Citation
Aruba Esso news

Material Information

Title:
Aruba Esso news
Creator:
Lago Oil and Transport Company, Ltd
Place of Publication:
Aruba Netherlands Antilles
Publisher:
Lago Oil and Transport Co., Ltd.
Creation Date:
July 3, 1954
Frequency:
biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 30-44 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Petroleum industry and trade -- Periodicals -- Aruba ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Language:
Text in English and papiamento.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
v. 1- 1940-
General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Biblioteca Nacional Aruba
Holding Location:
Biblioteca Nacional Aruba
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
000307401 ( ALEPH )
06371498 ( OCLC )
ABT4040 ( NOTIS )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
[Are Awarded LVS
1954 Scholarships

| Tinea



J J Horigan Discusses
“Future Of The Company

|. Says Lago Must Seek

*¥ "Competitive Business”

§
rE
Na

A

Lago’s future outlook was the
subject of an address given by
President J. Horigan before
some 600 lests at the annual
JN Supervisors’ Party June 26 at
the Aruba Golf Club. The pr
sident of the world’s largest ope
ating refinery told the supervisors
that Lago’s ba
but by keeping costs low
picking up competitive business "we
continue operating at

J.
gu

7E





can or near
capacity.”

Mr. Horigan explained
basic load has shrunk.
war,” he said, "we had
kets in Europe and Latin Americ
These provided us with
load on which to operate

He explained that because of the
growth of oil production around the
world, Lago has lost some of its as-|
sured marketing areas. Mr. Horigan
stated that of these countries
taking age of their low
labor rates are building refine-

the |
the
ured mar-

why

"Before



ge basic |





many
adva
and

are





ries.

Not only do these countries benefit
from this wage advantage, but by
producing in their own country they





rex benefits in currency exchange.
Referring to an article in Time”
magazine, Mr. Horigan pointed out

the low industrial wages in Europe
$.35 in France, $.384%
Germany and $.47 in England
pared to Lago’s a
of $1.03 plus.

He went on to



such as in





com-
age hourly wage |







however, that}













PUBLISHED BY LAGO OIL & TR

sic load has shrunk, |
and |





July 3, 1954



PORT CO.,



Supervisor a
Tende Horigan
Papia di Futuro

bata topico di un discurso teni door
di Presidente J. J. Horigan di Lago
Oil & Transport Co., Ltd., pa mas
of menos 500 invitado na Super-
visors’ Party anual Juni 26 na
Aruba Golf Club. E presidente di
refineria mas grandi cu ta opera
na mundo a bisa e supervisornan
cu Lago su negoshi a baha, pero
cu door di tene costo abao y ha-







e





ciendo competitivo "nos por sigui
opera na of cerca di plena capacidad.”
Sr. Horigan lica pakiko ne-





ia bai
> el a bi
segur na Europa
Esaki tabata duna nos un area gran-
di pa opei

El a pa motibo di pro-
duccion di azeta vond di mundo, Lago
{a perde algun di su mereadonan ase-
gu *. Horigan a bisa cu hopi di e
paisnan aki ta tuma ventaha di nan

-romer cu guer-
tabatin mercado
America del Sur.

atra









splica cu

LAGO President J. J. Horigan
at the 1 |

d annua
Supervisors’ Party.





a







LAGO Presidente J. J. Horigan jSueldonan abao di trabao y ta tra-
ta papia na e segundo Fiesta | hando refineria. om
Anual pa Supervisornan o solamente e paisnan aki tin



beneficio di e sueldonan abao, pero

door di produci den nan mes lugar





up this additional business,” he said.
He pointed out that Lago has a good



moneda estranhe

geographic position, a high through-|articulo den "Time”, Sr. Horigan a |
put which keeps unit costs down and|splica cu e sueldonan industrial abao

5 na Fran-
y $47 n
compara




low deprecitation based on Lago’s de- | na Europa, por ehemplo $

ion-era construction when pric 1

> low. | Inglaterra manera nan ta
Horigan told the group|cu sueldo promedio pa ora na Lago

as far as labor costs are concern-|loke awor ta poco mas cu $1.03.

ed, however, Lago is not so well off.| Sinembargo, el] a bisa tambe cu

up this point, he stated) consumpcion di azeta ta subiendo. El

that many of Lago’s competitors em-|a conta e grupo cu di e aumento ge-

ploy six or seven men per thousand] neral den tur parti di mundo cu





S| cia, na Alemani





also

Following





















ah oi consumption is rising. He told the| barrels of capacity while Lago em-|tuma lugar awor, afiliadonan di I

< group that of the general increase| Ploys 15 despite a longer work week/ta participa den e aumento na un
world-wide at present, Esso affiliates | 22d higher throughput. cantidad di mas of menos 100,000
figure in the increase to about 100,000 Mr. Horigan informed the super-|barril pa dia. demanda aumenta

an barrels a day. This increased demand| Visors that one-third of the Lago em j aki ta den me i re

nd is in the competitive market — "the | Ployee body is employed in such busi- | mercado cu Lag

rk market Lago must go after to con-| esses as the comm ry, housing,| sigui opera na of cerea di plena ca-
tinue operating at or near capacity.” | lé undry, dining halls and clubs. He! pacidad.”

ich We are in a good position to pick (Continued on page 2) | (Continua na pagina 3)

of

+ Over 100 Boys Rewarded

DC ———————





rete
pon
ged
‘ing

the
ush



dec
ules
tole

his

zon



‘Vocational School Has 1st ‘Honors Day’

| The Lago Vocational School
| rewarded 100 students for
| participation in various school and
}extra-curricular activities at its
| first annual "Honors Day” June 24,
Inscribed br keys, shop tools
|and books handed out at ce-
remonies conducted in the school’s
Noon-Hour Area. J. V. Friel,
Industrial Relations manager,
| the principal speaker.
| The vent
players, volleyball players, outstan-
ding athletes, safety monitors, stu-
|dent council members, school news-
| paper staff

over







ere

was

to basketball!

awards



membe



housekeepers,



members of the G Club, shop

| craftsmen, ‘suggestion box’ contri-

| butors and the school’s crack spelle

| Seven varsity and nine junior-
ity basketba!] players received



ass keys as did 10 varsity and 10
junior-varsity volleyball play who

;







The represented the school in leagues

Pret }sponsored by the Aruba _ School

the Athletic Association.

Lom HONORS DAY at the Lago Vocational School brought (left to right) Six boys were named by fellow

a J. Donata, J. Arends, A. Rasmijn, J. Monsanto, H. Thomsom, S. Feliciano |¢lass-members as the outstanding
and C. Richardson to the stage to receive inscribed keys from Instructor athletes of the school year. Third-

Glenroy E. S. Straughn. Over 100 boys got awards. |

(Continued on page 3)

Prospectiva futuro di Lago ta-|



nan ta realiza beneficionan den nan
10. Referiendo na un}





*

*

*









|

Loreto Kock



















Hendrik P. Bareno



; IDR’s Elected:

Start 2-Year

‘Term July 1

|

staff and regular employees, took
| up their duties as district represen-
|tatives July They will





serve





repr ntatives for employees in
districts through June, 1956.
Tie votes in District 10 forced a

tie
forced a

run-off representative election;
votes in Districts 29 and 32
|run-off alternate representative elec-
|tion. Both were scheduled for this
| we



Elected representatives during the
; voting June 17, 18 and 19 were:

District 1, A. C. Peterson and A. A. |
; District 2, F. Maduro and
District 38, I. Re
Angela; District



| Mz

|/V. Figaroa;
District 4, M.







E. A. Carti and A. Lampe; District 6,
a

L. Olive and M. Kemp;

D. Tromp.

District





», Wever; District 9,

District 11, 4H.
strict 12, J. H. Lake;
A. Bishop; District 14, }
Thompson; District 15, A. C.



J.

W.



Johnson; District 16, A. de Roble
| District 17, J. Boom; District 18,
‘|F. E. Romn District 19, A. B.}




Semerel; District 20, R. F. V

District 21, S. Lacle; District
| N. Croes; District 23, J. E. Romney;
District 24, F. O. Thomson; District
B. Luydens; District 26, J. Tromp; |

















District 27 Fung-A-Fat; District
28, District 29, I. Ras;
District ¢ >. Massdammello, A
Tearr; District Malmberg





32,

C. I. Tromp and District
B. J. Jones. |

| District
| 33,

| promise

=) Aruba

Thirty-seven men, elected by Lago’s |



!the members of that cl



Hendrik P. Bareno and Loreto
Kock were named last night by
President J. J. Horigan as the re-
cipients of the 1954 scholarships
that will take them to Allentown
High School in Pennsylvania for
one all-expenses-paid year of study.

The two 18-year old Aruban youths
were awarded the scholarships at the
12th Lago Vocational School gradua-
tion on the basis of scholastic ability,
personality and the high degree of
both boys show for the





future.

In the ceremonies held last night,
82 other Lago Vocational School stu-
dents capped four years of study and
practice by receiving their diplomas
before an audience of family mem-

| bers, friends and Lago executives.

Hendrik, who was born in Aruba
July 21, 1936, completed the sixth
at Piedra Plat School before
entering the vocational school in 1950.
Well-liked by his instructors and
fellow students, Hendrik h, been
especially adept at mathemat





ela





Loreto, who was also born in Aruba
in 1936, but on July 7, came to the
| vocational school from St. Dominicus
'College where he completed the
seventh grade. Well thought of on
the job and in class, Loreto has been
active in sports, especially baseball,
in addition to maintaining a high
standing in his studies.

Both boys will leave for Allentown
the latter part of next month to begin
what is sure to be an eventful year.
At Allentown they will be following
in the footsteps of 10 other LVS gra-
duates who have preceded them dur-
ing the last five years.



inciple speaker at the graduation
s last night was Netherlands
Assistant Inspector of Educa-
Kok, who is acting head of
schoo] system. Mr. Kok spoke
future of education in the
Antilles d told the graduates of
the necessity of training to equip
themselves for work anywhere in the
world.



Antille:
tion





on the




Following an address of welcome
by Scholarship Winner Kock and the
introduction of guests, J. V. Friel,
program chairman and manager of
Lago’s Industrial Relations Depart-
ment, welcomed the group and com-
|mented on "the unique accomplish-
ments” of the Class of 1950.

While noting that the graduates
had gone further into such subjects
as geometry, algebra, and trigono-
metry than any previous LVS class
they were entering a world in which
the demand for increased training
has made secondary education almost
required.





Musie was an important highlight
of the program, with the processional
played by the Lago Community Band
and songs by the Lago Vocational
School Glee Club under the direction
of Mrs. G. N. Owen. Three of the
glee club’s selections were "Ten



| Little Indians,” ’"Himno di Aruba,”
jand "Aruba Dushi.”




Following Mr. Kok’s addre Mr.
Friel introduced graduate apprentices
who began their vocational school

training in 1940, after which one of
, A. Kock,
ge to the




delivered a_ brief
mblage.

bian Francis, instructor in Eng-
at the vocational school, pre-
nted the graduating cl for the
awarding of diplomas by General
Superintendent F. E. Griffin.

After announcement of the scholar-
and a brief address by
gan, Purey Brunings, a
member of the graduating class, de-
livered the farewell address.

Ceremonies closed with the singing
of the Wilhelmus by the glee club
and a recessional march by the Lago
Community Band.

mes



lish













ARUBA

News

Printed by the Curacaosche Courant, Curacao, N.W.I.
PUBLISHED EVERY OTHER SATURDAY AT ARUBA, NETHERLANDS

WEST INDIES,

BY THE LAGO OIL & TRANSPORT CO., _ LTD.

Lago Vocational School

A Tene 1o "Dia di Honor”

Lago Vocational School a duna premio na mas cu 100 studiante pa
participacion den e varios actividadnan di school na ocasion di su pro-

mer "Dia di Honor”

celebra Juni 24,

Yabi di koper inscribi, herment y buki a worde presenta durante e
ceremonianan den e veld unda e studiantenan ta tene actividadnan di

J. V. Friel, gerente di Rela-
tabata e

merdia.
ciones et
principal.

E premionan a bai pa hungadornan
etball, di volleyball, atletanan
liente, monitornan di seguri-

dad, miembronan di consejo di stu-
diantenan, miembronan di redaccion
di corant di e school,
orden, miembronan di Glee
tesanonan, contribudornan na ’caha
di sugerencia’ y e studiantenan mas
sobresaliente den spe Imento.

Un total di di hungador di

basketball a recibi yabi di koper y
tambe binti hungador di volleyball cu
a representa e school den e competi-
cion bao auspicio di Aruba School
Association.

Seis mucha homber a worde
bra door di companjeronan di
como atletanan sobresaliente di e
anja escolar. Studiantenan di tres
anja a eligi Bernard Geerman y Carl
Lejuez; studiantenan di segunda anja
a eligi Caspar Boekhoudt y Alfonso
Steenen; studiantenan di promer an-
ja a eligi Mario Hanson y Rafael
Croes.

Diez-nuebe mucha homber cu a sir-
bi como monitor di seguridad den e
programa na school tambe a recibi
como regalo yabi di koper, y tambe
12 miembro di Consejo Estudiantil,
12 miembro di redaccion di e corant
di school, 12 mucha homber encarga
cu percuracion domestico na school y
40 miembro di Glee Club.

Hermentnan di corta palo a worde
regala na e tres studiantenan di pro-
mer anja escogi pa trabao sobresa-
liente. Nan tabata Hendrik Leo, Con-
stancio Gomez y Mariano Croes. Es-
nan cu a haya mencion honorable pa
nan trabao tabata Juan v/d Linden,
Cecilio Ras y Francisco v/d Linden.

E school cu no ta participa den
programa di ’Coin Your Ideas’ tin un
’eaha di sugerencia.’ Addison Harms
y Regino Tromp a recibi buki como
regalo pa e sugerencianan cu nan a
manda aden y cu a worde huzga di
mehor di henter e anja escolar.

Ganadornan di e concurso di spel-
mento di Ingles pa e segunda semes-
ter a recibi un diccionario como pre-
mio. Di e 450 palabra cu nan mester
a spel, Rosindo Geerman a sali pro-
mer cu 448 bon; Betrando de Cuba
segunda cu 445 y Cecilio Ras tabata
di tres cu 442.

Carl Lejuez, presidente di Consejo
Estudiantil, y Caspar Boekhoudt a
parti honor pa e cantidad mas grandi
di premio cu cinco cada uno.

nom-

klas

orador

tenedornan di| ;
Club, ar- |



Future of Lago

(Continued from page 1)
indicated that some of Lago’s princi-
pal competitors are not burdened with
these side lines. Mr. Horigan stated
that wages in the petroleum industry

higher than in other
businesses

"This airrerence in wages,” he con-
tinued, “is especially high in Aruba
and by turning over the jobs to
others, we will save a large percent-
age of this and place ourselves in a
better competitive position.”

About Lago’s side lines, Mr. Hori-
gan assured the group that “as long
as present conditions remain un-
changed Lago will continue to run the
hospital.” He told of plans to shrink
the size of Lago Colony as Lago’s

nationalization program makes is

| more unnecessary to bring in foreign

staff employees.

He mentioned that the only definite
plans concerned Lago Heights. His
final remark on side line business

: "As to the other side lines we
are in, we have no definite plans, but
they seem easier of solution than
the hospital and Lago Colony.”

Mr. Horigan closed his address by
complimenting the oil men of Lago,
stating that he felt sure, judging
from past experience, the old ’pros’
who successfully handled all Lago’s
assignments before will meet what-
ever problems the future might hold
and get the job done and done well
regardless of its complications.

Following the dinner and enter-
tainment which include an orchestra,
boxing bouts and a dancer, the
evening was brought to a close with
remarks by General Superintendent
Frank E. Griffin. Speaking of the
supervisors’ job, he told the men they
form a team that through competent
leadership can successfully meet any
challenge that might arise.

Paul M. Walker
Retires Oct. 1

Paul M. Walker will end almost a
quarter-century of service with Lago
Oct. 1 when he retires as Fire Equip-
ment Maintenance foreman. He was
first employed in 1929 as
fitter first class.

He has also served as Pipe Shop
subforeman, Salvage Yard foreman |
and Fire Maintenance foreman. He |
will return to the United States.

FELLOW Utility Division employees chipped in last month to present
Paul M. Walker (center) with a gift in honor of his retirement after almost
a quarter-century of service with Lago.
COMPANJERONAN di trabao den Utilities Division a contribui hunto
luna pasé pa presenta Paul M. Walker (centro) un regalo en honor di su
retiro despues di casi un cuarto siglo di servicio cu Lago.

a pipe-|

| from Bukuru w

ARUBA ESSO NEWS

Care to travel? Then the ex-
ploits of a man whose particular
| talents have taken him across four
continents in the past 14 years
|should stir envious thoughts. The
gentleman whose suitcase, pass-|
|port and airplane ticket form the
badge of his wandering office is |
Joseph P. DeKens.

As field service representative of
E Export Corporation’s Technical
Department, Mr. DeKens goes wher-
ever an aircraft refueling expert is
needed — be it Europe, Africa, North
America or South America.

So that planes may be quickly and}
efficiently fueled at insta
pumping Mr. DeKe
close surveillance over their
tions. In maintaining this supervision, |
his route has covered 42 countries and

taken him from burning desert
ar where temperatures range
around 135 degre Fahrenheit to
sub-zero weather in war-torn, coal-
short Berlin, Germany.

It wasn’t always globe-trotting, |
however. Mr. DeKens was first |
employed as a mechanic with Socony |
Vacuum. As a mechanic he learned
the intricacies of fueling installa-
tions and their proper maintenance.
His experience in refueling led him
to his first assignment ’’on the road.”

lations |
keeps |

opera-

0,

as



It was July, 1942. The
raging and the Allied war machine
needed supplies. High on the list of
urgent needs was aviation gasoline.
Mr. DeKens was assigned to 4
to set up supply lines and refueling |
installations in Liberia, the Gold
Coast and Nigeria. His first stop was
Marshall, Libe but not until he
had made a nervy ngling trip across
the Atlantic that involved dodging
German submarines intent upon
sending their torpedoes into Allied
ships.

At Marshall he assisted in laying
out supply Roberts Field. |
His next stop was Accra, Gold Coast,
where he arranged to bring in avia-
tion gasoline from Tankarodi, also in
the Gold Coast, and the
war bulk plant location in tk
Accra was headquarters
Middle East Air Wing.

From Accra his African journey
took him to Lagos, Nigeria. Here he
set up supply lines to Bukuru and
Kano. At Kano he supervised the
establishment of bulk storage facili-
ties and at Bukuru he put into effect
an around-the-clock convoy of tank
trucks that fed one of the most im-
portant airfields in the area.

Madugari
378 miles inland
Madugari. Here the
Allies set up an airfield which was
|the last stop on the west coast of
Africa. It was vital that this field
have sufficient oil and gasoline for
planes making Madugari their final |
port of call before the long flight |
across the desert. Working with 20}
trucks each capable of carrying 1800 |
gallons, Mr. DeKens had convoys of |
/10 on the road between Bukuru and |
| Madugari at all times. |
| The round trip rook three days. |

war was

lines for

Located

some



| continued,

| Mr.



@ | Driving at night to avoid as much
|heat as possible, the drivers bounced |
| along the oil-packed trail cut through
heavy jungle to the lf-way house.”
| Here they rested briefly and set out
|for the remainder of the trip. Going
jor coming, they followed the same
procedure of driving half-way, rest- |
ing, and then continuing. |

The drivers and those who worked |
lat the Madugari airfield were all
members of the Hausa, Falarnu and |
Pagan tribes. The convoy drivers |

all natives trained by Mr. DeKens |
and his assistants — proved to be|
good, depen le drivers.

"In fact, they got more uses out of |

those trucks than the manufacturer
ever thought’ possible,’ mused Mr.
DeKens. "One of the their favorite
tricks was to tie chickens on the
crankshaft. The heat of the motor

plus the high temperatures of the}

area gave the driver a perfectly well| pumped 10 million gallons and until | pany

| entry into Germany, he was appoint-

| United States Air

Forty-two Countries in 14 Years

SUITCASE in hand
DeKens, field service representative

Department, is rea

for another trip in hi

Esso Man Girdles Globe Fueling Planes

passport and airplane tick

of Esso Exp

well-trave

roasted chicken.
those chicken
motor!”

But, oh what
feathers made

a me

the

of
|

DeKens
of our

Chuckling to himself, Mr.
"Another time
|drivers spotted a leopard and raced
the truck into the jungle after him.
Oddly enough, the cat turned into the |
truck and the driver ran over him |
a rather novel way of killing animals
in the jungles of Africa.”
Never-the-] Mr. DeKens and his
crew kept the airfields supplied with
gasoline. Between the Karno and
Madugari airfields, over five million
gallons were pumped a_ month.
Aruba’s Dakota airport pumps an
average of 60,000 a month.

one

High Temperatures

It was in the Madugari locale that
DeKens experienced temperatu-
res up to 135. At night it dropped
off to about 95. Although the night
time temperatures seem high, those
of us in that area felt cold at night
and wore jackets. It was just a
matter of our bodies being so over-
heated during the day, that a drop
of over 30 degrees made us run for!
warmth.” And if it wasn’t the heat
he had to contend with, it was sand
storms or rains. The Hamatan season
hits the Madugari area in October,
November and December, and with it |
comes cutting sand storms. The rains
run from April to September. They |
always started April 15. When it |
started to rain, you knew exactly
what date it was without fail,’ he}

intense heat that |
confronted Mr. DeKens. For in 1946
following the war and a short stay
at home, he found himself in Berlin,
Germany, aiding airport supervisors
to reorganize their installations. That |
winter he found himself trying to
scape the biting cold in sub-zero,
coal-short, war-torn Germany.
Nine months after his July,

It wasn’t alw



1946

ed aviation coordinator for all of Ger-
This appointment came a few |
months before he engaged in|
the biggest task encountered |
during his career — the refueling of
planes flying the Berlin air lift.

Berlin Air Lift

In Hamburg at the time, he rushed
to Frankfort and the Rhine-Main Air |
Base, main operating center of the
Force. He super-}
vised refueling operations at this|
base and also the airfield at Weis-
baden. The immersity of the opera-
tion is best described in the number
of gallons pumped. W in the
millions? Mr. DeKens w

He smiled. "In July,

many.
was
ever



1948,

we

| storage

|demanding task,

lift subsided
appr hed this figure every
he said he started to
hectic days of the lift.

