Citation
Stratigraphic and paleontologic studies of wells in Florida

Material Information

Title:
Stratigraphic and paleontologic studies of wells in Florida United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Power House well no. 2. Peninsular Oil and Refining Company's J. W. Cory no. 1 ( FGS: Bulletin 19 )
Series Title:
Florida Geological Survey: Bulletin
Creator:
Cole, W. Storrs ( William Storrs ), 1902-
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee
Publisher:
The State Geological Survey
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vi, 91 p. : incl. illus., 18 pl., tables, diagrs. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Paleontology -- Florida ( lcsh )
Foraminifera, Fossil ( lcsh )
Oil well drilling ( lcsh )
Geology, Stratigraphic -- Tertiary ( lcsh )
City of Ocala ( local )
City of Tampa ( local )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Series Statement: ( FGS: Bulletin 19 )
Statement of Responsibility:
With description of a species of Foraminifera from another well. By W. Storrs Cole.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
001809069 ( aleph )
01349318 ( oclc )
AJN2920 ( notis )
gs 41000177 /REV ( lccn )

Full Text




STATE DEPARTMENT
FLORIDA GE


E. RICE Herman


OF OF


FLORIDA CONSERVATION


O0LOGIGAL


SUPERVISOR


Gunter.


SURVEY CONSERVATION


Director, Geological


Survey


GEOLOGICAL


BULLETIN No.


- I


STRATIGRAPH IC


STUDIES


OF


AND


WELLS


PALEONTOLOGIC


FLORIDA


United


Brotherhood


House


Wefl


Carpenters


and


Joiners


America,


Power


Penlnsulv Oil and Refining


Company's J


Cory


With


description


species


Ftraminif era


from


another


well.


w.
Olili


Storra SState


C ,Ph.D. ,,"niversity


frln.Lllntl AaI *,'.







~57


31


* 7. .U;v"s


FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN


NINETEEN


Frontispiece


C


t I ..~. I


- ~-...
I
'V..-".

.. 4t




S

'--A'


t I ~~ViA'.
- 1L~

'I t~. I' -~



~ ~
*

k



tX.'



4
*
-V.

2.




'~ ~

4
*



~'* \

'4-N





-' .' ~ a*~ .Ae-~
-~ ~ ~


- ~,.,<.x
o ~ ,~ C -J
*. -.~ ~ "(. I


a V A.
- a -t



*.. S ~ N.


~ .~. N. t .4 t' ?,rvt ~., -.~-s~-.- 4.
h-
4. -. ~ j
3 -' ..~. <.~- ~ -..~'.
- *4t ~ .. ~c*~' 4, ~
~
~ -%- >sac ~
~ ~ V

- - ~ ~.t.


-- ''C'.--.

................................

t *-M 4% ~

--- ~

..4~ ..r~4 i #t4r~z-~, -r
-- -~..
,
-~ j -~ ...r'.4 ..
3 t A



- .,~, ~ 2~A~

* "-.. -~

-I
'4rk'4y~tt ~t~
'- I --. -'. -.
-~ -t ~ 2tM~~.' $.s~Th~z "'. ,..-
,.~Y ..

N,
* .08 ,
.- 3 ~ ~. .C 5 .4 ~
\ ~ -'


-~ -. ~iit~ ii



* -'tt*4 ~~LvA;r;7s~z~


.- -.7'

-- ~~.4j.:t.#S~~n' .
- 7
'~<~~' I

a S.

., -'4-I ~ at~t'4,yk& tt. ..-# .' k.~t r 'S-'-tr~%~.
'A

a - -~ ~:tr~-. 4~ a-.





a






.' I 44



.* I'- ,



.
*'4 -Nt

~ 1.~- p.~ :~~.-;

3 yr -t ~- '.1


I3- '~'~ its. I 71 ~ ri

a


4



A
'ft


p t.VK :jtx#- *> ,. .: ~
1,~ K .. 4.A
~A '~'' .
7 V k '~At ~ ~
'A *

-'I
:5

k'~' -~ A' ~
~
~;. ~ p
4
Nt. ~

2 .~ ~' a
.




p.,


r







~r -. S &
'- "' 1 >
~ A
~.19~ *
4-, ,., ?
~ ~1~S



a;







LETTER


OF


TRANSMITTAL


HONORABLE S.


Supervisor of


RICE, Conservation.


I have


honor


transmit


a report


entitled


,Stratigraphic


and


Paleontologic


Studies


Welts


inFloridat


Storrs


Cole


Ohio


State


University,


Columbus


,Ohio,


published


as Geological


Bull6tin


This


paper contains studies of two


wells


peninsular


Florida


that


particular


scientific


and


economic


interest,


and


is a continua-


tion wells


a series


that


as a deep


Both
great


The


test


because
interest


second


well


studies


Peninsular


oil and


depth


both


initiated


and


IS SO


and


pure


is a water


Bulletin"


Refining
deepest


geographic


scientist


supply


'well


One


Company,


well


position


and and


drilled


this


economic included


was


these


drilled


Florida.


~vel1


geologist. because it


furnishes


useful


data


correlation


purposes.


want


take


this


opportunity


express


appreciation


interest


ment


and


you


have


support


you


work


have


so generously


Geological


Depart-


given


Very


respectfully,


HERM AN


GUNTER,


Director


Geological


Tallahassee May 6, 19d


Survey


,Florida,


61.


shown




















PUBLISHED


AUGUST


1941




CONTENTS


Introduction..... Acknowledgments Previous studies


PAGE


a a S ... *0 ..... - a a a ........ - a a a - --- a a S ... ..... ... ..... a .... a a a a a a - .... ..... S S S .... ... a ... a a a a ......
.........a ............. ........... - a. ....... ... -. .. .... ....... .... .... ....... ...... .... ... ...... a ...... .....


United Brotherhood of Carpenters and


Power


House


Well


(W-448)


Joiiiers of


Anmerica,


Stratigraphy
Miocene


S SS -......- .. -a aa a ..... ..mmoo~... -a ........ .. ..- .... -a.. ........ a. ..... o~~eo go~ola ... a .....


Hawthorn


formation


Tampa Eocene....


Ocala
Middle


limestone


liuestone
Eocene


Paleontological Record


aaa -a%


... - a a a .... a a a a a a a a a a * a ...... ........ ... ... a a a a a a ... a .... a a a tO a a a ..... a a a - a a
- ....... .... a ......... - a a... a aa a a .......... a a a a a aa a a a a a .4 a a a a ....... a ... a a a ... a a -


Peninsular


Refining


Company's


W. Gory


* (\V.445)


Stratigraphy
Pltocene


a a a. a a .... --- a a a a a a a .... a .... a a a ...... a. a a a a a a a a a a a .... a a a a a a a a a a ..... a a a a a ... S a a a a a a .... 4 a a a a a a a a a a a a
S a a S a S ... a a a a a a S a a a a a a a a a .... a a a a a .... a a a a a - .... a a a a a a .... a a a a a a a .... a a a a a a a ... a a a a a a ...... a a a a a a a a a a


Caloosahatchee


Miocene


Hawthorn Tampa 111


Oligocene Eocene ...
Ocala
Middle Lower


formation


formation nestone ...a.


limestone aaaaaa.'aaaaaaaaaaaaE-aaa..aaaa..aaaa.aa.--aaa--aa-.aaa..a- ..aa.
Ei oce nie .... ..aa...aa aa ....... a..a...... aa.............-..... .. ... ....a...a ...a.... a ... aa a..... -aa....


Cr ietaceous .... ........
Comparison of the Gory well


Description


cores from


Paleontological Record


(W-445)
~Cory~


with the Marathon eli (W-445) a.... .ea....a


well


a... 1


Descriptions


of Species


Textularilidne..
rewtuiuaria
Verneuilinidne.
1'crncuilinza
Valvhliidae ...


TVa vutina


Lituoela Ooslinoiioz


corjJen8i8


flortdanc&


mart 11


floritl.anta 4 ] fic, dana


Cole,


Cole,


Cushman


Dole ;Co


n. Si).


l3ernuulez


Oushnman fl Si). le, n. s


Bernnidez


* a ... a a a a a a ... a ... a a a - a a a a ...... a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
I. a a. a. a..a5 a a a. ... a...aa..aa a aaaa..a.a. a a. a a a a a a.... a a a a. a a


Diet yoconus coolcei (Moberg)
guntert Moberg


.... ..... a a a .... a a a .... ............. a .... .... a ........ a a ... a a a - a a a a
................. a - a a a ..... ...... ..... ......... a a -, a a. ..... .... a .... ...


Camnerinidlae.
Oanicrina


moodybraiwhensis


vandcr8toki


(Rutten


Gravell


Hanna


Vermunt)


P8eCtdolbitofli lu, 0bensl8





PAGE


Peneroplidae
Sp irolina


cOrjJcflsi8


Cole,


Alveolinellidne


Bctreliis


guit cr1 Cole,


11. sp.


'variety


fioridana


Cole,


var.


Biulixiinidae ....................
Pscudochrysalidina Cole, n. g fioridana


R~otaliidae ............ ....... ....
D iscorinopsis Cole,


)FJponiclc8


gun ten
jclelc8onen8i8


Cole,


gen. .. ...
Cole, n. sp
(Cuslhman


nI. sR.


Applin)


idlae


Lopidorbiloides


Lcpidorbitoide~ Lepidocycliout


( Lepidorbftodes )


( Lep idocyelina )


()%Tcplrolepjdjna )


ILO1'tOfli


mo'toni ocaiana


(Vaughan)


Cushman Cushnian


variety attenuata CJushman.......
fiorridana Cushman........
pseudonuzrgintta Cushxnaii
variety attenuata Cushinan. .....
tsclhoppi Thiadens .... ................ ... .... ........


8CflliflCSt


Vaughan


Cole


Discocyclinidae .....
Psen Jophlragmiia


( Pro pcrocycliua.)


cit rensis


(Vaughan)


Miogylpsinidae
Miogypsin a


(Miogypsina)


ltaavkinsi


Hodson


Appenidix


ILLUSTRATIONS


Plates


Figure 1. Figure 2.


Index


nmp


showin


location


of wells


Log of United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America,


Power


House


IVell


NO. 2


Figure 3. Figure 4.


Table


Log of Peninsular 01


Electric
Gory N


Comparison


Refining Company's


Peninsular


of American


Refining


Species


Cory


No. 1


Company' s


Lepidorbitoides


0rbitoid







S TRATIGRAPH IC
OF


AND!t WELLS


' ALEONTOLOGIC


FLORIDA


STUDI ES


Peninsular


and Refining


Company's


Cory


United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of


America,


Power


House


Well No. 2.


STORES


COLE


OHIO


S TATE


UNIVERSITY


INTRODUCTION


1938 the


Florida


Geological


Survey


published


a bulletin


entitled


"Stratigraphy and Micropaleontology


of Two


Deep


Well


in Florida.


The


purpose


that


bulletin


was


make


a complete


analysi


stratigraphy and micropaleontology of two


well


which Herman


Gunter,


Geologist


State


scientific samples
Refining


County


able vey dent


analysis.
submitted contractor


Florida


importance.


After


Peninsular


Company


well, (W the


n


near Jr
-445), V Florida


Robert


ineerest


~ere


mnad(


Geologic
Campbell


company,


sample:


rfrom


stu S V


Vaughc second


selected


because


publication


their


this


economic


Report,


a log


and and


and


Cory Monroe 3 availal Sur,preP][dy and vas also
LI, well well at


torn/Mn of


/. Crpen/rrb Un/on e Orj na /nw/,


we/I.


Power


Brotherhood


House


United


Carpenter


and


Joiners (W-448)


America


Gunter


miles


wrote


north


writer


f! Lakeland requesting


Polk


that


County studies


on key


1939.


wells


This


continued


bulletin


The


embodies


study


most


was


begun


significant


summer


results


these


studies.


The approximate


location


well


hown


in figure


Although


satisfactory


correlations


made


younger


for-


/
WE//si





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


hoped could 1 result middle


that all


correlated


this


Eocene.


formations


also


study


However,


with


penetrated


other


shown


well


that


studies


by the
known


this


wells


drill. units


cannot


located


Gory well


elsewhere.


done


One


below


strategic


S
p081-


tions


between


Granberry


and


Gory


wells


may


lead


eventually


correlation


older


formations


~'vIhic1i


underlie


middle


Eocene


iln southernmost


Florida.


United


Brothier1hood


Carpenters


and


Joiners


P ower


H ouse


wvell


2 ended


in the


middle


Eocene,


identification


stratigraphic


units


encountered


could


made


with


certainty


specimens


discussed


this


bulletin


filed


Florida


Geological


Survey


Museum


Tallahassee;


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Since


1929


been


privilege


writer


cooperate


with


Florida


stratigraphy


IHerman


Gunter


Geological


and


State


Survey


microfaunas


Geologist,


various


that


state.


assisted


problems


During


those


relatingS


that


studies


time
ways


numerous


list.


Thus


is a pleasure


acknowledge


eouragement


irationi


of this


exanunlg


and~


and


support


bulletin.


which


M r.


I am indebted


commenting


on many


GOunter has


given


Wayland


lprepa-


Vaughian


photomicrographs


during


a brief


visit


with


him


this


past


ISUmner.


Mrs.


abeth


Burekunyor


furnished milnifera.


able
The


arslstance


United


mn making


St ates


Geological


drawings of the Survey undertook


small the d


Fora1iff icult


task


sup~)1yiflg


suitable


photomicrograp~h


illustrating


external


appearance


large


Foraminif era.


PREVJOU


TUDJES


The samll


well


('1y448)


from have


United Brothlerhood


been


previously


Carpenters and


studied


any


Joiners


geologist


-Ia


I'-


1~4 -


nn~t-n* nnn.- *~~- *1 fl nnrrb n nn r.fl~ru r *I~I ,. .


1.701 ~I


(XIT 4A4r\


110170


bnol-I


.IT




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


IN FLORIDA


The


second


note


recapitulates


information


given


first


although


second


note


Campbell


states


that


Diet yoconus


(presumably


gunteri)


occurs at approximately


1.800


feet


Boretis


about 8.300


feet and


hit otina


watnuten


(Dictyoconus


walnut en


was


reported


worker


from


final


core.


A summary


of the determinations of Mrs.


Applin


the first article


given


below.


Pilocene


(Caloosahiatchee


formation)


Una ssigne(d


Top


Miocene


Depth in feet .....0-110
...... 11 0-3 90


Top of Oligocceie


lop of Eocene


( Ocalut


01) of Upper Cretaceous


lop of Lower


limestone


1220 57301 8106


I
Cretaceous


The oniy fossils mentioned ini


this brief account


were


Lepidorbitoid


5,730


feet


and


miliolids


in the


Lower


Cretaceous


or Comanchean


The


Campbell


present


in his


study


substantiates


article


complete


certain


agreement


contacts


is not


given


possible.


may


due


differences


in interpretation.


The


observation


should


Oligocene


made


indicated


this


S Campbell


and


tudy, place.


certain


Eocene p)oimts


check


with


dliffecre


Miocene


feet.


This


calcareous


sandstone


and


does


ma rk


slight


lithologic


break.


The


writer,


however


placess


Miocene


(Hlawthorn


formation)


feet


wich


marks


section


sand


and


marls


in1 this


well.


The


Upper


Lower


Cretaceous


Cretaceous


is stated


given


definitely


5.730


feet


8,106


and feet


though


some


both


caution


must


these


depths


Cretaceous


exercised


will


deposit


stated


were


encountered


clearly


other


portions lacking


this


below


bulletin


2.000


feet.


that


The


paleontological


fossils


that


evidence


occur


virtually


indlicative


deposits,


absolute


indicators


that


a series


rock


have


been


reached.





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


UNITED


BROTH ERHOOD


OF


CARP ENTERS


AND


JOINERS


WELL


(W-448)'


The


drilled located


United


Brotherhood


Vaughan,


about


miles


Well


north


Carpenters Contractor Jaakeland it


and


Joiners


Tampa.


