Citation
Tropic news. Volume 9. Issue 1.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Volume 9. Issue 1.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text


TR PIC NEWS


DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL
RESOURCES
October 1996


How Migrating Animals
Find Their Way
In mid-September, Terns
leave and Tropic birds take up
residency on our offshore cays.
Upon emerging from under-
ground nests, leatherback
hatchlings crawl toward the
moonlit ocean, swim into oncom-
ing waves and out to sea. Over 250 species of
butterflies travel in a seasonal east-west migration
in the mountains near Monteverde, in north-
central Costa Rica. These are examples of animal
migration, the regular movement of birds, mam-
mals, and insects along well established routes
that take place, all over the globe.
Scientist and casual observers have long known
that animals possess navigational skill far superior
to ours. The question still exist: How do they find
their way?
The search for the answer combines many
different factors, including animal behavior and
physiology, evolutionary and population biology,
ocean sciences, and habitat conservation and
restoration.
Migratory animals gather information about the
world through a rich array of sensory cues: solar
and celestial maps, sound and smell, visual land-
marks, Earth's magnetic field, and patterns of
light. Unraveling this complex guidance system is
one step to understanding how different animals
read and utilize the information necessary for
travel.
Like humans, most migrants refine their navi-
gating skills through experience, enabling them to
set and stay the course over longer distances and
overcome dangers along the way. Their journeys
allow scientists to explore how complex behavior
develops, both in individual and in species and
help to identify the impact of environmental
change on unique life-cycle needs of different
animal species.
Scientist have speculated that some migrating
animals could sense magnetic field lines and use
them for orientation. Modern experiments with
long distance migrants have shown that many
animals can determine direction from the earth's
magnetic field. Continued research will help us to
better understand the migration of animals.


I ,I


DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Volume 9 Number 1


Environmental Education Videos

There are two UR NATURAL VIRGIN ISLANDS
new videos available coastaand Marine E cosystem of
at our offices in the ViryT Is andr
Redhook, St. Thomas cpi. of Plmaning A Natural .Rou.rc
D!ivisin of Fish d WUdllfe
and Lagoon Street, N oW7 n1 .
St. Croix. These ...
videos are an addi-
tion to the various
materials available through our environmental
education program. The first video, "OUR NATU-
RAL VIRGIN ISLANDS: Coastal and Marine
Ecosystems of the Virgin Islands briefly dis-
cusses each ecosystem, its importance, the prob-
lems it faces, as well as, ways to protect these
important habitats. The nine minute forty second
video features great footage of our saltponds,
mangroves, seagrass beds, coral reef and sandy
beaches.
The second video,
"OUR NATURAL OUR NATURAL VIRGIN ISLNDS
VIRGIN ISLANDS: Man~rw a.n lcosystemin
Mangroves: An Eco- J-t.ya.
system In Jeopardy" DIi"Loomsi. WHf .= '
thf diff r) 771Wm .77 ...1"
discusses the different t i".,
species of mangroves
found in the V. I. These
valuable trees play an important role in the main-
tenance of nearby sea grass beds and coral reefs.
Thirteen minutes in length, the video addresses
the problems our mangroves faces.
A third video, soon to be available, features Sea
Turtles of the Virgin Islands. The script for a
fourth video featuring coral reefs is complete and
footage will be selected. Future videos will feature
other habitats of the V. I.
The videos are free to interested parties, but
we do request $ 2.00 per video for postage. Please
send two dollars in stamps to cover postage.


Quote

"A person does not begin to gain wisdom,
until they first realize they are no longer
indispensable"


*






_________________________________ ___________________________________ I _________


COASTWEEKS 1996:
V. I. Students make a clean sweep
Coastweeks is an international event which is
celebrated from September 21 thru October 9,
1996. Schools, businesses and many special inter-
est groups
throughout the
world participate
in numerous
Activities. Right
,- ) here in the Virgin
k Islands, over 400
-school students
S o~ participated in
beach clean ups.
Students recorded
the type, amount and origin of garbage found on
the beaches. All of the data collected will be sent to
the Center for Marine Conservation in Virginia.
This information is combined with worldwide data
which will help to solve the problem of marine
debris.
In a classroom presentation prior to the beach
clean up, students learned how sea turtles die by
mistaking plastics bags for jellyfish. Students also
learned, that many species of animals are en-
tangled in marine debris such as discarded fishing
line and nets.
Special Thanks go out to all participants in
Cleanup 1996. The Division of Fish and Wildlife
worked with students, teachers and parents at
Antilles, Joseph Gomez, Montessori and Pine
Peace schools and Wendy's provided us with addi-
tional garbage bags. We hope to see all of you next
year at Coastweeks 1997!
Tree wer savedby print recycled paper
Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


Environmental Education
Materials Available

The latest poster in
Sh our Habitats of the
3 Virgin Islands series is
to _o now available. "Salt
? i Pond Habitats of the
> Virgin Islands" is the
newest addition to our
Collection of nine post-
oS-- r ers depicting Gamefish
,^ F and Habitats of the
L region. The original
artwork was done by
local artist, Theresa "Red" Fisher.
Another addition to our environmental educa-
tion program is the
"Marine Reserves and
Wildlife Sanctuaries"
brochure. It identifies
the location of various
marine reserves and
sanctuaries and dis-
cusses the importance
of these areas. This
brochure and other
environmental educa-
tional material is
available at our Red-
hook and Lagoon
street offices.