"The fuel came in all over
the world. It was pumped into the
tanks at Bremerhaven where
the Germans had built storage faci-
lities capable of holding two billion
gallons — the largest in the world.
The tanks were under 15-feet of
concrete to protect them from Allied
bombardment.

the air
end, we
month,”
the

as it neared its

as
relive

from

"From Bremerhaven the gasoline
was railed to Weisbaden and Rhine
Main. We didn’t have storage facili-
ties when the lift started and had
to pump directly from the railroad
tank car to the waiting trucks. The
trucks, in turn, took the gas to the
planes on the field. Later we had
storage facilities for the gas coming
in by rail. This made our operation
a little bit easier.

"Night and day
trucks refueling planes laden with
coal, food and clothes. Twenty-four
trucks carried 4000 gallons, 20 r
ried 2000 gallons and the remainder
handled the planes’ oil demands. The
crews that manned the trucks were
all German. It was a nerve-racking,
but brought it
ul conclusion.”

we operated 60

we

to a succes

Frazier Promoted
In TSD- Engineering

Project Engineering’s Section
Technical Service Department, h
new Assistant Supervising Engineer.
Promoted to that post, effective July
1, was Burton R. Frazier.

Mr. Fre who first joined Lago
in July, 1952 as an Electrical Design-
er Engineering, Engineer A
at the time of his present promotion.

During the last
; years, four of
them with the U.S.
@ Navy, Mr. Frz c
has been emplc
in
ties in the oil busi- *
including 2%
years in Ecuador
and Peru as a pe-
troleum geo-phys
cist for the Inter- i
national Petroleum
Company, one year i

zier,

was an

various capaci-

ness,

B. R. Frazier

similar capacity with the
Oil and Refining Compan
and, for the last six years prior to *
joining Lago, employed as a ,
design-engineer with the T Com-
at a refinery in Los Angeles,

in a
Humble

was









—

July 3, 1954



Futuro di Lago

(Continua di pagina 1)



s ta den bon posicion pa b
e negoshi adicional aki,” el a bi
El a munstra cu Lago tin un posicion
geografico cu ta favorable, un pro-
duccion halto cu ta tene costo di
plantanan abao y un _ depreciacion
abao debi na e construccion cu
a haci tempo di depresion ora prijs
tabata barata.

Sr. Hor a declara na e grupo
tambe cu en cuanto costo di trabao
ta toca, sinembargo, Lago no ta asina
bon para. Siguiendo ariba e punto aki
el a bisa cu hopi competidornan di
Lago ta emplez , ste homber
pa cada mil barril di capacidad mien-
tras Lago ta mantene 15, un siman
di trabao mas largo y produccion mas
halto.

Sr. Horigan a informa supervisor-
nan cu un tercera parti di empleado-
nan ta traha den lugarnan manera
comisario, casnan, laundry, dining
hall y clubnan. El a indica cu algun
di e competidornan principal di Lago
sorto di servicionan. Sr.








seis of s







no tin tal

Horigan a declara cu sueldonan den |

industria petrolero semper ta mas
halto cu den cualkier otro negoshi.

”f diferencia aki den sueldo,” el a
continua, "ta specialmente halto na
Aruba y door di pasa e trabaonan na
otro, nos ta bai spaar un percentaje
grandi y pone nos mes den mehor po-
sicion pa competi.”

Tocante e servicionnan di Lago, Sr.
Horigan a egura e grupo cu "tan
tempo condicionnan presente no cam-
bia Lago ta sigui opera e hospital.”
El] a conta tocante plannan pa reduci
tamanjo di Lago Colony segun Lago















su programa di nationalizacion ta ha-
ci mas y mas innecesario pa_ trece
empleadonan foreign staff aki.”





El a menciona cu e unico plan de
finitivo ta concerna Lago Heights. Su
observacion final ariba e servicionan
tabata: "Tocante e otro servicionan
cu nos ta aden, nos no tin ningun plan
definitivo, pero parce cu nan por wor-
de soluciona mas liher cu e problema
di hospital y Lago Colony.”

Sr. Horigan a termina su discurso
complimentando e hombernan di Lago,
bisando cu el tabata segur, huzgando
for di experiencia pasa, e veterano-
nan bieuw kende previamente a cum-
pli cu exito na tur encargonan di
Lago lo enfrenta atrobe cualkier pro-
blema cu futuro por trece y logra ha-
ci e trabao y bon haci tambe no ob-
stante e complicacionnan.

Despues di e comida y programa di
recreacion cual tabata inclui un or-
chestra, boxeo y un _ bailarina, e
anochi a worde cerra cu un discurso
di Superintendente General Frank E.
Griffin. Papiando tocante trabao di
un supervisor, el a bisa e hombernan
cu nan ta forma un equipo cu door di
direccion competente por enfrenta cu











exito cualkier situacion cu por pre-
senta.

Mucha Homber

A Skirbi Cu Su
Poyito Ta Bon

Ernesto de Kort di 15 anja, un

studiante di dos anja den Lago Vo-
cational School, a scirbi un composi-
cion den un concurso na school y a
gana. Titulo di e composicion tabata
”Pakiko Mi Kier Un Poyito.” Den un
nota na Aruba Esso News reciente-
mente, el a duna un reportaje tocan-
te su premio.

El a scirbi, "Bo ta corda cu mi a
gana e poyito e dia, pero en realidad
mi no a haya e poyito cu a nace den
refineria. Mi a ha un otro pasobra
esun di promer a muri un dia promer
cu mi mester a haye’le. Mi a hiba e
poyito cas e siguiente Diasabra. Mi
a traha un cas pe. E tabata un gai
chikito.

”Un siman a pasa y tur cos a bai
bon, pero den di tres siman e tabata
hopi malo. Mi a kere cu e ta bai
muri, pero mi mama y ami a traha
hopi cu ne. Ni ariba su pianan el por
a para. >

"Nos a sigui asina como cuatro dia
largo, anto di cinco dia el a para y
a cuminza camna y despues a mehora
rapidamente. Awor e ta un gai gran-
di blanco mas of menos 14% pia hal-
tos"













Nn
HENDRIK BEKS is shown receiving a

co-workers in honor of his retirement July | after 21'/> years of service
with Lago.

HENDRIK BEKS ta munstrd recibiendo un check for di companjeronan
di trabao den Mechanical — Electrical en honor di su retiro Juli despues

di 21-!/p anja di

Toren di Control ta Yama
"Wowo y Horeanan di Haaf”’

’Wowo y horeanan di haaf” ta loke nan ta yama e toren di control
ariba Marine Office. En realidad e wowo y horeanan ta pertenece na e
cuatro hombernan cu ta dirigi como 10,000 yegada y salida di bapor

tur anja.
Sesenta y cinco pia halto den un

gudi cu cada ranca di biento, e hombernan aki ta alerto 24 ora pa dia.

Hasta ora nan ta papia, nan wowo-
nan ta busea ariba lamar y e haaf
bao nan.

Nan ta waak pa un tanquero cu
por ta bini di Rotterdam, of New|
York, of Port Said. Nan ta waak
tambe pa un tanquero chikito cu por
ta bini for di Lago Maracaibo, of un
T-2 procedente di Amuay.

Mirando den haaf, nan ta waak
particularmente pa un senjal indi-
cando cu un bapor a caba di carga, |
of ta cla pa sali. Trahando tambe co-
mo observadornan di posible candela,
nan ta alerto pa cualkier vlam chiki-
to of nubia di huma.

Sinembargo, nan promer responsa-
bilidad ta pa mira cu bapornan dren-
ta haaf, mara na e luga igna, des- |
carga of tuma un carga y sali cu un
minimo di tempo perdi y un maximo
di seguridad.

E trahadornan den e toren di con- |
trol ta sirbi como dirigidornan di tra-
fico ariba e avenidanan di lamar cu
ta termina den haaf di San Nicolas.
Nan ta opera no cu fluit y hand-
schoen blanco na man, pero cu conico
y bala pinta cu strepi, luznan di co-
lor, luznan di duna senjal y radio-
telefoon. |

Tur dia nan ta r i
pornan cu mester drenta y
ey. Hunto cu otro informacion, e|
lista ta duna e ora calcula di yegada, |
e lugar di mara y ora di salida. |

Awor ta keda na e trahador den e |
toren pa soma e bapornan ora nan
bira rond di Colorado Point, bini di
direccion di Oranjestad of for di pa-
for. Cu un luz di duna senjal el ta}
pidi e bapor pa determina su identi-
dad y ta duna instruccion pa mara
cual e bapor ta repeti.

Anto, mientras e bapor ta acercan-
do haaf, e operador ta yama oficial-
nan di duana y imigracion na tele-
foon, e hefe di waaf, un remoleador,
un loods, Departamento di Receiving
& Shipping y e despachador di lan-
cha. Pa tempo cu e bapor ta dilanti
di un di e entradanan, cada persona
concerna cu su yegada ta presente.

Ademas di usa Morse Code y In-
ternational Code Flags, e operador-
nan tin un set di senjal devisé door
di Lago pa controla trafico den haaf,
E senjalnan aki, den dia, ta componi
di varios sorto di bala, conico y bar-















°
es







ril pinta cu strepi geel y oranje.
Anochi nan ta luz corra, geel y
blanco.

El por habri of cerra Entrada Pa-



ARUBA ESSO NEWS



nor Beks
BY,





check from Mechanical — Electrical

servicio cu Lago.

cubiculo blanco cu berde cu ta sa-



riba of Pabao, of limita nan uso pa
bapornan cu ta sali. El por cerra un
entrada y laga e otro habri pa ba-
pornan cu ta yega of sali. El por ha-
bri Entrada Pariba of Pabao sola-
mente pa bapornan cu ta drenta, y
cerra e otro pa tur trafico. El por
cerra tur dos entrada of habri tur
dos.

Un gran parti di trabao di e toren
ta cu e tanqueronan chikito. Ora e
bapor ta bini di afor, e operador ta
manda afor su instruecionnan pa ma-
ra. Captan di e bapor, pa indica cu
el ta comprende, ta repeti e instruc-
cionnan door di blink e tres luznan
blanco monta ariba e cuarto di stuur
di tur e bapornan cu ta nabega re-
gularmente den Lago Maracaibo.

Ora e bapor mara y ta deseargan-
do e ta hiza un conico preto te mitar
di su mastre. Ora e ta cla pa sali e
ta hiza e conico e resto of
chi — ta duna senjal cu e luznan di



ano-

Canina Tower Operators



On Job 24 Hours A Day

"The eyes and ears of the harbor”

to every gust of wind, these men
Even as they talk, their eyes scan
the sea and the harbor beneath them.

They’re on the watch for an ocean
tanker which may be arriving from
Rotterdam, or New York, or Port
Said. They keep a lookout, too, for
a lake tanker coming up from Lake
Maracaibo, or a T-2 bound in from
Amuay.

Scanning the harbor, they keep an
eye peeled for a signal indicating a
ship is unloaded, or is ready to sail.
Doubling as harbor fire wardens,
they’re on the alert for a_ tell-tale
tongue of flame or puff of smoke.

Their primary responsibility, how-
ever, is to see that ships enter the
harbor, tie up at the assigned berth,
discharge or take on cargo and
sail with a minimum of wasted time
and a maximum of safety.

The control tower operators serve
as traffic officers over the sea lanes
which empty into San Nicolas harbor.
They operate not with whistles and
white-gloved hand signals, but with
| striped cones and balls, colored lights,
| blinker lamps and radio telephones.

Each day they receive lists of the
ships expected to arrive and depart
that day. Along with other informa-
tion, the list gives the anticipated
arrival time, assigned berth and
sailing time.

It is up to the control tower oper-
ator to spot the ships as they come
west and north from Colorado Point,
southeast from Oranjestad or in from
the southwest. With a blinker lamp he
signals the ship to determine its
identity and pass along its berthing
instructions which the ship repeats.

Then, while the vessel approaches
the harbor, the operator telephones
customs and immigration — officials,
the dock master, a tug, a pilot, Re-
ceiving and Shipping and the launch
dispatcher. By the time the vessel is
off one of the entrances, each person
concerned with its arrival is standing
by.

In addition to using Morse Code
and International Code Flags, the
operators have a set of signals de-
vised by Lago to control its harbor












traffic. Thes mbols, by day, are
composed of various arrangements of
balls, cones and barrels striped

yellow and orange. At night they’re



Lago Maracaibo.

HIGH ABOVE San Nicolas harbor, Control Tower Operator J. A.

combinations of red,

made up of







dies

Scott

prepares to hoist an orange-yellow striped ball, one of the signals used

to direct ha

HALTO ARIBA haaf di San Nicola
Scott ta prepara pa hasi un bala c
cu ta worde usa pa d

rbor traffic.

s, operator di Control Tower J. A.
u strepi oranje-geel, un di e signal
irigi trafico den haaf.

™™ Directing Ship Movements

is what they call the control tower

atop the Marine Office. Actually the eyes and ears belong to the four
men who direct some 10,000 ship arrivals and departures each year.
Perched 65 feet in the air in a green and white cubicle which vibrates



are on the alert 24 hours a day.



green and white lights.

By hoisting the cone, the ball or
both in combination to the yard-arm
atop the signal tower or by turning
on the lights, the operator can route
the ship traffic so as not to interfere
with work being done in the harbor,
or with ships moving about the
harbor.

He can close or open the East or
West Entrance, or limit their use to
outgoing ships. He can close one
entrance and leave the other open to
ships arriving and departing. He can
open the East or West Entrance only
to incoming ships, and close the
other to all traffic. He can close both
entrances, or open both.

Much of the tower’s work is with
lake tankers. As the ships come in
from the southwest the operator
blinks out its berthing instructions.

The ship’s master, to indicate he
understands, repreats the instruc-
tions by flashing the three white

lights mounted over the wheelhouse

of all vessels regularly sailing in
Lake Maracaibo.
Berthed and unloaded, the Lake

tanker hoists a black cone halfway
to its yardarm. When it is ready to
sail, it hoists the cone and its code
flag the rest of the way or — at
night — signals with its Lake Ma-
racaibo lights.

The man in the control tower must
keep an eye out for these signals and
fit the lake tanker’s departure into
the harbor traffic schedule. He has
to listen for the two long whistle
blasts that indicate an ocean-going
vessel is ready to sail. And he has to
watch for approaching ships.

It is not unusual for an operator
to have — simultaneously — a ship
docking, another sailing and several
waiting to enter the harbor. The suc-
cessful operation of the harbor de-
pends in a large part upon the skill
of these men who must judge, within
minutes, the time each ship will con-
sume in these operations.

Honors Day

(Continued from page 1)

- year students elected Bernard Geer-
man and Carl Lejuez; second-year
students elected Caspar Boekhoudt
and Alfonso Steenen; first-year stu-
dents elected Mario Hanson and
Rafael Croes.

Nineteen boys who served as
monitors in the school’s Safety Pro-
gram were also rewarded with brass
keys as were 12 members of the Stu-
dent Council, 12 members of the
school newspaper staff, 12 boys who
helped with the school] housekeeping
detail and 40 members of the Glee
Club.

Woodworking tools were given as
prizes to the three first-year stu-
dents chosen for outstanding shop
work. They were Hendrik Leo, Con-
stancio Gomez and Mariano Croes.
Given honorable mention for their
shop work were Juan v/d_ Linden,
Cecilio Ras and Francisco v/d Lin-
den.

The school, which does not have a
‘Coin Your Ideas’ program, has a
’suggestion box.’ Addison Harms and





Regina Tromp received books «as
awards for the suggestions they
submitted which were judged the
best during the school year. e

The winners of the second semester
English spelling contest received
dictionaries as prizes. Asked to spell
450 words, Rosindo Geerman was
first with 448; Betrando de Cuba was
second with 445 and Cecilio Ras’ was



third with 442.

ee ee ee ee







ARUBA ESSO NEWS





SQUAT incthestaten















ng
t 1 bug, the dredge work
day new,
tring-straight c te
Palmas. , 600
mile: ong, it w 160
vars. One thousand it
end seven miles in the n
into the Gulf of Venez
PLAT den awa manera un bestia monstruo
largo, e draga “Jamaica Bay’ ta
dia y i ariba e canal n
est den Lago Maracaibo cu ta corre for

Punta de Pal
600 pia hancho milla
ta 160 million bolivars.

Trinta

y |8





extende siete mille



di Venezu

Lite Aboard a Lake Tanker

“What Has It Been Like, This Shuttling Back And Forth?”



The "'Mara” sailed about 8:35. Capt. J. P. Turner took her out through
the West Entrance, conning the ship by lining up the red and green
clusters which showed high admist the myriad lights of the refinery
astern.

”"Paaawrt a bit, quartermaster,” the captain sing-songed to the helmsman.
*Paaawrt a bit more. Steady!” Then, ’Steady as you go.” Turning to the
third mate the captain said, Full away, Mr. McBride. The course is . We
went down at 225 the last trip and we were a bit inside.”

Third Mate John McBride rang "full ahead” on the engine telegraph and
the S.S. Mara was off on its 1231st voyage.

For over Lake Tankers such as the ”
down” to acaibo. They sail out of San } as harbor with their
lowest de four to five feet above the water. They return with the same
decks awash, burdened with Venezuelan crude oil for Lago.

They have been the life-line of the refinery and of Aruba, the artery which
has carried the "black gold” upon which the refinery and its employees
prospered.

But now the slow, limited-capacity lakers have become out-dated. They’r«
being forced to give way to the larger, faster ships — T-2’s, super-tankers
and others — which can load crude pipelined to Amuay and which will soon
be able to go where once only the lakers could go.

What has it been like, this shuttling back and forth for over three decades
hauling crude to the transshipment station which was the fore-runner of
Lago, and later to feed the insatiable appetite of the largest operating
refinery in the world today? For the most part it’s been like the trip the
”Mara” set off on June 3.

The Mara” was bound for Palmarejo, a loading terminal on the south-
west shore of the lake, to pick up some 40,000 barrels of Mara crude. Though
the ship’s ’sailing-time’ clock said 6 p.m., a faulty pump delayed the
departure almost 242 hours.

After an “outside” trip to Haiti, the "Mara” had returned to Aruba via
Amuay where it had taken on a load of crude. By the time the last tank was
unloaded, Capt. Turner was on the bridge. Chief Mate L. R. Good, who had
telephoned the control tower atop the Marine Office, reported the ship
dispatchers had scheduled the ’Mara” to sail after the S.S. Geni, an ocean-











” have been "running





have







QUARTERMASTER C. O. Emerenciano hoists the ‘J’ code flag as

signal to the control tower that the “Mara’’ is ready to sail.

TIMONERO C. O. Emerenciano ta hiza e bandera cu letra “J

senjal na toren di control cu ''Mara’’ ta cla pa sali.

como

AS THE

AT THE engin

going tanker, which was then leaving the dock and heading for the East
Entrance.

As the Geni” passed astern, Capt. Turner alerted the engineers by having
"stand by” rung on the engine telegraph, then checked to ma sure Chief
Mate Good and Second Mate S. T. M. Boyd were fore and aft to supervise
handling of the

Next he ordered Mr. Good to "single up” — to free
had one blast sounded on the ship’s whistle. The signal was for Mr. 1 to
let go all lines aft. With engines and rudder the captain worked the stern
from the dock, then ordered Mr. Good to "let go forward.”

With the engines astern, the *"Mara” backed from the No. 4 Lake Tanker
Dock and into the harbor. Ordering "half ahead” on the starboard engine,
the bow swung around and headed for the West Entrance.

"When I have a choice, I always prefer to sail by the West Entrance,
Capt. Turner explained as he gave orders to the helmsman from the bridge.
"Starboard a bit,’”’ he called. From inside the wheelhouse came the voice of
the helmsman repeating the order. ’Midships,” the captain called. ’Midships,”
echoed the helmsman.

On the decks below the coiled the eight-inch
rewound the cables on their drums and secured the ship for sea.

Once past the red and green lights which marked the opening of the West
Entrance, Capt. Turner gave Mr. McBride the "full away” order. Though
the engine telegraph indicated both engines were at "full ahead,’ Mr.
McBride repeated the signal.



mooring lines.

all lines but one — and













crew mooring hawsers,

In the engine room astern the telegraph pointer swung around, then came
back to “full ahead.” It was a signal to Second Engineer E. W. McDowell
and Fourth Engineer A. R. Bald that the maneuvering was over, that their
1,000 horse-power steam engines would probably stay "full ahead” until the
ship reached the entrance to Lake Maracaibo.

The "Mara” headed out into the dark, wind-whipped Caribbean. Ahead to
port the Southern Cross competed with a sliver of moon that rode high in the
. Outside the harbor the lights of two ships, waiting to enter, broke the
darkness.

On the horizon the lights of two passing ships could be seen while astern
the lights of the S.S. Cumarebo, heading for Amuay, slipped off to port.









Mara

relax in their qu

MIENTRAS ‘Mara’ ¢s

miembronan di tripu

*



July 3, 1954





crew member
have other hobbies.



90M

for ''full ahe



o di maquin

adilanti

On the bridge the captain, mat
only by the glow that broke thr
telegraph and the binnacle light

Once outside the reef the "Ma
the ship — riding high with all
"There’s about two hours of this
compressed between the island anc
here.”

The captain’s prediction proved
passed some 2% miles off Macol
the north coast of Venezue the
in relatively calm seas at a stead

The sound of music, which had
aft, died away as the men turnec
,’ the ”"M s” two cats,
and turned in, too. Only the sound
the rigging and the muted mumb

As the night on the ligl
appeared, passed and disappeared
overtook the ”Mara” ed
cence.

At midnight Mr. Boyd relieved
termaster relieved the helmsman :
Mr. Good relieved Mr. Boyd, anot
Mara” plowed on.









ge



eri

wore

and p

Dawn spotted the ship still
As the sun rose so did the crew 1
around, then returned to straight
indicating breakfast for the
who had been on duty since four.

Thirty-minutes later white-coa
handbells which they
and of: On the
ham, eggs, toast and coffee.

Breakfast over, the

son





rang,

rang to an



cers. menu was

crew swun

a

IN THE

Ce
work on a

ombra ariba dek <

DEN

splits cable. Durante e via





July 3, 1954





ONCE outside San Nicolas harbor, lake tanker quartermasters like J. S$. Thompson

ARUBA ESSO NEWS

(above) steer a straight course to the lake mouth.

