Citation
Tropic news. Volume 10. Issue 9.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Volume 10. Issue 9.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








June 1998


A Divers Guide to
Things That Sting

This is the final segment of this article, which
has been in previous issues.
Other Potentially Harmful Animals
Stingrays and Scorpionfishes Stingrays and
Scorpionfishes are non-
aggressive marine
animals which rely
upon camouflage to
blend them into the
surrounding area.
Because they are not
always easily seen by swimmers and divers, inju-
ries sometimes occur. Both stingrays and
scorpionfishes are capable of producing a deep
puncture wound. Scorpionfishes can inject a strong
venom into the victim. Do not attempt to remove
any spines which may be imbedded. Seek medical
attention immediately, as these types of wounds
may produce serious reactions.
Now that you know about all the dangerous
things that live beneath the sea, it almost makes
you want to up and move to Oklahoma, right?
Well, don't start packing yet. You can still enjoy
the beauty of the undersea world without risking
your health. A little common sense will go a long
way in helping you enjoy safe diving, snorkeling,
and swimming activities:
1.) Avoid touching coral or other animals, espe-
cially if you are unfamiliar with the animal or are
prone to allergic reactions.
2.) Learn more about reef creatures and how to
recognize those that are potentially harmful.
3.) Prepare a first aid kit that would be useful
in treating venomous marine wounds.
4.) Always use the "buddy system", so you'll
have help available if you need it in the event of an
emergency.
Article written by Cathy C. Lawlor former DFW
employee.


PIC NEWS
..... ,,,,, ..

AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Volume 10 Number 9


_ L II


May 1998 Redhook. St. Thomas


Temperature
Maximum Minimum
89.0F 72.30F


Rainfall
4.97 inches


1998 National Clean
Boating Campaign

The Marine Environmental Education Foun-
dation (MEEF) has
Launched the first
annual National Clean
Boating Campaign
(NCBC), a year round
program to promote
good stewardship of
our water resources by
boating families,
NATIONAL marina operators, boat
CLEAN BOATING dealers and manufac-
CAMPAIGN turerq.

Campaign Goals

The goal of the National Campaign for Clean
Boating is to improve water quality from boating
and boating industry activities through a na-
tional outreach educational program.

Campaign Objectives

The National Clean Boating Campaign objec-
tives for the public/private partnership for clean
boating include:
1. To build a network of partnering national,
state, and local organizations, businesses, agen-
cies and individuals to promote clean water
practices by the boating industry and boating
public
2. To establish an annual National Clean Boat
Week celebration of the importance of recre-
ational boating and clean water each summer
3. To produce a national education campaign
of multiple national and local programs to pro-
mote clean water practices by recreational boat-
ing industry and boating public
4. To develop corporate and public partner-
ships to support and promote clean boating and
clean water
5. To increase industry and boating public
awareness of the importance of water quality
protection.







1998 National Clean Boating Campaign
Boat Sewage Control & Pumpout Use

Remember...
Do your part to keep sewage out of
America's boating waters.
Clean water is just more fun.

What Boaters Can Do
1. Always use onshore restrooms when
docked.
2. Encourage everyone to use the shoreside
facilities before casting off.
3. When going boating for three or more
hours, plan for onshore restroom stops while
buying fuel or eating at waterfront restau-
rants.
4. Do not dump any untreated sewage into
any lake, river, or coastal water inside the
three mile limit; it's illegal.
5. Keep fats, solvents, oils, emulsifiers,
paints, poisons, phosphates, disposable dia-
pers, sanitary napkins out of toilets.
6. Take dogs to marina's posted pet walk
area (or use a pooper scooper).
7. Help other boaters understand ways to
control boat sewage, pass this information on.


COASTWEEKS 1998
Celebrate, Educate, Participate
September 19 October 11, 1998


Endangered Species Coloring
Book now available

A long awaited addition to the Environmental"
Education Program is our Endangered Species
Coloring Book of the Virgin Islands. The book
features an official list of V.I. Threatened and
Endangered Species of local plants and animals, as
well as drawings of many species. Illustrations
were done by Teresa "Red" Fisher.
The coloring book was produced to provide
information on some of the threatened and endan-
gered plants and animals found in the U.S. Virgin
Islands. Each plant or animal in the book is in
danger of extinction. The threats are all related to
human activities which alter the natural environ-
ment. Threats include overharvest, habitat destruc-
tion and introduction of exotic species which are
predators or compete with local species for food and
habitat. By learning about our endangered species
you will be better able to make informed decisions
and take proper actions to protect and conserve
our valuable natural resources.
As with most of our environmental education
materials, there is a postage fee of $ 2.00 (U.S.
Stamps only) per coloring book. Give us a call or
'mail in your request with appropriate name/ad-
dress information.


