Citation
Miami New Times (Florida)

Material Information

Title:
Miami New Times (Florida)
Uniform Title:
Miami New Times (Florida) (Online)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publisher:
New Times, Inc.
Village Voice Media Holdings LLC.
Voice Media Group
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Miami ( fast )
Florida -- Miami-Dade County ( fast )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Creation/Production Credits:
Print began in 1995.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Voice Media Group. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
891087301 ( OCLC )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
New times

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
H a r c h U - ZD . 9 9 B ! F R E E
Metro:
Guzzling champagne
T from the public trough
Volume ÍD, Number 48
Film: Bottle Rocket sets off unexpected fireworks
-v Everyone says Commodore Bay tePlISyr
would make a nice park. But S' ,
it’s up to its mangroves in nastiness. 1
By Robert Andrew Powell feátsÉfl
Music: You may
like him, but will
Nil Lara play in
Peoria?
Theater:
A
captivating
Carousel


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Contents
UNITED They Stand 22
For Monica Russo, unionizing local nursing home
workers is a labor of love.
By Kathy Glasgow
Metro: It’s Our
Party 5
And we’ll spend your
money if we want to.
By Robert Andrew
Powell
*The Ten Yfears’
War 13
The sad truth about
Commodore Bay, the
park that couldn’t be.
By Robert Andrew
Powell
Msyor League. .83
King of the hill in Miami,
Nil Lara now goes
national.
By Steven Almond
Volume lO
Number 48
March 14-20,
1996
Letters 3
Metro 5
News of the Weird .11
Troubletown 11
Calendar 36
Calendar Listings 39
Earthweek 39
Life in Hell 40
Ernie Pook’s Comeek 43
Film 61
Film Capsules 64
Showtimes 66
Theater 69
Cafe 71
Dining Guide 72
Music 83
Rotations ...87
Reverb 89
Concert Calendar 90
Into the Night 91
Clubs .92
Classified 100
Comics 102
This Modern World
Steven
In a Perfect World
Julius Knipl
The Quigmans
Romance 121
On the cover:
photo by
Steve Satterwhite
Editorial
Editor Jim Muliin
Managing Editor Tom Rnkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Music Editor John Floyd
Staff Writers Elisa Ackerman, Judy Cantor,
Jim DeFede, Kathy Glasgow, Oscar Musibay,
Robert Andrew Powell, Sean Rowe, Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Dorothy Atcheson,
Christine Tague
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
listings Specialist Elizabeth Martinez
Proofreader Georgia Rachman
Contributors Todd Anthony, Pamela Gordon,
Jen Karetnick
Editorial Administrator Rebecca Kennedy
Art
Art Director Dave Hogerty
Staff Photographer Steve Satterwhite
Production
Production Manager Carla Peters
Production Assistant Manager Jeffrey Rakes
Editorial Layout Belén López
Production Amy Cinnamon, Ewald Fuchs,
Marcy Mock
Advertising
General Sales Manager Jenni Price
Retail Sales Director Shari Gherman-Rance
Senior Account Executives Scott Cohen,
Frank Tomasino
Account Executives Shifra Abramson,
Doug Bescher, Beth BrandesAntonia Calzad ilia,
Hillary Crane, Carol Evans, Dana Fox,
Ivan Gutierrez, Michael Parra,
Richard Santelises, Sheila SL Amour
Account Managers Louise Fuller, Kristi Kinard,
Allison McCall-Mayfield
Ad Designer J.P. Robinson
Sales Assistant Will Griffin
Sales Coordinator Samanta Naranjo
Sales Secretary Annika Butardo
National Advertising The Ruxton Group
National Sales Director Susan Belair
Classified
Classified Director Maureen Olson
Classified Department Administrator
Juan Saborido
Classified Sales Supervisor Kevin Montgomery
Senior Advertising Representatives
Alex Budyszewlck, Tracey Burger
Classified Advertising Representatives
Amy Brito, Sam Heltman, Nicole Kalil,
Henry Pinto, Andrew Polsky, Edward Reid,
Humberto Wispe
Romance Director Leisa Sanchez
Romance Coordinator Jane Mercer
Romance Representatives Todd Chttoff,
Alyson Gold, David Shor
Circulation
Circulation Manager Leonard F. lyescas
Circulation Assistant David Figueredo
Business
Business Manager Jeff Scott Fried
Accounting Supervisor Michelle Fabelo
Classified Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Accounting Clerks Beatriz Avnllan,
Orlando Hislop
Systems Manager Frank Yglesias
Front Desk Administrator Barbara C. Garcia
Publisher Crag Stier
New Times mailing address:
P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101-1591
Street address:
330 Biscayne Blvd, 10th Floor
Miami, FL 33132-2220
For general information:
372-0004 or 763-2422 (Broward)
For advertising: 372-3380
For classiMed advertising: 372-9393
For romance Information: 579-1350
For national advertising information:
(312)82841364
Audit Bureau
of Circulations


Letters Policy
We welcome letters to the editor via mail,
fax, or Internet, Letters may be edited for
length or clarity and must refer to materi¬
al published in New Times. Please include
your address, daytime telephone (for con¬
firmation only), and complete name,
Gga Mail: Letters, New Times
‘■’^P.O.Box 011591
Miami, FL 33101-1591
Fax: 372-3446
Jjg| Internet
editorial@miami-newtimes,com
Austin: Swooning over Swelter
I’ve never set foot in a South Beach nightclub.
I haven’t even a passing acquaintance with
the frivolity, venality, and fabulosity rampant
in the world Tom Austin has covered in “Swel¬
ter” as a reporter for New Times.
I have, however, been a devoted reader,
plowing to “Swelter” first with a fervor last felt
when I copped a look at my dad’s confidential
magazines, probably before Austin was bom.
The difference, of course, is that when I
read Austin’s trash, I was savoring the jottings
of an artist My sincere apologies for not writ¬
ing sooner to tell you of my regard and appre¬
ciation of him.
I am guilt-ridden, but then, I have just
returned from my front yard, where I affixed a
“For Sale by Owner” sign to the gates of the
home I have owned in Coconut Grove for
almost twenty years.
I am guilt-ridden, but I am prepared to let it
be.
FU miss Tom Austin.
Jane Ross Scott
Coconut Grove
Austin: Swelter from the Storm
I’m sad to see Tom Austin go. I’ve enjoyed
“Swelter” for its humanity, insight, and quirky
use of language. I wish him the best of luck in
his future endeavors.
AdamMatza
Fort Lauderdale
Drugs and Kayaks
Sean Rowe’s well-written article “Bahama
Trauma” (February 22), about kayaker
Miguel Hernandez’s traumatic experience in
the Bahamas, was a thoughtful human-inter¬
est stoiy that provided a lot of insight
Op-BAT (Operation Bahamas and Turks-
Caicos), which is an expensive collaboration
of U.S. Coast Guard and DEA personnel
working with Bahamian authorities to dimin¬
ish drug trafficking in the area, had no right to
incarcerate Hernandez in a Nassau jail, as he
wasn’t involved in any criminal activity.
A seasoned traveler like Hernandez, in a
solo journey in a kayak looking for adventure,
has the right to do what he wants as long as
he is carrying a bona fide U.S. passport Hope¬
fully, drug smuggling in that part of the world
will eventually be stopped — when Congress
decides to legalize the stuff
Robert S. Denchfield, Sr.
Miami Beach
Digestive Tract
I would be remiss if I didn’t compliment your
restaurant critic, Jen Karetnick, on her astute
reviewing. Many restaurant critics detail their
own personal likes and dislikes, so we learn
more about the critics than about the food.
I’ve read critiques in which the reviewer
writes that some dish was wonderful or was
mouth-watering; the only things we’ve
learned are that the critic carries around a set
of rules in his head where his open mind
ought to be — and that he’s capable of salivat¬
ing. Ms. Karetnick does what good critics are
supposed to do: describe the subject in depth.
As a past president of a state restaurant
association, I appreciate a critic who does a
fair review without putting a restaurant in
harm’s way — one who, by conscientious
description, points out the attributes of a dish,
whether positive or negative. Imperfections
really should be pointed out in a relatively
benign way. Rather than say, for instance, that
the red snapper was old and fishy, wouldn’t it
be more merciful to say that the snapper was
properly cooked but could have lost its life a
little more recently? Oh yes, Ms. Karetnick
occasionally will write that “the roast beef was
cold and tough and a real disappointment,”
but there is really no other way to get across
such information.
In my younger days as a restaurant
reviewer, I once wrote that a certain dish
could have been improved by the addition of
anything. That kind of sarcastic remark
doesn’t really help anything but the writer’s
ego. Ms. Karetnick’s comprehensively
descriptive reviews, however, can indeed be
helpful to potential dining-out customers as
well as to restaurateurs.
Jay Tischenkel
Aventura
Distribution: New Times is available free of
charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional
copies of the current issue of New Times may be
purchased for $1.00, payable at the New Tunes
office in advance. New Times may be distributed
only by New Tunes’s authorized distributors. No
person may, without prior written permission of
New Times, take more than one copy of each
New Times weekly issue.
Subscriptions: Domestic subscriptions may be pur¬
chased for $75 yearly. Mail to:
Subscriptions/New Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, Florida 33101. Delivery may take one
week.
New Times: (ISSN 10723331) (USPS 010669) is
published by New Tunes, Inc., 330 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, FL 33132, weekly, 52 times per
year. Second-class postage rate is paid at Miami,
Florida 33152.
Postmaster Send address changes to New Times,
Post Office Box 011591, Miami, Florida 33101-
1591.
Copyright The entire contents of New Times are
Copyright 1996 by New Times, Inc. No portion
may be reproduced in whole or part by any
means including electronic retrieval systems
without the express written permission of the
Publisher, New Times, 330 Biscayne Blvd., Tenth
Floor, Miami, FL 33132. Please call the New
Times office for back issue information.
ft
Audit Bureau
of Circulations
New Times, Inc.
Executive Editor Michael Lacey
Design Director Km Klein Executive Managing Editor
Christine Heming Corporate Editorial Assistant Bridget
McKeever Operations Director Marjorie Rothrock
Computer Systems Dave Ritter Systems Developer
Wade Simmons Director of Electronic Publishing
Braxton Jarratt Corporate Administrator Kathy Ziegler
Director of Human Resources Yolanda Calis Financial
Coordinator Michalls Anderson Sales Director Michele
Laven Chief Financial Officer Jed Brunst Executive Vice
President Scott Spear President and Chief Operating
Officer Hal Smith
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jim Larkin
4MS&
uiWittventorm
’ : ■l' ■ •
- Sunday
,. r ;%Z
Visit our new showroom
11 SW 7th St.
(Brickell Area Adjacent to Fishbone Grille)
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


■iiütii n iitiifi
S4
& '¡y
CL0SI1G SALE
we're leaving Bal Harbour
EVERY thing MUST GO
to the bare walls
nothinq held back
with discounts up to
80% OFF
regular prices on all
fashion, jewelry, art & stuff
the twenty-four collection
where it’s usual to find unusual fashion, jewelry, art & STUFF.
9700 Collins Ave. Bal Harbour Shops (305) 868-2400
Open Mon. Thurs & Fri until 9 pm • Tues. Wed. Sat & Sun until 6 pm
Hawk Your
Quality ofLife?
Live on the water.
At a rate you can afford.
And it’s bound to improve!
You’D enjoy:
• BreathTaking Views
• Comfortable Floor Plans
• European Style Eat-in Kitchens
• Ceiling Fans
• Designer Vertical Blinds
• Large Balconies & Terraces with Bay Views
• Designer Color Coordinated Flooring
Resort Recreation.
• Docking Facilities with Direct Access to Deep Water
• Bayside Pool and Spa
• Elegant Sundeck
• Private Clubhouse with Lounge
Poolside Cabana & Bar
• Waterfront Jogging Course
• Meticulous Landscaped Gardens
• Media Room with Large Screen T. V. & V.C.R.
• Card Room
• Laundry Facilities
• Car Wash Area
• Volleyball Court
• Controlled Access Entry System
• State of the Art Exercise Room
• Planned Social Activities
LUXURY RENTAL APARTMENTS
PhOIl€¡ (305) 757-8474 8000West Drive in Miami • Minutes away from Downtown Miami and South Beach’s historic Ait Deco District


