Citation
University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Journal Publishing Program Survey 2019 Summary Report

Material Information

Title:
University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Journal Publishing Program Survey 2019 Summary Report
Creator:
Stapleton, Suzanne
Johnston, Chelsea
Collins, Perry
Publisher:
University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
technical report ( aat )

Notes

Abstract:
The purpose of the Libraries’ journal publishing program survey is to assess and improve the journal publishing program of the University of Florida Libraries (Libraries) and to contribute generally to research on academic library publishing programs. The Libraries’ journal publishing program has grown in volume, staffing, and identity since it launched in 2012. Journals published in partnership with the Libraries are hosted on Florida Online Journals, using the Open Journal System digital publishing platform. The first survey of the journal publishing program, distributed in 2018, focused on user experience of the publishing program. The 2019 survey expanded the scope to include anticipated future program needs and to provide assessment and education of best publishing practices in regards to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Journals published represent a variety of scholarly output in humanities, social sciences, and STEM disciplines, including 4 focused on student research and 8 sponsored by societies external to the University of Florida. Publications range in longevity, frequency and size yet all seek to diversify the scholarly record with Open Access to their unique contributions. Published formats are primarily text and images although 13 respondents anticipate publishing audio-visual material and 5 additional journals plan to use hyperlinks to external content in the future. The majority of respondents were “very satisfied” with ease of finding their journal(s) online, journal usage, and archiving/preservation. A minority expressed frustration with the complexity and/or opportunities for errors in the digital publishing platform, Open Journal Systems. An external assessment of journal webpages documented transparency of journal policies, provided a spot check on PDF accessibility, and revealed areas of improvement for each journal. The 2019 survey was reconfigured as a tool to assess as well as educate survey respondents on best publishing practices, focused on practices and policies relating to DEI. As a result of this survey, the research team recommends several easy-to-implement best publishing practices. This annual survey provides valuable information for improving library publishing services to enhance journal policies that better match the mission and goals of the editors and publishers, particularly in the areas of transparency and ethics.
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Suzanne Stapleton.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Creator/Rights holder. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Journal Publishing Program Survey 2019 Summary Report ( Mixed Material ) --
METS:mets OBJID IR00011146_00001
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2020-08-13T22:19:24Z ID LASTMODDATE 2020-05-28T13:39:05Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida Institutional Repository
METS:note Created using CompleteTemplate 'IR' and project 'UFIR'.
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC - FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:abstract displayLabel Abstract The purpose of the Libraries’ journal publishing program survey is to assess and improve the journal publishing program of the University of Florida Libraries (Libraries) and to contribute generally to research on academic library publishing programs. The Libraries’ journal publishing program has grown in volume, staffing, and identity since it launched in 2012. Journals published in partnership with the Libraries are hosted on Florida Online Journals, using the Open Journal System digital publishing platform. The first survey of the journal publishing program, distributed in 2018, focused on user experience of the publishing program. The 2019 survey expanded the scope to include anticipated future program needs and to provide assessment and education of best publishing practices in regards to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Journals published represent a variety of scholarly output in humanities, social sciences, and STEM disciplines, including 4 focused on student research and 8 sponsored by societies external to the University of Florida. Publications range in longevity, frequency and size yet all seek to diversify the scholarly record with Open Access to their unique contributions. Published formats are primarily text and images although 13 respondents anticipate publishing audio-visual material and 5 additional journals plan to use hyperlinks to external content in the future. The majority of respondents were “very satisfied” with ease of finding their journal(s) online, journal usage, and archiving/preservation. A minority expressed frustration with the complexity and/or opportunities for errors in the digital publishing platform, Open Journal Systems. An external assessment of journal webpages documented transparency of journal policies, provided a spot check on PDF accessibility, and revealed areas of improvement for each journal. The 2019 survey was reconfigured as a tool to assess as well as educate survey respondents on best publishing practices, focused on practices and policies relating to DEI. As a result of this survey, the research team recommends several easy-to-implement best publishing practices. This annual survey provides valuable information for improving library publishing services to enhance journal policies that better match the mission and goals of the editors and publishers, particularly in the areas of transparency and ethics.
mods:accessCondition type restrictions on use Rights Copyright Creator/Rights holder. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
mods:genre authority sobekcm Technical Reports
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:url access object in context https://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00011146/00001
UF Library (instrument) note Instrument https://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00011131/00001
mods:name
mods:namePart Stapleton, Suzanne
Johnston, Chelsea
Collins, Perry
mods:note acquisition Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Suzanne Stapleton.
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries
mods:dateIssued 05/04/2020
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source IR00011146_00001
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida Institutional Repository
mods:titleInfo
mods:title University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Journal Publishing Program Survey 2019 Summary Report
mods:typeOfResource mixed material
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation ALL
UFIR
IUF
sobekcm:MainThumbnail UF_Library_Journal_Publishing_Survey_2019_Summary_Report_Finalthmthm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFIR
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID IR00011146
sobekcm:VID 00001
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement University of Florida Institutional Repository
sobekcm:SortDate 737548
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 PDF1 applicationpdf CHECKSUM 125b3f82329d3a1f90112e43b4a7167a CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 431107
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href UF_Library_Journal_Publishing_Survey_2019_Summary_Report_final.pdf
THUMB1 imagejpeg-thumbnails 9b90680cccf8edda7b9b33b738cbb8d5 8786
UF_Library_Journal_Publishing_Survey_2019_Summary_Report_Finalthm.jpg
G5 THUMB5 db04466055b08759ea6648d22ea27e0b 8775
UF_Library_Journal_Publishing_Survey_2019_Summary_Report_Finalthmthm.jpg
G6 THUMB6 bdf2c18e56287a36d3c1f52c4b6f495a 8769
UF_Library_Journal_Publishing_Survey_2019_Summary_Report_Finalthmthmthm.jpg
G2 TXT2 textplain e32c5e4d86555eb28d74c30304ce2228 34494
UF_Library_Journal_Publishing_Survey_2019_Summary_Report_final_pdf.txt
G3 TXT3 9b670fff5c56df2ee194b6cf9678992e 1087
agreement.txt
G4 XML4 b175edb179d3f48ee8c3caa4bdbc88fb 6516
marc.xml
METS:structMap STRUCT2 other
METS:div DMDID ADMID ORDER 0 main
ODIV1 1 Main
FILES1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
FILES2 2
FILES3 3
FILES4 4
FILES5 5
FILES6 6



