Citation
Tropic news. Volume 7. Issue 9.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Volume 7. Issue 9.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



TROPIC NEWS


DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL
RESOURCES


DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE


Volume 7 Number 9


More Moorings for V.I. Waters
Every year in the V. I. we loose the equivalent of
whole coral reefs through the indiscriminant placing of
boat anchors on coral reefs and other living marine
communities. What has taken nature hundreds or
thousands of years to create can take an anchor seconds
to destroy. Recently a positive step has been taken to
stop this destruction. A permit has been issued by the
Coastal Zone Management Commission to the Reef
Ecology Foundation for the installation of permanent
moorings for day use only at frequently used dive site
locations in the territorial waters surrounding the
islands of St. Thomas and St. John.
Moorings are safe, easy to use, and eliminate the
need to anchor, thus preventing further destruction of
our precious coral reef and other hard-bottom communi-
ties from anchors. The moorings are fixed to the bottom
with either a sand screw or a stainless steel eye-bolt
which is cemented directly into carbonate pavement.
The floating mooring line (painter) with a buoy is picked
up and tied to a short bow line on the vessel.
Phase one of this project involves installation of a
total of forty-five (45) moorings atthe designated loca-
tions listed below as specified for each site.


Site
Cow & Calf


Little St. James

Carvel Rock
Capella Island
Congo Cay
Grass Cay
Thatch Cay
Great St. James

Flat Cay

Saba


Location
4W. of Cow
2E. of Calf


6of Buoys
6


S.W. of Little
St. James Island
S. of Rock
N. of Island
S.W. of Island
S. of Island
N.W. of Island
2S. W. of Island
2W. of Island
2W. N. W. of Island
2E. of Island
W. of Island
Total


The moorings shall be able to accommodate vessels
up to sixty (60) feet and one hundred (100) gross tons.
The Division of Environmental Enforcement (DPNR)
will distribute an informational package concerning the
moorings during the issuance and renewal of boat
licenses.
For more information about moorings please contact
Environmental Enforcement at DPNR 774-3320.


Fishing is not for Everyone

National Fishing
Week is June 5-11,TAKE A FRIND
1995. People across FISHIN
the country are anx-
iously waiting to join
the festivities that are f
being sponsored in
conjunction with this
annual event. Lending
their talents to this
year's program is
award winning cartoon- 0
ist Jim Davis, and his N, G W-'
lovable fat cat Garfield. m SE m
So why don't we
have banners and radio announcements informing the
public about this event in the Virgin Islands? Actually,
it would be in our best interest not to locally advertise
this particular event.
For decades we've been taking fish from the sea
much faster than they can replace themselves, with dire
consequences. The numbers of marine fish are at an all
time low, and the chief culprit is overfishing to meet
an unprecedented demand for seafood.
The immediate threat posed by overfishing is
aggravated by long term threats of large-scale changes
to marine ecosystems. Most salt water fish spend all or
at least part of their lives in coastal waters, where their
environment is continually assaulted by pollution and
development. Without healthy, properly functioning
coastal ecosystems fish cannot grow and reproduce -in
a word, they can't survive.
It's up to us conservation minded citizens to be
informed about urgent problems threatening marine
fish populations and get behind efforts to:
V promote sustainable use polices that balance
commercial, recreational and ecological values;
V improve our understanding offish and their role
in the marine environment; and
Preserve coastal habitat and water quality.




Quote
'This curious world which we inhabit
is more wonderful than it is convenient;
more beautiful than it is useful; it is more
to be admired and enjoyed than used"
Thoreau, 1837


June 1995


-YIr --- -- ---- -







Take A Closer Look

Picture this; It's Saturday afternoon, you're sitting
on the sand at your favorite
beach sipping a cool refresh-
ing drink enjoying a cool
tropical breeze. You are
surrounded by various kinds '
of trees and shrubs and
you've never given them any
consideration other than
which ones would provide
the most shade. Take a
closer look!
Our beautiful beaches
would not be if it wasn't for
the many species of seashore
plants. They influence their
environment by trapping soil
and aiding in land building.
Other species actively crack
and dismantle rocky shore-
lines.
In addition to shaping the
shorelines, many seashore
plants have medicinal uses. We know about Aloe and its
many healing properties but did you know that wild
looking vine with yellow flowers called "leatherleaf' is
great for dandruff. Or a tea made from the roots, leaves
and bark of the Sea Grape tree is used to treat hoarse-
ness, asthma, hemorrhage and diarrhea. A word of
caution goes out to anyone who isn't familiar with the
various species of seashore plants before using them.
Whether it be for food, wood or fuel, seashore
plants have always been used by man. We shouldn't
view them as useless bushes growing along the
shoreline, but as an intergral part of the beach envi-
ronment.


Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
****K>
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
6291 Estate Nazareth 101
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


SEASHORE PLANT DEMONSTRATION


PROJECT

We are currently working on a
Seashore Plant Brochure which will
identify a few of the various species
planted at our Division of Fish and
Wildlife Estate Nazareth office. The
brochure will consist of general
information about the plants as
well as a map locating the species
found on the property. Each plant
will be identified with a name
plate. Additional information
regarding reproduction,
propogation and uses for each
species will be available upon
request.


UIRIU*R
Q








rlml
w
IYLIII~U
~tl~-~*l
LILIII)


Thought For the Day

A reminder: When food shopping, look for containers
that are easy to recycle-- beverages in glass or alumi-
num bottles, sauces, condiments, baby foods in glass,
etc. If 10% of Americans would purchase products with
less packaging just 10% of the time, we could eliminate
an estimated 144 million pounds (65 million kgs) of
plastic from our landfills each year, as well as reduce
industrial pollution.
Man is a complex being; he makes deserts bloom-
and lakes die"
-Gil Stern


This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


~g~a~glP~r I ---~r~s~ ~c~--~pac --Ib~ ~t~-~Yl..r~Ae~B~e~PIC~R~e~


- le -- I-. II c.


