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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00001604/00001
 Material Information
Title: Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Tillman, Barry L.
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2006
 Notes
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Melanie Mercer.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Publication date January 2006. Reviewed January 2009."
General Note: "SS-AGR-13"
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001604:00001

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B. L. Tillman, D. W. Gorbet, H. C. Wood, M. W. Gomillion, J. McKinney2 1. This document is SS-AGR-13, one of a series of the Agronomy Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Originally published as Marianna NFREC Research Report 06-1. Publication date January 2006. Reviewed January 2009. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. B. L. Tillman, assistant professor, Agronomy Department, North Florida Research and Education Center--Marianna, FL; D. W. Gorbet, professor, Agronomy Department, North Florida Research and Education Center--Marianna, FL; H. C. Wood, OPS technical, Agronomy Department; M. W. Gomillion, biological scientist, North Florida Research and Education Center--Marianna, FL; J. McKinney, biological scientist; Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. UF/IFAS does not guarantee or warranty the products named, and references to them in this publication does not signify our approval to the exclusion of other products of suitable composition. Variety choice is a critical management decision for peanut production. There are several good peanut varieties to choose from today. We strongly recommend planting more than one variety on your farm, especially if you plant more than 100 acres of peanuts. Planting more than one variety can help to spread risk of losses from diseases and weather. For example, if you have fields with a history of white mold, there are varieties that have good resistance to that disease compared to some others. We recommend using the University of Georgia Disease Risk Index, or the University of Florida Plant Protection Pointers to evaluate variety resistance to diseases. Your county agent can help you find these resources. For convenience, we have included a summary table from the University of Georgia Disease Risk Index in this article (Table 5 ). When you try a new variety for the first time, we recommend planting a relatively small test plot (20-50 acres) to make sure you see the differences first-hand. There are significant differences among varieties, so it is important to consider disease resistance, maturity, seed supply, and anticipated planting dates as well as the primary consideration of pod yields and grade. The potentially devastating effects of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in the southeast makes variety choice very important. Compared to previous years, TSWV was more prevalent and severe in the 2005 growing season. All of the factors that create favorable conditions for TSWV are not known, but we do know that variety resistance is one of the most effective control measures. Among the tests grown in Florida, TSWV is most severe in Marianna, so variety performance in that location will give a good indication of the TSWV resistance of a given variety. Results often are very different between Marianna, Gainesville, and Jay, depending on TSWV and other disease pressure. The varieties that are most resistant to TSWV are AP-3, C-99R, Hull, Carver, ANorden, Andru II, Georgia Green, Virugard, Georgia 01R, Georgia 02C, Georgia 03L, VC-2 and Gregory, based on Florida data, and the University of Georgia TSWV Risk Index.