Citation
Redressing Native American Oral Histories: Revitalization, Repatriation, and Responsible Sharing of Digital Cultural Heritage (Preliminary Proposal)

Material Information

Title:
Redressing Native American Oral Histories: Revitalization, Repatriation, and Responsible Sharing of Digital Cultural Heritage (Preliminary Proposal)
Creator:
Mahar, Ginessa
Birch, Stephanie
Collins, Perry
de Farber, Bess
Dinsmore, Chelsea
Durant, Fletcher
Hendrix, Deborah
Ma, Xiaoli
Ortiz, Paul
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Grant Application

Notes

Abstract:
The University of Florida seeks $199,772 to digitize and make accessible oral history interviews of its Native American History Project collection comprising 967 interviews recorded on audio cassette tapes housed within the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. The project is organized into six stages: 1) creation of a comprehensive inventory and database for the collection; 2) completion of vended digitization of all items in the collection; 3) audio optimization for digitized files; 4) completion of transcriptions of the audio files; 5) development of metadata and ingestion of digitized items into the University of Florida Digital Collections; and, 6) determination of permissions, delivery of digitized files to tribal organizations, and coordination to determine public and private access.
Acquisition:
Sponsor: Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Amount Requested: $199,772

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Creator/Rights holder. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Tax ID 59-0974739 Prefix Dr. Last Name Mahar City Gainesville Email gjmahar@ufl.edu [External Email]From: de Farber, Bess Gail To: Rojas,Juliana Subject: FW: Your Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Application Submission Date: Thursday, October 29, 2020 1:17:33 PM Attachments: image001.png We submitted Could you create a full application pdf from the content below? Then we can load this new pdf to the IR as a separate volume to the preliminary proposal that is already there. Thank you! From: Mahar,Ginessa J Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 1:00 PM To: de Farber, Bess Gail Subject: FW: Your Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Application Submission From: Doris Duke Charitable Foundation < mail@grantapplication.com > Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 12:58 PM To: Mahar,Ginessa J < gjmahar@ufl.edu > Subject: Your Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Application Submission Thank you for your submission. Your application has been submitted successfully. For your records, here is a copy of the contents of your application.CW Grant Application Upload FormThank You! Your application has been submitted.DDCF Grant Application Upload Form In order to save your work, or to save and return to your form at another time, you must click the "Save & Finish Later" button. Do not rely on using the "Next" button to automatically save your work. You must bookmark this page for future access to your form. Once you click "Submit," revisions to the online form will not be possible. If you would like to share a draft copy of the application with your colleagues at any time before final submission, click "Email Draft" at the top of any page of the online form. Organization Name University Of Florida Foundation Inc Primary Contact or Principal Investigator First Name Ginessa Suffix Title Anthropology Librarian Office Address George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117001 State FL Zip Code 32611-7001 Office Phone 352-273-2729 Program Administrator or Coordinator (if applicable)

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Prefix Dr. Email dchristie@uff.ufl.edu Prefix Dr. Email dchristie@uff.ufl.edu Prefix Dr. Email dchristie@uff.ufl.edu Prefix E-mail bhood@ufl.edu First Name David Last Name Christie Title Chief Financial Officer Office Phone 352-392-5475 Authorized Signatory/Grants and Contracts Administrator This person should have the authority to sign the grant agreement in the event of an award First Name David Last Name Christie Title Chief Financial Officer Office Phone 352-392-5475 Financial Contact First Name David Last Name Christie Title Chief Financial Officer Office Phone 352-392-5475 Public Relations/Media/Communications Contact This is the contact that could review and approve press releases about a grant, if the project is funded First Name Barbara Last Name Hood Title Director of Communications, Smathers Libraries Office Phone 352-273-2505 Project Title Limit 255 characters, including spaces Redressing Native American Oral Histories: Revitalization, Repatriation, and Responsible Sharing of Digital Cultural Heritage AttachmentsTitle File Name Proposal Narrative UF DDCF Project Narrative.pdf Executive Certification UF DDCF Executive Certification.pdf Project Budget and Budget Narrative UF DDCF Budget with Budget Narrative.pdf Files attached to this form may be deleted 120 days after submission.