UNA VEZ pafor di haaf di San Nicolas, stuurmannan na bordo di tanqueronan



raquingarto Maquinista
anti’ yra’ ta ariba su di 1231 viaje.

n, mat! helmsman stood in darkness relieved
ke thrithe red glass windows of the engine
light } the comp
© *Ma’an into a quartering swell which set
th al] ts wing tanks empty — to tossing.

of thispt. Turner explained. "The current is
ind andland and builds up into a bit of a swell





proved2ct. About two hours later, as the ship
Macokht which flashes from a headland on
la, thell subsided and the ship plowed along
. stead knots an hour.

ch hade from a radio in the crew’s quarters
turnedor the night. "Marmalade” and ”Gin-
its, er{ under the mid-ship accommodations
sound e bubbling bow wave, the wind through
mumbof the engir could be heard.

he liglf other ships, coming from the lake,
pearedrn. Faster ships, heading for the lake,
passed a wake of shimmering phosphores-



‘lieved McBride on the bridge, another quar-
sman +e ship continued on its way
ij, anotielmsman took over the whe



ill sone hours from the entrance to the lake.
crew vers. They appeared on deck for a look
raightp their quarters. At 7:30 a single bell
for thecers and men who would relieve those
e four.




ite-coaitewards appeared fore and aft with
to ante breakfast for the rest of the crew
1 was juice, cereal, curried lamb and rice,

swuno the daily maintenance work. As the

= POP | Simon Bozmen (left) and John Taylor

lice. C the trip the crew does daily main-

fek ate rane:
eo atr mon Bozmen (robez) y John Taylor ta
2 e via

ripulacion ta haci mantenecion diario.



chikito manera J. S. Thompson (ariba) ta mantene un direccion fiho pa yega boca

di e Lago.

ship steamed through a white-capped Gulf of Venezuela turned a sparkling
blue by the bright sun, they appeared on the trunk deck with hammers,
chipping irons and brushes to flake away the paint blistered by sun and sea
and the rust underneath.

On the poop deck aft others spliced cables, checked running gear, painted
a bulkhead or performed other chores while keeping one eye cocked on the
wire fishing lines which trailed astern. Suddenly Simon Bozmen, who had
been at work on a cable, dropped his tools and grabbed one of the lines which
had snapped taut.

Pulling hand-over-hand he hauled a 20-pound jack-fish over the rail with
practiced ease and threw it flopping on the deck. Another crew-member circled
the fish, then darted in and with an expert blow of a club dispatched it.

Down in the green and white engine room Fireman Geronimo George
worked with an oil can, filling reservoirs and lubricating the moving parts
of the hissing steam engines, fuel pumps, water circulators and the spinning
twin propellor shafts.

On the bridge Mr. McBride stood behind a pair of field glasses. He was
on the lookout for a Island, a low, sandy spit which swings out into
the Caribbean and forms the stern side of the lake mouth. About 9 a.m.
the beacon which marks the island appeared in the gl. S.

A half hour later Capt. Turner appeared on the bridge, checked the ship’s
position and ordered "port a bit, quartermaster.” He explained he preferred
to be "a little to windward” as the ship neared the entrance to the channel
which pierces the outer bar.

The “EM” — ’entrance to Maracaibo’ — buoy came in sight, bobbing in
the chop some four miles off the finger of Venezuela which juts up into and
forms the east coast of the Guajira Peninsula. Nearer the shore rode another
buoy which marked the wreck of the Don Alberto.”

As the Mara” stood in toward the shore, Capt. Turner ordered "stand by”
rung on the engine telegraph and the engineers hurried to their stations. The
captain then ordered "half ahead” on the engines and a black cone suspended
from the forward mast was run down half way as a signal to other ships
that the ’Mara” was proceeding at half spee

Ahead lay the peninsula shore. At the water’s edge, on railroad tracks so
they could be shifted if the channel moved, stood three mar . Capt. Turner
conned the ship by lining the center marker with another atop a mountain
some five miles to the southwest.











eS










Then, behind two ocean-going tankers, the Mara” passed another buoy,
turned to port and started through the channel which pierces the outer bar.

The outer bar channel averages about 180 feet in width and 25 feet in
depth. It has been a restle passage, working its way across the entrance
to the lake and back again. Silt, carried by the lake current, eventually filled
each cut. Then the impounded waters broke through and scoured another
channel, only to fill it once again with silt.

Since 19: however, dredges jointly maintained by three of the largest oil
com producing in Venezuela have deepened the channel and kept it
cle i ry. The first of these dredges was a converted lake tanker,
the ’

As the lake current frothed past the channel buoys, it tumbled into the
gulf and built a white-capped chop which frigate birds skimmed on their way
Zaparita Island.

"That island dumps so much sand into the channel that they have to dredge
here quite frequently,” Capt. Turner explained.

To the east, some two miles and extending into the gulf from Zapara
Island, rose the breakwater the Venezuelan government is building to protect
the mouth of the new channel it is dredging through the lake.

Through field glasses cranes could be seen loading boulders — lightered
across the lake from Toas Island — into railway s which were drawn to
the gulf end of the breakwater and dumped. One of the two helicopters used
to carry men and nr ges between the two islands windmilled in from the
west and settled near the cranes.

As the ship continued between the red and green buoys which mark the
confines of the channel a cabin cruiser, throwing a bow wave on either side,
sped toward the Mara.”

*That will be the pilot launch coming from San Carlos,” the captain said
as the cruiser drew abreast of the ship and, in a spraying curve, ran up
along the starboard e. As the two craft continued ahead the pilot leaped
from the top of the cabin to the harbor deck of the Mara.”

With a burst of speed the crusier pulled away from the larger ship while
the pilot mounted to the bridge. There he took over from Capt. Turner, giving
his orders in Spanish to the quartermaster.
































_ (The second in this series of two articles on Lago’s Lake Fleet will appear
in the July 17 issue of the Aruba Esso News.)




CAPT. J. P. Turner searches for the ‘entrance to Maracaibo’ buoy.

Past the outer bar and in the lake, a pilot takes over.

CAPT. J. P. Turner ta buscando e boei cu ta marca entrada di Mara-

caibo. Pafor di e barra den e Lago, loods ta bini na bordo.




GOOD FOOD is traditional in the Lake Fleet. Here J. T. Pampier (fore-

ground) and Chief Cook Wan Hee ready lunch for the men on the
“Mara.”

BON CUMINDA ta tradicional den Lake Fleet. Aki J. T. Pampier (adi-
lanti) y Chief Cook Wan Hee ta prepara cuminda pa e hombernan
abordo di "Mara."



CHIPPING and painting rust spot a continuous chore. Quartermaster
Thompson sweeps up the scale, will soon be back with paint and brush.



CASCANDO jy verfmento di lugarnan frusto ta un trabao continuo.
Stuurman Thompson ta bari e frusto, pronto lo bolbe cu verf y kwashi.











Bida Riba Ta

E tanquero Mara” a sali mas of menos 8:35. Capt. J. P. Turner
sali cu ne door di entrada pabao, maniobrando cu e bapor ariba
troshinan di luznan corra y berde di refineria atras.

*Hala un poco banda robez,” e captan a grita e stuurman. ”Un poco mas.
Sigui awor!” Anto, al
e captan a bisa, "Full afor, Sr. McBride. E direccion ta 228. Ultimo biaha
225 y nos tabata un poco paden.”

1 John McBride a ring “full adilanti” ariba telegraaf di e
Mara a cuminza su di 1231 viaj

Pa mas cu 30 anja tanqueronan chikito manerz
Aruba y Lago Maracaibo. Nan ta sali for di den haaf di San Nicolas cu nan
deknan mas abao como cuatro te cinco pia ariba awa. Nan ta bolbe cu e
mes deknan pareuw cu awa, carga di azeta crudo di Venezuela pa Lago.

Nan tabata e linea vital di refineria y di Aruba, e slagader cu a carga e
“oro negro” cual a haci e refineria y su empleadonan prospera.

Pero awor e lento tanqueronan chikito cu capacidad limita a bai for di|
moda. Nan ta worde forza pa haci lugar pa e tanqueronan mas grandi, por |
ehemplo e super tankernan y esnan di typo T-2, cual por carga ecrudo cu
bini Amuay door di linea di tubo y cu pronto lo por drenta te na unda antes
solamente e tanqueronan chikito por a yega.

Com esaki tabata, e corremento bai y bini pa mas cu tres decenia halando
crudo pa e stacion di transladacion cu tabata aki promer cu Lago, y des-
pues pa alimenta e apetito insaciable di e refineria mas grandi cu ta opera
na mundo awor. Mayoria tabata mescos cu e viaje cu “Mara” a emprende
Juni 3.

”"Mara” su destino tabata Palmarejo, un terminal di cargamento na costa
zuidwest di Lago Maracaibo, pa tuma como 40,000 barril di crudo di Mara.
No obstante cu ora di e bapor sali tabata 6 p.m., un pomp defecto na terra
a duna e bapor un tardanza di casi 2% ora.

Despues di un viaje “casual” pa Haiti, "Mara” a regresa Aruba via
Amuay unda el a tuma un carga di crudo. Pa ora cu su ultimo tanki tabata
descarga, Capt. Turner tabata ariba brug caba. Promer Oficial L. R. Good,
kende a telefonea toren di control ariba Marine Office, a bisa cu despacha-
dornan di e bapor a fiha pa e sali despues di S.S. Geni, un tanquero di lamar
grandi cu net na e momento aki tabata distanciando for di haaf cogiendo
rumbo pa entrada pariba.

"Ora mi por escoge, semper mi ta prefera di sali door di entrada pabao,”
Capt. Turner a splica mientras el tabata duna orden for di ariba brug na
e stuurman. ”Un poco banda drechi,” el a grita. For di cuarto di e timon|
a sali voz di e stuurman repitiendo e orden. |

Una vez cu e luznan berde y corra marcando apertura di entrada pabao
a worde pasa, Capt. Turner a duna Sr. McBride orden pa "full afor.” No
obstante cu tur dos maquina tabata corre asina caba, Sr. McBride a repiti
e senjal.

Den e cuarto di maquina atras wijzer di e telegraaf a draai rond, y des-
pues a bolbe ariba ,,full adilanti.” Esaki tabata un senjal pa Segunda Ma-
quinista E. W. McDowell y Tercer Maquinista A. R. Bald cu tur maniobra
a pasa, cu probablemente nan motornan di 10,000 forza di cabai lo keda
ariba "full adilanti” te ora e bapor aleanza entrada di Lago Maracaibo.

Mara” a coi camina den obscuridad. Un biento fuerte tabata supla ariba
Caribe. Pafor di haaf luznan di dos bapor wardando pa drenta a kibra e
obscuridad un rato.

Na horizonte hende por a mira luznan di dos bapor cu tabata pasa mien-
tras atras luznan di S.S. Cumarebo, na camina pa Amuay, a kita na banda
robez.

Ariba brug e captan, oficial y stuurman tabata para den un obscuridad
kibra solamente door di e luz cu tabata refleha door di e bentananan di
glas corra y e luz ariba e compas.

Una vez pafor di cai "Mara” a drenta den un lamar halto y bruto cu a
pone e bapor — liher cu casi tur su tankinan bashi — lora hopi.

"Esaki ta dura como dos ora,” Capt. Turner a splica. ’E coriente ta com-
promi entre e isla y continente y ta lamta un lamar halto aki.”

Loke e captan a bisa tabata berdad. Mas of menos dos ora despues, ora
e bapor a pasa como 2% milla dilanti luz di Macolla cual ta luza for di ariba
costa norte di Venezuela, e lamar a calma y e bapor a sigui den awa calma
na un velocidad constante di 94% milla pa ora.

E zonida di musica cu tabata bini for di un radio den cuarto di e tripu-
lantenan atras, a keda keto ora esakinan a coi cama. ’Marmalade” y in-
ger”, e dos pushinan di abordo, tambe a busca un lugar di drumi. A keda
solamente zonida di olanan cu ta kibra adilanti, e biento cu ta supla den
mastre y zonida di e maquinanan.

Mientras nochi tabata pasa luznan di otro bapornan, biniendo for di Lago
Maracaibo a aparece, pasa y desaparece atras. Bapornan mas rapido, tam-
be cu destino pa Lago Maracaibo, tabata pasa Mara” na camina lagando
atras un strepi hancho di awa turbulente.

Mei anochi Sr. Boyd a cambia Sr. McBride ariba brug, un otro stuurman|
a cambia esun cu tabata na warda y e bapor a sigui su camina. Cuatro ’or
di marduga Sr. Good a cambia Sr. Boyd, un otro stuurman a tuma wiel di
"Mara” y e viaje a sigui.

Ora di dia a habri ainda e bapor tabata como 4% ora leuw di entrada
di e Lago. Solo a sali y tripulantenan a lamta. Nan a aparece na dek pa
un rato, anto nan a bolbe abao pa drecha nan cabina. Siete ’or y mei a zona
un bel, indicando ora di desayuno pa e hombernan y oficialnan cu mester |
subi warda pa cambia esnan cu ta trahando desde cuatro ’or di marduga. |

Mei ora despues algun steward den bachi blanco a aparece adilanti y
atras cu belnan anunciando cu desayuno tabata cla pa resto di e tripulacion
y oficialnan. E menu tabata inclui hugo di fruta, cereal, carni di carner cu
curry y aroz, ham, webo, pan gerooster y koffie.

a
e



Si, sigui asina.” Dirigiendo su mes na e tercer ofic






nos a sali arib
Tercer Ofi
maquina y S









Mara” a haci viaje entre


































































Ora desayuno a pasa e tripulacion a cuminza cu su trabao di tur dia.
Mientras e bapor tabata traversa den Golfo di Venezuela, nan a aparece
ariba dek cu martillo, brush di staal y herro di chip raspa e verf cu ta
casca door di biento y lamar y e frusto abao. |

Ariba dek atras otro tabata splits cable, check e cabuyanan, verf cualkier
biga of haci cualkier otro trabao mientras nan tabata tene vista ariba e
ligjanan di pisca cu tabata lastra atras. Di repente Simon Bozmen, kende
tabata traha cu un cable, a laga su hermentnan cai y a tira man pa un di
e linjanan cu a hala bira strak.

Halando cu tur dos man el a trece un pisea di 20 liber ariba dek y a
bente’le abao zapatiando. Un otro tripulante a yega cerca e pisca y cu un
golpe experto di un pida palo el a despacha e pisca. |

Abao den e cuarto di maquina geverf blanco y berde Fogonero Geronimo










Pa 30 Anja Nan a Trece Azeta Aki

ARUBA ESS



nker di Lago

€ partinan movible di e
nan di propellor.

Ariba brug S
Isla Zapara
Pa 9 a.m. e

maquina, pompnan, circuladornan di awa y e shaft-



McBride tabata mira door di un kijker. El tabata busca
un isla di santo den Caribe canto di entrada pariba di e Lago.
la a bini na vista.

Mei ora despues Capt. Turner a aparece ariba brug, check posicion di e
bapor y a ordena e stuurman pa stuur un poco mas na banda robez. El
splica cu el ta prefera di ta un tiki na banda di biento ora e bapor ta acere
entrada di e nal

= boei ando entrada di Maracaibo a bini na vis lamtando den
lamar como cuatro milla dilanti costa oriental di Peninsula di Guajira. Mas
cerca di cos tabatin un otro boei marcando resto di Don Alberto.

Ora "Ma tabata é . Turner a
maquini an a tur an posicion. Anto e captan a ordena pz
na mitar velocidad y un conico preto cu tabata colga na e mast
a worde baha te mitar pa munstra otro bapornan cu "Mara” tabat
na mitar velocidad.

Adilanti tabatin costa di e peninsula. Dentro poco Mara”
al.
canal pafor tin como 180 pia hancho y 25 pia hundo. Santo, cu ta worde
carga door di e coriente, ta acumula ey den na cantidad.

Desde 1938, sinembargo, draganan manteni door di e tres companianan
mas grandi cu ta produci na Venezuela ta cobando e canal y ta mantene’le
limpi y stacionario. E promer di e draganan aki tabata un tanquero con-
verti, ’Invercaibo.”

Na banda pariba, como dos milla leuw y extendiendo den e Golfo for di
Isla Zapara, ta lamta e dam di wanta awa cu gobierno di Venezuela ta tra-
hando pa protega boca di e canal nobo cu e ta coba den e Lago.

Door di kijker hende por a mira grua cargando piedra grandi — treci
over di e canal den lancha for di Isla Toas — den wagonnan di ferrocarril
cu ta worde lastra te na punto di e dam y gedomp. Un di e dos helicopters









a



mar








ordena "stand by” y
prosegui
ilanti

a corriendo








ca







usa pa carga hendenan di trabao y hiba respondi entre e dos islanan a bini|
| di pabao

y baha canto di e gruanan.

Mientras e bapor tabata sigui entre e boeinan berde y corra cu ta mare
extremonan di e canal un boto di loods, tabata acercando Mara” cu bast
velocidad.

”Esey ta e boto di loods cu ta bini for di San Carlos,” e aptan a bisa ora
e boto a yega acerca y a hala na un canto na banda drechi. Mientras tur
dos tabata sigui e loods a bula for di e boto ariba e dek abao di Mara.”

Cu un rancada duro e boto di loods a kita bai for di e bapor mas grandi
mientras e loods a subi na brug. Aya el a tuma over for di Capt. Turner,
dunando su ordennan na Spanjo na e stuurman.

Dentro di algun minuut ”Mara” a pasa San Carlos, un pueblecito tras
di un forti chikito traha ariba un pida terra cu ta sali for di costa pabao
di e Lago. Cayonnan bieuw, poni cabez ariba den santo, tabata forma un
sorto di trankera for di e forti te canto di lamar.
oco pasa di San Carlos "Mara” a pasa un di e dos draganan Ame
cu ta cobando un canal estrecho door di e Lago te na un hundura di





a








ano

5 pia.



E draganan aki den un sentido ta cobando graf di e tanqueronan chikito |

opera door di Lago y otro refinerianan.

Ora e canal ta cla, tanqueronan grandi di lamar grandi capaz pa carga
cinco vez mas tanto crudo cu Mara” y mayoria otro tanqueronan chikito
lo por nabega door di e Lago yega te na e terminalnan di tuma carga.

E tanqueronan chikito a worde usa promer pa saca e crudo for di Lago |

Maracaibo pa motibo di nan bom flat. Trinta anja pasa nan tabata e unico
bapornan cu por a traversa e barra pa aleanza e awanan mas hundo ariba
Punta de Palmas.

E canal nobo, sinembargo, lo habri e Lago pa bapornan cu no solamente



ta mas grandi cu e tanqueronan chikito, pero cu lo opera cu tripulacion | ®

solamente un poco mas grandi. Pesey, nan lo ta mas economico pa opera y

Lago — forza door di competicion creciente pa reduci costo unda cu ta
posible — ta bai elimina su flota di Lago na beneficio di bapornan mas
grandi.

E draga, "Jamaica Bay,” tabata parce un bestia di awa. Hancho y poco|

plat, e ta pasa un hose ariba fondo di e Lago. Asina e ta chupa e santo y
ta pase’le pa un otro hose cu, wanta cu drum di azeta bashi, ta lora for
di atras di e draga manera un rabo.

E santo tabata corre for di punto di e rabo. Islanan chikito cu net ta
munstra ariba superficie di awa ta indica unda e santo a worde basha segun
e draga ta sigui su trabao den e Lago.



(E segundo den ¢ serie aki di dos articulo ariba Lago au Lake Fleet lo
parece den e Esso News di Juli 17.)

Training Division To Help
MULO Grads Pick Career

One week later William
assistant Lago Vocational
principal, will speak at the college
on "The Effects of Supply and De-
mand of Jobs on the Selection of a
Career.”

On July 30 the graduating students
will be brought to the Reception
Center to hear E. F. Welch, training
division head, speak on "The Impor-
tance of Education in Getting the
| "Right Job’.” The students will then

mbark on a two-hour tour of the
| refine y and wind up back at the
| Reception Center for refreshments

j i |and a question period.
¢ Social Happenings Q The talks and tour are designed to |
point up industry’s need for persons |
trained in other than clerical skills,
Ruby E. Edmead of the Accounting | the thinking n to the selec-

Lago’s Training Division has Meskill,
scheduled three sessions this month
to help some 50 graduating MULO
school students select a career.

On July 10 Frank Cassens, pei-
sonnel research coordinator, will
speak at St. Dominicus College on
"Planning a Career.” Two films,
”You and Your Mental Abilities” and
"Discovering Your Real Interests”
will also be shown.











Roe BET aR or eae

ooOoOolCorcoron aoa err oe














George tabata traha cu un canica di azeta, yenando reservoirs y lubricando



Department and Abdon M. De|tion of a satisfactory career and the
Freitas of Catalytic and Light Ends | nec y of students’ training for |
were married June 19. Co-workers|work in industry throughout the
presented the couple with gifts. | world. t



a drenta den e|

School |

July 3, 1



Lago Lo Yuda
50 Studiante

Escoge Carera

Training Division di Lago lo tene
| tres sesion e luna aki pa yuda como
50 studiantenan cu caba MULO
school escoge un carer

Dia 10 di Juli Fr:

sonnel resi







ank Cassens, per-
rch coordinator,
Dominicus College tocante
amento di un Ca ” Dos
"Abo y bo Abilidadnan Men-
* y “Descubriendo bo Interesnan
3erdadero” lo worde munstra tambe
Un siman despues William Meskill,
|sub-director di Lago
School, lo papia na e mes
cante fectonan di Ofertz



lo papia




Vocational
school to-







y Deman-





da di Trabao Ariba Seleccion di un
Carer

Dia 30 di Juli e studiantenan cu
ta caba school lo bini Reception
Center pa tende E. F. Welch, hefe di



Training Division, papia tocante "Im-
portancia di Educacion den Haya-
mento di e ’Propio Trabao’.” De spues
e studiantenan lo cuminza ariba un
| paseo door di refineria cu lo dura dos
{ora y lo caba esaki na Rece ption
Center atrobe unda refresco lo wor-
y unda lo tin oportunidad
ci pregunta,

E lecturanan y paseo tin como in-
tencion padilanti dad
di industria pa personanan sinja den
ramonan otro klerk,
pensamento escoge-







pa trece nec

sino trabao di
e necesario den
mento di un carera satisfactorio y ¢
necesidad di sinjamento di studian-
tenan pa trabao den industria
|tur parti di mundo.

den

Lago Contributes
Toward Construction

Of Brazil Church

To help in the building of a new
church in Brazil, Lago recently con-
tributed Fls. 23,000 to Rev. P. D.
Grove, OP, the ish priest whose
energy and faith is the driving force
behind the proposed construction.

