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Interview with Lois Beville Cone

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone
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O'Bryne, Betty
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English

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Oral history -- Florida ( LCTGM )

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Matheson History Museum
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Matheson History Museum
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Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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MA THESON HISTORICAL CENTER
ORAL HISTORYPROGRAM


INTER VIE WEE: INTERVIEWER: TRANSCRIBER:


Lois Beville Cone Betty O'Byrne Pamela Petersen


March 30, 1995

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995


0: I am Betty O'Byrne, an interviewer for the Oral History Program at the Matheson Historical
Center. Today, I am interviewing Lois Cone in her home, on the morning of March 30, 1995. Before we begin, I want to remind you, Lois, of the need for you to sign a release giving the Matheson Center the full use of information gathered in this interview for
whatever purposes it may have. Do you have any questions about this form? C: No I do not. I think I understand that it will be used. 0: Okay, good, then I will ask you to sign it at this time. Thank you for signing Lois. Will you
please state your full name, date and place of birth?

C: Lois Beville Cone. October 27, 1912, Gainesville, Florida. 0: Thank you. How do you spell that Beville? C: B-e-v-i-l-l-e.

O: Ok. I noticed in the information you gave me about your family that at times it is spelled
differently.

C: Yes, B-e-v-i-1.

0: But you put the "e" on it? C: Yes.

0: Thank you. What were the names of your parents? Who was your father? C: Bev Person Beville. And my mother was Susie Bullard Beville. 0: Your father's first name was what? C: Beverly.

0: Beverly .

C: Person.

0: And how did they spell that, how did he spell that? C: B-e-v-e-r-l-y. But he was know as Bev. 0: And your mother, was you said.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995



C: Susie.

0: Was Susie her real name or Susan? C: Yes, no it was Susie. S-u-s-i-e. 0: Oh, S-u-s-i-e. Alright. And her middle name? C: Bullard. B-u-l-l-a-r-d. O: Alright. Where were they from? Were they both born in this area? C: My father was born in Gainesville, and my mother was from Savannah, Georgia. O: What brought her to this area? C: Well, Daddy was at one time dealing in cotton, and he went up to Savannah where, you
know the cotton buyers were back in that era, and he met my mother and that is how they
met.

0: Where did they meet? Was it at the Cotton Exchange, or at a party, or do you know? C: I do not know. That is all I know. O: When did she come to Gainesville, then? C: Well, I really do not know, Betty. O: Did she come just when they got married, or before, or what? C: Yes, I think she came when they got married. 0: So your father was born here? C: Yes.

O: Who was his father, do you remember, do you know his father's name? C: Yes, his father was Steven Pierce Beville, and his mother was Lois Knight Beville. 0: And that Lois is where you got your name, I guess?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone3 March 30, 1995



C: That is where I got my name. 0: That would be your grandfather. Was he born in Gainesville, or Alachua County or what? C: Well, he was born in Alachua County, and I assume in Gainesville, because the Beville
property, I do not know if it belonged to his daddy or not, but anyway, that the brothers had
it out here right off of 43rd Street. 0: Right off of 43rd. C: Yes, big acreage. 0: You say your father was born in Gainesville, or in Alachua County? C: Yes.

O: Do you know where he was born? C: Oh, at home, I am sure at home. O: Do you know where his home was located, his family home? C: Yes, it was on the Newberry Road, do you know where Ft. Clark Church is? O: Yes.

C: Okay, turn to the left, I do not know the. 0: It would be south. if you were going out towards Ft. Clark Church, it would be. C: South, at the church, and about two miles down the road. His mother had a large farm on the
right hand side.

0: When you were growing up, what was the name of that church there? Was that church there
when you were growing up? C Ft. Clark.

0: Was it known as Ft. Clark then? C: Yes, only I called it Four o'clock. I thought for a long time it was a Four o'clock church and
they met at Four o'clock in the afternoon. But anyway, it is Ft. Clark.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 4
March 30, 1995



0: 1 think that is interesting. Your father was born out near Ft. Clark and then lived there? C: Yes.

o: Did he go to school near here, anywhere around here that you know of? C: Yes, he went to the school here in Gainesville, I would not be able to name it. o: He went to school here in Gainesville? C: Yes, that is right. 0: And what was his occupation? C: Well, when he was young, he was dealing in cotton in Gainesville. O: Did they grow cotton out there on his plantation or farm, or his father's farm? C: I think so, but, really I do not know. 0: But what did he do later? C: Later, I can only remember that he was in the grocery business, and the building is still
standing.

0: Oh, where is that? C: It is on South West 1 st Avenue and the corner of 2nd Street. It dead ends. SW 1 st Avenue
dead ends.

0: Okay, SW 1 st Avenue. C: Yes, SW 1 st Avenue dead ends, you know, where the parking back of Wise's Drug Store
and.

0: Okay, it dead ends. What is the building used for now? C: Really, I do not know. 0: Can you name some of the things that used to be there after your father. C: You mean where the building. well.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995



0: What businesses were. C: Later on it was still a grocery business, and 0: Was that Robinson's? C: One of the Robinson's had it. 0: One of the Robinson's had it? C: Yes, that is right. 0: Okay, and that was your father's business where he had his grocery store. What was the
name of his grocery store? C: I really do not know. 0: You can not remember that? Was it called Beville's Grocery, or do you remember? C: I really do not remember. 0: And where were you born? C: I was born in Gainesville. 0: Where? At home? C: At home.

O Where was that home located?

C: In the South East area of Gainesville, back of probably what is now the Court House. 0: What is now the Court House? Back of where the Court House is now? C: Yes.

0: And, did you grow up there and live there all of your life? C: No, no. We moved, I guess I was about four, when we moved to what was then Arredondo
Street, and that was in the S.W. area.

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0: And Arredondo, can you tell me some of the buildings there? Is the house you lived in on
Arredondo, is it still there? C: No. It is now a parking lot. 0: It is now a parking lot. C: Back of Wise's Drug Store. 0: Back of Wise's Drug Store, and that would be across from the First Presbyterian Church? C: That is right. 0: And how long did you live there? C: Well, until I was fourteen, and we moved to S.W. 1 st Avenue in the 800 block, which is now
just west of Ayer's Medical Center. The house is still standing. 0: That was the Old Union Street? C Yes.

O And the house is still there?

C: Yes.

O And you lived there from about age fourteen until.

C: I married.

0: Until you got married. C: Yes.

O: So, when you were born, did the doctor attend your birth, or did a midwife? C: No, no, mother had a doctor, who was Dr. Lartigue. 0: Who? How do you spell it? C: L-a-r-t-i-g-u-e.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995



0: You were born at home? C: At home.

O: Are there any family stories connected with your birth that would be of interest? C: Not that I know of. O: Nothing that was passed down to you? C: No, nothing that was passed down to me. 0: Do you have any idea after you were born how long your mother stayed in bed? C: No.

O: Who took care of the family? C: Her mother came. O: And stayed with the family? Did you have any siblings, brothers or sisters? C: Yes, I had two sisters and one brother. 0: And what were their names? C: My brother was H. D. Beville. My sister was Nathalie Beville. O: How do you spell that? C: N-a-t-h-a-l-i-e Beville. And then, Ethel. 0: Are any of them still living? C: No.
0: Which was the oldest, where do you come in? C: H.D., my brother, Nathalie, then me, and Ethel was youngest. 0: What are some of your earliest memories of growing up in the house on Arredondo?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 8
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C: Well, my earliest memories, I was thinking the other day. The street was unpaved, and once
a week, Ms. Highsmith, who owned a dairy farm, she had a wagon with a top on it, and she would go all over town, pulled by horse, the wagon was, selling milk, cream, butter, eggs, and vegetables. And she had a big bell, a hand bell, that she would ring, and you could hear her coming. So you knew if you wanted something, you would go out on the front of the yard to get whatever you wanted from Ms. Highsmith. That was one, and then another, there was a tremendous oak tree in the road between the sidewalk, I do not remember if we had a sidewalk right there at that point, but we did later, and we had a bag swing which was made out of a croaker sack, filled with moss, and how much fun that was, playing with that. And then the Chautauqua would come once a year, and where they had the tent and all was not too far from our house, and we all looked forward to going to the programs there. My sister, Nathalie, had a horse, and it was kept in a barn across the street from us, and I never did ride the horse, but I always did admire her on the horse. We had, you know, nice neighbors,
older people.

0: Can you remember some of the names of your neighbors?

C: Oh yes. On the corner of Arredondo and University, the Ludwigs lived, and then we lived,
and then next door to us was Miss Millie Adamson and her brother, and she rented rooms out. And across the street on the corner of University and Arredondo, was the Dogan Stringfellow house, and back of the Stringfellow house on Arredondo lived her sister, Ms.
Harper. And then next to Ms. Harper, the Hartfields lived. On the corner, going on past our house on Arredondo, on the, I guess now its 2nd Avenue, the Daughtry's lived. And across the street from them, the Evan's. and the Chittys, and Hewlett Anderson's mother and father lived two blocks down from us on the corner of Arredondo and I guess 2nd or 3rd Avenue.

0: Were there many children in the neighborhood that you could play with?

C: No. The Hartfield's had a boy, Frank, and of course the Chittys down on the corner, there
was Margaret, and Virginia, and Henry. And the Evans, their son, Bill is the father of Dr.
Evans who is a doctor in Gainesville.

0: Dr. William Evans?

C: Right. And then the Ramseys lived across from the Daughtry's. 0: Besides playing with your swing made out of moss, how did you entertain yourself? What
games did you play?

C: I can remember when we were going to school over at Kirby Smith, I can remember that we
skated to school, and we could not wait for recess to play jacks. I can remember playing jacks. And, you know, the games that people played back then, Drop the Handkerchief, and tennis, I was older, you know and in high school. Later on, when we still lived on Arredondo

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 9
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Street, Ms Millie Adamson moved, and the Singers came from New York, and they lived in the house and they had three sons, and I forgot to mention that back of us, on Pleasant Street, lived Margaret and Sarah Smith. And, then on the corner from them, lived the Touses, and Josephine and I can't remember her name, anyway there were children in the neighborhood,
and we used to have plays in a garage.

0: Can you remember any of the plays you had? C: No, I really can not. o: Were they plays that you made up? C: Yes, they must have been. 0: How did you create a stage, or a curtain. C: In our garage. And we decorated it, at that time there was a vine called Stink Vine, it was a
beautiful vine growing, it had pretty clusters of white flowers, but when you would break it off, and put it somewhere, it would begin to smell, but anyway we just had chairs I guess for
the audience who were our parents.

0: That sounds like it must have been fun. C: It was.

0: You went to school and you started to school when you were how old? C: I assume six.

O: And where.

C: At Kirby Smith. 0: At Kirby Smith? C: Yes.

0: Was that the name of the school at that time when you began there? C: Yes it was.


0: How long did you go to that school?

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C: Well, until I went to high school, and they had built G.H.S. 0: And where was G.H.S. located? C: On University Avenue. 0: Is it still there? C: No, no, where Ayers Medical Center is. 0: Ayers Medical Center? C: Yes.

O: And do you remember how long you went to Kirby Smith? Did you start in the 9th grade at
Gainesville High School, or. C: I think probably the 8th. 0: Probably the 8th? C: Yes.

0: Can you remember any of your teachers at Kirby Smith? C: Yes, I can remember one. Mrs. Olsen. And Mrs. Blacklock, but I can not remember any of
the others.

0: What about high school? Can you remember any of your teachers in high school? C: Yes, Mrs. Olsen again. She taught Latin when I was in high school. 0: Was that Mrs. Gladys Olsen? Was that her first name? C: No, Clara.

0: Clara Olsen?

C: She was Clara McDonald before she married. Clara Olsen, and Dr. J. Hooperwise taught
first year Latin. Elizabeth Shaw McClamrock, Margie and Ruth White, Ms. Wallace taught history, Ms. Phipps taught us math. I did not take French, so I did not have Ms., I have
forgotten her name, and there was a Mr. Black that taught us.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 1
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0: Black?

C: Black. He was a brother to A. T. Black, but I can not remember his name other than Black.
And of course, Ralph Buchholtz was the. 0: The principal, the head of the school? C: The principal.

0: Do you have any particular fond memories of attending Gainesville High School? C: Yes, it was just fun. It really was fun. We had a great class and everybody just enjoyed
going to school. You did not question that you could not go, you just knew you would go and you knew that you would have a good time. I really rememberjust having a good time. 0: Do you remember any special teacher? C: Mrs. Olson was outstanding. O: In what way was she so outstanding? C: Well, she was so caring and so giving and so interested in you and she just had a wonderful
attitude and she loved her students and she was just a lovely teacher. 0: She inspired you?

C: She inspired us.

O And she taught you Latin? And you also had her you say when you were in.

C: I did, in either the 3rd or 4th grade of school, I mean. O: Kirby Smith?

C: Yes, elementary.

0: What were some of the activities that went on at Gainesville High school besides the
classroom?

C: Well, they had sports, football, basketball for girls, baseball, but I did not play tennis, so I do
not know if they had tennis or not. I played basketball, and I knew that we had football. I do
not think they had a swimming team, or anything like that back then.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 12
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0: Probably just football and baseball. C: You had a P.E. teacher that you went to at P.E. period. o: What kind of things did you have in P.E., what did you do during P.E.? C: Well, I guess we had exercises and played games or something like that. 0: By the time you went to Gainesville High School, you were living right across the street
from it, weren't you?

C: Not across the, well, yes, across the street. 0; The street you lived on dead ended. C: Dead ended right into the.

0: the high school playground. So if you moved over there, I guess that when you went to Kirby
Smith, when you were living on Arredondo, that was a lot closer than when you moved to
Union, so did that make any difference in how you got to school? C: No, we walked or we skated. 0: You walked or you skated? Did your family have a car as you were growing up when you
were younger?

C: Yes, I remember that we had a car, and that it was a Buick, that had jump seats. o: Now what is a jump seat?

C: Well, they were in back of the front seat and you can fold them down where they were out of
the way. But you also could pull them up and they were called jump seats. 0: They were attached to the back of the front seat? C: No. There were no glass windows. We had Isinglass curtains. If it rained you had to get
them out and snap them on. I remember that.

0: Do you ever remember not having an automobile for transportation? C: No, I really do not. I am sure we did not, but I really do not remember not having one.

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0: You said that Ms. Highsmith, was it, came and she delivered milk and things like that. Did
you all buy your milk, how did you get milk, did you have a cow? C: We had a cow and we had chickens in the back yard. 0: Who took care of the cow and chickens? C: My mother. She milked the cow and fed the chickens, and then my brother, when he was
older, she taught him how to milk.

0: Did you have any chores growing up, that you had to do around the house? C: Yes.

0: What were they?

C: Make up my bed, pick up my clothes, and carry the dirty clothes downstairs. We had a cook,
so I did not have to do anything in the kitchen, but that was many years ago.