Your Tax Dollars at Work
(Hiccup!)
The City of Miami’s upstanding leadership had a swell time at a
swanky centennial party. Who paid? You did, of course.
By Robert Andrew Powell
Cries of “Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-De-Ay!” bel¬
lowed from tuxedoed revelers
crammed inside a replica of Henry
Flagler’s luxurious Royal Palm Hotel.
Jazz music wafted from one stage, Latin
music from a second, rock from a third.
Partiere stuffed with cote de boeufbourguignon
slammed champagne while they admired the
tum-of-the-century costumes worn by their
fellow celebrants. One woman dressed as
Miami matriarch Julia Tuttle. A gentleman
paraded around as railroad baron Flagler.
Lots of men wore funny-looking bowler hats.
By the end of the night, as all of the 1040
people lucky enough to attend the Miami
Centennial Ball grabbed their souvenirs and
headed for their antique cars or authentic
horse-drawn carriages, they gushed at the
sheer spectacle of Miami’s 100th birthday cel¬
ebration. “It was a great party,” declared
Miami Police Chief Donald Warehaw. “It was
the first of these kinds of parties where people
were saying they
wanted to be there
rather than they had
to be there.”
It was also yet
another creative use
of taxpayer money.
City of Miami offi¬
cials spent 4500
public dollars on
tickets to the birth¬
day gala, held
February 24 under
For many city staffers, the free tickets were
no big deal. What’s wrong with spending a
measly $4500 so that a select group of munici¬
pal employees might attend a dazzling birth¬
day party honoring the very city for which
they work? The city supports Centennial ’96
(the nonprofit group organizing the year-long
celebration) in many ways — free office
space, computers, telephones, postage and
more. Commissioner J.L. Plummer is a co-
chairman of the organizing committee.
But this party was different, explains Amy
Deutch, executive director of Centennial ’96
and a city employee. A charity fundraiser for
the restoration of Overtown’s historic Lyric
Theater and other local landmarks, it created
unusually strong demand for the limited num¬
ber of tickets. In fact, so many people were
eager to pay (more than 1000 would-be
partiere were turned away) that organizers
upped ticket prices from an initial $150 to an
eventual $1000 apiece. The combination of
"It was [one] of these parties where
people were saying they wanted
to be there rather than
they hadto be there."
an elaborately decorated tent pitched in a
parking lot across from downtown’s Dupont
Plaza Hotel. The city purchased three tables
of ten seats each, at a cost of $1500 per table,
with the 30 tickets being distributed among all
five city commissioners, the city manager, all
six assistant city managers, and three other
staffers — plus a guest for each. Not one of
those officials was asked to repay the city for
the privilege of attending the sold-out party.
charity and fierce demand also forced the
organizers to crack down on freeloaders. “A
lot of people in this town are used to getting
things for free,” says Deutch. “We went out of
our way to make sure no one got in for free.”
Indeed, other public officials at the gala paid
their own way. All ten seats at Sen. Bob
Graham’s $2500 table were purchased by the
senator’s Graham Companies. Coral Gables
City Manager Jack Eads did not dip into his
“We went out of our way1
to make sure no one
got in for free.”
Centennial ’96 executive director Amy Deutch
HKf (If;
I 31
¡Ül lyS.. V ~ J§§f
§gf § ^ mam'
> I5SJLjm í3éH
... i' 1 HI 1
UlSi -«. -• . lUsj
It ^
B r WnÁi JÜ
Hr 1 Shs
â– k ^ jpi jra
Hi
IF... Ü
Commissioner J.L Plummer (left) and Miami Police Chief Donald Warshaw enjoying themselves at
the big bash
city’s coffers for ticket money. Neither did
West Miami Mayor Rebeca Sosa. Her
impoverished dtyr she T?ays,'cannot afford to
misspend even one cent. “The city [of West
Miami] does not pay for things like that,”
she notes. “We are a very poor city. We even
pay from our pockets for most things
because the city doesn’t have the money.”
(Sosa attended as a guest of her daughter’s
godfather, whom she says does not work for
the City of Miami.)
Miami City Commissioners Plummer,
Willy Gort, and Mayor Steve Clark attended
the ball. Commissioner Miller Dawkins did
not, though he would not say what he did
with his tickets. City Manager Cesar Odio
couldn’t make it because he was preoccu¬
pied with that day’s Brothers to the Rescue
crisis. Commissioner Joe Carollo attended
the party, and like his commission peers,
did not pay for his tickets. He assumed that
the city had received free tickets in the first
place. “It concerns me in that it was our
event,” he says. “Why should we have to pay
for our own event?”
Chief Warehaw, a guest of the city, admits
he was unsure of the rules governing the
acceptance of his gift. “I thought about it
when the tickets were offered to me,” he
recalls. “When I go to banquets around the
city, I always pay for my guests. That is the
policy citywide, I think. I guess [accepting a
free ticket to the ball] is not playing by or is
manipulating the rules, but the way I saw it,
it was the city’s centennial. A lot of money
was raised -by the-people who work for the
city. And it is a rarity that the city would buy
anything [for the staff] that includes
spouses and guests.”
Although Warshaw sat for free at one of
the city’s tables, he also purchased a police
department table with money specifically set
aside to celebrate the centennial. Five top
police officials attended the ball for free, but
at Warshaw’s insistence (and unlike
Warshaw himself), the police officials had to
pay $200 each to bring their spouses.
City officials were not alone in their free-
loading. Five members of the city’s
International Trade Board attended the ball
for free (with their spouses) at a table
bought with trade board money. County
commissioners Maurice Ferre and Betty
Ferguson also attended for free, at a table
purchased with public money by County
Manager Armando Widal. Joining Vidal and
the commissioners were five assistant
county managers. “Generally at these kinds
of things you want your public officials to be
in attendance,” offers Alyce Robertson, the
county’s liaison to Centennial ’96. “I actually
think this was one of the things where I was
glad that they were in attendance. This was
really a magic night in Miami. There was a
real sense of community that is hard to feel
the rest of the year.” CQ
Voulez Vous Boudoir?
12413 Biscayne Blvd,
North Miami
(305)895-1207
AGORA
FOLK ART • POTTERY • FURNITURE
640 Lincoln Road * Miami Beach * 673-5589
SOUTH BEACH
2 BEDROOM
C0ND0I
Pool, Gym, Valet Parking, 24 Hr. Security
Call Mike 673-1700
5
Hew Time» March 14 -20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
JabubuA JaAhwnA
J-Dh SÍ¡A&W íO 26 \ J
187&5áSÍMxiifrts filed tdJjxámoMAjsaihichQAland
Th/dh ’Yniam&tack JtoAida.
iÚ5'9i7*6í«
JJm - Jtrf 10-1Qtm&$m 104
Spring1
Spruce-Up
^ Sale! •
20-40% Off
Selected Items
(Sale good thru March 1996)
“Best Tiles" of 1992 - New Tunes Best of Miami.
7800 NW 34 St #99 in Miami, 591 *7283
1911 Ponce De Leon Blvd,
Cota1 Gables, 567-9755
1000 Pliippen Wait ter Road
Danta, FL 923-2255
Wool Blend Suit, Shirt & Silk Tie
Now *129 & 2 for *199
100% Cotton Dress Shirts Made in Italy
Now *19.95 & 2 for *29.95
100% Wool Slacks Made in Italy
Reg. *140 Now *59 & 2 for *100
Designer Ties - Hugo Boss, Giorgio Armani,
Valentino, Lancel, Azaro, etc.
Reg. *89 Now *24.95 & 2 for *39.95
100% Silk Ties Now *5.95 & 2 for *10
Baby Alligator Shoes Reg. *750 Now *299
Crocodile Belts *29.95 & 2 for *50
Purchases over *300 Recieve a free Crocodile Belt.
EUROPEAN
OWLET INC
3750 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 576-5355
Monday-Saturday 104 * Sunday 11-6 • Across the street from the Police Museum
Free Secure Parking in the rear off of NE 4th Court, 1 block west of Biscayne Blvd.
Christian Dior & Ungaro
Suits made in Italy
Now $199 & 2 for $300
IDEAS CELLULAR USA
MIAMI RADISSON MERCHANDISE MART
755 NW 72ND AVENUE, #23 • (305) 265-7776
Fax (305) 265-7988 • Bp (305) 645-1770
apAlhir Wireless Services
—^ Authorized Dealer
We're proud to be an authorized dealer for AT&T Wireless
Services providing the products & services from the
most trusted name in tele communications.
BANYAN BAY
APARTMENTS
Marty floor plans to choose from • Panoramic Views
Dry Dock • Lighted Tennis Courts • Cafe & Convenience Shop •
Valet & Dry Cleaners • On Premises Hair Salon for Men & Women •
Two Unique Pools • Laundry Facilities in Every Building
Exercise Room • Outdoor Barbecues • Jacuzzi & Sauna •
Tropical Landscaping • Ceramic Tile Floors • Models open daily
Professionally Managed by: GREAT ATLANTIC Call For Rental Information, Prices Subject to Availability
703 NE 63rd Street
'srr.
â–  JO
0\
703. ÚB 63*° ST.
Sri
' ’***
•5°Q
QQ
.X
195 East
One Bedroom Starting at $575


etro
One Hot Idea
The call came in at 4:00 a.m. Pacific
time. A man in a phone booth in
Seattle had a question. He needed an
answer fast
The question: Do chickens wear contact
lenses? If so, why?
Three thousand miles away, Bob Sherman
booted up his computer in North Miami
Beach and went to work. Eight minutes later
he was inside a U.S. Department of
Agriculture database in Washington, D.C.
At 4:12 he called back his new client and
took down his Visa card number. Only then
did he answer. Yes, hundreds of thousands of
chickens wear rose-colored contact lenses.
Poultry experts discovered long ago that
tinted eyewear reduces pecking brawls in
jam-packed commercial growing houses.
Five weeks after the early-morning call,
this arcane tidbit surfaced on ABC’s 20/20.
The mystery man in the Seattle phone booth
turned out to be a producer for the TV show.
For the past thirteen years, private detec¬
tives, paparazzi, professors, and public offi¬
cials have sought out Bob Sherman, Florida’s
premier information broker. As founder and
president of Computer Assisted Research On
Line, Sherman hunts answers to oddball
questions, traces people and property, and
works with some of the country’s biggest net¬
works and newspapers chasing the hottest
stories of the horn-.
Now hundreds of South Florida firefighters
and fire buffs are getting to know the 56-year-
old ex-newshound. Sherman’s newest ven¬
ture, Gold Coast Fire Net, supplies a growing
clientele with 24-hour-per-day news flashes
and updates on everything from brush blazes
to 30-story infernos — local and national —
as they are actually occurring. Subscribers
pay $5.50 per month for the service and cany
high-quality alphanumeric pagers. The
minibulletins pop up on the pagers’ tiny
screens 30 to 40 times per day.
“I think it’s the cat’s pajamas,” says John
Maury, a supply officer for Boca Raton Fire
Rescue Services who first heard about the
technology from a friend at Metro-Dade Fire
Rescue. “When I first got this thing, I
thought the whole country was burning
down. At night I leave the pager in the fámily
room. But first thing I do in the morning,
after I take the dog out but before I go to the
bathroom, I review the overnight pages.”
Maury notes that subscribers to Gold
Coast Fire Net knew hours before the public
last Monday that a forest fire had closed off
the Keys, thus enabling them to avoid traffic
hassles. Last month customers heard about
the crash of a Boeing 757 off the coast of the
Dominican Republic a full 45 minutes before
the Associated Press filed its first story. And
last year, Maury says, news of the bomb
explosion at the Oklahoma City federal build¬
ing came over his pager nearly a half-hour in
advance of the first CNN broadcast on TV.
Interviewing the mastermind behind Gold
Coast Fire Net is an exercise in interruption.
The pager next to his milkshake glass keeps
humming to life with two-line blurbs. One is
out of Dekalb County, Georgia, where fire is
shooting through the roof of a three-story
brick building. Walls and floors are collaps¬
tural reasons, New England is the biggest
hotbed for fire buffs. East Coast Paging
Systems, a Boston-based commercial outfit
similar to Sherman’s, boasts about 4000
pager-carrying members.
Locally Sherman scans the dispatch fre¬
quencies of Dade and Broward fire depart¬
ments, but he also makes frequent phone
calls to fire department headquarters to
make sure he hasn’t missed anything. Most
of the larger and more media-friendly depart¬
ments page him or fax him with official infor¬
mation as soon as it is known to their spokes¬
men. But in some cases the public-affairs
personnel themselves find out about a signifi¬
cant fire from Sherman’s pagers long before
learning about it through official channels.
For his clients Sherman is careful to edit out
dime-a-dozen kitchen fires and smoldering
garbage Dumpsters, but he throws in the
occasional tornado, fatal car wreck, or plane
crash.
Lt Paul Blake, a Metro-Dade firefighter,
says he thinks Gold Coast Fire Net will
grow and spark the development of a South
Florida fire buff subculture, heretofore
small and unorganized. He notes that until
recently, curious civilians with $50 scanners
could easily eavesdrop on three well-known
radio frequencies used by police and fire
personnel. That is changing fast as local
departments switch from 400-megahertz to
800-megahertz transmitting equipment.
The new dispatching equipment jumps
from frequency to frequency. It’s harder for
fire buffs to monitor, requiring vastly more
expensive scanners.
Within the official fire fraternity, it’s also
harder for curious firefighters to listen in
on other jurisdictions. Blake, for example,
works at a fire station down the street from
the city boundaries of Miami. Until he
joined Gold Coast Fire Net, he was often
unaware of fires taking place close by. “The
service is going to expand,” Blake predicts.
He is unconcerned about the prospect of
hundreds of fire buffs showing up at fire
scenes and clogging streets, as occasionally
happens up north.
Sherman says he welcomes tips from the
public about fires to his news hotline,
829-6161. The Fire Net remains a side busi¬
ness, spreading slowly by word of mouth.
Sherman’s computer-assisted research
(Does boxing promoter Don King have a
house in Palm Beach County? Has the
Defense Department done a study on how
weather affects human behavior? Does ex-
Miami commissioner Miriam Alonso own
property in Hialeah?) still keeps him the
busiest In addition he helps his wife of 30
years run Carolyn Sherman News Service, a
spot-news notification system subscribed to
by many of the big media in the Southeast
“When you add up the phone bills and
everything else, I’m not sure we’re making
money with the Fire Net,” Sherman says.
“But we’re having fun with it”
To what degree is he himself a fire nut?
“I’ve covered my share of fires working the
police beat,” he says with a shrug. “I will
not go out of my way to go to a fire.”
All the more reason to carry a Fire Net
pager, he notes. On cue, the little gadget
starts humming again: Fort Lauderdale. A
triplex at 701 W. 21st Terr. Smoke and
flame showing. CD
ing, ten fire engines on the scene, four ladder
trucks. In Washington, D.C., a firefighter has
been hit by a car outside Engine 25 head¬
quarters. And closer to home, the pager
screen says, “Metro-Dade Fire on scene of
Code 2 fire for three units at 6870 SW 44th St
Also a Code 2 for three at 291NW 177th St”
Later a tenement fire in New York halts
Sherman’s chuckling banter. From the infor¬
mation on the pager screen, he recognizes
the neighborhood. It’s the same part of
Queens he scoured as a young nighthawk
news photographer for the New York Daily
Mirror. In December 1964, he moved to
Miami with Life magazine, just in time to
cover the famous Murph the Surf jewelry
heist
Today Sherman spends his days and nights
in a small house near the Skylake Mall in
North Dade, surrounded by banks of police
scanners, computers, and phone lines. The
radios squawk and the calls pour in from as
Bob Sherman blazes down the info highway in an endless
search for towering infernos
By Sean Rowe
far away as Tokyo and Paris. Nudge him a bit
and hell tell how he successfully sued AT&T
in 1966 to become the first American with a
truly portable telephone. (Prior to that,
mobile phones were registered, and
anchored, to cars.) With a bit more urging,
Sherman describes how he unscrambled and
monitored the Secret Service radio frequency
at the 1988 Republican national convention in
New Orleans, while working as an editor for
a national newsweekly. (Men in dark suits
invited him to Washington to explain how he
did it) But Sherman, a vet¬
eran hacker and technol¬
ogy buff, says it is human
sources, not gizmos, that
give him the edge. “Never
bum a source,” he warns.
“I haven’t”
That advice is particu¬
larly germane to the one-
year-old Fire Net, which
Sherman touts as “Florida’s
Premier Incident Notification System.”
Sherman depends on Gold Coast clients to
phone in tips. Each client has an identifica¬
tion number, and if the tip goes out on the
pagers, the source’s ID code gets broadcast
along with it The result is a friendly competi¬
tion among subscribers to feed Sherman hot
news fast
For out-of-town fires, Sherman trades infor¬
mation with a loose network of volunteer and
commercial pyrophiliac groups stretching
across the nation from Chicago to Seattle to
Los. Angeles to Phoenix to New Orleans to
Atlanta. For historical, cultural, and architec¬
Firebug: Bob Sherman with tools of the trade, a pager and a two-way radio
“When I first got this thing, I
thought the whole country was
burning down.”
7
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 • 20,1996
Judgment
Day
After two years of litigation,
a libel lawsuit against
New Times is tossed out
This past week Circuit Judge Juan
Ramirez, Jr., granted a motion for
summary judgment in favor of New
Times Newspapers of Florida, Inc.,
thereby ending a two-year-old libel lawsuit
filed by a prominent nursery owner against
the newspaper company, which owns Miami
New Times. The lawsuit was filed February
14,1994, following the
publication of a story,
“The Great Largo
Gumbo Limbo Im¬
broglio,” regarding a
Monroe County code
enforcement dispute
involving Manuel
Diaz, owner of the vast
Manuel Diaz Farms in
South Dade. The law¬
suit claimed that the story, published
January 5,1994, was “false and defamatory.”
“He blamed the messenger instead of the
person who created the message,” says
attorney Sanford Bohrer, who represents
New Times. “His original problem was with
Monroe County, and he claimed he was mis¬
treated by Monroe County. All we did was
report what the official spokesperson said
and report what was in the county’s official
records."
The story explained that Diaz was facing
accusations that he illegally removed hun¬
dreds of gumbo-limbo cuttings from a pro¬
tected forest in north Key Largo, and dam¬
aged hundreds of other plants in the
process. The incident occurred in May J993
in the North Key Largo Habitat Con¬
servation Area, a sensitive biological ecosys¬
tem. A Monroe County biologist who investi¬
gated the case told New Times that Diaz’s
employees took approximately 350 gumbo-
limbo cuttings and damaged at least 350
other plants by trampling a path across the
property to the gumbo-limbo stand.
While some parts of the conservation area
are under private ownership, strict develop¬
ment rules apply within its boundaries. Diaz
told Monroe County officials he had
received permission from a private
landowner in the area to remove the gumbo-
limbo plants from the property, but the offi¬
An attorney representing Diaz contended
that no land-clearing permits were needed
because Diaz was only “pruning” the trees.
The Monroe County Code Enforcement
Department disagreed, issued a notice of vio¬
lation to the property
owners — the Bell *
Family Trust — and ;
ordered the planting of •
700 trees and shrubs at ?
a state-owned nature •
preserve as a form of
restitution. But after
negotiations between
the two sides, Monroe
County reduced that
number to 150. On
March 2,1994, Manuel
Diaz Farms donated the
trees to the state for
planting at Fort Zachary
Taylor State Park in
Key West
While Diaz was re
Nurseryman Manuel Diaz
phrase,” in the newspaper. “Publication of
the statements which are in the article are
privileged as part of a neutral report of gov¬
ernment actions,” he wrote.
Diaz also complained that an accompany¬
ing illustration was “grossly
distracted [sic] and exagger¬
ated.” The drawing depicted
a path cut through dense
foliage and strewn with bro¬
ken twigs and branches.
Bohrer argued that the car¬
toon qualifies as “rhetorical
hyperbole” and is therefore
protected by the First
Amendment. In his com¬
plaint, Diaz also maintained
that the article insinuated he
was “poaching trees in
Monroe County and selling
to Dade County.” In fact, the
article only mentioned that
in addition to his extraordi¬
nary philanthropy and high-
“All we did was report what the official
spokesperson said and report what was
in the county’s official records.”
cials said he never secured the necessary
land-clearing permits. A Monroe official told
New Times that even if Diaz had applied, he
wouldn’t have been given a permit because
county regulations prohibited land-clearing
in that particular subdivision.
solving the code-enforcement issue, he was
also suing New Times. The lawsuit specifi¬
cally took issue with several
phrases that appeared in the
story, among them “tree
poacher,” “raping a hammock,”
“felling trees in a protected
area,” and “leaving a path of
destruction.” Diaz also
objected to a county biologist’s
characterization of him as a
“dirtbag” and a “scumbucket”
In his request for summary
judgment, New Times attorney Bohrer
argued that aside from the phrase “leaving a
path of destruction,” which doesn’t appear in
the article, all the statements at issue were
made by public officials and “simply
reported, either by quotation or by para¬
profile private work with some of South
Florida’s wealthiest developers, he also had
a contract to provide trees to the Metro-
Dade Parks and Recreation Department.
The article pointed out that the contract
called for gumbo-limbos, among other trees.
As a result of the publication of the story,
the lawsuit stated, Diaz “suffered the indig¬
nity of ridicule, damage to reputation, hon¬
esty has been questioned, standing as a citi¬
zen has been impugned, and . . . suffered
great mental distress,” as well as “business
losses.” But when questioned by Bohrer
during a deposition, Diaz was hard-pressed
to point out the exact injuries he suffered,
monetary or otherwise. “I can assure you it
didn’t help me sell any trees,” he noted.
Diqz’s trial attorney did not respond to a
request for comment CD
I
Waáfom
1006-1008 Lincoln Rd
Miami Beach
305 672 - 7779
n Daily From 11am to 9pm Friday and Saturday till 10pm Sundays Noon to 6png
AlWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION, AN0 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. AN0 PLEASE RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT. Obey the law, and read your
owner's manual thoroughly. For rider training information, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-80^447-4700.
ST1100
There are lots of ways to get where you want to go. But if the journey is as important
as the arrival, make sure you’re on a Honda ST1100.
• Liquid-cooled 1084cc longitudinally mounted V-4 engine is smooth and powerful.
• Enormous 7.4-gallon fuel tank provides unsurpassed cruising range.
• Detachable, lockable, color-matched 35-liter saddlebags can each hold a full-face helmet
•Wide, rigid windshield incorporates integral vents for less noise and reduced turbulence.
• Dual-disc front brake with twin-piston calipers and a single-disc rear for solid
stopping performance.
Do more than just arrive. Arrive in style-aboard Honda's 1996 ST1100.
GABLES HONDA
7300 Bird Road • Mlam
•83(
Rhonda
Come ride with us.


