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Miami New Times (Florida)

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Title:
Miami New Times (Florida)
Uniform Title:
Miami New Times (Florida) (Online)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publisher:
New Times, Inc.
Village Voice Media Holdings LLC.
Voice Media Group
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Frequency:
weekly
regular
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Miami ( fast )
Florida -- Miami-Dade County ( fast )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

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Creation/Production Credits:
Print began in 1995.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Voice Media Group. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
891087301 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Metro: A pay raise
for Miami commissioners -
more money, fewer dweebs?
V o I ti me II. Number ID
^LfühUE)j6arfies the passengers.
Nletrprail gets the moneyrThat s no fare.
Y&T Music
gives Amanda
the Green
light
Director Todd Solondz
relives the blunder
years in Welcome
to the Dollhouse
Hubris meets arrogance -
■■ ■ in Jorge Mas 'émmmmm. ■'■■■■ ■'
v. The New Republic. ,
. By Elise Ackerman.


lew Times June 20-26,1996
§
Token Ridership.. ... 22
Dade’s neglected bus system just might hold the key to the
county’s transportation woes.
By Kirk Semple
Jorge Mas
Canosav. The
Hew Republic. .13
What happens when you
call Mas a gangland
thug? Embarrassing
things and intriguing
things.
By Elise Ackerman
Metro:
I Like Hike 5
A Coconut Grove activist
• ’
proposes a pay increase
for Miami city
commissioners.
By Robert Andrew
Powell
Volume 11
Number 10
June 20-26,
1996
Letters
...3
Metro
...5
News of the Weird
..11
Troubletown
..11
Calendar
..34
Calendar Listings
.37
Earthweek
.37
Film
..49
Film Capsules
51
Showtimes
.53
Theater
..57
Art
..61
Cafe
..63
Dining Guide
.66
Music â–  â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– .â– â– â– â– â– â– 
..75
Reverb
77
Concert Calendar ......
.79
Into the Night .........
.81
Clubs
.83
Comics
.87
This Modern World
Steven
In a Perfect World
Miami’s Next
Weird Thing.. .75
Quiet riot grrrl
Amanda Green considers
fame in a karaoke
machine universe.
By Jim Murphy
Julius Knipl
The Quigmans
Classified p .90
Romance * I...............104
Editorial
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Tom Finkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Music Editor John Floyd
Staff Writers Elise Ackerman, Judy Cantor,
Jim DoFede, Kathy Glasgow, Ray Martinez,
Robert Andrew Powell, Sean Rowe, Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Dorothy Atcheson, Christine Tague
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
Listings Specialist Uz Martinez
Proofreader Georgia Rachman
Contributors Todd Anthony, Pamela Gordon,
Jen Karetnick
Editorial Intern Michelle Mayer
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Art
Art Director Dave Hogerty
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Production
Production Manager Carla Peters
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Production Amy Cinnamon, Ewald Fuchs, Marcy Mock
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General Sales Manager Jenni Price
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Publisher Greg Stier
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Letters Policy
Wp welcome letters to the editor via mail,
tax. or Intmif i. U rtor» may hr <-flitod tur
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¡¡L Pax: 372-3446
p? Internet:
Playing Politics at the Expense
of the Poor
Robert Andrew Powell’s article “From
Knight Manor to Nightmare” in last week’s
issue touched a strong chord in me; I am
an affordable-housing advocate. I com¬
mend nonprofits like Tacolcy that build
safe, decent, and affordable housing for the
working poor. Tacolcy’s Garden Walk in
Cutler Ridge is a perfect example of how
nonprofits put good deals together. The
development is beautiful — you can tell the
subsidy is in the project, not in their pock¬
ets. Tacolcy has a track record for taking
affordable housing seriously — and doing
it well.
Lorenzo Simmons was appointed to the
board of the Florida Housing Finance
Agency in the early Nineties because of his
know-how and experience. I know this
because I have had the opportunity to
study his approach to affordable housing
for several years now. I barely know the
man, but I can always recognize a Tacolcy
community. Shame on Miami city commis¬
sioners for allowing the Tacolcy project to
fail! This is a prime example of what hap¬
pens when politics and prejudice stop com¬
munity developers from building communi¬
ties. Liberty City certainly needs decent
affordable housing. I respect Simmons
even more for supporting the Urban
League of Greater Miami in its efforts.
Debra D. Sandstrom
Homestead
There's More to Grant Giving
Than Meets the Eye
I am very pleased to read such candid criti¬
cism regarding the state of the arts here in
South Florida. Judy Cantor’s article “The
(Kind of) Magnificent Seven” last week was
much needed to reveal some of the non¬
sense surrounding the arts. Her statement
that “some of the artists who received the
Cultural Consortium grants seem to have
been chosen because their work typifies
aspects of life in South Florida — i.e., Latin
American imagery, gay themes, and subur¬
ban culture” further proves that art’s only
moral value is to be good, and that its most
fulfilling reward is unrelated to sex, poli¬
tics, and religion. Is there more to art than
meets the eye? Depends on what you’re
looking for.
Kerry Ware
Miami
The Beach Cop Bop, Part 1
Just finished reading Elise Ackerman’s arti¬
cle about Gina Cunningham’s treatment by
the Miami Beach Police (“Insult to Injury,”
June 6).
I’m sorry for Ms. Cunningham’s pain, but
there was nothing unusual about the inci¬
dent — perhaps with the exception of the
fact that she knew how to get attention by
telling the press. There are plenty of people
who get treated the same way by police in
their own hometown but do not have the
connections to get any attention.
Of course, Ms. Cunningham’s complaint
to the review committee will come out
something like this: Br’er Fox sitting in the
hen house asks, “Did any of you other
foxes eat Farmer Brown’s fattest chicken?
See? Of course not, we’re all very good
foxes [citizens].”
The only time a police officer gets chas-.
tised (with pay, of course) is when some
really bad citizen catches him or her on
film. Let us not forget also that as long as
the “good cops” let the “bad cops” stay on
the force, they’re all bad. The good ones
have said, “It’s okay for these guys to rep¬
resent the blue uniform.”
What all communities need is a civilian-
dominated review committee for the police.
All the excuses as to why a civilian review
committee wouldn’t work — civilians don’t
understand, or the proceedings must be
secret — are so much horse hockey. If citi¬
zens really cared, they would call their
local commissioners — all of them — and
insist that it happen now.
John A. Brennan
Miami
The Beach Cop Bop, Part 2
Elise Ackerman’s article “Insult to Injury”
should be headed by words like scandalous,
brutality, criminal, excess, et cetera.
Police behavior like this is totally outra¬
geous and should be prosecuted vigorous¬
ly. Pepper spray, beating, lying two hours
on the floor? Pardon me? Is it standard
today in police circles to. use death-squad
tactics on bagged citizens? To serve and to
protect — what a joke. Just the language
used by the officers — even if only partly
true — shows a total disregard for human
dignity, constitutional rights, and their duty
as officers. Their thuggish behavior is
criminal and should trigger immediate sus¬
pension.
Alas, I fear all we’ll hear is a delayed “All
is well” by the leaders of this frat house.
Tragically, this nation is so programmed by
TV shows — the cops and the public both
— that a scandalous event like this does
not cause the outcry it deserves. Cops act
out TV, which is mostly violent, and the
public sees nothing but heroes in uniform.
The Miami Beach police are in dire need
of purges and extensive re-education, if
such a thing is possible.
Name withheld by request
Miami Beach
New Times, Inc.
Executive Editor Michael Lacey
Design Director Mm Mein Executive Managing Editor
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“I have never known a Miami city
commissioner who left office
I
Raising Pain
Glenn Terry thinks a salary hike is the answer to Miami’s
commission woes. Others insist it's money for nothing.
By Robert Andrew Powell
^pw that a special election has been
announced to fill the Miami mayor’s
seat, a searchlight scans the terrain
for leaders who are able and willing
to lead the city. Many names have been
bandied about, but so far the only people
who have actually stepped forward are
losers from the last city election. The ros¬
ter of aspirants includes Humberto
Hernandez, recently reprimanded by the
Florida Bar for handing out business cards
at a Valujet memorial service.
So shallow and murky is the candidate
pool that Miami Herald political editor
Tom Fiedler half-seriously proposed
Sylvester Stallone as a more favorable can¬
didate than anyone who’ll actually run.
“Miami city politics so rarely attracts peo¬
ple who embody the city’s reality and itsr
promise, who represent the very best of its
qualities, whose vision can keep pace with
real life,” Fiedler Complained in tapping
Stallone. He also fantasized about Mayor
Madonna.
Glenn Terry is neither a movie star nor a
mayoral aspirant Nor is he a career politi¬
cian. He tried to be a county judge once,
back in 1976, but hé considers his defeat at
the polls to have rescued him from a dis¬
mal legal career. Now instead of wrangling
over divorce cases he “raises his karma a
few levels” by teaching art classes at
Thomas Jefferson Middle School in
Northwest Dade.
Terry’s main accomplishment in the pub¬
lic arena is the King Mango Strut a leg¬
endary Coconut Grove spoof of the Orange
Bowl Parade. Owing in part to the success
of the Strut, which Terry founded in the
early Eighties, some Grove leaders asked
him to run for the Village Council, the
quasi-governtnental body that presents
Grove concerns to the city. Terry com¬
plied, won a seat last fall, and looked
around for something to do.
“It’s pretty boring mostly. We go to a lot
of meetings,” the 49-year-old Grove leader
grumbles about his post, for which he does
not get paid. “But I did ask, What the hell
can we do to get better leaders in the city
of Miami?’ I figured good leadership in the
city means good leadership for the Grove.
Yet when I looked at the city government, I
realized these guys work full-time for
$5000 a year. Their staffers can make
$45,000. That’s just crazy. That’s like going
to a doctor who is paid less than a nurse.”
Miami city commissioners do earn only
$5000 per year, a salaiy level that was set in
1949. Their pay is supplemented by full
health insurance, a car allowance, a cellular
phone allowance, and other perks, but even
with those benefits, the compensation is
dwarfed by the pay of the lowliest commis¬
sion aide. (The mayor, who has no more
power than his fellow commissioners, earns
no more pay, either.) Terry suspects this
subminimum wage salary is the reason the
commission can’t attract better leaders.
“I want the best people to run for and get
elected to city and county government I
want regular people, people like me, to run
for office,” he says, barely audible over the
background hollering of his two-year-old
son Ian. “I just want the people holding
these positions to be more than the
wealthy and those connected to wealth.”
Terry persuaded his fellow Village
Council members to ask city commission¬
ers to call for a raise referendum. “I can’t
poorer than when he came in.**
Annette Eisenberg, Downtown Development Authority
To improve the commission, improve commissioners' salaries, says Glenn Terry
believe an educated person who talks to
me for five minutes wouldn’t vote in favor
of the pay raise,” Terry says, describing
the support he’s already finding for his ini¬
tiative. Concurs former Miami commis¬
sioner Rosario Kennedy, who pulled down
five grand a year from 1985 to 1989:
“Something needs to be done. Miami is a
big, international city. Serving on the com¬
mission is a fulltime job. Many good peo¬
ple will not run until the job pays more
money.”
Commissioner J.L. Plummer, who sup¬
ports a pay raise hooked to a population-
based formula similar to the one that gov¬
erns the pay of most county
commissioners in Florida (though not
Dade County commissioners, who earn
only $6000 per year, plus perks), has seen
raises come to a public referendum three
times in his almost 26-year tenure on the
dais. Three times they were voted down.
“Each time, though, it was grouped with a
Continued on page 7
Roads Choler
Residents of Miami’s Roads neighborhood successfully fought
city hail. Now that they've won, they're fighting among
themselves.
By Robert Andrew Powell
L/ike most residents of the Roads neigh¬
borhood in Miami, northwest of
BrickeO Avenue and file Rickenbacker
Causeway, Lorraine Albury didn’t take
to the high-rise idea. When developers pro1
posed a nine-story apartment tower on a tiny
swatch of property four blocks from the house
where she has spent the past 56 years of ha7
life, Albury scrounged for money to help pay a
lawyer to quash the development
“I was strapped at the time. I did without,”
recalls the 81-year-old AJbury, who feared that
visitors to the apartments would park their
cars outside her modest home. “It’s one of
those tilings that you have to do. I sacrificed
plenty. I would have liked to do other tilings,
but I couldn’t do them. It was a hardship for
most people to donate, but everybody gave
what they could give.”
Luis Herrera, a truck driver who lives near
Albury, shared the sacrifice. When a commu¬
nity volunteer explained that the first legal bill
would be $2500, Herrera raided his vacation
fond. "The lady collecting money told me the
lawyer needed $2500,” he recalls. “She only
had something Ike $400.1 told her to wait one
minute, FA be back in a second. I made acheck
for $2500 and I gave it to her. That was my
vacation money, for my grandchildren to go to
Disney World.”
Besides forgoing Space Mountain, Herrera
grew so intent on foiling the apartment tower
project that he became president of the
Vizcaya Roads Homeowners’ Association.
Some nights he would stay up past 1:00 a.m.
posting flyers on front doors, only to leave two
hours later for the commute to his job in
Jupiter. “He busted his tail. He really worked at
it and suffered,” says Jesús Roiz, a neighbor
who joined Herrera’s group.
Mostly Herrera collected money for the
lawyers. Walking door to door, he solicited
checks made out to the Luis Herrera Legal
Fund. The money he collected went to pay for
about $50,000 in legal services, reasonable
when you consider that the case against the
developer and thé City of Miami went all the
way to the Florida Supreme Court, in 1992 —
and that the Supreme Court ruled in the home-
owners’ favor.
In a settlement this past September, the
City of Miami agreed to pay the developer
(an openly acknowledged friend of three
Miami city commissioners) one million dol¬
lars to not bufld the project The homeown¬
ers’ group enjoyed a small return as well, in
the form of $50,000 to cover the legal fees. In
December primary attorney John Fletcher
took from that jále bis final fee of $3129. The
remaining cache was to be returned to the
Lorraine Alburys and Jesús Roizes who had
donated money.
Emphasis on the was.
Six months after the city cut the $50,000
check, no homeowner has received a dime.
Roiz insists that Herrera is a sloppy book¬
keeper who can’t be trusted to return the
money to the residents. Herrera counters that
he is the president of the group and is free to
distribute (or not distribute) the money as he
sees fit A judge will settle the matter.
“The unfortunate thing is the neighbors
should be working together to resolve these
issues rather than fighting with each other and
distracting from what they really should be
doing,” says John Shubin, the lawyer who is
now trying to sort out the mess. “What they
really should be doing is finding everybody
who gave money and returning it to them.”
Roiz insists that Herrera has not properly
documented all the donations he collected.
Roiz is his own best example. According to
Herrera’s accounting, Roiz is due $200 for his
past contributions. Roiz insists he donated
more than $500, This discrepancy makes Roiz
suspicious aboutall the other donations.
Roiz joined Herrera’s fight to foil the project
Continued on page 9 5
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


• New Times June 20 *26,1998
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Continued from page 5
bunch of other items that the voters didn't
like,” Plummer notes.
But there is a good chance the item
would be rejected no matter how it sat on
the ballot. Skeptics, noting that some can¬
didates spend more than $400,000 to run,
assume the payoff for holding office is
more than just a warm feeling of civic ser¬
vice. “I said this years ago, and I’ll sáy it
again now: I have never known a Miami
city commissioner who left office poorer
than when he came in,” cracks Annette
Eisenberg, a board member of the
Downtown Development Authority.
“I don’t think money is-the issue here,”
adds David Gell, a Grbve activist.
“Whatever the salary, you get candidates
who are for the people and candidates who
are Trot, I don’t think pay is going to make
someone any more altruistic than another.
At $60,000 a year [the ballpark salary
Terry is kicking around], do you think
these people will be more honest or
“These guys work
for $5000 a year.
Their staffers can
make $45,000. That’s
like going to a doctor
who is paid less
than a nurse.”
straightforward than they are already?”
The 50 aldermen on Chicago’s city coun¬
cil each, earn $||>,000 per year for their
labors, an increase of $20,000 since 1991.
Similarly to Miami, “the rationale for the
raise was that they were considered part-
time employees but it was full-time work,”
volunteers Daphne Daume, vice president
of the League of Women Voters of
Chicago.
Now that they take home healthy
salaries, are the aldermen more honest?
“Funny, funny, funny,” replies Daume,
aware that several council members
resigned recently after “Operation Silver
Shovel” revealed they had allowed illegal
dumping in their wards in exchange for
cash payoffs. Several more remain under
investigation.
“To say that [a higher salary] would pre¬
vent corruption, our experience is no, it
doesn’t,” Daume states. And did the larger
paychecks raise the quality of the candi¬
dates running for the council? “Yes and
no. We have gotten some good people
who have run who might not have run
before. But we also have elected some jjj
who aren’t.” _
Terry is familiar with the uneven results
pay increases have had in other cities.
Raul Martinez, the oft-indicted mayor of
Hialeah, earns $70,00.0 a year, Terry
admits. Still, he sticks to his point: You’re
more likely to get quality if you pay for it
“After all,” he asks, “Do you know anyone
willing to work for $100 a week?”
What about Sylvester Stallone? Is it the
low pay that keeps him from ruling
Miami? “Unfortunately,” says a Stallone
spokesman in LA, “he has no comment at
this time.” CD


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Jesús Roiz still hopes for an equitable disbursement of donated funds
Roads
Continued from page 5
back in 1991, dropping out a year- later ter assist
the recovery from Hurricane Andrew. Hé
renewed his interest in the homeowners’ asso¬
ciation after the city Settlement and, in a letter
to Herrera, demanded a^reconcifiatieihof the
books: “During the first years of fundraising,
arid-in spite of frequent requests, you were
always reluctant to produce financial state¬
ments. Moreover, after sbtyéars of existence
of this fund I have never seen an audit of this
account Now you are no longer in trouble,, the
suits have been successful and everything can
go back to normal At this point thert has to be
a reconciliation and an audit for this,account
performed by an outside certified firm. You are
dealing with moneys belonging to hundreds of
people and which came from the city's general
fund. The refund has to be handled in a strict
business fashion.:
“I intend to oversee this work apd I am will¬
ing to work to make sure that ALL contributors
get their money back.”
Grumbles Roiz: “He was very sloppy. His
records were handwritten on pieces of paper
stored in a cardboard box. I do not believe his'
record of contributors is a complete listing. We
do not know who the contributors are. There
might be people who are out there who do not
know that the money has bee'n returned^
That’s why I am asking for a public listing.”
Upset that other people. Were teliing him
what to do, Herrera-refused to hire an out¬
side accountant; he had already found a
neighbor willing to do the job for free:-Roiz
recommended a .áéc’on-d, -independent
accountant. “He charge $130 an hour,”
^Herrera stammers in his uncertain English.
“I call Mr. Fletcher. I say, f am not going to
pay $130 to do accounting"jvhen I got one
that’s gonna do it for nothing.’ No way I’m
going to do it.”
Further annoyingHerrera, Barbara Samet,
one of théfounders-of the homeowners’ associ¬
ation, also/called to voice her opposition to his
choice of accountants. “I said, ‘Barbara, what
do you mean I can’t do that? This man is going
fo do it for üsfór free.’ She said to me, “No, you
Can’t do that’ I said, “Well listen, let me'tell you
something. I am the president of fifis associa¬
tion and this man offers it for free and that’s the
way we’re gonna do it’” (Samet declined to be
interviewed for this story.)
Herrera insists he is no thief and that hé has
maintained a proper accounting of all' the
money. ’“I don’t steal no money from nobody,
never in my life,” he declares. “I made a copy of
all tee checks^ including the cash money:
Whatever they give to me, I got a copy.” Still,
Herrera admits he-doesn!t know how much
money he personally donated to the fund. T
never figured outhowmuch I got in there. I fig¬
ure about $80t)0, or something like that, from
my own pocket”
After -the, ^Sep¬
tember 1995 settle¬
ment, attorney Flet¬
cher sent numerous
letters asking Herr¬
era, Roiz, and Samet
to agree on a meth¬
od of disbursement
He had not 'made
any progress by
March of this year,
when he was ap¬
pointed to the Third District, Court of Appeals.
The prestigious judicial appointment spurred
him toward a speedy solution. In a legal
motion, he asked Circuit Court Judge Celeste
Muir to distribute the money as she sees fit A
hearing is scheduled for July 10: ;
At an initial hearing before Muirla neigh¬
bor who accompanied Herrera declared that
mo money should be returned. “The only
persons asking formoney back are Barbara
Samet and Jesús Roiz,” said Carolina Paez,
according to court documents. “The rest of
the neighbors, they don’t want money back.
They’d rather have a strong association.”
-Herrera, a Cuban immigrant, is distancing
himself from that comment Even if the rest
of the neighbors don’t want the money, he
says, they should have it back. T don’t care
about money. I came to this country with
tone hand on the flops-and the other hand
behind jmy back. I don’t value money. I am
going togive the money back to everybody,
so (here is nothing to worry about” CD
“He was very sloppy. His records
were handwritten on pieces of
paper stored in a cardboard box.”
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News of the Weird
Lead Story
•Woe unto the perfectionist In May in North
Brunswick, New Jersey, police charged
Rutgers University math professor Walter
Petiyshyn, age 67, with bludgeoning his wife
to death. A friend said Petryshyn had become
despondent recently because he feared his
career had been ruined by an error in his lat¬
est textbook, Generalized Topological Degree
and Semilinear Equations.
•Breast exams in the news: This month the
first of six pending lawsuits against
Washington, D.C., physician Peter Kwon,
for improper diagnoses, goes to trial.
According to one patient, Kwon “examined
my breast no matter what I told him was
wrong.” Kwon admitted he gives breast
exams to every female patient if more than
30 days has elapsed since her previous
breast exam. And in May, the
Massachusetts Board of Registration of
Chiropractors-finally suspended the license
of Ronald A. Goldstein for giving improper
massages to fourteen women pver a seven-
teen-year period. Goldstein hád maintained
that the “uterine lift” and “chest spread”
treatments were legitimate.
The Entrepreneurial Spirit
•The coroner for Floyd County, Kentucky,
complained in February that ambulance dri¬
vers were taking obviously dead people to
the hospital just so that could bill the county
for rides. One man was rushed to the hospital
even though his suicide shotgun blast was so
powerful that it blew both eyeballs out of
their sockets. Another had been
dead so long that rigor mortis had
commenced, leaving the body bent
at the waist so that it would not fit on
a stretcher. The driver said he
thought he felt a pulse.
•In January the New York City parks depart¬
ment, which controls permits for vendors on
park land, doubled the annual fee for the hot
dog pushcart that had the exclusive license
for a spot just south of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art—to $288,200 a year.
•Reuters news service reported in May that
German scientists at the Max Planck
Breeding Institute have invented a suicidal
potato — the cells automatically kill them¬
selves if attacked by the potato blight fungus,
thus slowing the blight and saving crops.
People with Too Much Money
•This summer in Putney, Vermont, Honey
Loring expects 400 people to enroll in her
two-week, $1300 camp for dogs and their
owners. At Camp Gone to the Dogs (now in
its sixth year), she offers doggie square danc¬
ing, doggie swimming lessons, and a doggie
bathing suit pageant and costume parade, as
well as traditional classes in Frisbee catching.
•The Central Wholesale Market in Sapporo,
Japan, put two melons on sale in May with a
price tag of about $1285 each. They were
described as “perfect beauties” in color and
sweetness.
Government in Action
•According to criticism in May from Gov.
George Pataki, the New York City school
board recently voted to spend $187,000 to
put a metal art structure on the roof of P.S.
279 but not to repair the school’s elevator,
which has been broken for nearly two years.
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A VEAL
r .. Pataki said the board has spent $11 million
on artwork for public schools that have
problems ranging from leaky roofs to out¬
dated textbooks.
•The U.S. Treasury Department announced
that it would spend up to $32 million in a
worldwide public relations campaign on the
new counterfeit-proof $100 bill. (Within two
months of the bill’s release, in Richmond,
Virginia, alone, the Secret Service found at
least fourteen counterfeits of the new bill that
had been passed in stores.)
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11
New Times June 20 • 26,1996


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Jorge Mas
answered a
journalistic '•
hatchet job-.;
with a Abel
lawsuit.
But now
everyone is;
getting out
to the bone;.:
By
ELISE ACKERMA
I aOctofref 3,1994, the The New Republic
magazine published an article titled “Our
Man in Miami,” written by freelance jour¬
nalist Ann Louise Bardach. The story pur¬
ported to be a sweeping compendium oil
facts about the life of Cuban exile leader Jorge Mas
Canosa, Miami’s multimillionaire business executive
and chairman of the Cuban American National
Foundation. On-fhe magazine’s cover, Bardach’s article
was described this way; “Clinton's Miami Mobster.”
Over the,yeafs, the powerful anti-Castro activist had
fjw%athered numerous negative news reports.
Journalists had delved into Mas’s alleged CIA connec¬
tions, they had attempted to link him to covert opera¬
tions; in Latin America, they had brazenly expounded
upon his psychological makeup, and they had probed
the finances of the foundation and other organizations
with which it is allied.
; But no one had ever called him a mobster.
The New Republic did so three times: once on the
cover, again at the article’s opening as a subheadline
Continued on page 15
13
New Times June 20 -26,1996


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Jorge Mas Canosa: He's accustomed to being a controversial figure in the news, but the Hew Republic article made him go ballistic
Mobster
Continued from page 13
(“Jorge Mas Canosa: mobster and megaloma¬
niac”), and once more in the test of Bardach’s
lengthy piece: “People" do not like Mas but
they fear him.... These days, he barely bristles
when called a demagogue, a bully, a mobster
and worse.”
In fact, 56-year-old Mas has never been crinF
inafiy charged with anything. From his point of
view, the magazine’s use of the “mobster”
'appellation alone was an outrage. The article
itself was hardly any better.
And the timing couldn’t have been worse.
Just two months earlier President Clinton,
after meeting with Mas and other Miami coim
munity leaders, had embraced Mas’s policy
recommendations in dealing with that sum¬
mer’s burgeoning crisis of Cuban rafters head¬
ing for Florida by the thousands. It had been a
moment of vindication for Mas, a resounding
answer to critics who had long griped that he
was top authoritarian, too inflexible, too prone
to caudillismo, too similar in temperament to
his nemesis, Fidel Castro.
Now the Washington, D.C.-based publica¬
tion had revived those criticisms for the ben¬
efit of its 100,000 readers, many of whom are
Beltway insiders with little knowledge of
Cuban exile history and no conceptual con¬
text within which to measure the article’s
hyperbolic claims. (Bardach characterized
Mas’s relationship with Clinton as a
“Faustian deal.” She quoted a South Florida
writer who claimed that “Mas was bom and
bred by the CIA” and linked with such leg¬
endary spooks as covert operations master
Theodore Shackley and Miami’s Felix
Rodriguez, the man credited with the capture
of Che Guevara.)
“The article calls our client a criminal; more
than that it calls him a mobster, which is an
organized crime leader,” wrote Mas’s attorney
Hank Adorno in an October 4 letter demand¬
ing an apology and a retraction. “The article
accuses our client of a variety of other abhor¬
rent, anti-democratic and anti-sodal activities,
from controlling the main Cuban radio stations
in Miami and access to them to using them to.
encourage others to engage in violence, van¬
dalism, and other malicious or dangerous con¬
duct. The article,. .states that our client is, like
the prototype mobster, a person willing tlol
engage in crinfinal and other illegal behavior,
and is malicious and
vindictive. Thus it
recounts repeated
instances in which
people who ‘cross’
our Client suffer the
consequences one
would éxpect to suf¬
fer when one crosses
a mobster: losing
their careers or jobs,
being physically or
verbally abused, or
living in fear of such
acts of retribution.
The article characterizes our dientas a friend
of convicted criminals and others who engage
in immoral, if not criminal conduct
The article is a smear,” Adorno concluded.
“It is the essence of yellow journalism, written
fey a person with no regard for the truth or
responsible journalism.”
Filed a few weeks later on November 18,
1994, Mas’s defamation lawsuit listed Bardach
show that
domo fpfequently made
mñg remarks to the
sing attorneys.
and The New Republic as defendants and cited
40 examples of objectionable text Although
initially filed in state court the lawsuit was sub¬
sequently transferred to federal district court
because Bardach is a California resident
Miami attorneys Paul Schwiep and Jeffrey
Crockett of Aragon Burlington .Weil &
Crrickett, and Richard Ovelmen of Baker &
McKenzie, are defending Bardach and The
New Republic. Representing Jorge Mas Canosa
are Adorno and Raoul Cantero from theMiami
law firm Adorno & Zeda-. (Sanford L Bóhrer,
who represents New Times on First Amend¬
ment issues and is a former law partner of
Adorno, was erroneously recorded in federal
court as one of Mas’s attorneys.)
The allegedly libelous materials were so
voluminous that defense attorneys initially esti¬
mated they would need two full years to pre¬
pare for trial In an effort to expedite the law¬
suit, Judge Edward Davis split the discovety
phase of the case into two parts. (During dis¬
covery, the opposing sides exchange informa¬
tion and interview named parties and wit¬
nesses.) The first phase would consist of
research to establish whether Maswasa pub¬
lic figure, making it more difficult for him to
win his claim, and also to determine whether
the article was published with “malice” — that
is, with a “reckléss disregard” for the truth.
Continued on pa£e 17..
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Mobster
Continued from page 15
The second phase would be devoted to all
other aspects of discovery.
During the initial, discovery phase'which
ended two weeks ago, Mas and his lawyers
documented some of the most lamentable
foibles of modem American journalism: a fasci¬
nation with scandal, an embrace of stereo¬
types, inadequate research varnished with
facile prose, and stunning leaps of inductive
reasoning. Meanwhile, the other side was able
to force Mas to hand over many of the docu¬
ments that would have justified a hard-hitting
examination of his activities. It has been one; of
those rare instances in
which arrogance and
hubris collide with
equal force.
The gg depositions
themselves have been
uncommonly combat¬
ive, prompting attor¬
neys for Bardach and
The New Republic to
ask the court to in¬
struct Mas’s lawyers to
tone' down their
rhetoric. For example,
during a hearing before federal Magistrate
Barry Garber this past February, the attorneys
claimed that Hank Adorno had been so abu¬
sive during his questioning of Bardach that
they had been forced to abruptly terminate her
deposition. In addition, they said, while Adorno
was questioning Andrew Sullivan, the maga¬
zine's former editor, the attorney launched into
a profanity-laden tirade so vicious that the
court reporter fled the room.
Deposition transcripts also show that
Adorno frequently made insulting remarks to
the opposing attorneys. He told Jeffrey
Crockett, for instance, that he “got an A for
reading,” after Crockett recited portions of the
article during Mas’s deposition. Adorno also
commanded Paul Schwiep to “keep typing” on
his laptop, adding sarcastically: “That’s what
you’re good at”
Additionally, Schwiep recounted, “I was told
that I shouldn’t call myself a Cuban because it
was a disgrace to fee community.”
“You shouldn’t call yourself a what?” asked
the bewildered jurist
“A Cuban,” Schwiep repeated. “I’m Cuban,
judge, and proud of that heritage.”
“I have had the opportunity to review the
transcript.. .and quite frankly I think Mr.
Adorno’s conduct is inappropriate,” Magistrate
Garber commented during the hearing.
Turning to Raoul Cantero, one of Mas’s,
lawyérs, who also happens to be a grandson of
Fulgencio Batista, Garber said, “You know,
there’s no need to cast aspersions at counsel,
make snide remarks. That’s just totally inap¬
propriate and unnecessary, and it’s not going
to be tolerated.”
The idea for Bardach’s story grew out of a
Washington, D.C., dinner party in June 1994 at
the home of journalist and policy pundit
Christopher Hitchens. According to Bardach’s
deposition, the dinner guests, among them
New Republic editor Andrew Sullivan, began
talking about the emergence of moderate anti-
Castro groups. “There had been a human
rights report that had come out about the
abuses in the Miami community, that people of
different opinions weren’t allowed to express
their opinions,” Bardach said. “There were
accusations of everything from harassment to
intimidation to outright murders,... We were
talking about human rights in Cuba, human
rights in Miami. It was this kind of basic con¬
versation, you know, mostly dealing with free-
dom-of-speech issues.”
Sullivan suggested that Bardach write a
story about the Miami exile community.'
Months later, when Jorge Mas Canosa
emerged as the key exile figure during the
Cuban rafter crisis, the focus of the piece
shifted to him. At the time Bardach knew little
about Mas. She had seen a 60 Minutes seg¬
ment about him and had read a profile pub-?
fished in Esquire magazine. Both were highly
critical.
A 46-year-old screenwriter and freelance
Continued on page 18
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Continued from page 17
journalist, Bardach had begun writing about
Cuban-related topics in 1993, when she pub¬
lished a stpry in Vanity Fair about a woman
who claimed to be have oribe been Fidel
Castro’s mistress. Subsequently Bardach
obtained a rare personal interview with the
Cuban strongman. (Last year she won a PEN
USA West award for an interview she did with
Mexican ^guerrilla leader Comandante
Marcos.)
To prepare for her new assignment, Bardach
said in her deposition, she read hundreds of
newspaper articles. She also said she inter¬
viewed mpre than 80 people, including half a
dozen reporters and editors at the Miami
Herald, confidential government sources, and
leaders of other anti-Castro groups. She admit¬
ted, however, that 90 percent of her article was
based on previously published reports, and
that in particular she-relied heavily on the
research of South Florida writer Gaeton Fonzi,
an author and former researcher with the
House Select Committee on Assassinations.
Bardach did not interview Mas’s business
associates, and did not speak to any of file 100-
plus directors and trustees of the Cuban
American National Foundation (CANF),
although she asserted in her deposition that
“the opinion that I gathered from most people
is that Mas and CANF are interchangeable;
that he runs that organization, you know, lock,
stock, and barrel...and that there’s very little
dissent of opinion within the organization. I say
that based on my interviews with three or four
former directors.” :
When Hank Adorno quizzed Bardach for
names, she conceded that she had actually
spoken to only one former director. She had
simply read the deposition of one antagonistic
former director taken during an unrelated law¬
suit arid had looked over interviews Fonzi had
conducted with Raul Masvidal, one of the orga¬
nization’s founding members who is now a
vocal critic of Mas.
In attempting to sound out current CANF
supporters, Bardach limited her efforts to two
men in charge of public relations and to Joe
Garcia, a former foundation executive who left
in order to accept an appointment to Florida’s
Public Service Commission. Bardach also said
she tried to talk to Mas himself, enlisting
Garcia as an intermediary and appealing to
Mas’s personal secretary—to no avail.
Forihis part, Mas insisted under oath that
Bardach made no effort to get in touch with
him. “Who is Joe Garda?” he wondered aloud
during his deposition. “I, don’t recall who Joe
Gardfris, but no, I haven’t gotten any request
from Bardach to talk to me....Joe Garcia is a
very common name.”
Bardach's article
begins with Mas’s
August 1994 meeting
with Clinton: “When
Jorge' Mas 'Cariosa
sauntered out of the
White House Cabinet
Room on August 19—
following a 90-minute
meeting, with .the
President;, of the
United States, he was
irrepressibly gleeful. I
Although the combat¬
ive, scandal-plagued mega-millionaire has long
dominated Miami and, to-some degree, Florida
politics from the bully pulpit of his coffer-rich
Cuban American National Foundation, Mas
had just pulled off the coup of his career—dic¬
tating America’s new Cuba policy.”
From Bardach’s deposition:
; Hank Adorno: Tell me the source or sources of
-the factual information which is induded in the
first paragraph of your story.
Bardach: Some of the sources that I can recall
at this moment are the Miami Herald, and the
actual facts of the meeting were in the Miami
Herald.. .and somebody I spoke to at the State
Department
Adorno: And who’s that?
Bardach: He wishes confidentiality.
Adorno: Was that person at the meeting?
Bardach: I don’t know.
Adorno: Did you ask him whether he was at
the meeting?
Bardach: I don’t recafl.... Everybody learned of
the meeting very quickly. It spread through
the exile community, here instantly. And I
talked to people at Cambio Cubano about it
[Cambio Cubano is a Cuban-exile group philo¬
sophically at odds with CANF.]
Adorno: The Cambio Cubano individ¬
uals...were any one, either one of those indi¬
viduals at the meeting?
Bardach: No, they heard about it through the
grapevine.
Adorno: Did you seek to interview any of the
individuals that actually attended the meeting,
other than Jorge Mas Canosa?
Bardach: No, I relied on the Herald.
Adorno: What do you mean by the word
sauntered?
Bardach: You know, walked out, you know,
walking but with a bit more of a 12t3n the walk.
Adorno: And who described him? You didn’t
see him walk out, did you? •
Bardach: I was told he was very, very pleased
with himself
Adorno: Who told you that?
Bardach: The State Department and thé
Cambio Cubano people.
Adorno: None of which were at the meeting?
Bardach: I’m not sure about the State
Department, so yes, that’s the answer.
Other, ifrqre controversial passages in
Bardach’s article relied on similarly vague or
biased sources. For example, she claimed that
CANF had “pulled off the feat of securing mil¬
lions of dollars from government grants, tun¬
neling the funds through its various umbrellas
and PACs, such as the Free Cuba Committee,
and then paying much of it out to favored politi¬
cians and causes.”
From Bardach’s deposition:
Adorno: What millions of dollars have they
secured from government grants?
Bardach: This is based on the research and
published work of John Nichols in the Nation,
[a politically liberal weekly], and other pub¬
lished sources.
Adorno: First of all, did you do. any indepen¬
dent researchtodeterminewhat government
grants — meaning did you go to the govern¬
mental agencies and speak to them, or did you
just get this information from a published
source?
Bardach: Published sources.
Adorno: All I’m frying to establish is that
you’re going to find out almost all of that is
incorrect.... Was it your intent in these two
sentences to state that CANF, using jts non¬
profit, tax-exempt status, gets [government]
grant money and then somehow funnels it to
political causes?
Bardach: Yes, the point being that there have
been published articles questioning the non-


profit status of CANF because of its political
lobbying, to the extent of its political lobby¬
ing. And this is just á reference to all that
material that has been written about that
aspectof CANF.
Adorno^ Do you know whetherXANF has
an audited financial statement by a Big Six
accounting firm?
Bardach: I do not know.
Bardach’s reporting technique — imagina¬
tive extrapolation froin news accounts'— led
to a' series of minor'eirors.in her article. For
.example, she stated
that Clinton received
almost$300,000 in
“Mas-eóB tro Hed
Cuban exile money”
after attending
á v fundraise^ at
Victor’s Café. The
accurate sum was
about half -that
amount During her
deposition, Bardach
admitted she djTd
not. .speak .with
Jorge Perez of Paul Cejas, organizers of the
event. “I did not investigate who Was the
fundraiser, who,hired thehall, whdpaid the
bills,” she said. “All I know is that [Clinton]
left with contributions and pledges for a sig¬
nificant amount of money.”
“Of which you attribute to Mas, correct?”
asked AdoiW
> “To'Mas’s friends_and associates,” replied
Bardach. _
-Other errors ran the„gamut from trivial
(the location of M^s’s home and placing Joe
Carollo in office when he wasn’t) to the seri¬
ous (claiming Mas “dismissed” a Radio
Marti executive who in fact resigned, and
misstating Mas’s position regarding the
detention of Cuban balseros).
Still more mistakes wereeontained in pas¬
sages characterized as defamatory by Mas
and bis attorneys. For instance, Bardach
described Mas as “a good friend” of anti-
Castro terrorist Orlando Bosch, “who served
eleven years in a Venezuelan prison for blow¬
ing up a civilian Cuban airplane.”
As Adorno-pointed out during Bardach’s
deposition, Bosch was acquitted by the]
Venezuelan Supreme Court because of lack
of evidence: “I wasn’t even aware of the
acquittal at- that time,” Bardach responded.
“I didn’t learñ about the subtle perambula¬
tions that happened later. All I knew at that
time was that’he had done the jail time. I
operated under .the assumption that you
don’t do long sentences unless you are con¬
victed.” Bardach admitted she did not review
any court records or speak to either Bosch’s]
lawyers or the prosecutors involved.
Other sections of the story alleged to be
defamatory were less clearly false, but were
nevertheless hotly contested by Mas.
From Mas’s deposition:
Crockett: (reading from the article)
“Throughout the 1980s, Mas was a staunch
supporter of [William] Casey’s-covert-ven-
ture's in Xatin America:” Does that harm
your-reputation, sir?
Mas: Yes.
Crockett: How does that harm yóur reputa¬
tion?
Mas: I was not a supporter of Casey, or the
CIA, or any activities down there because I
did not know them.
Crockett: (reading from the article) “ ‘Mas
was bom and bred by the CIA,’ says Gaeton
Fonzi, a Miami-based writer and authority oh
Mas who has covered Cuban exile politics
for two decades.” Does that sentence harm
your reputation?
Mas: YeS, sir. -
Crockett How does it harm your reputation?
Mas: I have never been a member of the.
CIA. I never been hired, I never been bora
and bred by the CIA, I never done anything
for the CIA
Crockett What is wrong with being involved
with the CJA’s activities that harms your rep¬
utation, sir,?' .V
Mas: Tbjs is'riot riiy line of business... .1 find
that defariiatory. If s' a false statement
Crockett: Do you believe that Cuban exiles
in Miami, which were associated with the
CIA, have their reputations damaged by that
association? -
Mas: I don’t know.
Crockett: The next sentence, sir, states'
“ ‘He’s a master of psychological warfare. Bill
Clinton didn’t have a prayer once he agreed
to dance with Mas.’” Does that sentence
harm your reputation?
Mas: One at a trine.
•Crockett: You can break it up.
Mas: “He is a master of psychological war¬
fare.” That’s Mse. Notitrue.
Crockett: Does that harm your reputation?
Mas: Yes. -
Crockett: How does that harm your reputa¬
tion?
Mas: I’m not a psychological warfare master.
I’m a businessman.
During'Bardach’s deposition, she empha¬
sized that her principal sources were news¬
paper articles and writer Gaeton Fonzi, who
provided her with the quotation about psy¬
chological warfare. But she also relied on
individuals well known for their opposition
to Mas andón Miami friends with no particu¬
lar expertise. For example, she recounted
that a casual conversation led herto believe
that Mas supported covert operations in
Chile. “I walked into my friends’ apartment,
who are Cubans here, living in Miami, and
they were watching [a talk-show host] inter-
:view Mas Canosa,” she said, “and they told
me he had just expressed his support and
admiration for Pinochet-, a Chilean — the
dictator,* the former dictator of Chile. And
they said that he had said something about,
that he felt that, the feeling he expressed
was that Pinochet was a good role model for
what was needed in Cuba.”
Even if Mas could prove that Bardach’s
reporting was negligent, it would be of little
help "to him legally. As Miami libel expert
Tom Julin observes, the notion of malice as it
would apply in this situation (assuming Mas
is found to be a public figure) “is not about [a
reporter’s] duty to conduct an investigation;
ft’s about what was going on in a reporter’s
mind.”
Thus the discovery phase of the lawsuit
may prove far more beneficial to Bardach
and her lawyers than it will Jo Mas. Because
he objected to such a broad range of mater¬
ial in the article — involving statements that
encompass virtually every aspect of his life
— the defense lawyers are justified in seek¬
ing almost anything they want
Indeed, Crockett and Schwiep have energeti¬
cally pursued everything from documents that
indicate Mas intended to do business with
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Continued from page 19
communist China to paternity allegations
made against him by a woman who says she
was once his lover. (That case was chronicled
in a May 23 New Times cover story, “Love and
Cuba.”) Mas’s lawyers have objected to such
wide-ranging discovery, but Judge Davis has
general^ ruled against them.
Since June 1995, lawyers for Bardach and
The New Republic have submitted six
requests for documents, including one
demand that included 96 different categories
of material. The defense lawyers have asked
fon
•“Any and all documents related to Oliver
North.”
• “Any and ali documents relating to the hir¬
ing, retention, or use of private detectives by
Mas or CANF for the period from 1985 to
1995.”
• “Any and all documents relating to the
income and expenses of Mas for the period
from 198b to 1995, including bank accounts
and checks.”
•“All documents that refer or relate to any
communications, discussions, dealings, or
contacts of any nature between Mas and any
prosecution or law enforcement authorities
(state or federal) regarding any criminal con¬
duct or potential prosecution of any individ¬
ual, including Mas.”
• “All documents relating to all lawsuits in
which Mas has been a party or a witness.”
Mas’s attorneys balked. “Some of the
defendants’ requests...simply go too far,”
wrote Adorno in a court pleading. “They
either request production of a vast array of
documents, without limitation as to time or
scope, or they seek documents totally unre¬
lated to the issues of this lawsuit” In particu¬
lar, Adorno opposed releasing Mas’s tax
returns, information about hiring private
detectives, and lawsuits, which he main¬
tained were public record and thus readily
available to the defendants and their coun¬
sel.
In response, Crockett pointed out that at
least one civil suit involving Mas and his
brother Ricardo, inexplicably was missing
from the Dade County Courthouse, indicat¬
ing that public records regarding Mas may
be unreliable. “This is a lawsuit that the
plaintiff filed,” Crockett argued. “And the
certain amount of airing of Ins dirty laundry
is the necessary result... Wé’re entitled to
complete discovery on whether he’s involved
in any criminal conduct”
Schwiep maintained that Mas’s use of pri¬
vate detectives, was relevant because
Bardach’s article stated that during Mas’s
1992 battle with the Miami Herald he “told
the paper’s top brass that he had hired pri¬
vate detectives to investigate them and their
children.”
Schwiep wrote: “Mas’s utilization of private
detectives to investigate opponents (and pos¬
sibly supporters) is directly probative ofthe
article’s allegedly libelous portrayal of Mas
as manipulative,- intolerant, and intimidat¬
ing.”
In an order issued this past December,
Magistrate" Garber ruled that Mas did not
Have to produce his financial documents at
that point in the case, but he did order Mas
to produce the other- disputed items, with
the provision that material related to private
investigators would first be reviewed by
Garber in his chambers before being admit¬
ted as evidence in*the case.
By this past January Mas had turned over
more than 300 pages of confidential personal
information, as well as boxes-of material
related to the Cuban American National
Foundation, including membership contribu¬
tion statistics, Mas’s correspondence with
foundation executives and editors at the
Miami Herald, the foundation’s advertising
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budget during Mas’s battle with the newspa¬
per (for the “I Don’t Relieve the Herald”
campaign), paperwork relating to various
grants received from the National
Endowment for Democracy, and, internal
foundation memos.
As word of the lawsuit spread, other people
began providing information to the defense
team. Anonymous packages began showing
up. Former Mas associates telephoned and
volunteered their cooperation.
Among the most damaging material in the
court file today is a deposition from Mas’s
estranged brother Ricardo, which repeats
allegations Ricardo made during the course
of a libel suit filed in 1987. Mas’s younger
brother alleged that Jorge Mas had made
cash payments to Dade County commission¬
ers and one state senator in return for politi¬
cal favors, and that he had evaded taxes by
keeping money'in offshore bank accounts.
He also alleged that Mas bestowed gifts
(including cash) upon Southern Bell execu¬
tives.
Ricardo Mas repeated those allegations
this past April 16 in a deposition taken as
part of the The New Republic lawsuit In addi¬
tion, Ricardo alleged that in the early
Eighties Mas reached an agreement with a
Broward-based business competitor not-to
compete for contracts in each other’s terri¬
tory. The alleged pact may have violated fed¬
eral antitrust laws.
Lawyers for Bardach and The New
Republic also requested the release of mate¬
rials gathered in 1990 by a federal grand jury
that aHegédly investigated Ricardo’s claims.
In addition, they demanded that Mas turn
over all his passports from 1985 to present
and his “telephone books, Rolodex, tele¬
phone log or similar compilation of names,
addresses, and telephone numbers for the
period from 1985 to present”
“The defendants have pursued a scorched-
earth strategy for litigating this case,”
Cantero wrote in protest. “They have
adopted the position that because the plain¬
tiff emphatically denies he is a mobster, they
are entitled to discovery about virtually
every aspect of his personal life.” .
Magistrate Garber disagreed. “Among the
issues in this cause are whether [the] plaintiff
is a ‘public figure/ ” Garber noted. He reasoned
that the documents could “shed light on such
issue” by revealing Mas’s “community status”
through his association with government and
media officials. Mas has since declared that he
could not find anything except his passport
from 1991 to 1996. The request for the 1990
grand jury material is pending.
Ultimately the case comes down to the defin¬
ition of defamation and how it applies to some¬
one like Jorge Mas Canosa. Were the glib
phrases written by Bardach capable of defam¬
ing him? Were they produced with a reckless
disregard for the truth? Can he show how he
was injured? Did it ruin Mas’s reputation to be
associated with the CIÁ, to be described as
intimidating, to be accused of misusing gov¬
ernment grants? Should the word “mobster”
be considered libelous on its face? -
Former editor Andrew Sullivan explained
in bis deposition that when he wrote
“Clinton’s Miami Mobster” he did not mean
it in the literal sense that Mas was involved
in organized crime. “I thought of it as some¬
body who was clannish, controlling, intimi¬
dating,” Sullivan said. “Those were the sort
of features that stood out for me.”
During Mas’s deposition, the defense
lawyers asked what “defamation” meant to
•him personally. “Defamatory in my opinion
is when you print a lot of lies about me and
you call me a mobster,” he. said. “That’s my
definition of defamation. You have defamed
me.” CD
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New Times June 20 • 26,1996


[ÍMetrobusll Dade’s most effective public transportation. ’ |
But when it comes to funding, the bus system and its patrons
always get taken for a ride. Mm


It’s that time again, when local politicians crank up
the rhetoric, express their profound concern, promise
the impossible. And regardless of whether they’ve
officially declared their candidacies, Dade’s mayoral
hopefuls are at the vanguard, plumbing the depths of
credibility with their pretty come-ons to potential vot¬
ers. Among their talking points: public transporta¬
tion. And boy do they have plans for our transit sys¬
tem! Two politicos — Metro Commission Chairman
Aft Teele and Xavier Suarez, former mayor of Miami
— have vowed to ratchet back bus and rail fares from
$1.25 per ride to an alarmingly low 50-cents.
.¡jOf course, this will never happen. There’s barely
enough money to pay for the system as it is: It oper¬
ates at adeficifof slightly less than $89 millipn annu¬
ally (which is offset by property taxes, plus a penny
per gallon from the county’sisix-cent gas tax).
Lowering the cost of a trip by 75 cents would cut rev¬
enues by more than $29.5 million, and there’s no evi¬
dence that a fare reduction would attract enough new
riders to make up the shortfall, even if it were linked
with other incentives, such as frep parking at
Metrorail stations (which now costs two dollars per
day) and free transfers (now 25 cents apiece).
Furthermore, drastic financial modifications would
require a drastic shift in the mindset prevalent
among our public officials, which until now has been
dominated by tf ldyeaffair with trains. Though
there’s a consensus that Metrorail and its downtown
offspring Metromover-ire one of the biggest
American transportation boondoggles of the"
Twentieth Century, county officials are malting plans
to spend vast sums to extend the rail in at least two
directions. The victims of the generation-old obses¬
sion with rail: Dade’s bus system and the passengers
Contirtliied on page 24


New Times June 20-26,1996
Norman Wartman: “We basically gutted our bus system, gutted highway projects
which buses would run, in order to put together the Metrorail system.”
\
Token
¡Continued from pago 23
who depend on it Amid all the banter about
rail, there is precious little talk about buses.
“Metrobus is the forgotten stepchild,” goes
the common refrain. Passengers-say it.
Drivers say it. Transportation economists
say it Even some county bureaucrats say it
(softly). The bus system is understaffed,
underfunded, undersupplied, and under-
maintained. There aren’t enough buses on
the road to adequately serve the existing
ridership and not enough mechanics to
maintain the buses the county does have.
“We basically gutted our bus system —
existing and potential — gutted public
works and highway projects on which buses
would run, in order to put together the
Metrorail system,” says Norman Wartman,
a long-time transit activist who now chairs a
Metro-Dade transportation advisory board.
“We’ve been paying for it ever since.”
Wartman and other bus boosters are in
favor of a back-to-basics approach to public
transportation in Dade. They emphasize
that unlike trains, bus routes are flexible
and can be adjusted as demand warrants.
"The foundation of the transit system is the
carpools, the buses, the jitneys,” Wartman
argues. “We need to have the base of the
pyramid broadened. Because this county is
50 miles deep by 30 miles wide, a little
teensy line on the map is not a cure-all.”
T. Willard Fair, president and CEO of the
Urban League of Greater Miami, agrees, but
he’s skeptical about the ability of Dade’s
public leadership to see the light. “We have
a tendency in this community to initiate pub¬
lic policy for the emotional image of the
community,” says Fair, citing as an example
the recent scramble to build a new arena
downtown. “And the development of our
rapid-transit system fits into that image-as-
public-policy making. We have this notion
that if we’re going to have a first-class, 21st-
century city, we need these massive devel¬
opments,”
And in order to acquire them, Fair con¬
cludes, “we are willing to sell our soul.”
INTERLUDE:
THE S BUS-WAITING FOR GODOT
From the archives of the Metro-Dade
Transit Agency Complaint Department: ’•
To Whom ItMay Concern:'
¿ f am a regular user of public transporta¬
tion, exclusively buses, I depend on Metro-
Dade bus transit to take me to and from
work. I take the S route bus at the comer of
Eleventh Street and Alton Road (in front of
the First Union Bank), going downtown.
The usual time I am there is 10:00 a.m. to
10:15 a.m. daily. The bus service at this hour
is terrible to say the least I am not alone in
this opinion.
I have had to wait 30 minutes for buses.
Other times buses pass by but do not bother
stopping because they feel they are “full.”...
Friday, August 11, 1995,1 got to the bus
stop around 10:10 a.m. I had just missed the
bus, because I saw it leaving that bus stop á
minute before. After approximately fifteen
minutes, an S bus passed without stopping,
motioning that there was another bus
behind. That bus was an F/M bus, which I
do not use, therefore it was no use to me.
About 30 minutes later, another S passed
by. This driver wasn’t taking any more pas¬
sengers either.... However, the next S bus
that passed around 11:00 a.m was bus
#1158. Finally I was on my way to work,
though I start at 1030 a.m.
' I feel it is ridiculous to spend more time'
waiting for á bus than actually riding it Will
the bus service improve?...
yjitio not know how to drive. I rely on
Metro-Dade bus transit, though I wish I did
not have to. I need to get to work and make
a living. I really hope things improve for us
bus transit users. Any advicé?
Sincerely,
Rose de la Cruz
If Metrobus is indeed the neglected
stepchild of the Metro-Dade Transit Agency
(MDTA), then Metrorail and Metromover
are its overindulged siblings, show ponies to
Metrobus’s workhorse.
The numbers clearly delineate this unbal¬
anced relationship:
•Metrobus serves more than 201,000 one¬
way passengers each weekday; Metrorail
and Metromover combined serve fewer
than 65,000.
•Metrobus routes cover a service area of
500 square miles; the rail systems stretch a
paltry 23 miles.
•In the past fiscal year, Metrobus boasted
revenues of $52.1 million — 73 percent of
MDTA’s totai revenue; Metrorail and
Metromover pulled in only $13.4 million, or
19 percent
Continued on «age 27 .
24 Taken for a ride: Waits of more than half an hour during peak hours are all too common


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Transit activist Norman Wartman questions the value of throwing more money at Metrorail
Token
Continued! from page 24
•More significantly, Metrobus was able to
recoup 42 cents of every dollar deposited
into the fárehox, ohe of the highest rates
among U.S. public bus systems and far
superior to the 24-cent return on every dol¬
lar expended at the turnstile for Metrorail
and Metromover. (The so-called farebox
recovery has never been higher than 27
cents per dollar for the rail system.)
•Despite its greater utility and productivity,
Metrobus splits local funding fairly equally
with the rail systems. During the past fiscal
year, for example, Metrobus received 47
percent ($47.5 million) of the property tax
dollars allocated to the transit system, while
the rail systems received 43 percent ($43.3
million).
•Metrobus costs $.1-9,7 to operate per one-,
way passenger. Metrorail costs $3.34 per
passenger; Metromover $2.21. (In a 1994
study undertaken by transportation
researchers at the-University of South
Florida, Dade County showed'the highest
operating expense per passenger trip
among five metropolitan rail systems
surveyed. Metrobus
finished in the middle
of the pack in a simi¬
lar survey of Severn
bus systems.)
Metrorail didn’t
/always se’p-nHike a
bad idea. The notion
of a rail system
.gained currency dur¬
ing the _1974 oil
embargo and the
.attendant panic
at)out the potential
for three-dollar-a-gal-
Joh gas prices. Here
and elsewhere, civic
and government leaders began envisioning
mass-transit alternatives to the automobile,
and many hit on an elevated rail as a solu¬
tion.
Predicting Metrorail would serve more
than 250,000 one-way passenger trips daily
by the mid-Eighties, the county’s consul¬
tants recommended a 54-mile, 54-station
plan, the first leg of which would run from
Kendall to Hialeah. Academics believed the
system was inappropriate for a sprawling
megalopolis like Miami and was destined to
flop. But the federal government agreed
with the consultants and financed 80 per¬
cent of the approximately $1.2 billion con¬
struction costs. In 1984 the Kendall-to-
Hialeah .line opened — and almost
immediately became an. embarrassment of
national proportions.
Ignoring prevailing theory, designers did
not build tracks along roads that already
had a high volume of public transportation
(and therefore a built-in ridership). Instead
the route passed through low-density neigh¬
borhoods, went nowhere near major tourist
attractions, and was badly integrated with
the bus system, inspiring critics to lambaste
it as a service designed for South Dade’s
middle class at the expense of the transit-
"dependent, urban-dwelling poor. Ridership
figures fell far short'of initial projections.
The system became known as Metrofail.
' Without the anticipated rail ridership to
help defray costs, the county was forced to
suck money away from the bus system. A
promised augmentation of the bus fleet was
delayed, and commissioners forged ahead
with the next rail stage: Metromover.
After the downtown loop was completed in
1986, Metrorail ridership figures increased
by fewer than 10,000 trips per year — at a
price of an additional six million dollars per
year in operational costs. (Simultaneously,
bus ridership decreased by nearly 5000 trips
annually.) Still, at the beginning of this
decade, when the, time came to build the
Metromover’s extensions to the Omni and
Brickell, there was again little hesitation.
Among the plan’s critics, however, was
the transit workers’ union, whose leaders
argued that the money should go toward
beefing up the bus system. “I think too
much priority was placed on [the
Metromover],” complains Eddie Talley,
president of Transport Workers Union
Local 291. “During the time money was
allocated to the new legs, we tried to get
the county to use the money to double the
bus fleet as they had promised. Instead we
have an expanded Metromover downtown
thattumed out tobe a detriment to tiicius
system.”
That vaunted bus-system augmentation
never did come to be. Today the county has
an operating fleet of about 600 buses,
“essentially the same” number in use when
Continued on page 28
Critics lambasted
Metromover as a
service designed For South Dade's
middle class at the expense oF
the urban-dwelling poor.
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New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20-26,1996
Metrobus serves more than 201,000 one-way passengers each weekday, more than three times the
number served by Metrorail and the Metromover combined
Token
Continued front page 27
Metrorail opened in 1984, according to
Vernon Clarke, general superintendent of
the MDTA’s bus operations division.
Moreover, Clarke says, at any given lime
about 12Q of those buses are in the shop
for repairs, “During the peak hours, we
need to have approximately 480 to 490
buses on the road,” Talley notes. “We’re
scraping the bottom of the barrel to get
that."
:!girhe size of the fleet certainly hasn’t kept
pace with Dade’s population, which has
grown by fifteen percent since 1984. A
maintenance facility built in the early
Eighties to house 1500 buses has been
abandoned by MDTA and is now leased to
the school system for one dollar a year.
Fewer buses serving a larger and more
widespread population means less-fre¬
quent service, a common complaint among
riders. A 1994 MDTA report summarizing
that year’s schedule illuminates the prob¬
lem: During peak hours, buses on no more
than 26 of 72 routes ran at fifteen-minute
intervals or better. On about half the
routes, passengers couldn’t hope for more
than one bus every half an hour. Of those,
at least eighteen routes required a wait of
up to an hour or more. The figures haven’t
improved significantly sincé then. (By
comparison, Metrorail trains run no more
than twenty minutes apart — there’s a
train every seven minutes during morning
and afternoon rush hours -Ja and
Metromover cars come at six-minute inter¬
vals.)
The skeletal condition of the bus system
is a bane to those who most need public
transportation. According to another 1994
MDTA survey, about half of all Metrobus
riders are unemployed, with about two-
thirds reporting annual household
incomes of less than $20,000. Nearly 80
percent said the main reason they rode the
bus was that they had no car or didn’t
(hive. Metrorail passengers, on the other
hand, are a comfortable lot: According to
the same survey, nearly one-third have
household incomes of $40,000 or more.
The vast majority cited traffic congestion
and parking problems as their reasons for
riding the rail.
Even worse, with the advent of Metrorail
a far greater percent of bus routes were
eliminated from low-income neighbor¬
hoods than from high-income ones. As
part of his college senior thesis, Kendall
native and Harvard economics student
Eric Nierenberg compared bus maps from
1983 (pre-Metrorail) and 1995 (post-
Metrorail) and calculated the number of
bus routes passing through each of Dade's
census tracts. Census tracts with a median
household income of less than $10,000 suf¬
fered a loss in bus service of more than 50:
percent, Nierenberg found, while tracts
with median household incomes of greater
than $40,000 experienced only a 13.2 per¬
cent decrease.
Though Nierenberg counted only bus
routes and not the actual number of buses
per census tract, he says that a preliminary
analysis of about a quarter of the tracts
revealed that the reduction in actual fre¬
quency was even greater in the lower-
income areas. “When they introduced
Metrorail, they cut back on bus service
partly because they thoiight they’d elimi-.
nate overlap {with Metrorail] and partly to,
prevent'ballooning costs,” Nierenberg
says. “But the majority of service they cut
was in lower-income areas. They built a
system that’s supposed to help poor people
but it actually penalized poor people.”
Roosevelt Bradley, MDTA’s new assis¬
tant director of bus operations and mainte¬
nance, hasn’t studied the socioeconomic
impact of bus cuts and therefore can’t com¬
ment on Nierenberg’s findings. But
Bradley says that no matter where he goes
in Dade — whether to wealthy neighbor¬
hoods or poor ones — residents complain
that there aren’t enough buses. The pub¬
lic is definitely screaming for more ser¬
vice, and more service means to provide
more buses,” he acknowledges, putting
the ideal number of buses at somewhere
between 800 and 1000.
Unfortunately, say Bradley and his boss,
MDTA Director Chester “Ed” Colby, there
just isn’t any money for such a purchase.
“We’re not expanding anything,” confirms
Colby. “We haven't had a budget that’s had
money in it for a long time.”
In spite of Metrorail’s less-than-stellar pub¬
lic reception, the two most ambitious tran¬
sit-improvement projects now under way
in Dade — meant to unclog two congested
roadways, State Road 836 and NW 27th
Avenue — are rail-centered. Though both
are still in the study phase, buses are an
afterthought, if a thought at all.
The State Road 836 study, commonly
known as the East-West Corridor Project,
is aimed at relieving the gridlock along the
Dolphin Expressway, which runs from 1-95
to Florida’s Turnpike, It calls for carpool
Janes, an expressway link between 836 and
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“Dade County is as Far back in the queue to get Federal transportation dollars as
Butte, Montana, is to get FBI agents,” says Metro Commission Chairman Art Teele.
International Airport. The project’s pri¬
mary component is an elevated Metrorail
track tGTun from the Palmetto Expressway
to the Port of Miami.
And the bus? Kouroche Mohandes, a
Florida Department of Transportation
engineer who is coordinating the project,
says thaf if the rail is built, planners would
reconfigure the bus system to provide
feeder service. There has also been talk of
sending express buses along the carpool
lanes before the rail is finished. The entire
project is expected to cost about $2.5 .bil¬
lion.
Transit mayen Norman Wartman is look¬
ing for more immediate attention. He pro¬
poses constructing bus-only lanes along
the Turnpike between Kendall Drive and
NW 41st Street, and on State Road 836
between the Turnpike and Le Jeune Road.
He says there’s plenty, of room either in
the median or along the roadside to build
the special lanes. “We could do it cheap as
mud and for. a fraction of the cost of one
mile of rail,” Wartman declares. Until the
rail is-built, the bus routes could help to
develop a transit ridership.. When the rail
is built, they would feed the system at a
station planned for the intersection of the
Palmetto and SR 836, Wartman has intro¬
duced the idea to planners. ?They said
they’d ‘think about it,’ ” he scoffs.
The second big transit project is the
North Corridor Transit Study, intended to
undog the 27th Avenue artery^
Commissioners have narrowed the possi¬
ble designs to three. Two involve building
an elevated Metrorail extension up NW
27th Avenue to 215th Street, with offshoot
extensions to Joe Robbie Stadium and
Miami-Dade Community College’s North
Campus. The third involves the construc¬
tion of a reversible bus lane The coui^^É
awaiting funds to pay for an. environmental
impact statement for the study. Planners,
as well as several: county commissioners
— particularly Art Teele ánd Betty
Ferguson — are gung-ho about the rail.
Preliminary studies have concluded that
the rail is half as cost-effective as the bus
but will attract five to six times more new
riders.
There are detractors (among them a
commissioner or two) who say it looks like
another enormous waste of moheyr'One
county consultant has estimated that á
Metrorail extension up NW 27th Avenue
will increase rail ridership by about 23,000
trips per day but will encourage only about
4800,new public-transportation riders. The
line’s estimated cost: between $453 million
and $463 million, depending on its place¬
ment.- Ushigta-formula that-figures annual-
ized capital costs, planners estimate that
the system will cost between $17.80 and
$18.22 per new rider. (A busway wouldn’t
be much rosier: It is estimated to attract
only about 800 new transit riders per day,
although at a far more cost-efficient rate of
$9.23 per new passenger.)
The north corridor Metrorail leg might
be an economically worthwhile option, crit¬
ics say, if it were to hook into Broward’s
transportation system. One proposal is to
run the extension up to the Broward Mall
at the intersection of University Drive and
Broward Boulevard. But already the'
Plantation City. Council has passed a reso¬
lution opposing a railroad track running
through their city to the mall.
Proponents say the rail has no chance of
becoming profitable until it’s fully com¬
plete, that our investments in this century
will pay off in the next. It’s an argument
that-taxes, the patience of Miami attorney
Richard Friedman, w(ho led a citizens’ fight
against the construction of Metrorail.
“That big lie has been perpetuated in all
the writings of MDTA,” Friedman com¬
plains; “They used the same argument [to
expand] the Metromover. At one point
.they said, ‘We only have half -the
Metromover, so unless we complete it we
won’t be able to attract all these people
who are going to jump on the Metrorail.1”
Even Commission Chairman Art Teele,
who supports both corridor projects,
decries the inadequacies of Metrobus. “It’s
horrible!” he exclaims. “I don’t think we
need to build another inch on this rail sys-
tem until‘we rationalize and make sense of
our bus system. The problem is, what can
you do? When you have a troubled com¬
pany, it’s hard without money to solve the
problems. It’s like pulling up a blanket
that’s too sma]l for tibe bed. Something’s
going to be uncovered.” ~
There’s no guarantee, Teele adds, that
any of the extensions will ever be built.
“Dade County is as far back in the queue
to get federal transportation dollars as
Butte, Montana, is to get FBI agents,” he
says.
Federal and state assistance has been
drying up in recent years, explains Danny
Alvarez, MDTA deputy director for admin¬
istration, with federal operating subsidies
for MDTA dropping in the past decade
from about $18 million to about $7 million.
Dade is still without a local funding source
solely earmarked for public transportation
:r*sa dedicated revenue source that would
vastly improve the county’s chances of
winning matching federal funds. Voters
have twice rejected efforts to create a spe¬
cial transit sales tax, in 1990 and again in :
1991.
Wartman says it’s unlikely the public is
going to look kindly on another attempt in
the hear future. “It's going to take a mas¬
sive increase in the faith of the population,
and thaf s only going tobe done when they
see us move a lot of people at a reasonable
cost,” he says..“If you have someone
you’ve given money to, and they’ve gone
Continued on page 30
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Continued from page 29
and blown that money, are you going to
give them money later? Because of the
mistakes of the past, we’re screwed now.”
INTERLUDE:
A MOMENT IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT
A total of 1084 people work as Metrobus
operators. The majority are black (713)
and male (913). They make gbod wages,
ranging from a rookie rate of $7.28 per
hour to a veteran’s top scale of $15.98. On
top of that, they have the opportunity to
work a lot of overtime.'
“This is one of the few places that a minor¬
ity can come in and get a decent-paying job
and not have educational requirements. But
don’t let the rates fool you,” cautions Eddie
Talley, who was hired as a bus operator in
1966, and continued driving even after
becoming full-time union president in 1989.
According to Talley, Metrobus operators
work for fifteen to twenty years — and die
an average of three years after they retire.
None has lived more than ten years after
turning in his keys.
‘The doors open up and the driver gets the
brunt of all the negatives out there in the
street, not to mention all the bad traffic, peo¬
ple bringing all their bad driving habits from
other countries,” Talley carps. “And we’re
expected to maintain our schedule out there!”
'f lbne'of ihe first black drivers hired by
Dade County, Franklin Jenkins ranks as
MDTA’s senior driver, with 34 years behind
the wheel. The key to his longevity? T try
not to get upset,” he ventures. “You hear
things from passengers and you just have to
let it go. If cars cut you -off, you don’t let it
bother you. It’s nerve-racking and every¬
thing else.”
Richard Roberts was hired as an operator
in 1963, a year and a half after Jenkins. “It’s
more stressful now than when I started,”
says Roberts, an avuncular man who favors
tinted bifocals and a goatee. like Jenkins,
Roberts is slender, a rarity among Dade’s
beefy bus corps. “The traffic is a lot worse
and the passengers are a lot worse,” he
explains. “Back then if you asked somebody
to do something, they usually did it. Now if
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tell you where to go. You learn over the
years that you need to laugh it off, not get
uptight If you do, you end up retaliating.”
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Metrobús receives
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v y
Indeed, Metrobus headquarters receives
plenty of complaints about rude or danger¬
ous drivers, and about operators who ,have
bypassed waiting passengersv(It’s not
uncommon in Dade to hear out-of-town rid¬
ers marvel at the antics required to flag
down a bus; some drivers seem only to stop
for,the equivalent of a full-bore cheerleading
maneuver,)
Conceding that there are “some bad
apples,” Roosevelt Bradley says he is insti¬
tuting more training in customer relations
and in the provisions of the Americans with
Disabilities Act. But he and other upper-
level managers say behavior is much better
â– than it has been in the past
Good things, too, have been known to hap¬
pen; Richard Roberts remembers especially
clearly an attractive hospital worker who
used to regularly ride his bus home. They’re
now married.
Bus supporters have some causé to rejoice
.^jpr at least to be cautiously optimistic. The
state is nearing completion of an eight-mile
busway that will run along South Dixie
Highway from Cutler Ridge to Kendall
Drive, (Cost: $6 million per mile, versus
Metrorail’s cost of $57 million per mile.)
Transit officials hope to extend that busway
ail the way down to Florida City within a few
years. Plans are also afoot to develop routes
for smaller buses to circulate through neigh¬
borhoods and feed the major arteries and
the'jail, a project desigñed to challenge jit¬
neys, privately owned vans that have
cropped up in recent years to fill the holes in
the bus system. ¿According to MDTA, jit-
neyg have sucked an estimated six million
dollars per year in revenues away from the
county.) '
?\|h another recent development that may
reflect a change in transit prejudices, the
Metropolitan Planning Organization, a
cqgnty transportation board composed
mainly of Metro, commissioners, recently
authorized a thorough review of Tri-Rail.
The vote was requested by members of an
appointed citizens’ advisory group that
wondered whether the rail should be left
as is, modified, or eliminated. The group
pointed out that,while Tri-Rail staff has
doubled, ridership has dropped. Weekday
riders have decreased from about $500,
(February 1905) to about 7000 (February
1996). Fare revenue is only about $5.4 mil-
continued on page 32
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Continued from page 31
lion, a fraction of the $70 million annual
subsidy. By the group’s calculations, Tri-
Rail is being subsidized to the annual tune
of more than $17,500 per passenger. (Most
of the,operational cost of the Tri-Rail
provided By the state; Dade, Broward, and
Palm Beach counties kick mafepytoiie mil¬
lion dollars each.) In outlining their con¬
cerns, the citizens’ group asked whether
an express-bus service could better serve
the commuting population.
Making reference to the vote to review
Tri-Rail, Metro Commissioner Alex
Penelas. says he’d like to review the entire
transit system, with an eye toward perhaps
turning over Metrorail to a private contrac¬
tor.
Among MDTA bus personnel, a modicum
of hopefulness-lias been brought about by a
recent change in administration. This past
January, when Ed Colby appointed Roosevelt
Bradley as assistant director of bus
operations, he alsoH
tapped Bradley’s
boss, Carlos Bonzon,
for the post of deputy
director of bus and
train ‘operations.
While neither'-has
been in the job long
enough to prove his
worth, managements
traditional adver¬
saries are hopeful.
Union president
Eddie Talley ¿says
Bradley has already
presented some “cre¬
ative and innoyafiyel
plans” for improving
the system. As for Bonzon, who is the former
director of Dade’s Building and Zoning
" Department, Talley says, “He strikes, me as
someone who has a genuine interest in the
bus part and the whole industry.”
A ten-year veteran'of the transit system,
Bradley recognizes he’s walking intosa
potential snake pit. (“I don’t think an assis¬
tant director of bus has ever survived,”
notes Colby, the man who appointed him.)
It doesn’t help Bradley that he had never
worked in bus operations: Aside from a
year-long stint with Metrobug on.special
assignment, he spent his decade of service
on the rail side. That fact frustrates some
of his staffers. “We’re going through
another education process educating our
boss,” sighs a frustrated Vernon Clarke,
general superintendent of bus operations
and a 30-year veteran of the bus system.
“It’s not the first time.”
Bradley is trying to make his mark early:
In May he produced a comprehensive. 90-
day report detailing the ills of the system,
ranging from poor communication
between mfpagement and the labor unions
to roach infestation as a result of irregular
exterminations. “J!m„basically trying to
hold people mare accountable for their
responsibilities,” he declares.
He faces a trial by fire, literally. Summer
is here, and with it come» an increase in
bus breakdowns.. Bradlely has been devis¬
ing a plan to deal with the problem. “You
know the saying, the proof is in the pud¬
ding?” asks Talley. “We will be into the
pudding by June, and we will see what Mr.
Bradley and Dr. Bonzon are made of.”
Right now they don’t have much to work
with. MDTA has 77 buses on order from
the Flxible bus company, but the firm is in
dire financial straits and has stopped man¬
ufacturing new vehicles. Regardless, those
buses were meant to replace the oldest
one» in the county’s fleet, which date back
stoT980. Under federal guidelines, they are
overdue for the junk pile.
. Ancient buses mean even more break¬
downs. This past year, Metrobus suffered
10)344 breakdowns (“roadcalls,” in bus
parlance, which could mean anything from
engine failure to a malfunctioning rearview
mirror) — an average of about 28 per day.
According to an MDTA review of six U.S.
metro areas (Atlanta, Baltimore, Detroit,
Pittsburgh, Portland, and Dade) the
county’s buses broke down more fre¬
quently than every other fleet except
Pittsburgh’s.
It isn’t necessarily the oldest buses that
are giving mechanics the biggest
headaches. The newest vehicles, those
extra-long, articulated craft, have been
nothing less than a nightmare. For-one
Archie Saunders:
“We hired a lot oF new
mechanics in a huriy.They didn’t
know the Front oF the bus From the
back Some oFthem still don’t.”
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thing, they-are equipped with fancy new
computers that mechanics aren’t trained, to
fix. They are also plagued by serious
glitches in the. air conditioning systems
that have rendered them useless in
Miami’s forbidding heat. “My biggest
problem has been how am I maintain my;
oddball equipment with unqualified per¬
sonnel?” mutters Archie Saunders, assis¬
tant general superintendent of mainte¬
nance. “This new equipment has had
problem after problem, and most of my
staff hasn’t had any normal training.”
In the past, normal training meant a six-
month training course. Budget cuts have
eliminated the program. What’s more,
Metrobus lost many of its most experi¬
enced mechanics a few years ago; they
jumped overitb Metromover for the
promise of higher wages. “We hired a lot
of new mechanics in a hurry.” Saunders
says. “They went basically from filling out
the application right into the shop. They
didn’t know the front of the bus from the
back. Some of them still don’t”
As a result of the bus shortage, Dade has
had to withdraw its promise to loan 77
buses to the Olympic Games in Atlanta
this summer; the county will be one of only
a handful of Midwestern and Eastern com¬
munities not chipping in any buses for the
Olympics.
Vernon Clarke says that even without a
specific tax earmarked for transit—a dedi¬
cated funding source — there’s plenty
MDTA management can do to improve bus
service. “We don’t need a dedicated source
of funding,” he grumbles. “I think we’re
using it as an excuse.” Clarke argues that
if upper management, the Dade County
Manager’s Office, and Metro commission¬
ers were to focus more intensely on bus
operations, service and efficiency could be
improved 20 to 25 percent simply by redi¬
recting routes, coordinating bus sched¬
ules, and generally tightening things up.
“We need a totally independent review of
the system,” he says. “Someone who won’t
pull their punches needs to come and take
a look at it. Looking at it universally, I
know the rail could be a good component
But it really frosts us in bus operations and
maintenance to see all the emphasis on
rail. We’re going for pie in the sky when
we don’t have our feet on the ground. This
whole operation is on the verge of col¬
lapse.”
As the days wo.und down before the
county manager released; his proposed
budget this past month, there was appre¬
hension among bus personnel about the
hits their system might take. Staff layoffs?
Route curtailments? But in the end, County
Manager Armando Vidal proposed to leave
the bus system alone. He did, however,
request that the Bicentennial Park
Metromover station be shut down owing to
low ridership.
The news elicited smiles at Metrobus
headquarters. CD
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New Times June 20 • 26,1996


