Citation
Willy's country visit

Material Information

Title:
Willy's country visit
Series Title:
The Goldfinch story-books
Creator:
Goldfinch, Bella
Foster, Myles Birket, 1825-1899 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Sampson Low, Son & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Sampson Low, Son, & Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1856
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 p. : col. ill., ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Country life -- Juvenile fiction -- England ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nature -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1856 ( rbbin )
Evans -- Signed bindings (Binding) -- 1856 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1856
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Signed bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
NUC pre-1956, supp.,
Citation/Reference:
BM,
General Note:
Series statement at head of cover title.
General Note:
Half-title.
General Note:
Bella Goldfinch is a pseud. according to NUC pre-1956 supp., cited below.
General Note:
Chromolithographs with additional coloring by hand or stencil: frontispiece, text illustrations. Illustrations engraved by E. Evans (i.e., Edmund Evans)
General Note:
Wood engraving: title-page vignette.
General Note:
Colored front and back wrappers designed and signed: E. Evans.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Bella Goldfinch ; illustrated with eight coloured pictures by Birket Foster.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA3362 ( ltqf )
ALK2425 ( notis )
12589274 ( oclc )
027264656 ( alephbibnum )

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WILLY’S

C.0 'U Nel BY a7 1S?) T.

BY

BELLA GOLDFINCH.

Illustrated with Eight Coloured Piétures by
BIRKET FOSTER. :



LONDON:
SAMPSON LOW, SON, & CO., 47 LUDGATE Hiii
1856



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

‘THERE were two little girls named Hannah and Lucy, who lived
with their father and mother in a small village far from any town.
Hannah was ten years old, and Lucy was six. ‘They were good
girls, and had learned to read and to sew, and Hannah could write
pretty well. Their father, whose name was Carter, worked as
gardener at the Hall, a large house standing in a fine park close to
the village ; and their mother, who had been a servant at the Hall,
helped to maintain her family by sewing and ironing. She was a
lean and good woman, and she wished to make: Hannah and
Lucy as honest and industrious as herself. Her cottage was
always neat, and the little bit of garden in front of it was gay with
common flowers, and with some new or rare ones, which were
given to Carter by his master, the head-gardener at the Hall. Of
this garden Carter was very proud, and he used to work at it in
the summer evenings, when he had left his master. Thus his
little girls also learned to be fond of flowers. ‘They had a baby
sister, and a dog that was at present a better playfellow than the
baby. |

These little girls had never been away from the village; they
thad never seen a larger house than the Hall, which indeed was a
very large house; and they had no idea that the town to which
their father used sometimes to go to buy seeds, or sell the apples



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 5

which grew in the orchard, was at all different to their own village:
they only supposed there were more houses in it. A broad river
ran close to the village, the green lawn of the park sloped down
to this river, and, when the tide was high, the water washed quite
up to the fine old oaks in the park; and the cows used to gather
together in the shade, and cool themselves by standing in the clear
calm water; while the speckled deer would lie in a shady dell just
by, and when any one went near them, would scamper off among
the trees, and come back again when the passer-by was out of
sight. All this was very pretty, and I dare say our little girls
would have said that it was so if any one had asked them, but they
did not think much about it. Sometimes Hannah used to wonder
where the ships went to when they disappeared behind the hills
and trees; she had heard that they brought corn and wood from
the sea to the town ; but, as she had never seen either town or sea,
she had no more true idea of either than her picture-books had
given her; and, in truth, she thought very little on the matter.

One day Carter came home to dinner with a letter in his hand
— this was a great event, for these good people had few letters—
and both Mrs. Carter and the little girls were curious as to what
there was in it. ‘Their father told them that the letter was from a
brother of his, who lived in a large town a great way off, and that
this brother asked him to take a young son, who was just getting
strong after a bad fever; for the doctor said the boy wanted good
air and country exercise.

‘‘'What say you, wife, shall we take the boy? He can go '
with me to the gardens sometimes, I can make him useful there,
I dare say.”

After a short silence, Mrs. Carter agreed that it would be great
kindness to give the poor boy this chance of getting strong again ;
and as her husband’s family had once been very civil to her, she
would do all she could to make the boy happy at the cottage. 5o



6 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT,

the letter was answered, and a day fixed for Carter to meet his
nephew and bring him to the village in the carrier’s cart.

The day came, and Willy arrived. He was a pale, thin boy,
about a year older than Hannah, very silent and rather shy.
Hannah, who was an open-hearted little girl, pitied him, and was
kind ; but Lucy hung about her mother, and seemed jealous of the
attention given to him. Neither of the little girls knew what to
say or do to their new friend, till their mother said, perhaps he
would like to go with them and see their rabbits. This was
gladly agreed to, and they went to the rabbit-hutch, which was
in one corner of the orchard at the back of the house. Willy was
much pleased at being allowed to handle the little creatures ; and,
in answer to Hannah’s question whether he had ever seen any
before, he said,—

(Yas many times ; a man in our street has above two hun-
dred. He keeps them to sell in the market.”

Lucy looked up in surprise, and, patting her own little pet,
thought, “I will not sell you.”

The talk that Willy heard that evening about vegetables, and
spring frosts, and early flowers, and trees bursting, was very
strange to him; at last he ventured to ask some questions, which
showed his cousins that he knew as little about the country as
they did about the town; and Lucy was very happy in thinking
that if she had never seen two hundred rabbits, at least she did
know what a field of turnips was, which Willy had confessed that —
he did not.

On the next morning the little girls went to school, and Mrs.
Carter asked Willy if he would go with her to feed some young
calves, Willy said ** Yes ;” but he was quite surprised when his
aunt gave him a pail of milk to carry to some nice, clean, bright-
looking creatures, very different to the calves he had seen in the
streets of his native town. As soon as the three animals saw





FEEDING THE CALVES



a WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

Mrs. Carter, they came up to her, rubbing their heads against her,
and smelling at the pail which Willy held, half afraid. But he
soon got courage, and let the calves drink out of the tub he held
to them; and one strong creature, handsomely marked with red
and white, would presently have lapped it all up, had not Mrs.
Carter pushed him away, to leave some milk for a delicate white
calf that did not seem strong enough to get to the tub by
itself.

The next day Mrs. Carter told Hannah that she wanted her to
take some fine linen to the Hall, and that, as it must be there by a
certain hour, she must give up her morning school and carry it.
Mrs, Carter added that perhaps Willy would like to go with her,
as the day was fine and warm. On Hannah saying something
about going Sod the river-bank, T exclaimed, —



ray let me go with you, Hannah; I Ny carry the basket
all the way for you. I never saw a real river.’

At this Lucy cried out in great surprise, and Mrs. Carter
wondered how such a thing could be. In answer to her questions,
Willy said that there were many canals in the large busy town
which was his home, but that there was no river ; and that, except
when he was whirled along over bridges i in the “railway tain, he
had never seen one, adding,— RES I

“T do so wish to see a fine broad river with real ships sailing
on it, and my father told me I should see one here ; besides, I
have learned about it at school.”

‘© What is a canal ?”” asked Hannah.

“© Oh, it is like a straight road of water with walls on each
side ; so dirty and dull in the town, and but a little more pleasant
in the country; it is very different to the waters I crossed in



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 9

coming here. But let us go to your river, I shall be-so very
pleased to see it.”

Hannah and Willy set off on their walk, and the boy’s delight
when he first caught sight of the broad blue river, with its high
wooded banks, cannot be described. He lingered behind her,
after stopping to look around him; and at last he asked her if he
might remain by the river-side while she took the basket up to the
Hall. Hannah said to be sure he might, she should know where
to find him if he did not go beyond certain trees that she pointed
out ; but that she thought he would like to see the Hall, it was
such a grand house, with so many large windows.

But Willy said he did not care to see a grand house, for he
had seen the Town Hall where he lived every day ; and he had
rather see the broad flowing river tnan alf the houses in the whole
world, So Hannah left him lying on the grass, gazing intently on
the scene beneath him. Ships and boats of all sizes were passing
and repassing; and presently there came a steamboat full of
people, and some men playing on various instruments. Willy
had often heard music, and good music too; for his father had
taken him to concerts which cost very little, on purpose for
workmen and their families. But he thought he had never heard
any so sweet as that played by the little band on the steamboat ;
and perhaps he was right, for it came softly over the water,
sometimes loud and sometimes like a whisper, less and less distinct
till the boat was out of sight behind the trees of the Park. Willy
thought to himself, “* This is pleasanter than a town,” and for the
first time since he left home he was glad that his father had
sent him into the country.

Hannah found her cousin in the very spot where she had left
him ; she could not understand his delight at seeing the ships and
boats, for she had seen them every day since she was born ; and
she was still more surprised when he told her that though he had



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HAYMAKING.



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. II

never seen any boat but a canal-boat, he knew the names of all
those kinds which he had just seen. He had noticed prints of
them at the shop-windows and in books.

When this was told at home, Willy rose very much in the
opinion of his uncle and aunt; even Lucy began to think that he
might know some clever things which she did not. Carter, too,
became fond of the boy, who was useful to him in many ways.
Willy went to the gardens every day, and when his uncle planted
out the vegetables, he could reckon how many would be wanted
to fill a certain space, and thus save the trouble of taking up more
than were required at once. He also reckoned the quantity of
gravel that must be brought from the pit for the kitchen-garden
walks; this was as useful to Carter as helping him to dig it
would have been, and Willy was not yet strong enough to do that.

‘Thus the spring passed away; Willy began to think that a
held of fine green corn, with the wind blowing over it, was a very
beautiful sight; though not so beautiful as the river; and he
hoped that his father would not send for him until the green corn
had become golden; he wished to stay till harvest was over, for
Lucy said everybody was merry at harvest-time.

Before harvest came hay-time, which the girls enjoyed also.
It was nice pastime to make hay; but Hannah could not explain
to her cousin why tossing the hay about was called making it ;
she only knew that it was good fun to cover themselves up with
the sweet hay. Willy thought so too, and he enjoyed hay-
making as much as any of his companions did. And there were
now so many pretty flowers in the hedge-banks ; there was the
pink dog-rose, and the white rose, and the honeysuckle twining
among the stubborn hawthorn-branches ; ‘and there were the sweet
tufts of May and the broad white heads of the elder-flower; and
then on the bank itself was the silvery saxifrage, and the sky-blue
veronica, and the bright red herb Robert, with its disagreeable



12 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

scent. All this the boy enjoyed very much, and he thought the
wild flowers which he gathered every day fresh, to adorn Mrs.
Carter’s room, were quite as beautiful as the rare bits of strange
plants which the head gardener sometimes gave his uncle.
Perhaps Willy was right, though his cousins wondered at his
taste.

Willy had a great deal to learn in the country, and his kind
friends were quite willing to teach him, in return for which he
made himself useful to his aunt in various ways. His father was
a carpenter, and he had taught his son to handle tools when he
was quite a little boy, so Willy could do many things that were
required to make the cottage comfortable, and save his aunt the
expense of sending for the village carpenter. Even Lucy
began to be glad that her cousin had come to the village.
She had been very proud of teaching him the names of wild
flowers and birds; and she had many little secrets which she
found great fun in teasing Willy with. She would foretell rain,
without letting Willy know that the little shepherd’s weather-glass
was closely shut up, and she would guess that it was noon by the
flowers of the goat’s-beard being closed. But Willy was be-
ginning to be as wise as Lucy was about these things; and the
little girl soon found more pleasure in hearing her cousin tell of
what he had seen in the town, than in showing off her own
knowledge of country things.

Willy was also very useful to Lucy. He made a little bed-
stead for her doll of some nice white wood that the carpenter at
the Hall was so kind as to give him; the posts of it were very
grand, for his friend the carpenter allowed him to turn them in
the workshop. While this was going on, Lucy really felt vexed
that she could not understand or remember the names by which
he called the different parts of his work, nor even his tools ; but
she was very grateful to him when she saw the smart little bed-



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 13

stead finished, and ready for some gay curtains which her mother
gave her.

Lucy was generally a good little girl, but she had not been a
healthy child; and having required much care while very young,
she had been a little spoiled afterwards. Hannah was strong and
active; she could help her mother in keeping the house clean, and
she sewed neatly enough to work for the housekeeper at the Hall.
So she was often sent there by her mother; but Lucy was not
strong enough to walk so far in the heat of the day or in a hurry ;
so she was obliged to be content with her doll or her favourite
playfellow the dog.

Lion, for so the dog was called, was a little creature with a
smooth white coat. I cannot think who could give him such a
grand name, for he was not the least like a lion; somebody must
have been laughing at him when he was named so. But, though
he was not wild like a lion, he was very fierce if strangers came
into the cottage-garden, and would not let even a neighbour touch
anything in it. Sometimes he went with Carter and Willy to the
gardens to work, and then he would lie on his master’s coat in the
tool-house till it was time to go home to dinner; and Lion
seemed to know dinner-time as well as the gardeners did, for he
would whine and be restless if his master was later than usual.

He was a clever fellow; his master had taught him to know,
by the manner in which he put on his coat after breakfast, whether
he was to go to the gardens or not; and if Carter said, * Shall
Lion go?” he would run to his master wagging his tail, and
looking up in his face, as if to say; “ Pray let me go.” Dogs may
be taught a great many things. ‘The shepherd’s dog often knows
every sheep in his master’s flock, and he will take care that not
one strays away when going out to the field. This is very useful,
for in Scotland, and in some English counties, the sheep go out to
feed on open moors, where the grass doés not grow thick, as in



14 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT,

our meadows, and where there are no hedges to prevent the sheep
straying ; but the poor things are scattered about, glad to roam
over the hills in search of the sweet grass, which grows so
sparingly, When the shepherd comes to take them home, his
dog will find out every straggler, and drive it to the rest of the
flock; and when he sees that they are all safe, he looks up into
his master’s face, as if to ask which way they are to go. In a
part of the country where there are fields and hedges, the shep-
herd’s dog has less to attend to.

Lucy and Lion were good friends. Lucy used to tie her doll
upon Lion’s back and make him run about the garden; but
very often this sport ended in the doll’s frock being torn, and
sometimes Lion would drag it along the dirtiest part of the
garden. ‘Then Hannah was so kind as to mend the frock, and
her mother washed it; so Lucy was really a little spoiled, but we
must hope that as she grows stronger she will get rid of her faults.

One of these faults was selfishness, and this was much tried
by the strong friendship which grew up between Willy and Lion.
It was not strange that the dog should like better to play and run
races with a strong boy than to carry about a little girl’s doll, or
be made to lie by her side in a corner while she dressed and
undressed her baby; but Lucy was too young to see this, and she
was rather jealous. One day Lion caused her great crying and
unhappiness, thus: the gardener at the Hall wanted to send to the
market-town for some seeds that were ordered, and Willy begged
that he might go. He had often wished he were on board the
steamer that went past the village twice a-day; he used to watch
it as it went out on the broad water towards the sea, for from one
hill in the village it might be seen some miles off; and still more
he used to watch it round the wooded hill in the Park, for there
the slope on the other side of the river was dotted with gentlemen’s
houses, and farms almost hidden by fine trees. So he was very



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THE SHEPHERD COUNTING HIS FLOCK,



16 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

thankful when the head-gardener gave him leave to go to the
town, and said, that as the weather was warm, he had better go by
the steamer at noon, and walk home in the cool of the evening, it
being about five miles. Mrs, Carter doubted whether Willy was
strong enough for this, but, on condition that he walked slowly,
she agreed to his going.

