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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III
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Jones, Ray
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English

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Oral history -- Florida ( LCTGM )
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North America -- United States -- Florida -- Alachua

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Matheson History Museum
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Matheson History Museum
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Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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MATHESON HISTORICAL CENTER

ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM




INTERVIEWEE: Judge William Wade Hampton III INTERVIEWER: Ray Jones TRANSCRIBER: Ruth C. Marston


February 16, 1999

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III 1
February 16, 1999


J: My name is Ray Jones. I am interviewing Judge Wade Hampton for the Oral History
Program at the Matheson Historical Center, on February 16, 1999, in Gainesville, Florida.
Judge Hampton, will you please give your full name and birthdate for the tape.

H: William Wade Hampton, 111. 1 was born in Gainesville on October 24, 1915.

J: For the record, would you please state that you give the Matheson Center permission to use
the information gathered in the interview.

H: I do.

J: Thank you. Please tell me about your family's origin and how the Hamptons came to
Gainesville?

H: My family came from England. William Hampton landed in Strawberry (Norfolk James
River), Virginia, in 1620. Four generations lived in Virginia and then one generation in Lincoln County, N.C., and one in Shelby County, S.C., where my great-grandfather was born. My grandfather was born in Bainbridge, Georgia. The family (my grandfather, William Wade Hampton) moved to Gainesville in 1875. He and his brother founded the
Gainesville Times, which is the forerunner of the Gainesville Sun, in 1875.

My grandmother was from Alabama, and the family, shortly before the Civil War, moved from eastern Alabama to Mississippi and they came down here to visit in Gainesville. It was Birket Jordan and my Grandmother and her sister, who later married Ben Richards. My
father was born in January of 1894 in Gainesville.

My mother's family came from Augusta, Georgia, to Jacksonville, in the 1880's. My mother was born on November 14, 1892, in Jacksonville. My mother and dad were married in
Jacksonville on January 8, 1913. Mother died September 13, 1993.

J: You were born in Gainesville?

H: Yes.

J: I know that your father was involved in many of the most important developments in
Gainesville. Are there any comments that you would like to make about his activities and
accomplishments?

H: My Grandfather practiced law until the time of his death at the age of 72 here in Gainesville
in 1928. He was the first President of the Florida Bar. My father graduated from Washington Lee Law School in 1908 and practiced with his father until he died on November 7, 1924. The firm was named Hampton and Hampton. After World War I, when

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dad's younger brother, Edwin Birket Hampton, graduated in Law from the University of Florida, he practiced with the firm of Hampton and Hampton. The middle brother graduated from the University of Florida and practiced law in Tampa until my father died in 1924, and then he moved to Gainesville. My Grandfather died in 1928, Ed Hampton in 193 1, and Fred
Hampton in 1937.

J: Where did you first live in Gainesville with your family?

H: We lived on the southeast corner of what is now N.E. 4t Street and 3 rdAvenue. The frame
house is still there. Behind the house was my grandfather's tennis court, and on the other end of the block -- the east end of the block -- were his stable and the carriage house. This is
at the back entrance to the Recreation Center on the Boulevard and N.E. 2 ndAvenue.

J: Who were your friends when you were growing up?

H: My closest friend was Henry Graham, who was later a doctor. He has been dead since I
think it's 1970. He lived on East Main Street now the southwest corner of N.W. 7t Avenue and N.E. 1st Street. His grandfather was the founder of the First National Bank. His daddy
was later president of the First National Bank, and his name was Lee Graham.

J: What schools did you attend?

H: I attended for six years what was then called the Eastside Grammar School, now KirbySmith. In the west building I went through first through fourth grades, and they had a two and a half story building to the east of that, and when I was in grade school, that was Senior High School. There were two tennis courts and our basketball court that were clay, one in front of the high school part of it, the other south of the west elementary school building.
The west building was built somewhere around 1900. This building still stands and is being
used by the school board.

Let's go a little bit further. Gainesville High School was built on West University Avenue.
The front part of it opened in 1923. They built an east wing and west wing to the south, and in the middle they put the stage for the auditorium. The basketball court was on the stage.
The cafeteria was just south of the basketball court. I entered that school when it was just barely completed, in 1927; 1 entered the seventh grade, and I completed high school in that
school in 1933.

J: You were in school certainly during part of the Depression times. Do you remember
anything in particular about those times?

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 3
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H: Well, I graduated in 1933, and as I recall, my junior year the family had to pay, I believe,
$15.00 a month forthree months in order to keep the high school qualified and certified, and
I believe one month or two months as a senior.

In the class graduating with me was Seldon Waldo, Covington Johnston, and Frank McCraw.
The four of us went to the University of Florida and graduated in Law in 1939. Henry Graham went to medical school, and after World War 11 came back to Gainesville to practice. Also, in our class was Jimmy Goodson. Jimmy was a chemist with Black & Crowe. Two of the girls in our class went to law school, after graduating from Agnes Scott.
One was Lucille Carnes, now Lucille George, and the other was Jeannette Te Selle. Her daddy was one of the professors in the law school. I believe that her name is Mrs. Peter Plunk. Also in that class was M.M. Parrish, Cecil Simmons, whose daddy was connected with the school board. Cecil was later an employee of the Post Office. Dell Jernigan was also later an Assistant Postmaster. Another boy who did real well was Robbie Rabinowitz,
who changed his name to Robins, and he was a chemist, I believe.

J: You immediately went off to college after graduation?

H: All of us stayed and finished our education here in Gainesville at the University of Florida -all the boys, with the exception of Henry Graham, who went to school in New York State.
The two girls went to the University of Florida after they graduated at other colleges outside
the state.

J: Where did you go to law school?

H: The University of Florida.

J: And what year did you graduate?

H: 1939.

J: Where did you first practice law?

H: I practiced law in Jacksonville with the firm of Knight and Knight for eight months. Then I
came back to Gainesville.

J: When were you married and to whom?

H: I met my wife (Dorothy Maples) through a boy who moved to Gainesville when he entered
the college. I was visiting in Jacksonville and I had two dates with her during the summer of 1939 and after I went to Jacksonville in approximately January of 1940, 1 started having dates with her. When I returned to Gainesville, on August 1, 1940, 1 practiced here and then

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went into service on August 26, 194 1. When I returned from California in December, 1942, 1 was supposed to arrive in Jacksonville by plane on Monday morning. I was grounded in El Paso and came through on the train and got to Gainesville on Wednesday at noon. My sister got married on Saturday, December 12, 1942. 1 asked my wife to marry me on Wednesday night, and we got married on December 17, 1942, at 7 o'clock in the evening. At 9 o'clock
we were on a train, which did not leave Jacksonville until I I o'clock to go to California.

J: I'll come back to your children, but I notice in your writeup in "Who's Who" that you won
the Bronze Star. Were you in combat? Could you describe some of your activities during
World War 11?

H: I almost fought the battle of the United States. I reported to Fort Bragg August 26, 1941,
which was a Tuesday evening and I processed Wednesday morning. We had Wednesday afternoon off buying uniforms. I taught two classes on Thursday morning. At noon Thursday we went in the field, and I was executive officer of the Firing Battery, and we went into position at approximately ten o'clock at night. One hour before daylight we fired what we called a high burst adjustment, and I was so raw that I didn't know we were supposed without having a safety officer present. There was none present. Shortly after that, we went on Carolina maneuvers for two months. On December 31, 1941, 1 reported to Fort Sills, Oklahoma, to take a three-months course. Upon completion, I had a two-week vacation. I returned to Fort Sills and in the meantime, in February, my unit had moved from Fort Bragg to Fort Sills. We were school troops. Nothing happened out of the ordinary except the recoil of an old French 75 went out and when I called and reported to the officer in charge of firing at the observation post, he ordered me to fire the gun. I told him it was unsafe and refused to fire it unless he gave me authority and assumed the responsibility in writing, which he didn't
do. Later when the gun was sent to Ordnance, my diagnosis was correct.

Another time we were firing World War I shrapnel ammunition, 75 mm guns, and quite
frequently we got a muzzle blast, which meant that the impact of firing a gun would
blow the fuse, and steel pellets would go out. This hit the back of the hill and went over the crest of the hill. We could see the top of the trucks of a school class. An instructor called
me and wanted to know what I meant by firing within 200 yards of the front of his class.

J: A friendly fire!

H: Yes. I told him that we had a muzzle blast, that we had checked the ammunition. He was a
Lieutenant Colonel -- I was a First Lieutenant -- and he started chewing on me. The Executive Officer, who was a Major, was down at gun position as safety officer, and he saw
me and also checked the ammunition, so in those two instances I came out all right.

I took over a battery on a Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock in September. At 6 p.m. we had orders to go overseas and we took up all of the wool clothing and issued out another

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three suits of khaki on Thursday and Friday, then on Saturday morning they said the orders are changed. Issue back what you took up and take up what was issued. We were going to California! On September 7, 194 1, we went to the California Mojave Desert. I was a train commander of one of the two trains in the battalion. We started out headed for El Paso. The Southern Pacific could not take care of us, so we went north to Belen, New Mexico, as I recall, and got on the Santa Fe. We got to Needles, California, across the Colorado River, climbed up out of the valley. We stopped at a little place on the main line and they put us over on the eastbound track. The engine was not strong enough to push us off the track, and the flagman had to run down the track and flag the Super Chief, and the Super Chief pushed us off the track and we went south into the desert approximately sixty or seventy miles to a place called Freda. Freda had one covered railroad building, no windows, no sides, about 200 yards off the main road, and we unloaded and we stayed in the desert from approximately September 12 th until about December I't, when we went to Camp Cook, now Vandenburg Air Force Base, in California. We were part of the Fifth Armored Division.
We left there in February of '42. 1 had been married in December '41, and we went to Tennessee to the Tennessee maneuvers. We left Tennessee about the I't of July of '42 and went to Pine Camp, N.Y. The interesting thing in Pine Camp was that we had the cadets from the U.S. Military Academy with us for approximately sixty days, and some of them
were assigned to our unit, and we let them act as officers with us supervising.

I got transfer orders in October, and I went down to a camp out of Petersburg, Virginia. It turned out that it was the formation of an armored group headquarters. One of my classmates from college back in 1937, named Franklin Bennett, who was from Sanford, Florida, was on the same orders from the 47 th Field Artillery, and when we got there we had one full Colonel, and he and I were the two Captains, and then we had a bunch of Lieutenants. From there I was sent to a special five-weeks school at Washington Lee University. Miss Lizzie Graham, who ran a boarding house between Washington Lee and VMI -- was still running a boarding house -- we arrived too late, and my wife could not get a room with her, but she arranged for us to have a room with the head of the English Department at VMI. I had to eat at the Washington Lee cafeteria. My wife ate with Lizzie
Graham in the same boarding house my father had lived in before he graduated in 1908.

From there my unit was transferred to Arkansas at Camp Fort Smith. We were lucky and got a nice duplex. Thirty days later we left Fort Smith and went up to a camp in Kansas, out of Salinas, Kansas. I was sent with the advance detachment, and I thought that we were being invaded when just before daylight I looked up and I saw the blinking lights of what turned out to be a B24. It was about four miles off of the airport runway, and I did not know there was an Air Force base there. It looked like I could stand on the roof and touch the plane.
Later I looked at the chapel and noticed it had no steeple. The month before the steeple had
been knocked off.

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While I was there, my first child, Dorothy Mae Hampton, was born on May 27, 1944, and about two weeks after she was born, I was transferred from this group headquarters that had nothing but tank units on it, to Fort Riley, Kansas, and 155 Howitzer Battalion there. About August 11, 1944, 1 was transferred on overseas orders to go to Fort Meade, Maryland. I brought my wife and baby home and reported. I got a ten-day leave, went back to Fort Meade, and we went to Camp Reynolds, Pennsylvania, for thirty days and from there went back to Meade. One of the interesting things was that in Camp Reynolds, I ran into Bill Long, who had introduced me to my wife, and the three other boys from the University of Florida. We got back to Meade. My wife had come up and spent some time in New York with her brother and then came up to Reynolds, Pennsylvania. We went back down to Meade and I put her on a train on Thursday and on Sunday, one of the boys said that he had overseas orders to go to Fort Ord, California. He said my name was on it. I made a copy of it, and two hours later I was on a train headed for Florida. I got to Florida that night about eleven o'clock and had a couple days in Gainesville, a couple days in Jacksonville, and then reported to California on or about the 26 th of October. We stayed at Fort Ord for a couple of month and then went to a camp outside of Riverside, California, and from there went to the Port of Los Angeles and I had a ticket that said, "Capt. William Wade Hampton III and 785
others on the Southern Pacific Railroad." Again I was the train commander.

We were on a ship for thirty-two days, going to Bombay, India, and we had no escort until we got to Perth, Australia. We had spent two nights in Melbourne, and went across Australia bight, and off of Perth we picked up a destroyer escort that was with us for two days. It left us that night and the next morning we had a torpedo across the bow of our ship. I was on a ship that was designed for the South American trade. It was twin engine, about 630 or 640 feet long, and could do 26 to 28 knots. Just at dusk that night, we pulled into Bombay, India.
The first person I saw was Frank Wright walking up the gangplank. Frank Wright had been head of the alumni secretary at the University of Florida. After one night we were put aboard a train. It was about 200 yards from the ship to the train. I had two and a half cases of whiskey with me. Two cases were in a footlocker, and we had put two pair of wool socks on each bottle, two or three towels on the bottom. I saw my footlocker drop from the head of one of the Indian porters, and I figured I had lost some of my whiskey. The other six bottles (I had three in my musset bag and three of them in a bed roll) one fifth, one fifth, and one fifth. Out of the twenty-seven officers in our shipment, we had over forty cases of whiskey,
and in transit only one bottle was broken.

