Citation
Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey. 1907-1908.

Material Information

Title:
Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey. 1907-1908.
Series Title:
Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey
Creator:
Florida Geological Survey
Sellards, E. H.
Publisher:
Capital Publishing Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Geology -- Florida ( LCSH )
The Everglades ( local )
City of Ocala ( local )
City of Miami ( local )
Tampa Bay ( local )
City of Chattahoochee ( local )
City of Tampa ( local )
Limestones ( jstor )
Geology ( jstor )
Phosphates ( jstor )
Geological surveys ( jstor )
Rocks ( jstor )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Funding:
Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
1st (1907/08)-24th (1930-1932).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some parts of the reports also issued separately.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Report year ends June 30.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Tenth to Eleventh, Twenty-first to Twenty-second, and Twenty-third to Twenty-fourth annual reports, 1916/18, 1928/30-1930/32 are issued in combined numbers.
Statement of Responsibility:
Florida State Geological Survey.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights she or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier:
AAA0384 ( LTQF )
AAA7300 ( LTUF )
01332249 ( OCLC )
000006073 ( 000006073 )
020295540 ( ALEPH )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Biennial report to State Board of Conservation

Full Text
iLOBIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY rInsT ANNUAL REPORT, RONTISPIECZ, PL. I PHOSPHATE MINING IN FLORIDA BY FLOATING DREDGE, DUNELLON, FLA.




FLORIDA STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY E. H. SBLLARDS, STATE GEOLOGIST
FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
1907-08
ADMINISTRATIVE REPORT MINERAL INDUSTRIES BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FLORIDA GEOLOGY
BY
E. H. SELLARDS
CAPITAL PUBLISHING CO., State Printer,
Tallahassee, Fla.
1908




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.
His Excellency, IHon. N. B. Broward,
Governor of Florida.
[ have the honor to submit herewith the First nual Report of the Florida State Geological Survey o ering the operations of the Survey for the year ending U e, 1908. The miscellaneous results of this first year's
r are included in this report. The special investigas which have been carried on during the year will
the subject of separate publications, one of which, a Il tin on underground water supply, accompanies this rt. A report on the general geology and stratigraphy Florida forming a part of co-operative work between ational and State Surveys is in preparation.
rmit me to express at this time my appreciation of nterest you have shown in the work of the State eol gical Survey, and the encouragement you have given
e prosecution of this work.
Respectfully,
E. H. SELLARDS,
State Geologist.
a e, Florida,
July 1, 1908.
ISA0




CONTENTS.
Pago
nistrative report ..............................
te Survey law ....................................... 7
e purposes and duties of a State Geological Survey..... 9 embers of the State Survey force .................1
-operation with the National Geological Survey ........... 12
elation of the State Survey to other organizations ...... 12 he Survey library ..................................... 13
xhtbition of geological material .................... 13
he relation of the State* Survey to the ownership of mineral-bearing lands ................................. 14
amples sent to the Survey for examination ............. 14
he collection of statistical information .......... ..... 15
inancial statem ent ........................... ........ 16
,etch of the geology of Florida ........................... 17
Lable of the geologic time divisions ..................... 20
Fossils contained in the Florida formations .............. 23
Fossil human remains in Florida ........................ 26
ineral industries ........................................ 26
Phosphate .............................................. 26
V arieties .............................................. 28
L ocation ........ ....... t .............................. 29
Origin and oCcurrence .................................. 29
C lay .................................................... 31
Plastic kaolin or ball clays ............................ 32
Brick-making clay ...............................3
Fuller's earth ................................... 33
Minerals of fuller's earth .............................. 33
Analysis of fuller's earth .............................. 34
Physical properties of .............. 35
Tests for fuller's earth ................................ 35
Uses ...... ............ ........... 36
Occurrence ........................................... 36
Loc4tion and extent .... ....................... 36
Production of fuller's earth during 1907.............. 37
Peat ...................... 37
Diatomaceous earth ...............................39




CONTENTS.
Page.
Lime and cem ent ........................................ 40
Lim e ................................................. 40
Natural cem ent ....................................... 41
Portland cement ...................................... 42
Sand lime brick ......................................... 42
Concrete building blocks, hollow blocks, and artificial stone. 43 Minerals new to the State .............................. 44
Sulphur ........................................... ..44
Mineral waters .......................................... 45
Road-making materials .................................... 46
Rocks of Florida classified according to origin ........... 47
Rocks of Florida classified according to chemical composition ................................................. 47
Siliceous rocks--flint and chert ........................ 48
Properties .......................................... 48
Occurrence of flint and chert in Florida .............. 48
Origin of flint and chert in the Vicksburg Limestone.. 49
Calcareous material ................................... 50
Distribution and amount of calcareous rocks ......... 51
Argillaceous rocks-Road-making clays ................ 51
Bog iron ore .......................................... 53
Phosphate rock ....................................... 53
Geological investigations In Florida previous to the organization of the present Geological Survey .................. 54
Papers on geology ...................................... 54
Papers on paleogeography .............................. 68
Bibliography of Florida Geology ........................... 73
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Plate Facing page I. Phosphate mining in Florida by floating dredge, Frontispiece IT. Ocala Limestone--Type exposure, Ocala, Florida ........ 22
11. Mining river pebble phosphate in Florida; and Caloosahatchee beds (Pliocene), Caloosahatchee River ....... 24 IV. Land pebble phosphate, showing bedded phosphate
deposit; and phosphate washer, Bartow, Florida ........ 30 V. Flowing well near Palatka ............................ 4t
VI. Lake Okeechobee, entrace to three-mile canal; and the /
Everglades, from the south to the north drainage canal 4




FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FLORIDA
STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
BY E. H. SELLARDSJ STATE GEOLOGIST.
The State Geological Survey was authorized by the General Assembly of 1907. The act establishing the Survey reads as follows:
AN ACT establishing a Geological Survey for the State of Florida,
to provide for the appointment if a State Geologist, to define his
duties, and to provide for the maintainance of the survey. Be it Enacted by the Legislature of -the State of Florida:
Section 1. That the Governor of the State shall appoint a suitable person to conduct a geological survey of the State; such person shall be known as the State Geologist, and shall have his office at the Capitol.
Section 2. The State Geologist shall appoint subject to the approval of the Governor such assistance as he may find necessary to enable him to sucoessfully, and with reasonable dispatch, accomplish the object of the survey, and such assistance shall be entirely under the control of the State Geologist.
Section. 3. The State Geologist shall make jto the Governor annually a report'of the progress of his surveys and explorations of the minerals, water supply and other natural resources of the State, and he shall include in such report full description of such surveys and explorations, occurrence and location of mineral and other deposits of value, surface and subterranean water supply and power and mineral waters; and the best and most economical methods of development, together with analysis of soils, minerals and mineral waters, with maps, charts and drawings of the same; and it shall be the duty of the State Geologist and his assistants, when they discover any mineral deposits, or other substance- of value, to notify the owner of the land upon which such deposits occur. Failure of the said Geologist to notify the owner of such deposit before disclosing to any other person or persons, shall subJect said Geologist to a fine of one thousand dollars and six months' imprisonment.
Section 4. It shall be the duty of the State Geologist to make collections of specimens illustrating the geological and mineral features of the State; one suit of which chall be deposited in the office of the State Geologist, at Tallahassee, and duplicate suits In




FLOLDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
the libraries of each 'of the State Colleges; each suit to he cerrectly labeled for convenient use and study.
Section 5. That for the purpose of expeditiously and thoroughly carrying out the provisions of this act, there shall be ap. propriated out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated the sum of seven thousand five hundred dollars per annum. The Comptroller shall, upon the requisition of the State Geologist, when approved by the Governor, draw his warrant on the Treasurer for the amount so appropriated in such sums as may be needed from time to time for the purpose of said survey as herein set forth; and for all such expen4itures made under the provisions of this act. except for the payment of the salary of the State Geologist, as herein provided, the consent and approval of the Governor shall be obtained, and the vouchers for all such expenditures made from this fund shall be filed with the Comptroller; and a statement of his receipts and expenditures shall be printed in such annual report of the State Geologist. Of the amount annually appropriated, there shall be expended: Frst, for the salary of the State Geologist, two thousand five hundred dollars per annum, which salary is hereby fixed at that sum. Second, for the contingent expenses of the survey, including compensation of all temporary and permanent assistance; traveling expenses of the geological corps; purchase of materials or other necessary expenses for outfit; expenses incurred in providing for the trans.portation, arrangement-and proper exhibition of the geological and other collections made under the provisions of this act; for postage, stationery and printing, and the printing and engraving of maps and sections to illustrate the annual reports, five thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary.
Section 6. All chemical, analytical or assay work shall be performed by the State Chemist and his assistants, at the direction of the Governor, upon request of the State Geologist.
Section 7. All laws and parts of laws inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed.
Section 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage and approval by the Governor, or upon its becoming a law without auck approval.
Approved June 3, 1907.




ANNUAL REPORT.
Taa PURPOSES AND TH DUTIES OF THU STATE GEOLOGICA, SuRvMY.
The State Geological Survey is intended to serve both an economic and an educational purpose. Provision is made for the exploration of the mineral and other natural resources of the State, and for the publication in a suitablh manner of the results of such explorations. The establishment of a State Survey upon a basis that is broad, efficient, and capable of development is an accomplishment upon which a State is to be congratulated. The successful carrying out of such a survey demands on the part of its officials faithful, persistent adherence to deftnite plans, and on the part of the people of the State a generous and constant co-operation. Among the specific objects for which the Survey exists, as stated in the enactment, is that of making known information regarding "minerals, water supply, and other natural resources of the State," including the "occurrence and location of minerals and other deposits of value, surface and subterranean waber supply and power, and mineral waters, and the best and most economic methods of development, together with analysis of soils, minerals and mineral waters, with maps, charts, and drawings of the same".
While strictly economic purposes are thus emphasized, a distinctly educational function of the Survey is indicated by Section 4, which makes it the duty of the State Geologist to make collections of specimens illustrating the geological and mineral features of the State. One set of these specimens is to be deposited in the office of the State Geologist, while duplicate sets are made accessible to each of the State colleges. These collections form the basis upon which the conclusions of the Survey's investigations rest and their proper care and preservation is a ihatter of importance. The educational work of the State Survey should, however, go beyond the distribution of collections. The minute investigation' of a mineral deposit and publication of the results of that investigation are




iS FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
matters of interest not merely to the individuals who ma.
happen to own or mine from these deposits, but are mat-i ters which concern the people of the State as a whole. Al State Survey will fall short of its responsibilities andi
-opportunities if it does not, through Its publications, fur-l nish to the people a better knowledge of the resources of the State and the possibilities and limitations of such resources.
In its economic relations, a State Survey touches on varied phases of the State's development. In its results it may be expected, judging from the experience of similar surveys in other States, to contribute not so much to sensational or sudden development of great mineral de, posits as to an intelligent development of the State's nat-. ural resources. Its educational value is of no less immediate concern to the State, both to the citizens within the State and to prospective citizens without.
In view of the size of the State and its varied resources, it is apparent that for efficiency the Survey must concen. trate its work for the present along specific lines. A thorough investigation of some one natural resource, with the publication of the results, is of much more value to the State than incomplete reports on the many resources. It will be the plan of the State Survey to investigate and report on such natural resources specifically, as, for instance: The undergrouhd water supply of the State, artesian and non-artesian, its possibilities for agricultural, commercial and general tisage; the phosphate deposits; the fuller's earth deposits; the clays; the road making materials; the sand and cement materials; the fuels; and similarly, other natural resources as they develop. The results of these investigations will constitute a series of economic reports. Other reports, not lacking in economic value, but intended particularly as of educational value, will relate to the general geology of the State. Finally; it is hoped that it may be possible to issue reports of combined educational and economic value treating of the




ANNUAL REt1oRT. I
State by limited areas in detail, as by counties, and intended as final reports for the are.!as so treated.
MEMBEMRs OF THlE STATE SURVEY FORcM
The writer's services as State Geologist began in June, 1907. On August 15, 1907, Mr. Herman Gunter was employed as Field Assistant. In connection with :o-operafive work between the State and the National Surveys, the State Survey secured during a part of the year the services of F. G. Clapp and George C. Matson. The chemioal work of the State Survey is provided for by law through the office of the State Chemist.
Mr. Gunter's time has been given largely to field work op underground water, to the collection of geological ma4erial, and to assistance in the exhibition of specimens. Messrs. Clapp and Matson, who worked with the State Spryey in co-operation with the National Survey, have in preparation a report on the general geology and stratigraphy of the State. This report will contain a geological map of the State, and, if practicable, a topographic map with contour lines at intervals of 50 feet. Mr. E. Peck Greene served as office assistant during the months of March and April., Miss Nellie Mathes has served as stenographer during a part of the year. The total cost to the Survey in salaries for the year as shown by the financial statement given on a later page was 3,568.03.
The State Geologist has given attention in detail, so far as possible, to the field work .of the Survey, as well as to the equipment of the office, and to the correspondence. Many of the letters of inquiry received, by the office admit of a brief reply, while others require considerable time, and in some cases investigation or examination of specimens, in order to supply the information desired.
Two publications have been issued during the year as follows: A pamphlet (n the Organization and Plans of the State Geological Survey, and a circular containing a map with explanatory text showing the areas of artesian




12 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
flow in the State. A bulletin on the underground water supply of central Florida accompanies this report.
CO-OPERATION WITH THE NATIONAL GEOLOGICAL SURVux.
The State Geological Survey has fortunately been able to co-operate during the year with the National Geological Survey. This co-operative work, planned, soon after the organization of the State Survey, includes a detailed investigation of the stratigraphy and underground waters of the State, and has been carried on throughout the year in accordance with the original plans. The State Survey has profited very greatly by assistance from the National Survey and by the presence of members of the National Survey in the field. Moreover, the State has had the benefit of a much more extended geological investigation than would otherwise have been possible. The results of these investigations will be embodied in a special bulletin on the stratigraphy and general geology of the State and in reports on the underground water supply.
I
REwATION OF THE SURVEY TO OTHER ORGANIZATIONS.
Geological Surveys of Neighboring States :-Geological formations are limited by no such lines as State boundaries, .and an intelligent study of a formation often necessitates a knowledge of its extent and development in a neighboring State. The relationship of a State Survey is therefore close with neighboring States, and particularly with adjoining States. This relationship in the case of the Florida Survey is especially close with Georgia and Alabama. With more distant States there is a no les8 real relationship growing out of a similarity of deposits, and of methods of study and development.
Office of State Chemist :-The Survey law provides that analytical work necessary to the investigations of the Survey shall be done by the State Chemist. The Survey is thus brought into co-operative relation with the Division




ANNUAL REPORT. 13
of Chemistry of the Department of Agriculture and in so far as the work of the Survey contributes to agricultural interests, to the Department of Agriculture as a whole.
The State Agricultural Experiment Station :-In its study of the water supply in relation to agriculture, of soils in their geological relations, and in other ways, the work of the State Survey. may be expected to supplement certain lines of work of the State Experiment Station, the two organizations being of mutual aid
-to each other. The Director of the State Experiment Station has, during the present year, very kindly supplied a considerable number of analyses of water samples which have been incorporated in the bulletin on underground water, prepared to accompany this report.
THn SURVEY LIBRARY.
An effort has been made during the year to bring together those publications which are necessary to the immediate and future work of the Survey. The Survey library now contains more than 1,000 volumes. These include the reports of the several State Geological Sur. veys; the Annual Reports, Bulletins, Monographs, Professional Papers, Water Supply and Irrigation Papers, and other publications of the National Geological Survey; the repo-ts of the Canadian, and a few other foreign Geological Surveys; and many miscellaneous volumes and papers on geological subjects.
ExHIBITION OF GEOLOGICAL MATERIAL.
The Survey law provides for the exhibition of geological material. The space available for this purpose is unfortunately as yet very limited. A part of dne room, has, however, been used for this purpose. Three cases have been built, designed to serve the double purpose of storage and exhibition, the lower part of the casebeing adapted to the purpose of storing material. In making the coliec-




14 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
tions a systematic plan has been followed to secure a representation of the rocks, minerals, and fossils of each formation in the State. The collections will be dded to as opportunity permits.
THE RELATION OF THu STATE SURVEY TO THI OWNERSHIP
or MINeRAL-BEARING LANDS.
The relation of the State Survey to the ownership of mineral-bearing lands is speciflally defined. The Survey law provides that it shall be the duty of the State Geologist and his assistants, when they discover any mineral deposits or substance of value, to notify the owners of the land upon which such deposits occur before disclosing their location to any other person or persons. Failure to do so is punishable by fine and imprisonment. It is not intended by the law, however, that the State Geologist's time shall be devoted to examinations and reports 'upon the value of private mineral lands. Reports of this character are properly the province of commercial geologists, who may be employed by owners of land for that purpose. To accomplish the best results, the work of the Survey must be in accordance with definite plans by which the State's resources are investigated in n orderly manner. Only such examinations of private lands can be made as constitute a part of the regularly planned operations of the Survey.
SAMPLES SENT TO THE SURVEY FOR EXAMINATION.
Samples of rocks, minerals and fossils will be at all times gladly received, and reported upon. Attention to inquiries and general correspondence are a part of the duties of the office, and afford a means through which the Survey may in many ways be useful to the citizens of the State.
The following suggestions are offered for the guidance of those submitting samples:




ANNUAL POLT. 15
1. The exact location of all samples should be given. This should be carefully written out in full and placed on the inie of the package.
2. The statement accompanying the sample should give the conditions under which the specimen occurs, whether an isolated fragment or part of a. larger mass or deposit.
3. Each package vhould be addressed to the Florida State Geological Survoy, Tallahassee. The name and address of the sender should be plainly written on the outside.
4. Transportation charges, whether by mail, express I or freight, should in all cases be prepaid.
Tui COLLECTION OF STATISTICAL INFORMATION.
For many purposes the collection and publication of statistical information is helpful, both to the industries concerned and to the general public. Such statistical information is desired from all the mineral industries of the State. Such information will be recognized as strictly confidential in so far as it relates to the private business of any individual or company, and will be used only in making up State and County totals. The co-operation of the various industries of the State is invited in order that the best possible showing of the State's products may be
hiade annually.




16 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
The following is a summary of the expenditures of the Survey for the year ending June 2, 1908:
Office supplies and equipment ................ 919.34
Field supplies and equipment ................ 402.93
Expense of field operations.................2,183.42
Exhibition of geological material.............. 155.93
Express, freight and drayage.................. 24.49
P rinting .................................... 83.55
Stationery and postage ....................... 162.31
Salaries .................................... 3,568.03
$7,500.00




SKETCH OF THE GEOLOGY OF FLORIDA.
A scientific study of the mineral industry is necessarily based upon a knowledge of the geology. The summary of the geological features of the State is given briefly at this time since th'e subject will be dealt with in more detail in a later bulletin to be isiued by the State Survey.
Flirida lies withinltnd is a part of the general coastal plains deposits of the United States. These embrace a strip along the Atlantic and, the Gulf coasts, varying in width and covering the .eastern part of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,' Georgia' and all of Florida, as well as much of the southern part of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. The formations of the coastal plains are sedimentary, containing much clay, shale, limestone and sandstone, and lie nearly horizontal or with but slight dip. The sediment making up these deposits, except the organic material of the limestone, came from higher lands to the no1th and west. The sea occupying the present position of Florida, was in early time remote from sources of sediment; so that the proportion of wash from the land was much less here than nearer the original shore line. This' clear sea was favorable to the existence of an abundant shell life, their remdnE-accnmulating to form lime rock. Hence, in the Coastal Plains section, Florida is exceptional in the large' amount of limestone that it contains..
In its general geology, Florida is of comparatively simple structure. The rocks are all gf sedimentary origin, no igneous or greatly metamorphosed rocks occurring within the State. The strata lie for the most part, either horizontally, as formed, or with a slightly accentuated dip, and have suffered no great distortion such as often. characterizes the rocks of a mountainous country. These sedimentary formations consist of limestones, sandstones, shales and clays; The underlying foundation rock throughout the State, being a massive and very thick limestone.
Formerly it was believed that the greater part, if not 2-GeoRepi




118 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
all of the State of Florida, was of coral formation. This view was founded upon the observations of Louis Agassiz and Joseph LeConte. The first publication on the subject by Agassiz appeared in 1852 as an appendix to the report of the Superintendent of the United States Coast Survey for the year ending November, 1851. Agassiz believed that not only the extreme south Fjrida and the Florida Keys were of coral formation, but that the Peninsula as far at least as the 28th degree of north latitude was of similar origin. LeConte's paper appeared in 1857, and to the conclusions of Agassiz' added the theory that the keys rested upon a substructure of inorganic sediment carried by the Gulf Stream. Previous to these publications the true character of the limestone of the mainland had been recognized and described by several observers. J. H. Allen, in 1846, described the limestone outcropping in the vicinity of Tampa.2 During the same year T. A. Conrad publishes two papers on these formations, giving in the second paper a description of a number of the.fossil shells contained in them.3. Tuomey in 1851 concurred in Conrad's reference of the Tampa formations to the early Tertiary.4
Bailey collected fossil foraminifera during the winter
and spring of 1849-50 from a locality forty miles west of
1On the agency of the Gulf Stream in the formation of the Peninsula of Florida. Joseph LeConte, Am. Assoc. Adv. Set. Proc. X, 103-119, pt. 2, 1857.
2Some facts respecting the Geology of Tampa Bay, Florida. J. H. Allen, Am. Jour. Sdl. (2), vol. 1, p. 38-42. 1846.
3Observations oni the Geology of a Part of East Florida, with
a catalog of Recent Shells of the Coast. T. A. Conrad, Am. Jour.
Set. (2), II, 3648, 1846.
4Notice of the Geology of the Florida Keys and of the Southern
Coast of Florida. Tuomey, M. Am. Jour. Set. (2) vol. XI, 390-394,
1851.
5Microscopical Observations made in South Carolina, Georgia
and Florida. Smithsonian Contr. Knowl. II, No. 8, 48 pp. 1851;
Am. Jour. Set. (2) XI, p. 86, 1857.




ANNUAL REPORT-GEOLOGY. 19
Palatka and recognized the formation as the "White Orbitulite (Orbitoides) Limestone".
The views of Agassiz and LeConte gained wide circulation and were for a generation the accepted view as to the origin of the peninsula. The credit for again estabo lishing the true character of the limestone of the interior of Florida is due to Professor Eugene A. Smith. State Geologist of Alabama. Professor Smith's paper appeared in 1881, his observations on the geology of Florida having been made during the previous year, while acting as special agent for the cotton culture report of the 10th Cern sus.' While the observations made by Smith were not ufficiently detailed to permit of a differentiation of the several formations occurring in the interior of the State, his conclusions as to the history of the formation of the peninsula were substantially correct.
The Florida deposits are all of comparatively recent date geologically. The place of the formations as now known in the geological time scale is indicated by the table given on the following page. The Archeozoic at the bottom of the table is the oldest of the large time divisions; the Cenozoic at the top, is the latest. Similarly the Eocene is the oldest division of the Cenozoic, while the Pleistocene is the most modern and leads up through recent formations to the present time.
The oldest formation known in Florida is the Vicksburg Limestone, which is believed to belong, as indicated by the table, to the Oligocene division of the Cenozoic. The conditions under which this limestone was formed were, as indicated by the rock itself, as follows: A clear sea of medium depth free from land sediment in which marine life, especially the minute organisms known as the forannifera, abounded, the shells of these small animals, along with larger shells, making up the limestone. Of the many fossils occurring in this limestone the most
*Am. Jour. Set. (3) .Vol. XXI, pp. 292-309, 1881.




20 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
'PABLE OF .GEOLOGICAL TiME DivisioNs, SHOWING FORMATIONS PRESENT IN FLORIDA.
Represented b (Sand-dunes shell-mounds, Recent... Florida by.... Indian remains, leading to the present time.
Represented i r Columbia sands, Pleistocene F y. Marine shellrock, Florida by .... Miami Oolite.
Pliocene Represented in Lafayette formation, Florida by.. $ Caloosahatchee beds. Cenozoic Miocene Represented in Florida by. Chesapeake Miocene.
(Upper Oligocene (ChattaRepresented in hoochee and C h I po I a Oligocene.. Florida by.... groups), Lower Oligocene, (Vicksburg and Ocala Limestones.)
Eocene .... tNot known It is probable that the in Florida.... Eocene occurs in Florida Cretaceous. ( underlying the Oligocene at Mesozoic Jurassic... Not known some considerable depth.
Triassic... In Florida.... This inference is based on the occurrence of Eocene Permian... Not known limestone to the north and Carbonifer- in Florida.... west which dips toward the
ous south beneath Oligocene Paleozoic Devonian.. limestone. It is possible
Ordovician. Not known also that Cretaceous rocks Cambrian. in Florida.... occur at still greater depth C a below the Eocene. There is .....at present no basis on
IWithsubdi- Not known which to judge the presProterozoic visions..* in Florida.... ence or absence oZ yet older formations beneath the ( With subdi- Not known Florida peninsula with the Archeozoic visions.., in Florida.... possible exception of the Archeozoic, which is presumably world-wide in its occurrence.




ANNUAL REPOR'L-EOLOGY. 21abundant and characteristic are small foraminifera of the genus Orbitoide. From the predominance of these small fossils the formation has come to be known commonly as the Orbitoides Limestone. The formation -contains in places large masses of flint. These flint masses seem to have been formed by replacement of calcium carbonate by silica carried in solution by the underground water, which circulates freely through the limestone. Locally, this originally porous and fossiliferous limestone has become compact and more or less perfectly crystallized. Apparently this change is also to be attributed to the effect of underground water. The Vicksburg Limestone doubtless underlies the entire State. It is a part of an extensive formation which encircles the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Louisiana. In Alabama it makes up apparently the middle part of the St. Stephens or White Limestone, and has there, according to Smith, an estimated thickness of between two and thre hundred feet.1 In Mississippi, Casey recognizes two faunal horizons in the Vicksburg Bluffs2, the upper of which contains Orbitoides as a characteristic fossil. Upon this basis Dall has proposed tentatively .for the Orbitoidal phase of this extensive formation the term "Peninsular Limestone", from its typical occurrence in the peninsula of Florida.3 In Florida this limestone lies at the surface in limited aias, but is, for the Most part, buried beneath later deposits. Good exposures are seen in the central portion of Alachua and in the southern part of Columbia CounlReport on the Geology of the Coastal Plains of Ala., Geological Survey of Ala. Eugene Allen Smith, State Geologist. 1894, pp. 107122. The Underground Water _Resources of Ala._ Eugene Alle Smith, Geological Survey of Ala. 1907. The Ala. Survey has not found it practicable, however, to separate any part of the White bIzzestone as it occurs in that State from the Eocene. (Coastal Plains, p. 109.)
2Proceedings Academy Natural Science of Phtladelphia, PP. 513-518, 1901.3Trans. Wagner Free Institute Sci. Vol. III, pt. VI, p. 1554t .1903.




0') FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
ties. It is exposed locally throughout an area extending from Pasco County to South Columbia County and locally west to the Suwannee River. The largest exposed areas lie in Pasco, Hernando, Marion and Levy Counties. 'Lying upon the Orbitoidal limestone and probably conformable with it is a thin limestone of similar character known as the Ocala Limestone from its typical exposure at the Meffert lime kiln at Ocala. These two formations make up the Lower Oligocene of Florida.
The Upper Oligocene formation consists of limestones and clays. Over much of the north central and western part of the State, these deposits lie at or near the surface, forming a thin coating which rests unconformably upon an eroded surface of the older limestone. The Suwannee River cuts across them between Hamilton, Columbia and Suwannee Counties. They are also cut by the Apalachicola River from Chattahoochee to Bristol. South of the Orbitoidal limestone area these late Oligocene formations crop out along the Hillsboro River, Tampa Bay and elsewhere. They doubtless also extend to the east in that direction underlying later formations.
The Miocene deposits, next above, lie along the east aide of the peninsula from Jacksonville to Lake Worth. Deposits representing the same time interval occur in 'est Florida from Tallahassee to Pensacola, lying between the Oligocene and the coast. Marine Pliocene deposits, consisting of marls and shell beds, occur over much of the southern end of the peninsula, being best exposed along the Caloosahatchee River. Residual and river-formed Pleistocene deposits are to be expected locally throughout the State. A Marine Pleistocene shell rock occurs along North Creek, near Osprey. Similar deposits have been reported from other localities. The Miami Oolite limestone is apparently the most extensive mrine Pleistocene deposit in the State. This Oolitic limestone is known to reach north to or beyond Ft. Lauderdale, forming the eastern boundary of the Everglades and dipping to the west. Miami, New River, and other




FW~IA O~tA)tC~At S~VE~~t AiiAL k~oI~, Pt.Al
-J.
~'L A I I~hVNF 'PPE EXOSURE OCA ALRIA




4&,NlUAL REPORT- GEOLOGY. $3
streams from the 'glades cut across it. Its present- altitude is due to a mild elevation of the east coast which occurred probably, during. or, at the close of Pleistocene time,.
The recent formations in the,,State include rock accumulations of several varieties., Loose sands are not infrequently firmly cemented by the iron deposited from chalybeate springs. A rock so formed, although comparatively recent; may, nevertheless be extremely hard. An example of such rock containing numerous snails is found
* along Sarasota Bay. Marl deposits have been observed to accumulate at the point of meeting of fresh and salt water. Coquina rock forms as a result of the more or less complete cementation of masses of shells. Sand'dunes occur along both the east and the west coasts, while shell mounds and Indian remains are found in many places.
FOSSILS CONTANED IN THE FLORIDA FORMATIONS.
The fossil record contained in the rocks of Florida is above the average in completeness. This is especially true of, the marine invertebrate fauna. From the Oligocene period to the present time there is an almost unbroken series of rock formations made up largely of the remains of such marine invertebrates as lived during the time of the.'formation of these rocks. W. H. Dall' says :* "The State.of Florida presents the most complete succession ofTegiaxy. and post-Tertiary fossil-bearing strata of any par Of the United States. Nowhere else can the, probiefpr of descent with modifications during Cenow zOic. ,ano late time be, go well studied in the fossil; and recen_ fai s" More than fifteen hundred species of
inyertelbrates hav been recognized in the, Florida formations Mid Iit is proliabj. that, a much larger number actLally1 ioqr. Aearly as. the lgfte Oligocene a .few livig .spe q f Wirpiiyertebrate appear,. The proportion of' m operp ,pecesj n ,the, fauna i.cieases witz eacji period ,. inrthst time to the present. .
*BulIl. U. S. Geol. Survey No. 84, p. 85, 182" .