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APPLICANT: University of Florida PROJECT DIRECTOR: Ginessa Mahar, Ph.D. E MAIL: gjmahar@ufl.edu ; ufproposals@ufl.edu TELEPHONE: 352 273 2729 AMOUNT REQUESTED: $ 200,000 Project Title: Redressing Native American Oral Histories: Revitalization, Repatriation, and Responsible Sharing of Digital Cultural Heritage PROJECT SUMMARY: The University of Florida seeks $ 200,000 to digitize and make accessible Doris Duke Charitable Foundation funded oral history int erviews from its Native Am erican History Project collection housed within the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program . The project is organized into seven stages: 1) creation of a comprehensive inventory and database for the collection; 2) completion of vended digitization of all items in the collection and delivery to originating communities ; 3) audio optimization for digitized files; 4) completion of transcriptions of the audio files; 5) development of metadata and ingestion of digitized items into the University of Florida Digit al Collections; 6) determination of permissions and coordination with originating communities to determine accessibility; and 7) engagement with the originating communities to facilitate academic and cultural reciprocal exchanges, including the digital rep atriation of oral histories and derivative files. PROJECT ACTIVITIES AND TIMELINE : The overarching goal of this project is to digitize, transcribe, and make accessible the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation funded interviews that are included in the Native America n History Project collection contained within the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) at the Universi ty of Florida (UF). Th is collection contains approximately 967 interviews originally funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) in cluding 48 interviews with the same Seminole interviewees from 1998 2000 . This resulted in a published compendium o f Seminole perspectives titled, Seminole Voices: Reflections on Their Changing Society 1970 2000 . Th e recordings of Native American interviewees housed within SPOHP represents the only DDCF funded collection of oral histories east of the Mississippi and includes Native voices from the Catawba, Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, and Lumbee, in addition to the Seminole. This project is a collaborative effort between SPOHP and the George A. Smathers Libraries (Li braries) which manages the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC). The following narrative outlines the scope of the proposed work and contains project specific details including a description of each activity , responsible units and personnel, and a justification for how each activity meets the objectives of the program. The first stage of the project is to build a comprehensive inventory and catalog for the collection. The initial inventory of audio tapes ha s been carried out by Deborah Hendrix ( Digital Humanities Coordinator , SPOHP ) . This inventory of 2,005 audio tapes , representing approximately 967 interviews , will serve as the basis for the collection s first catalog , to be created by Ginessa Mahar (Anthr opology Librarian, Libraries). Records management has been a challenge for the collection, and this project will enable the development of its first master catalog a critical component for any collection. SPOHP curates and maintains all physical materials associated with the collection, while the Libraries host and maintain the resulting digital collections in the UFDC under a sub collection titled Native People of the Americas . Mahar will create a central database for both the digital and physical col lection s , connecting materials from across mediums in a comprehensive manner . The database will allow for cross referencing between inventoried physical audio materials (i.e. origin al reels, cassette tape duplicates), print and electronic transcriptions, digitized media files (e.g. digital audio files, digitized images) , and other affiliated items (e.g. photographs, newspapers). Such a database will serve to enable proper curation an d management of the collection for generations to come. One student assistant, supervised by Mahar, will be hired to assist with the creation of the database (i.e. cross referencing inventories, catalogs, and digital files, data entry). Once complete, the database will facilitate the subsequent stages of the project,