We were at a camp outside of Calcutta for approximately two weeks, it having taken five days to go across India from Bombay to Calcutta by train. They would tell us that we would be in to a little town fifteen or twenty miles down the road and they would have hot water for us so we could eat our "C" rations, and they would not have it. It was maybe the third town
down the road that we would get it.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 7
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While there, we were twenty or thirty miles out of Calcutta and we could get transportation
by train. You've seen pictures of the train with people hanging all over the outside?
Well, there were a couple times when we got on to go in town and we had to do the same thing. We'd hang on the outside until we could find a place to sit down. If nobody was in
first class, we would make use of it, and they didn't object.

On one trip in Calcutta to the Karney Estate -- a hotel which was a U.S. recreation hotel, I was sitting in the bar with three or four of my friends and I looked up and I saw this fellow come in and I said, "That looks like my cousin." It was Nelson Black. He was a medic with a B24 squadron. They said, "Your cousin?" and I said, "It looks like it." I could not see his insignia and see whether he was a medic or not. When I got up and walked over and he looked up, it was my cousin's husband. They had been married in 193 8 and I saw him for a week and then two nights after that in 1939, and this was 1944, and I recognized him. I had written when I was in California to Lee Graham, who is living in Tallahassee and is a retired Episcopal minister, and he married Betty Thomas. I wrote him and said, "Don't be a bit surprised if I don't drop in to see you at Easter." I missed. I got to Kunming, China, on the Wednesday after Easter, and we had supper together that night. I saw him the next day and two days later, I had a truck to go to the eastern part of China. We were in a small village and we were living in the bus station the Americans had taken it over. The artillery unit was Chinese. They had been shot up three months before and we were retraining the unit. We moved the pack artillery Chinese outfit forward about 400 miles up near where the front was, and when we got there, the Chinese held one side of a ridge and there was a little valley 200
yards or so across, and the Japanese held the other ridge.

The most interesting thing there was a Chinese general came up and with my Colonel, we were in what was called an advisory group which consisted of three artillery officers, three artillery sergeants, a veterinary officer, and two veterinary sergeants. We went up and we walked around the corner of the ridge, and there was about a three foot wall between us and the river, and we were surprised that there was no firing. We learned the next day that the Japanese general was doing the same thing at the same time we were, and we were within
200 to 300 yards of one another, so that was the reason there was no firing.

The night that the war ended in Europe we had moved or were in the process of moving up to the front with the Chinese artillery, and we got to a ferry too late to go across. We pulled back about one-half mile to the top of the ridge, and we noticed a road off to the side. We moved down that road about 300 yards and found some nice pine trees thatwere about as big around as your leg. We hung ourjungle hammocks and our radio picked up that the war in Europe had ended that day. The next morning we noticed that we only about 300 yards from the ammunition depot. That night a Japanese plane called a "Betty" had flown over and
dropped two or three bombs in the vicinity of the ferry, not hitting anything.

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From there -- the Japanese had pulled back -- we moved up another 100 miles or so and got orders to go to a town forty miles off of the road. It was at that point that the war with the Japanese ended. The Japanese surrender plane was over this little town when two fighters owned by either Chinese or Americans looked like they were going to shoot it down. They
went to Clickyang Air Base, and this is what terminated the fighting there.

A few days later we moved from that area and went on up to Hengyang. We had been in Hengyang and moved up to Nanking and had orders to go to the Yangtze River and we would be met by a Navy ship. We got four or five hours from the Yangtze when a Taylor Cub flew over and dropped a message that the ship couldn't make it and we had to drive four days back to Clickyang, where I ran into a couple of the officers that had been on the shipment with me when we went overseas. I ran into Henry Dozier, an attorney from Ocala, and a couple of other boys from Florida. Newcome Barco from Ocala. After being in Calcutta for three to four weeks, we went aboard the ship. At that point General Neyland from Tennessee spoke to us. Thirty-three days later with a night stop at Port Said and a night
stop at Ceylon, we pulled into New York in the middle of December 1945.

J: A very explicit and detailed account of a very fascinating war. Of course, you didn't say
how you got your Bronze Star medal.

H: My citation for the Bronze Star Medal was for our American Unit 4 officers and 5 sergeants
trained a Chinese Pack Artillery Battalion. We were the furthest unit north and east of Kunming, China, and about 500 miles from the coast. I received the Bronze Star Medal for organizing and supervising a 500 mile forced march from Puan to Junkow. We moved men, mules, pack 75 mm guns and equipment (American) furnished to the Chinese by truck and part by foot. On numerous occasions we were strafed by Japanese planes. The forced march of the Pack Artillery Battalion was over badly damaged roads, all bridges demolished, many roadblocks including shell craters and two river crossings -- and was made in five days.
Also included was a statement that I was instrumental in the speedy and efficient equipping, supplying and training of the 57 thDivision (Chinese) with American arms and equipment.

We never did get to the coast but did get to within about 70 miles of the Yangtze River near Nanchang about two weeks after the war ended, then returned to Kunming and were flown to
India.

J: Can I ask you now questions about your civilian life when you got back and you started
practicing law again, I understand.

H: I came back out of the service and went back with Jordan, Lazonby & Dell and worked with
Birket Jordan, my dad's first cousin. He was in the firm when it was Hampton and Hampton. I stayed with them until 1950, and then went out on my own. In 1954, with two others, we started a corporation in the insurance field. I was the Vice-President. My job was

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almost like the Vice-President in charge of claims, handling self-insured and hotels for automobiles, Workmen's Compensation. In September, 1954, 1 was appointed Municipal
Judge, a position I held until September, 1973.

J: I know from reading a newspaper account that you made a number of procedural changes
when you became judge. Can you tell us about those?

H: Well, it was interesting. The municipal building was a two and a half story building and the
court originally met in a semi-basement, which would be at the corner of N.E. I't Street and 2 nd Avenue, and a few years later they built the current police station on N.W. 6th Street and court was on the second floor. It was at this point, a year ortwo after we moved there, that a judge started wearing a robe other than a suit. My first recollection of the Gainesville Municipal Court was when Larkin Carter was a judge and it was held over on the second floor of the Fire Department on S.E. I't Street in the 200 block. From there, later on, they built the library on University Avenue at the corner of N.E. 3 rd Street, and the court took over the old library on East University Avenue at the Branch. We had a court room and the entire building was occupied by the Municipal Court. We stayed in that building until we did away with the court in 1973. The reason the court was terminated was that over the years, where originally we had the city attorney or someone from his office to prosecute the
case, we had to furnish a full-time Public Defender.

About 1970 or 1971, every now and then someone would ask for a jury trial. It was
practically unheard of in Municipal Court, and we decided that we were going to
have to do it, so we started in February, as near as I can recall, and later in July that the Florida Supreme Court ruled that if they asked for a jury trial in cases like driving while intoxicated and so forth, they were entitled to it. We had been operating approximately four months at that time. We had had so many cases that we started the general cases -- drunk and disorderly, cases like that -- at nine o'clock, and we would barely get through about twelve o'clock, and at one o'clock we would start our traffic cases. We generally had it set up for shoplifting cases that if the witnesses would show up at 3:30, the cases would be called within the hour. When we were in the old Municipal Building, I've seen members of Margaret Ann, later part of Winn Dixie, appear at two o'clock in a case and the case called at six or seven o'clock at night. It was always the management that we wanted to please. In
this way, we got them to prosecute instead of letting them go.

About eight or ten communities around the state came in after we started having jury trials, and they would ask what our procedure was, and they adopted what we were doing. We would have had to discontinue the Municipal Court in 1974 because the state went with the four tier system: the County Court, the Circuit Court, the Appellate Court, and the Supreme Court. They did away with all Magistrate Courts, all Municipal and City Courts. We did it
one year early.

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In 1974, Bo Arnow, who was a Federal District Judge, living in Pensacola, asked me if I could take over as a part-time United States Magistrate. In talking with my partner in insurance business, which I was working almost full-time, he said as long as it didn't interfere with what I was doing, go ahead. I took that on, and in 1980 after having a heart attack, I sold out in the insurance business and remained as a part-time United States Magistrate until October of 1993. I was nineteen years in the municipal court and nineteen
years Magistrate Judge.

It's interesting to look back and see that the City of Jacksonville had two Municipal Judges and they worked full-time, as I recall, in the 1970's and were handling about fifty-five thousand cases a year. Initially, the Municipal Court was one afternoon. Later it became all day Tuesday, with arraignment on Friday. We handled about fifteen thousand. Then when we went to jury trials once a month, on Wednesday we would start jury trial and it generally was for two to two and a half days. As U.S. Magistrate, they told me I would handle about seventeen matters a year. The first year I handled 57 cases, and the work continued to
increase to where it was somewhere between 75 and 150 a year.

One of the most interesting things as U.S. Magistrate was with what they called the Gainesville Six. Later one of those got in trouble, and I had to have a hearing while he was in intensive care at the hospital. In 1992, after having abdominal surgery, and just out of intensive care, I had to hold an emergency hearing for a warrant to stop some people leaving the country. By this time, with modern media and equipment, the warrant was issued for the arrest of this man and this woman, and they were arrested that night or late that afternoon as
they were attempting to leave the country and go to Hong Kong.

J: Judge Hampton, what power changes did you observe in Gainesville with the growth of the
University and the growth of the town?

H: The University of Florida, when I entered the school in September 1933, had, as I recall,
about 2200 students. When I graduated six years, there were approximately 3200 or 3300.
Gainesville, after World War 11, was predicted as one of the two or three towns in the country that would treble within ten years. The University did more than that. Around 1948, when the new gymnasium was built off the southeast corner of the present stadium, it would seat about 8500. As I recall, the student body at that time was somewhere between 10,000 and 11,000. With this number of students it created problems. The original group of students that came back after World War 11, came out of the service and were all older than the other students. One of the first things that we ran into was vandalism. They held the panty raids, and some of the students who came up before me I had them write essays on subjects like "Why I should obey the law," or some question like that. They would have to write 2500 or 3000 words. The Clerk and I read it and if it was not complete and neat, they redid it. The worst one I ever got was a boy about twenty-five years old who had been in the

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III I I
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service for four years. One of the best ones I had was a freshman either eighteen or nineteen
years old.

We had a lot of students and people that were charged with shoplifting or petty larceny. In
cases like that -- at one time there was an estimated 2500 that I had withheld
adjudication on -- I required them to come and see me every three months, and if they were out of town to write me, and they did this religiously, and to the best of my knowledge, there were only five of those who did this who got in trouble a second time. One of them was a very nice looking girl, who when I looked up and saw her sitting there, she looked like she could have been the sister of my youngest daughter. Within three months she had committed a second offense. I did this not only for students in the age bracket of twenty-two, but there were also a few up in the 70's and one, as I recall, in the 80's. They came from all walks of life. There was a Dean's son, several college professors' sons or daughters, and some of them were working on Master's Degrees. If they behaved themselves and came to see me
before they graduated, I would dismiss the case.

One of the most interesting was a very attractive young lady from the West Palm Beach area, and four months after she left, she and the boy she was going with or living with went to work with Schenectady Electric in New York, and she wrote two or three times, and I went to court once about quarter of nine and they said that a young lady wanted to see me. She and the boy came in, and she was dressed in the skimpiest shorts and bra that you could see on the street, and he was not dressed much better, and he said they had ridden all night and they wanted to talk with me. I told them I didn't have time to talk to them, but if they would come in at a quarter of one I'd be glad to talk to them. They came back, and she was dressed very attractively in what you would call a Grandma dress, a long dress, clean, neatly pressed, and he was in khakis, clean and neatly pressed. He said that they had gotten married and he wanted to go back into the service and he could go back in as a sergeant and an MP with his qualifications. She apologized for coming into court. I said, "Young lady, you didn't embarrass me because I've got children, but in my capacity asjudge, I was going to have to say something to you if you had come back in dressed like that." The last I heard he had
gotten into service and got along.

Another little girl from the Palm Beach area came in, and I saw her three or four times, and she came in in June and said, "I've finished my exams and I'm graduating." She had a little grin on her face. I said, "All right, you've got something you want to tell me." She said, "I'm getting married next week, and my husband-to-be is out front." He came in and we talked for a few minutes, and he told me they were going to St. Petersburg. A year and a half later, I had a phone call. She said, "This is so-and-so from the Palm Beach area. Do you know who I am?" I said, "No, keep on talking." Then I recognized her. I said, "Now don't get mad, but if you are who I think you are, the last time I saw you, you told me you were getting married the next week and going to St. Pete." You could almost hear her laughing.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 12
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1 still have a few of the letters that some of these kids wrote me. I would tell them, if they were arrested for shoplifting, if they ask you this question, "Have you ever been arrested and convicted?" you can truthfully say, "No." But if they ever ask you if you've been arrested or convicted, you'd have to say yes, that you were arrested but not convicted. So this was the
way we would handle it.

We had a bunch of almost riots out in the street, particularly at the corner of 13 th and University Avenue. About the same time or right after the panty raids. The ones that came up before me, I used to tell them the ones that generally start something like this, as a general rule, slip away before it gets out of hand. I said the only thing you all can do, if you see it down at the comer, is to go around the block. Don't go up there. We didn't have too much
trouble with that.

We came to the question of integration in the Florida Theater. There were several of these
episodes. The Police Department didn't know many times that things were going to
happen until they happened. Therefore, they were unable to take the necessary steps to keep the streets open for something like that, until it was already crowded. At the Florida Theater, which was in the 200 block of West University Avenue, was the first. A reporter I knew, with his camera, got out of his truck, parked it, put his ladder up against the building and climbed up on top of the building, and was setting up his camera, when the owner came out and made him get down. He insisted that because he was part of the media he had the right
to be there.