Order toll-free 1-800-334-SHOP #4 b®Ur& a day'Yi
your skin type.
for Normal to Dry Skin Types:
FHJMQ0ÍAU: Visibly Revitalizing Solution,
GALATÉE DOUCEUR Milky Creme Cleanser,
TOSIOUE DOUCEUR Akohof-Free Freshener,
AH in
Flos,
Full-
All tucked
For Normal to Oily Skin Types:
PRIM ODIALE Visibly Revitalizing Solution,
CLARIFIANCE Oil-free Del Oeonser,
CLARIFIANCE: Alcohol-free Natural Astringent,
$m
Full-size LipCote in Motto Brúlé end
¡8TENCU.S Full Intensity Moscow. All tucked
a sleek block and while cosmetic bog.
THE FLORIDA STORE*
Choose your
customized gift of S
skincare essentials.
Yours with any 17.50
Laucóme purchase.
MM
9
s
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
PROVEN RESULTS
FOR A DOLLAR A DA
J3ponnei|yWorid Trade Center YMCA.
90 in Miami, Phone: 577-3091
r
L
how can our
fine salon offer
haircuts for
half price?
simuNumu nave to
oo some ol die cutting
yourself. 50% off
your first hair cut.
Brickell Harbour Condominium
200 SE I5th Rd. Miami • 854-5858
Specialism» in Exotic Birds
with pnces... cheap, cheap, cheap
tremendous variety and a
triendly, knowledgeable staff.
Seed‘Toys «Books «Cages
Tutéétfe Mótil Azadabh.
Coconut Grove
3065 Fuller St. Coconut Grove
448-5750
/VEDA
OPEN 7 DAYS
Offer expires 4/4/96. Offer good one visit, first time clients only
at the Coconut Grove location only. Not valid with any other offer.
It*s wor (It die drive from anywhere.
Tic s4u¿CVUf
22707 South Dixie Highway
258-BIRD
PÜ
m
experience the passion
Experience Miami Beach's premiere sports and fitness facility. Whether you choose
to cross train on South Florida's only rock climbing wall, shoot hoops on our pro sized
courts, slam a squash or racquet,had^fejgpjillllll^gyate, air-conditioned court club,
the choice is vours. With MlllÍÍÍÍÍIÉIiÍlllÍl8l^illiybex vr-2 strength training,
unlimited aerobic pool», cabanas* and lavish spa treatments, no
other club even you don't make the call.
¡®J1
■Éiál
. ill
•? • '
of-
Located at the Eden Roc Resort 4S2S Collins
674-5585
Beach
the Public
OPEN SATURDAYS
MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT
180 NE 39 STREET #112.
MIAMI.FL 33137
TELEPHONE (305) 573-6493
FAX (305) 576-5229
10


ews
Troubletáwn
IF All the "EbVcATtoN RE FORKS'' HAffENEo AT OfJce.
Lead Story
•Among recent passings of note: in
Columbus, Ohio, Mr. M.S. Tooill; in
Arlington, Virginia, Mr. W.M. Croker; and in
Oklahoma City, Mr. William Death. In
February a 44-year-old man was killed on 1-95
in Rhode Island after being hit by a truck
while standing on the shoulder between two
other trucks — one hauling granite slabs for
tombstones and the other belonging to the
Yates Casket Company. And three weeks ear¬
lier, a 23-year-old man was killed in Fallston,
Maryland, when his car smashed into a truck
carrying burial vaults.
Weird Science
• In December surgeon Isam Felahy
removed an inch-long tree sprig from the
right lung of sixteen-year-old Tracy McIntyre
in Stockton, California. Tracy had apparently
inhaled it from the family Christmas tree in
1980. The sprig, which was still green, was
apparently the source of Tracy’s notoriously
bad breath.
•In December scientists at the Japan Atomic
Power Company in Takasaki reported that
bombarding cheap wine and whiskey with a
deadly (for humans) dose of gamma rays
actually improved the taste. According to
researcher Hiroshi Watanabe, irradiation
promotes a blend that poorly made wine and
whiskey lack. He predicts that by the year
2000 irradiation will be used to improve the
taste of many common foods. (Watanabe
admits that irradiating good wine and
whiskey makes them taste worse.)
•An October Houston Chronicle
report on University of Texas bio¬
chemist Barrie Kitto revealed that
the only way government inspectors
can currently detect microscopic par¬
ticles of feces in cereal grain (to ascertain
whether the allowable level of two rat pellets
per kilogram of grain has been exceeded) is
by visual inspection. Dr. Kitto has developed
a substance sensitive to the feces that will
turn a sample green, thereby making inspec¬
tion easier.
Cultural Diversity
•The city of Bacolod in the Philippines
endured a rash of cemetery invasions during
the summer, as a gang of thieves dug up
graves to steal corpses’ kneecaps, which are
thought by some Filipinos to have magical
properties. The kneecaps were ground into
powder and burned outside homes in order
to put residents to sleep, making them easier
targets for the gang’s burglaries.
•A court in Grenaa, Denmark, announced it
would soon impose a higher fine on a woman
because she refuses to change the spelling of
her son’s name, “Christophpher,” which is
unapproved by the ministry that regulates
names. She has paid about $18 a week since
1989. Chris is now eight years old, and so far
his name has cost the woman thousands of
dollars in fines. She insists the uniqueness is
worth it
•In November Knight-Ridder News Service
reported that the government in Nanking,
China, is levying fines of about $1.50 for peo¬
ple in restaurants who order more food than
they can eat
People With Too Much Time on Their Hands
•A study of 12,000 people done by University
of North Carolina researchers revealed that
most people who drink lots of beer have large
bellies, but most people who drink lots of
wine don’t
•In December the Arizona Republic profiled
animal psychologist Krista Cantrell, who says
she can communicate telepathically with ani¬
mals. She was praised by the owner of a
horse, on the verge of being euthanized, that
was able to tell Cantrell that he was simply
overmedicated. (Five weeks later, the horse
won a race.)
-By Chuck Shepherd
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
Bret Taylor, Lie. Real Estate Broker
THE SOUTH BEACH CONDO SPECIALIST!â„¢
531-BRET
5 3 1 - 2 7 3 8
Bret Taylor Real Estate • 420 Lincoln Road • Suite 260 • Miami Beach
BEWARE OF
BIG CITY
SHARKS!
If you are car shopping, don't get attacked by sharks
disguised as salesmen.
Escape the big city
pressure, and call Largo
Honda. We'll give you the
best possible price
without the hassle.
Uivclkdc
Just call 930-HONDA toll-free.
Great selection, low prices... and no more sharks!
11
H«w Timas March 14-20,1996


