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Interview with Jack Moore

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Title:
Interview with Jack Moore
Creator:
Clayton, James E. ( Interviewer )
Marston, Ruh C. ( Transcriber )
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
Matheson Historical Center
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Florida
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua

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Source Institution:
Matheson History Museum
Holding Location:
Matheson History Museum
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Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Interview with Jack Moore 10
May 27, 2005

M: He was never associated with the College of Architecture.

C: He was only with the Board of Control, is that correct?

M: Yes. Rudolph Weaver passed away during the war, approximately in 1941, I
guess, and Fulton was named his successor as Architect to the Board at that time.
He stayed in the position for approximately twenty years. After he went on the
Board of Regents and they wanted to move the office to Tallahassee and Mr.
Fulton didn't want to move and was near retirement, he stayed on and worked just
as an architect at the University for a little while. Jeff Hamilton succeeded him as
Architect for the University. Forrest Kelly, who was the former partner of
Sanford Goin before the war, at the time was the architect to Dade County School
Board, and he was appointed as Mr. Fulton's successor. Actually, he stayed in the
office longer than Mr. Fulton or Mr. Weaver.

C: Did he stay in Gainesville or did he move to Tallahassee?

M: He went to Tallahassee. His office was always in Tallahassee. Of course, he had
the responsibility for most of the new campuses the University of South Florida,
the University of Central Florida, and Florida Atlantic.

C: During your career as an architect with Sanford Goin and then later, I guess, with
other associates, I'm sure you designed and built a number of residences here in
Gainesville, didn't you?

M: Yes.

C: Can you give me the names of some of the houses that you designed and built?

M: Some of the earlier ones were the Peck house, which is on the street I live on now.

C: That's a colonial type house, is that correct?

M: Yes. A big house.

C: There were houses on that street before that one?

M: Yes, there were three or four houses actually. We did the house for my present
wife, the Hartman house, which is on the corer, the Welch house, which is across
the street, and the George house, which is down the street. The Montigue house
was also on that street.

C: Do you recall who was the architect for Benmont Tench's house?

M: Al Parker. Our firm did do a house for Benmont earlier. That's where his
children grew up in that neighborhood. Parker was an outstanding architect. He






Interview with Jack Moore 7
May 27, 2005

at that time that rationing by the federal government would only permit one part
of it to be built to begin with. They cut it in half and started one part but they
got approval to go ahead with the whole building before that was done.

C: Do you remember who the structural engineer for that building was?

M: Actually, I did most of the structural myself. I sort of specialized in structural
design when I was in school and also worked with two very good structural
engineers for about four or five months before I went into the Navy. They were
doing the Jacksonville Navy shipyard. One of those engineers was employed to
do design trusses for the gym. I didn't have that much experience in truss design.
It was a 212' clear-span truss, and I didn't want that responsibility, but I did the
remaining structural design.

C: John McLaughlin. Does that sound familiar to you?

M: No.

C: Do you remember his name?

M: I can't recall. He was not a local engineer.

C: He was from Jacksonville.

M: Yes.

C: What do you recall? Did you see that building to completion?

M: Yes. Actually, we finished the drawings and I went back to Orlando and worked
there for another several months. Then in September of 1947, they had taken bids
and were letting a contract, and Sanford Goin asked me to come back and join his
firm permanently and handle the construction administration, which I did.

C: What buildings were you working on then when you came back in '47?

M: Along that time, we were working on the Agriculture Arena building for the
Department of Agriculture out on Archer Road and the new Dairy Research
Center for the University of Florida on the road to La Crosse.

C: That Arena building is still there, isn't it?

M: Yes, that's still there.

C: That's the big pavilion with the open steel curved roof?


M: Yes.






Interview with Jack Moore 9
May 27, 2005

consolidated the Alachua and High Springs High Schools and was completed in
1956.

C: Fifty years old now?

M: Yes, in 2005. Originally the school was planned on the site where J.J. Finley
Elementary School is. It was a very limited site in a very swampy area, too, so it
was fortunate it was never built there. We didn't get very far with the plans but
just did some preliminary plans, but that was the idea to build it there. Then they
wanted to start a new site. In fact, they held a bond issue and the bond issue
failed and then they came back later and got the high school on 13th Street.
Addison Pound, Sr., contributed more than half of the property. Actually he had a
cattle operation going on the land. The Turlington family was also there at that
site. I think it was about 20 acres that Addison Pound gave and the Turlington
site was purchased. That was probably another 10 acres.

C: When you speak of the Turlington site, you're speaking of the father and mother
of Ed Turlington?

M: Yes, Ed and Ralph Turlington.

C: They're both still living, I believe.

M: Yes.

C: I personally remember the Turlington house.

M: I don't know what happened to that.

C: I don't either.

M: I think it probably just was demolished. Ed would know.

C: You mentioned Mr. Rudolph Weaver as the Dean of Architecture, and he was
followed by Mr. Jeff Hamilton. Is that correct?

M: He was followed by William T. Arnett, I believe, who was in the original
graduating class of the School of Architecture.

C: Who was after him?

M: I believe it was an architect named Turpin Bannister. I'm not sure exactly where
he came from but it was somewhere in the north.


C: You mentioned Guy Fulton.






Interview with Jack Moore 12
May 27, 2005

C: That was on the corer there. Are there any other houses that you all might have
designed that you can point to and say, "I did that house"?

M: The Dr. Manus house over in the Highlands.

C: Did you ever teach at the University?

M: No, I never did. I've had a number of associates that taught there.

C: Sanford, I think, designed a house for himself down on the creek in the Duck
Pond area.

M: He took an old house, and he redid it. He put a wing on there for his office. Back
in those days, in 1947, when I came back to Gainesville from Orlando, he was just
moving in that house. He had actually moved in there but Sanford's father and
Sanford were in the old Baird building right down the street, upstairs over Mike's
Book Store. Mike was in the book store and hat and cigar business. Sanford's
father was there when he first came to Gainesville because the building where
Cox Furniture Company was next door and is now owned by the McGurn's. It
was the Opera House back in those days, and his father ran the Opera House
because he had had some training in stage design and that type of thing. When
his father died, Sanford continued that office. Of course, the office was closed
during World War II. After World War II, Sanford reopened the office in the
same place and was there until he moved to his residence on The Boulevard and
N.E. Fourth Avenue.

C: You mentioned the Baird building. Was that building on the south side of the
Square?

M: No, it's a block away from the Square.

C: A block away from the original Square. Now Baird Hardware was not the Baird
building you were referring to?

M: No. It was called the Baird building. Why I'm not sure! Apparently the Baird's
owned it.

C: You say you were raised in Lake City or in Jacksonville?

M: Mixed. Well, I was born in Jacksonville and was there until I went into high
school. Then I went to high school in Lake City.


C: You say your father was an engineer?






Interview with Jack Moore 1
May 27, 2005

C: My name is Jim Clayton. I am interviewing Jack Moore, who is one of the oldest
architects in Gainesville. I don't mean that in any way except complimentary.
We are here in my office at 111 S.E. First Avenue in Gainesville, and the date is
May 27, 2005. Jack came to Gainesville, as I understand it, in 1937. Jack, if I
may, let me ask you where are you from originally?

M: I was born in Jacksonville, but I finished high school in Lake City. That's when I
left home when I was 18 and came to the University of Florida.

C: What year did you come to the University of Florida?

M: 1937.

C: Were you a freshman when you came?

M: Yes. I was in the freshman class.

C: You've lived in Gainesville ever since then. Is that correct?