4YIP


~i~f~




Full Text

PAGE 1

~ DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE June 1995 Volume 7 Number 9 Fishing is not for Everyone TAKE A FRIEND FISHIN' a~ ~~ q ~ More Moorings for V.I. Waters Every year in the V. I. we loose the equivalent of whole coral reefs through the indiscriminant placing of boat anchors on coral reefs and other living marine communities. What has taken nature hundreds or thousands of years to create can take an anchor seconds to destroy. Recently a positive step has been taken to stop this destruction. A permit has been issued by the Coastal Zone Management Commission to the Reef Ecology Foundation for the installation of permanent moorings for day use only at frequently used dive site locations in the territorial waters surrounding the islands of St. Thomas and St. John. Moorings are safe, easy to use, and eliminate the need to anchor, thus preventing further destruction of our precious coral reef and other hard-bottom communities from anchors. The moorings are fixed to the bottom with either a sand screw or a stainless steel eye-bolt which is cemented directly into carbonate pavement. The floating mooring line (painter) with a buoy is picked up and tied to a short bow line on the vessel. Phase one of this project involves installation of a total of forty-five (45) moorings at.the desi~ated locations listed below as specified for each site. Sik Location #ofBuoxs Cow & Calf 4W. of Cow 6 2E. of Calf Little St. James S.W. of Little St. James Island 5 Carvel Rock S. of Rock 5 Capella Island N. of Island 5 Congo Cay S.W.ofIsland 5 Grass Cay S. of Island 4 Thatch Cay Great St. James N.W. of Island 7 28. W. of Island 2W. of Island 4 Flat Cay 2W. N. W. of Island 2E. of Island 4 National Fishing Week is June 5-11, 1995. People across the country are anxiously waiting to join the festivities that are being sponsored in conjunction with this annual event. Lending their talents to this year's program is . award winning cartoonist Jim Davis, and his NATiONALFlSI«::;;;:-lovable fat cat Garfield. ~&-11.1:80 why don't we have banners and radio announcements informing the public about this event in the Virgin Islands? Actually, it would be in our best interest not to locally advertise this particular event. For decades we've been taking fish from the sea much faster than they can replace themselves, with dire consequences. The numbers of marine fish are at an all time low, and the chief culprit is overfishing to meet an unprecedented demand for seafood. The immediate threat posed by overfishing is aggr~vated by long term threats of large-scale changes to marine ecosystems. Most salt water fish spend all or at least part of their lives in coastal waters, where their environment is continually assaulted by pollution and development. Without healthy, properly functioning coastal ecosystems, fish cannot grow and reproduce -'-in a word, they can't survive. It's up to us conservation minded citizens to be informed about urgent problems threatening marine fish populations and get behind efforts to: V promote sustainable use polices that balance commercial, recreational and ecological values; V improve our understanding offish and their role in the marine environment; and V' preserve coastal habitat and water quality. Saba W. of Island Total .i 45 Quote 'This curious world which we inhabit is more wonderful than it is convenient; more beautiful than it is useful; it is more to be admired and enjoyed than used" Thoreau, 1837 The moorings shall be able to accommodate vessels up to sixty (60) feet and one hundred (100) gross tons. The Division of Environmental Enforcement (DPNR) will distribute an informational package concerning the moorings during the issuance and renewal of boat licenses. For more information about moorings please contact Environmental Enforcement at DPNR 774-3320.

PAGE 2

Take A Closer Look SEASHORE PLANT DEMONSTRATION PROJECT -. -~ a;. .~ We are currently working on a Seashore Plant Brochure which will identify a few of the various species planted at our Division of Fish and Wildlife Estate Nazareth office. The brochure will consist of general information about the plants as well as a map locating the species found on the property. Each plant will be identified with a name plate. Additional information regarding reproduction, propogation and uses for each species will be available upon request. IB -':'='~": Thought For the Day Picture this; It's Saturday afternoon, you're sitting on the sand at your favorite beach sipping a cool refreshing drink enjoying a cool tropical breeze. You are surrounded by various kinds of trees and shrubs and you've never given them any consideration other than which ones would provide the most shade. Take a closer look! Our beautiful beaches would not be if it wasn't for the many species of seashore plants. They influence their environment by trapping soil and aiding in land building. Other species actively crack and dismantle rocky shorelines. ' In addition to shaping the ~ --shorelines, many seashore plants have medicinal uses. We know about Aloe and its many healing properties but did you know that wild looking vine with yellow flowers called "leatherleaf' is great for dandruff. Or a tea made from the roots, leaves and bark of the Sea Grape tree is used to tre~t hoarseness, asthma, hemorrhage and diarrhea. A word of caution goes out to anyone who isn't familiar with the various species of seashore plants before using them. Whether it be for food, wood or fuel, seashore plants have always been used by man. We shouldn't view them as useless bushes growing along the shoreline, but as an intergral part of the beach environment. A reminder: When food shopping, look for containers that are easy to recycle-beverages in glass or aluminum bottles, sauces, condiments, baby foods in glass, etc. If 10% of Americans would purchase products with less packaging just 10% of the time, we could eliminate an estimated 144 million pounds (65 million kgs) of plastic from our landfills each year, as well as reduce industrial pollution. " Man is a complex being; he makes deserts bloomand lakes die" -Gil Stern This newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Semce, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the Government of the VI. Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 6291 Estate Nazareth 101 St. Thomas, USVI 00802-1104 (809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.) Address Correction Requested