Citation
Tropic news. Vol.1. No. 2.

Material Information

Title:
Tropic news. Vol.1. No. 2.
Series Title:
Tropic news
Creator:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publisher:
United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Caribbean ( LCSH )
Newspapers -- Caribbean ( LCSH )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Fish and Wildlife.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text







NEWS


'DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES
::i' DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE
.: UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS
^;^c;* t**fc** *** ******+


BILLFISH REGULATIONS

The fishery management plan fur
Atlantic Billfish went into effect
on October 28, 1988. This plan
applies to all billfish (except
Swordfish) along the East and Gulf
coasts of the U.S. and territorial
seas in the Caribbean. The rules
outline the following provisions:
1) prohibit the sale of billfish
in the United States unless
accompanied by documentation
that it was caught-outside
the management area (effective
December 27, 1988)
2) prohibits the possession of
billfish in the U.S. Exclusive
Economic Zone (EEZ) by pelagic
longline and drift net vessels
3) Possession or retention of
billfish in the U.S. EEZ only
allowed by rod & reel.
4) Establish minimum sizes for
possession of billfish in EEZ
Blue marlin 86 inches
White marlin 62 inches
Sailfish 57 inches
Longbill spearfish no
minimum size

Violation of these regulations may
result in confiscation of fishing
vessel and gear and/or a civil
penalty up to $25,000.00.


The R/V Deleware II arrived Novem-
ber 22 at Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
for a 3-week research cruise in
Puerto Rico/U.S.Virgin Island
waters. Fishery scientists from
both islands will participate in
the studies.


NOVEMBER


CARIBBEAN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
MINIMUM SIZE REGULATIONS

Thu Caribbean Fisheries ManagerneuL
Council. (CFMC) has established
minimum size limits for the following
species in the Caribbean:

1) Nassau Grouper = 15" total, '
length from 22 Sept. 1988 to 21 Se]
1989 increasing one inch-per year
up to 24 inches
2) Yellowtail Snapper = 12" total
length
3) Caribbean Spiny Lobster = 3.5"
total carapace length and 5.5"
total tail length
************************************
GULF & CARIBBEAN FISHERIES
INSTITUTE CONFERENCE

The. 41st annual meeting of the Gulf
and Caribbean Fisheries Institute
(GCFI) was held in St.Thomas from
November 6-11 at the Virgin Isle
Hotel. Approximately 160 people
attended. Representatives from
Central and Latin America countries
were present.
Topics discussed included habitat
concerns, conch and lobster "culture,
aquaculture and fishery;management
***'A^ ********************************
ENDANGERED SPECIES
Currently: considered a Federally
Endangered Specieds, the Brown Pelican
population in the Virgin.Islands
and'Puerto.oRico, .. appears to be
stable and. may soon be considered
for de-listing to Threatened
status. They are.a- difficult species
to study due to their tree-nesting
in some of the more rugged areas.
They are also in various phases of
nesting during this month.


TROPIC


VOL. I
****


NO. 2


., ,r ..., "






MARINE POLLUTION ACT TO BE ENFORCE

As of Dec 31, the U.S. Coast Guard
will help enforce rules against
garbage disposal at sea. They
prohibit dumping of:
plastics, including syn-
thetic ropes, fishing nets
and plastic bags.
Floating dunnage (padding),
lining and packing material,
less than 25 miles from the
nearest land. .
Paper, rags, glass, metal,
bottles, crockery and similar
refuse, less than 12 miles from
nearest land.
Paper, rags, glass, metal,
bottles, crockery and similar
refuse that is not small enough
to pass through one-inch screen
mesh, less than 3 miles from
nearest land.
Food waste not pulverized, less
than 12 miles from nearest land.
Pulverized food waste, less than
3 miles from nearest land.

The rules will apply to all vessels
in U.S. waters and waters within.. the
nation's 200-mile. Exclusive Economic
Zone, Regardless of flag, and to U.S.
ships wherever they are located.

**************************************
SEABIRD RESEARCH

Three types of boobies are also
currently being surveyed on their
breeding islands. These are the
Brown Booby, the most commonly
seen in this area, the Masked
Booby, and the Red-footed Booby.
All three species are in various
stages of nesting during November.
Banding of adults and chicks
continues as a way of determining
distribution, longevity and
mortality rates.


