Citation
Aruba Esso news

Material Information

Title:
Aruba Esso news
Creator:
Lago Oil and Transport Company, Ltd
Place of Publication:
Aruba Netherlands Antilles
Publisher:
Lago Oil and Transport Co., Ltd.
Creation Date:
July 6, 1951
Frequency:
biweekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 30-44 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Petroleum industry and trade -- Periodicals -- Aruba ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Language:
Text in English and papiamento.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
v. 1- 1940-
General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Biblioteca Nacional Aruba
Holding Location:
Biblioteca Nacional Aruba
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
000307401 ( ALEPH )
06371498 ( OCLC )
ABT4040 ( NOTIS )

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Again! Lago’s two scholarship winners land at Dakota Airport.

Yegando Cas! Lago su aprendiznan a bolbe di Merea.

Hundreds Hail Jan and Pedro's

Arrival from Year in States

Pedro Irausquin and Jan Wester
returned to Aruba Sunday, June 24, to be met

scholarship winners

Lago’s two Vocational School

by a large crowd of friends and relatives at Dakota Airport.

"There’s no place like home”,
to be back”.

C. F. Smith is Named
To a New Position

Charles F. Smith was this month
named to the new position of Ser-
and Staff Departments Super-
intendent. Departments under his
supervision are Colony Service, In-
dustrial Relations, Medical, and Pu-
blic Relatior

At the same time, Mr. Smith was
also named a member of the Com-
pany’s Executive Committee.

Until his new assignment, Mr.
Smith had been Lago’s manager of
Industrial and Public Relations. His
Jersey service dates back to 1930; he
first came to Aru-
ba in 1938 as heac
of the Training Di-

vice


















vision and was la
ter personnel ma
nager. In 1941 he
returned to thc,
United States.
where >



al year:

Pat
ous training!
employee re





and
lations posts in thi

New Je y Works




He was transfer-
red to the Emp!oy- , oT ans
ee Relations De- ©: F- Smith

partment in New York in 1946, and
returned to Aruba in August 1948,
In recent months Mr. Smith has held
various Executive Development Pro-
gram assignments here, and in 1950
attended the advanced management
course at Harvard University’s Gre
duate School of Business Admini-
stration.







Tanker Rescues Vessel

The SS Fort Fetterman, south-
bound from Aruba to Amuay Bay
June 25, rescued a 60-foot Venezue-
lan fishing ve 1 that was stranded
at sea. The Is of the ship — the
San Miguel — were torn to shreds by
the strong winds and the S
helpless without any auxili
ines.

When she sighted the Fort Fet-
terman, the San Miguel waved her
down and asked to be towed. The
Fort Fetterman towed her to the
entranc> of Amuay Bay, where she
was turned over to the tug Esso
Las Piedras. The tug towed the San
Miguel on into the dock.

Donald P. Swain is captain of the
Fort Fetterman.













both of them said, "and we're glad

”Aruba looked so good to me,” Jan
added, "that as soon as we saw the
island from the plane I almost broke
the windows to get out.”

The boys finished up their almost
ten months in the States by king
an automobile trip from Pennsylvania
to Miami. They made the trip with
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wilkinson and



their two children; Mr. Wilkinson is
with the Allentown Public Schools,
and Pedro and Jan — as well as Do-




minico Britten and Fran
hoff, the two previous scholars
winn-rs — lived with him and his
family in Pennsylvania. On _ their
1800-mile trip to Florida they went
through Delaware and Maryland;
saw the sights of W ington, D.C.,
the nation’s capital; visited Mount
Vernon, Virginia, home of George
Washington; went swimming at
Mrytle Beach, South Carolina; and
arrived in Miami the day before they
boarded a KLM plane for the return
trip to Aruba.

(Turn to Page 6, Column 3)









oss ;

PUBLISHED BY LAGO OIL & TRANSPORT CO. LTD.

VOL.

Estudio di Costo di
Bida Casi Completa

Consehero Técnico Ta
Analizando Informacion

12 No. 14




Punchmento di urchi y tabulacion
di resultadonan di estudio di Costo di
Bida a keda di bini cla na cumi
mento di e siman aki. Probablemente
den e siguiente dos simannan, e con-
sehero técnico Laurence De Trude lo
i di analiza resultadonan y di pre-
4 recomendacionnan tocante com-
cion di e index nobo pa costo di














bida

Progreso di c estudio a worde dis-
cuti dia di Juni cu miembronan
di Lez Imployee Council. Na
reunion, James M. Smith, hefe
Wage & Salary, sr. De Trude
pone LEC na corriente di tur desa-
royo reciente. Un reunion igual ta-
bata yama pa Diasabra, 30 di Juni.







r. De Trude ¢ > sistema di
usa code na e cu tur in-
formacion colecta pa e entrevistador-
nan mester worde poni na number.
Por ehempel, e 200 pacusnan na cual-
nan empleadonan ta cumpr aun
tin un number; tur e articulonan
cumpra cada un tin un number, ete.
Dunando un number (code) na cada
cos, e number nan por worde gepunch
riba kaarchinan di tabulacion, pa poi





calcula tur cos cu machiennan di ta- |

bulacion.

Sr. De Trude a bisa cu e estudio
lo mustra cuater punto principal. Di
promé, lo e mustra un comparacion
entre e index di anja 1941 y esun
actual. Di dos, lo e mustra cuanto di-
ferente sorto di articulo ta worde





cumpra, di ki tamafo, unda, prome-
dio di loque cada famia ta gasta. Di |
culonan ta
di

tres, lo e mustra cual ar
principal den preparamento
resumen di costo di bida. Di cua
cantidad cumpra, variacion den prijs
y importancia di cada articulo.

Den nomber di LEC, Vice-Presiden-
te cil R. A. Bishop a gradici y a
expresa aprecio pa tur e empleado-
nan di oficina cu a traha oranan lar-
go riba e anan di pregunta te ora
cu tur entre nan a keda completa.
Otro miembronan di LEC tambe a co-
menta riba e trabao bon haci. Sr. De
Trude tambe a elogia e empleadonan
den oficina e trabao excelente, cu
a worde hiba a cabo di un moda ex-
cepcional.
















New NWI Governor Holds Press Conference







4

Dr. A. A. M. Struyeken, Governor of the NWI, holds a press conference



with members of the Aruba Press

ssociation on Monday, June 25, before

leaving Aruba after his 4 day official visit. Left to right: His Excellency
the Governor; A. Cloo, editor of the Arubaansche Courant; J. Bode, corres-
pondent for La Prensa; (backs to camera) E. F. Lo, Beurs correspondent;

and F.



teenmeijer, also of Beurs.

Or. A. A. M. Struycken, Gouverneur di Antillanan Hulandes, a tene un

conferencia cu miembronan di

Asociacion

di Prensa di Aruba Dialuna,

25 di Juni, promé cu e bai despues di su bishita oficial di 4 dia na Aruba.
Di robez pa drechi: Su Excelencia Gobernador; A. Cloo, editor di Aru-

baans* Courant; J. Bode, correspondent pa La Prer



(lomba pa camera)

E. F. Lo, correspondent di Beurs; i F. Steenmeijer, tambe di Beurs.

q

Samuel Joseph



July 6, 1951

1950 Capital Award
Winners Named Today



Walter G. Byer

Capital Award Winners for 1950 were announced today. Herman
Huising, LOF, won the top award of Fls. 1000, boosting his winnings
on a single idea to Fls. 4000. On March, 1950 he was given an initial
award of Fls. 1000, and in April of this year the idea earned a supple-

Fiesta pa lrene

Dia di Su Anja

Un sorpresa grandi pa Irene Ja-
cobs kende ta na Philadelphia pa
tratamiento médico, tabata un fiesta
pa celebra su anja dia 25 di Mei, na



cual fiesta tabatin dos invitado ines- |



E invitadonan tabata Jan Wester y
Pedro Irausquin, kendenan a bini di
Allentown, Pennsylvania pa medio di
esfuerzonan di Lions Club di Phila-
delphia.

Ta Lions Club di Philadelphia mes ;

tambe a regla tur cos pa e fiesta di
Irene. Mas o menos 300 hende tabata
presente na e celebracion cu a tuma
lugar den sala di un school.

Alegria di Irene ora cu el a mira
e dos mucha- hombernan ta expresa
den e carta cu e mucha-hombernan
a skirbi despues.







"Irene no tabata sa cu nos tabata
di bini su fiesta”, nan ta bisa, "y e
tabata sorprendi ora cu el a mira
nos drenta. Nos a cuminza hari y un
hende a bisa ’nan tambe ta di Aruba;
Irene no por a comprende na promé
ora, pero ora cu nos a cuminza pa-
pia cuné na Papiamento y nos a bi-
sé kende nos ta, e ora ey si! Nos no
por splica kico el a sinti, pero ta di
| comprende com contento el tabata na
e momento.”

Ora cu Lions Club a tende cu e
{dos mucha-hombernan Arubiano, Pe-
| dro y Jan tabata solamente 50 milla
for di Philadelphia, nan a haci are-
|glonan pa nan bini Irene su fiesta.
|E promé cos cu e mucha-hombernan
| a haci ora cu nan a yega Philadelphia





(Continud na Pagina 2)



<

mental of Fls. 2000. The idea was to
install a blockvalve in No. 7 crude
line and a connection from pump No.
1243 to the upperside of the block-



e.
Vincent Burgos, Drydock, won the
second capital award of Fls. 600 with
his suggestion to use welding torches
to clean salt deposits from N. D. and
P. D. Condenser tubes. He received
an initial award of Fls. 200, and a
supplemental of Fls. 900, adding up
to Fls. 1700 total.

Third capital award of Fls. 400
went to Samuel Joseph, Catalytic and
Light Ends (who is no longer work-
ing for Lago). His idea to withdraw
spent caustic at a very slow rate to
as low a level as possible before
recharging AAR-2 and ISAR earned
a Fils. 250 initial award and
Fls. 250 supplemental award, to-
talling Fls. 900.

Walter G. Byer, LOF, was given
the fourth capital award for his idea
of eliminating a steam pump from
No. 1 Pitch Still. This idea received
an initial award of Fls. 150, and a





supplemental award of Fls. 250,

adding up to Fls. 600. Total amount

|given on these four ideas was
Fls. 7200.

Esso Heights to Elect
Residents of Esso Heights will

|elect four men to represent them on

the Esso Heights Advisory Com-
mittee July 23 and 24. List of the
nominees will appear in the July 20
issue of the Esso News.

Eight men were nominated by the
nominating committee June 29. Ad-
ditional names may be added to the
ballot by submitting a petition signed
by 50 Esso Heights residents; peti-
tions should be turned in by July 7
to the Industrial Relations Depart-
ment.





2 ARUBA ESSO NEWS

ARUBA Esso) EWS ‘Wallace Spans U.S.

PUBLISHED EVERY OTHER FRIDAY AT ARUBA, NETHERLANDS Sees 22 States

WEST INDIES, BY THE LAGO OIL & TRANSPORT CO., LTD.
Printed by the Curacaosche Ceurant, Curacao, N.W.I.











When Paul Wallace, Lago Police
aurtment, started out on his last
vacation, he really set out to see the
United States. At the end of seven

weeks, he had travelled through 27
states — a distance of 10,500 miles -

} | driving from New York through the
southern states across to California,





up the Pacific Coast, and back to
New York by way of the northern
states,

"T had a vacation, a new car, and

I wanted to what the United
States looked like”, Mr. Wallace says
in explanation of his trip.
Starting from New York City, he
| drove through 22 s










New J ey, Penn
Vv West Virgini

s, Texas, New Mexico, Ari-
zona, California, Oregon, Washing-
ton, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming,
Nebraska, Jowa, Illinois, Indiana,
Ohio, then back into Pennsylvani

Then he took a trip to his hometown
in Vermont, travelling in five more
states: Connecticut, Rhode Island,





M chusetts, New Hampshire, and
his home state.

"The weather was wonderful all
the way, and I just stopped when-



ever and wherever I
Mr. Wallace says.
Among the many scenic
w on his cross-country trip, he was
particularly impressed by Yelloy
stone National Park, Imperial Valle
and the redwood section in
nia, and the Columbia River Valley
in Oregon.

felt like it”,



sights he




was his visit to — of all places —
a cemetery. It was the well-known
cemetery in Tombstone, Arizona,

famed wild frontier town during the
early days of the West. Among the
50 or so headstones above the
| grav many contained humorous
inscriptions giving details of how the
various people met their death (see
cut). Under the names of four men





ana pasa, nan a stop pa algun dia na
New York, pa mira e bistanan di e
stad grandi aki. Despues nan a sigui
|pa Allentown, unda pa nuebe luna
jnan lo keda biba.

”Tur hende aya tabata nos amigo”,
nan a bisa. "Hendenan na Allentown
y tambe na tur otro camindanan cu
nos a bai, tabata masha carinoso cu
nos, Cu curazon pisé nos a laga nan.”

Estudiantenan Jan
y Pedro Ta Bolbe

Un grupo grandi di amigonan y
famia tabata para na vliegveld Da-
kota pa duna bon-binida na Pedro
Irausquin y Jan Wester — e dos
aprendiznan cu a gana beca ofreci



door di Lago su School di Ofishi, cu Durante nan estudia na Pennsyl-
a bolbé Aruba Diadomingo, 24 di vania, e jovennan a bai Philadelphia
Juni. tres diferente biaha, Ariba un di e



”Ningun otro luga ta manera bo
mes tera’, nan a bisa, ”y nos ta con-
tento cu nos a bolbe cas atrobe”’.

"Aruba a mustra mi asina bon,”
Jan a sigue, "cu ora nos a mira e
isla fo’i den aeroplano, mi a hera ki-
bra e bentananan pa mi sali.”

E dos jonkumannan aki a duna
terminacién na nan estudia di casi
diez luna na Merca cu un biaha cu
auto fo’i Pennsylvania te Miami. Nan

biahanan aki nan a yuda Irene Ja-
cobs celebra su fiesta di ana. (Lesa
storia separa) Nan a bishita Bethle-
hem tambe, unda nan a mira e plan-
ta enorme di Bethlehem Steel, y nan
a bishita otro centronan industrial
unda nan a observa trabao den va-
rios di e plantanan.

Un di nan experencianan nobo ta-
bata sneeuw, cu nan a mira pa di



There isn’t much humor in most
cemeteries, but the one in Tomb-
stone, Arizona is a notable exception.
Paul Wallace, LPD, snapped this
picture of a headstone on a
there. The inscriptions reads
Lies - Lester Moore - Four Slugs -
From a .44 - No Les - No More.



rome biaha den nan bida; tambe %

a worde acompana door di Sr y Sra naa a experencia temperatura frio|W2S the large word, "Murdered.
Wilkinson y nan dos yieuwnan. cu a baha te na ocho grado bao zero. Another man was hanged, but the
Sr Wilkinson ta conecta cu e "Tabata ariba un diasabra ora e| headstone left no doubt about the

Schoolnan di Gobierno na e stad di| temperatura a baha te na ocho gra-
Allentown, y Pedro cu Jan — mes-| do bao zero”, nan a bisa, "y nos a
cos cu Dominico Britten y Francisco| eda henter dia den cas.”