Polk


wvell


This


County


was


well


Samples


cuttings


regular


were


intervals5


received


from


July I feet


1939.


These


feet


were


which


collected


depth


well


was


completed.


The


elevation


of the


well is


157.6


feet


above sea


level.


Examination


area


immediately


Hawthorn


geological


adjacent


formation


map city


Miocene


age.


Florida6


indicates


Lakelandi Although


that


underlain


Hawthorn


formation


is assumed


underlie


Polk


County,


outcrops


only


the western half.


Below


Hawthorn


formation,


Tampa


limestone


assumed


underlie


Polk


nately,


County


only


entire


have


a very


county.7 already


generalized


Some


been


details


presented


picture


fossil


subsurface


MossomYs


zones


section


Unfortu-


encountered


in those


wells


is given.


Thus


,exact


correlation


is impossible.


STRATJGRAPHY


The


penters


formations


and


Joiners


formations


penetrated


wvel


correlated


:hown with


United


graphically


known


Brotherhood on Figure'


outcropping


units


Car-


except


middle


Eocene


which


been


recognized


surface


any


area


in Florida.


MIOCEINE


Hawthorn


formation


.-The


first


amplej


represents


interval


rfr


feet


and


is assigned


Hawthorn


formation.


The


'V tI*


Hawthorn


is comnosed


formation


nhosnhatie


represented


mars


sands.


samples


some


limestone


from


and


this
beds


qkBl_


F





STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


IN FLORIDA


...AoSample
..-Sih/v ca/oructos, chayej, con/alning phospho/c pehb/es


pho4d ia//c


-ebs


\G/ enlsh ijly sandy


with occasionaliphospha/ic pebbl


wi/h scoltead phosphM/i p ebb/es


]."--7'Yri whie, w/h some cos/.sofsman/l/gasfropods


soft, porous, numerous


bryozoa


fossiliferous


large toram/nifera


Ilargje


toraminifera


foram/nifera


'-tan, ex/remejy


(largey casfs of soll/ forms)


fossliferous


of small forominifera; some brown ca/Icile


rc4s5llferous


chalky


ILiht- tan, porous
... Tahard "" 2ey, pom us.


A 'h lioan, hard fosslilferous


Hard
-._Sl/'ghtf/ arenaceous 'WVo a m ple


Grey greasy


J~q~fUIt4I4 nora


Soft porous,


Abundant,


Ma/n/y


rI' casts


Browm hamd


while





IFLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


Tampa


containing


careful
sample.


tion that feet.


limestone.-At


a few


search


casts


was


]3lowever


feet.


of small


made


because


gastropods foraminifera


lithologic


a. hard- white


was


encountered.


were


character


limestone
Although


encountered


and


that thle Tampa limestone underlies the entire county


w ell


penetrated


Tampa


limestone


between


this


assump:


it is thought


and


Tihe


succeeding


sample


(117-180


feet)


was


also


found


devoid


diagnortic


Foraminif era


rather


numerous


B3ryozoa


were


countered.


States letter :"


These


National


' 'However,


were submitted
Museum. The


W-448


contain


]3assler


following


quotation


an abundance


United


f'r om


clharacteris-


Jacksomian


Bassler


811(1


fossil


with


Reteporidae
Tubucellaria


Potyascosoecia


f altax


Canu


and


jacksondica


B3assler,


Canu


and


an equally


good


spcieCs.


The


other


species


this


Neflia


oculata


Busk


Porella and


Entalophora


wich


have


a wider


range. ''


Oanu and Bassler' give the following ran


for the


various genera


and


pecies


mentioned


Bassler


letter :


)~olyascosoccia


Tribuecllaria


jacksonilea...


faila


'2


..~~iMAdd1e Jacksonian


iipirnr


,1


Jacksonian to Recent


P e.lo) Jla~ .. .. .aa ..a.. ..a........a........... .....a.......... .. a-.a .....


mutetian


Recent


to Claibornian


Although


age,


Eocene
portion1


certain


prevailing


disdrepancies


Foraminif era


(117-180


feet)


aspect


n-iay


appear


well


Bryozoa


noted. until placed


suggests


Inasnutch


a depth


in the


an Eocene
diagno-tic


feet


Tampa.


this


may


that the Bryoza found have a longer range


01' it may


be that they represent


reworked


than form


was


believed for merly


EJOOENE


Ocala Jimestone.--The


tWO


samples repre


enting tqinterval from


feet


abundant


large


coImpIosed


Foraminif era.


f asoft
Certain


L)o~'ous,


small


gray


limestone


Foraminif era


with


were


a .t - a a n a ., a a. a -




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WVELLS


IN FLORIDA


Many


stone these


other


which


large


areas


reported


Foraminif era


state.


from


diagnostic


Certain


Ocala


species


Oeala


associated


limestone


first


limewith
time,


although


most


these


speeds


have


been


found


elsewhere


deposits


upper


Eocene


age.


Middle


tered.


Eocene.-At


Except


interval


a light between


limestone


and


was feet


eneoun-


and


feet


predominating


color


limestone


encountered


light


probable


brown.


This


section


equivalent


represents
Claiborne


middle


section


Eocene.


lrepbit ed


from


Granb erry correlation


Stubbs12


W'ell.11


can


refers


Much


proved. as the


more


detailed


work must


undoubtedly


Coskinolina


zone


done same


in Seminole


before


zone


this that


County


PALEONTOLOGICAL


RECORD4


117-180 feet Bryozoa
Entalophora sp.
Nellia ocutata Husk


Polya800oecia Pore fla sp.


Pu buceflaria


fallaa~


214.217 feet
Oibietidc8 sp.
Ripihidium sp).
1?ponidea sp.
Oloborotalia sp.
Rotalia sp.
Trilooutlhw sp.
250-258 feet
Carnerina sp. probabi
flphidiurn tewanurn


Fl ponide8


Globulina gibba d'Orbigny


Gtypstna globul Lepidocyclina


Canu


Banssler


Canu 81nd Bassler


3' 0. vaflderstoki (M. C(Cushnmn and Applin)


(Cushmnan


a(Reuss)
(Lepidocyclina)


variety


Operculinoide8


floriden8is


OCUlaflU8


(Hetlprtn)


(Oushman)


Teaxtularia aubhaueril Oushman
Valvulina ocalana Oushman 258-205


Rutten and Verinunt)


Applin )


attenuata Cushman


floridana


Cushman


Jackson Ica


Jaok8onen~si8


nor'tont Cushiman ocalana Cushman





FLORIDA

Opercu lino ides
300-320 feet


GEOLOGICAL


wiilcoxi


SURVEY-BULLETIN


(Hellprin)


Cam erina nzoodybranchensis Psetidophragmina (Pro poroy


Gravell


dma)


citrefl8l


370-390 feet
Discorinopsis gunttert Cole, n. sp.
llvuina Jloridana Cole, n. sp. 390-395 feet


Djictyoconus cookel
409-413 feet


(Moberg)


Coskinolina floridana Cole, 413419 feet
Spirolina coryensis Cole, n. 505-520 feet


Lituton ella


Hanna is (Vaughan)


nI. sp?.


n. sp).


floridana Cole,




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


Peninsular Oil and Refining (w


Company's ..
-445)


We


Cory


No.


The


Peninsular


and


Refining


Company


Tampa,


Florida,


drilled center County


wildcat NWlAco


'.This


well


well


known


Section


was


started


Gory


Township December


., Range


1938


and


was


Monroe


abandoned


May


1939.


It is the deepest so


far drilled in Florida.


The elevation


of the


log were


derrick floor was 14


presented


through the courtesy


Loff land Numerous


ceived.


These


Br others


samples
cuttings


feet.


on June


Samples,


1939


of Robert B.


Tulsa


cuttings


represented


Campbell, Oklahoma.


taken


the driller


Florida Tampa.


's log


and


Geological


electric
Survey


The drillers were


(Frontispiece).


foot


intervals


intervals


from


feet


were


2.840


feet


and


cuttings,


from 3,252


pletion


was


from


3,240


feet


8.310


cores were sent which


feet to


10,006


10,006


feet.


feet. This


feet. were


The total


addition


collected at


depth


samples


samples


irregular


this


was


Well


given


intervals its cornFlorida


Geological


Survey


number


W-445.


STRATIGRAPHY


The


lithologic


exact


formations


encountered


characteristics


stratigraphic


shown


determinations


Cory


well


on figure


quite


(W-445)


The


impossible


writer below


with


2,610


their found


feet


because of lack of paleontological markers.


shown


as few


samples


cuttin


Below


were


8.000 feet


,only


submitted


cores final


2,000 feet.


PLIOCENE


Caloosahatohee


formation.--Althoughi


first


sample


was


col-


leeted


from


feet


reference


geologic


map


Florida


indicates samples


:that
from


this


well


starts


feet


in the


composed


Caloosahatchee


porous,


formation.


gray,


The


fossiliferous


marl, which


(14-60)


followed


is underlain


almost


an arenaceous


white,


marl


hard


limestone


(60-70)


(70-90).


Foraminif era


present,


mb0


-~


a ~ ~-


badly
1x.ih ni-


preserved


that


iden-


UL~~ -. rnnnnnbl n| Erw*~ **t nn lA a I.n ntn1'0


L


I.U


|w


. "!TM





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


IN FLORIDA


fine


one-half


relatively


inch in


coarse.


diameter


Some these


largest


were


well


particles


rounded


and


were


polished.


least
The


chief


constituent of this


phosphatic


was


pebbles


cemented


and


appeared.


a calcareous


was quartz,


Between cement.


but frequently


and


dark feet.


,polished,


sand


Foraminif era


which


could


definitely


identified


appeared


this


section


suitable 480-490; recovered


well.


The


identification


490-500


each


500-510.


these


following


100-110


Although


depths,


only


depths 110-120


yielded


130-140


relatively


composite


fauna


Foraminif era


360-370


species


were


represent


Hawthorn


formation


without


question.


feet


stones


begin.


fragments


soft,


There
a hard


porous


limestones


is a marked


white


limestone


and


lithologic


found


dense, break


fine-grained


this


lime-


point.


sample


feet


those


formation.


area


were


which


fragments


Cushman


Thus,


is a soft


would


;porous


and


Ponton13


appear


limestone


These report


that


and


specimens


from


basal


a dense


similar


Hawthorn


Hawthorn


,fine-grained


this


limestone.


Above this is the sandstone section.


The


soft, porous


limestone


and


dense


,fine-grained


limestone


Hawthorn


sandy


marl


portion


a thickness


feet.


The


thickness


feet


sandstone,


ands


therefore


and
total


amount assigned


Hawthorn


formation


this


well


is 500


feet.


Tampa


appeared floridanus


lzes


limestone .--At


which


(Conrad),


were (see


feet


embedded


plate


Tampa limestone


,fragment


few


8, figure outcrop c


a brown


specimens


This


this


species


formation.


limestone Archaias
character-


fact


only


recognizable


Foraminif era


reported


from


Tampa


lime-


stone.


Although


species is a


proof


that


poor may


basis


writer for the


be offered


appreciates recognition


that


occurrence


a formation


is the


best


present.


OLIGOOJ~2NE


Sorites





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


At 1,100 to


1,110 feet, a Heterostegina was found


which


is referred


texana


first


Gravel


appearance of


hawkinst.


and


Hanna.


texana occurred


well


under


rort feet


test


below


consideration .H


well


appearance


.texana


appeared


feet


below the


first


occurrence


hawkinsi.


Below the Miogypsina hawkinsi and Heterostegina


texana zones


other


careful found.


Miogypsina


search


appeared


made


Port


gunteri


test


Gory


wvell.
well.


Although


was


However,


associated


with H.


texana


was


a small


brachiopod,


Airgy-


Irotheca tu
described


utegetfafni Cole


from


,(see


Meson


plate


formation


,figures


Mexico.5


which


previously


been
this


pieces


brachiopod


was


known


only


from


type


locality


therefore


interesting to find it in Florida in association with H


texana


which


also


occurs


type


locality


Argyrotheca


wegemanut.


amazing


forms


that


more


in Mexico


Foraminif era


occur


associated


samples


rfrm


with


this


these


well.


At 1,140


feet


a number


of specimens


were


encountered


which


were


tentatively


assigned


Dietygoconus cookei


(Moberg)


The


type


locality


this


species


United


State


Geological


Survey


locality


6828


New-


land


County,


Sprimg,


near


Florida.


Falmouth,


This


rock


miles


west


Live


included


Oak,


Suwannee


Suwannlee limestone


Oligocene age,


named


Cooke


and 1MIansfield1


1935.


The


next


recognizable


Foramninif era


were


found


feet.


These


were


representatives


the genus


Lepidocyclina.


Upon


detailed


analysis these proved


be species characteristic of the


Ocala limestone


elsewhere


in Florida.


1,340


discovered


feet


1,140


specimens


feet,


were


namely,


encountered


forms


which


which


were


resembled tentatively


those iden-


tified 1,140


as Dict yoconus


feet


and


1.50


cookei


feet


(Moberg) detailed


Specimens


study


Upon


were


selected


analysis


.a. a


*1


--a


I. ~r1


I -- -~


-a


p


A




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


Inasmuch


as the


tWO zones


containing


Diet yoeonus


and


Coskinotina


were


separated


Oeala


limestone,


conclusion


was


reached


that


specimens


upper


zone


(1,140


feet)


represented


reworked


middle


Eocene


forms


and


that


the specimens


previously


reported


from


Newland


Spring


had


same


type


origin.


Although


Cushman'7


states


that


range


Goskinolina


and


Diet yoeonus


lower


and


middle


Eocene


Davies18


proved


that


primitive


representative


genus


Diet yconu


occurs


Cretaceous.


records


Thus


range


occurrence


been


these


forms


extended


above


older


Eocene


rocks,


have


been


published


except for the


Newland


Spring


locality


of Mrs.


Moberg.


Inasmuch


as the.


stratigraphic


range


Diet yoconus


been


tended


downward


is only


logical


suspect


that


representatives


of this genus might have existed longer in


certain


areas than


in others.


Although


this


possibility was


considered


account


occurrence


of both Diet yoconus


and


Goskinolina in


Oligocene


Gory well


and


Newland


Spring


in the


Suwannee


limestone


was


dismissed


in favor


of the


idea


that


specimen


in the


younger


rocks


were


worked.


The


same


speeds


occur


both


1.340


feet


and


1,140


feet


with


unquestioned


Oeala


limestone


intervening.


Inasmuch


these


specialized


forms,


seems


doubtful


that


they


would


survive


such


a period


time


without


some


evolutionary


change.


The


most


abundant


species


and


below


1.340


feet


were


found


1.40


feet


rarer


specie


were


not.


Thus


Lituonella


was


found


at 1.140


feet


a few individuals


were


found


in many


samples


below


1,350


feet.


This


may


explained


fact


that


in reworking,


more


abundant


types


will


occur


with


greater


fre-


quency


younger


deposit


is possible


that


careful


search


will


reveal


Lituonella


accompanying


Coskleoina


and


Diet yoconus


reworked


faunas.


future


,great


care


must


taken


in dealing


with


species


Coskinotina


and


Dictyoconuws


in order


prove


that


reworked


ma-


terial





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY--BULLETIN


seems


pertinent


this


problem


quote


portions


letter


which


1~ir.


Stubbs


wrote.