0: Did your mother make your own clothes, or did you have a seamstress that came? C: My mother made them. She even made them when I was in high school. 0: Did she teach you how to sew?

C: She tried to. But I have a daughter that sews as beautifully as my mother, and I did not teach
her, she just inherited it.

0 So your mother made your clothes up into high school. Where did she buy her material?
C Well, I will have to tell you this. Mother used to take the flour sacks that the flour came in
from the grocery store, and bleach them, and she made our underpants from the flour sacks.
She bought material and all from Wilson's and then there was Smith and Hooper. 0: Where was Smith and Hooper?

C: On the south side of the square where probably Fold's Hardware Store was later. 0: And at this time there would be restaurants and things like that there on the south side of the
Square?

C: Yes.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 14
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0: And where was Wilson's located? C: On the corner of University and First Street. 0: That was, at that time, called 1 st Street, when you first remember? C: Yes, I think., no it was called East Main. 0: It was called East Main? It is 1 st Street now. Can you describe a typical day in your life as
you were a pre-teen?

C: Well, on Saturday, we would get up and one of my favorite girlfriends was Thelma Beasley.
Her father had a furniture store, Beasley and Williams Furniture Store. And either she would come over to my house, or I would go to her house, and that night, we would go to the Lyric
Theater, and if it was not too late when it was over, we would go to Glass' Drugstore. 0: Where was that located? C: It was in the middle of the block between West Main and East Main. 0: What is now Main Street and East 1 st Street? C: It was on University Avenue, right in the middle of the block between West Main and East
Main.

0: But it was on University Avenue? C: Yes. Glass'. Later, it was I think called Vidal's. 0: So you would.

C: And I would spend the night with her or she would spend the night with me. 0: And that was a typical Saturday? C: Yes.

0: What about Sunday? What did you do on Sunday? C: Well, we would get up and we would go to Sunday School at the First United Methodist
Church on what is now 1 st Street, and sometimes stay for church and sometimes not. And I

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 15
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had another friend who was Baptist. So, I would go to BYPU at the Baptist Church on
Sunday afternoon with her.

0: And your family was Methodist? C: My family was Methodist. 0: Were both of your parents Methodist? Was there anything that you used to do at church that
you remember?

C No, but I do remember two of my teachers from Sunday school when I was a young girl
growing up, and one of them was Mrs. O'Neill, Clarence O'Neill's mother, and the other was
Ms. Blocker. Those are the two that stand out. 0: Blocker, would that be B-l-o-c-k-e-r? C: Yes. Later they moved to Ocala and they had a furniture store in Ocala, but their mother,
and Ms. O'Neill I remember.

0: Do you remember any social activities that the young people had at the church? C: Well yes, because I went to BYPU at the Baptist Church. O What kind of activities did they have?

C: Well, we would have a meeting and we would sing and sometimes they would have ice
cream or just a little social time.

0: Where was the Baptist Church located at that time? C: It was located where, I think where the City Hall is. It was on University Avenue, on the
corner.

0: Where City Hall is now. Probably their Rose Garden or the Entrance or something like that. C: Yes, in that area. 0: Do you remember when they moved to their present location? C: I do remember. Yes. 0: And did you attend BYPU there, too?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 16
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C: No, I think I had stopped going to BYPU then. Another thing that we liked to do on Sunday
afternoons, Mother sometimes would fix a picnic lunch and we would all go to Earlton
Beach.

O Where was Earlton Beach?

C: Between Melrose and Waldo. 0: It is known as Earlton now? C Yes.

O And what lake would that be on? Would that be Santa Fe Lake?

C: I think that would be Santa Fe Lake. O: But it is there at Earlton. C: Yes. Same lake that Melrose is on. And then another place we liked to go was Pinkoson
Springs, which was Charlie's father, it was a man made springs, and then to Poe Springs, which was right out of High Springs, and then later on to Glen Springs which is still right
here in Gainesville, that Mr. Pound developed, and I think the Elks Club is there now. 0: Elks Club has that property now? C: Yes.

O: What kind of things do you remember doing at Earlton Beach? Did you just go swimming
there, did you have any special.
C: Just go swimming. Oh they had a slide you know, and it was fun to slide down the slide and
just swimming. Betty, I forgot to mention Magnesia Springs. We used to go out there too.
Mr. Kelly, who owned it, would bottle the water and sell it in Gainesville in big five gallon
demi-johns, because it was supposedly so very pure.

0: Do you remember what happened to Earlton Beach that it is no longer a beach, or it stopped
being a beach?

C: No, no, it is still a beach. 0: It is still a beach. Do people still go there?


C: Yes.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 17
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0: Is Pinkoson Springs still in operation? C: No it is not.

O: Where was that located? Do you remember? C: Yes. Between Gainesville and Hague. O: Between Gainesville and Hague? And, Magnesia was out near what? C; Going towards Hawthorne. 0: What was the water like swimming at those different places? C: Well at Earlton it was warm, but Magnesia, Pinkoson, Poe and Glen were all very cold. You
had to really swim and exercise in the water to stay in it. 0: What was your favorite place to go swimming? C: I think probably Pinkoson Springs. 0: What kind of bathing suit did you have when you were going swimming? How did they
look, or vary through the years? What did they change?

C: They werejust a one piece suit with a skirt attached to it, and the legs of the suit were almost
down to your knees, and a bodice with just about a 2 inch strap across. 0: Do you remember them changing as you grew up? C: Yes I do. I remember changing into a one piece suit, but the legs were very short and it was
molded more, you know. I was a teenager, I had developed.

0: How did you mother and father feel about the new, more fitting suits? C: Well, I guess they thought they were lovely. They were not like the suits of today, I tell you. 0: They did not make any objections to you wearing those, buying those suits? C No.

0 Do you still go swimming?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 18
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C: No. I do not anymore.

0: Is it because it is an activity you do not want to do now, or the water is too cold? C: It is an activity I do not want to do now. 0: What kind of discipline did you know at home as you were growing up? How did your
family handle discipline?

C: My mother disciplined us. My daddy never did, but mother's great thing was for you to go
and break a switch and bring it in here to her, and do not get one that is going to break,
because if you do, you will go out and get another one. 0: So she used the switch?

C: She used the switch.

0: What kinds of offenses did she call for the use of the switch? Do you remember? C: Oh, probably when Ethel and I would get in a fight, you know. We were just a year apart,
and instead of being very, I can't think of the word I want to use, instead of being very close, I resented Ethel because she would pout, I would just get so mad and mother would say, "Now Lois, you just know Ethel, she is so sensitive, you just can not do that" and I would think, well I'm sensitive too. But really, we were a very agreeable, a happy family growing
up. I can't remember too much discord or unhappiness.

0: And you and your sister, Ethel were close, and became very close as you got older? C: Yes, yes. I think that comes with age. I think in most families that happens. As you get older
you become very loving of each other.

0 Do you remember what kind of discipline was used at school, on students at school, say in
your elementary school?

C: I never had to, but I assume we went to the principal and he probably used a ruler, but I do
not remember.

0: You do not remember?

C: No, I do not really.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 19
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0: What about high school? Do you remember anybody getting disciplined in high school? C: Yes, I do. But you knew if you did something, I will say this about Professor Buchholtz, as
we called him, you knew if you did something that you were not supposed to do, you would be punished, there was no doubt about it. So you did not do things. I mean, I do not think we had the discipline problems we have now with children or teenagers. We respected him and
he deserved respect.

0: Do you remember, you say you knew you would be punished, do you remember what type of
punishment he meted out?

C: Well, you may have to stay after school, you may have to write a lesson or something like
that, or you could be expelled for a day or two.

0: You spoke earlier before we started, about elocution lessons? Where did you have those? C: In elementary school and Ms. Roux, I'll always remember her name. o: What was her name?

C: Ms. Roux, R-o-u-x. taught us.

o: What kinds of things did you do in your elocution lessons, classes? C: I really do not remember what we did, maybe that is one reason I talk funny. Then I
remember Ms. Blacklock, she also taught, but when we had chapel in elementary school, she
was the song leader.

0: You had chapel in elementary school? Do you remember what took place during these
chapel meetings?

C: Well, we would sing, and I do not know. I would hate to say, Betty. Probably we would
have a, reading from the Bible, and prayer, and if there was anything that the students needed
to know, I think we were told at chapel.

0: Did you continue to have chapel when you went to high school? C: No.

0: Do you remember whether or not you had Bible readings when you were at school when you
were growing up?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 20
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C: I think so, yes.

0: Where did your family buy clothing as you got older? C: Yes, we would go to Wilson's or Ms. Geigers, which was right next to Wilson's, or to, I do
not know if Ms. Lanier and Ms. Cherry were there at that time. I know later I bought from
them and Ruddy's, which was also there on the south side of the square. 0: Where did you buy shoes? C: From Tench.

O: You bought shoes from Tench? Where was Tench's located? C: That was on the west side of the square, on Main Street between University and 1 st Avenue.
And there was a Matthews. Ms. Matthews, she and her husband had a yard good store there
on the corner, and Thomas Hardware. That is where the big fire was. 0: And when was that? Do you remember the date? C: Well, I remember, I was married, so it had to be after 1931. Anyway it burned. 0: Where was Thomas' Hardware located? C: Right in the middle of the block. 0: Right in the middle of the block, west of the square. C: Facing on Main Street, yes. Parker's in that. 0: Parker's is in that area now? What other store were located in that area at the time of the
fire?
C Otto Stocks. He handled men's wear, and on the corner, I think was Canova-s Drug Store.
There was a drug store, and those were the stores I remember on that block. O: Where would you go to buy furniture? C: Mr. Seagle's, or to Coxes. 0: Where was Seagle's located?

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C: Seagle's was located facing on University Avenue between Main, going west, be 1 st Street,
in the middle of that block, and there was a grocery store in there, Mr. Harrold's grocery
store.

0: How did you spell that Harrold, do you know? C: I think it's H-a-r-r-o-l-d. I think its two r's. 0: What is located in that block now, where the Seagle Furniture store was? C: Chestnuts in on the corner there and truly I do not go that way much, I do not know what is
in there now.

0: You do not go down town very much anymore? C: No, I do not. I use 8th Avenue. 0: You used to know that area real well because you lived down there. When did you stop
going downtown to shop?

C: Never, until the shopping centers came to Gainesville. Everybody went downtown to shop,
and as long as Ms. Cherry and Ms. Lanier, and Ms. Geiger and Wilson's were dress shops. 0: And then they moved out? C: Then they moved out. 0: If you wanted a hat, where did you go to buy your hats? C: Ms. McCormick's.

O: And where was that? C: On the corner, she faced University Avenue, too. It was on the corner of I guess 2nd Street. 0: What is there now? C: A nightclub.

0: A nightclub. Is that where Penny's used to be? C: Yes, that is where Penny's used to be.

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0: That was on the same block that your home was on, then, wasn't it?

C: That is right. But when I lived on Arredondo Street, there where Penny's used to be, is
where the Duttons lived. They had a great big home there. And he, I think I am right in this,
was president of the bank, his name was Henry Dutton.

0: Do you remember who lived behind Dutton's home, behind you?

C: That was Dr. Smith's house, Dr. D.T. Smith. And then next to them was the McKinstry's,
and then next to them was the Powell's and that's the next corner.

0: That is where the Presbyterian Church is now. No, no it would not be, it is where a drive-in
hamburger place is now.

C Yes. That is true. The church is where the Ramses lived.

O: Did you have an allowance as a child?

C: Well, yes, I'm sure I did, but not much. I can remember that when mother and daddy built on
1 st Avenue, which was then known as Union Street, the lot was empty and mother, or daddy I guess, would plant peas, and my sister Nathalie and I would go down and pick peas and take them home and shell them, and then sell to my daddy at the grocery store. And we did
that so we could go the skating rink.
0: Oh, they had a skating rink? Where was that located?

C: It was upstairs over the Ogletree Garage, and that was between University Avenue on N.W.
1 st Street and the next street I think was Mechanic, between University and Mechanic,
upstairs, yes we did.

0: So you would pick peas and sell them to your dad. As you got into high school and you
were going to the movies on Saturday, how did you get the money to go to the movies?

C: Well, I am sure that we probably asked daddy for it or we had an allowance, I really do not
remember.

0: You do not remember? That is alright.

C: And it did not cost much. Back then a dime went a long way.


0: What are your earliest memories of Gainesville?

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C: My earliest memories of Gainesville are things that I did. Now, that University Avenue, the
college was already there, but Ms. Walker, whose husband was in the Army and I think was head of ROTC at the University of Florida, she was our Girl Scout leader, and we used to go for weekend campouts in the area where the bank is now, when it was just a tremendous pine
grove.

O: What bank would that be?

C: The one not too far from where your mother lived, where you all lived.

0: Barnett Bank.

C: The one that is on University Avenue. And that was a pine grove and that is where we would
have our weekend campouts.

0: So you belonged to the Girl Scouts, and Mrs. Walker was your leader? Well then, you must
have been the first Girl Scouts in Gainesville, or one of the first troops.

C: I really do not know, probably so.

0: At that time, did Girl Scouts sell cookies?

C: No, no, we did not. I really do not remember what we did. I remember being a Girl Scout
and going camping in that pine grove.

0: In that pine grove on University, what is now University Avenue near the University. Do
you remember any special events that happened in Gainesville? You mentioned a fire, but
that was when you were older?

C: No, not really. I think Gainesville was just a nice, quiet, you know, a family oriented town,
and I can not remember anything.

0: Do you have any memories of the University and how it impacted on Gainesville as you
were growing up?

C: No, I can remember, though, in high school, Jessie Gibbs had a Ford and it was our delight
to get in the Ford and ride out to the University to look at the students, that was about it. I can remember, yes, I can remember an impact, when we lived on Arredondo Street. Mother and daddy had a sleeping porch all the way across the back of the house, so that is where we slept, year round, and then we had a dressing room, and that is where we would dress. In
growing up, I did not have a bedroom. We were all on the sleeping porch.

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0: The whole family, or just all the kids. C: No, the family, mother and daddy and the four of us, and mother and daddy would take in
two students from the University and rent a room to them, I remember that. 0: Did they have football games or anything like that? C: Yes.

0: Did you go to the football games or did you just. C: I was only allowed to date a University of Florida student when I was a senior in high
school.

0 When you were a senior in high school. Well, did your parents go to any of the games? Did
they partake of any of the functions like that?

C I am sure daddy did probably, but I can not remember mother going to them.

0: So you were allowed to date University of Florida students when you were a senior in high
school? It must have been a big date. C: Oh it was, definitely.

