Citation
Tropic news. Volume 10. Issue 2.

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Title:
Tropic news. Volume 10. Issue 2.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
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serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text



TROPIC NEWS

- _.=--'-E P.-RTM ENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL DI\'ISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
RESOURCES


November/ December 1997


Volume 10 Number 2.3


America's #1 source of toxic
marine pollution

The two-stroke outboard motor, found on
most boats and personal watercraft, is America's
largest source of toxic pollution. In the U.S., the
two-stroke marine motor causes the equivalent of
1.1 billion pounds of hydrocarbon emissions per
year. These high emissions are due to the ineffi-
ciency of the two-stroke motor, which has remained
essentially unchanged and unregulated since the
1940's. The engine design necessitates the mixing
of oil and fuel prior to use, causing incomplete
combustion. As a result, 25% of all the fuel and oil
that these motors use is emitted unburned -"out of
the tailpipe," along with other exhaust by-products.
The high level of oil and fuel released from
vessels with two-stroke motors poses a serious
threat to aquatic ecosystems, fish populations and
municipal water supplies. Fuel and oil released
from two-stroke motors float on the surface of the
water and settle within the shallow ecosystems of
bays, lakes, rivers, and seas, where aquatic life is
youngest and most vulnerable. These areas are
home to organisms at the base of the food chain,
including fish eggs, larvae, algae, crabs, mussels,
shrimp and zooplankton, all of which are extremely
sensitive to oil and other petroleum products.
Chromosomal damage, reduced growth and high
mortality rates among fish occur at extremely low
levels of fuel and oil pollution. In one study, re-
searchers exposed fish and fish larvae to exhaust
levels that reflected two-stroke emissions found in
natural habitats. The study concluded that "emis-
sions produced by two-stroke motors contain sub-
stances that have a negative impact on living fish.
Disruption of normal biological functions has been
observed at different levels, including cellular and /
physiological. In addition, serious disruption of
reproduction among fish seems likely." Scientists
determined that two-stroke exhaust is "a serious
threat to the marine environment." New engines
on the market such as four-stroke outboards,
greatly reduce the amount of oil and fuel released
into the environment.

Excerpted from article by Lighthouse Marine


Coral Reef Video Available

OUR NATURAL VIRGIN ISLANDS The
fourth
Cora R Zeef AnvU~rde.water video in the
RIaiforet series, "Our
Dept. of Planning & Natural Resources Natural
ltihiun ur FiR and Wildlife Virgin
j ~(3OQ40 775-67t;2, 772-145. 1 T.
1997 Islands" is
S.___0 !-.,3_ now avail-
able. The
video is titled, "Coral Reefs: An Underwater
Rainforest." This video was developed in harmony
with the International Year of The Reef (IYOR)
campaign which draws attention to the condition of
the world's reefs. The video is directed by the
Division of Fish and Wildlife and produced by "Two
Guys Video". The funding for the video was pro-
vided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
In beautiful underwater.footage you learn about
the diversity of coral reefs. Coral can be found in
just about every shape, color and size. Coral reefs
provide food, habitat and shelter for a variety of
marine animals. Many of the fish we eat live on the
reef or spend part of their lives there. In the video,
you learn about the relationship between the
corals, algae, fish and all the other species which
live on the. coral reef. Any disturbance to one or
more of the species on the reef may indirectly affect
the overall health of the reef. Our coral reefs are
plagued with diseases, careless anchoring, marine
debris, pollution from runoff and many other hu-
man impacts.
As with all of our videos, if you wish to obtain a
copy there is a two dollar postage fee per video.
There are presently four videos in the series.
Please, do not send cash or checks to us. To obtain
one or any of our videos, please send two dollars
per video in U.S. stamps. Please clearly indicate
the name and address to which we are to send the
videos.

Quote
"Only after the last tree has been cut down,
Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only
after the last fish has been caught, Only then will
you find that money can not be eaten."
... T 1 T 1


Il~$k~E~eX~L~B~~~'~9~g~~







Fisherman's Gauge


A redesigned fisherman's gauge will soon be
available at our Fish and Wildlife offices. The
fisherman's gauge is a tool used to determine the
size of various species of animals. Many species are
not reproductively mature until they grow to a
certain size. These sizes are their legal size for
harvest. The gauge represents sizes of animals
found in our local fisheries. The sizes have been
established through years of studying each species.
It is necessary to allow the animals to obtain their
mature size in order to avoid overfishing of that
species. The following are legal sizes for harvest.
Conch: Shell must be at least 9" long or have a
lip thickness of 3/8 ". Conch season is October 1st
through June 30th of each year. Maximum number
of conch allowed to be harvested is 6 conch per
person or a maximum of 24 conch per boat per day
for personal use. For commercial fishermen use is
150 conch per boat per day. All conch must be
landed alive in the shell. Empty shells are not to be
disposed of in the water.
Whelk: Shell must be larger than 2 7/16" in
diameter. Whelk season is October 1 through
March 10 each year.
Lobster: Carapace must be at least 3.5" long.
Lobsters must be landed whole (spearfishing is
illegal).
Yellowtail Snapper: All yellowtail caught
outside of three miles must have a snout to tip of
tail length of 12.0 ".
These fishing regulations have been established
to protect populations of marine animals from
being overfished.


,IH t This newsletter was funded by the US
S Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Si Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
t-oa, Fishery Management Council and the
bR^ Government of the VI.
Donna M. Griffin Editor
Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES

Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)






Address Correction Requested


BULK RATE.
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I.
PERMIT NO. 35


Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper







Full Text

PAGE 1

America's #1 source of toxic marine pollution Coral Reef Video Available OUR NATURAL VIRGIN ISLANDS CoraL R~ A t\I U rtd.e•w(;f.,t;e.,y Rait'\{c~ The fourth video in the series, "Our Natural Virgin Islands" is now avail, able. The video is titled, "Coral Reefs: An Underwater Rainforest." This video was developed in harmony with the International Year of The Reef (IYOR) campaign which draws attention to the condition of the wQrld's reefs. The video IS directed by the Division of Fish and Wildlife and produced by "Two Guys Video". The funding for the video was provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In beautiful underwater footage you learn about the diversity of coral reefs. Coral can be found in just about every shape, color and size. Coral reefs provide food, habitat and shelter fora variety of marine animals. Many of the fish we eat live on the reef or spend part of their lives there. In the video, you learn about the relationship between the corals, algae, fish and all the other species which live on the. coral reef. Any disturbance to one or more of the species on the reef may indirectly affect the overall health of the reef. Our coral reefs are plagued with diseases, careless anchoring, marine debris, pollution from runoff and many other human impacts. As with all of our videos, if you wish to obtain a copy there is a two dollar postage fee per video. There are presently four videos in the series. Please, do not send cash or checks to us. To obtain one or any of our videos, please send two dollars per video in U.S. stamps. Please clearly indicate the name and address to which we are to send the videos. The two-stroke outboard motor, found on most boats and personal watercraft, is America's largest source of toxic pollution. In the U.S., the two-stroke marine motor causes the equivalent of 1.1 billion pounds of hydrocarbon emissions per year. These high emissions are due to theinefficiency of the two-stroke motor, which has remained essentially unchanged and unregulated since the 1940's. The engine design necessitates themixmg of oil and fuel prior to use, causing incomplete combustion. As a result, 25% of all the fuel and oil that these motors use is emitted unburned."out of the tailpipe," along with other exhaust by-products. The high level of oil and fuel released from vessels with two-stroke motors poses a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems, fish populations and municipal water supplies. Fuel and oil released from two-stroke motors float on the surface of the water and settle within the shallow ecosystems of bays, lakes, rivers, and seas, where aquatic life is youngest and most vulnerable. These areas are home to organisms at the base of the food chain, including fish eggs, larvae, algae, craps, mussels, shrimp and zooplankton, all of which are extremely sensitive to oil and other petroleum products. Chromosomal damage, reduced growth and high mortality rates among fish occur at extremely low levels of fuel and oil pollution. In one study, researchers exposed fish and fish larvae to exhaust levels that reflected two-stroke emissions found in natural habitats. The study concluded that !'emissions produced by two-stroke motors contain substances that have a negativ~ impact on living fish. Disruption of normal biological functions has been observed at different levels, including cellular and / physiological. In addition, serious disruption of reproduction ~mong fish seems likely." Scientists determined that two-stroke exhaust is "a serious threat to the marine environment." New engines on the market such as four~stroke outboards, greatly reduce the amount of oil and fuel released into the environment. Excerpted from article by Lighthouse Marine Quote "Only after the last tree has been cut down, Only after the last river has been poisoned, Only after the last fish has been caught, Only then will you find that money can not be eaten." rt_-T_.:t! ~ 1 Dept. of Plannin« & Natural Resources

PAGE 2

Fisherman's Gauge s:~ OQ ~ ~ ~ ~ _. 00 g-. ~ (JQ "0 ~. ~ fb" 0.. 0 ~ ~ ~ (') ~ ~ 0 A redesigned fisherman's gauge will soon be available at our Fish and Wildlife offices. The fisherman's gauge is a tool used to determine the size of various species of animals. Many species are not reproductively mature until they grow to a certain size. These sizes are their legal size for harvest. The gauge represents sizes of animals found in our local fisheries. The sizes have been established through years of studying each species. I t is necessary to allow the animals to obtain their mature size in order to avoidoverfishing of that species. The following are legal sizes for harvest. Conch: Shell must be at least 9" long or have a lip thickness of 3/8 'to Conch season is October 1st through Ju~e 30th bfeach year. Maximum number of conch allowed to be harvested is 6 conch per person or a maximum of24 conch per boat per day for personal use. For commercial fishermen use is 150 conch per boat per day. All conch must be landed alive in the shell. Empty shells are not to be disposed of in the water. Whelk: Shell must be larger than 2 7/16" in diameter. Whelk season is October 1 through March 10 each year. Lobster: Carapace must be at least 3.5" long. Lobsters must be landed whole (spearfishing is illegal). Yellowtail Snapper: All yellowtail caught outside of three miles must have a snout to tip of tail length of 12.0 It. These fishing regulations have been established to protect populations of marine animals from being overfished. ~S1l & ~ This newsletter was fund,ed by the US ~ ~~ Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and ~~i~~ Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean ~ O~ Fishery Management Council and the -.'t)R}'~~ Government of the VI. Donna M. Griffin Editor Ralf H. BoulonJr. Chief of Environmental Education BULK RATE. U.S.POSTAGEPAill CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (809)775-6762 (ST. T .), (809)772-1955 (ST .X.) Address Correction Requested Trees were saved ~y printing on recycled paper ~ ~ _. C/) _. = C/) 2 ~ _. 0 = ~