Citation
The Burning Spear

Material Information

Title:
The Burning Spear
Uniform Title:
Burning Spear (Saint Petersburg, Fla. : Online)
Alternate title:
Spear
Creator:
Junta of Militant Organizations
Institute of Black Unity
African People's Socialist Party
Place of Publication:
St. Petersburg, Fla
Publisher:
Junta of Militant Organizations
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Irregular
completely irregular
Language:
English
Edition:
v. 1 no. 1, December 22, 1969

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers ( lcsh )
Blacks -- Newspapers -- United States ( lcsh )
Black power -- Newspapers -- United States ( lcsh )
Socialism -- Newspapers -- United States ( lcsh )
African Americans ( fast )
Blacks ( fast )
Socialism ( fast )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Oakland (Calif.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alameda County (Calif.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- San Francisco (Calif.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Louisville (Ky.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Ky.) ( lcsh )
California -- Alameda County ( fast )
California -- Oakland ( fast )
California -- San Francisco ( fast )
Florida -- Alachua County ( fast )
Florida -- Gainesville ( fast )
Florida -- Pinellas County ( fast )
Florida -- Saint Petersburg ( fast )
Kentucky -- Jefferson County ( fast )
Kentucky -- Louisville ( fast )
United States ( fast )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Saint Petersburg
United States -- California -- Alameda -- Oakland
United States -- California -- San Francisco -- San Francisco
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
United States -- Kentucky -- Jefferson -- Louisville
Coordinates:
27.7521533 x -82.6516506

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Selected articles available via the Internet.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 22, 1969)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Suspended with June 1971 issue; resumed with Nov. 1973.
General Note:
Published in: Louisville, Ky., Dec. 1978-July 1980; Gainesville, Fla., Aug. 1980-May 1981; San Francisco, Calif., June-July 1981; Oakland, Calif., Aug. 1981-June 1993; St. Petersburg, Fla., Aug. 1993-
General Note:
Published by: the Institute of Black Unity, Dec. 28-July 1971; the African People's Socialist Party, Nov. 1973-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, African People's Socialist Party. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
1128813751 ( OCLC )
2019227495 ( LCCN )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


L ±*age 2
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Monday
THE BURNING SHEAR
is published twice
a month by the
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
in St* Petersburg, Florida*
OFFICE ADDRESS:
Junta of Militant Organizations
2i63 First Avenue, South
St. Petersburg, Florida
Phone: (813) 829-2231
THE BURNING SPEAR STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
Joseph Waller
NEWS DIRECTOR
Lonnie Donaldson
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Saul A. Rentz
CONTRIBUTING ‘ EDITORS
Ruthe Benton
Dwight Waller
Delores Young
ARTISTS
Joyce Walker
Leonard vYaller
JQMO
2163 First Avenue, South
St. Petersburg, Florida
Enclosed $5>«00-one year-regular
mm
Enclosed $2.Q0-one year-students
NAPE
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
SUBSCRIPTIONS
BLACK PLEDGE
I pledge allegiance to my Black people. I pledge to develop my mind and body
to the greatest extent possible.
I will learn all that I can in order to give my best to my people in our
struggle for liberation through revolution. ^
I will keep myself physically fit, building a strong body free from drugs and
otner substances which weaken me and make me less capable of protecting myself, my
family and my Black brothers and sisters.
- I will unselfishly share my knowledge and understanding -with others in order
to bring about change more quickly.
I will discipline myself to direct my energies thoughtfully and constructively
rather than wasting them In idle hatred.
- will train myself never to hurt or allow others to harm my Black brothers and
sisters for I recognize that we need every Black man, Voman, and child to be physi¬
cally, mentally and psychologically strong.
These principles I pledge to practice daily and to teach them to others in
order to unite my people.-UHUEU
\. ' 5,
Chairman waller makes a point to Brothers Michael Avery and Kenneth Rap
Harrington, two of the JOtoO representatives at loth Street Junior High
School, in St. Petersburg. Unlike Negroes at many of the high schools,
tne young brothers and sisters at loth Street Junior High are quickly
reaching a revolutionary plateau.
WHAT JOMO BELIEVES
1. The united states of america is a colonized nation where Black people are being colonized by america.
2* Black people have no responsibility—morally or legally—to perpetuate, sustain or protect" this country which is
actively oppressing us*
3. Because of the fact of our colonization, Black people have no responsibility to the law which was made without our
consent and without consideration for our interest.
4* All Black people in Jails and prisons throughout this country are therefore political prisoners and not criminals*
5* america is a criminal society which have historically and traditionally made it her unspoken and unwritten foreign
and domestic policy to enslave, destroy and wipe out from this earth all non-white peoples she comes in contact with.
6* america is an all-white nation in fact, and plans to eliminate the so-called negro problem by eliminating the
so-called negro*
7* Black people must begin to control the political, economic and social power of our community*
8* Black people must begin to acquire land, which is the basis for revolution and liberation and must establish in¬
dependent businesses which w ill make it possible to employ our people and will help to prepare us for the day when it
pay be necessary to build our own nation and separate from this brutal, racist nation.
9* Black people must form alliances with all other oppressed people all over the world, so we will be able to depend
on support much greater than the 20-30 million Black people here in this country.
10* Black people must broaden their struggle beyond the arena of civil rights and move into the field of human rights,
so we can bring this racist country before the world body called the United Nations and air our grievances before the
world and have america condemned before all the other non-white nations of the world*
11* Black people must view this racist oppressive nation Just as we view any other enemy we have* We must view this
nation Just as this nation views its smSmies, and we must be prepared to react to her oppression and brutality toward
our people accordingly*'
12* Black people must not allow themselves to be drafted into the racist wars of america which are generallly dir¬
ected toward other oppressed peoples anyway*. We must refuse to fight for a nation which refuses to recognize the hura>-
anlty of 20-30 million Black people right here on this continent*
13# The battleground for Black people is in the streets of america*
14* It is the duty of all Black people to arm themselves so they will be able to protect their families when this
racist white power structure decides to revert to the "good old days" and swoop down into the colony to eliminate the
Black man*


December 22
Page 3
ruetec
ones
by Ododuai .
Three years ago, on Dec. 29,
1966, an artless mural depicting
black people as grosteque-looking
minstrels lined a wall of the in¬
famous St. Petersburg city hall.
It strod for everything that is
near and dear.to all whites of this
city...it was a rascist mural kept
on the wall to keep the white man's
image perpetuated and to remind
blacks of their inferior subserv¬
ient position in this colony.
Well as of this date one, artic¬
ulate, young black has spent 17
months in hell and is still living
an hour1; by hour hell because he
ripped this filthy artless rag
from the walls of city hall. Some¬
thing every black in St. Petersburg
wanted to do but didn't have the
nerve to do. They simply iowereu
their eyes when they looked at the
mural and moved on to dutifully pay
their water bill or visit the other
offices in the lily-white staffed
building.
Joseph Waller spent time in the
St. Petersburg city jail, the Clear- ,
water jail ana Raiford prison for
tearing down this trash. He h^s
been constantly intimidated by police
harrassed by racist judges and
every establishment figure in town...
because when he touched that picture
he tore away a little bit of their
life...and if city hall isn't safe
what else can be safe in lily white
town?
The torture at Raiford and the
torture of his life can never be
undone...but the amazing part of
this sordid story is that this fine
black brother has never "lost the
faith.11 He kept on fighting, he
recouped, salvaged black brothers
from the neighborhood, doushed them
in the living fire of black pride
and stamina that makes him the most
unusual black man in this area and
has spun a new philosophy in St.
Petersburg.
He's made blacks look at each'
other, talk to each other, love each
other, respect each other, fight for
each other, die for each other. He's
made them realize they are the
creators of everything that is
important and worthwhile in this
world. He's made St. Petersburg
blacks live for the first time.
December 29 is the third anni¬
versary of this mural ripping and
right now Brother Waller is visiting
for redemption from the U.S. Supreme
Court. They are deciding whether
Brother 7/aller was placed in double
jeapordy...they are deciding ulti¬
me tly if this man who gave and. is
giving his intellect, time and
sweat to black folks, can once
again be a free man.
The sentencing of Joseph Waller
in St. Petersourg was a rascist
sham...it was an illustration of
the lengths white judges, estab¬
lishment, pigs will go to keep
blacks in their places...his act
jshould not go unrecognized...
[Remember brothers December 29.
by Richard Arvedon—CLM. ^
On Monday December 15th Joseph
Waller went to court and the move¬
ment went to war versus Judge Charles
R. H(F)olly. We Won! H(F)olly had
long ago made the racist nature of his
court quite clear. On November 21,
1968, before sentencing J.O.M.O. mem¬
ber Andre Shellman to ten years In
jail for ten years in jail for ten do
dollars worth of groceries H(F)olly
told him, "And if I think you think
what Joe Waller thinks, you're going
to get absolutely everything I can
possibly give you.”
When Joe received a divorce in Octo¬
ber H(F)olly was the judge. The di¬
vorce agreement had been drawn up by
Joe's wife's lawyer and was agreeable
to all parties-all parties save
Charles R. H(F)olly. H(F)olly, with¬
out asking Joe if he was working or
how much money he was making or even
how much Joe could afford to pay in
the divorce agreement, H(F)olly or¬
dered Joe to get a job. H(F)olly
thought it would be a fine idea for
Joe to get a job on a garbage truck* .
If nothing was open in that line of
work H(F)olly ordered Joe to apply
to the Florida State Employment
Service and accept any job availiable.
Joe went to Florida and agreed to
except a job in the field of jour-
nalism-an occupation in which he had
been trained. Florida State Employ¬
ment could come up with no job in the
field of journalism and Joe refused
to except a job which would under¬
employ him.
At this point H(F)olly informed Joe
that he was in contempt of court for
refusing to accept the type of job
that H(F)olly had ordered Joe to ac¬
quire.
H(F)olly*8 motives were clear:
he would use the racist nature of his
court to repress the political acti¬
vity of Joe Waller and at the same
time make himself a hero to the racist
voters he will have to appeal to when
he runs for the State Supreme Court.
Or so H(F)olly thought*
Word of H(F)olly inpending action
spreaded quickly and the Bay Area Move¬
ment began to mobolize. A meeting was
held three days before the trial date
with representatives from Black youth
for peace and power , Bay Area Free
Press, Community Liberation Movement,
CLAM, JOMO and Tampa S.D.S. R-Y.M.'
It was decided at the out-set that
Joe Waller would not go to jail. That
we-the movement-would keep our brother
free. H(F)olly would not be allowed
to use his court of injustice for it's
repressive ends. When Joe went to
court on Monday, December 15th he did
not go alone. The court room was c
crowded with over a hundred of Joe's
brother and sisters - black and white
H(F)olly was up-tifeht-first he or¬
dered the hearing to be held in closed
chambers-then he ordered the heasing
to be held in open court-then he
changed his mind and ordered the hear¬
ing to be held in chambers again. The
Movement went outside to take the jus¬
tice of its position to the community
We began a long slow picket line a-
round the courthouse-all the time
talking to those who came by and let¬
ting them know why we were there and
what was going on inside. People be¬
gan to join us and the picket line
grew.
When Joe came out of the courthouse
we knew we had won a victory which
said loud and clear: No more injus¬
tice-in darkness no more will the
Charles R. H(F)ollys* of this nation
be allowed to inprison our brothers
and sisters for the ends of repressive
injustice-from this day forward we
are a movement which will negotiate
for nothing to save justice. And in
the end we will win. Right ON!
ItJlltAN BPND
non y
Letter to Judge Charles Holley, from
Julian Bond, Georgia State Represen¬
tative.
December IS, 1969
Sir:
It has come to my attention that
Joseph 7/aller is again a victim
of the Florida judicial system.
I cannot understand by what right
the judge stipulates that he must
take a job on St. Petersburg's
garbage trucks, as part of his di¬
vorce decree—especially when he
is in the process of negotiating
for a job in Louisville, Ky.
Is he to s erve as an example of
what happens to Black men who dare
to call their people to unite
against the oppressiveness of white
racism?
Repression against Black militants
has been used recently by certain
men in public life-in Florida, as
a means to further their political
ambitions. Is this happening a gain
with the jailing of Joseph Waller?
Men like Waller are this nation's
hopes, and its greatest patriots.
They should be honored—not jailed.
Sincerely,
Julian Bond
Georgia State Representative