Dijkhoff, ¢ dos aprendiznan cu e| Pedro ta traha cu Laboratorio di
ana anterior a gana beca, tabata bi- T.S.D., y Jan ta cu Metal Trades.
ba cerea dje y su famia. Ariba nan) Tyr dos e jovennan ta sinti cu, como ,..2 é 3
biaha di 1800 milla, fo’i Pennsylvania | resultado di nan entrenamento. mas didn’t any highway accidents”,
pa Florida, nan a pasa door di e esta-| adyansa, nan ta miho capabel awor he says. "I saw an accident in Har-
donan Delaware y Maryland, y a bi- pa haci nan trabao. Pa nan, e tiempo risburg, Pennsylvania right after I
shita Washington D.C., e capital di cu nan a pasa na Merca tabata un started out. That was the last one
Merca, y Mount Vernan na Virginia, periodo maravilloso di hopi utilidad. I saw until I had gone all the way
e cas unda George Washington taba-| exito di nan estudia na Merca ta|2¢ross. the country and back to
ta biba; nan a bai landa na Myrtle | worde demonstra tambe den un carta | Harrisburg. There, oddly enough, I
Beach den South Carolina; y yega| ey Sy, F. M. Scott, Jefe di e Depar- | S8W another one on my way back to}
Miami un dia prome cu nan mester | tamento di Entrenamento a ricibi fo'i | New York.”
a tuma aeroplano di KLM pa bolbe gy. Clifford S. Bartholomew, Maestro | How does Mr. Wallace feel about
Aruba. | principal di e School na Allentown, | all the different parts of the country
Tur dos e jovennan a expresa nan| Tabata un placer pa tin Jan y Pe- he saw on his long trip? -
gratitud na Lago pa e oportunidad | dro hunto cu nos” Sr Bartholomew a "It was really a wonderful trip,
cu a worde duna na nan pa studia| scirbi. "No tin ningun duda cu den|#nd I enjoyed every minute of it”,
na Merca. tur e klasnan cu nan a pasa, nan a he says. "However, the old home
*Tabata un sonjo cu a worde rea-| establece un bon ehempel, y nan com- | town — Waterbury, Vermont — still
liza” Jan a bisa. portacién den School tabata di mas | looks the best to me. That’s where
"Tabata un sonjo cu nunca ni si-| mihé. Nan actitud tabata excelente. I’m going to settle down some day”.
quiera mi tabatin,” Pedro a bisa, "y Mi lo gusta di tin un school yen di
di berdad e tabata magnifico”. mucha manera esunnan cu boso a
E dos mucha-hombernan, e dos| manda nos fo’i Aruba.”
aprendiznan mas sobresaliente cu a
gradua fo’i School di Ofishi afa pa-
sa, a studia na e High School Publi-
co di Ofishi na Allentown, Pennsyl-
vania. Cu nan regreso na Aruba nan

circumstances: on it were the words,
"legally hanged”.

Mr. Wallace had no flat tires, |
or any kind of car trouble, through-
out his trip.

”On the major part of the trip I





















B Bo C
Schedule of Paydays usca Bo Copa

Tur esnan cu a gana copa of premio

Semi-Monthly Payroll ‘ es oearae e
i . na Olimpiada di Anja di La Reina, y



> 16-3 } ae ae :
a trece cu nan hopi memorianan di eae ee oe say ; cu no a ricibié ainda, sea asina bon
experencianan nobo, cu lo keda cu y 2 CaYn Wy di bai tumé cerca Henry Nassy. Su
nan pa semper. Durante nan biaha di Monthly Payroll oficina ta den Edificio di ‘Training
Aruba pa Allentown na September June 1-30 Tuesday, July 10 | (B.Q. No. 3), cuarto No. 14.

Califor- |

A humorous highlight of his trip |

a



Wor ing up a poster design, I. Lorenzo Hernand 1949 student, gets
advice from instructor Jan W. A. Smit. Hernandez is using colored chalks.

1 Lorenzo Hernandes, estudiante di 1949, ta worde conseha den pintamento
di su poster di Seguridad. Su instructor ta Jan W. A. Smit.

Students Use New Skill
In Safety Poster Contest

Four groups of cond-year vo-
cational students began a contest last
month that will combine a newly- i
developed skill with a useful purpose. | Fiesta pa Irene
Winding up their year’s activity in|
freehand drawing class, the 101 boys
are now preparing for a_ safety
poster contest that will highlight | tabata di bai directamente na un pa-
their progress. naderia caminda nan tabata traha

All posters worthy of being used un bolo pa Irene su anja. Ey nan a
will be posted at appropriz ; traduci "Happy Birthday, Irene”, na
by the Safety Division, and the "Feliz Cumpli Ano Irena”, pa e pa-
who created these posters will nadero por a skirbié riba e bolo di
ceive prizes. At the same time aj tres piso.
judging comittee will select the three
best posters, and special awards will
be given for these. Judges will in-
clude two men from the Safety Di-| ta hopi mihor, E mucha-hombernan
vision, two from the Training Divi-| ta bisa cu dokternan ta bisa cu pron-
sion, and one from the Public Relat-| to Jo e ta tur bon, y cu tur hende
ions Dept. na Aruba por keda sosega pasobra e
their present one-hour daily | ta de lo mas mihor cu por tin.
sessions the boys are making E
posters, putting into practise ¢









(Continud di Paginal)












Irene, e mucha-muher di 13 anja
cu Lions Club di Aruba a manda
Philadelphia pa tratamiento médico,







mucha-hombernan a

? ‘ cu tur hende na e fi tabata bisa
the drawing skills they have learned cul Tsetse i lief ater ii:

since last September. In this stage tra si tur mucha-muhernan di Aruba
they ‘are'\modeling their work after|+,° mes lief y si t’asina anto sigur
professional posters supplied by the hopi di nan. lo ke bin bishita Aruba
Safety Division. Late this month the algun dia.
actual contest will find them design- é
ing and creating their own.

They will be permitted to use any

bisa tambe












sa tambe
dicido na tur

E mucha-hombernan
cu Aruba mester



ta gr








subject matter concerning safety, | ¢Snan na Philadelphia kendenan a de-
but will be urged to relate the dica nan tempo pa Irene su hacimen-
posters to their own experience if | t® di anja tabata un ocasion asina
possible. contento pe

Jan Smit and Glenroy Straughn are | __ Tabatin dos grupo di Padvinder y
the drawing instructors, with Mr.|Kabouter na e fiesta, Nan a traha
Smit leading three-fourths of the bolonan chikito, dorna cu letternan

class sessions and Mr. Straughn the | 00s, geel, y berde cu Irene su nom-
balance, This is the first year that | ber ariba nan. E fiesta a cuminza cu
freehand drawing has been part of eo cantica pa cuminda Irene.

the program; it will now be a re- Lions Club a percura pa un ya-
gular feature of the students’ second| mada na telefon for di Merca pa



year work, followed the next year) Aruba, pa Irene por a papia cu su
by mechanical drawing. | mama.
A later Esso News will carry Entre esnan presente na e fiestz





S
y nan senjora; miembronan di Lions
Club, nurse- y dokternan, padvinder-
y nan leidernan, y hopi otro. Irene
a ricibi un cantidad di regalo, y tur
hende a pasa masha bon na e fiesta.

pictures of the winning students and | tabata consul y vice-consul Huland
their prize poste





Instrumental School
Being Organized

Irene su dokter na Temple Univer-
sity Hospital, unda e ta bao trata-
miento ta skirbi cu e tabata radian-

te na e fiesta, den su shimis nobo,
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Born recently | sy jas, y cu e tabata sonrei continua-

arrived in Aruba from Holland to} mente. Irene a haya hopi amigo no-
set up an instrumental music school bo, entre otro su nurse Senora Ro-
here, This will be the first school of Lewis. Despues di e fiesta
this type in the NWI. nan a bin come na mi cas y mi por
mira cla cu e nurse ta masha bon pe.







semary



wife





Both Mr. Born and his are
experienced musicians and instruc- Tenia nee taba camarvve ta Reid.
tors. In addition to teaching piano,| )., sea su nurse, vice-consul Hulan-
Mr. Born has specialized in training ra, of un di e miembro-

| des y su se
choral groups; he is alsojan pULOnE: nan di Lions Club ta compané, Irene
ty on folk music. Mrs. Born teaches’ 54 adres ta Temple University Hos-
both piano and voice. pital, Board & Ontario Streets,

Plans to set up this music school | Children’s Ward, Park Avenue, Phi-
here started with Aruba’s Cultural | ladelp| Pa.













Center, which received istance Na ocasion di su hacimento di an-
from Sticusa in Amsterdam. ja, Irene sigur lo a pensa cu carino

Anyone interested in further infor-| na tur su amigonan y bien-hechornan
mation about the school may get in| na Aruba; pasobra ta nan a_haci
touch with F. Steenmijer at the Bo-| posibel cu e por a bai Merca pa e
tica Aruba in Oranjestad, or with| haya e tratamiento médico cu ‘a ne-
Mr. Born at the Scala Hotel. cesario pa su sali.















1951

July

6,



Celebrating a job well done. Interviewer

members meet with Com

LEC



s in the Cost of Living Study and

pany Management on June 16.

C-of-L Study Being Analyzed

tabulating of
Living study
been compl

Key punching and
results in the Cost of
was scheduled to have
ed early this week. It inticipated
that Technical sult Lau
De Trude will have analyzed results,
and prepared recommendations con-
cerning the composition of the new
cost of living base index within the













next week or two.

Developments in the study were
discussed June with members of
the Lago Employee Council. 4 é



James M. Smith, head of
ry, and Mr. De Trude brought
the LEC up to date on progress of
the study. A similar meeting was
scheduled for last Saturday, June 30
Mr. De Trude explained the system
coding to the group: how all the
gathered by the inter-
translated into num-

tim
«& &







of
information
viewers must be



bers. For instance, the 200 stores
where employees buy will each have
a number; all the various items

bought by employees will each have
a number, and so on. By coding the
material, it can be punched on IBM
machines; the key punchin 5



once





completed, the numbers are tran
ed back into words (the names o
stores, items bought, and so forth).

Tabulation consists of taking all the
information from each questionnaire
and averaging it.

Mr. De Trude pointed out that the

study will show four major things.
First, it will show the relative im-
portance of items in the original

1941 cost of living survey as com-
pared to today. Second, it will show
how many units are being bought, in
what sizes, where, the relative pro-
portion of the nily budget being
spent on various items. Third, it will
show what items to measure to make
a cost of living survey. Fourth, three
things — the amount bought, variat-
ion in price, and importance of the
item — will show the relation of
prices to be investigated in a cost of
living survey

On behalf of the LEC, Vice-Chair-
man Cecil R. Bishop extended
thanks and appreciation to the office
workers who worked long hours on
the questionnaires after the inter-
viewing was completed. Other LEC
members also commented on the fine
work done by this group.

Mr. De Trude also
office workers for doing
job in completing hug
had been carried in
manner


















these
lent
that
yable

praised
n €





on
throughout.

Intermediate Typewriting





L. Del Pino presents Carl W.
Hicks with a gift check on June 26
representing contributions by Carl’s
fellow workers in the Colony Com-
missary. He was married on June 28
to Susanna Mercer at the
Anglican Church in San Nicolas.



A. L. Del Pino ta entrega Carl W.

Hicks un cheque den nomber di Carl

su co-empleadonan. Carl su matri-

monio cu Seforita Susanna Mercer a

tuma lugar na Kerki Angelicano dia
28 di Juni.

Popular Fleet Bosun
Returns to St. Vincent

William John, well-known bosun in
Fleet, left for his home in
Vincent Jun» 13, following



St.
disability termination. With him went

his

the good wishes of
Marine friends

His 12 years



great
shore and at s
9 months service
n in the M&C Boiler Shop
August 3, 1$ He joined the Lake
Flest’s Pedernales in June 1940, and
was on the ship when Nazi torpedoes
broke it in half eight months later.
He sailed on a number of other ships,
the San Carlos being his t
7

many
Le












He was one of the first elected
members of the Lake Tankermen’s
Committee, with a reputation for
ably representing his constituents.

Class is Graduated



ARUBA ESSO NEWS
Lago ta Anuncia
Premionan Capital
Nomber di e ganadornan di premio-

nan capital di Coin Your Idea
worde anuncia awe. Herman Huis





ng



di LOF a gana e promé premio di
Fls. 1000. Anteriormente el a gana
un premio inicial di TF 1000, un



premio adicional di F 2000 pa e
mesun idea. Na tur e ide
produci Fls. 4000 pa Sr. Huisir
Vincent Burgos di Drydock a gz

° 600.
















e segundo premio di Su
premio inicial tak Ff 200 y su
premio adicional 900, lo cual te
trece total di su idea na F 1700

s premio di I 400 a bai
pa 1 Joseph di Catalytic &
Light s, kende anteriormente a
ricibi 0 como premio inicial y



un otro Fls. 250 como premio adicio-




nal. Na tur Sr. Joseph a colecta
Fls. 900 pa su idea.

Fls. 200, suma di e di cuater pre-

toca na Walter G. Byer di

4 kende anteriormente a gana

Fls. 150 y . 250 como premio in-

cial y adicional respectivamente. E



idea a gana Fls. 600 pa Sr. By
Ya tur, Coin Your Id a {
7200 pa e cuater ideanan.



Lago Su Estudiantenan
Ta Pinta pa Concurso

di Poster di Seguridad

Cuater grupo di estudiantonan vo-
cacional cu ta den nan segundo anjz
a cuminza cu un concurso luna Pp ,
cual concurso lo combina un abilidad



nobo cu un doel util. Na fin di nan
actividadnan di pintamento foi ca-
bez pa e anja aki, e 101 mucha-hom-
bernan ta preparando pa un con-

curso di prenchinan di Seguridad
(poster) pa demonstra nan progreso.

Tur e posternan ale la pena
pa worde u y Division lo po-
ne na lugay Jecuado, y e mucha-







hombernan cu pinta e posternan
aki lo ricibi premionan. Na e mes
tempo, e Comité lo scoge e tres mi-

hor posternan y premionan especial
lo bai pa nan. Hueznan lo inclui dos
homber di Safety Division, dos di
Training Division, y un di Public Re-
lations.

Den e kl di un ora, e
mucha-hombernan ta trahando pos-
ternan como proef, practicando lo-
que nan a sinja di pintamento desde
September di anja pa Actualmen-
te nan ta haci nan trabao, siguiendo
riba posternan profesional cu Safety
Division a procura. Mas laat e luna
aki, pa e concurso di berdad, nan lo
pinta foi cabez.

ctual











Nan ta permiti di pinta kico cu
nan ke tocante di Seguridad, pero
nan lo worde curasha pa pinta nan





7
rlenroy Straughn ta e
instructornan di pintamento; Senor
Smit ta na cargo di %4 parti di e klas
y Senor Straughn ta na cargo di «€
resto. Esaki ta e promé cu pin-
tamento foi cabez tabata parti di e
programa; di awor p’adilanti lo e ta
riba programa regularmente pa estu-
diantenan den nan segundo anja,
gui pa pintamento técnico den
di tres anja.

Den un Esso News cu ta sigui, lo
tin portretnan di estudiantenan cu a
gana y di e posternan cu a worde
premia.

mes experienc
Jan Smit y













si-
nan



Lunch Shelter Opens

Starting last Monday, July 2, the
former Zone 1 office will be open 24
hours day as a lunch shelter for
he interior of the build-
s been completely repainted
and fitted out as an eating place for
employees.

The building
with picnic-type
a water cooler has
oilet facilities are
lition, men can smoke







has
ible
be

been equipped
and benches
n installed, and
ilable. In ad
in the shelter.