New Timas March 14 • 20,1996
And To Everything
That Moves On The Earth
Which Has Life, I Have
Given Every Green Plant
For Food.”
Genesis 1:30
Nutrition For Life
Now Featured At
FLORIDA
CORPORATION
INCORPORATE OVER THE PHONE... ITS EASY
*99«
COMPLETE - INCLUDES: Artid« of
Incorporation, Corporal* Minutes, By
Laws, Corporal* Book, Corporal* Seal,
Stock Certifícate, Preliminary Name
Search, State Filing Fees, Attorney’s Fees
Corps also immediately available W/Tax LDi Also Sob S
Corps., Non Profit Corps., Limited Partnerships, LLCs, DBAs,
Trademarks, Business Sale/Purchase, and On Shore Corps.
*93, '94, ft ’95 Corps also available for immsdisl* delivery
Counselor and Attorney at Law vitA-M-UfO* a*
HaUrta|4ilNHrbMtaeMMiMiNM*NUMlkiMMiqiifH
■SwSncia* S»fcr«y SsOSmOi ■§ m —4*— O— «iMwIMwir
qualifications and experience. Carat CiMm • U»r— J. Spkijtl.Esq,
m A unique
collection of
handmade
ceramics
featuring our
exclusive
Lime Dolls
(Descaradas)
We offer
Stencil and
Wall Treatment
Lessons
turn*
213 Aragon Avenue
Coral Gables
(formerly located at
Falls Shopping Center)
448-6005
Comfort and Style
Slipcover Sofas
Starting at $699
Slipcovers Starting At
Sofa $699
$279
Apartment Sofa $679
$269
Love Seat $649
$249
Chair & 1/2 $549
$219
Ottoman $349
4077 Ponce De Leon
$179
• Coral Gables
Phone: 445-
Mon-Fri 10am-8pm •
â– 3848
Sat llam-6pm
Sunday llam-5pm
12


wasted
Solitude standing: Michael Goldstein stands alone on the
ground between the owners' and the city's attorneys
This waterfront
plot i
in Coconut Grove
isn’t park land,
it’s a factory.
A
lawsuit factory.
ill he hugs were a good sign. So were
the back slaps and handshakes
I that followed Michael Goldstein’s
presentation to the Miami City
Commission last July. In ten short minutes
on that summer morning, the environmen¬
tal lawyer and activist had solved a twelve-
year legal puzzle. Thanks to his work, it
looked as if a piece of cherished Coconut
Grove property that once was slated for
massive development would finally
become a public park.
Armed with posters and charts and speak¬
ing with the confidence of a poker player
holding four aces, Goldstein had explained
to commissioners that the owners were will¬
ing to sell the property. He had explained
how, after nearly a year of lobbying on his
part, the state and the county were prepared
to pony up more than half the purchase
price, whatever it might be. Tapping his fin¬
ger on the podium, he had triumphantly
announced that the state was even willing to
loan the city the rest of the money — at file
very appealing interest rate of exactly zero
percent for the first five years of the loan.
The commissioners jockeyed to applaud
Goldstein’s efforts. Miller Dawkins recited
an impromptu ode to green space. Victor De
Continued on page 15
13
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


W«w Times March 14 - 20,1996
PUBLISHING
Imagine creating your own hard cover, library quality
books, Custom Presentations, Portfolios, Thesis
Papers, Family History, Poems, Short Stories, Recipes,
JDiaries, Manuals... anything!
Let Mar Com of Miami turn your
, next binding project into a
i masterpiece of professional
B quality. Now you can be your
very own publisher for a
â–  fraction of the cost of regular
process binding. Call Mar Com
today for free information on our
ChannelBindâ„¢ System, and put
us to work for you.
MAR COM
Mar Com Enterprises 13200 S.W. 128th St. B3, Miami FL, 33186. (305) 256.7811
NOW IS THE BEST TIME
TO BUYA DIGITAL
CELLULAR PHONE!
We're proud to be an authorized dealer for AT&T Wireless
Services providing the products and services from the most
trusted name in telecommunications.
ELITE
HOME THEATER
30 Day Money Back Guarantee
30 Day Price Guarantee • Free Delivery
50 NE 2nd Ave • 377-4466
Call for Directions • Free Parking
MOUNTAIN BIKE
TREK 800 sport
$219“
CYCLE WORLD
Bikes come fully assembled
Open SundaysfBird Rd. only)
9541 BIRD RD. MIAMI 221-2123
5090 WEST 12THAVE. HIALEAH 362-0003
big feet
great seat
scandia
furniture, inc.
14321 South Dixie Highway, Miami. 252-9867
Monday - Saturday 10-6. Sunday 12-5
Major Credit Cards & Financing
The Salon
Package We
Can’t Stop
Running...
HAIR CGI
Full hour massage, manicure,
mini-facial, hair color consulta¬
tion, hair color/clear glossing,
deep conditioning treatment,
color correction service,
haircut/style, steamroom/ sauna.
ONLY $100
$60 without massage
50% off highlights with package
50% off acrylics with package
50% off glycolic wash with package
50% off waxing services with package
50% off — hair straight¬
ening system with package.
Our New Oceansidi
Gift Certificates
Available
AT THE LUXURIOU
NO
★ 5151 CO
PENTHOUSE
305 -
Hours: Tuesday I
-
Fabulous Lincoln Road • South Beach Lifestyle
SpaciousOne & Two Bedroom • Two Bath & Walk-in Closets
Floor to Ceding Tile Bath • Beautiful Wood Floor
flstom Designed Kitchen • Security Code Entry
1614 Pennsylvania Avenue, Miami Beach
l/2 Block from Lincoln Road Mall
Buy Direct from Developer
Brokers Welcome
Open Saturday 3-6pm
For Appointment
Call 674-8687
The South Beach Lifestyle
At It’s Best!
tsaagSKsasatt;
14


u
Commodore Bay is like a majestic lion. It is beautiful to look at,
but on the other hand it chews up a lot of people.”
A chainlink gate separates Commodore Bay from the development and traffic of central Coconut Grove
Wasteid
Continued from page 13
Yurre, who was facing a tough re-election
battle, asked to lead the sale negotiations.
He knew a purchase would win him votes
and quash the threat of more lawsuits from
the property owners, a trio of developers
known for their litigiousness. “People were
congratulating me and slapping me on the
back,” Goldstein recalls. “It certainly felt like
a victory.”
Precisely what the young lawyer had won,
though, was unclear. The commissioners
appeared to have approved a motion to buy
the property and turn it into a park. But what
they actually passed was in fact so fuzzy that
eight months later the city attorney’s office
has not deciphered the motion well enough
to frame it in precise legal language. The
owners’ attorneys, in the meantime, have
broken off negotiations, the attorneys for the
city having made it known that they refuse
to close a deal without a written promise in
advance that they won’t be sued. Even the
city commissioners have been muzzled, lest
their comments come back to haunt them in
court
Unless the stalemate ends soon, warns
Michael Goldstein, lawsuits will indeed fol¬
low, delaying yet again the sale of
Commodore Bay. “I think we are so close
and that is why it is so frustrating,”
Goldstein groans. “It is such a wonderful
opportunity. All the money is there and
we’ve come so far, and it is 3 way to end all
the litigation.”
He sighs at the thought that his work
might come to nothing. “Commodore Bay is
like a beautiful animal,” he ventures.
“Maybe like a majestic lion. It is beautiful to
look at, but on the other hand it chews up a
lot of people.”
Bubba Red stands at the shore of Biscayne
Bay, squinting into the noon sun, his dark
eyes shaded by a weathered Yankees cap. A
self-confessed crack addict, he lives on the
Commodore Bay property full-time. Raising
a Marlboro as if it were a pointer, he sweeps
the glowing cigarette across the panorama
to convey the majesty of the view, then turns
180 degrees to face a stand of hardwood
trees and exotic grasses, and nineteen fellow
homeless people. He sucks one last drag,
The owners stung Linda Dann when she tried to
help out
flicks the Marlboro into the bay, and com¬
mences a guided tour of his home.
“This is the most tranquil place in the
Grove,” says Red, traversing the dirt path
that starts where the bay meets a four-foot-
tall chainlink fence separating the property
from Peacock Park. To his left, Red points
out, is the Barnacle, the homestead of
Commodore Ralph Munroe. The early set¬
tler erected Coconut Grove’s first house,
referred to by some as the Plymouth Rock
of South Florida, with wood recovered from
a shipwreck. A well-patrolled fence keeps
Red and his ilk away from the state historic
site.
Farther up the path the vegetation grows
denser, thick with live oak and gumbo-
limbo. The entire property takes up a little
more than six acres, and after a few minutes
Red’s short walk ends at Main Highway and
a padlocked gate. Out beyond the fence is
the concrete amusement park of the Grove
—Fuddrucker’s and CocoWalk, thousands
of weekend visitors. A world away from
Commodore Bay’s trees and shade. “It’s a
place where we can escape the noise and
the horns of the rest of the village,” Red
says, patting his jacket in search of a ciga¬
rette. “It’s a place where you can get away
and relax your mind.”
The son of a prominent Grove activist,
Bubba Red has always lived in the village. He
has seen it change from an artists’ colony to a
hippie hangout, and finally to an overgrown
Continued on page 16
}'4li
•are1’
there.
a ¡jinn
ROBERT’S
WESTERN WEAR
1 The Largest
â–  Lucchese Dealer
if in the Southeast
Justin
Durango
Code West
Boots • Jeans
Shirts • Hats
5854 South Dixie Hwy
South Miami
666-6647
Redisoover
^Tradition
of junctional &
(tHC P©TTító PRLM.)
Cauley Square Historic District • 22400 Old Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida • 258-7474
15
New Times March 14 - 20.1996


New Times March 14 • 20,1996
THE GRIDIRON CUIR
FOR TOTAL FRINESS
BUY 3 MONTHS
GE! 1 MINI H
FREE!
BUY 1YEAB
GET 3 MONTHS
FREE!
INCLUDES INE FREE IOUR 0F PERSONAL TRAINING
531-GRID
IS7G ALTON RIAD, MIAMI DEMI
HDORS: 5:31AM - M* M* - 8 -1 SAL -1 - 6 SUN
Wasted
Continued from page 15
mall. The Grove still had a faint hippie feel
to it back in 1983, when this wild property
was purchased by three developers with a
grand vision.
Along with partners Howard Scharlin and
Gerald Katcher, Ken Treister, the architect of
Mayfair, bought the parcel for three million
dollars. Though the trio knew the land was
zoned for single-family homes, they felt it had
more potential. They wanted to build a 195-unit
condo complex on top of a massive shopping
center filled with stores and art galleries.
There would be subsidized art studios and
classes to evoke the village’s past, and a 650-
space parking garage to ease the Grove’s
growing car crunch. The property had no
name, but the blueprints submitted to the city
on June 15, 1984, bore the imprint
Commodore Bay.
City officials lapped it up like an architectural
parfait. The way they saw it, the Brickell
Avenue boom — gleaming, skyscraping con¬
dos rising along the waterfront as quickly as
anyone with a few dollars could find a con¬
struction crane—was arriving in the Grove.
Village residents, on the other hand, are
known for their anti-development zeal, and
many failed to share their elected officials’
taste for suites. The project’s opponents
noticed with relief that while the Community
Planning and Revitalization Department had
approved the plans, staffers had attached myr¬
iad conditions. A big hangup was traffic:
Compact and congested, Coconut Grove could
not support a massive condo project without
additional access from the site onto McFarlane
Road. The developers solved the problem by
adding to their blueprints a new road across
the parking lot of adjacent St. Stephen’s
Episcopal Church.
Bad call. The owners didn’t count on the
wrath of St Stephen’s congregation. Many
members balked at the idea of a road running
past the playground near their children’s gram¬
mar school. “I began working on this the day
my child started junior kindergarten and now
he’s in the tenth grade,” grumbles Linda Dann,
a St Stephen’s parent who became active in
the fight to nix the condo complex.
The partners also failed to factor in the envi¬
ronmental backlash that resulted when they
called for a gutting of the property’s hardwood
hammock. Activists, including the esteemed
Marjory Stoneman Douglas, joined the church
parents to sway the commission. Ultimately
they succeeded. On November 12,1984, the
commissioners voted 3-2 to kill the project
Still, they gave the developers an extraordi¬
nary second chance: Instead of going by the
law and waiting a year before presenting
another development plan, the partners were
invited to revisit the commission as soon as
they were ready. Six months was all it took to
craft another, slightly smaller plan. Instead of
195 condos, there would be only 150. Instead
of 80,000 square feet of commercial restau¬
rants and shops, there would be only 49,000.
The parking garage would hold only 533
spaces.
The planning department conditionally
approved the plan once again, but it was
rejected by the Zoning Board and the Planning
Advisory Board. Without waiting for a public
hearing before the city commission, the devel¬
opers withdrew the plans and the project died
a second death.
South Beach's
Newest Hot Spot
Isn't A Restaurant
This season the place to see and be seen is our humble thrift
shop! Here you 'll find everything from the practical to the
sublime, haute couture to T-shirts, meat grinders to doorknobs,
lawn furniture to sofas, Russian novels to comic books and
more! Your purchases and donations fund programs which
help people living with HIV. For
information please call: 672-7251. ^Ej3=network
1435 Alton Road • Miami Beach
Open Mon.-Sat 10«m-7pm / Sundays Noon-5pm
AT WAREHOUSE
PRICES!
â– Portable Antennas
*9.9* /
Car Chargers Jg
$15.95 m
mmm
m <» cs
m <$
mmm
NEW Battery with Built -In Digital
Recorder for Messages, Memos, Etc. |
*79.»
NEW Battery with Built -In Charger -
Plugs into Any 120v Outlet with No
Adapter ^
Solar Battery - Recharges From Sun,
12vor 120v
*99»
Export Prices Available
It was dawning on city officials, meanwhile,
that the property might make a nice park. That
way the Grove’s anti-development soldiers
would be appeased. Better still, the city would
be in a better position to proceed with its plan
to develop Bayside Marketplace downtown.
A shopping mall, food court, and eventual
mothership to a Hard Rock Cafe, Bayside was
(305) 599-1804 Fax (305) 599-1805
4995 NW 79 Ave. Suite 120
Miami, FL 33166