Now Lion was so constantly Willy’s companion, that he
supposed he was to go with him on this day also; and though
Willy looked at him, saying, “* No, I cannot take Lion to-day,”
the dog still wagged his tail, and looked wistfully at Willy, as if to
say, “ What a pleasant companion I shall be in your walk home!”
Lucy said she could not spare her dog, and that he would be lost
if he went; but her father said, that if Willy did not mind the
trouble of him on the steamer he might be of use on his return, as
Willy had never been on that road, and there were some cross-
ways, and a short cut through the Park, which the dog knew
much better than Willy could learn by description. So it was
settled that Lion should go. Lucy dared not say anything more,
but she got leave to go to the river-side with the travellers, and
there she had a bitter crying fit when a man took the dog up into
the boat that was to take them to the steamer, as it passed in the
middle of the wide river. She called, “Lion! Lion!” and
almost hoped he would jump into the water, and swim to her;
but he lay quietly at Willy’s feet, only wagging his tail with joy.
Still Lucy did not give him up, but waited to see him safe on
board the steamboat; and after nodding her head a hundred times
to him, as he stood on a bench looking very wise and very happy,
she turned away, still crying, and walked slowly home.

‘That was a sad, lonely day to Lucy. Her mother pitied her,
and said nothing to vex her; but when Lucy sobbed out, ‘* He
ought not to love Willy better than me,” Mrs, Carter was
obliged to reprove her, and show her how wretched such jealousy



WILLY’sS COUNTRY VISIT. 17

would make her if she indulged in it, and how wrong it was to
feel unkindly even towards a dog. Lucy promised to try not to
be jealous any more, and her mother proposed that she and
Hannah should go as far as the Park-stile in the ba to meet
her cousin.

We must now look back to Willy ; but we cannot describe
his delight when he found himself gliding along the smooth, clear
river, with the lovely country on each side of him, the trees Silacet
dipping into the water, and the snug farmhouses and fields of
waving corn, After enjoying all this for an hour, the scene
changed, and became more familiar to Willy ; for he landed among
busy people, and soon found himself in the town. He and Lion
went to the seedsman, and having got his parcel he started off
to walk home. His aunt had provided him with some bread
and cheese, which he sat down to eat as soon as he had left the
town. ‘The evening shadows were getting longer and longer as
the travellers entered the Park; they had still two miles to walk,
and Willy began to be tired. Eioes too, did not gambol about so
much as when they set off, but ran on before his master at a
steady pace, as if he, too, should be glad to see the village. When
they entered the Park, Willy had cause to rejoice that he had the
dog with him, for here were so many tracks in all directions that
he was uncertain which to choose. Lion, however, knew the
right path, and ran forward without stopping, so Willy thought he
might trust him, A dog may always be trusted thus, and so may
a horse. We have seen a horse very unwilling to take a wrong
road, when his driver, who had forgotten the way, obliged him to
it; and when the mistake was found out, he turned round so
gladly, and trotted off briskly in the right road when his master
was wise enough to trust to him.

Thus Lion and Willy found their way across the Park, and
seated on the stile next the village they saw the two little girls.

B







GATHERING FLOWERS AND SHRUBS,



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. Ig

“Lion! Lion!” cried Lucy; “come here, good dog! I.
am so glad to see you again.”

Lion seemed equally glad to see his young mistress, and he
jumped up, licking her face and hands.

“« What have you seen, Willy?” asked Hannah.

‘¢ A great deal: the nursery garden to which I was sent is a
beautiful place, indeed ; there are many fine hot-houses filled with
rare plants ; and such lovely flowers, Hannah !”

‘¢ But the houses and the streets, 1 mean?!” said his cousin.
For Hannah’s curiosity about the busy world had been much
roused by the tales of it that she had heard him tell Lucy; and
she had listened also to the talk between her father and cousin, as
they spoke of Willy’s birthplace. Hannah began to understand
that the village in which she lived, though very pretty, was not the
only place in the world worth seeing.

‘* The town is an old and dirty one,” replied Willy. ‘* Of
course I did not walk about it; but as I went through to the
garden, I could see that the streets are narrow and the churches
are old. They are very different to those in the place I come
from, but they look grand, and I dare say many persons would
admire them for being old, as ome gentleman on the steamboat
said he did.”

*¢T should like to go banca said Hannah, thoughtfully.

*¢ Would you, indeed? I fancied you thought nothing could
be good out of your own village.”

“Oh, no, no, Willy! At least, I do not think so now.
I hear you tell Lucy of many things that I should like to see,—
your fine railway, and the high bridges you talk of: I never saw a
bridge, except the wooden one on the meadow.”

Willy could not help smiling, as he compared the foot-bridge of
a couple of planks with the beautiful one on which the railway
passes near his native town; but he remembered how strange it

B2



20 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

seemed to Hannah, four months ago, that he should never have
seen a turnip-field, and did not know wheat from barley, except
by the ear. So he said nothing but,—

‘There are many wonders in the world, Hannah; and I dare
say you would like to see them all as well as I should. You
must ask my aunt to take you to town one day.”

Here they were met by Mrs. Carter, and Hannah was just
preparing her request to go with her mother to the town the next
time she went, when the latter said,—

“There are to be grand doings at the village next week.
What do you think? One of the ladies at the Hall is going to be
married, and there is to be a great deal of company. Besides,
I hear that some men are coming from London to make the
rooms very smart for a grand ball there.”

This was great news, indeed; and the girls, who had not
heard of it before, asked their mother many more questions than
she could answer.

“ All I know at present is, that Mrs. Wills has brought me
work enough to last a fortnight, and it must be done in ten days ;
so you and [ must not think anything about the doings at the
Fall, but work very hard indeed to finish what there is to be
done.”

Hannah promised industry, and then ventured to say she
should like to go to the town the next time her mother went.

“¢ Well, well, we shall see,”’ replied Mrs. Carter. ‘ I may not
go for a long time, for the day always tires me; but be a good
girl, and I do not say No. Eat your supper, Willy, and go to
bed; I dare say you are tired.”

Willy was very glad of his supper, and still more glad of his
bed; and he went to sleep directly, too much fatigued even to
dream of his voyage, or of the lovely new flowers he had seen.

When Carter and Willy went to the Hall gardens the next



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 2I

day, they heard all about the wedding plans. ‘There was to be a
grand ball in the evening for the ladies and gentlemen; and the
next day all the persons employed by the Squire, and many of his
farmers, were to have tea in the village schoolroom ; and then all
persons who chose it might go into a part of the Park nearest the
village and play at games, and amuse themselves till it was dark.
Of course this made everybody very busy; the gardeners were
at work early and late in making the lawns and paths neat, and
the flower-beds gay and tidy. A great many new and beautiful
plants were sent from the nursery garden to which Willy had
been, and he was pleased to see some among them that he had
particularly admired. But these beautiful plants were more new
to the head-gardener and Carter than to Willy, for the latter had
seen many of them at a gentleman’s house near his native town.
In that country plants do not grow well in the gardens, for the
smoke from chimneys is very thick and heavy; and as coal is
cheap, every person who has space enough builds a hothouse,
and has what are called stove-plants.

Just before the wedding-day the head-gardener told Carter
he was in great trouble, and on the latter inquiring the cause the
man replied,—

“You know our orange-trees are to stand in a row on the
front terrace, and I wish to place pink flowers between them ;
I cannot find plants enough that I dare put into pots, and I wish
to know if you, or rather Willy, will lend me your two oleanders.
I know the young lady is very fond of them, as she has seen them
growing wild in foreign countries.”

Carter hesitated a minute, for the plants belonged to Willy,
who had nursed them up to carry home to his mother, as they
would bear smoke pretty well. However, he said he would ask
his nephew, and as the gardener had been very kind he had no
doubt he might have the oleanders. Willy consented of course ;



22 WILLY'S COUNTRY VISIT.

and both he and Carter were very proud of them, when their
master praised them, saying that they must have been well tended
to have grown so finely since he gave them to Willy.

Green boughs, also, and flowers were required to dress the
schoolroom, and the little girls were happy in sending their best
and sweetest for the purpose. 5o altogether there was a great
bustle, and a great deal to be done. Willy obtained leave through
his friend the carpenter to help the London men in decking the
entrance-hall and staircase, and thus he learned how to go to work
at the schoolroom, which Carter was desired to attend to. But
Carter had never seen a room decked with flowers, and, being no
carpenter, he would not have been able to make it look half so
well as it did, had not Willy got many useful hints from the
London men.

The wedding-day came, and everything was ready in time.
Lucy had been pleased and proud at being allowed to help her
mother, and Lion and the doll were for once not thought of by
her. ‘he sun shone brightly, and all passed off well. ‘The
company admired the gardens and the flowers, and the bride
noticed Willy’s oleanders. The Hall was brilliantly lighted up
at night, and the lights sparkled prettily through the trees till it
was almost daylight, for the dancing was kept up very late ; and
as they went away, the guests might hear the lark and thrush
singing their morning song of rejoicing at another day. But
I think they were too tired and sleepy to listen to the sweet song
of the birds.

Lucy’s first question the next morning when her mother called
her, was, “Is it fine weather, mother?” and both the little girls
were glad to hear that the sun shone as clear as it had done on the
day before. Many other persons in the village, and all the little
boys and girls, were anxious for a fine day too, and they had their
wish. ‘The tea-partv in the schoolroom went off verv well; all





THE GLEANERS.



24 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

the company admired the tasteful manner in which it was adorned ;
and Hannah and Lucy, who had cut their best flowers for the
purpose, were especially pleased with its gay appearance. At tea
the Squire and his lady paid the party a vine and they too
expressed their admiration. ~

After tea the folks went into the Park, wil they were joined
by the rest of the villagers; the old deonle sat on the grass, or
walked about ; the’ young people played at ball or cricket ; and the
children had their own games. Noisy ones they were; for to
make a noise seemed to be one of the greatest pleasures of the day
to them. They ran about till they were quite tired, and then
“there were buns and milk in the schoolroom for the very little
ones. The corner of the Park where all this took place was by
the river side, and level with it; doubtless it was a pretty sight
from the steamboat that passed in the evening, and I dare say the
passengers wondered what it meant ; perhaps some of them who
had come a long voyage would have enjoyed being of the party.
As twilight came on, the Rey children went home to bed, and
the villagers dropped off, till the Park was left silent and quiet to
the deer who gathered in the thick grove for the night. This
party could not stay till the lark and thrush began their morning
song; they must sleep while the birds slept, that they might be
ready to rise with them and go to their daily work with renewed
strength,

Harvest time was now drawing near ; the corn which while it
was green used to wave so gracefully in the summer breeze, was
now golden; it had lost much of its elegance and beauty to the

-eye, but the £ yellow fields of ripened grain’ promised plenty, and
healthful food for the winter. How rich and beautiful is a field of
corn just before it iscut! And how blank the country looks after
it is cut, when only the bristling stubble remains! Harvest time
*s joyous for man; he has sown and weeded, and seen the corn



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 25

grow while the rain and sun have nourished it; and now he is
thankful that a full crop is granted to him. Harvest time is a busy
time for others besides the farmer. ‘The cottagers’ wives, and all
the children who are old enough, go to glean ; that is, after each
ficld is cut they go in and gather up the loose ears, which they
carry to the mill to be ground; and thus some families obtain a
good quantity of sweet new flour to make into bread. While the
women and elder children go to glean, the younger children and
infants are taken care of by some woman appointed for the pur-
pose ; it is a strange sight to see twenty or thirty little children
together in a large room; a few of them six years old, but the
ereater part of them much younger. The mothers take little beds”
there for the infants, who sleep as soundly as if they were in
their own homes.

Willy’s father and mother had often written to him that they
thought he had been long enough in the country to get quite
strong ; and indeed this was true, for he was now a stout, tall lad ;
and instead of being pale as when he first came, he was aidhos: as
sunburnt as Carter himself. But Willy was in no hurry to go
back, and his uncle and aunt did not wish to part with him, so
they wrote to his father and told. him they should like to keep him
a little while longer. cs

“© Oh! pray stay with us till Gfer harvest.” said Ligy ; « you
must go gleaning; and we shall want you to dress up the last load,
for you know how to do such things so smartly. 3

“What do you mean?” asked Willy. | P

“We always get as many gay handkerchiefs and bright
ribands as we can, and fasten them to the forks and sticks on the
top of the last load; and we dress ourselves up with flowers,
and shout, and make as much noise as we can, as we go home
with the waggon. ‘You must not go away before harvest,’’ said
Hannah. ,





BLACKBERRYING.



WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 27

33

“T am quite willing to stay,” replied Willy; “and as I am
earning money at the Hall, I think my father will not insist on
my going home yet. Indeed, I wish I could be a gardener all my
life, instead of going back to live in that crowded, smoky town.”

‘Perhaps it may be so,” said Mrs, Carter, who found Willy
so very useful, that she did not like to part with him; besides
which, she and her husband had both become attached to him.

So the letter was written, and an answer was received, giving
leave for Willy-to stay at the village till after harvest.

There was a great deal of work to be done at the gardens just
at this time. The Hall was full of company, so the beds and
walks must be kept very neat, and both Carter and Willy worked
very hard. “There was a great quantity of fruit to be gathered
also, and Lucy was afraid that, after all, Willy would have no
time allowed him to go with her to glean. However, at last he
had one half-day given him, and the three cousins set off after
dinner to the field. ‘There they found nearly half the village, and
among them were two of the young ladies from the Hall, who
seemed to enjoy themselves at their work. Willy was awkward
at first, and Lucy felt inclined to laugh at him, but she recollected
how clever he had been at many things that even her father could
not do; so she patiently showed him how to gather up the loose
corn, saying, with a smile, “I can guess that there are no corn-
fields where you live, Willy.”

as No, indeed ; unless corn would grow on coal, there can be
none.’

“Coal! what do you mean?” cried Lucy, stopping from her
work, and almost letting her bundle of ears fall.

] ought not quite to say what I did; but one part of the
country near our town is almost all coal, and nothing will grow
there of course.”

** How very odd, and how ugly!” exclaimed Lucy.



28 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISI>-.

“Indeed it is; but that coal is very valuable, and if you ever
come to see us, Lucy, I will show you what a great many things
are done by help of it. Oh, dear! this ‘gleaning is warm work,
it tires me as much as digging does.” So saying, he threw him-
self down under the hedge, and the little girls, who were tired also,
sat down too. ;

“What say you to gathering some blackberries? I see plenty
over the stile,” said Hannah.

“« They will be so refreshing,” cried Lucy, jumping up.

Willy agreed to go too, and they were joined by some com-
panions as heated and tired as themselves. How delicious the
ripe blackberries were! Lucy was so sorry that Lion was -not
with them, as he was fond of blackberries ; but of course she had
been obliged to leave him at home; dogs must not go into a
harvest-field.