New Times June 20-26,1996
On Friday, Natalie Merchant warbles liberally
The downtown library celebrates Miami architecture on Monday
t li u
r
s
day
j
U
n
•
Stealing Beauty. Apparently, Italian
director Bernardo Bertolucci has
contracted the dreaded Merchant-
Ivory disease, which causes an
otherwise provocative filmmaker
to start fashioning lovely-to-look-at, yet utterly
vapid, puppy-love paeans. In Bertolucci’s case,
thatmeans morphing from the auteur behind
Lost Tango in Paris into the creator of Stealing
Beauty, wherein actress Liv Tyler, in search of
the boy who first bussed her and in attempt¬
ing to solve a “riddle” she finds in her
deceased mother’s diary, traipses through
Tuscany enchanting everyone who meets
her. Tonight at 8:00 at the AMC Coral Ridge
Theatre (Oakland Park Boulevard and Feder¬
al Highway, Fort Lauderdale), the Fort Laud¬
erdale International Film Festival presents a
sneak preview of Stealing Beauty. You’ll
laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll kiss five bucks good¬
bye. Call 5680500. (MY)
Carlos Molina: Guitarist Carlos Molina flies in
the face of the old saw that goes “Those who
can’t do, teach.” While Molina serves as a pro¬
fessor át both Florida International University
and Metro-Dade Community College, he also
plays out • riot only here in South Florida,
but throughout the U.S., South America, and
Europe. Tonight at 8:00 at the Episcopal
Church Center of Coral Gables (1150 Stan¬
ford Dr., Coral Gables), he offers a program
ii of Spanish and Latin American guitar music
that includes works by Astor Piázzolla,
Joaquin Rodrigo, Agustín Barrios, Francisco
Tárrega, and Manuel de Falla. Tickets for the
concert cost ten dollars. Call 386-3103. (MY)
fr
i
d
ay
i.
u
n
•
Summer Shorts: In an effort to pump
new life into local theater, playwright
Susan Westfall and . actresses
Stephanie Heller Norman and Elena
Wohl have formed City Theatre,
which debuts tonight at 8:00 with Summer
Shorts, eighteen new one-act plays split into
two alternating programs. The works, written
by national and local playwrights Geffrey
Sweet, David Fleisher, plus many others), run
the gamut from high drama to low comedy,
and none of them Istsis longer than fifteen
minutes. The founding trio has engaged a
gaggle of South Florida directors (including
Maria Rodaz, Barry Steinman) and actors
(Peter Haig, Margot Moreland, among oth¬
ers) to present the one-acts at the Jerry Her¬
man Ring Theatre (University of Miami, Coral
Gables). From tonight through July 7, Pro¬
gram A runs Friday at 8:00 and Saturday at
7:00; Program B, Saturday at 9:30 and Sunday
at 7:00. Tickets range from $12 to $28. Call
446-9289. (MY)
Sting/Natalie Merchant Ah, a match made in
VH1 heaven: der Stinger and Nat the PC Brat
Before he became a pinup for strenuously
tasteful middle-age adults with fistfuls of dis¬
posable income, Sting led the mildly insurrec¬
tionary Police, whose first two albums burst
with skittering rhythms and undiluted pas¬
sion. Then, inevitably, he grew up, broke, up
the band, and, quite effortlessly, turned into
his generation’s Paul McCartney—just a guy
with a song in his heart and a chip on his
shoulder. As for Merchant, she, too, led a
somewhat innovative outfit, 10,000 Maniacs,
which seamlessly melded folk rock melodies
to thoughtful — if occasionally knee-jerk lib¬
eral — lyrics; like Sting, she flew the group
coop to go solo, and her first release under
her own name, Tigerlily, brims with the kind
of innocuously likable songs one would
expect from a budding careerikL Tonight at
7:30, they perform at the Coral Sky Amphithe¬
atre (601 Sansbury’s Way, West Palm Beach),
along with Latin chánteuse Soraya. Tickets
range from $20 to $50. Call 358-5885. (MY)
Andrew Dice Clay: The fimniest bit this scumbag
comedian/failed actor ever did wasn’t on a
concert stage, in his celluloid stink bomb The
Adventures of Ford Fairlane, or on his short¬
lived TV series from last year. Nope, it was on
one of those Current Affair/Hard Cofly-type
shows about five years ago, after Clay’s racist,
sexist, homophobic style of comedic assault
had fallen out of favor. He was sad, bloated,
and looked as if he hadn’t been sleeping well.
And he was crying. Crying. Seemed the Dice-
man felt like he was a victim of ill will among
media types and leftist do-gooders who for
some reason just couldn’t understand the
complexities of his sense of humor, which he
claimed was simply a reflection of what’s on
the minds of average bluecollar Americans, It
was a pathetic and manipulative display, but
riotously funny in that Clay really thought
someone might believe him. And — surprise!
—some people still thrill to this hatemonger’s
every utterance, thus proving P.T. Bamum’s
theory about suckers. Clay appears at Sunrise
Musical Theatre (5555 NW 95th Ave., Sun¬
rise) tonight at 8:00. Tickets range from $23
to $33. Call 741-7300. OF)
Caribbean Comedy Festival: What cracks them
up in Kingston? Same thing that cracks
them up in Manhattan. Human foibles.
Tonight and tomorrow night at ,8:00, seven
Caribbean comics converge on the North
Miami Beach Cultural Center (17011 NE
Nineteenth Ave., North Miami Beach) for a
yuks-a-plenty fest See and hear Errol Fabi¬
an, Tommie Joseph, Nickie Crosby (all
Trinidad and Tobago), Bello and Blacka
Gamaica), Trevor Eastman (Barbados),
Gravy (Antigua), and Ken Corsbie (Guyana)
as they illuminate the lighter side of the
Caribbean experience. Tickets cost $20. Call
653-7479 for more information. (MY)
sat
u
r
1 a y
j
u
n
•
r*=T| Performance/Art Fusion: Get
J II down, get dirty, and get inter-
U disciplinary as InVerse, the lit-
ji erary and art club of Florida
Atlantic University, presents an
evening of poetry, music, and performance


o n d a y
june
A Century of Architecture in Miami:
Chrissie Hynde put it succinctly:
“My city had been pulled
down/Reduced to parking
spaces’' (from the Pretenders’
“My City Was Gone”). She was singing about
Cleveland, but the eradication of cities, build¬
ing by building, happens almost impercepti¬
bly everywhere, including here. To coincide
with this town’s centennial, the Miami-Dade
Public library’s main branch (101W. Flagler
St) presents “A Century of Architecture in
Miami,” which surveys the evolution of the
city as manifested by its numerous structures
and ponders Miami’s evolving social, cultural,
and economic identities. Are we not our budd¬
ings? On display in the main library’s auditori¬
um through September 15, with free admis¬
sion. Cafl 3755016 for hours. (MY)
t u e s d a y
june
i Dinosaur Families: Learn about the
lives of families that lived 80 trnl-
I lion years ago at the Miami Muse-
lum of Science and Space Transit
' Planetarium (3280 S. Miami Ave.);
diese families Were composed of dinosaurs, of
course. Over the past ten years, during digs at
199 sites worldwide, scientists have uncov¬
ered fossilized dinosaur remains and eggs
that reveal how dinosaurs reproduced, may
have cared for their young, and may have
evolved into birds. The interactive exhibition
“Dinosaur Families: Fantastic Fossil Finds”
shares these discoveries through robotic
dinosaurs, full-size skeletal castings, embry¬
onic model dinosaurs in eggs, and more. The
exhibition runs through January 12. The
museum is open daily from 10:00 to 6:00.
Admission is five dollars. Call 8544247. (GC)
|w e d n e s d a y|
and, visual art tonight at 7:30 at the
Broward Community College’s lecture the¬
ater (3501 SW Davie Rd., bldg. 6, Davie).
The players: spoken word/musical group
Weeds; poets Mike Minassian and Don
Adams; actors Tom Atkins, Morningstar
Rumly, and Jeremy Menekseoglu; visual
artists John Foster, Greg Eltringham,
Ginette Fogel, Mark Jette, and Brian
Clapp; plus a musical combo consisting of
Robert Dixon (flute), Evan Kline (percus¬
sion), and Michael Riendeau (guitar). Can
you say “sensory overload”? Admission is
free. Call 4756605. (MY)
Rick Derringer: Additional proof that some¬
times old rock stars don’t get corporate
sponsorship, they just slowly — glacially
— fade away, gradually moving through
the seven concentric rings of rock-venue
hell that culminate in the scorching infer¬
no of the Kustom Kar show. But Rick ain’t
there yet! A teen-dream member of Sixties
garage rockers the McCoys (“Hang on
Sloopy” —yes!), Derringer made his name
as a flash guitarist with Edgar Winter’s
White Trash in the Seventies before going
solo with 1973’s All American Boy, which
included his hit version of “Rock and Roll
Hootchie Coo.” Since then — hmmm, not
much. Derringer straps on his guitar
tonight at Gary’s Sports Bar (5325 S. Uni¬
versity Dr., Davie), where he’s scheduled
to goon at approximately 12:30 a.m. Locals
Sticks and Stones, Dirt Cheap, and Grass
River Tyde open. Admission is $12. Call
434-9680. (MY)
Native American Festival: You have to suspect
that mall culture has reached its apex (or
its nadir, depending on how you choose to
interpret such things) when a festival cele¬
brating Native Americans is staged within
one of these contempo meeting halls, a
magnet for all societal strata. From now
until June 30, the Native American Festival
takes place inside the megatepee that is
Broward Mall (Broward Boulevard and
University Drive, Plantation). Today at
1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, and 5:00, Apache
flutist Andrew Vasquez will perform Native
American music. The festival also features
three exhibits: “A Tribute to the World’s
Greatest Athlete” (a Jim Thorpe pictorial);
“Saynday Was Coming Along” (Silver-
horn’s drawings of the Kiowa Trickster);
and “300' x 35 Miles Corridor to the Past”
(Native American artifacts dating back
more than 4000 years). Admission is free.
Call 474-7406 for the mall’s hours. (MY)
Breathless: Director Jean-Luc Godard
checked his politics at the studio door
(well, mostly, anyway) when he made this
wry, provocative, and highly entertaining
film back in 1960. It helps, of course, that
Francois Truffaut wrote the screenplay,
which follows the exploits of a dodgy petty
crook. (Jean-Paul Belmondo) on the run
from Parisian gendarmes, with his young
American moll (Jean Seberg) in tow.
Godard and Truffaut wanted to celebrate
the work of the Hollywood studios
(notably Monogram) responsible for the
noir classics of the Forties — they suc¬
ceeded — while exploring the nouveau
vagueness of a contemporary filmic protag¬
onist. The eminently watchable Paris set¬
tings only enhance the proceedings. Today
and tomorrow at 2:00 at the Alliance Cine¬
ma (927 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach), Cine¬
ma Vortex screens Breathless in French
with English subtitles. Admission is four
dollars. Call 531-8504. (MY)
=rt 1996 Slammie Awards: What was
I the name of that Three Dog
A Night hit? Oh, right, “Easy to Be
I Hard.” Tonight at 7:30 at the
d) Edge (200 W. Broward Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale), the South Florida Slam¬
mie Awards honor those local bands that
find if easy to be just that —hard, or, per¬
haps more to the point, hardcore. They’ll
receive their commemorative award (a
ceramic skull engraved with each winner’s
name — charming) between sets by heavy-
duty sonic reducers such as Brooklyn’s
relentlessly metallic Biohazard (which has
enlisted former Helmet guitarist Rob Echev¬
erría to join the fold), LA’s pure-punk-for-
now-people D.F.L., and a clutch of South
Floridians, including Radio Baghdad, Sub¬
liminal Criminal, Brethren, Nonpoint, and
Level Nine. A splendidly loud time is guar¬
anteed for all. Tickets cost $12. Calif
5259333 for additional information, (MY)
june
jjTl IrTl The Great Train Robbery: Esthetes
LI II may thumb their noses at the
// nlbooks and movies of
// I I writer/director Michael Crich-
_L_j ton, but until recently (Jurassic
Park, Congo), he wrote taut novels {The
Andromeda Strain, Coma) that adapted readi¬
ly to the screen, directing his own work with
crispness and intelligence {Westworld
remains an unsung Seventies gem). He
based his first venture outside the
medical/sci-fi world, 1979’s The Great Train
Robbery, on a real-life nineteenth-century
caper, wherein atrio of intrepid rogues (Sean
Connery, Lesley-Anne Down, Donald Suther¬
land) attempts to steal a cache of gold from a
moving train. Crichton whips this sucker
along ata frenetic pace while sprinkling the
proceedings with a dusting of humor. Today
at 3:00, the Sanford L Ziff Jewish Museum
(301 Washington Ave., Miami Beach)
screens The Great Train Robbery. Admission
to the museum is fotir dollars, plus another
dollar to see the film. Call 672-5044. (MY)
The Calendar is written by
Georgina Cárdenas,
John Floyd,
and Michael Yockel.
For more listings, turn the page
New Times June 20-26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
niw worI n
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★BEST PRODUCTION OF A PLAY: FAITII IIEÁLER
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m
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space
restrictions. Submissions should be
mailed to Calendar Editor, New
Times, P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must
be received ten days prior to date of issue.
Thursday, June 20
Art Hour Concerto: Meza Fine Arts becomes a music
venue four nights a week; enjoy performances by
Malena Burke (Thursday), Candi Sosa (Friday),
Rene Luis Toledo (Tuesday), and Andrés Trujillo
and Federico Britos (Wednesday). $15.6:00 p.m.
275 Giralda Ave, Coral Gables; 461-2723.*
Carlos Molina: See “Calendar.”
Friday, June 21
Judd Alan: Jazz musician Alan performs melodic,
new-age piano selections. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Books and Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Fort
Lauderdale; 630-0953.
Kathy Fleischman: Female vocalist Fleischman
serenades you with song. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Warehaus 57,1904 E Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood;
926-6633.
Jazz Weekend: Enjoy toe tappin’ classics with local
jazz musicians performing every Friday and
Saturday night. Free. 7:00 p.m. Bread of life
Supermarket, 7720 Peters Rd, Plantation; 236-0600.
Stephen Mikes: Local musician Mikés performs
original sitar selections. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Sting/Natalie Merchant: See “Calendar.”
Diane Ward: Local award-winning vocalist Ward
performs. Free. 9:00 p.m. Borders Books and
Music, 19925 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 935-0027.
Saturday, June 22
Rick Derringer: See “Calendar.”
IDHT: Musical group IDNT performs original
acoustic folk and blues. Free. 9:00 p.m. Warehaus
57,1904 E Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 926-6633.
Sinti: Experience this trio of teen musicians’
performance of gypsy jazz guitar selections at 4:00
p.m. Later that evening, jazz band Gas Money
heats things up. 9:00 p.m. Both events are free.
Borders Books and Music, 19925 Biscayne Blvd,
Aventura, 935-0027.
Sunday, June 23
Mainly Mozart Festival III: The St. Petersburg String
Quartet performs Mozart’s String Quartet K. 428,
Schubert’s Quartettsatz, and Beethoven’s String
Quartet op. 18. $10.6:00 p.m. Omni Colonnade
Hotel, 180 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 4444755.
1996 Slammie Awards: See “Calendar.”
Marie Randel and Sergio Puig: Violinist Randel and
pianist Puig perform classical works. $5.2:30 p.m.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650
Harrison St, Hollywood; 921-3274.
Monday, June 24
Songwriters^ Showcase: The Creative Alliance of
Florida hosts a forum for songwriters with Scott
Avery and Bob McDonald. Free. 8:30 p.m. Mr. C’s
Sports Bar, 4361N Dixie Hwy, Fort Lauderdale;
954-561-8585.
Theater
Baubles, Bagels, and Beads: A musical revue paying
tribute to great Jewish performers of the American
theater, including Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker,
Molly Picon, Judy Holliday, Danny Kaye, A1 Jolson,
George Bums, and Zero Mostel. Through August
18. Evening performances Thursday through
Saturday at 8:15 (dinner at 6:15), Sunday at 6:15
(dinner at 4:15). Jan McArt’s Rooftop Cabaret
Theatre, 315 SE Mizner Blvd, ste 213, Boca Raton;
407-392-3755.
The Convertible Girl: Rod Goldman, who is Jewish,
and his Catholic live-in girlfriend Christina .
Donatelli wrangle over kids, marriage,
commitment, and religion in Daniel (brother of
Neil) Simon’s comedy. Through June 30. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00. Broward Stage Door Theater, 8036
W Sample Rd, Coral Springs; 344-7765.
The Fabulous Fable Factory: A modem children’s
musical rendition oí Aesop’s Fables features
Aloyisius A. Aesop, whose fable factory is missing
a “moral maker.” June 24 through August 10.
Matinee Saturday at 2:00. Actors’ Playhouse, 280
Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-9293.
Forever Plaid: Fifties singers the Four Plaids dream
of stardom but are killed in a bus accident; they
return to Earth for one night to sing tunes for a
modern-day audience. Preview performances
Wednesday, June 26, at 2:00 and 7:30. Regular run
June 27 through July 14. Evening performances
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 7:30;
matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at
2:00. Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201
SW 5th Ave, Fort Lauderdale; 954462-0222.
Last Summer at Bluefish Cove: Jane Chambers’s
drama about a close circle of women friends who
meet at their lesbian beach colony for one final
summer, when one of them is diagnosed with
cancer. Through July 14. Evening performances
Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at
2:00; additional performances Thursday, June 27,
at 8:00 and Sunday, June 30, at 6:00. New River
Repertory, 640 N Andrews Ave, Fort Lauderdale;
954-523-0507.
The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me: The Miami
premiere of David Drake’s 1994 Obie Award¬
winning play stars Robert Tamayo in this
performance piece, which details a young man’s
experiences growing up gay. Through June 23.
Evening performances Friday through Sunday
evening at 8:00. EDGE/Theatre, 405 Española
Way, Miami Beach; 233-5776.
Passage: An inventively directed world premiere that
Arctic Retreat
Researchers in Canada
announced that the per¬
mafrost, which covers a
vast area of the nation’s far north, is
retreating. Larry Dyke, a scientist at
the Geological Survey of Canada,
said a six-year study revealed that
the permanently frozen ground in
the Mackenzie Basin has retreated
by 63 to 125 miles over the past 10O
years.
The phenomenon is believed to
be linked to a gradual warming of the
earth that has raised the average
temperature of the survey area by
one-half to one degree Fahrenheit
during the past century.
Still Testing
China exploded at least
one nuclear bomb beneath
the Lop Nor Desert, spark¬
ing a fresh round of international crit¬
icism at the continued testing of
nuclear devices.
Japan’s Nihon Keizai Shimbum
newspaper reported the U.S. gov¬
ernment had advised Tokyo that
more than one bomb may have been
detonated simultaneously because
of growing criticism against the
tests. Global seismological monitor¬
ing could not determine how many
explosions occurred, but indicated
the test had an effective magnitude
of 5.7.
Tropical Cyclone
The monsoon sea arrived
over Sri Lanka when trop¬
ical cyclone 03B ended an
extended drought that has caused a
critical shortage of hydroelectric
power. Resulting floods sent thou¬
sands of residents into temporary
shelters after their homes were sub¬
merged by water or covered by mud¬
slides.
Much of the rainfall eluded the
Indian Ocean island’s main
hydropower catchment areas in the
central hills, and rationing of elec¬
tricity was expected to continue.
Fires that have ravaged
Mongolia for three months
were finally brought under
control. Heavy rains across the
country helped an international fire¬
fighting effort to contain or extin¬
guish most of the blazes.
Cool and damp weather helped
bring forest fires north of Anchorage,
and on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula,
under control. Nearly 350 structures
and 70,000 acres of forest were
destroyed by the fires.
Nairobi was buzzing with
sounds of desert locusts
which swarmed over the
Kenyan capital from the semi-desert
area in the north of the country. Chil¬
dren rushed into the streets to col¬
lect the insects, then roasted them
for a rare feast. An entomologist at
the Desert Control Organization of
East Africa, Dr. Tessema Mege-
nasa, believes the locusts will prob-
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
By Steve Newman
Rabies Alarm
A small rabid bat which
apparently flew across the
English Channel from
France caused a scare in southern
Britain, where strict quarantine con¬
trols have kept the country free of
the disease for 70 years. The flying
mammal, found clinging to a wall
near Brighton, bit two women from
a local bat-enthusiast group who
were observing the creature.
Earthquakes
HA powerful Aleutian Island
temblor sent a small
tsunami rushing across the
Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific, but
caused no damage near the epi¬
center. The central Philippines was
rocked by a magnitude 6.2 quake
that knocked out power on Samar.
Earth movements were also felt
in northern and central Japan,
Armenia, eastern Romania, western
Greece, El Salvador, northern
Colombia and southern Mexico.
Locust Invasion
Under Control
Close Call
A South African puppy was
in intensive care but lucky
to be alive after a hungry
crowned eagle swooped into its
owner’s back yard and plucked the
baby Jack Russell away. “I heard
this incredible whimpering and -saw
this huge bird grappling with Licky,”
said the dog’s owner. The Johan¬
nesburg Starve ported that the eaglé
sank its talons into Licky and flew off
towards a tree. The airborne puppy
managed to wiggle free from certain
death and fell 15 feet headfirst into
a suburban Pietermaritzburg swim¬
ming pool. After diving in to save her,
the unnamed owner rushed Licky to
a clinic where she was being treated
for concussion, water in the lungs
and talon punctares on the neck.
Additional Sources: U.S. Climate Analysis
Center, U.S. Earthquake Information Center
and the World Meteorológica! Organization.
ES
ably be only a nuisance unless they
move into upcountry farms.
For the week ending
June 14, 1996
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New Times June 20-26,1996
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July 21,4:00pm Women: China vs. Sweden
July 21, 6:30pm Mem Brazil vs. Japan
July 22,7:00pm Men: Saudi Arabia vs. Australia
July 23,6:00pm Women: China vs. Denmark
July 23,8:30pm Men: Brazil vs. Hungary
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details the true-life stories of Cuban balseros
crossing the Florida Straits. Through June 30.
Evening performances Thursday through Saturday
at 8:15, Sunday at 7:15. Area Stage Company, 645
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 673-8002.
Pirates of Tigertail: Susan Westfall’s play, the
second offering in New Theatre’s New Plays
Project, pits an old Coconut Grove family
(including ghosts) against speculators interested
in the family’s land. Through June 30. Evening
performances Wednesday through Saturday at
8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00. New Theatre, 65
Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Puttin' on the Ritz: A song-and-dance revue
celebrating the music of American composer
Irving Berlin. Through August 1. Evening
performances Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and
Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees
Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday at 2:00. Pope
Theatre Company, 262 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan;
407-585-3404.
The Second Rehearsal: A reading of a script by New
York City playwright Michael Lengel, Also, other
short plays by New York playwrights. Evening
performance Sunday, June 23 only, at 7:00. Theater
With Your Coffee?, Hollywood Boulevard Theater,
1938 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 460-2234.
Summer Shorts: See “Calendar.” A festival of
eighteen short (fifteen minutes or less) Florida- or
world-premiere one-act plays performed in two
alternating programs. The fest features eleven
directors and'twelve actors from South Florida as
well as new works by national and international
(Brian Friel, David Ives, Jeffrey Sweet, Richard
Dresser) and local playwrights (Manny Diez,
David Fleisher, David Latner, Susan Westfall).
June 21 through July 7. Evening performances for
Program A, Friday at 8:00 and Saturday at 7:00; for
Program B, Saturday at 9:30 and Sunday at 7:00.
City Theatre, University of Miami’s Jerry Herman
Ring Theatre, University of Miami Campus, 1380
Miller Dr, Coral Gables; 446-9289.
Take Me Along: The 1959 musical comedy by Bob
Merrill (based on Eugene O’Neill’s only nontragic
play Ah, Wilderness!) chronicles two romances that
flower during a summer weekend in a Connecticut
town circa 1910. Through August 25. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00
(dinner at 6:00), Sunday at 6:00 (dinner at 4:00);
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 (lunch
at noon). Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, 315 SE
Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton; 800-841-6765.
Talk Radio: Mark Swaner, director of last year’s
acclaimed production of Lenny, is back to direct
Eric Bogosian’s roiling take on a controversial talk-
radio host. Through July 14. Evening perform¬
ances Friday and’Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday
at 2:30. Florida Playwrights’ Theatre, 1936
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 954-925-8123.
Too Jewish?: Actor Avi Hoffman, an alum of the
University of Miami’s Theater Department, brings
his musical comedy revue about Yiddish theater,
language, and culture to South Florida after a run
in New York. Nominated for an Outer Critics’
Circle and a Drama Desk Award. Through
September 1. Evening performances Thursday
through Saturday at 8:00; matinees Wednesday,
Thursday, and Sunday at 2:00 and Sunday at 5:00.
Broward Stage Door Theater Coihpany, 8036 W
Sample Rd, Coral Springs; 344-7765.
A View from the Rridge: Brooklyn longshoreman
Eddie Carbone takes in two of his wife’s illegal
alien cousins from Italy, but his patience is tested
when one of them falls in love with his niece.
Through June 23. Evening performances Friday
and Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00.
Hollywood Playhouse, 2640 Washington St,
Hollywood; 922-0404.
Film
Thursday, June 20
Stealing Beauty: See “Calendar.”
Saturday, June 22
Breathless?. See “Calendar.”
The Cranes Are Flying: The museum screens this
Russian art film in conjunction with the
“Monumental Propaganda” exhibition. $3 with $5
museum admission. Today and tomorrow at 2:00
p.m. Bass Museum of Art, 212TPark Ave, Miami
Beach; 673-7530.
Sunday, June 23
Cinema Vortex: The Alliance Film/Video Co-op
presents screenings of milestone films by influential
directors; today’s program features Jean Cocteau’s
Testament of Orpheus. $4. Noon. Alliance Cinema,
927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-8504.
Tuesday, June 25
Film Series: Enjoy the film thriller The Usual
Suspects and stay for the discussion that follows.
Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 3390
Mary St, Coconut Grove; 374-7428.
Wednesday, June 26
Badfilm Society: Scantily clad cave girls run from
stone age studs, hairy giants, and hungry dragons
in the movie that single-handedly created the
“cave girl” genre, Prehistoric Women. Free. 8:00
p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925 Biscayne
Blvd, Aventura, 935-0027.
The Croat Train Robbery: See “Calendar.”
My Name is hair. The museum screens this Russian
art film in conjunction with the “Monumental
Propaganda” exhibition. $3 with $5 museum
admission. 2:00 p.m. Bass Museum of Art, 2121
Park Ave, Miami Beach; 673-7530.
Events
Thursday, June 20
Art Alfresco: Local, national, and international
artists display and create works against a
backdrop of luxury yachts, food, and live music.
Free. 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. Miami Beach Marina, 300
Alton Rd, Miami Beach; 532-2168.
Big Band Dancing: Trip the light fantastic to the
sounds of a big band every Thursday at 7:30 and
Sunday at 6:30 p.m. $6. Florida Expo Center, 1125
Banks Rd, Margate; 979-5571.
Summer Solstice Celebration: Celebrate summer as
ancient cultures did with drumming, dancing and
ritual céremonies and Roots, Rhythms, and
Rituals. Free. 8:00 p.m. Collins Avenue and 53rd
Street, Miami Beach; 460-3365.
Friday, June 21
Artwalk: Downtown Hollywood’s artists open the
doors of their galleries and studios while art
lovers enjoy viewing works, wine tastings, and
live music by local jazzster Sha-Shaty. Free. 5:30
to 9:30 p.m. Hollywood Boulevard and Harrison
Street, Hollywood; 921-3016.
Caribbean Comedy Festival: See “Calendar.”
Andrew Dice Clay: See “Calendar.”
A Day of Compassion: Join the folks from Cable
Positive to help raise awareness and promote a
more compassionate climate for those affected
with AIDS. $5. 6:30 p.m. Tita’s Restaurant. 1445
Pennsylvania Ave, Miami Beach; 532-6966.
Main Street Live: Local jazz, blues, and pop groups
perform live music while shoppers take in Miami
Lakes’s establishments each Friday and Saturday
night; tomorrow, Fifth Circuit Split performs.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Main Street, Miami Lakes;
-821-1130, ext 207.
Sidewalk Said: After surviving.months of
construction on Lincoln Road, merchants,
restaurateurs, art, galleries, and entertainment
establishments have banded together to create
three days and nights (today through Sunday) of
high energy opportunities. Stores will offer
special sales while other establishments offer
three days and nights of nonstop action. Lincoln
Road Mall, Miami Beach; 531-3442.
Wines from Around the World: Sip four different
wines from California, each with a
complementing culinary dish, $10. 7:00 p.m. Ad
Gustum Market, 180 Crandon Blvd, Key
Biscayne; 540-5050.
Saturday, June 22
Antique and Jewelry Show: Coconut Grove Cares,
Inc. sponsors this show featuring American and
English silver jewelry, Georgian and Victorian
pieces, Continental and American furniture, and
more. $3. Today from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
tomorrow from noon to 6;00 p.m. Coconut Grove
Exhibition Center, 2700 Bayshore Dr, Coconut
Grove; 579-3316.
Historic Pursuit: Join in the fun of this scavenger
hunt as a chauffeured limousine drives you and
your team from one hot spot to another, locating
clues and searching for answers and acquisitions
related to Miami history. Funds raised benefit the
programs of the Historical Museum of Southern
Florida. Participants should meet at Groove Jet
nightclub (323 23rd St, Miami Beach; 532-2002)
at 6:00 p.m. to register. The game itself takes off
from the same spot at 7:30 p.m. $70 registration
fee includes drinks and hors d’ouévres on your
search and a postgame party at Groove Jet ($25
for just the postgame party).
Mobile Animal Care Unit:, Metro-Dade Animal Care
and Control’s mobile clinic will be open to spay
and neuter cats and dogs for a low fee. $25-$35.
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New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
Today through Tuesday at 7:00 a.m. North Dade
Justice Center, 15665 Biscayne Blvd, North
Miami; 884-SPAY.
Native American Festival; See “Calendar.”
Performance/Art Fusion: See “Calendar.”
Red, Het, and Proud: Get moving and grooving with
DJ Robbie Leslie as Pride South Florida sponsors
the official party of the Pride Month festivities.
$10.9:00 p.m. Port Everglades, 1850 Eller Dr,
terminal 22, Fort Lauderdale; 537-4111.
Sunday, June 23
Española Way Market: Artists, growers, and
merchants offer fresh fruits and veggies, flowers,
plants, coffees, breads, and arts and crafts, plus
â–  live music and entertainment, at this weekly
marketplace. Free. 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Española Way and Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach; 538-0679.
Holistic Fair: Acupuncturists, aromatherapists, and
more gather for an afternoon of healing and self-
discovery. Free. 11:00 to 4:00 p.m. Fairy’s Ring
Bookstore, 73 Merrick Way, Coral Gables;
446-9315.
Miami Design Preservation League: Come celebrate
the MDPL’s 25th anniversary of preserving the
beauty of the Miami Beach Architectural District.
Free. 6:00 p.m. Ocean Front Auditorium, 1001
Ocean Dr, Miami Beach; 672-2014.
Pride Parade: Put your feet to the street and show
your support for the gay, lesbian, and bisexual
community. The parade begins at Bubier Park on
the comer of Andrews Avenue and Las Olas
Boulevard and runs east along Las Olas to 84th
Street, north to Broward Boulevard, west to US1,
and then north until Holiday Park, where it
empties into Pride South Florida’s Pridefest ’96
where food, games, and live entertainment await.
For more information, including how to register
for the parade, call 771-1653.
Monday, June 24
A Century of Architecture in Miami: See “Calendar.”
Charity Opening Reception: No need to throw
another shrimp on the barbie when this
Australian steakhouse brings out steak, chicken,
ribs, and their famous Bloomin’ Onion appetizer
at this buffet-style dinner to benefit the Miami
Project to Cure Paralysis. $10. 6:00 p.m. Outback
Steakhouse, 1801 SE 10th Ave, Fort Lauderdale;
954-523-5260.
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen: Congresswoman Ros-Lehtinen
is the featured speaker at the Beach Republican
Club’s monthly meeting. Free. 7:30 p.m. Prior to
the meeting, there will be a buffet-style dinner. .
$15.6:30 p.m. Miami Beach Ocean Resort, 3025
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 861-0054.
Tuesday, June 25
Cigar Schmooze: Join the folks from the Cigar
Smoking Club of America for some networking
while you smoke your complimentary cigar and
sample wines from around the world. $15.8:00
p.m. Shelbome Beach Resort, 1801 Collins Ave,
Miami Beach; 244-2710.
Dinosaur Familias: See “Calendar.”
Multi-Media Performance Tuesdays: Artists,
filmmakers, videographers, actors, and other
assorted performers and creators are invited to
show off their talents or just hang out with the
ART-ACT arts group. $3.7:30 p.m. ART-ACT
Space, 10 NE 39th St; 573-7272.
Wednesday, June 26
Deer Tasting: Sample one or all of Miami’s newest
micro-brewed beer, Hurricane Reef, from South
Beach’s own Miami Brewing Company. Proceeds
benefit the Shelboume House operating fund, an
apartment building providing people with AIDS a
comfortable and secure place to live. $20. 6:00
p.m. Del Sol Brewing Company, 630 6th St,
Miami Beach; 673-3102.
Largest Indoor Flea Market Manufacturers from
around the globe come to this gigantic
marketplace of miles of shopping aisles packed
with clothing, jewelry, plants, home furnishings,
art, computer software, electronics and more. As
part of the festivities, the figure skating
spectacular “Stars and Stripes on Ice” delights
young and old. Runs through June 30. $4. Noon
to 9:00 p.m. Miami Beach Convention Center,
1901 Convention Center Dr, Hall C, Miami
Beach; 673-7311.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through June 23 — “Where
the World Meets the Sky," photographs of Ladakh
and Tibet by Ellen Kaplowitz; “Tales of
Enchantment: Legend and Myth,” works by
children from the International Museum of
Children’s Art in San Francisco; “Graffiti Art,”
works by Danny Polanco; and works by Samuel
Komberg.
Art Museum at FID, University Park, SW 8th Street
and 107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 348-2890. Through
August 10—Works by Kate Kretz and Christine
Tamblyn.
Rass Museum of Art, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530. Through July 14 — “Monumental
Propaganda,” an exhibition about the preservation
of Russia’s totalitarian monuments; “Through a
Glass Darkly,” new works by Judith Schaechter;
and “Images of Women from the Bass Collection.”
Roca Raton Museum of Art, 801W Palmetto Park Rd,
Boca Raton; 407-392-2500. Through July 28 — 45th
Annual All-Florida Juried Exhibition.'
Ruehler Planetarium, 3501 SW Davie Rd, Davie;
475-6681. Through June 30 — “Max’s Flying
Saucer.” Through July 29 — “Islands in a Sea of
Night” Through September 28 — “Laser Pink
Floyd: The Wall.”
Contar for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-1700.
June 14 through August 25 — “Latin American <
Women Artists, 1915-1995,” featuring works by
Rosa Acle, Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Frida
Kahlo, Ana Mendieta, Catalina Parra, and others.'
Through June 30 — New work by Gerardo Suter.
Through July 28 — “Heads,” new work by Kenny
Scharf. Through October 13 — “Dream Collection:
The Human Figure,” selections from the Albright-
Knox Art Gallery.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art 1
NE 40th St; 576-5171. Through July 6 — “A Look
at Contemporary Latin American Art”
Fort Lauderdale Historical Museum, 219 SW 2nd Ave,
Fort Lauderdale; 954-463-4431. Through
September 29 - Miami Centennial exhibition.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler
St; 375-1492. Through September 29 — “Miami:
The First 100 Years,” including an exhibit on
historical architecture and fashion.
Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 1301
Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536. Through July
28 — “Josiah Wedgwood: Experimental Potter”;
and “Contemporary Inuit Drawings and
Sculpture.”
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza; 376-2906. Through
June 28 — Royal Poinciana Fiesta’s eleventh
annual art exhibition.
Miami Youth Museum, Miracle Center, 3301 Coral
yfay, 446-4FUN. Through August 31 — “Crayola
Dream-Makers,” an exhibition of works by more
than 60 Dade County public school students.
Morikami Museum, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray
Beach; 4074954)233. Through July 7 — “Folding
Images: Japanese Screens from the Liza Hyde
Collection.”
Museum of Art 1E Las Olas Blvd, Fort Lauderdale;
954-5255500. Through August 4 — South Florida
Cultural Consortium 1996 fellowship recipient
exhibition; and “Artists/Teachers,” works by
Thomas Easkins, Robert Henri, John Sloan, and
Joseph Albers. Through November 3 — “Strike a
Pose,” a mini-survey of past and present artistic
movements. Through November 30 — “Oceania:'
Man, Ritual and Spirit”
Museum of Contemporary Art, 770 NE 125th St
North Miami; 893-6211. Through September 8 —
Works on paper from the permanent collection.
Through September 21 — “Not From Where I’m
Standing,” an installation by Mark Handforth.
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2nd St
Fort Lauderdale; 954-467-6637. Through
September 2 — “Mazes,” a labyrinthine
installation.
North Dade Regional Library, 2455 NW 183rd St
6256424. Through September 30 — “It’s Us: A
Celebration of Who We Are in America Today,” a
multicultural photojournalism poster exhibition.
Sanford L Ziff Jewish Museum, 301 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 672-5044. Through September 1 —
“By Train to America’s Playground,” photographs
by Florida East Coast Railway photographer Harry
M. Wolfe.
South Dade Regional Library, 10750 SW 211th St
233-8140. Through September 30 — “It’s Us: Á
Celebration of Who We Are in America Today,” a
multicultural photojournalism poster exhibition.
West Dade Regional Ubraiy, 9445 Coral Way;
5551134. Through June 30 — Ceramic League of
Miami student-faculty art show. Through
September 30 — “It’s Us: A Celebration of Who
We Are in America Today,” a multicultural
photojournalism poster exhibition.
West Kendall Regional Library, 10201 Hammocks
Blvd; 3857135. Through September 30 — “It’s Us:
MICHAEL
BEFORE
AD SCHOOL.
Michael was working as a copywriter at a little ad agency in Chicago. But he
wasn’t getting anywhere. You see, the agency wasn’t very good and neither was their
work. Michael found his book wasn’t improving, so he couldn’t get a better job.
He tried working on his book on his own, but that didn’t work either. He was
frustrated and depressed. He knew he needed to go back to school to get a
more professional portfolio. But where? He already had a degree in advertising.
He couldn’t waste time taking unnecessary academic classes. So he asked around.
He talked to creative directors at some ad agencies in Chicago. And they all
talked about a place down in Miami called the Ad School that was doing great
stuff. So he made a few more calls. And then he stuck his chin out, packed up
all his stuff, threw it in the back of a U-Haul, and drove to Miami Beach.
MICHAEL
AFTER
AD SCHOOL.
Michael studied copywriting at the Ad School under the best creative directors,
art directors and copywriters in the city. He already had good Macintosh skills,
so he was able to get a job at McFarland & Drier advertising during the day doing
computer production. That kept him alive financially while he took classes at
night. He busted his butt. He redid his entire portfolio and finished the program
in a year and a half. McFarland & Drier thought so much of Michael’s new work,
they immediately offered him a copywriting job. But although the offer was
tempting, Michael missed the cold weather he grew up in. One of last year’s most
award-winning ad agencies, Roche Macaulay & Partners in Toronto, heard about
Michael and flew him up for an interview. They loved his book and offered him
a great job on the spot for almost twice what he made in Chicago. Later, gator.
NEXT QUARTER REGISTRATION, JUNE 12. MIAMI AD SCHOOL (305) 538 3193
NOW ELIGIBLE TO ACCEPT FOREIGN STUDENTS FOR 120 VISAS! FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE.


A Celebration of Who We Are in America Today,”
a multicultural photojournalism poster exhibition.
The Wolfsonian, 1001 Washington Ave, Miami '
Beach; 531-1001. Through September 30 —
“Modem Dutch Posters.” through December 31
— “Wish You Were Here,” a collection of objects
and posters that Capture the Roaring Twenties in
Miami and Miami Beach, and “Culinary Culture,”
kitchen appliances and gadgets of the early
Twentieth Century.
Galleries
Adamar Fine Arts, 177 NE 39th St; 5751355.
Through July 10 “Sylvia King (1925-1994):
Portraiture.” ó
Arquideco: 3132 Ponce de LeonBlvd, Coral Gables;;
445-5445, Through July 3 — Works by Maria - „■¡
Santamarina, Peter Sussmann, Claudia Parral,:..
Maria Luisa San Miguel, and Luis Fernandez ,
Arroyo.
Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;674-8278. -
Through July 6 “Animal Crackers,” works by
Suzanne Ragan Lentz.'
Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, 1799SEU7th SL
Fort Lauderdale; 463-3000. Through July 12 —L
“Subconscious Drama,” works by Matt Cave. • -
Art of Cuba, 3117 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 446-0301, Through July 11 -r “Bloom,”
works by lip Galletti. - -
Artspace Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
CoraTGables; 4444493. Through June 30 —
“Director’s Choice, Part I,” works by Florian- .
Depenthal, Michael Roque Collins, Jorge Enrique,
and AlejandroMazon. -
Astoria Fine Art 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1222. Through June 30 — “The Iine.of
Tune,” works by A/K/RONA.
Bakehouse Art Complex, 561NW 32nd St; 5752,828.
Through June 26<— “Nature and Neurosis,” works
by Ann Tracy, Necee Regis, and Lloyd Gunther .
' Dallet.
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 534-7872rphrough August 31 —
“Memories of Jazz,” photographs by Herman
Leonard.
Barbara Scott Gallery, 919 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 531-9171. Through July 9 — “Pop, Goes the-,
Easel!8 pop art wprkshy Dine, Lichtenstein, ,
Warhol, Oldenburg, and others. -
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 673-6677. Through July 9 — Glass jewelry
by Kol Naylonr--
Best Buddies Art Company, 1637 Jefferson Ave,
Miami Beach; 531-8821. Through July;9—limited
edition prints byHaring, Lichtenstein, Brittp,.
Dine', and Scharf.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd,,Miami Beach; -
531-8821. Through July 9 — “Fresh Pop,” re<||||||j
works by Romero Britto.
Capon Gallery, 22400 Old Dixie Hwy, Homestead;
|_5&y388.,Through June 29 — Works by Phil
Capen.
Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami,*, ? â– 
Beach; 531-2627. Through July 32 ^ “(Jnder the
Chupa: Judaica for the Wedding.”
Carol Gallery, 9281incoln Rd, Miami Beaich;
5344384. Through'August 10V- “Post- --
Impressionists,” nineteenth- and twentieth-century
masters, including works by Bernard Buffet and
new acquisitions.
Commenoz Gallery, 328 Crándon Blvd; Key
Biscaype; 361-7052. Through June 26 j— Paintings-
by Jordi Prat Pons.
Common Space, 1665 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
674-8278. Through July 9 — UM graduate student
sculpture.
Contemporary Art Foundation, 1630 Jefferson Ave,
Miami Beach; 674-9541. Through July 9 — “Six
Generations, Six Concepts, Six Criterions About • •
the Landscape of Latin American.”
Continental Bank Art Gallery, 1801SW 1st St;
642-2440. Through July 31Works bypainter
Alfredo Moliner.
Continuum Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd,.Miami Beach;
531-8504. Through June 24—“Male Energy,”
works by Carol Fryd and Jim Tommaney.
Cuban Collection Fine Art 1804 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 442-7732. Through June 28— - -
“Cuban Portfolios,"-recent works by Cuban artists. |
Borsch 6allery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 85640801
Through July 5 — Paintings and sculptures by
Mandy Salter and Wolfram Schnitzler. -
Durban-Segnini Gallery, 1416 NW 82nd St; 599-9496.
Through June 30—Works by Rufino Tamayo.
Española Way Art Center, 405 Española Way, Miami
Beach; 673-6248, Through June 30 —Second
annual Tibetan National pay exhibition.
Faces Art Gallery, 1160 Kane Concourse, ste 100B, j
Bay Harbor Islands; 861-6080. Through June 30—
THURSDAY «JULY 18* 1:30PM
DOORS OPEN AT 11:30AM
$1111111 FLORIDA FAIREROBNDS
Dade 305-358-5885
CENTRAL FLORIDA 407-839-3900
NORTH FLORIDA 904-353-3309
TAMPA 813-287-8844
Dates and support ad(s) subject to change without notice. Al tickets subject to conveniencet/handiiiig charges.
VEST PAIR (EACH, FLORIDA
FOR DIRECTIONS OR MORE INFO 24 HRS. A DAY
CALL: 1-800-759-4624
NET TICKET PRICE $35,oo+$1 FOR CHARITy PLUS APPLICABLE CHARGES
(Tlie $1 Will Go to Develop and Support Programs that Improve Our Communities)
Also ky tickets through out Website- ktpi/MapaloozAxom


New Tintes June 20-26,1996
Downtown artists open their gallery
doors to you, Stroll along the new,
beautifully lit, wide brick sidewalks or
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A gourmet coffee house, featuring j
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6:30-10:30pm
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Featuring: Melton Mustafa
Wine Tasting By: Deloach
HOURS: 11-2am
Closed Sunday
~ 2039 Hollywood Blvd.*929-Í772~
“Women at Faces,” works by Yana Ben, Michelle
Cü'ncepsion, Esther Cruz, Lidia Godoi, and-others
Galena del Sol, 1628 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
,56747076. Santiago CarbtmeO. “
Jorge M. Sori Fine Art 2960 Ronce de Leon Blvd,
”, Coral%ables; 567-31Í1. Through June 28 —
Works by Eleomar Puente' *7
Kenneth R. Laurence Gallery, 1007 Kane "Concourse,
Bay Httfbor Islands; 866-3600rThrí)ugh Juñe 30 —
‘World War II: A Loók Bade,” letters and
documents written or signed by military and
political figures of the WWII era, including
Eisenhower, Churchill, Hitler, Mussolini, Rommel,
and others.
Kirschner-Haack Gallery, 922.LincolnRd, Miami
"Beach; 531-77^p, Through July9 — Group show,
featuring works by Audrey- Kirschner, Noel,
Joanna Tyka, and Join Hager.
Kris Lopez Fine Art 224 Washington Ave, - -
Homestead; 2Í2-9883; Through July 20^-^roup
show.
Margulies Taplin Gallery, 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables' 447-1199. Through August ¡Sl„—
“Summertime,” group show by gallery artists.
Mayfair Fine Art, 701 Lincoln Rdt ste 701, Miami
Beach; 534-1004. Through July 9 — "The New
Russians."
NWSA Art Gallery, 25 NE 2nd Ave;237-35o£V>
Through July 10 — NWSA high school visual arts
' senior student exhibition. (See “Art,” page 61.)
Old and Modern Masters, 730 Lincoln1 Road^Miqmi
; Beach; 5314900. Through July 9 — “Paihthigs and,
Sculpture of Historical Importance.”
One Datran Center, 9100 S Dadeland Blvd; 372-0983.
Thrbugh June 29—works by Maria Eugenia:
Tireflo, JuanCIrlos Robelo, Marcos Rivers, and 7
Carlos Oviedo. -
Osuna-Lennon Gallery, 1635¡Jefférson Ave, Miami
Beach; 673-3324. Through July 9,— “Treasures
from eighteenth-century Italy.”
Pallas Photographic, 50 NE?40th St ste 103;
"573-7020. Through August 6 — Group show
featuring works by Renee Collins,.Stolen ,
Karyfyllakis, Norman Lemer, 'AndttHfimQck, and
others.
Photogroup, 130 Madeffh Ave, Coral Gables;
444-0198. Through July 26— “Long Frames,”
works by National Geographic, photographer Seth
jBeJ."
Profiles Gallery, 244 Valencia At^Coyil Gables;
: 446-3313: Through Jl^^^ —yfedpic
Colbies,” works by SomáiJprisijp^
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art900iincoiij Rd,
Miami Beach; 532-4141. Through July 9 — Group a
show-Jéaturing works By Andr^ Zemel, and a
(^Tfeci^oflsragffarifcpr .
Santayana Gallery, 20 Crandon Blvd, suite 49; Key
Jíiscayné, 36L-7588.Jítíñe 21 (receptfc»6iÓ0'p¡m.)
through JalyTY^JCh» Ton y So»,T works by
Latin, AmerictófrüstsLidia Godoi.Ramon Lago,
and George Rodez.
Sky Gallery, NationsBank ToweridOO SÉ?2ñd St >
ThroughJune 30-r-Works by Néisa de
la Torre.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon
Blvd, Coral Gables;441-8166. Through July'S —
“Pastels' on Parade,” workshy Robert Berlind;.
Suzanne Lander, Lisa Parker Hyatt, and other
artists.
South Florida Art Center - ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln
Rd, Miami Beach;;5343339: Through July ”6-^ -
“Common Ground: Christine Fedferighi and Her
Students over Twenty Years,” atribute exhibition
to University of Miami ceramic arts professor.
Federighi.
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035ÍÍjiboÍn
Rd,'Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through July h-f
“Here & Now Festival.” :
South Florida Art Center - Print Room, 924 Lincoln
Rd, ste 140, Miami Beach; 567-2416. Through July
9—“Brian Reedy and Nelson Santiago: The Fine
Art of Printmaking." T
Studio Holomontage, 630E Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach; 532-8880. Through July 9 — “Holomontage
by Katalin Sallai.” , :
3080,3080 SW 38th Ct; 229-0333. Through Jiine29
— Works by José Bedia, Consuelo Castañeda,
Tom Downs, Teresita Fernández, Quisqueya
Henriquez, and others.. -
UM New Gallery, 1300 Campo Sano Dr, AR 101,-
Coral Gables; 2842542. Through June 25
Magnet program high school art exhibition;,.;.;.'
Wirtz Gallery, 5750 Sunset Dr, South Miami;
.66Z-5511. Through June 30 — Works by Valentino
Cortazar. “
World Resources Gallery, 719 Lincplp Rd, Miami
Beach; 5349095. Through July 9—Traditional
•Baliñésé' necklaces; •
Zagami Fine Art, 515 SW 4th Ave, Fort Lauderdale;
954463-0014. Through June 30—• Works by
Salvatore Zagami.


500 winners and their guests fly to Vegas,
stay at Caesars Palace & party ‘til we say stop.
Plus there’s $250 spending cash in it for each winner.
To enter, go to wherever you buy your smokes
or call 1-800-CAMEL-CASH (1-000-226-3522)
for a free Camel Cash Groove Blender
catalog with entry form and official rules.
Call by 0/15/96.
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s must pay postage when submitting entries,
n regarding the sweepstakes or entry forms may be obtained by calling
1. On an official entry form only, hand print your name, home address, and home phone number. Entries missing name and address or on which the certification box has not been fully completed (including entrant's signature) will rv
2. Mail your entry to: Camel's Big Vegas Groove Blender, PO Box 5777, Norwood, MN 55583*5777. All entries must be mailed via U.S. Postal Service first class mail (no express, registered or certified mail accepted). Participants n
No reproductions of entry forms accepted. You may enter as many times as you lite, but only one sweepstakes entry per outer envelope (mailed separately) is allowed. Additional information regarding the sweepstakes or entr
1 - 800 - 226 - 3522. Incomplete, illegible or mutilated entries are ineligible. Sponsor is not responsible for lost, late, damaged, postage-due, misdirected or slow delivered mail.
3. The Camel’s Big Vegas Groove Blender is limited to legal residents of the 48 continental United States (Alaska and Hawaii excluded) who are 21 years of age or older and are smokers, except employees of R J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, its affiliates, subsidiaries, advertising and promotion agencies
and the immediate ramilies of each. All federal, state and local laws and regulations apply. Offer void in MA, Ml, VA and wherever prohibited by law. Prize delivery limited to United States only.
4. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company is the Sponsor of this promotion. All entries become the property of the Sponsor and will not be returned. Sponsor will not acknowledge receipt of or confirm eligibility or ineligibility of any entry(s). Sponsor will not return any ineligible enfries.
5. All entries must be received By September 10,1996. There will be 500 Prize Winners. Winners will be determined by a random drawing from all entries received. The drawing will be held on or about September 11tli, 1996 by an independent judging organization whose decisions are final on all matters
relating to this promotion. Odds ofwinning depend upon the number of eligible entries received but will not exceed 1 in 130,000. Provisional prize winners will be notified by mail. Provisional prize winners must execute and return an Affidavit of Efigibility/Release of Liabffity/Publiaty/Prize Acceptance Form
within 20 days of attempted delivery. Prowsional prize winners are subject to age verification. Travel companions must sign and return a liability release and where legal, a publicity release prior to issuance of travel documents. Noncompliance within the 20 day time period or return of any provisional prize
notification as undeliverable may result in disqualification and the selection of an alternate provisional prize winner. No substitution, transfer of prizes, or election of cash in lieu of prizes will be permitted except at sole discretion of Sponsor. All federal, state and local income and other taxes on prizes are
solely the responsibility of the winners. In the event of prize unavailability, Sponsor reserves the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater value. Acceptance of prize offered constitutes permission to use winner’s name, biographical information, and/or likeness for purposes of advertising and promotion
without further compensatidn, unless prohibited by law. All prizes will be awarded and will be fulfilled in November, 1 §96.
6. PRIZES: The following prizes will be awarded: 500 Prizes of 2 round-trip airplane tickets to Las Vegas, hotel accommodations for November 22nd and 23rd, 1996, $250 cash, attendance to Camel party, valued at approximately $1,350.00 each. Total value of all prize values is approximately $675,000. Travel
must be completed by November 24th, 1996. Restrictions and blackout dates may apply. Accommodations are subject to availability and change without notice. Trip companions must be 21 years of age or older and must sign and return a liability/publicity release prior to travel. Taxes, tips, alcoholic
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unless otherwise specified herein. The difference between any stated value and actual value will not be awarded to winners. In the event of cancellation
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7. Any game materials including without limitation the offer, rules and announcement of winners, containing production, printing or typographical errors, or
obtained outside authorized, legitimate channels are automatically void; and the liability of Sponsor, if any, is limited to the replacement of such materi¬
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and all losses, claims, or damages that may result.
8. By claiming a prize, winners agree that R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, its parent, and the judging organization and their respective officers,
directors, employees and agents shall have no liability for any injuries, losses or damages of any kind (including death) resulting from acceptance,
possession, participation in or use of any prize.
9. For advance copies of Affidavit of Eligibility/Release of Liability/Publicity/Prize Acceptance Form or the names of prize winners (available after 10/15/96),
send a separate, self-addressed stamped envelope to Camels Big Vegas Groove Blender, Winners List, P.O. Box 5526, Norwood, MN 55583-5526.
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They speak; the same language.
iíet each has ^spñtéthing very different to say.
Latin American ^Vomen Artists, 1915-1995
June 14 ifVugust 25, 1996
This startling range of expression emerged from a world of influences. ¡Some mod¬
ern. Othersaneierit. Sortie Spanish. Others African and Asian. In the U.S.'s first
large scafe exhibition of 20th-century Latin American women's art, 35 artists
from IT-o&ontriés find expression through a variety of media. This homage to
shared heritage wijl enlighten you to the farces that have shaped artistic expres¬
sion in this century. These women have much to say. Listen well.
This exhibition is organized by the Milwaukee Art Museum.
The exhibition and national tour are sponsored by Philip Moms Companies, Inc.
Additional support is provided by the NationalEndowment for the Arts. Presentation in
Miami is made possible, in part, by contributors to the CFA Annual Exhibitions Fund.
Sponsors: Bankers Trust Company and BellSouth. Patrons: Cory and Karla King and
Emanuel and Patricia Papper.
CENTER FOR THE FINE ARTS
MIAMI
101 WEST FLAGLER STREET 305.375.3000
THE CENTER FOR TOE FINE ARTS, WHICH WILL BE RENAMED THE MIAMI ART MUSEUM OF DADE COUNTY IN TOE FUL OF 19941SREG0GNZEDBV THE SIAIE OF FIORIOA AS AMAIOR
CUUURAL INSTITUTION AND RECEIVES MAIOR FUNDING FORM THE STATE OF FLORIDA THROUGH THE FIORJDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE; THE FLORIDA ARfSCOUNCli,ÁÑD THE DM-'
SION OF CUUURALAFFAIRS. THE199596 EXHIBITION PROGRAMS ARE SPONSORS) N PART BY THE DADE COUNTY CUUURALAFFMRS COUNCIL AND THE METRODADE COUNTY
BOARDOF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.


Readings & Discussions
Thursday, June 20
Brainstorming Workshop: Hypnotherapist and
brainstorming instructor Martin Weisberg
discusses how and why you think, act and feel the
way you do. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop,
9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.’ „
Jill DiMaggio: Author of Jodi's Song, DiMaggio reads
from her book ábout her son’s struggle with AIDS.
Free. 7:00 pm Borders Books and Music, 2240 E
Sunrise Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; 5660358.-
Miami Storytellers Guild: Listen every Thursday to
legends and tales about die historic Biltmore Hotel
and the stars who stayed there. Free 7:d0p.m 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 445-1926.
School Weapons Searches: An expert panel discuss
how to make schools safer for our children. Books
& Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Surviving the Odds: Author Tom Culley discusses the
tactics described in his book Beating the Odds in
Small Business. Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble
Bookstore, 7710-N Kendall Dr, 598-7292.
Write Out Loud: In celebration of Gay and Lesbian
Pride month, meet author Shelly Roberts (Roberts’
Rules of Lesbian Living; Hey Mom, Guess What!) for
some informal reading, a book signing, and some r
stress-free networking with fellow writers. Free.
7.30 p m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 591S
University Dr, Plantation, 723-0489
Writer's Workshop: Ixingtime Miami Herald writer
Ron Henry hosts a creative nonfiction workshop.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Warehaus 57,1904 E Hollywood
Blvd, Hollywood; 926-6633.
Friday, June 21
Astronomy: Join Dr. Don Parker, world-renowned
astrophotographer, in a discussion about what you
see when you gaze at the night sky and a showing of
his incredible comet photos. Fre,e. J1U Physics
Bldg, 1400SW 107th Ave, rm 145; 66£¿ggH
Caribbean Creative Writing: Jamaican poet and artist
Lorna Goodison reads from her published collection
of poems Free 8.00 p m. Books & Books, 296
Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Frank DeCaro: Author DeCaro reads from his book A
Jttfy Named Phyllis. Free.i&OO p.m. Books & Books,
933 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 532-3222.
Know Your Rights: Get informed as attorneys ’ I
Rosemary Wider and Sam Blum discuss the rights
of gays and lesbians. Free! 5:00 p.m. Borders Books
and Music, 3390 Mary St, Coconut Grove; 374-7428.’
Lessons in Labor View a video of the 1934
Minneapolis Teamsters labor strike and stay for a
discussion about the right to have labor unions and
the right to strike. $4.7:30' p.m. Pathfinder
Bookstore, 137 NE 54th St,-756-1020.
Listen To Your Heart: Featured speakers discuss the
threat of heart disease to women, as well as the
benefits of exercise and good nutrition. Free. 6:00 ’ ’
p.pi. Deering Hospital, 9J533 SW1152nd St There will
also be two free seminars tomorrow at Cedars
Medical Center (1400 NW 12th Ave) and North
Shore Hospital (1100NW 95th St). Both are at 10:00
aun, To register, call 373-5119.
Womyn’s Group: Lesbian activist Julia Dawson
addresses this Friday Night Womyn’s Group •
meeting. $2.8:00 p.m. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual
Community Center, 1335Alton Rd, Miami Beach,
2513-3740.
Saturday, June 22
Art Demonstrations: Rex Art hosts a series of how-to
art lectures; today, Ivonne Lanza demonstrates gold
leafing techniques. Free. 12:30 p.m. 2263 SW 37th
Ave; 445-1413!
A Better Life: Nelson Vergel and Melanie Walgren
discuss the benefits of anabolic steroids and
nutritional supplementation as a comprehensive -
approach to improving life with AIDS. Free. 1:00 .
pin. Imperial Point Hospital, 6401N Federal Hwy,
Fort Lauderdale, 630-8002.-
Curing a Migraine: Discover the latest techniques and
treatments from .Dr. David B. Sudderth and Joseph
KandeL authors of the book Migraine — What
Works. Free. 1:00 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore,
591S University Dr, Plantation; 7230489.
Vicki Hendricks: Local author Hendricks reads from
and discusses her novel Miami Purity, recently
released in paperback. Free. 4:00 p.m. Book
Warehouse, 1928 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood,
929-9339.
Internet Seminar Leam howto go online with Net
Results Marketing representative Chuck Bachus.
Free. 300 pm. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 591S
University Dr, Plantation; 7230489.
Journal Writing Bring your notebook as Pamela
Gordon, New Timefs own theater critic, teaches
writing exercises and discusses a dozen techniques ;
on generating ideas and.producing journal writing
that is fresh and imaginative. $40.9:30.a.m. Imperial
Point Library, 5985 N Federal Hwy, Fort Lauderdale,
%-7401.
Romance Writers: Spend a steamy afternoon as the
authorrdfrotnante novels drop in for abook signing
and an audience question and answer session; hosted
by Jeff Altman. Free. 2:00 p.m. Borders Books and
Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; 566-
0358.
Women's Business Workshops: Learn the skills and
techniques essential for a successful business startup
at this Women’s Business Development Center
seminar. $30:900 am. FIU North Campus, Biscayne
Boulevard and 151st Street, AC 11-214;348-3951.
Sunday, June 23
Guatemalan Journey. Join author Steve Benz for an
intelligent and sometimes humorous look at
Guatemala’s political history, the role of its military,
and more. Free. 3:00pm Borders Bookshop, 9205 S
Dixie Hwy, 665-8800.
Massage Therapy Workshop: Le Nutter demonstrates
howmassage can reduce stress, depression, and pain.
Free. 500 pm Borders Books and Music, 3390 Mary ,
St, Coconut Grove; 374-7428. -
Talk With Angels: Mary E. Shirk channels the spiritual
guides that help us overcome life’s challenges and lets
us ask questions about personal concerns and this
vast universe we live in. $25! 3:00 pm Mystical
Amulet, 7360 Coral Way, suite #17A, 265-2228.
Monday, June 24
Cancer Workshop: Dr. Emil Schandl discusses new
qancer detection methods as well as ihnovative
therapies. $3.700pm St James Lutheran Church,
110 Rioenida Ave, Coral Gables; 271-2865.
Tuesday, June 25
Business Planning Workshop: Leam how to start and
manage your own business at this FIU. Small-Business
Development Center seminar. Free. Tonight and
tomorrow night at 6:00 p.m. North Dade Regional
library, 2455 NW 183rd St; 348-2272.
Wednesday, June 26
Downtown Bay Forum: Discuss the choices and cast
your straw vote for the next mayor of Miami at this
luncheon sponsored by the: Downtown Bay Forum
$20. l'l:30 am Sheraton Biscayne Bay Hotel 495
BrickeDAve, 757-3633.
Dynamics of Food: Holistic lifestyle educator and
vegetarian cook Alicia Siririn shows how to bring food
and activities into balance for improved enhanced
health and energy. Free. 5:00 pm-Borders Books and
Music, 3390 Mary St, Coconut Grove; 374-7428.
Herb Lore: Expand your herbal horizons with this
fascinating workshop on the vast selections and uses
of herbs. Free. 9:30 am Enchanted Forest Park, 1725
NE 135th St, North Miami, 895-1119 ! fo
Laser Surgery Demonstration: Dr. Victor Beraja
discusses the most recent advances in laser cosmetic
surgery and performs a live demonstration in one of
the latest laser procedures. Free. 7:00 pm Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 6658800. ?
Dance
Friday, June 21
Contact Dance: Experience this improvised dance form
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in which the dancers remain in constant contact $5. -
8:00p.m. In Motion Dance Center, 4542 SW 75th Ave,
229-1354.
Sunday, June 23
Learn to Bellydance: Wiggle your midcfle with aquicl^
lesson in bellydancgJ^ditioñaLMiddle Eastern
folk dance, and Braizijian dance.' Admission ......
includes mini classesand refreshments, as well as’ ’'
performances by.pfofessional dancers. $5;3:0G'pan.
Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350 Iincdln Rd/ste,
505, Miami Beach; 5384608.':
Tuesday, June 25
Juanita Baró: The woman who taught Marisa Tpmei
and Anjelica Houston to move like real Cubans can
teach you salsa, mambo, and Afro-Cuban dances
each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evening.
Prices and times vary. Miami Hispanic Ballet’ 957’.
SW 27th Ave; 649-2619.
Wednesday, June 26
Tango Argentino: Practice the moves of-one of the
world’smost-elegant and sensual dances each
Wednesday. $Í0. Dántíe classes from 8:30 tq9:30;.
dance-starts at 9:30 p:m. Amigos del.Tango, 22
Giralda St Coral Gábles; 667-0809. '
Friday, June 21
Marlins' Kids Opening Day: All kids under 12> /
accompanied by a paying adult will be issued a - |
free ticket In addition, face painters and
entertainers will be on hand at the gates, and all
entertainment throughout the game will be geared
toward kids. Prior to the game, there will also be a
on-field banner parade; Call’626-7400 for
registration information. Joe Robbie Stadium, 2269
NW 199th St; 930-7800. . g
Friday, June 21
Florida Marlins: The Marlins meet Pittsburgh. All
kids 12 and under accompanied by a paying adult
will be issued a-free ticket (see “Kids*). $2-$30:: >
7l05 pan. Joe Robbie Stadium, 2269 NW 199th St;
930-7800
Rodeo: Cqwboy skills and daredevilry will be on
display as the Mahi Shrine Temple sponsors this
five-star rodeo and children’s charity event :
tonight and tomorrow night. $10.-6:30 pan. Davie
Rodeo Arena, 6591 SW 45th St;-797-1166.
Saturday, June 22
Florida Marlins: The Marlins meet Pittsburgh, §2,
$30.7:05 p.m. Joe Robbie Stadium, 2269 NW
199th St; 930-7800.
Sunday, June 23
Florida Marlins: The Marlins meet Pittsburgh. $2--
$30.4:35j).m. Joe Robbie Stadium,.2269 NW
199th St; 930-7800.'
Monday, June 24
Florida Marlins: The Marlins meét San Francisco.'
$2-$30.7:05 pan. Joe Robbie Stadium, 2269 NW
199th St; 930-7800.'
Tuesday, June 25
Florida Marlins: The Marlins meet San Francisco.
$2-$30.7:Q5'p.m. JoeRobbie Stadium, 2269 NW
199th St; £30-78,00.
Wednesday, June 26
Florida Marlins: Tne Marlins meet San Francisco. -
$24>30.1:35 p.m. Joe Robbie Stadium, 2269 NW
199th St; 930-7800. j ;
Dn the Road 5 Sea
Thursday, June 20
Bougainvillea Gardening: Adilson Rodriguez shares
his sécrets, demonstrates how to care for, and
answers your questions about bougainvillea
gardening. The workshop is free and begins at
9:30 a.m. Enchanted Forest Park, 1725 NE 135th
St, North Miami; 895-1119.—.''
Friday, June 21
Miami Seaquarium’s Summer Nights: The marine
park comes to life at night with special nighttime
shows and live music every Friday and Saturday
night. Admission for gpests arriving after 5:00.
p.m. is $10. Daytime guests can stay and enjoy -
the after-dark activities at no extra cost 4400
Rickenbacker Cswy, Key Biscayne; 361-5705.
Saturday, June 22
Growing Coconuts in Florida: Learn howto plant,
grow, and caréffo.r the many varieties of
coconuts7$lO. 10:00 a.m.. Meet at Fruit dndSpice
Park, 248bl SW 187th Ave. 247-5727. ^
Sunday, June 23
Stiltsville Tour: Meetup with local historian Paul
George for a picturesque boat ride through
Biscayne Bay's-most unusual neighborhood.
Hear all about Stiltsville, Key Biscayne, Virginia
Key, and the Cape Florida lighthouse on this M
historic journey. Reservations required. $25.5:00
p.m. 375-1625.
Tuesday, June 25
Sea Turtle Walks: Meet up with fellow turtle
watchers atthe Museum of Discovery and
Science (401SW>2nd St, Fortjauderdale;
467*6637) for a brief slide show and orientation
and'then reconvene at Fort Lauderdale Beach to
catch a glimpse of nesting loggerhead sea turtles.
$8. Group meeterat the museum at 9;00 p.m.
Wednesday, June 26
Naturalist Luncheon Series: Bring a bag lunch and
enjoy naturalist-Monica Ribaudo’s discussion ..
about the diverse plant compounity that
surrounds us. Free. 11Í00 a.m. Fern Forest
Nature Center. 201 Lyons Rd South, Pompano
Beach; 954-970-0150,
Hotlines
AFAnon: 687-4049
Animal Rights Foundation of Florida: 968-7622"
Coalition for Hypertension Education and Control:
8006644447 :{ i
Cocaine Anonymous: 537-1379'
Dade County Citizens Safety Council: 592-3232
Family Counseling Services: (for in-home counseling to
people with "HIV) 573-25Ó0’
Habitat for Humanity: 670-2224
Housing Opportunities for Excellence: 3744660
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 80O329FOOD
Mental Health Crisis Center 643-1400
Metro-Dade Cultural Affairs Arts and Culture Hotline:
557-5600
Miami Bridge: (runaway, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 324-8953 !
Narcotics Anonymous: 662-0280
National AIDS Hotline: 800342-AIDS
national Food Addiction Hotline: 8008720088
Hational Organization for Women: 9327444
Rape Treatment Center at Jackson: 585-7273 (to report
a rape); 5856949 (for recovery support)
Senior Center Hotline: (referral service for all elderly i
services) 6284354
SHE Center (Sex Health Education and women’s
medical care, including abortion information)
895-5555
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Fear and
Loathing in
Middle School!
By Todd Anthony
A little girl gets picked on. It’s amazing how Todd
Solondz’s stark, painful suburban comedy Welcome to
the Dollhouse takes that simple premise and twists it
into a wrenching exploration of the dark side of the
Wonder Years. Solondz’s eleven-year-old protagonist,
an archetypically awkward, bespectacled middle
school misfit named Dawn Wiener-fries in vain to
maintain a positive outlook in the face of hostile class¬
mates, thickheaded teachers, blithely oblivious par¬
ents, anda pair of siblings who make Dawn wish she
were an only child. 7 .
Older brother Mark is a high school computer nerd
who, like the dutiful product of the bourgeois ’burbs
that he is, equates going to college with deliverance.
When Mark’s chick-magnet bandmate Steve drops
out of high school and moves to New York City to try
to become “the next Jim Morrison,” Mark shakes his
head and sympathetically laments, “He’ll never get
into a good school now.” Younger sister Missy seems
bom of different parents; she’s one of those charmed,
golden-haired, ballet-dancing, perfect tittlegirls who
grow up to become cheerleaders and homecoming
queens and terrorize ugly ducklings like Dawn.
Janis Ian learned the truth at seventeen; Dawn starts
taking her lumps at eleven. Her seventh-grade class¬
mates call her “Dogface,” and she is so impopular that
even when she saves a fellow student from a beating
at the hands of a gang of bullies, he screams, “Leave
me alone, Wiener Dog!” Puberty seems like a pretty
grim ride. And when Dawn asks Mark if the going
gets any easier iiihigh school, his answer offers scant
relief: “It’s closer to college,” he reasons. “They still
call you names, but not to your face.”
Sorry, Dawn. You’re stuck in that comer of hell
known as adolescence. The best you can hope for is to
Blue Jean
Mark Rappaport makes funny movies. Not funny in
the ha-ha, laugh-out-loud sense; rather, funny in the
oddball, hard-to-categorize sense. Rappaport calls his
features “fictional autobiographies.” Others have
labeled 1992’s Rock Hudson’s Home Movies and 1995’s
From the Journals of Jean Seborg “imaginary mono¬
logues,” “mock autobiographical documentaries,”
“blends of fiction, biography, and sociocultural medi¬
tation,” “film essays,” and “docu-biographies ” Just as
there were no home movies — Hudson’s or anyone
else’s — in Rock Hudson’s Home Movies, neither are
there any journals in From the Journals of Jean Seberg.
Instead Rappaport casts an actress (Mary Beth Hurt)
| who bears a physical resemblance to the titular sub¬
ject as a sort of ghost narrator who analyzes film clips
of the deceased screen star and then ties them
together with a postmodern, revisionist slant that is
100 percent Rappaport.
In Rock Hudson’s Home Movies, Rappaport garnered
belly laughs by linking Hudson’s performances — as
well as those of many of his costars—to the celluloid
hunk’s closeted gayness. Butin Seberg’s case Rappa¬
port seems more interested in eliciting tears than guf¬
faws. While he makes no exaggerated claims for
Seberg’s talents as a thespian, he portrays her as a
martyr—the quintessential persecuted, misunder¬
stood, tragic artist: Saint Jean.
maintain your dignity and snatch a few moments of
grace out erf the moutii of humiliation. :
"The movie has been described as Muriel’s Wedding
meets Heathers, but I prefer The Brady Bunch movie
meets Kids,” avers writer/director Solondz, a soft-spo¬
ken, diminutive, four-eyed geek who bears more than
a passing physical resemblance to Heather
Matarazzo, the remarkably poised young actress who
plays Dawn Wiener. You couid easily imagine him
getting picked on as a child. Solondz looks completely
out of place conducting an interview in a nearly
deserted cafe at the posh Mayfair Hotel; but like his
plucky young heroine, the filmmaker ignores his sur¬
roundings and forges ahead. “I think that the perse¬
cuted and the persecutor reside in each of us. Con¬
tending with those forces is part of the process of
growing up. Some kids who endure this kind of perse¬
cution can be warped, damaged for life from this expe¬
rience, but I think that others may in fact be strength¬
ened by it Heather brings a certain resilience to the
role. You know, she doesn’t jump out the window at
the end of the movie. It’s a story of survival. She’s
going to endure. She survives with her integrity intact
I don’t think it matters whether she becomes a punk
rocker after high school, as some people have sug¬
gested, or a doctor or a housewife.”
Or, for that matter; a hot young independent film¬
maker whose lacerating look at the casual cruelties
preteens inflict on each other garnered the Grand
Jury Prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.
Solondz, á New York University film school alumnus,
turned his back on moviemaking after his first feature,
1989’s Fear, Anxiety, and Depression, bombed. The
fledgling filmmaker, distraught over the lack of auton¬
omy afforded by his studio, bailed out of Hollywood
and returned to New York, where, for the next five
years, he taught English to newly arrived Russian
immigrants. But when a lawyer friend presented
Solondz the opportunity to helm a low-budget inde¬
pendent feature, he leapt back into the fray.
“The response has been very surprising,” Solondz
says with a smile. “This movie somehow struck a
chord. It’s not the sort of thing that you plan on. I had
a story and characters that I found very compelling.
It’s really the most unpromising of premises, you
know—little girl gets picked on. Not box-office gold
when you hear that So for it to take off in this way —
tiie Sony Classics {distribution deal], Sundance,
Berlin — every time I think it's the best it can be, it
gets better. We broke house records, jn LA I feel
incredibly lucky. I have lived out every young film-
maker’s dream.”
Dawn Wiener should be so lucky. We meet Dawn
as she emerges from the school lunch line, food tray
in hand, like a Christian stepping into the lion’s den.
Dawn confronts a cafeteria M of rambunctious, jeer¬
ing peers. She carefully surveys the teeming room,
searching for an empty table where she might eat her
food in peace. Finding none, Dawn looks for the next
best thing — a vacant seat at an occupied table. We
Continued on page so
â–² Dawn patrol:
Heather
Matarazzo
embodies the
quintessential
girl nerd in
Welcome to the
Dollhouse
Mary Beth Hurt portrays Jean Seberg in Mark Rappaport s fictional autobiography
Seberg’s story needs little
embellishment; her acting
career went from a fairy-tale
beginning to a nightmare end¬
ing. As a seventeen-year-old
unknown, Seberg beat out
18,000 contenders — includ¬
ing- the young Barbra
Streisand —for the lead role
in Otto Preminger’s bally-
hooed 1957 Joan of Arc biopic
Saint Joan (based on the
George Bernard Shaw play).
Despite Preminger’s ¿ft for
generating hype, the movie
flopped. Seberg debuted at
the top of the Hollywood lad¬
der Wore most of her peers had graduated from high
school, and then crashed in record time. But three
years later she landed opposite Jean-Paul Belmondo
in Jean-Luc Godard’s jittery French NewWave exis¬
tential gangster flick Breathless, which went on to
become an international sensation and has since
become regarded as a cinema classic. (After seeing
the film, thousands of young French women rushed
out to their stylists to have their locks shorn “ala
Seberg.”)
Throughout the Sixties and early Seventies Seberg
appeared in more than two dozen films. Her finest per¬
formance came opposite Warren Beatty in 1964’s
Lilith, although many more American moviegoers
caught her lightweight supporting turn in 1970’s Air¬
port. The waiflike blonde married badly: first to a
dashing young aspiring director (Francois Moreuil),
and later to second-rate-novelist-tumed-third-rate-
director Romain Gary, who was twice Seberg’s 23
years when they exchanged vows. She unwisely
agreed to appear in degrading roles in both men’s
embarrassingly bad films. Ah, love. Seberg’s union to
Gary being, well, French, both spouses entertained
their share of extramarital couplings. Seberg’s parar
mourS included Clint Eastwood, with whom she dal¬
lied while filming 1969’s Paint Your Wagon.
As a teenager back in Iowa, Seberg had joined the
Continued on pace 80
Ubicóme to the
Dollhouse.
Written and
directed by
Todd Solondz; with
Heather
Matarazzo,
Brendan Sexton,
Jr., Eric Mabius,
Matthew Taber,
Daria Kalinina,
and Meterla (totds.
New Times June 20 - 26,1996 3


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
(WINNER • BEST PICTURE)
1996 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL
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Fear
Continued from page 49
sharp Tier palpable sense of relief when a
rough-looking girl named bolita allows Dawn
to sit across from her. That temporary comfort
evaporates when a gaggle of airhead cheer¬
leaders in immaculate blue-and-white uniforms
accosts Dawn and accuses her of being a les¬
bian. Dawn denies the
charge, but Lolita, rather
than sticking up for her,
betrays her tablemate and
falsely claims that Dawn
hit on her.
“Why do you hate me?”
Dawnpleads.
“Because you’re ugly,”
Lolita replies matter-of-
fáctly. (Of course, there’s
more to it than that Lolita’s bad-boy boyfriend
Brandon has the hots for Dawn, but Dawn
doesn’t realize it yet)
That scene is just ohe example of how
Welcome to the Dollhouse dredges up the
agony of youth and then sifts it through a
sieve of humor devoid of sugarcoating or
mawkish sentiment “The fihn is a comedy
because that’s the only way I know how to
deal with excruciating torment,” confesses
Solondz. “I find something both funny and
poignant in the struggle to endure humilia¬
tion. It’s a comedy, but it’s a very sad com¬
edy. It’s harsh. It’s brutal. It’s a hard movie
for people to take. I doubted myself some¬
where along the line during the making of
the movie, thinking, ‘Well, maybe I’m just
too tough. Maybe I should relent, sort of
throw a bread crumb out there.’ But I stuck
to my guns.”
Solondz uncannily recálls all the little
details that lend veracity and punch to
youthful emotional crises such as Dawn’s
cafeteria trauma. You get the sense that the
author/director of Welcome to the Dollhouse
shared his protagonist’s childhood ordeal,
and that the experience marked him
deeply. “Obviously I couldn’t have written it
without my life experience,” he notes. “But
if this were a book, it wouldn’t be a memoir.
I mean, just for the record I wasn’t a little
girl. I don’t have a little sistér. Nothing in
the movie actually happened to me, and yet
it’s as if it had. Emotionally I feel so very
connected, just as much to Dawn as to
Brandon, Mark, et cetera. If I were to make
a Western, I think it would be no less auto¬
biographical than this movie, although it
certainly wouldn’t be like a John Ford West¬
ern. Iam pleased that people do ask if it’s
autobiographical because I think what
they’re saying is that it feels real.” CD
“The film is a comedy because
that's the only way I know how to
deal with excruciating torment."
Blue
Continued from page 49
NAACP. As an internationally renowned movie
star, she used her celebrity status to champion
the cause of the Black Panthers. In the process
she earned the contempt of reptilian FBI direc¬
tor J. Edgar Hoover, who launched a sleazy
character-assassination campaign against her.
When Seberg became pregnant, Hoover’s vile
minions spread rumors that the father of her
unborn child was a Black Panther. The harass¬
ment may have caused Seberg to deliver pre¬
maturely; the baby — a girl named Nina, after
Gary’s mother’s — weighed only four pounds
at birth and died two days later. The child was
buried in a glass-covered coffin so that the
world could see she was white. Nina’s death
accelerated Seberg’s downward slide, which
encompassed nervous breakdowns, alco¬
holism, drug addiction, and paranoid fantasies.
She attempted to take her own life every year
on the anniversary of her daughter’s death.
Although mysterious circumstances — her
partially decomposed body was found in her
car, which was parked on a Parisian side street
— surround Seberg’s death in September
1979, there appears little reason to question
the official cause of death, which was listed as
suicide. After a decade of trying, Seberg had
finally rendered herself breathless. (Ex-hus-
band Gary shot himself a few months later,
leaving behind a note claiming his suicide had
“nothing to do with Jean Seberg.”)
Not much opportunity for humor in that
story, and humor has been Rappaport’s
strong suit. Since he can’t really mine the
material for laughs, the filmmaker uses;
Seberg’s sad life as a point of departure for
a series of droll but never very compelling
digressions. He muses on “the curse of
Joan of Arc” (many actresses who assayed
the role suffered career lows shortly there¬
after) and contrasts the arc of Seberg’s
career/political activism with those of
actresses Jane Fonda and Vanessa Red¬
grave. “Jane waS the Vietnam War, Vanessa
was the P.L.O., and I was the Black Pan¬
thers,” notes Seberg (played with flat,
cropped hair and a flat, clipped voice by
Hurt, who was born in Seberg’s hometown
of Marshalltown, Iowa, and who resembles
what the actress might have looked like had
she lived a few years longer). Rappaport
draws some amusing parallels among the,
three women, but offers little jn the way of
penetrating insight or groundbreaking
observation.
Likewise, Rappaport uses the actress’s
Eastwood connection to riff on everything
from Clint’s lack of singing ability to the
actor’s strong, silent image. He suggests
that differences in the way Eastwood’s and
Seberg’s impassive screen personas were
perceived (“only women are called ‘mysteri¬
ous’ and ‘sphinxlike’”) illuminate larger
inequities in the treatment of women in the
movies. Like many of Rappaport’s asser¬
tions, there may be some truth to the idea,
but most of the evidence is circumstantial.
The trick to enjoying From the Journals of
Jean Seberg lies in delighting in its wicked
wit and cynical irreverence but riot taking
anything too seriously. The film may as well
be summing up Rappaport’s attitude toward
probing any of his subjects deeper motiva¬
tions when, in response to the obvious
question of why Seberg allowed herself to
be such a willing, passive victim for the
men (from Premiriger to Gary) who humili¬
ated her even as they used her to make
their movies, Hurt-as-Seberg shrugs, “Don’t
even ask why.” Well, why not? Isn’t that the
point of “fictional autobiography” — to free
the filmmaker from getting bogged down in
petty details and iftstead allow him to specu¬
late about the deeper motives? By not even
trying to burrow beneath the surface, Rap¬
paport blows an excellent opportunity to get
at Seberg’s essence. He emerges as merely
the latest in a long line of males exploiting
her name to further his own directing
career.
-Todd Anthony
From the Journals of Jean Seberg.
Written and directed by Mark Rappaport; with
Mary Beth Hurt
SO


Film
Fil
m
Dapsu
les
The following are capsule reviews of movies opening
this week, or currently showing, in the Greater Miami
area. For information about movie times and locations,
see “Showtimes," contact local theaters, or call 888-
FILM, a free service.
Openings
Conjugal Warfare (U): Three interwoven dark
comedy vignettes probe the romantic
psychopathology of Brazilian suit-and-tie
civilization.
Eraser (R): Ahnuld plays a U.S. Marshal who
safeguards government informants in the Witness
Protection Program by “erasing” all traces of their
existence, and rubbing out a few bad guys when
the need arises. This being a Schwarzenegger
flick, the need arises often.
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G): Kiddie literature
from the House of Mouse. Victor Hugo’s classic
gets a Nineties makeover, complete with happy
ending and an endearing, merchandising-friendly
Quasimodo. (Imagine Tom Hulce’s boy-next-door
tenor coming out of Nathan Lane’s face which
rests atop Lou Ferrigno’s body.) Yet despite the
unnecessary narrative compromises and the cute-
ification of Quasi, Hunchback stands tall as
Disney’s most sophisticated animated offering to
date. With Demi Moore’s flirtatious voice and
button-straining cleavage, Esmerelda will inspire
more wet dreams from young male viewers than
any Disney character since Jessica Rabbit, and
scenes of Quasi’s public humiliation and raging,
murderous defense of Notre Dame are far more
intense than the usual children’s cartoon fare.
Combine those with the lushest, most stunningly
vivid colors and realistic character movements of
any animated feature ever, and you could have had
a Hunchback for all ages. If only they hadn’t
softened up the story for mass consumption.
Last Summer in the Hamptons (R): A Hollywood star
who wants to act in a play (Victoria Foyt) visits the
Long Island retreat of an extended family of
theatrical types loosely presided over by a lively,
passionate matriarch (Viveca Lindfors). The film is
more structured than director Henry Jaglom’s
previous work (owing, no doubt, to the
contributions of his star-cowriter-wife Foyt), but
it’s also every bit as funny and insightful — if .
narrower in its subject matter — as Jaglom’s
1990’s Eating and 1994’s Babyfever.
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (U): Restored, Dolby-
ized revival of Jacques Demy’s vibrant, technicolor
love story set in the rainiest city in France. With
Catherine Deneuve and hundreds of twirling,
multicolored precipitation deflectors.
Welcome to the Dollhouse (R): Reviewed in this
issue.
All Dogs Go to Heaven 2 (G): And in Heaven they
have no sequels.
The Arrival (PG-13): It took guts to release this sci-
fi movie during a summer when fans of the genre
wait with bated breath for Independence Day.
Radio astronomer Charlie Sheen intercepts signals
warning of an alien invasion, and must flee from
both shadowy government agents and
extraterrestrials disguised as common folk.
The Birdcage (R): Mike Nichols (The Graduate)
directs Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, and
Nathan Lane in the English-language remake of
the beloved French comedy La Cage aux Folies,
about a middle-age gay couple who pretend to be
straight. Elaine May (Heaven Can Wait, Ishtar)
scripted. The Birdcage marks the first motion
picture collaboration of the legendary Nichols-
May comedy team that split up in the mid Sixties
so that both could try their luck in Hollywood.
Broken Arrow: John Travolta is the bad hotshot
pilot, Christian Slater is the good hotshot pilot,
and stolen nuclear warheads are the booty for
which they wrangle. Directed by Hong Kong
action maestro John Woo from a screenplay by
Graham Yost, the man who wrote Speed.
The Cable Guy (PG-13): Matthew Broderick gets
wired with help from Jim Carrey, then goes
béíserk'vfh'eñ efery channelíéalüf'éfe’a 24-hour
Ace Ventura film festival.
Cemetery Man (R): Zapping zombies hasn’t been
this much fun since Dawn of the Dead. Michele
Soavi’s modern horror tale (based on the Italian
adult comic book series Dylan Dog) amps up the
sex and violence as Rupert Everett’s droll night
watchman delivers dozens of splitting headaches
to the undead at the cemetery where he works.
Cold Comfort Farm (PG): Director John Schlesinger
(Midnight Cowboy, Marathon Man) returns to
peak form with this biting British social satire
based on Stella Gibbons’s 1932 novel of the same
name about a recently orphaned but proper young
city woman who ventures into the country to live
on a farm full of eccentrics. Ian McKellen (Richard
III) heads a distinguished ensemble cast that
includes Joanna Lumley (Patsy in Absolutely
Fabulous), Rufus Sewell (Carrington), and Royal
Shakespeare Company leading lady Eileen Atkins.
Tho Craft (R): As if high school weren’t scary
enough already, consider this tale of supernatural
hijinks: Four outsiders form a coven and use
witchcraft to exact revenge on the usual targets —
stupid boyfriends, clueless parents, and nasty
classmates. Carrie on, girls.
Dead Man Walking (R): Surprise! Just when you
think you have this film pegged as a well-
intentioned, by-the-numbers anti-capital-
punishment treatise, it changes course in
midstream and evolves into something much more
original and affecting. Susan Sarandon plays a
naive nun who helps a death row inmate appeal his
sentence. Both the sister and the film take a pretty
sympathetic view of his plight until she meets the
families of the murder victims and becomes
entangled in their grief as well. Sean Penn is
stunning as the condemned man watching the
minutes tick by. Forget the bad-boy antics and the
questionable move into directing. This tour de
force re-establishes Penn as one of the most gifted
actors of his generation. „
Dragonheart (PG-13): Sean Connery’s voice may
get top billing (the erstwhile Bond lends his vocal
chords but not his visage to the role of Draco, the
world’s last living dragon) but the real hero of this
medieval fantasy is the computer-generated
Draco, a flying beast created by the same folks
who designed Jurassic Park’s dino-stars.
Eddie (PG-13): Whoop Dreams! Whoopi Goldberg
races reporters to the locker room when she takes
over as coach of the Knicks.
Executive Decision (R): Die Hard on a plane! Joel
Silver, epitome of the slick, money-grubbing
modém Hollywood producer and the man
responsible for the Bruce Willis action series (not
to mention Fair Game) presents this far-fetched,
testosterone-driven, stop-the-terrorist flick. Six
elite U.S. military operatives led by Steven Seagal
and Kurt Russell board a hijacked plane in midair
and attempt to defuse a bomb loaded with nerve
gas that, if exploded, could paralyze Washington,
D.C. (Not that anyone would notice.)
Fargo (R): Joel and Ethan Coen are back with a
vengeance. This savagely funny film noir about a
bungled kidnapping combines the humor of
Raising Arizona with the dark heart of Blood
Simple. An instant cult classic.
Fear (R) : A teen Fatal Attraction with a twist:
(Don’t-call-me-Marky) Mark Wahlberg plays the
new psycho on the block.
Flipper (PG): Everyone’s favorite aquatic mammal
makes the ocean safe for a crocodile — Dundee
(Paul Hogan), that is. Elijah Wood costars as
Sandy, the city kid who befriends the snickering
bptüenose. Alan Shapiro (The Crush) scripted and
directed.
The Great White Hype (R): Samuel L. Jackson plays a
flamboyant boxing hustler who takes an
anonymous white guy and promotes him as a
legitimate heavyweight contender. Expect the
toughest acting performance from director
Reginald Hudlin (House Party, Boomerang), who
will have to keep a straight face during interviews
while swearing that any similarities to Don King,
Peter McNeely, and the plot line of Rocky are
purely coincidental.
Heaven's Prisoners (R): Here’s a movie for anyone
who wonders what would have happened if Sonny
Crockett had doffed Versace and moved to the Big
Easy. Director Phil Joanou (State of Grace) brings
James Lee Burke’s novel of the same name to the
screen in a disappointing adaption that substitutes
action-movie clichés — a rooftop chase scene, a
dangerous femme fatale, a hooker with a heart of
gold, and an ex-cop trying hard to live down his
past — for Burke’s authentic Cajun spice. Heaven’s
Prisoners suffers from the same curse that doomed
screen versions of Elmore Leonard’s work until
last year’s Get Shorty. The flavor of Burke’s
evocative writing gets lost in an attempt to cram all
the plot details into the screenplay. Alec Baldwin
Neu/Times uflDWtimG
COMPLETE WEEKLY MOVIE LISTINGS
VICTORIA FOYT is..
“WONDERFUL-TWO THUMBS If!!”
-SISKEL & EBERT
“SUPERB!”
-.Iclf ( r¡ii¡>. SIXTY SECOND PREVIEW
“FASCINATING!”
-Michael Medved, SNEAK PREVIEWS/N.Y. POST
“DELIGHTFUL!”
-Joe Ballake. SACRAMENTO iil I
“OUTRAGEOUSLY BOLD!”
-Bob Carlton, BIRMINGHAM NEWS
“LUMINOUS!”
-Kevin Thomas. LOS WOLI.LS TIMLS
“RAPTUROUS!”
-Michael Wilmington, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
“DELICIOUS!”
-F.X. Eecnev. I ..A. WEEkl A
“HILARIOUS!”
-Susan Stark, DETROIT NEWS
LAST SUMMER*
IN TH6
HAMPTONS
XFiLMsy H6NK.Y JACLOM
In \ It \l\lti i\\ 1(111 \s|
STARTS FRIDAY, ««• amUA
JUNE 21! co~&%r6
———j http:7Aimw.wwtoMtonw.com/hMmptonM —
(WINNER • BEST PICTURE j
1996 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL
“A SLY,
HILARIOUS
BLACK
COMEDY!"
-Janet Maslln.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
A FILM BY
Todd Solondz
iRMHEsB-l,
üm ikft
SONY PICTURES CLASSICS
Not all girls
want to play
with dolía
51
Hew Time» June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
THANKS
MIAMI!
Once again, New Times readers
have chosen Cocowalk as the
best movie theater in Miami.
looks world-weary and handsome enough to lend
some credibility to his performance as retired New
Orleans detective Dave Robicheaux. But when
called upon to emote, Baldwin steals a page from
Don Johnson's squint-frown-mumble-furrow-your-
brow-and-stare-soulfully-off-into-space book of
acting technique.
The Horseman on the Roof (U): If you saw Cyrano,
you know French director Jean-Paul Rappeneau
has a way with period tales. He’s back with an epic
costume adventure based upon a classic French
novel by Jean Giono. As a cholera epidemic
sweeps through dying towns and villages in 1832
France, a brave army officer (Olivier Martinez)
teams up with a beautiful young woman (Juliette
Binoche) to search for her missing husband.
I Shot Andy Warhol (R): Mary Harron’s searing bio
of militant lesbián visionary /nutcase and would-be
Warhol assassin Valerie Solanas captures
Solanas’s brilliance, humor, and madness, while at
the same time taking voyeuristic delight in its
portrayal of the casual decadence of Warhol’s
vaunted Factory. Lili Taylor’s riveting portrayal of
Solanas is one for the time capsule, and Jared
Harris effortlessly nails Andy Warhol’s ghostlike,
mumbling, passive-aggressive essence.
Mission: Impossible (PG-13): This summer’s most
impossible mission will be avoiding the hype for
Tom Cruise’s vertiginous thrill ride.
Moll Handers (PG-13): Writer-director Pen
Densham loosely adapts Daniel Defoe’s classic
about a prostitute in eighteenth-century London.
Densham liberally tosses in elements and
characters Defoe never dreamed of, such as
Morgan Freeman as Moll’s loyal, mysterious
childhood Mend. Robin Wright plays the title
character and Stockard Charming costars as the
cruel madam in whose house of ill repute Moll
toils.
Mulholland Falls (R): Kiwi Director Lee Tamahori’s
stylish, brutalizing Once Were Warriors wowed ’em
two years ago on the festival circuit; an impressive
list of Tinseltown talent lined up to help him make
the jump to Hollywood with this Fifties film noir
about an elite squad of LAPD cops investigating
the murder of a woman who’s been thrown from
an airplane. John Malkovich, Nick Nolte, Chazz
Palminteri, Chris Penn, Treat Williams, Michael
Madsen, and Melanie Griffith pitch in.
Hueba Yol (U): Crocodile Dundee with a merengue
beat. A naive immigrant from the Dominican
Republic moves from Santo Domingo to the Big
Apple (“Nueba Yol” is slang for New York) only to
learn there’s no place like home.
Oliver & Company (G): Disney keeps finding new
ways to make money. By never releasing on video
this 1988 musical cartoon adventure about a clever
kitten who teams up with some misfit mutts, the
studio gets to milk lunch money out of a fresh
batch of kids and their parents who are desperate
for family entertainment.
Original Gangstas OR): Macho ex-football-players-
tumed-sort-of-actors Jim Brown and Fred “The
Hammer” Williamson (no relation to the bankrupt
rapper of the same nickname) team up with hot
Coffy Pam Grier for a blaxploitation reunion. They
gonna git you sucka.
The Phantom (PG): A motion picture based on a comic
book superhero—how original!
The Postman (PG): “Poetry doesn’t belong to those
who write it, but to those who need it,” reasons Mario
(Massimo Troisi), the timid title character, in an
attempt to enlist the aid of exiled Chilean poet Pablo
Neruda (Cinema Paradiso’s Philippe Noiret) to
support Mario’s quest to woo the most beautiful
woman on sun-dappled Capri. The Italian island’s
postmaster, overwhelmed by the volume of mail
bound for Neruda (mail that begins to arrive even
before the fabled wordsmith does), hires Mario, the
son of a local fisherman, to serve as Neruda’s personal
letter carrier. The unlikely Mendship that develops
between poet and postman leads to a Cyrano-like
courtship in this enchanting character study. Troisi,
considered by many to be Italy’s finest actor, died of
heart Mure at the age of 41 one day after completing
principal photography on the film.
Primal Fear (IQ: Richard Gere stars as a cynical
defense attorney who takes on a client accused of a
sensational murder. In true only-in-Hollywood
fashion, the case is being prosecuted by Gere’s ex¬
lover (Laura Linney). Gere’s client has to be a fool;
when was the last time any man won an argument
with his ex?
The Quest (PG-13): Despite the Belgian strongman’s
shortcomings as a thespian, Jean-Claude Van Damme
searches for yet another vehicle to parlay his martial
arts skills into a windfall at the box office.
The Rock (R): Nicolas Cage’s mild-mannered FBI
agent and Sean Connery’s grizzled escape artist team
up to topple rogue U.S. general Ed Harris’s plans to
hold San Francisco hostage to a potential poison gas
attack launched from Alcatraz Island. In other words,
yet another high-testosterone pseudomilitary tale
from the Don Simpson-Jerry Bruckheimer producing
tandem (Top Gun, Crimson Tide). Trivial aside #1: The
Rock features three bald/balding male leads
(although Connery sports both long and short rugs
and Cage’s receding hairline has been carefully
camouflaged). Trivial aside #2: Super-producer
Simpson died of a drug overdose earlier this year; The
Rock marks his last completed project
Sgt Bilko (PG): Steve Martin as the U.S. Army
sergeant whose ability to make a buck playing all the
angles far outsMps his talent for running file Ft
Baxter motor pool.
Spy Hard (PG-13): Leslie Nielsen as Dick Steele, secret
agent WD40. Need we say more?
The Star Maker (U): Bittersweet Italian fable about a
con man posing as a casting agent who travels the
countryside and charms his way into the hearts and
pocketbooks of unsuspecting victims whose dreams
of making movie magic cloud their common sense.
The Substitute (IQ,: Hollywood loves those dassroom-
as-battlefield scenarios. Jim Belushi wielded a
baseball bat in The Principal. Michelle Pfeiffer
demonstrated karate moves to get her kids’ attention
in Dangerous Minds. NowTom Berenger takes the
genre to its logical conclusion as a soldier who poses
as a teacher in order to catch file hoods who assaulted
his girlfriend. Class dismissed.
Sunset Park (R): Call it Dangerous Hoops: A
determined high school basketball coach (Rhea
Perlman) inherits a talented but unmotivated team.
A Thin line Between Love and Hate (R): Martin Lawrence
plays a freewheeling bachelor nightclub owner whose
casual declaration of love to a girlfriend results in a
near-fatal attraction.
The Truth About Cats and Dogs (PG-13): Yet another
remake of Cyrano. This time the identity-switchers are
women (Janeane Garofalo and UmaThurman).
Twister (PG-13): Jam with a twist Blockbuster-makers
Steven Spielberg and Michael Crichton (Jurassic
Parti) team up with Speed director Jan De Bont to
whip up summer’s biggest breeze. Twister has all the
elements to blow the competition away at the box
office—simplistic plot, regrettable acting (with the
exception of Helen Hunt), two-dimensional
characters, lame attempts at humor, so-so special
effects (including much more footage of twister debris
than of the actual cyclones themselves) and a massive
advertising budget
The Young Poisoner's Handbook (U): Wickedly
warped tale of a budding alchemist whose love of
science has deadly repercussions for his
dysfunctional family as well as his brain-dead
friends.
52