'lARINE NURSEA7 VALUP OF MAN ..'OVE
LAGOONS

Mangrove lagoon Areas on St.T-homas-
and St.John, U.S.Yirgin Islands, have
been sampled on a monthly basis to
determine habitat use and nursery
importance for fish1and invertebrates.
Three study sites of varying degrees
of degradation were chosen for study,
the Mangrove lagoon, Vessup Bay and
Hurricane Hole.
Results have demonstrated a significan-
difference.in species diversity,
composition and abundance of fishes
between the degraded and natural sites.
These differences appear to be directlN
related to the degree of pollution.
Primary differences between sites
appear to be related more to writer
quality than to structural complexity c
'the habitats.
*, ***** *******************************

WETLANDS PROJECT

The Division of Fish and Wildlife
is conducting a five year study to
document the use of Virgin Islands
wetlands by wildlife. Wildlife
observations are currently being
conducted.at 10-study sites on
St.Thomas/St.John. Observations on
St.Croix will commence in the near
future. Although birds are the
primary wetlands animals, use has
also been noted by deer, mongoose,
burros and iguanas, Wetland bird
species include waders, such as
herons and.egrets; sandpipers and
other probing shorebirds;, ducks,
rails and gallinules; and arboreal
birds, such as warblers, thrashers
and bananaquits. Many of the birds
using VI wetlands are migrants.
However, the list also includes VI
residents, some of which use man-
grove wetlands exclusively.

***********************************
BUSINESS LICENSES REQUIRED IF YOU
wholesale fish to supermarkets or
restaurants according to Commissioner
a Mathes of:' .-Co'rnimer 'SerVices.
***t** ****** **************************




Full Text

PAGE 1

.;"",., .". ...~ ~ ~'..I ~., NEWS , TROPIC \:.. " c ~ ,\ \ RESOURCES . " '.". . '.. :nEPARTMENT OF PLANNlr~G AND NATURAL :"~il';'":..'::.;...;""" O . IS IFE ;1:~£;:':K':.i;)::;':z"..:c:~:.:.,1ii':OIVISI N OF, F HAND WllOl ~;gqi~f;~;;;;:~...;:;.::i.;!~~,.UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLA NOS 988 NOVEMBER 'o!. ,:, NO.;; 2: VOL.. I ******************** **** CARIBBEAN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT MINIMUM SIZE REGULATIONS BILLFISH REGULATIONS Tli~ Cal'llJlJ~ali Ii' l~h~l"les Mt:l.uager1Jeu [, Council. (CFMC) has established minimum size limits tor the following species in the' Caribbean: 1) Nassau Grouper = 15" total, ,,-,; length from 22 S,ept, .1~88 t.o 21 Se] 1989 increasing one inch'per year "up t'6 24 1nches 2) Yellowtail Snapper = 12" total length 3) Caribbean' Spiny Lobster = 3.511 total carapace length and 5.5" total tail length ************************************ GULF & CARIBBEAN FISHERIES INSTITUTE CONFERENCE Thc fishery mana~ement I.Jlall Iur' Atlantic Billfish went into effect on October 28, 1988. This plan applies to all billfish (except Swordfish) alo~g the East and Gulf coasts of the U.S. and territorial seas in the Caribbean. The rules . . outline the following provisions: 1) prohibit the sale of billfish in the United States unless accompanied by documentation that it was caught. outside the management area (effective December 27, 1988). 2) prohibits the possession of billfisn ln the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) by pelagic longline and drift net vessels 3) Possessio~ or retention of billfish in the U.-S. EEZ only allowed by rod &. reel. 4) Estab~ish minfmumsizes for possession of billfish in EEZ . Blue marlin 86 inches White marlin 62 inches Sailfish57,inches Longbill speairfish no minimum size Violation of these regulations may result in confiscation of fishing vessel and gear and/or a civil penalty up. to $25, 000. 00. * ****01;:.'" "'*X X* xxx * ***~** *.** ** * * * * **** * NOAA bHIP ARRIVES-.' ... The RjV Deleware II arrived November 22 at Mayaguez, Puerto Rico for a 3-week research cruise in Puerto RicojU.S.Virgin Island waters. Fishery scientists from both islands will participate in the studies. The. 41st annual meeting of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute (GCFI) was held in St.Thomas from November 6-11 at the Virgin Isle Hotel. Approximately 160 people attended. Representatives from' Central and Latin America countries were present. Topics discussed included habitat . -. -" cqncerns, conch and lobster "c'~l ture, aqlJ.a.ci.llture and fishery;." management ~c: " " * ';:"*\~~~~~~~~~-'* * * * ~ ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ENDANGERED SPECIES Currently: conside"red a Federally Endangered Speci~s-, the Brown Pelican popul~tion in the Virgin "Islands and' Puerto("Ri"co, ", appears to be stable and may soon be considered for de-listing to Threatened status. T:t1:ey are ad.d;.f~icult spe?ies to study due to their tree-nesting in some of the more rugged areas. They are also in various phases of nesting during this month. ***********************************

PAGE 2

\~' RIN r'" l 'T' RSE ""-' -. ~ .t; ~ u Ii " L.D.GOOi\'S v ALUf:; f)}""' r.1AN\ .i.~.OVE MARINE POLLUTION ACT 'ro B:S ENFORCEr. As of Dec 31, the U. S., Co'ast Guard will help enforce rules against garbage disposal at sea. They prohibit dumping of: . plastics, including synthetic ropes, fishing nets and plastic bags. Fioa,ting dunnage (padding), lining and packing material, less than 25 miles from the nearest land.: Paper, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery and siffii.liar refuse, less than 12 miles from nearest lanrl. Mangrove lagoon 2i.reas on St. T'homas and St.John, U.S.'lirgin Islands, have been sampled on a monthly basis to determine habitat use and nurseryimportance for fisn--' and invertebrates. Three study sites of varying degrees of degradation ,vere chosen for study, the Mangrove lagoon, Vessup Bay and Hurricane Hole. Results have demonstrated a significan. di1f~renGe in speci.es di versi ty, camp"osition and abUndance of fishes, between the de"graded and natural ,.s"i tes. These differences appear to be directl~ related to th~ degree of pollu:t;ion. Prililury differel1ce~ ue Lween si 't~s appear:to be related more to Vi;tter quality than to structural complexity c 'the habitats. )~~<1;****************** * * ** * *** * **** * WETLANDS PROJECT Paper, rags; glass, metal, bottles, crockery and similiar refuse that is not small enough to pass througha one-inch screen mesh, less than 3 miles from nearest land. l~ood waste not pulverized, less than 12 miles from nearest land. Pulverized food waste, less than 3 miles from nearest land. The rules will apply to all vessels j-ri u. S. waters and waters wi t,hin the nation IS 200-mile; Excltlsi ve Economic Zone, Regardless of fLag, and to U.S. ships whereever they are loc.ated. ********************"""*************** 'SEABIRD RESEARCH Three types of boobies are also cuJ.'ren-tly being surveyed on their breeding islands. These are the Brown Booby, the most commonly s(::en in this area, the Masked Booby, and the Red-fpoted Booby. AIJ. three species are in various stages of nesting during November. Banding of adults and chicks continues as a way of determining distribu.tion, longevity and mortality rates. 'c The Division of Fish and Wildlj,fe is conducting a five year study to dc~'cument the use of Virgin Island,s vIet lands by wildlife. Wildlife observatj,ons are currentJ.,y being <.'.onducted at 10 'study sites on St. Thomas/St. John. Observations on St. Croix will commence in the near future. Although birds are the prim'ary \•etlands animals, use has also been noted by deer, mongoose, burros and iguanas, Wetland bird species include waders, such as herons arid egrets; sandpipers and other probing shorebirds;. ducks, rails and gallinules; and arboreal. birds, such as warblers, thrashers and bananaquits. Many of the birds using VI wetlands are migrants. However, the list also includes VI residents, some of which use mangrove wetlands exclusively. -, * * .*~;t;-*,-***,** **:.*: ~~ *.*:* * **.,* * * :+:****** *~. *********************************** BUSINESS LICENSES REQUIRED IF YOU whole~ale fish to supermarkets or restaurants acc,oJ;d,ingto Commissioner . *'*-***~ ~*-** * ***:~~*** * ** ** * * * * * * ** * * * * *