The children gathered plenty of blackberries to eat with their
bread, and then it was proposed to pluck some to carry home, as,
mixed with apples, they make an excellent pudding. So they
gathered enough for a pudding, and then went back to finish
gleaning,-much refreshed.

At length harvest was finished, the last load was carried home,

ecked with boughs, and ribands, and flowers. ‘The fields lay
bare and brown, and the partridges that had made their nests
among the corn, were fortunate if they did not see their young
ones carried off by the reapers. The autumn winds began to
rustle through the oaks in the Park, tearing off the rich brown
leaves ; the holly-berries began to turn red ; and the long, trailing
branches of the Traveller’s Joy were covered with bunches of
feathery seeds. ‘The delicate green of the lime-trees was turned ,
into gold colour; and the deer in the Park were obliged to take
shelter under the dark firs and shining hollies, instead of gam--
bolling about in the open glades. ‘The swallows were gone to a



WILLY’s COUNTRY VISIT. 29

warmer country, and one by one the more hardy birds had ceased
their song. But the robin never is silent; when the snow lies
deep on the ground, and the trees are clothed with glittering frost
instead of leaves, the robin still sings. Up on the highest branch
of the tall elm he sits; and as the sunlight glances on his bright
feathers, you may stand below, and watch, and listen to as sweet a
song as any you can hear in a summer evening.

Willy did not go home yet; he stayed at the village till
winter was almost over; and, though there was not much work to
do at the gardens, he cau employment, for the carpenter was
glad of his help in his shop. The weather was sharp, and the
ground covered with snow; the poor sheep looked dirty and
ragged, and the cattle seemed very miserable as they crowded
together under the leafless trees. ‘The river was not frozen, but
it looked black and rough, and the steamboat toiled heavily along
with a few passengers, but without its gay flag and noisy band.

Still the scene was lovely : every tree had its own dress of snow,
the long branches of the firs were bent down by it, and swept the
ground like a lady’s train; while the varnished hollies were only
speckled with white, and their red berries shone out, a ready
food for the birds when the insects were all snug in their winter
holes. |

The children had great pleasure in giving the birds crumbs of
bread, and they had often quite a little flock of different kinds
around them. Of all birds the robin was the boldest; it has
been called the friend of man, and indeed it is a very com-
panionable little creature.

“« See how the birds come to be fed, as if they knew our time
for breakfast,’ said Lucy one morning, as a robin tapped with
his beak at the cottage window.

‘7 think they do know it; all dumb creatures have a good idea
of time,” said her father.

i



zo WILLY’s COUNTRY VISIT.

“They shall be rewarded,” said Hannah, taking a plate of
crumbs to the door. ‘* No, Lucy, do not throw them all down ;
the linnets and robins will not let the poor sparrows get one, if
you do.”

*« Are the linnets so bold then?” asked Willy.

“Yes, they will even beat the robins away. I have seen
one green linnet peck at a robin till he was obliged to fly off;
then the linnet would come and eat a little, turning round at
ewery pick to see if his rival were daring enough to come back
again. Oh! we see such battles sometimes; and the poor ugly
sparrows are always the worst off. See how that robin struts
about as if he were king of the place.”

“Here is a troop of sparrows, now for a fight,” cried Lucy;
but no, not a sparrow dared alight on the ground while the robin
was there; but when he had satisfied his hunger, they all came
down and soon cleared away every crumb.

At last Willy must go home to the smoky close town, that he
would never wish to see again, did not his parents and his little
hrothers and sisters live there. He was very sorry, indeed, to leave
the villaze, even though it was dreary winter time; and Mrs.
Carter told him she should expect him back soon ; while his uncle
saxl he was sure his help would be required in the gardens as soon
as the frost broke up. Lucy was as much grieved to part with
her cousin as she had been sorry to receive him when he first
came; and Hannah felt that she had learned to think of many new
places and things that were quite as well worth knowing about
as her own secluded village.

On his part, too, Willy had learned a great deal during these
months of country life; and not merely the names of trees and
birds and plants, but he had learned to admire and feel the works
of God, and to be thankful for the bounty which provided for
every living creature.



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FEEDING THE ROBIN,



32 WILLY’s COUNTRY VISIT.

He had learned, too, that while every living creature is provided
for by its Maker, and while each is taught by instinct how to
obtain the food suited to its nature, yet that each must seek that
food for itself. None of God’s meaner creatures are idle. The
bright king-fisher which he had watched as he lay on the river
bank, must hover long over the water, often with tired wing, ere
it can seize its tiny prey with its long bill ; the woodpecker must
tap long and patiently on the hollow tree, before the insect on
which it feeds comes forth. And man, too, must toil, if he would

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WILLY’S

C.0 'U Nel BY a7 1S?) T.

BY

BELLA GOLDFINCH.

Illustrated with Eight Coloured Piétures by
BIRKET FOSTER. :



LONDON:
SAMPSON LOW, SON, & CO., 47 LUDGATE Hiii
1856
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

‘THERE were two little girls named Hannah and Lucy, who lived
with their father and mother in a small village far from any town.
Hannah was ten years old, and Lucy was six. ‘They were good
girls, and had learned to read and to sew, and Hannah could write
pretty well. Their father, whose name was Carter, worked as
gardener at the Hall, a large house standing in a fine park close to
the village ; and their mother, who had been a servant at the Hall,
helped to maintain her family by sewing and ironing. She was a
lean and good woman, and she wished to make: Hannah and
Lucy as honest and industrious as herself. Her cottage was
always neat, and the little bit of garden in front of it was gay with
common flowers, and with some new or rare ones, which were
given to Carter by his master, the head-gardener at the Hall. Of
this garden Carter was very proud, and he used to work at it in
the summer evenings, when he had left his master. Thus his
little girls also learned to be fond of flowers. ‘They had a baby
sister, and a dog that was at present a better playfellow than the
baby. |

These little girls had never been away from the village; they
thad never seen a larger house than the Hall, which indeed was a
very large house; and they had no idea that the town to which
their father used sometimes to go to buy seeds, or sell the apples
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 5

which grew in the orchard, was at all different to their own village:
they only supposed there were more houses in it. A broad river
ran close to the village, the green lawn of the park sloped down
to this river, and, when the tide was high, the water washed quite
up to the fine old oaks in the park; and the cows used to gather
together in the shade, and cool themselves by standing in the clear
calm water; while the speckled deer would lie in a shady dell just
by, and when any one went near them, would scamper off among
the trees, and come back again when the passer-by was out of
sight. All this was very pretty, and I dare say our little girls
would have said that it was so if any one had asked them, but they
did not think much about it. Sometimes Hannah used to wonder
where the ships went to when they disappeared behind the hills
and trees; she had heard that they brought corn and wood from
the sea to the town ; but, as she had never seen either town or sea,
she had no more true idea of either than her picture-books had
given her; and, in truth, she thought very little on the matter.

One day Carter came home to dinner with a letter in his hand
— this was a great event, for these good people had few letters—
and both Mrs. Carter and the little girls were curious as to what
there was in it. ‘Their father told them that the letter was from a
brother of his, who lived in a large town a great way off, and that
this brother asked him to take a young son, who was just getting
strong after a bad fever; for the doctor said the boy wanted good
air and country exercise.

‘‘'What say you, wife, shall we take the boy? He can go '
with me to the gardens sometimes, I can make him useful there,
I dare say.”

After a short silence, Mrs. Carter agreed that it would be great
kindness to give the poor boy this chance of getting strong again ;
and as her husband’s family had once been very civil to her, she
would do all she could to make the boy happy at the cottage. 5o
6 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT,

the letter was answered, and a day fixed for Carter to meet his
nephew and bring him to the village in the carrier’s cart.

The day came, and Willy arrived. He was a pale, thin boy,
about a year older than Hannah, very silent and rather shy.
Hannah, who was an open-hearted little girl, pitied him, and was
kind ; but Lucy hung about her mother, and seemed jealous of the
attention given to him. Neither of the little girls knew what to
say or do to their new friend, till their mother said, perhaps he
would like to go with them and see their rabbits. This was
gladly agreed to, and they went to the rabbit-hutch, which was
in one corner of the orchard at the back of the house. Willy was
much pleased at being allowed to handle the little creatures ; and,
in answer to Hannah’s question whether he had ever seen any
before, he said,—

(Yas many times ; a man in our street has above two hun-
dred. He keeps them to sell in the market.”

Lucy looked up in surprise, and, patting her own little pet,
thought, “I will not sell you.”

The talk that Willy heard that evening about vegetables, and
spring frosts, and early flowers, and trees bursting, was very
strange to him; at last he ventured to ask some questions, which
showed his cousins that he knew as little about the country as
they did about the town; and Lucy was very happy in thinking
that if she had never seen two hundred rabbits, at least she did
know what a field of turnips was, which Willy had confessed that —
he did not.

On the next morning the little girls went to school, and Mrs.
Carter asked Willy if he would go with her to feed some young
calves, Willy said ** Yes ;” but he was quite surprised when his
aunt gave him a pail of milk to carry to some nice, clean, bright-
looking creatures, very different to the calves he had seen in the
streets of his native town. As soon as the three animals saw


FEEDING THE CALVES
a WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

Mrs. Carter, they came up to her, rubbing their heads against her,
and smelling at the pail which Willy held, half afraid. But he
soon got courage, and let the calves drink out of the tub he held
to them; and one strong creature, handsomely marked with red
and white, would presently have lapped it all up, had not Mrs.
Carter pushed him away, to leave some milk for a delicate white
calf that did not seem strong enough to get to the tub by
itself.

The next day Mrs. Carter told Hannah that she wanted her to
take some fine linen to the Hall, and that, as it must be there by a
certain hour, she must give up her morning school and carry it.
Mrs, Carter added that perhaps Willy would like to go with her,
as the day was fine and warm. On Hannah saying something
about going Sod the river-bank, T exclaimed, —



ray let me go with you, Hannah; I Ny carry the basket
all the way for you. I never saw a real river.’

At this Lucy cried out in great surprise, and Mrs. Carter
wondered how such a thing could be. In answer to her questions,
Willy said that there were many canals in the large busy town
which was his home, but that there was no river ; and that, except
when he was whirled along over bridges i in the “railway tain, he
had never seen one, adding,— RES I

“T do so wish to see a fine broad river with real ships sailing
on it, and my father told me I should see one here ; besides, I
have learned about it at school.”

‘© What is a canal ?”” asked Hannah.

“© Oh, it is like a straight road of water with walls on each
side ; so dirty and dull in the town, and but a little more pleasant
in the country; it is very different to the waters I crossed in
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 9

coming here. But let us go to your river, I shall be-so very
pleased to see it.”

Hannah and Willy set off on their walk, and the boy’s delight
when he first caught sight of the broad blue river, with its high
wooded banks, cannot be described. He lingered behind her,
after stopping to look around him; and at last he asked her if he
might remain by the river-side while she took the basket up to the
Hall. Hannah said to be sure he might, she should know where
to find him if he did not go beyond certain trees that she pointed
out ; but that she thought he would like to see the Hall, it was
such a grand house, with so many large windows.

But Willy said he did not care to see a grand house, for he
had seen the Town Hall where he lived every day ; and he had
rather see the broad flowing river tnan alf the houses in the whole
world, So Hannah left him lying on the grass, gazing intently on
the scene beneath him. Ships and boats of all sizes were passing
and repassing; and presently there came a steamboat full of
people, and some men playing on various instruments. Willy
had often heard music, and good music too; for his father had
taken him to concerts which cost very little, on purpose for
workmen and their families. But he thought he had never heard
any so sweet as that played by the little band on the steamboat ;
and perhaps he was right, for it came softly over the water,
sometimes loud and sometimes like a whisper, less and less distinct
till the boat was out of sight behind the trees of the Park. Willy
thought to himself, “* This is pleasanter than a town,” and for the
first time since he left home he was glad that his father had
sent him into the country.

Hannah found her cousin in the very spot where she had left
him ; she could not understand his delight at seeing the ships and
boats, for she had seen them every day since she was born ; and
she was still more surprised when he told her that though he had
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HAYMAKING.
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. II

never seen any boat but a canal-boat, he knew the names of all
those kinds which he had just seen. He had noticed prints of
them at the shop-windows and in books.

When this was told at home, Willy rose very much in the
opinion of his uncle and aunt; even Lucy began to think that he
might know some clever things which she did not. Carter, too,
became fond of the boy, who was useful to him in many ways.
Willy went to the gardens every day, and when his uncle planted
out the vegetables, he could reckon how many would be wanted
to fill a certain space, and thus save the trouble of taking up more
than were required at once. He also reckoned the quantity of
gravel that must be brought from the pit for the kitchen-garden
walks; this was as useful to Carter as helping him to dig it
would have been, and Willy was not yet strong enough to do that.

‘Thus the spring passed away; Willy began to think that a
held of fine green corn, with the wind blowing over it, was a very
beautiful sight; though not so beautiful as the river; and he
hoped that his father would not send for him until the green corn
had become golden; he wished to stay till harvest was over, for
Lucy said everybody was merry at harvest-time.

Before harvest came hay-time, which the girls enjoyed also.
It was nice pastime to make hay; but Hannah could not explain
to her cousin why tossing the hay about was called making it ;
she only knew that it was good fun to cover themselves up with
the sweet hay. Willy thought so too, and he enjoyed hay-
making as much as any of his companions did. And there were
now so many pretty flowers in the hedge-banks ; there was the
pink dog-rose, and the white rose, and the honeysuckle twining
among the stubborn hawthorn-branches ; ‘and there were the sweet
tufts of May and the broad white heads of the elder-flower; and
then on the bank itself was the silvery saxifrage, and the sky-blue
veronica, and the bright red herb Robert, with its disagreeable
12 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

scent. All this the boy enjoyed very much, and he thought the
wild flowers which he gathered every day fresh, to adorn Mrs.
Carter’s room, were quite as beautiful as the rare bits of strange
plants which the head gardener sometimes gave his uncle.
Perhaps Willy was right, though his cousins wondered at his
taste.

Willy had a great deal to learn in the country, and his kind
friends were quite willing to teach him, in return for which he
made himself useful to his aunt in various ways. His father was
a carpenter, and he had taught his son to handle tools when he
was quite a little boy, so Willy could do many things that were
required to make the cottage comfortable, and save his aunt the
expense of sending for the village carpenter. Even Lucy
began to be glad that her cousin had come to the village.
She had been very proud of teaching him the names of wild
flowers and birds; and she had many little secrets which she
found great fun in teasing Willy with. She would foretell rain,
without letting Willy know that the little shepherd’s weather-glass
was closely shut up, and she would guess that it was noon by the
flowers of the goat’s-beard being closed. But Willy was be-
ginning to be as wise as Lucy was about these things; and the
little girl soon found more pleasure in hearing her cousin tell of
what he had seen in the town, than in showing off her own
knowledge of country things.

Willy was also very useful to Lucy. He made a little bed-
stead for her doll of some nice white wood that the carpenter at
the Hall was so kind as to give him; the posts of it were very
grand, for his friend the carpenter allowed him to turn them in
the workshop. While this was going on, Lucy really felt vexed
that she could not understand or remember the names by which
he called the different parts of his work, nor even his tools ; but
she was very grateful to him when she saw the smart little bed-
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 13

stead finished, and ready for some gay curtains which her mother
gave her.