FOR SAI Webster wire recorder,
nicrophone, extra wire, automatic
shut-off, late model. F 200,



Sarratt, American Consulate,

maduates of the course in Interme-



liate Typewriting are shown at left
m June 22. From left to right: C.

vunsam, A. Kiebler, instructor, M. de





‘uba, E. Innocen J. Mae Intosh,
*. Wever, G. Bentham, I. Croes, E.
Thame, E. George, P. Croe: J.

Halley, S. Tromp, and F. Croes.



audience at the Sociedad Bolivariana on June 26. The widely-acclaimed
singer, who performed with top musical organizations throughout the
world, is seen above with his accompanist. (Photo by Sam Rajroop)





Todd Duncan, bariton famoso Americano, a parce na Sociedad Bolivariana
dia 26 di Juni, dilanti di un audiencia entusiasma. Aki nos ta mira e gran
cantor, kende a traha cu organizacionnan 1 al di mihor, hunto cu e

pianista cu a acompaneé.





Fishermen Go To School
School Goes to Fishermen




Ff

q P.

Unusual sight at Malmok last month were the crowds of people fishing for

Jacks which came in schools of thousands along a mile-long stretch of

beach. On some days there were at least 500 fishermen, some using twigs

for poles, and others with hand lines. What caused the fish to swarm, we
don’t know, but they make good eating.

Luna pasa tabs
dornan tambe.
bangonan di bini

in cantidad di masbango na Malmok, y cantidad di pisca-

n dia tabatin mas di 500 hende. Kico a causa tur e mas-

tanto asina ningun hende no sa, pero e piscadornan si
sa com bon nan a smaak despues.







Seen for Governor Struyeken

Lt. Governor of Aruba

at the reception giv
(see picture on page 1) are





F, A. Jas, and H. A. am Rajroop)
Na un recepeion dund pa Gouverneur Struycken na Sociedad Bolivariana
dia 23 di Juni, nos ta mira Sefior J. de Castro, G thebber Interino di



A. Jas, y Sefior H. A. Hessling.



| Aruba F







The Trans-Arabian Pipe Line Company, an American concern,
has completed the world’s largest oil pipe line system. The oil of
Saudi Arabia is now available on the shores of the Mediterran-
ean, more than a thousand miles from its source.

The Arabs gave the name TAPLINE to this greatest of all
long range engineering projects. Tapline in its completion has
done more than serve the cause of national security and inter-
national peace. It has given proof that a democracy produces
private initiative and enterprise which can handle any industrial
undertaking no matter how large it is.

One of the major problems facing the world today is the
future supply of oil.

The vast reserves of the Middle East offer the best answer
to this problem. The trouble before has been their inaccessibili-
ty. Now Tapline, cutting to the core of this crucial difficulty,
in effect has moved the oil fields of Saudi Arabia some 3500
miles closer to the markets of western Europe.

The initial capacity of Tapline is 300,000 barrels per day.

From that amount of oil enough gasoline can be produced to
operate 2,840,000 automobiles for an average day’s driving.
That would take care of all the cars in New York State. The
amount of oil delivered by Tapline in a day can produce an
amount of fuel oil sufficient to heat 259,000 average homes for
24 hours. That would be sufficient for the heating needs of
Philadelphia, a city of over two million people, for a day.

Tapline passes through four countries — Saudi Arabia, the
Hashimite Kingdom of Jordan, Syria and Lebanon. The effect
of Tapline’s industrial development in those countries already
is being seen in an improvement in the living standards of their
people.

More than half a million individuals have a financial interest
in Tapline through ownership of stock in the companies which
own and operate the line.

It is the story of Tapline, one of the great sagas in the history
of industrial achievement, which follows.

Arabian Peninsula.

The peace which followed World
War II brought great demands for
oil to be used in the rebuilding of
Europe. Until the completion of Tap-
line it was necessary to transport
Middle East oil in tankers down the
Persian Gulf, through the Indian
Ocean to the Red Sea and then
through the privately-owned Suez

Tapline is the abbreviated name
customarily used to identify the
world’s biggest oil pipe line system
which connects the oil fields of
eastern Saudi Arabia with a Mediter-
ranean shipping terminal at Sidon
in the Republic of Lebanon. Actually
the Tapline system is composed of
two sections under different owner-
ship and operation.

The Trans-Arabian Pipe Line Com-
pany’s part of the line begins at
Qaisumah in northeastern Saudi
Arabia and extends northwesterly
753.5 miles to Sidon. The 314.7 miles
ef pipe line which extends east and
south from Qaisumah to one of the
world’s largest producing oil fields
at Abqaigq, is the heart of the gather-
ing system of the Arabian American
Oil Company (ARAMCO). This
eastern section of the pipe line
system can be used either for collect-
ing oil and delivering it at the Per-
sian Gulf shipping port of Ras Ta-
nura, or for a westward journey,
through the royalty-gauging tanks at
Qaisumah, to the Mediterranean ship-
ping terminal at Sidon. The Aramco-
owned part of the line connects with
Aramco’s producing fields and can
be linked to future fields as they
are discovered and developed.

The history of Tapline must start
with the discovery of oil in Saudi
Arabia. That oil is close to the
Persian Gulf but by taker route it is
3500 miles from the Mediterranean.
Oilmen, looking at their maps, saw
quickly that tremendous savings in
time and money could be made by |
piping the oil across the sands, gra-
velly plains and mountains of the |

Lengths of 30-31 inch diameter

unloaded at Ras el Misha’ab, Saudi
operation, in which 30 inch pipe was shipped inside
31-inch diameter pipe, cut shipping costs.

ARUBA

ESSO

NEWS

Canal. That meant a 20-day, 7000-
mile round trip for the tankers and a
Canal toll of 18 cents a barrel, or
$40,000 for the oil in each big modern
tank ship.

The men who first saw the bene-
fits to be gained from a pipe line
across Arabia had to put that project
into the background to deal with
the war and the great expansion
projects which came with peace.

During the war there was the
great adventure of the Little Inch
and Big Inch pipe line from Texas
oil fields to the industrial northeast.
It has been said that without the
Big and Little Inch pipe lines D-
Day in Normandy would have had
to be postponed a full year.

In early 1944 a recommendation
was made by United States military
authorities for the construction of a
trans-Arabian pipe line as a project
of the wartime Petroleum Reserves
Corporation. This proposal did not
materialize but Aramco’s parent com-
panies made a careful engineering
study of the pipe line project. It was
decided that a pipe line half-again
as big in diameter as the Big Inch



might be laid across the barren
wastes of the northern Arabia
steppes and on across the coastal

mountains to the Mediterranean.

Aramco, until December of 1948,
was owned by the Standard Oil Com-
pany of California and The Texas
Company. The Trans-Arabian Pipe
Line Company was chartered as a
Delaware corporation in July, 1945,
with the same ownership as Aramco.
On Dec. 2, 1948, Standard Oil Com-
pany (New Jersey) and the Socony-
Vacuum Oil Company, Inc. were
added to the Aramco partnership.
At the same time they acquired par-
ticipating shares in Tapline.

Under this new set-up there began
the intensive planning without which
any great project must fail. First
there was the pipe line engineering
study.

Work progressed both in engineer-
ing of the line and the negotiation
of agreements with the countries



nested pipe being
Arabia. Nesting

| ing with companies which really we

}It has



July 6, 1951





This story of Tapline — the world’s biggest oil pipe line — is

adapted from material published by the

Trans-Arabian Pipe Line

Company. Thanks for permission to reprint the material is ex-

tended to Trans-Arabian;

to Photographers Corsini, of the

Arabian American Oil Company, and Richard Finnie, Interna-

tional Bechtel In

(Map courte

through which the line would pass.
In dealings with those countries Tap-



line representativ: followed the
pattern cut when Standard of Ca-
lifornia first dealt with Saudi A



concerning the original oil conce
there. Middle East countries had been
accustomed to the European mixture
of government and commerce in deal-



no more than extensions of the go-
vernment. Americans went into the
Middle East simply as businessmen.
In effect they said:

"Look. We are prepared to take
risks, to make sacrif and to o
come difficulties for exactly the same
incentive that brought greatness to
America. That incentive is the hope
ard corresponding to the risks,
sacrifices and difficulties. If at the
same time your country flourishes
because of our efforts, if millions
throughout the world benefit from
the increased production of petro-
leun., why then no one is happier
than we. But we are businessmen and
we are going into this for profit and
you wiil profit too”.

That was new in the Middle East.
been cessful in Saudi
Arabia and successful when
Tapline men carried it across the
desert and the mountains to the Me-
diterranean. Permission to construct
the line was granted by the countries
concerned and the work began.

In the summer of 1947 Tapline
started, from scratch, to lay the
biggest pipe line ever laid acro:
one of the most forbidding regions
of the world. Engineers had drawn a
line on a map. It followed a great
circle route from a place which might
been called Nowhere on _ the
an Gulf to the ancient Biblical
»f Sidon in Lebanon above the
Mediterranean.

From either end of this line
connaissance parties and then s
veyors moved on converging courses
into as barren a land as could be
found almost anywhere in the world.
There were only a few tiny settle-
ments along the desert route. A tree
was a rarity anywhere from the
Persian Gulf to the frontier of Le-
banon.

The route cro




















re-







's heavy sand dune



////4 yin
e777.

View of a freighter berthed at the artificial sea-isle

three miles off the mainland of Ras el Misha'ab, Saudi

Arabia. The Skyhook machine rode on cables slung
from a parade of 90-foot high A-frames.









for the pictures.

"The Lamp")





country only on its hundred
miles on the east end. of there
for absolutely
bar to the Jordan
frontier noticeable surface
featur are occasional dry wadis












where surface water flows or stands
for a few days, and sometimes only
for hours, after rain showe Aver-



age rainfall is only three inches per
ar. Normally no rain falls from
April to November inclusiy

The surface of this 750-mile
stretch is either level or gently slop-
ing and is about evenly divided be-
tween smooth gravel plains, disin-
tegrated limestone overlaying hard
limestone strata, and level country
with two to six inches of topsoil co-
vering limestone hard enough to re-
quire blasting for removal. The line
reaches its highest elevation, 75
feet above sea level, just before
leaves Saudi Arabia.

The 80-mile route across Jordan
was regarded as the toughest sec-
tion of the entire route because the

ed with

1 ie lava, disin-

tegrated in chunks ranging from a

few pounds to as much as_ several

tons. It is practically an insurmount-
able obstacle for pedestrians.



































Approaching the -Lebanon
frontier the line descends a steep
arpment into the south end of
at is called the Bekaa Valley,
which runs northward between two
mountain ranges, the Lebanon and
the Ante-Lebanon. He it crosses
several creeks or riv which are





the only
encounte

That was the sort of terrain over
which it had been decided to lay the
world’s greatest pipe line. Add to
those features the fact that summer
temperature ri to 130 degrees
Fahrenheit, with a humidity below
seven per cent. In such a climate a
man drinks two gallons of water a
day, metal surfaces become too hot
to touch with the bare hand.

Over part of the route across the
tilted desert there are high sand
dunes which constantly “travel” un-
der the buffeting of the fiery winds

ms of running water it




tr








from the north. In other regions
there are great desert swamps. And
the > long stretches of flinty



stone both above and below ground.

As a result of this changing ter-
rain the great pipe was finally laid,
three-fifths of its length in ditches
dug or blasted beneath the surface,
and the remaining two-fifths above
the ground.

With the









survey completed, Tap-













line was ready to go into business
on an unpr dented scale. First of
all, of course, was the pipe itself.
Tapline had contracted for 265,000
tons of steel plate to be supplied by
the Genev Utah, plant of the
United States Steel Corporation. This



plate was rolled by Consolidated
Jestern Steel Corporation at its
ywood plant in Los Angeles. Con-



the only concern in
red to manufacture
larger

solidated was
the country pre
a sufficient quantity of pipe
than 26 inches in diameter.

And in having the pipe manufac-
tured, Tapline gave early evidence
of the enterprise which was to
characterize the entire project.
mum economy together with









maxi-
mum efficiency was always the rule.



So that principle started operating

in the shipment of pipe from Cali-

fornia. F
Tapline ordered its pipe to be built,

[half of it 31 inches in diameter and







July 6, 1951

Powerful bulldoz
dune on the de 1
along the course of the pipeline.







rs cleared the right-of-way of the trans
t near Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia.





Many terrain
r the Mediterreanean coast,

of the 1068-mile system is buried.

the other half 30 inches. Then cach
30-inch length was nested in a 31-
inch length, and even in the 30-inch
lengths much material such as ce-
ment was stowed. So before the pro-
ject really began, the shipping cost
of the pipe was reduced by more
than half and the speed of delivery
was more than doubled.

It was decided to lay the pipe line
as the surveyors had worked, be-
ginning at each end simultancousl

Beirut, near Sidon on the Med
t n end, could handle
shipping, but there just w
suitable place on the Persian Gulf.
The oil port of Ras ura was too
far to the south. It was planned to
have the eastern terminal tie in with
the gathering tem for Aramco’s
producing fields and to have Tapline
proper start at Qaisumah. As there
wasn’t any suitable port, it was de-
cided to make one.















’t any














The location decided on was 1:
miles from the nearest habitation,
40 miles from the nearest drinkable



water. It had nothing whatever in its



favor except that there deep
water — two and a half miles off-
shore.

In a blinding shamal or sand

storm the first construction crew set
its tents and went to work. To con-
struct buildings to replace the tents
the men first had to make the brick,
with the aid of Arab workmen. But
in a matter of months there was a
sizable community and it even
acquired a name.

The conformation of the shoreline
at that point was vaguely reminis-
cent of the forked stick or mishaab
which Arab herders carry. And so the
Arabs called the new town Ras el
Mishaab, and so the maps now place
it.

Not even barges could come ashore
in the shallow water, but soon a sand
jetty and then a crushed stone pier
stretched out into the blue water.
And barges brought ashore general
cargo, tools, and the first pipe.

Then the Tapline p!anners, always
seeking by initiative and imaginat-
ion to meet the requirements of a
private enterprise job economy



ocean |

| without loss of efficiency — borrow-

ed a page from the book of the
Douglas fir loggers in the western
United tes.

At certain places in those
the inventive loggers had rigged
overhead cables on which to haul
timber from otherwise inacc
mountain slopes. §
never been used for
but Tapline they could be u on the Persian
Gulf on the other side of the world.

And so a_ skyhook
three miles out into the Pe
connecting the shore with a
made and built to serv







states











man-
as unload-
ing point for ocean ships. They built
21 A-frames to hold the cable, from





which spended three self-
propelled cars, each capable of hoist-
ing 10 tons of pipe or other cargo.

Operated in tandem these automo-

tive hoists of the high wire made
the three mile journey in _ five
minutes, and they brought ashore



1,100 tons a day, swinging it along
80 feet above the water.
Transportation of the pipe from
California to Ras el Mishaab having
thus been solved, the next thing was







to get it out onto location. Field
welding v a terrific problem, with
the necessity of moving the welding



equipment each time two pipe ends
were joined. So that problem, too,
was conquered.

As soon as the nested pipes were
brought ashore at Ras el Mishaab
a special machine, invented and ma-
nufactured for the purpo: as so
many machines were on this whole
project, denested the 30 from the 31-
inch pipe. Then three lengths were
automatically welded on the base,
making lengths of about 93 feet each
for moving onto the job.

Long before the first black goat-
hair Arab tent had been raised at Ras
el Mishaab, the engineers and exe-
cutives back home had been figuring
out problems to be met in advance.
Trucks and trailers too wide and too
heavy for any United States highway
had been built and tested on the de-
sert of New Mexico, under conditions
at least approaching those in Saudi










Arabian pipeline through a sand
problems
yoleanic boulders had
be blasted out of the way to make way for 30-31 inch diameter pipeline. About 60 per cent

ARUBA

ESSO NEWS

overcome
to

were

| Arabia.