PAGE 1

Page 1 of 16 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries Journal Publishing Program Survey 2019 Summary Report Research Team: Stapleton, Suzanne Cad y (PI), Marston Science Library Collins, Perry (Co PI ), George A. Smathers Libraries Johnston, Chelsea (Co PI ), George A. Smathers Libraries Abstract The purpose of the L ibraries journal publishing program survey is to assess and improve the journal publishing program of the University of Florida Libraries ( Libraries ) and to contribute generally to research o n academic library publishing programs. The Libraries journal publishing program has grown in volume, staffing, and identity since it launched in 2012 . Journals publi shed in partnership with the Libraries are hosted on Florida Online Journals, using the Open Journal System digital publishing platform. The fir st survey of the journal publishing program , distributed in 2018, focused on u ser e xperience of the publishing program . T he 2019 survey expan ded the scope to include anticipated future program needs and to provide assessment and education of best publishing practices in regards to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Journals published represent a variety of scholarly output in humanities, social sciences, and STEM disciplines, including 4 focused on student research and 8 sponsored by societies external to the University of Florida . P ublications range in longevity, frequency and size yet all seek to diversify the scholarly record with Open Access to their unique contribution s . Published formats are primarily text and images although 13 respondents anticipate publishing audio visual material and 5 additional journals plan to use hyperlinks to external content in the future. The majority of with ease of finding the ir journal (s) online, journal usage , and archiving/preservation. A minority expressed frustration with the complexity and/or opportunities for errors in the digital publishing platform, Open Journal System s . An external assessment of journal webpages documented transparency of journal policies, provided a spot check on PDF accessibility, and revealed areas of improvement for each journal. The 2019 survey was reconfigured as a tool to assess as well a s educate survey respondents on best publishing practices, focused on practices and policies relating to DEI . As a result of this survey, the research team recommends several easy to implement best publishing practices. This annual survey provides valuable information for improving library publishing services to enhance journal policies that

