Citation
Tropic news. Vol. 3. No. 7.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Vol. 3. No. 7.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




TROPTIC NE WS


NT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
RESOURCES Volume 3 Number 7/8


FEEDING MARINE MAMMALS IN
WILD BANNED

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra-
tion published a final rule banning the feeding of all
marine mammals in the wild. This rule went into effect
on April 19, 1991. Due to an increase of dolphin feeding
cruises in the south Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico as well
as the feeding of wild sea lions in Monterey Bay, Califor-
nia, NOAA felt that something had to be done. Problems
such as dependency, malnutrition and altered feeding
habits arise when humans take it upon themselves to
feed wild animals. The survivability and balance of
nature is disrupted.
Violators will be charged with a "take" of a marine
mammal under the Marine Mammal Protection Act
(MMPA). Penalties for MMPA violations include fines
up to $20,000 and/or one year in prison.

ENDANGERED STATUS PROPOSED
FOR AFRICAN ELEPHANT


The US Fish and Wildlife Service, responding to peti-
tions from several conservation and animal welfare or-
ganizations, has reclassified the African elephant from
threatened to endangered status.
According to the proposal, populations of the African
elephant would be reclassified to endangered status
under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) except those
occurring in Botswana, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.
Populations in these countries would remain classified as
threatened because the sizeable elephant populations
there are managed under effective conservation programs
and their numbers are stable or increasing.

FISHERMAN/RESTAURANTEUR FINED
$6,000 FOR BILLFISH VIOLATIONS

A recreational fisherman who sold a blue marlin to
compensate for damages caused to his boat while landing
the fish has been assessed a $3,000.00 fine, according to
NOAA Enforcement Agent Mike Christian.
Jesus G. Canovas, a resident of Puerto Rico, was
fishing from his Mako Sportfisherman when he hooked


The Spiny Lobster, Panulirus argus, is considered a
delicacy by most people. However, its populations are decreas-
ing seriously due to overfishing. A female lobster can release a
half a million larvae at one time but less than one percent of
those survive to maturity. That is why it is so important not to
take females with eggs and to obey the 3-1/2 inch carapace size
limit. All lobsters that have reached that size have reproduced
at least once, ensuring that there will be more lobsters for
future generations of Virgin Islanders to enjoy.

the blue marlin, later weighed- out at 386 pounds.
The fish was finally subdued after a three and one half
hour battle, during which an estimated $1,200.00 worth
of damage was inflicted on Canovas' vessel.
The blue marlin was subsequently purchased by El
Arrecife Restaurant in Puerto Nuevo and was in the
process of being cut into steaks when NOAA enforce-
ment agents arrived. The owner of the restaurant, Jose
R. Tizol, was charged with purchasing the marlin, a
violation of federal regulations which prohibit the sale,
purchase, trade or barter of any billfish taken within the
U.S. management zone. Tizol also received a $3,000.00
fine.
-- ~ ~ _. _

CONING SOON


BOAT RAMP NEWS

VI ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST


INDIGENOUS SPECIES PERMITS

PTATTCS/T~fAT1TTrRRAC.T VTnTEO


APRIL/MAY 1991


_13






~smn en~~usasrl~B8ss~~~-LpUI


EARTH DAY COVERAGE


Earth day activities on St. John and St. Thomas pro-
vided information and earth-saving tips to hundreds of
people on both islands. At both the NPS ballfield on St.
John and Bluebeards Beach on St. Thomas, displays were
set up by EAST, the Audubon Society, the Division of Fish
and Wildlife, The National Park Service, distributors of
earth friendly beauty products and solar energy alterna-
tives.
Food and music were available as well as games for the
kids. Cleanup activities were organized and recycling tips
provided.
On St. John, the Community Foundation hosted an en-
vironmental forum with speakers on a wide range of
topics. Proceeds from earth day activities on St. John go to
support St. John Community Foundation environmental
activities.