To be called Christ the King
| Church, it will be located in Brazil

|







| just off the main San Nicolas-Oran-
je d road where Father Grove now
has a small school. It is in this school







that he conducts services. Being
however, the building cannot




small,
accommodate h
is why he is



entire parish. That
ing night and day

to build a church for his people.
The

proposed structure will
sons. One of the outstanding
planned for the new church
is a large statue of Christ to be
placed on top of the bell tower.

seat



|
|Lago ta Haci
Contribucion pa Yuda
Traha Misa Nobo

Pa yuda den trahamento di un mi-

nobo Brazil,
Lago a contribui Fls.
Pastoor O:P;;
parokia kende su energia y
forza empujante tras di «
cion proponi.

E misa cu lo yama Misa di Cristo
Rey lo worde traha na Brazil p
di mina grandi di Oranjestad-San
Nicolas unda Pastoor Grove tin un
school chikito na su disposicion. Den

recientemente
00 na Rey.
di

sa na



Grove

pastoor
fe

construc-









¢







school aki el ta haci misa awor.
| Sinembargo, e lugar aki ta mucho
chikito p: moda henter su parokia.



Ta pesey el ta lucha di dia y anochi
| pa traha un misa pa su parokianonan.



| E misa nobo lo tin lugar pa 500
|hende sinta. Un di e aspectonan so-
resaliente planea pa e misa nobo ta



Jun imagen grandi di Cristo Rey cu

instala ariba e toren.

lo worde



Bertrando Ras







Bertrando Ras, a launch helper
B with over six years of service,
died June 16 at Sabaneta. Survived
by his widow and two children, he








was 28 years old. Services were
held June 17 at the Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic Church in Saba-











July 3, 1954

ARUBA ESSO NEWS



Camel Takes Softball Tourney Opener

Radio Operators
Join International

Field Test Day

A group of “ham”
Aruba took their equipment into
the field the middle of last month to
join with amateur radio hobbyists in
the United States, Canada and | ( Cuba
in an international ”Field Day.

The "hams,” of Verona

- Aruba, set up their voice and code

radio operators
in



members



transmitters and receivers at the
Pova Beach Club and on a site ad-
joining the Palm Beach Club the
afternoon of June 19.

For 24 hours they kept the sets in
operation, striving to “contact”
American Radio Relay League

Despite poor
and busy air
operators in Aruba raised
“hams” from the Middle Atlantic
States to the Middle West.

The Netherlands Antilles
ment approved the club’s participa-
tion in the event. Local industry and
businessmen lent electricity gene-
rators and other equipment. Two
volunteers — L. A. Pomeroy and
Dr. W. G. R. N. De — cooked
for the 20 men who operated the
equipment in shifts.

Camel,

as
many
members as possible.
weather

waves,



conditions



the

govern-

3oer



CARL LEJUEZ, Red Sox

Hochstuhl, Jr.
Mateo Reyes,

chairman of the



captain, ¢
division championship in the Sport Park
of the Public Relations Department.

Sport

tion Juni 22







ion
e played
huebe

nochi.

yames will be

Here Camel






CAMEL a habri 19



a ultimo inning

1 a produ

rimi_un rally
victoria di II pa 10. aS r
a pitcha di promer

u lo worde hu





Copas.
ventaha di dos careda,
sali

un careda y a cu



den e competicion di dos c
ariba terreno na lago Heig





di Rey
y ta hera uno.

Came










op-
un

relli di C ony Sens

divi-

hts.

de







LVS Boy’s
Prize Chick
Is Thriving

Fifteen-year-old Ernesto de Kort,
a second-year student in the Lago
Vocational School, wrote an essay
in a school-sponsored "Why I
Want A Chicken” contest last year
and won. In to the Aruba
E News he gave a
progre report on his prize.

He wrote, ”You remember that
I won the Shanghai chicken, but
I did not really receive the chicken
born in the





a note
recently,

so







that was refinery. I
got another one for the f died
one day before I to r ve it.
I took the chicken home the next
Saturday. I built a home for it.





and everything

went okay, but about the third
week he was very sick. I thought
he would die, but my mother and

I worked v hard with him. He
could not even stand on his legs.

"We continued like that for
about four days, then about the
fifth day he stood up and walked
around and quickly improved. Now
he is a big white cock about 11%
feet high.”



epts the trophy emblematic of B
oftball competition from W. C.
Watching (left)

Park Board's Softball Steering

Committee.

CARL LEJUEZ, captain di Red Sox, ta acepta e trofeo como emblema

di campeonato di division B den

e competicion di softball di L

ago Sport

Park for di W. C. Hochstuhl, Jr. di Departamento di Relaciones Publicas.

Observando (robez) ta Mateo Rey

Committee di



presidente di Softball Steering

Lago Sport Park.

Radio-Amateurnan A

Celebra ‘‘Field Day”
Na POVA Beach Cl

Un di
Aruba
luna pasa pa participa hunto cu

grupo radio-amateur

a hiba nan aparatonan pd

ub

na
afor
afi- |

cionadonan di radio den Estados Uni-

Canada y Cuba den
’ internacional.
= aficionadonan di Aruba — mi

an di Verona a instala









ape
un sitio canto di Palm Beach Club |



| Juni 19 tramerdia.

, League.
nan di tempo y frecuencianan carg:
acta

contacto cu ma
bronan di American
No obstante



Radio R
mal condi




e amateurnan na Aruba a cont
aficionadonan den
Ameri
Gobierno di Antillas Holandes
aproba participacion di e club de
evento. Industria local y
tenan a _ presta generadornan
electricidad y otro herment. Dos
luntario L. A. Pomeroy y
W. G. R. N. De Boer, a cushina ¢
binti hombernan cu t ta oper
aparatonan segun warda.



2.



comer





Red Sox Take Softball Titles —

Camel and the Red Sox
champions of the A

are
le



gue and

| divisions of the Lago Sport Park s

| division crown

ball competition completed June
Camel defeated the Dodgers in
finals and the Red
behind thrill
affair the
at the of

A division



came from in a
to

expense

seven-inning win
St. in Boys.

The S
if eit would keep them from
3 title. The Red Sox
discouraged by the
ficit and put together
the

Louis Boys started off

refused to
early-inning

four runs

three.

| Steering Committee,

| Boys captain; James B

| tion;

Following the game, presentati
made to the outstanding te
athletes of the
Mateo
Park

were
and
troduced by
of the Sport

two leagues.
Reyes,
Board’s
W.
the Public Relations Depé
made the
Trophies and gold medals went
Hodge,
Lejuez, Red Sox captain; J.
Dodger captain; J. Daniel, St. Le
ryson, pite
winning most games in A comp
N. Larmonie, pitcher
most games in B competition;
S. Reed of Camel,

Jr., of

ment, awards.

Ramon

winn

| champion.

0 Le

un “FF

atonan na Pova Beach Club y

last two innings to win four

Camel captain; Cz
Diddler,

em-
nan



varios estados di

a
ne

vo-

Dye
Ja
ae

the
1B
oft-
15.
the

Sox

ing
B
the

the
be
de-
in
to

ons

ams

In-

chairman
Softball
. Hochstuhl,

art-

to
ar]

puis
her
eti-
ing

and
A division batti

ing

boxing

Mr.
which he
basic production had shrunk
continue
city”
ing competitive business

ies ice,

| colate battled to a dra
| contest, also for
Weganan di division “A ta tuma lugar Diamars y Dia- ! Kid Godoy against Jim Slater. Godoy,
nochi; weganan di division B Dialuna y Diara-
Aki Camel ta coge un corred
s out na primera,



unanimous de

| veteran Aruba battler,
| took on Kid Zorro of Curacao. Despite

ield |
Ritmica,
| ba and v

with

"team,”

can successfully
3inti-cuatro ora largo nan a tene e |

setnan na trabao tratando pa tuma |

tanto posible mere

y Sport Park Offered
° |For ABBA Games

na |



made the Sport Park t
available for games being conducted
by the Amateur Baseball Bond Aruba. |
scheduled in the midst of |
will be played|
o'clock. |

“| The
Sport Park leagues,
Tuesday nights starting at 7
The 10 o’clock curfew will be observed
for the

~



Lago Supervisors Feted
At Second Annual Party

Addresses, Dinner, Boxing, Dancer

Featured On Program At Golf Club

It was stag night at the Aruba Golf Club last Saturday when Lago

played host to some 600 supervisors and other guests at the second
| annual Supervisors’ Party.

On the program were addresses by President J. J. Horigan and

matches and ”Elva-Ballerina

Exotica.”

The top event of the evening was
Horigan’s welcoming address in
said that though La
"we
near ¢
and secur-




r0'S



operating at or
by keeping costs low



A buffet dinner, catered by Colony

The second
rounds, pitted



four
right-hander, took al
sion.
feature eight-round event a

Colorado Kid,

hard-hitting



In the

12-pound weight disadvantage,

| Zorro proved a strong opponent as
his speed
lity
rounds.

abi-
early

and counter-punching
piled up points in the

Zorro brought his superior ring

of the fight and was awarded |





bac
danced a mambo and rhum-
called back for an encore.
Griffin wound up the party
the assurance that the
with competent
meet



"Elva,”



Mr.

any challenge

The Lago Sport Park Board has

sball diamond





games

ABBA games.

_ Schedule ot Paydays



Semi-Monthly Payroll
June 16 - 30 Thursday, July
Monthly Payroll
June 1 - 30 Friday, July 9



was next on the program and |

was followed by the first of three
boxing matches. In a four-round go
| Ruben ’Curly” Kayo and Aruba Cho- |

General Superintendent F. S. Griffin,

Ce three

Sport Bar @nens
Baseball Season

The Lago Sport Park’s

refreshments,





1954 base-

ball competition got underway the
night of June 24 when B. Teagle,
| public relations manager, threw the
\first pitch for the game in which
Camel B defeated Heineken, 5 to 4.
Three leagues — A, B and Junior
— will play a round-robin tourna-



}ment which will run into September.

knowledge to bear during the latter |
loss

half

a unanimous decision.

ed up by the Orchestra |

Lago |
leadership, |

8] Aug. 1, w:

Twelve teams have signed up for the
| A League, eight teams for the
B League and six teams for the
Junior League.

The A League games will start at
7 o’clock Thursday, Friday and Satur-
Friday nights at the Sport Park.
B League games will be played at
7 o’clock Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day nights. Junior League games will

played at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Friday.
The Heineken team protested its
to Camel, claiming the curfew
rule was applied too early.







be

Abraham Scores
Cricket Record





The Magic Bats cricket team,
1953-54 champions of the Lago
Sport Park Intermediate League,

showed one day last month that
their was magic in the bat of at
least one of its players.

Kenneth Abrahams, one of
Aruba’s well-known, — all-round
athletes, went to bat in a league
match after the Courageous
Cricket Club had put up 123 runs.
In 92 minutes Abrahams scored a
new Sport Park record of 15 sixes,
17 fours, one five and 20 scattered
runs for a total of 183 not out.

The Bats finished with 223 for
the loss of two wickets and won
the match.









Correction

Lionel Dean, who will retire
first employed by Lago
in the G and not in Light Oils
Finishing as the Aruba News

| stated in its issue of June





Esso

19.

a

p

COLORADO KID of Aruba (left), outfought by Kid Zorro of Curagao, »

slugs
Party.

it out during the feature bout at the second annual Supervisors’
Zorro won an eight-round

COLORADO KID di Aruba (banda robez),

decision.

cu ta bringa menos bon cu

Kid Zorro di Curagao, ta duna sla pa sla durante e main bout na e se-







gundo Fi

esta Anual pa Supervisornan. E pelea di ocho esalto a worde

gana pa punto door di Zorro.









ARUBA ESSO NE





600-Pounder Hooked at Boca Mahos



Nine Haul Shark Ashore With Truck

Three boys, three girls, three Department of Sani-

shark.

Intrigued by t
Boca Mahos by
the mouth of
on a hook on a ¢

ot away
sharks appeared

bait, circled



the thrashing sh



cliffs which ring



team



THREE MEMBERS of the nine-’'man hark
hown with their erstwhile playmate. From left: Al
Leak, Jack Horigan, John Borbonus, shark.

as a "brown sha







To the Suggestor

Thirty-Three Ideas Coined
For Total of Fls. 1585

Thirty-three employees had their ideas accepted in April and shared
in awards totally Fls. 1585. Once again, these employees saw where
they could help improve a particular situation and sent their ideas to
the CYI committee. Their ideas accepted they found themselves from
Fls. 20 to Fls. 250 richer.

The top award went to A. A. G.










The boys and girls — all from Lago Colony —

leaving

truck was scheduled to

struck.
The anglers w
shore when the three



to the rear of their truck, they pulled the





tation employees and a dump truck combined talents |
one day last month to depopulate the Caribbean by one |

we

Al Leak, John Borbonus, Jack Horigan, his sister, Eli-
zabeth, Carla Massey



and Polly Mingus.





he tales of shar

the dumping of garbage, they

fishing in the North Shore bay. Stringing a line across
the

inlet, they dangled a piece of bec

hain suspended by the line.

Horigan with line burns on his hand

With the hook rebaited, the sextet watched as other

the
shark

sanitatic

noticed tl

before

One

a few minutes

arrive.

it warily for about 10 minutes and then) PO

fight the fish

men drove up with their

ere attempting to

load of refuse. They joined the fray and helped beach

on a ledge. Then, hooking the lir
fish up th

the bay.

Checked for vital statistics later, the shark was found

eight feet in length. It was of the type known locally

Tew

| NEW ARRIVALS

June 11








Ce - Storehouse: A daughte
Pearl Eliza a
June 12
| CROES, Gerrit - Storehouse: A son, Er
Everhart.











TSD Lab 2
. Pipe: A
- Mech
daug
& A

Ship.:
- Shipyard: A so

- Storehouse


































s being attracted to

went |

into |
truck-













of

Suddenly a shark took the bait, ran, fought and finally

A FEW MINUTES

dre

fter tt
ed in t+

The 20





liplom e 25

yn
CO MINUUT des¢

Ee





diploma.

|
|
|
ne |
|

he

to weigh between 600 and 700 pounds and to measure

h- |
|
|

n, |
















July 3, 1954







Son of Ex-Lago Employee
Instructs Here This Summer









Slater of the Mechanical Department-| J. E. Fran Fls. caer
Administration whose suggestion that! H. L. H. Engelen Fls. ¢ See Rene na aad i
ei A nate alter A, - Metal Trades son,
a Crosby reseating machine be pur- T. MeDavid Fis. ¢ Walter Wendell. >;
chased was worth Fls. 250. The| J. E. Francis Fils. MARQUE Dominico - TSD: A son, Danil- |
second highest award was won by|J. P. Faleoni Fis. 25 ‘ Dominico R. - TSD: A son,
M. Arends of Light Oils Finishing.| J. P. Falconi Fis. 25 :
ci = we 3 i - Cracking: A daughter,
He received Fls. 175 for suggesting Cracking
the installation of four-inch block-! L. Bettencourt Fls. 75 F. - A son, Ed-
valves in a rundown line. Also in the| P. - Cracking - Burners - Weld ridge June 16
top money bracket was W. H. Maduro} on air cylinder & install saddle. Rss
: : : - daughter, Ly
who received Fls. 150 for suggesting | J. D. Jamieson Fls. 60) aati A daughter,
the ordering of stakes for use in the|P. - Cracking - No. 11 G.O. control | a - ‘
field by the field engineers. house - remove storm curtain & re-| Cynthia 3 ret. VENTRILOQUIST Glen Cargyle with one of the life-like dummies he
Other awards are: Bier amas eee ce | ROS caughtsanalindy: bis makes himself shown entertaining an audience of youngsters in Cali-
A J. D. Jamieson Fls. 30! witson’ James E. H : aoa 2 ; x sees Iie gsi,
Accounting Department = 5 ae fornia.
5 A. Evertsz Fils. 25 A dav Joan
T. J. McAuliffe Fils. D0 aor) Bacchus Fls. 20 June 17
Cc. S. - Esso & Lago Clubs - Submit | cane - L.O.F. ae aeecD Ae EE The son of a former Lago employee , studied at Graceland Junior College,
daily reports semi-weekly. 4 ; ee IER, Raymundo - Shipyard: |who left Aruba in 1940 came back | Lamont, the University of Iowa,
: op | M. Arends Fils. 175| 4 daughter, Glenda Maria Ludwine 3 x ahs En ae
TS Je McAuliffe Fis. 20 |p sO: Ree nstalle42ablockvalve in Vine ae last month as an instructor in the|the University of California and is
Industrial Relations Dept. | a» Peta Se z on e 47 | CASUELA, Henrique S. - Mech, Boiler: Lago Community Council’s Summer|now working on a master’s degree
ee 4” rundown line to tanks 8,7 & 17. At sone Galvin’ Lwaac : :
RNS Fis. 50 TSD - Engineering CRO rancisco - Mech. Machine: Recreation Program. jin education at Los Angeles State
I. R. - Voce. Schools - Have students RW ACT RMT adGee Fls. 150 A daughter, Ludwina Felomena. | He is Glen Cargyle, 27-year-old | College.
punch time cards in class sequen SD - Fie ineers - Also order | YANGA. Candi M.- Lake Fleet: A daugh- |Son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cargyle.| Glen’s efforts to produce life-like
rn a TSD - Field Engineers - Also order & aa ;
A. Croes Fis. ee Diet aasitar nice. inctield' } . ter, Juliana Rosalinda. |The family came to Aruba when Mr. | dummies for himself and for a grow-
RED Oxose Fls 2x stakes for use in field. VAN VE JELD, Julius - Cracking z : * ” ere ay i
. D. SCO Ss. i Moray Fls. 50 Av aor alts tendo ainianilor Cargyle was employed in Colony|ing customer list which today ex-
Marine Department ~ Sei PS. aie y e A. - Utilities: A son, Eric|Service and Glen three years | tends around the world led him into a
z as |TSD - Drafting - Order "levelall Rants | ? ‘ -
G. C. Ramsey Bil SveA0) Roa tay seve Miatramentts) i tenetzo old. Like any other colony youngster, | study of ceramics, leathercraft, clay
Medical Department | Utilities aoe RAS, Daniel y Shipyard: Agson, Martinus.|he eventually enrolled in the Lago | modeling, painting, marionettes, pup-
A. Milton Fis. 20157 Burne : VERE S Lois Bs LOK 2A gon; Silvio: i vementarye Schools pets and a host of other subjects
Mechanical Department ly. Toth en 2, Baldwin - Mech. Col. Maint.: Glen w in the sixth grade when In addition to his studies, Glen is
Administration [ema ss RESIN ie er Office lhe first learned about ventriloquism. | practice-teaching each day in a Los
A. A. G. Slater Fls. 250 A daughter, Sandra Ann. |The idea of projecting his voice into| Angeles school, staging puppet and

SERVICE AWARDS

20-Year Buttons

Purchase Crosby reseating machine. |
D. B. Richardson Fls. 75
Mech, Adm. - Discontinue submitting







2 copies of Safety talk slips. Edward Byington, Jr. Ind. Rel. Dept.
T. P. Viapres Fls. 20 |Joseph Krozendijk Shipyard
Electrical Lazaro Geerman Launches
R. MacMillan Fis. 30 | Benancio Maduro
Garage Rec. & Ship. - Wharves
C. A. Thompson | Francisco Dijkhoff Yard
Machinist Pedro J. Ridderstaat Garage
E. Maduro Fls. 50 | Denius E. Kruythoff Instrument



Machinist
Carpenter

10-Year Buttons

” | nuginatin Madure

Lodewico Bislip
Emil M. Sambre

Mech. - Rock crusher - install 24
tension to foundation.
V. Briezen
%. Berkel









Welding James W. Brooks Mason & Insulators

C. Yarzagaray Maximo Maduro Boiler
Bary | Hamilton Blaize Garage

L. B. de Cuba Louis F. tlidge Col. Maint

| ig

Yard | James E. Arrindell Tin |

N. C. Werleman Fis. 25} meters eseran Mees as

Te. 8. 25] man - Eng
>rocess Department Francisco Arrindell SD - Lab

Process Depart: | Lennie McD. Simon TSD - Lab

Cat. & L.E. | Jean A. Richardson TSD - Lab

Pipe |







A daughter, Melga Edeltrudis.
June 2
PAMBERTON, Julian P
Margaret Elizabeth.
| June 23

- W/S Comm







SOLOGNIER, Federico F. - Col. Comm
A
| Dominico - Cracking
| A daughter
HAZEL faurice W. - Mech. Yard
Veronica Elfreda
A son



Paul Trimon
Louis F. Cruden

Commissar







| 3 . Calatayud Col. Serv. Operatior
William A. Woods Lage ce Dep
| Clement P. Celaire Trainin,

| Brown M tosh
| Calvin Bristol



Shipyar

TSD - Lab

Utilitie



| HAMLET, Joseph B. - Mech. Col. Maint: |); ;
ee rese! Beet oeheok | Maint: | his dog, or having a pie beg his
EST R Sea June 21 mother "please don’t cut me,
STER, Jan D. - Metal Trades: A so .
fa Buseblo fetal Trades: A son. | fascinated the boy.
PA EENQ, Santo S. - TSD Eng.: A son So he wrote for books on the sub-
LY. Thomas F. - Cracking: A daugh-|Ject. While other youngsters were at
Maria \the beach or playing baseball, Glen
Alexander - Mech. Garage: |

home studying and
ntually his dog talked, the
pleaded and Glen took part in shows



pies

at the Esso Club, at schooi and at
| parties.

| In 1940 the Cargyles left Aruba
for Independence, Mo., and_ settled

down in their home three blocks from
the homestead of ex-President Harry
S. Truman. Glen worked per-
fected his voice-throwing technique
and started creating dummies bi
Â¥|those he bought did not suit him.
.| By the time he started in college
& was so adept he found he

he
j|earn expenses as a ventriloquist. He

and





cause





could





practicing. |

marionette shows and appearing as a
ventriloquist. Recently he turned out
eight dummies which
Danny Kaye for the
in a new Paramount picture, "Knock
on Wood.”

arrived in Aruba June
with his assistant, Tomas Muro, who
is also studying for a masters degree
in teaching. Within the summer pro-
gram which is expected to attract
some 500 they

will teach sculpting, painting, puppe

resembled

n to use



comedia




Glen

colony youngsters,

and marionette making, ceramics,
costume making and other creative
arts

In addition Mr. Muro, a profes-
sional dancer, will give instruction

in the dances typical of various coun-
tries of the world. They
stage shows which will be presented
throughout the island.

also plan







Full Text


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[Are Awarded LVS
1954 Scholarships

| Tinea



J J Horigan Discusses
“Future Of The Company

|. Says Lago Must Seek

*¥ "Competitive Business”

§
rE
Na

A

Lago’s future outlook was the
subject of an address given by
President J. Horigan before
some 600 lests at the annual
JN Supervisors’ Party June 26 at
the Aruba Golf Club. The pr
sident of the world’s largest ope
ating refinery told the supervisors
that Lago’s ba
but by keeping costs low
picking up competitive business "we
continue operating at

J.
gu

7E





can or near
capacity.”