We had some trouble with the street being blocked, and after the first time, I talked with the Police Department, the Chief of Police, and I said that we had almost a riot and making arrests, we've got a lot of problems proving what they did. I said the easiest thing would be to turn in a fire alarm, have the fire department come rushing down the street and if they are blocking and can't get through, any of them in the street you can make an arrest because they
were blocking an emergency vehicle. I think that we used it once or maybe twice.

J: Did you have some difficult cases? I read in some of the old issues of the Gainesville Sun
that you did have some of the students who were leading some of the protests on the campus
and also in the city. Were they difficult cases to deal with individually?

H: Well, as far as City Court was concerned, we didn't have too much trouble with anything
like that. There were two or three times that some of the boys or a boy went to a sorority house. They said they had the right to go up to the second floor, even though the head of the sorority had told them they did not have the right and had asked them to leave, or the house mother had. So we got them as a general rule on obnoxious intrusion after being asked to leave. We tried to make an offense as simple as possible because it was simple to prove. Of
course, the Police Department was the one who had to do that.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 13
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In regard to the U. S. Magistrate, the main j ob of the U. S. Magistrate part-time is to try mi sdemeanors and to hol d initi al hearings when they've b een arrested on a maj or offense or as the result of a warrant for their arrest. I had one that gave me trouble. They made threats against the President of the United States. There was another one who turned out to be a captain in one of the factions, I believe, in Nicaragua. Another one had married a girl in the States -- he was Greek -- and he ran a restaurant. We found an underground room with all kinds of weapons there. His sister came over from Greece and turned him in, and he had a family of children back in Greece. My only concern on those cases was to listen to it to see if there was enough evidence to where there was probable cause to charge them with. Then I would either have them remain in jail pending trial or impose a bond. The trial was usually
before the U.S. District Judge.

J: Judge, there are a few areas that we perhaps skipped. I did not ask you about the full names
of your children.

H: My oldest daughter is Dorothy Mae Hampton, born May 27, 1944. She married a
Gainesville boy. She graduated from high school with him. His name is Phillip Loggins.
They live in Tallahassee and they have a son and a daughter. The daughter graduated from the University of Florida five years ago. Her brother, named Phillip 111, graduated from Florida three years ago. Elizabeth is living in Tallahassee and getting an advanced degree in
hospital management.

My next daughter is Margaret Frances Hampton, born May 12, 1947. She graduated from Florida State with her major in French, minor in Spanish. She went to school one summer at the University of Nice. She was a stewardess. They cut back around 1970 and she was furloughed because she worked three hours longer than six months; under that they were fired. During that period of time when she was not working, Pan Am hired her. So Margaret was working as a stewardess for Pan Am. She got her Master's Degree in business from Columbia and was working as Assistant Vice-President at Manufacturers Hanover Trust in New York. She was later Executive Vice-President of the BankSouth in Atlanta, and is now living in Crystal River and she is a financial consultant. She has one son, Robert, who is
fifteen years old and around 63" tall.

Boys came along much later. Wade IV was born December 22, 1958. He graduated from the University of Florida in Electrical Engineering. He worked down in Boca Raton at Mitel Corporation and while there he got his Master's Degree in Business and is now living in Stafford, Virginia. He is going to the Episcopal Church, the same church that the fourth generation of my family were married in. He has a wife and three children, two boys and
one girl (9, 6 and 2). One of the boys is named William Wade Hampton V.

My youngest son, John Thomas Hampton, graduated from the University of Florida in Civil Engineering, and he got his Master's Degree in International Finance at New York

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 14
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University. His wife is a doctor, and they have no children. They live in Indian Shores,
Florida, and he is a financial consultant and real estate developer.

J: Thank you. You have quite a family, don't you. Before we go on, I asked you a question
about what was Gainesville like in the Depression, and you reminded me that the 20's were a pretty fabulous and interesting time and you were growing up at that time. Do you want to
share some things about Gainesville in the 20's?

H: My earliest recollections of Gainesville go back to somewhere around 1920 to 1922. The
only streets in Gainesville that were paved was University Avenue from East 8t Street to West 7th Street. They were brick. University Avenue was later improved out to 13 thStreet.
The entrance to the campus was on the southwest corner of the intersection of 13th Street and it went in a loop and came back out at 18t Street, where the Catholic chapel is. They started paving all of that area. The rest of the streets were dirt, with the exception of East Main now N.E. 1st Street, which were flint rock. They had a grass plot in the middle, as it still has now.

South of the Episcopal Church there were two big oak trees between 1't Avenue and University. All they had was just a curbing around the trees. University Avenue had a grass plot starting at 2dStreet and went on out to 8t Street, then when they continued the street improving out to the Waldo Road. At one time they had a grass plots there but for a very
short time. Of course, that's been taken up.

The Presbyterian Church was on West University Avenue at 2 ndStreet's northeast corner.
There were a couple of big oak trees in that block, between that corner and 1't Street.
Of course, Main Street was brick from 8t Avenue down to Depot Street. 1't Avenue south was three and four blocks; 2 ndAvenue east was four blocks. S.E. 2 ndStreet was brick.
From one block north of University down to Seaboard station on Depot Street, then Pleasant Street. N.W. 2 ndStreet was brick, as it is now up to 4 thAvenue. A little bit of North I' Avenue was brick. Somewhere in 1922 or 23 they started paving the streets in northeast Gainesville. My mother's home, a little over the north half of the block, bordered on the west by N.E. 3 rdStreet. The house of my grandparents has been torn down. The balance of that block was owned by my grandmother's brother, Birket Jordan. The north half of the second block south of 3 rd Avenue was owned by my grandmother's sister and her husband, Ben Richards. It is claimed to be the house that mother and dad owned was from Frank Hampton at 425 N.E 3 rdStreet. Originally there was a house that faced the park and there was a house on the northeast corner there. My dad bought that, I believe, in 1919. They moved in there sometime in 1920 after my sister was born. She was born in 1919. My mother continued to live in that house until 1987 or 1988 when she was 95, then she had an apartment at the Atrium. When I went out to visit with them, they said, "How old is your mother?" I said, "She was 95 in November." They were opening up December 1't. We can't take anybody that age. I said, "Let me bring her out here. Let you make your own decision." So we went out there and she walked in. They asked her a few questions about

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 15
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medications she was on. She said none. What problems do you have medically? None.
What about food problems? No problems. She was the oldest member there, and she was
100 plus ten months when she died in 1993.

The reason I remember when the streets were paved is that first of all, we had two beautiful oak trees in front of our house. The curb was to be on the east side of it. The city had agreed that the curb would go around the tree and come back in and go around, as they did in the block between 5t Avenue and 6th Avenue, which is Thomas Hotel property. They cut so much of the root that when my dad came back after he had been out of town about a week, my mother had already started taking the trees down and he told her, "I'm glad you did what
you did." Dad died on November 7, 1924.

They paved 8th Avenue from Main Street to about N.E 2 nd Street, I believe it was, and they paved 5t Avenue down across the Branch to N.E. 7t Street and then back down to University and the streets that led to University Avenue. They paved two or three streets east and west and S.E. 7t Street south of University Avenue, and then they did a little bit of
paving in the southwest part of town, over in the downtown area.

Then about 1926 M.M. Parrish and his Daddy and Granddaddy came along and developed Highlands and Highland Heights and they paved The Boulevard up to 8t Avenue. When I was in eleventh grade, the corner of N.E. 5t Street and 8t Avenue was still dirt. It was paved at The Boulevard, but not east of The Boulevard. Then 8 thwas improved shortly after.
When we were in tenth or eleventh grade, which would have been 1929 or 1930, we had a real nice deal out there with paved streets around where we played ball, and they went in and planted oak trees. They did the same thing with those oak trees at the city park. They were about eight or ten feet tall and about three or four inches in diameter, and they were planted
in the late 20's, around 1930.

J: You were in high school in 1929. Was there a lot of social activity then and did it reflect the
feeling of the 20's in the country?

H: Well, my group was a little young then, because I entered the seventh grade in 1927 and
graduated in May or June 1933, and there wasn't much for us to do. Back in the 20's during the summer you'd find seven or eight families would either on Wednesday or Thursday, take the afternoon off and we'd go somewhere to picnic. The Pavilion was out at Santa Fe Lake.
The other was to go to Poe Springs. My first recollection of Glen Springs was that we went out Alabama Street, now N.W. 6 thStreet and across Hogtown Creek and went west. We came in there alongside the cemetery just north of Morrison Cafeteria, went down and crossed the creek there and then went south to Glen Springs. We had to stay in the car while Dad would go in. That would make it before 1924. They would get out and rake the leaves out of the spring and the run of the creek and let us go swimming. Of course, later on Glen Springs was developed and Charlie Pinkoson's daddy developed Pinkoson Springs. All

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 16
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during the 20's, on Saturdays, there were horse and buggies all over the south side of the square. Some would water their horses at Hogtown Creek, and most of them would come to town to get the supplies. Daddy used to take us out and let us swim in Hogtown Creek on the old Newberry Road. They had a bridge across there and on the south side of the bridge all our horse and buggies would go down in the creek and water the horses and then come on to town. The original building of the Gainesville Golf and Country Club was torn down in 192 1, as near as I can remember the date. It was the old pavilion that was out at Newnan's Lake at Palm Point. I learned to swim at Newnan's Lake. They had a double fence. The area for swimming had a fence around it, and about 15 or 20 feet there was another fence to keep the snakes out and they would watch the kids and if there were any snakes swimming in between the two fences, we had to get out. The hyacinths almost covered the lake in those
days.

The fill for the road right-of-way of 441 was completed in 1926. They had a big coal-fired barge. It hung up on a rock and overturned and one person was drowned and they made them change to complete the road. Somewhere in the stuff I've got, I have an article written by Judge Harry McDonald's mother describing her first trip into Gainesville and all the water she saw. Apparently she came in from Ocala and they came up the east side of Gainesville on the train and came into Gainesville. She describes all she saw of Paynes
Prairie.

After World War 1, Senator Bill Shands and my father owned an inboard boat, which they kept out at the Alachua Sink. It was stolen and/or sunk. Sam Mixon, Odell Prince, Daddy, Ernest Roebuck, Elmer Hayne, Lee Graham, and others had a boat house at the Cannon's property on Paynes Prairie, up there half a mile west of the Ocala road. It was about 100 to 150 yards out to the tree land. During the 20's there was enough water on the prairie that most of the time -- they built a little sort of a canal and built it up -- there was enough water that you could take the duck boat down -- a duck boat being a boat approximately ten or ten and a half feet long, 36 to 40 inches wide, and pointed at both ends It had a deck about four inches up, and then it had a cockpit that was about three inches high, and it was operated with push poles. As late as 1932 and 33, the boat house was still there and Calvert Cannon and others have gone across the prairie from there. My Uncle Fred Hampton bought an outboard motor, Johnson light twin, 2 1/2 horsepower, and we were out on the prairie in 1928 or 29 and there was a thin sheet of ice for a couple hundred yards out on the prairie. It
was so cold that we came in.

About the time I graduated from high school, Camp had built his canal. All the water from Newnan's Lake and Prairie Creek had been diverted into the canal to the River Styx and the north part of Orange Lake. I have walked over across the prairie, walking around wet spots
and shallow spots, and hardly got my feet wet.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 17
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As late as 1936, as near as I can recall, H.H. Parrish and Sam Dell and M.M. Parrish and I went duck hunting. Sam Dell owned the property just off of the Ocala road, north and east of the Ocala road, on the north side of the prairie. Camp had dug a ditch that went east and west. That ditch looked like it was very narrow, but when we got there M.M. Parrish handed me his gun and hunting coat, and he tried to jump it. Neither one of his feet got to the other side. We found a narrower spot and I threw my gun and his gun and shells over to him, and I managed to jump and get one foot across. No one was able to jump it. When we came in that night, it was about 45 degrees. H.H. Parrish and I had ten or twelve ducks apiece, and we just sat down on the side, using the ducks as flotation and went across and came on out.
That was the last time I've really hunted on the prairie, then refilled until Camps Canal. The
prairie went dry somewhere around the time just after World War 1.

My grandfather had a Packard. My Uncle Ed and a friend went out fishing and got three sacks full of fish, threw them on the leather seats, and needless to say, my grandfather bought new seats. A year or so later, my uncle went to Steve Hange' s's place at San Felasco Hammock, about due west of the present electric plant. He started to cross the little creek in front of Steve Hange's house, and Jack Spruill, who married the daughter of Mrs. Ben Richards, was in there. They ended up in the creek with water over the seats. Needless to
say, new seats again.

Louis Burkhim's first wife was drowned on Paynes Prairie when the vessel she was in,
somewhere around the turn of the century, overturned. We heard a little bit about the
recreation area that was down at Boulware Springs. Apparently it was a pretty nice place.
As I recall, they said a bear got loose and attacked somebody and then it was closed. The story I was told about Alachua Sink was that the Indians called it a jug or a big hole and someone said that supposed it had opened up suddenly and an Indian in a canoe had been
sucked in and appeared two or three days later at Silver Springs.

My first recollection of Silver Springs was when I went down in a Model T Ford with my father, so it had to be prior to November 1924, and I remember there was a 50 or 60 foot
vessel tied up over on the south side of the springs. That's all I can recall of that.

There were two or three of the hills out of Gainesville, Cloclough Hill being one of them.
The branch just short of39hAvenue atN.W. 6t Street, Hogtown Creek, the sand would get so bad that the Model T clutch would give out. I've been in the Model T when he turned it
around and backed up the hill.