0: How old were you when you were allowed to date? C: I was, well, I graduated when I was 17, so I was 17. 0: When were you allowed to date other people, not necessarily University of Florida students? C: You know, I really do not remember dating. I remember a group of us would get together
and have parties, but as far as a date, you know, just as a couple, I do not remember. 0: What kind of parties would you have as a group? C: Well, we would have parties at home. 0: Would they be dances, or would you play games? C: They would have to be dances, because I knew how to dance, but yes, probably games,
dancing, and you know, just a group of young people from one house or another. And then of
course we had the Little Women, so you could go to that.

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0: Little Women was what? Would you explain Little Women? C: It was a club sponsored by the Women's Club and it was for the member's young children,
girls only. I do not know the ages, I guess high school age. 0: And what would this club do? C: They would have dances which you could invite your date to, and I think it was a social club.

0 And where were these dances held?

C In the Women's Club.

0 And where was the Woman's Club?

C It was across the street from the high school on University Avenue. There is a little shopping
center area in there. But the Woman's Club building is still in existence.

0 And where is that?

C: Its on 16th Avenue out towards 43rd Street, and that is where the Gainesville Little Theater
has their plays.

0: So that used to be the Woman's Club. So your mother must have been a member of the
Woman's Club.

C: She was.

0; What other organizations in town was she a member of? C: She was a member of the UDC. 0: What does that stand for? C: United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Woman's Club, and she was a member of the
Founder's Circle Garden Circle, and a member of the circles at church, a member of the
church. I can not remember any others.

0: Was she an officer in any of these clubs that you remember? C: No, not that I remember.

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0: You said she was a member of the Founders' Circle of the Garden Club. Was she
instrumental in beginning the Garden Club? C: No she was not. 0: But those were the activities she took part in. C: Yes, and she enjoyed playing bridge, and she played bridge, but did not belong to a bridge
club as such.

0: Just her friends got together and played. Did you have a telephone when you were
growing up?

C: Yes, we did. I remember on Arredondo Street. I do not remember much about where we
lived until I was four years old, really about that. o When you moved on to Arredondo.

C: Yes. It was the kind, you know, where you rang central and gave her your number. It was
the phone on the wall.

0: So you do not remember a time really that you did not have a telephone. C: No, I do not.

0: Did your father have a telephone in his grocery store? C: Yes, he did.

o: Did people call in? C: Call in orders.

0; They would call in orders? C: Yes, and he had a colored man, we called him Uncle Dan, and he would deliver groceries in
a dray.

0: A dray?

C: Which was an open wagon pulled by a horse.

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0: So even though you do not remember a time when you did not have a car, there was a
mixture of cars and horses being used as you were growing up. C: Yes, yes.

0: Talking about stores, in your father's store, how did he display his wares? Was there any
special way he had of displaying them that might be different?
C: Well, I can remember that he had a counter that had glass compartments, and they would
display bulk candies in those and that the flour came in 25 pound sacks, and if you wanted a pound, they would take a pound out. They had canned goods, and they had a meat market and of course, they had a glass compartment for the meat market too, and they displayed
meat. That is about all I remember about it.

0: Did the farmers bring in their produce to your father? C: Yes, they did.
0: Or did he have to go out to it to the town, or something like that? C: No, they brought it in.

0: They brought it in?

C: Yes.

0: You say you bought your shoes at Tench's shoe store. C: Tench's, yes.

0: What did the shoe store look like at that time? Was it different or was it just like a shoe store
we have now?

C: It was like a shoe store we have now. Shoe boxes on the wall, and those little stools they sit
on and put your foot up there and put the shoe on.

0: How did they get, were the shoes on the wall, or boxes on the wall or. C: Yes, but on the street the store had glass and they would display the shoes so that you could
see them before you walked in the store.

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0: And if you picked out a shoe that you liked, but it was not the right size, what did they do
then? How did they get the shoe that was the right size?

C: I do not know, because I never had any trouble. They always had my size. 0: Did they have their shoes stacked along the wall up real high towards the ceiling? C: Yes, all the way to the ceiling. 0: Well, how did they get the shoes down from the ceiling? C: They had a ladder that was on a track, and they would push it down. 0: They just pushed the ladder. C: Up on that track.

0: On the wall, and they may have that in the back of shoe stores these day, but that is
something we do not see.

C: No, you do not.

0: Did you say you started dating University students when you were a senior in high school?
How did you meet Mr. Cone?

C: Fred was my sister's age, he was older really, he was four years older than 1, but he was in
her grade, and he played football and he was a well known football player, and I knew him in high school just slightly, and then we started going together when I was a senior. He originally was from Raleigh, Florida, and went to grammar school, elementary school, and
part of high school in Williston. So I only knew him in high school. 0: Where is Raleigh?

C: Raleigh is between Williston and Archer. 0: Then his family was a long time resident of Florida? C: Yes.

0 And he was also born in Florida?

C: Yes.

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0: And then he went to high school here in Gainesville? C: Yes, his family moved to Gainesville, and his father ran the Commercial Hotel, and his
mother had the Arlington Hotel, which was in a home. It was a family hotel. When Fred and
I married he was working for his father as the night clerk at the hotel. 0: Where was the Commercial Hotel? C: It is still standing. It is on the corner of S. Main and 2nd Avenue. The city owns it now. 0: The city owns it now? C: It is across from the Tench Building. 0: Where was the Arlington Hotel? C The Arlington Hotel was a great big two story wooden house, and it was on the corner of I
guess 4th Avenue and 1 st Street. It was a block off University Avenue. It was torn down, of course. And when Fred and I married, his mother also had the Arlington Apartments which were on the corner of S. Main and 4th Avenue, and she gave us an apartment. She did not
charge us because Fred was working as a night clerk in the hotel.

0: Let us go back. Do you remember when you graduated from high school? C: Yes.

o: When was that?

C: In 1930.

0: In 1930? Then you went to college where? C: Tallahassee, FSCW. 0: What does FSCW stand for? C: Florida State College for Women. 0: And so, how long did you attend?


C: Three months.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 30
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0: Three months?

C: From September to December. 0: And I believe that December is where we left off on the other tape. And he was. C: Taking me back to college and we decided to get married. So we stopped in Monticello and
Judge Byrd married us. And, he took me on to Tallahassee, and I went up to my room and got some clothes, and then we went to Lake City. His brother had the Powell Hotel there, and he borrowed some money from the night clerk so that we could go to Jacksonville and spend the night in the George Washington Hotel. That was our honeymoon. One night in the George Washington, and we came home the next day, and faced our respective parents. 0: 1 was just going to ask. How did your families feel about this? C: Well, they accepted it. And, we were very happy for over 50 years. I think Fred and I had
been married 54 years when he died. 0: Well that was a successful elopement. C: Yes, we were very lucky. Not many turn out that fortunate when you are that young. 0: You said that when you got married his mother gave you an apartment, rent free, because he
was working for.

C: His daddy.

0: And how long did you live there? C: We lived there until Susan was I guess a year old. We lived there four years. 0: Four years? And how many children were born there, when you were living there? C Only one, the oldest, Susan.

0 And when was she born?

C: In 1934.

0 Do you remember the date, the month?

C: Yes, September 25, 1934.

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O And is she still living?

C: She is still living and she lives in Leesburg. O Is she married?

C: Yes, she is married. O: And what is her name now? C: Well, her name now is Susan Anderson. She had three children, a boy and two girls and they
are my grandchildren.

O When you moved from the apartment with Susan, where did you go to live then?

C: We built a house on what was then Ninth Street, which is now 13th Street. O Where was the house located?

C: On the east side of 13th Street, a block past the sorority houses, and it is still standing. O: What is there now? C: It is still a home, but it is rented to University students. 0: That would be south of the sorority houses on the east side? C: I remember when we built there, Fred's mother had bought that property and we were the
first house to build on that property. During the years they sold the lots and other people
built out there.

0: And were other children born while you were living there? C: Yes. Celia, my other daughter, Fred and Tommy. 0: So those are all the children you had? C: Yes.

0 How long did you live in that house?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 32
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C: About 15 years. And we built it when FHA was in. You borrowed from the government and
paid so much a month. My daddy went into the laundry business with Major Thomas, the
Gainesville Laundry.

0: Where was that located? C: That was on 6th St and University Avenue, where a shopping center is now. And then when
daddy started the Ideal Laundry, Fred went into business with my daddy. 0; And where was that?

C: That is on 1 st Avenue, east of 6th Street, and now the Cone Building is there. 0: The Cone Building is there. So there is no more Gainesville Laundry or Ideal Laundry? C: No, there is one on S. Main Street, I do not know who has it, but it is not ours, but that is the
name of it, Ideal Laundry.
o What happened to the Ideal Laundry?

C: A fire.

0: There was a fire?

C: Yes, and then we rebuilt and leased it in 1972, Fred leased it to a laundry business from the
north, and I can not remember the name of the laundry, and it just finally went out of
business.

0: And there are other businesses located in that building that you rebuilt after the fire? C: Yes.

0: So he continued to work for his father, until he went into business with your father at the
Ideal Laundry?

C: Yes.

0: And that was when?

C: I would hesitate to say, but I guess about 193 7, 193 8. 0: How did your father happen to get into the laundry business?

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C: You know, I really do not know, Betty. Major Thomas and daddy were co-owners of the
Gainesville Laundry. The laundry had been there, I am sure, I do not know who was
operating it before they were.

o What civic organizations have you been a part of in Gainesville?

C: Well, you mean like DALR, Garden Club? o What does DALR stand for?

C: Daughters of the American Revolution, Garden Club, definitely active in church, circles,
church committees, the Junior League, the Gainesville Little Theater, the Heritage Club, the
Gainesville Golf and Country Club, and of course PTA.

0: Were you a member, or are you still a member of the Women's Club? C: Oh yes, I was a member. I forgot that too, didn't 1. Yes, Gainesville Women's Club. Former
member. I'm not active in any of the them anymore.

0: You're not active in any of them. Did you hold offices in any of them? C: Yes, I did. I was president of the Junior League, and president and Circle Chairman of the
Woman's Society.

0: And what is the Women's Society? C: Christian Service for the Church. O: At church.

C: Yes. I guess that is about it. O: Do you have any outstanding memories of things that occurred while you were officers in
these groups, like the Junior League?

C: The year I was president, we dedicated a room to Ella May Canova, who was in the Junior
League, at Alachua General Hospital. We furnished it, and maintained it for children. 0: Any other?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 34
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C: Well, yes. The Woman's Society of Christian Service, we built the parsonage on 1 st Street.
We bought the organ which is still in the church, in our present church now. We fed, I think it was a Kiwanas, or the Rotary Club there at the church to make money. I guess that is
about all the money.

O How did your other organizations make money? How about the Junior League? How did
they make money?

C: Well, the members paid dues. They had the Thrift Shop, which was in a garage at that time.
Now they have a building and own it, but they sold used clothing and toys and shoes and pots and pans and things like that. Now they do lots to make money, but back when I was a member, that was the main thing, the thrift shop. And also during the war, they participated in serving meals at the school. The government furni shed meals, but they helped serve them
and all for the needy families.

0: This is World War 11? And they would furnish the meals at school at that.

C: We did not furnish the meals, we furnished the help, to do it.

O When you were in elementary and high school, did they have a lunch room, or what?

C: They did, but we mainly took our lunch which consisted of a sandwich and maybe a ripe
pear, peach or banana, and I guess we took something to drink. They had drinking fountains
on the school yard, I know that.

O Well, when you were in high school, did you eat lunch at school or did you go home?

C: Oh no, it was just a couple of steps away from home. Plus, I was always trying to lose
weight, and I remember this friend of mine, Sue Towson she was, now she is Sue James, and so at lunch, we would eat an apple, and act as though we were very satisfied. But no, I never
really ate at school really.

0: You would go home.

C: Sure.

O Did your family have the big meal of the day at the middle of the day?

C: In the middle of the day we had dinner, and then supper at night.

0: So dinner was the middle of the day and supper was at night. Did your father come home to
eat with you?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 35
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C: Yes, from the grocery store.

0: And all of your family would eat together? C: Yes, we did.

0: What other businesses was your husband involved in town? C: Well, he was on the Board of the Citizen's Bank, and then the Sun Bank. He was a member
of the Kiwanas Club, he played pick-up baseball, he played golf, and then he was always interested in having a ranch somewhere. That was sort of his hobby, and we got into buying acreage, and having cows, and then in the later years, after he retired, we had a large acreage out between Micanopy and Windsor on the prairie and we had cows, and also race horses. 0: After you sold your home on what is now South 13th Street, where did you move to then? C We moved over to Highlands, and we bought the house from Ms. Gus Phifer, we called her
Aunt Nell. The house was originally built by J.C. Atkins who was a lawyer and judge in Gainesville, and it was on the boulevard, on the corner of N.E. 8th Avenue and the
boulevard. A big two story house.

o Is it still there?

C It is still there. And the people who bought it from us, the Rays, he is connected with the
University, I do not know in what capacity, they still own it. O And how long did you live there?

C: Well, lets see, we bought it in 1941 or 1942 and lived there until 1972. We lived there about
30 years.

0: And where did you move to then? C: This house.

0: And you all built?

C: No, we did not build this. We bought it. It was built in 1970 by the Dormans and at that
time, he was connected with the Athletic Department at the University of Florida. Then he
lost his job and they moved to Orlando, and we bought it.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 36
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0 And you have been living here ever since? I know that your husband was very active in
Civic affairs. Can you tell me some of the things he did?

C: Well, he was mayor twice, and he served on the City Commission several terms. 0; That would be when? Do you remember what years that would be? C: I should, but I do not.
0: Okay. At that time when he was mayor, was he elected by the people or was that like it is
now, the mayor was just appointed?

C; Like it is now.

0 The commissioners would appoint him.

C: Yes.

0 Do you remember any special thing that occurred while he was mayor?

C: No, I do not.

0 While he was on the commission, were there any controversies in Gainesville or anything?

C: Oh there were always controversies. I remember one though. There was an organization or
a group of people that wanted to sell the regional utility company, you know, I think it was Florida Power, and Fred was very much against that. And if he was living today, he would still be against it. He would think it should be City owned and operated, and it gives a revenue for the city to use for other things. That was one of his main things. And they had really interesting little things that would come up, but to specifically give you one I just can
not.

0: Do you remember World War I at all? C: No, I remember mother talking about it, about the flu epidemic at the University of Florida,
and how the ladies in Gainesville would make tremendous pots of soup and take out there for them to feed the students, and I think there were some soldiers stationed here, but I am not
sure, I do not remember.

0 What about the years of the 20's? Do you have any special memories of national events or
anything that occurred in the 1920's?


C: If you would prompt me, I could tell you.

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0: Well, let's see I believe that we had prohibition at that time. Did it have any impact on
Gainesville?

C: I do not know. I would think so. If you bought whiskey, you would have to go outside the
county, I am sure, because I knew that Alachua County was a dry county. 0: And do you remember when Alachua County became "undry"? C: No, I do not. Became wet? No, I do not. 0: I could not think of the word. What about the depression? Do you have memories of the
depression?

C: In the 30's?