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 2 This report provides data from University of Florida trials conducted at Gainesville (Citra), Marianna, and Jay research centers from 2002-2005. Tests in Marianna and Gainesville were grown mostly with irrigation and the tests at Jay are not irrigated. All tests are managed for optimum production, including the use of pesticides to control various pests. In furrow insecticides (Temik or Thimet) were used in Gainesville and Jay, but not in Marianna. Pod yields, TSMK (total sound mature kernels) percentage, maturity and TSWV ratings for tests at three locations in Florida in 2005 are reported in Table 1. Each entry was harvested (dug) at their apparent optimum maturity stage (i.e., E = 125-130 days after planting [DAP]; M = 133-139 DAP; L = 145-155 DAP). TSWV ratings were on a 1-10 scale, where 1 = no disease and 10 = all plants with severe damage or dying. Only two early/medium early varieties are available for production, Andru II and Virugard. In our tests, Andru II has had the highest pod yield of those two. Averaged over all three locations, the medium maturing varieties Georgia 03L, AT3085A, AP-3, and AT3081B had higher pod yield than Georgia Green in 2005. All of these but AT3081B had less TSWV than Georgia Green as well. Among the late maturing varieties, Georgia 01R and C-99R had excellent pod yields and good grade in 2005. Both of these have very good resistance to TSWV and leafspot. The performance of runner market-type varieties in Florida over the past four years (2002-2005) is shown in Table 2. Among the medium maturity cultivars tested over the past 4 years, AP-3 has demonstrated excellent pod yields, good TSMK percentage, and the best resistance to TSWV. In 2 years of testing, Georgia 03L has had very good pod yields, TSMK and good TSWV resistance. Both of these cultivars appear to have higher yield and better resistance to TSWV than Georgia Green. Yield, TSWV resistance and TSMK were similar among the late maturing cultivars Georgia 01R and C-99R. The performance of Virginia market-type varieties in Florida over the past four years (2002-2005) is shown in Table 3. All of these varieties are more susceptible to TSWV and if they contract the disease, yield losses could be substantial. Pod yield of VAC92R, VC2, NCV-11, and Gregory were similar and more than the pod yield of NC-12C. The pod yield of peanut cultivars grown in three locations in Florida is shown in Table 4. In general, the highest yielding entries in one location also did well in the other locations. Yields are generally lower in Jay, Florida because the peanuts are not irrigated. Pod yields in Gainesville are generally higher because tomato spotted wilt virus is very mild. In Marianna, yields can be severely limited by tomato spotted wilt virus so usually the most resistant varieties have the highest yield. TSWV pressure was much greater in Marianna in 2005 compared to 2004. Disease resistance is a very important factor in choosing a variety. The reaction of several peanut varieties to some diseases that are present in Florida is presented in Table 5. In order to optimize the benefit of these varieties, it is important to chose based on their disease resistance. From this table, it is relatively easy to find a variety with the right disease package for your situation. If white mold is a problem in some of your fields, AP-3, C-99R, or Georgia-01R would be good choices. Similarly, if you are interested in a late maturing variety, C-99R, Georgia 01R and Tifrunner have good leafspot resistance and could allow a reduction in the frequency of fungicide sprays needed for leafspot compared to susceptible varieties. Variety choice is a critical management decision for peanut production. There are many choices among varieties suitable for production in the Southeastern US with good to excellent resistance to TSWV. Several of these varieties also have

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 3 resistance to other diseases. Growing these varieties can reduce your risk and production cost. The varieties C-99R, DP-1, Hull, and Georgia 01R all have considerable resistance to leafspot allowing you to reduce fungicide sprays and therefore production costs. Some of the cultivars have good resistance to soil-borne diseases such as white mold (S. rolfsii) (C-99R, DP-1, Hull, & AP-3) and CBR (Georgia 01R, Georgia 02C, and Carver). Further information on these traits is available from the University of Florida Plant Protection Pointers web page (http://plantpath.ifas.ufl.edu/takextpub/ExtPubs/ ppp1205.pdf) and the University of Georgia Disease Index (University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service, 2005 Peanut Update, CSS-05-0118, pp. 41-57 or on the web at: http://www.ugapeanuts.com/). In choosing a variety, it is our advice to evaluate your production and marketing situation and make arrangements for seed of the varieties that best fit your needs. Seed supplies for some of the new cultivars (AP-3, Carver, and Georgia-03L) will be very limited in 2006.

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 4 Performance of peanut varieties in three locations in Florida in 2005. Varieties are sorted by market type, maturity and then yield in descending order. . Andru II RME 2239176532852430 5.22.73.9 66.175.570.8 Virugard R E 2052 1236 3094 2127 5.8 2.7 4.3 74.8 68.5 71.6 Georgia-03L R M 3198294356373926 5.52.03.8 74.075.174.5 AT3085A R M 3298251040203276 3.32.73.0 75.770.172.9 AP-3 R M 3417263934753177 2.83.73.3 72.271.171.6 AT3081B R M 2807238835012899 5.53.34.4 71.867.669.7 ANorden R M 2336241028652537 5.84.35.1 73.065.769.3 Georgia Green R M 1736210033332390 7.02.34.7 74.073.873.9 Carver R M 1997147134912320 4.84.04.4 72.170.671.4 AT201 R M 1420217532782291 8.32.75.5 73.771.272.4 Florunner R M 894134229811739 7.86.06.9 71.072.371.6 SunOleic 97R R M 1055 1126 2626 1603 8.2 5.0 6.6 68.7 68.9 68.8 C-99R R L 4046387544014107 2.33.32.8 74.975.775.3 Georgia-01R R L 3636316251053968 3.82.73.3 75.278.676.9 Hull R L 3359243336113134 5.03.34.2 73.473.873.6 Georgia-02C R L 2581 3078 3607 3089 5.0 3.0 4.0 76.4 75.6 76.0 VC2 V E 2285186838592671 4.84.04.4 70.973.072.0 NCV11 V E 2114171739852605 5.84.35.1 69.767.668.7 VAC92R V E 2249170737752577 5.34.34.8 70.168.469.2 Gregory VME 2055156836882437 5.03.74.3 67.472.269.8 NC12C V E 1739 1497 3252 2163 6.0 5.3 5.7 71.7 71.5 71.6 C.V 12161616 18.729.423.1 1.92.82.4 LSD 427520808351 1.31.40.9 2.33.52.1 *Market Type: R=runner, V=virginia; **Maturity: E = early, M = medium, L = late; Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus ratings (1-10, 1 = no disease); High oleic oil chemistry; Locations: MR=Marianna, JY=Jay, GV=Gainesville (Planting Dates: MR=5/11, JY=5/14, GV=4/15)

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 5 Performance of runner market-type peanut varieties in two or three Florida locations over the past four years (2002-2005). Entries are sorted by maturity and the four year average yield (in descending order). Andru II** ME 2430312432643358 70.871.571.772.9 3.93.02.82.9 Virugard E 2127 2734 2849 2935 71.6 74.3 75.5 75.9 4.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 AP-3 M 3177395040944162 71.672.573.073.9 3.32.42.12.2 Carver M 2320327235193595 71.473.673.674.2 4.43.23.03.1 Georgia Green M 2390326334073450 73.975.476.577.0 4.73.73.43.4 ANorden** M 2537316533503428 69.371.672.573.0 5.13.93.53.4 AT201** M 2291297330703103 72.475.075.776.3 5.54.34.54.5 Florunner M 1739235724612569 71.672.974.172.9 6.95.45.14.8 SunOleic 97R** M 1603226023402450 68.871.073.073.9 6.65.65.55.2 Georgia-03L M 39264255 74.574.8 3.83.1 AT3085A** M 3276 72.9 3.0 AT3081B M 2899 69.7 4.4 Georgia-01R L 3968442646004631 76.978.278.779.6 3.32.32.12.1 C-99R L 4107447844584349 75.376.176.577.2 2.82.22.22.2 DP-1 L 3320387539833953 73.674.774.775.3 2.72.01.92.0 Hull** L 3134367837803579 73.674.774.975.6 4.23.12.92.8 Southern RunnerL 2706328034523436 72.974.475.175.2 5.03.63.33.2 Georgia-02C** L 3089 3660 3647 76.0 77.4 77.4 4.0 2.9 2.6 C.V. 161313 13 2.41.91.81.9 23.122.322.420.7 LSD 351276239209 2.11.20.90.8 0.90.50.40.3 *Maturity: E = early, M = medium, L = late; **High oleic oil chemistry. 2 YR= average of 2004 and 2005, 3 YR= average of 2003, 2004 and 2005; 4 YR= average of 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. ***Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus ratings (1-10, 1 = no disease)

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 6 Performance of Virginia market-type peanut varieties in two or three Florida locations over the past four years (2002-2005). Entries are sorted by maturity and the four year average yield (in descending order). NCV11 E 2605319333973497 68.770.871.572.1 5.14.44.14.0 VAC92R E 2577340635173520 69.272.072.773.1 4.83.83.63.7 NC12C E 2163281128993016 71.673.674.275.0 5.74.44.24.0 Gregory ME 2437318933993465 69.870.771.572.4 4.33.73.63.5 VC2** E 2671 3317 3418 3508 72.0 72.4 73.1 73.8 4.4 3.8 3.4 3.5 C.V. 16131313 2.41.91.81.9 23.122.322.420.7 LSD 351276239209 2.11.20.90.8 0.90.50.40.3 *Maturity: E = early, M = medium, L = late; **High oleic oil chemistry. 2 YR= average of 2004 and 2005, 3 YR= average of 2003, 2004 and 2005; 4 YR= average of 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. ***Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus ratings (1-10, 1 = no disease) Pod yield of peanut varieties in three Florida locations. Entries are sorted by market type, maturity and the average yield in Marianna in descending order. Andru II** MER2396286945692239 3018 15291765 1647 5070450153563285 4553 Virugard E R 1839 2103 3863 2052 2464 1462 1236 1349 4719 4284 4695 3094 4198 AP-3 M R3884395759533417 4303 24552639 2547 4985509457603475 4829 Carver M R2178320148631997 3060 20971471 1784 5627531757113491 5037 ANorden** M R2360289043922336 2994 19232410 2167 5118491950662865 4492 GeorgiaGreenM R1561252549041736 2682 18882100 1994 5687515456143333 4947 AT201 M R1307210444111420 2311 15842175 1880 5167461449693278 4507 SunOleic 97R**M R1380140032461055 1770 13741126 1250 4404376041302626 3730 Florunner M R101616502807894 1592 13871342 1365 4985389647272981 4147 Georgia-03L M R 55763198 4387 29362943 2940 52435637 5440 AT3085A** M R 3298 3298 2510 2510 4020 4020

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 7 Pod yield of peanut varieties in three Florida locations. Entries are sorted by market type, maturity and the average yield in Marianna in descending order. AT3081B M R 2807 2807 2388 2388 3501 3501 Georgia-01R L R3255440057663636 4264 32753162 3219 6256584156155105 5704 C99-R L R2456362056794046 3950 35073875 3691 5373517853564401 5077 DP-1 L R2831329457663378 3817 26812882 2782 4828532548403701 4674 Hull** L R2420364551303359 3639 22622433 2347 3134452552763611 4136 Southern Runner L R1610289347112223 2859 23812753 2567 5130504644693143 4447 Georgia-02C** L R 2983 5105 2581 3556 2520 3078 2799 4234 5066 3607 4302 VAC92R E V2159298249042249 3073 15581707 1633 4913471262443775 4911 VC2** E V2522296244592285 3057 19301868 1899 5215447755023859 4763 Gregory MEV2262308442142055 2904 19591568 1764 5203497456473688 4878 NCV11 E V2218288837692114 2747 18171717 1767 5578512857603985 5113 NC12C E V2070243137211739 2490 17521497 1625 4901389649043252 4238 *E = early, M = medium, L = late; **High oleic oil chemistry; *** R=runner, V=virginia market type

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Peanut Variety Performance in Florida 2002-2005 8 Disease resistance of major peanut varieties in the southeastern U.S. Fewer points = better resistance. SunOleic 97R 2 50 30 30 Flavorunner 458 2 50 not rated not rated NC-V 11 35 30 25 NC12C 35 not rated not rated AT-201 2 35 30 20 Georgia Green 30 20 20 Virugard 30 25 20 Gregory 30 30 20 VC2 30 not rated not rated Anorden 2 25 25 25 Andru II 2 25 30 20 C-99R 4 20 15 15 Hull 2 20 10 15 Carver 3 20 30 20 GA03L 15 15 10 GA02C 2,3 15 20 10 GA01R 3 10 10 15 DP1 4 10 5 10 AP3 4 10 25 10 Tifrunner 10 15 25 Adapted from the 2006 University of Georgia Disease Risk Index. 1-Adequate research data is not available for all varieties with regards to all diseases. Additional varieties will be included as data to support the assignment of an index value are available. 2-High oleic variety. 3-Varieties Carver, GA-02C, and GA-01R have increased resistance to Cylindrocladium black rot (CBR) than do other varieties commonly planted in Georgia. 4-Varieties AP3, DP1, and C-99R are less resistant to CBR and are not recommended for fields where this disease is a problem.