Mr. Horigan explained
basic load has shrunk.
war,” he said, "we had
kets in Europe and Latin Americ
These provided us with
load on which to operate

He explained that because of the
growth of oil production around the
world, Lago has lost some of its as-|
sured marketing areas. Mr. Horigan
stated that of these countries
taking age of their low
labor rates are building refine-

the |
the
ured mar-

why

"Before



ge basic |





many
adva
and

are





ries.

Not only do these countries benefit
from this wage advantage, but by
producing in their own country they





rex benefits in currency exchange.
Referring to an article in Time”
magazine, Mr. Horigan pointed out

the low industrial wages in Europe
$.35 in France, $.384%
Germany and $.47 in England
pared to Lago’s a
of $1.03 plus.

He went on to



such as in





com-
age hourly wage |







however, that}













PUBLISHED BY LAGO OIL & TR

sic load has shrunk, |
and |





July 3, 1954



PORT CO.,



Supervisor a
Tende Horigan
Papia di Futuro

bata topico di un discurso teni door
di Presidente J. J. Horigan di Lago
Oil & Transport Co., Ltd., pa mas
of menos 500 invitado na Super-
visors’ Party anual Juni 26 na
Aruba Golf Club. E presidente di
refineria mas grandi cu ta opera
na mundo a bisa e supervisornan
cu Lago su negoshi a baha, pero
cu door di tene costo abao y ha-







e





ciendo competitivo "nos por sigui
opera na of cerca di plena capacidad.”
Sr. Horigan lica pakiko ne-





ia bai
> el a bi
segur na Europa
Esaki tabata duna nos un area gran-
di pa opei

El a pa motibo di pro-
duccion di azeta vond di mundo, Lago
{a perde algun di su mereadonan ase-
gu *. Horigan a bisa cu hopi di e
paisnan aki ta tuma ventaha di nan

-romer cu guer-
tabatin mercado
America del Sur.

atra









splica cu

LAGO President J. J. Horigan
at the 1 |

d annua
Supervisors’ Party.





a







LAGO Presidente J. J. Horigan jSueldonan abao di trabao y ta tra-
ta papia na e segundo Fiesta | hando refineria. om
Anual pa Supervisornan o solamente e paisnan aki tin



beneficio di e sueldonan abao, pero

door di produci den nan mes lugar





up this additional business,” he said.
He pointed out that Lago has a good



moneda estranhe

geographic position, a high through-|articulo den "Time”, Sr. Horigan a |
put which keeps unit costs down and|splica cu e sueldonan industrial abao

5 na Fran-
y $47 n
compara




low deprecitation based on Lago’s de- | na Europa, por ehemplo $

ion-era construction when pric 1

> low. | Inglaterra manera nan ta
Horigan told the group|cu sueldo promedio pa ora na Lago

as far as labor costs are concern-|loke awor ta poco mas cu $1.03.

ed, however, Lago is not so well off.| Sinembargo, el] a bisa tambe cu

up this point, he stated) consumpcion di azeta ta subiendo. El

that many of Lago’s competitors em-|a conta e grupo cu di e aumento ge-

ploy six or seven men per thousand] neral den tur parti di mundo cu





S| cia, na Alemani





also

Following





















ah oi consumption is rising. He told the| barrels of capacity while Lago em-|tuma lugar awor, afiliadonan di I

< group that of the general increase| Ploys 15 despite a longer work week/ta participa den e aumento na un
world-wide at present, Esso affiliates | 22d higher throughput. cantidad di mas of menos 100,000
figure in the increase to about 100,000 Mr. Horigan informed the super-|barril pa dia. demanda aumenta

an barrels a day. This increased demand| Visors that one-third of the Lago em j aki ta den me i re

nd is in the competitive market — "the | Ployee body is employed in such busi- | mercado cu Lag

rk market Lago must go after to con-| esses as the comm ry, housing,| sigui opera na of cerea di plena ca-
tinue operating at or near capacity.” | lé undry, dining halls and clubs. He! pacidad.”

ich We are in a good position to pick (Continued on page 2) | (Continua na pagina 3)

of

+ Over 100 Boys Rewarded

DC ———————





rete
pon
ged
‘ing

the
ush



dec
ules
tole

his

zon



‘Vocational School Has 1st ‘Honors Day’

| The Lago Vocational School
| rewarded 100 students for
| participation in various school and
}extra-curricular activities at its
| first annual "Honors Day” June 24,
Inscribed br keys, shop tools
|and books handed out at ce-
remonies conducted in the school’s
Noon-Hour Area. J. V. Friel,
Industrial Relations manager,
| the principal speaker.
| The vent
players, volleyball players, outstan-
ding athletes, safety monitors, stu-
|dent council members, school news-
| paper staff

over







ere

was

to basketball!

awards



membe



housekeepers,



members of the G Club, shop

| craftsmen, ‘suggestion box’ contri-

| butors and the school’s crack spelle

| Seven varsity and nine junior-
ity basketba!] players received



ass keys as did 10 varsity and 10
junior-varsity volleyball play who

;







The represented the school in leagues

Pret }sponsored by the Aruba _ School

the Athletic Association.

Lom HONORS DAY at the Lago Vocational School brought (left to right) Six boys were named by fellow

a J. Donata, J. Arends, A. Rasmijn, J. Monsanto, H. Thomsom, S. Feliciano |¢lass-members as the outstanding
and C. Richardson to the stage to receive inscribed keys from Instructor athletes of the school year. Third-

Glenroy E. S. Straughn. Over 100 boys got awards. |

(Continued on page 3)

Prospectiva futuro di Lago ta-|



nan ta realiza beneficionan den nan
10. Referiendo na un}





*

*

*









|

Loreto Kock



















Hendrik P. Bareno



; IDR’s Elected:

Start 2-Year

‘Term July 1

|

staff and regular employees, took
| up their duties as district represen-
|tatives July They will





serve





repr ntatives for employees in
districts through June, 1956.
Tie votes in District 10 forced a

tie
forced a

run-off representative election;
votes in Districts 29 and 32
|run-off alternate representative elec-
|tion. Both were scheduled for this
| we



Elected representatives during the
; voting June 17, 18 and 19 were:

District 1, A. C. Peterson and A. A. |
; District 2, F. Maduro and
District 38, I. Re
Angela; District



| Mz

|/V. Figaroa;
District 4, M.







E. A. Carti and A. Lampe; District 6,
a

L. Olive and M. Kemp;

D. Tromp.

District





», Wever; District 9,

District 11, 4H.
strict 12, J. H. Lake;
A. Bishop; District 14, }
Thompson; District 15, A. C.



J.

W.



Johnson; District 16, A. de Roble
| District 17, J. Boom; District 18,
‘|F. E. Romn District 19, A. B.}




Semerel; District 20, R. F. V

District 21, S. Lacle; District
| N. Croes; District 23, J. E. Romney;
District 24, F. O. Thomson; District
B. Luydens; District 26, J. Tromp; |

















District 27 Fung-A-Fat; District
28, District 29, I. Ras;
District ¢ >. Massdammello, A
Tearr; District Malmberg





32,

C. I. Tromp and District
B. J. Jones. |

| District
| 33,

| promise

=) Aruba

Thirty-seven men, elected by Lago’s |



!the members of that cl



Hendrik P. Bareno and Loreto
Kock were named last night by
President J. J. Horigan as the re-
cipients of the 1954 scholarships
that will take them to Allentown
High School in Pennsylvania for
one all-expenses-paid year of study.

The two 18-year old Aruban youths
were awarded the scholarships at the
12th Lago Vocational School gradua-
tion on the basis of scholastic ability,
personality and the high degree of
both boys show for the





future.

In the ceremonies held last night,
82 other Lago Vocational School stu-
dents capped four years of study and
practice by receiving their diplomas
before an audience of family mem-

| bers, friends and Lago executives.

Hendrik, who was born in Aruba
July 21, 1936, completed the sixth
at Piedra Plat School before
entering the vocational school in 1950.
Well-liked by his instructors and
fellow students, Hendrik h, been
especially adept at mathemat





ela





Loreto, who was also born in Aruba
in 1936, but on July 7, came to the
| vocational school from St. Dominicus
'College where he completed the
seventh grade. Well thought of on
the job and in class, Loreto has been
active in sports, especially baseball,
in addition to maintaining a high
standing in his studies.

Both boys will leave for Allentown
the latter part of next month to begin
what is sure to be an eventful year.
At Allentown they will be following
in the footsteps of 10 other LVS gra-
duates who have preceded them dur-
ing the last five years.



inciple speaker at the graduation
s last night was Netherlands
Assistant Inspector of Educa-
Kok, who is acting head of
schoo] system. Mr. Kok spoke
future of education in the
Antilles d told the graduates of
the necessity of training to equip
themselves for work anywhere in the
world.



Antille:
tion





on the




Following an address of welcome
by Scholarship Winner Kock and the
introduction of guests, J. V. Friel,
program chairman and manager of
Lago’s Industrial Relations Depart-
ment, welcomed the group and com-
|mented on "the unique accomplish-
ments” of the Class of 1950.

While noting that the graduates
had gone further into such subjects
as geometry, algebra, and trigono-
metry than any previous LVS class
they were entering a world in which
the demand for increased training
has made secondary education almost
required.





Musie was an important highlight
of the program, with the processional
played by the Lago Community Band
and songs by the Lago Vocational
School Glee Club under the direction
of Mrs. G. N. Owen. Three of the
glee club’s selections were "Ten



| Little Indians,” ’"Himno di Aruba,”
jand "Aruba Dushi.”




Following Mr. Kok’s addre Mr.
Friel introduced graduate apprentices
who began their vocational school

training in 1940, after which one of
, A. Kock,
ge to the




delivered a_ brief
mblage.

bian Francis, instructor in Eng-
at the vocational school, pre-
nted the graduating cl for the
awarding of diplomas by General
Superintendent F. E. Griffin.

After announcement of the scholar-
and a brief address by
gan, Purey Brunings, a
member of the graduating class, de-
livered the farewell address.

Ceremonies closed with the singing
of the Wilhelmus by the glee club
and a recessional march by the Lago
Community Band.

mes



lish










ARUBA

News

Printed by the Curacaosche Courant, Curacao, N.W.I.
PUBLISHED EVERY OTHER SATURDAY AT ARUBA, NETHERLANDS

WEST INDIES,

BY THE LAGO OIL & TRANSPORT CO., _ LTD.

Lago Vocational School

A Tene 1o "Dia di Honor”

Lago Vocational School a duna premio na mas cu 100 studiante pa
participacion den e varios actividadnan di school na ocasion di su pro-

mer "Dia di Honor”

celebra Juni 24,

Yabi di koper inscribi, herment y buki a worde presenta durante e
ceremonianan den e veld unda e studiantenan ta tene actividadnan di

J. V. Friel, gerente di Rela-
tabata e

merdia.
ciones et
principal.

E premionan a bai pa hungadornan
etball, di volleyball, atletanan
liente, monitornan di seguri-

dad, miembronan di consejo di stu-
diantenan, miembronan di redaccion
di corant di e school,
orden, miembronan di Glee
tesanonan, contribudornan na ’caha
di sugerencia’ y e studiantenan mas
sobresaliente den spe Imento.

Un total di di hungador di

basketball a recibi yabi di koper y
tambe binti hungador di volleyball cu
a representa e school den e competi-
cion bao auspicio di Aruba School
Association.

Seis mucha homber a worde
bra door di companjeronan di
como atletanan sobresaliente di e
anja escolar. Studiantenan di tres
anja a eligi Bernard Geerman y Carl
Lejuez; studiantenan di segunda anja
a eligi Caspar Boekhoudt y Alfonso
Steenen; studiantenan di promer an-
ja a eligi Mario Hanson y Rafael
Croes.

Diez-nuebe mucha homber cu a sir-
bi como monitor di seguridad den e
programa na school tambe a recibi
como regalo yabi di koper, y tambe
12 miembro di Consejo Estudiantil,
12 miembro di redaccion di e corant
di school, 12 mucha homber encarga
cu percuracion domestico na school y
40 miembro di Glee Club.

Hermentnan di corta palo a worde
regala na e tres studiantenan di pro-
mer anja escogi pa trabao sobresa-
liente. Nan tabata Hendrik Leo, Con-
stancio Gomez y Mariano Croes. Es-
nan cu a haya mencion honorable pa
nan trabao tabata Juan v/d Linden,
Cecilio Ras y Francisco v/d Linden.

E school cu no ta participa den
programa di ’Coin Your Ideas’ tin un
’eaha di sugerencia.’ Addison Harms
y Regino Tromp a recibi buki como
regalo pa e sugerencianan cu nan a
manda aden y cu a worde huzga di
mehor di henter e anja escolar.

Ganadornan di e concurso di spel-
mento di Ingles pa e segunda semes-
ter a recibi un diccionario como pre-
mio. Di e 450 palabra cu nan mester
a spel, Rosindo Geerman a sali pro-
mer cu 448 bon; Betrando de Cuba
segunda cu 445 y Cecilio Ras tabata
di tres cu 442.

Carl Lejuez, presidente di Consejo
Estudiantil, y Caspar Boekhoudt a
parti honor pa e cantidad mas grandi
di premio cu cinco cada uno.

nom-

klas

orador

tenedornan di| ;
Club, ar- |



Future of Lago

(Continued from page 1)
indicated that some of Lago’s princi-
pal competitors are not burdened with
these side lines. Mr. Horigan stated
that wages in the petroleum industry

higher than in other
businesses

"This airrerence in wages,” he con-
tinued, “is especially high in Aruba
and by turning over the jobs to
others, we will save a large percent-
age of this and place ourselves in a
better competitive position.”

About Lago’s side lines, Mr. Hori-
gan assured the group that “as long
as present conditions remain un-
changed Lago will continue to run the
hospital.” He told of plans to shrink
the size of Lago Colony as Lago’s

nationalization program makes is

| more unnecessary to bring in foreign

staff employees.

He mentioned that the only definite
plans concerned Lago Heights. His
final remark on side line business

: "As to the other side lines we
are in, we have no definite plans, but
they seem easier of solution than
the hospital and Lago Colony.”

Mr. Horigan closed his address by
complimenting the oil men of Lago,
stating that he felt sure, judging
from past experience, the old ’pros’
who successfully handled all Lago’s
assignments before will meet what-
ever problems the future might hold
and get the job done and done well
regardless of its complications.

Following the dinner and enter-
tainment which include an orchestra,
boxing bouts and a dancer, the
evening was brought to a close with
remarks by General Superintendent
Frank E. Griffin. Speaking of the
supervisors’ job, he told the men they
form a team that through competent
leadership can successfully meet any
challenge that might arise.

Paul M. Walker
Retires Oct. 1

Paul M. Walker will end almost a
quarter-century of service with Lago
Oct. 1 when he retires as Fire Equip-
ment Maintenance foreman. He was
first employed in 1929 as
fitter first class.

He has also served as Pipe Shop
subforeman, Salvage Yard foreman |
and Fire Maintenance foreman. He |
will return to the United States.

FELLOW Utility Division employees chipped in last month to present
Paul M. Walker (center) with a gift in honor of his retirement after almost
a quarter-century of service with Lago.
COMPANJERONAN di trabao den Utilities Division a contribui hunto
luna pasé pa presenta Paul M. Walker (centro) un regalo en honor di su
retiro despues di casi un cuarto siglo di servicio cu Lago.

a pipe-|

| from Bukuru w

ARUBA ESSO NEWS

Care to travel? Then the ex-
ploits of a man whose particular
| talents have taken him across four
continents in the past 14 years
|should stir envious thoughts. The
gentleman whose suitcase, pass-|
|port and airplane ticket form the
badge of his wandering office is |
Joseph P. DeKens.

As field service representative of
E Export Corporation’s Technical
Department, Mr. DeKens goes wher-
ever an aircraft refueling expert is
needed — be it Europe, Africa, North
America or South America.

So that planes may be quickly and}
efficiently fueled at insta
pumping Mr. DeKe
close surveillance over their
tions. In maintaining this supervision, |
his route has covered 42 countries and

taken him from burning desert
ar where temperatures range
around 135 degre Fahrenheit to
sub-zero weather in war-torn, coal-
short Berlin, Germany.

It wasn’t always globe-trotting, |
however. Mr. DeKens was first |
employed as a mechanic with Socony |
Vacuum. As a mechanic he learned
the intricacies of fueling installa-
tions and their proper maintenance.
His experience in refueling led him
to his first assignment ’’on the road.”

lations |
keeps |

opera-

0,

as



It was July, 1942. The
raging and the Allied war machine
needed supplies. High on the list of
urgent needs was aviation gasoline.
Mr. DeKens was assigned to 4
to set up supply lines and refueling |
installations in Liberia, the Gold
Coast and Nigeria. His first stop was
Marshall, Libe but not until he
had made a nervy ngling trip across
the Atlantic that involved dodging
German submarines intent upon
sending their torpedoes into Allied
ships.

At Marshall he assisted in laying
out supply Roberts Field. |
His next stop was Accra, Gold Coast,
where he arranged to bring in avia-
tion gasoline from Tankarodi, also in
the Gold Coast, and the
war bulk plant location in tk
Accra was headquarters
Middle East Air Wing.

From Accra his African journey
took him to Lagos, Nigeria. Here he
set up supply lines to Bukuru and
Kano. At Kano he supervised the
establishment of bulk storage facili-
ties and at Bukuru he put into effect
an around-the-clock convoy of tank
trucks that fed one of the most im-
portant airfields in the area.

Madugari
378 miles inland
Madugari. Here the
Allies set up an airfield which was
|the last stop on the west coast of
Africa. It was vital that this field
have sufficient oil and gasoline for
planes making Madugari their final |
port of call before the long flight |
across the desert. Working with 20}
trucks each capable of carrying 1800 |
gallons, Mr. DeKens had convoys of |
/10 on the road between Bukuru and |
| Madugari at all times. |
| The round trip rook three days. |

war was

lines for

Located

some



| continued,

| Mr.



@ | Driving at night to avoid as much
|heat as possible, the drivers bounced |
| along the oil-packed trail cut through
heavy jungle to the lf-way house.”
| Here they rested briefly and set out
|for the remainder of the trip. Going
jor coming, they followed the same
procedure of driving half-way, rest- |
ing, and then continuing. |

The drivers and those who worked |
lat the Madugari airfield were all
members of the Hausa, Falarnu and |
Pagan tribes. The convoy drivers |

all natives trained by Mr. DeKens |
and his assistants — proved to be|
good, depen le drivers.

"In fact, they got more uses out of |

those trucks than the manufacturer
ever thought’ possible,’ mused Mr.
DeKens. "One of the their favorite
tricks was to tie chickens on the
crankshaft. The heat of the motor

plus the high temperatures of the}

area gave the driver a perfectly well| pumped 10 million gallons and until | pany

| entry into Germany, he was appoint-

| United States Air

Forty-two Countries in 14 Years

SUITCASE in hand
DeKens, field service representative

Department, is rea

for another trip in hi

Esso Man Girdles Globe Fueling Planes

passport and airplane tick

of Esso Exp

well-trave

roasted chicken.
those chicken
motor!”

But, oh what
feathers made

a me

the

of
|

DeKens
of our

Chuckling to himself, Mr.
"Another time
|drivers spotted a leopard and raced
the truck into the jungle after him.
Oddly enough, the cat turned into the |
truck and the driver ran over him |
a rather novel way of killing animals
in the jungles of Africa.”
Never-the-] Mr. DeKens and his
crew kept the airfields supplied with
gasoline. Between the Karno and
Madugari airfields, over five million
gallons were pumped a_ month.
Aruba’s Dakota airport pumps an
average of 60,000 a month.

one

High Temperatures

It was in the Madugari locale that
DeKens experienced temperatu-
res up to 135. At night it dropped
off to about 95. Although the night
time temperatures seem high, those
of us in that area felt cold at night
and wore jackets. It was just a
matter of our bodies being so over-
heated during the day, that a drop
of over 30 degrees made us run for!
warmth.” And if it wasn’t the heat
he had to contend with, it was sand
storms or rains. The Hamatan season
hits the Madugari area in October,
November and December, and with it |
comes cutting sand storms. The rains
run from April to September. They |
always started April 15. When it |
started to rain, you knew exactly
what date it was without fail,’ he}

intense heat that |
confronted Mr. DeKens. For in 1946
following the war and a short stay
at home, he found himself in Berlin,
Germany, aiding airport supervisors
to reorganize their installations. That |
winter he found himself trying to
scape the biting cold in sub-zero,
coal-short, war-torn Germany.
Nine months after his July,

It wasn’t alw



1946

ed aviation coordinator for all of Ger-
This appointment came a few |
months before he engaged in|
the biggest task encountered |
during his career — the refueling of
planes flying the Berlin air lift.

Berlin Air Lift

In Hamburg at the time, he rushed
to Frankfort and the Rhine-Main Air |
Base, main operating center of the
Force. He super-}
vised refueling operations at this|
base and also the airfield at Weis-
baden. The immersity of the opera-
tion is best described in the number
of gallons pumped. W in the
millions? Mr. DeKens w

He smiled. "In July,

many.
was
ever



1948,

we

| storage

|demanding task,

lift subsided
appr hed this figure every
he said he started to
hectic days of the lift.

"The fuel came in all over
the world. It was pumped into the
tanks at Bremerhaven where
the Germans had built storage faci-
lities capable of holding two billion
gallons — the largest in the world.
The tanks were under 15-feet of
concrete to protect them from Allied
bombardment.

the air
end, we
month,”
the

as it neared its

as
relive

from

"From Bremerhaven the gasoline
was railed to Weisbaden and Rhine
Main. We didn’t have storage facili-
ties when the lift started and had
to pump directly from the railroad
tank car to the waiting trucks. The
trucks, in turn, took the gas to the
planes on the field. Later we had
storage facilities for the gas coming
in by rail. This made our operation
a little bit easier.