"Your conclusi from the Bocene t range of the gener abundantly above observations cost debate.


support


Ocala


' a in, and :itute


of this


lilnestone


that tihe f' ,the Ocala. volved and below thle l proof and


contention,
Deposited


orns above the Ocala To support this you the fact tlhat the saw Ocala. I still do not That tihe subject is


the following parts of penin,


It was subsequently eroded and in a few places it removed, except for small scattered patches. The d Ocala is based on study of several hundred wells t Eocene. The extensive erosion that completely remove Ocala seems to have taken place after the deposition Miocene. I base this statement on the results of m.ny the Serninole-Volusia County area. In that territo: find the Caloosahatchee marl resting upon Middle Eqc the territory the Hawthorn occurs as remnants, but has been present in well cuttings, it has always been i lain by at least a few feet of typical Ocala. Therefore difficult to understand how the Ooskinolifla and other


were reworked cite the short e species occur feel that these still oien for


observations. sular Florida. been entirely ibution of the penetrate the portion of the the Hawthorn


has istri hat d a of


study ry, we


of wells in frequently


acene. In much of where Hawvthorn nunediately undere, it is exceedingly
' forms could have


been derived from covered Eoceue beds. It further seems that we would necessarily have many Ocala forms present in the reworked material and there is not one Ocala species present.
"There are, so far as we know now, only two areas from which this reworked fauna could have been derived. One is .In south Georgia in the Quitman to Tbrnnasville vicinity and tihe other is in a small Lpart of


V olusil south


Seminole


Georgia


in one respect.


area


Brevard
different


At Thoniasville


Eocene. There we find a upon the Coskinolina-bea C oskinolina-Dict yocon us.
removed by erosion after material. The Ocala whe: exceedingly fossiliferous. to the argument that if


bout I ring In.bol
being re pre It see the 0.


Counties


from


in east


that


East


central


Florida.


Peninsular


the Oligocene may rest upon the ZOO feet of Oligocene sediments Eocene. These Oligocene beds th of these areas the Ocala. hi deposited over the Coskinohina. ,sent as remnants in these two


higoc


Florida Middle resting
contain as been
-bearing areas is


that this would lend further weight


~ene


fauna


been


working, then the reworked material should contain Ocala species as It does Coskinolina Eocene forms.


derived


as many


or more


"On the other hand, in the lithologic character of very similar. This means t of Coskino lina and other current during Oligocene 1 all the forms died during u


support of the recurrent fa the rocks in the Bocene a :hat ecologic conditions coiii members of that group ii timer. We have no reason ipper Eocene times because


the distribution of the fauna is ver aimt oanini an d nn~ tt n flwnlvs mtiln


tu na we find nd Oligocene
lucive to the rere probably to contend our knowledg


y meager, and because we know 1 ~inme. eniivnle~nts. A fauna iral


that are life
rethat ;e of


ha Line


!




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


The writer replied as follows:


"The problem is mainly an academic one rather than practical. I believe you will agree in this. I have now established beyond question that there are two zones in which Dittyoeonu8-Uoakinolmna occur. Therefore, the use of these forms In establishing stratigraphic units Is open
to question unless there is supporting evidence. This is all the more true because the same species occur in both zones. In fact, there may be more than two zones.


mfy well faun nment that than


"The opinion Is due


academic problem is not solved so readily. I that the upper Diet yoeonus-Ooskinolina zone to reworking despite your excellent plea for


La at this horizon. t has merits, that my stand is bas yours. Davies


1938-1939, pp. changes take development correct is iI1( D. cookei, D.


778-779 place,
of the s lienated gunteri


still hold to in the Cory a recurrent


pLet me hasten to say, however, that your the idea cannot be entirely discarded, but ed on stronger theoretical and practical gr (Trans. Roy. Acad. Edinburgh, vol. LIX,


9) has demons especially in ubdivisions of by the cliarac k. D. eodon an


trated that rather rapid evolut Diet yoconu8. This is shown
the nmrginal trough. That Da


ters found (d others.


myself


I
I


arguI feel ounds pt. 3, onary Ln the dies is


others


"I am of


the


opinion, from


my rather


extensive


studies


of larger


Foraminifera, that these highly specialized forms have very restricted time ranges. I doubt If a species wvould persist through two epochs, and I am convinced that a genus would show some slight modification.
"I do nlot see that the Tropidoieptu8 problem is applicable here, inasmuch as there Is a definite tonguing of the sediments in which it occurs. In the Cory well the entire section concerned is composed of


marls 11n( fromt nid( logical cm either the


"Let


*marly ile Eoce
middle me add


limnestones. If the range of Diet yoconus.-Ooslcinolfna is ne to Tampa, why isn't it continuous in this well? Ecowere as favorable for its survival in Ocala time as In F ocene or Oligocene.


a point


no0t covered


my manuscript.


well at 1130-40 feet there are a few specimens of calling Di860rinopsis guntert. These show by tin that they have suffered transportation as they are
"It is true that many of the specimens of Di at 1140-1150 feet appear fresh without abrasion c dentally, this is a point In favor of your argument these specimens are filled with calcite, a eoflditi specimens below 1340 feet which are perfectly chambers. This is not proof, of course, of suggestive.
"The fact that the middle Bocene is covered taken .and the strongest point for a recurrent :Floridian plateau has only about one-half its surfa as the remainder is under the waters of the Ati areas. one or lboth, may have been high during 01i been the source for the rewvorked middle Eocene fl "Eocene foraminifera from the submarine cores of North America," Contrib., .vol. 15, pt. 8, 1939.).


Cory


the form which I am ir physical condition battered and chipped. ct yoeonu8s-Oos kinloliu$
f the surface. (Inci1.) However, most of [on not found in the preserved with open ransportation, but is


by the fauna.
ce avai antic o gocene orms. 4 off the


Ocala is well
However, the lable for study ,r Gulf. These
time and have ( See Oushmnan, eastern coast


This contention is not


ID,


J


[
!


v





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY--BULLETIN


bution of these forms and probably two or more rewvorked zones in the Oligocene.


If we were to hold to your viewpoint


of the section of limestone in


, we would not be able to sopthe Gory well into formations


on the basis of short ranged fossils because we would never know when


we were


dealing


with


a recurrent


fauna."'


EOCENE3


Ooala limetone.-The


first


appearance


Ocala limestoneq is


Lepidocyctina


this


well.


The


based


various


on the
species


found
Florida region.


have


or in


been


other


reported


deposits


from


upper


Ocala


limestone


Eocene


elsewhere


Caribbean


Middle Elocene.-At 1,840 to


1,350 feet,


a light tan


brown lime-


stone appears.
parently this


This


formation


Irmation is widel.a


contains


abundant


distributed


over


Diet yoconus.
peninsular F]


Ap-


Lorida.


Tliis


limestone


may


deeper


water


equivalent


sands


scribed


paper


Claiborne.


on the


Many


wells


Granberry


must


well'9 examine


(w-285)


and


prove


assigned


this


point.


Two


well


:D.


gunters
portion cookei


species
cookei


Dietygoconus


(Moberg)


is encountered


middle


zone


below


which


first 2.050.


Eocene


found


appears


,060


into


occurs


feet.


two


below


1,340


1.340-1.850


Some


zones,


Diet yoeonus


workers


, the


gunteri


feet feet


this


and


divide


this


Dictyoconus


zone.


The


cookei zone


in this


well


a thickness


feet.


Lituonella


floridana


associated


with


cookei


but is


rather


rare


most


samples


examined.


may


extend


cookei
More


zone.


work


may


is needed


practical establish


designate
validity


a Lituonella


these


sub-zone.


suggestions


The


Dictyoconus gunteri


zone


apparently


extends


2.610


feet


which stone


point


soft,


appears.


porous


this


limestone


interpretation


ends


and


correct,


a dense


brown


middle


lime-


Eocene


Diet yoconus


zones have a


thickness


1.260


feet.


Lower


Eocene.-Below


Diet yoconus


gunteri zone,


there


recognizable


fossils


- -


a deuthi


.p


3,350


feet.


- -


3,35C


feet


specimens


arate any




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


is composed


greater


a foraminiferal


percentage


of the


limestone


forms


but


thin


belong


sections faily


show


that


Miliolidae.


Generic


textbook2'


ment


and


specific


U states shallow,


"The
warm


identifications


Miliolidac


waters


have the


impossible.


reached Upper I


their


Cushman


greatest


Cretaceous


and


developEocene,


and


now


particularly


characteristic


coral


reef


conditions


in the


tropics.


core
was


Unfortunately,


help


data


determining


derived


from


section


study from


this


which


taken.


The


Gory


writer


well


has found it
encountered


impossible to


pick the exact point at


Upper


Cretaceous.


which


The


chalk


Cretaceous


5,750


formation.


feet How


certainly


much


represents


interval


Upper


between


3,350


feet


and


5,750


feet


might


Upper


Cretaceous


is a question


which


cannot


decided Below


this


time.


Lepidorbitoides


zone,


macroscopic


fossils


were


found


two


cores,


from


depths


7,676-7,684


feet


and


7,944-7,949


feet.


Stephenson


macroscopic


fossils


United


States


request


Geological !Herman


Survey Gunter.


examined


The


lowing


quotation


is from


Stephenson


letter21


Gunter.


"The core from a depth of 7,676-7,684 feet bears the imprint of the


posterior position
seen* thle labiatus


part


(perhaps


of: the beak trend of ti Schlotheitm,


also suggests


about


and binge


half) and


concentric


anl Inoceramus.


the outline of


innrks


a characteristic


certain hard faces


strongly


Eagle


Ford


Eagle


Al


the shell suggests .4 species.


Ford.


though cannot


! noceramus
lPhe matrix


The. hard limestone from a


depth


fragments and imperfect young shells


(86n8 I6


Lithologically the


the Comanche series.


lato),


rock might


none of


~'ery


of 7,944-7,049 feet contains many of Ostreidue some of which belong


them is specifically identifiable. be one of the limestones from


well


Although there is no doubt that the cores examined


Stephen-


represent


their


correlation


Cretaceous,


with


standard


there


sections


considerable elsewhere.


question


Campbell


This The


places


determination


writer


is not


was


able


based


agree


Lower


on a change


that


Cretaceous
)f lithology


evidence


8,106


this


is sufficient


feet.


depth.


state


definitely


that


this


well


penetrated t.


Lower


Cretaceous.


to Gryphaea





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


1917 and completed to a total depth of 2,555 feet early in 1918.


M ossoln22


and


Cushman28


have


both


studied" samples


from


this


well.


describing


litliologic character


sediments


encountered


Mossom


feet


logs


coralline


sandstone


limestone


from


from 1.790


feet


feet


(the


:from


last sample collected)


limestone.


Recognizable


fossil


zones


listed


follows


Marathon


"tell


(W-2)


Depth below surface in feet


*Or.bitolites


Gory


Well


(W-445)


Miogypsina cushifafii....


Miogypsin a hawkinsi


Lepidocyclina


(various sp.)


Dictyoconu8 cookei


Dictyoconus


. ... 1248
.... 1790


gunteri


*Probably Sorites sp).


...... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .........9 0 0


1220 1340 2050


DESCRIPTION


CORES FROM:


THE


GORY WELL


(W-445)


Depth


In feet


8252-56.--Dolomitic


If


limestone,


which


contains


mottled cream


mottled,


gray


sroe, except for a few pore spaces.


entirely


mixture


which could be seen 3655-60.--Argillaceous chalk,


shade


darker


3838-43.-Anihydrite, mottled,


4350-55.--Anhydrite*,


4617


mottled,


calcite


withl the naked eye.


mottled


predominating,


white


salt andr Compact,


limestone to dark


white to dark


.-Limestone, cream-colored,


tracoda noted


5256-66.-Limestone,


light


brown


mnas-


One fragment composed almost


dolomite


pepper soft.


with gray. gray.


crystals,


appearance


masses


many with


compact, nmssive, Foraminifera and


on freshly broken surfaces.


light


gray


extremely


porous,


with


casts


molds of fossils. '.
5550-70.-Limestone, creamn colored, mainly composed of small calcite crystals.


6712-32.-Limestone, 7000-10.-Chalk, whi 7352-62.--Chalk, whi
7676-84.-Limestone, 7944-49.-Limestone.


pact oneco


8168-75.-Anhydrite,
8225-50.-Limestone,


(one fragment).


ream


8333-52.-Limestone, c 8395-8409.--Anhydrite,


light


ite,


compact,


crystalline.


compact.


ite, compact. dark gray, compact, three light gray fri


three


rather


,white, colored


colored.


massive,


with a. slight odor of petroleumn.


agmnents


dark


gray to


which


nearly


abundant fossils.


gray,


light


, compact


compact.


mottled


gray


brown, (one fr


black


compact, 'agnient) ;


corn-


fragments, massive.
Anhydrite


brown.


- - a -t


,compact,


posed of black doloniltic


e fragment of selenite.


the om-


C


to tan,


brown,


without fossils


are dense and





STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


8937-53.---Anhydrite
massive, fi fragment).


(several fragments)


minute


pore


space:


limestone s, slight


,dark gray to lignt tan,


odor


of petroleum


(one


8964-81.-Anhydrite
argillaceous, 9025-49.-Dolomltic Ii


fragment)
meant .
9024-49.--Anhydrite


(several


fragments)


limestone,


massive, soft, faint petroleum


Limestone, dolomitic


gray


to tan


limestone,


(three fragments).


colored


dark


gray


dark


odor.


gray,


, etreinely


compact


,slightly


porous
(one


(one frag-


9185-9208.-4Limestone,
inents).
9341-56.--Anhyd rite.


9611-25.-Limestone,


dark


,porous


gray,


(one


massive,


fragment)


compact,


anhydrite


faint


(two


petroleum


frag-


odor.


9750-65.-Limestone, dark tan colored, with rather abundant shell fragments. 9841-51.-Limestone, dark gray to nearly black, compact and massive, interbedded with some anhydrite.


9995-10,006.-Anhydrite
appearance ol slightly cryst


(several fragments)


! petroleum


alline


stain


( several


slight ]


limestone, it odor of


dark gray with


petroleum,


massive,


fragmentss:


PALEONTOLOGICAL


100-110 feet
Amphistegina gibbosa d'Orbigny
Sorite8 sp. 110-120 feet
Gun eotina angusta Cushinan 130-140 feet


Bulirnitella Dyocibicide8
Elphidtium i


clef/at Lti8sima


(d'Orbigny)


biserialis Cushinan and


iccrtu fj


(Williamson),


RECORD


Valentino


variety


elavalnin


Cushiman


360-370 feet
Robulus americanus


(Cushnman)


480-490 feet
Anguloger.ina ovoid


Bulimina


gracilis


entails


Cushman


(Cushman)


Buliminzclli ourta (iushunan Ca88iduhina laevigata d'Orbigny


Cibicides


Diecorbi8


sub globosa H. conceniricus (Ci


variety


Cushman


B. Brady
ushinl)


(Oushman) ( d' Orbigny )


'Orbigny) (Jones and Parker)


Uvpigerina peregrina Cushminan 490-500 feet
Bolivina margin t a Cushiman, 500-510 feet
rjuncolina angusta Ouslhman, 500-520 feet


(Ian firnina atlantica


(Bailey)


variety ,nuitioostata


vaflriety


Cushiman


Cusliinan


carinata


floridanus can deiana


Nonion pizarr'ensis Berry


Planmuina depressa (6 Textulariefla barretti/i




FLORIDA


1100-1110 feet
Argyrothoca


GEOLOGICAL


we gem ans:t Cole


iloterostegina tewaucs Gravell and Hanna 1140-1150 feet
Ooskinolina floridana Cole *
Diet yoocrnue cooked (Moberg) 1220-1230 feet


Lepidocyclina


(La pidooyolna)


1230-1240 feet
Lop idocyolit a (Lop idocyolina)
1250-1260 feet


Operculfuoldes
Lepidocyolin a
1340-1850 feet


clLrcl8aviou8


(Rutten


(Nap flrolopidina)


BURVEY--BULLETIN


attenutata Cushman


fiG ridana


Cushman


Vernmnnt)


sCrn~tfl Vaughan and Cole


DbCtyoeoIue c ooke! (Moberg)
1350-1860 feet


pinlarenals Cushmian and


Di80orlnopsfs gun tori Cole, n
Pseuldoehrpsalidtua floridanza Cole, n.
Valvulisza flor'idana Cole, ni. Sop. 1360-1370 feet


lAtuonella


flermnudez


Textularia coryonsits Cole, fl. sp.
1'alvullna ma:tit Cushinon and Berinudez
Vorin itna. ep.
1890-1400 feet


Splroiina 001' Fabularfa sp. 1440-4450 feet


gjesls Cole, ni. sp.