And so when the first pipe arrived,
first by barge and then by skyhook
there were trailer trucks capable oi
hauling 93-foot lengths totaling ut
to 50 tons. Delivering the pipe to thc
pipe line right-of-way in this lengtl
cut the on-location welding by two
thirds.

The automatic welding at Ras el
Mishaab not only reduced the fielc
welding but effected fully a 50% sav
ing in overland transportation cost:
because of the greater and more
economical loads which could bk
carried with the 93-foot strings.

Originally Tapline’s engineers had
hoped that only a moderate amouni
of road building would be requirea
along the pipe line’s route. But even-
tually it became necessary to build
adjacent to the line a highway 93(
miles long from Ras el Mishaab tc
an intersection with an existing roaa
in Jordan.

This road across previously im-
passable desert has already had by-
products of prosperity. The road was
built as a necessity for Tapline’s pro-
ject, but for more than a year noy
the Middle East public has take
free shares in it. Now for the f
time in history it is possible to make
motor round trips between Mediter-
ranean ports, Persia, Kuwait, and the
Persian Gulf shore of Saudi Arabia
Over this road built for a pipe line
trucks now are speeding hundreds
of miles to carry fruits and vege-
tables and other goods from the Me-
diterranean area to the Persian Gulf
| markets.

All in all the Tapline project has
been the biggest transportation and
trucking job of any pipe line. Before
the last 93-foot sections of pipe were |
welded there had been three billion |
ton miles of ocean shipping and 150
million ton miles of field trucking,
the latter over those specially-con- |
structed roads now so blithely used
by the truck gardeners from the Me-
diterranean end.

















The physical obstacles to success
of this great adventure have been
mentioned. As it turned out there

were other obstacles which could not



Five powerful D-8 Caterpillar tractors tow a Giant
Ripper. This 18-ton monster was used to make a ditch
for burying the pipeline in areas where ditch-digging

machines could not operate because
ers. Such earth-handling machines - bulldozers, Cater-| there should be no such large ship-
pillars, ditchers - played a vital role in building Tapline. {ments of critical materials to far

of rocks and bould-

a



At the Mediterreanean shipping terminal at Sidon, Tapline’s tank farm is located right on the
coast. The view above is looking westward from a hillside above the Sidon terminal, with
the Mediterranean and the cluster of tanks on the horizon, With the completion of Tapline,
the vast oil reserves of Saudi Arabia were in effect moved some 3500 miles closer to the

markets of Western Europe.



A Kenworth truck being relieved of its 50-ton burden along the right-of-

way of the trans-Arabian pipeline. Special, low-pressure sand tires

per-

mitted these huge vehicles to haul their loads over some of the most diffi-
cult terrain in the world.

have been evaluated in advance and
which delayed the undertaking by a
full y

In the first place there was the
Palestine war. That conflict caused
considerable delay along the section
of the line skirting Palestine.

The other great delay came from
Washington. Any such project as this
must be approved by the Department
of Commerce. And when that ap-
proval w obtained for Tapline, it
was necessary to receive quarterly
licenses from the Commerce Depart-
ment’s Office of International Trade.









issued and Tapline was well in
The pipe was being laid
sed of a mile a day, an almost
tic achievement in view of the
physical condi And then sudden-
ly the OIT sz » more licenses,
at least for now”.










It is not difficult to imagine the
consternation, the confusion, in the
Tapline offices from Ras el Mish



to Beirut to San France





York. No reason was given then, or
since. Just no licenses. The ump-
tion was there had been complaints

that in a time of shortages at home



parts of the world. And these com-
plaints echoed loud in the ears of
political office holders, even though
it was demonstrated that less steel
vas required for Tapline than would
be needed for the 65 tankers it would
replace.

All this left Tapline with a fleet
of 15 Liberty ships contracted for
from the Isthmian Line to carry ma-
terial half way around the world.
It left Tapline with crews to lay pipe
which wasn’t going to arr any
more. It left Tapline in a me:









This was only one

- huge problem fac-
= ing Tapline in its
construction of the



world’s biggest oil
pipe lir How it
met these pro-

- language




rs, training
d_ workers,
r ntaining a wa-
ter supply, and
others - will be
told in the conclud-
ing section in the
next issue of the
Esso News.



An

Arah welder.



ARUBA ESSO NEWS





Unexpected - but certainly welcomed - guests at Irene Jacobs’ birthday

party in Philadelphia were Pedro Irausquin
Vocational School scholarship students. The
dent in Philadelphia; wife of the Netherland
Lewis, nurses’ aid and great



Berlin, Lions Club p
Consul there; and Mrs. Rosemary
Irene’s. The huge doll is ene



and Jan Wester, Lago’s two
seen with Irene; Joseph
Vice









frien

of Irene’s birthday presents.

Surprise Party for lrene

Biggest surprise for Irene Jacobs who was sent to Philadelphia for

her final operation was a birthday

unexpected guests attended.

The guests were Jan Wester and
from Allentown, Pennsylvania
through the efforts of the Phila-
delphia Lions Clubs.

The way Irene felt when she met
the two boys is best described in a









letter they wrote to Aruba before
their recent return here.
"She did not know that we would



be at her birthday party,” they said,
"and w she surprised when she
came in and saw us. We laughed and
somebody told her ‘they are from
Aruba’; she did not understand any-
thing of that, but then we started
to talk to her in Papiamento and told
her who we were and boy ’o boy, we







cannot explain how she felt, but
everyone can understand how she
felt at such a moment.”

It was the Lions Club in Phila-

delphia that handled all the
ments for Irene’s party. An e
300 people attended the affair, which
was held in a school auditorium to
handle the large crowd.

When the Lions heard that the
two Aruban boys, Pedro and Jan,
were only 50 miles away in Allen-
town, they made arrangements to
have them attend the party. The boys’ |
first job when they arrived in Phila-
delphia was to go directly to the
bakery where Irene’s birthday cake |
was being made. There they translat- |
ed "Happy Birthday, Irene” into |
"Felice Cumpli Ajo, Irena” so that!
the baker could print it on top of |
the three-deck birthday cake.

Irene, the 13-year old girl whom
Aruba’s Lions Club sent to Phila-
delphia for medical treatment, is
doing fine. The boys said that
"doctors said she will be fine in a
very short time, and that all in
Aruba may relax because she is at
her best”.

The boys added that everyone at
the party talked about one thing.

"If all Aruban girls are as lovely
as she is,” they wrote, ”a great num-
ber of them said that someday they
must visit the island.”

The boys added that ’Aruba owes
a great deal to all those in Phila-
delphia who gave their effort and
time to make Irene’s 13th birthday
such a happy one.” |

Two troops of Brownies and two
Girl Scout troops attended the birth-
day party. They had made cupcakes
iced with pink, yellow, and green
frosting. On each cupcake was the
word “Irene”. The girls started the
party off by singing ”Hello, Irene”
to the tune of the popular song,
"Goodnight, Irene.”

The Lions Club also arranged for
a long distance telephone call to
Irene’ mother in Aruba.

Among those present at the party
were the Netherlands consul and
viceconsul in Philadelphia and their
wives; Lions Club members, nurses
and doctors, scouts and their leaders,
and many more. Irene received
countless gifts, and everyone at the
party enjoyed themselves immensely.

Irene’s doctor at the Temple Uni-
versity Hospital, where she is being
treated, wrote that she "was radiant
at the party in her new dress, coat,
and jewelry. She smiled constantly.
Trene has made good friends with
one of the nurses’ aids, Mrs. Rosema-
ry Lewis. After the party they both
had dinner at my house, and it is

arrange-









imated | |,

party held on May 25 which two
Pedro Irausquin who were brought

NEV! ARRIVALS

Leon C.: A
June 13

BELL

aureen,

daughter Patricia



CROES, Venancio: A daughter, Adelfa An-












tonia, June

COLLINS, James T.: A son, Scott Hilding,
June 13.

ARCHER, Rafael: A daughter, Filomena
June 14

DIRKS, Enrique: A son, Vito Roy, June 15.

KELLY, Higinio A.: A son, Efrain,
June 15

SOLOC Juan S.: A daughter, Cres-

, June 15

fduardo: A son, Ruben Daniel,






June 16.
BOEKHOUDT, Pedrito: son, Alfonso R.,
16.
ROCHI, Innocencio: A daughter, Greta
len, June 16













A son, Johan Alwin,
CUMMINGS, Edmund W.: A son, Hugh
Covington, June 17.
OGILVIE, John G,: A son, Esmond John,
June 18.
OSWALD, Frederick: A daughter, Cheryl
Ann, June 18.
YR QUIN, Pedro: A daughter, Gloria
aria, June 18.
CROES, Estevan: A daughter, Luisa
Deanne, June 21.
MADURO, Camilio: A son, Luis Roberto, |



June 21

WERLEMAN, Daniel: A son, Alex David,
June 21.

DONGEN, Egbert J.: A daughter, Linda

Augusta Eugene, June 21.
KELLY, Vicente: A

June 21.
BLACKMAN, Alexande

lyn Patricia, June
NICHOLS, Theodore I

daughter, Luisa Maria, |

A daughter, Ros-





A daughter, Joanne











French, June

HOOGSLAG, Klaas W.: A son, Marcel
Andre, June 22.

GIEL, Bruno: daughter, Maria Elisa-
beth, June 22,

LACLE, Juan O.: A daughter, Filomena
Te a, June 22.

PROTERRA, Anth J.: A son, David
Anthony, June 23.

ARRINDELL, Frederic J.: A daughter, |
Linda Martina, June 23. |



Mc INTOSH, B n: A son, Kenneth Cuth-







bert, June .

NICOLAAS, Alfredo: A son, Juan Marti-
nes, June 24.

ALBUS, Leoncio: A daughter, Alida Maria
Goretti, June 25





SONES, Errol: A daughter, Juanita Hazel
Eudora, June 26.

CROES, Anselmo: A son, June 26.
CROES, Frederico A.: A daughter,

26.

June



very evident that Rosemary is good |
for Irene.”

Irene is not confined to bed, and
travels all over Philadelphia seeing
the sights of the city. She is accom-
panied on these trips by Mrs. Lewis,
the Netherlands Vice Consul and his
wife, or by Lions Club members and
their wives. Her address is Temple
University Hospital, Broad & Onta-
rio Streets, Childrens’ Ward, Park
Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

On the joyful occasion of her birth- |
day party, Irene no doubt thought
affectionately of her many friends
and well-wishers in Aruba. For it is



the many people here who made it gures at the left; develop them as they are done

possible for her to go to the States |
for the medical treatment she needed. |

Jan and Pedro
Back in Aruba

(Continued from page 1)

Both boys voiced their deep ap-
preciation to Lago for the opportuni-
ty they had had of studying in the
States

"It was a dream come true,” Jan
said.

"It was a dream I had never even
ad,” Pedro said, "and it
tainly wonderful.”

The two boys, the two outstanding





graduates of last year’s Vocational
ning School graduating class,



studied at the Allentown Vocational
Public High School in Pennsylvania
When they returned to Aruba, they
brought with them a vast supply of
memories of new experiences that
will stay with them forever. On their
way to Allentown la Septembe
they stopped off in New York City
to the sights the Then they
went on to Allentown, which was to
be their home for the next
months.








nine



rybody there was our friend,”
d. "People in Allentown





they



and every place we went, for that

matter — were awfully nice to us.

We sure hated to leave them.”
While in Pennsylvania, the



made three trips to Philadelph
one of which they helped Irene
cobs celebrate her birthday (see se-
parate story); to Bethlehem, where
they saw the huge Bethlehem Steel
plant; and to other nearby industrial
centers where they observed various
plant operations.

Among their new periences was
seeing snow for the first time — and
xperiencing temperatures as cold as
eight degrees below zero.

"It was a Saturday when it went
down to eight below,” they said,
we yed indoors all the time.”

Pedro is with the TSD Lab, and
Jan in Metal Trades. Both boys feel
that, as a result of their advanced
training, they are far better equipped
to perform their jobs. To them, their
time in the States was a wonderfully
worthwhile od. The success of
their stay there is also shown in a
letter from Clifford S. Bartholomew,
principal of Allentown High School,
to Frank M. Scott, head of Lago’s
Training Division.

"It was a pleasure to have Jan
and Pedro with us,” Mr. Bartholomew
wrote. "They certainly set a good
example in every class they were in,
and their citizenship in school was
the finest. Their attitudes were ex-
cellent. I would love to have a whole
school filled with kids like you
people have sent us from Aruba.”

Next month Lago will announce
the names of the two scholarship
winners from this year’s Vocational
School graduating class. The two
boys selected will have high ords
to aim at if they are to maintain the
standards set in Allentown this year
by Jan and Pedro, and last year by
young Britten and Dijkhoff.









































Kid's Korner

Drawing is Fun

| port to G. B. Mathews.

July 6, 1951




















Nobody

eems to know the cause of Aruba’s recent fog. But everyone at

1 t agrees that there is a great deal of fog and it’s very unusual. The

picture above was taken in the refinery shortly before noon one day; the

new refinery road turns off just to the left to run along the seashore, and
the nearby Plant Dispensary is invisible in the fog ahead. :



Fog Fools Few

Thousand Theories
Thrive

Organization Changes
in Mechanical Dept.

Organization changes in the Me-
chanical Department last month saw
L. G. Wannop appointed to the posit-
ion of zone foreman in Zone No. 3,



Vo two people



m to asree about









replacing R. H. Baggaley, who is re- the origin of Aruba’s persistent fog. |
tiring. Mr. Wannop will not take over Everybody, however, agrees on one |
his new duties until September 1, thing: they wish that the fog would

go ¢



when he has completed his assign- y-





















ment as technical Among the conflicting theories
supervisor of the heard about the origin of the fog}
Technical and Ad are these: from the ahara |
ministration Grouy Desert in is blowin ound
in M&C. Unti the world; spring’s atomic tests
then, V Turne in the Pacific created certain pecul-
will act as zon iar atmospheric conditions; a hydro-
supervisor in Zone gen bomb was exploded; a submarine
83, after which h« volcano exploded; the nd of Mar-
will take over th tinique erupted; there was an e

new hospital pro quake in the Cape Verde Islands

ject a » super Fogo volcano there blew up; it

visor i arge of a blanket of smoke from Cu
construction. hot air from a large continental land



body had moved out over cold water.









Mr. : ier
came to Aru in Ls G. Wannop Whatever the reason and you
December 1945 as could pretty well select whichever
cal engineer II in M&C £ on» appealed to you the most — the
ion. In September 1949 fact remained that an unusual fog
an tant zone supervis d come to Aruba, and when or













July 1950 acting technical super re it would go from here nobody
in M&C. >med to know.

In other organization shifts, L.
Ammann returned to the refinery . .
Field Coordination Craft early this @@t Olympiad Trophies
month. The Colon one organization






as such was ated and its func-
tions incorporated into the Colony
Maintenance Crz F. Legenhausen
signed these duties reporting
to S. Hartwick, who continues to re-

All prizewinners in the Queen’s
Birthday Olympiad, who have not yet
received their trophi can do so
now. The trophies can be obtained
in Room 14, BQ 3 (the Training
Building), from H. M. } y. |

Pa Muchanan

Pintamento ta Pret











Kids-drawing is fun. And it’s easy if you follow
the steps shown above. Just start out with the fi-

above. You'll end up with the scene at the right.



