Citation
Tropic news. Volume 6. Issue 1.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Volume 6. Issue 1.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



TROPIC NEWS


DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL
RESOURCES


October 1993


DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE


Volume6 Number 1


WILDLIFE HAPPENINGS

The migratory Ospreys have returned to
the Virgin Islands and are now adding interest
to our shorelines by perching on poles and
other exposed perches near the sea. This large
hawk, which has a mostly white head with a
dark stripe through the eye, can alsn he seen
soaring over shallow coastal waters. The
Osprey catches shallow water fish such as
mullet by plunging into the water feet first and
grabbing the fish in its talons.
Flamingos were at one time regular in-
habitants of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Is-
lands but were eliminated by hunting and
disturbance of nesting sites. In the past sev-
eral years there have been several attempts to
reintroduce Flamingos in Puerto Rico and on
Guana Island and Anegada in the BVI. Some
of these birds are appearing in the U.S. Virgin
Islands and have been sighted near Coral Bay,
St. John and Perseverance Bay, St. Thomas.
On October 6, one was seen near the Red Hook
ferry dock on St. Thomas. Twelve flamingos
were in the West End saltpond in St. Croix for
several months but disappeared and now there
are two.
We can tell that Fall is here by the ab-
sence of many seabirds on our waters. During
the Spring and Summer, we get used to seeing
large flocks of seagulls and terns diving on
schools offish. The Laughing Gull, and a num-
ber of terns (Roseate, Sooty, Bridled, Noddy,
Sandwich and Least) arrive here each year in
April and depart in October. They spend the
rest of the year feeding in the nutrient rich
waters near the South American coast. They
migrate to our islands because our numerous,
small offshore cays provide predator free nest-
ing sites. The only seabirds that remain here
year-round are the Brown Pelican, Brown,
Redfoot and Masked Boobies, Royal Tern,
Tropic Birds, and Frigate Bird.


SCOMBRID FISH POISONING

The Division has received reports of sick-
ness resulting from eating cooked tuna pur-
chased locally. This type offish poisoning is
different from ciguatera, which can be con-
tracted from more than 100 species ofreeffish.
Ciguatera is caused by the fish ingesting a
dynoflagelate called Gambierdiscus toxicus
which grows on marine plants or other sub-
strate. The dynoflagelate is concentrated up
the food chain as carnivorous fish eat herbivo-
rous fish.
Scombrid poisoning is contracted from
members of the mackerel family, tunas, wahoo,
and kingfish. These fast swimming, long rang-
ing gamefish have an extensive circulatory
system to enable more efficient gas exchange
between the blood and tissues. Internal body
temperatures are higher than the external
environment and the circulatory system aids
in the dissipation of the heat produced by
rapid swimming.
Once tuna or members of the mackerel
family are caught, care should be taken to
immediately bleed and ice the catch. Rapid
chilling lowers the internal core temperature
of the flesh, inhibits the bacterial breakdown
of muscle tissue and maintains optimum qual-
ity of the fish. These species, if left in the sun
on deck or in the bottom of the boat, will
quickly spoil and the flesh becomes soft. A low
quality fish reduces saleability and consump-
tion may result in illness. When purchasing
these fish it is best to quickly cut the fish into
the desired portions and freeze them.
Symptoms of scombrid poisoning are
temporary and include gastrointestinal dis-
tress, diarrhea and/or vomiting. The most
important thing is to replace body fluids by
drinking lots of liquid.


..r-~LL~~ _n_8~.--sa. ~ ~__1---~-~ag~~ ~*iha.






MAIDMENT JOINS FISHERIES
FAMILY

The Division of Fish and Wildlife wel-
comes Sheri Maidment to the Fisheries Bu-
reau. Sheri is an Environmental Specialist I
and will be working on benthic habitat and
fisheries assessment projects. Sheri has a
Bachelors of Science degree in Marine Science
Biology from Long Island University in
Southhampton, New York. She has worked
there as a field and lab technician and as a
Fisheries Biologist for the National Marine
Fisheries Service on board the Oregon II in the
Gulf of Mpxico, Sheri's hobbies include SCUBA
diving, sailing and photography.

FISHERIES/HABITAT POSTERS

The Division is producing a series of Virgin
Islands fisheries deepwaterr, midwater, shal-
low water, and benthic gamefish) and habitat
(mangroves, seagrass, coral reef, saltpond, and
woodlands) posters. Others will include sea-
birds, land birds and terrestrial animals. All
are being done in full color and will be avail-
able free of charge when completed. Paul
Borghi is painting the fisheries posters and
Teresa "Red" Fisher is painting the habitat
posters. We hope that the first of these posters
will be available in early 1994. For more infor-
mation please contact the Division.
es were saved by printing on recycled paper
Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


FREQUENT FLIERS DESERVE SPE-
CIAL CARE : Don't Take Feathers Lightly

There's nothing in nature quite like the
sight of migrating birds. Their routes take
them thousands of miles each way, but they're
always on schedule. Unfortunately, many of
them could be on a one-way trip to nowhere. 75
years ago, millions of migratory birds were
being killed commercially just to supply
feathers for fashion. Back then, our nation
came together behind a strict new law, the
Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Its enforcement
assured smooth flights and happy landings for
nature's most frequent fliers.
SMore recently, destruction of the habitats
where these frequent fliers nest, feed and
winter is causing drastic declines in their
populations. Today, we have to come together.
again: to battle the threat of wholesale habitat
destruction and the wild places so important to
our feathered friends. For more information
you can write:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (MBMO)
Department of the Interior
Washington, D.C. 20240
or call the Division of Fish and Wildlife on
St. Thomas or St. Croix.