Because Commodore Bay is privately owned, homeless people can live on the property free from
police harassment
born as the city’s attempt to revitalize
Bayfront Park. In 1985 construction was
ready to begin. But to build docks and pavil¬
ions on the waterfront, the city needed spe¬
cial permits from the state. During a visit to
then-governor Bob Graham, Commissioner
J.L. Plummer proposed a trade: If the city
were allowed to proceed with Bayside, he’d
create a trust fund to collect a portion of the
developer’s rent paid to the city each year,
with the money earmarked for the purchase
of waterfront property along the Miami
River or Biscayne Bay. The first choice was
obvious. “The priority item will be agreed to
by the city, once again, and that is the prop¬
erty adjacent to the Barnacle,” Plummer
told Graham, as recorded in a transcript of
the meeting. The governor gave his bless¬
ing, and the trust began stockpiling cash.
Yet the owners weren’t quite ready to sell.
Forty-three days after abandoning their sec¬
ond plan, they came back to the city with an
unusual request. They wanted a zoning
change, from single-family homes to some¬
thing more dense, far more dense. The
change, if approved, would permit not only
a development of, say, 195 condo units and
a 650-space parking garage, but something
four times that dense.
In itself, a zoning-change request isn’t
uncommon. But astonished officials didn’t
fail to discern that the owners stood to ben¬
efit handsomely from a change that would
boost the value of their land. They also
noticed that the partners had not attached
any blueprints to their request. “[Our previ¬
ous] recommendations [in favor of the first
two projects] are irrelevant because [the
third application] is something completely
different,” a planning department staffer
told city commissioners. “It’s like compar¬
ing, for example, a contract in which you
specify all the terms ... and a blank check.
We’re recommending against a blank
check.”
The commissioners agreed.
Thrice rejected, the owners turned to the
courts. In a 1986 lawsuit, they alleged that city
officials were trying to “take” the
land by keeping the value as low
as possible, making it easier for
the city to buy it for a park. It was
a blatant double standard, they
complained: The city was pro¬
development on Brickell Avenue,
at CocoWalk, and even on
Biscayne Bay, where politically
connected restaurateur Monty
Trainer was afforded certain exemptions from
the rules, such as permission for his cus¬
tomers to park on adjacent city property.
The city, however, prevailed. An appeal
failed, as did a second lawsuit, and a third. Five
more legal maneuvers — all primarily regard¬
ing the requested zoning change — Med as
well.
Nine years after purchasing the land, the
owners pitched one last development idea: a
parking lot. The Department of Off-Street
Parking rejected the plan, leaving the owners
frustrated and willing to sell.
Michael Goldstein is a fitness nut That fact,
more than his lifetime spent in Coconut
Grove, has made him an environmentalist
“I run a lot, usually on the same path
through the Grove,” says the 28-year-old
Ransom Everglades High School alumnus.
“Over the years, I noticed a significant
change in the community. A lot of develop¬
ment, a lot of concrete. Every time a tree
would come down, literally it was like they
took a rib from my chest I don’t know why,
but it gave me such anger and sadness, and
a level of frustration and hopelessness.”
Earning a law degree from the University
of Miami, he found hope. He joined (and
soon became president of) the zealous zon¬
ing activists collectively known as the
Coconut Grove Civic Club. He fought
against the development of Virginia Key.
Now he is concentrating on Commodore
Bay. “This is the kind of stuff that is impor¬
tant to me,” Goldstein says. “I am an invet¬
erate, unabashed, unrepentant tree hugger.
This is what’s important to me. This is how
I spend my time.”
Goldstein knew the Commodore Bay
owners from his frequent battles against
the development. As their proposals were
shot down one after the other, he saw in
their frustration an opportunity to save the
property. They weren’t doing anything with
the land, so why not sell it to someone who
Continued on page 19
Astonished officials didn’t fail to discern that the
owners stood to benefit handsomely
from a zoning change.
AT THE MIAMI BEACH MARINA * 538-3500
BAD TO THE BONE!
We’ve got the finest cuts of meat, poultry
AND SEAFOOD ON THE BEACH.
i MARKET
OPEN 7 DAYS 7AM-8PM • 300 ALTON ROAD
m
Xv*
m
m
j&sS»*
fob* VS)
VICTORS
ELECTRONIC DISCOUNT CENTER
358-0333
29 S.E. 2ND AVE. S.E. HABLA
ESPAñOL FALA-SE PORTUGUES
• Requires 12 month service agreement with Victor’s and AT&T.
r
r
i
s
i


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
COLONIAL MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN FURNITURE & ACCESSORIES
TWO GREAT LOCATIONS TO SERVI YOU • 8880 S.W. 129 TERRACE IN MIAMI, 378-0377
137 MIMCIE MILE IN COMI 6MIES, 460-9880 • Open Hoe. - Sol. 10am-6pm
All Custom
Table Pads
50% Off
Your mother saved
her table from bums
and scratches with
beautiful SUPERIOR
table pads. We’re your
exclusive SUPERIOR
dealer, & we’ll come
out and measure your
table for free!
IratiftrW
R.MS. Tabfo Pouk
Call now for your
immediate
appointment!
271-8333
Guaranteed Speedy Delivery
SAM'S COMMUNICATON CENTER
We're proud to be an authorized dealer lor AT&T Wireless Services providing the products and services from the most trusted name in telecommunications.
AT&T WIRELESS IS HERE!
$49.95* $59.95* FREEA
19
FREE
New digital subscribers
receive UNLIMITED
home airtime usage for
the 1st and 13th month
Digital Advantage 2-5
subscribers also receive
the access fee waived for
the 1st and 13th month
Subscribers
may purchase
FREE nights and
weekends for just
$4.95/month (digital) or
$9.95/month (analog)!!!
==AW
Wireless Services
Authorized Dealer
$29.95 $39.95
Requires activation Requires activation
Requires sctivaUoa on AT&T's ATT, AN2, AN3, AN4 or ANS plan.
742 ALTON ROAD - MIAMI BE AC 11
PHONE: (305) 538-9494
- OONTEIVIFORARY - SOFAS - RUGS - IV1IRRORS - FUTONS -
Up To 80% Off On All
Black Hi-Tech Items
Bads Starting At *99
* Ovar 75 Stylas
Dining Sats
Chairs $24" Rag. $99
Tobias $99" Rag. $199
Introducing A Complete ,
Line of Mexican Furniture
• Over 100 Items
fe i e m e n ff s
. AH Sizas 2227 CORAL WAY • 2854)899
Reconstructs
Revitalizes
Reconditions
Manageability
Adds Volume
Adds texture to fine limp hair
Facilitates style versatility
Removes unwanted perms
Eliminates frizzies
Repairs over processing
We use and recommend
Paul Brown products kA*ia"
Salon and Skin Care
Gift Certificates
Available
STRAIGHT PERM SYSTEM*
I All
«It 1IU‘
ECC
AV3118 Dle €|| ||||i Protecting Endangered Beauty...
Complimentary ccc Hours: Mon-Fri 10-8
Valet Parking I————J Sat-Sun 10-6
Eden Roc Resort & Spa • 4525 Collins Ave • 674-5584 • Miami Beach, FL
ACCESSORIES - LAIVIRS - DINING ROOIVIS


“I am an inveterate, unabashed,
unrepentant tree hugger.
This is what’s important to me. This is iKTW
I spend my time.”
Wasted
Continued from page 17
I would preserve the trees and the open
â–  space? Why not sell it to the city so it could
\ become a park?
On a November dáy in 1994, the idealistic
I lawyer met Kenneth Treister for lunch at
I Greenstreet Cafe, across Main Highway from
I the disputed property. Goldstein asked
I Treister if he would be amenable to the idea of
| a park on his property. Treister said he was.
I Goldstein asked Treister if he would be willing
I to sell the property to the public to achieve that
I end. Treister said he was. Granted a third yes
s after asking whether the owners would reim¬
burse him for the costs of searching out a
| buyer (although not pay him anything more
I for his services), Goldstein set out to make it
| happen.
“Michael Goldstein cares about the commu-
I nity and he is active in the community,” says
I Treister’s partner Howard Scharlin. “He’s a
| bright young man. He is not our attorney, but
I from our point of view, his personal desires for
I this property are not inconsistent with what
I would be a good deal for us.”
Flying off to Tallahassee on the owners’;
I nickel, Goldstein lobbied bureaucrats in sev-
| eral state agencies. The land, he argued, was
I too valuable and time was too short to let its
I purchase be anything other than a priority. On
I June 27,1995, Goldstein secured a commit-
I ment from the state for half the cost of the pur-
I chase, plus a loan to the city on very favorable
repayment terms.
Goldstein knew of a Metro-Dade fund dedi¬
cated to the purchase of park land, so he also
made a pitch to the county officials who over¬
see the fund. “As concrete replaces canopy,”
he wrote in a persuasive letter to the
Environmentally Endangered Lands Program,
“the name itself, ‘Coconut Grove,’ may very
well become a bittersweet and ironic reminder
of what this village once was.” Sure enough,
county officials were in for ten percent of the
property’s cost
All this Goldstein presented to city commis¬
sioners last July. He even mentioned the
approximately $500,000 that sits in the Bayside
: Agreement trust fund, the money J.L.
Plummer had promised for Commodore Bay.
And as the commissioners thanked
Goldstein for his efforts and slapped him on
the back, the first fateful letters were already
being typed.
“The day after Michael Goldstein’s presenta¬
tion, Kenneth Treister sent a letter to the city
saying the deal was off” says Joseph Fleming,
one of three outside counsel representing the
dty in the Commodore Bay matter. “I told him,
‘Michael, I think you are being played for this
one, just like Linda Dann was.’ ” (Fleming was
referring to an earlier effort by Dann, one of
the parents at St Stephen’s church, to gather
state money to purchase the property. “I
worked my butt off for several years to get
them to sell, then at the last minute they
changed their minds,” Dann says today, her
words laced with bitterness. “Then they just
jerked the rug out from under us. They filed a
whole bunch of lawsuits, including one in
which they accused me of collaborating with
Monty Trainer. I don’t even know Monty
Trainer.”)
The owners’ attorney, renowned land-use
lawyer Toby Prince Brigham, dashed off a let¬
ter as well. “The willingness of the city to
resolve the matter is a never-ending illusion,”
Brigham wrote in a July 25 missive to another
of the city’s trio of attorneys, Gary Held. “It
seems to me your suggestions for further
negotiation are a snare and a delusion. We can
see no reason to continue further negotiations
with the dty. We deem them concluded.”
Held snapped back in a letter dated August
4. “You claim illusion, snare, and delusion on
the part of the city, but those same words
could describe how my clients feel about yours
following the years of litigation and your letter
tome.”
The dtys attorneys don’t have a lot of trust
in the owners, nor for the lawyers who repre¬
sent them. Lead attorney Joe Fleming asserts
that the partners have filed so many lawsuits
and set so many legal traps that he has no
cause to believe they’ve changed their ways.
Goldstein’s presentation might very well be
another trap, he figures, designed to demon¬
strate that the dty “took” the land by keeping
the low-density zoning. “He says his heart is in
the right place and that he is from the Grove,”
Fleming says. “But I tell him: “It doesn’t matter
where you are from, you have to be careful that
you are not setting up the city for a lawsuit.
They.aregoing.to-takeuallthis-[infQnnation].
you collected and put it in their context and
then be able to force the city to give them
whatever they want At that point Michael, you
will not be the architect of a settlement you
will be the architect of a high-rise.’ ”
Goldstein is accustomed to such admonish¬
ments. Ever since he proposed a dialogue with
Treister and Scharlin, he has been criticized by
park activists for selling out to developers.
“Working hand in hand with the property own¬
ers has not been a tremendously easy
process,” he admits. “I have come under attack
by certain segments of the community who
feel I am naive or have been co-opted by the
property owners or that I’ve negotiated a settle¬
ment or made a deal to profit from it” He esti¬
mates that he has collected less than $2000 for
his work, a far cry from his hourly rate, which
by now would have netted him closer to
Continued on page 21
Cool girl seeks sociable
silent type to share
la dolce vita”.
try it as
a shot, try it
with a new
date, try it with
your hat on,
try it chilled,
try it with
someone you
don’t know,
yet
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


MBL ‘oz • U M3JBH seuni mon
CCM Cellular
mtim* Connection of
*ww Miami, Inc.
BELLSOUTH MOBILITY
GIVES YOU
HONE*
2 FREE
PHONES
TO CHOOSE
FROM
&
3
MONTHS
UNLIMITED NIGHTS/
WEEKEI
&
DEUVEI
cellular sen.ice by
@ BellSouth Mobility
•> 1®
take
application
er the phone
305)371-6942
PH (305)371-6942 / FAX(305)371-6943
1 N.E.1ST. STREET #403 - Miami - FL 33132
Subject to credit approval and early cancellation fee. Effective until 3/31/96
Tmaiurner
T1NAM. TURNER, CPA ESQ.
Low Rates Rom $35
Personal / Business Returns
Evening / Weekend Appointments.
598-8722 361-6484
Sunset Dr. Key Biscayne
$15 after 11am
*520before 11am
r AGC members only
AGC Membership $20
play anytime from
11/15/95 lo 4/15/96
and pay no more than $20
a* V\
I Normandy Shores Golf Club
2401 Biarritz Dr. Miami Beach
868-6502
taxes