Coskinolina floridana Cole, ni. 2050-2060 feet


Diet gocon us 8350-3360 feet


gun tori


(Moberg)


Borlis gun tori Cole, n. s inariety
6760-5770 feet


Lopidorbitoide8


floridana 0ole3,


(Lophlorbitoides)


norton I


11. var.


(Vaughan)


* lewvorked Eocene specimens,


See text p.


ocalana Cushman
variety
t801hoppt Thiadens


nlwrtontf Cuslhman


A mphisteg na


f'lorldana~ Cole




STJRATIGRAPRY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


DESCRIPTIONS


OF


SPECI ES


Family


TEXTULARIJDAE


Subfamily


Toxtulariinae


Genus


TEXTULARIA


TEXTULARIA


Defranee,


CORYENSIB


Cole


1824


,n.a8p.


Plate


,figure


Test


elongate,


subrectangular


side,


front


and


vieWS,


widest


and


thickest


near


apertural


end


chambers


numerous,


broader


than


high, areas
with


each


chamber ridged


between


calcareous


iidged


cement


sutures


chambers


aperture


fairly


wall


broad


distinct


rather


,lOW,


in marked


coarsely


indistinct.


depressed


arenaceoun


Length


hiolotype


signed


1.14


mm.


greatest


width


0.85


this species have a length


mm. mm.


Certain


specimens


First
Typo


appearance


locality


a depth


Peninsular


1360-1370


Oil and Refining


feet


W-445.


Company's J


.W


Gory


(W-445),


at&t


depth


1360-1370


feet.


Holotype


Fla.


Geol


Survey


Cat.


S -1533


paratype,


Occurrence


F.S.G.S.
Middle


Cat.


S-1533A.


Eoeeneo:


Family


VERNEUJLINIDAE


Genus


VERNEUlLINA


d 'Orbigny


1840


VERNEUILINA


Plate


,figure


few


sample


large


specimens


1360-1370


feet


assigned SW-445.


this


These


genus


were


specimens


found


were


poorly


preserved to describe specifically

Family Vi


Subfamily


'They are figured for future reference.


XLVULJNIDAE


Valvulininae


Genus


VALVULINA


d 'Orbhi


.~I *


1826


v --


1





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


inner


margin


last


formed


chamber


with


a large


valvular


tooth


accompanied


a smaller


secondary


tooth


in many


specimens.


Diameter


Him.


height


mm.


Two


Eocene.


have


species


"ocalana


triangular


Valvutina


Cushman


have


and


cross-sections.


been


described


mar tii


both


from


Cushman


these


and


species


American :Bermuaez chambers


are fairly


distinct.


First


appearance


ata


depth


370-390


feet


W-448


a depth


1350-1360


feet


W-445.


Type


locality


United Power 390-395


Brotherhood


House


Well


Carpenters


-448)


and


Joiners


a depth


feet.


Holotype


Fla.


Geol.


Survey


Cat.


S -1582


paratype


Occurrence


F. S.G.S
Middle


O at.


S -1582A


Eocene.:


VALVULINA


MARTI
Plate I


I Gush man figure 1


Bermudez


Valvulina martin Ouslunan and Bermudez, Cout. Oushman Lab. Foram. Jies.,


5, figs.


1937.


Va ivulina


tion No.


few


martin C5ushman,


p. 9, p1. 1,
specimen


Cout.


fIg. 19, 1937.


were


recovered


Cushman


whliich


Lab.


Forain.


lies.,


doubtfully


Publica-


assigned


this


species.


First


appearance


Occurrence


Middle


a depth Eocene.


1360-1370


feet


W -445.


Subfamily


Eggerellinae


Genus PSEUDORBITOL'INA


PSEUDORBITOLINA


Plate


Douvill6,


CUBENSIS Cushman


,figures


1910


Bermudez


5-11


Pseudorbitoiina


Foraln.


lies.


vol. 12


GUI) OtZ8i8


Cushman


Bermnudez,


,p. 59, p1. 10, figs. 27-30, 1936.


Cont.


Cushmnan


Lab.




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


First appearance at a depth


of 390-395


feet


-448.


Occurrence


Middle


Eocene.


Genus


LITUONELLA


LITUON ELLA


Schlumnberger,


FLORIDANA


Cole,


1905


n. sp.


Plate 3


,figures 14-17


plate 4, figure


plate 6,


figures


9-fl


Lituonella 8p. (?)
cation No. 8, p. 185, p1.


Cushiman


Gont.


fig. 14, 1937.


Cnslunnii


Lab.


Forarn.


Res.,


Publl-


Test elongate,


bulbose,


with


circular


bulb


or elliptical


containing the early,


in transverse section,


spiral


chambers.


initial


The


end bulb


is twisted


to one side of


the test.


The surface of the


test


is marked


slight


corrugations.


The


height


mnegalospheric


individuals


is from


to 2.1 ram.


the diameter at the mase is 1.0 to


1.2mrm.


: thle diameter


just


below the


juncture of the


initial


bulb


is about


mm.


The


marginal


trough


has a


width


of 120


thickness


floor


marginal


trough


about


The


outer


wall


test


a thickness


The


area


central


shield


composed


of a series of


irregular


pillars.


Aff inities.-L.


floridana


longitudinal


section


slightly


resembles


lib urnica


Schubert.


lib urnica


is a larger


form


with


a more


regular marginal


trough and


a greater


proportion


test


occupied


central


shield


area.


Associated


initial
these


end.


with


V
(cc
L


specimens


represent


a new


floridana


4 fig.


microspheric


species,


specimens


Longitudinal individuals.


present


which section


These


they


have


a pointed


indicate pecimens


cons


that may


idered


microspheric generation


floridana.


First


appearance


a depth


505-520


feet


W-448


W-445


at a


depth


1360-1370


feet.


Type


locality


United


Brotherhood


Carpenters


and


Joiners


Power


House


Well


(W-448)


depth of


w w





FLORIDA


GEIOLOGIOAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN:


Genus


COSKINOIJINA


Stache


1875


COSKINOLINA


Plato


figures 1


plate


FLORIDANA


figures


1-9 ;


Cole, :
plate


,figures


, 11;


plate


Coskinoa
166-108. I1.


r cooked
3, fig 6


Moberg (not figs.


(part)


figure Florida ). 1928.


Geol.


Survey,


19th


Ann,


Bept.,


Tihe


measurements of 26


specimens


are


presented


below.


The


sped-


mens


were


taken


from


sample


collected


419-444


feet


W -448.


Diamieter of Base
0.68mm.
0.68 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.72 0.76 0.76 0.76 0.76 0.81 0.85 0.89
0.89 0.9 0.89 0.93 0.93 0.97 0.97 0.97 0.97 1.02 1.06 1.06


Height 0.89ram.
0.85 0.89 0.93 0.85 0.98 0.89 0.98 0.85 1.15 1.06 0.93 0.93 1.10 1.02 0.9s 1.02
1.23 1.10
1.02 1.10 1.27
1.27 1.15
1 .02 1.19


26.60


Average 0.85 nun.


1.02 ram.





STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


Width


Distance


Height


Thickness Thickness Diameter


Spacing


Thickness Th ikness


trough


Inargina! between cups


floor floor


of perforations


Iperforations


outer


chamber


partitions


trough


hield


of central


shield


to center)


wall


W-448 419-444' 100.40$ 40-60% about 50% about 20$ 35.40p about 25$ 5-60#~
about 2O0# about 8#


W-445 1500-10'


8O0.130% 40-60# about 45$ about 20$ about 35p 20-25$ 55-60$ 20-30# abont 8$


horizontal


divided


marginal


sections a single trough


show


vertical


chambers


plate.


subdivided


The


into


axial


marginal sections


chambers,


trough indicate


that


these


ubdivided


any


horizontal


plate.


Thus,


horizontal


See-


tions suggest Diet yoconus,


but the vertical sections suggest


Coskinolina.


This seems to


very


constant


in all


specimens


sectioned.


horizontal


absent. should


Davies


irecognizes


plates subdividing the


The


question


The


vertical


Coskinotina,


chambers


which section


genus


both


marginal


such


definitely


ertical trough


a form


and are this


type tive


horizontal section


Dict yoconus.


The


writer


illustrates


prefers


characteristics


a sgn


this


form


primigenus


Coskinolina,
intermediate chambers of developed.


expanding


forms


marginal


definition


which


singe


trough,


that


vertical


horizontal


genus plates


plates


include


subdivide


have


such the been


,floridana
hemisphere


a primitive


tion. The


is the


only


inasmuch


Diet yoconus.


cookei has a larger,


internal


structure


representative


asOC.


cook ci


cook ci


and


broader and lower cone


particularly


this


ls now


genus


reported


considered


occur


than


vertical


from


I represent in associafloridana.


sections.


First


appearance


a depth


409-418


feet


W-448


a depth


1440-1450


feet


W -445.


marginal central s]


(center


chamber


The


partitions


that


Affinities.-As


assigned


arises


Goskinolina


this


floridana


is different,





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


Genus


DICTYOGONUS


Blanckenhorn


,1900


DICTYOCONUS


COOK El


(Moborg)


Plate


,figures


11-13 ;


plate


,figures


6-10,


plate 6,


figures


plate


,figure


Goskino lina


166-168,


p1. 3,


cookeot


figs.


Moberg, Fi 7-8 (not fig.


lorida


Geol.


1928.


Survey,


19th


Ann.


Rtept.,


Ooskinolina
cation No. 8, p.


cookci


C ushma1n 1 22, figs.


,Coit.
27-29.


Cushinan


31-38


Lab.


(not fig.


Forani. 0). 1937.


.,Sp.


Publi-


Tihe


measuremnlts


'-448


and


three


eleven


specimens


typical


from


speclIndn


1440-1450


from


feet


409-413 W-445


feet


given


below


W-44


'v.445


409-413 feet


Diameter


of base


111111.


Dinameter


Height 1.4ram.


1440-1450 of base


2.3xnn.


Height I .9rai.
1.4 1.8


Average


2.43mm.


1.7nnn.


Average


2.22mm.


1 .6ram.


A microspheric individual has a height of


1.95


lnni.


and


a diameter


at the base of 3.19


1.JxIn.


In shape


circular


other.


The


test is a low


outline surface


with


test


cone


base


diameter


is typically


which


slightly


smooth


may


longer


and


perfectly


than


featureless.


The


measurements


various


internal


features


given


following


table:




STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


The


vertical


(axial)


and


horizontal


sections


show


this


form


a typical (Garsey).


in turn


sections)


primitive


The


and


type


marginal


subdivided


a single


trough a single


vertical


plate


related


subdivided


horizontal


(seen


walnwtensis


into


plate


chambers


(observed


in horizontal


sections)


which


axial .1D.


walnut ensis


similar


arrangement.


Regarding


walnut ensis,


Davies21


written


"Thus


form


is a Diet yoeonu


and


Goskinolina,


and since


there


only


a single


subdividing


plate


in each


plane,


the species represents the simplest


possible


form


Diet yoconus.


Occasional


chambers


both


vertical


and


horizontal


sections,


show


no subdividing


plates


and


specimens


may


said


partly


Coskinolina."


The


horizontal


section


demonstrates


presence


character-


itS 1165


central


shield


with


circular


perforations


more


or less


evenly


dis-


tributed


over


extent.


Semilunar


areas


within


central


shield


show


presence


typical


pillar-buttresses.


The


chambers


usually


subdivided


horizontal


and(


vertical


plates,


Davies


reported


walnut ensis,


these


occasionally


lacking.


Affinities


cookei


closely


related


walnut en


wal-


nutonsis
marginal


smaller


trough


rises


form


more


and


abruptly


inner


and


edge


higher


floor


mD


.cookei


than


walnut ensis.


First appearance at a depth


of 390-395


feet


W-448


as reworked


material at a depth


of 1140-50


feet


W-445


as indigenous specimens


a depth


1340-1350


feet


W-445.


Occurrence


M iddle


Eocene.


DICTYOCON US


GUNTERI


Moberg*


Plate


, figure


8-10


plate


,figures


p. 168, p1.


j


8, figs. 9, 10


~u~&tc
;pl.


ri Moberg, 4, figs. 1-3,


Florida
1928.


Geol.


survey,


19th


Ann.


Rept.,


Diet ~OCOt&U8 Dictnoconu8


gunteri Vaughan,


aunt cr1


Cushiman


Jour. Pal.


Cont.


p.98,


Cushiman


Lab.


Fora in.


fig.


8, 1932.


.. Sn.


- a


Pub-


Dict yoconus


Diet goconus





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY--BULLLETIN


ftroi


M~arathion


well


Key


Vaca


and


specinens


codon


W.oodring


parson W-445.


from 0, 11)


with


Haiti.


thin


Illustrations are


section


thin sections made


made


presented


fir'11


the e


from u peeimnen


, figs.


specnnens


of D


S
gunt or I


COlllfrom


t appearance at a


depth


2050-2060


feet


W-445.


Occurrence


Middle


Eoceiie.


Family CA
Subfamily


MERINIDAE


Camerininae


Genus CAMERINA Brugi~re,


1792


GAMER


MOODYbRANCH EN


Gravell


Hanna


Plate


, figure


plate


, figures


1~
9-b


Camli crina


29, figs.


mood ybi'anchcns


15, 22-24,


1935.


0 ravell


:Henla


Jour.


,p. 332,


3052


,pp'. 328, 824,


moodybranohensis


13, fig. 5


Barker


20, fi1g.


Proc.


Nat,.


MUS., 1939.


Tis


Barker


species


given


been


notes


Adequately


on Ivexicaln


described
sp~ecimelns


Gravell


assignedl


and this


H-anna.


species.


The specimens


First


from


appearance


0 occurrence


Ocala


W -448


seem


ta depth limestone.


entirely


300-320


typical.


feet


W-448.


GAMERINA


VANDERSTOK


(Rutten


Vermunt)


Plate


,figures


2-10


Ntis mulites


Amsterdam


van dcr8tokt


,rol. 85.


flutten


p. 240, 1)l. 1, fig.


Verinunt


,roc. Ko 6, 12, 1932.


Akad.


Wet.


Cain erina


van 4cr toki Barker,


,fig.


Proc.


p1. 18, fig. 8


Nat.


figs.


Minis


10-12,


,vol. 86, 1939.


8052,


The


. S4 S


horizontal published


sections


Rutten


.5


and


Florida


Vermnunt.


S S ~S N


- 1 -- - -- -----------A - A- -- - - a n A a - a. a


speennens


The


are


tran


identical


.sverse


n a n nne.n t4 *I~.


sections


n. I


.. ,-... *Ut d *- -Cr


Ca inerina


I'q






STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


IN FLORIDA


veloped


axial


corresponding


plug plug


on the 011 thle


right other


hand side.


side


and


probable


suggestion


that


thcir


section


is not


oriented


exactly


through


center


test


and


also


slightly


oblique.


Barker has assigned


certain specimens from the Claiborne of Mexico


this


speeds.


The


as great a range as


three


transverse


sections


transverse section


which of the


figures


exhibit


Florida specimens.


1-lowever,


closely


transverse sections of


with


type


than


Florida


sections


individuals


published


agree


Bark er


more since


figures


an axial
mnens is Florida


plug.


nearer


Tfhe
that


specimens


Mexican


thickness


specimens


barely


through


typeC


which


seems


indicate


center


description


than


consistently


presence


3Mexican
thickness


specd-


greater.


description


of the Florida specimens follows


TYest


medium


sized,


flattened


lenticular


even


lenticular,


completely


involute


utures


clear


shell


material


normally


flush


with


surface


test.


Dia-


meters of


an average


individual


mm.


, thickness


mm.


Sections


chambers


average in the


individuals


final


whorl.


show


small


whorls


specimen


with


with


diameter


of 1.9


tion.


mm,


The


septa


had


whorls


regular,


with


nearly


chambers


straight


little


final
more


voluthan


three-fourths


their


p~eriphlery


length,


test.


then The


strongly, chambers


evenly higher


recurved


than


toward


long.


