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Tropic news. Volume 10. Issue 4.

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Title:
Tropic news. Volume 10. Issue 4.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
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English

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Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
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serial ( sobekcm )
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North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text




_-t TR OPIC NEWS

-P oPARTM'NT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
RESOURCES


January 1998


Sportfishing Worth $108
Billion to U.S. Economy
U.S. anglers are casting their economic influ-
ence farther than ever before. Sportfishing was
worth a whopping $108 billion to the U.S. economy
in 1996, according to a study conducted by the
American Sportfishing Association. Corrected for
inflation, that's a 36 percent increase since the last
such study conducted in 1991.
Experts report that recreational anglers in 1996
spent $38 billion directly on trips and equipment.
That includes everything from bait and boats to
motels and restaurants. That's $38 billion spent in
retail outlets which then rippled through the
nation's economy as a whole.
Here's how it works.
Suppose you spend $200 on a new reel at a local
specialty fishing store. The owner of the specialty
store may use the profits from your $200 reel to
buy advertising, pay rent, insurance and other
bills. The money you spend also impacts the dis-
tributor who markets the reel to the specialty
store, the trucker who delivers the shipment and
the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer has to
buy raw materials, hire workers, and pay property
taxes. This is what is meant by the ripple effect.
The numbers of anglers have remained stable,
with 35.6 million adults age 16 or older in 1991
and 35.2 million in 1996. The numbers have not
increased but anglers are fishing more days and
spending more moiey on each trip.
Sportfishing is not only important to the na-
tional economy, but to state economies as well.
According to the study, 25 states topped the one
billion dollar mark in benefits from the effects of
sportfishing.
The increase in angler expenditure can be ex-
plained by a couple of different factors. A large part
of the increase in sportfishing expenditures is due
to a booming economy in 1996, compared to 1991,
when the nation as a whole was in a recession.
Individual anglers are also willing to spend more
money on things like fishing tackle and equipment,
boats and recreational vehicles. All of this points
out the value of properly managing our sport fish
resources such that they will continue to be viable
in the future.
Excerpted from: American Sportfishing, Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan.
1998.


E _1 I _I


Volume 10 Number 4


Summer Migrant Seabirds
of the V. I. Poster

A new poster is
now available at the
Division of Fish and'
Wildlife. Get a
closer look at our
summer avian
visitors and learn to
distinguish the
various species. This
group features the
following species;
Least Terns, Laugh-
ing Gulls, Sandwich
Terns, Royal Terns,
Roseate Terns, Bridled Terns, Sooty Terns and
Brown Noddies. Migratory birds inhabit our off-
shore cays and many are protected under V.I. law.
From mid May throughout the summer, seabirds
nest and raise their young on our off shore cays.
In the Virgin Islands, increasing population and
tourism have rapidly accelerated certain activities
by man in marine areas. As we penetrate more
remote coasts and offshore islands, colonial nesting
seabirds lose both the space and solitude needed to
nest. When somebody approaches a seabird colony,
the birds' natural reaction is to flee, leaving eggs.
and chicks exposed to intense sun and vulnerable
to predation. Some birds, if disturbed early in the
breeding season, will abandon the colony. The eggs
of some seabirds are patterned to camouflage
them, and as such, they are easily stepped on by
someone walking through the colony.
The art work for this poster was done by local
artist, Paul Borghi. Paul has also worked on our
game fish and reef fish series of posters. The post-
ers are available free of charge at our St. Thomas
or St. Croix offices. There is a charge if postage fees
are involved. Future posters will feature beaches
and mammals of the Virgin Islands.