M: Well, I graduated in 1942 and a few months after that, I went into the Navy. I
came out of the Navy in 1945 and came back to Gainesville in 1946.

C: When you went into the Navy, had you already graduated from the University?

M: Yes.

C: What was your field?

M: I graduated in architecture.

C: Do you remember who the Dean of the School of Architecture was at that time?

M: Director Rudolph Weaver. He was the original Director, who came in 1927 to
start the School of Architecture and also was the Architect of the Board of Control
from that time until he died.

C: What was the nature of his responsibility as Architect of the Board of Control?

M: He was charged with the responsibility of designing all the buildings on state
campuses, which at that time was mainly the University of Florida, Florida State
College for Women, which is now FSU, and Florida A&M College. Also, he was
responsible for the Florida School for the Deaf & Blind, in St. Augustine.

C: Are there any buildings still standing on the campus today that were designed by
Mr. Weaver?






Interview with Jack Moore 14
May 27, 2005


M: No, I didn't.

C: Do you remember that the Elks Lodge was in an old residence?

M: Yes. It was obviously a big residence though. It probably belonged to one of the
big movers and shakers in Gainesville. I think it may have been the Dutton
house. Incidentally, we haven't mentioned that but we were the architects Goin
& Moore and John E. Pierson were both members of the Presbyterian Church, and
those two firms were selected to do the new church building, which was built on
2nd Avenue, two blocks away.

C: Did you ever know John Tigert? You mentioned his sister.

M: No, I never did know John.

C: As a freshman, were you still wearing rat caps?

M: Yes. We wore rat caps until the second semester. Of course, we kept our rat caps
because that was our means of transportation.

C: How was that?

M: Well, when you hitchhiked, you wore the rat cap and everybody recognized that
people with an orange rat cap were University students.

C: You didn't even have to thumb, did you? You would just stand there and
somebody would just pick you up and ask you where you were going.

M: Right. 13th Street then was 9th Street and the University Avenue corner was the
main thing going north or south. A good hitching place. That was my means of
transportation all the way through school.

C: Where did you go? Back to Lake City?

M: Lake City, yeah.

C: Did you have any trouble getting a ride?

M: No, not really. Always within an hour or so.

C: In about an hour, somebody would come and pick you up and find you were
going to Lake City and they would take you up there.

M: Yes.






Interview with Jack Moore 19
May 27, 2005

that has done all of our work and we would like to continue to use them," so that
was acceptable to them to do only the structural engineering.

C: Jack, if you don't mind, can you tell me your date of birth.

M: Yes, February 28, 1919.

C: I really appreciate your taking your time to do this and when we get it typed up, I
will submit it to you for editing before we publish it and deliver it to the
Matheson. Thank you again, very much. I really appreciate it.






Interview with Jack Moore 15
May 27, 2005

C: You went up 441.

M: Through High Springs.

C: How long did it take you to drive up there?

M: A little over an hour. I tell you, the first trip I made was when I had decided to
come to Gainesville. I had never been to the University before. I decided to
come here and look for a job. My parents couldn't support me at all and told me I
was on my own. I caught a ride in Lake City in a convertible car of some kind. It
was a young fellow and he had a girl friend in the front seat. He drove to
Gainesville in 45 minutes and I've never been able to drive that in that short a
time, even on the interstate. I don't know how we got here in 45 minutes!

C: Now, did you get a job here?

M: Yes, I got a job. Back then they had National Youth Administration that put
people to work, I guess, and helped students. You had to work out as much as
possible. They would allow you to work ten hours a week.

C: What kind of work did you do?

M: The pay was 250 an hour. I first started out working at the University dairy farm,
not the dairy farm but by the dairy farm, right behind where the auditorium is
now. The College of Music is there. A little bit south of that was the Nutrition
Lab, where they experimented in nutrition mainly for the cows, etc. I worked
there for the first year. When I came back the next year, Dr. Gaddom, who was
head of the Astronomy and what they called Physical Science, a general college
course, asked me to come to work with him. I wound up as a sophomore teaching
freshmen physical science, and I never studied astronomy in my life. It was an
easy study for me and I made good grades in it and didn't have any trouble, so I
wound up teaching, giving special instruction to the freshmen in that course. I
stayed there for a couple years and then they stopped that and I went to work for
the Board of Examiners in the Seagle Building. I worked there until I graduated.

C: Where did you live when you first came to Gainesville?

M: I lived in a boarding house on Washington Street almost across from Language
Hall, the main administration building at that time.

C: Washington Street would be about 17th Street today? Probably 15th Street.

M: 15th Street.


C: Do you remember who the owner was?






Interview with Jack Moore 13
May 27, 2005

M: Yes. He was Assistant City Engineer in Jacksonville. We were hit by the
Depression, as were a lot of other people, and he went back to the farm where he
was raised.

C: The city didn't need engineers when they didn't have the money to pay for
people.

M: That's right.

C: As architects, did you and Sanford have anything to do with the redesign of
downtown Gainesville?

M: Not really.

C: When the city decided to condemn so many of the downtown buildings and
redesign the mall and all that stuff down there, you didn't have anything to do
with it?

M: No. Before that time, we did a major renovation for the Wilson Department Store
on the northwest corner of University Avenue and N.E. lst Street. I did a redesign
for the Baird Hardware Company. It was a whole block. That was done just
before the new mall was built. The city was already on the downgrade at that
time and when the new mall was built, Sears moved out and Penney's moved out,
and the hardware company decided to close the doors.

C: Did you do the old Penney building?

M: We did the old Penney building.

C: That building was located at the intersection of W. University Avenue and 2nd
Street. Do you recall what was on that site before the Penney building was there?

M: I think it was a residence. I do recall that diagonally across the street was the
Presbyterian Church, which was one of the oldest buildings in Gainesville. When
I was a student and that church was still active, straight across the street, which
would have been just east of the Penney building, was the old Elks Lodge. The
Presbyterian Church, I guess, owned that because I went to Sunday School classes
there when I was a student. Billy Matthews was the Sunday School teacher and
Benmont Tench was in that same Sunday School class. He was a freshman the
same time I was.

C: You and Benmont were the same age.

M: Yes.


C: Did you attend his wedding?






Interview with Jack Moore 5
May 27, 2005


C: Oh, Sanford Goin's father.

M: Yes. His father was the architect. Sanford was just starting out to practice
architecture and became a registered architect shortly, even during the time they
were doing that plan, so his name is on the plan as an associate, but he wasn't
actually registered.

C: You graduated in '42 and went right into the service. Is that correct?

M: Yes.

C: You served in the Navy.

M: I served three years in the Navy in the South Pacific.

C: Did you see action in the Navy?

M: Oh yes. I was in five major landings on islands in the Pacific. I was on the
Attack Transport U.S.S. Pierce. In a couple of those, I was in the first waves that
went in. I was assigned to a Marine unit to navigate the amtracks, which were
amphibious landing crafts for travel on land or water.

C: Are they what were called ducks or something like that?

M: It wasn't the duck. The duck had wheels and amtracks had tracks.

C: I see. Your job was operating the amtrack.

M: No. We were supposed to help them navigate, to find the right beach, and fire the
rocket launchers.

C: You served for three years in the Navy.

M: Yes. I went to Midshipman school at Columbia University as an apprentice
seaman and wound up as a Lieutenant.

C: You came back to Gainesville when you were discharged.

M: Not to Gainesville. I came to Orlando and worked for a firm there and they had
the job of planning the University gymnasium, which was the first building that
was constructed at the University of Florida after the war. The firm had some
help problems and Mr. Fulton asked Sanford Goin to take over that particular job
and see it through, so I came to Gainesville to work in his office.






Interview with Jack Moore 16
May 27, 2005

M: Mrs. Gordy. She was there for a long time after I came back to Gainesville.

C: Is the house still there?

M: Yes, the house is still there. When I was a sophomore, three other students, who
were all in agriculture, and I had an opportunity to buy out a boarding house. We
weren't buying the property but the business, on University Avenue right across
from Language Hall, which is now the Episcopal Student Center. The other three
partners graduated a year before I did. I stayed on but I had some other fellows
that took my place. David Jones, with whom you are familiar at our Kiwanis
Club, was one of the people that took it over. There were three boys. One of
them was a brother of one of the original partners. They ran it for another couple
years. Two of the boys were killed in action.

C: Do you remember Ray Brennan?

M: Yes.

C: He had a shop.

M: His bicycle shop was a block and a half west of where our boarding house was.

C: Did you get to know him at all?

M: No, not really. He was a character, I know.

C: He was a very eccentric individual.

M: He stayed there a long time. He was there when I came back.

C: Was Wild Bill Carlton on the campus when you were there?

M: Yes, he was one of my professors.

C: Did he not live somewhere in that very close vicinity that you described when you
were on Washington Street?

M: If he did, I wasn't aware of it. There were some professors a couple blocks north
on Washington Street. There were some fairly nice houses along there.

C: How about Dr. Roux? Was he still there? There was a Roux Street right by
Washington Street. You didn't know him?


M: No.






Interview with Jack Moore 8
May 27, 2005


C: Do you recall what other architects may have come along about that time in
Gainesville, besides Sanford and you?

M: Well, John E. Pierson was still actively practicing. He was also a partner in the
Kirkpatrick Pierson Construction firm. They did a lot of residential work and
most of his work was designing the residences that they built. They did F.H.A.
financed houses.

C: You did a lot of work for the school board, did you not? You and Sanford?

M: Yes. Sanford was the architect to the School Board. Back in those days, they had
a private architect. They didn't have a staff for the School Board. Of course, that
was before the Florida Minimum Foundation was established in the state and
there was very little school construction. The first project we did was in 1950, or
it could have been '49. The Stephen Foster School and an addition to the Sidney
Lanier School were the first school construction after World War II.

C: You've done a lot of other schools, haven't you?

M: Oh yes. The firm has done virtually all of the elementary schools, and there must
be fifteen or twenty elementary schools in the county, including P.K.Yonge High
School.

C: Give me the names of some of the other elementary schools that you all worked
on.

M: The first one was J.J. Finley. That was done before the war. We did do some
additions, starting out in 1950. There were several additions to the Sidney Lanier,
which was built in 1939. Stephen Foster School was a complete elementary
school. Prairie View was somewhat later.

C: Idlewild?

M: Yes. Idlewild and Terwilliger Elementary Schools were basically built from the
same plans in 1964. There were also three schools done similar to the Glen
Springs School. Glen Springs, Prairie View, and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
School.

C: I think they consolidated Alachua and High Springs and some of those other
schools like that. Did you have anything to do with Santa Fe or with G.H.S.
building?

M: Yes. We were architects for Santa Fe and G.H.S. G.H.S. was done and
completed in 1955, so it's fifty years old this year. Santa Fe High School






Interview with Jack Moore 18
May 27, 2005

building in 1923. All the additions and renovations to that building since that
time have been done by Goin & Moore Architects and its successors.

C: Let me ask you this. Maybe it's not a fair question, but what do you consider to
be the most successful project?

M: Well, that would probably be the Reitz Union Building. The main reason is that
Bill Ryan, who was the Director of the Union, was a very brilliant person. He
was in the University during the war. I think he had some kind of disability that
kept him out of the service, and he was president of the student body at that time.
Billy Mathews, the first Director, became a Congressman and Bill Ryan replaced
him and served as Director for many years. He did the most thorough job in
trying to plan what he wanted in a new building. He spent a good many years
planning it because they didn't have the funds to do it for a long time. It was one
of the things that was so successful because it was well planned as to what he
wanted. It is a very complex building in that it houses so many different facilities
from motel rooms to food service, an auditorium, campus recreation, student
offices, and a theater.

C: Your firm was the architect?

M: It was a joint venture, consisting of Moore and May Architects, of Gainesville,
and Barrett, Daffin and Bishop Architects and Engineers, of Tallahassee. Back in
those days, the appointment of architects of state buildings was done politically.
When Farris Bryant was governor, I had supported him one time before he was
elected. The firm mentioned above, in Tallahassee, was asked by the governor's
office to associate with us because of the size of the job.

C: The site was not a really good site to build a building like that on, was it?

M: Well, there were a limited number of sites. They wanted it to be relatively central
because it has so many things that all the students use it for.

C: But considering this area, it was on a pretty severe hill and had ponds around it
and stuff like that.

M: That's right. It had a sink hole and pond right close to the building, but as far as
the foundation was concerned, it was done successfully. That was one of the
things that the governor's chief of staff, Jimmy Kynes, called the office to tell us
we had been selected as one of the firms to do that project. He said, "We'd like
for you to know that we use the engineering firm of Jim Wellman." He was a big
engineer down in Lakeland, and was Farris Bryant's campaign manager. We
found out they normally do phosphate plants and that type of thing. They had
structural engineers and mechanical engineers, too, but they didn't normally do
commercial buildings. I said, "We don't have any structural engineers on our
staff but we do have a very fine mechanical and electrical engineer in Gainesville






Interview with Jack Moore 11
May 27, 2005

was one of my professors when I was at school. He had just finished school
himself and was a very good student. He had a 40-year career in Miami and then
he came back and he is now a professor of architecture. He was a practicing
architect for many years.

C: He is still a professor of architecture?

M: He is still an adjunct senior professor.

C: Well, he ought to be retired, shouldn't he?

M: He should be. He has a special title and I guess some special dispensations. He's
a nationally known residential designer. He had many of his projects published in
national magazines.

C: I know that you designed my father's house.

M: Yes. We did. That was out in Golfview.

C: No, in Black Acres.

M: Oh yes. But he lived in Golfview, didn't he?

C: Well, in Golfview. Guy Fulton did that house and he did the house across the
street.

M: Yes. As I said, he's done a number of houses in Golfview and he lived in
Golfview for many years.

C: That was Ellison Haines' house across the street from I can't remember the
name of the guy that my father bought that house from. Do you remember who it
was?

M: No. He was a professor at the University.

C: Yes. He was a professor.

M: He was one of my professors, but I can't think of it. He taught in the geography
department.

C: The house was unfinished. He lived in it unfinished, and if I'm not mistaken,
Sanford and you finished it and did some design work and additions to it and stuff
like that. Do you remember who designed the Tercel house?


M: No, I don't.






Interview with Jack Moore 3
May 27, 2005

M: None whatsoever.

C: What kind of problems did you have with drafting in an un-air-conditioned room?

M: Well, you just expected it. There wasn't air-conditioning anywhere. We had fans
and generally you had pretty good ventilation in the rooms because that's the way
the buildings were built.

C: Did you do most of your drafting in pencil or in ink?

M: Most of it was in pencil, although we did a few ink drawings.

C: Are there any of those old original student draftings around at the University?

M: I don't know of any of the student work, but the plans for the buildings have been
pretty well preserved. They are in the Plants & Grounds Department and have
been preserved. I think there are even plans for some of the buildings done by the
original architects. They were duplicated back in those days as blueprints.
Nowadays they still refer to prints as blueprints quite often, although I think that
is probably being phased out.

C: So they were blue on the background and the drawing itself was white? Is that
right?

M: That's right.

C: So it was sort of backwards.

M: Yes. Actually, my father was an engineer back in those days and he made his
blueprints by putting sensitized paper on the glass and putting it out in the sun and
leaving it for a certain amount of time and then putting it into a solution of
hydrogen peroxide chemicals that made it blue and white. The paper was just
white to begin with. It made white lines on a blue background.

C: How did the University develop their blueprints?

M: I don't remember when the printing machines came into vogue, but probably in
the 1940's there were blueprint machines.

C: Let me ask you again about how you made the blueprints when you were a
student. Do you recall?

M: We didn't usually do any blueprinting. I believe there were blueprint shops
around. Perry McGriff had one of the first blueprint shops in Gainesville. There
was no reason for us to have duplicate copies, such as blueprints.















MATHESON HISTORICAL MUSEUM

ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM


Interviewee:

Interviewer:

Transcriber:


Jack Moore

James E. Clayton

Ruth C. Marston


May 27,2005






Interview with Jack Moore 4
May 27, 2005

C: Who is Perry McGriff?

M: Perry McGriff was a longtime surveyor Perry, Sr. He started with another
surveying firm. I recently had the opportunity to ask them for a map of
Gainesville. They had an 1885 original map.

C: Do you recall the name of the surveying company that Perry McGriff was with
before it was Perry McGriff's? You said he was with somebody else. Was it
Flowers, by any chance?

M: I believe it was Flowers. Yes, it was.

C: What is the name of the surveying company today? You said you recently had a
chance to call them.

M: It was a couple years ago and I think since that time they've changed their name.
It's on N.W. 13t Street.

C: Now, you graduated in '41?

M: '42. It was a 5-year course back in those days.

C: Was Sanford Goin practicing architecture when you were in school here?

M: Yes. He was practicing, but I did not know him at that time. In 1940, I think
there were four firms practicing here. One was a firm whose architect was O.C.R.
Stagberg. He was a member of the faculty and later on he went into full-time
practice. He did a lot of residential buildings here. Another firm was John E.
Pierson. The firm was Pierson & Moore. I actually worked for a short time for
them when I was a senior in school. The fourth firm was Sanford Goin. At that
time it was Goin & Kelly. Forrest Kelly was a partner of Sanford Goin and later
was Architect to the Board of Regents for 30 years. The firm was formed back in
1911. To the best of my knowledge, that was the first architectural firm in
Gainesville.

C: Do you recall any of the buildings that they may have designed that are still
standing?

M: Yes. Newbold Goin did mostly residential buildings. He did do some buildings
at the Alachua County Fairgrounds, which is now Citizens Field, but I don't think
there are any of those original buildings still standing. He also did the American
Legion Building, which now is the Matheson Center.

C: Who was the architect?


M: Newbold C. Goin.






Interview with Jack Moore 6
May 27, 2005

C: You said Mr. Fulton. Earlier you talked about Mr. Weaver, the Dean of
Architecture, and Mr. Fulton became the Dean of Architecture after him?

M: Yes, I meant to clarify that. Mr. Fulton was a registered architect and was the
senior person under Mr. Weaver. Since Mr. Weaver's primary job was being
Dean of the School of Architecture, Mr. Fulton was his chief assistant and he was
responsible for planning and running the office for the architect to the Board of
Control. Mr. Fulton did a number of projects of buildings on his own in
Gainesville, particularly houses. He has done many very fine residences scattered
all around Gainesville. He had a nice residence of his own in Golfview
subdivision and did a number of the other older residences in that subdivision,
including your father's (E.A. Clayton's) residence.

C: You mentioned that the first building that was built on the campus of the
University of Florida after World War II was the Florida Gymnasium. Is that
correct?

M: Yes.

C: And when you say that, you're speaking of not the old Florida Gymnasium, which
was a brick building, but a new brick building to the south of it. Is that correct?

M: It was the third gymnasium. The original building in 1905 was one of the three or
four or five that were built within a year or two. There was the old gymnasium,
which was later designated when the women came as their gymnasium. I think it
was shortly after World War I that the second gymnasium, which I believe was a
prefabricated building, was brought in from another location. It was a steel
building that had mostly wood siding on it, but it was just simply a gymnasium
building. I don't think it even had any locker rooms, but it was the main
gymnasium when I was a student. The Florida Gymnasium is southwest of the
other buildings and adjacent to Florida Field.

C: How about the first gymnasium? How is it being used?

M: It is still used by the students. I am not sure for what purpose.

C: They were side by side.

M: Yes. The first gymnasium wasn't even large enough for a full basketball court, I
don't believe, and it had no seating capacity at all.

C: Now you came back to Gainesville during the time that they were planning the
Florida Gymnasium.

M: Right. Actually, I was the project architect in Sanford Goin's office. It was the
final plan. The design was already done and approved. Materials were so limited






Interview with Jack Moore 17
May 27, 2005

C: Who all do you recall that was in class with you? You mentioned David Jones, I
believe. Is he still around here?

M: Well, I know two of the architects who were from Jacksonville. Incidentally,
there were three of us in architectural school at the same time who lived within
four or five blocks of each other in Jacksonville. Of course, I left there and didn't
get back in touch with them until I came to school here. Two of them wound up
as partners in Kemp, Bunch & Jackson, which at one time was about the largest
firm in the state and is now the largest in Jacksonville.

C: Kemp & Bunch?

M: Kemp, Bunch & Jackson.

C: Did you know Mr. Kemp and Mr. Bunch?

M: Yes, but they were in the original class. Kemp was and Bunch was back in the
second or third class, and Jackson was a good bit younger. They were all
graduates of Florida but before my time. The next generation in that firm were
two members of my class, and they were partners in that firm. One of them was
President of the firm.

C: I think I've pretty well covered what I wanted to cover. If you've got anything
you'd like to add to it, I'll give you that opportunity, if you can think of some
incident or something like that that you remember.

M: You asked at the beginning about old buildings that Mr. Goin, Sr., Newbold Goin,
did. One of the buildings he did was the Pepper Printing Company, the
Gainesville Sun Pepper Printing Company. The original building was done in
1925, and they still have the drawings in the office.

C: In the Pepper office or your offices? Where are those drawings?

M: In the architect's office. Brame Architect is the successor to Goin.

C: And they still have those original drawings. Bill Pepper would be interested in
that.

M: Yes. Bill knows. We've had a long relationship with the Pepper family. At that
time, we did an addition just before they sold out to the New York Times.

C: Did you do the old State Theater?

M: On W. University? No. However, across the street from the old State Theater is
the First Baptist Church. Mr. Newbold Goin was the supervising architect on that






Interview with Jack Moore 2
May 27, 2005

M: Yes. Most of his time here was during the Depression, and there weren't too
many buildings, but two or three dormitories were constructed through the WPA,
which was a "pump priming" project during the Depression. I think mainly he
was involved with dormitories.

C: Can you recall which dormitories?

M: No, I don't know the names of the dormitories that well. There were three, I
think, originally, including Thomas Hall.

C: Was Sledd Hall designed by him, too?

M: Yes, I think Sledd was one of the newer ones.

C: That's one today, I think, that everybody admires because of all the stonework
over the entrances, and things like that.

M: Yes, I'm pretty sure that was one of them built during his jurisdiction.

C: How many students were at the University of Florida when you first came in
1937?

M: There were a little over 1,000 students in the freshman class. I remember that. I
think there were between 2,500 and 3,000 students total. At that time, there were
no women on the campus except for the few special exceptions.

C: Were there any women in architecture?