LEATHERBACK TURTLES ARE HERE


The 1991 leatherback turtle season on Sandy Point,
St.Croix is promising to be the busiest season since the
start of this project in 1981. By the end of April, we
have had 36 turtles lay over 90 nests. Fifteen (15) of
those turtles have nested in previous years. We have
already had one night in which 10 turtles nested. This
has only happened a few times before and not before the
middle to end of May, our peak season. The project
continues using Earthwatch volunteers. This is now our
10th year, and we continue to find them to be dedicated,
hard working volunteers.
Public visitation to the project is limited to weekend
nights and can be scheduled through the St. Croix
Environmental Association at 773-1989.




Trees were saved by printing on recycled paper


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
OF THE UNITED STATES
****++
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Division of Fish and Wildlife
101 EstateNazareth
St. Thomas, USVI 00802
(809)775-6762 (ST.T.), (809)772-1955 (ST.X.)


NON-TOXIC SHOT REGULATIONS

Virgin Islands hunters are reminded that this is the
final implementation year of the 6-year plan to phase
out the use of lead shot for the taking of waterfowl, coots
and certain other species. All of the waterfowl harvest
this coming season will occur in nontoxic shot zones, in-
cluding Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and all offshore
U.S. territorial waters.
The final rulemaking on this issue was published on
May 13, 1991 and is available for review at the Division
of Fish and Wildlife.
A critical element in the Department of the Interior's
deliberations and decision to implement and enforce
regulations establishing nontoxic shot zones nationwide
has been the determination that lead poisoning result-
ing from waterfowl hunting is a significant annual
mortality factor in certain migratory birds. Birds, either
through consuming spent lead shot or by being wounded
with lead shot, often are poisoned by the lead and die.
This ruling will be enforced in the Virgin Islands and
all hunters are requested to comply with it so as to
minimize this risk to our precious migratory bird re-
sources.


QUOTE
"We travel together, passengers on a little spaceship,
dependant on its vulnerable supplies of air, soil and
water; all committed for our safety to its security and
peace, preserved from annihilation only by the care, the
work, and I will say, the love we give our fragile craft."
Adlai Stevenson


t t ,', This newsletter was funded by the US
Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fish and
SWildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean
? L Fishery Management Council and the
Government of the VI.


BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.
PERMIT NO. 35


Address Correction Requested


~d)l -I 19-_-~~I --~-~_- I II ~- --




Full Text

PAGE 1

TJRrr DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE .J DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL .. "APRIUMAY 1991 RESOURCES Volume 3 Number 7/8 FEEDING :MARINE MAMMALS IN WILD BANNED The Spiny Lobster, Panulirus argus, is considered a delicacy by most people. However, its populations are decreasing seriously due to overfishing. A female lobster can release a half a million larvae at one time but less than one percent of those survive to maturity. That is why i~ is so important not to take females with eggs and to obey the 3-1/2 inch carapace size limit. All lobsters that have reached that size have reproduced at least once, ensuring that there will be-more lobsters for future generations of Virgin Islanders to enjoy. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published a final rule banning the feeding of all marine mammals in the wild. This rule went into effect on April 19, 1991. Due to an increase of dolphin feeding cruises in the south Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico as well as the feeding of wild sea lions in Monterey Bay, California, NOAA felt that something had to be done. Problems such as dependency, malnutrition and altered feeding habits arise when humans take it upon themselves to feed wild animals. The survivability and balance of nature is disrupted. Violators will be charged with a "take" of a marine mammal under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). Penalties for MMPA violations include fines up to $20,000 and/or one year in prison. ENDANGERED STATUS PROPOSED FOR AFRICAN ELEPHANT the blue marlin, later weighedout at 386 pounds. The fish was finally subdued after a three and one half hour battle, during which an estimated $1,200.00 worth of damage was inflicted on Canovas' vessel. The blue marlin was subsequently purchased by EI Arrecife Restaurant in Puerto Nuevo and was in the process of being cut into steaks when NOAA enforcement agents arrived. The owner of the restaurant, Jose R. Tizol, was charged with purchasing the marlin, a violation of federal regulations which prohibit the sale, purchase, trade or barter of any billfish taken within the U.S. management zone. Tizol also received a $3,000.00 fine. The US Fish and Wildlife Service, responding to petitions from several conservation and animal welfare organizations, has reclassified the African elephant from threatened to endangered status. According to the proposal, populations of the African elephant would be reclassified to endangered status under the Endangered Species Act CESA) except those occurring in Botswana, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Populations in these countries would remain classified as threatened because the sizeable elephant populations there are managed under effective conservation programs and their numbers are stable or increasing. S(Q)(Q)N FISHERr\iAN/REST AU RANTEUR FINED $6,000 FOR BILLFISH VIOLATIONS BOAT RAMP NEWS VI ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST INDIGENOUS SPECIES PERMITS A recreational fisherman who sold a blue marlin to compensate for damages caused to his boat while landing the fish ha~ been.assessed a $3,000.00 fine, according to NOAA Enforcement Agent Mike Christian. . Jesus G: Ganovas, a 'resident of Puerto Rico; was fishing from his Mako Sportfisherman when he hooked PT A~TT~~fT ,RATHRRRA~K VTnRO