Monday
another dramatic announcement. He
called the pr ess together. He de¬
plored the w ay that they had succumb¬
ed to the evidence offered by the
Panthers. He absolutely glowed with
the sincerity and outraged honestly
of an accused Mafioso. And he
revealed photographs Showing bullet
* marks around the back kioor of the ^
apartment, supposedly the marks
of a Panther shotgun barrage.
He didn’t bother to point out
that this in itself contradicted the
account of the affair that he had
released a week earlier. At that time,
Sgt Daniel Groth, leader of the
raid, had explained how the "gunfight"
started:
"I knocked on the front door...
Then I forced the front door with
my shoulder ...As I entered the dark¬
ened apartment, I saw a girl on a
bed holding a shotgun. As she
fired the gun...’1 That's the way
it was—one week ago that is. But
now the story has changed —changed
because the fact is that the only
mark anywhere near the front door is
the hole made by a bullet fired
through the door from the outside.
That and the mark left by a pool of
blood on the inside, where Mark
Clark, Panther defense captain from
nearby Peoria, Ill, was hit by the
first of the bullets that took his
life.
So now Hanrahan reveals bullet
marks near the back door. And even
they are not very convincing. The
New York Times report had stated
flatly earlier in the week, "There
were no bullet marks around the two
doors through which the police said
they entered. There were no bullet
marks in the kitchen(the room into
which the back door opens) and the
dining room. There were a lot of
bullet marks where the Panthers
were snot.’’
The day after Hanrahan’s reve¬
lations, the Times laid it out
even more clearly:
"The Tribune printed four pic¬
tures provided by Mr. Hanrahan and
his staff.
One picture shows the kitchen
door in the back of the cramped
five-room apartment. There are
three circled areas on the picture*
two on the ddtUP ^ amb' Aiicf dne orifA1
piece of cloth draped over one side
of the door. The caption said the
circles indicated bullet holes.
Rut an inspection of the apart#-
ment.showed the two spots marked
by the circles on the door jamb
•were the heads of nails. There was
a circular hole in the cloth at
the spot, indicat by the circle
in the picture, but its edges were
not burned and there was no bullet
hole anywhere behind it."
For the rest, "...a bullet mark¬
ed door described by the police as
the outside of a bathroom dor is
the inside of a bedroom door; and...
there are no marks on the wails
where the police say a heavy deer
hunting slug was fired through a
door."
The battle of evidence continues.
And the Panthers continue to put their
trust in the ability of people to
see the apartment for themselves and
understand all that it had to say to
them. People continued to come by
the hundreds, arriving in the chill
dusk 'when the;- -were finished with work
and school, and waiting patiently to
see for themselves how death had
come to the man who had taken a
leading role in building the Illinois
chapter of the Black Panther Party
into the strongest chapter outside
the San Francisco where the Party 'was
born.
More than 5000 of them made the
journey across the city to Melrose
Park to the final memorial service
for Chairman Fred. Many of them
stood out side in the cold and filed
past the coffin 'while 800 packed the
seats of a church where Bobby Rush
(Panther Deputy Minister of Defense
and Hampton’s closest associate),
Ralph Abernathy of SCLC and Jesse
Jackson, Abernathy’s lieutenant,
spoke about the life of Fred
Hamotcn and the police attack that
murdered him.
They also heard about a united
effort—with groups ranging from
the Panthers, the Republic of New
Africa, and the League of Revolu¬
tionary Black workers to the Sou¬
thern Christian Leadership confer¬
ence—to bring charges of genocide
before the United Nations in con¬
nection with Chairman Fr^d^s ^e^t^
Fred Hampton lives ill
MACK
0FFCP
CHICAGO
CHICAGO (INS)-Fred Hampton was
murdered by the police. ThereJs
much question about that anymore.
The police haven’t admitted it yet
but they’re about the only ones who
haven't. And even they have had to
admit (in a very round-about way)
that their original story about what
happened was a far cry from the truth.
Because the evidence keeps piling up
—evidence that Fred was alseep when
the police broke into his apartment
and killed him in his bed, and that
police reports of a furious gun-fight
have nothing to do with what really
took place.
The Panthers announced the results
of an independent autopsy performed at
the funeral home (owned by one of the
aldermen, A. A. Fayner) where Hampton’s
body was kept for almost a week before
being flown to his parent’s original
home town, Haynesworth, La. The
Panthers stated that the autopsy, con¬
ducted by three white doctors, "con¬
firms our theory that he was murdered
while he was asleep."
"A bullet hole was found just below
Fred Hampton’s hairline above his
right eye. An examination of the angle
of the wound showed that if Hampton
was lying on his back, the person who
shot him would have been standing
above him, slightly to the right and
behind his head.
"Another bullet hole was below the
right ear, with an exit hole on the
left side of the lower neck, showing
exactly the same angle a s the other
bullet hole." Two other bullet grazes
showed the same angle. The report
differs markedly from the published
results of the official autopsy which
referred only to bullet holes in the
"left temple" and the lower neck.
Police response to the announce¬
ment of the autopsy at Raynor’s
funeral home was reveal t^at Aider-
man Rayner himself was "urier
investigation" for his "connections"
with the Panthers.
Then, a week a ft^ JJm assaspjLn^ ^ -
tion. State's Attnra#*/’nanraSiSI made 5
Pag® 4
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS


Rage 5
December 22
HARCSH HOIPS OK
CLEVISTON, FLA.-As one rent
strike was ending in St Louis,
an other was beginning in Harlem,
Florida, the Black of white Clevr-
iston. On November 9> a group
of Harlem’s tenants banded to¬
gether to use their combined
force to gain bargaining rights
from their slum landlords. The
Clewiston Housing Authority which
operates and manages the 179, old
wooden shacks to over 200 families,
had demanded that rent be raised
to as high as &60 per month. The
tenants reacted by organizing a
Harlem Tenants Association (HTA),
and pushed the housing authority
to accept their organization as
the only barganing agent during
the rent strike. When the housing
authority refused to recognize
HTA as the voice of the tenants,
HTA intensified its efforts by
obtaining legal services from Steve
Johnson, an attorney with Florida
Rural Legal Services. The tenants
led by Jesse Robinson and Ivy \
7/at son returned to the Authority
with a list of demands which called
for the purchase of the buildings
by the tenants, or management of the
units by HTA. Presently, there has
been no move taward accomodation.
The buildings in dispute are without
indoor toilet or shower facilities.
The Harlem Tenants Association
was handed a boost recently when in
a mass tenant meeting it won the sup¬
port of Marvin Davies, NAACF State
Field Director and James Campbell,
Housing and Planning Specialist of
the Southern Regional Council, At¬
lanta, Georgia.
Reacting as whites under pres¬
sure, the Clewiston Housing Authority
served eviction notices on 26 fami¬
lies—-whether they pay back rent or
not. The families, some with small
children, were ordered to leave the
shacks .four days before Christmas.
The families have been told to rest
in peace. The tenant organization
has been able tocfevelop total com¬
munity participation and community
people now make all decisions as to
housing. The residents now have
complete control over the 279 wooden
shacks. Rents are now paid to the
Harlem Tenants Association for de¬
posit to its escrow account in a
Black bank in Atlanta. The tenants
want to demolish the oresent shacks
and build a model community of clus¬
tered single family homes, coopera¬
tive and condominium apartments.
The Tenants have learned to fight
back instead of paying high rent
for nothing, or packing up and leav¬
ing. They have also learned that
power is in togetherness and that a
tenants organization is safe, legal,
and can achieve desired results.
If St. Louis, Washington, D.C.,
Detroit and New Orleans can give
tenants an equal voice on their
housing authorities why can’t
St. Petersburg?
THE BURNING SPEAR
TW6 WWf TWT WORKS RS
scoop spur
by ABE PECK
CHICAGO (LNS)--This is the house
that blood built. It is called 2337
Jest Monroe Street. It is in Chicago,
in what Elvis calls Hthe ghet-to.”
A pool of blood stains the carpet
behind the front door to this house.
The blood was part of Mark Clark until
the morning of Dec.U. Mark Clark was
a Black Panther from Peroria, Ill.
Color nim dead.
Overturned furniture fills the
front room and hallways of this house.
The 'walls jnd furniture are air-con¬
ditioned police style—ventilated by
shotgun, pistol, automatic rifle, and
magnum shells.
Color them violated.
There is a third bedroom at the end
of the hallway, and the mattress in
this room is half brown and half red.
The brown part is frayed from use,
the red part is fresh and slippery
with agony and pain.
This redness was a part of Fred
Hampton. Fred Hampton was Chairman
of the Illinois Black Panther Party.
Color him dead, too.
Fred Hampton was 21 years old.
Mark Clark was 22.
A block away, the Information
Minister and the Defense Minister and
several other speakers speak of Chair¬
man Fred and Mark Clark and armed
struggle. They speak of why they are
tired of writing and lecturing and
organizing in the shadow of i|00 years
of Bablonian Captivity.
.Fords. I
At the house that Hood built,
words are no longer necessary. The
shotgun patterns show where Ron
Satchel, Blair Anderson, Verlin Brewer,
and Brenda Harris were put un against
the wall. Shocked eyes play ”follow
the dots’1 and relay the truth: each
was shot only in the lower body, each
was shot to cripple him or her for a
long time.
Soon we will nay yet another visit.
Jews call it ’’sitting shivah.” Irish¬
men call it a ’’wake”. The Vikings
launched ships when the time came.
Soon we shall go to a place unlike
’’the ghet-to,” a place where the air
is clean and there is space for people
to strech out. tie shall go lc this
place of good-byes, and we shall say
out farewells to the 27th and 28th
Black Panthers to perish. We shall
stand over the graves and hear eulogies
to those who fought ’well and not in
vain.
More words.
We, the long-haired sons and daugh¬
ters of the middlw-class, v/ent to the
house that blood built and saw the
truth that words and rhetoric cannot
say. )Ye saw the redness of black men
and women and knew it for the redness
of the yellow Vietnamese and the
white activist whose blood will flow
before the beast is slain. We
stepped in the redness, and felt rage
that the State's attorney could dare
to congratulate his gunmen for killing
people in their beds. The redness
seeped into our minds as we thought
of our own communal homes and our
still-living loved ones.
When we left the house that blood
built, we knew that vie had descended
from the mountain to {join with those
who dwell in the valley. And, when
we lo ked into each other’s eyes we
knew that the back had been
sealed by the avalanche of what we
had seen.
Bring the ghetto home.
ctience
cvrtteRtK
tco*te
On December 20, 1969, at 5:30 a.m.
employees of Swanholm Nursing home,
located at 6200 Central Avenue decided
they have had enough unjust treatment
and employed for slave wages. Accord¬
ing to Mrs. Elvila Hayward, union
organizer for Bay Area Local 1010, the
home owed a bill of 553,000 and to
repay this bill they were working the
workers eight hours and only paying
them for 7 1/2 hours. Mrs. Hayward
further expressed that the present
salary is well below the poverty stand¬
ards as established by the government
anti-poverty scale and is not at all
in accordance with the minimum wages
as estadished by congress.
According to the workers, on Nov¬
ember 1969, a new administrator, Laurel
J* Chadwick, took over the nursing
home. The administrator’s first act,
according to workers was to be(£Ln
paying 7 1/2 hour wage for eight hours
of work* ”We have children, and are
not going to work for nothing,” said
one worker* ’’She claims she doesn’t
have funds to give us more money, so
she fired four good workers only to
hire another five who are sympathetic
and loyal to her* And although she
claims they don’t have the money to
pay us more, they have already hired
several policemen to guard the build¬
ing while we are peacefully picketing.”
"A deliberate attempt is being made
by Swanholm administrative staff to
scare us into thinking they are going
out of business, before they will give
us justice,” said Mrs. Hayward. ’’That
is the same song sung in Charleston,
South Carolina, during the summer*
Workers there were under paid and got
what they wanted by organizing and
sticking together*.We’re going to
8tick together too, and if Swanholm
would rather go our of business before
paying workers a decent salary, then
maybe it should do just that!” she
said* ”It is the 20th century and
people are not going to work for horse
and buggy wages. That’s the purpose
of our union, tc seek good working
conditions for people and to obtain
decent salaries. Bay Area Local 1010
is determined to do away with the idea
that Black people can live off nothing
for doing all the work and whites can
do nothing and get rich*”
Mrs* Hayward said that although only
Black Swanholm workers are in the pic¬
ket line, there are white workers who
have joined the union and who have
paid memberships and union cards*
The workers have received the sup¬
port of the Junta Of Militant Organ¬
izations and the Community Liberation
Movement, who joined them in the pic¬
ket lines*
Mrs* Hayward says anyone who wants
further information on the Swaibhola
strike should contact her at 2163
First Avenue, South or call Bay Area
Local 1010 at 829-2231*