0: In the 30O's you and your husband were just starting out then. C: Yes, yes. I remember that he made a very small salary and all, but it went a long ways. I do
not know that we took trips or anything like that, but we certainly did not want for anything. 0: He was employed all that time? He was never unemployed? C: No.

o: Either by his father, or went into business with. C: With my father.

o: Do you have any special memories connected with WW 11? C: I can remember that we would go up to the Red Cross office and roll bandages and fix
packages to be distributed. And I can remember that we had an airplane watch, and you would volunteer, and I think that was one thing the Junior League sponsored, but anyway, you would volunteer to go and sit for a certain number of hours, and if any airplanes came over from any direction at all. You know, at that time we were afraid probably because a German sub had been sighted off Jacksonville Beach. And I remember the recreation building was built for the soldiers from Camp Blanding. I remember that we were rationed on shoes, sugar, meat, heating oil and gasoline, and we had stamps, and you had to use those
stamps for other commodities, I am sure.


0: Well, did being rationed interfere with your lifestyle in an9wy

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 38
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C: Well, I think everyone was more aware of not doing things. I remember in the home we built
on 9th Street, we had a fireplace in the living room, and then a step down into the hall, and we hung a curtain there so that the heat from the fireplace would stay up in the living room and that is where we would gather. We had a circulating oil heater, but we used it sparingly
not knowing what the weather might be later on and you would need the heat.
0: You were talking about the airplane watch. Did you participate in that did you take a turn
in that?

C: Yes.

0: Where did you go to watch for planes?

C: It was out in what is now Highlands, then it was Stengel Field. It was called Stengel Field, as
it was an airplane field, I believe. It is all built up now, you know, homes and subdivisions.
Out off of 16th Avenue and Waldo Road, in that area.

0: Do you have any other special memories of Gainesville that you would like to share with us?

C: I enjoyed Gainesville more when you could go to the grocery store, and you would see
friends, and you would stop and chat. Now you go, and occasionally you might see someone you know. And you know, that, to me, is typical of my church. There are so many members that I really do not know in our church. I wish Gainesville were like it used to be, small and
friendly, and neighborly.

0: Where you would know everybody?

C: Yes.

o: You reared your children in the '3 0's then?

C: '30s and '40's.

0: What activities were they involved in and how did you plan them?

C: Well, when we moved on 9th Street, I had enrolled Susan in P.K. Yonge, and she went from
Kindergarten and graduated from P.K. Yonge. Celia was enrolled in P.K. Yonge, and she went from Kindergarten to fourth grade, and then she moved to Finley. My oldest son was enrolled at P.K., but he only went there two years. When we moved on the Boulevard, he went to Kirby Smith. Tommy, my youngest son, went to Kirby Smith, because we lived over in the North East area. And Fred, Celia and Tommy all graduated from G.H. S., but Susan
went all the way through P.K.

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0: You said you were a member of the Women's Club, and the Women's Club sponsored Little
Women. Were your daughters active in Little Women?

C: Yes, Celia and Susan. Fred and Tommy both played football in high school and little league
baseball. When Tommy was playing baseball, I was the official scorer, I learned how to score baseball and I kept score for his little team. His daddy could not come and be there
that time of the day, because the laundry was filled, so mother went.

0: When Gainesville was small at that time, were your children able to get to these activities by
themselves?

C: Well, Susan used to catch the bus and ride it to University and walk to P.K. Yonge. 0: Where was P.K. Yonge located at that time? C: The original building?

0: The original building.

C: It was on 13th Street and.

0: About 8th Avenue I believe, or 5th Avenue, the original P.K. Yonge. And how about the
other children, when they went to G.H.S?

C: Well, let-s see now. Fred had a car when he was 16, and Susan could drive, but she went to
P.K. Yonge. They had bicycles. I know the boys would ride bicycles. They would catch rides or I would take them. Because G.H.S. moved to 13th Street, and that is where they
went. Not where I went on University Avenue. They went on to G.H.S. on 13th Street. 0: So it was further away from their home then? C: And there was a car pool in the neighborhood. We would take turns. 0: What do you mean by car pool?

C: Well, for instance, there were four of Fred's friends that lived over there, and I would maybe
drive one week, and another mother another week, and another mother or an older sister or
something like that.

0: So what activities were your children involved in both in school and out of school?

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C: Well, Celia took dancing from the Buchanan sisters in high school. Fred was in the Honor
Society, but I do not know that they were involved in clubs or anything like that. I do not
think they had clubs. I know they did when I was in high school. 0: What kind of clubs did they have when you were in high school? C: Well they had Aran Akbar for the boys and Hi-Y, and LS S, and HAWK. They were some of
the local little clubs and they had names and all. 0: What was Hi-Y? What was that part of? C: That was, I think the student had to have a certain grade to belong to it. It was not a social
club. It was in a way, but it was more of a service club.

0: And that was part of school. And these other clubs you mentioned? C: They were just social.

0: They were social clubs outside of school? C: Yes, a group would organize a club and give it a name. 0: And you had your social activities. C: Yes.

O: And were your children part of the same clubs when they were growing up? C: No, they were not in existence then. I do not know if the Hi-Y was or not. I really do not
think it was. There was a Hi-Y and a Tri-Hi-Y, one was for boys and one was for girls. 0: What social clubs did you belong to? Did you belong to one of these social clubs? C: No, I did not.

0: You did not belong to any of those social clubs? They were here but you did not belong to
any of them?

C: No.

0: So, you do not think that your children had some of these same clubs? C: I do not think so.

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0: How did they occupy their time? Did any of them have after school jobs, or did they work
with their father?

C: The boys worked at the laundry with their father. And one summer, Tommy worked with a
roofing company. They worked every summer, they just did not sit around. He worked with a roofing company, but most of the time, they worked there at the laundry, driving trucks or picking up dirty laundry or working on a route. Susan and Celia worked at home, and helped
with the housework, even though I had a cook, they helped with the housework.

O Did you have the same cook for an extended time?

C: I did. The last one I had was Ida. She worked for me until Tommy was 25, she worked for
me 26 years. And the dearest person, a real person.

0: What was her name?

C: Ida Hall.

0: Is she still living?

C: No.

O: What were her duties, beside a cook? Did she have anything else to do beside the cooking?

C: To take care of Tommy. She was his second mother. When I would go off on a trip with
Fred or anything, Ida would just come and stay in the house with the children.

0: So she would run the whole household while you were gone?

C: Yes.

O: Did you and your husband do a lot of traveling?

C: Well, yes and no, we did. You know we went on trips and went to laundry conventions and
in the summer, and when my children were small, mother and daddy had built a house out at Kingsley Lake, so in the summer, my sister Ethel, my sister Nathalie and myself, we would go out there with our children and stay all summer. And at that time, there was Camp Blanding, and Nathaline's husband was in the Navy, so she had access to Camp Blanding, so we could go over there to the picture show and go shopping at the commissary. Then mother and daddy built a home in Waynesville, and I would usually go every summer and stay a month up there, with Ida to take care of Tommy. Then Fred and I went on a couple of

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 42
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cruises in the Caribbean, and laundry conventions. We went to New York for plays with friends. Not any long, extended trips, other than when I would take the children and we
would go either up to the lake or up to Waynesville, North Carolina.
O You would go up there, just you and the children, and your husband would stay here? And
would he join you up there at any time? C: No, he did not like the mountains. O: What about the lake? C: Oh yes, every weekend, it was so close. 0: But essentially, he stayed home and took care of business while you were at Waynesville. C: Yes, the laundry, because Daddy had retired at that time, and mother and daddy lived up
there six months of the year. 0: They lived where?

C: In Waynesville, North Carolina. 0: In Waynesville? Do you still have any of your. C: We still have that home, but my children and Nathaline's and Ethel's children are up there
now.

0: As a child, do you remember taking any trips with your family? C: Only to south Georgia to see my grandmother's uncles, mother's uncles that lived up there.
And that was around Adele, Georgia, out in the country. 0: How did you travel? How did you get there? C: In that Buick I was telling you about with the jump seat. 0: Was there a back seat besides the jump seat? C: Oh yes, it was just like a front and back seat, and then the jump seats were attached. 0: How did you carry your luggage in that car?

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C: It did not have a trunk that I remember, but it had to didn't it? Well, where did we keep the
Isinglass that we needed when it rained that we would put up? The curtains, I don't know if
we kept them under the seat or just where. I do not remember having a trunk.

0: Did you have special clothing that you wore since it was all open and you got a lot of wind
and everything?

C: No.

0: Just your regular clothing?

C: Yes.

0: Did you usually wear hats when you were going out? C: No, I did not. My mother did, though. 0: Growing up, did you always wear dresses or did you sometimes wear long pants? C: Oh, never, never. But I can remember the long stockings we had to wear in the winter time,
and you had to wear long underwear, and it was awful trying to get them up and they were
buttoned to the waistband. Didn't you ever have to wear those?

0: No. How did you heat your home when you were living on Arredondo? C: We had a big heater stove in the living room and then a fire place in the parlor, and then
upstairs in the dressing room, we had a little, what they called a hot stove, you could put newspaper. It give out a lot of heat. We did not have fire places in bedrooms and certainly
on the sleeping porch we had nothing, you know. 0: Must have been awfully cold sometimes. C: It was, but in the wintertime, mother put feather beds on every bed, and you would just sink
down into that feather mattress, and get so warm and toasty. 0: Where did she keep her feather mattresses when it was not. C: Well, downstairs, the sleeping porch was over a screened back porch and a great big room
and that was our storage. If we had an attic, it was not an attic you would go up in, and that
is were we would store things, and that is where she kept them.


0: Did she make her feather beds, her feather mattresses?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 44
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C: No, I do not think so. 0: Did you all have chickens in your. C: Yes, in the back yard, and you know, mother would kill them and we would eat them. She
cooked on a wood stove.

0: On a wood stove. Do you remember if the chickens were they allowed to run loose or where
they in a fenced in area?

C: I think they were in a fenced in area. But everybody, back then had chickens. O: Whose responsibility was it to kill the chickens? C: Mother's.

O: Do you remember her preparing the chickens? C: I do. I used to cry every time she had to kill one, but I sure could eat it. She would ring the
neck and then put them down in hot water, which made plucking them easier. 0: That would make the feathers come out easier? C: Yes.

O: Did she teach you how to. C: No, no.

O: By the time you were doing that, that was not the way. C: You bought them from the grocery store already dressed. O: After you got married where did you do your shopping, your groceries and things? C: At the Piggly Wiggly, which was up on the square. 0: Where was that located? C: It was on the east side of the square between University and Union. It was onE. Main Street.
And on the corner of East Main and University was Baird Hardware, and next to it

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 45
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was Piggly Wiggly, and then next to that was George Dell's and he specialized in what we now call gourmet groceries. And then McCrory's, and on the other corner was Phifer's State
Bank.

0: What about your clothes and things like that? Where would you buy them?

C: Wilson's, and Geigers, and Laniers and Ms. Cherry's and Ruddy's sometimes Ruddy's.

0: So a lot of the same stores were here after you were married that were here when you were
younger? Are those stores still around today?

C: No. none of them are around today.

0: So you had to change your shopping habits, where you went to buy things since your
children were young?

C: Yes.

0: Is there anything else that you want to tell me about your memories of Gainesville and
growing up here.

C: I have lived here for 82 years. People will say, do you know where Stoneridge, or do you
know where something I have never heard of them. Gainesville is so large now, and so full of subdivisions and areas that it is just bewildering to me. The only good thing I can say is with the quadrant system, if they say it is in the North West, or the North East, or the South
West or the South East, then you have a vague idea of the direction and the area it is in.

0: What did you have here before the quadrant system?

C: The names of streets, like Arredondo, and Pleasant, and Garden, and Mechanic, streets like
that. So many of them over in Highlands were named. I only can remember the streets that were right around where I lived at that time I was growing up. But we all thought it was awful, you know, when the quadrant system came, because we had such pretty names of
streets.

0: What about the telephone system? When you first telephoned you said you had to have a
crank. Then after that what kind of a system did you have?

C: Well, you know, a telephone, and you would pick it up and you could dial on it. But it was
just an upright. Not like they have now where you punch and all that.


0: Did there used to be party lines? Do you remember party lines?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 46
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C: No Ido not.

o: Was University Avenue always paved? C: No. I can remember when it was not paved. It was paved a certain distance but it was not
paved when we used to go camping in that pine forest (between what is now N.W. 11Ith and
12th Streets.)

0: What about street lights? Do you remember whether or not there were street lights
downtown when you were a child?

C: I think there were street lights on the corners. o: You do not remember when there were not street lights? C: No, I do not.

0: What about sidewalks? Was there ever a time when you remember when there were not
sidewalks downtown?

C: No.

o: Would you please tell me now who your sisters married? C: My sister, Nathalie married Julian Fant, and he was a lawyer in Jacksonville, and they lived
in Jacksonville. My sister, Ethel, married Marcus Milan, and they lived here in Gainesville.
He was from Miami. And my brother married several times, so I can not remember all the names, but anyway, he lived his later years in Jacksonville, and married a girl from
Blackshear, Georgia.

0: What did he do? What was his occupation? C: Laundry. The laundry business and dry cleaning. 0: You had four children. Who all did they marry? C: My oldest daughter, Susan, married Tommy Rogers from Gainesville, and they were
divorced about four years ago, and she married Andy Anderson from Chicago. Do you want
me to tell you about the children?


0: Yes, please.

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C: She and Tommy had three children. Susie, the oldest, went to Auburn and graduated in
pharmacy, and she married Paul Carpenter from Dothan, Alabama, and he also graduated from Auburn in pharmacy, and they now live in Savannah, Georgia and have two children, Mary Hanna and Parker. Then her daughter Vicky, went to Central Florida University in Orlando, and she graduated from there in accounting, and at college she met Frank Young from Miami. He is part Cuban and Chinese. He was in accounting, and they married and lived in Orlando. He now is in the law firm with my son, Fred, in Jacksonville. They have two children, Jessica, and Alica, two daughters. Celia has never married. At one time she was a nurse, then she went into education, and she has taught school for about thirty years.
She can retire next year. She taught at Jacksonville Beach, and she now is teaching in Melrose. Tommy, my youngest son, married Colleen Coward from Gainesville. And they have two daughters, Jennifer, and Brittany. Jennifer graduates this year from Oak Hall, and she has been accepted at the University of Alabama. They have a course there which she is very interested in. Brittany is in the 10th grade at Oak Hall. Did I tell you about Lamar,
Susan's son?

0: No.

C: I should go back, Fred and Barbara.

0: You have not told about Fred and Barbara.

C: They have two children, Kelly, the oldest, and Fred 111. Kelly married Bobby Steig, and they
live in Jacksonville and they have a daughter Sarah. They are expecting another baby in May. Fred III is here at the University in veterinary school. Susan's son, Lamar, is a distributor for Blacksouth, which is a pharmaceutical company. He lives in Lakeland, and
they have a son, Jack, a year old.

0: Well.

C: I think that is it.

0: Well, I think that covered them all. You and your children are fairly well scattered now,
although they are still in Florida. But times have changed. Your grandchildren, your greatgrandchildren, and your female grandchildren, some of them are working now, outside the
home. Are they working outside the home?

C: Only Susie Carpenter that lives in Savannah. She teaches chemistry in Armstrong College in
Savannah, which is a branch of Georgia.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone 48
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0: Well you have certainly seen a lot of changes in Gainesville, from a small town to a much
larger town, where you used to know practically everybody, and now it is hard to see them.
We certainly appreciate your taking the time and giving us this information, and I know that future generations will be very interested in it, and perhaps even your great-greatgrandchildren will want to come back someday and listen to what their grandmother had to
say about growing up.

C: I hope so, I have enjoyed it, I really have.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

MATHESON HISTORICAL CENTER ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM INTERVIEWEE: Lois Beville Cone INTERVIEWER: Betty O'Byrne TRANSCRIBER: Pamela Petersen March 30, 1995

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: I am Betty O'Byrne, an interviewer for the Oral History Program at the Matheson Historical Center. Today, I am interviewing Lois Cone in her home, on the morning of March 30, 1995. Before we begin, I want to remind you, Lo is, of the need for you to sign a release giving the Matheson Center the full use of information gathered in this interview for whatever purposes it may have. Do you have any questions about this form? C: No I do not. I think I understand that it will be used. O: Okay, good, then I will ask you to sign it at this time. Thank you for signing Lois. Will you please state your full name, date and place of birth? C: Lois Beville Cone. October 27, 1912, Gainesville, Florida. O: Thank you. How do you spell that Beville? C: B-e-v-i-l-l-e. O: Ok. I noticed in the information you gave me about your family that at times it is spelled differently. C: Yes, B-e-v-i-l. O: But you put the "e" on it? C: Yes. O: Thank you. What were the names of your parents? Who was your father? C: Bev Person Beville. And my mother was Susie Bullard Beville. O: Your father's first name was what? C: Beverly. O: Beverly ... C: Person. O: And how did they spell that, how did he spell that? C: B-e-v-e-r-l-y. But he was know as Bev. O: And your mother, was you said...

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Susie. O: Was Susie her real name or Susan? C: Yes, no it was Susie. S-u-s-i-e. O: Oh, S-u-s-i-e. Alright. And her middle name? C: Bullard. B-u-l-l-a-r-d. O: Alright. Where were they from? Were they both born in this area? C: My father was born in Gainesville, and my mother was from Savannah, Georgia. O: What brought her to this area? C: Well, Daddy was at one time dealing in cotton, and he went up to Savannah where, you know the cotton buyers were back in that era, and he met my mother and that is how they met. O: Where did they meet? Was it at the Cotton Exchange, or at a party, or do you know? C: I do not know. That is all I know. O: When did she come to Gainesville, then? C: Well, I really do not know, Betty. O: Did she come just when they got married, or before, or what? C: Yes, I think she came when they got married. O: So your father was born here? C: Yes. O: Who was his father, do you remember, do you know his father's name? C: Yes, his father was Steven Pierce Beville , and his mother was Lois Knight Beville. O: And that Lois is where you got your name, I guess?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: That is where I got my name. O: That would be your grandfather. Was he born in Gainesville, or Alachua County or what? C: Well, he was born in Alachua County, and I assume in Gainesville, because the Beville property, I do not know if it belonged to his daddy or not, but anyway, that the brothers had it out here right off of 43rd Street. O: Right off of 43rd. C: Yes, big acreage. O: You say your father was born in Gainesville, or in Alachua County? C: Yes. O: Do you know where he was born? C: Oh, at home, I am sure at home. O: Do you know where his home was located, his family home? C: Yes, it was on the Newberry Road, do you know where Ft. Clark Church is? O: Yes. C: Okay, turn to the left, I do not know the... O: It would be south... if you were going out towards Ft. Clark Church, it would be... C: South, at the church, and about two miles down the road. His mother had a large farm on the right hand side. O: When you were growing up, what was the name of that church there? Was that church there when you were growing up? C: Ft. Clark. O: Was it known as Ft. Clark then? C: Yes, only I called it Four o'clock. I thought for a long time it was a Four o'clock church and they met at Four o'clock in the afternoon. But anyway, it is Ft. Clark.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: I think that is interesting. Your father was born out near Ft. Clark and then lived there? C: Yes. O: Did he go to school near here, anywhere around here that you know of? C: Yes, he went to the school here in Gainesville, I would not be able to name it. O: He went to school here in Gainesville? C: Yes, that is right. O: And what was his occupation? C: Well, when he was young, he was dealing in cotton in Gainesville. O: Did they grow cotton out there on his pl antation or farm, or his father's farm? C: I think so, but, really I do not know. O: But what did he do later? C: Later, I can only remember that he was in the grocery business, and the building is still standing. O: Oh, where is that? C: It is on South West 1st Avenue and the corner of 2nd Street. It dead ends. SW 1st Avenue dead ends. O: Okay, SW 1st Avenue. C: Yes, SW 1st Avenue dead ends, you know, wh ere the parking back of Wise's Drug Store and... O: Okay, it dead ends. What is the building used for now? C: Really, I do not know. O: Can you name some of the things that used to be there after your father... C: You mean where the building...well...

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: What businesses were... C: Later on it was still a grocery business, and ... O: Was that Robinson's? C: One of the Robinson's had it. O: One of the Robinson's had it? C: Yes, that is right. O: Okay, and that was your father's business wh ere he had his grocery store. What was the name of his grocery store? C: I really do not know. O: You can not remember that? Was it called Beville's Grocery, or do you remember? C: I really do not remember. O: And where were you born? C: I was born in Gainesville. O: Where? At home? C: At home. O Where was that home located? C: In the South East area of Gainesville, back of probably what is now the Court House. O: What is now the Court House? B ack of where the Court House is now? C: Yes. O: And, did you grow up there and live there all of your life? C: No, no. We moved, I guess I was about four, when we moved to what was then Arredondo Street, and that was in the S.W. area.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: And Arredondo, can you tell me some of the bu ildings there? Is the house you lived in on Arredondo, is it still there? C: No. It is now a parking lot. O: It is now a parking lot. C: Back of Wise's Drug Store. O: Back of Wise's Drug Store, and that woul d be across from the First Presbyterian Church? C: That is right. O: And how long did you live there? C: Well, until I was fourteen, and we moved to S.W. 1st Avenue in th e 800 block, which is now just west of Ayer's Medical Center. The house is still standing. O: That was the Old Union Street? C: Yes. O: And the house is still there? C: Yes. O And you lived there from about age fourteen until... C: I married. O: Until you got married. C: Yes. O: So, when you were born, did the doctor attend your birth, or did a midwife? C: No, no, mother had a doctor, who was Dr. Lartigue. O: Who? How do you spell it? C: L-a-r-t-i-g-u-e.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: You were born at home? C: At home. O: Are there any family stories connected w ith your birth that would be of interest? C: Not that I know of. O: Nothing that was passed down to you? C: No, nothing that was passed down to me. O: Do you have any idea after you were born how long your mother stayed in bed? C: No. O: Who took care of the family? C: Her mother came. O: And stayed with the family? Did you ha ve any siblings, brothers or sisters? C: Yes, I had two sisters and one brother. O: And what were their names? C: My brother was H. D. Beville. My sister was Nathalie Beville. O: How do you spell that? C: N-a-t-h-a-l-i-e Beville. And then, Ethel. O: Are any of them still living? C: No. O: Which was the oldest, where do you come in? C: H.D., my brother, Nathalie, then me, and Ethel was youngest. O: What are some of your earliest memories of growing up in the house on Arredondo?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Well, my earliest memories, I was thinking the other day. The str eet was unpaved, and once a week, Ms. Highsmith, who owned a dairy farm , she had a wagon with a top on it, and she would go all over town, pulled by horse, the wa gon was, selling milk, cream, butter, eggs, and vegetables. And she had a big bell, a hand bell, that she would ring, and you could hear her coming. So you knew if you wanted some thing, you would go out on the front of the yard to get whatever you wanted from Ms. Highs mith. That was one, and then another, there was a tremendous oak tree in the road between the sidewalk, I do not remember if we had a sidewalk right there at that point, but we did later, and we had a bag swing which was made out of a croaker sack, filled with moss, and how much fun that was, playing with that. And then the Chautauqua would come once a year, a nd where they had the tent and all was not too far from our house, and we all looked forwar d to going to the programs there. My sister, Nathalie, had a horse, and it was kept in a barn across the street from us, and I never did ride the horse, but I always did admire her on the horse. We had, you know, nice neighbors, older people. O: Can you remember some of the names of your neighbors? C: Oh yes. On the corner of Arredondo and Univ ersity, the Ludwigs lived, and then we lived, and then next door to us was Miss Millie Adamson and her brother, and she rented rooms out. And across the street on the corner of University and Arredondo, was the Dogan Stringfellow house, and back of the Stringf ellow house on Arredondo lived her sister, Ms. Harper. And then next to Ms. Harper, the Hart fields lived. On the corner, going on past our house on Arredondo, on the, I guess now its 2nd Av enue, the Daughtry's lived. And across the street from them, the Evan's. and the Chitty s, and Hewlett Anderson's mother and father lived two blocks down from us on the corn er of Arredondo and I guess 2nd or 3rd Avenue. O: Were there many children in the neighborhood that you could play with? C: No. The Hartfield's had a boy, Frank, and of course the Chittys down on the corner, there was Margaret, and Virginia, and Henry. And the Evans, their son, Bill is the father of Dr. Evans who is a doctor in Gainesville. O: Dr. William Evans? C: Right. And then the Ramseys lived across from the Daughtry's. O: Besides playing with your swing made out of moss, how did you entertain yourself? What games did you play? C: I can remember when we were going to school over at Kirby Smith, I can remember that we skated to school, and we could not wait for r ecess to play jacks. I can remember playing jacks. And, you know, the games that people played back then, Drop the Handkerchief, and tennis, I was older, you know and in high sc hool. Later on, when we still lived on Arredondo

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 Street, Ms Millie Adamson moved, and the Singers came from New York, and they lived in the house and they had three sons, and I forgot to mention that back of us, on Pleasant Street, lived Margaret and Sarah Smith. And, then on the corner from them, lived the Touses, and Josephine and I can't remember her name, anyway there were children in the neighborhood, and we used to have plays in a garage. O: Can you remember any of the plays you had? C: No, I really can not. O: Were they plays that you made up? C: Yes, they must have been. O: How did you create a stage, or a curtain. C: In our garage. And we decorated it, at that time there was a vine called Stink Vine, it was a beautiful vine growing, it had pretty clusters of white flowers, but when you would break it off, and put it somewhere, it would begin to sme ll, but anyway we just had chairs I guess for the audience who were our parents. O: That sounds like it must have been fun. C: It was. O: You went to school and you started to school when you were how old? C: I assume six. O: And where... C: At Kirby Smith. O: At Kirby Smith? C: Yes. O: Was that the name of the school at that time when you began there? C: Yes it was. O: How long did you go to that school?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Well, until I went to high school, and they had built G.H.S. O: And where was G.H.S. located? C: On University Avenue. O: Is it still there? C: No, no, where Ayers Medical Center is. O: Ayers Medical Center? C: Yes. O: And do you remember how long you went to Kir by Smith? Did you start in the 9th grade at Gainesville High School, or... C: I think probably the 8th. O: Probably the 8th? C: Yes. O: Can you remember any of your teachers at Kirby Smith? C: Yes, I can remember one. Mrs. Olsen. And Mrs. Blacklock, but I can not remember any of the others. O: What about high school? Can you rememb er any of your teachers in high school? C: Yes, Mrs. Olsen again. She taught Latin when I was in high school. O: Was that Mrs. Gladys Olsen? Was that her first name? C: No, Clara. O: Clara Olsen? C: She was Clara McDonald before she marrie d. Clara Olsen, and Dr. J. Hooperwise taught first year Latin. Elizabeth Shaw McClamroc k, Margie and Ruth White, Ms. Wallace taught history, Ms. Phipps taught us math. I did not take French, so I did not have Ms., I have forgotten her name, and there was a Mr. Black that taught us.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Black? C: Black. He was a brother to A. T. Black, but I can not remember his name other than Black. And of course, Ralph Buchholtz was the... O: The principal, the head of the school? C: The principal. O: Do you have any particular fond memories of attending Gainesville High School? C: Yes, it was just fun. It really was fun. We had a great class and everybody just enjoyed going to school. You did not question that you could not go, you just knew you would go and you knew that you would have a good time. I really remember just having a good time. O: Do you remember any special teacher? C: Mrs. Olson was outstanding. O: In what way was she so outstanding? C: Well, she was so caring and so giving and so interested in you and she just had a wonderful attitude and she loved her students and she was just a lovely teacher. O: She inspired you? C: She inspired us. O And she taught you Latin? And you also had her you say when you were in... C: I did, in either the 3rd or 4th grade of school, I mean ... O: Kirby Smith? C: Yes, elementary. O: What were some of the activities that we nt on at Gainesville High school besides the classroom? C: Well, they had sports, football, basketball for gi rls, baseball, but I did not play tennis, so I do not know if they had tennis or not. I played bask etball, and I knew that we had football. I do not think they had a swimming team, or anything like that back then.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Probably just football and baseball. C: You had a P.E. teacher that you went to at P.E. period. O: What kind of things did you have in P.E., what did you do during P.E.? C: Well, I guess we had exercises and played games or something like that. O: By the time you went to Gainesville High School, you were living right across the street from it, weren't you? C: Not across the, well, yes, across the street. O; The street you lived on dead ended... C: Dead ended right into the... O: the high school playgr ound. So if you moved over there, I guess that when you went to Kirby Smith, when you were living on Arredondo, that wa s a lot closer than when you moved to Union, so did that make any difference in how you got to school? C: No, we walked or we skated. O: You walked or you skated? Did your family have a car as you were growing up when you were younger? C: Yes, I remember that we had a car, and that it was a Buick, that had jump seats... O: Now what is a jump seat? C: Well, they were in back of the front seat and you can fold them down where they were out of the way. But you also could pull them up and they were called jump seats. O: They were attached to the back of the front seat? C: No. There were no glass wi ndows. We had Isinglass curtains. If it rained you had to get them out and snap them on. I remember that. O: Do you ever remember not having an automobile for transportation? C: No, I really do not. I am sure we did not, but I really do not remember not having one.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: You said that Ms. Highsmith, was it, came and she delivered milk and things like that. Did you all buy your milk, how did you get milk, did you have a cow? C: We had a cow and we had chickens in the back yard. O: Who took care of the cow and chickens? C: My mother. She milked the cow and fed the chickens, and then my brother, when he was older, she taught him how to milk. O: Did you have any chores growing up, that you had to do around the house? C: Yes. O: What were they? C: Make up my bed, pick up my clothes, and ca rry the dirty clothes downstairs. We had a cook, so I did not have to do anything in the kitchen, but that was many years ago. O: Did your mother make your own clothes, or did you have a seamstress that came? C: My mother made them. She even made them when I was in high school. O: Did she teach you how to sew? C: She tried to. But I have a daughter that sews as beautifully as my mother, and I did not teach her, she just inherited it. O: So your mother made your clothes up into high school. Where did she buy her material? C: Well, I will have to tell you this . Mother used to take the flour sacks that the flour came in from the grocery store, and bleach them, and sh e made our underpants from the flour sacks. She bought material and all from Wilson's and then there was Smith and Hooper. O: Where was Smith and Hooper? C: On the south side of the square where probably Fold's Hardware Store was later. O: And at this time there would be restaurants a nd things like that there on the south side of the Square? C: Yes.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: And where was Wilson's located? C: On the corner of University and First Street. O: That was, at that time, called 1st Street, when you first remember? C: Yes, I think... no it was called East Main. O: It was called East Main? It is 1st Street now. Can you describe a typical day in your life as you were a pre-teen? C: Well, on Saturday, we would get up and one of my favorite girlfriends was Thelma Beasley. Her father had a furniture store, Beasley and Williams Furniture Store. And either she would come over to my house, or I would go to her hous e, and that night, we would go to the Lyric Theater, and if it was not too late when it was over, we would go to Glass' Drugstore. O: Where was that located? C: It was in the middle of the block between West Main and East Main. O: What is now Main Street and East 1st Street? C: It was on University Avenue, right in the mi ddle of the block between West Main and East Main. O: But it was on University Avenue? C: Yes. Glass'. Later, it was I think called Vidal's. O: So you would... C: And I would spend the night with her or she would spend the night with me. O: And that was a typical Saturday? C: Yes. O: What about Sunday? What did you do on Sunday? C: Well, we would get up and we would go to Sunday School at the First United Methodist Church on what is now 1st Street, and sometimes stay for church and sometimes not. And I

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 had another friend who was Baptist. So, I would go to BYPU at the Baptist Church on Sunday afternoon with her. O: And your family was Methodist? C: My family was Methodist. O: Were both of your parents Methodist? Was ther e anything that you used to do at church that you remember? C No, but I do remember two of my teacher s from Sunday school when I was a young girl growing up, and one of them was Mrs. O'Neill, Clarence O'Neill's mother, and the other was Ms. Blocker. Those are the two that stand out. O: Blocker, would that be B-l-o-c-k-e-r? C: Yes. Later they moved to Ocala and they ha d a furniture store in Ocala, but their mother, and Ms. O'Neill I remember. O: Do you remember any social activities that the young people had at the church? C: Well yes, because I went to BYPU at the Baptist Church. O: What kind of activities did they have? C: Well, we would have a meeting and we w ould sing and sometimes they would have ice cream or just a little social time. O: Where was the Baptist Church located at that time? C: It was located where, I think where the C ity Hall is. It was on University Avenue, on the corner. O: Where City Hall is now. Probably their Rose Garden or the Entrance or something like that. C: Yes, in that area. O: Do you remember when they moved to their present location? C: I do remember. Yes. O: And did you attend BYPU there, too?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: No, I think I had stopped going to BYPU then. Another thing that we liked to do on Sunday afternoons, Mother sometimes would fix a picn ic lunch and we would all go to Earlton Beach. O: Where was Earlton Beach? C: Between Melrose and Waldo. O: It is known as Earlton now? C: Yes. O: And what lake would that be on? Would that be Santa Fe Lake? C: I think that would be Santa Fe Lake. O: But it is there at Earlton. C: Yes. Same lake that Melrose is on. A nd then another place we liked to go was Pinkoson Springs, which was Charlie's father, it was a man made springs, and then to Poe Springs, which was right out of High Springs, and then later on to Glen Springs which is still right here in Gainesville, that Mr. Pound developed, and I think the Elks Club is there now. O: Elks Club has that property now? C: Yes. O: What kind of things do you remember doi ng at Earlton Beach? Did you just go swimming there, did you have any special... C: Just go swimming. Oh they had a slide you know, and it was fun to slide down the slide and just swimming. Betty, I forgot to mention Magnesia Springs. We used to go out there too. Mr. Kelly, who owned it, would bottle the water and sell it in Gainesville in big five gallon demi-johns, because it was supposedly so very pure. O: Do you remember what happened to Earlton Beach that it is no longer a beach, or it stopped being a beach? C: No, no, it is still a beach. O: It is still a beach. Do people still go there? C: Yes.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Is Pinkoson Springs still in operation? C: No it is not. O: Where was that located? Do you remember? C: Yes. Between Gainesville and Hague. O: Between Gainesville and Hague? And, Magnesia was out near what? C; Going towards Hawthorne. O: What was the water like swimming at those different places? C: Well at Earlton it was warm, but Magnesia, Pi nkoson, Poe and Glen were all very cold. You had to really swim and exercise in the water to stay in it. O: What was your favorite place to go swimming? C: I think probably Pinkoson Springs. O: What kind of bathing suit did you have wh en you were going swimming? How did they look, or vary through the years? What did they change? C: They were just a one piece suit with a skirt att ached to it, and the legs of the suit were almost down to your knees, and a bodice with just about a 2 inch strap across. O: Do you remember them changing as you grew up? C: Yes I do. I remember changing into a one piece suit, but the legs were very short and it was molded more, you know. I was a teenager, I had developed. O: How did you mother and father feel about the new, more fitting suits? C: Well, I guess they thought they were lovely. They were not like the suits of today, I tell you. O: They did not make any objections to you wearing those, buying those suits? C: No. O: Do you still go swimming?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: No. I do not anymore. O: Is it because it is an activity you do not want to do now, or the water is too cold? C: It is an activity I do not want to do now. O: What kind of discipline did you know at home as you were growing up? How did your family handle discipline? C: My mother disciplined us. My daddy never did, but mother's great thing was for you to go and break a switch and bring it in here to he r, and do not get one that is going to break, because if you do, you will go out and get another one. O: So she used the switch? C: She used the switch. O: What kinds of offenses did she call for the use of the switch? Do you remember? C: Oh, probably when Ethel and I would get in a fight, you know. We were just a year apart, and instead of being very, I can't think of the word I want to use, instead of being very close, I resented Ethel because she would pout, I w ould just get so mad and mother would say, "Now Lois, you just know Ethel, she is so sensitive, you just can not do that" and I would think, well I'm sensitive too. But really, we we re a very agreeable, a happy family growing up. I can't remember too much discord or unhappiness. O: And you and your sister, Ethel were close, and became very close as you got older? C: Yes, yes. I think that comes with age. I thi nk in most families that happens. As you get older you become very loving of each other. O: Do you remember what kind of discipline wa s used at school, on stude nts at school, say in your elementary school? C: I never had to, but I assume we went to the principal and he probably used a ruler, but I do not remember. O: You do not remember? C: No, I do not really.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: What about high school? Do you remember anybody getting disciplined in high school? C: Yes, I do. But you knew if you did something, I will say this about Professor Buchholtz, as we called him, you knew if you did something that you were not supposed to do, you would be punished, there was no doubt about it. So you di d not do things. I me an, I do not think we had the discipline problems we have now with children or teenagers. We respected him and he deserved respect. O: Do you remember, you say you knew you would be punished, do you remember what type of punishment he meted out? C: Well, you may have to stay after school, you may have to write a lesson or something like that, or you could be expelled for a day or two. O: You spoke earlier before we started, about elocution lessons? Where did you have those? C: In elementary school and Ms. Roux, I'll always remember her name. O: What was her name? C: Ms. Roux, R-o-u-x. taught us. O: What kinds of things did you do in your elocution lessons, classes? C: I really do not remember what we did, ma ybe that is one reason I talk funny. Then I remember Ms. Blacklock, she also taught, but wh en we had chapel in elementary school, she was the song leader. O: You had chapel in elementary school? Do you remember what took place during these chapel meetings? C: Well, we would sing, and I do not know. I would hate to say, Betty. Probably we would have a, reading from the Bible, and prayer, a nd if there was anything that the students needed to know, I think we were told at chapel. O: Did you continue to have chapel when you went to high school? C: No. O: Do you remember whether or not you had Bible readings wh en you were at school when you were growing up?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: I think so, yes. O: Where did your family buy clothing as you got older? C: Yes, we would go to Wilson's or Ms. Geigers, which was right next to Wilson's, or to, I do not know if Ms. Lanier and Ms. Cherry were there at that time. I know later I bought from them and Ruddy's, which was also there on the south side of the square. O: Where did you buy shoes? C: From Tench. O: You bought shoes from Tench? Where was Tench's located? C: That was on the west side of the square, on Main Street between University and 1st Avenue. And there was a Matthews. Ms. Matthews, sh e and her husband had a yard good store there on the corner, and Thomas Hardware. That is where the big fire was. O: And when was that? Do you remember the date? C: Well, I remember, I was married, so it had to be after 1931. Anyway it burned. O: Where was Thomas' Hardware located? C: Right in the middle of the block. O: Right in the middle of the block, west of the square. C: Facing on Main Street, yes. Parker's in that... O: Parker's is in that area now? What other st ore were located in that area at the time of the fire? C Otto Stocks. He handled men's w ear, and on the corner, I think was Canova s Drug Store. There was a drug store, and those were the stores I remember on that block. O: Where would you go to buy furniture? C: Mr. Seagle's, or to Coxes. O: Where was Seagle's located?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Seagle's was located facing on University Av enue between Main, going west, be 1st Street, in the middle of that block, and there was a gr ocery store in there, Mr. Harrold's grocery store. O: How did you spell that Harrold, do you know? C: I think it's H-a-r-r-o-l-d. I think its two r's. O: What is located in that block now, where the Seagle Furniture store was? C: Chestnuts in on the corner there and truly I do not go that way much, I do not know what is in there now. O: You do not go down town very much anymore? C: No, I do not. I use 8th Avenue. O: You used to know that area real well b ecause you lived down there. When did you stop going downtown to shop? C: Never, until the shopping centers came to Gainesville. Everybody went downtown to shop, and as long as Ms. Cherry and Ms. Lanier, a nd Ms. Geiger and Wilson's were dress shops. O: And then they moved out? C: Then they moved out. O: If you wanted a hat, where did you go to buy your hats? C: Ms. McCormick's. O: And where was that? C: On the corner, she faced University Avenue, too. It was on the corner of I guess 2nd Street. O: What is there now? C: A nightclub. O: A nightclub. Is that where Penny's used to be? C: Yes, that is where Penny's used to be.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: That was on the same block that your home was on, then, wasn't it? C: That is right. But when I lived on Arre dondo Street, there where Penny's used to be, is where the Duttons lived. They had a great big home there. And he, I think I am right in this, was president of the bank, his name was Henry Dutton. O: Do you remember who lived behind Dutton's home, behind you? C: That was Dr. Smith's house, Dr. D.T. Smith. And then next to them was the McKinstry's, and then next to them was the Powell's and that's the next corner. O: That is where the Presbyterian Church is now . No, no it would not be, it is where a drive-in hamburger place is now. C Yes. That is true. The church is where the Ramses lived. O: Did you have an allowance as a child? C: Well, yes, I'm sure I did, but not much. I can remember that when mother and daddy built on 1st Avenue, which was then known as Union St reet, the lot was empt y and mother, or daddy I guess, would plant peas, and my sister Nath alie and I would go down and pick peas and take them home and shell them, and then sell to my daddy at the grocery store. And we did that so we could go the skating rink. O: Oh, they had a skating rink? Where was that located? C: It was upstairs over the Ogletree Garage, and that was between University Avenue on N.W. 1st Street and the next street I think was Mechanic, between University and Mechanic, upstairs, yes we did. O: So you would pick peas and sell them to your dad. As you got into high school and you were going to the movies on Saturday, how did you get the money to go to the movies? C: Well, I am sure that we probably asked daddy for it or we had an allowance, I really do not remember. O: You do not remember? That is alright. C: And it did not cost much. Back then a dime went a long way. O: What are your earliest memories of Gainesville?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: My earliest memories of Gainesville are things that I did. Now, that University Avenue, the college was already there, but Ms. Walker, whose husband was in the Army and I think was head of ROTC at the University of Florida, she was our Girl Scout leader, and we used to go for weekend campouts in the area where the bank is now, when it was just a tremendous pine grove. O: What bank would that be? C: The one not too far from where your mother lived, where you all lived. O: Barnett Bank. C: The one that is on University Avenue. And that was a pine grove and th at is where we would have our weekend campouts. O: So you belonged to the Girl Scouts, and Mr s. Walker was your leader? Well then, you must have been the first Girl Scouts in Gainesville, or one of the first troops. C: I really do not know, probably so. O: At that time, did Girl Scouts sell cookies? C: No, no, we did not. I really do not remember what we did. I rememb er being a Girl Scout and going camping in that pine grove. O: In that pine grove on University, what is now University Avenue near the University. Do you remember any special events that happened in Gainesville? You mentioned a fire, but that was when you were older? C: No, not really. I think Gainesville was just a nice, quiet, you know, a family oriented town, and I can not remember anything. O: Do you have any memories of the University and how it impacted on Gainesville as you were growing up? C: No, I can remember, though, in high school, Je ssie Gibbs had a Ford and it was our delight to get in the Ford and ride out to the Univers ity to look at the students, that was about it. I can remember, yes, I can remember an impact, when we lived on Arredondo Street. Mother and daddy had a sleeping porch all the way across th e back of the house, so that is where we slept, year round, and then we had a dressing r oom, and that is where we would dress. In growing up, I did not have a bedroom. We were all on the sleeping porch.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: The whole family, or just all the kids. C: No, the family, mother and daddy and the four of us, and mother and daddy would take in two students from the University and rent a room to them, I remember that. O: Did they have football games or anything like that? C: Yes. O: Did you go to the football games or did you just.... C: I was only allowed to date a University of Florida student when I was a senior in high school. O When you were a senior in high school. Well, did your parents go to a ny of the games? Did they partake of any of the functions like that? C I am sure daddy did probably, but I can not remember mother going to them. O: So you were allowed to date University of Florida students when you were a senior in high school? It must have been a big date. C: Oh it was, definitely. O: How old were you when you were allowed to date? C: I was, well, I graduated when I was 17, so I was 17. O: When were you allowed to date other people, not necessarily University of Florida students? C: You know, I really do not remember dating. I remember a group of us would get together and have parties, but as far as a date, you know, just as a couple, I do not remember. O: What kind of parties would you have as a group? C: Well, we would have parties at home. O: Would they be dances, or would you play games? C: They would have to be dances, because I knew how to dance, but yes, probably games, dancing, and you know, ju st a group of young people from one house or another. And then of course we had the Little Women, so you could go to that.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Little Women was what? Would you explain Little Women? C: It was a club sponsored by the Women's Club and it was for the member's young children, girls only. I do not know the ages, I guess high school age. O: And what would this club do? C: They would have dances whic h you could invite your date to, and I think it was a social club. O: And where were these dances held? C: In the Women's Club. O And where was the Woman's Club? C: It was across the street from the high school on University Avenue. There is a little shopping center area in there. But the Woman's Club building is still in existence. O: And where is that? C: Its on 16th Avenue out towards 43rd Street, a nd that is where the Gainesville Little Theater has their plays. O: So that used to be the Woman's Club. So your mother must have been a member of the Woman's Club. C: She was. O; What other organizations in town was she a member of? C: She was a member of the UDC. O: What does that stand for? C: United Daughters of the Confederacy, and th e Woman's Club, and she was a member of the Founder's Circle Garden Circle, and a member of the circles at church, a member of the church. I can not remember any others. O: Was she an officer in any of these clubs that you remember? C: No, not that I remember.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: You said she was a member of the Founders' Circle of the Garden Club. Was she instrumental in beginning the Garden Club? C: No she was not. O: But those were the activities she took part in. C: Yes, and she enjoyed playing bridge, and she played bridge, but did not belong to a bridge club as such. O: Just her friends got together and pl ayed. Did you have a telephone when you were growing up? C: Yes, we did. I remember on Arredondo Str eet. I do not remember much about where we lived until I was four years old, really about that. O When you moved on to Arredondo. C: Yes. It was the kind, you know, where you rang central and gave her your number. It was the phone on the wall. O: So you do not remember a time really that you did not have a telephone. C: No, I do not. O: Did your father have a telephone in his grocery store? C: Yes, he did. O: Did people call in? C: Call in orders. O; They would call in orders? C: Yes, and he had a colored man, we called him Uncle Dan, and he would deliver groceries in a dray. O: A dray? C: Which was an open wagon pulled by a horse.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: So even though you do not remember a time when you did not have a car, there was a mixture of cars and horses being used as you were growing up. C: Yes, yes. O: Talking about stores, in your father's store, how did he display his wares? Was there any special way he had of displaying them that might be different? C: Well, I can remember that he had a counter that had glass compartments, and they would display bulk candies in those and that the fl our came in 25 pound sacks, and if you wanted a pound, they would take a pound out. They had canned goods, and they had a meat market and of course, they had a glass compartment for the meat market too, and they displayed meat. That is about all I remember about it. O: Did the farmers bring in their produce to your father? C: Yes, they did. O: Or did he have to go out to it to the town, or something like that? C: No, they brought it in. O: They brought it in? C: Yes. O: You say you bought your shoes at Tench's shoe store. C: Tench's, yes. O: What did the shoe store look like at that time? Was it different or was it just like a shoe store we have now? C: It was like a shoe store we have now. Shoe boxes on the wall, and those little stools they sit on and put your foot up there and put the shoe on. O: How did they get, were the shoes on the wall, or boxes on the wall or... C: Yes, but on the street the store had glass a nd they would display the shoes so that you could see them before you walked in the store.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: And if you picked out a shoe that you liked, but it was not the right size, what did they do then? How did they get the shoe that was the right size? C: I do not know, because I never had any trouble. They always had my size. O: Did they have their shoes stacked along the wall up real high towards the ceiling? C: Yes, all the way to the ceiling. O: Well, how did they get the shoes down from the ceiling? C: They had a ladder that was on a track, and they would push it down. O: They just pushed the ladder... C: Up on that track. O: On the wall, and they may have that in th e back of shoe stores these day, but that is something we do not see. C: No, you do not. O: Did you say you started dating University st udents when you were a senior in high school? How did you meet Mr. Cone? C: Fred was my sister's age, he was older reall y, he was four years older than I, but he was in her grade, and he played football and he was a well known football player, and I knew him in high school just slightly, and then we star ted going together when I was a senior. He originally was from Raleigh, Florida, and we nt to grammar school, elementary school, and part of high school in Williston. So I only knew him in high school. O: Where is Raleigh? C: Raleigh is between Williston and Archer. O: Then his family was a long time resident of Florida? C: Yes. O And he was also born in Florida? C: Yes.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: And then he went to high school here in Gainesville? C: Yes, his family moved to Gainesville, and his father ran the Commercial Hotel, and his mother had the Arlington Hotel, which was in a home. It was a family hotel. When Fred and I married he was working for his father as the night clerk at the hotel. O: Where was the Commercial Hotel? C: It is still standing. It is on the corner of S. Main and 2nd Avenue. The city owns it now. O: The city owns it now? C: It is across from the Tench Building. O: Where was the Arlington Hotel? C The Arlington Hotel was a great big two stor y wooden house, and it was on the corner of I guess 4th Avenue and 1st Street. It was a block off University Avenue. It was torn down, of course. And when Fred and I married, his mo ther also had the Arlington Apartments which were on the corner of S. Main and 4th Avenue, and she gave us an apartment. She did not charge us because Fred was working as a night clerk in the hotel. O: Let us go back. Do you remember when you graduated from high school? C: Yes. O: When was that? C: In 1930. O: In 1930? Then you went to college where? C: Tallahassee, FSCW. O: What does FSCW stand for? C: Florida State College for Women. O: And so, how long did you attend? C: Three months.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Three months? C: From September to December. O: And I believe that December is where we left off on the other tape. And he was... C: Taking me back to college and we decided to get married. So we stopped in Monticello and Judge Byrd married us. And, he took me on to Tallahassee, and I went up to my room and got some clothes, and then we went to Lake City. His brother had the Powell Hotel there, and he borrowed some money from the night clerk so that we could go to Jacksonville and spend the night in the George Washington Hotel. That was our honeymoon. One night in the George Washington, and we came home the ne xt day, and faced our respective parents. O: I was just going to ask. How did your families feel about this? C: Well, they accepted it. And, we were very happy for over 50 years. I think Fred and I had been married 54 years when he died. O: Well that was a successful elopement. C: Yes, we were very lucky. Not many turn out that fortunate when you are that young. O: You said that when you got married his mother gave you an apartment, rent free, because he was working for... C: His daddy. O: And how long did you live there? C: We lived there until Susan was I guess a year old. We lived there four years. O: Four years? And how many children were born there, when you were living there? C Only one, the oldest, Susan. O And when was she born? C: In 1934. O Do you remember the date, the month? C: Yes, September 25, 1934.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O And is she still living? C: She is still living and she lives in Leesburg. O Is she married? C: Yes, she is married. O: And what is her name now? C: Well, her name now is Susan Anderson. She had three children, a boy and two girls and they are my grandchildren. O When you moved from the apartment with Susan, where did you go to live then? C: We built a house on what was then Ninth Street, which is now 13th Street. O Where was the house located? C: On the east side of 13th Street, a block past the sorority houses, and it is still standing. O: What is there now? C: It is still a home, but it is rented to University students. O: That would be south of the sorority houses on the east side? C: I remember when we built there, Fred's mo ther had bought that property and we were the first house to build on that property. During the years they sold the lots and other people built out there. O: And were other children born while you were living there? C: Yes. Celia, my other daughter, Fred and Tommy. O: So those are all the children you had? C: Yes. O How long did you live in that house?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: About 15 years. And we built it when FHA was in. You borrowed from the government and paid so much a month. My daddy went into the laundry business with Major Thomas, the Gainesville Laundry. O: Where was that located? C: That was on 6th St and University Avenue, where a shopping center is now. And then when daddy started the Ideal Laundry, Fred went into business with my daddy. O; And where was that? C: That is on 1st Avenue, east of 6th Street, and now the Cone Building is there. O: The Cone Building is there. So there is no more Gainesville Laundry or Ideal Laundry? C: No, there is one on S. Main St reet, I do not know who has it, but it is not ours, but that is the name of it, Ideal Laundry. O What happened to the Ideal Laundry? C: A fire. O: There was a fire? C: Yes, and then we rebuilt and leased it in 1972, Fred leased it to a laundry business from the north, and I can not remember the name of the laundry, and it just finally went out of business. O: And there are other businesses located in that building that you rebuilt after the fire? C: Yes. O: So he continued to work for his father, until he went into business with your father at the Ideal Laundry? C: Yes. O: And that was when? C: I would hesitate to say, but I guess about 1937, 1938. O: How did your father happen to get into the laundry business?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: You know, I really do not know, Betty. Majo r Thomas and daddy were co-owners of the Gainesville Laundry. The laundry had been there, I am sure, I do not know who was operating it before they were. O What civic organizations have you been a part of in Gainesville? C: Well, you mean like DAR, Garden Club? O What does DAR stand for? C: Daughters of the American Revolution, Garden Club, definitely active in church, circles, church committees, the Junior League, the Gain esville Little Theater, the Heritage Club, the Gainesville Golf and Country Club, and of course PTA. O: Were you a member, or are you still a member of the Women's Club? C: Oh yes, I was a member. I forgot that too, di dn't I. Yes, Gainesville Women's Club. Former member. I'm not active in any of the them anymore. O: You're not active in any of them. Did you hold offices in any of them? C: Yes, I did. I was president of the Junior League, and president and Circle Chairman of the Woman's Society. O: And what is the Women's Society? C: Christian Service for the Church. O: At church. C: Yes. I guess that is about it. O: Do you have any outstanding memories of thi ngs that occurred while you were officers in these groups, like the Junior League? C: The year I was president, we dedicated a r oom to Ella May Canova, who was in the Junior League, at Alachua General Hospital. We furnished it, and maintained it for children. O: Any other?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Well, yes. The Woman's Society of Christian Service, we built the parsonage on 1st Street. We bought the organ which is still in the church, in our present church now. We fed, I think it was a Kiwanas, or the Rotary Club there at the church to make money. I guess that is about all the money. O How did your other organizations make money? How about the Juni or League? How did they make money? C: Well, the members paid dues. They had the Th rift Shop, which was in a garage at that time. Now they have a building and own it, but they sold used clothing and toys and shoes and pots and pans and things like that. Now they do lots to make money, but back when I was a member, that was the main thing, the thrift s hop. And also during the war, they participated in serving meals at the school. The government furnished meals, but they helped serve them and all for the needy families. O: This is World War II? And they would furnish the meals at school at that... C: We did not furnish the meals, we furnished the help, to do it. O When you were in elementary and high school, did they have a lunch room, or what? C: They did, but we mainly took our lunch wh ich consisted of a sandwich and maybe a ripe pear, peach or banana, and I guess we took some thing to drink. They had drinking fountains on the school yard, I know that. O Well, when you were in high school, did you eat lunch at school or did you go home? C: Oh no, it was just a couple of steps away fr om home. Plus, I was always trying to lose weight, and I remember this friend of mine, Su e Towson she was, now sh e is Sue James, and so at lunch, we would eat an apple, and act as though we were very satisfied. But no, I never really ate at school really. O: You would go home. C: Sure. O Did your family have the big meal of the day at the middle of the day? C: In the middle of the day we had dinner, and then supper at night. O: So dinner was the middle of the day and supper was at night. Did your father come home to eat with you?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Yes, from the grocery store. O: And all of your family would eat together? C: Yes, we did. O: What other businesses was your husband involved in town? C: Well, he was on the Board of the Citizen's Bank, and then the Sun Bank. He was a member of the Kiwanas Club, he played pick-up baseball, he played golf, and then he was always interested in having a ranch somewhere. That was sort of his hobby, and we got into buying acreage, and having cows, and then in the later years, after he retire d, we had a large acreage out between Micanopy and Windsor on the prairi e and we had cows, and also race horses. O: After you sold your home on what is now S outh 13th Street, where did you move to then? C We moved over to Highlands, and we bought th e house from Ms. Gus Phifer, we called her Aunt Nell. The house was originally built by J. C. Atkins who was a lawyer and judge in Gainesville, and it was on the boulevard, on th e corner of N.E. 8th Avenue and the boulevard. A big two story house. O Is it still there? C It is still there. And the people who bought it from us, the Rays, he is connected with the University, I do not know in what capacity, they still own it. O And how long did you live there? C: Well, lets see, we bought it in 1941 or 1942 and lived there until 1972. We lived there about 30 years. O: And where did you move to then? C: This house. O: And you all built? C: No, we did not build this. We bought it. It was built in 1970 by the Dormans and at that time, he was connected with the Athletic Departme nt at the University of Florida. Then he lost his job and they moved to Orlando, and we bought it.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O And you have been living here ever since? I know that your husband was very active in Civic affairs. Can you tell me some of the things he did? C: Well, he was mayor twice, and he served on the City Commission several terms. O; That would be when? Do you remember what years that would be? C: I should, but I do not. O: Okay. At that time when he was mayor, was he elected by the people or was that like it is now, the mayor was just appointed? C; Like it is now. O The commissioners would appoint him. C: Yes. O Do you remember any special thing that occurred while he was mayor? C: No, I do not. O While he was on the commission, were there any controversies in Gainesville or anything? C: Oh there were always controversies. I re member one though. There was an organization or a group of people that wanted to sell the regional utility company, you know, I think it was Florida Power, and Fred was very much agains t that. And if he was living today, he would still be against it. He would think it shoul d be City owned and operated, and it gives a revenue for the city to use for other things. Th at was one of his main things. And they had really interesting little things that would come up, but to specifically give you one I just can not. O: Do you remember World War I at all? C: No, I remember mother talking about it, about the flu epidemic at the University of Florida, and how the ladies in Gainesville would make tremendous pots of soup and take out there for them to feed the students, and I think there we re some soldiers stationed here, but I am not sure, I do not remember. O What about the years of the 20's? Do you have any special memories of national events or anything that occurred in the 1920's? C: If you would prompt me, I could tell you.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Well, let's see I believe that we had prohi bition at that time. Did it have any impact on Gainesville? C: I do not know. I would think so. If you bought whiskey, you would have to go outside the county, I am sure, because I knew that Alachua County was a dry county. O: And do you remember when Alachua County became "undry"? C: No, I do not. Became wet? No, I do not. O: I could not think of the word. What about the depression? Do you have memories of the depression? C: In the 30's? O: In the 30's you and your husband were just starting out then. C: Yes, yes. I remember that he made a very small salary and all, but it went a long ways. I do not know that we took trips or anything like that , but we certainly did not want for anything. O: He was employed all that time? He was never unemployed? C: No. O: Either by his father, or went into business with... C: With my father. O: Do you have any special memories connected with WW II? C: I can remember that we would go up to the Red Cross office and roll bandages and fix packages to be distributed. And I can reme mber that we had an airplane watch, and you would volunteer, and I think that was one thi ng the Junior League sponsored, but anyway, you would volunteer to go and sit for a certain number of hours, and if any airplanes came over from any direction at all. You know, at that time we were afraid probably because a German sub had been sighted off Jacksonv ille Beach. And I remember the recreation building was built for the soldiers from Camp Blanding. I remember that we were rationed on shoes, sugar, meat, heating oil and gasoline, and we had stamps, a nd you had to use those stamps for other commodities, I am sure. O: Well, did being rationed interfere with your lifestyle in any way?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Well, I think everyone was more aware of not doing things. I remember in the home we built on 9th Street, we had a fireplace in the living r oom, and then a step down into the hall, and we hung a curtain there so that the heat from the fireplace would stay up in the living room and that is where we would gather. We had a ci rculating oil heater, but we used it sparingly not knowing what the weather might be later on and you would need the heat. O: You were talking about the airplane watch. Did you participate in that did you take a turn in that? C: Yes. O: Where did you go to watch for planes? C: It was out in what is now Highlands, then it was Stengel Field. It was called Stengel Field, as it was an airplane field, I believe. It is all built up now, you know, homes and subdivisions. Out off of 16th Avenue and Waldo Road, in that area. O: Do you have any other special memories of Gainesville that you would like to share with us? C: I enjoyed Gainesville more when you coul d go to the grocery store, and you would see friends, and you would stop and chat. Now you go, and occasionally you might see someone you know. And you know, that, to me, is typical of my church. There are so many members that I really do not know in our church. I wish Gainesville were like it used to be, small and friendly, and neighborly. O: Where you would know everybody? C: Yes. O: You reared your children in the '30's then? C: '30s and '40's. O: What activities were they involved in and how did you plan them? C: Well, when we moved on 9th Street, I had enro lled Susan in P.K. Yonge, and she went from Kindergarten and graduated from P.K. Yonge. Celia was enrolled in P.K. Yonge, and she went from Kindergarten to fourth grade, and then she moved to Finley. My oldest son was enrolled at P.K., but he only went there two years. When we moved on the Boulevard, he went to Kirby Smith. Tommy, my youngest son, went to Kirby Smith, because we lived over in the North East area. And Fred, Celia and Tommy all graduated from G.H.S., but Susan went all the way through P.K.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: You said you were a member of the Wome n's Club, and the Women's Club sponsored Little Women. Were your daughters active in Little Women? C: Yes, Celia and Susan. Fred and Tommy both played football in high school and little league baseball. When Tommy was playing baseball, I was the official scorer, I learned how to score baseball and I kept score for his little t eam. His daddy could not come and be there that time of the day, because the laundry was filled, so mother went. O: When Gainesville was small at that time, we re your children able to get to these activities by themselves? C: Well, Susan used to catch the bus and ride it to University and walk to P.K. Yonge. O: Where was P.K. Yonge located at that time? C: The original building? O: The original building. C: It was on 13th Street and... O: About 8th Avenue I believe, or 5th Avenue, the original P.K. Yonge. And how about the other children, when they went to G.H.S? C: Well, let s see now. Fred had a car when he was 16, and Susan could drive, but she went to P.K. Yonge. They had bicycles. I know the boys would ride bicycles. They would catch rides or I would take them. Because G.H.S. m oved to 13th Street, and that is where they went. Not where I went on University Avenue. They went on to G.H.S. on 13th Street. O: So it was further away from their home then? C: And there was a car pool in the neighborhood. We would take turns. O: What do you mean by car pool? C: Well, for instance, there were four of Fred's friends that lived over there, and I would maybe drive one week, and another mother another wee k, and another mother or an older sister or something like that. O: So what activities were your children involved in both in school and out of school?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: Well, Celia took dancing from the Buchanan sisters in high school. Fred was in the Honor Society, but I do not know that they were invol ved in clubs or anyt hing like that. I do not think they had clubs. I know they did when I was in high school. O: What kind of clubs did they have when you were in high school? C: Well they had Aran Akbar for the boys and Hi -Y, and LSS, and HAWK. They were some of the local little clubs and they had names and all. O: What was Hi-Y? What was that part of? C: That was, I think the student had to have a cer tain grade to belong to it. It was not a social club. It was in a way, but it was more of a service club. O: And that was part of school. And these other clubs you mentioned? C: They were just social. O: They were social clubs outside of school? C: Yes, a group would organize a club and give it a name. O: And you had your social activities. C: Yes. O: And were your children part of the same clubs when they were growing up? C: No, they were not in existence then. I do not know if the Hi-Y was or not. I really do not think it was. There was a Hi-Y and a Tri-Hi-Y, one was for boys and one was for girls. O: What social clubs did you belong to? Did you belong to one of these social clubs? C: No, I did not. O: You did not belong to any of those social clubs? They were here but you did not belong to any of them? C: No. O: So, you do not think that your children had some of these same clubs? C: I do not think so.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: How did they occupy their time? Did any of them have after school jobs, or did they work with their father? C: The boys worked at the laundry with their fa ther. And one summer, Tommy worked with a roofing company. They worked every summer, they just did not sit around. He worked with a roofing company, but most of the time, they worked there at the laundry, driving trucks or picking up dirty laundry or working on a route. Susan and Celia worked at home, and helped with the housework, even though I had a cook, they helped with the housework. O: Did you have the same cook for an extended time? C: I did. The last one I had was Ida. She wo rked for me until Tommy was 25, she worked for me 26 years. And the dearest person, a real person. O: What was her name? C: Ida Hall. O: Is she still living? C: No. O: What were her duties, beside a cook? Did she have anything else to do beside the cooking? C: To take care of Tommy. She was his second mother. When I would go off on a trip with Fred or anything, Ida would just come and stay in the house with the children. O: So she would run the whole household while you were gone? C: Yes. O: Did you and your husband do a lot of traveling? C: Well, yes and no, we did. You know we went on trips and went to laundry conventions and in the summer, and when my children were small, mother and daddy had built a house out at Kingsley Lake, so in the summer, my sister Ethe l, my sister Nathalie and myself, we would go out there with our children and stay all su mmer. And at that time, there was Camp Blanding, and Nathaline's husband was in the Navy, so she had access to Camp Blanding, so we could go over there to the picture show and go shopping at the commissary. Then mother and daddy built a home in Waynesville, and I w ould usually go every summer and stay a month up there, with Ida to ta ke care of Tommy. Then Fred and I went on a couple of

