Citation
Tropic news. Vol.1. No. 8

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Vol.1. No. 8
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








TROPIC
,


NEWS


VOL. I "NO. 8


DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS


MAY 1989


LONGLINER ARRESTED

DVI Fisheries Officers arrested a
Japenese owned Longliner "HWA-
WOW". The boat was fishing
illegally in British waters. The
21 member Tawainese crew and
captain were arrested. The
captain was fined $10,000.00 and
the catch confiscated. The catch
amounted to 27,000 pounds of
mainly albocore tuna, some
dolphin, wahoo and marlin.


R/V SESHORSE ARRIVES IN VI

Four volunteers from the Division
of Fish and Wildlife, Joe LaPlace
Ken Turbe, Alan Friedlander, and
Denton Moore, flew to key West,
Florida early in May, and took
charge of the R/V Seahorse (formerly
called "Jesu Cristo), a 45' combination
long-liner/pot boat that was seized by
the National Marine Fisheries
Service under the Lacey Act.

The boat required a week's worth
of painting, cleaning, provisioning
and shaking down before beginning
the 1,000 mile trip to St.Thomas.

The trip required six days. The crew
crossed the Gulf Stream south of Key
West, and followed the Old Bahama
Channel, sometimes within sight of
Cuba, for nearly half the distance.

The Lacey Act is a federal law that
prohibits US fishermen from fishing
in violation of another countries'
fishery laws and bringing the illegal
fish into the United States.


WILDLIFE USE OF ST.CROIX WETLANDS

Large numbers of shorebirds were
sighted at Great Pond on the south
shore of St.Croix during April.
A total of 17 different species
were observed including some
species uncommon in the Virgin
Islands, such as the Whimbrel and
Willet. These numbers indicate
that Great Pond is an important
atging area for migratory
shorebirds. It is a good place
for experienced and avid birders
to see rare bird sightings as well
as a fine spot for th inexperienced
birdwatcher with much patience to-
begin "to learn shorebirds".

In addition to the shorebirds,
sightings included Great Blue
Herons, Snowy Egrets, Little Blue
Herons, Tri-colored Herons, Royal
Terns, Least Terns and Laughing
Gulls all feeding in the pond.
But perhaps the most pleasing
sightings on this visit was an
osprey. All in all, Great Pond
is a good place to birdwatch!

LONGLINING INFORMATION

Division personnel have participated
in two fisheries data collection trips
aboard the swordfish vessel "Miss
,Shannon". Information was also
provided to the South Atlantic
Fisheries Management Council
through Mote Marine Laboratory,
Sarasota, Florida, on billfish mortality
on longline gear. In 1987, 543,523 pound
of surface longline catch was landed on
St.Croix (70% swordfish and 29% tuna),
98% was shipped stateside and 2% was
sold locally.







BOAT RAMPS STX

The Division of Fish and Wildlife
will be initiating three public
boat access projects on St.Croix.
One.engineering firm has.been
selected to design improvements
to the north ramp at the Freder-
iksted Fishermens' Pier, improve-
ments to the existing Altona
Lagoon ramp with a pier and a
second ramp added. The third
boat ramp and pier are in Cotton
Valley.


NESTING SEASON

The overwintering migratory birds
have left USVI, heading north to
breed and raise their young. As a
result the forests are much quieter
However, the beaches and ponds have
been taken over by the Least Terns,
an endangered species that nests on
St.Croix.

This year the terns are nesting
in some unusual places, the beds
of dried up salt ponds, such as
Southgate. This creates an
interesting dilemma for biologists,
Like everyone else, we need rain.
But enough rain to fill up the ponds
will kill the young terns. Thus,
we must hope for just the right
amount of rain until the young
terns can fly.

Terns were also observed nesting
at Long Point Bay. To the best
of our knowledge, this is a new
record.

TURTLE WATCH

The Division is interested in
obtaining information on turtle
activities/nestings around St.Croix.
Persons with information may
contact DFW at 772-1955.


MUTTON SNAPPER PROJECT-STX


The Divisions' proj*t% to assess
the spawning aggregations of
mutton (virgin) snapper off Long
Point, funded by the:National
Undersea Research Center, has
been postponed to the unavail-
ability of a underwater remote
operating vehicle to use in the
study. The number and size of
fish in the spawning aggregation
have been greatly reduced over
the last 15 years due to heavy
fishing pressure.

LEATHERBACK PROJECT

The Leatherback turtle recovery
program, sponsored jointly by
the Division of Fish & Wildlife
and EARTHWATCH, is once again
in full operation. Since April,
more than 20 female leatherbacks
have nested at Sandy Point. Persons
interested in participating in the
turtle program may contact the
St.Croix Environmental Association
at 773-1989.

FISH ATTRACTANT DEVICES

The Division.of Fish & Wildlife
in St.Croix has finished the
construction of 12 surface fish
attractant devices (FAD's) to be
anchored in 40 fm of water around
Judith's Fancy Point and LaVallee
Point. The fish attractors consist
of 10 plastic cylinders linked
together to form a raft. Each raft
will have a marker buoy with colored
floats and aluminum reflective tape
for easy location. These FAD's
attract small fish which in turn
serve as food for larger commercially
important fish such a"tuna, dolphin
and wahoo. Fishermen are requested
not to tie off to the rafts since
the anchors are not capable of holding
bottom with the additional drag from
a small boat.! Commercial vessels
with cargo should remain two miles
offshore to avoid fisheries research
areas.




Full Text

PAGE 1

NEWS TROPIC P" \... '" ~ \' DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS RESOURCES 1989 MAY VOL. I NO.8 WTT,nT.Tli'R TTRR 01" RTCROIX WETLANDS LONGLINER ARRESTED DVI Fisher.es Officers arrested a Japenese owned Longliner "H\'1A"10"1". The boat vIas fishing illegally in British waters. The 21 member Tawainese crew and ~aptain were arrested. The captain was ,fined $10,000.00 and the catch confiscated. The catch amounted to 27,000 pounds of mainly albocore tuna, some dolphin, wahoo and marlin. Large numbel1s of shol1ebil1ds were sighted at Great Pond on the south shore of St.Croix during April. A total of 17 different species were observed including some species uncommon in the Virgin Islands, such as the Whimbrel and Willet. These numbers indicate that Great Pond is an important atging area for migratory shorebirds. It is a good place for experienced and avid birders to see rare bird sightings as well as a fine spot for th inexperienced birdwatcher with much patience to. begin "to learn shorebirds". R/V SESHORSE ARRIVES IN VI In addition to the shorebirds, sightings included Great Blue Herons, Snowy Egrets, Little Bl:ue Herons, Tri-colored Herons, Royal Terns, Least Terns and Laughing Gulls all feeding in the pond. But perhaps the mo.st pleasing sightings on this visit was an osprey. All in all, Great Pond is a good place to birdwatch! Four volunteers from the Division o~ Fish and Wildlife, Joe LaPlace Ken Turbe, Alan Friedlander, and Denton Moore, flew to key West, Florida early in May, and took charge of the R/V Seahorse (formerly called "Jesu Cristo), a 45' combination long-liner/pot boat that was seized by the National Marine Fisheries Service under the Lacey Act. The boat required a week's worth of painting, cleaning, provisioning and shaking down before beginning the 1,000 mile trip to St.Thomas. LONGLINING INFORMATION The trip required six days. The crew crossed the Gulf Stream south of Key West, and followed the Old Bahama Channel, sometimes within sight of Cuba, for nearly half the distance. Division personnel have participated in two fisheries data collection trips aboard the swordfish vessel "Miss Shannon". Information was also provided to the South Atlantic Fisheries Management Council tbrough Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, Florida, on billfish mortality on lon,gline gear. In 1987, 543,523 pound of surface longline catch was landed on St.Croix (70% swordfish and 29% tuna), 98% was shipped stateside and 2% was sold locally. The Lacey Act is a" federaly law that prohibits US fishermen from fishing in violation of another countries' fishery laws and bringing the illegal fish into the United States.

PAGE 2

MUTTON SNAPPER PROJECT-STX BOAT RAMPS STX The Divisions I pro,iee't to assess the spawning aggref;;tlittons of mutton (virgin) snapper off Long Point, funded by thelrl~ational -,., Undersea Research Center, has been postponed to the.unavailability of a underwater remote operating vehicle to use in the study. The number and size of fish in the spawning aggregation have been greatly reduced over the last 15 years due to heavy fishing pressure. The Division of Fish and Wildlife will be initiating three public boat access projects on St.Croix. One. engineering firm has.been selecteq to design improvements to the north ramp at the Frederiksted Fishermens' Pier, ~mprovements to the existing Altona Lagoon ramp with a pier and a second ramp added. The third boat ramp and pier are in Cotton Valley. T ."RA't'RF:RRA~K PR().TF:~T NESTING SEASON The Leatherback turtle recovery program, sponsored jointly by the Division of Fish & Wildlife and EARTHWATCH, is o~ce again in full operation. Bince April, more than 20 female leatherbacks have ~~sted at Sandy Point. Persons inter~sted in participating in the turtle program may contact the St.Croix Environmental Association at 773-1989. The overwintering migratory birds have left USVI, heading north to breed and raise their young. As a result the forests are much quieter However, the beaches and ponds have been taken over by the Least Terns, an endangered species that nests on St.Croix~ FISH ATTRACTANT DEVICES This year the terns are nesting in some unusual places, the beds of dried up salt ponds, such as Southgate. This creates an interesting dilemma for biologists. Like everyone else, we need rain. But enough rain to fill up the ponds will kill the young terns. Thus, we must hope for just the right amount of rain until the young terns can fly. Terns were also observed nesting at Long Point Bay. To the best of our knowledge, this is a new record. TURTLE WATCH The Division of Fish & Wildlife in St.Croix has finished the construction of 12 surface fish attractant devices (FAD's) to be anchored in 40 fm of water around Judith's Fancy Point and LaVallee Point. The fish attractors consist of 10 plastic cylinders linked together to form a raft. Each r.aft will have a marker buoy with colored floats and aluminum reflective tape for easy location. These FAD's attract small fish which in turn serve as food for larg~r commercially important fish such a$c?:tuna, dolphin . c;,'J, and wahoo. Flshermen",fare requested not to tie off to the rafts since the anchors are not capable of holding bottom with the additional drag from a small boat. S~f•'Commercial vessels .. ," with cargo should remain two miles offshore to avoid fisheries research areas. The Division is interested in obtaining information on turtle activitiesfnestings around St.Croix. Persons with information may contact DFW at 772-1955.