Page 6
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Monday
LETTER FROM
THE 6RAVE
April 30, 1963 Alachua county jail.
Around midnight.
(The following is an excerpt from a
log kept by Joseph Waller while he
was a political prisoner in the
Alachua County Jail in Gainesville
Florida, for inciting to roit.)
By Joseph Waller
April 30, 1963, Alachua County jail.
Around midnight.
Tonight while I lie silently on
my bunk there are many things flitting
across this vast desert I dare to
call my mind. And with obscene au¬
dacity I dare think some of these
flitting mental spirits should be
described.
It is not quiet in this cell
block although most of the jail seems
asleep. Somewhere on this cell
block there'is a radio playing. Ma¬
gic guitars are singing a popular
tune called ”Soul Serenade”;one of
the young freedom fighters on the
block is singing a freedom song, I
think it is Jethro: ’’Captain call
me a nappy head nigger ♦V#1*
But all these sounds are welcome
stimulants—the radio, hinting sounds
of a distant Congo land and heritage;
the young, stridant voice singing its
scorn of an american dilemma—all
these sounds are catylists for the
heresies my mind needs to purge
I have a great fear these days.
While in the midst of a revolution
which produces, like all revolu¬
tions, beautiful rhetoric of free¬
dom, while being an active partici¬
pant, a lover of freedom in its most
transendental application, and one
who willingly places his body, will,
and soul in the occupation of shat¬
tering oppressive forces, I watch
with an apprehensive anticipation as
our slumbering people shake the
apathy of the somnubulist and mobe
toward what each of us have begun to
define as freedom—our freedomU
It is ironic that my heart should
harbour apprehension, for it was not
too long ago that I shed tears of
anxiety, frustration, and anger be¬
cause of the apparant inability of
our people,to apply to OURSELVES
the glorious, pompous phrases of
freedom created in this country by
these american people to fit their
needs. I watched and listened with
singular anger as our people cheered
the past symbols of american free¬
dom—Jefferson, Lincoln, Henry,
Paine—cried for american disasters
and fought american battles.
Surely, I thou ht, it is more than
asinine that our people can be so
psychologically enmeshed 'with the
passions of freedom for america
to the extent of killing any heritic
among ourselves and yet not be able
to look at OURSELVES and OUR needs
comparatively to the needs of ameri¬
ca 'which evoked the american defini¬
tions of freedom.
But things began to happen and a
new awareness was born ox North ame¬
rican Africans—an awareness born of
long suffering which made us begin to
rightfully look to ourselves for sal¬
vation.
The masses were movingl But —I
wonder—while I realize that most of
american rhetoric which had to do
with freedom only met the needs of a
particular people and was often
spoken in hypocracy, does this des¬
troy +-he meaning of the american
ideal of freedom? Are we to create
a special kind of nationalism appli¬
cable to certain groups defined by
its ethnic or racial peculiarities,
or will we attempt to realize oppor¬
tunity given—nay, flung upon us—
that of creating a meaningful free¬
dom force, unqualified, peculiar-to
the needs- of mankind.
Will we create a force true to
mankind or an instrument of struggle
—singular in nature and unilateral
in application?
I understand, perhaps better than
most, the need and the reason for
anger, I walk with many of our peo¬
ple on an emotional precipice of
hate—my very being longing for a
soul-purging revenge. But do I
have a higher duty to mankind—a
, duty which requests, “entreats, that
I suggest that while ihis struggle1
goes on—and it must go on—some
sincere effort be made to include
humanity into our freedom rhetoric,
so that freedom can become more
than just a word, more than just a
word, more than just a cry to ra¬
lly segregated groups with peculiar,
nationalist interest?
There needs be an effort made to
induce mankina to lose nationalist
individuality, to induce all the
world’s neighbors to come together
to fight all the transgressors of
freedom, whereever and wnoever they
are$ to protect a common defini¬
tion of freedom from the perverted
slavemasters of the world.
I believe if we are good, and
careful we can abolish the United
Nations by creation a united Human¬
kind. I believe all the oppressed
peoples of the world have this op¬
portunity, but more realistically
I understand the need for all op¬
pressed peoples to gain their par¬
ticular segregated freedom, so my
feeble mutt rings are no more than
heritical mombo jumbo, but I sense
my own capacity for hate and it
frightens me. I know my need for
love and it consternates me. But
as the people go so am K deter¬
mined to go—with an 'unlatched
vigor.
CONCRETE]
& BLOCK WORK
(fattnacfonA
• PATIOS • FOUNDATIONS
• CARPORTS • WALKS
i • DRIVEWAYS
O FINISHING EXPERTS
II 8T6-0641 11
0.PEN 7 A.M. to 5 P.M. 5 DAYS
‘ SAT. 7 A.M. TILL NOON
George Jones
1951 4TH AV. S.
HYPOCRACY
VS
DEMOCRACY
The ideal purpose of government
has always been 10 protect and ro-
vide for its citizens . Governments
make laws for these purposes and the
people these rules and laws protect
and provide for are the citizens of a
government, fhe citizens also have
responsibilities to the government.
These responsibilities include paying
taxes, obeying the laws, and anything
else that promises to benefit and per¬
petuate the government. If e can
accept the above as being true we
must easily be able to see that the
american government has failed in
its responsibilities to Black peo¬
ple. Since the beginning o. this
country, North american Africans
have more than lived up to our re¬
sponsibility to this government.
Black people have fought and died in
every war this country has engaged
in. We have always paid taxes altho¬
ugh as a rule we were barely able
to support ourselves. We were slaves
for america for more than two hun¬
dred years, .Ye have been systema¬
tically barred from all positions of
power—left without any control of
our fate.
The american government recog¬
nizes that Black people have more
than met any responsibilities we
might have had to this racist coun¬
try, but how has american responded
to the needs of Black people?
America has promised, promised, pro¬
mised. Nothing more.
/ In 1776, american was one of tdie
loudest proclaimers of the worth of
the individual and the responsibili¬
ty of the government to its citizens.
It 'was during this era that the cry
wLiberty or Death” thundered around
the vrorld. But events that cry was
made there were Black men and women
whp were slaves in america, so it
becomes evident that when the cry
”Liberty or Death” was made, Black
people were not meant. In fact,
George Washington once sold a slave
for a barrel of molasses.
The american dream was never
meant for Black people. The ameri¬
can government has never met its
responsibilities to Black people.
And when Black people revolt, the
amehican government screams loudly a
and hysterically about the break¬
down of law and order. Then they
take taxpayers money (Black tax¬
payers included) and buy murderous
weapons to kill) Blacks with.
The fabt 'is tne american govern-
*
ment has never met iis responsibili¬
ties ta the North american African,
and until it does the North american
African is not responsible to the
american government. There should
be no order until Black people .are
helping to make the law.
There should be no young black
men fighting and dying in american-
made wars until these young men have
gained justice, liberty, and equality
at home. Every white attack on the
Black colony or members of the Black
colony should be met with a counter
attack from the Black colony.
There must be an end to the
’’legal” brutality being inflicted
against Black people. We must begin
to understand that the only difference
between the police and the Ku Klux
Klan is the uniform. The pigs are
just an occupying army—the enemy.
(see Hypocracy, page 10)
rxsmllefiS s'ibnA io dnsm


December 22
THE BURNING SPEAR
7
jomo teens loot
Presently JOMO is working on sev¬
eral projects. One of these projects ,
is a cooperative food store which
wa^Ll allow welfare recipients and
people in the colony to purchase
food chearly and will advance an ov¬
erall program designed to create ec¬
onomic independence to the greatest
degree possible. The cooperative
will be owned by the people in the
colony.
JOMO also intends to turn out
the Burning Spear on a regular ba¬
sis.
Our ability to do any of these
things will be determined b^r you,
our readers. In order for these pro¬
jects to succeed we need money0
DO MO with JOMO and start the
cash rolling in. All checks should
be made out to JOMO, 2163 1st Ave.
So. St. Petersburg* Florida
Photo at'top right is Chairman Joseph halier after he was beaten by
police while handcuffed in the back seat of a squad car. The beating
sparked four days and nights of rebellion in St. Petersburg, in August
1966.
The two photos above are JOMO members in Gainesville, Fla., and at
the state prison in Raiford, Florida* protesting the illegal imprison*
ment of Andre Shellman.


Pag* 8
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Kjaday
liiUTTr DAivrro/ c
m thc nwetmr
By now it should be obvious to
everyone in america that this country
is presently experiencing the greatest
threat to its existance since the last
civil war* America is engaged in a
revolution—a revolution no less aerl—
cus to its continuity than the war of
1776 or the more recent revolution of
1861.
This revolution is not something
new; it has been occuring since the
first African—transported to this
country wider the most inhumane con¬
ditions—resisted the racist american
theory that he was less than human,
mere chattel to be used without con-
concern for his needs or wants, mere
livestock to be fed, counted and mated:
at intervals-but certainly not human.
But although this revolution has been
occuring for some time now, many per¬
sons of the movement begin to date the
revolution from the 1960*s—the days
of the sit ins and freedom rides*
During these brave bloody days of
Black women and children being clubbed
to the ground by white southerners; of
young brave children teing sent spraw¬
ling across southern asphalt streets
by high-pressure water hoses, many
young white college students fell into
the ranks of the youthful Black
visionaries. Together these groups
of organized Black and white college
students—the most outstanding being
the Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee—raised natural hell with
the established racist structure of
america. With their eyes on the
prize of a better, more humane
american they marched, lived, laughed,
sang and died together. And america
today is Just as racist as it was
then*
But the marching and dying were not
in vain. And although the civil
rights movement as it was then known
is dead, the spirit, which made brave
Black and white boys nd girls heroic
enough to face nd defy a monstrous
racist-oriented america still prevails.
It prevails in such organizations as
SNCC, JOMO, the Black Panther Perty
and many other diverse groups; and it
prevails also in some white radical
groups as SDS and CL**.
These groups, though differentiated
by their physiognomy, are working
toward the same fundamental goals—
those of rescuing america from its
racist self, which will mean, prac¬
tically, destruction of the american
establishment s now known, and cre¬
ating humane atmosphere, conducive to
the well-being of all mankind*
However, there is one great danger
which threatens the success of those
different groups—and that is their
tendency to polarize according to
strictly racial lines. This tendency
is the greatest danger, but this type
of polarization creates many other
dangers. One, and perhaps the most
important, is the need for the white
radical groups to seek Jivey Issues
necessary to challenge the institu¬
tion. Presently the biggest issue
the radicals are concerned with is
the genocidal Vietnam war. What
happens when there is no longer a war?
The White Radical groups will have to
regroup, restructure and find another
issue.
This is by no means a suggestion
that there are no other great issues
waiting to be tackled with the conclu¬
sion of this war, but is should be
obvious that although such issues do
exist there will be some confusion
and a lost of momentum before a new
program can be evolved*
Another danger which should not be
overlooked is the fact—recently re¬
affirmed by the Kerner report—that a
america is a racist society. All of
us, both Black and white, are products
of this society, and it would not be
as difficult as it may seem on the
surface for us to sink back into the
racist habits we’ve only so recently
abondoned*
This is fundamentally what the
Brother Chairman was talking about
on the 13th of December at the march
on city hall when he suggested that
white radicals change their birth
certificates and drivers licenses to
read "negro"* The brother understands
how much trouble it is for out white
corar des to find issues to confront
america with*
While it is a necessary for every
brother in the colony to commit a
revolutionary act each chy as' a
matter of suivival, the average white
radical is involved only to the de¬
gree his politics determine the Black
Liberation struggle is important* If
the war ended today most white radi¬
cals would be stuck with a program
that speaks only to legalizing pot,
long hair, legalizing abortions and
air and water pollution, while most
of the brothers and sisters in the
colony are hoping to live long enough
to die 'rora polluted air and water.
Ideology is born through struggle.
Mao or Che did not pick up a book
on revolution and become over night
revolutionaries. They were involved
in struggle, and it was through this
struggle that their ideology evolved.
The only thing the Brother Chairman
and JOMO are asking of our white
comrades is that they become involved
in the life and dedth struggle that
Black people are living with each day
so they may truthfully call themselves
revolutionaries and bring the war home
where it ought to be.
Political whites have to decide whe¬
ther they’re going to be White Radicals
or White Rascals*
Repression
I n
St Pete.
Call the OINK OINK farm any other
name it smells the same. Some might
call it the lolice Station, others
might call it the Pig Station, it
still has the same smell, it still
does the very same thing in nature.
Repressive measures are being used in
this city by the pig dept on law
abiding colonized peoples. If you
think we are lying then just read
some ox the repressive things that
have happened to members of JOMO
in the past year. Instead of being
out trying to get the vandals who
are putting holes in tires they are
messing with us. To note oppression
here we need only to look at the de¬
finitions that are being used, if
Black poeple are involved, it is a
bad, vicious crime, but when'Whites
are involved it is then known ss
vandalism. The vandals have taken
enough Christmas decorations to
stretch from here to Jacksonville.
fou know ain’t no nigger commited
the crime, for it is a known facR
that niggers ain’t allowed in the
other folds communities aftr dark
unless they a re there to work and
perform slave tasks. Eut instead
of directing police energies to
real crime they would rather use
repressive measures against the
organization shat seeks to unseat
repression.
Take the case of Brother
Donaldson who around 3*00 a.m.
was in his ofice, and was locked
up for drunkness, cause the nigs
found he had a key and couldn’t
arrest him for breaking and enter¬
ing, the charges were dropped in
a couple of days only after the
threat of suit. The case of Brother
Saul Rentz is even worse* Have
you ever heard of a person being
placed in jail on charges of night
prowling in his own back yard?
Rant still more of the same?
Brother George Alderman was play¬
ing records at the Neighborhood
Concerns Community Center at the
request of the crimer/manager and
was busted. At first the oink
oink’s charged him with making
loud noises and it was later changed
to disobeying a pig order. That
was some time ago and the case is
still on the court docket. The
reason it was not tried is because
the oink oink’s know the charges are
jivey. Brother Kenyatta was charged
'with vagrancy which was later dropped
only after an attorney went to court
to show the repressive nature of the
crime. If you think those we -e bad
then here are a few move. Andre
Lee Shellman was given ten yeai’S for
alledgely stealing $10 worth of gro¬
ceries from a parked car. In court
the judge never asked about the crime
but rather his association with the
Junta Of Militant Organizations. In
effect, he was found guilty of being
involved in Black Liberation. Court
documents that are official clearly
show this, "And if I think you think
what Joe waller thinks, you’re going
to get everything I can possibly give
you." Or take the most recent divorce
of Joe Jailer, which was handled by
racist Holley, the repressive I inees
Friend. This case had no political
dealing what-so-ever just two people
getting a divorce, <«ell it just so
happened the stupid holley presided
and decided that the argument deci¬
ded on by both parties and the atto-
neys for both parties were not to
his liking. . He now has hanging over
Mr. Jailer’s head as well as every-
thing else he has hanging over his
h ad in court procedures a possible
charge of "Contempt of Court" for
which there is no bail,..If that is
not repression, then what is? want
more, ask Joyce walker why the pig
beat her up and hit her in the sto¬
mach? or ask Fred Hamilton, who at
the time was a member of JOMO why
the pigs beat him and ousted him to
the ground for nothing.
You can ask a lot of colony
dwellers and you can see that repres¬
sive measures are in use. A woman
carrying a baby in her womb was beat¬
en to her knees, another brother was
beaten to almost nothing for not
wanting to see the pigs beat his
sister.
A few weeks ago Marshall Law
enforced on people in the colony by
some pigs. If this is not a repres¬
sive city, then where is one?
Believe us when we say prepare
yourselves before pigs think it is
the good ole days and come in heaps
and just beat heads, like they used
to do.