Buy Direct From The Manufacturer
Of The Famous “Y* Necklaces
DELFINI
Wholesale • Retail
779 W. Flagler St. Miami, FL
(305) 325-8858 Parking In Rear
Open Weekdays 95
n
best haircut in
town guaranteed
or it's on us!
pete of bncBh
116 Avenue and Kendall Drive
274-1166
Hammocks Town Center
387-3711
15 f i f n s i *»fi 111 i f n -1 f f f ■■ 11
Wasted
Continued from page 19
$40,000. (Howard Scharlin refers to
Goldstein’s costs as “peanuts.”)
“I am not paranoid,” Fleming insists. “I act
this way because I litigated this, because I
know the case history. I paint them as being
very, very interested in litigating because that’s
what they have been doing for a long time. I
would think that if they really wanted to [turn
the land into a park], then Mr. Goldstein could
initiate the process. The city doesn’t own the
property, they do. They could sell it to the state
any time they want”
Or to the dty, Fleming adds. But before that
could occur, or even before sale negotiations
could begin, he demands that the partners sign
a legal agreement never to sue the city again.
"They want a full release!” snorts Goldstein.
“There is no way in hell Tm going to do that—
to give away every right simply for the privi¬
lege of sitting down with the city to discuss
what may or may not occur!"
Attorney Toby Brigham suspects Fleming’s
insistence on a release might be a ploy of his
own, designed to drag out the sale indefinitely.
The only pending lawsuit, Brigham points out,
is Fleming’s own, seeking fees for himself and
cocounsel Gary Held and Parker Thomson.
(The three lawyers signed witiTthe city at a
mere $50 an hour, a modified pro bono rate
that covered only costs. But under Florida law,
winning attorneys in pro bono cases can sue
the losing side for fees.) Fleming could collect
more than $1.5 million. T think Joe Fleming
has enjoyed being special counsel for the city,”
Brigham confides. “Mr. Fleming is condi¬
tioned because of the fact he would love to
keep this [potentially lucrative contract] for
himself There is a lot of money to be made in
city fees.”
While Fleming concedes that he’ll gladly
take the money if he can get if he is adamant
that he’s not impeding a deal. “I am very inter¬
ested in this coming to a close,” he offers.
“Frankly, I do enough pro bono work. I don’t
need to see the Treister case in the Grove go
from ten years to twenty years.”
The owners seem to share his desire to
bring the matter to a close by selling the prop¬
erty. “I have been with this so long I am not
looking to hurt anyone,” says Howard
Scharlin. “I would like only to get a fair price
for the property. I don’t want to be involved in
court procedures any more. I am worn out”
Even the city remains onboard, though
somewhat guardedly. J.L Plummer, on advice
of Fleming, chooses his words carefully when
he endorses the land’s sale. “I support it being
put into public ownership,” the veteran com¬
missioner says. “I am not going to be put in a
comer by saying I want it to be a park, but I
support acquiring it for public use.”
Everyone is in agreement and yet nothing is
being done. “Right now we are at an absolute
impasse and I don’t understand why,”
Goldstein complains, adding that time is run¬
ning out on the deal he presented to the com¬
mission: Unless the city shows interest the
state might decide to spend the Commodore
Bay money on another piece of property some¬
where else. If necessary, Goldstein says, he will
sue the city to enforce the Bayside Agreement
in which Plummer said the purchase of
Commodore Bay was a top priority.
litigation, though, is a bleak scenario. Not
only would it further delay a sale, it would
bring the property to the brink of a land use
that—right now, at least — everyone wants
to avoid. “The default scenario here is devel¬
opment,” Goldstein warns. “Ultimately,
eventually, [the owners] are not going to be
able to [afford to pay the taxes] on the prop¬
erty any more. They can develop it them¬
selves or they will sell it to someone else
who is willing to deal with the zoning prob¬
lems and with the Coconut Grove zoning
activists. ”GD I
feet
vervtime.
GRAND
OPENING SPECIAL
Free Cellular phone with any
$85.00 Package.
Massage •Tanning
Manicures • Painless European during
ifedicures • Fiacials
MiAMiTAN
A TANNING SALON «Turning $8.°°
•Manicure $8.°°
.«USHSCAYNEBLVD. .J^Ien s Mankure $5.°°
(Tieonly)
Offer requires a new activation on an AT&T Wireless Services
An2,3,4 annual rate plans. Subject to credit approval. Some
restrictions apply. Offer avaiable while supplies last
SILVER JEWELRY
SALE
Mon. . Fri. ioam - 7pm
Sat. ioam - opm • Sun. Closed
Huge Selection of Silver & Marcasite Jewelrj
Chains • Bracelets • Rings • Charms
Earrings ‘Nameplates • “Y” Necklaces
loooo S.W 56th Street #19
598-8656
Footworks
3724 Sunset Drive • South Miami
667-9322 • Open 7 Days
Hew Times March 14 - 20,1986


Labor organizer Monica Russo helps Dade’s nursing home
workers form a more perfect union


stand
UNfTFs Monica Russo has covered her office walls (left) with reminders of labor
campaigns past and present
le’ve been train¬
ing for this moment ¡not just the past few
hours or days, but for the past few years,”
Monica Russo declares emphatically, her
Voice tinged with a southern drawl. “And
now the moment has arrived.” She -paces,
lips pursed, pausing for a Haitian man to
translate her words into: Creole, andâ– . then
for a Peruvian woman to put everything
into Spanish. The 31-year-old Russo — styl¬
ishly dressed, bespectacled, no makeup,
simply done shoulder-length brown hair —
doesn’t remotely resemble the popular
image of a labor union boss. Yet that’s what
she is: the southern regional director of
organizing for the Union of Néedletrades,
Industrial and Textile Emplé¡|fé’es
(UNITE).
At this moment, on a chilly morning in
early January, Russo is standing in front of
about .50 people in a conference room at
the Howard Johnson Hotel on NW 163rd
Street in North Miami. She’s kicking off a
massive campaign to unionize nursing
home employees throughout South
Florida, where the booming health-care
industry employs increasing numbers of
immigrants in low-paying,
nonunion jobs. Nearly half of
those jobs belong to certified
nursing assistants (CNAs), also
called nurses’ aides, who earn an
average of $6.03 per hour while
performing one of the most dan¬
gerous jobs for women in the
''ÍES., at least according to a study done last
year by the Washington, D.C.-based
Service Employees International Union.
Russo has spent her ten-year adult pro-'
fessional career ás a labor organizer in the
Southeast. And even though she herself
hás never worked in a nursing home, for
this campaign she has corralled dozens of
organizers and union members with expe¬
rience as factory and/or nursing home
workers.
The translations completed, Russo
resumes. “What are we gonna talk about?”
she asks. “Conditions for nursing home
workers in South Florida have never been
worse. It’s so bad that women who’ve been
working as CNAs up to twenty years are
still making $5,25 an hour. How can you
afford to pay.$300 a month for medical
insurance when you’re making $5.25 an
hour\” Russo shouts.. Her audience
responds with the nodding of heads, the
clapping of hands, and calls of affirmation.
“Not only are the workers makin’ no
money,” she continues, “but they’re suffer-
ing from back injuries, injuries to their
legs, arms, shoulders — injuries they suf¬
fer for toe,”
Cassandra Davis, standing at the back of
the room, knows all this andjevery other
pitfall of the profession. Davis, a. tall woman
with a determined gaze, worked as a CNA
for fourteen years in her home state of
Indiana. The Teamsters had organized
healthrcare workers there, and Davis was
an early and active union member.
Although she loved her work, she loved
union business even more, and now her job
as a UNITE organizer in the South keeps
her on the road three weeks out of each
month, away from her home and husband
back in Gary. Along with about ten other
itinerant organizers, she has come to
By Kathy Glasgow
Miami to work alongside local UNITE
staffers and a contingent of rank-and-file
members.
“We think it’s bad now-r-we ain’t seen
nothin’.yet!” Russo tells the crowd. “With
the cuts coming down from Washington,
the entire bottom is gonna fall out There’s
not gonna be nothing for workers. So
there’s never been a better time in history
for nursing home workers to organize than
right now. Today. Not just one nursing
home. Unless we organize hundreds and
hundreds of workers all over South
Florida, we won’t have the power to defend
ourselves against the cuts coming down
Continued on page 28
23
Haw Timas March 14 - 20.1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
6 MONTHS - SAME AS CASH!
0% Financing - No payments. No interest for 6 months with approved credit
AM/FM Cassette Player
Auto reverse, 18 presets & digital clock'
Detachable face cassette
Auto reverse, disital clock, bass
& treble, high power.
Detachable face cassette
Built-in 60 watt amp, bass & treble, clock
CM) PIOIMCEJ?
Detachable face cassette
Auto reverse, 24 presets & digital clock,
line out, bass & treble.
*268®^ «268» *298
Detachable face CD
4x20 watt amp., clock & line output.
FM/AMw/24 presets
KENWOOD
Detachable face CD
Clock, dual illumination, line output &
high power
/ALPINE
348
fí(EMIER^
Detachable face CD
Built-in 100 watt amp, bass & treble,
dock, wireless remote
Installed*
Detachable face CD
140w amp, 2 yr. warranty
High Power radio cassette.
w/10 CD changer package
20Wx4, full logic tape deck, 30 presets
Universal 10 CD changer
w/ remote commander
add CD changer to your factory stereo
Installed*
Universal 6-CD changer w/
wireless remote
add CD changer to your factory stereo
Installed*
Universal 6-CD changer w/
wireless remote
add CD changer to your factory stereo
W
SCRATCH & DENT I AUTO ALARMS
Systems from
$149
installed*
Lifetime Guarantee
Nakamichi 3 way separates $300/set
Sony XK - 8D cass $150
Rockford Speakers from$39/pr
Pioneer DEX-M88WT $350
Bazooka tubes (Amp'd & Non Amp'd) from $79
Sherwood 240 w amp (dean).. $129
Kenwood 2x25 w amp $49
Uneaf Power amps closeout
Hifonicsamps closeout
Hifonics Pluto 70 wrms amp $129
CUF Designs Separates dosout
JVC Direct Drive Turntable. S shape ioneami w/shure V-15 III. .$ 149
Altec 6X9 2 way carbon fiber $79/pr
Asst woofers (Rockford, Kicker, Hifonics) . .from $39 ea
I
HIGH-END
HEADQUARTERS
MB Quart • Mobile ES
Phoenix Gold • Premier
Boston Acoustics * Rockford
Soundstream • JL Audio
esat&t
Wireless Services
Authorized Dealer
Available Features: Remote arm-disorm • active/passive arming 9
motion/shock sensor9 ignition kill 9 flashing IÍD 9 volet switch 9
remote trunk release 9 power door locks9 remote panic9 glass
sensor9 battery back-up 9 window roll up/down 9 remote engine
start 9 interior motion sensor9 perimeter sensor
NOKIA MOTOROLA
DIGITAL PHONE ANALOG FLIP
Requires new acthraHoi o
DI3, DI4, or DI5
No More Excuses.
Today’s promotions make it
easier titan ever to own a
cellular phone.
We're proud to be an authorized dealer for AT&T Wireless
Services providing the products and services from the most
trusted name in telecommunications.
DIGITAL RATE PLANS FROM
$19.99 PER MONTH WITH FIRST
MONTH AIRTIME FREE
ANALOG RATE PLANS FROM
$29.99 PER MONTH INCLUDING
30 MINUTES PER MONTH.
2 HOURS FREE WITH EVERY
NEW ACTIVATION.
Requires 12 month service agreement with AT&T Wireless
Services and Sounds Good. Fees for early cancellation.
Mon.-Sat.
9-5:30pm
* All major
credit cards
m EST1983 2227 Biscoyne Boulevard, Miami
Sounds Good Stereo57—
custom installation extra.


United
Continued from page 23
now. The workers are ready, and all
they’re waiting on is us to back ’em up.
Our job now is to go and talk to people
wherever we find ’em — at home, at their
second job, on the radio, on the job. We
need to let ’em know what their rights
are. And we need to make sure they know
this ain’t no freebie. This is gonna be a
fight. We need to prepare our people for
the bosses’ campaign of intimidation that
we all know because we’ve been through
it many times. How many of you been
threatened for getting a union?”
Among those waving their hands in the
air is Jean-Claude Demosthene, the per¬
sonable young Creole translator. He
immigrated to Miami seven years ago
from Port-de-Paix, Haiti, and is a single
father of a two-year-old girl. Until last fall,
Demosthene worked in a warehouse at
Parts Depot, Inc. and was among several
active UNITE members. He was also one
of about a dozen union members who
were told they were being laid off from
the company for economic reasons; how¬
ever, they’re certain they were let go in
retaliation for their union activity, and
UNITE lawyers have asked the National
Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to order
their reinstatement. Demosthene has
become a valued rank-and-file organizer
for UNITE and is considered an instru¬
mental liaison with the city’s Haitian com¬
munity in this campaign. “Talking to my
people,” he says often, placing a hand
over his heart and tilting his angular,
vaguely feline face.
Winding up her pep talk, Russo pre¬
pares to hand out manila folders bearing
lists of names, addresses, positions,
shifts, and whatever other information
organizers have been able to glean about
workers at several area nursing homes.
Two- and three-person teams will fan out
from Homestead to Fort Lauderdale to
announce the start of what is generally
called “the blitz.” For the next two weeks,
union campaigners will work around the
clock to make their presence and intent
inescapably clear, both to employees and
to management.
“When we’re out there, we have no time
to waste,” Russo concludes. “Remember,
our vision is to change the way nursing
homes operate in South Florida.”
When UNITE organizer Gihan Perera and
Lionel Laurat, a union member on leave
from his factory job as a sewing machine
mechanic, drive to northwest Dade late
on a Saturday morning, they know the 63-
year-old Haitian CNA they are looking for
wants to introduce a union into the Villa
Maria Nursing Center where she works.
And they know from talking to other
CNAs that she is respected not just for
her age and her fifteen years at the North
Miami nursing home, but also for her
great influence among her Haitian co¬
workers. Perera and Laurat’s mission is to
persuade her to bring others into the
union.
By now the UNITE organizers have
some idea of the floor plans and working
conditions in a dozen area nursing homes,
as well as who the best-known employees
are and what shifts they work, and how
sympathetic or unsympathetic their
supervisors may be to the possibility of a
union. This information, garnered from
conversations with workers and through
other channels the union doesn’t want to
make public, is the starting point for the
blitz. (While organizers obviously want to
avoid tipping their hand to nursing home
operators, they also fear the clout busi¬
ness interests have with the state legisla¬
ture, which periodically entertains pro¬
posals to limit access to public records.)
As the campaign progresses, computer¬
generated lists will be compiled and
posted at UNITE’s Allapattah headquar¬
ters. The lists, which contain the names
and addresses of workers, show who has
been visited at home. They also contain a
numerical ranking characterizing a
worker’s estimated level of support for the
union, and, most important, a notation
indicating whether she (or occasionally
he — there are some male nurses’ aides)
has signed a yellow card declaring her
intention to join UNITE. Depending on
the reception UNITE gets at the homes
initially targeted, Russo may decide to
concentrate more on one or pay less
attention to another. “We just cast a wide
net to see what jumped,” she notes about
the initial few weeks. “We really didn’t
know what to expect.”
Once 30 percent of the employees at any
nursing home have signed the cards, the
union can petition the NLRB — the fed¬
eral agency created in 1935 to protect
workers’ rights to organize unions — to
hold a vote. If the union wins a majority of
that vote, it becomes the official bargain¬
ing agent for all employees. (In Florida, a
right-to-work .state, no employee is
required to join a union, but any contract
negotiated by the union applies to mem¬
bers and nonmembers alike.)
Perera and Laurat find Yolaine (not her
real name) standing in the driveway of
her brown brick house. She wears an
ankle-length ruffled white nightgown cov¬
ered with a long pajama top, white socks,
and brown sandals. Perera, tall and thin
with short, neatly barbered black hair,
strides up and hugs the woman. “Hey,
how you doin’?” he asks. Yolaine smiles*,
wearily, and the trio files into her living *
room. g
“What’s going to happen if we sign the 8
cards and after that the management»
doesn’t want the union coming in, then i-
they fire people?” Yolaine wants to know. »
It’s illegal to do that, replies Perera. By ¿
law the workers have the right to orga-
nize. In any case, he adds, the union never 8
shows the cards to other workers or to
Continued on page 27 25
“There’s never been a better time
in history for nursing home workers
to organize than right now.”