The


axial


plug


diameters


iranging


from


0.4


mm.


surface


test.


The


internal


diameter


initial


chamber


ranges


from


100 to


First


appearance


Occurrence


:Ocala


a depth limestone.


258-265


feet


-448.


The


Jackson
reported


type age.


specimens


The


from


represent a


variety


came


specimens Claiborne.


of thi


from


Curacao


referred


may


species,


from


deposits


species


that


or it may


from


Mexican


be that it


has a


assumed


Mexico


specimens
compara-






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


resemble


mens


have


curasvwa,
a diameter


there


about


certain


mm.


and


differences. a thickness


These


0.76


speci-


mm.


The


horizontal


final


ection


volution.


The


available internal


coils


measurement


with


across


chambers


both


initial


chambers


is about


140 .


The


size,


outer


number


wall


whorls


identical


,shape


with


septa


features


and


shown


thickness


Rutten


and


Vermunt
specimen


illustration.


But


with a diameter of


their


about 3.1


transverse


mm.


and


section


illustrates


a thickness of 1.2


mm.


This specimen


is decidedly


umbonate


with


a wide


flange.


The


Florida


specimens


thinner


and


slope


rather


regularly


from


center


periphery.


curtcuS)


and


Vermunt


state


450 .


Florida spheric


a much


that


The


specimens


form,


distance


is about


larger Listane
across


140%.


embryonic


across thle el


These


both


mbryox


specimens


apparatus


embryonic ci nic chambers


may


Rutten
iamnbers


micro-


however.


With


Florida Si seems best


more


specimens


pecimens 4 However,


study


represent


this


might species.


to refer these specimens to 0.


decided


For


that


present,


ourasvicus in spite of


differences Occurrence


noted


:Ocala


above.


limestone.


OPERCULINOIDES


FLORIDENS1S


iprin)


Plate 9


Nsunmnulites
22, text fig.,


Ioridens
1885.


,figure 8


Heiprin,


plate Proc.


'figures


Nat.


Acad.


.Philadelphia,


Operculiza f1oriden 818 Cushmnan,


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


Paper


p. 180,


20, fig. 12,


1921.


Asilina florideusis Oushman


S Geol.


Survey Prof.


Paper 181, p. 32,


1935.


Test last


medium whorl s


large


somewhat


size, thinne


very c 'r than


oinpressed,


earlier


completely


coils.


The


involute, sutures


-- - -


. ... -' 11


ii


I'


I II


11run11 */'LuI u' Erl/l .nlin nnnnn/, n i1 n. h l ,l fl,1n*1' tf fl fl fli tt-. -B ---.


-I


LD lld[1


-NL i


L




S'2RATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


IN FLORIDA


First


appearance


Occurrence


Ocala


a depth limestone.


250-258


feet


W-448.


OPERCULINOIDES


OCA LA NUS


(Cushman)


Plate


,figures


Operculina ocalana Cushmnan, 19, figs. 4, 5, 1921.


Geol.


Survey


Prof. Paper


128-Fl,


p. 129,


Operculina ocalana Gravell and flanna, Jour. Pal.,


p 333,


1935.


(Geol)


18, NO. 1,


ocalane


Hanzawa


Rept.


JY6hoku


ImpJ)


P 18, 1985.


Univ.


Opercu luna
Ecuador," pp.


ocalana


Vaughan


158, 159, figs.


Operculincide8


pp. 816, 817


Operculinoides


No. 30,


Pp. 38-40,


ocaanu8


12, fig. 5


ocalonus
l.8, figs.


(in.


Sheppard's


)


Barker, P 15, fIg. 5, Vaughan


(1-8)


'roe. 1 1939.


figs.


t ole, 1-4


"The


1937. Nat.


Geology


of Southwestern


Mus


Geol. Soc. p1. 10, fIg.


3052,


Amer. 11. 1941.


Paper


Several W-448


specimens


which


discrepancies


I
States


that


were


appear


should


last


whorl


found


in the


represent


noted.


contains


sample


this


Cushman


"16


of the type specimen shows that this specimen


bers


final


volution.


Gravell


and


Hanna


taken


species.


1-owever


describing chambers'


more have


this


The


than


feet


certain species
figure I chain-


commented


discrepancy.


The


well


have


two


median


more


sections


chambers


than


available normally


specimen


occur


in other


form


from


this


referred


this


species.


specimen


with


diameter


2.8X


mm


has


coils


with


chambers


final


whorl.


Another


specimen


with


diameter


mm,


3 coils


with


approximately


chambers


final


volution.


Studies


of 0.


Vaughan


and


3 to 3.3 ram.


the final volution


those 4.5


Cole


have


proved


in greater diameter


mm


in diameter


that


have have


small


16 or
20Oto


pecimens chambers


22 chambers


and


those


mm.


in diameter


have


as many


as 26


chambers.


From


this


app ears


that


specimens


under


consideration


have


more


chambers


in the


final


volution


their


size


than


Vaughan


and


r~i~


*Prni *n 1


S
In cinflntrnflflci


.1. ~L. -


fl -. a a ri


*** a a


L1.-


'a~ I ru*u*** **ta~~ *s*t**tJ*u*n*tE** U, *U***ts* IU* N *u *L~ L.*~LRraNcUL~


Operozslinoide8


ocaianu


lit




FLORIDA


GEDOLOOIOAL


SUThVlIflt-BtJLLI!2TIN


specimens


have


strongly


costate


surface


which


typical


0. ocala nus.
periphery ol


The


abrupt


test


backward


is similar


curvature


that


costae


shown


type


specimen


ocalamns.


Finally


there


rapid


increase


in height


outer


whorl.


First


appearance


Occurrence


:Ocala


a depth limestone.


250.258


feet,


-448.


OPERGULINOIDES


WILLOOX


(HeIlprln)


Plate 9,


figures


Numinulites


1p. 191, figs.


ivfllcowii


1, 2, 1882; ibi


Hellprin, i., vol 30,


Prec.


Nat.


Amad,


pp. 821-822, figs.


Philadelphia, 1884.


Oporculina


willcowUi


20, figs. 9-11, 1921.


Oushxian


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


Paper


128-lfl,


Operen linela
p. 158, 1928.
Oporculin otes
(Geol.) vol. 18, N(
Op erotic lftotde8
pp. 809-310, p1. 13,


wilcowii

'willcowi(


willoeowilt
fig. 3; p~


Vaughan, Florida ilauzawa, Sci. ,1985.


Barker,


fig. 1.


Prec.


SGeol. Rept.


pl. 21,


Survey TOhoku


Nat.


Mus., 1939.


19th


11111).


Ann, U~niv.,


ilept., ser. 2


3052,


Typical specimens of


this species


OCCUr


W-448.


Cushmian


states


"The which


species


seem


is characterized


characteristic


certain


that


species


portion


Ocahta


Lepidocyclina


that


portion


which


Orthophragntina


is the


predominating


orbitoid


genus.


occurs


usually


in company


with


Heterostegina."


Thle


sanie


association


been


found


in W-448.


First


appearance


Occurrence


Ocala


a depth limestone.


300-320


feet


W-448.


Genus


HESTEROSTEGJNA


d'Orbigny,


1826


H ETEROBTEGI NA


OCALANA


Cushman


Plate


, figures


Hctc
131,


7rostcgifla


oealana Oushnian,


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


Paper


128-fl,


Heterostegina ocalana


Vaughan,


Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull.


,vol.


p. 789, 1924.


Hot erostegthua


oca lana


Oushnian,


Geol.


Survey


Prof.


Paper


- - I






STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


0OW WEfLLS


FLORIDA


specimens


having


' 'the


smoother


surface


test."'


a cornl-


pleto value


gradation


may


varietal


found


designation


in specimens


may


from


a single


sample,


questioned.


adequate


has been made.


description


Thle following summary


internal


niny


features be given


tis


species


the specimens


studlied.
Length ....*...... .......8.4-4.O 111111


Thickness Thickness Portion ot


through through


lie eiibryoi


occupied


Surf|Ice ornazmentatin..i


Number Diameter I)Inaueter Number Nuniber


Distinct axial


wvhorls... initial
second chamnbers


a' ppara tus


uniboitate


..a..0740.80 mil)


area"""..


....O.22-O.213


111111.


.umbonal boss


with tusilly


chianiber.


...... -a a
***


subdivided


c!oils.. ........... ...* .a** ... ....-.*.... *--a


ittised


some spechnens


costa, others


smooth.


...50-Ol1s X lO0s--l2O0


8
a.... a.e~.a. 3


plug present,


First


appearance


Occurrence


Ocala


,a depth limestone.


300-320


feet


W -448.


H-IETE ROBTEGINA


TEXANA


Gravell


Hanna


P late


,figures


pl1ate


,figures


11 ci orosi egi flu


figs.


tewaus


1937.


Grave


1-Tanna,


Sour


,vol. :11


,pp. 520,


520,


11 vi crosiegino


*figs.


18-21


tewgana{
Ifigs.


Cole,


Florida


,2, 3-8, 1938.


(leol.


S11 r",ey,


:ii,~ii.


1)P. 40,


, pl


These


specimenls


identical


those


Iigured1


frm


1P)ort


test


well.


First


appearance


a depth


1100-1110


feet


-445.


Occurrence


Oligocene.


Family


PENEROPLIDAE


Genus


SPIJROLiNA


Lamarek


1804


a - a a a a a aa a a a a a a a a


L





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SUR1VEY--BULLBTIN


First


appearance


1390-1400


feet


at a depth W-445.


413-419


feet


W-448


a depth


Type


locality


Peninsular


Oil and Refining


Company's J.


Gory


"-445)


a depth


1440-1450


feet.


Hoiotype:.
Occurrence


Ella.


Geol.


Middle


Surv


Cat.


S-1541.


Eocene


Family Genus


ALVEOLINELLJDAE


BORELIS


Montfort


1808


Plate


BORELIS 2, figures


GUNTER


Cole,


plate


n.sjp.


,figures


AlveoUna


3, fIgs.


?s8p, 1921.


Oushmnan


Florida


Geol.


Survey,


13th


Ann.


Rept.,


Test small


,involute,


circular


outline


when


viewed


from


the side,


compressed


laterally


diameter


from


ram.


thickness


mm.


Surface of uneroded specimens smooth;


with slight


erosion


surface


exhibits


a series


low,


elongatd


revolving


ridges.


Longitudinal


and


transverse


sections


show


a globular


initial


chain-


with


internal


diameter


160 .


Surrounding


proloculum


there


about


5 coils


which


gradually


increase


in height


toward


periphery


Each


chamber


divided


into


ingle


row


chamberlets.


These


chamberlets


vary


in size


and


shape.


Type


specimens


from


Dundee


Petroleum


Company


well


near


Bushnell
Florida,


Section


at a depth


,Township


of 2270


202


.Range


22E


Sumter


County


feet.


These


preserved


specimens than any


were


selected


others in


because


writer


they


more


perfectly


possession.


Affinities-B.


jarnaicensis


Vaughan


nearest


features


this


species.


However


there


is a great


difference


in external


shape


and
with


number o: a height


coils.


mm.


S
jamawensis


and


is depressed,


a transverse


subglobular


diameter


in form


mm.


yamnatcen sts


typically


9 coils.





STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


BORELIS


GUNTER


Cole,


variety


FLORIDANA


Cole,


Plate


Normally


marked


associated


globular


shape.


with


,figures
Boretis


gunt eri


description


these


there


specimens


specimens


follows


lest


small


,slightly


compressed


,subglobular,


height


fromn


0.84


1.10


mm.


diameter


rfrom


0.80


0.92


mm.


Specimens


internal


rfrom


diameter


W-166


8O~.


had


globular


Specimens


from


initial( W-445


chamber


had


with


globular


initial


chamber


with


an internal


diameter


from


220~.


The specimen


with


the small initial


chamber was composed


about


5 coils.


The


coils


increase


in height


very


slowly


and


chamberlet


rectangular


in shape.


The


specimens


with


larger


initial


chain-


bers


were


exactly imilar


poorly


determined.


that


preserved


However


smaller


that


o number structure


coils


which


could


preserved


specimens.


Except


difference


in shape


and


fact


that


chamberlets


appear to be rectangular in shape,


Moreover


, they


associated


these forms are similar to


samples


~vhicl~


gunte.m.


writer


examined.


Therefore


these


form


given


varietal


name


only.


Type


locality


Suwannee (W-166)


Petroleum


a depth


Corporation


2140


-2158


Sholtz


feet.


C otypes


F lorida S-2826A.


Geological


Survey


Cat.


8-2826


and


Occurrence


Lower


Eocene.


Family


BULIMINIDAE


Subfamily


Reusselinae


Genus


Genoholotype,


PSEUDOORRYSALIDINA


PSEU DOCH RYSALI DINA


Cole,


FLORIDANA


gen. Cole,


n. sp.


Test


conical


,triserial,


chambers


inflated


wall


calcareous,


forate


labyrinthic


axis


through


center


test


aperture


con-





FLORIDA


GIIIOLOOLCAL


StIR VIflY-I3ULIAflTIN


did not appear to


be calcareous grains


which


tihe animal


had


cemented


together.


Chrysatidina


is reported


date


only


from


Cretaceous


of France.


Pseudochrysalidi na occurs inl


middle


Elocene of Florida.


Thin


sections


show


chambers


large


and


open,


through


center


test


extends


a labyrinthic


column.


This


labyrinthic


structure
tioiiship


is developed


apertures.


terminal


clamber


chambers


and


added


8011a0


rela


labyrinthic


zolle


elongated


and


surrounded


01)011


chambers.


PSEU DOCH RVSALI DI NA


F LORIDAN A


Cole,


n tsp.


Plate


,45, 1)1.


1, figs.


*, figures
.Oushnian 1921.


plate


Florida


,figure


Snrvc'y


1I3thi


Ann.


11C)t.,,


The length of an average sized


and


the diameter


terminal


'nut11


Ihe


outer


surface


test


rather


coarsely ones and


perforate.


The


chambers


the sutures are distinct and


inflated


especiallyy


final


depressed.


First


appearance


a depth


1350-1360


feet


W -445.


locality


Peninsular


Oil and Refining Company 's J


(W-445)


a depth


1360-1370


feet.


Gory


Genohiolotype


. FAla.


Geol.


Survey


Cat.


S -1538


paratype


1?.B.GS.


Oat.


S-1538A.


Occurrence


M iddle


Eoceine,


Cushnian


figures


specimens


which


represent


this


species


from


Marathon


Well


at a


depth


1262


feet.


Family


ROTALJIDAE


Genus DISCOIRINOPSIS


Genoholotype,


DI800RINOPSIS


Cole,


GUNTERI


gen. Cole,


n1 up.


'list 'C


11?11 nfl


typically


whorls


plalle-conlvex,


visible Onl


ventral


dorsal side


irnnfrnl


,only


linilill ion1


side


the
u',pug


flattened chambers


ol ro


'troehold,


ii ~nnnsvv


Ghruaaifcifna


Ip





&TRATIGRAPHIY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WE1LS


IJLORIDA


chambers


may


slightly


lobate


chambers


typically


comprise


last formed


depresBed


sutures recurved


ventrally; di
chambers from


orsa11
tihe


y


,strongly depressed


ine whorls;


dlepressed


area


dorsally


separate


chambers of


, slightly


outer whorl


outer


long


shell


flnd~


material


best


narrow through


developed


umbilical


which


outer


area


filled


a series


edge


with


irregular umbilical


spongy openlill


mass


which


mass.


Height 0.89 am.


length


2 .89 11111.


width 2.12 mm


. (type specimeti)


Viewed Discorbis 1
as could I


dorsally


these


structure


discovered


these


specimens


would


umbilical


specinens


ref erred


I! hung


could


genus


is distinct.


referred


any


dlescribedi


genus.


First


appearance


W-448


a depth


370-390


feet


-445


at a depth


of 1350-1360


feet.


Type


locality


United Power


Brotherhood


House


Carp~enters


Well


-448)


and


Join1ers


a depth


390-895.


