- -99.78 3.49 9.28
053-527-1 F 341 260 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -86.70 7.56 14.66
058-503-1 F 83 --- 1955 B ---- ---- ---- -26.53 2.57 5.10




Water level above (+) 6or belo-0 ) land ,surface C at(teet)et mPrior to 1961 Rig ster Remarka aL n ay ya- at Remarks
JEFFERSON COUNTY
022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -140.57 -141.02 -141.30 -141.90 2.78 3.75
- u- a May or 'June lee nNy rnge
1960 1960
Ue 1906~Ngh '' 1 F 1962 16-1962 I Ino -o (year)- (year) 96
JEFFERSON CONT
022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -140.57 -141.02 -141.30 -141.90 2.78 3.75
1960 1960
038-336-1 F 183 147 1960 S -19.10 -19.40 -22.03 -23.75 4.41 &.44
1960 1960
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
038-317-1 F 106 --- 1961 B ---- --- --- -44.04 11.99 2.49
953-312-L F 146 112 1961 B ---- ---- -- -8.89 3.86 3.23
LAKE COUNTY
13 (357-138-1) F 190 --- 1936 B -50.52 -59.82 -51.82 -57.32 4.91 2.65
1960 1957
20 (900-123-1) F 252 --- 1936 B +9.9 +5.52 +7.6 +5.60 1.9 1.75
1942 1956
22 (909-131-1) F 254 --- 1936 B -0.80 -3.10 -2.10 -3.54 1.82 1.64
1959 1956
322-149-1 F 192 100 1959 S +111.70 +110.45 +109.57 +108.25 3.04 --1960 1960
322-149-2 S 23 18 1959 S +113.04 +111.20 +110.21 +109.74 3.94 --1960 1960
332-154-1 F 160 63 1959 C +101.62 +100.41 +99.57 +98.65 3.24 2.98 1960 1960
332-154-2 S 30 17 1959 C +101.93 +99.92 +99.56 +99.27 3.52 3.42 1960 1959
841-156-1 F 754 483 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -22.82 2.42 1.95
LEE COUNTY
246 S 27 19 1945 C +19.2 +10.5 +16.3 +12.6 5.0 6.8 M; P 1959 1949
414 R 94 60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1 +17.0 +14.5 8.4 7.2 M; P 1957 1955
LEON COUNTY
7 (027-416-1) F 314 165 1945 C -149.05 -169.91 -159.67 -160.80 4.43 4.94
1948 1955
36A (037-410-2) H 41 38* 1935 M -1.42 -33.14 -5.16 -14.99 15.53 13.01 *Screened from
1948 1956 38 to 41 feet 115 (031-420-1) F 194 104 1950 B -78.1 -93.3 -81.4 -84.6 3.2 3.9
1960 1957




tWater level above (+} or below (-) land surface I'~I(feeat)
W r Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximum Well number Mayor June level in May range Remarks =(year) (year)044 0 ow 0-:a. 1961 1962 1961 1962
LEON COUNTY--Continued 024-420-1 S 57 --- 1960 C -7.88 -8.72 -12.25 -11.94 3.79 5.51
1960 196C
024-420-2 S 15 12* 1960 B ---- ---- -5.10 -6.19 2.54 3.90 well point z
to 15 feet:
-4.98 feet only
May measurement
prior to 1961
026-418-1 F 296 106 1960 M ---- ---- -74.64 -77.26 4.31 4.47
034-407-1 F 231 --- 1960 C ---- ----- -165.26 -170.17 5.64 4.22
LEVY COUNTY
902-241-1 F 58 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -8.34 1.71 3.07
919-245-1 F 96 --c 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -0.55 0.16 0.13
LIBERTY COUNTY
14 (001-459-1) --- 1955 B -- ---- -4.68 -5.03 3.30 3.81 -5.68 feet only
May measurement
prior to 1961
15 (022-841-1) F 395 242 1960 C ---- ---- -23.05 -24.32 4.24 3.38
010-440-1 F 118 89 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +7.2 1.0 4.6
023-447-1 F 160 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +2.90 1.8 1.58
028-456-1 F 360 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -85.64 0.83 1.07
MADISON COUNTY
17 (029-325-1) F 320 300 1953 B -20.16 -38.12 -27.13 -28.03 7.57 8.07
1959 1955
18 (028-325-1) F 322 307 1952 C -18.18 -34.87 -24.35 -24.83 6.15 6.66
1960 1955
MANATEE COUNTY
92 (726-218-1) F 600 154 1941 B -37.10 -47.60 -49.12 -52.65 7.31 9.41
1947 1956
MARION COUNTY
5 (911-159-1) F 135 135 1933 C +13.62 +3.35 +11.20 +6.17 5.09 2.79 1960 1957
47 (902-156-1) F 179 --- 1936 B -13.84 -24.26 -16.29 -22.04 5.14 2.44
1960 1956
48 (859-150-1) F 152 --- 1936 B -1.07 -10.23 -0.82 -6.68 ---- 2.84
1959 1956
49 (910-138-1) F 175 --- 1936 B -25.0 -31.19 -25.77 -29.92 3.90 1.64
1942 1957
51 (910-210-1) F 106 --- 1935 B -26.04 -34.39 -28.44 -32.82 4.15 2.47
1960 1956




Water level above (+)or below (-) land surface S" (feet) Well .r A P, Prior to 1961 Highest vater, aximu
-levl InMayRemarks
e n ua mbray or June leveln y range : +" ei) 0 ) 1961 1962 1961 1962
1.- (year) (year)
MARTIN COUNTY
L40 S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +16.2 +19.1 +19.2 3.8 3.4 H 1957 1953
147 S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +4.2 +7.0 +2.9 4.8 6.3 M; P 1958 1957
928 S 11 10 1957 C +32.4 +29.0 +30.0 +28.4 2.7 5.9 H 1957 1959
933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.4 +20.8 +23.3 +21.1 3.7 3.5 M 1960 1960
NASSAU COUNTY
2 (035-127-2) F 580 350 1939 B +42.0 +21.6 +25.2 +20.8 6.6 4.6 P 1947 1957
8 (032-126-1) F 680 --- 1939 B +41.1 +24.9 +24.2 +20.6 4.3 4.2 P
1947 1959
12 (038-127-1) F 640 --- 1939 B +24.0 -17.23 -2.14 -12.64 18.92 15.62 P
1947 1955
27 (040-126-I) F --- --- 1939 B +10.1 -26.10 -17.12 -25.58 28.93 17.15 P
1946 1957
44 (037-136-1) F 1,000 450 1934 B +19.8 +3.3 +3.73 +0.26 6.11 4.04 P 1947 1957
50 (036-142-1) F 569 --- 1940 B +40.5 +22.4 +27.0 +22.1 3.9 6.5 P
1940 1956
51 (033-150-1) F 580 --- 1940 B +42.0 +26.3 +28.6 +26.2 3.4 1.9 P
1947W,8 1957
35 (037-130-1) F 540 504 1940 B +33.1 +8.5 +14.1 +9.3 9.7 10.0 P 1947 1957
OKALOOSA COUNTY
3 (024-636-1) F 800 500 1936 B +20.1 -47.67 -42.93 -70.26 25.19 43.30 P
1950 1957
(034-626-1) F 652 409 1947 B -93.3 -111.2 -115.0 ---- 7.3 ---- P
1948 1960
25 (038-631-1) F 609 456 1947 B -108.1 -121.9 -122.6 -124.8 2.2 3.1 P
1949 1959
27 (030-635-2) F 591 422 1948 B -27.9 -55.0 -60.7 65.2 6.4 13.2 P
1951 1959
29 (035-637-1) F 766 524 1947 B -102.3 -119.1 -121.7 -126.4 5.4 4.7 P
1948 1960
31 (037-645-1) F 690 527 1948 B -46.8 -62.6 -65.2 -66.5 2.2 2.4 P
1948 1960
34 (028-629-1) F --- --- 1947 B +26.6 +3.6 ---- -9.22 8.2 13.82 P
1950 1959




Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface o -. P rio to "1961 (feet) cc a 0
a Prior to 1961 Highest water. Maxi Wellnumb~r U aRemarks Well number May0or June level in May range Remarks . - a May orJunen
445 44 oa. W
.m ma igh Low
( 2 ) (year) 1961 196 1961 1962
OKEECHOBEE COUNTY
2 S 21 18 1949 C +46.7 +39.8 443.6 +39.1 4.0 8.9 M 1957 1949
3 S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.2 +58.5 3.6 4.7 M 1959 1950
ORANGE COUNTY
47 (832-128-1) F 350 328 1930 C -1.50 -10.97 -4.56 -12.25 10.44 6.94
1948 1956
47B (832-128-3) S 17 17 1948 B +3.04 -8.98 -1.11 -10.01 12.07 4.18
1960 1956
47C (832-128-4) S 50 46 1948 B -27.47 -39.35 -30.44 -36.40 9.98 2.66
1960 1953
832-105-1 F 492 151 1960 M ---- ---- -26.51 -28.33 3.44 4.55
OSCEOLA COUNTY
171 S 19 12 1950 C +32.1 +28.0 +30.9 +29.9 3.4 4.4 M 1957 1956
179 S 18 18 1949 C 447.1 +43.3 +44.8 +44.1 4.1 4.5 H 1960 1950
181 S 15 14 1948 C +77.9 +72.4 +73.8 +72.2 3.1 3.7 M 1957 1956
182 S 23 16 1949 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.9 +57.5 3.8 4.7 M 1957 1950
183 S 27 22 1948 C +73.2 +68.3 +70.9 +69.6 3.9 4.2 M 1957 1956
PALM BEACH COUNTY
88 B 17 16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +5.3 +4.5 4.1 5.1 M 1948 1956
99 B 18 16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 +6.6 +6.6 3.0 3.5 M 1957 1956
108 B 37 12 1950 C +17.0 +14.3 +16.3 +16.4 1.6 1.8 p 1957 1951
109 B 14 9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +18.0 ---- 2.9 3.8 H 1957 1956
110 B 8 8 1951 C -2.8 -5.6 -3.0 ---- 3.2 3.4 B
1957 1952
436 B 12 11 1956 C -2.10 -4.3 -3.1 -3.2 2.0 1.9 B 1957 1960




W- ater level above (+) or below ) land surface ,(feet) e arPrior to 1961 highest water Well number J level in a range Remarks "a 0.: a': Q: High Low I S(year) (year). 1961 1962 1961 1962
PASCO COUNTY
13 (813-226-1) F 49 43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1 -8.03 -8.92 3.17 4.41
1959 1945
326-211-t F 227 49 1959 C -9.97 -11.88 -16.93 -22.14 6.98 6.05
1960 1960
PINELLAS COUNTY
13 (808-245-1) F 14t 33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.89 -9.05 1.19 1.54
1948 1950
77 (304-243-1) F 282 --- 1947 C -64.41 -68.01 -65.70 -66.63 1.90 2.38
1959660 1949
i0> (Su3-246-1) F 230 25 1947 B -26.55 -27.57 -28.11 -29.53 2.11 2.86
1959 1960
66 (803-247-1) F 195 --- 1943 B -12.18 -18.34 -12.91 -15.20 5.88 6.76
1951 1953
246 (736-247-1) F 208 --- 1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -25.86 -26.42 2.00 2.26
1948 1956
561(750-230-1) F 188 --- 1947 C -1.53 -4.04 -2.90 -3.62 1.53 1.80
1948 1956
663 (7536-244-4) F 2. 81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -21.60 -22.38 2.33 3.24
1959 1955
667 (7359-243-1) F 843 --- 1954 C -53.32 -56.68 -54.49 -55.32 2.03 3.03
1959 1953
FOLK COUNTY
(610-136-1) F 195 81 1945 C -1.70 -4.85 -3.17 -5.34 2.76 2.23
1960 1956
43 (739-138-1) F 643 325 1948 C -63.65 -76.68 ---- -84.82 7.85 11.93 P
1948 1955
47 (310-136-2) S 67 60 1943 C +111.7 +107.3 +108.5 +107.1 3.5 1.5 M 1960 1956
48 (732-L31-1) S 62 59 1949 C +100.8 +96.2 +99.6 +97.3 3.2 1.6 M 1954 1956
49 (748-119-1) S 17 14 1949 C +104.7 +99.1 +101.0 +99.9 2.8 5.8 M 1957 1956
51 (744-131-1) H 319 208 1949 C -5.08 -14.20 -10.10 -14.56 8.73 10.15
1958 1955
733-158-311 F 710 237 1955 C -15.88 -28.60 -28.15 -37.04 10.96 13.02 P
1958 1956
802-132-1 F 463 137 1959 B --- ---- -7.65 ---- 0.94 1.97
805-155-2 F 311 82 1956 3 -15.16 -22.07 -21.59 -25.64 5.77 6.73
1959 1956
805-155-3 H 72 62 1955 B -12.52 -19.29 -17.86 -21.73 5.26 5.75
1959 1956
806-156-1 S 11 8* 1935 B -3.69 -7.82 -6.09 -8.86 2.82 1.91 *Screened from
1959 1956 8 to 11 feet
806-156-2 a 103 63 1956 B -16.89 -22.73 -24.22 -29.66 8.25 9.71
1959 1956




S Va ter -level above (+) or. below (-) land surface
- .. .- (feet)
n...er. ... :.w -Prior to 1961 Highest water V cm Well number 11. .g. h estwrk e lo level in May range .0 '- --. -a v ,May orJune, AU 4j a Oa 40
n om a.. .u a^m;Hg o
-1-- '( e a) ( 1961 1962 1961 1962
PUTNAM COUNTY
28 (925-138-1) F 159 --- 1936 B -6.2 -9.14 -7.27 -9.81 2.39 1.64
1944 1956
29 (939-138-1) F 300 --- 1936 B +10.8 +4.47 +5.19 +2.02 2.80 3.24
1936&47 1956
937-153-1 F 300 --- 1934 B -30.30 -35.65 -29.51 -31.81 1.21 3,68
1959 1957
939-134-11 F 547 113 1958 B +4.26 +3.21 +2.55 -1.75 4.35 3.60 1959 1960
943-152-1 H 124 --- 1956 B -44.91 -46.66 -43.20 -44.96 1.64 1.40
1958 1957
ST. JOHNS COUNTY
5 (007-123-1) F 350 180 1934 B +43.9 +36.7 +39.6 +35.0 3.9 5.3 1951 1957
8 (005-129-1) F 336 240 1934 B +36.5 +23.7 +26.4 +23.3 3.7 4.6 1947 1957
9 (953-118-1) F 1,400 170 1930 B +34.2 +22.5 +23.3 +19.5 4.0 3.8 1947 1956&57
000-123-2 F 258 --- 1957 B +4.72 +2.64 ---- -0.57 4.44 3.24
1959 1957
937-122-1 F 622 142 1958 C -17.30 -18.70 -18.80 -21.49 2.96 3.30
1959 1960
941-129-7 F- 541 --- 1955 B +10.1 +7.39 +6.7 +1.52 8.83 6.883 P
1959 1957
947-126-1 F 275 --- 1956 B -1.55 -6.1 -6.21 -10.86 15.13 6.81 P
1958 1956
ST. LUCIE COUNTY
41 S 17 13 1950 C +28.2 +25.2 +27.4 +26.7 2.5 3.4 M 1957 1956
42 S 18 13 1950 C +26.9 +24.1 +25.0 +24.6 3.0 4.7 M 1951 1955
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
10 (032-648-1) G 197 140 1947 B -80.1 -91.3 -85.7 -88.3 0.9 2.1
1948 1957
102 (021-709-8) S 41 31* 1950 C -4.43 -9.52 -5.40 -6.79 2.32 3.09 *Screened from
1960 1955 31 to 41 feet 035-706-1 G 211 206* 1959 M -82.94 -85.77 -82.84 -83.62 1.59 4.55 *Screened from
1960 1959 206 to 211 feet 040-708-1 G 128 123* 1959 M ---- ---- +4.83 +3.78 1.87 3.01 *Screened from
123 to 128 feet;
44.46 feet only
May measurement
prior to 1961
041-649-1 G 98 93* 1959 B -56.34 -56.54 -59.35 -56.39 4.41 2.66 *Screened from
1960 1960 93 to 98 feet