/0 & This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES

Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
101 Estate Nazareth
St Thomas, USVI 00802
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


aqlbaaaPsasls~a~8~rsp~i~i~~


____ 1 30000-----OM 1 11 11.0 ,




Full Text

PAGE 1

DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE October 1993 Volume 6 Number 1 WILDLIFE HAPPENINGS SCOMBRID FISH POISONING The migratory Ospreys have returned to the Virgin Islands and are now adding interest to our shorelines by perching on poles and other exposed perches near the sea. Tl)is large hawk, which has a mostly white head with a dark stripe through the ey~, caT! :'11 ~n hR ,c;RRn soaring over shallow coastal waters. The Osprey catches shallow water fish such as mullet by plunging into the water feet first and grabbing the fi~h in its talons. Flamingos were at one time regular inhabitants of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands but were eliminated by hunting and disturbance of nesting sites. In the past several years there have been several attempts tq reintroduce Flamingos In Puerto Rico and on Guana Island and Anegada in theBVI. Some of these birds are appearing in the U.S. Virgin Islands and have been sighted near Coral Bay, St. John and Perseverance Bay, St. Thomas. On October 6, one was seen near the Red Hook ferry dock on St. Thomas. Twelve flamingos were in the West End saltpond in St. Croix for several m~nths but disappeared and n.ow there are two. We can tell that Fall is here by the absence of many seabirds on our waters. During the Spring and Summer, ~~e ge.t used to seeing large flocks of seagulls and terns diving on schools of fish. The Laughing Gull, and a number of terns (Roseate, Sooty, Bridled, Noddy, Sandwich and Least) arrive here each year in April and depart in October. They spend the rest of the year feeding in the nutrient rich waters near the South American .coast. They migrate to our islands because our numerous, small offshore cays provide predator free nesting sites. The 9nly seabirds that remain here year-round are the Brown Pelican, Brown, Redfoot and Masked Boobies, R.oyal Tern, Tropic Birds, and Frigate Bird. The Division has received reports of sickhessresulting from eating cooked tuna purchased locally. This type of fish poisoning is different from ciguatera, which can be contracted from more than 100 species ofreeffish. Cig\iatera is caused by the fish ingesting 0I dynoflagelate called Gambierdiscus toxicus ! which grows on marine plants or other substrate. The dynoflagelate is concentrated up the food chain as carnivorous fish eat herbivorous fish. Scombrid poisoning is contracted from ~embers of the mackerel family, tunas, wahoo, I and kingfish. These fast swimming, long rangi ing gamefish have an extensive circulatory s~stem to enable more efficient gas exchange between the blood and tissues. Internal body temperatures are higher than the external environment and the circulatory system aids in the dissipation of the heat produced by rapid swimmIng. Once tuna or members of the mackerel family are caught, care should be taken to Immediately bleed and ice the catch. Rapid chilling lowers the internal core temperature of the flesh, inhibits the bacterial breakdown of muscle tissue and maintains optimum quality of the fish. These species, if left in the sun on deck or in the bottom of the boat, will quickly spoil and the flesh becomes soft. A low quality fish reduces saleability and consumption may result in illness. When purchasing these fish it is best to quickly cut the fish into the desired portions and freeze them. Symptoms of scombrid poisoning are temporary and include gastrointestinal distress, diarrhea and/or vomiting. The most important thing is to replace body fluids by drinking lots of liquid.

PAGE 2

FREQUENT FLIERS DESERVE SPECIAL CARE: Don't Take Feathers Lightly MAIDMENT JOINS FISHERIES F MilLY The Division of Fish and Wildlife welcomes Sheri Maidment to the Fisheries Bureau. Sheri is an Environmental Specialist I and will be working on benthic habitat and fisheries assessment projects. Sheri has a Bachelors of Science degree in Marine Science Biology from Long Island University in Southhampton, New York. She has worked there as a field and lab techpician and as a Fisheries Biologist for theN ational Marine Fisheries Service on board the Oregon II in the (}111fnfMp-xi('.(), Sh~1;'S hobbies include SCUBA diving, sailing and photography. FISHERIES/HABITAT POSTERS The Division is producing a series of Virgin Islands fisheries (deepwater, midwater, shallow water, and benthic gamefish) and habitat (mangroves, seagrass, coral reef, saltpond, and woqdlands) posters. Others will include seabirds, land birds and terrestrial animals. All. are being done in full color and ,viII be available free of charge when completed..Paul Borghi is painting the fisheries posters and Teresa "Red" Fisher is painting the habitat posters. We hope that the first of these posters will be available in early 1994. For more information please contact the Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . e 5 «J a . . . . . . . 8 . . .. .. Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper There's nothing in nature quite like the sight of migrating birds. Their routes take them thousands of miles each way, but they're always on schedule. Unfortunately, many of I them could be on a one-way trip to nowhere. 75 ! years ago, millions of migratory birds were being killed commercially just to supply feathers for fashion. Back then, our nation came together behind a strict new law, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Its enforcement assured smooth flights and happy landings for nature's most frequent fliers. More recently, destruction of the habitats where these frequent fliers nest, feed and winter is causing drastic declines in their populations. Today, we have to come together. again: to battle the threat of wholesale habitat de.struction and the wild places so important to our feathered friends. For more information you can write: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (MBIvrO) Department of the Interior Washington, D.C. 20240 or call the Division of Fish and Wildlife -on St. Thomas or St. Croix. This newsletter was funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Qouncil and the Government of the VI. ~ BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 101 Estate Nazareth 5t. Thomas, USVI 00"802 (809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (5T.X.) Address Correction Requested