Citation
Tropic news. Volume 9. Issue 2.

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Title:
Tropic news. Volume 9. Issue 2.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
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serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text




TRDOPIAC
-- DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL
RESOURCES
November 1996


IEWS
DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Volume 9 Number 2


A s
tEEF97

Coral reefs are among nature's most spectacu-
lar and beautiful creations. They are home to a
dazzling array of marine life nearly a million
species. Up to 3000 species may coexist on a single
reef and the density of fishes is 100 times greater
than the ocean average. These "rainforests of the
sea" rank as one of the most complex and diverse
ecosystems in the world, but unfortunately the
future of coral reefs is in jeopardy.
Coral reefs around the world are threatened by
over-fishing, coastal development, sewage, runoff
from agriculture and logging, and many other
causes. Concern about the state of the world's reefs
has inspired scientists and environmental groups
to accept the following challenges:
assessing the conditions of coral reefs world-
wide
planning and executing a major program of
public education about coral reefs
collaborating with governments, local commu-
nities and reef managers to develop and
implement plans for the sustainable use of
irreplaceable reef resources
The International Year of the Reef (IYOR)
1997 will begin a major effort of assessment, edu-
cation and collaboration. Scientists and volunteers
from the worldwide diving community will aid in
diagnosing the condition of representative reefs
throughout the tropical seas. Aquariums, scien-
tists, and conservation organizations are collabo-
rating to produce a variety of courses, video tapes,
brochures and other educational materials. Man-
agement plans are being created or revised for
individual coral reef areas. With the involvement
and financial support of governments, foundations
and individuals, all these initiatives and more can
be put in place to insure that the world's coral reefs
are preserved for the future.


.
A< A L

qra
440M


I I '1 I ~C I I


Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference
Nonpoint source pollution is a serious enough
problem in the V. I., that it warrants it's own
annual two day conference. The Third Annual
Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference was held
Oct. 29-30, 1996 at Marriott's Frenchman's Reef
Beach Resort. The conference featured many inter-
esting topics.
Status of Water Quality in the V. I.
Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution
Control Methods
Controlling Nonpoint Source Pollution from
Construction Activities
Nonpoint Pollution Control Practices for
Marinas & Recreational Boating
Nonpoint source pollution originates from
sources that are not easily identified. Nonpoint
source pollution comes from many different
sources. It's the result of rain water moving over
and through the ground picking up natural and
man-made pollutants. These pollutants end up in
our guts, wetlands, salt ponds, coastal bays,
beaches and ground water.
The effects of pollutants on our environment can
be harmful. Sediments smother coral reefs and
valuable fish spawning areas, block sunlight that
aquatic plants need for growth, and reduce water
clarity. Nutrients from fertilizers and manure and
from improperly functioning septic tanks aide in
algal growth. When the algae die and decompose,
they use up the oxygen other organisms need to
live. Oil, grease, heavy metals and other toxic
chemicals found in runoff water are toxic to
aquatic plants and animals, causing cancer, muta-
tions, reproductive problems, or death.
We can apply certain practices which will reduce
the effect of these pollutants. These practices
include: the usage of environmentally friendly
cleaners, proper disposal of hazardous items such
as used oil, antifreeze and paints, use of sediment
retention devices and immediate replanting of
native vegetation on cleared land.


Quote
"Until he extends the circle of his compassion to
all living beings, man will not himself find peace."
Dr. Albert Schweitzer






National Fish Hatchery Facts
Have you ever wondered where most of the
Nation's fresh water fish come from? Fish and
Wildlife Service's annual report on the National
Fish Hatchery System can answer some of your
questions. The Interior Department agency re-
leases the annual Fish and Fish Egg Distribution
Report, a treasure trove of statistics and other
information on hatchery operations nationwide
and how they fit into the agency's role in fisheries
management.
The Service produces, transports, and stocks
hundreds of millions of fish and fish eggs of more
than 60 different species annually to states and
Native American Tribes, bolstering fishery popula-
tions as well as fishing opportunities nationwide.
The present stressed state of the Nation's tsher:
ies and aquatic systems gives such information on
hatchery operations new relevancy. Pollution, poor
water quality, and destruction of habitat put ex-
treme strains on fisheries to the point that many
are not considered sustainable.
The National Fish Hatchery System currently
includes 72 national fish hatcheries, 8 fish health
centers, and 5 fish technology centers. In 1995,
these facilities distributed some 170 million fish
and 140 million fish eggs.
Here are some of the statistics:
Dworshak National Fish Hatchery in Idaho,
distributed nearly 440,000 pounds of steelhead
trout, Chinook salmon, and rainbow trout.
Washington (42 million), California (18 mil-
lion), Wisconsin (12 million), South Dakota (10
million) and North Dakota (8 million) received the
most fish from national fish hatcheries.
Washington State has eleven national fish
hatcheries.


Rx for Coral Reefs


Humpty Dumpty
never had it so good.
After a drifting cruise
ship struck the popular
Cheeseburger Reef off
Grand Cayman, 140
local divemasters and


SCO MNtf TYPCS A COR41



YL -
.F7


instructors took to the water to reattach thousands
of pieces of still-living coral.
During the three-month restoration effort,
volunteers used a special epoxy to glue more than
4,000 pieces of coral- including 30 large coral
heads- back together. A lot of people rallied to
the cause," says Peter Milburn, president of the
Cayman Islands Watersports Operators Associa-
tion. "At this point, we just have to wait and see if
it's successful."
The reef was damaged Jan. 12 when a sudden
squall caused the Holland American Lines ship
Massdam to drag anchor. The ship hit the reef
about 15 times, says Walter Jaap, a St. Petersburg,
Fla., scientist hired to oversee the $500,000 resto-
ration project funded by the cruise line. Based on
the results of a similar project in Fort Lauderdale,
Fla., Jaap says he is optimistic that the Cayman
restoration will be a success.
This article was written by Karen Schwartz.
Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper

This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
S Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
b ot Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.
Donna M. Griffin Editor
Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
******
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


- 1 II I


1, -, ,




Full Text

PAGE 1

, DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE November 1996 Volume 9 Number 2 ",' " + ~ ... ' ~ z -. -. Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference Nonpoint source pollution is a serious enough problem in the V. I., that it warrants it's own annual two day conference. The Third Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference was held Oct. 29-30, 1996 at Marriott's Frenchman's Reef Beach Resort. The conference featured many interesting topics. . Status of Water Quality in the V. I. . Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Methods . Controlling Nonpoint Source Pollution from Construction Activities . Nonpoint Pollution Control Practices for Marinas & Recreational Boating Nonpoint source pollution originates from sources that are not easily identified. Nonpoint source pollution comes from many different sources. It's the result of rain water moving over and through the ground picking up natural and man-made pollutants. These pollutants end up in our guts, wetlands, salt ponds, coastal bays, beaches and ground water. The effects of pollutants on our environment can be harmful. Sediments smother coral reefs and valuable fish spawning areas, block sunlight that aquatic plants need for growth, and reduce water clarity. Nutrients from fertilizers and manure and from improperly functioning septic tanks aide in algal growth. When the algae die and decompose, they use up the oxygen other organisms need to live. Oil, grease, heavy metals and other to~c chemicals found in runoff water are toxic to aquatic plants and animals, causing cancer, mutations, reproductive problems, or death. We can apply certain practices which will reduce the effect of these pollutants. These practices include: the usage of environmentally friendly cleaners, proper disposal of hazardous items such as used oil, antifreeze and paints, use of sediment retention devices and immediate replanting of native vegetation on cleared land. Coral reefs are among nature's most spectacular and beautiful creations. They are home to a dazzling array of marine life nearly a million species. Up to 3000 species may coexist on a single reef and the density of fishes is 100 times greater than the ocean average. These "rainforests .of the sea" rank as one of the most complex and diverse ecosystems in the world, but unfortunately the future of coral reefs is in jeopardy. Coral reefs around the world are threatened by over-fishing, coastal development, sewage, runoff from agriculture and logging, and many other causes. Concern about the state of the world's reefs has inspired scientists and environmental groups to accept the following challenges: . assessing the conditions of coral reefs worldwide . planning and executing a major program of public education about coral reefs . collaborating with governments, local communities and reef managers to develop and implement plans for the sustainable use of irreplaceable reef resources The International Year of the Reef (IYOR) 1997 will begin a major effort of assessment, education and collaboration. Scientists and volunteers from the worldwide diving community will aid in diagnosing the condition of representative reefs throughout the tropical seas. Aquariums, scientists, and conservation organizations are collaborating to produce a variety of courses, video tapes, brochures and other educational materials. Management plans are being created or revised for individual coral reef areas. With the involvement and financial support of governments, foundations and individuals, all these initiatives and more can be put in place to insure that the world's coral reefs are preserved for the future. Quote " Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living beings, man will not himself find peace." Dr. Albert Schweitzer ,OM A L