Water level above (+) or below () land surface
el n r Prior to 1961 lighest water Remarke ci- fet
S. 0 0 C- Myo ue level rae a a U LOW 1961 1962 19"61 1962
-T A je (year) (year)
SARASOTA COUNTY
9 (719-225-1) 7 730 101 1930 C +4.51 -5.60 -6.00 -7.98 6.71 7.77
1931 1956 SEMINOLE COUNTY 125 (841-122-1) F 158 74 1951 C -34.18 -41.33 -37.86 -41.77 5.06 3.89
1960 1956
257 (847-113-6) F 206 --- 1951 B +5.10 +1.40 +2.66 +40.27 3.50 3.06
1953 1956
SUMTER COUNTY 852-201-1 F 125 45 1961 B ---- ---- ---- ---- 4.06 0.75
SWANNnE COUNTY 019-249-1 F 138 135 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -33.02 2.30 3.14
TAYLOR COUNTY 35 (003-330-1) F 245 189 1946 C -1.00 -28.6 -23.8 -29.1 16.3 13.5
1949 1957 36 (004-331-1) S 35 --- 1947 C -5.10 -23.95 -10.68 -15.04 6.97 1.89
1948 1957
UNION COUNTY 001-224-1 F 256 198 1959 B ---- ---- -89.54 -92.57 2.21 1.82
007-222-1 F 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -88.45 -88.56 -91.89 3.04 2.02
1959 1960
VOLUSIA COUNTY 29 (911-125-1) F 107 --- 1936 B -11.86 -18.54 -16.93 -18.57 1.73 1.76
1951 1956
30 (917-128-1) F 180 --- 1936 B +11.2 +6.7 +9.6 +8.2 3.4 1.8
1959 1948
31 (856-105-1) F 113 --- 1936 C -4.72 -7.9 -6.33 -7.8 2.99 3.96
1953 1945 32 (919-125-1) F 138 --- 1936 B -1.2 -4.51 -3.32 -4.94 1.48 2.39
1937 &38 1956 905-113-3 F 351 93 1955 C -0.22 -3.66 -1.66 -2.72 2.86 3.78
1958 1956
909-106-1 F 235 102 1955 B -5.25 -5.87 -7.07 -8.86 2.18 3.41
1959 1955
909-106-4 F 234 102 1955 C -4.95 -7.56 -6.78 -8.95 3.55 5.25
1958 1960 909-106-9 F 496 480 1955 B -6.62 -7.18 -8.17 -9.81 2.01 2.58
1958 1960
910-105-1 F 220 152 1955 C -12.84 -16.65 -14.71 -17.27 5.40 7.61
1958 1960
911-104-4 F 235 115 1955 3 -15.72 -20.81 -22.97 -23.21 7.08 5.58
1955 1958
911-104-9 F 500 483 1955 3 -10.26 -12.63 -12.07 -13.82 2.31 2.49
1958 1956




r Water level above (+) or below--(-) land surface (feet) Wl -+.ea 0>v Prior to 1961 Highest water Maxhm rk
Well number M ay or June level in May range
0 0 W wa
o.0 o.6 U 0 0 High Low 1 1 S( ) (y 1961 1962 1961 1962
WAKULLA COUNTY
2 (009-412,-1) F 65 22 1937 B -0.86 -3.05 -2.27 -2.03 1.84 1.23 T
1958 1951
11 (000-426-1) F 70 45 1946 B -5.58 -8.25 -7.31 -6.70 1.22 2.58
1955 1960
005-417-1 F 87 --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- -2.43 2.36 2.03
011-410-1 F 80 --- 1961 B -- ---- ---- -1.87 1.45 0.83
WALTON COUNTY
13 (022-606-1) F 450 --- 1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +11.4 +11.2 1.1 1.7
1950 1956
17 (029-607-2) F 187 --- 1947 B +30.7 +25.4 +25.9 ---- 1.6 1.5
1948 1957
019-610-1 F 615 188. 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +12.5 0.3 1.0
023-610-1 F --- --- 1961 B ---- ---- ---- +14.3 0.8 0.6
029-614-1 F 160 --- 1961 B --- ---- ---- +20.5 0.9 1.0
043-612-1 F 509 323 1961 B ------ ---- -148.2 1.9 4.6
WABHUGTON COUNTY
4 (046-548-1) F 785 --- 1935 B -9.47 -15.09 -12.06 -12.26 6.66 6.73
1953 1954
037-542-2 F 206 202 1961 B ----- ---- -19.65 1.37 4.83




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STATE OF FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION DIVISION OF GEOLOGY FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Robert O. Vernon, Director INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1961-62 By Henry G. Healy Prepared by the UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY in cooperation with the FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY AND OTHER STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES TALLAHASSEE 1966

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Completed manuscript received October 25, 1965 Printed by the Florida Geological Survey (116) Tallahassee 1966 ii

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CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................. ........... ...... .1 Well-numbering system .......................................... 4 Principal aquifers .............................................. 5 Northwestern Florida .................. ........................ .8 Pensacola area............................................... 8 Ft. Walton area ......... ................... .............. 11 Panama City area............................................... 15 Northern and North-Central Florida ............................... 15 Tallahassee area ............................................. 15 Fernandina-Jacksonville area .................................. 20 Central Florida ................................................ 21 Tampa-St.. Petersburg area .................................... 26 Lakeland area .............................................. 29 Orlando area.................................. ................ 36 Cape Kennedy area ........................................... .37 Sarasota-Bradenton area ...................................... 39 Southern Florida ............................................... 39 Ft. Myers area ........................................ ..... .40 Stuart-West Palm Beach area .................................. 42 Ft. Lauderdale area ......................................... 44 Miami area .................................................. 49 Appendix ................................................... ... 53 ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1 Map showing observation-well network, December 1962, and the extent of principal aquifers and sources of ground-water supplies in Florida ..................................... 3 2 Diagram of explanation of well-numbering system ............ 6 3 Map showing piezometric surface and areas of flow of the. Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961 ............... .7 4 Map showing locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given ..................... 8 5 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, F lorida ............................................... .9 6 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Escambia 45, 46, and 62, Pensacola area .......... 10 7 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1960-62 ....................... 11 8 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area....... 12 iii

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9 Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton area, May 1951 to May .1960 ................ .13 10 Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1960 to May 1962 ............... 14 11 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida .. 16 12 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama City, and Washington 4 at Caryville ....................... 17 13 Map showing locations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given ....... 18 14 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Tallahassee, Florida ..................................... ........... 19 15 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tallahassee, 1960-62 ................................................ .21 16 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Leon 7 at Tallahassee, Madison 18 near Madison, Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida .............. ............................... ..22 17 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville, Florida ............................................... 23 18 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida ...................... ... ............ 24 19 Maps showing net change of ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1960 to May 1962 ................................................... 25 20 Map showing locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given ......................... 26 21 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehrin and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area ....................... .................... 27 22 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tampa, 1960-62 ........................ 28 23 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater .................. 29 24 Graphs showing changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area ... 30 25 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida ......................... ..... .................. 31 26 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Lakeland, 1960-62 ........................ 32 27 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area ... .... ........ ............... 33 28 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring .............. ............... 34 iv

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29 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley ................................... 35 30 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Orlando, 1960-62 ........... 36 31 Hydrograph showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47, near Orlando ......................... 37 32 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida ...... 38 33 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area. 40 34 Map showing locations of wells in southern Florida for which hydrographs are given .................................. 41 35 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1960-62 ............... 42 36 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier C54 and 131 Everglades, and Martin 147 near Stuart, Florida ................ 43 37 Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida.. 44 38 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1960-62 ................ 45 39 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 near West Palm Beach, Broward G561 and G617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G553 near Miami ... 46 40 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F291 at Hollywood, Dade S18 near Miami, Dade S196A near Redland, Dade F179 at Miami, and Broward 8329 near Ft. Lauderdale ............................... 47 41 Graph showing changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward G514 and S830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F296 and F64 near Miami .......................... .......... 48 42 Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S196A, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Homestead Experimental Station, 1960-62 ........ 49 43 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S19 and G10 near Miami, and Dade G72 northwest of Opalocka ......... ............................. 50 44 Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G596, G618, G613, and G620 in central Dade County ................................. .............. .51 45 Graphs showing changes in chloride content of water in wells Dade G354 and G580 near Miami and Dade G469, S529, and G212 in southeastern Dade County ....................... 52 .able 1 Well and water-level data for selected observation wells in Florida .................. ............................. 53

PAGE 6

ERRATA Florida Geological Survey Information Circular 48 "Water levels in artesian and nonartesian aquifers of Florida, 1961-62" Pave iv -Figure 21 -Ehren not Ehrin Page 5 -Paragraph 3, line 5, Broward not Brevard Page 11 -Paragraph 1, line 4, 10 million not 100 million Page 11 -Paragraph 2, line 3, 98 feet not 58 feet Page 11 -Paragraph 2, line 12 (p. 17) not (p. 19) Page 15 -Paragraph 4, line 7, 77 feet not 76 feet Page 20 -Paragraph 2, line 6, 1945-62 not 1946-62 Page 20 -Paragraph 6, line 4, 15 feet not 16 feet Page 20 -Paragraph 6, line 6, 13 feet not 14 feet Page 25 -Figure 19: Left figure: May 1951-May 1960 Right figure: May 1960-May 1962 Page 27 -Paragraph 1, line 4, Ehren not Ehrin Page 30 -Paragraph 1, line 3, 65000 million gallons Page 31 -Paragraph 3, line 9, Highlands 13 (fig. 29) Page 37 -Paragraph 1, line 4, maximum fluctuation of about 22 feet Page 39 -Paragraph 1, line 1, three not four Page 39 -Paragraph 4, line 3: 0.3 foot Page 39 -Paragraph 5, line 3: shown on page 41 Page 49 -Paragraph 3, line 3, at Redland .' :I

PAGE 7

WATER LEVELS IN ARTESIAN AND NONARTESIAN AQUIFERS OF FLORIDA, 1961-62 By Henry G. Healy INTRODUCTION The purpose of this report is to summarize the trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the principal aquifers in Florida during 1961-62. The report includes the following: (1) hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the several aquifers used as a source of water; (2) maps showing changes in ground-water levels during specific periods; and, (3) a table summarizing the principal data on selected observation wells. Observation wells for which records are available are listed in the "Index to Water Resources Data-Collection Stations in Florida, 1961" Florida Geological Survey Special Publication No. 11. The index, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey includes the location, aquifer, and type and period of records available for 3,629 observation wells. Since World War II, and particularly during the last decade, the demand for fresh water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural use in Florida has increased yearly. Although ground-water supplies have been adequate for the increased demand in most areas in Florida, water levels have declined appreciably in some areas where industrial and municipal use of ground water has increased. The supply of ground water is limited though generally adequate. Because demand for ground water continues to increase, shortages will occur and may become critical in some areas. In coastal areas, declining water levels may allow salt water to encroach and shortages could result from deterioration in quality as well as from the reduction of quantity of water available. In order to prevent future shortages, the present supplies of ground water must be properly appraised and utilized. Records of trends and fluctuations of ground water have long formed a basis for the appraisal of ground-water resources. The principal objective of the investigations of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey is to appraise and to evaluate the Nation's water resources. Although many types of ground-water investigations are carried out on State-wide basis

PAGE 8

2 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY throughout the Nation, the collection and compilation of basic hydrologic data constitute an important part of the water resources studies. Other principal objectives of the hydrologic data program include: the evaluation of available ground-water supplies; the prediction of trends of important ground-water supplies in the future and the delineation of present or potential areas of detrimentally high or low ground-water levels. Water levels are used to predict the base flow of streams, to determine the several forces that act on a water-bearing formation or aquifer, to demonstrate the interplay of those forces in the ground-water environment and to furnish information for use in basic research. The hydrologic data program is an important adjunct of the several types of geologic and hydrologic methods of study used in waterresources investigations. The hydrologic data-collection program of the U.S. Geological Survey is part of the cooperative investigations of the groundwater resources of Florida, in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey and other state and local agencies and municipalities. The observation-well network in 1962 included about 1,000 observation wells in the 67 counties of the Stale. Figure 1 shows the locations of the observation wells in the Stale-wide network. Table 1 lists data on 335 observation wells selected from the State-wide network of wells. The water-level data used in this report represent measurements taken from automatic water-stage recorder charts, pressure gages, and those made by wet tape. In general, water-level measurements made by tape and stage recorder are shown to the nearest hundredth of a foot, and those made with a pressure gage are shown to the nearest tenth of a foot. Table 1 summarizes well-data and water-level information for the several aquifers. Well data include the aquifer, depth of well, and depth of casing. The items: "Year record began" and "Frequency of measurements" are included as part of the well data. In the water-level portion of the table, levels for May or June are used because records are availafle for these months for a large percentage of the wells. Also, ground-water levels generally are lowest during May or June in many areas and records during that period constitute a base for comparison from year to year. The highest and lowest levels of record for May or June prior to 1961 are given in the table.

PAGE 9

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 3 I " 1 86" S4 1 83* 3 I 1. cvl ./° 30. Observation welanumber E. Flo idan\ / . i'dicates number of wells ^>? / t~j-.,.% t l?'.*.^ Sond-ond-grovel ." " *t* .. ./7, SFlorido n "" -",'i / -27 Floridon and/or others : l. '' ,,^ / #'p * * /.' * » *'l " a, B liscayne " . -Approximate oquifer boundary ; ' -7* * " i -28_ So' -q*/*, ..'-. 0 50v040Mo25u -----, I__ , " -I 84N 83* 82* 88* _ 0 aBo tilon trom 1933 edilion of ap of Fiorida by US. Gologlicat Surey Figure 1. Map showing observation-well network, December 1962, and the extent of principal aquifers and sources of ground-water supplies in Florida.

