Citation
Tropic news. Volume 11. Issue 10.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Volume 11. Issue 10.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
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serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text



T IROPIC NEWS

'Wt 'FX-ARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
f n.. T.. .- RESOURCES
July/August 1999 Volume 11 Number 10/11
LI


INDIGENOUS AND ENDANGERED
SPECIES PERMITS

Persons wanting to collect, import or export
various types of animals and plants must obtain
permits for these activities. Permits are available
through DPNR-Division of Fish and Wildlife
offices in St. Thomas and St. Croix. Permits are
necessary to protect the health of the island's
human population as well as the environment.
Permits help prevent the introduction of species
which may have a catastrophic effect on the envi-
ronment. Think of the problems caused by the
accidental introduction of the pink mealy bug to
ornamental and commercial plants The require-
ment of a permit for various activities is not to
harass people, but to protect all of us who call
these islands home.

Under the V.I. Indigenous and Endangered
Species Act of 1990 numerous activities require a
permit. To apply for a permit, a Permit Applica-
tion Form must be submitted. This form provides
all the necessary information for the DPNR to
evaluate the need and potential effects of the
proposed activity and the type of permit to be
issued. These forms are available at Division of
Fish and Wildlife and Bureau of Enforcement
offices on St. Croix and St. Thomas. The following
permits can be obtained;

Collector's Permit This is issued for any type of
collecting activity. Collecting of fish and marine
invertebrates for any commercial purpose requires
payment of a fee (10% of the value of the organ-
isms sold to an average dealer in Miami, Florida).
The fee schedule is available at the above men-
tioned offices. Exceptions to this are where the
collector is providing bonafide educational or
research opportunities to the public.



June/July 1999 Redhook, St. Thomas
Temperature
Maximum Minimum Rainfall
88.1/ 88.30F 72.0/ 72.10F 3.66/2.66
inches


Retention/Transit Export Permit This
permit is issued in conjunction with a collector's
permit if the collected flora or fauna are to be held
in captivity or shipped off-island.

Import Permit This permit is necessary if
a person wants to bring to the island, a spices
which is exotic or not indigenous to the environ-
ment. i.e.. a pet snake, iguana.

Mangrove Cutting Permit This permit
is issued for the cutting or pruning of any of the
three species of mangroves occurring in the US
Virgin Islands. These include; Red (Rhizophora
mangle), Black (Avicennia germinans) and White
(Laguncularia racemosa) Mangroves.
All permit applications will be reviewed by
the Division of Fish and Wildlife and will be
either issued or denied by the Commissioner
within 30 days of receipt by DPNR. For more
information on permits call the Division of Fish
and Wildlife St. Thomas office of at 340 775 6762
or St. Croix at 340 772 1955.


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Division of Fish and Wildlife soon may
have the following positions available.

Wildlife Biologist II or III (St. Croix)

Chief of Environmental Education & Endan-
gered Species Coordinator (St. Croix)

Fish & Wildlife Biologist I or II (St. Croix)

Chief of Fisheries (St. Thomas)

Interested persons should contact Barbara
Kojis, Director of Fish and Wildlife for additional
information. Phone 340 775 6762-


Quote

"If Man were really Superior to Animals, he
would take better care of the Earth."
Winnie The Pooh.








Leatherback News for 1999


The 1999 Leatherback season is proving to be
another successful year. With 100 turtles laying
6.5 nests per season, this year's count is well over
650 nests. We estimate that 48 hatchlings per nest
that is about 31,200 hatchlings for the season!
The Leatherback Recovery Project was


started in 1981 by the Division of Fish & Wildlife,
Endangered Species Coordinator, Rafe H. Boulon,
Jr. In 1984 Sandy Point became part of the U.S.
Fish & Wildlife Service's Caribbean Island Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge System. There are only 13
significant leatherback nesting sites worldwide.
The Sandy Point National Wildlife Refuge, St.
Croix, supports the largest and best studied popu-
lation of nesting leatherback sea turtles in the
United States and Northern Caribbean.
Nesting activity begins in March and contin-
ues through July each year. Volunteers from
Earthwatch help with nightly patrols to prevent
poaching and assist in data collection. Leatherback
turtles are on the Federal Endangered Species list.
For more information on The Leatherback
Recovery Project contact the Division at 340 775
6762.


The Code of Angling Ethics
*Promotes, through education and practice,
ethical behavior in the use of aquatic re-
sources.
* Values and respects the aquatic environment
and all living things in it.
SAvoids spilling and never dumps any pollut-
ants, such as gasoline and oil, into the aquatic
environment.
*Disposes of all trash, including worn lines,
leaders, and hooks, in appropriate containers,
and helps to keep fishing sites litter-free.
* Takes all precautionary measures necessary
to prevent the spread of exotic plants and
animals, including live baitfish, into non-
native habitats.
* Learns and obeys angling and boating regu-
lations, and treats other anglers, boaters, and
property owners with courtesy and respect.
* Respects property rights, and never tres-
passes on privates lands or waters.
*Keeps no more fish than needed for consump-
tion, and never wastefully discards fish that
are retained.
* Practices conservation by carefully handling
and releasing all live fish that are unwanted or
prohibited by regulation, as well as other ani-
mals that may become hooked or entangled
accidentally.