Genohiolotype Occurrence:


Fla.


Geol,


Middle


Survey


Cat.


S -1581.


Eocene.


Genius


EPONIDES


Montfort


1808


EPON


DES


JAGK8ONENSIS


(Cushman


Appli n)


Plate


, figures


GeoI


J~lt "linii,;a


JG0k8 anon


P. 181,


(Jusliinnn


)figs. 24,


1926.


Applin


Bull.


AA 110 .


Assoc.


Il'etrol.


First appearance at a


depth


-258


feet


-448.


Occurrence


Ocala


limestone.


Family Subfamily


Genus


ORBITOJDIDAE


Orbitoidinae


IJEPIDORBITOIDES


Prefer Silvestri


1907








FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY--BULLETIN


F


4)

1*;i


I
~hc~
0


"4


.
.4.3


fr~


-Il

4













SPECIES


Shape of equate orial
clhamrzilers .... ------


Numb er of lateral chambers at center.

Shape and arrang;ement of lateral
ckhaiiers....


P i- lar - ..................-


I. Dou ville


Arc uste


3-10

Ovr slapping
tiers; open


Small


roni?/
(Vaughan)


Diamond shaped to arc uate


Regular tiers to
overlapping
open


Small


plaizoasi
Rutten


Arc uate


.Not in tiers; low


None


S
rattan:
Thiadens


Hexagonal
to


arc uate


Overla pping


tiers


open


None


ratios: vs. amata
Thiadens


---- ----- S ------- -


palmed
Thiadens


Hexagonal
to
spatulate


Tiers


open


Small


Thiadens,


Ogi val to diamond
shaped

15


Tiers; open


No ne


(V


./


Qv tie


No
CE


* Specimens from Cory Well (W-445).






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


LEPIDORB ITO ID ES


(LEPIDORBITOIDES)


NORTON I


(Vaughan)


1'late


, figures


Orbltocyollna
,2, 1929).


itort on!


Vn~ig1ini,


Jour.


1'nl.,


1)1).


170-174,


figs.


lest


served


destroyed


clear


terial


there
group


small


pecinien


Surface material


Ii 'Ici


I n


somle


is a single,


111111.


~tery


,lenticular,


with


most


encircling


specilnens,


ornamentation


surrounding


spciIIeIs


central


small


and


tliere


papillac,


papillae.
e largest


The


consists


areas


opaque,


is an absence


and


a few


diameter


"Un.


T hose


run1


Lperfectly


fragile


polygonal whlitih," papillae;


speciellnls


have


smia11est


speimnls


jirebeen


mesh


Shell


Inn-


in others all apical speclnen


lacked


encircling


1'1111.


perfectly


iweserved


specimen


a diameter


'nilE "I'll.


this specimenI


dialmeter


central


inflated


and the width of the encircling rim is about 0.5 ram.


area


S
ItY 1.2 .1~~)


The thickness


average


individuals is about 0.4 ram.


The


embryonic


app1aratus


consists


two


initial


chambers


sur-


1roundedl


SO1'3' ( initial


ambers


chambers.


irehttivCI3y


whIich


The


thick


make


longer


~~'nIl


about


and


followed


three-quarters


diameter


initial


about a coil


five


a cecs-


arOUhll


chambers


:is l)(er-


)Clldiellrl to a line joining their centers.


i1nc~linlg


angles


witi


internal


thickness


surrounding


s is about diameter


initial


about


40$.


This diameter is


~val1


Thle


chamber


about 140 & diameter at subspherical


equatorial


sections


available, 1)artition.


'leSS
sory


the second


'The second


chamber


chamber


urrounding


embers


lightly


is pLarated


slightly


these


larger


from wider


chambers


than


first


than


long.


is about


equatorial


a straight


The The


chambers


thickacceswhich


follow themi


although some of the equatorial


chambers at


poeril~hery


test are as large as


the accessory


chambers.


horizontal


sections


equatorial


chambers


have


curved


outer


~~'n11


11)1(1


a


tmi uon f


I
innnr


fin sun


nqnon;n liv


=






STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


WIuLLS


IN FLOIDA


The


lateral


chambers


arranged


in regular


tiers


row


aIVeraIge


about


overlap


lateral


Ihe


Iheighit


those


chambers thickniess 3 chamber


adjacent


about


roofs


rOWS.
and and


Tihe


their floors


internal
average


about


hicig


cugtlh
eqiial


0901111


Pillars


'nay


1)resent


absecnt.


When


present,


they


conl-


central


portion


lisual ly


0110


031 CIIC


side


equatorial about 80t.


liLyci'.


Well


d(lCCojled


11)11 liii's


HIVO


a surtface


linmeter


.11ustrations


"'Cl's


zissigned


11q4)


R~uttei


inter


given


tructure


COlli)arlI8O11


peelwith


nor oni.


The


de~taledC~


descrilptioii


and


occ]urrenlce


jilanasi


will


dlSilscsd


in a bulletin


Florida


Geological


Survey


~v1i Id


80011


published.


lFirst


appearance


at a


(lelPil


5760-5770


feet


-445.


Occurrence


Upper


Cr etaeeous.


0011118
Subge LEPIDOCYCLII


LEPIDOCYCLiINA ( )nus Lepidocyclina Gi NJA (LEPlDOOCVOLINA)


lllmbe imbe],


1870


MORTON


Cushman


LPlate


figures


9-13


plate


,figures


plate


,figures


70.71


lit ffl'do(Jt/dUhia


27, figs.


ttori onE


C'rislunnn. 28, figs. 1.


1920.


acol.


urvey,


L j.ol?


II 1)01'


mp. 37-889, I)1.
I synononiy).


t (Lpidocyolin a) 80, figs. 1-9; pI.J


ill oH Viii


Oravell


,figs. i.-Il


,figs. 1-4.


:1935. (references


0 ravell


and


Il-Lanna


have


p)resenlted


a complete


description


this


1)00108,


accompanied


a series


beauti fil


tratiioiis.


The


"'ions


fotnd


Sn this


study


typical


representativ


pecics.


First


appearance


depth


1230-1240


feet


nW-445


r






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


Lepidocyolia ocalana No. 2, pp. 38, 39, text figs
Lepidocyclina ocalana
155, 156, 1928.


Douvilll4, Mdn. Soc.


19-21,


1924.


Vaughan,


Florida


O~oJ.


Ceol.


France, N.


Survey,


19th


vol. 1


Ann.


Mdrn.


Rept.,


Megalospheric


an average


individuals


thickness


Shave
'lntl


a diameter Microspheric


rfrom


individuals


mm. have


'with a di-


ameter from 12


16 ram.


with a


thickness of


about 2.5 mm.


Oushman


given


very


microspheric


satisfactory individuals.


description


The


megalospheric


external


appearance


individuals


present spheric


collection


forms


have


except


that


same
they


external


appearance


smaller


size


as do


as may


mlcronoted


by the measurements


given


above.


C ushiman


description


microspheric


specimens


follows


"Test


mediuln


size, flattened,


usually


slightly


sellaeformn


usual


diameter


speclinens


from


millimeters


with


range


adult


specunens


from


millimeters ; the


two


sides


tests


differing
portion,


typically


thenice


gradually


prominently


sloping


umbonate


periphery


central


opposite


side


thickened


side


center


other ;


form shape


than


umbonate


umbonate


the more evenly


showing


,evenly


more


curved side; surface


curved clearly


from


typically


sellaesmooth


or somewhat


serobiculate


from


unequal


erosion


outer


layer


lateral


chambers.' '


this


may


added


that


perfectly


preserved


specimens


with


smooth


surfaces


there


may


seen


small


light


areas


which


represent


the ends of the pillars.


These are irregularly scattered


over the surface.


The


following


table


summarizes


internal


measurements


made


011 megalospheric specimens


from


W-448


and


W-445.


Horizontal section


Embryonic ai
Diameter Diameter


Thickness


apparatus initial second


chamber chamber


bounding


wall


Accessory


chambers


'S






STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


Number


of lateral


chambers


Thiclner s


Height 4 Average Surface


roofs


rI opening length of diameter


and of


floors aterals


lateral


laterals


1Oo--260
12O--200


papillae


rrI~c


lateral


longer


chambers


chambers


Ipart


overlap


from


arranged


o11e


tflar


another


tiers


1)roducinlg


appearance
irregularly


irregularity


other


portion


Pillars


distributed.


irst


appearance


1220-1230 1l
Occurrence


~eet


* Ocalh


depth


-258


W-445
t limestone.


feet


-448


a depth


LEPIDOGYGLINA


(LEPIDOCYCLINA)


OCA LAN A


Cushman


variety


ATTENUATA


Cushman


P late


figures


plate


,figure


ii Gp'UdoC7ylCL
p1l. 24, figs. 7,
Lopidoeyclina


Survey,


19th


Ann.


(itteflU(tat
3. 1919.


ltept.,


Oushinan


Cushnian


155-157


Geol.


,variety


SulrVey


Prof.


ItTaligliall,


Paper


Florida


Geol.


1928.


Oushman


form


lohcric


this


forms


original


variety
fondw


description


The


following


W-448


\~Tas


based


descril)tion


a depth


250-258


microspheri e on megalo-


feet.


lest


mentation


outer


melnS


have


medium


conlS'S


rlln


size


of small


surrounding


a diameter


coid


with


papillae


umbo


about


11111


sinall


whlic]


iS S


umbo.


cover


mooth.


and


Surf ace
central


Average


ized


a thickness


ornalinbo, specdcenter


about


mum.


The


embryonic


apparatus


consists


tWO


large,


subequal


chambers


with


normally


two


periembryonic


chambers.


The


larger


chamber


internal


diameters of 360


aby 520


pand


the smaller chamber measures


1by


1)Crielnbrvonie


The


chamlber


bouiiding


I[ Lfll


wall


internal


is about
diameterg


thick.


'S -t -1-. 'S


nhv


The


smaller


-.1-tn' s-ad


and


(It fcflhl(tht





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY--BULLETIN


larly


mber


covered


most


toward


layer


portion


periphery.


lateral


the equatorial


The


chambers,


layer


is not


periphery ii occasionally


covered.


Tihe


normally


lateral


outer chain-


be cavity


openings.


[eprbsscd.
The cli


The


ambers


roofs are


and
not


floors


arranged


thicker regular


than tiers.


o'erlap


inl anl irregular


niatuier.


Pillars


irregularly


present


particularly


central


area.


They


have


a surf ace


diameter


as much


as 240


First


appearance


a depth


feet


-448


W-445


at a


depth


1220-1230


feet.


Occurrence


Ocala


limestone.


LEPIDOCYCLINA


(LEPI DOCVCLI NA)


OCALANA


Cushman


variety


FLORIDANA


Oushman


Plate


figures


late


,figure


Le(p idocli a
08, p1. 25, figs.
Lcpidocy lClina


, text fig. 3,


florida no


Cushman,


1919.


floridana


1924.


CooL


Ceol.


'11,v('y


Aiflor.


P1rof.


Pape


Bull


Sur~'ey,


19th


Ann.


RItet.,,


Oushinan,


'variety 1928.


floridana


Vaughan,


Florida


Geol.


The


vidual


description


Thi,


small


this


species


variety


was


based


ohanraeteri zed


on mega1osp)heric


possessig


mdi-


a strongly


saddle


C -51181)0(1


test.


1-lorizontal


sections


show


same


type


bryonic apparatus and


The selineforin


equatorial chambers that characterize C.


ch aractcr of the test of the variety


ocalan a.


ftoridaa is apparent


horizontal sections


because of


pattern


made


by the


arrangement


equatorial


chambers.


First


appearance


a depth


250-258


feet


-448


W-445


a depth Occurred


of 1220-1230 wee: Ocala 1


feet.


imcstoune.


LFI~lACIPVCLIF'JA


I IFi:Plnt3fllIr


.n II


ACA LA NA


Csi~nn


Lcpidocydlna






STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WEI.AS


IN FLORIDA


a megal os])hcric


typo


individual.
apl)arently


Tihe


larger


specimen


microspheric


which


individual


was T1he


,:CleCtC(d smaller


specimen


a diameter


mm.


with


surface


trongly


papil-


lato, especially


on the


pronounced


umbo.


Several


in 111


(devCloped


iuils


pecllnens


.with


were


a prominent


papillae. rep~resenlt


These


this


found


mbonate
specimens


variety


whose


W-448


area
wcrc type


wit)


which


a diameter is covci'ed


megalospheric


specninen


witi


~vel1


individ-


is a mierospherie


individual.


811(1


Horizontal equatorial


sections


sections
chamber variety


how


as found


clearly


saune


type


in typical


illustrate


embryonic


ocalana.


difference


apparatus


vertical


which


11afl~Ic


was


based.


Below


descrip1tionl


typical


vertical


ection


The


"'aS


isgiven. diameter


miade


Iflill


individual
thickness


from


"w7hied


vertical


section


In1111.


Ilatcral


chambers


open1,


short


or elongate.


,Some


are arranged


(chamlber's o1! lateral


in regular tiers,


OVC1'lftj)


clhalber~s


test.


'rue


Ilroni


0110


in most


tier


on either side


lateral


chambers


cases


llCX


certain


TIhere


Equatorial


decrease


lUyCI'


niimber


elongate
8 layers


center


toward


l)criphcry


isabon


lateral


test.


Normally,


chambers. thick ness


rihei


outer


height


roofs


ifl ilL


a normal


and


floors


test


lateral varies


is not


chamber


fro


internal tbout 80


hecighit


equatorial


chambers


center


lperiphery


1P)illars


test.


Smller


irregularly


nmay


Have


pillars near


p~resenlt, ti a surface


pcri phery


larger


diameter


have


ones


as much a surface


center


diameter


$1 lIAJiI:


TlAth


1f 'lt


andl]


mu nil .-I.


nill1ar.


tannr') .1


~srii1aHv


I.I II


IlI


!






FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY-BULLETIN


This


bryonic


species


chambers


characterized
a proportion


possessing


total


unusually


bulk


large


test.


emlThe


measurements


four


specimens


given


below.


Diameter Thickness


(nii n.) .........e...... ... ...... *.taa. a. .aa......a.......... ..a..aa.a.a..1... 1.
(ra m .) ............. .......................... *at .. .seaa.... -tae.......... 0. (


Embryonic chambers


Length Height Width Number 4


First


(mmi.
(nun.


) a.. .. .. a.... .... -t........... ..... ........t.t.att..a.a.....ae. C-tt* ...0 5
) ................t~a....-.-........-.a....... c...... ...-a......... .... .4


(xnam'.) ...... .... .


lateral


appearance


Occurrence


:Ocala


a..... .. .a....a.. a. a........ a.....,a.a.tat..... .aa...ta.7


cI~ai~bers. .... .........


a depth limestone.


1220-1230


*, .. .
feet


W-445.


Subgenus Nephirolepidina


Douvill6


1911


LEPIDOCYCLINA


(N EPH ROLEPI DI NA)


SEMMES


Vaughan


Cole


Plato


figures


Lephiocyolina
Miscell. Coil., vol. 31, figs. 1, 1 (t; pl


(Nepltroicphhina)


No. figs.


SCW flU381


Cole,


Smithsonian


1 )P. 29, 3, 1933.


p. 540, p1.


(.Aephruolcpf diii a)


,fig. 0, 1935.


Specimens


small


semmesi


species


Button


L epidocyctina


Jlour.


belonging


subgeinus


Ne phrolepidina


feet


were


W-445.


found


A lthoigl


sample1


these


taken


Hp COIIIICII


a depth smaller


than they


those


studied


iCrersent


this


Vauglian


species.


and


Cole


characteristic


,there


little


feature


doubt


that


species


the shape and arrangement of the


lateral


chambers.


Vaughan


and


Cole


state


"The


chamber


floors


much


thickened


layers


adjacent


equatorial


slits.'
from


Tis


layer,


feature


specimens


may


under


chamber


cavities


observedd discussion.


bomwing vertical


only


as narrow


section


made


Rlutten


giving types


reports


stratigraphic


from


this


range


upper


species


upper


Eocene


from


certain


Eocene


Tantoyuca


and


Cuban


stations


Oligocene.


formation


The


Mexico.


n...a. a.