PAGE 10

4 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY The hydrologic data program consists of the collection, tabulation, interpretation, evaluation, and publication of waterlevel and related data. Water levels for selected wells are published, at present, once every five years in the U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Information pertinent to ground water is also published in interpretative reports of investigations published by the Flori'da Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey. Data collected during an investigation and subsequent to that published are available from the District Chief, U. S. Geological Survey, P. O. Box 2315, Tallahassee, Florida 32304. WELL-NUMBERING SYSTEM Two well-numbering systems are used in this report. Observation wells in Florida may be numbered serially by counties and/or by a grid-coordinate system based on latitude and longitude of the well location. Frequently, where wells have been renumbered both numbers have been assigned to the well e.g. a well number may be shown as 20(008-537-2). This affords a tie-in with water-level data published previously under well number 20 in Bay County with data that may be published for the same well under number 008-537-2. Some wells used in table 1 have numbers with a letter prefix or suffix. In Broward and Dade counties, the letter prefixes G, S, F, and NP denote Geological Survey wells, supply wells, fire wells, and National Park Service wells, respectively. In Dade, Escambia, Highlands, Holmes, and Leon counties, the letter suffix A denotes a shallow well near a deeper well having the corresponding number without the letter suffix. In Orange County, the letter suffixes B and C denote wells drilled in the vicinity of well 47. The grid-coordinate well-numbering system in Florida is derived from latitude and longitude coordinates. The latitude and longitude prefix north and west and the first digit of the degree number are not included in the well number. The well number is a composite of three numbers separated by hyphens: the first number is composed of the last digit of the degree and the two digits of the minute that define the latitude on

PAGE 11

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 5 the south side of the 1-minute quadrangle; the second number is composed of the last digit of the degree and two digits of the minutes that define the longitude on the east side of a 1-minute quadrangle; and, the third number gives the numerical order in which the well was inventoried in the 1-minute quadrangle. For example, well number 835-105-1 is the first well inventoried in the 1-minute quadrangle north of the 28035' parallel of latitude and west of the 81005' meridian of longitude. The location of well 835-105-1 is shown diagrammatically in figure 2. PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS Ground-water supplies for industrial, agricultural, and municipal use in Florida are available from three principal aquifers: The Floridan aquifer in central and northern Florida; the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida; and, the sand-and-gravel aquifer in the extreme northwestern part of Florida. The generalized areal extent of the aquifers supplying most of the ground-water is shown in figure 1. The Floridan aquifer, which underlies all of the State, is the principal source of water in central, northern, and most of northwestern Florida, as shown in figure 3. Highly mineralized water precludes the usefulness of the Floridan aquifer as a source of potable water in some coastal areas and in most of southern Florida. In those areas, shallow artesian and nonartesian aquifers are the source of supply. The Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida is the chief source of water supply for industries, municipalities, and irrigation. This aquifer, one of the most highly productive of the shallow nonartesian aquifers in the world, underlies about 3,500 square miles of Brevard, Dade, and Palm Beach counties. The usefulness of the Biscayne aquifer is sharply restricted in areas adjacent to the coast because of the presence of saline waters. The sand-and-gravel aquifer in extreme northwestern Florida is the principal source of water supply, yielding large supplies of ground water for industries and municipalities. The aquifer extends beneath all of Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and part of western Okaloosa County. This report of ground-water conditions has been divided into four parts as follows: (1) Northwestern Florida, (2) northern,

PAGE 12

6 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY I1 i L Volusia Coa 29000' ILokake C. --\ 28o301 --JI Orange Co. 24L Osceolo Co. S,, 2800 ' 81030' 81'00d 28*25' 8110" 80055' 28037' 36' 35' 28*34' 8;108' 07' 06' 5' 81o04' 835 -. 105"-Figure 2. Diagram of explanation of well-numbering system. northeastern, and north-central Florida; (3) central Florida; and, (4) southern and southeastern coastal Florida.

PAGE 13

INFORMATIONe CIRCULAR NO. 48 7 87* 86" 85° 84' 83" ,Vto 31' •29 -t 267' 'EXPLANATION tq Contour represents thie Iight, in feet arefred to men sea , level, to which woare would have risen in tightly casied Swells that penetrate the majorw wotr-bIaring foamianst« in the Floridam aquifer, July 6-17, 1961. Contour interval 10 and 20 feet, changing oat mean so leveIl. y 25* a Areaof onreio flow Extent and distrlbution of flow areas vary with fluctuatians of the plezMortric surfac, particularly in areas of heay nt5 pumping. Relatively small areas of artesiman flow are not -41included imwediaely djoerinfe to and paromllling th ' coast and any of the moalor rivers and springs. i 0 10 20 30 40 50 miles S Token from Map Series No.4 by H.G. Haly, 196).' S .84° 83 " .82°" 81° 80° Figure 3. Map showing piezometric surface and areas of flow of the Floridan aquifer, in Florida, July 6-17, 1961.

PAGE 14

S FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY NORTHWESTERN FLORIDA Northwestern Florida as used here includes the Panhandle area extending from the Apalachicola River westward to the Florida-Alabama line, as shown in figure 4. L A B A M . I. --.-T -.--------/ r H O L M E S --, AC K S O N 0 *1 -SaTA ROsA OKALOOSA *"31 A L T O N / * WASHINGTON ' GULF OF MEXI CO Figure 4. Map showing locations of observation wells in northwestern Florida for which hydrographs are given. The principal sources of ground water supply in the section are the sand-and-gravel aquifer in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties and the Floridan aquifer in the rest of the area. Minor supplies of ground water are obtained from shallow nonartesian aquifers. The Florida Panhandle includes three rapidly growing areas of industry and population: the Pensacola area, the Ft. Walton Beach area, and the Panama City area. Pensacola Area The Pensacola area includes Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. This area, like many others in the State, is undergoing rapid economic development. Industrial and municipal water use are increasing. Pumpage in the Pensacola area in 1962 was about five times that in 1940. Figure 5 shows pumpage for the City of Pensacola 1933-62.

PAGE 15

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 9 Iooo -00 Figure 5. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Pensacola, 3,000 Florida. The observation-well program in the Pensacola area began Florida. in 1939. As part of the investigation to determine the adequacy and permanency of ground-water supply in Escambia County, the present program includes wells in the artesian and nonartesian parts of the sand-and-gravel aquifer. Figure 4 shows locations of the observation wells selected from the hydrologic data network for which hydrographs are given in this report, and table 1 presents data on 13 wells in Escambia County. Figure 6 shows fluctuations and long-term trends of water levels at Pensacola from 1940 through 1962. Comparison of the hydrographs of the three wells reveals that while water levels at the end of 1962 declined inland in the Pensacola area, the water level near the coast was above the 1940 level. Declines of artesian water levels in the sand-andgravel aquifer ranged from a maximum of 32 feet in well Escambia 45 to a minimum of 15 feet in well Escambia 46 in the period 194062. In the coastal area, at Pensacola, the artesian water level in well Escambia 62, at the end of 1962, was about 3 feet above the 1940 level. The trends and fluctuations of artesian ground-

PAGE 16

10 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ESCAMIBA 45 DEPTH 152 FT. CASED 152 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) 70 ---------72 tf ^-i--------------------------zaGt-------------------------------74 z 98 -l-------------------------76 go .8100 -104-----------------------------aIO9------------^-----------------------rom S108 lID0------------------------------1102------__--------------------------------------------------114 -Water level is affected by pumping of nearby wells 1 16 ESCAM1A 46 DEPTH 239 FT. CASED 239 FT. SAND-AND-GRAVEL AQUIFER (ARTESIAN) D60 -----56| ------------------\--------------------------------664 ' 70 -----------------'a4^ -----------------r-------------0 6676 § 6a------------------\---.----------'52---------------------------p ----7-----------_s ----------------------D 58 ----------------------------------------^------------------__ ^ 12-------------------------------1486---------------------------___ 82 -' 16 --------------------1-IIIIIII-----__a g--------------_ _ _ _ _ -[ Uu8687 'la I 16 W la82 V| v -S2 940 1945 ---1950 1955 190 1965 1970 197 wells Escambia 45, 46, and 62, Pensacola area. SCA940 D945 195 C 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975(ARTESIAN) 190 t95 190 195 160 165 170 17 Fiue6 yrgapssoigted adfutain O ae eesi wel saba4,4,an 2 escl ra

PAGE 17

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 11 water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly average rainfall at Pensacola, 1960-62 are shown in figure 7. JFMAMJJASONDJ FMAMJ JASONDJFMUMJJA SONDJFJMAJJASOJNDJFUAMJ J ASO ND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 JFMAMJJAS ONDIJ MAMJJASODJFMA MJJaSONDJ F tAM JJAS oNDJF MMJJA ND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 Figure 7. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Escambia 62 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Pensacola, 1960-62. Ft. Walton Area The Ft. Walton area includes the Ft. Walton Beach area and Eglin Air Force Base at Niceville. The rate of growth of industry and population is accelerating. Pumpage from the Floridan aquifer for all uses is about 100 million gallons per day. As a result of continuing heavy pumping, water levels have declined in about a 640 square-mile area. The hydrograph of well Okaloosa 3 at Ft. Walton Beach, as shown in figure 8, shows a maximum decline from highest water level in 1947 to the lowest level in 1962 of about 58 feet from 1947-62. In August 1936, the artesian water level was 46 feet above land-surface datum. During the period from August 1936 to July 1962, the water level in well Okaloosa 3 declined 124 feet, from 46 feet above land surface to 78 feet below land surface. The areal extent of the decline in artesian levels in the vicinity of Ft. Walton Beach is shown by the net change of water levels map, figures 9 and 10. The hydrograph of well Walton 13 at Point Washington, about 30 miles east of Ft. Walton Beach, shows the trend of decline in water levels during 1947-62 (p. 19).

PAGE 18

12 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OKALOOSA 3 DEPTH 800 FT. CASED 08 FT. FLORIDAN .AQUIFER +24 -4 W" " | | | | I I I I I 4 -1 --il 11 11 1 ,,, S.162--------JL-------------------------Z68 ----------------^ -----------------iL-'-a1 7 ---------------------t Wate level is affected by regional pumping 4 8-I I I I I I I I I I I _ _ _ _ _ _ 84 wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area. 64 :>< 68 :!r 84 lt level isaffected by regional pumping 1945 &W 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Fi-ure 8. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Okaloosa 3, 25, and 31, Ft. Walton Beach area.

PAGE 19

A L A B A M A r--F ,--L 0 IR I DA ?ESCAMBIA , SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON ' A Net change of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer I .---12 Not change of ground-water levels n' the sand-andgravel aquifer 5 0 asI J 4 Observation well number 23 PENSAOLAC 4 02 20 E0 0 40 0 27 < SCALE MILES Figure 9, Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensaoola and Ft. Walton area, May 1951 to May 1960.

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A L A B A M A F L 0 1 R I A ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA OKALOOSA WALTON ( I I | (X, PENSACa.A ci 0 5 10 20 30 40 SCALE MILES Figure 10. Map showing net change of ground-water levels, Pensacola and Ft. Walton areas, May 1960 to May 1962.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 15 Panama City Area The Panama City area includes 250 square miles in Bay County, including Tyndall Air Force Base. The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the water for municipal industrial, and military needs in the area. Figure 11 shows total pumpage from the Panama City well fields at St. Andrews and Millville for the period 1944-62. Additional industrial supplies for the pulp industry are obtained from the nonartesian aquifer; however, the amount is minor compared to that obtained from the Floridan aquifer. Ground-water supplies for municipal, industrial, and military use have increased considerably since the end of World War II. Panama City municipal supply increased from about 870 mgy (million gallons per year) in 1944 to about 1,200 mgy in 1962. The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels at Panama City are shown by the hydrograph of well Bay 7, shown in figure 12. The decline of water level in well Bay 7 represents the maximum known decline in the area and is caused by pumping in near-by wells. In August 1936, the water level in well Bay 7 was about 36 feet below land surface, while in June 1962, it was about 76 feet below land surface or a decline of 41 feet for the period 1936-62. NORTHERN AND NORTH-CENTRAL FLORIDA Northern and north-central Florida as used in this report extends from the Apalachicola River eastward to the Atlantic Ocean, as shown in figure 13, and includes 24 counties and parts of Levy, Marion, and Volusia counties. The Floridan aquifer is the principal source of ground-water supply except in areas along the coast in central and eastern St. Johns, Flagler, and Volusia counties where the principal source of water is a shallow, nonartesian, sand-and-shell aquifer. Tallahassee Area Pumpage in the Tallahassee area in 1962 was three times that of 1945, increasing at an average rate of 108 mgy. Figure 14 shows pumpage for the City of Tallahassee during 1933-62.

PAGE 22

" --.I I. ""I .., , , ., 1,400 (I 1,300 o 0 J 0 1 .1100 Figure 11. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, Panama City, Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 17 WALTON 13 DEPTH 450 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 26 24 iu 22 < 20 -W S4----12 Of 8 --I1-J I I r ---------w,> 10 6 < Water level is affected by regional pumping 6 -I I I I I I I I I I I I I BAY 7 DEPTH 253 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 36 38 38 6-------------------------40---------------42 42 -----------------------------------44 46 48 IV-, 50-S52 -54 .56 -58 S60 S62 e64 -----6 66 z 68 -70 8J74 S76---------78 80 ~84------------I-----------------82 84 86 88 Water level is affected by pumping of nearby wells 90 " -! 1 9zb I I I±I± IIL IzILI I i I WASHINGTON 4 DEPTH 785 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER o S4 ---6 < 18 0 10 I" Ii S2---------------------^-----------------, 22 S 24 1 26 S28 26 --J------1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 12. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Walton 13 at Point Washington, Bay 7 at Panama C.ity, and Washington 4 at Caryville.

PAGE 24

ALA SE O R G I A -1, N A 8 8 A U ' L E 0 N MA D I 0 N H A M I N u " JE FE SONn t , / 164 /nLIBERTY I.a F.ori--a--ow.c h d o/ jau r i I J-' A MULL A SUWNE N I 01 I SW *T ANN COLUMBIA I r-A LAFAVE;TT\^ U N 1 0 NC L A Y C6 ST. OH N GULF OF MEXICO M ' --.. .--.d.1. FLAGLER L E V Y L, Figure 138. Map showing lboations of observation wells in northern and north-central Florida for which hydrographs are given.

PAGE 25

3,00. 3,Z 00-~ ___________ SIt 0 0 0 o __ ___ _ _____ 5 SO IO_____ 00 o! o2 0 20 0 g z -0 Figure 14. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Tallahassee, Florida.

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20 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY The observation-well program in the Tallahassee area began in 1936 and currently includes seven observation wells. Fluctuations of water levels in the Floridan aquifer at Tallahassee are shown by the hydrograph, figure 15, of well Leon 7, which shows a downward trend for 1960-62. The graph shows characteristic seasonal trends with high levels in the spring and low levels in the fall. Figure 16 shows water levels in well Leon 7 for the period 1946-62. Fernandina-Jacksonville Area The Fernandina-Jacksonville area is one of the largest industrialized areas in the State, with water use increasing as a result of the rapid economic expansion. Figure 17 shows total yearly municipal pumpage for Jacksonville from 1921-62. The observation-well program in the area began in 1930 and has gradually expanded and currently includes 29 observation wells. Ground-water levels in the Fernandina-Jacksonville area have been declining for a considerable period of time. Trends .and seasonal fluctuations of the water levels in the Floridan aquifer at Jacksonville are shown for well Duval 122 and for well Duval 164 near Mayport. Hydrographs of wells in the Floridan aquifer in Nassau and Duval counties are shown in figure 16 and 18. The maximum decline of water levels in the Fernandina area occurred in the coastal area in well Nassau 12 (fig. 16), where water levels declined 44 feet from 28 feet above mean sea level to 16 feet below mean sea level during the period 1946-62. However, water levels in well Nassau 51, approximately 20 miles inland, declined only about 14 feet during the same period. Water levels in well Duval 122 at Jacksonville declined about 17 feet from 1930 to 1962, while along the coastal areas in Duval County water levels generally declined about 10 feet. These declines are part of the broad regional decline of water levels as may be seen in figure 19, which shows the net change of groundwater levels in several counties.

PAGE 27

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 21 165 5 156V" " " LEON z '" ----" I-----1-60 -62 JFMAMJ JASONDJ FMAMJ JASONDJ FMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJ JA SOND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 S I Normol monthly M2 I r c -4-JFMAMJ JASOND FMAMJ J ASONDIJ FMAMJ JAS ONDJFMAMJJ ASOND'JFMAMJ JASOND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 Figure 15. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Tallahassee, 1960-62. CENTRAL FLORIDA Central Florida includes 17 counties and covers about 18,000 square miles. The extent of this Section and location of observation wells for which hydrographs are given are shown in figure 20. The principal source of ground-water supply in western coastal and central peninsular Florida is the Floridan aquifer, while in the eastern coastal area the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of water supply.

PAGE 28

22 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LEON 7 DEPTH 314 FT. CASED 165 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 149 t 52 _' 155 S158 L161 >z 164 < d i ' -Water level is affected by pumping of nearby wells 1776 -: I II I I I I I I I I I I 1 MADISON 18 DEPTH 322 FT. CASED 307 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 4-1-2_ 35 ---_-----q-----------I------26 4 94 !02 COLSSAUIA 9 DEPTH 640 FT. CASED 680 FLORIDAN AQUIFER gg^ _ _-----»----i^ -^ ^--* ---M -----69-----------275>21-------------------------------------------------------------24 ---L iI \ !0515 9-3-NAS0 195 D96 66 F F-A -----.27 -12 .-93-^ 96 SSColum 12 neDE FeLORIDAN AQUIFR id -2-4 -U -27 . z -15 ---------------J.^ c -_ ------------«rte o _ _ _ _ _ _ .-------^ ------------------19 4 _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _V 1-6-------------Columbia 9 at Lake City, and Nassau 12 near Fernandina, Florida.