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outlined below. Furthermore, the database will enhance the searchability of the collection, increasing accessibility and enabling further utility of the collection by tribal members, researcher s, and the public. Once digitized (see below section, Digitization Plan) , original digitized recordings will be archived, and copies delivered to the originating tribal communities (see section on Community Engagement) while copies of the audio files wil l undergo optimization. Optimization serves to organize and clarify the recorded material for ease of reference, transcription, and listening. Hendrix (SPOHP) will be responsible for audio optimization including adjusting audio levels, removing background noise, clipping empty track, etc. Additionally, Hendrix will merge or divide the digitized files based on content (i.e. interviews). For example, several interviews may have been recorded on one tape or an interview might occupy several tapes. Stud ent assi stants will be hired to support the audio optimization process and with archiving of the original digitized files. At this time, the number of recorded hours within the collection is unknown. Optimization will ensure that each and every recorded history is discoverable and easily accessible. After optimization is complete, the optimized files will then be used to create transcriptions. SPOHP staff maintains their own style guide for audio transcriptions and all transcribing will be completed in house. Each file will be transcribed, audit edited, and final edited alongside the audio each time to verify names, dates, decipher inaudible language and ensure non standa rd English, colloquial terminology, and context specific content (place names, nicknames) has been transcribed correctly. Currently, there are approximately 45 interviews recorded using an indigenous language . SPOHP staff will coordinate with the Associati on of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums (ATALM) to recruit translators to assist in the transcription process (see section on Community Engagement) . Paul Ortiz (Director, SPOHP and project Co director ) and Hendrix will be responsible for the recruiti ng and trainin g of student transcribers. Graduate Student C oordinator s will be hired each semester of transcription to assist with the management of student workers and with the quality control ( i.e. audit editing, final editing) of the resulting transcrip tions. Many of the interviews in the Native People of the Americas collection have been previously transcribed. However, upon review, extant transcripti ons have been deemed inadequate by SPOHP staff. In 2010 SPOHP staff developed and adopted a detailed, in transcription policies and processes. Transcribers in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s often paraphrased or altered entire sections of the narrator's comme nts. These practices, no longer acceptable under current professional standards, resulted in diluted, inaccurate, and misrepresented transcriptions of indigenous voices. Transcribing the project collection correct these injustices by being true to the original recordings. Student s recruited as transcribers will benefit personally and academically through the training and transcribing experiences associated with this collection. Once the transcription stage i s underway, abstracts of each interview will be created. Abstracts serve as summaries of interviews and feature important details such as the names of the participants, dates of the interview , and events discussed, as well as places featured in the intervi ew. The student transcribers hired for this project will write the abstracts for the interviews, which in turn will be used in the generation of the associated metadata that will accompany the audio files and transcriptions once ingested into the UFDC. The creation and editing of the abstracts will be coordinated by Ortiz and Hendrix in conjunc tion with Graduate Student C oordinators. Abstracts serve to enhance the discoverability of the interviews and the searchability of the collection. Additionally, they may assist the originating communities in determining the level of accessibility that is most appropriate for the content of each interview . Digitization and sharing of oral histories and interviews, particularly created in collaboration with indigenous communities, raise both legal and ethical questions regarding permissions. A nalysis of extant documentation and knowledge of the history of these collections indicates that legally UF may undertake both preservation and dissemination activities under U.S. copyright and contract law. Recognizing that such legal provisions are often misaligned with indigenous perspectives on intellectual property, before sharing interviews publicly , Perry Collins (Scholarly Communications Librarian, Libraries) and the project team will look to protocols developed by the Local Contexts project and to guidance provided from tribal community represent atives and ATALM. These resources will ensure that the project team has the necessary context to understand and review recordings to determine if they should be made public and, if so, under what conditions (e.g., with a particular Traditional Knowledge La bel available through