Decemoer 22
On December 13, 1969, one of the
' most successful demonstrations in the
/history of St. Petersburg took place,
\ Approximately four-hundred people-—
young, old, Black and white, marched
and demonstrated against Nixon’s riot
in Vietnam, the Conspiracy 8 trial,
and the political arrest which have
become commonplace in america.
Apparently the march was too suc¬
cessful fo’a the establishment’s
standing three speakers, Otha Favors,
Pat Ford, and Hike Gold, are facing
arrest should they make an apperance
in St. Petersburg* It was decided
a few days after the march by the
St. Petersburg police department to
fij.e obscenity charges against the
three people.
Favors was quick to label the charges
as "jivy,n stating that it’s rediculous
for this country to talk about obsceni¬
ty, "Since it is the epitome of obs¬
cenity itself. How can a country
actively engaged in dropping tons of
napalm on helpless villages in Vietnam
talk about obscenity?” challenged
Favors* "The most obscene words in
the English language are embraced by
by this nation," he charged. "Words
like ’kill,’ ’murder’, ’war*, ’nigger’
and many others that no one has yet
attempted to have labeled obscene.
It is a sorry fact that as long as
you’re talking about any of these
things the government embraces you,
but when you talk about ending a war
that is systematically murdering a
nation of people you immediately come
under the guns of repression*"
Black people in the colony seem to
think there are other factors involved
in the charges which are not men¬
tioned by the establishment. Poeple
are saying that the charges <-ar©( real¬
ly directed at Otha Favors, the only
Black man who was charged.
One brother made this clear when he
said, "Man this ain’t nothing but stuff.
Thera other cats don’t have to come
back to St. Petersburg, but Otha’s
family lives here. The pigs know
the man is going to come back and see
his mother and sisters* They just
want to bust this dude because he’s
Black* They’re going to lynch another
legally, jut like they're always do¬
ing Brother Joe*"
In any event, it appears this is go¬
ing to 1» one of the most exciting
winters since the mural was pulled off
the wall in city hall on December 29,
1966* There are reports of mobiliza¬
tion in Tampa, Sarasota, and St. Peters¬
burg for mass demonstrations to be¬
gin in defense of the people facing
the charges.
■■CLEANING AT ITS FINEST”
QUICK CLEANERS
644 - 22nd ST., S. - ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
One Hour Dry Cleaning Nd Extra Charge
Fdr Fast Service I
telephone 89&-65&Q
.VIWAfwm *V»T sjfs*
THjc; BURNING SPEAR
cene
qrqes
QmI n]ovx
LEROY SHELLEY, Owner


Page 10
U.S.A.
Uaqy people get upset when JCMO
speaks of this nation as a colonized
nation where Black people (North am-
erican Africans) are colonial sub¬
jects and not citizens. People get
upset, either because they refuse
to admit that amerlca is capable of
colonizing people or because they
are afraid of the consequences of
colonization within the geographical
boundaries of america*
A colonized people is a group
of people who exist on a body of
land separate from the country which
governs it, and who exist solely for
the purpose of enriching the coloni¬
zer, generally with raw products,
which are in turn developed into a
finished product and sold back to tte
colony,
A colonized people are not re¬
garded as citizens of a country, but
merely as subjects to be governed
by the colonizer. Consequently, we
hear such words as second-class
citizens when referring to coloni¬
zed people.
Colonialism, by its very nature
"thingafy" people. It makes them
mere functionaries. It creates a
situation where men are not allowed to
function for the benefit of the soci¬
ety they have in common with their
fellow, but they must function for
the benefit of foreigners who exploit
their labor and their talents for the
benefit of a foreign society which
has reached a high plateau of techni¬
cal development.
Colonialism is a sophisticated
form of slavery at best. At worse,
colonialism is slavery in its rawest
crudest, basest form. The enslave¬
ment of mankind, under any pretense,
is criminal.
iiVhen Europeans first invaded the
North American continent, they attem¬
pted to colonize the Red man. But
because of the Red man's succeptibi-
lity to survive the criminal labor
requirements of the Europeans, and
because his familarity with the land
made escape easy, the Red man could
not be successfully colonized. Vftien
Europeans, recognized their inability
to colonize the Red man, the Red man
became expendable, and of no use to
them as a profitable labor source.
This resulted in a biLacdy massacre
of the Red man, until he was helpless
enough to be herded off into concen¬
tration camps called Reservations.
(Hypocracy, continued from page 6)
Ana Since we cannot, get justice
from the courts to end pig brutali¬
ty, we must get our justice from the
pigs—in the colony streets* The
occupying army must be driven from
our community. The american govern-
msnt must understand that it has
to pay a price for the criminal acts
it initiates against Black people.
When a judge like Holley deli¬
berately sentences one of our brothers
to ten years in prison because he is
involved in the struggle for Black
liberation, that judge hould also be
sentenced—by the Black colony.
As Brother Malcolm X said, wIt's
liberty or death; the ballot or the
bullet; freedom for everyone or free¬
dom for no one, and until you're
ready to pay that price don^t use
the word 'freedom* in your vocabu¬
lary.*
JbkTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
t WO OF A KIND
The fate of the Red man in this
country is not unusual. Colonialism
demands certain things of its victims
and when these things are not forth¬
coming the victims become a burden
and therefore expendable.
This is why it is very import¬
ant for Black people to correctly de¬
fine our situation in this country
for what it is—colonialism. With
the-increasing tendency of this coun¬
try toward automation, and with the
certainty that this country is moving
toward a cybernated(super automated)
society Black people will lose their
value to america as a labor source
and will become completely expendable.
There is no reason to believe
the fate of - North american Africans
will be any different than the fate
of the Red man, once Africans have
proved utterly useless to our coloni¬
al rulers.
Monday
RHODESIA
(Editor's note* the following re¬
port comes from the Zimbabwe News,,
voice of the Zimbabwe African Nation¬
al Union, a guerilla group fighting
against the racist regime presently
headed by Ian Smith in Zimbabwe
(Rhodesia)*)
LUSAKA, Zambia (LNS)—Rhodesia's
228,000 white settlers are of course
not all as rich as ^arry Openheimer;
nevertheless, ^tliey enjoy a standard
of living unsurpassed anywhere in the
world. They have more swimming pools
per capita than anybody else outside
of California's Beverly Hills. Indeed,
where else on earth do you find house
wives who cannot clean their own under¬
wear without the mrvice of illpaid
(f17.50) per month house servants?
There sire privileges unheard of
elsewhere, such as that of jobs re¬
served for whites only, regardless; of
qualification, and, to boot, wages
so.highly inflated that any pale-
afcinned bum immigrating from Europe
automatically gets ten times the
wages of an African doing a more
skilled job in the same industry.
It is with a view to protecting
these obscene privileges that con- •
titutions now seem to grow faster
on Rhodesian trees than do oranges.
In less than nine years Hhodesis
has had three constitutions, the
latest being the Constitution of
Rhodesia Act which was passed re¬
cently by the white ettler "parli¬
ament". The present constitution
enshrines Apartheid into as legal
an institution as that of religion.
But true to their English tradition
tradition of bitching around with the
language, white Rhodesia will not
call their brand of Apartheid by its
proper name. Instead, they will call
ir "PROVINCIALISM" and will be based
on the "two pyramid policy"—two
pyramids, one black and the other
white, standing sid by side. At
the summit of the black pyramid will
stand such paternalistic do-gooders
as missionaries and the regime's
Native Commissioners who will com¬
bine their services with those of
the puppet African chiefs to ensure .
that Zimbabwe's 5,000,000 blacks JENNINGS FfSH MARKET
stay "peaceful" and smiling in their . ......... _ 453-16* St. So.
arid tribal "homelands." The white TWO LOCATIONS So.
pyramid, on the other hand, will fSCfU £icu ft AII V C Li/lT CQiIOC
contain masses of unskilled blacks UHILT 9 nvi VllftOd
at this base.
The cornerstone of Rhodesia's
hitherto informal apartheid system
is the Land Apportionment Act (1931)
which specifically defines where and
how the races are to live. The Act
originally assisgned 37.5% of the
land to the whites and a little over
40% to the Africans. The remainder
was classified as "national", that is,
game reserves national parks, etc.
Now the Land Apportionment Act is to
be replaced by an even more rigidly
apartheidistic legislation, the Land
Tenure Act (1969), which increases by
another ten million acres the land
assigned to the 228,000 white settlers
while reducing that owned by Africans
by 3.5 million acres. So much for
economic "Provincialism."
There will initially be a "national
assembly" made up of 66 members
"elected" as follows: Rhodesia's
228,000 whites and what Smith's
constitution defines as "special
classes of Europeans"—Asians and
coloured—will vote for 50 (white)
of the M. Ps. (Members of Parlia—-
ment). The remaining 16 will be
made up of black puppets nominated
and "elected" by chiefs appointed
by the settler regime. Chiefs in
Matebeleland will choose four and
their counterparts in Mashonaland
will also choose four. The other
eight seats will be reserved for
"urban" Africans who must also vote
as tribal units. Thus even tribal
apartheid will be forced on the
people and brought into full playj
There will be a "senate" of ten b
black puppet-chiefs appointed to pari
parliament by one another (w±th the
regime's approval, of course) and
ten whites appointed by the white-
dominated "national assembly." Thus
not even such "independent" puppets a
as the 14 blacks who window-dress
the pewawnr parliament will have a
chance to come back. It will be
Smith's men all the way.
This system of "parliamentary repre¬
sentation" is being regarded in
Salisbury (capitol of Rhodesia) only
^s a temporary experiment. Within
the next five years Smith's ruling
Rhodesia Front expects a completer
realisation of "Political Provincial¬
ism." Then, only whites will sit in
the so-called national parliament.
The Africans, Asians and coloureds
will be "repatriated" to the rural
villages and urban ghettoes where
they will be expected to form their
own tribal councils and play "as full
a part in the -ffairs of their own
race as will be possible."
Again, ours won't be called
"Bantustans" or "Bantu Homelands"
as they would te called in South Africa.
They will be known simply as "Afri¬
can Tribal Trust Lands"—a difference
in name only.
The hurried enactment of this series
of Apartheid laws could not possibly
give much comfort to Smith's regime a
and thoughtless white settler mobs
behind it. In fact, Apartheid is not -
new in white Rhodesia and therefore
the frenzied promulgation if a dozen
draconian laws intended to institu¬
tionalize it can only betray a feeling
of greater fear and insecurity on the
part of our oppressors.


Page 11
Deceraoer 22
Any criticism falling around the
head of Stokely Carmichael must be
regarded as the criticism which might
have fallen around the head of Pro¬
metheus, the liberator in the ancient
Greek myth. For Carmichael was a
Prometheus—our Prometheus. He
brought us the gift of fire.
To single out Carmichael for lau*»
rels is not to cut any other brother
or organization down, but it is to
look at truth and recognize it as
such. It is understood that
Carmichael is not the founder of the
concept, Black Power, nor even the
phrase, but Carmichael did articu¬
late the concept. And he was beau¬
tiful. He was Malcolm moving among
us, the second coming (and for many
of us the third and forth coming.
Je bussed a lot of nuts when Stokely
did his thing.)
Many other Black Nationalist or¬
ganizations understood the concept
of Black Power and held weekly meet¬
ings in their little store-front
meeting halls and rapped their pro¬
grams to each other. But it took
Stokely, doing his uptight thing,
having his beautiful ‘'stuff*' toge¬
ther, to get their program out of
the store fronts and into the
streets where the oeople are;
Stokely broke out on the american
scene like hives, and, represent¬
ing all us unqualified niggers, he
THE BURNING SPEAR
put whitey in a bag of tricks Houd-
ini couldn’t mess with.
Maybe anyone articulating the
same program could have done the sane
thing. But anyone didn’t^ Stokely
did. SNCC did.
Other ’’respectable’1 organizations
were scared dodoless of the whole
thing. Or maybe they weren't. May¬
be they felt their white-controlled
interest would have been jeopardized
had they adopted a Black program.
COPE had the sense to ’’me-to”. They
dug what a dynamite thing this beau¬
tiful cat was articulating. But the
only thing we could hear from the
Nation of Islam was, Elijah said it
first in 1936, and the NAACP took its
usual stance.
But Stokley was a big £rin—
a* conspiring/ wnite-tootnea* BiacK
skinned grin. Black folks sat in
front of TV’s watching and loving
him anytime we could. And we grinned
too. We were part/ of the conspiracy
(talking about the so ul of Eiack
folksi). We sat watching the bro¬
ther blow the minds of degree-laden
honkies who professed not to under¬
stand what was meant by Black Power,
But we understood without definition.
We understood to the depths of our
unqualified, Flack hemorrhoid aching
bowels. And we murmered, ”rap,
brother, rap]1’.
PHONE 896-7976
DAY OR NIGHT
Pk
oto6
W. L. JONES
Studio Residence
909 - 22nd STREET SO. 1721 - 17th STREET SO.
ST. PETERSBURG. FLORIDA 33712
But same of the brothers started
knocking him for so much star trek¬
king, and his obvious enjoyment of the
role he assumed* But we needed it0
We needed to feel the brother was
having a blast, a real time of mess¬
ing up so many white minds* He blew
Our minds, too, because we had been
thinking of the same things he was
rapping about* things we were afraid
to utter. We were so silently se¬
rious about these things that we
prayed at night asking Lyndon John¬
son’s g0d to show us the light*
And this crazy, beautiful dude, so
sacriligeous, so irreverant, just
helped us to get all our "stuff” to¬
gether. He came on like he’d been
walking and talking with Allah. He
destroyed Baal without striking a
stone. He just conspired with Black
folks with his ’’stuff’’-eating grin.
Super Niggerl Come to lead us down
the oath of Malcolm, Our Father, who
art
PLOW807 fast Food Service
Located 443-N»=St.So.
BLACk owA/e CaW.N
Te|gpho/MF-8^--8551
AUTO - LIABILITY - LIFE - FIRE
HOMEOWNERS - MOTORCYCLE
Phone-894-3802
HOPKINS INSURANCE
AGENCY
SR-22's FILED
Notary Public
1405 - 22nd Street So.
St. Petersburg, Florida
MEriea America
ultural Center
mMNKL OIL PAINTINGS
mu.com X ALBUMS
HAND-CARVED OBJECTS
Ifni KENYA
BLR CK BIST HD A Y -t GREETING
XMAS CAROS, TOO
631 22°'St. So.St. Petersburg 61,


(While we realize that the demands listed here are reform, we also understand that while a revolutionary
program is being created Black people must meet immediate needs for mere survival* Here is a list of de¬
mands we think is necessary for survival*)
â– ^n the name of the North american African colony, JOMO demands*
1# Control of our schools-the curriculum, the hiring and firing and the determination of how much money
is to be Hotted to the schools*
(Traditionally the schools of the colony have not been Responsive to the needs of the colonized* The school
curriculum has been based on the values of middle-class whites. Consequently, we know nothing of ourselves
as a people—our culture or our history* Creative young Black teachers who have desired to introduce mean¬
ingful education to the classroom have been afraid to do so at the risk of their Jobs, which are controlled
by whites.)
2* A Police review board composed of a broad section of the colony*’
(This review board will not only give us the power to investigate alleged cases of police brutality and the
like, but will also give us an opportunity to question all policemen proposed for duty within the colony, so
we will be able to determine whether the proposed policemen have attitudes which are conducive to meaningful
and proper relations with the colony as a whole*)
3* An end to exploitation by white merchants who have businesses in the colony*
(It is no secret to any one that the colonial subject pays more for purchases than americans* We propose
not only an end to such exploitations, but also that all white merchants within the colony contribute finan¬
cially to the colony each month* We understand that white merchants are not in the colony because of any
love for Black people, but rather because the colony presents a ready-made, lucrative market for exploitation*)
4* Control of all Black public housing*
(Traditionally Black people who live in public housing have been subjected to the most blatant insults*
Whites who control public housing have acted in a manner designed to dehuminize the occupants—going so
far as to inspect apartments to determine whether women had men hiding in the closets or under the beds*
They have also used the fears of Black people to make them turn informers on each other in order to pre¬
vent being made to move*)
5* All slumlords having rental property in the colony be forced to turn that property over to the city
which will take theient in escrow and turn the property over to the occupants after a designated perior of
city hs always complained £>out the ineffectiveness of the penalties imposed on slumlords as stimulants
to improve their properties* The city can take the property from the slumlords who refuse to repair property
and*using the money placed in escrow can be considered as payment on the properties* The fact that the city
has demonstrated its power to confiscate Black-owned property for such things as to make way for highways is
indicative of the city*s power to take slum property for such a proposal as ours*)
6f The lines of our districts be redrawn so the area where Black people are a majority will constitute
a district, giving Black people the power to elect Black local representation who will not hve to depend
on the white vote for election*
(By constant gerrymandering of the districts local officials have made sure that Black people never be¬
come a majority in any given district* This has always been done so whites might have the ultimate say
so as to to who will represent us*! If we re so fortunate to have a Black person elected to office that
person has the white vote to thank for it, not Blocks* Consequently whites get his loyalty*)
7* Complete control of the Black community*
(There are many-other Immediate needs not spoken to in these demands* We understand this* However, we
believe that using these as a beginning the others can be realized without difficulty.)
'Page 12
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Monday
JOMO
7- Poi„t
Pro q ram


