Citation
Tropic news. Vol. 1. No. 4

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Vol. 1. No. 4
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text







TROPIC NE




DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS


JANUARY 19 89


LOW COST CONSERVATION

Due to the generosity of Ann
Marie Danet, St Croix iguanas may
stage a recovery. Finding a nest
of 27 iguana eggs hatching in her
backyare, Ms. Danet called Fish
and Wildlife seeking a location
where the hatchlings would be
less susceptible to mongoose
attack. A year previously,
Deputy Chief Farchette, Environ-
mental Enforcement, had requested
assistance in obtaining iguanas
to repopulate the excellent
habitat at Salt River. The newly
found hatchlings were released at
this site.

This is a fine example of how
citizen involvement and govern-
ment cooperation can accomplish
significant conservation objec-
tives at a very low cost.

It is illegal to harass, capture
or kill iguanas in the Virgin
Islands.

INDUSTRY WORKSHOP


National Marine Fisheries
Services is sponsoring a workshop
on Commercial Fisheries marketing
and processing at the Virgin Isle
Hotel on January 23 January 26.
All industries, government and
interested citizens are invited
to attend.


PORT SAMPLING
A more intensive effort was
directed to the recreational
fishery, and we were able
to recruit volunteer samplers who
helped us obtain nearly 100%
coverage of the important
billfish sector.

We were able to sample
(weigh and measure) 53, .169 fish
and 784 lobsters. One
preliminary conclusion as a
result of these investigations is
that the snapper/grouper species,
which once contributed about 50%
of the catch, now contribute less
than 15% of the catch,
MANGROVE. PRODUCTIVITY STUDY

Twelve monthly visual
censuses were czpleted in
Mangrove Lagoon and Hurricane
Hole on St. John (as a control).
Small mesh traps were set in
Mangrove Lagoon and Vessup Bay
for five days each month for
twelve successive months. Over
5,500 juvenile fish were caught
and measured.

As we suspected, this study
indicates that the inner portion
of Mangrove Lagoon has been
damaged, and has limited
potential as a fish nursery area.
Vessup Bay also seems poor, and
appears to be declining.

This study has been expanded
to include Salt River and Altona
Lagoon on St. Croix.


VOL I


NO. 4


WS





BROWN BOOBY STUD'


Brown boobies nest in three
different types of habitat;
sedge, fiscus, and rock. We
wanted to learn whether a
particular type of habitat was
more conducive to nesting
success, since this is a
parameter which can be
manipulated if need be.

Biweekly visits were made to
Frenchcap. Nest contents were
recorded, adults and chicks
banded, chick measurements taken,
nest measurements trangulated,
and when necessary, cause of
mortality recorded. We found the
sedye 1hi bai hi-i ton hp. the most
productive. Forty-six percent of
the 13 nests in this category
produced young. Twenty-four
percent of the 37 nests in rock
habitat produced chicks, while
only seventeen percent of the
fiscus nests were successful.



THEY ARE HERE AGAIN


It's whale season again and we
again have humpback whales
passing through our waters. Many
are observed with calves which
causes us to believe that they
give birth in or near our area.
This is logical as the warmer mid
Atlantic and Caribbean waters
would be less of a traumatic
shock to the calves as they are
born.


RED HIND REGULATIONS SIGNED


Acting Governor Derek Hodge
signed the Red Hind Area Closure
and Nassau Grouper regulations
into law on January 22, 1989.

The Red hind Area Closure
regulation will close the
spawning bank south of Saba Cay
from February 8 until March 31,
1989.

Approximately 10,000 Ibs of Red
hind, mostly fish less than 8 oz.
in size, were landed on St.
Thomas during January 14, 15, and
1G, 1909. Divers who examined
the reefs after the fishing was
over reported very few survivors.

That portion of the regulations
pertaining to Nassua groupers
makes it a crime to possess or
land Nassau grouper during the
three month period, January 1 to
March 31 on St. John/St. Thomas.
This is a partial implementation
of the FMP for Shallow Water Reef
Fish.


(whale season continued

The season has started slow with
no sightings of whales in
December. For the month of
January only three sightings have
been reported totalling six
adults and two baby humpbacks.
All were observed off the north
shore of St. Thomas.

Anyone with sightings of whales
is requested to call the Division
of Fish and Wildlife at 775-6762
or 772-1955 (It_ Crnijxv




Full Text

PAGE 1

-d~-' ~ TROPIC \... '~ \\ DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL DIVISION OF FISH AND WilDLIFE UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISlAN D S RESOURCES vOL I NO. 4 JANUARY 1989 LOY] COST CONSERVATION PORT SAMPLING A more intensive effort was. directed to the recreationai fishery, and we were able to' recrui t -~olunteer samplers who helped us obtain nearly 100% coverage of the import.ant billfish sector. vie were able to sample (weigh and measure) 53,169 fish and 784 lobsters. One preliminary conclusion as a result of these investigations is that the snapper/grouper species, which once contributed about 50% of the catch, now contribute less than 15% of the catch. Due to the generosity of Ann Marie Danet, st Croix iguanas may stage a recovery. Findir.g a nest of 27 iguana eggs hatching in her backyare, I~s. Danet called Fish and Wildlife seeking a location where the hatchlings would be less susceptible to mongoose attack. A year previously, Deputy Chief Farchette, Environmental Enforcement, had requested assistance in obtaining iguanas to repopulate the excellent habitat at Salt River. The newly found hatchlings were released at this site. MANG~OVE. PRODUCTIVITY STUDY This is a fine example of how citizen involvement and government cooperation can accomplish significant conservation objectives at a very low cost. Twelve month~7 visual censuses were c~leted in Mangrove Lagoon and Hurricane Hole on st. John (as a control). Small mesh traps were set in Mangrove Lagoon and Vessup Bay for five days each month for twelve successive months. Over 5,500 juvenile fish were caught anQ measured. capture Virgin It is illegal to harass, or kill iguanas in the Islands. INDUSTRY viORKSHOP National Marine Fisheries Services is sponsoring a workshop on Commercial Fisheries marketing and processing at the Virgin Isle Hotel on January 23 January 26. All industries, government and interested citizens are invited to attend. As we suspected, this study indicates that the inner portion of l~angrove Lagoon has been damaged, and has limited potential as a fish nursery area. Vessup Bay also seems poor, and appears to be declining. expanded Altona This study has been to include Salt River and Lagoon on st. Croix.

PAGE 2

BROWN BOOBY STUD" RED HIND REGULAT:[ONS SIGNED Acting Governor DereJc Hodge signed the Red Hind Area Closure and Nassau Grouper regulat.ions into law on January 22, 1989. Brown boobies nest in three different types of habitat; sedge, fiscus, and rock. We wanted to learn \vhether a particul,ar type of habitat was more conducive to nesting success, since this is a parameter ~•hich can be manipl~la ted if need be. ' The Red hind Area Closure regulation will close the spawning bank south of Saba Cay from February 8 until l~arch 31, 1989. ~pproximately 10,000 lbs of Red hind, mostly fish less than 8 oz. in size, were landed on st. Thomas during January 14, 15, and 1 G f 1909. Divers vI1-Lo examil-Led the reefs after the fishing was over reported -very few survivors. Biweekly visits were made to Frenchcap. Nest contents were recorded, adultS' and chicks banded, chick measurements taken, nest measurements trangulated, and when necessary, cause of mortality recorded. 1ve found the sedgH nnhi r.n1". r.o nA tn~ most productive. Forty-six percent of the 13 nests in this category produced young. Twenty-four percent of the 37 nests in rock habitat produced chicks, while only seventeen percent of the fiscus nests were successful. That portion of the regulations pertaining to Nassua groupers makes it a crime to possess or land Nassau grouper during the three month period, January 1 to March 31 on st. John/St. Thomas. This is a partial implementation of the FMP for Shallow Water Reef Fish. (whale season continued It's whale season again and we again have humpbac)( whales passing through our waters. Many are observed \ov'i th calves \'lhich causes us to believe that they give birth in or near our area. This is logical as the warmer mid Atlantic and Caribbean waters would be less of a traumatic shock to the calves as they are born. The season has started slow \'li tl'l no sightings of whales in December. For the month of January only three sightings have been reported totalling six adults and two baby humpbacks. All were observed off the north shore of st. Thomas. Anyone with sightings of whales is requested to call the Division of Fish and '~ildlife at 775-6762 or 772-1955 (,c;;tCrn]x)