Quote
"On the front lines of conservation there are no
time-outs, no shortcuts and few final victories."
Anonymous






Scientist sound alarm about ocean perils
1998: International Year of the Ocean

More than 1,600 scientists from around the
world sounded a warning January 6, 1998 that
overfishing, pollution and coastal development are
wreaking unprecedented damage on the oceans.
The "call for action" is endorsed by marine scien-
tists and conservation biologists from 65 nations.
The scientists want lawmakers to establish new
coastal marine reserves and strengthen the Endan-
gered Species Act and Clean Water Act. They also
want President Clinton to hold a White House
conference this year on the rapid, unprecedented
declines in fishing populations. Curt Weldon, R-
Pennsylvania, said, "It is appalling to me that we
spend more money studying the oceans of Mars
than we do on the oceans of the Earth".
The scientists said overfishing has devastated
commercial fish populations and caused the col-
lapse of fisheries around the world. Destructive
fishing methods, such as bottom trawling, have
crushed and buried bottom-dwelling species by
scouring vast areas of seabeds.
Of the world's 30 million species 99 percent live
in the oceans and less than 1 percent on land or in
freshwater. Coastal development has consumed
precious salt marshes, industrial pollution has left
"dead zones" in marine habitats, agricultural
runoff is causing new diseases in fish and global
warming has contributed to steep declines of
salmon. There are two problems which confront us:
too much is taken from the sea and too much is put
into the sea.
Scientific knowledge and plain common sense
tell us that we can't continue destroying the habi-
tats that support marine resources and expect
these species to persist.


New Brochures Available

The Bureau of Environmental Education an-
nounces the availability of two new brochures.
Shallow Water Reef Fish of the Virgin Islands
teaches you about fishing for Reef fish. Whether
you fish from the shoreline, a dock or a boat, this
brochure is filled with information. If you call it a
goo too or a blue fish this brochure will help clear
up some of the confusion in identifying fish.
The second brochure features Winter Resident
Seabirds of the Virgin Islands. These seabirds
spend a part of the winter on our offshore cays. The
brochure gives the avid bird watcher information
on type of habitat, breeding season, and nesting
sites. Give us a call at 775-6762 if you are inter-
ested in obtaining a copy.



A special thank you to Ivan Nagelkerken and
the Carmabi Foundation Ecological Institute of
Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. Ivan has spear-
headed a move to place sets of our environmental
posters (fish, habitats and seabirds) in schools
throughout Curacao, Bonaire, Saba, Statia and
Sint Maarten. This regional cooperation is benefi-
cial for our shared natural resources as more chil
dren grow up being exposed to it and learning
about it. We would be pleased to be involved in
similar cooperative efforts with other Caribbean
nations.

.4& 4, This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
SWildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
1r. Fishery Management Council and the
1OJ ~ Government of the VI.
Donna M. Griffin Editor
Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
******
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.). (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)






Address Correction Requested


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I
PERMIT NO. 35


Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


I I I I II I




Full Text

PAGE 1

~ ~ .J' c. OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE January 1998 Volume 10 Number 4 Summer Migrant Seabirds of the V. I. Poster I I A new poster is now available at the Division of Fish and' Wildlife. Get a closer look at our summer aVIan visitors and learn to distinguish the various species. This' group features the following species; I ~east Terns, Lau?hl I mg Gulls, SandWIch Terns, Royal Terns, Rose~te Terns, Bridled Terns, Sooty Terns and Brown Noddies. Migratory birds inhabit our offshore cays and many are protected under V.l. law. From mid May throughout the summer, seabirds nest and raise their young on our off shore cays. In the Virgin Islands, increasing population and tourism have rapidly accelerated certain a<;tivities by man in marine areas. As we penetrate more remote coasts and offsh<;>re islands, colonial nesting seabirds lose both the space and. solitude needed to nest. When somebody approaches a seabird colony, the birds' natural' reaction is to flee, leaving eggs. and chicks exposed to intense sun and vulnerable to predation. Some birds, if disturbed early in the breeding season, will abandon the colony. The eggs of some seabirds are patterned to camouflage them, and as such, they are easily stepped on by someone walking through the colony. The art work for this poster was done by local artist, Paul Borghi. Paul has also worked on our game fish and reef fish series of posters. The posters are available free of charge at our St. Thomas or St. Croix offices. There is a charge if postage fees are involved. Future posters will feature beaches and mammals of the Virgin Islands. Quote "On the front lines of conservation there are no time-outs, no shortcuts and few final victories." Anonymous Sportfishing Worth $108 Billion to U.S. Economy u.s. anglers are casting their economic influence farther than ever before. Sportfishing was worth a whopping $108 billion to the U.S. economy in 1996, according to a study conducted by the American Sportfishing Association. Corrected for inflation, that's a 36 percent increase since the last such study conducted in 1991. Experts report that recreational anglers in 1996 spent $38 billion directly on trips and equipment. That includes everything from bait and boats to motels and restaurants. That's $38 billion spent in retail outlets which then rippled through the nation's economy as a whole. Here's how it works. Suppose you spend $200 on a new reel at a local specialty fishing store. The owner of the specialty store may use the profits from your $200 reel to buy advertising, pay rent, insurance and other bills. The money you spend also impacts the distributor who markets the reel to the specialty store, the trucker who delivers the shipment and the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer has to buy raw materials, hire' workers, and pay property taxes. This is what is meant by the ripple effect. The numbers of anglers have remained stable, with 35.6 million adults age 16 or older in 1991 and 35.2 million in 1996. The numbers have not increased but anglers are fishing more days and spending more moheyon each trip. Sportfishing is not only important to the national economy, but to state economies as well. According to the study, 25 states topped the one billion dollar mark in benefits from the effects of sportfishing. The increase in angler expenditure can be explained by a couple otdifferent factors. A large part of the increase in sportfishing expenditures is due to a booming economy in 1996, compared to 1991, when the nation as a whole was in a recession. Individual anglers are also willing to spend more money on things like fishing tackle and equipment, boats and recreational vehicles. All of this points out the value of properly managing our sport fish resources such that they will continue to be viable in the future. Excerpted from: American Sportfishing, Vol. I, No. I, Jan. 1998.