Full Text

L ±*age 2
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Monday
THE BURNING SHEAR
is published twice
a month by the
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
in St* Petersburg, Florida*
OFFICE ADDRESS:
Junta of Militant Organizations
2i63 First Avenue, South
St. Petersburg, Florida
Phone: (813) 829-2231
THE BURNING SPEAR STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
Joseph Waller
NEWS DIRECTOR
Lonnie Donaldson
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Saul A. Rentz
CONTRIBUTING ‘ EDITORS
Ruthe Benton
Dwight Waller
Delores Young
ARTISTS
Joyce Walker
Leonard vYaller
JQMO
2163 First Avenue, South
St. Petersburg, Florida
Enclosed $5>«00-one year-regular
mm
Enclosed $2.Q0-one year-students
NAPE
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
SUBSCRIPTIONS
BLACK PLEDGE
I pledge allegiance to my Black people. I pledge to develop my mind and body
to the greatest extent possible.
I will learn all that I can in order to give my best to my people in our
struggle for liberation through revolution. ^
I will keep myself physically fit, building a strong body free from drugs and
otner substances which weaken me and make me less capable of protecting myself, my
family and my Black brothers and sisters.
- I will unselfishly share my knowledge and understanding -with others in order
to bring about change more quickly.
I will discipline myself to direct my energies thoughtfully and constructively
rather than wasting them In idle hatred.
- will train myself never to hurt or allow others to harm my Black brothers and
sisters for I recognize that we need every Black man, Voman, and child to be physi¬
cally, mentally and psychologically strong.
These principles I pledge to practice daily and to teach them to others in
order to unite my people.-UHUEU
\. ' 5,
Chairman waller makes a point to Brothers Michael Avery and Kenneth Rap
Harrington, two of the JOtoO representatives at loth Street Junior High
School, in St. Petersburg. Unlike Negroes at many of the high schools,
tne young brothers and sisters at loth Street Junior High are quickly
reaching a revolutionary plateau.
WHAT JOMO BELIEVES
1. The united states of america is a colonized nation where Black people are being colonized by america.
2* Black people have no responsibility—morally or legally—to perpetuate, sustain or protect" this country which is
actively oppressing us*
3. Because of the fact of our colonization, Black people have no responsibility to the law which was made without our
consent and without consideration for our interest.
4* All Black people in Jails and prisons throughout this country are therefore political prisoners and not criminals*
5* america is a criminal society which have historically and traditionally made it her unspoken and unwritten foreign
and domestic policy to enslave, destroy and wipe out from this earth all non-white peoples she comes in contact with.
6* america is an all-white nation in fact, and plans to eliminate the so-called negro problem by eliminating the
so-called negro*
7* Black people must begin to control the political, economic and social power of our community*
8* Black people must begin to acquire land, which is the basis for revolution and liberation and must establish in¬
dependent businesses which w ill make it possible to employ our people and will help to prepare us for the day when it
pay be necessary to build our own nation and separate from this brutal, racist nation.
9* Black people must form alliances with all other oppressed people all over the world, so we will be able to depend
on support much greater than the 20-30 million Black people here in this country.
10* Black people must broaden their struggle beyond the arena of civil rights and move into the field of human rights,
so we can bring this racist country before the world body called the United Nations and air our grievances before the
world and have america condemned before all the other non-white nations of the world*
11* Black people must view this racist oppressive nation Just as we view any other enemy we have* We must view this
nation Just as this nation views its smSmies, and we must be prepared to react to her oppression and brutality toward
our people accordingly*'
12* Black people must not allow themselves to be drafted into the racist wars of america which are generallly dir¬
ected toward other oppressed peoples anyway*. We must refuse to fight for a nation which refuses to recognize the hura>-
anlty of 20-30 million Black people right here on this continent*
13# The battleground for Black people is in the streets of america*
14* It is the duty of all Black people to arm themselves so they will be able to protect their families when this
racist white power structure decides to revert to the "good old days" and swoop down into the colony to eliminate the
Black man*

December 22
Page 3
ruetec
ones
by Ododuai .
Three years ago, on Dec. 29,
1966, an artless mural depicting
black people as grosteque-looking
minstrels lined a wall of the in¬
famous St. Petersburg city hall.
It strod for everything that is
near and dear.to all whites of this
city...it was a rascist mural kept
on the wall to keep the white man's
image perpetuated and to remind
blacks of their inferior subserv¬
ient position in this colony.
Well as of this date one, artic¬
ulate, young black has spent 17
months in hell and is still living
an hour1; by hour hell because he
ripped this filthy artless rag
from the walls of city hall. Some¬
thing every black in St. Petersburg
wanted to do but didn't have the
nerve to do. They simply iowereu
their eyes when they looked at the
mural and moved on to dutifully pay
their water bill or visit the other
offices in the lily-white staffed
building.
Joseph Waller spent time in the
St. Petersburg city jail, the Clear- ,
water jail ana Raiford prison for
tearing down this trash. He h^s
been constantly intimidated by police
harrassed by racist judges and
every establishment figure in town...
because when he touched that picture
he tore away a little bit of their
life...and if city hall isn't safe
what else can be safe in lily white
town?
The torture at Raiford and the
torture of his life can never be
undone...but the amazing part of
this sordid story is that this fine
black brother has never "lost the
faith.11 He kept on fighting, he
recouped, salvaged black brothers
from the neighborhood, doushed them
in the living fire of black pride
and stamina that makes him the most
unusual black man in this area and
has spun a new philosophy in St.
Petersburg.
He's made blacks look at each'
other, talk to each other, love each
other, respect each other, fight for
each other, die for each other. He's
made them realize they are the
creators of everything that is
important and worthwhile in this
world. He's made St. Petersburg
blacks live for the first time.
December 29 is the third anni¬
versary of this mural ripping and
right now Brother Waller is visiting
for redemption from the U.S. Supreme
Court. They are deciding whether
Brother 7/aller was placed in double
jeapordy...they are deciding ulti¬
me tly if this man who gave and. is
giving his intellect, time and
sweat to black folks, can once
again be a free man.
The sentencing of Joseph Waller
in St. Petersourg was a rascist
sham...it was an illustration of
the lengths white judges, estab¬
lishment, pigs will go to keep
blacks in their places...his act
jshould not go unrecognized...
[Remember brothers December 29.
by Richard Arvedon—CLM. ^
On Monday December 15th Joseph
Waller went to court and the move¬
ment went to war versus Judge Charles
R. H(F)olly. We Won! H(F)olly had
long ago made the racist nature of his
court quite clear. On November 21,
1968, before sentencing J.O.M.O. mem¬
ber Andre Shellman to ten years In
jail for ten years in jail for ten do
dollars worth of groceries H(F)olly
told him, "And if I think you think
what Joe Waller thinks, you're going
to get absolutely everything I can
possibly give you.”
When Joe received a divorce in Octo¬
ber H(F)olly was the judge. The di¬
vorce agreement had been drawn up by
Joe's wife's lawyer and was agreeable
to all parties-all parties save
Charles R. H(F)olly. H(F)olly, with¬
out asking Joe if he was working or
how much money he was making or even
how much Joe could afford to pay in
the divorce agreement, H(F)olly or¬
dered Joe to get a job. H(F)olly
thought it would be a fine idea for
Joe to get a job on a garbage truck* .
If nothing was open in that line of
work H(F)olly ordered Joe to apply
to the Florida State Employment
Service and accept any job availiable.
Joe went to Florida and agreed to
except a job in the field of jour-
nalism-an occupation in which he had
been trained. Florida State Employ¬
ment could come up with no job in the
field of journalism and Joe refused
to except a job which would under¬
employ him.
At this point H(F)olly informed Joe
that he was in contempt of court for
refusing to accept the type of job
that H(F)olly had ordered Joe to ac¬
quire.
H(F)olly*8 motives were clear:
he would use the racist nature of his
court to repress the political acti¬
vity of Joe Waller and at the same
time make himself a hero to the racist
voters he will have to appeal to when
he runs for the State Supreme Court.
Or so H(F)olly thought*
Word of H(F)olly inpending action
spreaded quickly and the Bay Area Move¬
ment began to mobolize. A meeting was
held three days before the trial date
with representatives from Black youth
for peace and power , Bay Area Free
Press, Community Liberation Movement,
CLAM, JOMO and Tampa S.D.S. R-Y.M.'
It was decided at the out-set that
Joe Waller would not go to jail. That
we-the movement-would keep our brother
free. H(F)olly would not be allowed
to use his court of injustice for it's
repressive ends. When Joe went to
court on Monday, December 15th he did
not go alone. The court room was c
crowded with over a hundred of Joe's
brother and sisters - black and white
H(F)olly was up-tifeht-first he or¬
dered the hearing to be held in closed
chambers-then he ordered the heasing
to be held in open court-then he
changed his mind and ordered the hear¬
ing to be held in chambers again. The
Movement went outside to take the jus¬
tice of its position to the community
We began a long slow picket line a-
round the courthouse-all the time
talking to those who came by and let¬
ting them know why we were there and
what was going on inside. People be¬
gan to join us and the picket line
grew.
When Joe came out of the courthouse
we knew we had won a victory which
said loud and clear: No more injus¬
tice-in darkness no more will the
Charles R. H(F)ollys* of this nation
be allowed to inprison our brothers
and sisters for the ends of repressive
injustice-from this day forward we
are a movement which will negotiate
for nothing to save justice. And in
the end we will win. Right ON!
ItJlltAN BPND
non y
Letter to Judge Charles Holley, from
Julian Bond, Georgia State Represen¬
tative.
December IS, 1969
Sir:
It has come to my attention that
Joseph 7/aller is again a victim
of the Florida judicial system.
I cannot understand by what right
the judge stipulates that he must
take a job on St. Petersburg's
garbage trucks, as part of his di¬
vorce decree—especially when he
is in the process of negotiating
for a job in Louisville, Ky.
Is he to s erve as an example of
what happens to Black men who dare
to call their people to unite
against the oppressiveness of white
racism?
Repression against Black militants
has been used recently by certain
men in public life-in Florida, as
a means to further their political
ambitions. Is this happening a gain
with the jailing of Joseph Waller?
Men like Waller are this nation's
hopes, and its greatest patriots.
They should be honored—not jailed.
Sincerely,
Julian Bond
Georgia State Representative

Monday
another dramatic announcement. He
called the pr ess together. He de¬
plored the w ay that they had succumb¬
ed to the evidence offered by the
Panthers. He absolutely glowed with
the sincerity and outraged honestly
of an accused Mafioso. And he
revealed photographs Showing bullet
* marks around the back kioor of the ^
apartment, supposedly the marks
of a Panther shotgun barrage.
He didn’t bother to point out
that this in itself contradicted the
account of the affair that he had
released a week earlier. At that time,
Sgt Daniel Groth, leader of the
raid, had explained how the "gunfight"
started:
"I knocked on the front door...
Then I forced the front door with
my shoulder ...As I entered the dark¬
ened apartment, I saw a girl on a
bed holding a shotgun. As she
fired the gun...’1 That's the way
it was—one week ago that is. But
now the story has changed —changed
because the fact is that the only
mark anywhere near the front door is
the hole made by a bullet fired
through the door from the outside.
That and the mark left by a pool of
blood on the inside, where Mark
Clark, Panther defense captain from
nearby Peoria, Ill, was hit by the
first of the bullets that took his
life.
So now Hanrahan reveals bullet
marks near the back door. And even
they are not very convincing. The
New York Times report had stated
flatly earlier in the week, "There
were no bullet marks around the two
doors through which the police said
they entered. There were no bullet
marks in the kitchen(the room into
which the back door opens) and the
dining room. There were a lot of
bullet marks where the Panthers
were snot.’’
The day after Hanrahan’s reve¬
lations, the Times laid it out
even more clearly:
"The Tribune printed four pic¬
tures provided by Mr. Hanrahan and
his staff.
One picture shows the kitchen
door in the back of the cramped
five-room apartment. There are
three circled areas on the picture*
two on the ddtUP ^ amb' Aiicf dne orifA1
piece of cloth draped over one side
of the door. The caption said the
circles indicated bullet holes.
Rut an inspection of the apart#-
ment.showed the two spots marked
by the circles on the door jamb
•were the heads of nails. There was
a circular hole in the cloth at
the spot, indicat by the circle
in the picture, but its edges were
not burned and there was no bullet
hole anywhere behind it."
For the rest, "...a bullet mark¬
ed door described by the police as
the outside of a bathroom dor is
the inside of a bedroom door; and...
there are no marks on the wails
where the police say a heavy deer
hunting slug was fired through a
door."
The battle of evidence continues.
And the Panthers continue to put their
trust in the ability of people to
see the apartment for themselves and
understand all that it had to say to
them. People continued to come by
the hundreds, arriving in the chill
dusk 'when the;- -were finished with work
and school, and waiting patiently to
see for themselves how death had
come to the man who had taken a
leading role in building the Illinois
chapter of the Black Panther Party
into the strongest chapter outside
the San Francisco where the Party 'was
born.
More than 5000 of them made the
journey across the city to Melrose
Park to the final memorial service
for Chairman Fred. Many of them
stood out side in the cold and filed
past the coffin 'while 800 packed the
seats of a church where Bobby Rush
(Panther Deputy Minister of Defense
and Hampton’s closest associate),
Ralph Abernathy of SCLC and Jesse
Jackson, Abernathy’s lieutenant,
spoke about the life of Fred
Hamotcn and the police attack that
murdered him.
They also heard about a united
effort—with groups ranging from
the Panthers, the Republic of New
Africa, and the League of Revolu¬
tionary Black workers to the Sou¬
thern Christian Leadership confer¬
ence—to bring charges of genocide
before the United Nations in con¬
nection with Chairman Fr^d^s ^e^t^
Fred Hampton lives ill
MACK
0FFCP
CHICAGO
CHICAGO (INS)-Fred Hampton was
murdered by the police. ThereJs
much question about that anymore.
The police haven’t admitted it yet
but they’re about the only ones who
haven't. And even they have had to
admit (in a very round-about way)
that their original story about what
happened was a far cry from the truth.
Because the evidence keeps piling up
—evidence that Fred was alseep when
the police broke into his apartment
and killed him in his bed, and that
police reports of a furious gun-fight
have nothing to do with what really
took place.
The Panthers announced the results
of an independent autopsy performed at
the funeral home (owned by one of the
aldermen, A. A. Fayner) where Hampton’s
body was kept for almost a week before
being flown to his parent’s original
home town, Haynesworth, La. The
Panthers stated that the autopsy, con¬
ducted by three white doctors, "con¬
firms our theory that he was murdered
while he was asleep."
"A bullet hole was found just below
Fred Hampton’s hairline above his
right eye. An examination of the angle
of the wound showed that if Hampton
was lying on his back, the person who
shot him would have been standing
above him, slightly to the right and
behind his head.
"Another bullet hole was below the
right ear, with an exit hole on the
left side of the lower neck, showing
exactly the same angle a s the other
bullet hole." Two other bullet grazes
showed the same angle. The report
differs markedly from the published
results of the official autopsy which
referred only to bullet holes in the
"left temple" and the lower neck.
Police response to the announce¬
ment of the autopsy at Raynor’s
funeral home was reveal t^at Aider-
man Rayner himself was "urier
investigation" for his "connections"
with the Panthers.
Then, a week a ft^ JJm assaspjLn^ ^ -
tion. State's Attnra#*/’nanraSiSI made 5
Pag® 4
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS

Rage 5
December 22
HARCSH HOIPS OK
CLEVISTON, FLA.-As one rent
strike was ending in St Louis,
an other was beginning in Harlem,
Florida, the Black of white Clevr-
iston. On November 9> a group
of Harlem’s tenants banded to¬
gether to use their combined
force to gain bargaining rights
from their slum landlords. The
Clewiston Housing Authority which
operates and manages the 179, old
wooden shacks to over 200 families,
had demanded that rent be raised
to as high as &60 per month. The
tenants reacted by organizing a
Harlem Tenants Association (HTA),
and pushed the housing authority
to accept their organization as
the only barganing agent during
the rent strike. When the housing
authority refused to recognize
HTA as the voice of the tenants,
HTA intensified its efforts by
obtaining legal services from Steve
Johnson, an attorney with Florida
Rural Legal Services. The tenants
led by Jesse Robinson and Ivy \
7/at son returned to the Authority
with a list of demands which called
for the purchase of the buildings
by the tenants, or management of the
units by HTA. Presently, there has
been no move taward accomodation.
The buildings in dispute are without
indoor toilet or shower facilities.
The Harlem Tenants Association
was handed a boost recently when in
a mass tenant meeting it won the sup¬
port of Marvin Davies, NAACF State
Field Director and James Campbell,
Housing and Planning Specialist of
the Southern Regional Council, At¬
lanta, Georgia.
Reacting as whites under pres¬
sure, the Clewiston Housing Authority
served eviction notices on 26 fami¬
lies—-whether they pay back rent or
not. The families, some with small
children, were ordered to leave the
shacks .four days before Christmas.
The families have been told to rest
in peace. The tenant organization
has been able tocfevelop total com¬
munity participation and community
people now make all decisions as to
housing. The residents now have
complete control over the 279 wooden
shacks. Rents are now paid to the
Harlem Tenants Association for de¬
posit to its escrow account in a
Black bank in Atlanta. The tenants
want to demolish the oresent shacks
and build a model community of clus¬
tered single family homes, coopera¬
tive and condominium apartments.
The Tenants have learned to fight
back instead of paying high rent
for nothing, or packing up and leav¬
ing. They have also learned that
power is in togetherness and that a
tenants organization is safe, legal,
and can achieve desired results.
If St. Louis, Washington, D.C.,
Detroit and New Orleans can give
tenants an equal voice on their
housing authorities why can’t
St. Petersburg?
THE BURNING SPEAR
TW6 WWf TWT WORKS RS
scoop spur
by ABE PECK
CHICAGO (LNS)--This is the house
that blood built. It is called 2337
Jest Monroe Street. It is in Chicago,
in what Elvis calls Hthe ghet-to.”
A pool of blood stains the carpet
behind the front door to this house.
The blood was part of Mark Clark until
the morning of Dec.U. Mark Clark was
a Black Panther from Peroria, Ill.
Color nim dead.
Overturned furniture fills the
front room and hallways of this house.
The 'walls jnd furniture are air-con¬
ditioned police style—ventilated by
shotgun, pistol, automatic rifle, and
magnum shells.
Color them violated.
There is a third bedroom at the end
of the hallway, and the mattress in
this room is half brown and half red.
The brown part is frayed from use,
the red part is fresh and slippery
with agony and pain.
This redness was a part of Fred
Hampton. Fred Hampton was Chairman
of the Illinois Black Panther Party.
Color him dead, too.
Fred Hampton was 21 years old.
Mark Clark was 22.
A block away, the Information
Minister and the Defense Minister and
several other speakers speak of Chair¬
man Fred and Mark Clark and armed
struggle. They speak of why they are
tired of writing and lecturing and
organizing in the shadow of i|00 years
of Bablonian Captivity.
.Fords. I
At the house that Hood built,
words are no longer necessary. The
shotgun patterns show where Ron
Satchel, Blair Anderson, Verlin Brewer,
and Brenda Harris were put un against
the wall. Shocked eyes play ”follow
the dots’1 and relay the truth: each
was shot only in the lower body, each
was shot to cripple him or her for a
long time.
Soon we will nay yet another visit.
Jews call it ’’sitting shivah.” Irish¬
men call it a ’’wake”. The Vikings
launched ships when the time came.
Soon we shall go to a place unlike
’’the ghet-to,” a place where the air
is clean and there is space for people
to strech out. tie shall go lc this
place of good-byes, and we shall say
out farewells to the 27th and 28th
Black Panthers to perish. We shall
stand over the graves and hear eulogies
to those who fought ’well and not in
vain.
More words.
We, the long-haired sons and daugh¬
ters of the middlw-class, v/ent to the
house that blood built and saw the
truth that words and rhetoric cannot
say. )Ye saw the redness of black men
and women and knew it for the redness
of the yellow Vietnamese and the
white activist whose blood will flow
before the beast is slain. We
stepped in the redness, and felt rage
that the State's attorney could dare
to congratulate his gunmen for killing
people in their beds. The redness
seeped into our minds as we thought
of our own communal homes and our
still-living loved ones.
When we left the house that blood
built, we knew that vie had descended
from the mountain to {join with those
who dwell in the valley. And, when
we lo ked into each other’s eyes we
knew that the back had been
sealed by the avalanche of what we
had seen.
Bring the ghetto home.
ctience
cvrtteRtK
tco*te
On December 20, 1969, at 5:30 a.m.
employees of Swanholm Nursing home,
located at 6200 Central Avenue decided
they have had enough unjust treatment
and employed for slave wages. Accord¬
ing to Mrs. Elvila Hayward, union
organizer for Bay Area Local 1010, the
home owed a bill of 553,000 and to
repay this bill they were working the
workers eight hours and only paying
them for 7 1/2 hours. Mrs. Hayward
further expressed that the present
salary is well below the poverty stand¬
ards as established by the government
anti-poverty scale and is not at all
in accordance with the minimum wages
as estadished by congress.
According to the workers, on Nov¬
ember 1969, a new administrator, Laurel
J* Chadwick, took over the nursing
home. The administrator’s first act,
according to workers was to be(£Ln
paying 7 1/2 hour wage for eight hours
of work* ”We have children, and are
not going to work for nothing,” said
one worker* ’’She claims she doesn’t
have funds to give us more money, so
she fired four good workers only to
hire another five who are sympathetic
and loyal to her* And although she
claims they don’t have the money to
pay us more, they have already hired
several policemen to guard the build¬
ing while we are peacefully picketing.”
"A deliberate attempt is being made
by Swanholm administrative staff to
scare us into thinking they are going
out of business, before they will give
us justice,” said Mrs. Hayward. ’’That
is the same song sung in Charleston,
South Carolina, during the summer*
Workers there were under paid and got
what they wanted by organizing and
sticking together*.We’re going to
8tick together too, and if Swanholm
would rather go our of business before
paying workers a decent salary, then
maybe it should do just that!” she
said* ”It is the 20th century and
people are not going to work for horse
and buggy wages. That’s the purpose
of our union, tc seek good working
conditions for people and to obtain
decent salaries. Bay Area Local 1010
is determined to do away with the idea
that Black people can live off nothing
for doing all the work and whites can
do nothing and get rich*”
Mrs* Hayward said that although only
Black Swanholm workers are in the pic¬
ket line, there are white workers who
have joined the union and who have
paid memberships and union cards*
The workers have received the sup¬
port of the Junta Of Militant Organ¬
izations and the Community Liberation
Movement, who joined them in the pic¬
ket lines*
Mrs* Hayward says anyone who wants
further information on the Swaibhola
strike should contact her at 2163
First Avenue, South or call Bay Area
Local 1010 at 829-2231*

Page 6
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Monday
LETTER FROM
THE 6RAVE
April 30, 1963 Alachua county jail.
Around midnight.
(The following is an excerpt from a
log kept by Joseph Waller while he
was a political prisoner in the
Alachua County Jail in Gainesville
Florida, for inciting to roit.)
By Joseph Waller
April 30, 1963, Alachua County jail.
Around midnight.
Tonight while I lie silently on
my bunk there are many things flitting
across this vast desert I dare to
call my mind. And with obscene au¬
dacity I dare think some of these
flitting mental spirits should be
described.
It is not quiet in this cell
block although most of the jail seems
asleep. Somewhere on this cell
block there'is a radio playing. Ma¬
gic guitars are singing a popular
tune called ”Soul Serenade”;one of
the young freedom fighters on the
block is singing a freedom song, I
think it is Jethro: ’’Captain call
me a nappy head nigger ♦V#1*
But all these sounds are welcome
stimulants—the radio, hinting sounds
of a distant Congo land and heritage;
the young, stridant voice singing its
scorn of an american dilemma—all
these sounds are catylists for the
heresies my mind needs to purge
I have a great fear these days.
While in the midst of a revolution
which produces, like all revolu¬
tions, beautiful rhetoric of free¬
dom, while being an active partici¬
pant, a lover of freedom in its most
transendental application, and one
who willingly places his body, will,
and soul in the occupation of shat¬
tering oppressive forces, I watch
with an apprehensive anticipation as
our slumbering people shake the
apathy of the somnubulist and mobe
toward what each of us have begun to
define as freedom—our freedomU
It is ironic that my heart should
harbour apprehension, for it was not
too long ago that I shed tears of
anxiety, frustration, and anger be¬
cause of the apparant inability of
our people,to apply to OURSELVES
the glorious, pompous phrases of
freedom created in this country by
these american people to fit their
needs. I watched and listened with
singular anger as our people cheered
the past symbols of american free¬
dom—Jefferson, Lincoln, Henry,
Paine—cried for american disasters
and fought american battles.
Surely, I thou ht, it is more than
asinine that our people can be so
psychologically enmeshed 'with the
passions of freedom for america
to the extent of killing any heritic
among ourselves and yet not be able
to look at OURSELVES and OUR needs
comparatively to the needs of ameri¬
ca 'which evoked the american defini¬
tions of freedom.
But things began to happen and a
new awareness was born ox North ame¬
rican Africans—an awareness born of
long suffering which made us begin to
rightfully look to ourselves for sal¬
vation.
The masses were movingl But —I
wonder—while I realize that most of
american rhetoric which had to do
with freedom only met the needs of a
particular people and was often
spoken in hypocracy, does this des¬
troy +-he meaning of the american
ideal of freedom? Are we to create
a special kind of nationalism appli¬
cable to certain groups defined by
its ethnic or racial peculiarities,
or will we attempt to realize oppor¬
tunity given—nay, flung upon us—
that of creating a meaningful free¬
dom force, unqualified, peculiar-to
the needs- of mankind.
Will we create a force true to
mankind or an instrument of struggle
—singular in nature and unilateral
in application?
I understand, perhaps better than
most, the need and the reason for
anger, I walk with many of our peo¬
ple on an emotional precipice of
hate—my very being longing for a
soul-purging revenge. But do I
have a higher duty to mankind—a
, duty which requests, “entreats, that
I suggest that while ihis struggle1
goes on—and it must go on—some
sincere effort be made to include
humanity into our freedom rhetoric,
so that freedom can become more
than just a word, more than just a
word, more than just a cry to ra¬
lly segregated groups with peculiar,
nationalist interest?
There needs be an effort made to
induce mankina to lose nationalist
individuality, to induce all the
world’s neighbors to come together
to fight all the transgressors of
freedom, whereever and wnoever they
are$ to protect a common defini¬
tion of freedom from the perverted
slavemasters of the world.
I believe if we are good, and
careful we can abolish the United
Nations by creation a united Human¬
kind. I believe all the oppressed
peoples of the world have this op¬
portunity, but more realistically
I understand the need for all op¬
pressed peoples to gain their par¬
ticular segregated freedom, so my
feeble mutt rings are no more than
heritical mombo jumbo, but I sense
my own capacity for hate and it
frightens me. I know my need for
love and it consternates me. But
as the people go so am K deter¬
mined to go—with an 'unlatched
vigor.
CONCRETE]
& BLOCK WORK
(fattnacfonA
• PATIOS • FOUNDATIONS
• CARPORTS • WALKS
i • DRIVEWAYS
O FINISHING EXPERTS
II 8T6-0641 11
0.PEN 7 A.M. to 5 P.M. 5 DAYS
‘ SAT. 7 A.M. TILL NOON
George Jones
1951 4TH AV. S.
HYPOCRACY
VS
DEMOCRACY
The ideal purpose of government
has always been 10 protect and ro-
vide for its citizens . Governments
make laws for these purposes and the
people these rules and laws protect
and provide for are the citizens of a
government, fhe citizens also have
responsibilities to the government.
These responsibilities include paying
taxes, obeying the laws, and anything
else that promises to benefit and per¬
petuate the government. If e can
accept the above as being true we
must easily be able to see that the
american government has failed in
its responsibilities to Black peo¬
ple. Since the beginning o. this
country, North american Africans
have more than lived up to our re¬
sponsibility to this government.
Black people have fought and died in
every war this country has engaged
in. We have always paid taxes altho¬
ugh as a rule we were barely able
to support ourselves. We were slaves
for america for more than two hun¬
dred years, .Ye have been systema¬
tically barred from all positions of
power—left without any control of
our fate.
The american government recog¬
nizes that Black people have more
than met any responsibilities we
might have had to this racist coun¬
try, but how has american responded
to the needs of Black people?
America has promised, promised, pro¬
mised. Nothing more.
/ In 1776, american was one of tdie
loudest proclaimers of the worth of
the individual and the responsibili¬
ty of the government to its citizens.
It 'was during this era that the cry
wLiberty or Death” thundered around
the vrorld. But events that cry was
made there were Black men and women
whp were slaves in america, so it
becomes evident that when the cry
”Liberty or Death” was made, Black
people were not meant. In fact,
George Washington once sold a slave
for a barrel of molasses.
The american dream was never
meant for Black people. The ameri¬
can government has never met its
responsibilities to Black people.
And when Black people revolt, the
amehican government screams loudly a
and hysterically about the break¬
down of law and order. Then they
take taxpayers money (Black tax¬
payers included) and buy murderous
weapons to kill) Blacks with.
The fabt 'is tne american govern-
*
ment has never met iis responsibili¬
ties ta the North american African,
and until it does the North american
African is not responsible to the
american government. There should
be no order until Black people .are
helping to make the law.
There should be no young black
men fighting and dying in american-
made wars until these young men have
gained justice, liberty, and equality
at home. Every white attack on the
Black colony or members of the Black
colony should be met with a counter
attack from the Black colony.
There must be an end to the
’’legal” brutality being inflicted
against Black people. We must begin
to understand that the only difference
between the police and the Ku Klux
Klan is the uniform. The pigs are
just an occupying army—the enemy.
(see Hypocracy, page 10)
rxsmllefiS s'ibnA io dnsm

December 22
THE BURNING SPEAR
7
jomo teens loot
Presently JOMO is working on sev¬
eral projects. One of these projects ,
is a cooperative food store which
wa^Ll allow welfare recipients and
people in the colony to purchase
food chearly and will advance an ov¬
erall program designed to create ec¬
onomic independence to the greatest
degree possible. The cooperative
will be owned by the people in the
colony.
JOMO also intends to turn out
the Burning Spear on a regular ba¬
sis.
Our ability to do any of these
things will be determined b^r you,
our readers. In order for these pro¬
jects to succeed we need money0
DO MO with JOMO and start the
cash rolling in. All checks should
be made out to JOMO, 2163 1st Ave.
So. St. Petersburg* Florida
Photo at'top right is Chairman Joseph halier after he was beaten by
police while handcuffed in the back seat of a squad car. The beating
sparked four days and nights of rebellion in St. Petersburg, in August
1966.
The two photos above are JOMO members in Gainesville, Fla., and at
the state prison in Raiford, Florida* protesting the illegal imprison*
ment of Andre Shellman.

Pag* 8
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Kjaday
liiUTTr DAivrro/ c
m thc nwetmr
By now it should be obvious to
everyone in america that this country
is presently experiencing the greatest
threat to its existance since the last
civil war* America is engaged in a
revolution—a revolution no less aerl—
cus to its continuity than the war of
1776 or the more recent revolution of
1861.
This revolution is not something
new; it has been occuring since the
first African—transported to this
country wider the most inhumane con¬
ditions—resisted the racist american
theory that he was less than human,
mere chattel to be used without con-
concern for his needs or wants, mere
livestock to be fed, counted and mated:
at intervals-but certainly not human.
But although this revolution has been
occuring for some time now, many per¬
sons of the movement begin to date the
revolution from the 1960*s—the days
of the sit ins and freedom rides*
During these brave bloody days of
Black women and children being clubbed
to the ground by white southerners; of
young brave children teing sent spraw¬
ling across southern asphalt streets
by high-pressure water hoses, many
young white college students fell into
the ranks of the youthful Black
visionaries. Together these groups
of organized Black and white college
students—the most outstanding being
the Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee—raised natural hell with
the established racist structure of
america. With their eyes on the
prize of a better, more humane
american they marched, lived, laughed,
sang and died together. And america
today is Just as racist as it was
then*
But the marching and dying were not
in vain. And although the civil
rights movement as it was then known
is dead, the spirit, which made brave
Black and white boys nd girls heroic
enough to face nd defy a monstrous
racist-oriented america still prevails.
It prevails in such organizations as
SNCC, JOMO, the Black Panther Perty
and many other diverse groups; and it
prevails also in some white radical
groups as SDS and CL**.
These groups, though differentiated
by their physiognomy, are working
toward the same fundamental goals—
those of rescuing america from its
racist self, which will mean, prac¬
tically, destruction of the american
establishment s now known, and cre¬
ating humane atmosphere, conducive to
the well-being of all mankind*
However, there is one great danger
which threatens the success of those
different groups—and that is their
tendency to polarize according to
strictly racial lines. This tendency
is the greatest danger, but this type
of polarization creates many other
dangers. One, and perhaps the most
important, is the need for the white
radical groups to seek Jivey Issues
necessary to challenge the institu¬
tion. Presently the biggest issue
the radicals are concerned with is
the genocidal Vietnam war. What
happens when there is no longer a war?
The White Radical groups will have to
regroup, restructure and find another
issue.
This is by no means a suggestion
that there are no other great issues
waiting to be tackled with the conclu¬
sion of this war, but is should be
obvious that although such issues do
exist there will be some confusion
and a lost of momentum before a new
program can be evolved*
Another danger which should not be
overlooked is the fact—recently re¬
affirmed by the Kerner report—that a
america is a racist society. All of
us, both Black and white, are products
of this society, and it would not be
as difficult as it may seem on the
surface for us to sink back into the
racist habits we’ve only so recently
abondoned*
This is fundamentally what the
Brother Chairman was talking about
on the 13th of December at the march
on city hall when he suggested that
white radicals change their birth
certificates and drivers licenses to
read "negro"* The brother understands
how much trouble it is for out white
corar des to find issues to confront
america with*
While it is a necessary for every
brother in the colony to commit a
revolutionary act each chy as' a
matter of suivival, the average white
radical is involved only to the de¬
gree his politics determine the Black
Liberation struggle is important* If
the war ended today most white radi¬
cals would be stuck with a program
that speaks only to legalizing pot,
long hair, legalizing abortions and
air and water pollution, while most
of the brothers and sisters in the
colony are hoping to live long enough
to die 'rora polluted air and water.
Ideology is born through struggle.
Mao or Che did not pick up a book
on revolution and become over night
revolutionaries. They were involved
in struggle, and it was through this
struggle that their ideology evolved.
The only thing the Brother Chairman
and JOMO are asking of our white
comrades is that they become involved
in the life and dedth struggle that
Black people are living with each day
so they may truthfully call themselves
revolutionaries and bring the war home
where it ought to be.
Political whites have to decide whe¬
ther they’re going to be White Radicals
or White Rascals*
Repression
I n
St Pete.
Call the OINK OINK farm any other
name it smells the same. Some might
call it the lolice Station, others
might call it the Pig Station, it
still has the same smell, it still
does the very same thing in nature.
Repressive measures are being used in
this city by the pig dept on law
abiding colonized peoples. If you
think we are lying then just read
some ox the repressive things that
have happened to members of JOMO
in the past year. Instead of being
out trying to get the vandals who
are putting holes in tires they are
messing with us. To note oppression
here we need only to look at the de¬
finitions that are being used, if
Black poeple are involved, it is a
bad, vicious crime, but when'Whites
are involved it is then known ss
vandalism. The vandals have taken
enough Christmas decorations to
stretch from here to Jacksonville.
fou know ain’t no nigger commited
the crime, for it is a known facR
that niggers ain’t allowed in the
other folds communities aftr dark
unless they a re there to work and
perform slave tasks. Eut instead
of directing police energies to
real crime they would rather use
repressive measures against the
organization shat seeks to unseat
repression.
Take the case of Brother
Donaldson who around 3*00 a.m.
was in his ofice, and was locked
up for drunkness, cause the nigs
found he had a key and couldn’t
arrest him for breaking and enter¬
ing, the charges were dropped in
a couple of days only after the
threat of suit. The case of Brother
Saul Rentz is even worse* Have
you ever heard of a person being
placed in jail on charges of night
prowling in his own back yard?
Rant still more of the same?
Brother George Alderman was play¬
ing records at the Neighborhood
Concerns Community Center at the
request of the crimer/manager and
was busted. At first the oink
oink’s charged him with making
loud noises and it was later changed
to disobeying a pig order. That
was some time ago and the case is
still on the court docket. The
reason it was not tried is because
the oink oink’s know the charges are
jivey. Brother Kenyatta was charged
'with vagrancy which was later dropped
only after an attorney went to court
to show the repressive nature of the
crime. If you think those we -e bad
then here are a few move. Andre
Lee Shellman was given ten yeai’S for
alledgely stealing $10 worth of gro¬
ceries from a parked car. In court
the judge never asked about the crime
but rather his association with the
Junta Of Militant Organizations. In
effect, he was found guilty of being
involved in Black Liberation. Court
documents that are official clearly
show this, "And if I think you think
what Joe waller thinks, you’re going
to get everything I can possibly give
you." Or take the most recent divorce
of Joe Jailer, which was handled by
racist Holley, the repressive I inees
Friend. This case had no political
dealing what-so-ever just two people
getting a divorce, <«ell it just so
happened the stupid holley presided
and decided that the argument deci¬
ded on by both parties and the atto-
neys for both parties were not to
his liking. . He now has hanging over
Mr. Jailer’s head as well as every-
thing else he has hanging over his
h ad in court procedures a possible
charge of "Contempt of Court" for
which there is no bail,..If that is
not repression, then what is? want
more, ask Joyce walker why the pig
beat her up and hit her in the sto¬
mach? or ask Fred Hamilton, who at
the time was a member of JOMO why
the pigs beat him and ousted him to
the ground for nothing.
You can ask a lot of colony
dwellers and you can see that repres¬
sive measures are in use. A woman
carrying a baby in her womb was beat¬
en to her knees, another brother was
beaten to almost nothing for not
wanting to see the pigs beat his
sister.
A few weeks ago Marshall Law
enforced on people in the colony by
some pigs. If this is not a repres¬
sive city, then where is one?
Believe us when we say prepare
yourselves before pigs think it is
the good ole days and come in heaps
and just beat heads, like they used
to do.

Decemoer 22
On December 13, 1969, one of the
' most successful demonstrations in the
/history of St. Petersburg took place,
\ Approximately four-hundred people-—
young, old, Black and white, marched
and demonstrated against Nixon’s riot
in Vietnam, the Conspiracy 8 trial,
and the political arrest which have
become commonplace in america.
Apparently the march was too suc¬
cessful fo’a the establishment’s
standing three speakers, Otha Favors,
Pat Ford, and Hike Gold, are facing
arrest should they make an apperance
in St. Petersburg* It was decided
a few days after the march by the
St. Petersburg police department to
fij.e obscenity charges against the
three people.
Favors was quick to label the charges
as "jivy,n stating that it’s rediculous
for this country to talk about obsceni¬
ty, "Since it is the epitome of obs¬
cenity itself. How can a country
actively engaged in dropping tons of
napalm on helpless villages in Vietnam
talk about obscenity?” challenged
Favors* "The most obscene words in
the English language are embraced by
by this nation," he charged. "Words
like ’kill,’ ’murder’, ’war*, ’nigger’
and many others that no one has yet
attempted to have labeled obscene.
It is a sorry fact that as long as
you’re talking about any of these
things the government embraces you,
but when you talk about ending a war
that is systematically murdering a
nation of people you immediately come
under the guns of repression*"
Black people in the colony seem to
think there are other factors involved
in the charges which are not men¬
tioned by the establishment. Poeple
are saying that the charges <-ar©( real¬
ly directed at Otha Favors, the only
Black man who was charged.
One brother made this clear when he
said, "Man this ain’t nothing but stuff.
Thera other cats don’t have to come
back to St. Petersburg, but Otha’s
family lives here. The pigs know
the man is going to come back and see
his mother and sisters* They just
want to bust this dude because he’s
Black* They’re going to lynch another
legally, jut like they're always do¬
ing Brother Joe*"
In any event, it appears this is go¬
ing to 1» one of the most exciting
winters since the mural was pulled off
the wall in city hall on December 29,
1966* There are reports of mobiliza¬
tion in Tampa, Sarasota, and St. Peters¬
burg for mass demonstrations to be¬
gin in defense of the people facing
the charges.
■■CLEANING AT ITS FINEST”
QUICK CLEANERS
644 - 22nd ST., S. - ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
One Hour Dry Cleaning Nd Extra Charge
Fdr Fast Service I
telephone 89&-65&Q
.VIWAfwm *V»T sjfs*
THjc; BURNING SPEAR
cene
qrqes
QmI n]ovx
LEROY SHELLEY, Owner

Page 10
U.S.A.
Uaqy people get upset when JCMO
speaks of this nation as a colonized
nation where Black people (North am-
erican Africans) are colonial sub¬
jects and not citizens. People get
upset, either because they refuse
to admit that amerlca is capable of
colonizing people or because they
are afraid of the consequences of
colonization within the geographical
boundaries of america*
A colonized people is a group
of people who exist on a body of
land separate from the country which
governs it, and who exist solely for
the purpose of enriching the coloni¬
zer, generally with raw products,
which are in turn developed into a
finished product and sold back to tte
colony,
A colonized people are not re¬
garded as citizens of a country, but
merely as subjects to be governed
by the colonizer. Consequently, we
hear such words as second-class
citizens when referring to coloni¬
zed people.
Colonialism, by its very nature
"thingafy" people. It makes them
mere functionaries. It creates a
situation where men are not allowed to
function for the benefit of the soci¬
ety they have in common with their
fellow, but they must function for
the benefit of foreigners who exploit
their labor and their talents for the
benefit of a foreign society which
has reached a high plateau of techni¬
cal development.
Colonialism is a sophisticated
form of slavery at best. At worse,
colonialism is slavery in its rawest
crudest, basest form. The enslave¬
ment of mankind, under any pretense,
is criminal.
iiVhen Europeans first invaded the
North American continent, they attem¬
pted to colonize the Red man. But
because of the Red man's succeptibi-
lity to survive the criminal labor
requirements of the Europeans, and
because his familarity with the land
made escape easy, the Red man could
not be successfully colonized. Vftien
Europeans, recognized their inability
to colonize the Red man, the Red man
became expendable, and of no use to
them as a profitable labor source.
This resulted in a biLacdy massacre
of the Red man, until he was helpless
enough to be herded off into concen¬
tration camps called Reservations.
(Hypocracy, continued from page 6)
Ana Since we cannot, get justice
from the courts to end pig brutali¬
ty, we must get our justice from the
pigs—in the colony streets* The
occupying army must be driven from
our community. The american govern-
msnt must understand that it has
to pay a price for the criminal acts
it initiates against Black people.
When a judge like Holley deli¬
berately sentences one of our brothers
to ten years in prison because he is
involved in the struggle for Black
liberation, that judge hould also be
sentenced—by the Black colony.
As Brother Malcolm X said, wIt's
liberty or death; the ballot or the
bullet; freedom for everyone or free¬
dom for no one, and until you're
ready to pay that price don^t use
the word 'freedom* in your vocabu¬
lary.*
JbkTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
t WO OF A KIND
The fate of the Red man in this
country is not unusual. Colonialism
demands certain things of its victims
and when these things are not forth¬
coming the victims become a burden
and therefore expendable.
This is why it is very import¬
ant for Black people to correctly de¬
fine our situation in this country
for what it is—colonialism. With
the-increasing tendency of this coun¬
try toward automation, and with the
certainty that this country is moving
toward a cybernated(super automated)
society Black people will lose their
value to america as a labor source
and will become completely expendable.
There is no reason to believe
the fate of - North american Africans
will be any different than the fate
of the Red man, once Africans have
proved utterly useless to our coloni¬
al rulers.
Monday
RHODESIA
(Editor's note* the following re¬
port comes from the Zimbabwe News,,
voice of the Zimbabwe African Nation¬
al Union, a guerilla group fighting
against the racist regime presently
headed by Ian Smith in Zimbabwe
(Rhodesia)*)
LUSAKA, Zambia (LNS)—Rhodesia's
228,000 white settlers are of course
not all as rich as ^arry Openheimer;
nevertheless, ^tliey enjoy a standard
of living unsurpassed anywhere in the
world. They have more swimming pools
per capita than anybody else outside
of California's Beverly Hills. Indeed,
where else on earth do you find house
wives who cannot clean their own under¬
wear without the mrvice of illpaid
(f17.50) per month house servants?
There sire privileges unheard of
elsewhere, such as that of jobs re¬
served for whites only, regardless; of
qualification, and, to boot, wages
so.highly inflated that any pale-
afcinned bum immigrating from Europe
automatically gets ten times the
wages of an African doing a more
skilled job in the same industry.
It is with a view to protecting
these obscene privileges that con- •
titutions now seem to grow faster
on Rhodesian trees than do oranges.
In less than nine years Hhodesis
has had three constitutions, the
latest being the Constitution of
Rhodesia Act which was passed re¬
cently by the white ettler "parli¬
ament". The present constitution
enshrines Apartheid into as legal
an institution as that of religion.
But true to their English tradition
tradition of bitching around with the
language, white Rhodesia will not
call their brand of Apartheid by its
proper name. Instead, they will call
ir "PROVINCIALISM" and will be based
on the "two pyramid policy"—two
pyramids, one black and the other
white, standing sid by side. At
the summit of the black pyramid will
stand such paternalistic do-gooders
as missionaries and the regime's
Native Commissioners who will com¬
bine their services with those of
the puppet African chiefs to ensure .
that Zimbabwe's 5,000,000 blacks JENNINGS FfSH MARKET
stay "peaceful" and smiling in their . ......... _ 453-16* St. So.
arid tribal "homelands." The white TWO LOCATIONS So.
pyramid, on the other hand, will fSCfU £icu ft AII V C Li/lT CQiIOC
contain masses of unskilled blacks UHILT 9 nvi VllftOd
at this base.
The cornerstone of Rhodesia's
hitherto informal apartheid system
is the Land Apportionment Act (1931)
which specifically defines where and
how the races are to live. The Act
originally assisgned 37.5% of the
land to the whites and a little over
40% to the Africans. The remainder
was classified as "national", that is,
game reserves national parks, etc.
Now the Land Apportionment Act is to
be replaced by an even more rigidly
apartheidistic legislation, the Land
Tenure Act (1969), which increases by
another ten million acres the land
assigned to the 228,000 white settlers
while reducing that owned by Africans
by 3.5 million acres. So much for
economic "Provincialism."
There will initially be a "national
assembly" made up of 66 members
"elected" as follows: Rhodesia's
228,000 whites and what Smith's
constitution defines as "special
classes of Europeans"—Asians and
coloured—will vote for 50 (white)
of the M. Ps. (Members of Parlia—-
ment). The remaining 16 will be
made up of black puppets nominated
and "elected" by chiefs appointed
by the settler regime. Chiefs in
Matebeleland will choose four and
their counterparts in Mashonaland
will also choose four. The other
eight seats will be reserved for
"urban" Africans who must also vote
as tribal units. Thus even tribal
apartheid will be forced on the
people and brought into full playj
There will be a "senate" of ten b
black puppet-chiefs appointed to pari
parliament by one another (w±th the
regime's approval, of course) and
ten whites appointed by the white-
dominated "national assembly." Thus
not even such "independent" puppets a
as the 14 blacks who window-dress
the pewawnr parliament will have a
chance to come back. It will be
Smith's men all the way.
This system of "parliamentary repre¬
sentation" is being regarded in
Salisbury (capitol of Rhodesia) only
^s a temporary experiment. Within
the next five years Smith's ruling
Rhodesia Front expects a completer
realisation of "Political Provincial¬
ism." Then, only whites will sit in
the so-called national parliament.
The Africans, Asians and coloureds
will be "repatriated" to the rural
villages and urban ghettoes where
they will be expected to form their
own tribal councils and play "as full
a part in the -ffairs of their own
race as will be possible."
Again, ours won't be called
"Bantustans" or "Bantu Homelands"
as they would te called in South Africa.
They will be known simply as "Afri¬
can Tribal Trust Lands"—a difference
in name only.
The hurried enactment of this series
of Apartheid laws could not possibly
give much comfort to Smith's regime a
and thoughtless white settler mobs
behind it. In fact, Apartheid is not -
new in white Rhodesia and therefore
the frenzied promulgation if a dozen
draconian laws intended to institu¬
tionalize it can only betray a feeling
of greater fear and insecurity on the
part of our oppressors.

Page 11
Deceraoer 22
Any criticism falling around the
head of Stokely Carmichael must be
regarded as the criticism which might
have fallen around the head of Pro¬
metheus, the liberator in the ancient
Greek myth. For Carmichael was a
Prometheus—our Prometheus. He
brought us the gift of fire.
To single out Carmichael for lau*»
rels is not to cut any other brother
or organization down, but it is to
look at truth and recognize it as
such. It is understood that
Carmichael is not the founder of the
concept, Black Power, nor even the
phrase, but Carmichael did articu¬
late the concept. And he was beau¬
tiful. He was Malcolm moving among
us, the second coming (and for many
of us the third and forth coming.
Je bussed a lot of nuts when Stokely
did his thing.)
Many other Black Nationalist or¬
ganizations understood the concept
of Black Power and held weekly meet¬
ings in their little store-front
meeting halls and rapped their pro¬
grams to each other. But it took
Stokely, doing his uptight thing,
having his beautiful ‘'stuff*' toge¬
ther, to get their program out of
the store fronts and into the
streets where the oeople are;
Stokely broke out on the american
scene like hives, and, represent¬
ing all us unqualified niggers, he
THE BURNING SPEAR
put whitey in a bag of tricks Houd-
ini couldn’t mess with.
Maybe anyone articulating the
same program could have done the sane
thing. But anyone didn’t^ Stokely
did. SNCC did.
Other ’’respectable’1 organizations
were scared dodoless of the whole
thing. Or maybe they weren't. May¬
be they felt their white-controlled
interest would have been jeopardized
had they adopted a Black program.
COPE had the sense to ’’me-to”. They
dug what a dynamite thing this beau¬
tiful cat was articulating. But the
only thing we could hear from the
Nation of Islam was, Elijah said it
first in 1936, and the NAACP took its
usual stance.
But Stokley was a big £rin—
a* conspiring/ wnite-tootnea* BiacK
skinned grin. Black folks sat in
front of TV’s watching and loving
him anytime we could. And we grinned
too. We were part/ of the conspiracy
(talking about the so ul of Eiack
folksi). We sat watching the bro¬
ther blow the minds of degree-laden
honkies who professed not to under¬
stand what was meant by Black Power,
But we understood without definition.
We understood to the depths of our
unqualified, Flack hemorrhoid aching
bowels. And we murmered, ”rap,
brother, rap]1’.
PHONE 896-7976
DAY OR NIGHT
Pk
oto6
W. L. JONES
Studio Residence
909 - 22nd STREET SO. 1721 - 17th STREET SO.
ST. PETERSBURG. FLORIDA 33712
But same of the brothers started
knocking him for so much star trek¬
king, and his obvious enjoyment of the
role he assumed* But we needed it0
We needed to feel the brother was
having a blast, a real time of mess¬
ing up so many white minds* He blew
Our minds, too, because we had been
thinking of the same things he was
rapping about* things we were afraid
to utter. We were so silently se¬
rious about these things that we
prayed at night asking Lyndon John¬
son’s g0d to show us the light*
And this crazy, beautiful dude, so
sacriligeous, so irreverant, just
helped us to get all our "stuff” to¬
gether. He came on like he’d been
walking and talking with Allah. He
destroyed Baal without striking a
stone. He just conspired with Black
folks with his ’’stuff’’-eating grin.
Super Niggerl Come to lead us down
the oath of Malcolm, Our Father, who
art
PLOW807 fast Food Service
Located 443-N»=St.So.
BLACk owA/e CaW.N
Te|gpho/MF-8^--8551
AUTO - LIABILITY - LIFE - FIRE
HOMEOWNERS - MOTORCYCLE
Phone-894-3802
HOPKINS INSURANCE
AGENCY
SR-22's FILED
Notary Public
1405 - 22nd Street So.
St. Petersburg, Florida
MEriea America
ultural Center
mMNKL OIL PAINTINGS
mu.com X ALBUMS
HAND-CARVED OBJECTS
Ifni KENYA
BLR CK BIST HD A Y -t GREETING
XMAS CAROS, TOO
631 22°'St. So.St. Petersburg 61,

(While we realize that the demands listed here are reform, we also understand that while a revolutionary
program is being created Black people must meet immediate needs for mere survival* Here is a list of de¬
mands we think is necessary for survival*)
â– ^n the name of the North american African colony, JOMO demands*
1# Control of our schools-the curriculum, the hiring and firing and the determination of how much money
is to be Hotted to the schools*
(Traditionally the schools of the colony have not been Responsive to the needs of the colonized* The school
curriculum has been based on the values of middle-class whites. Consequently, we know nothing of ourselves
as a people—our culture or our history* Creative young Black teachers who have desired to introduce mean¬
ingful education to the classroom have been afraid to do so at the risk of their Jobs, which are controlled
by whites.)
2* A Police review board composed of a broad section of the colony*’
(This review board will not only give us the power to investigate alleged cases of police brutality and the
like, but will also give us an opportunity to question all policemen proposed for duty within the colony, so
we will be able to determine whether the proposed policemen have attitudes which are conducive to meaningful
and proper relations with the colony as a whole*)
3* An end to exploitation by white merchants who have businesses in the colony*
(It is no secret to any one that the colonial subject pays more for purchases than americans* We propose
not only an end to such exploitations, but also that all white merchants within the colony contribute finan¬
cially to the colony each month* We understand that white merchants are not in the colony because of any
love for Black people, but rather because the colony presents a ready-made, lucrative market for exploitation*)
4* Control of all Black public housing*
(Traditionally Black people who live in public housing have been subjected to the most blatant insults*
Whites who control public housing have acted in a manner designed to dehuminize the occupants—going so
far as to inspect apartments to determine whether women had men hiding in the closets or under the beds*
They have also used the fears of Black people to make them turn informers on each other in order to pre¬
vent being made to move*)
5* All slumlords having rental property in the colony be forced to turn that property over to the city
which will take theient in escrow and turn the property over to the occupants after a designated perior of
city hs always complained £>out the ineffectiveness of the penalties imposed on slumlords as stimulants
to improve their properties* The city can take the property from the slumlords who refuse to repair property
and*using the money placed in escrow can be considered as payment on the properties* The fact that the city
has demonstrated its power to confiscate Black-owned property for such things as to make way for highways is
indicative of the city*s power to take slum property for such a proposal as ours*)
6f The lines of our districts be redrawn so the area where Black people are a majority will constitute
a district, giving Black people the power to elect Black local representation who will not hve to depend
on the white vote for election*
(By constant gerrymandering of the districts local officials have made sure that Black people never be¬
come a majority in any given district* This has always been done so whites might have the ultimate say
so as to to who will represent us*! If we re so fortunate to have a Black person elected to office that
person has the white vote to thank for it, not Blocks* Consequently whites get his loyalty*)
7* Complete control of the Black community*
(There are many-other Immediate needs not spoken to in these demands* We understand this* However, we
believe that using these as a beginning the others can be realized without difficulty.)
'Page 12
JUNTA OF MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS
Monday
JOMO
7- Poi„t
Pro q ram