The Haile Plantation, the first time I remember going out there, Graham and Tommy Haile -Tommy was a year older than I was and Graham was probably three years older -- and of course he was driving a Model T when he was fourteen or fifteen, and we went out there and had some parties out there in the old house. My father's name appears on the wall. In 1909, along with Maude Graham and Evans Haile. They were later married and the mother of

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 18
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Tommy and Graham Haile. We had a party out there in 1934, and on the north wall of that room my name was there along with Tommy Haile and Henry Graham and some others.
When I first went out there, the cook shack was still in the back of the main building with a passageway to it. I am not sure whether it was covered or not, but I think it was. I recall a slave quarters off to the northeast about 200 yards. In my recollection, there were approximately four houses on each side of sort of like a little street. There was an older man named Dewey, living out there. He said, "I don't know how old I was when my family moved to Florida, but they moved down somewhere around 1854, and that house was started but not completed until after the Civil War." And he said, "I don't know how old I was but I was a grown man about the time the war broke out." To my recollection, he lived two or three years after World War 11. In other words, that would put him in his late 80's or early
90's.

One of the most interesting things -- with what they've done out there, I can't show it to
anybody -- but about a quarter of a mile north of the house there was an overpass and
an underpass. The Gainesville-Archer Road was built up maybe three or four feet above the level of the ground and went down the other side. The Micanopy-Alachua Road went under.
It was high enough underneath that if you rode horseback, if you didn't duck, you would hit the logs. That's what they tried to do when you went out there the first time. They had two old race horses and they'd put one of you on the race horse and then try to race back to the
house. They would always go underneath it. Nobody ever got hurt.

The story I was told about that was the Hailes were rice planters in the James River area of South Carolina. They were flooded out two or three years and came down to Florida and said they would find the highest and the driest piece of property they could find. My recollection is there were only 1400 acres out there. The only water I ever saw was somewhere near where the overpass and underpass was built, and somebody had dug down
five or six feet and dirt was taken out. Otherwise, there was no water out there.

The Chestnut family were related to the Jordan family. They had some property pretty much on the present Farnsworth Road, a couple of miles north of Newberry Road, where the
Millhopper Road comes in.

J: A number of these families belong to the Episcopal Church, and I know your father played
an important role in the Episcopal Church.

H: My grandfather was Senior Warden for over thirty years.

J: And your father had a state office?

H: That was my grandfather. He, along with my father, had a lot to do with getting Bishop
Juhan, the former bishop of Florida back in the 20's. He stayed with the family and my

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 19
February 16, 1999


grandmother every time he came to Gainesville back in those days. The last time I saw him he was in front of the church waiting to go hunting with the family who owned the property
that was just west of Haile Plantation.

J: Now, you played a significant role in Holy Trinity, also.

H: I think my father and my Uncle Ed were on the vestry. I was always a vestryman. First of all, the
original
I
church
cost about $7,000.
Our present church
was two and a half million dollars after the fire. The first Sunday School classes
I went to were in the church.
I was in
about the
fourth or fifth Sunday

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III 20
February 16, 1999


School grade when they built the
parish house in back of the church.
It had a room that went up two stories and had a balcon
y
around three sides, and it had this small room for
classro oms, and it had a kitchen and a dining room, and then upstair s over

..







Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999


the
kitchen was one of two rooms for a kinderg arten. We held Scout meetin gs in there. We skated in
there. We rode our
bicycle s in there. This and the church burned.


About the time I went on the vestry, we had a building fund drive --as I remember, I was one of the co-chairman of the drive -- to build what is the north part of it on 2 ndAvenue. Then just above the main church there were two houses. The first house was owned by Eva Dell. She was a member of the church. Sam Wall was connected with her, and he got that after she died. I've forgotten the name of the people that had the house on the corner. There was a house back from the corner. The house back of it, as I recall, was torn down, the one that faced 2 nd Avenue, but the house that was on the corner was one of the houses that was moved over at about S.E. 7th Street and 2 nd Avenue. One of those houses over there.

Back in the early 20's, we had three blacksmith shops in Gainesville. One of them was over where the parking lot of the First National Bank, the First Union. The Coastline Railroad

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 22
February 16, 1999


Station, of course, was where First Union is. They had a side track that came up and went over to the northwest corner of N.W. 1st Avenue. Stringfellow Supply was just north of that over on Ilt Street. Of course, down in south Gainesville, Baird Hardware had a track that came injust above Depot Street and came into their property, and then the warehouse of Cox Furniture was there. They had a side track that went in and it was big enough for either one or two box cars to be inside the building. When they remodeled that building, which is now
offices.

You've seen the old hand-drawn map of Gainesville showing all the orange groves and all.
Well, I rented a house over on N.W. 6 thStreet just east of The Boulevard in the Duck Pond and Cecil Gracy owned the Taylor house on that northwest corner. Well, Cecil had at least a 50 or 75 foot lot from the garage north, and back of the east part of that, back in '46 and '47, there were eight or ten orange trees with the trunks almost as big around as your waist. They were still living, and they were there, the only old orange trees that I knew of in Gainesville.
The University had a nice orange grove, which was later killed in the freeze, on Archer
Road, where the parking lot for Shands is.

The big blacksmith shop was about where the Post Office is now. It was almost a three-story building, and about the time of World War 11 it was converted into seven or eight
apartments. Of course, it was later torn down.

The last hanging in Gainesville was, I believe, in 1926. The jail went all the way down to west of the Branch, and went down to the street that goes in front of the Post Office. It had a big wooden fence around it, and they built the scaffolding between the southwest corner and the jail, just a little bit east of that line. Henry Graham and I went down there. My father had died. We kind of innocently walked out and got in the middle of the crowd. No one had said anything but standing over next to the fence, a couple of Henry's Daddy's friends saw
us. Anyhow, we were run out of there. That's the nearest I ever saw anything like that.

J: Judge Hampton, a final question. When did you retire officially, and what sort of activities
have you been engaging in -- hobbies or other things -- since you've retired?

H: I sold out my share of the business in the insurance field in 1980 after I had a heart attack. I
continued on as U.S. Magistrate Judge and for four years I was one of the directors of the Magistrate Judges Association. In 1985, I had reached the age limit of over 70 and all the judges in the district agreed I could continue to serve on an annual basis. We had a change of three judges. I wanted to finish out my full year appointment to get my twenty years, and
he would not let me serve the last year. So in October, 1993, I basically retired.

I still had some of the family property. I did some legal work on that. There were a couple of estates that I did some work on. I sent the last bill approximately a year ago, and they came up in October for my birthday that to stay in the Florida Bar I had to go to school, and

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 23
February 16, 1999


at that time I said I didn't feel like going to school, so I officially retired. You cannot
practice law without qualifying education-wise.

In 1980 my wife and I started traveling. We had only one really big trip prior to that, when we went to England and France for five days back in the late 50's. In 1970 when my daughter was still with TWA, we took a trip for two or three days to the Mexico City area.
We got home on Christmas Eve and left the 26 th of December for Madrid, Rome and Athens.
As my daughter had resigned from the airline, we had to get back. Then she went with Pan Am, and we took a 45-day trip around the world. We took both of the boys, who were then twelve and thirteen. That was in 1970. We went to Portugal, Rome, Greece, Lebanon, India, Hong Kong, then from there we went to Japan, to Hawaii, Los Angeles, and back home.
After 1980, we've taken trips to Yugoslavia, Spain, and France. We got on a vessel in Malagar, Spain, and went to Rio. We went to Magistrate Judges Association meetings in San Francisco; Portland; Estes Park, CO; New Orleans; Washington; Philadelphia; Boston; and Nashville. When my son was working up in the Connecticut area, we took a trip up to
Newport, Rhode Island.

My brother-in-law had an interest in a fish camp in Canada, and I've gone on fishing trips five or six times up there, and one hunting trip up in an area up there above Lake Superior. I love to hunt and fish. I have done very little duck hunting. Most of my areas for duck
hunting have gone.

M.M. Parrish, H.H. Parrish, Bill Shands and I and one other person went over to Taylor County in 1941, could have been '40, to go deer hunting. All of us had shotguns. It was a Sunday morning. This one other person was coming in. I never saw him. This deer came out in the Pine Island and I strode through a swamp with knee-deep water. The next thing I
heard was ping-ping-ping. About four shots went over my head.

I started again with my son-in-law in Tallahassee area in 1980 or '81. Hunting up there is different. In these other places we move around. You try to get ahead of them. Up there, it's all still hunting. We have stands, 4x7. One had an old bucket seat out of an airplane
with a six inch foam rubber in it. I killed a couple of turkeys.

I belong to the East Side Garden Club. We are called the Hydrilla Circle.

J: You've given us a very extensive interview, Judge Wade Hampton, and we thank you very
much. I thank you for the pleasure. Is there any other area that you would like to include
before we finish?

H: One of the most interesting buildings in town was the old red court house, as we called it. I
knew the janitor down there, and up in the attic where the works for the clock were, all the beams were ten or twelve inches square. They went all the way up to the peak of the roof.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 24
February 16, 1999


In the old Presbyterian Church at the northeast corner of West University and 2 ndStreet, the
beams in the tower were likewise that heavy.

As you know, they had three railroads in Gainesville. The T&J went down into Marion County, and met the Seaboard and the Southern Railway up in Union County. Of course, the Seaboard came through Gainesville, but originated from Fernandino to Cedar Key. That railroad was taken up during the Civil War and put back down up through Alabama. It was later rebuilt after the Civil War. I can't remember the boy's name, but he wrote a history of the Seaboard Railroad back about 193 5. Then, of course, we had the Atlantic Coastline that came down Main Street, and the Seaboard down on Depot Street. The story is that the Coastline didn't have permission to come down Main Street, and they came in here at night and laid the track. They would have a tung oil festival back during the 30's and the parade was stopped and the train would come up just below 2 n Avenue south and stop and he couldn't start up the hill and he would have to back down the hill almost to the cemetery and get a running start to come up the hill. The train would stop and let passengers off to eat at the White House Hotel, pull up to the station, back up when it was time to leave, and people
would get back on the train and leave.

The American Legion had two or three picnics out at Sunnyside Beach at Cowpen Lake.
They would put on an extra baggage car and an extra couple coaches, and the train would go out of Gainesville about 1:30 in the afternoon, and we would go out there and stop over on the train right-of-way at Sunnyside, and it was a 200 or 300 yard walk over to the lake. We carried the food and we'd swim and eat, and the train would come back along and would
stop and pick you up and bring you back to town.

My father and uncle and all would want to go out to Haile Plantation. They would get on the train and tell the conductor they wanted to get off and he would stop and let them off. As the train came back by, if they wanted to come to Gainesville, they would get on it and come
back.

The same time with Fred Hampton. He used to get on the Coastline and get off up this side of Hague to go to San Felasco Hammock. I've ridden in the engine of the train from Gainesville to Cedar Key. The train left Cedar Key at five o'clock in the morning and five
o'clock in the afternoon. Two round trips a day back in the 20's to Jacksonville.

Old Pappy Odlund lived at a homestead island over at the mouth of the Suwanee, and for years he sent barrels of sea trout north. There were two or three layers of sea trout and sturgeon underneath. Once we were caught in a storm at Cedar Key, the train backed out at Cedar Key where it comes out on the dock. That's where the train track was. He'd back it out and we got right off the boat and right on the train and came home. The train would pull out of here about 6:30 at night, with twenty or thirty box cars. It would stop and shift them

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 25
February 16, 1999


off, and he'd get in down there about ten o'clock, sometimes as late as eleven o'clock at
Cedar Key.

The T&J back in the early 20's had the engine with the smokestack instead of straight up like they had them during the 30's had a big round thing, stove-shaped. They had a big yard down very near where the ice plant is at the end of Pr Street or 2 ndStreet, south of Depot Street, and they converted a coach. It was half baggage car and half coach, and they put an automobile engine in it, and they started carrying the passengers on it north to make connections with the Seaboard. When Gainesville High School was back in '28 and '29 in the Big Ten, they'd get on that and would go up to the Seaboard in Union County and would get off and get on the Seaboard and go to Pensacola and come back that way. Carol Adams, Cecil Gracy, and some others that were about ten years older than 1, would talk about going up some of the hills over there and all the boys would get out on the back platform and some of them would get out and start jogging alongside of it. Going up the hill, if the train couldn't make the grade, the conductor would get mad and make the boys get off the back
platform.
The last figures I saw on the Seaboard going south of Gainesville was that the passenger traffic that year -- and I recall it was somewhere between $3 or $4, less than $5 -- they made $300 or $400 in freight. While I was in college in the middle 3 0's, the Seaboard took their tracks up from Archer to Cedar Key. They still ran freight trains through here, turning south and then down to Williston. One of the Coastline trains that came through here started off at St. Pete and came through Gainesville. The Seaboard never had a passenger train except
between Cedar Key and Jacksonville.

When the Seaboard put on the Silver Meteor, my mother had a 1928 Buick that was thirteen years old, and it was just crossing University Avenue going toward Waldo and I got up to sixty-five before I got to 8t Avenue and the tail end of it was almost up to the entrance to Tacachale. I was told that that train was running approximately 100 miles an hour when they went across a canal down there down in Palm Beach County and somebody that was on it
said it went click, click, click.

They tell me, and I don't know how true it is, that at one time vessels could come out of the prairie into Bivens Arms and there was a tram road that ran from Bivens Arms up about where 16t Avenue comes to Archer Road -- that's what that little station was for -- they used
to bring produce up there and put it on the train.

Preston Roundtree could tell you about this. Some sink holes opened up out in the Paynes
Prairie and covered up two or three box cars somewhere back in the late 20's, around
1930. The club house out at Palm Point was torn down when the Gainesville Golf and Country Club was started and they built an L-shaped building at the club, now the University
of Florida County Club.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton 111 26
February 16, 1999


J: Is there anything else? H: No.

J: Thank you very much, Judge Hampton. We will have this transcribed and returned to you
for editing and any additions which you may wish to make.