PAGE 29

14,00 12,000 _________________________ (zLzn 9 -J I 20,00 0// /2, 0 2... _______ §_Z Figure 17. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Jacksonville, Wo Florida.

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24 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SNSSAU 51 DEPTH 580 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 42 4 ---38--------------------------34-S------32 5 32------------------^--=L--------1 30 W 28 326 24 22--------------------------DUVAL 122 DEPTH 905 FT. CASED 571 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 45 S43 4 -------------------_--__---LU ) > ,z 35 -? 33 25 -----25-7 --------------------------^ ---23-----------------23 -I 1 II I I I II I I UV AL 164 DEPTH 840 FT. CASED 450 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 43 LU!Z 4 33 -------------------27 > l \I. 5 DEPTH 135 FT. CASED 135 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER u8 t,__-_ _ .LVvi_ Z T 1 2 S14 -g 32-f-----------Z-__ ___ __ 1930 1935 940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 18. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Nassau 51 at Callahan, Duval 122 at Jacksonville, Duval 164 near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida. U. 10 UTNAM 29 DEPTH 300 FT. -I AQUFE R---4llo2:::^:::::::^-^^ ^ ;^::::^^::: W ^ 2 -_ _-_ near Mayport, Marion 5 near Ocala, and Putnam 29 at Palatka, Florida.

PAGE 31

N NASSAU 1 NASS U . / * DUA ," DU AL .so * *' Nt h f ,,und. e .14 CLA Y * L A Y / / b SKSONVILI D I--4o O R .0.i IN o EXPLANATION 2 -LL --A ,.e ,,, \ Figure 19. Maps sh g et change of ground-waterr l i th levelJacksonv In heFa loriaan aquftr. 1 1 to M 1 0 t M 1 I0)' \Contour Inervol 2 fI ll I / ) S CLAY C AY // Observation well number 021 I SST JOHNS ST JOHNS V/e /\\SCALE 0 0-/ i V s PUTNAM ego ]fiMILeS IJB PUTNAM *g 0 SFLAGLER n -o FLAGLER ego I14 ego \*H Figure 19. Maps showing net change of ground-water levels in the w Jacksonville and Fernandina areas, May 1951 to May 1960 to May 1962.

PAGE 32

2 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LS I J VOL U S I A< S" --.--i _ -! ......440 \\ N a I LLLSSOROUH 6 O 0S C EO L A -----: ......---, \45 ' 1 3 n.-) _.P 0 L K . 392, i ,._ [ o ,, 4 -! \0 LNi E SIDI AN RIVER A DaTEEEE i 0 K C O ! .S T LUCIE__ _ •L .S DSOTI I i E S OT 0 |," S A I NAS 0 T. A l---i! , _ -,--J ______.___ n__ Figure 20. Map showing locations of observation wells in central Florida for which hydrographs are given. Central Florida includes four rapidly growing centers of population and industry: the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, the Lakeland area, the Orlando-Cape Kennedy area, and the Sarasota-Bradenton -area. Tampa-St. Petersburg Area This area, particularly in the vicinity of Tampa and'St. Petersburg, is undergoing a rapid expansion in both industry and population. The observation-well program in this area began in 1930 with one well in Hillsborough County, and currently includes 30 observation wells in the Floridan aquifer.

PAGE 33

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 27 The long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area are shown in figure 21. The hydrographs show a similarity of water-level fluctuations in well Pasco 13 near Ehrin and well Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, during the period 1945 through 1962. Drought conditions and increased pumping during 1961-62 caused water levels to decline in well Hillsborough 13 to the lowest levels of record. Rainfall recorded at Tampa and the decline of water level in well Hillsborough 13 for the period 1960-62 is shown in figure 22. Water levels in two Pinellas County wells are shown in figure 23 and a slight downward trend from 1946 through 1956 can be noted for Pinellas 246. This downward trend was reversed during the latter part of 1956. PASCO 13 DEPTH 49 FT. CASED 43 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER I 4 0 ---------------------------------------_-2----------------------------------"' 6 8o 3 7 -l As, Vv4V---,cr 8 =U IO ----.l--------V --------------II 129 HILLSBOROUGH 13 DEPTH 347 FT. CASED 46 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 0--------------------.-------------------j2-------------------------------------------------------------, 3 § 4-------_-----------------------------------------------------C, 4------------------------~------7------, 13 -----------------------------------LLI .,,-1o V"--i----I_z -12 113 L 151 _ 130 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 213-.--------.>1----------__---------------------------------'1---------------------------------* I--------------,-------------------19---------------------------------------1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 21. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Pasco 13 near Ehrin and Hillsborough 13 near Citrus Park, Tampa area.

PAGE 34

28 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY .\ HILLSaOROUGH 13 FMaIJJASONDJFMAMJJASONCJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASOND 0 14 jF F'AAMJ J$A SONDIJ F MA MJ J A SOND J FMAMJ JiASO N D JF MAMJ JA SON D J FM A M J J A S O N D 960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1 = ~ I Figure 22. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tampa, 1960-62. The chloride contents of water from two wells in the Floridan aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 24. The chloride of well Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines ranged from 1,000 ppm (parts per million) to 2,200 ppm from 1957-62. The chloride content of |, FI MAM J j A S 0 ND! j FF MAM. J J A'S 0 N DIJ F M A M J J A S 0 N'D! J F .A M J J A'SON OIJ F M' M J J A S O'N'D 960 196m 19 t%63 1964 Figure 22Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Hillsborough 13 and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Tampa, 1960-62. The chloride contents of water from two wells in the Floridan aquifer in Pinellas County are shown in figure 24. The chloride of well Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines ranged from 1,000 ppm (parts per million) to 2,200 ppm from 1957-62. The chloride content of

PAGE 35

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 29 HILLSBOROUGH 30 DEPTH 500 FT. CASED 97 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 14 13 ----12 I I .J U, 1 oz 9 9-----------.JCn 8 --7u 1--------------------------------3---0---------------------------------0i PINELLAS 13 --DEPTH 141_FT. CASED 33 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 5 6 ^_j6 ---------------------5J INELLAS 24 DEPTH 141 FT. CAE _3 FT. FOIA AQUIFER 3 Water level is affected by tides 20PINELLAS 246 DEPTH 208 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER ^ 22 -(n 24 wl P IWater level is affected by tides Figure 23. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Hillsborough 30 near Ruskin, Pinellas 13 at Tarpon Springs, and Pinellas 246 at Clearwater. well Pinellas 166 at Dunedin ranged from about 20 ppm to 1,000 ppm during the same period. The chlorie eri content in both wells decreased during 1957-61. During 1962 the chloride in well 592 increased nearly to the 1959 concentration. In contrast, the chloride in well 166 remained low during 1962 and at the end of the year was well below the 1959 concentration. rakeland Area In the Lakeland area, like oiners in Florida, ground water is being pumped at an increasing rate, commensurate with the is being pumped at an increasing rate, commensurate with the

PAGE 36

30 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 2DO S00 000 1200 _____________ 1 400 a __________ _________ _________ ELAS 592 I P1ELLAS 166 19 i MW t659 960i 1961 I 962 1963 1 B1964 1 P 5 195 I s5 1960 1 61 1962 1963 1964 11965 Figure 24Graphs showing changes in chloride content in wells Pinellas 592 at Bay Pines and 166 at Dunedin, St. Petersburg area. growth of the area. Municipal pumpage at Lakeland' increased about 55 percent during the 10-year period 1953-62, and annual industrial pumpage in Polk County is presently (1962) about 45,000 million gallons. Figure 25 shows the total yearly pumpage at Lakeland for 1928-62. The observation-well program began in 1945 in the eastern part of Polk County and the network as of 1962 contains 34 wells in the artesian and nonartesian aquifers in the county. The marked decline of water levels in the Floridan aquifer during 1960-62, in the vicinity of Lakeland, is shown in figure 26 with a maximum decline about 20 feet in well Polk 45. The precipitation record at Lakeland shows rainfall deficiencies in the Lakeland area during years 1961 and 1962.

PAGE 37

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 31 4,200. 3400. 0 30 0 ____ ____ ______ --------------------------/ C 2t400 ( .24 0Q Figure 25. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Lakeland, Florida. Water levels declined to record lows in both artesian and nonartesian aquifers in the Lakeland area during 1960-62. Declines in artesian levels ranged from 6 feet in well Polk 44, near Davenport, to 20 feet in well Polk 45, south of Lakeland. Declines in the nonartesian, shallow-sand aquifer ranged from 6 feet in well Polk 49 to 9 feet in well Polk 47, near Davenport. Long-term trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Lakeland area are shown in figure 27. Water levels in the artesian aquifer, in southern Polk County, and in the shallow-sand aquifer, in southeastern Polk County, and in central Highlands County, are shown in figure 28. The most prominent features in the hydrographs in figure 28 are the declines of water levels in the artesian aquifer and in the shallow-sand aquifer'caused by the droughts of 1950-51, 1955-56, and 1961-62. Comparison of the effects of the drought on water levels during the latter part of 1960 through 1962 shows that maximum declines occurred during the 1961-62 drought in southern Polk County, in well Polk :51, and in central and in southeastern Highlands County in wells Highlands 10 and Highlands 13, respectively. L._ ___0 __ 1^ 3,respectively.

PAGE 38

32 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 190 T961 1962 1963 t964 64 r POLK 45 z M i 0t cipitation at Lakeland, 1960-62. ___ I. _J J _ J _ S ._ _DJ F SM a»JOJ 5JJ SO N OJ FM AMJ J S OND J FMAMJJ AS OND J F MAM JASO NO in the shallow-sand aquifer was about 10 feet during the 1955-56 'A T re -j d te 1961 62 n p o t wel Polk 45 near Lakeland and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Lakeland, 1960-62. and the 1961-62 droughts. In the southeastern part of the county, in lower Kissimmee Valley, nonartesians water levels declined 3 feet lower than the lowest water level of the 1956 drought. In contrast, decline of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer in

PAGE 39

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 33 POLK 44 DEPTH 195 FT. CASED 81 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER +2 Lii1f -JI*UU7t~.... ---------------:m -6 LI3 -5 ----_ _ ----_ zi 0 l-7 -8 POLK 45 DEPTH 643 FT. CASED 325 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 58 59 60 61 62 eo6------------------------------------------------------------CA68 -----------------------------63 65 -0 70 z-69 ---I-----6457j r'T ----~--------.-----------0 -w 72 672-----------------^ ------------------.73 W 74 75----S80 ------------------------------------76 81 ----82----------------------------83-------------------------------------1---------------84 86 S85------------------------------------F-------------87---86 ------------------------------88-89-1 POLK 47 DEPTH 67 FT. CASED 60 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 38 39 40 .39---------------------------------------40--------------------------------------------iw 41 w 42----------mi 43 -z 44 i 46 -.48 --i 51 521945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 27. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 44 and 47 near Davenport and Polk 45 near Lakeland, Lakeland area.

PAGE 40

34 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY POLK 49 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 14 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) = -I3 ---4 5 L 2 -7 i0 U.-7--------------------------------POLK 51 DEPTH 319 FT. CASED 208 FT. HAWTHORN FORMATION (ARTESIAN) 4 -_-_----------------------------L 4 5------------_-_----------------------SL -------_____ __ o 6-------------------------------------------j----------------^ 7-----------------p---------------------------------------------£,3 I -. 3 27 21 29 S13 t4 w ^-----------_-----------_ . 2 4I5 i1.I0 I 6 6 I .191 1980 Fi-ure 2 8 yro r p oig ~~ and --------1 1 l 2 16-----------24------------------------------27 9 2 --/---------------------------T 9-----------------------------------«« 24 ..........................---_ -_ _ ------_ i21----------------------»--.-------------------2z--------------1-----S-----^---------_------HIGHLANDS 10 DEPTH 45 FT. CASED 41 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) Z 26-------------------------_r 27------------------_-----------------------------------_--2 , S 28-------------------------------------------------------------^ 237--------------------------_--£ 38--------------------------------------------------t32 z 34 ----------------------------36--------------------------------------------> 39----------401 1 I 1 1 1 1 1+ 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 28. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Polk 49 near Frostproof, Polk 51 at Frostproof and Highlands 10 near Sebring.

PAGE 41

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 35 wells Osceola 183 and Okeechobee 3 did not exceed declines in these wells caused by the drought in 1955-56. Figure 29 shows fluctuations of water levels in the shallow nonartesian aquifer in Highlands, Okeechobee, and Osceola counties. HIGHLANDS 13 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 16 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 32 30---------31 ---------------------------L-----L ----------D2--------------------------------------^-----------------. 29---jjI w28 J 27 Uj 26 2 250 19 24 -----------3 22-----l---l----I I ---I I I----1 ------------------------OSCEOLA 183 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 22 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 276 i I 1 i I I -1 75--------, 74 -"-i---------70 w69 68 6^69-----------------4-----M-M------------, 8 1 1 1 1 4--I I 4 I------I---------OKEECHOBEE 3 DEPTH 22 FT. CASED 19 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 76 2J 75 S7158 64y ---t-------\------------------------r £563------------------------------------61,-, ----"-------.< 70r 6 54 53 53-----L------_-------1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 980 Figure 29. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Highlands 13, Osceola 183, and Okeechobee 3 in the Kissimmee Valley.

PAGE 42

36 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Orlando Area The Orlando area includes Brevard and Orange counties. The Floridan aquifer supplies most of the ground water for municipal and industrial needs in the area. The trends and fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer near Orlando are shown in figure 30. I \ 11 \ 1 -a -ao i twa -S -46 JF AMJJ A S0 OMDJ FMAMJ JASoN JFMAMJ JA S ONDJ FPMAUJ J ASNON IJ FMAMJ J ASOND -1 ------I -------------------------------WN -2 196 1961 62 1963 1964 J F X JA SO0 J FVA M 1 AS A ONM0 J F M AMJ J A S OOND J F MA MJ J AS ON..0 .D J'F MAM J J AS ON 0 MW 196 M" 963 Figure 30. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Orange 47 and 47B near Orlando and departures from monthly normal precipitation at Orlando, 1960-62.

PAGE 43

INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 37 The long-term trend of artesian water levels in the Orlando area is shown in figure 31. +ORANGE 47 DEPTH 350 FT. CASED 328 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER +9 +8 +7 +8-0--------------------------------W +5 S+3 6 -4 -----------.J-_-_-_--__---____ i +2 0 W -4 -5 [ l M-6 Srd be-----8 1A z -9 J 10 -1.2 :--„ -------,_ --J -g.,4-----------------------------L-->-II -1 " -13S-14 : -15 -16 ----17---18 -19 -20 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 31. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Orange 47, near Orlando. The hydrograph of well Orange 47 shows ground-water levels declined from the highest level of record in the spring of 1960 to the lowest level of record in 1962, for a maximum fluctuation of 22.96 feet. Cape Kennedy Area One of the most rapidly growing areas in the State is the Cape Kennedy area. Water in the Floridan aquifer in the area is generally brackish and is used primarily for crop irrigation. Figure 32 shows water-level fluctuations in eastern coastal Florida in Brevard, Indian River, and St. Lucie counties.