"Night and day
trucks refueling planes laden with
coal, food and clothes. Twenty-four
trucks carried 4000 gallons, 20 r
ried 2000 gallons and the remainder
handled the planes’ oil demands. The
crews that manned the trucks were
all German. It was a nerve-racking,
but brought it
ul conclusion.”

we operated 60

we

to a succes

Frazier Promoted
In TSD- Engineering

Project Engineering’s Section
Technical Service Department, h
new Assistant Supervising Engineer.
Promoted to that post, effective July
1, was Burton R. Frazier.

Mr. Fre who first joined Lago
in July, 1952 as an Electrical Design-
er Engineering, Engineer A
at the time of his present promotion.

During the last
; years, four of
them with the U.S.
@ Navy, Mr. Frz c
has been emplc
in
ties in the oil busi- *
including 2%
years in Ecuador
and Peru as a pe-
troleum geo-phys
cist for the Inter- i
national Petroleum
Company, one year i

zier,

was an

various capaci-

ness,

B. R. Frazier

similar capacity with the
Oil and Refining Compan
and, for the last six years prior to *
joining Lago, employed as a ,
design-engineer with the T Com-
at a refinery in Los Angeles,

in a
Humble

was






—

July 3, 1954



Futuro di Lago

(Continua di pagina 1)



s ta den bon posicion pa b
e negoshi adicional aki,” el a bi
El a munstra cu Lago tin un posicion
geografico cu ta favorable, un pro-
duccion halto cu ta tene costo di
plantanan abao y un _ depreciacion
abao debi na e construccion cu
a haci tempo di depresion ora prijs
tabata barata.

Sr. Hor a declara na e grupo
tambe cu en cuanto costo di trabao
ta toca, sinembargo, Lago no ta asina
bon para. Siguiendo ariba e punto aki
el a bisa cu hopi competidornan di
Lago ta emplez , ste homber
pa cada mil barril di capacidad mien-
tras Lago ta mantene 15, un siman
di trabao mas largo y produccion mas
halto.

Sr. Horigan a informa supervisor-
nan cu un tercera parti di empleado-
nan ta traha den lugarnan manera
comisario, casnan, laundry, dining
hall y clubnan. El a indica cu algun
di e competidornan principal di Lago
sorto di servicionan. Sr.








seis of s







no tin tal

Horigan a declara cu sueldonan den |

industria petrolero semper ta mas
halto cu den cualkier otro negoshi.

”f diferencia aki den sueldo,” el a
continua, "ta specialmente halto na
Aruba y door di pasa e trabaonan na
otro, nos ta bai spaar un percentaje
grandi y pone nos mes den mehor po-
sicion pa competi.”

Tocante e servicionnan di Lago, Sr.
Horigan a egura e grupo cu "tan
tempo condicionnan presente no cam-
bia Lago ta sigui opera e hospital.”
El] a conta tocante plannan pa reduci
tamanjo di Lago Colony segun Lago















su programa di nationalizacion ta ha-
ci mas y mas innecesario pa_ trece
empleadonan foreign staff aki.”





El a menciona cu e unico plan de
finitivo ta concerna Lago Heights. Su
observacion final ariba e servicionan
tabata: "Tocante e otro servicionan
cu nos ta aden, nos no tin ningun plan
definitivo, pero parce cu nan por wor-
de soluciona mas liher cu e problema
di hospital y Lago Colony.”

Sr. Horigan a termina su discurso
complimentando e hombernan di Lago,
bisando cu el tabata segur, huzgando
for di experiencia pasa, e veterano-
nan bieuw kende previamente a cum-
pli cu exito na tur encargonan di
Lago lo enfrenta atrobe cualkier pro-
blema cu futuro por trece y logra ha-
ci e trabao y bon haci tambe no ob-
stante e complicacionnan.

Despues di e comida y programa di
recreacion cual tabata inclui un or-
chestra, boxeo y un _ bailarina, e
anochi a worde cerra cu un discurso
di Superintendente General Frank E.
Griffin. Papiando tocante trabao di
un supervisor, el a bisa e hombernan
cu nan ta forma un equipo cu door di
direccion competente por enfrenta cu











exito cualkier situacion cu por pre-
senta.

Mucha Homber

A Skirbi Cu Su
Poyito Ta Bon

Ernesto de Kort di 15 anja, un

studiante di dos anja den Lago Vo-
cational School, a scirbi un composi-
cion den un concurso na school y a
gana. Titulo di e composicion tabata
”Pakiko Mi Kier Un Poyito.” Den un
nota na Aruba Esso News reciente-
mente, el a duna un reportaje tocan-
te su premio.

El a scirbi, "Bo ta corda cu mi a
gana e poyito e dia, pero en realidad
mi no a haya e poyito cu a nace den
refineria. Mi a ha un otro pasobra
esun di promer a muri un dia promer
cu mi mester a haye’le. Mi a hiba e
poyito cas e siguiente Diasabra. Mi
a traha un cas pe. E tabata un gai
chikito.

”Un siman a pasa y tur cos a bai
bon, pero den di tres siman e tabata
hopi malo. Mi a kere cu e ta bai
muri, pero mi mama y ami a traha
hopi cu ne. Ni ariba su pianan el por
a para. >

"Nos a sigui asina como cuatro dia
largo, anto di cinco dia el a para y
a cuminza camna y despues a mehora
rapidamente. Awor e ta un gai gran-
di blanco mas of menos 14% pia hal-
tos"













Nn
HENDRIK BEKS is shown receiving a

co-workers in honor of his retirement July | after 21'/> years of service
with Lago.

HENDRIK BEKS ta munstrd recibiendo un check for di companjeronan
di trabao den Mechanical — Electrical en honor di su retiro Juli despues

di 21-!/p anja di

Toren di Control ta Yama
"Wowo y Horeanan di Haaf”’

’Wowo y horeanan di haaf” ta loke nan ta yama e toren di control
ariba Marine Office. En realidad e wowo y horeanan ta pertenece na e
cuatro hombernan cu ta dirigi como 10,000 yegada y salida di bapor

tur anja.
Sesenta y cinco pia halto den un

gudi cu cada ranca di biento, e hombernan aki ta alerto 24 ora pa dia.

Hasta ora nan ta papia, nan wowo-
nan ta busea ariba lamar y e haaf
bao nan.

Nan ta waak pa un tanquero cu
por ta bini di Rotterdam, of New|
York, of Port Said. Nan ta waak
tambe pa un tanquero chikito cu por
ta bini for di Lago Maracaibo, of un
T-2 procedente di Amuay.

Mirando den haaf, nan ta waak
particularmente pa un senjal indi-
cando cu un bapor a caba di carga, |
of ta cla pa sali. Trahando tambe co-
mo observadornan di posible candela,
nan ta alerto pa cualkier vlam chiki-
to of nubia di huma.

Sinembargo, nan promer responsa-
bilidad ta pa mira cu bapornan dren-
ta haaf, mara na e luga igna, des- |
carga of tuma un carga y sali cu un
minimo di tempo perdi y un maximo
di seguridad.

E trahadornan den e toren di con- |
trol ta sirbi como dirigidornan di tra-
fico ariba e avenidanan di lamar cu
ta termina den haaf di San Nicolas.
Nan ta opera no cu fluit y hand-
schoen blanco na man, pero cu conico
y bala pinta cu strepi, luznan di co-
lor, luznan di duna senjal y radio-
telefoon. |

Tur dia nan ta r i
pornan cu mester drenta y
ey. Hunto cu otro informacion, e|
lista ta duna e ora calcula di yegada, |
e lugar di mara y ora di salida. |

Awor ta keda na e trahador den e |
toren pa soma e bapornan ora nan
bira rond di Colorado Point, bini di
direccion di Oranjestad of for di pa-
for. Cu un luz di duna senjal el ta}
pidi e bapor pa determina su identi-
dad y ta duna instruccion pa mara
cual e bapor ta repeti.

Anto, mientras e bapor ta acercan-
do haaf, e operador ta yama oficial-
nan di duana y imigracion na tele-
foon, e hefe di waaf, un remoleador,
un loods, Departamento di Receiving
& Shipping y e despachador di lan-
cha. Pa tempo cu e bapor ta dilanti
di un di e entradanan, cada persona
concerna cu su yegada ta presente.

Ademas di usa Morse Code y In-
ternational Code Flags, e operador-
nan tin un set di senjal devisé door
di Lago pa controla trafico den haaf,
E senjalnan aki, den dia, ta componi
di varios sorto di bala, conico y bar-















°
es







ril pinta cu strepi geel y oranje.
Anochi nan ta luz corra, geel y
blanco.

El por habri of cerra Entrada Pa-



ARUBA ESSO NEWS



nor Beks
BY,





check from Mechanical — Electrical

servicio cu Lago.

cubiculo blanco cu berde cu ta sa-



riba of Pabao, of limita nan uso pa
bapornan cu ta sali. El por cerra un
entrada y laga e otro habri pa ba-
pornan cu ta yega of sali. El por ha-
bri Entrada Pariba of Pabao sola-
mente pa bapornan cu ta drenta, y
cerra e otro pa tur trafico. El por
cerra tur dos entrada of habri tur
dos.

Un gran parti di trabao di e toren
ta cu e tanqueronan chikito. Ora e
bapor ta bini di afor, e operador ta
manda afor su instruecionnan pa ma-
ra. Captan di e bapor, pa indica cu
el ta comprende, ta repeti e instruc-
cionnan door di blink e tres luznan
blanco monta ariba e cuarto di stuur
di tur e bapornan cu ta nabega re-
gularmente den Lago Maracaibo.

Ora e bapor mara y ta deseargan-
do e ta hiza un conico preto te mitar
di su mastre. Ora e ta cla pa sali e
ta hiza e conico e resto of
chi — ta duna senjal cu e luznan di



ano-

Canina Tower Operators



On Job 24 Hours A Day

"The eyes and ears of the harbor”

to every gust of wind, these men
Even as they talk, their eyes scan
the sea and the harbor beneath them.

They’re on the watch for an ocean
tanker which may be arriving from
Rotterdam, or New York, or Port
Said. They keep a lookout, too, for
a lake tanker coming up from Lake
Maracaibo, or a T-2 bound in from
Amuay.

Scanning the harbor, they keep an
eye peeled for a signal indicating a
ship is unloaded, or is ready to sail.
Doubling as harbor fire wardens,
they’re on the alert for a_ tell-tale
tongue of flame or puff of smoke.

Their primary responsibility, how-
ever, is to see that ships enter the
harbor, tie up at the assigned berth,
discharge or take on cargo and
sail with a minimum of wasted time
and a maximum of safety.

The control tower operators serve
as traffic officers over the sea lanes
which empty into San Nicolas harbor.
They operate not with whistles and
white-gloved hand signals, but with
| striped cones and balls, colored lights,
| blinker lamps and radio telephones.

Each day they receive lists of the
ships expected to arrive and depart
that day. Along with other informa-
tion, the list gives the anticipated
arrival time, assigned berth and
sailing time.

It is up to the control tower oper-
ator to spot the ships as they come
west and north from Colorado Point,
southeast from Oranjestad or in from
the southwest. With a blinker lamp he
signals the ship to determine its
identity and pass along its berthing
instructions which the ship repeats.

Then, while the vessel approaches
the harbor, the operator telephones
customs and immigration — officials,
the dock master, a tug, a pilot, Re-
ceiving and Shipping and the launch
dispatcher. By the time the vessel is
off one of the entrances, each person
concerned with its arrival is standing
by.

In addition to using Morse Code
and International Code Flags, the
operators have a set of signals de-
vised by Lago to control its harbor












traffic. Thes mbols, by day, are
composed of various arrangements of
balls, cones and barrels striped

yellow and orange. At night they’re



Lago Maracaibo.

HIGH ABOVE San Nicolas harbor, Control Tower Operator J. A.

combinations of red,

made up of







dies

Scott

prepares to hoist an orange-yellow striped ball, one of the signals used

to direct ha

HALTO ARIBA haaf di San Nicola
Scott ta prepara pa hasi un bala c
cu ta worde usa pa d

rbor traffic.

s, operator di Control Tower J. A.
u strepi oranje-geel, un di e signal
irigi trafico den haaf.

™™ Directing Ship Movements

is what they call the control tower

atop the Marine Office. Actually the eyes and ears belong to the four
men who direct some 10,000 ship arrivals and departures each year.
Perched 65 feet in the air in a green and white cubicle which vibrates



are on the alert 24 hours a day.



green and white lights.

By hoisting the cone, the ball or
both in combination to the yard-arm
atop the signal tower or by turning
on the lights, the operator can route
the ship traffic so as not to interfere
with work being done in the harbor,
or with ships moving about the
harbor.

He can close or open the East or
West Entrance, or limit their use to
outgoing ships. He can close one
entrance and leave the other open to
ships arriving and departing. He can
open the East or West Entrance only
to incoming ships, and close the
other to all traffic. He can close both
entrances, or open both.

Much of the tower’s work is with
lake tankers. As the ships come in
from the southwest the operator
blinks out its berthing instructions.

The ship’s master, to indicate he
understands, repreats the instruc-
tions by flashing the three white

lights mounted over the wheelhouse

of all vessels regularly sailing in
Lake Maracaibo.
Berthed and unloaded, the Lake

tanker hoists a black cone halfway
to its yardarm. When it is ready to
sail, it hoists the cone and its code
flag the rest of the way or — at
night — signals with its Lake Ma-
racaibo lights.

The man in the control tower must
keep an eye out for these signals and
fit the lake tanker’s departure into
the harbor traffic schedule. He has
to listen for the two long whistle
blasts that indicate an ocean-going
vessel is ready to sail. And he has to
watch for approaching ships.

It is not unusual for an operator
to have — simultaneously — a ship
docking, another sailing and several
waiting to enter the harbor. The suc-
cessful operation of the harbor de-
pends in a large part upon the skill
of these men who must judge, within
minutes, the time each ship will con-
sume in these operations.

Honors Day

(Continued from page 1)

- year students elected Bernard Geer-
man and Carl Lejuez; second-year
students elected Caspar Boekhoudt
and Alfonso Steenen; first-year stu-
dents elected Mario Hanson and
Rafael Croes.

Nineteen boys who served as
monitors in the school’s Safety Pro-
gram were also rewarded with brass
keys as were 12 members of the Stu-
dent Council, 12 members of the
school newspaper staff, 12 boys who
helped with the school] housekeeping
detail and 40 members of the Glee
Club.

Woodworking tools were given as
prizes to the three first-year stu-
dents chosen for outstanding shop
work. They were Hendrik Leo, Con-
stancio Gomez and Mariano Croes.
Given honorable mention for their
shop work were Juan v/d_ Linden,
Cecilio Ras and Francisco v/d Lin-
den.

The school, which does not have a
‘Coin Your Ideas’ program, has a
’suggestion box.’ Addison Harms and





Regina Tromp received books «as
awards for the suggestions they
submitted which were judged the
best during the school year. e

The winners of the second semester
English spelling contest received
dictionaries as prizes. Asked to spell
450 words, Rosindo Geerman was
first with 448; Betrando de Cuba was
second with 445 and Cecilio Ras’ was



third with 442.

ee ee ee ee




ARUBA ESSO NEWS





SQUAT incthestaten















ng
t 1 bug, the dredge work
day new,
tring-straight c te
Palmas. , 600
mile: ong, it w 160
vars. One thousand it
end seven miles in the n
into the Gulf of Venez
PLAT den awa manera un bestia monstruo
largo, e draga “Jamaica Bay’ ta
dia y i ariba e canal n
est den Lago Maracaibo cu ta corre for

Punta de Pal
600 pia hancho milla
ta 160 million bolivars.

Trinta

y |8





extende siete mille



di Venezu

Lite Aboard a Lake Tanker

“What Has It Been Like, This Shuttling Back And Forth?”



The "'Mara” sailed about 8:35. Capt. J. P. Turner took her out through
the West Entrance, conning the ship by lining up the red and green
clusters which showed high admist the myriad lights of the refinery
astern.

”"Paaawrt a bit, quartermaster,” the captain sing-songed to the helmsman.
*Paaawrt a bit more. Steady!” Then, ’Steady as you go.” Turning to the
third mate the captain said, Full away, Mr. McBride. The course is . We
went down at 225 the last trip and we were a bit inside.”

Third Mate John McBride rang "full ahead” on the engine telegraph and
the S.S. Mara was off on its 1231st voyage.

For over Lake Tankers such as the ”
down” to acaibo. They sail out of San } as harbor with their
lowest de four to five feet above the water. They return with the same
decks awash, burdened with Venezuelan crude oil for Lago.

They have been the life-line of the refinery and of Aruba, the artery which
has carried the "black gold” upon which the refinery and its employees
prospered.

But now the slow, limited-capacity lakers have become out-dated. They’r«
being forced to give way to the larger, faster ships — T-2’s, super-tankers
and others — which can load crude pipelined to Amuay and which will soon
be able to go where once only the lakers could go.

What has it been like, this shuttling back and forth for over three decades
hauling crude to the transshipment station which was the fore-runner of
Lago, and later to feed the insatiable appetite of the largest operating
refinery in the world today? For the most part it’s been like the trip the
”Mara” set off on June 3.

The Mara” was bound for Palmarejo, a loading terminal on the south-
west shore of the lake, to pick up some 40,000 barrels of Mara crude. Though
the ship’s ’sailing-time’ clock said 6 p.m., a faulty pump delayed the
departure almost 242 hours.

After an “outside” trip to Haiti, the "Mara” had returned to Aruba via
Amuay where it had taken on a load of crude. By the time the last tank was
unloaded, Capt. Turner was on the bridge. Chief Mate L. R. Good, who had
telephoned the control tower atop the Marine Office, reported the ship
dispatchers had scheduled the ’Mara” to sail after the S.S. Geni, an ocean-











” have been "running





have







QUARTERMASTER C. O. Emerenciano hoists the ‘J’ code flag as

signal to the control tower that the “Mara’’ is ready to sail.

TIMONERO C. O. Emerenciano ta hiza e bandera cu letra “J

senjal na toren di control cu ''Mara’’ ta cla pa sali.

como

AS THE

AT THE engin

going tanker, which was then leaving the dock and heading for the East
Entrance.

As the Geni” passed astern, Capt. Turner alerted the engineers by having
"stand by” rung on the engine telegraph, then checked to ma sure Chief
Mate Good and Second Mate S. T. M. Boyd were fore and aft to supervise
handling of the

Next he ordered Mr. Good to "single up” — to free
had one blast sounded on the ship’s whistle. The signal was for Mr. 1 to
let go all lines aft. With engines and rudder the captain worked the stern
from the dock, then ordered Mr. Good to "let go forward.”

With the engines astern, the *"Mara” backed from the No. 4 Lake Tanker
Dock and into the harbor. Ordering "half ahead” on the starboard engine,
the bow swung around and headed for the West Entrance.

"When I have a choice, I always prefer to sail by the West Entrance,
Capt. Turner explained as he gave orders to the helmsman from the bridge.
"Starboard a bit,’”’ he called. From inside the wheelhouse came the voice of
the helmsman repeating the order. ’Midships,” the captain called. ’Midships,”
echoed the helmsman.

On the decks below the coiled the eight-inch
rewound the cables on their drums and secured the ship for sea.

Once past the red and green lights which marked the opening of the West
Entrance, Capt. Turner gave Mr. McBride the "full away” order. Though
the engine telegraph indicated both engines were at "full ahead,’ Mr.
McBride repeated the signal.



mooring lines.

all lines but one — and













crew mooring hawsers,

In the engine room astern the telegraph pointer swung around, then came
back to “full ahead.” It was a signal to Second Engineer E. W. McDowell
and Fourth Engineer A. R. Bald that the maneuvering was over, that their
1,000 horse-power steam engines would probably stay "full ahead” until the
ship reached the entrance to Lake Maracaibo.

The "Mara” headed out into the dark, wind-whipped Caribbean. Ahead to
port the Southern Cross competed with a sliver of moon that rode high in the
. Outside the harbor the lights of two ships, waiting to enter, broke the
darkness.

On the horizon the lights of two passing ships could be seen while astern
the lights of the S.S. Cumarebo, heading for Amuay, slipped off to port.









Mara

relax in their qu

MIENTRAS ‘Mara’ ¢s

miembronan di tripu

*



July 3, 1954





crew member
have other hobbies.



90M

for ''full ahe



o di maquin

adilanti

On the bridge the captain, mat
only by the glow that broke thr
telegraph and the binnacle light

Once outside the reef the "Ma
the ship — riding high with all
"There’s about two hours of this
compressed between the island anc
here.”

The captain’s prediction proved
passed some 2% miles off Macol
the north coast of Venezue the
in relatively calm seas at a stead

The sound of music, which had
aft, died away as the men turnec
,’ the ”"M s” two cats,
and turned in, too. Only the sound
the rigging and the muted mumb

As the night on the ligl
appeared, passed and disappeared
overtook the ”Mara” ed
cence.

At midnight Mr. Boyd relieved
termaster relieved the helmsman :
Mr. Good relieved Mr. Boyd, anot
Mara” plowed on.









ge



eri

wore

and p

Dawn spotted the ship still
As the sun rose so did the crew 1
around, then returned to straight
indicating breakfast for the
who had been on duty since four.

Thirty-minutes later white-coa
handbells which they
and of: On the
ham, eggs, toast and coffee.

Breakfast over, the

son





rang,

rang to an



cers. menu was

crew swun

a

IN THE

Ce
work on a

ombra ariba dek <

DEN

splits cable. Durante e via


July 3, 1954





ONCE outside San Nicolas harbor, lake tanker quartermasters like J. S$. Thompson

ARUBA ESSO NEWS

(above) steer a straight course to the lake mouth.