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Full Text

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MATHESON HISTORICAL CENTER ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM INTERVIEWEE: Judge William Wade Hampton III INTERVIEWER: Ray Jones TRANSCRIBER: Ruth C. Marston February 16, 1999

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 1 J: My name is Ray Jones. I am intervie wing Judge Wade Hampton for the Oral History Program at the Matheson Historical Center, on February 16, 1999, in Gainesville, Florida. Judge Hampton, will you please give your full name and birthdate for the tape. H: William Wade Hampton, III. I was born in Gainesville on October 24, 1915. J: For the record, would you please state that you give the Matheson Center permission to use the information gathered in the interview. H: I do. J: Thank you. Please tell me about your family’s origin and how the Hamptons came to Gainesville? H: My family came from England. William Hamp ton landed in Strawberry (Norfolk James River), Virginia, in 1620. Four generations lived in Virginia and then one generation in Lincoln County, N.C., and one in Shelby C ounty, S.C., where my great-grandfather was born. My grandfather was born in Bainbridge, Georgia. The family (my grandfather, William Wade Hampton) moved to Gainesville in 1875. He and his brother founded the Gainesville Times, which is the forerunner of the Gainesville Sun, in 1875. My grandmother was from Alabama, and the family, shortly before the Civil War, moved from eastern Alabama to Mississippi and they came down here to visit in Gainesville. It was Birket Jordan and my Grandmother and her sister, who later married Ben Richards. My father was born in January of 1894 in Gainesville. My mother’s family came from Augusta, Georgia, to Jacksonville, in the 1880's. My mother was born on November 14, 1892, in Jacksonville. My mother and dad were married in Jacksonville on January 8, 1913. Mother died September 13, 1993. J: You were born in Gainesville? H: Yes. J: I know that your father was involved in ma ny of the most important developments in Gainesville. Are there any comments that you would like to make about his activities and accomplishments? H: My Grandfather practiced law until the time of his death at the age of 72 here in Gainesville in 1928. He was the first President of the Florida Bar. My father graduated from Washington Lee Law School in 1908 and practi ced with his father until he died on November 7, 1924. The firm was named Hampt on and Hampton. After World War I, when

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 2 dad’s younger brother, Edwin Birket Hampton, gr aduated in Law from the University of Florida, he practiced with the firm of Hamp ton and Hampton. The middle brother graduated from the University of Florida and practiced law in Tampa until my father died in 1924, and then he moved to Gainesville. My Grandfat her died in 1928, Ed Hampton in 1931, and Fred Hampton in 1937. J: Where did you first live in Gainesville with your family? H: We lived on the southeast corner of what is now N.E. 4 th Street and 3 rd Avenue. The frame house is still there. Behind the house was my grandfather’s tennis court, and on the other end of the block -the east end of the block -were his stable and the carriage house. This is at the back entrance to the Recreation Center on the Boulevard and N.E. 2 nd Avenue. J: Who were your friends when you were growing up? H: My closest friend was Henry Graham, who was later a doctor. He has been dead since I think it’s 1970. He lived on East Main Street now the southwest corner of N.W. 7 th Avenue and N.E. 1 st Street. His grandfather was the founde r of the First National Bank. His daddy was later president of the First National Bank, and his name was Lee Graham. J: What schools did you attend? H: I attended for six years what was then called the Eastside Grammar School, now KirbySmith. In the west building I went through fi rst through fourth grades, and they had a two and a half story building to the east of that, and when I was in grade school, that was Senior High School. There were two tennis courts and our basketball court that were clay, one in front of the high school part of it, the other s outh of the west elementary school building. The west building was built somewhere around 1900. This building still stands and is being used by the school board. Let’s go a little bit further. Gainesville High School was built on West University Avenue. The front part of it opened in 1923. They built an east wing and west wing to the south, and in the middle they put the stage for the audito rium. The basketball court was on the stage. The cafeteria was just south of the basketball c ourt. I entered that school when it was just barely completed, in 1927; I entered the sevent h grade, and I completed high school in that school in 1933. J: You were in school certainly during part of the Depression times. Do you remember anything in particular about those times?

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 3 H: Well, I graduated in 1933, and as I recall, my junior year the family had to pay, I believe, $15.00 a month for three months in order to k eep the high school quali fied and certified, and I believe one month or two months as a senior. In the class graduating with me was Sel don Waldo, Covington Johnst on, and Frank McCraw. The four of us went to the University of Florida and graduated in Law in 1939. Henry Graham went to medical school, and after World War II came back to Gainesville to practice. Also, in our class was Jimmy Goodson. Jimmy was a chemist with Black & Crowe. Two of the girls in our class went to law school, after graduating from Agnes Scott. One was Lucille Carnes, now Lucille George, and the other was Jeannette Te Selle. Her daddy was one of the professors in the law school . I believe that her name is Mrs. Peter Plunk. Also in that class was M.M. Parrish, Cecil Simmons, whose daddy was connected with the school board. Cecil was later an empl oyee of the Post Office. Dell Jernigan was also later an Assistant Postmaster. Anot her boy who did real well was Robbie Rabinowitz, who changed his name to Robins, and he was a chemist, I believe. J: You immediately went off to college after graduation? H: All of us stayed and finished our education he re in Gainesville at the University of Florida -all the boys, with the exception of Henry Graham , who went to school in New York State. The two girls went to the University of Florid a after they graduated at other colleges outside the state. J: Where did you go to law school? H: The University of Florida. J: And what year did you graduate? H: 1939. J: Where did you first practice law? H: I practiced law in Jacksonville with the firm of Knight and Knight for eight months. Then I came back to Gainesville. J: When were you married and to whom? H: I met my wife (Dorothy Maples) through a boy who moved to Gainesville when he entered the college. I was visiting in Jacksonville and I had two dates with her during the summer of 1939 and after I went to Jacksonville in approximately January of 1940, I started having dates with her. When I returned to Gain esville, on August 1, 1940, I practiced here and then

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 4 went into service on August 26, 1941. When I re turned from Californi a in Dece mber, 1942, I was supposed to arrive in Jacksonville by plane on Monday morning. I was grounded in El Paso and came through on the train and got to Ga inesville on Wednesday at noon. My sister got married on Saturday, December 12, 1942. I as ked my wife to marry me on Wednesday night, and we got married on December 17, 1942, at 7 o’clock in the evening. At 9 o’clock we were on a train, which did not leave Jacksonville until 11 o’clock to go to California. J: I’ll come back to your children, but I noti ce in your writeup in “Who’s Who” that you won the Bronze Star. Were you in combat? Could you describe some of your activities during World War II? H: I almost fought the battle of the United St ates. I reported to Fort Bragg August 26, 1941, which was a Tuesday evening and I processe d Wednesday morning. We had Wednesday afternoon off buying uniforms. I taught tw o classes on Thursday morning. At noon Thursday we went in the fiel d, and I was executive officer of the Firing Battery, and we went into position at approximately ten o’clock at ni ght. One hour before daylight we fired what we called a high burst adjustment, and I was so raw that I didn’t know we were supposed without having a safety officer present. There was none present. Shortly after that, we went on Carolina maneuvers for two months. On December 31, 1941, I reported to Fort Sills, Oklahoma, to take a three-months course. Upon completion, I had a two-week vacation. I returned to Fort Sills and in the meantime, in February, my unit had moved from Fort Bragg to Fort Sills. We were school troops. Nothing happened out of the ordinary except the recoil of an old French 75 went out and when I called and reported to the officer in charge of firing at the observation post, he ordered me to fire the gun. I told him it was unsafe and refused to fire it unless he gave me authority and assu med the responsibility in writing, which he didn’t do. Later when the gun was sent to Ordnance, my diagnosis was correct. Another time we were firing World War I shrapnel ammunition, 75 mm guns, and quite frequently we got a muzzle blast, which meant that the impact of firing a gun would blow the fuse, and steel pellets would go out. Th is hit the back of the hill and went over the crest of the hill. We could see the top of the trucks of a school class. An instructor called me and wanted to know what I meant by firing within 200 yards of the front of his class. J: A friendly fire! H: Yes. I told him that we had a muzzle blast, that we had checked the ammunition. He was a Lieutenant Colonel -I was a First Lieutena nt -and he started chewing on me. The Executive Officer, who was a Major, was down at gun position as safety officer, and he saw me and also checked the ammunition, so in those two instances I came out all right. I took over a battery on a Wednesday afternoon at one o’clock in September. At 6 p.m. we had orders to go overseas and we took up all of the wool clothing and issued out another

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 5 three suits of khaki on Thursday and Friday, th en on Saturday morning they said the orders are changed. Issue back what you took up and ta ke up what was issued. We were going to California! On September 7, 1941, we went to the California Mojave Desert. I was a train commander of one of the two trains in the battalion. We started out head ed for El Paso. The Southern Pacific could not take care of us, so we went north to Belen, New Mexico, as I recall, and got on the Santa Fe. We got to Needles, California, across the Colorado River, climbed up out of the valley. We stopped at a little place on the main line and they put us over on the eastbound track. The engine was not strong enough to push us off the track, and the flagman had to run down the track and flag the Super Chief, and the Super Chief pushed us off the track and we went south into the de sert approximately sixty or seventy miles to a place called Freda. Freda had one covered railroad building, no windows, no sides, about 200 yards off the main road, and we unloade d and we stayed in the desert from approximately September 12 th until about December 1 st , when we went to Camp Cook, now Vandenburg Air Force Base, in California. We were part of the Fi fth Armored Division. We left there in February of . I had b een married in December , and we went to Tennessee to the Tennessee maneuvers. We left Tennessee about the 1 st of July of and went to Pine Camp, N.Y. The interesting th ing in Pine Camp was that we had the cadets from the U.S. Military Academy with us for approximately sixty days, and some of them were assigned to our unit, and we let them act as officers with us supervising. I got transfer orders in October, and I went down to a camp out of Petersburg, Virginia. It turned out that it was the formation of an armored group headquarters. One of my classmates from college back in 1937, name d Franklin Bennett, who was from Sanford, Florida, was on the same orders from the 47 th Field Artillery, and when we got there we had one full Colonel, and he and I were the two Captains, and then we had a bunch of Lieutenants. From there I was sent to a special five-weeks school at Washington Lee University. Miss Lizzie Graham, who ran a boarding house between Washington Lee and VMI -was still running a boarding house -we arri ved too late, and my wife could not get a room with her, but she arranged for us to have a room with the head of the English Department at VMI. I had to eat at the Wash ington Lee cafeteria. My wife ate with Lizzie Graham in the same boarding house my father had lived in before he graduated in 1908. From there my unit was transferred to Arkansas at Camp Fort Smith. We were lucky and got a nice duplex. Thirty days later we left Fort Smith and went up to a camp in Kansas, out of Salinas, Kansas. I was sent with the advance detachment, and I thought that we were being invaded when just before daylight I looked up and I saw the blinking lights of what turned out to be a B24. It was about four miles off of the airport runway, and I did not know there was an Air Force base there. It looked like I could stand on the roof and touch the plane. Later I looked at the chapel and noticed it had no steeple. The month before the steeple had been knocked off.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 6 While I was there, my first child, Doro thy Mae Hampton, was born on May 27, 1944, and about two weeks after she was born, I was transferred from this group headquarters that had nothing but tank units on it, to Fort Riley, Kans as, and 155 Howitzer Battalion there. About August 11, 1944, I was transferred on overseas orders to go to Fort Meade, Maryland. I brought my wife and baby home and reported. I got a ten-day leave, went back to Fort Meade, and we went to Camp Reynolds, Pennsylvania, for thirty days and from there went back to Meade. One of the interesting thi ngs was that in Camp Reynolds, I ran into Bill Long, who had introduced me to my wife, and th e three other boys from the University of Florida. We got back to Meade. My wife had come up and spent some time in New York with her brother and then came up to Reynolds , Pennsylvania. We went back down to Meade and I put her on a train on Thursday and on Sunday, one of the boys said that he had overseas orders to go to Fort Ord, California. He said my name was on it. I made a copy of it, and two hours later I was on a train headed for Florida. I got to Florida that night about eleven o’clock and had a couple days in Gainesville, a couple days in Jacksonville, and then reported to California on or about the 26 th of October. We stayed at Fort Ord for a couple of month and then went to a camp outside of Rivers ide, California, and from there went to the Port of Los Angeles and I had a ticket that said, “Capt. William Wade Hampton III and 785 others on the Southern Pacific Railroad.” Again I was the train commander. We were on a ship for thirty-two days, going to Bombay, India, and we had no escort until we got to Perth, Australia. We had spent two nights in Melbourne, and went across Australia bight, and off of Perth we picked up a destroyer es cort that was with us for two days. It left us that night and the next morning we had a torpedo across the bow of our ship. I was on a ship that was designed for the South American trade. It was twin engine, about 630 or 640 feet long, and could do 26 to 28 knots. Just at dusk that night, we pulled into Bombay, India. The first person I saw was Frank Wright walk ing up the gangplank. Fr ank Wright had been head of the alumni secretary at the University of Florida. After one night we were put aboard a train. It was about 200 yards from the ship to the train. I had two and a half cases of whiskey with me. Two cases were in a foo tlocker, and we had put two pair of wool socks on each bottle, two or three towels on the bottom. I saw my footlocker drop from the head of one of the Indian porters, and I figured I had lo st some of my whiskey. The other six bottles (I had three in my musset bag and three of them in a bed roll) one fifth, one fifth, and one fifth. Out of the twenty-seven officers in our shipment, we had over forty cases of whiskey, and in transit only one bottle was broken. We were at a camp outside of Calcutta for approximately two weeks, it having taken five days to go across India from Bombay to Calcutta by train. They would tell us that we would be in to a little town fifteen or twenty miles down the road and they would have hot water for us so we could eat our “C” rations, and they w ould not have it. It was maybe the third town down the road that we would get it.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 7 While there, we were twenty or thirty miles out of Calcutta and we could get transportation by train. You’ve seen pictures of the tr ain with people hanging all over the outside? Well, there were a couple times when we got on to go in town and we had to do the same thing. We’d hang on the outside until we coul d find a place to sit dow n. If nobody was in first class, we would make use of it, and they didn’t object. On one trip in Calcutta to the Karney Estate -a hotel which was a U.S. recreation hotel, I was sitting in the bar with three or four of my friends and I looked up and I saw this fellow come in and I said, “That looks like my cousin.” It was Nelson Black. He was a medic with a B24 squadron. They said, “Your cousin?” and I said, “It looks like it.” I could not see his insignia and see whether he was a medic or not. When I got up and walked over and he looked up, it was my cousin’s husband. They ha d been married in 1938 and I saw him for a week and then two nights after that in 1939, a nd this was 1944, and I recognized him. I had written when I was in California to Lee Graham, who is living in Tallahassee and is a retired Episcopal minister, and he married Betty Thom as. I wrote him and said, “Don’t be a bit surprised if I don’t drop in to see you at Easter .” I missed. I got to Kunming, China, on the Wednesday after Easter, and we had supper togeth er that night. I saw him the next day and two days later, I had a truck to go to the eastern part of China. We were in a small village and we were living in the bus station the Americans had taken it over. The artillery unit was Chinese. They had been shot up three months before and we were retraining the unit. We moved the pack artillery Chinese outfit forward about 400 miles up near where the front was, and when we got there, the Chinese held one side of a ridge and there was a little valley 200 yards or so across, and the Japanese held the other ridge. The most interesting thing there was a Chines e general came up and with my Colonel, we were in what was called an advisory group which consisted of three artillery officers, three artillery sergeants, a veterinary officer, and tw o veterinary sergeants. We went up and we walked around the corner of the ridge, and ther e was about a three foot wall between us and the river, and we were surprised that there wa s no firing. We learned the next day that the Japanese general was doing the same thing at the same time we were, and we were within 200 to 300 yards of one another, so that was the reason there was no firing. The night that the war ended in Europe we ha d moved or were in the process of moving up to the front with the Chinese artillery, and we got to a ferry too late to go across. We pulled back about one-half mile to the top of the ridge , and we noticed a road off to the side. We moved down that road about 300 yards and found some nice pine trees that were about as big around as your leg. We hung our jungle hammocks and our radio picked up that the war in Europe had ended that day. The next morning we noticed that we only about 300 yards from the ammunition depot. That night a Japanese plane called a “Betty” had flown over and dropped two or three bombs in the vicinity of the ferry, not hitting anything.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 8 From there -the Japanese had pulled back -we moved up another 100 miles or so and got orders to go to a town forty miles off of the roa d. It was at that point that the war with the Japanese ended. The Japanese surrender plan e was over this little town when two fighters owned by either Chinese or Americans looked like they were going to shoot it down. They went to Clickyang Air Base, and this is what terminated the fighting there. A few days later we moved fr om that area and went on up to Hengyang. We had been in Hengyang and moved up to Nanking and had orde rs to go to the Yangtze River and we would be met by a Navy ship. We got four or five hours from the Yangtze when a Taylor Cub flew over and dropped a message that the ship couldn’t make it and we had to drive four days back to Clickyang, where I ran into a couple of the officers that had been on the shipment with me when we went overseas. I ra n into Henry Dozier, an attorney from Ocala, and a couple of other boys from Florida. Ne wcome Barco from Ocala. After being in Calcutta for three to four weeks, we went a board the ship. At that point General Neyland from Tennessee spoke to us. Thir ty-three days later with a night stop at Port Said and a night stop at Ceylon, we pulled into New York in the middle of December 1945. J: A very explicit and detailed account of a very fascinating war. Of course, you didn’t say how you got your Bronze Star medal. H: My citation for the Bronze Star Medal was fo r our American Unit 4 officers and 5 sergeants trained a Chinese Pack Artillery Battalion. We were the furthest unit north and east of Kunming, China, and about 500 miles from the co ast. I received the Bronze Star Medal for organizing and supervising a 500 mile forced march from Puan to Junkow. We moved men, mules, pack 75 mm guns and equipment (American) furnished to the Chinese by truck and part by foot. On numerous occas ions we were strafed by Japanese planes. The forced march of the Pack Artillery Battalion was over badly damaged roads, all bridges demolished, many roadblocks including shell craters and two river crossings -and was made in five days. Also included was a statement that I was instrumental in the speedy and efficient equipping, supplying and training of the 57 th Division (Chinese) with Ameri can arms and equipment. We never did get to the coast but did get to w ithin about 70 miles of the Yangtze River near Nanchang about two weeks after the war ended, th en returned to Kunming and were flown to India. J: Can I ask you now questions about your ci vilian life when you got back and you started practicing law again, I understand. H: I came back out of the service and went b ack with Jordan, Lazonby & Dell and worked with Birket Jordan, my dad’s first cousin. He was in the firm when it was Hampton and Hampton. I stayed with them until 1950, and then went out on my own. In 1954, with two others, we started a corporation in the insurance field. I was the Vice-President. My job was