Showtimes
Following is a schedule for movies opening and currently
screening at local theaters. Ml times p.m. unless otherwise
noted. A * indicates a movie that opens this week. Ml movie
times are subject to change without notice; please call
individual theaters or 888-FILM (a free service) to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Alcazar Cinematheque
235 Alcazar Ave; 446-7144
«The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (U) Daily 6:00,8:00,10:00
(Sat-Sun matinees 2:00,4:00)
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna St; 443-6777
The Horseman on the Roof (R) Thur 6/20 only 7:30,9:45
«The Star Maker (U) Daily 6:00,10:00
«Jane Eyre (PG) Daily 8:00 (Sat-Sun matinee 4:00)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Grand Ave; 448-6641
Fargo (R) Thur 12:25, 2:55, 5:40,8:10,10:25; Fri-Wed 8:10,
10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Flirting With Disaster (R) Thur-Sat 12:05,2:20, 5:10', 7:30,
9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a); Sun-Wed 1:20, 5:10,7:30,
9:50
The Truth About Cats and Dogs (PG-13) Thur-Sat 12:20,2:35,
5:35,8:05,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a); Sun-Wed 1:15,
5:35, 8:05,10:15
The Craft (R) Daily 7:50,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:25a)
Twister (PG-13) Thur-Sat 12:00n, 2:25, 5:00, 7:35,10:05
(Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); Sun-Wed 2:00, 5:00,7:35,
10:15
I Shot Andy Warhol (R) Thur 6/20 only 12:20,2:50,5:15,
7:45,10:10 .
Flipper (PG) Thur 12:30,2:40, 5:25; Fri-Sat 12:25,2:55, 5:40;
Sun-Wed 1:10, 5:40
Eddie (PG-13) Thur-Sat 12:30,2:50,5:20,7:40,9:55 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:15a); Sun-Wed 1:05, 5:20, 7:40,9:55
Cold Comfort Farm (PG) Thur-Sat 12:15,2:40,5:10,7:35,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Sun-Wed 1:30, 5:10,7:35,
10:00
Primal Fear (R) Thur-Sat 12:10,2:45,5:20,8:10,10:45; Sun-
Wed 1:30, 5:20,8:10,10:45
The Rock (R) Thur-Sat 12:00n, 1:00,2:00,2:45,4:00,5:00,
5:45,7:00,7:55,9:00,10:00,10:50 (Fri-Sat late shows
12:00m, 12:55a); Sun-Wed 1:00,1:45,2:30,4:00,5:00,5:45,
7:00,7:55,9:00,10:00,10:45
Moll Flanders (PG-13) Thur-Sat 12:00n, 2:30,5:05,7:45,
10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:55a); Sun-Wed 1:40,5:05,7:45,
10:20
The Yeung Poisoner's Handbook (U) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,5:05,
7:40,10:20; Fri-Sat 12:15, 2:35, 5:30,7:50,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a); Sun-Wed 1:35,5:30,7:50,10:10
♦Spy Hard (PG-13) Fri-Sat 12:20,2:25, 5:15,7:30,9:45,
12:00m; Sun-Wed 1:35, 5:15,7:30,9:45
«Welcome to the Dollhouse (R) Fri-Sat 12:10,2:55,5:35,
7:55,10:15,12:35a; Sun-Wed 1:50,5:35,7:55,10:15
«Last Summer in the Hamptons (R) Fri-Sat 12:30,2:40,5:25;
Sun-Wed 1:10,5:25
♦The Arrival (PG-13) Fri-Sat 12:20,2:50,5:15,7:45,10:10,
12:35a; Sun-Wed 1:50,5:15,7:45,10:10
Bill Cosford Cinema
University of Miami (off Campo Sane Ave); 284-4861
«Conjugal Wartare (U) Fri-Sat 7:00,9:00; Sun 5:00, 7:00
Le Jeune Cinemas 6
782 Le Jeune Rd; 529-8883
Twister (PG-13) Thur 2:15,4:45, 7:25,9:50; Fri-Wed 7:25,
9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Mission; Impossible (PG-13) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:40,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 2:15,4:15,6:15,8:15,
10:15
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:15; Fri-
Wed 2:00,4:00
The Reck (R) Daily 2:00,4:30 (Thur 4:35), 7:10,9:50 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:10a)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Daily 2:0Q, 4:00,6:05,8:10,10:20
(Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
«The Hunchback ef Notre Dame (G) Daily 2:10,4:10,6:05,
8:00,9:55
«Eraser (R) Daily 2:20,4:50,7:25,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show
12:15a)
3390 Mary Street; 447-9969
Mission; Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:15,2:10; 4:00,5:00,7:30,
8:15,10:00,10:30; Fri-Wed 11:25a,1:50, 4:10,7:30,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:00,5:15,7:25,9:55
Dragonheart (PG-13) Daily 11:20a (except Thur), 1:40,4:05,
7:55,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:25,4:10,7:35,10:05
The Phantom (PG) Thur 1:30,1:50,4:00,4:20,7:40,8:10,
10:10,' 10:30; Fri-Wed 11:05a, IÍg 4:00,7:40,'Í0:10 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:25a)
The Cable Guy (P6-13) Thur 1:10,2:00,3:10,4:15,5:10,7:45,
8:00,9:45,10:15; Fri-Wed 11:10a, 11:30a, 1:10,2:00,3:10,
4:20,5:10,7:30,7:50,9:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
«The Hunchback of Notre' Dame (G) Daily 11:00a, 12:00n,
1:00,2:00,3:00,4:00,5:00,6:05,7:00,8:00,9:00,10:00 (Fri-
Sat late shows 11:00,12:00m)
♦Eraser (B) Daily 11:15a, 12:15a, 1:30,2:45,4:15,5:15,
7:20,8:00,9:50,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Miracle Center 10
3301 Coral Way; 442-2299
Twister (PG-13) Daily 12:35,3:05,5:35,8:10,10:30 .
Flipper (PG) Thur 12:30,2:45; Fri-Wed 12:15
Mission; Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:00,5:00,7:00,8:00,
10:00,10:30; Fri-Wed 12:15,2:45, 5:25,8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat
10:45)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 12:45,3:15,5:20,7:40,
10:15
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 12:30,2:40,5:25,7:40,10:10; Fri-
Wed 12:25,2:40,5:25,7:40
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:20,9:50; Fri-Wed
5:10,10:15
The Reck (R) Thur 12:30,1:30,3:20,4:45,6:15,7:45,9:15,
10:20; Fri-Wed 1:25,2:45,4:30, 5:40,7:45,9:00,10:30 (Fri-
Sat 10:45) (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 12:35,2:50,5:10, 7:30,9:50; Fri-
Wed 12:20,3:00,7:30,9:50
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Daily 12:30,2:45,5:10,7:40,10:10
(Thur 10:00) (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
«Eraser (R) Daily 12:00n, 1:15,2:30,4:00,5:15,7:00,8:00,
9:45,10:30 (Fri-Sat 10:40) (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 12:00n, 2:20,4:45,
7:15,9:30
Omni 4 and 6
1601 Riscayne Rlvd; 372-3439 and 358-2304
Twister (PG-13) Thur 12:10,2:40, 5:00, 7:30,10:05; Fri-Sun
1:45 (Fri 1:40), 5:00,7:40,10:15; Mon-Wed 1:40,5:00,7:30,
10:10
Original Gangstas (R) Thur 6/20 only 12:20,3:00, 5:30,8:00,
10:30
Ripper (PG) Thur 6/20 only 12:30,2:50
Missien: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 12:20,2:50,5:20,7:50,
10:20; Fri-Sun 1:15 (Fri 1:20), 5:20, 7:50,10:20; Mon-Wed
1:20, 5:20,7:50,10:10
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 5:10,7:40,10:20-
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:20, 5:10,7:40,10:10;
Fri-Sun 1:30,5:10,7:30,10:00; Mon-Wed 1:30, 5:10,7:40,
9:55
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 12:40,2:45, 5:45, 7:50,
10:00
The Phantom (PG) Thur 12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30; Fri
1:50, 5:10; Sat-Sun 2:00, 5:35; Mon-Wed 1:50, 5:20,9:55
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 12:10,2:40, 5:00,7:30,9:50; Fri-Sun
1:00,3:10 (except Fri), 5:30,8:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 1:00,
5:30, 8:00,10:20
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,5:15,7:45,10:15;
Fri 1:45, 5:15,7:45,10:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,3:00, 5:15, 7:45,
10:00; Mon-Wed 1:45, 5:10,7:40,9:45
«The Rock (R) Fri-Sun 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:30; Mon-Wed
1:30,4:30,7:15,10:00
«Eraser (R) Fri 1:10,2:00,5:00,5:30,7:40,8:10,10:15,10:45;
Sat-Sun 1:10,1:45,3:05,5:00,5:30,7:40,8:10,10:15,10:45;
Mon-Wed 1:10,2:00,5:00,5:30,7:30,8:00,10:00,10:20
Riviera
1560 SDfadeHwy; 6666514
Rocky Horror Picture Shew (R) Fri-Sat 12:15a
Twister (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:30,4:15,7:15,10:15
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) ftiur-1:00,4:00,7:00,10-&0; Fri- *
Wed 11:30a, 2:00,4:45,7:20,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Spy Hard (PG13) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:40,10:00
Dragonheart (PG13) Daily 1:45,4:20,7:20,9.45
The Rock (R) Daily 1:15,4:15,7:15,19.15 (Fri-Sat late show
12:55a)
♦Eraser (R) Daily 11:45a, 2:20,5:10,7:45,1925 (FriSat late
show 12:55a)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 11:30a, 2:10,4:35,7:00,
9:30 (FriSat late show 11:45)
Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Bakery Centre 7
5701 SunsetDr; 662-4841
Theater dosed tier renovation.
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dn 5985000
Twister (PG13) Daily 10:00a (except Tue-Wed), 11:30a, 12:20,
2:40,4:30,5:15,8:00,9:30,1030 (Fri-Satlate show 12:20a)
Ripper (PG) Daily 12:15,5:00
Missien: Impossible (PG-13) Daily 1900a (except Tue-Wed),
11:30a, 2:00,2:20,5:00,7:00,7:45,9:30,10:15 (FriSat late show
12:20a)
Eddie (PG-13) Daily 10:30a (except TueWed), 12:45,3:10,5:30,
8:10,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a) ,
The Phantom (PG) Daily 11:00a, 1:30,2:10,4:00,7:00,8:10,10:30
The Rock(R) Daily 10:00a (except TueWed), 11:00a, 1:00,2:00,
4:00,5:00,7:00,8:00,10:00 (FriSat late show 12:00m)
Moll Handers (PG-13) Daily 11:45a, 2:15,4:45,7:25,10:00 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:30a)
«Happily Ever After (G) TueWed 10:00a
«Little Dig League (PG) TueWed 1900a
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mils Dr 2714198
Heaven's Prisoners (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:20,4:45,7:35,10:35
Spy Hard (P6-13) Thur 12:55,3:15,5:40,10:15; Fri-Wed 10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:35a)
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 12:35,2:55,5:30,7:55,10:25; Fri-
Wed 1:40,5:20,7:50 (Fri-Sun early show 1910a)
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 1:10,5:00,7:45,10:20; FriSun 1:25;
Mon-Wed 1:25,5:00,7:40,1920
Original Gangstas (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:15,5:10
The Craft (R) Thur 6/20 only 12:50,3:05,5:25,7:50,
10:10
The Truth About Cats and Dogs (PG13) Thur 6/20 only 12:45,
3:00,5:15,7:40,9:55
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 12:30,1:00,1:30,2:40,3:10,3:40,
4:50,5:20,5:50,7:00,7:30,8:00,8:30,9:30,10:00,10:30; Fri-
Wed 12:15,1:00,2:30,3:10,4:40,5:45,7:15,7:45,8:15,9:30,
10:00,10:45 (FriSun early show 10:15a; Fri-Satlate shows
12:20a, 12:50a)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 12:00n, 12:45,1:15,
1:45,2:15,3:00,3:35,4:00,4:30,5:15,5:55,7:00,7:40,8:10,9:15,
9:55,10:25 (FriSun early shows 1900a, 10:45a, 11:00a; FriSat
late show 12:00m)
♦Eraser (R) Daily 12:30,1:30,3:00,4:45,5:30,7:30,8:00,10:05,
10:35 (FriSun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late shows 12:10a,
12:40a)
Miller Square VIII
13838 Miller Rd;387-3494
Twister (PG-13) Thur 1:10,4:10,7:20,9:45; Fri-Wed 1:10,
4:15,7:15,9:35 (FriSat late show 11:50)
Missien: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:20,5:10,7:30,9:55; Fri-
Wed 1:15,4:30,7:20,9:40 (FriSat late show 11:55)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:00/7:15 **B,***B*
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 1:30,3:30,5:20,7:35,9:30; Fri-Wed
1:30,3:30,5:30,7:40,9:50 (Fri-Satlate show 11:45)
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 4:15,9:40
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 1:15,5:00,7:25,9:40; Fri-Wed
1:20,7:20 (Fri-Satlate show 11:30)
The Reck (R) Thur 1:05,4:00, 7:00,935; Fri-Wed 1:05,4:15,
7:10,9:45 (Fri-Satlateshow 12:15a)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 1:25,3:30,5:15,7:40,9:50; Fri-Wed
4:45,9:30
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:45,10:00; Fri-
Wed 1:25,3:15,5:15, 7:45,9:55 (Fri-Satlate show 12:00m)
«Eraser (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show
12:30a)
«The Hunchback ef Notre Dame (G) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,
7:00,9:00 (Fri-Sat late show 11:00)
Movies at the Falls
8888 Howard Dr; 255-5200
Twister (PG-13) Thur 11:40a, 2:00,4:30,7:15,9:45; Fri-Wed
. 11:40a, 2:10,4:40,7:20,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Ripper (PG) Thur 6/20 only 12:00n, 2:15,4:20
Mission; Impossible (PG-13) Thur 11:45,2:50,4:15,5:30,
7:40,9:20,10:15; Fri-Wed 11:30a, 2:00,4:30,7:40,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 7:20,9:30
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 2:10,4:50,7:30,10:10;
Fri-Wed 1:00,4:15,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 12:15,2:40,5:00,7:30,9:50; Fri-Wed
12:15,2:40,5:15,7:35,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 11:50a, 12:45,2:20,4:50,7:15,9:45;
Fri-Wed 11:50a, 2:20,4:50,7:15,9:40 (Fri-Satlate show
12:15a)
The Reck (R) Thur 11:30a, 12:39,2:30,4:00,5:30,7:10,9:15,
10:15;Fri-Wed 12:30,4:00,7:00,10:00 (Fri-Satlate show
12:30a)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 12:45,2:00,3:00,4:15,
5:15,7:00,8:00,9:15,10:15; Fri-Wed 11:45a, 12:45,2:15,
3:00,4:40,5:15,7:00,7:45,9:15,10:15 (Fri-Satlate shows
11:40,12:30a)
Moll Handers (PG-13) Daily 11:45a, 2:30,5:00,7:40,10:15 I
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
«Eraser (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:00,4:45,7:30,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 11:40a, 12:30,2:00,
2:50,4:30,5:20,7:10,7:45,9:30,10:10 (Fri-Satlate show
12:00m)
South Dade 8
18591 South Dixie Hwy; 238-4424
Twister (PG-13) Thur 11:50a, 2:15,4:45,7:40,10:10; Fri-
Wed 12:00n, 2:30,5:10,7:55,10:25
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Daily 12:10,2:30,5:15,8:20,
10:40
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 12:40,3:30,5:45,8:00,10:20; Fri-Wed
8:00,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Dragonheart (PG-13) Daily 12:20,3:00,5:30,7:50,10:1» (Sat
early show 10:05a; Sat late show 12:15a)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 12:30,2:45,5:10,7:20,9:45; Fri-
Wed 12:40,3:20,5:45 (Sat early show 10:15a)
The Reck (R) Thur 1:39 4:30,7:30,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:10,
4:45,7:35,10:30 (Sat early show 10:20a)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:00,2:00,3:15,5:00,
6:00,7:15,8:10,9:30,10:15; Fri-Wed 1:00,3:15,6:00,8:19
10:15 (Sat early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
«The Hunchback ef Notre Dame (G) Daily 12:00n, 2:00,5:00,
7:15,9:30 (Sat early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
«Eraser (R) Daily 12:30, 2:45, 5:25,7:45,10:05 (Sat early
show 10:10a; Fri-Sat late show 12:25a)
Beaches
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Suite 119; 531-8504
The Yeung Poisoner's Handbook (U) Thur 8:00,10:00; Mon-
Wed 6:00,8:00,10:00 (no shows Fri-Sun)
«Welcome to the Dollhouse (R) Fri-Sun 4:00,6:00,8:00,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Breathless (U) Sun 2:00
Bay
1170 Kai
Harbor IV
1170llane Concourse; 86G2441
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:00,3:15,5:30,8:00,
10:15; Fri-Wed 1:05,3:15,5:30,8:00,10:25
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 1:10,3:20, 5:15,7:40,9:50; Fri-Wed
1:15,5:15,9:45
The Reck (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:20,10:10
Rirting With Disaster (R) Thur 1:20,3:30,5:20,7:30,9:45;
Fri-Wed 3:20,7:40
«Eraser (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:30,10:20
Twister (PG-13) Daily 1:50 (Thur 2:00), 4:30,7:40,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 1:45,3:45,5:45,7:45,9:45; Fri-Wed
4:30 9:45
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:45,4:20,7:50,10:20
Dragonheart (PG-13) Daily 1:45 (Thur 1:50), 4:40,7:30,
10:00 (Fri-Satlateshow 12:20a)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 1:40,4:45,8:00,10:15; Fri-Wed
1:40,7:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
The Cable Ckiy (PG-13) Daily 1:00,2:00,3:00,4:00,5:00,6:00
7:00,8:00,9:00,10:00 (Fri-Satlate shows 11:00a, 12:00m)
♦The Hunchback ef Notre Dame (G) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,
7:00,9:00 (Fri-Sat late hsow 11:00)
*Ruke (PG) Tue-Wed 10:00a
♦The Smurf and the Magic Ruto (G) Tue-Wed 10:00a
55
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
COBB THEATRES
OAKWOOD 16
CINEMAS
2800 OAKWOOD BLVD.,
HOLLYWOOD
923-4321
COBB THEATRES
BAY HARBOR 4
96 SI W. OF
COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH
866-2441
GENERAL CINEMA'S
INTRACOASTAL THEATRE
SUNNY ISLES BLVD.
3701 N.E. 163RD ST.
N. MIAMI BEACH
945-7416
COBB THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494 '
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. 1 ft
S.W: 165THST.
238-4424
AMC THEATRES
COCO WALK 16
3015 GRAND AVE.
448-6641
COBB THEATRES
KENDALL 9
KENDALL DR.
W. OF FLA. TURNPIKE
596-5000
COBB THEATRES
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107TH AVE.
OPP. FIU
223-2700
GENERAL CINEMA'S
HIALEAH 8
PALMETTO EXPWY, ft
N.W. 103RD. ST.
557-9888
OCEAN CINEMA
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
N.W. 7TH ST.
ft LEJEUNE RD.
529-8863
GENERAL CINEMA'S
RIVIERA CINEMA
1560 S. DIXIE HWY.
CORAL GABLES
666-8513
GENERAL CINEMA'S
MIRACLE CENTER 10
CORAL WAY
442-2299
AMC THEATRES
SHERIDAN PLAZA 12
4999 SHERIDAN ST.
HOLLYWOOD
987-4660
AMC THEATRES
OMN110
OMNI INTERNATIONAL
358-2304
Alto in Broward ah Galería, Deerfield.
Fountains, Mission Bay. Town Center, Coral
Springs, Fox Sunrise, Fox Festival, Sawgrass.
Pompano 4, Mercedes, tnverrary. Weston.
Swap Shop, Mtzner Park, Margare.
InWPB: Lakeworth, PGA, Regency Square,
Movies at Market Place, Cross Country:
I NO PASSES OR COUPONS ACCEPTED!
CORALOMLES
GENERAL CINEMA
RIVERA CINEMA
USI • 57 AVE.
666-8513
to .tlfiüNBJfUo
W THE GROVE
447-9669
IT
ERAL Cm
-.JLECE
corIPw
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVES AT
THE FALLS
J-8,11 s.w. 138TH ST
Mh°,V¿eIaÍt
REGAL CINEMAS
CAUFORMA CLUB 6
â– CO IVES DAIRY RD.
(1 Ml W OF 1-95)
UNIVERSITY 7
SW 107 AVE-OPP FUJ
223-2700
CHECK MOVIE CLOCK FOR TMES. ALSO AT: CORAL RIOSE. MBNER PIC, FOX FESTIVAL. FOX 8UNRISE. SAWGRASS. CO80 LAKEWORTH. MOVIES -BOYNTON, -MARKETPL. OKEE SO. CORAL SO. CM, PGA. POMRANO CM..
MISSION BAY CM.. FOUNTAMS CM.. DEER FLO. CM. MOVIES- TWN. CTR. MOVIES S MARGATE. GATEWAY, MVERRARY. WESTON. DELRAY 10. SWAP SHOP DJ.NO PASSES OR DBCOUNT TICKETS ACCEPTED.
>»SDOS A -OTS STEREO.
COBB THEATRES
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT MAIN ft LUDLAM
558-3810
REGAL CINEMAS
CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
850 IVES DAIRY RD.
652-8558
TFPT
^wwct»Satre^^^
SHERDAN PLAZA 12
• SHBUDAM STREET
HOLLYWOOO
987-4680
OPENS FRIDAY JUNE 21 ST!
AMC THEATRES
KENDALL TOWN
tCOUNTHVie
FLA.TPK eXENOALL OR
271-619»
AMC THEATRES
OCEANWALK10
OCEANWALK MALL
Hair
EHMimiHaEia
A SLAM-BANG ACTION THRILLER!’
“A ROCK-SOLID
ADRENALINE
RUSH!”
Rogar Start, CHICAGO SON-TIMES
SENSATIONAL FUN!
THE ROCK’ROCKS!”
tonaStaHt,
NBC-TV, TODAY SHOW
THE DROP-DEAD
THRILL RIDE
OF THE YEAR!”
Patrick StonH, WIYY-TV
THE MOVIE MINOR
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. 1 AT S.W. 1SSTHST.
238-4424
NOW SHOWING!
AMC THEATRES
OCEAN WALK 10
333 HARRISON ST.
HOLLYWOOD
BEACH '
920-6330
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
PALMETTO X-WAY
ft 636
266-6646
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT
THE FALLS
U.S. 1 ft S.W. 136TH ST.
255-5200
UNITED.ARTISTS
MOVIES AT
PEMBROKE
3 Ml. W. UNIV.BLVD.
ON PINES BLVD.
435-3700
Distributed by 8UENA VISTA PICTURES DISTRIBUTION. INC.
V ©HOLLYWOOD PICTURES COMPANY
North Dade
California Club VI
850 Ives Dairy Rd; 652-8551
Twister (PG-15) Thur 6/20 only 1:30,4:35,7:30,9:50
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:25,7:40,
10:05; Fri-Wed 12:50,3:10,5:25,7:45,10:00 (Sat early
' show 10:15a)
Dragonheart (P8-1J) Thur 1:10,3:15, 5:20,7:35,9:40; Fri-
Wed 1:15,3:15,5:20 (Sat early show 10:25a)
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 1:20,3:30,5:35,7:45,10:00; Fri-Wed
7:30,9:40
The Rock (R) Thur 1:25,4:25,7:05,9:45; Fri-Wed 1:25,4:20,
7:10,9:50 (Sat early show 10:20a)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 1:05,3:05,5:10,7:20,9:55; Fri-
Wed 1:00,2:05, 5:10, 7:20,9:30 (Sat early show 10:30a)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 12:30,2:40,4:50,
7:00,9:10
«Eraser (R) Daily 12:40,2:55,5:15,7:40,10:05 (Sat early
show 10:10a)
«Casper (PG) Tue-Wed 10:00a
«Pagsmastsr (G) Tue-Wed 10:00a
Fashion Island ~
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 931-2873
A Thin Line Between Love and Hate (R) Thur 1:05,5:40,8:10,
10:40; Fri-Sat 12:40a
The Substitute (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:10,5:25,7:55,10:25
The Gnat White Hype (R) Thur 6/20 only 8:00,10:30
The Craft (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:25, 5:45,8:20,10:30
Ripper (PG) Thur 12:40,2:50,5:30; Fri-Sun 12:15,2:35,
4:55; Mon-Wed 12:15,2:35,4:55,7:15,9:30 (Wed early
show 10:40a)
The Postman (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:20,5:20,7:50,10:20
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 12:55,3:10,5:50,8:15,10:15; Fri-
Wed 12:40,2:50,5:00,8:20,10:35 (Wed early show 10:10a;
Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 1:40,5:35,8:05,10:35; Fri-Wed
12:25,3:00,5:35,8:10,10:40 (Wed early show 10:00a)
Cold Comfort Farm (PG) Thur 1:50,5:10,7:40,10:10; Fri-
Wed 12:35,2:50,5:05,7:20,9:35 (except Fri-Sat) (Wed
early show 10:00a)
The Truth About Cats and Dogs (PG-13) Thur 12:45,3:00,
5:30,8:00,10:25; Fri-Wed 12:50,3:15,5:40,8:05,10:25
(Wed early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Horseman on the Roof (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:35,4:45,
7:25,10:05
Moll Handers (PG-13) Thur 1:15,5:00, 7:30,10:15; Fri-Wed
11:45 (Mon-Tue 12:00n)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,1:30,2:45,3:15,3:45, 5:00,
5:30,5:55,7:15,7:45,8:15,9:30,10:00; Fri-Sun 11:45a,
1:15,2:00,3:30,4:15,5:45,6:30,7:15,8:00,8:45,9:30,
10:15,10:50 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:45,12:30a); Mon-Wed
1:15,2:00,3:30,4:15,5:45,6:30,9:00,8:45,10:15,10:50
(Wed early show 10:45a)
•Flirting With Disaster (R) Fri-Sun 11:00a, 1:35; Mon-Wed
1:35 (Wed early show 10:45a)
•The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 12:00n, 1:05,2:15,
3:15,4:30,5:25, 7:00,7:45,9:10,10:00 (Wed early show
10:30a; Fri-Sun early show 11:00a; Fri-Sat late show 11:20)
•Eraser (R) Daily 12:00n, 1:35,2:00,2:45,4:10,4:45, 5:30,
6:45,7:30,8:15,9:20,10:15,11:00 (Wed early show 10:15a;
Fri-Sat late shows 11:55,12:45a)
«Welcome to the Dollhouse (R) Daily 12:50,3:05,5:20,7:35,
9:50 (Wed early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:05a)
Intracoastal
3701NE 163rd St; 945-7416
Twister (PG-13) Daüy 12:20,3:00,5:25,7:50,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:25a)
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Daily 12:30,1:10,2:50,3:30,
5:10, 5:50,7:35,8:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,
12:15a)
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 12:15,2:25,4:45,7:05,9:25; Fri-
Wed-1:45,4:00,7:05,9:25 (Fri-Sat late show 11:40)
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:20,4:30,7:10,9:20; Fri-Wed
1:50,4:30,7:10,9:20 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
The Rock (R) Thur 12:00n, 1:30,2:30,4:15,5:00, 7:00,7:45,
9:50,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:00,2:10,4:15,5:00,7:00,7:45,9:50,
10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Phantom (PG) Daily 12:10,2:30,4:40,7:20,9:30 (Fri-Sat
late show 11:45)
Skylake II
1720 HE Miami Gardens Dr; 944-2810
Don't Go a Menace (R) Thur 6/20 only 7:55
Toy Story (G) Thur 2:55; Fri-Wed 1:00,4:25
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 1:00,4:30; Fri-Wed 12:00n
The Quest (PG-13) Thur 6:05,9:40; Fri-Wed 2:35,6:00,10:00
The Birdcage (R) Thur 1:15,5:40,10:00; Fri-Wed 7:50
The Substitute (R) Thur 3:30,7:55; Fri-Wed 3:55,8:00
«Original Gangstas (R) Daily 2:00,6:05,10:05
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas 14
7775 W Flagler St; 2668664
Ripper (PG) Thur 12:15,2:45,5:00,7:30,9:55; Fri-Wed
12:15,2:45 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Twister (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,5:15,8:00,10:30; Fri-
Wed 11:45a, 2:15,5:00,7:45,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show
12:45a)
Mission: Impossible (R) Thur 1:30,4:30,7:15,10:10; Fri-
Wed 11:30a, 2:00,4:30,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show
12:30a)
The Craft (R) Thur 6/20 only 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:Í5
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 12:45,3:15,5:30,8:00,10:15; Fri-
Wed 2:30
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:45,5:15,8:00,10:30; Fri-Wed
5:00,7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 1:30,4.45,7:15,9:55; Fri-Wed
10:15
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 12:45,3:15,5:45,8:15,10:30; Fri-
Wed 12:00n, 2:45, 5:15,7:45 (Sat early show 10:00a; Fri-
Sat late show 12:30a)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00,7:45,10:15; Fri-
Wed 11:45a, 4:45,10:00
The Reck (R) Thur 12:00n, 1.0(f, 3:00,4:15,6:00,7:30,9:00,
10:30; Fri-Wed 11:30a, 1:00,2:30,4:15,5:30,7:30,8:30,
10:30 (Fri-Sun 10:45) (Sat early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 1:00,2:30 (Thur only),
3:30,5:00,6:00,7:30,8:30,9:55,10:30 (Fri-Sat 11:00; Sun
10:45) (Sat early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late shows 12:15a,
1:00)
«Hirting With Disaster (R) Daily 2:15,7:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 11:30,12:30,1:30,
2:45,3:45,5:00,6:00,7:30,8:15,9:45,10:30 (Sat early
show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late shows 12:00m, 12:30a)
«Eraser (R) Daily 11:45a, 1:30,2:30,4:15,5:15, 7:00,8:00,
9:45,10:30 (Fri-Sun 10:45) (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a, 1:00)
Super Saver Cinema
11501 Bird Rd; 227-0277
Jumanji (PG) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,5:30,10:00
Executive Decision (R) Daily 12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:20
Dead Man Walking (R) Thur 6/20 only 7:30,10:00
Sgt Bilko (PG) Thur 7:45,9:45; Fri-Wed 7:45,10:00
All Dogs Go to Heaven (G) Thur 12:30,3:15,5:00; Fri-Wed
12:45,2:30,4:15,6:00
Toy Story (G) Daily 12:30,2:15,4:00,6:00,8:00,9:45
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 12:45,2:45,4:45; Fri-Wed
1:00,3:15,5:15
Faar(R) Daily 12:45,3:00,5:00, 7:45,10:00
The Birdcage Thur 12:30,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15; Fri-Wed
12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:20
The Quest (PG-13) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:45,9:45
The Pallbearer (PG-1 J) Thur 6/20 only 3:15,7:45
Far from Home (PG) Thur 10:00a
•Baba (G) Wed 10:00a
•Up Close & Personal (PG-13) Daily 12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,
10:20
•Sunset Park (R) Daily 7:45,9:45
University VII
1645 SW 107th Ave; 223-2700
Twister (PG-13) Thur 1:30,4:40,7:20,9:40; Fri-Wed 1:35,
4:30,7:45,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:40,4:50,7:30,9:55; Fri-
Wed 1:45,4:45,7:35,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:05a)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 3:30, 7:55
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 1:50, 5:05,7:45,10:00; Fri-Wed 3:25,
7:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
The Arrival (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:15,5:15,9:35
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:00,7:40,9:55; Fri-Wed
1:15,5:30,9:40
The Rock (R) Thur 1:20,4:15,7:05,9:50; Fri-Wed 1:20,4:15,
7:00,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 1:00,3:05,5:10,7:25,9:40; Fri-
Wed 1:05,3:10,5:10,7:15,9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 1:00,3:00, 5:00,
7:00,9:00 (Fri-Sat late show 11:00)
•Eraser (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:30,10:Í5 (Fri-Sat late show
12:30a)
•Milo and Otis (G) Tue-Wed 10:00a
«The Indian in the Cupboard (PG) Tue-Wed 10:00a
Válentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 2662002
Movie times for Friday through Wednesday were not available
at press time.
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 7:00,9:00
Twister (PG-13) Thur 9:00
City Hall (R)-Thur 7:00
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 7:00,9:00
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Toy Story (G) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:50,10:00
54


Fear (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:50,10:00
The Quest (P6-13) Thur 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:50,10:00; Fri 8:00,
10:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:50,10:15; Mon-Wed 8:00,
10:00
The Pallbearer (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:50,
10:00
*The Birdcage (R) Fri 7:50,10:00; Sat-Sun 12:45,2:50,5:00,
7:45,10:15; Mon-Wed 7:50,10:00
«Sunset Park (R) Fri 8:00,10:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,3:00,5:00,
7:50,10:15; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
«Toy Story (G) Fri 8:00,10:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:50,
10:15; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
Hialeah Cinema VIII
4650 W 17th Ct: 557-9888
Twister (PG-13) Daily 12:10,2:35,5:00,7:20,10:00
Spy Hard (PG-13) Daily 12;30,5:00,9:20
Oragonheart (PG-13) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:25,7:35,9:50
The Arrival (PG-13) Daily 2:30,7:00
The Rock (R) Daily 12:45,1:45,3:45,4:45,7:00,7:45,10:00,
10:30 (Fri-Sat only)
The Phantom (PG) Daily 12:20,2:40,5:10,7:40,9:55
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 1:00,2:10,3:10,4:20,
5:20,7:30,8:00,9:40,10:10
Miami Lakes X
6711 Main St; 5584810
Twister (P6-13) Thur 11:30a, 2:00,4:30,7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed
11:30a, 1:50,4:20,7:30,10:00 (Fri-Satlate show 12:30a)
Mission: Impossible (PG-13) Thur 11:00a, 1:30,2:30,4:10,
7:30,9:50,10:30; Fri-Wed 11:00a (except Tue-Wed), 1:20,
4:10,7:50,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Spy Hard (PG-13) Thur 6/20 only 11:10a, 4:50,7:50
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 1:45,4:15,7:40,10:10; Fri-Wed
2:00,7:40 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 11:15a, 1:40,4:15,7:40,10:10; Fri-
Wed 4:40,7:50
The Rock (R) Thur 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:45,2:45,4:30,5:30,7:15,
8:15,10:00; Fri-Wed 11:00 (except Tue-Wed), 1:45,4:30,
7:15,9:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 11:40a, 2:10,4:45,7:50,10:15; Fri-
Wed 11:30a, 4:45,10:15
The Cable Guy (PG-13) Thur 11:15,12:15,1:30,2:30,4:00,5:00,
7:15,8:15,9:20,10:30; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 12:15,1:45,2:30,4:00,
7:40,9:50,10:30 (Fri-Satlate shows 12:10a, 12:40a)
«Eraser (R) Daily 11:15a, 12:15,1:30,2:40,4:15,5:15,7:15,
8:00,9:50,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
«The Hunchback of Hotre Dame (G) Daily 11:00a, 1:00,3:10,
7:30,9:45 (Fri-Satlateshow 12:00m)
«Getting Even with Dad (PG) Tue-Wed 10:00
«Pound Puppies (G) Tue-Wed 10:00
Movies at Hialeah
780 W 49th St; 826-7242
Movie times fbr Friday through Wednesday were not available at
press time.
AH Dogs Go to Heaven 2 (G) Thur 1:40,3:30,5:30
The Birdcage (R) Thur 7:45,10:15
A Thin Une Between Love and Hate (R) Thur 2:00,4:15,7:30,
9:45
Fear (R) Thur 1:50,4:00,7:20,9:30
The Substitute (R) Thur 2:20,5:10,7:30,9:50
Sunset Park (R) Thur 7:45,9:45
The Great White Hype (R) Thur 1:40,3:40,5:30
Original Gangstas (R) Thur 2:00,4:30,7:40,9:50
Ripper (PG) Thur 1:35,3:40,5:30,7:35,9:40
Mission; Impossible (PG-13) Thur 1:00,2:00,2:30,3:30,4:30,
5:15,6:30,7:00,7:45,9:00,9:45,10:15
Eddie (PG-13) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:30,9:45
The Quest (PG-13) Thur 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:30,10:00
The Craft (R) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:40,9:50
Primal Fear (R) Thir 1:15,4:00,7:15,10:00
South Broward
Oakwood 18
2800 Oakwood Blvd; 923-7777
Twister (PG-13) Thur 10:30a, 11:30a, 1:10,2:10,3:50,4:50,7:30,
8:30,10:10; Fri-Wed 10:30a, 1:10,4:00,7:30,10:10 (FriSatlate
show 12:40a)
nipper (PG) Thur 6/20 only 10:20a, 12:40,3:00,5:20
Mission; Impossible (PG13) Thur 10:00a, 11:00a, 12:30,1:30,
3:00,4:00,5:30,7:30,8:00,10:00,10:30; FriWed 11:00a, 1:30,
4:00,7:30,10:00 (FriSatlate show 12:30a)
Eddie (PG13) Daily 10:30a, 1:00,3:10,5:30,7:50,10:10 (FriSat
late show 12:30a)
Dragonheart (PG13) Daily 10:00a, 12:20,2;50( 5:20,7:50,10:20
(Fri-Sat late show 12:50a)
Spy Hard (PG13) Thur 10:20a, 12:30,2:40,4:50,7:50,10:10; Fri-
Wed 1:40,7:10
The Rock (R) Daily 10:30a, 12:30,1:30,3:30,4:30,7:30,8:30,
10:30 (FriSatlate show 11:30)
The Phantom (PG) Daily 11:30a, 1:50,4:10,7:40,8:30,10:00 (Fri-
Sat late shows 11:00,12:20a)
Jane Eyre (PG) Thur 6/20 only 10:10a, 12:40,3:10,5:30,8:00,
10:30
The Arrival (PG13) Thur 6/20 only 10:10a, 12:30,3:00,5:30,
8:00,10:30
The Cable Guy (PG13) Daily 10:10a, 11:10a, 12:10,12:40,1:40
(Thur only), 2:40,3:10,4:10,5:10,5:40,7:10 (Ihuronly), 7:40,
8:10,9:40,10:10,10:40 (Fri-Sat only) (Fri-Sat late shows
12:10a, 12:40a)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 10:00a (except Tue-
Wed), 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:00,2:00,3:00,4:00,5:00,6:00,7:00,
8:00,9:00,10:00 (FriSatlate shows 11:00,12:00m)
•Eraser (R) Daily 10:40a, 11:40a, 12:30,1:20,220,3:10,4:00,
5:00,5:50,7:30,8:00,8:30,9:40,10:30 (FriSat late shows
11:10,12:20a)
•Jumanji (PG) Tue-Wed 10:00a
*T|ie Pebble and the Penguin (G) Tue-Wed 10:00a
Oceanwalk Mall 10
Hollywoed Boulevard at A1A; 92G6330
Movie times for Friday through Wednesday were not available
at press time.
Twister (PG13) Thur 1:50,4:40,7:20,9:55
nipper (PG) Thur 1:55
Mission: Impossible (PG13) Thur 1:40,5:10,7:40,10:10
The Arrival (PG13) Thur 1:30,4:50,7:25,10:00
Dragonheart (PG-13) Thur 1:40,5:00,7:35,10:00
Eddie (PG1S) Thur 1:35,5:45,8:00,10:15
The Phantom (PG) Thur 1:45,5:30,7:45,9:55
The Rock (R) Thur 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:20
The Cable Guy (PG13) Thur 2:00,5:40,8:00,10:20
Movies at Pembroke Pines
11350 Pines Blvd; 435-3700
Twister (PG13) Daily 12:00n, 2:40,5:15,7:45,10:15
Dragonheart (PG13) Daily 12:05,2:35,5:00,7:20,9:45 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:00m)
Eddie (PG13) Daily 12:10,2:25,4:45,7:15,9:40 (FriSat late
show 11:50)
The Arrival (PG13) Daily 12:15,2:45,5:10,7:30,9:50 (FriSat
late show 12:10a)
The Rock (R) Thur 11:30a, 1:00,2:30,4:00,5:30,7:00,8:30,
10:00; Fri-Wed 11:30a, 2:30,5:30,8:30 (Fri-Sat late show
11:30)
The Phantom (PG) Daily 11:50a, 2:15,4:40,7:05,9:35 (Fri-Sat
late show 11:55)
The Cable 6uy (PG13) Daily 11:40a, 12:30,2:00,3:00,4:15,
5:20,7:10,8:00,9:30,10:15 (FriSat late shows 11:45,
12:15a)
«Hilling With Disaster (R) Daily 11:55a, 2:10,4:30,7:25,9:25
(Fri-Sat late show 11:35) -
Pembroke Pines 8
12520 Pines Blvd; 437-7790
Oliver II Company (G) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:05,5:10
The Birdcage (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:40,7:00,9:45
Hipper (PG) Thur 1:10,3:15,5:20,7:45,9:50; FriMon
11:30a, 1:40; Tue-Wed 1:40
Heaven's Prisoners (R) Thur 6/20 only 7:00,9:45
Mission: Impossible (PG13) Thur 1:00,1:10,2:30,3:30,3:40,
5:00,7:00,7:20,7:35,9:30,10:00,10:00,10:20; FriWed
11:00a (Fri-Mon only), 1:45, 3:50,4:30,7:00,7:15,9:35,
10:00 (Fri-Satlate show 12:00m)
Spy Hard (PG13) Thur 1:00,3:00,5:10,7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed
11:30a (FriMon only), 1:30,3:30,5:30,8:30,10:30
Moll Flanders (PG13) Thur 1:00,3:50,7:00,9:45; Fri-Wed
12:00n, 2:30,5:15,9:00
«Eraser (R) Daily 11:00a (Fri-Mon only), 12:10,1:50,2:50,
4:30,5:30,7:00,8:00,9:30,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
«The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) 11:00a (Fri-Mon only),
12:00n, 1:15,2:15,3:30,4:30,5:45,7:30,8:00,9:45,10:15
(Fri-Satlate show 12:00m)
Sheridan Plaza 12
4999 Sheridan St; 987-4680
Twister (PG1J) Daily 12:15,2:45,5:20,8:00,10:25 (Fri-Sun
10:35) (Sat-Sun early show 10:05a; Fri-Sat late show
12:45a)
Hipper (PG) Thur 12:10,2:20,5:05; Fri-Wed 12:25,3:00 (Sat-
Sun early show 10:20a)
Mission; Impossible (PG13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,7:35,
10:10; Fri-Wed 12:30.2:55,5:35,8:10,10:30 (Fri-Sun 10:45)
(Sat-Sun early show 10:10a; Fri-Sat late show 12:50a)
Spy Hard (PG) Thur 6/20 only 12:30,2:45,5:15,7:25,9:50
Eddie (PG13) Thur 12:10,2:35,5:00,7:45,10:15; Fri-Wed
7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Dragonheart (PG13) Daily 12:05,2:25,5:25,7:55 (Thur
7:50), 10:25 (Sat-Sun early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
The Arrival (PG13) Thur 6/20 only 7:30,10:05.
The Rock (R) Daily 1:00,2:00,4:30,5:15,7:40,8:15,10:30.
(Fri-Sun 10:45) (Sat-Sun early show 10:20a; Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
The Phantom (PG) Thur 12:20,3:05,5:30,7:55,10:20; Fri¬
Wed 12:10,2:35,5:15 (Sat-Sun early show 10:05a)
Moll Flanders (PG13) Daily 1:10,5:05,8:05,10:30 (Fri-Sun
10:40) (Sat-Sun early show 10:25a)
The Cable Guy (PG13) Thur 12:00n, 12:45,2:15,3:00,4:45,
5:30,7:15,8:00,9:45,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:20,2:50,5:30,7:35,
8:10,10:00,10:25 (Fri-Sun 10:35) (Sat-Sun early show
10:15a; Fri-Sat late shows 12:15a, 12:35a)
«Hirting With Disaster (R) Daily 5:30
•The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G) Daily 12:00n, 12:45,2:30,
3:15,5:00,5:45,7:30,8:00,9:45,10:15 (Sat-Sun early show
10:00a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
«Eraser (R) Daily 12:10,2:40,5:10,7:50,10:30 (Sat-Sun
early show 10:00a; Fri-Satlate show 12:45a)
Taft Hollywood 12
7001 Taft St; 981-5443
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:05,3:10,5:20,7:30,9:40
Jumanji (PG) Thur 6/20 only 12:40,2:55,5:10,7:25,9:40
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 12:45,3:20,7:00,9:30
Sgl Bllko (PG) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15
Executive Decision (R) Daily 12:45,3:20,7:00,9:30
Toy Story (G) Daily 1:05,3:05,5:05,7:05,9:05
Sense and Sensibility (PG) Thur 6/20 only 12:45,3:15,7:00,
9:30
Fear (R) Daily 1:05,3:05,5:05,7:05,9:05
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Daily 1:10,3:10,5:10,7:10,9:10
Mulholland Falls (R) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:30,9:40
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 6/20 only 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:00,9:00
Mrs. Winterbourne (PG) Daily 1:10,3.10,5:10,7;10,9:10
«The Quest (PG13) Daily 1:05,3:05,5:05,7:05,9:05
«The Pallbearer (PG13) Daily 1:00,3:05,5:15,7:20,9:30
«Up Cíese & Personal (PG13) Daily 1245,3:20,7:00,9:30
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55
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 â–  26,1996
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Thinking Globally, Acting
Locally
By Pamela Gordon
Rafael de Acha says he’s taking a risk.
Rather than launch the eleventh season of
his Coral Gables-based New Theatre with
a classic from the dramatic canon, a piece
of proven contemporary theater, or a
crowd-pleasing musical, instead, early this
month, he debuted the New Plays Project,
a showcase of world premiere scripts by a
trio of South Florida playwrights. As if find¬
ing an audience for new work isn’t difficult
enough, de Acha programmed the six-
week project — it runs through July 14,
with two weeks of full productions given to
each show — during a notoriously slug¬
gish time of the year. All because, the
artistic director claims, risks or no risks,
he’s committed to cultivating local voices.
“You’re really going out on a tightrope by
doing a new play if the playwright has no
track record,” de Acha contends. “There’s
no pedigree with the audience and no pedi¬
gree with the critics. But by seeking to do
new plays, I’m trying to make an impact
that will go beyond the flavor of the month.
By bringing a new play by an early-career
playwright to life, we not only revitalize
whatever else we do at the theater, we also
make some long-lasting impact on theater
in a big sense, hopefully giving these plays
an opportunity to have a life beyond New
Theatre.”
Since its inception in December 1986,
New Theatre has featured at least one new
work a year by either a regional or a
national playwright; that includes work
commissioned from Susan Westfall,,whose
Pirates ofTigertail (now through June 30)
premieres in this year’s New Plays Project.
(The other offerings include Richard
Janaro’s Youth and Asia, which just closed,
and Michael McKeever’s That Sound You
Hear, July 3 through 14.)
But de Acha real¬
ized that a full-fledged
festival of new pieces
demanded a more
extensive marketing
approach than the
usual press-release-
and-brochure cam¬
paign that might sell
an original work dur¬
ing the rest of his sea¬
son. So he sought and
eventually received a
grant from the Knight
Foundation. “We hardly ever do any paid
. advertising. If s just not within our means,”
de Acha explains. “Most of what we do is
direct mail, and then ifs word of mouth and
PSAs [public sendee announcements]. How¬
ever, because we had a little bit of this fund¬
ing helping us, we paid for some advertising
this time. Also, by concentrating each play
into a two-week run, we hope to get more
density of audience instead of spreading a
production out over five weeks. And to our
subscribers we said, ‘Hey folks, ifs only ten
“Hiere are (tore writers nowJn
Miami who are staying here,
living here, and not going to New
KM or L, A.”
Theater
New Theatre artistic director Rafael de Acha makes room for the homies with the New Plays Project
performances, so you’d better reserve early
because ifs going to fill up.’ ”
With any luck a number of other factors
might help to fill New Theatre’s 60 seats.
For one thing, audiences are growing
increasingly accustomed to new works
being presented by major theaters. A
glance at schedules from Miami to Palm
Beach over the course of the past year
reveals numerous world premieres, sev¬
eral written by South Floridians, as well as
new play-reading series that bring works in
progress to the community. For local tal¬
ent, think of Geoffrey Hassman’s Neal’s
Garden, which opened this past June at
Area Stage Company and went on to win
two Carbonell Awards for the 1994-95 sea¬
son. Coconut Grove Playhouse’s Encore
Room hosted Mama’s Last Waltz by
Miamian Rafael V. Blanco in the fall of
1995, followed by University of Miami pro¬
fessor and novelist Evelyn Wilde Mayer-
son’s Marjory this spring. ACME Acting
Company recently mounted Hollywood
playwright Janyce LaPore’s Ferris Wheel,
while in April and May, Jim Tommaney
presented his play South Beach at the
EDGE/Theatre on Miami Beach and then
at New River Rep in Fort Lauderdale. Tom¬
maney also produced new works this past
summer by New World School of the Arts
student Adam Stuart Littman and New
World faculty member Roberto Prestigia-
como; he also featured original one-person
pieces by New World college seniors at the
EDGE during January.
Playwright Rafael Lima knows from
experience that Miami used to be infinitely
less open to original drama. In fact, he fled
Miami for New York City in 1988 because
he could not get his work produced here.
Continued on page 59
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18 Plays. 12 Actors. 11 Directors.
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June 21 thru July 7
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Thinking
Continued from page 57
Lima saw three of his plays presented at
Manhattan’s Circle Repertory Company:
1988’s El Salvador, 1992’s Parting Gestures,
and 1994’s Hard Hats. Additionally, El Sal¬
vador was produced elsewhere in the U.S.,
as well as in Europe. Lured by Hollywood,
Lima moved from New York to Los Ange¬
les to write Scripts for television’s China
Beach and Wise Guys, before returning to
South Florida in 1994 to work on a novel
and to teach play writing at the New World
School of the Arts. Next year he assumes
' directorship of the play-writing program at
New World, where students can earn high
school and college degrees in the subject.
“The difference in Miami from when I left
to when I came back is absolutely worlds
apart,” notes Lima. “Now there are places
to go to have your plays read. There are
places to go to have them workshopped.
There are more writers now in Miami who
are actually staying here, living here, and
not going to1 New York or L.A. There’s an
enérgy here that certainly wasn’t here
before.”-^
Richard Janaro, who has lived in Miami
for 35 years, concurs. “There was only
Coconut Grove Playhouse and Studio M in
the Sixties ” he recalls, pointing out that
Tennessee Williams wrote Sweet Bird of
Youth on a typewriter in the alley of the lat¬
ter space, located at the intersection of
Bird Road and Ponce de Leon, where a
Jaguar dealership now sits. “With the com¬
ing of age of Miami as a film center, there
are a heck of a lot of writers here now,”
says Janaro. “A lot of them followed the
movies and television or followed their
friends who were in those media, but they
themselves were playwrights. A lot of them
come to Writers’ Alliance meetings and
say, We’ve just been trying to get our toes
wet in Miami, and now that we know this
wonderful group is here we’re going to
stay.’ ”
In 1992, feeling isolated from fellow play¬
wrights and frustrated by an inability to
break down what she terms the “feudal-
like barriers” to seeing her work produced
by area theaters, Susan Westfall started
the Writers’ Alliance; it’s an offshoot of the
Theatre League of South Florida, which
she also helped found One year earlier.
Westfall claims that receptivity to local
drama “has been a process of evolution,
and I would like to think that the Theatre
League and the Writers’ Alliance have had
an awful lot to do with that. The Writers’
Alliance was brought about as an opportu¬
nity for writers to help each other in a
workshop-like environment. We meet
[once a month] and develop our work. We
have been doing readings [in various Bor¬
ders Book Shops]. Local theater producers
are seeing audiences outside of Theatre
League people coming to enjoy the work. I
think it makes them feel a little more com¬
fortable with taking a chance on unknown
titles.”
Once a theater commits to a new script, it
can take months to bang a script into coher¬
ent enough shape to play well before an audi¬
ence. De Acha helped shortcut that process
by pairing his chosen authors with^eligible
directing partners. “I acted as the yenta,” de
Acha laughs, “marrying playwright with
director.” De Acha drew from a list in his
mind of whathe terms “early-career direc¬
tors.” Deborah Mello’s intuition, he sensed,
would complement Janaro’s work about a
family confronting a father’s terminal illness.
Paul Tei would bring a gritty street-smart
sensibility to Westfall’s tale of a family caught
up in politics, race, and property develop¬
ment in Coconut Grove. Roberto Prestigia-
como’s experimental bent could balance
McKeever’s realistic
take on three couples
in different stages of
their relationships
who huddle together
during Hurricane
Andrew.
The collaboration
between playwright
and director helped
give form to each
production. Mello,
for example, loved
Janaro’s characters
in Youth and Asia, but felt that the modular
set the playwright had stipulated (a series
of stationary platforms around which the
actors would move) did not suit the script’s
complexity. Accordingly, Mello designed
six black-and-white screens that moved on
tracks across the stage, carving out differ¬
ent environments. “We did the adjust¬
ments together,” Mello explains.
“[Richard] didn’t change the play without
me and I didn’t change it without him.”
A similar fruitful give-and-take occurred
between Westfall and Tei. “Paul’s instincts
have been wonderful,” remarks Westfall,
who adds that Tei came to her with sugges¬
tions for tightening the focus of Pirates. Tei
explains: “Tie main character Liz kind of dis¬
appeared in the second act By the time she
came back, there were all these other sub¬
plots. Tie play was really about Iiz, and we
needed to get back to that” Seeing that her
emotional identification with the main char¬
acter was preventing a deeper development
of that character, Westfall returned to her
desk for a round of revisions.
Before being picked up by New Theatre,
McKeever’s That Sound You Hear went
through a string of rewrites at the behest of
folks at a reading series called Theater with
Your Coffee? The series functions as a labo¬
ratory for writers, actors, and directors fash¬
ioning original work. Prestigiacomo, a dri¬
ving force behind the Hollywood-based
bimonthly Coffee program, knew McK¬
eever’s script well. Tie director had a vision
of hurricane devastation in the second act
that would illuminate the parallel between
stormy weather and the tempestuous rela¬
tionships at the heart of the script. “The
nightmare,” admits McKeever, “was actually
showing the aftereffects of the storm.
Roberto literally wanted the entire setting to
shift. I was going, This thing isn’t going to
happen,’ and lo and behold, he and Michael
[Essad, the set designer] actually figured out
a way to make it happen.”
Increasingly sophisticated audiences. A
high school and college training ground for
playwrights. New play-reading series at
almost all the major theaters. Networking
venues such as the Writers’ Alliance and
Theater with Your Coffee? All these ele¬
ments seem to have made local producers
sit up and take notice of talent in their own
back yard. As Janaro observes, “When
places like New Theatre that are tremen¬
dously successful want to allow new voices
to be heard, local writers are encouraged to
keep writing. Without that support, it would
be very discouraging.”ED
¡“When planes like New Theatre
allow new voices to be heard,
local writers are encouraged
to keep writing.”
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Detail from Hernán Bas's April Preparations and Eventual Trip in May for the Arrival of Ms. A
More Fun
in the
New World
By Judy Cantor
When you add it all together, the 26 visual arts
majors graduating from the New World School
of tiie Arts high school have won two and a half
million dollars in scholarships to university-
level art programs around the nation. New
York City’s esteemed Cooper Union School of
Art alone courted six of the New World gradu¬
ates with full-tuition scholarships for its selec¬
tive freshman class of 60. (Five of the New
World graduates accepted. Reza Moghadam, a
1996 Presidential Scholar-, opted for a similar
offer from the Maryland Institute, College of
Art)
Beaming from behind the desk in his office
in the New World building downtown, visual
arts dean Mel Alexenberg describes his
seniors as if they were the art world equiva¬
lents of blue-chip scholar-athletes. “They’re
like prized football players,” Alexenberg notes.
“Every art school competes for these stu¬
dents.”
Senior Showcase, the exhibition currently on
view at the school’s first-floor gallery, offers
testimony to young, emerging talent Techni¬
cally, the work of these seventeen- and eigh-
teen-year-old artists is remarkably accom¬
plished. Their grasp of color, composition, and
media is, as Alexenberg points out at least as
mature as that of most college art students.
The graduates also studied art history during
their four-year tenure at New World, and they
have obviously been influenced by a plethora
of artistic movements, most noticeably neoex¬
pressionism, graffiti art, and conceptual art.
But their paintings, sculpture, and installations
are fresh and original, not merely derivative.
Although the works are formally quite
sophisticated, their
content is not quite as
developed. The sub¬
jects they deal with,
the ideas they convey,
are unmistakably ado¬
lescent — this is the
output of high school
students, after all.
Although the con¬
trived titles of a lot of
the pieces (one exam¬
ple: John Howlett’s
expressionist painting
of two snarling foxes is called 4 Gold Teeth
[How I Leaned to Ditch Art School and Become
a Criminal Psychoanalyst]) suggest the young
artists are trying hard to appear jaded, the
work itself shows that they haven’t yet learned
to mask their emotions. They can’t help but
put their personalities on display. Works both
figurative and abstract evoke elements of high
school drama: sexual tension, identity crises,
peer pressure. There’s an endearing awkward¬
ness to the work in the show, with more
teenage angst on these walls than in an
episode of My So Called Life. It’s precisely the
kind of raw expression that makes for good art
A diptych by Danamarie Hosier, for exam¬
ple, shows a long-haired teenage girl sitting
alone on the grass with her head down, her
thoughts far away. She looks rejected, maybe
by a boy, maybe by a world
she feels she doesn’t fit in to
or doesn’t even care to under¬
stand. (If only it were That
Easy to fool people to lean
Against fence posts and shield
closed eyes. Bluebirds and
Fairy wings — a heart-shaped
badge reads “Happy’’—you
must know I’m not fooled is
just half of its title. Hosier
should get an A for creative
writing alone.) One half of the
diptych shows its subject sit¬
ting legs apart; in the other
she strikes a languid pose,
lying on her side. Both posi¬
tions subtly suggest a bud¬
ding sexuality that, indeed,
pervades the girl’s presence
and probably her thoughts.
Above each figure the artist
paints a bright, whirling sky,
part van Gogh, part Peter
Max, but this fantastic ele¬
ment is merely distracting.
Hosier’s emotional portraits
would have been stronger
with a more sober back¬
ground.
On the other side of the gallery hangs a
group of paintings by Lu Gold, collectively
titled A Sunday Painting. In the largest canvas,
an intense self-portrait, the artist paints herself
as a classical ballerina sitting on a sofa. Wear¬
ing a dance costume and pointe shoes, the girl
stares directly at the viewer. Her blatantly trou¬
bled countenance dispels the idealized image
of the on-stage dancer and reveals gnawing
insecurities. In this incisive piece, and in
smaller self-portraits and several small paint¬
ings of flowers also hung here, Gold reveals
herself as a perceptive and sensitive artist
Elsewhere, Nora Mora’s charcoal drawing
Eighteen Exits is a fluid composition composed
of elegant, morphing female figures. Mora has
a strong graphic sensibility, and she creates a
bold, almost abstract pattern of geometric
shapes in her study of feminine body types.
She also incorporates some criticism of
women’s role models as they are glamourized
in the media; for instance, on top of one thin,
shapely torso the artist has pasted the typed
word mentira (lie).
In two large paintings — Obtained Data from
the 4 Month Abyssal Dive and Reasons Why the
Data of the Four-Month Dive Were Omitted —
Keith Riley paints a hectic jumble of African-
looking masks, geometric shapes, and graffiti
tags and squiggles. This is welkexecuted work,
if heavily reminiscent of Jean-Michel
Basquiafs savage paintings. Thankfully, Riley
adds a more clearly rendered portrait of a
coolly pensive youth at the bottom of each can¬
vas. These representational figures make the
paintings more interesting. The aforemen¬
tioned deluge of figures and forms swirls
above the teenager’s head, bringing to life the
vertiginous thoughts that have overtaken his
brain.
Abraham Diaz’s Proper Man’s Closet hangs
from the ceiling like a large mobile; Diaz has
placed clothes he has made himself on wooden
hangers and hung them from wooden bars
suspended next to each other at eye and shoul¬
der level. He fashions his men’s vests and
women’s corsets, panties, and stockings from
heavy wire wrapped with gesso-soaked gauze.
The stiff, white sculptures have a simple,
organic quality, and they look something like
orthopedic casts. Some are accented with long
pieces of raffia woven into the cloth as corset
strings or sewn in a clump on the panties to
resemble pubic hair. Diaz, who often paints
portraits of a feminized version of himself, has
created a closet in which one can try on differ¬
ent gender roles and identities. It’s an engag¬
ing work, both formally and conceptually.
Nearby hangs Christian Salazar’s Stop
Action, a fragmented portrait of an androidish
man that’s presented on six small canvases.
Salazar paints in primary—almost fluorescent
— colors, and the geometric background of
the canvases recalls the gridded guts of a com¬
puter.
Heman Bas’s April Preparations and Even¬
tual Trip in May for the Arrival of Ms. A is a
work of fictional autobiography told through
photographs and objects. The “Ms. A” in ques¬
tion is aviator Amelia Earhart, and the installa¬
tion, which takes up an entire gallery wall, doc¬
uments the artist’s make-believe journey as he
goes to meet Earhart, who, it appears, is
returning from one of her flights. Bas’s fantasy
memoir is constructed by way of large photos
that the artist manipulates, washing them with
paint to enhance or blur certain images. The
first photos show the artist preparing for his
trip and traveling in a car. At the end of the
sequence, a girl who bears a close resem¬
blance to Amelia Earhart appears, ensconced
in the cockpit of her plane or posing on the
ground. Further elements of this fantasy are
provided on the floor, where some objects sit
in a row: old letters, men’s shoes with holes in
the soles, medicine bottles, an empty vanity
case, and what looks like a plane’s instrument
panel. Bas’s narrative is a bit oblique, but it
conveys a romantic tale that most viewers
know will end in tragedy with Earhaifs disap¬
pearance. The photos are meticulous and the
installation on the whole is neatly and affec¬
tively arranged; Bas has a good eye for three-
dimensional composition.
Among the New World seniors, Alejandro
Cardenas is undoubtedly the class clown. Here
he exhibits his Proposals for Senior Showcase,
plastering one gallery wall with drawings, doo¬
dles, press clippings, photos, and other
ephemera that include a swatch of plastic grass
and a Post-It note. Cardenas’s cartoonish illus¬
trations are displayed as if they were serious
proposals submitted to one of his teachers for
the work he would contribute to this exhibi¬
tion. Actually, they compose a Mad Magazine-
style spoof of conceptual and performance art
Among the proposals displayed, one shows a
musical stuffed moose (“song playing will be
the Canadian National Anthem”) with museum
goers lined up behind it waiting to look into its
butt A proposed performance piece involves a
mannequin covered with spikes that explodes,
“killing everyone at the opening.” Another pro¬
vides instructions to go to the beach and
“attempt to give away a chunk of fire coral.”
Elsewhere on the wall, still another proposal
calls for a land mine, a canvas taped to the ceil¬
ing, and gallery goers who will unwittingly par¬
ticipate in a new form of spatter painting when
the mine goes off.
Other ideas refer directly to artists on the
cutting edge, whose work Cardenas obviously
admires but doesn’t hesitate to poke tun at For
example, a picture of some strange-looking
chunks floating in a tank placed in the middle
of a gallery is accompanied by the text “Simul¬
taneous tribute to Damien Hirst and Joseph
Beuys: Lard and Felt Suspended in Formalde¬
hyde.’’ Admittedly, this whole thing is silly, a
classroom prank that could fall flat in less tal¬
ented hands. But Cardenas, combining the
principles of conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth
and the humor of Beavis and Butt-Head, has
made a hilarious piece. As with the work of the
other artists exhibiting here, Cardenas’s ideas
may be adolescent, but the quality of his work
belies his years.
Senior Showcase. Through July 10. New World
School of the Arts, New World Gallery; 25 NE 2nd
Works both figurativeand abstract
evoke elements of high school
drama: sexual tension, identity
crises, peer pressure. (
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


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with capers and onions; a green Greek salad fea¬
turing red onions, pepperoncini, cucumber, plum
tomatoes, feta cheese, and an olive vinaigrette;
and a Chinese chicken salad with cabbage and a
crackling trim of fried wontons.
Bread baskets contained an assortment of won¬
derful Parker House rolls, croissants, bagels,
Danish pastries, and miniature muffins. The
carving station featured a roast beef with
creamed horseradish sauce and a turkey breast
with cranberry-orange relish, both deliciously
prepared.. A cook flipped four omelets at a time,
an entertaining feat. But it was the French toast
— triangles slathered with an amaretto cream,
then battered with cornflakes and almonds and
fried — and the palm-size Belgian waffles that
held our attention, abetted by a trio of syrups.
The dessert table was a treasure too, from the
bowl of strawberries and sidekick of creamy Brie
to the finger-length custard éclairs, napoleons,
and chocolate cups filled with chocolate or
vanilla mousse to the luscious blueberry cheese¬
cake and tart key lime pie. Though I must admit
that by the end of the meal downing even one
slice of chocolate layer cake was something of a
challenge. I couldn’t imagine topping all this off
with a beer, as I saw some brunchers doing. The
mimosas were quite filling enough.
If only some evidence of brunch remained at
dinner.
Like a country club in the chill of winter, South
Pointe’s dining room lacks the bustling, jolly
spirit that infects brunch on Sundays. And sadly,
the fare suffers from this ennui as well. High
prices — $19 a pound for Maine lobster — dis¬
courage interest in tackling several courses, and
don’t always seem justified, given the mediocrity
of the main courses we ordered.
One way to minimize dining costs is to eat in
the pub area, noshing on a couple of starters as a
Continued on page 65
South Pointe
Seafood House
1 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach;
673-1708. Open
daily from 11:30
to 11:00 (until
midnight on
Friday and
Saturday).
Sunday brunch
from 10:30 to
2:30.
Fish dip
$S.0fff
Crabcake
$7.00
Swordfish
¡¡¡¡¡g
Teriyaki tuna
$21.00
Ever on Sunday
By Jen Karetnick
“It’s all about balance,” my dinner companion, a
fellow writer, said to me over cocktails a few
evenings ago. She paused to sip her Cuda Red
Ale thoughtfully. “Yes,” she said, swallowing
appreciatively, holding up her pint glass as if to
catch and drink the setting sun. “Balance.”
My friend was referring to writing, about jug¬
gling her corporate and creative lives. But it
struck me as she was speaking that the notion of
balance is apropos to cooking: Flavors must
complement, not overwhelm, each other. And to
restaurants: Quality must justify price. An occa¬
sional tipping of the scale — a flawed meal, a
dearth (of sudden rush, for that matter) of cus¬
tomers — might make a successful eatery teeter
for a moment or two. But if the restaurant has
balance, it will always recover.
South Pointe Seafood House attempts to perform
its own brand of balancing act. Located at
island’s end in South Pointe Park, the nine-year-
old restaurant overlooking the rocky, frothy
channel of Government Cut used to be Craw-
daddy’s, a Louisiana-style fish house that was
part of the California chain that owns Rusty Peli¬
can. In 1991, Arthur Forgette took over the spot,
and he’s been making it over ever since: renam¬
ing the place after its park setting; selecting
executive chef Dana Alan Brizee, who debuted
his new pub menu a few months ago; and remod¬
eling the lotsa-wood-and-carpeting lobby to
include a microbrewery, installing glistening
copper and stainless steel brewing and aging
tanks and importing brewmaster Jeff Nelson
from California.
Yet despite all the improvements, the 250-seat
restaurant still suffers from an identity crisis:
part tourist trap, part banquet hall, part brewpub.
And it fails to keep its halls filled with merrymak¬
ers. When I drink Government Cut Light Ale or
Hog Snapper Stout at South Pointe’s bar, I usu¬
ally drink alone, and when I follow that up with a
meal in the dining room, I find myself in the
sparse company of out-of-towners. I’ve often won¬
dered how the place stays in business.
I got part of my answer while
gazing at the herb garden that
nearby elementary school chil¬
dren planted and tend at the side
of the two-story building. “Does
the chef use the herbs in his
dishes?” I asked our server.
“No,” he said. “But McDonald’s
just rented it out for a shoot.”
McDonald’s and others look¬
ing for a pretty backdrop may
pay the rent. But the real reason
South Pointe stays in business as
a restaurant is apparent only one
day of the week. Because though dinnertime can
seem dark and dreary — the lighting too sub¬
dued, the vague scent of mildew in the air intru¬
sive, the service oversolicitous, supplied by wait¬
ers who don’t have enough to do — Sunday at
noon is the exact opposite: bright with Florida
sunshine, elegant but cozy. Intriguing, intertwin¬
ing aromas of yeasty beer and omelets. Speed¬
boats and water bikes churning through the Cut.
And unlimited champagne or mimosas, topped
off periodically by pleasant staffers who also
replace cutlery and plates as needed. It’s the dif¬
ference between, well, night and day.
For $22 per person, brunch is an excellent Sun¬
day activity (and believe me, it could take all
day). Brizee sets up rows of chafing dishes filled
with brunch-type entrées; trays of salads and
baskets of breads; an omelet, waffle, and carving
station; and a dessert table. Go with a good
appetite and sample everything — there are no
losers here. Even the stuff in the warming pans
is beautifully presented and replenished fre¬
quently.
Cheese-stuffed artichoke ravioli in cream sauce
was al dente but supple, cheese blintzes with
peach sauce hot and creamy in the middle and
crunchy outside. Bacon and sausage were
meaty, cottage fries crisp. A fragrant seafood
paella was rich in mussels, calamari, chicken,
and chorizo, and accented with a liberal dose of
roasted red peppers. The crowning glory, clus¬
ters of Dungeness crab legs with garlic butter,
were indeed so glorious that they hardly needed
the garlicky kick of the condiment.
A bowl of chilled peel-and-eat jumbo shrimp
complemented by a zesty cocktail sauce was also
a big draw, as were displays of peppered mack¬
erel and smoked salmon. Antipasto platters of
rolled Italian meats and cheeses, artichokes,
hearts of palm, pepperoncini, and Homestead
tomatoes and mozzarella scattered with basil
were vivid. And several salads were delicious —
most notably a saffron linguine with mussels and
shredded carrots; a salmon-and-new-potato blend
I couldn’t Imagine topping all this
off with a beer, as I saw some|
brunchers doing. The mimosas
were quite filling enoughs
63
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


Hew Times June 20 - 26,1996
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Sunday
Continued from page 63
way of making a meal. This is also a great
way to experience the more relaxed vibes
of the lounge, rather than the can-be-stuffy
formality of the main rooms. The offerings
here are culled from the appetizer section
of the dinner menu, augmented by a good
raw bar selection and filled out with soups,
salads, sandwiches (served only during
lunch), and snacky stuff such as hot pret¬
zels with beer mustard.
Smoked mahi-mahi fish dip was a good
mild blend, a generous scoop decorated
with curls of carrots and beets, kalamata
olives, tomatoes, cucumbers, and pepper-
oncini. Packaged garlic flatbreads were a
disappointment, however (as was the most
surprising garnish of the evening — a
long strand of hair). Jumbo shrimp
wrapped in bacon with a horseradish and
barbecue sauce mirrored the menu
description perfectly. A half-dozen shrimp
sported a wreath of bacon and surrounded
a pool of barbecue sauce spiked with a lit¬
tle horseradish. Though notably fresh¬
tasting, this dish lacked a unifying ele¬
ment and needed a better sauce,
something less dominating. And less
expensive: Eleven dollars is excessive for
a glorified cocktail. Griddled crabcake was
a more substantial bargain, big enough to
suffice as a main course. Well padded with
breadcrumbs and pan-fried, the molded
stone crabmeat was finely seasoned,
though a little-too salty. We liked the bed
of tomato aioli cole slaw upon which it sat
but thought it dangerously warm, rather
than cool and inhospitable to bacteria
breeding.
The dinner menu’s seafood selection is
appropriately enticing, ranging from
grilled salmon on a bed of wilted greens
with tomato balsamic vinaigrette and edi¬
ble flowers to blackened swordfish with
sour-orange sauce and red onion mar¬
malade. But several sound too similar,
treated with some form of butter (pine nut-
basil, mandarin orange, rum-coconut).
In any event, a grilled swordfish steak
was ample and juicy, topped with roasted
peppers and marinated plum tomatoes. A
dab of pine nut-basil butter was melted on
one end, supplying not nearly enough fla¬
vor for the fat. Al dente broccoli was invig¬
orating, but the powdery seasoning mix
that topped it tasted like Molly McButter.
(Herbs from the McDonald’s garden
might boost this vegetable.) Saffron rice
pilaf, a vaguely Indian-tasting starch,
rounded out the plate.
That rice worked well with sauteed
teriyaki tuna, a thick fillet coated with
sesame seeds and black pepper. Cooked
to a medium pink, the tuna supported a
few slices of canned-tasting mandarin
oranges that floated, unincorporated, in a
pool of butter. Broiled red snapper was
another nice piece of fish, moist and flaky.
But once again the accompaniments were
bland — an unspicy poblano pepper salsa
and á haystack of crisp tortilla strips. Satis¬
factory, but not sense-satisfying, a descrip¬
tion that serves equally well to describe
the dessert list, which we waved off.
Like a lot of us, I delight in excess — a.
plethora of champagne, an elaborate brunch,
a week of solid sleep, a shopping spree, a
whole day to write. But I function best on a
diet of moderation. Moderate drinking and
eating. Some (probably not enough) sleep
every night. A new shirt or pair of shoes
every once in a while. And a few hours a day
to put words to paper. South Pointe Seafood
House, balancing on a fine point, might con¬
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Cafe l
D
ining Guii
ie
The following restaurants are recommended by the
New Times food critic. Please call in advance for
operating hours, reservations, and other specific
information.
Price Guide
(based on a complete meal for one, excluding tip and
alcoholic beverages)
Inexpensive, less than $15: $
Moderate, $15 to $30: $$
Expensive, more than $30: $$$
North Dade: Mainland and causeways, north of
N 36th Street, excluding the areas covered under
West Dade-Hialeah (see below).
North Beaches: All beachside communities north of
Dade Boulevard in Miami Beach.
South Beach: Miami Beach south of Dade
Boulevard.
Miami-Central Dade: Mainland east of SR 826, from
North 36th Street south to Miller Road.
West Dade-Hialeah: Hialeah and adjacent municipali¬
ties (Hialeah Gardens, Opa-locka, Medley, Miami
Springs), as well as everything west of SR 826
from Okeechobee Road south to Miller Road.
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne: Key Biscayne proper
and everything in the City of Miami east of U.S. 1
and south of the Rickenbacker Causeway.
Coral Gables: Everything within the Coral Gables
city limits.
South MiamMtendall-South Dade: South Miami
proper, and everything south of Miller Road.
North Dade
The Bar-B-Q-Barn 11705 NW 7th Ave; 681-2491. An air-
conditioned, carpeted fern-bar rendition of a
barbecue shack. You got your spare ribs, your baby-
back ribs, your sliced-to-order barbecue turkey, beef
and ham, plus the lean and mean combination plates.
Lunch and dinner. $
Basilique Cafe 18640 NW 67th Ave; 623-0096. Johnson
& Wales grad Ralph Salvador and chef-partner PJ.
Flaherty put their best knives forward at this
reasonably priced Mediterranean eatery in Miami
Lakes. Though some of the fare seems experimental
and uneven, you can certainly count on a hefty, four-
cheese foccaciafor starters and a pungent rigatoni
rusticcio with sausage, roasted peppers, onions, sun-
dried tomatoes, and Gorgonzola and mozzarella
cheeses for an entrée. Desserts are more than
reliable—they’re delicious. Lunch and dinner. $$
Biscayne Wine Merchants & Bistro 738 NE 125th St;
899-1997. Arugula salad and homemade páté start
any meal off right Of the main courses, there’s
shrimp with peppercorn sauce and chicken stuffed
with leeks, dill, and crab with dill sauce. The main
deal here is the wine policy—each bottle costs the
same whether you take it home or have it here. Daily
specials range from fish and chicken to lamb and
veal, usually excellent Dinner, weekday lunch. $
Chef Allen's 19088 NE 29th Ave; 935-2900. Since
opening in 1986 this unique restaurant has
dominated the New World scene. These days
innovative chef-owner Allen Susser continues to
cater to his community’s fine-dining needs. A
James Beard Award-winning chef, he prepares the
finest fish in Miami, particularly whole yellowtail
smothered in a coconut-milk-and-curry sauce.
Caribbean antipasto, featuring tamarind-barbecue'
shrimp and jerk calamari, is a fiesta of fire;
swordfish, dotted with sun-dried fruit confit, is
moist and meaty. Nightly soufflés range from
lemon-blackberry to chocolate-brownie and are an
exceptional end to an outstanding meal. $$$
Gourmet Diner 13951 Biscayne Blvd; 947-2255. Cheap
in price but not in quality, this North Miami Beach
institution serves some of the best French-roots
cuisine in Dade. Steamed artichoke served chilled
‘with a fabulous pink vinaigrette makes a simple but
satisfying appetizer; snails are succulent in blitter,
garlic, and a powerful portion of white wine; aiid loin
of lamb encrusted with herbs is served rare and juicy.
House-made desserts are popular—you’d better
reserve a piece of that custard fruit tart before digging
in to your seafood au gratín. Lunch, dinner, and
weekend breakfast.$
Hiro Japanese Restaurant and Sushi & Yakitori Bar
3007 NE 163rd St; 948-3687. Soothing jazz
soundtracks and late-night hours (till 3:30 a.m.)
make Hiro appealing for cocktail-hour snacks and
after-movie munchies, but grilled yakatori and
fresh sushi rolls are appropriate for mealtimes too.
Don t pass up the spider roll (made with soft-shell
crab) or the salmon, scallion, and cream cheese
roll, a creamy delicacy designed to make you
crave more. Lunch and dinner. $$
II Piccolo Diner 2112 NE 123rd St; 893-6538. Dress
casually for this homestyle happening, where locals
in Lycra workout wear go to exercise their appetites
for Italian cuisine. But don’t expect heavy food'— the
chef-owners have a wonderfully light touch with
everything from chicken with a cognac-mushroom
sauce and veal marsala to eggplant parmigiana and
baked ziti. Even desserts, such as the outstanding
white chocolate mousse cake, seem like they have
more fluff, less fat Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Kebab 514 NE 167th St; 940-6309. Well, kebabs aren’t
all Middle Eastern, as this lovely Indian restaurant
proves. Your skewer can be ordered with lamb
chunks, minced lamb, or chicken—each resting
atop a mound of basmati rice. Among the more
traditional Indian dishes, the chicken tikka and butter
chicken are spectacularly fragrant, as are the lamb
curries, including a Madras sauce that sings with
spice and vegetable flavor. Ricé biryanis are also a
plus here. Among desserts, the best is gülab jamun
— sweet pastry in rosewater syrup. Service is
attentive. Lunch and dinner. $$
La Cascade Restaurant 8825 Biscayne Blvd; 758-1388.
The neighborhood is nothing much, the premier
homestyle fare is everything. Take what you can get
off the blackboard menu (a limited selection). Lambi
(sautéed conch) is this town’s most tender. Tasso,
made with goat meat, is a Haitian take on vaca frita,
the spicy, deep-fried crunchy exterior belying a soft
heart Brewed-to-order espresso for dessert
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Mark's Place 2286 NE 123rd St; 893-6888. Named one
of the fifty best restaurants in the nation and a
recipient of the Distinguished Restaurant Award from
Condé Nast Traveler, chef-owner Mark Militello’s
upscale establishment has placed Miami on the
fancy-food map. A nominee at the James Beard
Awards, Militello has garnered top praise for his
startlingly inventive cuisine — pappardelle with
grilled rabbit, for example, or pan-roasted pheasant
with black truffles and braised swiss chard. The
menu changes daily, but count on its being both
exquisite and extensive. And dessert, dessert,
dessert! Lunch and dinner. $$$
Neal's 2570 NE Miami Gardens Dr; 936-8333.
Husband-and-wife team Neal Cooper and Mary Mass-
Cooper run this charming, 70-seat Aventura eatery.
Entrées—such as fillet of salmon served over
mashed potatoes, or the inches-thick pork chop with
spiced apples—are mouth-watering and reasonably
priced. Asian influences add a touch of reinvention to
duck and stuffed pasta dishes; Italian notes abound in
the grilled vegetable-goat cheese pizza and
homemade focaccia. Dusted with 24-karat gold dust,
Almond Roca chocolate surprise is a dessert worth its
weight in, well, gold. $$
Nice Mon 19695 NW 2nd Ave; 652-3602. The name
says everything you need to know about this
Jamaican and Chinese counter-service restaurant and
bakery: nice people, nice food, nice prices. Jamaican
beef or lobster patties are rich and flaky bargains.
Jerk pork and curry chicken are authentically fiery,
so gringos beware. Snapper is fresh, deep-fried, and
covered with a brown stew sauce or a Scotch bonnet
pepper sauce. Soothe singed palates with dense,
delicious hard dough bread or bread pudding spiked
with raisins. Lunch and dinner. $
Outback Steakhouse 3161 NE 163rd St; 9444329. For
information see listing under West Dade.
Sara's Dairy and Vegetarian 2214 NE 123rd St;
891-3312. (Also 1127 NE 163rd St; 948-7777.) An
orthodox pizza parlor, Sara’s also offers some of the
most authentic Middle Eastern and home-cooked
Jewish fare in Miami. Hummus and falafel, stuffed
cabbage and mushroom barley soup have two things
in common: they’re meat-free, and they’re fantastic.
Complimentary egg bread with entrees is a chaDah of
a good time. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
North Beaches
al Carbón (in the Sheraton Bal Harbour Beach Resort)
9701 Collins Ave; 865-7511. literally “over coal”—
and if you stick with the name, you won’t go wrong:
The best items at this pricey Argentine-
Mediterranean supper club are the succulent grilled
steaks and chops, which come with all manner of
relishes and chutneys. Among the appetizers,
empanadas are expertly turned out, as are a combo of
feta cheese, rock shrimp, and kalamata olives served
on a bed of bitter greens, and grilled baby calamari
stuffed with minced shrimp. live music frequently
spices up the dinner hour. $$$
Amie and Richie's 525 41st St; 531-7691. As you walk in,
you know you’re in deli heaven: Fresh cuts of
smoked fish, ham, salami, roast beet cheese, and
other favorites line the refrigerated display case.


Sandwiches are hard to beat here; there’s no better r
pastrami on rye anywhere. Knishes also excel.
Breakfast, lunch, and early dinner. $
Cafe Avanti 732 41st St; 5384400. Pleasant Northern
Italian restaurant with a number of French nuances.
Start with soups as good as their pretty names
promise: minestrone Genovese, tortellini in brodo, or
zuppa maitata. The shrimp fra diávolo is spunky, the
veal dishes are exquisite and you won’t have to take
out a second mortgage to pay the check. Cuisine is
classical but with a flair—the chef has a penchant
for Pernod (notably with pears, as a grand finale). $$
Cafe Prima Pasta 414 71st St; 867-0106. One of the
best pasta cafés in town. Eat here for fine
handmade pasta at fine-with-everybody prices.
Coarsely chopped fresh tomato sauces are
especially good. But be prepared to mill about on
the sidewalk for a while —this establishment
always has a wait. Lunch and dinner. $$
Cafe Ragazzi 9500 Harding Ave; 866-4495. The
fascination with tiny trattorias continues, judging by
the business at this 40-seater. Though the service is
warm and personable, homemade bread, a decent
house wine, and a pleasant selection of Italian meat
and fish staples, such as osso buco and salmon with
sautéed racficchio and grapes, are the real draws. You
can eat your fill without padding the bill, especially if
you stick to wonderful baked pastas such as spinach-
and-cheese cannelloni and meaty lasagna. Daily
specials can be misleadingly pricey, so be sure to ask
before ordering—credit cards aren’t accepted
(neither are reservations). Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Da Vinci 1009 Kane Concourse; 861-8166. Run
by the folks who made Oggi a pasta-producing
legend in this town (see separate listing below),
this elegant trattoria serves gnocchi that float in
pesto, addictive ricotta-and-spinach agnolotti,
pappardelle that rival your wrist for width. Fish
and seafood specials are always fresh and feisty,
and a meringue layer cake for dessert is like a
cloud sandwich. Lunch and dinner. $$
Dominique's 5225 Collins Ave; 865-6500. The famous
lamb chops—marinated and cooked to poetic
perfection — raise the status of Dominique’s to near¬
legendary, which is unfair. If you’re adventurous, you
should try the alligator, rattlesnake, or buffalo dishes
that have become part of the lore. Desserts are
memorable, with soufflés from chocolate to pistachio.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$$
East Ocean Restaurant (in the Thunderbird Hotel)
18401 Collins Ave; 937-1006. Aged sirloin steaks
and Maine lobsters, served Cantonese style, are
the house specialties at this gourmet north-shore
eatery. Though X.O. chicken exudes peppery
exuberance, anyone looking to spice up the night
will want to request it extra-hot. Same goes for
other treats, such as hot-and-sour soup and tender
Szechuan wontons. $$
La Famiglia 2445 Collins Ave; 534-7111. Located in the
refurbished Traymore Hotel, this ballroom-size
restaurant is a stunner in more ways than one. Try
the clam appetizer, with bivalves steamed in an
intoxicating broth of champagne, shallots, green
peppers, and herbs, or the pasta efagioli, which is
among the best in town. This Continental menu leans
heavily toward Italian, and vitello Sinatra will light up
your ol’ eyes, no matter what color they are. Lunch
and dinner. $$
L'Aurora Ristorante Italiano 18250 Collins Ave;
936-8166. In a clean-lined, contemporary setting,
Nando Pietroni serves upscale Italian specialties to
customers who have followed him for years. A former
pastry chef on the Love Boat, Pietroni crafts
wonderful breads, pastas, and desserts. But don’t
overlook the seafood dishes, particularly when their
succulence is enhanced by a garlicky, red pepper fra
diavolo sauce. Sliced sirloin over arugula with
peppercorns is also a treat. $$
Le Petit Cafó 910 71st St; 861-0720. Petit is right But
this 28-seater dishes up French and Italian fare at
neighborhood prices. Skip the mostly mediocre
pastas and go straight to steak au poivre, an excellent
cut topped with a creamy peppercorn sauce. Veal
parmagiana is that rare animal, tender and juicy
cutlets laced with mozzarella and Brie. Eggy creme
brülée is more like a soufflé, but it’s still a dessert to
inspire spoon duels. $$
Matteo & Alfredo 9581 Harding Ave; 868-3355. Matteo
Giuffrida, the chef who put Alfredo’s the Original of
Rome on the Miami map, and Alfredo Alvarez, exec
chef at Giacosa, team up for this creative effort
Needless to say, homemade pastas are excellent
ricotta gnocchi, squid ink fettuccine, fish lasagna.
The Mediterranean meets the Far East in appetizers
such as seared sea scallops with wasabi flying-fish
roe over endive. Main courses in the vein of beef
tenderloin in mushroom-red wine demiglace are
more traditional, while desserts like raspberry-basil
cheesecake provide a spicy end. $$
Oggi Caffe 1740 79th St Cswy; 866-1238. Expanded
seating now allows for more diners and greater
comfort at this 70-odd-seat restaurant and deli in the -
White Star Center. Fettuccine, agnolotti, penne, and
spaghetti are all handmade;4hetortellem bicolor-e/ *
shifted with Sun-dried tomatoes and ricotta, is the
prince of the pile. Homemade desserts deserve
devouring. Lunch and dinner. $
The Rascal House 17190 Collins Ave; 9474581. A
labyrinthine deli, but surely one of the best The
menu is a trip through all the glories of Jewish fare:
chopped liver with shmaltz; herring; smoked fish;
Reuben, corned beef and pastrami sandwiches; huge
potato latkes with sour cream; brisket of beef
borscht... you get the picture. Atmosphere is frantic
but alive and infectiously buoyant Breakfast lunch,
and dinner. $
Yeung's Chinese Restaurant 954 41st Sf 672-1144. The
motto here is “We know how Chinese food should
be,” and we gotta agree. An extensive Mandarin and
Cantonese menu yields a great bunch of soups and
noodle dishes. Peking duck is a double delight—the
crisp skin wrapped in pancakes with scallions,
carrots, and plum sauce, and the succulent meat
wokked with shredded vegetables. Speedy takeout
and delivery service is a bonus for Beach-ites. Lunch
and dinner. $
South Beach
Allioli 1300 Ocean Dr; 5380553. It may be named after
a condiment but it takes its influences from a
continent Serving Euro-Mediterranean cuisine, the
menu relies largely on traditional Spanish appetizers
and French and Italian entrees. Tapas like the bacalao
empanadillas are tasty starters; gazpacho is of the
Andalusian variety. The veal chop and boneless duck
are dependable main courses. Lunch and dinner. $$
Boulevard Bar & Grill 740 Ocean Dr; 532-9069. A
favorite among locals and tourists alike, Boulevard
may well be the best on the Drive. Appetizers — a
meaty crab cake soaking in lemon-butter, for
instance, and warm goat cheese encased in a volcanic
burst of phyllo dough — attest to this distinction. Of
Mediterranean origin and stylistic bent, Chef Arcoub
is particularly skilled with fish, and main courses
reflect that preference; choose from sea bass,
pompano, snapper, tuna, and a number of tasty
shellfish and pasta preparations. Breakfast, lunch,
and dinner. $$
Cafe Thai Bistro 1533 Washington Ave; 5314181. This
optimistic little restaurant raises the level of the local
ethnic market with some of the best basic Thai fare
around. Chef-owner Matida Apunikpinyo stirs up a
mean massaman curry and a zippy garlic squid. She
might even come out of the kitchen to make sure
you’re eating her noodles fast enough, while they’re
still hot and juicy. Don’t be afraid to prove her wrong
— if you order too much, the pad Thai and ba mee
poo (egg noodles with crab and ham) are good as
cold leftovers, too. Lunch and dinner. $
Century 150 Ocean Dr; 674-8855. This sleek, stylish,
yet casual restaurant emphasizes light, mouth¬
watering cuisine, not attitude. While the decor is pre-
Columbian, the cuisine is up to the minute with
Oriental and Southwestern touches. Although
chicken, pasta, and occasionally turkey dishes are
also featured, the restaurant excels in its fish
treatments, such as Cajun mahi-mahi. Good sides
include wild rice, garlicky mashed potatoes, and
spunky black beans. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$
Chrysanthemum 1248 Washington Ave; 531-5656.
Service is as elegant and pleasant as the Szechuan
and Pekingese cuisine at this sister to Thai Toni and
Toni’s Sushi Bar. Descended from Montreal and
previously in Fort Lauderdale, Chrysanthemum's
reputation is well-deserved. Ravioli in sesame and
peanut butter sauce is a rich, delicious way to begin a
meal; chicken with crisp spinach and eggplant in
black Chinese vinaigrette are signature dishes that
shouldn't be missed. $$
El Rancho Grande Mexican Restaurant 1626
Pennsylvania Ave; 673-0480. As the flavor of the
recently trendy Lincoln Road region continues to
mutate, this homey Mexican cantina maintains its
individuality. The atmosphere is authentic, right
down to the service, which is often casual to the point
of being nonexistent Fortunately, the guacamole
alone is worth the effort of stealing your own
silverware from an adjacent table. likewise beef
flautas, bean tostadas, chicken taquitos, and more.
Lunch and dinner. $
El Yugante Segundo 1676 Collins Ave; 534-2101. (Also
in Hialeah.) Formerly part of the La Carreta chain of
Cuban restaurants, El Viajante Segundo (The Second
Traveler) has gone solo, but not without retaining all
the elements that worked so well in the past, most
notably a wide range of great Cuban dishes at
reasonable prices. This Collins Avenue hot spot is
tourist-friendly, printing its menu in English, Spanish,
French, and German. $
A Fish Called Avalon 700 Ocean Dr; 532-1727. This sleek
South Beach eatery, located in the refurbished
Avalon Hotel, combines minimalist decor with
topnotch cuisine. The menu changes daily, but the
The Best in
Italian Cuisine
Only at Pt
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216 Palermo, Coral Gables, 448-1240
Reg. Hours: Lunch M-F 11-3
Dinner Sun-Thur 5-11 Fri-Sat 5-12
Romantic Piano Music by Mac MacDonald
Mon. Nights
All American Cuisine
in a racey setting
Restaurant • Lounge
Full Motorsports Boutique
245-5277
US 1 Just South of the
Turnpike • Florida City
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just *30 for 6 months or *50 for a full year.
“Health Oriented Gourmet Cuisine”
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Our Specialties:
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Delicious Home Made Pastas ($7-10)
Traditional Dishes of Provence ($8-15)
Exceptional Wines ($I6-$I,200+)
Lunch: Mon-Fri. Ilam - 3pm
Dinner: Mon-Thursday 6-IOpm, Fri-Sat 6-11 pm
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Special June Promotion for Take-out Only
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Both Come with Mashed Potatoes 6 Wild Rice
842 Brickell Plaza (SE 1st Ave.) Miami FI 33131
Tel.(305) 372-0909 Fax.372-0509


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
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ITALIAN CUISINE
We invite you to a
2 FOR 1
DINNER ENTREE
To celebrate our new beginning
Dinners start at $7.50
Cafe, CapnL
1400 NE 79St Causeway
(Across form Channel 7)
North bay Village
865-7611
ALZHEIMERS ALERT
WE CARE
Call Sally Ann Swank
care centers est. 1965
(305) 248-9662
Piece of Cake
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616 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE • (305) 374-7980
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For 15 years we have been pleasing
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Los Ranchos Restaurants' contest.
“15 Years of Tradition in Miami”
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Get an entry form at your
favorite Los Ranchos location:
Bayside Market Place
401 Biscayne Blvd. No. 100
Miami.
Coral Gables
2728 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables.
Kendall Town & Country
Center 8505 Mills Drive
Miami
Sweetwater-Holiday Plaza
125 S.W. 107th Ave., Miami
The Alls Shopping Center
8888 S.W. 136 St, Suite 303,
Miami
Write your story, in
15 words or less,
about how and
where you lived in
Miami in 1981-
fifteen years ago.
The five most origi¬
nal stories will be
selected and the
winners’ names and
photographs will
be published in
local newspapers.
We’ll Stake Our
Reputation On It:
You’ll Love
Our Canton Steak
Sizzling hot, meltingly
tender and full of gusto, our
Canton steak satisfies your
craving for beef as nothing
else can. But it’s, just one of
the items that earned Canton
the Best Chinese Restaurant
title in the New Times
readers’ poll and the Best
Chinese Carry-put title in the
New Times Writers’ poll.
We're equally famous for our
honey garlic chicken. And
have you tasted our Foon
Shee, our Peking Shrimp or
our Ginger Lobster?
Come in and see why we say
we wok miracles.
CANTON RESTAUftWIS
Coral Gables King’s Bay Miami Lakes
2614 Ponce De Leon 14487 S Dixie Hwy 16780 NW 67 Ave
448-3736/Fax 444-3612 233-62247255-5115 821-1111
Daddand North Tamiami Trait Pembroke Pines
6661 S Dixie Hwy 9796SW8S) 220 N University Dr
666-5511/666-9198 226-8032/553-9905 435-3388
i *Kltai«atrt*x>KKiierarnw.*>l«e re* !• «is,
choices consistently reflect theessence of South |
Florida fere—fresh local seafood shown off to its best
advantage with fresh local fruits and vegetables. Any
catch of the day served with fruit relish and citrus
beurre blanc is bound to be delicious; likewise the
winning combo of cucumber-tomato and avocado
salsas. $$
Joe's Stone Crab 227 Biscayne St; 673-0365. Don’t let
the address fool ya; the entrance (and a parking
garage!) is now actually on Washington Avenue. And
don’t worry, diehards—the digs may be revamped,
but the eats are the same ol’. Here’s all you need to
know: crabs, crabs, crabs. Mustard dip. Creamed
spinach, garlic or otherwise. And key lime pie made
as if it were invented here. $$$
Kaori 136 Collins Ave; 534-2005. Japanese tapas are
the reason to visit this extensive sushi bar and
restaurant Eighty-four appetizers entice the diner
into sampling several plates like the shrimp
dumplings with mustard sauce. And the license to
create your own roll with ingredients like salmon
tempura and Alaskan king crab leg is the reason to
come back. Lunch and dinner. $$
Larios on the Beach 820 Ocean Dr; 532-9577. (Also in
Miami.) Most of the traditional favorites are offered
in this festive Cuban eatery. Shrimp creole and pork
loin are two of the recommended items. Desserts are
some of the best around, including an extraordinary
rice pudding and a stellar mamey flan. Breakfast,
lunch, and dinner. 6
L'Entrecdte de Paris 413 Washington Ave; 673-1002.
Yet another reason to venture south of Fifth Street
Twentysomething owners Susana Nouel and Pedro
Infante designed the menu to appeal to folks like
themselves—young, hip, and living on credit It
works. Scarf down sirloins, complete with salad and a
pile of pommes frites for a prix fixe of fourteen bucks.
Either that or opt for the salmon—that’s about all
there is to choose from at this 50-seater. Wine and
dessert aren’t included, but ifs as difficult to pass up
a moist crumbly apple tart as it is to allow a kir royale
to escape your attention. $
Lulu's 1053 Washington Ave; 532-6147. Listen up,
trendoids, here’s a veritable Graceland-by-the-sea.
While the service is sketchy, the surroundings
themselves are a sketch. (Hint picture every Elvis
souvenir extant) The menu is unabashedly southern
fried—chicken-fried steak, hush puppies, com-and-
okra fritters. The griddle sizzles with strip steak, crab
cakes, burgers, pork chops, and even a fried peanut-
butter-and-banana sandwich. Lunch and dinner. $
Lure 805 Lincoln Rd; 538-5873. The newest New Asian
eatery to troll on Lincoln Road, this place ain’t no fish
bait. Innovative sushi rolls are as much of a draw as
chef Scott Howard’s stellar creations. Soba noodles
with sweet basil and coconut milk are sweetened
even further with shrimp and clams; turmeric-seared
tuna with beets and mashed potatoes is divine; whole
yellowtail with a Scotch bonnnet-mango reduction is
mild fish, flavorful sauce. If that isn’t enough mango
for you, be sure to order the basil-mango cheesecake
edged with red pepper marmalade and cilantro syrup
— an herby pastry worthy of being dished up in
Eden. $$
Maiko Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar 1255
Washington Ave; 531-6369. lines are out the door for
innovative sushi creations, such as the spider roll
combining soft-shell crab, asparagus, and avocado.
Noodle dishes are generous portions of sautéed
buckwheat noodles. Generous also are the dinners
such as ebi misoyaki, shrimp in miso sauce, served
with your choice of soup or green salad. The miso
honey salad dressing is such an attraction you
probably won’t age a week before a return visit
Lunch and dinner. $$
Mezzanotte 1200 Washington Ave; 673-4343. (Also in
Coconut Grove.) Yes, the hustle and bustle inside can
make Grand Central seem meek, but thafs part of
the paparazzo charm. Terrific pastas are beautifully
prepared. (There are no better agnolotti in South
Florida.) Better carpaccios are hard to find, while veal
dishes can vary from mundane to the spectacular.
Second to none on the Beach. $$
Monty's on the Beach 300 Alton Rd; 673-3444. For
information see listing under Coconut Grove.
Nemo Restaurant 100 Collins Ave; 5324550. Wear your
tightest dress, your splashiest suit to this stunning
prestige palace, where the patrons sparkle almost as
brightly as the bejeweled, raw metal décor.
Fortunately, the fare outshines it all Chef Michael
Schwartz, formerly of Wolfgang Puck’s Chinois,
weaves Asian influences into appetizers such as
house-cured salmon wrapped around alfalfa sprouts.
Main courses include a curry-heavy pork loin dressed
with caramelized onions and papaya relish, as well as
a surplus of South Florida fishes. Side dishes are rich,
setting the stage for pátissier Nick Milano’s chocolate
delectables. Lunch and dinner. $$
News Cafe 800 Ocean Dr; 538-6397. Munch cold cuts
and any of a dozen cheeses and sip your choice of
three fine wines by the glass, or while away an entire
day with a bottle, listening to piped-in and piped-out
(to porch) jazz. Tahini salad with pita is tops, and the
gázpáchp is great Look cool with a Euro mag from
the in-house newsstand (hence the name). Open 24
hours. $
Norma’s on the Beach! 646 Lincoln Rd; 532-2809. An
offshoot of the internationally noted pair of
restaurants in Jamaica, Norma’s serves Caribbean
ingredients prepared with French flair. A brief menu
yields an intriguing smoked-marlin appetizer and a
feta-and-herb-encrusted lamb chop entrée;
blackboard offerings have included specialties such
as West Indian pumpkin soup and red snapper with a :
lime-butter sauce. Golden rum cake provides a
cocktail and a dessert, after which you might want to
sober up with French-pressed Jamaica Blue
Mountain coffee. Lunch and dinner. $$
Osteria del Teatro 1443 Washington Ave; 538-7850.
Recipient of the 1993 Golden Spoon Award and
named one of the top 200 restaurants in the country
by Trend magazine, Osteria is one of Miami’s
favorites as well. National Chefs Award-winner
Antonio Tettamanzi has a delicate hand with fish,
poaching salmon to perfection and grilling tuna to a
T. He also creates such fabulous pasta dishes as
pappardelle sauteed with stone crab meat, sea
scallops in the shell, fresh tomatoes, and vodka
cream sauce, and linguine with mixed seafood baked
in parchment paper. Now you can enjoy these
specialties from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. at Twilight Pasta,
the hippest early birder on the beach. $$$
Pacific Time 915 Lincoln Rd; 534-5979. Chef and co¬
proprietor Jonathan Eismann stuns the New World
with his take on Pacific Rim cuisine. Florida Keys
grouper is enticing, served with sake, shallot, and
ginger and tempura-fried sweet potatoes. Freshwater
catfish, also in tempura batter, is stuffed with ginger
and served whole. Honey-roasted Chinese duck with
a fresh plum and plum wine sauce and supple Peking
pancakes are simply outstanding. Finally, pastry chef
Jennifer Warren’s chocolate bomb dessert is a baked-
to-order explosion that’s guaranteed to blow you
away. $$$
The Palace 1200 Ocean Dr; 531-9077. Want to lighten
up, physically as well as psychologically? This spot
offers a royal array of true goodies—salad platters,
homemade soups, sandwiches (try fresh turkey
breast, roasted on the premises), and charbroiled
meats and seafood — and you needn’t feel guilty as
you munch and sip, and those perfect bodies stride,
skate, and sashay by. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and
late-night $
Pan Coast 2727 Indian Creek Dr (in the Indian Creek
Hotel); 531-2727. A boutique restaurant for a
boutique community. The twenty-seat dining room at
Pan Coast dishes up exactly what the establishments
name implies. The Pacific Rim menu rotates
frequently; appetizers may include a succulent
cashew-dusted beef and a shiitake mushroom salad,
while main courses might highlight a sesame-
studded rack of lamb and guava-soy barbecued pork
tenderloin. Chef Mary K. Rohan is especially skilled
with shellfish preparation—look for her sake-
steamed scallops and shrimp. Desserts such as
ginger-spiced mascarpone cheesecake are apropos.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$
Puerto Sagua 700 Collins Ave; 673-1115. If you’re
allergic to Calle Ocho, then there’s this excellent
Cuban emporium. Most of the usual favorites are
here, the best of which is ropa vieja—not too saucy
and not dry. Specials are tasty as well, from sautéed
chicken livers to salt cod. When it’s available, the
shrimp in “enchilada” sauce is pleasing. Enormous
portions. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Raleigh Bar and Restaurant 1775 Collins Ave; 534-1775.
Forget the blues and follow the rising star of the
Raleigh Hotel’s stylish restaurant Head chef Marc
Lippman has some creative ways for you to start your
meal: lamb sausage and couscous with cumin and
mint and a creamless yellow-squash soup with spiced
croutons are just two. Follow that with an entree of
roasted grouper in a slow-roasted vegetable sauce or
grilled loin of lamb. Order the roasted garlic mashed
potatoes for Americana with a kick. Breakfast and
lunch daily; dinner Wednesday through Saturday
only. $$
Ruen Thai and Sushi Bar 947 Washington Ave;
534-1504. In this startlingly beautiful room, the teak
tables are glass-topped and intricately carved. The
food is superb, particularly mee krob, crunchy
vermicelli in an intriguing sweet-and-sour sauce
garnished with bean sprouts, tiny shrimp, and a
butterfly sculpted from a carrot Delicious house
specialties include lobster with chili paste, curried
grouper, and a crispy, amazingly lean, duck. Hot
dishes are not as hot as billed, so crank up your order
accordingly. $
The Strand Restaurant 671 Washington Ave; 532-2340.
Perennially on the edge, this Beach institution now
goes to the Pacific Rim. For starters there’s a
Vietnamese spring roll or a new twist on the joints
erstwhile favorite, shrimp with leek hay, which now
comes with a lemongrass sauce. Choosing charred
sliced tuna with mixed greens in a wasabi-miso
vinaigrette would maintain the seafood theme,


though stir-fried tenderloin of beef with curried
vegetables on crisp egg noodles would round out
your food groups. $$
Tap Tap 819 5th St; 672-2898. Artfully prepared Haitian
cuisine in an artistically rendered space that took a
team of artists years to create. Fortunately, the food
doesn’t take that long. Chicken, goat, and whole
snapper grilled over charbon bwa (hardwood
charcoal) are especially flavorful, while savory
pumpkin soup or shrimp curled in coconut sauce
appeal to the more barbecue-phobic. Try the
watermelon soda, too—it’s a sweet alternative to
dessert Lunch, dinner, and Sunday brunch. $
Tiramesu 500 Ocean Dr; 5324538. Named for the
Venetian after-dinner treat, Tiramesu is a South
Beach fixture. The menu is pure pasta, and all
noodles — including lasagna, fettucdne alia
bolognese, and pipette alie melanzane — are
homemade. But it is the gnocchi, cloudlike potato
dumplings served in tomato, tomato-cream, or cream
sauce, that float the restaurant above the ordinary. Of
course you’ll want to save room for the famed
dessert $$
Yuca 501 Lincoln Rd; 532-9822. Chef Guillermo
Veloso continues to impress with finely prepared,
imaginative cuisine. Such standards as the sweet ••
plantain stuffed with dried cured beef and the
guava-barbecued baby back ribs remain on the
menu, in addition to a fabulous three-bean terrine
and a crisp plantain basket filled with tender
conch and shrimp. A skirt steak, cut to resemble a
tutu, is always a sound choice, and for Latin with
an Asian flair, pan-seared tuna with coconut-curry
rice is a rare treat. Chocolate tres leches, paired
with a rich cocoa sorbet, works wonderfully for
dessert Lunch and dinner. $$$
Miami-Central Dade
Bahama's Fish Market and Restaurant 7200 SW 8th St;
264-1448. Not really a Caribbean restaurant this
family-style operation is, however, a good spot for
fresh standard seafood dishes with Cuban nuances.
Don’t miss the escabeche, a chilled extravaganza of
lightly breaded and fried pickled kingfish smothered
with a tart onion-and-pepper studded marinade.
Nothing is frozen here and seasonal catches are
priced by the pound. Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Brasserie Brickell Key 601 Brickell Key Dr; 577-0907.
An upscale neighborhood restaurant located on
Claughton Island, this place is ideal for before-sports
(or other downtown entertainment) dining. Pasta
dishes such as linguine with white clam sauce or
agnolotti allegria (stuffed with ricotta, layered with
cream) are key to fulfillment For a different starter
try the French onion soup with a hearty tomato base.
Giant bonbons — gourmet ice cream dipped and
rolled in tricolor chocolate — rival the mousse pie for
irresistible richness. Dinner and Sunday brunch. $$
Cafe del Sol 1601 Biscayne Blvd (in the Crowne Plaza
Hotel); 374-0000. Not to be confused with the car of
similar name, this café has plenty to do with the sun,
serving a stunning variety of Caribbean and Latin
American cuisine. Beef dishes are especially good,
including a thicker-than-usual vaca frita marinated in
lime and Seville orange. Red snapper encrusted with
green plantain chips is the fish equivalent, while
black bean soup is the best in town, rich and heady
and fragrant. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Casa Juancho 2436 SW 8th St; 642-2452. This
cavernous Spanish emporium has become one of the
better-known attractions of little Havana. A shame,
because the food can often be better than that
Besides tapas, there’s a large selection of Iberian fish
specialties, such as snapper in green sauce and baby
eels in garlic and olive oil. Of the desserts, none is
better than the crema catalana custard topped with
burnt caramel. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Casa Larios 7929 NW 2nd St; 266-5494. For
information see listing under Larios on the Beach
under South Beach.
Cisco's Cafe 5911 NW 36th St; 871-2764. Looks like a
chain, but this is the only link. Standardized Mexican
fare — burritos, chimichangas, tacos, tamales, fajitas
— is elevated by the appetizers. Both com and flour
tortilla chips are homemade, as are all three salsas,
the hottest of which could singe nose hair.
Guacamole is buttery, ranch dressing is creamy, and
a breast of chicken smothered in tomatoes and bell
peppers is plump and juicy enough to distract from
the fireplaces, all of which operate on gas. Lunch and
dinner. $
Covadonga 6480 SW 8th St; 261-2406. Cubans know
about seafood, and this restaurant shows us how
much and why. A plain snapper fillet sautéed in the
skillet can raise comparisons with José Marti’s verse..
One of the seasonal specialties is fish stuffed with
crab meat Desserts vary in quality. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Crocodile Cantina at Bayside, 401 Biscayne Blvd;
374-7417. For Southwestern fare with a South Florida
flair, this restaurant serves the meekest—i.e., most
tender—alligator fajitas in town. But the chili
peppers are anything but tame. An authentic Santa Fe
seafood stew demonstrates their spicy properties
properly. And a crab com chowder isn’t shy of spice,
either. Lunch and dinner. $ _
East Coast Fisheries 360 W Flagler St; 372-1300. It’s
pricey, it’s always full, it’s noisy, but oh-so-good. The
wonders of the sea come alive in this landmark fish
restaurant, so full of character and homespun charm.
Conch fritters as appetizers are a must As for sauces,
where else can you find blackened fish served with a
red pepper sauce? Lunch and dinner. $$
El Novillo 6830 Bird Rd; 284-8417. (Also in Hialeah and
Kendall.) One of the finest Nicaraguan restaurants to
appear in recent years. The décor suggests a
hacienda, not a stable. The appetizers offer a
cornucopian variety, from fried cheese to
nacatamalitos to ceviche. But the churrasco is worth
saving room for. There is no more tender cut of meat
anywhere. And surprisingly, they prepare a fine
pepper steak in cream sauce. Dessert? The pío quinto
and queque cristal win hands down. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Fishbone Grille 650 S Miami Ave; 530-1915. This funky
spawn of Miami’s venerable Tobacco Road offers
eclectic décor, fresh seafood favorites, and a few
regional adaptions. Bait your hook with one of their
sensational soups — seafood gumbo or salmon and
dill chowder. But bring a book—service fluctuates
between speedy and slow. Lunch and dinner. $
Garcia's Seafood Grille & Fish Market 398 NW North
River Dr, 375-0765. Overlooking Miami’s North River,
this indoor-outdoor restaurant serves up fresh fish-
dishes and family hospitality courtesy of father-son
team Esteban and Este Garcia Choose blackboard
specialties or house favorites such as lemon-flavored
grilled grouper or blackened or breaded preparations
of your favorite fish. Seafood caesar salad, spicy
conch salad, or grouper chowder make tasty starters;
you can order your meal with a side of crinkle fries or
hushpuppies (just a dollar a pup). Lunch and early
dinner. $
Guayacan 1933 SW 8th St; 649-2015. A cozy spot in
little Havana offers all the increasingly familiar
Nicaraguan dishes, from nacatamales to vigorón and
churrasco to tres leches and pío quinto—and it does a
bang-up pescado a la Tipitapa, a red snapper deep-
fried whole and drenched in a sauce of onions and
peppers, as well as a delectable beef tongue in tomato
sauce. But what sets Guayacan apart from the crowd
of Nica spots is the array of hearty, homemade sopas
— different ones for every day of the week. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Hy-Vong 3458 SW 8th St; 446-3674. Some of the best
Vietnamese food in town. People have been coming
back (with reason) for years. Fish in mango sauce is
delectable, as is the chicken liver mousse with
blueberry sauce. Pork dishes are similarly
multifaceted, with a gingery tang both authentic and
delicious. And a must: the Vietnamese-style coffee at
the end of the meal. $
Islas Canarias 285 NW 27th Ave; 649-0440. A tiny
space packed with hungry patrons who know what
Cuban food is all about It may take three people to
finish the bistec uruguayo, a breaded palomilla steak
filled with Swiss cheese and ham. All the daily
specials are wonderful and are gone quickly.
Suggestions: half chicken with mojo, pigs’ feet “a la
andaluza,” oxtail stew, and fried whole snapper. If
there’s room, try the deceitfully delicate tocino del
délo, a flan made with egg yolks and cinnamon syrup
— sublime. Lunch and dinner. $
La Carreta 3632 SW 8th St; 444-7501. (Also in West
Dade and Kendall.) A muncher’s mecca, with the
flashy wagon wheel out front The food is not flashy,
but comprehensively Cuban and reliably good. Open
24 hours. $
La Casona 6355 SW 8th St; 262-2828. Not your run-
of-the-mill Cuban restaurant. Try the coconut
shrimp for starters, which is zipped with an
orange-guava sauce, and then dig into a roast
guinea hen stuffed with black beans and rice and
topped with an almond sauce. Unusual dishes
abound: baby goat marinated in red wine, for
example, and a cassoulet-type dish of rice, beans,
veal, pork, and rabbit. Lunch and dinner. $$
Los Ranchos at Bayside, 401 Biscayne Blvd; 375-0666.
For information see listing under West Dade.
Malaga 740 SW 8th St; 8584224. A Cuban restaurant
celebrating a Spanish heritage. The charming,
covelike décor adds warmth to the dining room,
while the cuisine is excellent. You may have to wait
for arroz con polio or paella, but you’ll be glad you
did. Fried snapper and grouper are specialties, as is
chicken with wine sauce. On the sweet side, Malaga
offers satisfying boniatillo (sweet potato pudding),
and arroz con leche. Lunch and dinner. $
Maria's Greek American Food Shop 1363 Coral Way;
8564)938. Taramosalata roe spread has never tasted
more lemony than at Maria’s. Served with toasted
slices of pita, it makes for a beautiful beginning.
Moussaka and pastitsio are made with beef instead of
^ “ Try our crusty french bread 2
sandwiches and asparagus
soup in an edible bowl.”
French Bakety & Cqfe
To%"off
Any Lunch
Menu Item
Limit 1 coupon per customer I
Expires 6/30/96
13274 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami (305) 893-3336
Pure Italian Magic*..
'Q0>
l
1740 79th Cswy
North Bay Village 866-1238
rfía TJtna
1009 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbour Islands 861-8166
eh
Don ate 110 Trattoria
1903 E. Atlantic Blvd
Pompano 954-786-2996
m Donatello
DaVinci
Oggi
Zimes 10 YEAR
ANNIVERSARY!
The Original Japanese Restaurant
and Sushi Bar On
South Beach
wants to thank the community for
10 incredible years
SAVE 25%
(June 15 to July 15)
1208 Washington Ave • Miami Beach • 673-9368
New TKftes June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 28,1996
BHit
9
Mezzaluna
Open 7 Days a Week
Lunch & Dinner
834 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach
(305) 674-1330
JAPANESE RESTAURANT & SUSHI BAR
SUSHI • SASHIMI • YAKITORI
Open for lunch Mon. - Fri.
NIGHT OWL SPECIAL
12:00am - 3:30am
DINNER $7.50 -1 Drink Included
Sunny Isles Square
3007 N.E. 163rd Street,
N. Miami Beach
(305) 948-3687
Mon.-Fri. 11:30am- 3:30am
Sat. & Sun. 5pm-3:30am
Voted Rest Restaurant in Coeonut Grove
iNew Times Reade» 1995
SÃœE
^-'70
Mpest j^0
in Coconut Grove!
All liquor drinks ate 2 foCT-
Í.- All shooters are $£.0d¡||
All beers imported.HH
aré’jiplll
$2.00 off all bar menu items
s>ha
Insaiata Mixta
^anzarella alia Tozcana
' Entries
. 'Véa! Rosamarino
Fragole or Gelato
K
VaKd Sunday-Thutsday 5:00pm - llKKtpm. !
) Friday- Saturday 5:00pm . ri:0úpm
(ta* St fralaity not i»duálS| '
VIRGINIA BREE VALfeT PARKING WITH DINNER
â– 
lamb, and the béchamel sauce on top is rich—so
you’ll need an Olympian appetite to finish the plate.
Fine rice pudding and haldava for dessert Very
authentic. Lunch and dinner. $
Mykonos 1201 Coral Way; 856-3140. Mediterranean
specialties such as gyros and souvlaki yield much
pleasure because the pita bread is heated to
perfection and the lamb is lean. Like the island ifs
named after, things are e-a-s-y. Lovely
galaktobourico, overflowing with custard. Lunch and
dinner. $
Orlando Seafood Restaurant & Rsh Market 501NW 37th
Ave; 642-6767. The seafood at this wonderful standup
eatery is fresh and inexpensive. Fried squid and fish
croquetas are homemade treats; a fantastic kingfish
escabeche is hearty. The house specialty, a Cuban
fishwich, comes with grouper, tuna, swordfish,
dolphin, or snapper, according to your preference.
The service is as sweet as the flan dessert Lunch and
dinner. $
Salmon & Salmon: 2907 NW 7th St; 649-5924. Don’t
expect the Great Northwest at this excellent Peruvian
restaurant—Salmon is the owner’s name. The
specialty here is corbina, a white-fleshed fish. Ifs
especially delicious sauced with seafood a lo
“Salmon.” The fresh, pungent coriander sauce is also*
wonderful. Lunch and dinner. $
S&S Diner 1757 NE 2nd Ave; 3734291. A Miami
institution made famous by Mel Kiser and Corky
hick’s movie Last Night at the S&S Diner. Bring a
book while you wait, ’cause wait you will id this
popular counter spot Try the chopped steak with
onions and gravy, the roast turkey, or the fried sole
or shrimp. And there are few better mashed potatoes
served in the area. Desserts are unexceptional, but
there’s a decent rice pudding. Breakfast lunch, and
dinner. $
Porcao 801S Bayshore Dr; 373-2777. Pork out at this
powerfully good churrascaría. For a fixed price of
$24.50, take advantage of the oniy option here, the
Brazilian rodizio, an ongoing feast of salads and
meals. Start at the unlimited gourmet buffet, which
includes delicacies such as pickled quail eggs,
marinated Spanish onions, fresh watercress, and a
whole prosciutto. Then move on to the meats—
everything from lamb to filet mignon to chicken
hearts—grilled, skewered, and sliced tableside onto
your plate. Side dishes like fried yuca, manioc
(cassava flour), white rice, and black beans complete
the prix fixe, but not the meal—á la carte desserts,
particularly the flan in caramel sauce, are worth the
additional fee. Lunch and dinner. $$
Tacos by the Road 638 S Miami Ave; 5790059. Check
out of the office and hit the Road — the Taco one, not
the Tobacco one. Named for its location next to that
venerable institution—as well as for its nod to
Mexico’s infamous roadside taco stands—this
counter-service eatery is the place for a quick meal.
Steak fajitas and nachos grandes topped with beef
pork, or chicken are flavorful and filling. Tacos and
burritos, both made with flour tortillas, are also worth
investigating. Three different help-yourself-to-’em
salsas aren’t particularly piquant For real heat, go to
the Arena. Lunch and dinner. $
Tobacco Road 626 S Miami Ave; 374-1198. More
famous for its gritty sounds and blues-drenched
ambiance than for its dishes, the 80-year-old fixture is
as easy on the palate as it is on the ears. Hamburgers
can be ordered with mushrooms, chili, cheese, and
fried egg piled on, while the chili itself is a fire-
hydrant feeing. Soups and salads are all good. Leave
room for the homemade ice cream, especially star
fruit and cinnamon. Rough-and-ready, no-frills eating.
Lunch and dinner. $
Unde Tom’s Rarbecue 3988 SW 8th St; 446-9528. Tom’s
has been around longer than most natives care to
remember. And best of all, it ain’t changed none. Ribs
are none too sweet, with a tang all their own. And
amid all the photos of goddesses such as Rita
Hayworth, Mae West, and Liberace, you can count on
barbecued chicken that’s moist, tender, and tasty.
Lunch and dinner. $
Versailles 3555 SW 8th St; 4444)240. A Cuban
monolith, a tradition, a reality. Here’s where it ail
began—or so it seems. These days the menu is
longer than the Old Testament Also a good place for
a midnight snack—expertly prepared medianoches
and sandwiches cubanos, for instance. Recently
they’ve expanded the dessert selection to include a
few odd choices, such as majarete (com custard) and
dulce de leche, a soured milk confection. Lunch and
dinner. $
Victor's Café 2340 SW 32nd Ave; 445-1313. The best
New York City export to the Miami area since the
deli, this local hermana to a Big Apple Cuban eatery
is spectacular. If you’re on a limited budget, try the
mejillones en salsa verde, fresh mussels sauteed in
green sauce, which is both yummy and half the price
of most of the other dishes. If you’re flush and want
to pig out, the lechón asado is wonderfully crunchy
On the outside, moist on the inside. The wine list is
one of the most comprehensive in town. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Serving Lunch
Tuesday-Saturday • 11:00am-3 :OOpm
Serving Dinner Thurs., Fri. & Sat.
5:oo pm tilt The Fat Lady Sings.
Closed for Vacation July 1-8
Live entertainment by Katie P. Jones
free Secured Perking
146 NW 7th St • Homestead • 248-1076
White
Lion
Cale
CHARLOTTE’S
CHINESE KITCHEN
“Critics Favorite Budget
Chinese Restaurant”
-Miami IIcmld gM
■ “Best Chinese Take Out” ajj
Will -Ne\v Times lies! of Miami ‘94 JR


THE LIGHT
CAFE • ART
â–  &
pi
ii & WORLD VEGETARIAN
V. ” CUISINE
« GOME EVERT SOÍtVAí ÍTlGifT TO
0- EiSSOt Aft ITALIAN ?ILM 8. A
O DELICIOUS TASTA SPECIAL AT 9PM.
SAT *ClAO BELLO' TOR A TREE SMOOTHIE
WASmttGTOU AVE 8.stfi ST. TSJROÃœGij PARKIRgLOT
BestCuban
Restaurant
1995New Times Best of Miami!
Nice Healthy Portions! Just 3 Minutes Prom Downtown.
“DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS"
ALL UNDER s4.95!
PiaadBlo, Arms, Potaje y Maduros....... $3H0
(Picadillo, Sice, White Bean Soup, hied Plantains)
Open for Lunch & Dinner
1510 S.W. 8 St. Miami, (305) 643-0227
HASSLE
MOVIE
LISTINGS
RIGHT
IN YOUR
HANDS.
(PRETTY COOL HUH?)
uw.'iimma
WE'VE GOT WHAT'S PLATING.
Villa Habana Restaurant 3398 Coral Way, 446-7427. In
its second incarnation, this Cuban café delivers first-
rate traditional cuisine. From white bean and black
bean soups to white rice and black bean side dishes,
everything is homemade by the same team that runs
Villa Italia. Especially promising are the croquettes
and vaca frita, the favored flavor of shredded and
fried flank steak. Lunch and dinner. $
West Dade-Hialeah
Cami’s, the Seafood Place 12170 SW 8th St; 223-2911.
(Also in Kendall and Pembroke Pines.) Specializes in
standard seafood offerings in plain-jane
surroundings. The oysters, shrimp, clams, grouper,
scallops, lobster, et cetera, aré not gussied up — and
neither are the prices. Shellfish pasta is as uptown as
it gets here, but it’s so good you might find yourself
licking your plate. You don’t need to put on your best
bib and tucker—a paper napkin and a big appetite
will do. Lunch and dinner. $
B Cristo 8177 Bird Rd; 261-2947. Choose from every
Cuban classic imaginable, and have enough change
left over to take home something from the butcher,
fruit, or wine shops. Don’t miss the superb tasajo and
boliche, made all the more memorable by the Side
dishes: the plátanos will drive you bananas.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
B Novillo 1255 W 46th St; 5566888. For information
see listing under Miami-Central Dade.
B Viajante Segundo 2846 Palm Ave; 888-5465. For
information see listing under South Beach.
La Carreta 5350 W 16th Ave; 823-5200. (Also 8650
Bird Rd; 553-8383.) For information see listing under
Miami-Central Dade
Los Ranchos 125 SW 107th Ave; 221-9367. (Also in
Miami, Coral Gables, and Kendall.) Out in the wild,
wild West, this Nica steak house introduced many a
left-wing skeptic to right-wing delicacies. Beef has
rarely been so full of flavor. Pile on the dhimichurri
and gorge on gallo pinto and fried plantains. As for
the famous tres leches, it, too, aims at re-creating the.
first time — and nearly succeeds. Fine food and
sfervicé. Lunch and dinner. $$
Outback Steakhouse 8255 W Flagler St; 262-9766.
(Also in North Miami Beach and Kendall.) Leave it
to the Aussies to beat us at our own game: good ol’
thick, juicy steaks. Except for a couple of pseudo-
Australian offerings, you’ll find the menu
comparable to an American house o’ beef—right
down to offerings of non-beef items such as
chicken and fish — but delicious steaks are what
this restaurant is all about. $
Tropical Chinese Restaurant 7991 Bird Rd; 262-7576. An
intriguing menu ranges beyond China for spicy
masterpieces like black-bean chicken and Hong
Kong-style steak, succulent from a sake marinade.
Clay-pot cooking renders some of the best Asian fare
in Miami; flaming pineapple boats certainly make it
the most dramatic. Lunch and dinner. $$
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne
Bayside Hut 3501 Rickenbacker Cswy, 361-0808. They
don’t use big words like “convivial” here, but that’s
the word that best describes this local treasure,
adjacent to Miami Marine Stadium. Fresh seafood
dishes are rendered simply but deliciously and
served in a mellow, waterside setting. What more
could you want? A spot where Fido is welcome, too?
Doggone if it ain’t so. Lunch and dinner. $
Café Europa 3159 Commodore Plaza; 448-5723.
Traditional French cuisine has never tasted fresher.
Cassoulet Toulousain (navy beans, duck, and garlic
sausage) and coq au vin are Chef Bernard Lapo’s
specialties. Snails Bernard á la Bourguignonne are
bread-dipping pots of pleasure, a necessity for
escargots lovers. A limited selection of pastas are
homemade. Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Med 3015 Grand Ave; 443-1770. If you can stand
the wait and the noise, you’ll be rewarded with good
food and especially reasonable prices at this tony
CocoWalk café. Carpaccios — particularly the
Tropicale, with hearts of palm, avocados, and
Parmesan shavings — aid thin-crust pizzas are
among the highlights of an adventurous
Mediterranean menu. Lunch and dinner. $
Café Tu Tu Tango 3015 Grand Ave; 529-2222. This
perpetually crowded tapas bar in the CocoWalk
extravaplaza is much more than the sum of its artsy
parts. Styled alter a European artist’s loft, the Café
serves up a wide and wonderful variety of chips, dips,
frittatas, empanadas, kebabs, and assorted other
tidbits. Don’t miss the designer pizzas or the plantain
and boniato chips with chunky salsa Lunch and
dinner. $
The Chart House 51 Chart House Dr; 8569741. The
prime rib of beef and filet mignon are sinfully tender
... Romance happens
The New Times Romance
Blue Moon Party.
Sunday, June 30th from 7 to 10pm, by the
Light of the full moon, join New Timed
for an evening of Romance and elegance at
180 Aragon Avenue, Coral Gabled,
at the corner of Ponce Oe Leon and Aragon Avenue,
one block north of Miracle Mile. All ding Led placing a
free Romance ad will receive a complimentary
Blue Martini courtedy of Skyy Vodka, complimentary
hord d’oeuvred, and registration for fabuloud
drawing prided. So come dredded in blue,
and get ready for a night of magic and Romance
that only happend...Once in a Blue Moon
Call 579-1525 for more information
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
V E C C H IA BUe R A
IL R i ST 0 R A N T E
Creative, Different and One of a %ind!
Qome Tor The Tood...
Stay Tor The Tun!
1440 Ocean ‘Drive • Miami‘Beach • (305) 535*9995
TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS
2 for 1
ENTRÉES
TUESDAY- FRIDAY
HAPPY HOUR
2 FORI
ON ALL DRINKS
Buono Appetito!
LAFAMIGLIA
Located at the Traymore Hotel 2445 Collins Avenue
For Reservations Call Pony: (305) 534-7111 ext #2108
FREE VALET Open 5-llpm Tuesday thru Sunday
mention this ad for this special offer
£3»
72
Business Lunch at Cafe Set Set.
nAlScif
aOne of South Florida’s
best Italian restaurants f
Indoor & Outdooor Dining ¡
For Reservations
Call 446 - 5104
New Dinner Menu
3043 Grand Ave.%
Coconut Grove.
and flavorful, but there’s also fresh fish every day.
Swordfish and dolphin, in particular, have rarely been
this good. Mammoth portions and a lovely setting at
Dinner Key Marina $$
Grand Cafe 2669 S Bayshore Dr; 858-9600. Former
Euro Disney exec chef Pascal Oudin brings his
classical French training to bear on South Florida’s
bounty. The results are superbly restrained and
succulent For starters, try Chilean salmon in sherry
vinaigrette. Entrées include local soft-shell crabs over
springy buckwheat linguine, and an inches-thick New
York strip steak coupled with a juniper-berry
reduction and a mélange of wild mushrooms.
Desserts are Oudin-designed luxury treats in a
deluxe setting—the two-tiered, mirrored and
carpeted dining room. Breakfast lunch, afternoon
tea, Sunday brunch, and dinner. $$$
Johnny Rockets 3036 Grand Ave; 444-1000. (Also in
Kendall.) Fifties-style diner serving only burgers and
sandwiches, but burgers and sandwiches so good
you’ll think you were back in the days when parents.
\wore “I like Ike” buttons and Elvis sightings were
áqtual. Burgers are cooked before your eyes, shakes
are'almost too thick to drink, and the staff entertains
diners by. grooving to jukebox tunes. Lunch and
dinner. $ \
Las Rías Gallegas 2890 SW 27th Ave; 443-0037. For
information see listing under Coral Gables.
Le Bouchon du Grove 3430 Main Hwy; 448-6060.
Goldenrod-colored walls and open-to-the-sidewalk
French doors beckon you inside this charmant
French eatery; friendly service and bubbly kir royales
make you want to stay. But it’s the homemade duck
páté, tiie fresh fish or chicken en papillote, the steak
with green peppercorn sauce, and the freshly
prepared desserts that will bring you back. Breakfast,
lunch, and dinner. $$
Mandarin Garden 3268 Grand Ave; 446-9999. One of
the secret wonders of the Grove, this Chinese haven
may be small and unassuming, but it features the
best sesame chicken and Beijing duck in the area
The food is spicy and Szechuan-inspired. Dumplings
are gingery, and the hot-and-sour soup is a sinus
blaster. Dishes are expertly prepared and served by a
pleasantly attentive, unaffected staff. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Mark's in the Grove 4 Grove Isle Dr; 857-5007. Award¬
winning chef-restaurateur Mark Militello makes
another mark on the map of Miami. This waterside
restaurant, located on private Grove Isle, presents a
stunning view of Biscayne Bay and a startling take on
fusion cuisine. Militello and company are up to their
usual hard-to-read but easy-to-eat tricks: appetizers
like seared foie gras over French lentils, and seared
blue spot prawns on risotto with a heavenly truffled
split pea broth; entrées such as five-spice duck breast
with Egyptian couscous and tangerine ponzu, and
pan-seared yellowfin tuna marinated in lemongrass
and served over black Thai rice. Supple crépe cake
for dessert Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$$
Mezzanotte 3390 Mary St; 448-7677. For information
see listing under South Beach.
Monty's Stone Crab Seafood House & Raw Bar 2550 S
Bayshore Dr; 858-1431. (Also on South Beach.) This
snazzy, scenic spot is housed in a vertical shopping
strip on Dinner Key. Sit indoors, or dine outside on a
vast, bar-studded terrace overlooking the bay. Count
on beaucoup seafood goodies, especially, in season,
the stone-crab fixation that made Monty’s mighty
mollusk reputation. A phone call will net you the
market price. Lunch and dinner. $$
Señor Frog’s 3008 Grand Ave; 448-0999. A quesadilla is
a quesadilla, right? Wrong. Frog’s offers above-
average Mexican fare. It may not be the real item, but
with the strolling mariachi band and the fast-moving
decadence all around, who cares? Tostadas, burritos,
and enchiladas show the ingredients to best
advantage. And then there’s the amazing natilla
custard — absolutely the best in the city. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Trattoria Pampered Chef 3145 Commodore Plaza;
567-0104. Distinctive, Genovese food in a partylike
atmosphere. Pastas come with flavorful sauces, from
tuco to pesto to walnut to cream to creamy
mushroom. It’s one of the few places around that
offers vitello tonnato and paesano ham. Osso buco
here is one of the best, richly fragrant and served
with a fine risotto. Service is above par. Superb
crépes (suzette and suchard) for dessert Breakfast,
lunch, .and dinner. $$
Coral Gables
Bangkok Bangkok 157 Giralda Ave; 444-2397. (Also in
Kendall.) This “so nice they named it twice” place for
Thai has become something of an institution in just a
few years. The huge, tasty Tittle Big Man,” a fresh
mackerel fried whole, might as well be called “Holy
Mackerel,” and the “Roasted Duck Darling” is
delectable. Curries are exquisite, particularly the
shrimp. Traditional Thai treats such as pad Thai, mee
krob, and satay are among the appetizers. Flawless
service. Lunch and dinner. $
Cafe Barcelona 160 Giralda Ave; 448-0912. like the city
of Barcelona itself, this storefront restaurant displays
an unselfconscious elegance and timelessness.
Excellent fish and meat dishes represent the best of
Spanish cooking. The sea bass in sea salt is
exceptionally tender, as is the lamb and skewered
shrimp Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Kolibri 6901 Red Rd; 665-2421. The Bakery
Centre area finally has another bakery—and this
one carries gourmet, low-fat, and vegan items. It’s
also a deli, market, and restaurant. Décor is as
beautiful as the cuisine, and both reflect the natural
side of life. Don’t miss the portobello mushrooms and
anything roasted in the Tuscan oven. A beer-and-
wine bar features some organic choices, but desserts
— mostly chocolate-and-liqueur varieties — sport a
higher proof than the wines. Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Abbracci 318 Aragon Ave; 441-0700. A verifiable
showplace where Italian dishes of supreme
refinement reign: snails with polenta in a red-wine
sauce and mushrooms; gnocchi with porcinkomato
sauce; veal chop and grilled seafood dishes with
virgin olive oil and herbs. Desserts (Campari sorbet!)
are the finest Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Baci 2522 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 442-0600. Now
under its second owners, this veteran of Coral Gables
fine Italian dining once again shows its native colors.
Fare takes on a Mediterranean flair depending more
on light oils and spices than heavy, rich creams, and
menus are seasonal. Expect some excellent fish and
meats, baked in the Tuscan oven, and some lovely
cold salad and carpaccio plates. Don’t expect a quiet
little spot for two—this business rivals Mezzanotte’s
for elite appeal. Lunch and dinner. $$
Christy's 3101 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 446-1400. An
upwardly mobile carnivore’s hangout Apart from
enormous and beautifully prepared caesar salads,
there are the massive cuts of beet among the best in
the city. The prime ribs alone would make Fred
Flintstone envious. For the Japanese-minded, a rich
filet mignon is prepared with teriyaki. The baked
Alaska is terrific. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Darbar 276 Alhambra Cir; 448-9691. The room is
sleek, masculine, and clubby looking, but the staff
goes out of its way to make you feel comfortable and
to introduce you to fine Indian cooking. Try the lamb
Madras with basmati rice if you like it hot An array of
curries is offered from various regions of India, along
with a cornucopia of fruits, sweets, and potable
concoctions. Lunch and dinner. $$
House of India 22 Merrick Way; 444-2348. Can rice
dishes get any better? This restaurant prepares them
with style. Splendid curries are a staple, even if they
can be coriander-strong. A tandoor is in full view as
blazing skewers are extracted bearing tender, moist,
brick-colored chicken. If the atmosphere is dark and
cloying, the sarnosas quickly make you forget. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Islands 2345 SW 37th Ave; 444r0334. This popular
Caribbean-style roadhouse changed its name
(formerly Kountry Kottage) to better fit its simple but
simply great island cuisine. Known from here to
Trinidad for its wood-scented, tangy, barbecued ribs
and chicken, this spot also features sandwiches,
salads, breads, and muffins bursting with raisins,
nuts, and other goodies. Noisy, cross-generational,
big-family atmosphere tempered by the soft, musical
English of the wait staff. Lunch and dinner. $
JohnMartin's 253 Miracle Mile; 445-3777. Who said
Irish food was all stew? This authentic Irish
emporium boasts a charming pub and an elegant
dining room serving the best poached salmon and
hollandaise in the area, sirloin steaji with a whiskey
sauce, lovely homemade pátés, soups, and desserts.
(Try the Bailey’s ice cream!) $$
Justa Pasta 139 Giralda Ave; 567-9555. It’s easy to
order exactly what you want to eat at this enchanting
restaurant, now in its second location. Feel like
seafood? Choose the black-and-white delight bicolore
fettuccinewith scallops, shrimp, clams, and mussels
in cream sauce, from the “Entrees with Seafood”
category. Have a yen for veal and vegetables? Got
those categories, too, even one that reads “Entrees
with Cheese,” which offers everything from cheese
tortellini to bite-size raviolini. Choose from a dozen
different salads for lunch. Lunch and dinner. $$
La Bussola 270 Giralda Ave; 445-8783. There is no
better service anywhere—formal, wami, attentive.
Rice and pasta dishes are finished at tableside, a nice
touch that helps to overcome some of the kitchen’s
inconsistencies. Lovely, cold vitello tonnato is a
memorable appetizer. Veal scallops with porcini
mushrooms arrive on a skillet, but the success is
mixed. Unquestionably, though, a restaurant of
superior standards. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Las Rías Gallegas 804 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 442-9058.
(Also in Coconut Grove.) Named for the estuaries of
the Galicia region in Spain, this restaurant deals,
appropriately enough, in sea fare. Paella is the best in


Once in a
BLUE Moon...
rich tomato Creole sauce, is rightfully the house
specialty, and whole snapper is mild and sweet.
Lunch and dinner. $
Cami's, the Seafood Place 6272 S Dixie Hwy; 665-1288.
For information see listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Captain's Tavern 9621S Dixie Hwy; 666-5979.; A fixture
for more than 25 years, this nautical-theme seafood
house offers more local (and distant) fresh catches
than your local fishmonger. Among the South Florida
seafaring fare: lobster, yellowtail, snapper, pompano,
bay scallops, conch, dolphin, grouper, and stone
crabs. Steaks and other meat dishes are available, as
are some trendy seafood creations, but for the most
part dishes are simply—and tastily—rendered.
Vast and varied wine list Lunch and dinner. $$
Chilango s Mexican Grill 5859 SW 73rd St;
663-9333. For well-prepared Mexican food served
with a humorous flair, try this pretty remake of the
old UM hangout Coach’s. The chunkiest richest
guacamole in town is a quick start easing you into
moist and tender sopes and spicy tortilla soup. Follow
up with an enchilada platter smothered in a salsa
verde and wash it down with Padfico. Lunch and
dinner. $
El Toro Taco 1 Krome Ave, Homestead; 245-8182.
Andrew couldn’t blow away this Mexican
establishment which dishes up authentic cuisine and
plenty of it Chicken burritos burst at the seams with
shredded white meat and taco shells spill over with
ground beef. Although you won’t torch your
tastebuds on this mostly mild fare, tasty selections
such as mole de polio—chicken glazed with a sleek
sauce — and steak, onion, and pepper-filled fajitas
supply more than enough flavor. A great stop to or
from the Keys, when you honestly can’t face another
conch fritter. Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Fancy's 7382 SW 56th Ave; 661-3981. Looks like a
spaghetti house but aspires to carbohydrate
greatness — arid frequently succeeds. If you like
your pasta with a kick, try the puttanesca, made
with hot Italian sausage. If you like your noodles
creamy with a little crunch, order the primavera.
Nine veal dishes are offered, along with avast
selection of appetizers and nearly 1000 wines.
Lunch and dinner. $
Git Capa's Bistro 10712 SW 113th PI; 273-1102. This is a
restaurant like no other, but it offers Italian-American
food at its homey best, cooked by the owner himself
(who likes to inspect his customers), A delightful
antipasto salad prepared with Capa’s secret herb
dressing starts things off. The finest entrée is the
sirloin with a superb sauce made from green
pepperoncini, black olives, garlic, tomatoes, and
capers. Good cannoli for dessert $$
Johnny Rockets in Dadeland Mall, 7535 N Kendall Dr,
663-8864. For information see listing under Coconut
Grove-Key Biscayne.
Le Glacier 5950 S Dixie Hwy; 666-3120. Delightful,
unpretentious French café with friendly service and
filling, affordable daily specials. Or try onion soup,
quiche, crab salad, or a sandwich—on a croissant, of
course. As the name indicates, this pretty auberge-
style restaurant—with greenery galore and
skylights—features wonderful ice cream desserts.
Lunch and dinner. $
Los Ranchos 8505 Mills Dr; 596-5353. For information
see listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Outback Steakhouse 13145 SW 89th PI; 2544456. (Also
11800 Sherri Lane; 5964)771.) For information see
listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Punjab Palace 11780 N Kendall Dr; 274-1300.
Turbaned, bearded, and impressive, Punjabi Sikhs
run this immaculate Indian restaurant Tandoori
chicken is a high point Sarnosa pastries with either
vegetables or meat are crumbly and satisfying. Of the
main courses, rogan josh made with cubed lamb is
creamy and mild, and the chicken curries are
immensely fragrant and delicious. Indian food at its
finest and most elegant Lunch and dinner. $$
Shorty's Bar-B-Q 9200 S Dixie Hwy; 670-7732. Another
landmark barbecue joint this one features the
ubiquitous ribs and chicken in slightly sweeter and
spicier renditions than elsewhere. Hot off the wood,
such specialties continue to please after all these
years. Lots of character, lots of fun. Lunch and
dinner. $
Siam Lotus Room 6388 S Dixie Hwy; 666-8134. Some of
the best Thai food anywhere. The prize item is the
fried whole snapper with fiery chili sauce. The same
sauce lights up the “Volcano Shrimp” entrée. Salay
beef or pork sticks are pungently sweet, especially
with the peanut sauce. Spring rolls, different from
Chinese, also add spice and variety. Clean
surroundings and pleasant ambiance. Lunch and
dinner. $
Tani Thai 12260 S Dixie Hwy; 2533583. You’ll need
some imagination to consider dishes named “Hello
Ginger!” and “Kiss Me!”—but don’t worry, all is not
lost The pad Thai noodles are excellent, as are the
various fish and duck dishes flavored with red pepper
flakes and peanuts. Service is first-rate, and the
setting has charm. Lunch and dinner. $$
ffM
M
Newümes
ROMANCE Call 579-1525 for more information
I III Ian
Illlpüli*
... Romance Happen**,
The New Timed Romance Blue Moon Party. Sunday, June 30tb
from 7 to 10pm. Come dreooed in blue and join uo
for an evening of Romance and elegance at
Doc Dammero, 180 Aragon Avenue, Coral Gabled.
m
m.
m
town and a bargain to boot at $14.95 per person; arroz
con pescado makes a hearty meal for a heart¬
warming price, while swordfish and tuna steaks
served on hoagie rolls are grilled sandwich treats.
(The Coconut Grove location offers a bigger menu
and a wider range ofprices to match.) Lunch and
dinner. $
Le Provencal 382 Miracle Mile; 448-8984. Leeks,
tomatoes, garlic, onions, olive oil... this is French
cuisine that beats the butter-and-cream rap. The
bouillabaisse gets all the honors—various fish fillets,
seafood, toasted rounds of French bread, and the
piquant red pepper touille. If the famed soup is too
ambitious, there’s an excellent dolphin in leek sauce.
Service is outstanding. Lunch and dinner. $$
Los Ranchos 2728 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 446-0050. For
information see listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Norman's 21 Almería Ave; 4464)767. He’s up to his old
tricks again, and some new ones, too. Award-winning
chef and cookbook author Norman Van Aken returns
to the field to test the creative limits of New World
cuisine with specialties such as Rioja-braised lamb
shanks with South American fries and caramelized
root vegetables; hibachi tuna with Asian jus and
Oriental mushroom salsa; and smoked tea-and-
shallot-stuffed grilled salmon. Paella is always a hit,
as is Van Aken’s signature rhum-and-pepper-painted
grouper. For the culinary adventurer who likes to
sample a little bit of everything, tapas at the bar are
the way to go. Desserts, too, are well worth
exploring. Lunch (weekdays) and dinner. $$$
Peppy's in the Gables 216 Palermo Ave; 4431240. Don’t
be misled by the vaguely Spanish name—this place
is purely Italian. Peruse your take-home copy of the
menu while enjoying complimentary roasted and
mashed garlic spread on crusty bread. Pasta dishes
are masterful, especially those made with cream
sauces and seafood. The dante veal preparation is an
inferno of flavor. Amaretto cheesecake is an
exceptional dessert Lunch and dinner. $$
Picnics at Allen's Drug Store 4000 Red Rd; 665-6964.
Diner ambiance and home cooking plunked down in
a drugstore. Tasty staples such as fried chicken, liver
and onions, meaty chili, not to mention burgers,
sodas, deli sandwiches, genuine key lime pie, and
salads. Lots to survey as you munch: jukebox with
moldy-oldie tunes, wait staff that looks to have been
lifted out of an Archie comic, pics of James Dean and
other idols. Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Rodeo Grill 2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 447-6336. An all-
you-can-eat carnivore’s paradise where sausages,
chicken, turkey, lamb, short ribs, top sirloin, ham,
pork loin, and surprises such as chicken hearts are
skewered onto long swords, grilled over hot coals,
and theatrically whisked to your table. Seafood
kebabs are also available and the salad bar is one of
the best in town. Fast before going and, afterward, do
not get on your scale. Lunch and dinner. $$
Two Sisters Restaurant 50 Alhambra Plaza (in the
Hyatt Regency); 441-1234. Newly revamped, Two
Sisters now features Pacific Rim cuisine with a
Spanish twist Tapas include succulent squid rings
married to a lemongrass dressing. Pot stickers filled
with minced chicken and duck are fragrant treats,
topped with poblano-chili-and-tomato relish. Seafood
rules the entrée list Try whole tempura-battered
yellowtail swimming through a sea of shredded
cucumber and cellophane noodles, or mahi-mahi
grilled and sauced with a fabulous black sesame seed
butter. Mango sorbet with a sesame macaroon
cookie for dessert is tropically sweet Breakfast
lunch, and dinner. $$
South Miami-Kendall
South Dade
Bahama's Fish Market and Restaurant 13399 Bird Rd;
2254932. For information see listing under Miami-
Central Dade.
Bangkok Bangkok 12584 N Kendall Dr; 595-5839. For
information see listing under Coral Gables.
Café Bistro 10121 Sunset Dr; 5933663. Charming, two-
story Italian restaurant with a well-rounded selection
of chicken, veal, seafood, and pasta dishes at ultra-
reasonable prices. lightly breaded and fried calamari
ringlets, zucchini fingers, and mozzarella sticks make
good starters; the horseradish dressing
accompanying the zucchini is finger-licking fine.
Don’t miss the dolphin prepared Greek-style with feta
cheese and a few Szechuan dishes. Known for its
many, cooked-upon-order hearty soups in lightly
seasoned broths. Duck on the menu in many
different styles, and lots of deep-fried appetizers,
‘ favorites of Peruvians. Chinese and Peruvian beers.
Lunch Tuesday through Sunday; dinner nightly. $
Café Creole 12983 SW 112th St; 3837070. Haitian
specialties in a spiffy Kendall setting. Malanga fritters
dipped in a powerful chili pepper sauce are crunchy
nuggets. Lambi, tender marinated conch served in a
New Times June 20-26,1996


New Times June 20 â–  26,1996
Blue Note Yesterday & Today
16401 NE 15th Ave 1614 Alton Road
N. Miami Miami Beach
940-3394 534-8704
Unde Son's Unde Son's Unde Son's
1141 Wnshhqlon Ave 4580N.Umvers¡tyDr. 3271N. Federal Hwy.
Miami Beadi lauderhfl Pompano Beadi
5320973 (305)742-2466 (305)941-3973
WEDNESDAYS REGGAE
CULTURE JAM
BALLISTIC THURSDAYS
featuring-
and
DJ COOP DA VILL...
EVERY FRIDAY
"THE GATES"
featuring
DJ CRAZE
JESSIES
615 Washington Ave. • 538-6688
Live Music, Food,
Coffee Den & Games
Home of “Fat Moe’s”
Eyebrow Cream
55 NE 2nd Street
In Downtown Miami’s
Historic Arts District
(305)373-7808
Quick, before
it's banned.
Experience the hot, then cool taste
of After Shock" at your favorite bars.
After Shock™ Liqueur, Bottled at 40% Alc./Vol., ©1996 Munson Shaw Co., Deerfield IL.
Make responsibility part of your enjoyment.
GRAND OPENING
JULY 4, 1996
PERFORMING LIVE
Life in
Sodom
D.J. ALAN TRUEBA
A.K.A.
Uncle Alice
DOORS OPEN AT
10PM ...UNTIL
$5.00 COVER
BRING YOUR ID PLEASE
3339 Virginia Street
Coconut Grove
444-5333
IF HAVING FUN
WAS AN OLYMPIC
EVENT, THIS IS WHERE
YOU’D COME TO
TRAIN.
Wednesday Ladies Night - Ladies play pool for free.
Come in and try a cigar - specials on the cheny & vanilla
Thursday Cigars & Pool - Watch then roll your own cigar
Friday Music all night starting with happy hour favorites
and ending with Doghouse from 10-ciose


The Greening
of Amanda
By Jim Murphy
A lot of things seem weird to Amanda Green.
The 24-year-old singer/songwriter uses the
word a lot to describe, in general, her personal
life and, in particular, die confluence of profes¬
sional events ranging from her first club gig
last August (a solo date on the patio of
Churchill’s Hideaway) to the upcoming
release of her debut album and die start of a
monthlong East Coast tour.
Her classical training on piano, which
started when she was four years old? Weird,
Green declares. Ditto for her debut public per¬
formance, when as a kindergartner she pro¬
vided piano accompaniment as her classmates
sang about rectangles, triangles, and circles.
(“All I know is the piano made me different
from everybody else,” Green recalls, “because
I was always playing piano while everybody
else was in the play.”) As for the semester she
spent studying music composition at
Michigan State University? Again, weird.
(“Everybody wore Beethoven shirts all the
time.”)
And so on. That maiden show at Churchill’s?
Well, you can guess. “I was a lithe freaked out
because I had just learned how to play guitar
and I was really doubtful about my ability to
communicate anything to anybody,” she con¬
fesses. Green is also doubtful — for now, at
least — about her ability to front a band that
includes veteran drummer Derek Murphy
(Forget the Name, Sixo, Milk Can) and her
boyfriend, bassist Matt Sabatella (who for¬
merly led his own self-named band and played
bass with Diane Ward and Brian Franklin).
“I’m still at the point where I feel scared to go
over something too many times because I
don’t want to waste their time,” she admits. “I
haven’t reached the point where I’m a very
didactic bandleader or any¬
thing, and I doubt that I
ever really will. I don’t
know. It’s just weird.”
Also rating high on
Green’s weirdometer is the
fact that she’s been sharing
space these past few
months at Criteria
Recording Studios, with
arena-rock demigods
Aerosmith, who have been
in Miami recording their
forthcoming album. “It’s
just very weird because it’s your first album
and you go in and it’s like ... Aerosmith. You
can’t get a more emblematic, rock and roll
type of career-oriented band than Aerosmith.
It was just really bizarre.” Not that the guys in
Aerosmith have been snobs. In fact the band’s
scarf-flourishing lead singer Steven Tyler
played his band’s rough mixes for Green
between sessions and asked what she
thought “Nothing could have made me feel
punier than hearing their songs,” she notes.
“They just have that sound of gold.”
Weird as the notion seems to Green, her
work — an engaging blend of hypnotic rock
riffs and quirky pop hooks drenched in a defi¬
antly postmodern attitude — has the sound of
gold to her manager Richard Ullóa, whose
knack for spotting and nurturing talent has
given him something of a Midas-like aura
locally. Ulloa, the owner of Yesterday & Today
Records in South Miami, founded the Y&T
Music label a few years ago simply to help the
then-struggling, now-platinum country act the
Mavericks record and release their work.
Later, as a manager, he helped Mary Karlzen
and For Squirrels find their way to major-label
contracts.
Ulloa cues up a rough mix of T Stay Home,”
a track from Green’s upcoming disc Junk and
Stuff, being issued on Ulloa’s Y&T label. Over,
the speakers Green can be heard faintly ask¬
ing “Now?” and then giggling ever so slightly
as she strums the song’s opening chords.
Bass and drums join in a choppy, midtempo
gallop as Green launches into a rambling,
deadpan monologue that sounds like an over¬
heard slice of conversation between two jaded
models at a South Beach nightclub: “I met this
guy he tells me a story/How he met this girl
who took him back/To an apartment where
they got real high/He could’ve hit the sack
but he didn’t try.”
The mind races for musical points of refer¬
ence: Velvet Underground? Liz Phair?
“Eveiyone has a different opinion,” Ulloa says.
“I’ve heard Amanda compared to Tori Amos,
the B-52’s, even Mary Karlzen.” So who would
he compare her to? None of the above. “This
girl has the power, in my opinion, to revolu¬
tionize the record business,” he gushes. That
sort of outcome would no doubt seem weird to
Green because, as she sheepishly comments,
“I have no idea what I’m doing.”
Which is not entirely accurate. Green was
something of a musical whiz as a youngster,
winning piano competitions and, at the age of
nine, earning a soloist spot with the Miami
Youth Symphony. She started writing songs a
few years later, after her father bought her a
Panasonic Double Cassette Recorder with
Super Echo, a contraption commonly known
to lounge lizards and armchair Sinatras as a
karaoke machine. And yet Green wasn’t inter¬
ested in belting out “Old Tune Rock & Roll” or
chirping along to the backing track of “Wind
Beneath My Wmgs.” “I remember specifically
telling my dad in the store, ‘I don’t have to buy
the tapes of the background songs,’ ” she
recalls. “I just wanted to use it because it had
the microphone input and the headphones
and a really big echo.”
That same karaoke machine occupies a Cen¬
tral spot in the living room of Green’s Coral
Gables condo and has played a pivotal role in
her songwriting career. The turning point
came in early 1995, after Green had worked
for a few years as co-writer on a project for a
well-known dance music producer whom she
diplomatically — and firmly — refuses to
name. “Bad things that shouldn’t be in the
world,” Green now says of the songs she
helped write with the hotshot producer, her
voice dripping with disdain. Indeed, she looks
back with more than a little embarrassment at
having authored lines such as ‘You make me
wet all over” and “With the right love you can’t
Amanda Green, Miami's queen of junk and stuff
go wrong.” But, as she points out, “people
always said, ‘If you do this and you have a hit,
then you can do anything you want
afterward.’”
To be sure, the collaboration could’ve been
Green’s ticket to the big leagues; before mak¬
ing the demos, the unnamed producer signed
her to a one-year recording and publishing
deal. But beyond picking up some extra vocal
experience and getting a chance to work in a
professional studio (the songs were cut at the
Bee Gees’ Middle Ear studio in Miami
Beach), nothing ever came of the demos or
the deal. Following that artistic debacle, Green
retreated to her condo and the karaoke
machine. “It was so irritating to me because at
that point I was in a multimillion-dollar facility
and I was basically working for hire,” she
grumps, “and when I was finally writing the
songs that I wanted to write, I was here at the
karaoke machine on my floor.”
For the next six months or so Green taught
herself how to play the guitar while experi¬
menting with melodies, lyrics, and sounds.
She refers to the results as “the karaoke
tapes” — the literally hundreds of unlabeled
cassettes that litter her apartment, each filled
with melodic ideas, nonsensical aural frag¬
ments, and songs in various stages of develop¬
ment. It was one such cassette that sparked
Ulloa’s enthusiasm. After seeing her perform,
he asked Green if she had anything on tape.
She demurred, he persisted, so she went to
her car and found one under the seat. The
tape floored him. “There’s so much magic that
I’d be willing to put out a CD just of the
karaoke tapes,” he says. “They’re that incredi¬
ble.”
Those early, homemade versions of Green’s
songs brim with an urgent kind of tension that
connects daring experimentation and raw tal¬
ent. If anything, the effect is enhanced by
Green’s rudimentary guitar chops and the lim¬
itations of tiie karaoke machine. (The device
is made to record only one dub clearly, subse¬
quent dubs make the preceding mixes
murkier, and some of the songs have been
copied at least a half-dozen times.) “A lot of
people have told me I play the guitar like a
pianist, which is kind of weird,” she states
unsurprisingly. “I think because I know what
notes go together, but I don’t know where
they are on the guitar, I wind up with voicings
that sound different than regular chords. I
know enough chords to write songs, though.
You only need a few, right?”
Despite the technical limitations, Green’s
playfulness with lyrics and melodies pierces
through the decidedly low-fi murk of the
karaoke tapes, whether it’s the bright, rela¬
tively uncluttered mix of the whimsical
“Twenty Years” (“I like pretending that I’m in
the CIA/I spy on strangers just to brighten up
my day”) or the hazy, opium-den feel of “Way
Out,” a seething fuck-you dirge (Tm not your
friend/I don’t like you any more/Season’s
over/Don’t let your ass hit the door”).
“It was a total gamble what was on it,” Green
observes of the tape she handed over to Ulloa.
“Actually I was lucky because there were a few
songs on that tape, and I could have given him
a tape of me mumbling to myself.” Green
pauses to reflect on the felicitous twists of fate
her career has taken in the past ten months. “I
mean, think about it My whole life I’m living
up to a certain day in a certain way, then one
day I just played a show and I meet Matt and
then I started playing a bunch of shows, and
it’s been completely different since then. Last
year at this time I wasn’t doing anything. I was
thinking about signing up for summer school
and, you know, getting a life.”
Another pause. “I just hope I don’t use up all
my luck.” CD 75
“When I was finally writing the
songs that I wanted to write, I
was here at the karaoke
machine on my floor.”
US
&%>
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 ^26.1996
Bar None
Bar None is so exclusive that there’s no sign, but celebrities
and the beautiful people still manage to find this
Washington Avenue hot spot. Pick a comfortable spot in one
of the three areas inside and settle in for the night. People
watching is best on the weekends, but Funkadelica with DJ
Sista Leventhal on Thursdays, is not to be missed.
411 Washington Avenue
672*9252
KCÓ€ ó has elevated listening to
live music to an art form This week's
acts include: Manchild, Mindflower,
Righteous Groove, Miguel Cruz with
Loco Mambo featuring Dayami.
Friday, 6/21 and Saturday, 6/22 -
Rose's f eatures Its Newjlork City All
Star Players series featuring Gerardo
Velez; Carmine RjojaSi Richie
Cannatta, Bernard Fowler, Oscar
Brown and special guest Vernon Reid.
754 Washington Avenue 532-0228
Where else can you listen to incredible
music in a relaxed bar setting? Only at
Society Hill, where the music changes
every night! Rock to the sounds of
Manchild every Sunday night or try
out your singing voice at Monday's
Open MÍC Night. Tuesday night's
Trash Can, Trash Can features
local punk and alternative bands. On
Wednesdays It's A Better World
with DJ Chief spinning reggae. Local
bands are the attraction on Thursdays
and dance to disco and retro on Friday
and Saturdays.
62*7 Washington Avenue 534-9993
restaurants
CHICAGO.. .NEW YORK. .L. A
Km.
Tudor Lounge
It’s mellow, it’s fun, It’s happening - this laid-back lounge is
an indoor/outdoor paradise for people watching, cocktailing
and conversing. One of the few bars in South Beach that has
a relaxed, chilled feeling. The perfect place to begin your
evening. Things get hot at Tuesday’s Home Cookin’ with
Conrad and DJ Mark Leventhal. It’s real tasty!
1111 Collins Avenue
604-9770
Jessie’s
Every night is a fun night at Jessie’s, especially on Model
Mondays where the beautiful people mingle. Everyone in the
neighborhood will enjoy Local’s Night every Tuesday with
half-price specials and $5.00 pitchers. Visit the Caribbean at
Wednesday’s Reggae Culture Jam and Thursday is- Ladies
Night where the gals drink free from 9rllpm and the guys
can buy $5.00 pitchers. And on Saturday nights, DJ Snowhite
throws down the funkiest retro tunes.
615 Washington Ave.
558-6688
Swirl
There’s never a cover or an attitude at Swirl. With a newly
renovated sound and light system, this cool, hip spot promis¬
es to be even more fun. Two full bars for those wishing a
libation and coming soon - The Camel Lounge. Tune into The
Late Show on Monday nights, a talk show presented by the
Justice League of Drag, with stars Adora, Bridgit, Marvella,
Shejly Novak and Taffy keeping you up late. It's Too Much on
Fridays, with DJ JoJo Odyssey spinning just the right amount
of hi-energy dance music. Saturdays, come get the skinny on
Phat with DJ Axel’s old fashioned house party.
1049 Washington Avenue
554-2060
Farfolla Trattoria
Home of classic and delicious Italian food for two years,
Farfalla has been feeding the South Beach community only
the very best pasta. And Farfalla loves the Ladies so much,
that the restaurant has introduced Ladies Night every
Wednesday where all unescorted ladies dine free and enjoy
fun music.
701 Washington Blvd.
675-2555
Lucky Cheng’s
Every night a party of fun, food and music at this gender-
bender restaurant featuring waiters in drag, as well as night¬
ly cabarets. So while you’re dining on their unique Chino-
Latino cuisine, check out this beyond belief entertainment.
It’s guaranteed to put a smile on anyone’s face.
1412 Ocean Drive
672-1505
(í( K
Monday Night Madness - $i
beers, $3 shot specials and Outrageous
Virtual Reality. Velveeta Wednesdays - bowl¬
ing shirts, polyester, Retro Cheez music
from DJ Shannon and no cover. Virtual
Reality prizes - high score wins a free box
of mac & cheese. Friday, hot Virtual multi-
media, $3 drink specials and seductive
sounds from DJ Shannon. Event begins at
10pm and no cover. Sundays, In The Biz
Nitet hospitality employee appreciation with
2-4-1 drinks and virtual reality. $100 free bar
tab to largest group of employees (5 or
more) at 2am. Bring ID or pay stub before
midnight to enter contest.
1509 Washington Avenue 552-0254
The Strand
The most famous restaurant on South Beach, the Strand has
been serving its signature French and American cuisine for
over ten. years. Sophisticated ambiance and quality fare
attract locals, visitors and celebrities with great frequency
and weekends are particularly dazzling. Sundays, check out
the locals barbecue with free buffet. White Wednesdays
event captures the spirit of the annual White Party.
671 Washington Avenue
552-2540
café
I w ~
Big Star Coffee
For a little slice of Seattle, head over to Big Star Coffee
where the freshest, best coffee in town is served indoors and
outdoors. A varied coffee selection will make all coffee
lovers ecstatic and try Big Star’s salads, sandwiches, pas¬
tries, smoothies and desserts.
1259 Washington Avenue
552-0012
clubs
Amnesia
Home to the legendaryFoam parties, Amnesia is also one of
the Beach’s largest nightclubs. This mammoth, open-air club
contains its own restaurant, VIP room, marble dance floor
and much more. Come prepared to get wet and wild,
Thursday night’s - at Foam. Friday and Saturday nights,
dance to the music of various DJs and spend Sundays groov¬
ing at the T-Dance with DJ Wendy Hunt.
156 Collins Ave.
551-5555
11 mg. "tar". 0.8 mg nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method. LIGHTS
¡iiiiiiiiiii
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
First Person
Kirstin Leistner
Bartender at Swirl
Get out of line here and
you’ll get a Swirly.