PAGE 2

Page 2 of 16 better match the mission and goals of the editors and publishers, particularly in the areas of transparency and ethics. Introduction The purpose of the survey is to assess and improve the journal publishing program of the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries (Libraries) and to contribute generally to research on academic library publishing programs. The Libraries contribute to discourse and guidanc e on library publishing as active members of the Library has grown in volume, staffing, and identity since it launched in 2012. Journals published represent a variety o f scholarly output in humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines, including 4 focused on student research and 8 sponsored by societies external to the University of Florida. Journals publi shed in p artnership with the Libraries are hosted on Florida Online Journals, using the Public Knowledge Project Open Journal System digital publishing platform. Florida Online Journals is a statewide installation of the Open Journal System managed by the Florida Virtual Campus and Florida Academic Services Libraries Cooperative. The 2019 survey is the second annual survey of faculty, staff and students who work as editors, editorial board members, and/or journal managers for journals published in partnership with the Libraries. The 2018 survey focused on documenting user experience of the j ournal publishing service s . The 2019 survey expanded queries into anticipated future needs and focused on assessment and education of best publishing practices in rega rds to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). The Survey The 2019 sur vey consisted of two sections, a self ass essment by editorial team members and an external evaluation of publically accessible journal webpages by the research team ( UF IRB no.201901730) . Thirty six people contributed to the self assessment using a Qualtrics survey instrument ( A ppendix B ) between August 9 October 20, 2019 . Respondents represented 8 1 % of the journals in the Libraries journal publishing program. In compariso n, respondents to the 2018 survey represe nted 82% of the active journals . Note that each respondent did not answer every question in the response numbers to questions rep orted will not always sum to the full 36 respondents. The external e valuation of webpages for 17 journals was conducted between De c ember 2019 and April 2020. This second section of the survey included two journals in development that had not yet , as of the evalua tion, published any issues. Typically , the Libraries journal publishing team has numerous interactions with each (the content provider) over the course of a year. An annual confirmation of the contact and editorial team fo r each journal is good practice,

PAGE 3

Page 3 of 16 particularly due to high turnover with student led journals. The annual survey provides an opportunity to confirm the Memorandum of Agreement between the content provider and the Libraries. The survey instrument also provid es a mechanism for editorial teams to describe current or anticipated needs and any unmet challenges with the publishing arrangement . Survey r esponses, in turn, guide educational program development targeted to meet stated needs. The positive feedback is a welcome a cknowledgement of the role the Libraries contribute to publish ing these scholarly works and supporting the publishing service . In 2019, t he research team further developed the survey as an educational tool , not just to inform impro vements and refinement of the Li braries publishing program, but also as a means to introduce and explain concept s of best publishing practices to scholars in editorial roles. Description of Journals Publishing in Partnership with the Libraries At the time of this survey, there were 17 journals in active publishing partnership with the Libraries producing scholarly content in the humanities, social sciences, and STEM disciplines (Appendix A) . Two of these journals are new, producing their first publication within the last two years . T wo more are in development with anticipated first publication in 2020. Two of the journals are transitioning from another publishe r. Five of the journals have been publishing f or over five years with the L ibraries. Ten journal s preceded the library publishing program , four journals have over 40 year s of publication each . One journal ceased publication in 2019. The frequency of journal publishing varies, as well as the size of each publication . Frequency of the journal s published include annual (4 journals, including one with 5 7 published on a rolling basis ), bi annual (8 journals), three times per year (1 journal), quarterly (2 journals), six times per year (1 journal). Additionally, one journal has erratic freq uency (special issues only) and two others have not yet initiated publication; they anticipate producing two issues per year. The size of journals varies in our publishing program: 2 journal s publish less than 5 articles per y ea r; 6 journal publish 5 9 art icles per y ea r, 3 journals publish 20 45 articles per y ea r; 4 journals publish greater than 75 articles per y ea r (three of these publish over 130 articles per y ea r). Most of the journals (82%) publish original research in peer review articles. The journal publishing program at the Libraries has robust partnership s with campus entities as well as external scholarly organ izations. In 2019, there were 4 journals that were student led or feature student authors. Eight journals are published in partn ership with external scholarly societies.