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
28
MARCH MADNESS BLOWOUT SALE!
WE'RE MAKING
YOU AN OFFER YOU
CAN'T REFUSE.*
Right now cellular service from BellSouth Mobility is only $19.96 a month. And,
if you act now, we'll throw in 15 minutes of local night and weekend airtime every
month. You could also get up to 6 months of unlimited night and weekend
calling and waived activation. That’s a $50 value. So go ahead and call today.
P120
• 24 Number Speed
Dial Memory
• 100 Min. Continuous Talk
•Any Key Answer
NEC
• 100 min. ot Continuous Talk
• 9.9 oz. with Talk Pak Battery
• Signal Strength, Volume &
Battery Meter
<8>
i MOTOROLA
820
•135 Minutes Talk Time
•36 Hrs. Standby Time
• One Touch Dialing
• 24 Number Memory
NEC
TeleTac 200
• Up to 100 min. of Talk Time
and 18 Hrs. of Standby Time
• Super Speed Dial • Battery Meter
• 11.5 oz. w/ Talk Pak Battery
MOTOROLA
Free Leather Case With
All New Activations
TRADING
FULL WARRANTY, INSTALLATION & SERVICE CENTER
fflBHPSA • 9548 S. DIXIE HWY, SOUTH MIAMI, 6704440
l/Ration . kendall town & country center, 279-0440
NEAR YOU! • 1440 BRICKELLAVENUE, MIAMI, 377-044»
authorized agent of
@ BellSouth Mobility8
COUNT ON IT.
• BellSouth Mobility provides Autopie x®
System 1000 advanced digital Technology.
• BellSouth Mobility offers exciting new services
. like Prolink One Humber Service and Mobile
2 Mobile Discount Calling.
‘Now minimum 12-month service agreement required. The $19.95 Plan includes the first 15 minutes of off-peak airtime a month. Free Unlimited Night &
Weekend local calling available for three months with a new 24-month agreement and for six months with a new 36-month agreement. Activation tee of
$19.95 available with a new 12-month agreement Waived activation fee (regularly $50) available with a new minimum 24-month agreement Offer does
not Include cost of long distance and/or roaming or applicable sales tax. Offer good at participating authorized BellSouth Mobility agents and retailers.
Subject to credit approval and early cancellation lee. Not good In conjunction with any other offers. Limited time offer. Certain other restrictions may apply.
Providing Autoplex® System 1000 advanced digital technology. Copyright 1996 BellSouth Mobility. “ Advertised pricing requires minimum 12-montn
service agreement with Dick Anderson's Cellular Trading and BellSouth Mobility* on approved price plan.
305 - 530 ~ 5350
HOT!
SELECTED AS ONE OF THE
OUTSTANDING SCHOOLS
IN THE USA FOR ART DIRECTION
AND COPYWRITING.
MIAMI AD SCHOOL
^538 3193
UTH BEACH
Next quarter registration March 15
NEED A
CELLULAR PHONE
OR BEEPER?
NO CREDIT?
BAD CREDIT?
Pager Deal, One Beeper, One Year Airtime,
One Beeper Chain, One Free Month of Voice Mail
only S96.M Plus Taxes and Connection Fee.
1-800-799-7928 or 674-9030
407 Lincoln Road Suite# 12-N Miami Beach
Personal Checks Accepted
ALUMINUM FURNITURE
FACTORY OUTLET
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
S2031 N.E. 163rd St.. Metro Center
Phone 947-2143.
Open Mon. — Sat. 106*Sun 12-5
PEMBROKE PINES
8369 Pines Bhrd. Scotty Plaza
Phone: 438-8383,
Mon - Sat 1045 *Fri 10-8* Sun 12-5


United
Continuad from page 26
anyone connected with the employer.
Yolaine listens dispassionately, appearing
almost convinced.
Even before the blitz started, Villa Maria’s
management held what it called an informa¬
tional meeting — what the union called a
brainwash meeting. Workers said they
were told they’d lose their homes, cars, and
jobs if they joined a union. The 272-bed Villa
Maria, which the Catholic Archdiocese of
Miami bought two years ago from an order
of nuns, is one of three nursing homes the
archdiocese owns in Dade County.
Archdiocese spokeswoman Mary Ross
Agosta denies that Villa Maria administra¬
tors would threaten employees. Tensions
escalated at the nursing home when union
teams showed up to hand out leaflets and
talk to workers between shifts, and North
Miami police were called in to disperse
them. One morning a security guard threat¬
ened to turn a hose on the union advocates.
(At St John’s, another home owned by the
archdiocese, police were also called in, and
that nursing home’s administrator came out
to shoo away the union people.) Still,
Yolaine insists she’s so tired of the long
hours and poor pay that she isn’t fazed by
the Villa Maria administration’s tactics.
“I’ve been there fifteen years,” she says.
“And how much you think I get?”
“Ten, eleven dollars an hour,” Perera sug¬
gests, knowing full well the real answer will
be far less.
“Six-ninety. Last week they gave me a
thirteen-cents raise. They give us insurance,
but we pay $35 every fifteen days. It would
be $378 per month for my family; that’s why
I don’t put my kids in. But I got insurance
because I’m old.” Yolaine looks sideways at
the 25-year-old Perera, who’s sitting beside
her on a cushiony brown sofa. A teenage
boy and girl drift in and out of the adjacent5
kitchen, nodding politely at the visitors.
Yolaine smiles and smoothes her
uncombed hair. This is her only weekend
off all month.
She wakes up at 5:00 a.m. to arrive at Villa
Maria by 7:00, where she works until 3:00
helping residents — some of whom are
senile or mentally disturbed — do the
things they can’t do for themselves: dress,
walk, negotiate a bathtub or toilet, eat, sit,
get into or out of bed. She isn’t allowed to
administer medicine, but owing to staff cut¬
backs she sometimes must perform duties
that are normally the responsibilities of
licensed practical nurses. At any given time
she may be responsible for as few as eight
or as many as twenty patients, depending
on how many workers are on duty or, some¬
times, on the whims of her supervisors.
When her shift at Villa Maria ends, Yolaine
hurries to her second job as a CNA at Plaza
Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, another
nursing home in North Miami. She’s sup¬
posed to be there by 3:00 p.m., but her
bosses at Plaza give her a break because of
her schedule and allow her to arrive by 3:30.
After getting off work at 11:00 p.m., she
makes it to bed by about 1:00 a.m.
Before he leaves, Perera firmly places a
half-dozen yellow union cards (written in
Creole) in Yolaine’s hands. He wants her to
pass them out at Villa Maria and return
them to him, signed. She shakes her head".
“You know I can’t give it,” she tells him.
“You don’t trust nobody. I don’t want to do
that.” She confers in Creole with Laurat,
who then explains to Perera that the Haitian
CNAs are worried they’ll be reported to
management and are afraid even to discuss
the union among themselves.
“What if we had a meeting they could all
come to?” Perera asks.
“I don’t know,” Yolaine says doubtfully.
Perera protests gently, with no hint of
annoyance: “Unless you use your rights,
you’re not going to get any more rights. The
only way you’re gonna get a union there is if
all the people sign each other up.
Somebody has to stand up, and that’s you.”
Yolaine shakes her head. The men leave
some cards with her anyway. She may
change her mind in the coming days.
“She can sign everyone up in that place if
she wants to,” Perera remarks to Laurat as
they climb into his UNITE company car, a
light green Pontiac. “You can’t be easy, not
now. If you’re easy, you won’t get a union.
It’s difficult and not comfortable to push
people like that, but if you don’t, it’s not
going to happen.”
After a fruitless few stops (no one’s
home), Laurat offers to make lunch at his
North Miami apartment — a room in the
back of a house, actually — since they’re
already in the neighborhood. “Not much
food here',” he announces, slipping off his
black Calvin Klein baseball cap and ducking
behind a white curtain into his kitchen. He
returns with a large glass jar of confiture a
friend brought him from Haiti. He ladles the
thick, sweet brown jam — the product of
grapefruits and sugar that have been
cooked for hours — into Styrofoam cups,
then pushes a cassette into an ancient tape
player. The infectious, buoyant music of the
Haitian superstar Sweet Mickey immedi¬
ately brightens the dim room. On a tabletop
is an envelope addressed in flowery hand¬
writing to “Mon Amour Lionel Laurat” It’s
from his fiancée in Port-au-Prince, whom he
left behind in 1994. Laurat fled the country,
he says with little expression, a few days
after armed men burst into his family’s
home and shot to death his brother and his
mother. He hid under a bed. He assumes
the attack, was in retaliation for his family’s
support of Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s return to
power.
Once in Miami the 35-year-old Laurat
landed a job operating a sewing machine at
Bag Specialists in Opa-Locka, one of seven
local plants whose work force is repre¬
sented by UNITE. A few months ago he was
promoted to mechanic after receiving addi¬
tional training. He plans to study English
and possibly resume his pursuit of a law
degree, which he began in Haiti. Soon, he
hopes, his fiancée can join him here.
Monica Russo’s small corner office is
located on the second floor of a nonde¬
script gray building in working-class
Allapattah. The room is adorned with
scores of snapshots of union members and
union rallies and victory celebrations.
Continued on page 29
“It’s difficult and not comfortable
to push people like that, but if you
don’t, it’s not going to happen.”
’oelive'V **
gapping
State of Florida
Concealed Firearm
Licensing
Call For
Next Class
Florida Firearms
State Certified
Guns, Rifles and Accessories
"G” Armed Security Training
11060 Biscayne Blvd.
893-6500
South Beach
Surfside
BAYSIDE
MARKETPLACE
GENERAL NUTRITION CENTERS
Here's To Your Health America!â„¢
A Special
multiple
vitamin for
a special
woman.
You.
MET-Rx $36.”
anytime
Cats daw Root m stock (Uña de Gato)
GNC Melatonin - End 1/S price
SO% off with GNC Gold Card
Baysidc
401 Biscayne Stud.
378-7181
Open every day til lOpai
South Beach Surfside
540 Lincoln Bd. 9441 Harding Ave
538-9513 165-8443
Nightly til fpu
SendaystflSpa
betpt flnrstiys Jt Saptr
Táctil? Wipe
LARGEST ROLLERBLADE INVENTORY IN MIAMI
AUTHENTIC ROLLERBLADE®IN-UNE SKATES
* 1 SOUTH BEACH 726 LINCOLN ROAD MALL 532-1954
*2 SOUTH BEACH FIFTH STREET AND OCEAN DRIVE, 5324)054
»3 CLEARWATER 700 CLEVELAND STREET, (813) 445-1954
REMEMBER, WE WILL MATCH ANY SKATE SHOP'S PRICES NO QUESTIONS ASKED!
27
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


tt Hew Un»» March 14-20,1998
Bring the Light of a
New Dawn Into Your Home
Í -X- - T \ FUTON & FURNITURE ^
^ Contemporary Designs Classic Hardwood Furniture ^
^ Guaranteed! O
O Highest Quality & Lowest Price ^
8 CONE SEE ENTIRE SELECTION OF h
; FUTON FURNITURE ¿
Cj SOUTH MIAMI PLANTATION O
Í 5820 South Dixie Highway 801 South University Drive H
2 667-8830 4726044 g
FUTON • FUTON • FUTON • FUTON • FUTON • FUTON
UMhi )■ n (;> a <• * v-r t b r> ViI***»
American Dance Theatre of Miami
Enter two worids with American Dance Theatre of Miami presented in ADT’s trademark theatrical style.
Rhythm and improvisational tap explodes in Hot Tap/Cool Jazz with guest artist, The Great Jenny Lane.
Then experience the dramatic tale of ADT’s Rock Ballet “A Night At the Opera” as told through the
music of Queen. Tickets '17.50, '12.50 for seniors and students. For more information call, 552-0617.
With support of the Miami Beach Visitor and Convention Authority and the City of Miami Beach.
ini—. - 11?* , Buy Tickets at Sears, Spec’s Marshall’s, BlockBuster Music, Caches, Select Eckerds.
Or Call: (305) 358-5885 • (305) 523-3309 • («7) 966-3309 Ip
CONDOS FOR SALE
In the Heart of South Beach
From $64,900 Cali 535-3530
940 Ocean Drive, Suite 230, Miami Beach - Sales Office Open
UNIQUE BEACH PROPERTIES, INC.
, Sleighbeds
starting at
l$699.O0
84” Solid Pine Dining Table
Reg. $999.-Sale $749.00 Ȥfll v
42” Solid Wood Dining Tables from $199.00 ip& gt&S '
EVERYTHINGS IS ON SALE!
starting at
KxJIUKBíOp urniture
12475 S. Dixie Hwy • Miami • 238-5379
lours: Mon-Wed-Fii 10-8 • Tue-Thur 10-6 • Sat 10-5 • Sun 12-5
St. Patrick’s Day
Furniture Sale
The Original Finished and Unfinished Furniture Store.


