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Tropic news. Volume 8. Issue 10.

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Title:
Tropic news. Volume 8. Issue 10.
Series Title:
Tropic news
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United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
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English

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Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
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serial ( sobekcm )
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North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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TROPIC NEWS


DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL
RESOURCES


July 1996

Pesticide Impacts
Environmental contaminants from such sources
as hazardous waste sites, urban runoff, and oil
spills pose significant to native animals, plants and
of special concern is the threat to endangered and
threatened species. The Fish and Wildlife Service's
(FWS) Environmental Contaminants Program
works with other FWS programs as well as other
Federal and State agencies and the private sector,
to prevent losses of indigenous species from pollut-
ants.
Although it is true that DDT can no longer be
used legally in the U.S., many of our wildlife spe-
cies are still being affected by this chemical. DDT
and its breakdown products can persist in the
environment for decades.
In addition to the lingering effects of certain
banned pesticides, fish and wildlife potentially can
be affected by some of the thousands of pesticide
products currently registered for use in the U.S.
Pesticides are used for many beneficial pur-
poses. When a pesticide is selective for a specific
pest, it generally does not pose notable hazards to
fish and wildlife. However, many widely used
pesticides are not particularly specific for the
stated "target" organism. Such pesticides can cause
unintended and unwanted effects to "non-target"
resources.
When pesticides are used according to the prod-
uct label and in a specialized manner, such as spot
treatment of weeds with herbicides, exposure of
non-target organisms may be avoided. However,
there are many pesticides that are not specific in
their toxicity or exposure potential, and these
compounds can pose threats to endangered species
and other non-target organisms. Many poisonings
of listed species are unintentional and related to
normal uses of pesticides.
There are few cases showing a singular link
between a given pesticide and the status of a par-
ticular endangered species. However, because
these compounds are designed to be toxic and are
widely present in the environment, a strong pro-
gram of research, education, interagency consulta-
tion, and careful management of pesticide use is
vital for the conservation of many endangered and
threatened species.
This article by Laura Lyons was excerpted from Endan-
gered Species Bulletin March/April 1996 Vol XXI No. 2


DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Volume 8 Number 10


Annual Fathers Day Tournament

The Committee for the Betterment of Carenage
has again hosted the 1996 Father's Day In-Shore
Fishing Tournament on Sunday, June 9, 1996 at
the Gustave Quetel Fishing Center in Frenchtown.
Division of Fish and Wildlife staff assisted the
tournament organizers by acting as the official
weigh masters and
by recording impor-
tant biostatistical i ..
information on all
the fish that were Barracuda
landed during the tournament. This year
there were 31 boats registered with 105 anglers.
Qualifying fish species included dolphin, kingfish,
horse -eye, barracuda, amber jack, bonito, tuna and
mackerel. The winning catch was a 23.0 lbs. barra-
cuda.
Scientist from the U.S. Food and Drug Adminis-
tration (FDA) were also
present to collect those fish
W.." species known to cause
S ciguatera fish poisoning.
Bonito The Division has regularly
assisted the FDA to collect
fish samples from various Virgin Islands fishing
tournaments. With these fish samples to aid their
research, scientist are getting nearer to the devel-
opment of a test kit to identify the presence of
ciguatera toxin in local fish varieties.
The next fishing tournament in the U.S. Virgin
Islands will be the July Open, 5-7 July, 1996. The
scientist of the DFW have been again asked to be
weigh masters for this tournament. Data collected
by the Division at these tournaments are very
important in monitoring the long-term health of
our marine resources. The Division would like to
thank the tournament organizers for their coopera-
tion.



What is Natural Resources Conservation
Education?
It is a lifelong learning process that promotes
the understanding of natural resources and ecosys-
tems their interrelationships, conservation, use,
management and value to society







Captive Bred Puerto Rican Parrot
Chick Begins New Life in the Wild

The Puerto Rico Department of Natural and
Environmental Resources and the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service recently released to the wild a
young endangered Puerto Rican parrot chick that
is expected to enhance the genetic variability of the
species' diminished wild population. Noreen K.
Clough, the Service's Southeast Regional Director,
called it "an important milestone for the endan-
gered Puerto Rican parrot recovery program."
The release of the chick was timed to arrive at
the nest at the time of the day that parent birds
are usually away from their nests, foraging for food
to bring back to their young. The biologists had
earlier discovered a nest containing chicks of ap-
proximately the same age and maturity as the
young captive-bred chick. The plan was to release
the immature parrot to the wild by placing it into a
wild nest to be reared by wild birds. Hopefully,
they would do so until it was time for the fledgling
to leave its nest and fly for the first time. This
usually happens approximately 13 weeks from
hatching.
Agustin P. Valido, the Service's National Spe-
cies Coordinator for the Puerto Rican Parrot Recov-
ery Program commented that the release had great
significance for the future of the species. "This
chick," he said, was fathered by a founder bird,
captured in 1972, from a population in the West
Fork area of the forest that has not been occupied
by parrots for approximately 7 years. If he survives
to breed with the existing wild flock, Valido said,
"he will pass on valuable genetic variability to his
offspring that will help save these rare parrots
from extinction."


Fish Kills

There have been two recent fish kills at Half
Penny Bay and Sugar Bay, St. Croix. No signs of
trauma from confinement in fish traps, gill nets or
other methods of capture were evident on the fish
observed. Based on observations, it is most likely
that the fish kills were a result of people using
poison (chlorox) to force lobster or octopus out of
holes in the reef during the day. Virgin Islands law
prohibits the throwing into any water of the V. I.,
oils, acids, poisons or any other substance which
can destroy or injure fish. In both incidents, there
was a considerable amount of fish killed from
several different species.
We can see the effect of poison to fish popula-
tions evident by the number dead fish along the
shoreline. The effect on other organisms including
reef building corals is more difficult to document
since it would require knowing the condition of the
reef before the poison was released and comparing
it afterwards. However, the result is the same,
poison such as chlorox are hazardous to the marine
environment and their effects can be long lasting.
People using this method to obtain lobsters or
octopus are threatening the health of our marine
environment. Please report fish kills to the Div. of
Environmental Enforcement at 776-8600 (STT)
and 773-5774 (STX) or Div. of Fish and Wildlife
775-6762 (STT) and 772-1955 (STX).

Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper
B -- E .


-4 ~]I


This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
**r***
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


r''"wammammemmma e.: m.m.m.e. .e. .-.m.m.


101 121 .. ... "l I 11-2-T


Il~--~a~-irrrr-*~rru~crrl---r-lwuur ----------




Full Text

PAGE 1

Volume 8 Number 10 Annual Fathers Day Tournament The Committee for the Betterment of Carenage has again hosted the 1996 Father's Day In-Shore Fishing Tournament on Sunday, June 9,1996 at the Gustave Quetel Fishing Center in Frenchtown. Division of Fish and Wildlife staff assisted the tournament organizers by acting as the official weigh masters and by recording impor~~~ tant biostatistical ~~~~:.:_:.:::~ information on all B "" d the fish that were arracu a landed during the tournament. This year there were 31 boats registered with 105 anglers. Qualifying fish species included dolphin, kingfish, horse -eye, barracuda, amber jack, bonito, tuna and mackerel. The winning catch was a 23.0 lbs. barracuda. Scientist from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were also "*-",,, , ;# present to collect those fish ~,:,::::~:;i.11~!~~~$~t species known to cause ."":~:":v,~:~::~'4'-'" '" ciguatera fish poisoning. Bonito The Division has regularly assisted the FDA to collect fish sam pIes from various Virgin Islands fishing tournaments. With these fish samples to aid their research, scientist are getting nearer to the development of a test kit to identify the presence of ciguatera toxin in local fish varieties. The next fishing tournament in the U.S. Virgin Islands will be the July Open, 5-7 July, 1996. The scientist of the DFW have been again asked to be weigh masters for this tournament. Data collected by the Division at these tournaments are very important in monitoring the long-term health of our marine resources. The Division would like to thank the tournament organizers for their cooperation. What is Na.tural Resources Conservation Education? It is a lifelong learning process that promotes the understanding of natural resources and ecosystems their interrelationships, conservation, use, manag-ement and value to societv Pesticide Impacts Environmental contaminants from such sources as hazardous waste sites, urban runoff, and oil spills pose significant to native animals, plants and of special concern is the threat to endangered and threatened species. The Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) Environmental Contaminants Program works with other FWS programs as well as other Federal and State agencies and the private sector, to prevent losses of indigenous species from pollutants. Although it is true that DDT can no longer be used legally in the U.S., many of our wildlife species are still being affected by this chemical. DDT and its breakdown products can persist in the environment for decades. . In addition to the lingering effects of certain banned pesticides, fish and wildlife potentially can be affected by some of the thousands of pesticide products currently registered for use in the U.S. Pesticides are used for many beneficia,l purposes. When a pesticide is selective for a specific pest, it generally does not pose notable hazards to fish and wildlife. However, many widely used pesticides are not particularly specific for the stated "target" organism. Such pesticides can cause unintended and unwanted effects to "non-target" resources. When pesticides are used according to the product label and in a specialized manner, such as spot treatment of weeds with herbicides, exposure of non-target organisms may be avoided. However, there are many pesticides that are not specific in their toxicity or exposure potential, and these compounds can pose threats to endangered species and other non-target organisms. Many poisonings of listed species are unintentional and related to normal uses of pesticides. There are few cases showing a singular link between a given pesticide and the status of a particular endangered species. However, because these compounds are designed to be toxic and are widely present in the environment, a strong program of research, education, interagency consultation, and careful management of pesticide use is vital for the conservation of many endangered and threatened species. This article by Laura Lyons was excerpted from Endangered Species Bulletin March/April 1996 Vol XXI No.2