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 9 almost like the Vice-President in charge of claims, handling self-insured and hotels for automobiles, Workmen’s Compensation. In September, 1954, I was appointed Municipal Judge, a position I held until September, 1973. J: I know from reading a newspaper account th at you made a number of procedural changes when you became judge. Can you tell us about those? H: Well, it was interesting. The municipal build ing was a two and a half story building and the court originally met in a semi-basement, which would be at the corner of N.E. 1 st Street and 2 nd Avenue, and a few years later they built the current police station on N.W. 6 th Street and court was on the second floor. It was at this point , a year or two after we moved there, that a judge started wearing a robe other than a suit. My first recollection of the Gainesville Municipal Court was when Larkin Carter wa s a judge and it was held over on the second floor of the Fire Department on S.E. 1 st Street in the 200 block. From there, later on, they built the library on University Ave nue at the corner of N.E. 3 rd Street, and the court took over the old library on East University Avenue at the Branch. We had a court room and the entire building was occupied by the Municipal C ourt. We stayed in that building until we did away with the court in 1973. The reason the court was terminated was that over the years, where originally we had the city attorney or someone from his office to prosecute the case, we had to furnish a full-time Public Defender. About 1970 or 1971, every now and then someone would ask for a jury trial. It was practically unheard of in Municipal Court, and we decided that we were going to have to do it, so we started in February, as n ear as I can recall, and later in July that the Florida Supreme Court ruled that if they aske d for a jury trial in cases like driving while intoxicated and so forth, they were entitled to it. We had been operating approximately four months at that time. We had had so many cases that we started the general cases -drunk and disorderly, cases like that -at nine o’ clock, and we would barely get through about twelve o’clock, and at one o’cl ock we would start our traffic cases. We generally had it set up for shoplifting cases that if the witnesses would show up at 3:30, the cases would be called within the hour. When we were in th e old Municipal Building, I’ve seen members of Margaret Ann, later part of Winn Dixie, appear at two o’clock in a case and the case called at six or seven o’clock at night. It was always th e management that we wa nted to please. In this way, we got them to prosecute instead of letting them go. About eight or ten communities around the state cam e in after we started having jury trials, and they would ask what our procedure was, and they adopted what we were doing. We would have had to discontinue the Municipal Court in 1974 because the state went with the four tier system: the County Court, the Circuit Court, the Appellate Court, and the Supreme Court. They did away with a ll Magistrate Courts, all Municipal and City Courts. We did it one year early.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 10 In 1974, Bo Arnow, who was a Federal District Judge, living in Pensacola, asked me if I could take over as a part-time United States Ma gistrate. In talking with my partner in insurance business, which I was working almost full-time, he said as long as it didn’t interfere with what I was doi ng, go ahead. I took that on, and in 1980 after having a heart attack, I sold out in the insurance business and remained as a part-time United States Magistrate until October of 1993. I was nineteen years in the municipal court and nineteen years Magistrate Judge. It’s interesting to look back and see that th e City of Jacksonville had two Municipal Judges and they worked full-time, as I recall, in the 1970's and were handling about fifty-five thousand cases a year. Initially, the Municipal Court was one afternoon. Later it became all day Tuesday, with arraignment on Friday. We handled about fifteen thousand. Then when we went to jury trials once a month, on Wednesd ay we would start jury trial and it generally was for two to two and a half days. As U.S. Magistrate, they told me I would handle about seventeen matters a year. The first year I handled 57 cases, and the work continued to increase to where it was somewhere between 75 and 150 a year. One of the most interesting things as U.S. Magistrate was with what they called the Gainesville Six. Later one of those got in troubl e, and I had to have a hearing while he was in intensive care at the hospital. In 1992, af ter having abdominal surgery, and just out of intensive care, I had to hold an emergency hear ing for a warrant to st op some people leaving the country. By this time, with modern media and equipment, the warra nt was issued for the arrest of this man and this woman, and they were arrested that night or late that afternoon as they were attempting to leave the country and go to Hong Kong. J: Judge Hampton, what power changes did you obser ve in Gainesville with the growth of the University and the growth of the town? H: The University of Florida, when I entere d the school in September 1933, had, as I recall, about 2200 students. When I graduated six y ears, there were approximately 3200 or 3300. Gainesville, after World War II, was predicted as one of the two or three towns in the country that would treble within ten years. The University did more than that. Around 1948, when the new gymnasium was built off the southeast corner of the present stadium, it would seat about 8500. As I recall, the student body at that time was somewhere between 10,000 and 11,000. With this number of students it cr eated problems. The original group of students that came back after World War II, came out of the service and were all older than the other students. One of the first things th at we ran into was vandalism. They held the panty raids, and some of the students who cam e up before me I had them write essays on subjects like “Why I should obey the law,” or some question like that. They would have to write 2500 or 3000 words. The Clerk and I read it and if it was not complete and neat, they redid it. The worst one I ever got was a boy a bout twenty-five years ol d who had been in the

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 11 service for four years. One of the best ones I had was a freshman either eighteen or nineteen years old. We had a lot of students and people that were charged with shoplifting or petty larceny. In cases like that -at one time there wa s an estimated 2500 that I had withheld adjudication on -I required them to come and s ee me every three months, and if they were out of town to write me, and they did this re ligiously, and to the best of my knowledge, there were only five of those who did this who got in trouble a second time. One of them was a very nice looking girl, who when I looked up a nd saw her sitting there, she looked like she could have been the sister of my youngest daughter. Within three months she had committed a second offense. I did this not only for student s in the age bracket of twenty-two, but there were also a few up in the 70's and one, as I recall, in the 80's. They came from all walks of life. There was a Dean’s son, several college professors’ sons or daughters, and some of them were working on Master’s Degrees. If they behaved themselves and came to see me before they graduated, I would dismiss the case. One of the most interesting was a very attractive young lady from the West Palm Beach area, and four months after she left, she and the boy she was going with or living with went to work with Schenectady Electric in New York, and she wrote two or three times, and I went to court once about quarter of nine and they said that a young lady wanted to see me. She and the boy came in, and she was dressed in the skimpiest shorts and bra that you could see on the street, and he was not dressed much bette r, and he said they had ridden all night and they wanted to talk with me. I told them I di dn’t have time to talk to them, but if they would come in at a quarter of one I’d be glad to talk to them. They came back, and she was dressed very attractively in what you would call a Grandma dress, a long dress, clean, neatly pressed, and he was in khakis, clean and neatly pressed. He said that they had gotten married and he wanted to go back into the service and he could go back in as a sergeant and an MP with his qualifications. She apologized for coming into court. I said, “Young lady, you didn’t embarrass me because I’ve got children, but in my capacity as judge, I was going to have to say something to you if you had come back in dressed like that.” The last I heard he had gotten into service and got along. Another little girl from the Palm Beach area cam e in, and I saw her three or four times, and she came in in June and said, “I’ve finished my exams and I’m graduating.” She had a little grin on her face. I said, “All right, you’ve got something you want to tell me.” She said, “I’m getting married next week, and my husbandto-be is out front.” He came in and we talked for a few minutes, and he told me they were going to St. Petersburg. A year and a half later, I had a phone call. She said, “This is so-and-so from the Palm Beach area. Do you know who I am?” I said, “No, k eep on talking.” Then I recognized her. I said, “Now don’t get mad, but if you are who I think you are, the last time I saw you, you told me you were getting married the next week and going to St. Pete.” You could almost hear her laughing.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 12 I still have a few of the letters that some of th ese kids wrote me. I would tell them, if they were arrested for shoplifting, if they ask you this question, “Have you ever been arrested and convicted?” you can truthfully sa y, “No.” But if they ever ask you if you’ve been arrested or convicted, you’d have to say yes, that you were arrested but not convicted. So this was the way we would handle it. We had a bunch of almost riots out in the street, particularly at the corner of 13 th and University Avenue. About the same time or ri ght after the panty raids. The ones that came up before me, I used to tell them the ones that generally start something like this, as a general rule, slip away before it gets out of hand. I said the only thing you all can do, if you see it down at the corner, is to go around the block. Don’t go up there. We didn’t have too much trouble with that. We came to the question of integration in the Florida Theater. There were several of these episodes. The Police Department didn’t know many times that things were going to happen until they happened. Therefore, they were unable to take the n ecessary steps to keep the streets open for something lik e that, until it was already crowded. At the Florida Theater, which was in the 200 block of West University Avenue, was the first. A reporter I knew, with his camera, got out of his truck, parked it, put his ladder up against the building and climbed up on top of the building, and was se tting up his camera, when the owner came out and made him get down. He insisted that because he was part of the media he had the right to be there. We had some trouble with the street being blocked, and after the first tim e, I talked with the Police Department, the Chief of Police, and I said that we had almost a riot and making arrests, we’ve got a lot of problems proving what they did. I said the easiest thing would be to turn in a fire alarm, have the fire departme nt come rushing down the street and if they are blocking and can’t get through, any of them in the street you can make an arrest because they were blocking an emergency vehicle. I think that we used it once or maybe twice. J: Did you have some difficult cases? I read in some of the old issues of the Gainesville Sun that you did have some of the students who were leading some of the protests on the campus and also in the city. Were they difficult cases to deal with individually? H: Well, as far as City Court was concerned, we didn’t have too much trouble with anything like that. There were two or three times that some of the boys or a boy went to a sorority house. They said they had the right to go up to the second floor, even though the head of the sorority had told them they did not have the right and had asked them to leave, or the house mother had. So we got them as a general ru le on obnoxious intrusion after being asked to leave. We tried to make an offense as simple as possible because it was simple to prove. Of course, the Police Department was the one who had to do that.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 13 In regard to the U.S. Magistrate, the main j ob of the U.S. Magistrate part-time is to try misdemeanors and to hold initial hearings when they’ve been arrested on a major offense or as the result of a warrant for their arrest. I ha d one that gave me trouble. They made threats against the President of the United States. Th ere was another one who turned out to be a captain in one of the factions, I believe, in Ni caragua. Another one had married a girl in the States -he was Greek -and he ran a restaurant. We found an underground room with all kinds of weapons there. His sister came ove r from Greece and turned him in, and he had a family of children back in Greece. My only c oncern on those cases was to listen to it to see if there was enough evidence to wh ere there was probable cause to charge them with. Then I would either have them remain in jail pendi ng trial or impose a bond. The trial was usually before the U.S. District Judge. J: Judge, there are a few areas that we perhaps skipped. I did not ask you about the full names of your children. H: My oldest daughter is Dorothy M ae Hampton, born May 27, 1944. She married a Gainesville boy. She graduated from high school with him. His name is Phillip Loggins. They live in Tallahassee and they have a son and a daughter. The daughter graduated from the University of Florida five years ago. Her brother, named Phillip III, graduated from Florida three years ago. Elizabeth is living in Tallahassee and getting an advanced degree in hospital management. My next daughter is Margaret Frances Ha mpton, born May 12, 1947. She graduated from Florida State with her major in French, minor in Spanish. She went to school one summer at the University of Nice. She was a stewar dess. They cut back around 1970 and she was furloughed because she worked three hours longe r than six months; under that they were fired. During that period of time when she was not working, Pan Am hired her. So Margaret was working as a stewardess for Pan Am. Sh e got her Master’s Degree in business from Columbia and was working as Assistant Vice -President at Manufacturers Hanover Trust in New York. She was later Executive Vice-Presiden t of the BankSouth in Atlanta, and is now living in Crystal River and she is a financia l consultant. She has one son, Robert, who is fifteen years old and around 6'3" tall. Boys came along much later. Wade IV was born December 22, 1958. He graduated from the University of Florida in Electrical Engin eering. He worked down in Boca Raton at Mitel Corporation and while there he got his Master’s Degree in Business and is now living in Stafford, Virginia. He is going to the Episc opal Church, the same church that the fourth generation of my family were married in. He has a wife and three children, two boys and one girl (9, 6 and 2). One of the boys is named William Wade Hampton V. My youngest son, John Thomas Hampton, graduated from the University of Florida in Civil Engineering, and he got his Master’s Degr ee in International Finance at New York

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 14 University. His wife is a doctor, and they have no children. They live in Indian Shores, Florida, and he is a financial consultant and real estate developer. J: Thank you. You have quite a family, don’ t you. Before we go on, I asked you a question about what was Gainesville like in the Depre ssion, and you reminded me that the 20's were a pretty fabulous and interesting time and you were growing up at that time. Do you want to share some things about Gainesville in the 20's? H: My earliest recollections of Gainesville go back to somewhere around 1920 to 1922. The only streets in Gainesville that were paved was University Avenue from East 8 th Street to West 7 th Street. They were brick. University Avenue was later improved out to 13 th Street. The entrance to the campus was on the sout hwest corner of the intersection of 13 th Street and it went in a loop and came back out at 18 th Street, where the Catholic chapel is. They started paving all of that area. The rest of the streets were dirt, with the ex ception of East Main now N.E. 1 st Street, which were flint rock. They had a grass plot in the middle, as it still has now. South of the Episcopal Church there were two big oak trees between 1 st Avenue and University. All they had was just a curbing around the trees. University Avenue had a grass plot starting at 2nd Street and went on out to 8 th Street, then when they continued the street improving out to the Waldo Road. At one time they had a grass plots there but for a very short time. Of course, that’s been taken up. The Presbyterian Church was on West University Avenue at 2 nd Street’s northeast corner. There were a couple of big oak trees in that block, between that corner and 1 st Street. Of course, Main Street was brick from 8 th Avenue down to Depot Street. 1 st Avenue south was three and four blocks; 2 nd Avenue east was four blocks. S.E. 2 nd Street was brick. From one block north of University down to S eaboard station on Depot Street, then Pleasant Street. N.W. 2 nd Street was brick, as it is now up to 4 th Avenue. A little bit of North 1 st Avenue was brick. Somewhere in 1922 or 23 th ey started paving the streets in northeast Gainesville. My mother’s home, a little over the north half of the block, bordered on the west by N.E. 3 rd Street. The house of my grandparents has been torn down. The balance of that block was owned by my grandmother’s brothe r, Birket Jordan. The north half of the second block south of 3 rd Avenue was owned by my grandmother’s sister and her husband, Ben Richards. It is claimed to be the house that mother and dad owned was from Frank Hampton at 425 N.E 3 rd Street. Originally there was a house that faced the park and there was a house on the northeast corner there. My dad bought that, I believe, in 1919. They moved in there sometime in 1920 after my sister was born. She was born in 1919. My mother continued to live in that house until 1987 or 1988 when she was 95, then she had an apartment at the Atrium. When I went out to visit with them, they said, “How old is your mother?” I said, “She was 95 in Nove mber.” They were opening up December 1 st . We can’t take anybody that age. I said, “Let me bring her out here. Let you make your own decision.” So we went out th ere and she walked in. They asked her a few questions about

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 15 medications she was on. She said none. Wh at problems do you have medically? None. What about food problems? No problems. Sh e was the oldest member there, and she was 100 plus ten months when she died in 1993. The reason I remember when the streets were pave d is that first of all, we had two beautiful oak trees in front of our house. The curb was to be on the east side of it. The city had agreed that the curb would go around the tree and come back in and go around, as they did in the block between 5 th Avenue and 6 th Avenue, which is Thomas Hotel property. They cut so much of the root that when my dad came back after he had been out of town about a week, my mother had already started taking the trees down and he told her, “I’m glad you did what you did.” Dad died on November 7, 1924. They paved 8 th Avenue from Main Street to about N.E. 2 nd Street, I believe it was, and they paved 5 th Avenue down across the Branch to N.E. 7 th Street and then back down to University and the streets that led to Univers ity Avenue. They paved two or three streets east and west and S.E. 7 th Street south of University Avenue , and then they did a little bit of paving in the southwest part of town, over in the downtown area. Then about 1926 M.M. Parrish and his Da ddy and Granddaddy came along and developed Highlands and Highland Heights and they paved The Boulevard up to 8 th Avenue. When I was in eleventh grade, the corner of N.E. 5 th Street and 8 th Avenue was still dirt. It was paved at The Boulevard, but not east of The Boulevard. Then 8 th was improved shortly after. When we were in tenth or eleventh grade, which would have been 1929 or 1930, we had a real nice deal out there with paved streets around where we played ball, and they went in and planted oak trees. They did the same thing with those oak trees at the city park. They were about eight or ten feet tall and about three or four inches in diameter, and they were planted in the late 20's, around 1930. J: You were in high school in 1929. Was there a lo t of social activity then and did it reflect the feeling of the 20's in the country? H: Well, my group was a little young then, because I entered the seventh grade in 1927 and graduated in May or June 1933, and there wasn’t much for us to do. Back in the 20's during the summer you’d find seven or eight families w ould either on Wednesday or Thursday, take the afternoon off and we’d go somewhere to picnic . The Pavilion was out at Santa Fe Lake. The other was to go to Poe Springs. My first r ecollection of Glen Springs was that we went out Alabama Street, now N.W. 6 th Street and across Hogtown Creek and went west. We came in there alongside the cemetery just nor th of Morrison Cafeteria, went down and crossed the creek there and then went south to Glen Springs. We had to stay in the car while Dad would go in. That would make it before 1924. They would get out and rake the leaves out of the spring and the run of the creek and let us go swimming. Of course, later on Glen Springs was developed and Charlie Pinkoson’s daddy developed Pinkoson Springs. All

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 16 during the 20's, on Saturdays, there were horse and buggies all over the south side of the square. Some would water their horses at Hogt own Creek, and most of them would come to town to get the supplies. Daddy used to take us out and let us sw im in Hogtown Creek on the old Newberry Road. They had a bridge across there and on the south side of the bridge all our horse and buggies would go down in the creek and water the horses and then come on to town. The original building of the Gaines ville Golf and Country Club was torn down in 1921, as near as I can remember the date. It was the old pavilion that was out at Newnan’s Lake at Palm Point. I learned to swim at Newnan’s Lake. They had a double fence. The area for swimming had a fence around it, and about 15 or 20 feet there was another fence to keep the snakes out and they would watch the ki ds and if there were any snakes swimming in between the two fences, we had to get out. Th e hyacinths almost covered the lake in those days. The fill for the road right-of-way of 441 was completed in 1926. They had a big coal-fired barge. It hung up on a rock and overturned and one person was drowned and they made them change to complete the road. Somewhere in the stuff I’ve got, I have an article written by Judge Harry McDonald’s mother describing her first trip into Gainesville and all the water she saw. Apparently she came in fr om Ocala and they came up the east side of Gainesville on the train and came into Gaines ville. She describes all she saw of Paynes Prairie. After World War I, Senator Bill Shands and my father owned an inboard boat, which they kept out at the Alachua Sink. It was stol en and/or sunk. Sam Mixon, Odell Prince, Daddy, Ernest Roebuck, Elmer Hayne, Lee Graham, and others had a boat house at the Cannon’s property on Paynes Prairie, up there half a mile west of the Ocala road. It was about 100 to 150 yards out to the tree land. During the 20's there was enough water on the prairie that most of the time -they built a little sort of a canal and built it up -there was enough water that you could take the duck boat down -a duck boat being a boat approximately ten or ten and a half feet long, 36 to 40 inches wide, and pointed at both ends It had a deck about four inches up, and then it had a cockpit that was about three inches high, and it was operated with push poles. As late as 1932 and 33, the boat house was still there and Calvert Cannon and others have gone across the prairie from there. My Uncle Fred Hampton bought an outboard motor, Johnson light twin, 2 1/2 horse power, and we were out on the prairie in 1928 or 29 and there was a thin sheet of ice for a couple hundred yards out on the prairie. It was so cold that we came in. About the time I graduated from high school, Ca mp had built his canal. All the water from Newnan’s Lake and Prairie Creek had been dive rted into the canal to the River Styx and the north part of Orange Lake. I have walked over across the prairie, walking around wet spots and shallow spots, and hardly got my feet wet.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 17 As late as 1936, as near as I can recall, H.H. Parrish and Sam Dell and M.M. Parrish and I went duck hunting. Sam Dell owned the property just off of the Ocala road, north and east of the Ocala road, on the north side of the prai rie. Camp had dug a ditch that went east and west. That ditch looked like it was very narrow, but when we got there M.M. Parrish handed me his gun and hunting coat, and he tried to jump it. Neither one of his feet got to the other side. We found a narrower spot and I threw my gun and his gun and shells over to him, and I managed to jump and get one foot across. No one was able to jump it. When we came in that night, it was about 45 degrees. H.H. Parrish and I had ten or twelve ducks apiece, and we just sat down on the side, using the ducks as flotation and went across and came on out. That was the last time I’ve really hunted on the prairie, then refilled until Camps Canal. The prairie went dry somewhere around the time just after World War I. My grandfather had a Packard. My Uncle Ed and a friend went out fishing and got three sacks full of fish, threw them on the leather seats, and needless to say, my grandfather bought new seats. A year or so later, my uncle went to Steve Hange’s’s place at San Felasco Hammock, about due west of the present electric plant. He started to cross the little creek in front of Steve Hange’s house, and Jack Spru ill, who married the daughter of Mrs. Ben Richards, was in there. They ended up in the creek with water over the seats. Needless to say, new seats again. Louis Burkhim’s first wife was drowned on Paynes Prairie when the vessel she was in, somewhere around the turn of the century, overturned. We heard a little bit about the recreation area that was down at Boulware Springs. Apparently it was a pretty nice place. As I recall, they said a bear got loose and attacked somebody and then it was closed. The story I was told about Alachua Sink was that the Indians called it a jug or a big hole and someone said that supposed it had opened up s uddenly and an Indian in a canoe had been sucked in and appeared two or three days later at Silver Springs. My first recollection of Silver Springs was when I went down in a Model T Ford with my father, so it had to be prior to November 1924, and I remember there was a 50 or 60 foot vessel tied up over on the south side of the springs. That’s all I can recall of that. There were two or three of th e hills out of Gainesville, Cloclough Hill being one of them. The branch just short of 39 th Avenue at N.W. 6 th Street, Hogtown Creek, the sand would get so bad that the Model T clutch would give out. I’ve been in the Model T when he turned it around and backed up the hill. The Haile Plantation, the first time I remember going out there, Graham and Tommy Haile -Tommy was a year older than I was and Grah am was probably three years older -and of course he was driving a Model T when he was f ourteen or fifteen, and we went out there and had some parties out there in the old house. My father’s name appears on the wall. In 1909, along with Maude Graham and Evans Haile. Th ey were later married and the mother of