M: Yes. When I was there Mary Jane Tigert, who was the daughter of President
Tigert, was a student in the arts department. Ellen Moore (no relation) was the
first woman student in Architecture. I would say there weren't more than four or
five women students at that time in the whole University of Florida.

C: How well did you know Mary Jane Tigert?

M: Not real well. She was in the room right next to me day and night almost, in
Peabody Hall, where we spent our total time after we got into Architecture.

C: The School of Architecture was in Peabody Hall?

M: Yes. It was on the third and fourth floors. The fourth floor was really the attic.
The Dean's office was on the third floor, with the senior drafting room and also
the drafting room for the work he did for the Board of Control.


C: Was there any air-conditioning in those buildings at that time?




Full Text
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MATHESON HISTORICAL MUSEUM ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM Interviewee: Jack Moore Interviewer: James E. Clayton Transcriber: Ruth C. Marston May 27, 2005

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 1 C: My name is Jim Clayton. I am intervie wing Jack Moore, who is one of the oldest architects in Gainesville. I don’t mean that in any way except complimentary. We are here in my office at 111 S.E. First Avenue in Gainesvill e, and the date is May 27, 2005. Jack came to Gainesville, as I understand it, in 1937. Jack, if I may, let me ask you where are you from originally? M: I was born in Jacksonville , but I finished high school in Lake City. That’s when I left home when I was 18 and came to the University of Florida. C: What year did you come to the University of Florida? M: 1937. C: Were you a freshman when you came? M: Yes. I was in the freshman class. C: You’ve lived in Gainesville ever since then. Is that correct? M: Well, I graduated in 1942 and a few months after that, I went into the Navy. I came out of the Navy in 1945 and came back to Gainesville in 1946. C: When you went into the Navy, had you al ready graduated from the University? M: Yes. C: What was your field? M: I graduated in architecture. C: Do you remember who the Dean of the School of Architecture was at that time? M: Director Rudolph Weaver. He was the original Dire ctor, who came in 1927 to start the School of Architecture and also was the Architect of the Board of Control from that time until he died. C: What was the nature of his responsibility as Architect of the Board of Control? M: He was charged with the responsibility of designing all the buildings on state campuses, which at that time was mainly the University of Florida, Florida State College for Women, which is now FSU, and Florida A&M College. Also, he was responsible for the Florida School for the Deaf & Blind, in St. Augustine. C: Are there any buildings still standing on the campus today th at were designed by Mr. Weaver?

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 2 M: Yes. Most of his time here was du ring the Depression, an d there weren’t too many buildings, but two or three dormitori es were constructed through the WPA, which was a “pump priming” project duri ng the Depression. I think mainly he was involved with dormitories. C: Can you recall which dormitories? M: No, I don’t know the names of the dormito ries that well. There were three, I think, originally, incl uding Thomas Hall. C: Was Sledd Hall designed by him, too? M: Yes, I think Sledd was one of the newer ones. C: That’s one today, I thin k, that everybody admires beca use of all the stonework over the entrances, and things like that. M: Yes, I’m pretty sure that was one of them built during his jurisdiction. C: How many students were at the Univer sity of Florida wh en you first came in 1937? M: There were a little over 1,000 students in the freshman clas s. I remember that. I think there were between 2,500 and 3,000 students total. At that time, there were no women on the campus except for the few special exceptions. C: Were there any women in architecture? M: Yes. When I was there Mary Jane Tigert, who was the daughter of President Tigert, was a student in the arts department. Ellen Moore (no relation) was the first woman student in Architecture. I w ould say there weren’t more than four or five women students at th at time in the whole University of Florida. C: How well did you know Mary Jane Tigert? M: Not real well. She was in the room ri ght next to me day and night almost, in Peabody Hall, where we spent our total time after we got into Architecture. C: The School of Architecture was in Peabody Hall? M: Yes. It was on the third and fourth floors. The fourth floor was really the attic. The Dean’s office was on the third floor, with the senior drafting room and also the drafting room for the work he did for the Board of Control. C: Was there any air-conditioning in those buildings at that time?

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 3 M: None whatsoever. C: What kind of problems did you have w ith drafting in an un-air-conditioned room? M: Well, you just expected it. There wasn ’t air-conditioning anywhere. We had fans and generally you had pretty good ventilati on in the rooms because that’s the way the buildings were built. C: Did you do most of your draf ting in pencil or in ink? M: Most of it was in pencil, a lthough we did a few ink drawings. C: Are there any of those old original st udent draftings around at the University? M: I don’t know of any of the student work, but the plans fo r the buildings have been pretty well preserved. They are in th e Plants & Grounds Department and have been preserved. I think there are even pl ans for some of the buildings done by the original architects. They were duplicated back in those days as blueprints. Nowadays they still refer to prints as bl ueprints quite often, although I think that is probably being phased out. C: So they were blue on the background a nd the drawing itself was white? Is that right? M: That’s right. C: So it was sort of backwards. M: Yes. Actually, my father was an engineer back in those days and he made his blueprints by putting sensitized paper on th e glass and putting it out in the sun and leaving it for a certain amount of time a nd then putting it into a solution of hydrogen peroxide chemicals that made it blue and white. The paper was just white to begin with. It made white lines on a blue background. C: How did the University develop their blueprints? M: I don’t remember when the printing mach ines came into vogue, but probably in the 1940’s there were blueprint machines. C: Let me ask you again about how you ma de the blueprints when you were a student. Do you recall? M: We didn’t usually do any blueprinting. I believe there we re blueprint shops around. Perry McGriff had one of the first blueprint shops in Gainesville. There was no reason for us to have duplicate copies, such as blueprints.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 4 C: Who is Perry McGriff? M: Perry McGriff was a longtime surveyor – Perry, Sr. He started with another surveying firm. I recently had the oppor tunity to ask them for a map of Gainesville. They had an 1885 original map. C: Do you recall the name of the surveyi ng company that Perry McGriff was with before it was Perry McGriff’s? You said he was with somebody else. Was it Flowers, by any chance? M: I believe it was Flowers. Yes, it was. C: What is the name of the surveying co mpany today? You said you recently had a chance to call them. M: It was a couple years ago and I think since that time they’ve changed their name. It’s on N.W. 13 th Street. C: Now, you graduated in ? M: . It was a 5-year co urse back in those days. C: Was Sanford Goin practicing archit ecture when you were in school here? M: Yes. He was practicing, but I did not know him at that time. In 1940, I think there were four firms practicing here. On e was a firm whose architect was O.C.R. Stagberg. He was a member of the facu lty and later on he went into full-time practice. He did a lot of residential bu ildings here. Another firm was John E. Pierson. The firm was Pierson & Moore. I actually worked for a short time for them when I was a senior in school. The fourth firm was Sanf ord Goin. At that time it was Goin & Kelly. Forrest Kelly was a partner of Sanford Goin and later was Architect to the Board of Regents for 30 years. The firm was formed back in 1911. To the best of my knowledge, that was the first architectural firm in Gainesville. C: Do you recall any of the buildings that they may have designed that are still standing? M: Yes. Newbold Goin did mostly reside ntial buildings. He did do some buildings at the Alachua County Fairgrounds, which is now Citizens Field, but I don’t think there are any of those origin al buildings still standing. He also did the American Legion Building, which now is the Matheson Center. C: Who was the architect? M: Newbold C. Goin.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 5 C: Oh, Sanford Goin’s father. M: Yes. His father was the architect. Sanford was just star ting out to practice architecture and became a registered arch itect shortly, even during the time they were doing that plan, so his name is on th e plan as an associate, but he wasn’t actually registered. C: You graduated in and went right into the service. Is that correct? M: Yes. C: You served in the Navy. M: I served three years in th e Navy in the South Pacific. C: Did you see action in the Navy? M: Oh yes. I was in five major landings on islands in the Pacific. I was on the Attack Transport U.S.S. Pierce. In a couple of those, I was in the first waves that went in. I was assigned to a Marine un it to navigate the amtracks, which were amphibious landing crafts for travel on land or water. C: Are they what were called ducks or something like that? M: It wasn’t the duck. The duck had wheels and amtracks had tracks. C: I see. Your job was operating the amtrack. M: No. We were supposed to help them navigate , to find the right beach, and fire the rocket launchers. C: You served for three years in the Navy. M: Yes. I went to Midshipman school at Columbia University as an apprentice seaman and wound up as a Lieutenant. C: You came back to Gainesville when you were discharged. M: Not to Gainesville. I came to Orlando and worked for a firm there and they had the job of planning the University gymnas ium, which was the first building that was constructed at the University of Florida after the war. The firm had some help problems and Mr. Fulton asked Sanford Goin to take over that particular job and see it through, so I came to Gainesville to work in his office.