UNA VEZ pafor di haaf di San Nicolas, stuurmannan na bordo di tanqueronan



raquingarto Maquinista
anti’ yra’ ta ariba su di 1231 viaje.

n, mat! helmsman stood in darkness relieved
ke thrithe red glass windows of the engine
light } the comp
© *Ma’an into a quartering swell which set
th al] ts wing tanks empty — to tossing.

of thispt. Turner explained. "The current is
ind andland and builds up into a bit of a swell





proved2ct. About two hours later, as the ship
Macokht which flashes from a headland on
la, thell subsided and the ship plowed along
. stead knots an hour.

ch hade from a radio in the crew’s quarters
turnedor the night. "Marmalade” and ”Gin-
its, er{ under the mid-ship accommodations
sound e bubbling bow wave, the wind through
mumbof the engir could be heard.

he liglf other ships, coming from the lake,
pearedrn. Faster ships, heading for the lake,
passed a wake of shimmering phosphores-



‘lieved McBride on the bridge, another quar-
sman +e ship continued on its way
ij, anotielmsman took over the whe



ill sone hours from the entrance to the lake.
crew vers. They appeared on deck for a look
raightp their quarters. At 7:30 a single bell
for thecers and men who would relieve those
e four.




ite-coaitewards appeared fore and aft with
to ante breakfast for the rest of the crew
1 was juice, cereal, curried lamb and rice,

swuno the daily maintenance work. As the

= POP | Simon Bozmen (left) and John Taylor

lice. C the trip the crew does daily main-

fek ate rane:
eo atr mon Bozmen (robez) y John Taylor ta
2 e via

ripulacion ta haci mantenecion diario.



chikito manera J. S. Thompson (ariba) ta mantene un direccion fiho pa yega boca

di e Lago.

ship steamed through a white-capped Gulf of Venezuela turned a sparkling
blue by the bright sun, they appeared on the trunk deck with hammers,
chipping irons and brushes to flake away the paint blistered by sun and sea
and the rust underneath.

On the poop deck aft others spliced cables, checked running gear, painted
a bulkhead or performed other chores while keeping one eye cocked on the
wire fishing lines which trailed astern. Suddenly Simon Bozmen, who had
been at work on a cable, dropped his tools and grabbed one of the lines which
had snapped taut.

Pulling hand-over-hand he hauled a 20-pound jack-fish over the rail with
practiced ease and threw it flopping on the deck. Another crew-member circled
the fish, then darted in and with an expert blow of a club dispatched it.

Down in the green and white engine room Fireman Geronimo George
worked with an oil can, filling reservoirs and lubricating the moving parts
of the hissing steam engines, fuel pumps, water circulators and the spinning
twin propellor shafts.

On the bridge Mr. McBride stood behind a pair of field glasses. He was
on the lookout for a Island, a low, sandy spit which swings out into
the Caribbean and forms the stern side of the lake mouth. About 9 a.m.
the beacon which marks the island appeared in the gl. S.

A half hour later Capt. Turner appeared on the bridge, checked the ship’s
position and ordered "port a bit, quartermaster.” He explained he preferred
to be "a little to windward” as the ship neared the entrance to the channel
which pierces the outer bar.

The “EM” — ’entrance to Maracaibo’ — buoy came in sight, bobbing in
the chop some four miles off the finger of Venezuela which juts up into and
forms the east coast of the Guajira Peninsula. Nearer the shore rode another
buoy which marked the wreck of the Don Alberto.”

As the Mara” stood in toward the shore, Capt. Turner ordered "stand by”
rung on the engine telegraph and the engineers hurried to their stations. The
captain then ordered "half ahead” on the engines and a black cone suspended
from the forward mast was run down half way as a signal to other ships
that the ’Mara” was proceeding at half spee

Ahead lay the peninsula shore. At the water’s edge, on railroad tracks so
they could be shifted if the channel moved, stood three mar . Capt. Turner
conned the ship by lining the center marker with another atop a mountain
some five miles to the southwest.











eS










Then, behind two ocean-going tankers, the Mara” passed another buoy,
turned to port and started through the channel which pierces the outer bar.

The outer bar channel averages about 180 feet in width and 25 feet in
depth. It has been a restle passage, working its way across the entrance
to the lake and back again. Silt, carried by the lake current, eventually filled
each cut. Then the impounded waters broke through and scoured another
channel, only to fill it once again with silt.

Since 19: however, dredges jointly maintained by three of the largest oil
com producing in Venezuela have deepened the channel and kept it
cle i ry. The first of these dredges was a converted lake tanker,
the ’

As the lake current frothed past the channel buoys, it tumbled into the
gulf and built a white-capped chop which frigate birds skimmed on their way
Zaparita Island.

"That island dumps so much sand into the channel that they have to dredge
here quite frequently,” Capt. Turner explained.

To the east, some two miles and extending into the gulf from Zapara
Island, rose the breakwater the Venezuelan government is building to protect
the mouth of the new channel it is dredging through the lake.

Through field glasses cranes could be seen loading boulders — lightered
across the lake from Toas Island — into railway s which were drawn to
the gulf end of the breakwater and dumped. One of the two helicopters used
to carry men and nr ges between the two islands windmilled in from the
west and settled near the cranes.

As the ship continued between the red and green buoys which mark the
confines of the channel a cabin cruiser, throwing a bow wave on either side,
sped toward the Mara.”

*That will be the pilot launch coming from San Carlos,” the captain said
as the cruiser drew abreast of the ship and, in a spraying curve, ran up
along the starboard e. As the two craft continued ahead the pilot leaped
from the top of the cabin to the harbor deck of the Mara.”

With a burst of speed the crusier pulled away from the larger ship while
the pilot mounted to the bridge. There he took over from Capt. Turner, giving
his orders in Spanish to the quartermaster.
































_ (The second in this series of two articles on Lago’s Lake Fleet will appear
in the July 17 issue of the Aruba Esso News.)




CAPT. J. P. Turner searches for the ‘entrance to Maracaibo’ buoy.

Past the outer bar and in the lake, a pilot takes over.

CAPT. J. P. Turner ta buscando e boei cu ta marca entrada di Mara-

caibo. Pafor di e barra den e Lago, loods ta bini na bordo.




GOOD FOOD is traditional in the Lake Fleet. Here J. T. Pampier (fore-

ground) and Chief Cook Wan Hee ready lunch for the men on the
“Mara.”

BON CUMINDA ta tradicional den Lake Fleet. Aki J. T. Pampier (adi-
lanti) y Chief Cook Wan Hee ta prepara cuminda pa e hombernan
abordo di "Mara."



CHIPPING and painting rust spot a continuous chore. Quartermaster
Thompson sweeps up the scale, will soon be back with paint and brush.



CASCANDO jy verfmento di lugarnan frusto ta un trabao continuo.
Stuurman Thompson ta bari e frusto, pronto lo bolbe cu verf y kwashi.








Bida Riba Ta

E tanquero Mara” a sali mas of menos 8:35. Capt. J. P. Turner
sali cu ne door di entrada pabao, maniobrando cu e bapor ariba
troshinan di luznan corra y berde di refineria atras.

*Hala un poco banda robez,” e captan a grita e stuurman. ”Un poco mas.
Sigui awor!” Anto, al
e captan a bisa, "Full afor, Sr. McBride. E direccion ta 228. Ultimo biaha
225 y nos tabata un poco paden.”

1 John McBride a ring “full adilanti” ariba telegraaf di e
Mara a cuminza su di 1231 viaj

Pa mas cu 30 anja tanqueronan chikito manerz
Aruba y Lago Maracaibo. Nan ta sali for di den haaf di San Nicolas cu nan
deknan mas abao como cuatro te cinco pia ariba awa. Nan ta bolbe cu e
mes deknan pareuw cu awa, carga di azeta crudo di Venezuela pa Lago.

Nan tabata e linea vital di refineria y di Aruba, e slagader cu a carga e
“oro negro” cual a haci e refineria y su empleadonan prospera.

Pero awor e lento tanqueronan chikito cu capacidad limita a bai for di|
moda. Nan ta worde forza pa haci lugar pa e tanqueronan mas grandi, por |
ehemplo e super tankernan y esnan di typo T-2, cual por carga ecrudo cu
bini Amuay door di linea di tubo y cu pronto lo por drenta te na unda antes
solamente e tanqueronan chikito por a yega.

Com esaki tabata, e corremento bai y bini pa mas cu tres decenia halando
crudo pa e stacion di transladacion cu tabata aki promer cu Lago, y des-
pues pa alimenta e apetito insaciable di e refineria mas grandi cu ta opera
na mundo awor. Mayoria tabata mescos cu e viaje cu “Mara” a emprende
Juni 3.

”"Mara” su destino tabata Palmarejo, un terminal di cargamento na costa
zuidwest di Lago Maracaibo, pa tuma como 40,000 barril di crudo di Mara.
No obstante cu ora di e bapor sali tabata 6 p.m., un pomp defecto na terra
a duna e bapor un tardanza di casi 2% ora.

Despues di un viaje “casual” pa Haiti, "Mara” a regresa Aruba via
Amuay unda el a tuma un carga di crudo. Pa ora cu su ultimo tanki tabata
descarga, Capt. Turner tabata ariba brug caba. Promer Oficial L. R. Good,
kende a telefonea toren di control ariba Marine Office, a bisa cu despacha-
dornan di e bapor a fiha pa e sali despues di S.S. Geni, un tanquero di lamar
grandi cu net na e momento aki tabata distanciando for di haaf cogiendo
rumbo pa entrada pariba.

"Ora mi por escoge, semper mi ta prefera di sali door di entrada pabao,”
Capt. Turner a splica mientras el tabata duna orden for di ariba brug na
e stuurman. ”Un poco banda drechi,” el a grita. For di cuarto di e timon|
a sali voz di e stuurman repitiendo e orden. |

Una vez cu e luznan berde y corra marcando apertura di entrada pabao
a worde pasa, Capt. Turner a duna Sr. McBride orden pa "full afor.” No
obstante cu tur dos maquina tabata corre asina caba, Sr. McBride a repiti
e senjal.

Den e cuarto di maquina atras wijzer di e telegraaf a draai rond, y des-
pues a bolbe ariba ,,full adilanti.” Esaki tabata un senjal pa Segunda Ma-
quinista E. W. McDowell y Tercer Maquinista A. R. Bald cu tur maniobra
a pasa, cu probablemente nan motornan di 10,000 forza di cabai lo keda
ariba "full adilanti” te ora e bapor aleanza entrada di Lago Maracaibo.

Mara” a coi camina den obscuridad. Un biento fuerte tabata supla ariba
Caribe. Pafor di haaf luznan di dos bapor wardando pa drenta a kibra e
obscuridad un rato.

Na horizonte hende por a mira luznan di dos bapor cu tabata pasa mien-
tras atras luznan di S.S. Cumarebo, na camina pa Amuay, a kita na banda
robez.

Ariba brug e captan, oficial y stuurman tabata para den un obscuridad
kibra solamente door di e luz cu tabata refleha door di e bentananan di
glas corra y e luz ariba e compas.

Una vez pafor di cai "Mara” a drenta den un lamar halto y bruto cu a
pone e bapor — liher cu casi tur su tankinan bashi — lora hopi.

"Esaki ta dura como dos ora,” Capt. Turner a splica. ’E coriente ta com-
promi entre e isla y continente y ta lamta un lamar halto aki.”

Loke e captan a bisa tabata berdad. Mas of menos dos ora despues, ora
e bapor a pasa como 2% milla dilanti luz di Macolla cual ta luza for di ariba
costa norte di Venezuela, e lamar a calma y e bapor a sigui den awa calma
na un velocidad constante di 94% milla pa ora.

E zonida di musica cu tabata bini for di un radio den cuarto di e tripu-
lantenan atras, a keda keto ora esakinan a coi cama. ’Marmalade” y in-
ger”, e dos pushinan di abordo, tambe a busca un lugar di drumi. A keda
solamente zonida di olanan cu ta kibra adilanti, e biento cu ta supla den
mastre y zonida di e maquinanan.

Mientras nochi tabata pasa luznan di otro bapornan, biniendo for di Lago
Maracaibo a aparece, pasa y desaparece atras. Bapornan mas rapido, tam-
be cu destino pa Lago Maracaibo, tabata pasa Mara” na camina lagando
atras un strepi hancho di awa turbulente.

Mei anochi Sr. Boyd a cambia Sr. McBride ariba brug, un otro stuurman|
a cambia esun cu tabata na warda y e bapor a sigui su camina. Cuatro ’or
di marduga Sr. Good a cambia Sr. Boyd, un otro stuurman a tuma wiel di
"Mara” y e viaje a sigui.

Ora di dia a habri ainda e bapor tabata como 4% ora leuw di entrada
di e Lago. Solo a sali y tripulantenan a lamta. Nan a aparece na dek pa
un rato, anto nan a bolbe abao pa drecha nan cabina. Siete ’or y mei a zona
un bel, indicando ora di desayuno pa e hombernan y oficialnan cu mester |
subi warda pa cambia esnan cu ta trahando desde cuatro ’or di marduga. |

Mei ora despues algun steward den bachi blanco a aparece adilanti y
atras cu belnan anunciando cu desayuno tabata cla pa resto di e tripulacion
y oficialnan. E menu tabata inclui hugo di fruta, cereal, carni di carner cu
curry y aroz, ham, webo, pan gerooster y koffie.

a
e



Si, sigui asina.” Dirigiendo su mes na e tercer ofic






nos a sali arib
Tercer Ofi
maquina y S









Mara” a haci viaje entre


































































Ora desayuno a pasa e tripulacion a cuminza cu su trabao di tur dia.
Mientras e bapor tabata traversa den Golfo di Venezuela, nan a aparece
ariba dek cu martillo, brush di staal y herro di chip raspa e verf cu ta
casca door di biento y lamar y e frusto abao. |

Ariba dek atras otro tabata splits cable, check e cabuyanan, verf cualkier
biga of haci cualkier otro trabao mientras nan tabata tene vista ariba e
ligjanan di pisca cu tabata lastra atras. Di repente Simon Bozmen, kende
tabata traha cu un cable, a laga su hermentnan cai y a tira man pa un di
e linjanan cu a hala bira strak.

Halando cu tur dos man el a trece un pisea di 20 liber ariba dek y a
bente’le abao zapatiando. Un otro tripulante a yega cerca e pisca y cu un
golpe experto di un pida palo el a despacha e pisca. |

Abao den e cuarto di maquina geverf blanco y berde Fogonero Geronimo










Pa 30 Anja Nan a Trece Azeta Aki

ARUBA ESS



nker di Lago

€ partinan movible di e
nan di propellor.

Ariba brug S
Isla Zapara
Pa 9 a.m. e

maquina, pompnan, circuladornan di awa y e shaft-



McBride tabata mira door di un kijker. El tabata busca
un isla di santo den Caribe canto di entrada pariba di e Lago.
la a bini na vista.

Mei ora despues Capt. Turner a aparece ariba brug, check posicion di e
bapor y a ordena e stuurman pa stuur un poco mas na banda robez. El
splica cu el ta prefera di ta un tiki na banda di biento ora e bapor ta acere
entrada di e nal

= boei ando entrada di Maracaibo a bini na vis lamtando den
lamar como cuatro milla dilanti costa oriental di Peninsula di Guajira. Mas
cerca di cos tabatin un otro boei marcando resto di Don Alberto.

Ora "Ma tabata é . Turner a
maquini an a tur an posicion. Anto e captan a ordena pz
na mitar velocidad y un conico preto cu tabata colga na e mast
a worde baha te mitar pa munstra otro bapornan cu "Mara” tabat
na mitar velocidad.

Adilanti tabatin costa di e peninsula. Dentro poco Mara”
al.
canal pafor tin como 180 pia hancho y 25 pia hundo. Santo, cu ta worde
carga door di e coriente, ta acumula ey den na cantidad.

Desde 1938, sinembargo, draganan manteni door di e tres companianan
mas grandi cu ta produci na Venezuela ta cobando e canal y ta mantene’le
limpi y stacionario. E promer di e draganan aki tabata un tanquero con-
verti, ’Invercaibo.”

Na banda pariba, como dos milla leuw y extendiendo den e Golfo for di
Isla Zapara, ta lamta e dam di wanta awa cu gobierno di Venezuela ta tra-
hando pa protega boca di e canal nobo cu e ta coba den e Lago.

Door di kijker hende por a mira grua cargando piedra grandi — treci
over di e canal den lancha for di Isla Toas — den wagonnan di ferrocarril
cu ta worde lastra te na punto di e dam y gedomp. Un di e dos helicopters









a



mar








ordena "stand by” y
prosegui
ilanti

a corriendo








ca







usa pa carga hendenan di trabao y hiba respondi entre e dos islanan a bini|
| di pabao

y baha canto di e gruanan.

Mientras e bapor tabata sigui entre e boeinan berde y corra cu ta mare
extremonan di e canal un boto di loods, tabata acercando Mara” cu bast
velocidad.

”Esey ta e boto di loods cu ta bini for di San Carlos,” e aptan a bisa ora
e boto a yega acerca y a hala na un canto na banda drechi. Mientras tur
dos tabata sigui e loods a bula for di e boto ariba e dek abao di Mara.”

Cu un rancada duro e boto di loods a kita bai for di e bapor mas grandi
mientras e loods a subi na brug. Aya el a tuma over for di Capt. Turner,
dunando su ordennan na Spanjo na e stuurman.

Dentro di algun minuut ”Mara” a pasa San Carlos, un pueblecito tras
di un forti chikito traha ariba un pida terra cu ta sali for di costa pabao
di e Lago. Cayonnan bieuw, poni cabez ariba den santo, tabata forma un
sorto di trankera for di e forti te canto di lamar.
oco pasa di San Carlos "Mara” a pasa un di e dos draganan Ame
cu ta cobando un canal estrecho door di e Lago te na un hundura di





a








ano

5 pia.



E draganan aki den un sentido ta cobando graf di e tanqueronan chikito |

opera door di Lago y otro refinerianan.

Ora e canal ta cla, tanqueronan grandi di lamar grandi capaz pa carga
cinco vez mas tanto crudo cu Mara” y mayoria otro tanqueronan chikito
lo por nabega door di e Lago yega te na e terminalnan di tuma carga.

E tanqueronan chikito a worde usa promer pa saca e crudo for di Lago |

Maracaibo pa motibo di nan bom flat. Trinta anja pasa nan tabata e unico
bapornan cu por a traversa e barra pa aleanza e awanan mas hundo ariba
Punta de Palmas.

E canal nobo, sinembargo, lo habri e Lago pa bapornan cu no solamente



ta mas grandi cu e tanqueronan chikito, pero cu lo opera cu tripulacion | ®

solamente un poco mas grandi. Pesey, nan lo ta mas economico pa opera y

Lago — forza door di competicion creciente pa reduci costo unda cu ta
posible — ta bai elimina su flota di Lago na beneficio di bapornan mas
grandi.

E draga, "Jamaica Bay,” tabata parce un bestia di awa. Hancho y poco|

plat, e ta pasa un hose ariba fondo di e Lago. Asina e ta chupa e santo y
ta pase’le pa un otro hose cu, wanta cu drum di azeta bashi, ta lora for
di atras di e draga manera un rabo.

E santo tabata corre for di punto di e rabo. Islanan chikito cu net ta
munstra ariba superficie di awa ta indica unda e santo a worde basha segun
e draga ta sigui su trabao den e Lago.



(E segundo den ¢ serie aki di dos articulo ariba Lago au Lake Fleet lo
parece den e Esso News di Juli 17.)

Training Division To Help
MULO Grads Pick Career

One week later William
assistant Lago Vocational
principal, will speak at the college
on "The Effects of Supply and De-
mand of Jobs on the Selection of a
Career.”

On July 30 the graduating students
will be brought to the Reception
Center to hear E. F. Welch, training
division head, speak on "The Impor-
tance of Education in Getting the
| "Right Job’.” The students will then

mbark on a two-hour tour of the
| refine y and wind up back at the
| Reception Center for refreshments

j i |and a question period.
¢ Social Happenings Q The talks and tour are designed to |
point up industry’s need for persons |
trained in other than clerical skills,
Ruby E. Edmead of the Accounting | the thinking n to the selec-

Lago’s Training Division has Meskill,
scheduled three sessions this month
to help some 50 graduating MULO
school students select a career.

On July 10 Frank Cassens, pei-
sonnel research coordinator, will
speak at St. Dominicus College on
"Planning a Career.” Two films,
”You and Your Mental Abilities” and
"Discovering Your Real Interests”
will also be shown.











Roe BET aR or eae

ooOoOolCorcoron aoa err oe














George tabata traha cu un canica di azeta, yenando reservoirs y lubricando



Department and Abdon M. De|tion of a satisfactory career and the
Freitas of Catalytic and Light Ends | nec y of students’ training for |
were married June 19. Co-workers|work in industry throughout the
presented the couple with gifts. | world. t



a drenta den e|

School |

July 3, 1



Lago Lo Yuda
50 Studiante

Escoge Carera

Training Division di Lago lo tene
| tres sesion e luna aki pa yuda como
50 studiantenan cu caba MULO
school escoge un carer

Dia 10 di Juli Fr:

sonnel resi







ank Cassens, per-
rch coordinator,
Dominicus College tocante
amento di un Ca ” Dos
"Abo y bo Abilidadnan Men-
* y “Descubriendo bo Interesnan
3erdadero” lo worde munstra tambe
Un siman despues William Meskill,
|sub-director di Lago
School, lo papia na e mes
cante fectonan di Ofertz



lo papia




Vocational
school to-







y Deman-





da di Trabao Ariba Seleccion di un
Carer

Dia 30 di Juli e studiantenan cu
ta caba school lo bini Reception
Center pa tende E. F. Welch, hefe di



Training Division, papia tocante "Im-
portancia di Educacion den Haya-
mento di e ’Propio Trabao’.” De spues
e studiantenan lo cuminza ariba un
| paseo door di refineria cu lo dura dos
{ora y lo caba esaki na Rece ption
Center atrobe unda refresco lo wor-
y unda lo tin oportunidad
ci pregunta,

E lecturanan y paseo tin como in-
tencion padilanti dad
di industria pa personanan sinja den
ramonan otro klerk,
pensamento escoge-







pa trece nec

sino trabao di
e necesario den
mento di un carera satisfactorio y ¢
necesidad di sinjamento di studian-
tenan pa trabao den industria
|tur parti di mundo.

den

Lago Contributes
Toward Construction

Of Brazil Church

To help in the building of a new
church in Brazil, Lago recently con-
tributed Fls. 23,000 to Rev. P. D.
Grove, OP, the ish priest whose
energy and faith is the driving force
behind the proposed construction.