PAGE 2

Captive Bred Puerto Rican Parrot Chick Begins New Life in the Wild, Fish Kills There have been two recent fish kills at Half Penny Bay and Sugar Bay, St. Croix. No signs of trauma from confinement in fish traps, gill nets or other methods of capture were evident on the fish observed. Based on observations, it is most likely that the fish kills were a result of people using poison (chlorox) to force lobster or octopus out of holes in the reef during the day. Virgin Islands law prohibits the throwing into any water of the V. I., oils, acids, poisons or any other substance which can destroy or injure fish. In both incidents, there was a considerable amount offish kill~d from several different species. We can see the effect of poison to fish populations evident by the number dead fish along the shoreline. The effect on other organisms including reef building corals is more difficult to document since it would require knowing the condition of the reef before the poison was released and comparing it afterwards. However, the result is the same, poison such as chlorox are hazardous to the marine environment and their effects can be long lasting. People using this method to obtain lobsters or octopus are threatening the health of our marine environment. Please report fish kills to the. Div. of Environmental Enforcement at 776-8600 (STl') and 773-5774 (STX) or Div. ofFish and Wildlife 775-6762 (STl') and 772-1955 (STX). Trees were sayed by printinrr. on recycled DaDer The Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently released to the wild a young endangered Puerto Rican parrot chick that is expected to enhance the genetic variability of the species I diminished wild population. Noreen K. Clough, the Service's Southeast Regional Director, called it It an important milestone for the endangered Puerto Rican parrot recovery program;" The release of the chick was timed to arrive at the nest at the time of the day that parent birds are usually away from their nests, foraging for food to bring back to their young. The biologists had earlier discovered a nest containing chicks of approximately the same age and maturity as the young captive-bred chick. The plan was to release the immature parrot to the wild by placing it into a wild nest to be reared by wild birds. Hopefully, they would do so until it was time for the fledgling to leave its nest and fly for the first time. This usually happens approximately 13 weeks from hatching. Agustin P. Valido, the Service's National Species Coordinator for the Puerto Rican Parrot Recovery Program commented that the release had great significance for the future of the species. "This chick," he said, " was fathered by a founder bird, captured in 1972, from a population in the West Fork area of the forest that has not been occupied by parrots for approximately 7 years. Ifhe survives to breed with the existing wild flock, "Valido said, "he will pass on valuable genetic variability to his offspring that will help save these rare parrots from extinction. " This newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the Government of the VI. BULKRA1E U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOT1E AMALIE, V PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF 11IE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF 11IE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address Correction Requested