you want it.
you¿Otifc.
right to your door
NewTunes
o79-1509 right now to get your personal copy of
Wtew Times delivered direct to your home or office for just
| *30 for 6 months or *50 for a full year. Checks and
money orders accepted,
Call
mecca of Athens, Georgia, where they’re
some kind.of hot shit, if you can believe file
press-material that accompanies this tápe, a
nineteen-song yawner best described by the
title of its last cut, “Endless.”
¿(MW war Wn'B jt mmihxmjcí»
â– WNPiPilWippaHHMHMWMMIMI
Acid Fist X, mad as hell
available, and now I’m paying the price.
Such are the perils of interest and greed.
Anyway, here’s another batch of new or
recent local and regional tapes, singles, and
CDs. Tfyou want to-send me something,
address it to my attention, care of Aew
Times, Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101.
Needless to say, lyric sheets are both wel¬
come and encouraged.
Shuttlecock, “Pulpit”/“Glory Bus” (Esyñc).
Like country doofus Jerry Clower with a
fetish for beat poetry, or a Southern
preacher goofed on amphetamine and
cough syrup; Shuttlecock ranter/guitarist
Bill-Méntzer can ramble with almost psy-
chotk>authority about what sounds to these
ears like dothing much at all. The racket he
creates with drummer Michael Steigman
and bassist Will Trevor on this seven-inch
slab ain’t bad: Fat, distorted guitars collide
with helter-skelter beats and paint-peeling
blasts of sax (compliments of Ron Dziubla),
While fidgety bass lines map out what I
guess you could call melodies. It’s an
intriguing, nutty mess that has musical and
conceptual links to mathematical indie-rock¬
ers from Breadwinner to Chavez. Fun as it
is, it’s not something I’d want to take with
my morning coffee, although it would serve
as a nice way to blow the rocks out of-my
head on a hjingover afternoon.
Day by the River, 12-16-95 Georgia Theatre
(No label). The-sound of a second-stage
H.O.R.D¿E. band noodling away in a jam-
band tribute to the Grateful Dead, the
Allman Brothers Band, and other improv
icons of the pseudo-hippie generation.
Actually, Day by the River is a Miami group
that moved last year to the erstwhile hipster
Acid Fist X, Welcome to Discordia (Neural-
space). Yipes, AciciFist frontman Jonathan
Wright is one unhappy pappy. And who can
blamf him? In one song his
skin’s-getting burned by melt¬
ing candle wax (“Wax”); in
another he’s screaming for
dear jife. in a “Man Made
Hell”¿añd in yet another he’s
haunted by the ghost of a sui¬
cide girlfriend named “Sonia.”
No dfljjuht such unpleasantries
can ifiake a guy’s life seem
pretty lousy, but really, he
should cheer up. I read some¬
where recently that Spinal Tap
is looking for material for its
next álbum. I’m sure they'd go
bonkers over this stuff.
Live Bait, Paper Man (Baytle
Music). Twelve poorly re¬
corded pop songs, most of
them cut from the tear-soaked
cloth of failed romance and
failed poetry, by ¿ Fort Lauderdale guy
named Newell Bate. I swear I’m not trying
to be mean, but words really can’t describe
the naiveté of the execution here, nor the
unknowingly warped observations in ‘That’s
My Dream,” “Ain’t It Strange” — hell, all of
them. Still, after playing Paper Man a couple
times, I got to thinking: Some official agency
should be regulating the sale of home-studio
recording equipment, as they do with
firearms, explosives, and uranium. In the
wrong hands a foifr-track can be a danger¬
ous instrument
Various Artists, da Boom: Florida’s Finest
World Beat (Reel Street). The subtitle is a
whopper of a grand? statement that’s backed
up nowhere on this state-spanning hodge¬
podge of synthetic reggae and tropical pop.
They missed some- obvious Miami choices:
Where’s Pepe Alvd? Paquito Hechavarria?
Nil Lara? Ayabomtibe? Koleksyon Kazak?
Johnny Dread pops up with the not-bad
“Hammerin’,” but South Florida’s better rep¬
resented on da Boom by Man Called
Scratch. His “Give Love Another Try” is a
slice of reggae pop that works because the
hip-hop beat beneath the scats and toasts
slinks around like a summer groove incar¬
nate — a classic for the coming months of
grueling -humidity. Elsewhere you’ve got
some hopelessly tinny and derivative cuts
by Jacksonville’s Edward Whitt, Jr,, and
what the producers consider Orlando’s
finest (I)G and the Melvihites, Ronnie G.,
Caribbean Explosion, and Eskimo & Toddy-
I among them), as well as Cornerstone, a
vocalist from that great Florida city of
Birmingham, England.
- By John Floyd
Despite the nature of my chosen profession,
I sometimes have a hard time with words —
both writing them and making them out
clearly when I hear them in songs. Maybe
that’s why I like instrumentals so much.
There’s oertainly no misinterpreting the
raunchy sax blowing of Big Jay McNeely or
the monster guitar twang of Dick Dale.
Whatever the case, consider the following to
be a formal apology to Miami’s - Loo'
Canadians;, whose really great song
“Claris^” Lmisquoted in a big way when I
wrote about the band’s Star Crunch EP in
this space more than a month ago. Yes, the
record comes with a lyric sheet. No, mine
didn’t I helped myself to a free copy pf the
EP long before its covers and inserts were
MoodBoots, MoodBoots (P of A Records).
There will come a time someday when the
five members of P&rl Jam will have to pay
for all the bombastic, submetal, gloom-and-
doom conglomerations they’ve inspired.
Their comeuppance? To be chained to a
stereo and forced to listen to said conglom¬
erations. All of them: the major-label
stinkers from Stone Temple Pilots to Bush,
and the self-released ruminations of every
sad-eyed, pissed-offwocalist/guitarist with a
notebook full of angst and an effects box full
of fuzz, MoodBodts mastermind Roger
Rimada among them. And then all will be a
bit more right in the world.
At
South Fknida’sOnjyVIrtuai
1309 Washington Avenue
South Beach532-0234
"A BILLIARDS AND
218 ESPAÑOLA WAY • MIAMI BEACH, H. • (305)672-1707
New Times June 2D - 26,1996


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José Luis Rodriguez: Friday, June 21 and
Saturday, June 22, Jackie Gleason Theater of
the Performing Arts, 1700 Washington Ave,
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Sting: Friday, June 21, Blockbuster Coral Sky
Amphitheatre (South Florida Fairgrounds),
601 Sansbury’s Way, West Palm Beach,
407-795-8883, with Natalie Merchant „ .
Rick Derringer: Saturday, June 22, Gary’s Sports
Bar, 5325 S University Dr, Davie, 434-9680,
with Sticks and Stones, Dirt Cheap, Grass
River Tyde.
“South Florida Slammie Awards': Sunday, June 23,
the Edge, 200 W Broward Blvd, Fort
Lauderdale, 525-9333, with Biohazard, D.FÍL,
Radio Baghdad, Subliminal Criminal,
Brethren, Nonpoint Factor, Level Nine.
Lorrie Morgan: Wednesday, June. 26, Sunrise
Musical Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave,
741-7300.
Patti Labelle: Thursday, June 27; James L.
Knight Center, 400-SE 2nd Ave, 372-0929,
with Eddie and Gerald Levert
Cowboy Junkies: Friday, June 28, Carefree
Theatre, 2000 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm
Beach, 407-833-7305'*
Barry White: Friday, June 28, Sunrise Musical
Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave, 741-7300.
Porno for Pyros: Tuesday, July 2, the Edge, 200
W Broward Blvd, Fort Lauderdale, 525-9333;.
White Zombie: Saturday, July 6, Miami Arena,
721 NW 1st Ave, 5304444, with Pantera.
Impotent Sea Snakes: Sunday, July 7, Squeeze, 2
S New River Dr, Fort Lauderdde, 522-2151.
Voodoo Glow Skulls: Sunday, July 7, the Edge,
200 W Broward Blvd, Fort Lauderdale,
525-9333, with Youth Brigade, the
Independents.
Styx: Tuesday, July 9, Blockbuster Coral Sky
Amphitheatre (South Florida Fairgrounds),
601 Sansbury’s Way, West Palm Beach,
407-7958883, with Kansas.
Orbital: Friday, July 12, Rezurrection Hall at
Club Nu, 245 22nd St, Miami Beach,
5359016.
Steely Dan: Saturday, July 13, Blockbuster
Coral Sky Amphitheatre (South Florida
Fairgrounds), 601 Sansbury’s Way, West
Palm Beach, 407-7958888.
“Lollapalooza": Thursday, July 18, Blockbuster
Coral Sky Amphitheatre (Simth Florida
Fairgrounds), 601 Sansbury’s Way, West
Palm Beach, 407-7958883, with Metallica,
Soundgarden, Rage Against the Machine, the
Ramones, Rancid, the Shaolin Rung Fu of
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Buck-04!ine: Friday, July 19, the Edge, 200 W
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Meat Loaft Saturday, July 20, Blockbuster Coral
Sky Amphitheatre (South Florida
Fairgrounds), 601 Sansbury’s Way, West
Palm Beach, 407-7958883.
k.d. lang: Friday, July 26, Sunrise Musical
Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave, 741-7300.
Reba McEntire: Friday, July 26, Miami Arena,
721 NW 1st Ave, 5304444.
Brian Setzer Orchestra: Saturday, July 27,
Carefree Theatre, 2000 S Dixie Hwy, West
Palm Beach, 407-8357305.
Pedro Fernandez: Saturday, July 27, Jackie
Gleason Theater of the Performing Arts, 1700
Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 6757300. ¡
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Into the Night
ith Saturday nights bringing out
almost all club crawlers, it’s a good
thing promoters and party planners
continually come up with new and
improved ways to inspire the social scene.
Leslie Armstrong, host of Clean and
Sober, a radio call-in talk show airing
Sunday mornings at 6:00 a.m. — you’d
have to sober to be up that early'— has
dreamed up the unimaginable: a nightclub
without alcohol. That’s exactly what you’ll
find this Saturday when you catch The Wave
at the new Rezurrection Hall at Club Nu
(245 22nd St., Miami Beach, 535-9016).
With an emphasis on funky performances
involving dancers, drummers, and exotic
musicians, Armstrong bets you won’t even
notice the lack of libations. For something
a little more intoxicating, check out Aloha
at Ensign Bitters (3000 Florida Ave.,
Coconut Grove, 448-2582). The nightclub
full of Eighties opulence and glamour hits
home with a Polynesian party complete
with hula gurus, fire dancers, live percus¬
sion, mai tais, and leis galore. If you’ve
recovered from the Hawaiian hangover by
Tuesday, June 25, add a kick to an other¬
wise ordinary week when you join the
Ladies & Gentlemen Cigar Smoking Club
of America, Inc., as it hosts Cigar Schmooze
at the Shelborne Beach Resort (1801
Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 954-244-2710).
The mega networking event begins at 8:00
p.m. — bring a pocketful of business
cards — and the $15 admission not only
gives you a chance to hobnob with other
jet setters like yourself, but includes a
hand-rolled cigar to dangle from your lips
while you’re at it.
Thursday
Caffe Torino, “Garbo’s.” Cabaret fun and
fantasy for girls who love girls, with a little
live music thrown in for good measure.
1437 Washington Ave., Miami Beach,
531-5722.
Rezurrection Hall at Club Nu, “Izm.” Ozzie and
friends throw it down With Miami’s best
DJs spinning funk, hip-hop, acid jazz, and
reggae. 245 22nd St., Miami Beach,
901-0597.
Liquid, “Caramelo.” A Latin party at the
nightclub known for being the center of
all party culture with mambo, mariachi,
and other Latin and Eurodance rhythms.
1439 Washington Ave., Miami Beach,
532-9154.
Marsbar, “Retrospect.” The hinterland
alternative club hurls musical classics at
the palnt-it-black crowd, all dressed up
and looking for angst. 8505 Mills Dr.,
Town & Country Center, Kendall,
271-6909.
Friday
Splash, “Bliss.” High-energy dance party
full of debauchery, drinking, and table-top
dancing girls for the ladies who prefer
ladies. 5922 S. Dixie Hwy., South Miami,
661-0917.
Bermuda Bar, “Friday Fascination.”
Glamour gal ladies night, where the girls
get free champagne and chocolate-cov¬
ered strawberries to suck on — and the
guys get to watch. 3509 NE 163rd St.,
North Miami Beach, 945-0196.
Kremlin, “Hot Tropical Salsa.” An homage
to the fevered and horny, with everything
from Brazilian house music to all-
American disco. 727 Lincoln Rd., Miami
Beach, 673-3150.
Saturday
Cameo Theater. Get
into die groove with
a jammin’ blend of
reggae, R&B, and house music pumped
out by DJ Waggy Tee. Tight and heavy
sounds for the masses. 1445 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach, 532-0922.
Amnesia, “Grand Central.” There’s fun for
all at the megamonster establishment
brimming with juice, sex, and artifice, 136
Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 531-5535.
Sunday
Astor Place, “Gospel Brunch.” If you can
wake up, divine diva Maryell Epps digs up
some jazz and gospel tunes for an early
afternoon of soul. 956 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 672-7217.
Jessie's, “Keep It Real.” Models and mere
mortals crowd the cozy inside as well as
the newly renovated outside patio for a
night of acid jazz, drink specials, and ail-
around good vibes. 615 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 538-6688.
Monday
Hard Rock Cafe, “Daily Double Happy
Hour.” Loosen those ties and kick off
those pumps with food, music, and half-
price drinks every weekday from 4:00 to
7:00, and from 10:00 until closing. 401
Biscayne Blvd (Bayside Marketplace),
377-3110.
Van Dyke Cafe & Lounge. Locals artists Billy
Marcus and Don Wilner perform toe-tap-
ping, finger-snapping jazz. 846 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach, 534-3600.
Lua, “Back-Door Bamby.” DJ Gigi spins a
sexy blend of deep house mood music for
an evening of erotic and not particularly
subtle pleasures. 409 Española Way,
Miami Beach, 672-8351.
Tuesday
Society Hill, ‘Trash Can Tuesday.” Local
bands help you stomp it up with the
world’s cheapest beer. Trash and thrash
to your heart’s content. 627 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach, 534-9993.
821, “Seventh Grade.” Retro disco spun by
DJ Shannon, with salutes to the lounge
lizards who make it all possible. 821
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 534-0887.
Bar None, “Absolut Sound.” The vodka
giant plays host to a night of experimental
fusion, trip-hop, and acid jazz with Absolut
goodies to be given away. 411 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach, 672-9252,
Wednesday
Rose's Bar & Music Lounge. Football star-
singer Demetrius Brown and his band
Manchild rock the house each week witlr
two sets of funky rhythms to keep you
grooving. 754 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, 532-0228.
Virtua Cafe. “Velveeta Wednesday.”
Cheese-O-Rama bowling shirts and tacky
polyester are recommended for this retro
party hosted by DJ Shannon, where a box
of the funky frontage goes to the player
with the highest virtual reality game
score. 1309 Washington Ave., 532-0234.
Warsaw, “Male Erotica Night.” Strippers,
both amateur and all-too-professional,
competing for sleaze and glory. Normally
Warsaw’s best night. 1450 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, 5314555.
- By Liz Martinez
Send information regarding special “one-
nighters” to “Into the Night.” Fax material
to 372-3446 or call 579-1572.


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
SUNDAY, JUNE 23
DANCE ON
THE DARKSIDE
DJ CHILLY
GREGORYGALAVOTT1
DYNAMO PLAZA
EVERY MONDAY
!1,T C NIGHT
HeIkens
EVERY TUESDAY
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Miami Beach • 532-0228
5pm m Sam • 7days • Showtime» 11pm
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with Cash & Prizes


Mu
I
ic
m
m
Cl
ubs
Club listings ara compiled by Liz Martinez. If yon wish
to be included, please call 579-1572, Monday through
Friday before 5:00 p.m. The listings are free.
Rack & Roll
Arreste, 5850 Sunset Dr, 661-3210: Open mike
night, hosted by Glenn Allen, Tuesday.
BO'S Sports Bar, 9240 SW 160th St, 255-2466:
Strychnine, Triday; Doc Rock, Saturday; live
music, Sunday,'-ladies night, Wednesday.
Cheers, 2490 SW 17th Ave, 857-0041:Texas is the
Reason plus Sense Field plus Makeshift plus
Nobuhjést, Thursday; El Subterráneo dance party
(Latin rock), Friday; Orgasmic Bliss plus the
Honeysticks plus the Miles, Saturday; Second
Hand plus Hudson, Tuesday; Soft EZ Chair plus
Kiddie Korn, Wednesday. -
Chili Pepper, 621 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
531-9661: Jazz it Up with DJ (acid jazz),
Thursday; DJ Rick Von Halle, Friday and
Saturday; Q-BAA, Tuesday; DJ, Wednesday.
Churchill's Hideaway, 5501NE 2nd Ave, 757-1807:
Laundry Room Squelchers, Thursday; Love
Canal, Friday; Bone Dry plus Seventeen Bucks,
plus Skimpy Knickers, Saturday; Caddy Jean plus
Gifted Class plus the Invalids plus United for
Change, Sunday; Tracy’s Dimensions, Monday;
Three-ring circus acoustic jam, hosted.by Louis -
Jurika, plus poetry reading, hosted by Josh and
friends.pliis Skiffle, Tuesday; Easy Virtue,
Wednesday.
Clevelander, 1020Ocean Dr, Miami Beach,
531-3485: Pangaea, Thursday through Saturday;
SOBE Blue,-Sunday (afternoon); Ruby Baker and
the Futuré-, Sunday; Rufflrouse, Monday and
Tuesday; the Wizz Band, Wednesday.
Corbett's Sports Bar, 1272TS Dixie Hwy, 238-0823:
Ladies night, Saturday; Bucket night plus late-
night pool tournament, Tuesday; Bucket night
plus ladies night, Wednesday.
Crown and Garter British Pub, 270 Catalonia Ave,
Coral Gables, £41-0204; Midnight Band,.Friday; -
the Tall Boys,“Saturday, ■
Del Sol Browing Co., 630 6th St, ÍVliami Beach,
6.73-3102: Jonathan Kreisberg Trio, Saturday; ‘
Jphnny Dread, Sunday.
Edge, 200 W Broward Blvd, Fort Lauderdale,-
E¡5Jfc9333: Pink Lincolns plus the Gotohells plus
the Crumbs, Thursday, Holy Terrors plusthe
Johnsons, Friday, South Florida Slanjmie Awards
featuring Biohazard-plus D;F.L,.plus Radio
Baghdad plus Subliminal Qriplinal plus Brethren
pjiist^pnpoint Factor plus Level Nine.;
Gary's Sports Bar, 5325 SUniversity Dr, Davie, t
434-9680 DJ, Thursday, Airborne plus Boone
Docks plus Company Kane, Friday; Rick Í
Derringer plus Sticks and Stones plus Dirt Cheap
pips Grass River Tyde, Saturday; DeadiSoiils plus-
Maniac plus Tnñh-Séritói» WednéSdiót.
Marco's Club Taj, 3339 Virginia StfCóconut.Gréve, is
444-5333: DJJFridayand Saturday, “
Rezurroction Hall at Club Nu.245 22nd St, Miami
Beach, 535-9016: Izm with DJ (hip-hópr acid jazz),
Thursday; Mobb Deep, Friday; the ¡Wave non-*
alcoholic party with DJ, Saturday.
Mobb Deep (and friend?) plays Rezurroction Hall
Rockandy, 909 E Cypress Creek Rd, Fort
Lauderdale, 492-0099: Rulette, Thursday; Rulette
plus Sense, Friday; Rulette plus Blind Raige,
Saturday; open jam night, hosted by Motor,
Monday, Alternativé Blue, Tuesday, the
Bleeding, Wednesday..
Rose's Bar A Music Lounge, 754 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach, 532-0228: Mind Flower plus
Righteous Groove, Thursday; New York City All-
Star Jam, featuring Vernon Reid (Living Color);
Friday and Saturday; DJ, Sunday, open mike
night, Monday; Miguel Cruz and his Loco
Mambo featuring Dayami, Tuesday; Manchild,
Wednesday.
Society Hill, 627 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
534-9993: Solomon Grundy, Thursday; Retro :
night with DJ Laz-a-Looney, Friday and Saturday;
Manchild, Sunday; Trash Can Tuesday vtith five -
music, Tuesday; For a Better World with DJ
Chief (hip-hop, reggae), Wednesday. â– 
South Beach Pub, 717 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 532-7821: Subliminal Criminal plus
Kreamy 'Léctric Santa plus Dynamo Haza,
Thursday; Crazy Fingers,- Friday; Sense plus the
Inside plus Black Janet, Saturday.
Squeeze, 2 S New River Dr, Fort Lauderdale,
522-2151: Ladies night with DJ Guy, Thursday; -
South Florida Slammie Awards pre-party
featuring Basketcase plus Endo plus the
Johnsons plus Nation of F'ear, Friday; DJ Guy,
Saturday; ladies night, Tuesday, the Weeds
performance group plus Hashbrown, Wednesday.
Taurus, 3540 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove,
448-0633 Carlos & Terry, Thursday, Hot Ice,
Friday and Saturday; Joe Donato, Tuesday;
Toussaint, Wednesday.
Jazz & Blues
Back Room, 16.E Mande.4ve; DelrayBeacif,
1407-243^11O:-Iivemusic, Thursday through.
Saturday; open mike night, Tuesday; Roach
Thompson Blues Band, Wednesday.
Berlin Bar, 661 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
674-9&00: Cozy Mondsy with live music.
Biz Bistro, 19575 Bi’scayne Blvd; Aventura,,
931-8448. Ladies n|gh£ Thursday Wayne Quaroli
Duo, Friday and Saturday.
Cafe Tu Tu Tango, 3Q15 Grand Ave JCocoWalk),
Coconut Grove, 529-2222: Martini Madness with
tneTfllr Pitee Tnd, WeMraaSy* * *
Cheers, 941E Cypress Creek Rd, Fort Lauderdale,
771-6337: Roach Thompson Blues Band,
Thursday; Wesley B. Wright and No Regrets,
Friday and Saturday; Andy Mendez, Sunday;
Jimmy Spagna, Monday; Russ and Rick, Tuesday,
Robbie Sanford, Wednesday.
Cool Beans Cuff, 12573 Biscayne Blvd, North
MiamL899-8815:'Rhapsody (soul), Thursday; Jet
Nqsffmo, Friday Didier (jazz), Saturday; open
poetry night, Sunday, Jet Nero Tijo, Monday;
open mike night, Tuesday, Jet Nero Trio,
Wednesday.
Cool Beans Cafe, 2039 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood,
9291772: Live jazz with U of M jazz students;
Thursday through Saturday, open mike night,
hosted by Nicholas the Storyteller, Monday. -
MoJazz Bar A Lazy Lizard Grille. 928 71st St (facing
Normandy Fountain), Miami Beach, 865-2636;
Latin jazz night with live music, Thursday,
Jonathan Kreisberg and the MoJazz Band,
Friday, Gary Campbell, Saturday; open mike and
jam night, Sunday; John Shapley Quartet,
Tuesday Joe Petrone, Wednesday.
New World Cafe, 9661W Sample Rd, Coral Springs,
954-340-7108: Open Michael night, hosted by
Michael Koretsky, Thursday; Valerie Tyson,
Friday, INHOUSE (rock), Saturday; X-High
(reggae), Sunday Motown Monday with Midnite
Electric; Cinema Hcnic with Rudy, Tuesday; My
Girlfriend (rock), Wednesday.
Hot too shabby: Sha-Shaty at O'Hara’s Pub
O'Hara's Pub, 722 F Las Olas Blvd, Fort
Lauderdale, 524-1764: Dr. Lonnie Smith and the
O’Hara’s Ail-Star Band with special guests,
Thursday through Saturday Ed Caile’s Double ,
Talk Band, Sunday (afternoon); “Sunday After
Dark,” featuring Dr. Lonnie Smith and Danny
Burger with special guests, Sunday Sha-Shaty,
Monday; Dana Paul arid the Nantucket Sound,
Tuesday; Dr: Lonnie Smith and the O’Hara’s All-
Star Band with special guests, Wednesday, -
One Night Stan's, 2333 Hollywood Blvd,..
Hollywood, '929-1566: Jerry Rischer Big Band, ,
Thursday; Cathy Cotton, Friday and Saturday -
jazz jam, hosted by Ira Sullivan, Monday; open ::
mike night, Tuesday Captain and Coyote with
the Blue Collar Band, Wednesday.
P.G. Boogie’s, Í025E Hillsboro Blvd, Deerfield .
-Beach, 954428-6438: “Doogie’s Jazz Greats”
featuring Billy Marcus/Jimmy Cavallo/Don í ?
Mosley/James Martin, Thursday through
Saturday; John SinibalcU Big Band, Sunday Jerry
Fischer Big Band, Monday; Gene Krupa Big
Band, Tuesday; “Doogie’s Jazz Greats” featuring
Billy Mfrcus/Jimmy Cavallo/Don Mosley/James
Martin,Wednesday.
Throe’s Company, 242 E Dania Beach Blvd, Dania,
921497(5: Hugh Lescano Trio, MoMayfltebeeca
Boyko Quartet, Wednesday,
Tobacco Road, 626 S Miami Ave, 374-1198: The
Beast and Baker show featuring live music
(upstairs) plus Louis Archambeaux (downstairs),
Thursday; live music, Friday through Sunday;
Iko-Iko, Monday five music, Tuesday Mark
Krumich’s jazz jam, Wednesday.
Van Dyke Cafe, 846-Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
534-3600: Brazilian night with Salo Fierra Trio,
Thursday; Sinti, Friday and Saturday Randall
Dollahpn Trio,-Sunday Billy Marcus and Don
Wilner, Monday Guy Fascianiand Don Wilner,
Tuesday Randy Tomasello Trio, Wednesday.
Country
Chubby’s, 12992 SW 89th Ave, 2334)610: Charlie
Rathbura, Thursday; Brian Bonds, Friday invited
open jam, Saturday open mike, hosted by David
Leicht, Tuesday; Rick West, Wednesday.
Cooperado, 2520 S Miami Rd, Fort Lauderdale, â– â– â– ;â– 
463-2855: Cheyenne Band plus DJ, Thursday
through Sunday Boots and Bikini contest phis
Cheyenne Band plus I>J, Wednesday.
Cafe Nostalgia, 2212 SW 8th St, 541-2631: Grujió
Nostalgia plus DJ plus vintage Cuban music film
clips, Thursday ^trough Sunday. “ '
Centro Vasco, 2235 SW 8th St, 643-9606: Salon!
Habana: Malena Burke, Friday and Saturday.
Club Mystique, 5101 Blue Lagoon Dr (Miami
Aiiport Ifilton), 265-3900: DJ Hector San Roman
plus DJ Gilbert plus salsa lessons, Thursday; live
music plus DJ Hector San Roman plus DJ Gilbert,
Friday and Saturday Super Salsa Sunday with DJ
Hector San Roman plus DJ Gilbert; ladies night
with DJ, Wednesday.
Club Tropigala, 4441 Collins Ave (Fontainebleau
Hilton), Miami Beach, 672-7469: A Night on the
Town musical revue plus Orquesta Tropigala,
Thursday; FI Conde de Guácharo phis A Night on
the Town musical revue plus Orquesta Tropigala,
Friday through Sunday; A Night on the (Town
musical revue plus Orquesta Tropigala,
Wednesday.
La Covacha, 1Q730 NW 25th St, West Dade,
594-3717: E)J Ray Perez, Friday and Saturday; La
Cárcel with DJ (Latin rock), Sunday.
Mango’s Tropical Caff, 900 Ocean Dr, Miami
Beach, 6734422: Rose and Ruben plus Max
Montana, Thursday Fmi and Miguel plus Max
Montana, Friday;: Latin Connection plus Max
Montana, Saturday Eco plus Latin Connection,
Sunday; Fmi and Miguel pltis Fco, Monday Rose
and Ruben plus Erica and the Brazilian
¡Explosion,'Tuesday Emi and Miguel plus Max
: Montana, Wednesday.
Maxim's, 7397 SW 8th St, 2654800: Israel Kantory
Su Orquesta plus DJ El Cubanita, Friday and
Saturday.
Miami's Concorde, 2301 SW 32nd Ave, 441-6974:
Los Fonomemécos comedy troupe plus Miami’s |
Concorde Band, Friday and Sunday. ¿
Pape's Hideaway, 6901 Collins Ave (Golden Sands
Hotel), Miami Beach, 447-0938: Jose Garcia plus ;
special guests (poets, painters, and musicians),
Saturday.
Ritz Plaza Hotel, 1701 Collins Ave, Miami Béach, s
674-7661: Bolero meets Jazz featuring Juan Pablo
â– m
mji
S3


, r Torres and spedal guests, Friday.
Scala Miami, 905 S Bayshore Dr, 371-5604: A
Night at the Copa musical revue, Thursday
through Saturday.
Yuca, 501 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 532-982£:i'
Albita Rodriguez plus Sonia Corp plus Orlando,
Friday and Saturday; T-Dance with Albita
Rodriguez, Sunday.
Dance Music ft DJs
Alcazaba, 50 Alhambra Plaza (Hyatt Regency),
Coral Gables, 441-1234: DJ Alex Gutierrez,
Friday, Saturday,‘and Wednesday; ladies night,
Wednesday.
Hooligan's Pub, 9555 S Dixie Hwy, 667-9673: DJ
Danny, Thursday and Friday; DJ Neal the Wheel,
Saturday; karaoke, Sunday; Smut Night, Monday;
college night with DJ Little Al, Tuesday; karaoke,
Wednesday.
Kitchen Club, 3701 NE 2nd Ave, 754-0777: Ladies
night with DJ Carlos Saint Germain, Friday; DJ,
Saturday.
0'Zone, 6620 Red Rd, South Miami, 667-2888: DJ,
nightly.
Planet X, 1417 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
,532-7500: DJ George Jimenez, Friday and
Saturday.
Salvation, 1771 West Ave, Miami Beach, 673-6508:
DJ Abel, Saturday.
Splash, 5922 S Dixie Hwy, South Miami, 661-0917:
Bliss with DJ, Friday; Men Who Prefer Men with
DJ, Saturday,
Temptations, 1532 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
5344288: Flamingo Follies musical revue,
Thursday through Sunday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday.
Tudor Lounge, 1111 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
604-9770: Home Cookin’ with DJ Mark Leventhal,
Tuesday.
Comedy Clubs
ComedySportz, 1432 N Federal Hwy, Fort
Lauderdale, 565-1369: Improv comedy show,
Thursday through Sunday.
New Theatre, 65 Almería Ave, Coral Gables,
461-1161: Laughing Gas Comedy Improvisation
Theatre Company, Saturday.
Uncle Funny's, 9160 SR 84, Fort Lauderdale,
954474-5653: Live comedy, Friday through
Sunday.
Folk & Ethnic
Kelly's Pub, 1832 \ Harrison St, Hollywood,
929-7940: Hollywood Jazz Quintet, Friday (happy
hour); Faithful Departed (Irish), Saturday.
Murphy’s Law, 2977 McFarlane Rd, Coconut
Grove, 446-9956: Back Beat (rock), Thursday;
Avalon (Irish), Friday; Liffey Folk (Irish),
Saturday; Hugh O’Neill (Irish), Sunday; Super
Trolley (blues), Tuesday; Back Beat (ladies
night), Wednesday.
Stinger Lounge, 6029 Miramar Pkwy, Miramar,
981-0202: DJ (oldies), Thursday; after-work jam
with DJ Yo-Yo, Friday; Caribbean night, with DJ
Yo-Yo, Saturday; singles’ party, Sunday.
Tugboat Annie's, 24777 SW 87th Ave, 258-3918:
Captain Harry, Friday through Sunday; Sir
Cedrick’s Island Riddim, Saturday and Sunday.
I
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New Times June 20 â–  26,1996
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ITS BEEN A ROUGH COUPLE OF WEEKS FOR THE
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New Times June 20 - 26,1996


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New Times June 20 -26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
MIAMI BEACH $600 AND UP 538-4621
Mónthiy rentals. Bayftont 1/1.5, furnished, balcony, great views,
no pets. Lido Apartments, 40 Island Ave, Venetian Causeway
MIAMI BEACH $460 868-5362
Studio in safe bldg. 1/2 blck to the bch, 3rd fir, full kitch, tile floors,
balcony, covered prk, in mint cond. No pets. Call Bp 306-2236.
MIAMI BEACH $525 673-5437
South Beach, 1 bedroom unfurnished, JefFerson Terrace Apart-
ments. 84016 St, no pets, A/C, dose to Lincoln Rd.
MIAMI BEACH $540 662-9993
Private, charming building, gated & secure. 1/1 unfum. Carpet &
tiles. 2 blocks to.peach. 6858 Abbott Ave. No Pets. Call 662-9993
MIAMI BEACH $825 532-2813
Oceanfront huge luxury studio, 49th & Collins. Beautifully furn. 24
hour doorman. Pool, cabana, & pking. Electric & gas incl. June-Nov.
MIAMI BEACH $600 534-6233
Large efFic. Must see! Pinetree & 26 St. Carden, Ig dosets, tile floor,
balcony. Utils incl. Call Shula days 554-6235 or evenings 531-5256.
MIAMI BEACH $900 864-6564
Dúplex, 2/2, modern, central A/C, two car parking, patio enclosed
with bar/recreation area, W/D, no pets, refsi Normandy Realty
MIAMI BEACH $450-$550 866-6691
7725 Carlyle efFidency $450. Or furnished one bedroom $550. Call
Normandy Realty
; 31
90
Dade 372"9393
Broward 763-2422
pax 579-1561
New Times Classified Index
100 Real Estate for Rent page 90
150 Roommates
93
200 Real Estate for Sale
94
300 Help Wanted
96
400 Buy/Sell/Trade
98
500 Home Services
99
525 Business Services
99
540 Byte Site
97
550 Personal Services
99
575 Mind/Body/Spirit
100
600 Music
100
650 Show Biz
100
700 Getaways
too
800 Motor
101
900 Romance
104
Business Hours:
Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wednesday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Deadlines:
Line Ads: Tuesday, 6pm
Display Ads: Friday, 6pm
Romance Ads: Tuesday, 12pm
100
Real Estate for Rent
105 Apts/Condos/TH for Rent
110 Houses for Rent
115 Rooms for Rent
116 Seasonal Rentals
120 Mobile Homes
nnn
125 Boat Dockage/Storage
130 Stores/Offices/Warehouses
135 Rentals Wanted
-140 Miscellaneous Rental
145 Rental Services
105
Apartments/Condos/Townhouses for Rent
ALL AREAS 893-2426
RENTER’S BEST
Studios, 1 Bedrooms, 2 Bedrooms, Townhouses, Houses, any¬
thing... We've got it covered from SOBE to BROWARD!
TIRED OF THE REST! GET WITH THE VERY BEST!
RENTER’S BEST
A no-fee rental service/7days all areas.
893-2426
ALL AREAS 538-RENT (7368)
$450,1 BR $525,2 BR $850-$1,000
Renter’s Connection - 538-RENT (7368)
BAL HARBOUR $600 AND UP 538-RENT (7368)
24 brand new. ocean front aDts. pool, on-site management!
Renter’s
Connection
BAY HARBOR $600 899-8588
Beautiful, spacious, 1 bedroom/1 bath, quiet/safe neighborhood,
A/C, private backyard, parking, 2 minutes from the beach. Call Jeff
BAY HARBOR $650 558-4377
Driftwood Isle. Two 1/1 condos, furnished or not. Both have cen¬
tral a/c, 1 has Italian tile throughout, the other has carpeting
(except kitchen and bath). ¡
BAY HARBOR $475 866-6709
Large studio waterfront. Central A/C, parking. Updated, walk to
beach. Please call and leave message 866-6709.
BAY HARBOR 866-6699
$450,1 BR $525,2 BR $850-$1,000
Renter’s Connection - 866-6699
BAY HARBOUR $650 to $1000 865-8197
1/1.5 and 2/2, tile firs, wall to wall carpet, balcony, cent a/c, 1000
to 1500 sq ft, extra parking, near school and Bal Harbour Shops.
COCONUT GROVE FROM $600 856-1995
Small 1 BR $600-$650.2/1 duplex $850,2/2 $900 W/D, yard. Jac-
cuzzi. Lux furn cottage/guest suite, short term $1,550. CMG
COCONUT GROVE FROM $625 285-0322
Walk to Cocowalk, Grove's most exciting location, lowest rents, 2
pools, 1 & 2 Brs, Ig closets, cent A/C, pets ok! U Pick carpet color.
COCONUT GROVE $1,690 856-8722
3 bedroom/2.5 bath luxury townhouse, all appliances, private gar-
age, pool, intercom and alarm system, little patio and yard
COCONUT GROVE 825-7108
2/2.5 brand new condo, tile floors, like 'Melrose Place*, pool, park¬
ing, security, alarm. 955-9064 bpr. Call for an appt
COCONUT GROVE $800 667-4455
Old Florida 1st FI duplex unit. 2/1 with sep living and dining. New
kit. Wood floors, ceil fans, French Doors, priv deck, sec bars, w/d.
COCONUT GROVE $700 443-2716
NORTH GROVE. Nice area. 1 bedroom duplex, white tile firs, new
kitehen, ceiling fans, parking, laundry. 2583 Trapp Ave.
COCONUT GROVE $950 443-2716
NORTH GROVE. Nice area. Rent includes all utilities. 2/1,2nd floor,
wood firs, covered balcony, fans, pkg, laundry. 2589-C Trapp Ave.
COCONUT GROVE $850 285-9333
Grove Carriage House, 1/1 apartment, excellent location, lush yard,
fenced, very private, unfum, $850/mo including utilities. 285-9335
COCONUT GROVE $850-$1,200 444-4263
Chateau Grove apts. fabulous building, fabulous people, come see
for yourself, 2 bedroom apartments, dean, quiet, secure, no pets.
COCONUT GROVE $850 235-3097
2/1 with pool on quiet street. Fenced backyard, central A/C, tile
floors, fans, and many trees. Lawn & pool maint inc. Pets welcome.
COCONUT GROVE $575 859-7741
1/1, bale, cvrd parking, security, pool, walk to CocoWalk, cent air,
w/d, avail 8/15/â– Call 265-2883 m-f 9-5,859-7741 eves & weekends
COCONUT GROVE $250/wk 854-7561
Shortterm, fully furnished kitchen, bedroom, cable TV, cold A/C,
utilities included, $250/wk Summer. 752-8401 beeper
COCONUT GROVE $625 445-3257
Charming South Grove 1 br, pvt entrance, lush vegetation, hard-
wood firs, walk-in closet, eat in kitchen, utl's extra. Sorry, no pets
COCONUT GROVE $675 858-0217
Quaint North Grove cottage, fan, tiled floors, A/C, fireplace, alarm.
1st, last & security deposit Available July 1 st.
COCONUT GROVE $1,500 448-4123
Penthse in Heart of Grove. 2/1.5 twrihse apt. Like new! Undergmd
prkg, walk to everywhere. Coconut Grove Realty, Randié Koroglu
COCONUT GROVE $1100 444-4330
Walk to the Grovel 2715 Tigertail. Nice 2/1 condo, 3rd floor. Sec,
gated parking, pool, balcony, tile, cable, w/d, fans, small pets ok.
COCONUT GROVE $495-$1,050 538-RENT (7368)
Charming 1/1 $495,2/2.5 townhouse, pvt parking, W/D $1,050
Renter’s
Connection
COCONUT GROVE $725 642-6377
2/1, large fenced yard, central A/C, dishwasher, washer/dryer,
alarm, 2 blocks from Cocowalk, pets OK.
CORAL GABLES $690 374-2705
121 Zamora Ave. 2 br apt $690. Spacious, hardwood firs, new appl,
pkg & phone entry system. 2 months sec. 574-2705'or 854-5206
CORAL GABLES FROM $525 667-5881
GABLES AREA. 1 and 2 br garden style apts. Pool, large screened
balconies, laundry facilities, walk to Metrorail. 6259 Sunset Dr.
CORAL GABLES $525 858-4779
102 Menores Ave, centrally located, across from park, large studio,
separate dining room, walk in doset, small building, rent incl utils
CORAL GABLES $1250 931-2086
Must see 2/2 remod condo, immac, quiet, safe, wrap around bale,
cent a/c, Mex tiles, pool, cozy, Prime area UM/Metro. 538-2757
CORAL GABLES $850 445-5230
Large 2/1 townhouse, 1100 sf, all renovated, hardwood & ceramic
tile floors, celling fans, track lights. 222 Zamora. Cats okay.
CORAL GABLES $450 567-8967
EfFic, 1 person, gay/gay friendly, a/c, kitchen, bath, laundry, tile,
private entrance, parking, & utilities included. Nonsmoker, no pets.
FORT LAUDERDALE STARTING AT $600 954-463-7263
Pine Crest Apartments. Studios, 1 & 2 bedrooms. Prime location in
.Victoria Park, near Las Olas and beach, with great amenities.
KENDALL $650 596-5471
FALLS AREA. Spacious, bright 2/1 duplex apt, lovely cul-de-sac east
of Dixie Hwy, wood firs, cent air, w/d hookup, Ig yard. 595-2458
MIAMI $875 751-4939
BAYSIDE - Clipper on the Bay. Charming 2/2 with bay view, central
air, pool, tennis, security, assigned parking, Available now!
MIAMI 759-5568
NEW DEAL MOTEL Apartment $155 & Efficiencies $150 Rooms
$140. HBO, Cablé, and Movies. .
MIAMI $750 523-7933
Venetia building, 5 minutes to SoBe, luxury studio, walk-in closet,
great view, pool, waterfront balcony, parking, 24 hr security, gym
MIAMI $375 756-5443
BAYSIDE VILLAGE. Studio Apts in Art Deco Bldg, $375 ind all. Safe
neighborhood. 1st, last, & sec 756-5443 or 757-7953.
MIAMI $500 673-2666
DESIGN DISTRICT AREA, large 1/1, next to the bay, newly remod¬
elled, llving/dining room, a/c, hardwood floors, ceiling fans. East
of Biscayne Blvd.
MIAMI $600 662-2551
East of Biscayne, near Design District. 2-story townhouse, 2br/
Tba, private back yard, parking. First month + security deposit,
available 6/15/96. Call Ray, 662-2551. ¡
MIAMI Starting at $395 886-5285
SW & NW area. 1 bedroom apartments & efficiendes for rent.
Water & electricity induded. Call 886-5285 or 541 -0430.
MIAMI $500 264-3635
435 N.E. 26th Terr. Clean Large 1/1, beautiful wood floors, very
clean, A/C, appliances included, section 8 welcome.
MIAMI $400 756-5888
Small cottage efFidency behind Momingslde home built in 1925
located in historic distnet east of Boulevard. $400 incl elec & cable.
MIAMI $600-$675 573-8992
WATER FRONT
NEAR DESIGN DISTRICT
MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
1 BR from $600 and 2 BR from $675
Large, renovated apartments, huge pool, BBQ, lush courtyard,
200 feet of bayftont views, tile floors, secured parking
Call Robert * 573-8992
MIAMI $395-$495 759-7472
NEAR DESIGN DISTRICT
EAST OF BISCAYNE
MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
1 BRfrom $475, efficiencies from $395. Large, renovated
apartments, some with wood floors, ppol arid bay front views,
charming Art Deco buildings.
Call Robert * 573-8992
MIAMI $365 539-9327
OMNI AREA EAST OF BISCAYNE.
1/2 block to bay/park. Secure building. Spacious studios, new
paint/carpet, new queen beddr futon, bistro table with 2 chairs.
Mini blinds. A/C. refrigerator, stove-perfect, laundry room.
MIAMI $295 757-8925
MORNINGSIDE. One bedroom apt $450, or efficiency apt near Bi-
scayne Bay, $295/month plus security. Call 756-1424/757-8925
MIAMI BEACH $475-$775 672-5766
ALLENDALE APTS ALL MIAMI BEACH
Michigan Ave: Studio $485
71 St 3/2 convertible waterfront $750 or 2/2 convertible $650
7 St 1/1, renovated $625
Calais Dr- 2/1 convertible $650 and 3/2 convertible $750
672-5766 or Beeper 210-9159 or645-8586
MIAMI BEACH FROM $300 AND UP 538-1209
BEST DEAL $300 EFFICIENCY!
Secured Building, Block To Collins Ave & Beach
2160 Park Avenue Tel: 538-1209
MIAMI BEACH $950 867-1863
Best bargain! Luxury beach front, big 1/2 $950 & 2/2 $1,200. Park-
ing, security, pool. Won't last! Terramar Bp 555-2023 or 867-1865
MIAMI BEACH 868-6770
MANHATTAN TOWERS
COME BACK TO THE BEACH!!
We'll meet all your needs with our beautiful studio's, 1/1.5 or 2/2
apts. Walk to beach, Publix, Walgreens, etc. Ask about our specials!
MIAMI BEACH FROM $500 531-0031
Nice hotel. 1 blkfrom ocean on 21 St. Cable TV & maid service,
kitchnettes, secure bldg. Weekly/Monthly. Call for info.
MIAMI BEACH STARTING AT $500 864-5244
71 ST STREET
Studios & 1 Bedroom Condos on the Water.
AVAILABLE MONTHLY.
MIAMI BEACH $900/M0 751-4939
Decorated furnished 2/2, pool, tennis, security and a/c included!
Available immediately! $900/mo
MIAMI BEACH $390 674-0256
1br-2brfor $520. Pool, tennis, docks, golf. Rent to Own, from
$390 mthly pmt. For more info call 865-7101 â– 
MIAMI BEACH
$570-$1,000
864-7728
PRADO BAY ON TREASURE ISLAND
^Beautiful Downtown Water Views
•Large walk-in Closets * Large Pool-Sundeck on Bay
*Ask about our move-in spedals’EOH
1455 North Treasure Drive
MIAMI BEACH $575 577-0618
Venetian Causeway. Rent efFidency on waterfront house. Prestig-
ious location, very private & independent. Pets ok. 5 min to Sobe
MIAMI BEACH 532-7093
The Gallery Hotel, best location. South Beach, 436 Ocean Dr, best
rates, daily and weekly ;
MIAMI BEACH $700-$750 866-6599
2 BR's/1 & 2 BA's, 80th Street Comer, balcony, Ig rooms, unfum.
Choose new carpet, terrazzo, wood floors. No dogs. Renovated.
MIAMI BEACH $425-$650 866-6599
78th St. & Abbott Ave. Efficiency, 1 and 2 BR's, pool, parking.
Choose new carpet or terrazzo floors. No dogs.
MIAMI BEACH 864-0113
NORMANDY ISLE on the wide Bay. 2 Br. 2 Ba $750,1 Bedroom
$495-$550, private parking. Please call 864-0115,552-6115
MIAMI BEACH $500-$600 861-4626
Very Large 1 Br & 2 Br apartments by the canal. Beautifully reno¬
vated, huge closet. Walk to beach!!
MIAMI BEACH $1,600 672-0320
5750 Collins 2/2, indudes: A/C, basic cable & 1 pkng space. High,
floor & ceilings, best view, tile firs, huge terrace. R Beck owner/agt
MIAMI BEACH $375-$450 864-9756
Studio and large efFidency, Walk to the beach, docking available,
ceramic tile or wood floors, pet ok! 955-0650
MIAMI BEACH $650 471-4400
Castle studio. Kitchenette, High floor, tennis, pool, beachfront,
parking, $650/mo includes utilities. Call 471 -4400
MIAMI BEACH $680 220-4387
Large studio, ocean front, cable tv, utilities induded, furnished,
garagé, pool, gym, laundry facilities, 24hr security. Option to buy!
MIAMI BEACH $500-$600 864-3266
BONITA HARBOUR, No Bch, newly remodeled, on the water near 71
St, only 4 blks to bch, pool, beautiful 1 Br Page 841 -5285
MIAMI BEACH $750 531-0608
2br/1.5ba, llving/dining room, tile floors, garage, built 11/2 years
ago! 6801 Harding ave. If no answer; call 866-1857 : ^
MIAMI BEACH FROM $700 532-8831
Rentals on the ocean, 1 and 2 BR's, newly renovated/European
style, come see us I0am-5pm, Mon-Frl at 3611 Collins Ave
MIAMI BEACH $575 864-7019
74th and Byron. Large, freshly painted 1/1, fully furnished, near
ocean, new tile, new carpet, new a/c. Just bring your tooth brush!
MIAMI BEACH $600-$2,000 861-4200
OCEANFRONT BUILDINGS!
Castle Beach - $600/Mo The Amethyst -1"BR $1,100/Mo
The Alexander - Condo/Hotel 2/2, furn, $2,000/Mo.
Amenities, concierge, valet parking, health club, 2 pools.
Several prime condos available
OCEANFRONT REALTY 861 -4200
MIAMI BEACH $475 534-1857
Designer renovated studio cottage, indudes utilities, great loca-
tion, brand new kitchen, newly tile floors. Unfurnished. Must See!.
MIAMI BEACH STARTING AT $850 866-2423
8101 BYRON AVE - $850 MONTHLY
2 br/2 ba with ocean views & washer/dryer. MARINELLO 864-9354.
9102 W BAY HARBOR DR - $1050 MONTHLY
1 brconvertible/2 bath, high floor, 1150sf. KONEFSKY 932-9738.
DELVISTA TOWERS, 23RD FLOOR - $1300 MONTHLY
2/2,1180sf, panoramic ocean/golf course views. BARTH 895-2070
6423 COLLINS AVE - $3000 MONTHLY
Luxury3 br/4 bath, new kitchen, tile floors. HEUER 931-8362
9655 E. BAY HARBOR DR - $3000 MONTHLY
Spectacular waterviews from gorgeous penthouse, 3 br/3.5 bath.
9511 COLLINS AVE - $1000 MONTHLY
929 sf, 1 br/1.5 ba, furnished condo on ocean. BROAD 865-3748
5845 COLLINS AVE - $2500 MONTHLY
Direct oenfmt Move in! Marble firs, huge ter. GOLDBERG 865-8727
M.KOTLER REALTY, INC 866-2423
MIAMI BEACH $390-$775 531-5723
•OCEAN &38TH*
POOL, BOARDWALK, SHOPS
SECURE BUILDING, UTILITIES AND A/C INCLUDED
Furnished or unfurnished efFidency, studio or one bedroom
OCEAN VIEWS - HUGE 1 BR -1,000 SQUARE FEET
MIAMI BEACH $2000 868-0968
Deco Plage 2/2 Direct Ocean Front, Remodelled, Security, Valet/
Parking. Available 6/15. Call Ricki.
MIAMI BEACH $650 866-8063
Large two bedroom apartment, new carpeting, ceiling fans, AC,
laundry on premises, adults only, no pets, near buses, and beaches
MIAMI BEACH FROM $135/WEEK, $500/MONTH 866-2000
Oceanfront, Normandy Plaza Hotel. 6979 Collins. $33/day efFics.
SaFe, secure^ warm, friendly, a/c, cable/HBO, maid, utils, phone.
MIAMI BEACH $475-$650 696-2877
Walk to N Beach. Lg late deco 1/1 for 7/1 occ $475. Move-in 2/1
apt big liv, din & Bf's with huge dosets $650. Yrly leases. No pets
MIAMI BEACH FROM $500 538-0398
Happening Hotel on 4th St, 2 blocks from ocean, central A/C, color
TV, telephone, cable and maid service, hardwood floors. & weekly
MIAMI BEACH $510 531-5492
1 Br apt at 24 st and Pinetree Dr. near ocean, no pets. $510/mo
531-5492
MIAMI BEACH $725 868-3456
Luxury Upscale 1 BR Studio...Cottage, all new kit/bath & A/C, tile,
track lights, mini blinds, private garden, parking, dean & quiet.
MIAMI BEACH $400 672-0109
Charming 3rd floor treetop studio in house. Partial kitchen. Util¬
ities included. Quiet responsible person. 3 month sublet.
MIAMI BEACH $925 223-7417
26 and Collins, 2br/2ba, w/d, bay view, new building, tile floors,
central a/c, pool, parking. Cellular 505-1331. ,
MIAMI BEACH $400-$675 864-4832
81st St & Abbott, 1 block from ocean. Fum/Unfum studios/1
Bdrms-gorgeous! By appoint 864-4832 One month free rent.
MIAMI BEACH 673-4981
Great location in a quiet, residential neighborhood (47th and Pine
Tree), 2 bedroom, wood floors, ample parking ,
MIAMI BEACH $750 310-3606
10th & Meridian (744-1OTH St). 2/2 Beautiful apt, wood & mexican
tiled firs, walk to beach, pets Ok! Perfect for couple. Hm 577-0307
MIAMI BEACH $650 554-9159
4000 COLLINS Furnished studio, kitchen, parking, security, pool.
Across from beach, $650 Includes all utilities or $175 week. -
MIAMI BEACH CALL FOR PRICES 864-2839
PEACEFUL PEOPLE
Want a quiet atmosphere ten minutes from South Beach?
Just renovated efficiency and 2 bedroom apartments ON THE BAY :
French windows, all white tile, great closet space, swimming pool,
breathtaking bay view!
Normandy Isle, 1 mile west of Collins on 71 St
For Information call 864-2839
MIAMI BEACH $475-$950 672-3202
833 - 39 St. 1 br, dean, no pets, $475.2 br/1 ba, newly renovated,
alarm, hardwood floors, central a/c, $950. Call 672-3202
MIAMI BEACH $750 531-4538
All new junior 1 BR with tile, central A/C, 12th fir bale, panoramic
view, garage parking, gym, sauna, pool, block to beach. A Machado
MIAMI BEACH $500-$950 554-1059
Studios $500-$600,1 BR'S $600-$750,2 BR $950. Utils incl, 1 block
to ocean, clean & bright! Eli, Pan Florida Realty, Inc (Bp) 658-9554
MIAMI BEACH $600 AND UP 932-4556
Plaza of The Americas 1 or 2 bedroom condos available, short/long
term leases, walk to beach, amenities, 24 hour security. Call Plaza
of the Americas Realty 949-7925 or Evenings 932-4656
MIAMI BEACH $450 & $1,700 864-4421
Millionaires row! Direct ocean view, 2 Bedroom, 2 Baths, fully tiled
& furnished 1,260 sq ft $1700. High-rise efficiency $450
MIAMI BEACH $1,200 673-0000
Beaut walled garden, 2/2, quiet, near 41 St, great for 1or2, by
ocean, prkg, screen prch, pool, cable/w&d inc, Irg closets, no pets
MIAMI BEACH $730+ 672-5600
1 and 2 bedrooms available. Parking, pool. All apartments feature
balcony and central A/C, New modem kitchen in 1 bedroom.
MIAMI BEACH FREE 672-2426
Looking for male or female, part time housekeeper, in exchange
for apartment behind single family home, must like dogs!
MIAMI BEACH $525-$850 573-9677
• SoBe studio (12th & Penn), furn/unfum, tiles, new kitchen,
parking, $525/Mo
• All new furnished studio (19201 Collins), oceanview, includes util¬
ities, parking, $850/Mo. Also, weekly/seasonal
Mayra Osorio 573-9677 • Pan Florida Realty 554-1059
MIAMI BEACH $845 865-8961
Hi floor 2/2, tile, gorgeous bay view, Walk to beach, lux building,
park 2 cars. Buy the Beach - htpp://www.buybeach.comm/access/
MIAMI BEACH $600 534-5051
Large quiet renovated 1 br cottage apartment near Uncolri, ter¬
razzofloors, private yard, parking, security, quaint, must see!


Renters Paradise
South Beach’s most experienced
NO FEE Rental Service!
STUDIOS
8th&9th Lg Corner, Full Kitchen Wdflr. $395
Española Balcony, Lg Closets/ Courtyard $450
23rd & Pinetree, X-tra lg., Pets O.K. $485
West Ave All utilities included, parking inc. $560
ONE BEDROOM
8thLenox Pool, park, security $595
10th Michigan, Parkview, Fireplacé $550
West Ave AC included, Water View $650
7th & 5th Central AC, Alarm, W/D $525
TWO BEDROOM
Luxury Highrise, 24hr sec, Pool, Parking $825
9thMeridian Large 2/2 on Sobe $895
West Ave Quiet, 1300Sq feet, AC included $850
865-0200
OPEN 7 DAYS
DecodUge
South Beach's * 1
Only Oceanfront Rentals
Monthly, yearly rentals S800-S3000/mo.
POOL*(jYM»PARKINC
Visit our lobby office or call 305 531-3050
100 Uncoln Road at the Ocean, Miami Beach
Kent karlock realty & assoc., inc.
$299.00
MOVES YOU IN!*
$100.00Security Deposit!
$199.00 First Months Rent!
Free Parking
Gatehouse
Attendants
dimming Pools
Jacuzzi
Huge Closets
Pretty Flowers
Water Views
Penthouses
* Summer Special Valid thru
7/15/96 on 1 bedroom apts.
Also available, studios &
HUGE two bedrooms
Apt. hornee for less than
you might think
Village Park Towers Apts.
1822 NE 142nd St.
947-4451
South Bepch
UloRTon Towers
Q Y
"The most spacious rentals on
South Beach, set in 17 private
acres of tropical landscaping.
I n com pera ble views, dancing
fountains, sparkling pools ana
the comfort of a 2-4 hour guard
gated entry. RL.US...
Fitness Center Sport Courts
Market Dry Cleaners Boutique
Private Marina
?m/ Cafe
The Best Sunset View on South Beach
5 Minute Stroll to Lincoln Road
1 O Minute Walk to Ocean Drive
1 O Minute Drive to Downtown
Eff/Studio/1 to 3 Bedroom *1 to 3
Many with balcony or patio
Bath
Leasing Office Open 1 0/7 Every Day
1 500 Bay Road
Alton Rd. to 15 St. West to Bay Rd.
MIAMI BEACH $500 532-1032
Large studio with separate full kitchen, 3 closets, renovated, quiet _
neighborhood, no pets. Please call 532-1032.
MIAMI BEACH 554-9159
MB 71st Collins, 2 bed/2 bath P/H, 18th fir, ocean* furniture, bal-
cony, parking, security, pool, $1,500,1 bed/1 bath same, $1,000
MIAMI BEACH 531-6061
WE HAVE LUXURY RENTALS FROM
$900 AND UP!!
Homes and apartments available NOW!
ALL AMENITIES, BRIGHT AND CLEAN!
EPIC REALTY, INC 531 -6061
MIAMI BEACH FROM $500 864-3266
BONITA HARBOUR
Lg remodeled, 1 bedroom on water, North Beach near 71 St, pool.
MIAMI BEACH $550 864-1114
Cottage. Mid Beach. 1 BR /1 BA, charming $550 plus util, small
yard. Quiet residential neighborhood. Betty Lesser Realty.
MIAMI BEACH $600 864-1114
Studio Helen Mar. Great building $600 pets ok. Betty Lesser Realty.
MIAMI BEACH $650 538-RENT (7368)
24 renovated 1 BR, ocean front apts, all new appliances, courtyard,
pool, Millionaires's Row to Bal Harbour, short term/long term
Renter’s
Connection
MIAMI BEACH 866-6699
$450,1 BR $525,2 BR $850-$1,000
Renter’s Connection - 866-6699
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 538-RENT (7368)
Call the rental experts at Renter's Connection for all the info you
need to rent an affordable, luxury apt on Millionaires Row. No fee!
MIAMI BEACH $650 (305)868-1568
One bed, one bath, private cottage for rent 2 blocks from beach &
shops. Utilities and washer/dryér included. Ideal for single profes¬
sional. Please call for more information.
MIAMI BEACH $725 534-8734
2 bedroom, 2 bath, granite floors, fresh paint, very clean. Other
studios and 1 bedrooms to choose from. Call Marbay R.E.
MIAMI $350 531-9227
Bayside Village. Beautiful 1br/1ba cottage in quiet, green neigh¬
borhood for rent for dog lover. Call for details. Utilities ihcl.
MIAMI $430 674-4811
1 br, new carpet/tile/bath. TV, A/C, updated appliances, includes
utilities & waste pickup: 1st, last & security required. 276-7991 *11
MIAMI $450 279-4250
Dadeland area large studio apartment, walk to mall and metro rail.
Security & lease $450 a month. Call 279-4250
MIAMI $550 955-0454
DESIGN DISTRICT. 2/2,2 balconies, available parking, bay view, am-
ple closet space, recently remodeled kitchen.
MIAMI $575-$1,200 538-RENT (7368)
Venetian Wav. bav front apt, central A/C. parking, minutes to SoBe
Renter’s
Connection
NMB $615 949-6774
One bedroom, one & 1/2 bath, over looking a canal, large screen
porch, cable TV, dock available, ocean access yearly. Eastern Shores
NORMANDY ISLE $600 868-8111
Large 1/1, in fourplex, upstairs rear apt, newly renovated, ceramic
tile floors, new refrigs, stove & a/c, ceiling fans, verticle blinds,
new bath fixtures. 1 st month rent & 1 mo security to move in.
NORMANDY ISLE FROM $445 673-1234
2150-70 Bay Drive, large, waterfront 1 BR's with terrazzo floors,
central A/C. Columbia Management
NORTH BAY VILLAGE $475 556-0606
Studio with panoramic Bay view, tennis, pool, great area. $475 in¬
cludes water. Call 556-0606 or Beep 212-1284
NORTH BAY VILLAGE 754-2200
HARBOR WEST and RACQUET CLUB
ON THE WATER!
BEAUTIFUL VIEWS!!
EFFICIENCIES AND 1 BEDROOMS
Renovated with hard wood floors, new appliances,
private balcony, pool, tennis, laundry room,
BBQ area, lush tropical settings.
BOAT SLIP MARINA ALSO AVAILABLE
Cali Ingrid 754-2200
NORTH BAY VILLAGE $850 541-0430
2/2 convertible, 10 fl, 3 balconies, waterfront view from all 3 bale,
pool, pkg, partly f um, $850/mo waterincl: 541 -0430 or 886-5285
NORTH BEACH $1,100 866-8823
3/2, duplex, 4 blocks to beach, on bay, one parking space, 1st last
and references, available 7/1. Gall 866-8823
NORTH BEACH $395-$450 659-7028
Large Studios/1 BR on 80th St & Harding Ave, one block to BEACH
EVERYTHING NEW! OAK FLOORS!!
New Appl *New Bath/Kitchen Tiles *New Paint *Pets OK
NORTH BEACH $475 - $495 673-3666
NORMANDY ISLE. Large 1 br, wood or tile firs, a/c, close to beach,
pets OK, promotion for who's moving soon! Champs Enterprises.
NORTH MIAMI FROM $599 893-9771
GREENWICH PARK APARTMENTS
Spacious 1 & 2 Br Apts. 24hr Manned Gatehouse
Fitness Center/Tennis Courts * Pool/Jacuzzi/Saunas
Call Now & save $300
893-9771
NORTH MIAMI $650-$1100 944-9214
MARINA PARK APTS
•Newly Renovated Units EOH
•Controlled Covered Parking and Bldg Access
•Sparkling Pool with Sundeck Overlooking interCoastal
•Spacious Floor Plan with Large Walk-In Closets
•Private Boat Dockage Available
We Offer Efficiencies & 1 -2 Bedroom Apartments
with Screened Balconies.
2640 NE 135 St • 944-9214
NORTH MIAMI $119,900 947-1133
Zero down on spacious 2/2.5 penthouse with panoramic views on
Intracoastal. Owner will take back note for 20% down or trade eq-
uity for both. NO AGENTS. 947-1133 or 520-3328.
NORTH MIAMI WEEKLY $100/MONTHLY $375 688-5106
Near Biscayne, cute efficiency with eat-in kitchen. $100/week or
$375/month, utilities included. Call 688-5106 or beeper 544-0469
NORTH MIAMI $425-$500 899-8588
Spacious, 1 bedroom/1 bath. 2 bedroom/1 bath, refurbished, wa-
terfront, quiet neighborhood, A/C, washer/dryer, parking. Call Jeff
NORTH MIAMI $500 895-2227
125th St. Torrino Apartments. 1 and 2 bedroom, balcony, bar, walk
in closet, pool, garage.
NORTH MIAMI $500-$600 759-3600
HOLLY HOUSE APARTMENTS
Clean, Quiet, Safe Environment
Ideal University Location
Newly Renovated Unite
Pool, laundry, dose to everything
Ask about our Move-in Specials.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH 754-2200
EASTERN SHORES
ON THE WATER
DIRECT OCEAN ACCESS
2/2’s in quiet secure building, bike to beach,
pool, covered parking, all new 18”x18” Italian
tile, new appliances, central A/C
GATOR SUN WORLD APARTMENTS
Call Ed
754-2200
NORTH MIAMI
$550-$850
538-RENT (7368)
Renovated 1 and 2 BR, central A/C, pool, parking, gym
Renter’s
Connection
SOUTH BEACH $575-$650 531-3003
Large, bright studios, newly renovated, new appliances, designer
lighting and flooring, some with alarms and dishwashers, park like
setting, next to Lincoln Rd, private condo quality, long/shortterm,
Visa/MC accepted. CalL53l-3003
SOUTH BEACH $475 532-7878
Steps to Lincoln Road, Large Studio. Keystone Properties
SOUTH BEACH FROM $450-$675 531-5070
Large Art Deco Studios, Totally Renovated 1 Bedrooms, wood
floors, fireplace, no fee. CHOICE
SOUTH BEACH $800 531-5070
Lincoln Rd. 1BR/2 BA Condo, secure building with pool and court¬
yard. d/w, central a/c, balcony, gated parking. CHOICE
SOUTH BEACH $650-$800 531-1929
Newly renovated 2 BR's in 3 story walk-up
Security entry.system, central A/C, appliances & carpeting
1559 Michigan Ave
SOUTH BEACH $1,195 531-5070
Charming Renov 2 Br Townhouse, c/a, d/w, w/d, garage, hurry! Lg
2/2,1 yr young condo, c/a; d/w, 2 covered pkg, sm pets. CHOICE
SOUTH BEACH 532-0958
901 Collins Ave, ocean view, fully furnished, 3 room efficiency.
Washer/Dryer, wood fire, new appls. 1st class. Very reasonable!
SOUTH BEACH FROM $450 658-0374
POOL!
PARKING!
SECURITY!
SUN DECK!
Studios, 1 and 2 bedroom apartments from $450 per month
835 Lenox Avenue, see manager
Please call digital beeper 658-0374
HEAVENLY
i RENTALS
SOUTH BEACH
673-1940
CONDOS FOR RENT!!
FURNISHED/UNFURNISHED
SHORTTERM/LONGTERM
Studios From
$400
One Bedrooms From
$600
TWo Bedrooms From
$725
BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME
REGATTA REAL ESTATE
MANAGEMENT 673-1940
SOUTH AND NORTH BEACHFROM $425 868-6080
SUMMER SPECIAL!
$200 off first month's rent! Efficiencies from $425.1/1 from
$475.2/2 from $700. Evenings or weekends call 865-0339 or
beeper 655-7621. Habla Español. Triton R.E. Management
SOUTH BEACH $545 532-7878
Cool, Comfortable Central Air, First Deposit Takes It!!! Keystone
Properties
SOUTH BEACH 758-3902
FULLY FURNISHED JULY 4 SPECIAL
INCREDIBLY CHARMING FULLY EQUIPPED 1 BR & ROOF CARDEN
APTS. IN LUSH, TROPICAL DECO SETTING WITH JACUZZI & BAR.
long OR short term. Free Parking. CALL 758-3902
SOUTH BEACH $475 532-6669
BEST ON SOBE!
Art deco 1 bedroom for the price of a studio! Wood floors, no
pets, year lease, security dep. 1st mo, last mo, near Lincoln Road.
SOUTH BEACH $600 538-4671
OCEAN DR Special. Charming fum studios some with balcony and
view. Steps to beach and nightlife. Starting at $600. Call Fran
SOUTH BEACH $110 672-2511
Washington & 5th. Rooming house. Private bath, fully fum, fridge,
all included, weekly $110. Key dep $20.672-2511
SOUTH BEACH
• Studios (Lg)
• 1/1's
• 2/2's & TH's
• Houses
$500-$5000
SUMMER RATE SPECIALS!
Some Furnished
Renov/Pool/Pking
Pking/Deco
3 br/Pool
INCOME REAL ESTATE
673-9999
$500-$9Q0
$595-$1300
$750-$1500+
$1500-$5000
673-9999
91
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
MORADA
Fully Renovated
Central A/C
Security Intercom
Walk-In Closets
New Kitchens
Studios from $450
One Bedroom from $525
Two Bedroom from-$775
CALL TODAY FOR
JUNE SPECIAL
531-7889
100
Real Estate top Rent
continued
SOUTH BEACH $400-$725 531-6795
Art Deco Renovated - Immediate Occupancy
STUDIOS from $400
1 BEDROOM from $500
SUMMER SPECIAL! ONLY $300 DEPOSIT!
6 Month or 1 Year Lease
Pool - Walk to Beach - New Carpet - Parking
531-6795
SOUTH BEACH CALL FOR PRICE 672-4461
Sobe Showplare, 3/3,2400 sf, 2 terr, bay, city, ocean view. Owner's
unit (many extras). See Morton Towers ad in this'section.
SOUTH BEACH CALL FOR PRICES 538-3583
Lincoln Rd area. 1 Br's, 2 Br's also townhouse 2Br, 2.5Ba, + den
(near golf course). 1 Br, 2 Br also Penthouse, 3 balcony. Million $
view. On bay with p-king, & boat dock rentals.
SOUTH BEACH 531-7889
Art Deco Studios. 1 & 2 Bedrooms
Fully renov, central A/C, sec intercom, walk-in closets, new kit's
Call 531-7889
SOUTH BEACH
STARTING AT $450
659-7028
15TH& MERIDIAN
7TH EUCUD
911 MICHIGAN
•Large Studios
•Large Studios
. «Large 1 BDRM's
•Oak Floors
•New Kitchens
•Oak Floors
•Fireplaces
•Woodfloors
•Fireplaces
•2-blk Lincoln Rd
•New Tiles
•New Appliances
$475-$495/mo
$450-$475/mo
$525-$650/mo
SOUTH BEACH $425 866-2975
Art Deco 9th St Magic. Renov jumbo studios, sec, new kitchen, wd
firs, frplc, No Dogs.VISA/MC/AE. Studio $6506 motease. 1 bed-
room 2 bath with parking $725. Same day move in. Open 7 days.
SOUTH BEACH $600 AND UP 596-6111
Ocean Drive & 14th St 1 Br apartments, also Ocean views available,
monthly rentals, pets allowed. Must seel! Call after Ham.
SOUTH BEACH $475-$730 534-9415
Art Deco - Studios $475-$515.1 BR's $675-$730. Hard wood firs,
lañáis, lush landscaping. No fee! Trida Development Bp 441-4561
SOUTH BEACH $400 672-2771
Studlos...Beach Specials 6 month, 1 year tease. Totally renovated,
well kept, parking, security entry. 558-1117 â– 
SOUTH BEACH $450 899-9934
WHY RENT
WHEN YOU COULD
OWN!!
Large studio, 8th/Collins, $1,900 down, $450/month. Owner finance
SOUTH BEACH $500 672-3821
Charming efficiencies with kitchen and bathroom available in cen¬
trally located building 2 blocks from Lincoln Road, one block from
Española shops and restaurants, 5 blocks from beach. $500/mo
1st, last & $500 security deposit to move in. 672-3821
SOUTH BEACH $650 672-3821
Located in the heart of the Art Deco district. 1 block from beach,
several apts available in charming 12 unit complex. Laundry facility
92 on premises. 1st last & $500 security deposit to move in
Beverly Hills Club
Luxury Rental Community
19455 NE lOth Avey
NMB, FL /
654-7500
Spacious Studios 1, & 2 bedrooms
$399 moves you in!
* 24 Hr attended gatehouse w/ roving patrol
* 2 lighted tennis courts
* 12ft. walk in closets & screened balconies ^
â– Miami
Cay Club
Locations & Views Second to None?
X-large, 1 Bedrooms Available
for Immediate Occupancy
ONE MONTH'S FREE RENT
• Located on Bise. Bay
• Electronic Entry Gate & Private Keyed Elevators
• Tennis, Sauna & Bay Front Pool
601 NE 39th St*t
Miami, FL
573-1987
Forte Towers
Rental Apartments
On the Bay
5T ’
J
forté towers
Studios • 1 & 2 Bedrooms
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat-Sun llam-4pm
672-7815
1000 West Avenue • South Beach
SOUTH BEACH FROM $390 531-0390
Studios from $390, efficiencies from $490,1br and 2br from
$590. Prime locations. For more information cali 865-7101
SOUTH BEACH FROM $465 531-6795
ART DECO
Large renovated studio, full kitchen,
hardwood floors, wood beam ceiling, fireplace.
6 month to 1 year lease. 531 -6795
SUMMER SPECIAL! ONLY $300 DEPOSIT!
SOUTH BEACH $775 251-8507
Octagon Towers, large, renov studio, 550 sq ft, f um/unfum, high
floor, pool, parking, short/long term. 251-8507 or Bp 517-6532
SOUTH BEACH $625 661-5698
Recently renovated, ground floor 1 BR in historic Deco building on
Meridian, across from park, wood floors, fireplace, A/C, ceiling fans
SOUTH BEACH $850 UP 531-6421
FULLY FURNISHED/UNFURN SUITES
LUXURY
state of the art studios and 1 bedrooms in the beautiful new
COMMODORE
14TH& COLLINS
* Washer/Dryer inside Suites * Elevator * Central A/C
* Full Kitchen * cable TV * Local calls All included
Daily, Wefekly, and Monthly Rates
call Willie 531-6421
SOUTH BEACH $575 674-7368(RENT)
SOUTH BEACH ART DECO RENTALS
One Bedroom's from $575
Walk to Beach, Hardwood firs, Secure building.
Pets o.k. Some w/Parking
674-RENT (7368)
SOUTH BEACH $2,000 532-7368X115
325 Meridian Ave. New townhome. 3 blks to
ocean. 2 bedroom with den/2 bath. Washer/
dryer, parking, alarm system, wood floors.
Chris Helmstetter streamline Properties
SOUTH BEACH $495-$645 531-7017
Great location, newly renovated bldg, hardwood & tile f Iré, laundry
rm, sec bldg, studios/1 br's, Walk to Lincoln Rd. Empire Properties
SOUTH BEACH $700 532-6113
Extra large 1 Bedroom, 2 Baths. Can be converted into 2 Bed-
rooms. Zoned for office or residential use. Please call 552-6115. ;
SOUTH BEACH $1350 532-6113
DECOPLAGUE Completely designer decorator fum over looking
Ocean/Ocean drive. Includes VCR. Can be use for corporate exec-
utive suite. Will entertain short term rentals. Please call 532-6115
SOUTH BEACH FROM $600 538-0662
THE STUDIOS AT DECO PLAZA
1 & 2 BEDROOMS In award-winning Deco restoration.
Central A/C, elec appliances, blinds, steps to beach/nightlife
CALL MARK 538-0662 - CREC - From $600 mo
SOUTH BEACH FROM $475 532-7368 X124
Art Deco studios from $475,1 bdrmsfrom $525,
2 bdrmsfrom $850. Wood floors. Secure blags.
Ports Bérrtz Streamline Properties
SOUTH BEACH $750 672-0967
Must see! This is it! Extra large 2 BR, very quiet secure building,
new fridge, cabinet, stove, wood floors, A/C and fans, no pets
SOUTH BEACH $850 532-7368X115
132015th Street. 2 bedroom with parking.
Small quiet bldg. Comer unit. Hardwood floors.
Chris Helmstetter Streamline Properties
SOUTH BEACH $550-$650 439-6697
Studios, 1 brs. Art Deco bldg with great courtyard next to Flamin¬
go Park. 1435 Meridian at Española Way. 1st, last, sec. No pets. No
fee. KENT KARLOCK, BROKER. 439-6697 or 532-0260
SOUTH BEACH $475 673-8558
1 BEDROOM CONDO, 252 Jefferson in clean quiet 2 story catwalk
bldg, 2nd floor, carpet, a/c. Please Call or leave message.
SOUTH BEACH $1,500 674-1089
1/2, office, Mediterranean 2 story cottage behind Alton Rd home,
balcony, open living with french doors to back yard; pkg, W/D, all
new appl, across from golf and tennis, first, last and sec, elect incl.
SOUTH BEACH $850 672-8497
1 br/2 ba. Available July 1st until January 1st. Sublet. Fully fur-
nished Victorian style. $850/mo. Pets negotiable. Joey 672-8497
SOUTH BEACH FROM $700 531-3535
1/1 and 1/2. convertible, 844 Euclid Ave, outstanding remodeled
units, new kitchens, microwave, D/W, new baths, security, lush
landscaping, attentive management. 366-7717
SOUTH BEACH FROM $600 534-5788
HEART OF SOUTH BEACH
750 COLLINS AVE
1 Block to Beach. Newly renovated 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts,
Central A/C, Appliances, Carpet, Laundry Room, From $600,
yearly lease. Office Apt #1. Mon - Fit Tel 534-5788
SOUTH BEACH 538-5324
Huge Studio/Apt for rent. Beautiful custom made by int design-
ers. Fum/unfum. See It to believe it! 538-5324/534-6924.24hris
SOUTH BEACH FROM $610 895-0463
Michigan near Lincoln. Newly renov, quiet, very large 1 bedroom,
max occupancy: 2 peoplé. NéwA/C's> new appliances, ample clos¬
ets, one apartment with woodf loors. Telephone entry system, se-
cured bldg. No Petsl Very dean & well npaintained. Yearly lease
SOUTH BEACH $475 857-9020
Small 1 bdrm, secured bldg with parking, pool, comer balcony.
Perfectfor single person. West Ave, sublet until Jan 50. $475+dep
SOUTH BEACH $675 572-3957
800 West ave, South Bay Club, spacious studio with pool and bay
view, parking 24hr security, gym, sauna, jacuzzi. Must see!!
SOUTH BEACH FROM $475 531-6795
SUMMER SPECIAL, $300 SECURITY DEPOSIT
Extra large studio, with separate dining area.
3 story elevator building with telephone security system.
20th Street, 1 block to beach. 6 month or 1 year lease. 531-6795
SOUTH BEACH $600 532-9856
A GREAT PLACE TO CALL HOME!!!
Quiet bldg with live-in resident mgr. Laundry facilities. Very dean &
well maintained. 1 br $600. Beautifully remodeled, 2 blocks from
ocean, by Convention Center. No dogs. Bpr 678-9011
SOUTH BEACH $995 672-1298
Beautiful modem 2br/2ba in South Point Walk to the beach.
White tile, cent a/c, dishwasher, laundry. Private parking. Must see!
SOUTH BEACH $490 374-1515
Lincoln Road. By the bay, pool, parking. Large efficiendes starting
from $475 per month & 1 bedrooms starting from $680 per mo.
SOUTH BEACH $475 672-9432
1419 West Ave, large studio apartment available in small, secure
building, parking, new carpeting, large dosets. Call 672-9452
SOUTH BEACH 534-1701
Large effidendes affordable rent, in the heart of South Beach.
Please call for more information 534-1701
SOUTH BEACH $750 858-3363
1250 West Ave. 1/1 apt. great bay view, wall mirror, tile, high floor,
parking, security, pool, water and A/C free. Avail 6/1
SOUTH BEACH $575 673-2948
Art Deco 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath, hardwood floors, fireplace, central
air, very charming. 1515 West Avenue.
SOUTH BEACH FROM $700 672-6031
GRAND OPENING!
221 Collins Ave. Large 2 br/2 ba new everything. Wood floors, D/
W, laundry, security system. Just opened! FROM $700 Yearly tease.
SOUTH BEACH FROM $525 672-6031
205 Collins Ave. Large studio & 1 br loaded, new building, D/W,
laundry, sundeck. Starting from $525 yearly lease. Call 672-6051.
SOUTH BEACH $1200 757-1500
2/2 with balconies, panoramic view, 7th floor, central a/c, pool,
laundry facility on each floor, private, secure garage.
SOUTH BEACH $435 673-8759
Studios -1818 Meridian Ave (apt 10-A), opposite Convention Cen-
ter, one block to Lincoln Rd, rent includes A/C, pets welcome
SOUTH BEACH $675 448-7878
Penn & 11th. Large 1 br, hardwood firs, tiled kitchen, 3 blocks to
beach, best area! Pkg available. Call or Bp 544-5606 or 448-7878.
SOUTH BEACH 625-8444
Decoplage. Magnificent Ig studio. Professionally fum & renov. Sec,
pkg. Cable, elec & phoneincluded in rent. Just bring toothbrush!
SOUTH BEACH FROM $550 495-2413
Meridian & 10th, Art Deco Bldg, jüst renovated, very large units, 1
br or effic's, wood floors or carpet, great location. Avail Now!
SOUTH BEACH $650-$850 672-5237
Décoplage ocean front efficiency $650 and 1 BR $850. Both fum,
central A/C, parking, gym, pool, 24/hr security, long/short term
SOUTH BEACH $710 262-5195
1 BR/1 BA, 15th & Euclid, hardwood floors, fans, bright, lots of
windows, washer/drVer in building, great location. _
SOUTH BEACH STARTING AT $20/DAY 534-0128
SHORTTERM RENTALS
$20/DAY (MONTHLY), $30/DAY (WEEKLY). $40/DAY (DAILY)
1343 Collins. Fully furnished, renovated, full kitchens & baths.
Utilities and dailymaid service included. One block to ocean! â– 
SOUTH BEACH $875 532-9890
2/1, SE comer, bright and airy, central A/C, 2 blocks to beach, new
kitchen and bath, secured building, no pets, first/last/security req
SOUTH BEACH $450 532-9890
Studio, south of 5th St, wood floors, 2 blocks to beach, historic
charm, first and last required
SOUTH BEACH $575-$650 674-4495
TWo beautifully renovated studios, loft bed, hard wood floors, gar-
den view, security, near Lincoln Rd. 674-4495 or 538-3199
SOUTH BEACH $1300 538-5674
16th and Pénn, dose to Lincoln Rd. Small, charming, Deco build-
ing, hard wood floors, central A/C, D/W, W/D on premises
SOUTH BEACH $500 532-8561
Art Deco 1 bedroom & studio apartment with wood floors, 2
blocks from the ocean & Lincoln Rd. Call 932-4652
SOUTH BEACH $800 279-2426
Remodeled 1 BR on the beach, f um/unf urn, parking, gym, cable,
pool, security, long term tease preferred. Dr Castellanos 266-9996
SOUTH BEACH $750 758-6629
Art deco, one bedroom condo, completely furnished, 100 feet
from the beach. Available now, must see, $750 obo. Call 758-6629
SOUTH BEACH $525 674-0539
Huge well lit studio, newly renovated building, new kitchen and
appliances, new A/C, wood floors, 11th and Michigan, péts okay
SOUTH BEACH $625 673-2422
344 Meridian Ave. Terrific 1 bedroom, modem bldg, 2nd floor
with cross ventilation, A/C, sec, Covered parking, & ref req.
SOUTH BEACH $675-$2000 532-7663
1424-1430 OCEAN DRIVE. OCEAN PLAZA
•1/1 >. From $700 -
•2/2 Totally Renovated Frorh$950
Central A/C, cable ready, security. Judith Rosen, Broker
SOUTH BEACH $425 531-1109
Large Studio. Quiet building. Near ocean. Available now. Please call '
Euro Floridian Realty;
SOUTH BEACH $538-2766
ALL INCLUSIVE
FURNISHED MEDITERRANEAN STYLE APARTMENT
• Cable TV • VCR • Fax/Telephone • Sound System •
• Maid service • Hardwood Floors • AC • Lincoln Road •
WALK TO SHOPPING. NIGHTLIFE. & BEACH!!
WKLY/MTHLY RENTALS CALL 538-2766
SOUTH BEACH $550-$650 538-2766
Spacious 1br & studios in the heart of South Bch, hdwd firs, adja-
cent Lincoln Rd, walk to bch, shopping, night life! Avail immed!
SOUTH BEACH WEEKLY FROM $250 534-9678
Shortterm, 960 Collins, steps to beach, furnished efficiency, wood
floors, private phone, cable TV. Please call 554-9678.
SOUTH BEACH $500-$5,000 669-8118
Apartments, Condos, Houses. Furnished or Unfurnished, http.//
pobox.com/atlarge. atlarge@pobox.com. Call Patrick. (J Poole Inc)
SOUTH BEACH $630-$650 538-3367
Art-Déco. 650 Lennox Ave, 1/1, totally renovated, 2nd floor, new
kitchen, No pets. 864-1309 /Bp. 571-6406
SOUTH BEACH $775 823-9705
1/1,12th & Collins, 4th floor with balcony, gated parking, month-
ly/seasonal, utilities included, renovated. Call 594-9302 during day
SOUTH BEACH 673-4981
1610 Euclid 1 bedrooms, newly remodeled. Also, large efficiency
at 935 Jefferson
SOUTH BEACH $650-$695 538-7424
710 Lenox Ave, recently renovated 1 BR bungalow apts in charm¬
ing, historic, 20 unit courtyard complex, featured in several mo-
vies, tropical landscaping, on-site resident manager, walk to beach
SOUTH BEACH , $675 858-6574
Top floor in beautiful bldg, fum studio with walk in closet, utils
ind, cable TV, pool, gym, W/D, sec, easy parking. Bp 939-2216
SOUTH BEACH $475 674-9495
Furnished studio, tile & carpet, ocean view, utilities included, 1475
Collins Ave, 1 block to beach
SOUTH BEACH FROM $450 931-7520
Art Deco studios and 1, spacious and attractive, wood floors, laun-
dry facilities, great location, near beaches
SOUTH BEACH $380-$560 838-9675
Effic $380. Large carpeted 1 br, fully renovated $560. New cabi-
nets, a/c & appliances in renov bldg on 1619 Jefferson
SOUTH BEACH $495 756-8553
Deco, sunny, large comer studios, eat-in kitchen, refinished wood
floors, A/C, freshly painted, no pets, 8th & Jefferson Ave.
SOUTH BEACH $875 954-561-3991
Huge 1/1.5, modern kitchen, new carpet/paint, balcony, many up¬
grades, 24 hour doorman, pool, jacuzzi, plush lobby, parking, mag¬
nificent harbor/bay view. Prestigious Venetian Cswy. No Realtors.
SOUTH BEACH $1,200 673-4783
Luxury 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 parking spaces, 24-ho.ur security,
pool, gym, pets, 1,5th floor, excellent view!
SOUTH BEACH $500 387-1072
Art Deco studio, beautifully furnished with kitchenétte, ocean
view, TV, A/C and utilities included â– 
SOUTH BEACH $675 856-1872
1529 Jefferson s-p-a-c-i-o-u-s 1 Br, renov kitchen, charming quiet
4 unit deco bldg, pvt garden. Lincoln Rd/Flamingo Pk. '
SOUTH BEACH $475 233-9898
920 Meridian, Large studio. 4 blks to beach. 2nd fir. Near park. Full
kitchen, bath, a/c, walk-in closet, clean, cable, laundry, no dogs.
SOUTH BEACH $750 668-0457
Fully renovated penthouse, Deco condo on 31st & Collins, rent in-
cludes all utils, one block to beach, yearly lease, avail August 1
SOUTH BEACH $495-$695 532-7011
Large bright studio, separate kitchen + 1br with den with design-
er touches. Parking available.
SOUTH BEACH $1800 538-0661
301 OCEAN DRIVE
2br/2ba, 1400 sq ft, oceanfront with balcony overlooking park! 2
secured covered parking spares, central A/C, cable, and much
more! In small, quiet building below 5th St. Avail immediately!! For
appointment call Neli 558-0661 . .
SOUTH BEACH $525 532-5875
Beautifully renovated, second fir, light, airy, oak floors, large walk- ;
In closets, sleeping alcove. All new appliances. Apt available July 1.
SOUTH BEACH $1,100 576-8348
2 bed/2 bath, 1673 Bay Road, with parking, newly renovated kitch-
en and bath, 2 baloneys, washer/dryer on the same floor, bay view
SOUTH BEACH $725 674-9297
Charming bldg facing Flamingo Park. Courtyard garden. Sec gate.
Lg 1 br; 2nd floor overlooking park; wood floors; nigh ceilings; big
windows. Sorry-no pets. 1361 Meridian.
SOUTH BEACH 577-0101
72114TH PLACE
Extra nice studio, Central A/C, secured building, furnished attrac-
tively. Short/lorig term lease available. Call 577-0101,' â– 
SOUTH BEACH $850 860-9010
DECO. Newly renovated 2/2 condo, central AC, new kitchen & appl
inc D/W, 2-blks to 12th St beach. 2 mo security. No pets, N/S.
SOUTH BEACH $650 498-2695
BEST ART DECO!
750 Pennsylvania Ave. 1/1, kitchen, hardwood floors, central A/C,
renovated, sec, 1 mo free for qualified tenants, principals only.
SOUTH BEACH $700 446-2550
Furnished Deco Gem! Meridian and 12th junior 1 bedroom, hard-
wood floors, across from park, long or short term. Robau Realty
SOUTH BEACH $600 554-6617
Washington and 7th. 2 room, large bright studio, big kitchen,
large closets w/ built in shelves, whitetile throughout. Completely
remodeled a year ago with all brand new appliances. No dogs.