24 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
The record of land life is no less interesting. The earliest land inhabitants of the State yet recorded are the land snails, the shells of which are found sparingly in the Ocala limeetone. This was during Lower Oligocene time. The peninsula land area was then, apparently, an islh d, access to which was for ordinary land vertebrates probably difficult, or even impossible. It is scarcely to be doubted, however, that birds, bats and perhaps many of the small land animals found their wa.y to the islands. An increased elevation occurred following the formation of the Lower Oligocene limestones. Evidence of this upward movement attended by subsequent depression is afforded by an unconformity between the Lower and Upper Oligocene limestones. This movement, if not actually connecting the islands with the mainland, must at least have gcreatly narrowed the intervening body of water, and may possibly have permitted land vertebrates to reach the peninsula. If so, their remains will doubtless be found imbedded in the Upper Oligocene formations.
By the close of the Chesapeake Miocene the peninsular area was sufficiently elevated to become connected directly with the continent, thus permitting free migration of land vertebrates from the continent. The remains of land animals occur most commonly in clay beds which were doubtless formed along the borders of lakes, streams, and sinks.
The land animals found in these clays include the mastodon, the elephant, the rhinoceros, the saber-toothed tiger, horses, deer, bison, tapirs, giant sloths and glyptodons. The fossil remains of these animals are widely scattered, occurring over practically all parts of the State, those which have been described come mostly from the Alachua Clays in the vicinity of Archer and Ocala; from Peace Creek in Manatee County; and from the Plio. cene beds of the Caloosahatchee River. They are probably of Pliocene and Pleistocene age. The South American representatives in this fauna came doubtless by the way of tle Isthmus of Panama after the connection of North and South America.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY FIRST ANNUAL REPORTt PL. Ilt
RIVER PERBLR PHOSPHATE MINING, ARCADIA F[ORIDA.
T YPICAL IEXPOSURH OF ('ALOOSXAfATCHIE BEDS (PLIOCENE), ( Al O's'ATH 'J'IlFFM RIVER. FLO)RID)A.




M INERAL INDUSTRIES.
PHOSPHATE.
Phosphate mining is Florida's leading mineral industry, the value of this product now exceeding six million dollars annually. Fully twelve million tons with a value of not less than forty-eight million dollars have been taken from the Florida fields from the beginning of active mining in 1888 to the close of 1907.
References to phosphate in Florida began to appear in literature as early at least as 1883. The Proceedings of the National Museum for 1882, published in 1883, contain (p. 47) an analysis of a phosphatic rock found at Hawthorne. The volume on Mineral Resources by the U. S. Geological Survey for the year 1882, published, 1883, contains a reference (p. 523) to phosphatic marl occurring in Clay, Alachua, Wakulla, Duval and Gadsden Counties. These references are repeated in Mineral Resources for 1883-84, and in addition, the occurrence of phosphatic rock between Wakulla andt the St. Marks River in Wakulla County is recorded. During 1884 and 1885 exploration of the Florida phosphate was made by Dr. Lawrence C. Johnson of the United States Geological Survey. At this time the line of phosphate was traced from Live Oak, in Suwannee County, to Ocala in Marion County. From samples examined and from popular reports phosl)hate was believed to occUr from Thomasville, Georgia, through Hamilton, Suwannee, Alachua, Marion, Sumter, and Polk Countiesto Charlotte Harbor in DeSotp County. Most of the phosphates examined by Johnson were of low grade and occur, as he himself recognized, in formations later than the Vicksburg Limestone. The high grade rock phosphate was not discovered by Johnson at this time. Some of the localities mentioned as being examined by Johnson are Preston Sink, 2j miles north of Waldo; Ft. flarley, 3j miles northwest of Waldo; the Devil's Mill Hopper near Gainesville; Simmons' Quarry, 3 miles west




ANNUAL REPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES. 27
of Hawthorne; and a locality 3 miles northwest of Newnansville.
Dr. C. A. Simmons of Hawthorne is credited by Johnson as having been the first to recognize and to make use of the Florida phosphate. Dr. Simmons is said to have recognized the phosphatic character of the Hawthorne rocks as early as 1879. A mill for grinding this rock as a fertilizer was operated as early as 1883 or 1884.
Professor Eugene Smith, State Geologist of Alabama, and also Mr. L. C. Johnson, in papers published during 1885, described the Florida phosphates and recognized the localities known up to that time as belonging to formations later than the Vicksburg.
In 1886, Dr. John Kost, State Geologist of Florida, reported phosphate deposits extending through several townships in Wakulla County between Sopchoppy and the Ocklocknee River. Samples from this locality were reported as containing as much as 23.85 per cent of phoisphoric acid, (59.05 per cent phosphate of lim).*
Phosphates along Peace River are reported to have been obsered by Captain J. Francis LeBaron as early as 1881. Again in 1886. Captaiii LeBaron made an extended investigation of the Peace River district. His plans for developing the phosphates, however, do not seem to have mct with success, and other parties took up the development of this industry. The first shipment of phosphate from the State is reported to have been made in 1888, three thousand tons having been sent during this year to Atlanta. It was during 1888, also, that rock phosphate in large quantities was discovered in Florida. While putting down a well near Dunnellon in the spring of 1888, Mr. Albertus Vogt -observed fossil teeth in a white subsoil. This material proved upon analysis to be a good grade calcium phosphate. This chance discovery resulted in the speedy location 'of extensive phosphate deposits in this and adjoining sections.
These discoveries were followed by an eXeciptionally
*Mlineial Resources, 1886, p. 617.




8FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY,
active period of development. An excessive number of mining companies were floated, transportation was inadequate, and, on account of exaggerated reports of the quantity of phosphate obtainable, prices were depressed. In spite of these conditions, however, the output, as reported by the National Geological Survey, steadily increased with succeeding years. In 1889, 8,100 tons were produced; in 1890, 46,501 tons; in 1891, 112,482 tons; in 1892, 287,343 tons, and in 1893, 438,804 tons.
The year 1894 is marked by the entrance of Tennessee into the market as a phosphate producer, 19,188 tons having been marketed from that State during that year. During this same year Florida became a leading phosphate producer, having for the first time an output in excess of that of South Carolina. The industry, moreover, was becoming established on a firmer and more rational basis and has continued to grow With succeeding years. The output since and including the year 1904 has exceeded one million tons annually. The amount produced in 1907 was 1,386,578 long tons valued at over six and a half million dollars.*
By way of comparison it may be addedthat the toial output of Florida for twenty years from 1888 to 1907 inclusive, will closely approximate the total output of South Carolina for the forty years, 1868 to 1907. The output in the United States during 1907 was 2,356,486 long tons, more than. half of which was produced in Florida. The world's output of phosphate fdr the year 1905 was something more than 3,500,000 tons. Of this amount Florida produced 1,194,106 tons, or slightly more than one-third. (Min. Resources, 1906.)
Varieties:-Phosphate is an extremely variable nineral. Four leading forms or varieties are commonly recognized in the Florida deposits. They are known as hard rock phosphate, soft phosphate, river pebble phosphate, and land pebble phosphate. No soft phosphate has been produced for a number of years. The relative amount
#U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources, for 1907, 1908.




ANNUAL REPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES. 29
of the remaining three grades produced, may be inferred from the statistics of 1906. Of hard rock there was produced in Florida. in that year 587,598 tons; of land pebbdle phosphate 675,444 tons; of river pebble phosphate 41,463 tons.
Location:-The phosphates of Florida lie principally in a comparatively narrow curved belt reaching from west of the Apalachicola River, southeast and south to the Gulf in Manatee and Lee Counties, a distance of 350 xuiles.*
The pebble phosphate occurs in the southern part of he area. The principal deposits of rock phosphate occur in the central part of the area in Columbia, Alachua, Marion and Citrus Counties.
Origin and Occurrence :-The origin and occurrence of the Florida phosphates have given rise to extended discussion, and much additional investigation will be required, in order to determine doubtful points. First of all, it is not to be assumed that all phosphates originate in the same way. Moreover, phosphates occur in several geological periods and the deposits have been subjected, since their formation, to varying conditions. Phosphoric acid in solution in the water may replace the carbonate of a limestone, forming calcium phosphate. This replacement process is clearly an agent in the formation of rock phosphate. Shells are found occasionally in which the original calcium carbonate has been changed to phosphate, proving the possibility of the formation of the mineral in this way., Phosphoric acid in quantities sufficient to form large deposits of phosphate may have been supplied from any one of several sources.
It is well known that phosphatic material in small quantities occurs widely scattered through various formations. As a rsult of the progressive decay and wearing away of the surface rock, phosphatic material is concentrated at a lower level, either mechanically, due to the
*Eldridge, G. I.; A Preliminary Sketch of the Phosphates of Florida. Trans. Am. Inst. Min. Eng., Vol XXI, 196-231.- 1893.




30 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY..
fact that the resisting power of the nodules is greater than that of the surrounding material, or chemically by the replacement process. The hard rock phosphate area has not in the view of several geologists, been continuously exposed since its first appearance above water ii Oligocene time. Later formations, originally present, are believed to have been largely removed by erosion. Phosphate, usually of a low grade, occurs in the Upper Oligocene formations in several localities between the Suwannee and the Apalachicola Rivers and in several localities in east central Florida. The Miocene deposits usually contain some phosphatic material, as do also the Pliocene. These later formations, if originally present over the Vicksburg Limestone in the hard rock phosphate section may have served as a source of phosphate which, with the decay of these rocks, accumulated either chemically or mechanically at a lower level. Several other possible sources of phosphoric acid have been suggested. Among these may be mentioned the probability of the addition of phosphoric acid to the limestone from the rookeries of birds.-The land pebble phosphate occurs in the Pliocene formation and represents apparently a stratified deposit of chemical origin.
Future of the Phosphate Industry :-An estimate of the total aiount of phosphate in Florida is diffitiilt.-The deposits are local and scattered and their extent is to be determined only by extensive prospecting. It is safe to say. however, that the industry, both in the extent of production and in the method of mining, Is still in its infancy. Practically all of the high grade phosphate produced is now exported to foreign markets. This condition is unfortunate. Phosphate is one of the earliest of soil constituents to be exhausted, and it is apparently only a matter of time until the American demand will exceed the supply. More regrettable is the waste which accompanies mining. While the phosphate companies operate as economically as present conditions will permit. a large loss in phosphate salts is known to occur.




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY FIRST ANNUAL REPORT, PL. IV
LAND PEBBLE PHOSPHATE, SHOWING BEDDED DEPOSIT.
MARTOW, FLORIDA.
PIHOSPHATE WASIII,R, BARTOW, FLORIDA.




ANNUAL REPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES. .31
CLAY,
The term clay is applied to earthy materials which possess in a varying degree the property of plasticity, or stickiness when wet. Clay consists of a mixture of several minerals, rarely if ever of a single mineral. Hydrated aluminum silicate minerals, of which kaolinite is a type, predominate. With these is found quartz, feldspar, mica. iron, and many other minerals. The mineral particles are of varying size and are mixed in widely varying proportions. Chemically, the clays are both complex and variable. This follows as a necessary result of the vary= ing proportion in which the minerals occur. The physical properties differ as widely,,as do the mineralogical and chemical constituents. Thus in plasticity, clays vary from the remarkable plastic ball clays to slightly plastic kaolins. In texture they may vary from the fine grained clay made up of particles of microscopic size to coarse grained clay grading into sands, sandstones and other rocks. Other properties as tensile strength, porosity, shrinkage, color, and fusibility depend upon the minerals present, the size of the particles, and the conditions in which they occur, all of which give rise to endless variations.
Practical tests of clays must take into account chemical and mineralogical composition, and physical properties. A chemical or ultimate analysis may serve to indicate certain properties of the clays. Thus if the total percentage of fluxing elements is high the clay may be expected to fuse easily. A mineral or rational analysis is' intended to determine in so far as possible the minerals present in the clay, and the relative proportion of each. Complete tests of the physical properties require specially adapted devices and machinery.
S Tle clays in Florida are among the promising undeveloped resources of the State. The Survey plans contemplate a thorough investigation of the clays of the State. The sandy clays suitable for road-making material will be investigated in connection with other road-making ma-




32 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVBY.
terials. The kaolin and fuller's earth deposits will be studied in detail as quickly as this work can be accomplished. Provisions will be made also for tests of brickmaking and other clays, and for the location and extent of clay deposits in the State.
PnAsTIc KAOLIN OI BALL CLAY.
The ball clays are among the most important clay products of the State. They are often called kaolins. The term kaolin, however, is best restricted to the white burning, highly refractory, and very plastic residual clays. The Florida ball clays, while they'are white burning, and highly refractory are very plastic and are of sedimentary origin. Reis suggests that they be known as plastic kaolins.' The ball clays are used largely to mix with the less plastic clays to bring up the grade of plasticity. They contain little or noiron and, are of light color, This clay as it occurs in Florida is intimately mixed with coarse sand. There is usually an overburden of a few feet of sand. This is loosened and washed into the pit by force pumps, and is thence removed by suction pumps. The presence of the sand in the clay necessitates washing, after which the clay is allowed to collect In the settling basins. It is then "compressed into cakes by which excess of water is removed. The cakes are then broken up. and either air-dried or artificially dried for shipment. The deposits at present known lie in the central peninsular section from Putnam to Polk Counties. Putnam County deposits occur in and about Edgar and McMeekin. Deposits have been located in Lake County along the Palatlakaha (Palalakaha) River.2 Ball clay has also been reported from near Bartow Junction in Polk County, which is apparently the locality farthest south at which
these, deposits have been found.
Clays, Their Occurrence, Properties and Uses. 1906, p. 165.
217th Ann. Reprt. U. S. Geol. Surv., -pt. 3 (cont.) 1895-96, p. 872.




ANNUAL REPORT-MINERAL JNDUSTRIES. 33
Four plants have been engaged in mining plastic kaolin d.uring 1907. Two of these, under the man agement of the Edgar. Plastic Kaolin Co., are located at Edgar in Put.nam County. The two, other plants are the Ricihmond Kaolin Co.,. of Richmond, Florida, and the Florida Clay Co. of Yalaha, Florida, bdth in Lake County. The total output of.kaolin during the year, as reported by the producers, was 19,615 tons, valued at $97,690.
BRICK MAKING CLAYS.
The surface deposits of north and central Florida contain many clay beds. These clay deposits are often of local extent, and usually. of variable character. The sandy clays of the Lafayette and Grand Gulf formations make up the surface deposit over much of the northern tier of counties west of the Suwannee River: Less well defined clays -of local extent and variable character occur widely in peninsular Florida. In part these are doubtless the residupm of a former southward. extent of the Lafayette; in part of other formations. Many of the clay beds of this area are too sandy for brick material. For this purpose a clay should mold easily, and burn hard at a low temperature without excessive loss from warping and cracking. Such beds as occur in Florida suitable for brick making are confined to no particular geological horizon.
FULLER'S EARTH.
Fuller's earth is a term applied to a variety of clays. These differ from other clays principally in that they are less plastic and possess in a high degree the quality of absorbing greasy substances. This earth was formerly used by fullers to remove greasy spots from cloth, from. which usage it received its name of fuller's earth.
Minerals of Fuller's Earth :-The clays, as has been stated, are as a rule complex, both chemically and mineralogically. They consist not of a. single mineral, but of a mixture of minerals. Owing to the minute size of the mineral particles, it is -usually impossible to identify the 8-GeoRepl




34 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
several minerals making up a clay. This is true of fuller's earth ,as of other clays. Under the microscope the Gadsden County fuller's earth shown angular particles of quartz together with green double refracting particles which Merrill regards as a siliceous mineral.* In fuller's earth from Arkansas, Merrill observed sharply angular colorless mineral particles, faintly double refracting, but lacking crystal outlines or other physical properties such as would determine their exact mineral nature. Angular particles of quartz and a few yellowish iron stained particles suggestive of residual products from decomposition of iron magnesia silicates were also recognized in this sample. The fuller's earth from Surrey, England, according to the same writer, consists of extremely irregular eroded particles of a siliceous mineral and of minute coldrless particles suggestive of a soda lime feldspar. Thus it may be said that while fuller's earth is known to consist like most other clays of a mixture of minerals, a satisfactory determination of these minerals has not yet been made.
Chemical Constituents :-There is a wide range in variation in the chemical constituents of different fuller's
-earths, or fuller's earth from different localities. The range of individual constituents may be inferred from the accompanying analyses,
ANALYSES OF FULLER'S EARTH FROM VARIOUS LOCALITIES.
1. 1i. 111. IV. V1 VI. Silica (SiO)......-... 62.83 67.46 58.72 50.36 74.90 63.19
Alumina (AIO3).....10.35 10.08 16.90 33.38 10.25 18.76
Ferric Oxide (Fe,20). 2.45 2.49 4.00 3.31 1.75 7.05 Lime (CaO) .......... 2.43 3.14 4.06 .... 1.30 .0.78
magnesia (MgO) ..... 3.12 4.09 2.56 .... 2.30 1.68
Potash (KO) ........ 0.74 --.1 0.21
Soda (NaO) ........0.20 2.11 1.75 1.50
Water (H20) ......... 7.72 5.61 8.10 12.05 5.80 7.57
Moisture .............. 6.41 6.28 2.30 1.70 ....
Loss on ignition ...........................11.86
*Report of the U. S. National Museum 1899, p. 333.




ANNUAL REPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES' 35
No. I. From Gadsden County, Florida. U. S. Geol. Sur. 17th An. Rept., pt. III (cont.), page 880. No. II. From Decatur County, Georgia. Ibid. No. III. From Fairburn, S. D. Ibid. No. IV. Glacialite, Enid, Okla. G. P. Merrill, Non-mc-tallie Minerals. U. S. Nat. Mus,, Rept. for 1899, p. 337, 1901. No V. From Sumter, S. C., U. S. Geol. Surv., Min. Reso., 1901, p. 933, 1902.
No. VI. From Alexander, Ark. Branner, Amer. Inst. Min. Eng.
Trans. XXVII, p. 62, 1898.
Physical Properties:-The most distinctive physical property of fuller's earth is that already mentioned, namely, the property of clarifying oils. When wet the fuller's earth is often of a lean character. This, however, is not invariable, as the Gadsden County fuller's earth is sticky when wet.
Test for Fuller's Earth :-Fuller's earth varies in color. It may be light buff, or brownish, or olive green or gray. It is not readily distinguished in general appearance from other clays. When dry fuller's earth adheres firmly to the tongue, but :some other clays are also adhesive. A practical test of fuller's earth is necessary in order to determine its value. A test may be made by the use of a glass tube j to 1 inch in diameter and 2 to 3 feet long. To make the test support the tube in an erect position, the lower end being plugged with asbestos fiber. The earth is powdered and packed into the tube. Crude oils, vegetable or mineral, are then passed through it. If the clay in a fuller's earth the oils will be more or less perfectly clarified, depending upon the quality of the earth. It has been found that a fuller's earth that will clarify a vegtable oil may not affect a mineral oil, while an earth used to clarify a Min. eral .oil may be unsatisfactory when applied to a vegetable oil. A theory of the action of fuller's earth in clarifying oils is given by Porter as follows (U. S. Geol. Surv. Bull. 31 p. 282. 1908). "Fuller's earth has for its base a series




3'6 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
of hydrous aluminum silicates., These silicates differ in chemical composition, but are similar in that they all possess an amorphous colloidal structure. These colloidal silicates possess the power of absorbing and retaining organic coloring matter, thus bleaching oils and fats."
Uses :-The Florida fuller's earth finds its chief use in filtering mineral lubricating oils. According to Day, "The common practice with these mineral oils is to; dry the earth carefully, after it has been ground to 60 mesh, and run it into long cylinders, through which the crude black mineral oils are allowed to percolate very slowly. As a result the oil which comes out first is perfectly waterwhite in color, and markedly thinner than that which fol. lows. The oil is allowed to continue percolating through the fuller's earth until the color reaches a certain maximum shade, when the process is stopped, to be continued with a new portion of earth. The oil is recovered from the spent earth.*" It is also used to some extent for light. ening the color of cotton seed oil, and lard oil, although the English fuller's earth is better for-these purposes. The original use of fuller's earth, that of cleaning, is now one of the minor uses. It is said to be used in the manufacture of some soaps. It is used in cleaning furs and by druggists as an absorbent, and recently to some extent as a carrier for insecticides.
Occurrence :-Fuller's earth occurs in stratified deposits, which, however, are often of local extent. The geological horizon in which the fuller's earth of western Florida lies has been determined by Vaughan as Upper Oligocene. The 'geological horizon of the deposit in Manatee County has not been determined.
Location and Extent--Outcrops of fuller's earth have been reported -at many other localities in Gadsden, Leon and Liberty Counties, and Decatur County, Georgia. It is reported to occur as a thin stratum in the Devil's Mill Hopper in Alachua County, and has been identified by the writer on the property of B. S. Quarterman, at Fairfield,
*U. S. Geol. Sur. 21st Ann. Rept. pt. 6, (cont.) p. 592. 1901.




ANNUAL REPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES. 37
Florida. The wide distribution of fuller's earth in north and central Florida, together with its known occurrence in south Florida, probably indicates numerous deposits not yet located'.
Production of Fuller's Earth During 1907:-Three plants were engaged in mining fuller's earth during 1907. These were the Owl Commercial Co.,Quincy; The Southern Fuller's Earth Co., Mt. Pleasant; and the Atlantic Refining Co., of Ellenton, Florida. The total amount of fuller's earth mined in the State during 1907 as reported to the Survey by the prod~hcers was 24,148 short' tons, valued at $235,443. The product is used principally in the United States, although a certain part of the 1907 product was exported to foreign markets.
PEAT.
Peat has been mined in Florida in an experimental way .for %'everal years. Two plants are now being operated during all or a part of the 'year. The Orlando Water and Light Company has operated a plant near the city of Orlando for several years. The peat at this plant, after removal from the bog, is passed through a kneading machine wjiich disintegrates the fiber and prevents reabsorption of moisture. It is then dried in the open, and after, drying is cut into convenient sized pieces for local use as a fuel. Bricketting, which was formerly used, has been abandoned by this company as impracticable for this peat. The Florida Peat Fuel and Construction Company operates a plant near Bayard in St. Johns County.
Such tests of Florida peat as have been made, have been unusually promising. The fuel and gas producing value of peat from the Orlando bog was tested in the fuel and testing plant of the U. S. Geological Survey in 1906. The report on these tests contained in Bulletin 290, p. 134-135 of the United States Geological Survey is as follows: "In connection with this test of a small quantity of




38 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
Massachusetts peat it is deemed advisable to refer briefly to a more elaborate test of peat bricks obtained from Florida, the results oL which tests have been obtained in time to be mentioned here, although the test was run subsequent to the date covered by the body of the report. In the producer-gas test of the Florida peat the producer was maintained in operation for fifty hours, and no difficulty.whatever was experienced either in maintaining the load or in handling the fuel bed. The peat was furnished by the Orlando Water and Light Company and was secured from a bog near the* city of Orlando, Orange County, Florida.
"In starting the producer test the fuel bed was built up entirely of the Florida peat, and the usual preliminary run was conducted before the official test began. The total amount of peat consumed in the producer in the fifty-hour run was 29,250 pounds, or 585 pounds per hour. The average calorific value of the gas produced was 175 British thermal units per cubic foot. During the' entire run the average electrical horsepower developed at the switchboard was 205. The amount of peat used per electrical horse power per hour available for outside purposes, including the estimated quantity required for the generation of the steam used in the operation of the producer, was 3.16 pounds, while 2.69 pounds were required per brake horsepower hour at the gas engine, available for outside purposes.
"It should be stated that the peat bricks had been dried and that the moisture content of those used averaged 21 per cent. The gas was particularly rich in hydrogen, running 18.5 per cent, and comparatively low in nitrogen (45.5 per cent).
"As there was a small supply of peat bricks left after the completion of the gas-producer tests, a short run of a little over four hours was made in the boilers. This was not sufficiently long to make any definite conclusions pos. sible, but the results obtained were exceedingly satisfactory so far as they went. No difficulty was encountered in




ANNUAL ItEPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES. 39
keeping the boiler up to its rated capacity, and, in fact, during the four hours' run the percentage of rated horsepswer of the boiler developed was 113.2. The amount of peat burned per indicated horsepower hour at the steam engine was 5.66 pounds, and per electrical horsepower huor at the switchboard was 6.98 pounds. The calorific value of the peat as used was 10,082 British thermal units per pound. The principal, difficulty in the utilization of peat under boilers appears to be the frequency with which it is necessary to fire. On account of the lightness of the material and also on account of its rapid combustion the fireman was kept at work almost constantly during the test." The details of these tests are given in a later Bulletin No. 332, pp. 76-78, 1908.
The great abundance of coal in the United States has delayed the development of the peat industry. Peat deposits are known to be extensive in this country, and with the approach of the exhaustion of coal together with the advance in price as a result of increased cost of mining attention will be directed more and more to peat as a source of fuel. In Florida, in particular, the lack of a local fuel is keenly felt. If present conditions continue the supply of wood will soon be exhausted, while the importation of coal involves heavy freight charges. If the peat bogs can be drawn upon as an addition to the fuel supply the State will be greatly benefited. Some of the European countries, as is well known, have relied upon peat as a local source of fuel for many centuries. Canada, whose coal is les9 bountiful than that of the United, States, has advanced much beyond us in the utilization of peat.
DIATOMACEOUS EARTH.
Diatomaceous or infusorial earth occurs in the State and has been mined to some extent in the vicinity of Eustis. None of this material, however, was produced during i907.




4i) FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
LIME AND CEMENT.
Lime or "quick lime" is chemically an oxide of calcium Or calcium and magnesium. It is formed ordinarily by burning limestone, although shells and other calcium carbonates may be used for the same purpose. Limestone when burned gives up carbon dioxide. The residue after burning forming a lime, consists of a calcium oxide, when a pure calcium carbonate limestone is used; or of calcium and magnesium oxide when a dolomitic limestone is used. The reaction in the case of a pure limestone is as follows. Ca(CO), when heated breaks up into CaO+(Co) 2. In the case of dolomitic limestone a magnesium oxide as well as calcium oxide is formed.
The character of the lime varies according to the amount of magnesium present in the limestone from which it is made. Peppel* offers the following classifl. cation of the ordinary or "white limes", including in that term limes containing not more than 5 per cent of sandy and clayey impurities:(1) High-calcium, or "hot" or "quick" limes. Mado from limestones containing not less than 85 per cent. of carbonate of calcium.
(2) Magnesium limes. Made from limestone containing between sixty-five and eighty-five per cent. carbonate of calcium and between ten and thirty per cent. of carbonate of magnesium.
(3) Dolomitie, or "cool", or "slow" limes. Made from limestones containing more than thirty per cent. of carbonate of magCesium.
These limes differ slightly among themselves. The high calcium or "hot" or "quick" limes set more quickly, while the magnesium and dolomitic limes set more slowly. Limes thus serve different purposes, the high caloium limes being used when a quick-setting lime is desired, while
* Bulletin No. 4, 4th Series, Ohio Geol. Survey, p. 254, 1906.




ANNUAL RPORT-MINERAL INDUSTRIES. 41
the other limes are used when slow-setting limes are desired. After calcination, the lime may be placed on the market as quick lime, or it may be slaked and placed on the market as hydrated lime. Hydrated lime is said to be desirable for certain purposes since the lime if properly slaked breaks up into exceedingly fine powder.
The Florida Lime Co., of Ocala, operated three lime plants during 1907. The limestone used is from the formation known as the Ocala Limestone, which is well exposed in and about Ocala. This formation, is, however, not restricted to Marion County, but extends as the surface formation south to Sumter County and northwest to Columbia County.
NATURAL CBM1INT.
Practically all limestones contain some sandy and clayey impurities. When the amount of clay material present exceeds a certain percentage the product resulting upon burning will set under water and is known as a natural hydraulic cement. Bleininger classes the natural cements as (1) hydraulic limes and (2) Roman cements. The hydraulic limes in this classification are those which contain from 75 to 80 per cent of calcium carbonate and from 20 to 25 per cent of clay. The Roman cements contain 50 to 75 per cent. of calcium carbonate and 50 to 30 per cent. of clay. Peppel, however, proposes to place the range of sandy and clayey matter in hydraulic limes at 5 to 10 per cent, while the range in the natural or Roman cement is given as "10 to 30 per cent. The practical distinction between the hydraulic limes and Roman cements is that the former after burning and upon exposure to the air slake by themselves and evolve considerable heat, while the latter burn to a cinder which must be ground; they also evolve less heat of hydration on slaking than do the limes.
No cements other than lime are at present being manufactured in Florida. flydraulic cement was formerly




42 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
manufactured to a limited extent from a natural cement rock near River Junction. The output from this plant in 1898 is given as 7,500 barrels.*
The formation from which the cement was made is the Chattahoochee Limestone, which is extensively exposed along the Apalachicola and Chattahoochee Rivers above and below River Junction. It is reported that the cement made from the rock at River Junction was of a good quality. It was placed on the market under the trade name of "White Roman Hydraulic Cement of Florida."
PORTLAND CEMENT.
Portland cement is made from raw materials mixed in such manner as to supply the proper constituents for cement manufacture. Ordinarily clay and some form of limestone is used. The clay supplies the silica and alumina, while the limestone supplies calcium or calcium and magnesium. Marl, chalk, or slag, or in fact, any material which supplies the necessary calcium oxide without introducing substances deleterious to the cement may be used if desired instead of limestone. Both the clay or mixture of clays and the limestone must be selected with a view to securing the right proportion of constituents in the resulting mixture. Since both clays and limestone vary greatly in composition each must be selected with a view to supplementing the other. While no Portland cement is being made at present in Florida, both clays and limestone available for this purpose doubtless occur.
SAND-LIME BRICKS.
-The materials used in the manufacture of sand-lime bricks are sand and lime. The bonding, power of the brick is due to the chemical reaction between these ingredients. The chemical changes occur in the presence of
* 90th Ann. Rept. U. S. Geol. Sur., pt. VI (cont.), p. 547. .1899.