Lucy was generally a good little girl, but she had not been a
healthy child; and having required much care while very young,
she had been a little spoiled afterwards. Hannah was strong and
active; she could help her mother in keeping the house clean, and
she sewed neatly enough to work for the housekeeper at the Hall.
So she was often sent there by her mother; but Lucy was not
strong enough to walk so far in the heat of the day or in a hurry ;
so she was obliged to be content with her doll or her favourite
playfellow the dog.

Lion, for so the dog was called, was a little creature with a
smooth white coat. I cannot think who could give him such a
grand name, for he was not the least like a lion; somebody must
have been laughing at him when he was named so. But, though
he was not wild like a lion, he was very fierce if strangers came
into the cottage-garden, and would not let even a neighbour touch
anything in it. Sometimes he went with Carter and Willy to the
gardens to work, and then he would lie on his master’s coat in the
tool-house till it was time to go home to dinner; and Lion
seemed to know dinner-time as well as the gardeners did, for he
would whine and be restless if his master was later than usual.

He was a clever fellow; his master had taught him to know,
by the manner in which he put on his coat after breakfast, whether
he was to go to the gardens or not; and if Carter said, * Shall
Lion go?” he would run to his master wagging his tail, and
looking up in his face, as if to say; “ Pray let me go.” Dogs may
be taught a great many things. ‘The shepherd’s dog often knows
every sheep in his master’s flock, and he will take care that not
one strays away when going out to the field. This is very useful,
for in Scotland, and in some English counties, the sheep go out to
feed on open moors, where the grass doés not grow thick, as in
14 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT,

our meadows, and where there are no hedges to prevent the sheep
straying ; but the poor things are scattered about, glad to roam
over the hills in search of the sweet grass, which grows so
sparingly, When the shepherd comes to take them home, his
dog will find out every straggler, and drive it to the rest of the
flock; and when he sees that they are all safe, he looks up into
his master’s face, as if to ask which way they are to go. In a
part of the country where there are fields and hedges, the shep-
herd’s dog has less to attend to.

Lucy and Lion were good friends. Lucy used to tie her doll
upon Lion’s back and make him run about the garden; but
very often this sport ended in the doll’s frock being torn, and
sometimes Lion would drag it along the dirtiest part of the
garden. ‘Then Hannah was so kind as to mend the frock, and
her mother washed it; so Lucy was really a little spoiled, but we
must hope that as she grows stronger she will get rid of her faults.

One of these faults was selfishness, and this was much tried
by the strong friendship which grew up between Willy and Lion.
It was not strange that the dog should like better to play and run
races with a strong boy than to carry about a little girl’s doll, or
be made to lie by her side in a corner while she dressed and
undressed her baby; but Lucy was too young to see this, and she
was rather jealous. One day Lion caused her great crying and
unhappiness, thus: the gardener at the Hall wanted to send to the
market-town for some seeds that were ordered, and Willy begged
that he might go. He had often wished he were on board the
steamer that went past the village twice a-day; he used to watch
it as it went out on the broad water towards the sea, for from one
hill in the village it might be seen some miles off; and still more
he used to watch it round the wooded hill in the Park, for there
the slope on the other side of the river was dotted with gentlemen’s
houses, and farms almost hidden by fine trees. So he was very
aa c- fs ae oe a, Pe
a



THE SHEPHERD COUNTING HIS FLOCK,
16 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

thankful when the head-gardener gave him leave to go to the
town, and said, that as the weather was warm, he had better go by
the steamer at noon, and walk home in the cool of the evening, it
being about five miles. Mrs, Carter doubted whether Willy was
strong enough for this, but, on condition that he walked slowly,
she agreed to his going.

Now Lion was so constantly Willy’s companion, that he
supposed he was to go with him on this day also; and though
Willy looked at him, saying, “* No, I cannot take Lion to-day,”
the dog still wagged his tail, and looked wistfully at Willy, as if to
say, “ What a pleasant companion I shall be in your walk home!”
Lucy said she could not spare her dog, and that he would be lost
if he went; but her father said, that if Willy did not mind the
trouble of him on the steamer he might be of use on his return, as
Willy had never been on that road, and there were some cross-
ways, and a short cut through the Park, which the dog knew
much better than Willy could learn by description. So it was
settled that Lion should go. Lucy dared not say anything more,
but she got leave to go to the river-side with the travellers, and
there she had a bitter crying fit when a man took the dog up into
the boat that was to take them to the steamer, as it passed in the
middle of the wide river. She called, “Lion! Lion!” and
almost hoped he would jump into the water, and swim to her;
but he lay quietly at Willy’s feet, only wagging his tail with joy.
Still Lucy did not give him up, but waited to see him safe on
board the steamboat; and after nodding her head a hundred times
to him, as he stood on a bench looking very wise and very happy,
she turned away, still crying, and walked slowly home.

‘That was a sad, lonely day to Lucy. Her mother pitied her,
and said nothing to vex her; but when Lucy sobbed out, ‘* He
ought not to love Willy better than me,” Mrs, Carter was
obliged to reprove her, and show her how wretched such jealousy
WILLY’sS COUNTRY VISIT. 17

would make her if she indulged in it, and how wrong it was to
feel unkindly even towards a dog. Lucy promised to try not to
be jealous any more, and her mother proposed that she and
Hannah should go as far as the Park-stile in the ba to meet
her cousin.

We must now look back to Willy ; but we cannot describe
his delight when he found himself gliding along the smooth, clear
river, with the lovely country on each side of him, the trees Silacet
dipping into the water, and the snug farmhouses and fields of
waving corn, After enjoying all this for an hour, the scene
changed, and became more familiar to Willy ; for he landed among
busy people, and soon found himself in the town. He and Lion
went to the seedsman, and having got his parcel he started off
to walk home. His aunt had provided him with some bread
and cheese, which he sat down to eat as soon as he had left the
town. ‘The evening shadows were getting longer and longer as
the travellers entered the Park; they had still two miles to walk,
and Willy began to be tired. Eioes too, did not gambol about so
much as when they set off, but ran on before his master at a
steady pace, as if he, too, should be glad to see the village. When
they entered the Park, Willy had cause to rejoice that he had the
dog with him, for here were so many tracks in all directions that
he was uncertain which to choose. Lion, however, knew the
right path, and ran forward without stopping, so Willy thought he
might trust him, A dog may always be trusted thus, and so may
a horse. We have seen a horse very unwilling to take a wrong
road, when his driver, who had forgotten the way, obliged him to
it; and when the mistake was found out, he turned round so
gladly, and trotted off briskly in the right road when his master
was wise enough to trust to him.

Thus Lion and Willy found their way across the Park, and
seated on the stile next the village they saw the two little girls.

B




GATHERING FLOWERS AND SHRUBS,
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. Ig

“Lion! Lion!” cried Lucy; “come here, good dog! I.
am so glad to see you again.”

Lion seemed equally glad to see his young mistress, and he
jumped up, licking her face and hands.

“« What have you seen, Willy?” asked Hannah.

‘¢ A great deal: the nursery garden to which I was sent is a
beautiful place, indeed ; there are many fine hot-houses filled with
rare plants ; and such lovely flowers, Hannah !”

‘¢ But the houses and the streets, 1 mean?!” said his cousin.
For Hannah’s curiosity about the busy world had been much
roused by the tales of it that she had heard him tell Lucy; and
she had listened also to the talk between her father and cousin, as
they spoke of Willy’s birthplace. Hannah began to understand
that the village in which she lived, though very pretty, was not the
only place in the world worth seeing.

‘* The town is an old and dirty one,” replied Willy. ‘* Of
course I did not walk about it; but as I went through to the
garden, I could see that the streets are narrow and the churches
are old. They are very different to those in the place I come
from, but they look grand, and I dare say many persons would
admire them for being old, as ome gentleman on the steamboat
said he did.”

*¢T should like to go banca said Hannah, thoughtfully.

*¢ Would you, indeed? I fancied you thought nothing could
be good out of your own village.”

“Oh, no, no, Willy! At least, I do not think so now.
I hear you tell Lucy of many things that I should like to see,—
your fine railway, and the high bridges you talk of: I never saw a
bridge, except the wooden one on the meadow.”

Willy could not help smiling, as he compared the foot-bridge of
a couple of planks with the beautiful one on which the railway
passes near his native town; but he remembered how strange it

B2
20 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

seemed to Hannah, four months ago, that he should never have
seen a turnip-field, and did not know wheat from barley, except
by the ear. So he said nothing but,—

‘There are many wonders in the world, Hannah; and I dare
say you would like to see them all as well as I should. You
must ask my aunt to take you to town one day.”

Here they were met by Mrs. Carter, and Hannah was just
preparing her request to go with her mother to the town the next
time she went, when the latter said,—

“There are to be grand doings at the village next week.
What do you think? One of the ladies at the Hall is going to be
married, and there is to be a great deal of company. Besides,
I hear that some men are coming from London to make the
rooms very smart for a grand ball there.”

This was great news, indeed; and the girls, who had not
heard of it before, asked their mother many more questions than
she could answer.

“ All I know at present is, that Mrs. Wills has brought me
work enough to last a fortnight, and it must be done in ten days ;
so you and [ must not think anything about the doings at the
Fall, but work very hard indeed to finish what there is to be
done.”

Hannah promised industry, and then ventured to say she
should like to go to the town the next time her mother went.

“¢ Well, well, we shall see,”’ replied Mrs. Carter. ‘ I may not
go for a long time, for the day always tires me; but be a good
girl, and I do not say No. Eat your supper, Willy, and go to
bed; I dare say you are tired.”

Willy was very glad of his supper, and still more glad of his
bed; and he went to sleep directly, too much fatigued even to
dream of his voyage, or of the lovely new flowers he had seen.

When Carter and Willy went to the Hall gardens the next
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 2I

day, they heard all about the wedding plans. ‘There was to be a
grand ball in the evening for the ladies and gentlemen; and the
next day all the persons employed by the Squire, and many of his
farmers, were to have tea in the village schoolroom ; and then all
persons who chose it might go into a part of the Park nearest the
village and play at games, and amuse themselves till it was dark.
Of course this made everybody very busy; the gardeners were
at work early and late in making the lawns and paths neat, and
the flower-beds gay and tidy. A great many new and beautiful
plants were sent from the nursery garden to which Willy had
been, and he was pleased to see some among them that he had
particularly admired. But these beautiful plants were more new
to the head-gardener and Carter than to Willy, for the latter had
seen many of them at a gentleman’s house near his native town.
In that country plants do not grow well in the gardens, for the
smoke from chimneys is very thick and heavy; and as coal is
cheap, every person who has space enough builds a hothouse,
and has what are called stove-plants.

Just before the wedding-day the head-gardener told Carter
he was in great trouble, and on the latter inquiring the cause the
man replied,—

“You know our orange-trees are to stand in a row on the
front terrace, and I wish to place pink flowers between them ;
I cannot find plants enough that I dare put into pots, and I wish
to know if you, or rather Willy, will lend me your two oleanders.
I know the young lady is very fond of them, as she has seen them
growing wild in foreign countries.”

Carter hesitated a minute, for the plants belonged to Willy,
who had nursed them up to carry home to his mother, as they
would bear smoke pretty well. However, he said he would ask
his nephew, and as the gardener had been very kind he had no
doubt he might have the oleanders. Willy consented of course ;
22 WILLY'S COUNTRY VISIT.

and both he and Carter were very proud of them, when their
master praised them, saying that they must have been well tended
to have grown so finely since he gave them to Willy.

Green boughs, also, and flowers were required to dress the
schoolroom, and the little girls were happy in sending their best
and sweetest for the purpose. 5o altogether there was a great
bustle, and a great deal to be done. Willy obtained leave through
his friend the carpenter to help the London men in decking the
entrance-hall and staircase, and thus he learned how to go to work
at the schoolroom, which Carter was desired to attend to. But
Carter had never seen a room decked with flowers, and, being no
carpenter, he would not have been able to make it look half so
well as it did, had not Willy got many useful hints from the
London men.

The wedding-day came, and everything was ready in time.
Lucy had been pleased and proud at being allowed to help her
mother, and Lion and the doll were for once not thought of by
her. ‘he sun shone brightly, and all passed off well. ‘The
company admired the gardens and the flowers, and the bride
noticed Willy’s oleanders. The Hall was brilliantly lighted up
at night, and the lights sparkled prettily through the trees till it
was almost daylight, for the dancing was kept up very late ; and
as they went away, the guests might hear the lark and thrush
singing their morning song of rejoicing at another day. But
I think they were too tired and sleepy to listen to the sweet song
of the birds.

Lucy’s first question the next morning when her mother called
her, was, “Is it fine weather, mother?” and both the little girls
were glad to hear that the sun shone as clear as it had done on the
day before. Many other persons in the village, and all the little
boys and girls, were anxious for a fine day too, and they had their
wish. ‘The tea-partv in the schoolroom went off verv well; all


THE GLEANERS.
24 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT.

the company admired the tasteful manner in which it was adorned ;
and Hannah and Lucy, who had cut their best flowers for the
purpose, were especially pleased with its gay appearance. At tea
the Squire and his lady paid the party a vine and they too
expressed their admiration. ~

After tea the folks went into the Park, wil they were joined
by the rest of the villagers; the old deonle sat on the grass, or
walked about ; the’ young people played at ball or cricket ; and the
children had their own games. Noisy ones they were; for to
make a noise seemed to be one of the greatest pleasures of the day
to them. They ran about till they were quite tired, and then
“there were buns and milk in the schoolroom for the very little
ones. The corner of the Park where all this took place was by
the river side, and level with it; doubtless it was a pretty sight
from the steamboat that passed in the evening, and I dare say the
passengers wondered what it meant ; perhaps some of them who
had come a long voyage would have enjoyed being of the party.
As twilight came on, the Rey children went home to bed, and
the villagers dropped off, till the Park was left silent and quiet to
the deer who gathered in the thick grove for the night. This
party could not stay till the lark and thrush began their morning
song; they must sleep while the birds slept, that they might be
ready to rise with them and go to their daily work with renewed
strength,

Harvest time was now drawing near ; the corn which while it
was green used to wave so gracefully in the summer breeze, was
now golden; it had lost much of its elegance and beauty to the

-eye, but the £ yellow fields of ripened grain’ promised plenty, and
healthful food for the winter. How rich and beautiful is a field of
corn just before it iscut! And how blank the country looks after
it is cut, when only the bristling stubble remains! Harvest time
*s joyous for man; he has sown and weeded, and seen the corn
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 25

grow while the rain and sun have nourished it; and now he is
thankful that a full crop is granted to him. Harvest time is a busy
time for others besides the farmer. ‘The cottagers’ wives, and all
the children who are old enough, go to glean ; that is, after each
ficld is cut they go in and gather up the loose ears, which they
carry to the mill to be ground; and thus some families obtain a
good quantity of sweet new flour to make into bread. While the
women and elder children go to glean, the younger children and
infants are taken care of by some woman appointed for the pur-
pose ; it is a strange sight to see twenty or thirty little children
together in a large room; a few of them six years old, but the
ereater part of them much younger. The mothers take little beds”
there for the infants, who sleep as soundly as if they were in
their own homes.