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Mukurtu CMS ). While the UFDC is not yet compatible with either Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS) or the Murkutu CMS, the project team will wor k with tribal representatives and ATALM to ensure that the Native People of the Americas oral history collection data are indexed with these systems in mind and with the intention of having these systems facilitate culturally responsible access to collection content (see Community Engagement section ) . Finalized t ranscriptions, digitized audio files, and other digital content will be ingested into the UFDC for permanent storage (i.e. preservation) and copies of all files will be delivered to the originating communities . The UFDC will serve as the repository for the digital files associated with the Native American History Project collection for SPOHP , however, access to these materials will remain restricted until the originating communities determine the level of accessibility that is most fitting for each intervie w content . Chelsea Dinsmore (Chair, Digital Support Services , Libraries) and Xiaoli Ma (Metadata Librarian, Libraries) will be responsible for the ingest of digital materials into the UFDC an d the resulting organization, record creation, and record amendment. Two student assistants will be hired to help with the ingest process, supervised by Ma (Libraries). Student assistants will be trained by Digital Support Services (DSS) staff to access th e UFDC online interface and complete the metadata template that has been designed specifically for this project. While the UFDC is not compatible with OHMS, all metadata for this project will be shared with the originating communities so that they may integrate these data into their OHMS platforms. DSS staff will complete quality control checks on will be responsible for final ingest of all materials. Dinsmore and Mahar will be responsible for sharing finalized digita l content with the tribes using Mukurtu CMS and establishing relationships with the UFDC holdings. Descriptive metadata, along with derivatives of the oral history files slated for review or access by tribal communities and/or the general public, will be i ngested in Mukurtu CMS as well. ATALM staff members will be providing training to the originating communities for using both Mukurtu CMS and OHMS. The Libraries and SPOHP are committed , long term, to implementing the project priorities for the communities from which these histories originated. Once pe rmissions have been determined and selected materials have been made accessible, the accessible oral history content in the UFDC and Mukurtu CMS will be featured Oral History library research guide . This guide is maintained by Stephanie Birch (African American Studies Librarian and liaison to the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Libraries). As part of this project, the L ib G uide will be edited to include a sub collection tab labeled Native People of the Americas Oral Histories , with contextualized information, direct links to oral history content within the collection, and recommendations for complimentary web and library resources. In conjunction with the UFDC interface , the L ib G uide will facilit ate ease of access to , and promotion of, the oral history collection critical component s of the project priorities determined by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and its partner organization ATALM. Community Engagement Plan In the past decade, SPOHP has been in periodic contact with several of the originating Native American T ribes who were part of the Doris Duke oral history project of the 1970s. These include: Lumbee, Seminole, and Poarch Band of Creek Indians. SPOHP staff plan to work with ATALM s taff to reconnect with representatives from all Native American Tribes represented in the collection of Doris Duke interviews at the University of Florida. These communities include the Lumbee of North Carolina, the Catawba of South Carolina, the Seminole of Hollywood, Florida, the Mississippi Choctaw of Choctaw, Mississippi, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of Cherokee, North Carolina, and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama. B uild ing on the successful 50 year collaboration wit h the Poarch Band of Creek Indians , SPOHP staff will work to engage in academic, cultural, and reciprocal exchanges with these originating tribes. Activities will include field work trips with SPOHP staff and students to tribal lands , hosting tribal elder s for round table discussions and presentations at UF, film screenings , and virtual educational event s. This reconnection with the respective tribes will provide the opportunity to organize all the oral history components collected by the Doris Duke projec t of the 1970s and their derivatives for the purpose of returning the digital material s back to the tribes. These materials will include archival quality audio files created from original cassette tapes, optimized audio files derived from the original recordings, associated metadata files, electronic transcriptions and abstracts, and in some cases photos and other media. Reconnecting with t he tribes will also provide the opportunity to translate approximately 45 interviews recorded in indigenous languages. Honoraria are budgeted to support tribal