PAGE 2

Rx for Coral Reefs CO.'!MOII TYPF:S ()I' COM''",;;;;';;:r;;:"Y Humpty Dumpty never had it so good. After a drifting cruise ' ship struck the popular ; Cheeseburger Reef off ; Grand Cayman, 140 local divemasters and ',... -==~=instructors took to the water to reattach thousands of pieces of still-living coral. . During the three-month restoration effort, volunteers used a special epoxy to glue more than 4,000 pieces of coralincluding 30 large coral headsback together. " A lot of people rallied to the cause," says Peter Milburn, president of the Cayman Islands Watersports Operators Association. "At this point, we just have to wait and see if it's successful." The reef was damaged Jan. 12 when a sudden squall caused the Holland American Lines ship Massdam to drag anchor. The ship hit the reef about 15 times, says Walter Jaap, a St. Petersburg, Fla., scientist hired to oversee the $500,000 restoration project funded by the cruise line. Based on the results of a similar project in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Jaap says he is optimistic that the Cayman restoration will be a success. This article was written by Karen Schwartz. . Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper National Fish Hatchery Facts Have you ever wondered where most of the Nation's fresh water fish come from? Fish and Wildlife Service's annual report on the National Fish Hatchery System can answer some of your questions. The Interior Pepartment agency releases the annual Fish and Fish Egg Distribution Report, a treasure trove of statistics and other information on hatchery operations nationwide and how they fit into the agency's role in fisheries management. The Service produces, transports, and stocks hundreds of millions of fish and fish eggs of more than 60 different species annually to states and Native American Tribes, bolstering fishery populations as well as fishing opportunities nationwide. The present stressed state of the NatIon's hsher:: ies and aquatic systems gives such information on hatchery operations new relevancy. Pollution, poor water quality, and destruction of habitat put extreme strains on fisheries to the point that many are not considered sustainable. The National Fish Hatchery System currently includes 72 national fish hatcheries, 8 fish health centers, and 5 fish technology centers. In 1995, these facilities distributed some 170 million fish and 140 million fish eggs. Here are some of the statistics: . Dworshak National Fish Hatchery in Idaho, distributed nearly 440,000 pounds of steelhead trout, Chinook salmon, and rainbow trout. . Washington (42 million), California (18 million), Wisconsin (12 million), South Dakota (10 million) and North Dakota (8 million) received the most fish from national fish hatcheries. . Washington State has eleven national fish hatcheries. . This newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the ~~~Government of the VI. Donna M. Griffin Editor Ralf H. Boulon Jr. Chief of Environmental Education BULK RAm u.s. POSTAGE PAm CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address Correction Requested