Willy’s father and mother had often written to him that they
thought he had been long enough in the country to get quite
strong ; and indeed this was true, for he was now a stout, tall lad ;
and instead of being pale as when he first came, he was aidhos: as
sunburnt as Carter himself. But Willy was in no hurry to go
back, and his uncle and aunt did not wish to part with him, so
they wrote to his father and told. him they should like to keep him
a little while longer. cs

“© Oh! pray stay with us till Gfer harvest.” said Ligy ; « you
must go gleaning; and we shall want you to dress up the last load,
for you know how to do such things so smartly. 3

“What do you mean?” asked Willy. | P

“We always get as many gay handkerchiefs and bright
ribands as we can, and fasten them to the forks and sticks on the
top of the last load; and we dress ourselves up with flowers,
and shout, and make as much noise as we can, as we go home
with the waggon. ‘You must not go away before harvest,’’ said
Hannah. ,


BLACKBERRYING.
WILLY’S COUNTRY VISIT. 27

33

“T am quite willing to stay,” replied Willy; “and as I am
earning money at the Hall, I think my father will not insist on
my going home yet. Indeed, I wish I could be a gardener all my
life, instead of going back to live in that crowded, smoky town.”

‘Perhaps it may be so,” said Mrs, Carter, who found Willy
so very useful, that she did not like to part with him; besides
which, she and her husband had both become attached to him.

So the letter was written, and an answer was received, giving
leave for Willy-to stay at the village till after harvest.

There was a great deal of work to be done at the gardens just
at this time. The Hall was full of company, so the beds and
walks must be kept very neat, and both Carter and Willy worked
very hard. “There was a great quantity of fruit to be gathered
also, and Lucy was afraid that, after all, Willy would have no
time allowed him to go with her to glean. However, at last he
had one half-day given him, and the three cousins set off after
dinner to the field. ‘There they found nearly half the village, and
among them were two of the young ladies from the Hall, who
seemed to enjoy themselves at their work. Willy was awkward
at first, and Lucy felt inclined to laugh at him, but she recollected
how clever he had been at many things that even her father could
not do; so she patiently showed him how to gather up the loose
corn, saying, with a smile, “I can guess that there are no corn-
fields where you live, Willy.”

as No, indeed ; unless corn would grow on coal, there can be
none.’

“Coal! what do you mean?” cried Lucy, stopping from her
work, and almost letting her bundle of ears fall.

] ought not quite to say what I did; but one part of the
country near our town is almost all coal, and nothing will grow
there of course.”

** How very odd, and how ugly!” exclaimed Lucy.
28 WILLY’S COUNTRY VISI>-.

“Indeed it is; but that coal is very valuable, and if you ever
come to see us, Lucy, I will show you what a great many things
are done by help of it. Oh, dear! this ‘gleaning is warm work,
it tires me as much as digging does.” So saying, he threw him-
self down under the hedge, and the little girls, who were tired also,
sat down too. ;

“What say you to gathering some blackberries? I see plenty
over the stile,” said Hannah.

“« They will be so refreshing,” cried Lucy, jumping up.

Willy agreed to go too, and they were joined by some com-
panions as heated and tired as themselves. How delicious the
ripe blackberries were! Lucy was so sorry that Lion was -not
with them, as he was fond of blackberries ; but of course she had
been obliged to leave him at home; dogs must not go into a
harvest-field.

The children gathered plenty of blackberries to eat with their
bread, and then it was proposed to pluck some to carry home, as,
mixed with apples, they make an excellent pudding. So they
gathered enough for a pudding, and then went back to finish
gleaning,-much refreshed.

At length harvest was finished, the last load was carried home,

ecked with boughs, and ribands, and flowers. ‘The fields lay
bare and brown, and the partridges that had made their nests
among the corn, were fortunate if they did not see their young
ones carried off by the reapers. The autumn winds began to
rustle through the oaks in the Park, tearing off the rich brown
leaves ; the holly-berries began to turn red ; and the long, trailing
branches of the Traveller’s Joy were covered with bunches of
feathery seeds. ‘The delicate green of the lime-trees was turned ,
into gold colour; and the deer in the Park were obliged to take
shelter under the dark firs and shining hollies, instead of gam--
bolling about in the open glades. ‘The swallows were gone to a
WILLY’s COUNTRY VISIT. 29

warmer country, and one by one the more hardy birds had ceased
their song. But the robin never is silent; when the snow lies
deep on the ground, and the trees are clothed with glittering frost
instead of leaves, the robin still sings. Up on the highest branch
of the tall elm he sits; and as the sunlight glances on his bright
feathers, you may stand below, and watch, and listen to as sweet a
song as any you can hear in a summer evening.

Willy did not go home yet; he stayed at the village till
winter was almost over; and, though there was not much work to
do at the gardens, he cau employment, for the carpenter was
glad of his help in his shop. The weather was sharp, and the
ground covered with snow; the poor sheep looked dirty and
ragged, and the cattle seemed very miserable as they crowded
together under the leafless trees. ‘The river was not frozen, but
it looked black and rough, and the steamboat toiled heavily along
with a few passengers, but without its gay flag and noisy band.

Still the scene was lovely : every tree had its own dress of snow,
the long branches of the firs were bent down by it, and swept the
ground like a lady’s train; while the varnished hollies were only
speckled with white, and their red berries shone out, a ready
food for the birds when the insects were all snug in their winter
holes. |

The children had great pleasure in giving the birds crumbs of
bread, and they had often quite a little flock of different kinds
around them. Of all birds the robin was the boldest; it has
been called the friend of man, and indeed it is a very com-
panionable little creature.

“« See how the birds come to be fed, as if they knew our time
for breakfast,’ said Lucy one morning, as a robin tapped with
his beak at the cottage window.

‘7 think they do know it; all dumb creatures have a good idea
of time,” said her father.

i
zo WILLY’s COUNTRY VISIT.

“They shall be rewarded,” said Hannah, taking a plate of
crumbs to the door. ‘* No, Lucy, do not throw them all down ;
the linnets and robins will not let the poor sparrows get one, if
you do.”

*« Are the linnets so bold then?” asked Willy.

“Yes, they will even beat the robins away. I have seen
one green linnet peck at a robin till he was obliged to fly off;
then the linnet would come and eat a little, turning round at
ewery pick to see if his rival were daring enough to come back
again. Oh! we see such battles sometimes; and the poor ugly
sparrows are always the worst off. See how that robin struts
about as if he were king of the place.”

“Here is a troop of sparrows, now for a fight,” cried Lucy;
but no, not a sparrow dared alight on the ground while the robin
was there; but when he had satisfied his hunger, they all came
down and soon cleared away every crumb.

At last Willy must go home to the smoky close town, that he
would never wish to see again, did not his parents and his little
hrothers and sisters live there. He was very sorry, indeed, to leave
the villaze, even though it was dreary winter time; and Mrs.
Carter told him she should expect him back soon ; while his uncle
saxl he was sure his help would be required in the gardens as soon
as the frost broke up. Lucy was as much grieved to part with
her cousin as she had been sorry to receive him when he first
came; and Hannah felt that she had learned to think of many new
places and things that were quite as well worth knowing about
as her own secluded village.

On his part, too, Willy had learned a great deal during these
months of country life; and not merely the names of trees and
birds and plants, but he had learned to admire and feel the works
of God, and to be thankful for the bounty which provided for
every living creature.
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FEEDING THE ROBIN,
32 WILLY’s COUNTRY VISIT.

He had learned, too, that while every living creature is provided
for by its Maker, and while each is taught by instinct how to
obtain the food suited to its nature, yet that each must seek that
food for itself. None of God’s meaner creatures are idle. The
bright king-fisher which he had watched as he lay on the river
bank, must hover long over the water, often with tired wing, ere
it can seize its tiny prey with its long bill ; the woodpecker must
tap long and patiently on the hollow tree, before the insect on
which it feeds comes forth. And man, too, must toil, if he would