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38 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BREVARD 19 DEPTH 413 FT. CASED 80 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER U 30 -------29 -------Z8 25 24 ?i --------------------------_ _ a _____ _ _ _ _------_--_ 23 22 20 ^z7-------------------------1-----^: ----------.---------19 18 14 -4UT 4.. ,..FO.D" AQ..E -,.2-----------_--"-------------,------------!----_-__--------------£ 16 -----------------------------------g 16------------------------------------------------------141-1-----------------------11-II------I---1--I--1--I-I-I-I-I-I0 Z BREVARO 1479 DEPTH 160 FT. CASED 8105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER §1i ^ --------------+ --------------------------4 ---------------13 -J +2-----------------+-F-----#--------12 0 ---I i-Il--ILI BREVARD 148 DEPTH 206 FT. CASED 105 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER zae (0 ---dy an e r-nlo l oi --I---i-A I -----------4"2-, -1 'i---25 INDISTN RIVER Z25 DEPTH 19 FT. CASED 13 FT. SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) ...UJ 32 ------.. 31 1 --1 -1 zt 30 ------29-.----28 " jErE LUj S26 ,u 25-25 -a 24 . 23 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 19tpr Figure 32. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels near Cape Kennedy and eastern-central coastal Florida.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 39 Hydrographs of four wells in Brevard County show a longterm downward trend of artesian levels in the Floridan aquifer. Since 1946, artesian water levels have declined about 7 to 10 feet near Melbourne and Eau Gallie and a minimum of 7 feet at Cocoa. Levels have declined about 8 feet on Merritt Island about 10 miles northwest of Cape Kennedy. Hydrographs of wells in the shallow-sand aquifer in Indian River and St. Lucie counties indicate only a slight downward trend of ground-water levels has occurred during the period of record. Sarasota-Bradenton Area The Sarasota-Bradenton area includes Manatee and Sarasota counties in southwestern coastal Florida, and the principal economic activities in the area are agriculture and stock raising. The coastal section is rapidly developing as a retirement and year-round tourist center. Figure 33 shows the water-level fluctuations in observation well Sarasota 9, in the Floridan aquifer, have been declining at an average rate of about 0.5 foot per year since 1930. Water level records for several wells in southwestern Florida indicate that the decline is regional and that the rate of decline is accelerating. SOUTHERN FLORIDA The southern Florida area includes all counties south of Lake Okeechobee and covers an area of about 17,500 square miles as shown on page 45. The locations of selected observation wells in southern Florida are shown on figure 34. In southern Florida, nonartesian aquifers are the principal source of water supply. In the coastal areas of Martin and Palm Beach counties, a nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer is the chief source of supply; in Broward and Dade counties, the Biscayne aquifer is the principal source; and in southwestern coastal Florida and inland areas, nonartesian shallow-sand and shell aquifers are the main sources.

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40 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MANATEE 92 DEPTH 600 FT. CASED 154 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER 34 35 36 --------------37 ----------------------0 38-----cr 39 -,--------5 42---------------_ ---_--------JL , 40 z741 -42 S43: , 45 T I : I ^ ----------.--H^ -^---------------^ ---4 6 --47 SARASOTA 9 DEPTH 730 FT. CASED 101 FT. FLORIDAN AQUIFER -2 52 Ic N Ft. Myers Area = -i---b! -j < -3I I I I ", -5 UThe Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties and -9 -. --12 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Figure 33. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Manatee 92 and Sarasota 9, Sarasota-Bradenton area. Ft. Myers Area The Ft. Myers area includes Lee and Charlotte counties and like adjacent counties to the north and is developing rapidly as a winter tourist and retirement center.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 41 IMANATEE OKEECOBEE ST. LUCIE .....i___ o ioo ' ... s ...J .... ---SARASoTA DESOTO HIGHLANDS SA R T' CH R LOTTE EGLA DES -0 EE-V--------,---i---}---------~----J.S\ `\ ;a ^ L E E H E N D R Y P AL EA CH C L L I E 0 W A RD 5 329 S HA,\ -.G Ai -Gf--------s3 Figure 84. Map showing locations of wells in southern Florida for which (3 1 G S i ° i hydrographs are given. The observation-well program in the Ft. Myers area began in 1943. The program was part of the investigation of the trends and flucture 34. Map showing locationser levels in southersian and Floridan aquifers in the area. Currently, water levels are being measured in eight wells in Lee County. The principal source of ground water is the nonartesian aquifers. Figure 35 shows the seasonal fluctuations of ground-water levels in well Lee 246 and rainfall at Ft. Myers for the period 1960-62. Generally, seasonal fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers closely correspond to fluctions in the amounts of rainfall. Figure 36 shows the trends and

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42 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY O2 LEE 246 S J F AM JASOO FMAMJJASO FONMA JJAS DSJ FMAMJ JASONDJ FMAMu JASONDJ FMAMJ JASOND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 F MJ JAONDJ MA J IJ J A S NDJFMAMJ A S 0 N J F M AMJJ A S 0 N 0 F AMJJAS ND S960 862 196 664 Figure 35. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Lee 246 near Ft. Myers and departures from normal monthly precipitation at Ft. Myers, 1960-62. fluctuations of water levels in nonartesian aquifers for selected wells in southern Florida. Stuart-West Palm Beach Area This area includes coastal parts of Martin and Palm Beach counties and is a segment of the rapidly growing populous coastal complex extending from Jacksonville southward through the Keys. Municipal pumpage at Stuart increased about 250 percent between 1941-45 and 1955-60 as shown in figure 37.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 43 LEE 246 DEPTH 27 FT. CASED 19 FE TAMIAMI PORMATION NONARTESIA a 7-.:4 4 ---+ -------2 -J I , ---------------£» 9--4-----------444-----------------------iJ --------4-+ ------------------LL.r 12 Water level is affected pumping of tearby wells -' 4I I i T -..L L. ..I 1n II LI I-I14 COLLIEk C131 DEPTH 54 FT. CASED 22 FT. TAMIAMI FOWMATION (NONARTESIAN) 28 § 27--rn---:----------[-----.----.----------------------I*-1S25 7 r 24 21 "e 19s------------------------------IT1 ------------------COLLIER C54 DEPTH 9 FT. CASED 8 FT. SAND AND SANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN) 12 -8 +1---------------------------^ -j ---15-----------------------------------.7 I ' MARTIN 147 DEPTH 74 FT. CASED 73 FT. SDNSANDSTONE AQUIFER (NONARTESIAN +15 +14--1 -1 -I--+1-----------------------44 L ---.-------------.,4C-----------------J---J-i----------------t+13----------------------------}-------------"+72-------------------L--_------------S+3 w I5 il-------4---1 -1 1 2 uj +-____-__A--IL_.,--.-----------W_o----------------------------B------<-----------I--. 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 19T5 1 Figure 36. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Lee 246 near Ft. Myers, Collier C 54 and 131 Everglades, and Martin 147 near Stuart Florida. n I 1 S15 _z 12 Martin 147 near Stuart, Florida.

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44 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY I30 9-i f -7/ o Io7 Figure 37. Graph showing total yearly pumpage, City of Stuart, Florida. The principal source of water supply in the Stuart area is the nonartesian shallow-sand aquifer. Trends of water levels in the nonartesian aquifer at Stuart are shown in figure 36. The hydrograph of well Martin 147 shows a downward trend of nonartesian levels. Levels declined to a record low of less than 2 feet above mean sea level in the spring of 1962. The declines are caused, in part, by increased pumping in the Stuart well field: The Biscayne aquifer is the chief source of water supply in southern Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade counties. Figure 38 shows the trends and fluctuations of end-of-mohth water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and rainfall data at West Palm Beach. Fluctuations of water levels for several selected wells are shown in figures 39 and 40. The hydrographs indicate that there are downward trends of water levels in some wells for the period of record shown by the graphs. Ft. Lauderdale Area The Ft. Lauderdale area includes the populous coastal part of Broward County, extending from Deerfield-Boca Raton area in

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 45 10 \ PALM BEACH 88 SJFMAMJJ AS ON 0 JFMAMJ J ASONDI JFMAMJ J ASOND FMA M JJAS ONDJ FMAMJJ ASOND 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 S12 -4 I ...... | | I I J FM FMA JASSNDNJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJ JASONDJFMAMJJASONO 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 Figure 38. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Palm Beach 88 and departures from monthly normal precipitation at West Palm Beach, 1960-62. the northern part of Broward County, to the Hollywood area in the southern part of the county. Water levels in this area have declined during the past decade. Long-term downward trend of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in, and adjacent to, the Ft. Lauderdale area are shown by hydrographs of wells Palm Beach 88 (fig. 39), Broward F 329 at Ft. Lauderdale (fig. 40), and Broward G 617 about 15 miles northwest of Ft. Lauderdale (fig. 39). Water levels in these wells declined to new record-low levels during 1950-51, 1955-56, and 1961-62. The Biscayne aquifer contains salty water in areas adjacent to the coast and along tidal canals. Figure 41 shows graphs of the chloride content of water in wells Broward G 514 and S 830 in the vicinity of the Ft. Lauderdale Dixie well field and in wells Dade F 296 and F 64 in North Miami Beach and Miami.

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FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 13PAM BEACH 88 DEPTH 17 FT. CASED 16 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER '2 i A D 6I DETl--rI 1 1 I I B A Mz 5 I I I I 1,1 1 0 4 Lii7--kM------------------------2 ---t-----4-------------------I-------u------------4-------------------0----------UM--------------------z 3 ^ °i toI-t ,J -! I I I I I i I I I I I I I I S +1BROARD 6561 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER -U L II-------------------0m | >i 0--9 9d r h .w1 "re d n fut--in-------------oLf_-_-_a------------------------4-------------------i 4 -1------------------------------_----------d5 eM DB1 ARDE G617 DEPTH 29 FT. CASED 28 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER -1.4 ----4---------^----------------------Li +13-------------------------------------_-_ ,, II I -, 2 -0 10 .l 8 uli --S w 2 " , 1 nDE a553 DEPTH 91 FT. CASED 79 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER -I-1 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 39. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Palm Beach 88 near West Palm Beach, Broward G 561 and G 617 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade G 553 near Miami.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 47 SBROWARD F291 DEPTH 107 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER ww -. 6J -_j 5 A 4 DADE SI8 DEPTH 52 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER ',DADE SI96A DEPTH 20 FT BISCAYNE AQUIFER___ S* I -I I + 7 --_ 26 --[ w > 4 DADE S196A DEPTH 20 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER WI--K IF o 9 1 BROWARD S329 DEPTH 68 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER "i 8------------------------T----1----------||I --1-1-| II" 1+9 W-+8 >0W 7+7 --_Noreco, d ovoI a bie I 1930 1935 1940 1945 19501955 1960 1965 zw +w 3 -W -Figure 40. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Broward F 291 at Hollywood, Dade S 18 near Miami, Dade S 196A near Redland, Dade F 179 at Miami, and Broward S 329 near Ft. Lauderdale. U-i
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48 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BROWARD G 514 --.--, -BISCAYNE AQUIFER ^ \r-DEPTH 177 FT 4000 3000 3500 3000 2500 2000 000 I\ BROWARD S 830 15001 --BISCAYNE AQUIFER _ ' i i^ ^ DEPTH 119 FT Si000o---" = 500---, ,. 0--S_ 1 1000 z DADE F296 S600 -I ---BISCAYNE AQUIFER DEPTH 47 FT. H 4001 200 ^ B aG5aS3n F No Record ale i 1 DADE F 64 1200o --,BISCAYNE AQUIFER ",,DEPTH 114 FT 600 400200 -sw I I 5 I 190eo I I65 Figure 41Graph showing changes in chloride content of water in wells Broward G 514 and S 830 near Ft. Lauderdale, and Dade F 296 and F 64 near Miami.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 49 Miami Area The Miami area includes Broward and Dade counties and is the most populous area in the State. The principal source of water supply is the Biscayne aquifer, the extent of which is shown on figure 1. The observation-well program began in the Miami area in 1939 and currently includes 125 wells in Broward County and about 350 wells in Dade County. The locations of selected observation wells in the Miami area for which hydrographs are given are shown by figure 34. Water level observations were made as early as 1933 at Homestead in well Dade S 196A. Long-term record of water-level fluctuations at Homestead are shown in figure 40. Figure 42 shows trends of water levels and rainfall recorded at Homestead Experimental Station 1960-62. I_____,MASON _JA__OMMO____M____________M I JFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDJFMAMJJASONDMJFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJJASOND d960 1961 1962 1963 1964 2+1 S+8 S+16 I I , I I I'II I I I I I j 1 , , ., , , , , I , , I , , I , , , , , ; I ., i W V F MA MJ A SO ND J F M A MJ J AS O ND J FMA M J J A S ON DJ FMAM J J A SO N D J F MAM I JJASON D 960 1961 1962 1963 1964 Figure 42. Graphs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in well Dade S 196A, and departures from monthly normal precipitation at I Homestead Experimental Station, 1960-62. t12

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50 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Except for the relatively narrow coastal strip, most of the Miami area is occupied by the Everglades. Fluctuations of groundwater levels in the Everglades are shown by hydrographs of wells Dade G 72, G 596, G 618, and G 620, figures 43 and 44. Fluctuations of ground-water levels in the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of Miami are illustrated by hydrographs of well Dade G 10 about 5 miles west of Miami, Dade S 19 at Miami Springs (fig. 43), and well Dade F 179 at Miami (fig. 40). The water level in well Dade S 19 is affected by pumping in the municipal well field of the City of Miami. DADE 519 DEPTH 95 FT. CASED 91 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER -'!+-~ .-----I | -tWater level is ofected'b puming of nearby wells DA DEPTH 6 FT CASED 6 F BISCAYNE AQUFER 10 -191, 55 10 15 10 1 in wes Dade S 19 and G 10 near Miami, and Dade G 72 northwest of --3: I I 'E 672 DEPTH 5 FT. CASED 4 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER I I t I-I -----.-T I--N _.-, -----I----------------40 1945 1950. 55 1960 15 1970 1975 Figure 43. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade S 19 and G 10 near Miami, and Dade G 72 northwest of Opa-Locka.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 51 DADE G596 DEPTH 13 FT. CASED II FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER S +10 > +9 G-D +8 E A Id LJ +7 S+4---->5 iJ +3-M +2 -o -I I --------1 DADE G618 DEPTH 20 FT. CASED II FEET BISCAYNE AQUIFER +10 +9 gs. +----------------------111 11 11--------+4----------------------iF -i: --------LU +5 Lý +4 +2 -I DADE 6613 DEPTH 21 FT. CASED 18 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER -+6 .+5 l IJo +3-r... aq.fe b th enracI........tr.. WW +21-0 +1i an are hef 0-S -1 DADE G620 DEPTH 16 FT. CASED 6 FT. BISCAYNE AQUIFER .8 6 w W W WII 0 o -I -2 ------------1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 Figure 44. Hydrographs showing trends and fluctuations of water levels in wells Dade G 596, G 618, G 613, and G 620 in central Dade County. In the Miami area, as in other coastal areas, the contamination of the Biscayne aquifer by the encroachment of salty water is an ever-present problem. Through intensive practice of water control, the situation in many areas has been alleviated. The effectiveness of water control is graphically illustrated in figure 45 by the decrease in chloride content of ground water in many areas. 4----W S 1945 195 695 16 95 17 95 18 Fiur 445 yrgah hwn rnsadfutain fwtrlvl in wel DaeG56 U 1,G63 n 2 ncnrlDd ony In th MiaITaea nohrcatlaes h otmnto of the Bicyeaufrb h nraheto at ae sa evrprsn prbe.Truhitniepatc fwtrcnrl

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52 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVE. soo-t------------------»ec------------To--------------A. 400 --------1 1 -CI DADE 6354 -MUW AQUFER -DEPTH 91FT loOoE 6580 I --\ -BSCWuM WER em --4_DEPTH 22 FT § 600o-1 ' -41 | 5 00C ----------I 0ADE G469 4000 ----M ER DEPTH 137 FT 0 i. 0 A. -i --K : -........ 3000-25002000 f-\ ---------5004 DADE S529 SiBSC4 AQL ER 1 -_ I DEPTH 1 FT. 600 -1---------10o0 -\ --------500Dad County.R -_ MrEH 79 F Dade County.

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INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 48 53 APPENDIX Table 1.--Summary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells.

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Table l.--Summary of well data and water levels in selected observation wells. Well number: Well numbers are based on county numbering system e.g. Bay County well Bay 20, or on the latitudinal and longitudinal system well 008-537-2. Both numbers 20 and 008-537-2 are given where this well has been reported previously in a publication under the county number. Aquifer: B, Biscayne; F, Floridan; G, sand-and-gravel aquifer; H, Hawthorn; NA, nonartesian; S, shallow sand. Depth of well: Reported unless otherwise noted; M, measured by U. S. Geological Survey. Frequence of measurement: A, annually; B, bimonthly; C, continuous;.D, daily; I, intermittently; M, monthly; Q, quarterly; S, semiannually; W, weekly. Water level: To hundredth of a foot if measured by wet-tape method or if taken from recorder chart; to the nearest tenth of a foot if measured by pressure gage or'airline. Remarks: B, water level below measuring point; M, water level with reference to mean sea level; P, water level affected by pumping of nearby wells; R, recorder installed on date shown in remarks; S, water level affected by seasonal pumping; T, water levels affected by ocean tides. SWater level above (+) or below (-) land surface I m M (feet) Sell number Prior to 1961 Highest water xiu Remarks Sl .r -~_ ay or J une level in May range a s a. u May or JuneLo Sp t l EI | (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962 ALACHUA COUNTY 936-236-1 F 252 136 1958 C -23.48 -24.88 -23.85 -29.74 4.50 4.51 1960 1959 942-216-1 F 447 175 1957 B -89.55 -93.04 -88.52 -91.84 2.89 3.15 1958 1957 949-235-2 F 300 250 1960 B ------37.68 -39.17 0.63 3.83 BAKER COUNTY 011-227-1 S 13 18 1958 C +0.17 -3.00 -2.21 -4.01 4.24 4.68 1959 1960 014-226-1 F 168 --1957 B -------100.48 ---1.53 016-207-1 F 625 400 1945 B -55.4 -56.53 ----71.27 ---3.03 1945 1945 026-214-1 H 198 102 1960 B --------18.95 ---5.76 BAY COUNTY 7 (010-541-1) F 253 --1936 B -42.33 -66.69 -72.79 -77.58 11.16 9.98 P 1947 1960 8 (016-538-1) F 435 300 1936 B +1.80 +1.08 +1.20 +1.80 1.10 1.47 1952 1955 10 (014-536-1) F 300 --1936 B -6.76 -9.53 -9.79 -10.67 2.56 3.11 1950 1957 12 (017-551-1) F 290 --1961 B -----+0.72 +0.50 1.55 0.73 20 (008-537-2) F 457 140 1951 C -117.81 -139.0 -132.5 -124.6 37.3 23.2 P 1952 1955 43 (004-535-1) F 645 238 1946 B -62.8 ----92.6 -128.7 18.5 48.0 1948 53 (012-552-1) G 134 114 1961 B --------8.97 0.58 0.70 62 (956-525-1) F 63 --1961 B ----------11.50 1.43 1.13 65 (006-525-1) F 200 --1961 B ---------+4.30 2.3 5.6 68 (023-526-1) F 160 158 1961 B ---------+1.81 ---1.76 69 (025-525-1) G 153 136 1961 B -------13.76 ---1.67 | \,.'»

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Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface 0 i (feet) 0 l ell n er Prior to 1961 Highet water Maxim Rearks Woell tuer 0 1 Remarks r. -Ma oa3 lvel n Ma range , .n.e ac High Low 19 Z ~, a-,, (-ear) (year) "1961 1962 1961 1962 BAY COUNTY--Continued 012-541-213 F 345 326 1962 M ---------------2.71 BRADFORD COUNrY 000-210-2 F 294 247 1959 B -------70.84 -73.96 1.86 2.11 BREVARD COUNTY 19 (305-045-1) F 413 80 1934 B +27.3 +20.2 +19.6 +20;6 7.0 1.2 P 1950 1956 20 (795-043-2) F 447 125 1934 B +28.7 +21.0 +20.4 +19.8 3.4 3.2 S 1947 1956 79 (347-051-1) F 160 85 1946 B +5.1 +0.14 +1.9 -0.55 2.8 2.92 S 1947 1956 143 (321-0!5-1) F 206 105 1946 B +10.9 +5.7 +7.1 +4.3 4.4 3.8 S 1953 1955 59 (334-039-1) F 210 144 1946 B +14.9 +8.2 +11.5 +9.1 3.0 3.2 S 1953 1958 759-045-1 S 9 4 1958 C -4.4 -6.2 -5.7 -6.4 0.4 0.6 1958 1959 307-039-2 S 50 4 1958 C -6.5 -7.3 -7.2 -8.2 1.1 0.2 1959 1960 814-048-2 S 9 4 1958 C -0.9 -2.9 -3.1 ---0.1 --1959 1960 322-046-7 S 32 4 1958 B +21.5 +20.3 -----------M 1959 1958 822-047-2 F 129 4 1960 C +32.6 +29.9 +29.5 +28.1 0.9 1.2 M 1960 1960 BROWARD COUNTY 9291 B 107 --1939 C +4.3 +0.4 +2.2 +1.2 2.1 2.6 M 1958 1952 G56L B 20 20 1948 C +4.1 +0.2 +2.2 +1.1 2.1 3.0 M 1958 1956 G616 B 25 19 1952 C +12.9 +8.7 +11.6 +10.7 5.1 3.9 M 1957&58 1956 G617 B 29 28 1950 C +6.6 +2.8 +6.1 +3.8 3.0 3.7 M 1954 1956 0820 B 224 215 1956 C -------2.5 -0.8 4.5 6.2 M; Prospect well field 0853 B 22 21 1960 C ---------+2.8 ---4.0 M; Pompano well field S329 B 68 --1940 C +5.5 +0.5 +3.3 +2.2 3.9 4.6 M; Dixie well 1955 1954 field

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" Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface A -o (feet) ell ber Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximum Remarks Well number 44 44 .0 u r Maxirks 'a level in May S C .0 a May orJune l inay range U o.s n 0s 01 High Low P19' Ev s. (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962 CALHOUN COUNTY 1 (026-502-1) F 212 --1961 B ------2.27 -3.05 1.39 2.85 7 (026-509-1) F 188 64 1961 B ------+8.0 +7.4 1.2 1.6 11 (014-511-1) F 147 47 1961 B -----+11.7 +10.9 0.5 2.6 CITRUS COUNTY 15 (902-228-1) F 78 --1933 B -8.62 -19.83 -11.88 -18.38 4.13 4.35 1959 1956 856-223-2 F 91 --1961 B ---------48.36 7.57 4.71 CLAY COUNTY 5 (006-149-2) F 530 157 1940 B +35.5 +21.0 +24.0 +21.6 3.1 2.6 1947 1957 7 (958-139-1) F 650 276 1940 B +16.4 +11.8 +16.2 +15.2 2.9 2.9 1952 1953 948-202-6 H 144 80 1960 B ------45.67 -47.72 1.71 3.04 -45.33 feet only May measurement prior to 1961 948-202-7 NA 42 40 1960 B ------29.38 -30.94 2.80 3.62 -28.38 feet only May measurement prior to 1961 948-202-8 F 250 193 1960 C ------55.02 -57.56 1.63 2.74 COLLIER COUNTY 54 B 9 8 1951 C +13.1 +8.6 +9.7 +8.5 4.1 5.5 M 1958 1956 131 B 54 22 1952 C +26.2 +21.9 +21.5 +21.2 4.9 6.2 M 1958 1955 164 B 51 20 1958 C +5.5 +1.3 +2.4 +1.8 4.9 7.2 M; Naples well 1959 1960 field 271 B 38 --1959 C -3.8 -4.9 -5.1 -4.5 3.1 4.5 B 1960 1960 296 B 45 --1959 C -9.4 -10.3 -11.0 -11.1 3.3 4.2 1960 1960 COLUMBIA COUNTY 9 (010-238-1) F 836 --1942 C -79.60 -97.02 -88.99 -92.55 3.71 2.72 1948 1957 DADE COUNTY F45 B 85 --1939 C +3.9 +1.6 +2.1 +1.5 1.4 3.4 M; R, 1959 1960 1960 F179 B 77 --1940 C +6.0 +0.9 +2.5 +1.6 1.9 2.7 M 1958 1945 F240 B 60 --1939 C ---------+1.2 ---2.6 M; R, 1961 F319 B 17 13 1940 C +5.4 +0.5 +3.3 +1.5 1.5 1.3 M 1958 1945

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water level above (+) or below (-) land surface (teeat) Pl umer .Prior to 1961 Bigesat water Maxmim We ber a a level in hMay S () 1961 1962 191 1962 DADE COUITy--Continued P358 B 54 --1940 C +6.7 -0.8 ---+0.4 ---5.8 M 1954 1945 G3 B 20 11 1940 C +3.0 -0.5 +1.5 -1.3 2.4 4.8 M; P 1958 1951 GIO B 6 6 1940 C +6.0 +0.5 +4.3 +1.4 3.2 3.6 M 1958 1945 c39 B 8 6 1939 C +7.2 +2.2 +3.3 +1.3 2.8 1.8 M; P 1958 1955 G72 B 5 4 1940 C +6.5 +1.2 +4.8 +2.5 3.2 3.4 M 1958 1945 GC76 B 24 19 1947 C +5.5 +0.4 +2.1 +1.2 1.6 1.7 M 1958 1950&56 G553 8 91 79 1947 C +8.6 +1.7 +4.8 +1.4 3.7 4.1 M 1958 1956 G580 B 22 4 1960 C +4.2 +2.4 +5.3 +1.3 3.8 2.9 M 1960 1960 G395 B 14 11 1949 , +8.5 +1.3 +2.3 +1.0 4.1 5.5 H; P 1958 1960 C596 B 13 11 1949 C +8.4 +3.2 +6.3 +2.6 3.9 5.7 H 1958 1952 G6L3 B 21 18 1950 C +5.5 -0.5 +3.6 +0.1 4.8 5.6 H 1954&58 1956 G614 B 20 18 1950 C +8.2 +0.9 +3.9 +1.0 3.9 6.2 H 1958 1956 G613 B 20 11 1950 C +8.4 +3.7 +6.5 +3.9 3.6 4.2 M 1958 1956 G619 B 12 6 1950 C +8.3 +4.3 +7.5 +7.4 2.2 3.6 H 1958 1956 G520 B 16 6 1950 C +7.0 +3.6 +6.0 +5.5 1.1 3.5 H 1958 1952 G757 B 20 10 1957 C +9.3 +2.1 +4.9 +1.5 4.9 6.0 H 1958 1956 G789 B 20 10 1956 C +7.3 +2.0 +6.6 +1.2 4.8 6.4 M 1958 1956 G799 B 20 10 1956 C +7.8 +2.0 +4.1 +1.7 2.8 3.4 H; P 1958 1956 G850 B 22 11 1959 C +2.3 +1.2 +1.8 +1.4 0.9 2.2 M 1960 1959 G851 B 18 11 1959 C +2.9 +1.8 +3.3 +1.9 1.8 3.3 H 1960 1959 G852 B 22 10 1959 C +2.4 +0.4 +1.4 +0.7 1.5 3.7 M 1960 1959 G855 B 20 10 1958 C ----------9.1 ---5.0 B 357 19 135 1959 C +3 +1.8 +3.5 +1.3 2.6 3.0 H 19;1 1960 G858 B 20 11 1959 C +6.3 44.2 +5.1 +1.9 4.5 6.9 H 1960 1959

PAGE 65

Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface -ea -(feet) e3 ll or Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximum Well number r ---g Remarks a " o level in May range -= *0 -0 1 May or June 44 W Cu " UK 3 :S = I usW as High Low U4 Is .(yea) (y 1961 1962 1961 1962 .61 = ea (year) DADE COUNTY--Continued G859 B 20 11 1959 C +5.8 +1.9 +3.5 +1.2 4.1 5.1 M 1960 1959 G860 B 20 11 1959 C +5.0 +2.4 +3.0 +1.2 5.0 3.6 M 1960 1959 G861 B 23 11 1961 C ---------+2.3 2.5 5.0 M; R, Nov. 1961 G863 B 18 6 1961 C ---------+1.5 ---6.2 M; Do G864 B 20 11 1959 C +5.3 +1.0 +3.7 +0.4 5.8 6.0 M 1959 1959 G865 B 19 13 1959 C +1.8 +0.9 +2.0 +1.6 1.4 1.4 M 1960 1960 G968 B 50 --1960 C -----+4.1 +3.1 2.5 3.3 M G968A B 3 --1961 C ---------+3.6 0.7 3.2 M; R, Nov. 1961 G970 B 15 10 1958 C +4.0 +2.4 +4.3 +2.2 2.5 2.8 M 1960 1959 G972 B 15 10 1958 C +5.5 +4.5 +5.3 +3.5 3.0 4.3 M 1960 1959 G973 B 15 10 1958 C +4.5 +2.3 +3.4 +1.7 2.5 2.1 H 1960 1960 G974 B 15 10 1958 C +5.4 +3.3 +4.7 +2.7 3.6 3.6 H 1960 1959 G975 B 15 10 1958 C +6.9 +5.5 +5.4 +4.2 5.1 4.4 H 1960 1959 G976 B 15 10 1958 C +6.0 +4.2 +5.6 +2.9 3.2 3.7 M 1960 1959 G978 B 15 10 1958 C +6.7 +4.9 +6.1 +2.9 3.9 4.1 M 1960 1959 G1045 B 20 12 1960 C +2.3 +1.5 +1.7 +1.5 1.6 3.0 M 1960 1960 G1165 B 12 11 1961 C ---------+1.5 1.2 3.4 M; R, Oct. 1961 G1166 B 11 11 1961 C ---------+5.6 0.5 1.9 M; Do G1183 B 25 --1961 C --------+1.0 4.0 0.9 M; Do NP44 B 33 --1960 C +2.9 +0.2 +4.5 +0.8 4.5 4.2 M 1960 1960 NP46 B 25 --1960 C +1.3 +0.3 +0.3 -0.3 2.4 3.4 M 1960 1960 NP57 B 54 --1961 C ------+1.9 +0.1 2.2 2.9 M NP62 B 20 9 1962 C -----------------M; R, Oct. 1962 NP67 B 20 6 1962 C ------------M; Do NP72 B 20 6 1962 C --------------M; Do S18 B 52 --1939 C +3.2 +0.10 +2.4 +1.4 1.4 1.8 M; P 1942 1945 S19 B 95 91 1939 C +7.3 -1.2 +1.9 -0.5 2.5 4.4 M; P 1958 1945 S68 B 61 51 1939 " +3.2 -2.1 +0.3 -3.0 2.7 4.9 M; P 1958 1945

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c Water level above (+) or below () land suriface a (feet)WeLt nuer Prior to 1961 Highest water Maxiami Rerk U 0-0 y laorJuno level in May range c 0may or June a High Low _ A 'i (y r) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962 DAE COUNPY--Continued 3S12 B 51 --1940 C +9.5 0.0 +3.5 +0.7 3.6 3.1 H 1958 1945 SL96A B 20 --1932 C +8.5 -1.0 +3.9 +0.4 4.1 7.5 H 1958 1945 DE SOTO COUNTY 703-157-1 F 468 189 1962 B ---------------6.95 704-147-1 F 462 --1962 C --------------0.93 720-1.48-1 F 470 --1962 C ---------------1.32 DIXIE COUNTY 15 (937-306-1) F 215 105 1957 C -2.77 -5.15 -6.55 -8.20 3.26 1.86 1959 1960 DUVAL COUNTY 12 (019-140-1) F 785 --1938 B +27.5 +15.9 +21.0 +15.1 9.8 9.8 P 1947 1957 18 (018-14-0-1) F ----1938 B +39.9 +22.5 +26.4 +20.1 8.0 10.2 P 1947 1957 102 (019-133-1) F 875 400 1930 B +6.4 -17.95 -15.02 -20.94 4.82 8.00 P 1931 1960 107 (023-136-1) F ----1939 B +53.2 +35.3 +36.8 +34.4 4.8 4.5 P 1939 1959 115 (016-142-1) F 729 476 1930 B +36.2 +14.7 +17.2 +11.6 7.0 8.4 P 1938 1957 118 (018-143-1) F 900 --1939 B +32.9 +16.4 +17.6 +11.9 4.5 7.2 P 1947 1957 122 (023-138-1) F 905 571 1930 M +44.9 +27.9 +28.8 +25.6 4.7 3.7 P 1947 1957 123 (019-142-1) F 1,075 --1930 B +39.0 +20.3 +21.7 +15.7 4.4 6.2 P 1931 1957 129 (015-141-1) F 600 470 1940 B +40.4 +21.2 +23.5 +17.4 7.8 8.9 P A. 7 1957 145 (028-137-1) F ----1940 ,.2 +8.3 +9.1 +5.58 4.5 3.3 P 1947 1957 149 (024-136-1) F 800 --1940 B +25.7 +12.4 +11.4 +9.8 4.6 4.3 P 1947 1956 151 (023-139-1) F ----1940 B +43.4 +34.1 +34.9 +31.0 6.3 5.3 P 1952 1956 152 (027-133-1) F ----1940 B +29.9 +22.1 +21.5 +19.6 4.5 5.8 P 1952 1957 154 (013-135-1) F 625 461 1940 B +29.6 +14.8 +14.1 +10.5 5.2 5.6 P 1947 1960 160 (018-123-1) F 585 357 1934 B +41.7 +26.2 +25.5 +20.2 6.1 8.5 P 1934 1960

PAGE 67

Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface a (feet) "nmber >w Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximum R Well number ayorJune level in Hay range S )' May or June 4j U k S. OB z _ .l s H h) (year) L 1961 1962 1961 1962 DUVAL COUNTY--Continued 164 (025-125-1) F 840 450 1930 B +43.8 +29.0 +29.3 +25.8 3.8 4.5 P 1931 1956 206 (015-145-1) F 1,920 1,000 1941 C -2.06 -15.58 -13.55 ---3.85 2.62 P 1948 1956 262 (026-135-1) F 1,393 584 1951 B +37.0 +25.6 +26.2 +23.5 3.7 3.7 P 1951 1957 263 (026-135-2) F 1,025 850 1951 B +35.5 +26.1 +26.9 +24.2 3.7 3.8 p 1952 1957 264 (026-135-3) F 700 450 1951 B +35.3 +25.9 +25.9 +23.2 3.5 4.1 p 1952 1957 265 (025-136-1) F 556 --1951 B +39.4 +29.0 +25.3 +22.3 6.6 7.8 P 1952 1957 ESCAMBIA COUNTY 39 (023-716-2) G 247 --1940 M -4.59 -12.00 -7.89 -10.95 3.04 4.24 1940 1955 45 (036-719-1) G 152 152 1940 C -69.30 -111.82 -103.27 -101.71 2.79 1.94 P 1941 1956 46 (031-716-1) G 239 239 1939 W -58.09 -82.12 -67.54 -68.66 2.86 3.75 1948 1956 62 (024-715-1) G 142 142 1940 C -6.50 -23.84 -14.34 -15.22 3.97 5.72 1949 1955 62A (024-715-2) C 18 18 1940 W -10.22 -12.53 -11.35 -12.02 1.55 2.91 1944 1954 73 (035-715-3) G 306 198 1951 C -39.03 -56.66 -50.94 -51.76 5.90 4.10 P 1953 1958 74 (036-716-1) G 352 350* 1951 C -77.37 -89.52 -86.67 -86.30 3.06 2.70 *Screened from 1952 1959 260 to 270 feet and from 340 to 350 feet 83 (035-714-3) G 301 --1954 C -36.10 -41.99 -37.05 -37.53 7.37 6.48 P 1955 1956 026-713-5 G 149 144* 1959 W -58.15 -58.90 -59.15 -59.57 ].63 5.08 *Screened from 1960 1960 144 to 149 feet 026-713-6 G 65 60* 1959 W -51.78 -51.98 -52.46 -52.14 1.90 5.77 *Screened from 1960 1960 60 to 65 feet 032-724-1 G 170 165* 1959 M ------91.22 -91.93 1.25 1.61 *Screened from 165 to 170 feet; -91.18 feet only Hay measurement prior to 1961 054-726-1 G 206 201* 1959 B -86.40 -89.48 -85.64 -82.95 3.75 2.75 *Screened from 1960 1959 201 to 206 feet 054-726-2 G 107 102* 1959 B -70.88 -74.92 -69.68 -65.21 5.62 3.64 *Screened from 1960 1959 102 to 107 feet FLAGLER COUNTY 14 (927-115-1) F 417 --1936 B -3.4 -7.38 -7.12 -8.19 2.30 2.67 1937 -1956 44 (928-122-1) F 159 --1956 B -7.67 -11.41 -9.16 -11.44 5.60 6.87 P 1959 1956

PAGE 68

SI Water level above (+) or~ elow (-) land surface (feet) * " 5 Prior to 1961 Righest water Maxiaum erk r o level In ayl Remarks 'ell uumber May or 'June r in M gange. FRANIJH COMUTY 10 (950-439-1) F 380 --1958 B -1.86 -2.47 -1.80 -4.45 1.42 3.45 1959 1958 31 (943-458-1) F ----1949 B +3.95 +0.40 +2.20 +1.55 1.00 1.30 1950 1952 947-446-1 F 98 --1961 B ----------11.26 1.23 1.09 957-443-1 F ----1961 B ---------+2.97 0.93 2.20 GADSDEN COUNTY 035-434-1 F 406 --1961 B ----------90.96 13.68 1.40 039-425-1 F 525 381 1961 B ----------143.96 3.00 4.07 GILCHRIST COUNTY 953-251-1 F 65 42 1961 B ----------22.11 8.27 10.95 GULF COUNHY 30 (948-518-1) F 522 475 1946 C -7.11 -27.22 -7.50 -8.93 2.14 3.06 P, prior to 1956 1950 1954 33 (939-521-1) F 595 487 1961 B ---------+1.29 0.75 0.45 34 (006-511-1) F 578 248 1961 B ----------10.0 3.0 22.5 P HWILTON COUNTY 036-305-1 F 273 60 1961 B ----------101.78 0.87 11.04 HARDES COUNTY 731-145-1 F 450 --1962 C ----------33.60 ---8.88 BENDmY COUNt 3 S 10 8 1941 *D, +19.5 +14.3 +18.0 +14.2 4.7 6.6 M; *D, 1941-44; *C 1958 1956 *C, 19505 S 13 8 1941 C -3.5 -6.3 -5.0 -6.2 2.8 4.0 B 1952 1956 HERNANDO COUNTY 838-215-1 F 140 ---1961 B ----------20.28 2.50 3.51 HIGHLANDS COUNTY 9 S 26 22 1948 C +130.4 +126.0 +128.2 +136.8 3.2 4.2 H 1953 1949 10 S 45 41 1948 C +90.7 +83.9 -88.6 +84.9 4.1 7.7 H 1958 1956 11A S 10 8 1956 C +48.3 444.5 +47.1 +44.2 2.9 4.9 M 1957 1956 13 S 20 16 1948 C +28.9 +22.7 +24.6 +21.6 5.1 7.8 H 1957 1956

PAGE 69

" :Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface e -9» 4 w (feet) S-----ell number Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximu Re Well number _W Q4 .U || -Remarks S V jMay or June ran a. msx (year) (year) 1961 1962 1961 1962 HIGHLANDS COUNTY--Continued 14 S 35 29 1948 C +22.2 +14.7 +21.5 +17.0 8.0 8.2 H 1960 1951 15 S 23 19 1948 C +58.3 +53.8 +57.3 +55.3 3.8 4.5 M 1953 1956 440 S 22 18 1956 C +116.9 +112.6 +114.3 +111.4 2.7 5.9 M 1958 1956 .HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY 13 (807-230-3) F 347 46 1930 C -6.70 -11.05 -10.74 -11.91 4.47 5.82 P 1931 1956 30 (744-225-39) F 500 34 1950 C +8.70 +1.63 +3.01 +3.98 5.87 6.26 1959 1952 500 (742-219-1) F 330 97 1951 B -50.82 -57.98 -----9.42 5.89 1958 1956 751-203-1 F 759 65 1957 B -42.52 -47.04 -54.60 -61.05 11.24 8.97 1958 1960 801-213-15 F 417 --1958 C +0.55 -2.89 -5.64 -8.06 7.57 10.62 1959 1960 HOLMES COUNTY 4 (043-556-1) F 187 --1938 B +4.92 +1.82 +3.10 +3.60 2.60 3.10 1960 1956 7 (058-535-1) F 205 170 1938 B -8.09 -15.66 -9.94 -12.45 3.72 2.17 1949 1956 7A (058-535-2) NA 13 10* 1960 B -------5.99 -5.77 8.50 10.61 *Screened from 10 to 13 feet -3.83 feet only May measurement prior to 1961 050-548-1 F ---1961 B ---------+3.90 1.00 4.86 051-556-1 F 260 --1961 B ---------205.76 5.03 4.40 052-545-2 F 300+ --1961 B --------+13.8 5.1 5.8 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY 25 S 19 13 1950 C +30.2 +25.4 +27.7 +26.9 3.2 4.7 M 1957 1956 JACKSON COUNTY 23 (042-453-1) F 475 100 1950 B -22.54 -38.15 -31.38 -25.20 9.68 7.19 1958 1951 044-506-1 F --94 1961 B --------76.05 4.03 6.25 046-515-1 F 180 --1961 B ---------99.78 3.49 9.28 053-527-1 F 341 260 1961 B ------86.70 7.56 14.66 058-503-1 F 83 --955 B ----------26.53 2.57 5.10

PAGE 70

SWater level above: (+)or below-( ) land surface C t c(feet) " eit nbr > Prior to 1961 Highest er. a Remarka ;-level in May fa * Mu a ay or June range III I I, i r ) (year) 961 1962 19611962 I I (year) (year) 196 JEFFERSON COUNTY 022-356-1 F 216 169 1960 S -140.57 -141.02 -141.30 -141.90 2.78 3.75 1960 1960 038-336-1 P 183 147 1960 S -19.10 -19.40 -22.03 -23.75 4.41 A.44 1960 1960 LAFAYETTE COUNTY 038-317-1 F 106 --1961 B -------44.04'11.99 2.49 953-312-1 F 146 112 1961 B --------8.89 3.86 3.23 LAKE COUNTY 13 (357-133-1) F 190 --1936 B -50.52 -59.82 -51.82 -57.32 4.91 2.65 1960 1957 20 (900-123-1) F 252 --1936 B +9.9 +5.52 +7.6 +5.60 1.9 1.75 1942 1956 22 (909-131-1) F 254 --1936 B -0.80 -3.10 -2.10 -3.54 1.82 1.64 1959 1956 322-149-L F 192 100 1959 S +111.70 +110.45 +109.57 +108.25 3.04 --1960 1960 322-149-2 S 23 18 1959 S +113.04 +111.20 +110.21 +109.74 3.94 --1960 1960 332-154-1 F 160 63 1959 C +101.62 +100.41 +99.57 +98.65 3.24 2.98 1960 1960 332-154-2 S 30 17 1959 C +101.93 +99.92 +99.56 +99.27 3.52 3.42 1960 1959 841-156-1 F 754 483 1961 B ---------22.82 2.42 1.95 LEE COUNTY 246 S 27 19 1945 C +19.2 +10.5 +16.3 .+12.6 5.0 6.8 M; P 1959 1949 414 H 94 60 1948 C +18.8 +11.1 +17.0 +14.5 8.4 7.2 M; P 1957 1955 LEON COUNTY 7 (027-416-1) F 314 165 1945 C -149.05 -169.91 -159.67 -160.80 4.43 4.94 1948 1955 36A (037-410-2) H 41 38* 1935 H -1.42 -33.14 -5.16 -14.99 15.53 13.01 *Screened from 1948 1956 38 to 41 feet 115 (031-420-1) F 194 104 1950 B -78.1 -93.3 -81.4 -84.6 3.2 3.9 1960 1957

PAGE 71

t .Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface .. o (feet) W n -. Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximum ell number MayorJune level in May range Remarks S" m May. or une _ " 14 4jo 0 o 0 ca High) Low .4 n S Nigmh .1961 1962 1961 1962 S -I o [94 (year) (year) 96 LEON COUNTY--Continued 024-420-1 S 57 --1960 C -7.88 -8.72 -12.25 -11.94 3.79 5.51 1960 196C 024-420-2 S 15 12* 1960 B -------5.10 -6.19 2.54 3.90 -Well point 2 to 15 feet: -4.98 feet only May measurement prior to 1961 026-418-1 F 296 106 1960 M -------74.64 -77.26 4.31 4.47 034-407-1 F 231 --1960 C -------165.26 -170.17 5.64 4.22 LEVY COUNTY 902-241-1 F 58 --1961 B ----------8.34 1.71 3.07 919-245-1 F 96 -1961 B ----------0.55 0.16 0.13 LIBERTY COUNTY 14 (001-459-1) ----1955 B ------4.68 -5.03 3.3ý 3.81 -5.68 feet only May measurement prior to 1961 15 (022-841-1) F 395 242 1960 C -------23.05 -24.32 4.24 3.38 010-440-1 F 118 89 1961 B ---------+7.2 1.0 4.6 023-447-1 F 160 --1961 B ---------+2.90 1.8 1.58 028-456-1 F 360 --1961 B ----------85.64 0.83 1.07 MADISON COUNTY 17 (029-325-1) F 320 300 1953 B -20.16 -38.12 -27.13 -28.03 7.57 8.07 1959 1955 18 (028-325-1) F 322 307 1952 C -18.18 -34.87 -24.35 -24.83 6.15 6.66 1960 1955 MANATEE COUNTY 92 (726-218-1) F 600 154 1941 B -37.10 -47.60 -49.12 -52.65 7.31 9.41 1947 1956 MARION COUNTY 5 (911-159-1) F 135 135 1933 C +13.62 +3.35 +11.20 +6.17 5.09 2.79 1960 1957 47 (902-156-1) F 179 --1936 B -13.84 -24.26 -16.29 -22.04 5.14 2.44 1960 1956 48 (859-150-1) F 152 --1936 B -1.07 -10.23 -0.82 -6.68 ---2.84 1959 1956 49 (910-138-1) F 175 --1936 B -25.0 -31.19 -25.77 -29.92 3.90 1.64 1942 1957 51 (910-210-1) F 106 --1935 B -26.04 -34.39 -28.44 -32.82 4.15 2.47 1960 1956