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 18 Tommy and Graham Haile. We had a party out there in 1934, and on the north wall of that room my name was there along with Tommy Haile and Henry Graham and some others. When I first went out there, the cook shack was still in the back of th e main building with a passageway to it. I am not sure whether it was covered or not, but I think it was. I recall a slave quarters off to the northeast about 200 yards. In my recollection, there were approximately four houses on each side of sort of like a little street. There was an older man named Dewey, living out there. He said, “I don’t know how old I was when my family moved to Florida, but they moved down somewhere around 1854, and that house was started but not completed until after the Civil War.” And he said, “I don’t know how old I was but I was a grown man about the time the war broke out .” To my recollection, he lived two or three years after World War II. In other words, that would put him in his late 80's or early 90's. One of the most interesting things -with wh at they’ve done out there, I can’t show it to anybody -but about a quarter of a mile north of the house there was an overpass and an underpass. The Gainesville-Archer Road wa s built up maybe three or four feet above the level of the ground and went dow n the other side. The Micanopy-Alachua Road went under. It was high enough underneath that if you rode horseback, if you di dn’t duck, you would hit the logs. That’s what they tried to do when you went out there the first time. They had two old race horses and they’d put one of you on the race horse and then try to race back to the house. They would always go underneath it. Nobody ever got hurt. The story I was told about that was the Hailes we re rice planters in the James River area of South Carolina. They were flooded out two or three years and came down to Florida and said they would find the highest and the driest piece of property they could find. My recollection is there were only 1400 acres out there. The only water I ever saw was somewhere near where the overpass and underpass was built, and somebody had dug down five or six feet and dirt was taken out. Otherwise, there was no water out there. The Chestnut family were relate d to the Jordan family. They had some property pretty much on the present Farnsworth Road, a couple of miles north of Newberry Road, where the Millhopper Road comes in. J: A number of these families belong to the Epis copal Church, and I know your father played an important role in the Episcopal Church. H: My grandfather was Senior Warden for over thirty years. J: And your father had a state office? H: That was my grandfather. He, along with my father, had a lot to do with getting Bishop Juhan, the former bishop of Florida back in th e 20's. He stayed with the family and my

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 19 grandmother every time he came to Gainesville b ack in those days. The last time I saw him he was in front of the church waiting to go hunting with the family who owned the property that was just west of Haile Plantation. J: Now, you played a significant role in Holy Trinity, also. H: I think my father and my Uncle Ed were on the vestry. I was always a vestryman. First of all, the origina l church cost about $7,000. Our present church was two and a half million dollars after the fire. The first Sunday School classes I went to were in the church. I was in about the fourth or fifth Sunday

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 20 School grade when they built the parish house in back of the church. It had a room that went up two stories and had a balcon y around three sides, and it had this small room for classro oms, and it had a kitchen and a dining room, and then upstair s over

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 21 the kitchen was one of two rooms for a kinderg arten. We held Scout meetin gs in there. We skated in there. We rode our bicycle s in there. This and the church burned. About the time I went on the vestry, we had a building fund drive -as I remember, I was one of the co-chairman of th e drive -to build what is the north part of it on 2 nd Avenue. Then just above the main church there we re two houses. The first house was owned by Eva Dell. She was a member of the church. Sam Wall was connected with her, and he got that after she died. I’ve forgotten the name of th e people that had the house on the corner. There was a house back from the corner. The house back of it, as I recall, was torn down, the one that faced 2 nd Avenue, but the house that was on the co rner was one of the houses that was moved over at about S.E. 7 th Street and 2 nd Avenue. One of those houses over there. Back in the early 20's, we had three blacksmith shops in Gainesville. One of them was over where the parking lot of the First National Bank, the First Union. The Coastline Railroad

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 22 Station, of course, was where First Union is. They had a side track that came up and went over to the northwest corner of N.W. 1 st Avenue. Stringfellow Supply was just north of that over on 1 st Street. Of course, down in south Gain esville, Baird Hardware had a track that came in just above Depot Street and came into their property, and then the warehouse of Cox Furniture was there. They had a side track that went in and it was big enough for either one or two box cars to be inside the building. When they remodeled that building, which is now offices. You’ve seen the old hand-drawn map of Gainesv ille showing all the orange groves and all. Well, I rented a house over on N.W. 6 th Street just east of The Boulevard in the Duck Pond and Cecil Gracy owned the Taylor house on that nor thwest corner. Well, Cecil had at least a 50 or 75 foot lot from the garage north, and back of the east part of that , back in and , there were eight or ten orange trees with the trunks almost as big around as your waist. They were still living, and they were there, the only ol d orange trees that I knew of in Gainesville. The University had a nice orange grove, whic h was later killed in the freeze, on Archer Road, where the parking lot for Shands is. The big blacksmith shop was about where the Post Office is now. It was almost a three-story building, and about the time of World War II it was converted into seven or eight apartments. Of course, it was later torn down. The last hanging in Gainesville was, I believe , in 1926. The jail went all the way down to west of the Branch, and went down to the street th at goes in front of the Post Office. It had a big wooden fence around it, and they built the s caffolding between the southwest corner and the jail, just a little bit east of that line. He nry Graham and I went down there. My father had died. We kind of innocently walked out a nd got in the middle of the crowd. No one had said anything but standing over next to the fe nce, a couple of Henry’s Daddy’s friends saw us. Anyhow, we were run out of there. That’s the nearest I ever saw anything like that. J: Judge Hampton, a final question. When did you retire officially, and what sort of activities have you been engaging in -hobbies or other things -since you’ve retired? H: I sold out my share of the business in the in surance field in 1980 after I had a heart attack. I continued on as U.S. Magistrate Judge and for four years I was one of the directors of the Magistrate Judges Association. In 1985, I had reached the age limit of over 70 and all the judges in the district agreed I could continue to serve on an annual basis. We had a change of three judges. I wanted to fi nish out my full year appointment to get my twenty years, and he would not let me serve the last year. So in October, 1993, I basically retired. I still had some of the family property. I did some legal work on that. There were a couple of estates that I did some work on. I sent th e last bill approximately a year ago, and they came up in October for my birthday that to stay in the Florida Bar I had to go to school, and

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 23 at that time I said I didn’t f eel like going to school, so I officially retired. You cannot practice law without qualifying education-wise. In 1980 my wife and I started traveling. We had only one really big trip prior to that, when we went to England and France for five days back in the late 50's. In 1970 when my daughter was still with TWA, we took a trip for tw o or three days to the Mexico City area. We got home on Christmas Eve and left the 26 th of December for Madrid, Rome and Athens. As my daughter had resigned from the airline, we had to get back. Then she went with Pan Am, and we took a 45-day trip around the world. We took both of the boys, who were then twelve and thirteen. That was in 1970. We we nt to Portugal, Rome, Greece, Lebanon, India, Hong Kong, then from there we went to Japan, to Hawaii, Los Angeles, and back home. After 1980, we’ve taken trips to Yugoslavia, Spain, and France. We got on a vessel in Malagar, Spain, and went to Rio. We went to Magistrate Judges Association meetings in San Francisco; Portland; Estes Park, CO; New Orleans; Washington; Philadelphia; Boston; and Nashville. When my son was working up in the Connecticut area, we took a trip up to Newport, Rhode Island. My brother-in-law had an interest in a fish camp in Canada, and I’ve gone on fishing trips five or six times up there, and one hunting trip up in an area up there above Lake Superior. I love to hunt and fish. I have done very little duck hunting. Most of my areas for duck hunting have gone. M.M. Parrish, H.H. Parrish, Bill Shands and I and one other person went over to Taylor County in 1941, could have been , to go deer hunting. All of us had shotguns. It was a Sunday morning. This one other person was coming in. I never saw him. This deer came out in the Pine Island and I strode through a sw amp with knee-deep water. The next thing I heard was ping-ping-ping. About four shots went over my head. I started again with my son-in-law in Talla hassee area in 1980 or . Hunting up there is different. In these other places we move around. You try to get ahead of them. Up there, it’s all still hunting. We have stands, 4x7. One had an old bucket seat out of an airplane with a six inch foam rubber in it. I killed a couple of turkeys. I belong to the East Side Garden Club. We are called the Hydrilla Circle. J: You’ve given us a very extensive intervie w, Judge Wade Hampton, and we thank you very much. I thank you for the pleasure. Is there any other area that you would like to include before we finish? H: One of the most interesting buildings in town was the old red court house, as we called it. I knew the janitor down there, and up in the attic where the works for the clock were, all the beams were ten or twelve inches square. They went all the way up to the peak of the roof.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 24 In the old Presbyterian Church at the northeast corner of West University and 2 nd Street, the beams in the tower were likewise that heavy. As you know, they had three railroads in Ga inesville. The T&J went down into Marion County, and met the Seaboa rd and the Southern Railway up in Union County. Of course, the Seaboard came through Gainesville, but originated from Fernandino to Cedar Key. That railroad was taken up during the Civil War and put back down up through Alabama. It was later rebuilt after the Civil War. I can’t reme mber the boy’s name, but he wrote a history of the Seaboard Railroad back about 1935. Then, of course, we had the Atlantic Coastline that came down Main Street, and the Seaboard down on Depot Street. The story is that the Coastline didn’t have permission to come down Ma in Street, and they came in here at night and laid the track. They would have a tung oil festival back during the 30's and the parade was stopped and the train would come up just below 2 nd Avenue south and stop and he couldn’t start up the hill and he would have to back down the hill almost to the cemetery and get a running start to come up the hill. The tr ain would stop and let passengers off to eat at the White House Hotel, pull up to the station, back up when it was time to leave, and people would get back on the train and leave. The American Legion had two or three picnic s out at Sunnyside Beach at Cowpen Lake. They would put on an extra baggage car and an extra couple coaches, and the train would go out of Gainesville about 1:30 in the after noon, and we would go out there and stop over on the train right-of-way at Sunnyside, and it was a 200 or 300 yard walk over to the lake. We carried the food and we’d swim and eat, and the train would come back along and would stop and pick you up and bring you back to town. My father and uncle and all would want to go out to Haile Plantation. They would get on the train and tell the conductor they wanted to get o ff and he would stop and le t them off. As the train came back by, if they wanted to come to Gainesville, they would get on it and come back. The same time with Fred Hampton. He used to get on the Coastline and get off up this side of Hague to go to San Felasco Hammock. I’v e ridden in the engine of the train from Gainesville to Cedar Key. The train left Cedar Key at five o’clock in the morning and five o’clock in the afternoon. Two round trips a day back in the 20's to Jacksonville. Old Pappy Odlund lived at a homestead island ove r at the mouth of the Suwanee, and for years he sent barrels of sea trout north. There were two or three layers of sea trout and sturgeon underneath. Once we were caught in a storm at Cedar Key, the train backed out at Cedar Key where it comes out on the dock. That’s where the train track was. He’d back it out and we got right off the boat and right on the train and came home. The train would pull out of here about 6:30 at night, with twenty or thirty box cars. It would stop and shift them

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 25 off, and he’d get in down there about ten o’cl ock, sometimes as late as eleven o’clock at Cedar Key. The T&J back in the early 20's had the engine with the smokestack instead of straight up like they had them during the 30's had a big round thing, stove-shaped. They had a big yard down very near where the ice plant is at the end of 3 rd Street or 2 nd Street, south of Depot Street, and they converted a coach. It was half baggage car and half coach, and they put an automobile engine in it, and they started carrying the passengers on it north to make connections with the Seaboard. When Gaines ville High School was back in and in the Big Ten, they’d get on that and would go up to the Seaboard in Union County and would get off and get on the Seaboard and go to Pensaco la and come back that way. Carol Adams, Cecil Gracy, and some others that were about ten years older than I, would talk about going up some of the hills over there and all the boys would get out on the back platform and some of them would get out and start jogging alongsid e of it. Going up th e hill, if the train couldn’t make the grade, the conductor would get mad and make the boys get off the back platform. The last figures I saw on the Seaboard going south of Gainesville was that the passenger traffic that year -and I recall it was somewh ere between $3 or $4, less than $5 -they made $300 or $400 in freight. While I was in college in the middle 30's, the Seaboard took their tracks up from Archer to Cedar Key. They still ran freight trains thr ough here, turning south and then down to Williston. One of the Coastline trains that cam e through here started off at St. Pete and came through Gainesville. The Seaboard never had a passenger train except between Cedar Key and Jacksonville. When the Seaboard put on the Silver Meteor, my mother had a 1928 Buick that was thirteen years old, and it was just crossing University Avenue going toward Waldo and I got up to sixty-five before I got to 8 th Avenue and the tail end of it wa s almost up to the entrance to Tacachale. I was told that th at train was running approximately 100 miles an hour when they went across a canal down there down in Pa lm Beach County and somebody that was on it said it went click, click, click. They tell me, and I don’t know how true it is, that at one time vessels could come out of the prairie into Bivens Arms and there was a tram road that ran from Bivens Arms up about where 16 th Avenue comes to Arch er Road -that’s what that little station was for -they used to bring produce up there and put it on the train. Preston Roundtree could tell you about this. Some sink holes opened up out in the Paynes Prairie and covered up two or three box car s somewhere back in the late 20's, around 1930. The club house out at Palm Point was to rn down when the Gainesville Golf and Country Club was started and they built an L-shaped building at the club, now the University of Florida County Club.

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Interview with Judge William Wade Hampton III February 16, 1999 26 J: Is there anything else? H: No. J: Thank you very much, Judge Hampton. We will have this transcribed and returned to you for editing and any additions which you may wish to make.