SOUTHGATE T0W6RS APT5. AND HOTEL
WATBTfflONTROITAlS
‘Renovated Apts. *1 &2 Bdrms & Studios
‘Microwaves ‘Deli & Sports Bar
‘Salt Water Pool *A/C ind in Rent
‘Health Club/Sauna
900 WEST AVG MIAMI BEACH
672-24 IS
SOUTH BEACH Í $800 576-6600
2/1, Parking! Washer/dryer, central a/c, alarm, security bars, 1/2
block to beách. First/last/and security. No dogs, other pets ok!
SOUTH BEACH $425 558-7982
7th & Michigan. Beautiful spacious efficiency with.ceramic tiles,
new appliances and large dosets. No pets. Call 538-7982/538-8057
SOUTH BEACH $600 538-8057
Beautiful 10th floor oceanview 1/1. Ceramic tile, inside secure pkg
North of Lincoln Rd. 2-mo sec. No pets. 538-8057 or 672-1171
SOUTH BEACH $550 531-7262
Rustic conch cottage in tropical garden, 1/1, endosed porch.
Call Ilona Weiss R.E. Services 531 -7262
SOUTH BEACH FROM $795 531-3003
FURNISHED!!
WEEKLY/MONTHLY
Large, bright luxury garden studio. Charming Key West style
building, new kitchen, appliances, windows, designer lighting and
flooring, dishwasher, security alarm, park-like setting, next to
Lincoln Rd, long/short term, upscale furniture. Private condo
quality from $795/mo,~Visa/MC accepted
MUST SEE! 531-3003
SOUTH BEACH 666-3676
1/1.5 with tile, central A/C and parking, located at 1334 Collins Ave.
By appointment only -11 am-6pm -
SOUTH BEACH $800 233-6844
1/1, fully furnished, allnew, 2 blocks from beach, shortterm avail-
able, 1-6 mos, tile, security, utilities and cable inc. 952-8761 bpr.
SOUTH BEACH $475-$625 673-1234
Lincoln Rd, newly renov bldgs! Studios and 1 BR's with Ig closets,
new kitchens/baths, wood floors, pkng, no pets. Columbia Mgmt
SOUTH BEACH $750 672-1234
8th and Euclid. Large 1/2, hardwood floors, secure building, cen-
tral.a/c, second floor, alarm, call.Gil, Global Mgmt Rlty. 672-1254.
SOUTH BEACH $600 672-1234
10th & Meridian. Large i BR/1 BA, secure building, laundry, yvafk to
beach. Cali Oil, Global Mgmt R!tY.-672-l234 „
SOUTH BEACH $475-$675 1 672-0714
Deco Discounts. 1 BR $575 - $675. Large efficiency $475. Wood .
floors, laundry facilities, personal management. Fashion Apts.
SOUTH BEACH FROM $500 868-6080
Beagtiful studios, 1 brs & 2 brs completely renovated with security
alarm, hardwood floors and central a/c, starting from $500. Triton
R.E. Management 868-6080, or weekends beep 655-7621
SOUTH BEACH FROM $650 673-1940
1255 PENN 1 Br, 1 Ba, total renov, D/W, cent A/C, intercom entry,
fumished/unfurnished. 5 available now! Regatta Mgmt 673-1940
SOUTH BEACH FROM $500 673-1940
1405 EUCLID. Studios &1 Bedroom's renovated, balconies, inter-
com entry. Regatta Mgmt 675-1940
SOUTH BEACH $600 534-8505
Spacious studio, waterfront, one blockfrom beach, ceramic floor,
pool, parking, w/d, waik-in closet, available now. Call 554-8505
SOUTH BEACH $875-$1,150 322-4055
Luxury 1 and 2 BR's, high rise, parking, pool; security, gym, two
blocks to beach. Kent Karlock Realty And Associates Inc
SOUTH BEACH $550 534-8505
Spacious sunny studio, in historic renovated bdg, one block
from Line Rd, central air, hdwd floor, sec bldg, w/d. 534-8505
SOUTH BEACH 538-1118
RETRO RENTS
Today’s conveniences
at yesterday’s prices!
STUDIOS
1 BEDROOMS
FROM $425
FROM $570
2 BEDROOMS
FROM $875
Hardwood floors, flexible leases, $100 gift cer¬
tificates
VINTAGE REALTY (305)538-1118
SOUTH BEACH FROM $550 531-5867
Character, character! 1 & 2 Brs, wood firs, Ig kits & brs, fireplaces,
beam ceilings, security bldg, 1/2 block from bch, no lease req.
SOUTH BEACH $375-$3,500 838-0445
Short Term Furnished Rentals
• Studio, 2 blks to bch, modem furn. full kitch, great loc $375/wk
• 1/1.5 Oceanview, balcony, Mex tile, S Bch style furn $1500/mo
Annual Rentals
• Studio, 12th & Meridian, carpet, extra Irg, great loe! $500
• 1/1 all new deco, wd firs, frpl, secure pk, Irg closets $850
• 2/1 Bay Harbor, newly renovated, prkg, pets, 2nd fir $900
• 1/1 Ocean Drive, prkg, balcony, W/D, tiled, great view! $100
• 2/2.5 TH, new, Irg terr, prkg, pool, marble/granite $2400
Becky Adkins, Majestic Properties 674-0202
SOUTH BEACH 538-RENT (7368)
$450,1 BR $525,2 BR $850-$1,000
Renters Connection - 538-RENT (7368)
SOUTH BEACH $85Q-$1,300 538-RENT (7368)
Unique, 2/2 townhouses and apts, garage, W/D, wood floors
Renter’s
Connection
SOUTH BEACH $500-$675 460-2235
Studios and 1 br apt, Art Deco district, phone intercom, very spa-
dous, dean bldgs. Euclid & 8th/ Collins & 13th. Call 460-2255
SOUTH BEACH $685 540-5032
Large refurbished apartments for rent, Collins Avenue, all utilities
and cable induded, security first month moves you in! Call Monica
SOUTH BEACH 538-RENT (7368)
VACATION RENTALS * $700-$2,500
RENTER’S CONNECTION - 538-RENT (7368)
YOU’VE JUST FOUND A
GREAT REALTOR!
Nanqw
MIAMI SHORES
AND NEARBY NEIGHBORHOODS
NANCY DOWSON 787-1380
_ DUFFY REALTY
I “ I Equal Opportunity Housing
wm mu mm m cmicm*
SOUTH BEACH $650-$695 538-RENT (7368)
New, unique 1/1 bungalows, good size, tile, landscaped courtyard
Renter’s
Connection
110
Houses for Rent
COCONUT GROVE $1,250 661-8164
Charming Florida home, Spadous on two lots, 3/1,frplc, Ig living
room, screened porch, formal dining room, ceiling fans, centrar
air, two blocks from Coco Walk. 618-1705 bp.
CORAL GABLES $1,500 858-9096
Area 3/2 - 5390 Sunset Dr, between Red Rd & Cocoplum Circle re-,
nov, old Spanish, on Ig lot, lush landscaping, pool, cathedral ceiling,
central A/C, fireplace, tile & hardwood firs: 2 car car port, enclosed
work room storage, no pets, quiet tennant withered it & refs
MIAMI $800-$3,000 663-7941
S Mia, Gables, Grove. 3/2, c/a/c, w/d $800.1/1 pvt cott, pool $880.
2/2, pool-$1200.3/3,2 car, poof $1400.4/3 $1,400. .5/3, pool, acre
$2200.4/5, waterfront $3,000. Peter, Waterhouse RE 775-8961
MIAMI $1200 756-5443
BAYSIDE VILLAGE. Historic 4/3,2 story, 2 car garage, central a/c,
safe neighborhood. 1st, last, & sec 756-5443 or 757-7953.
MIAMI $1,350 754-5555
BAYSIDE. 1926 restored charmer. 4/2, a/c, private yard, 2 blks from
bay/great neighborhood with park. Negotiable!
MIAMI $800 271-3460
Art Deco house, 446 NE 39 St, 2/1 living, dining and Florida rooms,
garden, fireplace, wood floors, parking, first/last/security required
MIAMI $1,300 573-8992
BAYFRONT AND BAYFRONT VIEWS
NEAR DESIGN DISTRICT
MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
IWo seperate houses:
Bayfront 3/2 with hard wood floor, fenced yard,
garage, central A/C, W/D $1,300
3/2 plus seperate efficiency, tile floors, fenced yard,
covered patio, BBQ, W/D $1,300
Robert * 573-8992
MIAMI LAKES $1500 532-0857
Gorgeous lakefront 2 story 3.5 Br, 2.5 Ba's, 2 car garage,Jacuzzi,
marbled baths, community pool & park. 532-0857, Bp 843-6469
MIAMI $1.250 756-8966
1060 NE 85 St. 3 bedroom, rare find! Absolutely Adorable 1930's
home in mirit condition! Gorgeous hardwood floors, fire place,
new kitchen & appliances. Charm Galore! Call Todd 756-8966
MIAMI $1300 757-2967
MORNINGSIDE. 546 NE 57th St. 2 story old Spanish. 3 br/2 ba. cen-
tral A/C, oak firs, fireplace. Norah Schaefer, inc. 757-2967
SOUTH BEACH $2500 532-6113
BAYSHORE GOLF COURSE comer, 3 Br, 2 Ba + den. Compl renov.
ind garage, water, gas & landscaping (paid by owner). •
SOUTH BEACH $1,250 531-7349
Lincoln Rd area lovely newly renovated 2 br/2 ba house, Florida
room, central air $1,250/mo. Call Owner/Agent. 551-7549
SOUTH BEACH 673-4981
3 bedroom 3 bath home with wood floors, great condition, Wash-
ington Ave and Lincoln Rd area -
SOUTH MIAMI $1300 579-1577
MUST SEE!!!!!
Spacious 3 br/2 ba, quiet neighborhood, great schools, huge eat-
in kitchen, central air, high ceilings, very large fenced backyard
with fruit trees, carport, Florida room, washer/dryer, ceramic tile,
big closets. Close to Metrorail and shopping district.
SOUTH MIAMI $850 271-5551
2/1 house with large fenced yard, dose to South Miami hospital.
Dadeland Mall, UM & Metrorail. A/C with fans, W/D.
115
Rooms for Rent
BAY HARBOR 386-2685
Beautiful master room, with priv bath & phone number. Indudes
all utilities & cable. Must have references & be non smoker
MIAMI $270 381-6813
DOWNTOWN. Free cable, fridge, small room. Near Bayside, campus
& Peoplemover, safe building, monthly rentals
MIAMI $550 1 220-1947
Spacious room for rent. Beautiful house in Roads area. Looking for
quiet, responsible and artistically oriented person. . :
MIAMI BEACH FROM$115/WK 861-9331
Rooms and efficiencies starting from $125 per wk, a/c, TV, maid
service, shops, busses, restaurants.
MIAMI BEACH $600 538-5958
Spacious estate on South Beach, every room has deck and french
doors. Huge lot & pool, parking, tile and wood firs, very private
walled in estate. Beautiful andluxurious
MIAMI BEACH FROM $125/WEEK, $500/MONTH 866-2000
Oceanfront rooms & effics yearly, quiét/safe, phone, cable/HBO,
restaurante,: banks, bus, Fublix 1/2 block. 6979 Collins Ave.
MIAMI BEACH $125/Wk 868-7213
Bright furnished room in beach house. Cable, utilities, kitchen
privileges, pool induded. \
MIAMI SPRINGS $350 871-2708
Airport area. Cable induded, private home. Nonsmoker. $350 per
month. Call, leave message 871-2708
NORTH MIAMI $280 758-1080
Furnished room in excellent neighborhood for nice, responsible,
non-smoker, rent includes utilities
NORTH MIAMI BEACH 944-0055
Looking for handyman, will reduce rent for fully furnished, luxury
room with private entrance and A/C, all utilities induded
SOUTH BEACH FROM $139/WEEK 532-0849
FURNISHED RENOVATED EFFICIENCIES
FROM $139 WEEK- FROM $450 MONTH
Utilities - Phone - Cable TV - Maid Service - 24 Hour Security
532-0849
SOUTH BEACH 538-9158
$7 PER DAY & UP
Bath in hall, european style. A/C, TV, fridge avail. Community kit &
parking, 2 block to ocean, $7/Day & UP, Open 24 Hours!
SOUTH BEACH $100WK 538-0007
Rooms for rent, starting from $118 a week and up, on Ocean
Drive, in the heart of the Art Deco district 1060 Ocean Drive
JAMÉCR DEVELOPMENT, BVC.
NOW LEASING ON SOUTH BEACH
One and Two Bedroom Apts.
Many Apts, with Parking
Hardwood Floors • Secured Building
Alarm systems • Central A/C
New Appliances (including Dishwashers)
(305) 531-3155
MIAMI BEACH • 4100 COIUNS AVE.
WiSTOViR HOTEL APTS.
$550 & UP
* Furnished 18r, wiíh M Kitchen
ALSO
♦ Full suites/UvIng, Dining & Ierr • VC, TV, MAID SRYC, LAUNDRY ROOM
534-2693
SOUTH BEACH STARTING AT $40/DAY 534-4069
ARTDECO. Steps to the beach. $40 per day and up, tax included.
Double occupancy. Cable TV; HBO, a/c, fridge. Buses, shops, res¬
taurants, dubs. Minutes to downtown and airport. '
SOUTH BEACH 443-0684
Furnished rooms available, reasonable rates, ALL utilities included.
Weekly or monthly. Call 443-0684 or beeper 843-7497.
116
Sesonal Rentals
BLUE RIDGE, GA $10,000/WK 706-234-3292
OLYMPIC VACATION
In North Georgia Mountains on Lake Blue Ridge.
Close to river events, easy access to Atlanta. New 6 bed¬
room, 4 bath fully equipped house. Sleeps 16 easily. On great
water, boat dock, wave runners, and many extras.
MIAMI BEACH $1,100/M0 534-7767
SUMMER RENTAL! 2 bedroom, 2 bath house, close to beach, near
41st St, shops & restaurants, outdoor shower, beautiful tropical yd
SOUTH BEACH WEEKLY OR MONTHLY 532-0857
18th & Collins, beautiful ocean front full kitchen Irg terr, over¬
looking pool & ocean. Seasonal or vacation Wkly $600, mo $1200 &
5 day wk ends $400. Please call 552-0857 or Bp 843-6469
130
Stores/Offices/Warehouses
COCONUT GROVE $550 854-5206
Office for rent oh Coral Way, 2 rooms, ideal for professionals &
secretaries, $550/mo, walk to Vizcaya Metrorail station 3135 SW
3rd Ave. Call Alec 854-5206 or655-5726
COCONUT GROVE $900 854-5206
Office for rent on Coral Way, up to 1000 sq ft, walk to Vizcaya Met¬
rorail (600 ft). 5135 SW 3rd Ave. Call Alec 854-5206 or 655-5726 ~
CORAL GABLES $300 854-7314
Small office, eight blocks north of Miradé Mile, 1/2 block east of
Ponce. Can be combined with other offices for larger space.
HALLANDALE 954-454-5004
Photography studio, 1800 sf, darkroom, a/c, curved wall, ready for
occupancy.
HALLANDALE 454-5004
Warehouse free standing. 1000 sq ft warehouse, large new office.
600 sq ft. Long term lease. Immediate. Near I-95. Call 454-5004
MIAMI $3 PER SQUARE FOOT 573-7463
MIAMI ART AND DESIGN DISTRICT 2nd floor with elevator, 5,000 sq
ft of open space, suitable for studio or loft apartment
MIAMI BEACH 203-831-0554
studio or loft 3000 sq ft with high ceiling, on 69th and Collins,
available parking, $10/sq ft, move-in condition, across from beach.
MIAMI BEACH FROM $225 864-8885
Renovated office space from 200 to 6000 sq ft, move in condition,
across from beach, parking available, all utilities induded.
SOUTH BEACH 531-3535
Lincoln Road stores available, 500 block, flexible terms. Call for
more information
SOUTH BEACH NEGOTIABLE 673-4242
Seeking model agency, production, or graphics oriented company
to share NY styleloft with established production company on
Ocean Drive in South Beach. Long and short-term available, rent
negotiable, parking available, available August 1. Call 505-675-4242
SOUTH BEACH $600 534-5454
Great location! Warehouse. 400 square feet with a/c, for clean
business only. $600 per month plus utilities.
SOUTH BEACH 538-0007
Office or stores in the exdusive Ocean Drive area, from 500sq/ft,
trendy location, fantastic exposure. Call Mr Z at 558-0007
SOUTH BEACH $3,000 673-9323
Office space for lease, approx 2,000 sq ft, prime location in South
Beach above the News Cafe on Ocean Dr. Please call 673-9323
SOUTH BEACH $3100 866-8980
907 Washington Ave. Professional office. Ideal medical office or
dinic, 1250 sq ft + small loft. Fully finished & ready to move in.
Ground Floor. November occupancy. Owner/brkr 866-8980
SOUTH BEACH $450 538-9950
Primé office space avail on the comer of Lincoln Rd & Washington.
SoBe location, 450 sq ft, electric induded. Please call 538-9950
SOUTH BEACH FROM $50 PER MONTH 531-3003
Use our fully staffed South Beach office to try any business or spe-
dal project. All secretarial and business services at great rates. Mail,
phone messages, fax. Computer, private office and conference
rooms by the hour, day or month. The Office 551 -3005
SOUTH BEACH $750 AND UP 538-RENT (7368)
Lbts of premium office and storefront space on Meridian, Wash-
ington, Collins and 5th St! Call Mark
145
Rental Services
ALL AREAS 362-2290
Landlord Problems? Can't get your deposit back? We may be able
to help - First Consult Free. Michael W. Gomez, ESQ. Law Office
serving Dade & Broward (305) 362-2290 Dade Office.
150 tft
Roommates 9 "
150
Roommates
ALL AREAS ALL PRICES 66>7777
Roommate Referrals. Florida's Oldest and Largest Company. All
Screened. Broward: 797-7779, Boca: 407-395-2366 9:30a-6:00p
NO NEED TO FIGHT TRAFFIC WHEN
YOU LIVE AT THE
DUPONT PLAZA CENTER
IN THE HEART OF THE BUSINESS DISTRICT
LARGE 1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS
FROM ONLY $600 PER MONTH
INCLUDES
•24 HOUR SECURITY
•UTILITIES
•AIR CONDITIONED
• EQUIPPED KITCHEN
•CABLE TV
• POOLANDDECK
• INDOOR SELF PARKING
• WATER AND CITY VIEWS
•SUNDRY SHOP
• ONE YEAR LEASE MINIMUM
• FULLY FURNISHED; $750 PER MONTH
COME BY FOR AN INSPECTION OR
CALL BARRY HARRIS
358-2541
300 BISCAYNE BLVD. WAY, MIAMI, FL 33131
ATTENTION RENTERS!
We don’t offer paradise,
We don’t offer you the world or
any other connections
We just offer:
—mi
RENTAL SERVICE
Tired of the rest? Get with the best!
Let our staff of hand-picked
professionals help you with all
your rental needs.
Studios, 1 bd’s, 2 bd’s, townhouses,
houses, anything.
We’ve got it covered!
Renters Best
7 days Any Area
893-2426
AVENTURA FROM $750 531-3003
Share executive lakefront home in prestigious Oak Forest, gated
community, Jacuzzi, tremendous kitchen, living room with fire¬
place and master bedroom on lake, great for entertaining, must
see! Shortterm/long term. Credit check and references required,
COCONUT GROVE $375 441-2635
Share 'like-new' 2/1 duplex with central A/C, W/D, large Mexican
tile, three blocks to CocoWalk, half utilities, available July 1st
COCONUT GROVE $400 656-8894
Share a 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, non-smoker, male/female. $400
month, includes water, & waste. Call Beeper 656-8894
CORAL GÁBLES $375 668-4671
professional or grad student preferred for room in 2br/2ba, good
area, pool, dose to Cocoplum circle. First/last/references.
CORAL GABLES $700 663-7950
Roommate needed under 25, price negotiable. 5734 Riviera Dr. 4
bedroom, Florida Intercoastal, big backyard, pool, boat, hot tub.
Nice neighborhood.
CORAL GABLES $425 825-3692
GABLES AREA. Fum room in 3/2 house, garage, w/d, & all house
privs. Nonsmoker. $425 incl all. 1st+dep. Bpr 881-2459. Call Dan
CORAL GABLES $400 669-4423
Young professional male seeks young male to share very nice 2/1
house, fully furnished, large yard near UM & South Miami.
FT LAUDERDALE $400 291-9030
Lake Ridge. GWM to share 2 br house, 11/4 mi to ocean, near Gal-
leria, n/s, no drugs, $400 dep, utils incl. Serious inquiries only
KENDALL $350 385-2608
Share my attractive 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath townhouse. Responsible
non-smoker. Many details, please call 585-2608.
KENDALL $350 271-7067
GWM to share 2/2, non-smoker, must provide references, $350
plus half utilities, available immediately. Call 271-7067
KENDALL $300 271-8072
Wanted mature woman, drug free, non-smoker. Lg room, private
bath, sec gate, pool, pay half util's, dose to hwy, 275-0016
KENDALL $400 386-0789
WEST KENDALL. GM seeks roommate to share nice home with ja-
cuzzi, garage, in private community, prefer GM. $400 incl utils.
KENDALL $425 232-4491
New, luxury, two story townhouse, patio, Jacuzzi, kitchen/den,
washer/dryer, private room with bath, workout room, tennis/vol-
leyball courts, pool, private security, 1st, last and half utilities
KEY BISCAYNE $400 361-0665
Beach condo, pool, tennis, gym, sauna, bus stop, peaceful, quiet.
Call Juan 561-0665
MIAMI $400 - 751-5848
MORNINGSIDE Roomate to share 3/2 home with SGWM. $400/mo
utils ind. Close to S Beach, Downtown & I-95. Pete ok. No drugs.
MIAMI $285 624-3629
Male/female share 4/2, clean and comfortable with other singles,
dose to Turnpike and Broward, secure parking, utils ind. Mike
MIAMI FREE 649-2194
Near Gables. Free room in exchange for work around the house
3 BR/1 BA, non-smoking/drinking. Must like dogs. Student pref.
MIAMI $395 858-6290
Roads area room wanted for large quite house. Hardwood floors,
W/D, $595 Includes utilities. 1 month security deposit required.
MIAMI BEACH $300-$400 498-0543
2 rms, or 1/2 rm avail, ocean view balcony, 5th st, pool/sauna/
cable/cent air. Clean and resp. 7am-l2pm / 8pm-l2am. Sec dep
MIAMI BEACH $450 861-3507
Female seeks non-smoking, vegetarian m/f, prof or student to
share spadous 2br/2ba, fully furnished w/large balcony, w/d, pool,
secured private parking, 3 blocks from beach and tennis courts.
No pets/drugs. Deposit and references. Iv message. Util ind
MIAMI BEACH $400 531-7433
SURFSIDE 91 St, big beautiful home to share, 2 blocks to ocean,
non-smoker, share 1/3 utils. Call Eric 531-7433
MIAMI SHORES $285 758-6754
Non-smoker roommate needed to share 3 Br. 3 Ba house, with
yard, laundry facilities, all amenities, on canal. Rent +1/3 utilities.
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 â–  26,1996
150
Roommates
5 continued
MIAMI SHORES 895-5689
Roommate needed for 4 Bedroom house with a pool. Smokers
OK. Please call 895-5689
MIAMI $365 358-6454
Downtown, share 2/2 apt, beautiful 18th fir view, 24 hr sec, park-
ing, pool & weight room, quiet & responsible person seeking same
NORTH MIAMI $350 895-6977
Need roommate to share townhouse with mom and child. First,
last and leasé. 1/2 utilities, help dean.
NORTH MIAMI $450 899-0788
Reliable ROomate to share spacious home. Utils included washer &
dryer available. Nonsmoker please. Must seel! 15 min to South Bch
NORTH MIAMI $450 944-4275
Roommate wanted to share huge 3 br/2 ba house. Pool, jacuzzi,
washer/dryer, $450/mo +1/3 utilities. 944-4275 â–  â– 
SOUTH BEACH $600 674-1089
Prefer someone who likes birds and dogs to share large home on
Alton Rd with pkg, elect .Inducted, first, last and security required
SOUTH BEACH $430 538-9830
â– n Puerto Rican boy has large bedroom in deluxe apartment, $430
**! monthly with parking and utilities. Call 538-9830 or beep 540-4781
SOUTH BEACH $400 532-5610
Must see! Female/gay male to share huge 2 bedroom/1 bath, din-
; Ing room, with hardwood floors, no pets, 1st, last, and refrences
SOUTH BEACH $500 531-9096
1881 Washington Ave. Model's apt, 2/2 completely furnished in
white carpet & leather-females only. $150 week. 538-4562
SOUTH BEACH $400 672-7323
Gay male seeking gay or straight male/female to share luxury 2/2 .
condo. Fum or unfurn.br with priv.bath, pool, iacuzzi, gym, w/d
on bay near Lincoln Rd. Refs, no pets, nonsmok. 1st +1/5 utils.
SOUTH BEACH $335 673-8084
Straight Male flight attendant seeks roommate (female preferred)
to share SoBé studio. I'm away 3-4 nights/ wk. Gorgeous view, 24
hóúr sec. NO lease. Deposit. Must be employed full time. 8-5 pref.'
SOUTH BEACH $400 538-0683
Cool large room with bathroom. Large house in West Avenue,
back yard & front porch. All house prlvlliges. $400+1/5 util.
SOUTH BEACH $505 672-2652
GWM professional seeks same to share 10th fir 2/2,1200 sf, views
&-balcony, new carpet, pool. 18th & Meridian. Parking $35 extra.
SOUTH BEACH $500 672-5676
MID BCH Share Ig 4/5 home on Alton Rd, (female pref). $500 cov-
, ers all except phone. Pvt ba, alarm, fenced yrd, jacuzzi, frplce, C/A.
—
SOUTH MIAMI $350 662-1602
Three br duplex, cable and utilities incl, need two roommates,
male or female, clean, non-smoker, responsible, 662-1602
SOUTH MIAMI $375-$400 667-4424
Near hospitals, MetroRail and UM, room and private bath, 1 or 2
people, house and pool privillges, utils included 1 st/deposit req
SOUTH MIAMI $395-$495 666-5227
Rent 1 of 2 rooms in nice home, includes kitchen, W/D, cable, utilr.
¡ties in safe, quiet area near Red and Bird Roads, UM and buses
ZOO
Real Estate tor Sale
205 Condos/Towntiomes for Sale 225 Real Estate Wanted
210 Houses for Sale 230 Mise. Real Estate
215 Commercial Property for Sale 235 Finance
220 Income Property for Sale 240 Real Estate Services
205
Condos/Townhouses for Sale
ALL AREAS $45,000 - $89,000 865-8864
Penn Ave 1/1, bale, open view, pkg, nr Lincoln Rd, Low maint. 65K
Deco studio, Collins Ave, elite, ocean view, lo maint, A/C. $49-59K
North Beach 2/2, pool view, security, parking, valet. $66K
1/1.5, huge balcony, view, cov park, pool, low maint. $59K
Miami Gardens Dr. Huge, clean apt, gorgeous lake view. Cheap!
Buy the Beach Realty - http://www.buybeach.com/access/
ALL BEACH AREAS ALL PRICES 531 -BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
JEFFERSON AVE...
252 Jefferson, 1 br, sellerfinance! bldg has pkng! $59,500
301 Jefferson, 1 br, spaeioüs f loorplan, covd pkng, SOLD!
301 Jefferson, Tbr, wide open view, pkng, spacious, $69,900
921 JefFerson, 1 br, priced to selll cOvd pkng, bale, $57,500
1498 JefFerson, 1 br, walk to Lincoln Rd, pkng, large, $69,900
1840 JefFerson, 2 br, secluded neighborhood, pkng, $129,000
1840 Jefferson, 2 br, golf course view, pool, pkng, SOLD!
1840 Jefferson, 3 br, a rare find! walk to Lincoln Mall, SOLD!
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET* 531-2738
COCONUT GROVE $98,000 667-4815 VM 653
2801 Florida Ave. 2-story 1 BR /1 BA, bright condo with white
European kitchen and built-ins. In Irg blag in heart of Grove, sec,
pkg garage, pool, and more! The Prudential Florida Rlty. S.Lilly
COCONUT GROVE $185,000 854-4171
Direct bay view, 2br/2ba townhouse, tile floors, updated kitchen,
pets allowed, boat slips available. Chris Monge, C Grove Realty
COCONUT GROVE $135,000 854-4171
Newly renovated 3/level townhse, wood firs, gourmet kit, below-.
level prkg, pool/tennis/pets ok, w/d. Chris Monge, C Grove Realty
..COCONUT GROVE $58,000 663-3338
^â– Courtyards of the Grove. Cute 1 BR /1 BA, upgraded, tile / carpet.
Security. Walk to Mayfair/Cocowalk.
COCONUT GROVE $99,900 448-4123
Reduced! 1/1.5 plus loft, mexican tile fir, steps from CocoWalk,
many amenities, sec pkg. Call David 464-7446 / 448-4123 Ext 144.
HALLANDALE $55.000 . (954)456-6957
Ocean front, 1/1, newly furnished, tile floors, ceiling fans, no pets.
Low, low maintenance, Won't last long!, owner financing
MIAMI $80,000 383-1306
Huge 3 bedroom/2 bath in Kendall Country Club Area, secluded,
secured gated community, top floor comer unit, all amenities:
pool, gym, close to everything including golf course. 5 min from
836,10 minutes frorh Miami Dade & Flu. Shopping close by.-Please
94 calf583-1306. . , „ "
MIAMI $68,000 751-4939
BELLE MEADE estate sale! 2/2 Great bay view, pool, tennis, 24hr se¬
curity-dose to beach,must see. Also1/1? mia^SQ's, in same bldg
MIAMI 866-2423
FABULOUS CHARTER CLUB
Eoioy this 14th floor, very spacious 2 br/2 ba with breathtaking
ocean views! Tile floors, washer/dryer, in bldg with 24 hour secur¬
ity, pool, spa, tennis, grocery & covered parking.
Call REITER 864-4217 or BLOCK 659-8844. M. Kotler Realty, Inc.
MIAMI $109,900 751-2266
PALM BAY WATERFRONT!
By Owner/Agent
1,500 + S.F. 2 BED 2 BATH
NEW APPLIANCES JILE & MARBLE FLOORS.
SOPHISTICATED & SUBTLE DESIGNER TOUCHES.;
POOL, TENNIS, GYM, SECURITY. PETS OK.
ONLY $109,900 (305)751-2266
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
PÉNNSYLVANIAAVE...
.650 Pennsylvania, 1 br, just 2 blks to beach! bale, $67,500
1050 Pennsylvania, 1 br, steps to beach, a steal! $49,000
1060 Pennsylvania, Studio, lovely garden setting, $39,900
1211 Pennsylvania, Studio, historicart deco decor,. SOLD!
1211 Pennsylvania, 1 br.art deco, seller finance, $79,900
1231 Pennsylvania, Studio; hardwood firs, pkng!!!! $46,900
1235 Pennsylvania, Studio, covd pkng, near ben, . SOLD!
1235 Pennsylvania, 1 br, front cornér unit, evd pkng, $79,500
1400 Pennsylvania, Studio, top fir, bright sunshine, $49,900
1614 Pennsylvania, 1 br, exquisite front unit, renov, $119,000
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET* 531-2738
MIAMI BEACH : $125,000 569-9080
MILUONAIRES'S ROW Why Settle for Less? Fab 950 sf 1/1.5 bi-level
condo. Overlooks pool & ocean. Maintenance includes A/C! Foreign
owner wants offers! 5445-Collins Avenue.
Marcus Real Estate Service, Inc. Terry Dominguez.
MIAMI BEACH $39,900 TO $89,900 866-6691
7620 Carlyle, efficiency, pool, parking, oceanview, modem $39,900
7725 Carlyle, one bedroom, walk to ocean! Asking $47,000
250 Meridian, one bedroom With computer room Only $54,900
1674 Bay Rd/one bedroom on bay, parking, pool Offers!
7125 Bay Dr, 1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, pkng, pool, faces water $69,500
7125 Bay Dr, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, spotless, modem pkng $89,500
Ask about our 1000 square foot 1 bedroom knockout water view
unit on water, pool and.2 car parking!
Normandy Realty • 866-6691
MIAMI BEACH 868-3166
1620 WEST AVE
Fourth floor 1 bedroom, pool, parking, reduced to $67,500
5 ISLAND AVE
TWo 1 BR units with pool, parking and doorman from $89,500
CALL GEORGE SANDERS 866-6211
Prudential Florida Realty
MIAMI BEACH $169,900 531-2380
COSTA BRAVA, deluxe bedroom, den, 2 ba's, restaurant, valet & in-
door parking, heated pool. Will hold 8% mortgage.
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 866-2423
CONDOS FOR SALE
DRASTICALLY REDUCED
Oceanfront bldg, 1/1, low maintenance, great closet space, 678 sf
BEAUTIFUL BAY HARBOR CONDO
Spacious 1 br/2 ba, eat-in kit! New carpet & window treatments.
1060 CO-OP APTS FROM $36,900
mm Possible owner fin, kit with breakfast bar^ GOLDBERG 865-8727
CUTE AND BRIGHT CO-OP
1 br/1 ba, 530 sq ft, $39,900. BROAD 865-3748
$89,000 PENTHOUSE
Waterfront, many closets, 1 bedroom convertible. Estate sale!
9149 COLUNS AVE - $95,000
2 br/2 ba garden style bldg on the ocean! PORTMAN 865-2744
BAYVIEW TOWERS - $65,000
2/2, city view! Low maintenance & taxes, assigned parking.
1100 ALTON ROAD - $70.000
1/1,680 sf, low maint, assigned parking. RENNERT 866-8195
FABULOUS BLAIR HOUSE - $84,900
1 br convertible/1.5 ba, gorgeous Waterviews. 24 hr doorman.
BAY HARBOR CO-OP - $79,900
Fantastic waterviews! 1 br convertible/2 bath. KONEFSKY 932-9738
9 FT CEILINGS!-$89,900
White tile floors, 1 bedroom convertible.'
PRICED BELOW MARKET - $60,000
Security, pool, sauna, assigned parking, 1/1. PORTMAN 864-8541
M. KOTLER REALTY, INC. 866-2423
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
BAY RD...
1658 Bay, 1 br, sparkling direct bay view, pkng $85,000
1665 Bay, 1 br+den, steps to Lincoln Rd, pkng, $98,500
1665.Bay,1 br, spacious floórplan, pkng, bale, SOLD!
1665 Bay, 2 br, penthouse uriit, covd pkng, bale, $99,900
1665 Bay, 2 br, penthouse unit, covd pkng, bale, $109,000
1670 Bay, 1 br, priced to sell! top cmr unit, pkng, $69,900
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
MIAMI BEACH $69,000 895-2070
COLLINS AVE gorgeous hi-f Ir studio with panoramic bay view. Great
oceah front bldg with tennis, pool,' spa, security. Motivated Owner!
MIAMI BEACH FROM $65,500 531-6061
BEACH CONDOS FOR SALE!!
465 & 345 OCEAN DR - 4 units, redone, ocean views, parking .
1228 WEST AVE - 2 BR, SW comer, redone, watch sunsets $195,000
3 ISLAND AVE 1 BR - co-op, updated, new kitchen $65.5K
300 MERIDIAN AVE 1 BR - redone, 777 sq ft, parking, security $95K
COURTS OF-SOBE 3 BR -1,542 sq ft; parking, upgrades $299K
EPIC REALTY 531-6061
MIAMI BEACH FROM $27.000 672-1234
NORMANDY ISLE. Studios $27K, 1 BR's, from $42,500.2 BR's from
$67,500, low Maintenance. On water. 5% Down for qualified buy¬
ers. For info call Call Global Mgmt Realty. 672-1234.
MIAMI BEACH
NEW LISTING!
OPEN 1PM-3PM, SUNDAY
6941 Bay Drive
Charming and large 1 BR's from $45,900 2 BR's from $67,750
ANDREA SILVERTHORNE AND MARCO GIANCOLA
322-4055
Kent Kariock Realty And Associates, Inc
MIAMI BEACH $179K 673-2201
Hug? 2br/2ba, oak firs, prvtyrd, prkg, cent AC. Just like a house w/
detached artist studio ind. Scott P 673-2201 or Scott Me 558-SOLD
MIAMI BEACH $285.000-$399,000 699-6414 (BEEPER)
BEAUTIFUL FINISHES, FANTASTIC OCEAN VIEWS
AFFORDABLE OPULENCE - $285,000-$399J000
Call Gina. Béeper 699-6414 Office 674-0202
MAJESTIC PROPERTIES
MIAMI BEACH FROM $19.000 531-0390
100% FINANCING AVAILABLE. Exc locations, great customizing op- -
portunity, 2br $59k Why rent when you can own! 865-7101
MIAMI BEACH $50,000 674-8235
Studio, parking, 5% down, 15% owner financed, 80% loan, seller
. will negotiate any closing costs. Paul or Jacob 674-8235
MIAMI BEACH $79,000 538-4960
Belle Isle. Near Alton Rd. Excellent building, 1/1, tiled, bay view
bale, pool, pkg, doorman, quick sale.
MIAMI BEACH 532-0838
2 Studios for sale at 3025 Indian Creek, excellent condition, tile
floors, new appliances& a/c; murphy bed. 1 block to beach!
MIAMI BEACH $159,900 531-4164
Reduced! Belle Plaza. Beautiful 2 BR/2 BA updated, tile, waterview,
security, pool, tennis, restaurant, gym and all ammenlties
MIAMI BEACH FROM $105,000 856-6496
SOUTH BEACH 1614 Euclid Avenue
1/2 Blk to Lincoln Rd Mall
100 % NEW CONDOS-TOWNHOMES, PARKING, W/D IN UNIT
OPEN SUNDAYS2TO 5
ONLY
4
UNITS
LEFT
READY
TO
MOVE
IN
MIAMI BEACH $129,900 757-5050
MILUONAIRE'S ROW Ocean view 1/1 conv, large comer unit, com-
pletely remodeled with central A/C, Italian tile, pool, parking, sec
MIAMI BEACH FROM $575/MO 868-0408
Spectacular NEW condos, 1 bedroom, 1 bath & 2 bedroom, 2 bath
starting at $575 per month. Call 868-0408 or 256-7600
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICE RANGES 538-7224
FREE INFO FAX HOTLINE 538-7224
24 HOUR AUTOMATED LISTINGS SERVICE
OF ALL AVAILABLE CONDOS ON THE BEACH!
PRESENTED BY MAJESTIC PROPERTIES
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
LINCOLN RD...
100 Lincoln, studio, 'Decoplage* on the ocean, $69,900
100 Lincoln, studio,'Decoplage'great city vw, | $78,900
100 Lincoln, studio,'Decoplage'spacious unit, $SOLD!
100 Lincoln. 1 br, 'Decoplage' ocean & dty views, $159,000
100 Lincoln, 1 br, 'Decoplage' ocn vw, renov, $165,000
100 Lincoln, 2 br,'Decoplage'great ocean vw, - SOLD!
1340 Uncoln, 1 br, seller will finance! Pkng, bale, $74,900
1400 Lincoln, 1 br, renov penthouse, bale, pkng, $79,900
1400 Lincoln, 1 br, front comer unit, nearly 900 sq ft> $84,500
1670 Lincoln Ct. 1 br, on the bay! Bay view, pkng, $82,000
1670 Lincoln Ct, 1 br, spectacular bay view, pkng, SOLD!
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
MIAMI BEACH 839-2233
THE AMETHYST
5313 Collins Ave. 1/1.5, Spacious, remodeled, Ocean view Condo
Must Sell & Condo For Rent, fully fum. Vivian Rodriguez 839-2233
HAPPY REALTY CO. 553-0880.
MIAMI BEACH $38.000-$140,000 672-7258
CARRIAGE CLUB N -1 BR, oceanfront $140,000
ROYAL EMBASSY -1 BR, 16th floor, bay views $139,500
710 WASHINGTON - Large studio, 2nd floor - $59,500
3025 INDIAN CREEK - Studios $38,000-$45,000
CHARTER CLUB -On biscayhe bay, 1-2 BR . $65,000+
THE VENETIA - Fabulous 1 BR, TOOOsqft Ü $110,000 ■
CRICKET CLUB - 2 BR, 1,950 sq ft, water views! $130,000
For more listings, call FfeAMER REALTY, INC
MIAMI BEACH $150,000 214-9668 (BEEPER)
Luxury 2/2 comer condo, 12th floor, panoramic bay view, best buy
in area! Call Veronica, your Millionaire's Row sales specialist! Sdar
Realty 949-3787
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
NUMBER STREETS...
820 3rd St, Studio, Ig 2nd floor unit, low maint fee, SOLD!
74010th St, T br, The Dixon'at Meridian, art deco, $74,900
72114th PI, Studio, historic art deco, hdwd floors, $54,900
104510th St, 1 br, secure covd pkng, huge terrace, $74,900
104510th St, 1 br. sixth floor unit, nice view, pkng, SOLD!
110011th St, 1 br, covd parking, very spacious unit, $64,500,
110011th St, 1 br, parking, across from dty park, $71,500
120014th St. 2 br, at Alton Road, spacious unit, pkng,' $129,000
255 W 24th St,-Studio,'The Mantell'T blk tobeach, $39,000
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
MIAMI BEACH ALL PRICES 531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
ALTON RD...
1025 Alton, 1 br, immaculate comer unit, pkng, SOLD!
1025 Alton, 1 br, spectacular, deco view, evd pkng, SOLD!
1100 Alton, 1 br, pets allowed!! covd pkng, bale, $69,900
1250Aton,1 br, handsome unit, private parking, SOLD!
1300 Alton, 1 br + convertible, water views, pkng, $97,000
1300 Alton, 2 br, bright ocean View! pkng, Ig bale, SOLD!
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.i
The South Beach Condo Spedalist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
NORTH MIAMI $55,000 654-2639
BOATER’S DREAM FOR A BARGAIN!
1-br convertible/2 ba, waterfront, screened balcony, covered park¬
ing, pool, gym, boat dockage ($1.50 per foot); move-in condition.
Call Lorraine Fox COLDWELL BANKER 654-2639
NORTH MIAMI BEACH $65,000 (305)448-1793
Water front apt 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath, tiled floors. Cent A/C, verticals,
24 hour security, $65,000 or best offer, call eves (305) 448-1793
NORTH MIAMI BEACH 864-7729
Jade Winds/Skylake. 1660 NE191 St. Must see! Water view fronts
rear, 2 br/2 ba, many extras. Josh, days 864-7729, eves 948-3474
NORTH MIAMI BEACH $43,500 947-2664
AVENTURA VICINITY 1 BR convertible/1.5 bath, great lake view,
white kitchen and tile, sec, pool, upgraded, cable TV, owner/agent,
kids ok, big discount for cash or lease with option to buy
PERRINE $65,000 233-5809
Palmetto area by Falls, East of US1.2 story townhouse, 2br/l.5ba,
exc cond, new carp, cent a/c, sun deck, quiet area. Must see!
SOUTH BEACH ALL PRICES 531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
EUCLID AVE...
358 Eudid, 1 br, spadous this one's a steal!! Hurry! ¡ $49,900
552 Eudid, Studio, bldg has pkng! walk to beach!!! $39,900
618 Eudid, 2 br, front comer unit, pkng, Ig terrace, SOLD!
719 Euclid, 1 br, best unit in bldg! front corner; pkng, $64,000
826 Euclid, 1 br, 'Decolux' stunning art deco design, $84,900
1020 Euclid, Studio, renov art deco, hardwood firs, $49,900
1401 Euclid, 1 br, secure gated bldg, covd parking, V SOLD!
1520 Euclid, Tbr, *The Gibson' steps to Lincoln Rd, / $59,000
1545 Euclid, 1 br, steps to Lincoln) pool, pkng, bale, SOLD!
1575 Euclid, 1 br, covd pkng, large bale, Jow price! > $68,000
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738


SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
ESPAÑOLA WAY...
641 Española, Studio, filled with sunlight, spacious,
641 Española, 1 br, great comer unit, bldg has pkng,
641 Española, 1 br, sprawling front unit, large bale,
$39,900
$67,000
SOLD!
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531 -BRET • 531 -2738
SOUTH BEACH
$47,000
331-3418
LARGE CLASSIC DECO STUDIOS
1525 Meridian Ave * 2 blocks to Lincoln Rd * 5 blocks to Beach
«ONLY $2,500 DOWN *$465/M01
• Hardwood Oak Floors • New Appliances • New Tile & Paint
• Fireplaces • Ziggurat Ceilings • Walk-in Closets
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
MERIDIAN AVE.,
221 Meridian, 1 br, front corner unit, Irg bale, pkng,
250 Meridian, 1 br, spacious corner unit, wd firs,
344 Meridian. 2 br, front comer unit, bale, pkng,
659 Meridian, Studio, perfect for investors hurry!
801 Meridian. 1 br, corner unit-breathtaking view,
901 Meridian, Studio, renovated, garden view,
901 Meridian, 2 br, totally renovated, w/d in unit,
911 Meridian, 1 br, front comer unit, porch, renov,
911 Meridian, Studio, totally renovated, must see!
944 Meridian, 1 br, corner unit, covered parking!!!
1020 Meridian, 1 br, high floor, spectacular view,
1051 Meridian, 1 br, classic art deco design,
1229 Meridian, 1 br, stunning example or art deco,
1605 Meridian, 1 br, next to Dncoln, pkng, bale,
1732 Meridian, 1 br, large outdoor terrace, pkng
1732 Meridian, 1 br, walk to Lincoln Mall, parking,
1900 Meridian, 2 br, wrap-around térrace, cov pkng.
$59,000
$56,000
SOLDI
SOLD!
$74,900
1 SOLD!
$115,000
M SOLD!
$49,900
$75,500
$85,500
$58,000
$69,900
$87,000
SOLD!
$65,000
M SOLD!
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET* 531-2738
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
1242 Drexel;
1242 Drexel,
1308 Drexel,
1308 Dréxél,
1342 Drexel,
1342 Drexel,
1519 Drexel,
• $71,000
$144,500
$42,900
SOLD!
$49,900
SOLD!
$79,900
DREXEL AVE...
1 br, 'The Seville* historic Spanish
2 br, “The Seville' front 2 level TH,
Studio, 'The Habana' central a/c,
2 br, 'The Habana' renovated unit,
1 br, totally renovated, walk to bch,
1 br, top comer unit, high ceilings,
1 br, steps to Lineóla pkng, balcony.
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET • 531-2738
SOUTH BEACH ALL PRICES 673-2201
-ART DECO - BUY/RENT - STUDIOS, 1/2 BR’S
12th & MERIDIAN
Carden Condos Overlooking Flamingo Park, Pvt Patios. 2 Parkings.
Studios From $52,900,iBr's From $75K. Some Owners Financing.
SMALL CHARMING BUILDING
1446 LENNOX 2/1,750 Sf. From $93,900. Oak Floors, Fireplace,
Charming. 2/2,1500 Sf, Private front Yard, Cent A/C, detached 1
, Br, artist studio included, Secure Parking. $179K.
Call Scott R 673-2201 or Scott Me at 538-7653
SOUTH BEACH FROM $82K 534-2667
Lrge l br, pool/prking/balcony/tiled, won't last! Also avail flawless,
totally upgraded, 2br townhome $11 OK. Call Cy, Majestic Property.
SOUTH BEACH $130,000 532-3207
. High rise oceanfront bldg. 5th floor 1/1, spectacular ocean view,
balcony, parking, oceanside pool, sauna, low maintenance.
SOUTH BEACH $51,900 861-8003
Great location, 1/1,2nd fir, completely renov, very low maint fees,
central A/C, new carpet, sec system, D/W, big bright windows!
SOUTH BEACH
FROM $170,000
532-7663
“THE DRAKE” 1460 OCEAN DRIVE
2 bedroom, 2 bath $170K. 3 bedroom/2.5 bath duplex + deck,
totally renovated, $21 OK. Judith Rosen, Broker
SOUTH BEACH $49,000 672-0109
West Ave, Modern lovely studio with balcony. Secured well main- -
tained building. Parking, pool, etc. Broker
SOUTH BEACH $105,000 531-6061
WATERFRONT-REDUCED!!!
1 bedroom with breathtaking bay view, hard wood floors, parking*
Jacuzzi, pool, security, pets welcome!
EPIC REALTY -531-6061
SOUTH BEACH $65,000-$150,000 538-7368
1 BR $65K, 1.5 BR $93K, 2 BR $150K
SCLAR REALTY - 538-7368
SOUTH BEACH $125,000 532-7878
Penthouse with Two Master Suites, Solarium, Parking, Pool, Mag¬
nificent View. Keystone Properties
SOUTH BEACH $89,250 277-7000
2/2 Deco, renov, front view,13rd fir, central A/C, 2 blocks to beach,
best location, great building, bargain price! G Hennes/K Karlock RE
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
OCEAN DRIVE...
260 Ocean, Studio, parking, across from beach!!!!
345 Ocean, Studio, fabulous ocean view, balcony,
345 Ocean, 1 br, stunning comer unit, pkng, bale,
345 Ocean, 1 br, breathtaking ocean view, pkng
345 Ocean, Jr 1 br, direct ocean view!!!!!! parking,
401 Ocean, 1 br, immaculate unit, nice view, pkng,
401 Ocean, 1 br, terrific ocean view, huge terrace,
401 Ocean, 1 br, view of Oean Drive excitement,
401 Ocean, 1 br, handsome tile floors, great wy,
465 Ocean, 1 br, motivated seller! north ocean vw,
465 Ocean, 1 br, perfect ocean view, pkng, bale,
465 Ocean, 1 br, soothing ocean view, pkng, bale
1446 Ocean, Studio, terrific frontunit, ocean view,
1446 Ocean, Studio, across from beach, secure
1446 Ocean, Studio, perfect weekend getaway!
1446 Ocean, Studio, spacious 2nd floor unit, hurry!
$49,500
$69,900
$98,500
$113,000
$109,000
SOLD!
$99,000
$109,000
$99,500
$126,000
$129,000
$125,000
SOLD!.
$75,000
$74,900
$79,900
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET • 531-2738
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
WEST AVE...
800 West, Studio, 'South Bay Club' bayfront bldg,
800 West, 1 br, 'South Bay Club' lovely bay vw
800 West, 1 br, 'South Bay Club' super bay vw
1228 West, 1 br, frontunit, great deco views, Ig,
1228 West, 1 br, bayfront bldg, bay vw, renov,
1250 West, Studio, bayfront bldg; don't miss out!
1455 West, 1 br + den, easily becomes a 2 br,
1520 West, 1 br, reduced for quick sale! Call now!
1614 West, 1 br, pool, pkng, bale, near Lincoln, v
1688 West, 1 br, 'West Bay Plaza' super views,
1688 West, 2 br, unit has its own private yard!
1688 West, 2 br, spectacular bay views, 12th fir.
$65,000
SOLD!
$99,000
SOLD!
$88,900
$39,900
SOLD!
$69,900
SOLD!
SOLD!
$149,900
$168,000
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
WASHINGTON AVE...
65 Washington, Studio, next to Joe's & Pommier, $45,000
65 Washington, 1 br, hardwood firs, parking!!!!!- $69,900
228 Washington, 1 br, spacious corner unit, hurry! $69,900
323 Washington, 1 br, 2 blks to beach, low maint, $59,900
524 Washington, Jr. 1br, sellerfinancing, balcony, SOLD!
524 Washington, Jr. 1 br, steps to beach, pkng, SOLD!
524 Washington, Jr. 1 br* covd pkng, owner finance, $45,000
710 Washington, Studio,'The Hampton'charm, SOLD!
710 Washington, Studio, 'The Hampton' renovated, $54,000
188T Washington, 2 br, 'Octagon Towers' large, $85,500
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The south Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
SOUTH BEACH $77,000-$325,000 538-0204
1 block from ocean, European style, renovated, pvt condos, hard
wood floors, parking, pool, security system, marble bath and more
Sclar
Realty
SOUTH BEACH $139,000 448-4123
1 BR convertible 1.5 BA furnished, 912 s.f. top floor. Bldg on
ocean. Low maintenance. Call David 464-7446 or 448-4123 Ext 144.
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
COLLINS AVE...
101 Collins, 1 br, covd pkng, across from Nemo! $77,500
101 Collins, 1 br, top front comer unit, balcony, $79,900
350 Collins, 1 br, one blk to beach, a real deal!! $49,900
401 Collins, 1 br, comer unit, steps to Ocean Drive, SOLDI
1801 Collins, 1 br TH, The Shelbome' on ocean, $139,000
1801 Collins, 2 br TH, The Shelbome, oenf ront, $219,000
2457 Collins, 2 br, The Royal Club' direct ocn vw, $219,000
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
SOUTH BEACH
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
MICHIGAN AVE...
544 Michigan, Studio, perfect for investors, wd firs, $35,000
610 Michigan, 1 br, classic art deco architecture, SOLD!
840 Michigan, 1 br, historic charm, wd firs, must see! SOLD!
934 Michigan, 1 br, dramatic historic design, hurry! $65,000
T59Ó Michigan, Studio, just steps to Lincoln, SOLD!
1743 Michigan, 3 br townhouse, newly built, pkng, SOLD!
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
VENETIAN ISLAND
ALL PRICES
531-BRET
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
ISLAND AVE...
5 Island, 1
9 Island, 1
11 Island,
11 Island,
16 Island,
16 Island,
20 Island,
br; terrific bay view, parking, balcony,
br+convertible, bay views, balcony
1 br+convertible, bay views, balcony,
1 br+convertible, high floor, balcony
Studio, 'Belle Towers' on the bay;
1 br, 'Belle Towérs' super view, pkng,
1 br, 'Belle Plaza' bay view, balcony.
BRET
TAYLOR
REAL ESTATE INC.
The South Beach Condo Specialist (TM)
531-BRET *531-2738
SOLD!
$179,000
$139,900
I SOLD!
SOLD!
SOLD!
SOLD!
210
Houses For Sale
ALL AREAS 756-5874
MORNINGSIDE, BAYSIDE & BELLE MEADE ARE HOTI
To Find Out Why - And See This Home. And Other Historic (And Not
So Historic) Homes - Call The Neighborhood Specialist Today! MIKE
FITZGERALD (305)756-5874 THE PRUDENTIAL FLORIDA REALTY
ALL AREAS 787-1380
Nancy’s the ONE to call for HOT new listings!
ESTATE SALEI
Lowest price in the neighborhood! $109K
BIG BANG FOR THE BUCKI
2,300 sq ft, 3 car garage $142K
FINISHED TO A ar I
Sparkling, ready to move in! $139K
GOLF COURSE VIEW!
Sprawling $142K
ADORABLE DECO!
Beamed ceilings, fireplace, 2/1 $114K
RENT OR LEASE OPTION!
Shores 3/2, new kitchen! $142K*
WATERFRONT!
3story townhouse, deeded, DOCK! $189K
EL PORTAL STEAL!
Great starter, 2 full bath, only $83K
DROP DEAD GORGEOUS VIEW!
Condo on NE 30th St, owner READY!
NANCY DOWSON
787-1380
DUFFY
AVENTURA $279,000 . 531-3003
Executive lakefront home, 3/3 In prestigious Oak Forest, gated
community, Jacuzzi, tremendous kitchen, living room with fire¬
place and master bedroom on lake, great for entertaining, must
see! Owner/agent
CORAL GABLES $100,000 758-3451
FHA; Downtown Gables. 3 br/3 ba townhome with double parking,
secluded community, low maintenance, as is $100K. 758-3451
MIAMI $196,000 829-3409
4BR/2 BA, Ig master suite, and Ig dining area, 2 car gar, entertain¬
ment & family home, oversized comer lot on cul-de-sac, screened
pool & patio, all living areas have pool access. Motivated sellers.
MIAMI $180K 751-2788
MORNINGSIDE Lovely bow front renovated 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath,
near park, $180K. Agent 751-2788
MIAMI BEACH $289K 751-2788
4 Br, 4 Ba Spanish 2 story villa with pool, and separate quest house.
Motivated seller $289K. Agent 751 -2788.
MIAMI $69,900-$159,900 576-5478
The new Design Village, a redeveloping community,
reminiscent of old Coconut Grove and SoBe before the boom!
HISTORIC HOMES
3/21924, architectural gem, move in condition! $69,900
4/3 two story Mediterranean on large lot $130,000
3/2+ renov, 1,875 sq ft, 1 car garage, new wood floors, gorgeous
mantle. Deco block accents, a must see! Owner/broker $89,900
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
4 unit apartment building, zoned C1, needs work $74,900
10 units plus 1 store, zoned C1, on two lots $159,900
2 commercial lots, 10,500 sq ft, one block from shops, ready for .
development $95,000
Other choice investment properties available
KAIL
REAL ESTATE
YOUR DESIGN VILLAGE SPECIALIST 576-5478
MIAMI $135,000 757-2967
MORNINGSIDE. 5560 NE 5 AVe. Spacious 2/2, in historic district, oak
floors, lush landscaping, central a/c, large garage, Fla room, re¬
duced for quick sale! Norah Schaefer Realty.
MIAMI BEACH 531-7262
SHERIDAN AVENUE
Deco charmer & guest cottage, great potential, needs some work.
Call Ilona Weiss R.E. Services 531 -7262
MIAMI SHORES $185,000 892-8282
4/3 with pool, interior garden/atrium, family room, Florida room,
library, garden, central A/C, 33ÓÓ sq ft, newly renovated, asking
$185,000. Rent until closing. 880-5191 beeper.
MIAMI SHORES $129,000 756-1424
3/3, high wood ceilings, brick & wood floors, fireplace, lots of
charm. Landmark Properties. Zoned. Central air. Call John
MIAMI $133,000 545-6022
Miami River area. Forget SoBe! 1924 Mission renov. 3/1.5, Ig yd/gar
+ porch. Sec, fplc, wd firs, mins to SoBe, great area. $1200/mo
215
Commercial Property For Sale
MIAMI BEACH $229,000 864-8293
SURFSIDE 4 unit apartment building, one block from beach, park¬
ing, must se|l. Owner 864-8295
225
Real Estate Wanted
ALL AREAS ALL PRICES 1-800-898-9778
Government foreclosed homes for pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repossessions, REG'S. Your area. For current listings, call toll free at
1 -800-898-9778 Ext H-4460
230
Mise. Real Estate
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND $147,500 538-5470
CHESAPEAKE BAY. 50'W x 290'D waterfront lot with a 14'W x 26'L
summer cottage, 8'W x 10'L garden shed and 9'W x 11'L utility
, bldg. Running water, electricity, & telephone service. Please call.
CALIFORNIA $14K PER ACRE 619-253-7788
Clean air and sweet water. Desert, 15 acres; 5 Acres fenced - $14K
per acre. Betweeri Vegas & LA. $32 million sports complex under
construction 1 mile away. Artesian well water, electricity.
CENTRAL FLORIDA $5000 662-2551
MONTURA RANCH ESTATES. Lush pinelands 10 minutes from Lake
Okeechobee. 1" acre lot with phone, electric & cable available.
Great for cabin or weekend getaways. Paved roads, great neigh-
bors. Map & photos available, call Ray, 662-2551.
240
Real Estate Services
ALL AREAS OUICK LOANS 305-607-1623
Good rates on home & commercial mortgages. Ucensed mort¬
gage broker. We provide real estate services through Century 21
ALL AREAS ^ 442-8414
Real Estate Closings For ONLY $275! Residential and Commercial.
FREE CONSULTATION! Call attorney Richard A. Muñoz 442-8414
95
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 â–  26; 1996
Mm
CAN YOU PASS THE
BAR EXAM?
ABC BARTENDING SCHOOLS
267-1446
JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE
1-800-227-8363
Ft. Laud. - Miami - WPB - Orlando
TELEMARKETING
A dear speaking voice can earn you:
$6-$12/Hr. Salary Guaranteed!!
Daily Cash Bonuses
• Weekly & Monthly Bonuses
• Medical & Dental Insurance
• Great Work Atmosphere
• Very Easy Phone Sale
• Our product Sells Itself
• No Experience Necessary
• 14 Years in Business!
891 -1687 Cal for an interview WE TRAIN
International Entertainment
ER. and special events company with
offices in London, Beverly Hills and
Miami Beach searching for an events
coordinator in our Miami office with
strong writing skills to join our team.
Please fax your resume to:
305-866-3665
Assistant Manager
Photo Lab with challenging work place is
seeking an Asst Manager with good
communication skills to handle
coordination of work, quality control,
maintenance &. repair.
Electronic and mechanical skills essential.
Send resume with salary history to:
New Times c/o H. Wispe
RO. Box 011591, Miami Florida 33101*1591
300
Help Wanted
ton ' 305 Career Training/Schools
310 Employment Information
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320 Domestic
325 Entertainment
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335 Management/Professional
340 Medical
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350 Phone
355 Restaurant/Hotel/Clubs
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375 Technical
380 Positions Wanted
305
Career Training/Schools
EMPLOYMENT NOTICE New
Times is committed to equal'
employment opportunity and
does not accept employment
advertising which seems to in¬
dicate a.preference based on
age, sexi creed, color or ethnic
background.
310
Employment Information
READER NOTICE Ads listed
under Employment Informa¬
tion may not be for actual
positions available but rather
for job lists and information
about certain career opportu¬
nities. Some ads may ask for
money through the mail to
purchase such lists.
$25/HOUR TO SHOP! $100/
Hour To Test Products 400,000
Mystery Shoppers and Focus
Croup Participants needed
monthly. 800 224-0204 24 Hr.
AIRLINE JOBS Now hiring do¬
mestic & international stiff!
Flight attendants, ticket
agents, reservationists, ground
crew & more. Excellent travel
benefits! Call Airline Employ¬
ment Services. 1-206-971-3692
eXtL23541.
0 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing
Industry. Earn up to $3000-
$6000+ per month. No expe¬
rience necessary. Male/Female.
Age 18-70. For more info, call
(206) 971 -3512 ext A73545
BILINGUAL PEOPLE Needed to
help expand our business
around the world. Great Career
opportunity. Extremely great
income. Call 559-9715.
CRUISE SHIPS Hiring. Earn up
to $2000+ mo working on
cruise ships or land-tour com¬
panies. World Travel. No expe¬
rience necessary. For info call
206-634:0468 ext C73545
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY
Work at home! $1,500 part
time or $3,000 full time. Paid
Vacations. Se habla Español.
Call 305-371-3773
HOME TYPISTS $40,000/Year'
income potential. Home typ¬
ists/PC users. For listings, call
TOLL FREE 1-800-898-9778 Ext
T-4460
MISCELLANEOUS $35,000/Year
income potential, reading
books. Call toll free for details
1-800-898-9778 Ext R-4460
PROCESSORS Honest Income
$300 - $1100 weekly potential.
Process FHA Mortgage refunds
at home. No experience nec¬
essary, own hours, start now!
Please call 24 hours: 460-3259
M or 1-800-844-3846 ext 7091
8B Dept 94. •
WORK AT Home. $1000 weekly
working at home. Free details.
Send self-addressed stamped
envelope to: P.O. Box 500-MQ,
Lima, PA 19037
315
Computer
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Mac Free¬
lancer with own computer.
Quark/llustrator/Photoshop.
2+yr exp. Multimedia/Web a +.
Fax resume/sal req: 672-5027
320
Domestic
HOUSEKEEPER Full-time for
luxury apartment community
in East Fort Lauderdale. Please
call for an interview appoint¬
ment 954-463-7263.
325
Entertainment
ADULT ENTERTAINERS $Cash$
Paid Daily. Dancers/Models.
Earn $600 - $900 a week. No
Experience Necessary. Start
today! 24 hrs call 899-0009
DANCERS
DANCERS!
Earn $600-$900/week!
Apply at:
13690 NW 7th Ave,
Miami
MODELS WANTED ads can be
found in the SHOW BIZ section
under classification 660,
To place an ad, please call
New Times Classified 372-9393
330
General
ACTIVIST
¿ AND NOW FOR SOMETHING
COMPLETELY DIFFERENT...
A job you can believe in! Work
in á fun, challenging
atmosphere and feel a sense
of accomplishment after each
day of fighting political
corruption and environmental
devastation. Paid training,
rapid advancement
opportunities, $300-$400/wk.
EOE
Clean Water Action
call 444-1619
AREA DISTRIBUTOR
EARN UP TO
$1200/M0 PT,
$5000/M0 FT.
WORK AT HOME,
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY.
COMPLETE TRAINING
PROGRAM.
CALL 954-340-0768
ASSISTANT Creative, percep¬
tive, energetic and above all
mature man or woman need¬
ed at Beach Cat Hospital. Re¬
spect, not love, for cats re¬
quired. Call 534-2784.
CIRCULATOR/PETITIONER
Earn $20-$40 an hour circulate
4 easy petitions. Part time or
full time. No experience nec¬
essary. Apply and attend or¬
ientation class at 1111SW 8th
St #207, Miami, 9:30am,
11:30am, 1:30pm or 3:30pm,
Mon-Fri. Call for info 854-6145
CUSTOMER SERVICE/Order
Taking/Accounts payable per¬
son for S Beach distribution co.
Fluent Eng necessary, FT $8 hr..
Office exp required. Call After
6pm & leave mess. 558-5329
DANCE INSTRUCTORS Arthur
Murray Dance Studio now tak¬
ing applications for teacher
training program. Exciting ca¬
reer teaching people to dance.
Leam to be an expert in Latin,
nightclub and contemporary
dances. Please call for an inter¬
view, 1pm-8pm, 444-6136
DRIVERS
ROUTE DRIVERS
NEEDED
To deliver NEW TIMES every
Weds. Van required.
Call 579-1510.
NewTimes
PHONE WORK Part time orfoll
time. Make great money!! Will
train. English or French speak¬
ing. South beach location. Call
Jake 674-1249
GONDOLIER Must like out¬
doors & water. Theatrical atti¬
tude a plus. Also need pho¬
tographer/ticket seller. Fun
Job. Flexible hours. 573-1818
JEWELER'S ASSISTANT Cool
young company seeks jewel¬
er's assistant experienced in
sterling silver production. Must
speak English. 666-5639
MASSAGE THERAPISTS LMT'S
wanted for out-call and cor¬
porate, on-site, chair massage.
Call Paul at Educating Hands
285-6991 Ext 41
MASSAGE THERAPIST Massage
therapy school seeks
extremely professional
Licensed massage therapist :
with minimum 3 yrs exp. PT
days. Fax resúmete 597-9110
PHOTOGRAPHER'S ASSISTANT
Part-time for adult filrri pro¬
duction. No experience nec¬
essary. Miami Beach location.
Call Jim 529-7171
SAILBOAT TECHNICIAN Knowl¬
edge in Sailboat systems a
must for FT position with Flor¬
ida Yacht Charters. Contact
Ben: 505-532-8600 ext 106.
SALES/PROMOTIONS SPORTS
AND FITNESS minded person
wanted for fast growing com¬
pany expanding into South FI.
We need quality people to join
our team! Call 895-7656
TRADES PERSON Carpenter,
roofer/dry wall finisher/tile/
block, windows. Non/smoker/
drinker. FT/PT. Must have
transp & tools. 558-3583.
TYPESETTER NEEDED Key
Largo print shop needs
experience FT position person
with Pagemaker, Layout, A.P.
style and graphic exp. Andrew
305-451 -8009/Fax 451-5744
335
Management/Professional
ALL POSITIONS Gourmet
market on South Beach is hir-
ing. Please call 552-1600
ASSISTANT MANAGER
FULLTIME
Asst Circulation Mgr
New Times seeks a responsible,
organized & energetic individ¬
ual who is willing to assume
many responsibilities & can
perform heavy physical work.
Excellent communication skills
in English & Spanish required.
65% of the time on the road;
must have reliable transporta¬
tion, van or truck pref.
NewTimes
Call 24 hour voice mail
579-1509 & leavé message, or
fax resume to 579-1590, Attn:
Circulation Manager
LEASING CONSULTANT Need¬
ed full-time for luxury apart¬
ment community in Fort Lau¬
derdale. Experience preferred.
Please call ,954-465-7265.
PROFESSIONAL
Depot Trading Corp
offers ovéfl 5,000
products and services
with sales exceeding
$6.5 billion annually.
The 1200 companies
associated with our or¬
ganizations can give
you the opportunity to
achieve your economic
independence. Making
up to $5,000 a month¿
working only 8-10
hours a week. Cali
Monday-Friday
9:30am-6pm.Askfor
Mr. Amado
305-639-3077
PROMOTIONS
THINK
GLOBALLY
ACT LOCALLY. If you are
interested in increasing global
awareness and making a better
than average income, then call
us today!
418-4911.
SPORTS & FITNESS Fast grow¬
ing company expanding in
South Florida. We need quality
people to join our team. Call Z
594-6500 for an appt
STREET SUPERVISOR Entry
level position. Coordinate san¬
itation and landscaping efforts
forSouth Beach revitalization
program. Candidate should
have supervisory experience
and art iriterest in urban/street
design. Forward resume or job
history to Anthony Dean, 1205
Drexel Ave,'Miami Beach 33139
WRITERS
NEWTIMES
is looking for experienced
journalists who. are as adept at
analyzing court filings as they
are at crafting entertaining
stories. We afford the time and
space needed to develop am¬
bitious profiles, investigative
pieces, and news accounts.
And we put a priority orcstylish
writing; So.if you're a talented
reporter whoféels stymied by
the restrictions of daily
journalism, we want to hear
from you.
All applicants should come
equipped with story ideas of
their own and bring to their
work a high degree of passion
and creativity. Competitive sal¬
ary negotiable. Full benefits.
Please send cover letter,
résumé, writing samples, and
three well-developed story
ideas to:
Jim Mullin, Editor
NewTimes
P.O. Box 011591
Miami, FL 33101
NewTimes
No phone calls, please.
340
Medical
DENTAL ASSISTANT F/t need¬
ed for fast-paced Downtown
Miami office. Friendly profes¬
sional atmosphere. Outgoing
personality and experience a
must Call Kathy at 358-3384.
EXPERIENCED PEOPLE NEEDED FOR:
• Banquet Wait Staff
• Hostesses/Hosts
Call Steve 11am - 4pm
532-1192
This is not a jo
It’s an adventure
International Marketing Firm
Looking tor New Talent. Image
and Personality a Must!
€MJL 4700033
The Men’s Club
Entertainers/Dancers are reporting great suc¬
cess at The Men's Club of Mexico City!
Enjoy iree airfare and complimentary apart¬
ment for only a fifteen shift stay!
To book your trip to Mexico City,
contact Mindi Moore at
The Men's Club of Dallas at 214-654-9100
Tell Your Friends!!
DENTIST/HYGIENIST Part
time, preferably-with experi¬
ence. Exceptional recent grads
also considered, for South
Beach dental office. Must be
personable. 532-7056
345
Office/Clerical
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Beck¬
er Personnel, South Florida's
finest resource for Financial,
Systems; and Human Resourc¬
es personnel has an excellent
permanent opportunity for a
hard-working, team-oriented
accounts receivable clerk with a
great attitude. Lotus and 10-
key skills preferred. Become
part of a fast-paced and fun
organization with room to take
on more responsibility. Call
954-776-5554 today and/or fax
your resumé to 954-776-5855.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Wholesale company needs
organized self starter with
computér skills. Must be avail¬
able to work overtime. Full
time only. Fax resume to
534-1005 or interview at
420 Uncoln Rd, Suite 392
Monday, 9am-5pm only
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Answering phones; computer
and financial system support
for South Beach revitalization
effort Organization and peo¬
ple skills a must. Mail resume
to: 1205 Drexel Avenue, Miami
Beach. FI 33139
CATERING ASSISTANT Strong,
organized individual with 60
WPM minimum. WordPerfect
6.0 and Delphi a plus, Spanish
helpful. Major benefits and
401K. Qualified individuals only.
Send fax for immediate inter¬
view 672-9796
COLLECTIONS/CUST SERV
Busy sales office needs Ag¬
gressive and Dependable per¬
son for phones collections.
Please call for more informa¬
tion call: 891-1687.
OFFICE/CLERICAL
Do You Possess
Above Average Skills?
WE WANT YOU!
Ashley Administrative Services
a local personnel service with á
reputation for quality place¬
ment of temporary and per¬
manent office personnel is ac¬
tively searching fot experi¬
enced candidates to fill the fol¬
lowing openings:
• SECRETARY/ADMIN ASST:
Must have previous experience
as assistant to exec of large
company All general secretar¬
ial skills including ability to deal
with people at all levels, excel¬
lent communication skills, and
computer literacy. Starting sal; â– 
ary $30,000 plus benefits.
• BILINGUAL RECEPTIONISTS:
Must be experienced with
switchboard or regular
phones. Must have excellent
communication skills in English
as well as general clerical skills.
Salary ranging $6.00-$8.00/hr
depending on experience.
Benefits available.
Call 594-9090 and let's dis¬
cuss your current job status,
if you can make an impres¬
sion, we can make a
difference! NO FEE.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT Part-
Time. Computer literate (Excel,
Act and Quicken). General
office skillsa must. Must live
near Grove, Cables or Sobe
area. Call David 448-4123 X144
or Bp 464-7446
RECEPTIONIST With experi¬
ence for busy Lincoln Road law
firm. M-F, 9-5:30. WP 6.0,
50WPM. Eng/Span. $300/wk.
Fax resume to 538-1987.
RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY
Fast paced South Beach Law
Firm, seeks highly motivated
Receptionist/Secretary. Excel¬
lent phone manner required,
WP 5.1 knowledge and general
office skills. Exceptional bene¬
fits. Fax Resume - 673-9235.
SALES/SECRETARY For Yacht
sales office. Casual atmosphere
at Miami river location. Start
$320 weekly plus medplan/va-
cation, holidays. We required
excellent telephone personal¬
ity, like typing, some computer
skills. English and Spanish a
plus. Call Bob Zarchen, at:
MERRILL-STEVENS 547-2650
SECRETARY P-T needed for
South Bch condominiums, le¬
gal secretary pref, from 9am-
1pm. Word perfect, & must be
organized. Robin 531 -1143
SECRETARY/BOOKKEEPER
Handle all posting; billing, filing
& typing for 1 man ad agency,
part time. Must be bright, per-;
sonable and computer literate.
Flexible hours. 642-7000
TYPIST SoBe co. needs effi- -
dent, n/s with good commu¬
nication and computer skills,
word. Excel, Dictaphone. FT/PT.
Fax resume to 532-8381.
WORD PROCESSING And gen¬
eral office, computer and MS
Word experience a must, 55
WPM minimum, FT/PT, VIP
dientele. Call 531-3003
350
Phone
ADVERTISING REP needed for
New Times Classified dept.
Fulltime inside sales and
customer sen/ice. Computer,
typing and spelling skills a
must. Preference given to
those wltii marketing/sales
backgrounds who are not
afraid to go after new busi¬
ness. Compensation is base sal¬
ary, commission & bonus op¬
portunities. Good benefits,
growing company. Fax your
salary requirements, resume &
cover letter today to: Attn:
M.Q. 579-1561, or mail to Clas¬
sified Director, New Times, PO
Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101-
1591. No phone calls please.
NewTimes
PHONE PSYCHICS New age
Friends Wanted for tarot &
psychic readings. Some exp
necessary $6 per hr Must have-
fax machine. 954-923-0433
TELEMARKETERS Part-time,
on Miami Beach, $7/hr plus
comm, 3hrs/night, m orf. Ex¬
cellent communication skills,
dance knowledges plus. Call
Mike 532-4880 x285 eves 6-9
355
Resteurant/Hotel/Clubs
ALL POSITIONS Gourmet
market on South Beach Is hir¬
ing. Please call 532-1600
ALL POSITIONS
Wanted: Self disciplined
professionals concerned
with progress in life.
Come and help us
make our team continue to be
"the best in town!*
Service! Service! Service!
Mercury
Opening July 9. interviewing
from June 17, l-5pm dally.
Accepting for all positions!
764 Washington Ave
532-0070
CHEF Cashier, fast sandwich
prep & delivery people for
Brickell Area restaurant Please
call 759-8882 or bpr 449-4141
COOKS/WAITSTAFF Experi¬
enced. Hofbrau Bar & Grill is ac¬
cepting applications. Apply in
person: 172 Giralda Ave, Coral
Cables, FI. Call 442-2730 . ....
DANCERS
2 ADULT CLUBS
NOW HIRING:
DANCERS
Amateur or pro
3 shifts available
Must be 18 or older,
No experience. 3 shifts
227-0130
DANCERS Adult Club, Female
& Male & Barstaff, 3 shifts. Shift
pay $$$ plus bonuses. Excel¬
lent clientele. Professional or
Amateur. Call 949-0139
DANCERS
DANCERS
$350 a SHIR
minimum guaranteed
for those qualified! No
nudity or experience
necessary. Will train.
FT/PT AM PM shifts.
CALL 633-4000
DANCERS
DANCERS
WANTED
Come and dance for us.
Come and dance for fun.
Come and dance for money.
BIG
MONEY
$$$
No nudity. No
experience necessary
887-1550
DRIVERS $10-$15 per hour de¬
livering lunch in YOUR car for a
busy Aventura Sub shop. Mon-
Fri 11-3pm. PT Cooks also
needed. Exc Pay. 433-1881
FRONT DESK Hotel personnel
needed. All shifts Part & Full -
Time. Must be flexible. 909 Col*
tins Ave. Miami Beach, FI
FRONT DESK Energetic person
wanted forSouth Beach's
newest tanning salon. Drug
test required. Call 532-7076 or
369-9037
HOTEL POSITIONS Valet park-
ers and maintenence person
needed at the Traymore Hotel.
Must speak Englishi Apply at
2445 Collins Aye Miami Beach
UNE COOK/PANTRY R/PT po¬
sitions, apply in person only
between 2pm-4pm weekdays.
Cafe Ritmo in Mangos, 900
Ocean Drive, South Beach.
Bring References! §
RESTAURANT STAFF
ITALIANNI’S
Is now accepting applications
for experienced food servers,
host/hostess, cooks at
Kendall's newest Italian
Restaurant. We offer excellent
pay & benefits. Please apply in
person, M-F, 2-4pm. 11625 N.
Kendall Drive. No phone calls.
RESTAURANT POSITIONS
COLONY HOTEL
AND BISTRO
736 OCEAN DR
NOW INTERVIEWING FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS:
•RESTAURANT
MANAGER
Experienced individual with
Strong Leadership Skills
•HOUSEKEEPING
•BREAKFAST
•WAITSTAFF FOR
HOTEL (7AM-11AM)
APPLY IN PERSON WITH ALL
NECESSARY PAPERS AT
FRONT DESK OF HOTEL
ASK FOR JULIE OR ALEX
RESTAURANT POSITIONS ROO¬
NEY PLAZA/HOTEL needs pizza
man with grille & sautee expe¬
rience, bilingual. 2301
Collins Ave, Mezzanine Cafe
RESTAURANT POSITIONS Man¬
go's Cabaret is now hiring serv¬
ers, bartenders, and bussers to
perform choreographed dance
routines and serve in South
Beach's busy nightclub/res¬
taurant. Apply in person at
Mango's, 900 Ocean Dr.
RESTAURANT STAFF
Have You Always
Wanted To
Work With The Best?
PACIFIC TIME
AT LINCOLN RD
is opening
PACIFIC HEIGHTS
AT2530 PONCE DE
LEON, CORAL GABLES
We will be accepting applica¬
tions for all dining room and
kitchen positions from 11am-
2pm Thursday June 27-th &
Friday June 28th only. Apply in
person, well groomed, with
references, and resume.
Only the best need apply.
TAKE-OUT EXPEDITOR/Cash
ier for busy South Beach Chi¬
nese Restaurant. Full time,
permanent position avail for
responsible, friendly and hard¬
working individual. Bonuses +
Tips! Call (after 2pm) 532-0228
WAIT STAFF Great opportu¬
nity. Very experienced only.
For busy downtown cafe Mon¬
day - Friday. Days only. Call
381-6337.
WAIT STAFF Needed, experi¬
ence a must, salary plus tips.
Please Call 652-6000, or apply
in person 850 Ives Dairy Rd
WAITPERSON/BUSPERSON
Siam River Apply at 3455 NE
163rd St in person or call 945-
8079
360
Retail
ALL POSITIONS Gourmet
market on South Beach is hlr-
ing. Please call 532-1600
ALL POSITIONS Andalusia Bake
Shop now hiring for all posi¬
tions. Asst Managers, Deli, Bak¬
ery & Coffee Bar. Apply in per-
son: 909 Alton Rd. 531-CAKE
ATTENDANT needed for busy
tanning salons, hourly pay + %
commission. Apply in person
at 76717st SoBe or 9601
South Dixie Hwy, Miami
FLOWER SHOP Cleaning and
flower preparation. All around
work. Part time/permanent.
Call after 4pm. 895-4555
RETAIL MANAGER B(P in in¬
ventory & sales. Computer lit¬
erate. Apply: Dish, 939 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach or fox to:
305-534-8323
365
Sales
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE HOME
FROM COLLEGE? Chamber of
Commerce looking forrasser-
tive. Self-motivated business
major for summer work. Must
have car and desire to make
great business contacts for the
future. If you are sharp arid
want a summer job with
meaning, fax resume to Cham¬
ber South at 666-0508 ASAP.
No calls please.
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Here'S
your ticket to a career in ad¬
vertising sales. Work Full or ;
Part Time, flexible hours. Com¬
pensation includes; salaiy, ben¬
efits, + attractive commissions.
Based at our Miami regional of¬
fice. Exp is a plus. Training will
be provided. Auto required.
Fax resume to 858-1984 or call
us at 858-4151 ask for Bob.
ALL POSITIONS
SPOILED BRAT
BUT CAN'T AFFORD THE
UFESTYLE YOU WANT?
We^can help! Looking
for career-oriented,
money-motivated individuals
who want to achieve success.
Call 599-9931


