Citation
Tropic news. Volume 6. Issue 2

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Volume 6. Issue 2
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text



TROPIC NEWS


DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL
RESOURCES
November 1993


DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE


Volume 6 Number 2


11,11-1111 INE11 I I MINX-J.


FISHY HAPPENINGS

There is a new addition at Fish and Wild-
life, a "Sea Otter".


," ,. f .'
g 'w ~':'.- j .'. .

'.4




Not your typical brown California variety,
but a bright yellow remotely operated vehicle
(ROV). Our "Sea Otter" is a high performance,
mobile, underwater camera system equipped
with four proportionally controlled propulsion
motors allowing it to move in any direction at
speeds up to two knots. The "Sea Otter" can
locate and inspect targets at depths up to 500
feet.
Unlike underwater towed video systems,
the "Sea Otter" is manually flown from the
deck of the research vessel with the aid of a
video monitor. ROV's have been used by uni-
versities, commercial engineering and marine
companies, and oceanographic research insti-
tutes for underwater searches and explora-
tions, as well as for ecological and biological
monitoring.
The Division of Fish and Wildlife, funded
by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport
Fish Restoration Fund, is using the "Sea Ot-
ter" to investigate offshore fisheries habitats
on the insular shelf south of St. Thomas and
St. John. The ROV will assist researchers in
locating and mapping unique shelf features,
the extent of which will then be characterized
and charted. Benthic habitats will be described
and eventually routine monitoring of habitats
and ecological processes will be implemented.


PLANT A TREE: HELP THE EARTH

One way children can make a positive
impact on the environment is to plant a tree.
Planting a tree gives kids a chance to learn
what it means to take charge of a spot on the
earth, place a living thing there, and see to it
that the living thing is nurtured and tended.
Remember that where you plant a tree is
very important. Plant the right tree in the
right place. Imagine the tree fully grown -
make sure it won't interfere with power lines,
buildings or sidewalks. Make sure the new
tree gets a thorough watering once a week.
Place a six inch layer of mulch around the tree
to retain water. Wait six months before apply-
ing fertilizer. Have the children help you look
for insects and disease. Wilting leaves or
branches, changes in leaf color, webs and
sticky materials on the leaves all are signs of
insect and disease problems..
There are other ways that kids can learn
about and appreciate the trees around them.
Have them get to know the trees in their
neighborhood. Discuss differences between
trees that lose their leaves and those that
don't. Count the number and types of trees in
your area. Learn the names, their uses by
wildlife and their natural history.
Keep a journal on a particular tree. Fol-
low it during the year and sketch its changes.
Collect samples of bark, leaves, flowers, fruit
and seeds. Observe the kinds of wildlife that
use and enjoy the tree.
Make mulch discuss how organic (living)
material is recycled back into the earth; how
carbon dioxide, oxygen and water are recycled
through the composted leaves.
For more information on the Global
Releaf program contact the Division. The UVI
Cooperative Extension Service can help you
with information on types of trees to plant and
how to nurture them (774-0210 on St.Thomas,
778-024 ann Rt. f'rniY' T-Tav fiint






BROCHURE RACKS


The Division of Fish and Wildlife is dis-
tributing brochure racks to a number of cen-
tral locations on all three islands to better
disseminate our environmental education
materials. Places like post offices, hospitals,
the University, certain Government offices and
others will have these materials for public use.
We will provide a list of locations in a later
issue of this newsletter.

IDENTIFICATION COURSES

The Division would like to remind teach-
ers and other interested persons that we have
three identification courses available for public
use. The courses are all produced by Paul
Humann and.include; Reef Fish Identification,
Reef Coral Identification, and Reef Creature
Identification.
All of the courses include many high
quality slides of the animals and have a sug-
gested course guide to present them to an
audience or class. All are available with the
accompanying books on the same topic by Paul
Humann.
To check out one of these courses please
call one of our offices. These are excellent
teaching guides for anyone interested in the
marine life surrounding our islands.


Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES

Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
101 Estate Nazareth
St. Thomas, USVI 00802
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


FEDERAL FISHERY REGS..UPDATE

Effective November 15, 1993 the Shallow
Water Reef Fish Fishery Management Plan
(FMP) is amended to: 1. include the
deepwater reef fish and aquarium fish, 2.
restrict the collection of aquarium fish to hand-
held dip nets and slurp guns, 3. prohibit the
harvest or possession ofjewfish, Nassau grou-
per, seahorses, and foureye, banded and
longsnout butterflyfish, 4. prohibit fishing
from December 1 through February 28, each
year, in two red hind spawning aggregation
areas located south of St. Thomas and east of
St. Croix, 5. prohibit fishing in a mutton snap
per spawning aggregation area south of St.
Croix, from March 1 through June 30, each
year, and 6. specify regulations concerning the
size, location, composition, and fastening mate-
rial for degradable escape panels on fish traps.
These changes to the FMP only apply in
Federal waters beyond three miles from our
coasts. All of these management measures are
expected to result in increases in populations
of our fishery resources which will benefit us
and future generations. For more information
please contact the Division or the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council at 766-5926.


This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Volume 6 Number 2 FISHY HAPPENINGS PLANT A TREE: HELP THE EARTH There is a new additIon at Fish and Wildlife, a "Sea Otter", ;»"",;"i,jilii Not your typical brown California variety, but a bright yellow remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Our "Se'a Otter" is a high performance, mobile, underwater cam~ra system equipped with four proportionally controlled propulsion motors allowing it to move in any direction at speeds up to two knots. The "Sea Otter" can locate and inspect targets at depths up to 500 feet. Unlike underwater towed video systems, the IISea Otter!' is manually flown from the deck of the research vessel with the aid of a . video monitor. ROV's have been used by universities, commercial engineering and marine companies, and oceanographic research institutes for underwater searches and explorations, as well as for ecological and biological monitoring. The Division of Fish and Wildlife, fu~ded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fis~ Restoration Fund, is using the IISea Otterll to investigate offshore fisheries habitats on the insular shelf south of St. Thomas and St. John. The ROV will assist researchers in locating and mapping unique shelf features, the extent of which will then be characterized and charted. Benthic habitats will be described and eventually routine monitoring of habitats and ecological processes will be implemented. One way children can make a positive impact on the environment is to plant a tree. Planting a tree gives kids a chance to learn what it means to take charge of a spot on the earth, place a living thing there, and see to itthat the living thing is nul-tured and tended. Remember that where you plant a tree is very important. Plant the right tree in the right pl~ce. Imagine the tree fully grown make sure it won't interfere with power lines, buildings or sidewalks. Make sure the new tree gets a thorough watering once a week. Place a six inch layer of mulch around the tree to.retain water. Wait six months before applying fertilizer. Have the children help you look for insects and disease. Wilting leaves or : branches, changes in leaf color, webs and , sticky materials on the leaves all are signs of insect and dis,ease problems.. There are other ways that kids can learn about and appreciate the trees around them. Have them get to know the trees in their neighborhood. Discuss differences between trees that lose their leaves and those that don't. Count the number and types of trees in your area. Learn the names, their uses by wildlife and their natural history. Keep a journal on a particular tree. Follow it during the year and sketch its changes. Collect samples of bark, leaves, flowers, fruit and seeds. Observe the kinds of wildlife that use and enjoy the tree. Make mulch discuss how organic (living) material is recycled back into the earth; how carbon dioxide, oxygen and water are recycled I through the composted leaves. For more information on the Global Releaf program contact the Division. The UVI Cooperative Extension Service can help you with information on types of trees to plant and how to nurture them (77.4-0210 on St.Thom:I.--, 77R-O24.f) nn Rt. (;rn;y) H~vp f11nl

PAGE 2

--BROCHURE RACKS FEDERAL FISHERY REGS.. UPDATE Effective November 15,1993 the Shallow Water Reef Fish Fishery Management Plan (FMP) is ammended to: 1. include the deepwater reef fish and aquarium fish, 2. restrict the collection of aquarium fish to hand. held dip nets and slurp guns, 3. prohibit the harvest or possession ofjewfish, Nassau grouper, seahorses, and foureye, banded and longsnout butterflyfish, 4. prohibit fishing from December 1 through February 28, each year, in two red hind spawning aggregation areas located south of St. Thomas and east of St. Croix, 5. prohibit fishing in a n1.utton snap per spawning aggregation area south of St. Croix, from March 1 through June 30, each year, and 6. specify regulations concerning the size, location, composition; and fastening material for degradable escape panels on fish traps. These changes to the FMP only apply in Federal waters beyond three miles from our coasts. All of these management measures are expected to result in increases in populations of our fishery resources which will benefit us and future generations. For more information please contact the Division or the Caribbean Fishery Management Council at 766-5926. The Division of Fish and Wildlife is distributing brochure racks to a number of cehtl"allocations on all three islands to better disseminate our environmental education materials. Places like post offices,.hospitals, the University, certain Government offices and others will have these materials for public use. We will provide a list of locations in a later issue of this newsletter. illENTIFICATION COURSES Thr. nivi",ion w0111c1 likp. t.o t"~mind t.~::tchers and other interested persons that we have three identIfication courses available for public use. The courses are all produced by Paul Humann and. include; Reef Fish Identification, Reef Coral Identification, and Reef Creature Identification. All of the courses include many high quality slides of the animals and have a suggested course guide to present them to an audience or class. All are available with the accompanying books on the same tOpic by Paul Humann. To check out one of these courses please call one of our offices. These are excellent teaching guides for anyone interested in the marine life surrounding our islands. This newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the Government of the VI. I Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper ,," ~ BULKRA1E U.S.POSTAGEPAID CHARLOTIE AMALIE, V.I. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF mE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF mE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 101 Estate Nazareth St. Thomas, USVI 00802 (809)775-6762 (ST. T .), (809)772-1955 (ST .X.) Address Correction Requested