PAGE 4

Page 4 of 16 Self Assessment Section Survey Respondents T he online survey was constructed in Qualtrics (Qualtrics, Provo, UT) and tested prior to distribution in both years . In 2018, 72 people were invited to participate in the online survey, compared to 178 in 2019. For the first year of the survey, 2018, only editors/editor in chiefs and journal managers were invited to participate in the survey. In 2019, all editorial board members of each journal and all journal staff were invited. An initial invitation was followed by two reminders, all distributed by email. In 2018, 11 people participated in the survey (15% of invited) , representing 9 different journals out of the 11 active at the time (8 2%) . In 2019, 36 people participated in the survey (20% of invited) , representing 13 different journals out of the 1 6 active at the time (81%) . The survey in 2018 was open for two weeks in March; in 2019 , the survey was open for two months in the fall. Survey respondents represented all roles in the journal publishing process, including author, reviewer, associate/section editor, editor, editor in chief, and journal manager. In one case respondents also served as copy editors, layout , and proof editors. In 2019 , 8 respondents (22%) did not identify the journal they served . Three respondents identified publications or entities that are not serials pub lished by the Libraries; one has program oversight over all journals published by the Libraries and two r espondents misidentified the journal name, e.g. Citrus Industry and African Studies Review. Misidentification of the journal suggests there is opportunity to improve branding of publications from the Libraries. publishing pl atform, Florida Online Journals The library journal publishing service is currently using the Florida Online Journals platform (OJS) hosted at https://journals.flvc.org . The Florida Online Journals is a s managed by the Florida Academic Libraries Serv ices Coopera tive and the Florida Virtual Campus. Thus, the publishing platform is available to all State University System institu tions in the State of Florida. Currently, there are a total of 40 journals publically available on this platform published by 7 institutions. Of the statewide collection of journals in Florida Online Journals , 2 are fo rthcoming and 12 provide archives onl y. 60% of the active journals on Florida Online Journals are published with the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. Survey respondents from scholars working with journals associated with the University of Florida reported that the journal publishing platform, Florida Online Journals, is

PAGE 5

Page 5 of 16 primarily used to host archive/back issues (n=23) , accept and manage submissions (n=15), conduct review (n=14). Only 6 respondents representing 4 journals indicated that they are using the software to perform layout , copyediting , and proofreading. Three respondents to this question report that they are not currently publishing with the Florida Online Journals platform. Survey respondents were asked why the y publish in partnership with the Libraries. Only five responses were received to this open ended question. Three explained that their publication was affiliated with and/or supported by a college or department at the University of Florida. One described One referenced improved indexing and compatibility with ever changing internet browsers and online formats. User Experience Participants were asked to rank their experience with Florida OJ on a 5 point Li kert satisfaction scale for east of finding the journal online, journal usage, and archiving and preservation. The majority of respondents to this question indicated they we usage, and archiving & preservation (Fig. 1) . At the time of the survey, Florida Online Journals used the Open Journal System version OJS 3.1.1.4, which is optimized for content discovery with search engines such as Google and Google Scholar. In fact, Goo gle Scholar recommends OJS for journal publishers with technical expertise ( https://scholar.google.com/intl/en/scholar/inclusion.html ). Interactions with the Libraries journals publishing team were rated in from 1 (very poor) to 5 (excellent). The journal publishing team includes the Scholarly Publishing and Repository Librarian, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Agricultural Sciences/Digital Scholarship Librarian, and the sub ject specialist (liaison) librarian appropriate for each journal. 75% of the 20 respondents to this question indicated excellent quality of service and 80% indicated excellent promptness of responses by the library journal publishing team. Seventeen of the 23 respondents (74%) indicated that they know who their subject specialist librarian is. Those who did not know (26%) may have been editorial board members who rarely interact directly with the library journal publishing team and may be affiliated with in stitutions other than the University of Florida. For those who indicated that they did not know their subject specialist librarian, a link was provided in the survey tool to the online Subject Specialist database. This is one example of how the annual surv ey can serve to inform as well as assess.