For the latest information on internet
providers and computer services, turn
fio Byte Site in this week's Classifieds.
mo Advertise, tall an Advertising % ^ -y-
# Unlimited Uncensored Internet Access
sfc Efficient Service & Support
sk Reliable Hardware & Internet connections
Dedicated connections available
sf* Free Internet Access Software with Sign-Up
To find out about our other services, call
StarServe
(305)418-4100
Serving Dade & Broward
^Jittg^wwwstareervexom^infoQstarservejCOfn^
INTERNET ACCESS
$ 15/IVONTH
Unlimited SHGLL/SUP/PPP. IOMB, FTP,
G-mail, News, Chat, Download Free 5W
FREE WEB HOME PAGE
NetSideCorp.
531-1995
http://www.netside.net
THE ONLY ONE IN MIAMI
INTERNET FOR ALL
Rent our Computers from $7.00 (30 min)
Computer Games - Graphic Design - Business
and Copy Services - Fax, Printing and Scanning
Services - Education Software
Learn Spanish on Computers!
NET trip
1461 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, 305-674-9644
internet
connections
* Web Hosting & Design
8 Novell To Internet ¡¡pfeways
ifllMliii
♦lOMb.Diskspace
-World Wide Web
•WWW-Usef Home Pages Free Mg
j•Companion email accounts
•Serving Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, JHB|
amauw and Boca Raton
•free Internet setu| software |.«
I • ISON lines and V.34
NelRunner Inc 12173 South Dixie Highway
Miomi FL 3Jijo
■■fta-- .‘rv’ ” 1
1305) 255-5800 • (3051 255-5403 (fax)
info@nelrunner.net iiHp -,'www netrunnoi net
Di4a A directory for Computer
DJIC vllv Services ¿ Equipment
y —
The Best
â–  Internet Service Provider
I in the Southeast Now Has
’ the Best Prices!
|® Full Internet access for
as low as $6.95/month.
I ® Your choice of five
flexible plans designed
to fit the way you use
the Internet.
® Unlimited use plans as low
as $19.95/month.
® All plans include a full
suite of software, including
Netscape Navigatorâ„¢, and
accessible tech support.
H.
MindSpring
30 Day Money Back Guarantee.
800-719-4332
sales@mindspring.com
http://www.mindspring.com/
© 1996 MindSpring Enterprises, Inc.
Send tis your ad by e-mail,
and we'll publish it free.
Remember to include your
name, phone number and
snail-mail address.
romance@miami-newtimes.com
Professional
Macintosh®
Consultant/
¡gP Trainer
•System Upgrades
• Memory/hard drive upgrades
•Purchase Advice
• Internet training/access 460-4440 or
• Office & Home Service 770-6306 Bpr.
INTERNET
FULL ACCESS. Unlimited Hours
$0 pp/mo.
www.worldpass.net
Call Now! (305) 933-2577
y/////// \\\ \ \\\
\
V
\
\
\
m
m
540
Byte Site
COMPUTER 386SX-33 with
modem, monitor, & surge pro¬
tector, 2 years old, great for
school, works perfect. $275
obo. 945-5648 brp 842-4073
COMPUTER TUTORING
PRIVATE COMPUTER TUTOR
Professional teaches how to
use PC. Learn MS Office or MS
Works for Word Processing,
Databases, and Spreadsheets,
Word Perfect, Windows 95,
America Online and Internet, E-
mail. Computer Dating, and
much more! One on one in
home/office at your pace &
schedule. Call Tim Harris Dade/
Broward (954) 779-3424
COMPUTERS 1 brand new AST.
14>rand new NECPentium 75.
1 gig HD, 8 megs, fully loaded.
1486 SX, 4 megs, 400 mb, fully
loaded. Call 800-998-6183.
CONSULTANT Mac Consultant,
assist with installation/opera¬
tion of software, hard disks,
up-dates, system problems,
INTERNET & music. Fair prices.
House calls. Patrick 790-5026
INTERNET ACCESS Net Run¬
ner. See our display ad in this
section or call 255-5800
INTERNET CLASSIFIEDS
90 Days for $50. Call now for
details! 1-800-211-5788
INTERNET SERVICE BlidgeNet
See our display ad this section.
Http://www.bridge.net. Or call
374-3031.
MONITOR & PRINTER About 6
months old. Excellent condi¬
tion. 12' Macintosh Performa
6116 monitor, $300 obo. Hew¬
lett Packard color desk jet
printer, 855-C, $400 includes
software. 675-5001
WEB SUE MANAGEMENT
We specialize in the (lay to day
operations of your web site.
From HTML to GAVA. For more
info: e-mail: ftJrvra@gate.net *
or call Frank 954-425-3721 J
COMPUTERS
Find all computer
services & equipment
for sale in
BYTE SITE,
New Times
Classified’s computer
directory.
To advertise, call
New Times Classified
372-9393
if-
Times June 20 - 26,1996


New Times June 20 - 26,1996
A directory for the
Mind, Body & Spirit
Hat is the Sound of Turn Hands massaging?
It’s the small, quiet voice within you that says pu ye made the right choice
for your own life ¡j by choosing a career based upon personal fulfillment.
Contentment, Eased upon the quality of your working hours.
Security, based upon who you arejnd what you do each day to earn your living.
You’ve chosen Educating Hands School of Massage*
- A caring, highly gersonalized approach to massage instruction.
|§|4^ ^Towaíkisíth others ori^ihe toad;less traveled,”
' towMls a rewarding, hurnanistic career.
.New evening classes begjn june 25th. Daytime classes begin July 8th.
Listeni§¿your ownjntemal voice.
Take action. ,
educating hands
School of massage
I 8th Street near Brickell Metroráil'Stáffóh^ 800-999^^t
OMENTAL HEALTH
•Sweífish - /y V y
CENTER
•NeurollHS^HMm* Reflexology
. •*"**w‘wWWOOOOOflft|*
n.nom-——- :
Community Night
PROFESSIONAL ONLY
Tues • Wed • Thurs
CaroHiniÉfreé ijif
Acupuncture Treatment?
MA 11801 / i HMr 737-5615
Only $20
| Stress
11/4 HR MASSAGE
Intro Special $40
Iris^nnia
1§|¡¡ Bv Appointment Only
• Low Back Pain
I K&Sfr Selected as a therapist
-• aa8jüj¡g¡|8SB£.- s.-féftm. ' . ¿MÍÉb
* Stomach Problems mm '***
■ MSí f * to The U.S. Olympic
V Team “Atlanta 1996”
Call: 266-6099
By Appt: (305) 672-9961 or 586-9049 Pager 605-4515
ROBERT ALLEN, LMT
MA#0014738 Nationally Certified
300
Help Wanted
continued
AREA SALESPERSON
PUBLIC NOTICE
WE NEED 95 PEOPLE
WHO SERIOUSLY WANT TO LOSE
10-30 LBS IN 30 DAYS-100%
NATURAL HERBS FOR ONLY $33.
(AREA DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED.)
ENGLISH 573-7668
SPANISH 460-3344
commission sales Persons
required to sell advertising on
TV. Experience preferred but
not necessary. Written appli¬
cations only: CARIB TV, 725
84th St #2 M Beach. FL 33141
PHONE SALES $10 per hour
salary. Easy sales. Strong, posi¬
tive, aggressive, pleasant, per¬
son needed. Call 954-384-2200
PROMOTIONS
CIRCLE ME!
How many ads are you going
to drcle before you realize,
you're not getting ahead? Fun
company seeking fun people.
Looking for strong leader to
earn above average income.
CALL 305-513-0222
REAL ESTATE Agents needed.
Are you experienced? Do you
need tb be trained? Busy
South Beach office. Licensed
98 RE broker. Joseph 531 -1973.
SALES
COMMODITY ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Established Commodity Fu¬
tures Brokerage Now Hiring A
Limited Number Of Qualified
Senes 3
Licensed Professionals
And/or
Proven Sales-Oriented
Trainees
• Excellent Income Potential
and Competitive Commission
Structure ($50,000 Annually is
Conservative)
• 100% Company-Sponsored
Lead Programs
• Health Plan
• Positive, Energetic, Fast-
Paced Working Environment
with Offices Located at The
Grand Bay Plaza, Coconut
Grove
• Proven, Established & Crow¬
ing Organization Fully Licensed,
NFA/CFTC Registered, Inde¬
pendent introducing Broker¬
age
• Will Provide Training and
Sponsor Licensing for Qualified
Trainees .
SALES PROFESSIONAUSM
A MUST!
Call For Appointment Mon-
Sat 8am-5pm 305-858-9039
SALES
$$ATTENTION$$
Inti company in expantion
seeks suce$$-minded individ¬
uals to help develop a market¬
ing group. Training/travel avail¬
able. Above average income!
FOR APPT CALL
994-9908
SALES Prominent fitness cen¬
ter needs a professional sales¬
person to help generate new
business. Prior exp. is required
with a proven track record. Fax
resume to 592-3363
SALESPERSON wanted to pro¬
mote exciting new fashion line.
Commission. Experience/will
train. Call Maribel at (305)
653-2129
sports & fitness Fast grow¬
ing company expanding in
South Florida. We need quality
people to join our team. Call
594-6500for an appt.
TELEMARKETING We need a
person with a dear speaking
voice, earn from $6-$12 a hr.
Great working atmosphere &
benefits. Call for interview we
train! 891-1687
TELEMARKETERS Florida
Grand Opera seeks sales people
for part time positions, 9:30-
1:30 & 2:30-6:30, previous sales
experience and good phone
skills a must. Call Jill, Mon-
Thurs, 9:30am-6pm 854-1643
370
Salons
ALL POSITIONS
PROFESSIONAL’S
NEEDED
One of Miami's finest salons is
now looking for experienced
stylist's and fadalist's prefer¬
ably with own following. Also
assistant's and other positions
available. For consideration call:
ALEXANDER’S
OF AUSTRALIA
666-4092
ALL POSITIONS
LEO OF ITALY
At The Mayfair in
Coconut Grove needs:
• Professional Hairdressers
• Licensed Assistants
• Fadalist/Masseur/Nail Tech
Salary plus commission.
START NOW!
For interview call 448-2555
FACIAL! ST/M AN ICURISTS
Equipped fadal room and
room for hairstylists/manicur¬
ists. Rent or commission. In
trendy So. Miami. 666-1097
HAIR STYLIST With following
wanted urgently. Excellent
commission. Busy Miami Beach
area salon. Refs required.
Please call any time 867-0832.
HAIRDRESSERS and Manucur-
ists needed. Doral area, up to
70% commission with cus- ¡
tomers. Call 592-3647
MET-RX
60’s $ 88.88
20’s $ 33.33
Unbeueveable Fat Burners!!
DESIGNER PROTEIN • FULL EAS UNE
$22.99 (2 LB)
All Natural Nutrition
Located in Shopping Center at corner
of Coral Way and S.W. 122 Ave.
553 - 8233
WALK RIGHT INTO YOUR
FUTURE.
Our Uve psychics will
guide you there!
Love
Success
Money
Happiness
Sex
Power
Family
Career
1 -800-577-TELL
$2.99 min. (8355 )
1-900-286-STAR
$3.99 min. ( 782 7)
Mystical Aamulet
occammrn
SpeUCandpl
JcwcSy, Oil
giiaTterapy
¡illlressels
W 1
w
Classes intne Metaphysical
Psychic Consultations & Classes Available in English/Spanish
Serving the Wiccan, Pagan and Metaphysical Community
7360 Coral Way 17A * 265-2228
FRENCH FORMULA NAILS
305-865-8650^,
NOT
v ACRYLIC
Looks Absolutely Natural!
Fill Once A Month
Won’t damage your nails
No polish needed
HEALTH
STUDIO
ORIENTAL STAFF
BEST RELAXATION
LUXURY STEAM BATH
(305) 652-4448
MM0005810
339 NE167 St, North Miami Beach
10am - 12pm - Open 6 Days mm
SALON POSITION
THINKING OF
CLOSING?
Current Salon Owners
with following oppto:
• work with renowned stylist
• be an indep contractor
• fabulous location - C Gables
• professionalism to compli¬
ment you & your dientele
• all inquires confidential
MACHIK0 SALON
445-7885
550 Biltmore Way Coral Cables
SALON POSmONS Hairstylist
and Manicurist with following
needed for South Beach Salon.
Call 538-1121
SALON POSITIONS Reception¬
ist, assistant, hairdresser and
manicurist needed, experi¬
enced and licensed, for Inter¬
view, call Patrick 361-8399
STYUST Experienced hairsty¬
lists with or without following
for a full service salon. Must be
positive minded and motivat¬
ed. Call 358-0353
STYUSTS/NA1L-TECHS. and
fadalists needed immediately.
Call Shawndee or Hunter at
234-7799
375
Technical
CARPENTER & HELPER Tools &
Transportation a must. South
Beach area. English a plus.
Please contact 674-1740
WINDOW TINTER Needed,
great pay, Miami Beach, exp a
must. Call Arthur 673-3268
380
Positions Wanted
ARTIST For Sale! logos, murals,
painting, drawing, comics,
graphics, portraits, mosaic art.
fashion illustration, etc. We
work with you! Call 861-9087
Maxim or Trapy
RECEPTIONIST Mature woman
seeks full time or part time
work. Coral Gables area. Call '
461-2766
405 Antiques/Arts/Collectibles
410 Appliances
415 Auctions
420 Business/Commercial
425 Clothing
430 Computers
435 Electronics
440 Exercise/Sports Equipment
445 Furniture
446 Gift Guide
450 Garage/Yard Sales
455 Jewelry
460 Lost & Found
465 Miscellaneous
470 Pets/Supplies
475 Photo/Video
480 Records/CDs/Tapes
485 Tickets
490 Videos
495 Wanted to Buy
Confused? ;
Psychic Anytime
Dayc|Night
I 1^28 gM
Agil
Irione l8 or older
ml I 24 hours
Hemorrhoids, Herpes, Yeast &
Urinary Infection, Impotence,
Premature Ejaculation Problem?
Too embarrassed to talk?
Even with a professional?
Find out how to control the
problem at home*
1-900 -787- OllO, 18+,
$2.99 a min., 3 min. avg., avg. cost $8.97
CREDIT CARD PROCESSOR
Zon Jr XL credit card process¬
ing machine and printer.
Bought new in December for
$1000, used only 3 times. Ask-
ing $500 FIRM. 538-5470
430
Computers
COMPUTERS
Find all computer
services & equipment
for sale in
New Times
Classified’s computer
directory.
To advertise, call
New Times Classified
372-9393
435
Electronics
CAR AMPUFIER Sony XM-4045,
160 watts, 4/3/2 channels,
under warranty until 6-4-98,
asking $275. Call 371-5944 ext
201 or 669-0157 after 6pm
CAR CD/STEREO Sony CDX-
5060 with detachable face.
Bought for $349. Sell for $100.
Call 673-8776 after 6:30pm.
CAR STEREO Alpine with rmvbl
face $235, ADS PQ20 Amp -
$250, Boston Acoustic 6x9s
$150 Alpine alarm 8070L $125.
279-2914
TELEVISION 4'Hitachi split
screen television, brand new.
three year warranty, surround
sound, five speakers $1,500.
Call 673-1501
THEATRE SYSTEM For the
home, all hi-fidelity compo¬
nents, new and in the box,
paid $3,000, sacrifice for
$1,900. Call Rene at 868-0956
440
Exercise/Sports Equipment
ASSORTED STUFF
• Home stairmaster. Fitness
Stepper brand, excellent
condition, all manuals, digital,
paid $200, only $85.
• Schwinn Sports Tourer
female 10 speed, works, $25.
• 70* Head snowskis. Look
bindings, poles, bag, excellent
condition, $60.
• Avant snowskis, lyrolia
bindings, poles, $20.
• Nordioa NR990 ski boots,
men's size 10, $20.
Kendall Area
Call Tracey 666-9348.
BYTE SITE,
405
Antiques/Arts/Collectibles
ANTIQUES Natural pine english
hutch. Dealers wanted it, now
ready to sell at $1,200. Arrange
moving. Other decorative ob¬
jects. Call 531-7467
ART DECO Charming 6ft kitch¬
en cabinet with glass window
$85,2 unique Indian Toma¬
hawks $100 each, private party.
Call Carol at 945-2090
CLOTHING Would you like to
get into Elton John's pants?
Call 254-5199
COLLECTIBLE SUIT ELTON
JOHN. One of a kind electric
blue Versace tour suit with
matching blue Versace snake-
skin shoes. Worn by Elton John
on the 1994 Two Man World
Tour with Ray Cooper. $25,000
obo. For more info: 668-4727
COLLECTIBLE HELMET DON
SHULA collectible. One of a kind
helmet, #325 from all time
record breaking 325th win!
Signed by the coach himself.
$10,000 obo. For more info
Cbll 668-4727
COLLECTIBLES Planters & gar¬
den urns (iron), benches
(concrete), antique doors,
trunk, medicine cabinet (wood,
teak). Call 864-2440
DRESSES European Designer
Collectible Dresses (2, both size
6) worn by Luda Mendez in the
sitcom Confetti on National TV.
One evening gown $5000 obo,
other cocktail dress $2500 obo.
954-927-0096
PAINTING Peter Max original
oil, 12' x 14', all documenta¬
tion induding appraisal, serious
inquiries only. Please call pager
#954-209-4436
410
Appliances
AIR CONDITIONING Repairs.
Buy and sell. Also auto A/C
done. Call 757-8805.
420
Business/Commercial
COPIERS 1 Minolta EP 470 Z,
model A-15, with collated 1 Mi¬
nolta EP 8600 with collater.
Must sell! Changing offices. Call
for price 800-998-6183


ICnow^cwrJcrc?
VAMPIRE
The Masquerade
The Storytelling Game
of Personal Horror
Take the Vampire: The
Masquerade Trivia Test
Win Free Vampire Merdgindise.
For more Information And An
Entry Form Visit Our Store Or
CaB (305) 264-1250
jsptfa
m
Hill ill
White Wolf Game Studio
PllltSlllt all rights reserved
7921 Bird Road #44 • Miami, FL. 33155* 264-1250
THANKS FOR MAKING US
“BEST OF MIAMI”
Anime Shown Ail Day
(Overbad 450 Titles Available)
50%
Off
Sale
as a
Thank
You!
r THE >
ALTERNATE DIMENSION
COMICS & ANIME RENTALS >
6781 Miller Drive Miami, Florida 33155
305 663-4730
BICYCLE Black men's 10-speed,
racing bike in excellent condi¬
tion, $95 obo. Please call
868-3561.
BICYCLE Raleigh Racing Bike,
26' frame, aqua, clip-on ped¬
als, computer, scott bar, $300
Obo. Call 598-8702
BICYCLE Road bike, Raleigh
Technium Prestige. Paid $900
will sacrifice for $300. Cali Ro¬
chelle at 445-7833
BIKE Klein mountain bike, can¬
dy apple red, originally $1,800,
will sellfor $950 obo. 899-5726
BIKE New beach cruiser, tur¬
quoise blue, one speed. Paid
$135, will sell for $115, need
space! Call 673-0783
HOME GYM Universal weight
set. 326 lbs. Brand new bench¬
ing bar worth $100. Preacher
curl bar with-steel locks. Marcy
bench with leg extension. It all
goes out the door for $150
Call 673-8776.
KAYAK Flat/white. Good con¬
dition, allaccessories. Cost
$700, selling for $400. Please
call 674-1490.
MASSAGE TABLE and chairs
wanted. Will pay top $$$ for
good condition. Call 794-2340.
POOL TABLES Regulation size
billiard tables - shop closed, ex¬
cellent condition, reasonably
priced. Call Mr Z at 558-0007
ROLLERBLADES Bauer F-3'S.
Mens' size 8.5. Used 3-4 times.
Brand new! Will sell for $90
o.b.o. Call 673-8776 +6pm.
TANNING BEDS
WOLFF TANNING BEDS
TAN AT HOME!
Buy direct and
SAVE!!
Commercial/Home
Units from $199.00
Low Monthly Payments
FREE color catalog
Gall TODAY
1(800)842-1305
USED SPORTING Goods
Wanted! We buy and sell new
and used sporting goods.
Kendall Mall 9019 SW 107th
Ave, or call 596-5580
püry it nomn
SPORTS
445
Furniture
ASSORTED 3 sofas, $150-$300.
Rattan chest of drawers $50,
armolre $65, dresser $65,2
endiables $20 ea, mirror $25.2
chrome/leather chairs $40 ea.
Mise lamps, more. 532-1133
BED Brand new never used
Serta Perfect sleeper queen
size. Includes mattress, bot¬
tom & frame. Was $900 scari¬
fying fór $325; Call 541 -1704.
BED Full size, and furniture,
only $195. Call Emanuel 668-
8525
BED Full size: Brand néw
frame, metal headboard, and
Medi-Pedic mattress and box¬
spring. The mattress retails for
$299. Selling whole set for
$200. Call 673-8776 after 6pm.
BED King size Sealy. New! Nev¬
er used. Was $1200, will sell
$375. Call 446-9346 can deliver.
BEDROOM SET Early American
bedroom furniture. Dresser
with hutch, two night stands,
king size headboard. Call for
price anytime. 275-8106.
COFFEE/END TABLES Glass
top and black modem base: All
matching. Art deco. Will sell
the whole set for $60. Call 673-
8776 after 6pm.
DINETTE SET Circular basket
chrome table with excellent
glass top, 4 matching chairs,
cushioned and mauve $290.
Call 868-8423
DINING ROOM Brand new,
beautiful black lacquer set. 4
chairs, extension and matching
china cabinet. Asking $1000.
Please call 559-0222.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Black and forest green. Very
modem & very cool. Room for
32' TV, 100+ CD's, VCR, etc..,
Glass door. Retails at $300. Will
sell for $150. Call 673-8776 af-
ter 6;00pm.
FURNITURE Mid-century & vin¬
tage Deco armchair, bookshelf,
contry comer cabinet, Paul
McCobb chairs & desk, Vem -
Panton stocking chairs, sofa,
buffet. Call 868-9416
FURNITURE Luxury living room
set. 3mth's old. Biege sofa,
loveseat, large chair & otto- |
man. TWo glass end tobies, one
large glass coffee table. Scotch
Guarded and guaranteed with
papers to prove it! Paid $2,400,
sacrifice for $1,700.579-1513
or bpr 617-6669
FURNITURE Art Deco four
piece rattan sectional sofa,
cocktail tables, rattan/glass din¬
ing table, other Deco pieces
plus a Memphis chaise lounge.
Call for descriptions and prices
921-1840
FURNITURE Moving Sale.
Everything you need for an
Apt. Beds, couches, chairs,
car...etc... Call Immediately
672-6765
FURNITURE High quality ma¬
hogany book cases & antiques.
Priced for quick sale. Please call
531-3110
FUTON CHAIR with ottoman.
Natural rough wood, excellent
Condition, great for studio or
overnight guests. $150. Please
call 532-3090.
FUTONS Fabulous futons for
sale. $110 or nearest offer.
Class top table $35 or nearest
offer. Call 672-8589
HIGH CHAIR Peg Perego high
chair, adjustable height. Like
new, $65. Please call 933-1599.
LOVE SEAT Natural canvas.
Large & small white Shelves,
13* color Tv, black desk-air¬
brush, compressor, coffee
maker, etc. Robin 531-1143
MATTRESS Mattress with box,
queen size, like new, $170 obo.
Call Lionel at 867-1743
MATTRESS SET Extra Firm.
Queen $199. Full $160. Free
Frame, Free Delivery, 20 Year
Warranty. Call 551 -3937 or
beep 391-8192
MATTRESS SET Brand new.
Free frame. Free delivery.
Queen $160. Full $130. iwin
$105. Call 551-3937 dr beep
391-8192
MISCELLANEOUS Black Laquer
entertainment center $350,
Glass & chrome 48' round din¬
ing room table & 4 black chairs,
$400. Peter Max framed pic¬
ture, $500. G|ass & chrome tea-
cart $150, Modern glass halo¬
gen light fixture. 931 -8608
MOVING SALE Couch, bed, TV.
typewriter, book shelves, lamp,
etc. Make best offer! Please call
381-8908
MOVING SALE Two classic
Ethan Allen arm chairs, excel¬
lent condition, $250. Two Ba¬
roque, solid brass, antique
chandeliers $300/each. One
antique gold-leaf mirror, oval,
3'x4', $150. Designer sports
jackets and suits. Gall Deen at
534-0854, leave message
SOFA & CHAIR Overstuffed,
white on white, paid $2,400,
asking $1,100. Call 538-4534
SOFA Black leather sofa bed,
modem, round, hardwood ta¬
ble with four chairs. Moving at
the end of the month. MUST
SELL. Call Simon 673-9678
TABLE Antique Oak Table (3x3
extends to 3 x 5) & 4 chairs.
$400. Call 672-5860
TABLE One dining room table,
black marble base, glass top,
55'x35', two years old $125 .
obo. South Beach area. Call
(leave message) 555-6338
WALL UNIT Almond laqured
wall unit/enterteinment cen¬
ter. Call 944-9746
WATERBED Beautiful, black
leather, king size bed. Black
leather headboard, brand new,
$400,.mótion free mattress,
heater, timed vibrator, king
size reversadle comforter. Will
sell all for $400! Please leave
message at (954)961-1896
450
Garage/Yard Sales
SOUTH BEACH 919 Michigan
Ave #2.6/22-6/23rd, 10am till.
Upscale furniture and acces¬
sories for a whole house.
Paintings, artwork. Everything
must go. Any questions Call;
673-0478
455
Jewelry
DIAMOND RING Beautiful! Ap¬
praised $2800 sale, $1800, No
dealers. 385-2608
465
Miscellaneous
A/C UNIT Rheerh 3 Ton con¬
densing unit & inner unit $400
and IHP water pump for jacuzzi
Spa $100/828-3745
ARCHITECHTURAL FACADES
Ideal for flea markets or art .
fairs. 600 assorted designs, $3
each. Gall Paul 534-0840 or
674-1000.
ASSORTED Big and small stag¬
horns, plus other plants.-Col¬
lectors bottles, cracked, glass
vases, etc. Iron lawn furniture.
Lawn equipment and tools.
Decorator & collectors books.,,
Bamboo stick shades. Call now!
954-782-6956,305-895-9602-
ASSORTED For salé: piano, Ro- •
land DX 7 synthesizer, kids' gar¬
den playhouse, 2 bikes, lamps,
dresser, 2 mattresses, more.
Call to see. 532-7628
ASSORTED STUFF Refrigerator
$75. Antique tapestry $800.2
Art Deco dressers-$200 each,
plus designer accessories. Must
sell! Please call 867-7700.
HOT DOG CART Includes pans,
umbrella and full propane tank,
for dally use or special events,
excellent condition: For more
information call 891-1089
HYDROPONICS SYSTEM Com¬
plete system for sale. Great for
the home gardener. A Steal for
$300. For more information
call 635-2090
MATTRESS twin size without
box spring $35, picture frame
(wall-to wall) $75. Call after
1pm 557-6571
MISCELLANEOUS GE Electric
Dryer, $75. Old IBM typewriter,
$20. 532-3270
MISCELLANEOUS Resettable
combination lock - Texas Sup¬
ply 9/89: Cheney Reaction/
Tower: Shin Bet drone/Clinton
helicopter: Greenspan Con¬
corde/Griffin. Will - Safe de¬
posit box 73„Chase Federal
Bank, 7474 Collins Ave, MB, Fla.
33141 William Broder, 'Reb' Zev
- Cm Jkt. New Times 6/20/96
MISCELLANEOUS
ART DECO STYLE
FURNITURE AT
LIQUIDATION
PRICES
EVERYTHING MUST
GO!!!
•ANTIQUES «STOVES
•TELEVISIONS «BEDS
•CHAIRS •REFRIGERATORS
•SOFAS «TABLES «LAMPS
Vintage & Modem Furniture
PRIMROSE HOTEL
1120 COLUNS AVE
WEDJUNE 19-SUNJUNE 23
MOVING SALE Furniture, Fu¬
ton bed, Kitchen appliances.
Stereo, TV, VCR, paintings, din¬
ing room table, phone, all
must gol Call Beth at 532-1967
POTTERY SUPPLIES Manufac¬
turers of de-aired clay, full line
of kilns, wheels, glazes, tools,
books and more! Also, classes
avail. Miami Clay Co 651-4695
VARIOUS ITEMS 14K pocket
watch. Motorola classic 2 cell
phone. Wheel chair $95. Pen-
tax ME. 12' kickers car box. DJ
set up. Call 674-1310
VARIOUS ITEMS Glass etogere,
elec typewriter, Sharp AM/FM
recorder, Betomax. $40 each.
Anniversary clock, speakers,
luggage. $25 each. 861-5044
WATCHES Costume jewelry,
portable VCR, 13' TV, Poloroid/
slide/movie equip, 3/4' Beta
topes. Turntable, reél-cassette,
speakers. Guitar case. Cel-
phone. Apple II, Amiga, printer,
Comodore128 & 286. Folding
bike, tennis racquet. Baby
monitor, stroller. Old Ninten¬
do, Sega. All $1-$50.674-1310
470
Pets/Supplies
CAT/KITTEN Abandonéd,
beautiful 6 week old kitten,
available for adoption to a lov¬
ing home. If you are the right
person, I will pay for herShbts..-
Please call 856-6413
CATS Kittens for adoption to
loving home, one orange/
white, óné calico, and two
orange, shots included. Call
271-7368
CATS Rescued: Ginger & white
female spayed, shot. Black
male neutered Siamese mixed
Personality plus. 666-2196
CATS TWo cats, four yrs old:
one black with green eyes, the
other smokey colored with
blue eyes. Both for adoption
to a loving home. 866-4024
CATS/KITTENS 6 weeks, fluffy,
black/white, $25. Male calico
one year. Call 534:8662
DOC Free to good home. Lov¬
able, pure Shepherd. 4 year old
male. Call 651-6883
DOGS Free Puppies to loving
home. Jade Russell Terrier mix.
5 females, 8 weeks old. Call
754-4648
CUINNEA PICS IWo babyguin-
nea pigs, cage, water bottles,
and all their belongings. Great
kids' birthday gift! $45 for all.
Call 235-5539
Not Paid Right?
Q. I Hied a complaint against my
employer with the U.S. Dept of
Labor because I was not paid prop*
erly. The Dept of Labor investigat¬
ed and wrote me that I was correct,
my employer owed me back wages,
but that it would not pursue my
claim. What can I doI
A. We would be glad to assist you to pursue
your claim for back wages for overtime or
minimum wage. If you are interested in col¬
lecting your unpaid wages call for a free con¬
sultation.
No fees and no cost if no recovery.
Jonathan Kroner Law Office
305-358-0025
100 N. Biscayne Blvd. 30th Floor Miami
SNAKE 3 ft Red Tail Boa Con¬
strictor with tank and accesso¬
ries. Fantastic dealfor only
$200. Call 635-2090
475
Photo/Video
ADULT VIDEOS Private collec¬
tion, all kinds, over 100 factory
originals only $5-$10 each, Call
447-7913
VCR Quasar HIFI Stereo, 4-head
video, remote control, owner's
manual, black, perfect cond.
Asking $140 obo. Call George
945-3648 or bpr 842-4073
485
Tickets
AIRLINE TICKETS for sale can
be found in the Getaways sec¬
tion of Classifieds, appearing
every week before Motor.
OLYMPICS TICKETS Basketball,
rowing, volleyball. July 24-26.
Will sell at face válüe. Please call
for details. Won't last tong!
567-9646
495
Wanted To Buy
ELECTRIC TRAINS Wanted! Old
Uonel, American-Flyer, etc. Any
condition, cash waiting! Also .
want slot cars. Private collec-.
tor/Hollywood. 954-987-6485
500
Home Services
505 Mise. Home Services
Air Conditioning
Alarms/Security
Appliances
Carpentry
Carpets Floors
Cleaning/Home & Office
Contractors
Electrical
Glass/Mirror
Home Improvement
Interior Design
Landscaping
Moving/Storage
Painting
Pest Control
Plumbing
Pool/Spa
Remodeling
Roofing
505
Home Services
CLEANING
CLEANING QUEENS
We're as picky as you are! Leave
the dirty work to us. Honest
and reliable. 859-7364.
CLEANING HOME/OFFICE
PRESTO CLEANING
One call cleans It all. Licensed &
Insured. Commercial & Resi¬
dential. 10% Off new custom¬
ers. Call (305) 673-5555
MOVING/STORAGE
★ ★ ★ it'it'★ ★ ★ ★ ★
ALWAYS MOVING
Flat Rate. 24 hours local and
long distance. Know what you
are paying before you move.
Uc# MR95/125; Call 650-9080
MOVING
DOUG'S MOVING Lie #344610-1
Truck/van, 24 hr service, very
experienced, dependable! Call
Doug 891-0195 - Bp 478-4852
ROOF & WOOD repair. Quality
work at great prices, guaran¬
teed. Uc #057001. Please call
378-6305 or beep 806-8448.
530 Business Opportunities
535 Mise. Business Services
Accounting /Bookkeeping
Computer Services
Credit/Financial Services
Income Tax Services
Legal Notices
Legal Services
Resumes/Typesetting
Typing/Word Processing
Workshops/Seminars
530
Business Opportunities
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
DO AWAY with your Long Dis¬
tance phone bill (NO carrier
change) + make serious money
Call: Marta at 691-0020
EARN TRUE POTENTIAL One
of the fastest growing tele¬
communications co. in Amerind
offers terrific career oppt for
aggressive self starters. Be
your own boss with flexible
hours. Please call 228-7739
HEALTH AND WEALTH Ethical
professionals: Earn big money
in preventative health care.
24 hour recorded message,
447-8044, or 800-890-7022
IMPORTANT
NOTICE!
$1,500 weekly possible! High
pay and flexible hours with no
gimmicks! Serious individuals.
Call 1-800-700-9518
INVESTOR/PARTNER New
York fashion designer seeks se¬
rious individual or company for
retoil/wholesale business. Call
Cosme 908-354-1963
PARTNER WANTED For rapid¬
ly-expanding recession-proof
business. Free 24hr recording,
800-677-1207, pin 1725, then
call 305-532-2182.
REACH MILUONS of buyers for
your products/services. Details
free! Call 1-800-458-5580 .
535
Mise. Business Services
ACCOUNTING/CPA
BUSINESS/INDIV/TAXES.
Free phone consultation or we
can visit you! Ask for 1 free
month of services. 864-8454
COMPUTER SERVICES Find all
your computer services and
equipment for sale in BYTE
SITE, New Times Classified's
computer directory.
CREDIT/FINANCIAL Debt con¬
solidation. Cut payments to
50%, reduce or eliminate inter¬
est. Same day approval. NON¬
PROFIT. Call 1-800-522-4485
LEGAL NOTICE
ADOPTION:
DEVOTED DADS...
Active, Loving,
Relaxed,
Home Study
Approved
Professional couple
with Strong Basic
Values
Desire Open Adoption.
We will provide your
precious infant with a
caring & nurturing
home filled with Love,
Enthusiasm, Energy,
Fun, Music, Books, and
Two playful dogs.
PLEASE CALL
1(800)284-9904
irSOMNB
am nun vni dm
For the latest information
on internet providers
and computer services,
turn to Byte Site in this
week's Classifieds.
To advertise, call an Advertising
Representative at 372-9393
Newtimes
CLASSIFIED
LEGAL NOTICES
FICTITIOUS NAME
Mr. Billiard. Owner: Intertech
Enterprises, Inc. 1000 Island
Blvd, Suite 2111, North Miami
Beach, FL 33160.
LEGAL NOTICES
FICTmOUS„NAME
Outpatient Med Psy Care. Own¬
er: Outpatient Psy Care, Inc.
"3990 West Flagler St, Suite
205B, Miami, FL 33134.
LEGAL NOTICES
FICTITIOUS NAME
J.P. Randolph Corporation.
Owner: Carport Megabrokers,
Inc. 2895 Biscayne Blvd, Suite
401, Miami, FL 33137.
LEGAL NOTICE
FICTICIOUS NAME .
DBA as SAGO Graphics. Owner:
Jaime Salinas. 17000 NW 67th
Ave, Suite 412, Miami FL 33015.
LEGAL SERVICES FREE
consultation! Traffic tickets
$49. Divorce, personal injury,
wills (Se habla Español). Ste¬
phen P Gant, Atty 858-2000
LEGAL SERVICES Family Law:
Divorce, paternity, child custo¬
dy/support, restraining orders.
Call attny Anastasia M Garda
from 9am-5pm at 461-5885.
LONG DISTANCE Long distance
services. Independent agents
wanted. Call Dan at 375-9555
READER NOTICE The hiring of
a lawyer is an important ded-
sion that should not be based
solely upon advertisements.
Before you dedde, ask the law¬
yer or the law firm to send you
free written information about
the lawyer or law firm's qual¬
ifications and experience.
550 ^ ^
Personal Services
555 Mise. Personal Services
Adoptions
Announcements
Adult Care
Beauty Services
Bridal Services
Child Care
Entertainment
Instruction/Tutoring •
Party Services
Photography/Video
Parents & Kids
Private Investigation
560 Singles Scene
565 Wedding Bells
555
Mise. Personal Services
CREDIT BAD? Our Attorneys
dear your negative reports. We
get home loans for good peo¬
ple with bad credit! FREE CON-
SULTATiON. Call 505-576-8822
HARP MUSIC FOR WEDDINGS
AND PARTIES. Call for free tope
and information. Classical-Jazz-
Trio (flute-cello-harp) also avail¬
able. Call Christine 954-564-
0171x103,407-289-1035
si
New Times June 20 - 26,1996


S New Times June 20 - 26; 1996
KH
i V Í
tM
TAHITI #s
2Rrl
Florida Residents
$1,648per person August 17 and 24,1996
Cruise only, per person port charges
additional, based on double occupancy.
7 DayTMiiti Guises Sailing from Papeete
Huahme • Raiatea • Bom Bora • Moorea
Call 670-0800
EKMlIiMRHIlilil
50%. 95% OFF H
Miami to Panama City
—la
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Miami to Wo -
IrEpII
Miami to Buenoa Aif©3 ;'' ■
mmom
“Flimits subject to Availability"
1-800-549-2300 ext
9»
550
Personal Services
continued
INSTRUCTION/TUTORING
TENNIS LESSONS
Michael Russell, Certified
USNTA Tennis Instructor, Saxo¬
ny Hotel, M Bch. For Info call
751-4006 or Bp 729-0177.
LEGAL
DUIJ00
MANY POINTS,
HIGH RISK?
We Can Helpl
For free information packet
CALLTODAY
1-800-467-5907
TUTOR Certified teacher with
Master's Degree will tutor ele¬
mentary students in any sub¬
jects. Fair rates, guaranteed re¬
sults. Call Lisa 673-3998
560
Singles Scene
AD-UNE CLASSIFIEDS Now Of¬
fering free romance ads on
the internet, print and voice
system. Browse and respond
for free. 933-9979
EVENTS
FREE 24-H0UR EVENT
HOTLINE 579-1551
*FREE Events ‘FREE Buffet
‘GREAT Door Prizes ‘Parties
‘Dances ‘Happy Hours'
One of the best ways in town
to meet quality people! Call
anytime for upcoming event
info! The call is FREE and you
pay nothing to be a participant
of our events.
Nraffiats
ROMANCE
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
LOVELY RUSSIAN LADIES
want to meet YOU! Free color
photo brochure! Russia 71,
P.O. Box 888851, Atlanta, GA
30356 or call (770) 458-0909
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL
Thai Asian Worldwide Ladies
seek life mates. For free
brochure: 1-808-329-5559
INTRODUCTION SERVICE
MEET, BEAUTIFUL, FAITHFUL la¬
dles From Russia, Philippines,
worldwide. 1400 marriages
sindé 1989. Free 270 photo
brochure. 702-451-3070
565
Wedding Beils
BRIDAL GOWN Beautiful bridal
gown, size 8, white lace with
sequins. Queen Anne collar,
long sleeves, long train, $800
obo. Call beeper #880-8450
HONEYMOON IDEAS Tropical
paradise! Victorian house in the
Historic Seaport District (Old
Town). Tropical garden with
pool & grill facilities.
Kitchenettes & Rooms.
NANCY'S WlLUAM STREET
GUEST HOUSE. Call 305-744-
7207 or 1-800-71-NANCY
575
Mind/Body/Spirit
580 Health & Fitness
585 Licensed Massage
590 Mise. Mind/Body/Spirit
Astrology
Beauty
Churches .
Counseling
Events
Holistic
Hypnosis
Metaphysical
Psychics
Support Groups
Tarot
Workshops
580
Health & Fitness
CERTIFIED TRAINER You can
change your body. Lose fat &
gain muscle. Feel & Look good.
Cardiovascular & weight train¬
ing. Nutrition & Diet program.
Kyriakos 674-7633
COLONICS Body cleansing
through colon therapy. State
of the art equipment. Purified
water. Disposables. Call David
for free consultation 538-2018
FREE BROCHURE! HOWTO
BURN BODY FAT. Safe, cheap,
effective! Write to Bradley at
831 Meridian Ave #12, Miami
Beach, FI 33139
headaches Suffering From
Migraines? You need to come
see usl Call 266-6099
HEALTH & FITNESS
FAT LOSS!!
Safe, Effective & Easy
Send $19.95 to New Symmetry
12327 SW143 Lane,
Department #NT104
Miami, FL 33186 235-1600
IMPOTENCE Got You Down?
TVy Oriental Medicine. Give us a
call 266-6099
KOMBUCHA TEA 100% pure,
not diluted. Detoxlfierand im¬
mune system booster. Call Lar¬
ry now to order 858-8045
NUTRITIONAL CONSULTATION
Specializing in anti-aging;
weight-loss, immune system
enhancement, and more! Call
Brucé Hoffman at 935-2312
PENIS ENLARGEMENT Profes¬
sional vacuum pumps/lnStruc-
tion. Gain 1-3 Inches'. Perma¬
nent, safe. Enhance erection.
FREE brochures Dr. Joel Kaplan
312-409-5557. Foc.latest sut
gical/riori-surgical enlargement
information ($2.95 min), call
900-976-PUMP
PERSONAL TRAINING in your
home. I'll cometo you! Lose
weight, body fat, increase
muscle through exercise. Cer¬
tified trainer best rates around.
Call Becky at 661-4403
585
Licensed Massage
ACU MASSAGE Calm the mind,
heal the body, soothe the soul,
increase Productivity, concen¬
tration & inner peace MA13944
Call 571-8515 bpr 641-0608
ALL MODALITIES
SHIATSU-SPORTS-SWEDISH
Best massage & personal train¬
ing. Specializing in home train¬
ing. Discounts on home exer¬
cise equipment. MA#12331.
Tom 937-4412, pg 839-2266
ALL MODALITIES Light & Deep,
injuries to relaxation. 7_days till
midnight. All Miami MA #3180.
'A Caring Detailed Therapist'
Cheryl Montana 442-0747.
BODYWORK THERAPIST
HEALTHY TOUCH
MASSAGE THERAPY
Nationally Certified
MA19764
CALL SCOTT
Bp 276-0203
BODYWORK/BREATHWORK
Work out pain and ténsion with
an exceptional massage. Heal
your body and your soul.
MA12384. Lohan Bp 843-8400
COMBINED TECHNIOUES TO
melt your stress & soreness. At
your home or Hotel in Miami.
Till 10pm. You'll feél great!
Lie 6520. Jim 442-1408 .
DEEP TISSUE/SWEDISH
PROFOUNDLY COMFORTING
Deep tissue or Swedish Mas¬
sage for stress or pain relief.
John 544-0917. MA18547.
DEEP TISSUE
NATIONALLY CERTIFIED
Depp tissue technique, custom
designed for YOU! 20% off
with ad!! MA#19214. Call Ziv
383-4350 or Bp 339-0064
DEEP TISSUE/SPORTS
11/4 HR.MASSAGE-SPECIAL
$40¡ Neuromuscular, injury,
déep tissue & Sports. Home, •
office, hotel. MA14738. Robert
Allen 672-9961,586-9049
DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE IN SOUTH BEACH
By experienced Deep Tissue
therapist. Relieve your stress
now! MA#13266. Call Troy:
674-9316 or beeper 317-4635.
GENERAL
A TOUCH OF HEAVEN To SOOthe
your entire being! Swedish,
deep tissue to ease your pain
and stress. N Dade #15601
Yvonne (305)655-2166
ALTERNATIVE
ABSOLUTE STRESS RELIEF.
Total relaxation-massage by
Manny. You^ll feel great!
#10632.24 hr SVC. Bp 578-3091
GENERAL
JOLIE SUPER MASSAGE
Add years to your life; A re¬
warding experience. MA#3100.
751-1897. Free Cruise with
every massage.
GENERAL
#1 MASSAGE IN THE LAND
Massage therapy by contest
winning bodybuilder & pro r
kickboxer. Satisfaction guaran¬
teed. Donald Lee. MA#10747.
Dade bpr (305) 410-4851, Brow
bpr (954) 409-1090
GENERAL
70 MINUTE MASSAGE $25!
Back pain, Neck pain. lOyrs exp.
Lie #MA0006625. Call Nelson
866-3272 or beep 464-5861
RELAXATION/STRETCHING
HIGHLY SKILLED
Cert pro exp'd in many types
of massage. Swedish, deep tis¬
sue? Of course. But consider
craniosacral, shiatsu, thai, nmt
& scs. These therapies maybe
more effective & pleasurable.
MA16680. peter 738-1981 bpr.
RELAXATION/SHIATSU
French masseuse.specializihg
* in Swedish and Shiatsu. Stress
or pain relief. Very good hands.
FI LC#MA0012738 Bp 656-4929
SWEDISH MASSAGE
AROMATHERAPY/REFLEXOLOGY
Pain/Stress Relief. Oscar.-
lie #12979; C&ll 532-5733
464-6443 bpr
SWEDISH
MASSAGE BY MICHAEL
Relaxing and stress reducing.
Studio/outcall. MA#19916. Call
538-5984 or bpr 870-8658.
SWEDISH Put yourself in pro¬
fessional hands. Let go of your
tension in a sóothing atmos¬
phere. Strictly therapeutic with
ABSOLUTELY nó sexual or sen-'
sual touching involved-NO EX¬
CEPTIONS. Experience Lucy's
Magic Touch. 2 hour massages
avail. MA 0020170.225-2906.
SWEDISH STRESS REDUCTION.
Experience unique massage
techniques in a relaxing
atmosphere MA#0019775. Call
Donna 949-3110
THAI/NEUROMUSCULAR
Invigorating and relaxing
personalized treatments for
pain or stress. MA 4773. CaILZoi
270-0031
THERAPEUTIC
A HEALTHIER ALTERNATIVE
Reduce stress & chronic pain.
Feel better all around! #8755.
For appt, call Jose 441-2049 or
Beep 464-4800.
THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE
$30 ONE HOUR SPECIAL
Looking for good, reliable ther¬
apy? Then, call Hollywood stu¬
dio 925-9246 'Massage Thera¬
peutics' by Tim and Sandra.
Serving community since 1992.
MM3915. Appt only 925-9246.
THERAPEUTIC
TOTAL MASSAGE
For total release. Whatever
massage you want is the mas¬
sage you get! Shiatsu, Swedish,
Deep Tissue, Sports and much
more! 24 hours. MA# 14695.
Please call Juan at 674-9071 or
bpr 512-9210, cell 496-0907.
590
Mise. Mind/Body/Spirit
aikido JU-JITSU Do your sur¬
roundings haye you living in
fear? If so, call Sempai Rick
Jones for private lesSons in self
defense. Certified in Rape Pre¬
vention. Call 529-7809 or Bp
529-7414
ASTROLOGY CHARTS Person¬
alized 12pg report. Tell us you
& your loved ones DOB, place
OB, Time OB & for just $20,
we'll send you a complete as¬
trological guide ind a FREE as¬
trological wheel! Send chk/MO
to: The Scarab Oracle, Inc PO Bx
170955, Miami, FL 33017-0995
HEALINGS No money accepted
until you are well. Avoid muti¬
lation, mastectomy etc. Your
M.D. verifies all cures. Call Juan
Trigo 361-0665. Cancer Busters
METAPHYSICAL SHOP
MYSTICAL ÁAMULET
is now open at 7360 Coral Way
17A to serve the Wiccan, Pagan.
& Metaphysical Community.
Lectures in all areas of the
metaphysical, private consul- .
tations are avail 265-2228.
PSYCHICS
LIVE
PSYCHIC LINE
Accurate readings by certified
psychics (24 hours)!
Compatibility, money,
- guidance, decision making.
FREE TO CALL
(305)933-2868
PSYCHICS
LIVE PSYCHICS
REAL ANSWERS TO
YOUR QUESTIONS
ABOUT LOVE, SUCCESS,
MONEY, ETC.
1-900-329-4400x102
% $3.95/min 18+
CS# 913-422-1900
PSYCHICS
TRULY GIFTED
PSYCHICS
GET REAL ANSWERS TO YOUR
QUESTIONS ABOUT
• LOVE •SUCCESS
• MONEY • NUMEROLOGY, ETC
1-900-329-4400X054
$3.95/mih, 18+,
Cust sve 913-422-1901
REIKI
PSYCHIC BODY READINGS
by Johnathan
Healing energy tells past,
present & destiny, will shed
light on career moves & unite
you with friends & loved onés!
Free question by phone!
Available.for parties.
Call 944-6481
SUPPORTGROUP
HIV+ SINGLES PROGRAM
Confidential free info: call 954-
784-7494. Try browsing our
fun voice mail option 1-900-
We Enjoy, $l.99/min.FREE AD.
600 rf*
Music
605 Mise. Music Services
Acts for Hire
•Disc Jockeys
.Recording
610 Musical Instruction
615 Musical Equipment
620 Musical Instruments
625 Musicians Available
630 Musicians Wanted
605
Mise. Music Services
CD’S Custom-made from your
DAT, cassette or vinyl master.
Put your demo, live record¬
ings, etc. on to cd. Call
Pro Disc at 448-4819.
D J Music from yesterday and
today. Having a party? We blow
away the competition! For the
lowest prices and a half hour
FREE with your scheduled
event, CALL ANYTIME 920-3791
DISCJOCKEY
ADVENTURES ENTERTAINMENT
A variety of music for all occa¬
sion at a reasonable priee. Call
888-1525 or beeper 362-2893.
DISCJOCKEY
DYNAMIC SOUNDS
For the hottest party or wed¬
ding. With the best music from
the 50's to the 90's. Call DJ Gil
251-3107 or Bp 314-0162.
MASTERING Songwriters,
bands, etc: Hottést CD's and
tapes in town with 19 bit mas¬
tering, noise reduction and
stereo enhancement. Midi re¬
cording also available. Give your
music an extra edge! Call now!
954-921-5784
MASTERING/CD PRESSING
Make a CD from your DAT or
Cassette. Custom CD's starting
from onjy $10. Broadcast qual¬
ity mastering $20 a song.
1-800-552-8141
MUSIC VIDEOS Video/Film
projects. Straight Arrow Prod.
STATE OF THE ART DIGITAL. Call
Stuart at 947-5740
PROMOTION
BANDS & CLUBS!!
if you have a band or club you
want to advertise in New Times
for FREE in our Club listings,
call 579-1572
RECORDING STUDIOS
REAL SOUND
PRODUCTIONS
32 track Digital. Live or MIDI.
Ideal studio for band or solo
project. Producers,
programmers, engineers, &
Musicians available.
Call for Rates:
471-7096
RECORDING STUDIOS
Own your own professionally
built sound proof room (no
equip) in a 3/2 home in historic
bayside. Hardwood firs, ce-.
ramie tile in kitchen & baths,
hot tub, everything redone to
perfection. J.Poole Assoc., Inc.
Rlt, Cheri 669-8118/881-7706.
SOUND DESIGN STUDIOS
Since 1986! World class equip¬
ment. 48 track Digital, Live or
MIDI. Artist Demos to CD Re¬
leases. In-House Producers/Tal
erit. Recordable CD's as low as
$35. Project rates. MC/VISA/
AMEX. Call 945-1728
REHEARSAL STUDIOS
SOUTH FLORIDA
REHEARSAL STUDIOS
Clean, professional atmos-,
phere. Competitive rates. 4-
fully equipped rehearsal studi-
• os, and 1-1,200 sq ft. Studio/
Soundstage. 1885 N.E. 149th
St Call Glenn 949-5303 for info
and bookings. Visa/Amex/MC.
610
Musical Instruction
GUITAR LESSONS Spanish
acoustic, electric techniques.
Learn with a teacher at home,
you can play well, start now!
For all areas. Call 867-7948
GUITAR LESSONS
EASY GUITAR
Rob Friedman, pro guitar ;
player & teacher offers a fun &
quick approach to playing.
Learn favorité songs overnight.
All Ages. 20yrs exp. 232-1337
PIANO LESSONS Learn piano,.
the EZ and fun way with music
graduate, 20 years experience.
Read & play by ear. Classic?. |
Love kids; advanced tdo. Caif
865-9902- -
RADIO INSTRUCTION
RADIO ANNOUNCER
No Experience Required
On-The-Job Training
in local Radio Stations
Part-Time, Nights, Weekends.
Free Video and Brochure
tells how
1-800-295-4433
Ask about our Record Label!
http://www.sna.com/musicbiz
SINGING LESSONS Learn the
mechanics of singing and the
importance of a good tech¬
nique. All levels welcome. Call ;
Alejandro 543-1866
615
Musical Equipment
AMPLIFIER Peavey Heritage 45
with two 12' Scorpion speak¬
ers, channel switching (comes
with foot switch), great condi¬
tion $250 obo. Call 538-2866
CYMBALS 14: hi-hats, 13' thin
crash, 16' rock crash, 20’ Earth
ride, all Zildjan, clamp on cym¬
bal stand, carry bag. Pearl kick
pedal, all good condition. Leave
message with Chuck 445-6310
MISCELLANEOUS Fender Su¬
per Reverb, Roland Jazz Chor¬
us 160, Sunn bass amp, Cer- /
win-Vega speakers, Peavy 2 ;
channel power head, Yamaha
powered mixer, 100 watt, pow¬
er amp, small P.A. amp, Roland
space echo, Roland chorus
echó, new Barracuda Strato-
caster guitar, Yamaha mini/
PSS-480 keyboard, cd player
with remote, 8 space rack case,
bargin. Tom anytime 864-8744
RECORDER 8 Track Reel to
Reel Tascam TSR-8,1/2 inch an¬
alog tape machine. Excellent
condition. $1900.892-2185
STUDIO GEAR Like néw. ADAT8
track digital recorder. Topaz
24/8 mixer. Ibanez Iceman
electric guitar. All items priced
to sell! Call 954-791-2616.
620
Musical Instruments
ALL INSTRUMENTS
ALL
MAJOR
BRANDS
‘ SALES * RENTALS * REPAIRS
NOW OPEN!!!
5360 NW 167th Street
Miami Lakes
(305) 628-3510
BASS Alembic 5-string bass,
exotic woods, mint condition,
$1,600 obo. For more info call
George 551 -2719 or pager
955-8445
GUITAR Lotus Guitar with soft
case, Gorilla mini amp, Head-
Jammer eletric tuner $275. Call
532-3270
GUITARS Up to $10,000 cash
paid for your old, used guitars
or other stringed instruments,
Hammonds/Leslies. 242-0882
PIANO Art Deco style. Spinet
piano and bench. Beautiful
look and sound $750 obo. Call
653-0388
PIANO Baldwin upright with
de-humidifier. Excellent con-
dition. $1200 672-5860
625
Musicians Available
KEYBOARDIST avail for gigs.
Good renter, shows/rehear¬
sals. Also composer for thea¬
ter, ballet, video & will prepare
backing/demo tapes. 638-2274'
LEAD VOCALIST Female with
good looks & must be able to
dance for high energy top 40
dance band. Ask for Jarvis 954-
726-6260or beep 631 -1159
630
Musicians Wanted
ALL MUSICIANS Former major
label-singer songwriter re¬
cording artist, seeks modern
'musicians for alternative pro-*
ject; Bowie, nine inch -nails, Gar¬
bage, Stabbing Westward. For
inore info, contact Kraig Geiger
(305) 940-1074, fax (305) 940;
2845. See web site, http://
www.shinwa;Com/kandrew
BASS, KEYS & 2ND GUITARIST
Wanted For Society's Child
'Society News' CD at Spec's.
Once in a Lifetime Chance.
Tour with US 305-856-5398
GUITAR PLAYER Needed for
original alternative band. Call .
Manny.after 6pm at 388-6700
GUITARIST Original Spanish
Rock project needs lead gui-.
tarist. Must have equipment
and transportation. Please call
707-1005.
GUITARIST Lead Guitarist
wanted. Bassist, keyboardist
and drummer looking for a
seasoned player. Vocals a must.
Male or female. Forming 60-
90's cover group. Rock, soul,
funk, pop, etc. Age unimpor¬
tant - personality is. Must be
mature and stable. Call Neil
(954)454-8002.
VOCALIST Producer seeking
Female Dance Vocalist for up¬
coming release on established
Independent label. Call for
Interview 305-682-8590
655 Miscellaneous Show Biz
Acting
Auditions/Casting
Events
Make Up/Hair
Production
660 Modeling & Talent
665 Photographers
655
Mise. Show Biz
ACTÍÑG
ACTING CLASSES
TV, FILM AND STAGE
“THE METHOD”
DIR. SHERRY FAITH
Leam how to Audition for
Film * TV Commercials
Monologues ‘ Scene Study
and More! ‘ON CAMERA'
534-6800
ACTING
ACTING
ON THE BEACH
The
Panuro Workshop
Theatre Company, Inc.
TV COMMERCIALS
(8 wk course) Ages 8-80
Next class starts June 22nd.
SCENE STUDY
PRIVATE COACHING
IMPROVISATIONS
' (Every Monday)
SPECIAL SEMINARS
DIRECTOR - ANNA PANARO
532-9422
AUDITIONS
PANARO PERSONAL MGMT
seeking Talented Actors &
Kids (All Ages). For audition
appointment call 552-9422
ACTING
ACTING TRAINING!
Creative
Workshops, Inc.
Classes for Film, TV & stage
ACTING TECHNIOUE
IMPROVISATION
SPEECH & DICTION
AUDITION SKILLS
PRIVATE COACHING
3 Camera studio Set-Up!
Dir - Stewart Solomon, M.S.
933-0560
AUDITION ART-ACT produc- .
tions is casting actors, perfor¬
mance artists; video and film
poets, dancers, unusual acts,
etc - for weékly events at Sal-
vation on SoBe.cCaH 575-7272
AUDITIONS Graduate student
thesis film needs 2 males; 1
ages (23-3Ó) and i (35-45). 1
female (23-33). Call 667-6619
AUDITIONS
YOU WEAR IT
WELL!
. Currently Casting for Designer
Eyewear Line.
If you've been told you Have
Beautiful Eyes! Call.
Top $ FEM only
868-6369
CASTINGS/CREW
INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
CO. IS SEEKING FOR CREW &
CAST FOR "SPAfcE PARTS'
16mm color sync sound inde¬
pendent short film.
CREW: 1st & 2nd AD & AC. Gaf¬
fer, Grips, Sound, Set designer.
Prod. Manager.
CAST: Female-Desiree 18-21 at-
tractive model type. Class
mates 18-25 models. Booking
agent, secretary 25-35. Male
photographer 25-35. Boy¬
friend 19-35. Ray 25-35.
DEFERRED PAYMENT
Please send resume & head
shot to:
SPARE PARTS
8087 S. Dixie Hwy. #B2
Miami, FL 33143
(305) 669-0294
POPCORN PICTURES/Ryan
needs Actors, Actresses, sing¬
ers, make-up, below the line
peoplé. Send resume to: 2105
Bricked Ave. #116, Miami, FI
33139.
SHOW BIZ
CELEBRITY
LOOK-ALIKES
Do You Look Like-
Musicai group, (oldies &
present), Don Johnson, Phil¬
lip Michael, President Clin¬
ton, Dole, Marilyn, Tom
Cruise, Sylvester Stallone,
Schwarzengger, Luis Miguel,
Antonio Banderas, Gloria
Estefan, George Bums,
Groucho Marx, Liza, Al Paci¬
no. Looking also for circus &
unique talents. 666-3463
TALENT SEARCH! Seeking
singers, comics, dancers & oth
er forms of entertainers, mag¬
ic acts for talent competition.
Great $$, excellent exposure!
Call for line-up 954-572-4777
660
Modeling & Talent
ACTING
ACTORS/MODELS
F/M & kids for TV, film, catalog,
commercials & extras. No exp
nec. Image Talent Agcy, TA 383,
420 Lincoln Rd, #207
531-9096
ACTING/MODELING
FIONTE PRODUCTIONS.
On-Camera classes taught by
working casting directors, di¬
rectors & actors from NY/LA &
FI. Commercial/TV/Film. Audit
free class. 'Not All Acting
Schools are the Same... Expe¬
rience the Professional Differ¬
ence.' (305) 925-1380.
MODELING & TALENT
NEWEST AGENCY ON
SOUTH BEACH!
Scouting New Faces
For Fall ‘96 - Spring
‘97 Season
Open Call Every Monday &
Thursday. 12 Noon - 4PM.
Mirage Talent Division Also
scouting All Types & All Ages.
MIRAGE
MODEL MGMT
940 Uncoln Road, Suite 105
Miami Beach, FL 33139
LiC#0000507
Call 673-6398
MODELS 2 or 3 fémales (age
18-23) needed to pose to¬
gether for nude fine art pho¬
tographs. Must be clean and
attractive. Call 460-5745
MODELS Females full-figured
for 1997 photo projects. Cen¬
terfold style - Sensual but
tasteful nudity required with
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Full Text
Metro: A pay raise
for Miami commissioners -
more money, fewer dweebs?
V o I ti me II. Number ID
^LfühUE)j6arfies the passengers.
Nletrprail gets the moneyrThat s no fare.
Y&T Music
gives Amanda
the Green
light
Director Todd Solondz
relives the blunder
years in Welcome
to the Dollhouse
Hubris meets arrogance -
■■ ■ in Jorge Mas 'émmmmm. ■'■■■■ ■'
v. The New Republic. ,
. By Elise Ackerman.

lew Times June 20-26,1996
§
Token Ridership.. ... 22
Dade’s neglected bus system just might hold the key to the
county’s transportation woes.
By Kirk Semple
Jorge Mas
Canosav. The
Hew Republic. .13
What happens when you
call Mas a gangland
thug? Embarrassing
things and intriguing
things.
By Elise Ackerman
Metro:
I Like Hike 5
A Coconut Grove activist
• ’
proposes a pay increase
for Miami city
commissioners.
By Robert Andrew
Powell
Volume 11
Number 10
June 20-26,
1996
Letters
...3
Metro
...5
News of the Weird
..11
Troubletown
..11
Calendar
..34
Calendar Listings
.37
Earthweek
.37
Film
..49
Film Capsules
51
Showtimes
.53
Theater
..57
Art
..61
Cafe
..63
Dining Guide
.66
Music â–  â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– .â– â– â– â– â– â– 
..75
Reverb
77
Concert Calendar ......
.79
Into the Night .........
.81
Clubs
.83
Comics
.87
This Modern World
Steven
In a Perfect World
Miami’s Next
Weird Thing.. .75
Quiet riot grrrl
Amanda Green considers
fame in a karaoke
machine universe.
By Jim Murphy
Julius Knipl
The Quigmans
Classified p .90
Romance * I...............104
Editorial
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Tom Finkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Music Editor John Floyd
Staff Writers Elise Ackerman, Judy Cantor,
Jim DoFede, Kathy Glasgow, Ray Martinez,
Robert Andrew Powell, Sean Rowe, Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Dorothy Atcheson, Christine Tague
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Contributors Todd Anthony, Pamela Gordon,
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Production Manager Carla Peters
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p? Internet:
Playing Politics at the Expense
of the Poor
Robert Andrew Powell’s article “From
Knight Manor to Nightmare” in last week’s
issue touched a strong chord in me; I am
an affordable-housing advocate. I com¬
mend nonprofits like Tacolcy that build
safe, decent, and affordable housing for the
working poor. Tacolcy’s Garden Walk in
Cutler Ridge is a perfect example of how
nonprofits put good deals together. The
development is beautiful — you can tell the
subsidy is in the project, not in their pock¬
ets. Tacolcy has a track record for taking
affordable housing seriously — and doing
it well.
Lorenzo Simmons was appointed to the
board of the Florida Housing Finance
Agency in the early Nineties because of his
know-how and experience. I know this
because I have had the opportunity to
study his approach to affordable housing
for several years now. I barely know the
man, but I can always recognize a Tacolcy
community. Shame on Miami city commis¬
sioners for allowing the Tacolcy project to
fail! This is a prime example of what hap¬
pens when politics and prejudice stop com¬
munity developers from building communi¬
ties. Liberty City certainly needs decent
affordable housing. I respect Simmons
even more for supporting the Urban
League of Greater Miami in its efforts.
Debra D. Sandstrom
Homestead
There's More to Grant Giving
Than Meets the Eye
I am very pleased to read such candid criti¬
cism regarding the state of the arts here in
South Florida. Judy Cantor’s article “The
(Kind of) Magnificent Seven” last week was
much needed to reveal some of the non¬
sense surrounding the arts. Her statement
that “some of the artists who received the
Cultural Consortium grants seem to have
been chosen because their work typifies
aspects of life in South Florida — i.e., Latin
American imagery, gay themes, and subur¬
ban culture” further proves that art’s only
moral value is to be good, and that its most
fulfilling reward is unrelated to sex, poli¬
tics, and religion. Is there more to art than
meets the eye? Depends on what you’re
looking for.
Kerry Ware
Miami
The Beach Cop Bop, Part 1
Just finished reading Elise Ackerman’s arti¬
cle about Gina Cunningham’s treatment by
the Miami Beach Police (“Insult to Injury,”
June 6).
I’m sorry for Ms. Cunningham’s pain, but
there was nothing unusual about the inci¬
dent — perhaps with the exception of the
fact that she knew how to get attention by
telling the press. There are plenty of people
who get treated the same way by police in
their own hometown but do not have the
connections to get any attention.
Of course, Ms. Cunningham’s complaint
to the review committee will come out
something like this: Br’er Fox sitting in the
hen house asks, “Did any of you other
foxes eat Farmer Brown’s fattest chicken?
See? Of course not, we’re all very good
foxes [citizens].”
The only time a police officer gets chas-.
tised (with pay, of course) is when some
really bad citizen catches him or her on
film. Let us not forget also that as long as
the “good cops” let the “bad cops” stay on
the force, they’re all bad. The good ones
have said, “It’s okay for these guys to rep¬
resent the blue uniform.”
What all communities need is a civilian-
dominated review committee for the police.
All the excuses as to why a civilian review
committee wouldn’t work — civilians don’t
understand, or the proceedings must be
secret — are so much horse hockey. If citi¬
zens really cared, they would call their
local commissioners — all of them — and
insist that it happen now.
John A. Brennan
Miami
The Beach Cop Bop, Part 2
Elise Ackerman’s article “Insult to Injury”
should be headed by words like scandalous,
brutality, criminal, excess, et cetera.
Police behavior like this is totally outra¬
geous and should be prosecuted vigorous¬
ly. Pepper spray, beating, lying two hours
on the floor? Pardon me? Is it standard
today in police circles to. use death-squad
tactics on bagged citizens? To serve and to
protect — what a joke. Just the language
used by the officers — even if only partly
true — shows a total disregard for human
dignity, constitutional rights, and their duty
as officers. Their thuggish behavior is
criminal and should trigger immediate sus¬
pension.
Alas, I fear all we’ll hear is a delayed “All
is well” by the leaders of this frat house.
Tragically, this nation is so programmed by
TV shows — the cops and the public both
— that a scandalous event like this does
not cause the outcry it deserves. Cops act
out TV, which is mostly violent, and the
public sees nothing but heroes in uniform.
The Miami Beach police are in dire need
of purges and extensive re-education, if
such a thing is possible.
Name withheld by request
Miami Beach
New Times, Inc.
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New Times June 20 -26.1996
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“I have never known a Miami city
commissioner who left office
I
Raising Pain
Glenn Terry thinks a salary hike is the answer to Miami’s
commission woes. Others insist it's money for nothing.
By Robert Andrew Powell
^pw that a special election has been
announced to fill the Miami mayor’s
seat, a searchlight scans the terrain
for leaders who are able and willing
to lead the city. Many names have been
bandied about, but so far the only people
who have actually stepped forward are
losers from the last city election. The ros¬
ter of aspirants includes Humberto
Hernandez, recently reprimanded by the
Florida Bar for handing out business cards
at a Valujet memorial service.
So shallow and murky is the candidate
pool that Miami Herald political editor
Tom Fiedler half-seriously proposed
Sylvester Stallone as a more favorable can¬
didate than anyone who’ll actually run.
“Miami city politics so rarely attracts peo¬
ple who embody the city’s reality and itsr
promise, who represent the very best of its
qualities, whose vision can keep pace with
real life,” Fiedler Complained in tapping
Stallone. He also fantasized about Mayor
Madonna.
Glenn Terry is neither a movie star nor a
mayoral aspirant Nor is he a career politi¬
cian. He tried to be a county judge once,
back in 1976, but hé considers his defeat at
the polls to have rescued him from a dis¬
mal legal career. Now instead of wrangling
over divorce cases he “raises his karma a
few levels” by teaching art classes at
Thomas Jefferson Middle School in
Northwest Dade.
Terry’s main accomplishment in the pub¬
lic arena is the King Mango Strut a leg¬
endary Coconut Grove spoof of the Orange
Bowl Parade. Owing in part to the success
of the Strut, which Terry founded in the
early Eighties, some Grove leaders asked
him to run for the Village Council, the
quasi-governtnental body that presents
Grove concerns to the city. Terry com¬
plied, won a seat last fall, and looked
around for something to do.
“It’s pretty boring mostly. We go to a lot
of meetings,” the 49-year-old Grove leader
grumbles about his post, for which he does
not get paid. “But I did ask, What the hell
can we do to get better leaders in the city
of Miami?’ I figured good leadership in the
city means good leadership for the Grove.
Yet when I looked at the city government, I
realized these guys work full-time for
$5000 a year. Their staffers can make
$45,000. That’s just crazy. That’s like going
to a doctor who is paid less than a nurse.”
Miami city commissioners do earn only
$5000 per year, a salaiy level that was set in
1949. Their pay is supplemented by full
health insurance, a car allowance, a cellular
phone allowance, and other perks, but even
with those benefits, the compensation is
dwarfed by the pay of the lowliest commis¬
sion aide. (The mayor, who has no more
power than his fellow commissioners, earns
no more pay, either.) Terry suspects this
subminimum wage salary is the reason the
commission can’t attract better leaders.
“I want the best people to run for and get
elected to city and county government I
want regular people, people like me, to run
for office,” he says, barely audible over the
background hollering of his two-year-old
son Ian. “I just want the people holding
these positions to be more than the
wealthy and those connected to wealth.”
Terry persuaded his fellow Village
Council members to ask city commission¬
ers to call for a raise referendum. “I can’t
poorer than when he came in.**
Annette Eisenberg, Downtown Development Authority
To improve the commission, improve commissioners' salaries, says Glenn Terry
believe an educated person who talks to
me for five minutes wouldn’t vote in favor
of the pay raise,” Terry says, describing
the support he’s already finding for his ini¬
tiative. Concurs former Miami commis¬
sioner Rosario Kennedy, who pulled down
five grand a year from 1985 to 1989:
“Something needs to be done. Miami is a
big, international city. Serving on the com¬
mission is a fulltime job. Many good peo¬
ple will not run until the job pays more
money.”
Commissioner J.L. Plummer, who sup¬
ports a pay raise hooked to a population-
based formula similar to the one that gov¬
erns the pay of most county
commissioners in Florida (though not
Dade County commissioners, who earn
only $6000 per year, plus perks), has seen
raises come to a public referendum three
times in his almost 26-year tenure on the
dais. Three times they were voted down.
“Each time, though, it was grouped with a
Continued on page 7
Roads Choler
Residents of Miami’s Roads neighborhood successfully fought
city hail. Now that they've won, they're fighting among
themselves.
By Robert Andrew Powell
L/ike most residents of the Roads neigh¬
borhood in Miami, northwest of
BrickeO Avenue and file Rickenbacker
Causeway, Lorraine Albury didn’t take
to the high-rise idea. When developers pro1
posed a nine-story apartment tower on a tiny
swatch of property four blocks from the house
where she has spent the past 56 years of ha7
life, Albury scrounged for money to help pay a
lawyer to quash the development
“I was strapped at the time. I did without,”
recalls the 81-year-old AJbury, who feared that
visitors to the apartments would park their
cars outside her modest home. “It’s one of
those tilings that you have to do. I sacrificed
plenty. I would have liked to do other tilings,
but I couldn’t do them. It was a hardship for
most people to donate, but everybody gave
what they could give.”
Luis Herrera, a truck driver who lives near
Albury, shared the sacrifice. When a commu¬
nity volunteer explained that the first legal bill
would be $2500, Herrera raided his vacation
fond. "The lady collecting money told me the
lawyer needed $2500,” he recalls. “She only
had something Ike $400.1 told her to wait one
minute, FA be back in a second. I made acheck
for $2500 and I gave it to her. That was my
vacation money, for my grandchildren to go to
Disney World.”
Besides forgoing Space Mountain, Herrera
grew so intent on foiling the apartment tower
project that he became president of the
Vizcaya Roads Homeowners’ Association.
Some nights he would stay up past 1:00 a.m.
posting flyers on front doors, only to leave two
hours later for the commute to his job in
Jupiter. “He busted his tail. He really worked at
it and suffered,” says Jesús Roiz, a neighbor
who joined Herrera’s group.
Mostly Herrera collected money for the
lawyers. Walking door to door, he solicited
checks made out to the Luis Herrera Legal
Fund. The money he collected went to pay for
about $50,000 in legal services, reasonable
when you consider that the case against the
developer and thé City of Miami went all the
way to the Florida Supreme Court, in 1992 —
and that the Supreme Court ruled in the home-
owners’ favor.
In a settlement this past September, the
City of Miami agreed to pay the developer
(an openly acknowledged friend of three
Miami city commissioners) one million dol¬
lars to not bufld the project The homeown¬
ers’ group enjoyed a small return as well, in
the form of $50,000 to cover the legal fees. In
December primary attorney John Fletcher
took from that jále bis final fee of $3129. The
remaining cache was to be returned to the
Lorraine Alburys and Jesús Roizes who had
donated money.
Emphasis on the was.
Six months after the city cut the $50,000
check, no homeowner has received a dime.
Roiz insists that Herrera is a sloppy book¬
keeper who can’t be trusted to return the
money to the residents. Herrera counters that
he is the president of the group and is free to
distribute (or not distribute) the money as he
sees fit A judge will settle the matter.
“The unfortunate thing is the neighbors
should be working together to resolve these
issues rather than fighting with each other and
distracting from what they really should be
doing,” says John Shubin, the lawyer who is
now trying to sort out the mess. “What they
really should be doing is finding everybody
who gave money and returning it to them.”
Roiz insists that Herrera has not properly
documented all the donations he collected.
Roiz is his own best example. According to
Herrera’s accounting, Roiz is due $200 for his
past contributions. Roiz insists he donated
more than $500, This discrepancy makes Roiz
suspicious aboutall the other donations.
Roiz joined Herrera’s fight to foil the project
Continued on page 9 5
New Times June 20 - 26,1996

• New Times June 20 *26,1998
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Continued from page 5
bunch of other items that the voters didn't
like,” Plummer notes.
But there is a good chance the item
would be rejected no matter how it sat on
the ballot. Skeptics, noting that some can¬
didates spend more than $400,000 to run,
assume the payoff for holding office is
more than just a warm feeling of civic ser¬
vice. “I said this years ago, and I’ll sáy it
again now: I have never known a Miami
city commissioner who left office poorer
than when he came in,” cracks Annette
Eisenberg, a board member of the
Downtown Development Authority.
“I don’t think money is-the issue here,”
adds David Gell, a Grbve activist.
“Whatever the salary, you get candidates
who are for the people and candidates who
are Trot, I don’t think pay is going to make
someone any more altruistic than another.
At $60,000 a year [the ballpark salary
Terry is kicking around], do you think
these people will be more honest or
“These guys work
for $5000 a year.
Their staffers can
make $45,000. That’s
like going to a doctor
who is paid less
than a nurse.”
straightforward than they are already?”
The 50 aldermen on Chicago’s city coun¬
cil each, earn $||>,000 per year for their
labors, an increase of $20,000 since 1991.
Similarly to Miami, “the rationale for the
raise was that they were considered part-
time employees but it was full-time work,”
volunteers Daphne Daume, vice president
of the League of Women Voters of
Chicago.
Now that they take home healthy
salaries, are the aldermen more honest?
“Funny, funny, funny,” replies Daume,
aware that several council members
resigned recently after “Operation Silver
Shovel” revealed they had allowed illegal
dumping in their wards in exchange for
cash payoffs. Several more remain under
investigation.
“To say that [a higher salary] would pre¬
vent corruption, our experience is no, it
doesn’t,” Daume states. And did the larger
paychecks raise the quality of the candi¬
dates running for the council? “Yes and
no. We have gotten some good people
who have run who might not have run
before. But we also have elected some jjj
who aren’t.” _
Terry is familiar with the uneven results
pay increases have had in other cities.
Raul Martinez, the oft-indicted mayor of
Hialeah, earns $70,00.0 a year, Terry
admits. Still, he sticks to his point: You’re
more likely to get quality if you pay for it
“After all,” he asks, “Do you know anyone
willing to work for $100 a week?”
What about Sylvester Stallone? Is it the
low pay that keeps him from ruling
Miami? “Unfortunately,” says a Stallone
spokesman in LA, “he has no comment at
this time.” CD

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Jesús Roiz still hopes for an equitable disbursement of donated funds
Roads
Continued from page 5
back in 1991, dropping out a year- later ter assist
the recovery from Hurricane Andrew. Hé
renewed his interest in the homeowners’ asso¬
ciation after the city Settlement and, in a letter
to Herrera, demanded a^reconcifiatieihof the
books: “During the first years of fundraising,
arid-in spite of frequent requests, you were
always reluctant to produce financial state¬
ments. Moreover, after sbtyéars of existence
of this fund I have never seen an audit of this
account Now you are no longer in trouble,, the
suits have been successful and everything can
go back to normal At this point thert has to be
a reconciliation and an audit for this,account
performed by an outside certified firm. You are
dealing with moneys belonging to hundreds of
people and which came from the city's general
fund. The refund has to be handled in a strict
business fashion.:
“I intend to oversee this work apd I am will¬
ing to work to make sure that ALL contributors
get their money back.”
Grumbles Roiz: “He was very sloppy. His
records were handwritten on pieces of paper
stored in a cardboard box. I do not believe his'
record of contributors is a complete listing. We
do not know who the contributors are. There
might be people who are out there who do not
know that the money has bee'n returned^
That’s why I am asking for a public listing.”
Upset that other people. Were teliing him
what to do, Herrera-refused to hire an out¬
side accountant; he had already found a
neighbor willing to do the job for free:-Roiz
recommended a .áéc’on-d, -independent
accountant. “He charge $130 an hour,”
^Herrera stammers in his uncertain English.
“I call Mr. Fletcher. I say, f am not going to
pay $130 to do accounting"jvhen I got one
that’s gonna do it for nothing.’ No way I’m
going to do it.”
Further annoyingHerrera, Barbara Samet,
one of théfounders-of the homeowners’ associ¬
ation, also/called to voice her opposition to his
choice of accountants. “I said, ‘Barbara, what
do you mean I can’t do that? This man is going
fo do it for üsfór free.’ She said to me, “No, you
Can’t do that’ I said, “Well listen, let me'tell you
something. I am the president of fifis associa¬
tion and this man offers it for free and that’s the
way we’re gonna do it’” (Samet declined to be
interviewed for this story.)
Herrera insists he is no thief and that hé has
maintained a proper accounting of all' the
money. ’“I don’t steal no money from nobody,
never in my life,” he declares. “I made a copy of
all tee checks^ including the cash money:
Whatever they give to me, I got a copy.” Still,
Herrera admits he-doesn!t know how much
money he personally donated to the fund. T
never figured outhowmuch I got in there. I fig¬
ure about $80t)0, or something like that, from
my own pocket”
After -the, ^Sep¬
tember 1995 settle¬
ment, attorney Flet¬
cher sent numerous
letters asking Herr¬
era, Roiz, and Samet
to agree on a meth¬
od of disbursement
He had not 'made
any progress by
March of this year,
when he was ap¬
pointed to the Third District, Court of Appeals.
The prestigious judicial appointment spurred
him toward a speedy solution. In a legal
motion, he asked Circuit Court Judge Celeste
Muir to distribute the money as she sees fit A
hearing is scheduled for July 10: ;
At an initial hearing before Muirla neigh¬
bor who accompanied Herrera declared that
mo money should be returned. “The only
persons asking formoney back are Barbara
Samet and Jesús Roiz,” said Carolina Paez,
according to court documents. “The rest of
the neighbors, they don’t want money back.
They’d rather have a strong association.”
-Herrera, a Cuban immigrant, is distancing
himself from that comment Even if the rest
of the neighbors don’t want the money, he
says, they should have it back. T don’t care
about money. I came to this country with
tone hand on the flops-and the other hand
behind jmy back. I don’t value money. I am
going togive the money back to everybody,
so (here is nothing to worry about” CD
“He was very sloppy. His records
were handwritten on pieces of
paper stored in a cardboard box.”
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News of the Weird
Lead Story
•Woe unto the perfectionist In May in North
Brunswick, New Jersey, police charged
Rutgers University math professor Walter
Petiyshyn, age 67, with bludgeoning his wife
to death. A friend said Petryshyn had become
despondent recently because he feared his
career had been ruined by an error in his lat¬
est textbook, Generalized Topological Degree
and Semilinear Equations.
•Breast exams in the news: This month the
first of six pending lawsuits against
Washington, D.C., physician Peter Kwon,
for improper diagnoses, goes to trial.
According to one patient, Kwon “examined
my breast no matter what I told him was
wrong.” Kwon admitted he gives breast
exams to every female patient if more than
30 days has elapsed since her previous
breast exam. And in May, the
Massachusetts Board of Registration of
Chiropractors-finally suspended the license
of Ronald A. Goldstein for giving improper
massages to fourteen women pver a seven-
teen-year period. Goldstein hád maintained
that the “uterine lift” and “chest spread”
treatments were legitimate.
The Entrepreneurial Spirit
•The coroner for Floyd County, Kentucky,
complained in February that ambulance dri¬
vers were taking obviously dead people to
the hospital just so that could bill the county
for rides. One man was rushed to the hospital
even though his suicide shotgun blast was so
powerful that it blew both eyeballs out of
their sockets. Another had been
dead so long that rigor mortis had
commenced, leaving the body bent
at the waist so that it would not fit on
a stretcher. The driver said he
thought he felt a pulse.
•In January the New York City parks depart¬
ment, which controls permits for vendors on
park land, doubled the annual fee for the hot
dog pushcart that had the exclusive license
for a spot just south of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art—to $288,200 a year.
•Reuters news service reported in May that
German scientists at the Max Planck
Breeding Institute have invented a suicidal
potato — the cells automatically kill them¬
selves if attacked by the potato blight fungus,
thus slowing the blight and saving crops.
People with Too Much Money
•This summer in Putney, Vermont, Honey
Loring expects 400 people to enroll in her
two-week, $1300 camp for dogs and their
owners. At Camp Gone to the Dogs (now in
its sixth year), she offers doggie square danc¬
ing, doggie swimming lessons, and a doggie
bathing suit pageant and costume parade, as
well as traditional classes in Frisbee catching.
•The Central Wholesale Market in Sapporo,
Japan, put two melons on sale in May with a
price tag of about $1285 each. They were
described as “perfect beauties” in color and
sweetness.
Government in Action
•According to criticism in May from Gov.
George Pataki, the New York City school
board recently voted to spend $187,000 to
put a metal art structure on the roof of P.S.
279 but not to repair the school’s elevator,
which has been broken for nearly two years.
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A VEAL
r .. Pataki said the board has spent $11 million
on artwork for public schools that have
problems ranging from leaky roofs to out¬
dated textbooks.
•The U.S. Treasury Department announced
that it would spend up to $32 million in a
worldwide public relations campaign on the
new counterfeit-proof $100 bill. (Within two
months of the bill’s release, in Richmond,
Virginia, alone, the Secret Service found at
least fourteen counterfeits of the new bill that
had been passed in stores.)
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11
New Times June 20 • 26,1996

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Jorge Mas
answered a
journalistic '•
hatchet job-.;
with a Abel
lawsuit.
But now
everyone is;
getting out
to the bone;.:
By
ELISE ACKERMA
I aOctofref 3,1994, the The New Republic
magazine published an article titled “Our
Man in Miami,” written by freelance jour¬
nalist Ann Louise Bardach. The story pur¬
ported to be a sweeping compendium oil
facts about the life of Cuban exile leader Jorge Mas
Canosa, Miami’s multimillionaire business executive
and chairman of the Cuban American National
Foundation. On-fhe magazine’s cover, Bardach’s article
was described this way; “Clinton's Miami Mobster.”
Over the,yeafs, the powerful anti-Castro activist had
fjw%athered numerous negative news reports.
Journalists had delved into Mas’s alleged CIA connec¬
tions, they had attempted to link him to covert opera¬
tions; in Latin America, they had brazenly expounded
upon his psychological makeup, and they had probed
the finances of the foundation and other organizations
with which it is allied.
; But no one had ever called him a mobster.
The New Republic did so three times: once on the
cover, again at the article’s opening as a subheadline
Continued on page 15
13
New Times June 20 -26,1996

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Jorge Mas Canosa: He's accustomed to being a controversial figure in the news, but the Hew Republic article made him go ballistic
Mobster
Continued from page 13
(“Jorge Mas Canosa: mobster and megaloma¬
niac”), and once more in the test of Bardach’s
lengthy piece: “People" do not like Mas but
they fear him.... These days, he barely bristles
when called a demagogue, a bully, a mobster
and worse.”
In fact, 56-year-old Mas has never been crinF
inafiy charged with anything. From his point of
view, the magazine’s use of the “mobster”
'appellation alone was an outrage. The article
itself was hardly any better.
And the timing couldn’t have been worse.
Just two months earlier President Clinton,
after meeting with Mas and other Miami coim
munity leaders, had embraced Mas’s policy
recommendations in dealing with that sum¬
mer’s burgeoning crisis of Cuban rafters head¬
ing for Florida by the thousands. It had been a
moment of vindication for Mas, a resounding
answer to critics who had long griped that he
was top authoritarian, too inflexible, too prone
to caudillismo, too similar in temperament to
his nemesis, Fidel Castro.
Now the Washington, D.C.-based publica¬
tion had revived those criticisms for the ben¬
efit of its 100,000 readers, many of whom are
Beltway insiders with little knowledge of
Cuban exile history and no conceptual con¬
text within which to measure the article’s
hyperbolic claims. (Bardach characterized
Mas’s relationship with Clinton as a
“Faustian deal.” She quoted a South Florida
writer who claimed that “Mas was bom and
bred by the CIA” and linked with such leg¬
endary spooks as covert operations master
Theodore Shackley and Miami’s Felix
Rodriguez, the man credited with the capture
of Che Guevara.)
“The article calls our client a criminal; more
than that it calls him a mobster, which is an
organized crime leader,” wrote Mas’s attorney
Hank Adorno in an October 4 letter demand¬
ing an apology and a retraction. “The article
accuses our client of a variety of other abhor¬
rent, anti-democratic and anti-sodal activities,
from controlling the main Cuban radio stations
in Miami and access to them to using them to.
encourage others to engage in violence, van¬
dalism, and other malicious or dangerous con¬
duct. The article,. .states that our client is, like
the prototype mobster, a person willing tlol
engage in crinfinal and other illegal behavior,
and is malicious and
vindictive. Thus it
recounts repeated
instances in which
people who ‘cross’
our Client suffer the
consequences one
would éxpect to suf¬
fer when one crosses
a mobster: losing
their careers or jobs,
being physically or
verbally abused, or
living in fear of such
acts of retribution.
The article characterizes our dientas a friend
of convicted criminals and others who engage
in immoral, if not criminal conduct
The article is a smear,” Adorno concluded.
“It is the essence of yellow journalism, written
fey a person with no regard for the truth or
responsible journalism.”
Filed a few weeks later on November 18,
1994, Mas’s defamation lawsuit listed Bardach
show that
domo fpfequently made
mñg remarks to the
sing attorneys.
and The New Republic as defendants and cited
40 examples of objectionable text Although
initially filed in state court the lawsuit was sub¬
sequently transferred to federal district court
because Bardach is a California resident
Miami attorneys Paul Schwiep and Jeffrey
Crockett of Aragon Burlington .Weil &
Crrickett, and Richard Ovelmen of Baker &
McKenzie, are defending Bardach and The
New Republic. Representing Jorge Mas Canosa
are Adorno and Raoul Cantero from theMiami
law firm Adorno & Zeda-. (Sanford L Bóhrer,
who represents New Times on First Amend¬
ment issues and is a former law partner of
Adorno, was erroneously recorded in federal
court as one of Mas’s attorneys.)
The allegedly libelous materials were so
voluminous that defense attorneys initially esti¬
mated they would need two full years to pre¬
pare for trial In an effort to expedite the law¬
suit, Judge Edward Davis split the discovety
phase of the case into two parts. (During dis¬
covery, the opposing sides exchange informa¬
tion and interview named parties and wit¬
nesses.) The first phase would consist of
research to establish whether Maswasa pub¬
lic figure, making it more difficult for him to
win his claim, and also to determine whether
the article was published with “malice” — that
is, with a “reckléss disregard” for the truth.
Continued on pa£e 17..
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Mobster
Continued from page 15
The second phase would be devoted to all
other aspects of discovery.
During the initial, discovery phase'which
ended two weeks ago, Mas and his lawyers
documented some of the most lamentable
foibles of modem American journalism: a fasci¬
nation with scandal, an embrace of stereo¬
types, inadequate research varnished with
facile prose, and stunning leaps of inductive
reasoning. Meanwhile, the other side was able
to force Mas to hand over many of the docu¬
ments that would have justified a hard-hitting
examination of his activities. It has been one; of
those rare instances in
which arrogance and
hubris collide with
equal force.
The gg depositions
themselves have been
uncommonly combat¬
ive, prompting attor¬
neys for Bardach and
The New Republic to
ask the court to in¬
struct Mas’s lawyers to
tone' down their
rhetoric. For example,
during a hearing before federal Magistrate
Barry Garber this past February, the attorneys
claimed that Hank Adorno had been so abu¬
sive during his questioning of Bardach that
they had been forced to abruptly terminate her
deposition. In addition, they said, while Adorno
was questioning Andrew Sullivan, the maga¬
zine's former editor, the attorney launched into
a profanity-laden tirade so vicious that the
court reporter fled the room.
Deposition transcripts also show that
Adorno frequently made insulting remarks to
the opposing attorneys. He told Jeffrey
Crockett, for instance, that he “got an A for
reading,” after Crockett recited portions of the
article during Mas’s deposition. Adorno also
commanded Paul Schwiep to “keep typing” on
his laptop, adding sarcastically: “That’s what
you’re good at”
Additionally, Schwiep recounted, “I was told
that I shouldn’t call myself a Cuban because it
was a disgrace to fee community.”
“You shouldn’t call yourself a what?” asked
the bewildered jurist
“A Cuban,” Schwiep repeated. “I’m Cuban,
judge, and proud of that heritage.”
“I have had the opportunity to review the
transcript.. .and quite frankly I think Mr.
Adorno’s conduct is inappropriate,” Magistrate
Garber commented during the hearing.
Turning to Raoul Cantero, one of Mas’s,
lawyérs, who also happens to be a grandson of
Fulgencio Batista, Garber said, “You know,
there’s no need to cast aspersions at counsel,
make snide remarks. That’s just totally inap¬
propriate and unnecessary, and it’s not going
to be tolerated.”
The idea for Bardach’s story grew out of a
Washington, D.C., dinner party in June 1994 at
the home of journalist and policy pundit
Christopher Hitchens. According to Bardach’s
deposition, the dinner guests, among them
New Republic editor Andrew Sullivan, began
talking about the emergence of moderate anti-
Castro groups. “There had been a human
rights report that had come out about the
abuses in the Miami community, that people of
different opinions weren’t allowed to express
their opinions,” Bardach said. “There were
accusations of everything from harassment to
intimidation to outright murders,... We were
talking about human rights in Cuba, human
rights in Miami. It was this kind of basic con¬
versation, you know, mostly dealing with free-
dom-of-speech issues.”
Sullivan suggested that Bardach write a
story about the Miami exile community.'
Months later, when Jorge Mas Canosa
emerged as the key exile figure during the
Cuban rafter crisis, the focus of the piece
shifted to him. At the time Bardach knew little
about Mas. She had seen a 60 Minutes seg¬
ment about him and had read a profile pub-?
fished in Esquire magazine. Both were highly
critical.
A 46-year-old screenwriter and freelance
Continued on page 18
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Continued from page 17
journalist, Bardach had begun writing about
Cuban-related topics in 1993, when she pub¬
lished a stpry in Vanity Fair about a woman
who claimed to be have oribe been Fidel
Castro’s mistress. Subsequently Bardach
obtained a rare personal interview with the
Cuban strongman. (Last year she won a PEN
USA West award for an interview she did with
Mexican ^guerrilla leader Comandante
Marcos.)
To prepare for her new assignment, Bardach
said in her deposition, she read hundreds of
newspaper articles. She also said she inter¬
viewed mpre than 80 people, including half a
dozen reporters and editors at the Miami
Herald, confidential government sources, and
leaders of other anti-Castro groups. She admit¬
ted, however, that 90 percent of her article was
based on previously published reports, and
that in particular she-relied heavily on the
research of South Florida writer Gaeton Fonzi,
an author and former researcher with the
House Select Committee on Assassinations.
Bardach did not interview Mas’s business
associates, and did not speak to any of file 100-
plus directors and trustees of the Cuban
American National Foundation (CANF),
although she asserted in her deposition that
“the opinion that I gathered from most people
is that Mas and CANF are interchangeable;
that he runs that organization, you know, lock,
stock, and barrel...and that there’s very little
dissent of opinion within the organization. I say
that based on my interviews with three or four
former directors.” :
When Hank Adorno quizzed Bardach for
names, she conceded that she had actually
spoken to only one former director. She had
simply read the deposition of one antagonistic
former director taken during an unrelated law¬
suit arid had looked over interviews Fonzi had
conducted with Raul Masvidal, one of the orga¬
nization’s founding members who is now a
vocal critic of Mas.
In attempting to sound out current CANF
supporters, Bardach limited her efforts to two
men in charge of public relations and to Joe
Garcia, a former foundation executive who left
in order to accept an appointment to Florida’s
Public Service Commission. Bardach also said
she tried to talk to Mas himself, enlisting
Garcia as an intermediary and appealing to
Mas’s personal secretary—to no avail.
Forihis part, Mas insisted under oath that
Bardach made no effort to get in touch with
him. “Who is Joe Garda?” he wondered aloud
during his deposition. “I, don’t recall who Joe
Gardfris, but no, I haven’t gotten any request
from Bardach to talk to me....Joe Garcia is a
very common name.”
Bardach's article
begins with Mas’s
August 1994 meeting
with Clinton: “When
Jorge' Mas 'Cariosa
sauntered out of the
White House Cabinet
Room on August 19—
following a 90-minute
meeting, with .the
President;, of the
United States, he was
irrepressibly gleeful. I
Although the combat¬
ive, scandal-plagued mega-millionaire has long
dominated Miami and, to-some degree, Florida
politics from the bully pulpit of his coffer-rich
Cuban American National Foundation, Mas
had just pulled off the coup of his career—dic¬
tating America’s new Cuba policy.”
From Bardach’s deposition:
; Hank Adorno: Tell me the source or sources of
-the factual information which is induded in the
first paragraph of your story.
Bardach: Some of the sources that I can recall
at this moment are the Miami Herald, and the
actual facts of the meeting were in the Miami
Herald.. .and somebody I spoke to at the State
Department
Adorno: And who’s that?
Bardach: He wishes confidentiality.
Adorno: Was that person at the meeting?
Bardach: I don’t know.
Adorno: Did you ask him whether he was at
the meeting?
Bardach: I don’t recafl.... Everybody learned of
the meeting very quickly. It spread through
the exile community, here instantly. And I
talked to people at Cambio Cubano about it
[Cambio Cubano is a Cuban-exile group philo¬
sophically at odds with CANF.]
Adorno: The Cambio Cubano individ¬
uals...were any one, either one of those indi¬
viduals at the meeting?
Bardach: No, they heard about it through the
grapevine.
Adorno: Did you seek to interview any of the
individuals that actually attended the meeting,
other than Jorge Mas Canosa?
Bardach: No, I relied on the Herald.
Adorno: What do you mean by the word
sauntered?
Bardach: You know, walked out, you know,
walking but with a bit more of a 12t3n the walk.
Adorno: And who described him? You didn’t
see him walk out, did you? •
Bardach: I was told he was very, very pleased
with himself
Adorno: Who told you that?
Bardach: The State Department and thé
Cambio Cubano people.
Adorno: None of which were at the meeting?
Bardach: I’m not sure about the State
Department, so yes, that’s the answer.
Other, ifrqre controversial passages in
Bardach’s article relied on similarly vague or
biased sources. For example, she claimed that
CANF had “pulled off the feat of securing mil¬
lions of dollars from government grants, tun¬
neling the funds through its various umbrellas
and PACs, such as the Free Cuba Committee,
and then paying much of it out to favored politi¬
cians and causes.”
From Bardach’s deposition:
Adorno: What millions of dollars have they
secured from government grants?
Bardach: This is based on the research and
published work of John Nichols in the Nation,
[a politically liberal weekly], and other pub¬
lished sources.
Adorno: First of all, did you do. any indepen¬
dent researchtodeterminewhat government
grants — meaning did you go to the govern¬
mental agencies and speak to them, or did you
just get this information from a published
source?
Bardach: Published sources.
Adorno: All I’m frying to establish is that
you’re going to find out almost all of that is
incorrect.... Was it your intent in these two
sentences to state that CANF, using jts non¬
profit, tax-exempt status, gets [government]
grant money and then somehow funnels it to
political causes?
Bardach: Yes, the point being that there have
been published articles questioning the non-

profit status of CANF because of its political
lobbying, to the extent of its political lobby¬
ing. And this is just á reference to all that
material that has been written about that
aspectof CANF.
Adorno^ Do you know whetherXANF has
an audited financial statement by a Big Six
accounting firm?
Bardach: I do not know.
Bardach’s reporting technique — imagina¬
tive extrapolation froin news accounts'— led
to a' series of minor'eirors.in her article. For
.example, she stated
that Clinton received
almost$300,000 in
“Mas-eóB tro Hed
Cuban exile money”
after attending
á v fundraise^ at
Victor’s Café. The
accurate sum was
about half -that
amount During her
deposition, Bardach
admitted she djTd
not. .speak .with
Jorge Perez of Paul Cejas, organizers of the
event. “I did not investigate who Was the
fundraiser, who,hired thehall, whdpaid the
bills,” she said. “All I know is that [Clinton]
left with contributions and pledges for a sig¬
nificant amount of money.”
“Of which you attribute to Mas, correct?”
asked AdoiW
> “To'Mas’s friends_and associates,” replied
Bardach. _
-Other errors ran the„gamut from trivial
(the location of M^s’s home and placing Joe
Carollo in office when he wasn’t) to the seri¬
ous (claiming Mas “dismissed” a Radio
Marti executive who in fact resigned, and
misstating Mas’s position regarding the
detention of Cuban balseros).
Still more mistakes wereeontained in pas¬
sages characterized as defamatory by Mas
and bis attorneys. For instance, Bardach
described Mas as “a good friend” of anti-
Castro terrorist Orlando Bosch, “who served
eleven years in a Venezuelan prison for blow¬
ing up a civilian Cuban airplane.”
As Adorno-pointed out during Bardach’s
deposition, Bosch was acquitted by the]
Venezuelan Supreme Court because of lack
of evidence: “I wasn’t even aware of the
acquittal at- that time,” Bardach responded.
“I didn’t learñ about the subtle perambula¬
tions that happened later. All I knew at that
time was that’he had done the jail time. I
operated under .the assumption that you
don’t do long sentences unless you are con¬
victed.” Bardach admitted she did not review
any court records or speak to either Bosch’s]
lawyers or the prosecutors involved.
Other sections of the story alleged to be
defamatory were less clearly false, but were
nevertheless hotly contested by Mas.
From Mas’s deposition:
Crockett: (reading from the article)
“Throughout the 1980s, Mas was a staunch
supporter of [William] Casey’s-covert-ven-
ture's in Xatin America:” Does that harm
your-reputation, sir?
Mas: Yes.
Crockett: How does that harm yóur reputa¬
tion?
Mas: I was not a supporter of Casey, or the
CIA, or any activities down there because I
did not know them.
Crockett: (reading from the article) “ ‘Mas
was bom and bred by the CIA,’ says Gaeton
Fonzi, a Miami-based writer and authority oh
Mas who has covered Cuban exile politics
for two decades.” Does that sentence harm
your reputation?
Mas: YeS, sir. -
Crockett How does it harm your reputation?
Mas: I have never been a member of the.
CIA. I never been hired, I never been bora
and bred by the CIA, I never done anything
for the CIA
Crockett What is wrong with being involved
with the CJA’s activities that harms your rep¬
utation, sir,?' .V
Mas: Tbjs is'riot riiy line of business... .1 find
that defariiatory. If s' a false statement
Crockett: Do you believe that Cuban exiles
in Miami, which were associated with the
CIA, have their reputations damaged by that
association? -
Mas: I don’t know.
Crockett: The next sentence, sir, states'
“ ‘He’s a master of psychological warfare. Bill
Clinton didn’t have a prayer once he agreed
to dance with Mas.’” Does that sentence
harm your reputation?
Mas: One at a trine.
•Crockett: You can break it up.
Mas: “He is a master of psychological war¬
fare.” That’s Mse. Notitrue.
Crockett: Does that harm your reputation?
Mas: Yes. -
Crockett: How does that harm your reputa¬
tion?
Mas: I’m not a psychological warfare master.
I’m a businessman.
During'Bardach’s deposition, she empha¬
sized that her principal sources were news¬
paper articles and writer Gaeton Fonzi, who
provided her with the quotation about psy¬
chological warfare. But she also relied on
individuals well known for their opposition
to Mas andón Miami friends with no particu¬
lar expertise. For example, she recounted
that a casual conversation led herto believe
that Mas supported covert operations in
Chile. “I walked into my friends’ apartment,
who are Cubans here, living in Miami, and
they were watching [a talk-show host] inter-
:view Mas Canosa,” she said, “and they told
me he had just expressed his support and
admiration for Pinochet-, a Chilean — the
dictator,* the former dictator of Chile. And
they said that he had said something about,
that he felt that, the feeling he expressed
was that Pinochet was a good role model for
what was needed in Cuba.”
Even if Mas could prove that Bardach’s
reporting was negligent, it would be of little
help "to him legally. As Miami libel expert
Tom Julin observes, the notion of malice as it
would apply in this situation (assuming Mas
is found to be a public figure) “is not about [a
reporter’s] duty to conduct an investigation;
ft’s about what was going on in a reporter’s
mind.”
Thus the discovery phase of the lawsuit
may prove far more beneficial to Bardach
and her lawyers than it will Jo Mas. Because
he objected to such a broad range of mater¬
ial in the article — involving statements that
encompass virtually every aspect of his life
— the defense lawyers are justified in seek¬
ing almost anything they want
Indeed, Crockett and Schwiep have energeti¬
cally pursued everything from documents that
indicate Mas intended to do business with
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communist China to paternity allegations
made against him by a woman who says she
was once his lover. (That case was chronicled
in a May 23 New Times cover story, “Love and
Cuba.”) Mas’s lawyers have objected to such
wide-ranging discovery, but Judge Davis has
general^ ruled against them.
Since June 1995, lawyers for Bardach and
The New Republic have submitted six
requests for documents, including one
demand that included 96 different categories
of material. The defense lawyers have asked
fon
•“Any and all documents related to Oliver
North.”
• “Any and ali documents relating to the hir¬
ing, retention, or use of private detectives by
Mas or CANF for the period from 1985 to
1995.”
• “Any and all documents relating to the
income and expenses of Mas for the period
from 198b to 1995, including bank accounts
and checks.”
•“All documents that refer or relate to any
communications, discussions, dealings, or
contacts of any nature between Mas and any
prosecution or law enforcement authorities
(state or federal) regarding any criminal con¬
duct or potential prosecution of any individ¬
ual, including Mas.”
• “All documents relating to all lawsuits in
which Mas has been a party or a witness.”
Mas’s attorneys balked. “Some of the
defendants’ requests...simply go too far,”
wrote Adorno in a court pleading. “They
either request production of a vast array of
documents, without limitation as to time or
scope, or they seek documents totally unre¬
lated to the issues of this lawsuit” In particu¬
lar, Adorno opposed releasing Mas’s tax
returns, information about hiring private
detectives, and lawsuits, which he main¬
tained were public record and thus readily
available to the defendants and their coun¬
sel.
In response, Crockett pointed out that at
least one civil suit involving Mas and his
brother Ricardo, inexplicably was missing
from the Dade County Courthouse, indicat¬
ing that public records regarding Mas may
be unreliable. “This is a lawsuit that the
plaintiff filed,” Crockett argued. “And the
certain amount of airing of Ins dirty laundry
is the necessary result... Wé’re entitled to
complete discovery on whether he’s involved
in any criminal conduct”
Schwiep maintained that Mas’s use of pri¬
vate detectives, was relevant because
Bardach’s article stated that during Mas’s
1992 battle with the Miami Herald he “told
the paper’s top brass that he had hired pri¬
vate detectives to investigate them and their
children.”
Schwiep wrote: “Mas’s utilization of private
detectives to investigate opponents (and pos¬
sibly supporters) is directly probative ofthe
article’s allegedly libelous portrayal of Mas
as manipulative,- intolerant, and intimidat¬
ing.”
In an order issued this past December,
Magistrate" Garber ruled that Mas did not
Have to produce his financial documents at
that point in the case, but he did order Mas
to produce the other- disputed items, with
the provision that material related to private
investigators would first be reviewed by
Garber in his chambers before being admit¬
ted as evidence in*the case.
By this past January Mas had turned over
more than 300 pages of confidential personal
information, as well as boxes-of material
related to the Cuban American National
Foundation, including membership contribu¬
tion statistics, Mas’s correspondence with
foundation executives and editors at the
Miami Herald, the foundation’s advertising
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budget during Mas’s battle with the newspa¬
per (for the “I Don’t Relieve the Herald”
campaign), paperwork relating to various
grants received from the National
Endowment for Democracy, and, internal
foundation memos.
As word of the lawsuit spread, other people
began providing information to the defense
team. Anonymous packages began showing
up. Former Mas associates telephoned and
volunteered their cooperation.
Among the most damaging material in the
court file today is a deposition from Mas’s
estranged brother Ricardo, which repeats
allegations Ricardo made during the course
of a libel suit filed in 1987. Mas’s younger
brother alleged that Jorge Mas had made
cash payments to Dade County commission¬
ers and one state senator in return for politi¬
cal favors, and that he had evaded taxes by
keeping money'in offshore bank accounts.
He also alleged that Mas bestowed gifts
(including cash) upon Southern Bell execu¬
tives.
Ricardo Mas repeated those allegations
this past April 16 in a deposition taken as
part of the The New Republic lawsuit In addi¬
tion, Ricardo alleged that in the early
Eighties Mas reached an agreement with a
Broward-based business competitor not-to
compete for contracts in each other’s terri¬
tory. The alleged pact may have violated fed¬
eral antitrust laws.
Lawyers for Bardach and The New
Republic also requested the release of mate¬
rials gathered in 1990 by a federal grand jury
that aHegédly investigated Ricardo’s claims.
In addition, they demanded that Mas turn
over all his passports from 1985 to present
and his “telephone books, Rolodex, tele¬
phone log or similar compilation of names,
addresses, and telephone numbers for the
period from 1985 to present”
“The defendants have pursued a scorched-
earth strategy for litigating this case,”
Cantero wrote in protest. “They have
adopted the position that because the plain¬
tiff emphatically denies he is a mobster, they
are entitled to discovery about virtually
every aspect of his personal life.” .
Magistrate Garber disagreed. “Among the
issues in this cause are whether [the] plaintiff
is a ‘public figure/ ” Garber noted. He reasoned
that the documents could “shed light on such
issue” by revealing Mas’s “community status”
through his association with government and
media officials. Mas has since declared that he
could not find anything except his passport
from 1991 to 1996. The request for the 1990
grand jury material is pending.
Ultimately the case comes down to the defin¬
ition of defamation and how it applies to some¬
one like Jorge Mas Canosa. Were the glib
phrases written by Bardach capable of defam¬
ing him? Were they produced with a reckless
disregard for the truth? Can he show how he
was injured? Did it ruin Mas’s reputation to be
associated with the CIÁ, to be described as
intimidating, to be accused of misusing gov¬
ernment grants? Should the word “mobster”
be considered libelous on its face? -
Former editor Andrew Sullivan explained
in bis deposition that when he wrote
“Clinton’s Miami Mobster” he did not mean
it in the literal sense that Mas was involved
in organized crime. “I thought of it as some¬
body who was clannish, controlling, intimi¬
dating,” Sullivan said. “Those were the sort
of features that stood out for me.”
During Mas’s deposition, the defense
lawyers asked what “defamation” meant to
•him personally. “Defamatory in my opinion
is when you print a lot of lies about me and
you call me a mobster,” he. said. “That’s my
definition of defamation. You have defamed
me.” CD
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New Times June 20 • 26,1996

[ÍMetrobusll Dade’s most effective public transportation. ’ |
But when it comes to funding, the bus system and its patrons
always get taken for a ride. Mm

It’s that time again, when local politicians crank up
the rhetoric, express their profound concern, promise
the impossible. And regardless of whether they’ve
officially declared their candidacies, Dade’s mayoral
hopefuls are at the vanguard, plumbing the depths of
credibility with their pretty come-ons to potential vot¬
ers. Among their talking points: public transporta¬
tion. And boy do they have plans for our transit sys¬
tem! Two politicos — Metro Commission Chairman
Aft Teele and Xavier Suarez, former mayor of Miami
— have vowed to ratchet back bus and rail fares from
$1.25 per ride to an alarmingly low 50-cents.
.¡jOf course, this will never happen. There’s barely
enough money to pay for the system as it is: It oper¬
ates at adeficifof slightly less than $89 millipn annu¬
ally (which is offset by property taxes, plus a penny
per gallon from the county’sisix-cent gas tax).
Lowering the cost of a trip by 75 cents would cut rev¬
enues by more than $29.5 million, and there’s no evi¬
dence that a fare reduction would attract enough new
riders to make up the shortfall, even if it were linked
with other incentives, such as frep parking at
Metrorail stations (which now costs two dollars per
day) and free transfers (now 25 cents apiece).
Furthermore, drastic financial modifications would
require a drastic shift in the mindset prevalent
among our public officials, which until now has been
dominated by tf ldyeaffair with trains. Though
there’s a consensus that Metrorail and its downtown
offspring Metromover-ire one of the biggest
American transportation boondoggles of the"
Twentieth Century, county officials are malting plans
to spend vast sums to extend the rail in at least two
directions. The victims of the generation-old obses¬
sion with rail: Dade’s bus system and the passengers
Contirtliied on page 24

New Times June 20-26,1996
Norman Wartman: “We basically gutted our bus system, gutted highway projects
which buses would run, in order to put together the Metrorail system.”
\
Token
¡Continued from pago 23
who depend on it Amid all the banter about
rail, there is precious little talk about buses.
“Metrobus is the forgotten stepchild,” goes
the common refrain. Passengers-say it.
Drivers say it. Transportation economists
say it Even some county bureaucrats say it
(softly). The bus system is understaffed,
underfunded, undersupplied, and under-
maintained. There aren’t enough buses on
the road to adequately serve the existing
ridership and not enough mechanics to
maintain the buses the county does have.
“We basically gutted our bus system —
existing and potential — gutted public
works and highway projects on which buses
would run, in order to put together the
Metrorail system,” says Norman Wartman,
a long-time transit activist who now chairs a
Metro-Dade transportation advisory board.
“We’ve been paying for it ever since.”
Wartman and other bus boosters are in
favor of a back-to-basics approach to public
transportation in Dade. They emphasize
that unlike trains, bus routes are flexible
and can be adjusted as demand warrants.
"The foundation of the transit system is the
carpools, the buses, the jitneys,” Wartman
argues. “We need to have the base of the
pyramid broadened. Because this county is
50 miles deep by 30 miles wide, a little
teensy line on the map is not a cure-all.”
T. Willard Fair, president and CEO of the
Urban League of Greater Miami, agrees, but
he’s skeptical about the ability of Dade’s
public leadership to see the light. “We have
a tendency in this community to initiate pub¬
lic policy for the emotional image of the
community,” says Fair, citing as an example
the recent scramble to build a new arena
downtown. “And the development of our
rapid-transit system fits into that image-as-
public-policy making. We have this notion
that if we’re going to have a first-class, 21st-
century city, we need these massive devel¬
opments,”
And in order to acquire them, Fair con¬
cludes, “we are willing to sell our soul.”
INTERLUDE:
THE S BUS-WAITING FOR GODOT
From the archives of the Metro-Dade
Transit Agency Complaint Department: ’•
To Whom ItMay Concern:'
¿ f am a regular user of public transporta¬
tion, exclusively buses, I depend on Metro-
Dade bus transit to take me to and from
work. I take the S route bus at the comer of
Eleventh Street and Alton Road (in front of
the First Union Bank), going downtown.
The usual time I am there is 10:00 a.m. to
10:15 a.m. daily. The bus service at this hour
is terrible to say the least I am not alone in
this opinion.
I have had to wait 30 minutes for buses.
Other times buses pass by but do not bother
stopping because they feel they are “full.”...
Friday, August 11, 1995,1 got to the bus
stop around 10:10 a.m. I had just missed the
bus, because I saw it leaving that bus stop á
minute before. After approximately fifteen
minutes, an S bus passed without stopping,
motioning that there was another bus
behind. That bus was an F/M bus, which I
do not use, therefore it was no use to me.
About 30 minutes later, another S passed
by. This driver wasn’t taking any more pas¬
sengers either.... However, the next S bus
that passed around 11:00 a.m was bus
#1158. Finally I was on my way to work,
though I start at 1030 a.m.
' I feel it is ridiculous to spend more time'
waiting for á bus than actually riding it Will
the bus service improve?...
yjitio not know how to drive. I rely on
Metro-Dade bus transit, though I wish I did
not have to. I need to get to work and make
a living. I really hope things improve for us
bus transit users. Any advicé?
Sincerely,
Rose de la Cruz
If Metrobus is indeed the neglected
stepchild of the Metro-Dade Transit Agency
(MDTA), then Metrorail and Metromover
are its overindulged siblings, show ponies to
Metrobus’s workhorse.
The numbers clearly delineate this unbal¬
anced relationship:
•Metrobus serves more than 201,000 one¬
way passengers each weekday; Metrorail
and Metromover combined serve fewer
than 65,000.
•Metrobus routes cover a service area of
500 square miles; the rail systems stretch a
paltry 23 miles.
•In the past fiscal year, Metrobus boasted
revenues of $52.1 million — 73 percent of
MDTA’s totai revenue; Metrorail and
Metromover pulled in only $13.4 million, or
19 percent
Continued on «age 27 .
24 Taken for a ride: Waits of more than half an hour during peak hours are all too common

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Transit activist Norman Wartman questions the value of throwing more money at Metrorail
Token
Continued! from page 24
•More significantly, Metrobus was able to
recoup 42 cents of every dollar deposited
into the fárehox, ohe of the highest rates
among U.S. public bus systems and far
superior to the 24-cent return on every dol¬
lar expended at the turnstile for Metrorail
and Metromover. (The so-called farebox
recovery has never been higher than 27
cents per dollar for the rail system.)
•Despite its greater utility and productivity,
Metrobus splits local funding fairly equally
with the rail systems. During the past fiscal
year, for example, Metrobus received 47
percent ($47.5 million) of the property tax
dollars allocated to the transit system, while
the rail systems received 43 percent ($43.3
million).
•Metrobus costs $.1-9,7 to operate per one-,
way passenger. Metrorail costs $3.34 per
passenger; Metromover $2.21. (In a 1994
study undertaken by transportation
researchers at the-University of South
Florida, Dade County showed'the highest
operating expense per passenger trip
among five metropolitan rail systems
surveyed. Metrobus
finished in the middle
of the pack in a simi¬
lar survey of Severn
bus systems.)
Metrorail didn’t
/always se’p-nHike a
bad idea. The notion
of a rail system
.gained currency dur¬
ing the _1974 oil
embargo and the
.attendant panic
at)out the potential
for three-dollar-a-gal-
Joh gas prices. Here
and elsewhere, civic
and government leaders began envisioning
mass-transit alternatives to the automobile,
and many hit on an elevated rail as a solu¬
tion.
Predicting Metrorail would serve more
than 250,000 one-way passenger trips daily
by the mid-Eighties, the county’s consul¬
tants recommended a 54-mile, 54-station
plan, the first leg of which would run from
Kendall to Hialeah. Academics believed the
system was inappropriate for a sprawling
megalopolis like Miami and was destined to
flop. But the federal government agreed
with the consultants and financed 80 per¬
cent of the approximately $1.2 billion con¬
struction costs. In 1984 the Kendall-to-
Hialeah .line opened — and almost
immediately became an. embarrassment of
national proportions.
Ignoring prevailing theory, designers did
not build tracks along roads that already
had a high volume of public transportation
(and therefore a built-in ridership). Instead
the route passed through low-density neigh¬
borhoods, went nowhere near major tourist
attractions, and was badly integrated with
the bus system, inspiring critics to lambaste
it as a service designed for South Dade’s
middle class at the expense of the transit-
"dependent, urban-dwelling poor. Ridership
figures fell far short'of initial projections.
The system became known as Metrofail.
' Without the anticipated rail ridership to
help defray costs, the county was forced to
suck money away from the bus system. A
promised augmentation of the bus fleet was
delayed, and commissioners forged ahead
with the next rail stage: Metromover.
After the downtown loop was completed in
1986, Metrorail ridership figures increased
by fewer than 10,000 trips per year — at a
price of an additional six million dollars per
year in operational costs. (Simultaneously,
bus ridership decreased by nearly 5000 trips
annually.) Still, at the beginning of this
decade, when the, time came to build the
Metromover’s extensions to the Omni and
Brickell, there was again little hesitation.
Among the plan’s critics, however, was
the transit workers’ union, whose leaders
argued that the money should go toward
beefing up the bus system. “I think too
much priority was placed on [the
Metromover],” complains Eddie Talley,
president of Transport Workers Union
Local 291. “During the time money was
allocated to the new legs, we tried to get
the county to use the money to double the
bus fleet as they had promised. Instead we
have an expanded Metromover downtown
thattumed out tobe a detriment to tiicius
system.”
That vaunted bus-system augmentation
never did come to be. Today the county has
an operating fleet of about 600 buses,
“essentially the same” number in use when
Continued on page 28
Critics lambasted
Metromover as a
service designed For South Dade's
middle class at the expense oF
the urban-dwelling poor.
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New Times June 20 - 26,1996

New Times June 20-26,1996
Metrobus serves more than 201,000 one-way passengers each weekday, more than three times the
number served by Metrorail and the Metromover combined
Token
Continued front page 27
Metrorail opened in 1984, according to
Vernon Clarke, general superintendent of
the MDTA’s bus operations division.
Moreover, Clarke says, at any given lime
about 12Q of those buses are in the shop
for repairs, “During the peak hours, we
need to have approximately 480 to 490
buses on the road,” Talley notes. “We’re
scraping the bottom of the barrel to get
that."
:!girhe size of the fleet certainly hasn’t kept
pace with Dade’s population, which has
grown by fifteen percent since 1984. A
maintenance facility built in the early
Eighties to house 1500 buses has been
abandoned by MDTA and is now leased to
the school system for one dollar a year.
Fewer buses serving a larger and more
widespread population means less-fre¬
quent service, a common complaint among
riders. A 1994 MDTA report summarizing
that year’s schedule illuminates the prob¬
lem: During peak hours, buses on no more
than 26 of 72 routes ran at fifteen-minute
intervals or better. On about half the
routes, passengers couldn’t hope for more
than one bus every half an hour. Of those,
at least eighteen routes required a wait of
up to an hour or more. The figures haven’t
improved significantly sincé then. (By
comparison, Metrorail trains run no more
than twenty minutes apart — there’s a
train every seven minutes during morning
and afternoon rush hours -Ja and
Metromover cars come at six-minute inter¬
vals.)
The skeletal condition of the bus system
is a bane to those who most need public
transportation. According to another 1994
MDTA survey, about half of all Metrobus
riders are unemployed, with about two-
thirds reporting annual household
incomes of less than $20,000. Nearly 80
percent said the main reason they rode the
bus was that they had no car or didn’t
(hive. Metrorail passengers, on the other
hand, are a comfortable lot: According to
the same survey, nearly one-third have
household incomes of $40,000 or more.
The vast majority cited traffic congestion
and parking problems as their reasons for
riding the rail.
Even worse, with the advent of Metrorail
a far greater percent of bus routes were
eliminated from low-income neighbor¬
hoods than from high-income ones. As
part of his college senior thesis, Kendall
native and Harvard economics student
Eric Nierenberg compared bus maps from
1983 (pre-Metrorail) and 1995 (post-
Metrorail) and calculated the number of
bus routes passing through each of Dade's
census tracts. Census tracts with a median
household income of less than $10,000 suf¬
fered a loss in bus service of more than 50:
percent, Nierenberg found, while tracts
with median household incomes of greater
than $40,000 experienced only a 13.2 per¬
cent decrease.
Though Nierenberg counted only bus
routes and not the actual number of buses
per census tract, he says that a preliminary
analysis of about a quarter of the tracts
revealed that the reduction in actual fre¬
quency was even greater in the lower-
income areas. “When they introduced
Metrorail, they cut back on bus service
partly because they thoiight they’d elimi-.
nate overlap {with Metrorail] and partly to,
prevent'ballooning costs,” Nierenberg
says. “But the majority of service they cut
was in lower-income areas. They built a
system that’s supposed to help poor people
but it actually penalized poor people.”
Roosevelt Bradley, MDTA’s new assis¬
tant director of bus operations and mainte¬
nance, hasn’t studied the socioeconomic
impact of bus cuts and therefore can’t com¬
ment on Nierenberg’s findings. But
Bradley says that no matter where he goes
in Dade — whether to wealthy neighbor¬
hoods or poor ones — residents complain
that there aren’t enough buses. The pub¬
lic is definitely screaming for more ser¬
vice, and more service means to provide
more buses,” he acknowledges, putting
the ideal number of buses at somewhere
between 800 and 1000.
Unfortunately, say Bradley and his boss,
MDTA Director Chester “Ed” Colby, there
just isn’t any money for such a purchase.
“We’re not expanding anything,” confirms
Colby. “We haven't had a budget that’s had
money in it for a long time.”
In spite of Metrorail’s less-than-stellar pub¬
lic reception, the two most ambitious tran¬
sit-improvement projects now under way
in Dade — meant to unclog two congested
roadways, State Road 836 and NW 27th
Avenue — are rail-centered. Though both
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“Dade County is as Far back in the queue to get Federal transportation dollars as
Butte, Montana, is to get FBI agents,” says Metro Commission Chairman Art Teele.
International Airport. The project’s pri¬
mary component is an elevated Metrorail
track tGTun from the Palmetto Expressway
to the Port of Miami.
And the bus? Kouroche Mohandes, a
Florida Department of Transportation
engineer who is coordinating the project,
says thaf if the rail is built, planners would
reconfigure the bus system to provide
feeder service. There has also been talk of
sending express buses along the carpool
lanes before the rail is finished. The entire
project is expected to cost about $2.5 .bil¬
lion.
Transit mayen Norman Wartman is look¬
ing for more immediate attention. He pro¬
poses constructing bus-only lanes along
the Turnpike between Kendall Drive and
NW 41st Street, and on State Road 836
between the Turnpike and Le Jeune Road.
He says there’s plenty, of room either in
the median or along the roadside to build
the special lanes. “We could do it cheap as
mud and for. a fraction of the cost of one
mile of rail,” Wartman declares. Until the
rail is-built, the bus routes could help to
develop a transit ridership.. When the rail
is built, they would feed the system at a
station planned for the intersection of the
Palmetto and SR 836, Wartman has intro¬
duced the idea to planners. ?They said
they’d ‘think about it,’ ” he scoffs.
The second big transit project is the
North Corridor Transit Study, intended to
undog the 27th Avenue artery^
Commissioners have narrowed the possi¬
ble designs to three. Two involve building
an elevated Metrorail extension up NW
27th Avenue to 215th Street, with offshoot
extensions to Joe Robbie Stadium and
Miami-Dade Community College’s North
Campus. The third involves the construc¬
tion of a reversible bus lane The coui^^É
awaiting funds to pay for an. environmental
impact statement for the study. Planners,
as well as several: county commissioners
— particularly Art Teele ánd Betty
Ferguson — are gung-ho about the rail.
Preliminary studies have concluded that
the rail is half as cost-effective as the bus
but will attract five to six times more new
riders.
There are detractors (among them a
commissioner or two) who say it looks like
another enormous waste of moheyr'One
county consultant has estimated that á
Metrorail extension up NW 27th Avenue
will increase rail ridership by about 23,000
trips per day but will encourage only about
4800,new public-transportation riders. The
line’s estimated cost: between $453 million
and $463 million, depending on its place¬
ment.- Ushigta-formula that-figures annual-
ized capital costs, planners estimate that
the system will cost between $17.80 and
$18.22 per new rider. (A busway wouldn’t
be much rosier: It is estimated to attract
only about 800 new transit riders per day,
although at a far more cost-efficient rate of
$9.23 per new passenger.)
The north corridor Metrorail leg might
be an economically worthwhile option, crit¬
ics say, if it were to hook into Broward’s
transportation system. One proposal is to
run the extension up to the Broward Mall
at the intersection of University Drive and
Broward Boulevard. But already the'
Plantation City. Council has passed a reso¬
lution opposing a railroad track running
through their city to the mall.
Proponents say the rail has no chance of
becoming profitable until it’s fully com¬
plete, that our investments in this century
will pay off in the next. It’s an argument
that-taxes, the patience of Miami attorney
Richard Friedman, w(ho led a citizens’ fight
against the construction of Metrorail.
“That big lie has been perpetuated in all
the writings of MDTA,” Friedman com¬
plains; “They used the same argument [to
expand] the Metromover. At one point
.they said, ‘We only have half -the
Metromover, so unless we complete it we
won’t be able to attract all these people
who are going to jump on the Metrorail.1”
Even Commission Chairman Art Teele,
who supports both corridor projects,
decries the inadequacies of Metrobus. “It’s
horrible!” he exclaims. “I don’t think we
need to build another inch on this rail sys-
tem until‘we rationalize and make sense of
our bus system. The problem is, what can
you do? When you have a troubled com¬
pany, it’s hard without money to solve the
problems. It’s like pulling up a blanket
that’s too sma]l for tibe bed. Something’s
going to be uncovered.” ~
There’s no guarantee, Teele adds, that
any of the extensions will ever be built.
“Dade County is as far back in the queue
to get federal transportation dollars as
Butte, Montana, is to get FBI agents,” he
says.
Federal and state assistance has been
drying up in recent years, explains Danny
Alvarez, MDTA deputy director for admin¬
istration, with federal operating subsidies
for MDTA dropping in the past decade
from about $18 million to about $7 million.
Dade is still without a local funding source
solely earmarked for public transportation
:r*sa dedicated revenue source that would
vastly improve the county’s chances of
winning matching federal funds. Voters
have twice rejected efforts to create a spe¬
cial transit sales tax, in 1990 and again in :
1991.
Wartman says it’s unlikely the public is
going to look kindly on another attempt in
the hear future. “It's going to take a mas¬
sive increase in the faith of the population,
and thaf s only going tobe done when they
see us move a lot of people at a reasonable
cost,” he says..“If you have someone
you’ve given money to, and they’ve gone
Continued on page 30
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and blown that money, are you going to
give them money later? Because of the
mistakes of the past, we’re screwed now.”
INTERLUDE:
A MOMENT IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT
A total of 1084 people work as Metrobus
operators. The majority are black (713)
and male (913). They make gbod wages,
ranging from a rookie rate of $7.28 per
hour to a veteran’s top scale of $15.98. On
top of that, they have the opportunity to
work a lot of overtime.'
“This is one of the few places that a minor¬
ity can come in and get a decent-paying job
and not have educational requirements. But
don’t let the rates fool you,” cautions Eddie
Talley, who was hired as a bus operator in
1966, and continued driving even after
becoming full-time union president in 1989.
According to Talley, Metrobus operators
work for fifteen to twenty years — and die
an average of three years after they retire.
None has lived more than ten years after
turning in his keys.
‘The doors open up and the driver gets the
brunt of all the negatives out there in the
street, not to mention all the bad traffic, peo¬
ple bringing all their bad driving habits from
other countries,” Talley carps. “And we’re
expected to maintain our schedule out there!”
'f lbne'of ihe first black drivers hired by
Dade County, Franklin Jenkins ranks as
MDTA’s senior driver, with 34 years behind
the wheel. The key to his longevity? T try
not to get upset,” he ventures. “You hear
things from passengers and you just have to
let it go. If cars cut you -off, you don’t let it
bother you. It’s nerve-racking and every¬
thing else.”
Richard Roberts was hired as an operator
in 1963, a year and a half after Jenkins. “It’s
more stressful now than when I started,”
says Roberts, an avuncular man who favors
tinted bifocals and a goatee. like Jenkins,
Roberts is slender, a rarity among Dade’s
beefy bus corps. “The traffic is a lot worse
and the passengers are a lot worse,” he
explains. “Back then if you asked somebody
to do something, they usually did it. Now if
you ask somebody to do something, they
tell you where to go. You learn over the
years that you need to laugh it off, not get
uptight If you do, you end up retaliating.”
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Metrobús receives
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drivers, and about
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bypassed waiting
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v y
Indeed, Metrobus headquarters receives
plenty of complaints about rude or danger¬
ous drivers, and about operators who ,have
bypassed waiting passengersv(It’s not
uncommon in Dade to hear out-of-town rid¬
ers marvel at the antics required to flag
down a bus; some drivers seem only to stop
for,the equivalent of a full-bore cheerleading
maneuver,)
Conceding that there are “some bad
apples,” Roosevelt Bradley says he is insti¬
tuting more training in customer relations
and in the provisions of the Americans with
Disabilities Act. But he and other upper-
level managers say behavior is much better
â– than it has been in the past
Good things, too, have been known to hap¬
pen; Richard Roberts remembers especially
clearly an attractive hospital worker who
used to regularly ride his bus home. They’re
now married.
Bus supporters have some causé to rejoice
.^jpr at least to be cautiously optimistic. The
state is nearing completion of an eight-mile
busway that will run along South Dixie
Highway from Cutler Ridge to Kendall
Drive, (Cost: $6 million per mile, versus
Metrorail’s cost of $57 million per mile.)
Transit officials hope to extend that busway
ail the way down to Florida City within a few
years. Plans are also afoot to develop routes
for smaller buses to circulate through neigh¬
borhoods and feed the major arteries and
the'jail, a project desigñed to challenge jit¬
neys, privately owned vans that have
cropped up in recent years to fill the holes in
the bus system. ¿According to MDTA, jit-
neyg have sucked an estimated six million
dollars per year in revenues away from the
county.) '
?\|h another recent development that may
reflect a change in transit prejudices, the
Metropolitan Planning Organization, a
cqgnty transportation board composed
mainly of Metro, commissioners, recently
authorized a thorough review of Tri-Rail.
The vote was requested by members of an
appointed citizens’ advisory group that
wondered whether the rail should be left
as is, modified, or eliminated. The group
pointed out that,while Tri-Rail staff has
doubled, ridership has dropped. Weekday
riders have decreased from about $500,
(February 1905) to about 7000 (February
1996). Fare revenue is only about $5.4 mil-
continued on page 32
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Continued from page 31
lion, a fraction of the $70 million annual
subsidy. By the group’s calculations, Tri-
Rail is being subsidized to the annual tune
of more than $17,500 per passenger. (Most
of the,operational cost of the Tri-Rail
provided By the state; Dade, Broward, and
Palm Beach counties kick mafepytoiie mil¬
lion dollars each.) In outlining their con¬
cerns, the citizens’ group asked whether
an express-bus service could better serve
the commuting population.
Making reference to the vote to review
Tri-Rail, Metro Commissioner Alex
Penelas. says he’d like to review the entire
transit system, with an eye toward perhaps
turning over Metrorail to a private contrac¬
tor.
Among MDTA bus personnel, a modicum
of hopefulness-lias been brought about by a
recent change in administration. This past
January, when Ed Colby appointed Roosevelt
Bradley as assistant director of bus
operations, he alsoH
tapped Bradley’s
boss, Carlos Bonzon,
for the post of deputy
director of bus and
train ‘operations.
While neither'-has
been in the job long
enough to prove his
worth, managements
traditional adver¬
saries are hopeful.
Union president
Eddie Talley ¿says
Bradley has already
presented some “cre¬
ative and innoyafiyel
plans” for improving
the system. As for Bonzon, who is the former
director of Dade’s Building and Zoning
" Department, Talley says, “He strikes, me as
someone who has a genuine interest in the
bus part and the whole industry.”
A ten-year veteran'of the transit system,
Bradley recognizes he’s walking intosa
potential snake pit. (“I don’t think an assis¬
tant director of bus has ever survived,”
notes Colby, the man who appointed him.)
It doesn’t help Bradley that he had never
worked in bus operations: Aside from a
year-long stint with Metrobug on.special
assignment, he spent his decade of service
on the rail side. That fact frustrates some
of his staffers. “We’re going through
another education process educating our
boss,” sighs a frustrated Vernon Clarke,
general superintendent of bus operations
and a 30-year veteran of the bus system.
“It’s not the first time.”
Bradley is trying to make his mark early:
In May he produced a comprehensive. 90-
day report detailing the ills of the system,
ranging from poor communication
between mfpagement and the labor unions
to roach infestation as a result of irregular
exterminations. “J!m„basically trying to
hold people mare accountable for their
responsibilities,” he declares.
He faces a trial by fire, literally. Summer
is here, and with it come» an increase in
bus breakdowns.. Bradlely has been devis¬
ing a plan to deal with the problem. “You
know the saying, the proof is in the pud¬
ding?” asks Talley. “We will be into the
pudding by June, and we will see what Mr.
Bradley and Dr. Bonzon are made of.”
Right now they don’t have much to work
with. MDTA has 77 buses on order from
the Flxible bus company, but the firm is in
dire financial straits and has stopped man¬
ufacturing new vehicles. Regardless, those
buses were meant to replace the oldest
one» in the county’s fleet, which date back
stoT980. Under federal guidelines, they are
overdue for the junk pile.
. Ancient buses mean even more break¬
downs. This past year, Metrobus suffered
10)344 breakdowns (“roadcalls,” in bus
parlance, which could mean anything from
engine failure to a malfunctioning rearview
mirror) — an average of about 28 per day.
According to an MDTA review of six U.S.
metro areas (Atlanta, Baltimore, Detroit,
Pittsburgh, Portland, and Dade) the
county’s buses broke down more fre¬
quently than every other fleet except
Pittsburgh’s.
It isn’t necessarily the oldest buses that
are giving mechanics the biggest
headaches. The newest vehicles, those
extra-long, articulated craft, have been
nothing less than a nightmare. For-one
Archie Saunders:
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thing, they-are equipped with fancy new
computers that mechanics aren’t trained, to
fix. They are also plagued by serious
glitches in the. air conditioning systems
that have rendered them useless in
Miami’s forbidding heat. “My biggest
problem has been how am I maintain my;
oddball equipment with unqualified per¬
sonnel?” mutters Archie Saunders, assis¬
tant general superintendent of mainte¬
nance. “This new equipment has had
problem after problem, and most of my
staff hasn’t had any normal training.”
In the past, normal training meant a six-
month training course. Budget cuts have
eliminated the program. What’s more,
Metrobus lost many of its most experi¬
enced mechanics a few years ago; they
jumped overitb Metromover for the
promise of higher wages. “We hired a lot
of new mechanics in a hurry.” Saunders
says. “They went basically from filling out
the application right into the shop. They
didn’t know the front of the bus from the
back. Some of them still don’t”
As a result of the bus shortage, Dade has
had to withdraw its promise to loan 77
buses to the Olympic Games in Atlanta
this summer; the county will be one of only
a handful of Midwestern and Eastern com¬
munities not chipping in any buses for the
Olympics.
Vernon Clarke says that even without a
specific tax earmarked for transit—a dedi¬
cated funding source — there’s plenty
MDTA management can do to improve bus
service. “We don’t need a dedicated source
of funding,” he grumbles. “I think we’re
using it as an excuse.” Clarke argues that
if upper management, the Dade County
Manager’s Office, and Metro commission¬
ers were to focus more intensely on bus
operations, service and efficiency could be
improved 20 to 25 percent simply by redi¬
recting routes, coordinating bus sched¬
ules, and generally tightening things up.
“We need a totally independent review of
the system,” he says. “Someone who won’t
pull their punches needs to come and take
a look at it. Looking at it universally, I
know the rail could be a good component
But it really frosts us in bus operations and
maintenance to see all the emphasis on
rail. We’re going for pie in the sky when
we don’t have our feet on the ground. This
whole operation is on the verge of col¬
lapse.”
As the days wo.und down before the
county manager released; his proposed
budget this past month, there was appre¬
hension among bus personnel about the
hits their system might take. Staff layoffs?
Route curtailments? But in the end, County
Manager Armando Vidal proposed to leave
the bus system alone. He did, however,
request that the Bicentennial Park
Metromover station be shut down owing to
low ridership.
The news elicited smiles at Metrobus
headquarters. CD
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New Times June 20 • 26,1996

New Times June 20-26,1996
On Friday, Natalie Merchant warbles liberally
The downtown library celebrates Miami architecture on Monday
t li u
r
s
day
j
U
n
•
Stealing Beauty. Apparently, Italian
director Bernardo Bertolucci has
contracted the dreaded Merchant-
Ivory disease, which causes an
otherwise provocative filmmaker
to start fashioning lovely-to-look-at, yet utterly
vapid, puppy-love paeans. In Bertolucci’s case,
thatmeans morphing from the auteur behind
Lost Tango in Paris into the creator of Stealing
Beauty, wherein actress Liv Tyler, in search of
the boy who first bussed her and in attempt¬
ing to solve a “riddle” she finds in her
deceased mother’s diary, traipses through
Tuscany enchanting everyone who meets
her. Tonight at 8:00 at the AMC Coral Ridge
Theatre (Oakland Park Boulevard and Feder¬
al Highway, Fort Lauderdale), the Fort Laud¬
erdale International Film Festival presents a
sneak preview of Stealing Beauty. You’ll
laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll kiss five bucks good¬
bye. Call 5680500. (MY)
Carlos Molina: Guitarist Carlos Molina flies in
the face of the old saw that goes “Those who
can’t do, teach.” While Molina serves as a pro¬
fessor át both Florida International University
and Metro-Dade Community College, he also
plays out • riot only here in South Florida,
but throughout the U.S., South America, and
Europe. Tonight at 8:00 at the Episcopal
Church Center of Coral Gables (1150 Stan¬
ford Dr., Coral Gables), he offers a program
ii of Spanish and Latin American guitar music
that includes works by Astor Piázzolla,
Joaquin Rodrigo, Agustín Barrios, Francisco
Tárrega, and Manuel de Falla. Tickets for the
concert cost ten dollars. Call 386-3103. (MY)
fr
i
d
ay
i.
u
n
•
Summer Shorts: In an effort to pump
new life into local theater, playwright
Susan Westfall and . actresses
Stephanie Heller Norman and Elena
Wohl have formed City Theatre,
which debuts tonight at 8:00 with Summer
Shorts, eighteen new one-act plays split into
two alternating programs. The works, written
by national and local playwrights Geffrey
Sweet, David Fleisher, plus many others), run
the gamut from high drama to low comedy,
and none of them Istsis longer than fifteen
minutes. The founding trio has engaged a
gaggle of South Florida directors (including
Maria Rodaz, Barry Steinman) and actors
(Peter Haig, Margot Moreland, among oth¬
ers) to present the one-acts at the Jerry Her¬
man Ring Theatre (University of Miami, Coral
Gables). From tonight through July 7, Pro¬
gram A runs Friday at 8:00 and Saturday at
7:00; Program B, Saturday at 9:30 and Sunday
at 7:00. Tickets range from $12 to $28. Call
446-9289. (MY)
Sting/Natalie Merchant Ah, a match made in
VH1 heaven: der Stinger and Nat the PC Brat
Before he became a pinup for strenuously
tasteful middle-age adults with fistfuls of dis¬
posable income, Sting led the mildly insurrec¬
tionary Police, whose first two albums burst
with skittering rhythms and undiluted pas¬
sion. Then, inevitably, he grew up, broke, up
the band, and, quite effortlessly, turned into
his generation’s Paul McCartney—just a guy
with a song in his heart and a chip on his
shoulder. As for Merchant, she, too, led a
somewhat innovative outfit, 10,000 Maniacs,
which seamlessly melded folk rock melodies
to thoughtful — if occasionally knee-jerk lib¬
eral — lyrics; like Sting, she flew the group
coop to go solo, and her first release under
her own name, Tigerlily, brims with the kind
of innocuously likable songs one would
expect from a budding careerikL Tonight at
7:30, they perform at the Coral Sky Amphithe¬
atre (601 Sansbury’s Way, West Palm Beach),
along with Latin chánteuse Soraya. Tickets
range from $20 to $50. Call 358-5885. (MY)
Andrew Dice Clay: The fimniest bit this scumbag
comedian/failed actor ever did wasn’t on a
concert stage, in his celluloid stink bomb The
Adventures of Ford Fairlane, or on his short¬
lived TV series from last year. Nope, it was on
one of those Current Affair/Hard Cofly-type
shows about five years ago, after Clay’s racist,
sexist, homophobic style of comedic assault
had fallen out of favor. He was sad, bloated,
and looked as if he hadn’t been sleeping well.
And he was crying. Crying. Seemed the Dice-
man felt like he was a victim of ill will among
media types and leftist do-gooders who for
some reason just couldn’t understand the
complexities of his sense of humor, which he
claimed was simply a reflection of what’s on
the minds of average bluecollar Americans, It
was a pathetic and manipulative display, but
riotously funny in that Clay really thought
someone might believe him. And — surprise!
—some people still thrill to this hatemonger’s
every utterance, thus proving P.T. Bamum’s
theory about suckers. Clay appears at Sunrise
Musical Theatre (5555 NW 95th Ave., Sun¬
rise) tonight at 8:00. Tickets range from $23
to $33. Call 741-7300. OF)
Caribbean Comedy Festival: What cracks them
up in Kingston? Same thing that cracks
them up in Manhattan. Human foibles.
Tonight and tomorrow night at ,8:00, seven
Caribbean comics converge on the North
Miami Beach Cultural Center (17011 NE
Nineteenth Ave., North Miami Beach) for a
yuks-a-plenty fest See and hear Errol Fabi¬
an, Tommie Joseph, Nickie Crosby (all
Trinidad and Tobago), Bello and Blacka
Gamaica), Trevor Eastman (Barbados),
Gravy (Antigua), and Ken Corsbie (Guyana)
as they illuminate the lighter side of the
Caribbean experience. Tickets cost $20. Call
653-7479 for more information. (MY)
sat
u
r
1 a y
j
u
n
•
r*=T| Performance/Art Fusion: Get
J II down, get dirty, and get inter-
U disciplinary as InVerse, the lit-
ji erary and art club of Florida
Atlantic University, presents an
evening of poetry, music, and performance

o n d a y
june
A Century of Architecture in Miami:
Chrissie Hynde put it succinctly:
“My city had been pulled
down/Reduced to parking
spaces’' (from the Pretenders’
“My City Was Gone”). She was singing about
Cleveland, but the eradication of cities, build¬
ing by building, happens almost impercepti¬
bly everywhere, including here. To coincide
with this town’s centennial, the Miami-Dade
Public library’s main branch (101W. Flagler
St) presents “A Century of Architecture in
Miami,” which surveys the evolution of the
city as manifested by its numerous structures
and ponders Miami’s evolving social, cultural,
and economic identities. Are we not our budd¬
ings? On display in the main library’s auditori¬
um through September 15, with free admis¬
sion. Cafl 3755016 for hours. (MY)
t u e s d a y
june
i Dinosaur Families: Learn about the
lives of families that lived 80 trnl-
I lion years ago at the Miami Muse-
lum of Science and Space Transit
' Planetarium (3280 S. Miami Ave.);
diese families Were composed of dinosaurs, of
course. Over the past ten years, during digs at
199 sites worldwide, scientists have uncov¬
ered fossilized dinosaur remains and eggs
that reveal how dinosaurs reproduced, may
have cared for their young, and may have
evolved into birds. The interactive exhibition
“Dinosaur Families: Fantastic Fossil Finds”
shares these discoveries through robotic
dinosaurs, full-size skeletal castings, embry¬
onic model dinosaurs in eggs, and more. The
exhibition runs through January 12. The
museum is open daily from 10:00 to 6:00.
Admission is five dollars. Call 8544247. (GC)
|w e d n e s d a y|
and, visual art tonight at 7:30 at the
Broward Community College’s lecture the¬
ater (3501 SW Davie Rd., bldg. 6, Davie).
The players: spoken word/musical group
Weeds; poets Mike Minassian and Don
Adams; actors Tom Atkins, Morningstar
Rumly, and Jeremy Menekseoglu; visual
artists John Foster, Greg Eltringham,
Ginette Fogel, Mark Jette, and Brian
Clapp; plus a musical combo consisting of
Robert Dixon (flute), Evan Kline (percus¬
sion), and Michael Riendeau (guitar). Can
you say “sensory overload”? Admission is
free. Call 4756605. (MY)
Rick Derringer: Additional proof that some¬
times old rock stars don’t get corporate
sponsorship, they just slowly — glacially
— fade away, gradually moving through
the seven concentric rings of rock-venue
hell that culminate in the scorching infer¬
no of the Kustom Kar show. But Rick ain’t
there yet! A teen-dream member of Sixties
garage rockers the McCoys (“Hang on
Sloopy” —yes!), Derringer made his name
as a flash guitarist with Edgar Winter’s
White Trash in the Seventies before going
solo with 1973’s All American Boy, which
included his hit version of “Rock and Roll
Hootchie Coo.” Since then — hmmm, not
much. Derringer straps on his guitar
tonight at Gary’s Sports Bar (5325 S. Uni¬
versity Dr., Davie), where he’s scheduled
to goon at approximately 12:30 a.m. Locals
Sticks and Stones, Dirt Cheap, and Grass
River Tyde open. Admission is $12. Call
434-9680. (MY)
Native American Festival: You have to suspect
that mall culture has reached its apex (or
its nadir, depending on how you choose to
interpret such things) when a festival cele¬
brating Native Americans is staged within
one of these contempo meeting halls, a
magnet for all societal strata. From now
until June 30, the Native American Festival
takes place inside the megatepee that is
Broward Mall (Broward Boulevard and
University Drive, Plantation). Today at
1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, and 5:00, Apache
flutist Andrew Vasquez will perform Native
American music. The festival also features
three exhibits: “A Tribute to the World’s
Greatest Athlete” (a Jim Thorpe pictorial);
“Saynday Was Coming Along” (Silver-
horn’s drawings of the Kiowa Trickster);
and “300' x 35 Miles Corridor to the Past”
(Native American artifacts dating back
more than 4000 years). Admission is free.
Call 474-7406 for the mall’s hours. (MY)
Breathless: Director Jean-Luc Godard
checked his politics at the studio door
(well, mostly, anyway) when he made this
wry, provocative, and highly entertaining
film back in 1960. It helps, of course, that
Francois Truffaut wrote the screenplay,
which follows the exploits of a dodgy petty
crook. (Jean-Paul Belmondo) on the run
from Parisian gendarmes, with his young
American moll (Jean Seberg) in tow.
Godard and Truffaut wanted to celebrate
the work of the Hollywood studios
(notably Monogram) responsible for the
noir classics of the Forties — they suc¬
ceeded — while exploring the nouveau
vagueness of a contemporary filmic protag¬
onist. The eminently watchable Paris set¬
tings only enhance the proceedings. Today
and tomorrow at 2:00 at the Alliance Cine¬
ma (927 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach), Cine¬
ma Vortex screens Breathless in French
with English subtitles. Admission is four
dollars. Call 531-8504. (MY)
=rt 1996 Slammie Awards: What was
I the name of that Three Dog
A Night hit? Oh, right, “Easy to Be
I Hard.” Tonight at 7:30 at the
d) Edge (200 W. Broward Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale), the South Florida Slam¬
mie Awards honor those local bands that
find if easy to be just that —hard, or, per¬
haps more to the point, hardcore. They’ll
receive their commemorative award (a
ceramic skull engraved with each winner’s
name — charming) between sets by heavy-
duty sonic reducers such as Brooklyn’s
relentlessly metallic Biohazard (which has
enlisted former Helmet guitarist Rob Echev¬
erría to join the fold), LA’s pure-punk-for-
now-people D.F.L., and a clutch of South
Floridians, including Radio Baghdad, Sub¬
liminal Criminal, Brethren, Nonpoint, and
Level Nine. A splendidly loud time is guar¬
anteed for all. Tickets cost $12. Calif
5259333 for additional information, (MY)
june
jjTl IrTl The Great Train Robbery: Esthetes
LI II may thumb their noses at the
// nlbooks and movies of
// I I writer/director Michael Crich-
_L_j ton, but until recently (Jurassic
Park, Congo), he wrote taut novels {The
Andromeda Strain, Coma) that adapted readi¬
ly to the screen, directing his own work with
crispness and intelligence {Westworld
remains an unsung Seventies gem). He
based his first venture outside the
medical/sci-fi world, 1979’s The Great Train
Robbery, on a real-life nineteenth-century
caper, wherein atrio of intrepid rogues (Sean
Connery, Lesley-Anne Down, Donald Suther¬
land) attempts to steal a cache of gold from a
moving train. Crichton whips this sucker
along ata frenetic pace while sprinkling the
proceedings with a dusting of humor. Today
at 3:00, the Sanford L Ziff Jewish Museum
(301 Washington Ave., Miami Beach)
screens The Great Train Robbery. Admission
to the museum is fotir dollars, plus another
dollar to see the film. Call 672-5044. (MY)
The Calendar is written by
Georgina Cárdenas,
John Floyd,
and Michael Yockel.
For more listings, turn the page
New Times June 20-26,1996

New Times June 20 - 26,1996
niw worI n
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Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space
restrictions. Submissions should be
mailed to Calendar Editor, New
Times, P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must
be received ten days prior to date of issue.
Thursday, June 20
Art Hour Concerto: Meza Fine Arts becomes a music
venue four nights a week; enjoy performances by
Malena Burke (Thursday), Candi Sosa (Friday),
Rene Luis Toledo (Tuesday), and Andrés Trujillo
and Federico Britos (Wednesday). $15.6:00 p.m.
275 Giralda Ave, Coral Gables; 461-2723.*
Carlos Molina: See “Calendar.”
Friday, June 21
Judd Alan: Jazz musician Alan performs melodic,
new-age piano selections. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Books and Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Fort
Lauderdale; 630-0953.
Kathy Fleischman: Female vocalist Fleischman
serenades you with song. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Warehaus 57,1904 E Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood;
926-6633.
Jazz Weekend: Enjoy toe tappin’ classics with local
jazz musicians performing every Friday and
Saturday night. Free. 7:00 p.m. Bread of life
Supermarket, 7720 Peters Rd, Plantation; 236-0600.
Stephen Mikes: Local musician Mikés performs
original sitar selections. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Sting/Natalie Merchant: See “Calendar.”
Diane Ward: Local award-winning vocalist Ward
performs. Free. 9:00 p.m. Borders Books and
Music, 19925 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 935-0027.
Saturday, June 22
Rick Derringer: See “Calendar.”
IDHT: Musical group IDNT performs original
acoustic folk and blues. Free. 9:00 p.m. Warehaus
57,1904 E Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 926-6633.
Sinti: Experience this trio of teen musicians’
performance of gypsy jazz guitar selections at 4:00
p.m. Later that evening, jazz band Gas Money
heats things up. 9:00 p.m. Both events are free.
Borders Books and Music, 19925 Biscayne Blvd,
Aventura, 935-0027.
Sunday, June 23
Mainly Mozart Festival III: The St. Petersburg String
Quartet performs Mozart’s String Quartet K. 428,
Schubert’s Quartettsatz, and Beethoven’s String
Quartet op. 18. $10.6:00 p.m. Omni Colonnade
Hotel, 180 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 4444755.
1996 Slammie Awards: See “Calendar.”
Marie Randel and Sergio Puig: Violinist Randel and
pianist Puig perform classical works. $5.2:30 p.m.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650
Harrison St, Hollywood; 921-3274.
Monday, June 24
Songwriters^ Showcase: The Creative Alliance of
Florida hosts a forum for songwriters with Scott
Avery and Bob McDonald. Free. 8:30 p.m. Mr. C’s
Sports Bar, 4361N Dixie Hwy, Fort Lauderdale;
954-561-8585.
Theater
Baubles, Bagels, and Beads: A musical revue paying
tribute to great Jewish performers of the American
theater, including Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker,
Molly Picon, Judy Holliday, Danny Kaye, A1 Jolson,
George Bums, and Zero Mostel. Through August
18. Evening performances Thursday through
Saturday at 8:15 (dinner at 6:15), Sunday at 6:15
(dinner at 4:15). Jan McArt’s Rooftop Cabaret
Theatre, 315 SE Mizner Blvd, ste 213, Boca Raton;
407-392-3755.
The Convertible Girl: Rod Goldman, who is Jewish,
and his Catholic live-in girlfriend Christina .
Donatelli wrangle over kids, marriage,
commitment, and religion in Daniel (brother of
Neil) Simon’s comedy. Through June 30. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00. Broward Stage Door Theater, 8036
W Sample Rd, Coral Springs; 344-7765.
The Fabulous Fable Factory: A modem children’s
musical rendition oí Aesop’s Fables features
Aloyisius A. Aesop, whose fable factory is missing
a “moral maker.” June 24 through August 10.
Matinee Saturday at 2:00. Actors’ Playhouse, 280
Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-9293.
Forever Plaid: Fifties singers the Four Plaids dream
of stardom but are killed in a bus accident; they
return to Earth for one night to sing tunes for a
modern-day audience. Preview performances
Wednesday, June 26, at 2:00 and 7:30. Regular run
June 27 through July 14. Evening performances
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 7:30;
matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at
2:00. Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201
SW 5th Ave, Fort Lauderdale; 954462-0222.
Last Summer at Bluefish Cove: Jane Chambers’s
drama about a close circle of women friends who
meet at their lesbian beach colony for one final
summer, when one of them is diagnosed with
cancer. Through July 14. Evening performances
Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at
2:00; additional performances Thursday, June 27,
at 8:00 and Sunday, June 30, at 6:00. New River
Repertory, 640 N Andrews Ave, Fort Lauderdale;
954-523-0507.
The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me: The Miami
premiere of David Drake’s 1994 Obie Award¬
winning play stars Robert Tamayo in this
performance piece, which details a young man’s
experiences growing up gay. Through June 23.
Evening performances Friday through Sunday
evening at 8:00. EDGE/Theatre, 405 Española
Way, Miami Beach; 233-5776.
Passage: An inventively directed world premiere that
Arctic Retreat
Researchers in Canada
announced that the per¬
mafrost, which covers a
vast area of the nation’s far north, is
retreating. Larry Dyke, a scientist at
the Geological Survey of Canada,
said a six-year study revealed that
the permanently frozen ground in
the Mackenzie Basin has retreated
by 63 to 125 miles over the past 10O
years.
The phenomenon is believed to
be linked to a gradual warming of the
earth that has raised the average
temperature of the survey area by
one-half to one degree Fahrenheit
during the past century.
Still Testing
China exploded at least
one nuclear bomb beneath
the Lop Nor Desert, spark¬
ing a fresh round of international crit¬
icism at the continued testing of
nuclear devices.
Japan’s Nihon Keizai Shimbum
newspaper reported the U.S. gov¬
ernment had advised Tokyo that
more than one bomb may have been
detonated simultaneously because
of growing criticism against the
tests. Global seismological monitor¬
ing could not determine how many
explosions occurred, but indicated
the test had an effective magnitude
of 5.7.
Tropical Cyclone
The monsoon sea arrived
over Sri Lanka when trop¬
ical cyclone 03B ended an
extended drought that has caused a
critical shortage of hydroelectric
power. Resulting floods sent thou¬
sands of residents into temporary
shelters after their homes were sub¬
merged by water or covered by mud¬
slides.
Much of the rainfall eluded the
Indian Ocean island’s main
hydropower catchment areas in the
central hills, and rationing of elec¬
tricity was expected to continue.
Fires that have ravaged
Mongolia for three months
were finally brought under
control. Heavy rains across the
country helped an international fire¬
fighting effort to contain or extin¬
guish most of the blazes.
Cool and damp weather helped
bring forest fires north of Anchorage,
and on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula,
under control. Nearly 350 structures
and 70,000 acres of forest were
destroyed by the fires.
Nairobi was buzzing with
sounds of desert locusts
which swarmed over the
Kenyan capital from the semi-desert
area in the north of the country. Chil¬
dren rushed into the streets to col¬
lect the insects, then roasted them
for a rare feast. An entomologist at
the Desert Control Organization of
East Africa, Dr. Tessema Mege-
nasa, believes the locusts will prob-
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
By Steve Newman
Rabies Alarm
A small rabid bat which
apparently flew across the
English Channel from
France caused a scare in southern
Britain, where strict quarantine con¬
trols have kept the country free of
the disease for 70 years. The flying
mammal, found clinging to a wall
near Brighton, bit two women from
a local bat-enthusiast group who
were observing the creature.
Earthquakes
HA powerful Aleutian Island
temblor sent a small
tsunami rushing across the
Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific, but
caused no damage near the epi¬
center. The central Philippines was
rocked by a magnitude 6.2 quake
that knocked out power on Samar.
Earth movements were also felt
in northern and central Japan,
Armenia, eastern Romania, western
Greece, El Salvador, northern
Colombia and southern Mexico.
Locust Invasion
Under Control
Close Call
A South African puppy was
in intensive care but lucky
to be alive after a hungry
crowned eagle swooped into its
owner’s back yard and plucked the
baby Jack Russell away. “I heard
this incredible whimpering and -saw
this huge bird grappling with Licky,”
said the dog’s owner. The Johan¬
nesburg Starve ported that the eaglé
sank its talons into Licky and flew off
towards a tree. The airborne puppy
managed to wiggle free from certain
death and fell 15 feet headfirst into
a suburban Pietermaritzburg swim¬
ming pool. After diving in to save her,
the unnamed owner rushed Licky to
a clinic where she was being treated
for concussion, water in the lungs
and talon punctares on the neck.
Additional Sources: U.S. Climate Analysis
Center, U.S. Earthquake Information Center
and the World Meteorológica! Organization.
ES
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move into upcountry farms.
For the week ending
June 14, 1996
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MATCH SCHEDULE
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July 20,5:30pm Local Opening Ceremonies
July 20,6:30pm Mem France vs. Australia
July 21,4:00pm Women: China vs. Sweden
July 21, 6:30pm Mem Brazil vs. Japan
July 22,7:00pm Men: Saudi Arabia vs. Australia
July 23,6:00pm Women: China vs. Denmark
July 23,8:30pm Men: Brazil vs. Hungary
Juty24,7:00pm Men: France vs. Saudi Arabia
July 25,6:30pm Women: U.S. vs. China
July 25,9:00pm Men: Brazil vs. Nigeria
QUARTERFINALS
July 27,6:00pm Mem Orlando 1st vs.
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details the true-life stories of Cuban balseros
crossing the Florida Straits. Through June 30.
Evening performances Thursday through Saturday
at 8:15, Sunday at 7:15. Area Stage Company, 645
Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 673-8002.
Pirates of Tigertail: Susan Westfall’s play, the
second offering in New Theatre’s New Plays
Project, pits an old Coconut Grove family
(including ghosts) against speculators interested
in the family’s land. Through June 30. Evening
performances Wednesday through Saturday at
8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00. New Theatre, 65
Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Puttin' on the Ritz: A song-and-dance revue
celebrating the music of American composer
Irving Berlin. Through August 1. Evening
performances Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and
Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees
Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday at 2:00. Pope
Theatre Company, 262 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan;
407-585-3404.
The Second Rehearsal: A reading of a script by New
York City playwright Michael Lengel, Also, other
short plays by New York playwrights. Evening
performance Sunday, June 23 only, at 7:00. Theater
With Your Coffee?, Hollywood Boulevard Theater,
1938 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 460-2234.
Summer Shorts: See “Calendar.” A festival of
eighteen short (fifteen minutes or less) Florida- or
world-premiere one-act plays performed in two
alternating programs. The fest features eleven
directors and'twelve actors from South Florida as
well as new works by national and international
(Brian Friel, David Ives, Jeffrey Sweet, Richard
Dresser) and local playwrights (Manny Diez,
David Fleisher, David Latner, Susan Westfall).
June 21 through July 7. Evening performances for
Program A, Friday at 8:00 and Saturday at 7:00; for
Program B, Saturday at 9:30 and Sunday at 7:00.
City Theatre, University of Miami’s Jerry Herman
Ring Theatre, University of Miami Campus, 1380
Miller Dr, Coral Gables; 446-9289.
Take Me Along: The 1959 musical comedy by Bob
Merrill (based on Eugene O’Neill’s only nontragic
play Ah, Wilderness!) chronicles two romances that
flower during a summer weekend in a Connecticut
town circa 1910. Through August 25. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00
(dinner at 6:00), Sunday at 6:00 (dinner at 4:00);
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 (lunch
at noon). Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, 315 SE
Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton; 800-841-6765.
Talk Radio: Mark Swaner, director of last year’s
acclaimed production of Lenny, is back to direct
Eric Bogosian’s roiling take on a controversial talk-
radio host. Through July 14. Evening perform¬
ances Friday and’Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday
at 2:30. Florida Playwrights’ Theatre, 1936
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 954-925-8123.
Too Jewish?: Actor Avi Hoffman, an alum of the
University of Miami’s Theater Department, brings
his musical comedy revue about Yiddish theater,
language, and culture to South Florida after a run
in New York. Nominated for an Outer Critics’
Circle and a Drama Desk Award. Through
September 1. Evening performances Thursday
through Saturday at 8:00; matinees Wednesday,
Thursday, and Sunday at 2:00 and Sunday at 5:00.
Broward Stage Door Theater Coihpany, 8036 W
Sample Rd, Coral Springs; 344-7765.
A View from the Rridge: Brooklyn longshoreman
Eddie Carbone takes in two of his wife’s illegal
alien cousins from Italy, but his patience is tested
when one of them falls in love with his niece.
Through June 23. Evening performances Friday
and Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00.
Hollywood Playhouse, 2640 Washington St,
Hollywood; 922-0404.
Film
Thursday, June 20
Stealing Beauty: See “Calendar.”
Saturday, June 22
Breathless?. See “Calendar.”
The Cranes Are Flying: The museum screens this
Russian art film in conjunction with the
“Monumental Propaganda” exhibition. $3 with $5
museum admission. Today and tomorrow at 2:00
p.m. Bass Museum of Art, 212TPark Ave, Miami
Beach; 673-7530.
Sunday, June 23
Cinema Vortex: The Alliance Film/Video Co-op
presents screenings of milestone films by influential
directors; today’s program features Jean Cocteau’s
Testament of Orpheus. $4. Noon. Alliance Cinema,
927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-8504.
Tuesday, June 25
Film Series: Enjoy the film thriller The Usual
Suspects and stay for the discussion that follows.
Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 3390
Mary St, Coconut Grove; 374-7428.
Wednesday, June 26
Badfilm Society: Scantily clad cave girls run from
stone age studs, hairy giants, and hungry dragons
in the movie that single-handedly created the
“cave girl” genre, Prehistoric Women. Free. 8:00
p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925 Biscayne
Blvd, Aventura, 935-0027.
The Croat Train Robbery: See “Calendar.”
My Name is hair. The museum screens this Russian
art film in conjunction with the “Monumental
Propaganda” exhibition. $3 with $5 museum
admission. 2:00 p.m. Bass Museum of Art, 2121
Park Ave, Miami Beach; 673-7530.
Events
Thursday, June 20
Art Alfresco: Local, national, and international
artists display and create works against a
backdrop of luxury yachts, food, and live music.
Free. 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. Miami Beach Marina, 300
Alton Rd, Miami Beach; 532-2168.
Big Band Dancing: Trip the light fantastic to the
sounds of a big band every Thursday at 7:30 and
Sunday at 6:30 p.m. $6. Florida Expo Center, 1125
Banks Rd, Margate; 979-5571.
Summer Solstice Celebration: Celebrate summer as
ancient cultures did with drumming, dancing and
ritual céremonies and Roots, Rhythms, and
Rituals. Free. 8:00 p.m. Collins Avenue and 53rd
Street, Miami Beach; 460-3365.
Friday, June 21
Artwalk: Downtown Hollywood’s artists open the
doors of their galleries and studios while art
lovers enjoy viewing works, wine tastings, and
live music by local jazzster Sha-Shaty. Free. 5:30
to 9:30 p.m. Hollywood Boulevard and Harrison
Street, Hollywood; 921-3016.
Caribbean Comedy Festival: See “Calendar.”
Andrew Dice Clay: See “Calendar.”
A Day of Compassion: Join the folks from Cable
Positive to help raise awareness and promote a
more compassionate climate for those affected
with AIDS. $5. 6:30 p.m. Tita’s Restaurant. 1445
Pennsylvania Ave, Miami Beach; 532-6966.
Main Street Live: Local jazz, blues, and pop groups
perform live music while shoppers take in Miami
Lakes’s establishments each Friday and Saturday
night; tomorrow, Fifth Circuit Split performs.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Main Street, Miami Lakes;
-821-1130, ext 207.
Sidewalk Said: After surviving.months of
construction on Lincoln Road, merchants,
restaurateurs, art, galleries, and entertainment
establishments have banded together to create
three days and nights (today through Sunday) of
high energy opportunities. Stores will offer
special sales while other establishments offer
three days and nights of nonstop action. Lincoln
Road Mall, Miami Beach; 531-3442.
Wines from Around the World: Sip four different
wines from California, each with a
complementing culinary dish, $10. 7:00 p.m. Ad
Gustum Market, 180 Crandon Blvd, Key
Biscayne; 540-5050.
Saturday, June 22
Antique and Jewelry Show: Coconut Grove Cares,
Inc. sponsors this show featuring American and
English silver jewelry, Georgian and Victorian
pieces, Continental and American furniture, and
more. $3. Today from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
tomorrow from noon to 6;00 p.m. Coconut Grove
Exhibition Center, 2700 Bayshore Dr, Coconut
Grove; 579-3316.
Historic Pursuit: Join in the fun of this scavenger
hunt as a chauffeured limousine drives you and
your team from one hot spot to another, locating
clues and searching for answers and acquisitions
related to Miami history. Funds raised benefit the
programs of the Historical Museum of Southern
Florida. Participants should meet at Groove Jet
nightclub (323 23rd St, Miami Beach; 532-2002)
at 6:00 p.m. to register. The game itself takes off
from the same spot at 7:30 p.m. $70 registration
fee includes drinks and hors d’ouévres on your
search and a postgame party at Groove Jet ($25
for just the postgame party).
Mobile Animal Care Unit:, Metro-Dade Animal Care
and Control’s mobile clinic will be open to spay
and neuter cats and dogs for a low fee. $25-$35.
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New Times June 20 - 26,1996

New Times June 20 - 26,1996
Today through Tuesday at 7:00 a.m. North Dade
Justice Center, 15665 Biscayne Blvd, North
Miami; 884-SPAY.
Native American Festival; See “Calendar.”
Performance/Art Fusion: See “Calendar.”
Red, Het, and Proud: Get moving and grooving with
DJ Robbie Leslie as Pride South Florida sponsors
the official party of the Pride Month festivities.
$10.9:00 p.m. Port Everglades, 1850 Eller Dr,
terminal 22, Fort Lauderdale; 537-4111.
Sunday, June 23
Española Way Market: Artists, growers, and
merchants offer fresh fruits and veggies, flowers,
plants, coffees, breads, and arts and crafts, plus
â–  live music and entertainment, at this weekly
marketplace. Free. 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Española Way and Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach; 538-0679.
Holistic Fair: Acupuncturists, aromatherapists, and
more gather for an afternoon of healing and self-
discovery. Free. 11:00 to 4:00 p.m. Fairy’s Ring
Bookstore, 73 Merrick Way, Coral Gables;
446-9315.
Miami Design Preservation League: Come celebrate
the MDPL’s 25th anniversary of preserving the
beauty of the Miami Beach Architectural District.
Free. 6:00 p.m. Ocean Front Auditorium, 1001
Ocean Dr, Miami Beach; 672-2014.
Pride Parade: Put your feet to the street and show
your support for the gay, lesbian, and bisexual
community. The parade begins at Bubier Park on
the comer of Andrews Avenue and Las Olas
Boulevard and runs east along Las Olas to 84th
Street, north to Broward Boulevard, west to US1,
and then north until Holiday Park, where it
empties into Pride South Florida’s Pridefest ’96
where food, games, and live entertain