ANNUAL II'OlT-M INEHAL INDUSTRHS. 43
heat, pressure and moisture, and result in the formation of hydro-silicates of calcium and magnesium.
The sand used in the manufacture of sand-lime brick should be comparatively pure and preferably with some variation in the size of the grains. The mixture of lime, sand, and water, is cut out in the form of bricks and conveyed to a hardening cylinder. Necessary heat and pressure is obtained in the hardening cylinder adapted for the purpose. The sand-lime bricks are placed in this cylinder and subjected to a pressure and temperature which varies according to the method of treatment. With a pressure of about tuvo atmospheres'and a temperature of 125 degrees C. the duration of exposure in the cylinder should be about seventy-two hours. With a steam pressure of seven to ten atmospheres and 170 to 175 C, six to ten hours' exposure is usually sufficient.
CONCRETE BUILDING BLOCKS, HOLLOW BLOCKS, OR ARTIFICIAL STONE.
The materials for the manufacture of concrete building blocks are sand, gravel, or crushed stone, and cement. The sand intended for use in making cement blocks should be sharp and angular. Coarse grained sand is preferred to fine grained. A mixture of coarse and* fine grained sand, however, gives excellent results, and requires less cement, since the relative proportion of voids in the sand is reduced by the presence of the fine grains of sand among the coarse. It has been commonly supposed that a clean sand must be used, but recent experiments seem to indicate that a small proportion of loam or clay is not detrimental. Tests carried on at the Ohio State University appear to indicate that clay or loam up to 15 per cent of the weight of the sand adds strength to a mortar.* Concrete building blocks havebeen, as a rule, favorably received throughout the State, The ease of manufacture, together with the relatively small cost of equipment and
*Bulletin No. 2, 4th Series, Ohio Geol. Survey. P, 33, 1904.




44 FLORIDA ONOLOICAL. SURVY..
the abundance of sand is greatly in favor of this industry. Most cities of considerable size have one or more firms engaged )n the manufacture of this material. Sand suitable for the manufacture of concrete building blocks occurs in almost all parts of the State.
MINERALS NEW TO THE STATE.
SULPHUR,
Native sulphur has been found in Florida during the past year, a large mass estimated to weigh two: tons having been brought up from the pit of the Dutton Phosphate Company, at Floral City. The phosphate at this place was worked down to the water level as a dry it and is now being worked below the water level bydredging. The mass of sulphur was brought'up on the dipper from about thirty feet below the water level, or a total depth from the original surface of about seventy feet. When first brought up the sulphur mass was mistaken for arock boulder, which being too large to go through the dipper, was drilled. into and blasted. Most of the pieces fell back into the pit, a few thrown on the land were found to be crystallized sulphur with only a slight adxnixture of impurities. The phosphate beds of Citrus County rest upon Lower Oligocene limestone. The sulphur was found either upon or in Oligocene limestone.
PROBABLD SOURCE OP SULPHUR.
In a Bulletin on the Water Supply whidh accompanies this report the writer has disegesed in some detitl the probable source of hydrogen sulphide ir underground waters. It is there shown that the hydrogen sulphidebi underground water is supplied not fr6m, deposits of native sulphur, but from decayhig.rg*iie'matterand' from .sulphides and sulphittes conned in the rock. .-It I0 as shown that hydrogen sulphide, while not originatingfrqm




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY FIRST ANNUAL BEPORTe PL. V
J44
..... ....
FLOWING WE&LLNERrLTA




ANNUAL REPOR'--MINERAL INDUSTRIES. 45
sulphur deposits may itself, under proper conditions, form such deposits. This gas, although not affected by oxygen when dry is, under moist conditions, or in the presence of water containing oxygen in solution slowly oxidized, forming sulphur and water.
In, view of these facts, it seems probable that the sul phur mass found at Floral City was formed by the decomposition of hydrogen sulphide gas slowly escaping from the underground waters, the reaction taking place in the presence of a limited supply of oxygen.
While only a small quantity of sulphur has been found in Florida, if the above suggestion as to the origin is correct, the presence of this mineral in workable, quantities is not impossible and is indeed even probable.
MINERAL WATERS.
The springs of Florida are famous for their volume of flow as Well as for the clearness and beauty of their water and the beautiful scenery about them. Many of these springs are used as health resorts. The United .States Geological Survey volume on Mineral Resources reports the sale of mineral waters in'Florida for 1907 as 43,430 gallons, valued at $12,378.
The areas in which flowing artesian wells are obtained are indicated on the imnp which accompanies Bulletin No.
1 of the Florida Survey.




ROAD MAKING MATERIALS.
The rocks of the earth's crust may'be classed for convenience of a brief tieatment as either igneous or sedimentary. The igneous rocks are those which appear with more or less certainty to have cooled from a molten condition, such as trap, basalt, obsidian, and the granites. The sedimentary rocks are those which are formed by the accumulation of sediments. The sediments may be of purely mechanical origin as in the case of sandstones, shales and clays; or of organic origin as in the case of the limestones. In a broad sense, the sedimentary rocks are made to include even those which are of chemical origin, such as bog iron ore formations. Should one attempt a minute and exhaustive classification of rocks these two main divisions would be found insufficient. Chemical changes are going on incessantly in the earth's crust and affect all rock formations. Chemical and physical forces have in many instances so profoundly altered formations that it is no longer possible to determine whether they were originally igneous or sedimentary. It has been found necessary to establish for these a third division known as metamorphic rocks. With regard to the Florida deposits, however, the classification is not greatly complicated.
The following summary relates to the rock materials occurring within the State, and available for country roads at a slight expense. The more expensive products used in paving city streets are not included.
-No igneous formations occur in Florida. All of the rocks of this State are sedimentary. Two classifications are given below. In the first the rocks are classified according to origin; in the second according to chemical composition.




ANNUAL RiPORW-ROAD MATBRIAL5, 47
ROCKS OF FLORIDA CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO ORIGIN.
Rocks of[Sandstones,
Mechanical origin... Shales, Clays.
IShell limestone,
Organic-origin ............ Infusorial earth,
Muck, peat, lignite.
Formed by pre Bog iron ore, 'cipitation and j Qolitic limestone, chemical segre- Land pebble phosChemical origin gation. phate (?) "
k." Flint or chert, Fore by r- Crystallized 1 i m e. Formed by re tone, placement. 1Hard rock phosphate (in part).
ROCKS OF FLORIDA CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO CHEMICAL COMPOSITION.
Disregarding mode of origin and placing the rocks according to chemical composition, the classification may be arranged as follows: r FltLn and chert,
Siliceous rocks........... Sandstone,
Infusorlal earth.
Clay,
Argillaceous rock .......... Shale.
r Shell limestone,
* .Crystallized limestone,
Calcareous rock ........... Oolitic limestone,
L Marl.
* Carbo-Hydrates ........... Muck, peat, lignite.
Ferruginous rocks ........'Bog iron ore.
a rHard rock phosphate,
.............Phosphat.....c. I Pebble phosphate.




48 FLORIDA GBOLOGICAL SURVBY.
SILICHoUS ROCKS :-FINT AND CHERT.
Flint is chemically an oxide of silica SiO2 with more or lees accompanying impurities. It is a variety of the mineral quartz, occurring massive and non-crystallized or more accurately very imperfectly, crystallized (cryptocrystaline). The term chert is often used interchangeably' with flint. Properly chert is an impure flint or flinty rock. Flint and chert are lacking in cleavage. They break, as do the other varieties of quartz, with conchoidkl fracture. A flint rock when crushed breaks into sharp cornered pieces of varying size.
Properties :-The mineral quartz, of which flint is a variety, has a hardness of seven on a scale in which the hardest mineral diamond, is ten. The varieties of quartz vary in hardness slightly according to the impurities that they contain. Silica is one of the least soluble of minerals and among the most resistant to decay.
Occurrence of Flint and-Chert in FlorIda :-Flint and chert occur mostly as masses or "horsebacks" in the limestone formations. A good illustration of the manner of occurrence may be seen in phosphate pits or in some of the pits of the Florida Lime Co., at Ocala. In some of the. sinks on Thompson's -farm two miles east of Sumterville will be seen flint niasses exposed by the natural decay of the limestone. The flint masses appear to conform to no rule as to size and extent. A flint may form a ridge running through the limestone; or again they occur as rounded or elongate masses. Occasionally the flint forms as a thin stratum lying horizontally. This flint bearing limestone lies at no great distance from, the surface throughout all of the central peninsular section of the
State from Columbia County on the north to Sumterv.
County on the south and from the Suwannee River and the Gulf coast to east Alachua and Marion Countips. Much of the hard rock phosphate rests upon and in this flint-bearing limestone, and from the. phosplhate pits great qnantities of the flint may be obtained. Occasional flint




ANNUAL REPORT-ROAD MATERIALS. 0
hills such as that crossed near Evinston and Micanopy stand out as evidence of the resistance of flint to the weathering agencies, the suitounding limestone having disappeared through erosion. This flint-bearing limestone is known as the Vicksburg Limestone. It is not to be inferred, however, that no other Florida formation contains silica. On the contrary, many of the formations are highly siliceous. The Vicksburg Limestone is, however, the chief flint-bearing formation of Florida.
Origin of the Flint in the Vicksburg Limestone :-T]ie flint occurs as has been stated, in masses irregularly distributed through the limestone. Well drillers can bear witness to the frequency of flints and to their distribution through the limestone to a great 'depth. The flint masses were clearly not present in the limestone as originally formed. This formation when not affected by chemical change consists typically of a mass of calcarou& shells of varying size from minute foraminifera to larger bivalves and gastropods with which is interbedded coral and other fossils, along with a limited amount of siliceous material supplied principally by sponge spicules. Originally, without doubt the limestone consisted largely of the remains of these calcarous shells, the flint masses having been subsequently deposited through the agency of underground water. Water in its round of circulation through surface and deeper formations takes silica as well as other substances into solution. In the course of its. circulation through the limestone the silica in solution iff the water replaces the calcium carbonate of the limestone. The direct evidence that the flint masses are formed by the replacement process is to be had from the examination of a piece of flint. In this it will be seen that the foraminifera and other shells which were originally calcarous have been changed to silica. The replacement process isby no means confined to the formation of flints. As mentioned in the introduction to this chapter, chemical changes are constantly going on among the minerals making up the rock formations, and replacement of one min4-GeoRepl




5* FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURYMY.
eral by another is one of the important phases of chemical change. This process is again referred to in treating of the limestones.
CALCAREOUS MATERIAL.
Calcareous road materials occur in form of shells, shell and coral limestones, oolitic limestone, and marls. All of these rocks consist essentially of calcium carbonate or of the double carbonate of calcium and magnesium, and have certain features in common. They are much less resistant to wear than is quartz. When pure and crystallized the mineral calcite (CalO8) has a hardness of only three in the-scale in which quartz is seven and diamond is ten. It is thus much softer than the steel tires of wagons, and a chief item in the repair ,of calcareous roads arises from the fact that steel tires cut holes in the soft material. On the other hand, an advantageous property of calcareous material is the readiness with which it re-cements itself. *Calcium carbonate dissolves to an appreciable extent in water containing CO2 gai or weak organic acids. Chemical readjustment is therefore rapid in a mass of ground up or broken calcareous rock, the dissolved calcium carbonate acting as a cementing miaterial.
In practical application, the physical condition in which these naterials occur must be taken into consideration. In the case of recent shells the calcium carbonate is in a compact amorphous condition. The shells of a shell limestone are usually more brittle and often crumble easily. The oolitic limestone is made up of innumerable minute
-round concretions barely large enough to be readily visible to the eye. These are held together by a calcareous cement. After crushing the particles re-cement more or less perfectly. The marls are calcareous deposits containing more or less clayey impurities; they usually fall apart readily. More or less perfectly crystallized limestone occurs locally in the State. Its formation is prob-




ANNUAL REIORT-ROAD MATERIALS*
ably due to a replacement process similar to that described for flint and chert. The chemical changes in this case involve a rearrangement of the constituent molecules as a result of which the non-crystallized material of the rock assumes a definite form. When partly crystallized the limestone becomes compact and close grained.
]Distribution and' Amount of Calcareous Rocks :-The calcareous rocks are widely distributed in the State. The Vicksburg Limestone, as already stated, lies at or neartho surface over much of central Florida. Oolitic limestones make up an extensive formation running north and south from Miami and forming the east border of the Everglades. Coral and oolitic limestones form the foundation of the keys from Miami to Key West. Shell limestone occurs extensively along the Caloosahatchee River. Tampa Bay affords a compabt limestone which ofteil carrie much silica.' The Chattahoochee series of compact limestones occurs extensively in parts of west Florida. The marls are usually of local occurrence and are restricted to no part of the State Shells, thanks to the oyster industry of the present, and to the shell mound builders of the past, occur in inexhaustible quantities.
ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS-ROAD-MAKING CLAYS.
Fine grained clay mixed in proper proportion with coarse, angular quartz, makes a road that has been found useful where cheapness of construction is necessary, and where the roads have light travel. In mixing sand and clay for road purposes the proportion should be so adjusted that there is jtist enough clay in the mixture to fill the voids or interstices between the grains of sand. If too little clay is added the sand grains will lack bonding poWer and will not compact into a solid roadbed. If tog. much clay is added, the sand grains are widely separated and the road behaves much as though the sand were not present at ail.. The amount of clay necessary t. mix with a given volume of any particular sand may be




52 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
roughly determined by ascertaining the amount of water necessary to fill the interstices of the sand. A simple procedure recommended in Farmer's Bulletin No. 311, U. S. Department of Agriculture, p. 10, is as follows: "Two ordinary glass tumblers of the same size are filled to the brim, one with dry sand to be tested and the other with water. The water is then poured carefully from the one glass into the sand in the other until it reaches the point of overflowing. The volume of water removed from the glass which was originally full of water can be taken as an approximate measure of the voids in- the unit volume of sand contained in the tumbler. A simple calculation will reduce this to percentage volume."
Since all clay contains more or less sand, it may be expected that certain localities will supply clay that contains, the right admixture of sand and clay to form a natural sand-clay road, or so pearly the proper admixture that it will serve that purpose satisfactorily. Fortunately for Florida, almost every county is supplied with an abundance of clay which serves admirably the purpose of road-making. The widespread occurrence of sandy clays in the north, west and central Florida has already been mentioned. The clay in many of these deposits contains sand and clay so proportioned as to make excellent roads. With this material at hand road construction in country sections is carried on 4 a minimum expense, and the resulting roads, while not all that could be desired, are a great improvement over the ordinary sand roads.
They find their greatest usefulness in country sections where cheapness in road-making is necessary. Their special usefulness arises from the fact that owing to their widespread occurrence they can often be obtained from pits near at hand, thus lessening the expense of transportation. Many of these clays have the disadvantage of being sticky after rains. In the open country, however, 'where these roads find their greatest usefulness a part only of the road is clayed, the remainder of the road remiining sandy is traveled during seasons of rain, at which time




ANNUAL REPORT-ROAD MATERIALS, 53
the sand is compact and hard. Thus the sand roads and the clayed roads supplement each other.
The road-making clays are of a red or yellowish color, indicating a high percentage of iron compounds which probably assist in the bonding power of the material. In texture the clay is rather coarse, and breaks up readily.
BOo IRON Ottu.
Bog iron ore occurs in various parts of the State, but usually in thin deposits and of local extent. It has been stated by Shaler, (U. S. Geological Survey, 15th Ann. Rept., p. 272, 1895), that where the surface of a limestone road can be covered with iron ore, the firmness of the mass is much increased. An iron oxide, such as bog iron ore, serves as a cementing material, and this is doubtless the explanation of its usefulness for this purpose.
PIHOSPhIATIC R OCK.
Phosphate of a too low giade or too high in objectionable impurities to work commercially may serve in some localities as a useful road rock. The hard rock phosphate is harder than limestone and is reported to have better cementing qualities.




S
GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS IN FLORIDA
PREVIOUS TO THE ORGANIZATION OF THE
PRESENT GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
The record of the geological investigations in Florida as contained in the literature, is briefly summarized in the following pages. It has been found impossible to mention all of the important papers, and only those which are especially necessary to an understanding of the course of development of the geological researches in this State are included. In the bibliography at the end of the chapter will be listed all the titles that have been found relating to the geology of Florida. This summary is given in the beginning of the State Survey's work in order to take stock, as it were, of the results already arrived at in this field. The numbers given in parenthesis in the text refer to the bibliography.
A number of references to Florida Geology occur in publications issued previous to the acquisition of the territory of Florida by the United States in 1821. M. Catesby as early as 1771, wrote on the natural history of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (24), and in 1791, William Bartram published the.first edition of his travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia and east and west Florida (15). Bartram's account is of interest as being one of the early publications based upon direct observations. William McClure's memoir, "Observation on the Geology of the United States," includes mention of Florida along with the other coastal plains States. The first edition of this work appeared in 1809 in the Transaction of the American Philosophical Society (141); A second edition revised and enlarged was published in book form in 1817, and in the "Transactions" for 1818. The science of Geology at this early date was very imperfectly developed as may be inferred from the fact that McChire accepts the Wernerian classification. Florida was believed to belong entirely to the formation known




ANNUAL REPORT-EARflY INlESTIGATIONS. 55
as, the Alluvium, the fourth division in the Wernerian 'system.
A paper by John Finch entitled "Geological Essay on the Tertiary Formations in America," published in the American Journal of Science for November, 1823 (69), is credited byProfessor William B. Clarke (25) as the first attempt to correlate the deposits of the coastal plains on scientific grounds. This paper refutes the prevalent idea that the coastal plains consist entirely of alluvium. With regard to this point, Finch states, page 32, that:
"In America, an immense tract of country, extending from Long Island to the sea of Mexico, and from thirty to two hundred miles in width, is called an alluvial formation, by most of the geologists who have written upon the subject, and by'some It appears to be considered as an exception to the general arrangement and position of strata, which are. found to occur in other Jounfriis.
"From an examination of fossils brought from that quarter of the United States, from a personal inspectidn of some of the strata, and the perusal of most of the publications. which bear a reference to it, I wish to suggest that what is termed the alluvial formation, in the geological maps of Messrs. Maclure and Cleaveland, is identical and contemporaneous with the newer secondary, and tertiary formations of France, England, Spain, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Poland, Iceland, Egypt and Hthdoostan'
Specimens of Florida clays from Escambia Bay, seven miles above Pensacola, contained in the Academy of Natural Science of Philadelphia are mentioned, (p. 37.)
A paper published the following year, 1824, by R. Dietz, contains a description of the coquina rock of Anastasia Island at St. Augustine (63). In a note appended to this paper Thomas Say identifies and lists the shells contained in a rMass- of the coquina rock.
The territory of Florida, "A recent and valuable acquisition to the United States", is described by James Pierce in a paper published' in 1825 (158). This paper, like Bartram's, is based aipon:actual explorations. Central Fl0rida was visited by-Pierce'ahd the topographic features. accu-




56 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
rately described, including the limestone rock, sinks, natural wells, subterranean streams, "savannas" or 'prairies." lakes and hammock lands. A great savanna, believed to be one hundred miles in circumference, located in south Florida (presumably the Everglades), is reported (p. 124) as having been seen by Colonel Gadsden. Theexistence of a large permanent lake located by maps in the southern part of the peninsula (evidently referring to Lake Okee'thobee) is doubted.
A paper by Charles Upham Shepard, published in 1833 (182) is of interest chiefly from the quotations which are incorporated front Bartram' and others, describing the springs of Florida. In referring to Manatee Spring and to a sink described by Bartram as "near Tallahassee," this writer evidently confuses the present city of Tallahassee with the ancient Indian village of Tallahasochte, which was located on the Suwannee River.
A paper published in 1838 by Henry Whiting (205) contains an interesting description of Florida, including some observations of geologic interest. The coraline formations of the keys is noted, the shell formation of the upper St. Johns River is mentioned, and the coquina rock at St. Augustine described. It is interesting to note that at this date both the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee are referred to in doubtful terms.
The next group of papers of importance appeared in 1846. One of these, by John H. Allen (11), entitled '-Some Facts Respecting the Geology of Tampa Bay," gives an accurate description of the limestone alqng the Hillsboro River, together wi th a partial list of fossil shells contained in the limestone. Allen falls into the error of regarding the limestone at Tampa Bay as identical with the limestone of the interior,a including that observed by him in central Florida, and that reported to occur in the Everglades.
T. A. Conrad accompanied an expedition sent out by the Navy Department during the winter of 1842 under the command of Capt. Powell. The expedition visited the




FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY FIRST ANNUAL REPORT, PL. VI ,,
[...1_.
-1 _t i. t4%4THE EVERGLADES, FROM THE SOUTH TO THE NORTH DRAINAGE CANAL-




ANNUAL REPORT-EARLY INVESTIGATIONS. 57
St. Johns River and subsequently made its way around the coast past Key West to Tampa Bay. The steamer having entered the St. Johns River, Conrad was able to etamine the banks near the early village of Hasard. The banks which are here elevated some feet above the water level, were identified by him as a Post-Pliocene formation. The limestone of the Florida Keys was examined and likeWise identified as Pogt-Pliocene. These observations, with others along Tampa Bay, form the basis of the conclusion that a considerable elevation of the whole of the Florida peninsula occurred in Post-Pliocene time, "a movement which clearly has raised all the Florida keys above water"
(28). Arriving at Tampa Bay, the objective point of the expedition, many of the islands and the coast generally as well as the banks of the Hillsboro River to the falls were examined. The formations were regarded as belonging probably to a member of the Upper Eocene period. The second paper by Conrad (29) contains descriptions of a number of species from the "Upper Eocene limestone of Tampa Bay.", Conrad had not personally examined the limestone of the interior and like Allen, fell into the error of supposing that the limestone examined at Tampa Bay was the same as the limestone underlying the interior of the State. These papers by Conrad are of interest as being the first to refer the Florida formations to definite geologic horizons. The entire chain of keys are referred to the Post-Pliocene, while the limestone along Hilisboro Bay are regarded as Eocene.
The report of Buckingham Smith on the Everglades of Florida, addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury in 1848, contains observatibns on the geology (185). The presence of shells belonging to recent species was observed in the Miami oolitic limestone and the Post-Pliocene age of the formation recognized.
Two papers of note dealing with the geology of Florida appeared in 1851. One of these by J. W. Bailey, published in the Smithsonian Contribution to Knowledge, (13) describes fossil polythalamia (foraminifera) from the lime-




K FLORIDA' GIOLOGICAL SURVEY.
stone forty miles west of Palatka, and an infusorial stratum near Tampa. Bailey's description of the silicified foraminifera is of interest as being an early record Of the true character of the white Orbitulite limestone of central Florida. Subsequent observations seem to indicate that the supposed infusorial stratum is less distinctly infuso. rial than was believed by Bailey. (Dall, 45, p. 115).
The second paper of this year is by Tuomey, entitled "Notice of the Geology of the Florida Keys and of the Southern Coast of Florida". (196), Tuomey visited the Florida Keys during the summer of 1850 and recorded his observations the following year in the American Journal of Science. The oolitic structure of the limestone at Key West is noted. The large masses of corals that often occur in the limestone of the Keys were observed and reported by him in this paper. With regard to the elevation of the Keys which has been previously postulated by Conrad, Tuomey, says (pp. 392-393):
"There can be no doubt that this great chain f Keys diverging from Key Biscayne extending oler a distance of one hundred and fifty miles, and having an average breadth of fifteen miles, is due to the elevation of vast uneven coral reef whose prominent points rising above the water, form the foundation of the Keys the sands driven up by the waves having done the
rest."
Tuomey agrees with Conrad in referring the limestone at Tampa to a tertiary formation older than the Miocene. Tuomey examined the limestone at the mouth of the Miami River and at the falls of the Miami leading into the Everglades, and describes it as being of the same age as that at Key -West, the shells, as previously pointed out by B. Smith, being identical with the shells living in. the surrounding water. Tuomey regards the Everglades as resting upon a vast basin of the Miami. Limestone. Tuomey distinguishes clearly betweeh this limestone and the Tertiary limestone occurring at Tampa Bay. The mainland along the east coast like the Keys have, in the opinion of Tuomey, been elevated. He sats, (p. 394):




ANNUAL REPORT-EARLY INVESTIGATIONS.
"The contour of the ridge surrounding the 'Everglades,' takes together with the structure of the rock of which it is composed, and imbedded organic rema. s, leads very strongly to the conelusion that it once occupied a position similar to that now occupied by the Keys. And it is evident that an elevation of the Keys of about ten or twenty feet would produce a similar ridge, shutting out the sea from the space, at present, between the reef and the mainland, and producing a second 'Everglade,' differing from the present only in Its greater comparative length."
A paper by Agassiz on the "Florida Reefs, Keys and Goast" appeared in 1852, (6). The Florida Keys were examined and described by him in considerable detail. Agassiz expresses the view that the growth of the keys above the surface of the water is due solely to materials accumulated as a result of the action of the wind and waves. He states (p. 153):
"That part of the Keys which rises above the level of the
water is, therefore, a sub-aerial and not a submarine accumulation of floating matter, thrown above high-water mark by the tempestuous action of the water. We insist upon the fact, that the Keys furnish in themselves, by the internal structure of their rock, the fullest evidence that they have been formed above high-water mark by the action of gales and hurricanes, instead of having grown as a reef up to the water level, and been subseqently raised to their present height. The evidence of this statement rests upon certain facts obtained from observation of the reef itself, at Sand Key and the Sambos."
OJi this point Agassiz's views are thus in opposition to the. previously expressed views of Conrad and Tuomey. After having examined the Keys, Professor Agassiz examined the rocks along .the mainland. These he found to be of the same structure as the rocks of the Keys. He states on page 156 that:
"Along all that part of the shore which was examined, as well as .upon the shores of the Miami, we found everywhere the same coarse, oolitic rock, with cross-stratification, consistlng of thin beds, dipping at various angles in different directions, precisely as we find it at the western extremity of Key




60 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
West, excepting, perhaps, that the cross-stratification is here more prominent, the strata dipping more frequently in several directions within the same extent."
Notwithstanding the considerable elevation which the rocks along the mainland attain in the vicinity of Miami, Agassiz was of the view that these rocks, like the rocks of the Keys, had been built above water level by the action of winds and tides. He says on page 156:
"We are satisfied that as far as coral formations have been
observed upon the main-land of Florida and within the present extent of the coral reefs, no change of the relative level has taken place either by subsidence or upheavel of the coral ground, and that all the modifications which the reef has presented at successive periods have been the natural consequence of the growth of reef-building corals, wit4 the subsequent accumulation of their productsin the manner described
above."
The conclusions of Agassis with regard to the gradual growth of the peninsula through the agency of corals have given rise to much discussion. On page 157 of this publication he says:
"There we have a peninsula-a narrow, flat strip of land,
projecting for about five degrees from the mainland, between the Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, and forming an effective barrier between the waters of the two seas, which otherwise, even by the change of a few feet in the relative level of the intervening peninsula, would communicate freely with one another; and this peninsula we now know to have been added to the continent, step by step, in a southerly direction.
'"We know that the time can not be far behind us when the
present reef, with its few keys, did not exist. and when the channel, therefore, was broader, and -the Gulf Stream flowed directly along the main range of keys. We know further, that at some earlier period the keys themselves were not yet formed, and that then the channel between Cuba and Florida was wider still, washing freely over the grounds now known as the mud fiats, between the keys and the mainland, and that there was then nothing to impede a free communication between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic ocean. The channel of the Gulf Stream was not only wider-it was also less shallow along its northern borders, for the whole extent of




ANNUAL REPORT-EARLY INVESTIGATIONS. 61
soundings south of the mainland of Florida was an uncovered coral ground, upon which the deep-water species were just beginning to spread. But we may trace the change farther'. There was a time when neither the southern bluffs of the continent, nor Long Key within the Everglades, nor even the Everglades themselves, existed; when, therefore, the Gulf Stream had a broad communication with the Atlantic and the southern shores of the United States extended in almost unbroken contiguity from west to east, from the shores of Texas and Louisiana to St. Augustine. At that time the Gulf channel was, in reality, a broad bay, as broad, as the Gulf itself, destitute of all those obstructions which now cause the tropical current to follow such a circuitous course between the West 1ndia islands, through the Caribbean Seas, and around the peninsula of Florida. The influence which the Gulf Stream has upon the climate of the Atlantic is so well known, that its connexion with the changes which the current itself has undetgone within a comparatively recent period cannot be overlooked."
"We have seen how successfully severl refs have been formed, more or less parallel, within the limits of the peninsula of Florida, as well as beyond the mainland. We have seen, also, how these parallel or concentric reefs have been gradually transformed into mainland by the accumulation of coral sand and mud with other loose materials, and also that the keys are now slowly annexed to the mainland by the same process."
A series of rock samples obtained by Agassiz in the course of his investigations of the keys were examined by iorsford and reported upon in two papers, the first of which was published in the Proceedings of the Axuerican Association for the Advancement of Science, and with some chages in the American Journal of Science (100). The second paper (101), was called'out by criticism of the first by Professor Dana, and is occupied with a defense of his earlier paper. The chief conclusions of thesg papers are:
"1. That the submerged or oolitic rock has been solidified
by the infiltration oi finely powdered (not dissolved) carbonate of lime, increasing the points of contact; and the intro-




#2 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVNY.
duction of a small quantity of animal mucilaginous matter, ser hig the same purpose as the carbonate of lime, that .of increasing the cohesive attraction. "2. That the surface or crust rock has been solidified b having, in addition to the above agencies, the ikid of a serie of chemical decompositions and recompositlons, resulting is the formation of a cement."
With regard to the source of lime in corals Horeftrd concludes that:
"The carbonate of lime of corals may be due to the decomposition of the sulphate present in sea-water with the exhaling carbonate of ammonia from coral animals yielding insoluble carbonate of lime on the one hand, and soluble sulphate of ammonia on the other."
The General Assembly of Florida passed an act in 186 establishing the office of State Engineer and Geologist. The geological part of the work, however, seems not to have been provided for. The first report of the State Engineer and Geologist occupies pages 19-36 of Documents accompanying the Message 9f the Governor of Florida, submitted November 28, 4854. That part of the report relating to geology occurs on page 20 of the appendix and nads as follows:
"Ox the subJect of the Geology of the State, I have
made no report, from the fact that the General Assembly failed to specify any duties or make any appropriations to defray any expenses incurred in reference to the matter. Consequently nothing has beendone by me, except to obtain specimens of soils and minerals from the various localities (where marked changes were perceptible); visited by me in the performance of the duties of Engineer."
,
The office of State Engineer and Geologist was abolished by an act of the Legislative Assembly of 1855.
A paper by Professor John LeConte published in 1861 is of interest in its geological .relation, from the fact that the writer describes the character of the Florida limestone accurately, stating that it consists typically of a man of shells, with occasional masses of flint. (117). The




ANNUAL RPORT-EARLY INVESTIGATIONS.
writer had probably not seen the papers by Agassiz jand Joseph LeConte, since he makes no reference to them, although his conclusion that the limestone about Silver $Prings is probably of the Eocene period is not in accord with the views of these two earlier writers.
Professor Joseph LeConte accompanied Agassiz during the winter of 1851 in his explorations of the Florida Keys, and published a paper in 1857 supporting and developing the views of Pofessor Agassiz (118). He agrees with Agassiz that the growth of the peninsula has been due to succssive reefs, and that the elevation of the keys above water is due to wind and tide and not to elevation. LeConte is of the view, however, that the coral agencies are not alone sufficient to account for the growth of the peninsula, since as is well known corals do not grow. at a greater depth than ten to twenty fathoms. To account for the successive reefs concentrically disposed from the north to the south, he invokes the agency of the Gulf reama. LeConte's theory was that the Gulf Stream carried sediment which formed the foundation of the keys. This view necessitates the assumption that the Gulf Stream has shifted farther and farther to the south with the growth of the peninsula until it has come to occupy its present position.
Hunt contributes to a knowledge of the keys in a paper published in 1862, republished in 1863 (103). This writer during a residence of five seasons at Key West, 1857-1862, during which time he was in charge of the construction of Ft. Taylor, was able to observe closely the structure of the keys. Hunt calls attentiowto the extent of the line of keys to the south and southwest. Hunt agrees with Agassiz in the view that there has been no recent elevation of the keys, but objects to LeConte's theory that sediment carried by the Gulf Stream forms the substructure. Thi} substructure, he believes, to be formed of organic material resulting from shells and corals distrib. uted by a return eddy from the Gulf Stream. The ex-




6 ~~~ ... 1,"., St.I V Ye 64 _v' .It IuuF
istence of this return eddy accounts also for the gradual extension of the keys to the west.
In 1865 T. A. Conrad identified three species of invertebrates from the Ocala Limestone. These were found to be Eocene species of California, Maryland and New Jersey. Conrad refers the Ocala rock to the period of the Shark River marl of New Jersey. This paper, (31), like the one by Professor John LeConte, is of interest as identifying the limestone of Florida as Eocene, notwithstanding the papers of earlier date by Agassiz and Joseph LeConte, both of which writers regarded the deposits j the State as of comparatively recent date.
A paper published in 1881 by Professor Eugene A. Smith (186) is of great importance as being the first paper to correct the erroneous views regarding the coral formation of Florida. The underlying limestone of the interior of Florida was identified by him as the Vicksburg Limestone, and was traced by actual outcroppings from Jackson County in west Florida, through middle Florida to Marion County, in south-central Florida. From his own observations and from observations of others, Smith was brought to the conclusion (p. 298): "That almost the whole of the State of Florida, 1rpm the
Perdido River of the west, eastward and southward, including the middle and western -parts of the peninsula certainly as far south as the latitude of Tampa Bay, and probably as far as the latitude of Charlotte Harbor, has for its underlying formation the White or Orbitoldes limestone of Vicksburg age."
It is now known that the supposed southward extent of the Vicksburg, based principally on the observations of others, was much too great. The essential facts remain, however, that Smith correctly identified the Vicksburg limestone as the foundation rock of the interior of tentral Florida. Smith records in this paper for the first time the presence of Miocene deposits in ,Florida, an exposure having been examined by him at Rock Springs in Orano County. N.




ANNUAL REPORT-EARLY INWESTIGATIONS. 65
Rock specimens collected by Wilcox enabled Professor Angelo Heilprin to determine in 1882 definitely the existence of a nummilitic limestone in Florida. The specimens examined were taken from the neighborhood of the Chesehouiska River about four miles from ths coast. The nummulites were associated in the specimens examined with recent land and fresh water shells. The presence of the genus Orbitoides, however, leads to the conclusion that the formation represents the European nummulitic either Eocene or Oligocene (80.)
Professor Alexander Agassiz' bulletin on Tortugas and the Florida Reefs appeared in 1883 (1). Agassiz' investigations led him to the conclusion previously stated by Hunt that the Florida keys had been elongated westward due to the return eddy-current of the Gulf Stream. This return eddy-current was found to carry an abundance of food supply for corals.
Professor Joseph teConte in 1883, following the appearance of Agassiz' bulletin, recognizes that the sediment forming the foundation of the Florida keys could not have been deposited by the Gulf Stream. On this point he accepts the conclusion of Hunt and A. Agassiz that the sediment is of organic origin. In view of the investigation of Smith on the Geology of Florida. LeConte conceded also that the process of addition of land to Florida by the combined agencies of the Gulf Stream and corals could not have commenced north of the north shore of the Everglades (119.).,
Two papers relating to Florida were published by Reilprin in 1884. In the first of these (81), this writer gives further reasons for regarding the Florida limestone as of Vicksburg age and for accepting Conrad's reference of the Vicksburg limestone to the Oligocene. In a summary of the geology of Florida in this paper, Heilprin repeats his observations of the occurrence of nummulitie rock along the west coast, and reviews the additions to a knowledge of the geology of the State contributed by Professor Smith. This paper contains a map (in" colors)
5-Geoflep-1




"16 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
'of the Tertiary formations of the Atlantic and Gulf States. The map of Florida is based upon Professor Smith's earlier map. The Vicksburg is mapped as reaching to Lake Okeechobee and the borders of 'the Everglades, the error of regarding the Tampa Limestone as identical with the Vicksburg not having yet been corrected. In the second paper of this yeaT (82), Heilprin dese-ibes some new foraminifera from the nummulitic formation of Florida.
Papers by Smith (188) and by Joinson (104), in 1885, record a much greater extent of Miocene deposits over the peninsula of Florida than has been previously supposed.
In 1887 Heilprin's exploration of the west coast of Florida and the Okeechobee Wildernes appeared (92). This publication contains a narrative of a journey along the west coast of Florida from Cedar Keys to the Caloosahatchee River, and thence to Lake Okeechobee, made by Mr. Heilprin, in company with Mr. Joseph Wilcox, in the winter of 1885-'86. A statement of the geological results of this expedition was contained in an advance publication which appeared in 1886 (91). Heilprin points out the fact that with regard to the supposed coral origin, the evidence is very strong, that the structure of the peninsula even beyond Lake Okeechobee is of organic and' inorganic material accumulated in the normal way. He also calls attention to the uninterrupted section from the Oligocene to the present, the gradual change in the invertebrate life and to the evidence of the gradual elevation of the peninsula.
Dr. J. Kost published in 1887 a "First Report of the Geological Survey of Florida". This paper derives an added interest from the fact that it was prepared under the authority of the State. Dr. Kost was appointed State Geologist of Florida by Governor Perry in 1886, with the expectation that a continuance of the Geological Survey would be provided for by the Legislative Assembly of the following year. This expectation, however, was not realized. Dr. Kost's report contains observations on the




ANNUAL REPOWJ-I-ARLY INVESTIGATIONS. 6T
geology, physical geography, soils and timber, with remarks on the phosphates, lime, marls, clays, iron, coal, building stone, and mineral waters. (114.)
In a paper published in 1888, Mr. Lawrence C. Johnson (105) gives a sketch representing a generalized section across the peninsula of Florida through St. Augustine and Gainesville. 'This sketch is designed to illustrate the structure of the peninsula. It shows the anticlinal structure of the Vicksburg Limestone, which has a mild dip to :the west with comparatively thin surface deposits, and a much more rapid dip to the east with a much thicker Miocene and later deposits.
In 1889, D. IX. Langdon, Jr., published the results of his observations along the Chattahoochee River made two years earlier, Mr. Langdon's paper (115) includes a section of Alum Bluff, Florida, and also a section at Ocheesee, Florida. Langdon suggests the name of Chattahoochee group, which he regards as the oldest member of the Miocene or the newest member of the Eocene white limestone.
The publications on Florida Geology for 1890 and succeeding years become so numerous and diversified in character that a review.of even important papers is difficult. A number of these have already been mentioned in connection with the phosphate industry of Florida. Some others are listed under fuller's earth. In the following account only the more important publications of a general nature are reviewed. For a more complete list the reader may consult ,the bibliography of Florida geology which follows this chapter.
In connection with the correlation papers of the Eocene formations of the United States by Dall and Harris (45), Sthe senior author, W. II. DalI, takes occasion to give a
- summary of the geology of Florida as understood at that time. The stratigraphy of the State is described in some
-detail. The bulletin is accompanied by a geological map on which the formations of the State are outlined in much greater detail than in any previous publication.




68 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL .SURIEY.
In 1893, Professor Raphael Pumpelly (162) called attention definitely to the time intervals which must ha ve elapsed between the Vicksburg Limestone and the Chattahoochee group. He states that the evidence of a time break exists in:
1. The almost general presence of a limestone conglomerate
at the base of the Ohattahoochee immediately overlying Eocene fossils. This conglomerate is sometimes a breccia, and often like a rock shattered in place; but more often It consists of clearly rolled pebbles of limestone not distinguishable from the Eocene rock below. 0
2. The surface of demarcation between the Eocene and the
Chattahoochee is very irregular. The Eocene rises Island-like into the Miocene. The altitude differs considerably at this
point but a few miles along the strike."
In 1903 W. H. Dall completed his extensive publication on the Tertiary fauna of Florida, the first issue of which appeared thirteen years earlier. These researches, making up volume 3, parts 1-6, of the Transactions Wagner Free Institute of Science, contain the most detailed, investigation that has yet been made on the invertebrate fauna of Florida. A discussion of the geologic results is given in part 6, pages 1541 to 1620 (42).
Descriptions of the vertebrate fossils of Florida by the veteran paleontologist Joseph Leidy are contained in the Transactions of the Wagner Free Institute of Science, volume II, 1889, and volume IV, 1896, the latter edited by F. H. Lucas.
The paleogeography of Florida has been freely discussed in literature and has given rise to a diversity of views. Evidence of minor changes of level of the peninsula have been recorded by a number of observers. A mild elevation of the peninsula during Post-Pliocene time was suggested by Conrad to account for the elevated position of Post-Pliocene formations along the east, south, and west coasts (28). Tuomey (196), after examining the mainland of southwest Florida and the Florida keys, was of the opinion that it was necessary to recog-




ANNUAL REPORT-EARLY INVESTIGATIONS. 69
nize an upward movement to account for the present elevation of this region.
Louis Agassiz (6) and Hunt (103), both of whom examined the keys with care, were of the opinion that no such movement had occurred.
In order to account for the character of the orange sands of Mississippi and Louisiana, Professor E. W. Hilgard, (94) believes it necessary to assume that previous to its deposition the Gulf coast suffered an elevation of at least 45,0 feet above its present level, followed during the Champlain epoch by a. slow depressiQn of at least twice that amount, with finally a re-elevation of at least 450 feet. While these minor changes of elevation are believed by Hilgard to have affected more particularly the axis of the Mississippi Valley, they doubtless also extended to Florida.
Smith (186), in summarizing the geological history of Florida, notes that the axis of elevation which brought the Vicksburg Limestone above sea, probably lay to the west of the center of the present peninsula, the western coast then lying probably 100 miles west of its present position. To account for the Orange Sand as then understood, Smith postulates the submergence of Florida during the Champlain epoch, followed by a. re-elevation to the present height.
The elevations which were believed to have affected the West India Islands during the early Quarternary led Dana: (53) to, assume that Florida was necessarily affected by the same movements. Dana argues further ihfatte subsidence that brought Florida to its present level occurred during the era of formation of the Floridt coral. reefs. A mild subsidence of the west coast of Florida to account for the surface configuration was suggested-by Heilprin (92) in 1887. Mild folds, with axis parallel to the peninsula, were observed by Dall along the Caloosahatchee River in 1887 (42).
Kost, in 1887, recognized the anticlinal axis traversing the Florida peninsula (113), while Johnson (105), in




70 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
his sketch illustrating the structure of the peninsula, likewise indicates its anticlinal structure.
The fact that the marine deposits in Florida are drained of salt originally present in the interstices of the rock for nearly a thousand feet below sea level, as indicated by bored wells, together with solution cavities at considerable depth, led Shaler (181) to postulate an elevation of the peninsula at some time since its formation to not less than 800 to 1000 feet.
McGee's memoir -on the Lafayette formations (138) containN the writer's conclusions as to the history of the coastal plains during late geographical times. Previous to the formation of the Lafayette the coastal plains, in the opinion of McGee, had been for a long time quiescent. In order to account for the lfayette formation McGee, like Hilgard, finds it necessary to postulate an extensive submergence, involving the entire coastal plains. It is, however, considered as not absolutely certain that southern Florida was submerged (p. 509). Following the Lafayette deposits an elevation occurred bringing the southern coastal plains much above their present level. Previous to the Lafayette deposits canyons were cut by rivers across the coastal plains. McGee estimates this elevation as 200 to 700 feet above the present level. A re-submergence, not so extensive as that of the Lafayette, but involving Florida, is indicated, in the view of McGee, by the presence of the Columbia sands on top of the Lafayette. A Post-Columbian high level period, followed by subsidence to the present level, closes the history of the coastal plains.
In regard, to the supposed elevation of land north of the Gulf of Mexico postulated by Spencer, Upham and others to account for the glacial epoch, Da~l (45) main. tains that for Florida, at least, no such elevation occurred. Canyons and sculpturing of -the topography such as would necessarily have occurred in the soft Florida formation, being absent.




ANNUAL REPORT--EARLY INVESTIGATIONS. 71.
In his preliminary sketch of the phosphates of Florida, George H. Eldridge (66) expresses the view that the entire area of Florida was re-submerged to receive the mantle of superficial sand which forms such a prominent feature of its surface.
in 1895 J. W. Spencer published a paper (193) in which he postulates the elevation of the Antillean and surrounding region sufficient to connect the two Americas by way of the West Indies. Thvo main periods of elevation are recognized. The first occurred in the Pliocene period. This is followed by a period of depression during the late Pliocene or possibly early Pleistocene, which corresponds, Spencer believes, to the Lafayette depression described by McGee. The land rose again to a great elevation during Pleistocene time, uniting the continents by way of the Antillean bridge. A subsidence followed in the later Pleistocene, which submerged most of Florida. This depression corresponds to the depression during which the Columbian series was formed on the co'ntinent. iAfter this subsidence the land rose 150 to 200 feet above the present level, with subsequently slight depression to its present level. Spencer concludes that the Antillean bridge stood' from one and a half to two and a half miles above the present altitudes of the plains which now tf61m fht&eiands:..
"It has been found that there have been two epochs of great
elevation, -namely, In the Pliocene and in the Pleistocene periods. Between these there was a subsidence of such depth as to drown the continental coastal plains and reduce the West Indian region to very small islands, with (probably) a shallow connection between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
The mid-Pleistocene depression was not quite so great as the earlier and there was probably a strait connecting the two oceans. Since that time there have been several oscillations of minor degree, with the formation of many small coastal
canyons and the elevation of terraces and coral reefs."
To the conclusion of Spencer, Dall (42) enters a vigorous objection. He states (pp. 1544, 1545, 1546):
"Dr. J. W. Spencer has propounded some very startling




72 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
hypotheses, involving the elevation of some of the Antilles and Florida many thousand feet and their submergence within
a comparatively recent period of geological time.
"The, on the whole, remarkable horizoantallty of the Floridian strata indicates a freedom from violent changes of level from the time the Peninsular limestone first emerged from the sea. Landshells in the Ocala limestone show that the then dry land existed. South of the Suwannee Strait, closed in late Miocene time, there is no evidence of subsequent submersion to any serious extent. Two gentle flexures run parallel with the peninsula, having the lake district between them; a tilting of, at the most, thirty feet, up at the east, down at the west, which may have been contemporaneous with the flex.ures; and, for the rest, very slow and glight but probably nearly continuous elevation never exceeding one hundred feet and perhaps less than half that, with dry land and fresh-water lakes constantly existing since the Ocala islands were raised above the sea; such is the geological history of -the Florida peninsula. Denudation of the organic limestone by solution rather than erosion is the prominent characteristic of the changes in the surface. Soft, crumbling under the finger nail, the rocks of the plateau, if lifted five or six thousand feet, as claimed by Dr. Spencer, would have been furrowed by canyons and swept bodily Into the sea. Indeed, to me the proposition is inconceivable as a fact and incompatible with every geologic and paleontologic fact of south Florida which has come to my
knowledge."
In reply to Dali's chief objection, that the peninsula if elevated would have been deeply ea-rled and cut by canyons, Spencer maintains (194) that part of Florida which now constitutes the peninsula was during the period of elevation a remnant of a plateau not yet dissected.




BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FLORIDA GEOLOGY.
The following list of papers includes all publications relating to the geology of Florida of which record has been obtained. The list is necessarily lacking in completeness and notice of omnissions will be appreciated. Those papers, the place of publication and title of which have not been verified from, the original are followed by an asterisk. i Al
1. Agwssiz, AlexanderThe Tortugas and Florida Reefs.*
Am. Acad. Mem. II, 107-134, 12 pls. 1883; reviewed by J. D. Dana, Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XXVI, 408-409, 1883; Abst. Am. Nat. XVII, 1267-1268,
1883.
2. Agassiz, AlexanderA Contribution to American Thalasography.
Three cruises of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey steamer Blake in the Gulf of Mexico, in the Caribbean Sea, and along the Atlantic Coast of the United States from 1877 to 1880. In two volumes, vol. 1, XII, 314 pp. maps; vol. II, 219 pp. pls.
Cambridge, 1888.*
Mus. Com. Zool. Bul. XIV and XV.
3. Agassiz,.-AlexanderNote (on coral reefs of southern Florida and
their relations to the growth of the peninsula).
Mus. Oomp. Zool. Bull., XVI, 157-158, 1890.
.A Note appended to Shalor's paper (No. 178),




74 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURViY.
4. Agassiz, AlexanderNote on the Florida Reef.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XLIX, 154-155, 1895.
Letter to J. D. Dana, dated Tampa Bay, Florida, December 27, 1894. The Miami Limestone is regarded as of Aeoliau origin. Agrees with Tuomey as to elevation of
the outer reef.
5. Agassiz, AlexanderThe Elevated Reef of Florida.
Mus. Com. Zool. Bull. XXVIII, No. 2, 29-62,
26 pls., 1896.
6. Agassiz, LouisFlorida Reefs, Keys and Coast.
U. S. Coast Survey Rept. for 1851. (Appendix
No. 10), 145-160, 1852.
Extracts from the report of Professor Agassiz to the
Superintendent of the Coast Survey.
7. Agassiz, LouisRelation of the Geological and Zoological Researches to General Interests, in the development
of Coast Features.
U. S. Coast Survey Rept. for 1867, 183-186, 1869.
Letter addressed to the Superintendent of the Coast
Survey.
8. Agassiz, LouisReport on the Florida Reefs.
Mus. Comp. Zool. Mem. VII. pp. 1-40, 18Sf.
Report of Professor Agassiz to the Superintendent of
the Coast Survey (letter referred to in No.%{ in full).
9. Aldrich, Truman H.A New Conus from the Tertiary of Florida.
Nautilus XVI, 131182, 1903.
Describes (. Waltonenss from Shoal Creek, Walton
County.




ANNUAL REPORT-BIBLIOGRAPHY. 75
10. Aldrich, Truman H.New Species of Tertiary Fossils from Alabama,
Mississippi and Florida.
Nautilus, XVI, 97-101, 1903.
11. Allen, John H.Some facts respecting the Geology of Tampa
Bay, Florida.
Am. Jour. Sci. (2) I, 3842, 1846.
i2 aley, J. W.Discovery of an Infusorial Stratum in Florida.
Am. Jour. Sci. (2) X, 282, (1-5 p.), 1850.
This is an advance notice of the infusorial stratum
described in the following.
13. Bailey, J. W.Microscopical Observations made in South Caro.
lina, Georgia and Florida.
Smithson. Contri. Knowl. II, art. VIII, 48 pp.
(3 pls.), 1851.
The observations on Florida occupy pages 14-25. The
geological references occur on pages 16 and 19 the first relating to the limestone 4'0 miles west of Palatka, the
second to a supposed infusorial stratum at Tampa,
14. Bailey, J. W.Silicified Polythalamia in Florida.
Am,. Jour. Sci. (2) XI, 86, (1-4 p.), 1851.
This is an extract from the preceding with the addition
of list of genera identified.
15. Bartram, WilliamTravels through North and South Carolina,
Georgia, east and west Florida, the Cherokee Country, the extensive territories of the Muscogul.
gem or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the




76 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
Choctaws, containing an account of the soil and natural productions of those regions, together with observations on the mafiners of the Indians. 522
pp. 6 pis. map.
Philadelphia, 1791; second edition printed in
London, 1794.
16. Bland, ThomasPhysical geography of and distribution of terrestrial mollusca in the Bahama Islands.*
New York Lyceum of Nat. Hist. Annals X, 311324; abst. Am. Jour. Sci. (3), VIII, 231-233, 1874.
17. Boyer, Charles S.A fossil marine diatomaceous deposit at St. Augustine, Florida.*
Torrey Bet. Club, Bull., XXII, 171-174, 1895.
18. Bradley, Frank H."Geological chart of the United States east of
the Rocky Mountains and of Canada", New York,
1875.*
19. Brewer, William H.Warren's New Physical Geography, 144 pp.,
Philadelphia., 1890.*
20. Brown, Lucius, P.The Phosphate Deposits of the Southern States.
Eng. Assoc. South. Proe., XV, No. 2, 53-128,
1904.
Phosphates of Florida described on pp. 63-86.
21. Burnett, W. I.(Elevations in Florida).
Am. Jour. Sci. (2), XVII, 407. 1854.
Letter to Professor J. D. Dana.




ANNUAL RPORT---BIBLIOGRAPHY. 77
22. Carnot, AdolpheSur les Variations observees dans la composition
des apatites, des phosphorites, et des phosphates sedimentaries. Remarques sur le gisement et le
mode de formation de ces phosphates.*
Ann. Des Mines, X, 137-231, 1896.
23. Casey, Thomas L.On the probable age of the Alabama White Lime.
stone.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila., Proc. 513-518, 1901.
24. Catesby, MarkThe Natural History of Carolina, Florida and
the Bahama Islands: Containing the figures of
Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Serpents, Insects, and "
Plants: Particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former Authors, with their Descriptions in English and French. To which is prefixed A New and Correct Map of the Countries; with Observations on their Natural State, Inhabitants, and Productions. By the late MARK CATESBY, F. R. S. Revised by Mr. Edwards. Lineman Index of the Animals and Plants.
Vols. I and II, London, MDCCLXXI, 1771.
25. Clark, W. B.Correlation Papers: Eocene.
U. S. Geol. Sur. Bull. 83, 1891.
Eocene of Florida discussed on pages 55-57, and on pages
82-83.
26. Codington, E. W.The Florida Pebble-Phosphates.
Am. Inst. Min. Eng. Trans. XXV, 423-431, 1896.
27. Conrad, Timothy A.Observations on the Tertiary and more recent




78 .FL4RIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
formations of a portion of the Southern States.*
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Jour. VII, 116-129, 1894.
28. Conrad, Timothy A.Observations on the Geology of a part of East
Florida, with a Catalogue of Recent Shells of the
Coast.
Am'. Jour. Sci. (2) 1I, 3648, 1846.
29. Conrad, Timothy A.Descriptions of new species of Organic Remain.
from the Upper Eocene Limestone of Tampa. Bay.
Am. Jour. Sci. (2) II, 399-400, 1846.
30. Conrad, Timothy A.Observations on the Eocene formation in the
vicinity of Vicksburg, Miss.
Acad. Nat. Sci., Phila. Jour. (2), I, 111-134,
(ps. XI-XIV), 1850.
31. Conrad, Timothy A.-Observations on American Fossils, with descriptions of two new species.
Acad. Nat. Sci., Phila. Proc. XVII, 184, 1865.
Three species of invertebrates identified from Ocala, and
the formation referred to the Eocene (Shark River Marl
of New Jersey).
32. Cope, Edward D.An Intermediate Pliocene Fauna.*
Am. Nat. XXIII, 253-254, 1889.
33. Cope, Edward D.(Note on the fossils of the Alachua clays) coptained in U. S. Geol. Sur. Bull. 84, 130, 1892.
Alachua clays regarded as probably intermediate between the Loup Fork and the Equus beds.




ANNUAL REPORT--BIBLIOGRAPHY. 79
34. Cowles, H. C.A Remarkable Colony of Northern Plants along
the Apalachicola River, Florida, and its significance.
Rept. 8th International Geographic Congress
held in the U. S. in 1904, 599, (1-2 p.), 1905.
Suggests that the Torreya and other plants failed to
follow the retreat of the Plelstooene tee.
35 Cox, E. T.An extensive deposit of phosphate rock in
Florida.*
Am. Nat. XXIV, 1185-1186, (5-6 p.), 1890.
36. Cox, E. T.
Florida Pebble and Nodular Phosphate of Lime.*
Eng. Min. Jour. LII, 359-360, 1891.
37. Cox, E. T.Floridite: A new variety of Phosphate of Lime.
Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci., Proc. XXXIX, 26f-262.
1891.
38. Cox, E. T.The Albion Phosphate-District.
Am. Inst. Min. Eng. Trans. XXV, 36-40, 1896.
39. Cox, E. T.Geological Sketch of Florida.
Am. Inst. Min. Eng. Trans. XXV, 28-36, 1896.
40. Dall, W. H..Miocene deposits in Florida.
Sci. VI, 82, (1-8 p.) 1885.
Calls attention to the fact that the characeristic Miocene
fossil Echphora quadricostata has been obtained from
Tampa.




80 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
41. Dall, W. II.Notes on the Geology of Florida.
Am. Jour. Sdi. (3) XXXIV, 161-170, 1887.
Notes based upon the expedition made in 1885 and 1887.
Includes notes on the Geology in the vicinity of Gainesville, Tampa, and the Caloosahatchee River. The mild folds
along the Caloosahatchee River are noted at this time.
42. Dall, W. H.Contributions to the Tertiary Fauna of Flbrida.
Wag. Free Inst. Sci. Trans. II, pts. I-VI, 1620
pp., 60 pls. 1890-1903.
43. Dall, W. H.On the age of the Peace Creek beds, Florida.*
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc. 120, (1-3 p) 1891:
abst. Am. Geol. VII, 382, (4 lines) 1891.
44. Dal], W. H.Elevation of America in the Cenozoic periods.* Geol. Mag. VIII, 287-288, 1891; Am. Nat. XXV,
735-736, 1891.
45. Dall, W. H., and Harris, G. D.Correlation Papers: Neocene of North America.
U. S. Geol. Sur. Bull. 84, 1892.
The geology of Florida is described by the senior author
on pp. 85-158.
46. Dali, W. H.The Tertiary Mollusks of Florida.
Am. Jour. Sci., (3) XLV, 441, 1893.
47. DalI, W. H., Stanley-Brown, J.Cenozoic Geology along the Apalachicola River.
Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. V, 147-170, pl. 1894; abst.
Am. Geol XIII, 137-138, (1-2 p), 1894.




ANNUAL REP;)RT-BIBLIOGRAPHY. 81
48. Dall, W. H.Diagnoses of New Tertiary Fomils from the
Southern United States.
Nat. Mus. Proc. XVIII, 21-46, 1895.
Many species of invertebrates described, but not illustrated, from Florida and other .States.
49. Dall, W. H.(Account of the manner of occurrence of fossil
vertebrates in the AlaqhuaC lys.) containedd in introduction to -."Fossil Vertebrates.. from the
Alachua, 9lys,'1. by, ,Joseph Leidy.)
Wag. Free Inst. Sci. Trans. IV, 1896.
50. Dall, W. H....
(Introduction to) Descriptions of Tertiary Fossils from the Antillean Region, by Guppy, R. J. L.,
and Dall, W.. H.
Nat. Mus. Proc. XIX, .303-305, 1897.
The referemce to Florida occurs on p. 363, where DalI
stated with- reference to the "Old Miocene" (of Florida and elsewhera)' that all these beds dre referable to the "'Migocene or Uppermost Eocene".
51. Dall, W. H..,
A Table of the North American Tertiary Horizons, correlated with one another and with those of
western Europe, with annotations.
U. S. Geol. Sur. 18th Ann. Rept., pt. I, 323-348,
1898.
This paper although not published until 1898, was propared as stated by the author iA 1395.
52. Dall, W. H., Bartsch, Paul-Synopsis of the Genera, Sub-genera, and sections
of the family Pyramidellid.,
Wash., Biol. Soc. Proc. XVII, '1-61 1904.
6GeoRep-1 "




82 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
53. Dana, James D.Origin of the Coral Reefs and' Islands.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XXX, 89-105, and 169-191,
map, 1885.
The reference to Florida reefs occurs in pt. II, p. 178,
in which evidence of subsidence during the growth of the
reefs Is presented.
54. Dancy, F. L.Report of the State Engineer and Geologist, contained in Message of the Governor of Florida submitted with Accompanying Documents. November
28, 1854.
The reference to geology occurs on p. 20 (Appendix). No
geological work accomplished beyond the collecting of some
soils and minerals.
55. Darton, N. H.Notes on the Geology of the Florida Phosphate
Deposits.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XLI, 102-105, 1891; abst. Eng.
Min. Jour. LI, 210, (14 cola.) 1891.
56. Darton, N. J.-Record of a Deep Well at Lake Worth, southern
Florida.
* Aim Jour. Sci. (3) XLI, 105-106, 1891.
The Vicksburg Limeston6o was identified at depth of
1000 feet. The well ended it this formation at 1212 feet.
~7. Darton, N. H.Preliminary List of Deep Borings in the United
States, part I.
U. S. Geol. Sur. Water Supp. and Irri. Paper,.
No. 57, 1902.
The list of borings made in Florida occurs on pp. 21-22.
A second edition with additions was issued as-Water Supply Paper No. 149, 1905.




ANNUAL REPORT-BIBLIOGRAPHY.' 83
58. Davidson, Walter B. M.Suggestions as to the origin and deposition of
Florida Phosphates.*
Eng. Min. Jour. LI, 628-629, 1891.
59. Davidson, Walter B. M.A Phosphatic Chalk at 'Taplow, England*
Eng. Min. Jour. LII, 502, (2-3 col.) 1891.
60. Davidson, Walter B. M.Notes on the Geological Origin of Phosphate of
Lime in the United' States and Canada.
Am. Inst. Min. Eng. Trans. XXI, 139-157, 1893.
61. Davidson, Walter B. M.(Review of) "Florida Phosphates: Origin of the
boulder phosphates of the Withlacoochee River
district," by N. A. Pratt.*
Eng. Min. Jour. LIII, 42, 1892.
62. Day, David T.Gypsum Deposits in Florida.
U. S. Geol. Sur. Bull. 223, 48, 1904.
Describes gypsum on Bear Island, 6 miles west of Panasoffkee.
63. Dietz, R.Description .of a testaceous formation at Anastasia Island, extrted from hotes made on a journey to the southern part of the United States, during
the winter Of 1822 and 1823
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Jour. IV, 73-80, 1824.
64. Edwards, J. BakerOn some recent analysis of soils (Canada, Florid and Northwest Territory).*
Can. Nat. (n.s.) X, 458-460, 1883.




