Citation
Tropic news. Vol. 1. No. 6

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Vol. 1. No. 6
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text















OL. I NO. 6


L I
TROPIC NE




DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES
..., -DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS


Birds Depart Mangrove


Winter migrants to the U.S.
Virgin Islands are once again on
the wing. Ten mangrove wetlands
on St. Thomas/St. John were home
to at least 10 migrant
warbler species, 8 species of
migrant shorebirds, 4 species of
migrant ducks, and 2 other
migrant species (Osprey, Belted
Kingfisher) during te 1988-1989
winter season, according to a
Division of Fish and Wildlife
study. March 1989 data suggest
that many of these birds have
already left for their northern
breeding grounds. However, the
Northern Parula Warbler and
Northern Waterthrush are still
abundant in mangrove wetlands;
and some shorebirds may still be
observed. Grab your binoculars
and cameras for a last look at
this year's.winter migrants!

Tips for the Fishermen from the
Bureau of Enforcement

Fishermen by tradition conduct
their fishing activities from
very early mornings to sometimes
late at night. If you are
operating your boat between
sunset and sunrise you are
required to display proper
navigation lights. If your
fishing activities generate
garbage such as plastics and
other refuse it cannot be dumped
at sea. It must be brought
ashore and disposed of at the
city dump.


Migrant
Wetlands


WS


BAITFISH

Information on the baitfish, blue
fry (Jenkinsia lumprotaenia), has
been collected during the past
three years. Blue fry appears to
be an annual species which
spawns during full moon phases.
They form spawning aggregations
which migrate inshore along the
south side of St. Thomas and St.
John. During these aggregations,
blue fry are fished by fishermen
with large cast nets as bait for
yellowtail snapper and blue
runner (hard nose) fishing and
for use in fish traps.

Blue fry are more commonly called
dwarf herring. They are one of
the smallest species in the
herring family. Herring are
important species in all seas for
consumption and bait. They are
rapid growers and readily respond
to environmental variables.
Environmental factors have had a
profound effect on blue fry.
Several years ago they were found
in large abundance in bays along
the south shore of St. Thomas,
such as Mangrove Lagoon and
Secret Harbor. Development,
runoff and sewage have combined
to make these habitats
undesirable and reduce abundance.

Concern over depleted stocks has
resulted in regulations
prohibiting 1) use of beach
seines, 2) wanton waste; and 3)
export of baitfish.


MARCH


1989






ATTENTION AIRCRAFT


This Division has received
numerous complaints about low-
flying aircraft and helicopters,
especially in the Cockroach-Congo
Cay area. Please be advised that
such activities may be in
violation of the Federal
Endangered Species Act and, to
the extent they disturb nesting
seabirds, are also in
violation of rules and
regulations promulgated under
authority of section 94 (b) of
Title 12, Virgin Islands Code,
which state: "It shall be
unlawful for any person to land
on, or create any disturbance
near any island or cay listed in
the annex...."

The annex lists 19 islands and
cays, all of which belong to the
Virgin Islands. A separate list
is attached for your convenience.

Two birds, the Brown pelican and
the Roseate tern, are Federally
listed. Willful harassment of
threatened or endangered species

is prohibited by Federal law, and
the penalties for such activities
are quite severe.

It is the view of this Division,
shared by the Bureau of
Environmental Enforcement, that
evidence of a disturbance is when
birds are provoked or frightened
into concerted action such as
taking to the air en mass.

We are asking the public to
report incidents of low flying,
or harassing behavior in and
around the cays, particularly
taking note of the offending
aircraft's ID numbers. Perhaps
in this way we can identify the
few offending pilots and stop
this harmful practice.

If you have any questions or
concerns you might like to raise,
please call the Director, Mr.
Denton R. Moore, at 775-6762, or
Chief Joseph Sutton, head of the
Bureau of Environmental
Enforcement at 774-3320.


Freedom and Back Again

The dolphins that escaped from
the filming- pen on St. .John have
been found. They escaped on
March 3, 1989 by jumping over the
fence which formed their
enclosure in Haulover Bay. The
son "Natua was c found in St.
Martin on -arch 24-. He was
reportedly begging 7fro: boats
anchored.,in Phillipsburg. He had
lost 70 pounds but was healthy
enough to be returned to the
Dolphin -Research Center in
Florida. -The mother, "Theresa",
was found in Nanny Cay, Tortola
on March 30 where she was begging
food from fishermen and boaters.
Sho had lost 150 of her original
425 pounds and is being held in
Tortola until she regains her
strength for transport back to
Florida. Theresa is 30 years old
and has been in captivity for 15
years. Natua was born in
captivity an is 15 years old.




Full Text

PAGE 1

-.;. ,.. ~ TR.OPIC ,: . -"'~"" \.. "" ~ " \ \ DEPARTfI."ENT OF i"LANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES :' ,1.;;". :OIVrSION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE . ,..' " ." UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS NO. '6 tal, I i\lARCH 1989 BAITFISH i\'1iqrant Birds Depart Manqrove. ~'I7etlands Winter. migrants to the u.s. Virgin Islands are once again on the \qing. Ten mangrove wetlands on st. Thomas/St. John were home to at least 10 migrant warbler species, 8 species of migrant shorebirds, 4 species of migrant ducks, and 2 other migrant species (Osprey, Belted Kingfisher) during te 1988-1989 \qinter season, according to a Division of Fish and Wildlife study. March 1989 data suggest that many of these birds have already left for their northern breeding grounds. However, the l~orthern parula Warbler and l~orthern ~vaterthrush are still abundant in mangrove wetlands; and some shorebirds may still be observed. Grab your binoculars and cameras for a last look at this year's .winter migrants! Information on the baitfish, blue fry (Jenkinsia lumprbta~nla), ha~ been collected during the past three years. Blue fry appears to be an annual species which spawns during full moon phases. They form spawning agg+egations which migrate inshore along the south side of st. Thomas a~d st. John. During these aggregations, blue fry are fished by fishermen with large cast nets as bait for yellowtail snapper and blue runner (hard nose) fishing and for use in fish traps. Tor rnp ~;~nprmpn rrnm t-hpTins Bu-reau,--_-E-nforcemen t , Blue fry are more commonly called dwarf herring. They are one of the smallest species in the herring family. Herring are important species in all seas for consumption and bait. They are rapid growers and readily respond to environmental variables. Environmental factors have had a profound effect on blue fry. Several years ago they were found in large abundance in bays along the south shore of st. Thomas, such as Mangrove Lagoon and Secret Harbor. Development, runoff and sewage have combined to make these habitats undesirable and reduce abundance. Concern over depleted stocks has resulted in regulations prohibiting 1) use of beach seines, 2) wanton waste; and 3) export of baitfish. Fishermen by tradition conduct their fishing activities from very early mornings to sometimes late at night. If you are operating your boat between sunset and sunrise you are required to display proper navigation lights. If your fishing activities generate garabage such as plastics and other refuse it cannot be dumped at sea. It must be brought ashore and disposed of at the city dump.

PAGE 2

ATTENrfION AIRCRAFT ,Freedom and Back ~~ The dolphins that escaped from the filming. pen on st. ;:"John have been found. They escaped' on March 3, 1989 by jumping over the fenCe which formed their e ,..r ] '" ""1"'-':' 1. ' n H a o-' 10 ve r Bay ' The ... ~ \.,'"' ~.. . -.L ~ . son f'~-latu,':A: w~S oJ fDund in st. , , cc Martin on !:.1t?tr.c~.:;' ,24i,~ He was . ,-",,",. --,-.",t; reportedly begging~,.';,1'.t+tom boats anchoF~d",in Phillipsbufg. He had lostlQ pounds but was healthy enough to be,~~:;'r.gturned to the ", c .."c,..""""~"f,;.", , Dolphin ,~i"'-Rese-:a':tc~;'.,::,. Center in Florida. 'The rti6ther" "Theresa", was found in Narlny Cay ~--Tortola on March ~ where she was begging food from fishermen and boaters. Sho hild lost lQQ of ll~r original 425 pounds and is being held in Tortola until she regains, her strength for transport back to Florida. Theresa is 30 years old and has been in captivity for 15 years. Natua was born in captivity an is 15 years old. This Division has received numerous complaints about lo\yflying aircraft and helicopters, especially in the Cockroach-Congo Cay area. Please be advised that such activities may be in violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and, to the extent they disturb nesting seabirds, are also in violation of rules and regulations promulgated under authority of section 94 (b) of Title 12, Virgin Islands Code, which state: "It shall be unlawful for any person to land on, or create any disturbance near any island or cay listed ih the annex " The annex lists 19 islands and cays, all of vlhich belong to the Virgin Islands. A separate list is attached for your convenience. Two birds, the Brovffi pelican and the Roseate tern, are Federally listed. Willful harassment of threatened or endangered species is prohibited by Federal law, and the penalties for such acti'Tities are quite severe. It is the view of this Division, shared by the Bureau of Environmental Enforcement, that evidence of a disturbance is when birds are provoked or frightened into concerted action such as taking to the air en mass. \~e are asking the public to report incidents of low flying, or harassing behavior in and around the cays, particularly taking note of the offending aircraft's ID numbers. Perhaps in this way we can identify the few offe~ding pilots and stop this harmful practice. If you have any questions or concerns you might like to raise, please call the Director, ~1r. Denton R. Moore, at 775~6762, or Chief Joseph Sutton, head of the Bureau of Environmental Rnf~rcemAnt ~t 774-3320.