PAGE 6

Page 6 of 16 Fig. 1. Responses from 23 survey participants to Q . 12 Rank your experience with Florida OJ in the following categories, from 1 (unsatisfactory) to 5 (very satisfactory): ease of finding journal online; jour nal usage; and archiving and preservation . 19/23 reported being slightly to very satisfied with journal discoverability. Publishing Practices The most common formats of publication content were original research articles ( n= 18), review, systematic review, literature review articles ( n= 10), and static images (e.g. figures, photos) ( n= 15). Fewer respondents indicated other formats published: d ata articles (n=6), datasets (n=3) , h yperlinks to content external t o the journal (n=6), editorials/letters to the editor/correspondence/opinions (n=4) , reviews by peer reviewers (n=2) and other peer reviewed content (n=2) and non pee r reviewed content (n=6). None of the respondents are currently publishing audio recordings or audio visual materia l (e.g. video, an imated images) . These same respondents were asked what formats they anticipate publishing in the future. Eight respondents indicated that they plan to publish audio visual material (e.g. videos, animated images) , five plan to publish audio recordings and five plan to publish hyperlinks to content external to the journal . When asked respondents selected reviews by peer reviewers (n=11) , editorials/letters to the

PAGE 7

Page 7 of 16 editor/corresponde nce/opinions (n=9) , datasets (n=9) , audio recording s (n=9) and post publication comments (n=9) . Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Publishing New questions were developed for the 2019 survey to explore DEI knowledge and practices among our publishing partners. The survey introduced this topic by asking journal(s). thought identity diversity. 18 selected author characteristics (e.g. race, gender, sexual orientation, physical ability, religious perspective, socio economic background or geography) that a re underrepresented in the discipline. 15 indicated that the editorial board has a diverse composition. Diversity of thought was indicated as an expression of under represented perspective to a lesser extent. 15 respondents indicated that underrepresented p erspectives means publication content focused on an underrepresented population. 12 respondent s included publication of negative results or results that contradict established knowledge in their understanding of Twenty pe ople shared responses to the open ended question, In your opinion, what can editors and publishers do to reduce barriers faced by under represented or marginalized scholars in academic publishing? The open ended format of this question revealed thoughtfu l responses and enabled the true voices of the respondents to be heard. With permission, we include a few examples: lingual articles; reduce or eliminate page charges; encourage reviewers to consider positive as well as n egative aspects of manuscripts; Have a diversity policy, have practices where diversity is a required part of regular conversations. In the same way that checklists for surgeons keep people alive, checklists to checkin/remind ourselves that we need to think about who is in the room and who isn't making editorial & publishing decisions. Solicit an d provide support for contributions from underrepresented or marginalized scholars. Identify opportunities to facilitate

PAGE 8

Page 8 of 16 S everal themes emerged from the open ended responses to this question : a) provide mentoring ( e.g. seek out members of m arginalized groups to be authors , reviewers , and board members , and train reviewers to provide constructive feedback), b) establish policies & procedures (e.g. checklist to mitigate effects of implicit bias; use of double blind peer review) Additional specific suggestions included eliminating Article Processing Charges (APCs) and publishing in languages other than English. A commitment to DEI can be demonstrated by a number of journal publishing policies and practices. 22 respondents indicated that the y demonstrate commitment to DEI by providing open access to publication contents . Other publishing practices were used to a lesser extent including providing training for peer reviewers, evaluating diversity of editorial board composition, and actively soliciting underrepresented author s and/or author s with underrepresented perspectives. One respondent reported providing training in implicit bias to editorial board members. Six respondents state that their currently have policies to promote diversity, equity and inclusion Figure 2. Responses to Q20 How does your journal demonstrate a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion? Select all that apply.