Muchanan-Pintamento ta pret. Y fa i bo sigui
e prenchinan cu bo ta mira aki 'riba. Cuminsa cu
figuurnan na man robez, y sigui manera a worde
haci aki ‘riba. Ora bo caba, bo lo tin un prenchi ma- |
nera esun na banda drechi. |









Full Text
Home



Again! Lago’s two scholarship winners land at Dakota Airport.

Yegando Cas! Lago su aprendiznan a bolbe di Merea.

Hundreds Hail Jan and Pedro's

Arrival from Year in States

Pedro Irausquin and Jan Wester
returned to Aruba Sunday, June 24, to be met

scholarship winners

Lago’s two Vocational School

by a large crowd of friends and relatives at Dakota Airport.

"There’s no place like home”,
to be back”.

C. F. Smith is Named
To a New Position

Charles F. Smith was this month
named to the new position of Ser-
and Staff Departments Super-
intendent. Departments under his
supervision are Colony Service, In-
dustrial Relations, Medical, and Pu-
blic Relatior

At the same time, Mr. Smith was
also named a member of the Com-
pany’s Executive Committee.

Until his new assignment, Mr.
Smith had been Lago’s manager of
Industrial and Public Relations. His
Jersey service dates back to 1930; he
first came to Aru-
ba in 1938 as heac
of the Training Di-

vice


















vision and was la
ter personnel ma
nager. In 1941 he
returned to thc,
United States.
where >



al year:

Pat
ous training!
employee re





and
lations posts in thi

New Je y Works




He was transfer-
red to the Emp!oy- , oT ans
ee Relations De- ©: F- Smith

partment in New York in 1946, and
returned to Aruba in August 1948,
In recent months Mr. Smith has held
various Executive Development Pro-
gram assignments here, and in 1950
attended the advanced management
course at Harvard University’s Gre
duate School of Business Admini-
stration.







Tanker Rescues Vessel

The SS Fort Fetterman, south-
bound from Aruba to Amuay Bay
June 25, rescued a 60-foot Venezue-
lan fishing ve 1 that was stranded
at sea. The Is of the ship — the
San Miguel — were torn to shreds by
the strong winds and the S
helpless without any auxili
ines.

When she sighted the Fort Fet-
terman, the San Miguel waved her
down and asked to be towed. The
Fort Fetterman towed her to the
entranc> of Amuay Bay, where she
was turned over to the tug Esso
Las Piedras. The tug towed the San
Miguel on into the dock.

Donald P. Swain is captain of the
Fort Fetterman.













both of them said, "and we're glad

”Aruba looked so good to me,” Jan
added, "that as soon as we saw the
island from the plane I almost broke
the windows to get out.”

The boys finished up their almost
ten months in the States by king
an automobile trip from Pennsylvania
to Miami. They made the trip with
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wilkinson and



their two children; Mr. Wilkinson is
with the Allentown Public Schools,
and Pedro and Jan — as well as Do-




minico Britten and Fran
hoff, the two previous scholars
winn-rs — lived with him and his
family in Pennsylvania. On _ their
1800-mile trip to Florida they went
through Delaware and Maryland;
saw the sights of W ington, D.C.,
the nation’s capital; visited Mount
Vernon, Virginia, home of George
Washington; went swimming at
Mrytle Beach, South Carolina; and
arrived in Miami the day before they
boarded a KLM plane for the return
trip to Aruba.

(Turn to Page 6, Column 3)









oss ;

PUBLISHED BY LAGO OIL & TRANSPORT CO. LTD.

VOL.

Estudio di Costo di
Bida Casi Completa

Consehero Técnico Ta
Analizando Informacion

12 No. 14




Punchmento di urchi y tabulacion
di resultadonan di estudio di Costo di
Bida a keda di bini cla na cumi
mento di e siman aki. Probablemente
den e siguiente dos simannan, e con-
sehero técnico Laurence De Trude lo
i di analiza resultadonan y di pre-
4 recomendacionnan tocante com-
cion di e index nobo pa costo di














bida

Progreso di c estudio a worde dis-
cuti dia di Juni cu miembronan
di Lez Imployee Council. Na
reunion, James M. Smith, hefe
Wage & Salary, sr. De Trude
pone LEC na corriente di tur desa-
royo reciente. Un reunion igual ta-
bata yama pa Diasabra, 30 di Juni.







r. De Trude ¢ > sistema di
usa code na e cu tur in-
formacion colecta pa e entrevistador-
nan mester worde poni na number.
Por ehempel, e 200 pacusnan na cual-
nan empleadonan ta cumpr aun
tin un number; tur e articulonan
cumpra cada un tin un number, ete.
Dunando un number (code) na cada
cos, e number nan por worde gepunch
riba kaarchinan di tabulacion, pa poi





calcula tur cos cu machiennan di ta- |

bulacion.

Sr. De Trude a bisa cu e estudio
lo mustra cuater punto principal. Di
promé, lo e mustra un comparacion
entre e index di anja 1941 y esun
actual. Di dos, lo e mustra cuanto di-
ferente sorto di articulo ta worde





cumpra, di ki tamafo, unda, prome-
dio di loque cada famia ta gasta. Di |
culonan ta
di

tres, lo e mustra cual ar
principal den preparamento
resumen di costo di bida. Di cua
cantidad cumpra, variacion den prijs
y importancia di cada articulo.

Den nomber di LEC, Vice-Presiden-
te cil R. A. Bishop a gradici y a
expresa aprecio pa tur e empleado-
nan di oficina cu a traha oranan lar-
go riba e anan di pregunta te ora
cu tur entre nan a keda completa.
Otro miembronan di LEC tambe a co-
menta riba e trabao bon haci. Sr. De
Trude tambe a elogia e empleadonan
den oficina e trabao excelente, cu
a worde hiba a cabo di un moda ex-
cepcional.
















New NWI Governor Holds Press Conference







4

Dr. A. A. M. Struyeken, Governor of the NWI, holds a press conference



with members of the Aruba Press

ssociation on Monday, June 25, before

leaving Aruba after his 4 day official visit. Left to right: His Excellency
the Governor; A. Cloo, editor of the Arubaansche Courant; J. Bode, corres-
pondent for La Prensa; (backs to camera) E. F. Lo, Beurs correspondent;

and F.



teenmeijer, also of Beurs.

Or. A. A. M. Struycken, Gouverneur di Antillanan Hulandes, a tene un

conferencia cu miembronan di

Asociacion

di Prensa di Aruba Dialuna,

25 di Juni, promé cu e bai despues di su bishita oficial di 4 dia na Aruba.
Di robez pa drechi: Su Excelencia Gobernador; A. Cloo, editor di Aru-

baans* Courant; J. Bode, correspondent pa La Prer



(lomba pa camera)

E. F. Lo, correspondent di Beurs; i F. Steenmeijer, tambe di Beurs.

q

Samuel Joseph



July 6, 1951

1950 Capital Award
Winners Named Today



Walter G. Byer

Capital Award Winners for 1950 were announced today. Herman
Huising, LOF, won the top award of Fls. 1000, boosting his winnings
on a single idea to Fls. 4000. On March, 1950 he was given an initial
award of Fls. 1000, and in April of this year the idea earned a supple-

Fiesta pa lrene

Dia di Su Anja

Un sorpresa grandi pa Irene Ja-
cobs kende ta na Philadelphia pa
tratamiento médico, tabata un fiesta
pa celebra su anja dia 25 di Mei, na



cual fiesta tabatin dos invitado ines- |



E invitadonan tabata Jan Wester y
Pedro Irausquin, kendenan a bini di
Allentown, Pennsylvania pa medio di
esfuerzonan di Lions Club di Phila-
delphia.

Ta Lions Club di Philadelphia mes ;

tambe a regla tur cos pa e fiesta di
Irene. Mas o menos 300 hende tabata
presente na e celebracion cu a tuma
lugar den sala di un school.

Alegria di Irene ora cu el a mira
e dos mucha- hombernan ta expresa
den e carta cu e mucha-hombernan
a skirbi despues.







"Irene no tabata sa cu nos tabata
di bini su fiesta”, nan ta bisa, "y e
tabata sorprendi ora cu el a mira
nos drenta. Nos a cuminza hari y un
hende a bisa ’nan tambe ta di Aruba;
Irene no por a comprende na promé
ora, pero ora cu nos a cuminza pa-
pia cuné na Papiamento y nos a bi-
sé kende nos ta, e ora ey si! Nos no
por splica kico el a sinti, pero ta di
| comprende com contento el tabata na
e momento.”

Ora cu Lions Club a tende cu e
{dos mucha-hombernan Arubiano, Pe-
| dro y Jan tabata solamente 50 milla
for di Philadelphia, nan a haci are-
|glonan pa nan bini Irene su fiesta.
|E promé cos cu e mucha-hombernan
| a haci ora cu nan a yega Philadelphia





(Continud na Pagina 2)



<

mental of Fls. 2000. The idea was to
install a blockvalve in No. 7 crude
line and a connection from pump No.
1243 to the upperside of the block-



e.
Vincent Burgos, Drydock, won the
second capital award of Fls. 600 with
his suggestion to use welding torches
to clean salt deposits from N. D. and
P. D. Condenser tubes. He received
an initial award of Fls. 200, and a
supplemental of Fls. 900, adding up
to Fls. 1700 total.

Third capital award of Fls. 400
went to Samuel Joseph, Catalytic and
Light Ends (who is no longer work-
ing for Lago). His idea to withdraw
spent caustic at a very slow rate to
as low a level as possible before
recharging AAR-2 and ISAR earned
a Fils. 250 initial award and
Fls. 250 supplemental award, to-
talling Fls. 900.

Walter G. Byer, LOF, was given
the fourth capital award for his idea
of eliminating a steam pump from
No. 1 Pitch Still. This idea received
an initial award of Fls. 150, and a





supplemental award of Fls. 250,

adding up to Fls. 600. Total amount

|given on these four ideas was
Fls. 7200.

Esso Heights to Elect
Residents of Esso Heights will

|elect four men to represent them on

the Esso Heights Advisory Com-
mittee July 23 and 24. List of the
nominees will appear in the July 20
issue of the Esso News.

Eight men were nominated by the
nominating committee June 29. Ad-
ditional names may be added to the
ballot by submitting a petition signed
by 50 Esso Heights residents; peti-
tions should be turned in by July 7
to the Industrial Relations Depart-
ment.


2 ARUBA ESSO NEWS

ARUBA Esso) EWS ‘Wallace Spans U.S.

PUBLISHED EVERY OTHER FRIDAY AT ARUBA, NETHERLANDS Sees 22 States

WEST INDIES, BY THE LAGO OIL & TRANSPORT CO., LTD.
Printed by the Curacaosche Ceurant, Curacao, N.W.I.











When Paul Wallace, Lago Police
aurtment, started out on his last
vacation, he really set out to see the
United States. At the end of seven

weeks, he had travelled through 27
states — a distance of 10,500 miles -

} | driving from New York through the
southern states across to California,





up the Pacific Coast, and back to
New York by way of the northern
states,

"T had a vacation, a new car, and

I wanted to what the United
States looked like”, Mr. Wallace says
in explanation of his trip.
Starting from New York City, he
| drove through 22 s










New J ey, Penn
Vv West Virgini

s, Texas, New Mexico, Ari-
zona, California, Oregon, Washing-
ton, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming,
Nebraska, Jowa, Illinois, Indiana,
Ohio, then back into Pennsylvani

Then he took a trip to his hometown
in Vermont, travelling in five more
states: Connecticut, Rhode Island,





M chusetts, New Hampshire, and
his home state.

"The weather was wonderful all
the way, and I just stopped when-



ever and wherever I
Mr. Wallace says.
Among the many scenic
w on his cross-country trip, he was
particularly impressed by Yelloy
stone National Park, Imperial Valle
and the redwood section in
nia, and the Columbia River Valley
in Oregon.

felt like it”,



sights he




was his visit to — of all places —
a cemetery. It was the well-known
cemetery in Tombstone, Arizona,

famed wild frontier town during the
early days of the West. Among the
50 or so headstones above the
| grav many contained humorous
inscriptions giving details of how the
various people met their death (see
cut). Under the names of four men





ana pasa, nan a stop pa algun dia na
New York, pa mira e bistanan di e
stad grandi aki. Despues nan a sigui
|pa Allentown, unda pa nuebe luna
jnan lo keda biba.

”Tur hende aya tabata nos amigo”,
nan a bisa. "Hendenan na Allentown
y tambe na tur otro camindanan cu
nos a bai, tabata masha carinoso cu
nos, Cu curazon pisé nos a laga nan.”

Estudiantenan Jan
y Pedro Ta Bolbe

Un grupo grandi di amigonan y
famia tabata para na vliegveld Da-
kota pa duna bon-binida na Pedro
Irausquin y Jan Wester — e dos
aprendiznan cu a gana beca ofreci



door di Lago su School di Ofishi, cu Durante nan estudia na Pennsyl-
a bolbé Aruba Diadomingo, 24 di vania, e jovennan a bai Philadelphia
Juni. tres diferente biaha, Ariba un di e



”Ningun otro luga ta manera bo
mes tera’, nan a bisa, ”y nos ta con-
tento cu nos a bolbe cas atrobe”’.

"Aruba a mustra mi asina bon,”
Jan a sigue, "cu ora nos a mira e
isla fo’i den aeroplano, mi a hera ki-
bra e bentananan pa mi sali.”

E dos jonkumannan aki a duna
terminacién na nan estudia di casi
diez luna na Merca cu un biaha cu
auto fo’i Pennsylvania te Miami. Nan

biahanan aki nan a yuda Irene Ja-
cobs celebra su fiesta di ana. (Lesa
storia separa) Nan a bishita Bethle-
hem tambe, unda nan a mira e plan-
ta enorme di Bethlehem Steel, y nan
a bishita otro centronan industrial
unda nan a observa trabao den va-
rios di e plantanan.

Un di nan experencianan nobo ta-
bata sneeuw, cu nan a mira pa di



There isn’t much humor in most
cemeteries, but the one in Tomb-
stone, Arizona is a notable exception.
Paul Wallace, LPD, snapped this
picture of a headstone on a
there. The inscriptions reads
Lies - Lester Moore - Four Slugs -
From a .44 - No Les - No More.



rome biaha den nan bida; tambe %

a worde acompana door di Sr y Sra naa a experencia temperatura frio|W2S the large word, "Murdered.
Wilkinson y nan dos yieuwnan. cu a baha te na ocho grado bao zero. Another man was hanged, but the
Sr Wilkinson ta conecta cu e "Tabata ariba un diasabra ora e| headstone left no doubt about the

Schoolnan di Gobierno na e stad di| temperatura a baha te na ocho gra-
Allentown, y Pedro cu Jan — mes-| do bao zero”, nan a bisa, "y nos a
cos cu Dominico Britten y Francisco| eda henter dia den cas.”