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members participat ing in translation activities or other in person engagements at UF. Using data from a SPOHP survey to be completed by tribal representatives, tribal preferences and needs will drive plans to determine community engagement. Funds have been budgeted for UF SPOHP staff and students to travel to the originating communities to deliver co ntent and engage in relationship building in coordination with tribal representatives. Finally , SPOHP staff will continue to pursue academic and research collaborations with the originating tribes . For example , SP O HP recently organized a special roundtabl e session at the 2020 Oral History Association Annual Meeting with leaders of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. This session , titled: "Celebrating a 50 Year Oral History Collaboration Between the Poarch Band of Creek Indians and the University of Florida" will serve as inspiration for similar collaborations with other tribal communities represented in this collection. Paul Ortiz , director of SPOHP has been named vice chair of special task force on African and Native American History. In this capacity, he will work with scholars at UF , including the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program to build stronger linkages bet ween the respective tribes and the university. Additionally, Ginessa Mahar (Anthropology Librarian) was recently appointed as the Library Liaison to the America n Indian and Indigenous Studies Program and will work to ensure the products from such collabora tions are preserved, accessible, and shared with the originating communities. Project Timeline (January 2021 December 2022) September 2020: Inventory of Native People of the Americas Collection at SPOHP; Hendrix January 2021: Create database for the co llection including audio tapes, transcriptions, digital files, and other associated materials; Hendrix and Mahar and OPS Student Assistant Spring 2021: Send tapes to vendor for digitization; Durant and Hendrix Spring/Summer 2021: Travel to three tribal com munities by SPOHP staff and students Spring/Summer 2021: Host three tribal community representatives for engagements at UF Summer 2021: Begin audio optimization; Hendrix and OPS Student Assistant Fall 2021: Begin transcribing audio files; SPOHP and OPS Stu dent Assistants Fall 2021: Begin writing interview abstracts (summary transcriptions); SPOHP and OPS Student Assistants Fall 2021: Begin permissions research and Mukurtu CMS relationship; Collins, Mahar, and SPOHP February 2022: First Report Submission; Mahar and Project Team Spring 2022: Begin creating metadata and working on UFDC records corrections and UFDC ingest of all digital materials; Dinsmore, Ma and OPS Students Spring 2022: Begin sharing of all digitized content with originating communities; Mahar and Ortiz in coordination with ATALM Spring/Summer 2022: Travel to three tribal communities by SPOHP staff and students Spring/Summer 2022: Host three tribal community representatives for engagements at UF Fall 2022: Complete and launch LibGuide; Birch Fall 2022: Present roundtable with tribal representatives at Oral History Association annual conference February 2023: Second Report Submission; Mahar and Project Team

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DIG ITIZATION PLAN: The Director of Conservation and Preservation ( Fletcher Durant , Libraries ) will work with Hendrix and Mahar to collate the inventoried tapes (n=2005) for digitization. Durant will work with Pr eserve South , the selected digitization vendor , to develop a shipment and digitization schedule . Durant and Hendrix will package and prepare the tapes for shipment to the vendor. While digitization is underway, Durant will coordinate with the vendor if any condition issues arise that could impact the digitization plan. Durant will receive delivery of the digitized files and perform a brief quality control check to identify any major oversights in the deliverables before working with the UFDC staff on ingest ing the digital audio files . Digitized materials will be received in uncompressed broadcast WAV (96 kHz/24 bit) files. Once received, the master files will be archived in perpetuity while copies will be optimized and used for transcription purposes. Digiti zation of the oral histories serves two priorities of the project: preservation and accessibility. Digitization of the oral histories will further ensure their vitality, long after deterioration of the cassettes. Furthermore, digitizatio n will allow the re corded histories to be shared with their originating communities. Many of the interviews have only been accessible by attending the repository in person, an inconvenient barrier for those wishing to listen to the recorded histories. Hard drives with digital copies of the audio files and transcriptions will be delivered to each community. Dissemination of Results: The George A. Smathers Libraries staff in partnership with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program staff will execute a pr omotional dissemination plan to create awareness of the new resources created as a result of this project. This will include distribution of the LibGuide content, articles in Source Magazine and LibaryPress@UF , and news releases from UF. Furthermore, SPOHP outlets include its website, email list, and other media outlets. Presentations at national conferences by pr oject team members will share methodologies and outcomes to advance scholarship and further promote the utilization of the collections. Anticipated audiences to be reached through these methods include the originating communities, the UF community of schol ars and students, the greater oral history community through SPOHPs contacts, attendees at national conferences, and the greater public. All of the above promotional activities will apply only to those oral histories that are deemed openly accessible by th e communities from which they originated.