To be called Christ the King
| Church, it will be located in Brazil

|







| just off the main San Nicolas-Oran-
je d road where Father Grove now
has a small school. It is in this school







that he conducts services. Being
however, the building cannot




small,
accommodate h
is why he is



entire parish. That
ing night and day

to build a church for his people.
The

proposed structure will
sons. One of the outstanding
planned for the new church
is a large statue of Christ to be
placed on top of the bell tower.

seat



|
|Lago ta Haci
Contribucion pa Yuda
Traha Misa Nobo

Pa yuda den trahamento di un mi-

nobo Brazil,
Lago a contribui Fls.
Pastoor O:P;;
parokia kende su energia y
forza empujante tras di «
cion proponi.

E misa cu lo yama Misa di Cristo
Rey lo worde traha na Brazil p
di mina grandi di Oranjestad-San
Nicolas unda Pastoor Grove tin un
school chikito na su disposicion. Den

recientemente
00 na Rey.
di

sa na



Grove

pastoor
fe

construc-









¢







school aki el ta haci misa awor.
| Sinembargo, e lugar aki ta mucho
chikito p: moda henter su parokia.



Ta pesey el ta lucha di dia y anochi
| pa traha un misa pa su parokianonan.



| E misa nobo lo tin lugar pa 500
|hende sinta. Un di e aspectonan so-
resaliente planea pa e misa nobo ta



Jun imagen grandi di Cristo Rey cu

instala ariba e toren.

lo worde



Bertrando Ras







Bertrando Ras, a launch helper
B with over six years of service,
died June 16 at Sabaneta. Survived
by his widow and two children, he








was 28 years old. Services were
held June 17 at the Sacred Heart
Roman Catholic Church in Saba-








July 3, 1954

ARUBA ESSO NEWS



Camel Takes Softball Tourney Opener

Radio Operators
Join International

Field Test Day

A group of “ham”
Aruba took their equipment into
the field the middle of last month to
join with amateur radio hobbyists in
the United States, Canada and | ( Cuba
in an international ”Field Day.

The "hams,” of Verona

- Aruba, set up their voice and code

radio operators
in



members



transmitters and receivers at the
Pova Beach Club and on a site ad-
joining the Palm Beach Club the
afternoon of June 19.

For 24 hours they kept the sets in
operation, striving to “contact”
American Radio Relay League

Despite poor
and busy air
operators in Aruba raised
“hams” from the Middle Atlantic
States to the Middle West.

The Netherlands Antilles
ment approved the club’s participa-
tion in the event. Local industry and
businessmen lent electricity gene-
rators and other equipment. Two
volunteers — L. A. Pomeroy and
Dr. W. G. R. N. De — cooked
for the 20 men who operated the
equipment in shifts.

Camel,

as
many
members as possible.
weather

waves,



conditions



the

govern-

3oer



CARL LEJUEZ, Red Sox

Hochstuhl, Jr.
Mateo Reyes,

chairman of the



captain, ¢
division championship in the Sport Park
of the Public Relations Department.

Sport

tion Juni 22







ion
e played
huebe

nochi.

yames will be

Here Camel






CAMEL a habri 19



a ultimo inning

1 a produ

rimi_un rally
victoria di II pa 10. aS r
a pitcha di promer

u lo worde hu





Copas.
ventaha di dos careda,
sali

un careda y a cu



den e competicion di dos c
ariba terreno na lago Heig





di Rey
y ta hera uno.

Came










op-
un

relli di C ony Sens

divi-

hts.

de







LVS Boy’s
Prize Chick
Is Thriving

Fifteen-year-old Ernesto de Kort,
a second-year student in the Lago
Vocational School, wrote an essay
in a school-sponsored "Why I
Want A Chicken” contest last year
and won. In to the Aruba
E News he gave a
progre report on his prize.

He wrote, ”You remember that
I won the Shanghai chicken, but
I did not really receive the chicken
born in the





a note
recently,

so







that was refinery. I
got another one for the f died
one day before I to r ve it.
I took the chicken home the next
Saturday. I built a home for it.





and everything

went okay, but about the third
week he was very sick. I thought
he would die, but my mother and

I worked v hard with him. He
could not even stand on his legs.

"We continued like that for
about four days, then about the
fifth day he stood up and walked
around and quickly improved. Now
he is a big white cock about 11%
feet high.”



epts the trophy emblematic of B
oftball competition from W. C.
Watching (left)

Park Board's Softball Steering

Committee.

CARL LEJUEZ, captain di Red Sox, ta acepta e trofeo como emblema

di campeonato di division B den

e competicion di softball di L

ago Sport

Park for di W. C. Hochstuhl, Jr. di Departamento di Relaciones Publicas.

Observando (robez) ta Mateo Rey

Committee di



presidente di Softball Steering

Lago Sport Park.

Radio-Amateurnan A

Celebra ‘‘Field Day”
Na POVA Beach Cl

Un di
Aruba
luna pasa pa participa hunto cu

grupo radio-amateur

a hiba nan aparatonan pd

ub

na
afor
afi- |

cionadonan di radio den Estados Uni-

Canada y Cuba den
’ internacional.
= aficionadonan di Aruba — mi

an di Verona a instala









ape
un sitio canto di Palm Beach Club |



| Juni 19 tramerdia.

, League.
nan di tempo y frecuencianan carg:
acta

contacto cu ma
bronan di American
No obstante



Radio R
mal condi




e amateurnan na Aruba a cont
aficionadonan den
Ameri
Gobierno di Antillas Holandes
aproba participacion di e club de
evento. Industria local y
tenan a _ presta generadornan
electricidad y otro herment. Dos
luntario L. A. Pomeroy y
W. G. R. N. De Boer, a cushina ¢
binti hombernan cu t ta oper
aparatonan segun warda.



2.



comer





Red Sox Take Softball Titles —

Camel and the Red Sox
champions of the A

are
le



gue and

| divisions of the Lago Sport Park s

| division crown

ball competition completed June
Camel defeated the Dodgers in
finals and the Red
behind thrill
affair the
at the of

A division



came from in a
to

expense

seven-inning win
St. in Boys.

The S
if eit would keep them from
3 title. The Red Sox
discouraged by the
ficit and put together
the

Louis Boys started off

refused to
early-inning

four runs

three.

| Steering Committee,

| Boys captain; James B

| tion;

Following the game, presentati
made to the outstanding te
athletes of the
Mateo
Park

were
and
troduced by
of the Sport

two leagues.
Reyes,
Board’s
W.
the Public Relations Depé
made the
Trophies and gold medals went
Hodge,
Lejuez, Red Sox captain; J.
Dodger captain; J. Daniel, St. Le
ryson, pite
winning most games in A comp
N. Larmonie, pitcher
most games in B competition;
S. Reed of Camel,

Jr., of

ment, awards.

Ramon

winn

| champion.

0 Le

un “FF

atonan na Pova Beach Club y

last two innings to win four

Camel captain; Cz
Diddler,

em-
nan



varios estados di

a
ne

vo-

Dye
Ja
ae

the
1B
oft-
15.
the

Sox

ing
B
the

the
be
de-
in
to

ons

ams

In-

chairman
Softball
. Hochstuhl,

art-

to
ar]

puis
her
eti-
ing

and
A division batti

ing

boxing

Mr.
which he
basic production had shrunk
continue
city”
ing competitive business

ies ice,

| colate battled to a dra
| contest, also for
Weganan di division “A ta tuma lugar Diamars y Dia- ! Kid Godoy against Jim Slater. Godoy,
nochi; weganan di division B Dialuna y Diara-
Aki Camel ta coge un corred
s out na primera,



unanimous de

| veteran Aruba battler,
| took on Kid Zorro of Curacao. Despite

ield |
Ritmica,
| ba and v

with

"team,”

can successfully
3inti-cuatro ora largo nan a tene e |

setnan na trabao tratando pa tuma |

tanto posible mere

y Sport Park Offered
° |For ABBA Games

na |



made the Sport Park t
available for games being conducted
by the Amateur Baseball Bond Aruba. |
scheduled in the midst of |
will be played|
o'clock. |

“| The
Sport Park leagues,
Tuesday nights starting at 7
The 10 o’clock curfew will be observed
for the

~



Lago Supervisors Feted
At Second Annual Party

Addresses, Dinner, Boxing, Dancer

Featured On Program At Golf Club

It was stag night at the Aruba Golf Club last Saturday when Lago

played host to some 600 supervisors and other guests at the second
| annual Supervisors’ Party.

On the program were addresses by President J. J. Horigan and

matches and ”Elva-Ballerina

Exotica.”

The top event of the evening was
Horigan’s welcoming address in
said that though La
"we
near ¢
and secur-




r0'S



operating at or
by keeping costs low



A buffet dinner, catered by Colony

The second
rounds, pitted



four
right-hander, took al
sion.
feature eight-round event a

Colorado Kid,

hard-hitting



In the

12-pound weight disadvantage,

| Zorro proved a strong opponent as
his speed
lity
rounds.

abi-
early

and counter-punching
piled up points in the

Zorro brought his superior ring

of the fight and was awarded |





bac
danced a mambo and rhum-
called back for an encore.
Griffin wound up the party
the assurance that the
with competent
meet



"Elva,”



Mr.

any challenge

The Lago Sport Park Board has

sball diamond





games

ABBA games.

_ Schedule ot Paydays



Semi-Monthly Payroll
June 16 - 30 Thursday, July
Monthly Payroll
June 1 - 30 Friday, July 9



was next on the program and |

was followed by the first of three
boxing matches. In a four-round go
| Ruben ’Curly” Kayo and Aruba Cho- |

General Superintendent F. S. Griffin,

Ce three

Sport Bar @nens
Baseball Season

The Lago Sport Park’s

refreshments,





1954 base-

ball competition got underway the
night of June 24 when B. Teagle,
| public relations manager, threw the
\first pitch for the game in which
Camel B defeated Heineken, 5 to 4.
Three leagues — A, B and Junior
— will play a round-robin tourna-



}ment which will run into September.

knowledge to bear during the latter |
loss

half

a unanimous decision.

ed up by the Orchestra |

Lago |
leadership, |

8] Aug. 1, w:

Twelve teams have signed up for the
| A League, eight teams for the
B League and six teams for the
Junior League.

The A League games will start at
7 o’clock Thursday, Friday and Satur-
Friday nights at the Sport Park.
B League games will be played at
7 o’clock Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day nights. Junior League games will

played at 4:30 p.m. Monday and
Friday.
The Heineken team protested its
to Camel, claiming the curfew
rule was applied too early.







be

Abraham Scores
Cricket Record





The Magic Bats cricket team,
1953-54 champions of the Lago
Sport Park Intermediate League,

showed one day last month that
their was magic in the bat of at
least one of its players.

Kenneth Abrahams, one of
Aruba’s well-known, — all-round
athletes, went to bat in a league
match after the Courageous
Cricket Club had put up 123 runs.
In 92 minutes Abrahams scored a
new Sport Park record of 15 sixes,
17 fours, one five and 20 scattered
runs for a total of 183 not out.

The Bats finished with 223 for
the loss of two wickets and won
the match.









Correction

Lionel Dean, who will retire
first employed by Lago
in the G and not in Light Oils
Finishing as the Aruba News

| stated in its issue of June





Esso

19.

a

p

COLORADO KID of Aruba (left), outfought by Kid Zorro of Curagao, »

slugs
Party.

it out during the feature bout at the second annual Supervisors’
Zorro won an eight-round

COLORADO KID di Aruba (banda robez),

decision.

cu ta bringa menos bon cu

Kid Zorro di Curagao, ta duna sla pa sla durante e main bout na e se-







gundo Fi

esta Anual pa Supervisornan. E pelea di ocho esalto a worde

gana pa punto door di Zorro.






ARUBA ESSO NE





600-Pounder Hooked at Boca Mahos



Nine Haul Shark Ashore With Truck

Three boys, three girls, three Department of Sani-

shark.

Intrigued by t
Boca Mahos by
the mouth of
on a hook on a ¢

ot away
sharks appeared

bait, circled



the thrashing sh



cliffs which ring



team



THREE MEMBERS of the nine-’'man hark
hown with their erstwhile playmate. From left: Al
Leak, Jack Horigan, John Borbonus, shark.

as a "brown sha







To the Suggestor

Thirty-Three Ideas Coined
For Total of Fls. 1585

Thirty-three employees had their ideas accepted in April and shared
in awards totally Fls. 1585. Once again, these employees saw where
they could help improve a particular situation and sent their ideas to
the CYI committee. Their ideas accepted they found themselves from
Fls. 20 to Fls. 250 richer.

The top award went to A. A. G.










The boys and girls — all from Lago Colony —

leaving

truck was scheduled to

struck.
The anglers w
shore when the three



to the rear of their truck, they pulled the





tation employees and a dump truck combined talents |
one day last month to depopulate the Caribbean by one |

we

Al Leak, John Borbonus, Jack Horigan, his sister, Eli-
zabeth, Carla Massey



and Polly Mingus.





he tales of shar

the dumping of garbage, they

fishing in the North Shore bay. Stringing a line across
the

inlet, they dangled a piece of bec

hain suspended by the line.

Horigan with line burns on his hand

With the hook rebaited, the sextet watched as other

the
shark

sanitatic

noticed tl

before

One

a few minutes

arrive.

it warily for about 10 minutes and then) PO

fight the fish

men drove up with their

ere attempting to

load of refuse. They joined the fray and helped beach

on a ledge. Then, hooking the lir
fish up th

the bay.

Checked for vital statistics later, the shark was found

eight feet in length. It was of the type known locally

Tew

| NEW ARRIVALS

June 11








Ce - Storehouse: A daughte
Pearl Eliza a
June 12
| CROES, Gerrit - Storehouse: A son, Er
Everhart.











TSD Lab 2
. Pipe: A
- Mech
daug
& A

Ship.:
- Shipyard: A so

- Storehouse


































s being attracted to

went |

into |
truck-













of

Suddenly a shark took the bait, ran, fought and finally

A FEW MINUTES

dre

fter tt
ed in t+

The 20





liplom e 25

yn
CO MINUUT des¢

Ee





diploma.

|
|
|
ne |
|

he

to weigh between 600 and 700 pounds and to measure

h- |
|
|

n, |
















July 3, 1954







Son of Ex-Lago Employee
Instructs Here This Summer









Slater of the Mechanical Department-| J. E. Fran Fls. caer
Administration whose suggestion that! H. L. H. Engelen Fls. ¢ See Rene na aad i
ei A nate alter A, - Metal Trades son,
a Crosby reseating machine be pur- T. MeDavid Fis. ¢ Walter Wendell. >;
chased was worth Fls. 250. The| J. E. Francis Fils. MARQUE Dominico - TSD: A son, Danil- |
second highest award was won by|J. P. Faleoni Fis. 25 ‘ Dominico R. - TSD: A son,
M. Arends of Light Oils Finishing.| J. P. Falconi Fis. 25 :
ci = we 3 i - Cracking: A daughter,
He received Fls. 175 for suggesting Cracking
the installation of four-inch block-! L. Bettencourt Fls. 75 F. - A son, Ed-
valves in a rundown line. Also in the| P. - Cracking - Burners - Weld ridge June 16
top money bracket was W. H. Maduro} on air cylinder & install saddle. Rss
: : : - daughter, Ly
who received Fls. 150 for suggesting | J. D. Jamieson Fls. 60) aati A daughter,
the ordering of stakes for use in the|P. - Cracking - No. 11 G.O. control | a - ‘
field by the field engineers. house - remove storm curtain & re-| Cynthia 3 ret. VENTRILOQUIST Glen Cargyle with one of the life-like dummies he
Other awards are: Bier amas eee ce | ROS caughtsanalindy: bis makes himself shown entertaining an audience of youngsters in Cali-
A J. D. Jamieson Fls. 30! witson’ James E. H : aoa 2 ; x sees Iie gsi,
Accounting Department = 5 ae fornia.
5 A. Evertsz Fils. 25 A dav Joan
T. J. McAuliffe Fils. D0 aor) Bacchus Fls. 20 June 17
Cc. S. - Esso & Lago Clubs - Submit | cane - L.O.F. ae aeecD Ae EE The son of a former Lago employee , studied at Graceland Junior College,
daily reports semi-weekly. 4 ; ee IER, Raymundo - Shipyard: |who left Aruba in 1940 came back | Lamont, the University of Iowa,
: op | M. Arends Fils. 175| 4 daughter, Glenda Maria Ludwine 3 x ahs En ae
TS Je McAuliffe Fis. 20 |p sO: Ree nstalle42ablockvalve in Vine ae last month as an instructor in the|the University of California and is
Industrial Relations Dept. | a» Peta Se z on e 47 | CASUELA, Henrique S. - Mech, Boiler: Lago Community Council’s Summer|now working on a master’s degree
ee 4” rundown line to tanks 8,7 & 17. At sone Galvin’ Lwaac : :
RNS Fis. 50 TSD - Engineering CRO rancisco - Mech. Machine: Recreation Program. jin education at Los Angeles State
I. R. - Voce. Schools - Have students RW ACT RMT adGee Fls. 150 A daughter, Ludwina Felomena. | He is Glen Cargyle, 27-year-old | College.
punch time cards in class sequen SD - Fie ineers - Also order | YANGA. Candi M.- Lake Fleet: A daugh- |Son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cargyle.| Glen’s efforts to produce life-like
rn a TSD - Field Engineers - Also order & aa ;
A. Croes Fis. ee Diet aasitar nice. inctield' } . ter, Juliana Rosalinda. |The family came to Aruba when Mr. | dummies for himself and for a grow-
RED Oxose Fls 2x stakes for use in field. VAN VE JELD, Julius - Cracking z : * ” ere ay i
. D. SCO Ss. i Moray Fls. 50 Av aor alts tendo ainianilor Cargyle was employed in Colony|ing customer list which today ex-
Marine Department ~ Sei PS. aie y e A. - Utilities: A son, Eric|Service and Glen three years | tends around the world led him into a
z as |TSD - Drafting - Order "levelall Rants | ? ‘ -
G. C. Ramsey Bil SveA0) Roa tay seve Miatramentts) i tenetzo old. Like any other colony youngster, | study of ceramics, leathercraft, clay
Medical Department | Utilities aoe RAS, Daniel y Shipyard: Agson, Martinus.|he eventually enrolled in the Lago | modeling, painting, marionettes, pup-
A. Milton Fis. 20157 Burne : VERE S Lois Bs LOK 2A gon; Silvio: i vementarye Schools pets and a host of other subjects
Mechanical Department ly. Toth en 2, Baldwin - Mech. Col. Maint.: Glen w in the sixth grade when In addition to his studies, Glen is
Administration [ema ss RESIN ie er Office lhe first learned about ventriloquism. | practice-teaching each day in a Los
A. A. G. Slater Fls. 250 A daughter, Sandra Ann. |The idea of projecting his voice into| Angeles school, staging puppet and

SERVICE AWARDS

20-Year Buttons

Purchase Crosby reseating machine. |
D. B. Richardson Fls. 75
Mech, Adm. - Discontinue submitting







2 copies of Safety talk slips. Edward Byington, Jr. Ind. Rel. Dept.
T. P. Viapres Fls. 20 |Joseph Krozendijk Shipyard
Electrical Lazaro Geerman Launches
R. MacMillan Fis. 30 | Benancio Maduro
Garage Rec. & Ship. - Wharves
C. A. Thompson | Francisco Dijkhoff Yard
Machinist Pedro J. Ridderstaat Garage
E. Maduro Fls. 50 | Denius E. Kruythoff Instrument



Machinist
Carpenter

10-Year Buttons

” | nuginatin Madure

Lodewico Bislip
Emil M. Sambre

Mech. - Rock crusher - install 24
tension to foundation.
V. Briezen
%. Berkel









Welding James W. Brooks Mason & Insulators

C. Yarzagaray Maximo Maduro Boiler
Bary | Hamilton Blaize Garage

L. B. de Cuba Louis F. tlidge Col. Maint

| ig

Yard | James E. Arrindell Tin |

N. C. Werleman Fis. 25} meters eseran Mees as

Te. 8. 25] man - Eng
>rocess Department Francisco Arrindell SD - Lab

Process Depart: | Lennie McD. Simon TSD - Lab

Cat. & L.E. | Jean A. Richardson TSD - Lab

Pipe |







A daughter, Melga Edeltrudis.
June 2
PAMBERTON, Julian P
Margaret Elizabeth.
| June 23

- W/S Comm







SOLOGNIER, Federico F. - Col. Comm
A
| Dominico - Cracking
| A daughter
HAZEL faurice W. - Mech. Yard
Veronica Elfreda
A son



Paul Trimon
Louis F. Cruden

Commissar







| 3 . Calatayud Col. Serv. Operatior
William A. Woods Lage ce Dep
| Clement P. Celaire Trainin,

| Brown M tosh
| Calvin Bristol



Shipyar

TSD - Lab

Utilitie



| HAMLET, Joseph B. - Mech. Col. Maint: |); ;
ee rese! Beet oeheok | Maint: | his dog, or having a pie beg his
EST R Sea June 21 mother "please don’t cut me,
STER, Jan D. - Metal Trades: A so .
fa Buseblo fetal Trades: A son. | fascinated the boy.
PA EENQ, Santo S. - TSD Eng.: A son So he wrote for books on the sub-
LY. Thomas F. - Cracking: A daugh-|Ject. While other youngsters were at
Maria \the beach or playing baseball, Glen
Alexander - Mech. Garage: |

home studying and
ntually his dog talked, the
pleaded and Glen took part in shows



pies

at the Esso Club, at schooi and at
| parties.

| In 1940 the Cargyles left Aruba
for Independence, Mo., and_ settled

down in their home three blocks from
the homestead of ex-President Harry
S. Truman. Glen worked per-
fected his voice-throwing technique
and started creating dummies bi
Â¥|those he bought did not suit him.
.| By the time he started in college
& was so adept he found he

he
j|earn expenses as a ventriloquist. He

and





cause





could





practicing. |

marionette shows and appearing as a
ventriloquist. Recently he turned out
eight dummies which
Danny Kaye for the
in a new Paramount picture, "Knock
on Wood.”

arrived in Aruba June
with his assistant, Tomas Muro, who
is also studying for a masters degree
in teaching. Within the summer pro-
gram which is expected to attract
some 500 they

will teach sculpting, painting, puppe

resembled

n to use



comedia




Glen

colony youngsters,

and marionette making, ceramics,
costume making and other creative
arts

In addition Mr. Muro, a profes-
sional dancer, will give instruction

in the dances typical of various coun-
tries of the world. They
stage shows which will be presented
throughout the island.

also plan