Dijkhoff, ¢ dos aprendiznan cu e| Pedro ta traha cu Laboratorio di
ana anterior a gana beca, tabata bi- T.S.D., y Jan ta cu Metal Trades.
ba cerea dje y su famia. Ariba nan) Tyr dos e jovennan ta sinti cu, como ,..2 é 3
biaha di 1800 milla, fo’i Pennsylvania | resultado di nan entrenamento. mas didn’t any highway accidents”,
pa Florida, nan a pasa door di e esta-| adyansa, nan ta miho capabel awor he says. "I saw an accident in Har-
donan Delaware y Maryland, y a bi- pa haci nan trabao. Pa nan, e tiempo risburg, Pennsylvania right after I
shita Washington D.C., e capital di cu nan a pasa na Merca tabata un started out. That was the last one
Merca, y Mount Vernan na Virginia, periodo maravilloso di hopi utilidad. I saw until I had gone all the way
e cas unda George Washington taba-| exito di nan estudia na Merca ta|2¢ross. the country and back to
ta biba; nan a bai landa na Myrtle | worde demonstra tambe den un carta | Harrisburg. There, oddly enough, I
Beach den South Carolina; y yega| ey Sy, F. M. Scott, Jefe di e Depar- | S8W another one on my way back to}
Miami un dia prome cu nan mester | tamento di Entrenamento a ricibi fo'i | New York.”
a tuma aeroplano di KLM pa bolbe gy. Clifford S. Bartholomew, Maestro | How does Mr. Wallace feel about
Aruba. | principal di e School na Allentown, | all the different parts of the country
Tur dos e jovennan a expresa nan| Tabata un placer pa tin Jan y Pe- he saw on his long trip? -
gratitud na Lago pa e oportunidad | dro hunto cu nos” Sr Bartholomew a "It was really a wonderful trip,
cu a worde duna na nan pa studia| scirbi. "No tin ningun duda cu den|#nd I enjoyed every minute of it”,
na Merca. tur e klasnan cu nan a pasa, nan a he says. "However, the old home
*Tabata un sonjo cu a worde rea-| establece un bon ehempel, y nan com- | town — Waterbury, Vermont — still
liza” Jan a bisa. portacién den School tabata di mas | looks the best to me. That’s where
"Tabata un sonjo cu nunca ni si-| mihé. Nan actitud tabata excelente. I’m going to settle down some day”.
quiera mi tabatin,” Pedro a bisa, "y Mi lo gusta di tin un school yen di
di berdad e tabata magnifico”. mucha manera esunnan cu boso a
E dos mucha-hombernan, e dos| manda nos fo’i Aruba.”
aprendiznan mas sobresaliente cu a
gradua fo’i School di Ofishi afa pa-
sa, a studia na e High School Publi-
co di Ofishi na Allentown, Pennsyl-
vania. Cu nan regreso na Aruba nan

circumstances: on it were the words,
"legally hanged”.

Mr. Wallace had no flat tires, |
or any kind of car trouble, through-
out his trip.

”On the major part of the trip I





















B Bo C
Schedule of Paydays usca Bo Copa

Tur esnan cu a gana copa of premio

Semi-Monthly Payroll ‘ es oearae e
i . na Olimpiada di Anja di La Reina, y



> 16-3 } ae ae :
a trece cu nan hopi memorianan di eae ee oe say ; cu no a ricibié ainda, sea asina bon
experencianan nobo, cu lo keda cu y 2 CaYn Wy di bai tumé cerca Henry Nassy. Su
nan pa semper. Durante nan biaha di Monthly Payroll oficina ta den Edificio di ‘Training
Aruba pa Allentown na September June 1-30 Tuesday, July 10 | (B.Q. No. 3), cuarto No. 14.

Califor- |

A humorous highlight of his trip |

a



Wor ing up a poster design, I. Lorenzo Hernand 1949 student, gets
advice from instructor Jan W. A. Smit. Hernandez is using colored chalks.

1 Lorenzo Hernandes, estudiante di 1949, ta worde conseha den pintamento
di su poster di Seguridad. Su instructor ta Jan W. A. Smit.

Students Use New Skill
In Safety Poster Contest

Four groups of cond-year vo-
cational students began a contest last
month that will combine a newly- i
developed skill with a useful purpose. | Fiesta pa Irene
Winding up their year’s activity in|
freehand drawing class, the 101 boys
are now preparing for a_ safety
poster contest that will highlight | tabata di bai directamente na un pa-
their progress. naderia caminda nan tabata traha

All posters worthy of being used un bolo pa Irene su anja. Ey nan a
will be posted at appropriz ; traduci "Happy Birthday, Irene”, na
by the Safety Division, and the "Feliz Cumpli Ano Irena”, pa e pa-
who created these posters will nadero por a skirbié riba e bolo di
ceive prizes. At the same time aj tres piso.
judging comittee will select the three
best posters, and special awards will
be given for these. Judges will in-
clude two men from the Safety Di-| ta hopi mihor, E mucha-hombernan
vision, two from the Training Divi-| ta bisa cu dokternan ta bisa cu pron-
sion, and one from the Public Relat-| to Jo e ta tur bon, y cu tur hende
ions Dept. na Aruba por keda sosega pasobra e
their present one-hour daily | ta de lo mas mihor cu por tin.
sessions the boys are making E
posters, putting into practise ¢









(Continud di Paginal)












Irene, e mucha-muher di 13 anja
cu Lions Club di Aruba a manda
Philadelphia pa tratamiento médico,







mucha-hombernan a

? ‘ cu tur hende na e fi tabata bisa
the drawing skills they have learned cul Tsetse i lief ater ii:

since last September. In this stage tra si tur mucha-muhernan di Aruba
they ‘are'\modeling their work after|+,° mes lief y si t’asina anto sigur
professional posters supplied by the hopi di nan. lo ke bin bishita Aruba
Safety Division. Late this month the algun dia.
actual contest will find them design- é
ing and creating their own.

They will be permitted to use any

bisa tambe












sa tambe
dicido na tur

E mucha-hombernan
cu Aruba mester



ta gr








subject matter concerning safety, | ¢Snan na Philadelphia kendenan a de-
but will be urged to relate the dica nan tempo pa Irene su hacimen-
posters to their own experience if | t® di anja tabata un ocasion asina
possible. contento pe

Jan Smit and Glenroy Straughn are | __ Tabatin dos grupo di Padvinder y
the drawing instructors, with Mr.|Kabouter na e fiesta, Nan a traha
Smit leading three-fourths of the bolonan chikito, dorna cu letternan

class sessions and Mr. Straughn the | 00s, geel, y berde cu Irene su nom-
balance, This is the first year that | ber ariba nan. E fiesta a cuminza cu
freehand drawing has been part of eo cantica pa cuminda Irene.

the program; it will now be a re- Lions Club a percura pa un ya-
gular feature of the students’ second| mada na telefon for di Merca pa



year work, followed the next year) Aruba, pa Irene por a papia cu su
by mechanical drawing. | mama.
A later Esso News will carry Entre esnan presente na e fiestz





S
y nan senjora; miembronan di Lions
Club, nurse- y dokternan, padvinder-
y nan leidernan, y hopi otro. Irene
a ricibi un cantidad di regalo, y tur
hende a pasa masha bon na e fiesta.

pictures of the winning students and | tabata consul y vice-consul Huland
their prize poste





Instrumental School
Being Organized

Irene su dokter na Temple Univer-
sity Hospital, unda e ta bao trata-
miento ta skirbi cu e tabata radian-

te na e fiesta, den su shimis nobo,
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Born recently | sy jas, y cu e tabata sonrei continua-

arrived in Aruba from Holland to} mente. Irene a haya hopi amigo no-
set up an instrumental music school bo, entre otro su nurse Senora Ro-
here, This will be the first school of Lewis. Despues di e fiesta
this type in the NWI. nan a bin come na mi cas y mi por
mira cla cu e nurse ta masha bon pe.







semary



wife





Both Mr. Born and his are
experienced musicians and instruc- Tenia nee taba camarvve ta Reid.
tors. In addition to teaching piano,| )., sea su nurse, vice-consul Hulan-
Mr. Born has specialized in training ra, of un di e miembro-

| des y su se
choral groups; he is alsojan pULOnE: nan di Lions Club ta compané, Irene
ty on folk music. Mrs. Born teaches’ 54 adres ta Temple University Hos-
both piano and voice. pital, Board & Ontario Streets,

Plans to set up this music school | Children’s Ward, Park Avenue, Phi-
here started with Aruba’s Cultural | ladelp| Pa.













Center, which received istance Na ocasion di su hacimento di an-
from Sticusa in Amsterdam. ja, Irene sigur lo a pensa cu carino

Anyone interested in further infor-| na tur su amigonan y bien-hechornan
mation about the school may get in| na Aruba; pasobra ta nan a_haci
touch with F. Steenmijer at the Bo-| posibel cu e por a bai Merca pa e
tica Aruba in Oranjestad, or with| haya e tratamiento médico cu ‘a ne-
Mr. Born at the Scala Hotel. cesario pa su sali.












1951

July

6,



Celebrating a job well done. Interviewer

members meet with Com

LEC



s in the Cost of Living Study and

pany Management on June 16.

C-of-L Study Being Analyzed

tabulating of
Living study
been compl

Key punching and
results in the Cost of
was scheduled to have
ed early this week. It inticipated
that Technical sult Lau
De Trude will have analyzed results,
and prepared recommendations con-
cerning the composition of the new
cost of living base index within the













next week or two.

Developments in the study were
discussed June with members of
the Lago Employee Council. 4 é



James M. Smith, head of
ry, and Mr. De Trude brought
the LEC up to date on progress of
the study. A similar meeting was
scheduled for last Saturday, June 30
Mr. De Trude explained the system
coding to the group: how all the
gathered by the inter-
translated into num-

tim
«& &







of
information
viewers must be



bers. For instance, the 200 stores
where employees buy will each have
a number; all the various items

bought by employees will each have
a number, and so on. By coding the
material, it can be punched on IBM
machines; the key punchin 5



once





completed, the numbers are tran
ed back into words (the names o
stores, items bought, and so forth).

Tabulation consists of taking all the
information from each questionnaire
and averaging it.

Mr. De Trude pointed out that the

study will show four major things.
First, it will show the relative im-
portance of items in the original

1941 cost of living survey as com-
pared to today. Second, it will show
how many units are being bought, in
what sizes, where, the relative pro-
portion of the nily budget being
spent on various items. Third, it will
show what items to measure to make
a cost of living survey. Fourth, three
things — the amount bought, variat-
ion in price, and importance of the
item — will show the relation of
prices to be investigated in a cost of
living survey

On behalf of the LEC, Vice-Chair-
man Cecil R. Bishop extended
thanks and appreciation to the office
workers who worked long hours on
the questionnaires after the inter-
viewing was completed. Other LEC
members also commented on the fine
work done by this group.

Mr. De Trude also
office workers for doing
job in completing hug
had been carried in
manner


















these
lent
that
yable

praised
n €





on
throughout.

Intermediate Typewriting





L. Del Pino presents Carl W.
Hicks with a gift check on June 26
representing contributions by Carl’s
fellow workers in the Colony Com-
missary. He was married on June 28
to Susanna Mercer at the
Anglican Church in San Nicolas.



A. L. Del Pino ta entrega Carl W.

Hicks un cheque den nomber di Carl

su co-empleadonan. Carl su matri-

monio cu Seforita Susanna Mercer a

tuma lugar na Kerki Angelicano dia
28 di Juni.

Popular Fleet Bosun
Returns to St. Vincent

William John, well-known bosun in
Fleet, left for his home in
Vincent Jun» 13, following



St.
disability termination. With him went

his

the good wishes of
Marine friends

His 12 years



great
shore and at s
9 months service
n in the M&C Boiler Shop
August 3, 1$ He joined the Lake
Flest’s Pedernales in June 1940, and
was on the ship when Nazi torpedoes
broke it in half eight months later.
He sailed on a number of other ships,
the San Carlos being his t
7

many
Le












He was one of the first elected
members of the Lake Tankermen’s
Committee, with a reputation for
ably representing his constituents.

Class is Graduated



ARUBA ESSO NEWS
Lago ta Anuncia
Premionan Capital
Nomber di e ganadornan di premio-

nan capital di Coin Your Idea
worde anuncia awe. Herman Huis





ng



di LOF a gana e promé premio di
Fls. 1000. Anteriormente el a gana
un premio inicial di TF 1000, un



premio adicional di F 2000 pa e
mesun idea. Na tur e ide
produci Fls. 4000 pa Sr. Huisir
Vincent Burgos di Drydock a gz

° 600.
















e segundo premio di Su
premio inicial tak Ff 200 y su
premio adicional 900, lo cual te
trece total di su idea na F 1700

s premio di I 400 a bai
pa 1 Joseph di Catalytic &
Light s, kende anteriormente a
ricibi 0 como premio inicial y



un otro Fls. 250 como premio adicio-




nal. Na tur Sr. Joseph a colecta
Fls. 900 pa su idea.

Fls. 200, suma di e di cuater pre-

toca na Walter G. Byer di

4 kende anteriormente a gana

Fls. 150 y . 250 como premio in-

cial y adicional respectivamente. E



idea a gana Fls. 600 pa Sr. By
Ya tur, Coin Your Id a {
7200 pa e cuater ideanan.



Lago Su Estudiantenan
Ta Pinta pa Concurso

di Poster di Seguridad

Cuater grupo di estudiantonan vo-
cacional cu ta den nan segundo anjz
a cuminza cu un concurso luna Pp ,
cual concurso lo combina un abilidad



nobo cu un doel util. Na fin di nan
actividadnan di pintamento foi ca-
bez pa e anja aki, e 101 mucha-hom-
bernan ta preparando pa un con-

curso di prenchinan di Seguridad
(poster) pa demonstra nan progreso.

Tur e posternan ale la pena
pa worde u y Division lo po-
ne na lugay Jecuado, y e mucha-







hombernan cu pinta e posternan
aki lo ricibi premionan. Na e mes
tempo, e Comité lo scoge e tres mi-

hor posternan y premionan especial
lo bai pa nan. Hueznan lo inclui dos
homber di Safety Division, dos di
Training Division, y un di Public Re-
lations.

Den e kl di un ora, e
mucha-hombernan ta trahando pos-
ternan como proef, practicando lo-
que nan a sinja di pintamento desde
September di anja pa Actualmen-
te nan ta haci nan trabao, siguiendo
riba posternan profesional cu Safety
Division a procura. Mas laat e luna
aki, pa e concurso di berdad, nan lo
pinta foi cabez.

ctual











Nan ta permiti di pinta kico cu
nan ke tocante di Seguridad, pero
nan lo worde curasha pa pinta nan





7
rlenroy Straughn ta e
instructornan di pintamento; Senor
Smit ta na cargo di %4 parti di e klas
y Senor Straughn ta na cargo di «€
resto. Esaki ta e promé cu pin-
tamento foi cabez tabata parti di e
programa; di awor p’adilanti lo e ta
riba programa regularmente pa estu-
diantenan den nan segundo anja,
gui pa pintamento técnico den
di tres anja.

Den un Esso News cu ta sigui, lo
tin portretnan di estudiantenan cu a
gana y di e posternan cu a worde
premia.

mes experienc
Jan Smit y













si-
nan



Lunch Shelter Opens

Starting last Monday, July 2, the
former Zone 1 office will be open 24
hours day as a lunch shelter for
he interior of the build-
s been completely repainted
and fitted out as an eating place for
employees.

The building
with picnic-type
a water cooler has
oilet facilities are
lition, men can smoke







has
ible
be

been equipped
and benches
n installed, and
ilable. In ad
in the shelter.







FOR SAI Webster wire recorder,
nicrophone, extra wire, automatic
shut-off, late model. F 200,



Sarratt, American Consulate,

maduates of the course in Interme-



liate Typewriting are shown at left
m June 22. From left to right: C.

vunsam, A. Kiebler, instructor, M. de





‘uba, E. Innocen J. Mae Intosh,
*. Wever, G. Bentham, I. Croes, E.
Thame, E. George, P. Croe: J.

Halley, S. Tromp, and F. Croes.



audience at the Sociedad Bolivariana on June 26. The widely-acclaimed
singer, who performed with top musical organizations throughout the
world, is seen above with his accompanist. (Photo by Sam Rajroop)





Todd Duncan, bariton famoso Americano, a parce na Sociedad Bolivariana
dia 26 di Juni, dilanti di un audiencia entusiasma. Aki nos ta mira e gran
cantor, kende a traha cu organizacionnan 1 al di mihor, hunto cu e

pianista cu a acompaneé.





Fishermen Go To School
School Goes to Fishermen




Ff

q P.

Unusual sight at Malmok last month were the crowds of people fishing for

Jacks which came in schools of thousands along a mile-long stretch of

beach. On some days there were at least 500 fishermen, some using twigs

for poles, and others with hand lines. What caused the fish to swarm, we
don’t know, but they make good eating.

Luna pasa tabs
dornan tambe.
bangonan di bini

in cantidad di masbango na Malmok, y cantidad di pisca-

n dia tabatin mas di 500 hende. Kico a causa tur e mas-

tanto asina ningun hende no sa, pero e piscadornan si
sa com bon nan a smaak despues.







Seen for Governor Struyeken

Lt. Governor of Aruba

at the reception giv
(see picture on page 1) are





F, A. Jas, and H. A. am Rajroop)
Na un recepeion dund pa Gouverneur Struycken na Sociedad Bolivariana
dia 23 di Juni, nos ta mira Sefior J. de Castro, G thebber Interino di



A. Jas, y Sefior H. A. Hessling.



| Aruba F




The Trans-Arabian Pipe Line Company, an American concern,
has completed the world’s largest oil pipe line system. The oil of
Saudi Arabia is now available on the shores of the Mediterran-
ean, more than a thousand miles from its source.

The Arabs gave the name TAPLINE to this greatest of all
long range engineering projects. Tapline in its completion has
done more than serve the cause of national security and inter-
national peace. It has given proof that a democracy produces
private initiative and enterprise which can handle any industrial
undertaking no matter how large it is.

One of the major problems facing the world today is the
future supply of oil.

The vast reserves of the Middle East offer the best answer
to this problem. The trouble before has been their inaccessibili-
ty. Now Tapline, cutting to the core of this crucial difficulty,
in effect has moved the oil fields of Saudi Arabia some 3500
miles closer to the markets of western Europe.

The initial capacity of Tapline is 300,000 barrels per day.

From that amount of oil enough gasoline can be produced to
operate 2,840,000 automobiles for an average day’s driving.
That would take care of all the cars in New York State. The
amount of oil delivered by Tapline in a day can produce an
amount of fuel oil sufficient to heat 259,000 average homes for
24 hours. That would be sufficient for the heating needs of
Philadelphia, a city of over two million people, for a day.

Tapline passes through four countries — Saudi Arabia, the
Hashimite Kingdom of Jordan, Syria and Lebanon. The effect
of Tapline’s industrial development in those countries already
is being seen in an improvement in the living standards of their
people.

More than half a million individuals have a financial interest
in Tapline through ownership of stock in the companies which
own and operate the line.

It is the story of Tapline, one of the great sagas in the history
of industrial achievement, which follows.

Arabian Peninsula.

The peace which followed World
War II brought great demands for
oil to be used in the rebuilding of
Europe. Until the completion of Tap-
line it was necessary to transport
Middle East oil in tankers down the
Persian Gulf, through the Indian
Ocean to the Red Sea and then
through the privately-owned Suez

Tapline is the abbreviated name
customarily used to identify the
world’s biggest oil pipe line system
which connects the oil fields of
eastern Saudi Arabia with a Mediter-
ranean shipping terminal at Sidon
in the Republic of Lebanon. Actually
the Tapline system is composed of
two sections under different owner-
ship and operation.

The Trans-Arabian Pipe Line Com-
pany’s part of the line begins at
Qaisumah in northeastern Saudi
Arabia and extends northwesterly
753.5 miles to Sidon. The 314.7 miles
ef pipe line which extends east and
south from Qaisumah to one of the
world’s largest producing oil fields
at Abqaigq, is the heart of the gather-
ing system of the Arabian American
Oil Company (ARAMCO). This
eastern section of the pipe line
system can be used either for collect-
ing oil and delivering it at the Per-
sian Gulf shipping port of Ras Ta-
nura, or for a westward journey,
through the royalty-gauging tanks at
Qaisumah, to the Mediterranean ship-
ping terminal at Sidon. The Aramco-
owned part of the line connects with
Aramco’s producing fields and can
be linked to future fields as they
are discovered and developed.

The history of Tapline must start
with the discovery of oil in Saudi
Arabia. That oil is close to the
Persian Gulf but by taker route it is
3500 miles from the Mediterranean.
Oilmen, looking at their maps, saw
quickly that tremendous savings in
time and money could be made by |
piping the oil across the sands, gra-
velly plains and mountains of the |

Lengths of 30-31 inch diameter

unloaded at Ras el Misha’ab, Saudi
operation, in which 30 inch pipe was shipped inside
31-inch diameter pipe, cut shipping costs.

ARUBA

ESSO

NEWS

Canal. That meant a 20-day, 7000-
mile round trip for the tankers and a
Canal toll of 18 cents a barrel, or
$40,000 for the oil in each big modern
tank ship.

The men who first saw the bene-
fits to be gained from a pipe line
across Arabia had to put that project
into the background to deal with
the war and the great expansion
projects which came with peace.

During the war there was the
great adventure of the Little Inch
and Big Inch pipe line from Texas
oil fields to the industrial northeast.
It has been said that without the
Big and Little Inch pipe lines D-
Day in Normandy would have had
to be postponed a full year.

In early 1944 a recommendation
was made by United States military
authorities for the construction of a
trans-Arabian pipe line as a project
of the wartime Petroleum Reserves
Corporation. This proposal did not
materialize but Aramco’s parent com-
panies made a careful engineering
study of the pipe line project. It was
decided that a pipe line half-again
as big in diameter as the Big Inch



might be laid across the barren
wastes of the northern Arabia
steppes and on across the coastal

mountains to the Mediterranean.

Aramco, until December of 1948,
was owned by the Standard Oil Com-
pany of California and The Texas
Company. The Trans-Arabian Pipe
Line Company was chartered as a
Delaware corporation in July, 1945,
with the same ownership as Aramco.
On Dec. 2, 1948, Standard Oil Com-
pany (New Jersey) and the Socony-
Vacuum Oil Company, Inc. were
added to the Aramco partnership.
At the same time they acquired par-
ticipating shares in Tapline.

Under this new set-up there began
the intensive planning without which
any great project must fail. First
there was the pipe line engineering
study.

Work progressed both in engineer-
ing of the line and the negotiation
of agreements with the countries



nested pipe being
Arabia. Nesting

| ing with companies which really we

}It has



July 6, 1951





This story of Tapline — the world’s biggest oil pipe line — is

adapted from material published by the

Trans-Arabian Pipe Line

Company. Thanks for permission to reprint the material is ex-

tended to Trans-Arabian;

to Photographers Corsini, of the

Arabian American Oil Company, and Richard Finnie, Interna-

tional Bechtel In

(Map courte

through which the line would pass.
In dealings with those countries Tap-



line representativ: followed the
pattern cut when Standard of Ca-
lifornia first dealt with Saudi A



concerning the original oil conce
there. Middle East countries had been
accustomed to the European mixture
of government and commerce in deal-



no more than extensions of the go-
vernment. Americans went into the
Middle East simply as businessmen.
In effect they said:

"Look. We are prepared to take
risks, to make sacrif and to o
come difficulties for exactly the same
incentive that brought greatness to
America. That incentive is the hope
ard corresponding to the risks,
sacrifices and difficulties. If at the
same time your country flourishes
because of our efforts, if millions
throughout the world benefit from
the increased production of petro-
leun., why then no one is happier
than we. But we are businessmen and
we are going into this for profit and
you wiil profit too”.

That was new in the Middle East.
been cessful in Saudi
Arabia and successful when
Tapline men carried it across the
desert and the mountains to the Me-
diterranean. Permission to construct
the line was granted by the countries
concerned and the work began.

In the summer of 1947 Tapline
started, from scratch, to lay the
biggest pipe line ever laid acro:
one of the most forbidding regions
of the world. Engineers had drawn a
line on a map. It followed a great
circle route from a place which might
been called Nowhere on _ the
an Gulf to the ancient Biblical
»f Sidon in Lebanon above the
Mediterranean.

From either end of this line
connaissance parties and then s
veyors moved on converging courses
into as barren a land as could be
found almost anywhere in the world.
There were only a few tiny settle-
ments along the desert route. A tree
was a rarity anywhere from the
Persian Gulf to the frontier of Le-
banon.

The route cro




















re-







's heavy sand dune



////4 yin
e777.

View of a freighter berthed at the artificial sea-isle

three miles off the mainland of Ras el Misha'ab, Saudi

Arabia. The Skyhook machine rode on cables slung
from a parade of 90-foot high A-frames.









for the pictures.

"The Lamp")





country only on its hundred
miles on the east end. of there
for absolutely
bar to the Jordan
frontier noticeable surface
featur are occasional dry wadis












where surface water flows or stands
for a few days, and sometimes only
for hours, after rain showe Aver-



age rainfall is only three inches per
ar. Normally no rain falls from
April to November inclusiy

The surface of this 750-mile
stretch is either level or gently slop-
ing and is about evenly divided be-
tween smooth gravel plains, disin-
tegrated limestone overlaying hard
limestone strata, and level country
with two to six inches of topsoil co-
vering limestone hard enough to re-
quire blasting for removal. The line
reaches its highest elevation, 75
feet above sea level, just before
leaves Saudi Arabia.

The 80-mile route across Jordan
was regarded as the toughest sec-
tion of the entire route because the

ed with

1 ie lava, disin-

tegrated in chunks ranging from a

few pounds to as much as_ several

tons. It is practically an insurmount-
able obstacle for pedestrians.



































Approaching the -Lebanon
frontier the line descends a steep
arpment into the south end of
at is called the Bekaa Valley,
which runs northward between two
mountain ranges, the Lebanon and
the Ante-Lebanon. He it crosses
several creeks or riv which are





the only
encounte

That was the sort of terrain over
which it had been decided to lay the
world’s greatest pipe line. Add to
those features the fact that summer
temperature ri to 130 degrees
Fahrenheit, with a humidity below
seven per cent. In such a climate a
man drinks two gallons of water a
day, metal surfaces become too hot
to touch with the bare hand.

Over part of the route across the
tilted desert there are high sand
dunes which constantly “travel” un-
der the buffeting of the fiery winds

ms of running water it




tr








from the north. In other regions
there are great desert swamps. And
the > long stretches of flinty



stone both above and below ground.

As a result of this changing ter-
rain the great pipe was finally laid,
three-fifths of its length in ditches
dug or blasted beneath the surface,
and the remaining two-fifths above
the ground.

With the









survey completed, Tap-













line was ready to go into business
on an unpr dented scale. First of
all, of course, was the pipe itself.
Tapline had contracted for 265,000
tons of steel plate to be supplied by
the Genev Utah, plant of the
United States Steel Corporation. This



plate was rolled by Consolidated
Jestern Steel Corporation at its
ywood plant in Los Angeles. Con-



the only concern in
red to manufacture
larger

solidated was
the country pre
a sufficient quantity of pipe
than 26 inches in diameter.

And in having the pipe manufac-
tured, Tapline gave early evidence
of the enterprise which was to
characterize the entire project.
mum economy together with









maxi-
mum efficiency was always the rule.



So that principle started operating

in the shipment of pipe from Cali-

fornia. F
Tapline ordered its pipe to be built,

[half of it 31 inches in diameter and




July 6, 1951

Powerful bulldoz
dune on the de 1
along the course of the pipeline.







rs cleared the right-of-way of the trans
t near Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia.





Many terrain
r the Mediterreanean coast,

of the 1068-mile system is buried.

the other half 30 inches. Then cach
30-inch length was nested in a 31-
inch length, and even in the 30-inch
lengths much material such as ce-
ment was stowed. So before the pro-
ject really began, the shipping cost
of the pipe was reduced by more
than half and the speed of delivery
was more than doubled.

It was decided to lay the pipe line
as the surveyors had worked, be-
ginning at each end simultancousl

Beirut, near Sidon on the Med
t n end, could handle
shipping, but there just w
suitable place on the Persian Gulf.
The oil port of Ras ura was too
far to the south. It was planned to
have the eastern terminal tie in with
the gathering tem for Aramco’s
producing fields and to have Tapline
proper start at Qaisumah. As there
wasn’t any suitable port, it was de-
cided to make one.















’t any














The location decided on was 1:
miles from the nearest habitation,
40 miles from the nearest drinkable



water. It had nothing whatever in its



favor except that there deep
water — two and a half miles off-
shore.

In a blinding shamal or sand

storm the first construction crew set
its tents and went to work. To con-
struct buildings to replace the tents
the men first had to make the brick,
with the aid of Arab workmen. But
in a matter of months there was a
sizable community and it even
acquired a name.

The conformation of the shoreline
at that point was vaguely reminis-
cent of the forked stick or mishaab
which Arab herders carry. And so the
Arabs called the new town Ras el
Mishaab, and so the maps now place
it.

Not even barges could come ashore
in the shallow water, but soon a sand
jetty and then a crushed stone pier
stretched out into the blue water.
And barges brought ashore general
cargo, tools, and the first pipe.

Then the Tapline p!anners, always
seeking by initiative and imaginat-
ion to meet the requirements of a
private enterprise job economy



ocean |

| without loss of efficiency — borrow-

ed a page from the book of the
Douglas fir loggers in the western
United tes.

At certain places in those
the inventive loggers had rigged
overhead cables on which to haul
timber from otherwise inacc
mountain slopes. §
never been used for
but Tapline they could be u on the Persian
Gulf on the other side of the world.

And so a_ skyhook
three miles out into the Pe
connecting the shore with a
made and built to serv







states











man-
as unload-
ing point for ocean ships. They built
21 A-frames to hold the cable, from





which spended three self-
propelled cars, each capable of hoist-
ing 10 tons of pipe or other cargo.

Operated in tandem these automo-

tive hoists of the high wire made
the three mile journey in _ five
minutes, and they brought ashore



1,100 tons a day, swinging it along
80 feet above the water.
Transportation of the pipe from
California to Ras el Mishaab having
thus been solved, the next thing was







to get it out onto location. Field
welding v a terrific problem, with
the necessity of moving the welding



equipment each time two pipe ends
were joined. So that problem, too,
was conquered.

As soon as the nested pipes were
brought ashore at Ras el Mishaab
a special machine, invented and ma-
nufactured for the purpo: as so
many machines were on this whole
project, denested the 30 from the 31-
inch pipe. Then three lengths were
automatically welded on the base,
making lengths of about 93 feet each
for moving onto the job.

Long before the first black goat-
hair Arab tent had been raised at Ras
el Mishaab, the engineers and exe-
cutives back home had been figuring
out problems to be met in advance.
Trucks and trailers too wide and too
heavy for any United States highway
had been built and tested on the de-
sert of New Mexico, under conditions
at least approaching those in Saudi










Arabian pipeline through a sand
problems
yoleanic boulders had
be blasted out of the way to make way for 30-31 inch diameter pipeline. About 60 per cent

ARUBA

ESSO NEWS

overcome
to

were

| Arabia.

And so when the first pipe arrived,
first by barge and then by skyhook
there were trailer trucks capable oi
hauling 93-foot lengths totaling ut
to 50 tons. Delivering the pipe to thc
pipe line right-of-way in this lengtl
cut the on-location welding by two
thirds.

The automatic welding at Ras el
Mishaab not only reduced the fielc
welding but effected fully a 50% sav
ing in overland transportation cost:
because of the greater and more
economical loads which could bk
carried with the 93-foot strings.

Originally Tapline’s engineers had
hoped that only a moderate amouni
of road building would be requirea
along the pipe line’s route. But even-
tually it became necessary to build
adjacent to the line a highway 93(
miles long from Ras el Mishaab tc
an intersection with an existing roaa
in Jordan.

This road across previously im-
passable desert has already had by-
products of prosperity. The road was
built as a necessity for Tapline’s pro-
ject, but for more than a year noy
the Middle East public has take
free shares in it. Now for the f
time in history it is possible to make
motor round trips between Mediter-
ranean ports, Persia, Kuwait, and the
Persian Gulf shore of Saudi Arabia
Over this road built for a pipe line
trucks now are speeding hundreds
of miles to carry fruits and vege-
tables and other goods from the Me-
diterranean area to the Persian Gulf
| markets.

All in all the Tapline project has
been the biggest transportation and
trucking job of any pipe line. Before
the last 93-foot sections of pipe were |
welded there had been three billion |
ton miles of ocean shipping and 150
million ton miles of field trucking,
the latter over those specially-con- |
structed roads now so blithely used
by the truck gardeners from the Me-
diterranean end.

















The physical obstacles to success
of this great adventure have been
mentioned. As it turned out there

were other obstacles which could not



Five powerful D-8 Caterpillar tractors tow a Giant
Ripper. This 18-ton monster was used to make a ditch
for burying the pipeline in areas where ditch-digging

machines could not operate because
ers. Such earth-handling machines - bulldozers, Cater-| there should be no such large ship-
pillars, ditchers - played a vital role in building Tapline. {ments of critical materials to far

of rocks and bould-

a



At the Mediterreanean shipping terminal at Sidon, Tapline’s tank farm is located right on the
coast. The view above is looking westward from a hillside above the Sidon terminal, with
the Mediterranean and the cluster of tanks on the horizon, With the completion of Tapline,
the vast oil reserves of Saudi Arabia were in effect moved some 3500 miles closer to the

markets of Western Europe.



A Kenworth truck being relieved of its 50-ton burden along the right-of-

way of the trans-Arabian pipeline. Special, low-pressure sand tires

per-

mitted these huge vehicles to haul their loads over some of the most diffi-
cult terrain in the world.

have been evaluated in advance and
which delayed the undertaking by a
full y

In the first place there was the
Palestine war. That conflict caused
considerable delay along the section
of the line skirting Palestine.

The other great delay came from
Washington. Any such project as this
must be approved by the Department
of Commerce. And when that ap-
proval w obtained for Tapline, it
was necessary to receive quarterly
licenses from the Commerce Depart-
ment’s Office of International Trade.









issued and Tapline was well in
The pipe was being laid
sed of a mile a day, an almost
tic achievement in view of the
physical condi And then sudden-
ly the OIT sz » more licenses,
at least for now”.










It is not difficult to imagine the
consternation, the confusion, in the
Tapline offices from Ras el Mish



to Beirut to San France





York. No reason was given then, or
since. Just no licenses. The ump-
tion was there had been complaints

that in a time of shortages at home



parts of the world. And these com-
plaints echoed loud in the ears of
political office holders, even though
it was demonstrated that less steel
vas required for Tapline than would
be needed for the 65 tankers it would
replace.

All this left Tapline with a fleet
of 15 Liberty ships contracted for
from the Isthmian Line to carry ma-
terial half way around the world.
It left Tapline with crews to lay pipe
which wasn’t going to arr any
more. It left Tapline in a me:









This was only one

- huge problem fac-
= ing Tapline in its
construction of the



world’s biggest oil
pipe lir How it
met these pro-

- language




rs, training
d_ workers,
r ntaining a wa-
ter supply, and
others - will be
told in the conclud-
ing section in the
next issue of the
Esso News.



An

Arah welder.
ARUBA ESSO NEWS





Unexpected - but certainly welcomed - guests at Irene Jacobs’ birthday

party in Philadelphia were Pedro Irausquin
Vocational School scholarship students. The
dent in Philadelphia; wife of the Netherland
Lewis, nurses’ aid and great



Berlin, Lions Club p
Consul there; and Mrs. Rosemary
Irene’s. The huge doll is ene



and Jan Wester, Lago’s two
seen with Irene; Joseph
Vice









frien

of Irene’s birthday presents.

Surprise Party for lrene

Biggest surprise for Irene Jacobs who was sent to Philadelphia for

her final operation was a birthday

unexpected guests attended.

The guests were Jan Wester and
from Allentown, Pennsylvania
through the efforts of the Phila-
delphia Lions Clubs.

The way Irene felt when she met
the two boys is best described in a









letter they wrote to Aruba before
their recent return here.
"She did not know that we would



be at her birthday party,” they said,
"and w she surprised when she
came in and saw us. We laughed and
somebody told her ‘they are from
Aruba’; she did not understand any-
thing of that, but then we started
to talk to her in Papiamento and told
her who we were and boy ’o boy, we







cannot explain how she felt, but
everyone can understand how she
felt at such a moment.”

It was the Lions Club in Phila-

delphia that handled all the
ments for Irene’s party. An e
300 people attended the affair, which
was held in a school auditorium to
handle the large crowd.

When the Lions heard that the
two Aruban boys, Pedro and Jan,
were only 50 miles away in Allen-
town, they made arrangements to
have them attend the party. The boys’ |
first job when they arrived in Phila-
delphia was to go directly to the
bakery where Irene’s birthday cake |
was being made. There they translat- |
ed "Happy Birthday, Irene” into |
"Felice Cumpli Ajo, Irena” so that!
the baker could print it on top of |
the three-deck birthday cake.

Irene, the 13-year old girl whom
Aruba’s Lions Club sent to Phila-
delphia for medical treatment, is
doing fine. The boys said that
"doctors said she will be fine in a
very short time, and that all in
Aruba may relax because she is at
her best”.

The boys added that everyone at
the party talked about one thing.

"If all Aruban girls are as lovely
as she is,” they wrote, ”a great num-
ber of them said that someday they
must visit the island.”

The boys added that ’Aruba owes
a great deal to all those in Phila-
delphia who gave their effort and
time to make Irene’s 13th birthday
such a happy one.” |

Two troops of Brownies and two
Girl Scout troops attended the birth-
day party. They had made cupcakes
iced with pink, yellow, and green
frosting. On each cupcake was the
word “Irene”. The girls started the
party off by singing ”Hello, Irene”
to the tune of the popular song,
"Goodnight, Irene.”

The Lions Club also arranged for
a long distance telephone call to
Irene’ mother in Aruba.

Among those present at the party
were the Netherlands consul and
viceconsul in Philadelphia and their
wives; Lions Club members, nurses
and doctors, scouts and their leaders,
and many more. Irene received
countless gifts, and everyone at the
party enjoyed themselves immensely.

Irene’s doctor at the Temple Uni-
versity Hospital, where she is being
treated, wrote that she "was radiant
at the party in her new dress, coat,
and jewelry. She smiled constantly.
Trene has made good friends with
one of the nurses’ aids, Mrs. Rosema-
ry Lewis. After the party they both
had dinner at my house, and it is

arrange-









imated | |,

party held on May 25 which two
Pedro Irausquin who were brought

NEV! ARRIVALS

Leon C.: A
June 13

BELL

aureen,

daughter Patricia



CROES, Venancio: A daughter, Adelfa An-












tonia, June

COLLINS, James T.: A son, Scott Hilding,
June 13.

ARCHER, Rafael: A daughter, Filomena
June 14

DIRKS, Enrique: A son, Vito Roy, June 15.

KELLY, Higinio A.: A son, Efrain,
June 15

SOLOC Juan S.: A daughter, Cres-

, June 15

fduardo: A son, Ruben Daniel,






June 16.
BOEKHOUDT, Pedrito: son, Alfonso R.,
16.
ROCHI, Innocencio: A daughter, Greta
len, June 16













A son, Johan Alwin,
CUMMINGS, Edmund W.: A son, Hugh
Covington, June 17.
OGILVIE, John G,: A son, Esmond John,
June 18.
OSWALD, Frederick: A daughter, Cheryl
Ann, June 18.
YR QUIN, Pedro: A daughter, Gloria
aria, June 18.
CROES, Estevan: A daughter, Luisa
Deanne, June 21.
MADURO, Camilio: A son, Luis Roberto, |



June 21

WERLEMAN, Daniel: A son, Alex David,
June 21.

DONGEN, Egbert J.: A daughter, Linda

Augusta Eugene, June 21.
KELLY, Vicente: A

June 21.
BLACKMAN, Alexande

lyn Patricia, June
NICHOLS, Theodore I

daughter, Luisa Maria, |

A daughter, Ros-





A daughter, Joanne











French, June

HOOGSLAG, Klaas W.: A son, Marcel
Andre, June 22.

GIEL, Bruno: daughter, Maria Elisa-
beth, June 22,

LACLE, Juan O.: A daughter, Filomena
Te a, June 22.

PROTERRA, Anth J.: A son, David
Anthony, June 23.

ARRINDELL, Frederic J.: A daughter, |
Linda Martina, June 23. |



Mc INTOSH, B n: A son, Kenneth Cuth-







bert, June .

NICOLAAS, Alfredo: A son, Juan Marti-
nes, June 24.

ALBUS, Leoncio: A daughter, Alida Maria
Goretti, June 25





SONES, Errol: A daughter, Juanita Hazel
Eudora, June 26.

CROES, Anselmo: A son, June 26.
CROES, Frederico A.: A daughter,

26.

June



very evident that Rosemary is good |
for Irene.”

Irene is not confined to bed, and
travels all over Philadelphia seeing
the sights of the city. She is accom-
panied on these trips by Mrs. Lewis,
the Netherlands Vice Consul and his
wife, or by Lions Club members and
their wives. Her address is Temple
University Hospital, Broad & Onta-
rio Streets, Childrens’ Ward, Park
Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

On the joyful occasion of her birth- |
day party, Irene no doubt thought
affectionately of her many friends
and well-wishers in Aruba. For it is



the many people here who made it gures at the left; develop them as they are done

possible for her to go to the States |
for the medical treatment she needed. |

Jan and Pedro
Back in Aruba

(Continued from page 1)

Both boys voiced their deep ap-
preciation to Lago for the opportuni-
ty they had had of studying in the
States

"It was a dream come true,” Jan
said.

"It was a dream I had never even
ad,” Pedro said, "and it
tainly wonderful.”

The two boys, the two outstanding





graduates of last year’s Vocational
ning School graduating class,



studied at the Allentown Vocational
Public High School in Pennsylvania
When they returned to Aruba, they
brought with them a vast supply of
memories of new experiences that
will stay with them forever. On their
way to Allentown la Septembe
they stopped off in New York City
to the sights the Then they
went on to Allentown, which was to
be their home for the next
months.








nine



rybody there was our friend,”
d. "People in Allentown





they



and every place we went, for that

matter — were awfully nice to us.

We sure hated to leave them.”
While in Pennsylvania, the



made three trips to Philadelph
one of which they helped Irene
cobs celebrate her birthday (see se-
parate story); to Bethlehem, where
they saw the huge Bethlehem Steel
plant; and to other nearby industrial
centers where they observed various
plant operations.

Among their new periences was
seeing snow for the first time — and
xperiencing temperatures as cold as
eight degrees below zero.

"It was a Saturday when it went
down to eight below,” they said,
we yed indoors all the time.”

Pedro is with the TSD Lab, and
Jan in Metal Trades. Both boys feel
that, as a result of their advanced
training, they are far better equipped
to perform their jobs. To them, their
time in the States was a wonderfully
worthwhile od. The success of
their stay there is also shown in a
letter from Clifford S. Bartholomew,
principal of Allentown High School,
to Frank M. Scott, head of Lago’s
Training Division.

"It was a pleasure to have Jan
and Pedro with us,” Mr. Bartholomew
wrote. "They certainly set a good
example in every class they were in,
and their citizenship in school was
the finest. Their attitudes were ex-
cellent. I would love to have a whole
school filled with kids like you
people have sent us from Aruba.”

Next month Lago will announce
the names of the two scholarship
winners from this year’s Vocational
School graduating class. The two
boys selected will have high ords
to aim at if they are to maintain the
standards set in Allentown this year
by Jan and Pedro, and last year by
young Britten and Dijkhoff.









































Kid's Korner

Drawing is Fun

| port to G. B. Mathews.

July 6, 1951




















Nobody

eems to know the cause of Aruba’s recent fog. But everyone at

1 t agrees that there is a great deal of fog and it’s very unusual. The

picture above was taken in the refinery shortly before noon one day; the

new refinery road turns off just to the left to run along the seashore, and
the nearby Plant Dispensary is invisible in the fog ahead. :



Fog Fools Few

Thousand Theories
Thrive

Organization Changes
in Mechanical Dept.

Organization changes in the Me-
chanical Department last month saw
L. G. Wannop appointed to the posit-
ion of zone foreman in Zone No. 3,



Vo two people



m to asree about









replacing R. H. Baggaley, who is re- the origin of Aruba’s persistent fog. |
tiring. Mr. Wannop will not take over Everybody, however, agrees on one |
his new duties until September 1, thing: they wish that the fog would

go ¢



when he has completed his assign- y-





















ment as technical Among the conflicting theories
supervisor of the heard about the origin of the fog}
Technical and Ad are these: from the ahara |
ministration Grouy Desert in is blowin ound
in M&C. Unti the world; spring’s atomic tests
then, V Turne in the Pacific created certain pecul-
will act as zon iar atmospheric conditions; a hydro-
supervisor in Zone gen bomb was exploded; a submarine
83, after which h« volcano exploded; the nd of Mar-
will take over th tinique erupted; there was an e

new hospital pro quake in the Cape Verde Islands

ject a » super Fogo volcano there blew up; it

visor i arge of a blanket of smoke from Cu
construction. hot air from a large continental land



body had moved out over cold water.









Mr. : ier
came to Aru in Ls G. Wannop Whatever the reason and you
December 1945 as could pretty well select whichever
cal engineer II in M&C £ on» appealed to you the most — the
ion. In September 1949 fact remained that an unusual fog
an tant zone supervis d come to Aruba, and when or













July 1950 acting technical super re it would go from here nobody
in M&C. >med to know.

In other organization shifts, L.
Ammann returned to the refinery . .
Field Coordination Craft early this @@t Olympiad Trophies
month. The Colon one organization






as such was ated and its func-
tions incorporated into the Colony
Maintenance Crz F. Legenhausen
signed these duties reporting
to S. Hartwick, who continues to re-

All prizewinners in the Queen’s
Birthday Olympiad, who have not yet
received their trophi can do so
now. The trophies can be obtained
in Room 14, BQ 3 (the Training
Building), from H. M. } y. |

Pa Muchanan

Pintamento ta Pret











Kids-drawing is fun. And it’s easy if you follow
the steps shown above. Just start out with the fi-

above. You'll end up with the scene at the right.



Muchanan-Pintamento ta pret. Y fa i bo sigui
e prenchinan cu bo ta mira aki 'riba. Cuminsa cu
figuurnan na man robez, y sigui manera a worde
haci aki ‘riba. Ora bo caba, bo lo tin un prenchi ma- |
nera esun na banda drechi. |









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