84 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVYr.
65. Eldridge, George H.-Report of Geological Investigations.
U. S. Geol. Sur. 12th, Ann. Rept., pt. 1, 82-84,
1891; ibid 13th Ann. Rept., pt. 1, 117-118, 1892;
ibid 15th Ann. Rept. 160, (1-4 p.), 1895.
66. Eldridge,'George H.A preliminary Sketch of the Phosphates of
Florida.
Am. Inst. Min. Eng. Trans. XXI, 196-231, 1893.
67. Featherstonhaugh, G. W.Remarks on the 'oolitic rocks from Florida.
Am. Jour. Sci. XVI, 206, (1-5 p.) 1829. (From
Proc. of the Lyceum of Sationalt History of New
York, XV, September, 1828).
68. Fewkes, J. WalterThe Origin of the Present '.Outlines 0f the Bermudas.
Am. Geol. V, 88-100, 1890.
Reference to Florida occurs oil p'. 9. Objects to Helprin's view that the Florida reefs are a area of elevation.
Believes that the outlines of the reefs are determined by ocean currents indepndent either of elevation or subs!dence.
69. Finch, John----Geological Essay on the Tkrtiary Formations in America.
Am. Jour. Sci. VII, 31-43, 1823.
Read to Acad. Nat. Sdl. Phila., July 15, 1823.
70. Foerste, Aug, F.Studies on the Chipola Miocene of Bainbridg.,
Georgia, and Alum Bluff, Florida.
Am. Jpur. Sct. (3) XLVI, 244-254, 1893.




ANNUAL REPORT-BIBLIOORAPHY. 85
71. Foerste, Aug. F.The Upper Vicksburg Eocene and the Chattahoochee Miocene of Southwest Georgia and adjacent Florida.
Am. Jour. Sc!. (3) XLVIII, 41-54, 1894.
72. Fuller, M. L.--Notes on the Wells, Springs, and General Water Resources of Certain Eastern and Central States.
U. S. Geol. Sur. Water-Supp. and Irri. Paper,
No. 102, 1904.
Wells and Springs of Florida given on pp. 238-275.
73. Fuller,,M. L.Underground water-of Eastern United States.
U. S. Geol. Sur. Water Supp. and Irri. Paper
No. 114, 1905.
The underground water of Florida described, pp. 159-168.
74. Goldsmith, E.Pea-Like Phosphorite from Polk County, Florida.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc. X, (1-2 p.)'1890.
Contains a brief description of the microscopic structure of pebble phosphate from Ft. Meade. Acicular crystals
of apatite were found imbedded in Amorphous silica,
75, Gorrte, -.
(On Change of Levels of West Coast of Florida).
Bost. Soc. Nat. Hist. Proc. IV, 391-392, (1-2 p.)
, 1854.
The slow depression of the land in the vicinity of Apalachicola reported.
76. Griswold, Leon S.
Notes on the geology of southern Florida.
Mus. Comp. Z0ol. .Bull. XXVIII, No. 2, 52-59,
.ps, XVII-XXVI, 1896.




86 FLORIDA OOwGICAL SURVEY.
77. Harper, R. M.'Hammock,' 'Hommock,' or 'Hummock'?
Science, (u.s.) XXII, 400-402, 1905.
Discusses the use of these terms as applied to a type of
vegetation and soil in the Coastal Plains section. 'Hammock' considered the proper term.
78. Harris, G. D.Sections made in 1901 of the Chattahoochee
series in northwestern Florida, contained in Comparison of the Oligocene by C. J. Maury.
Am. Paleont. Bull. No. 15, 53-58, 1902.
79. Hawes, George W.On a Phosphatic Sandstone from Hawthorne, in
Florida.
Nat. Mus. Proc. for 1882, 46-48,1883.
Contains an analysis of rock from the quarry of C. A.
Simmons. Asalyses made by A. B. Home.
80. Heillrin, AngeloOn the Occurrence of Nurmnulitic Deposits in
Florida, and the Association of Nummulites with
a Fresh-water Fauna.
- Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc. 189-193, 1882; Am.
Nat. XVI, 08-309 (2-3 p.), 1883. Reprinted in the Naturalist Leisure Hour and Monthly Bulletin, No.
81, May, 1884; abst: Am. Jour. Se. (3) XXIV, 294,
1882; ibid, XXV, 158, 1883.
81. Heilprin, AngeloContributions to the Tertiary Geology and
Paleontology of the United' States.* 117 pp., map,
Phila., 1884.
82. Feilprin, AngeloNotes on' S6fie X4W Foraminifera from the Num.
mulitic Formation of Florida.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc., 321-322, 1884.




ANNUAL RI.PORT-BIBLIOGRAPHY. 87
83. Hellprin, AngeloThe Tertiary Geology of the Eastern and Southern United States.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Jour. IX, pt. I, 115-154,
map, pls., 1884.
The Geology 6f Florida is briefly summarized on pp.
137-138. The Geological map is based, so far as Florida is concerned, on that previously issued by Smith, with the exception that the area indicated by Smith as probably
Eocene is here mapped as Vicksburg.
84. Heilprin, Angelo(Remarks on the Florida Tertiary).
Science, III, 607 (1-4 p.), 1884.
85. Heilprin, AngeloThe classification and paleontology of the U. S.
Tertiary Deposits.
Science, V, 475-476, 1885.
86. Heilprin, AngeloThe classification and paleontology of the U. S.
Tertiary Deposits.
Science, VI, 83-84, 1885.
Meyer having questioned the Oligocene age of the Vicksburg, Heilprin reiterates his views.
87. Heilprin, Angelo-(Shells from the Mouth of the Manatee River,
Florida).
Science, VI, 499 (1-8 p.), 1885.
A new species of the genus conorbis. 0. princeps.
88. Heilprin, Angelo(Tertiary Fossils from Kentucky, Texas and
Florida.).
Science, VII, 103 (1-3 p.), 1886.
Reports the receipt of fossil shells. Tnose from Florida
were obtained near Gainesville.




88 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
89. Heilprin, Angelo(Observations in Florida.)
Science, VII, 353 (1-2 p.), 1886.
Brief report to the Philadelphia Academy of Natural
Science of a tour in Florida during the winter of 1885-1886.
90. Heilprin, Angelo-Notes on the Tertiary Geology and Paleontology
of the Southern United States.
Aad. Nat. Sei. Phila. Proc., 57-58, 1886.
Among other specimens reports on samples of nummulites from Florida. (Receipt of which was noted in No. 87).
91. Helilprin, Angelo-Explorations on the Western Coast of Florida
and the Okeechobee Wilderness.
Wag. Free Inst. Sci. Trans., 1886.
Advance publication from the following, pp. 65-127.
92. Heilprin, AngeloExplorations on the West Coast of Florida and
in the Okeechobee Wilderness, with special reference to the Geology and Zoology of the Floridian
Peninsula.
Wag; Free Inst. Sci. Trans. 1, 134 pp. 19 pls.,
1887; abst: Pop. Sci. Mon. XXXIII, 418 (1-2 p), 1887; Am. Jour. Sci. (3), XXXIV, 230-232, 1887.
93. Herrick, R. H.Memoirs of Florida. vol. II.*
Chapter on Resources and Industries, 227-243,
1902.
94. Hilgard, E. W.On the Geological History of the Gulf of Mexico.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) II, 391-404, 1871; Am. Assoc.
Proc. XX, 222-236, 1871; Louisiana State Univ.




ANNUAL REPORT-BIBLIOGRAPHY. 89
Rept. of Supt. for 1871, 207-222, New Orleans, 1872; Am. Nat. V, 514-518, 1871; discussed in ibid, 518523; abst: Neues Jahrbuch, 551-552, 1872.
95. Hilgard, E. W.On the Geology of Lower Louisiana and the Salt
Deposits of Petite Anse Island, 38, pp. 2 pls.*
Smithson. Contri. Knowl. XXIII, Separate as
248, Washington, 1881; abst: Smithson. Inst.
Rept. for 1867, 47, 1868; Rept. for 1870, 20-21, 1871.
96. Hilgard, E. W.The Later Tertiary of the Gulf of Mexico.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XXII, 58-65, map, 1881.
97. Hill, H. T.Notes on the Geology of the Island of Cuba.
Miis. Comp. Zool. XVI, No. 15, 243-288, 9 pis.
1895.
No evidence that Cuba has had connection since its
earliest history with the United States. p. 285.
98. Hitchcock, C. ElGeological map of the United States and
part of Canada.* Compiled to illustrate the scheme of 'coloration and nomenclature recommended by the International Geological Congress.
Am. Inst. Min. Eng. Trans. XV, 465-488, 1887. 99. Hitchcock, C. Hi;'-Fresh-water Springs in the Ocean.
Pop. Sci. Mon., Dec. 673-683, 1905.
The springs of Florida are described on pp. 680-683.
100., lorsford, E. N.Solidification of the Rocks of the Florida Reefs,
and the Sources of Lime in the Growth of Corals.
Am. Jour. Sci. (2) XIV, 2457253, 1852; Am. As"soc. Adv. Sci. Proc., 207-215, 1852.




90 FLORIDA EOfCLOGICAL SURVEY.
101. Horsford, E. N."
On the Soidification of the Coral Reefs of
Florida, and the Source of Carbonate of Lime in
the Growth of Corals.
This paper is a further defense of the views presented
in the preceding and is a reply to criticism by Dana.
102. Hovey, E. 0.Notes on the Artesian Well sunk at Key West,
Florida., in 1895.*
Mus. Comp. Zool. Bull. XXXVIII, 65-91, 1896;
abst: Am. Geol. XVIII, 218, 1896.
103. Hunt, E. B.- Cho
On the Origin, Growth, Substructure and Chro.|
nology of the Florida Reef.
U. S. Coast Sur. Rept. App. No. 25,' 241-248,
1862; Am. Jour. Se. (2) XXXV, 197-210, 1863.
104. Johnson, Lawrence C.Phosphatic Rocks of Florida.
Science, V, 396, 1885.
105. Johnson, Lawrence, C.The Structure of Florida.
Am. Jour. Sdi. (3) XXXVI, 230-236, 1888.
106. Johnson, Lawrence C.Florida, iq MacFarlane's Geol. Railway Guide
2d. ed. 392-394, 1890*.
107. Johnson, Lawrence C.The Chattahoochee Embayment.
Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. III, 128-132, 1891.
108. Johnson,+ Lawrence 0.The Miocene Group of Alabam'.*
Science XXI, 9O-91, 1893.




ANNUAL REPORT 'BIBLIOGRAPHY. 91
109 Johnson, Lawrence C.Notes on the Geology of Florida: 'Two of the
lesser but typical Phosphate Fields.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XLV, 497-503, 1893.
Describes phosphatic formations of Alachua County, and
the plate-rock phosphate of Marion County.
110. Johnson, C. W.-A New Pliocene Polygyra from, Florida.
Nautilus, XIII, 67-68, 1899.
111. Kennish, -. -.
Artesian Well at St. Augustine, Florida.
Am. Jour. Si. (3) XXXIV, 70, (1-3 p.), 1887.
Includes a partial log of the Flagler well at St. Augustine.
112. Kerr, W. C.Notes on the geology of the region about Tampa,
Florida.*
Elisha Mitchell Sci. Soc. Jour. 1884-85, 86-90,
1885.
113. Kost, J.Geology of Florida.
Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci. Proc., XXXV, 231, (1-2 p.)
1887.
Abstract of paper read before the meeting at Buffalo,
August, 1886.
114. Kost, J.-First Report of the Geological Survey of Florida.
31 pp, Tallahassee, 1887.
Abst: Science, IX, 446-447, 1887.
Ret rt iade to Governor E. A. Perry.




92 FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY.
115. Langdon, Daniel, W., Jr.Some Florida Miocene.
Am. Jour. Sci. (3) XXXVIII, 322-824, 1889.
Proposed the "Chiuttahoochee Group" for limestone
aong the Chattahoochee.
116. Langdon, Daniel W., Jr.Geology of the Coastal Plain of Alabama.
Geol. Sur. Ala., .1894.
The description of Florida formations occurs on pp.
373-376.
117. LeConte, JohnOn the Optical Phenomena presented by the "Sil.
ver-Spring," in Marion County, Florida.
Am. Jour. Sci. (2), XXXI, 1-12, 1861.
118. LeConte, JosephOn the Agency of the GulfStream in the Forma.
tion of the Peninsula of Florida.
Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci. Proc., pt. 2, 103-119, 1857.
Orx
119. LeConte, JosephThe Reefs, Keys, and Peninsula of Florida.
Science, II, 764, 1883.
Recognizes that the substructure of the keys is not duo
to the Gulf Stream and that the process of coral formation of the peninsula can not have commenced north of the
north line of the Everglades.
120. Ledoux, Albert B.The Newly-diseovered Ph6sphate-beds of Florida New York Aead. Swi. Trans,,. IX 84-94,- 1890;
Eng. Min. Jour. XLIX, 175477, 1890; .:Sei. Am.
Supp. XXX, 12104-12105, No. 758, 1890.




ANNUAL RIPORT--TIBLI]OOAPHY. 93
121. Leidy, Joseph-Vertebrate Fossils from Florida.
Acad. Nqt. Sci, hlla. Proc., 118-119, 1884;
Science, III, 606, 1884.
A collection submitted. for examination by the Smithsonlan Institution, collected by Dr. J. C. Neal, of Archer,
Florida.
122. Leidy, JosephRhinocerous and Hippotherium froni Florida.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc., 32-33, 1885.
Gives notice of the occurrence of Hypotherim ingeuum.
123. Leidy, JosephMastodon and Llama from Florida.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc., 11-12, 1886.
Collection made by W. H. Dall near Archer, Florida.
124. Leidy, JosephAn Extinct Boar from Florida.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc., 37-38, 1886.
125. Leidy, JosephFossil Bones from Florida.
Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. Proc., 309-310, 1887.
Receipt of fossil vertebrates collected by L. C. Johnson.
126. Leidy, JosephNotice of some Fossil Human Bones.
Wag. Free Inst. Sci. Trans. II, 9-12, 1889.
Describes human remains from Little Sarasota Bay obtained by Heliprl and Wilcox in 1886 and by Wilcox in
1887.




94 WLORIPA. OJOLOGICALo 5URYIEY.*
127. Leidy, JosephDescription of Mammalian Remains from a
Rock Crevice in Florida.
Wag. Free Inst. Sci. Trans. i, 13.17, 1889.
Describes Pleistocene vertebrates obtained from quarry
of F. N. Phillips, at Ocala, by Joseph Savage.
128. Leidy, JosephDescription of Vertebrate Remains from Peace
Cre9k, Florida.
Wag. Free. Inst. Sci. Trans. II, 19-31, 1889.
a
Describes material obtained by Mr. Joseph Wilcox, acconpanied by Wm. H. Mtgs, from a sand bar in Peace
River, near Arcadia.
129. Leidy, JosephFosil Vertebrates from Florida.
Acad. Nat. Si. Phila. Proc., 64-65, 1890.
Notice of receipt of vertebrate fossils from Archer, collected by J. B. Hatcher.
130. Leidy, JosephFossil Vertebrates from the Alachua Clays of
Florida. (Edited by Lucas, F. A.)
Wag. Free. Inst. Sci. Trans. IV, 61 pp. pis., 1-19,
1896.
131. Lewis, Elias, Jr.Evidence of a probable modern change of level
on the coast of Florida.
Am. Jour. Sci. (2) XLI, 406, (1-4 p.) 1866.
Modem depression of the coast at St. Augustine, indicated by stumps of cedar trees and peat accumulations
below low tide level.
132. Lucas, F. A.(Prefatory Note and notes appended as editor




ANNUAL RIPORT--BIBLIOGRAPHY. 95
to "Fossil Vertebrates from the Alachua Clays of
Florida," by Joseph Leidy.)
Wag. Free. Inst. Sci. Trans. IV, 1896.
133. MeCallie, S. W.A .Preliminary Report on the Phosphates and
Marls of Georgia.
Geol. Sur. Georgia. Bull. No. 5-A, 1896.
The phosphates of Florida are briefly described on pp.
25-28.
134. McCrady, J.(Remarks on the Eocene Formation in the Neighborhood of Alligator, Florida.)
.Elliot, (S. C.) Soc. Nat. Hist. Proc. I, 282-283,
1859.
Notes the presence of sinks and disappearing streams at
Alligator (Lake City) and describes the new genus of
echioderms RaveneliW.
135. Macfarlane, James;An American Geological Rail-way Guide, giving
the Geological Formation at every Railway Station and a description of each of the formations.
New York, 219 pp. 1879.
136. McGee, W. J.
Map of the United States exhibiting the Present
status of Knowledge Relating to the Areal Distri.
bution of Geologic Groups.
U. S. Geol. Sur. '5th. Ann. Rept., 1885.
137. McGee, W. J.(Discussion following paper by J. B. Tyrrell).
Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. I, 409, (1-4 p.) 1890.
Not only all Florida, but two-thirds ot Georgia and the
greater part of South Carolina submerged during early
Pleistocene time.




96 WRD&(tLOGICAL; SirVE~."
138. McGee, W.J
The Laf4yette Formation.
U. S. Geol. Sui. 12th Ann. Rept. pt. 1, 347-52
1891.
139. McGee, W. J.icuion fl~owlng paper by J. W. Spencer on
"Terrestrial Submergence southeast of the Amerij
can Continent."
Geol. Soc. Am. Bull.. V, 21-22, (1-.2, ) 1893
Observations on the Geology of the United States Am. Philc. trans. Vi, 41-428; uap, 1809;
Jour. de Phys. LXIX, 204-2i3; ibid. LXII, 137.
165, map, 1811.
141. MaClure, William-""
Observations on the Geology of the tnited States
of North America; with remarks on t16e probable effects that mvy e prodde4 bK th depomposition of the diffeent clgsnes of Rocks,'oA th' nature and fertility of soils; applied tohe different tates of the Union; agreeably to the accompanying geological map.
Am. Philo. Soc. Trans. I, (n.s.) 1-91, 2 pls. gad
map, 1818. Published in. book form Philadelphia,
1817.
This is a revised' and- enlarged edition of the above.
The rocks of Florida .are referred t6-the Alluvium class of the Wernerian system. Northern Florida as far south as the line crossing the peninsula, Just below St. Augustine,
is included in the map and represented ad al*uviai. I
t42. MacGonigle, John N.The Everglades of Florida.
Rept. of the 8th. I Inter. Geol. Cong. held in the
United States in 1904, 767-771< 1905.




ANNUAL REPORT--BIBLIOGRAPHY. 97
143. Marcou, JulesGeological Map of the United States and British
Provinces of North America, 92 pp. 8 pls., Boston,
1853.
Reviewed in part by W. P. Blake, Am. Jour. Sci.
(2), XXII, 383-388, and by Anon, ibid XVII,
199-206.
144. Marcou, JulesUber die Geologie der Vereinigten Staatem und
der englishchen Provinzen von Nord-Amerika.*
Peterman's Mitt, I, 149-159, map, 1855.
145. Marcou, JulesGeology on North America, with two reports on
the prairies of Arkansas and Texas, the Rocky Mountains of New Mexico, and the Sierra Nevada of California, originally made by the United States Government. 144 pp. 7pls., 3 maps, Zurich, 1858.*
Reviewed by J. D. Dana., Am. Jour. Sci. (2)
XXVI, 323-334, 1858; XXVII, 137-140; by A.
Agassiz XXVII, 134-137, 1859.
146. Maury, Carlotta J.A Comparison of the Oligocene of Western
Europe and the Southern United States.
Am. Paleont. Bull. No. 15, 118 pp. 1902.
The Oligocene of Florida is described on pp. 45-67.
147. Memminger, C. J.Florida Kaolin Deposits.
Eng. Min. Jour. LVII, 436, 1894.
Describes the kaolin beds in Lake County, and includes
copy of analysis of sample.
7GeoRep-1




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'2017-02-02T11:06:26-05:00'
describe
'1636926' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
45d6f476c9afa068d95fed567cd0c862
1e4026968ad4693c444e109d458e9134a15f90b1
describe
'1985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f8c45e10d090b9f2f0e7a101d5793dff
6742fb07b6e0a7c1794d70d54270b0be394af9cd
'2017-02-02T11:07:27-05:00'
describe
'200419' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
a6c1afded715e00fed6bbfbdb193ea9c
3beb70ed333c1ce83b6a29e89886b20d6c624175
'2017-02-02T11:07:02-05:00'
describe
'330370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
8204ecd54bfd68c2d46a87a6bd1d156f
75348b63dae35fef13fd0135749f8425b31d10fa
'2017-02-02T11:06:57-05:00'
describe
'47721' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
8c55b0a1df0a2677e7f999e0f4402bd8
43d2fd66e0ffa8b59d3fa89c3bc8184e17795226
'2017-02-02T11:06:38-05:00'
describe
'102738' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
0eeefa3828d2eebfdcbf03bddc033e6e
00b2ea0133551be0aa06f1395ec45aaed9a79508
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a4e986566b2dd9c99449967c1129d6d5
1242af0454b91c46ea6c2464b8eea1d25c862830
'2017-02-02T11:05:53-05:00'
describe
'1968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
5b639763d2d76a19b50cb0e249190e5b
7eab2e5d8827e6f208bd2e015b173f753fe9cedc
describe
'200930' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADCZ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
5252e965e8cbf99952ac84015b020b2a
dc42c416efdba9f94dcab27ea1eb903d23fb80af
describe
'271858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDA' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
dbe0726f667057eeff46f8fe025fa2f3
f08f0501d4abb483277c5f639870b3d038c710df
'2017-02-02T11:07:28-05:00'
describe
'45960' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
eb8a31212dbe175f55d41699b0e94a61
86c33d08df4834d0f8168eea1da902c38fdb75e1
describe
'82351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDC' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
82e3987d615023bf93b69650c6326b84
0287f2ce2565e3eeb13a9866fba6e9302768d266
'2017-02-02T11:05:52-05:00'
describe
'1772958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
631c0e7415508616723dae431c07cfdd
cc56dcdd0fd1aa9148b3e76ee1bd8f252ab1e1ed
'2017-02-02T11:07:40-05:00'
describe
'1843' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDE' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e30c3fc31cb5955ddc863502481bf24c
45b497db813ae69a80d654410342271126f3493c
describe
'147051' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
2567128c40dbbb135dcf53a34787a4ad
21b6fe55ac172a5e6c7c49438f5dc9555d2a802b
describe
'232438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
2eeba19307cbf1fcb28ea46da41604ad
b4e7652a02eb010b7ecdf4b0adc4586bf719edc8
'2017-02-02T11:05:56-05:00'
describe
'31929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ded19fc2207cff60337b92b99cf0972e
119964f1b2eca471b8ca754b137a0e194dec6064
describe
'74094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a34098cbeaa6ef9ac99c849636ff750c
9ef43a8c91ad55211224728338a89d19c22c6e30
describe
'1550534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
277c04e43dfbb966528fc63b7c989c80
4b8a67f722e370556bc8a5658e0d6999184dfbab
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
dc2b5fe2b099b8e7066b116e244b1978
6dfb964668c5ed2dd83e1e5737b6fa951ed3e0c4
'2017-02-02T11:05:40-05:00'
describe
'61087' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c0cbb617acce9952b9e16b1fbf5e56cb
afc7fb1de5c671b371a5ea1a49d5303e4929dd4e
'2017-02-02T11:05:45-05:00'
describe
'109348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
1d8dd71f146eebb2705f92457cc15530
4548aa22238253908a8ccd5ddcef2c4fa20130a0
describe
'15669' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
c20f89b24ba9280975dbf001a8975b41
1baf7d14efd92e0c934977dbf3dfc36f2cb5f257
'2017-02-02T11:05:55-05:00'
describe
'39893' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDO' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
95a520989f8c946000c2fd9ea3ced530
22034f905aad362736ed7c3f50628af1a6f4f14f
'2017-02-02T11:06:28-05:00'
describe
'1527248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDP' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a5a5295cf36dd798951a6476f4c53bec
24f13f3a1a09728a3f839c83cea3f40fb1eb5744
'2017-02-02T11:06:55-05:00'
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e4dc1ee9ab37c51fd42ae28c0e69d2d9
2dcfce3600c3e3f2d470170b626064972bdf510e
describe
'228599' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDR' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
23ff3d50adbca3c37150eac10f30d778
bb915a7a24c8a8364b06eea3d6ccd05b8434674e
describe
'388789' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c72e5f26bed8286a98c18390a4ff86dc
13e8322071628057b82953b3ffe994591d139cb4
describe
'54503' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
dece3dd49b359b341ed3c35340cceab3
34181034d0e47178a3f4057d0f66a33f623b040e
'2017-02-02T11:06:42-05:00'
describe
'116348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
55eacd988467202fda0496fb9b77306e
176f6df56a2d8d0ff95928e91d47225a0a64624c
'2017-02-02T11:07:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
7b0890a6fe5a4716b26ad64a7c2a3b0c
76dade51be9f7f1ef988d7f89b602c58394a9447
'2017-02-02T11:06:04-05:00'
describe
'2146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDW' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d8d18c8da9eef4e3c4d0b83fafbead8e
b826dda11aafe24f52816dd0104098f77ef61384
'2017-02-02T11:05:51-05:00'
describe
'212073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
d9b22b64c5ac7771c88faae569d2db81
47cd3effca21bdeaf754518e2bf782eb178b2bae
'2017-02-02T11:06:05-05:00'
describe
'322388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9b1d39072873d85955dd23899c825f05
a2aa325d59c04b16a4cfad2d191768fc0cd8290e
'2017-02-02T11:07:48-05:00'
describe
'53112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADDZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6c128e4f4dca1512da4c7b66c1277159
a446c7bb5bda5dbbe6f94240e67e059469c4329b
'2017-02-02T11:07:12-05:00'
describe
'98786' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
13b3f567a3c6fadd3814ccbe99f419a6
8823bcf393fd954279a7ab3ad420c2533e584a92
'2017-02-02T11:07:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
f3a2133a62384f0ad1c78b2bd3303c77
0afc18cae518e46f334f43274fbd1d3a65c74428
'2017-02-02T11:06:00-05:00'
describe
'2149' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a4e46a5fa2aa64efa24e276d26a8af08
4aa0e91a655e997e98801f6d699c0983e6ed9c5b
'2017-02-02T11:06:53-05:00'
describe
'217509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADED' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
81fd1c2df9b11953b9ecf4022f0da88e
6e4884d483a32b1d08a86896aea3e238186198ac
describe
'357313' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3be35d33793dada5fbc331e0512671e6
44480f2ab4f3d0864bd337ef98c5b6c7a682b343
describe
'51923' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
97bdf4950c2d8a99ab7bc8debfcf1c27
2f3d49996a46bc402101b4d66e6abb5980b51c23
describe
'110131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
1c91c185cfe13b7517d47ede617f3c4b
d129e3cf49594be4c45c6e81a8df98516b1a70d4
'2017-02-02T11:07:41-05:00'
describe
'1464900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
afc37f8952c5727a648504c9500b9159
3ebaa4a9dcf950cd102ce4f77b3f80f4c7dc9242
'2017-02-02T11:07:50-05:00'
describe
'2103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
6837bd595d30dbc496604c78ab125ab6
5e05ded6e9cb019132fa851f4e829ca9c337f580
describe
'151240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEJ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
9769e3be64436fc3724d395741770ee2
a0c09dd1b682219a74a609a2580f01a2296a8e06
'2017-02-02T11:07:26-05:00'
describe
'250564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEK' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
98d87f609947da8b444e850a3a07f44f
b7559486ca11d5c35d18af65da1b0a096aec9861
describe
'41839' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
7d7592b0fbfbc72e2481a9709e90be61
0148d63b83187f71165e69f83f61f20d9d2f71db
describe
'84466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEM' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d52c50e6158db7c529fae11ec2a15241
feb240aefb0f234a665fefab8058e9f853cef44c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEN' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b7186fac5380672c37161f5d9e15f985
9058e38ad240a9082869d638c8062467ff0249ee
describe
'1901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEO' 'sip-files00019.txt'
de04ff087ff9420acb890309bff47366
48e768363a841d1e2fac4abd43be340857822651
describe
'229596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bb035d4a1e71dba65d78a0270107df68
f86276b2114c445f91352ae34548f157445c2de9
'2017-02-02T11:06:58-05:00'
describe
'377302' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEQ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
39de1cc4938d0211234f604cf66488d6
74ad34a645e21b62225c6961982287dde44cabeb
'2017-02-02T11:06:10-05:00'
describe
'55019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADER' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e8d90a7fdcd6ec803c6403c8745c1849
7587747442c31f12c68f51740f6644bf7a1abfa0
describe
'113587' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADES' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
697b19254a0af92ebd8a13d16f7054b7
423425d459bf68c7b7bb64faf73972d0d3b56c84
describe
'1469242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADET' 'sip-files00020.tif'
98dcbcccb907f088e1c22dcd497c71bc
09e645a84005701e7186e2014e18fcc48b56512d
'2017-02-02T11:06:51-05:00'
describe
'2221' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
f26ddcab99406eb03d90f8b39b17c65b
2ccb12b3e18f996b4406919db8b8fbc9dd807ac1
describe
'222269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEV' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f2caa0826172d5443a5e2411ff1dbaec
f9b0ae0f0331a3a0c335497efd3fafab1e2f7a9a
describe
'345773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEW' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f590e9e03d7d779d27ea6bc245138373
a7265d1d763c6361a45e7f25634b3d819add720f
describe
'54707' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e4a2142a2267033e59f03c5160b02b0d
107826934c5e44e34f0c838bf5818cf5a126a191
describe
'104251' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8dc70027523e1853028360e231bdfa08
c96cad609a77989552e7f75ca7c0b0cb4e9d4181
'2017-02-02T11:06:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADEZ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9d6e93e952c842bb9a39654cb8ef9db7
93fbc4441a76ecea9ffd7dcbc3a61e4fd96e13e3
describe
'2171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d34d6b383fe4e8b0a34a5b53f8145a23
8bb6bd0aab7303099cc35a8e77fadaadaf448e44
describe
'174851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ea79e3847a410e6bc747c643a5abb407
c3e0e58747f658f4073d22798a793ec2c08d4039
'2017-02-02T11:05:50-05:00'
describe
'132120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a1450d27c4999335cf4f4cf2a58a58d7
652e67d5d2c38d2eec043aa7e43aabe2b16df9f5
describe
'3081' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
6a94fdd8a0e570b5b7f3519853fe2e7b
0cd1373d965562228180ccc177124326e5024c73
describe
'36971' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
da3fe4421fcce8e65fa6914f42aea863
3f16414126d5e08a9358ed36642a825fd88150a7
'2017-02-02T11:05:41-05:00'
describe
'1668798' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
30e69b90361b5cb9fe13735703756435
0e475619250210900bfbbe41cdbc70c5d6841d0f
'2017-02-02T11:06:46-05:00'
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
84fc0b884558dfaa4b7648784c70b7df
c5b5f30403b1d80183b385e58897cb3df19fc08b
'2017-02-02T11:06:09-05:00'
describe
'245851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
4a1d8b3651f03077a36a307fb0e3d85a
97c1ae538886541dfd4e50b2e7e432d3023333b2
describe
'351412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
4e3f5b426005abc9f5a92938d74b6c6a
d0224c6d2fd0099f6d285f681395f260ad1b4b50
'2017-02-02T11:06:49-05:00'
describe
'53254' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
49ebca5da0a347254f387c7efe8146a6
293dcde4e0dba66a95270a4830e658fe7c9194a8
'2017-02-02T11:06:02-05:00'
describe
'107145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
065aea3d6fef447864d9df67f5aef978
c33111d57d07f04951c099f79a9e3bf489068c99
describe
'1751926' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
876877712a6e645756e886472c28035e
eeaef1cfb5fa6f8e0d76d3cff1187fa4e914f1a7
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
543332cf3399b06f4d0767b56db5f8e1
a04e2f5da1e60a5de3d2b595f3c245326b957c6c
describe
'223081' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFN' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ef3052714264d947ae109476d185fc69
9e4f1a3eb008a9d7f8e6846fdfb48d4c56cc34ce
describe
'357301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFO' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3425f9d4948ea8e98fd648a0e199ec4a
2fa75182bb5c916533029c8e90be9c15a355c044
'2017-02-02T11:07:38-05:00'
describe
'55499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFP' 'sip-files00024.pro'
0f3f40fa366004923e1acf6700d601f4
2ee4f0b10fb9f580b6ba22f95a04dc0f3f9a4d66
describe
'107622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFQ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
239d07fbff263f0dbed4c2e20c357146
ce09540fbdbb126436e53e114741a84bfbe3ebbd
describe
'1565334' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
7a21027121ea42c6956d408b7bf18938
63bcd900cf0cb9506e038f3c33364f147c97e99d
describe
'2198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFS' 'sip-files00024.txt'
ceab258ae1adb02954e91fffb4c49963
aa6687a14e3f88e7b91d89a659d81e8b78903dab
'2017-02-02T11:07:34-05:00'
describe
'148415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFT' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
2ee5b6026048a9fe2af682b4845615ba
dbc96d874986442eabd77b470274b26b62187bb6
'2017-02-02T11:07:49-05:00'
describe
'232089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b1826e174acd48d957e8ca8bd3cae06d
64b635160a29839fb9a53c8a2b76c687a7842e9b
'2017-02-02T11:07:20-05:00'
describe
'5816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFV' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e5804935718b7815700c10996ca670aa
2d3df693b4232593ea70b89f7acf57201f8f8dfd
describe
'75224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFW' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
89a211ba58dc71cc684008c9fa140c0c
7c7fa3a8d4d6b3cbd847b70a3ba76c31994e6b96
'2017-02-02T11:07:06-05:00'
describe
'1703602' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFX' 'sip-files00025.tif'
03ebafb77e9485baa89aeeb008e6837c
9547068845a4c2806354e8f7a6b48245e9ea4859
describe
'358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFY' 'sip-files00025.txt'
4f3fd5e29f8237463d8b880ac12a2676
0061ea35fedf4eb45a161445579c440d9ebef27a
'2017-02-02T11:06:27-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'209698' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADFZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
01fa56ad7d4ba24ad8e2340b8ed496ea
d4933fa4374d98a01ed9544e24e17f7ea8d8c885
'2017-02-02T11:06:39-05:00'
describe
'325741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
27de97ecdcea5452c206554c83274639
bfe85d1f31a68ae7457250498e563702b851c64d
describe
'49669' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e4ea7b99df731e54524173ff86b9dc64
0a99b742737e1668e6dc0e6482b342dfa15be573
'2017-02-02T11:06:17-05:00'
describe
'96175' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e3637e3977118e3fa3ff598dfa4ec657
7657566ed078205808897b7dfc18adfdd8f2d6eb
describe
'1632434' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
6aef2ea8d339f153db066b19ce20d451
774fe7483a0b81c4417487d164e97662c47c08a0
describe
'1984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d76ee9b90f160aeb016f5c6c41c33c96
a4ae6fc575e80c658e722aceef597ae36675f333
'2017-02-02T11:07:24-05:00'
describe
'224041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
55d0954a71234d857fa78cd41d1fd107
d9ee845e55b1e6242fc4965aca55ea72c34c02f4
'2017-02-02T11:07:05-05:00'
describe
'328951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
26350a4fe46f798beb535decf5113ca8
cb7682523faf4bfaf8bbc02b9d813765b6724ae3
'2017-02-02T11:06:50-05:00'
describe
'53017' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
9928fc0aa628e600e7fe0b3fbce50894
d18bcff15767919c58d209cc965f39a75ea74edf
'2017-02-02T11:07:09-05:00'
describe
'99748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
91a746c5614702cf04fcf43a76d9ce2a
ca413b01f399e6a0315ae2c67e9a5c80a070983a
'2017-02-02T11:07:52-05:00'
describe
'1708278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a7a87046d74c2264005c4ae82f9a0ca5
afdfd5c51f529d82fe02d9949dd075c585f5a84e
describe
'2105' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a0122062ec9b052d0f9dbeeca5c90dce
d779da58e51bc8c4569fa5c5b9f7b1610d931691
'2017-02-02T11:07:37-05:00'
describe
'219179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
09ccab10f744eb95fe3adfcc94a80158
bcda925a5ef2e7e8886ca7fffb90ba437bfa8016
describe
'358535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
62688c32e3ecd05cefe1203c7f57a19f
36ed518aac2dbed6bb49ad0782c11e3544d0d83f
describe
'54009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
37464dcc1cd5942ad2a66ec247c5c8a6
71977cb54257e3a8a26806f90c479ff583c0b5ec
'2017-02-02T11:06:03-05:00'
describe
'107407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
996c125ff8f5bc05ed78276ca12fc0f5
a214ae04ffda8253553e9e2b2aa848b4ed591455
'2017-02-02T11:06:37-05:00'
describe
'1593686' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9dcc034a8b5e92aaa4307f35118b3071
ece116a78db1e1531a75b30c2e409b70a93621ea
'2017-02-02T11:06:13-05:00'
describe
'2140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
833c9650caf8f9f9f02878efe83cf89e
b5eef9d4c88197ad54e80d10984b941d7366e541
describe
'221284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGR' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c63bf8f7ef9dcaf11fcdcfd92d7e7244
1b8fa45e872ae2f9cc3e7c6a4f65b0df83835848
describe
'335084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
1b484a28af70f5bdb3943aaee075627f
766bc0e1061a9c12d5f8e2168e97db306425fcef
describe
'53474' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
74f361c22e8b2c131f10f11e7e5c3b47
cffc58735a2c9f256fcb2e62bb7fba4bee8dc9ba
describe
'100607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGU' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
b793b3fea9f28387340e06735e7ab697
ec78ea3f5b50b4fe9bd55cd385b899b20b389a19
describe
'1683794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGV' 'sip-files00029.tif'
37d12af89ce749bd158997fba2155ce0
09d6902688a7dbac66605485d0c96077dbc90e9f
'2017-02-02T11:05:38-05:00'
describe
'2147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGW' 'sip-files00029.txt'
bf55e7bf18a7a9fab90b367f77f6b262
9b8c12183479a08b0fe4783fba362f87d1bcdef8
'2017-02-02T11:05:49-05:00'
describe
'222518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
08da176daf926539e854b3d03ad32847
5c9385d22279da8bb1a4916388eaa428f9b44152
describe
'351318' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2e5340bb34390b68704cef5175b73625
b17da2424ff5343e0e88bf33da301499e0f45c0c
'2017-02-02T11:07:18-05:00'
describe
'55379' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADGZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
db046a76a802aa99725adcacfa55e421
f16c15044c49809ce170518ad740b03e4603cc79
describe
'106011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
df1afe7ce848edfb7cd55dd8269d1fe7
1b3caf2782ec5648d7ece94fd16ecae48cd2813b
describe
'1598144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e4fef28a835f36ffa6f8846e93504416
bdf3e0fd7751d93f79e2b9315f4f3380a3fed24b
describe
'2193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ace122d0faca9efc03f5af647d21ea5a
566e40aa870d10674a2468aa333d5b687bb232c6
describe
'134447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHD' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
23be9b9e4bd491f44302ed15b4bee29a
a0ab0d14f35b68eef7f84e710fb4c690dcbe141a
describe
'231708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHE' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
dc4035ae30fe46b83ceba82d16f0067c
4bca4b3228d63ca060723268e595be98c83f71f5
describe
'4269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHF' 'sip-files00031.pro'
76da41b81f6f771e23fb217d3f475074
efa8bca4768708307ea4776df53331dcc010850c
describe
'76220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHG' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
f89efa670114f4fef51fc4c949ab5bd9
458d0da4044fbebb7791781376e5e01c0c9b9b25
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHH' 'sip-files00031.tif'
a38ac08aa15dbb06243efc17b61ccd07
7d011c32bd0e3150cf336e7ecfd984c283c52780
'2017-02-02T11:06:48-05:00'
describe
'199' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHI' 'sip-files00031.txt'
48ac4b5201462817232952a46992e496
f19cc9f63b3b398442c2870fd68294fec1e60bd3
describe
'223283' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
0d2ccc18c90e5ba3b108d19ec61736a4
9c8d72a1ebf15e9ec453f89bc1a18b93518711f9
'2017-02-02T11:05:44-05:00'
describe
'329276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
77da85992080db99a679b57e271f7a39
8ac8a663741beb075d45c27c0bba8b399da1eb22
'2017-02-02T11:07:33-05:00'
describe
'54091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
414cfb438a53aa1a7cdb6fc63e9e1617
d3931fdd8d7ee8e5377a25b197a692d2bad32ec6
describe
'97280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
af5f47f0d5db6ee7f2ac965e5e31fc13
a2c6f550e1f8710de0c12a45743b9a5cf36f06ec
describe
'1696024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c1e1868432eb12568d4066536ae01676
5d81bd9a59e7b1a182b8eb0f109ef833c166641e
describe
'2166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
be475b7eb038b43f1dac2b634459302f
9d7ee74be830d183c50a0aa5c1608aabb7506d0c
describe
'205957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
aa077eb682ce868a3f91278cab748bd3
df539343093ae0a982ebb9eadfd8cba0bd607eec
describe
'318281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
acf782fa073d51a24dc08b1141b259b7
26b2d35ff2a8e04c801c74fdba05de0ed89795b2
describe
'50526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
da0571b0b619ba201211a4e8eb82a850
360aa21d7548322f3a3ce6818b2904e973c5e86c
describe
'97121' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
739fe295dd3fd61c8fe0387a3afae2ba
bdd006af617d7427239403535ab19d1decb0dcad
describe
'1620554' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
30c068cd60b29cb5aa4af75011e787ed
48c38f28ff3b36863f312583a09f9285eeb29540
describe
'2036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
72fa33eb4a4552acf8eeb9907bdb4d65
53f38b890a1d384c16d7fe8637cedee2a76288d9
describe
'219294' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHV' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
a914029d9ec09a78e3b18e916b4cfd1f
b9a026aa0b7e0cb9183644d4201d25e9344bb12e
'2017-02-02T11:07:00-05:00'
describe
'326239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
6bff1627dcae27cabc8c37bbe05e38ae
31df2f80a465b45843f4cdf09612d80c67d7c324
describe
'51674' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHX' 'sip-files00034.pro'
a1485de579979d5be40380be2e5f9fd6
4780bc05fab651aa14e40abeea05761b953e0307
'2017-02-02T11:06:07-05:00'
describe
'97851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
d0e0c492a994825bc5467b25d9b80cbd
bace48cf439cd929c8a53ed7d4c68196209b83ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADHZ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
29d55de0379f2ee8104a118665adadf9
d60f27ec8c8e9043a45f151daebc97dd61055b50
describe
'2109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIA' 'sip-files00034.txt'
d5e1e33ab997e13d47603738a2080892
b43b894c922a4da86e25b59f96535fa54c31d201
describe
'202783' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
adee740a9e71f546e973b065a02b1a53
35788a40824267a8c1d48023d2af19f472f603ec
describe
'360281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
cf092111eb1829db8ed9c63b2452095a
5d5dd105b7c9d09b5839f1013077f25b2b611ae6
describe
'53235' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADID' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5da03e7220524a22bcfc601e3c05da44
afb1e419f6644dea3c13a7af86cda640fe860663
describe
'116069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
da7a2f283fcea0fd21918fc867a07534
6fe8d21ac01221979badc826de1acb737698b88b
describe
'1351366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
da8694e4affce7d4a7a0d483d729aa38
58677e420e2948c91ca1dc3e2a7bd5c5d4e0fcc8
'2017-02-02T11:06:45-05:00'
describe
'2208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
97786e030a53dd76efe4a83b0851bef5
c01cd376d184d9760d4ab134b08d96ce52927b53
describe
'202017' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIH' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
da70cfccd1dc6fdd5cf178234729abae
ef96456e046e867607f7e14c23727fd192ee1af2
describe
'341790' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADII' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a003bc54ff32e37c41a3c2f766ac234d
35c49c7f8bd7cf35362d8206193adaf41c1d1d12
describe
'51444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
c87b1b553c573e8af38f9e8fc324b49f
96db3037bfc4191989516b708a7e08c4859df8ec
describe
'110852' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
53431230295d44aaa23bb1c7c68562e8
2adea9d77f7cde10f5f6be8ba0404241c984733c
'2017-02-02T11:07:08-05:00'
describe
'1337090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIL' 'sip-files00036.tif'
a1eb7e49c04f8d382e4c9fb383d52bb3
5048a71f1b26be84de57c0bd3469c86eb300afed
describe
'2117' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6adce523dea1ca1735a3c6c457d1f419
a2fed68908f4ee19e37f2da81f519271690c5203
describe
'236123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
02383d3a1f07a2d83cb8934b9b015dce
4b057f9a9c1ae496e6243c6a645563c832bb32a6
describe
'371725' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a297c153a4f2745d879471e7a4043690
03c733ea2ce89afc55ec100e064f0b96ce597a63
describe
'56306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
8e8bf2cc303783af91419047f7044f6d
0bddecbcabda384bfa12b6a1cde12cfa8dd16b4d
describe
'111909' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5e2741a7c1877c44ef70b747458d8617
f4f317574a737c390e6db51cc24699da121da10b
describe
'1503670' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1b59fe4f1ecf5455b24051fb1cde5627
32f1b18f73a9dfd134d0c6a7d69f6df580ea84d2
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
0f6e84a6e897b6daedde1b64a43bd1cf
45783aa52f3d2942427d76ea87447696b730580f
describe
'207111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
10d6e5461b4f36ea8a4023a6d842528e
29e504b4e236859d1ebe862fea2a12338f1c7b8b
describe
'349965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
080b391e29f4c06841f12484db41b309
ba922791b335eb0cd1003847976017ab74e380ae
describe
'48871' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
60d71807fe62b9599569db9c73c02714
ae604fb98a15ae54f566547a19349060334048c9
describe
'110099' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
ace3c63a3cdd7359bfa3fa20432d7406
cc75f7b3e9d16a737bcdd2aebb675b73ca58a2ff
describe
'1368170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
45743fdc6404eadeb3699b44358e5505
0bcf0d018eeaf38a6fc5e37a09e88c7242541665
describe
'1987' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
a94855d5d2b8f1e6b3f48e3658f1638a
562fbd90aa1f80a2992ec61e676e06ea413523af
describe
'220129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADIZ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ceaf39c71d4a58a312bd48727c62973d
ccd384344b973795fd65a366378676408812dd63
describe
'373507' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJA' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b5aaee7e4572b716d3a29c53a49d58aa
2101fda6d4a86829fdc8338747805645926e195e
describe
'53722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJB' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1c1958e971f6e304b621545bc634146f
8e72dd63a3b73acfd0f9eed5efb167c35a75b679
describe
'115551' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJC' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f92b09ab71465d22c5ca92fe2cb92c8e
e92939740ab7398ff4f0f01c830c3601bca3f728
describe
'1424248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
5e26d028511d5d4efa48b3a45da7e2e3
eb331bbf9847815cc5b75f1ec1c787074337832e
describe
'2139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJE' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3e1914439cc734f7eba740ba919c9810
27058979adf9d10a61f22861ee72f0385240258f
describe
'203496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
51e573016ba3567e3dde1b9be59f1640
0f380002497519f7a50289ecdbf9c004bc1ce619
'2017-02-02T11:07:14-05:00'
describe
'349444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
43ecf0f0166c405006eee097cb147ac1
309560857f4475f7089f3c61026af81a1cf7e44d
describe
'49716' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
a234279d61f9685a972dab7ecad1e2f3
150f22316cde1ab14d37c7c0f503de33bf0750f9
describe
'107558' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f52807b335fd72158f8ba3c493c8a9c0
76a3cd12b5cef283297f1c9104de27882135a5fd
'2017-02-02T11:07:19-05:00'
describe
'1330318' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
00c9ec403c4251b8d7e220146398bad6
c0d8138e74dabbf97743e2c71e4eb93215323515
describe
'2010' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
ae034eb2bc97a83552cc9fae1e68849e
d25e1ce6ca6d71dc6cc760428a9967b958db8544
'2017-02-02T11:07:17-05:00'
describe
'190529' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d5ede9ead5a59f0fa809b2928c3291f0
e6c52130e441a7b7446251ca93bb546f79fbc5c0
describe
'315720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
fa63b398024ba9f441fead53a79f3918
38b4378b152058b6e53e77f90e18d10f50a0ebbb
describe
'46255' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJN' 'sip-files00041.pro'
10a4174f476719ed57695fc2101a6011
38a0bf54f65aa6e32a41f1a71b7a0b53e8a12ddd
describe
'100557' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c7bf49e5ed108fef4dbcf4a197bdb6c8
76f9a81185bcbc718ea1b4919a35441710a98599
'2017-02-02T11:07:47-05:00'
describe
'1445408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
48650f0692f435cd93c0447c240e1053
ed47cabba2e84704cf74ec38869273432bf02efc
describe
'1913' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ec490b4f262eacaef7f7f1a7e08a4196
d47c650d4d467ffc25caa2e628019e96e1901b17
describe
'209508' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJR' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
cc46ad8f3bfbc08ef114769fa7012291
d252d09992dd4c726094f93fca80800fbd8ea7b8
describe
'350461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
17e45f4ebd40dee31c42187bf27c9338
e531b1288196c637fac744b6518776d5f7ffe0cf
'2017-02-02T11:06:23-05:00'
describe
'49799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c1b7010b4f8c3eb7252ad6c0f8140ebc
c24061ee3cd211aa9132e36c7b7bdee204977760
describe
'110230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
f659b82ccd6c22be9a890cac22d261b0
66ce67c78835e53eb024a571449d9138a9300e9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
b166e9a02040534acfdd6f8c6257ed9e
97a9498472c937fdfe630abb4d10ddf45aaf45fb
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4010534c291050bf9329382c3b35c54b
1a0ca92acdbfaed941b3862a0acb6f4f80560626
'2017-02-02T11:07:13-05:00'
describe
'194839' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
55a6acfc8bc760c64278b01e86a0c9be
7d7933e13b402fe15f439837791852aec043b9be
describe
'341696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
1ddf1a1a16e2e5ac32541a5c05a4fde8
c5a1881370453de2293ab3257536d07e27248982
describe
'45684' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADJZ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d4b4db0ee4bf0c1815190443fa185a1c
5a374213f96fdec751136a5c0f93d9a0f0115003
'2017-02-02T11:06:56-05:00'
describe
'109345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
5d22771d4a0f0ff7e050ee1d9bbbcb9c
b7ccbb5906493c2dec1f353ab8b1f10618cfd43a
describe
'1389150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKB' 'sip-files00043.tif'
30489b7f8626685c39b9fe80f76eca29
1a7d83df160a7fdc17b2899430798f95512c6204
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
1086297626e32700fc4079d05f24af78
50d63d65f55646f9402e4219c4361bdcac001e56
describe
'217208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
984739e7c84aa505eb46c132fc3580f6
055766813966616891af1f41dc3a9ec9619363da
describe
'368667' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
63237e63069e14c26aa3113f3a7d9c9a
b8fa43ebc4c7a5aa08d7162598f21468efadcba9
describe
'51659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
844db266c93c7c7380055170f50d1fcf
bc4e4592f46bd52e3a961a92714a339c05364147
describe
'115959' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e7c969fcfcc52cf4fb83c0c119388bf4
51dadf19dbc9c84389e828d7be9d73b7be0793e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
628bb4325ea1f9838a96515a20cd161f
ea3722aba2ae345fc5a85a746c28de8fca4deb43
describe
'2094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
29ae96a4cc9623e10e4999c9edad7ede
b9d51733c9e820bcb6b1dfc493f300bc2b04f19e
describe
'205448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKJ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
f33136a4330c7e218da0036b0a888d9b
10b5feaa537e390867a9cce91f9ce02ad4ebf712
describe
'360981' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKK' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c7ace7be75d9895db6aa7442d7ab461f
e8cae0db6e4c12fac0367d9eed4ed26ce945021e
describe
'45157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
85b3e5b86744a83e190c087bf8139a6c
4720ac450cfcf2ee56e66e5185fb4d9dd10fe612
describe
'114031' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d314e011e6cef7b245d131a83c85f54a
54763f23dc9f83f29ed3ad58d3e3094807aaaa84
describe
'1412798' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b02d84c59429edfc5d9ee566cd366d61
ba4f1d9d5acf469ac138a0a91059b3c074b4e733
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
c9bc5677357b1ce27f1f23d32d7763c4
eb02cd0640aee3b3712727fa30f01a1337bddea6
describe
'145060' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9dbbd378b66aae08a5efd6cf5469c1c2
9414f7b0db37b0df75379ca95f7d1e89eeac502c
describe
'128733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
547bab88b25bfc3083190c9868a1cf03
6c5f48df8f139d1159b11fd8a2bd15e941542010
describe
'3573' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
4137fbb47da465459923232ce4da6428
aa5455731cb30e9d1014ce37fed9710a2a0803ee
describe
'49137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
838edaadec64fffffde873fa91fc369b
ed41a9901d754ec622e61d84e0fdf8fbfb4399cf
'2017-02-02T11:07:15-05:00'
describe
'1591804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
cd8c09d3607fbefe7722dde6beb8d8f3
0352aa5615aaef5525a93178a8e900c2f43029ce
describe
'178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
86fc66dfe87cad5899a7d73975326413
6f22490128e29ba643d50a8e6ddbd35331da8b8c
describe
'144415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKV' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
ce3a0184996d52411bd00724840979b3
ec4e51bb0861e319805e92cfaee9265955caa538
describe
'241782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKW' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b81906249d00d966cca83b2fdd3458ce
f8d15aab30c4ef905ffc04c5b5f8ab96ad1f4c58
describe
'33581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKX' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ad4ae1fe8c2d7e22a5e95dfeb520bfd5
e672d3b9b48874a03f1530255021521b008dfc2d
describe
'76482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKY' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
43b7d02a028626aa7302895c4d5b827f
7098459ae1e64f5ab48dc1d38a2fd2e0139eadc6
describe
'1343868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADKZ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
053fa3f53c9d29b8243b49b835812f5f
e55fd96def9092b065f05ed24293730b92dd941d
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLA' 'sip-files00047.txt'
efe5ed6ec773c123e1553f93ac568369
9fbcb4e235be3bd1745eba75dbe6721b28bcd581
describe
'186146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9cbefb5071b07f5a02707d75c68b52cf
b8661f10bc0edbd9bde3d03cdb8f10f8385c9cdb
describe
'364655' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLC' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
487b4864e13eb0e2f676c3e1323841c2
c3ca07c1f87e988166fa01f2b92c58b049d51f87
'2017-02-02T11:07:53-05:00'
describe
'44293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLD' 'sip-files00048.pro'
3fa863d306cf6ec3dc8f2f1014a0d4c4
8899cd05bbba82abb2b1e1c47bfb12d6157b2144
'2017-02-02T11:06:14-05:00'
describe
'120090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLE' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
acee52cbbabca547e056ab09cdf35cb9
5f079539d876277e2c6e32996c7dbb743a9ddd89
describe
'1225914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLF' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9fb576d06e9e52c600f8a5cce91afad8
bc9319f5ef1489c85108e61304e9bdc7a1df5827
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
39d5ca90614c6d60c346b5f43a1e9649
750a0fd015ca684d9043a856e276f40b842aa95a
describe
'108867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c1b141526bcf649420d2ba672b938adc
5a18a879c9cfb57082f44814d12ed0e49fd6c9de
'2017-02-02T11:06:25-05:00'
describe
'189443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
77d2361cbff623d03ebb2827c874de11
650bd58b24c51769566dfc1e36d8d0dd167b645f
describe
'27346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e8b971bae8998643f88034cca8be1b7f
345029d11007048f9ac426df6f185f1d1bbd9091
describe
'69287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e4e08808f8b63af479a4117f05fd1285
2e79aa81f7b76b10a846ea59072c55c4291188bc
describe
'1264146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLL' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8189d5f9355b59f934c2a51ab3513f4c
2be81dba4864f67533cf6a88ada8233ba132a627
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
17b825ff83ef78a97e122220f8181e11
4d45d8b9032354c08b171310314467f8b31f907e
describe
'218669' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
6ade595208cbfcab86725b5589a79f38
7cfef4586d6782297ef8923a93754c2375aaa5f7
describe
'405960' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
68515aa7747cd3db9db9a69e68251906
e61b9243c6ed7bad4a874947a759c694aeab49da
describe
'53476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLP' 'sip-files00050.pro'
b7e91e7ed187641f2fdb22a182fd0665
71ad9ac634ae67ad0a643480abbd193298cfe328
'2017-02-02T11:07:30-05:00'
describe
'125844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
626701bff975e5f0fc5b70344d147703
0f099445e15202e58520b63dda8b023c84c9b269
describe
'1312290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8cc1ef36380186e208adb8a6dd42d84f
f26ea3e365d006bc53ea4b90f0882e3804b89ba7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLS' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d098773567415cf99f619fa51598f91d
08ba756e37bcbd7bdd617dd9620f8cd525267124
describe
'230179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLT' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
29e6f437d558d3d883a5c3dd48f95b02
23bffd724d168252224feda40f796dd20e05891c
describe
'401892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLU' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6405a973022caa3225f735fa5c3ae675
1eb9f9eeb24bfc014c4448fe31b2c4ff0d42719a
describe
'56520' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLV' 'sip-files00051.pro'
92e80cfc08e80a1a9dd3f69a32b4f4dc
de1c675da607fd79affdea87ad738928b15d2a08
describe
'123054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLW' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
74aeeb77f7daf9400b81995b319281ef
805ca1ba8b954dcf7e2fa64791477457939676da
describe
'1312288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLX' 'sip-files00051.tif'
83723744bcdf5b4e760c03a61a7f7972
30ee2fe63a8fd87587d5820a10cb5ff4759d2045
describe
'2246' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
356004f5001715cf2501a5c91cfd0e0e
dfa19e0f07008146a4e8c91522c2fe98a9ac4d7a
describe
'205905' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADLZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
76ac3fa6e697b4d931c07b48f73023e4
6fc76eaed92ea24412186e386de3b061323e7f33
describe
'376165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
819d9ed9668ad56cdaeb011f9165fe3d
3d7898e5b0e91462914b98ad1287f07197ef4cb4
describe
'50150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMB' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a85693a5ceae0e540bafe958f753dfdf
891ad2abfbded8e7f096379ddaef42e7decf4166
describe
'119330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
3fb80d6f9f3903d1a6f9946ab608d902
8dbbfda2781757b02a5d943e873466ac5af96dd5
describe
'1331310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
4447f7f7c71c69eeb9b76eac95ccbd64
f66a12fc387a6e3fb0d4da90cd23d55d7573044f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADME' 'sip-files00052.txt'
94eeb2f097cb296230ec3f03aa65daf8
866d09f84ddd340b917fa0b344a5a45aef6f321b
describe
'214470' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d351841b92ff5a36e8085c4d6d320d3c
34f8764c483b04e38c63bc52bcb86b83b3e6cd7a
describe
'375179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cbd8f30b424dc85919834aa0e57ca7c6
04c69449bffdf9423d7431fb18ce7cb16c084320
describe
'51848' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
50626f68f5b0f3c9779401873a90f8ed
af6f12f829b587caa5823eea86735e3a67d113b9
describe
'116600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3023d11184aabb7715b8bff02c395d8d
c5c9e72202f265f8efaa27e5f2fe8a4e2dc4e5bc
'2017-02-02T11:05:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMJ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ff739225527122d5b9a16cbefc4eb143
a68b1675fc7e7d72747bccf695dad965f806419d
describe
'2100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
e9c8cbe3ed034d9372b9ba2c355a13a6
aee004eef07fbedf30a829f250a86be193bfa9e4
describe
'234302' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADML' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
34956d3fb58207b87498dcc6f083eb38
37d9a5b8d5110f28914266aeb62a3329021793d5
describe
'399571' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
45cfda3823cfd22d7ee07db50d4bd6b0
b7c6fbcafb6f03b5c9f9598d9b39a923fc9a8ba1
describe
'56167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMN' 'sip-files00054.pro'
23b0264735fc80f59f8868ea2e5de606
caa79816cf787f7f06a4ae12855bc335dfa4241b
describe
'121809' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
be1039db63bea15fc853464eafc4f238
a7e01bf5a1f087caeec18e949e3859b9e2215b7f
describe
'1404390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
68705b44a812f20caa22d1a299510c73
0ac6c524ec96ed9d06dbe2daf3915ddb896c2a83
describe
'2249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMQ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
98fd47cdcbc3102508d9dc48a53fe720
ad6a33fe5a7d5a5ee5b96a7745b5e71f6498141d
describe
'124859' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMR' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
47c545e1db42a29ac98e956ecbd3458d
d4844a9ef6a2b3bf814e57406434f1a214ba8f69
describe
'204014' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMS' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
cdde405268e5b636ec5df47a8abdb44d
a4288ae43b4969be117843eaf611eebf0fe959ed
describe
'28328' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
b0af266c8417b01077ee86bcede0fd4b
3a6963b0714956998fdddbddec94f5ca5b714235
describe
'67624' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMU' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2ba056c46990b1defd36c1c18f75a857
ec81cd6d608a6a233b5f2cf788b6b17e5b0eb4ea
describe
'1386174' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMV' 'sip-files00055.tif'
318002fe16e6b95321a90fb4ab6afc89
4b59046e1c50343dc52935db6a5da38e1d5d18b3
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMW' 'sip-files00055.txt'
e085a8dcc718e23c8899c1c4a6c0bf45
bfa0adeceec793c41903a82be56c5ce448996f05
describe
'208552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
41d6a4cbfdb5a326e79ce17c9ab6eabc
bf44f3c41f3cb280f5eef9f083cd71334e01cd5e
describe
'397102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f5f90d298f007f4ba1140123f8fa0612
edc82d71f578e6a82c689e8fa5754bc02b70238e
'2017-02-02T11:07:01-05:00'
describe
'50297' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADMZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f900407fe0226c0a11c823dd2ea680c8
9ce258d103a1cf926d98ba1687fc66be8c91591f
describe
'125564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
cb10620284e2ac20dc20a4a1ba0c697c
951f9e66c1e74b2898f91101578dde57bd10757e
describe
'1274426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
ff41051f169a31b35e624e26e16117e6
112c4107b35d14a8cabfa5646610c56d391edd7c
describe
'2023' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a24ca9e5dbb14fe366d48398c4b49cd0
aaff2fdf84b96a78a56a845f9f4a0a873660f887
describe
'218746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADND' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6ca700429cf2d5401d50654f5df4a107
7397c3afc24593ead23fd6f479feeaa9887f4652
describe
'371722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNE' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
a8b41ed53e372e79ebf5252f02d6d02e
897d53575b1283aed8a7ce475611d58cba5120ec
describe
'55041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNF' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8bd70203e23501a981b3280ecf685832
86c506ce2ddeb059d63a86a7ddd4663524c9c8e5
describe
'112046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNG' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4663eb7e7b153d01fff5cd2b289f0963
8d8184f0d6411f1dbf28b519dc36742b0fda6d00
'2017-02-02T11:07:11-05:00'
describe
'1301340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNH' 'sip-files00057.tif'
cf690439620fb5722ba1ad4a21c68767
5ab36ad514404121ce7b2f220ab3cdfefa32ed39
describe
'2231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNI' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4083820662e1da6b000cca73b3609965
b8f2471fc3daa8d97c48e798b19b60f08a036f3c
describe
'218940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f349162fce1f6193bb96ea8520e2cd7a
f22645949f9c79e346a6213c55950ffa42a029d7
describe
'408649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
78a7ec76c39cd0377aaf8119feaca216
e79aa4f4492113eb902414039e02b1ba377fd9de
describe
'53156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f1deaefa65721c13f57cb690a73d9423
69ee862600fce3375755eda29fe194f0688d0abf
describe
'125877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2555e84adbae1c56336bfb857eaa5932
a2aaf6741d7eb6267dc0367b7c4104c2bd50ce5d
describe
'1292054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
fb56b7ceb6970d39d70115e0cd4c9d70
c15bb1bdd47c2d7913bd8cbc90ccd04f2a881e9f
describe
'2130' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e8d375b39c26529a7a11b117611ae9d0
96a0e083a9be634813ba7129c5a1641edb9af25a
describe
'96535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
3f639ec63978ab114d41ae5b6536ed86
76fdc45ce990e60d277682b23d0d5dec3f470f2f
describe
'204406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
eba6dca0fd878064aad370b932e1257e
f3931b13e1b670bc9bc2bf7059b38a20092d379b
describe
'10509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0160276d916a0e11b35d256310ac209f
112339ce7b02ada97d9e5cfd146fd32964a90c9f
describe
'66066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
abbbcb602e2ae2e927480b8bc657f7bc
b60d84f38dc678f3b27105706742b1a6d9c09321
describe
'1370722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b9ed69bd20f4869a56cdaf5f9667777b
51732e4c95d80ccfd911139fb0c0ff847a1246d5
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5c5f53f94ba1297dda3c4dd71290f94e
1ab0140ce8f7db3f54145dd8d20dfaa01abf7b3f
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'231291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNV' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8ee6b263f7c58594b9d9a26ceeaeda9e
cb38843020c60a8e333bcdf9ea68d769f98bba8c
describe
'395655' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
03d34b5f51e7881c96bd7d56f94d196b
265260bdc8d97b3c4d0251fe54146e61ef77a010
describe
'54853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNX' 'sip-files00060.pro'
efbb4ca8f39b6a2bd4cd344eca1b173b
8f906428a3700ef39655abb153e57e3e4e024386
describe
'123792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f7d82a9606f8d2ce0dfb897f50c8a520
1ee354aacabff16033f2a6eb85d689a4ae250523
describe
'1321800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADNZ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b3c69de19d54cef53c1bc78a86ead5e8
b65db1d2f3076fbf779f9b30257c9c877543685c
describe
'2184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOA' 'sip-files00060.txt'
aac6848ee807558cc7415400a67876a8
8daa582293c60ea95e7716b58cae50a531c998ea
describe
'226577' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
f897efcc281c3e6fc167e1cb055cea4d
2b78ff5440b5465cb0dc4761961806bd1b99a442
describe
'402047' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
251ede15e3ba36354dc8c837808f344b
2908b34f2d3ed111f5a92f7169f2c7f59f16cf68
describe
'54497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOD' 'sip-files00061.pro'
376fdb786529d343d08290933e8ab341
5638effa366d627fe0da51f5e3a2308b46495891
describe
'127277' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOE' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d8f7bdc7f486c5c75e8db80f9bf83da2
489cb7e31117f30a95e73e038ba4633801503013
describe
'1321710' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOF' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2c5d3b3c473e614dc2fa4f984d1eecc1
8f5d7e35692b5c22c3f521b6000d7ae56b9bd69d
describe
'2202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3f5527e8aef4611cd09a4ea70a16bd8a
aece95f4e29bd96bbc50959bb7dfe4c6f933fba2
describe
'212840' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOH' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
64ac705e8cc92183fd6a9b6ecfdefa93
e91b493e87c47d3c5c59fcf44a3ff08a197a41e7
describe
'355969' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOI' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
d4f2907deece5812aa4da9ad5e97d33f
5591593fb9eeb7f4c60c4c5fb8d0947bed1e6f29
describe
'57266' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOJ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6f637b965d9ff770592efc879d7368e4
f485f0ffbfe201cf7641c809e2444b52383cc106
describe
'109136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOK' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
0e720ab74fa66021eb93dafaa7abf27b
ef1208a3112817d95de74ad4c510070cf90cdfb1
describe
'1377574' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOL' 'sip-files00062.tif'
6bc525fae3ea85ba3c8edbb06a611e0c
0cbe7d169d196dafe154b3312106e5751b11dfa2
describe
'2381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOM' 'sip-files00062.txt'
2258e28158cafd70f8a02ca7e6ce773b
9d7e63e5653dbf50747932c2dbf199a24bb6cdbd
describe
'219252' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADON' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
b194cb943ad3f0a034f36d4a13a6211b
7a8e34bc917111184c5906b28953603256545fed
describe
'381059' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
10166cfb3fb9647476eea8191f3e1294
d6773ed9a74c121195ca027da47ae92a937f12af
describe
'58814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a1e7e17748a1bda098120eb25fd4ca83
bf705f8c2b763dff443c01ebfff72c1055701c32
describe
'117376' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
b45a6ad1a937b2393bc2357a16077011
d98940e449530953f8979d97b82fa152b4910748
describe
'1357534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
86c5afcf8e798cf7a45b635669628970
9523e82cb8a4ef0b75583670b227c81fa9c3ec1b
describe
'2498' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
193c325815e67fa31792405c9c0fa480
252e032601e1d2388be5825b2d937b2935f7d35a
describe
'216268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
718c0763b9878b9a1d77349b8e5f98b5
67454c6808af123b4f0b08eca3fa675d8a23ad37
describe
'347949' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOU' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
17f756443119fc8de074564438c5357b
edf309628807135db3c2dbdc9c18b7de34df3492
describe
'56853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOV' 'sip-files00064.pro'
55c6336da7b7c69ef7f5087997d6eff6
a7ba48155d7b5ff4a1f5b96ab8529d03f347f08b
describe
'105139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOW' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
52d41a851ecd8654db3f3e068354efa0
c2707348def003439629a579bd588b6b4d42369b
describe
'1407208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b8fa1c74482838706adb3874cf1ffc8c
976feb5a990cabd90ffefd22097952c32940ced4
describe
'2378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOY' 'sip-files00064.txt'
82bdf929cb295a1c2353ac60106ea90c
0ae9d94d5d6dbf72387ee3554767bfb08d2c3d15
describe
'195135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ec072fe19fbc0967483afcb4f90b960e
9a6ad88333f94addcde3b7477ea6f96e7556e23b
describe
'365313' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPA' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
5b1e96f9c2aa9396874ce293fc001485
fcb8f4b3e44628b6baa7337566be917e3493f474
describe
'51820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPB' 'sip-files00065.pro'
6af57eba1a77839bf88106658e8f3fbd
5cdcb65f025681f476504c0071ba0a735449f2e1
describe
'117274' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPC' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
fde1f2a2cc949e35f61f3856fb5ce50d
9a2139f59616dc1224f1c253a2212c394b071e3b
describe
'1233088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
40d4afe3c75ea8e8da59789201d8de05
4065b8acaf49670040ace8047da26658b71bf6bf
describe
'2154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPE' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f468240342fb2259f3f659ac5e0c4aa0
13a29d1254972e2d5044e22724b4ab0256a1bffa
describe
'220011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
f6aeb5338bec5ddbc451606ba8239c68
2d90dbbe5e4895904c8c30e5c5658d06eed25273
describe
'377173' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
5d47b4b1b189c1e39f181502e1e7ac8a
401f17a94931eb26b66e719eca9dd559e460bc7e
describe
'53307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
27f018a72bb8dc111f194b2d2229efed
3d6600c7fdbf91bdaf25a601d1a14827f170d703
describe
'116653' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
fa9475523cf87b6a4ca9b900bb7855da
0b24a198537597fdae04069dee5bb4faba395805
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
9485c55f9e22d2e39c5c377234d9026d
786fbce4f1d0aa32e0127435e95c4fb42792fcc5
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e5ca16e3ea20c51e8f9cb60b44336b41
cbe85b2431cb1dd43594120220a167e5b5e6b79d
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'208633' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9566b522eafd5f8c7aad1c1a62e54b01
0f37370f2cdc2f2b356b6a585b3d3cf88b0fdb14
describe
'380213' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
27fc5dfb578463ccd1b15e5ac59de2ee
92728b6fbb503c20081378c730cf51e2d72aa105
describe
'51976' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
61449b96db13dd294f66e8048151da6a
2e7fe7925cf9e14cbca25f59aceea583bb2b4631
describe
'119704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
2098fe69b0d6c5d6867f7f7b1af12f33
a05462baf6b7c002ff09b70eb85cab4c92436750
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
21e7f0b5405f58927cbd9e70314265ef
5b4173987ecc73234b0cba584d8ca39652816ab8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
249c93bc44e34ba1076f1589db602948
1bb5fec9eced16c0f59eadfa83dd477d1e90e475
describe
'223166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
3cec531b6d02ffb3f4220d9d43882b5f
04b43042201eb9ad42d8df7ca5f0db3047baa903
describe
'384929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e6629cdaf7a4b061e61dd81f04c1f496
134652ab4000cd042e35f521d600c208a917b290
describe
'53807' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
8c905a1ae800689ce8137e7468e131e9
aff573c40529c4496936ff6501ed89062f0d120a
describe
'120414' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
29e3c2710912615675a3bd1e6de5d2e2
1406aaf41b2804f3f717e61c59992772427fe353
describe
'1319010' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
7d247ae8d0eb3177cd01fae4e7e91054
ee2c6dbac5a8cb6f154c3334111b3df5daf2a280
'2017-02-02T11:07:39-05:00'
describe
'2158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
00e9c8b622aac030a0a69798e299960c
591f3097a8a2aad8381943063b1d909e8f8ca792
'2017-02-02T11:07:25-05:00'
describe
'226191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
2f6fc6060ca93a877c48bc756d7fe0f3
9d413ec64e874485b541e7af34c3bb4126c6fabe
describe
'392265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
3aca8df8ac9a91d30dc8ef8d29b17e46
c36340d536ca4c11f89adbc01af99c3e818794f7
describe
'53753' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9f93416b8ade5eb841af718badeda8c5
ff15e255bd4473da86024fa43f0e2ef27bebe4bb
describe
'122085' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
7e67f56886042406e9c851f43e9842d7
f9709227549c55f6d18d957c1b185edcf4c74bb5
describe
'1378220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6ee10e1340572360be0f6cccd1728b8e
ef17a13d87edffa649e653a8e10654f4c00470ff
describe
'2129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
be4078b1cd490be5d37707ae8cadc7c7
78d7595cdebe3313bbe65460a0b3c44512988ab7
describe
'219214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQD' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5636f4cc0eca45320be204e54af2bf89
bf68a737c21e01e1a826705e0aef88dcd072e383
'2017-02-02T11:06:20-05:00'
describe
'376243' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQE' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
72f7b565cbb7eb4ec94673072f6c2c70
303f748900b8d49a20c0820472e19236795142a3
describe
'53037' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
671f4e77c60f884a301caa7da6b78d4b
eb53367922dd5e3da14fc5b8f146ec0e4f47e85c
describe
'117347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQG' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
976127302cf0db1b04af6a18aaa9bc50
a7afa0bfc66db168be5cf35b2788f3449041a9d1
describe
'1373274' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e731e1a052e1fef2c145f85e828a5e45
e9cdcaf2d1717323afffd92d833ef412a79b0501
describe
'2123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQI' 'sip-files00070.txt'
f683c34e420f990a3486f84c42edfe7e
f35dfbfe770aaf9693aa856c10ab7e8645cbdd9f
describe
'208580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
ff560caea2372b983dc73c7fc6f53dd5
e86c93fc840f0dda8ae3f39db28bebcd8cacdb01
describe
'374760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQK' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c42bc70aca33d981d9838b30a7164578
7c454eef01e5ae58fa28709a8d00517cb44577b3
describe
'52682' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQL' 'sip-files00071.pro'
337ed30db7a580c08108ad88a2792145
14dd5244cb345dd6d9f1cf4aabe8e7a0db601a7c
describe
'119046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQM' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
73e207ac8ff7a0e23f31c41b8e62ba7d
031c3f0757f6eed4960846bd034c7e8d3e9ec5ec
describe
'1281004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQN' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b71878fbb24fd3b6591aafdf8a13d034
56b63ab0a0c11de703594388070054436bbe51a2
describe
'2174' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQO' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2f88c5c614acfce0caca2e128f674434
dddd770846039f674b9905d4c6f444873acf0775
describe
'215067' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
55a4fedb1760d1a97628d5f84ebba8ec
380cc0c1b146ada38fb459da62266d1dbb213739
describe
'365290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
3a70ed7d74c88d6a4e682cd8d2cf3880
33ba096742f677b4c2d87f01aa79cfc8aee5ffbb
describe
'51853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c166564db56000abf3ceb5ef3b486297
5e28d03267f3973cae5669905b7ff00a7b06d71c
describe
'115726' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a106db81d5b1fe81e3217ccf3bad7e34
81488d5844b93b65712a7600286cef61db07312b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQT' 'sip-files00072.tif'
368135b97006edbacc0bd94f0de651ee
6c84c1ec8035a8e64191a2424e4021f9fa480c51
describe
'2087' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQU' 'sip-files00072.txt'
e74017eac682a3fe5b4585807ce906cc
c580cfd549b9768c84d561d99e1e27a03c8a19e4
describe
'218751' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQV' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9fb5261a71b89f0ee2af38305182fd57
0a0a300f910d633ded7f7efcdb9ee2cae461ea76
describe
'388164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQW' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
78962e4cfc3478d4f940a82eb6f25725
c8e33e5512f42cbc95f5ba7c36bd67214071d5b1
describe
'52407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQX' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f1f15a138846a0e648dc28b82d0fa62f
a072229d7b330db1c03b3fd69c41c8821332f15a
describe
'122592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQY' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
fcde8964b4bdfe1af2d4d58d42a1729e
41aa0200474474eb21b881598dbbffdf11f22cfb
describe
'1342144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
92d531bc3741fb78a6bea9a5e4f9a889
9c22dc7fca0749ea809b7cfdd5e4d10f1cfba7fd
describe
'2073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
0280c11c64ab443956444311622e5454
2ef29b82355144b7d7467b5a4b83c186f8a35268
describe
'220901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5399ff700b4e2cf790cea81113db208b
1ff37881edd79fe08e7b3f762e674255f6d218ac
describe
'368259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
8cb6d7ad717ca7391af6680965d66c21
e399aa9a43b753114e46c30817d15a66772a8f06
describe
'56337' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
975c7109e3ee3ee201a0d13073091869
9042aa71422c2c7ac14223e1a23406a512a0da1c
describe
'113197' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
bab64b687c7e1d9ee406ee10c44959ec
3ef5de060446609181c2e162d5f74ab81af2217f
describe
'1359602' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
98f856b214beda2bf2440dba482ab6a2
01df0aa57531e36f0236c6e64773246819ae249d
describe
'2341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRG' 'sip-files00074.txt'
d7214ed4355c5cb6290e093bda4d1e53
5807b0b1f1386d10dd61d888daea88d29f0e2c0d
'2017-02-02T11:07:44-05:00'
describe
'171581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
f3d3c31bc07c6905d6a2982b82a6dfef
c4f9c68a7e68fde596d10df065894ea5eff84c3a
describe
'316142' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRI' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
baeb34e62330e12f76f0fa1a7f08889b
0b41b9ba231d5370859a0a041ac81ada0e420b8b
describe
'47971' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
0f6aa5e7ef0c9496ea8d02ddb7a8bef0
aed0cd625a3326909745307f769cd03756d564c4
describe
'94927' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fbe66bc5a296dedaf90aab9a62cf29f2
420bd2a60217761926a5d1d1b42b5130344f17a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRL' 'sip-files00075.tif'
64161f08684549b196f807b7508357ed
37b5c5b01809c57df0f8db77c4056f7d7dca93fa
describe
'2011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
4812d155278566545f6a41da16abf954
e9ecc6e37f88e750250903e5562378cdc6194801
describe
'134805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRN' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
93edc0e5141d2e046861a792213ff37a
296bf3fab8701b397b93158ce0a6b8c9cc1e395d
describe
'236528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRO' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
e71fbf9e965fe0767d42d3d0469562bf
6cbb281b840ab71006ac638aba5a47bf8c9601a9
describe
'31089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
b74488b0d719d962eac541c88f407334
16057332f5a82549d60c5a8d8b2a7c7ddadb37e8
describe
'79312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
cf75e717a20e2526c4eb9755bc8c20a6
1fa12ec3b1115ba396211f934954d4500d9ac961
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
b451c57608f22860f82bedb41bd7297a
13711e54c2705b3d15e22a2e8eccc5ba7c02d8ad
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRS' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1c54a4e437fbe46ca4e402a60e28a03a
ef1b85f91adb7397d20a0e5d6bb0285937333b1d
describe
'129842' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRT' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9523e7f17f336e4de658e046e66be258
9f06dc04ff71ece779b5fa65fd1bf4e294673d22
describe
'236640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRU' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
2b79fbc504cbd74bddf86786953b14b3
54a75bd60efa9d00a82e1454ed18f24c1be8c0c4
describe
'31797' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRV' 'sip-files00077.pro'
be6fefc14607a215a5751b232cf06352
d83cb8c018ad6698a77130111b5c9f01d7deb737
describe
'80900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRW' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
bcdeb6e9b116c3098010cf21719d4399
84fde0193b9788df082dedad8a301f0a0b39dbf2
describe
'1289202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRX' 'sip-files00077.tif'
c837332eac9d1c4e25f89807b5bb8671
8aac76480331b185d5dfebe1976528c5abde0df6
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRY' 'sip-files00077.txt'
cf9e0aa6ebc2383b5abd2b102381142a
e1babf92d86f7301de5bc5f426c6afc66511e6a4
describe
'133259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
082c822ec8f31cb92cf3bcc27a41a859
fd1aaf2522f85d05cd7b8a3d91f5c90f5e156524
describe
'221117' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSA' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b99704b30ef9ff0d5d172218584ac903
ea3efe8f0cb937a87a29e440abbc51f046c73210
describe
'32025' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSB' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1ace34b941f549cbaf2392e1f9ba8bad
66f162ef840b709868adf77275655fad80a8f9e1
describe
'78475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSC' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
4e52bdcf687d66243b8bad6766d115ae
b680db2f3e6f0a69937a454718310a235be4be43
describe
'1355318' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSD' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8705fd0592858540540d37f81b42961d
1fda5f21bf62a64b731727797a560c6dc86b662b
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSE' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b711c0986e4a1d785cf71be2ee908c30
d3b2ac44febe555bd702af7c6dbcab9a5b038256
describe
'123204' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3c32985002acc693b3098f148f3d5bd0
7607a7e9dce10e3e1c844cd7dcd0a57770b63ad9
describe
'219571' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
550889e278839d5da8305072f1041044
a890d715929b7d12f5c059df4c07025a200962db
describe
'28616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
43850bcf7089a0afbc3b4b0bf0acffea
391d6bbe4bfacfa82fc6f3f9de77642b967f8433
describe
'78709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
74e2736178fedc6be8a0afac940b4055
8282d8f94a73e517c78ccf0241730be14506f35a
describe
'1270358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6ee2c4c2be9733b4fe478afdebe6dade
f6cca485423ade176fe24044799855a2e77ff446
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSK' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f07368c19258a0b745fd1b6890911411
484d33fb66dc274dc6074e060d06b4422682f019
describe
'147454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
dc6535997916501fafe0ed74df7326f0
c274baafba986561d596ed9085762665d2027c92
describe
'243558' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
e1b0eb5f9e5c5d99edd1a5d259697f47
1258d2fcb34ee5c4afd11e8e8d457cbdf4be375f
describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
8996b63cfacaf0bdfa4df4bab9a973e6
dcd0a5cd80e914c5b0e1b62a75023810d55289e2
describe
'81343' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
b9fb48a711e47b8c8c845da665f09d73
4b51b8495417c642255b57379032e03a44344f0b
describe
'1352466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
0999963f193f36b689ca90e7ac8aa5be
4684137315432e956e4568da8b10532e9d437b53
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b980bfcab1ed9b5a7348cbef1e45ebbd
366ba7d106d20878284fbf82a4a082515c52a0e9
describe
'132469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSR' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
9e8bd0766dfd8cce4cdaa5b44ed5674d
7e7a807b5d02e8540ec03a614745242a1e2ceefe
describe
'236030' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSS' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
34eef22aae6570babe9f4e1ada25bfdc
8922effd1d191983141a6cea7599ce0cb43f9413
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADST' 'sip-files00081.pro'
1e9e7920c167582dab588a77553b238e
99bfca23a69c4904b638b038094602f491f94016
describe
'83374' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSU' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4431ca6831977ada58ed0ac13b069dea
ce223377f1b017d5d8be14883d62f25952a92602
describe
'1313510' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSV' 'sip-files00081.tif'
8cee7508bf0d27d5536a99002f90b3a8
b44c1e22f646e97b8da6c2122c24f1aa90d7c3e9
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSW' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f8a4544311651feea9693f14bcd8f26e
aace810e5db807941bdda676cf4774032d9ab20b
describe
'117510' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
e50f5e5e5a1feb8e2a949bbf69bda247
2e8e4c8be163d0459b5482751bc09beda2d46f5b
describe
'193275' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ad3d1623e52595899a4926020bb8935d
46c98d399403e39832933b651f670e551eb62314
describe
'27401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5b8cddc3514a9697cb953e5baacde5fb
eba9f64c9a51c667b7656f2581584ea63f403874
describe
'70499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
67afff09afe40c4169ae9828879f01a8
6643bf95e791066603ecc10ddf8ecb061ca6bb58
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f05a1f75b26e33fe4125aff052c24b45
4c35371f904b23b18a84202e42ed79d5747c116f
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
ec50e99f8521885afaca6fb47056dc4c
8e811fa5c04f12638d54c15efe6459ff7ba7b39f
describe
'132026' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTD' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c4c609c89ebf8f5f5c3c46612a8dce42
84e9efc2fa20d70725227d285a74a81b22d7a3db
describe
'236638' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTE' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5e8eeb82d817490ba10ad79dc425e669
e5e5cf146cc1c645611dab493322f33d07f701ef
describe
'31506' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ec0207a2bc5905cf30d3292dcaf0c2da
5242f7b833af1dd6f76e0fd2ad691a8b94c807de
describe
'82445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTG' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f74b171f23e7ac0c5f4cab8b8d346913
7ce6b5c5789eef5f4b717d13e035b57f22fb0b3c
describe
'1324616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTH' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f256144cb111db38a51173fec1f0474a
b9509862867def3c4f72a082d601a8065fcdb9f9
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTI' 'sip-files00083.txt'
0ddc25d4183bd7f8e30946a572e44ef4
f8273a4449c037341fe33e06a21f430714f78f1e
describe
'150419' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7911a1f1607c8bcc2c523e11e722d4ea
03d12e175fb5d51dc8a476d86cf7583b4e541d96
describe
'251945' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
36afa79b6b531e654066fb905fe9a497
b238d98de9ab7805e19e5dbc98b1c4dce9a36d94
describe
'34820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
5d69f8f1335d48089c0065c8eaa293fa
ea4cc6bedf2c3e51a004e74eb497df31b2cae038
describe
'84619' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d029c0dd8d7a6b286100b389ef6d5f67
4c0b4a71e7ad099366157c870ab33761c1b66525
describe
'1434506' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
ef72e8846b923fe030c2db0f4f8fdd6c
2acf40e21388e4f48bc684694c8d972190e335df
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
1262e091d51d8c6a316dcbe7853153d9
1ac7c5c1e2eb1958e82a62dba6f18efa3c87bad8
describe
'131368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
8f368810ae794e4a381588adebc2f9d0
a35bf66827dcdd29545bb26f188c021940fd30a2
describe
'242756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
dcae89166e36a8bf2abed7d4fbb3c281
ee1e6b8a28523cb8f1027a172946a8f4292718da
describe
'32832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0f80f3d72e8ecb556b7e1aff4ed117bf
2594499feb829ad88f0d8676f6c9841858aeab31
describe
'83339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9a5acfef3fd3bd7d269709b85eb2a232
60bd376027dfa757f855cadedfdb318a0771fe33
describe
'1250424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
6b0f6669a930735174086a51479cb62d
cb96eba1e91a5d769784054656f50385c2c9b7f6
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
4d49309d9a5a5a2f1eb8cda773386093
374e106ffee5604ef60eba31ce04741f4cbe0483
describe
'131518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e78edd5515fc1e30afc58f66477e6e73
165a7c7d97f51839c1334af774d6c151c1fb54df
describe
'226043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
2c427ea1578a95e3b3b2badf015fb466
f2bf698ed8a029b3da8343b250873ffc36e45b1d
describe
'30045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5bab61a714845eb476913317b09f138c
617684df8197991604d0724b1fe5740c246e7e03
describe
'76755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
256edc458e651816bf0e19abd2c0fe0d
bf74c202cda0b5d1b4ea556bd4467c6a3b9f581b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADTZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
731da800124bfc4ff1598dc14f7b6cde
e14cbcaa1d285bcb749c7a8e3a1a9218c1d2cdf3
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
434503e9cd1285638f661ff43d629a61
8a89df18e37074261e8b11d26f75a1004dd69a38
describe
'136057' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
50ee2c6bb5b3d7dcea33873782975c2a
3928e250ced3a627bcf8c9e0b76f46c2be51129f
describe
'241402' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d093fea46c36451de768aae226c0edb6
3167bf1293b8d7cda97caae4b59e2a05b361798d
describe
'31223' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
ada283f37b3e58a890bb4bdda590ca9c
461167ab15cd84dfa80501c645f42492dfea6d98
describe
'85332' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUE' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
211f6899d1525d9db67ef63365f24870
3ebb032b8753a0cb2d9bcc8d82ad054feb34c504
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
56ee732f327a8a74d61e0c5a48f8f12e
b7d8254c347858177f72812874f4e2df70f10af3
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
d972d32ed55452c801850c10f10684ff
a47f6993aa5fa57c2e91593251d25048897a56fc
describe
'137719' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUH' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0f8c861481159174ed8dcf16417ac207
a628668a240aab6d0ad74fe778260c2c32d79747
describe
'237098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUI' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
5227e334b6d60d83043c8967694b561e
ca72d21e0a49d08547e9c64495ae74e3854dd5a3
describe
'31872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUJ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
3f4e1ca273a83c4a96de4c836ac41f78
73da23ed3cc2de25e6849f9f5dd18b86d41e5a8e
describe
'80167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0ff83a9cfafaf4c6747945c1c78bd052
28551508c4026870fba00f8b61d66d8ec4c2a5d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUL' 'sip-files00088.tif'
05dde702752b3abb02f8b310843d1fe1
1be093f7250ff126df589f3ff16f9ee2c666eec0
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUM' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d946470c1dc70c7941f7dd1306d1a411
2debb4bd5cfb198952e9ca2b73e6623605302543
describe
'144672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
6771ce5060c25af3c9e2a0b0d860b808
cbc546e77fa27413295efcc92ea1ee6344350864
describe
'275115' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
ecf24f7e2cc2d6c36b9b0d67fcab9f10
85c8ef95a8bcfc18eb46dc3a50b046c346c57fca
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
4668d3f276be2d54270ebaa1c496d123
96ffd6a128d3382ea83d7148f9c6be4bcf6fbe1c
describe
'92380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
74d03a908518d572b3549afdc5cd7823
3b26430266f82170f48cac11a06cbe31ecc28a6f
describe
'1204090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4200ee238f616094162de86dd95ac151
7e08e85c9e82ea7126c4328ad7eff8c6a1832f02
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
fe230ee2c027735a1e4fd218630a87a6
0dc0b674a3196921131f1bd83a948d0640fa2379
describe
'132762' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUT' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
abf54ab0d98553248b7b32ba25a5b311
5824d1fe191ffac1ad2b85650d6750df2ac8b48c
describe
'220301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUU' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
62cfbc23c163a2f2da19fa15128c7d8b
7e503faf7659b14e2dacdb729425224a4312e0a4
describe
'31659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUV' 'sip-files00090.pro'
d0baed5b8e01151bb9784328091f81d4
b6be742dbd2f47f29c08929fc940340c43d94afa
describe
'77243' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUW' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
74cac9df7dba1bf5312c4fcec8f5316c
ca95d18529bd7fa969aadac73e061a4d9daa5518
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUX' 'sip-files00090.tif'
66e87758c414752a22a5dc1237b31689
7f3ef405917933f44576299fa03cb113869c6bca
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUY' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ce2c07a54220b8ecb37760b6befc4b0a
8a94f0c79da547727129909e22f4a342e4bad270
describe
'139564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADUZ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b198fc333004077ecb8d2b8ed17505d0
3256b03317d103c983e096d4da54b3d6d8cf2d2d
describe
'247017' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVA' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
6cb1cb6c2ff5a27cfe37b89c9b93d8b6
0dc368491972632ee01f269d8d22e354ecd9429a
describe
'33369' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVB' 'sip-files00091.pro'
33b97d52efad6ed624059c85875aa944
0033d2d6d0ee73cde166e1502fca04a61c413c79
describe
'84045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVC' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
0b9e4d4ec512ed49c46166b62a8ddb10
1d1770864c0028789de38891582dac36f7dd654b
describe
'1306858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVD' 'sip-files00091.tif'
200e033af936fe13eaf0877fd3bcb428
297a156fbb1efe1c3f583d9f7d59830eab08b907
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVE' 'sip-files00091.txt'
7d146d7f8dfcb3128ee404cdb3bdccc3
73dd147d39523b9f87bc26a130b95a821ea0ccd8
describe
'151801' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
8b6b040ba1df8dab288f38d83ca11e81
1c300bd6020748ebca97bb240dd9f31ac5be394c
describe
'255348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
6f3b8b36752e07068bd491f4905c7c4c
bd2c06da8c7007066bca969e7f1336b661eaf2c7
describe
'35373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c5b7051c5727bbc9031ec7cb796b4275
d67ccc8314ff37ce02581bd93469856c5a7847da
describe
'85837' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
07e6e8c5b3ff63bdff7f916392be6532
a6c87095d2708ebe4c0d79c4e842a725290d7a4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
e13862979caecb66295afd42f3ba703b
e80a0084abff4d70bb5ffb863db7ef04794d51a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
fef90ec2e86cd95a05942da3596591d9
c9bace0175602e9747efac3f9c6d976493f66006
describe
'132765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c3c5064a5a8dac003e7ee1c7fb59fc11
0f5ec4f879d385f9631e27dc23a0383464af8510
describe
'229823' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
5d899940ae89fdd9dafbe5497119824e
2f09d2c23ba80b57820097a9b383f301362bc410
describe
'28519' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
b27a93cb7bfb0d1c0daf16710f14e4d1
8a91e75a9d2bf43e84d990c93bfe4b999bea8489
describe
'80320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c7cd1c8a94eec8e4048457b20a86dcd0
f3be5d2db1e50c8d554095d10742bebc4fedc4cd
describe
'1263510' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
7f7a1ce4396653f6802d1baa8f3a2532
f9d4d60711eb768e03902d9b8754c312c9ee802a
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
5bdbfe1c9dd0ac3bf8ad1670281f0449
8ff95e9abd2d1a91471e41f6b929f1e65e94cf1b
describe
'111451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
cb4fc0ca517ecabf27fc82463b5ca882
b6e37ebd180565adac5c495b7e0102ef344a24c2
describe
'203625' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
4404d080e1a0d225e000cb769409459e
b3b4bec1b5ac231916eff1544eefc2fb88f4415c
describe
'25699' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVT' 'sip-files00094.pro'
66919283c62016dc8770382fb9bbad32
2b9ae9362327dc70ab5aea0be0de682702827c7a
describe
'71679' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
84601e116e395f3f48066e06104d3188
1106774203e7e3f67ef891490e7848e7b7659a40
describe
'1196238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
73e2d125ee4d332b31e3e64cc214a162
36b83837775f728673b2faf95f78132b805cf98c
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVW' 'sip-files00094.txt'
2f9c7e8e162cbd64bf706880d992d228
4d2298048651bd61d7368925900b1cc50e258fe8
describe
'133439' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
4d41db1eabdb73f5dbf3ee25472a3ea4
7fd8cdc3a3d78e21c8feedc9991918861983ef51
describe
'228682' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e90ce71bf0e67fc39374bcc76f6d7212
b92779d25993d113dc8335fb0af58bcb620e817c
describe
'30099' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADVZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
3b9d1dc9b153335579ca4729be1524f9
2fbfe9215684781fb23ef33482db2ff92b0cae7f
describe
'80762' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
72ab48d4b30c3382ad2570a1b5a03221
3b3d84b389b83da35e358a570404a1728e729776
describe
'1371082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
5e8aa9563399a2913b04f138b3cfb4f3
c50199aac38277b108ddc67aee4cf4a89815aca0
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
c1590e30c683767cd7f056f704103455
820c7cb3dda6926243ddf073c15c8c1796f967fe
describe
'120270' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWD' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
03f492656a13e6986f1a9a59db8623d4
b031d18a4f996168f1a56687c03b6c22e775bbc2
describe
'199745' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWE' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
0c54c89e866d4e4a4044144aae15c035
834151b24427e363a62f9f6c64640a3fc2a202cd
describe
'27314' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
0f6dd8b69a765d2ee97036b9d134ed46
9452656057d1910117a07f38095d0270afd11c69
describe
'73556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWG' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
67e1f64a395bf07e86dbb2b9a9076c8b
b10d1134f0e9dcc87a8827ed362bc1f22c18aef8
describe
'1404608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWH' 'sip-files00096.tif'
674c82e394f2d5f69072b72e9b6b35de
1dd263e2825a365d9dad885462b2b88b1b0ecd75
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWI' 'sip-files00096.txt'
65f6c3c51dc67c12571c1876de723107
06322cd0eb597280a81a60b1da4985b89b0c178b
describe
'126917' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWJ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9503d5023ebf0af594f54a09778726a4
0df91b76973f77503f3756115048595df151d819
describe
'234009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWK' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
0caa7961c7f3b21dc8bad9528a7c7082
cb36d31e9856fa481e2a0bc774378b8f145b75d2
describe
'31024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWL' 'sip-files00097.pro'
cc9e450a71620034f62ac355cab1d42b
0504526bd457db4b6e06c943a9a45486c9350e6f
describe
'82857' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWM' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
18163272c5e8f2695af91566ca31eabd
64fb94f901b25cfc13c7f0051075c5b304357870
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWN' 'sip-files00097.tif'
3d82b6c86a2e7ba8309f7085b106851e
539fd15367052e75371c9f587485f858ba19a45e
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWO' 'sip-files00097.txt'
2d995c30d8c0c1c0ac16906fac9dd5a8
06751bd97a4af1d3605e99c0f780a1a67b3abd53
describe
'139348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
7b070b6ee5a37e5f02763080d36f07fc
d4d1033efeab12c5c3f507b61d2c6a7ff251b1cd
describe
'240548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWQ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
7bfb72a39b4963cbc091dff4b77103eb
564529181efe15bf3d6fdb72817eba02d02bb3e2
describe
'32203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWR' 'sip-files00098.pro'
a8f8f0dcc9a67676cf1b97d9336845ae
283e7cf7c6f0d54412bd6d846007207bc7a82116
describe
'82758' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWS' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
bcf39569c28d4f5c16e73b01e09b35c7
2266f817f915cd47558f20bb12d7e16e58dc1996
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWT' 'sip-files00098.tif'
402431fbbd2a78264f2316d9078e8d1a
aeb7562fb30889646bc86b4cca3a8317f49d06dd
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWU' 'sip-files00098.txt'
90f4f939adbffc483d0fa9aaf97f1593
8250bc4866c80dfd56e9d1145938da0f56d3486c
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'170501' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWV' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
2bd2de7cd310c7c441674f431427ee8b
39d49755e7150397d4425431c2e5cd75f0dd2459
describe
'308696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWW' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
22bdc9362cec5e466a93a6f153d8b75d
70f356cc44c867c17274c48f5523c1b4bc116528
describe
'35685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWX' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f3b8cff29e590e0c2638d4c7d381ec64
c582c1856b4bb5ac4d8569bb7b569219a23e8b86
'2017-02-02T11:06:36-05:00'
describe
'101240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWY' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
dfc3f67fc463ae8885081dd57bf0d20e
828369b361bb9db3db3c0409bc64399489308f3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADWZ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
3b816a21f8cd9c220c1bcc0dd6f5b538
72fc39fb320026c7b27906cc582d523ba1e6d8e5
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
008c10a0201c751628503d26ed2556f2
0ab8cab425771b6bd470f5552250b16e54046bf5
describe
'133607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
a24c035205a75c695d11198109585eaf
de8603af69b2c7ff7292f27aae904116a8461191
describe
'223421' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5a1aa2cde03aeac0ab6ecaa33c0fae96
24edf5bbdb172ddcfcf408038e72b2e7447caa9e
describe
'30632' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
858dc88b1b6720c62e57f6240b8e9b1e
6dcef88e6fcb36eaf046c9f53ebe8133a4b2afa1
describe
'74935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
138c8ced6fd9506e89be2ad8bb6c2ab7
85fc1e4be2c377b596e58be35bc6c65101350972
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
542f97218b9e0ef5e36f868c6f39b9e5
31a11830aba367f13e73c479bfae68e700a4e970
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
e7c84b602ad07e921927f4c4bb9dd082
246056b00e09ef2d877a310ec4b2cffe14b72a46
describe
'117536' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
4a671063146f3cd17aa608a3ccb86546
72e779710e70f1150ea22fdb59a81c2f9fbbf031
describe
'217732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXI' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
aeb5fc2c57c17f0a4e69e3fd7c211c91
6bee3a7b9f6ed3e5364713c1cd73d61ebb14c55b
describe
'27995' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
080181cc57c75acc47eeb139bd3d361e
7447518cd3760bb3391cce2571a5d427c535f829
describe
'75749' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
0b1eb0384d4fa085497e9f5ab20ef198
f43161d904e745b27da39a9cde397bdbe6b37132
describe
'1256946' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fc933866307b06bf72032c0f04b16116
56ba5455cd23ae0b7127b3c936d06ea4ff4d80d5
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXM' 'sip-files00101.txt'
e1d74722e98977bcf3d85078a31268d0
c98d91fca5cfff4d2b2a10bef9501a952f80dcfb
describe
'141357' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXN' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2e0cdd843305c157b11e544043af222c
ab2d369093c25c5b9374f7254fc6d5f1fcf48197
describe
'239769' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXO' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
2d4cbc0828605327f47eba4a95c23d60
b893a4370f7d5c9d70069aeac9596c587f424480
describe
'33916' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXP' 'sip-files00102.pro'
30d976c894a4b3b6fabdf278cad63731
3cebdc7813f9f7e23f9727c40e926c316e86b174
describe
'80077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXQ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
41920513ac09da8ecda7ae956da723bb
5e5f9ede4d1a3139829a560e6d62970e30d71a9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXR' 'sip-files00102.tif'
898c85caf63d62ff59e69ad5feec5044
9c3a1b19b940800183f6138eaebf914820c63b16
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXS' 'sip-files00102.txt'
92ad6b1e6cbb6029e85edc3566470c9b
f19f216584a15b3e7ef6824bd620118f43b4b25e
describe
'135849' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXT' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
35182c0503857aa770aa94409d892005
b8aeb038a8a3b72608d2d7ba56e438aeea479dbe
describe
'236448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXU' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
17eba408ca9532738eea3a7a0649a6ea
ae7883d392d3d5766929134e357284b5a4fb4522
describe
'30915' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXV' 'sip-files00103.pro'
5ce3ab0c334c21a2aa6582fb94161262
f585d583b11b921ca0cc456ac32a44579fc5c53d
describe
'84203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXW' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
22a477c5ef3fc8caf333fe6e9c6e8bab
7b84b1ceef8265c47bae70c3dde388e2388c860c
describe
'1350394' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXX' 'sip-files00103.tif'
100c3a34a29986e922a1dc3c73859674
3c70f22fb1a7a7e9b1705532e41f2bcfabb9788e
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXY' 'sip-files00103.txt'
4fe2bd1abf1e4b2d7a5934a59fdfb4ba
55db4096383b5194420ff64813fb44eecd5c2b20
describe
'131800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADXZ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2bf36116655094a790a6dd8d25e4d8e9
288975815ef7f495316269c66ba4d023baf3f8ea
describe
'227295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYA' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
b58f3290a332a1f9c32b0e25cbb4fedf
486a6310e269558f852fae96dc56ba4c7bb7a5e7
describe
'29691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYB' 'sip-files00104.pro'
0162f44e0a66f27ef9361853a1617dc1
45f9b7d901ecfd43a0b2cbbd199956414bf6c6c6
describe
'78675' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYC' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
c42809a107238796ff58eeb183447d6a
e6b250178481bd9bdb04dc1da95ea0579b29c23e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYD' 'sip-files00104.tif'
d6eba0dcbc36c3eb59871da4f3a33aa3
73480b253a77e88964b9177109449460e362c46c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYE' 'sip-files00104.txt'
50037080983f05f88f9b6ed1309e0bc2
9c68572e383531c3ca0ac0bc808dd7828a8f2eb8
describe
'134310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
10ea538cd21698d7bf95b815dec335d5
fba53b0a92ac7b872f5546406d312c04beebe8a1
describe
'251583' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
d3ab0ed41eb9f3c7c39086816272117a
3d236a0583d609844a08a583ddba7ec6a5269e7a
describe
'34257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
19e5667d1e4dd47679c1e4bf866bc8a5
7fdc6c13d2b94b2c064930ad97cf035cce8368fc
describe
'85530' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d11df12d5c758caad903064938fe33cf
3dbe0268d6c043be194451e53663fdee1ce75ac6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c2e4f64a7c5b15260456562837dc8db6
191db0b8ea516caf0c093e5d2d52b9dec7d0c0b1
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ba9d23334956c9e67cd77c84e35c1368
1675cc832a8aeb1ee8df19f6b7182f0ad0eee16b
describe
'128295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYL' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2fb9f62e8ce7c8bf26dc640aaffeda17
88a2c4e325f5eab784335184359690f9e5ca5b88
describe
'221467' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYM' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a49c86753eb9dc7800af7a5c6e45e940
30d878ed5d21a94df49cc58bce04d70cf18a339f
describe
'29400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYN' 'sip-files00106.pro'
3b8d8755ede174b5a70550ed2a29e31c
f23840b5d4ea6e511b5a54f99a8aa6d1122b6cde
describe
'76778' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYO' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d95eb03227b4bb02a47c1f747380c89a
ae086828b3b6f18be21b7e32537bb9a97984a312
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYP' 'sip-files00106.tif'
55bd708d22a42277738cdd1649a2d33a
d09e6edb1000615b05f16190c44c7222322d5760
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYQ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
d6208660a43ebce7e9996e5eb8833783
c1b92beaec818ef8c177c72a7c67d5c8701410e5
describe
'134255' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYR' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
0b94d47f46557271a7a2a2892c7f2888
d7ad8e48a7e38c8e536347977673bb1926688975
describe
'238919' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYS' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
227648d1a415cc34990e41e0a1a98f03
50784643cda9f405b19895a6ec6025583f8c5abc
describe
'30712' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYT' 'sip-files00107.pro'
06674f1aee29afe0a4854e54af9d077a
ba3cb290569a4a471e118b14180d37babe7a7bf6
describe
'83334' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYU' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b127f5263bf54d1f1587e5366d82c090
dbd4db43d02fd390e511247e2ef4ee1df3b092fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYV' 'sip-files00107.tif'
000e7afa3a6738f17a17a713e5d10eed
ec14d79704bd753217923cde03280dad26753454
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYW' 'sip-files00107.txt'
7b8b2376704d1a722b83421f4406742d
9ad15e62435ec0f882e650dd2ba388df5d7cc96e
describe
'130860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYX' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
1a5ce0490b9f3c6a2f7d8951ec968d66
c3930d1be0fd0360a311e337e1bfde6be785404f
describe
'225292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
3ade5fda45133a79d6d96477e5df6962
89f4362488bab608c919e8641d77357ae9b25bee
describe
'30358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADYZ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
6cfd9a45b30bf63fc8fbcfa3a4382951
2e384e525c9230f44e66a9c9ae591fbc27882b49
describe
'77646' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZA' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
065f02cfddde88347946f11c0dab0101
d9f4cba50583f7b65e670c08a0ddd72da3b4f549
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
d46c9aa3dd14e8668ef8183d59161227
df25bdd5ed21be5253eacb15cd15a2b9af8f989f
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZC' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3fa8cb91f445a8fc31b59a13f7bebe23
8041f275504400aede28ec581813249894a87672
describe
'153469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZD' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
6e252eb43e79ff45d8fe0710d7de016a
c3b38add1dc1ddf1426b2a99d57655de86cbffac
describe
'291049' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZE' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5999e5166ef66621a986dfe6877aa062
e2cb5e1ff44852a4a6a70bfdba9daaece0305961
describe
'36695' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZF' 'sip-files00109.pro'
8b30d7ac5657391c79acd90911e92324
c6315570ce8f19012ce027e9602c5feaf30eb016
describe
'97810' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZG' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
7094ade9d81c0a86e97c0ed5a5510b3c
b11ddd0219834926a128ed8e8c04970784ef5ae7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZH' 'sip-files00109.tif'
fec38b2df4088f66b818ee1ae90afad5
2d60e5caf84b7e9abf9620f896cf38e5d3f0d3a0
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZI' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d19e4b8d401f1b0e89e1f6345e636704
24605ed92c40b41f97c9a4d6dca916500641ec98
describe
'112381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZJ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
6800fd937831508076a6df5ad6bb8461
080a68b273256f18817b93f4d46edda7b45d1c89
describe
'192010' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZK' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
24b544aca559ac9a2db95333b3a81fb5
4389abcc5200f876df16ac0ab1887b414f5026c5
describe
'24417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZL' 'sip-files00110.pro'
bbbeb961a0cb515daebc3cc13680c05d
80c94d4fa6b9053f45b493027faf5674e7031699
describe
'67720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZM' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
75aed7b1ef46759a9befd98e304caf86
989c4deaceb14658c808fc2a28f5aeeac2f54324
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZN' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c72b2e1f986a5382174a4a96726ae8d8
f596873108ef145ba33988e8d2e972e61d30f8a8
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZO' 'sip-files00110.txt'
6339305641112b01e0988bb33cb35fb4
9c9bf7b157023608664afb2e31301e372a79853a
describe
'66311' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
44c1929279e715e5a8a1e8a8baadb05d
ca381643a42cca822fb47fce2a37b9ee22bcbd54
describe
'121663' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f1f66dee27d10ecca0239d6102d5763c
c2a1a1d562d4aa9010bb135844ae416f926fd588
describe
'13403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
a713d4004ca6f9b15b443b80a057b215
f65e35a0a46b6aae99819dd20a3a646325d6b91a
describe
'43583' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
11b169444426961a05b75839bdde8bcc
d581ee705d4091a01f8f758fa8f2d7a21edf51c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ccc45dc0c206b7aea910fd8ac3939c39
0fc8e45bcefe5351ef35499d3ea8905c0f5af442
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e75aa7b7c49c95a562e0dad9cc91a3ed
3235236237fb48f4b535ae67f14172456e71294d
describe
'167937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
3291410d135c2e77144afa3b630d69e4
20cc2f6123a7bcf70267880d80e3912e81e3a5c6
describe
'327287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
d720bdad9b46e6b61e0c51e1f8cb4818
c80fdce5e302ac80af99c0a85018c84356c0046d
describe
'62854' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
bb89e209c76d3a0162706dd70d267df9
5e2d9a0054e7f2c6514ab05a9f7efd3eaacb7613
describe
'105345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
20c2f4a25e58753bba611a19584704c9
af6a2c165810d2624b39e1dd7a9babfdeb4a41ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAADZZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
416e021e7cbe6fd1bab55f4b8e895848
555fb8fc203cf26b6eff5eb3b42acf7b94147a63
describe
'2719' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fc490da96a720320c663f027697c1a22
ae9f1f13f1ce650b748a5d073a159e790f447297
describe
'188044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAB' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
37a6ee73cce01bd7508f24163744cb97
b9e5ef3259c0c8a31dd546ea018dcdf4fd050b7e
describe
'345642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAC' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
2e27a1269346049ad4b5bce75e16d16d
c0d577bdd4733bef0352b9bf03e9db314174d9bd
describe
'67291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAD' 'sip-files00113.pro'
c5963d8321e23a4bd954f601ebbfc97d
1a453d6aef9cf306da1bb2afe65b50181bef7625
describe
'112399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAE' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
a0c3711731ebe77970928465f0e6e84e
5ae945c3bd34f610c893787de7d711ed1ae6bd17
describe
'1394740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
ea54911be89917412da9bb142e8cd813
ad24e42619c31bd9baecd95b1a2fe1e6b3c55252
describe
'2805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAG' 'sip-files00113.txt'
c80101e7bb27261a5a4c94512bc47ca9
d18063f0972a6ef13241180af23cad3b6b1784cb
describe
'188464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
ff5affcc74ecdc932f4af59cd3a6295f
6305f9f4c1b2fbd5d8a8537b9d844ab7bb0000a9
describe
'352280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
824a8bac4a083b493e95290588a72782
0ce7421f1de180740259b239cdd20102cc8aad91
describe
'68872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAJ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
7ea2123edddbcb679d6645e8ba2ac73a
3dc21764194eec6585405340ab733ffd53eff068
describe
'111935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
764dc20522e815ace4b56d1c60043780
836619a65657d578f8617c0112e31d81826e1ca4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
9d3f4e36df763b9e8bdbb536c7aaddb0
1b72f525d3a527b3afd49e6cc70e5dc529dcc641
describe
'2971' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAM' 'sip-files00114.txt'
5ce3d5b68b027295cf127d703ab3c1d4
cfe8bd2f530d6dfcb5c8e816ac69c4bfb67b1ab6
describe
'172602' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
6f15b15a48224eaca445aac493d88c2a
c79de3e7127d7a970d05020e06f270e0a0698278
describe
'338652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
91565fe4b92388ad8c63b17ee12fc0d9
d80d8cae9879edee8c74ca8fa720cb61b6686a1f
describe
'69574' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAP' 'sip-files00115.pro'
e3537758313ff69ee631f61ffc996caa
1bc6937ce58effda569b746fb92dcfa69f26fda2
describe
'111531' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAQ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
e0d0c531424cacc429433bc335fec955
e3ca1618c4d258863f150f211e12cd12dbe5daba
describe
'1361654' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
fbb74fb5779288cf7da921621e9f8d71
a17360fb9738769949c09d2b61967a1cba9b1bc8
describe
'2944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAS' 'sip-files00115.txt'
0126f62393d2f781e9b55fad456712b5
b3b2cb803e2d1fc0375cfc7bac52cbabe752cd8d
describe
'158097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAT' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
d41dc33f199b08020dcc5f360e466d32
f7195e770be4f55be48834451531f4c50287328c
describe
'317793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAU' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
6b8e0f85e1dc68091a39ae34d760e420
cce135bbd0ac8d73c67eba8c02d31703d14deb56
describe
'66659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
873ce621c10d08e2ccd1c096afb2dc20
1a55557834f8a024e00db4db64cafd2371d8ea04
describe
'105682' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAW' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7d031d69a479a27f14b2fb5313b5fd82
e483939256c413a74002ed97458b0bcb6cf283ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAX' 'sip-files00116.tif'
44ba8adeccf1857da0f7269401f2837b
21fd847dcbce010254409918dc9684b086b1ed7d
describe
'2831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAY' 'sip-files00116.txt'
8e6685e489bb2c8d51d4f6c09df19994
9123007e62ecf18b53c74af6e8f07d0b24d41add
describe
'93189' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEAZ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
8233d28a0c7293422492856874632a78
f6871441aa34f21d2471c2ae05a37f0027459954
describe
'197529' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBA' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
85edaf0dce2effd44ba28e28907af4d2
f8d72d8918dcdd434a16946e208713a169fc081c
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBB' 'sip-files00117.pro'
1a122ab29ac7673236440e035723573a
22174655e0618e2246a7cce0b935f2bca9937de3
describe
'68733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBC' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
498861f661e76fc1729fc74b1fdca24d
ce898d57101e9a49f963ef6dd0354e9d0d14e5cc
describe
'1300382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d75977fd8f32004c3eb35aeea121d994
5628d7c526ac88830d1c1c0a384095ea84972ada
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBE' 'sip-files00117.txt'
814f0ccbaedf025ada2c6b74d8b5653d
be3ea3031ce0f0aa11b7858112ec80e785ee56da
describe
'5164728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBF' 'sip-filesUF00000001.pdf'
9af71f8202b97b982505295acb64928c
f9e970503218a670c23b0ad1864a57bc0c12fbaa
'2017-02-02T11:06:29-05:00'
describe
'805609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBF-norm-1' 'ARCHIVE' 'aip-filesF20080809_AAAEBF-norm-1.pdf'
da4b7030615e19fa0105780faefbfb33
bfbcbb3528f787c340a0f0821b24bf547d4b7b5b
'2017-05-02T09:42:01-04:00'
describe
'2017-05-02T09:39:47-04:00'
normalize
'202683' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBG' 'sip-filesUF00000001_00001.mets'
8d0edd19cda554418d06b126cd8d1410
3eacf2366d46e940a30477a0712e914b62bbf4f8
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2017-05-02T09:43:20-04:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
BROKEN_LINK schema http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'230152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAENfileF20080809_AAAEBJ' 'sip-filesUF00000001_00001.xml'
32aebbaa8e1a988ae4387cc5ff518a4d
78c49cf95ebda24c2850d8f6d049387b643b7bdb
describe
'2017-05-02T09:42:40-04:00'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
!DOCTYPE Archive SYSTEM http:greenstone.orgdtdArchive1.0Archive.dtd
Section
Description
Metadata name gsdldoctype indexed_doc
gsdlthistype Paged
Identifier UF0000000100001
assocfilepath UF/00/00/00/01/00001
ufdc.Collection fast1
internal.Collection fast1
ufdc.SubCollection FGS
internal.Thumbnail 00001thm.jpg
NumPages 117
ufdc.AccessMethod 0
ufdc.Interfaces ;UFDC;
ufdc.SerialHierarchy 1st (1907-1908)|1
ufdc.HoldingCode UFGOV
ufdc.Holding Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
ufdc.PubDate 1908
dc.Description Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
ufdc.Type Serial
ufdc.FormatType Serial
dc.Language English
ufdc.Publisher Capital Publishing Co.
dc.Identifier (NOTIS) AAA0384
(NOTIS) AAA7300
dc.Subject Geology -- Florida. ( LCSH )
ufdc.Country United States of America
ufdc.State Florida
North America -- United States of America -- Florida
ufdc.Spatial North America -- United States of America -- Florida
dc.Title Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey. 1907-1908.
internal.Title Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey. 1907-1908.
Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey
dc.Creator Florida Geological Survey
internal.Author Florida Geological Survey
Sellards, E. H.
Sellards, E. H.
internal.Citation UFGOV Government Documents Department, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 1908 Digitized as a collaborative project with the Florida Geological Survey, Florida Department of Environmental Protection Serial English Capital Publishing Co. AAA0384 AAA7300 Geology -- Florida. ( LCSH ) North America -- United States of America -- Florida Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey. 1907-1908. Annual Report, Florida State Geological Survey Florida Geological Survey Sellards, E. H.
ufdc.BibID UF00000001
ufdc.VID 00001
ufdc.SourceCode UF
ufdc.Source University of Florida
dc.Source University of Florida
internal.SortTitle ANNUAL REPORT FLORIDA STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 1907-1908
internal.SortDate -1
UF00000001 00001 UF University of Florida
Letter of transmittal First annual report of the Florida State Geological Survey The purposes and the duties of the State Geological Survey Members of the State Survey Force Cooperation with the National Geological Survey Relation of the survey to other organizations Survey library Exhibition of geological material The relation of the State Survey to the ownership of mineral-bearing lands Samples sent to the survey for examination The collection of statistical information Financial statement Sketch of the geology of Florida Fossils contained in the Florida formations Mineral Industries Phophate Clay Peat Diatomaceous earth Lime and cement Portland cement Sand-lime bricks Minerals new to the State Mineral waters Road making materials Rocks of Florida classified according to origin Siliceous rocks Flint and chert Calcareous material Argillaceous rocks Road-making clays Bog iron ore Phosphatic rock Geological Investigations in Florida previous to the organization of the present Geological Survey Bibliography of Florida Geology
internal.TOC Letter of transmittal First annual report of the Florida State Geological Survey The purposes and the duties of the State Geological Survey Members of the State Survey Force Cooperation with the National Geological Survey Relation of the survey to other organizations Survey library Exhibition of geological material The relation of the State Survey to the ownership of mineral-bearing lands Samples sent to the survey for examination The collection of statistical information Financial statement Sketch of the geology of Florida Fossils contained in the Florida formations Mineral Industries Phophate Clay Peat Diatomaceous earth Lime and cement Portland cement Sand-lime bricks Minerals new to the State Mineral waters Road making materials Rocks of Florida classified according to origin Siliceous rocks Flint and chert Calcareous material Argillaceous rocks Road-making clays Bog iron ore Phosphatic rock Geological Investigations in Florida previous to the organization of the present Geological Survey Bibliography of Florida Geology
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INGEST IEID EM9JVK8KP_8IG71B INGEST_TIME 2017-04-05T19:45:18Z PACKAGE UF00000001_00001
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