PAGE 72

Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface S"-. (feet) Well .r Prior to 1961 H ighest ater. xImUum -level In May, ,Remarks u May or June level in ay rg range S -" " ig H ) 1961 1962 1961 1962 a1. a (year) (year) MARTIN COUNTY L40 S 31 20 1950 C +20.2 +16.2 +19.1 +19.2 3.8 3.4 M 1957 1953 147 S 74 73 1952 C +9.8 +4.2 +7.0 +2.9 4.8 6.3 M; P 1958 1957 928 S 11 10 1957 C +32.4 +29.0 +30.0 +28.4 2.7 5.9 M 1957 1959 933 S 15 14 1957 C +23.4 +20.8 +23.3 +21.1 3.7 3.5 M 1960 1960 NASSAU COUNTY 2 (035-127-2) F 580 350 1939 B +42.0 +21.6 +25.2 +20.8 6.6 4.6 P 1947 1957 8 (032-126-1) F 680 --1939 B +41.1 +24.9 +24.2 +20.6 4.3 4.2 P 1947 1959 12 (038-127-1) F 640 --1939 B +24.0 -17.23 -2.14 -12.64 18.92 15.62 P 1947 1955 27 (040-126-1) F ----1939 B +10.1 -26.10 -17.12 -25.58 28.93 17.15 P 1946 1957 44 (037-136-1) F 1,000 450 1934 B +19.8 +3.3 +3.73 +0.26 6.11 4.04 P 1947 1957 50 (036-142-1) F 569 --1940 B +40.5 +22.4 +27.0 +22.1 3.9 6.5 P 1940 1956 51 (033-150-1) F 580 --1940 B +42.0 +26.3 +28.6 +26.2 3.4 1.9 P 1947W48 1957 55 (037-130-1) F 540 504 1940 B +33.1 +8.5 +14.1 +9.3 9.7 10.0 P 1947 1957 OKALOOSA COUNTY 3 (024-636-1) F 800 500 1936 B +20.1 -47.67 -42.93 -70.26 25.19 43.30 P 1950 1957 (034-626-1) F 652 409 1947 B -93.3 -111.2 -115.0 ---7.3 ---P 1948 1960 25 (038-631-1) F 609 456 1947 B -108.1 -121.9 -122.6 -124.8 2.2 3.1 P 1949 1959 27 (030-635-2) F 591 422 1948 B -27.9 -55.0 -60.7 -65.2 6.4 13.2 P 1951 1959 29 (035-637-1) F 766 524 1947 B -102.3 -119.1 -121.7 -126.4 5.4 4.7 P 1948 1960 31 (037-645-1) F 690 527 1948 B -46.8 -62.6 -65.2 -66.5 2.2 2.4 P 1948 1960 34 (028-629-1) F ----1947 B +26.6 +3.6 ----9.22 8.2 13.82 P 1950 1959

PAGE 73

S" " Water level above (+) or below (-) land surface r" o to 16 .. I" (feet) cc U 0 a4 c Prior to 1961 Highest water. Maximum Wellnumber .0 Ugtsw er a;^mr |Remarks Well number ay or June level in May range Remarks ..0 --a May orJunen 445 C 45 o U.W S .m u High Low ~ ~ (year) (year) 196 962 1961 1962 OKEECHOBEE COUNTY 2 S 21 18 1949 C +46.7 +39.8 +43.6 +39.1 4.0 8.9 M 1957 1949 3 S 22 19 1948 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.2 +58.5 3.6 4.7 M 1959 1950 ORANGE COUNTY 47 (832-128-1) F 350 328 1930 C -1.50 -10.97 -4.56 -12.25 10.44 6.94 1948 1956 47B (832-128-3) S 17 17 1948 B +3.04 -8.98 -1.11 -10.01 12.07 4.18 1960 1956 47C (832-128-4) S 50 46 1948 B -27.47 -39.35 -30.44 -36.40 9.98 2.66 1960 1953 832-105-1 F 492 151 1960 M ------26.51 -28.33 3.44 4.55 OSCEOLA COUNTY 171 S 19 12 1950 C +32.1 +28.0 +30.9 +29.9 3.4 4.4 M 1957 1956 179 S 18 18 1949 C +47.1 +43.3 +44.8 +44.1 4.1 4.5 M 1960 1950 181 S 15 14 1948 C +77.9 +72.4 +73.8 +72.2 3.1 3.7 M 1957 1956 182 S 23 16 1949 C +61.3 +56.7 +58.9 +57.5 3.8 4.7 M 1957 1950 183 S 27 22 1948 C +73.2 +68.3 +70.9 +69.6 3.9 4.2 M 1957 1956 PALM BEACH COUNTY 88 B 17 16 1944 C +8.6 +3.6 +5.3 +4.5 4.1 5.1 M 1948 1956 99 B 18 16 1948 C +10.0 +5.5 +6.6 +6.6 3.0 3.5 M 1957 1956 108 B 37 12 1950 C +17.0 +14.3 +16.3 +16.4 1.6 1.8 M 1957 1951 109 B 14 9 1950 C +18.9 +15.0 +18.0 ---2.9 3.8 H 1957 1956 110 B 8 8 1951 C -2.8 -5.6 -3.0 ---3.2 3.4 B 1957 1952 436 B 12 11 1956 C -2.10 -4.3 -3.1 -3.2 2.0 1.9 B 1957 1960

PAGE 74

SWater level above (+) or below -) land surface .(feet) e Prior to 1961 Highest water )ax Well mber level in Hay range ark "a 0. a' Q High iLow v i (ye (year). 1961 1962 -1961 1962 PASCO COUNTY 13 (313-226-1) F 49 43 1934 C -4.77 -10.1 -8.03 -8.92 3.17 4.41 1959 1945 325-211-I F 227 49 1959 C -9.97 -11.88 -16.93 -22.14 6.98 6.05 1960 1960 PINELLAS COUNTY 13 (808-245-1) F 141 33 1947 C -8.29 -10.70 -8.89 -9.05 1.19 1.54 1948 1950 77 (304-2j-1) F 282 --1947 C -64.41 -68.01 -65.70 -66.63 1.90 2.38 1959660 1949 ito (Su3-246-1) F 230 25 1947 B -26.55 -27.57 -28.11 -29.53 2.11 2.86 1959 1960 (66 (303-247-1) F 195 --1945 B -12.18 -18.34 -12.91 -15.20 5.88 6.76 1951 1953 246 (73d-247-1) F 208 --1945 C -25.12 -28.72 -25.86 -26.42 2.00 2.26 1948 1956 561(750-2'0-1) F 188 --1947 C -1.53 -4.04 -2.90 -3.62 1.53 1.80 1948 1956 663 (758-244-4) F 2.1 81 1954 C -20.12 -24.55 -21.60 -22.38 2.33 3.24 1959 1955 667 (735-243-1) F 843 --1954 C -53.32 -56.68 -54.49 -55.32 2.03 3.03 1959 1955 POLK COUNTY 4 9 (10-136-1) F 195 81 1945 C -1.70 -4.85 -3.17 -5.34 2.76 2.23 1960 1956 43 (79-1538-1) F 643 325 1948 C -63.65 -76.68 ----84.82 7.85 11.93 P 1948 1955 47 (310-136-2) S 67 60 1943 C +111.7 +107.3 +108.5 +107.1 3.5 1.5 M 1960 1956 48 (732-131-1) S 62 59 1949 C +100.8 +96.2 +99.6 +97.3 3.2 1.6 M 1954 1956 49 (743-119-1) S 17 14 1949 C +104.7 +99.1 +101.0 +99.9 2.8 5.8 M 1957 1956 51 (744--13-) H 319 208 1949 C -5.08 -14.20 -10.10 -14.56 8.73 10.15 1958 1955 733-158-311 F 710 237 1955 C -15.88 -28.60 -28.15 -37.04 10.96 13.02 P 1958 1956 802-132-1 F 463 137 1959 B ------7.65 ---0.94 1.97 305-155-2 F 311 82 1956 B -15.16 -22.07 -21.59 -25.64 5.77 6.73 1959 1956 805-155-3 H 72 62 1955 B -12.52 -19.29 -17.86 -21.73 5.26 5.75 1959 1956 306-156-1 S 11 8* 1935 B -3.69 -7.82 -6.09 -8.86 2.82 1.91 *Screened from 1959 1956 8 to 11 feet 806-156-2 1 103 63 1956 B -16.89 -22.73 -24.22 -29.66 8.25 9.71 1959 1956

PAGE 75

S-I * .-Water-level above (+) or below (-) land surface *' r-. -1 "..-..-. (feet) n....... ...-.:i -Prior to 1961 Highest water Maximu Well number S., .4. -Rhearks Well ^. level in May range AU 4j a Oa 0 -r n *o one am; h 1 -I (y; ear) (yea) 1961 1962 1961 1962 PUTNAM COUNTY 28 (925-138-1) F 159 --1936 B -6.2 -9.14 -7.27 -9.81 2.39 1.64 1944 1956 29 (939-138-1) F 300 --1936 B +10.8 +4.47 +5.19 +2.02 2.80 3.24 1936&47 1956 937-153-1 F 300 --1934 B -30.30 -35.65 -29.51 -31.81 1.21 3.68 1959 1957 939-134-11 F 547 113 1958 B +4.26 +3.21 +2.55 -1.75 4.35 3.60 1959 1960 943-152-1 H 124 --1956 B -44.91 -46.66 -43.20 -44.96 1.64 1.40 1958 1957 ST. JOHNS COUNTY 5 (007-123-1) F 350 180 1934 B +43.9 +36.7 +39.6 +35.0 3.9 5.3 1951 1957 8 (005-129-1) F 336 240 1934 B +36.5 +23.7 +26.4 +23.3 3.7 4.6 1947 1957 9 (953-118-1) F 1,400 170 1930 B +34.2 +22.5 +23.3 +19.5 4.0 3.8 1947 1956&57 000-123-2 F 258 --1957 B +4.72 +2.64 ----0.57 4.44 3.24 1959 1957 937-122-1 F 622 142 1958 C -17.30 -18.70 -18.80 -21.49 2.96 3.30 1959 1960 941-129-7 F541 --1955 B +10.1 +7.39 +6.7 +1.52 8.83 6.83 P 1959 1957 947-126-1 F 275 --1956 B -1.55 -6.1 -6.21 -10.86 15.13 6.81 P 1958 1956 ST. LUCIE COUNTY 41 S 17 13 1950 C +28.2 +25.2 +27.4 +26.7 2.5 3.4 H 1957 1956 42 S 18 13 1950 C +26.9 +24.1 +25.0 +24.6 3.0 4.7 M 1951 1955 SANTA ROSA COUNTY 10 (032-648-1) G 197 140 1947 B -80.1 -91.3 -85.7 -88.3 0.9 2.1 1948 1957 102 (021-709-8) S 41 31* 1950 C -4.43 -9.52 -5.40 -6.79 2.32 3.09 *Screened from 1960 1955 31 to 41 feet 035-706-1 G 211 206* 1959 M -82.94 -85.77 -82.84 -83.62 1.59 4.55 *Screened from 1960 1959 206 to 211 feet 040-708-1 G 128 123* 1959 M ------+4.83 +3.78 1.87 3.01 *Screened from 123 to 128 feet; +4.46 feet only May measurement prior to 1961 041-649-1 G 98 '93* 1959 B -56.34 -56.54 -59.35 -56.39 4.41 2.66 *Screened from 1960 1960 93 to 98 feet

PAGE 76

S c -(feet) Sb. Prior to 1961 Highest ater aximu Remar S. 0 0 C ^ May or June level ^ May r --a a. L 1961 1962 1961 1962 TI I (year) (year) 1962 1961 1962 SARASOTA COUNTY 9 (719-225-1) 7 730 101 1930 C +4.51 -5.60 -6.00 -7.98 6.71 7.77 1931 1956 SEMINOLE COUNTY 125 (841-122-1) F 158 74 1951 C -34.18 -41.33 -37.86 -41.77 5.06 3.89 1960 1956 257 (847-113-6) F 206 --1951 B +5.10 +1.40 +2.66 +0.27 3.50 3.06 1953 1956 SUMtER COUNTY 852-201-1 F 125 45 1961 B ------------4.06 0.75 SWANNEE COUNTY 019-249-1 F 138 135 1961 B ----------33.02 2.30 3.14 TAYLOR COOUTY 35 (003-330-1) F 245 189 1946 C -1.00 -28.6 -23.8 -29.1 16.3 13.5 1949 1957 36 (004-331-1) S 35 --1947 C -5.10 -23.95 -10.68 -15.04 6.97 1.89 1948 1957 UNION COUNTY 001-224-L F 256 198 1959 B -------89.54 -92.57 2.21 1.82 007-222-1 F 724 694 1958 C -86.92 -88.45 -88.56 -91.89 3.04 2.02 1959 1960 VOLUSIA COUNTY 29 (911-125-1) F 107 --1936 B -11.86 -18.54 -16.93 -18.57 1.73 1.76 1951 1956 30 (917-128-1) F 180 --1936 B +11.2 +6.7 +9.6 +8.2 3.4 1.8 1959 1948 31 (856-105-1) F 113 --1936 C -4.72 -7.9 -6.33 -7.8 2.99 3.96 1953 1945 32 (919-125-1) F 138 --1936 B -1.2 -4.51 -3.32 -4.94 1.48 2.39 1937 &38 1956 905-113-3 F 351 93 1955 C -0.22 -3.66 -1.66 -2.72 2.86 3.78 1958 1956 909-106-1 F 235 102 1955 B -5.25 -5.87 -7.07 -8.86 2.18 3.41 1959 1955 909-106-4 F 234 102 1955 C -4.95 -7.56 -6.78 -8.95 3.55 5.25 1958 1960 909-106-9 F 496 480 1955 B -6.62 -7.18 -8.17 -9.81 2.01 2.58 1958 1960 910-105-1 F 220 152 1955 C -12.84 -16.65 -14.71 -17.27 5.40 7.61 1958 1960 911-104-4 F 235 115 1955 B -15.72 -20.81 -22.97 -23.21 7.08 5.58 1955 1958 911-104-9 F 500 483 1955 B -10.26 -12.63 -12.07 -13.82 2.31 2.49 1958 1956

PAGE 77

r :-Water level above (+) or below-.(-) land surface a r. 4 w (feet) Wl -+ea w > Prior to 1961 Highest water Maxim mr ell number ay or un level in May range 0 Hay or une 0. 06 0 0 _High Low 4O14 o. w i 1961 1962 1961 1962 *u'| .. (gyear) (year) 61 WAKoULA COUNTY 2 (009-412-1) F 65 22 1937 B -0.86 -3.05 -2.27 -2.03 1.84 1.23 T 1958 1951 11 (000-426-1) F 70 45 1946 B -5.58 -8.25 -7.31 -6.70 1.22 2.58 1955 1960 005-417-1 F 87 --1961 B ---------2.43 2.36 2.03 011-410-1 F 80 --1961 B -------1.87 1.45 0.83 WALTON COUNTY 13 (022-606-1) F 450 --1936 B +15.8 +11.1 +11.4 +11.2 1.1 1.7 1950 1956 17 (029-607-2) F 187 --1947 B +30.7 +25.4 +25.9 ---1.6 1.5 1948 1957 019-610-1 F 615 188. 1961 B ---------+12.5 0.3 1.0 023-610-1 F ----1961 B -------+14.3 0.8 0.6 029-614-1 F 160 --1961 B -------+20.5 0.9 1.0 043-612-1 F 509 323 1961 B -------148.2 1.9 4.6 WASHIHGTON COUNTY 4 (046-548-1) F 785 --1935 B -9.47 -15.09 -12.06 -12.26 6.66 6.73 1953 1954 037-542-2 F 206 202 1961 B ------19.65 1.37 4.83

PAGE 78

-FLORIDA-GEOLOGICAL-SURVEY COPYRIGHT NOTICE © [year of publication as printed] Florida Geological Survey [source text] The Florida Geological Survey holds all rights to the source text of this electronic resource on behalf of the State of Florida. The Florida Geological Survey shall be considered the copyright holder for the text of this publication. Under the Statutes of the State of Florida (FS 257.05; 257.105, and 377.075), the Florida Geologic Survey (Tallahassee, FL), publisher of the Florida Geologic Survey, as a division of state government, makes its documents public (i.e., published) and extends to the state's official agencies and libraries, including the University of Florida's Smathers Libraries, rights of reproduction. The Florida Geological Survey has made its publications available to the University of Florida, on behalf of the State University System of Florida, for the purpose of digitization and Internet distribution. The Florida Geological Survey reserves all rights to its publications. All uses, excluding those made under "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright legislation (U.S. Code, Title 17, Section 107), are restricted. Contact the Florida Geological Survey for additional information and permissions.


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UF00001108.pdf
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METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 1 Title Page
PAGE1 i
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2 ii
PDIV2 Table Contents
PAGE3 iii
PAGE4 iv
PAGE5 v 3
PAGE6 vi 4
PDIV3 Main
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PDIV4 Appendix
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STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1
FILES2