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 cruises in the Caribbean, and laundry conventions . We went to New York for plays with friends. Not any long, extended trips, other th an when I would take the children and we would go either up to the lake or up to Waynesville, North Carolina. O You would go up there, just you and the ch ildren, and your husband would stay here? And would he join you up there at any time? C: No, he did not like the mountains. O: What about the lake? C: Oh yes, every weekend, it was so close. O: But essentially, he stayed home and took care of business while you were at Waynesville. C: Yes, the laundry, because Daddy had retired at that time, and mother and daddy lived up there six months of the year. O: They lived where? C: In Waynesville, North Carolina. O: In Waynesville? Do you still have any of your... C: We still have that home, but my children and Nathaline's and Ethel's children are up there now. O: As a child, do you remember taking any trips with your family? C: Only to south Georgia to see my grandmother's uncles, mother's uncles that lived up there. And that was around Adele, Georgia, out in the country. O: How did you travel? How did you get there? C: In that Buick I was telling you about with the jump seat. O: Was there a back seat besides the jump seat? C: Oh yes, it was just like a front and back seat, and then the jump seats were attached. O: How did you carry your luggage in that car?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: It did not have a trunk that I remember, but it had to didn't it? Well, where did we keep the Isinglass that we needed when it rained that we would put up? The curtains, I don't know if we kept them under the seat or just where. I do not remember having a trunk. O: Did you have special clothing that you wore since it was all open and you got a lot of wind and everything? C: No. O: Just your regular clothing? C: Yes. O: Did you usually wear hats when you were going out? C: No, I did not. My mother did, though. O: Growing up, did you always wear dresse s or did you sometimes wear long pants? C: Oh, never, never. But I can remember the l ong stockings we had to wear in the winter time, and you had to wear long underwear, and it was aw ful trying to get them up and they were buttoned to the waistband. Didn't you ever have to wear those? O: No. How did you heat your home when you were living on Arredondo? C: We had a big heater stove in the living room and then a fire place in the parlor, and then upstairs in the dressing room, we had a little, what they called a hot stove, you could put newspaper. It give out a lot of heat. We di d not have fire places in bedrooms and certainly on the sleeping porch we had nothing, you know. O: Must have been awfully cold sometimes. C: It was, but in the wintertime, mother put feather beds on every bed, and you would just sink down into that feather mattress, and get so warm and toasty. O: Where did she keep her feather mattresses when it was not... C: Well, downstairs, the sleeping porch was over a screened back porch and a great big room and that was our storage. If we had an attic , it was not an attic you would go up in, and that is were we would store things, and that is where she kept them. O: Did she make her feather beds, her feather mattresses?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: No, I do not think so. O: Did you all have chickens in your... C: Yes, in the back yard, and you know, mother would kill them and we would eat them. She cooked on a wood stove. O: On a wood stove. Do you remember if the chic kens were they allowed to run loose or where they in a fenced in area? C: I think they were in a fenced in area. But everybody, back then had chickens. O: Whose responsibility was it to kill the chickens? C: Mother's. O: Do you remember her preparing the chickens? C: I do. I used to cry every time she had to kill one, but I sure could eat it. She would ring the neck and then put them down in hot water, which made plucking them easier. O: That would make the feathers come out easier? C: Yes. O: Did she teach you how to... C: No, no. O: By the time you were doing that, that was not the way... C: You bought them from the grocery store already dressed. O: After you got married where did you do your shopping, your groceries and things? C: At the Piggly Wiggly, which was up on the square. O: Where was that located? C: It was on the east side of the square between University and Union. It was on E. Main Street. And on the corner of East Main and University was Baird Hardware, and next to it

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 was Piggly Wiggly, and then next to that was Ge orge Dell's and he specialized in what we now call gourmet groceries. And then McCrory's, and on the other corner was Phifer's State Bank. O: What about your clothes and things like that? Where would you buy them? C: Wilson's, and Geigers, and Laniers and Ms. Cherry's and Ruddy's sometimes Ruddy's. O: So a lot of the same stores were here afte r you were married that were here when you were younger? Are those stores still around today? C: No. none of them are around today. O: So you had to change your shopping habits , where you went to buy things since your children were young? C: Yes. O: Is there anything else that you want to te ll me about your memories of Gainesville and growing up here. C: I have lived here for 82 years. Peopl e will say, do you know where Stoneridge, or do you know where something I have never heard of th em. Gainesville is so large now, and so full of subdivisions and areas that it is just bewildering to me. The only good thing I can say is with the quadrant system, if they say it is in the North West, or the No rth East, or the South West or the South East, then you have a vague idea of the direction and the area it is in. O: What did you have here before the quadrant system? C: The names of streets, like Arredondo, and Pl easant, and Garden, and Mechanic, streets like that. So many of them over in Highlands were named. I only can remember the streets that were right around where I lived at that time I was growing up. But we all thought it was awful, you know, when the quadrant system came, because we had such pretty names of streets. O: What about the telephone system? When you first telephoned you said you had to have a crank. Then after that what kind of a system did you have? C: Well, you know, a telephone, and you would pick it up and you could dial on it. But it was just an upright. Not like they have now where you punch and all that. O: Did there used to be party lines? Do you remember party lines?

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: No I do not. O: Was University Avenue always paved? C: No. I can remember when it was not paved. It was paved a certain distance but it was not paved when we used to go camping in that pine forest (between what is now N.W. 11th and 12th Streets.) O: What about street lights? Do you rememb er whether or not there were street lights downtown when you were a child? C: I think there were street lights on the corners. O: You do not remember when there were not street lights? C: No, I do not. O: What about sidewalks? Was there ever a time when you remember when there were not sidewalks downtown? C: No. O: Would you please tell me now who your sisters married? C: My sister, Nathalie married Julian Fant, and he was a lawyer in Jacksonville, and they lived in Jacksonville. My sister, Ethel, married Marcus Milan, and they lived here in Gainesville. He was from Miami. And my brother married several times, so I can not remember all the names, but anyway, he lived his later years in Jacksonville, and married a girl from Blackshear, Georgia. O: What did he do? What was his occupation? C: Laundry. The laundry business and dry cleaning. O: You had four children. Who all did they marry? C: My oldest daughter, Susan, married Tommy Rogers from Gainesville, and they were divorced about four years ago, and she married Andy Anderson from Chicago. Do you want me to tell you about the children? O: Yes, please.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 C: She and Tommy had three children. Susie, the oldest, went to Auburn and graduated in pharmacy, and she married Paul Carpenter from Dothan, Alabama, and he also graduated from Auburn in pharmacy, and they now live in Savannah, Georgia and have two children, Mary Hanna and Parker. Then her daughter Vi cky, went to Central Florida University in Orlando, and she graduated from there in accounting, and at college she met Frank Young from Miami. He is part Cuban and Chinese. He was in accounting, and they married and lived in Orlando. He now is in the law firm w ith my son, Fred, in Jacksonville. They have two children, Jessica, and Alica, two daughters. Celia has never married. At one time she was a nurse, then she went into education, and she has taught school for about thirty years. She can retire next year. She taught at Jack sonville Beach, and she now is teaching in Melrose. Tommy, my youngest son, married Coll een Coward from Gainesville. And they have two daughters, Jennifer, a nd Brittany. Jennifer graduates this year from Oak Hall, and she has been accepted at the University of Alabam a. They have a course there which she is very interested in. Brittany is in the 10th gr ade at Oak Hall. Did I tell you about Lamar, Susan's son? O: No. C: I should go back, Fred and Barbara... O: You have not told about Fred and Barbara. C: They have two children, Kelly, the oldest, a nd Fred III. Kelly married Bobby Steig, and they live in Jacksonville and they have a daughter Sarah. They are expecting another baby in May. Fred III is here at the University in veterinary school. Susan's son, Lamar, is a distributor for Blacksouth, which is a pharmaceutical company. He lives in Lakeland, and they have a son, Jack, a year old. O: Well. C: I think that is it. O: Well, I think that covered them all. Y ou and your children are fairly well scattered now, although they are still in Florida. But times have changed. Your grandchildren, your greatgrandchildren, and your female grandchildren, some of them are working now, outside the home. Are they working outside the home? C: Only Susie Carpenter that lives in Savanna h. She teaches chemistry in Armstrong College in Savannah, which is a branch of Georgia.

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Interview with Lois Beville Cone March 30, 1995 O: Well you have certainly seen a lot of changes in Gainesville, from a small town to a much larger town, where you used to know practically everybody, and now it is hard to see them. We certainly appreciate your taking the time and giving us this information, and I know that future generations will be very interested in it, and perhaps even your great-greatgrandchildren will want to come back someday and listen to what their grandmother had to say about growing up. C: I hope so, I have enjoyed it, I really have.