&


This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.
Donna M. Griffin Editor


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES

Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(340)775-6762 (ST.T.), (340)772-1955 (ST.X.)


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested
Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper




Full Text

PAGE 1

-. yyq ~ DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE ~~~~ARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL ~ ~ L~ -. "T" ~ RESOURCES -~July! Aul!Ust 1999 Volume 11 Number 10/11 INDIGENOUS AND ENDANGERED SPECIES PERMITS Retention/Transit Export Permit This permit is issued in conjunction with a collector's permit if the collected flora or fauna are to be held in captivity or shipped off-island. Persons wanting to collect, import or export various types of animals and plants must obtain permits for these activities. Permits are available through DPNR-Division of Fish and Wildlife offices in St. Thomas and St. Croix. Permits are necessary to protect the health of the island's human population as well as the environment. Permits help prevent the introduction of species which may have a catastrophic effect on the environment. Think of the problems caused by the accidental introduction of the pink mealy bug to ornamental and commercial plants The requirement of a permit for various activities is not to harass people, but to protect all of us who call these islands home. Import Permit This permit is necessary if a person wants to bring to the island, a spices which is exotic or not indigenous to the environment. i.e.. a pet snake, iguana. Mangrove Cutting Permit This permit is issued for the cutting or pruning of any of the three species of mangroves occurring in the US Virgin Islands. These include; Red (Rhizophora mangle), Black (Avicennia germinans) and White (Laguncularia racemosa) Mangroves. All permit applications will be reviewed by the Division of Fish and Wildlife and will be either issued or denied by the Commissioner within 30 days of receipt by DPNR. For more information on permits call the Division of Fish and Wildlife St. Thomas office of at 340 7756762 or St. Croix at 340 772 1955. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES The Division of Fish and Wildlife soon may have the following positions available. Under the V.I. Indigenous and Endangered Species Act of 1990 numerous activities require a permit. To app~y for a permit, a Permit Application Form must be submitted. This form provides all the necessary information for the DPNR to evaluate the need and potential effects of the proposed activity and the type of permit to be issued. These forms are available at Division of Fish and Wildlife and Bureau of Enforcement offices on St. Croix and St. Thomas. The following permits can be obtained; Wildlife Biologist II or III (St. Croix) Chief of Environmental Education & Endangered Species Coordinator (St. Croix) Collector's Permit This is issued for any type of collecting activity. Collecting of fish and marine invertebrates for any commercial purpose requires payment of a fee (10% of the value of the organisms sold to an average dealer in Miami, Florida). The fee schedule is available at the above mentioned offices. Exceptions to this are where the collector is providing bonafide educational or research opportunities to the public. Fish & Wildlife Biologist I or II (St. Croix) Chief of Fisheries (St. Thomas) Interested persons should contact Barbara Kojis, Director of Fish and Wildlife for additional information. Phone 340 771) fi7fi2 Quote June/July 1999 Redhook, St. Thomas Tem,perature Maximum Minimum Rainfall 88.1/88.3°F 72.0/72.1°F 3.66/2.66 inches "If Man were really Superior to Animals, he would take better care of the Earth." Winnie The Pooh.

PAGE 2

Leatherback News for 1999 The 1999 Leath~rback season is proving to be another successful year. With 100 turtles laying 6.5 nests per season, this year's count is well over' 650 nests. We estimate that 48 hatchlings per nest that is about 31,200 hatchlings for the season! The Leatherback Recovery Project was The Code of Angling Ethics . Promotes, through education and practice, ethical behavior in the use of aquatic resources. . Values and respects the aquatic environment and all living things in it. .Avoids spilling and never dumps any pollutants, such as gasoline and oil, into the aquatic environment. . Disposes of all trash, including worn lines, leaders, and hooks, in appropriate containers, and helps to keep fishing sites litter-free. . Takes all precautionary measures necessary to prevent the spread of exotic plants and animals, including live baitfish, into nonnative habitats. . Learns and obeys angling and boating regulations, and treats other anglers, boaters, and property owners with courtesy and respect. . Respects property rights, and never trespasses on privates lands or waters. . Keeps no more fish than needed for consumption, and never wastefully discards fish that are retained. . Practices conservation by carefully handling and releasing all live fish that are unwanted or prohibited by regulation, as well as other animals that may become hooked or entangled accidentally. started in 1981 by the Division of Fish & Wildlife, Endangered Species Coordinator, Rafe H. Boulon, Jr. In 1984 Sandy Point became part of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Caribbean IslandNational Wildlife Refuge System. There are only 13 significant leatherback nesting sites worldwide. The Sandy Point National Wildlife Refuge, St. Croix, supports the largest and best studied population of nesting leatherback sea turtles in the United States and Northern Caribbean. Nesting activity begins in March and continues through July each year. Volunteers from Earthwatch help with nightly patrols to prevent poaching and assist in data collection. Leatherback turtles are on the Federal Endangered Species list. For more information on The Leatherback Recovery Project contact the Division at 340 775 6762. This newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the Government of the VI. Donna M. Griffin Editor ~S1l&~ (e1~\ ~RA.~'O~ BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Diyision of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas,USVI 00802-1104 (340)775-6762 (ST.T.), (340)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address Correction Requested Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper