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Tropic news. Volume 9. Issue 11.

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Title:
Tropic news. Volume 9. Issue 11.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
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English

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Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
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serial ( sobekcm )
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North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text




TROPIC NEWS


RESOURCES


August 1997


AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Volume 9 Number 11


Coastweeks 1997:
Celebrate, Educate, Participate

Coastweeks '97, a nationwide
celebration of our coasts, is set to
begin September 20 with the
kickoff of the International
OAST Coastal Cleanup that day. For the
COA 16th consecutive year, communi-
W EEKS ties across America will celebrate
the importance and value of our
CELEBRATE coasts by conducting beach clean-
PARTICIPATE ups and other special events
during the three-week period.
Coordinated nationally by the Center for Marine
Conservation (CMC), and locally by the Division of
Fish and Wildlife, Coastweeks '97 will include the
International Coastal Cleanup and National
Estuaries Day.
On September 20, the International Coastal
Cleanup -- a global effort to remove and catalogue
litter and debris from beaches, coastlines, water-
ways, and underwater areas -- will take place. The
one day annual event is expected to draw over
quarter of a million volunteers in 55 U.S. states
and territories and over 90 countries.
Coastweeks was created in 1982 by Massachu-
setts resident Barbara Fegan, who developed the
event as an educational tool to focus on the value
of coastal natural resources. In 1994, Fegan
passed coordination of the national Coastweeks
celebration to the Center for Marine Conservation.
Coastweeks is endorsed and supported by numer-
ous national and local organizations and state and
federal agencies. The event is celebrated each year
in the fall, beginning on the third Saturday and
continuing through Columbus Day.
Coastweeks 1996 was celebrated locally by 400
private and public school children who gathered
data by collecting garbage from several east-end
beaches.Government departments, private busi-
nesses and dive shops also cleaned the beaches
and removed debris form our beaches..
For more information about Coastweeks '97
activities in the Virgin Islands, please contact
Donna Griffin, Division of Fish and Wildlife, 340-
775- 6762 or the Center for Marine Conservation
at 1-800-CMC- BEACH or on-line at www.cmc-
ocean.org.


Environmental Education
Teacher's Workshop

Pencil in September 24, 1997
on your calendar if you are a
teacher interested in teaching
your students about our natural
resources. The Division of Fish
and Wildlife has reserved the
Department of Education Cur-
riculum Center from 5:30 to 7:30
pm for this event. The goal of the
workshop is to make educators
aware of services about environ-
mental issues available to them
and their students.
This workshop will feature a variety of repre-
sentatives from various agencies. Each representa-
tive will give a brief description of services offered
by their agency. Agencies will include: Division of
Fish and Wildlife, Environmental Education Bu-
reau, DPNR Coastal Zone Management (CZM),
UVI Virgin Islands Marine Advisory Service
(VIMAS), National Park Services (NPS), UVI -
Cooperative Extension Service, UVI Water Re-
source Research Institute (WRRI), Environmental
Association of St. Thomas/ St. John (EAST), Junior
Gardening and Ecology Academy and the V.I.
America's Cup Challenge Marine Program.
The future of our natural resources depends on
a community knowledgeable about issues concern-
ing our environment. Education is one of the first
steps towards protecting our island paradise.
Participation in coastal beach cleanup and recy-
cling are examples of activities which help the
environment. Every little bit helps towards pre-
serving a viable environment for our children.
For more information about the workshop,
please contact Donna Griffin at the Division of Fish
and Wildlife Redhook office at 340 775 67632.
We also ask that, if you are interested in attending
the workshop, please give us call to reserve a seat
and bring along another teacher as a guest.

Quote
"For whatever happens to beast, soon
happens to man. All things are connected."
Anon


~~L~L__ _,jrB~' __~ l ".E..







EARTHWATCH
What is EARTHWATCH? Earthwatch is the
world's largest organization matching members of
the public with scientific and conservation projects
worldwide. It acts as a bridge between science,
business, and the community. For 25 years they
have been providing support for scientific field
research projects by matching paying volunteers
with field researchers who need their help.
Earthwatch expeditions are not for everyone. If
your idea of environmental commitment is limited
to choosing paper or plastic, then Earthwatch is not
for you. But if you are the kind of person who likes
to roll up your sleeves and dig into the world, if you
believe that every problem has a solution, if you're
brimming with curiosity and commitment, then
consider Earthwatch.
You don't have to have any special skills or
knowledge to participate. You'll be thoroughly
briefed before you go, and you will be taught every-
thing you need to know during the first few days of
each expedition team. The scientist leading your
expedition will provide informal lectures and lead
campfire discussions in the evenings and answer
questions and give you explanations as you work
through the day. You don't have to know anything
when you arrive, but you will feel like a Rhodes
Scholar when you go home.
Participants on Earthwatch projects share
among themselves the costs of their food, housing
and transportation. In addition, your contribution
directly helps to pay for field equipment, truck
rentals, and much more. The costs for each expedi-
tion range from $650 to $3,695, depending on expe-
dition costs involved and the length of the team.
For the last seventeen years, the Division of Fish
and Wildlife and Earthwatch volunteers have


4 *& This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
] Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
S Fishery Management Council and the
R^XSo Government of the VI.
Donna M. Griffin Editor
Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
******
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(340)775-6762 (ST.T.), (340)772-1955 (ST.X.)






Address Correction Requested


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.
PERMIT NO. 35


Trees were saved by printing on recycd4p pgr


I II I I It 1i'6


been patrolling the beach at the Sandy Point
National Wildlife Refuge, St. Croix. Researchers
and volunteers have been piecing together the
reproductive cycle of the endangered leatherback
turtle for longer than anyone else. Earthwatch
teams patrolling on this erosion-prone and once
heavily poached beach since 1982, have tripled the
number of leatherback hatchlings that make it to
the sea. The project has served as a role model for
sea-turtle conservation worldwide and has earned
Earthwatch the U.S. Department of Interior's
coveted Conservation Award in 1987.
There have been 1000 volunteers at the Sandy
Point National Refuge since 1982. They have
spent 102,000+ hours on the beach gathering
important data. They have walked approximately
80,000 miles of beach!
A typical day for Earthwatch volunteers on the
Sandy Point Leatherback Project actually begins
at 8pm where you will patrol 2.6 kilometers of
beach every hour until 5 am. The evening is bro-
ken into adult nesting and nest recovery activities
both of which are very rewarding. At the end of
the shift you head back to your room at Cottages
by the Sea where you will sleep until 2 pm, have a
field trip or free time, prepare dinner and then
head back to the beach at 8 pm for another
evening on patrol.
This year we are seeing record numbers of
turtle and nests. We believe this is a result of
work done by the first and every Earthwatch
team. A world of thanks goes out to each of you.


a -




Full Text

PAGE 1

Environmental Education Teacher's Workshop Coastweeks 1997: Celebrate, Educate, Participate Pencil in September 24,1997 /) on your calendar if you are a E1 teacher interested in teaching ~ ~ !) your students about our natural ~ resources. The Division of Fish :2 and Wildlife has reserved the Department of Education Curriculum Center from 5:30 to 7:30 pm for this event. The goal of the workshop is to make educators aware of services about environmental issues available to them and their students. This workshop will feature a variety ofrepresentatives from various agencies. Each representative will give a brief description of services offered by their agency. Agencies will include: Division of Fish and Wildlife, Environmental Education Bureau, DPNR Coastal Zone Management (CZM), UVI Virgin Islands Marine Advisory Service (VIMAS), National Park Services ( NPS), UVI Cooperative Extension Service, UVI Water Resource Research Institute (WRRI), Environmental Association of St. Thomas/ St. John (EAST), Junior Gardening and Ecology Academy and the V.I. America's Cup Challenge Marine Program. The future of our natural resources depends on a community knowledgeable about issues concerning our environment. Education is one of the first steps towards protecting our island paradise. Participation in coastal beach cleanups and recycling are examples of activities which help the environment. Every little bit helps towards preserving a viable environment for our children. For more information about the workshop, please contact Donna Griffin at the Division ofFish and Wildlife Redhook office at 340 775 67632. We also ask that, if you are interested in attending the workshop, please give us call to reserve a seat and bring along another teacher as a guest. Coastweeks '97, a nationwide celebration of our coasts, is set to begin September 20 with the kickoff of the International COAST Coastal Cleanup that day. For the 16th consecutive year, communiWEEKS ties across America will celebrate the importance and value of our C £ L E 8 RAT!: coasts by conducting beach cleanEDUCATE d th . I t p A ~ TIC I PAT E ups an 0 er speCla even s during the three-week period. Coordinated nationally by the Center for ~arine Conservation (CMC), and locally by the Division of Fish and Wildlife, Coastweeks '97 will include the International Coastal Cleanup and National Estuaries Day. On September 20, the International Coastal Cleanup -a global effort to remove and catalogue litter and debris from beaches, coastlines, waterways, and underwater areas -will take place. The one day annual event is expected to draw over quarter of a million volunteers in 55 U.S. states and territories and over 90 countries. Coastweeks was created in 1982 by Massachusetts resident Barbara Fegan, who developed the event as an educational tool to focus on the value of coastal natural resources. In 1994, Fegan passed coordination of the national Coastweeks celebration to the Center for Marine Conservation. Coastweeks is endorsed and supported by numerous national and local organizations and state and federal agencies. The event is celebrated each year in the fall, beginning on the third Saturday and continuing through Columbus Day. Coastweeks 1996 was celebrated locally by 400 private and public school children who gathered data by collecting garbage from several east-end beaches. Government departments, private businesses and dive shops also cleaned the beaches and removed debris form our beaches.. For more information about Coastweeks '97 activities in the Virgin Islands, please contact Donna Griffin, Division of Fish and Wildlife, 3407756762 or the Center for Marine Conservation at 1-800-CMCBEACH or on-line at www.cmcocean.org. Quote " For whatever happens to beast, soon happens to man. All things are connected." Anon

PAGE 2

been patrolling the beach at the Sandy Point National Wildlife Refuge, St. Croix. Researchers and volunteers have been piecing together the reproductive cycle of the endangered leatherback turtle for longer than anyone else. Earthwatch teams patrolling on this erosion-prone and once heavily poached beach since 1982, have tripled the number of leatherback hatchlings that make it to the sea. The project has served as a role model for sea-turtle conservation worldwide and has earned Earthwatch the U.S. Department of Interior's coveted Conservation Award in 1987. There have been 1000 volunteers at the Sandy Point National Refuge since 1982. They have spent 102,000+ hours on the beach gathering important data. They have walked approximately 80,000 miles of beach! A typical day for Earthwatch volunteers on th~ Sandy Point Leatherback Project actually begins at 8pm where you will patrol 2.6 kilometers of beach every hour until 5 am. The evening is broken into adult nesting and nest recovery activities both of which are very rewarding. At the end of the shift you head back to your room at Cottages by the Sea where you will sleep until 2 pm, have a field trip or free time, prepare dinner and then head back to the beach at 8 pm for another evening on patrol. This year we are seeing record numbers of turtle and nests. We believe this is a result of work done by the first and every Earthwatch t.PJ'lm A U1nrliJ. nfth~nk~ (Toes out to each OfVOll. EARTHWATCH What is EARTHWATCH? Earthwatch is the world's largest organization matching members of the public with scientific and conservation projects worldwide. It acts as a bridge between science, business, and the community. For 25 years they have been providing support for scientific field research projects by matching paying volunteers with field researchers who need their help. Earthwatch expeditions are not for everyone. If your idea of environmental commitment is limited to choosing paper or plastic, then Earthwatch is not for you. But if you are the kind of person who likes to roll up your sleeves and dig into the world, if you believe that every problem has a solution, if you're brimming with curiosity and commitment, then consider Earthwatch. You don't have to have any special skills or knowledge to participate. You'll be thoroughly briefed before you go, and you will be taught everything you need to know during the first few days of each expedition team. The scientist leading your expedition will provide informal lectures and lead campfire discussions in the evenings and answer questions and give you explanations as you work through the day. You don't have to know anything when you arrive, but you will feel like a Rhodes Scholar when you go home. Participants on Earthwatch projects share among themselves the costs of their food, housing and transportation. In addition, your contribution directly helps to pay for field equipment, truck rentals, and much more. The costs for each expedition range from $650 to $3,695, depending on expedition costs involved and the length of the team. For the last seventeen years, the Division of Fish and Wildlife and Earthwatch volunteers have ~Sll.\ ~ This newsletter was funded by the US ~ ~~ Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and 5I~~~m Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean .f'~i O~ Fishery Management Council and the -.-oRA.~~ Government of the VI. Donna M. Griffin Editor Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF 11IE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF 11IE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (340)775-6762 (ST.T.), (340)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address Correction Requested Trees were sayed by printinE! on recycled DaDer