-U a


L epidocycliza


250-1260


Sn,


m[f





STRATIGRAPHY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


Family


DJSCOCYCLINIDAE


Vaughan


and


Cole,


1940


Genus


Subgenus


PSEUDOPIIItAGMINA


Proporocyclina


Vaughan


Douvill6,


and


Cole


1923 1940


PSEUDOPHRAGMINA


(P ROP0OROCYGLIN A)


GITRENBIS


(Vaughan)


Plate


figure


Diacocyolina


Ann.


Itept.,


pp. 159, 100,


2, figs.


citresfs


Vaughan,


Florid a


(C ol.


1928.


Survey


19th


few typical specimen


were


found.


seems


ur~)r1P1flg


that


more


representatives


group


were


encountered.


First


appearance


Occurrence


Ocala


a depth limnestone.


300-320


feet


W-448.


Family


Genus
MIOGYPBINA


MIOGYPSJNIDAE


MIOGYPSINA (MIOGYPSINA)


Sacco


Tanl, 1893


HAWKINS


1936


Hodson


Miogypsina r, fig. 9; .p1.
Miogypsina


8. 4, pl.


6, figs.


Aliogypsina


,44,


lUiWkifl8 I


8, figs.


lutwlcvflSi


11-14,


(Miogyp


7, figs. 5-7


Plate
L-odson


figures


Bull.


Amer.


vol. 12,


No. 47,


pp. 28,


L2, 1920.


Gravell


1933.


8s121a)
1938.


Smithsonian


Cole


Miscell


Floridla


vol. 89


Geol.


Survey


No. 11,


Bull.


Spe)Cimen~fs


those


Gunter


were found in


rep~orted1


sent feet


from


peclillens


1P)ort


from


identification


-445


900-910


test


1\Iaratlion


and


feet


wvell


wvell


comparison


~vitIi


which t700-7


on Key


those


identical


feet.


Vaca22
in the


found


Gory


well.


Thc


following


table


a comparison


these


specimens.


Gory BSre1 (W-445)


Marathon Well


Diameter .....


'1111.


I2htekniess.. .. C****. -......... .. -.*... ....


Diameter
Diameter 1)istancc 1)ianmeter Thtelness


iitial
IMeCOfl(l


of initial


chuambers


equatorial cli of equatorial


Number of lateral


fromi


mnil'


0.90 mam.
100X 190Og 110 g


periphery..


1 ii ~ 1~ e ..... C* C- ...... .... -


Cr ... . --- ... - ...... C ...


chambers on


either


...........
---....... --of


...
I'


. 4 A I)


(Discocycflina)


hawkins i





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVYY--BULLETIN


cushmani


appears


possess


characteristics


intermediate


tween


hawkinsi and


tauff eri


Koch.24


The


American


specie


Miogypsina


should


restudied.


First


appearance


a depth


900-910


feet


W-445.


Occurrence


Oligocene.


"i. Koch


geol.


llelvet


"Miogypsina
1a, vol. 19,


stauff
No. 3,


c,', nov. spec pp. 751-753, p


from


Northwestern ,s. 1-3. 1926.


Venezuela


o Ecologae





STRtATIGRAPHTY


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


OF WELLS


FLORIDA


Appendix


Peninsular Oil


and


Refining Company


Cory


No.


Inasmuch


drilled


as this


is at


Florida


Present desirable


deepest


that


well


that


available


been


information


assembled


this


Bulletin.


For


that


reason


there


being


included


a copy drillers burton


driller


and


Well


as prepared


reproduction


Cementing


from


electric


Company


daily made


I-oustoni


records


Halli-


Texas.


been


pointed


that


electric


this


well


very


little


value


,especially


present.


electric


there


is no inci-


cation


of porosity of any


degree throughout the entire section


Drilling


conditions


porous


were 2.963


but it 6,000
delpth


indicated


,however,


throughout


encountered


feet was
feet


down


abA


during


2.986


increasingly


whliich


drilling


that


Eceotion. drilling,


2,997


difficult


depth


was


returns


continued


rocks


rThree


penetrated


distinct


2.846


feet.


These


maiiitain


were


with


2.864


cavities


circulation


entirely


clear


were


cavernous


feet


were down


and


water.


extremesections


2,958 cased


about


from


that


interval


circulation


feet


was


no nud


renewed


was


used


and


excessive
a record


use


inud,


formation


below


was


8,500


obtained


coring.


DRILLER'S


LOG*


DEPTH


FORMATION


Cellar Sand Gravel Gravel Shells


130- 218


Saud Sand Blue Sand


lhard lime


and lime shale


lhne


lime


shells shells


shell


shells


DEPPTI1036-1138 1188-1720 1720-1841 1841-2635 2635-2682 2682-2689 2689-2788 2788-2847 2846-2864


FORMATION


Broken


Liiie


Broken Lime


I-lard


lilne


lime


lhne


Lime
tn ainl anhydrite shells


Hard


Oavity
"!"1" .. I


lime


- -- -.1


3' CU tUrn *Jt!t IS I "S *I; K.J fl tilt U U1bn nfl's n~7Y1taUuTyu





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY- BULLETIN


DEPTH 3184-8217


32173230 32418250 3276


-3280
,-3241
-3250
-3252
-3298


3298-3302 3302-8383 3383-3417 3417-3481 3431-3463 3463-3506 8506-3585 3535-3555 8555-3566 3566-3575 3575-3593 3593-3608 3608-3644 3644-3655 3655-3660 8660-3723 3723-3798 3798-3823 3823-3838 3838-8845 8845-3850 3850-3866 3866-3945 3945-3963 3963-3971 3971-3998 3998-4006 40064013 4018-4027 4059-4093 40934100
41004113 4113-4123 41234161 4161-4206 4206-4216 4216-4347 4347-4383 4882-4446
4446-4453 4453-5411

4511-4531 4531-4541
A ,A1 A ,0f7


FORMATION


Hard Lime Hard Hard Lime Hard Lime


DEPTH 4869-4935


lime


lime


sandy


lime


4935. 5052506550755130-


lime


Chalk Chalky lime Hard lime


Lime and b] Lime, streali
Hard lime Gypsum and


Hard


roken :s of


chalk chalk


broken lime


lime


Sand-? Gray lii Lime ai Broken Chalk Lime an


fle
id gypsum limne


gypsumu


Broken lime Hard lime


Broken lini Hard lime
Lime
Broken in Anhydrite Gypsum an
Chalk, shall


-5052
-5065
-5075
-5130
-5140


5140-5256


5256-5300 5800-5427 5427-5550 5570-6027 0027-6037 6087-6039 0059-0706 6706-6820 6820-0897 6897-7000 7000-7010
7010-7201 7201-7007


7607-7615


ie


Ld broken lime le and lime


Hard lime and gypsum Broken lime and chalk


Hard lii
Chalky ,ilne hii
Lime ai 1-ard lii Brokeni Lime aI] Chalk a Lime ar Broken Lime am. Gypsum
Lime an Hard lii Chalky


[no
lime
trd
id chalk hard tie and anhydrite lime and chalk


Lid mmd id un


anliydritc lime
anhydrite


id anhydrite and lime
Ld anlhydrite broken ne and anhydrite


lime


with


streaks


hard lime Hard lime and anhiydrite


Lime and


anhydrite


a


7015
767670847707782978957918-


7676 .7684 .7707 .7829 .7895 .7918 7944


7944-7949 7949-7974


79747998803680668085-


.7998
-8036
-8066 .8085 .8095


8095-8106
8106-8128 8128-8131 8131-8166

8166-8168 8168-8175 8175-8200 8200-8212


8212 8220 8225 8243
Q00


-8220
-8225
-8243
-8288
0000


FORMATION


Broken


Soft Shale Hard Soft Hard


lime


broken and]1 lime lime lime


line


Ohalk lime with streaks of hard lime


Lime Chalk


and
and


chalk lime


Broken lime Chalk and lJ Lime
Chalk and lIF Chalk and 11: Soft lime Hard broken
Broken lime Lime
Chalk and 11 Broken lime.


chalk Chalk
Lime Lime Shaly Broke Shale Lime Hard
Hard Hard Broke
Hard Hard
Lime Sandy
Hard


-4,


and chalk [le hard
nm
Slime


lne
lime


nd shale


broken


111elime anid lime


lime


gray lime
n limit lime gray


lime lie


shale
111la0


Broken lii Gray lime Chalky 1il hard lime H-ard limo Core


Hard
Chalk3 I-ard Chalk. Core Hard
Cih n11


lie Lie


WI Cli


streaks


lime 7linm. lime k, llime

lime







STRATIGRAPHY


DEPTH 8610-8051


80518700872188288856-


8700 8721 ,8828 .8854 .8898


8898-8937 8937-8945


89450 8953
8909 8974 8983 8990 9039 9049 9147


-8953
-8909
-8974
-8983
-8990
-9039
-9049
-9147
-9168


9168-9182


918291859203920892519332-


-9185
-9203
-9208 .9251
-9332
-9356


9350-9370


AND


PALEONTOLOGY


FORMATION


Anhyd rite Hard li Core
Hard 11111 Lime and1( I-ard lira


*0

C


Lime and1( Anhydrite Soft lime Anhydrite Lime


Lime Broke Lime Broke Time Lime Hard


anhydrito


anhydrite


lime


Ad anhydrite
lime
(d ahlydlrite lime


anhydrite


broken lime ali


Broken lime Soft lime Anhiydrite I-ard lime ai Broken lime


Hard
I-ardl


DEPTI


9370-9413 9413-9434 9434-9464
9464-9472 9472-9481


9481-91


9482
948795379543

9568
95789595
9611-


ahlydlrite


anhydrite


lime


9487 9537 .9543 .9555
9568 .9578
-9595
-9611
-9025


9625-9029
9629-9789


0739 9750 9756 9758 9765


-9750
-9756
-9758
-9765
-9994


9994-10006


OF WELLS IN~r FLORIDA I FORMATION


Lime


broken


I-ard lime and Broken lime Core
Anhydrite and Cored hard bin H-ard lim Broken lime H-ard lime Broken lime Hard lime Broken lime Hard lime Broken lime Hard lime


Soft Hard


anhydrite

lime ek lime


lime lime


Broken liii Soft lime I-ard lime Broken 1111 Hard lime


Broken


no


lime


anhydrite












WELL L..0U


alliburron
a maca.
Ouuil7iCemeniflg Lb.


cs-pay JOFAIJAISLIL AR Qil Ar PAP a


ConK


Wa H


Evrooz A flPS MAr P~ 1939


O~n6n' k' 141/10
kawm t-.,n. * ..


c.uMy A#OA'Por ~FUe N.._______


NO


OTINflAL-Mv. DIP1 o S~PtDANCj-OI.~ 160 -40


IC

























.E------ 4c




"5



S--- -H ..


}00


00


roo



- -


__-








-


.1-I-I



-4
I - -



-


- -
- - -S
-
~-4
- -A

-

--
---






- -


I~c- I-1


Vi:


-I---.


I0


. . .-470















- ---












-5

















I-


~oo 00


9







.10


a


- '-
-I I-.
- I I-i - I- -b


trtrrl zr7zh


--

- -

-- - _


- --
- -
-
-
-
- -- -


S
-- -
-- - -


HrIr


t


'0










'C


2


-a
S

- -a
--
-

-
-
-


-


-










I





-- -


)




















1 t~I-I----4 I-


I-f---- I-I -


-
- -
- -
- - -


-
-

- -


-
- -
- -- -


-

t - -


-

S --
- -


-
-
- -
I-
I~. --
- -
--
-
-






E

- -
-
-

-


-






E



~









-
-

- -

- -
- -
- -


--- -
-

I
- - -













































































-


-
-








































--
-


7,00 7/00 7O0














































































7Soo














fl a



- -


~.60c































4700 eeoc


[
[


1





)I










t































-


; I










































-!












-q




































-a
Si












































SI

- -


-













-


















































































-


- -


- -


940 9800


~II


84o BSo 6~oc















87'oc BBoc 68Cc 900 sloc


I


)














)















3


k


t


I


.


























- -


I









































































-




















































































































































a

















PLATES


1-1
















Plate


Figures depth o


Figures 1450 feet


of Slpecinmens


Jf 390-395 feet


10-14


10-14


at a


3, .4,


front


at a


,of slpecimns


dlepth


the Carpenters


(deIpth from


of 250-258


tihe Gory


Hoe


well


feet.


~~re11


at a


del1)thl


1440-


of 1360-1370 feet.


All figures,


X35,


except figures


which


are X15.


Figure


Valvulina.


S -1582A)


floridan a


al)ertulral


' jew


front


view


of holotype.


a prratyiie


.S.G.S.


.S.G.S.


No. S-1582


3. 4.


hipoflides
view.


jackson


('11.8 38


(Cushmian and Applin)


3. (dorsal view


ventral


2pirolina corycusis C
view~ of the lholotype


ole, II. (P.S.q


G.S.


5, side view of a No. S-1541).


yOunlg specimens


6, side


seoranopsas
'.S.G.S. No


gu uteri
S -1581)


-'I 11 dorsal


jview


side


all figui'es


vietlw


of holotype


ventral


'view.


10, 11.


IPseudochirjsa lidinza


holotype


.S.O.S.


floridana. Cole, %o. 5-1538),; 11


nU Sp.;


,apertural


view


front


of 1)a ratype


.S.G.S.


No. S-1538A).


lQiiViiiifla.


martli Cushman


Berimudez


front


tularia


60)7/enS


is Cole


front


view?


limlotype


S-1533).


V CrflCi ili~zla


front


IviewY.


'vew








SURVEY


BULLETIN


NINETEEN,


1~ LATE


4.

4
.1
* -'C I,
* 4~ ,b,,* ~


V
.4


*'~w.-. .~

****;
to
,~'. ,. *r.
$ij ~ .0


4 t.'ytt.~5,. A: *~ .4
-. V
.,
.1
J -'~ S ~N- J
I. -. -,
I
F ..
* I.
7*.





FLOR IDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY


BULLETIN


NINETEEN,


P LATE~























Plate


Figures a dlepth


1-3, of Sp~ecilelns of 2270 feet.


firolll


the Dundee


LPetroleuin


('onipany


Figure 4,


of al specimen from


the Cory


wxell at 'a


dlel)th


of 1360-1370 feet.


Figures 5-11 290-395 feet.


s[pecllnls


from


Carlpenters


Home


;~'efl


a depth


Figures Figures


Xi5.


X4 0.5.


Figure 1-3.


HordEs


No. S-2


gunteri Cole. ii. Sl). 325).: 2. transverse


medium


side VieW


section


section of 1)aratype


of exterior of


1o1oty~)e


.S.G.S.


.S.G.S.


S-2825A )


IPs cr d o hurys a ihin a


fiorin tL


Cole,


n. gen.


n. Sl..;


section


show


in ternal


relationships.


5-iL


Pseudorbitolina


en bensis


Cuslunan


Bermudez


exterilal


'views


side


view?


specimens figured


-9, api)cal as 8 an(I


x'iew


(note


three


ventral


initial


chambers


Ivertical


I


show


section.


of 1paratype (1F .G.S. No. S-2825


vie",


















late


Figures


1-3. (1-15.


17. of


specimens


fronl


tihe (:ory


wvel1:


-t0-.t


H (1Ql)th


of 1500-


1510 feet


,7. 14. 15. at a depth


of 1700-171(0 fee


S.D.


at a


(lepth


o}f 2050-203(


9, 10,


Figures 4. d. 1 of 419-444 feet


[1 (ll)th


of 2(090-2100


of SpecielnlS from


10, at a


deplth


,11-13,


tihe (2


carpenter


U (1Q1)tl


(}1110


of 1360-1370


feet.


i (lepth


of 520-530 feet


All figures,


XiS.


Figure


S- .
11-13.


toskinoliiui
No. S-1548).

D ietyocon u.R J) ieltioeon u.8


florida 11(1


~munteri ('00/CC!


Cole.


IM1oherg;
(Moberg)


l. S1);


('xtei'i


tr*fli.tbnl


extern'll


VI(eWS


1 -3 cotyl~es


'.S.4.S.


e~vs.


'.wwS


,lapicl


'v.iew~


18. basal


view.


14-17.


Lit itoiteilti


floridana


('ole,


11. S}


cx terna I


Vit'~VX


,II (,otyI)


U.S.


No. S-1590)






FLORIDA


GEOLO0GICAL


SURVEY


BULLETIN


NINETEEN


PLATE





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY


BULLETIN


N INEJTEEN


PLATE




















Plate 4


Figures depth of 1500-1510


specinmens


1700-1710 feet


at a


dIepth


from thle Cory of 1140-1150 fec


well : 4.


a depth


feet.


Figures 3, feet.


,of specimens from


tihe Carpenters Home wve11 at a


depth


of 419-444


All figures,


X40.5.


Figure
1-9. Ooslinoiina


tions ;


floridana Cole,


(F.S.G.S.


nI. sI).,


No. S-1543D)


ax"'


(KS


sections


.09.


horizontal


2-1543C)


see-


(F.S.G


No. S-1543B).


Lituoncila floridana Cole, n.


axial section of a ieirospheric individual.


























Plate 5


Figures


I'it LI


1-8. 10. 12.


d1e1)tII of


13, of specimens from


444465 feet


5. 7, 12at a


tihe Carpenters Home


del)th


of 409-413 feet


10. at a


depth


of 419-444 feet.


Figures 9. 11. of specimens from 11. at a del)th of 1140-1150 feet.


the Cory well


9, at al


dlepth


of 1350-1360 feet


Figures
Figures


,13,


X-tO.5.


X15.


Fiizure


Coskinolina


zontal


florida no


Cole. no


axial sections


lion-


sections.


6-10. 12


D ictyocon us8


coo/wi


(Moberg)


6-10.


a xliii


sections


1, mijrospheric


form


12, 13. horizontal sections.






FLORI DA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY


BULLETIN


N INETEtEN


I 'LATE





FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY


BULLETIN


NINETEEN


,PLATE



























Plate 6


Figures


at a


,of specimens


depth


from


of 1700-1710


the Cory


well


a (lepthl


of 1360-1370


feet.


Figures 9, 520-530 feet.


specimens


from


the Carpenters


Home


~vel1


depth


Figures Figures


X40.5.


xis.


Figure 1-8. Diet yoconus
vidual: 7. 8


cooke
horiz


(Moberg)


ontal


axial


sections


lnicrospherie


litidi-


sections.


9-il.


Lituonella
sections :


floridana
,paratype


Cole (F


No. S-1590B )


axial


,11.
.831


S-1590A);


sections


lparatyp~e


horizontal


(F.S.G

























Pla te


Figures


7,of SI)QCll11teflS


froml


tihe north


of Mftt. Puilh~oretiu.


Itai ti.


Topo-


typews, 1)Iresenit'( Cole.


to tihe writer by


Dr. T


Vaughn ii


collction


Figures


- A.
D.OI


Slpecllenls


froni


tihe Cory


~s'e1l


2. at


[a (del)tlh of 2710-2120


aI (elithi


of 2090-2100 feet.


Figures 2000 feet


s~eclunelis


collect


froml Cole.


~vell


a1 (Ql)th


Figures Figure


XiS.


X4 0.5.


Figure


D)i et yoeon us


These


StbCtiOflS


( odon


Woodring


atre introduced


axial


section


coliplji 11S011


wit-li


horizontal


g un tenr


section. Moberg.


2-6. 8.


D iet poeo' its
sections.


g~zuiterr


NMoberg ;


axial


sections


horizontal


~T






(GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN NITEEN:.I I:,,,,, .,, PLATE 7




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL


SURVEY


BULLETIN


NINETEEN


PLATE


m




























Plate


Figure 1, of a .speeiinen flrom


the Cory wvell at a


del)thl


of 790-800


feet.


Figures of 258-26


2-10,
;5 feet


of sI)eciIUens


from


(1011th


the Carlpenters


of 250-258


H-ome


a (depth


feet.


All figures,


XiS.


Figure


1(10 flitS


Ca nc,'hia


U1lediiIn


7-10.


Camlerlina
sections;


(Conrad)


(Rutten
ex ternil


vancierstoki


section ;
p)robafbly


transverse


external


view of slightly


ITerniunt)


e rodled


tlransverse


specienl. sections :


view.


(TRutten 111nd


Verluint)


median


sections.


V(Ifde)rstoki





























Plate 9


SI)ClIIICIHIS


'~1~C.at a


t
troill


(1l1)th


tihe Cu rpe elrs


of 250-


IIoni


~veII


el)thl


300-320


feet.


All figures,


X15.


Figure
1-7. Olperrulinoidtes


:ldlllt


icilleoxi


S ~QC~11iCfl


L-eilIprin)
,ll(ll1


seti oln of


V1e'W


a young


iliedlail


section


si)CCIII1Il


transverse sections.


Opcre:uIin~.'ides


floridensis


(I-Ieillprin)


1l1C(liOfl


st'Ctiohi.


Ca1 JJZ Cr'111 aI


moodybrauzchcnsis


Gravell


lannalll


11edlianl


section.





FLORIDA


GEOGLOGI CA1


suuV~~


B~LLE~15i N


NINETEEN


'IATE




FLORIDA


GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN NINETEEN, PLATE 10


L














4-



























Plate 10


Figures feet.
Figures


specimnens


from


specimens from


the Carpenters


the Cory wveII


1-lome


at a


wvell


depth


depth


of 1100-1110 feet.


All figures,


X15.


Figure 1-8.


Opcrduflnohlc8


florhicusis


(lHeilprin)


median


section


transverse


section


external


vie~v.


Opereulinoides


OCahil~ 1118


(Cushmian)


ex tern al


vie~~'


See-


sf 7,


transverse


sectioii.


Ileterostegina


section


tc~ra ii(i~


Gravell


median sec.tion.


llanna


,portion


showing eiibryonic chambers


al transverse


initial


coils.














Plate 11

Figures 1. 2. 7. 8, of specimens from the ('ory well; 1, 2, at a (l of 11001110 feel" 7, S. at a depth of 1250-126(0 feet.
Figures 3 (1. 0-15, of specimens from the ('arlucpnters Home well at a depth of 300-320 feet.

Figures 1-15, Xi5.

Figure
1, 2. Hlhtcrolcyina I(lqarm Gravell an1d Ilanna; 1. exlernal view: 2. natural
section showing emb0ryonice chambers and the division of the chambers
into chmierlets.
3-6. Ifelcroslqyinqo o lh a [Wlislushmanam ;, nedlnil section; 4, 5, 1 malmiSverse seetions" G3, extern1:al view.
7, S. Oucruuliaoidcs ,uras its (iutten aid Vermnt ); 7. median section 8.
transverse section.
9-15. Canwcrima mood ybruachnsis (ravell and I lanna 9, 13, 14, median sections; 10-12, transverse sections; 15, external view.


[76]






BULLETIN NINETEEN, PLATE 11


V

I!


6


[77]


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY





FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


BULLETIN NINETEEN, PLATE 12


13


14


[78]


I


























10


























Plate 12


Figures 1-8, of specimens from the Cory well at a depth of 5790-5800 feet.
Figures 9-11, 13-14, of specimens from the Suwannee Petroleum Corpration's Sholtz No. 1 (W-166) near Cedar Keys It a depth of 2807 feet; figure 12. a specimen at a depth of 2840-50 feet.

Figures 1-3, X15.
Figures 4-14, X40.5.

Figure
1-8. Lepidorbitoides (Lepidorbitoics) nortoni (Vaughan) ; 1-3, external views;
4. 5, vertical sections; 6-8. equatorial sections; 0, 7, negalospheric individuals; 8, microspheric individual.
--14. Lepidorbitoies (Lepilorbitoies) phinasi M. G. Rutten; 9-11, equatorial
sections; 12-14, vertical sections.


[79]



























Plate 13


All specimens fro1 the CarIpenters Honme well" 1, 3. at a depth of 290-300 feet; 2, 4, 6, 7, at a depth of 258-265 feet; 5, at a (lelth of 250-258 feet.

Figures 1-4, 7, X15.
Figure 5, XS.
Figure 6, X40.5.

Figure
1-7. Lcpidocyclia (Lcpidocyelin a) ocalana. Cushman ; 1. 2, vertical sections,
illustrating (lifferent degrees of inflation of the test of negalospheric illdividllals 3, 4. equatorial sections of megalospheric individuals" 5, external views; 6. equatorial section of a mnicrospherie individual, illustrating the initial coil an( shape of the equatorial ehaibers" 7, vertical
section of a amicrosplheric individual.


[801




F)R1AIOOE BUJLLET'IN NINETEEN, I'LATE 13


5 3


7


[81]


FLIDIIIA OEOLOGICAL SURVEY





BULLETIN NINETEEN, PLATE 14


[82]


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SIIRVEY
















Plate 14


Figures 1-7, specimens from the Carpenters Home well; 1-3, at a depth of 290-300 feet; 4-7 at a depth of 265-290 feet. Figure 8, a specimen from the Cory well at a depth of 1260-1270 feet.

Figures 1, 4, X5.
Figures 2, 3, 5-8, XI5.
Figure
1-3. Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) ocalhia Cushman. variety floridana Cushman; 1, external views of three specimens showing sellneform character
of the tests; 2, equatorial section; 3, vertical section.
4-7. Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyclina) ocalana Cushman, variety pscidomarginata
Cushman; 4, external view, showing strong papillae which are especially well developed on the umbo; 5, vertical section; 6, 7, equatorial sections. 8. Lepidocyclina (Lcpidocyclina) lshoppi Thlindens: equatorial section,
showing the large embryonic chambers which constitute the greater part
of the test and the shape of the equatorial chambers.


[83]

















Plate 15

Figures 1. 2. 5. 12. of specilens froll tile Carpenters Ho-1 e 1 well at a depth of 250-258 feet.
Fianres 3. 4. 6-11. 13. 14. of specimens from the ('ory well 3. 4. 14. at a (1et]h of 122(-1230 feet: 6-11. 13. at a depth of 1250-1260 feet.

Figures 1-4. 8-11. X15
Figures 5. 12. 13. X5.
Figure 14, X40.5.

Figure
1-5. Lepidocyclina (Lcp idoryclina) oeUlana Cushman. variety aftenuata Cushman" 1. 4, vertic l sections: 2. 3. equatorial sections" 5. external view. i-8. Lepidoeyelina (Xcphrolepidina) smmesi Vaughan and Cole; 6. 7. \'ertical sections" 8, equatorial section.
(-13. Lcpidocyclinma (Lcpido.yclin a) mortoni Cushman: 9, 10, vertical sect10os:
11. equatorial section: 12. 13, external views.
14. Lcpidocylclina (Lcpidocyclina) tschoppi Thiadens" vertical section.


1441




BUJIIEYtIN NIN ,,110IN, I'IATE 15


9


14 12 [ 851]


FLOIDA ()'E'OLjOG.I CAI., SURtVEY





FLOR!DA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BULLETIN NINETEEN, PLATE 1.6 12


11


[86]












Plate 16

Figures 1-10, 13, 15-17, of specimens from the Cory well; 1, 3-6, 9, 10, 15-17, at a depth of 1220-1230 feet; 2, 8, at a depth of 1270-1280 feet; 7, at a depth of 1250-1260 feet; 13, at a depth of 1260-1270 feet.
Figures 11, 12, 14, of specimens from the Carpenters Home well at a depth of 300-320 feet.

All figures, X15, except figure 13 which is X40.5.

Figure
1-4, 6-10, 15. Lepidocyclina (Lephiocyclina) ocalana Cushman; 1-4, 6-8, vertical
sections to illustrate variation in the number of lateral chambers which may occur on each side of the equatorial layer; 9, 10, 15,
equatorial sections.
5. Lophiooliclina (Lepidocyclina) ocala na Cushman, var. att l ata
Cushman; vertical section.
11, 12, 14. Lepidocyclina (Lepidoeyclina) niortoni Cushman; 11, 14, equatorial
sections; 12, vertical section.
13, 16. Lepidocyolina (Lopidocyclina) tsclioppi Thiadens; 13, vertical seetion; 16, equatorial section.
17. Lepidocyolina (Lepidocyclihna) ocalana Cushman, var. floridana
Cushman,; portion of equatorial section to illustrate embryonic upparatus and equatorial chambers.


f87J
























Plate 17

Figures 1. 2. of spelmens from the Cory well; 1. at a depth of 90-910 feet:
2. at a depth of 1000-1010 feet. Figures 3-5. of specimens from the Marathon well at a depth of 852 feet. Figure-s 6. 7. of specimens from the Carpenters Home well :6. at a depth of 8(-32 feet: 7. at a depth of 335-355 feet.

Figures 1. 2, 5-7. X40.5. Fitures 3. 4. X15.

Fhure
1. 2. _1Iiogaipiiia (Mioqqpqina) hawkinsi Hodson: 1. horizontal section 2,
vertical section.
35. MiogypOn (Miogyp.yiOn) cushmuni Vaughan: 3. 4, horizontal sections;
5. vertical section. These are introduced for comparison with Il, hawkinsi
Hodson.
J. 7. It.wudophramia (Proporocticl iiui) citrus is (Vaughan); 6. vertical seeim: 7. horizontal section.


[88]





''lAII I)A ( f()IA((I'1Al SIJItRVEY


18191


BULLEI9II11IIN NINI.TIEEON, PLATIE 17





BULLETIN NINETEEN, PLATE 18


12


11


14


[901


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY












Plate 18

Figures 1, 2, 7-9, 12-14, of specimens from the Cory well; 1. 2, at a depth of 1100-1110 feet; 7, 8, at a depth of .3360-3370 feet; 9, at a (le1th of 11,10-1150 feet; 12, at a depth of 1440-1450 feet; 13, nt a depth of 1230-1240 feet ; 14, at a depth of 1340-1350 feet.
Figures 3-6. of speeilens from the SuwNannee Petroleum Corporation's Sholtz No. 1 (W-166) near Cedar Keys at a (1th of 2140-2158 feet. Figures 10. 11. of specimens froi about 1 ha. liclow the ptss on the north foot of Mt. Puilboreau. l)resellted to the writer by 1r. '. Wayland Vaughan collection of W. S. Cole.

Figures 1, 2, 5. 10-13, X15.
Figures 3, 4, 6-9, 14, X40.5.
Figure

1, 2. ArgyrothccI WCgenian iCole; external views. 3, 4, 7, 8. Borelis gantcri Cole, variety floridana Cole, n. var.; 4-7 median sections; 3. 8. transverse sections; 3, paratyl)e (F.S.G.S. No. 2826) ; 4,
paratype (F.S.G.S. No. S-2826A).
5, B. Iorelis gun teri Cole, n. Sls.; 5. median section ;6. transverse section.
Coskinolina floridana Cole, n. sp.; vertical section of a reworked
specimen from the Oligocene.

10, 11. Dietyoconus codon Woodring; 10, vertical section; 11, transverse
section. These are introduced for comparison with D. gunteri Moberg
and D. cooked (Moberg).
12. Dictoconus cookei (Moberg)" vertical section of a mnegailospherie
individual.
13. 14. Lepidocyclina (Lepidocyelina) niortont Cushman; vertical sections.


[91]




Full Text
xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000045100001datestamp 2009-01-05setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Stratigraphic and paleontologic studies of wells in Florida: United Brotherhood of Carpenters and JoinersBulletin - Florida Geological Survey ; 19dc:creator Cole, W. Storrsdc:publisher Florida Geological Surveydc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00000451&v=00001001809069 (aleph)AAA1597 (ltqf)AJN2920 (ltuf)dc:source University of Florida