PAGE 2

EARTH DAY COVERAGE NON-TOXIC SHOT REGULA'l'IONS Earth day activities on St. John and St. Thomas provided information and earth-saving tips to hundreds of people on both islands. At both the NPS ballfield on St. John and Bluebeards Bea~h on St. Thomas, displays were set up by EAST, the Audubon Society, the Division of Fish and Wildlife, TIle National Park Service, distributors of earth friendly beauty products and solar energy alternatives. Food and music were available as well as games for the kids. Cleanup activities were organized and recycling tips provided. On St. John, the Community Foundation hosted an environmental forum with speakers on a wide range of topics. Proceeds from earth day activities on St. John go to support St. John Community Foundation environmental acti\rities. LEATHERBACK TURTLES ARE HERE Virgin Islands hunters are reminded that this is the final iD:1plementation year of the 6-year plan to phase out the use of lead shot for the taking of waterfowl, coots and certain other species. All. of the waterfowl harvest this coming season will occur in nontoxic shot zones, including Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and all offshore U.S. territorial waters. The final rulemaking on this issue was published on May 13, 1991 and is available for review at the Division of Fish and Wildlife. A critical element in the Department of the Interior's deliberations and decision to implement and enforce regulations establishing nontoxic shot zon~s nationwide has been the determination that lead poisoning resulting from waterfowl hunting is a significant annual mortality factor in certain migratory birds. Birds, either through consuming spent lead shot or by being wounded with lead shot, often are poisoned by the lead and die. This ruling will be enforced in the Virgin Islands and all hunters are requested to comply with it so as to minimize this risk to our precious migratory bird resources. ~ + ..+. 4-" QUOTE 'We travel together, passengers on a little spaceship, dependant on its vulnerable supplies of air, soil and water; all commited for our safety to its security and peace, preserved from annihilation only by the care, the work, and I will say, the love we give our fragile craft." Adlai Stevenson +. ;\.Sfl & ~ . f.." '\: ~~ ~ ThIS newsletter was funded by the US ~ Fish and Wild1ife Service, Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, the Caribbean Fishery Management Council and the Government of the VI. The 1991 leatherback turtle season on Sandy Point, St. Croix is promising to be the busiest season since the start of this project in 1981. By the end of April, we have had 36 turtles layover 90 nests. Fifteen (15) of those turtles have nested in previous years. We have already had one night in which 10 turtles nested. This has only happened a few times before and not before the middle to end of May, our peak season. The project continues using Earthwatch volunteers. This is now our 10th year, and we continue to find them to be dedicated, hard working volunteers. Public visitation to the project is limited to weekend nights and can be scheduled through the St. Croix Environmental Association at 773-1989. Trees were naved by printing on recycled paper , .~ BULKRA1E U.s. POSTAGE PAID CHARLOT1E AMALIE,V. PERMIT NO. 35 GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STAreS ****** Department of Planning and Natural Resources Division of Fish and Wildlife 101 EstateNazareth St. Thomas, USVI 00802 (809)775-6762 (ST. T.), (809)772-1955 CST.X.) Address Correction Requested