PAGE 2

New Brochures Available -Scientist sound alarm about ocean perils 1998: International Year of the Ocean The Bureau of Environmental Ed~cation announces the availability of two new brochures. Shallow Water Reef Fish of the Virgin Islands teaches you about fishing for Reef fish. Whether you fish from the shoreline, a dock or a boat, this brochure is filled with information. If you call ita goo too or a blue fish. this brochure will help clear up some of the confu~ion in identifying fish. The second brochure features Winter Resident Seabirds of the Virgin Islands. These seabirds spend a part of the winter on our offshore cays. The brochure gives the qvid bird watcher information on type of habitat, breeding season, and nesting sites. Give us a call at 775-6762 if you are interested in obtaining a copy. A special thank you to I van N agelkerken and the Carmabi Foundation Ecological Institute of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. Ivan has spearheaded a move to place sets of our environmental posters (fish, habitats and seabirds) in schools throughout Curacao, Bonaire, Saba, Statiaand SintMaarten. This regional cooperation is benefi. cial for our shared natural resources as more chil. dren grow up being exposed to it and learning about it. We would be pleased to be involved in similar cooperative efforts with other Caribbean nations. More than 1,600 scientists from around the world sounded a warning January 6, 1998 that overfishing, pollution and coastal development are wreaking unprecedented damage on the oceans. The "call for action" is endorsed by marine scientists and conservation biologists from 65 nations. The scientists want lawmakers to establish new co~stal marine reserves and strengthen the Endangered Species Act and CleanW ater Act. "They also want President Clinton to hold a White House conference this year on the rapid, unprecedented declines in fishing populations. Curt Weldon, RPennsylvania, said, "It is appalling to me that we spend more money studying the oceans of Mars thim vIe do on the oceans of the Earth". The scientists said overfishing has devastated commercial fish populations and caused the collapse of fisheries around the world. Destructive fishing methods, such as bottom trawling, have crushed and buried bottom-dwelling species by scouring vast areas of seabeds. Of the world's 30 million species 99 percent live in the oceans and less than 1 percent on land or in freshwater. Coastal development has cQnsumed precious salt marshes, industrial pollution has left "dead zones" in marine habitats, agricultural runoff is causing new diseases in fish and global warming has contributed to steep declines of salmon. There are two problems which confront us: too much is taken from the sea and too much is put into the sea. Scientific knowledge and plain common sense tell us that we can't continue destroying the habitats that support marine resources and expect tJ,"' se " pe ,.;° s + 0 ~""" s :' st ---~ '"' v.~ " jJ~. '" . ~S1'I & ~ This newsletter was funded by the US ~ ~~ Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and 5i:~~~~ Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean ~~: 0-