PAGE 7

Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 6 C: You said Mr. Fulton. Earlier you talked about Mr. Weaver, the Dean of Architecture, and Mr. Fulton became th e Dean of Architecture after him? M: Yes, I meant to clarify that. Mr. Fu lton was a registered architect and was the senior person under Mr. Weaver. Sin ce Mr. Weaver’s primary job was being Dean of the School of Architecture, Mr. Fulton was his chief assistant and he was responsible for planning and running the office for the architect to the Board of Control. Mr. Fulton did a number of projects – of buildings on his own in Gainesville, particularly houses. He has done many very fine residences scattered all around Gainesville. He had a nice residence of his own in Golfview subdivision and did a number of the other older residences in that subdivision, including your father’s (E.A . Clayton’s) residence. C: You mentioned that the first building that was built on the campus of the University of Florida after World War II was the Florida Gymnasium. Is that correct? M: Yes. C: And when you say that, you’re speaking of not the old Florida Gymnasium, which was a brick building, but a new brick building to the south of it. Is that correct? M: It was the third gymnasium. The origin al building in 1905 was one of the three or four or five that were built within a y ear or two. There was the old gymnasium, which was later designated when the wome n came as their gymnasium. I think it was shortly after World War I that the second gymnasium, which I believe was a prefabricated building, was brought in fr om another location. It was a steel building that had mostly wood siding on it, but it was just simply a gymnasium building. I don’t think it even had any locker rooms, but it was the main gymnasium when I was a student. The Fl orida Gymnasium is southwest of the other buildings and adjacent to Florida Field. C: How about the first gymnasium? How is it being used? M: It is still used by the students. I am not sure for what purpose. C: They were side by side. M: Yes. The first gymnasium wasn’t even large enough for a full basketball court, I don’t believe, and it had no seating capacity at all. C: Now you came back to Gainesville during the time that they were planning the Florida Gymnasium. M: Right. Actually, I was the project architect in Sanford Goin’s office. It was the final plan. The design was already done and approved. Materials were so limited

PAGE 8

Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 7 at that time that rationing by the federal government would only permit one part of it to be built to begin with. They cut it in half and started one part , but they got approval to go ahead with the wh ole building before that was done. C: Do you remember who the structural engineer for that building was? M: Actually, I did most of the structural my self. I sort of specialized in structural design when I was in school and also worked with two very good structural engineers for about four or five months before I went into the Navy. They were doing the Jacksonville Navy shipyard. On e of those engineers was employed to do design trusses for the gym. I didn’t have that much experien ce in truss design. It was a 212’ clear-span truss, and I didn’ t want that responsibility, but I did the remaining structural design. C: John McLaughlin. Does that sound familiar to you? M: No. C: Do you remember his name? M: I can’t recall. He was not a local engineer. C: He was from Jacksonville. M: Yes. C: What do you recall? Did you see that building to completion? M: Yes. Actually, we finished the drawi ngs and I went back to Orlando and worked there for another several months. Then in September of 1947, they had taken bids and were letting a contract, and Sanford Goin asked me to come back and join his firm permanently and handle the construc tion administration, which I did. C: What buildings were you working on then when you came back in ? M: Along that time, we were working on the Agriculture Arena building for the Department of Agriculture out on Arch er Road and the new Dairy Research Center for the University of Flor ida on the road to La Crosse. C: That Arena building is still there, isn’t it? M: Yes, that’s still there. C: That’s the big pavilion with the open steel curved roof? M: Yes.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 8 C: Do you recall what other architects ma y have come along about that time in Gainesville, besides Sanford and you? M: Well, John E. Pierson was still actively practicing. He was also a partner in the Kirkpatrick Pierson Construc tion firm. They did a lot of residential work and most of his work was designing the residenc es that they built. They did F.H.A. financed houses. C: You did a lot of work for the schoo l board, did you not? You and Sanford? M: Yes. Sanford was the arch itect to the School Board. Back in those days, they had a private architect. They didn’t have a st aff for the School Board. Of course, that was before the Florida Minimum Foundati on was established in the state and there was very little school construction. The first project we did was in 1950, or it could have been . The Stephen Fost er School and an addition to the Sidney Lanier School were the first school construction after World War II. C: You’ve done a lot of other schools, haven’t you? M: Oh yes. The firm has done virtually a ll of the elementary schools, and there must be fifteen or twenty elementary schools in the county, including P.K.Yonge High School. C: Give me the names of some of the ot her elementary schools that you all worked on. M: The first one was J.J. Finley. That was done before the war. We did do some additions, starting out in 1950. There were several additions to the Sidney Lanier, which was built in 1939. Stephen Foster School was a complete elementary school. Prairie View was somewhat later. C: Idlewild? M: Yes. Idlewild and Terwilliger Elementa ry Schools were basically built from the same plans in 1964. There were also three schools done similar to the Glen Springs School. Glen Springs, Prairie View, and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings School. C: I think they consolidated Alachua a nd High Springs and some of those other schools like that. Did you have anything to do with Santa Fe or with G.H.S. building? M: Yes. We were architects for Sant a Fe and G.H.S. G.H.S. was done and completed in 1955, so it’s fifty years ol d this year. Santa Fe High School

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 9 consolidated the Alachua and High Spri ngs High Schools and was completed in 1956. C: Fifty years old now? M: Yes, in 2005. Originally the school wa s planned on the site where J.J. Finley Elementary School is. It was a very limited site in a very swampy area, too, so it was fortunate it was never built there. We didn’t get very far with the plans but just did some preliminary plans, but that was the idea to build it there. Then they wanted to start a new site. In fact, they held a bond issue and the bond issue failed and then they came back later and got the high school on 13 th Street. Addison Pound, Sr., contributed more than ha lf of the property. Actually he had a cattle operation going on the land. The Tur lington family was also there at that site. I think it was abou t 20 acres that Addison Pound gave and the Turlington site was purchased. That was probably another 10 acres. C: When you speak of the Turlington site, you’re speaking of the father and mother of Ed Turlington? M: Yes, Ed and Ralph Turlington. C: They’re both still living, I believe. M: Yes. C: I personally remember the Turlington house. M: I don’t know what happened to that. C: I don’t either. M: I think it probably just was demolished. Ed would know. C: You mentioned Mr. Rudolph Weaver as the Dean of Architecture, and he was followed by Mr. Jeff Hamilton. Is that correct? M: He was followed by William T. Arnett , I believe, who was in the original graduating class of the School of Architecture. C: Who was after him? M: I believe it was an architect named Turpin Bannister. I’m not sure exactly where he came from but it was somewhere in the north. C: You mentioned Guy Fulton.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 10 M: He was never associated with the College of Architecture. C: He was only with the Board of Control, is that correct? M: Yes. Rudolph Weaver passed away during the war, approximately in 1941, I guess, and Fulton was named his successor as Architect to the Board at that time. He stayed in the position for approximately twenty years. After he went on the Board of Regents and they wanted to move the office to Tallahassee and Mr. Fulton didn’t want to move and was near re tirement, he stayed on and worked just as an architect at the University for a little while. Jeff Ha milton succeeded him as Architect for the University. Forrest Kelly, who was the former partner of Sanford Goin before the war, at the time was the arch itect to Dade County School Board, and he was appointed as Mr. Fulton’s successor. Actually, he stayed in the office longer than Mr. Fulton or Mr. Weaver. C: Did he stay in Gainesville or did he move to Tallahassee? M: He went to Tallahassee. His office was always in Tallahassee. Of course, he had the responsibility for most of the new campuses – the University of South Florida, the University of Central Florida, and Florida Atlantic. C: During your career as an arch itect with Sanford Goin and then later, I guess, with other associates, I’m sure you designed a nd built a number of residences here in Gainesville, didn’t you? M: Yes. C: Can you give me the names of some of the houses that you designed and built? M: Some of the earlier ones were the Peck house, which is on the street I live on now. C: That’s a colonial type house, is that correct? M: Yes. A big house. C: There were houses on that street before that one? M: Yes, there were three or four houses actually. We did th e house for my present wife, the Hartman house, which is on the corner, the Welch house, which is across the street, and the George house, which is down the street. The Montigue house was also on that street. C: Do you recall who was the archite ct for Benmont Tench’s house? M: Al Parker. Our firm did do a house for Benmont earlier. That’s where his children grew up – in that neighborhood. Pa rker was an outstanding architect. He

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 11 was one of my professors when I was at school. He had just finished school himself and was a very good student. He had a 40-year career in Miami and then he came back and he is now a professor of architecture. He was a practicing architect for many years. C: He is still a prof essor of architecture? M: He is still an adj unct senior professor. C: Well, he ought to be retired, shouldn’t he? M: He should be. He has a special title and I guess some special dispensations. He’s a nationally known residential designer. He had many of his projects published in national magazines. C: I know that you designed my father’s house. M: Yes. We did. That was out in Golfview. C: No, in Black Acres. M: Oh yes. But he lived in Golfview, didn’t he? C: Well, in Golfview. Guy Fulton did th at house and he did the house across the street. M: Yes. As I said, he’s done a number of houses in Golfview and he lived in Golfview for many years. C: That was Ellison Haines’ house across th e street from – I can’t remember the name of the guy that my father bought that house from. Do you remember who it was? M: No. He was a professor at the University. C: Yes. He was a professor. M: He was one of my professors, but I can’t think of it. He taught in the geography department. C: The house was unfinished. He lived in it unfinished, and if I’m not mistaken, Sanford and you finished it and did some de sign work and additions to it and stuff like that. Do you remember who designed the Tercel house? M: No, I don’t.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 12 C: That was on the corner there. Are there any other houses th at you all might have designed that you can point to and say, “I did that house”? M: The Dr. Manus house over in the Highlands. C: Did you ever teach at the University? M: No, I never did. I’ve had a number of associates that taught there. C: Sanford, I think, designed a house for himself down on the creek in the Duck Pond area. M: He took an old house, and he redid it. He put a wing on there for his office. Back in those days, in 1947, when I came back to Gainesville from Orlando, he was just moving in that house. He had actually moved in ther e but Sanford’s father and Sanford were in the old Baird building right down the street, upstairs over Mike’s Book Store. Mike was in the book store and hat and ci gar business. Sanford’s father was there when he first came to Gainesville because the building where Cox Furniture Company was next door and is now owned by the McGurn’s. It was the Opera House back in those days , and his father ra n the Opera House because he had had some training in stag e design and that type of thing. When his father died, Sanford continued that o ffice. Of course, the office was closed during World War II. After World War II, Sanford reopened the office in the same place and was there until he moved to his residence on The Boulevard and N.E. Fourth Avenue. C: You mentioned the Baird building. Wa s that building on the south side of the Square? M: No, it’s a block away from the Square. C: A block away from the original Square . Now Baird Hardware was not the Baird building you were referring to? M: No. It was called the Ba ird building. Why I’m not sure ! Apparently the Baird’s owned it. C: You say you were raised in La ke City or in Jacksonville? M: Mixed. Well, I was born in Jacksonville and was there until I went into high school. Then I went to high school in Lake City. C: You say your father was an engineer?

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 13 M: Yes. He was Assistant City Engineer in Jacksonville. We were hit by the Depression, as were a lot of other people, and he went back to the farm where he was raised. C: The city didn’t need engineers when they didn’t have the money to pay for people. M: That’s right. C: As architects, did you and Sanford have anything to do with the redesign of downtown Gainesville? M: Not really. C: When the city decided to condemn so many of the downt own buildings and redesign the mall and all that stuff dow n there, you didn’t have anything to do with it? M: No. Before that time, we did a majo r renovation for the Wilson Department Store on the northwest corner of University Avenue and N.E. 1 st Street. I did a redesign for the Baird Hardware Company. It wa s a whole block. That was done just before the new mall was built. The city was already on the downgrade at that time and when the new mall was built, Se ars moved out and Penney’s moved out, and the hardware company d ecided to close the doors. C: Did you do the old Penney building? M: We did the old Penney building. C: That building was located at the intersection of W. University Avenue and 2 nd Street. Do you recall what was on that si te before the Penney building was there? M: I think it was a residence. I do reca ll that diagonally acro ss the street was the Presbyterian Church, which was one of the oldest buildings in Gainesville. When I was a student and that church was still active, straight across the street, which would have been just east of the Penne y building, was the old Elks Lodge. The Presbyterian Church, I guess, owned that because I went to Sunday School classes there when I was a student. Billy Matthews was the Sunday School teacher and Benmont Tench was in that same Sunday School class. He was a freshman the same time I was. C: You and Benmont were the same age. M: Yes. C: Did you attend his wedding?

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 14 M: No, I didn’t. C: Do you remember that the Elks Lodge was in an old residence? M: Yes. It was obviously a big residence though. It proba bly belonged to one of the big movers and shakers in Gainesville. I think it may have been the Dutton house. Incidentally, we haven’t mentioned that but we were the architects – Goin & Moore and John E. Pierson were both members of the Presbyterian Church, and those two firms were selected to do the new church building, which was built on 2 nd Avenue, two blocks away. C: Did you ever know John Tigert ? You mentioned his sister. M: No, I never did know John. C: As a freshman, were yo u still wearing rat caps? M: Yes. We wore rat caps until the second semester. Of course, we kept our rat caps because that was our means of transportation. C: How was that? M: Well, when you hitchhiked, you wore th e rat cap and everybody recognized that people with an orange rat cap were University students. C: You didn’t even have to thumb, did you? You would just stand there and somebody would just pick you up and ask you where you were going. M: Right. 13 th Street then was 9 th Street and the University Avenue corner was the main thing going north or south. A good hitching place. That was my means of transportation all th e way through school. C: Where did you go? Back to Lake City? M: Lake City, yeah. C: Did you have any trouble getting a ride? M: No, not really. Always within an hour or so. C: In about an hour, somebody would co me and pick you up and find you were going to Lake City and they would take you up there. M: Yes.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 15 C: You went up 441. M: Through High Springs. C: How long did it take you to drive up there? M: A little over an hour. I tell you, the firs t trip I made was when I had decided to come to Gainesville. I had never been to the University before. I decided to come here and look for a job. My parents co uldn’t support me at all and told me I was on my own. I caught a ride in Lake City in a conver tible car of some kind. It was a young fellow and he had a girl friend in the front seat. He drove to Gainesville in 45 minutes and I’ve never b een able to drive that in that short a time, even on the interstate. I don’t know how we got here in 45 minutes! C: Now, did you get a job here? M: Yes, I got a job. Back then they had National Youth Administration that put people to work, I guess, and helped student s. You had to work out as much as possible. They would allow you to work ten hours a week. C: What kind of work did you do? M: The pay was 25 an hour. I first started out working at the University dairy farm, not the dairy farm but by the dairy farm , right behind where the auditorium is now. The College of Music is there. A little bit south of that was the Nutrition Lab, where they experimented in nutrition mainly for the cows, etc. I worked there for the first year. When I came back the next year, Dr. Gaddom, who was head of the Astronomy and what they calle d Physical Science, a general college course, asked me to come to work with him. I wound up as a sophomore teaching freshmen physical science, and I never studied astronomy in my life. It was an easy study for me and I made good grades in it and didn’t have any trouble, so I wound up teaching, giving special instruction to the freshmen in that course. I stayed there for a couple years and then they stopped that and I went to work for the Board of Examiners in the Seagle Bu ilding. I worked there until I graduated. C: Where did you live when you first came to Gainesville? M: I lived in a boarding house on Washi ngton Street almost across from Language Hall, the main administration building at that time. C: Washington Street would be about 17 th Street today? Probably 15 th Street. M: 15 th Street. C: Do you remember who the owner was?

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 16 M: Mrs. Gordy. She was there for a long time after I came back to Gainesville. C: Is the house still there? M: Yes, the house is still there. When I was a sophomore, three other students, who were all in agriculture, and I had an oppor tunity to buy out a boarding house. We weren’t buying the property but the busine ss, on University Av enue right across from Language Hall, which is now the Epis copal Student Center . The other three partners graduated a year before I did. I stayed on but I had some other fellows that took my place. David Jones, with whom you are familiar at our Kiwanis Club, was one of the people that took it ove r. There were three boys. One of them was a brother of one of the original partners. They ran it for another couple years. Two of the boys were killed in action. C: Do you remember Ray Brennan? M: Yes. C: He had a shop. M: His bicycle shop was a block and a half west of where our boarding house was. C: Did you get to know him at all? M: No, not really. He was a character, I know. C: He was a very eccentric individual. M: He stayed there a long time. He was there when I came back. C: Was Wild Bill Carlton on th e campus when you were there? M: Yes, he was one of my professors. C: Did he not live somewhere in that very close vicinity that you described when you were on Washington Street? M: If he did, I wasn’t aware of it. There were some professors a couple blocks north on Washington Street. There were some fairly nice houses along there. C: How about Dr. Roux? Was he still th ere? There was a Roux Street right by Washington Street. You didn’t know him? M: No.

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 17 C: Who all do you recall that was in class with you? You mentioned David Jones, I believe. Is he still around here? M: Well, I know two of the architects who were from Jacksonville. Incidentally, there were three of us in architectural school at the same time who lived within four or five blocks of each other in Jacksonville. Of c ourse, I left there and didn’t get back in touch with them until I came to school here. Two of them wound up as partners in Kemp, Bunch & Jackson, which at one time was about the largest firm in the state and is now the largest in Jacksonville. C: Kemp & Bunch? M: Kemp, Bunch & Jackson. C: Did you know Mr. Kemp and Mr. Bunch? M: Yes, but they were in the original cl ass. Kemp was and Bunch was back in the second or third class, and Jackson was a good bit younger. They were all graduates of Florida but before my time. The next generation in that firm were two members of my class, and they were partners in that firm. One of them was President of the firm. C: I think I’ve pretty well covered what I wanted to cove r. If you’ve got anything you’d like to add to it, I’ll give you th at opportunity, if you can think of some incident or something like that that you remember. M: You asked at the beginning about old bu ildings that Mr. Goin, Sr., Newbold Goin, did. One of the buildings he did was the Pepper Printing Company, the Gainesville Sun Pepper Printing Company. The original building was done in 1925, and they still have the drawings in the office. C: In the Pepper office or your o ffices? Where are those drawings? M: In the architect’s office. Bram e Architect is the successor to Goin. C: And they still have those original drawings. Bill Pepper would be interested in that. M: Yes. Bill knows. We’ve had a long re lationship with the Pepper family. At that time, we did an addition just before they sold out to the New York Times. C: Did you do the old State Theater? M: On W. University? No. However, acro ss the street from the old State Theater is the First Baptist Church. Mr. Newbold Goin was the supervising architect on that

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 18 building in 1923. All the additions and re novations to that building since that time have been done by Goin & Moore Architects and its successors. C: Let me ask you this. Maybe it’s not a fair question, but what do you consider to be the most successful project? M: Well, that would probably be the Reitz Union Building. The main reason is that Bill Ryan, who was the Director of the Union, was a very brilliant person. He was in the University during the war. I th ink he had some kind of disability that kept him out of the service, and he was president of the student body at that time. Billy Mathews, the first Director, becam e a Congressman and Bill Ryan replaced him and served as Director for many years. He did the mo st thorough job in trying to plan what he wanted in a new building. He spent a good many years planning it because they didn’t have the f unds to do it for a long time. It was one of the things that was so successful becau se it was well planned as to what he wanted. It is a very complex building in that it houses so many different facilities – from motel rooms to food service, an auditorium, campus recreation, student offices, and a theater. C: Your firm was the architect? M: It was a joint venture, consisting of Moore and May Architect s, of Gainesville, and Barrett, Daffin and Bishop Architects and Engineers, of Tallahassee. Back in those days, the appointment of architects of state buildings was done politically. When Farris Bryant was gove rnor, I had supported him one time before he was elected. The firm mentioned above, in Ta llahassee, was asked by the governor’s office to associate with us b ecause of the size of the job. C: The site was not a really good site to build a building like that on, was it? M: Well, there were a limited number of sites. They wanted it to be relatively central because it has so many things that all the students use it for. C: But considering this area , it was on a pretty severe hill and had ponds around it and stuff like that. M: That’s right. It had a sink hole and pond right close to the building, but as far as the foundation was concerned, it was done su ccessfully. That was one of the things that the governor’s chief of staff, Jimmy Kynes, called the office to tell us we had been selected as one of the firms to do that project. He said, “We’d like for you to know that we use the engineeri ng firm of Jim Wellman.” He was a big engineer down in Lakeland, and was Farris Bryant’s campaign manager. We found out they normally do phosphate plants and that type of thing. They had structural engineers and m echanical engineers, too, but they didn’t normally do commercial buildings. I said, “We don’t have any structural engineers on our staff but we do have a very fine mechanical and electrical engineer in Gainesville

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Interview with Jack Moore May 27, 2005 19 that has done all of our work and we would like to con tinue to use them,” so that was acceptable to them to do only the structural engineering. C: Jack, if you don’t mind, can you tell me your date of birth. M: Yes, February 28, 1919. C: I really appreciate your ta king your time to do this a nd when we get it typed up, I will submit it to you for editing before we publish it and deliver it to the Matheson. Thank you again, very mu ch. I really appreciate it.