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1938 W. University Avenue (32603) | P.O. Box 14425 | Gainesville, FL 32604 2425 | Main: (352) 392 1691 Reviewed ________________ UFF Legal Counsel October 28 , 2020 Rumeli Banik, PhD Program Officer, Child Well being Program Doris Duke Charitable Foundation 650 Fifth Avenue, 19th Floor New York, NY 10019 Dear Dr. Banik, The University of Florida Foundation (UFF) appreciates the opportunity to submit an application to digitize, transc ribe and disseminate recordings of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program for the Native American History Project collection that were previously funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. receiving organization, the UFF regularly receives such gifts and disburses them according to policy. Receiving funding for this project, Redressing Native American Oral Histories: Revitalization, Repatriation, and Respon sible Sharing of Digital Cultural Heritage, Please let me know if there is any other information you might need to consider this proposal for funding. Sincerely, David Christie cc: Gin essa Mahar, PhD Paul Ortiz, PhD

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Redressing Native American Oral Histories: Revitalization, Repatriation, and Responsible Sharing of Digital Cultural Heritage University of Florida Budget Narrative Personnel – Salaries , Wages and Fringe Benefits (request) The George A. Smathers Libraries seeks to employ University of Florida students to serve in a variety of roles for successful project execution. This includes a database assistant ($12/hour for 10hrs/week for 15 weeks totaling $1,800 in year one); transcription assistants ($15/ hour for 1,000 hours in year one and 4,000 hours in year two, totaling $15,000 in y ear one and $60,000 in year two); a graduate student coordinator to manage workflows, quality control processes, and student workers ($20/ hour for 15 hours /week for 15 weeks in year one and $ 20.60/hour— includes a 3% increase for retention — for 30 weeks in year two, totaling $4,500 in ye ar one and $9,270 in year two); an audio assistant to support audio optimization ($20/hour for 20 hours/week for 12 weeks in year one and $20.60/hour— includes a 3% increase for retention — for 20 hours/week for 12 weeks in year two, totaling $ 4,800 in year one, and $ 4,944 in year two); and two metadata assistant s working concurrently at $15/hour for 600 hours total in year two, totaling $9,000. Fr inge benefit rates for student workers are calculated at 1.9% for a total of $496 in year one and $ 1,581 in year two. Personnel – Salaries and Fringe Benefits (contributed cost share) The Libraries’ staff estimate their cost share contributions as follows: Anthropology Librarian, Ginessa Mahar, ( PI ) (5% in year one and year two); African American Studies Librarian, Stephanie Birch (1% in year one and two); Scho larly Communications Librarian, Perry Collins (2% in year one and two); Director of Digital Support Services , Chelsea Dinsmore (1% in year one and year two); Director of Conservation and Preservation, Fletcher Durant (1% in year one); and Metadata Libraria n, Xiaoli Ma (1 % in year one and 3% in year two). Total salary and fringe benefits contributed to the project is $9,581 in year one and $10,560 in year two, totaling $20,141. Consultants and Contract Labor Vended digitization will be performed by Preserve South to digitize 2,005 cassette tapes in year one at a cost of $30,456 based on an estimate that was provided, and digitization of associated materials including photographs, letters and newspaper clippings related to the collection is estimated at $500 to be performed by a to bedetermined outside vendor. Honoraria for tribal representative s to visit UF for panel discussions, translation assistance, and other related collection and engagement activities is estimated at $1,100 per person for 12 repr esentatives to assist with travel and meals, and to provide a stipend: 12 representatives in year one and also in year two for a total of $ 26,400. Travel Per ATALM, the estimated travel costs to support attendance of two representatives from the project team to attend the ATALM Conferences in year one and two total $4,000 per year. Travel for UF SPOHP staff and students to visit tribal representatives on their lands includes costs for lodging and meals for a team of six travelers for thre e trips in year one and also in year two ($9,390 per year for two years), (each trip: 5 rooms at $160 per night for 3 nights for $1,920; meals at $36 per day for 4 days; fuel at $200; and, van rental at $266, totaling $3,130 per trip). Supplies, Materials , and Equipment Computer supplies including flash drives and external hard drives for delivering digital materials to tribal r epresentatives are estimated at $2,570 in year one. A variety of preservation supplies for collection materia ls related to the interviews are estimated at $1,903.