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'2012-04-05T11:39:24-04:00'
describe
'105978' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_01.jpg'
4fb54433a6ac516a66c23a5ffd55958f
4fd38600a0cbe84981d3211f40a7e78a1d751b98
'2012-04-05T11:42:18-04:00'
describe
'539' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_01.pro'
96d853fd0da9236e61eed0e2b9f851b2
a8517288be68856b42f6474e62c03cb4f166b45f
'2012-04-05T11:42:57-04:00'
describe
'29306' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_01.QC.jpg'
ad3db8745f4ce2636fc8f0988a703d41
c83bf95c0a6ed49095204a705d67376bffc5879e
'2012-04-05T11:40:21-04:00'
describe
'31469140' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_01.tif'
9d4e5bc0f85de8e84ea8c74f3bd587fa
9bc7a306d99b6840bc02b1c5d19b4127c823fca2
'2012-04-05T11:42:52-04:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_01.txt'
86ed6412e485304d818d8f7237b8f3ac
911a9703248bba9a428873e06460729f28aeaecb
'2012-04-05T11:39:57-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'8666' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_01thm.jpg'
c2961de23ef6f15f8f02423444d31283
708e9b0667bd3eec9889372353b74d88f090a3c7
'2012-04-05T11:42:50-04:00'
describe
'1193795' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPST' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02.jp2'
e6b5d63e7bd0462a8aff9f29efbc4b88
568e39eb937efc4c2f775c56ee159c69f11bdff3
'2012-04-05T11:43:19-04:00'
describe
'40600' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02.jpg'
d02d06b5555b3c599be6f4a27fb64a8c
409b7b722c044b114b0cf4d89145f42929cd43b0
'2012-04-05T11:41:11-04:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02.pro'
ced5d74726bcf2ab0c6b1304996153e0
41908ecac6ecc7408726fcd4fb424da6b28c7621
'2012-04-05T11:41:13-04:00'
describe
'10238' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02.QC.jpg'
f66fe47c76551ac1d2f5b869a98905b1
d9a83760a9454a568749eba67a068edb4fe6b203
'2012-04-05T11:42:35-04:00'
describe
'28678558' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02.tif'
b90a7d458080254e342e6d71115ee1ef
72834c62513f2ef2b0db061db904637de7e2a405
'2012-04-05T11:38:25-04:00'
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02.txt'
f416902d8162335ea90aa559912fa4f5
3c90c8a73e27435db088c7bca5e7c8e57bb21b48
'2012-04-05T11:41:42-04:00'
describe
'2882' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPSZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_02thm.jpg'
6b339926c9eb42f918a29b90a63cea6b
078ce823596d4fcffc29c78f80d944f38fdd6e3b
'2012-04-05T11:43:00-04:00'
describe
'1178733' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03.jp2'
99341c1e5a234ec7d372f29c14384b84
75f75b88b99579fde17ebe1f82704a85de490c9c
'2012-04-05T11:42:42-04:00'
describe
'29570' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03.jpg'
d70aa8a3846273560d9ecac5f091e1b8
a8ad219a4e03ed08981312a566c456fd3c5ee780
'2012-04-05T11:41:01-04:00'
describe
'3081' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03.pro'
39f1073e6b1982c2722a28867a4bf11d
1ea9532368158ed76a48032f18dfd55f1d7df633
'2012-04-05T11:41:06-04:00'
describe
'8610' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03.QC.jpg'
9f61ed4af5c5334a23a8fc9c43828780
ecc4b9e1450606c3134155dc094d2479cb168722
'2012-04-05T11:38:51-04:00'
describe
'28315940' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03.tif'
2debb2e133b985e89e2c0a6ffb092e6a
df66057aff530b0fb63185479b1dd59ced4dd8c3
'2012-04-05T11:41:30-04:00'
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03.txt'
b2afe33bc5b44165596d229f85bd3041
2a5c11c750b275b91046c93a61f51156d47fc2cb
'2012-04-05T11:39:28-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2958' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_03thm.jpg'
d09588417cac675b65f9864c2870dcfe
a58d391513da53d521714f6b07c5937a05b66bfb
'2012-04-05T11:40:42-04:00'
describe
'1214107' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04.jp2'
2301c63cb2cb6d62d6e4ca184adb273b
237344efb492144a4664b675d4047dd70a052eb8
describe
'24054' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04.jpg'
ee67681d8d3685a5a74c82bba9511284
511eb72ea73d0ddd7f2adbfcd919783aec15ad9b
'2012-04-05T11:38:54-04:00'
describe
'408' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04.pro'
136edf6c3066bd8c050ba1f2ee80b991
aa2ad43ea178cff7bba34f64e4317fb91253feae
'2012-04-05T11:42:05-04:00'
describe
'6574' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04.QC.jpg'
fb4a841aa08cbc6e8664757de0bbb04f
6ee9adc753750b48b81361dc3356add94d2e25a5
'2012-04-05T11:42:32-04:00'
describe
'29167304' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04.tif'
7241825a192e9047a7a498e1b42c0a4d
e4de3552c965122de6363022fb317b20afdd9312
'2012-04-05T11:40:49-04:00'
describe
'329' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04.txt'
53f5c6c3ec08a5e6296b20e38dcd420c
35af6a21a77f61e478bd7b93af492f41cdb15c62
'2012-04-05T11:40:54-04:00'
describe
'2198' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_04thm.jpg'
f078c64cd1f0109744f4c6c8521f47e9
b9326102f4cae9bd7f8e14ad9616199d0baa4bed
'2012-04-05T11:38:52-04:00'
describe
'1104854' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05.jp2'
7dfefbc90592ec38b037b012ca4ea4a6
56c527d0e47ebff5c88aba03bb3441f24097e910
'2012-04-05T11:39:04-04:00'
describe
'42981' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05.jpg'
91e447515c3a77cc2cbb4630b975a419
69e3037b4f8918fc7e39cade7efa1916ec752036
'2012-04-05T11:43:06-04:00'
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05.pro'
7af133354a1d1fd0b4806fa0f470ddc4
770a70dcb4c4b02c4a5209cd85869e4fea78268d
'2012-04-05T11:38:59-04:00'
describe
'12079' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05.QC.jpg'
0f504fbde7d227b173a0d1a0de608fbf
3f0a37d6f4829c6fd1ec798d916adf5aade77d13
'2012-04-05T11:42:40-04:00'
describe
'26542266' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05.tif'
33b548053bc8400bfd2685cba74c26fd
49df5b3aa67804878a060bc19df98c3690e65e90
describe
'60' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05.txt'
ea7cb98ec2a22f2852c2da781ad680f6
40f0369b6beef29d92cbc23722fe6cdde269678f
'2012-04-05T11:42:33-04:00'
describe
'3676' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_05thm.jpg'
d42ab4ad7f86ccc22a168f347027cbff
cccfef9dad219f602e13a1d239d336f7bef8eb82
describe
'1225260' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06.jp2'
d66e342b66cd05e811736c28883af70f
9adf99b3125161ffaa1d9de8c2fca3592d3274a0
'2012-04-05T11:42:54-04:00'
describe
'64865' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06.jpg'
6f73fd014904cde2f89988533afebdc5
0a46f3a638bc04403537f8f887e97f5d9d91cd93
'2012-04-05T11:39:47-04:00'
describe
'6285' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06.pro'
3d87702684d580c69a2c7e863331a536
70121a0d75408acb5d9870c5c7155b296c06261c
'2012-04-05T11:40:52-04:00'
describe
'19539' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06.QC.jpg'
5cda3f73fe273db89fce5b06513ca9dd
aaa3df8628b2deec1fe39730841c502f8042e281
'2012-04-05T11:42:49-04:00'
describe
'29435326' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPTZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06.tif'
3cc4d6bc1911a40b1c576043c2dabb5f
1de3b1219cd04cdf2ffb50c84ebfdbfb05fd9270
describe
'249' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06.txt'
0ab4a10f9933742da122c5927fdf9bca
c9f11ce43aa52e1072a1dea3f83abd7c4e8a6f98
'2012-04-05T11:41:07-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6350' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_06thm.jpg'
b47cde0b33df605f6c2f1d99e1f7fdf2
27e74af2fa4320eb8478f931b9be390424afc577
'2012-04-05T11:39:31-04:00'
describe
'1147195' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07.jp2'
71982fc96efd9645034acc3f3c02f27e
ff4451d21ca50cbc0cd76d89553851c3954c491c
describe
'96756' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07.jpg'
3c4a4c09147bee4db0e4cad79262c491
4bd2b11d668813c1dfbb006e25b8f2961e618f21
describe
'36660' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07.pro'
730d01c718b6573f7782f59464845738
5225a62176699a2714d8c8f9144e5ef7827bed24
'2012-04-05T11:42:01-04:00'
describe
'31157' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07.QC.jpg'
a1ab911848cc670a03d77dbd9e466754
d61ac1ad7b0182a3e0cf633080a55e21fdd89993
'2012-04-05T11:41:04-04:00'
describe
'27559172' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07.tif'
c69b85f8cb848b0790824bb0f3f7ebce
b8556ab29d4c20d32fdf36a1467a01e61ea148e6
'2012-04-05T11:43:27-04:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07.txt'
a84515752bbf586fb3df5a351b5debfb
dc981b04f9b715596683216b3b5a2915397957bf
describe
'7879' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_07thm.jpg'
5b7a6c707786c81f76e0408f05fcfaf1
2a9e43c3480187f926a1ebf3d223f9660ebcb4a8
describe
'1176046' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08.jp2'
ce8b7e7a97b22df92e61601cd8dd9d46
75c69bc4a55667ebd64893428efc24583552aec3
'2012-04-05T11:42:59-04:00'
describe
'118585' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08.jpg'
d366b661bfedcf197e3c3fd10e34cf43
c3d3f66df7e0f0e6dac6ebbe9ca1a89802da4276
'2012-04-05T11:41:17-04:00'
describe
'53709' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08.pro'
cdc6eaf41e7f3f0b8b5da8d46b72e976
d8541ecc17d955df94103c26ec3f8abb9b50a5ab
describe
'39075' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08.QC.jpg'
ba56a4015e07b10ba43095a38db51e0f
dc437141d789778ce0a4ca3d2b10b734a7fa6414
'2012-04-05T11:43:28-04:00'
describe
'28252876' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08.tif'
383714ebd6d08d0df5f45846026e5c44
b76d0f7005d04851e455aedaa71374684e1744e1
'2012-04-05T11:38:45-04:00'
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08.txt'
a4e91d2ef28c43569dc272e6072ed471
14618f6514c780d67b30ad72f3f1cba7209bf512
'2012-04-05T11:42:43-04:00'
describe
'9541' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_08thm.jpg'
a0f986faf550dea1e1b19baca2ae0c95
0181adfe7f48936c1c638c63b0c79d4ec73c7da0
'2012-04-05T11:38:30-04:00'
describe
'1192506' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09.jp2'
d06b21289804670881be98952176da68
8d358bdd858c571d2c4cc71697b547c4cda8f4fc
'2012-04-05T11:41:23-04:00'
describe
'125058' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09.jpg'
3fc9916732028181d484f3d955b583fe
c7ba4273c04c44fdce39932cf435ed115f63d674
'2012-04-05T11:38:17-04:00'
describe
'51030' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09.pro'
57245869a03a095936ba593ebf2b2052
a9b140fe946bc9bbbc962ba75dc5bc402924d24a
'2012-04-05T11:38:36-04:00'
describe
'41185' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09.QC.jpg'
1cd029ec2b2c203f1fafd1dbb0e827f3
261bd6cccc1b3c462dbf7e5a07bd650aaeda5a82
'2012-04-05T11:39:18-04:00'
describe
'28647026' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09.tif'
fa1c9609da1ff10cde66cbee214c9e7d
8d08d1631c0da95ec23cfb6dcafd339385941df6
'2012-04-05T11:40:24-04:00'
describe
'1969' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09.txt'
b6b1af80434134d579e53b0a5712423e
4578e2f4bf5d3f92d5c3ed135c8bbe9e5ba010df
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_09thm.jpg'
e43f705385314ada8c7b5fcf3b907e71
510d7ae36db906c6bea69e91195d37951f4b5ccf
'2012-04-05T11:42:07-04:00'
describe
'1154087' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10.jp2'
a635f05fe2a303598e2a9e5b3cb3f287
90a0b60343996b1ba9d6e63390ba5d0d9868381f
'2012-04-05T11:40:03-04:00'
describe
'123091' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10.jpg'
a08c5e59e40e1f5fba930d21c437d6ee
fa6ad90756a45ae5383f67868ec6651c68c0e022
'2012-04-05T11:40:05-04:00'
describe
'7750' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPUZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10.pro'
e5ee1a08f7af59570d68eaee09209f09
381168aba010cc0c170c0a2226cb4d177a1b687e
'2012-04-05T11:43:13-04:00'
describe
'34711' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10.QC.jpg'
8dc5809d79faaba4e65b9a5bacbbf5a4
e9cccba0e49263fde627e85e2589272ecdf41760
'2012-04-05T11:39:21-04:00'
describe
'27724716' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10.tif'
7ceff24074af6eb9b4b9384d97d85727
a3f777105743082c589a860fc6578702784e84b7
'2012-04-05T11:40:51-04:00'
describe
'490' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10.txt'
37cc5397515ebc8a5a09d7da35fc6b88
6442460e3fcb6edff7f7614e02cd085e1b54c5c7
'2012-04-05T11:42:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9148' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_10thm.jpg'
c2a88163ed0eae7ac0a3b697b2c9e121
236b34cb61d53bf99dcc8cb9b0af692b9a7b3486
'2012-04-05T11:40:15-04:00'
describe
'1177363' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11.jp2'
e00081a1b7fccf334001895117f19d64
2456f5390dac86eee21603b2b2bdc6db4be59b4d
'2012-04-05T11:43:18-04:00'
describe
'126533' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11.jpg'
ad1fede2f66bafcf886f883106bed028
d3f26d672e6d94f119a7adaa106a5f05000f3b79
'2012-04-05T11:41:45-04:00'
describe
'49006' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11.pro'
0be2aae1836d2f8506dbf36d070e9926
93f0756ccbed745439f478cf724f37dd41be44e5
'2012-04-05T11:38:58-04:00'
describe
'41460' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11.QC.jpg'
b6dbc5c47a3efa271a55ba5b1b53cdfb
5caa4f04bdd7b8a9143a08cb2c924cdf2973196d
'2012-04-05T11:41:34-04:00'
describe
'28284408' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11.tif'
93abef1857148067c0202f5ab4686241
abe79b9c10c3e9b0adc6f14905e3b54f41fc1680
'2012-04-05T11:38:50-04:00'
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11.txt'
9aed2906037a7a67fd44c3b6df4b521c
124bffd4c37c548e8380aacb4fc90dad97fe8d5a
'2012-04-05T11:41:18-04:00'
describe
'10332' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_11thm.jpg'
6981118d1482133efe0509f9239b6c45
8fb896ae6eefc312a64328abe39734e7d95ef639
'2012-04-05T11:41:05-04:00'
describe
'1155438' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12.jp2'
ebd62b4616ea3aaf9cda08289426f51d
bc60f6385b13c0c0513ea568ab56f88b68c236ad
'2012-04-05T11:39:29-04:00'
describe
'130418' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12.jpg'
0cae8b028e8ef35d2bafdc9b6980c4cb
9f559021ff083b30a8deac3b9a0ce3cab4263ebb
'2012-04-05T11:40:09-04:00'
describe
'52874' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12.pro'
7e65c17db1a825c4541fd2fd7aa1945b
ead686c6299291e11dd4173d7d108e75a3487433
'2012-04-05T11:38:55-04:00'
describe
'42666' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12.QC.jpg'
841088338cc98c1b935780c2ea262768
786a89699516a80b4c00f94dc15fb87d1afd047f
'2012-04-05T11:41:25-04:00'
describe
'27756248' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12.tif'
8664ccf7c45a549efebfb8586e46be7b
27f26dbc53637611bd7ba1ef6785705101cfd387
'2012-04-05T11:39:09-04:00'
describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12.txt'
19c3e707bb3f193567f1253411e4f0a9
d279353088f5e080bed75ff22d59051ece136d87
'2012-04-05T11:38:32-04:00'
describe
'10536' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_12thm.jpg'
2119b2d1342ca2f40506053564589a23
bb6b0ee9c64a1ca0196f350f62b48cf67bae9de4
describe
'1195039' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13.jp2'
72709108e0e9f44dda412d5c978f37c6
ca1920ee031d89f779f219a605dab64b03677770
'2012-04-05T11:41:55-04:00'
describe
'129436' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13.jpg'
338090ea61fe7dd7a369144eef9979b1
93b8aaf834860a6f28719debf4b0d4968d19572f
'2012-04-05T11:38:42-04:00'
describe
'5199' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13.pro'
1883283191c74e66b92e1c9f44844c7e
4ce3738e2b5fa5451d60ecec8c0e786e8f7f306f
'2012-04-05T11:42:45-04:00'
describe
'35178' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13.QC.jpg'
8fa346a665ad598d9df4ac1cf5b1ff2b
9cdbb33afae9c84af06c843c6cffb5a70536b0f7
'2012-04-05T11:41:03-04:00'
describe
'28710090' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13.tif'
132552dfe160129a3a2a7bc30fa83f79
3c20f41ebd2dff887b785cb9ea78ae7a0198454d
'2012-04-05T11:41:54-04:00'
describe
'252' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13.txt'
5dd254d38da4e2da0823d002c5985463
d77374672a15967f8b333d2bf0301436b2f2445c
describe
Invalid character
'9196' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_13thm.jpg'
11e49412581b81d3ae43491d6e2fa5ad
0fd7b5401f8a1dc7c580de2b25c6c8a614bd6d5a
'2012-04-05T11:41:56-04:00'
describe
'1171840' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPVZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14.jp2'
e4b263badffe884f93d2ac4102f32808
85b4beb1409f174b8616a89eb13a0b10c2449967
'2012-04-05T11:42:23-04:00'