Is_ & This newsletter was funded by the US
& Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
,; Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
S Fishery Management Council and the
"ORC~xO Government of the VI.
Donna M. Griffin Editor
Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES

Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


~?~arc~L-~s~r;lanwl~asr~~a~.~Taarrmssn


-----~-- --- '




Full Text

PAGE 1

nIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE Volume 10 Number 9 June 1998 1998 National Clean BoatingCampaign ~-A Divers Guide to Things That Sting 1\ , , a~;=:::7 NATIONAL ClEAN BOATINCJ CAMPA InN The Marine Environmental Education Foundation (MEEF) has launched the fust annual National Clean Boating Campaign (NCBC), a year round ~ program to promote good stewardship of our water resources by boating families, marina operators, boat dealers and manufac--~turerR. Campaign Goals The goal of the National Campaign for Clean Boating is to improve water quality from boating and boating industry activities through a national outreach educational program. Campaign Objectives This is the final segment of this article, which has been in previous issues. Other Potentially Harinful Animals Stingrays and Scorpionfishes Stingrays and Scorpionfishes are non/"\ aggressive marine ,.../ .:)." animals which rely ~ .:\ upon camou~age to. \':;: :... ~ ' , blend the:n mto the \ .~~~~ surrounding area. \ ;. y Because they are not ~ always easily seen by swimmers and divers, injuries sometimes occur. Both stingrays and scorpionfishes are capable of producing a deep puncture wound. Scorpionfishes can inject a strong venom into the victim. Do not attempt to remove any spines which may be imbedded. Seek medical attention immediately, as these types of wounds may produce serious reactions. Now that you know about all the dangerous things that live beneath the sea, it almost makes you want to up and move to Oklahoma, right? Well, don't start packing yet. You can sti,ll enjoy the beauty of the undersea world without risking your' health. A little common sense will go a long way iJ;l helping you enjoy safe diving, snorkeling, . and swimming activities: 1.) Avoid touching coral or other animals, especially if you are unlamiiiar with the animal or are prone to allergic reactions. 2.) Learn more about reef creatures and how to recognize those that are potentially harmful. 3.) Prepare a first aid kit that would be useful in treating venomous marine wounds. 4.) Always use the "buddy system", so you'll have help available if you need it in the event of an emergency. Article written by Cathy C. Lawlor former DFW employee. The National Clean Boating Campaign objectives for the public/private partnership for clean boating include: . 1. To build a network of partnering national, state, and local organizations, businesses, agencies and individuals to promote clean water practices by the boating industry and boating public 2. To establish an annual National Clean Boat Week celebration of the importance ofrecreational boating and clean water each summer 3. To produce a national education campaign of multiple national and local programs to promote clean water practices by recreational boating industry and boating public 4. To develop corporate and public partnerships to support and promote cleaI:l boating and clean water 5. To increase industry and boating public awareness of the importance of water quality protection. May 1998 Redhook. St. Thomas Temperature Maximum Minimum 89.0°F 72.3°F Rainfall 4.~7 ;.ncheH

PAGE 2

1998 National Clean Boating Campaign Boat Sewage Control & Pumpout Use Endangered Species Coloring Book now available Rememb er ... . Do your part to keep sewage out of America's.boating waters.. :. Clean water is just more fun. .. Along awaited addition to the Environmental" Education ,Program is our Endangered Species Coloring Book,of the Virgin Islands. The book features an official list of V.I. Threatened and Endangered Species of local plants and animals, as well as drawings of many species. Illustrations were done by Teresa "Red" Fisher. The coloring book was produced to provide information on some of the threatened and endanI gered plants and animals found in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each plant or animal in the book is in danger of extinction. The thre'ats are all related to human activities which alter the natural environment, Threats include overharvest, habitat destruction and introduction of exotic species which are predators or compete with local species for food and habitat. By learning about our endangered species you will be better able to make informed decisions and take proper actions to protect and cons~rve our valuable natural resources. As with most of our environmental education materials, there is a'postage fee' of $ 2.00 (U.S. Stamps only) per coloring book. Give us a call or 'mail in ybur request with appropriate name/address information. What Boaters Can Do 1. Always use onshore restrooms when docked. 2. Encourage everyone to use the shoreside facilities before casting off. 3. When going boating for three or more hours, plan for onshore restroom stops while buying f:uel or e,ating at waterfront restau~rants. 4. Do not dump any untreated sewage into any lake, river, or coastal water inside the three mile limit; it's illegal. 5. Keep fats, solvents, oils, emulsifiers, paints, poisons, phosphates, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins out of toilets. 6. Take dogs to marina's posted pet walk area (or use a pooper scooper). 7. Help other boaters understand ways to control boat sewage, pass this information on. COASTWEEKS 1998 Celebrate, Educate, Participate September 19 October II, 1998 ~,91& ~ This newsletter was fu,nded by the US k ~ ~~ Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and 5I~i~~~ Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean ~ o~ Fishery Management Council and the -.fQR""t~ Government of the VI. Donna M. Griffin Editor Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNM:gNT OF THE V1RGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address Correction Requested Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper