Citation
Miami New Times (Florida)

Material Information

Title:
Miami New Times (Florida)
Uniform Title:
Miami New Times (Florida) (Online)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publisher:
New Times, Inc.
Village Voice Media Holdings LLC.
Voice Media Group
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Miami ( fast )
Florida -- Miami-Dade County ( fast )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Creation/Production Credits:
Print began in 1995.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Voice Media Group. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
891087301 ( OCLC )
037050547 ( ALEPH )

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Succeeded by:
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AA00069221_00489 ( .pdf )

AA00069221_00489_pdf ( .txt )


Full Text
Want to cozy up to the political elite of Cuban Miami?
Get yourself a boat and join the MOC.
BY KIRK NIELSEN
The arrival of a multiplex on South Beach isn't
Cafe: Taco's best
MIDEM's Latin
Metro: Lock a
v the big news. It's the skimpy selection of
stand in the
sounds come
croc a day
indie films in Miami. By Brett Sokol
Grove
ashore
away


Contents
Volume 14
Number lO
June 17-23,
1999
Chairmen of the Outboard 28
Not far from downtown Miami Cuban exiles do own one
island: Watson Island.
By Kirk Nielsen
Big Screens,
Small Minds... 17
The new Regal
multiplex will bring
more movies to Miami,
but viewing options for
indie films remain slim.
By Brett Sokol
Metro: What a
Croc 9
Key Biscayne golfers
have been contending
with a new hazard in
recent months —
American crocodiles.
By Jacob Bernstein
Down #0f7fg....69
M Ensemble’s simple
production comes alive
with lyrics and
movement.
By Robin Dougherty
2 Jee»47*--2J,-i#99- Miami New Times . ÍÜ3KK53¿¿ViSÉ * *Y«V« .
t •DM&W.WMP • •
Letters... ..3
Metro 9
Riptide 1 9
News of the Weird 15
Red Meat 15
Night & Day 40
Calendar Events 42
Earthweek ., JfgfS 42
Life in Hell 44
Troubletown 47
The Quigmans 49
Film 58
Film Capsules 61
Showtimes 64
Theater 69
Theater Listings 71
Art Listings.... I ..72
Cafe 77
Dining Guide .79
Julius Knipl 79
Nuts 81
Music 91
Rotations .’. 94
Kulchur ...96
Concerts 99
Early Warnings 99
Clubs 101
Underworld 103
Romance .......110
Classified .....119
web extra
This week in miaminewtimes.com, the online
edition of Miami New Times:
•What’s the wacky Jesus guy up to this week?
Peter Gilstrap serves another heaping portion of
Jesus of the Week. Sure to satisfy.
www.miaminewtimes.com
Staff
Editorial
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Chuck Strouse
Associate Editor Anne Techida
Music Editor Brett Sokol
Staff Writers Jacob Bernstein, Judy Cantor, Jim DeFede,
Kathy Glasgow, Josa Luis Jiménez, Jen Karetnick,
Tad S. Kissell, Tristram Korten, Kirk Nielsen,
Robert Andrew Powell
Copy Editor Michele Morcey
Calendar Editor Nina Korman
Nightlife Listings Larra Boytano
Proofreader Georgia rapas
Contributors Robin Dougherty, Andy Klein,
Michael Sragow
Fellow Lissette Corea
Editorial Administrator Nicola Kemmerer
Editorial Intern Alex Salinas
Art Director Dean Sabring
Staff Photographer Steve Satterwhite
Electronic Publishing
Online Editor Robin Shear
Production
Production Manager Marcy Mock
Assistant Production Manager Christopher Murray
Advertising Art Director Angel Espiñdola
Editorial Layout Artist Amelia del Castillo
Production Daniel Rums, Scott Horton, Dennis Snyder
Advertising
Ad Director Jill Muller
Retail Sales Director Nancy Morales
Retail Sales Manager Anthony Gordon
Senior Account Executives Alex Budyszewick,
Kristi Kinard
Account Executives Sarah Abrahams, Alfred Caballero,
Ben Erichsen, Carol Evans, Francesca Felicioni,
Ewald Fuchs, Jeffrey Querrá, Jeff Herschler,
Michelle Hereehler, Armando Lapido, Tracy Luther,
Damarys Mora, Shirley Ratter
Account Managers Danielle Bianco, Maritza Diaz,
Vanessa Garmany
Sales Coordinator Isabelle Rios
Sales Assistant Fatima Knipping
National Advertising
The Ruxton Group
l-888-2Ruxton
Classified
Ad Director Kevin Montgomery
Sales Manager Henry Pinto
Senior Account Executives Angie Alexander,
Tammie Durham, Tavia Manzano, Humberto Wispe
Employment Sales Executives Adelaida Alamo,
Ladyane Lopez
Real Estate Sales Executives Jason McGee,
Lourdes Navarro, Ed Ochoa
Account Executives Daniella Cervantes, Kristina Hayes,
Joshua Menendez. Richard Still, Michael Thompson,
Dennys Trabada, Jennifer Trimble, Alejandra Unago
Classified Administrator Chrystal Gomez
Romance
Romance Marketing Director Bridgette Lumpkins
Romance Administrator Katrina Come
Circulation
Circulation Director Julian Suardi
Circulation Marketing Manager Brian Chiles
Circulation Assistant Pedro Pasamar
Business
Business Manager George McIntyre
Accounts Receivable Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Financial Accountant Adam Horowitz
Business Administrator Marisol Aquila, Annika Butardo
Systems Manager Christian Kitchen
Front Desk Administrator Lizbeth Cedeno
Publisher Michael R. Cohen
Mailing address:
P.0. Bex 011591, Miami, a 33101-1591
Street address:
2800 Biscayne Btvd
Miami, R 33137
For general information: 305-576-8000
For advertising: 305-571-7699
For classified advertising: 305-573-9090
For romance information: 305-571-7525
For information about Hew Times Broward*Palm
Beach: 954-233-1600
For national advertising information: 602-238-4800
Distribution: New Times is available free of charge, limited to
one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of
New limes may be purchased for $1.00, payable at the New
lunes office in advance. New limes may be distributed only
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Postmaster Send address changes to New Times, P. O. Box
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Letters Policy
Weweleome letters' to tieed&T'®3 mail,
fax, or InternelíLetters may beeditpd for
orcteite ifedrotf^iCTirito'iriigtlHi
al publishetiin IJew Times. Please include
firmation only), ¡todcomplete name.',.' y
■ Mail;,Letters,J/«M> Times
P^BoxdttSMri
Spl^gijpi^MplMp
^ Fax: 30$47Met| *C*;' ’ .
Síf'íifeérriet:)*;*,:
*'edÍtí>ñát@miáHOáewtímes.coin
That Mermaid Means War!
Robert Andrew Powell’s article regarding
Pow Wow (“Miami: See It Like a Pam¬
pered, Sheltered, Spoiled-Rotten Tour
Pperator from Munich,” June 10)- was
enough to make me explode. As a Miami-
Beach resident I know I have rights, and
that I should not be shut off from a major
public road. It seems unconstitutional that
these.travel agents should come in and
take over Lincoln Road (which for many of
us is like our living room) as though we
didn’t exist.
My girlfriend and I were sitting at Score
atil:S0 p.m. when a Miami Beach Police
officer came over to' escort us off public
property. After repeating himself several
times, I snarled, “We heard you already!”
L disagree with Pow Wow delegate Rose¬
mary McCormick (from Ndpa, California)
anti her eamment that tourism is an instru¬
ment of global peace. In this ¿ase tourism
-was not bringing people together": it was
segregating them, replacing locals with Ken
and Barbie clones. Shutting regular-people
off from our own city will not bring global
peace, it’ll bring war.
Tourism professionals want to make South
Florida look like Disney World because of the
previous attacks on tourists. But-how can you
mislead people by bringing'them'to a city that
does not exist? I have yet to see a mermaid on
Lincoln Road.
Jessie L Malig
MiamfBeaeh
That Fence Means Money!
I had to write and thank you for pointing out
yet another absurd moment As a resident of
Miami Beach sirice 1986, I’ve enjoyed every
minute of the circus. It is never boring. But for
police to tell me I cannot use a public road
because the city has once again sold out to
somebody waving green under its hose—that
really pisses me off
If Miami’s tourism officials were so'coni
cerned about their fantasy version of Miami
Beach, they should have kept their fake Pow
Wow atmosphere inside the convention cen¬
ter, where they would have had plenty of
room, and air conditioning, too!
This disregard for real people goes right
along with attitudes like those of Michael
Comras and his development plans for Lm-'
coin Road. I’ve got a couple of suggestions
along the lines of Jim Mullin’s fecent article
(“Lincoln Road Miracle: From Scruffy
D-hr^lict to Enchanting Shoppers’ Par¬
adise,” April 29). Let’s get rid of all those
bohemian places like Café Papillon, where
local residents waste so much time, and put
in a Checkers. I think wé could attract a lot
more tourists if^we evicted that artsy New
World Symphony and stuck in a Ripley’s
Believe It or Not like the, one in Key West
Maybe the whole fence thing was actually a
good idea We .could charge admission to Lia*
coin Road, just like Disney World. Of course
when I called the mayor’s office arid asked for
an explanation, I got no reply. But then we life-
'tie residents who keep Miami Beach going
after the conventions, leave town don’t really
count Yes, I guess you could call me a mus¬
cle-boy kamikaze bike rider with a dog, but I
live here.
. By the way could you please tell me the dif-
ference between businessman and politician? I
can’t seem to tejl them apart anymore.
Joe Burge
Miami Beach
Cuban Racist, Yes; White
Supremacist No
Alex Salinas kept using the term “white
supremacist” in his article “A Mind in Exile”
(June 10). How can a Cuban be a white
supremacist?
Andres Orta and his Alianza Nacional group
are racists, nothing less. This is a case of His
panic aggression toward Americans that runs
rampant in this town.
Ryan SneU
Miami
So It’s a Jewish World After All
Alex Salinas’s article shows only too well
the emotive nature of the fascist mind, a
mind filled with hate and void of rationality.
First, Miguel Angel Aldana’s coinment that
“Everyone is Jewish” should not be entirely
written off. Jewish migrations out of
ancient Mesopotamia, then Egypt, then
Babylon (having probably mixed with
and/or having been ajnixture of other
races)-,'not to mention' Hellenic-European,.
Ethiopian, and Spanish'Jewry (I am part
Jewish also), -makes the term “Jewish” vir¬
tually universal. In fact Orta himself may
have Jewish blood running through his
But suppose for a moment that the Jews
had been a peculiar race,’standing out
there bri their own, all by themselves, ruin¬
ing everything, as Orta vividly and conve¬
niently imagines. Had it not been for our
Jewish brethren, there would have been no
searchfor-the one god within, and hence
no Renaissance. Likewise idealism, also a
search within, would have been taken for
granted, and hence no Kant, Nietzsche,
and others. We wouldn’t have needed
them. And there would be no need to
bridge the gap between good and evil, and
thus no hope for a better world through a
coming messiah.
I have one word of advice for Andres Orta
and his virtuosos should they decide to write
or say anything in the future: Think.
Manny Losada
Miami
The Swine Syndrome
I choose not to address Andres Orta’s allega¬
tions because if you wrestle with a pig, you
become just as dirty as the pig.
I would much prefer to help someone to the
top of a hill, because as you do so, you grow
closer to the top of the hill yourself
AlanGittelson
Miami Beach
Continued on page 4
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Letters
Continued from page 3
Clean Up This Dirty World? Sounds
Like a Job for Jack Thompson
.Trjgtram Korten (“2 live Screwed,” June 3)
didnjdafe tomentidn a lot of good things that
came out of my efforts against Luther Camp-.*
'bell and 2 live Grew: 1) Parents were waítíed
that a pornographer was selling obscene
records to their children behind their backs;
2) a nation was informed as to how record
companies, run by men, target women for
Objectifying degradation; and 3) because of
my efforts against Luther, I am now represent¬
ing the parents of the three girls murdered in
the school shootings in Paducah, Kentucky, in
their lawsuit against the entertainment entities7
whose products, including violent video
games, helped cause the murders.
Luther Campbell is thus the reason, by
God’s cleverness, that I have been able to talk
about the nexus between entertainment and
sodopathic behavior in the past month on 60;
Minutes, Today, ABC World News Tonight, and.
tiie NBC Nightly News. Thanks, Luke.
The only person who hasn’t learned much
from all this is Luther himself. He is still a
pornographer; he still talks about God and
acts like a demon; and he still doesn’t know
how to hire a good lawyer.
Luther, ifyou need one, let me know. I know
a counselor who can keep you out of trouble.
Jack Thompson
Coral Gabies
What's a Little Sexual Harassment
Among Friends?
I recently read Ted B. Kissell’s articlé on
Pedro F. Fonteboa (“King Leer,” June 3) and
was shocked. The fact that this man had seven
complaints of sexual harássment levied
against him, was investigated by Florida Inter¬
national University because of these allega¬
tions, came than agreement that required him ’
Jo leave the university, and was then hited by
the Mmmi Herald to report on high school
sports is absolutely disgustitig.
As a female I can say it is humiliating to be
rkubjected to a moronic individual who thinks:
hife can speak with his- libjdo in the workplace,
or any other place for that matter. The fact is
that segual harassment is still taken lightly. -
Too many times the woman making the report
is the recipient of a backlash or is labeled a
troublemaker or as being too sensitive.
How sad it is that we can’t always feel com¬
fortable just going to work and doing our jobs,
but must have our guard up for people like
Pedro ¿bnteboa. For a high school-age girl,
howevtk the effects can be devastating. High
schooTage students are at á very difficult stage
in life. If a young female athlete were to be
subjected to sexual harassment, it could scar
her for years.
How can the fact that an individual repeated¬
ly acted so inappropriately toward fellow
employees and students be overlooked when
hiring for a job description that includes being
surrounded by student athletes? The Heralds
attorneys must be having a fit with this one.
The only saving grace is that New Times
brought this hiring screwup to the surface.
Should Fonteboa harass again, at least fhe vic¬
tim will be able to sue Hat Miami Herald. Its
not like they can claim they were unaware
they’d put the fox in the chicken coop,
i; Melissa Jattkówski
Miami
Mallíngly Bad Taste
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Letters
Continued from page 4
have already recognized: South Florida is
steadily.evolving into a tasteless, homoge¬
neous entity devoid of uniqueness and style.
Like Coconut Grove before it, %uth Beach
(with its new multiplex on Lincoln Road) is
rapidly losing the unique style that made it
popular in the first pláce.
It is a sad commentary on the greed, corrup¬
tion, and lack of vision of the developers and
dvic leaders who do not seem to comprehend
thevaiue of neighborhood identity and quality
oflife . /
David Kadko
Mjámi Beach
500 Parents Can't All be Wrong
I’m writing in response to Ted B. Kssell’s arti¬
cle “A Lesson in Mismanagement” (May 20). I
am a second-year teacher at Henry E.S^"
Reeves Elementary School who has twelve
years’ experience in Miami-Dade County Pub¬
lic Schools. I am -concerned the article sug¬
gested that five teachers were speaking for the
entire 69-member faculty.
1 knew when I accepted a job atKeeves that
there would be longer hours and a longer
school year. It’s part of the Edison Project
design. In other schools where I’ve taught,!
also worked hard. Reeves has beenno excep¬
tion. I believe that if I didn’t work hard, my stu¬
dents would not achieve. So yes, teaching is a
“high-pressure situation” at Reeves — and at
any other school.
1 am in support of our principal, Diane Dyes-
PaschaL You can!t ask for afiner, more profes¬
sional person. Mrs. Paschal works hard and is
very sincere about her job. Her number-one
concern has always been the children. The
question she seems to ask constantly is, Will
the children benefit?
.The school is making progress. Our test
scores have increased yearly. Our students
have participated in and received recognition
in several activities such as math bowls, global
awareness, and oratory contests; and submit¬
ted more than 900 entries to the Miami-Dade
County Youth Fair and a science fair, all under
her leadership.
Our first “Evening of Excellence” recently
was a huge success; more than 500 parents
came to school On inclement weather) to cele¬
brate their children’s excellence and achieve¬
ment That should indicate something good is
going on at Henry E.S. Reeves. I believe Mrs.
Paschal is leading her staff in the right direc¬
tion after only two years at this school. The
: beautiful new building cannot teadh the chil¬
dren. The Miami-Dade Counly Public
Schools-Edison Project partnership cannot
teach the children. And the prinápal is not
there to teach. So whether the principal is in
or out of the building, it is my responsibility as
a teacher to work with our children so they
can achieve.
AJ. Parker
. North Miami Beach
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Metro
Crocodile Fears
Golfers and fishermen beware! The
endangered reptile is making a
comeback.
By Jacob Bernstein
The fourth hole at Crandon Golf at Key Biscayne is
particularly treacherous. There are brackish ponds
surrounded by mangroves on both sides of the tee.
An errání drive can send a ball flying into muddy
oblivion. But it’s not just water that presents a threat.* A
duffer who recently hooked a shot into the drink decided
"to plunge in up to hisshoulders to retrieve the ball. When
he "extended his arm and turned his head, he found him¬
self staring into the eyes of an American crocodile.
You can imagine the story in the the Weekly World News.
It would include something like this: “After the mandibles
of death were finished, nothing remained but a five iron and
a tom piece of plaid.”
% In reality the golfer escaped
unharmed.. But the story illustrates
a new reality that humans must
'learn to accommodate: The endan¬
gered croc is making a comeback.
Spurred by encounters between
humans and the resurgent reptiles,
county parks staffers are trying to
quickly educate the public. They are
preparing brochures and have started
placing signs in croc-accessible public
areas. “The die-hard golfers who like
to go after their golf balls get aggra¬
vated'and want {the Crocodiles]
removed,” explains park naturalist
Paula Schneeberger. “[But] crocs are
| not aggressive and they mainly hunt
atnight” -
Parks officials believe two juver
nile crocodiles have taken up resi-
Üenbé on Key Biscayne. (Crcjcs
have been seen as far north as
Broward County;) A third reptile
has been sighted, but is thought to
be an exotic caiman that escaped
from captivity. The pair divides its
-time between the golf course and a
recently restored tidal marsh at the nearby .Bill Baggs
Cape Florida State Recreation Area. They feast on ¡gua¬
mas that can grow to the size of large cats, which the
crocs catch by yanking them from low-hanging tree
branches:
A hundred years ago probably several thousand croco¬
diles roamed the southern coast of the Florida peninsula,
the only place in the United States where they are found;
By the Sixties the population fell to a' few hundred at
most. Poachers killedmr captured some and developers
paved over many of the estuaries and coastal areas where
the animals lived and nested.
Today the population has risen to about 600. Biologists
trace the rejuvenation primarily to an increase in habit¬
able areas. Besides restoring traditional marshes and
mangroves, man has unwittingly built ideal crocodile
homes at golf courses and nuclear power plants.
In the Seventies the animals began using 168 miles of
cooling canals at the Turkey Point nuclear facility as a
hatchery. The warm water and marly berms are perfect
for the reptiles, which are shy and finicky about where
they lay their eggs. These days there are between 30 and
50 crocs at Turkey Point, depending on the time of year.
: On a recent morning scientists counted sixteen croco¬
diles floating and sunning themselves along a five-mile
stretch.
In fact the animals have been doing so well at Turkey
Point that some migrated north to escape the crowds
(Male crocs are territorial and demand a substantial
amount of space.)
But crocodiles aren’t likely to overwhelm South Florida,
scientists say. Although a nest can-hold as many as 25'
eggs, only a small percentage of the reptiles survive.
Baby crocs have a plethora of predators: fish, raccoons,
hawks, even the fire ant Joe Wasilewski, a biologist who
works at Turkey Point recalls surveying nests one year;
and discovering an egg that swarmed with fire ants.
'Tibien he returned the following day there was nothing
left but the hatchling’s skeleton. “We are not going to be
üp to our ass in crocodiles,” he concludes.
There are well over one million alligators in Florida, far
more than the number of crocodiles. Alligators have a
wider, more square snout and are darker in color.'Croco¬
diles have a tapered jaw, their back armor is bumpier, and
they are more agile. Although the two are'generally simi¬
lar in size, American crocodiles in the United States
rarely grow beyond fifteen feet, whereas alligators have
reached nineteen feet. L
Parks department naturalist Roger Hammer believes
crocodiles are unfairly stigmatized. Some picnickers
recently observed Hammer posting a warning sign at a
AUMENTAR 0
Park naturalist Roger Hammer hopes these signs will calm human fears of crocodiles
county marina and asked whether the reptiles were in the
lagoon. When he replied in the affirmative, they hurriedly
packed their things and left “The perception of the public
is that crocs are evil animals when really the alligators
are the ones to watch if you have children playing around
them,” Hammer insists.
The mistaken belief that crocodiles are dangerous
comes from television nature programs, Hammer asserts.
The shows generally feature varieties common in Africa
or the Asia-Pacific area. These species are larger and
more aggressive than their American brethren; they
sometimes wrestle unsuspecting zebra or wildebeest to
death, while American crocodiles generally trap smaller
mammals, crustaceans, fish, and birds.
Hammer says there are no recorded incidents of croc
attacks in Florida, but some locals tell a colorful tale. Sup¬
posedly in 1925 a croc killed a surveyor on Key Biscayne
after the man blasted it twice with a shotgun. In true
South Florida fashion, the croc is alleged to have survived
and gone on to a successful career as a tourist attraction.
The crocs may very well become victims of their resur¬
gence. The Florida Game and Freshwater Fish Commis¬
sion has received dozens of complaints about them.
(Ihere are roughly 15,000 alligator complaints in Florida
every year.) A woman on the Miami River who feeds
ducks protested when a croc arrived and began eating
Continuad on page lO
' â– iimniM
The Ritz is getting an early start as an all-night juke
joint in Coconut Grove. Alter recent rains, hotel
builders started working around-the-clock to remove
water that gathered in the Inundation on SW 27th
Avenue near Biscayne Bay.
Neighbor David Ralph complained and Ofcr. Tom Braga
checked it out. Then, after some negotiation, City
Manager Donald Warshaw agreed to let developers of the
planned 200-room, multimillion-dollar hotel work
through the night. The sound from the pump was muf¬
fled. “It’s acceptable now,” Ralph says.
The real issue: Almost two years after plans for the
hotel were" announced, the Ritz is not only underwater,
but still without financing. Developers hope to get final
signoff on the bucks later this month, says attorney
Lucia Dougherty.
The June 7 New Yorker issue thatincludéd Mimi Swartz’s
piece “The Herald's Cuban Revolution" sailed from the
newsstands. “I immediately sold out. They were gone
the same day they arrived," says J.C. Moya, manager of
Books & Books in Coral Gables. Stores in Aventura
and Coconut Grove provided similar comments.
Although Herald columnist 3oan Fleischman did an
admirable job of summarizing the article, she skipped
a couple of important snippets: 1) 43 employees have
left the paper in the past year and have not been
replaced; and'2) this gem about recent readership
trends: “The paper remained unloved and largely
unread by Miami's Hispanic population. T have to say
the only mail I got was from elderly white women,’ one.
reporter told me.”
Speaking of other publications’ reviews of the
Herald, the June edition of Brill’s Content points out
the newspaper published an entire article on the Her¬
ald s Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, but fea¬
tured just a tiny box describing the other winners.
Hubris, anyone? ‘ , i
And the Herald isn’t even kind to its own. A special
page whipped up for executive editor Doug Clifton’s
goodbye makes brutal fun of his propensity to lay off
employees, alienate friends, and cause newsroom
turnover. The page also notes the Herald’s real and
imagined changing self-promotional phrase: “Florida’s
Largest Newspaper, then Florida’s Second Largest
Newspaper, then Florida’s Foremost Newspaper, then
f Florida’s What the Heck We Still Have a Páper Paper.”
The good news: An Editor an# Publisher survey of50
columnists shows the Heralds Dave Barry and Leonard
Pitts to be among the most popular of their peers. Only;’
the New York Ttwes’s Maureen Dowd received more
votes.’ Question: Sure columnists are reading, but is
the public? *
The cost of Carmen. Not only did federal prosecutors
spend millions of dollars in taxpayer money to screw
up prosecution of former Pprt qf Miami director Carmen
Lanetta and associates Neal Harrington and Calvin Grigsby.
Not only did the coimipng Lunetta walk away with a
$280,000 payout when he retired amid dear signs he
had abused the public’s trust. Not only are county
attorneys spending more on a dvil case that is likely
futile.; But th^ láakbf'a'cottvictiWmeanjs ínnetta
will almost certainly pick a $113,00O-per-year pension
from taxpayers’ pockets.
. as told to Chuck Strouse
Tips? Cal 305-571-7605 or e-mail
riptide@miaminewtimes.com.
Warm (lew Times Í


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C r o codil e
Continued from page 9
, the .birds. Groes have even been spotted at
Bayfront Park.
i ToddHardwick, who owns a-pest-control
outfit called Pesky Critters, warns that
problems await if a management plan is
not dev£lo]ped soon. “These ate cold¬
blooded reptiles and people do stupid
things,” he says. He believes the crocs will
losé their fear as they are exposed to
humans, with disastrous consequences.
The parks department decided to take
action after an incident at Black Point
Marina, just a few miles north of Turkey
Point. A crocodile that fávored the
marina’s lagoon, became unnaturally fat
feasting on discarded fish carcasses that
had been tossed into the water. His length
was estimated at nifie ffeet. Fishermen
claimed the reptile tried to climb, into
boats and disturbed blue-crab traps.
In February 1998 the Florida Game and
Freshwater Fish. Commission made the
unusual decision to move the croc
Man has unwittingly
built ideal crocodile
homes at golf
courses and nuclear
power plants.
because of its size, aggressiveness, and
agilily. Workers delivered the reptile to
Metrozoo, where employees attempted for 1
40 days to make the animal forget about
the marina. Park officials then released
the croc into the C-lll canal that leads
from the Everglades to Florida Bay.
Within five months the croc returned to its
former home.
This past February a community activist
was walking her dog at Black Point when
a fisherman warned her to be careful: Pet-
and-child-eating crocodiles lurked in the ,
water. The woman complained and the
parks department took action: This time
the croc earned a trip to a Collier County
park. It has yet to return.
Hammer also created signs for marinas
and coastal áreas warning people about
the crocs. The yellow metal placards show
a picture of the reptile and read “Caution
Crocodiles In Area” in both English and
Spanish. They also admonish the public it
is illegal to feed'or harass the animals.
“[The crocodiles],lose their fear,” Ham¬
mer says. The maximum penalty for mess¬
ing with a croc is a $250,000 fine and one
year in federal prison. Hammer has posted
about 35 signs in locations including Black
Point, Matheson Hammock, Greynolds,
and Haulover parks. The county parks
.department plans to install a total of 65.
Hammer has also written a brochure that
will soon be distributed to park visitors.
Ultimately naturalists hope South Florid-
• iaris will embrace the crocodile rather |
than feár it. “How many people have seen
an American crocodile in the wild?” Ham¬
mer asks. “That to me would be a nature
experience to get excited about. If you
want to see one, you have to come to
.South Florida. We have them and nobody
else does. ” CQ
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Miami
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Newport Beach
Thrii-on Being open to
any ‘last minute surpris¬
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closed.
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Columbus Tum-off:
No one
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talks incessantly about
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Washington D.C.
Tum-on: Chivalry is not
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Los Angeles
Tum-off: Asking for a
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Philadelphia
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Gncinnati
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Atlanta
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New York
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Austin
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Dallas
Tum-off: Wandering
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Lisa Cherry
Houston
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Lori Stone
Los Angeles
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New Jersey
Whitney Claphanson
Miami
Heather Smith
Washington D.C.
Victoria Dunphy
Philadelphia
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T ell him to go fuck himself!” shouts
Eddie Garcia, manager of the strip
club on Biscayne -Boulevard formerly
known as Club Madonna. Garcia is
responding to a reporter’s question about
Frank Pinter, owner of the neighboring
Madonna’s Restaurant. “Tell him and his lit?
tiff friend to go fuck themselves, alright? I’ve
gétno tíme to talk to yoqfTry
•Garda slams down the phone, refusing to
discuss how a simple dispute over a catering
bill has riven the two like-named businesses,
how a few cases of unconsumed chicken
wings and ribs could possibly have led to a
civil lawsuit, an alleged death threat, and a
police report
Two minutes later Garcia.calls back, appar¬
ently having found the time to talk. “Look,
man, I didn’t mean to hang up on you,” he
apologizes. “I thought you could be [Pinter],
He’s capable of doing something like that.
The guy is realty something else.” >
Well, no doubt about that. Eleven years
ago Pinter bought an old chowder-shack on
the bank of the Little River Canal near Bis¬
cayne Boulevard and NE 78th Street and
opened the Bimini Bar and Grill. The water¬
front location proved a good fit for his menu
of semiauthentic Caribbean cuisine, ice-cold
béer, and ramshackle décor,-which matches
Pinter’s personality. He regularly jumps
from the restaurant’s patio to swim with the
manatees drifting in the fetid water. He’s
been married seven tintes. His current wife
(the “little friend”' to whom Garcia refers)
answers to the name Boom-Boom, though
her given name is Kárina. “I am number
seven, so I am like Sunday,” BOom-Boom
says in a thick Finnish accent, “a day of rest”
The quality of the food has ebbed over the
years, and so has the flow of customers. TWo
years ago Pinter saw an opportunity to
reverse the tide when the strip club, known
then as the Pussycat, changed its name to
Club Madonna, sister of the popular Miami
Beach club. “I saw them working on the
building' and thought it was going'to be a
real upscale, classy club,” Pinter recalls,
“and I knew they weren’t going to sell food,
sot I decided to change otir name to
Madonna Restaurant, to try and steal some
of their traffic.”
Madonna v. Madonna
Never mind the aging pop star, the problem now
is an unsettled catering bill
By Robert Andrew Powell
ra_powell@miaminewtimes.com
by Knter. “Why send a cop over if I was try¬
ing to compromise with him?” Garcia asks. “I
offered him $300 to let him be happy and let
it go. When I saw him the next day, I was
upset because... he sends a cop on me.”
That’s not all. After “the assault” Pinter
filed a police report describing the incident
and visited the State Attorney’s Office to
explore the possibility of initiating a criminal
complaint Finally he filed a civil suit in April
seeking damages to cover the original cater¬
ing bill, lost work time, and legal costs. Trial
is scheduled for July 12.
“I don’t give a damn,” Garcia says of the
impending legal showdown. “We’ll win and
then we’ll countersue him for our lawyer’s
fees and the work we’// miss. This whole
thifig is stupidity. All I did was tell him to fry
some food. Well work it out”
While the legal dispute continues, the
disharmony of one Madonna suing another
has been muffled. The strip club recently
opted for a name changóla decision that had
nothing to do with Puiterfor even his little
friend). The Madonna moiiiker has been
removed from the marquee andfrecent radio
commercials advertised the locatibnjis The
Boulevard Club, featuring “women of color.”
The new name hasn’t gone over too well, and
another new name is planned: Black Gold. •
Is Pinter prepared to again rename his
restaurant? *1 could,” he says. “I could change
anytimeT want, to Bimini Grill or whatever.
But it costs too much to make the change.
This is a mom-and-pop store. The only thing I
want is to be paid for the food.” CD
He takes a long drag on a cigá-
rette before breaking into a slow
cackle. “It didn’t wofk out too
well,” he says.
Business is, down so much-
that Pinter rarely bothers’ to
open for lunch. Steady daytime
income trickles in from visitors
to the nearby Immigration and
Naturalization Service offices.
He charges those'who wish to]
park in his lot five dollars for
:the privilege. The Pinters, with platter
In this bleak context it seemed
like a godsend when Garcia contacted Pinter
this past October. Club Madonna was plan¬
ning to host a private parly for rapper Luther
Campbell and needed someone to cater the
gig. “I could have gone to anyone I wanted,”
Garcia recalls, “hut I went to him because I
wanted to keep it in the neighborhood.”
Pinter, who had never done business with
Club Madonna, strove to make a good
impression. He contends he agreed to lose
money on the deal. He prepared three cases
of wings, four'cases, of barbecued ribs, two
pounds of rice, two bowls of salad with dress¬
ing, and a pound of barbecue sauce, then
served it all in eight aluminum trays.
All agree the food bombed with Luke’s
crowd. The caterer sold no more than 25 din¬
ners at ten dollars per plate. Afterward there
were plenty of leftovers, which, Garda insisted
on donating to the homeless. Pinter submitted
an invoice for $490; $300 covered half the food
expense and the rest was for “extra services,”
including dishing out the chow.
Garcia balked at the bilL“When-we made
the deal, I said, “Well work it out Whatever.
You make the food, alright?’ There were no
papers signed, if was all done verbally. When
the time came ...I lost $600 worth of food.”
According to Pinter, Garcia first said he
would pay only $140, then decided to pay
nothing. The disagreement spawned what
Pinter refers to as “the assault”
Pinter says that on November 11; 1998, a
Miami police officer stopped by the restau¬
rant for lunch. After the restau¬
rateur relayed his frustration at
the supposed stiffing, the officer
walked over to Club Madonna.
Garcia confirms the officer’s
visit “What he heck is [Pinter]
doing sending a cop on me?”
Garcia asks. “He sends a manto
my property wháí‘is wearing a
gun? I don’t care if the man is a
police-officer, the gun makes it
extortion. At least that’s how 1
look at it”
The next day at approximately 10:00 a.m.,
Pinter was sitting in his parking lot when, he
says, a “red Ford pulled up in the middle of
the street ... and [Garcia] jumped out
screaming and cursing that he owned the
police department, walked over across the
street, and pushed me. [At] that time I
jumped up and said to him to pay me what
lie owed and to get back in his car. He-
explained that I would not get my money, I
had better shut up, and he would come back
and cap my ass.”
Garcia, not surprisingly, relays a different
story. He denies making a threat and says he
offered to pay Pinter a reasonable settle¬
ment He alleges the conflict was escalated
“He explained ! would not
get my money, I had better
shut up, and he would come
back and cap my ass."
Free Parking
Mayor’s staff finds a new
protocol for corruption
By Jim DeFede
á member of Miami-Dade Mayor Alex
Penelas’s staff has admitted bilking
the county out of at least $5000 dur¬
ing. the,rpasLseyeral years. The
employee, Joseph Jean-Baptiste, who is
chief of protocol for .the mayor’s office, gave
his wife and another relative'passes that
Jean-Baptiste apologized
for his behavior and
offered full restitution.
.allowed them .to park for free at
Miami International Airport
The county-issued cards are sup¬
posed to be used only by members of
the mayor’s staff who are on official
business at the airport. Both Jean-
Baptiste’s wife and the relative work
at the airport
Aviation director Gary Dellapa
said this past week that “a routine
audit” turned up the misuse. Airport offi¬
cials have documented at least $5000 in
lost fees and, according to sources familiar
w,ith the investigation, the final figure
could run between $8000 andfc$12,000.
“l^hen confronted .with this allegation,
Mr. Jean-Baptiste immediately admitted
his error, apologized for his behavior, and
offered full restitution to the county for all
expenses,” Penelas wrote in a May 28
memo to County Manager MerretfStier-
heim. “Although Mr. Jean-Baptiste has
apologized for this situation, I find this
behaviorjnexcusable and unacceptable.”
Penelas, however, did not find the behavior
inexcusable enough to fire Jean-Baptiste.
Instead he decided to suspend the protocol
chief for. 30 days without pay. Penelas’s chief
.of staff Sergio Gonzalez said the mayor
believes the penalty is appropriate because
Jean-Bapfiste has been “a loyal and hard¬
working” employee. Jean-Baptiste, who has
been with the county since 1985 and earns an
annual salary of $42,750, could not be reached
for comment
County officials have referred the matter
to the public corruption sections of the
Miami-Dade Police Department and the
State Attorney's Office. ED
. jim_defede@miaminewtimes.com
iiwwwwMMTTMnriffinr-nTirT i rr • *-~~~~'~)rrnirirM,iinimxwniiiiini him* i ii, emi* nummii in iff
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14 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New linns


tedium’s oaken tent pole
Lead Stories
•Professor Kevin Warwick of Reading (Eng¬
land) University told the Times of London in
May that “several” firms had approached
him about surgically implanting transponder
microchips into their workers as a way of
tracking their hours and whereabouts/
Cybernetics expert Warwick last year put a
chip into his own forearm to demonstrate
the technology, which will be further exhib¬
ited in England beginning in 2001 to keep
track of pets and might, he said, be used to
keep track of people who are granted
licenses to carry firearms.
•José Lopezes in the Operating Room: In
May José Maria Lopez, age 33, had a foot
amputated at Whittier (California) Hospital
Medical Center. He still has two remaining;
what was taken was a six-inch, fooflike growth
inside his left ankle that has always hampered
his walking and limited his shoe selection.
And a few days earlier, in San Pedro Sula,
Honduras, surgeons removed a miniature
bottle from the rectum of a José Lopez, age
43. He said he got drunk, passed out, and has
no idea how the bottle got there.
•Nó More Inhumane Punishment: Ion
May controversial Phoenix tough-guy
Sheriff Joe Arpaio announced he would
institute bedtime stories at the Maricopa
County jails, consisting of audiotapes of
classic novels (e.g., Little Women) to be
read at lights out every night The novels
will replace the previous nighttime fare,
which ran for four years: a videotaped lec-
turé serios by former Speaker of the
House Newt Gingrich.
RED MEAT
It was late in the Fall when my dad told us that
we couldn't kéep that shriveled dead clown in
his shed any longer. My brother and I didn’t
have the heart to simply throw it away ...it had
brought us such joy since the day we found it.
So we bought a ladies’ wig at the second-hand
store and spray painted it red. We put the wig
on the clown and took him downtown to the
McDonald's and left him in one of the booths.
from the secret files of
mo* cannon
When my dad read about it in the paper the
next day, he put us on restriction for a whole
month. We thought it was worth it, though...
that dead clown was the funniest thing ever.
Ironies
•According to an April Tampa Tribune story,
the following fates have beMen young men
who in recent years have recovered the sub¬
merged, religiously blessed cross in annual
diving competitions during the Epiphany fes¬
tival in Tarpon Springs, Florida: Oné died in a
ear accident; one suffered a severe spinal
injury; one was arrested on burglary charges;
and, this year, two former winners and a third
diver were charged with attempted murder
for bashing two people’s skulls with shovels
because their ear was going too slow.
•In Montreal, Quebec, in December, con-
victed serial killer Allan Legere announced he
had increased the amount of his 1994 lawsuit
against the prison for its failure to stop
inmates from beating him up. Legere is serv¬
ing life for five murders, including the rape
and torture killings of three women and the
beating death of a Catholic priest One wit¬
ness against Legere said she once remarked
to him: “You like to torture.” Legere allegedly
responded, “Yes, I do.”
•In the election campaign of 1998, Fred Mor¬
gan, the new Republican leader in the ;Qkla-
homa House of Representatives, personally
embraced the party’s proposal for reforming
motor-vehicle regulation, including cracking
down on residents who drive with out-of-state
license plates. In December Morgan admitted
that the car with the Arkansas tag in his park¬
ing space at the capítol was his (but that he
would register it in Oklahoma as soon as his
late mother’s probate was settled). And in
February Katrina Clark, director of housing-
code enforcement for the City of Boston, was
evicted from her apartment for failure to pay
more than $3500 in rent and for reneging on
her repayment plan.
Undignified Deaths
•In incidents one week apart in April, in Mor¬
ristown, New Jersey, and Bloomfield Town¬
ship, Michigan, construction workers became
trapped in sandpits. In both cases quick-think¬
ing co-workers attempted to pull them out
with backhoes, accidentally decapitating the
workers.
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16 June 17-23,1888 Miami New Times


the big picture
Vlliuma fWIWA 9 UHIIVII WUVI VI
“I’m a_sked ten
times a day,‘What are you going
to do when the multiplex opens?’” sighs an
exasperated Joanne Butcher, director of
Miami Beach’s Alliance Cinema, located on
Lincoln Road two blocks west of the eigh¬
teen-screen Regal Cinemas, which opens
Friday. “Well, we’re going to continue
showing the films we show, films the multi¬
plex is never going to show. You’re never
going to see The Apple at a multiplex,” con¬
tinues Butcher, referring to the Alliance’s
rim of the highly acclaimed and indepen¬
dently distributed film from Iranian direc¬
tor Samira Makhmalbaf.
At Regal Cinemas’ corporate headquar¬
ters in Nashville, there’s a similar note of
'.co-existence. “By nature of being in the
same business, we’re in competition to
some degree,” concedes Phil Zacheretti,
Regal’s vice president of marketing. But
while the new complex has earmarked a few of its screens for so-caile.d art films, “we’re never going to be
playing the same pictures,” Zacheretti says. “We don’t feel a need to put ¡^squeeze on anybody. We fecog-
nize the flavor of the area; we know we’re not plopping down eighteen screéns in the middle of á mid¬
state mall. But you’ve still got a mass audience in Miami Beach looking for mass Hollywood fare.”
A David and Goliath scenario, then, would seem a bit overstated. Yet.itVhard not to notice the
marked contrast between the nonprofit Alliance Cinema with its single, tiny screen, and the
by brett SOKOV
photos by Steve Satterwhfte
?>> neighboring 3300 seat behemoth — the latest outpost of the worid’s largest cinema chain,
n a
%\%
\\ \
^ film in Miami. Despite the construction of eighteen new screens, viewing options
which has 420 Regal Cinemas locations worldwide.
But even if the immediate future of the Alliance is notin doubt, the opening qf the
new Regal multiplex does highlight a larger issue: the dismal state of alternative
'O &
continue to shrink.
Continued on pago 19
i
Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 17


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Piet Ur e
Continued from page 17
;Tn fact when it comes to showcasing
independent film, re-released classics, and
touring repertory programs, Miami has
one of the most limited scenes of any
major city in the United States. The num¬
bers speak for themselves: Miami cur¬
rently only has one screen fully dedicated,
to opening new independent films (the
Alliance), with a second, the University of
Miami’s Bill CosfOtd Cinema, operating
for only part of the year, and only occa¬
sionally introducing such pictures to the
city. In contrast a Midwestern city such as
Cleveland, hardly considered a cultural
mecca, has eleven screens fully given over
to independents, foreign cinema, and
widely heralded programs like the
Francois Truffaut, Robert Bresson, and
AlfrédÜitcíicock retrospectives now tour¬
ing the nation.
Hiere is no single villain at work here,
but rather á particularly painful confluence
of conservatism and poor planning on the
part of local figures, and .destructive
trends on a national level. What it means
is that fewer and fewer truly exciting films
will be making their way to Miami. And it
may get worse.
Of course Capewell shouldn’t have to
worry about these things in addition to his
teaching schedule, which is precisely the
complaint of many who criticize the Cos-
ford’s lack of vision! Unwilling to see itself
as serving the entire community of Miami
instead of just the university campus (clos¬
ing for the summer — the perfect time to
catch an air-conditioned flick in Miami
is indicative of this), it stands as one of the
few theaters of its ilk without any operat¬
ing budget for film. While the theater
trumpets its upgrade this summer to a
THX sound system, it has yet to obtain a
grant for ongoing film programming, rais¬
ing the question: What’s more important,
quality films or high-tech gadgetry? "
For John Ewing, director of the Cleve¬
land Cinematheque, the formula for sur¬
vival is simple. “One of the keys to the
longevity of the Cinematheque is that we
do exclusive runs, that’s very important,”
he explains. “If [another art house] is fun¬
ning Life Is Beautiful, I’m not going to
touch it Maybe I could make money, but
it would be a waste. Our focus is always on
the community at large. We feel as though
we’re serving a purpose: to bring in films
to the greater Cleveland area which
wouldn’t come to this region otherwise.”
As for marketing, Ewing thinks when it
comes to screening art films, nothing is
more important than producing a good
movie calendar: “The calendar is the main
vehicle for reaching audiences, and that’s
borne but when we get crowds for films
we’ve gotten no other publicity on. We
showed a Japanese film called Junk Food,
and it got no local press. It had nothing
going for it besides being dotíe by an
interesting young director. But we’ve built
up an audience for Japanese cinema. Peo¬
ple were' intrigued by the calendar’s
description of it and we got a good
turnout”
“I just don’t have the money,” answers
Capewell when asked about the Cosford’s
own skimpy calendar. “Three years ago I
printed up this nice, glossy program
guide. In the film department [at UM] we
Continued on page 21
Miami New Times jtftt «W 19
Irma Vep from Olivier Assayas, Seventh
Heaven from Benoit Jacquot, and My Sex
Life ... or How I Got into an Argument
from Amaud Desplechin). “If there’s an
audience in Lincoln, Nebraska, for our
movies,” she says cooly, “then
there should be an audience in
Miami- We consider Miami a
major city, yet we’re not able to
play our films there as if it were
amajor venue.” The problem for
Gertsman is nothing culturally
intrinsic to South Florida, how-
ever. Rather it’s a peculiar busi¬
ness situation, one that was
echoed by several other film dis¬
tributors, small and large.
“Booking is hard these days,”
Gertsman explains.-“There’s a
real glut of product and not
enough theaters. But a lot of the.
time when you can’t find a suit¬
able art theater for the kind of
film that Zeitgeist distributes,
there’s a university film society,
some sort of college venue, or a
media center — something that
picks up the slack. That’s been
the problem in Miami. There’s
never been one centralized
place that specialized art films
play. Miami is missing a real
theater that plays the ‘outsider-
independent’ films, the things
that aren’t distributed by Mira¬
max or Fine Line.” Gertsman
cites the Cleveland. Cinema¬
and the Cosford’s booker, and accuses
him of a lack of programming philosophy
and poor marketing. .
5 “My God, pay somebody proper remuner¬
ation and program the Cosford accord¬
ingly!” Chediák says. “I’m sure
Capewell is doing his best, but he’s
just not being paid enough to
devote his full attention to pro¬
gramming that theater like it
should be. Why spend a quarter of
a million dollars, just to flush
something down the tubes?”
Indeed the bulk of this past
season’s programming at the
Cosford (it closes for the sum¬
mer) simply duplicated films
shown at the AMC CocoWalk,
ineluding treacly Hollywood fare
such as Playing by Heart.
Capewell frejely admits these
^elections could be viewed as
uninspired, but points to fall 1999
bookings of Several films that
otherwtee would bypass Miami:
Olivier Assayas’s latest, Late
August, Early September, After
Life\ and Leila. Moreover he bris¬
tles at Chediak’s charges.
“I’m a full-time professor! When
am I supposed to do all this stuff?”
Capewell asks. “All Nat [Chédiak]
does is the festival He watches
films year-round, period. If I had
the budget hé has, I’d market
more, too. Not to iqention all the,
free ads he gets from the Herald.”
ford Cinema. To many, however, the Cos-
ford isn’t fulfilling the role it could. “The
University of Miami spent $250,-000 bring¬
ing the Cosford up to par,” says Nat Ché¬
diak, director of the Miami International
Who's afraid of Hollywood? Not the Alliance Cinema's Joanne Butcher
‘‘MV God. pay somebody proper remuneration and
program ttte cosford accordingly?”
Some would suggest the lack of indepen¬
dent film is simply the price of living in
Miami. When asked to comment on the
dearth, one local arts writer said simply:
“Miami is the sticks. You don’t get art
films in the sticks.”
It’s an argument that doesn’t fly with
Nancy Gertsman, copresident of Zeitgeist
Films (the distributor of acclaimed titles
such as Abbas Kiarostami’s Taste of
Cherry, and “new” French Wave pictures
3300 seats, eighteen screens, and a whole lot o' nachos: The Regal multiplex hits South Beach
theque as an example of just such a non¬
profit, university-sponsored theater, one
located iff the heart of “the sticks” that still
manages to be a place where “films that
need special attention can be curated
properly.”
Of course Miami does have a university-,
sponsored, nonprofit theater: the Bill Cos-
Film Festival, previously the owner of two
Miami art houses in the Seventies and
Eighties, and a University of Miami alum¬
nus. “You’d think they would spend a little
more for somebody to actually program it
properly.” Chédiak points his finger,
squarely at professor George Capewell,
chair of the university’s film department


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Continued from page 19
have three or four well-published authors
on film: big minds from Harvard, places
like thát. I included literary commentary
from them on the films. I lost $2000 on it.
If that happens again, I’d be out of busi¬
ness.”
Ewing’s attitude toward exclusivity
points out one of the chief problems with
the Absinthe House, Cinematheque and
the Astor Art Cinema (both in Coral
Gables), two locally owned art houses that
have fallen baqk on trying to compete with
AMC CoCoWalk and Sunset Place for the
same audience, and the same films. In fact
the Astor ran Life Is Beautiful for more
than four months while it screened at
CócoWalk. Although Life may have been a
solid revenue generator, it begs the ques¬
tion of just what the role of an art house is.
In a city with a chronic shortage of
screens available for truly adventurous
fare, isn’t running Life Is Beautiful, as
Ewing puts it, “a waste?”
Cesar Hernandez-Canton, co-owner of
tfie Absinthe, disagrees, “The audience
that goes to see art films does not want to
park, go up’a flight of stairs, pay for,the
fi/eo tfie dreaded
mafis* once tile
Physical
antitfiesis of
indie films, nave
gotten in on
tUe act.
ticket, go up another flight of stairs to see
the movie, and all within a mall environ¬
ment.” Moreover it isn’t as if •Hernandez-
Canton isn’t trying'to open exclusives at
his theater. He cites two foreign films he
recently begged distributors for: the
astonishing debut from French director
Erick Zonca, The Dreamlife of Angels, and
the Argentine psychosexual thriller Open
Your Eyes. In both cases he was turned
down in favor of AMC sites. “The commu¬
nity thinks we" don’t give a shit about art
films, but they don’t know what’s going on
behind the scenes,” he says. “I just refuse
to accept the proposition that art films gg
with malls.”
Tom Prassis, vice president of sales for
Sony Pictures Classics (file distributor for
Dreamlife)f is sympathetic to Hemandez-
; Cantons plight, but insists on the need to
follow the bottom line when choosing-
where to book his company’s films. “The
Absinthé fe a fairly good house and we’ll
play some of our pictures there,” he
explains. “But they need to build up an audi-.
,ence,”
Dreamlife’s run at Sunset Plage was
solid, but unspectacular. Coiild Sony have
toade more money by placing the moviein
the more art-film-friendiy environs of the
Absinthe? Hernandez-Canton,thinks so,
but says he finds himself in a Catch-22 sit¬
uation. “The distributors say I don’t have
the grosses to justify them giving me a
certain film exclusively,” he explains. “But
how can I get those grosses if they won’t
let me open a qualify film like The Dream-
life of Angels?”
The Alliance’s Joanne Butcher puts it this
way. “Whefi the majors see a sex, lies¡ and
Continued on page 23
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Picture
Continued from page 21
videotape 6r a Brofiters^McMulien making
big dollars, they’re not willing to let that go,”
she says. “They’re not satisfied with just
doing Titanic and Star Wars. They want
every penny that’s out there. That’s why
every big studio has a classics or indie
division.”
Today’s world of independent film can be
traced to 1989 and the breakout success of
sex, lies, and videotape. The debut feature
from the young director Steven Soder¬
bergh, sex was the toast of a then-little-
publicized film festival assembled by
Robert Redford called Sundance. From
there it went onto take the Palme d’Or at
Cannes. Financed for $2.5 million (a pit¬
tance in the film industry) primarily by a
home-video company operating outside
the established Hollywood studio system,
the film would go on to gross more than
$25 million in the United States, and $100
million worldwide. Although sex certainly
wasn’t the first independent film to grab
headlines (John Cassavetes was raising
eyebrows with his own self-financed pro¬
ductions back in the Fifties), it proved that
independent films could mean big bucks,
and for á relatively modest initial invest¬
ment. It was a trend cemented by the
arrival of Quentin Tarantino and the phe¬
nomenal international grosses for his sec¬
ond film, Pulp Fiction, in 1994.
Five years later independent film is its
own genre, with a parallel universe to Hol¬
lywood. It has its own glossy magazines,
award shows, and even competing cable
networks. In fact the indies now seem less
an alternative to Hollywood than merely
Earmafkihg screens for art films’ isn’t a
; cjjainwide,policy, however. Regal’s Phil
Zacheretti concedes that doing so
depends solely on profitability.
Profits of course are what independent
film is all about these days. Once the
province of artists such as Jim Jarmusch
and Hal Hartley, who were not considered
bankable enough for Hollywood, it is now a
growth industry. The designation “indie
film director” is rapidly rivaling “rock star”
in the hipness quotient But as the world of
independent film has changed, so has its
vision. The bulk of the independent films
being shot seem less the product of edgy
auteurs, and more like calling cards for
Hollywood-bound résumé holders. A look
at Miami’s own South Beach Film Festival
bears this out locally, with most of the
works differing little from upcoming net¬
work TV pilots.
Torn Bernard, copresident of Sony Pic¬
tures Classics (the indie-friendly division of
Sony), explained this evolution in a recent
interview with the New York Times. After
mulling over the sharp drop in quality show¬
cased at this year’s Sundance Film Festival,
he said, “The motivation for most kids to
make independent movies is not to have a
means of independent expression, to say
something you can’t say within the system,
but to get into the system, become a major
director, and get rich.”
This growing corporatization of indepen¬
dent film was brought home for the
Alliance’s Joanne Butcher this past year
with the release of Hurricane Streets, a
gritty, urban coming-of-age tale directed
by newcomer Morgan J. Freeman (no rela-
Continued on page 25
Cesar Hemandez-Canton (left) and Johnny Calderin, co-owners of the Absinthe, declare war on the malls
an adjunct to it. Technically speaking,
they are. The bulk of the so-called inde¬
pendent features that receive media atten¬
tion are in fact released on independent
subsidiaries of the major studios. Mira¬
max, once a scrappy hole-in-the-wall outfit,
is part of the Disney empire, and outspent
the competition by millions on 1999 Oscar
ads.
Even the dreaded malls, once the physi¬
cal antithesis of indie films, have gotten in
on the act. Several chains now set aside
two to three of their nunierous screens at
a given multiplex for “art films” — includ¬
ing the AMC sites at Coconut Grove’s
CocoWalk and the Shops at Sunset Place
in South Miami. The new Regal Cinema in
South Beach will also screen some inde¬
pendent films, mainly the same heavily
marketed ones that AMC shows. It also
plans to aggressively challenge the
Alliance’s present near-monopoly on gay-
theme releases. Of course this competi¬
tion could be a blessing in disguise, free?
ing the Alliance (as well as Miami’s other
art houses) to fully concentrate on pre¬
cisely those independent films and trea¬
sured re-releases overlooked by the malls.
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Continued from page 23
tion j:o the aetor), which tookthC Audi-
eiice Award atSifñtlance. The film’s assis¬
tant director was Jamin O’ Brien, a'hoard
member of the Alliance, and* the theater’s
boohing agent. The critical success of
Hurricane Streets and its resulting pur¬
chase at Sundance by MGM would seem
,to be a triumph for the Alliance. But it was
a Pyrrhic victory.
“MGM wouldn’t let us show it!” exclaims
an exasperated Butcher. “The film was a
blood relative and they wouldn’t let the
Alliance show it.” Apparently MGM had
its sights1’set on a mainstream market for
Hurricane Streets. “Then when it was a
box-office failure, we still had to fight for
the-film,” she continues. “The only reason
we finally got it was because a guy I know
in MGM’s accounting department leaned
on their distribution department and
forced them to return my phone calls:
Thafs the only reason that film ever made,
it to Miami. MGM is going to pick up an
‘Alliance’ film and then they’re going to
kill it It’s just corporate arrogance. They
don’t know how to market these films.”
Hurricane Streets is not th^pnly^exam-
ple of Hollywood’s mismanagement of
“Had oat of siffM
been marketed
by a smaller
distributor,
it would tiai/e
been a nit.”
indie films. Sitting on a panel at the Wolf-
soniamFIU in February as part of the
Miami International Film Festival, the ven¬
erable film critic Andrew Sarris struck a
tone similar to Butcher’s. Hollywood no-
longer knows how to reach adult audi¬
ences, he lamented,, decrying a trend in
which the. bulk of the studio’s promotional
efforts are aimed at the highly profitable
teenage market. Quality pictures, even
those made by proven talents, are simply
cast to the wind. Consequently two of Sar-
ris’s picks as 1998’s best (Steven Soden
bergh’s Out of Sight and Sam Raimi’s A
Simple Plan) were box,-office disasters.
Marketed as mainstream pictures and
screening mainly at malls,"the two films
failed to connect with audiences, despite
being aesthetically accessible and having
the Hollywood advertising juggernaut at
their disposal.
Ther'e’’is no small irony at play.
Rewarded with a big budget and studio
backing after his.indie debut/Soder-
bergh’s original fans deserted him. This
despite Out of Sights star power (Jennifer
Lopez and George Clooney), a bankable
Elmore .Leonard-based script, add'lfnani-
mous criticaTpraise. Raimi, too, received
glowing accolades for A Simple Plan, with
many calling it the long-awaited master¬
piece from aj director who made similar
wayes in indie circles with his low-budget
1983 cult horror classic The Evil Dead,
taking an award at Cannes fomthat selfj
financed picture.'
Peter Biskind, author of Easy Riders,
Raging Bulls, a history of Seventies Holly¬
wood and its modern evolution, is blunt.
“Had 0«f of Sight béen márketed by a
smaller distributor, it would have been a
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Picture
Continued from page 25
hit,” he says, certain that the same
audiences that flocked to the simi¬
larly themed Get Shorty would have
bought tickets. But because the film
was budgeted at more than $20 mil¬
lion, it was automatically assigned to
the major Hollywood “parent” of
October Films. “They just have no
idea how to work that kind of film,”
Biskind asserts. He believes A Sim¬
ple Plan died financially for the
same reason.
Moreover indie films in general,
even the ones marketed as such, are
falling victim to commercial pres¬
sures. “Distribution patterns of inde¬
pendent films are becoming more
and more like the majors,” continues
Biskind. “There’s a glut of indepen¬
dent films oh the market, and there
are many more films than there are
screens, so they’re getting into the
same situation as studio films. The
first weekend is crucial in deciding
whether the film is going to be
retained on the screen or not”
Foreign cinema particularly gets
lost in the shuffle. Even more so
than with domestic indies, rigid formulas
apply in marketing foreign films to Ameri¬
can audiences: Merchant-Ivory bodice-rip¬
pers, Shakespearean-theme pageants, and
middle-of-the-road weepers are the only
types of foreign pictures cónsidered finan¬
cially viable.
Accordingly several mainstream critics
have wondered, aloud as to the whereabouts
of the successors of the great foreign direc¬
tors of the Sixties and Seventies. Where are
the inheritors of the spirit of Godard,
Bergman, and Fellini? The truth islhisnext
generation is hard at work in their native
lands, but thanks to the vagaries of distribu¬
tion, their films are erratically screened in
America, and often below the media radar.
Ignored by the studio-run indies (and
thus, shut out of the malls), exposing these
movies to American audiences is left to
truly independent distributors such as
Kino (which released Hong Kong
director Wong Kar-Wai’s Fallen
Angels and Happy Together), New
Yorker Films (Serbian director Emir
Kusturica’s Underground and Samira
Mákhmalbafs The Apple), and Zeit¬
geist Films, all of whom must now
, compete for the single screen at the
Alliance or the Cosford.-
Professor George Capewell on the Cosford's critics: “Show me the money!”
ence of 41,000 out of thin air!” he says with
a roar, referring to the record crowds this
past year for the Miami International Film
Festival. “These people are here. I don’t
invent them. They don’t come out to the
movies for ten days in February and then
go away skiing.”
case quality cinema that would otherwise
remain unseen in Miami, than simply to
make money.
“Everybody wants to do festivals now,”
Chédiak says dryly. “They go to Gusman,
they see a packed house, and like any
dunce, they think, ‘Hey, I can do that!’
theater. Because of this [lack of sup¬
port], the smaller independent distrib¬
utors know that if they open a film in
Miami, they’re not going to get pub¬
licity, andtheyfregoingtodidst
Writing in me film journal the Inde¬
pendent, critic Rob Nelson addressed a
similar situation in his hometown of
Minneapolis, focusing on the role of
that city’s daily paper and its film
reviewer, Jeff Stridden Nelson writes
that Strickler declared “coverage of
indies... is limited in his paper by mea¬
ger space and resources,” then added a
revealing comment from the reviewer:
“‘My job is to report and review, not to
support local filmmaking. It is not my
job to sell tickets to their movies.’” Nel¬
son continues, “So if I understand this
correctly [Strickler’s] comprehensive
and prominently placed coverage of
studio films week in and week out [in
the daily paper] does not constitute
selling tickets to their movies. It’s sim¬
ply a matter of reporting and reviewing
whatever’s most worthy of attention. In
practice this has meant that a movie
that’s wide-released by a major studio,
even if it sucks, is automatically
deemed more worthy than a foreign
and/or independent movie playing at [an
art house], even if it’s great (and could use
a leg up).” As this approach spreads to
more and more local papers (both weeklies
and dailies), film criticism appears increas¬
ingly to be simply an extension of the Holly¬
wood publicity machine.
“What’s crucial is a local iuedia tfiaf nurtures
and tnrows a spotligiu on [independent] movies.
Chediak’s success with the festival
hasn’t gone unnoticed locally. Instead of
inspiring a multiscreen art house (such as
Fort Lauderdale’s Gateway Theater) , how¬
ever, the example of those 41,000 paying
customers has sparked only more festi¬
vals. The motivation seems less to show¬
Look at the Hispanic Film Festival. I swear
to you, 39 Spanish films and not a single
one I would recommend to anyone I call a
friend. Look at the Brazilian Film Festival.
Opening night is Central Station [a film
that played for months at CocoWalk and
the Absinthe]. Everybody and their
mother has already seen that
movie! What’s the point?”
For the Absinthe the solution to this
business dilemma may be to opt out
of the competition altogether. By the
end of the summer, co-owner Cesar
Hernandez-Cantpn hopes to switch
the programming of the Absinthe to
retrospectives, beginning with a
sampling of the work of director Fed¬
erico Fellini in July. The horizon is
less certain, though. In the year 2000
the theater’s lease is up, and Hernan-
dez-Canton’s landlord has expressed
a desire to convert the building into
more lucrative office space.
“This is a strange market,” Heman-
dez-Canton says with a note of weari¬
ness in his voice. “You’re competing
with the ocean and the beach. You’re
not freezing your ass off in the rain
when you get out of work every day,
like in New York, which makes you
want to see a show.”
Don’t talk about the weather to Nat
■Chédiak. “I don’t materialize an audi¬
The art houses struggle, but Nat Chédiak pulls in record
crowds for the Miami International Film Festival
The blame for Miami’s anemic film
scene also fells on the local media.
Virtually every figure in the indus¬
try cites the. importance of an
impassioned local critic willing to
champion independent film as a
key ingredient to a city’s cinematic
health. “Intellectual traditions, cul¬
tural ferment, lots of bookstores, .a
large student population: All these
things help make a city a great film
town,” says author Peter Biskind.
“But whatis crucial is a local media
that nurtures and throws a spot¬
light on [independent] movies with
feature pieces on independent film¬
makers.”
The Alliance’s Joanne Butcher is
blunt on the matter. “The New
Times sucks,” she says. “When
they got rid of their local film critic,
it changed everything,” Butcher
continues, referring to New Times’s
chainwide decision to replace local
film writers with a group of Los
Angeles-based critics. “Now they’ll
run reviews of independent films
that show at the multiplexes, but
not ones that open at the Alliance,”
she continues. “If the New Times is
alocal paper, then they ought tobe
reviewing films thaLslmjvaLajlqcaL
The Gosford’s George Capewell, the
Absinthe’s Hernandez-Canton, and Ché¬
diak all echoed this view, saying that their
fortunes are by default tied to the HerakTs
reviews and their “star” rating system.
Booking choices become dictated by what
will receive a good review, regardless of a
film’s actual merit A little-known film that
receives four or five stars can thrive, with
word of mouth building up audiences
beyond the opening weekend’s draw. Con¬
versely a poor review, no matter what the
size bf the national buzz, almost inevitably
kills a picture.
From a national perspective, Sony’s Tom
Prassis cites Cleveland as an example of a
city with responsive local criticism. “We
got a glowing review of The Governess
from the Cleveland paper,” he says. “Con¬
sequently we were able to play that film
for fifteen weeks there. We never
expected it to perform that well.”
K there’s a way out of this impasse, it lies
with individuals willing to ignore both
national trends and local neglect; with theater
owners who see the spread of independent
films at multiplexes not as a threat, but as an
opportunity. Instead of duplicating the mall’s
selections, why not choose to dig deeper?
Barron Sherer is a figure who has taken
that path, soldiering on week after week
with Miami’s sole repertory film program,
his Cinema Vortex series, which takes place
Sundays at noon at the Alliance. Showcas¬
ing a wide array of pictures, from lost noir
classics Point Blank and The Asphalt Jungle
to the experimental work of Stan Brakhage
and Kenneth Anger, Sherer hasn’t let occa¬
sionally small crowds dampen his spirits.
“I’m not going to stop,” he says firmly. “If
somebody figures out how to draw huge
crowds in this ttíwn, let me know, but I’m
nqtetopping.” CD
* 26 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times
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Miami New Times June 17- 23,1999 21


CHAIRMEN OF THE
A 50-year-old Biscayne Bay institution
builds a dock to the 21st Century


BY KIRK NIELSEN
It is Sunday evening in thie Happy Room, the bar
at the Miami Outboard flub on Watson Island.
Clemente Gonzalez, a talkative 38-year-old with
a goatee, is recapping (he aquatic equivalent of
war which broke out-fin, the MOC grounds a
few hours earlier. Armed with bilge pumps,
dozens of members drenched one another with
powerful streams, of water. The soggy battle
marked the end of the club’s regatta, an annual
treasure hunt that takes contestants to the far
reaches of Biscayne Bay.
- As Gonzalez tells nis Me, ©1-year-old Juan
Munne stands a few steps away; remembering a
tour that would-have made Ginger,-the Professor,
the Howells, and all the Gilligan’s Island charac¬
ters shudder. Six years ago He was a few miles
off Bimini piloting the Wet and
Dry —his^34-foot sport-fish¬
ing vessel — with his wife
and’teenage daughter and
son onboard. They were
heading westward to Miami
after ten days on the
Bahamian island. It was late
morning and Munné?s compass
was just where he wanted it, at 270
degrees. Then a tomadolike storm
blew in from behind. The high wind,
rough seas, and driving rain sent
him off course, “I got switched
around and aU of a sudden I was
at 90 degrees,” he recalls. “The
waves were ten or eleven feet
And with following seas. Follow¬
ing seas are very bad. When you
get hit from the bow you can navi¬
gate waves. But when you get it
from the stem, you have to surf. Oth¬
erwise you fall into the hole.”
The hole. It lies below your boat when you are
riding a huge swell. If you don’t know how to han¬
dle tile descent, you can nosedive and capsize.
Munne whipped up an emergency plan: Beach
the vessel and swim to terra firma. “I was going
to crash the boat against the shore and save my
family,” he says. “But the breakers were so bad I
was afraid to throw my children into the water.”
So he headed back to sea to ride out the storm.
In the end Munne made it safely to the out¬
board club docks. “I just hugged my family and
we kissed each other,” he says. The Wet and Dry
was in fairly good shape.
The Happy Room is steeped in such stories. “We
are not exactly tame people. We are a little wild,”
confesses Munne, who emigrated from Cuba to
Miami by boat in 1965. “For people with families
the dub adds a little action to fife. It’s good, healthy
action.” The seventeen-year MOC member works
as a boat-engine mechanic at a shop on the Miami
River. As Munne ends his saga, Gonzalez is still
raving about the water fight to his beer-sipping
compadres. He’s leaning on a section of the bar
dubbed long ago “the Cuban comer.” Nearby two
men roll dice from a leather cup. And though it is.
approaching midnight, the clacking sound of shuf¬
fling dominoes marks the start of yet another game
atone of three tables in the lounge next to the bar.
The boat club is among the last remnants of
old Watson Island, an 87-acre heap of bay bot¬
tom that has once again become a target for
developers. Along with their neighbors (fish¬
mongers, fishing-charter captains, a bait and fuel
shop owner, seaplane and helicopter operators)
the boaters are feeling the pinch. Over the next
year Parrot Jungle, a multimillion-dollar tourist
attraction, is supposed to move from suburban
Pinecrest to a sixteen-acre site adjacent to
MOC’s three-and-a-half acres. Four million dol¬
lars’worth of new water- and sewer-lines and
roadway ramps are already under construction.
Across MacArthur Causeway city planners envi¬
sion a seaplane and helicopter airport that will
feature a new terminal, hangars for six choppers
Continued on page 31
Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 29


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Andy Antelo, Clemente Gonzalez, and Eddie Cavadas (left to right) in tho soon-to-expand Happy Room
Vice commodore Jorge Gonzalez, commodore Gonzalo Planas, and fleet commander Juan Munne
-ll!9f«*WKIIIIIIIililRI*fVltlMrilllBSSmC9ffff*59l*Smp*tPfStSSifai
Outboard
Continued from page 29
•and two aircraft, and a U.S, Customs sta¬
tion. A new facility for the Greater Miami
Convention & Visitors Bureau is also in the
works, and officials are contemplating new
cruise-ship terminals.
“This island has been Cinderella for a
long time. There are lots of princes who
want to take her on a honeymoon,”
observes MOC vice commodore Jorge Gon¬
zalez, who-sells chandeliers to upscale
Clients and keeps his 25-foot Sea Ray
cruiser at the club. Although most of the
island’s residents think their days are num¬
bered, the boát club’s flanks are formidably
¿protected; it has a lease that expires in 2026
¡and a bevy of city and county politicians on
fits membership rolls.
“Club members are at the beck and call of
any organization in time of trouble or disas¬
ter,” a February 16,1941, Miami Daily News
article stated.
Of course the motorboaters also had a good
time. They displayed their wildness by racing
across Biscayne Bay and towing stunt artists
who water-skied while standing on one
another’s shoulders. After some intolerant
souls complained about noisy boats, a club
leader beseeched members to use mufflers.
During World War II the MOC organized-
patrols to help defend against possible aggres¬
sion by the Axis powers.
The MQC’s first clubhouse was an old
wooden cottage on the eastern comer of Wat¬
son Island. The motorboaters had famous
neighbors across County Causeway, the road
that bisects the island and was later renamed
for General Douglas MacArthur. The
Goodyear blimp was stored there as were sea-
Three outboard-engine salesmen launched
the MOC in April 1938: Robert Soelke, Harry
Santana, and Lew Hewes. Thirty members
attended the first meeting at Hewes Out¬
board Service on the Miami
River and agreed to pay dues of
é50 cents per month. They adapted
mies from the Tampa Outboard Club.
The craft were small, wooden, and propelled
by Evinrude and Johnson motors. Among
•the club’s first members were BUI Barker
and Ed Todd, who would become local mar¬
itime celebrities for their swift Barker-Todd
plywood boats.
For its first few years the group had no per¬
manent home, yet it quickly became one of
the largest motorboating collectives in the
jJnited States. The MOC offered rescue
training and searched for missing children.
THE MOC ORGANIZED THE
COUNTY’S FIRST MARINE
PATROL AT THE
BEHEST OF COUNTY
SHERIFF TOM KELLY.
planes from Chalk’s International Airlines,
which arrived on the island soon after it was
created in the Twenties. A year later the
Miami Yacht Club, then twenty years old,
moved in next door to the MOC. (The yacht
dub had been headquartered on the Miami
River.) The state turned the spoil island over
to the city in 1949, with the proviso that it be
reserved for public or governmental use.
In the Fifties the MOC organized the
county’s first marine patrol. Richard Taylor, a
Miami lawyer who is now age. 75, helped
assemble the force at the behest of then-Dade
County Sheriff Tom Kelly. “We were sworn in
by the sheriff” Taylor remembers. “We didn’t
carry guns, but we had full uniforms and boats
labeled with a police sign we put on them. And
die main thing even then was controlling traf¬
fic, slowing people down at bridges, that kind
of thing. It hasn’t changed much, except the
numbers. We were usually two in a boat.
There were fourteen or fifteen of us. The sign
and the uniform, that’s about all you need.
People slow down real quick.”
Taylor, who served as commodore in 1960,
introduced the first boat with an inboard
motor to the dub. A local mechanic installed
the engine inside his nineteen-foot cruiser; the
biggest outboard available at the time would
barely move it
In 1957 the MOC signed a twenty-year lease
with the dtyat one dollar per year, and a new
clubhouse, which still stands today, went upin
1958. But as the boaters fished and
cruised away their days, little else
changed on the island. One exception
was flie 1961 arrival of Hotei, a Shinto
god of happiness. His pot-bellied gran¬
ite figure was just one facet of the
Miami-Japan Garden, donated by
Japanese industrialist Kiyoshi
Ichimura. Throughout the Sixties the
MOC anchored itself as a Miami insti¬
tution with charitable acts: hosting
races for the Orange Bowl Regatta,
providing Thanksgiving dinners for
senior dtizens, and sponsoring fishing
tournaments for poor kids from social
¿service groups such as Big Brothers
Big Sisters.
The club in those days reflected
/Miami’s population: The majority of
members were Anglo. As Cubans
streamed into South Florida after the
1959 revolution, the MOC became
more Hispanic. But unlike at many
local institutions, the immigrants were
accepted as part of the gang, as long
as they had a vessel, Taylor and other
old-timers observe.
Continued on page 33
The club is “a reflection of the city we live in," says past
commodore Richard Taylor, photographed at his
canalside home
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Continued from page 31
Edgar Lendian, a Havana native who arrived
m Miami in 1961, was one of the first Latin
members. He joined in 1964 after: returning
from college at Louisiana State University.
There was no ethnic strife, he insists. “A lot of
the Americans were my Mends,” says the
lawyer and real estate broker, now age 66. He
soon convinced another successful exile to
join, Ed Fernandez. Fernandez, who had
made a fortune packaging Sweet’N Low,
became the MOC’s first Cüban-bom com¬
modore in 1975, ten years before Miami
elected itsfirst Cuban-American mayor, Xavier
Suarez. “It was a gradual thing over file years,”
Lendian says of the club’s demographic
change from Anglo to Hispanic domination.
The shift accelerated after the 1980 Marie!
boafiift, he adds.
By the late Eighties the club’s roster was full
of Latin names. “It happens that Cubans like
boating very much because we’re from an
island,” says Lendian. “We’re not land lovers,
we’re water lovers. I think that’s what attracted
us.” He’s always considered the chib fo be
cross-cultural, though he acknowledges a
drop in Anglo membership. “They retired and
moved out We kept on boating.”
THE FBI
LATER
REPORTED
THAT CLARK HAD
OFFERED POLITICAL
HELP, BUT NOTHING
OVERTLY ILLICIT.
. A few Anglos still belong to the club and
Jceep boats there, but MOC social events are
attended almost exclusively by Cuban exiles.
Taylor, who joined in 1955, remembers that
some Anglo members groused about their
new minority status But he thinks for the
most part the organization has been a rare
example of ethnic harmony in Miami. “We’ve
had an invasion more or less and you might as
well laugh at it and go along with it, or leave
town,” he declares. “I don’t think grumbling is
going to do a bit of good.” He sold his 41-foot
Hatterasin April, in part because he’s feeling
his 75 years. “It got to be a long way from the
bridge to the engine,” he says. But there are
other reasons he rarely sets foot in the club¬
house anymore. Tve-been backing off over
the past year. I go over there and they are as
nice as can be — ‘How you doin’, Taylor?’ —
but then they go right back into Spanish. And
I’m a Berlitz Mure.”
For some members politics was as much a
passion as boating. And the MOC’s patch of
Watson Island offered an excellent vantage
point for viewing two of the most bizarre
events in Miami-Dade’s political history. Coin¬
cidentally both occurred in 1985.
One of them erupted over a plan to makefile
spoil island a tourist destination. That idea was
not new, of course. In ftie Seventies and early
Eighties, then-Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre
campaigned repeatedly for a theme park on
the island. “When Ferre wanted to build that
big project we put out a bumper sticker that
read ‘Save Watson Island for boats, birds, and
blimps,’” recalls Armando Gutierrez, a politi-
cal consultant who has been an MOC member
since the Seventies. (He owns a seventeen-
footMako.)
But a new-and-improved 1985 concept for
file rustic isle gained enough steam to win the
Continued on page 35
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34 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New limes


Vice commodore Jorge Gonzalez (in straw hat) and talent-show crew
Outboard
Continuad from page 33
dty commission’s backing. Developer John K.
Meyer's proposed $130 million, Arquitectqn-
ica-designed complex that would include a
boat-exposition center, a 300-room hotel, two
restaurants, and docks for 300 boats. It also-
called for the MOC and the Miami Yacht Chib
to merge into one building. Among Meyer’s
associates was lawyer (and future City and
County Commissioner) Arthur Teele. The
investors included Cuban American National
Foundation honchos Jorge Más Canosa and
Pepe Hernandez.
But then-Commissioner JdeCarollo, who
cast the sole vote against the project, sent
the scheme into disarray by disclosing that
a company with dealings in communist
countries was among the twelve investors.
A war of words followed and Mas Canosa
challenged Carollo to a duel with guns or
knives. The commissioner suggested water
pistols. In the end there was neither a
shootout nor construction. “They are run¬
ning like chickens,” Carollo bragged to the
Miami Herald after Mas Canosa and other
CANF investors pulled out
Another bizarre drama unfolded that year
in and around the MOC’s Happy Room. On
August 22 an FBI undercover informant met
with then-County Mayor Steve Clark and
retired Miami zoning officer Kevin “Waxy”
Gordon. (Clark was a club member.) Agents
were probing two claims: 1) longshoremen
were involved in racketeering at the port;
and 2) Gordon was involved in a zoning
scam in Hialeah. The FBI later reported that
Clark had offered political help, but nothing
overtly illicit
Six months later Clark and Gordon were
again at the MOC. Now Gordon was wearing
an FBI wire; agents had snared him in a
drug deal several weeks before the
encounter. According to a transcript of the
chat, then-federal Judge, now U.S; Congress
man, Alcee Hastings warned Clark to stay
away from Gordon. Hastings was privy to the
federal investigations because he had autho¬
rized the wiretaps. (Disclosing such informa¬
tion is illegal.)
Here are some highlights of Clark’s barely
intelligible exchange with Gordon at the
MOC:
Clark: I remember saying, “Hello, judge,”
and he comes to me saying, “Stevie, I want to
tell you something.... Don’t get near Kevin....
Kevin Gordon is involved in some zoning in
Hialeah and don’t, I’m just telling you don’t,
don’t [go near him]... just walk away from it”
... How in the heü would he know that?
Gordon: I have no idea.... Here’s what I did.
I made onecalL...:
Clark: To a commissioner?
Gordon: To a commissioner out there....
Clark: How, how in the fuck would the
judge know about this?
Gordon died of'a heart attack a month
later. The FBI eventually dropped the inves¬
tigations and theijJvS. Senate impeached
Hastings for plotting to take a bribe, but
acquitted him of charges he leaked word of
the wiretaps to Clark. (Hastings denied
warning Clark and a federal judge later ruled
the impeachment invalid. The affair was the
subject of a July 13,1988 New Times feature
story, “Undercover.”)
í HilllüMi IWItiAtMJll SfMJpi
lore. “We never figured out what really hap¬
pened,” concludes commodore Conzalo
Planas, an electrical contractor who lives in
Hialeah.
Clark sailed on and so did the MOC. The
extent of Clark’s advocacy for the chib, which
paid the city $13,000 in yearly rent, is unclean
“Clark didn’t attempt to do their politics for
them, that I know of. He was just the guy in
the background,” concludes John Brennan,
who chairs the city’s Waterfront Advisory
Board. “I think itwas sort of like having a shot¬
gun in the closet They didn’t have to open the
closet, but you knew that they could get seri¬
ous if they had to.”
By 1988, MOC’s 50th anniversary, it was
clear the club had forged a grand Anglo-
Cuban alliance. Proclamations commending
the motorboaters’ public service were issued
by Cuban-American mayors across Dade
County, including West Miami’s Pedro
Reboredo (now a Miami-Dade commissioner),
Sweetwater’s Isidoro Cuevas, and Miami’s
Suarez.
Through all the politics, the MOC’s purpose
remained as stated in its charter “for the fur¬
therance of outboard boating in all of its allied
activities... to foster a spirit of helpfulness and
good fellowship ... [and] to enable the boat¬
man to fully enjoy the use of his outboard-pow¬
ered craft.”
Speed is not the only factor in this year’s
regatta. As in a scavenger hunt, crews locate
clues, figure out the answer, then travel to
tiie next stop. Members hide out in various
parts of Biscayne Bay dispensing hints.
Commodore Planas stations himself at the
edge of Bicentennial Park with the first clue.
Continued on page 36
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gfsrawissi® r
Outboard
Continued from page 35
The last stop is at a boat just off Virginia Key.
The winners take home a coveted prize: a,
bottle of booze.
- Later that day the motorboaters gather for
the annual regatta banquet About 150 mem¬
bers devour salad, soup, and fish. Spanish is
the preferred linguistic order of the day.
Seated at one of fifteen round tables are
Humberto .Amaro, an aide to Mayor Alex
.Pendas, and Amaro’s wife. A guest asks
whether all of MOC’s members are Cuban.
Someone at the table offers that there is one
exception. “No, lo botaron hace un par de
años (No, they kicked him out a couple of
years ago),” says an elderly woman in a
sleeveless blue dress, dotted with white
daisies. Everyone at the table laughs.
Planas is hustling around in a shirt with red,
white, and blue stripes, and yellow shorts. Hy’
wears a cell phone on one hip and a ring of
keys on the other. He’s making last-minute
preparations for the night’s big event the tal¬
ent show. Through the club’s fuzzy speaker
system, he announces the first act, the MOC
ONE BY ONE
WOMEN
DRESSED AS
NUNS WALK OUT
SINGING “MY GUY.” ONE
OF THEM APPEARS TO
BE PREGNANT.
Boys, three kids in sunglasses and baseball
caps. One of them is actually a girl in a shiny
black jacket To taped music they sing a song
called “Adelante la Juventud” (“Onward
Youth”). Next, fifth-grader Jenny Perez, in red
bell-bottoms, lip-synchs Whitney Houston’s
“As Long as You Love Me.” Four women
billed as the MOC Village People dance and
fake the words to the tune “YMCA,” after
which Planas exults in English: “These village
people are from Hialeah and little Havana!”
Then Juan Munne croons a bolero, slightly
off-key, as another man, wearing a wig, several
fuchsia leis, shorts, and a white T-shirt with
fake breasts, prances across the stage. After
Munne’s tune concludes, a Gloria Estefan'
impersonator in á black spandex body suit
mouths the words ^Yo quiero bailaf (T want
to dance”) as the diva’s voice sounds from a
stereo. A woman in the audience squeals, “It
really looks like her!”
Next Mary Wells’s Sixties hit “My Guy”
blasts from the speakers as vice commodore
Jorge Gonzalez struts onstage clad in a bright-
red robe with silver wings attached to his back
and a halo around his heafi. He is supposed to
be God. One by one women dressed as nuns
Walk out singing “My Guy.” One of them
appéars to be nine-months pregnant. The
crowd explodes.
Finally it’s time for the “Who has the most
beautiful legs?” contest. Several members
string tip a sheet that will enable the audi¬
ence to view the participants’ from the waist
down only. The first one saunters out behind
the sheet, prompting chuckles. The legs
belong to a man. So do those of the next
seven contestants. “¡Ay, que piernas, papi!
¡Que piernas.1” (“Oh, what legs, papa! What
legs!”), exclaims Planas. As the laughter
resounds, the commodore begins the judg¬
ing. He asks the audience to applaud for its
favorite appendages. Suddenly the vice com¬
modore, still wearing his red robe and
wings, dives out from off-stage and wraps his
arms around one man’s ankles. The audi-
Contlnued on page 38
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All fishing is local: Mayor Garollo snags a trophy and good PR at a recent tourney
For the greater good, and a lesser rent club members take kids from inner-city youth centers fishing
Outboard
Continued from page 36
ence roars. When the judging is over» con¬
testant number eight the one with the skin¬
niest legs, wins'.
Even before all theperformers cram the
stage for the finale» the sound of dominoes
being shuffled clattersin from the next room.
MQC’s hilarity was nearly silenced in 1993.
Then-city planner Jack Luft told the boaters
Miami law required the municipality to
explore whether other clubs were inter¬
ested in the site. Along with thé Miami
Yacht Club and the Coconut Grove Sailing
Club, the MQC took its cause to the public.
First; members persuaded commissioners
to put the question to voters: Should non-
profitclubs such as MOC that operate on
city property be allowed to negotiate leases
without competition? That November, by a
slim margin, .city voters approved the mea¬
sure. “That was the Alamo for us,” asserts
MQC member Jack; MgGovem, a 65-year-
old, retired shipping executive who helped
engineer'the referendum campaign.
A 30-year leasé signed in 1996
increased the motorboaters’ rent
from about $Í3S000 per year to
$65»O0O; a discount of up to $30,000
was allowed if the group sponsored
charitable events. The rleal also
required thé "MOC to shell out
$300,000 to improve the facilities, a
process that is stHl under way. This
past April the city raised the rent to
about $75,000. -
So how did they pull it off? Former
commodore RichardTaylor, who
was on the MOC’s lease-negotiating
committee with McGovern, says it
was the same old formula that had
won hearts and mmds.before: taking
inner-city ldds fishing, feeding peo-
pleffom retirement homes, and host¬
ing popular public events like the
Orange Bowl.Regatta.
Moreover MOC ranks include sev¬
eral top politicians. Among them:
current andiformer Miami Commis¬
sioners Wilfy Gort, Joe Sanchez, and
Victor deYurre; Mjami-Dade Mayor
Alex Penelas and County Commis¬
sioners Miguel Diaz de la Portilla
and Pedro Reboredoi.State Rep. Alex
Diarde m Portilla, Migúel’s brother,
.is also on the MOCjpstov |U
Miami Commissioner J.L. Plum-
mér Is also an ally. Plummer and I
go way back. That didn’t hurt,” Tay¬
lor admits. But Plummer’s popularity
» June 17 - 23.1999 Miami New Times
the Pledge of Allegiance. Then Graciela
Botero, a neighbor from the nearby Miami
Yacht Club, walks up to a microphone and
thanks MOC members for helping out ata
recent fundraiser.
Sanchez sidles to the mike and invites
everyone to compete in the Mahi-Mahi Clas¬
sic, an annual fishing contest founded by
policemen and hosted by the MQC. “It’s a
“WE JUST LIKE TO GET
OUT ON THE
WATER,” LENDIAN
SAYS. HE’S OWNED
TEN BOATS.
great fishing tournament because it allows
us to open up our hearts and provide for
those who are less fortunate,” he intones.
The proceeds go to five local charities, most
of them Cuban American. After his spiel
Sanchez heads for the Happy Room.
Planas quickly moves through the agenda.
Two new members are nominated and unan¬
imously approved. Clemente Gonza¬
lez presents Planas with the cash he
raised. A man in a black T-shirt
emblazoned with wings, a motorcy¬
cle, and the words “Ride Free” tells
the group that a 45-year-old man he
works with has tumors on his larynx
from smoking cigarettes. “Justa little
thing I thought I would share with
you,” he says earnestly and walks
back to his seat
The meeting is adjourned. Some
head for the domino tables, a few
meander into the billiards parlor, and
others move to the Happy Room,
where Sanchez is enjoying his din¬
ner. “Hey» want a beer?” he asks New
Times: He and Eileen Taulbee won¬
der what story the paper is working
on. “Don’t write anything bad,”
Taulbee pleads, with a big grin, ‘This
is a good place.”
Sanchez and Taulbee return two
weeks later for the June 5 fishing tour¬
nament One of tiie other competitors:
Mayor Carollo.
It is about 2:00 on a sunny Sunday
afternoon in June. A man and woman
are fastening a small fishing boat to a
trailer at one edge of the MOC
grounds, which are packed with ves¬
sels of all sizes and styles. Out on the
club’s main dock two men have just
at tiie club dipped in 1993, when he ques¬
tioned whether there was sufficient public
access to toe MOC.
Politicians continue to traipse through the
MOC entrance. If s a recent Monday njght
and members swipe their plastic méníbership
cards through a magnetic gadget on the glass
doors and head inside for the club’s weekly
meeting. Then in walks City Commissioner
Joe Sanchez, dressed in a suit and tie and
accompanied by his chief of staff
Eileen Taulbee. Clemente Gonza¬
lez, the boastful bilge-pump gunner
from tiie watertight, approaches Sanchez with
a thick wad of cash in one hand. “Sanchez
glances at a New Times reporter. “Look, he’s
trying to bribe me!” the politician says in jest
Actually Gonzalez has just scrounged the
money from MOC members in a ten-minute
crisscrossing of the clubhouse. He collected
about one thousand dollars to help pay med¬
ical expenses for a 41-year-old member who
recently had a brain tumor removed.
A few minutes later Planas calls the general
meeting to order and about 50 members recite
Havana-born Edgar Lendian joined the MOC in the Sixties, before
it was cool to be Cuban
returned from a half-day of fishing and are
hosing down the deck of a large white sport¬
fishing craft. A few slips away, Edgar
Tertian stands in the stem of Blue Eyes, his
31-foot Tiara fly-bridge fishing cruiserrHe
and his wife Diana, who heads the promo¬
tions office at Bacardi-Martini USA, are
about to cruise over to Hey Biscayne. “We’ll
go for a dip, have a féw drinks,” Lendian
says, sporting a black.Bacardi cap. One of
his two friends onboard Blue Eyes is Mariano
Sentí, a 43-year-old construction worker vrho
was granted political asylum in the United
States a month ago after spending twelve
years in a Cuban prison. “We just like to get
out on the water, get away from town,”
Lendian says¿ Since joining the club in the
early Sixtie s he’s owned ten boato.
“This is a workingman’s dub," insists Andy
Antelo, who joined in 1969. Today thedÉin-
gual 45-year-old sales manager owns a 25foot
open fishing vessel. But he rarely uses it
because his job frequently requires him to
leave Miami. “There are people here who
make five dollars an hour and people who
make a lot more than that But when we walk
through that door we’re all equal”
Indeed a working stiff can afford the rates,
though they have risen substantially in
recent years. The MOC’s 350 regular mem¬
bers each pay $450 per year to belong. About
100 people have limited memberships,
which cost $100 and allow them to usé the
bar and dining facilities. Monthly storage
fees and an assessment for improvements
add a few hundred dollars per year.
Although some Anglo members have left
over the past few years, Jack McQovem
thinks the MOC is in good hands. “The
advent of the Hispanics has been a boon,” he
concludes. “We used to have to twist peo¬
ple’s arms to get them to run for of£ce.”
Then he adds a jocular caveat “But basically
I would say that if you don’t know howto
play dominoes you’re not going to meet very
many people.”
Besides flooding caused by the Parrot Jun¬
gle construction, commodore Planas must
deal with restoring the membership rolls. Tm
trying to bring new blood here,” he says.
“We’ve got the new millenmum coming.”
Planas recently has managed to lure a few
new members, including Frank Falestra^n 42-
year-old Miami native of Italian-American
extraction. Falestra, who runs a small record¬
ing studio and performs rock music under toe
alias Rat Bastard, scores his twenty-foot yfessel
at MOC. “They’re really nice,” he says. “They
gaveitie a plaqUe”;He joined toé club mainly
because it is an' affordable place to keep his
boat, not for the domino sessions or talent-
show boleros. CD
tint t ihw’i J


THIS AO CONTAINS:
I! iVi ( Hungry Women
íítflí Hot Guys
lAfcfi Man Stew
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED
Miami New Times June 17 - 23.1999 39


A Wallflower
Haskin shows off his renaissance, word darás* and general efegance aí Wall-
Itfs a building first, a two-stoiy former flower, Haskin and Flash intend to add
office complex in the murky shadows of yoga classes, acting workshops, event»
downtown’s federal courthouse. Outside chi sessions.
flue streets are busy with the business of' lately the gaBayhas come alive mostly
making money and deploying power, the on weekends. This Thursday at 7:30 pm.,
proverbial hastíe and bustle of the gray- Wallflower hosts Billy Yeager, who will
flannel herds. _ show Ins years-in-the-making semicinéma
Upstairs inside is culture unbound, vérité motion picture Jimmy’s Story.rThe ■ j
Haskin, former honcho at the Gallery of film tells the taleofYeager’s struggles with
the Unknown Arfisis, bought the place a
couple of years ago, knocked down some
interior wails, and turned it into an art
gallery and fashion-design operation^
Early flus year be brought in a manager;
with vision, a guy named Flash. The duoX
has turned the place, called the Wallflower
Gallery, into one of Miami’s hippest hang¬
outs.
, Haskin and Flash guide their guest up
the stairs into the reception area, where
coffee, soda, juices, muffins, and the like
are served. Smoking is allowed in this area
(and only iff flus area). To the left is a si¬
ting room with a plaid couch, ornate coffee
tables, wood-framed mimas, in front of
that two more rooms, divided like cham¬
bers in a Poe story, more fine furniture,
and, at the far end, a stage where Matthew
Sabatella is playing solo and where the
band the Inside will soon blast out a
full set
On the other side of the complex Flash
has arranged art in four rooms, each con¬
taining paintings and sculpture. “All the
paintings in each room are by one artist all
the sculpture in each room is by one
artist” Flash explains. “The combination
provides movement.” His guest is dis¬
tracted by a $750 glass-and-iron lamp that
looks skullish and amoebic, yet Gofluc.
’ “Come on,” says Haskin. “There’s
more.” Down a hallway, through lacy black
curtains, past, double wooden doors. His
guest is expecting to be murdered and
tossed into the alleyway outside. Instead
he finds the hidden roots of the Wallflower
forest A sewing machine, a spreader, cut¬
ter, rutting table, reams of yam, remains
from Haskin’s fashion-design days. “And
over here,” he continues, leading his via¬
tor back into the hallway and through
another door, “is what used to be a law
library, I think. We’re going to turn this
into a retail shop to sell local CDs, art,
T-shirts.”
Music room, sitting rooms, art galleries,
retail, juice bar — all electronically con¬
nected so the live music resonates (and
plays on monitors in most rooms) any¬
where you wander. Behind the stage is a
screen on which video images are pro-
Flash managing at the Wallflower Gallery
tire music industry (early cute included a
scale in which Yeager mailed the testicles
of a butt to music-biz bigwig Chris Black-
well) and the hoax in which he (a white
man,but a brflliantguitarist nonetheless)
passed himself off as the illegitimate son of
Jimi Hendrix, a scam fbat fooled local and
national media. After the screening the
filmmaker answers questions and hypes
his new acting workshop. Wall art by
Emerson CáídérdniJÚexFeliciano, and
Craig Carpentieri will be on display, along
with accent peces by Daniel Florda, Rafael
Menresa, and Robert Kassover.
Friday features Ploppy's Podium, a
poetry and music event with, guests
lifeblood, a band that mixes jazz, world-
beat, and jam sounds. Saturday music
comes from Spoonbeacb, Rachelíe Coba,
and Jeff Rollasen (a,k.a Jeff and Jeff tire
Space Cowboy, and the sometime front¬
man of the Curious Hair, the Mini Drivers,
Merigold’s, and formerly Mr. Tasty and
the Bread Healers).
“We’re going lor a friendly vibe,”
Haskin says. “We want you to be able to
step out of Miami and into a place of cul¬
ture.”-Greg Baker
I8ÍI#
The Walfflower Gallery is located at 10 NE 3rd St
Admission and starting times vary. Gall
Thursday
The Florida Dance Festival continues this
week, incorporating films and discus¬
sions with a bevy of dance perfor¬
mances. This evening at 7:00 Dance-
maker, Matthew Diafftond’s Academy
Award-nominated documentary about
the Paul Taylor Dance Com¬
pany, screens at the Alliance
Cinema (927 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach; 305-534-7171).
Also tonight at 7:30 Dale
Andree and Roberta Kjel-
gaard host “Looking at:
Dance: Audience Critical;
Response,” an informal pre¬
sentation of works by Florida
choreographers followed by
a question-and-answer period
at Miami Light Project’s
Light Box (3000 Biscayne
Blvd.; 305-5764350). Admis¬
sion to the film is six dollars.
The lecture is free. The festi¬
val runs through June 26.
Call 305-674-3350. (NK)
Cuban-music aficionados will be sur¬
prised to hear that Elio Revé will be
appearing in Miami. Revé, whose semi¬
nal dance band Orquesta Revé served
as a sort of university for the island’s
best musicians, died in 1997. But his
spirit lives on. Revé’s son, Elito, has
taken over as director of the band, Elio
Revé y Su Charangon. The group will
appear tonight and tomorrow at Timba
(2898 Biscayne Blvd.), performing Papa
Revé’s quintessential Cuban big-band
music plus new songs. The show starts
at 9:00 p.m. Tickets cost $20. Call
305-576-5866. (JC) .
Saturday
Nothing like watching a teenager
expertly playing a violin to remind you
«a | June 17 -23,1999 Miami New times
how much you hated those music
lessons your parents forced on you as a
kid. All those practice sessions may
have wiped out your eagerness to mas¬
ter an instrument, but they didn’t van¬
quish your love for classical music.
Tonight at 8:00 the American Russian
Young Artists Orchestra performs at the
Jackie Gleason Theater of the Perform¬
ing Arts (1700 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach), where you can watch a collec¬
tion of ultratalented youngsters play
those tunes you just can’t get enough
of. Conductor Dimitri Liss leads the
musicians in a program of works by
Ellington, Rachmaninoff, and Szy¬
manowski, the last of which showcases
Siberian violin prodigy Mikhail
Simonyan. Yes, the little fiddler is all of
thirteen years old. Tickets range from
$10 to $25. Call 305-673-7300. (NK)
It’s safe to say that over the past five
years, Tigertail Productions, the orga¬
nizers of FLA/BRA, the festival that
celebrates new works from Florida and
Brazil, has been teased incéssantly
about the ostensible reference to lin¬
gerie in their event’s name. Well,
they’ve finally decided to get smart
and have the last laugh by staging the
first annual FLA/RRA Auction. They’ve
j enlisted a slew of local visual artists
(Carlos Betancourt, William. Cordova,
Robert Flynn, Michelle Weinberg,
David Rohn, Dina Knapp, and Miralda,
to name a few) and asked them each to
create their own interpretation of a
bra. You heard right: artist-made
undies for which you will probably pay
big money. Dancers and special guests
will model the brassieres and New
York City-based cowboy rumba
crooner, tunesmith, and auctioneer
Ned Sublette will direct the bidding. A
discerning panel of judges will dole out
awards for the best work. Can’t wait to
see those push-up versions! The fun
starts at 6:30 p.m. at Bar Room, 320
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach. Tickets
cost $75 and, of course, benefit Tiger-
tail and the upcoming festival. Call
305-3244337. (NK)
The Coconut Grove Playhouse (3500
Main Hwy., Coconut Grove) is falling
apart. Seems some construction
geniuses in the Twenties mixed beach
sand into the. cement and some .sup¬
porting metal structures are now cor¬
roding faster than you can say “flop.”
It’s going to cost around six million dol¬
lars to -restore the joint. Let the*
fundraising begin! First up tonight at
the playhouse at 8:30: Rhythm to the Res¬
cue, a concert by Latin singing sensa¬
tions Willy Chirino and his wife Lissette,
with special guests. Tickets range from
$45 to $250. Call 3054424000. (NK)


See this photo by Michael Carlebach among the images shown at the Miami-Dade Public Library
Futurist Female
JKs asomewhat lively weekoigbt on thecor-
ner nf Miami Reach’s Tenth Street and
Washington Avenue and sound isaHarouad. ‘
Hip-hop blares from car stereos. Miniskirted
drunken women amble along thesidewalk
muttering loudly. Motorcycles transporting
fet guys thunder down the road. An action-
packed evening for a place that usually
wakes up for weekends, when the streets
and sidewalks vibrate incessantly.
Part of that dynamic energy was what
conceptual artist Annie Wharton fropedte/|
capture in her installation Mastic Theater,
occupying the gleaming steel Bridge Ten¬
der’s House in front of the Wblfeonian-iTU
museum. A show devoted to Futurist Jíhr-BÉ
tunato Depero is on display at thp main
ittuseum, which features art from Í8S5 to
1945. The Futurist movement, founded in
19,09 italy, extolled the virtues of the mass
market, raachines, and violence, and was
determined to propel ifs nation into tibe
world of tomorrow.
Outside in tibe tender’s house, Wharton’s!
installation is resolutely today with an eye
toward yesterday. Three strips of opaque
•, depicting female marionettes, hang
fromtheceiling. The
long-haired; luscious-
lipped gals wear elegant
Ic&eifHses-- arují
l|eelel¿krieétó^boptST
t front of a blue fabrie
background. White
cloud-shaped pillows are I
strewn about Bathed in
a pink fight the women,
though constricted, appear
;. ffrfie boogying nonchalantly
la the sky. The sound to which they move: ,
■Wharton’s voice reading Depero’s poem,
Colon, over a daik musical track by Britfeh
drum and bass artist Grooverider, mixed by
New^fcrkfrasedjunglist jDJ aGraM. 1
The multimedia brew of puppets, music,
Futurists, who employed all sorts of ele¬
ments to get their frequently fascist point of
view across. One major difference: the pur- -
trayal of strong women. Futurists did not j
often employ fosales as subject matter. T; |
wanted to focus on the strength of the con¬
temporary woman still hemmed in by strings
but dancing nonetheless, tnumphmg over
situations * says Wharton, whose current ;
works incorporate typical tools of housework
and whose past pieces have ranged from
mammoth metal sculptures to photographs
and videos of female prizefighters,
i Unlike the sensory assault thatis South |
Beach, Wharton is a bit less in-your-face
about tibe way she does things. “My work
is quiet and contemplative these days,”
she explains. T don’t tike to bombard peo¬
ple.” Nor does she like to rely on the com¬
monplace. In a discussion of marionettes
(hers are inspired by a German photo¬
graph from the Twenties), the name of
the famed Italian puppet inevitably comes
up. How wouldPinoechjo figure into afrof
this? He wouldn’t. Wharton shakes her
head from side to side and scoffs; “He’s a
guy!” - Nina Korman
HU, 1001 Washington Ave, Miami Beach. Call
39W31-18B1.
true love tonight af%00 at Books &
Books, 933 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach.
Admission is free. Call305-532-3222. (NK)
WA
Hi
:0
Sunday monday
Pair burly macho director John Huston
and literary pip-squeak Truman Capote
to collaborate on a movie script and the
result is bound to be really weird. The
odd combo got together in 1953 and
wrote the lines for Beat the Devil, a hilari¬
ous spoof of international thrillers based
on a novel by James Helvick. The plot
concerns a bunch of con artists all trying
to claim the same uranium-rich land.
Who needs Mike Myers when you have
a cast that includes Humphrey Bogart,
Jennifer Jones, Robert Morley, GinaLol-
lobrigida, and Peter Lorre? The film,
which Huston also directed, screens at
noon today as part of the Cinema Vortex
series at the Alliance Cinema, 927 Lin¬
coln Rd., Miami Beach. Tickets cost four
dollars. Call 305-531-8504. (NK)
Hard to fathom that babe-andra-half
author Brad Gooch (City Poet: The Life and
Times of Frank O’Hara) has trouble
attracting the same sex. But the awful
truth is now revealed. Or maybe not Per¬
haps Gooch just sympathizes with all his
desperado gay brethren and that’s why he
recently wrote Finding the Boyfriend
Within: A Practical Guide for Tapping into
the Source cfLove, Happiness, and Respect.
Or maybe he’s just a greedmeister cash¬
ing in on other people’s misery. Whatever
the reason Gooch was compelled to pen a
self-help book, it seems he’s in accord
with playwright Oscar Wilde, whose great
fine from Am Ideal Husband says: “To love
oneself is the beginning of a lifelong
romance!” Get the goods on Gooch and
listen to his advice about finding that one
Want to see the epitome of thte ugly Amer¬
ican?, Take a look at the work of Michael
Carlebach. The photojoumalist, documen-
taiysphotographer, and professor ofAmer-
ican studies at the University
ofJpami is the author of three £Kk
books: The Origins of Photo-
journalism in America, Farm
Security Administration Pho- I ( "l
tographs of Florida', and Amen- pH
can Photojournalism Comes of
Age. His most recent tome,
This Way to the Crypt, features
scads of black-and-white pho-
tographs of average people
doing everyday things,
whether it’s dancing, changing a CIE
tire, or sitting around patiently
waiting. The photos were taken between
the Sixties and the Nineties all across the
United States, but especially in South
Florida, and they reaffirm Carlebach’s
contention that there is no typical Ameri¬
can citizen. Geez, just hanging around
Miami a couple of days is bound to con¬
vince anyone of that! See the shots in the
exhibition Michael Carlebach: This Way to the
Crypt at the Miami-Dade Public library,
101' W. Flagler St Admission is free. The
show runs through September 3. Call
30S§75-2665. (NK)
nesday
we
Legendary percussionist Luis Miranda
has performed with renowned musicians
such as Machito, Cal Tjader, and Charlie
Parker. Tonight at 8:00, however, he
really gets down when he joins local
experimental jammers the Spam Allstars,
featuring Andrew Yeomanson, Nicole
Martinez, and Robin Carter, for a show
called H Piquete Que Corta (the cutting-edge
group) at Esperanto Music (513 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach). Poets wifi be on hand
to share their rhymes and special guest
musicians are slated to improvise. Wine
and cheese will be served as well. Admis¬
sion» free. Call 305-534-2003. (NK)
g: By Judy Cantor and Nina Korman


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3009 Aventura Boulevard
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to June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times
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Calendar listings ara offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, Mew Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Events
Thursday, June 17
Glaucoma Screenings: Local opthalmologists donate
their services to raise awareness about the
importance of eye care and periodic eye exams.
Free. 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Miami lighthouse for the
Blind, 601SW 8th Ave; 305656-2288.
Jam at MAM: Listen to the jazzy sounds of Mantra
while they accompany Love Jones poets reciting
their works, and indulge in free gourmet snacks at
this casual after-work event Free. 5:00 p.m. Miami
Art Museum, 101W Flagler St; 3053753000.
Saturday, June 19
Estate Auction: Bid on treasures acquired from
international collections. Free. 10:00 a.m. Sloan’s
Auction Galleries, 8861NW 18th Terr, ste 100;
305592-2575.
Family Music Night listen to reggae music by D.L
LaFleur while you enjoy an array of healthy food
samples. Free. 6:00 p.m. Wild Oats Community
Market, 11701S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest; 305971-0900.
Feast Among the Grapes: Eat, drink, and raise money
for the Diabetes Research Institute. $75.8:00 p.m.
Eden Roc Resort and Spa, 4525 Collins Ave, Miami
Beach; 800-321-3437.
Festivart Stroll among artists displaying their wares
and listen to live music at this weekly outdoor event
Free. 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. every Saturday.
Española Way and Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach; 305791-2366.
FLA/BRA Auction: See “Night & Day.”
Mobile Animal Cara Unit Metro-Dade Animal Care and
Control’s mobile clinic will be open to spay and
neuter cats and dogs for a low fee (or free for low-
income families). $25-$35.7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
today and tomorrow. West Miami City Hall, 901 SW
62nd Ave; 305884-7729.
Normandy Isle Farmers' Market Shop for farm-fresh
fruits, vegetables, flowers, plants, and baked goods
from vendors gathered around the fountain. Free.
10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. every Saturday. Normandy
Isle Fountain, 71st Street, Miami Beach;
305532-1366.
Rhythm to the Rescue: See “Night & Day.”
Sunday, June 20
Lincoln Road Farmers' Market Purchase fruits,
vegetables, flowers, and baked goods from vendors
on the Road and enjoy music by John Roush. Free.
10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. every Sunday. Lincoln Road,
between Pennsylvania and Euclid avenues, Miami
Beach; 305532-1366.
Mobile Animal Cara Unit See Saturday.
Wings of Soul: Releasing Your Spiritual Identity:
International speakers and performers showcase
poetry, music, verse, and dance during this
celebration of spirit in the arts. Free. 3:00 to 5:00
p.m. Miami Beach Community Church, Lincoln
Road and Drexel Avenue, Miami Beach;
305442-2252.
Wednesday, June 23
Fanfare and Tropees Night Out Join members of the
New World Symphony’s and Historical Museum of
South Florida’s young professional support groups
for a visit to the studio of artist Fernando Ureña Rib.
$5$10.6:00 pm Lincoln Theatre, 541 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 305-673-6930, ext 8.
South Beach AIDS Project Board of Directors Elsction:
Join this organization as it chooses new leadership.
Free. 6:30 p.m. Miami Beach Police Department
Community Room, 1100 Washington Ave,' Miami
Beach; 305532-1033.
Sports & Recreation
Saturday, June 19
Inline Skating Fitness Tour and Clinic: Take a guided
skate tour of Key Biscayne and pick up tips for
efficient endurance skating. $20.9:00 a.m; call
305531-3430 for details.
Red RuH Great Skate Event: Inline and roller skaters
showcase their talents in this freestyle dance and
skate competition. Free to spectators. 10:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. today and tomorrow. 14th Street and
Ocean Drive, Miami Beach; 305782-3481.
Sunday, June 20
Red Bull Great Skate Event See Saturday.
Ongoing
Aqua Aerobics: Tone those muscles without working
â–  up a sweat every Tuesday and Thursday at 5:00 p.n
$8 per class. Venetian Pool, 2701 De Soto Blvd,
Coral Gables; call 305460-5356 for details.
Aventura Bike Ride: Get in gear while riding twenty
miles through the Aventura and North Miami Beac
or Hollywood areas every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Fret
Meet at Whole Foods Market, the Waterways, 356£
NE 207th St, Aventura; 3059374463.
Badminton: Swing that racket and aim for the
shuttlecock every Monday and Thursday at 4:00
p.m. and Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Free. Tropical Park,
Bird Road and SW 82nd Avenue; 3053857078.
Biscayne Bay Sailing Club: Members meet the fourth
Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. Coconut
Grove Sailing Club, 2990 S Bayshore Dr, Coconut
Grove (boat ownership or experience not necessar
for membership); 305385-6402.
Greyhound Racing: Bet on the dogs day and night
through December. 8:05 p.m. nightly and 1:05 p.m.
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
By Steve Newman
Flood Evacuations
â– pi Two million Chinese, are
,being permanently moved
I——-T from low-lying areas along
the Yangtze River that are in danger
of being flooded. The flood season,
which begins this month, is pre¬
dicted to bring 30 per cent more rain
than during normal years. Disaster
officials warriéd earlier this year that
the worst drought in a decade had
made ftie earth too dry to absorb this
summer’s returning rains — a con¬
dition that could make this season’s
inundations much more severe.
Floods along the Yangtze River and
in northeast China last year killed
more than 4000 people.
Glacial Melt
All 15,000 glaciers in the
Himalayas are melting at
an alarming rate, accord¬
ing to environmentalist Syed Iqbal
Hasnain of the Jawaharlal Nehru
University in New Delhi. The melt¬
ing glaciers could unleash a series
of torrential floods in the mountain
valleys of northern India during the
next 40 years. Hasnain predicts the
floods will be followed by water
shortages because the rivers will
eventually dry up without the
glaciers as a source. Gangotri
Glacier, which is the source of the
Ganges, is retreating at a rate of
about 100 feet a year.
Vampire Bat Attacks
Fears of rabies have
prompted authorities to
issue quarantine alerts in
northern Mexico after a flurry of fif¬
teen vampire bat attacks. Earlierthis
year, a six-year-old child died from
rabies after being bitten by one of
the bloodsucking mammals. Three
small towns in Chihuahua have
been placed under a special watch.
Disease prevention officials have
warned inhabitants that it is particu¬
larly dangerous to walk at night near
the woods and caves where the bats
dwell.
G&to fitwjromnstf ;
Di3f«buteri by L A Timas Syndicate
Temperature
Extremes Unavailable
PPIIIPSS
For the week ending
June 11, 1999
m1 -
iE;mail: earth@slip.net
gi
Eruptions
mmm Nicaragua’s Telica volcano
Jl resumed its rumblings with
_S a fresh plume of smoke
from its crater. Civil defense officials
said that preparations have been
made to evacuate more than 9000
residents if a violent eruption occurs.
Telica is located 62 miles northwest
of Managua and has been inactive
for five years.
Mount Cameroon volcano
threatened to erupt once again after
being dormant for six weeks. Offi¬
cials said an increased volume of
magma is pouring out of the vol¬
cano, located 215 miles west of the
Cameroon capital of Yaounde.
Tropical Storm
Typhoon Maggie lashed
the northern Philippines
and southern Taiwan,
swamping some coastal areas and
disrupting transportation across the
region. The storm later lost force as
it blew ashore near Hong Kong.
Earthquakes
BOne person was killed and
fifteen others injured when
a magnitude 7.0 earth¬
quake wrecked the town of Agaly in
western Azerbaijan.
A magnitude 5.1 earthquake
rocked the Philippine island of Min¬
danao, destroying twenty buildings.
The tremor was centered near
Bayugan, 500 miles southeast of
Manila.
Earth movements were also felt
in northwest Iran, Cyprus, and from
southern Mexico to Nicaragua.
Yellowstone Surprise
A parking lot in Wyoming’s
Yellowstone National Park
has its own tourist attrac¬
tion—a new mud spring. The spring
developed in the Jot, eating up sev¬
eral parking spaces and the adjoin¬
ing sidewalk. The new spring sur¬
faced last month when it began
sending up steam through cracks in
the pavement. Some of the park’s
staff removed pieces of asphalt and
discovered a gaping space that
holds a bubbling pool of steaming
mud five feet below the surface.
Feline Intrusion
Surprisingly high levels of
cat dander and dust mites
have been found in the
Antarctic, the Wellington Asthma
Research Group reported. The
researchers stated that Antarctica
has always been feline free. The
mystery of how such substances
made it to the remote region was
solved when the scientists studied
clothing and mattresses that
belonged to workers at Scott Base
on Ross Island, some of whom had
cats at their homes in New Zealand.
It’s believed that the imported mite
can proliferate even in the harsh
Antarctic environs.
Additional Sources: Hong Kong Observa¬
tory, Japan Meteorological Agency, U.S.
National Earthquake Information Center, and
the United Nations World Meteorological
Organization.


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Miami New Times Juné 17 - 23,1999 43


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Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. $3. Flagler Dog
Track, NW 7th Street and 37th Avenue; 305-649-3000.
Hialeah Horse Racing: The ponies pound the turf
t every day (but Thursday) at 1:15 p.m. Hialeah Park
Race Track, 2200 E 4th Ave, Hialeah; 305-885-8000.
Horseback Riding: Beginners through advanced,
t young and old, can saddle up and enjoy the great
outdoors. South winds Equestrian Center, 6201SW
122nd Aye; call 305-285-7715 for details.
Jai Alai: The players grab their cestas and get
moving Wednesday through Saturday at 7:00 p.m.,
and every day (except Tuesday) with matinees at
noon (1:00 p.m. on Sunday); round out the fun in the
poker room, opening at 11:00 am. Monday,
Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday; 5:00 p.m.
Thursday; and noon Sunday. $1. Miami Jai Alai,
3500 NW 37th Ave; 305-633-6400.
Miami Rugby Football Club: Watch, practice, and then
play the British version of football every Tuesday
and Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Players of all skill levels
are welcome; call 305-667-0422.
Pilates Method of Body Conditioning: Certified Pilates
instructor Ana Caban guides you through a
beginner’s mat class. $13. Noon Tuesday and
Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Progressive
. BodyWorks of Miami, 3620 NE 2nd Ave;
305438-0555.
Strollerobics: Get fit and meet new people while you
push your kid around. 9:00 a.m. Fridays. Call
305-782-3481 for details.
Surfside Tennis Center: You don’t need a racquet to
meet your match; kids and adults are-invited to
participate in free round robins, group lessons, and
more. Open Tuesday through Sunday. 8750 Collins
Ave, Surfside; 305-866-5176.
Tai Chi: Improve your balance, flexibility, and
coordination while strengthening muscles. $7.
Every Thursday and Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at
Harmony Community Center (10250 SW 107th
Ave), and Friday, Monday, and Wednesday at 10:00
am. at Tropical Park (Bird Road and SW 82nd
Avenué); 305-227-1637.
Tai Chi at the Monastery: Spend a serene morning
improving balance, reducing stress, increasing
energy, and attaining inner peace. $6. Every
Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. Old Spanish Monastery,
16711W Dixie Hwy, North Miami Beach;
305-945-1461.
Volleyball: Serve, spike, and volley every Monday
and Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. at Robert King High
Park, 7025 W Flagler St; 305-261-6151.
-Weekly Bicycle Rides: For information about cycling
events call the individual clubs: Broward Wheelmen
Bicycle Club, 954-564-5614; Everglades Bike Club,
305-598-3998.
West Kendall Roller Hockey Club: Games Tuesday
through Friday evenings at MDCC’s Kendall
Campus. League membership costs $80. Call
305-386-2453.
Yoga: Beginners can learn to stretch, breathe,
balance, and relax. $13.6:30 p.m. Monday or 10:00
a.m. Tuesday. Yoga Center of Miami Béach? 763
41st St, Miami Beachj. 305-673-8380.
Yoga by Helena: Yoga instructor Helena leads this
class in stretching and breathing. $8. Every Friday
and Wednesday at 5:45 p.mi. Miami Shores
Recreation Center, 9617 Park Dr, Miami Shores;
305-758-8103.
Yoga by the Sea: Stretch and meditate twice a week.
$9, Every Saturday at 9:30 am- and Monday at 6:00
p.m. Church by the Sea, 50196th St, Bal Harbour;
305-947-9117. ft
Yoga in the Grove: Reenie D’Andre instructs you in
traditional hatha yoga postures, breathing, and
meditation. $10. Every Saturday at 9:30 a.m. and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Coconut Grove United
Methodist Church, 2850 SW 27th Ave, Coconut
Grove; 305-545-5141.
Yoga on the Beach: Peter Rickman leads this class,
which encompasses meditation and incorporates
elements of tai chi. Admission by donation. Every
Saturday at 10:30 am. and Monday and Wednesday
at 6:30 p.m. On the beach at 51st Street and Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach; 305-864-2591. gf
Kid Stuff
Thursday, June 17
Youth Acting for TV Commercials: Kids age eight and
older can learn the audition process for a successful
career in television commercials. 6:30 to 9:30
tonight and Tuesday, and 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday.
Panaro Workshop, 421 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach; call 305-532-9422 for details.
Saturday, June 19
Capoeira: Brazilian martial arts master Delei leads
this class for kids. $50 per month. 2:00 p.m. today
and 7:00 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Gil Santos
Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 318, Miami
Beach; 3056746709.
Children's Salsa and Swing Workshop: Angel Arroyo
teaches kids age six through twelve the latest dance
crazes., $45 (orfive classes. 1:00 p.m. Peaches
School of Dance, 16378 NE 26th Ave, North Miami
Beach; 305-949-7799.
Creative Dance for Kids: Shirley Julien teaches this
class for children. $5.11:00 am. every Saturday.
Iroko Dance and Performance Center, 1860-A West
UGeiti
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Miami Now Times June 17 - 23,1999 45


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46 June 17 - 23.1999 Miami New Times


by lloyd
DANGLE
The SECRETS HAD To HAVE BEEN
stolen, because chínese students
are so fab behind us in Physics
They*d never have figured it Out.
The complex and subtly nuanced
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and china has been Jolted by
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THE SECRETS TO EVERY ONE OF OUR
NUCLEAR WEAPONS SiNcE 1ASO
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Ave, Miami Beach; 305-604-9141.
Patch O’Heaven Petting Farm: Make friends with more
than 200 cute and cuddly animals and enjoy hay- and
pony-rides at this “living museum,” $8. Noon to 3:00
p.m. 21900 SW 157th Ave; 305-247-1947.
Youth Acting for IV Commercials: See Thursday.
Monday, June 21
Jazz Dance for Kids: Tatiana Garrido teaches this
class for children age six to thirteen. $40 per month.
5:00 p.m. today and Wednesday. Gil Santos Dance
Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Magic City Monday: Magic shows, arts and crafts
workshops, and puppet shows keep kids
entertained. $1.9:00 a.m. Joseph Caleb Auditorium,
5400 NW 22nd Ave; 305-636-2350.
Salsa for Kids: Instructors from Forever Salsa studios
teachkids age ten to sixteen to dance together and
casino rueda style. $6.8:00 p.m. every Monday and
Wednesday. Gold’s Gym, 1617 SW 107th Ave;
305-5538878.
Snorkeling Camp: Children age eight and up can
spend three days learning snorkeling from
professional instructors. $50.9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Through Thursday. Tarpoon Scuba Diving
Academy, 3200 Palm Ave, Hialeah; 305-887-8726.
Supsrtot Creative Movement Kids age three to six can
channel their energy into dance. $8.4:30 p.m. 21st
Street Community Center, 2100 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 305-532-2839.'
Tuesday, June 22
Youth Acting for TV Commercials: See Thursday.
Wednesday, June 23
Capoeira: See Saturday.
Jazz Dance for Kids: See Monday.
Salsa for Kids: See Monday.
On the Road & Sea
Friday, June 18
Ocean Lifeguard Tournament Watch South Florida’s
finest lifeguards demonstrate lifesaving skills. $3,50
per car. 2:00 to 7:00 p.m. Crandon Park Beach, 4000
Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne; 305-361-7373.
©19V?
Saturday, June 19
Bamboo Sale: View and purchase samples of these
useful plants. $8.9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fairchild
Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Rd; 305-667-1651.
Dragons and Monsters: A Reptile Encounter: Naturalist
and reptile specialist Joe Wasilewski presents a new
show devoted to slithery, scaly creatures. $14.12:15,
1:30,3:30 and 4:45 p.m. through September 6.
Parrot Jungle and Gardens, 11000 SW 57th Ave;
305-666-7834.
Father's Day Breakfast at Miami Metrozoo: Spend the
morning with Dad and the animals at this event to
benefit the South Florida Association of Zoo
Keepers. $ll-$20.7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Miami Metrozoo,
12400 SW 152nd St; 305-255-5551.
Orchid Workshop: RF. Fuchs teaches you everything
you need to know to grow these beautiful, delicate
blooms. $15,10:00 a.m. Fruit and Spice Park, 24801
SW 187th Ave, Homestead; 305-247-5727.
Ongoing
Arch Creek Park Historic Walk: Take a guided stroll
through historic Arch Creek Park. Free. Every
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. 1855 ÑE 135th St, North
Miami; 305-944-6111.
Art Deco Bike Tours: Grab some wheels and check out
Miami Beach’s history, from the city’s first hotel,
through the Depression-era building boom, to the
vibrant community of today. $10 (plus $5 bike rental
fee). The third Sunday of every month at 10:30 a.m.
Miami Beach Bicycle Center, 601 5th St, Miami
Beach; 3054574-0150.
Art Deco District Up to Date: The Miami Design
Preservation League supplements its original Art
Deco District Tour with a look inside several
buildings, including the Marlin and Park Central
hotels, the Miami Beach Police Station, and the
Kenneth Cole building. $10. Departs every
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. from the Art Deco Welcome
Center, 1001 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach; 305-672-2014.
Astronomy Programs: Learn about what you see when
you gaze at the night sky with scientists from the
Southern Cross Astronomical Society, professional
observatories, and research centers. Free. Each
second Friday of the month at 8:00 p.m. FIU
University Park Campus, 1400 SW 107th Ave,
Physics Bldg, rm 145; 305661-1375.
Aventura Bike Riders: Get in gear while riding twenty
miles through the Aventura and North Miami Beach
or Hollywood areas every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Free.
Meet at the Waterways, 3575 NE 207th St, Aventura;
305-937-4463.
Barnacle House: Tour the home of Commodore Ralph
Middleton Munroe, built in 1891, for a look at tum-
of-the-century Coconut Grove.-$1. Tours start at
10:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:30 p.m. The
park is open Friday through Sunday from 9:00 a.m.
to 4:00 p.m. 3485 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove;
305448-9445.
Biltmore Walking Tour The Dade Heritage Trust
hosts tours of the grounds of the historic Biltmore
Hotel every Sunday at 1:30,2:30, and 3:30 p.m. Free.
Meet in the hotel lobby, 1200 Anastasia Ave, Coral
Gables; 305445-1926.
Bonnet House: Named for the bonnet lilies that grow
around the estate’s tranquil ponds, the 30-room
winter home of the Bartlett family—built on a 35
acre spread—provides a look at the gracious
lifestyle of old Fort Lauderdale. $9. Open
Wednesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 1:30
p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 2:30
p.m. 900 N Birch Rd, Fort Lauderdale; 954-563-5393.
Enchanted Forest Park Nature Walks: Stroll through a
tropical woodland and experience Dade County’s
historic landscape. Free. Every Saturday at 10:00
a.m. 1725 NE 135th St, North Miami; 3058951119.
Miami New timos Juna 17 - 23,1999 . 47
-V—Vij v 1 íf.i-í-v,;* -■ '.‘i -- -■ «v v'-' ■ ' t


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IN OLD MAPS


Fairchild Tropical Garden Tram and Walking Tours:
Visitors can walk or ride and get a glimpse of the
rare petticoat palm, the gingerbread palm, and the
cannonball tree. $8 garden admission. Tram tours
are every hour on the hour from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00
p.m. on weekdays and 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on
weekends. 10901 Old Cutler Rd; 305-667-1651.
Heavenly Gazing Southern Cross Astronomical Society
experts will guide you through the celestial seasons.
Free. Every Saturday (weather permitting) at 8:00
p.m. Old Cutler Hammock Nature Center, SW 176th
Street and 79th Avenue; for more information call the
SCAS hotline; 305-661-1375..
Miami Skies: On the first and third Friday of every
month head for the Space Transit Planetarium to
observe the stars through the large public telescope
and see what’s happening “In the Miami Skies,”
weather permitting. Free. 8:00 p.m. 3280 S Miami
Ave; for details call the Cosmic Hotline at
305-854-2222.
Ocean Drive and Beyond: The Miami Design
Preservation League guides Decophiles through the
history of the Art Deco movement and its
preservation in the Miami Beach Deco District
during this comprehensive walking tour. $10. Every
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. Art Deco Welcome Center,
1001 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach; 305-672-2014.
Self-Guided Art Deco District Tour: The Miami Design
Preservation League offers a self-guided tour of the
architectural wonders of Ocean Drive and Collins
and Washington avenues via audio equipment. $5
(plus refundable deposit). Daily from 11:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. Art Deco Welcome Center, 1001 Ocean
Dr, Miami Beach; 305-672-2014.
Sierra Club: The Miami chapter offers canoeing,
camping, hiking, biking, and snorkeling trips all
year; call 305-667-7311.
Solar Viewing Safely view the sun with experts from
the Southern Cross Astronomical Society. Free.
Every Sunday (weather permitting) from 10:00 a.m.
to noon. Metrozoo, 12400 SW 152nd St;
305-661-1375.
Tropical Audubon Society: The society offers extensive
nature programs throughout the year, including
bird watching and native tree identification events;
call 305-666-5111 for a complete schedule.
Vizcaya Museum and Gardens: Travel back to the
Renaissance with a visit to this exquisite Italian villa
and its formal gardens; inside view one of the finest
collections of sixteenth- to nineteenth-century
decorative arts in the U.S. $5-$10.3251S Miami Ave;
call 305-250-9133.
Comedy
Friday, June 18
ComedySportz: Two teams battle for laughs and
points in a head-to-head competition of
improvisational humor based on audience
suggestions. $7.11:00 p.m. every Friday.
Hollywood Boulevard Theater, 1938 Hollywood
Blvd; 954-269-4086.
Just the Funny: The troupe performs 90-minutes of
buck-wild comedy featuring sketches, music,
parodies, and improvisations based on audience
suggestions. $10.11:00 p.m. every Friday and
Saturday. Absinthe House Cinematheque, 235
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 305-693-8669.
Laughing Gas Comedy Improv: Basic training
exercises for actors become hilarious instances of
interactive comedy when this rotating troupe of
actors and comedians develops random audience
suggestions into comedic skits. $10.11:00 p.m.
every Friday and Saturday. New Theatre, 65
Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 305461-1161.
Saturday, June 19
Alvares Guedes: The popular Hispanic humorist
gets you giggling. $45. 9:30 p.m. Fontainebleau
Hilton Resort and Spa, Club Tropigala, 4441
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 305-672-7469.
Just the Funny: See Friday.
Laughing Gas Comedy Improv: See Friday.
Punch 59: Sketch Comedy, music, and mayhem
rule when this wacky troupe takes the stage. $10.
11:00 p.m. Hollywood Boulevard Theater, 1938
Hollywood Blvd; 954-5834577.
Separate Checks: The audience picks the show
from a vast menu of humor when this
improvisational sketch comedy troupe performs.
$7.50 11:00 p.m. every Saturday. Hollywood
Playhouse, 2640 Washington St, Hollywood;
954-922-0404.
Monday, June 21
Def Comedy Jam: Local comedians and yucksters
from HBO’s Def Comedy Jam TV show try to get
the audience roaring at this open-mike night 7:30
tonight and tomorrow. $10-$15. The Improv, 3399
Virginia St (Streets of Mayfair), Coconut Grove; .
call 305441-8200 for details.
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Tuesday, June 22
Def Comedy dam: See Monday.
Film
Thursday, June 17
Florida Dance Festival: See “Night & Day.”
Jimmy's Story: Billy Yeager screens his film
depicting his attempts to break into the music
business. $3.7:30 p.m. Wallflower Gallery, 10 NE
3rd St; 305-579-0069.
Saturday, June 19
Silence Is Golden: Enjoy silent films under the stars
every Saturday night at 9:00 p.m: Free. 123 N
Krome Ave, Homestead; 305-246-8878.
Sunday, June 20
Cinema Vortex: See “Night & Day.”
Readings & Lectures
Thursday, June 17
Apollo, Helios, and Aman Ra - The Dangerous Sun God:
Marc Rouleau explores various cultures’ myths and
legends associated with the sun. $6.7:30 p.m.
Buehler Planetarium, 3501SW Davie Rd, Davie;
954475-6681.
Coral Gables Toastmasters: Be the star of the show
when you speak up. $10.12:15 p.m. Holiday Inn,
2051 Lejeune Rd, Coral Gables; 305-577-0016.
Bob Edelson: The árithor autographs his book, New
American Street Art: Beyond Graffiti, which features
color photographs of the most diverse street art
produced in the United States since 1990, Free. 8:00
tonight at Borders Books & Music (19925 Biscayne
Blvd, Aventura; 305-935-0027) and 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Borders Book Shop (9205 S Dixie
Hwy; 305-665-8800).
third Thursday of every month at 6:00 p.m. Miami
Beach City Hall, 1700 Convention Center Dr, Miami
Beach; 305-5324327.
Florida Dance Festival: See “Night & Day,”
Ghost Stories at the Biltmore: Storyteller Linda Spitzer
sits by the fireplace every Thursday and recounts
the celebrities and ghosts who have haunted the
Biltmore. Free. 7:00 p.m. Biltmore Hotel, 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 305-665-8429.
Integrate Body, Mind, and Spirit Through the Message of
Socrates: Learn about educating the body and soul
and attaining spiritual understanding at this course.
$5.7:30 p.m. New Acropolis, 320 Miracle Mile, 2nd
fir, Coral Gables; 305461-5758.
Open-Mike Poetry: Read your original works or recite
selections by afavorite author. Free. 7:00 p.m. at
Borders Book Shop (9205 S Dixie Hwy; 305-665-8800)
and 7:30 p.m. Friday at Barnes & Noble Bookstore
(7710 N Kendall Dn 305-598-7292).
Bruce Turkek Turkel, a partner in the local advertising
agency Turkel Schwartz & Partners, discusses his
book, Brain Darts: The Advertising Design of Turkel
Schwartz & Partners. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books,
296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 3054424408.
Friday, June 18
Future Goals of NASA Space Exploration: Darrell Foster,
NASA mission manager of unmanned launch
vehicles at Kennedy Space Center, delivers a lecture
delving into the next generation of space
exploration at this Southern Cross Astronomical
Society meeting. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU Physics Bldg,
rm 145, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue;
305661-1375.
Open-Mike Poetry: See Thursday.
Ploppy's Podium: Local talents showcase their literary
works at this open-mike series; tonight’s special
musical guest is Lifeblood. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Wallflower Gallery, 10 NE 3rd St; 305-5794)069.
Noreen Wald: The author reads from and discusses
her novel, Ghostwriter, the first in a new mystery
series featuring gutsy heroine Jake O’Hara, a witty,
Single, young woman who accepts a job as a
ghostwriter for a literary grande dame. Free. 8:00
p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
3054424408.
Richard Webster At 7:30 tonight the author discusses
and signs his book, Feng Shui in the Garden, at
Barnes & Noble Bookstore (152 Miracle Mile, Coral
Gábles; 3054464152), and at 2:00 p.m. tomorrow at
the Northeast Subregional library (2930 Aventura
Blvd, Aventura; 305-931-5512) he talks about his
book, Feng Shui for Beginners. Free.
Saturday, June 19.
Lynn McKee: The author autographs her book,
Spirit of the Turtle Woman. Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes
& Noble Bookstore, 7710 N Kendall Dr;
305-598-7292.
José Luis Orozco: The popular Mexican
performer/songwriter shares bilingual congs and
hand games from De Cobres and Other Latin
American Folk Songs for Children, and Diez
Deditos/Ten Little Fingers, two collections that he
created especially for youngsters age two through
eight Free. 3:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables; 3054424408.
Qigong for Health, Longevity, Creativity, and Mental
Clarity: Learn the basics of this Chinese health care
system. Free. 2:00 p.m. South Miami Branch
library, 6000 Sunset Dr, South Miami; 305-667-6155.
Richard Webster: See Saturday.
Monday, June 21
Alternative Health Education Lecture Series: Jay Foster
delivers a lecture titled “Reversing Osteoporosis and
Arthritis.” $3 donation. 7:00 p.m. St James Lutheran
Church, 110 Phoenicia Ave, Coral Gables;
305-271-2865.
Brad Gooch: See “Night & Day.”
Ellen Hoffman: Federal policy expert arid retirement
specialist Hoffman discusses her book, Bankroll
Your Future: How to Get the Most from ihe
Government for Your Retirement Years. Free. 8:00
p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
3054424408:
Tuesday, June 22
Bob Béamon: The author, who stunned the world
with his Olympic- and record-breaking leap of 29
feet; 2 1/2 inches at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic
Games, reads from and discusses his book The
Man Who Could Fly, written with Milana Walter"
Beamon. Free. 7:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296
Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 305442-4408.
Linda Bladholm: The author autographs her book,
The Asian Grocery Store Demystified, a guide to
foodstuffs of every major Asian culture, including
Chinese, Japanese, Laotian, Thai, and Korean.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Books & Books, 933 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 532-3222.
Impact on Florida of Changes in Cuba: Antonio
Villamil, director of tourism, trade, ánd economic
development for the state of Florida; Raul
Martinez, mayor of Hialeah; José Cancela,
chairman of the Greater Miami Chamber of
Commerce; arid Antonio Jorge, professor of
economic and intemationál relations at FIU
participate in this discussion moderated by Jaime
Suchlicki, director of thé University of Miami’s
Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American studies.
$15 (includes lunch). Noon. University of Miami
Faculty Club, 1550 Brescia Ave, Coral Gables; call
305-2842822 to' reserve.-
Poetry Readings: Vie for prizes at this night of
original poetry and short-story reading. Free. 8:30
p.m. Warehouse Cafe, 7181 SW 117th Ave;
305-273-0870.
Poetry Slam: Shamelle Jenkins hosts this monthly
spoken word night featuring giveaways. Free. 8:00
p.m. Borders Books & Music, 3390 Mary St,
Coconut Grove; 305-4442907.
Water for Our Future: A Public Forum: Learn about
water, resources.management, and Everglades
Flamingo Toastmasters: Sharpen communication and
leadership skills at this meeting. Free. The first and
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restoration at this public forum. Free. 6:30 p.m.
Homestead Branch Library, 700 N Homestead
Blvd, Homestead; 305-264-0168.
Wednesday, June 23
Downtown Toastmasters Club; Learn to express yourself
better when addressing groups the second and fourth
Wednesday of every month. Free. 6:15 p.m. Camila’s,
129 SE 1st Ave; 305-377-7753.
Bob Edelson: See Thursday.
Janet Fitch: Fitch reads from her debut novel, White
Oleander, the story of a teenage girl’s coming of age.
Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave,
Coral Gables; 305442-4408.
Hands On Miami: Learn about volunteer
opportunities for busy professionals at this
orientation meeting. Free. 7:00 p.m. Barnes &
Noble Boosktore, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura;
305-935-9770..
Institute of Maya Studies: Cecelia Birtcher delivers a
slide lecture titled “Chichén Itzá: Buries Temple
Comes to life.” $5.8:00 p.m. Miami Museum of
Science and Space Transit Planetarium, 3280 S
Miami Ave; 305-666-0779.
Classes & Workshops
Thursday, June 17
Actors ProShop: Learn intermediate through
advanced techniques for film and stage acting in
this course. $185. 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. through July
15. Creative Workshops, 17065 W Dixie Hwy,
Aventura; 305-933-0560.
Afro-Cuban Percussion Workshop: Lazaro Alfonso
teaches you' different styles of drumming, from
rumba to timba. $14. 7:00 p.m. today and Tuesday,
and 3:00 p.m. Saturday. Ogordo Afro-Cuban
Studio, 2772 SW 8th St, ste 202; 305-642-8889.
TV Commercials: Learn the audition process for a
successful career in television commercials. 6:30
to 9:30 p.m. today and Tuesday, and 1:30 to 4:30
p.m. Saturday. Panaro Workshop, 421 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; call 305-532-9422 for details.
Friday, June 18
AIDS Mastery Workshop: Mercy Hospital Special
Immunology Services presents this intensive
weekend-long seminar on self-empowerment for
people living with AIDS and HIV and their
caregivers, family members, and friends. $20
donation. 6:30 to 11:00 p.m. today, 10:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Mercy Hospital,
3663 S Miami Ave; 305-285-2994.
Saturday, June 19
Afro-Cuban Percussion Workshop: See Thursday.
AIDS Mastery Workshop: See Friday.
TV Commercials: See Thursday.
Sunday, June 20
AIDS Mastery Workshop: See Friday.
Artplay in a Day: Artists Yehudis Levitin and
Carolyn Schlam teach you how to use art to bring
fun back into your life. $50.1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Miami Beach Botanical Garden, 2000 Convention
Center Dr, Miami Beach; call 305-532-7319 for
details.
Monday, June 21
Feature Film and Screenwriting Level I and li:
Independent screenwriter Duba Leibell teaches
this course concentrating on preparing a
treatment, writing a screenplay, and revising a
screenplay. 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. every Monday and
Wednesday. Panaro Workshop, 421 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; call 305-532-9422 for details.
Haitian Drumming: Former members of the Haitian
National Dance Company, Ton-Ton and T-Roupe,
teach sacred and secular Haitian drum rhythms.
6:00 tonight and Wednesday. Iroko Dance and
Performance Center, 1860-A West Ave, Miami
Beach; call 305-604-9141 for details.
Tuesday, June 22
Afro-Cuban Percussion: Master percussionists teach
you Cuban-style drumming. $18.6:00 p.m. Iroko
Dance and Performance Center, 1860-A West Ave,
Miami Beach; 305-604-9141.
The Big Chill: Alysa Plummer teaches you to cook
refreshing low-fat goodies. $45.7:00 p.m.
real-life.basic, 643 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-604-1984.
Cooking with Homo Restaurant Chef Frank Jeannetti
shares recipes from the acclaimed restaurant’s
menu. $30. 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Kitchen Hearth, 456
Arthur Godfrey Rd, Miami Beach; 305-538-3358.
TV Commercials: See Thursday.
Wednesday, June 23
Feature Film and Screenwriting Level I and II: See
Monday.
Haitian Drumming: See Monday.
Dance
Thursday, June 17
Afro-Cuban and Latin Dance: Cuban dancer-
choreographer Neri Torres teaches these classes
for beginning- and intermediate-level students. $10.
7:00 tonight and Tuesday, and noon Saturday. Ifé-Ilé
Cuban Dance and Music Center, 4545 NW 7th St,
ste 13; 305-863-2151.
Afro-Cuban Dance: Dancers Elena Garcia and Alain
Hernandez, former members of the Folkloric National
Company of Cuba, lead this class in orisha dances and
rumba. $10.7:00 tonight and Tuesday, and noon
Saturday. Iroko Dance and Performance Center, 1860-
A West Ave, Miami Beach; 305-604-9141.
Afro-Samba Dane»: Work out while you dance to Afro-
Brazilian rhythms. $10. 7:00 tonight and Tuesday.
Gil Santos Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 305-674-0709.
Belly Dancing with Maja: Belly-dance expert Maja
conducts a free-for-all for belly dancers and
musicians with workshops every Thursday at 6:30
p.m. at Tap Tap (819 5th St, Miami Beach) and
workshops every Monday at 1:30 p.m. at the 21st
Street Community Center (2100 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach). $5; 305673-7784.
Brazilian Dance: Gil and Monica offer samba,
lambada, bolero, and swing lessons every Thursday
and Tuesday. $10.9:00 p.m. Gil Santos Dance
Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
The Dancer and the Drummer: Dancer Jihan Jamal,
accompanied by Tunisian drummer Fathi, teaches
you how to blend choreography with her favorite
rhythms in this two-session class. $15.7:00 to 8:30
p.m. Performing Arts Network, 55517th St, Miami
Beach; 305672-0552.
Improvisational Belly Dance: Montreal dancer and
instructor Ylsa leads this intermediate and advanced
workshop. $10.7:30 p.m. Mideastem Dance
Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach;
305538-1608.
Israeli Dancing: Discover traditional dance moves
from this rich culture. $4. Every Thursday and
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900
NE 25th Ave, North Miami Beach; 305-682-7954.
Salsacise: Shape up while you learn fun Latin dance
moves. $4.7:00 tonight and Tuesday, 9:00 a.m.
Saturday, and 6:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday.
Dance and Body Studio, 10370 W Flagler St;
3052230316.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: Let the sizzling sounds of
salsa move you at this dance workshop. $7 (first
class free). 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday at
Blue Banquet Hall (9843 SW 40th St) and 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday at Violines Banquet Hall
(3706 W 12th Ave, Hialeah); 305220-7115.
Salsa Workshop: Put on your salsa shoes and dance
as Angel Arroyo teaches you the latest steps. $10.
7:30 tonight and Tuesday. Peaches School of Dance,
16378 NE 26th Ave, North Miami Beach;
305949-7799.
Samba: Learn the basics of Brazil’s most popular
dance. $10.9:00 tonight and Tuesday. Gil Santos
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Stephan Baker, M.D. tinelio Garcia Jr., M.D.
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Miami-Dade
Tracy M. Baker, M.D.
1501S, Miami Ave.
Miami*305-854-2424 :
Jesse O. Basadre, M.D.
351 NW 42 Ave, Ste. 501
Miami*305-631-8300
Joo Won Bln, M.D.
8750 SW 144 St, Ste. 201
Miami*305-378-0006
Darryl J. Blinskl, M.D.
7800 SW 87 Ave, Bldg. C, #375
Miami*305-598-0091 -
Emilio J. Canillo, M.D.
266 Palermo Ave.
Coral Gables*305-442-456l
John M. Cassel, M.D.
8950 N. Kendall Dr, #106
Miami*305-596-1010
Broward
Laurence I. Arnold, M.D.
7710 NW 71 Ct, #206
Tamarac*954-720-9513
Yoav Barnavon, M.D.
1150 N. 35th Ave, #550
Hollywood*954-987-8100
H. Michael Bass, M.D.
2855 University Dr, #400
Coral Springs*954-755-3666
Richard B. Edison, M.D.
3109 Stirling Rd, #100
Ft Lauderdale*954-981-3223
Steven D. Eisenstadt, M.D.
220 SW 84th Ave, #203
P!antation*954:236-9633
Jay B. Fine, M.D.
601N. Flamingo Rd, #408
Pembroke Pines*954-436-0244
Walter P. Garst, M.D.
999 Brickell Bay Dr, Ste. 1901
Miami*305-374-1888
Brad P. Herman, M.D.
8940 N. Kendall Dr, #903 E
Miami*305-595-2969
Jorge E. Hidalgo, M.D.
2310 S. Dixie Hwy.
Miami*305-860-0717
Baruch Jacobs, M.D.
400 Arthur Godfrey Rd, #305
Miami Beach*305-674-8586
Brandon E. Kallman, M.D.
820 Arthur Godfrey Rd, #202
Miami Beach*305-673-6l64
Michael E. Kelly, M.D.
8940 N. Kendall Dr, #903 E
Miami*305-595-2969
Gerald D. Grau, M.D.
540 NE 8th St.
Ft Lauderdale*954-764-5600
Jeffrey C. Hamm, M.D.
3900 Hollywood Blvd, #304
Hollywood*954-985-0400
Chance Kaplan, M.D.
1754 E. Commercial Blvd.
Ft Lauderdale*954-772-1069
David J. Levens, M.D.
985 University Dr.
Coral Springs*954-344-4555
Nathan Mayl, M.D.
6405 N. Federal Hwy, #200
Ft. Lauderdale*954-771-3100
Roger K. Khouri, M.D.
328 Crandon Blvd., #227
Key Biscayne*305-36l-8200
Ary Krau, M.D.
1143 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Is. *305-861-6881
Joel M. Levin, M.D.
7800 Red Rd., #305
Miami*305-665-10l7
George A. Levine, M.D.
8700 N. Kendall Dr, #102
Miami*305-279-1532
Gregory C. Lovaas, M.D.
1321 NW 14th St, #400
Miami*305-324-6633
D. Ralph Millard, M.D.
1444 NW 14th Ave.
Miami*305-325-l44l
Walter R. Mullin, M.D.
1444 NWl4th Ave.
Miami*305-325-l44l
Richard D. Nadal, M.D.
3661S. Miami Ave, #602
Miami*305-854-186l
Richard F. Ott, M.D.
4801N. Federal Hwy, #202
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C. Roberto Palma, M.D.
910 NE 26th Ave.
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Russel S. Palmer, M.D.
2699 Stirling Rd, #B101
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Jorge A. Perez, M.D.
6245 N. Federal Hwy, #200
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Ivo D. Pestaña, M.D.
3080 NW 99th Ave, #302
Coral Springs* 954-755-8844
Howard N. Robinson, M.D.
601N. Flamingo Rd, #317
Pembroke Pines*954-437-l l6l
Claude J. Noriega, M.D.
9955 N. Kendall Dr.
Miami*305-271-7446
Harold G. Norman, M.P.
262 Almería Ave.
Coral Gables*305-445-156l
Jack D. Norman, M.D.
848 Brickell Ave, #940
Miami*305-358-7110
Mel T. Ortega, M.D.
1110 Brickell Ave, #206
Miami*305-374-2929
Myron M. Person, M.D.
2912 SW 27th Ave.
Coconut Grove*305-567-2889
Luis A. Picard-Ami Jr., M.D.
11760 Bird Rd, #452
Miami*305-228-6055
Lance P. Raffle, M.D.
4302 Alton Rd, #620
Miami Beach*305-538-8658
Alan S. Rapperport, M.D.
6280 Sunset Dr, #501
Miami*305-666-1352
Joel L. Roskind, M.D.
7400 N. Kendall Dr, #518
Miami*305-670-1003
Pamela B. Rosen, M.D.
1401 University Dr, #300
Coral Springs*954-341-8907
Robert E. Rothfield, M.D.
1845 N. Corporate Lakes Blvd.
Weston*954-389-7999
Harris Shampain, M.D.
2253 N. University Dr
Pembroke Pines*954-963-3003
Blane T. Shatkin, M.D.
1604 Town Center Blvd, Ste. C
Weston*954-384-9997
Marvin M. Shuster, M.D.
4001 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood*954-96l-5500
Leonard A. Roudner, M.D.
550 Biltmore Way, #890
Coral Gables*305-444-8585
Alan S. Serure, M.D.
7300 SW 62nd PI, #200
South Miami*305-669-0184
Michael D. Storch, M.D.
21110 Biscayne Blvd., #103
Aventura*305-932-3200
Seth R. Thaller, M.D.
l6ll NW 12Ave,JMH
Miami*305-585-5798
Edward S.Truppman, M.D.
2999 NE 191 St, PHI
Aventura*305-937-6471
Bernabe Vazquez, M.D.
366l S. Miami Ave, #508
Coconut Grove*305-858-8222
S. Anthony WoHe, M.D.
1444 NWl4th Ave.
Miami*305-325-1300
Thomas Zaydon Jr., M.D.
3661S. Miami Ave, #509
Miami *305-856-0338
Peter J. Simon, M.D.
3201 N. Federal Hwy, #302
Ft Lauderdale*954-568-1010
James D. Stem, M.D.
1150 N. 35th Ave, #550
Hollywood*954-987-8100
Vernon P. Turner, M.D.
3536 N. Federal Hwy, #100
Ft Lauderdale*954-568-3031
Harlan I. Wald, M.D.
3700 Washington St, #404
Hollywood*954-963-4800
Bose Yalamanchi, M.D.
985 University Dr
Coral Springs*954-344-4555
Donald Zelman, M.D.
201 NW 82 Ave, #102
Plantation*954472-4600
Q
•Select members participating in this Public Education Campaign to promote quality in plastic surgery.
Miami Newt Times g June 17 23,1999 51


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Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-674-0709.
Tango Argentine: Take this group class and learn all
the right moves. $10. Every Thursday at 8:00 p.m.
and Monday at 9:00 p.m. Gil Santos Dance Studio,
350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Friday, June 18
Belly, Flamenco, Salsa, and Merengue Dance:
Professional dancer Middy Garcia teaches you hip¬
shaking, foot-stomping moves. $15 registration fee
and $6-$10 per class. 6:30,7:30, and 8:30 p.m. Dance
and Body Studio, 10370 W Flagler St; 305-2230316.
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents Jazzdance
by Danny Buraczeski, featuring a piece inspired by
the novels of James Baldwin and works set to tunes
by composer Philip Hamilton and jazz musicians
such as Ornette Coleman, Billy Strayhom, Duke
Ellington, Artie Shaw, Brave Old World, and Benny
Goodman. $20.8:00 p.m. Colony.Theater, 1040
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-3350.
Hecho en Miami (Made in Miami): Learn salsa, casino,
and merengue steps at this new nightclub. $10.7:00
to 9:00 p.m. tonight, Monday, and Wednesday.
Timba, 2898 Biscayne Blvd; 305438-0500.
Latin Dance with a Uve Band: Swing or salsa to the
sounds of a live band. $1.6:00 p.m. 21st Street
Recreation Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach; 305-6737784.
Salsa for Beginners: Novices can learn to move to the
hot Latin beat $10.7:00 tonight 8:00 p.m. Monday
and Wednesday. Gil Santos Dance Studio, 350
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Saturday, June 19
Afro&iban and Latin Dance: See Thursday.
Afro-Cuban Dance: See Thursday.
Beginners Belly Dance: Tamalyn Dallal teaches the
hip-shaking basics today at 12:30 p.m. and Tuesday
at 7:30 p.m. $10. Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350
Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach; 3035331608.
Belly Dance Class for Beginners: Kahreen teaches you
the basics, including transitions and choreography,
in this twelve-week workshop. 10:30 a.m. Miami
Shores Community Center, 9617 Park Dr, Miami
Shores; 3037540258.
Capoeira: Self-defense master Delei leads this class
on the Brazilian martial art/dance. $15.4:00 p.m.
today, and 7:00 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Gil
Santos Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 318,
Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Capoeira Angola Style: Mestre Caboquinho teaches
you this mix of martial arts and dance. $15.5:00 to
6:30 p.m. today at Mideastern Dance Exchange (350
Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach) and 7:30 to 9:00
p.m. Monday and Wednesday at International
Language School (2469 Collins Ave, Miami Beach);
303551-5821.
Capoeira Dance: Get in shape by learning the
rhythmic Afro-Brazilian martial art $10. Noon every
Saturday. Miami Folkloric Institute, 2772 SW 8th St,
ste 202; 303642-8889.
Dance Now: The fourteen-member modem, ballet,
and jazz dance troupe created by Hannah
Baumgarten and Diego Salterini presents four world
premieres as well as one United States premiere
during this program. $12.8:00 p.m. Performing Arts
Network, 555 17th St Miami Beach; 305-672-0552.
Flamenco Dance Classes: Juana Magdalena, director
of Gypsy Fire, shows beginning and intermediate
students how to improve their flamenco moves. $12.
4:00 p.m. every Saturday. In Motion Dance Center,
4542 SW 75th Ave, South Miami; 3036334061.
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents a
performance by the Le Jeune Ballet de France, a
professional youth training company founded by
Robert Berthier with the help of Rosella Hightower,
former prima ballerina for the New York City Ballet
$15.8:00 p.m. Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 3036743350.
Haitian Dance: Move to the beat of a live drum while
Manno Merisier, former member of the Haitian
National Dance Company and student of Katherine
Dunham, teaches you dances such as the snake,
spider, and warrior. $10.4:00 p.m. today and 7:00
p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Iroko Dance and
Performance Center, 1860-A West Ave, Miami
Beach; 305-6049141.
Intermediate Belly Dance: Tamalyn Dallal leads this
workshop for experienced dance students. $10.2:30
p.m. Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd,
ste 505, Miami Beach; 3035331608.
Orisha Dances: To the beat of live drums, dancer
Elena Garcia, former member of the Folkloric
National Company of Cuba, leads this class in the
movements associated with the orisha Oshun. $12.
Noon. Iroko Dance and Performance Center, 1860-A
West Ave, Miami Beach; 305-6049141.
Sal sad se: See Thursday.
Saturday Evening Dance: Make Mends with other
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* Well, they ore on certain issues,
but maybe not on others.
How about the Cuba-Cubans issue, for example?
Miami NewTimes June17 - 23,1998 53
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54 June 17-13,1989 Miami Nmr Times


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Spiritdance; Fatima Gueye hosts ah Afro-Cuban
dance workshop. $5. Every Saturday at 4:00 plm.
21st Street Community Center, 2100 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; 305635-2839. .V •
Strictly Passion, the Tango Buffet Dinner, Dance, and
Shew: Take a group dance class, partake of food, and
watch «killed dancers move. $12.7:30 p.m. every \
Saturday. Polish American Club, 1250 SW 22nd Ave;
3052676923.
Swing/Disco Classes: TeachersfromSalsations Dance
Productions show you the way to move. $10.7:30
p.m. every Saturday. In Motion Dance Center, 4542
SW 75th Ave, South Miami; 3056334061.
West African Dance and Percussion: Corina Fitch
teaches you the rich dance-drumming traditions of
the Anlo-Ewe people of WestAfrica. $10-$15.2:00 to
4:00 p.m. Iroko Dance and Performánce Center,
1860-A West Ave, Miami Beach; 305604-9141.
Sunday, June 20
Bringing Back the Big Bands: Enjoy refreshments, win
door prizes, and learn to swing dancé to music by
the Swingables. $Í0.6:15p.in. every Sunday. Pofisli
American Club, 1250 SW 22ñd Ave; 3052676923.
Florida Dance Festival: In collaboration with Flu’s
Intercultural Dance and Music Institute the festival
presents Fiesta African y Caribeña an AfroCaribbean
inspired-program featuring the African American
Dance Ensemble and the flé-Ifé AfreCuban Dance
and Music Ensemble. $15.760,p.m. Colony Theater,
1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-3350.
Israeli Dancing See Thursday.
Salsa Casino Dance Studio: Leant those hot salsa steps
at this weekly beginning, intermediate, and
advanced salsa and rueda workshop. $8.7:00 put. f
every Sunday and Tuesday at Ballet Concerto (4186
,.SWvZ4th Ct), and 8;00-p.mrevery Monday at Cream
(601 Washington Ave, Miami Beach); 305207-3600:
Salsa on the Beach: Dancer Luz Pinto leads this
workshop on salsa casino. $10. Every Sunday at 6:30
p.m. Performing Arts Network, 55517th St, Miami
Beach; 305868-9418.
Sunday Evening Dance: Twirl around the dance floor
and groove to the music of a live band. $1.7:00 pjn.
North Shore BandshcD, 7275 Collins Ave, Miami .
Beach; 305993-2001.
June 21
Advanced Belly Dance: Kahreen, Kira, and Helena lead
this class for advanced-level dancers. $8.7:00 pun.
Miami Shores Recreation Center, 9617 Park Dr,
Miami Shores; 3057586103.
Belly Dancing with Muja: See Thursday.
Capoeira: See Saturday.
Capoeira Angola Style: See Saturday.
Country Line Dancing by Pat Cocchi: Cocchi, half of the
Kismet Dancers, leads a beginner and intermediate
workshop. $5.10:30 a.m. Miami Shores Recreation
Center, 9617 Park Dr, Miami Shores; 305754-0258.
Haitian Dance: Sec Saturday.
Hecho en Miami (Made in Miami): See Friday.
Salsa Casino Dance Studio: See Sunday.
Salsacise: See Thursday.
Salsa for Beginners: See Friday.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: See Thursday.
Swing and Latin Dance: Learn exciting dance moves
with The Best of Times. $10.7:00 p.m. every
Monday. LaSalle High School cafeteria, 3601S
Miami Aye; 3052676923.
Swing Workshop: Angel Arroyo teaches you the wild
steps of the swing era; $10.8:30 p.m. Peaches
School of Dance, 16378 NE 26th Ave, North Miami
Beach; 305949-7799. ' '
Tango Argentine: See Thursday.
Tuesday, June 22
AfreCuban and Latin Dance: See Thursday.
AfreCuban Dance: See Thursday.
AfreSamba Dance: See Thursday.
Ancient Art of Belly Dancing Practice your- Egyptian-
" style shimmies and hip movements with ethnic
dance instructor Evelyn Hamsey. $30 for six
lessons.:7:30 p.m. every.Tuesday. West Miami
Community School, 7525 SW241Ü St; 3052616383.
Beginners Belly Dance: See Saturday.
Brazilian Dance: See Thursday.
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents Florida
Dances, a showcase of works by Florida dancers,
students, and independent choreographers. $15. .
8:00, pjn. Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami i
Beach; 305237-3413.
Salsa Casino Dance Studio: See Sunday.
Salsacise: See Thursday.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: See Thursday.
Salsa Workshop: See Thursday.
Samba: See Thursday.
Strictly Passion, the Tango: The Best of Times teaches
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Eyelash Tinting
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305-261-6558 • 305-264-0567
Mon-Sat. 10am-7:3Qpm «' ¿uh 12-5pm
fei^-sís.
yoii Argentina’s romantic dance. $10.'7:30 p.m.
every Tuesday. Polish American Club, 1250 SW 1 i
22nd Ave; 3052678923.
Swing Night: Dancers Randy Adas and Luz Pinto offer
lindy swing lessons. $10:8:00 p.m. every Tuesday. .
American Classics Lounge, Dezerland Hotel, 3701
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 800404-7693. ,
Wednesday, June 23
Ballet for Adults: I lancer Pilar Saavedra, formerlyof
the Ballet de Santiago de Chile, offers these classes
for nimble adults. 21st Street Recreation Center! '
2100 Washington $vg, Miami Beach;1 tali'
305^673-7784 for details.
Ballroom Glasses: Tty,out anew dance step — tango;
merengue, cumbia, swing, cha-cha-cha — v¡ith a
’different class every six weeks. $10, Every
Wednesday at 8,30 pm Peaches School of Dance,
16378ÍNE 26th Jive, North Miami Beach;
50 >-949-7799
Belly Dance Intensive Workshop: Kahreen, Kira, and
Helena lead an eight-week workshop for
beginning /4njtefm.ediate students that will'cover! ,
everything from the basics to a complete
choreographed piece. §8;;7:00 p.m, Miami Shores
Recreátíon Genter,.9617 Park Dr, Miami Shores; .,
â– 30^758^103:
Capoeira: See Saturday.
Capoeira Angola Style: See Saturday.
Dance Aerobics: Geta workout while you listen to hip-
hop and club tunes. $3,5:30 p.m. 21st Street
Recreation Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 305-532 2839
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents the Mary
Street Dance Theater in an improvisational program
titled Food for Thought aná the Demetrius'Klein? ■
Dance Company performing Bella Dama and ,
Sokol/Falcon.'$i5;.8HÉ p.m. Colony Theater, 1040 ,
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;'305874335ff
Haitian Dance: See Saturday.
Hecho on Miami (Made in Miami): See Friday.
Intensive Belly Dance: Maria Jamal teaches this
â– 'workshop for experienced students. $TG: 6:30 p.m. 1.
Mideastem-Dance Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, sfe
,505, Miami Beach, 3Q5-538-16Q8
Salsacise: See Thursday. ..i
Salsa for Beginners: See Friday.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: See Thursday.
Tango Argentino Dance Party: Practice the moves of
one of the world’s most elegant and sensual dances.
$10 Dance classes from 8 30 to 9.30; dance starts at
,9:30 p.m. every Wednesday. Elks Club, 2916 Ponce
deLeon Blvd, Coral Gables; 305446-9444.
Hotlines
AIDS Hotline: 305-325-1955 ,
Alcohol or Drag Abuse Hotline: 305892-8440
American Cancer Society: 305-5944363
American Heart Association: 305856-1449
American Red Cross: 305-644-1200
Crisis Intervention/Suicide Hotline: 305-358-HELP
Domestic Violence Hotline: 305-547-3170 ;
Drags, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens (The Village):
Families of Gays and Lesbians Helpline: (supppit and
information) 3054458445
Family Counseling Services: (in-home counseling for
people, with HTVj'305573-25001 ’;v
Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service: 800-3428011:
Florida HIV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English);
, 300-545-SIDA, (Spanish) i 800-AIDS-101 (Haitian
'Creole),
Habitat for Humanity. 30587(42224 ,'
Health Crisis Network/AIDS Hotline: 305-751-7751
(English); 305-759-1213 (Spanish)
Hepatitis-B Hotline: 800891^7.07 gg
Herpes Speakeasy Hotline: 3058955555
Homeless Hotline: 3§5]>7frH0ME
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 80O325FOOD
Immunization Info: 800-^32:2^2 (English);
81)0-232=0233 (Spanish)
Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami: 3054450555
March of Dimes National Resource Center:
888-MODIMÉS
Miami Bridge: (runaway, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 305-6358953
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â–² Doggie's
devotion saves
Wang’s hide-
and his dying art
The King of Masks,
Directed by
Wu Tianming.
Screenplay by
WeiMinghing.
Starring
ZhuXu,
Zhou Renting,
Zhang Riuyang,
and
Zhao Zhigang.
Twice Upon a
Yesterday.
Directed by Maria
Ripoll. Written by
Rafa Russo.
Starring Lena
Headey, Douglas
Henshall,
Penelope Cruz,
and Elizabeth
McGovern.
An Heir for Art
By Andy Klein
Second
Chances
By Jean Oppenheimer
Twice Upon a Yesterday seems almost too geared for
the Sliding Doors croará. By relying on the same
kind of conceptual sleight of hand as that recent
Brit hit (which owed a giant debt of its own to
Groundhog Day), this romantic fable’s sense of
originality and wit is greatly diminished.
Although it contains a couple of very different
and clever plot twists, Twice Upon a Yesterday
resembles its predecessor in too many ways. Set
in contemporary London, it features a lovelorn
Scotsman with an endearing brogue and revolves
around a “what if’ scenario, as in: “What if events
had gone in a different direction?”
Instead of two versions of the present running
side by side, the new film gives its protagonist the
chance to relive, and thus change, the past.
Disheveled, unemployed actor Vic (Douglas Hen¬
shall of Angels and Insects) and hospital psycholo-
gist-in-training Sylvia (Lena Headey of Mrs. Dal-
loway and TV’s Merlin) have arrived at the point in
their long-standing relationship at which she
wants more commitment and he wants less — a lot
less. Only after obtaining his freedom does Vic
realize he truly loves Sylvia. By then, of course, it’s
top late; she is about to marry David (Mark
Strong), a yoga enthusiast whom she met at a
health club. A distraught Vic gets drunk and falls
into the hands of two garbage collectors who magi¬
cally transport him back intime to the morning of
the breakup. With 20-20 hindsight Vic doesn’t
make the same mistake again. But will the course
of true love run any more smoothly the second
time around?
Parts of this picture are highly enjoyable,
though, as with Sliding Doors, one has to be some¬
what of a romantic to get caught up in it (unlike
Groundhog Day, which had such charm and
humor it appealed to cynics as well as to roman¬
tics). The film’s weakness lies partially with the
script, which makes Sylvia less sympathetic as the
story progresses, but also with the characters (or
perhaps it’s the actors) who prove only intermit¬
tently engaging. This is especially true of Hen¬
shall who, though he is playing a very different
Continued on page 60
port his family on academic lecturing fees, he
opened a video store in one of Los Angeles’s Chi-
nese-American suburbs. The King of Masks was his
first new production after his return to China.
The return isa triumphant one. Wu has fashioned
a completely accessible and heartwarming tear-
jerker. He transplants the classic Silas Marner
schfick (child warms the heart of crusty old man) to
the particularly brutal milieu of China between the
fall of the empire and the revolution.
The King of Masks is much more sentimental than
The Old Well, and it also has an apparent political
subtext. How can one not see Wu himself in the
story of an aging artist whose difficult mission is to
pass on his art to a younger generation? An artist
who is repeatedly beaten down by bad luck and
worse timing? Whose career is threatened by the
interference of callous government officials? It may
not have been his stated intent, but the events of
his life (however much transformed) certainly con¬
tribute to making The King of Masks such a wrench-
ing emotional experience. CD
While Hong Kong movies have been invading Hol¬
lywood through the success of Jackie Chan, John
Woo, Jet Ii, and others, mainland Chinese cinema
has invaded the classier neighborhoods of the film
industry during the past decade or so. The latest
contender is The King of Masks, an affecting melo¬
drama from veteran Chinese filmmaker Wu Tian¬
ming.
The title refers to Wang (ZhuXu), an aging street
performer who wanders the villages of 1930s China
displaying the dying art of “change-face opera” — a
sort of quick-change magic act in which a series of
masks magically appear nn his face seemingly
instantaneously and independently.
Wang is the last practitioner of this skill, which is
a closely guarded family secret But his only child
has long since died. A popular Chinese opera star
named Liang (Zhao Zhigang) offers Wang a place
in his traveling show, but Wang suspects (perhaps
correctly) that Liang is only interested in observing
him to ¿seem and steal his secret technique. When
Wang politely declines the offer (he and Liang both
speak in metaphors that couch all meaning, no mat¬
ter how hostile, into proper, “face”-saving dis¬
course), the younger man equally politely reminds
him that he isn’t getting any younger. If he doesn’t
pass his technique along soon, it will die with him.
Taking this to heart, Wang visits a neighborhood
where desperately impoverished parents sell chil¬
dren in order to purchase food for their remaining
offspring. He is charmed into buying Doggie (Zhou
Ren-Ying), an adorable seven-year-old boy with
whom he quickly forms a deep emotional bond. It
seems as though all his problems have been solved,
until he discovers Doggie is actually a girl, essen¬
tially less than worthless in that time and place.
Because Doggie has no place to go, Wang reluc¬
tantly allows her to stay on as his servant, training
her in Chinese opera skills without, however,
divulging his secrets to her. Her curiosity leads to a
series of catastrophes that bring the local
authorities down on Wang. Doggie’s
resourcefulness and devotion are the mas¬
ter’s only hope.
That director Wu is getting a relatively
wide American release at this stage of his
career is ironic: He is older and more expe¬
rienced than the so^alled Fifth Generation
directors such as Zhang Yimou (Raise the
Red Lantern) and Chen Kaige (Farewell
My Concubine), who have become art-
house staples. In fact, in the politically
volatile world of Chinese cinema, Wu
stands as one of the central pioneers who
enabled his younger colleagues to break
away from the ideological restrictions of
postrevolutionary mainland art
Bom in 1939 Wu is old enough to have
started his film career in the early 196Qs;
he was accepted as part of the fifth class
of the Beijing Film Academy. But then
came the Cultural Revolution, which shut
down the Academy and much of the film
industry, clothing what was left in an ide¬
ological and aesthetic straitjacket After
the Cultural Revolution ended, Wu was
able to codirect his first film, Reverberar
tions of Life, in 1979; in 1983 he made his
solo directing debut with River Without
Buoys, which garnered the sort of atten¬
tion (and awards) at international
film festivals that had evaded Chinese films
for decades.
Following that success-Wu was made;
head of Xi’an Studios, where he opened the
doors to a new crop of young filmmakers:
the first class to graduate from the Beijing
Film Academy since before the Cultural Rev¬
olution. (Rather than take new students each
year, the Beijing Film Academy teaches a
single class for years before starting the
next class; hence, the numbered genera¬
tions. The Fifth Generation studied from
1978 to 1982.) Zhang Yimou, Chen Káige¿ Tian
Zhuangzhuang (The Blue Kite), and Huang Jianxin
(The Wooden Man's Bride) were among those to
whom he gave a start ,
While his 1986 The Old Well greatly augmented
his international reputation, politics again derailed
his career. Wu was in the United States asa visiting
scholar during the Tiananmen Square incident in
1989. He chose to remain here until 1994, waiting
for things to settle down in China. Unable to sup-
It seems as though all his
problems have been solved,
until he discovers Doggie
is actualty a girl.
58 JMe 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times


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Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 59


Leaving Mike
Figgis
Jean Oppenheimer
Pretentiousness masquerading as profundity; self-
indulgence masquerading as art The Loss of Sexual
innocence, the dreadfrd new film from writer/direc¬
tor Mike Figgis {Leaving Las Vegas, One Night
Stand), joins the ranks of the worst films ever
made. A statement that may, on the surface, seem
harsh and heartless but that will probably strike
anyone who actually sees the picture as a gross
understatement
Presented as a series of snippéts from the life of an
English film director, the movie reveals the events
that have made Nic (Juhan Sands, still best known to
moviegoers for Room with a View) the man he is
today. All of the episodes involve sexual matters or
incidents equating the body with feelings of shame.
As a five-year-old living in Africa, Nic witnesses a
disturbing sexual situation in which a teenage black
girl, clad only in stockings and underwear, reads
aloud to an elderly white man. As a self-conscious
twelve-year-old back in Britain, the schoolboy is
shamed by his gym teacher and taunted by class¬
mates because he is overweight. At age sixteen,
now slim and attractive (in the person of Jonathan
Rhys-Meyers, most recently seen in Velvet Gold¬
mine) but still quite shy, he explores his budding
sexual feelings with his hesitant and rather rigid
girlfriend. Even the scenes of Nic as an adult depict
a certain dysfunction and unease surrounding sex,
as he is trapped in a troubled marriage with a
woman who drinks to drown her unhappiness and
who dreams about stripping in a nightclub while an
oblivious Nic plays the piano.
These sequences are intercut with scenes of
Adam and Eve (naked throughout the film) and
The question that keeps running
through the viewer’s mind is,
Whatw
Figgis thinking?
â–  â– 
their fall from grace. After rising from a lake as fully
mature adults, they meet each other, explore their
new surroundings, happen upon a tree bearing (for¬
bidden) fruit — complete with a snake slithering
around the trunk — and discover sex, before they
are driven, frightened and shamed/out of the Gar¬
den of Eden. Oh, puhlease.
The different episodes are preceded by written
"titles. Adam and Eve appear under the heading
“Scenes from Nature.” Another chapter is íabeled
“Twins” and features Saffron Burrows (Circle of
Friends) playing twin sisters who are separated at
birth. One is raised in Britain, the other in Italy;
they pass each other in an airport The characters
in this very long sequence seem to have; dropped
out of a Calvin Klein advertisement. They are all
sun-drenched, beautiful specimens with bored
expressions mid an air of enveloping narcissism.
The significance of the twin theme is unclear, but
then the entire movie is so tedious and pedantic one
doesn’t waste much time mulling the
possibilities. The question that keeps
running through the viewer’s mind is,
What was Mike Figgis thinking? There
have been some truly awful movies
over the past few months (Welcome to
Woop Woop and 200 Cigarettes spring
to mind), but none have been as
affected or self-reverential as this one.
Even on the most basié storytelling
leygl the film falters. Why give Nic
blond hair a& a child and again as an adult, but not
as a teenager? The five-year-old is not referred to by
name in the opening sequence, so when Rhys-Mey:
ers pops up in the next scene and is addressed as
Nic, it’s not at all clear that this is supposed to be
the same individual we saw earlier. A little later a>;
very blond Julian Sands appears, followed by a
scene of a pudgy twelve-year-old with brown hair
who looks nothing like the angiilar, poutishly hand¬
some Rhys-Meyers. Would it have been so difficult
to give each actor .the saitie hair color?
Benoit Delhomme’s cinematography is the film’s
one praiseworthy feature. Shot in Superl6 format
and developed using an assortment of photographic
processes, the film proves visually arresting* veer¬
ing from highly textured, washed-out images to
bold, saturated colors of almost carnivorous inten¬
sity to moody infrared landscapes. The one cinema-
graphic misstep is the reliance on a hand-held cam¬
era, which draws even more attention to the film’s
overly calculated, artsy feel.
The music also proves unüsually annoying. Fig¬
gis, an acclaimed composer and jazz musician, has
selected several grating piano pieces (by Mozart
and Chopin, no less) whose simplistic, sing-song
repetition' of flotes would constitute cruel and
unusual punishment if piped into a prison yard.
(Somebody, please, shoot the piano player!) ;
, Figgis’s work has goné steadily downhill ever
since his impressive feature debut, Stormy Monday,
a hypnotically atmospheric film starring a sultry
Melanie Griffith. For this reviewer nothing has
come remotely close to that achievement; not the
popular Internal Affairs and.certainly notLeaving
Las Vegas, despite the rash of accolades and critics’
awards it received. Even die-hard fans will be shak¬
ing their heads over this latest work. Figgis has
said The Loss of Sexual Innocence is his most per¬
sonal movie (the similarities between the director
and Nic aretoo obvious to be dismissed anyway),
but what a pity that his worst film should be the one
with which he most closely identifies. CD
Chances
Continued from page 58
personality type, pales in comparison with the
irresistible John Hannah of Sliding Doors.
Shot in England with a predominantly British
cast (exceptions include Elizabeth McGovern
and Spanish actress Penelope Cruz), the film
was actually written, directed, and produced by
Spaniards. Maria Ripoll, who studied directing at
the prestigious American Film Institute and is a
highly regarded television director in her own
nation, makes her feature debut withTiw'ci[Upon
60 June 17 - 23.1999 Miami NOW limes
a Yesterday and shows á sure hand With both the
surrealistic aspects, of the story (most notably
the Don Quixote- and Sancho Panza-inspired
trashmen and their fantastical garbage dümp)
and the more mundane romantic developments.
The junkyard sequence is, without quéstion, the
most bewitching in the film.The garbagemen (six--
teenth-century Spanish figures living ihfnódéfhday
London) have transformed their workplace into a
whimsical playground of discarded refrigerators and
dishwashers. The sense of wonder and magic that
infuses this scene isn’t replicated anywhere else, but
then Spanish novelist/songwriter Raía Russo, mak¬
ing his debut as a screenwriter, clearly wasn’t trying
-to fashion another like Water for Chocolate. That’s
somewhat of a pity, as the scene casts a spell that the
rest of the film fails to match.
While not living up to its similarly themed pre¬
decessors, Twice Upon a Yesterday is an accept¬
able addition to the canon of romantic comedies
and may be just the ticket for viewers hungry for
light fare with a romantic bent. And who among
us hasn’t wished we could travel back in time and
change the past? CD
The Loss of Sexual
Innocence.
Written and
Mike Figgis.
Starring
Saffron Burrows,
and


Film
¡§j
F i I
m
Capsules
Unless otherwise noted, the following capsule reviews are written and initialed
by Robert Abele, Andy Klein, David Kronke, Peter Rainer, Michael Sragow, and
Scott limberg. (Unsigned capsules are fer movies that have not been
reviewed.) For information about movie times and locations, see “Stiowtimes"
or contact local theaters.
understand. No one expected or even wanted fidelity to all of
Burroughs’s pulpy twists and ideas. But this film reworks the theme
into one of the most maddening of modem formulas: the Search for
the Father’s Approval. Still, on the whole, this Tarzan is a fine
entertainment value. Most kids will love it, and it won’t leave adults
fidgeting. It’s beautifully made (considering the literally thousands
of names that crawl past in the end credits, it better be) and
drencjied in deep, rich emerald, with sinuous tracking visuals driven
forward by pleasantly African-flavored songs from Phil Collins. Tony
Goldwyn provides the voice-of the title character, and Minnie Driver
is a charming, nonsyrupy Jane. The voices of Glenn Close, Rosie
O’Donnell, Lance Henriksen, Nigel Hawthorne, Brian Blessed, Alex
D. Linz, and Wayne Knight are also featured. Directed by Kevin
Lima and Chris Buck. (M.V. Moorhead)
Twice Upon a Yesterday (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Ongoing
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13): This sequel to the
shockingly successful Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery kills
whatever charm the first movie had by recycling its few serviceable bits
and filling the other 85 or so minutes with a dreary series of celebrity
cameos (Tim Robbins as the president?!), product plugs (Virgin
Megastpre, Philips Electronics), dick jokes, and extended explorations of
the humorous side of the bowel. This time Austin’s nemesis, Dr. Evil
(also played by Mike Myers) creates a time machine that allows him to
travel back to 1969 to steal the frozen Austin’s mojo, the mysterious force
that drives his libido. A flaccid 1999 Austin follows Dr. Evil in his own
time machine a psychedelic-painted VW Beetle7— to get back his mojo
Openings and Revivals
Dance maker (U): Early in his career, when asked to outline his
choreographic credo for a book on modem dance, Paul Taylor self-
effacingly deflected attention from himself by crediting his dancers.
But within the ego-driven realm of American modem dance (in
which companies are founded to cany the name and perform the
works of an individual choreographer), it was only a matter of time
before Taylor achieved living-legend status and became a prime
subject for a movie about himself. Matthew Diamond’s regally titled
documentary skillfully avoids mythologizing either the man or his
works, presenting the good, bad, and ugly with equal weight, from
Taylor choking up over the remembered death of a past company
member to him unflinchingly firing one of his current dancers (“I do
what I want,” he explains). Ostensibly a chronicle of Taylor’s career
path from boy to artist, the film goes judiciously light on
biographical details (we learn merely that Taylor resented his foster
child upbringing) and heavy on mesmerizing performance footage,
shot both backstage and on; only occasionally is the effect made
dizzying through an overabundance of camera angles. Fittingly
enough, though, the film’s most telling moments focus on the
company dancers .themselves and their mixed reverence and dread
toward the deadpan, fiercely alienated man they unanimously
considec“the greatest living choreographer.” The tone of
unquestioning adoration is lightened by Diamond’s ability to depict
the dancers as füll-fleshed personalities who can both obsess over-
pleasing their idol and mentor during rehearsal and then stuff
themselves with hors d’ oeuvres at a Swanky postperformance party.
An ominous but realistic view of the funding situation for dance
threads its way throughout, making Dancemaker an honest and
empathetic record of both a specific, spectacular choreographer and
the endangered world of American modem dance. (Rachel Howard)
The General's Daughter (R): Director Simon West (Con Air) likes the
kind of closeups that bore into an actor's face, exposing every
clogged pore and mascara smudge. In his new thriller, starring John
Travolta and Madeleine Stowe, his camera also tracks in to capture
the thick layer of sweat coating the skin of both officer and enlisted
man on duty at Fort MacCallum in the remote bogs of coastal
Georgia, where the. action is set. Travolta plays Paul Brenner, a
good-ole-boy detective with the U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigation
Division. He boasts a thick-as-gravy Southern accent, the stump of a
stogie, and a shit-eatin’ grin. No sooner is he finished with one
undercover job than an even bigger one lands in his lap. Because of
the special circumstances of this murder, Brenner is joined in the
investigation by a rape specialist with CID named Sarah Sunhill
(Stowe). From the moment Sunhill comes onboard, it becomes clear
that she and Brenner are anything but strangers. For the audience
this is a blessing, because the hanter between them makes their
scenes together the funniest and the sexiest in the film. As Brenner,
Travolta may look heavier than usual and rumpled from the
humidity, but the actor has seldom been sharper or more focused on
his work. Both physically and intellectually, Tie’s a formidable
presence. His first meeting with James Woods, who plays everyone’s
primary suspect, is a tour de force for both performers and easily the
movie’s most electrifying scene. In general it’s good that the level of
the acting in the film is so high, because the further we are drawn
into the story, the more preposterous and less satisfying the movie
becomes. To his credit West and his collaborators (cinematographer
Peter'Menzies, Jr., and production designer Dennis Washington)
have given the film a beautiful, haunted look, in which the landscape
séems almost to be rotting before your very eyes. This, together
with Carter Burwell’s destabilizing, gutbucket-blues score, makes
nearly every frame seem eerie and threatening, as if at any moment
violence is ready to spring. (Hal Hinson)
KingofMasks (U): Reviewed in this issue.
The Loss of Sexual Innocence (R): Reviewed in this issue..
Tarzan (G): Disney’s latest animated extravaganza is an adaptation of
the perennial Tarzan of the Apes, by Edgar Ripe Burroughs, the least
politically correct of popular American authors, yet somehow most
of the author’s racial and social elitism has béen drained from the
story. So, alas, has much of the passion. It’s been pointed out that
mothers don’t get much play in the world of Disney animated
fantasy: They’re usually either absent altogether, as in The Little
Mermaid, Aladdin, and Beauty and the Beast, or they’re minor
background figures, as in The Lion King. The bottomless,
courageous devotion of Kala, Tarzan’s adoptive ape-mother, to her
foundling son might partly have redressed this gap, but Kala
remains a recessive figure here, and the story focuses on Tarzan’s
conflict with the ape-clan ruler Kerchak, who, believing that Tarzan
is a threat to the-safety of the gorillas, is no longer so much a
menace as he is one more hard-ass Dad who just doesn’t
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A FILM BY MATTHEW DIAMRND
I.DAN CEMARHf.ORG
Alliance Cinema 927l«ohRaad#119/MbriBeadi*Calfortmes305/531-8S04
from the director of “leaving las vegas
I “Mesmerizing! Sex, guilt, violence...
The sour fruit of original sin! It’s
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the loss of sexual innocenc
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Starts Friday, (une 18!
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and stop Dr. Evil’s plan to hold the world hostage witha •
giant, moon-based laser. Created by physicist Alan Parsons,.
, die laser is .called-— you guessed it-r-the Alan Parsons
Project Whatis new hére is fliinner, more predictable, arid
far more coarse than the first dim. (In one scene Austin _
winds up drinking from ’a coffee cup filled with diarrhea,
which leaves,his upper lip covered in the liquid brown.) The
rest borrows wholesale from the previous movie; if you liked
a gagfrom the first, don’t worry, because it shows up four
more times in this one. (Patrick Williams)
Besieged (R): Bernardo Bertolucci’s Besieged is a movie of
enthralling visual poetry. Set almost entirely inside a
ravishing Roman villa, itis alove story played out in furtive
glances and stolen looks, by characters on opposite sides of •
the ethnic divide. Culturally Mr. Kinsky (David Thewlis) and
Shandurai (Thandie Newton) couldn’t lie-more different
Kinsky is an accomplished pianist who dedicates himself
completely tohismusic. By day Shandurai, who immigrated
to Italy from her African homeland after the imprisonment of
her husband, works as a cleaning woman fqr Mr. Kinsky; at
right ^ attends university in order to complete her
: medicaljfegree. While Shandurai goes about her chores, the
reclusive Kinsky practices his (nano, filling the villa with
exquisite music. What soon becomes clear, though, is that
Kinsky is trying to make contact with the young African
beauty, and rather than do so directly, is attempting to.reach
out through his music. Bertolucci has never worked with the'
. simplicity, discipline, or subtlety that he shows here. The
impact of Besiegedis that of a short story. Stifi, Bertolucci and
his coscenarist Clare Peploe, have built a political dimension
into the developing relationship between the protagonist^
placing pointed emphasis on the fact that Kinsky is from the
West and Shandurai from the emerging Third World. The <
atmosphere that Bertolucci has created is ratified and
cultured without being enervating. As Shandurai, Thandie
Newton is a revelation. She is a fearless,-electrifying actress.
And David Thevdis works with tremendous simplicity and
authority. When he sits at the piano, you feel as if you can
read the music in his face, and whenheis with Shandurai,
- his fragility and openness are heartbreaking. (Hal Hinson) ;
Black Mask (IQ: Tracy (Karen Mok) gets a crush on Tsui (Jet
i Li), ashy, mild-mannered librarian. What she doesn’t know .
is that Tsui is a survivor of a secret government experiment: |
to create supersoldiers who can feel no pain. Tsui shields his
• true identity from everyone, even his best friend (Lau Ching-
Wan), a cop moonlighting asa masked superhero named -
the Black Mask. When a group of his former comrades ;,
launch ah evil plot to take over the entire Asian drug
, business, Tsuimust stop the gang, which includes his
former lóvé (Franchise Trip), fotoe wake of Jet li’s American
success in Lethal Weapon 4, this 1996 Hong Kong film
(produced by Tsui Hark and directed by Daniel Lee) is .
being released in the States. like thejackie Chan films that
have come out here, it’s been dubbed, recut, and rescored;
' and, because the new version was not screenedtor the
press, this review is based on the original Hong Kong
version, ft’s far from Li’s best film, but it’s got its share of
good action scenes, Still both the script and the execution .
feel rushed, like so many Hong Kong productions of recent
years.-In many ways if s a better display of the talents of
costar Lau'Ching-Wan, who brings a touch of realism to
an otherwise Gomicibook endeavor (A.K.)„
Buena Vista Social Chib (G): Director Wim Wenders has
managed to éoqvey infectious, intoxicating joy in every
: frame of the ravishing documentary Buena Vista Social Club,
the German filmmaker’s most soulful film since Wings of •
Desi’re. The project came about as a result of American
musician Ry’.pqpdePs lifelong passion for Cuban music,
^ which in 199^ bore fruit as an extraordinary hit recording, _
that rescued the members of this exclusive “club” (many of
whom were in their seventies, eighties, and nineties) from
totd'obscurity¡,,Thé musicfeatüred in.this film is folk music
in the truest sense: If emerges directly from the lives of the
people who, perform it The songs speak with aweinspiring
Simplicity and honesty ofhearts that blossom with love and
the sorrow of love gone ^vrong. These are songs too, that *
are deepened by the lines in the singers’ faces, which
Wenders’s'camera captures with remarkable sensitivity.
Wenders and his crew1 not only watch as theserfiasters lay
down the tracks during their recording sessions, and as they
perform onstage before their transfixed fans; they also follow
the musicians to the neighborhoods where they grew up,
back to the streetcomers and crowded-apartments where .
they first learned the music as children at their father’s knee.
Many of the musicians áre unsurpassed in their field, almost
tp tito point of being living legends. Nearly eveiy musidaj)
has a story to tell. And. if the,personal stories and the music
weren’t enough to carry the film, the skill with which
Wenders and his cinematographers convey the richness of
Cuban street life almost causes us to forget we re watching
documentary. Just to see these musicians take the stage at '
Carnegie Hall is a sublime moment On an entirely different
level, though, the shots bf the musicianswandering the
streets of Manhattan, window-shopping andJookingout over
the cityfrom the top of the Empire State Building, isjust as
powerful. Wenders has already made two films about angels,
and, at times, Buena Vista Social Club almost qualifies as a
third. Or perhaps that’s just another way of saying it’s ~
heavenly. (Hal Hinson)
Endurance (G): Leslie Woodhead’s inspirational docudrama
tolls the story—part of it, anyway—of Haile Gebrselassie,
the great Ethiopian athlete who rose from poverty and
deprivation on a rural farm to become the greatest distance -
runner of all time. Using a slippery mishmash of new
interviews, “dramatic reenactments,” and borrowed TV
footage, the British filmmaker shows us a driven boy who
ran six miles each way to school before slaving in the fields
and hauling water, who overcame the resistance of a stem:
father and kept going for God, family, and country. In the
end, though, this rather listies&jaece of business does - -
justice to tiie hardships of Gebrselassie's youth but not the
achievements of his career. The man set fifteen world
records, but the movie focuses solely on his 10,000-meter
victory at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games—as’tfhewqjle
some boltfrom the blue who never broke a tape before or
since. The gorgeously sinuous footage of Haile’s Olympic
win, by the way, is not Woodhead’s work but that of the*. -
exemplary American Sports documentarían Bud Greenspan,
You’ll find yourself yearning for more of the man ándhis life,
hot to mention his speed. (Bill Gallo) &
Entrapment (R) : Sean Connery has always been a tersq, -
minimalist actor, spitting out his lines in tight bursts of
Scottish brogue. But in Entrapment, the tiresome new caper
picture frorri director Job Amiel, the kingly Scot goes beyond
minimalism to the point where he’s practically doing
semaphore with his eyebrows. As the legendary art thief %
Robert “Mac” MacDougal, Connery isn’t just reserved, he’s
comatose. The picture opens with Mac scaling a New York
skyscraper in order to steal a priceless Rembrandt Or at
least we think if s Mac. At any rate the heist catches the:'
attention of a foxy agent with a prestigious New-Yoik
insurance company. Gin (Catherine Zeta-Jones), it seems, .
has been on Mac’s trail for some time. She tells her boss (an
unusually sedate Will Patton) .she’s Sure Mac is the only man
alive with moves smooth enough to have pulled blithe
Rembrandt job and begs him to let her go after him. As
expected there is a bit of sexy banter between the ntale
and female leads, most of it barbed, all of it designed to
make it look as if the two can’t stand the sight of each
another. But there is noteven the slightest trace of
freshness or originality in either the script, which' was
written by Ron Bass and William Broyles, or in Amiel’s
stodgy direction. First with The Mask of Zorro and, now,
this, Zeta-Jones seems to' have proved that her talents '
extend to the decorative and no further. Her best scenes
here are the ones in which she gets to put her athletic
ability (and her pert bottom) on displaying Rhames â– 
has a small part (mercifully) as —we think-h-Mac’s
good friend. (Hal Hinson) ,
Get Real (R): With Beautiful Thing, Like It Is, and now Get :
Real, it would seem the British have the gay teenage
“comingnuf film down pat Maybe too pat Like its
; predecessors, this tale ofteenagelove is well shot* well
directed, and well acted. But the script (adapted by Patrick
Wide from his own play), though sometimes touching,
more often suggests the Afterschool Special That Dare Not *
Speak Its Name. A high school student (BenSilverstone);
remarkable for the ease with which he’s adjusted to his
sexual orientation, finds himself growing increasingly
impátient with a world that doesn’t have a place for him. -
Push comes to shove when he begins an affair with the
school’s serioqsly closeted Sports God (Brad Gorton), vhp’s
as terrified of himself as he is of letting anyone else know '
about the romance. Director Simon Shore gets a lot of
drapiatic mileage over the sight of the younger, slighter
Silverstone holding so much power over the slightly older :
and much larger Gorton. Amusing too is the hero’s best
friend (Charlotte Brittain) a gawky, overweight, but
alarmingly forthright and intelligent young woman who’s
wise to tiie fact that the course of true love never runs
smooth. Shore might have done better to build an entire film
around this character, whose personal and societal
difficulties kre far more severe than those of the lead couple.
Her dry asides pack- more punch than the big Telling the
-Whole School Gffspeech tiie hero gets. “I never knew you
were such a drama queen!” she quips. Better than Like Ills,
but not quite as good as Beautiful Thing, Get Real will
doubtless find favor with gay teenagers eveiywhere—
provided they can muster enough courage to go up to tiie jjf
box office and ask for a ticket (David EhrenStein)
Instinct (EO: In an early scene in the Jon Turfeltaub film
Instinct, the'brilliant primatologist Ethan Powell (Anthony
Hopkins) isbeing retifrned to the United States from
Rwanda, where -for several -years he has been engaged fora
close study of the mountain gorillas with which he lived.
While in the bush,,tiie doctor’s gorilla family is brutally
attacked’byta group of Rwandan rangers. Rather than allow
the animals to be slaughtered, PoweQ-springsto their
defense and, in the process, kills two of the rangers. As a
result he is incargeraieti in a maximum-security hellhole in
Florida, where he will remain until itis determined whether .
he is sane enough to stand trial. This task falls into the eager
hands of Theo Caulder (Cuba Gooding, Jr.), who sees the
Tiigh-proffle-Gaserashis ticket to media stardom. The bulk of
the filmis .comprised of fh^sessions between the ambitious
psychiatrist and his reluctant subject As the de-evojving
primatologist, Hopkins builds his character mainly out of
recycled bits from other performances, primarily The Silence
of the Lambs. And, ih the movie’s most ludicrous scene,
there’s even a tiny hint of Picasso as tile prisoner uses chalk:
62 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times


to sketch óüt the history of the world on the wall of his cell
With actors as dynamic as these two facing off against each
other, it’s impossible for the picture to be completely without
fireworks. But Gooding’s role is too dour for him to express
his lusty extroversion. And Hopkins is not phoning it in, he’s
sending it by Pony Express. (Hal Hinson)
Umbo (R): There are some things to like in John Sayies’s
Alaskan survival drama, in winch an ex-salmon fisherman
with guilty memories, an itinerant lounge singer with a lousy
voice, and the Singer’s melancholy teenage daughter do
battle with the forces of nature while stranded on a remote
island. The film has a contemplative energy you won’t find in
the summer blockbusters, and there are terrific
performances by young Vanessa Martinez, as the troubled
gir], and Kris Kristofferson, as a seedy bush pilot But the
rather urbane David Strathaim, as the fisherman, and Mary
Elizabeth Mastrantonio, as the neurotic singer, are badly
miscast Sayles (Matewan, Lake Star) also indulges in the
same blunt instructional tone that characterizes his weaker
films: We “learn” here that fish suffocate in air, people iff":'K*
water, and that most of us are caught in a limbo between a
past life and afuture One, or between alienation and love.
And (tiffs just in!) Alaska is America’s last frontier, where
people are constantly reinventing themselves. (Bill Gallo)
Lovers of the Arctic Circle (IQ: Two children (Sara Valiente and
Peru Medem) meet through bizarre, almost mystical
circumstances; as teens (Kristel Dias and Victor Hugo
Oliveira), they become lovers; and, as young adults (Najwa.
Nimri and Fele Martinez), they are parted They long to
reunite but, even as their paths continually cross, they
always seem to just miss connecting, until the very end—
the very ambiguous end. Spanish director Julio Medem’s
fourth feature (the first to receive distribution here) more
than fulfills the promise of his excellent debut, the 1992 Cows:
(yacas). The story is intriguing, but Medem’s prime
accomplishment is in the telling, not the plot The narrative
shuttles back and forth between the point of views of the )
main characters, presenting the couple’s history as
something of a jigsaw puzzle. Repeated images, themes, and
even words are studded throughout the movie in ways both
clever and evocative. It’s almost as though Medem decided
to retell the story of Vincent Ward’s 1993 Map of the Human
Heart with the technique of Jaco van Dormael’s Tota tire
Hero (1991). The central difference is one of tone Tote’s
basic worid view is comic; Lovers, tor all its cleverness and
wordplay, is for more grave. In general the comic view'
trumps die serious nine times out often. But Loners of tire
Arctic Circle is that other one out of ten; it earns its
gravity. (A.K.)
The Matrix (R): Stuffed full of fantasy comics, addicted to
action, and steeped in digital technology, the frenetic
moviemakers Andy and Larry Wachowski (Hound) have
done what-they must created an eyepopping, morph-mad,
quasi-mythical sci-fi flick that will thrill computer nerds as it
kicks serious ass. With its complex (sometimes opaque)
cosmology, this to a movie that, aisó presumes to think
deeply, but hard-core science fiction buffo will likely be more
impressed by that than die rest of. us. If shard to compete
with state-of-the-art effects, including some transcendent
kung fu stuff But the Wachowskis did sign on human stars.
Keanu Reeves, looking pale and desiccated, andLaurence
Fishbume, burly and booming, are rebels trying to destroy a
planetary illusion called the Matrix that has enslaved all
mankind. The filmmakers borrow from Orwell and Heinlein,
acknowledgeAffretn WonuMtouf, and ransack religious
myth, but the real fun lies in their fuMte visual and aural
bombardment Forget the philosophical mUmbojumbo and
enjoy the ride. With Carrie-Anne Moss and Hugo Weaving
(as the sinister villain Agent Smith). (BíffiGáHo) ,
A Midsummer Night's Dream (PG-13): Adapter-director Michael
Hoffman manages to have it both ways in his nineteenth-
century Tuscan version of Shakespeare’s lyric-romantic
masterpiece: the gauzy fantasy and the bacchanal Although
the film is traditional enough in approach to employ
Mendelssohn’s incidental music—as did Max Reinhardts
1935Hollywood version—it is still an original. Like
Kenneth Branagh’s screen Shakespeares, this Dream could
easily be underrated by highbrow critics as conventional, but
it is so only on its vigorous, accessible surface. Hoffman, like
Branagh, comes up with some truly inventive and startlingly
valid interpretations on the level of characterization and '
mood. Your heart may sink when you see fireflies buzzing
around under the opening titles, but that’s just a front; when
we finally get a look behind the glowworm disguise, we meet
a Puck (Stanley Tucd) with a perpetual “Who me?”
expression, a voluptuary bad boy caught with his hand dither
in the cookie jar or down someone’s blouse. And Hoffman
has reimagined Bottom and his fellow “rude mechanicals’ as
real comic characters rather than as broadly played clowns.
Kevin Kline makes Bottom lovable, complex,'and humanly
convincing. Handsome with an edge of shabbiness, he’s a
fatuous ass even before he’s transformed, and he’s
authentically romantic even with donkey’s ears growing out,
of his head. And in his most inspired bit of interpretation,
Hoffman allows Flute (Sam Rockwell) to become a good
actor in his final speech as Thisbe. It cuts the froth with a
whisper of romantic poignancy, and fi chases away four
centuries of aristocratic patronizatioa With Michelle Pfeiffer,
absurdly beautiful and beautifully absurd as Titania; Rupert
Everett as Oberon, Roger Rees as a diplomatic Quince;
wonderful Max Wright, attended by a sweet litfle terrier, as
Starveling; Anna Friel, Christian Bale, Dominic West, and
Cafista Flockhart as the lovers; David Strathaim as Theseus,
Sophie Marceau as Hippolyta, and Bill Irwin, Bernard £011,
Gregory Jbara, and John Sessions. (M.V. Moorhead)
Matting Hill (PG-13): Hugh Grant is charming, almost
charming enough to make one completely forgive the weak-
kneed celebrity wet kiss that substitutes for romance in
Nottihg HiU, the not-a-sequel-but-hopefully-it-feels-like-one
from the writing-producing teain responsible for 1994’s
surprise hit romantic comedy Four Weddings and a Funeral.
As in that film, Grant plays William, the peipctffally fumbling
hangdog Everybrit who has never quite found true love, but
finally might in the guise ofa darling American girL This
timé the darling American girl is the biggest movie star in
the world,-Anna Scott, cast appropriately enough as the
Pretty Woman herself, Julia Roberts. From the moment Anna
impetuously leaves William with a kiss and kindles a
romance — poof!— out of thin air Notting Hill rarely veers
fatefully far from its amusing but rote romantic-comedy
conventions. Julia Roberts, as Anna, might as well be sitting
down for á Vanity Fair interview and photo shoot as Julia
Roberts. She brings nothing to the role besides her own star
power. And when the film does try to offer a peek beneath
the surface image of The Movie Star, Anna comes off as an
utter bitch—at least that’s the impression gleaned from
scenes that don’t involve musical interludes and fuzzy
montages, and there are many. From theget-go, Notting Hid
never plays with its potential for satire; it barely even
acknowledges it, preferring instead to go straight for the
heart while bypassing the brain altogether. William simply
likes Anna for who she is. Okay. Fine. But the question
forever remains: Why? (Scott Kelton Jones)
Star Wan: Episode I-Hie Phantom Menace (PG): The prequel
glows with that hard-to-naü “Star Wars feeling,” the fairy-tale
sensation that hooked so many people the first time around,
and there’s no doubt this is the real thing, taken to a higher,
more frantic level But the “feeling" is dim and diffused, split
through a lens of Nineties crispness and detachment,
overworked and undernourished. The story revolves around
nine-year-old Anakin Skywalker, who will grow tip to become
Darth Vader, played wife surprising dexterity by Jake Iloyd.
like it or not, this is his movie. Lucas has recast his now-
familiar universethrough the eyes of ayoung boy, building
an elaborate playhouse where the fate of the galaxy hangs on
the things that a kid might think are cool Two Jedi, Qui-Gon
Jinn (Liam Neeson) and his apprentice Obi-Wan Kenobi
(Ewan McGregor, doing a perfect Alec Gtiinness
impersonation), are sent to settle a trade dispute involving
the teenage Queen Anúdala (Natalie Portman), whose planet
is being invaded by scrawny robots. From here Lucas
launches a relentless caper where every move becomes an
excuse for another elaborate action showstopper, an
underwater chase; or masterfully staged fight-saber duel, j
And then there’s Jar-Jar Binks. Voiced by Ahmed Best and
carrying the weight of “comic relief,” this wacky biped is
more Roger Rabbit than Chewbacca, and his incoherent
blathering reads like a desperate attempt for kids’ atfentioff.
The technical -advances of The Phantom Menace alone,
however, make it worthy of all the fuss, with CGI creatures
rubbing elbows with meat-covered actors in nearly every
scene, with planctwide cityscapes teeming with shadows and
traffic. Whafs really misdng can only be described as edge.
The casual abrasiveness that made the original trilogy’s :
heavy-handed mystical voodoo palatable is gone, replaced by
siOy whimsy and misplaced irony. (Glenn Gasfin)
The Winslow Boy (G): David Mamet, famous for his in-
your-face characters, his brutal, frequently raunchy
dialogue and his deliberate, staccato prose, would seem
an unlikely >ch(aice to write and direct a screen adaptation
of British playwright Terence Rattigan’s genteel drama
about injustice. But the Pulitzer Prize-winrúrig-authór
(for Glengarry Glen Ross) does a commendable job with
The Winslow Boy, bringing delicate emotion and
unexpected huinbr to the story. Set in 1910 Britain,: and
based on a real-life case, the story concerns a thirteen- *
year-old naval cadet who is expelled from school after
being found guilty of stealing a five-shilling postal order
from a classmate. Convinced of his son’s innocence, >
Arthur Winslow (Nigel-Hawthome) dedicates himself to
clearing his name, despite the financial and psychological v;
burdens it places on the family. When the country’s leading
lawyer, Sir Robert Morton Oeremy Northam), agrees to take
the case, Arthur must use his daughter’s dowiy money and
his elder son’s Oxford tuition to pay the bills: Mamet brings
a gentleness and what could almost pass for warmth to the
movie. (An earlier version was filmed in 1950.) He finds low-
key but credible humor in characters and situations, while
infiising the overall film with a courtly, empathetic tone.'
Hawthorne and Gemma Jones (as the mother) are terrific,
but the surprise htírefé Northam (Emma, The Net), v/ho
gives an uncxpectably nuanced performance, making
Morton both aloof and likable. As the daughter, Mamet’s
wife Rebecca Pidgeon creates a character that is a trifle too
modem; her cadence and manner of speaking are too
reminiscent of “Mametspeak,” the staccato rhythiff
associated with her husband’s work: The performance
isn’t bad but feels less a piece with the rest of the actors.
An ideal movie for audiences who like their films a bit
old-fashioned but still mainstream. (Jean Oppenheimer)
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in here
Life is
beautiful
Win a Day of Beauty!
SEASON SHOW
(NOW. 16-21. 16661
to be
announcedi
Oec. 21-26. 1666
• A pair of season tickets to the
Miami Beach Broadway Series.
• Salon package for two.
• Dinner for two.
• Overnight stay on beautiful
South Beach
Just tell us in 500 words or less What
Makes Your Life Beautiful. Fax your
essay, typed or handwritten, (neatness
counts), along with name, address and
phone number to (305) 571-7677
attn: life is Beautiful
r<£«ilSf tá ESSEX
MCA 1* HOUSE
I ^divine TUB SPA
f A* DOKAU
Winner will reoeive a prize package consisting of two season tickets to the five upcoming
Miami Beach Broadway Series shows at the Jaokie Gleason Theater (except Tony N* Tina’s
Wedding -venue TBA)
Tickets will be for the Opening Night of each performance and will inolude invitations for two
to attend an after-theater oast party (when one is scheduled). Tickets will be looated in the
lower orchestra section of the theater.
Winner is responsible for all other costs, fees, taxes or personal expenses that may be inourred
as aresult of using the prize. Prize is non-transferable and cannot be substituted. Performance
dates subject to theater’s finalized schedule.
Jan. 4-30. 2000
Venue To Be
Miaren 14-16. 2000
ladle Oleasen
TOeater
Anri! 4-6. 2000
Xaeatle Gleason
Theater
Los Angeles Film School
invites you to
Jain The Ñext IWave
A one-year, intensive filmmaking program
â–º Professional training by award-winning entertainment industry professionals
â–º Hands-on experience - make a minimum of four films in one year in digital, super
16mm and 35mm formats
^ America’s premiere professional training school for film, television and new media
â–º On campus state-of-the-art digital equipment and studios, sound stages, multi-track
sound mixing facility, AVID bays, THXstadium format theatre and moré
â–º Part-time Fall programs available
The
Los Angeles
Film School
Dede Allen:
Chris Blackwell:
Jackie Goldberg:
Amy Heckeriing:
Janusz Kaminski:
Thom Mount:
Adolfo Nodal:
Phillip Noyce:
Alan Rudolph:
Thomas Schatz:
Richard Sylbert:
Advisory Board
Academy Award®-nominated film editor of Dog Day Afternoon and Reds
Founder of Island Records and Palm Pictures
Los Angeles City Council Member
Director of Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Clueless
Two-time Academy Award®-winning cinematographer of Saving Private Ryan and Schindler s List
Former Universal Pictures President and producer of films such as Frantic and Bull Durham
General Manager of the City of Los Angeles’ Cultural Affairs Department
Director of mega-hits like Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger
Independent Spirit Award-nominated director of The Modems, Choose Me and Mrs. Parker and The
Vicious Circle
Chair of the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin
Two-time Academy Award®-winning production
designer of Dick Tracy and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf Also nominated for Chinatown, Reds,
Shampoo and The Cotton Club
■fumín eiii*e
iumwmihfc
IS DESTINY
6363 Sunset Boulevard "Hollywood, CA 90028"Phone: 877-9LA-FILM*Fax: 323-634-0044
For more information visit our website at www.lafilm.com
TM 1999 Hollywood Chamber of Commerce licensed by Global Icons, Los Angeles, CA 90034. All Rights Reserved, www.globalicons.com
Showtimes
Following is a schedule for movies opening and currently
screening at local theaters. All times p.m. unless
otherwise noted. A # indicates a movie that opens this
week. All movie times are subject to change without
notice; please call individual theaters to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Absinthe House
235 Alcazar Ave; 305446-7144
Cuban Women: Branded by Paradise (NR) Fri-Wed 6:15,.8:00
(Sat-Sun matinee 4:30)
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna St; 305443-6777
A Walk on the Moon (R) Thur 6/17 only 6:00,8:00
Besieged (R) Fri-Wed 6:15,8:00,9:45 (Sat-Sun matinees
2:45,4:30)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Grand Ave; 305466-0450
A Walk on the Moon (R) Fri-Wed 3:40,8:05 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:35a)
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 2:15,
2:45, 5:00,5:30,7:20, 7:50,9:40,10:05; Fri-Wed 1:00,1:45,
3:15,5:00,5:45,7:15,8:00,9:30,10:15 (Fri-Sat late shows
11:45,12:30a)
Resieged (R) Thur 2:30,5:50,8:00,10:10; Fri-Wed 1:20,
3:25,5:35,7:50,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Ruena Vista Social Club (G) Thur 2:50,5:20,7:45,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:05,3:20,5:40,8:05,10:25
Election (R) Thur 2:40,5:40,8:10,10:25; Fri-Wed 1:10,3:30,
5:55, 8:15 (exceptTue), 10:45
Endurance (G) Thur 2:30,5:30,7:30,9:30; Fri-Wed 1:05,
3:05,5:25,7:25,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Instinct (R) Thur 2:00,4:50,7:40,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:20,5:20,
7:45,10:40
Life Is Beautiful (R) Thur 2:40,5:40,8:20; Fri-Wed 1:55,
4:50,7:35,10:20-
Shakespeare in Love (R) Thur 6/17 only 2:15,4:50,7:40,
10:15
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 2:00,
2:30,3:00,4:45,5:15,5:45,7:30,8:00,8:30,10:45,11:15;
Fri-Wed 1:15,2:00,4:45,5:30,7:30,8:15,10:30,10:50
(Mon-Wed), 11:15 (Fri-Sun)
The Castle (R) Fri-Wed 1:35,6:00,10:30
*The Loss of Sexual Innocence (R) Fri-Wed 1:30,5:15,7:40,
10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
The Love Letter (Pfi-1 J) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:15,9:30; Fri-Wed
1:25,3:35,5:50,8:05,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Matrix (R) Thur 2:10,5:10,8:10; Fri-Wed 1:50,5:10,
8:10 (Fri-Sun late show 11:00)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:45,10:20; Fri-
Wed 1:40, 5:05,7:45,10:30
This Is My Father (R) Thur 6/17 only 2:00,5:00,7:40,10:30
•Twice Upon a Yesterday (R) Fri-Wed 1:15,3:25,5:50,7:55,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Le Jeune Cinemas 6
782 N Le Jeune Rd; 305-529-8883
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 1:35,
3:50,6:05,8:10,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 2:10,4:45,7:25,9:55 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:30,.
2:45,4:15,5:30,7:05,8:15,9:50; Fri-Wed 1:30,4:15,7:05,
9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 2:20,4:55,7:25,10:00
(Fri-Sát late show 12:15a)
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 2:15,4:50,7:20,9:55 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 6/17 only 2:30,5:00,7:30,
10:00
Miracle 10 at Paseos
3301 Coral Way; 305-442-2299
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:00,
2:10,3:10,4:30, 5:30,7:00,8:00,9:30,10:30; Fri-Wed
11:00a; 12:00n, 1:00,2:10,3:10,4:30,5:30,7:00,8:00,9:30,
10:30 (Fri-Sun early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late shows
12:00m, 1:00a)
Entrapment (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:05,4:15,7:15,10:15
Instinct (R) Thur 1:45,4:35,7:25,10:10; Fri-Wed 1:30,4:00,
7:10,9:50 (Fri-Sat late Show 12:30a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:25,7:20,10:00,10:05
(Thur)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:00,
2:00,4:00, 5:00,7:00, 8:00,10:00; Fri-Sun 11:00a, 1:45,
4:35, 7:30,10:25; Mon-Wed 12:00n, 2:30,5:00, 7:30,10:25
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:00,2:05,3:05,4:25,
5:25,7:00,8:00,9:30,10:30 (Fri-Sun early show 10:00a;
Fri-Sat late shows 12:00m, 1:00a)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 1:15,4:15,7:10,10:00
(Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
The Matrix (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:20,4:10,7:00,9:55
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45; Fri-Sun
1:00,4:00; Mon-Wed 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:10,4:45,7:35,
10:20
Regal Mayfair 10 Cinema
3390 Mary St: 305447-9969
A Walk on the Moon (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:00n, 2:15,4:30,
7:45,10:00
Entrapment (R) Daily 12:45,3:30,7:00,9:15 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:45)
Get Real (R) Daily 1:00,3:30,7:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show
12:15a)
•King of Masks (NR) Fri-Wed 12:20,2:30,4:45,7:30,9:30
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Lovers of the Arctic Circle (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:20,2:30,
4:45,7:00,9:15 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:15,2:30,3:45,5:00,7:00,
7:30,9:30,10:00; Fri-Wed 1:15,3:45, 7:00,9:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:00m)
Playing by Heart (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:00n, 2:45,5:15,7:45,
10:15
•Tarzan (G) Daily 12:00n, 12:30,2:00,2:30,4:00,4:30,6:00,
6:30,8:00,8:30,10:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Daily 12:15,2:45,5:00,7:30,9:50
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Castle (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:30,2:45,4:45, 7:15,9:30
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
•The General's Daughter (R) Daily 12:00n, 12:30,2:20,3:00,
4:45,5:20,7:15,7:45,9:45,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 12:15,1:00,2:45,3:30,5:15,7:15;
7:45,9:45,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15
Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr; 305-598-5000
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 12:05,
12:30,1:15,3:50,5:05,7:05, 7:35,9:45,10:10; Fri-Wed
11:20a, 12:05,1:45,2:35,4:10, 5:00, 7:10,7:40,9:40,10:10
(Fri-Sat late shows 12:10a, 12:40a)
Instinct (R) Thur 12:15,1:10,3:00,3:55,5:45,6:55,8:30,
9:40,11:15; Fri-Wed 11:25a, 12:00n, 2:05,2:40,4:45,5:20,
7:25,8:05,10:05,10:45 (Fri-Sat late shows 12:10a, 12:40a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 12:45,3:15,4:15,7:10,
7:40,10:05,10:35; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 11:45a, 2:00,2:30,4:50,
5:15,7:35,8:00,10:20,10:50 (Fri-Sat late show 1:05a) .
Star Wars; Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily 1:00,
1:30,4:00,4:30,7:00,7:30,10:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show
1:00a)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 12:30,4:10,7:15,10:15; Fri-
Wed 11:30a, 1:50,4:05,7:05,9:25 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Dr; 3054604)450
Analyze This (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:40,6:00,8:25
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:35,5:30,7:40,10:00
Doug's let Movie (6) Thur 6/17 only 1:55
Entrapment (R) Thur 1:40,5:25,8:00,10:20; Fri-Wed 1:30
(Fri, Mon-Wed), 2:00 (Sat-Sun), 4:45,7:25,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Life Is Beautiful (R) Thur 1:45,5:50,8:20; Fri 1:20,5:15; Sat-
Sun 10:55a, 1:20; Mon-Wed 1:20,5:15
Never Been Kissed (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 5:35,7:50
Shakespeare in Love (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:50,5:40,8:15
•Tarzan (fi) Fri-Wed 11:40a (Fri, Mon-Wed), 11:30a (Sat-
Sun), 12:45,1:45,3:15,4:30,5:35,7:15,7:55,9:30,10:15
(Sat-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 12:30,1:15,3:00,4:15,
5:20, 7:00,8:10,9:45,10:45 (Sat early show 10:30a; Sun
early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late show 12:05a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 1:50,5:45,8:05,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:00,5:40,8:00,10:10
The Matrix (R) Thur 2:00,5:45,8:30; Fri-Wed 1:10,4:20,
7:20,10:30
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:30,5:15,7:55,10:20; Fri 11:30a,
2:00, 5:00,7:40,10:20,12:40a; Sat-Sun 10:50a, 1:30,5:00,
7:40,10:20 (Satiate show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 11:30a, 2:00,
5:00, 7:40,10:20
Trippin' (R) Thur 2:00,6:00,8:10,10:15; Fri-Sun 7:50,9:50
(Fri-Sat late show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 11:50a, 1:50,7:50,
9:50
Movies at the Falls
8888 Howard Dr; 305-255-5200
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily
11:30a, 12:30,2:15,2:45,4:30,5:15,7:10,7:45,9:40,10:30
(Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Election (R) Daily 12:30,3:00,5:25,8:00,10:20 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Entrapment (R) Daily 12:40,3:15,5:30,8:00,10:30
Instinct (R) Daily 12:00n, 3:00,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 11:00a, 1:00,2:00,4:00,5:00,7:00,
7:50,9:45,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily
11:00a, 12:00n, 1:00,2:00,3:00,4:00,5:00,6:30,7:00,8:00,
9:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,12:20a)
•tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:10,3:20,5:30,7:40,9:50 -
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:15,4:15,7:30,
64 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times


'■10:15“ „:■
‘The General's Daughter (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:15,5:00,7:40,10:30
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 1 G0Í4 00 (Thur) 4 10,7 00 (Thar) 7,,
7'd0,J9’45 (Fn Sat late show 12 30a)
South Dade 8
18591 S Dixie Hwy; 3054664)450
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:30,4:30,^
' 7:30/19':,00;Fri-Wed 100, i 15,5 30,7 45,10 UO (Fri Sat 1 ite show
12:30a/ i
Entrapment (R)TR^)fl7 only 14ft 5,30,7.55,lif3G,r Í
Instinct (R) Thür2:00,:5:00/,7:50, MB Wed 1 "0 5 00 7 50
Netting Hill (PG-13) rhur 1 40,5 20.8 00.10 10, Fri Wed 150,510,
750,1035 )
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Ihur 130 2 30
4C 0 5 20 7 30 8 00, 10 li, 1045 FnWedl30 130 715,1000
(111 Sat late -.how 12 40a)
‘Tarzan (G) In 131 d 115 2 00 (Mon Wed) 2 50 (Tri Sun) 3 20
5 00 5 JO " 10 I 10 9 20 O >0 (Fri Sun niifljtol-Y 12.30; Fn-Sat „
late shows,U:30, . 12:00m), u
‘The General's Daughter (R) Fri Wed 1 15 (Mon W ed) 2:00 (Fri
Sun)¿4:30/7:íb,9:45'(Fri-'Satlate show:12:2ffá), jj
The Mummy (PGÍ3):S^^|li5^^PÜfS^|B»Íí^ffi|
10:-ÍO (FiiSat'lkte show l2;30a) ‘ ’
The Thirteenth Floor(iR)
Sunset Place 24
5101 SW 72nd St; 30546641450
AO indicates an IMAX film.
0Extreme (NR)-Dail\ 110 3 30 5 50 810,10 30 (Fn Sit Ute show
¿1:450-,
Olnto the Deep (NR) Daily 12 OOn, 2'2ft4 40,TOO, 3.20
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) rhur 12 45,120,
íleo 315 3 50 r 05 > 45 7 00 7 40 8 20 9 10 10 15 10 r0 Fn
Sun 1250,125 2 00 3 20 3 5i ^ 15 r45 705 745 820 9 F
10:15 10 55 (Fri Satiate show 12 05a), Mon Wed 100,1 30,2 00
3 20,3 50,5 25,5 55,715,7 45 8 20,9 40,1010,10 40
Glack Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only. 1:00,5:30,10:30
Ruena Vista Social Club (G)Thu'r 6/17 only 1:40,5-35.8 l'0,10:35
Election (R) Thurl 55 -500; f 3fl 9 55, Fn Sun 1,50 ¿4), 710,
9140 (Eri-Sat late show 12:00m);'Mon-We.d 1:50)5:40,8:15,10:30'
Entrapment (R) rhur 1,50 4 50,7 25, y 55; Fn-Sun 155,4 45 7 15,
4 45 (Fn-Sat late show 12 10a), Mon V, ed 1 r 5 15 7 40 10 00
Get Beal (R)lhur 130 510 735 1020 Fri-Sun 1 50 5 30,805
, 1040, Mon-Wed l:,40;-5;40 8:15,10:35 <
Instinct (R) Hiui 1255 l«ff|flt5 "15 7 55jmfi*^Kl
1 n Sun 12 55 1-35 3 50 5 10 7 25 8 05 10 25 10 50 (Sun) 114)0
(Fn-Sat late show 12 55a), Mon W ed 12 55 1 35 |BpBHpn8|S
8.05 1()2'? 10 50
life
Limbo (R) Thur 140,4:40,7 30,19:30- Fri-SUn 155,5'20,7>55, «
MS, Mon-Wed 1.55, gl$§Sí0;;Í0¡:4$= £
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12 40,115,¿55/3.35,4.40,5 2ft 7 05,„
7 45,8.15,10 05,10 40, Fn Sun 12 10, ‘UO 3 35 5.00,710 7 55
10:05,10.50 (Fri-Sat late show’12:40a); Mon-Wed 12:45,1:25,
msmSMmk&p is¡ 10 so
Shakespeare in Leve (R) Fri-Sat 12:55a
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Iliur 105 1 35,
3 40 4 20 1 55 6 45 7 20 8 00 9 50 10'25 1100 FnSunl230
100 130 3 40 4 20 4 50 6 45 " 20 8 00 9 r0 10 ?0 1110 (Fn
Satiate show J2;50a), Mon Wed 12 40,110 1 10 3 4Q 4 35.5 05.
705 " h 805 100r 1035 1100
‘Tarzan (G) Fri-Sun 12:45 1 15 1 45 315 3 4$, 5 05 5 40 6 50
7:30/8:10,9:30,-10:00,10:30 (FrhSat late, shotfs 11:55, É:25ah ,\
Mon Wed 12 50 1 20 1 50 3 15 ffiapWHf 10,7 40,8 10 i
TJO. I(f00 10 30 m
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Thur 5/17 only 150,4-35,7-25,10 05
‘The General's Daughter (R) Fn-Sun 12 35,1:05, I 4ft 3 30,4 30,
15:25,7.00,7:40,8:15,9:55,10.35,11:00 (Snn/ JfcOS (Fri-Sat late
show-12:45a); Mori-Wed 12:45,1:15/1^5,3^0,4:40,5:10,7:00/ -
í po/«:00,;9:|S,-10:15;TO:45' j
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 3:20,7:35
The Matrix (R) TTiur.l:25,4:3()(7;30/iQ;20; Fri-Sat 12:30a; Sui)
10 55, Mon Wéd 120,5*00,750)10 4ft,
The Mummy (PG-13) Ihur 12 50,1 |SnHH|flMm{
10:45; Fri-Sun'l-:40> 4:55,;7;33i-T0310 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); -
Mon-Wed 145,5 1ft ¿4ft Í0:20'r'
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur Í 0p,,5)ift9:4S; Fn-Sat 12-45a; Sun
1030; Mon-Wed 2:00,5:50r8:25,10:45
Beaches
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Ste 119; 305-531-8504
Beat the Devil (HR) Sun 12:00n ,
‘Dancemaker (HR) Fn-Wed ftOO/Sift^lftOO (Fri-Sun matinee
*4:00)
Pusher (NR) Thur 6/17 onIy'6:á)/8ÍtíO„lO.-O0
Bay Harbor IV
1170 Kane Concourse; 305-866-2441
A Walk on the Moon (R) Ihur 2 10 4 50 7 20 10 00 Fn Wed 2 10
4:50,7:3b,-10:10
Election (R) Thur 6/17 only 2-00,4.40,7:10 9 30' *
Instinct (R) Daily. 1:50; 43ft.m ft50
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 1-40 4:20>7:Q0,9-4O
‘The General's Daughter (H) Fn-Wedt 00,4l4ft 73b¿lft0O
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St 305-866-9623
Analyze This (R) Thur 145 4 45 7 45,10 Oft Fn-W ed 12 05 2 20,
4:45,7'45,/0:OOJ,í
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only
1:4ft 4:00,7:3ft, 9)50
Baby Geniuses (PG) Da|i$Hl£:lftr7:()l
Doug's 1st Movie (G) Daily 12 0On 145 i 30 5 30 7 1" 9 00 '
EDtv (PG-13) Daily 2T0>, 4:45,9.Í0
Forces of Nature (PG-13) Dailyl2;25,2:4ft 4:45,7:1*0, 9:35
Life (R) Ihui 6/17'onlv 120,3 50 7 Oft 9 10
October Sky (PG) Da#,12 20,-'2.30,4 40 7 10,9-30 J
Payback (ft) Dafly 12-30;í2:45,;5.<Í0,-$g0, 9-40, S'
Star Wars: Episode i - The Phantom Menace {PG) Iliur 6/17 only
1:15,4:15,7;J5,TQ:15,'» j.
The Matrix (R) Thur 6/17 only 115,4 00,7-10, 9,45 4
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only!:20/4:OO, 7:0ft, 930 ft.4/
The Thirteenth Floor (R) 1 hur 6/17 only 1 -iO ) 50 7 05 9 35
Twin Dragons (PG-13) Daily 12:1ft ¿00,4-00,7:00,915; *-
South Beach Cinema
1100 Lincoln Rd; 305-674-6766
A Walk on the Moon (R) Fri-Wed ftlft*ftlfl||ji%li 15
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Fri-Wcd 1:45,2:2ft -
345 4 45 5 55 7 20 8 20 10 45 (i m Sat late •-how® 12 00m,- ‘
-l-OOa)
Besieged (R) Fn-Well.40,3 50 5J5ft8 05,10,50 (Fn-Sat late '
shoiy 1*.£i3r'
Entrapment (R)Fri-Wed 1,50,4 20,7 35 1110 (Fn-Sat lab- show
/:50a)''1 ’
Get Real (R) Fri-Wed 2:35,4:50/7:5ft IO:20.(3Fn-Sat late show
12 55a)
Hideous Kinky (R) Fri-Wed 2:15,4:25/7:0519,30,11:50/.
Instinct (R) Fri-Wed 1:35,4:15,¿40; ¿1:5,5 /Fri-Sat late show ,
l;35aV j
‘King of Masks (NR) Fri-Wed 2 05.4 35 710 ig 05 (Fn-Sat late
show 12 50a)'
Notting Hill (PG-13)iFr^^(||||^^05,'7:2|Ml0^5 (Fri-Sat late
showiisa)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Fri-W¡3ft 1:00,2:00,
4 00,5=00 7'15,815; 1010,1140 (Fn.Satlateshow 130a)'c,;/
‘Tarzan (G) Fn-Wed l’lft&lft ¿lft 4-30 5:35,7:00,8:00,9:15,
-It) 15,11 30..-.
‘The General’s Daughter (R) Fn-Wed 1-30 2 10 4 40 5 40 7 3ft
brío;'¿p;40, fT:45 (Fri-Sat late show 1:40a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Fri-Wed 1:55,4 10.7 55,10 35 (Fi i Sat late
show 12-40®)
The Mummy (PG-13) Tn Wed 2 25 5 05 7 45 10 ¡0 (Fn S it late
showi-iSQi);
North Dade
Aventura 24 Plex
19501 Biscayne Blvd; 305-466-0450
A Midsummer Night's Dream (PG-13) 'tiuit/6/17 bftly 2iOO,'5:Q0/,, t
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 12:0Qft"i> â– 
(except Tbur) 12 45 1 30 215 3 00 3 4 4 45 5 20 6 00 7 00,
7 45 8 30 9 30' 10 15 10 40 (Ihur) 10 15 (S it Su n eariy shows
'Í0:30a, 11:20a; Fri-Sat late shows 12.00m, 12:3,5®) <
Baby Geniuses (PO) Thur TOO, 3T5,5-30, Fn-W^d 1.05,3-15 (Sat-
Sun early show 10'50a)
Black Mask (») Thur 6/17 only 1;20,3.25,5.35„8-05 jftT5 ,
Election (R) Thúr 6/17 oftilyí 50,4 35,7:0ft 3.25
Entrapment (R) Daily 105 °2" r50 620 10 40 (Ihur) 1045
•¡(Mon Wed), 10 55 (I n Sun)
Instinct (RJ Thur 11ft 2 45,420,5 -5,7 05,8.05» 9 50,10 40, Fi i ’
Sun 12 05,110, 2 45,4 20,5 25,7 05,8 05,9 50 10 10 (Sun)
-10 50'(Fn), 1150 (Sat) (Fn-Sat lale «.how 12 30a), Mon-Wed 1 lb,-,-:'
2:45,4:20,5:2ft'7»5/m/§%10:40
Life (R) Thur 1:50,5;20,ftl0, IQ 3ft Fn-Wed 1 00,5 40,10 25 ' ‘ ■
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12-45,1 lft2:30
700*745 8 25,9-40 1920 EriWedl23ff 225 3,lft5J0A§4g !-
7:45,8:25,1O;20 (Sat-Snn eariy shows 11:30k; Fri-Sat tete shows
11:05,12:45a)'
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily 12:45,1:30'
;i#KSí#ÍM»^MSSBfiÍÍÍM515.6 45 7áft¡f§|¡|§§
9 4ft 10J5 (Sat-Sun early showá 1040a;T);25ai )fn Sat late
shows 11:15,'
‘Tarzan (G) Fn-Wedll 50a (Sat-Sun), 12?p0n (Fn, Mon-Wed),
12 35,120,2 05,2 $T3-35,4.20,5i0St 5 50/7.00; ¿3®, 8 ift 9.15, * ¡
9-45,10.30 (Fri-Sat late shows 1L3Q, 12,00m)
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Thur,atOO'ft^ft-m.SSO,¿0:45; fri
Sun 1:00 3 30,6:0p;8:35j li 00 (SaTSun early shows 10
MonWefiOftftaft 6/4,8:30,10:45
‘The General's Daughter (R) Fn Wed 12 OOn V 45 1 55 2 40 3 20 ,
4 35,5 20 6.00,-7;lft 8:00,8' 45,
1015a, 1115a, Fri-Satlate shows 1125,12 30% 12-4fta) ,
The Matrix (R) Thur 7;45* 10:|§;FriWed 1:15,5 10,8 05
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:25,2;20,3:05,4:15,5:05,5.5ft 7:10, 1
30 710 S 25 HhH§|
(Sat early show lT35afFn-Sat late show l:l:ift; sj*
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Dtulv 2 00,5 00,7 40,10 25 (Sat Sun early
show, 11:20a; Fri-gun late show 12:45a)
Trippln' (R) Thur 1:354,35,.5 40,8 00,1010. Fri>éd3“3ft 840
(Sal-Sun earl/ show!.:10;45a; Fri-Sat late show-12í^0a)' «.
California Club VI
850 Ives Dairy Rd; 305-652-8558
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 1 -45.4-45,
•:8:f)0,Í0Í30
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only lj3ft 4,„30i-7;50v '10:30
Entrapment (R)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Dailv 100, 4 00,
700,1000 1
•Tarzan (0) Fri-Wed‘1:20,4:2ft 7:30,
. ‘The General's Daughter (R|í^-7Sra|0í:|3OIW!»bSiiÍ
The Mummy (PG-13) Drily 1:15,4:15,7:15,10:15 ,
Trippln' (R) Drily 1:10,- 4;10,‘ 7:4ft 10:20
t 'â–  'â– xfrp.wj/yi,'
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Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 65


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tiaturaf realms imaginable
Julia Roberts and Huj
it do lunch in Hotting Hill
Fashion Island
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 30546641450
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PO-13) Thur 1:3%
5:30,7:45,10:00- Fri-Sun 1:05,3:15,5:35,3:10,10:25 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:40a); Mon-Sun 1:05,3:15,5:35,8:10, -
10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 1:05,3:15,
5:30,7:45,10:00
Besieged (R) Thur 2:00,5:20,7:55,10:10; Fri-Sun 1:10, ..
3:25,5:35, 7:45,9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 1235a); Mon-Wed
2:0% 5:20.7:45; 9:55
Black Mask (R) Thur 1:55,5-35,8:00,10:15; Fri-Sun. 1:05,
3:10,5:15," 7:25,1030 (Fri-Sat late showl2i05a); Mon-
.Wed 1:50,5:15,7:20,9:50
Electien (R) Fri-Sun 2:00,5:25; 8:05,10:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:55a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:20,7:45,10:15
Entrapment (R) Thur 1:50,5:00,730,9:50; Fri-Sun 1:45,
5:10,7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed
1:45,5:15,7:50,,10:15
Get Real (R) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:50,10:15; Fri-Suh 1:5%: 53%.
7:30,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a); Mon-Wed 1:20, ’
â– 5:00,7:35,10:15
life (R)Thur 1:30,7:15; Fri-Sun 5:30,10:15; Mon-Wed
5:30,10:10 •
Levers of the Arctic Circle (R) Thur 1:40,5:20, 7:45,10:10;
Fri-Wed 1:40,5:10,7:40,10:25 /
Netting Hill (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:45,4:45,4:50,7:30,
10:05 .
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:15,
2:00,4:15,4:45,7:00,7:40,9:45,10:25; Fri-Sun 1:20,2:00,
4:25,5:00,7:10,7:50,9:55,10:40 (FriSat late show
12:40a); Mon-Wed 1:15,1:50, 4:15,5:00,7:0% 7:45,9:45,
10:30
’Tarzan (G) FriSun 1:00,3:20,5:40,7:55,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a), Mon-Wed 1:00,3:20,5:40,7:50,10:00
’The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Sun 1:00,1:45,4:30,5:15;
,7:15,8:00,10:00,10:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-
Wed 1:1% 1:40,5:00,.5:3.0,7:45,8:15,10:00
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:50,5:4% 7:55, .
10:30
The Matrix (R) Thur 6/17 only 4.30,9:45
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:00.7:40,10:2% Fri-Sun
1:35,4:30,7:15; 10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a); Mon-
Wed 1:45, 5:00,7:45,1030
The Thirteenth Roor (8) Thur 6/17 only 1:40,515,7:50,
10:25
The Winslow Boy (6) Thur 6/17 only 1:35,5:30,8:00,10:15
This Is My Father (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:55,535,7:35,10:00
Trippin' (R)Thur 1:35,5:30,7:50,10:00-Fri-Wed 1:15; 7:55
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
’Twice Upon a Yesterday (R) Fri-Sun 1:30,5:30,7:45,10:15
(FriSatlate show 1235á); Món-Wed 1:25,5:45,8:10,,' *■
10:20 ’
Intracoastal
3701 NE 163rd St; 305-945-7416
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:00,'
3:15,5:30,7:45,1%O0; Fri-Wed 12:15,2:30,5:00,7:4%
10:00'
Entrapment (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:30,4:00,7:00,10:00
Instinct (R) Daily i3% 1:15 (Thur), 430,7:00,9:45
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily ,1:40,420 (Ihur), 4:30,7:10,9:50
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:00,
.2:1% 4:00,5:05,7:00,83% 1030; Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:45,
4:30,7:15,10:00
’Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:15,3:20,7:30,9:30
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Daily 1:20,4:20,7:20,10:00
’The General's Daughter (R) FriWed 12:00n, 1:30,2:30,
4:20,5:20,7:00,8:0% 9:40,10:30'
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:30,4:15,7:0% 9:45
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas
7775 W Flagler St; 305-466-0450
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:30,
2.-00,5:00,5:45,7:30,830,9:45,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:45; 1:3%
3:00,3:45,5:20,6:0% 7:4% 8:3% 10:0% 10:55 (Fri-Sun)
áhbín¿:í5ájJ3*' 11
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/I7®i^:i45,8:0O3$3ppj
Buena Vista Social Club (G) Thur 1:40,5:10,7:35, a^ri:..
Sun 1:00,3:20,5:45,8:10,10:40 (Sat early show,lo:40a);
Mon-Wed 1:00,3:2% 5:40,8:0Q, 10:15 ,' ",
Entrapment (R) Thur 1:55,5:05,73%'MlO; Fri-Wed 2:00,
4:45,- 775,10SL5 (Sat early show 10:55a; Fri-Sát late "show
12:40a) -
Instinct (R)Thur 1:50,4:40,775,10:05; Fri-Wed 1:00,4:15,
7:05,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) TÃœUr 1:50,4:40,7:25,10.-05; Fri-Wed
1:40; 4:30,7:20,10:10 (Sat early show 10:50a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:30,
2:00,4:30,6:30,7:00,8:15,9:00,10:00; Fri-Wed 12:30,1:15,
3:20,430,6:45,7:25,9:45,10:15 (Sateariy show 10:15a;
Fri-Satlate show 12:35a)
’Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed:11:00a, 12:30,1:15,2:45,3;3% 53%
545,7:15,8:% 9:30,10:15 (Sat early show 10T5a; Fri-Sun
late show 11:45)
’The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Sun 1:00,2:p0/4;00,5:30,
7:00,8:15; 10:00,10:45 (Sat early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 13% 2:00,4:00,5:15,-7'00,7;50,
10:00,10:20
The Matrix (R) Thur 1:45,4:45,7:30,10:15; Fri-Sat i2:55a
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:30,8:00,10:00; Fri-Sua
1:45,5:0% 7:55,10:50 (Sat early show 10:50a); Mén-Wed
i:4%530,7:45,1030
The Thirteenth Roer (R) Thur 1:3% 5:4Ot7j|5,10ii% Fri-
Sun 5:0% 10:2% 12:30a; Mon-Wed 145,5:15;74% 10=10 7
Palace 18 Cinemas
11865 SW 26th St; 305-221-1801
Austin Powers; The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 12:15,
12:4% 2:3% 33% 4:45,5:1% 7:”00,7:3% 9:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat
late shows 1230m, 12:30a) -
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:20,2:30,4:40 7:15, 9:30
Election (R)Thur6/17 only 12:5% 3:1% 5:40 8:00„ 10:30
Entrapment (R) Thur 12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30; Fri-Wed
11:30a, 2:00,4:30,730,9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Instinct (R) Thur 12:15¿4:O0,7:00,9:45; Fri-Wed 11:00a,
135,430,7:00,-9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Life(R)Daily 12:15,2:40,5:05,7:30,9:55 (Fri-Satlateshow
12:30a) -
Never Been Kissed (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 12:40,3:1%6:30;
7:50,10:10 "
Netting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12:15,1:00,4:00,4:45,7:00,7:45,
9:45,10:30; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 1:15,2:00,4:00,4:45,7:00,
8:00,945, Í0:40 (Fri-Satlate show 123Qa)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily
11:00a (except Thur), 1:00,1:30,4:00,4:30,530,730,
'7:30,8:00,10:00,10:30,11:00 (Fri-Satlate show 12:45a)
’Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:10a, 11:40a, 12:10,1:2% 1:5% 23%
3:30,4:00,4;30,5:40,6:10,7^0,7:50,8:2% 9:30,10:00,
10:30 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:40,12:10a, 12:40a) :
’The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed ll:10a,.1140a, 1:50,
2:20,4:00,4:30,7:10,7:35,9:50,10:10 (Fri-Satlate show
12:40a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 12:40,2:50, 5:00,
7:20,940
The Matrix (R) Thur 1:00,4:00, 7:00,1030; Fri-Wed 11:15a,
2:10,5:00,7:50,10:50
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:30,7:15,1030; Fri-Wed
11:00a, 1:45,4:30,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Satlate show 12:40a)
The Thirteenth Roor (R) Daily 12:50,3:iQ, 530„83%: 10:30
(Fri-Sat late show 1245a)
Trippin' (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:15,2:30,4:45,7:00,9:30
Silver Cinemas Westbird 8
11501 Bird Rd; 305-227-0277
Analyze This (R) Daily 12:15,2:35,4:55,7:15, 940 :
Baby Geniuses (PG) Daily 1230,23% 430,735,9:00
Doug's 1st Movie (G) Daily 1235,230,4:30,6:45,8:45
Forces of Nature (PG-13) Fri-Wed 1230,2:30,4:45,7:00,9:15
Go (R)Da% S i% 945‘ ■
Idle Hands (R) Thur6/17 only 4:40,9:20
My Favorite Martian (PG) Daily 1230,23% 53% 7:30,9:35
(exeeptThur)
Payback (R) Thur 1235,2:40,530,735,93% FriWed 2:40,
7:10,935
She's AH That (PG-13) Thur 935; FriWed 4:40,930
The King and I (G) Daily 12:40,245.630
,ilie|PM!^elif^gip^EG)''t(^r'T^j^5;'%^|!3^)Q'i[''f


Twin Dragons (PG-13) Fri-Wed 12:35,5:00
Valentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 305-266-2002
All movies have Spanish subtitles.
Entrapment (R) Thur 6/17 only 7:00" P
(lotting Hill (PG-13) Thur 7:00,9:00; Fi* 6:00,8:10,10:10;'
Sat-Sun 2:00,4:00,6:10,8:10,10:10; Mon-Wed 7:00,9:10
•Tarzan (0) Fri 6:00,8:00^ Í0:00; Sat-Sun 2:00,4:00,6:00,
8:00,10:00; Mon-Wed 7:00,9:00''
•The General’s Daughter (0) Fri 6:00,8:00,10:00; £at-Sun
2:00,4:00,6:10,8:10,10:15- Mon-Wed 7;00,900
The Mod Squad (R)Thur 6/17 only 7:00 9:00
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 9:00 |
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Favorite Cinemas Hialeah
4650W 17th Ct; 305-557-9888
8 MM (R) Daily 1:00; 4:00,7:00; 9:35 '
Analyze This (R) Fri-Wed 12:50,3:00,5:10,7:35,9:30
Gaby Geniuses (PG) Daily 1:20,3:15, 5:30, 7:40; 940
Forces of Nature (PG-13) Fri-Wed l2:55,3KB, 5:Í5, 730,9:40> .
Idle Hands (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:50,3:00,5:20,7:30,9:45
My Favorite Martian (PQ) Daily 1:00,3:15,530,7:35,9-30
Payback (R) Daily 12:55,3:10,5:15,7:35,9:45
The Faculty (R) Daily 1.10,3:20,535,7:30; 9:45
Twin Dragons (PG-13) Fri-Wed 1:05,330,5:20,730,935
Miami Lakes 17
6711 Main St; 305-558-3810
A Walk on the Moon (R) Thur 6/17 only 11:10,2:05,5:(B, 735,''f'
Í035
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thtir 11:15a,
li 35a, 135,2.00r4 30, 445,c7:00, 730,9:15,9-45, Fn-Wed
1115a U35a, 135 2 05 4 30 4 45 'HXL 7:35,935.9:50" (Fri
Sat late shows 12:05a, 1230a)
Slack Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only li:50sg 235,4:40,7:1^935
Election (R) Thur 6/17 only 11-lOa, 2:05; 5:Q5; 7:35, Wipi
Entrapment (R) Thur 11:30a, 2:00,430,7115,945; Fri-Wed
11.45a, 230,4:40,7:20,9:40 (Fn-Sat late show 1215a)
Instinct (R) Thur 6/17 only 11:05a, 1:40,435; 7:10,10:00ifn-
Wed 11:20a, 2:1b; 5:1b, 7:50,1X^30 â– 
Life (R) Thur 6/17 only 11:45a, 230,4:40,7:20,9:40
Never Seen Kissed (PG-13) Daily 11:45a, 2 20,4 40.7 20.9 40
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a).; -
Netting Hill (PG-13) Daily 11:00a, 1:45,4:35,7£Í5;10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 10:00a,
1100a 1115a 1200n 145 2 00 330,445 515 5 45 7 30
•8:00,9:00,1030,11:00; Fri-Wed 11:05a, ll:10a,'l2;ÓQñ,'1:50,
roo, 3.00,4 45,515,545,7-30,8 (X) 9 00,10-15,10 35 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
•Tarzan (G) Fn Wed 1130a, 1150a, 2 05 2 25,4 25,4 50,710,
7:3Q, 3:20,9:35 (EriSat late show 11:30)' *
•The General's Daughter (R) Fn Wed 1100a 1125a 145,2 05
4 35,5.00,7.15(7-35,1000,1005
The Matrix (R) Daily 11:20a, 2:10,5£0rB& 1030 ;
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 11:20a, 2:10,5:10,7:50,10:30
The Thirteenth Fkmr(R)Thur 1110a, 2 05 5 05,7 15,1005 Fn-
Wed 11:40a, 2:15,4:40,7:25,9:45 (Fri-Satlate show 12:15a) ’
Trippin’ (R) Thur 11:40a, 2:15,4:35,7:05,>35; FriWed 11:15a,
>1:35,4:30,7:00,,9:25 (Fri-Satlate shdw'l2;00m) , <
Movies at Hialeah
780 W 49th St; 305-828-7242
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Fri-Wed 11:15a,
123b, 1:4503:00,4rl^530( 7:00,8:00,9:15,10:15 (Sat early
show 10:15a; Fti-Satlate shows 11:30,12:20a)
Entrapment (R)
show 10:30a; Fri-Satlate show 12:25a) v
Instinct (R) Fn-Wed 1115a, 2.00,4 45,7:30,10:10 (Fn-Sat late
Netting Hill (PG-13) Fri-Wed 11:15a; 1:45.4:30
Star Wars: pisodo I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Fri-Wed lláOa,
1:45,2:30,4:30,5:30,7;30; 8:30,10:15 (Sat eariy show 10:30a; \
EriSat late show 11:30)!' -
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:30a, 12:15,1:Q0,-1;45,2:15) 3:00,3:45,
4.30 515 545,645,730,815,900 9-45,10-20 (Sateariy
shows 10:00a, 10:30s'FriSat late shows ll:CHQ?Tl:45,12:20a)
•The GeneraTs Daughter (R) Fn Wed 1140a 12 30 2 00 3 00
4:45,5:30, /kS, 8:00,9:45,10:25 (Sat eariy show 10:15a; FriSat
late show 12:15a) ,
The Mummy (PG-13) Fri-Wed 130,4:30,7:15,10:00 (Sat eariy
show .10:45a; Fri-Sat late show 1230a)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Fri-Wed 730,1030 (FriSat late show
1230a)
Trippin’ (R) Fri-Wed 1:10; 3:10; 5:15,730,930 (Sat early show
IHjba; FriSat late show 11:45)
South Broward
Oakwood 18
2800 Oakwood Blvd; 954-923-7777
A Walk on the Moon (R) Daily 12:15,2:20,4:30 (Thur), 4:50,
(7;Í0,9:40
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur
12:00n, 1230^2:20,, 2:50,430. z-an frts :
Fri-Sat 11:01® 11-4S0 EOO, KÍ0, ®; 5Do!^0o,
7:30,9)lS, 9:45 (Fri-Satlate shows ÍI30, i2:10a)
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only 1230,2:40,4:40,7:10,9:10
Election (R) Daily 12:20,3:00,5:20,7345,10:00 ,
Entrapment (R) Thur 130,3:40,7:10,9:50; Fri-Wed 11:15, f
,1;30,3:40,7:10,§30 (Fri-Satlateshow 11145)'
Instinct (R) Daily 12:10,2:40,5:10,7:40,10:10
Lité (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:20,2:30,4:50,735,9:40 ■
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 11:00a (Fri-Wed), 12:00n, 1:10, -
230,4:10,5:10,6:50,7:40,930,10:10,10:15 (Ihur)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily
12-OOn, 100,1-30,3 00,4 00,4.30,6 00/7-00,7 30,9 00,
10:00,10:30 (FriSat late show 12:00m)
•Tarzan (6) Fri-Wed 11:15a, li:50a, 1:15,2Í0Q, 3:15,4:00,
6:w^7:20,9:10,930 (FriSat late shows 11:15,
12:00m)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 11:20a, 130 2:00,
4:30,5:00,6:50,7:45,9:30,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 12:50,2:50,4:40,
"7:2©; 9:20- -
The Matrix (R) Thur 12:45,3:50,7:00,9:45; Fri-Wed 12:10,
3 30,7 00,9 4b (Fri-SatTate show 12:15a): "
The Mummy (P6-13) Thur 12fl0;3:20,7:20,10:15; Fri
11:30a, 2:10,4:50,730,’9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a) :
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Daily 12:50,3:10,5:30,7:50,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Trippin’ (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:15,2:20,4:20,7:15,9:15
Pembroke Pines 8
12520 Pines Blvd; 954-437-7790
Austin Powers: Ths Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 1:00,$
200,310,410 520 700(Thur),7 15,7 50,9 40,10 10
(Fn-Mon early show 11:00a; Fn-Sat late show 12:00m)
Doug's 1st Movis (G) Thur 6/17 only 1:20,3:10,5:00 /
Life Is Beautiful (R) Fri-Wed 1:50,4:10,7:10,9:50
Notting Hill i PG-13) Daily 1 10,150,3 50 4 40,710 7 40,
!7:50 (Thur), 9:50,10:20 (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri.- gg
Sat late show 12:30a)
Shakespeare in Love (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:20,4:20
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 12:10,1:10,2:20,3:20,4:30,5:30,7:00^
8:00,9.20,10:20 (FriSun early show 10 00a Fri-Mon early
show' 11:00a; FriSat late show 12:00m)
The Matrix (R) Thur 7:20,10:10; Fri-Wed 10:10 '
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 130,4:00,7:00,7 40,9-40,1030 f
(Thur) (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show
,12:20a)
Sheridan Plaza 12
4999 Sheridan St: 305-46641450
A Midsummer Night's Dream (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:40,
430,720,955
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1-30.
1 45,4 15,5 05.7-00,7 30,9 30,9 50, Fn Wed 100,115
3 30,5 30,5 45 7 45 8 00,9 45 (Mon Wed), 10 00 10 15
(Fri-Sun) (Fri-Sat late shows 1215a, 12 30a)
Entrapment (R) Thur 150 4 30,7 20,9 55, Fn-Wed 120, *
4:50,7:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12i20a) ">
Instinct (R) Thur 1 15 4 25 715 10 05 Fn W ed 110 4 25
7 10 9 45 (Mon Wedl 10 05 (Fn Sun) (Fn-Sat late show
Hotting Hill (PG-13) Thur,,1:55 “4:45,7 35 1000 FnWed
130,4:45,7:35,10.00 (Mon-Wed), ÍÓÍÍ5 (Fri-Sat)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) lhur 130,
2 00 4 20 4 50 7 10 7 40 10 05 10 15 ln%edl30 120
7:Í0,9:SQ (Mon-Wed), 10:00 (Fri-Sun) (Fri-Sat late show
12-35a)
•Tarzan (G) I n Wed 100 115,3 10,3 25,5 20,5 35.7 30j
7 45,9.30,9-45 (Mon-Wed), 9 55 (Fri-Sun) (Fri Sat late --
show,ll:S||l|p|MS
•The General's Daughter (R) Fn-Wed 125,4 40,715,9 40 t
(Mon-Wed) ,>55 (Fri-Sun) (Fri-Sat late show 12-25aV J
The Matrix (R)Thm 200 r 00 8 00 FnWtdl30 430
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:35,435,7,15,10:05, Fn-Wed ,
. 130,4:35,7 20.9 50 (Mon Wed), 10-10 (Fri-Sun)
The Thirteenth I loor (R) ihur 2 00,5 00 7 45,1015 Fn
Wed 1:10,5:00,7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12’30a)
Trippin’ (R) Thur 15.5» 7;45,1010, Fri-Sun 1015 (Fri
Sat late-show 4.2:15a); Mon-Wed 10:Í0 1jS
Taft Hollywood 12
7001 Taft St; 954-981-5443
Analyze This (R) Fri-Wed 3:00,5:00,7:00,9:05 (Sat-Sun
matinee 12:55)
Baby Geniuses (PG) Daily 3:05,5:05,7:05,9:05 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:05)' J ’
Cruel Intentions (R) Daily 3:20,530,7:20,9:20 (Sat-Sun
matinee 130)
Doug's 1st Movie (G) Daily 3:10,5:20,7:20,935 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:15).
Forces of Hature (PG-13) Fri-Wed 3:05, 5:10,7:15,9:20 (Sat-
Sun matinee 1:00) v:; '
Ge (R) Thur 6/17 only 3:00,5:05,7:05,9:15
My Favorite Martian (PG) Drily 3:10,5:10,7:'l0,9:10 (Sat-
Sun matinee 1:10) '
Payback (R)Daily3:05,5:05,7:10,9:20. (Sat-Sun matinee
1:00)
She's All That (PG-13) Drily 3:20,5:15,7:10,. 9:05 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:20)
The Faculty (R) Daily 3:15,535,,7:30,9:35 (Sat-Sun matinee
fflpii
The King and I (G) Daily 3:00,5:10,7:05,9:10 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:05), r 4
The Prince of Egypt (PG) Drily 3:15,5:15,7:|5 9:15 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:15/
Twin Dragons (PG-13) Fri-Wed^^g^^^.j^t- ,
Sun matinee 1:10)
South Park Trivia Contest
* Answer three South Park trivia questions correctly
for a chance to win passes for the advanced screen¬
ing of “South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut”
and movie promotional prizes!
1st Trivia Question
What Rob Reiner co-star made a guest appearance on South
Park hoarding Cheesy-Poofs on another continent?
To Get the 2nd Trivia Question
Watch Deco Drive on June 17th or June 18th at 7:30pm or
shkim
3rd Trivia Question
Come to the pre - “South Park: Bigger, Longer &
Uncut” party at Iguana Cantina on June 24th in The
Shops of Mayfair, 3rd floor, (305) 444-6606, for the
last trivia question.
Bring all answers as enrty to the raffle.
Celebrate your success and
‘Employees of Paramount, New Times and Iguana Cantina are not eligable.
‘■No- purchase necessary. -While supplies last. Must participate to be eligable. - -
” hiianii Newlimes June 17 - 23,1999' 61


AUDITION RELEASE
Company.: PAPER GARDENS, INC.
Name:
Address:
Date of Audition: June 24, 1999
Project: FAMILY BAND CASTING CALL
Rhone Number:
Ladies' and Gentlemen;-:
I desire to audition for a role in the television program tentatively entitled "Family¿Band""(the
"Project ""l. I represent ajn^warranj Jthat I anti in good health and physical condition, and that I
am under no physical or mental condition or disability which would be aggravated or affected
by the. audition1, ápd 1 have nd prioáibjury, unless expressly disclosed on the back of this release,
which would prevent me from performing the audition material, and if engaged on the Project
would prevent tmfrbm'pérformingicá' subject me io additional disability,!irijunyor illness vb ,
acknowledge that Company is relying on my representations and warranties as,a material'
"inducement to audition nrte for-the Project
Open
Casting
Call
One Day Only
I understand that) ath hot employed by Company and am ,acting-s®(ely ait mybwn direction and
‘control duFfng,thé'audrtion-, and (asSurtte all risks of injury that may ¿¿curto me in the audition
process As a material .condition of the" audition, I hereby release, discharge, and hold harmless
Company (ipdgding atl/relatéd companies, the officers, board member!», employees,, L,
representatives assigns, licensee^,, exhibitors, sponsors thereof, apd the satces$ofs and assigns
of each of them) and any participants from any andtell claims, demote (fei or (buses of action of
¿ny 1<]nd,or'pátui;e that I hiay haVg .againk'iftfnpahyior SUCli-otheppartyOes) whether for libel
aflolattonof my right of'privacy, emotional distfess/paih and suffering, ahybahnagesJnd bodily
injury (direct and/or donsequential), or any other matter arising out of or in any manner '
connected with thebuditfon and the use arid exercise, offthe rights grafted to Company herein
My rights and remedies Shall be limited to an action jit law, arjd not índudé the nghfeto
rescind, nullify or >eójoin,the nghtslg ranted to Company hereunder a nd/orCojnpanyb rights'Jo- V
exploit the Project:
In fujl consideration of my Appearance hereunder, and without any further, cohsrderátiomdge f!
from Company or ány'tbird party’to me, 1 agree to participate in the audition, (alone or with
ol:hers)1)S designated ^ Company and acknowledge that I may perform bprtaipioriginal musjcal
cómpositíon(s) selected by me ántí qhvyhich I hold an Ownership‘"and/or authorship interest
therein, and agree that Company may photograph me and record my yoirce, conversation, g
Sounds, arid vocal and/of instrumental pérformance('S)pf 'the'hlusEcal‘conífpósitióñ(s) duringand
in connection therewith -If applicable, Company hereby acknowledges that f retain my
bwnershi¿/unfereshjp^té prrgiñaf mpStcálpomp©SftíQb(s) performed by me. For the purposes of
this audition- f hereby grant Cdtnpany the^ght to indyde and yse raid rri|Usicakcomposition(s) in
thephotography add as embodied, in the recording of the audition, without any obligation
(financial or otherwise) *of any kind whatsoever tootle l agref? that Company is the sole owner
”df all the tesults-ánd ’proceeds-of such jahotography and recording, with the right for Company,
Company's employees and independent contractors/ jCcynpany's assigns and Company's
licensees, forever and throughout the-tmiyerse' to-use the |oregóing|natenai and any portion
thereof and jny name, voice, likeness,-biographical material (including discography) concerning
fee,,.and editorial Comments concerning me '•hi all media and other forms of exploitation npw
known or hereinafter developed, including, without limitation, motion pictures, televisionlpd
publishing, and in connection with the advertising, safe) and publicizing of the Projggt, -
i warrant that I arrttet least SlELyeaEsnof age or an emancipated minor, apd, have the full,
complete and unrestrictecfppht arid authority to enter rntothis agreement, and that i shall not ;
diregrtly on indirectly lásue or "permit the issuance of any publicrfy whatsoever with respect to the
Project,?,my audition or appearance m .connection therewith
signatures/ name \ ^
IF YOU ARE UNDER THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOUR PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN MUST SIGN'
1 hereby warrant theft I am the parent and/or tegaLgulraian of the rrídiviáiial Who. Signed the
foregoing agreement, that I have caused said individual to execute this agreement, that i wi| - "
indemnify- Company against all claims, liability and expense with-respect dio*fhj-s ágreerrferit'and
that, knowing of -’Company's reliance hereonH agree to cause ¿aid individual to adhere t&aU df
Bps provisions of this-agreement.
SIGNATURE OF PARENT/GUARDJAN
itlNT-NAME
Thursday
June 24
lOamÜ 4pm
National Hotel
1677 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, FL 33139
305 532-2311
SINGERS ACTORS
BANDS
If you feel your talent can take you to the top
and you're waiting for a lucky break, come see
us. We're looking for 18 to 24 year olds to star
in a new Fox Family Channel series. Family
Band, featuring a group of musicians in the style
of Backstreet Boys or Spice Girls. In addition to
starring in the series, cast members will be
signed to a major recording deal.
What does it take to audition? Come prepared
to sing, dance and read for 3 to 5 minutes.
Bring along a photograph, a demo tape and/or
an instrument. Additional playback tape for live
vocal audition preferred. And fill out the form
On the left. If you're under 18, a parent or
guardian must sign for you.
‘PHQNE #
ADDRESS
IMPORTANT:
If you're under 18, you mu# have a parent or guardian sign
"this form and bring it to the audition.
CHAN N E L
68 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times


Miami Beach
June 22-25, 1999
ill*
New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement 1?


- , V
CD’S AVAILABLE AT:
- West Palm Beach - Cutler Ridge
- Sawgrass/Flamingo Point Royale Plaza
Shopping Center _ Hialeah
- West Kendall j
Tropicare Shopping - Dadeland Station
Center -Aventura
- Boca Raton - Pembroke Pines
Shadowland Square
: 2 v Mew Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement


The annual music industry conference now known as MIDEM Americas,
is in town for the third yeaT in a row, and for music lovers that means one
thing: thiee nights of spectacular concerts on Miami Beach!
Among the worid-class.artists who will be thrilling audiences.on -the
evenings of June 22, 23, and 24 are the Gipsy Kings, South African trum¬
peter Hugh Masekela, jazz flutist Nestor Tones, jazz saxophonist Gato Bar-
bieri, gospel legends the Mighty Clouds.of Joy and Vickie Winans, salsa star
José Alberto “El Canario”, Latin heartthrob Christian, RGB cfooner Tevin
Campbell, and reggae veteran Pato Bariton. Just as exciting art the remain¬
ing 60-plus acts that may not be household names yet, but represent the
most outstanding talent and cutting-edge trends in world beat, Caribbean,
Latin, African, and dance/electronic music.. The theme of MIDEM Americas
says it all: “The music of Africa meets the music of the Americas.”
- The concerts, called showcases, group several artists on one bill and occur
at an interesting mix of South Beach venues, from spacious halls, such as
the Jackie Gleason Theater, Lincoln Theatre, and Cameo Theatre, to atmos¬
pheric nightspots, including Cristal and Shadow Lounge. Concert organizers
are capitalizing on the balmy setting of Ocean Drive,“as well, with nightly
concerts in front of the Tides Hotel tin an open-air stage sponsored try the
City of Miami Beach. Tickets for nearly all outdoor and indoor showcases
are $10 to $20 each, a bargain not only for headliner acts, but also for the
opportunity to hear the musicians who rarely play in the .United States, let
alone in Miami. (See page 15 for how and where to buy tickets.)
Among the outstanding events concertgbers can' choose from:
• An .outdoor evening of Latin music presented by Chris Blackwell and
featuring salsa staT José Alberto “El Canario, hard-hitting trombonist
1999
Jimmy Bosch, fhd the Puerto Rican grassroots phenome¬
non Rena Librl
Two cbn^ts highlighting music of the Caribbean
islands, including the French Antilles, Haiti, and Réunion
• An RGB gala and benefit concert in support of VH-1
Save the Music, starting Tevin Campbell, Shanice Wilson,
and other high-energy performers t
• “African Night,” with headliners Hugh Masekela, for¬
mer Zap Mama singer Sally Nyolo, and phenomenal talent
from Mali and Cameroon
| »A highly anticipated noche showcasing the next
big ñames th rock en español, hosted by MTV and
Waniét Chappell
And more!
While South Beach parties by night to the sounds of
back-to-back concerts, the Miami Beach Convention
CenteT provides the daytime hub fordealmaking and
networking among music professionals. More than
3000 participants and 500 exhibitors from, 70 countries
are expected to attend the global industry powwow.
The buzz at this year’s conference includes e-com-
merce, the U.f>. Spanish-speaking market, and the boom
«M3!
Nestor Torres 4
The Mighty
Clouds of Joy 6
José Alberto 10
Concert Celender «... ”13
Ticket Information 15
Guide to
the Performers 16
Ali text by Barbara Drake, dekign by Diari Sebring,
copy editing by Robin Sheaiyproofreadjrtg |
Additional information on MIDEM Americas 1999
is available at www.miaminewtimes.com
in film music!
> ’So take a moment to-study this .guide, plan your
social calendar for the next threrevehings, and enjoy
the music!
n New Times MIDEM Guide - M Sfrei¥sMg3ii|>pl6ment * t


NESTOR
TORRES
A heart-to-heart with the conscience of smooth jazz )
Rethink your ideá of Nestor Torres. The Puerto
Rican-bom flutist may be referred to by some as “the
pied piper of Latin jazz,” but in Torres’s heart, he’s a
popular entertainer, in the best sense of the phrase.
“The word entertainer can be taken lightly, but IjifcJ
actually much more significant” Torres says. “It means,
‘I’m here to entertain you, to uplift you. I respect you.
Thank you for giving me the time to share my music
with you.’”
This attentiveness to the deeper meaning of things
is just one of the surprises you encounter when
talking to Torres, whose sweet flute sounds belie
iron-firm artistic and personal commitments. He’s a
practicing Buddhist, a crusader for children’s rights,
and a critic of mindless, “cotton candy” culture. He’s
also a passionate advocate for music that speaks to
people’s most profound need: the need to be nurtured
— body, heart, and soul.
Treasures of the Heart, his fifth album and his first
for Shanachie Entertainment, may be the artist’s most
personal statement yet Torres wrote all but one of the
ten'tracks, alone or in collaboration with keyboard
player David Mann. The compositions shimmer with
bright tonalities, Spanish guitar licks, and Latin
grooves. Over these textures Torres’s silvery melodies
leap and glide like a porpoise through the waves: With
titles like “Musing,” “Luna Latina,” “Velvet Nights” and
“Daybreak,” the pieces reflect their creator’s self-
admitted “amazing appreciation for life and the people
around [him].”
Appreciation for life has not always been easy.
Torres was riding high on the release of his Verve solo
debut, Morning Ride, when he was severdy injured in a
1990 celebrity boat race in Biscayne Bay. Eighteen
fractured ribs, a broken clavicle, and a collapsed lung
put Torres out of commission long enough to decide
that “defeat was never going to be ah option.” During
the year-long recuperation, Tones realized his music
could attain a higher purpose: “serving others by
uplifting their spirits.”
Like fellow Miamian Gloria Estefan, whose brush
with death in a bus crash in the early Nineties inspired
Torres’s 1991 comeback album was appropriately
titled Dance of the Phoenix. The Nineties saw him
gigging with jazz and Latin all-stars like Herbie
Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Tito Puente, and Celia Cruz,
as well as with the legendary Cuban bassist Cachao. In
1994 be released his Sony Latin Jazz debut, Burning
Whispers, which was followed in 1996 by Talk to Me.
That year Torres carried the Olympic torch
triumphantly through the streets of Miami And when
the flutist was asked to serve as musical director for a
seventeen-piece, all-star band at President Clinton’s
1997 inaugural bafi, he knew he had arrived.
Even with an active touring and recording schedule
these past few years, Torres has been driven to push his
creative boundaries. While recording for Verve and
Sony Latin, Torres played other people’s compositions
mainly. When he signed with Shanachie, he saw his
chance to spread his wings as a songwriter. “In the past
I focused more on my abilities as a flute player and
interpreter,” he says. “[With Treasures of the Heart] I
was involved in the entire process from writing to
preproduction and on through fruition. I decided
that this album would come from my heart and be
about who I am. I was prepared to accept lull
responsibility for taking the lead.”
Nestor Torres and Guests perform on Wednesday,
June 23,8:30 p.m., at the City of Miami Beach
Concert, in front of the Tides Hotel, Twelfth Street
and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach.
One composition that is especially dose to Torres’s
heart is “Casey’s Garden.” The tune is dedicated to his
pet sheltie, Casey, who died at age fourteen, around the
time the album was made. “It took a sheltie dog to
teach me what unconditional love is,” he says. “It’s that
intangible energy, that total giving. No matter what
mood you’re in, a dog accepts you. Fm grateful to
Casey for showing me that”
Whatever life-lessons Torres has experienced, his
priority now is sharing with his listeners what he’s
learned. Call it his mission statement “The consumer
has a need for music that is nurturing, that is good for
the soul,” he says. “Music should offer something of
substance. When we think of‘religious’ music, we think
of composers like Bach, but in today’s world, that musk
doesn’t have to be dassicaL It can belike Gloria’s
album, lifting people up.”
Torres continues, “The question is, how do I
translate that religious feeling, that passion, into my
own music? For me, it means being grounded and
understanding that what I do as a performer affects
people. I need to ask myself, to what extent am I
fulfilling my responsibility to my listeners? I mean,
people are paying to see me; they could be doing
anything dse, but they’ve chosen to hear me play. I
have a responsibility to enhance their lives in some
y way. The point isn’t to sell four million records in
order to earn a lot of money (although that’s nice!);
the point is that I want to touch four million lives
with that feeling of empowerment That’s the essence
of my life as a performer.” <@)
For sound clips and more information about Nestor Torres,
visit his website: nestortorres.com
the album Into the Light, Torres may have been
physically wounded by his accident, but the setback
only strengthened his will to succeed.
4 New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement


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The Mighty Clouds of Joy: The name alone
makes you want to say it out loud, roll it on
the tongue, savor it like a sliceof ripe, Georgia
peach. And for fans of gospel music, the
news that this renowned group is coming to ~
Miami is especially sweet because the Mighty
Clouds of Joy move mountains when they -
perform.
With a career that spans 39 years and 34 ;
albums, and includes three Grammy Awards,
the Mighty Clouds of Joy are among the leg¬
endary ensembles in gospel history. They got
their start in 1959 in Los Angeles, with
founder Joe Ligón enlisting the vocal talents
of Johnny Martin, Richard Wallace, and Elmo
Franklin. Several years later the group s
infused traditional gospel with REtB, and a
new style was bom. The first gospel group to
use Bass, drums, and keyboards, the Mighty
Clouds of Joy were a target of criticism in
their early days. Also frowned upon were
their choreographed moves and brightly col¬
ored outfits. Eventually, their innovations
became accepted as a standard part of gospel
music.
Known as the “Temptations of Gospel,” the
Mighty Clouds were also the first gospel act i
to appear on Soul Train, and over the years
they’ve performed with an array ofmainr
strearn artists; Including Marvin Gaye, Aretha
Franklin, Paul Simon, and the Rolling Stones.
While the ámazihg!energyi they project
onstage moves people of all faiths, the Clouds
ignite'a'sp'éaál,passion amongtheir longtime |
fans, who experience their concerts as spiritual healing.
The Mighty Clouds’ látest album, Live in Charleston,
brings the group full circle with the’traditional, down-
home gospel that launched their career. Recorded in 1996
at Abundance Tabernacle AM.E. Zion Church in
Charleston, South Carolina, Before a packed house, the
recording has an urgency and passion unmatched by
many contemporary albums, gospel or otherwise. Clearly
thegroup’s currentlineüp — original members Ligón and
Wallace, with vocalists Wilbert Williams, Michael
McCowin, Ron Staples, and Johnny’Valentine — is doing a
splendid job of carrying on the Mighty Clouds’ legacy.
We spoke with Alabama native Joe’Ligon, whose bari¬
tone voice typifies the hard-slashing lead in gospel music
{concerts néarly shred his voice). Quieter on the phone
than onstage, he shared his thoughts on his group’s place
in.the history of gospel, his own evolution as a singer, and
the concept of music ministry.
CLOUDS
OF JOY
Question: Not long ago you released your 34th album,
Live in Charleston, which received outstanding reviews
and was nominated for a Grammy. How do you keep your
music fresh after so ijtaiiy yeiirs? '
Joe Ligón (JL): We love it Anything you love, you find a
Way to do it. We’ve had so ¿many wonderful experiences;
along the way. Why stop now?
Q: What do you consider the highlights of your career?
JL: We’ve just been inducted into the Nashville Hall of
Fame. That was a thrill. I’m proud to say that they induct¬
ed all the members of the current band, including our
drummer. We’ve won three Grammys. We’ve played at the
White House. President Carter asked for us. You know,
he’s from Georgia and he’s a religious man. He asked for
several artists to come and one of those was the Mighty
Clouds of Joy. I’m proud of that
Q: Maybe this administration could use some Mighty
Clouds as well?...
JL: [Laughs. No comment]
Q: When did you know you wanted to be a singer?
JL: I dreamed of Being onstage while I was a kid. My
father was a gospel singer. When I was a little boy, he
used to take me to hear [the gospel quartet] the Fairfield
Four. That’s when I started dreaming that when I grew up,
1 was going to be up onstage, too. I’m kind of like Michael
The Mighty Clouds of Joy perform with Vickie Winans
in “Gospel Night,” Wednesday, Jone 23,9:00 p.m., at
the Lincoln Theatre, 541 Lincoln Rd., Miami Reach.
Jackson, awkward and shy offstage. But when
I’m up there, I love it You can’t stop me.
Q: Whose idea was it in the Sixties to add RGB
to your music?
JL: I give credit to ABC [Records]. They had an
idea that the music was coming. At the time,
there was no Andrae Grouch in gospel, just tra¬
ditional groups like the Staple Singers. Some¬
one from ABC said, “On your album, you
should start putting in some of that ’message
music’” That’s what they, called it then. It all
grew from there.
Q: Who approached you to sing for the Rolling
Stones? I can’t imagine a group farther from
the Mighty Clouds of Joy.
JL: Keith Richards heard us when we played in
Britain. He liked us so much that when he got
home, the Rolling Stones asked us to open for
them in Washington, D.C. It was something
else. We were real nervous. ‘Oh, the Mighty
Clouds are singing for the Rolling Stones. Are
we crazy? That audience isn’t going to like
gospel.’ But Mick Jagger came backstage and
did his best to make us comfortable. “Just do
your thing,” he said. “They’ll love you.” We did
three songs. The first song, the audience was
just sitting there, looking at us. The second
song I spoke to the people: “The Rolling
Stones sent us hereto warm you up. So, come
on, get yourselves warm.” Then we sang “I
Came to Jesus” and that did it They loved us..
Q: How do you differ today from the singer you were 40
years ago?:
JL: I’m more dedicated, more serious. I take it as a min¬
istry. I tell people that they can make it ’cause I’ve been
through hard times myself, and 1 know that what you’ve
got to do is believe I can’t get to church now, since we’re
performing so much, so these concerts are my church. 1
don’t bully people into believing in God or Jesus or what¬
ever. There is a Supreme Being. I believe in it The people
in our audiences — we pray together, we cry together.
Q: What musicians do you listen to for inspiration?
JL: The [Sensational] Nightingales. Their leader, the Rev¬
erend Julius Cheeks. He has been a big inspiration to me.
Also, the Soul Stirrers. [Lead singer] Sam Cooke was one
of my best friends.
Q: What songs will you sing in Miami?
JL: We’ll decide when we’re onstage. We watch the audi¬
ence, the age bracket how they respond. We’ve been on
the road so long, all we have to do is look and we know
what they’ll like. We’ll have some of that rock and roll
audience, I’m sure. You can’t miss with the O’Jays’ “Love
Train.” You’ll see. I take that tune to tell the people about
how we can have a better world if we just get along edu¬
cate our children, be peaceable with one another.
Q: But straight-ahead, message gospel is what you’re
known for. People are going to want to hear that - the
testifying the Holy Spirit
JL: Oh, don’t you worry. Eventually we’re going to end
up doing what we do! ® ,
Supreme beings of gospel music
6 New Times MIDEM Guide -An Advertising Supplement


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Mew Times Reader's Choice
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New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement 7


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New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement 9


José Alberto
fThe voiee of salsa romantica
Salsa star José Alberto has been making music - and Latin music
history — for more than twenty years with his irresistible voice and
impeccable musicianship. But the Dominican singer still gets the same
thrill onstage as he did at age nineteen when he first began performing
with the likes of Tito Puente and Tito Rodriguez, Jr. .$T'
“Singing is my life,” says José Alberto, known as “Eg|!anario”’frhe
Canary) for his exquisite voice and amazing whistling ^abilities. “I love
what I dó. I enjoy what I do. This is such happy, upbeafcmusic.”
El Canario’s infectious, joyous feeling practically throbs through
his latest release, despite its title, Herido (Heartbreak).':!! is his fif¬
teenth solo album and first offering on the RykoLatino label. The.’
album features the exhilarating arrangements and razor-sharp
ensemble playing José Alberto’s fans have come to expect. What’s
new is the range of rhythms found on these tracks: salsa dura,
merengue, reggae, vals peruano. The unifying flavor of the album,
however, is driving, dance-till-you-drop salsa.
Although José Alberto refiises to name a favorite song ón Herido —
“They’re all great,” the singer insists in his soothing, reedy voice; gf it’s,
obvious he has a special affection for the last track, a salsa version of
the Peruvian classic, “Flor de la Canela,” writteft by the great singer-
composer Chabuca Granda. So how did a Peruvian vals end up on a
salsa record? “I love Peru,” the singer admits,. “1 have two godsons
there. A few years ago I promised publidy that I would dedicate a song
to Peru on an album. ‘La Flor de la.Canela’ is almost like Peru’s nation¬
al anthem. 1 did it as a tribute to Peni and its people. The song starts off
with a vals and at the end, it goes into a special Peruvian rumba.”
Musical inventiveness has been a hallmark of José Alberto’s career.
Bom in the Dominican Republic, he spent his childhood in Puerto Rico
and then moved to New York City. But the music that caught the
twelve-year-old’s ear was not merengue, the staple sound of his birth¬
place» but salsa. “Salsa was the style of music that was happening
then,” he explains. Tnaturally went toward that” By 1973 he was
singing with salsa bands irpuNew Yofk.Cj.fy, attracting attention wherev¬
er hé performed. Three years later, he made his recording.debut asi lead
vocalist on the album Curious? by Tito Rodriguez.
“It was something,” El Canario laughs, remembering those early
years. “Here I was, ablack kid singing salsa. ‘Wow, that’s weird!’ people
thought ‘It’s different’ [I was] a nineteen-year-old Dominican singing
up a storm, up there with Tito Puente, Rodriguez — those guys were
cats already.”
The talented newcomer worked with some of the most influential
artists at a crucial period in the development Of tropical inuSic. Between
1978 and the early Eighties José Alberto was lead vocalist with the
groundbreaking ensemble Tipica 73. His recordings with Típica 73
include Salsa Encendida (1978) and Charangueando con hi Tipica 73
(1980). He was also among the lead vocalists on Louie Ramirez’s pro¬
duction, Noche Caliente, the first album to give popular Jfidlads an
uptempo salsa treatment. The catchy style quickly became known as
salsa romántica.
El Canario’s smooth yet crisp voice caught listeners’ attention on his
first solo albums, recorded for Sono Max, which yielded such hits
as “Desesperado” and “La Cinta Verde.” In 1987 he became the
José Alberto “El Canario” and his Orchestra play Tuesday,
June 22, at 9:00 p.nt., in “Chris Blackwell & Friends”
The showcase takes place at the open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel, Twelfth Street and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach.
first artist to record for the newly formed RMM label and had an inter¬
national hit in 1988 with Sueño Contigo. The salsa star stayed with
RMM for ten years, recording and cpproducing numerous hit albums,
including Dance With Me (1991), which features guest stair Sergio Var¬
gas; Llegó la Hora (1992): and De Pueblo y Con Clase (1994). On Time
(1995) features a duet with the undisputed queen of salsa, Cefip Cniz,
jdth whom hé frequently tours.
|@|! wasi e^átage, atNew York’s Studio 84, that the singer first began
whistling along withthe melody, imitating á flute. His imitation was so
convincing that audiences began searching the back of the stage to find
where the flutist was hiding. Soon whistling became his trademark. José
Alberto “El Canario” is quick to point out that being a good whistler, is
not as easy as it seems: “Can you whistle?” hé asks. “Try doing a whole
melody, in rhythm and on pitch. It’s difficult!”
José Alberto and his Orchestra are extremely popular on the interna¬
tional music scene, bringing salsa to North and South America, the
Caribbean, Japan, Europe, and even Australia. Non-Latino audiences
may love salsa, but can they really move to it, we wonder? “You could
say that,” he smiles. “Italians — they can salsa. They’re pretty good. So
are Germans. You’d be surprised. In the Forties and Fifties there were
lots of [military] bases in Germany, and a lot of Puerto Ricans went to
live there. So salsa has been in Germany for a while.”
At his MIDEM showcase, the singer shares a bill with Puerto Rican
band Plena libre and trombonist Jimmy Bosch. “My last song, we’re
going to dó án ári^steurT’ El'CánarKTéhthüséi “I’m going to get the
other acts back onstage and jam. It should be funr”
Most of all, he relishes the opportunity to do what hé loves best :
sing his heart out “Í love to perform. Even if there’s only one person
in the audience, if the place is packed, even if they don’t know what
salsa is -1 make them understand with my voice. I make than feel how
beautiful the music is. That’s what being an artist is about” ©
Ü1
(mes MIDEM Advertising Supplement gj
.14 if t ¡fit fe a. .'4 V.lUkl!.l«f,/uiV th A
30L
wmmmmm




A night of Live Music, Great Food and Good
PRESENTED BY
CIGARETTES
© Philip Morris Inc. 1999 18863-62
Offer limited to smokers 21 or older. Guests must be 21 or older.
16 mg "tar," 1.1 mg nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.


gg
m
A night of Live Music, Great Food and Good Times.
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Quitting Smoking
Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health.
© Philip Morris Inc. 1999 18863-62
Offer limited to smokers 21 or older. Guests must be 21 or older.
I mg nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.


MIAMI
BEACH
ABN*AMRO Bank
NewTunes
ACTProductions
rvan magazine
Magazine
12, \ New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement
midem americas
(Mexico)



ISRfR&itMjRU
r^, ,..r
9.30 pm
Amnesia
136 Collins Ave,
Miami Beach
OPENING NIGHT PARTY
SGAE PRESENTS: IBIZA NIGHT I
PRIVATE SHOW ON INVITATION ONLY]
featuring
GESAR DE MELERO Serial Killer Vyftii/Spain
KADOC Zen Records/Spain
PM PROJECT Sony - Dance Pool/Spain
TUESDAY JUNE 22nt
5.30 pm / 6115 pm
17 pm
Lincoln Theatre
541 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach
MANA Warner MUsic Latip/Mexlco
Private Screenings: On Invitation only
8.00 pm
Jackie Gleason
Theater
1700 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
CELEBRATING lOO YEARS
OF SGAE:
HERNALOO ZUNIGA Warner Music/Nicaragua
PEDRO GUERRA BMG Arioia/Spain
ROSANA Universal Music/Spain
9.00pm CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS:
Open Air Stage JOSÉ ALBERTO **EL CANARIO”
Ocean Drive & Rykolatino/Dominican Republic
12th Street JAMMY BOSCH Rykoiatmo/USA
'Qn front of the Tides Hotel) PLENA LIBRE Rykolatino/Puerto Rico
Miami Beach
9.00 pm
Shadow Lounge
1532 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
BNII SHOWCASES
GEZAR SANTANAusa
LOS HIDALGO Radio Vox Corporation/USA
PEDRO ALFONSO Radio Vox Corporation/USA
G ATO BARRIER! Columbia Jazz/Argentina
10.00 pm
Cameo
1445 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
MIDEM ”99 R&B GALA
A Benefit Concert in Support of
“VH-1 Save the Music” featuring:
HOSTED BY T’KALLA Hárdboiled Entertainment & Media/USA
DANGEROUS CURVÉS Hárdboiled Entertainment &Media/USA
DIVINE Red Ant Erftertainment/USA
RIGORES Hárdboiled Entertainment & Media/France
FELICIA ARAMS Jadé Prodüctions/USA
JAZÉ Universal Music/USA
SH ANIDE WILSON La Face/USA
mu Goldmine Etektra Entertaiñment/USA
THE MANGO RGGM Hárdboiled Entertainment & Media/USA 1
TEVIN CAMPBELL Qwest Records/USA
10.00pm AFRICAN NIGHT:
Warsaw HUGH MASEKELA Sony Music/South Africa
1450 Collins Ave, RlCHARO BORA Coiumbia-Sony Music/Cameroon j
Miami Beach ROKIA TRAORÉ Label Bleu/Mali
SALLY NYQLO Lúsáftíca/Gameroon
10.00pm HMC PRODUCTION
Cristal Night presents: A Tumi Music Exclusive Artist
Club ELIO REVÉ JR Y SU CHARAN60H
1045 - 5^ Street, Tumi Music/Guba
Miami Beach
8.00pm MIZIK KRÉYOL LAKARAYIB;
Amnesia akIYO Déclic/Guadeloupe
136 Collins Aye, K ANPlCH Frederic Pierre-Louis Productions/Haiti
Miami Beach MARTINIQUE SWING MACHINE
Hibiscus record
WCK WCK Records Ltd/Dominica
18.30 fW
Open AirStage
Ocean Drive &
HnMH
(In front of the Tides Hotel)
Miami Beach
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT:
GROPO CAFÉ NOSTALGIA Nave/USA
.NESTOR TORRES Shañáchíe Écrtértairimerit/Puerto
RICARDO LEMVQ & IMiSI
Putumayo/USA
9.00pm GOSPEL NIGHT:
Lincoln Theatre mighty GLOtins of joy cGipiattam/usA
541 Lincoln Road, VICKIE WINfflHS CGi Piatinum/usA
Miami Beach
9.00 pm
Shadow Lounge
1532 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
ASfpftP SHOWCASE s
DEREK LOPEZ Universal Music/Atgeniina
JAVIER Caiman Music/Spain
ROBERT AVELLA N EF RMM Records & Video CorpTPuerto Rico
THE LATIN JAZZ CREW Sunset Records/USA I
VALLEJO USA
10.00pm MTV » WARNER CHAPPELL
Cameo present? “Heehe He ¡seen en Español":
1445 Washington Ave, RERSOIT Universal Music/Argentina
Miami Beach CONTROL MACHETE Universal Music/Mexico
El MANJAR RE LOS RIOSES
Radio Vox Corporation/Puerto Rico
OZOMATLI Almo Sounds/USA
10.00pm SOLID AGENCY AND COZIER
Cristal Night ENTERTAINMENT present:
Club BRICK a. LACE Solid Agency/Jamaica
1045 ¡ 5th Street, GH A PA RITA Solid Agency/Jamaica
Miami Beach ©MERI Bad boy Entertainment/USA
BOUGIE E.FRESH
Solid Agency-Cozier Entertainment/USA
FEMME FATALE Relativity/USA
QT Solid Agency/Jamaica
SOARS DEM GREW 7VT Records/Jamaica
7.00pm PRIVATE SCREENINGS
Amnesia Broadcasting the short film "Revés"
taken from their forthcoming album
asa premier with the band attendance
On invitation only
CAFÉ TACUBA Warner, Music Latiri/iyiexico
136 Coiiins Ave,
Miami Beach
8.00 pm
Jadltie Gleason
Theater
1700, Washington Ave,;
Miami Beach
TRIE GIPSY KINGS Pá&Sony l^&c/France
9,00 pm
Open Air Stage
Ocean Drive &
12th Street
(In front of the Tides Hotel)
Miami Beach
SONO CREST PUSH#
.mmmwmm Sonpdiso-Musisoft/La Réunion •'
JAGOB' OESVARJEOK' ¿onodisbrMüsisoít/éuadeloüpe
LES IRIRES DECIMUS >S¿nQ¡disc^Musisoft/Guad(eloup8
MKBtlDr COMBO Sonodisc*Musísoft/Ráit»
10.00pm Sitas PRESENTS
‘ROCK LATINO”;
GIRASOULES EM(/Spain
JULIETA VENERAS BMG/Mexico
SARGENTO .GASECHA Qhewaka-Virgin/Guba-France
1450 Collins Ave,
Miami Beach
10.00 pm
Cristal Night
Club
1045 - 5th Street,
Miami Beach
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD*
AFRICAN RHYTHM MESSENGERS
Sonika Records/Nigeria
BARB ASSAD MENAGERIE Brazil
PATH RAMlrDN Global Music Promotions-Surfdog/UK
8.00 pm
Jackie Gleason
Theater
1700 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
BMG US LATIN
PRESENTS:
CHRBSTIAN^^^^m
11.00 pm
Shadow Lounge
1532 Washington Aye,
Miami Beach
ISHG RECORDS PRESENTS:
BALLY SAGOO & FRIENDS
BALLY SAGOO Ishq records/UK
THE RiJB FACTORY
RUN JAN SBNRH
FREEDOM CIRCLE
HERBA DANCERS
OMZONE
New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement


fffftff!
IffRflfSV!
S gi g|
if 9 H
christiancastro
mi vida sin tu amor
Don't miss the opportunity
to see Christian Castro
in a private concert.
Get a FREE pair of tickets
Christian Castro's new album
"mí vida sin tu amor" at your
BrallÉÉt SPEC'S MUSIC Store.
White supplies last until June 22,1999
Album on sole now
$12.99 CD $7.99 Cass.
SAJLÉSNDS 4/24/99
Je Santander for Estelan Enterprises, Inc.
with the purchase of
114 New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement


^Tickets for MIDEM Americas concert showcases can be
purchased in advance at Ticket Master locations or online at
¿ vyww.ticketmaster.com. Tickets can also be bought at each
\fenue on the day of the concert. Most showcases are open
to the public, with the exception of several private
showcases and Monday’s opening-night party.
TUESDAY JUNE SS
9:00 P.M. CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
00, open-air stage)
9:00 P.M. BMI SHOWCASE
00, Shadow Lounge)
10:00 P.M. MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA:
A benefit conceit in support of VH-1 Save the Music
($20, Cameo Theatre)
10:00 P.M. AFRICAN NIGHT
05, Warsaw Ballroom)
10:00 P.M. ELIO REVE, JR., Y SU CHARANGON
($20; Cristal; call Hugo Cando at 305-576-5866)
WEDNESDAY JUNE S3
8:00 P.M. MIZIK KREYOL LAKARAYIB
05, Amnesia)
8:30 P.M. CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT
05, open-air stage)
9:00 P.M. GOSPEL NIGHT
($20, Lincoln Theatre)
9:00 P.M. ASCAP SHOWCASE
00, Shadow Lounge)
10:00 P.M. NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL,
PRESENTED BY MTV AND WARNER CHAPPELL
05, Cameo Theatre)
10:00 P.M. SOLID AGENCY & COZIER
ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT
05, Cristal)
THURSDAY JUNE S4
8:00 P.M. GIPSY KINGS
($35-55, Jackie Gleason Theater)
9:00 P.M. SONO CREOL NIGHT
00, open-air stage)
10:00 P.M. RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
05, Cristal)
11:00 P.M. BALLY SAGOO AND FRIENDS
00, Shadow Lounge)
jcmmmsm-
Amnesia,
136 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
305-5317¡j535
Cameo Theatre,
1445 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
-3p5r532-092'2rs
Cristal,
1045 Fifth St, Miami Beach;
305-604-2582
Jackie Gleason Theater,
1700 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
305-673-7300
Ss
Lincoln Theatre,
541 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-673-3331
Open-air stage
in front of the Tides Hotel, Twelfth Street
and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach
Shadow Lounge,
1532 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
305-531-9411
Warsaw Ballroom,
1450 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
305?531-4555
Zoniyht all his
perceptions o{
reality were
swept away
and he {elt
an emotion he
couldn't
deny... fyipltOtU|
<7eel Zhe £motion £very Zhursday, Friday & Saturday
"Doors Open 11pm - 5am
737 VOushinyton ^Ivenue, S>outh f^each
Dip Reservations 305.674.0048 305.674.1933
P|||F|pies MIDEM Guide â–  An Advertising Supplement 15
New Expanded
Dining Room
located near
THS-Cottvéfitieñ
t©*ifiGrS#|gg^
Lincoln Road


BADI ASSAD MENAGERIE
At the forefront of this eclectic trio is the
ihasterful Brazilian guitarist-singer badi
assad. On Chameleon, her latest album,
badi (no capital letters, please) redefines
acoustic guitar performance, blending
Brazilian melody and body percussion
with ethnic sounds from around the
world. She’s joined by U.S. guitarist Jeff
Scott Young (formerly of Megadeth) and
Brazilian percussionist Simone Soul. Lis¬
AFRICAN RHYTHM
MESSENGERS
Composed of seasoned musicians
from some, of the greatest bands
from Africa and beyond, the
African Rhythm Messengers play a
high-spirited dance music with a global
kick. Musicologists could have a field
day tracing the rhythms on their album
Bottom Bellé (influences include high-
life, soukous, Afro-beat and reggae), but
what gets fans jumping at concerts are
the rollicking guitar licks, sensational
horns, and thrilling vocal harmonies.
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
Cristal
Thursday, June 24
10:00 p.m.
AKIYO
Guadeloupe’s most prestigious and popu¬
lar Carnival band formed nearly twenty
years ago in Pointe á Pitre. Drawing
heavily on African and Amerindian
influences, Akiyo in concert is a vibrant
whirl of drumming, dance, masks, and
costumes. What gives the group its stay¬
ing power is its hypnotic blend of parody
and gwo ka, a style of drumming and
singing once practiced in secret and now
celebrated as the heartbeat of Guade¬
loupe’s Carnival season.
MIZIK KRÉYOL LAKARAYIB
Amnesia
Wednesday, June 23
8:00 p.m.
Bands
A Guide to the Performers
ten to the sparks fly as these consum¬
mate musicians conjure up breathtaking
ethnopop soundscapes!
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
Cristal
Thursday, June 24
10:00 p.m.
BALLY SAGOO
Bom in Delhi, India, and now living in
England, acclaimed artist-producer
Bally Sagoo fuses Eastern sounds with
hip-hop, reggae, house, soul, and dance
music. Just imagine if Krishna let his
powers loose on a mixing board! Also
appearing with Sagoo:
• Anomie: A Miami-based improvisation-
al hip-hop band with an electronic vibe;
• The Dub Factory: Artists Paverez, Rita
Pereira, and Echo Ranks unite dub with
Indian music;
• Feenom Circle: A San Francisco-based
hip-hop group with an Indian rapper; and
• Gunjan Singh: A female vocalist from
India via England.
BALLY SAGOO & FRIENDS
Shadow Lounge
Thursday, June 24
11:00 p.m.
BASTER
Lead by singer Thierry Gauliris, this pop¬
ular group from the Indian Ocean nation
of Réunion mixes traditional maloya .
with modem sounds. Albums include
Mon Royom, Lorizon Kasé, and their
newest, Black Out, a collaboration with
Tyrone Downie of the Wailers. Fans of
Afro-pop will delight in the crosscurrents
that stir the album's grooves, transport¬
ing the listener from Africa to Jamaica
and back again!
SONO CREOL NIGHT
Open-air stage in front of the Tides Hotel
Thursday, June 24
9:00 p.m.
BERSUIT
Until recently, political repression made it
all but impossible for an Argentine band to
record a song like “Sr. Cobranza,” an out¬
right attack against Argentina’s government
and the oppression of Latinos. The single is
just one of several controversial offerings
on Libertinaje, the highly anticipated U.§.
debut by Buenos Aires rockers Bersuit. The
six-member band strikes a blow for freedom
of expression this Wednesday with an
explosive mix of rock, tango, rap,
and folklórica.
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV & Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
BRICK & LACE
Sisters Tasha, Nyanda, and Nailah honed
their talents singing in church, eventually
opening for such artists as Roberta Flack.
On Display, their first CD, offers a tasty mix
of Jamaican-seasoned RGB.
SOUD AGENCY & COZIER ENTERTAIN¬
MENT PRESENT ...
Cristal
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
CAFÉ TACUBA
One of the leading forces in Latin rock,
this quartet was awarded the 1998 MTV
Latino Video of the Year Award for its
song, “La Ingrata” (Thankless Woman).
_ Café Tacuba’s third album,
Avalancha de Exitos
(Avalanche of Hits) signals a
change in direction for the
band, offering new takes on
Latin American standards. Sortgs range
from Dominican merengue to bldtime
Mexican boleros. At a private showcase,
the band will premiere the short film,
“Revés,” from their new album;1
Private Screening, by invitation only
CÉSAR DE MELERO
The godfather of the Spanish house scene
since the early 1980s, DJ César de Melero
was instrumental in creating the legendary
Ibiza sound and “Balearic beat.” Voted one
of the 100 best DJs in the world by DJ
Magazine, he began his career at Ku Disco
(later Privilege) in Ibiza and since then has
played in Tel-Aviv, Euro Disney, and
throughout Europe. His first production to
chart in Great Britain was the single
“Night Moves.”
SGAE PRESENTS IBIZA NIGHT
Opening-night party, by invitation only
CEZAR SANTANA
This daredevil singer-guitarist mixes
spoken word and multimedia with lyrics .
in Portuguese, English, and Spanish.
Together with American composer Ricky
“Ricardo” Andrews, Santana is part of
New World Beat, which harnesses lush
chords and bittersweet melodies to
grooves from Brazil, North AMCrica, and
Africa. “Ze-ba-rum-ba,” a single from
their eponymous debut album, might be
described as a Brazilian surfer rock bal¬
lad (sort of like if the Beach Boys had
been from Rio.)
BMI SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Tuesday, June 22
9:00 p.m.
16 New Timas MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement


Bands
include Mística, Sueños de Libertad,
and his latest, Campos de Ilusiones.
CHRISTIAN
At 25 years old, this singer has
already garnered a string of
hit songs and awards in both
.Latin America and the United
States. His best-selling albums
include Agua Nueva, Nunca Voy
a¡ Oxidarte, and Lo Mejor de Mi.
Christian’s latest album, Mi Vida sin
tu Amor, was produced by Kike San¬
tander, who also worked with Christ-
ianipn the theme music for the soap
opera Angela. ‘
BMG PRESENTS
Jaclfie Gleason Theater
Wednesday, June 23
8,'ÓÜ p.m.
CONTROL MACHETE
This three-member group is the first
Mexican hip-hop band to achieve
crossover success in Latin America.
Mucho Barato (1997), their first
album, went gold in the United
States, Central America, and ;
Vtóezuela. Their new release,
Artillería Pesada Presente, spawned
the No. 1 single and video “Si Señor”;
it also'includes possibly the first track
in the history of Latin music to com¬
bine an aggressive rap with .tradition¬
al Cuban salsa performed by a live ,
ensemble. Control Machete’s MIDEM
appearance coincides with an exten¬
sive tour of Latin America, the United
States, and Europe. .
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV& Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
DANGEROUS CURVES
A^so known as Stephanie Haik, Dan¬
gerous Curves was formally trained as
an opera singer and classical musician
before honing her skills on New
York’s jazz and RftB circuit. Her
impressive vocals can be heard on
tracks by De La Soul, Malcolm
McLaren, and David Sancious. During
her MIDEM appearance she’ll work
tier magic on tunes such as “Feel
Inside” and “Love on the Sidewalk.”
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
DEREK LOPEZ
This best-selling musician has topped
the charts in Latin America with such
hits as “Batida de Coco,” “Esperando el
Sol” and “Ripa Na Xulipo.” Lopez’s
sound mixes Brazilian and Latin
rhythms with catchy melodies. Albums
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23
9:00 p.m.
DIVINE
Teenage singersNikki Bratcher, Kia
Thornton and Tonia Tash are simply
Divine. Thetfiib released then first album
last year, an upbeat effort called Fairy
Tales. Their breakthrough single, ^Late¬
ly,” finds the trio singing about (what
else?) teen romance. Says Nikki: “Our
album has a live feel, a fun feel; it is
about young love. Although our percep¬
tion ©floye may not be the same in ten
years, it’s about what’s real to us now —
empowerment, self respect,
moving on.”
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
ELIO REVÉ, JR., Y SU
CHARANGON
Musician Elio Revé, Jr., leads this
acclaimed band fiom Cuba. The group is
; released a hit album, Chagüi en la Casa
de Nora.
HMC PRODUCTION PRESENTS ...
A Tumi Music exclusive artist
Cristal
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
EL MANJAR DE LOS
DIOSES
El Manjar de los Dioses (The Food of the
Gods) fuses Latin rhythms, flamenco,
and postmodern European rock with a
dose of theatricality. A cult favorite in
Puerto Rico and the United States, they
were named one of the ten best rock
bands by Boom magazine (alongside Los
Fabulosos Cadillacs, Café Tacuba, and
Maná). Watch for their forthcoming trib¬
uté to The Cure, on an all-Latin release
by WEA Latina.
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV & Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
FELICIA ADAMS
Best known for her single, “Thinking
About You,” from her debut album New
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New Times MIDEN Cuide - An Advertising Supplement 17


Bands
his homeland following a
30-year exile.
AFRICAN NIGHT
¡mi
pi Beginnings, Felida Adams began her career
singing backup for Maty J. Blige. She is
currently in the studio working on a sec¬
ond album and has recorded a track with
Heavy D’ for his upcoming release.
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
*>3 Cameo Theatre
^ Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
|Ü GATO BARBIERI
A driving force in contemporary jazz for
30 years, tenor saxophonist Leandro
“Gato” Barbieri has seen his career flour¬
ish in three distinct phases: free jazz,
i*Latin jazz, and smooth jazz. Although the
musician-composer earned raves for his
work with Don Cherry, Airto, and other
innovators, it wasn’t until the release of, ’
his 1973 soundtrack Last Tango in Paris
that Barbieri became a household name.
, Che Corazon, his new release, features
original compositions and a cover of
“Auld Lang Syne” that promises to be an
anthem for the millenium!
BMI SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Tuesday, June 22
«I*, 9:00 p.m.
GIPSY KINGS
Hailing from the caravans of a Gypsy com-*
munity in the south of France, this band of
tightly Tout brothers. a£rd--eousins are
among world music's most acclaimed
artists. The brothers Reyes and Baliardo,
who speak in the Gypsy dialect of Gitane,
have mined their musical and cultural
. ropts,, producing such.hits as “Bamboleo”
Top 10 albums Mosaiqne, Allegria,
and Tierra Gitana. Their unique style,
..’known as rumba flamenca, blends Spanish,
French, and North African influences with
h flamenco guitar and passionate vocals.
Jackie Gleason Theater
Thursday, June 24
8:00 p.m.
GIRASOULES
A favorite in Spain and Latin America,
Girasoules is known for the hit song “Sin
Trabajo” (“Out of Work”), which rose
tó=No. 1 in Puerto Rico. The group -
recently released its fourth album,
Un Mundo Feliz (Á Happy World),
and toured this past February in-
Ecuador and the United States. Their
sound is a melodious mix of pop-
rock, Latin American, and Mediter¬
ranean-influenced music.
SGAE PRESENTS ROCK LATINO
By invitation only
GRUPO
CAFÉ NOSTALGIA
This fíne band makes its home in Little
Havana. The house band for Café Nos¬
talgia, a smoky little club on Calle Ocho,
boasts five talented musicians who
infuse Cuban standards with jazz, rock,
rumba, and rap. This past November the
band released Te Di la Vida Entera (I
Gave You AU I Had), a musical take on
a novel by Cuban expatriate Zoé Valdés.
For a taste of their percolating all-night
jam sessions, sample Grupo Café Nostal¬
gia, Live, recorded at the famous
Miami dub.
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT
Open-air stage in front of the Tides Hotel
Wednesday, June 23
8:30 p.m.
HERNALDO ZUÑIGA
This acclaimed singer-songwriter has
' been recording and performing for more
than twenty years. A restless spirit
whose music unites tropical, Andean,
and European influences, Zuñiga was
born in Nicaragua and has enjoyed suc¬
cessful careers in Chile, Spain, and Mex¬
ico. Among his best-known songs are
“Procuro Olvidarte,” “Una Vez al Mes”
(an homage to women), and Después de
Todos Estos Años.”
CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF SGAE
By invitation only
HUGH MASEKELA
South Africa’s leading émigré trumpeter
and bandleader has marked his 60th
year with an ambitious world tour and a
new album, Black to the Future. The
release finds Masekela mixing his .ever-
evolving Afro-soul-jazz sound with
Jamaican dancehalt, American hip-hop
and even Celtic-pop ballads. Highlights
of this gifted musician’s career include
touring the world with Paul Simon’s
Graceland show, cowriting the Broad¬
way musical Sarafina, and returning to’
Warsaw
Tuesday, June 22
10M) p.m.
JACOB DESVARIEUX
Born in Paris, Jacob Desvarieux spent
his childhood in the West Indies. At age
twelve he moved to Senegal, where he
learned to play guitar. In 1974 he met
brothers Pierre-Edouard and Georges
Dedmus and formed Kassav. This group
was one of the leading forces behind the
birth of zouk music and grew to achieve
international renown. Desvarieux shares
the stage Thursday night with his histo¬
ry-making cohorts.
SONO CREOL NIGHT
Open-air stage in front of the Tides Hotel
Thursday, June 24
9KX)p.m.
JAVIER
Bom in Spain, this 22-year-old pop singer
has just released his debut album, Lucha y
Verá, produced by Roberto Morales and
Christian De Walden. Induded in the
twelve tracks are Javier’s own pop and bal¬
lad compositions, among them, “Tiembla
MiPid.”
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23
9.-00p.m.
JAZÉ
This Orlando-based quartet is comprised of
four singers who also dance, ad, play
instruments, and write their own material
(whew!). Their self-titled debut (to be
released this summer) is a soulful collection
of Nineties music ranging from acoustic
RGB to hip grooves and pop ballads.
Onstage look for José on guitar, John on
bass, and Larry and Chaunty on keyboards.
MIDEM’99 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
JIMMY BOSCH
One of fire foremost
instrumentalists in Latin
jazz, trombonist Jimmy
Bosch pioneered the
movement known as salsa
dura (hard salsa). This year
he launched into his roles as bandleader, .
composer, and lyricist with the release of ,c
Sonea Trombon (Singing Trombone). Catch
Jimmy and his band live as they take lis-.
teners from Bronx funk to sultry guajiras
and swinging cha-cha-chas.
CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Tuesday, June 22
9.-00 p.m.
JOSÉ ALBERTO “EL
CANARIO»
A prolific recording artist with fifteen
solo albums under his belt, salsa star Jóse'
Alberto earned the nickname “El Canario”
because of his exquisite voice and amaz¬
ing whistling abilities. Chart-topping
releases indude Sueño Contigo (1988) and
On Time (1995), featuring a duet with his
frequent touring partner, Celia Cruz. Heri¬
do, his latest, showcases El Canario’s
vocal prowess in an exdting range of
musical settings, inducting merengue,
salsa dura, reggae, and classic Peruvian
mdodies.
CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Tuesday, June 22
9fl0p.m.
JULIETA VENEGAS
The young Mexican artist and composer
Julieta Venegas began her musical career
when she was a child. A former member
of the groups Chantaje and Tijuana No, |g
she ventured out on her own in 1991 and
released her first solo album, Aqui, six
years later. The album sold in both Mexi¬
co and the United States, and featured
Venegas’s own compositions and instnH
mentals.
SGAE PRESENTS ROCK LATINO
By invitation only
KADOC
This Spanish house-techno band scored in
1995 with the hit The Night Train," which
sold more than four million copies world-
■ Hew Times, MIDEM Guide - An Adv^rti^jig Supp!ement s f 1„ ,
fit tnsmatqnug SnfaB’iíwbíí - abiuff «aniiT #aK


twenty years of zouk with the release
of Soldi.
wide. Other notable maxi-sin¬
gles include “You Giot to Be
There” and “Rock the Bells.”
Popular with Boy George, resi¬
dent DJ of the Ministry of
Sound, Kadoc has toured Europe,
Scandinavia, and Russia, and is a
favorite of Europride, the gay macrofes¬
tival. United People, Kadoc’s first album,
Was released in 1998.
SGAE PRESENTS IBIZA NIGHT
Opening-night party, by invitation only
KANPÉCH
Kanpéch is considered one of the top
three rasin (roots) bands in Haiti, along-
side Boukman Eksperians and Boukan
Ginen. The group formed in 1985 under
the name Sunrise and evolved a unique
style that blends rasin with rock, jazz,
Upes, and reggae. For the past two years
Kanpéch has won first place in Haiti’s
Carnaval. The music you’ll hear in -
Wednesday’s showcase features arresting
pop-rock melodies over a base of tradi¬
tional vodou and rara rhythms.
MIZIK KRÉYOL LAKARAYIB
Amnesia
Wednesday, June 23
8.-00 p.m.
THE LATIN JAZZ CREW
.Originally from the United States, Cuba,
Venezuela, and Puerto Rico, the five-
irttember Latin Jazz Crew first came
together in Miami for special engage¬
ments. The musical chemistry was so
exhilarating that they decided to form
their own all-star group. The crew’s ros¬
ter includes bass player and musical
director Eddie “Gua Gua” Rivera and
pianist-composer Jorge Sosa. Recent
performances in South Florida include
infest Festival, the Lipton Tennis
Championship, and Super Bowl XXXflL
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23
900 p.m.
LES FRÉRES DECIMUS
Brothers Pierre-Edouard and Georges
Decimus enjoyed successful solo'
careers in Guadeloupe before moving
to Paris in the early 1980s. That geo¬
graphic shift led to the formation of
the band Kassav and the birth of a
new French West Indian music —
zouk. Awarded the Victoire de la
MuSique for their efforts, Kassav sold
several million albums and toured T
throughout the world. This year, tes
SONO CREOL NIGHT
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Thursday, June 24
9.-00 p.m.
LOS HIDALGO
Although Venezuela is part of South
America, its Caribbean access gives
some of its artists an island perspec¬
tive, as well as a readiness to absorb
new influences. These tendencies are
hallmarks of the three brothers Jesús
Henrique, Jannio, and Jaime Hidalgo,
who weave a polyphonic tapestry of
Caribbean sounds, mainty Afros-
Cuban. Listen carefully at the group’s
BM1 showcase to their lyrics, written
by their father, Venezuelan poet and
composer Enrique. Hidalgo.
BMI SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Tuesday, June 22
900p.m.
MANÁ
Grammy Award winners Maná have
claimed three gold records in the
United States (a first and only for a
Latin rock hand) and boast multiplat¬
inum sales worldwide. Their latest
effort, an MTV Unplugged album,
kicks off a U.S. stadium tour this
summer, in which they coheadline
with Carlos Santana. Maná's most
recent studio album, Sueños Líquidos,
earned the group a Grammy this year
in the Best Latin Rock/Alternative
category.
Private Screenings, by invitation only
THE MANGO ROOM
The Mango Room combines hip-hop,
soul, and text to create mesmerizing
spoken-word performances. Once a
fringe art, spoken word has exploded
into the mainstream with such pro¬
jects as Broadway’s Bring in ’da
Noise, Bring in ’da Funk. Today the
Mango Room has grown to become
one óf the most popular performance
sets in live entertainment, playing to
crowds from New York City to S -
Europe.
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
1000 p.m.


MARTINIQUE SWING
MACHINE
As a show of solidarity for MIDEM
Americas 1999,. mote than a dozen of
Martinique’s acclaimed performers have
¡. joined forces to form^the Martinique
mM Swing Machine. This all-star showcase
band represents nearly every style of
popular West Indian music, including
zouk. The electrifying lineup features
Harry Diboula, Kali, Doc Lee, Thierry
: Lof, Eddy Marc, Mareé et Tumpak,
Orlane, Max Ransay, Dédé. Saint Prix,
to Shango, Shanky, Skwal, and
T many others.
MIZIK KRÉYOL LAKARAYIB
Amnesia
Wednesday, June 23
8:00 p.m.
MIGHTY CLOUDS OF JOY
Hold onto your Sunday hats, Miami. A
legendary gospel act is blowing into
town, and they’re gonna rain praise on
. the^Magic City. The three-time Grammy
winners will “Steal Away to Jesus"
. Wednesday night with the down-home,
'^traditional sound that launched their
career in the 1960s. This was before
they broke ground as the “Temptations
of Gospel” and made funk an article of
faith. “That spark that only the Holy
Spirit can give you is still burning
strong in us,” says founding member
- Joe Ligón. “If we ever lost that, we
might as well pack it in and go home.”
GOSPEL NIGHT
Lincoln Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
9:00 p.m.
NESTOR TORRES
The premier flutist in Latin jazz has
become a favorite on the Miami concert
and social scene since he moved here
from Puerto Rico in the 1980s. Three
years ago he received his biggest honor
yet when he was asked to perform at
Florida’s Inaugural Ball for the President
and Vice President. On Wednesday night
Torres showcases material from Treasures
of the Heart, his fifth release. The album
. includes a sensuous cover of the classic,
’ “Ain’t No Sunshine,” and guest appear-
n^ances by Marc Antoine and Kim Waters.
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Wednesday, June 23
9.Wp.m.
PEDRO GUERRA
Bom and raised on the island of Tenerife,
Pedro Guerra is one of Spain’s hottest
singer-songwriters. His newest album,
Raiz (Root), boasts a unique pop sensibil¬
ity flavored by the music of the Canary
Islands. Guerra’s best-selling singles
include “Debajo del Puente” (“Under the
Bridge”), and “Contamíname” (“Contami¬
nate Me”), which was also interpreted by
Ana Belén and Victor Manuel. Miami
audiences may be familiar with his
soundtrack for Maraña, which received
the award for Best Film at the recent
Miami Film Festival. -
CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF SGAE
By invitation only
PLENA LIBRE
In just four years this band has become a
potent force in Puerto Rico’s music
scene, offering a new twist on the Afro-
Caribbean style known as plena, Trans¬
forming, traditional rhythms with unique
arrangements, Plena Libre has generated
RICARDO LEMVO
& MAKINA LOCA
Voted Best Emerging Artist of 1998 at
the American Music Awards, Ricardo
Lemvo and his band Makina Loca play
an infectious mix of AfrorCuban
rhythms and soukous music from the -
Congo region. Composer and lead singer
ROK1A TRAORÉ
Singer Rokia Traoré belongs to a new
generation of African artists who are
acutely modem and open to Western
influences Whüe remaining attached to
OZOMATU
This ten-piece band from East LA
tweaks people’s consciousness with a
highly politicized amalgamation of
cumbia and hip-hop. They sing in
Spanish but rap in English, creating a
high-octane mix of congas and
claves, turntables and tablas, trum¬
pets and saxophones. New York Times
music critic Ann Powers listed their 1998
debut album as one of the year’s ten best
Watch for the samba line that begins every
live performance.
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV & Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
PATO SANTON
A fifteen-year veteran of the reggae
scene, Banton has enjoyed a string of hits
with Sting, UB40, and the Beat, as well as
with Bis own band, the Reggae Revolu¬
tion. His group’s worldwide hits include
. “Baby Come Back,” “Groovin’”, and
“Bubbling Hot” A dynamic stage art,
they come to Miami fresh from a two-
week tour of France with Jimmy QifF.
After MIDEM Americas 1999 they embark
on a tour of the United States.
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
Cristal
Thursday, June 24
10.-00 p.m.
Bands
ten hit singles and seven
albums, including Juntos y
Revueltos, just reissued with
new mixes and vocals. An outstanding
live art, they’ve played more than
1000 concerts.
CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Tuesday, June 22
9:00 p.m.
PM PROJECT
PM Project is the stage name of Pedro del
Moral,, an Ibiza DJ and producer with
extensive credits. He has remixed songs
by the Gipsy Kings, Ricky Martin,
Suzanne Vega, Azúcar Moreno, Ketama,
and Texas and produced and remixed
material by ASAP. His first release as PM
Project, “Rima Brasileña,” sold more than
one million copies throughout the world;
he followed it with the single, “I Know
What You Did.”
SGA£ PRESENTS IBIZA NIGHT
Opening-night party, by invitation only
Lemvo grew up in the
former Zaire. He formed
his eight-member group
in Los Angeles in Í990
with musicians from
Cuba, Europe, and the
United States. Expect
this multilingual group
to take Afro-pop to the I
bridge and beyond at Thursday’s
showcase.
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT
Open-air stage in front of
the Tides Hotel
Wednesday, June 23
8:30 p.m.
RICHARD BONA
The buzz has been building for soiné |
time about this extraordinary bassist i
with the haunting voice. Multi-instru- ||
mentalist Richard Bona was a Child
prodigy in his native West Africa before
he joined the ranks of top session play-k
ers in Paris and New York City, playing
for Paul Simon, Harry Connick, Jr., and
Harry Belafonte. Scenes From My Life,
his forthcoming debut album, features
Bona’s vocal and songwriting prowess
in a mix of jazz, world music,
and pop.
AFRICAN NIGHT
Warsaw
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
PEDRO ALFONSO
This virtuoso Cuban violinist digs deep
into Afro-Cuban rhythms (guagiianco,
son montuno, and danzón) while main¬
taining impeccable classical technique.
Alfonso’s signature style has graced
albums by Alberto Plaza, lllapu, Oscar
Silva, and. Carmen Prieto. Prior to set¬
tling in Miami this past; October, Alfon-.
so spent six years in Chile, where he
recorded Cuerdas Locas, his first sólo
album.
BMI SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Tuesday, June 22
9:00 p.m.
Q.T.
Quality and Togetherness (Q.T.) form the
nucleus of this all male quintet whose
members range in age from 18 to 21. The
group sings a soulful blend of reggae and
REtB and has earned two consecutive
JAM1 Award nominations for their live
performances. Q.T. appeared at Reggae
Sunsplash ’98 and Reggae Super Jam ’97,
and opened for Sting in two back-to-back
performances. Singles include “My Way”
and “You and Me.”
SOLID AGENCY & COZIER ENTERTAIN¬
MENT PRESENT
Cristal
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
ROBERT AVELLANET
One of the highest-profile ex-Menudos,
Avellanet brings a fresh spirit to both
classic and contemporary salsa. The
young tenor recently launched his solo -
career with Sentir, arranged by Isidro
Infante. The album includes a salsa ver-; ¡
sion of the Enrique Iglesias hit,
“Miente,” and “Mi Confesión," written
for Avellanet by Domingo Quinones. ^
Avellanet recorded four albums with J
Menudo between 1988 and 1991, when?
he left to form the group Euphoria.
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23
9:00 p.m.


Wr •
New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement 21


m
fíiiíYsi
their roots;TIer limpid Evince and Subtle
compositions point tOward a unique
direction for African, wprnen’s music. Her
latest album is titled Mounaissa- (1998). ijjgj
AFRICAN NIGHT ....
Warsaw ;
Tuesday, June 2IpM
10:00 p.m.
ROSANA
During a six-month period in 1996, this
-charismatic singer-songwriter went from
Ofr small-town bars in’Spain to the top of
the country’s charts. Ho- debut album,
Lunas Rotas, spent seven weeks at No. 1 -
and was followed inj'1998' by Luna
Nueva. Rosaña’s hybrid music encom- *
passes Latin influences from both sides
of the Atlantic,'t- salsa, rumba, ranchera,
and Iberian folk music — and possesses
an optimism she attributes to having
grown up in the- light-filled
' Canary Islands.
CELEBRATING 100 YESARS OFSGAE
By invitation only â– 
<||| SALLY NYOLO
^Former Zap Mama singer Sally Nyolo
continues to dazzle with her rich reper¬
toires and phenomenal vocal range. On
Multiculti, “The Flower of Cameroon”
blends intricate African melodies and
rhythms with earthj^^cal stylings and
a strong sense of lyricism. Among the
delicious sounds she stirs into her brew
: are reggae, bikutsi, rap, Pygmy-yodel,
hip-hop, and makossa. Warsaw - the
club thqt prides itself on having “been
there, done that” - ain’t seen nothing
’ -like this visionary artist/activist. Whit
rill she steps up to the mike and has her
W^ íway with South Beach.
AFRICAN NIGHT
Warsaw
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
SARGENTO GARCIA
Named for its lead singer (Bruno “Sar¬
gento” Garda), this eleven-member
band plays a mixed grill of Cuban
rhythms, salsa, and ragamuffin. In its
prior incarnation as Ludwig von 88, the
group was a star in the French alterna¬
tive rock scene and recorded eleven
albums before splitting up in 1998. Sar¬
gento Garcia’s first album, ¡Que Viva el
Sargento!, piqued the interest of Cuban
musician Isaac Ddgado, who hooked the
band up with Virginjtecords. ÍÍjs
group’s second album, Un Poquito Que-
ifffffffPfffffffiffflili
maó, features seventeen' songs in French
and. Spanish, that celebrate love, la fies-
ta, and sqgial justicg;
SGAE PRESENTS ROCK
LATÍNO
By invitation only ?;â– 
SCARE DEM CREW
One of Kingston’s wildest
bands, ScareDem Crew has
been knownto speak in tongues
and leap offstage headfirst at
"Tuesday’s benefit -for VHrliSave the
f Musfe,-Which -supports musiCdn the’'
E? â– sthoolsr-^
Bands
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999
R&B GALA .
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
fans. But don’t let that throw you.
Behind outrageous costumes and psy¬
chedelic hair are some of the most
infectious grooves in hard-core dance-
hall. The crew is currently touring in
support of their debut album, Scared
From the Crypt. Miami should be jump¬
ing when Boom Dandemite and friends
“Kick in da Door” with their
gangsta licks. ' â– 
SOLID AGENCY & COZIER
ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT
Cristal
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
SHANICE WILSON
A former Motown singer, Wilson hit the
top of the pop and RftB charts with “I
Love Your Smile” and other hits pro¬
duced by Narada Michael Walden. The
twenty-something-year-old singer has
just recorded her first album for La
Face, titled simply Shanice. Producer
Babyfaee showcases Wilson’s powerful,
sensitive vocals, as well as her emerging
songwriting talents. At the R&B Gala,
she’s certain to entertain listeners with
soul-filled slow jams and infectious
groove tunes.
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
TABOU COMBO
Tabou Combo are the most renowned per¬
formers of compás, Haiti's national dance
music. Since moving from Petion-Ville to
New York-City in 197 J, the twelve-member
band has played in venues throughout
Europe, Japan, North America, South
America, and the Caribbean, with a special
appearance'at the United Nations. In their
31 years together, Tabou Combo has -
released more than 26 albums, including
I997’s 360 Degrees.
SONO CREOL NIGHT
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel -
Thursday, June 24
900p.m.
T.C.
Emerging talent T.C. is a charismatic*
eighteen-year-old RGB artist from Grand
Rapids, Michigan. Signed to Missy “Mis¬
demeanor” Elliot’s label, T.C. has1 been ;’
described ás a “modern-day DOnny Hath¬
away.” The singeris nerve is. almost-as,
impressive as his voice,TJpon meeting
Missy Elliot for the first time, T.C. sattg;¿¿
for her a capella right on the street; the
producer was so impressed she sirred
him on the spot T.C.’s first album is
scheduled for release in August and fea¬
tures Missy Elliot and Lil’ Mo.
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
CameoTheatre
Tuesday, June 22
1000p.m.
T* KALLA
Brooklyn-bred T’Kalla is a well-known
performer and’writer on the New York
arts scene. She has performed with the
Fugees, Nona Hendrix, and Me’Shell
NdegeOcello, and appeared at .the Blue
Notefin^London,rand Hot Brass, in Paris:
T’Kalla hails james Brown and Ntozake ’’
Shange as her inspirations: “They have
so much funk, soul, and flava in their jp
work, you can almost taste it.” She hosts
TEVIN CAMPBELL
Lauded as the next Michael Jack-f
son, Tevin Campbell wasthirteen years!
old when he recorded his first No. 1 hit|
“Tomorrow (A Better You, Better Mejjjr
for the Quincy Jones multiplatinum -I
album, Back On The Block (1990). SiSc¿
then, Campbell has recorded four suc¬
cessful CDs, yielding three Top 5 pom;
hits and six No. 1 RftB singles. His nlw
self-titled album finds the singer mafiire
and confident of his musical gifts, wáh
soulful ballads, funky grooves und pipnt
ty Of crossover appeal."
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22 J,
10:00 p.m.
VALLEJO
, ThiCAustin quintet (named for lead. _
singer-güiíárist.AJ Vallejo and His twin ^
brother, drummer Alejandro) shakes up
Latin rhythms, hard funk, and Seventies
rock. On Beautiful Life, their second"" -
release, Vallejo adds hip-hop to the J
incendiary sound, with Beastie Boys | \
cohort D J Hurricane mixing four of the f
album’s tracks. A well-honed and fieiy
live show!
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23 -
9.00 p.m.
VICKIE WINANS
Gospel star Vickie Winans is riding the suc¬
cess of her sixth solo effort, Vickie WinM^:
Live in Detroit Ft, and its lead single,
“Already BeenJo the Water.” The Detroit* ^
. bgrn snigerrsays, “It has me singing Jesus
with all my might I think we say Jesus 50-
tb.60 times back to bade in the song! You
see, I’m not ashamed to call His name.”
Take your own count at Vickie’s perfor¬
mance, where the star of the Broadway
musical, Don’t Get God Started, unleashes
her magnificent; soul-stirring voice.
GOSPEL NIGHT
Lincoln Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
900 p.m.
WCK
This five-member group has earned
place among top Caribbean dance bandsby
updating Dominica’s traditional music, jing
ping, with a pulsating beat The result iaj£L
music they call bouyop. Formed in 1988
WCK (Windward Caribbean Kulture) has .Is
released an album every year since 1992, ‘
making a mark with the hit singles “Conch
Shell” (1993) and “Balance Batty” (1995).
The award-winning group has toured most
of the-Caribbean, North and South Ameri-
ca, and Europe.
MIZIK KREÉYOL LAKARAYIB
Amnesia
Wednesday, June 23
800p.m.
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Best Be Getting Home
By'Robin Dougherty
Like the old adage about good campers who can
start á fire with only three matchsticks, the M
Ensemble Company, Inc., has struck a full blaze
with Home, a production crackling with inventive¬
ness fhat defies its low-budget parameters with
cotitáfiistible theater talent Samm-Art Williams’s
draidjMn-poetry about a young Southern fariner
whódoses his love, and nearly his life, to the big
city has only three actors and a defiantly simple
stoiytarc. But this troupe is so supple there’s no
ddubt the Ensemble'could stage, oh, a Twelfth
Night in its tiny storefront space that would be
iridre thoughtfal and original than almost any¬
thing shown at the Coconut Grove Playhouse or
the. Florida Stage this past season.
Not that anyone needs them to do the Bard.
The 28-year-old Ensemble (the “M” stands for
magic, mystery, movement) has been staging
works With African-American themes since they
moved into a former warehouse in liberty City in
the early Seventies and produced works by local
playwrights. The company made its home at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts Center from 1975
to 19^6,-then moved to the Bakehouse Art Com¬
plex, jvhere it stayed through 1991, producing
acclaimed but rare-in-South Florida works such
asrpebrge C. Wolfe’s The Colored Museum and
Lonnie Edler Ill’s Ceremonies in Dark Old Men.
Home, which the Negro Ensemble Company pre¬
miered in its Ñew York studio in the late Seven-
ties%tefore transferring it to Broadway, is the M
Ensemble’s first show in its new Space, nestled
in a strip mall in North Miami.
That file theater is not on the list of most-often
mentioned Miami cultural institutions is our loss.
It took me a year to find M Ensemble and now
that I have, I’m happily recommending it as an
alternative to South Elorida’s commercial the¬
aters that s’eemingly choose works
because they’ll offend the least number
of subscribers. M Ensemble -has lasted
almost 30years by doing the plays it
thought were important to the commu¬
nity or ignored by other theaters. Sure I
wish they had an upscale venue, but
given the choice between .comfortable
seats, and discomforting theater experi¬
ences, I’ll take the basics of good acting
and directing over a big-budget set or
plush auditorium anytime.
It’s nice to report that Home, despite its
twenty-year-old shelf life, has also aged remark¬
ably well. Set primarily in North Carolina in the
Fifties, Sixties, and Seventies, the drama is time¬
less in’the true sense of the word. References to
the Vietnam War or Quaaludes don’t date it,
though other references (Saturday night fish
fries, jump-rope chants, and Seventies fashions)'
give the story a palpable cultural specificity.
At its center is Cephus Miles, a poor black
farmer in a town called Cross Roads who is in
love with local girl Pattie Mae Wells. The story,
told in sinuous flashbacks, recounts how
Cephus’s life changes when Pattie Mae goes off
to college in Richmond, Virginia, then marries a
lawyer and decides not to return to Cross Roads.
Long before we learn of this important develop¬
ment, however, we perceive that Cephus’s life is
infused with sadness.
When he is still a young man, the grandfather
and uncle who raised him die and Cephus is left
alone, searching for God. But God, it seems, is
nowhere to be found. In fact .“he took a vacation to
the beaches of Miami, while
I’m stuck in the hot tobacco
fields,” Cephus reports. This
doesn’t stop Cephus.. In one of
the plays many comically
expressionisfic tacks, he tries
to reach God by phone. Later
a voice tells Cephus: “Don’t
you call God, hell call you.”
As it happens' 'Cephus
hears many voices through¬
out the play. The drama’s
secondary roles are played
by two women, Tara Reid
(who also portrays, Pattie
Mae) and Shirley Richardson
.'(an M Ensemble cofounder).
Together they embody an
entire army of people -;— Sun¬
day-school teachers, neigh¬
bor children, bus drivers,
drug dealers, jazz musicians,
welfare clerks, á cSnjure
woman, and on ^¿‘who
cross paths witft Cephus over
the years.
The two women also act ask"
sort of Greek chorus. Somé- g
"times their voices reflect the
straggles with Cephus’s conscience. That’s the
'case when Cephus hasto decide whether to take
his collection money fe church with him on Sun¬
day morning or to step over to the graveyard,
where he can roll .dice with other gamblers on the
flat surfaces of the raised vaults.
Other times the voices provide a soundtrack to
Cephus’s life, replete with gospel tunes and|
poetry improvised from cultural touchstones and
That M Ensemble is
noton the list of most-often
mentioned Miami cultural
institutions is our loss.
â– â– 
' locomotive soundsCOne recurring voice urges
Cephus to leave Cross Roads, hop a train, and
“take it to the city.
“Clickety-clack, clickety-clack,” the"voice says.
“The Midnight Special and the Shoo Fly/Take
this country boy to the promised land.”
No one will be surprised to learn that the urban
landscape that lures and seduces Cephus with its-
flash is not the promised land. Or that Cephus
eventually returns to Cross Roads, where, if"
turns out, God may have been on vacation but be
did arrange a nice surprise for the farmer.
No, the power of Home comes from its sweet
retelling of now eternal themes: of the widening
. divide between rural and urban values; and of
communities that are destroyed when individu¬
als are separated from their homes or leave
because the land can’t give them all they need. “I
, can’t grow fat and old and slow breeding babies
in a dusty old farmhouse,” Pattie Mae tells her
Cross-Roads friends. “The socieconomic stan¬
dards .are, no longer tp my .liking. ”,
Williams’s nostalgia-drunk dialogue remakes
this familiar story into something fresh and new,
full of affectionate images. In one aside Cephus
tells us about a-second cousin who learns from
watching her pet rooster intimidate the family
dog that “this was a sign from. God that short
^people had permission to beat up on large peo:
"Iple.” Later, as Cephus winds his way back to
^Cross Roads, Williams has his chorus point out
that while the bus passes,tenements and slums,
. on .this night the travelers’ perception ofjfep
world is rosy, because if s Christmas •
In broad comic strokes, the playwright paints
fiie activity within the bus itself. “Like a shoebox
full of chickens,” is how Cephus describes it, not"
ing that “the Greyhound bus isn Negro institu¬
tion,” overflowing with crying babies, smelly
-feet, and ne’er-do-wells offering passengers
drinks of “gin and beer.” As for Cephus himself,
nervous to return after thirteen years away, the
Santa Claus-like bus driver exhorts, “Don’t worry
how you look, just get onboard.”
get onboard, too, after sitting through just,
afew minutes oiHome. Although technically con¬
fined on a set made of 50 dollars’ worth of hard¬
ware (a wooden fence defines the perimeter of the
performance space, where the only furniture is
- Gephus’S .front-porch rocking chair and a few
boxes shifted around to suggest other objects),
the production easily lends itself to the audience’s
imagination. Director Jerry Maple, Jr., moves his
three-person cast with a sophisticated choreogra¬
phy of comings and goings, costiime changes, and
transformations of age and sex.
Reid and Richardson are deft and appealing per¬
formers, but the show belongs to Nathan Andrew.
As Cephus he never flags from delivering a perfor¬
mance that's as physically demanding as it is emo¬
tionally authentic. He’s an old man and a young
man, a hipster (“I am... so cool”), a farmer down
on his luck, a jailbird, and a free spirit, all in the
space of two hours. For a theatergoer looking to
be transported out of the day-to-day routine,
Andrew’s acting is an open-door. CD isyoA •/«.
Samm-Art
Williams.
Directed by
Jerry Maple, Jr.
With
Shirley
Richardson,
Tara Reid, and
Nathan Andrew.
Through
â– 
M Ensemble
Company, Ine,
12320 W Dixie
Nwy, North Miami;
305-895-8955.
Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 69


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Theater
Listings
Ain't Misbehavin': Broadway hit ai® Tony winner set
in ^ 1930s Harlem nightclub and featuring the
mu^h of Fats Waller, including “Honeysuckle
‘•Rose” and “The Joint'Is Jumpin’.” Through August
15. Evening performances Friday and Saturday at
8'OOjmatinee Saturday and Sjmday at-2:0Q. $
Broward Stageíloor Theatre, 8(336 W Sample Rd,
'■Sorefl Springs; 954-344-7765'. •
Always... Patsy Cline: Sally Struthers (All in the
Family) costars in this show aboutthe couhtry-
western singing sensation, Struthers plays a
woman who befriends Cline right before her
carefcr takes off. The show is designed to .
showcase Cline fávorites from “Crazy” and
'Walkin’ After Midnight” tote%s well-known
covers of Hank Williams and Bill Monroe songs,
and $4ichael Larsen’s musical direction is almost
•always sure of itself. Rachel Lynn Ricca sings the
title role; she’s a charismatic cabaret singer who ,,
béais a striking resemblance to Cline. Her, voice
powerfully conjures the memory of Cline’s
[ gorgeous and baroque vocal mannerisms.
Struthers, on the other hand, is all ham. Through
June 27. Evening performances Wednesday
through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinee
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2;00. ', ,
•Hollywood Playhouse, 2640 Washington St,
Hollywood; 954-922-0404.
Bent: Martin She rman’s 1979 play about a
homosexual who ends up in Dachau. Through
June 27. Evening performances Friday and
Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00. Academy
Theatre, 2700 W Oakland Park Blvd, Fort
Lauderdale; 9544868876 /:
Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect UpP:
Musical revue about the trials and tribulations of
elementary school. Through July ! L. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00
(dinner at 6:00); twilight show Suñjíay'at 6:00 - -
(dinner at 4:00); matinee Wednesday. Saturday,
and some Thursdays at 2:00 (dinner at noon).
Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, 303 SE Mizner Blvd,
Boca Raton; 561-392-3755. -
Home: Reviewed in this issue. Drama about two
black teenagers in a small Southern town whose
lives are changed when the girl goes off to college
and die boy stays home to farm. Through June 27.
Evening performances Thursday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 3:00. M Ensemble, 12320 W Dixie Hwy,
North Miami; 305-895-8955. _
The Horror Cali: Dracula, Frankenstein’s monster,
and other creeps interact with the audience, who
walk through the performance area in a tour of a
simulated haunted house. Evening performances
Thursday through Sunday beginning at 6:00. • •
Indiana Mystery at the Horror Center, 2895
McFarlane Rd, Coconut Grove. ;
I Love You, You're Perfect How Change: This affable, if
not particularly original, musical commentary
(with sketches) on modern romance features a
cast in good voice. Through September 5. Evening
performance Thursday through Saturday at 8:30,
matinee Sunday at 3:00. Actors’ Playhouse at the
Miracle Theatre, Balcony Theater, 280 Miracle
Mile, Coral Gables; 305444-9293.
Sibling rivalry with a twist The Sisters Grimm dish the dirt on their stepsister, Cinderella
International Hispanic Theatre Festival: Fourteenplays
and dance performances from nine nations,
performed through iJuiie’20 at Teatro Avante (235 i
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 305445-8877); the
Coconut Grove Playhouse (3500 Main Hwy,
Coconut Grove; 3054424000); Miami-Dade
Community College, Wolfeon Campus, (Wolfeon
Auditorium, 30O NE 2nd Ave; 3.05237-3262); the
Colony Theater (1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
3056743350); the little Theatre (2100 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach;-3054458877); Area Stage (645
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-673-8002); Lincoln
Theatre (541 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-673-3331); and El Habito (5401 Collins Aye,
Miami Beach;305445887). Roberto Athayde's La
Señorita Doña Margarita, presented by Teátro
-Utftc, Madrid, Spain: Evening performances in
Spanish June 17 and 18 át &30 at the Little Theatre.
Crespulo Torres B’s £/ Album, presented by Teatro
TecaL Bogotá, Colombia: Evening performances in
mime June 18 and 19 at 7:00 at the Euclid Circle,
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach. L Fernandez de
Moratin’s El Sí délas Niñas, presented by El
Alacrán Teatro, Madrid, Spain: Evening
performance by deaf actors using sign language
June 19 at 8:30 at the Lincoln Theatre. Miguel de
Cervantes’s Clown Quijote de la Mancha, presented
•by Teatro Uroc, Madrid, Spain as part of
International Children’s Day celebration: Matinee in
Spanish June 20 at 2:00 at MDCC Wolfeon
Auditorium. Osvaldo Drágen and Ismael Hase’s Y
por Capa, Cómo Andamos?, presented by Compañía
Mabel Manzotti, Buenos Aires, Argentina: Evening
performance in Spanish June 20 at 8:30 at El Hábito.
For information about any festival events, call the
festival hotline, 3054458877.
Isadora Libra: Octavio Campos’s dance-theatre piece
explores the works of choreographer Isadora
Duncan and the political speeches of Fidel Castro.
June 21 through 23. Performance on June 21
benefits the Juggerknot Theatre Company’s Jiily
appearance at the American Living Room Festival in
New York.' Evening performances Monday through
Wednesday at:8:l5; second evening shows Tuesday
and Wednesday at 10:15. Area Stage, 645 Lincoln
Rd, Miami Beach, 305-673-8002.
Looking into the Stands: Rodolfo Sáñtana’s play,
translated into English by Charles Philip Thomas,
is about two adversaries who discover they have
something-in common. Matinee Saturday, June 19,
at 2:00. Bridge Theater at Miami Beach library
Rotunda, 2100 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
3053752665.
Love's Fin: Showcase of seven ghort plays by Eric
Bogosian, William Finn, John Guare, Tony
Kushner, Marsha Norman, Ntozake Shange, and
Wendy Wasserstein, based on the sonnets of
William Shakespeare and performed by an
ensemble ofeightSoutiiTloridaactors. The acting
talent isn’t evenly dispersed among the troupers,
so the quality ranges from brilliant to annoying,
but the production s lively, intelligent, and in
several cases, highly inventive. Through June 20¿
Evening performance Friday and Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00. Actors’ Project Theatre
Company at the Studio, 640 N Andrews Ave, Fort
Lauderdale, 954-3458063.
Mixed Emotions: Romantic comedy about two
widowed senior citizens who discover they may be
in love with each other. Through July 25. Evening
performance Friday and Saturday at 8:00, Sunday
at 7:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00. Broward Stage
Door Theatre, 8036 W Sample Rd, Coral Springs;
954-344-7765;
Murder at Café Hoir: Audience-participation murder-
mystery modeled on 1940s detective dramas.
Ongoing. Evening performance Saturday at 7:30
(includes dinner). The Landmark, 219 N 21st Ave,
Hollywood^954-922-7488.
Písase Don't Squeeze the Melons: Musical revue
about finding and holding onto love and
relationships in Y2K. Through June 27. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; ;/
matinee Sunday at 2:00. Public Theatre at
Miiseum of Aft Auditorium” YE Etfsuias
Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; 954-5652243.
Psychopathia Sexualls: Florida premiere of
John Patrick Shanle/s romantic comedy
about two men and one therapist June 19
through July 18. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturdays 8:00, v •> g
Sunday át 7:00¿matin.eeSundayat 2:00.
GableStage-atthe Biltmore, 1200 Anaplasia
Ave, Coral Gables, 3054451119.
A Raisin in the Sun: Lorraine Hansbenys
classic, which is 40 years old this year, is
about an African-American family who
dreams of living in their own home but
fight prejudice and bad luck as they |
struggle to make it a reality. Through June
27. Vinnette Carroll Theatre, 503 S£ 6th St,
Fort Lauderdale; 954462-2424. ; at..
The Sisters Grimm: Late-night comedy
about Lucinda and Fabella Grimm, "
Cinderella’s infamous stepsisters, who
retell the classic fairy tale from their
point of view. Ongoing. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at
11:00. EDGE/Theatre, 405 Española
Way, Miami Beach; 305531-6083.
Studio Theatre '99: Festival of one-act plays
directed by students. 702 and Vampire
lesbians of Sodom: Evening performance
Wednesday, June 16, through Friday, June
18, at 7:30. Miami-Dade Community
College, North Campus, William and Joan
Lehman Theater, Bldg 5,11380 NW 27th
Ave; 305237-1091.
Suddenly Last Summer Tennessee Wdliams’^-^fe
potboiler about a woman who suffers a nervofllr
breakdown after experiencing an unusual incident.
while on vacatioa Through June 20. Evening
performance Friday and Saturday at 8:00, matinee
Sunday at 3:00. EDGE/Theatre at Hollywood â– 
Boulevard Theatre, 1938 Hollywood Blvd; W
9549295400.
Summer Shorts '99: CityTheatre’s fourth annual’
festival of ten-minute plays. Program A: Staci
Swedeen’s A Little Bit of Culture-, Don Nigro’s
Things That Go Bump in the Night, Jane Martin’s .
Making the Call; Brooke Berman’s Dancing mth
the Devil; David Ives’s Time Flies; Caroline sjj
Williams’s Just Be Frank; James Farrell’s Donnie;
and Al Sjoerdsman’s Progress. Program B: Seth
Kramer’s The Tarantino Variation; William
Mastrosimone’s Precipice; John Sheehyfe Stopping
at Union; Rich OrlofFs Last-Minute Adjustments
and Matterhorn; Des Gallantes White Dance;
Leslie Ayvazian’s Plan Day; and Christopher
Durang’s The Hardy Boys and the Mystery of
Babies Come From. Through June 27. ProgramA
is performed Thursdáy and Sunday evenings at
7:30, Saturday evening at 5:00. Program B is
performed Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30, „
Sunday evening at 5:00. Preshow happy hour takes
place at 6:30 nn Thursday and Friday evenings.
Picnic suppej (reservations needed) is at 6:30 p.in.
on Saturday and Sunday evenings between
performances of programs A and B. Hay readings
take place on Wednesday evening at 7:30. Jerry
Herman Ring Theatre, University of Miami, 1312 •
Mifier Dr, Coral Gables; 3052843605.
Sylvia: ARGume/s comedy about a Manhattan .
"couple whose lives are upset when the husband
befriends a large dog in Central Park. Reprise of the
popular CaldweD production, directed by Kenneth
Kay, and staring Kim Cozort as Sylvia. June 18;, .
through July 11. CaldweD Theatre Company,787!rN
Federal Hwy, Boca Raton; 561-241-7432.
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Apts
Museums
AK^rican Police Hall of Fame & Museum, 3801 Biscayne
Blvdfi305573;0070. Ongoing—The nation’s only
memorial honoring U.S. few officers who (tied in the
tine of duty, with law enforcement exhibitions and a
crime scene where visitors are invited to solve the
murder.j
Art Museum at F1U, University Park Campus, PC 110,
[ SW‘8th Street and,107fh Avt nue, 305-348-2800 June
lMfecéption gSSStégni through August 14—Annual
fSwfty exhibition, featuring the work of photography
professor William Maguire.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, l||;^Éíji^:£^
1305-375-1492.June 17 (recejrtipn 6.00 pin.) through
September 19—“Cuba in Old Maps,” rare antique
Cuban maps, which provide a glimpse as to how the
nation was viewed by natives and outsiders.
Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 1301 Stanford
Dr, Coral Gables' 305-284-3535. Thi ough July 25—
“Pure Vision: American BeadArtists,” work by 28
artists, ranging from diminutive bracelets and
necklaces to huge' sculptures and shrines; "The
Venerable Bead: Braded Objects jrom the Permanent
Collection,” a selection of pieces such as headdresses,
bags; clothing, and jewelry from the museum’s
African, Native American, Japanese, and Pre-
Columbian holdings. Through Juáe'-^- Five Greoq-
Rrifs&n antiquitiesfrótri the Ji P^ul Getty Museum.
Through October—“About Face: Painted Portraits
from the Permanent Collection”; “Rosenquist Times
ThfeefroirLthePermanent Collection.” e
Miami Art Museum, 101W Flagler St; 3053753000. ' -
Through July 4—“New WorfcMsa Roberts: Blind
Side,”ln installation which utilizes light, sound,
^reflection, and time to plac^ the Viewer in a position of
awareness and partidpafion. Through October 31 —
“New Acquisitions: Dream Cdllectioa..J,Part Five,”
acquisitions by the museum, pieces from the i
permanent collection, and a selection of works on loan
prom private collections.
Miami-Dade Art in Public Places - Miami International
Airport, Concourse,D;Departure-Level;v305'375-5362.
’Ongoing—“Miami Heliotrope,” an-installation by
Keith Sonnier; “Transpontine,” an installation by
' Robert Huff; and “Amos Continuos (Continuous ’
Years),” an installation by Maria Martinez-Caqas.
Miami-Dade Cultural Resource Center, ill NW 1st St;
305-3754635. June 22 (reception noon) through July
Works by Lisa Remeny.
Miami-Dade Public Library, 101W Flagler St;
3053752665. June 17 (reception 6:30 p.rri.) through
September s 4? “Michael Cariebach: This Way to the
Crypt” (see “Night & Day?). June 17 (reception 6:30
p,m.) through September3 — “AH God’s Children
Got (Shoes,” artists’ interpretations of shoes.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium,
'3280 S Miami Ave; 3058544247. Through September
’6—“REPTILES! Real and Robotic,” live and
Nina Ferre's "vignettes'' are featured at the Ambrosino Gallery
mechanized reptiles—a gila monster, albino
burmese python, green iguana, alligator, snapping
turtle^ and more—displayed in a dramatic lush
..teqpieafsettmg'.':',
Morikami Museum, 4000 Mririkami Pafk Rd, Delray
Beach; 561-4950233. Through September 26—
“Cultural Tales: The Art of Japanese Handmade
1 Dojis,” works by Group Kaze artists.
Museum of Art, 1E Las Olas Blvd, Fort Lauderdale;
954-5255500. Through August 15 rr “Javier Marin:
Sculptures,” twenty clay works by the acclaimed
Mexican artist Through August 22—“Alfredo Jaar
Lament of the Images,” three photography-based
installations that take an anti-photojournalistic
perspective on the 1994 genocide in Rwanda.
Sanford L Ziff Jewish Museum, 301 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 305-672-5)44.. Through August 31—
“Barely a Minyan: The Last Elderly Jews on South
Beach,” photographer Gary Monroe’s look at the life
of Miami-Bearih’s Jewish elderly from the mid-
Seventies to the earfy-Eighfies.
South Dade Regional Library, 10750’SW 211th St
305233-8140. June 18 through August 4—The Last
Harvest A History and Tribute to the Life and Work
of Farmworkers, on Lake Apopka,” a traveling
exhibition of photographs that commemorates the
recent clpsiijgdf the Lake Apopka vegetable forms.
The Wolfsonian-FlU, 1001 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach; 3O5S31-10O1. June 19 (reception noon)
through September 8'—“Artful Truth—Healthy
Propaganda-Arts Project,” works featuring persuasive
messages about tobacco use created by South Florida
students in the fourth through sixth grades. Through
July 26=— “Depero Futurista Rome-Paris-New York,
,1915-1932,” paintings, sculptures, decorative objécts,
furniture, graphic designs, tapestries, and more by
Futurist-movement artist Fortunato Depero; Bridge
Tender's House—“Plastic Theater,” an installation
by Annie Wharton (see “Night & Day”).
Galleries
Ambrosino Gallery, 3095 SW 39thAve; 3054452211.
Through July 3—“vignettes,” new works by Nina
The Americas Collection, 2440Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Cpral Gables 305-4455578. Through June 30 •— ‘Tina
Binkele: Paintings and Sculpture.”
The Art Calé, 391&N Mian#;fÉr3&55752439.
Through June 30—The Oasis Exhibition,” paintings
by Melendezfrom-his Ottoman Dreaqiscapes
pollection.-
ArtGenter/South Florida, 800Iincoln Rd; Miami Beach;
305-67 4-8278 Through July, 3 — “Currently: ArtFocus
1, Summer 1999," works by five emerging ártistsr ’
Frank Benson, Luis Campos, Ximena Carrion, Leslie
Merry, and Wendy Wischer.
Artesanos Gallery, 2729 Salzedo St, Coral Gables; : -'
305-4451322. ThroughJuly 1—“Algo Para Ver
(Something to See),” group exhibition by load and
international artists.
Artspace/Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 3054444493. Through June 30—
“Maxim Kanton Russia’s Leading Contemporary
Artist,” a preview,pf a major European traveling
exhibition devoted to Kantor.
Bakehouse Art Complex, 561 NW 32n& St; 3055752828.
Ongoing -— 55 open artists’ studios.
Bal Harbour Gallery, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins -
[Avéjéyel 2, Bal Harbour; 305-8645800. Ongoing—
Works by Dali, M*ro JThagaB, Picasso, Royo, and
others.
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939Lincoln Rd, Mianti-Beach;
305534-7872. Through July 10—“Summer Stock,”
works by Gilberto Ruiz, Robert Calvo, Bill Leech,
lYárd Shelly, and Pete-Kuentzel. Ongoing—“Icons of
Razz;” photographs of musical greats by Herman -:
Leonard.
Barry University Library Gallery, 11300NE 2nd Ave,'
Miami Shores; 305-899-3424. Through June 20—
Works by Esther “Zoli” Cubeta.
Bet Breira Art Gallery, 9400 Galloway Rd; 305271-9918.
ThroOgh June 22 -^- Photographs by Miriam
Armenguer, Bern Fried, Bud Lindenbaum, Norman
Sokoloff, and Donna Sweeny.
Bettcher Gallery, 919 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
305534-8533. Through September 30—“Awkwardly,
Silent, Simple,” oil paintingshy Eric Kunde. Ongoing
—Works by Duncan Hannah, Laura Páresky,
Deborah Cariago, and others. f'f
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
3054424408. Through June 30—Photographs by
students from Miami Palmetto Senior High SfeftgbL' .
Borders Gallery, 4031 Laguna St, Cpral Gabies;
305444-7-618. Through July 31—WorkshyESepn
Escarda.
Catalina Art Gallery, 1940 Ponce de Leon, Coral Gables;
3054453464. Through July 29—“Discovering...
works by Argentine artist Laura Rozen.
Centro Cultural Español, 800 Douglas Rd, ste 170, Coral
Gables; 3054459677. Through July 31 — Theater of
Memory: Five Cuban-American Photographers,” 3
works by Mario Algaze, Maria Martinez-Caflas, Silvia
Lizama, Eduardo Muñoz, and Tony Mendoza.
Clean Machine, 22612th St, Miami Beach;
305534-9429. Through August 31 — Works by Anne
M arie Oldham.
Commenoz Gallery, 328 Crandori Blvd, Key Biscayne;
305361-7052. ThroughJuly 3—Works by threp -
Korean artists.
Coral Gables International Art Center, 70 Miracle Mile,
Coral Gables; 305567-1750'. Through June 21 —
Carlos Aulet Juné 21 through June 27 — works by
OlegSMyakhov.
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Full Text
Want to cozy up to the political elite of Cuban Miami?
Get yourself a boat and join the MOC.
BY KIRK NIELSEN
The arrival of a multiplex on South Beach isn't
Cafe: Taco's best
MIDEM's Latin
Metro: Lock a
v the big news. It's the skimpy selection of
stand in the
sounds come
croc a day
indie films in Miami. By Brett Sokol
Grove
ashore
away

Contents
Volume 14
Number lO
June 17-23,
1999
Chairmen of the Outboard 28
Not far from downtown Miami Cuban exiles do own one
island: Watson Island.
By Kirk Nielsen
Big Screens,
Small Minds... 17
The new Regal
multiplex will bring
more movies to Miami,
but viewing options for
indie films remain slim.
By Brett Sokol
Metro: What a
Croc 9
Key Biscayne golfers
have been contending
with a new hazard in
recent months —
American crocodiles.
By Jacob Bernstein
Down #0f7fg....69
M Ensemble’s simple
production comes alive
with lyrics and
movement.
By Robin Dougherty
2 Jee»47*--2J,-i#99- Miami New Times . ÍÜ3KK53¿¿ViSÉ * *Y«V« .
t •DM&W.WMP • •
Letters... ..3
Metro 9
Riptide 1 9
News of the Weird 15
Red Meat 15
Night & Day 40
Calendar Events 42
Earthweek ., JfgfS 42
Life in Hell 44
Troubletown 47
The Quigmans 49
Film 58
Film Capsules 61
Showtimes 64
Theater 69
Theater Listings 71
Art Listings.... I ..72
Cafe 77
Dining Guide .79
Julius Knipl 79
Nuts 81
Music 91
Rotations .’. 94
Kulchur ...96
Concerts 99
Early Warnings 99
Clubs 101
Underworld 103
Romance .......110
Classified .....119
web extra
This week in miaminewtimes.com, the online
edition of Miami New Times:
•What’s the wacky Jesus guy up to this week?
Peter Gilstrap serves another heaping portion of
Jesus of the Week. Sure to satisfy.
www.miaminewtimes.com
Staff
Editorial
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Chuck Strouse
Associate Editor Anne Techida
Music Editor Brett Sokol
Staff Writers Jacob Bernstein, Judy Cantor, Jim DeFede,
Kathy Glasgow, Josa Luis Jiménez, Jen Karetnick,
Tad S. Kissell, Tristram Korten, Kirk Nielsen,
Robert Andrew Powell
Copy Editor Michele Morcey
Calendar Editor Nina Korman
Nightlife Listings Larra Boytano
Proofreader Georgia rapas
Contributors Robin Dougherty, Andy Klein,
Michael Sragow
Fellow Lissette Corea
Editorial Administrator Nicola Kemmerer
Editorial Intern Alex Salinas
Art Director Dean Sabring
Staff Photographer Steve Satterwhite
Electronic Publishing
Online Editor Robin Shear
Production
Production Manager Marcy Mock
Assistant Production Manager Christopher Murray
Advertising Art Director Angel Espiñdola
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Production Daniel Rums, Scott Horton, Dennis Snyder
Advertising
Ad Director Jill Muller
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Account Executives Daniella Cervantes, Kristina Hayes,
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Classified Administrator Chrystal Gomez
Romance
Romance Marketing Director Bridgette Lumpkins
Romance Administrator Katrina Come
Circulation
Circulation Director Julian Suardi
Circulation Marketing Manager Brian Chiles
Circulation Assistant Pedro Pasamar
Business
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Accounts Receivable Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Financial Accountant Adam Horowitz
Business Administrator Marisol Aquila, Annika Butardo
Systems Manager Christian Kitchen
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Letters Policy
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That Mermaid Means War!
Robert Andrew Powell’s article regarding
Pow Wow (“Miami: See It Like a Pam¬
pered, Sheltered, Spoiled-Rotten Tour
Pperator from Munich,” June 10)- was
enough to make me explode. As a Miami-
Beach resident I know I have rights, and
that I should not be shut off from a major
public road. It seems unconstitutional that
these.travel agents should come in and
take over Lincoln Road (which for many of
us is like our living room) as though we
didn’t exist.
My girlfriend and I were sitting at Score
atil:S0 p.m. when a Miami Beach Police
officer came over to' escort us off public
property. After repeating himself several
times, I snarled, “We heard you already!”
L disagree with Pow Wow delegate Rose¬
mary McCormick (from Ndpa, California)
anti her eamment that tourism is an instru¬
ment of global peace. In this ¿ase tourism
-was not bringing people together": it was
segregating them, replacing locals with Ken
and Barbie clones. Shutting regular-people
off from our own city will not bring global
peace, it’ll bring war.
Tourism professionals want to make South
Florida look like Disney World because of the
previous attacks on tourists. But-how can you
mislead people by bringing'them'to a city that
does not exist? I have yet to see a mermaid on
Lincoln Road.
Jessie L Malig
MiamfBeaeh
That Fence Means Money!
I had to write and thank you for pointing out
yet another absurd moment As a resident of
Miami Beach sirice 1986, I’ve enjoyed every
minute of the circus. It is never boring. But for
police to tell me I cannot use a public road
because the city has once again sold out to
somebody waving green under its hose—that
really pisses me off
If Miami’s tourism officials were so'coni
cerned about their fantasy version of Miami
Beach, they should have kept their fake Pow
Wow atmosphere inside the convention cen¬
ter, where they would have had plenty of
room, and air conditioning, too!
This disregard for real people goes right
along with attitudes like those of Michael
Comras and his development plans for Lm-'
coin Road. I’ve got a couple of suggestions
along the lines of Jim Mullin’s fecent article
(“Lincoln Road Miracle: From Scruffy
D-hr^lict to Enchanting Shoppers’ Par¬
adise,” April 29). Let’s get rid of all those
bohemian places like Café Papillon, where
local residents waste so much time, and put
in a Checkers. I think wé could attract a lot
more tourists if^we evicted that artsy New
World Symphony and stuck in a Ripley’s
Believe It or Not like the, one in Key West
Maybe the whole fence thing was actually a
good idea We .could charge admission to Lia*
coin Road, just like Disney World. Of course
when I called the mayor’s office arid asked for
an explanation, I got no reply. But then we life-
'tie residents who keep Miami Beach going
after the conventions, leave town don’t really
count Yes, I guess you could call me a mus¬
cle-boy kamikaze bike rider with a dog, but I
live here.
. By the way could you please tell me the dif-
ference between businessman and politician? I
can’t seem to tejl them apart anymore.
Joe Burge
Miami Beach
Cuban Racist, Yes; White
Supremacist No
Alex Salinas kept using the term “white
supremacist” in his article “A Mind in Exile”
(June 10). How can a Cuban be a white
supremacist?
Andres Orta and his Alianza Nacional group
are racists, nothing less. This is a case of His
panic aggression toward Americans that runs
rampant in this town.
Ryan SneU
Miami
So It’s a Jewish World After All
Alex Salinas’s article shows only too well
the emotive nature of the fascist mind, a
mind filled with hate and void of rationality.
First, Miguel Angel Aldana’s coinment that
“Everyone is Jewish” should not be entirely
written off. Jewish migrations out of
ancient Mesopotamia, then Egypt, then
Babylon (having probably mixed with
and/or having been ajnixture of other
races)-,'not to mention' Hellenic-European,.
Ethiopian, and Spanish'Jewry (I am part
Jewish also), -makes the term “Jewish” vir¬
tually universal. In fact Orta himself may
have Jewish blood running through his
But suppose for a moment that the Jews
had been a peculiar race,’standing out
there bri their own, all by themselves, ruin¬
ing everything, as Orta vividly and conve¬
niently imagines. Had it not been for our
Jewish brethren, there would have been no
searchfor-the one god within, and hence
no Renaissance. Likewise idealism, also a
search within, would have been taken for
granted, and hence no Kant, Nietzsche,
and others. We wouldn’t have needed
them. And there would be no need to
bridge the gap between good and evil, and
thus no hope for a better world through a
coming messiah.
I have one word of advice for Andres Orta
and his virtuosos should they decide to write
or say anything in the future: Think.
Manny Losada
Miami
The Swine Syndrome
I choose not to address Andres Orta’s allega¬
tions because if you wrestle with a pig, you
become just as dirty as the pig.
I would much prefer to help someone to the
top of a hill, because as you do so, you grow
closer to the top of the hill yourself
AlanGittelson
Miami Beach
Continued on page 4
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Letters
Continued from page 3
Clean Up This Dirty World? Sounds
Like a Job for Jack Thompson
.Trjgtram Korten (“2 live Screwed,” June 3)
didnjdafe tomentidn a lot of good things that
came out of my efforts against Luther Camp-.*
'bell and 2 live Grew: 1) Parents were waítíed
that a pornographer was selling obscene
records to their children behind their backs;
2) a nation was informed as to how record
companies, run by men, target women for
Objectifying degradation; and 3) because of
my efforts against Luther, I am now represent¬
ing the parents of the three girls murdered in
the school shootings in Paducah, Kentucky, in
their lawsuit against the entertainment entities7
whose products, including violent video
games, helped cause the murders.
Luther Campbell is thus the reason, by
God’s cleverness, that I have been able to talk
about the nexus between entertainment and
sodopathic behavior in the past month on 60;
Minutes, Today, ABC World News Tonight, and.
tiie NBC Nightly News. Thanks, Luke.
The only person who hasn’t learned much
from all this is Luther himself. He is still a
pornographer; he still talks about God and
acts like a demon; and he still doesn’t know
how to hire a good lawyer.
Luther, ifyou need one, let me know. I know
a counselor who can keep you out of trouble.
Jack Thompson
Coral Gabies
What's a Little Sexual Harassment
Among Friends?
I recently read Ted B. Kissell’s articlé on
Pedro F. Fonteboa (“King Leer,” June 3) and
was shocked. The fact that this man had seven
complaints of sexual harássment levied
against him, was investigated by Florida Inter¬
national University because of these allega¬
tions, came than agreement that required him ’
Jo leave the university, and was then hited by
the Mmmi Herald to report on high school
sports is absolutely disgustitig.
As a female I can say it is humiliating to be
rkubjected to a moronic individual who thinks:
hife can speak with his- libjdo in the workplace,
or any other place for that matter. The fact is
that segual harassment is still taken lightly. -
Too many times the woman making the report
is the recipient of a backlash or is labeled a
troublemaker or as being too sensitive.
How sad it is that we can’t always feel com¬
fortable just going to work and doing our jobs,
but must have our guard up for people like
Pedro ¿bnteboa. For a high school-age girl,
howevtk the effects can be devastating. High
schooTage students are at á very difficult stage
in life. If a young female athlete were to be
subjected to sexual harassment, it could scar
her for years.
How can the fact that an individual repeated¬
ly acted so inappropriately toward fellow
employees and students be overlooked when
hiring for a job description that includes being
surrounded by student athletes? The Heralds
attorneys must be having a fit with this one.
The only saving grace is that New Times
brought this hiring screwup to the surface.
Should Fonteboa harass again, at least fhe vic¬
tim will be able to sue Hat Miami Herald. Its
not like they can claim they were unaware
they’d put the fox in the chicken coop,
i; Melissa Jattkówski
Miami
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Letters
Continued from page 4
have already recognized: South Florida is
steadily.evolving into a tasteless, homoge¬
neous entity devoid of uniqueness and style.
Like Coconut Grove before it, %uth Beach
(with its new multiplex on Lincoln Road) is
rapidly losing the unique style that made it
popular in the first pláce.
It is a sad commentary on the greed, corrup¬
tion, and lack of vision of the developers and
dvic leaders who do not seem to comprehend
thevaiue of neighborhood identity and quality
oflife . /
David Kadko
Mjámi Beach
500 Parents Can't All be Wrong
I’m writing in response to Ted B. Kssell’s arti¬
cle “A Lesson in Mismanagement” (May 20). I
am a second-year teacher at Henry E.S^"
Reeves Elementary School who has twelve
years’ experience in Miami-Dade County Pub¬
lic Schools. I am -concerned the article sug¬
gested that five teachers were speaking for the
entire 69-member faculty.
1 knew when I accepted a job atKeeves that
there would be longer hours and a longer
school year. It’s part of the Edison Project
design. In other schools where I’ve taught,!
also worked hard. Reeves has beenno excep¬
tion. I believe that if I didn’t work hard, my stu¬
dents would not achieve. So yes, teaching is a
“high-pressure situation” at Reeves — and at
any other school.
1 am in support of our principal, Diane Dyes-
PaschaL You can!t ask for afiner, more profes¬
sional person. Mrs. Paschal works hard and is
very sincere about her job. Her number-one
concern has always been the children. The
question she seems to ask constantly is, Will
the children benefit?
.The school is making progress. Our test
scores have increased yearly. Our students
have participated in and received recognition
in several activities such as math bowls, global
awareness, and oratory contests; and submit¬
ted more than 900 entries to the Miami-Dade
County Youth Fair and a science fair, all under
her leadership.
Our first “Evening of Excellence” recently
was a huge success; more than 500 parents
came to school On inclement weather) to cele¬
brate their children’s excellence and achieve¬
ment That should indicate something good is
going on at Henry E.S. Reeves. I believe Mrs.
Paschal is leading her staff in the right direc¬
tion after only two years at this school. The
: beautiful new building cannot teadh the chil¬
dren. The Miami-Dade Counly Public
Schools-Edison Project partnership cannot
teach the children. And the prinápal is not
there to teach. So whether the principal is in
or out of the building, it is my responsibility as
a teacher to work with our children so they
can achieve.
AJ. Parker
. North Miami Beach
New Times, Inc.
| ExéeutiveEditor Michael Lacey Exeqitive Managing Editor
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Systems Director Richard Diamond Systet^'Developer Norm
Penrod Applications DeveloperShari Huber Softw^Devel^)^ -'
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Miami Naw Times June 17 - 23,1999
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Metro
Crocodile Fears
Golfers and fishermen beware! The
endangered reptile is making a
comeback.
By Jacob Bernstein
The fourth hole at Crandon Golf at Key Biscayne is
particularly treacherous. There are brackish ponds
surrounded by mangroves on both sides of the tee.
An errání drive can send a ball flying into muddy
oblivion. But it’s not just water that presents a threat.* A
duffer who recently hooked a shot into the drink decided
"to plunge in up to hisshoulders to retrieve the ball. When
he "extended his arm and turned his head, he found him¬
self staring into the eyes of an American crocodile.
You can imagine the story in the the Weekly World News.
It would include something like this: “After the mandibles
of death were finished, nothing remained but a five iron and
a tom piece of plaid.”
% In reality the golfer escaped
unharmed.. But the story illustrates
a new reality that humans must
'learn to accommodate: The endan¬
gered croc is making a comeback.
Spurred by encounters between
humans and the resurgent reptiles,
county parks staffers are trying to
quickly educate the public. They are
preparing brochures and have started
placing signs in croc-accessible public
areas. “The die-hard golfers who like
to go after their golf balls get aggra¬
vated'and want {the Crocodiles]
removed,” explains park naturalist
Paula Schneeberger. “[But] crocs are
| not aggressive and they mainly hunt
atnight” -
Parks officials believe two juver
nile crocodiles have taken up resi-
Üenbé on Key Biscayne. (Crcjcs
have been seen as far north as
Broward County;) A third reptile
has been sighted, but is thought to
be an exotic caiman that escaped
from captivity. The pair divides its
-time between the golf course and a
recently restored tidal marsh at the nearby .Bill Baggs
Cape Florida State Recreation Area. They feast on ¡gua¬
mas that can grow to the size of large cats, which the
crocs catch by yanking them from low-hanging tree
branches:
A hundred years ago probably several thousand croco¬
diles roamed the southern coast of the Florida peninsula,
the only place in the United States where they are found;
By the Sixties the population fell to a' few hundred at
most. Poachers killedmr captured some and developers
paved over many of the estuaries and coastal areas where
the animals lived and nested.
Today the population has risen to about 600. Biologists
trace the rejuvenation primarily to an increase in habit¬
able areas. Besides restoring traditional marshes and
mangroves, man has unwittingly built ideal crocodile
homes at golf courses and nuclear power plants.
In the Seventies the animals began using 168 miles of
cooling canals at the Turkey Point nuclear facility as a
hatchery. The warm water and marly berms are perfect
for the reptiles, which are shy and finicky about where
they lay their eggs. These days there are between 30 and
50 crocs at Turkey Point, depending on the time of year.
: On a recent morning scientists counted sixteen croco¬
diles floating and sunning themselves along a five-mile
stretch.
In fact the animals have been doing so well at Turkey
Point that some migrated north to escape the crowds
(Male crocs are territorial and demand a substantial
amount of space.)
But crocodiles aren’t likely to overwhelm South Florida,
scientists say. Although a nest can-hold as many as 25'
eggs, only a small percentage of the reptiles survive.
Baby crocs have a plethora of predators: fish, raccoons,
hawks, even the fire ant Joe Wasilewski, a biologist who
works at Turkey Point recalls surveying nests one year;
and discovering an egg that swarmed with fire ants.
'Tibien he returned the following day there was nothing
left but the hatchling’s skeleton. “We are not going to be
üp to our ass in crocodiles,” he concludes.
There are well over one million alligators in Florida, far
more than the number of crocodiles. Alligators have a
wider, more square snout and are darker in color.'Croco¬
diles have a tapered jaw, their back armor is bumpier, and
they are more agile. Although the two are'generally simi¬
lar in size, American crocodiles in the United States
rarely grow beyond fifteen feet, whereas alligators have
reached nineteen feet. L
Parks department naturalist Roger Hammer believes
crocodiles are unfairly stigmatized. Some picnickers
recently observed Hammer posting a warning sign at a
AUMENTAR 0
Park naturalist Roger Hammer hopes these signs will calm human fears of crocodiles
county marina and asked whether the reptiles were in the
lagoon. When he replied in the affirmative, they hurriedly
packed their things and left “The perception of the public
is that crocs are evil animals when really the alligators
are the ones to watch if you have children playing around
them,” Hammer insists.
The mistaken belief that crocodiles are dangerous
comes from television nature programs, Hammer asserts.
The shows generally feature varieties common in Africa
or the Asia-Pacific area. These species are larger and
more aggressive than their American brethren; they
sometimes wrestle unsuspecting zebra or wildebeest to
death, while American crocodiles generally trap smaller
mammals, crustaceans, fish, and birds.
Hammer says there are no recorded incidents of croc
attacks in Florida, but some locals tell a colorful tale. Sup¬
posedly in 1925 a croc killed a surveyor on Key Biscayne
after the man blasted it twice with a shotgun. In true
South Florida fashion, the croc is alleged to have survived
and gone on to a successful career as a tourist attraction.
The crocs may very well become victims of their resur¬
gence. The Florida Game and Freshwater Fish Commis¬
sion has received dozens of complaints about them.
(Ihere are roughly 15,000 alligator complaints in Florida
every year.) A woman on the Miami River who feeds
ducks protested when a croc arrived and began eating
Continuad on page lO
' â– iimniM
The Ritz is getting an early start as an all-night juke
joint in Coconut Grove. Alter recent rains, hotel
builders started working around-the-clock to remove
water that gathered in the Inundation on SW 27th
Avenue near Biscayne Bay.
Neighbor David Ralph complained and Ofcr. Tom Braga
checked it out. Then, after some negotiation, City
Manager Donald Warshaw agreed to let developers of the
planned 200-room, multimillion-dollar hotel work
through the night. The sound from the pump was muf¬
fled. “It’s acceptable now,” Ralph says.
The real issue: Almost two years after plans for the
hotel were" announced, the Ritz is not only underwater,
but still without financing. Developers hope to get final
signoff on the bucks later this month, says attorney
Lucia Dougherty.
The June 7 New Yorker issue thatincludéd Mimi Swartz’s
piece “The Herald's Cuban Revolution" sailed from the
newsstands. “I immediately sold out. They were gone
the same day they arrived," says J.C. Moya, manager of
Books & Books in Coral Gables. Stores in Aventura
and Coconut Grove provided similar comments.
Although Herald columnist 3oan Fleischman did an
admirable job of summarizing the article, she skipped
a couple of important snippets: 1) 43 employees have
left the paper in the past year and have not been
replaced; and'2) this gem about recent readership
trends: “The paper remained unloved and largely
unread by Miami's Hispanic population. T have to say
the only mail I got was from elderly white women,’ one.
reporter told me.”
Speaking of other publications’ reviews of the
Herald, the June edition of Brill’s Content points out
the newspaper published an entire article on the Her¬
ald s Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, but fea¬
tured just a tiny box describing the other winners.
Hubris, anyone? ‘ , i
And the Herald isn’t even kind to its own. A special
page whipped up for executive editor Doug Clifton’s
goodbye makes brutal fun of his propensity to lay off
employees, alienate friends, and cause newsroom
turnover. The page also notes the Herald’s real and
imagined changing self-promotional phrase: “Florida’s
Largest Newspaper, then Florida’s Second Largest
Newspaper, then Florida’s Foremost Newspaper, then
f Florida’s What the Heck We Still Have a Páper Paper.”
The good news: An Editor an# Publisher survey of50
columnists shows the Heralds Dave Barry and Leonard
Pitts to be among the most popular of their peers. Only;’
the New York Ttwes’s Maureen Dowd received more
votes.’ Question: Sure columnists are reading, but is
the public? *
The cost of Carmen. Not only did federal prosecutors
spend millions of dollars in taxpayer money to screw
up prosecution of former Pprt qf Miami director Carmen
Lanetta and associates Neal Harrington and Calvin Grigsby.
Not only did the coimipng Lunetta walk away with a
$280,000 payout when he retired amid dear signs he
had abused the public’s trust. Not only are county
attorneys spending more on a dvil case that is likely
futile.; But th^ láakbf'a'cottvictiWmeanjs ínnetta
will almost certainly pick a $113,00O-per-year pension
from taxpayers’ pockets.
. as told to Chuck Strouse
Tips? Cal 305-571-7605 or e-mail
riptide@miaminewtimes.com.
Warm (lew Times Í

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C r o codil e
Continued from page 9
, the .birds. Groes have even been spotted at
Bayfront Park.
i ToddHardwick, who owns a-pest-control
outfit called Pesky Critters, warns that
problems await if a management plan is
not dev£lo]ped soon. “These ate cold¬
blooded reptiles and people do stupid
things,” he says. He believes the crocs will
losé their fear as they are exposed to
humans, with disastrous consequences.
The parks department decided to take
action after an incident at Black Point
Marina, just a few miles north of Turkey
Point. A crocodile that fávored the
marina’s lagoon, became unnaturally fat
feasting on discarded fish carcasses that
had been tossed into the water. His length
was estimated at nifie ffeet. Fishermen
claimed the reptile tried to climb, into
boats and disturbed blue-crab traps.
In February 1998 the Florida Game and
Freshwater Fish. Commission made the
unusual decision to move the croc
Man has unwittingly
built ideal crocodile
homes at golf
courses and nuclear
power plants.
because of its size, aggressiveness, and
agilily. Workers delivered the reptile to
Metrozoo, where employees attempted for 1
40 days to make the animal forget about
the marina. Park officials then released
the croc into the C-lll canal that leads
from the Everglades to Florida Bay.
Within five months the croc returned to its
former home.
This past February a community activist
was walking her dog at Black Point when
a fisherman warned her to be careful: Pet-
and-child-eating crocodiles lurked in the ,
water. The woman complained and the
parks department took action: This time
the croc earned a trip to a Collier County
park. It has yet to return.
Hammer also created signs for marinas
and coastal áreas warning people about
the crocs. The yellow metal placards show
a picture of the reptile and read “Caution
Crocodiles In Area” in both English and
Spanish. They also admonish the public it
is illegal to feed'or harass the animals.
“[The crocodiles],lose their fear,” Ham¬
mer says. The maximum penalty for mess¬
ing with a croc is a $250,000 fine and one
year in federal prison. Hammer has posted
about 35 signs in locations including Black
Point, Matheson Hammock, Greynolds,
and Haulover parks. The county parks
.department plans to install a total of 65.
Hammer has also written a brochure that
will soon be distributed to park visitors.
Ultimately naturalists hope South Florid-
• iaris will embrace the crocodile rather |
than feár it. “How many people have seen
an American crocodile in the wild?” Ham¬
mer asks. “That to me would be a nature
experience to get excited about. If you
want to see one, you have to come to
.South Florida. We have them and nobody
else does. ” CQ
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Tum-off: Taking the 20
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cheerleader)
PJ. Osgood
Chicago
i vlbmroff: Talking about
.¡hying with your parents.
Tum-on: When you
receive a sincere com¬
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person^
Tum-off: Someone who
is over-opinionated or
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Sandro Boecio
Miami
Tum-on: Asking a lot of
questions - show you áre
interested.
Amy Sicre
Newport Beach
Thrii-on Being open to
any ‘last minute surpris¬
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closed.
Stacie Ray
Columbus Tum-off:
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cares for someone who
talks incessantly about
themselves.
Nancy Kirsch
Washington D.C.
Tum-on: Chivalry is not
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Allison Hill
Los Angeles
Tum-off: Asking for a
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remainder of your meal
Anna Singer
Philadelphia
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ex..(ex-girlftiend, ex¬
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Keri Molaf a
Gncinnati
Tum-on: Someone who
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and then pursues that
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Amanda Crawford
Atlanta
Tum-off: Don’t be fru¬
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tip appropriately!
Heather
Tum-on: Indianapolis
Someone
who has a passion
for their job, their hob-
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Tammy Korol
New York
Tum-on: Good eye con¬
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looks at me whether
they ape talking or lis¬
tening
lisa Starr
Austin
Thm-on: Polite manners
always count...and usu¬
ally lead to a second
date.
Jennifer Donnelly
Dallas
Tum-off: Wandering
eyes
Lisa Cherry
Houston
Tum-on: Someone who
is engaging, a good con¬
versationalist with a
sense of humor.
Lori Stone
Los Angeles
Tum-off: Heated politi¬
cal/religious debates on
the first date
Lisa D'Alessio
New Jersey
Whitney Claphanson
Miami
Heather Smith
Washington D.C.
Victoria Dunphy
Philadelphia
Tum-off: Complaining
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job, the food or service
or your life in general
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T ell him to go fuck himself!” shouts
Eddie Garcia, manager of the strip
club on Biscayne -Boulevard formerly
known as Club Madonna. Garcia is
responding to a reporter’s question about
Frank Pinter, owner of the neighboring
Madonna’s Restaurant. “Tell him and his lit?
tiff friend to go fuck themselves, alright? I’ve
gétno tíme to talk to yoqfTry
•Garda slams down the phone, refusing to
discuss how a simple dispute over a catering
bill has riven the two like-named businesses,
how a few cases of unconsumed chicken
wings and ribs could possibly have led to a
civil lawsuit, an alleged death threat, and a
police report
Two minutes later Garcia.calls back, appar¬
ently having found the time to talk. “Look,
man, I didn’t mean to hang up on you,” he
apologizes. “I thought you could be [Pinter],
He’s capable of doing something like that.
The guy is realty something else.” >
Well, no doubt about that. Eleven years
ago Pinter bought an old chowder-shack on
the bank of the Little River Canal near Bis¬
cayne Boulevard and NE 78th Street and
opened the Bimini Bar and Grill. The water¬
front location proved a good fit for his menu
of semiauthentic Caribbean cuisine, ice-cold
béer, and ramshackle décor,-which matches
Pinter’s personality. He regularly jumps
from the restaurant’s patio to swim with the
manatees drifting in the fetid water. He’s
been married seven tintes. His current wife
(the “little friend”' to whom Garcia refers)
answers to the name Boom-Boom, though
her given name is Kárina. “I am number
seven, so I am like Sunday,” BOom-Boom
says in a thick Finnish accent, “a day of rest”
The quality of the food has ebbed over the
years, and so has the flow of customers. TWo
years ago Pinter saw an opportunity to
reverse the tide when the strip club, known
then as the Pussycat, changed its name to
Club Madonna, sister of the popular Miami
Beach club. “I saw them working on the
building' and thought it was going'to be a
real upscale, classy club,” Pinter recalls,
“and I knew they weren’t going to sell food,
sot I decided to change otir name to
Madonna Restaurant, to try and steal some
of their traffic.”
Madonna v. Madonna
Never mind the aging pop star, the problem now
is an unsettled catering bill
By Robert Andrew Powell
ra_powell@miaminewtimes.com
by Knter. “Why send a cop over if I was try¬
ing to compromise with him?” Garcia asks. “I
offered him $300 to let him be happy and let
it go. When I saw him the next day, I was
upset because... he sends a cop on me.”
That’s not all. After “the assault” Pinter
filed a police report describing the incident
and visited the State Attorney’s Office to
explore the possibility of initiating a criminal
complaint Finally he filed a civil suit in April
seeking damages to cover the original cater¬
ing bill, lost work time, and legal costs. Trial
is scheduled for July 12.
“I don’t give a damn,” Garcia says of the
impending legal showdown. “We’ll win and
then we’ll countersue him for our lawyer’s
fees and the work we’// miss. This whole
thifig is stupidity. All I did was tell him to fry
some food. Well work it out”
While the legal dispute continues, the
disharmony of one Madonna suing another
has been muffled. The strip club recently
opted for a name changóla decision that had
nothing to do with Puiterfor even his little
friend). The Madonna moiiiker has been
removed from the marquee andfrecent radio
commercials advertised the locatibnjis The
Boulevard Club, featuring “women of color.”
The new name hasn’t gone over too well, and
another new name is planned: Black Gold. •
Is Pinter prepared to again rename his
restaurant? *1 could,” he says. “I could change
anytimeT want, to Bimini Grill or whatever.
But it costs too much to make the change.
This is a mom-and-pop store. The only thing I
want is to be paid for the food.” CD
He takes a long drag on a cigá-
rette before breaking into a slow
cackle. “It didn’t wofk out too
well,” he says.
Business is, down so much-
that Pinter rarely bothers’ to
open for lunch. Steady daytime
income trickles in from visitors
to the nearby Immigration and
Naturalization Service offices.
He charges those'who wish to]
park in his lot five dollars for
:the privilege. The Pinters, with platter
In this bleak context it seemed
like a godsend when Garcia contacted Pinter
this past October. Club Madonna was plan¬
ning to host a private parly for rapper Luther
Campbell and needed someone to cater the
gig. “I could have gone to anyone I wanted,”
Garcia recalls, “hut I went to him because I
wanted to keep it in the neighborhood.”
Pinter, who had never done business with
Club Madonna, strove to make a good
impression. He contends he agreed to lose
money on the deal. He prepared three cases
of wings, four'cases, of barbecued ribs, two
pounds of rice, two bowls of salad with dress¬
ing, and a pound of barbecue sauce, then
served it all in eight aluminum trays.
All agree the food bombed with Luke’s
crowd. The caterer sold no more than 25 din¬
ners at ten dollars per plate. Afterward there
were plenty of leftovers, which, Garda insisted
on donating to the homeless. Pinter submitted
an invoice for $490; $300 covered half the food
expense and the rest was for “extra services,”
including dishing out the chow.
Garcia balked at the bilL“When-we made
the deal, I said, “Well work it out Whatever.
You make the food, alright?’ There were no
papers signed, if was all done verbally. When
the time came ...I lost $600 worth of food.”
According to Pinter, Garcia first said he
would pay only $140, then decided to pay
nothing. The disagreement spawned what
Pinter refers to as “the assault”
Pinter says that on November 11; 1998, a
Miami police officer stopped by the restau¬
rant for lunch. After the restau¬
rateur relayed his frustration at
the supposed stiffing, the officer
walked over to Club Madonna.
Garcia confirms the officer’s
visit “What he heck is [Pinter]
doing sending a cop on me?”
Garcia asks. “He sends a manto
my property wháí‘is wearing a
gun? I don’t care if the man is a
police-officer, the gun makes it
extortion. At least that’s how 1
look at it”
The next day at approximately 10:00 a.m.,
Pinter was sitting in his parking lot when, he
says, a “red Ford pulled up in the middle of
the street ... and [Garcia] jumped out
screaming and cursing that he owned the
police department, walked over across the
street, and pushed me. [At] that time I
jumped up and said to him to pay me what
lie owed and to get back in his car. He-
explained that I would not get my money, I
had better shut up, and he would come back
and cap my ass.”
Garcia, not surprisingly, relays a different
story. He denies making a threat and says he
offered to pay Pinter a reasonable settle¬
ment He alleges the conflict was escalated
“He explained ! would not
get my money, I had better
shut up, and he would come
back and cap my ass."
Free Parking
Mayor’s staff finds a new
protocol for corruption
By Jim DeFede
á member of Miami-Dade Mayor Alex
Penelas’s staff has admitted bilking
the county out of at least $5000 dur¬
ing. the,rpasLseyeral years. The
employee, Joseph Jean-Baptiste, who is
chief of protocol for .the mayor’s office, gave
his wife and another relative'passes that
Jean-Baptiste apologized
for his behavior and
offered full restitution.
.allowed them .to park for free at
Miami International Airport
The county-issued cards are sup¬
posed to be used only by members of
the mayor’s staff who are on official
business at the airport. Both Jean-
Baptiste’s wife and the relative work
at the airport
Aviation director Gary Dellapa
said this past week that “a routine
audit” turned up the misuse. Airport offi¬
cials have documented at least $5000 in
lost fees and, according to sources familiar
w,ith the investigation, the final figure
could run between $8000 andfc$12,000.
“l^hen confronted .with this allegation,
Mr. Jean-Baptiste immediately admitted
his error, apologized for his behavior, and
offered full restitution to the county for all
expenses,” Penelas wrote in a May 28
memo to County Manager MerretfStier-
heim. “Although Mr. Jean-Baptiste has
apologized for this situation, I find this
behaviorjnexcusable and unacceptable.”
Penelas, however, did not find the behavior
inexcusable enough to fire Jean-Baptiste.
Instead he decided to suspend the protocol
chief for. 30 days without pay. Penelas’s chief
.of staff Sergio Gonzalez said the mayor
believes the penalty is appropriate because
Jean-Bapfiste has been “a loyal and hard¬
working” employee. Jean-Baptiste, who has
been with the county since 1985 and earns an
annual salary of $42,750, could not be reached
for comment
County officials have referred the matter
to the public corruption sections of the
Miami-Dade Police Department and the
State Attorney's Office. ED
. jim_defede@miaminewtimes.com
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14 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New linns

tedium’s oaken tent pole
Lead Stories
•Professor Kevin Warwick of Reading (Eng¬
land) University told the Times of London in
May that “several” firms had approached
him about surgically implanting transponder
microchips into their workers as a way of
tracking their hours and whereabouts/
Cybernetics expert Warwick last year put a
chip into his own forearm to demonstrate
the technology, which will be further exhib¬
ited in England beginning in 2001 to keep
track of pets and might, he said, be used to
keep track of people who are granted
licenses to carry firearms.
•José Lopezes in the Operating Room: In
May José Maria Lopez, age 33, had a foot
amputated at Whittier (California) Hospital
Medical Center. He still has two remaining;
what was taken was a six-inch, fooflike growth
inside his left ankle that has always hampered
his walking and limited his shoe selection.
And a few days earlier, in San Pedro Sula,
Honduras, surgeons removed a miniature
bottle from the rectum of a José Lopez, age
43. He said he got drunk, passed out, and has
no idea how the bottle got there.
•Nó More Inhumane Punishment: Ion
May controversial Phoenix tough-guy
Sheriff Joe Arpaio announced he would
institute bedtime stories at the Maricopa
County jails, consisting of audiotapes of
classic novels (e.g., Little Women) to be
read at lights out every night The novels
will replace the previous nighttime fare,
which ran for four years: a videotaped lec-
turé serios by former Speaker of the
House Newt Gingrich.
RED MEAT
It was late in the Fall when my dad told us that
we couldn't kéep that shriveled dead clown in
his shed any longer. My brother and I didn’t
have the heart to simply throw it away ...it had
brought us such joy since the day we found it.
So we bought a ladies’ wig at the second-hand
store and spray painted it red. We put the wig
on the clown and took him downtown to the
McDonald's and left him in one of the booths.
from the secret files of
mo* cannon
When my dad read about it in the paper the
next day, he put us on restriction for a whole
month. We thought it was worth it, though...
that dead clown was the funniest thing ever.
Ironies
•According to an April Tampa Tribune story,
the following fates have beMen young men
who in recent years have recovered the sub¬
merged, religiously blessed cross in annual
diving competitions during the Epiphany fes¬
tival in Tarpon Springs, Florida: Oné died in a
ear accident; one suffered a severe spinal
injury; one was arrested on burglary charges;
and, this year, two former winners and a third
diver were charged with attempted murder
for bashing two people’s skulls with shovels
because their ear was going too slow.
•In Montreal, Quebec, in December, con-
victed serial killer Allan Legere announced he
had increased the amount of his 1994 lawsuit
against the prison for its failure to stop
inmates from beating him up. Legere is serv¬
ing life for five murders, including the rape
and torture killings of three women and the
beating death of a Catholic priest One wit¬
ness against Legere said she once remarked
to him: “You like to torture.” Legere allegedly
responded, “Yes, I do.”
•In the election campaign of 1998, Fred Mor¬
gan, the new Republican leader in the ;Qkla-
homa House of Representatives, personally
embraced the party’s proposal for reforming
motor-vehicle regulation, including cracking
down on residents who drive with out-of-state
license plates. In December Morgan admitted
that the car with the Arkansas tag in his park¬
ing space at the capítol was his (but that he
would register it in Oklahoma as soon as his
late mother’s probate was settled). And in
February Katrina Clark, director of housing-
code enforcement for the City of Boston, was
evicted from her apartment for failure to pay
more than $3500 in rent and for reneging on
her repayment plan.
Undignified Deaths
•In incidents one week apart in April, in Mor¬
ristown, New Jersey, and Bloomfield Town¬
ship, Michigan, construction workers became
trapped in sandpits. In both cases quick-think¬
ing co-workers attempted to pull them out
with backhoes, accidentally decapitating the
workers.
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the big picture
Vlliuma fWIWA 9 UHIIVII WUVI VI
“I’m a_sked ten
times a day,‘What are you going
to do when the multiplex opens?’” sighs an
exasperated Joanne Butcher, director of
Miami Beach’s Alliance Cinema, located on
Lincoln Road two blocks west of the eigh¬
teen-screen Regal Cinemas, which opens
Friday. “Well, we’re going to continue
showing the films we show, films the multi¬
plex is never going to show. You’re never
going to see The Apple at a multiplex,” con¬
tinues Butcher, referring to the Alliance’s
rim of the highly acclaimed and indepen¬
dently distributed film from Iranian direc¬
tor Samira Makhmalbaf.
At Regal Cinemas’ corporate headquar¬
ters in Nashville, there’s a similar note of
'.co-existence. “By nature of being in the
same business, we’re in competition to
some degree,” concedes Phil Zacheretti,
Regal’s vice president of marketing. But
while the new complex has earmarked a few of its screens for so-caile.d art films, “we’re never going to be
playing the same pictures,” Zacheretti says. “We don’t feel a need to put ¡^squeeze on anybody. We fecog-
nize the flavor of the area; we know we’re not plopping down eighteen screéns in the middle of á mid¬
state mall. But you’ve still got a mass audience in Miami Beach looking for mass Hollywood fare.”
A David and Goliath scenario, then, would seem a bit overstated. Yet.itVhard not to notice the
marked contrast between the nonprofit Alliance Cinema with its single, tiny screen, and the
by brett SOKOV
photos by Steve Satterwhfte
?>> neighboring 3300 seat behemoth — the latest outpost of the worid’s largest cinema chain,
n a
%\%
\\ \
^ film in Miami. Despite the construction of eighteen new screens, viewing options
which has 420 Regal Cinemas locations worldwide.
But even if the immediate future of the Alliance is notin doubt, the opening qf the
new Regal multiplex does highlight a larger issue: the dismal state of alternative
'O &
continue to shrink.
Continued on pago 19
i
Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 17

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Piet Ur e
Continued from page 17
;Tn fact when it comes to showcasing
independent film, re-released classics, and
touring repertory programs, Miami has
one of the most limited scenes of any
major city in the United States. The num¬
bers speak for themselves: Miami cur¬
rently only has one screen fully dedicated,
to opening new independent films (the
Alliance), with a second, the University of
Miami’s Bill CosfOtd Cinema, operating
for only part of the year, and only occa¬
sionally introducing such pictures to the
city. In contrast a Midwestern city such as
Cleveland, hardly considered a cultural
mecca, has eleven screens fully given over
to independents, foreign cinema, and
widely heralded programs like the
Francois Truffaut, Robert Bresson, and
AlfrédÜitcíicock retrospectives now tour¬
ing the nation.
Hiere is no single villain at work here,
but rather á particularly painful confluence
of conservatism and poor planning on the
part of local figures, and .destructive
trends on a national level. What it means
is that fewer and fewer truly exciting films
will be making their way to Miami. And it
may get worse.
Of course Capewell shouldn’t have to
worry about these things in addition to his
teaching schedule, which is precisely the
complaint of many who criticize the Cos-
ford’s lack of vision! Unwilling to see itself
as serving the entire community of Miami
instead of just the university campus (clos¬
ing for the summer — the perfect time to
catch an air-conditioned flick in Miami
is indicative of this), it stands as one of the
few theaters of its ilk without any operat¬
ing budget for film. While the theater
trumpets its upgrade this summer to a
THX sound system, it has yet to obtain a
grant for ongoing film programming, rais¬
ing the question: What’s more important,
quality films or high-tech gadgetry? "
For John Ewing, director of the Cleve¬
land Cinematheque, the formula for sur¬
vival is simple. “One of the keys to the
longevity of the Cinematheque is that we
do exclusive runs, that’s very important,”
he explains. “If [another art house] is fun¬
ning Life Is Beautiful, I’m not going to
touch it Maybe I could make money, but
it would be a waste. Our focus is always on
the community at large. We feel as though
we’re serving a purpose: to bring in films
to the greater Cleveland area which
wouldn’t come to this region otherwise.”
As for marketing, Ewing thinks when it
comes to screening art films, nothing is
more important than producing a good
movie calendar: “The calendar is the main
vehicle for reaching audiences, and that’s
borne but when we get crowds for films
we’ve gotten no other publicity on. We
showed a Japanese film called Junk Food,
and it got no local press. It had nothing
going for it besides being dotíe by an
interesting young director. But we’ve built
up an audience for Japanese cinema. Peo¬
ple were' intrigued by the calendar’s
description of it and we got a good
turnout”
“I just don’t have the money,” answers
Capewell when asked about the Cosford’s
own skimpy calendar. “Three years ago I
printed up this nice, glossy program
guide. In the film department [at UM] we
Continued on page 21
Miami New Times jtftt «W 19
Irma Vep from Olivier Assayas, Seventh
Heaven from Benoit Jacquot, and My Sex
Life ... or How I Got into an Argument
from Amaud Desplechin). “If there’s an
audience in Lincoln, Nebraska, for our
movies,” she says cooly, “then
there should be an audience in
Miami- We consider Miami a
major city, yet we’re not able to
play our films there as if it were
amajor venue.” The problem for
Gertsman is nothing culturally
intrinsic to South Florida, how-
ever. Rather it’s a peculiar busi¬
ness situation, one that was
echoed by several other film dis¬
tributors, small and large.
“Booking is hard these days,”
Gertsman explains.-“There’s a
real glut of product and not
enough theaters. But a lot of the.
time when you can’t find a suit¬
able art theater for the kind of
film that Zeitgeist distributes,
there’s a university film society,
some sort of college venue, or a
media center — something that
picks up the slack. That’s been
the problem in Miami. There’s
never been one centralized
place that specialized art films
play. Miami is missing a real
theater that plays the ‘outsider-
independent’ films, the things
that aren’t distributed by Mira¬
max or Fine Line.” Gertsman
cites the Cleveland. Cinema¬
and the Cosford’s booker, and accuses
him of a lack of programming philosophy
and poor marketing. .
5 “My God, pay somebody proper remuner¬
ation and program the Cosford accord¬
ingly!” Chediák says. “I’m sure
Capewell is doing his best, but he’s
just not being paid enough to
devote his full attention to pro¬
gramming that theater like it
should be. Why spend a quarter of
a million dollars, just to flush
something down the tubes?”
Indeed the bulk of this past
season’s programming at the
Cosford (it closes for the sum¬
mer) simply duplicated films
shown at the AMC CocoWalk,
ineluding treacly Hollywood fare
such as Playing by Heart.
Capewell frejely admits these
^elections could be viewed as
uninspired, but points to fall 1999
bookings of Several films that
otherwtee would bypass Miami:
Olivier Assayas’s latest, Late
August, Early September, After
Life\ and Leila. Moreover he bris¬
tles at Chediak’s charges.
“I’m a full-time professor! When
am I supposed to do all this stuff?”
Capewell asks. “All Nat [Chédiak]
does is the festival He watches
films year-round, period. If I had
the budget hé has, I’d market
more, too. Not to iqention all the,
free ads he gets from the Herald.”
ford Cinema. To many, however, the Cos-
ford isn’t fulfilling the role it could. “The
University of Miami spent $250,-000 bring¬
ing the Cosford up to par,” says Nat Ché¬
diak, director of the Miami International
Who's afraid of Hollywood? Not the Alliance Cinema's Joanne Butcher
‘‘MV God. pay somebody proper remuneration and
program ttte cosford accordingly?”
Some would suggest the lack of indepen¬
dent film is simply the price of living in
Miami. When asked to comment on the
dearth, one local arts writer said simply:
“Miami is the sticks. You don’t get art
films in the sticks.”
It’s an argument that doesn’t fly with
Nancy Gertsman, copresident of Zeitgeist
Films (the distributor of acclaimed titles
such as Abbas Kiarostami’s Taste of
Cherry, and “new” French Wave pictures
3300 seats, eighteen screens, and a whole lot o' nachos: The Regal multiplex hits South Beach
theque as an example of just such a non¬
profit, university-sponsored theater, one
located iff the heart of “the sticks” that still
manages to be a place where “films that
need special attention can be curated
properly.”
Of course Miami does have a university-,
sponsored, nonprofit theater: the Bill Cos-
Film Festival, previously the owner of two
Miami art houses in the Seventies and
Eighties, and a University of Miami alum¬
nus. “You’d think they would spend a little
more for somebody to actually program it
properly.” Chédiak points his finger,
squarely at professor George Capewell,
chair of the university’s film department

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have three or four well-published authors
on film: big minds from Harvard, places
like thát. I included literary commentary
from them on the films. I lost $2000 on it.
If that happens again, I’d be out of busi¬
ness.”
Ewing’s attitude toward exclusivity
points out one of the chief problems with
the Absinthe House, Cinematheque and
the Astor Art Cinema (both in Coral
Gables), two locally owned art houses that
have fallen baqk on trying to compete with
AMC CoCoWalk and Sunset Place for the
same audience, and the same films. In fact
the Astor ran Life Is Beautiful for more
than four months while it screened at
CócoWalk. Although Life may have been a
solid revenue generator, it begs the ques¬
tion of just what the role of an art house is.
In a city with a chronic shortage of
screens available for truly adventurous
fare, isn’t running Life Is Beautiful, as
Ewing puts it, “a waste?”
Cesar Hernandez-Canton, co-owner of
tfie Absinthe, disagrees, “The audience
that goes to see art films does not want to
park, go up’a flight of stairs, pay for,the
fi/eo tfie dreaded
mafis* once tile
Physical
antitfiesis of
indie films, nave
gotten in on
tUe act.
ticket, go up another flight of stairs to see
the movie, and all within a mall environ¬
ment.” Moreover it isn’t as if •Hernandez-
Canton isn’t trying'to open exclusives at
his theater. He cites two foreign films he
recently begged distributors for: the
astonishing debut from French director
Erick Zonca, The Dreamlife of Angels, and
the Argentine psychosexual thriller Open
Your Eyes. In both cases he was turned
down in favor of AMC sites. “The commu¬
nity thinks we" don’t give a shit about art
films, but they don’t know what’s going on
behind the scenes,” he says. “I just refuse
to accept the proposition that art films gg
with malls.”
Tom Prassis, vice president of sales for
Sony Pictures Classics (file distributor for
Dreamlife)f is sympathetic to Hemandez-
; Cantons plight, but insists on the need to
follow the bottom line when choosing-
where to book his company’s films. “The
Absinthé fe a fairly good house and we’ll
play some of our pictures there,” he
explains. “But they need to build up an audi-.
,ence,”
Dreamlife’s run at Sunset Plage was
solid, but unspectacular. Coiild Sony have
toade more money by placing the moviein
the more art-film-friendiy environs of the
Absinthe? Hernandez-Canton,thinks so,
but says he finds himself in a Catch-22 sit¬
uation. “The distributors say I don’t have
the grosses to justify them giving me a
certain film exclusively,” he explains. “But
how can I get those grosses if they won’t
let me open a qualify film like The Dream-
life of Angels?”
The Alliance’s Joanne Butcher puts it this
way. “Whefi the majors see a sex, lies¡ and
Continued on page 23
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Continued from page 21
videotape 6r a Brofiters^McMulien making
big dollars, they’re not willing to let that go,”
she says. “They’re not satisfied with just
doing Titanic and Star Wars. They want
every penny that’s out there. That’s why
every big studio has a classics or indie
division.”
Today’s world of independent film can be
traced to 1989 and the breakout success of
sex, lies, and videotape. The debut feature
from the young director Steven Soder¬
bergh, sex was the toast of a then-little-
publicized film festival assembled by
Robert Redford called Sundance. From
there it went onto take the Palme d’Or at
Cannes. Financed for $2.5 million (a pit¬
tance in the film industry) primarily by a
home-video company operating outside
the established Hollywood studio system,
the film would go on to gross more than
$25 million in the United States, and $100
million worldwide. Although sex certainly
wasn’t the first independent film to grab
headlines (John Cassavetes was raising
eyebrows with his own self-financed pro¬
ductions back in the Fifties), it proved that
independent films could mean big bucks,
and for á relatively modest initial invest¬
ment. It was a trend cemented by the
arrival of Quentin Tarantino and the phe¬
nomenal international grosses for his sec¬
ond film, Pulp Fiction, in 1994.
Five years later independent film is its
own genre, with a parallel universe to Hol¬
lywood. It has its own glossy magazines,
award shows, and even competing cable
networks. In fact the indies now seem less
an alternative to Hollywood than merely
Earmafkihg screens for art films’ isn’t a
; cjjainwide,policy, however. Regal’s Phil
Zacheretti concedes that doing so
depends solely on profitability.
Profits of course are what independent
film is all about these days. Once the
province of artists such as Jim Jarmusch
and Hal Hartley, who were not considered
bankable enough for Hollywood, it is now a
growth industry. The designation “indie
film director” is rapidly rivaling “rock star”
in the hipness quotient But as the world of
independent film has changed, so has its
vision. The bulk of the independent films
being shot seem less the product of edgy
auteurs, and more like calling cards for
Hollywood-bound résumé holders. A look
at Miami’s own South Beach Film Festival
bears this out locally, with most of the
works differing little from upcoming net¬
work TV pilots.
Torn Bernard, copresident of Sony Pic¬
tures Classics (the indie-friendly division of
Sony), explained this evolution in a recent
interview with the New York Times. After
mulling over the sharp drop in quality show¬
cased at this year’s Sundance Film Festival,
he said, “The motivation for most kids to
make independent movies is not to have a
means of independent expression, to say
something you can’t say within the system,
but to get into the system, become a major
director, and get rich.”
This growing corporatization of indepen¬
dent film was brought home for the
Alliance’s Joanne Butcher this past year
with the release of Hurricane Streets, a
gritty, urban coming-of-age tale directed
by newcomer Morgan J. Freeman (no rela-
Continued on page 25
Cesar Hemandez-Canton (left) and Johnny Calderin, co-owners of the Absinthe, declare war on the malls
an adjunct to it. Technically speaking,
they are. The bulk of the so-called inde¬
pendent features that receive media atten¬
tion are in fact released on independent
subsidiaries of the major studios. Mira¬
max, once a scrappy hole-in-the-wall outfit,
is part of the Disney empire, and outspent
the competition by millions on 1999 Oscar
ads.
Even the dreaded malls, once the physi¬
cal antithesis of indie films, have gotten in
on the act. Several chains now set aside
two to three of their nunierous screens at
a given multiplex for “art films” — includ¬
ing the AMC sites at Coconut Grove’s
CocoWalk and the Shops at Sunset Place
in South Miami. The new Regal Cinema in
South Beach will also screen some inde¬
pendent films, mainly the same heavily
marketed ones that AMC shows. It also
plans to aggressively challenge the
Alliance’s present near-monopoly on gay-
theme releases. Of course this competi¬
tion could be a blessing in disguise, free?
ing the Alliance (as well as Miami’s other
art houses) to fully concentrate on pre¬
cisely those independent films and trea¬
sured re-releases overlooked by the malls.
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Continued from page 23
tion j:o the aetor), which tookthC Audi-
eiice Award atSifñtlance. The film’s assis¬
tant director was Jamin O’ Brien, a'hoard
member of the Alliance, and* the theater’s
boohing agent. The critical success of
Hurricane Streets and its resulting pur¬
chase at Sundance by MGM would seem
,to be a triumph for the Alliance. But it was
a Pyrrhic victory.
“MGM wouldn’t let us show it!” exclaims
an exasperated Butcher. “The film was a
blood relative and they wouldn’t let the
Alliance show it.” Apparently MGM had
its sights1’set on a mainstream market for
Hurricane Streets. “Then when it was a
box-office failure, we still had to fight for
the-film,” she continues. “The only reason
we finally got it was because a guy I know
in MGM’s accounting department leaned
on their distribution department and
forced them to return my phone calls:
Thafs the only reason that film ever made,
it to Miami. MGM is going to pick up an
‘Alliance’ film and then they’re going to
kill it It’s just corporate arrogance. They
don’t know how to market these films.”
Hurricane Streets is not th^pnly^exam-
ple of Hollywood’s mismanagement of
“Had oat of siffM
been marketed
by a smaller
distributor,
it would tiai/e
been a nit.”
indie films. Sitting on a panel at the Wolf-
soniamFIU in February as part of the
Miami International Film Festival, the ven¬
erable film critic Andrew Sarris struck a
tone similar to Butcher’s. Hollywood no-
longer knows how to reach adult audi¬
ences, he lamented,, decrying a trend in
which the. bulk of the studio’s promotional
efforts are aimed at the highly profitable
teenage market. Quality pictures, even
those made by proven talents, are simply
cast to the wind. Consequently two of Sar-
ris’s picks as 1998’s best (Steven Soden
bergh’s Out of Sight and Sam Raimi’s A
Simple Plan) were box,-office disasters.
Marketed as mainstream pictures and
screening mainly at malls,"the two films
failed to connect with audiences, despite
being aesthetically accessible and having
the Hollywood advertising juggernaut at
their disposal.
Ther'e’’is no small irony at play.
Rewarded with a big budget and studio
backing after his.indie debut/Soder-
bergh’s original fans deserted him. This
despite Out of Sights star power (Jennifer
Lopez and George Clooney), a bankable
Elmore .Leonard-based script, add'lfnani-
mous criticaTpraise. Raimi, too, received
glowing accolades for A Simple Plan, with
many calling it the long-awaited master¬
piece from aj director who made similar
wayes in indie circles with his low-budget
1983 cult horror classic The Evil Dead,
taking an award at Cannes fomthat selfj
financed picture.'
Peter Biskind, author of Easy Riders,
Raging Bulls, a history of Seventies Holly¬
wood and its modern evolution, is blunt.
“Had 0«f of Sight béen márketed by a
smaller distributor, it would have been a
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Picture
Continued from page 25
hit,” he says, certain that the same
audiences that flocked to the simi¬
larly themed Get Shorty would have
bought tickets. But because the film
was budgeted at more than $20 mil¬
lion, it was automatically assigned to
the major Hollywood “parent” of
October Films. “They just have no
idea how to work that kind of film,”
Biskind asserts. He believes A Sim¬
ple Plan died financially for the
same reason.
Moreover indie films in general,
even the ones marketed as such, are
falling victim to commercial pres¬
sures. “Distribution patterns of inde¬
pendent films are becoming more
and more like the majors,” continues
Biskind. “There’s a glut of indepen¬
dent films oh the market, and there
are many more films than there are
screens, so they’re getting into the
same situation as studio films. The
first weekend is crucial in deciding
whether the film is going to be
retained on the screen or not”
Foreign cinema particularly gets
lost in the shuffle. Even more so
than with domestic indies, rigid formulas
apply in marketing foreign films to Ameri¬
can audiences: Merchant-Ivory bodice-rip¬
pers, Shakespearean-theme pageants, and
middle-of-the-road weepers are the only
types of foreign pictures cónsidered finan¬
cially viable.
Accordingly several mainstream critics
have wondered, aloud as to the whereabouts
of the successors of the great foreign direc¬
tors of the Sixties and Seventies. Where are
the inheritors of the spirit of Godard,
Bergman, and Fellini? The truth islhisnext
generation is hard at work in their native
lands, but thanks to the vagaries of distribu¬
tion, their films are erratically screened in
America, and often below the media radar.
Ignored by the studio-run indies (and
thus, shut out of the malls), exposing these
movies to American audiences is left to
truly independent distributors such as
Kino (which released Hong Kong
director Wong Kar-Wai’s Fallen
Angels and Happy Together), New
Yorker Films (Serbian director Emir
Kusturica’s Underground and Samira
Mákhmalbafs The Apple), and Zeit¬
geist Films, all of whom must now
, compete for the single screen at the
Alliance or the Cosford.-
Professor George Capewell on the Cosford's critics: “Show me the money!”
ence of 41,000 out of thin air!” he says with
a roar, referring to the record crowds this
past year for the Miami International Film
Festival. “These people are here. I don’t
invent them. They don’t come out to the
movies for ten days in February and then
go away skiing.”
case quality cinema that would otherwise
remain unseen in Miami, than simply to
make money.
“Everybody wants to do festivals now,”
Chédiak says dryly. “They go to Gusman,
they see a packed house, and like any
dunce, they think, ‘Hey, I can do that!’
theater. Because of this [lack of sup¬
port], the smaller independent distrib¬
utors know that if they open a film in
Miami, they’re not going to get pub¬
licity, andtheyfregoingtodidst
Writing in me film journal the Inde¬
pendent, critic Rob Nelson addressed a
similar situation in his hometown of
Minneapolis, focusing on the role of
that city’s daily paper and its film
reviewer, Jeff Stridden Nelson writes
that Strickler declared “coverage of
indies... is limited in his paper by mea¬
ger space and resources,” then added a
revealing comment from the reviewer:
“‘My job is to report and review, not to
support local filmmaking. It is not my
job to sell tickets to their movies.’” Nel¬
son continues, “So if I understand this
correctly [Strickler’s] comprehensive
and prominently placed coverage of
studio films week in and week out [in
the daily paper] does not constitute
selling tickets to their movies. It’s sim¬
ply a matter of reporting and reviewing
whatever’s most worthy of attention. In
practice this has meant that a movie
that’s wide-released by a major studio,
even if it sucks, is automatically
deemed more worthy than a foreign
and/or independent movie playing at [an
art house], even if it’s great (and could use
a leg up).” As this approach spreads to
more and more local papers (both weeklies
and dailies), film criticism appears increas¬
ingly to be simply an extension of the Holly¬
wood publicity machine.
“What’s crucial is a local iuedia tfiaf nurtures
and tnrows a spotligiu on [independent] movies.
Chediak’s success with the festival
hasn’t gone unnoticed locally. Instead of
inspiring a multiscreen art house (such as
Fort Lauderdale’s Gateway Theater) , how¬
ever, the example of those 41,000 paying
customers has sparked only more festi¬
vals. The motivation seems less to show¬
Look at the Hispanic Film Festival. I swear
to you, 39 Spanish films and not a single
one I would recommend to anyone I call a
friend. Look at the Brazilian Film Festival.
Opening night is Central Station [a film
that played for months at CocoWalk and
the Absinthe]. Everybody and their
mother has already seen that
movie! What’s the point?”
For the Absinthe the solution to this
business dilemma may be to opt out
of the competition altogether. By the
end of the summer, co-owner Cesar
Hernandez-Cantpn hopes to switch
the programming of the Absinthe to
retrospectives, beginning with a
sampling of the work of director Fed¬
erico Fellini in July. The horizon is
less certain, though. In the year 2000
the theater’s lease is up, and Hernan-
dez-Canton’s landlord has expressed
a desire to convert the building into
more lucrative office space.
“This is a strange market,” Heman-
dez-Canton says with a note of weari¬
ness in his voice. “You’re competing
with the ocean and the beach. You’re
not freezing your ass off in the rain
when you get out of work every day,
like in New York, which makes you
want to see a show.”
Don’t talk about the weather to Nat
■Chédiak. “I don’t materialize an audi¬
The art houses struggle, but Nat Chédiak pulls in record
crowds for the Miami International Film Festival
The blame for Miami’s anemic film
scene also fells on the local media.
Virtually every figure in the indus¬
try cites the. importance of an
impassioned local critic willing to
champion independent film as a
key ingredient to a city’s cinematic
health. “Intellectual traditions, cul¬
tural ferment, lots of bookstores, .a
large student population: All these
things help make a city a great film
town,” says author Peter Biskind.
“But whatis crucial is a local media
that nurtures and throws a spot¬
light on [independent] movies with
feature pieces on independent film¬
makers.”
The Alliance’s Joanne Butcher is
blunt on the matter. “The New
Times sucks,” she says. “When
they got rid of their local film critic,
it changed everything,” Butcher
continues, referring to New Times’s
chainwide decision to replace local
film writers with a group of Los
Angeles-based critics. “Now they’ll
run reviews of independent films
that show at the multiplexes, but
not ones that open at the Alliance,”
she continues. “If the New Times is
alocal paper, then they ought tobe
reviewing films thaLslmjvaLajlqcaL
The Gosford’s George Capewell, the
Absinthe’s Hernandez-Canton, and Ché¬
diak all echoed this view, saying that their
fortunes are by default tied to the HerakTs
reviews and their “star” rating system.
Booking choices become dictated by what
will receive a good review, regardless of a
film’s actual merit A little-known film that
receives four or five stars can thrive, with
word of mouth building up audiences
beyond the opening weekend’s draw. Con¬
versely a poor review, no matter what the
size bf the national buzz, almost inevitably
kills a picture.
From a national perspective, Sony’s Tom
Prassis cites Cleveland as an example of a
city with responsive local criticism. “We
got a glowing review of The Governess
from the Cleveland paper,” he says. “Con¬
sequently we were able to play that film
for fifteen weeks there. We never
expected it to perform that well.”
K there’s a way out of this impasse, it lies
with individuals willing to ignore both
national trends and local neglect; with theater
owners who see the spread of independent
films at multiplexes not as a threat, but as an
opportunity. Instead of duplicating the mall’s
selections, why not choose to dig deeper?
Barron Sherer is a figure who has taken
that path, soldiering on week after week
with Miami’s sole repertory film program,
his Cinema Vortex series, which takes place
Sundays at noon at the Alliance. Showcas¬
ing a wide array of pictures, from lost noir
classics Point Blank and The Asphalt Jungle
to the experimental work of Stan Brakhage
and Kenneth Anger, Sherer hasn’t let occa¬
sionally small crowds dampen his spirits.
“I’m not going to stop,” he says firmly. “If
somebody figures out how to draw huge
crowds in this ttíwn, let me know, but I’m
nqtetopping.” CD
* 26 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times
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Miami New Times June 17- 23,1999 21

CHAIRMEN OF THE
A 50-year-old Biscayne Bay institution
builds a dock to the 21st Century

BY KIRK NIELSEN
It is Sunday evening in thie Happy Room, the bar
at the Miami Outboard flub on Watson Island.
Clemente Gonzalez, a talkative 38-year-old with
a goatee, is recapping (he aquatic equivalent of
war which broke out-fin, the MOC grounds a
few hours earlier. Armed with bilge pumps,
dozens of members drenched one another with
powerful streams, of water. The soggy battle
marked the end of the club’s regatta, an annual
treasure hunt that takes contestants to the far
reaches of Biscayne Bay.
- As Gonzalez tells nis Me, ©1-year-old Juan
Munne stands a few steps away; remembering a
tour that would-have made Ginger,-the Professor,
the Howells, and all the Gilligan’s Island charac¬
ters shudder. Six years ago He was a few miles
off Bimini piloting the Wet and
Dry —his^34-foot sport-fish¬
ing vessel — with his wife
and’teenage daughter and
son onboard. They were
heading westward to Miami
after ten days on the
Bahamian island. It was late
morning and Munné?s compass
was just where he wanted it, at 270
degrees. Then a tomadolike storm
blew in from behind. The high wind,
rough seas, and driving rain sent
him off course, “I got switched
around and aU of a sudden I was
at 90 degrees,” he recalls. “The
waves were ten or eleven feet
And with following seas. Follow¬
ing seas are very bad. When you
get hit from the bow you can navi¬
gate waves. But when you get it
from the stem, you have to surf. Oth¬
erwise you fall into the hole.”
The hole. It lies below your boat when you are
riding a huge swell. If you don’t know how to han¬
dle tile descent, you can nosedive and capsize.
Munne whipped up an emergency plan: Beach
the vessel and swim to terra firma. “I was going
to crash the boat against the shore and save my
family,” he says. “But the breakers were so bad I
was afraid to throw my children into the water.”
So he headed back to sea to ride out the storm.
In the end Munne made it safely to the out¬
board club docks. “I just hugged my family and
we kissed each other,” he says. The Wet and Dry
was in fairly good shape.
The Happy Room is steeped in such stories. “We
are not exactly tame people. We are a little wild,”
confesses Munne, who emigrated from Cuba to
Miami by boat in 1965. “For people with families
the dub adds a little action to fife. It’s good, healthy
action.” The seventeen-year MOC member works
as a boat-engine mechanic at a shop on the Miami
River. As Munne ends his saga, Gonzalez is still
raving about the water fight to his beer-sipping
compadres. He’s leaning on a section of the bar
dubbed long ago “the Cuban comer.” Nearby two
men roll dice from a leather cup. And though it is.
approaching midnight, the clacking sound of shuf¬
fling dominoes marks the start of yet another game
atone of three tables in the lounge next to the bar.
The boat club is among the last remnants of
old Watson Island, an 87-acre heap of bay bot¬
tom that has once again become a target for
developers. Along with their neighbors (fish¬
mongers, fishing-charter captains, a bait and fuel
shop owner, seaplane and helicopter operators)
the boaters are feeling the pinch. Over the next
year Parrot Jungle, a multimillion-dollar tourist
attraction, is supposed to move from suburban
Pinecrest to a sixteen-acre site adjacent to
MOC’s three-and-a-half acres. Four million dol¬
lars’worth of new water- and sewer-lines and
roadway ramps are already under construction.
Across MacArthur Causeway city planners envi¬
sion a seaplane and helicopter airport that will
feature a new terminal, hangars for six choppers
Continued on page 31
Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 29

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Andy Antelo, Clemente Gonzalez, and Eddie Cavadas (left to right) in tho soon-to-expand Happy Room
Vice commodore Jorge Gonzalez, commodore Gonzalo Planas, and fleet commander Juan Munne
-ll!9f«*WKIIIIIIIililRI*fVltlMrilllBSSmC9ffff*59l*Smp*tPfStSSifai
Outboard
Continued from page 29
•and two aircraft, and a U.S, Customs sta¬
tion. A new facility for the Greater Miami
Convention & Visitors Bureau is also in the
works, and officials are contemplating new
cruise-ship terminals.
“This island has been Cinderella for a
long time. There are lots of princes who
want to take her on a honeymoon,”
observes MOC vice commodore Jorge Gon¬
zalez, who-sells chandeliers to upscale
Clients and keeps his 25-foot Sea Ray
cruiser at the club. Although most of the
island’s residents think their days are num¬
bered, the boát club’s flanks are formidably
¿protected; it has a lease that expires in 2026
¡and a bevy of city and county politicians on
fits membership rolls.
“Club members are at the beck and call of
any organization in time of trouble or disas¬
ter,” a February 16,1941, Miami Daily News
article stated.
Of course the motorboaters also had a good
time. They displayed their wildness by racing
across Biscayne Bay and towing stunt artists
who water-skied while standing on one
another’s shoulders. After some intolerant
souls complained about noisy boats, a club
leader beseeched members to use mufflers.
During World War II the MOC organized-
patrols to help defend against possible aggres¬
sion by the Axis powers.
The MQC’s first clubhouse was an old
wooden cottage on the eastern comer of Wat¬
son Island. The motorboaters had famous
neighbors across County Causeway, the road
that bisects the island and was later renamed
for General Douglas MacArthur. The
Goodyear blimp was stored there as were sea-
Three outboard-engine salesmen launched
the MOC in April 1938: Robert Soelke, Harry
Santana, and Lew Hewes. Thirty members
attended the first meeting at Hewes Out¬
board Service on the Miami
River and agreed to pay dues of
é50 cents per month. They adapted
mies from the Tampa Outboard Club.
The craft were small, wooden, and propelled
by Evinrude and Johnson motors. Among
•the club’s first members were BUI Barker
and Ed Todd, who would become local mar¬
itime celebrities for their swift Barker-Todd
plywood boats.
For its first few years the group had no per¬
manent home, yet it quickly became one of
the largest motorboating collectives in the
jJnited States. The MOC offered rescue
training and searched for missing children.
THE MOC ORGANIZED THE
COUNTY’S FIRST MARINE
PATROL AT THE
BEHEST OF COUNTY
SHERIFF TOM KELLY.
planes from Chalk’s International Airlines,
which arrived on the island soon after it was
created in the Twenties. A year later the
Miami Yacht Club, then twenty years old,
moved in next door to the MOC. (The yacht
dub had been headquartered on the Miami
River.) The state turned the spoil island over
to the city in 1949, with the proviso that it be
reserved for public or governmental use.
In the Fifties the MOC organized the
county’s first marine patrol. Richard Taylor, a
Miami lawyer who is now age. 75, helped
assemble the force at the behest of then-Dade
County Sheriff Tom Kelly. “We were sworn in
by the sheriff” Taylor remembers. “We didn’t
carry guns, but we had full uniforms and boats
labeled with a police sign we put on them. And
die main thing even then was controlling traf¬
fic, slowing people down at bridges, that kind
of thing. It hasn’t changed much, except the
numbers. We were usually two in a boat.
There were fourteen or fifteen of us. The sign
and the uniform, that’s about all you need.
People slow down real quick.”
Taylor, who served as commodore in 1960,
introduced the first boat with an inboard
motor to the dub. A local mechanic installed
the engine inside his nineteen-foot cruiser; the
biggest outboard available at the time would
barely move it
In 1957 the MOC signed a twenty-year lease
with the dtyat one dollar per year, and a new
clubhouse, which still stands today, went upin
1958. But as the boaters fished and
cruised away their days, little else
changed on the island. One exception
was flie 1961 arrival of Hotei, a Shinto
god of happiness. His pot-bellied gran¬
ite figure was just one facet of the
Miami-Japan Garden, donated by
Japanese industrialist Kiyoshi
Ichimura. Throughout the Sixties the
MOC anchored itself as a Miami insti¬
tution with charitable acts: hosting
races for the Orange Bowl Regatta,
providing Thanksgiving dinners for
senior dtizens, and sponsoring fishing
tournaments for poor kids from social
¿service groups such as Big Brothers
Big Sisters.
The club in those days reflected
/Miami’s population: The majority of
members were Anglo. As Cubans
streamed into South Florida after the
1959 revolution, the MOC became
more Hispanic. But unlike at many
local institutions, the immigrants were
accepted as part of the gang, as long
as they had a vessel, Taylor and other
old-timers observe.
Continued on page 33
The club is “a reflection of the city we live in," says past
commodore Richard Taylor, photographed at his
canalside home
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Outboard
Continued from page 31
Edgar Lendian, a Havana native who arrived
m Miami in 1961, was one of the first Latin
members. He joined in 1964 after: returning
from college at Louisiana State University.
There was no ethnic strife, he insists. “A lot of
the Americans were my Mends,” says the
lawyer and real estate broker, now age 66. He
soon convinced another successful exile to
join, Ed Fernandez. Fernandez, who had
made a fortune packaging Sweet’N Low,
became the MOC’s first Cüban-bom com¬
modore in 1975, ten years before Miami
elected itsfirst Cuban-American mayor, Xavier
Suarez. “It was a gradual thing over file years,”
Lendian says of the club’s demographic
change from Anglo to Hispanic domination.
The shift accelerated after the 1980 Marie!
boafiift, he adds.
By the late Eighties the club’s roster was full
of Latin names. “It happens that Cubans like
boating very much because we’re from an
island,” says Lendian. “We’re not land lovers,
we’re water lovers. I think that’s what attracted
us.” He’s always considered the chib fo be
cross-cultural, though he acknowledges a
drop in Anglo membership. “They retired and
moved out We kept on boating.”
THE FBI
LATER
REPORTED
THAT CLARK HAD
OFFERED POLITICAL
HELP, BUT NOTHING
OVERTLY ILLICIT.
. A few Anglos still belong to the club and
Jceep boats there, but MOC social events are
attended almost exclusively by Cuban exiles.
Taylor, who joined in 1955, remembers that
some Anglo members groused about their
new minority status But he thinks for the
most part the organization has been a rare
example of ethnic harmony in Miami. “We’ve
had an invasion more or less and you might as
well laugh at it and go along with it, or leave
town,” he declares. “I don’t think grumbling is
going to do a bit of good.” He sold his 41-foot
Hatterasin April, in part because he’s feeling
his 75 years. “It got to be a long way from the
bridge to the engine,” he says. But there are
other reasons he rarely sets foot in the club¬
house anymore. Tve-been backing off over
the past year. I go over there and they are as
nice as can be — ‘How you doin’, Taylor?’ —
but then they go right back into Spanish. And
I’m a Berlitz Mure.”
For some members politics was as much a
passion as boating. And the MOC’s patch of
Watson Island offered an excellent vantage
point for viewing two of the most bizarre
events in Miami-Dade’s political history. Coin¬
cidentally both occurred in 1985.
One of them erupted over a plan to makefile
spoil island a tourist destination. That idea was
not new, of course. In ftie Seventies and early
Eighties, then-Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre
campaigned repeatedly for a theme park on
the island. “When Ferre wanted to build that
big project we put out a bumper sticker that
read ‘Save Watson Island for boats, birds, and
blimps,’” recalls Armando Gutierrez, a politi-
cal consultant who has been an MOC member
since the Seventies. (He owns a seventeen-
footMako.)
But a new-and-improved 1985 concept for
file rustic isle gained enough steam to win the
Continued on page 35
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Vice commodore Jorge Gonzalez (in straw hat) and talent-show crew
Outboard
Continuad from page 33
dty commission’s backing. Developer John K.
Meyer's proposed $130 million, Arquitectqn-
ica-designed complex that would include a
boat-exposition center, a 300-room hotel, two
restaurants, and docks for 300 boats. It also-
called for the MOC and the Miami Yacht Chib
to merge into one building. Among Meyer’s
associates was lawyer (and future City and
County Commissioner) Arthur Teele. The
investors included Cuban American National
Foundation honchos Jorge Más Canosa and
Pepe Hernandez.
But then-Commissioner JdeCarollo, who
cast the sole vote against the project, sent
the scheme into disarray by disclosing that
a company with dealings in communist
countries was among the twelve investors.
A war of words followed and Mas Canosa
challenged Carollo to a duel with guns or
knives. The commissioner suggested water
pistols. In the end there was neither a
shootout nor construction. “They are run¬
ning like chickens,” Carollo bragged to the
Miami Herald after Mas Canosa and other
CANF investors pulled out
Another bizarre drama unfolded that year
in and around the MOC’s Happy Room. On
August 22 an FBI undercover informant met
with then-County Mayor Steve Clark and
retired Miami zoning officer Kevin “Waxy”
Gordon. (Clark was a club member.) Agents
were probing two claims: 1) longshoremen
were involved in racketeering at the port;
and 2) Gordon was involved in a zoning
scam in Hialeah. The FBI later reported that
Clark had offered political help, but nothing
overtly illicit
Six months later Clark and Gordon were
again at the MOC. Now Gordon was wearing
an FBI wire; agents had snared him in a
drug deal several weeks before the
encounter. According to a transcript of the
chat, then-federal Judge, now U.S; Congress
man, Alcee Hastings warned Clark to stay
away from Gordon. Hastings was privy to the
federal investigations because he had autho¬
rized the wiretaps. (Disclosing such informa¬
tion is illegal.)
Here are some highlights of Clark’s barely
intelligible exchange with Gordon at the
MOC:
Clark: I remember saying, “Hello, judge,”
and he comes to me saying, “Stevie, I want to
tell you something.... Don’t get near Kevin....
Kevin Gordon is involved in some zoning in
Hialeah and don’t, I’m just telling you don’t,
don’t [go near him]... just walk away from it”
... How in the heü would he know that?
Gordon: I have no idea.... Here’s what I did.
I made onecalL...:
Clark: To a commissioner?
Gordon: To a commissioner out there....
Clark: How, how in the fuck would the
judge know about this?
Gordon died of'a heart attack a month
later. The FBI eventually dropped the inves¬
tigations and theijJvS. Senate impeached
Hastings for plotting to take a bribe, but
acquitted him of charges he leaked word of
the wiretaps to Clark. (Hastings denied
warning Clark and a federal judge later ruled
the impeachment invalid. The affair was the
subject of a July 13,1988 New Times feature
story, “Undercover.”)
í HilllüMi IWItiAtMJll SfMJpi
lore. “We never figured out what really hap¬
pened,” concludes commodore Conzalo
Planas, an electrical contractor who lives in
Hialeah.
Clark sailed on and so did the MOC. The
extent of Clark’s advocacy for the chib, which
paid the city $13,000 in yearly rent, is unclean
“Clark didn’t attempt to do their politics for
them, that I know of. He was just the guy in
the background,” concludes John Brennan,
who chairs the city’s Waterfront Advisory
Board. “I think itwas sort of like having a shot¬
gun in the closet They didn’t have to open the
closet, but you knew that they could get seri¬
ous if they had to.”
By 1988, MOC’s 50th anniversary, it was
clear the club had forged a grand Anglo-
Cuban alliance. Proclamations commending
the motorboaters’ public service were issued
by Cuban-American mayors across Dade
County, including West Miami’s Pedro
Reboredo (now a Miami-Dade commissioner),
Sweetwater’s Isidoro Cuevas, and Miami’s
Suarez.
Through all the politics, the MOC’s purpose
remained as stated in its charter “for the fur¬
therance of outboard boating in all of its allied
activities... to foster a spirit of helpfulness and
good fellowship ... [and] to enable the boat¬
man to fully enjoy the use of his outboard-pow¬
ered craft.”
Speed is not the only factor in this year’s
regatta. As in a scavenger hunt, crews locate
clues, figure out the answer, then travel to
tiie next stop. Members hide out in various
parts of Biscayne Bay dispensing hints.
Commodore Planas stations himself at the
edge of Bicentennial Park with the first clue.
Continued on page 36
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Outboard
Continued from page 35
The last stop is at a boat just off Virginia Key.
The winners take home a coveted prize: a,
bottle of booze.
- Later that day the motorboaters gather for
the annual regatta banquet About 150 mem¬
bers devour salad, soup, and fish. Spanish is
the preferred linguistic order of the day.
Seated at one of fifteen round tables are
Humberto .Amaro, an aide to Mayor Alex
.Pendas, and Amaro’s wife. A guest asks
whether all of MOC’s members are Cuban.
Someone at the table offers that there is one
exception. “No, lo botaron hace un par de
años (No, they kicked him out a couple of
years ago),” says an elderly woman in a
sleeveless blue dress, dotted with white
daisies. Everyone at the table laughs.
Planas is hustling around in a shirt with red,
white, and blue stripes, and yellow shorts. Hy’
wears a cell phone on one hip and a ring of
keys on the other. He’s making last-minute
preparations for the night’s big event the tal¬
ent show. Through the club’s fuzzy speaker
system, he announces the first act, the MOC
ONE BY ONE
WOMEN
DRESSED AS
NUNS WALK OUT
SINGING “MY GUY.” ONE
OF THEM APPEARS TO
BE PREGNANT.
Boys, three kids in sunglasses and baseball
caps. One of them is actually a girl in a shiny
black jacket To taped music they sing a song
called “Adelante la Juventud” (“Onward
Youth”). Next, fifth-grader Jenny Perez, in red
bell-bottoms, lip-synchs Whitney Houston’s
“As Long as You Love Me.” Four women
billed as the MOC Village People dance and
fake the words to the tune “YMCA,” after
which Planas exults in English: “These village
people are from Hialeah and little Havana!”
Then Juan Munne croons a bolero, slightly
off-key, as another man, wearing a wig, several
fuchsia leis, shorts, and a white T-shirt with
fake breasts, prances across the stage. After
Munne’s tune concludes, a Gloria Estefan'
impersonator in á black spandex body suit
mouths the words ^Yo quiero bailaf (T want
to dance”) as the diva’s voice sounds from a
stereo. A woman in the audience squeals, “It
really looks like her!”
Next Mary Wells’s Sixties hit “My Guy”
blasts from the speakers as vice commodore
Jorge Gonzalez struts onstage clad in a bright-
red robe with silver wings attached to his back
and a halo around his heafi. He is supposed to
be God. One by one women dressed as nuns
Walk out singing “My Guy.” One of them
appéars to be nine-months pregnant. The
crowd explodes.
Finally it’s time for the “Who has the most
beautiful legs?” contest. Several members
string tip a sheet that will enable the audi¬
ence to view the participants’ from the waist
down only. The first one saunters out behind
the sheet, prompting chuckles. The legs
belong to a man. So do those of the next
seven contestants. “¡Ay, que piernas, papi!
¡Que piernas.1” (“Oh, what legs, papa! What
legs!”), exclaims Planas. As the laughter
resounds, the commodore begins the judg¬
ing. He asks the audience to applaud for its
favorite appendages. Suddenly the vice com¬
modore, still wearing his red robe and
wings, dives out from off-stage and wraps his
arms around one man’s ankles. The audi-
Contlnued on page 38
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All fishing is local: Mayor Garollo snags a trophy and good PR at a recent tourney
For the greater good, and a lesser rent club members take kids from inner-city youth centers fishing
Outboard
Continued from page 36
ence roars. When the judging is over» con¬
testant number eight the one with the skin¬
niest legs, wins'.
Even before all theperformers cram the
stage for the finale» the sound of dominoes
being shuffled clattersin from the next room.
MQC’s hilarity was nearly silenced in 1993.
Then-city planner Jack Luft told the boaters
Miami law required the municipality to
explore whether other clubs were inter¬
ested in the site. Along with thé Miami
Yacht Club and the Coconut Grove Sailing
Club, the MQC took its cause to the public.
First; members persuaded commissioners
to put the question to voters: Should non-
profitclubs such as MOC that operate on
city property be allowed to negotiate leases
without competition? That November, by a
slim margin, .city voters approved the mea¬
sure. “That was the Alamo for us,” asserts
MQC member Jack; MgGovem, a 65-year-
old, retired shipping executive who helped
engineer'the referendum campaign.
A 30-year leasé signed in 1996
increased the motorboaters’ rent
from about $Í3S000 per year to
$65»O0O; a discount of up to $30,000
was allowed if the group sponsored
charitable events. The rleal also
required thé "MOC to shell out
$300,000 to improve the facilities, a
process that is stHl under way. This
past April the city raised the rent to
about $75,000. -
So how did they pull it off? Former
commodore RichardTaylor, who
was on the MOC’s lease-negotiating
committee with McGovern, says it
was the same old formula that had
won hearts and mmds.before: taking
inner-city ldds fishing, feeding peo-
pleffom retirement homes, and host¬
ing popular public events like the
Orange Bowl.Regatta.
Moreover MOC ranks include sev¬
eral top politicians. Among them:
current andiformer Miami Commis¬
sioners Wilfy Gort, Joe Sanchez, and
Victor deYurre; Mjami-Dade Mayor
Alex Penelas and County Commis¬
sioners Miguel Diaz de la Portilla
and Pedro Reboredoi.State Rep. Alex
Diarde m Portilla, Migúel’s brother,
.is also on the MOCjpstov |U
Miami Commissioner J.L. Plum-
mér Is also an ally. Plummer and I
go way back. That didn’t hurt,” Tay¬
lor admits. But Plummer’s popularity
» June 17 - 23.1999 Miami New Times
the Pledge of Allegiance. Then Graciela
Botero, a neighbor from the nearby Miami
Yacht Club, walks up to a microphone and
thanks MOC members for helping out ata
recent fundraiser.
Sanchez sidles to the mike and invites
everyone to compete in the Mahi-Mahi Clas¬
sic, an annual fishing contest founded by
policemen and hosted by the MQC. “It’s a
“WE JUST LIKE TO GET
OUT ON THE
WATER,” LENDIAN
SAYS. HE’S OWNED
TEN BOATS.
great fishing tournament because it allows
us to open up our hearts and provide for
those who are less fortunate,” he intones.
The proceeds go to five local charities, most
of them Cuban American. After his spiel
Sanchez heads for the Happy Room.
Planas quickly moves through the agenda.
Two new members are nominated and unan¬
imously approved. Clemente Gonza¬
lez presents Planas with the cash he
raised. A man in a black T-shirt
emblazoned with wings, a motorcy¬
cle, and the words “Ride Free” tells
the group that a 45-year-old man he
works with has tumors on his larynx
from smoking cigarettes. “Justa little
thing I thought I would share with
you,” he says earnestly and walks
back to his seat
The meeting is adjourned. Some
head for the domino tables, a few
meander into the billiards parlor, and
others move to the Happy Room,
where Sanchez is enjoying his din¬
ner. “Hey» want a beer?” he asks New
Times: He and Eileen Taulbee won¬
der what story the paper is working
on. “Don’t write anything bad,”
Taulbee pleads, with a big grin, ‘This
is a good place.”
Sanchez and Taulbee return two
weeks later for the June 5 fishing tour¬
nament One of tiie other competitors:
Mayor Carollo.
It is about 2:00 on a sunny Sunday
afternoon in June. A man and woman
are fastening a small fishing boat to a
trailer at one edge of the MOC
grounds, which are packed with ves¬
sels of all sizes and styles. Out on the
club’s main dock two men have just
at tiie club dipped in 1993, when he ques¬
tioned whether there was sufficient public
access to toe MOC.
Politicians continue to traipse through the
MOC entrance. If s a recent Monday njght
and members swipe their plastic méníbership
cards through a magnetic gadget on the glass
doors and head inside for the club’s weekly
meeting. Then in walks City Commissioner
Joe Sanchez, dressed in a suit and tie and
accompanied by his chief of staff
Eileen Taulbee. Clemente Gonza¬
lez, the boastful bilge-pump gunner
from tiie watertight, approaches Sanchez with
a thick wad of cash in one hand. “Sanchez
glances at a New Times reporter. “Look, he’s
trying to bribe me!” the politician says in jest
Actually Gonzalez has just scrounged the
money from MOC members in a ten-minute
crisscrossing of the clubhouse. He collected
about one thousand dollars to help pay med¬
ical expenses for a 41-year-old member who
recently had a brain tumor removed.
A few minutes later Planas calls the general
meeting to order and about 50 members recite
Havana-born Edgar Lendian joined the MOC in the Sixties, before
it was cool to be Cuban
returned from a half-day of fishing and are
hosing down the deck of a large white sport¬
fishing craft. A few slips away, Edgar
Tertian stands in the stem of Blue Eyes, his
31-foot Tiara fly-bridge fishing cruiserrHe
and his wife Diana, who heads the promo¬
tions office at Bacardi-Martini USA, are
about to cruise over to Hey Biscayne. “We’ll
go for a dip, have a féw drinks,” Lendian
says, sporting a black.Bacardi cap. One of
his two friends onboard Blue Eyes is Mariano
Sentí, a 43-year-old construction worker vrho
was granted political asylum in the United
States a month ago after spending twelve
years in a Cuban prison. “We just like to get
out on the water, get away from town,”
Lendian says¿ Since joining the club in the
early Sixtie s he’s owned ten boato.
“This is a workingman’s dub," insists Andy
Antelo, who joined in 1969. Today thedÉin-
gual 45-year-old sales manager owns a 25foot
open fishing vessel. But he rarely uses it
because his job frequently requires him to
leave Miami. “There are people here who
make five dollars an hour and people who
make a lot more than that But when we walk
through that door we’re all equal”
Indeed a working stiff can afford the rates,
though they have risen substantially in
recent years. The MOC’s 350 regular mem¬
bers each pay $450 per year to belong. About
100 people have limited memberships,
which cost $100 and allow them to usé the
bar and dining facilities. Monthly storage
fees and an assessment for improvements
add a few hundred dollars per year.
Although some Anglo members have left
over the past few years, Jack McQovem
thinks the MOC is in good hands. “The
advent of the Hispanics has been a boon,” he
concludes. “We used to have to twist peo¬
ple’s arms to get them to run for of£ce.”
Then he adds a jocular caveat “But basically
I would say that if you don’t know howto
play dominoes you’re not going to meet very
many people.”
Besides flooding caused by the Parrot Jun¬
gle construction, commodore Planas must
deal with restoring the membership rolls. Tm
trying to bring new blood here,” he says.
“We’ve got the new millenmum coming.”
Planas recently has managed to lure a few
new members, including Frank Falestra^n 42-
year-old Miami native of Italian-American
extraction. Falestra, who runs a small record¬
ing studio and performs rock music under toe
alias Rat Bastard, scores his twenty-foot yfessel
at MOC. “They’re really nice,” he says. “They
gaveitie a plaqUe”;He joined toé club mainly
because it is an' affordable place to keep his
boat, not for the domino sessions or talent-
show boleros. CD
tint t ihw’i J

THIS AO CONTAINS:
I! iVi ( Hungry Women
íítflí Hot Guys
lAfcfi Man Stew
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED
Miami New Times June 17 - 23.1999 39

A Wallflower
Haskin shows off his renaissance, word darás* and general efegance aí Wall-
Itfs a building first, a two-stoiy former flower, Haskin and Flash intend to add
office complex in the murky shadows of yoga classes, acting workshops, event»
downtown’s federal courthouse. Outside chi sessions.
flue streets are busy with the business of' lately the gaBayhas come alive mostly
making money and deploying power, the on weekends. This Thursday at 7:30 pm.,
proverbial hastíe and bustle of the gray- Wallflower hosts Billy Yeager, who will
flannel herds. _ show Ins years-in-the-making semicinéma
Upstairs inside is culture unbound, vérité motion picture Jimmy’s Story.rThe ■ j
Haskin, former honcho at the Gallery of film tells the taleofYeager’s struggles with
the Unknown Arfisis, bought the place a
couple of years ago, knocked down some
interior wails, and turned it into an art
gallery and fashion-design operation^
Early flus year be brought in a manager;
with vision, a guy named Flash. The duoX
has turned the place, called the Wallflower
Gallery, into one of Miami’s hippest hang¬
outs.
, Haskin and Flash guide their guest up
the stairs into the reception area, where
coffee, soda, juices, muffins, and the like
are served. Smoking is allowed in this area
(and only iff flus area). To the left is a si¬
ting room with a plaid couch, ornate coffee
tables, wood-framed mimas, in front of
that two more rooms, divided like cham¬
bers in a Poe story, more fine furniture,
and, at the far end, a stage where Matthew
Sabatella is playing solo and where the
band the Inside will soon blast out a
full set
On the other side of the complex Flash
has arranged art in four rooms, each con¬
taining paintings and sculpture. “All the
paintings in each room are by one artist all
the sculpture in each room is by one
artist” Flash explains. “The combination
provides movement.” His guest is dis¬
tracted by a $750 glass-and-iron lamp that
looks skullish and amoebic, yet Gofluc.
’ “Come on,” says Haskin. “There’s
more.” Down a hallway, through lacy black
curtains, past, double wooden doors. His
guest is expecting to be murdered and
tossed into the alleyway outside. Instead
he finds the hidden roots of the Wallflower
forest A sewing machine, a spreader, cut¬
ter, rutting table, reams of yam, remains
from Haskin’s fashion-design days. “And
over here,” he continues, leading his via¬
tor back into the hallway and through
another door, “is what used to be a law
library, I think. We’re going to turn this
into a retail shop to sell local CDs, art,
T-shirts.”
Music room, sitting rooms, art galleries,
retail, juice bar — all electronically con¬
nected so the live music resonates (and
plays on monitors in most rooms) any¬
where you wander. Behind the stage is a
screen on which video images are pro-
Flash managing at the Wallflower Gallery
tire music industry (early cute included a
scale in which Yeager mailed the testicles
of a butt to music-biz bigwig Chris Black-
well) and the hoax in which he (a white
man,but a brflliantguitarist nonetheless)
passed himself off as the illegitimate son of
Jimi Hendrix, a scam fbat fooled local and
national media. After the screening the
filmmaker answers questions and hypes
his new acting workshop. Wall art by
Emerson CáídérdniJÚexFeliciano, and
Craig Carpentieri will be on display, along
with accent peces by Daniel Florda, Rafael
Menresa, and Robert Kassover.
Friday features Ploppy's Podium, a
poetry and music event with, guests
lifeblood, a band that mixes jazz, world-
beat, and jam sounds. Saturday music
comes from Spoonbeacb, Rachelíe Coba,
and Jeff Rollasen (a,k.a Jeff and Jeff tire
Space Cowboy, and the sometime front¬
man of the Curious Hair, the Mini Drivers,
Merigold’s, and formerly Mr. Tasty and
the Bread Healers).
“We’re going lor a friendly vibe,”
Haskin says. “We want you to be able to
step out of Miami and into a place of cul¬
ture.”-Greg Baker
I8ÍI#
The Walfflower Gallery is located at 10 NE 3rd St
Admission and starting times vary. Gall
Thursday
The Florida Dance Festival continues this
week, incorporating films and discus¬
sions with a bevy of dance perfor¬
mances. This evening at 7:00 Dance-
maker, Matthew Diafftond’s Academy
Award-nominated documentary about
the Paul Taylor Dance Com¬
pany, screens at the Alliance
Cinema (927 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach; 305-534-7171).
Also tonight at 7:30 Dale
Andree and Roberta Kjel-
gaard host “Looking at:
Dance: Audience Critical;
Response,” an informal pre¬
sentation of works by Florida
choreographers followed by
a question-and-answer period
at Miami Light Project’s
Light Box (3000 Biscayne
Blvd.; 305-5764350). Admis¬
sion to the film is six dollars.
The lecture is free. The festi¬
val runs through June 26.
Call 305-674-3350. (NK)
Cuban-music aficionados will be sur¬
prised to hear that Elio Revé will be
appearing in Miami. Revé, whose semi¬
nal dance band Orquesta Revé served
as a sort of university for the island’s
best musicians, died in 1997. But his
spirit lives on. Revé’s son, Elito, has
taken over as director of the band, Elio
Revé y Su Charangon. The group will
appear tonight and tomorrow at Timba
(2898 Biscayne Blvd.), performing Papa
Revé’s quintessential Cuban big-band
music plus new songs. The show starts
at 9:00 p.m. Tickets cost $20. Call
305-576-5866. (JC) .
Saturday
Nothing like watching a teenager
expertly playing a violin to remind you
«a | June 17 -23,1999 Miami New times
how much you hated those music
lessons your parents forced on you as a
kid. All those practice sessions may
have wiped out your eagerness to mas¬
ter an instrument, but they didn’t van¬
quish your love for classical music.
Tonight at 8:00 the American Russian
Young Artists Orchestra performs at the
Jackie Gleason Theater of the Perform¬
ing Arts (1700 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach), where you can watch a collec¬
tion of ultratalented youngsters play
those tunes you just can’t get enough
of. Conductor Dimitri Liss leads the
musicians in a program of works by
Ellington, Rachmaninoff, and Szy¬
manowski, the last of which showcases
Siberian violin prodigy Mikhail
Simonyan. Yes, the little fiddler is all of
thirteen years old. Tickets range from
$10 to $25. Call 305-673-7300. (NK)
It’s safe to say that over the past five
years, Tigertail Productions, the orga¬
nizers of FLA/BRA, the festival that
celebrates new works from Florida and
Brazil, has been teased incéssantly
about the ostensible reference to lin¬
gerie in their event’s name. Well,
they’ve finally decided to get smart
and have the last laugh by staging the
first annual FLA/RRA Auction. They’ve
j enlisted a slew of local visual artists
(Carlos Betancourt, William. Cordova,
Robert Flynn, Michelle Weinberg,
David Rohn, Dina Knapp, and Miralda,
to name a few) and asked them each to
create their own interpretation of a
bra. You heard right: artist-made
undies for which you will probably pay
big money. Dancers and special guests
will model the brassieres and New
York City-based cowboy rumba
crooner, tunesmith, and auctioneer
Ned Sublette will direct the bidding. A
discerning panel of judges will dole out
awards for the best work. Can’t wait to
see those push-up versions! The fun
starts at 6:30 p.m. at Bar Room, 320
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach. Tickets
cost $75 and, of course, benefit Tiger-
tail and the upcoming festival. Call
305-3244337. (NK)
The Coconut Grove Playhouse (3500
Main Hwy., Coconut Grove) is falling
apart. Seems some construction
geniuses in the Twenties mixed beach
sand into the. cement and some .sup¬
porting metal structures are now cor¬
roding faster than you can say “flop.”
It’s going to cost around six million dol¬
lars to -restore the joint. Let the*
fundraising begin! First up tonight at
the playhouse at 8:30: Rhythm to the Res¬
cue, a concert by Latin singing sensa¬
tions Willy Chirino and his wife Lissette,
with special guests. Tickets range from
$45 to $250. Call 3054424000. (NK)

See this photo by Michael Carlebach among the images shown at the Miami-Dade Public Library
Futurist Female
JKs asomewhat lively weekoigbt on thecor-
ner nf Miami Reach’s Tenth Street and
Washington Avenue and sound isaHarouad. ‘
Hip-hop blares from car stereos. Miniskirted
drunken women amble along thesidewalk
muttering loudly. Motorcycles transporting
fet guys thunder down the road. An action-
packed evening for a place that usually
wakes up for weekends, when the streets
and sidewalks vibrate incessantly.
Part of that dynamic energy was what
conceptual artist Annie Wharton fropedte/|
capture in her installation Mastic Theater,
occupying the gleaming steel Bridge Ten¬
der’s House in front of the Wblfeonian-iTU
museum. A show devoted to Futurist Jíhr-BÉ
tunato Depero is on display at thp main
ittuseum, which features art from Í8S5 to
1945. The Futurist movement, founded in
19,09 italy, extolled the virtues of the mass
market, raachines, and violence, and was
determined to propel ifs nation into tibe
world of tomorrow.
Outside in tibe tender’s house, Wharton’s!
installation is resolutely today with an eye
toward yesterday. Three strips of opaque
•, depicting female marionettes, hang
fromtheceiling. The
long-haired; luscious-
lipped gals wear elegant
Ic&eifHses-- arují
l|eelel¿krieétó^boptST
t front of a blue fabrie
background. White
cloud-shaped pillows are I
strewn about Bathed in
a pink fight the women,
though constricted, appear
;. ffrfie boogying nonchalantly
la the sky. The sound to which they move: ,
■Wharton’s voice reading Depero’s poem,
Colon, over a daik musical track by Britfeh
drum and bass artist Grooverider, mixed by
New^fcrkfrasedjunglist jDJ aGraM. 1
The multimedia brew of puppets, music,
Futurists, who employed all sorts of ele¬
ments to get their frequently fascist point of
view across. One major difference: the pur- -
trayal of strong women. Futurists did not j
often employ fosales as subject matter. T; |
wanted to focus on the strength of the con¬
temporary woman still hemmed in by strings
but dancing nonetheless, tnumphmg over
situations * says Wharton, whose current ;
works incorporate typical tools of housework
and whose past pieces have ranged from
mammoth metal sculptures to photographs
and videos of female prizefighters,
i Unlike the sensory assault thatis South |
Beach, Wharton is a bit less in-your-face
about tibe way she does things. “My work
is quiet and contemplative these days,”
she explains. T don’t tike to bombard peo¬
ple.” Nor does she like to rely on the com¬
monplace. In a discussion of marionettes
(hers are inspired by a German photo¬
graph from the Twenties), the name of
the famed Italian puppet inevitably comes
up. How wouldPinoechjo figure into afrof
this? He wouldn’t. Wharton shakes her
head from side to side and scoffs; “He’s a
guy!” - Nina Korman
HU, 1001 Washington Ave, Miami Beach. Call
39W31-18B1.
true love tonight af%00 at Books &
Books, 933 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach.
Admission is free. Call305-532-3222. (NK)
WA
Hi
:0
Sunday monday
Pair burly macho director John Huston
and literary pip-squeak Truman Capote
to collaborate on a movie script and the
result is bound to be really weird. The
odd combo got together in 1953 and
wrote the lines for Beat the Devil, a hilari¬
ous spoof of international thrillers based
on a novel by James Helvick. The plot
concerns a bunch of con artists all trying
to claim the same uranium-rich land.
Who needs Mike Myers when you have
a cast that includes Humphrey Bogart,
Jennifer Jones, Robert Morley, GinaLol-
lobrigida, and Peter Lorre? The film,
which Huston also directed, screens at
noon today as part of the Cinema Vortex
series at the Alliance Cinema, 927 Lin¬
coln Rd., Miami Beach. Tickets cost four
dollars. Call 305-531-8504. (NK)
Hard to fathom that babe-andra-half
author Brad Gooch (City Poet: The Life and
Times of Frank O’Hara) has trouble
attracting the same sex. But the awful
truth is now revealed. Or maybe not Per¬
haps Gooch just sympathizes with all his
desperado gay brethren and that’s why he
recently wrote Finding the Boyfriend
Within: A Practical Guide for Tapping into
the Source cfLove, Happiness, and Respect.
Or maybe he’s just a greedmeister cash¬
ing in on other people’s misery. Whatever
the reason Gooch was compelled to pen a
self-help book, it seems he’s in accord
with playwright Oscar Wilde, whose great
fine from Am Ideal Husband says: “To love
oneself is the beginning of a lifelong
romance!” Get the goods on Gooch and
listen to his advice about finding that one
Want to see the epitome of thte ugly Amer¬
ican?, Take a look at the work of Michael
Carlebach. The photojoumalist, documen-
taiysphotographer, and professor ofAmer-
ican studies at the University
ofJpami is the author of three £Kk
books: The Origins of Photo-
journalism in America, Farm
Security Administration Pho- I ( "l
tographs of Florida', and Amen- pH
can Photojournalism Comes of
Age. His most recent tome,
This Way to the Crypt, features
scads of black-and-white pho-
tographs of average people
doing everyday things,
whether it’s dancing, changing a CIE
tire, or sitting around patiently
waiting. The photos were taken between
the Sixties and the Nineties all across the
United States, but especially in South
Florida, and they reaffirm Carlebach’s
contention that there is no typical Ameri¬
can citizen. Geez, just hanging around
Miami a couple of days is bound to con¬
vince anyone of that! See the shots in the
exhibition Michael Carlebach: This Way to the
Crypt at the Miami-Dade Public library,
101' W. Flagler St Admission is free. The
show runs through September 3. Call
30S§75-2665. (NK)
nesday
we
Legendary percussionist Luis Miranda
has performed with renowned musicians
such as Machito, Cal Tjader, and Charlie
Parker. Tonight at 8:00, however, he
really gets down when he joins local
experimental jammers the Spam Allstars,
featuring Andrew Yeomanson, Nicole
Martinez, and Robin Carter, for a show
called H Piquete Que Corta (the cutting-edge
group) at Esperanto Music (513 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach). Poets wifi be on hand
to share their rhymes and special guest
musicians are slated to improvise. Wine
and cheese will be served as well. Admis¬
sion» free. Call 305-534-2003. (NK)
g: By Judy Cantor and Nina Korman

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to June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times
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Calendar listings ara offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, Mew Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Events
Thursday, June 17
Glaucoma Screenings: Local opthalmologists donate
their services to raise awareness about the
importance of eye care and periodic eye exams.
Free. 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Miami lighthouse for the
Blind, 601SW 8th Ave; 305656-2288.
Jam at MAM: Listen to the jazzy sounds of Mantra
while they accompany Love Jones poets reciting
their works, and indulge in free gourmet snacks at
this casual after-work event Free. 5:00 p.m. Miami
Art Museum, 101W Flagler St; 3053753000.
Saturday, June 19
Estate Auction: Bid on treasures acquired from
international collections. Free. 10:00 a.m. Sloan’s
Auction Galleries, 8861NW 18th Terr, ste 100;
305592-2575.
Family Music Night listen to reggae music by D.L
LaFleur while you enjoy an array of healthy food
samples. Free. 6:00 p.m. Wild Oats Community
Market, 11701S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest; 305971-0900.
Feast Among the Grapes: Eat, drink, and raise money
for the Diabetes Research Institute. $75.8:00 p.m.
Eden Roc Resort and Spa, 4525 Collins Ave, Miami
Beach; 800-321-3437.
Festivart Stroll among artists displaying their wares
and listen to live music at this weekly outdoor event
Free. 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. every Saturday.
Española Way and Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach; 305791-2366.
FLA/BRA Auction: See “Night & Day.”
Mobile Animal Cara Unit Metro-Dade Animal Care and
Control’s mobile clinic will be open to spay and
neuter cats and dogs for a low fee (or free for low-
income families). $25-$35.7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
today and tomorrow. West Miami City Hall, 901 SW
62nd Ave; 305884-7729.
Normandy Isle Farmers' Market Shop for farm-fresh
fruits, vegetables, flowers, plants, and baked goods
from vendors gathered around the fountain. Free.
10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. every Saturday. Normandy
Isle Fountain, 71st Street, Miami Beach;
305532-1366.
Rhythm to the Rescue: See “Night & Day.”
Sunday, June 20
Lincoln Road Farmers' Market Purchase fruits,
vegetables, flowers, and baked goods from vendors
on the Road and enjoy music by John Roush. Free.
10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. every Sunday. Lincoln Road,
between Pennsylvania and Euclid avenues, Miami
Beach; 305532-1366.
Mobile Animal Cara Unit See Saturday.
Wings of Soul: Releasing Your Spiritual Identity:
International speakers and performers showcase
poetry, music, verse, and dance during this
celebration of spirit in the arts. Free. 3:00 to 5:00
p.m. Miami Beach Community Church, Lincoln
Road and Drexel Avenue, Miami Beach;
305442-2252.
Wednesday, June 23
Fanfare and Tropees Night Out Join members of the
New World Symphony’s and Historical Museum of
South Florida’s young professional support groups
for a visit to the studio of artist Fernando Ureña Rib.
$5$10.6:00 pm Lincoln Theatre, 541 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 305-673-6930, ext 8.
South Beach AIDS Project Board of Directors Elsction:
Join this organization as it chooses new leadership.
Free. 6:30 p.m. Miami Beach Police Department
Community Room, 1100 Washington Ave,' Miami
Beach; 305532-1033.
Sports & Recreation
Saturday, June 19
Inline Skating Fitness Tour and Clinic: Take a guided
skate tour of Key Biscayne and pick up tips for
efficient endurance skating. $20.9:00 a.m; call
305531-3430 for details.
Red RuH Great Skate Event: Inline and roller skaters
showcase their talents in this freestyle dance and
skate competition. Free to spectators. 10:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. today and tomorrow. 14th Street and
Ocean Drive, Miami Beach; 305782-3481.
Sunday, June 20
Red Bull Great Skate Event See Saturday.
Ongoing
Aqua Aerobics: Tone those muscles without working
â–  up a sweat every Tuesday and Thursday at 5:00 p.n
$8 per class. Venetian Pool, 2701 De Soto Blvd,
Coral Gables; call 305460-5356 for details.
Aventura Bike Ride: Get in gear while riding twenty
miles through the Aventura and North Miami Beac
or Hollywood areas every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Fret
Meet at Whole Foods Market, the Waterways, 356£
NE 207th St, Aventura; 3059374463.
Badminton: Swing that racket and aim for the
shuttlecock every Monday and Thursday at 4:00
p.m. and Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Free. Tropical Park,
Bird Road and SW 82nd Avenue; 3053857078.
Biscayne Bay Sailing Club: Members meet the fourth
Thursday of every month at 7:30 p.m. Coconut
Grove Sailing Club, 2990 S Bayshore Dr, Coconut
Grove (boat ownership or experience not necessar
for membership); 305385-6402.
Greyhound Racing: Bet on the dogs day and night
through December. 8:05 p.m. nightly and 1:05 p.m.
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
By Steve Newman
Flood Evacuations
â– pi Two million Chinese, are
,being permanently moved
I——-T from low-lying areas along
the Yangtze River that are in danger
of being flooded. The flood season,
which begins this month, is pre¬
dicted to bring 30 per cent more rain
than during normal years. Disaster
officials warriéd earlier this year that
the worst drought in a decade had
made ftie earth too dry to absorb this
summer’s returning rains — a con¬
dition that could make this season’s
inundations much more severe.
Floods along the Yangtze River and
in northeast China last year killed
more than 4000 people.
Glacial Melt
All 15,000 glaciers in the
Himalayas are melting at
an alarming rate, accord¬
ing to environmentalist Syed Iqbal
Hasnain of the Jawaharlal Nehru
University in New Delhi. The melt¬
ing glaciers could unleash a series
of torrential floods in the mountain
valleys of northern India during the
next 40 years. Hasnain predicts the
floods will be followed by water
shortages because the rivers will
eventually dry up without the
glaciers as a source. Gangotri
Glacier, which is the source of the
Ganges, is retreating at a rate of
about 100 feet a year.
Vampire Bat Attacks
Fears of rabies have
prompted authorities to
issue quarantine alerts in
northern Mexico after a flurry of fif¬
teen vampire bat attacks. Earlierthis
year, a six-year-old child died from
rabies after being bitten by one of
the bloodsucking mammals. Three
small towns in Chihuahua have
been placed under a special watch.
Disease prevention officials have
warned inhabitants that it is particu¬
larly dangerous to walk at night near
the woods and caves where the bats
dwell.
G&to fitwjromnstf ;
Di3f«buteri by L A Timas Syndicate
Temperature
Extremes Unavailable
PPIIIPSS
For the week ending
June 11, 1999
m1 -
iE;mail: earth@slip.net
gi
Eruptions
mmm Nicaragua’s Telica volcano
Jl resumed its rumblings with
_S a fresh plume of smoke
from its crater. Civil defense officials
said that preparations have been
made to evacuate more than 9000
residents if a violent eruption occurs.
Telica is located 62 miles northwest
of Managua and has been inactive
for five years.
Mount Cameroon volcano
threatened to erupt once again after
being dormant for six weeks. Offi¬
cials said an increased volume of
magma is pouring out of the vol¬
cano, located 215 miles west of the
Cameroon capital of Yaounde.
Tropical Storm
Typhoon Maggie lashed
the northern Philippines
and southern Taiwan,
swamping some coastal areas and
disrupting transportation across the
region. The storm later lost force as
it blew ashore near Hong Kong.
Earthquakes
BOne person was killed and
fifteen others injured when
a magnitude 7.0 earth¬
quake wrecked the town of Agaly in
western Azerbaijan.
A magnitude 5.1 earthquake
rocked the Philippine island of Min¬
danao, destroying twenty buildings.
The tremor was centered near
Bayugan, 500 miles southeast of
Manila.
Earth movements were also felt
in northwest Iran, Cyprus, and from
southern Mexico to Nicaragua.
Yellowstone Surprise
A parking lot in Wyoming’s
Yellowstone National Park
has its own tourist attrac¬
tion—a new mud spring. The spring
developed in the Jot, eating up sev¬
eral parking spaces and the adjoin¬
ing sidewalk. The new spring sur¬
faced last month when it began
sending up steam through cracks in
the pavement. Some of the park’s
staff removed pieces of asphalt and
discovered a gaping space that
holds a bubbling pool of steaming
mud five feet below the surface.
Feline Intrusion
Surprisingly high levels of
cat dander and dust mites
have been found in the
Antarctic, the Wellington Asthma
Research Group reported. The
researchers stated that Antarctica
has always been feline free. The
mystery of how such substances
made it to the remote region was
solved when the scientists studied
clothing and mattresses that
belonged to workers at Scott Base
on Ross Island, some of whom had
cats at their homes in New Zealand.
It’s believed that the imported mite
can proliferate even in the harsh
Antarctic environs.
Additional Sources: Hong Kong Observa¬
tory, Japan Meteorological Agency, U.S.
National Earthquake Information Center, and
the United Nations World Meteorological
Organization.

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Miami New Times Juné 17 - 23,1999 43

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Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. $3. Flagler Dog
Track, NW 7th Street and 37th Avenue; 305-649-3000.
Hialeah Horse Racing: The ponies pound the turf
t every day (but Thursday) at 1:15 p.m. Hialeah Park
Race Track, 2200 E 4th Ave, Hialeah; 305-885-8000.
Horseback Riding: Beginners through advanced,
t young and old, can saddle up and enjoy the great
outdoors. South winds Equestrian Center, 6201SW
122nd Aye; call 305-285-7715 for details.
Jai Alai: The players grab their cestas and get
moving Wednesday through Saturday at 7:00 p.m.,
and every day (except Tuesday) with matinees at
noon (1:00 p.m. on Sunday); round out the fun in the
poker room, opening at 11:00 am. Monday,
Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday; 5:00 p.m.
Thursday; and noon Sunday. $1. Miami Jai Alai,
3500 NW 37th Ave; 305-633-6400.
Miami Rugby Football Club: Watch, practice, and then
play the British version of football every Tuesday
and Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Players of all skill levels
are welcome; call 305-667-0422.
Pilates Method of Body Conditioning: Certified Pilates
instructor Ana Caban guides you through a
beginner’s mat class. $13. Noon Tuesday and
Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Progressive
. BodyWorks of Miami, 3620 NE 2nd Ave;
305438-0555.
Strollerobics: Get fit and meet new people while you
push your kid around. 9:00 a.m. Fridays. Call
305-782-3481 for details.
Surfside Tennis Center: You don’t need a racquet to
meet your match; kids and adults are-invited to
participate in free round robins, group lessons, and
more. Open Tuesday through Sunday. 8750 Collins
Ave, Surfside; 305-866-5176.
Tai Chi: Improve your balance, flexibility, and
coordination while strengthening muscles. $7.
Every Thursday and Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at
Harmony Community Center (10250 SW 107th
Ave), and Friday, Monday, and Wednesday at 10:00
am. at Tropical Park (Bird Road and SW 82nd
Avenué); 305-227-1637.
Tai Chi at the Monastery: Spend a serene morning
improving balance, reducing stress, increasing
energy, and attaining inner peace. $6. Every
Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. Old Spanish Monastery,
16711W Dixie Hwy, North Miami Beach;
305-945-1461.
Volleyball: Serve, spike, and volley every Monday
and Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. at Robert King High
Park, 7025 W Flagler St; 305-261-6151.
-Weekly Bicycle Rides: For information about cycling
events call the individual clubs: Broward Wheelmen
Bicycle Club, 954-564-5614; Everglades Bike Club,
305-598-3998.
West Kendall Roller Hockey Club: Games Tuesday
through Friday evenings at MDCC’s Kendall
Campus. League membership costs $80. Call
305-386-2453.
Yoga: Beginners can learn to stretch, breathe,
balance, and relax. $13.6:30 p.m. Monday or 10:00
a.m. Tuesday. Yoga Center of Miami Béach? 763
41st St, Miami Beachj. 305-673-8380.
Yoga by Helena: Yoga instructor Helena leads this
class in stretching and breathing. $8. Every Friday
and Wednesday at 5:45 p.mi. Miami Shores
Recreation Center, 9617 Park Dr, Miami Shores;
305-758-8103.
Yoga by the Sea: Stretch and meditate twice a week.
$9, Every Saturday at 9:30 am- and Monday at 6:00
p.m. Church by the Sea, 50196th St, Bal Harbour;
305-947-9117. ft
Yoga in the Grove: Reenie D’Andre instructs you in
traditional hatha yoga postures, breathing, and
meditation. $10. Every Saturday at 9:30 a.m. and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Coconut Grove United
Methodist Church, 2850 SW 27th Ave, Coconut
Grove; 305-545-5141.
Yoga on the Beach: Peter Rickman leads this class,
which encompasses meditation and incorporates
elements of tai chi. Admission by donation. Every
Saturday at 10:30 am. and Monday and Wednesday
at 6:30 p.m. On the beach at 51st Street and Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach; 305-864-2591. gf
Kid Stuff
Thursday, June 17
Youth Acting for TV Commercials: Kids age eight and
older can learn the audition process for a successful
career in television commercials. 6:30 to 9:30
tonight and Tuesday, and 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday.
Panaro Workshop, 421 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach; call 305-532-9422 for details.
Saturday, June 19
Capoeira: Brazilian martial arts master Delei leads
this class for kids. $50 per month. 2:00 p.m. today
and 7:00 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Gil Santos
Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 318, Miami
Beach; 3056746709.
Children's Salsa and Swing Workshop: Angel Arroyo
teaches kids age six through twelve the latest dance
crazes., $45 (orfive classes. 1:00 p.m. Peaches
School of Dance, 16378 NE 26th Ave, North Miami
Beach; 305-949-7799.
Creative Dance for Kids: Shirley Julien teaches this
class for children. $5.11:00 am. every Saturday.
Iroko Dance and Performance Center, 1860-A West
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Miami Now Times June 17 - 23,1999 45

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46 June 17 - 23.1999 Miami New Times

by lloyd
DANGLE
The SECRETS HAD To HAVE BEEN
stolen, because chínese students
are so fab behind us in Physics
They*d never have figured it Out.
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Patch O’Heaven Petting Farm: Make friends with more
than 200 cute and cuddly animals and enjoy hay- and
pony-rides at this “living museum,” $8. Noon to 3:00
p.m. 21900 SW 157th Ave; 305-247-1947.
Youth Acting for IV Commercials: See Thursday.
Monday, June 21
Jazz Dance for Kids: Tatiana Garrido teaches this
class for children age six to thirteen. $40 per month.
5:00 p.m. today and Wednesday. Gil Santos Dance
Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Magic City Monday: Magic shows, arts and crafts
workshops, and puppet shows keep kids
entertained. $1.9:00 a.m. Joseph Caleb Auditorium,
5400 NW 22nd Ave; 305-636-2350.
Salsa for Kids: Instructors from Forever Salsa studios
teachkids age ten to sixteen to dance together and
casino rueda style. $6.8:00 p.m. every Monday and
Wednesday. Gold’s Gym, 1617 SW 107th Ave;
305-5538878.
Snorkeling Camp: Children age eight and up can
spend three days learning snorkeling from
professional instructors. $50.9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Through Thursday. Tarpoon Scuba Diving
Academy, 3200 Palm Ave, Hialeah; 305-887-8726.
Supsrtot Creative Movement Kids age three to six can
channel their energy into dance. $8.4:30 p.m. 21st
Street Community Center, 2100 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 305-532-2839.'
Tuesday, June 22
Youth Acting for TV Commercials: See Thursday.
Wednesday, June 23
Capoeira: See Saturday.
Jazz Dance for Kids: See Monday.
Salsa for Kids: See Monday.
On the Road & Sea
Friday, June 18
Ocean Lifeguard Tournament Watch South Florida’s
finest lifeguards demonstrate lifesaving skills. $3,50
per car. 2:00 to 7:00 p.m. Crandon Park Beach, 4000
Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne; 305-361-7373.
©19V?
Saturday, June 19
Bamboo Sale: View and purchase samples of these
useful plants. $8.9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fairchild
Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Rd; 305-667-1651.
Dragons and Monsters: A Reptile Encounter: Naturalist
and reptile specialist Joe Wasilewski presents a new
show devoted to slithery, scaly creatures. $14.12:15,
1:30,3:30 and 4:45 p.m. through September 6.
Parrot Jungle and Gardens, 11000 SW 57th Ave;
305-666-7834.
Father's Day Breakfast at Miami Metrozoo: Spend the
morning with Dad and the animals at this event to
benefit the South Florida Association of Zoo
Keepers. $ll-$20.7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Miami Metrozoo,
12400 SW 152nd St; 305-255-5551.
Orchid Workshop: RF. Fuchs teaches you everything
you need to know to grow these beautiful, delicate
blooms. $15,10:00 a.m. Fruit and Spice Park, 24801
SW 187th Ave, Homestead; 305-247-5727.
Ongoing
Arch Creek Park Historic Walk: Take a guided stroll
through historic Arch Creek Park. Free. Every
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. 1855 ÑE 135th St, North
Miami; 305-944-6111.
Art Deco Bike Tours: Grab some wheels and check out
Miami Beach’s history, from the city’s first hotel,
through the Depression-era building boom, to the
vibrant community of today. $10 (plus $5 bike rental
fee). The third Sunday of every month at 10:30 a.m.
Miami Beach Bicycle Center, 601 5th St, Miami
Beach; 3054574-0150.
Art Deco District Up to Date: The Miami Design
Preservation League supplements its original Art
Deco District Tour with a look inside several
buildings, including the Marlin and Park Central
hotels, the Miami Beach Police Station, and the
Kenneth Cole building. $10. Departs every
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. from the Art Deco Welcome
Center, 1001 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach; 305-672-2014.
Astronomy Programs: Learn about what you see when
you gaze at the night sky with scientists from the
Southern Cross Astronomical Society, professional
observatories, and research centers. Free. Each
second Friday of the month at 8:00 p.m. FIU
University Park Campus, 1400 SW 107th Ave,
Physics Bldg, rm 145; 305661-1375.
Aventura Bike Riders: Get in gear while riding twenty
miles through the Aventura and North Miami Beach
or Hollywood areas every Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Free.
Meet at the Waterways, 3575 NE 207th St, Aventura;
305-937-4463.
Barnacle House: Tour the home of Commodore Ralph
Middleton Munroe, built in 1891, for a look at tum-
of-the-century Coconut Grove.-$1. Tours start at
10:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:30 p.m. The
park is open Friday through Sunday from 9:00 a.m.
to 4:00 p.m. 3485 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove;
305448-9445.
Biltmore Walking Tour The Dade Heritage Trust
hosts tours of the grounds of the historic Biltmore
Hotel every Sunday at 1:30,2:30, and 3:30 p.m. Free.
Meet in the hotel lobby, 1200 Anastasia Ave, Coral
Gables; 305445-1926.
Bonnet House: Named for the bonnet lilies that grow
around the estate’s tranquil ponds, the 30-room
winter home of the Bartlett family—built on a 35
acre spread—provides a look at the gracious
lifestyle of old Fort Lauderdale. $9. Open
Wednesday through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 1:30
p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 2:30
p.m. 900 N Birch Rd, Fort Lauderdale; 954-563-5393.
Enchanted Forest Park Nature Walks: Stroll through a
tropical woodland and experience Dade County’s
historic landscape. Free. Every Saturday at 10:00
a.m. 1725 NE 135th St, North Miami; 3058951119.
Miami New timos Juna 17 - 23,1999 . 47
-V—Vij v 1 íf.i-í-v,;* -■ '.‘i -- -■ «v v'-' ■ ' t

^rOUN
ARE A
TARGET
for
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VISIT THE WOLFSONIAN'S
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.project: funded by the Florida
Tobacco. Pilot Program. Gall
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IN OLD MAPS

Fairchild Tropical Garden Tram and Walking Tours:
Visitors can walk or ride and get a glimpse of the
rare petticoat palm, the gingerbread palm, and the
cannonball tree. $8 garden admission. Tram tours
are every hour on the hour from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00
p.m. on weekdays and 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on
weekends. 10901 Old Cutler Rd; 305-667-1651.
Heavenly Gazing Southern Cross Astronomical Society
experts will guide you through the celestial seasons.
Free. Every Saturday (weather permitting) at 8:00
p.m. Old Cutler Hammock Nature Center, SW 176th
Street and 79th Avenue; for more information call the
SCAS hotline; 305-661-1375..
Miami Skies: On the first and third Friday of every
month head for the Space Transit Planetarium to
observe the stars through the large public telescope
and see what’s happening “In the Miami Skies,”
weather permitting. Free. 8:00 p.m. 3280 S Miami
Ave; for details call the Cosmic Hotline at
305-854-2222.
Ocean Drive and Beyond: The Miami Design
Preservation League guides Decophiles through the
history of the Art Deco movement and its
preservation in the Miami Beach Deco District
during this comprehensive walking tour. $10. Every
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. Art Deco Welcome Center,
1001 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach; 305-672-2014.
Self-Guided Art Deco District Tour: The Miami Design
Preservation League offers a self-guided tour of the
architectural wonders of Ocean Drive and Collins
and Washington avenues via audio equipment. $5
(plus refundable deposit). Daily from 11:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. Art Deco Welcome Center, 1001 Ocean
Dr, Miami Beach; 305-672-2014.
Sierra Club: The Miami chapter offers canoeing,
camping, hiking, biking, and snorkeling trips all
year; call 305-667-7311.
Solar Viewing Safely view the sun with experts from
the Southern Cross Astronomical Society. Free.
Every Sunday (weather permitting) from 10:00 a.m.
to noon. Metrozoo, 12400 SW 152nd St;
305-661-1375.
Tropical Audubon Society: The society offers extensive
nature programs throughout the year, including
bird watching and native tree identification events;
call 305-666-5111 for a complete schedule.
Vizcaya Museum and Gardens: Travel back to the
Renaissance with a visit to this exquisite Italian villa
and its formal gardens; inside view one of the finest
collections of sixteenth- to nineteenth-century
decorative arts in the U.S. $5-$10.3251S Miami Ave;
call 305-250-9133.
Comedy
Friday, June 18
ComedySportz: Two teams battle for laughs and
points in a head-to-head competition of
improvisational humor based on audience
suggestions. $7.11:00 p.m. every Friday.
Hollywood Boulevard Theater, 1938 Hollywood
Blvd; 954-269-4086.
Just the Funny: The troupe performs 90-minutes of
buck-wild comedy featuring sketches, music,
parodies, and improvisations based on audience
suggestions. $10.11:00 p.m. every Friday and
Saturday. Absinthe House Cinematheque, 235
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 305-693-8669.
Laughing Gas Comedy Improv: Basic training
exercises for actors become hilarious instances of
interactive comedy when this rotating troupe of
actors and comedians develops random audience
suggestions into comedic skits. $10.11:00 p.m.
every Friday and Saturday. New Theatre, 65
Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 305461-1161.
Saturday, June 19
Alvares Guedes: The popular Hispanic humorist
gets you giggling. $45. 9:30 p.m. Fontainebleau
Hilton Resort and Spa, Club Tropigala, 4441
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 305-672-7469.
Just the Funny: See Friday.
Laughing Gas Comedy Improv: See Friday.
Punch 59: Sketch Comedy, music, and mayhem
rule when this wacky troupe takes the stage. $10.
11:00 p.m. Hollywood Boulevard Theater, 1938
Hollywood Blvd; 954-5834577.
Separate Checks: The audience picks the show
from a vast menu of humor when this
improvisational sketch comedy troupe performs.
$7.50 11:00 p.m. every Saturday. Hollywood
Playhouse, 2640 Washington St, Hollywood;
954-922-0404.
Monday, June 21
Def Comedy Jam: Local comedians and yucksters
from HBO’s Def Comedy Jam TV show try to get
the audience roaring at this open-mike night 7:30
tonight and tomorrow. $10-$15. The Improv, 3399
Virginia St (Streets of Mayfair), Coconut Grove; .
call 305441-8200 for details.
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Tuesday, June 22
Def Comedy dam: See Monday.
Film
Thursday, June 17
Florida Dance Festival: See “Night & Day.”
Jimmy's Story: Billy Yeager screens his film
depicting his attempts to break into the music
business. $3.7:30 p.m. Wallflower Gallery, 10 NE
3rd St; 305-579-0069.
Saturday, June 19
Silence Is Golden: Enjoy silent films under the stars
every Saturday night at 9:00 p.m: Free. 123 N
Krome Ave, Homestead; 305-246-8878.
Sunday, June 20
Cinema Vortex: See “Night & Day.”
Readings & Lectures
Thursday, June 17
Apollo, Helios, and Aman Ra - The Dangerous Sun God:
Marc Rouleau explores various cultures’ myths and
legends associated with the sun. $6.7:30 p.m.
Buehler Planetarium, 3501SW Davie Rd, Davie;
954475-6681.
Coral Gables Toastmasters: Be the star of the show
when you speak up. $10.12:15 p.m. Holiday Inn,
2051 Lejeune Rd, Coral Gables; 305-577-0016.
Bob Edelson: The árithor autographs his book, New
American Street Art: Beyond Graffiti, which features
color photographs of the most diverse street art
produced in the United States since 1990, Free. 8:00
tonight at Borders Books & Music (19925 Biscayne
Blvd, Aventura; 305-935-0027) and 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Borders Book Shop (9205 S Dixie
Hwy; 305-665-8800).
third Thursday of every month at 6:00 p.m. Miami
Beach City Hall, 1700 Convention Center Dr, Miami
Beach; 305-5324327.
Florida Dance Festival: See “Night & Day,”
Ghost Stories at the Biltmore: Storyteller Linda Spitzer
sits by the fireplace every Thursday and recounts
the celebrities and ghosts who have haunted the
Biltmore. Free. 7:00 p.m. Biltmore Hotel, 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 305-665-8429.
Integrate Body, Mind, and Spirit Through the Message of
Socrates: Learn about educating the body and soul
and attaining spiritual understanding at this course.
$5.7:30 p.m. New Acropolis, 320 Miracle Mile, 2nd
fir, Coral Gables; 305461-5758.
Open-Mike Poetry: Read your original works or recite
selections by afavorite author. Free. 7:00 p.m. at
Borders Book Shop (9205 S Dixie Hwy; 305-665-8800)
and 7:30 p.m. Friday at Barnes & Noble Bookstore
(7710 N Kendall Dn 305-598-7292).
Bruce Turkek Turkel, a partner in the local advertising
agency Turkel Schwartz & Partners, discusses his
book, Brain Darts: The Advertising Design of Turkel
Schwartz & Partners. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books,
296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 3054424408.
Friday, June 18
Future Goals of NASA Space Exploration: Darrell Foster,
NASA mission manager of unmanned launch
vehicles at Kennedy Space Center, delivers a lecture
delving into the next generation of space
exploration at this Southern Cross Astronomical
Society meeting. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU Physics Bldg,
rm 145, SW 8th Street and 107th Avenue;
305661-1375.
Open-Mike Poetry: See Thursday.
Ploppy's Podium: Local talents showcase their literary
works at this open-mike series; tonight’s special
musical guest is Lifeblood. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Wallflower Gallery, 10 NE 3rd St; 305-5794)069.
Noreen Wald: The author reads from and discusses
her novel, Ghostwriter, the first in a new mystery
series featuring gutsy heroine Jake O’Hara, a witty,
Single, young woman who accepts a job as a
ghostwriter for a literary grande dame. Free. 8:00
p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
3054424408.
Richard Webster At 7:30 tonight the author discusses
and signs his book, Feng Shui in the Garden, at
Barnes & Noble Bookstore (152 Miracle Mile, Coral
Gábles; 3054464152), and at 2:00 p.m. tomorrow at
the Northeast Subregional library (2930 Aventura
Blvd, Aventura; 305-931-5512) he talks about his
book, Feng Shui for Beginners. Free.
Saturday, June 19.
Lynn McKee: The author autographs her book,
Spirit of the Turtle Woman. Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes
& Noble Bookstore, 7710 N Kendall Dr;
305-598-7292.
José Luis Orozco: The popular Mexican
performer/songwriter shares bilingual congs and
hand games from De Cobres and Other Latin
American Folk Songs for Children, and Diez
Deditos/Ten Little Fingers, two collections that he
created especially for youngsters age two through
eight Free. 3:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables; 3054424408.
Qigong for Health, Longevity, Creativity, and Mental
Clarity: Learn the basics of this Chinese health care
system. Free. 2:00 p.m. South Miami Branch
library, 6000 Sunset Dr, South Miami; 305-667-6155.
Richard Webster: See Saturday.
Monday, June 21
Alternative Health Education Lecture Series: Jay Foster
delivers a lecture titled “Reversing Osteoporosis and
Arthritis.” $3 donation. 7:00 p.m. St James Lutheran
Church, 110 Phoenicia Ave, Coral Gables;
305-271-2865.
Brad Gooch: See “Night & Day.”
Ellen Hoffman: Federal policy expert arid retirement
specialist Hoffman discusses her book, Bankroll
Your Future: How to Get the Most from ihe
Government for Your Retirement Years. Free. 8:00
p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
3054424408:
Tuesday, June 22
Bob Béamon: The author, who stunned the world
with his Olympic- and record-breaking leap of 29
feet; 2 1/2 inches at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic
Games, reads from and discusses his book The
Man Who Could Fly, written with Milana Walter"
Beamon. Free. 7:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296
Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 305442-4408.
Linda Bladholm: The author autographs her book,
The Asian Grocery Store Demystified, a guide to
foodstuffs of every major Asian culture, including
Chinese, Japanese, Laotian, Thai, and Korean.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Books & Books, 933 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 532-3222.
Impact on Florida of Changes in Cuba: Antonio
Villamil, director of tourism, trade, ánd economic
development for the state of Florida; Raul
Martinez, mayor of Hialeah; José Cancela,
chairman of the Greater Miami Chamber of
Commerce; arid Antonio Jorge, professor of
economic and intemationál relations at FIU
participate in this discussion moderated by Jaime
Suchlicki, director of thé University of Miami’s
Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American studies.
$15 (includes lunch). Noon. University of Miami
Faculty Club, 1550 Brescia Ave, Coral Gables; call
305-2842822 to' reserve.-
Poetry Readings: Vie for prizes at this night of
original poetry and short-story reading. Free. 8:30
p.m. Warehouse Cafe, 7181 SW 117th Ave;
305-273-0870.
Poetry Slam: Shamelle Jenkins hosts this monthly
spoken word night featuring giveaways. Free. 8:00
p.m. Borders Books & Music, 3390 Mary St,
Coconut Grove; 305-4442907.
Water for Our Future: A Public Forum: Learn about
water, resources.management, and Everglades
Flamingo Toastmasters: Sharpen communication and
leadership skills at this meeting. Free. The first and
How to Recognize a Plastic Surgeon
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r -50 8 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times

restoration at this public forum. Free. 6:30 p.m.
Homestead Branch Library, 700 N Homestead
Blvd, Homestead; 305-264-0168.
Wednesday, June 23
Downtown Toastmasters Club; Learn to express yourself
better when addressing groups the second and fourth
Wednesday of every month. Free. 6:15 p.m. Camila’s,
129 SE 1st Ave; 305-377-7753.
Bob Edelson: See Thursday.
Janet Fitch: Fitch reads from her debut novel, White
Oleander, the story of a teenage girl’s coming of age.
Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave,
Coral Gables; 305442-4408.
Hands On Miami: Learn about volunteer
opportunities for busy professionals at this
orientation meeting. Free. 7:00 p.m. Barnes &
Noble Boosktore, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura;
305-935-9770..
Institute of Maya Studies: Cecelia Birtcher delivers a
slide lecture titled “Chichén Itzá: Buries Temple
Comes to life.” $5.8:00 p.m. Miami Museum of
Science and Space Transit Planetarium, 3280 S
Miami Ave; 305-666-0779.
Classes & Workshops
Thursday, June 17
Actors ProShop: Learn intermediate through
advanced techniques for film and stage acting in
this course. $185. 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. through July
15. Creative Workshops, 17065 W Dixie Hwy,
Aventura; 305-933-0560.
Afro-Cuban Percussion Workshop: Lazaro Alfonso
teaches you' different styles of drumming, from
rumba to timba. $14. 7:00 p.m. today and Tuesday,
and 3:00 p.m. Saturday. Ogordo Afro-Cuban
Studio, 2772 SW 8th St, ste 202; 305-642-8889.
TV Commercials: Learn the audition process for a
successful career in television commercials. 6:30
to 9:30 p.m. today and Tuesday, and 1:30 to 4:30
p.m. Saturday. Panaro Workshop, 421 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; call 305-532-9422 for details.
Friday, June 18
AIDS Mastery Workshop: Mercy Hospital Special
Immunology Services presents this intensive
weekend-long seminar on self-empowerment for
people living with AIDS and HIV and their
caregivers, family members, and friends. $20
donation. 6:30 to 11:00 p.m. today, 10:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Mercy Hospital,
3663 S Miami Ave; 305-285-2994.
Saturday, June 19
Afro-Cuban Percussion Workshop: See Thursday.
AIDS Mastery Workshop: See Friday.
TV Commercials: See Thursday.
Sunday, June 20
AIDS Mastery Workshop: See Friday.
Artplay in a Day: Artists Yehudis Levitin and
Carolyn Schlam teach you how to use art to bring
fun back into your life. $50.1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Miami Beach Botanical Garden, 2000 Convention
Center Dr, Miami Beach; call 305-532-7319 for
details.
Monday, June 21
Feature Film and Screenwriting Level I and li:
Independent screenwriter Duba Leibell teaches
this course concentrating on preparing a
treatment, writing a screenplay, and revising a
screenplay. 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. every Monday and
Wednesday. Panaro Workshop, 421 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; call 305-532-9422 for details.
Haitian Drumming: Former members of the Haitian
National Dance Company, Ton-Ton and T-Roupe,
teach sacred and secular Haitian drum rhythms.
6:00 tonight and Wednesday. Iroko Dance and
Performance Center, 1860-A West Ave, Miami
Beach; call 305-604-9141 for details.
Tuesday, June 22
Afro-Cuban Percussion: Master percussionists teach
you Cuban-style drumming. $18.6:00 p.m. Iroko
Dance and Performance Center, 1860-A West Ave,
Miami Beach; 305-604-9141.
The Big Chill: Alysa Plummer teaches you to cook
refreshing low-fat goodies. $45.7:00 p.m.
real-life.basic, 643 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-604-1984.
Cooking with Homo Restaurant Chef Frank Jeannetti
shares recipes from the acclaimed restaurant’s
menu. $30. 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Kitchen Hearth, 456
Arthur Godfrey Rd, Miami Beach; 305-538-3358.
TV Commercials: See Thursday.
Wednesday, June 23
Feature Film and Screenwriting Level I and II: See
Monday.
Haitian Drumming: See Monday.
Dance
Thursday, June 17
Afro-Cuban and Latin Dance: Cuban dancer-
choreographer Neri Torres teaches these classes
for beginning- and intermediate-level students. $10.
7:00 tonight and Tuesday, and noon Saturday. Ifé-Ilé
Cuban Dance and Music Center, 4545 NW 7th St,
ste 13; 305-863-2151.
Afro-Cuban Dance: Dancers Elena Garcia and Alain
Hernandez, former members of the Folkloric National
Company of Cuba, lead this class in orisha dances and
rumba. $10.7:00 tonight and Tuesday, and noon
Saturday. Iroko Dance and Performance Center, 1860-
A West Ave, Miami Beach; 305-604-9141.
Afro-Samba Dane»: Work out while you dance to Afro-
Brazilian rhythms. $10. 7:00 tonight and Tuesday.
Gil Santos Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 305-674-0709.
Belly Dancing with Maja: Belly-dance expert Maja
conducts a free-for-all for belly dancers and
musicians with workshops every Thursday at 6:30
p.m. at Tap Tap (819 5th St, Miami Beach) and
workshops every Monday at 1:30 p.m. at the 21st
Street Community Center (2100 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach). $5; 305673-7784.
Brazilian Dance: Gil and Monica offer samba,
lambada, bolero, and swing lessons every Thursday
and Tuesday. $10.9:00 p.m. Gil Santos Dance
Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
The Dancer and the Drummer: Dancer Jihan Jamal,
accompanied by Tunisian drummer Fathi, teaches
you how to blend choreography with her favorite
rhythms in this two-session class. $15.7:00 to 8:30
p.m. Performing Arts Network, 55517th St, Miami
Beach; 305672-0552.
Improvisational Belly Dance: Montreal dancer and
instructor Ylsa leads this intermediate and advanced
workshop. $10.7:30 p.m. Mideastem Dance
Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach;
305538-1608.
Israeli Dancing: Discover traditional dance moves
from this rich culture. $4. Every Thursday and
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900
NE 25th Ave, North Miami Beach; 305-682-7954.
Salsacise: Shape up while you learn fun Latin dance
moves. $4.7:00 tonight and Tuesday, 9:00 a.m.
Saturday, and 6:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday.
Dance and Body Studio, 10370 W Flagler St;
3052230316.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: Let the sizzling sounds of
salsa move you at this dance workshop. $7 (first
class free). 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday at
Blue Banquet Hall (9843 SW 40th St) and 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday at Violines Banquet Hall
(3706 W 12th Ave, Hialeah); 305220-7115.
Salsa Workshop: Put on your salsa shoes and dance
as Angel Arroyo teaches you the latest steps. $10.
7:30 tonight and Tuesday. Peaches School of Dance,
16378 NE 26th Ave, North Miami Beach;
305949-7799.
Samba: Learn the basics of Brazil’s most popular
dance. $10.9:00 tonight and Tuesday. Gil Santos
Miami-Dade and Broward Membership* of the
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Stephan Baker, M.D. tinelio Garcia Jr., M.D.
999 Brickell Bay Dr, Ste. 1901 -7100 W. 20th Ave, #110
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Miami-Dade
Tracy M. Baker, M.D.
1501S, Miami Ave.
Miami*305-854-2424 :
Jesse O. Basadre, M.D.
351 NW 42 Ave, Ste. 501
Miami*305-631-8300
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8750 SW 144 St, Ste. 201
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Darryl J. Blinskl, M.D.
7800 SW 87 Ave, Bldg. C, #375
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Emilio J. Canillo, M.D.
266 Palermo Ave.
Coral Gables*305-442-456l
John M. Cassel, M.D.
8950 N. Kendall Dr, #106
Miami*305-596-1010
Broward
Laurence I. Arnold, M.D.
7710 NW 71 Ct, #206
Tamarac*954-720-9513
Yoav Barnavon, M.D.
1150 N. 35th Ave, #550
Hollywood*954-987-8100
H. Michael Bass, M.D.
2855 University Dr, #400
Coral Springs*954-755-3666
Richard B. Edison, M.D.
3109 Stirling Rd, #100
Ft Lauderdale*954-981-3223
Steven D. Eisenstadt, M.D.
220 SW 84th Ave, #203
P!antation*954:236-9633
Jay B. Fine, M.D.
601N. Flamingo Rd, #408
Pembroke Pines*954-436-0244
Walter P. Garst, M.D.
999 Brickell Bay Dr, Ste. 1901
Miami*305-374-1888
Brad P. Herman, M.D.
8940 N. Kendall Dr, #903 E
Miami*305-595-2969
Jorge E. Hidalgo, M.D.
2310 S. Dixie Hwy.
Miami*305-860-0717
Baruch Jacobs, M.D.
400 Arthur Godfrey Rd, #305
Miami Beach*305-674-8586
Brandon E. Kallman, M.D.
820 Arthur Godfrey Rd, #202
Miami Beach*305-673-6l64
Michael E. Kelly, M.D.
8940 N. Kendall Dr, #903 E
Miami*305-595-2969
Gerald D. Grau, M.D.
540 NE 8th St.
Ft Lauderdale*954-764-5600
Jeffrey C. Hamm, M.D.
3900 Hollywood Blvd, #304
Hollywood*954-985-0400
Chance Kaplan, M.D.
1754 E. Commercial Blvd.
Ft Lauderdale*954-772-1069
David J. Levens, M.D.
985 University Dr.
Coral Springs*954-344-4555
Nathan Mayl, M.D.
6405 N. Federal Hwy, #200
Ft. Lauderdale*954-771-3100
Roger K. Khouri, M.D.
328 Crandon Blvd., #227
Key Biscayne*305-36l-8200
Ary Krau, M.D.
1143 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Is. *305-861-6881
Joel M. Levin, M.D.
7800 Red Rd., #305
Miami*305-665-10l7
George A. Levine, M.D.
8700 N. Kendall Dr, #102
Miami*305-279-1532
Gregory C. Lovaas, M.D.
1321 NW 14th St, #400
Miami*305-324-6633
D. Ralph Millard, M.D.
1444 NW 14th Ave.
Miami*305-325-l44l
Walter R. Mullin, M.D.
1444 NWl4th Ave.
Miami*305-325-l44l
Richard D. Nadal, M.D.
3661S. Miami Ave, #602
Miami*305-854-186l
Richard F. Ott, M.D.
4801N. Federal Hwy, #202
Ft Lauderdale*954-772-o688
C. Roberto Palma, M.D.
910 NE 26th Ave.
Ft Lauderdale*954-565-8282
Russel S. Palmer, M.D.
2699 Stirling Rd, #B101
Ft Lauderdale*954-989-5001
Jorge A. Perez, M.D.
6245 N. Federal Hwy, #200
Ft Lauderdale*954-351-2200
Ivo D. Pestaña, M.D.
3080 NW 99th Ave, #302
Coral Springs* 954-755-8844
Howard N. Robinson, M.D.
601N. Flamingo Rd, #317
Pembroke Pines*954-437-l l6l
Claude J. Noriega, M.D.
9955 N. Kendall Dr.
Miami*305-271-7446
Harold G. Norman, M.P.
262 Almería Ave.
Coral Gables*305-445-156l
Jack D. Norman, M.D.
848 Brickell Ave, #940
Miami*305-358-7110
Mel T. Ortega, M.D.
1110 Brickell Ave, #206
Miami*305-374-2929
Myron M. Person, M.D.
2912 SW 27th Ave.
Coconut Grove*305-567-2889
Luis A. Picard-Ami Jr., M.D.
11760 Bird Rd, #452
Miami*305-228-6055
Lance P. Raffle, M.D.
4302 Alton Rd, #620
Miami Beach*305-538-8658
Alan S. Rapperport, M.D.
6280 Sunset Dr, #501
Miami*305-666-1352
Joel L. Roskind, M.D.
7400 N. Kendall Dr, #518
Miami*305-670-1003
Pamela B. Rosen, M.D.
1401 University Dr, #300
Coral Springs*954-341-8907
Robert E. Rothfield, M.D.
1845 N. Corporate Lakes Blvd.
Weston*954-389-7999
Harris Shampain, M.D.
2253 N. University Dr
Pembroke Pines*954-963-3003
Blane T. Shatkin, M.D.
1604 Town Center Blvd, Ste. C
Weston*954-384-9997
Marvin M. Shuster, M.D.
4001 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood*954-96l-5500
Leonard A. Roudner, M.D.
550 Biltmore Way, #890
Coral Gables*305-444-8585
Alan S. Serure, M.D.
7300 SW 62nd PI, #200
South Miami*305-669-0184
Michael D. Storch, M.D.
21110 Biscayne Blvd., #103
Aventura*305-932-3200
Seth R. Thaller, M.D.
l6ll NW 12Ave,JMH
Miami*305-585-5798
Edward S.Truppman, M.D.
2999 NE 191 St, PHI
Aventura*305-937-6471
Bernabe Vazquez, M.D.
366l S. Miami Ave, #508
Coconut Grove*305-858-8222
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1444 NWl4th Ave.
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3661S. Miami Ave, #509
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Peter J. Simon, M.D.
3201 N. Federal Hwy, #302
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James D. Stem, M.D.
1150 N. 35th Ave, #550
Hollywood*954-987-8100
Vernon P. Turner, M.D.
3536 N. Federal Hwy, #100
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3700 Washington St, #404
Hollywood*954-963-4800
Bose Yalamanchi, M.D.
985 University Dr
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201 NW 82 Ave, #102
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Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-674-0709.
Tango Argentine: Take this group class and learn all
the right moves. $10. Every Thursday at 8:00 p.m.
and Monday at 9:00 p.m. Gil Santos Dance Studio,
350 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Friday, June 18
Belly, Flamenco, Salsa, and Merengue Dance:
Professional dancer Middy Garcia teaches you hip¬
shaking, foot-stomping moves. $15 registration fee
and $6-$10 per class. 6:30,7:30, and 8:30 p.m. Dance
and Body Studio, 10370 W Flagler St; 305-2230316.
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents Jazzdance
by Danny Buraczeski, featuring a piece inspired by
the novels of James Baldwin and works set to tunes
by composer Philip Hamilton and jazz musicians
such as Ornette Coleman, Billy Strayhom, Duke
Ellington, Artie Shaw, Brave Old World, and Benny
Goodman. $20.8:00 p.m. Colony.Theater, 1040
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-3350.
Hecho en Miami (Made in Miami): Learn salsa, casino,
and merengue steps at this new nightclub. $10.7:00
to 9:00 p.m. tonight, Monday, and Wednesday.
Timba, 2898 Biscayne Blvd; 305438-0500.
Latin Dance with a Uve Band: Swing or salsa to the
sounds of a live band. $1.6:00 p.m. 21st Street
Recreation Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach; 305-6737784.
Salsa for Beginners: Novices can learn to move to the
hot Latin beat $10.7:00 tonight 8:00 p.m. Monday
and Wednesday. Gil Santos Dance Studio, 350
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Saturday, June 19
Afro&iban and Latin Dance: See Thursday.
Afro-Cuban Dance: See Thursday.
Beginners Belly Dance: Tamalyn Dallal teaches the
hip-shaking basics today at 12:30 p.m. and Tuesday
at 7:30 p.m. $10. Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350
Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach; 3035331608.
Belly Dance Class for Beginners: Kahreen teaches you
the basics, including transitions and choreography,
in this twelve-week workshop. 10:30 a.m. Miami
Shores Community Center, 9617 Park Dr, Miami
Shores; 3037540258.
Capoeira: Self-defense master Delei leads this class
on the Brazilian martial art/dance. $15.4:00 p.m.
today, and 7:00 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Gil
Santos Dance Studio, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste 318,
Miami Beach; 305-674-0709.
Capoeira Angola Style: Mestre Caboquinho teaches
you this mix of martial arts and dance. $15.5:00 to
6:30 p.m. today at Mideastern Dance Exchange (350
Lincoln Rd, ste 505, Miami Beach) and 7:30 to 9:00
p.m. Monday and Wednesday at International
Language School (2469 Collins Ave, Miami Beach);
303551-5821.
Capoeira Dance: Get in shape by learning the
rhythmic Afro-Brazilian martial art $10. Noon every
Saturday. Miami Folkloric Institute, 2772 SW 8th St,
ste 202; 303642-8889.
Dance Now: The fourteen-member modem, ballet,
and jazz dance troupe created by Hannah
Baumgarten and Diego Salterini presents four world
premieres as well as one United States premiere
during this program. $12.8:00 p.m. Performing Arts
Network, 555 17th St Miami Beach; 305-672-0552.
Flamenco Dance Classes: Juana Magdalena, director
of Gypsy Fire, shows beginning and intermediate
students how to improve their flamenco moves. $12.
4:00 p.m. every Saturday. In Motion Dance Center,
4542 SW 75th Ave, South Miami; 3036334061.
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents a
performance by the Le Jeune Ballet de France, a
professional youth training company founded by
Robert Berthier with the help of Rosella Hightower,
former prima ballerina for the New York City Ballet
$15.8:00 p.m. Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 3036743350.
Haitian Dance: Move to the beat of a live drum while
Manno Merisier, former member of the Haitian
National Dance Company and student of Katherine
Dunham, teaches you dances such as the snake,
spider, and warrior. $10.4:00 p.m. today and 7:00
p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Iroko Dance and
Performance Center, 1860-A West Ave, Miami
Beach; 305-6049141.
Intermediate Belly Dance: Tamalyn Dallal leads this
workshop for experienced dance students. $10.2:30
p.m. Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd,
ste 505, Miami Beach; 3035331608.
Orisha Dances: To the beat of live drums, dancer
Elena Garcia, former member of the Folkloric
National Company of Cuba, leads this class in the
movements associated with the orisha Oshun. $12.
Noon. Iroko Dance and Performance Center, 1860-A
West Ave, Miami Beach; 305-6049141.
Sal sad se: See Thursday.
Saturday Evening Dance: Make Mends with other
IF YOU
THOUGHT
YOUR
PARENTS
WERE RIGHT...
THINK AGAIN!!!*
"Babel’s Guide”
with Francisco Aruca
Monday thru Friday
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
ON WAXY 790 AM
(Sure, ifs English with an accent;
but you'll get it all in one language.)
* Well, they ore on certain issues,
but maybe not on others.
How about the Cuba-Cubans issue, for example?
Miami NewTimes June17 - 23,1998 53
anTmt inaH *££ «■*. S

the Pros at the
Itelbirifli off til»
Sth St. Gym
> Boxing Aerobics
» Kick-boxing Aerobics
> Technical Boxing
> Technical Kick-boxing
> Submission Wrestling
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Spiritdance; Fatima Gueye hosts ah Afro-Cuban
dance workshop. $5. Every Saturday at 4:00 plm.
21st Street Community Center, 2100 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; 305635-2839. .V •
Strictly Passion, the Tango Buffet Dinner, Dance, and
Shew: Take a group dance class, partake of food, and
watch «killed dancers move. $12.7:30 p.m. every \
Saturday. Polish American Club, 1250 SW 22nd Ave;
3052676923.
Swing/Disco Classes: TeachersfromSalsations Dance
Productions show you the way to move. $10.7:30
p.m. every Saturday. In Motion Dance Center, 4542
SW 75th Ave, South Miami; 3056334061.
West African Dance and Percussion: Corina Fitch
teaches you the rich dance-drumming traditions of
the Anlo-Ewe people of WestAfrica. $10-$15.2:00 to
4:00 p.m. Iroko Dance and Performánce Center,
1860-A West Ave, Miami Beach; 305604-9141.
Sunday, June 20
Bringing Back the Big Bands: Enjoy refreshments, win
door prizes, and learn to swing dancé to music by
the Swingables. $Í0.6:15p.in. every Sunday. Pofisli
American Club, 1250 SW 22ñd Ave; 3052676923.
Florida Dance Festival: In collaboration with Flu’s
Intercultural Dance and Music Institute the festival
presents Fiesta African y Caribeña an AfroCaribbean
inspired-program featuring the African American
Dance Ensemble and the flé-Ifé AfreCuban Dance
and Music Ensemble. $15.760,p.m. Colony Theater,
1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 305-674-3350.
Israeli Dancing See Thursday.
Salsa Casino Dance Studio: Leant those hot salsa steps
at this weekly beginning, intermediate, and
advanced salsa and rueda workshop. $8.7:00 put. f
every Sunday and Tuesday at Ballet Concerto (4186
,.SWvZ4th Ct), and 8;00-p.mrevery Monday at Cream
(601 Washington Ave, Miami Beach); 305207-3600:
Salsa on the Beach: Dancer Luz Pinto leads this
workshop on salsa casino. $10. Every Sunday at 6:30
p.m. Performing Arts Network, 55517th St, Miami
Beach; 305868-9418.
Sunday Evening Dance: Twirl around the dance floor
and groove to the music of a live band. $1.7:00 pjn.
North Shore BandshcD, 7275 Collins Ave, Miami .
Beach; 305993-2001.
June 21
Advanced Belly Dance: Kahreen, Kira, and Helena lead
this class for advanced-level dancers. $8.7:00 pun.
Miami Shores Recreation Center, 9617 Park Dr,
Miami Shores; 3057586103.
Belly Dancing with Muja: See Thursday.
Capoeira: See Saturday.
Capoeira Angola Style: See Saturday.
Country Line Dancing by Pat Cocchi: Cocchi, half of the
Kismet Dancers, leads a beginner and intermediate
workshop. $5.10:30 a.m. Miami Shores Recreation
Center, 9617 Park Dr, Miami Shores; 305754-0258.
Haitian Dance: Sec Saturday.
Hecho en Miami (Made in Miami): See Friday.
Salsa Casino Dance Studio: See Sunday.
Salsacise: See Thursday.
Salsa for Beginners: See Friday.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: See Thursday.
Swing and Latin Dance: Learn exciting dance moves
with The Best of Times. $10.7:00 p.m. every
Monday. LaSalle High School cafeteria, 3601S
Miami Aye; 3052676923.
Swing Workshop: Angel Arroyo teaches you the wild
steps of the swing era; $10.8:30 p.m. Peaches
School of Dance, 16378 NE 26th Ave, North Miami
Beach; 305949-7799. ' '
Tango Argentine: See Thursday.
Tuesday, June 22
AfreCuban and Latin Dance: See Thursday.
AfreCuban Dance: See Thursday.
AfreSamba Dance: See Thursday.
Ancient Art of Belly Dancing Practice your- Egyptian-
" style shimmies and hip movements with ethnic
dance instructor Evelyn Hamsey. $30 for six
lessons.:7:30 p.m. every.Tuesday. West Miami
Community School, 7525 SW241Ü St; 3052616383.
Beginners Belly Dance: See Saturday.
Brazilian Dance: See Thursday.
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents Florida
Dances, a showcase of works by Florida dancers,
students, and independent choreographers. $15. .
8:00, pjn. Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami i
Beach; 305237-3413.
Salsa Casino Dance Studio: See Sunday.
Salsacise: See Thursday.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: See Thursday.
Salsa Workshop: See Thursday.
Samba: See Thursday.
Strictly Passion, the Tango: The Best of Times teaches
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305-261-6558 • 305-264-0567
Mon-Sat. 10am-7:3Qpm «' ¿uh 12-5pm
fei^-sís.
yoii Argentina’s romantic dance. $10.'7:30 p.m.
every Tuesday. Polish American Club, 1250 SW 1 i
22nd Ave; 3052678923.
Swing Night: Dancers Randy Adas and Luz Pinto offer
lindy swing lessons. $10:8:00 p.m. every Tuesday. .
American Classics Lounge, Dezerland Hotel, 3701
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 800404-7693. ,
Wednesday, June 23
Ballet for Adults: I lancer Pilar Saavedra, formerlyof
the Ballet de Santiago de Chile, offers these classes
for nimble adults. 21st Street Recreation Center! '
2100 Washington $vg, Miami Beach;1 tali'
305^673-7784 for details.
Ballroom Glasses: Tty,out anew dance step — tango;
merengue, cumbia, swing, cha-cha-cha — v¡ith a
’different class every six weeks. $10, Every
Wednesday at 8,30 pm Peaches School of Dance,
16378ÍNE 26th Jive, North Miami Beach;
50 >-949-7799
Belly Dance Intensive Workshop: Kahreen, Kira, and
Helena lead an eight-week workshop for
beginning /4njtefm.ediate students that will'cover! ,
everything from the basics to a complete
choreographed piece. §8;;7:00 p.m, Miami Shores
Recreátíon Genter,.9617 Park Dr, Miami Shores; .,
â– 30^758^103:
Capoeira: See Saturday.
Capoeira Angola Style: See Saturday.
Dance Aerobics: Geta workout while you listen to hip-
hop and club tunes. $3,5:30 p.m. 21st Street
Recreation Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 305-532 2839
Florida Dance Festival: The festival presents the Mary
Street Dance Theater in an improvisational program
titled Food for Thought aná the Demetrius'Klein? ■
Dance Company performing Bella Dama and ,
Sokol/Falcon.'$i5;.8HÉ p.m. Colony Theater, 1040 ,
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;'305874335ff
Haitian Dance: See Saturday.
Hecho on Miami (Made in Miami): See Friday.
Intensive Belly Dance: Maria Jamal teaches this
â– 'workshop for experienced students. $TG: 6:30 p.m. 1.
Mideastem-Dance Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, sfe
,505, Miami Beach, 3Q5-538-16Q8
Salsacise: See Thursday. ..i
Salsa for Beginners: See Friday.
Salsa Lovers Dance Studios: See Thursday.
Tango Argentino Dance Party: Practice the moves of
one of the world’s most elegant and sensual dances.
$10 Dance classes from 8 30 to 9.30; dance starts at
,9:30 p.m. every Wednesday. Elks Club, 2916 Ponce
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Hotlines
AIDS Hotline: 305-325-1955 ,
Alcohol or Drag Abuse Hotline: 305892-8440
American Cancer Society: 305-5944363
American Heart Association: 305856-1449
American Red Cross: 305-644-1200
Crisis Intervention/Suicide Hotline: 305-358-HELP
Domestic Violence Hotline: 305-547-3170 ;
Drags, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens (The Village):
Families of Gays and Lesbians Helpline: (supppit and
information) 3054458445
Family Counseling Services: (in-home counseling for
people, with HTVj'305573-25001 ’;v
Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service: 800-3428011:
Florida HIV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English);
, 300-545-SIDA, (Spanish) i 800-AIDS-101 (Haitian
'Creole),
Habitat for Humanity. 30587(42224 ,'
Health Crisis Network/AIDS Hotline: 305-751-7751
(English); 305-759-1213 (Spanish)
Hepatitis-B Hotline: 800891^7.07 gg
Herpes Speakeasy Hotline: 3058955555
Homeless Hotline: 3§5]>7frH0ME
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 80O325FOOD
Immunization Info: 800-^32:2^2 (English);
81)0-232=0233 (Spanish)
Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami: 3054450555
March of Dimes National Resource Center:
888-MODIMÉS
Miami Bridge: (runaway, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 305-6358953
Miami Pride Coalition: (promot^sünity for gays and
lesbians) 30535882^5 1 .
Miami Women's Health Center3058356165 I
Narcotics Anonymous: 3056628280',,
Nicotine Anonymous: 3d55784754''H‘
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Rape Treatment Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital:
-. 305585?/273 (to report a rape); 3055855185 (tor
recovery support)
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Miami Hew Times June IT - 23,1999 57

â–² Doggie's
devotion saves
Wang’s hide-
and his dying art
The King of Masks,
Directed by
Wu Tianming.
Screenplay by
WeiMinghing.
Starring
ZhuXu,
Zhou Renting,
Zhang Riuyang,
and
Zhao Zhigang.
Twice Upon a
Yesterday.
Directed by Maria
Ripoll. Written by
Rafa Russo.
Starring Lena
Headey, Douglas
Henshall,
Penelope Cruz,
and Elizabeth
McGovern.
An Heir for Art
By Andy Klein
Second
Chances
By Jean Oppenheimer
Twice Upon a Yesterday seems almost too geared for
the Sliding Doors croará. By relying on the same
kind of conceptual sleight of hand as that recent
Brit hit (which owed a giant debt of its own to
Groundhog Day), this romantic fable’s sense of
originality and wit is greatly diminished.
Although it contains a couple of very different
and clever plot twists, Twice Upon a Yesterday
resembles its predecessor in too many ways. Set
in contemporary London, it features a lovelorn
Scotsman with an endearing brogue and revolves
around a “what if’ scenario, as in: “What if events
had gone in a different direction?”
Instead of two versions of the present running
side by side, the new film gives its protagonist the
chance to relive, and thus change, the past.
Disheveled, unemployed actor Vic (Douglas Hen¬
shall of Angels and Insects) and hospital psycholo-
gist-in-training Sylvia (Lena Headey of Mrs. Dal-
loway and TV’s Merlin) have arrived at the point in
their long-standing relationship at which she
wants more commitment and he wants less — a lot
less. Only after obtaining his freedom does Vic
realize he truly loves Sylvia. By then, of course, it’s
top late; she is about to marry David (Mark
Strong), a yoga enthusiast whom she met at a
health club. A distraught Vic gets drunk and falls
into the hands of two garbage collectors who magi¬
cally transport him back intime to the morning of
the breakup. With 20-20 hindsight Vic doesn’t
make the same mistake again. But will the course
of true love run any more smoothly the second
time around?
Parts of this picture are highly enjoyable,
though, as with Sliding Doors, one has to be some¬
what of a romantic to get caught up in it (unlike
Groundhog Day, which had such charm and
humor it appealed to cynics as well as to roman¬
tics). The film’s weakness lies partially with the
script, which makes Sylvia less sympathetic as the
story progresses, but also with the characters (or
perhaps it’s the actors) who prove only intermit¬
tently engaging. This is especially true of Hen¬
shall who, though he is playing a very different
Continued on page 60
port his family on academic lecturing fees, he
opened a video store in one of Los Angeles’s Chi-
nese-American suburbs. The King of Masks was his
first new production after his return to China.
The return isa triumphant one. Wu has fashioned
a completely accessible and heartwarming tear-
jerker. He transplants the classic Silas Marner
schfick (child warms the heart of crusty old man) to
the particularly brutal milieu of China between the
fall of the empire and the revolution.
The King of Masks is much more sentimental than
The Old Well, and it also has an apparent political
subtext. How can one not see Wu himself in the
story of an aging artist whose difficult mission is to
pass on his art to a younger generation? An artist
who is repeatedly beaten down by bad luck and
worse timing? Whose career is threatened by the
interference of callous government officials? It may
not have been his stated intent, but the events of
his life (however much transformed) certainly con¬
tribute to making The King of Masks such a wrench-
ing emotional experience. CD
While Hong Kong movies have been invading Hol¬
lywood through the success of Jackie Chan, John
Woo, Jet Ii, and others, mainland Chinese cinema
has invaded the classier neighborhoods of the film
industry during the past decade or so. The latest
contender is The King of Masks, an affecting melo¬
drama from veteran Chinese filmmaker Wu Tian¬
ming.
The title refers to Wang (ZhuXu), an aging street
performer who wanders the villages of 1930s China
displaying the dying art of “change-face opera” — a
sort of quick-change magic act in which a series of
masks magically appear nn his face seemingly
instantaneously and independently.
Wang is the last practitioner of this skill, which is
a closely guarded family secret But his only child
has long since died. A popular Chinese opera star
named Liang (Zhao Zhigang) offers Wang a place
in his traveling show, but Wang suspects (perhaps
correctly) that Liang is only interested in observing
him to ¿seem and steal his secret technique. When
Wang politely declines the offer (he and Liang both
speak in metaphors that couch all meaning, no mat¬
ter how hostile, into proper, “face”-saving dis¬
course), the younger man equally politely reminds
him that he isn’t getting any younger. If he doesn’t
pass his technique along soon, it will die with him.
Taking this to heart, Wang visits a neighborhood
where desperately impoverished parents sell chil¬
dren in order to purchase food for their remaining
offspring. He is charmed into buying Doggie (Zhou
Ren-Ying), an adorable seven-year-old boy with
whom he quickly forms a deep emotional bond. It
seems as though all his problems have been solved,
until he discovers Doggie is actually a girl, essen¬
tially less than worthless in that time and place.
Because Doggie has no place to go, Wang reluc¬
tantly allows her to stay on as his servant, training
her in Chinese opera skills without, however,
divulging his secrets to her. Her curiosity leads to a
series of catastrophes that bring the local
authorities down on Wang. Doggie’s
resourcefulness and devotion are the mas¬
ter’s only hope.
That director Wu is getting a relatively
wide American release at this stage of his
career is ironic: He is older and more expe¬
rienced than the so^alled Fifth Generation
directors such as Zhang Yimou (Raise the
Red Lantern) and Chen Kaige (Farewell
My Concubine), who have become art-
house staples. In fact, in the politically
volatile world of Chinese cinema, Wu
stands as one of the central pioneers who
enabled his younger colleagues to break
away from the ideological restrictions of
postrevolutionary mainland art
Bom in 1939 Wu is old enough to have
started his film career in the early 196Qs;
he was accepted as part of the fifth class
of the Beijing Film Academy. But then
came the Cultural Revolution, which shut
down the Academy and much of the film
industry, clothing what was left in an ide¬
ological and aesthetic straitjacket After
the Cultural Revolution ended, Wu was
able to codirect his first film, Reverberar
tions of Life, in 1979; in 1983 he made his
solo directing debut with River Without
Buoys, which garnered the sort of atten¬
tion (and awards) at international
film festivals that had evaded Chinese films
for decades.
Following that success-Wu was made;
head of Xi’an Studios, where he opened the
doors to a new crop of young filmmakers:
the first class to graduate from the Beijing
Film Academy since before the Cultural Rev¬
olution. (Rather than take new students each
year, the Beijing Film Academy teaches a
single class for years before starting the
next class; hence, the numbered genera¬
tions. The Fifth Generation studied from
1978 to 1982.) Zhang Yimou, Chen Káige¿ Tian
Zhuangzhuang (The Blue Kite), and Huang Jianxin
(The Wooden Man's Bride) were among those to
whom he gave a start ,
While his 1986 The Old Well greatly augmented
his international reputation, politics again derailed
his career. Wu was in the United States asa visiting
scholar during the Tiananmen Square incident in
1989. He chose to remain here until 1994, waiting
for things to settle down in China. Unable to sup-
It seems as though all his
problems have been solved,
until he discovers Doggie
is actualty a girl.
58 JMe 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times

IT’S MORE THAN A MOVIE!
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Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 59

Leaving Mike
Figgis
Jean Oppenheimer
Pretentiousness masquerading as profundity; self-
indulgence masquerading as art The Loss of Sexual
innocence, the dreadfrd new film from writer/direc¬
tor Mike Figgis {Leaving Las Vegas, One Night
Stand), joins the ranks of the worst films ever
made. A statement that may, on the surface, seem
harsh and heartless but that will probably strike
anyone who actually sees the picture as a gross
understatement
Presented as a series of snippéts from the life of an
English film director, the movie reveals the events
that have made Nic (Juhan Sands, still best known to
moviegoers for Room with a View) the man he is
today. All of the episodes involve sexual matters or
incidents equating the body with feelings of shame.
As a five-year-old living in Africa, Nic witnesses a
disturbing sexual situation in which a teenage black
girl, clad only in stockings and underwear, reads
aloud to an elderly white man. As a self-conscious
twelve-year-old back in Britain, the schoolboy is
shamed by his gym teacher and taunted by class¬
mates because he is overweight. At age sixteen,
now slim and attractive (in the person of Jonathan
Rhys-Meyers, most recently seen in Velvet Gold¬
mine) but still quite shy, he explores his budding
sexual feelings with his hesitant and rather rigid
girlfriend. Even the scenes of Nic as an adult depict
a certain dysfunction and unease surrounding sex,
as he is trapped in a troubled marriage with a
woman who drinks to drown her unhappiness and
who dreams about stripping in a nightclub while an
oblivious Nic plays the piano.
These sequences are intercut with scenes of
Adam and Eve (naked throughout the film) and
The question that keeps running
through the viewer’s mind is,
Whatw
Figgis thinking?
â–  â– 
their fall from grace. After rising from a lake as fully
mature adults, they meet each other, explore their
new surroundings, happen upon a tree bearing (for¬
bidden) fruit — complete with a snake slithering
around the trunk — and discover sex, before they
are driven, frightened and shamed/out of the Gar¬
den of Eden. Oh, puhlease.
The different episodes are preceded by written
"titles. Adam and Eve appear under the heading
“Scenes from Nature.” Another chapter is íabeled
“Twins” and features Saffron Burrows (Circle of
Friends) playing twin sisters who are separated at
birth. One is raised in Britain, the other in Italy;
they pass each other in an airport The characters
in this very long sequence seem to have; dropped
out of a Calvin Klein advertisement. They are all
sun-drenched, beautiful specimens with bored
expressions mid an air of enveloping narcissism.
The significance of the twin theme is unclear, but
then the entire movie is so tedious and pedantic one
doesn’t waste much time mulling the
possibilities. The question that keeps
running through the viewer’s mind is,
What was Mike Figgis thinking? There
have been some truly awful movies
over the past few months (Welcome to
Woop Woop and 200 Cigarettes spring
to mind), but none have been as
affected or self-reverential as this one.
Even on the most basié storytelling
leygl the film falters. Why give Nic
blond hair a& a child and again as an adult, but not
as a teenager? The five-year-old is not referred to by
name in the opening sequence, so when Rhys-Mey:
ers pops up in the next scene and is addressed as
Nic, it’s not at all clear that this is supposed to be
the same individual we saw earlier. A little later a>;
very blond Julian Sands appears, followed by a
scene of a pudgy twelve-year-old with brown hair
who looks nothing like the angiilar, poutishly hand¬
some Rhys-Meyers. Would it have been so difficult
to give each actor .the saitie hair color?
Benoit Delhomme’s cinematography is the film’s
one praiseworthy feature. Shot in Superl6 format
and developed using an assortment of photographic
processes, the film proves visually arresting* veer¬
ing from highly textured, washed-out images to
bold, saturated colors of almost carnivorous inten¬
sity to moody infrared landscapes. The one cinema-
graphic misstep is the reliance on a hand-held cam¬
era, which draws even more attention to the film’s
overly calculated, artsy feel.
The music also proves unüsually annoying. Fig¬
gis, an acclaimed composer and jazz musician, has
selected several grating piano pieces (by Mozart
and Chopin, no less) whose simplistic, sing-song
repetition' of flotes would constitute cruel and
unusual punishment if piped into a prison yard.
(Somebody, please, shoot the piano player!) ;
, Figgis’s work has goné steadily downhill ever
since his impressive feature debut, Stormy Monday,
a hypnotically atmospheric film starring a sultry
Melanie Griffith. For this reviewer nothing has
come remotely close to that achievement; not the
popular Internal Affairs and.certainly notLeaving
Las Vegas, despite the rash of accolades and critics’
awards it received. Even die-hard fans will be shak¬
ing their heads over this latest work. Figgis has
said The Loss of Sexual Innocence is his most per¬
sonal movie (the similarities between the director
and Nic aretoo obvious to be dismissed anyway),
but what a pity that his worst film should be the one
with which he most closely identifies. CD
Chances
Continued from page 58
personality type, pales in comparison with the
irresistible John Hannah of Sliding Doors.
Shot in England with a predominantly British
cast (exceptions include Elizabeth McGovern
and Spanish actress Penelope Cruz), the film
was actually written, directed, and produced by
Spaniards. Maria Ripoll, who studied directing at
the prestigious American Film Institute and is a
highly regarded television director in her own
nation, makes her feature debut withTiw'ci[Upon
60 June 17 - 23.1999 Miami NOW limes
a Yesterday and shows á sure hand With both the
surrealistic aspects, of the story (most notably
the Don Quixote- and Sancho Panza-inspired
trashmen and their fantastical garbage dümp)
and the more mundane romantic developments.
The junkyard sequence is, without quéstion, the
most bewitching in the film.The garbagemen (six--
teenth-century Spanish figures living ihfnódéfhday
London) have transformed their workplace into a
whimsical playground of discarded refrigerators and
dishwashers. The sense of wonder and magic that
infuses this scene isn’t replicated anywhere else, but
then Spanish novelist/songwriter Raía Russo, mak¬
ing his debut as a screenwriter, clearly wasn’t trying
-to fashion another like Water for Chocolate. That’s
somewhat of a pity, as the scene casts a spell that the
rest of the film fails to match.
While not living up to its similarly themed pre¬
decessors, Twice Upon a Yesterday is an accept¬
able addition to the canon of romantic comedies
and may be just the ticket for viewers hungry for
light fare with a romantic bent. And who among
us hasn’t wished we could travel back in time and
change the past? CD
The Loss of Sexual
Innocence.
Written and
Mike Figgis.
Starring
Saffron Burrows,
and

Film
¡§j
F i I
m
Capsules
Unless otherwise noted, the following capsule reviews are written and initialed
by Robert Abele, Andy Klein, David Kronke, Peter Rainer, Michael Sragow, and
Scott limberg. (Unsigned capsules are fer movies that have not been
reviewed.) For information about movie times and locations, see “Stiowtimes"
or contact local theaters.
understand. No one expected or even wanted fidelity to all of
Burroughs’s pulpy twists and ideas. But this film reworks the theme
into one of the most maddening of modem formulas: the Search for
the Father’s Approval. Still, on the whole, this Tarzan is a fine
entertainment value. Most kids will love it, and it won’t leave adults
fidgeting. It’s beautifully made (considering the literally thousands
of names that crawl past in the end credits, it better be) and
drencjied in deep, rich emerald, with sinuous tracking visuals driven
forward by pleasantly African-flavored songs from Phil Collins. Tony
Goldwyn provides the voice-of the title character, and Minnie Driver
is a charming, nonsyrupy Jane. The voices of Glenn Close, Rosie
O’Donnell, Lance Henriksen, Nigel Hawthorne, Brian Blessed, Alex
D. Linz, and Wayne Knight are also featured. Directed by Kevin
Lima and Chris Buck. (M.V. Moorhead)
Twice Upon a Yesterday (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Ongoing
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13): This sequel to the
shockingly successful Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery kills
whatever charm the first movie had by recycling its few serviceable bits
and filling the other 85 or so minutes with a dreary series of celebrity
cameos (Tim Robbins as the president?!), product plugs (Virgin
Megastpre, Philips Electronics), dick jokes, and extended explorations of
the humorous side of the bowel. This time Austin’s nemesis, Dr. Evil
(also played by Mike Myers) creates a time machine that allows him to
travel back to 1969 to steal the frozen Austin’s mojo, the mysterious force
that drives his libido. A flaccid 1999 Austin follows Dr. Evil in his own
time machine a psychedelic-painted VW Beetle7— to get back his mojo
Openings and Revivals
Dance maker (U): Early in his career, when asked to outline his
choreographic credo for a book on modem dance, Paul Taylor self-
effacingly deflected attention from himself by crediting his dancers.
But within the ego-driven realm of American modem dance (in
which companies are founded to cany the name and perform the
works of an individual choreographer), it was only a matter of time
before Taylor achieved living-legend status and became a prime
subject for a movie about himself. Matthew Diamond’s regally titled
documentary skillfully avoids mythologizing either the man or his
works, presenting the good, bad, and ugly with equal weight, from
Taylor choking up over the remembered death of a past company
member to him unflinchingly firing one of his current dancers (“I do
what I want,” he explains). Ostensibly a chronicle of Taylor’s career
path from boy to artist, the film goes judiciously light on
biographical details (we learn merely that Taylor resented his foster
child upbringing) and heavy on mesmerizing performance footage,
shot both backstage and on; only occasionally is the effect made
dizzying through an overabundance of camera angles. Fittingly
enough, though, the film’s most telling moments focus on the
company dancers .themselves and their mixed reverence and dread
toward the deadpan, fiercely alienated man they unanimously
considec“the greatest living choreographer.” The tone of
unquestioning adoration is lightened by Diamond’s ability to depict
the dancers as füll-fleshed personalities who can both obsess over-
pleasing their idol and mentor during rehearsal and then stuff
themselves with hors d’ oeuvres at a Swanky postperformance party.
An ominous but realistic view of the funding situation for dance
threads its way throughout, making Dancemaker an honest and
empathetic record of both a specific, spectacular choreographer and
the endangered world of American modem dance. (Rachel Howard)
The General's Daughter (R): Director Simon West (Con Air) likes the
kind of closeups that bore into an actor's face, exposing every
clogged pore and mascara smudge. In his new thriller, starring John
Travolta and Madeleine Stowe, his camera also tracks in to capture
the thick layer of sweat coating the skin of both officer and enlisted
man on duty at Fort MacCallum in the remote bogs of coastal
Georgia, where the. action is set. Travolta plays Paul Brenner, a
good-ole-boy detective with the U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigation
Division. He boasts a thick-as-gravy Southern accent, the stump of a
stogie, and a shit-eatin’ grin. No sooner is he finished with one
undercover job than an even bigger one lands in his lap. Because of
the special circumstances of this murder, Brenner is joined in the
investigation by a rape specialist with CID named Sarah Sunhill
(Stowe). From the moment Sunhill comes onboard, it becomes clear
that she and Brenner are anything but strangers. For the audience
this is a blessing, because the hanter between them makes their
scenes together the funniest and the sexiest in the film. As Brenner,
Travolta may look heavier than usual and rumpled from the
humidity, but the actor has seldom been sharper or more focused on
his work. Both physically and intellectually, Tie’s a formidable
presence. His first meeting with James Woods, who plays everyone’s
primary suspect, is a tour de force for both performers and easily the
movie’s most electrifying scene. In general it’s good that the level of
the acting in the film is so high, because the further we are drawn
into the story, the more preposterous and less satisfying the movie
becomes. To his credit West and his collaborators (cinematographer
Peter'Menzies, Jr., and production designer Dennis Washington)
have given the film a beautiful, haunted look, in which the landscape
séems almost to be rotting before your very eyes. This, together
with Carter Burwell’s destabilizing, gutbucket-blues score, makes
nearly every frame seem eerie and threatening, as if at any moment
violence is ready to spring. (Hal Hinson)
KingofMasks (U): Reviewed in this issue.
The Loss of Sexual Innocence (R): Reviewed in this issue..
Tarzan (G): Disney’s latest animated extravaganza is an adaptation of
the perennial Tarzan of the Apes, by Edgar Ripe Burroughs, the least
politically correct of popular American authors, yet somehow most
of the author’s racial and social elitism has béen drained from the
story. So, alas, has much of the passion. It’s been pointed out that
mothers don’t get much play in the world of Disney animated
fantasy: They’re usually either absent altogether, as in The Little
Mermaid, Aladdin, and Beauty and the Beast, or they’re minor
background figures, as in The Lion King. The bottomless,
courageous devotion of Kala, Tarzan’s adoptive ape-mother, to her
foundling son might partly have redressed this gap, but Kala
remains a recessive figure here, and the story focuses on Tarzan’s
conflict with the ape-clan ruler Kerchak, who, believing that Tarzan
is a threat to the-safety of the gorillas, is no longer so much a
menace as he is one more hard-ass Dad who just doesn’t
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and stop Dr. Evil’s plan to hold the world hostage witha •
giant, moon-based laser. Created by physicist Alan Parsons,.
, die laser is .called-— you guessed it-r-the Alan Parsons
Project Whatis new hére is fliinner, more predictable, arid
far more coarse than the first dim. (In one scene Austin _
winds up drinking from ’a coffee cup filled with diarrhea,
which leaves,his upper lip covered in the liquid brown.) The
rest borrows wholesale from the previous movie; if you liked
a gagfrom the first, don’t worry, because it shows up four
more times in this one. (Patrick Williams)
Besieged (R): Bernardo Bertolucci’s Besieged is a movie of
enthralling visual poetry. Set almost entirely inside a
ravishing Roman villa, itis alove story played out in furtive
glances and stolen looks, by characters on opposite sides of •
the ethnic divide. Culturally Mr. Kinsky (David Thewlis) and
Shandurai (Thandie Newton) couldn’t lie-more different
Kinsky is an accomplished pianist who dedicates himself
completely tohismusic. By day Shandurai, who immigrated
to Italy from her African homeland after the imprisonment of
her husband, works as a cleaning woman fqr Mr. Kinsky; at
right ^ attends university in order to complete her
: medicaljfegree. While Shandurai goes about her chores, the
reclusive Kinsky practices his (nano, filling the villa with
exquisite music. What soon becomes clear, though, is that
Kinsky is trying to make contact with the young African
beauty, and rather than do so directly, is attempting to.reach
out through his music. Bertolucci has never worked with the'
. simplicity, discipline, or subtlety that he shows here. The
impact of Besiegedis that of a short story. Stifi, Bertolucci and
his coscenarist Clare Peploe, have built a political dimension
into the developing relationship between the protagonist^
placing pointed emphasis on the fact that Kinsky is from the
West and Shandurai from the emerging Third World. The <
atmosphere that Bertolucci has created is ratified and
cultured without being enervating. As Shandurai, Thandie
Newton is a revelation. She is a fearless,-electrifying actress.
And David Thevdis works with tremendous simplicity and
authority. When he sits at the piano, you feel as if you can
read the music in his face, and whenheis with Shandurai,
- his fragility and openness are heartbreaking. (Hal Hinson) ;
Black Mask (IQ: Tracy (Karen Mok) gets a crush on Tsui (Jet
i Li), ashy, mild-mannered librarian. What she doesn’t know .
is that Tsui is a survivor of a secret government experiment: |
to create supersoldiers who can feel no pain. Tsui shields his
• true identity from everyone, even his best friend (Lau Ching-
Wan), a cop moonlighting asa masked superhero named -
the Black Mask. When a group of his former comrades ;,
launch ah evil plot to take over the entire Asian drug
, business, Tsuimust stop the gang, which includes his
former lóvé (Franchise Trip), fotoe wake of Jet li’s American
success in Lethal Weapon 4, this 1996 Hong Kong film
(produced by Tsui Hark and directed by Daniel Lee) is .
being released in the States. like thejackie Chan films that
have come out here, it’s been dubbed, recut, and rescored;
' and, because the new version was not screenedtor the
press, this review is based on the original Hong Kong
version, ft’s far from Li’s best film, but it’s got its share of
good action scenes, Still both the script and the execution .
feel rushed, like so many Hong Kong productions of recent
years.-In many ways if s a better display of the talents of
costar Lau'Ching-Wan, who brings a touch of realism to
an otherwise Gomicibook endeavor (A.K.)„
Buena Vista Social Chib (G): Director Wim Wenders has
managed to éoqvey infectious, intoxicating joy in every
: frame of the ravishing documentary Buena Vista Social Club,
the German filmmaker’s most soulful film since Wings of •
Desi’re. The project came about as a result of American
musician Ry’.pqpdePs lifelong passion for Cuban music,
^ which in 199^ bore fruit as an extraordinary hit recording, _
that rescued the members of this exclusive “club” (many of
whom were in their seventies, eighties, and nineties) from
totd'obscurity¡,,Thé musicfeatüred in.this film is folk music
in the truest sense: If emerges directly from the lives of the
people who, perform it The songs speak with aweinspiring
Simplicity and honesty ofhearts that blossom with love and
the sorrow of love gone ^vrong. These are songs too, that *
are deepened by the lines in the singers’ faces, which
Wenders’s'camera captures with remarkable sensitivity.
Wenders and his crew1 not only watch as theserfiasters lay
down the tracks during their recording sessions, and as they
perform onstage before their transfixed fans; they also follow
the musicians to the neighborhoods where they grew up,
back to the streetcomers and crowded-apartments where .
they first learned the music as children at their father’s knee.
Many of the musicians áre unsurpassed in their field, almost
tp tito point of being living legends. Nearly eveiy musidaj)
has a story to tell. And. if the,personal stories and the music
weren’t enough to carry the film, the skill with which
Wenders and his cinematographers convey the richness of
Cuban street life almost causes us to forget we re watching
documentary. Just to see these musicians take the stage at '
Carnegie Hall is a sublime moment On an entirely different
level, though, the shots bf the musicianswandering the
streets of Manhattan, window-shopping andJookingout over
the cityfrom the top of the Empire State Building, isjust as
powerful. Wenders has already made two films about angels,
and, at times, Buena Vista Social Club almost qualifies as a
third. Or perhaps that’s just another way of saying it’s ~
heavenly. (Hal Hinson)
Endurance (G): Leslie Woodhead’s inspirational docudrama
tolls the story—part of it, anyway—of Haile Gebrselassie,
the great Ethiopian athlete who rose from poverty and
deprivation on a rural farm to become the greatest distance -
runner of all time. Using a slippery mishmash of new
interviews, “dramatic reenactments,” and borrowed TV
footage, the British filmmaker shows us a driven boy who
ran six miles each way to school before slaving in the fields
and hauling water, who overcame the resistance of a stem:
father and kept going for God, family, and country. In the
end, though, this rather listies&jaece of business does - -
justice to tiie hardships of Gebrselassie's youth but not the
achievements of his career. The man set fifteen world
records, but the movie focuses solely on his 10,000-meter
victory at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games—as’tfhewqjle
some boltfrom the blue who never broke a tape before or
since. The gorgeously sinuous footage of Haile’s Olympic
win, by the way, is not Woodhead’s work but that of the*. -
exemplary American Sports documentarían Bud Greenspan,
You’ll find yourself yearning for more of the man ándhis life,
hot to mention his speed. (Bill Gallo) &
Entrapment (R) : Sean Connery has always been a tersq, -
minimalist actor, spitting out his lines in tight bursts of
Scottish brogue. But in Entrapment, the tiresome new caper
picture frorri director Job Amiel, the kingly Scot goes beyond
minimalism to the point where he’s practically doing
semaphore with his eyebrows. As the legendary art thief %
Robert “Mac” MacDougal, Connery isn’t just reserved, he’s
comatose. The picture opens with Mac scaling a New York
skyscraper in order to steal a priceless Rembrandt Or at
least we think if s Mac. At any rate the heist catches the:'
attention of a foxy agent with a prestigious New-Yoik
insurance company. Gin (Catherine Zeta-Jones), it seems, .
has been on Mac’s trail for some time. She tells her boss (an
unusually sedate Will Patton) .she’s Sure Mac is the only man
alive with moves smooth enough to have pulled blithe
Rembrandt job and begs him to let her go after him. As
expected there is a bit of sexy banter between the ntale
and female leads, most of it barbed, all of it designed to
make it look as if the two can’t stand the sight of each
another. But there is noteven the slightest trace of
freshness or originality in either the script, which' was
written by Ron Bass and William Broyles, or in Amiel’s
stodgy direction. First with The Mask of Zorro and, now,
this, Zeta-Jones seems to' have proved that her talents '
extend to the decorative and no further. Her best scenes
here are the ones in which she gets to put her athletic
ability (and her pert bottom) on displaying Rhames â– 
has a small part (mercifully) as —we think-h-Mac’s
good friend. (Hal Hinson) ,
Get Real (R): With Beautiful Thing, Like It Is, and now Get :
Real, it would seem the British have the gay teenage
“comingnuf film down pat Maybe too pat Like its
; predecessors, this tale ofteenagelove is well shot* well
directed, and well acted. But the script (adapted by Patrick
Wide from his own play), though sometimes touching,
more often suggests the Afterschool Special That Dare Not *
Speak Its Name. A high school student (BenSilverstone);
remarkable for the ease with which he’s adjusted to his
sexual orientation, finds himself growing increasingly
impátient with a world that doesn’t have a place for him. -
Push comes to shove when he begins an affair with the
school’s serioqsly closeted Sports God (Brad Gorton), vhp’s
as terrified of himself as he is of letting anyone else know '
about the romance. Director Simon Shore gets a lot of
drapiatic mileage over the sight of the younger, slighter
Silverstone holding so much power over the slightly older :
and much larger Gorton. Amusing too is the hero’s best
friend (Charlotte Brittain) a gawky, overweight, but
alarmingly forthright and intelligent young woman who’s
wise to tiie fact that the course of true love never runs
smooth. Shore might have done better to build an entire film
around this character, whose personal and societal
difficulties kre far more severe than those of the lead couple.
Her dry asides pack- more punch than the big Telling the
-Whole School Gffspeech tiie hero gets. “I never knew you
were such a drama queen!” she quips. Better than Like Ills,
but not quite as good as Beautiful Thing, Get Real will
doubtless find favor with gay teenagers eveiywhere—
provided they can muster enough courage to go up to tiie jjf
box office and ask for a ticket (David EhrenStein)
Instinct (EO: In an early scene in the Jon Turfeltaub film
Instinct, the'brilliant primatologist Ethan Powell (Anthony
Hopkins) isbeing retifrned to the United States from
Rwanda, where -for several -years he has been engaged fora
close study of the mountain gorillas with which he lived.
While in the bush,,tiie doctor’s gorilla family is brutally
attacked’byta group of Rwandan rangers. Rather than allow
the animals to be slaughtered, PoweQ-springsto their
defense and, in the process, kills two of the rangers. As a
result he is incargeraieti in a maximum-security hellhole in
Florida, where he will remain until itis determined whether .
he is sane enough to stand trial. This task falls into the eager
hands of Theo Caulder (Cuba Gooding, Jr.), who sees the
Tiigh-proffle-Gaserashis ticket to media stardom. The bulk of
the filmis .comprised of fh^sessions between the ambitious
psychiatrist and his reluctant subject As the de-evojving
primatologist, Hopkins builds his character mainly out of
recycled bits from other performances, primarily The Silence
of the Lambs. And, ih the movie’s most ludicrous scene,
there’s even a tiny hint of Picasso as tile prisoner uses chalk:
62 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times

to sketch óüt the history of the world on the wall of his cell
With actors as dynamic as these two facing off against each
other, it’s impossible for the picture to be completely without
fireworks. But Gooding’s role is too dour for him to express
his lusty extroversion. And Hopkins is not phoning it in, he’s
sending it by Pony Express. (Hal Hinson)
Umbo (R): There are some things to like in John Sayies’s
Alaskan survival drama, in winch an ex-salmon fisherman
with guilty memories, an itinerant lounge singer with a lousy
voice, and the Singer’s melancholy teenage daughter do
battle with the forces of nature while stranded on a remote
island. The film has a contemplative energy you won’t find in
the summer blockbusters, and there are terrific
performances by young Vanessa Martinez, as the troubled
gir], and Kris Kristofferson, as a seedy bush pilot But the
rather urbane David Strathaim, as the fisherman, and Mary
Elizabeth Mastrantonio, as the neurotic singer, are badly
miscast Sayles (Matewan, Lake Star) also indulges in the
same blunt instructional tone that characterizes his weaker
films: We “learn” here that fish suffocate in air, people iff":'K*
water, and that most of us are caught in a limbo between a
past life and afuture One, or between alienation and love.
And (tiffs just in!) Alaska is America’s last frontier, where
people are constantly reinventing themselves. (Bill Gallo)
Lovers of the Arctic Circle (IQ: Two children (Sara Valiente and
Peru Medem) meet through bizarre, almost mystical
circumstances; as teens (Kristel Dias and Victor Hugo
Oliveira), they become lovers; and, as young adults (Najwa.
Nimri and Fele Martinez), they are parted They long to
reunite but, even as their paths continually cross, they
always seem to just miss connecting, until the very end—
the very ambiguous end. Spanish director Julio Medem’s
fourth feature (the first to receive distribution here) more
than fulfills the promise of his excellent debut, the 1992 Cows:
(yacas). The story is intriguing, but Medem’s prime
accomplishment is in the telling, not the plot The narrative
shuttles back and forth between the point of views of the )
main characters, presenting the couple’s history as
something of a jigsaw puzzle. Repeated images, themes, and
even words are studded throughout the movie in ways both
clever and evocative. It’s almost as though Medem decided
to retell the story of Vincent Ward’s 1993 Map of the Human
Heart with the technique of Jaco van Dormael’s Tota tire
Hero (1991). The central difference is one of tone Tote’s
basic worid view is comic; Lovers, tor all its cleverness and
wordplay, is for more grave. In general the comic view'
trumps die serious nine times out often. But Loners of tire
Arctic Circle is that other one out of ten; it earns its
gravity. (A.K.)
The Matrix (R): Stuffed full of fantasy comics, addicted to
action, and steeped in digital technology, the frenetic
moviemakers Andy and Larry Wachowski (Hound) have
done what-they must created an eyepopping, morph-mad,
quasi-mythical sci-fi flick that will thrill computer nerds as it
kicks serious ass. With its complex (sometimes opaque)
cosmology, this to a movie that, aisó presumes to think
deeply, but hard-core science fiction buffo will likely be more
impressed by that than die rest of. us. If shard to compete
with state-of-the-art effects, including some transcendent
kung fu stuff But the Wachowskis did sign on human stars.
Keanu Reeves, looking pale and desiccated, andLaurence
Fishbume, burly and booming, are rebels trying to destroy a
planetary illusion called the Matrix that has enslaved all
mankind. The filmmakers borrow from Orwell and Heinlein,
acknowledgeAffretn WonuMtouf, and ransack religious
myth, but the real fun lies in their fuMte visual and aural
bombardment Forget the philosophical mUmbojumbo and
enjoy the ride. With Carrie-Anne Moss and Hugo Weaving
(as the sinister villain Agent Smith). (BíffiGáHo) ,
A Midsummer Night's Dream (PG-13): Adapter-director Michael
Hoffman manages to have it both ways in his nineteenth-
century Tuscan version of Shakespeare’s lyric-romantic
masterpiece: the gauzy fantasy and the bacchanal Although
the film is traditional enough in approach to employ
Mendelssohn’s incidental music—as did Max Reinhardts
1935Hollywood version—it is still an original. Like
Kenneth Branagh’s screen Shakespeares, this Dream could
easily be underrated by highbrow critics as conventional, but
it is so only on its vigorous, accessible surface. Hoffman, like
Branagh, comes up with some truly inventive and startlingly
valid interpretations on the level of characterization and '
mood. Your heart may sink when you see fireflies buzzing
around under the opening titles, but that’s just a front; when
we finally get a look behind the glowworm disguise, we meet
a Puck (Stanley Tucd) with a perpetual “Who me?”
expression, a voluptuary bad boy caught with his hand dither
in the cookie jar or down someone’s blouse. And Hoffman
has reimagined Bottom and his fellow “rude mechanicals’ as
real comic characters rather than as broadly played clowns.
Kevin Kline makes Bottom lovable, complex,'and humanly
convincing. Handsome with an edge of shabbiness, he’s a
fatuous ass even before he’s transformed, and he’s
authentically romantic even with donkey’s ears growing out,
of his head. And in his most inspired bit of interpretation,
Hoffman allows Flute (Sam Rockwell) to become a good
actor in his final speech as Thisbe. It cuts the froth with a
whisper of romantic poignancy, and fi chases away four
centuries of aristocratic patronizatioa With Michelle Pfeiffer,
absurdly beautiful and beautifully absurd as Titania; Rupert
Everett as Oberon, Roger Rees as a diplomatic Quince;
wonderful Max Wright, attended by a sweet litfle terrier, as
Starveling; Anna Friel, Christian Bale, Dominic West, and
Cafista Flockhart as the lovers; David Strathaim as Theseus,
Sophie Marceau as Hippolyta, and Bill Irwin, Bernard £011,
Gregory Jbara, and John Sessions. (M.V. Moorhead)
Matting Hill (PG-13): Hugh Grant is charming, almost
charming enough to make one completely forgive the weak-
kneed celebrity wet kiss that substitutes for romance in
Nottihg HiU, the not-a-sequel-but-hopefully-it-feels-like-one
from the writing-producing teain responsible for 1994’s
surprise hit romantic comedy Four Weddings and a Funeral.
As in that film, Grant plays William, the peipctffally fumbling
hangdog Everybrit who has never quite found true love, but
finally might in the guise ofa darling American girL This
timé the darling American girl is the biggest movie star in
the world,-Anna Scott, cast appropriately enough as the
Pretty Woman herself, Julia Roberts. From the moment Anna
impetuously leaves William with a kiss and kindles a
romance — poof!— out of thin air Notting Hill rarely veers
fatefully far from its amusing but rote romantic-comedy
conventions. Julia Roberts, as Anna, might as well be sitting
down for á Vanity Fair interview and photo shoot as Julia
Roberts. She brings nothing to the role besides her own star
power. And when the film does try to offer a peek beneath
the surface image of The Movie Star, Anna comes off as an
utter bitch—at least that’s the impression gleaned from
scenes that don’t involve musical interludes and fuzzy
montages, and there are many. From theget-go, Notting Hid
never plays with its potential for satire; it barely even
acknowledges it, preferring instead to go straight for the
heart while bypassing the brain altogether. William simply
likes Anna for who she is. Okay. Fine. But the question
forever remains: Why? (Scott Kelton Jones)
Star Wan: Episode I-Hie Phantom Menace (PG): The prequel
glows with that hard-to-naü “Star Wars feeling,” the fairy-tale
sensation that hooked so many people the first time around,
and there’s no doubt this is the real thing, taken to a higher,
more frantic level But the “feeling" is dim and diffused, split
through a lens of Nineties crispness and detachment,
overworked and undernourished. The story revolves around
nine-year-old Anakin Skywalker, who will grow tip to become
Darth Vader, played wife surprising dexterity by Jake Iloyd.
like it or not, this is his movie. Lucas has recast his now-
familiar universethrough the eyes of ayoung boy, building
an elaborate playhouse where the fate of the galaxy hangs on
the things that a kid might think are cool Two Jedi, Qui-Gon
Jinn (Liam Neeson) and his apprentice Obi-Wan Kenobi
(Ewan McGregor, doing a perfect Alec Gtiinness
impersonation), are sent to settle a trade dispute involving
the teenage Queen Anúdala (Natalie Portman), whose planet
is being invaded by scrawny robots. From here Lucas
launches a relentless caper where every move becomes an
excuse for another elaborate action showstopper, an
underwater chase; or masterfully staged fight-saber duel, j
And then there’s Jar-Jar Binks. Voiced by Ahmed Best and
carrying the weight of “comic relief,” this wacky biped is
more Roger Rabbit than Chewbacca, and his incoherent
blathering reads like a desperate attempt for kids’ atfentioff.
The technical -advances of The Phantom Menace alone,
however, make it worthy of all the fuss, with CGI creatures
rubbing elbows with meat-covered actors in nearly every
scene, with planctwide cityscapes teeming with shadows and
traffic. Whafs really misdng can only be described as edge.
The casual abrasiveness that made the original trilogy’s :
heavy-handed mystical voodoo palatable is gone, replaced by
siOy whimsy and misplaced irony. (Glenn Gasfin)
The Winslow Boy (G): David Mamet, famous for his in-
your-face characters, his brutal, frequently raunchy
dialogue and his deliberate, staccato prose, would seem
an unlikely >ch(aice to write and direct a screen adaptation
of British playwright Terence Rattigan’s genteel drama
about injustice. But the Pulitzer Prize-winrúrig-authór
(for Glengarry Glen Ross) does a commendable job with
The Winslow Boy, bringing delicate emotion and
unexpected huinbr to the story. Set in 1910 Britain,: and
based on a real-life case, the story concerns a thirteen- *
year-old naval cadet who is expelled from school after
being found guilty of stealing a five-shilling postal order
from a classmate. Convinced of his son’s innocence, >
Arthur Winslow (Nigel-Hawthome) dedicates himself to
clearing his name, despite the financial and psychological v;
burdens it places on the family. When the country’s leading
lawyer, Sir Robert Morton Oeremy Northam), agrees to take
the case, Arthur must use his daughter’s dowiy money and
his elder son’s Oxford tuition to pay the bills: Mamet brings
a gentleness and what could almost pass for warmth to the
movie. (An earlier version was filmed in 1950.) He finds low-
key but credible humor in characters and situations, while
infiising the overall film with a courtly, empathetic tone.'
Hawthorne and Gemma Jones (as the mother) are terrific,
but the surprise htírefé Northam (Emma, The Net), v/ho
gives an uncxpectably nuanced performance, making
Morton both aloof and likable. As the daughter, Mamet’s
wife Rebecca Pidgeon creates a character that is a trifle too
modem; her cadence and manner of speaking are too
reminiscent of “Mametspeak,” the staccato rhythiff
associated with her husband’s work: The performance
isn’t bad but feels less a piece with the rest of the actors.
An ideal movie for audiences who like their films a bit
old-fashioned but still mainstream. (Jean Oppenheimer)
STARTS FRIDAY,
JUNE 18!
REGAL CINEMAS
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447-9969
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Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 63

in here
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beautiful
Win a Day of Beauty!
SEASON SHOW
(NOW. 16-21. 16661
to be
announcedi
Oec. 21-26. 1666
• A pair of season tickets to the
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• Overnight stay on beautiful
South Beach
Just tell us in 500 words or less What
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Winner will reoeive a prize package consisting of two season tickets to the five upcoming
Miami Beach Broadway Series shows at the Jaokie Gleason Theater (except Tony N* Tina’s
Wedding -venue TBA)
Tickets will be for the Opening Night of each performance and will inolude invitations for two
to attend an after-theater oast party (when one is scheduled). Tickets will be looated in the
lower orchestra section of the theater.
Winner is responsible for all other costs, fees, taxes or personal expenses that may be inourred
as aresult of using the prize. Prize is non-transferable and cannot be substituted. Performance
dates subject to theater’s finalized schedule.
Jan. 4-30. 2000
Venue To Be
Miaren 14-16. 2000
ladle Oleasen
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Anri! 4-6. 2000
Xaeatle Gleason
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Advisory Board
Academy Award®-nominated film editor of Dog Day Afternoon and Reds
Founder of Island Records and Palm Pictures
Los Angeles City Council Member
Director of Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Clueless
Two-time Academy Award®-winning cinematographer of Saving Private Ryan and Schindler s List
Former Universal Pictures President and producer of films such as Frantic and Bull Durham
General Manager of the City of Los Angeles’ Cultural Affairs Department
Director of mega-hits like Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger
Independent Spirit Award-nominated director of The Modems, Choose Me and Mrs. Parker and The
Vicious Circle
Chair of the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin
Two-time Academy Award®-winning production
designer of Dick Tracy and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf Also nominated for Chinatown, Reds,
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For more information visit our website at www.lafilm.com
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Showtimes
Following is a schedule for movies opening and currently
screening at local theaters. All times p.m. unless
otherwise noted. A # indicates a movie that opens this
week. All movie times are subject to change without
notice; please call individual theaters to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Absinthe House
235 Alcazar Ave; 305446-7144
Cuban Women: Branded by Paradise (NR) Fri-Wed 6:15,.8:00
(Sat-Sun matinee 4:30)
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna St; 305443-6777
A Walk on the Moon (R) Thur 6/17 only 6:00,8:00
Besieged (R) Fri-Wed 6:15,8:00,9:45 (Sat-Sun matinees
2:45,4:30)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Grand Ave; 305466-0450
A Walk on the Moon (R) Fri-Wed 3:40,8:05 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:35a)
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 2:15,
2:45, 5:00,5:30,7:20, 7:50,9:40,10:05; Fri-Wed 1:00,1:45,
3:15,5:00,5:45,7:15,8:00,9:30,10:15 (Fri-Sat late shows
11:45,12:30a)
Resieged (R) Thur 2:30,5:50,8:00,10:10; Fri-Wed 1:20,
3:25,5:35,7:50,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Ruena Vista Social Club (G) Thur 2:50,5:20,7:45,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:05,3:20,5:40,8:05,10:25
Election (R) Thur 2:40,5:40,8:10,10:25; Fri-Wed 1:10,3:30,
5:55, 8:15 (exceptTue), 10:45
Endurance (G) Thur 2:30,5:30,7:30,9:30; Fri-Wed 1:05,
3:05,5:25,7:25,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Instinct (R) Thur 2:00,4:50,7:40,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:20,5:20,
7:45,10:40
Life Is Beautiful (R) Thur 2:40,5:40,8:20; Fri-Wed 1:55,
4:50,7:35,10:20-
Shakespeare in Love (R) Thur 6/17 only 2:15,4:50,7:40,
10:15
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 2:00,
2:30,3:00,4:45,5:15,5:45,7:30,8:00,8:30,10:45,11:15;
Fri-Wed 1:15,2:00,4:45,5:30,7:30,8:15,10:30,10:50
(Mon-Wed), 11:15 (Fri-Sun)
The Castle (R) Fri-Wed 1:35,6:00,10:30
*The Loss of Sexual Innocence (R) Fri-Wed 1:30,5:15,7:40,
10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
The Love Letter (Pfi-1 J) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:15,9:30; Fri-Wed
1:25,3:35,5:50,8:05,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Matrix (R) Thur 2:10,5:10,8:10; Fri-Wed 1:50,5:10,
8:10 (Fri-Sun late show 11:00)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:45,10:20; Fri-
Wed 1:40, 5:05,7:45,10:30
This Is My Father (R) Thur 6/17 only 2:00,5:00,7:40,10:30
•Twice Upon a Yesterday (R) Fri-Wed 1:15,3:25,5:50,7:55,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Le Jeune Cinemas 6
782 N Le Jeune Rd; 305-529-8883
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 1:35,
3:50,6:05,8:10,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 2:10,4:45,7:25,9:55 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:30,.
2:45,4:15,5:30,7:05,8:15,9:50; Fri-Wed 1:30,4:15,7:05,
9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 2:20,4:55,7:25,10:00
(Fri-Sát late show 12:15a)
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 2:15,4:50,7:20,9:55 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 6/17 only 2:30,5:00,7:30,
10:00
Miracle 10 at Paseos
3301 Coral Way; 305-442-2299
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:00,
2:10,3:10,4:30, 5:30,7:00,8:00,9:30,10:30; Fri-Wed
11:00a; 12:00n, 1:00,2:10,3:10,4:30,5:30,7:00,8:00,9:30,
10:30 (Fri-Sun early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late shows
12:00m, 1:00a)
Entrapment (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:05,4:15,7:15,10:15
Instinct (R) Thur 1:45,4:35,7:25,10:10; Fri-Wed 1:30,4:00,
7:10,9:50 (Fri-Sat late Show 12:30a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 1:30,4:25,7:20,10:00,10:05
(Thur)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:00,
2:00,4:00, 5:00,7:00, 8:00,10:00; Fri-Sun 11:00a, 1:45,
4:35, 7:30,10:25; Mon-Wed 12:00n, 2:30,5:00, 7:30,10:25
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:00,2:05,3:05,4:25,
5:25,7:00,8:00,9:30,10:30 (Fri-Sun early show 10:00a;
Fri-Sat late shows 12:00m, 1:00a)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 1:15,4:15,7:10,10:00
(Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
The Matrix (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:20,4:10,7:00,9:55
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45; Fri-Sun
1:00,4:00; Mon-Wed 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:10,4:45,7:35,
10:20
Regal Mayfair 10 Cinema
3390 Mary St: 305447-9969
A Walk on the Moon (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:00n, 2:15,4:30,
7:45,10:00
Entrapment (R) Daily 12:45,3:30,7:00,9:15 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:45)
Get Real (R) Daily 1:00,3:30,7:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show
12:15a)
•King of Masks (NR) Fri-Wed 12:20,2:30,4:45,7:30,9:30
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Lovers of the Arctic Circle (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:20,2:30,
4:45,7:00,9:15 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:15,2:30,3:45,5:00,7:00,
7:30,9:30,10:00; Fri-Wed 1:15,3:45, 7:00,9:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:00m)
Playing by Heart (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:00n, 2:45,5:15,7:45,
10:15
•Tarzan (G) Daily 12:00n, 12:30,2:00,2:30,4:00,4:30,6:00,
6:30,8:00,8:30,10:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Daily 12:15,2:45,5:00,7:30,9:50
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Castle (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:30,2:45,4:45, 7:15,9:30
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
•The General's Daughter (R) Daily 12:00n, 12:30,2:20,3:00,
4:45,5:20,7:15,7:45,9:45,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 12:15,1:00,2:45,3:30,5:15,7:15;
7:45,9:45,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15
Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr; 305-598-5000
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 12:05,
12:30,1:15,3:50,5:05,7:05, 7:35,9:45,10:10; Fri-Wed
11:20a, 12:05,1:45,2:35,4:10, 5:00, 7:10,7:40,9:40,10:10
(Fri-Sat late shows 12:10a, 12:40a)
Instinct (R) Thur 12:15,1:10,3:00,3:55,5:45,6:55,8:30,
9:40,11:15; Fri-Wed 11:25a, 12:00n, 2:05,2:40,4:45,5:20,
7:25,8:05,10:05,10:45 (Fri-Sat late shows 12:10a, 12:40a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 12:45,3:15,4:15,7:10,
7:40,10:05,10:35; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 11:45a, 2:00,2:30,4:50,
5:15,7:35,8:00,10:20,10:50 (Fri-Sat late show 1:05a) .
Star Wars; Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily 1:00,
1:30,4:00,4:30,7:00,7:30,10:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show
1:00a)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur 12:30,4:10,7:15,10:15; Fri-
Wed 11:30a, 1:50,4:05,7:05,9:25 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Dr; 3054604)450
Analyze This (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:40,6:00,8:25
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:35,5:30,7:40,10:00
Doug's let Movie (6) Thur 6/17 only 1:55
Entrapment (R) Thur 1:40,5:25,8:00,10:20; Fri-Wed 1:30
(Fri, Mon-Wed), 2:00 (Sat-Sun), 4:45,7:25,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Life Is Beautiful (R) Thur 1:45,5:50,8:20; Fri 1:20,5:15; Sat-
Sun 10:55a, 1:20; Mon-Wed 1:20,5:15
Never Been Kissed (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 5:35,7:50
Shakespeare in Love (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:50,5:40,8:15
•Tarzan (fi) Fri-Wed 11:40a (Fri, Mon-Wed), 11:30a (Sat-
Sun), 12:45,1:45,3:15,4:30,5:35,7:15,7:55,9:30,10:15
(Sat-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 12:30,1:15,3:00,4:15,
5:20, 7:00,8:10,9:45,10:45 (Sat early show 10:30a; Sun
early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late show 12:05a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 1:50,5:45,8:05,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:00,5:40,8:00,10:10
The Matrix (R) Thur 2:00,5:45,8:30; Fri-Wed 1:10,4:20,
7:20,10:30
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:30,5:15,7:55,10:20; Fri 11:30a,
2:00, 5:00,7:40,10:20,12:40a; Sat-Sun 10:50a, 1:30,5:00,
7:40,10:20 (Satiate show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 11:30a, 2:00,
5:00, 7:40,10:20
Trippin' (R) Thur 2:00,6:00,8:10,10:15; Fri-Sun 7:50,9:50
(Fri-Sat late show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 11:50a, 1:50,7:50,
9:50
Movies at the Falls
8888 Howard Dr; 305-255-5200
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily
11:30a, 12:30,2:15,2:45,4:30,5:15,7:10,7:45,9:40,10:30
(Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Election (R) Daily 12:30,3:00,5:25,8:00,10:20 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Entrapment (R) Daily 12:40,3:15,5:30,8:00,10:30
Instinct (R) Daily 12:00n, 3:00,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 11:00a, 1:00,2:00,4:00,5:00,7:00,
7:50,9:45,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily
11:00a, 12:00n, 1:00,2:00,3:00,4:00,5:00,6:30,7:00,8:00,
9:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,12:20a)
•tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:10,3:20,5:30,7:40,9:50 -
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:15,4:15,7:30,
64 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times

'■10:15“ „:■
‘The General's Daughter (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:15,5:00,7:40,10:30
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 1 G0Í4 00 (Thur) 4 10,7 00 (Thar) 7,,
7'd0,J9’45 (Fn Sat late show 12 30a)
South Dade 8
18591 S Dixie Hwy; 3054664)450
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:30,4:30,^
' 7:30/19':,00;Fri-Wed 100, i 15,5 30,7 45,10 UO (Fri Sat 1 ite show
12:30a/ i
Entrapment (R)TR^)fl7 only 14ft 5,30,7.55,lif3G,r Í
Instinct (R) Thür2:00,:5:00/,7:50, MB Wed 1 "0 5 00 7 50
Netting Hill (PG-13) rhur 1 40,5 20.8 00.10 10, Fri Wed 150,510,
750,1035 )
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Ihur 130 2 30
4C 0 5 20 7 30 8 00, 10 li, 1045 FnWedl30 130 715,1000
(111 Sat late -.how 12 40a)
‘Tarzan (G) In 131 d 115 2 00 (Mon Wed) 2 50 (Tri Sun) 3 20
5 00 5 JO " 10 I 10 9 20 O >0 (Fri Sun niifljtol-Y 12.30; Fn-Sat „
late shows,U:30, . 12:00m), u
‘The General's Daughter (R) Fri Wed 1 15 (Mon W ed) 2:00 (Fri
Sun)¿4:30/7:íb,9:45'(Fri-'Satlate show:12:2ffá), jj
The Mummy (PGÍ3):S^^|li5^^PÜfS^|B»Íí^ffi|
10:-ÍO (FiiSat'lkte show l2;30a) ‘ ’
The Thirteenth Floor(iR)
Sunset Place 24
5101 SW 72nd St; 30546641450
AO indicates an IMAX film.
0Extreme (NR)-Dail\ 110 3 30 5 50 810,10 30 (Fn Sit Ute show
¿1:450-,
Olnto the Deep (NR) Daily 12 OOn, 2'2ft4 40,TOO, 3.20
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) rhur 12 45,120,
íleo 315 3 50 r 05 > 45 7 00 7 40 8 20 9 10 10 15 10 r0 Fn
Sun 1250,125 2 00 3 20 3 5i ^ 15 r45 705 745 820 9 F
10:15 10 55 (Fri Satiate show 12 05a), Mon Wed 100,1 30,2 00
3 20,3 50,5 25,5 55,715,7 45 8 20,9 40,1010,10 40
Glack Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only. 1:00,5:30,10:30
Ruena Vista Social Club (G)Thu'r 6/17 only 1:40,5-35.8 l'0,10:35
Election (R) Thurl 55 -500; f 3fl 9 55, Fn Sun 1,50 ¿4), 710,
9140 (Eri-Sat late show 12:00m);'Mon-We.d 1:50)5:40,8:15,10:30'
Entrapment (R) rhur 1,50 4 50,7 25, y 55; Fn-Sun 155,4 45 7 15,
4 45 (Fn-Sat late show 12 10a), Mon V, ed 1 r 5 15 7 40 10 00
Get Beal (R)lhur 130 510 735 1020 Fri-Sun 1 50 5 30,805
, 1040, Mon-Wed l:,40;-5;40 8:15,10:35 <
Instinct (R) Hiui 1255 l«ff|flt5 "15 7 55jmfi*^Kl
1 n Sun 12 55 1-35 3 50 5 10 7 25 8 05 10 25 10 50 (Sun) 114)0
(Fn-Sat late show 12 55a), Mon W ed 12 55 1 35 |BpBHpn8|S
8.05 1()2'? 10 50
life
Limbo (R) Thur 140,4:40,7 30,19:30- Fri-SUn 155,5'20,7>55, «
MS, Mon-Wed 1.55, gl$§Sí0;;Í0¡:4$= £
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12 40,115,¿55/3.35,4.40,5 2ft 7 05,„
7 45,8.15,10 05,10 40, Fn Sun 12 10, ‘UO 3 35 5.00,710 7 55
10:05,10.50 (Fri-Sat late show’12:40a); Mon-Wed 12:45,1:25,
msmSMmk&p is¡ 10 so
Shakespeare in Leve (R) Fri-Sat 12:55a
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Iliur 105 1 35,
3 40 4 20 1 55 6 45 7 20 8 00 9 50 10'25 1100 FnSunl230
100 130 3 40 4 20 4 50 6 45 " 20 8 00 9 r0 10 ?0 1110 (Fn
Satiate show J2;50a), Mon Wed 12 40,110 1 10 3 4Q 4 35.5 05.
705 " h 805 100r 1035 1100
‘Tarzan (G) Fri-Sun 12:45 1 15 1 45 315 3 4$, 5 05 5 40 6 50
7:30/8:10,9:30,-10:00,10:30 (FrhSat late, shotfs 11:55, É:25ah ,\
Mon Wed 12 50 1 20 1 50 3 15 ffiapWHf 10,7 40,8 10 i
TJO. I(f00 10 30 m
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Thur 5/17 only 150,4-35,7-25,10 05
‘The General's Daughter (R) Fn-Sun 12 35,1:05, I 4ft 3 30,4 30,
15:25,7.00,7:40,8:15,9:55,10.35,11:00 (Snn/ JfcOS (Fri-Sat late
show-12:45a); Mori-Wed 12:45,1:15/1^5,3^0,4:40,5:10,7:00/ -
í po/«:00,;9:|S,-10:15;TO:45' j
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 3:20,7:35
The Matrix (R) TTiur.l:25,4:3()(7;30/iQ;20; Fri-Sat 12:30a; Sui)
10 55, Mon Wéd 120,5*00,750)10 4ft,
The Mummy (PG-13) Ihur 12 50,1 |SnHH|flMm{
10:45; Fri-Sun'l-:40> 4:55,;7;33i-T0310 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); -
Mon-Wed 145,5 1ft ¿4ft Í0:20'r'
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Thur Í 0p,,5)ift9:4S; Fn-Sat 12-45a; Sun
1030; Mon-Wed 2:00,5:50r8:25,10:45
Beaches
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Ste 119; 305-531-8504
Beat the Devil (HR) Sun 12:00n ,
‘Dancemaker (HR) Fn-Wed ftOO/Sift^lftOO (Fri-Sun matinee
*4:00)
Pusher (NR) Thur 6/17 onIy'6:á)/8ÍtíO„lO.-O0
Bay Harbor IV
1170 Kane Concourse; 305-866-2441
A Walk on the Moon (R) Ihur 2 10 4 50 7 20 10 00 Fn Wed 2 10
4:50,7:3b,-10:10
Election (R) Thur 6/17 only 2-00,4.40,7:10 9 30' *
Instinct (R) Daily. 1:50; 43ft.m ft50
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 1-40 4:20>7:Q0,9-4O
‘The General's Daughter (H) Fn-Wedt 00,4l4ft 73b¿lft0O
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St 305-866-9623
Analyze This (R) Thur 145 4 45 7 45,10 Oft Fn-W ed 12 05 2 20,
4:45,7'45,/0:OOJ,í
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only
1:4ft 4:00,7:3ft, 9)50
Baby Geniuses (PG) Da|i$Hl£:lftr7:()l
Doug's 1st Movie (G) Daily 12 0On 145 i 30 5 30 7 1" 9 00 '
EDtv (PG-13) Daily 2T0>, 4:45,9.Í0
Forces of Nature (PG-13) Dailyl2;25,2:4ft 4:45,7:1*0, 9:35
Life (R) Ihui 6/17'onlv 120,3 50 7 Oft 9 10
October Sky (PG) Da#,12 20,-'2.30,4 40 7 10,9-30 J
Payback (ft) Dafly 12-30;í2:45,;5.<Í0,-$g0, 9-40, S'
Star Wars: Episode i - The Phantom Menace {PG) Iliur 6/17 only
1:15,4:15,7;J5,TQ:15,'» j.
The Matrix (R) Thur 6/17 only 115,4 00,7-10, 9,45 4
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only!:20/4:OO, 7:0ft, 930 ft.4/
The Thirteenth Floor (R) 1 hur 6/17 only 1 -iO ) 50 7 05 9 35
Twin Dragons (PG-13) Daily 12:1ft ¿00,4-00,7:00,915; *-
South Beach Cinema
1100 Lincoln Rd; 305-674-6766
A Walk on the Moon (R) Fri-Wed ftlft*ftlfl||ji%li 15
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Fri-Wcd 1:45,2:2ft -
345 4 45 5 55 7 20 8 20 10 45 (i m Sat late •-how® 12 00m,- ‘
-l-OOa)
Besieged (R) Fn-Well.40,3 50 5J5ft8 05,10,50 (Fn-Sat late '
shoiy 1*.£i3r'
Entrapment (R)Fri-Wed 1,50,4 20,7 35 1110 (Fn-Sat lab- show
/:50a)''1 ’
Get Real (R) Fri-Wed 2:35,4:50/7:5ft IO:20.(3Fn-Sat late show
12 55a)
Hideous Kinky (R) Fri-Wed 2:15,4:25/7:0519,30,11:50/.
Instinct (R) Fri-Wed 1:35,4:15,¿40; ¿1:5,5 /Fri-Sat late show ,
l;35aV j
‘King of Masks (NR) Fri-Wed 2 05.4 35 710 ig 05 (Fn-Sat late
show 12 50a)'
Notting Hill (PG-13)iFr^^(||||^^05,'7:2|Ml0^5 (Fri-Sat late
showiisa)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Fri-W¡3ft 1:00,2:00,
4 00,5=00 7'15,815; 1010,1140 (Fn.Satlateshow 130a)'c,;/
‘Tarzan (G) Fn-Wed l’lft&lft ¿lft 4-30 5:35,7:00,8:00,9:15,
-It) 15,11 30..-.
‘The General’s Daughter (R) Fn-Wed 1-30 2 10 4 40 5 40 7 3ft
brío;'¿p;40, fT:45 (Fri-Sat late show 1:40a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Fri-Wed 1:55,4 10.7 55,10 35 (Fi i Sat late
show 12-40®)
The Mummy (PG-13) Tn Wed 2 25 5 05 7 45 10 ¡0 (Fn S it late
showi-iSQi);
North Dade
Aventura 24 Plex
19501 Biscayne Blvd; 305-466-0450
A Midsummer Night's Dream (PG-13) 'tiuit/6/17 bftly 2iOO,'5:Q0/,, t
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 12:0Qft"i> â– 
(except Tbur) 12 45 1 30 215 3 00 3 4 4 45 5 20 6 00 7 00,
7 45 8 30 9 30' 10 15 10 40 (Ihur) 10 15 (S it Su n eariy shows
'Í0:30a, 11:20a; Fri-Sat late shows 12.00m, 12:3,5®) <
Baby Geniuses (PO) Thur TOO, 3T5,5-30, Fn-W^d 1.05,3-15 (Sat-
Sun early show 10'50a)
Black Mask (») Thur 6/17 only 1;20,3.25,5.35„8-05 jftT5 ,
Election (R) Thúr 6/17 oftilyí 50,4 35,7:0ft 3.25
Entrapment (R) Daily 105 °2" r50 620 10 40 (Ihur) 1045
•¡(Mon Wed), 10 55 (I n Sun)
Instinct (RJ Thur 11ft 2 45,420,5 -5,7 05,8.05» 9 50,10 40, Fi i ’
Sun 12 05,110, 2 45,4 20,5 25,7 05,8 05,9 50 10 10 (Sun)
-10 50'(Fn), 1150 (Sat) (Fn-Sat lale «.how 12 30a), Mon-Wed 1 lb,-,-:'
2:45,4:20,5:2ft'7»5/m/§%10:40
Life (R) Thur 1:50,5;20,ftl0, IQ 3ft Fn-Wed 1 00,5 40,10 25 ' ‘ ■
Notting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12-45,1 lft2:30
700*745 8 25,9-40 1920 EriWedl23ff 225 3,lft5J0A§4g !-
7:45,8:25,1O;20 (Sat-Snn eariy shows 11:30k; Fri-Sat tete shows
11:05,12:45a)'
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily 12:45,1:30'
;i#KSí#ÍM»^MSSBfiÍÍÍM515.6 45 7áft¡f§|¡|§§
9 4ft 10J5 (Sat-Sun early showá 1040a;T);25ai )fn Sat late
shows 11:15,'
‘Tarzan (G) Fn-Wedll 50a (Sat-Sun), 12?p0n (Fn, Mon-Wed),
12 35,120,2 05,2 $T3-35,4.20,5i0St 5 50/7.00; ¿3®, 8 ift 9.15, * ¡
9-45,10.30 (Fri-Sat late shows 1L3Q, 12,00m)
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Thur,atOO'ft^ft-m.SSO,¿0:45; fri
Sun 1:00 3 30,6:0p;8:35j li 00 (SaTSun early shows 10
MonWefiOftftaft 6/4,8:30,10:45
‘The General's Daughter (R) Fn Wed 12 OOn V 45 1 55 2 40 3 20 ,
4 35,5 20 6.00,-7;lft 8:00,8' 45,
1015a, 1115a, Fri-Satlate shows 1125,12 30% 12-4fta) ,
The Matrix (R) Thur 7;45* 10:|§;FriWed 1:15,5 10,8 05
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:25,2;20,3:05,4:15,5:05,5.5ft 7:10, 1
30 710 S 25 HhH§|
(Sat early show lT35afFn-Sat late show l:l:ift; sj*
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Dtulv 2 00,5 00,7 40,10 25 (Sat Sun early
show, 11:20a; Fri-gun late show 12:45a)
Trippln' (R) Thur 1:354,35,.5 40,8 00,1010. Fri>éd3“3ft 840
(Sal-Sun earl/ show!.:10;45a; Fri-Sat late show-12í^0a)' «.
California Club VI
850 Ives Dairy Rd; 305-652-8558
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 1 -45.4-45,
•:8:f)0,Í0Í30
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only lj3ft 4,„30i-7;50v '10:30
Entrapment (R)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Dailv 100, 4 00,
700,1000 1
•Tarzan (0) Fri-Wed‘1:20,4:2ft 7:30,
. ‘The General's Daughter (R|í^-7Sra|0í:|3OIW!»bSiiÍ
The Mummy (PG-13) Drily 1:15,4:15,7:15,10:15 ,
Trippln' (R) Drily 1:10,- 4;10,‘ 7:4ft 10:20
t 'â–  'â– xfrp.wj/yi,'
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Miami New Times June 17 - 23,1999 65

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’irTsorpe^pt thr most intonso
tiaturaf realms imaginable
Julia Roberts and Huj
it do lunch in Hotting Hill
Fashion Island
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 30546641450
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PO-13) Thur 1:3%
5:30,7:45,10:00- Fri-Sun 1:05,3:15,5:35,3:10,10:25 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:40a); Mon-Sun 1:05,3:15,5:35,8:10, -
10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 1:05,3:15,
5:30,7:45,10:00
Besieged (R) Thur 2:00,5:20,7:55,10:10; Fri-Sun 1:10, ..
3:25,5:35, 7:45,9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 1235a); Mon-Wed
2:0% 5:20.7:45; 9:55
Black Mask (R) Thur 1:55,5-35,8:00,10:15; Fri-Sun. 1:05,
3:10,5:15," 7:25,1030 (Fri-Sat late showl2i05a); Mon-
.Wed 1:50,5:15,7:20,9:50
Electien (R) Fri-Sun 2:00,5:25; 8:05,10:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:55a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:20,7:45,10:15
Entrapment (R) Thur 1:50,5:00,730,9:50; Fri-Sun 1:45,
5:10,7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed
1:45,5:15,7:50,,10:15
Get Real (R) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:50,10:15; Fri-Suh 1:5%: 53%.
7:30,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a); Mon-Wed 1:20, ’
â– 5:00,7:35,10:15
life (R)Thur 1:30,7:15; Fri-Sun 5:30,10:15; Mon-Wed
5:30,10:10 •
Levers of the Arctic Circle (R) Thur 1:40,5:20, 7:45,10:10;
Fri-Wed 1:40,5:10,7:40,10:25 /
Netting Hill (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:45,4:45,4:50,7:30,
10:05 .
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:15,
2:00,4:15,4:45,7:00,7:40,9:45,10:25; Fri-Sun 1:20,2:00,
4:25,5:00,7:10,7:50,9:55,10:40 (FriSat late show
12:40a); Mon-Wed 1:15,1:50, 4:15,5:00,7:0% 7:45,9:45,
10:30
’Tarzan (G) FriSun 1:00,3:20,5:40,7:55,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a), Mon-Wed 1:00,3:20,5:40,7:50,10:00
’The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Sun 1:00,1:45,4:30,5:15;
,7:15,8:00,10:00,10:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-
Wed 1:1% 1:40,5:00,.5:3.0,7:45,8:15,10:00
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:50,5:4% 7:55, .
10:30
The Matrix (R) Thur 6/17 only 4.30,9:45
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:00.7:40,10:2% Fri-Sun
1:35,4:30,7:15; 10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a); Mon-
Wed 1:45, 5:00,7:45,1030
The Thirteenth Roor (8) Thur 6/17 only 1:40,515,7:50,
10:25
The Winslow Boy (6) Thur 6/17 only 1:35,5:30,8:00,10:15
This Is My Father (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:55,535,7:35,10:00
Trippin' (R)Thur 1:35,5:30,7:50,10:00-Fri-Wed 1:15; 7:55
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
’Twice Upon a Yesterday (R) Fri-Sun 1:30,5:30,7:45,10:15
(FriSatlate show 1235á); Món-Wed 1:25,5:45,8:10,,' *■
10:20 ’
Intracoastal
3701 NE 163rd St; 305-945-7416
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:00,'
3:15,5:30,7:45,1%O0; Fri-Wed 12:15,2:30,5:00,7:4%
10:00'
Entrapment (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:30,4:00,7:00,10:00
Instinct (R) Daily i3% 1:15 (Thur), 430,7:00,9:45
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily ,1:40,420 (Ihur), 4:30,7:10,9:50
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:00,
.2:1% 4:00,5:05,7:00,83% 1030; Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:45,
4:30,7:15,10:00
’Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:15,3:20,7:30,9:30
Tea with Mussolini (PG-13) Daily 1:20,4:20,7:20,10:00
’The General's Daughter (R) FriWed 12:00n, 1:30,2:30,
4:20,5:20,7:00,8:0% 9:40,10:30'
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:30,4:15,7:0% 9:45
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas
7775 W Flagler St; 305-466-0450
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1:30,
2.-00,5:00,5:45,7:30,830,9:45,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:45; 1:3%
3:00,3:45,5:20,6:0% 7:4% 8:3% 10:0% 10:55 (Fri-Sun)
áhbín¿:í5ájJ3*' 11
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/I7®i^:i45,8:0O3$3ppj
Buena Vista Social Club (G) Thur 1:40,5:10,7:35, a^ri:..
Sun 1:00,3:20,5:45,8:10,10:40 (Sat early show,lo:40a);
Mon-Wed 1:00,3:2% 5:40,8:0Q, 10:15 ,' ",
Entrapment (R) Thur 1:55,5:05,73%'MlO; Fri-Wed 2:00,
4:45,- 775,10SL5 (Sat early show 10:55a; Fri-Sát late "show
12:40a) -
Instinct (R)Thur 1:50,4:40,775,10:05; Fri-Wed 1:00,4:15,
7:05,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Notting Hill (PG-13) TÃœUr 1:50,4:40,7:25,10.-05; Fri-Wed
1:40; 4:30,7:20,10:10 (Sat early show 10:50a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 1:30,
2:00,4:30,6:30,7:00,8:15,9:00,10:00; Fri-Wed 12:30,1:15,
3:20,430,6:45,7:25,9:45,10:15 (Sateariy show 10:15a;
Fri-Satlate show 12:35a)
’Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed:11:00a, 12:30,1:15,2:45,3;3% 53%
545,7:15,8:% 9:30,10:15 (Sat early show 10T5a; Fri-Sun
late show 11:45)
’The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Sun 1:00,2:p0/4;00,5:30,
7:00,8:15; 10:00,10:45 (Sat early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 13% 2:00,4:00,5:15,-7'00,7;50,
10:00,10:20
The Matrix (R) Thur 1:45,4:45,7:30,10:15; Fri-Sat i2:55a
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:30,8:00,10:00; Fri-Sua
1:45,5:0% 7:55,10:50 (Sat early show 10:50a); Mén-Wed
i:4%530,7:45,1030
The Thirteenth Roer (R) Thur 1:3% 5:4Ot7j|5,10ii% Fri-
Sun 5:0% 10:2% 12:30a; Mon-Wed 145,5:15;74% 10=10 7
Palace 18 Cinemas
11865 SW 26th St; 305-221-1801
Austin Powers; The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 12:15,
12:4% 2:3% 33% 4:45,5:1% 7:”00,7:3% 9:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat
late shows 1230m, 12:30a) -
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:20,2:30,4:40 7:15, 9:30
Election (R)Thur6/17 only 12:5% 3:1% 5:40 8:00„ 10:30
Entrapment (R) Thur 12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30; Fri-Wed
11:30a, 2:00,4:30,730,9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Instinct (R) Thur 12:15¿4:O0,7:00,9:45; Fri-Wed 11:00a,
135,430,7:00,-9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Life(R)Daily 12:15,2:40,5:05,7:30,9:55 (Fri-Satlateshow
12:30a) -
Never Been Kissed (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 12:40,3:1%6:30;
7:50,10:10 "
Netting Hill (PG-13) Thur 12:15,1:00,4:00,4:45,7:00,7:45,
9:45,10:30; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 1:15,2:00,4:00,4:45,7:00,
8:00,945, Í0:40 (Fri-Satlate show 123Qa)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily
11:00a (except Thur), 1:00,1:30,4:00,4:30,530,730,
'7:30,8:00,10:00,10:30,11:00 (Fri-Satlate show 12:45a)
’Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:10a, 11:40a, 12:10,1:2% 1:5% 23%
3:30,4:00,4;30,5:40,6:10,7^0,7:50,8:2% 9:30,10:00,
10:30 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:40,12:10a, 12:40a) :
’The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed ll:10a,.1140a, 1:50,
2:20,4:00,4:30,7:10,7:35,9:50,10:10 (Fri-Satlate show
12:40a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 12:40,2:50, 5:00,
7:20,940
The Matrix (R) Thur 1:00,4:00, 7:00,1030; Fri-Wed 11:15a,
2:10,5:00,7:50,10:50
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:30,7:15,1030; Fri-Wed
11:00a, 1:45,4:30,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Satlate show 12:40a)
The Thirteenth Roor (R) Daily 12:50,3:iQ, 530„83%: 10:30
(Fri-Sat late show 1245a)
Trippin' (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:15,2:30,4:45,7:00,9:30
Silver Cinemas Westbird 8
11501 Bird Rd; 305-227-0277
Analyze This (R) Daily 12:15,2:35,4:55,7:15, 940 :
Baby Geniuses (PG) Daily 1230,23% 430,735,9:00
Doug's 1st Movie (G) Daily 1235,230,4:30,6:45,8:45
Forces of Nature (PG-13) Fri-Wed 1230,2:30,4:45,7:00,9:15
Go (R)Da% S i% 945‘ ■
Idle Hands (R) Thur6/17 only 4:40,9:20
My Favorite Martian (PG) Daily 1230,23% 53% 7:30,9:35
(exeeptThur)
Payback (R) Thur 1235,2:40,530,735,93% FriWed 2:40,
7:10,935
She's AH That (PG-13) Thur 935; FriWed 4:40,930
The King and I (G) Daily 12:40,245.630
,ilie|PM!^elif^gip^EG)''t(^r'T^j^5;'%^|!3^)Q'i[''f

Twin Dragons (PG-13) Fri-Wed 12:35,5:00
Valentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 305-266-2002
All movies have Spanish subtitles.
Entrapment (R) Thur 6/17 only 7:00" P
(lotting Hill (PG-13) Thur 7:00,9:00; Fi* 6:00,8:10,10:10;'
Sat-Sun 2:00,4:00,6:10,8:10,10:10; Mon-Wed 7:00,9:10
•Tarzan (0) Fri 6:00,8:00^ Í0:00; Sat-Sun 2:00,4:00,6:00,
8:00,10:00; Mon-Wed 7:00,9:00''
•The General’s Daughter (0) Fri 6:00,8:00,10:00; £at-Sun
2:00,4:00,6:10,8:10,10:15- Mon-Wed 7;00,900
The Mod Squad (R)Thur 6/17 only 7:00 9:00
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 9:00 |
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Favorite Cinemas Hialeah
4650W 17th Ct; 305-557-9888
8 MM (R) Daily 1:00; 4:00,7:00; 9:35 '
Analyze This (R) Fri-Wed 12:50,3:00,5:10,7:35,9:30
Gaby Geniuses (PG) Daily 1:20,3:15, 5:30, 7:40; 940
Forces of Nature (PG-13) Fri-Wed l2:55,3KB, 5:Í5, 730,9:40> .
Idle Hands (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:50,3:00,5:20,7:30,9:45
My Favorite Martian (PQ) Daily 1:00,3:15,530,7:35,9-30
Payback (R) Daily 12:55,3:10,5:15,7:35,9:45
The Faculty (R) Daily 1.10,3:20,535,7:30; 9:45
Twin Dragons (PG-13) Fri-Wed 1:05,330,5:20,730,935
Miami Lakes 17
6711 Main St; 305-558-3810
A Walk on the Moon (R) Thur 6/17 only 11:10,2:05,5:(B, 735,''f'
Í035
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thtir 11:15a,
li 35a, 135,2.00r4 30, 445,c7:00, 730,9:15,9-45, Fn-Wed
1115a U35a, 135 2 05 4 30 4 45 'HXL 7:35,935.9:50" (Fri
Sat late shows 12:05a, 1230a)
Slack Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only li:50sg 235,4:40,7:1^935
Election (R) Thur 6/17 only 11-lOa, 2:05; 5:Q5; 7:35, Wipi
Entrapment (R) Thur 11:30a, 2:00,430,7115,945; Fri-Wed
11.45a, 230,4:40,7:20,9:40 (Fn-Sat late show 1215a)
Instinct (R) Thur 6/17 only 11:05a, 1:40,435; 7:10,10:00ifn-
Wed 11:20a, 2:1b; 5:1b, 7:50,1X^30 â– 
Life (R) Thur 6/17 only 11:45a, 230,4:40,7:20,9:40
Never Seen Kissed (PG-13) Daily 11:45a, 2 20,4 40.7 20.9 40
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a).; -
Netting Hill (PG-13) Daily 11:00a, 1:45,4:35,7£Í5;10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Thur 10:00a,
1100a 1115a 1200n 145 2 00 330,445 515 5 45 7 30
•8:00,9:00,1030,11:00; Fri-Wed 11:05a, ll:10a,'l2;ÓQñ,'1:50,
roo, 3.00,4 45,515,545,7-30,8 (X) 9 00,10-15,10 35 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
•Tarzan (G) Fn Wed 1130a, 1150a, 2 05 2 25,4 25,4 50,710,
7:3Q, 3:20,9:35 (EriSat late show 11:30)' *
•The General's Daughter (R) Fn Wed 1100a 1125a 145,2 05
4 35,5.00,7.15(7-35,1000,1005
The Matrix (R) Daily 11:20a, 2:10,5£0rB& 1030 ;
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 11:20a, 2:10,5:10,7:50,10:30
The Thirteenth Fkmr(R)Thur 1110a, 2 05 5 05,7 15,1005 Fn-
Wed 11:40a, 2:15,4:40,7:25,9:45 (Fri-Satlate show 12:15a) ’
Trippin’ (R) Thur 11:40a, 2:15,4:35,7:05,>35; FriWed 11:15a,
>1:35,4:30,7:00,,9:25 (Fri-Satlate shdw'l2;00m) , <
Movies at Hialeah
780 W 49th St; 305-828-7242
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Fri-Wed 11:15a,
123b, 1:4503:00,4rl^530( 7:00,8:00,9:15,10:15 (Sat early
show 10:15a; Fti-Satlate shows 11:30,12:20a)
Entrapment (R)
show 10:30a; Fri-Satlate show 12:25a) v
Instinct (R) Fn-Wed 1115a, 2.00,4 45,7:30,10:10 (Fn-Sat late
Netting Hill (PG-13) Fri-Wed 11:15a; 1:45.4:30
Star Wars: pisodo I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Fri-Wed lláOa,
1:45,2:30,4:30,5:30,7;30; 8:30,10:15 (Sat eariy show 10:30a; \
EriSat late show 11:30)!' -
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 11:30a, 12:15,1:Q0,-1;45,2:15) 3:00,3:45,
4.30 515 545,645,730,815,900 9-45,10-20 (Sateariy
shows 10:00a, 10:30s'FriSat late shows ll:CHQ?Tl:45,12:20a)
•The GeneraTs Daughter (R) Fn Wed 1140a 12 30 2 00 3 00
4:45,5:30, /kS, 8:00,9:45,10:25 (Sat eariy show 10:15a; FriSat
late show 12:15a) ,
The Mummy (PG-13) Fri-Wed 130,4:30,7:15,10:00 (Sat eariy
show .10:45a; Fri-Sat late show 1230a)
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Fri-Wed 730,1030 (FriSat late show
1230a)
Trippin’ (R) Fri-Wed 1:10; 3:10; 5:15,730,930 (Sat early show
IHjba; FriSat late show 11:45)
South Broward
Oakwood 18
2800 Oakwood Blvd; 954-923-7777
A Walk on the Moon (R) Daily 12:15,2:20,4:30 (Thur), 4:50,
(7;Í0,9:40
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur
12:00n, 1230^2:20,, 2:50,430. z-an frts :
Fri-Sat 11:01® 11-4S0 EOO, KÍ0, ®; 5Do!^0o,
7:30,9)lS, 9:45 (Fri-Satlate shows ÍI30, i2:10a)
Black Mask (R) Thur 6/17 only 1230,2:40,4:40,7:10,9:10
Election (R) Daily 12:20,3:00,5:20,7345,10:00 ,
Entrapment (R) Thur 130,3:40,7:10,9:50; Fri-Wed 11:15, f
,1;30,3:40,7:10,§30 (Fri-Satlateshow 11145)'
Instinct (R) Daily 12:10,2:40,5:10,7:40,10:10
Lité (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:20,2:30,4:50,735,9:40 ■
Notting Hill (PG-13) Daily 11:00a (Fri-Wed), 12:00n, 1:10, -
230,4:10,5:10,6:50,7:40,930,10:10,10:15 (Ihur)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) Daily
12-OOn, 100,1-30,3 00,4 00,4.30,6 00/7-00,7 30,9 00,
10:00,10:30 (FriSat late show 12:00m)
•Tarzan (6) Fri-Wed 11:15a, li:50a, 1:15,2Í0Q, 3:15,4:00,
6:w^7:20,9:10,930 (FriSat late shows 11:15,
12:00m)
•The General's Daughter (R) Fri-Wed 11:20a, 130 2:00,
4:30,5:00,6:50,7:45,9:30,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Love Letter (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 12:50,2:50,4:40,
"7:2©; 9:20- -
The Matrix (R) Thur 12:45,3:50,7:00,9:45; Fri-Wed 12:10,
3 30,7 00,9 4b (Fri-SatTate show 12:15a): "
The Mummy (P6-13) Thur 12fl0;3:20,7:20,10:15; Fri
11:30a, 2:10,4:50,730,’9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a) :
The Thirteenth Floor (R) Daily 12:50,3:10,5:30,7:50,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Trippin’ (R) Thur 6/17 only 12:15,2:20,4:20,7:15,9:15
Pembroke Pines 8
12520 Pines Blvd; 954-437-7790
Austin Powers: Ths Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Daily 1:00,$
200,310,410 520 700(Thur),7 15,7 50,9 40,10 10
(Fn-Mon early show 11:00a; Fn-Sat late show 12:00m)
Doug's 1st Movis (G) Thur 6/17 only 1:20,3:10,5:00 /
Life Is Beautiful (R) Fri-Wed 1:50,4:10,7:10,9:50
Notting Hill i PG-13) Daily 1 10,150,3 50 4 40,710 7 40,
!7:50 (Thur), 9:50,10:20 (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri.- gg
Sat late show 12:30a)
Shakespeare in Love (R) Thur 6/17 only 1:20,4:20
•Tarzan (G) Fri-Wed 12:10,1:10,2:20,3:20,4:30,5:30,7:00^
8:00,9.20,10:20 (FriSun early show 10 00a Fri-Mon early
show' 11:00a; FriSat late show 12:00m)
The Matrix (R) Thur 7:20,10:10; Fri-Wed 10:10 '
The Mummy (PG-13) Daily 130,4:00,7:00,7 40,9-40,1030 f
(Thur) (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show
,12:20a)
Sheridan Plaza 12
4999 Sheridan St: 305-46641450
A Midsummer Night's Dream (PG-13) Thur 6/17 only 1:40,
430,720,955
Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (PG-13) Thur 1-30.
1 45,4 15,5 05.7-00,7 30,9 30,9 50, Fn Wed 100,115
3 30,5 30,5 45 7 45 8 00,9 45 (Mon Wed), 10 00 10 15
(Fri-Sun) (Fri-Sat late shows 1215a, 12 30a)
Entrapment (R) Thur 150 4 30,7 20,9 55, Fn-Wed 120, *
4:50,7:15,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12i20a) ">
Instinct (R) Thur 1 15 4 25 715 10 05 Fn W ed 110 4 25
7 10 9 45 (Mon Wedl 10 05 (Fn Sun) (Fn-Sat late show
Hotting Hill (PG-13) Thur,,1:55 “4:45,7 35 1000 FnWed
130,4:45,7:35,10.00 (Mon-Wed), ÍÓÍÍ5 (Fri-Sat)
Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (PG) lhur 130,
2 00 4 20 4 50 7 10 7 40 10 05 10 15 ln%edl30 120
7:Í0,9:SQ (Mon-Wed), 10:00 (Fri-Sun) (Fri-Sat late show
12-35a)
•Tarzan (G) I n Wed 100 115,3 10,3 25,5 20,5 35.7 30j
7 45,9.30,9-45 (Mon-Wed), 9 55 (Fri-Sun) (Fri Sat late --
show,ll:S||l|p|MS
•The General's Daughter (R) Fn-Wed 125,4 40,715,9 40 t
(Mon-Wed) ,>55 (Fri-Sun) (Fri-Sat late show 12-25aV J
The Matrix (R)Thm 200 r 00 8 00 FnWtdl30 430
The Mummy (PG-13) Thur 1:35,435,7,15,10:05, Fn-Wed ,
. 130,4:35,7 20.9 50 (Mon Wed), 10-10 (Fri-Sun)
The Thirteenth I loor (R) ihur 2 00,5 00 7 45,1015 Fn
Wed 1:10,5:00,7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12’30a)
Trippin’ (R) Thur 15.5» 7;45,1010, Fri-Sun 1015 (Fri
Sat late-show 4.2:15a); Mon-Wed 10:Í0 1jS
Taft Hollywood 12
7001 Taft St; 954-981-5443
Analyze This (R) Fri-Wed 3:00,5:00,7:00,9:05 (Sat-Sun
matinee 12:55)
Baby Geniuses (PG) Daily 3:05,5:05,7:05,9:05 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:05)' J ’
Cruel Intentions (R) Daily 3:20,530,7:20,9:20 (Sat-Sun
matinee 130)
Doug's 1st Movie (G) Daily 3:10,5:20,7:20,935 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:15).
Forces of Hature (PG-13) Fri-Wed 3:05, 5:10,7:15,9:20 (Sat-
Sun matinee 1:00) v:; '
Ge (R) Thur 6/17 only 3:00,5:05,7:05,9:15
My Favorite Martian (PG) Drily 3:10,5:10,7:'l0,9:10 (Sat-
Sun matinee 1:10) '
Payback (R)Daily3:05,5:05,7:10,9:20. (Sat-Sun matinee
1:00)
She's All That (PG-13) Drily 3:20,5:15,7:10,. 9:05 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:20)
The Faculty (R) Daily 3:15,535,,7:30,9:35 (Sat-Sun matinee
fflpii
The King and I (G) Daily 3:00,5:10,7:05,9:10 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:05), r 4
The Prince of Egypt (PG) Drily 3:15,5:15,7:|5 9:15 (Sat-Sun
matinee 1:15/
Twin Dragons (PG-13) Fri-Wed^^g^^^.j^t- ,
Sun matinee 1:10)
South Park Trivia Contest
* Answer three South Park trivia questions correctly
for a chance to win passes for the advanced screen¬
ing of “South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut”
and movie promotional prizes!
1st Trivia Question
What Rob Reiner co-star made a guest appearance on South
Park hoarding Cheesy-Poofs on another continent?
To Get the 2nd Trivia Question
Watch Deco Drive on June 17th or June 18th at 7:30pm or
shkim
3rd Trivia Question
Come to the pre - “South Park: Bigger, Longer &
Uncut” party at Iguana Cantina on June 24th in The
Shops of Mayfair, 3rd floor, (305) 444-6606, for the
last trivia question.
Bring all answers as enrty to the raffle.
Celebrate your success and
‘Employees of Paramount, New Times and Iguana Cantina are not eligable.
‘■No- purchase necessary. -While supplies last. Must participate to be eligable. - -
” hiianii Newlimes June 17 - 23,1999' 61

AUDITION RELEASE
Company.: PAPER GARDENS, INC.
Name:
Address:
Date of Audition: June 24, 1999
Project: FAMILY BAND CASTING CALL
Rhone Number:
Ladies' and Gentlemen;-:
I desire to audition for a role in the television program tentatively entitled "Family¿Band""(the
"Project ""l. I represent ajn^warranj Jthat I anti in good health and physical condition, and that I
am under no physical or mental condition or disability which would be aggravated or affected
by the. audition1, ápd 1 have nd prioáibjury, unless expressly disclosed on the back of this release,
which would prevent me from performing the audition material, and if engaged on the Project
would prevent tmfrbm'pérformingicá' subject me io additional disability,!irijunyor illness vb ,
acknowledge that Company is relying on my representations and warranties as,a material'
"inducement to audition nrte for-the Project
Open
Casting
Call
One Day Only
I understand that) ath hot employed by Company and am ,acting-s®(ely ait mybwn direction and
‘control duFfng,thé'audrtion-, and (asSurtte all risks of injury that may ¿¿curto me in the audition
process As a material .condition of the" audition, I hereby release, discharge, and hold harmless
Company (ipdgding atl/relatéd companies, the officers, board member!», employees,, L,
representatives assigns, licensee^,, exhibitors, sponsors thereof, apd the satces$ofs and assigns
of each of them) and any participants from any andtell claims, demote (fei or (buses of action of
¿ny 1<]nd,or'pátui;e that I hiay haVg .againk'iftfnpahyior SUCli-otheppartyOes) whether for libel
aflolattonof my right of'privacy, emotional distfess/paih and suffering, ahybahnagesJnd bodily
injury (direct and/or donsequential), or any other matter arising out of or in any manner '
connected with thebuditfon and the use arid exercise, offthe rights grafted to Company herein
My rights and remedies Shall be limited to an action jit law, arjd not índudé the nghfeto
rescind, nullify or >eójoin,the nghtslg ranted to Company hereunder a nd/orCojnpanyb rights'Jo- V
exploit the Project:
In fujl consideration of my Appearance hereunder, and without any further, cohsrderátiomdge f!
from Company or ány'tbird party’to me, 1 agree to participate in the audition, (alone or with
ol:hers)1)S designated ^ Company and acknowledge that I may perform bprtaipioriginal musjcal
cómpositíon(s) selected by me ántí qhvyhich I hold an Ownership‘"and/or authorship interest
therein, and agree that Company may photograph me and record my yoirce, conversation, g
Sounds, arid vocal and/of instrumental pérformance('S)pf 'the'hlusEcal‘conífpósitióñ(s) duringand
in connection therewith -If applicable, Company hereby acknowledges that f retain my
bwnershi¿/unfereshjp^té prrgiñaf mpStcálpomp©SftíQb(s) performed by me. For the purposes of
this audition- f hereby grant Cdtnpany the^ght to indyde and yse raid rri|Usicakcomposition(s) in
thephotography add as embodied, in the recording of the audition, without any obligation
(financial or otherwise) *of any kind whatsoever tootle l agref? that Company is the sole owner
”df all the tesults-ánd ’proceeds-of such jahotography and recording, with the right for Company,
Company's employees and independent contractors/ jCcynpany's assigns and Company's
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thereof and jny name, voice, likeness,-biographical material (including discography) concerning
fee,,.and editorial Comments concerning me '•hi all media and other forms of exploitation npw
known or hereinafter developed, including, without limitation, motion pictures, televisionlpd
publishing, and in connection with the advertising, safe) and publicizing of the Projggt, -
i warrant that I arrttet least SlELyeaEsnof age or an emancipated minor, apd, have the full,
complete and unrestrictecfppht arid authority to enter rntothis agreement, and that i shall not ;
diregrtly on indirectly lásue or "permit the issuance of any publicrfy whatsoever with respect to the
Project,?,my audition or appearance m .connection therewith
signatures/ name \ ^
IF YOU ARE UNDER THE AGE OF 18 YEARS, YOUR PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN MUST SIGN'
1 hereby warrant theft I am the parent and/or tegaLgulraian of the rrídiviáiial Who. Signed the
foregoing agreement, that I have caused said individual to execute this agreement, that i wi| - "
indemnify- Company against all claims, liability and expense with-respect dio*fhj-s ágreerrferit'and
that, knowing of -’Company's reliance hereonH agree to cause ¿aid individual to adhere t&aU df
Bps provisions of this-agreement.
SIGNATURE OF PARENT/GUARDJAN
itlNT-NAME
Thursday
June 24
lOamÜ 4pm
National Hotel
1677 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, FL 33139
305 532-2311
SINGERS ACTORS
BANDS
If you feel your talent can take you to the top
and you're waiting for a lucky break, come see
us. We're looking for 18 to 24 year olds to star
in a new Fox Family Channel series. Family
Band, featuring a group of musicians in the style
of Backstreet Boys or Spice Girls. In addition to
starring in the series, cast members will be
signed to a major recording deal.
What does it take to audition? Come prepared
to sing, dance and read for 3 to 5 minutes.
Bring along a photograph, a demo tape and/or
an instrument. Additional playback tape for live
vocal audition preferred. And fill out the form
On the left. If you're under 18, a parent or
guardian must sign for you.
‘PHQNE #
ADDRESS
IMPORTANT:
If you're under 18, you mu# have a parent or guardian sign
"this form and bring it to the audition.
CHAN N E L
68 June 17 - 23,1999 Miami New Times

Miami Beach
June 22-25, 1999
ill*
New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement 1?

- , V
CD’S AVAILABLE AT:
- West Palm Beach - Cutler Ridge
- Sawgrass/Flamingo Point Royale Plaza
Shopping Center _ Hialeah
- West Kendall j
Tropicare Shopping - Dadeland Station
Center -Aventura
- Boca Raton - Pembroke Pines
Shadowland Square
: 2 v Mew Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement

The annual music industry conference now known as MIDEM Americas,
is in town for the third yeaT in a row, and for music lovers that means one
thing: thiee nights of spectacular concerts on Miami Beach!
Among the worid-class.artists who will be thrilling audiences.on -the
evenings of June 22, 23, and 24 are the Gipsy Kings, South African trum¬
peter Hugh Masekela, jazz flutist Nestor Tones, jazz saxophonist Gato Bar-
bieri, gospel legends the Mighty Clouds.of Joy and Vickie Winans, salsa star
José Alberto “El Canario”, Latin heartthrob Christian, RGB cfooner Tevin
Campbell, and reggae veteran Pato Bariton. Just as exciting art the remain¬
ing 60-plus acts that may not be household names yet, but represent the
most outstanding talent and cutting-edge trends in world beat, Caribbean,
Latin, African, and dance/electronic music.. The theme of MIDEM Americas
says it all: “The music of Africa meets the music of the Americas.”
- The concerts, called showcases, group several artists on one bill and occur
at an interesting mix of South Beach venues, from spacious halls, such as
the Jackie Gleason Theater, Lincoln Theatre, and Cameo Theatre, to atmos¬
pheric nightspots, including Cristal and Shadow Lounge. Concert organizers
are capitalizing on the balmy setting of Ocean Drive,“as well, with nightly
concerts in front of the Tides Hotel tin an open-air stage sponsored try the
City of Miami Beach. Tickets for nearly all outdoor and indoor showcases
are $10 to $20 each, a bargain not only for headliner acts, but also for the
opportunity to hear the musicians who rarely play in the .United States, let
alone in Miami. (See page 15 for how and where to buy tickets.)
Among the outstanding events concertgbers can' choose from:
• An .outdoor evening of Latin music presented by Chris Blackwell and
featuring salsa staT José Alberto “El Canario, hard-hitting trombonist
1999
Jimmy Bosch, fhd the Puerto Rican grassroots phenome¬
non Rena Librl
Two cbn^ts highlighting music of the Caribbean
islands, including the French Antilles, Haiti, and Réunion
• An RGB gala and benefit concert in support of VH-1
Save the Music, starting Tevin Campbell, Shanice Wilson,
and other high-energy performers t
• “African Night,” with headliners Hugh Masekela, for¬
mer Zap Mama singer Sally Nyolo, and phenomenal talent
from Mali and Cameroon
| »A highly anticipated noche showcasing the next
big ñames th rock en español, hosted by MTV and
Waniét Chappell
And more!
While South Beach parties by night to the sounds of
back-to-back concerts, the Miami Beach Convention
CenteT provides the daytime hub fordealmaking and
networking among music professionals. More than
3000 participants and 500 exhibitors from, 70 countries
are expected to attend the global industry powwow.
The buzz at this year’s conference includes e-com-
merce, the U.f>. Spanish-speaking market, and the boom
«M3!
Nestor Torres 4
The Mighty
Clouds of Joy 6
José Alberto 10
Concert Celender «... ”13
Ticket Information 15
Guide to
the Performers 16
Ali text by Barbara Drake, dekign by Diari Sebring,
copy editing by Robin Sheaiyproofreadjrtg |
Additional information on MIDEM Americas 1999
is available at www.miaminewtimes.com
in film music!
> ’So take a moment to-study this .guide, plan your
social calendar for the next threrevehings, and enjoy
the music!
n New Times MIDEM Guide - M Sfrei¥sMg3ii|>pl6ment * t

NESTOR
TORRES
A heart-to-heart with the conscience of smooth jazz )
Rethink your ideá of Nestor Torres. The Puerto
Rican-bom flutist may be referred to by some as “the
pied piper of Latin jazz,” but in Torres’s heart, he’s a
popular entertainer, in the best sense of the phrase.
“The word entertainer can be taken lightly, but IjifcJ
actually much more significant” Torres says. “It means,
‘I’m here to entertain you, to uplift you. I respect you.
Thank you for giving me the time to share my music
with you.’”
This attentiveness to the deeper meaning of things
is just one of the surprises you encounter when
talking to Torres, whose sweet flute sounds belie
iron-firm artistic and personal commitments. He’s a
practicing Buddhist, a crusader for children’s rights,
and a critic of mindless, “cotton candy” culture. He’s
also a passionate advocate for music that speaks to
people’s most profound need: the need to be nurtured
— body, heart, and soul.
Treasures of the Heart, his fifth album and his first
for Shanachie Entertainment, may be the artist’s most
personal statement yet Torres wrote all but one of the
ten'tracks, alone or in collaboration with keyboard
player David Mann. The compositions shimmer with
bright tonalities, Spanish guitar licks, and Latin
grooves. Over these textures Torres’s silvery melodies
leap and glide like a porpoise through the waves: With
titles like “Musing,” “Luna Latina,” “Velvet Nights” and
“Daybreak,” the pieces reflect their creator’s self-
admitted “amazing appreciation for life and the people
around [him].”
Appreciation for life has not always been easy.
Torres was riding high on the release of his Verve solo
debut, Morning Ride, when he was severdy injured in a
1990 celebrity boat race in Biscayne Bay. Eighteen
fractured ribs, a broken clavicle, and a collapsed lung
put Torres out of commission long enough to decide
that “defeat was never going to be ah option.” During
the year-long recuperation, Tones realized his music
could attain a higher purpose: “serving others by
uplifting their spirits.”
Like fellow Miamian Gloria Estefan, whose brush
with death in a bus crash in the early Nineties inspired
Torres’s 1991 comeback album was appropriately
titled Dance of the Phoenix. The Nineties saw him
gigging with jazz and Latin all-stars like Herbie
Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Tito Puente, and Celia Cruz,
as well as with the legendary Cuban bassist Cachao. In
1994 be released his Sony Latin Jazz debut, Burning
Whispers, which was followed in 1996 by Talk to Me.
That year Torres carried the Olympic torch
triumphantly through the streets of Miami And when
the flutist was asked to serve as musical director for a
seventeen-piece, all-star band at President Clinton’s
1997 inaugural bafi, he knew he had arrived.
Even with an active touring and recording schedule
these past few years, Torres has been driven to push his
creative boundaries. While recording for Verve and
Sony Latin, Torres played other people’s compositions
mainly. When he signed with Shanachie, he saw his
chance to spread his wings as a songwriter. “In the past
I focused more on my abilities as a flute player and
interpreter,” he says. “[With Treasures of the Heart] I
was involved in the entire process from writing to
preproduction and on through fruition. I decided
that this album would come from my heart and be
about who I am. I was prepared to accept lull
responsibility for taking the lead.”
Nestor Torres and Guests perform on Wednesday,
June 23,8:30 p.m., at the City of Miami Beach
Concert, in front of the Tides Hotel, Twelfth Street
and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach.
One composition that is especially dose to Torres’s
heart is “Casey’s Garden.” The tune is dedicated to his
pet sheltie, Casey, who died at age fourteen, around the
time the album was made. “It took a sheltie dog to
teach me what unconditional love is,” he says. “It’s that
intangible energy, that total giving. No matter what
mood you’re in, a dog accepts you. Fm grateful to
Casey for showing me that”
Whatever life-lessons Torres has experienced, his
priority now is sharing with his listeners what he’s
learned. Call it his mission statement “The consumer
has a need for music that is nurturing, that is good for
the soul,” he says. “Music should offer something of
substance. When we think of‘religious’ music, we think
of composers like Bach, but in today’s world, that musk
doesn’t have to be dassicaL It can belike Gloria’s
album, lifting people up.”
Torres continues, “The question is, how do I
translate that religious feeling, that passion, into my
own music? For me, it means being grounded and
understanding that what I do as a performer affects
people. I need to ask myself, to what extent am I
fulfilling my responsibility to my listeners? I mean,
people are paying to see me; they could be doing
anything dse, but they’ve chosen to hear me play. I
have a responsibility to enhance their lives in some
y way. The point isn’t to sell four million records in
order to earn a lot of money (although that’s nice!);
the point is that I want to touch four million lives
with that feeling of empowerment That’s the essence
of my life as a performer.” <@)
For sound clips and more information about Nestor Torres,
visit his website: nestortorres.com
the album Into the Light, Torres may have been
physically wounded by his accident, but the setback
only strengthened his will to succeed.
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The Mighty Clouds of Joy: The name alone
makes you want to say it out loud, roll it on
the tongue, savor it like a sliceof ripe, Georgia
peach. And for fans of gospel music, the
news that this renowned group is coming to ~
Miami is especially sweet because the Mighty
Clouds of Joy move mountains when they -
perform.
With a career that spans 39 years and 34 ;
albums, and includes three Grammy Awards,
the Mighty Clouds of Joy are among the leg¬
endary ensembles in gospel history. They got
their start in 1959 in Los Angeles, with
founder Joe Ligón enlisting the vocal talents
of Johnny Martin, Richard Wallace, and Elmo
Franklin. Several years later the group s
infused traditional gospel with REtB, and a
new style was bom. The first gospel group to
use Bass, drums, and keyboards, the Mighty
Clouds of Joy were a target of criticism in
their early days. Also frowned upon were
their choreographed moves and brightly col¬
ored outfits. Eventually, their innovations
became accepted as a standard part of gospel
music.
Known as the “Temptations of Gospel,” the
Mighty Clouds were also the first gospel act i
to appear on Soul Train, and over the years
they’ve performed with an array ofmainr
strearn artists; Including Marvin Gaye, Aretha
Franklin, Paul Simon, and the Rolling Stones.
While the ámazihg!energyi they project
onstage moves people of all faiths, the Clouds
ignite'a'sp'éaál,passion amongtheir longtime |
fans, who experience their concerts as spiritual healing.
The Mighty Clouds’ látest album, Live in Charleston,
brings the group full circle with the’traditional, down-
home gospel that launched their career. Recorded in 1996
at Abundance Tabernacle AM.E. Zion Church in
Charleston, South Carolina, Before a packed house, the
recording has an urgency and passion unmatched by
many contemporary albums, gospel or otherwise. Clearly
thegroup’s currentlineüp — original members Ligón and
Wallace, with vocalists Wilbert Williams, Michael
McCowin, Ron Staples, and Johnny’Valentine — is doing a
splendid job of carrying on the Mighty Clouds’ legacy.
We spoke with Alabama native Joe’Ligon, whose bari¬
tone voice typifies the hard-slashing lead in gospel music
{concerts néarly shred his voice). Quieter on the phone
than onstage, he shared his thoughts on his group’s place
in.the history of gospel, his own evolution as a singer, and
the concept of music ministry.
CLOUDS
OF JOY
Question: Not long ago you released your 34th album,
Live in Charleston, which received outstanding reviews
and was nominated for a Grammy. How do you keep your
music fresh after so ijtaiiy yeiirs? '
Joe Ligón (JL): We love it Anything you love, you find a
Way to do it. We’ve had so ¿many wonderful experiences;
along the way. Why stop now?
Q: What do you consider the highlights of your career?
JL: We’ve just been inducted into the Nashville Hall of
Fame. That was a thrill. I’m proud to say that they induct¬
ed all the members of the current band, including our
drummer. We’ve won three Grammys. We’ve played at the
White House. President Carter asked for us. You know,
he’s from Georgia and he’s a religious man. He asked for
several artists to come and one of those was the Mighty
Clouds of Joy. I’m proud of that
Q: Maybe this administration could use some Mighty
Clouds as well?...
JL: [Laughs. No comment]
Q: When did you know you wanted to be a singer?
JL: I dreamed of Being onstage while I was a kid. My
father was a gospel singer. When I was a little boy, he
used to take me to hear [the gospel quartet] the Fairfield
Four. That’s when I started dreaming that when I grew up,
1 was going to be up onstage, too. I’m kind of like Michael
The Mighty Clouds of Joy perform with Vickie Winans
in “Gospel Night,” Wednesday, Jone 23,9:00 p.m., at
the Lincoln Theatre, 541 Lincoln Rd., Miami Reach.
Jackson, awkward and shy offstage. But when
I’m up there, I love it You can’t stop me.
Q: Whose idea was it in the Sixties to add RGB
to your music?
JL: I give credit to ABC [Records]. They had an
idea that the music was coming. At the time,
there was no Andrae Grouch in gospel, just tra¬
ditional groups like the Staple Singers. Some¬
one from ABC said, “On your album, you
should start putting in some of that ’message
music’” That’s what they, called it then. It all
grew from there.
Q: Who approached you to sing for the Rolling
Stones? I can’t imagine a group farther from
the Mighty Clouds of Joy.
JL: Keith Richards heard us when we played in
Britain. He liked us so much that when he got
home, the Rolling Stones asked us to open for
them in Washington, D.C. It was something
else. We were real nervous. ‘Oh, the Mighty
Clouds are singing for the Rolling Stones. Are
we crazy? That audience isn’t going to like
gospel.’ But Mick Jagger came backstage and
did his best to make us comfortable. “Just do
your thing,” he said. “They’ll love you.” We did
three songs. The first song, the audience was
just sitting there, looking at us. The second
song I spoke to the people: “The Rolling
Stones sent us hereto warm you up. So, come
on, get yourselves warm.” Then we sang “I
Came to Jesus” and that did it They loved us..
Q: How do you differ today from the singer you were 40
years ago?:
JL: I’m more dedicated, more serious. I take it as a min¬
istry. I tell people that they can make it ’cause I’ve been
through hard times myself, and 1 know that what you’ve
got to do is believe I can’t get to church now, since we’re
performing so much, so these concerts are my church. 1
don’t bully people into believing in God or Jesus or what¬
ever. There is a Supreme Being. I believe in it The people
in our audiences — we pray together, we cry together.
Q: What musicians do you listen to for inspiration?
JL: The [Sensational] Nightingales. Their leader, the Rev¬
erend Julius Cheeks. He has been a big inspiration to me.
Also, the Soul Stirrers. [Lead singer] Sam Cooke was one
of my best friends.
Q: What songs will you sing in Miami?
JL: We’ll decide when we’re onstage. We watch the audi¬
ence, the age bracket how they respond. We’ve been on
the road so long, all we have to do is look and we know
what they’ll like. We’ll have some of that rock and roll
audience, I’m sure. You can’t miss with the O’Jays’ “Love
Train.” You’ll see. I take that tune to tell the people about
how we can have a better world if we just get along edu¬
cate our children, be peaceable with one another.
Q: But straight-ahead, message gospel is what you’re
known for. People are going to want to hear that - the
testifying the Holy Spirit
JL: Oh, don’t you worry. Eventually we’re going to end
up doing what we do! ® ,
Supreme beings of gospel music
6 New Times MIDEM Guide -An Advertising Supplement

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José Alberto
fThe voiee of salsa romantica
Salsa star José Alberto has been making music - and Latin music
history — for more than twenty years with his irresistible voice and
impeccable musicianship. But the Dominican singer still gets the same
thrill onstage as he did at age nineteen when he first began performing
with the likes of Tito Puente and Tito Rodriguez, Jr. .$T'
“Singing is my life,” says José Alberto, known as “Eg|!anario”’frhe
Canary) for his exquisite voice and amazing whistling ^abilities. “I love
what I dó. I enjoy what I do. This is such happy, upbeafcmusic.”
El Canario’s infectious, joyous feeling practically throbs through
his latest release, despite its title, Herido (Heartbreak).':!! is his fif¬
teenth solo album and first offering on the RykoLatino label. The.’
album features the exhilarating arrangements and razor-sharp
ensemble playing José Alberto’s fans have come to expect. What’s
new is the range of rhythms found on these tracks: salsa dura,
merengue, reggae, vals peruano. The unifying flavor of the album,
however, is driving, dance-till-you-drop salsa.
Although José Alberto refiises to name a favorite song ón Herido —
“They’re all great,” the singer insists in his soothing, reedy voice; gf it’s,
obvious he has a special affection for the last track, a salsa version of
the Peruvian classic, “Flor de la Canela,” writteft by the great singer-
composer Chabuca Granda. So how did a Peruvian vals end up on a
salsa record? “I love Peru,” the singer admits,. “1 have two godsons
there. A few years ago I promised publidy that I would dedicate a song
to Peru on an album. ‘La Flor de la.Canela’ is almost like Peru’s nation¬
al anthem. 1 did it as a tribute to Peni and its people. The song starts off
with a vals and at the end, it goes into a special Peruvian rumba.”
Musical inventiveness has been a hallmark of José Alberto’s career.
Bom in the Dominican Republic, he spent his childhood in Puerto Rico
and then moved to New York City. But the music that caught the
twelve-year-old’s ear was not merengue, the staple sound of his birth¬
place» but salsa. “Salsa was the style of music that was happening
then,” he explains. Tnaturally went toward that” By 1973 he was
singing with salsa bands irpuNew Yofk.Cj.fy, attracting attention wherev¬
er hé performed. Three years later, he made his recording.debut asi lead
vocalist on the album Curious? by Tito Rodriguez.
“It was something,” El Canario laughs, remembering those early
years. “Here I was, ablack kid singing salsa. ‘Wow, that’s weird!’ people
thought ‘It’s different’ [I was] a nineteen-year-old Dominican singing
up a storm, up there with Tito Puente, Rodriguez — those guys were
cats already.”
The talented newcomer worked with some of the most influential
artists at a crucial period in the development Of tropical inuSic. Between
1978 and the early Eighties José Alberto was lead vocalist with the
groundbreaking ensemble Tipica 73. His recordings with Típica 73
include Salsa Encendida (1978) and Charangueando con hi Tipica 73
(1980). He was also among the lead vocalists on Louie Ramirez’s pro¬
duction, Noche Caliente, the first album to give popular Jfidlads an
uptempo salsa treatment. The catchy style quickly became known as
salsa romántica.
El Canario’s smooth yet crisp voice caught listeners’ attention on his
first solo albums, recorded for Sono Max, which yielded such hits
as “Desesperado” and “La Cinta Verde.” In 1987 he became the
José Alberto “El Canario” and his Orchestra play Tuesday,
June 22, at 9:00 p.nt., in “Chris Blackwell & Friends”
The showcase takes place at the open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel, Twelfth Street and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach.
first artist to record for the newly formed RMM label and had an inter¬
national hit in 1988 with Sueño Contigo. The salsa star stayed with
RMM for ten years, recording and cpproducing numerous hit albums,
including Dance With Me (1991), which features guest stair Sergio Var¬
gas; Llegó la Hora (1992): and De Pueblo y Con Clase (1994). On Time
(1995) features a duet with the undisputed queen of salsa, Cefip Cniz,
jdth whom hé frequently tours.
|@|! wasi e^átage, atNew York’s Studio 84, that the singer first began
whistling along withthe melody, imitating á flute. His imitation was so
convincing that audiences began searching the back of the stage to find
where the flutist was hiding. Soon whistling became his trademark. José
Alberto “El Canario” is quick to point out that being a good whistler, is
not as easy as it seems: “Can you whistle?” hé asks. “Try doing a whole
melody, in rhythm and on pitch. It’s difficult!”
José Alberto and his Orchestra are extremely popular on the interna¬
tional music scene, bringing salsa to North and South America, the
Caribbean, Japan, Europe, and even Australia. Non-Latino audiences
may love salsa, but can they really move to it, we wonder? “You could
say that,” he smiles. “Italians — they can salsa. They’re pretty good. So
are Germans. You’d be surprised. In the Forties and Fifties there were
lots of [military] bases in Germany, and a lot of Puerto Ricans went to
live there. So salsa has been in Germany for a while.”
At his MIDEM showcase, the singer shares a bill with Puerto Rican
band Plena libre and trombonist Jimmy Bosch. “My last song, we’re
going to dó án ári^steurT’ El'CánarKTéhthüséi “I’m going to get the
other acts back onstage and jam. It should be funr”
Most of all, he relishes the opportunity to do what hé loves best :
sing his heart out “Í love to perform. Even if there’s only one person
in the audience, if the place is packed, even if they don’t know what
salsa is -1 make them understand with my voice. I make than feel how
beautiful the music is. That’s what being an artist is about” ©
Ü1
(mes MIDEM Advertising Supplement gj
.14 if t ¡fit fe a. .'4 V.lUkl!.l«f,/uiV th A
30L
wmmmmm


A night of Live Music, Great Food and Good
PRESENTED BY
CIGARETTES
© Philip Morris Inc. 1999 18863-62
Offer limited to smokers 21 or older. Guests must be 21 or older.
16 mg "tar," 1.1 mg nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.

gg
m
A night of Live Music, Great Food and Good Times.
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Quitting Smoking
Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health.
© Philip Morris Inc. 1999 18863-62
Offer limited to smokers 21 or older. Guests must be 21 or older.
I mg nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.

MIAMI
BEACH
ABN*AMRO Bank
NewTunes
ACTProductions
rvan magazine
Magazine
12, \ New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement
midem americas
(Mexico)


ISRfR&itMjRU
r^, ,..r
9.30 pm
Amnesia
136 Collins Ave,
Miami Beach
OPENING NIGHT PARTY
SGAE PRESENTS: IBIZA NIGHT I
PRIVATE SHOW ON INVITATION ONLY]
featuring
GESAR DE MELERO Serial Killer Vyftii/Spain
KADOC Zen Records/Spain
PM PROJECT Sony - Dance Pool/Spain
TUESDAY JUNE 22nt
5.30 pm / 6115 pm
17 pm
Lincoln Theatre
541 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach
MANA Warner MUsic Latip/Mexlco
Private Screenings: On Invitation only
8.00 pm
Jackie Gleason
Theater
1700 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
CELEBRATING lOO YEARS
OF SGAE:
HERNALOO ZUNIGA Warner Music/Nicaragua
PEDRO GUERRA BMG Arioia/Spain
ROSANA Universal Music/Spain
9.00pm CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS:
Open Air Stage JOSÉ ALBERTO **EL CANARIO”
Ocean Drive & Rykolatino/Dominican Republic
12th Street JAMMY BOSCH Rykoiatmo/USA
'Qn front of the Tides Hotel) PLENA LIBRE Rykolatino/Puerto Rico
Miami Beach
9.00 pm
Shadow Lounge
1532 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
BNII SHOWCASES
GEZAR SANTANAusa
LOS HIDALGO Radio Vox Corporation/USA
PEDRO ALFONSO Radio Vox Corporation/USA
G ATO BARRIER! Columbia Jazz/Argentina
10.00 pm
Cameo
1445 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
MIDEM ”99 R&B GALA
A Benefit Concert in Support of
“VH-1 Save the Music” featuring:
HOSTED BY T’KALLA Hárdboiled Entertainment & Media/USA
DANGEROUS CURVÉS Hárdboiled Entertainment &Media/USA
DIVINE Red Ant Erftertainment/USA
RIGORES Hárdboiled Entertainment & Media/France
FELICIA ARAMS Jadé Prodüctions/USA
JAZÉ Universal Music/USA
SH ANIDE WILSON La Face/USA
mu Goldmine Etektra Entertaiñment/USA
THE MANGO RGGM Hárdboiled Entertainment & Media/USA 1
TEVIN CAMPBELL Qwest Records/USA
10.00pm AFRICAN NIGHT:
Warsaw HUGH MASEKELA Sony Music/South Africa
1450 Collins Ave, RlCHARO BORA Coiumbia-Sony Music/Cameroon j
Miami Beach ROKIA TRAORÉ Label Bleu/Mali
SALLY NYQLO Lúsáftíca/Gameroon
10.00pm HMC PRODUCTION
Cristal Night presents: A Tumi Music Exclusive Artist
Club ELIO REVÉ JR Y SU CHARAN60H
1045 - 5^ Street, Tumi Music/Guba
Miami Beach
8.00pm MIZIK KRÉYOL LAKARAYIB;
Amnesia akIYO Déclic/Guadeloupe
136 Collins Aye, K ANPlCH Frederic Pierre-Louis Productions/Haiti
Miami Beach MARTINIQUE SWING MACHINE
Hibiscus record
WCK WCK Records Ltd/Dominica
18.30 fW
Open AirStage
Ocean Drive &
HnMH
(In front of the Tides Hotel)
Miami Beach
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT:
GROPO CAFÉ NOSTALGIA Nave/USA
.NESTOR TORRES Shañáchíe Écrtértairimerit/Puerto
RICARDO LEMVQ & IMiSI
Putumayo/USA
9.00pm GOSPEL NIGHT:
Lincoln Theatre mighty GLOtins of joy cGipiattam/usA
541 Lincoln Road, VICKIE WINfflHS CGi Piatinum/usA
Miami Beach
9.00 pm
Shadow Lounge
1532 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
ASfpftP SHOWCASE s
DEREK LOPEZ Universal Music/Atgeniina
JAVIER Caiman Music/Spain
ROBERT AVELLA N EF RMM Records & Video CorpTPuerto Rico
THE LATIN JAZZ CREW Sunset Records/USA I
VALLEJO USA
10.00pm MTV » WARNER CHAPPELL
Cameo present? “Heehe He ¡seen en Español":
1445 Washington Ave, RERSOIT Universal Music/Argentina
Miami Beach CONTROL MACHETE Universal Music/Mexico
El MANJAR RE LOS RIOSES
Radio Vox Corporation/Puerto Rico
OZOMATLI Almo Sounds/USA
10.00pm SOLID AGENCY AND COZIER
Cristal Night ENTERTAINMENT present:
Club BRICK a. LACE Solid Agency/Jamaica
1045 ¡ 5th Street, GH A PA RITA Solid Agency/Jamaica
Miami Beach ©MERI Bad boy Entertainment/USA
BOUGIE E.FRESH
Solid Agency-Cozier Entertainment/USA
FEMME FATALE Relativity/USA
QT Solid Agency/Jamaica
SOARS DEM GREW 7VT Records/Jamaica
7.00pm PRIVATE SCREENINGS
Amnesia Broadcasting the short film "Revés"
taken from their forthcoming album
asa premier with the band attendance
On invitation only
CAFÉ TACUBA Warner, Music Latiri/iyiexico
136 Coiiins Ave,
Miami Beach
8.00 pm
Jadltie Gleason
Theater
1700, Washington Ave,;
Miami Beach
TRIE GIPSY KINGS Pá&Sony l^&c/France
9,00 pm
Open Air Stage
Ocean Drive &
12th Street
(In front of the Tides Hotel)
Miami Beach
SONO CREST PUSH#
.mmmwmm Sonpdiso-Musisoft/La Réunion •'
JAGOB' OESVARJEOK' ¿onodisbrMüsisoít/éuadeloüpe
LES IRIRES DECIMUS >S¿nQ¡disc^Musisoft/Guad(eloup8
MKBtlDr COMBO Sonodisc*Musísoft/Ráit»
10.00pm Sitas PRESENTS
‘ROCK LATINO”;
GIRASOULES EM(/Spain
JULIETA VENERAS BMG/Mexico
SARGENTO .GASECHA Qhewaka-Virgin/Guba-France
1450 Collins Ave,
Miami Beach
10.00 pm
Cristal Night
Club
1045 - 5th Street,
Miami Beach
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD*
AFRICAN RHYTHM MESSENGERS
Sonika Records/Nigeria
BARB ASSAD MENAGERIE Brazil
PATH RAMlrDN Global Music Promotions-Surfdog/UK
8.00 pm
Jackie Gleason
Theater
1700 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach
BMG US LATIN
PRESENTS:
CHRBSTIAN^^^^m
11.00 pm
Shadow Lounge
1532 Washington Aye,
Miami Beach
ISHG RECORDS PRESENTS:
BALLY SAGOO & FRIENDS
BALLY SAGOO Ishq records/UK
THE RiJB FACTORY
RUN JAN SBNRH
FREEDOM CIRCLE
HERBA DANCERS
OMZONE
New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement

fffftff!
IffRflfSV!
S gi g|
if 9 H
christiancastro
mi vida sin tu amor
Don't miss the opportunity
to see Christian Castro
in a private concert.
Get a FREE pair of tickets
Christian Castro's new album
"mí vida sin tu amor" at your
BrallÉÉt SPEC'S MUSIC Store.
White supplies last until June 22,1999
Album on sole now
$12.99 CD $7.99 Cass.
SAJLÉSNDS 4/24/99
Je Santander for Estelan Enterprises, Inc.
with the purchase of
114 New Times MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement

^Tickets for MIDEM Americas concert showcases can be
purchased in advance at Ticket Master locations or online at
¿ vyww.ticketmaster.com. Tickets can also be bought at each
\fenue on the day of the concert. Most showcases are open
to the public, with the exception of several private
showcases and Monday’s opening-night party.
TUESDAY JUNE SS
9:00 P.M. CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
00, open-air stage)
9:00 P.M. BMI SHOWCASE
00, Shadow Lounge)
10:00 P.M. MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA:
A benefit conceit in support of VH-1 Save the Music
($20, Cameo Theatre)
10:00 P.M. AFRICAN NIGHT
05, Warsaw Ballroom)
10:00 P.M. ELIO REVE, JR., Y SU CHARANGON
($20; Cristal; call Hugo Cando at 305-576-5866)
WEDNESDAY JUNE S3
8:00 P.M. MIZIK KREYOL LAKARAYIB
05, Amnesia)
8:30 P.M. CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT
05, open-air stage)
9:00 P.M. GOSPEL NIGHT
($20, Lincoln Theatre)
9:00 P.M. ASCAP SHOWCASE
00, Shadow Lounge)
10:00 P.M. NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL,
PRESENTED BY MTV AND WARNER CHAPPELL
05, Cameo Theatre)
10:00 P.M. SOLID AGENCY & COZIER
ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT
05, Cristal)
THURSDAY JUNE S4
8:00 P.M. GIPSY KINGS
($35-55, Jackie Gleason Theater)
9:00 P.M. SONO CREOL NIGHT
00, open-air stage)
10:00 P.M. RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
05, Cristal)
11:00 P.M. BALLY SAGOO AND FRIENDS
00, Shadow Lounge)
jcmmmsm-
Amnesia,
136 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
305-5317¡j535
Cameo Theatre,
1445 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
-3p5r532-092'2rs
Cristal,
1045 Fifth St, Miami Beach;
305-604-2582
Jackie Gleason Theater,
1700 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
305-673-7300
Ss
Lincoln Theatre,
541 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
305-673-3331
Open-air stage
in front of the Tides Hotel, Twelfth Street
and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach
Shadow Lounge,
1532 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
305-531-9411
Warsaw Ballroom,
1450 Collins Ave, Miami Beach;
305?531-4555
Zoniyht all his
perceptions o{
reality were
swept away
and he {elt
an emotion he
couldn't
deny... fyipltOtU|
<7eel Zhe £motion £very Zhursday, Friday & Saturday
"Doors Open 11pm - 5am
737 VOushinyton ^Ivenue, S>outh f^each
Dip Reservations 305.674.0048 305.674.1933
P|||F|pies MIDEM Guide â–  An Advertising Supplement 15
New Expanded
Dining Room
located near
THS-Cottvéfitieñ
t©*ifiGrS#|gg^
Lincoln Road

BADI ASSAD MENAGERIE
At the forefront of this eclectic trio is the
ihasterful Brazilian guitarist-singer badi
assad. On Chameleon, her latest album,
badi (no capital letters, please) redefines
acoustic guitar performance, blending
Brazilian melody and body percussion
with ethnic sounds from around the
world. She’s joined by U.S. guitarist Jeff
Scott Young (formerly of Megadeth) and
Brazilian percussionist Simone Soul. Lis¬
AFRICAN RHYTHM
MESSENGERS
Composed of seasoned musicians
from some, of the greatest bands
from Africa and beyond, the
African Rhythm Messengers play a
high-spirited dance music with a global
kick. Musicologists could have a field
day tracing the rhythms on their album
Bottom Bellé (influences include high-
life, soukous, Afro-beat and reggae), but
what gets fans jumping at concerts are
the rollicking guitar licks, sensational
horns, and thrilling vocal harmonies.
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
Cristal
Thursday, June 24
10:00 p.m.
AKIYO
Guadeloupe’s most prestigious and popu¬
lar Carnival band formed nearly twenty
years ago in Pointe á Pitre. Drawing
heavily on African and Amerindian
influences, Akiyo in concert is a vibrant
whirl of drumming, dance, masks, and
costumes. What gives the group its stay¬
ing power is its hypnotic blend of parody
and gwo ka, a style of drumming and
singing once practiced in secret and now
celebrated as the heartbeat of Guade¬
loupe’s Carnival season.
MIZIK KRÉYOL LAKARAYIB
Amnesia
Wednesday, June 23
8:00 p.m.
Bands
A Guide to the Performers
ten to the sparks fly as these consum¬
mate musicians conjure up breathtaking
ethnopop soundscapes!
RHYTHM OF THE WORLD
Cristal
Thursday, June 24
10:00 p.m.
BALLY SAGOO
Bom in Delhi, India, and now living in
England, acclaimed artist-producer
Bally Sagoo fuses Eastern sounds with
hip-hop, reggae, house, soul, and dance
music. Just imagine if Krishna let his
powers loose on a mixing board! Also
appearing with Sagoo:
• Anomie: A Miami-based improvisation-
al hip-hop band with an electronic vibe;
• The Dub Factory: Artists Paverez, Rita
Pereira, and Echo Ranks unite dub with
Indian music;
• Feenom Circle: A San Francisco-based
hip-hop group with an Indian rapper; and
• Gunjan Singh: A female vocalist from
India via England.
BALLY SAGOO & FRIENDS
Shadow Lounge
Thursday, June 24
11:00 p.m.
BASTER
Lead by singer Thierry Gauliris, this pop¬
ular group from the Indian Ocean nation
of Réunion mixes traditional maloya .
with modem sounds. Albums include
Mon Royom, Lorizon Kasé, and their
newest, Black Out, a collaboration with
Tyrone Downie of the Wailers. Fans of
Afro-pop will delight in the crosscurrents
that stir the album's grooves, transport¬
ing the listener from Africa to Jamaica
and back again!
SONO CREOL NIGHT
Open-air stage in front of the Tides Hotel
Thursday, June 24
9:00 p.m.
BERSUIT
Until recently, political repression made it
all but impossible for an Argentine band to
record a song like “Sr. Cobranza,” an out¬
right attack against Argentina’s government
and the oppression of Latinos. The single is
just one of several controversial offerings
on Libertinaje, the highly anticipated U.§.
debut by Buenos Aires rockers Bersuit. The
six-member band strikes a blow for freedom
of expression this Wednesday with an
explosive mix of rock, tango, rap,
and folklórica.
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV & Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
BRICK & LACE
Sisters Tasha, Nyanda, and Nailah honed
their talents singing in church, eventually
opening for such artists as Roberta Flack.
On Display, their first CD, offers a tasty mix
of Jamaican-seasoned RGB.
SOUD AGENCY & COZIER ENTERTAIN¬
MENT PRESENT ...
Cristal
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
CAFÉ TACUBA
One of the leading forces in Latin rock,
this quartet was awarded the 1998 MTV
Latino Video of the Year Award for its
song, “La Ingrata” (Thankless Woman).
_ Café Tacuba’s third album,
Avalancha de Exitos
(Avalanche of Hits) signals a
change in direction for the
band, offering new takes on
Latin American standards. Sortgs range
from Dominican merengue to bldtime
Mexican boleros. At a private showcase,
the band will premiere the short film,
“Revés,” from their new album;1
Private Screening, by invitation only
CÉSAR DE MELERO
The godfather of the Spanish house scene
since the early 1980s, DJ César de Melero
was instrumental in creating the legendary
Ibiza sound and “Balearic beat.” Voted one
of the 100 best DJs in the world by DJ
Magazine, he began his career at Ku Disco
(later Privilege) in Ibiza and since then has
played in Tel-Aviv, Euro Disney, and
throughout Europe. His first production to
chart in Great Britain was the single
“Night Moves.”
SGAE PRESENTS IBIZA NIGHT
Opening-night party, by invitation only
CEZAR SANTANA
This daredevil singer-guitarist mixes
spoken word and multimedia with lyrics .
in Portuguese, English, and Spanish.
Together with American composer Ricky
“Ricardo” Andrews, Santana is part of
New World Beat, which harnesses lush
chords and bittersweet melodies to
grooves from Brazil, North AMCrica, and
Africa. “Ze-ba-rum-ba,” a single from
their eponymous debut album, might be
described as a Brazilian surfer rock bal¬
lad (sort of like if the Beach Boys had
been from Rio.)
BMI SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Tuesday, June 22
9:00 p.m.
16 New Timas MIDEM Guide - An Advertising Supplement

Bands
include Mística, Sueños de Libertad,
and his latest, Campos de Ilusiones.
CHRISTIAN
At 25 years old, this singer has
already garnered a string of
hit songs and awards in both
.Latin America and the United
States. His best-selling albums
include Agua Nueva, Nunca Voy
a¡ Oxidarte, and Lo Mejor de Mi.
Christian’s latest album, Mi Vida sin
tu Amor, was produced by Kike San¬
tander, who also worked with Christ-
ianipn the theme music for the soap
opera Angela. ‘
BMG PRESENTS
Jaclfie Gleason Theater
Wednesday, June 23
8,'ÓÜ p.m.
CONTROL MACHETE
This three-member group is the first
Mexican hip-hop band to achieve
crossover success in Latin America.
Mucho Barato (1997), their first
album, went gold in the United
States, Central America, and ;
Vtóezuela. Their new release,
Artillería Pesada Presente, spawned
the No. 1 single and video “Si Señor”;
it also'includes possibly the first track
in the history of Latin music to com¬
bine an aggressive rap with .tradition¬
al Cuban salsa performed by a live ,
ensemble. Control Machete’s MIDEM
appearance coincides with an exten¬
sive tour of Latin America, the United
States, and Europe. .
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV& Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
DANGEROUS CURVES
A^so known as Stephanie Haik, Dan¬
gerous Curves was formally trained as
an opera singer and classical musician
before honing her skills on New
York’s jazz and RftB circuit. Her
impressive vocals can be heard on
tracks by De La Soul, Malcolm
McLaren, and David Sancious. During
her MIDEM appearance she’ll work
tier magic on tunes such as “Feel
Inside” and “Love on the Sidewalk.”
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
DEREK LOPEZ
This best-selling musician has topped
the charts in Latin America with such
hits as “Batida de Coco,” “Esperando el
Sol” and “Ripa Na Xulipo.” Lopez’s
sound mixes Brazilian and Latin
rhythms with catchy melodies. Albums
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23
9:00 p.m.
DIVINE
Teenage singersNikki Bratcher, Kia
Thornton and Tonia Tash are simply
Divine. Thetfiib released then first album
last year, an upbeat effort called Fairy
Tales. Their breakthrough single, ^Late¬
ly,” finds the trio singing about (what
else?) teen romance. Says Nikki: “Our
album has a live feel, a fun feel; it is
about young love. Although our percep¬
tion ©floye may not be the same in ten
years, it’s about what’s real to us now —
empowerment, self respect,
moving on.”
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
ELIO REVÉ, JR., Y SU
CHARANGON
Musician Elio Revé, Jr., leads this
acclaimed band fiom Cuba. The group is
; released a hit album, Chagüi en la Casa
de Nora.
HMC PRODUCTION PRESENTS ...
A Tumi Music exclusive artist
Cristal
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
EL MANJAR DE LOS
DIOSES
El Manjar de los Dioses (The Food of the
Gods) fuses Latin rhythms, flamenco,
and postmodern European rock with a
dose of theatricality. A cult favorite in
Puerto Rico and the United States, they
were named one of the ten best rock
bands by Boom magazine (alongside Los
Fabulosos Cadillacs, Café Tacuba, and
Maná). Watch for their forthcoming trib¬
uté to The Cure, on an all-Latin release
by WEA Latina.
NOCHE DE ROCK EN ESPAÑOL
presented by MTV & Warner Chappell
Cameo Theatre
Wednesday, June 23
10:00 p.m.
FELICIA ADAMS
Best known for her single, “Thinking
About You,” from her debut album New
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New Times MIDEN Cuide - An Advertising Supplement 17

Bands
his homeland following a
30-year exile.
AFRICAN NIGHT
¡mi
pi Beginnings, Felida Adams began her career
singing backup for Maty J. Blige. She is
currently in the studio working on a sec¬
ond album and has recorded a track with
Heavy D’ for his upcoming release.
MIDEM AMERICAS 1999 R&B GALA
*>3 Cameo Theatre
^ Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
|Ü GATO BARBIERI
A driving force in contemporary jazz for
30 years, tenor saxophonist Leandro
“Gato” Barbieri has seen his career flour¬
ish in three distinct phases: free jazz,
i*Latin jazz, and smooth jazz. Although the
musician-composer earned raves for his
work with Don Cherry, Airto, and other
innovators, it wasn’t until the release of, ’
his 1973 soundtrack Last Tango in Paris
that Barbieri became a household name.
, Che Corazon, his new release, features
original compositions and a cover of
“Auld Lang Syne” that promises to be an
anthem for the millenium!
BMI SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Tuesday, June 22
«I*, 9:00 p.m.
GIPSY KINGS
Hailing from the caravans of a Gypsy com-*
munity in the south of France, this band of
tightly Tout brothers. a£rd--eousins are
among world music's most acclaimed
artists. The brothers Reyes and Baliardo,
who speak in the Gypsy dialect of Gitane,
have mined their musical and cultural
. ropts,, producing such.hits as “Bamboleo”
Top 10 albums Mosaiqne, Allegria,
and Tierra Gitana. Their unique style,
..’known as rumba flamenca, blends Spanish,
French, and North African influences with
h flamenco guitar and passionate vocals.
Jackie Gleason Theater
Thursday, June 24
8:00 p.m.
GIRASOULES
A favorite in Spain and Latin America,
Girasoules is known for the hit song “Sin
Trabajo” (“Out of Work”), which rose
tó=No. 1 in Puerto Rico. The group -
recently released its fourth album,
Un Mundo Feliz (Á Happy World),
and toured this past February in-
Ecuador and the United States. Their
sound is a melodious mix of pop-
rock, Latin American, and Mediter¬
ranean-influenced music.
SGAE PRESENTS ROCK LATINO
By invitation only
GRUPO
CAFÉ NOSTALGIA
This fíne band makes its home in Little
Havana. The house band for Café Nos¬
talgia, a smoky little club on Calle Ocho,
boasts five talented musicians who
infuse Cuban standards with jazz, rock,
rumba, and rap. This past November the
band released Te Di la Vida Entera (I
Gave You AU I Had), a musical take on
a novel by Cuban expatriate Zoé Valdés.
For a taste of their percolating all-night
jam sessions, sample Grupo Café Nostal¬
gia, Live, recorded at the famous
Miami dub.
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH CONCERT
Open-air stage in front of the Tides Hotel
Wednesday, June 23
8:30 p.m.
HERNALDO ZUÑIGA
This acclaimed singer-songwriter has
' been recording and performing for more
than twenty years. A restless spirit
whose music unites tropical, Andean,
and European influences, Zuñiga was
born in Nicaragua and has enjoyed suc¬
cessful careers in Chile, Spain, and Mex¬
ico. Among his best-known songs are
“Procuro Olvidarte,” “Una Vez al Mes”
(an homage to women), and Después de
Todos Estos Años.”
CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF SGAE
By invitation only
HUGH MASEKELA
South Africa’s leading émigré trumpeter
and bandleader has marked his 60th
year with an ambitious world tour and a
new album, Black to the Future. The
release finds Masekela mixing his .ever-
evolving Afro-soul-jazz sound with
Jamaican dancehalt, American hip-hop
and even Celtic-pop ballads. Highlights
of this gifted musician’s career include
touring the world with Paul Simon’s
Graceland show, cowriting the Broad¬
way musical Sarafina, and returning to’
Warsaw
Tuesday, June 22
10M) p.m.
JACOB DESVARIEUX
Born in Paris, Jacob Desvarieux spent
his childhood in the West Indies. At age
twelve he moved to Senegal, where he
learned to play guitar. In 1974 he met
brothers Pierre-Edouard and Georges
Dedmus and formed Kassav. This group
was one of the leading forces behind the
birth of zouk music and grew to achieve
international renown. Desvarieux shares
the stage Thursday night with his histo¬
ry-making cohorts.
SONO CREOL NIGHT
Open-air stage in front of the Tides Hotel
Thursday, June 24
9KX)p.m.
JAVIER
Bom in Spain, this 22-year-old pop singer
has just released his debut album, Lucha y
Verá, produced by Roberto Morales and
Christian De Walden. Induded in the
twelve tracks are Javier’s own pop and bal¬
lad compositions, among them, “Tiembla
MiPid.”
ASCAP SHOWCASE
Shadow Lounge
Wednesday, June 23
9.-00p.m.
JAZÉ
This Orlando-based quartet is comprised of
four singers who also dance, ad, play
instruments, and write their own material
(whew!). Their self-titled debut (to be
released this summer) is a soulful collection
of Nineties music ranging from acoustic
RGB to hip grooves and pop ballads.
Onstage look for José on guitar, John on
bass, and Larry and Chaunty on keyboards.
MIDEM’99 R&B GALA
Cameo Theatre
Tuesday, June 22
10:00 p.m.
JIMMY BOSCH
One of fire foremost
instrumentalists in Latin
jazz, trombonist Jimmy
Bosch pioneered the
movement known as salsa
dura (hard salsa). This year
he launched into his roles as bandleader, .
composer, and lyricist with the release of ,c
Sonea Trombon (Singing Trombone). Catch
Jimmy and his band live as they take lis-.
teners from Bronx funk to sultry guajiras
and swinging cha-cha-chas.
CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Tuesday, June 22
9.-00 p.m.
JOSÉ ALBERTO “EL
CANARIO»
A prolific recording artist with fifteen
solo albums under his belt, salsa star Jóse'
Alberto earned the nickname “El Canario”
because of his exquisite voice and amaz¬
ing whistling abilities. Chart-topping
releases indude Sueño Contigo (1988) and
On Time (1995), featuring a duet with his
frequent touring partner, Celia Cruz. Heri¬
do, his latest, showcases El Canario’s
vocal prowess in an exdting range of
musical settings, inducting merengue,
salsa dura, reggae, and classic Peruvian
mdodies.
CHRIS BLACKWELL & FRIENDS
Open-air stage in front of the
Tides Hotel
Tuesday, June 22
9fl0p.m.
JULIETA VENEGAS
The young Mexican artist and composer
Julieta Venegas began her musical career
when she was a child. A former member
of the groups Chantaje and Tijuana No, |g
she ventured out on her own in 1991 and
released her first solo album, Aqui, six
years later. The album sold in both Mexi¬
co and the United States, and featured
Venegas’s own compositions and instnH
mentals.
SGAE PRESENTS ROCK LATINO
By invitation only
KADOC
This Spanish house-techno band scored in
1995 with the hit The Night Train," which
sold more than four million copies world-
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twenty years of zouk with the release
of Soldi.
wide. Other notable maxi-sin¬
gles include “You Giot to Be
There” and “Rock the Bells.”
Popular with Boy George, resi¬
dent DJ of the Ministry of
Sound, Kadoc has toured Europe,
Scandinavia, and Russia, and is a
favorite of Europride, the gay macrofes¬
tival. United People, Kadoc’s first album,
Was released in 1998.
SGAE PRESENTS IBIZA NIGHT
Opening-night party, by invitation only
KANPÉCH
Kanpéch is considered one of the top
three rasin (roots) bands in Haiti, along-
side Boukman Eksperians and Boukan
Ginen. The group formed in 1985 under
the name Sunrise and evolved a unique
style that blends rasin with rock, jazz,
Upes, and reggae. For the past two years
Kanpéch has won first place in Haiti’s
Carnaval. The music you’ll hear in -
Wednesday’s showcase features arresting
pop-rock melodies over a base of tradi¬
tional