describe
'128453' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14.jpg'
3af7bc98bc39edb4fc9d07b3f7b86632
e0e16707a15960543ac47c7e5cdc0d6a99597293
'2012-04-05T11:41:12-04:00'
describe
'53456' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14.pro'
7e5a0200f84315920acc354cf28b881b
e7b2cc614dd80ecf3d6431b0a549c0e273fa4257
describe
'42365' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14.QC.jpg'
f2ae55e467c148fea7d05e87593834f3
0b53496453aa6eb4c4a9d0d4c88ce0f32b6ecd27
describe
'28150398' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14.tif'
ee07a37eeed74e5df66136ab2d404eb7
1baa62462af64d63553c2e6de1fdb4887cf8fa23
'2012-04-05T11:42:14-04:00'
describe
'2046' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14.txt'
be554a981aae8c49e3dd226848ee241e
85bf07255545c4f9327d097120337e56d8927cde
'2012-04-05T11:41:08-04:00'
describe
'10484' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_14thm.jpg'
269f52b8f562f7ca92533e3beba41090
619dd07a6c13dd2e869bbbc78fc9023e255d7b2c
'2012-04-05T11:41:38-04:00'
describe
'1166582' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15.jp2'
bee85667c0b20d358238b1022ba71c8c
b550b1731dcb1f64607068f5b71ee2cc4f62fd9d
describe
'123711' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15.jpg'
b23fee223b6b3c398e472e49117ae9af
4e399f5be375b4c991405bfb137b6578ad8d57f4
'2012-04-05T11:43:10-04:00'
describe
'52093' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15.pro'
3465a93d0b6ed95c702e760e735c89cd
92a3976002356bfabd6b2fbfa76964e1b4f16cf5
describe
'40847' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15.QC.jpg'
dc36d9903f6a9e67089bc6b6301660a7
c37d32857e3a69d55ad3d341798ccad50108866a
'2012-04-05T11:39:34-04:00'
describe
'28024270' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15.tif'
8d811c469afa7ec21dad86957e35d701
cda99fc225064a02680169aee77956eb74bb4085
'2012-04-05T11:42:10-04:00'
describe
'1997' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15.txt'
3b372e1acd86385e4e392023dbd7e68c
d4d9ecfcbcb93945488df3d062d532ea0a1b6a88
describe
'10088' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_15thm.jpg'
bf8f164d0f54ac6c67bf0154353ccfc7
955ee86b8646821fe3a28536436453e6f773f80f
'2012-04-05T11:39:58-04:00'
describe
'1158392' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16.jp2'
19d9cd49bd77d831d8fba3cbb451693a
ee2ac10c660cba4e441bb0025d9f4c1ec91a6bff
'2012-04-05T11:39:07-04:00'
describe
'124494' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16.jpg'
91b1de457fe396794117c3943a05dc62
237670b86d3d0c640f6cea7d27c8900b05e1157f
'2012-04-05T11:38:40-04:00'
describe
'52871' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16.pro'
8344db5b84ee235241a1d9451c2522d7
3b2f3c06870207c9126e578239bf93a3cf488457
'2012-04-05T11:40:32-04:00'
describe
'40517' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16.QC.jpg'
a95533ee6ea4134d80bb964fd9789f2a
05bd906b18728278fd54bd053acf3ff71416fcea
'2012-04-05T11:42:00-04:00'
describe
'27827194' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16.tif'
fb5efd5b253582f9d9fd3e6a9d026ea3
de16225842ae5954e2c82a42f781594ee0dafe6a
'2012-04-05T11:39:49-04:00'
describe
'2022' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16.txt'
ccf3ca9f5bad2965bae50c694783247e
4234153d1cfa798e63bcc64de27db884df8bc711
describe
'9904' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_16thm.jpg'
94824d105b9e50af5cc1274ea6875bcb
4ef25188aee5696b3f2e820f6e4bbefcf61b5dee
describe
'1186934' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17.jp2'
1dc4db0bbcf0cd9b219d91a0e01425c9
6f821a373a647c87491868641b3b9478d942be7d
'2012-04-05T11:39:03-04:00'
describe
'134342' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17.jpg'
5c982058a24b4dc1064ff0f8ff0e8c31
def7ea00f0c5cef55a63a5aa96342bad218c6ca5
'2012-04-05T11:39:53-04:00'
describe
'54673' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17.pro'
d12bfb3a65333b609cc81037b0e38cc2
407b17a73ccd30d3fe00b14b9521e52f1eacdb82
'2012-04-05T11:41:40-04:00'
describe
'44670' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17.QC.jpg'
2e5d6e611334b6f15e434b21ddfca9bb
a3acf341557a9c3a30df891f6d4cda3413eb8679
'2012-04-05T11:39:13-04:00'
describe
'28513016' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17.tif'
0eaa1f1648d0d83d1d85bf110c71390f
fe2623be97384ff15828d8f5dc9b7faecd5a70e8
'2012-04-05T11:42:22-04:00'
describe
'2089' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPWZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17.txt'
6444f7c938cf6b2f28e0d9513a318382
d963ca123ad070fbca1e63d9f2f6c3714cde2b03
'2012-04-05T11:43:22-04:00'
describe
'10771' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_17thm.jpg'
0200ff4c39e2c87ab1db21e04c19c604
af2bc7063b37e802c708f130ecbd7754ac635d39
'2012-04-05T11:42:26-04:00'
describe
'1214173' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18.jp2'
12190eb4b51ceeac59769cb1760b0c75
b4ec46608cd579b662e9edffa731c07f36c99c7e
'2012-04-05T11:42:36-04:00'
describe
'141427' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18.jpg'
3ba3c90c47313e809606e822a21a974c
cb9ff0be384ee2b72c0c5b5250219349150299af
describe
'3549' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18.pro'
3e55f1d95b4e792767bfb347d31f440a
bfd60992ce2b354996df6e241392d144ceeaba30
'2012-04-05T11:39:50-04:00'
describe
'39464' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18.QC.jpg'
1bf6188ec8a41fc2ab59eb14e1b28da9
6ec3f19b091480e3768947fae0126b82c841443e
'2012-04-05T11:42:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18.tif'
6eb652c6892158815dc66790d5d4b827
72258a207114137e71dbb4928472eee5b9177e28
'2012-04-05T11:41:28-04:00'
describe
'275' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18.txt'
29c630109c783715510fbb90cf21fe06
f857a64e23834ea8ab77cb0924adb89e8ea4f7fc
'2012-04-05T11:39:16-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10212' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_18thm.jpg'
15d6acad53c6d6309f7419f70a47e6f5
a2ecaf268e8858316e5448a9cb96ce6bcbc8a057
'2012-04-05T11:40:41-04:00'
describe
'1177408' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19.jp2'
c56dc84f3a7693fef0ec8c8f2fe3bb07
e5b8eac7cb9922be4466aaca8efafe7046f5c796
describe
'130634' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19.jpg'
de3bba715e2cf6474f42d7f29aaf2e4a
ab079b074d23d2157906f7d07ade5c8e75c53899
'2012-04-05T11:42:53-04:00'
describe
'53586' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19.pro'
a37840e889446d1c08df07faf65959c4
d189597c085334b112a2eb3120f252e1cbae738d
'2012-04-05T11:41:02-04:00'
describe
'42542' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19.QC.jpg'
2d57945ed22753ec4f40269692a83d20
fa9cd1a3a374adeba0f36107cc458485816989c9
'2012-04-05T11:42:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19.tif'
69a848d404546c7ac7db32bd618b9feb
e3989c5f93c0e75e9a320cfa27a7f1c40a5ed78f
'2012-04-05T11:40:40-04:00'
describe
'2044' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19.txt'
b3a8cd7cdb6a10a1533a62e02dd93232
6d761a831714a850b3a1693900d44cf766d50001
'2012-04-05T11:42:08-04:00'
describe
'10509' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_19thm.jpg'
f9287b93de065406e89e4aa11e062059
b6c156688f028d7ee0d5848d7104c25e34c2d6e3
describe
'1188226' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20.jp2'
2c5c54dbe58f7551febd1e78265e040e
0cb66a5fb7851f123155d940bd4365cf21836f3f
describe
'127433' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20.jpg'
d1a7647a5350de3dc20b07544262e207
c9e440094cb1ec88ce7a120f0100d5d6caee6b02
'2012-04-05T11:40:28-04:00'
describe
'52685' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20.pro'
a332327871055c58e9cd4c4a9533f4ee
80a5c9d74ef5523f8901379a51be85442d50d9d9
'2012-04-05T11:39:15-04:00'
describe
'40736' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20.QC.jpg'
0ce7821f9cb90021d86828d10003020d
284c40f2a8fb6714e3f0af75397dcc0abe6da88e
'2012-04-05T11:38:39-04:00'
describe
'28544548' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20.tif'
fdfabdece673cdb59233b3c101652557
2357b207d9ecfa1a7af031e6f9f8deacf48b943a
'2012-04-05T11:39:43-04:00'
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20.txt'
dedc9bb7d71d7cd57ff85c9d9c28ad89
d57199a664dbf8e7bbb2f9950a61705a800d9f7d
describe
'10102' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_20thm.jpg'
f6b68723bbe8cec1423215ba7c6b2aef
97e7129337bd57230c99221e1fc863385e5b226f
'2012-04-05T11:39:39-04:00'
describe
'1152759' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21.jp2'
5395f05addff00b849dcd4ccae8a42f5
796bc72788aab1b6e2fe8cdc0f53e5ff7d3484a5
'2012-04-05T11:40:16-04:00'
describe
'122847' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21.jpg'
816386163d8ca278d19a2b0d110f020c
2193a9fd8583ad5d334c8875cf08947570eb33ed
'2012-04-05T11:39:27-04:00'
describe
'5662' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21.pro'
4232345098826765aa253a744ccc1d56
ffe9e71ab1822b62dd6485e6981239c2e02dc598
describe
'34091' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPXZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21.QC.jpg'
63b1b03bc601f7678c3ca5c5310454ca
318ef4d62bf2e79ca633136cde74a19b7a8bc036
'2012-04-05T11:39:26-04:00'
describe
'27693184' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21.tif'
0d4cf895ba48798ccf5e55e371636781
219bfd16a94afe6bfe686e6b4471f59f56849727
'2012-04-05T11:42:25-04:00'
describe
'311' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21.txt'
e2a62d5e66dbc833ff48de42a0834492
fcf38b138470a8692187793065d93b80b90f66c8
'2012-04-05T11:39:30-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9171' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_21thm.jpg'
98ca60a8a1b25bd230d04f242223793b
c374d9f65e13143754460412bfe92e378ee510d9
'2012-04-05T11:43:08-04:00'
describe
'1191203' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22.jp2'
bbfc440145249945577bfc17ea0d70d8
05e2d492e7340f8972560a0c1fc1d877a6446271
'2012-04-05T11:41:09-04:00'
describe
'120712' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22.jpg'
39adf5f6f2ddfad4875c8952235cfd9c
cd8359f08d1e5f6fbed6f9b9c6c539d1125d2acc
'2012-04-05T11:40:14-04:00'
describe
'48450' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22.pro'
e46fe8cf4ac17d59a40dd17c86226dbd
8da51d64b546b44afe46108ff939427347552ca3
describe
'39048' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22.QC.jpg'
b93800226b3d5123238b2c21952879e8
336a50526abcf01d8af6f770769711e1d2d62fc6
'2012-04-05T11:41:20-04:00'
describe
'28615494' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22.tif'
d64895629dcfa4ec93c8d9271ebf8de9
498ba00b0a7fa4d59b793dc813d6532841a24b65
'2012-04-05T11:42:30-04:00'
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22.txt'
b523c170e566e3200ee1905cffed9850
523a3f08d51f5c126607e3e7207d51a2f8cdedb0
describe
'9759' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_22thm.jpg'
cdf693dbd7ad57e37ed303e9a6a16097
95991f38cafd758eda4cf99c763e8b013b629e42
'2012-04-05T11:40:27-04:00'
describe
'1167890' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23.jp2'
d2d45bdf7a527e2d37e9b76e1b720eae
efc732a21cf4af812c9a017239bda0733f070317
describe
'113844' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23.jpg'
860e891478fb3805a5024853480a0dbc
ce046a7b3a2d0317cd7f832def06f09fb663a3c6
describe
'47726' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23.pro'
1742784b283fd953c447b18b5c0fc087
98b33b754c7b695d8c7af9098ab311773ccb8b60
'2012-04-05T11:41:32-04:00'
describe
'37730' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23.QC.jpg'
21d687869942c8c66c3ebfa80196afdb
3881f6c69928840286cee3b40e4dfbca3ea5b4f7
'2012-04-05T11:41:52-04:00'
describe
'28055802' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23.tif'
994de24f8c94fc02822d46fe114e8dee
b04e58b66543c1a1725e59d84bb32e9ae418b36c
'2012-04-05T11:41:00-04:00'
describe
'1848' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23.txt'
c616346b51baf316ac1062a86cc6a6da
236117e127bd7264f255a7e0e142660239249e2c
'2012-04-05T11:39:25-04:00'
describe
'9655' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_23thm.jpg'
00dd0343e395801d28aa98d4ab0a5e95
1b6fa6d17732eba7cb0a97b38f48f81647a68d6f
describe
'1176042' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24.jp2'
aead57d2f02506cdcccd7a3bca2f262c
496e5157e79a073af3398423903e67bc38d2667f
'2012-04-05T11:41:21-04:00'
describe
'123468' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24.jpg'
d69a16929502f3ff0e39dd9e4e443c65
0a86e1a0afd3c391fcfdaae52d7d86cf45f8cf74
'2012-04-05T11:41:37-04:00'
describe
'52030' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24.pro'
ac5e7faea99f5df1bc69ec7527ef6530
bed91ec7dbc8f739676daa62efdc92c7ae3d5e49
describe
'40721' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24.QC.jpg'
5f090542adda7c6388740fd180fa67e2
2d2c5e9fe3038bf18518b711ce05252162f851fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24.tif'
c36bab5971dbb5887045ef7e62a10a76
118ba056976a2314ab3b0f898d01939f68d0707f
'2012-04-05T11:42:16-04:00'
describe
'1991' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24.txt'
2a14df7bc67beb28d52da598c9d122cf
85ffffb779b660c98815af5e342d6689e08e93db
'2012-04-05T11:38:20-04:00'
describe
'10330' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_24thm.jpg'
316fe87ab10f9838cf0d2297ca724d4d
87ee37f2296b639e62754deff35adbcafd66d9cd
describe
'1179993' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25.jp2'
dbe6b2b213a1a93d0cb65382459ef767
c397d62256827fb574bbf34a427fd103d0bf338c
'2012-04-05T11:42:41-04:00'
describe
'130143' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPYZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25.jpg'
d4f7f2402593ae8dee6ab16da0cd2911
d9782cebbf40d54d73fece88326f04075f313a78
'2012-04-05T11:41:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25.pro'
d1b9d5072e69a2952f727a0ea2af9f02
5e7f8a1224418729533525fabd2e17647f4c2fe2
'2012-04-05T11:43:11-04:00'
describe
'43107' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25.QC.jpg'
b4f7043cd683ebc22f0d8764a5c2ae83
b838f2aee8906fe2eaadfe34618dfec896480dfb
'2012-04-05T11:42:06-04:00'
describe
'28347472' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25.tif'
d499002309692edb02dbca084cb41a98
60cab56f6b5b92be325b735851e7105a5c84bdaa
'2012-04-05T11:39:46-04:00'
describe
'1996' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25.txt'
94443526d11d1112cef3c1faab073efe
0e8d6f4aad6b0b6c38f8e219526597fc017ea7ba
'2012-04-05T11:39:05-04:00'
describe
'10420' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_25thm.jpg'
5ec5fa62a535451ff018c45609956ca6
50227aebc33d689b528dfd9cf624a26bb2693e96
describe
'1195029' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26.jp2'
9df9a332d3bb0c91eee1c9d6ac034c10
d360364f1fa2c5957c83ee316c3d6e42f53e762f
'2012-04-05T11:42:12-04:00'
describe
'124383' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26.jpg'
f7a68e0dcc422b5d6b0a0e8a0d7ccb0f
2bb66f42ca6f617141b9e333d59ca43242b09591
describe
'3650' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26.pro'
622705a78feb73f8e52806e4a369a67a
d43b59ccc4968a9c0cbad4545f94b9e082a9517c
describe
'34295' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26.QC.jpg'
7b4d972aa21623d1125386b6ac3f7a19
6246234da142376634738723c727fe1b6a7f386b
'2012-04-05T11:40:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26.tif'
ffa00c9bf3428e55f97ccb1f8e1543e1
f574f30556561943b939635c5c1603c2bff76b40
'2012-04-05T11:40:26-04:00'
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26.txt'
a18a0a07196db8bfcb5bd7be6b6dbc79
0fdc4754d6170ac30f4752a23d491e54235183f9
'2012-04-05T11:40:08-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9128' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_26thm.jpg'
b97752bbd0d3dd2f69ec06d4c40d2646
f4237c23bd7f9f3a4fc9bf39b311c0b972e50c6b
'2012-04-05T11:39:56-04:00'
describe
'1178725' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27.jp2'
602d559dc586e0d7d40db1e66ca349a2
96d4d9044815ec2b30f6c11572847dc3bc9a44ee
describe
'135032' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27.jpg'
607f77c33d0acd9f27e064ffc7df90f5
0d1f79ceff9fab97115744cfc6a97debb18da6d2
describe
'53251' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27.pro'
64f9f97c29e9b97ed48dbe5662b0fbad
b12dec8d4d95aef8a8acad44cbb57f024f808a9d
describe
'44611' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27.QC.jpg'
a3832991dd78ce57b09a6a437b89309e
5776e99a5d442a12ee60ccc48dbc04ea7dd0dbd2
'2012-04-05T11:40:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27.tif'
86a504d8e95cb999507f20e5966c2dbe
d843aa68388ce4ae64f75cb24144dfb3a57ee77a