This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
*1***4**
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


.gdt-l It
^L




Full Text

PAGE 1

October 1996 Volume 9 Number 1 Environmental Education Videos Q!1:R NATURAL VIRGIN ISLA~ :MangruvU: .:4n TcosysCem In J~oyaTay Depc. of PI..eiDC" N raJ Reaou"," ~ D;";"_DCF1'iI'Dd Wildlif. .--~, Ih" «809) 77£.-7&1. 771-1'" fp~ ;~. I~=~ There are two new videos available at our offices in Redhook, St. Thomas and Lagoon Street, St. Croix. These videos are an addition to the various materials available through our environmental education program. The first video, "OUR NATURAL VIRGIN ISLANDS: Coastal and Marine Ecosystems of the Virgin Islands" briefly discusses each ecosystem, its importance, the problems it faces, as well as, ways to protect these important habitats. The nine minute forty second video features great footage of our saltponds, mangroves, seagrass beds, coral reef and sandy beaches. The second video, "OUR NATURAL VIRGIN ISLANDS: I Mangroves: An Ecosystem In Jeopardy" . discusses the different species of mangroves found in the V. I. These valuable trees play an important role in the maintenance of nearby sea grass beds and coral reefs. Thirteen minutes in length, the video addresses the problems our mangroves faces. A third video, soon to be available, features Sea Turtles of the Virgin Islands. The script for a fourth video featuring coral reefs is complete and footage will be selected. Future videos will feature other habitats of the V. I. The videos are free to interested parties, but we do request $ 2.00 per video for postage. Please send two dollars in stamps to cover postage. Quote How Migrating Animals Find Their Way In mid-September, Terns leave and Tropic birds take up residency on our offshore cays. Upon emerging from underground nests, leatherback hatchlings crawl toward the moonlit ocean, swim into oncoming waves and out to sea. Over 250 species of butterflies travel in a seasonal east-west migration in the mountains near Monteverde, in northcentral, Costa Rica. These are examples of animal migratIon, the regular movement of birds, mammals, and insects along well established routes that take place, allover the globe. . Scientist and casual observers have long known that animals possess navigational skill far superior to ours. The question still exist: How do they find their way? The search for the answer combines many different factors, including animal behavior and physiology, evolutionary and population biology, ocean sciences, and habitat conservation and restoration. Migratory animals gather information about the world through a rich array of sensory cues: solar and celestial maps, sound and smell, visual landmarks, Earth's magnetic field, and patterns of light. Unraveling this complex guidance system is one step to understanding how different animals read and utilize the information necessary for travel. Like humans, most migrants refine their navigating skills through experience, enabling them to set and stay the course over longer distances and overcome dangers along the way. Their journeys allow scientists to explore how complex behavior develops, both in individual and in species, and help to identify the impact of environmental ' change on unique life-cycle needs of different animal species. Scientist have speculated that some migrating animals could sense magnetic field lines and use them for orientation. Modern experiments with long distance migrants have shown that many animals can determine direction from the earth's magnetic field. Continued research will help us to better understand the mig-ration of animals. "A person does not begin to gain wisdom, until they first realize they are no longer indispensable" ~UR~TU!tAL VIRGIN ISLANDS C~ta£ a7ld:Marine Xcosystems Of l tlie "Virgm Isfand:s Dept. or PIanhiDI A Natural Beaou..:e. nlvi.l,,'FI.k and Wlld)I'.

PAGE 2

Environmental Education Materials Available ~~ ~ .~ ~ . ~ ,. . r ~ 6 'O i)L~ :.#~~; ~ ~ . II ~~ ,~ l I~bflll The latest poster in our Habitats of the Virgin Islands series is now available. "Salt Pond Habitats of the Virgin Islands" is the newest addition to our collection of nine post, erg depicting Gamefish and Habitats of the region. The original artwork was done by local artist, Theresa "Red" Fisher. Another addition to our environmental education program is the "Marine Reserves and Wildlife Sanctuaries" brochure. It identifies the location of various marine reserves and sanctuaries and discusses the importance of these areas. This brochure and other environmental educational material is available at our Redhook and Lagoon street officesThis newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the Government of the VI. COASTWEEKS 1996: V. I. Students make a clean sweep Coastweeks is an international event which is celebrated from September 21 thru October 9, 1996. Schools, businesses and many special interest groups throughout the world participate m numerous ~rn activities. Right jj>,..,IJ ( h . h V . . -: .". //.~ ere m t e lrgIn ~ ~ ..;~~~ ; -::~~Islands, over 400 ~ ..).. ..:;::-T-. school students ~~~~:.. :;. ;.)°r;.,"'" .. participated in " beach clean ups. Students recorded the type, amount and origin of garbage found on the beaches. All of the data collected will be sent to the Center for Marine Conservation in Virginia. This information is combined with worldwide data which will help to solve the problem of marine debris. In a classroom presentation prior to the beach clean up, students learned how sea turtles die by mistaking plastics bags for jellyfish. Students also learned, that many species of animals are entangled in marine debris such as discarded fishing line and nets. Special Thanks go out to all participants in Cleanup 1996. The Division ofFish and Wildlife worked with students, teachers and parents at Antilles, Joseph Gomez, Montessori and Pine Peace schools and Wendy's provided us with additional garbage bags. We hope to see all of you next year at Coastweeks 1997! Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper BULK RA1E U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOT1E AMALIE, V.I. PERMIT NO. 3S GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Narural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (8~)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address CoITection Requestoo