PAGE 9

Page 9 of 16 Transparency is best publishing practice. Journal policies should be clearly described on journal webpages. Transparency of ethical policies will help to establish credibility for new journals and help to distinguish journals from fraudulent publishers. The top three areas for transparency in or der to establish credibility are editorial board institutional affiliations so readers can assess the expertise of submission review, the peer review policy, and any fees required for publication. These policies should be clearly described to readers and potential authors prior to submitting articles for consideration. 32% of respondents (n=7 of 22) journal(s) are clearly communicated to readers, authors, reviewers and editorial board members . However, an equal num ber of respondents either strongly (n=3) or somewhat (n=4) disagree that their journal policies were clearly communicated. This topic wa s further evaluated in the external assessment of journal webpages (see below) . Regarding accessibility, most survey respondents (n=12 out of 32) did not know what techniques are employed to make journal content accessible. Fewer respondents indicated that editorial board and journal staff are familiar with American with Disabilities Act guidelines (n=6) and website design accommodates needs of people with visual or other disabilities (n=6) . On e respondent noted that providing the journal dashboard in multiple languages is one technique employed to further accessibility. The OJS software provides a free plug in feature that any journal can elect to enable to provide readers the option to display the publishing platform in a variety of languages including Spanish, French, Portuguese, German, Chinese. Note that this feature applies only to the dashboard text; it does not translate the content of published materials. One respondent reported that no techniques were used and another respondent indicated that journal staff were working to better incorporate accessibility. Jou rnal Success and Sustainability Respondents were asked to rank measures of journal success from 1 (most important) to 10 (least important). Re spondents to this survey question displayed wide variation. Most frequently ranked 1 or 2 was the number of artic le downloads or webpage visits and the number of submissions to the journal. Ano ther indicator of success mentioned include d the acceptance ratio. It is curious that tradition al measures of success -such as circulation, J ournal I mpact F actor TM , content by prestigious authors, and acceptance ratio did not rank consistently high by responders to this survey. It would be interesting to compare this population of journal editors and managers to those using commercial publishers. The results to this question suggest that scholars choosing to publish with libraries may have non traditional objectives. Criticism of the widespread use of the Journal Impact Factor as an indicator of journal success is long standing (e.g. Larivière and Sugimoto, 2019). The purpose of many student led journals, for instance, may be

PAGE 10

Page 10 of 16 the educational experience student s obtain of the scholarly publishing process more than the citation rate of their published works. Three of the 17 journals sur veyed and a fourth journal contains exclusively undergraduate content . Sources of funds to publish journals with the L ibraries was explored. The majority of respondent ( n= 12 out of 3 6 responses ) listed a sponsor or sponsoring organization as a source of funds. Advertisements ( n= 2), page charges or APCs ( n= 2), membership fees ( n= 5), subscription fees ( n= 3), endowment ( n= 2), in kind or volunteer labor ( n= 7) or other ( n= 4) were also indicated. Other included departmental contributions or the respondent di d not know the source of funds. Note respondents were asked to select all that apply. Topics of interest for training and education were also assessed. The responses from this annual survey contribute to educational program development by the library pub lishing team. The team hosts the Florida Online Journal Publishers Round Table each semester, for instance, where these topics can be addressed. The team maintains a LibGuide for journal publishing users ( https://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/floridaoj ) where education al needs are also addressed. The most popular topics selected for future learning included: DEI in scholarship, accessibility, indexing in subject specific databases and alternative metrics. resource to colleagues. Of the seven who have not, two indicated that their colleagues are at other institutions and three cite d complaints with the OJS publishing system. The three complaints mentioned that the publishing software is complicated and could be improved to be more intuitive and reduce opportunities for errors. For those who have recommended the service, they did so to colleagues in their department or college as an excellent way to improve dissemination, track review of submissions, and archive published knowledge. External Assessment Section: Journal Website s The research team conducted an external assessment of to complement the self assessments section of the survey. Th irty characteristics were assessed including the frequency, size, publishing history, content format, funding model, indexing, transparency of publishing policies, and a sampling of accessibility (Appendix C) . The rationale for this external assessment was out of consideration for questions from the self assessment section that could be a nswered by external review

PAGE 11

Page 11 of 16 of journal websites. practices, this was found to be very subjective and difficult to document or measure. torial board was not possible since many journals did not provide institutional affiliation information for all editorial identifying characteristics (race, gender, age, etc). I nformation obt ained through the external assessment identified additional areas where publishing practices can be improved. Transparent publishing policies Transparency of publishing policies was evaluated in this external section of the survey as well as in question s in the self assessment section. 13 of the journals display the affiliations of editorial board members; 4 do not. Of the 13 that list the institutional affiliations of editorial board members, 4 do not do so for all editorial board members. This is an easy to implement improvement that provides readers and potential authors The peer review policy is clearly described by 11 of the journals; 6 do not currently describe their peer review process on the journal website. Some of the journals provide the description of peer review within their author submission guidelines. Any publishing fees should be communicated to authors prior to article submission. Ten of the journals mak e their fees transparent on their websites, including 7 that clearly state there are no publishing fees assessed. 7 journals do not clearly describe publishing fee policies. Open access is one important option that journals seek in publishing partnerships with the Libraries. 13 of the journals offer Gold Open Access, in that their published content is immediately free to read upon publication. 4 journals provide Bronze Open Access, where their content is free to read but there are no long term licensing policies to ensure permanent open access to new or archived content . Licensing policies were transparent on 14 of the journals websites and not described on 3 journal websites. The most common licenses were Creative Commons CC BY and CC BY NC, permitting non commercial re use of published content . Creative Commons within the In general, it was found that newer journals displayed more transparent policies, especially regarding a publishing ethics statement and archiving policy, compared to established journals. Established journals may follow ethical publishing principles and have well devel oped archiving policies but fail to clearly communicate these policies on the journal website. This external evaluation of journal webpages included linked content, for instance, to author guidelines and sponsoring agency websites. Legacy

PAGE 12

Page 12 of 16 journals benefit from established credibility and readership, where ethical practices may be known from practice. Accessibility One part of the external evaluation was a spot check on accessibility. In addition to noting whether each journal described any DEI policies, t he research team tested a randomly selected current and archival publication with Adobe PDF screen reader. Most current files read well; however problems were encountered with some layout (e.g. columns), images, and journal logos. The use of metatags to i dentify the order to read the text and use of alt text for images is recommended. Some archival files were not able to be read by Adobe screen reader as a result of lack of Optimal Character Recognition from text scanned as images. Additional Recommendat ions The research team noted any additional concerns or recommendations during the website review. For instance, several journals need to elaborate the description of their scope and coverage on their webpages. O f the 17 journals actively publishing with the George A. Smathers Libraries at the time of this survey, 4 journals had not registered with the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number); one was waiting their ISSN approval. Six journals only had an ISSN for their print edition; 6 also had obtaine d an eISSN for their online publication. Although best practices are to obtain an eISSN, the research team discovered that many indexing and abstracting services only rely on the print ISSN (personal communication, Ulrichs, 4/9/2020). Notably, only one journal displayed indexing sources on the journal website; 13 did not. broader readership and article submission. While OJS is optimized for discovery in Google Scholar, subject specific databases are also important. Indexing of journals published with the Libraries is an area needing further attention, best handled in concert with a subject specialist librarian. The results from the external assessment of journal webpages provide specific examples of ways that each journal can improve best publishing practices. The external evaluation enhanced results from the self assessment secti on of the survey. Conclusions grow, serving to diversif y the scholarly record by contributing a broad spectrum of original publications. The annual survey provides an assessment of accomplishments wh ile also providing motivation and

PAGE 13

Page 13 of 16 guidance to improve best publishing practices among participating publishers . The publishing program contributes to the strategic directions of the Libraries with a focus on DEI publishing practices. While each publication is unique in its contributions, a number of publishing practices are universal, notably Open Access , which eliminates financial barriers to published knowledge. Satisfaction wit h discoverability and usage of journals through the digital publishing program is high. Results of the 2019 survey self assessment and external assessment indicate a range of current practices and identify anticipated growth of journals publishing in partn ership with the Libraries. Responses indicate the need to improve indexing of publications and expand publishing program capacity to support the anticipated use of audio visual publications, for example. Recommendations to improve adoption of best publishi ng practices are described , including increased transparency of journal policies in areas such as peer review and adherence to publishing ethics . Actions that editorial teams can implement to further engage underrepresented perspectives in the scholarly re cord are shared and reviewed through the survey. The survey, and the publishing program, contribute to the educational mission of the University of Florida. Future growth of the journal publishing program as an identity aligned with the institutional missi on to provide public access to quality scholarly content is welcome. Final version: 05/04 /2020 Works Cited Larivière V., Sugimoto C.R. (2019) The Journal Impact Factor: A brief history, critique, and discussion of adverse effects. In: Glänzel W., Moed H.F., Schmoch U., Thelwall M. (eds) Springer Handbook of Science and Technology Indicators. Springer Handbooks. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978 3 030 02511 3_1 Piwow ar, H., Priem, J., Larivière, V., Alperin, J. P., Matthias, L., Norlander, B., Farley, A., West, J., & Haustein, S. (2018). The state of OA: a large scale analysis of the prevalence and impact of Open Access articles. PeerJ, 6 , e4375. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.4375 Roh, Charlotte and Clement, Gail P. (2017). Scholarly Publishing Education for Digital Initiatives Symposi um. 6. https://digital.sandiego.edu/symposium/2017/2017/6

PAGE 14

Page 14 of 16 Appendix A. Journals Participating in 2019 Survey List of journal names 17 actively publishing with the Libraries at the time of the 2019 survey Library Press@UF link to Florida Open Journals (under construction at http://librarypress.domains.uflib.ufl.edu/florida open journals/) Arkivoc 1 (in transition from current site at https://www.arkat usa.org/) Chemical Engineering Education (http://ww2.che.ufl.edu/cee/) UF/IFAS Extension EDIS (https://journals.flvc.org/edis) Florida Entomologist (https://journals.flvc.org/flaent) Florida Linguistic Papers (https://journals.flvc.or g/floridalinguisticspapers) Holarctic Lepidoptera (https://journals.flvc.org/holarctic/issue/archive) International Journal of Intelligence Ethics 2 (https://journals.flvc.org/ijie) International Journal of Student Scholarship in Physical Therapy (https://journals.flvc.org/ijsrpt /about ) Nematropica (https://journals.flvc.org/nematropica) Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society (https://journals.flvc.org/fshs) Source: The magazine of the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libr aries ( https://journals.flvc.org/source ) Studies in African Linguistics (https://journals.flvc.org/sal) The Journal of Assessment in Higher Education 1 (https://journals.flvc.org/assessment/) The Journal o f Civic Information (https://journals.flvc.org/civic) The Journal of Public Interest Communication (https://journals.flvc.org/jpic/) The New Florida Journal of Anthropology 1 (in development at https://journals.flvc.org/NFJA) Tropical Lepidoptera Research (https://journals.flvc.org/troplep) University of Florida Journal of Undergraduate Research (https://journals.flvc.org/UFJUR/index) 1 In development or transition to active publication in Florida Online Journals 2 Ceased publication in 2019 . D ata from this publication was not included in the survey

PAGE 15

Page 15 of 16 Appendix B. 2019 Survey Instrument S elf asse s s ment Se ction Survey instrument distributed including participant informed consent and survey structure in Qualtrics (Qualtrics, Provo, UT)

PAGE 16

Page 16 of 16 Appendix C. 2019 Survey External Evaluation Section List of c haracteristics assessed by research team from journal webpages Journal Name Journal Website ISSN/eISSN University of Florida Affiliation (names & journal roles) First Publication Date First Publication Date with Libraries Date Memorandum of Understanding signed Number of articles published per year (average) Notes Any concerns Publication formats Access Funding model Transparent Publishing Fees Editorial Board (size) Editorial Board Diversity comments Transparency of Editorial Board (institutional affiliations provided) Editorial Board Transparency of Policies (e.g. selection, training) Transparent Peer Review Process Statement on Publishing Ethics (including how alleged misconduct is handled) Statement of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Transparent accessibility policies Screen reader comments current issue article Screen reader comments archival article Copyright policies transparent Licensing policies transparent Open Access Data sharing? Archiving policies transparent Indexing of Journal Displayed on Journal Website Indexing of Journal in Directory of Open Access Journals