'2012-04-05T11:39:33-04:00'
describe
'2039' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27.txt'
6c6e5f5dd8495a1a6b397974e7801a45
1a086eae60a228995521ab1c53dfa7f2def18e3f
describe
'10887' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_27thm.jpg'
5ea89bded4e97e0cba8af4ff32d6339d
d08a482aab226ea9d5a1cf015dd94a48f80ee5f2
describe
'1170515' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28.jp2'
2bee62735849821f0301d63f9e1ce383
0a40d8bcd4be5be72efab9644a180784f717e15f
'2012-04-05T11:40:02-04:00'
describe
'136236' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28.jpg'
74a8cb3d578a78ec5f6e07891427b19d
eb2b73fd65a910205c9822f1a7eae61cd86fb29b
describe
'50190' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28.pro'
68814c4ce9f9bcaf4d8f1838610ce4c1
60c64d99237320503d2d5e3be43fc3aa38cdf043
'2012-04-05T11:40:04-04:00'
describe
'44741' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28.QC.jpg'
d16db7e757fe7efe2d881535baaf7956
8b343b7b13801273ea0bb4b8602edb81829c2088
'2012-04-05T11:38:28-04:00'
describe
'28118866' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28.tif'
4d78a6fcc6bc7f27df3af37c11c21dec
e64d048d8eae83cc69f2d98219bd0ac49b6c0648
'2012-04-05T11:40:11-04:00'
describe
'1931' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28.txt'
e5b9f5968f134789d984b72da2b84169
3b1ae1e5427302c3c86709882a084147a1fca13f
'2012-04-05T11:42:24-04:00'
describe
'10670' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADPZZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_28thm.jpg'
8fb42ac33ecdf551de28a696d3d68931
c5b4d0c97e539915993491ade9dfc81216d4594e
'2012-04-05T11:41:46-04:00'
describe
'1204657' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29.jp2'
c92a537e2f3589f9622a0d4370cadfa8
2062b7876e8adbd608c56597f953fa77b6d5c494
'2012-04-05T11:39:06-04:00'
describe
'130224' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29.jpg'
31c2296d9b86e90dbc6547bcb3bcbaa4
30775737abd8784af89439a04846b59bf1f5bf7f
'2012-04-05T11:39:20-04:00'
describe
'2744' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29.pro'
0b5835affec4e1460217ae44e71351e0
1809a5acb8cc78758496884d56388f8a6646ec02
'2012-04-05T11:43:17-04:00'
describe
'36957' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29.QC.jpg'
026529f757264317c90a68f2da057d0c
659e3532698128bee973bb54907b2cbbb72abea4
describe
'28938698' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29.tif'
8b42b00ea0d60414c7af50b560e154af
840b5b039112d1371e14abc66a96b480bd7e40ff
'2012-04-05T11:40:56-04:00'
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29.txt'
0b55c41fca445409f4b83179101c5dba
4312d5e76260d970809204949e390084148cc253
describe
Invalid character
'9967' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_29thm.jpg'
9f124995314629d59999dc697c223b73
2aacb29697410fc850568e6dafa748047d7f223d
'2012-04-05T11:42:56-04:00'
describe
'1173127' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30.jp2'
164cce001a00058000fba83114441e7d
76a5683025d0f0eb0144fc9f4c53e482f16c85de
describe
'117993' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30.jpg'
7a8c3537b3c6fa65fae1d8fa798deb7f
12578c89f36c5c5f8547f6ff90738bd7222feb58
'2012-04-05T11:39:02-04:00'
describe
'50077' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30.pro'
c9f259f68c01c462191d408ad7ffdf38
f2c1d7793a394f78ea0bd4ca6fdc2eb229defcbe
describe
'39132' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30.QC.jpg'
5081fe4c7a1b722d6eb0f73102a4631e
240de7e62a3a7859a1ab26916c659fb39fb5cfb9
'2012-04-05T11:43:20-04:00'
describe
'28181930' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30.tif'
396725ba9bc802d57d1c07b264e9c342
412f1375b84be667e633f3ebe8811e4aba16337c
'2012-04-05T11:42:28-04:00'
describe
'1950' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30.txt'
c06aaaac9fba0dc5c6100d63714bf2e6
76213fe6f23e6da1cf226484e36344290e1c251c
'2012-04-05T11:39:00-04:00'
describe
'9829' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_30thm.jpg'
5ff56c09bff3d12f617142fa053c08ba
c53b9a5c6a780ffe7d91ca423394fff7cc8afaf0
'2012-04-05T11:41:51-04:00'
describe
'1167868' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31.jp2'
b792e465e2b64396a02bdc7a4adc196c
bb3868816d5bc268a1640f8adef34db80201a03d
describe
'115727' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31.jpg'
aabbf6adc72ace16e66e72405b9bfd66
4bc58de963ee55628c97044ba637c79c9518231b
'2012-04-05T11:43:14-04:00'
describe
'50250' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31.pro'
13c9139b6229e5ebf9343a0bc980ec87
a9ac565d283beaeab4a3bdf1eda01024df0a81f0
describe
'38596' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31.QC.jpg'
abb39b9f70c71dac39ced8f3cf795713
b2c69ba81d2688ff589fb79894d2ced765b71325
'2012-04-05T11:41:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31.tif'
e1d7a9f2a30abf8d1769843a3bb29403
a3bb641d371f7476a2613e545d2e9e0ab1a9e47f
'2012-04-05T11:41:49-04:00'
describe
'1942' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31.txt'
cadea7ece93736cf49c8778bd8618e0c
fd241cd8ce8026f29ea51780afcae6d7c14d60fc
'2012-04-05T11:41:43-04:00'
describe
'9620' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_31thm.jpg'
783cc6145fd65611a7d525e4e7a0ce95
3ee9c80b4baca05011b1558a41bb0c5f2604fa21
describe
'1177418' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32.jp2'
9418c1bc9d8336670bcbf2ce24929dec
11abdb7ffc92796b903b494f4d4ed9cce0ab0565
'2012-04-05T11:39:37-04:00'
describe
'125473' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32.jpg'
5eca71cae3f7ea2b2211e02347de127d
ff746dd9a95c4a095ca15293e9b06daac64ba7f9
'2012-04-05T11:39:51-04:00'
describe
'50433' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32.pro'
e60ffb18a1e31cebc8d1994f4560e242
d15e3e53915ba25b27f2c1786c2cbf688ad1139b
'2012-04-05T11:39:55-04:00'
describe
'41826' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32.QC.jpg'
ff09501e496ae7ea7f63814e1642f5e7
e84474ac43224bff3157dc7d2e32d99a1a14d191
'2012-04-05T11:39:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQAZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32.tif'
ef9c82643a16058f24c81b666a38cdb2
6426bb94a4c769849aa46302aad333adbcf0ddef
'2012-04-05T11:43:25-04:00'
describe
'1957' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32.txt'
5d92009ca3ea3f74bcbc6b11005011c1
ec083f0808f84642313e7dda6b6a0285012e81b8
describe
'10494' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_32thm.jpg'
5040dbcf7ff1eb43a0c3a63705acb42a
3b2e32546764007889f5d632cd78c166f643c624
'2012-04-05T11:40:53-04:00'
describe
'1167894' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33.jp2'
26ed579179a7f1aaac3785352a550af8
5c5d1eef2d125c7e6f58c28dedd2ab5a2ef9bfba
describe
'122478' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33.jpg'
ad94a2a68bb2bba21856bdbd8ddfde91
d6d91ef0a568cab29ce11a5eb68c9186d1c1de3e
describe
'49628' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33.pro'
c5e0b49860ad34b94fe88ba2d0cd0317
055c22af0384c09ee60455e7aa3f6b7beaf6fd90
describe
'39912' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33.QC.jpg'
742c82f7f50661d523540af4e47cc5c8
30d5de285cd27af6aea8801091acf04ce3b1764b
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33.tif'
cffa443ef2d2281142340be56e6e99d3
be932c544cf838af491bc26cb1caa91784fbeefa
describe
'1918' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33.txt'
b40b00e069cea3e275dc421e76d92967
a0baac5596d448fb749eb6a8f0be51414ff8fba4
'2012-04-05T11:40:13-04:00'
describe
'9837' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_33thm.jpg'
f83e84864fb054f3bdc17ad0605a4d70
3e498cb110d0fef7a95039a86f58b2d1cc3029b2
describe
'1215803' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34.jp2'
0624b2520a96ac41ea3d39b6930c090c
c0ecb5ee00ae0bf9681ca85a5219c4b6bf9ac1c0
describe
'131292' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34.jpg'
6d153c13d8a07debb61431b80f0b57cb
51799e2a7a227b2b0e02ce3df0527950f6976f7c
'2012-04-05T11:40:29-04:00'
describe
'3997' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34.pro'
9477dac9049fc57b517101f3db538514
2ac78b4d06c6b859d1ba3129b76a8c8eea47494a
'2012-04-05T11:38:38-04:00'
describe
'37553' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34.QC.jpg'
f878e902117b61f686421e910c6cedd6
3b0789b847c8fc9ba1e81e3cf5b9066df6b05b0a
'2012-04-05T11:42:47-04:00'
describe
'29206720' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34.tif'
6695245c0cbd467ecaa84d14cbf23780
15e69fefb7b9f202289dd9c347ab0038378b6bfa
describe
'256' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34.txt'
acc3c31bb2a038dfe1f6617f90c43ce5
52e18fa5a368c878e0a806ef4f64d799fdbf0917
'2012-04-05T11:42:17-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10127' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_34thm.jpg'
4e48232311e7d843bd8f4f7b45c31498
d147efb485f6304bc663cabd52d3ebca7b6465fc
describe
'1155433' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35.jp2'
664921f47b62d77f291fd64e73297182
323ab47f535a014754f97c891c69f80cb9ee8033
'2012-04-05T11:41:22-04:00'
describe
'76105' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35.jpg'
e39504201eb1d7b8216285ec25e60db1
03d96e2fd9a373314473a9c76aaeab21cc8011bf
'2012-04-05T11:39:10-04:00'
describe
'16927' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35.pro'
4a87355cbef338686ae101af899be170
a22fa6d27ca4dee6c0c445f835f2ad3514f77139
describe
'23308' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35.QC.jpg'
0f813fd740fe762281358cac45bebb54
3b0eab829714f3b58145e0c8a3ef58ddcee726f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35.tif'
3c967396d79828217450ebd623a76373
7b34af6dc651e4ec57580260d16e75030f3b81d7
'2012-04-05T11:40:00-04:00'
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35.txt'
2206253e67d334a0ce361e49d20e4c4f
027035005488c657fdf5fb5801d75d803505b539
describe
'6442' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_35thm.jpg'
10a0a52394edc109bf87a642cc42c99d
8eb4cec883dca3042f91c9bce81b77d23461f1b3
describe
'1219633' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36.jp2'
e51289d306820d6ed03e505447741381
c9998935b76cd2ef840fb5e0a9a4566ea9dae2d8
describe
'26109' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36.jpg'
361f9dfa0296d3153c6d5f704eb9f010
164f70d41a17ba9dbd329386fc91782c30d701b8
'2012-04-05T11:41:19-04:00'
describe
'234' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQBZ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36.pro'
d6dc459476f14ec6d9df45c6a1f3cf1c
b4a784501685151ff3d3c45ae7c105895d9cc692
'2012-04-05T11:42:19-04:00'
describe
'6981' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCA' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36.QC.jpg'
51c6f3b50c30789c3efa668b311af489
98854e761b7a3e23cb97cc360f3064f13bb68a9d
describe
'29301316' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCB' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36.tif'
19710cf5cd6d551e5f7a9e593d1422be
8e027535ab8cd81856171aa168aeb54e38538efa
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCC' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-04-05T11:38:26-04:00'
describe
'2326' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCD' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_36thm.jpg'
182e98612f11da1ce6e2e3af0e4d0b7d
c58f5298c174d237206441f6eece0b3a36f1edbb
'2012-04-05T11:41:10-04:00'
describe
'1200681' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCE' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37.jp2'
eba6c84b0a6cf556928c6f16fc195e0d
b0c3d597dedf4158357ba023a4727fb1aecc8657
describe
'22945' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCF' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37.jpg'
14546e584801cb960efc171cef884cf5
5e9800e97436d64f55458e77e0f982759373370d
describe
'393' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCG' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37.pro'
3581bbdbe551aaba600e2f604a53e570
76b7d4ec1c3f9b211293da1ae1df222b2df4266b
'2012-04-05T11:40:45-04:00'
describe
'5485' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCH' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37.QC.jpg'
04e077bebac28b9ef4b3c5724857ac38
7ed0f93db1169833a72d9058af5bc47d29a7e154
'2012-04-05T11:41:33-04:00'
describe
'28844102' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCI' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37.tif'
9971ce50f2c4225277028801b3354811
f613a7091bfa13b309d41591a9068dda9af202b0
'2012-04-05T11:38:22-04:00'
describe
'484' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCJ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37.txt'
fd9eeb01cab6dcfd4162d3836075d6bc
205e271be9e63612350ec022585fda77da896a4f
'2012-04-05T11:38:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1791' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCK' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_37thm.jpg'
5e096255a67fe610d7dbe946149e594e
d2bb75b4740c241f327c49092f13927a0986627c
describe
'1224014' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCL' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38.jp2'
25ea89a9587eea8cc5eebc36910f7ef5
891ed9d864c08a7a3216898a18f740553f1a5d3b
describe
'26799' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCM' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38.jpg'
1687e7bf6e7a21dd48f85b6ff9a134ec
60dca71baa062dea5f458ddff527dad7b2571960
'2012-04-05T11:38:47-04:00'
describe
'427' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCN' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38.pro'
6870dacca6644ceacf20bc0322cb23cf
b7ae87ac7d86b4e33a7ee8dddac042f42b204477
describe
'6185' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCO' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38.QC.jpg'
774f3fe0b965572cfed517d3deee2597
211ccdb63b2d9891d3a55b144b747eea14cb19d6
'2012-04-05T11:43:15-04:00'
describe
'29403794' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCP' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38.tif'
f19052d2b620e2bd158ee0f3ab859c5d
e4b7189c9c2107c5a93494ab04379540b03cdbe4
'2012-04-05T11:42:20-04:00'
describe
'472' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCQ' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38.txt'
7aaee532a9b384a8f8b0b71cf483e312
9fec236588de589e819dee0cec04c3f15f9a5682
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCR' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_38thm.jpg'
af637eaddad1f0365e9af7f6d2e2d2ce
cffb4eda9df045119c08554d408a7105afb6f56e
describe
'1303089' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCS' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39.jp2'
2e62e65f660d3c9bcad38acd00088135
bc8ad3cafd6e496795f9e11aa68501c00a4e7e40
describe
'112065' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCT' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39.jpg'
0f6aa6c418fffce0fff1ba26701cd4a9
6d6eed46b43bcab0c5bf455b639e329e0534c630
'2012-04-05T11:41:14-04:00'
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCU' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39.pro'
1db49e419a29319ec6a590156ef23e43
fc3151588ef0288157e000245616e68072c6bad8
describe
'31303' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCV' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39.QC.jpg'
2a391bc15fdf866182bb8dcc64cea2aa
81d5d7758b526f9bf85a077363896f1a92883776
describe
'31303598' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCW' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39.tif'
0a64c9bb48a2221516653c80d5b308a5
2062475a570f2854a27852ab58888d2f98caa25c
'2012-04-05T11:40:18-04:00'
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCX' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39.txt'
fb57961ba64f91b43dc8243c49397e68
6179318e599da1f70de1d4fb3e228f0d21dfdec7
describe
'9271' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCY' 'sip-filesBinder6_Page_39thm.jpg'
48fa7ce69e3e05effe7cbed7a17015b5
a153b6c7c42fcdb65913bbafe4876f12c8298c37
describe
'69155' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQCZ' 'sip-filesUF00000420_00001.mets'
bdab7536e4c80f65001a8c5770fb1db4
c2c8c74502666c06346e817ab5a8ba6cd9fe7c2b
'2012-04-05T11:38:41-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T17:16:38-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'83269' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAOUfileF20090917_AADQDC' 'sip-filesUF00000420_00001.xml'
78d33af3f274daf0e8c06986e899c073
4782a4873841d3fb7f72453c6b09d10739d0d2a8
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T17:16:39-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.