United
Continuad from page 27
Hanging on the wall are two maps of Haiti
— gifts from workers — whimsical assem¬
blages of colored gravel and shells glued
onto paper to represent palm trees, boats,
and Haiti’s different provinces. There’s a
poster of the late labor organizer Cesar
Chavez, and one of Emiliano Zapata,
emblazoned with the Mexican revolution-
aiys famous quote: “I would rather die on
my feet than live on my knees.”
Russo was bom in Oxford, Pennsylvania,
to activist parents, both of whom taught at
nearby Lincoln University, the nation’s
oldest black university. According to
Russo, her father, a history professor, was
fired for starting a union at the school.
After graduating from Georgetown
University in Washington, D.C., in 1986
with a BA in history, she searched for a
union-related job while working as a secre¬
tary. “The Bakery, Confectionary and
Tobacco Workers Union [BCTWU] called
and said they were conducting some cam¬
paigns in the South and was I interested,”
recalls Russo. “I packed up my stuff and
drove to Georgia and never went back.”
Actually, she did go back north for a few
After a few years Russo movecf on Id work
for the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile
Workers Union (ACTWU), one of the few
unions at the time committed to organiz¬
ing in the South. Like most organizers,
she traveled constantly, and yet she still
was able to start putting down some roots
in Miami. She picked up Creole from the
Haitian garment and factory workers she
was organizing, and Spanish from Latin
American and Caribbean workers.
When UNITE was created last year
through the merger of two venerable
institutions — ACTWU and the 95-year-
old International Ladies’ Garment
Workers’ Union (ILGWU, originator of
the “Look for the Union Label” advertis¬
ing campaign) — Russo was named direc¬
tor of organizing for its nine-state south¬
ern region headquartered in Atlanta.
Currently she’s keeping tabs on five other
campaigns besides the nursing home pro¬
ject
She owns a two-bedroom A-frame in
North Miami, which she has decorated
with Caribbean art, mostly Haitian paint¬
ings and carvings. Union colleagues fre¬
quently drop by to strategize or socialize,
and there’s usually a house guest. Russo
“Monica makes sure she has a lot of
workers around her all the time. She
makes sure they’re the leadership.”
months, to Patterson, New Jersey, where
she helped unionize a Bagel Crisps fac¬
tory. It was her first time running a cam¬
paign, and she credits helpful rank-and-file
organizers from a neighboring English
muffin factory for its successful outcome.
seems always to be working, but her
deceptively informal, lightsome manner
makes it appear as if she’s putting on a
play at a small-town community center
rather than supervising a multipronged
organizing offensive.
Francena Sheffield is proud of her 31 years at Villa Maria,
but not of her pay
Despite her young age, Russo
is regarded in union circles as
one of the top organizers in the
nation. Those who have worked
with her credit her close associ¬
ation with workers as a major
factor in her success. “You have
the danger of a really charis¬
matic person becoming the
union,” cautions Allison Porter,
assistant director of the organiz¬
ing department of the American
Federation of Labor-Congress
of International Organizations
(AFL-CIO, the powerful
national umbrella organization
of labor unions, with which
UNITE is affiliated). “Monica
makes sure she has a lot of
workers around her all the
time. She makes sure they’re
the leadership. It takes an
incredibly unusual person to
succeed as an organizer, and
it’s unusual to have really
strong leadership qualities and
to be empathetic at the same
time.”
Russo is emblematic of a new
direction in the labor move¬
ment nationwide. Last month
at the AFDCIO’s annual execu¬
tive committee meeting held in
Miami Beach, she received an
award citing her “achievements in organiz¬
ing which provide a model to American
labor and a beacon of hope to working
people.” In a closed session before the
executive committee, Russo and two rank-
and-file members described their organiz¬
ing efforts in the South, the region tradi¬
tionally neglected by most unions and
only recently singled out for special atten¬
tion by the AFL-CIO.
Many saw last year’s election of John J.
Sweeney to, the presidency of the AFL-CIO
as confirmation of organized labor’s deter¬
mination to break with long-standing iner¬
tia and to change its old image as a corrup¬
tion-prone old-boy network. At the
executive committee meeting, federation
leaders announced an unprecedented com¬
mitment to pour $20 million into organizing
Continued on pago 30
jag n? jES«
Watercraft Center
Parts, Sates & Service
Free Estimate (Unless Tear-Down is required)
Pick-up & Delivery Available
Sea -Doo ‘93 XP $3995.00
94 Yamaha Wave Blaster Riva Pipe
IxGeJteflt£ggfflaE^^y^
95 XP 800 Limited Production
Rare 787R Engine $7995.00
and other usadas available
YAMAHA* J5G<\000- Kawasaki
SAVE IKE MANATEES ______ „ - ' ’ • JaEíS %' „
â–  700Lincoln Rd. Mall
S. Beach530-1330
SLOW DOWN IN MANATEE ZORfS Fax 53B-9G5G
Roam Where
You Want To
New Ronda Calling from AT&T Wireless Services
Anywhere you go in Florida you get the same rate on any digital calling plan
new digital subscribers
receive free monthly
access and unlimited
airtime free*
Also
Digital subscribers
receive Florida calling
at home airtime prices!!!
SAME STATE
SAME RATE
Hi AW
Wireless Services
Authorized Dealer
It’s Good To Be With AT&T
We're proud to be an authorized dealer
for AT&T Wireless Services providins the
products and services from the most
trusted name in telecommunications.
Coconut Grove • 445-2299
Restrictions Apply. Requires activation on AT&T’s D12, D13, D14 or D15 plan. Long Distance Charges Not Included.
IM ®
LULAR
3208 Grand Avenue
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
“The other side’d better watch out,
because immigrant workers are gonna get
power and things are gonna change.”
(Tñítecl
Continued from page 29
over the next five years with an emphasis
on heretofore largely untargeted groups
such as women, immigrants, and workers
in the South.
Union membership has been declining
over the last 30 years, from 28 percent of
the U.S. work force in 1966 to less than 15
percent in 1995, according to the federal
government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The current union-dues-paying proportion
of the work force drops to 10.4 percent
when government employees are
excluded. Under Sweeney, a white-haired,
pink-faced man who made his name orga¬
nizing health care workers in New York
City, the AFUCIO’s Organizing Institute
has a new lease on life: The six-year-old
training school for organizers now hás a
$3.3 million annual budget, up from
$350,000 in 1990. These days the empha¬
sis is on aggressive and innovative orga¬
nizing — personal contact and recruit¬
ment, broadening the membership base
— as opposed to concentrating on protect¬
ing gains made by workers in traditional
industrial occupations.
“In my opinion the whole ability of
unions to organize nursing homes and
other kinds of service jobs is really their
future,” says Ed Lawler, a professor at the
University of Southern California’s busi¬
ness school who specializes in the organi¬
zation and economics of labor unions. “If
they can’t succeed in organizing this kind
of workplace, they’re basically history.”
Bruce Raynor, executive vice president
of New York City-based UNITE, agrees
with Lawler in principle, and underscores
the significance of the current effort to
organize area nursing homes: “This is a
big and important effort.” The newly
merged union, with a combined $46 mil¬
lion in net assets, employs about 750 peo¬
ple and claim» 350,000 members in the
U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico. “[Nursing
home workers] need to be organized and
want to be organized,” Raynor adds.
As of last month there were 678 nursing
homes in Florida — 94 in Dade and
Broward alone — employing more than
180,000 certified nursing assistants,
according to the Florida Agency for
Health Care Administration, which
licenses CNAs. The nursing home indus¬
try in general — and in Florida in particu¬
lar — is growing steadily, with net rev¬
enues in the state rising from about $1.5
billion in 1990 to $2.5 billion in 1994. Yet in
contrast to other urban areas, South
Florida’s health care workers, for the most
part, remain un-unionized. They have
become a priority for many unions not
only because they represent a relatively
untapped and expanding field, but also
because federal and corporate cutbacks,
among other factors, have made workers
more nervous about job security.
“With the changes taking place in health
care, everything seems to be going to big¬
ger and bigger conglomerates, and that
creates uncertainty,” points out labor
attorney Dan Kunkel of Kunkel, Miller &
Hament, a Tampa law firm that has coun¬
seled the owners of three different Miami
nursing homes on how to counter
UNITE’s efforts. After a lull in union activ¬
ity in the health care industry, Kunkel and
other observers say, unions are attempt¬
ing a comeback. (Union-busting has
become a specialty of many law firms, who
are called in by savvy employers at the
first sign of union activity. Though UNITE
took pains to keep its campaign under
wraps until January, it didn’t take long for
word to leak out. Monica Russo has a copy
of an undated memo faxed late last year to
South Florida nursing homes by Kunkel,
Miller & Hament: “This newly formed
union has begun to target Florida nursing
homes. It cannot be emphasized strongly
enough the importance of ensuring that
you are prepared for a possible union
organizing attempt at your facility.”)
According to UNITE’s Raynor, who
oversees the union’s operations in nine
southeastern states, the situation for work¬
ers in area nursing homes is critical.
“Workers in South Florida are mostly
immigrants, some African Americans, who
are being exploited by an industry that’s
growing,” he explains. “Not only growing,
but budget cuts are putting more and
more pressure on companies who are not
going to sacrifice profits and so will sacri¬
fice their workers’ rights and welfare
instead. More so than in the past, employ¬
ers feel they can get away with violating
workers’ rights and pay low wages, some¬
how in the name of competition.”
UNITE’s broad campaign isn’t particu¬
larly unusual, but it does represent some¬
thing of a departure for this regional
office, whose major successes to date have
been at textile, manufacturing, and laun¬
dry operations. Russo says the nursing
home campaign developed over the past
few years, after her staff received com¬
plaints from workers and their relatives,
many of whom were referred by friends or
family already employed at a UNITE shop.
One CNA had been injured on the job, and
her employers were denying worker’s
compensation. Another, a supervisor for
fifteen years who was the only black main¬
tenance staffer where he worked, came to
UNITE, having been fired after training
the man who eventually took his job. A
CNA with a history of commendations was
fired after an argument with a relative of a
patient; the CNA claimed that she had
never been allowed to speak in her own
eautíñil Legs...Naturally.
There’s nothing natural about varicose and spider veins.
They are a medical condition which only worsens with time.
Age and sunspots also detract from your natural beauty.
At Guylaine Lanctot, South Florida’s oldest and largest
non-surgical varicose and spider vein treatment center, we’ve
been making women’s legs and bodies more beautiful for
over 25 years. There’s no substitute for experience.
Call for a free medical consultation and learn how you can
restore your natural beauty today.
Guylaine Lanctót
Cliniques
Aventura
"l9495 Biscayne Blvd
Suite 204
(305) 936-5347
South Miami
*6701 Sunset Drive
Suite 209
(305) 666-5347
*Se Habla Español
Varicose and Spider Vein Treatment
Total Skin Health
Boca Raton
2255 Glades Road
Suite 238 West
(407) 998-8869
Palm Beach Gardens
3300 PGA Blvd
Suite 310
(407) 624-5347
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR
ANY OTHER SERVICE OR EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.


defense and had been
forced to sign a paper
that later was altered to
state that she could not
work in any other nurs¬
ing home. When
UNITE organizers fol¬
lowed up on these and
other complaints, they
met long-time employ¬
ees who were earning
less than subsistence
wages. They also heard
of homes that failed to
pay overtime, of racial
discrimination and
favoritism, and of staff
cutbacks resulting in
increasingly heavy
workloads. It was no
coincidence, they con¬
cluded, that local nurs¬
ing home workers were
mostly women of color
— immigrants from
Caribbean and Latin
American countries as
well as African
Americans.
It’s this heteroge¬
neous, largely immi¬
grant, and marginal¬
ized work force that
makes South Florida as
formidable as any chal¬
lenge confronted by
organized labor — a
challenge to union peo¬
ple such as Russo to
think creatively, to try
different ways to coax
ethnic groups who
don’t necessarily speak
the same language to
act as a unified force.
“My experience until
about four years ago
has been organizing in
the South, in more
rural, small-town set¬
tings,” admits Russo, who
nonetheless is fluent in Creole, Spanish,
and Portuguese. “And organizing immi¬
grant workers in the city is a totally differ¬
ent ball game. I love it. To me this isn’t
about helping the helpless but about
empowering workers. And it’s very, very
exciting, especially
with immigrants
who’ve been so
dogged out, so
trounced. The other
side’d better watch
out, because immi¬
grant workers are
gonna get power
and things are gonna change.”
Despite the widespread reluctance — fear
is the word UNITE’s organizers use — of
Villa Maria employees to attempt to union¬
ize, UNITE teams assigned to the Hebrew
Home for the Aged and Palm Garden
Nursing Home, both in North Miami
Beach, have been welcomed with enthusi¬
asm. Their reception has been particularly
encouraging at the Hebrew Home, where
the firing in November of the CNA who
had exchanged harsh words with a
patient’s family member galvanized her
colleagues. There, UNITE workers are
signing up almost everyone they show a
card to.
At the same time, UNITE is bringing its
campaign to the general public, notably
the area’s Haitian and African-American
communities. Russo and other union
tioned the NLRB for
elections at Hebrew
Home and Palm
Garden and is waiting
for the board to set
dates.
According to Russo,
the press conference is
an important symbolic
gesture toward the
workers, a show of sup¬
port for their first steps
in a new and untested
direction. It’s important
for the union’s public
image, too, as UNITE
works to establish itself
not only as a viable
union but as a nursing
home workers’ union.
“It’s all about imagery,”
Russo insists. In addi¬
tion to the unfamiliarity
of UNITE’s name
among workers, its pre¬
vious successes in
South Florida have
been in fields other
than health care.
Competing unions and
nursing home admin¬
istrators have been
quick to jump on this
point “We have so lit¬
tle access to the work¬
ers, and the employ¬
ers have eight hours a
day,” Russo laments.
“We have to show
we’re a union actively
fighting for the work¬
ers. We have to define
UNITE as the union
for nursing home
workers.”
That will be expen¬
sive. Salaries for more
than a dozen organiz¬
ers (not all working at
the same time) and
union staffers (Russo
earns about $41,000 per year).
Compensation for rank-and-file volunteers’
lost wages. Travel. Meals. Rental cars.
Conference rooms and motel rooms.
Printing expenses for the reams of
leaflets, cards, and posters. UNITE execu¬
tive vice president
Bruce Raynor says it’s
impossible to tell how
much money the union
will spend on the entire
campaign because it
has no annual budget
per se, with funds allot¬
ted as needed. It
spends what it has to when it has to. And
the union can afford to foot the bills. “The
merged union has ample resources to go
up against any corporation in society,”
asserts Raynor. “No company is too big for
us. These unions have been around for a
long time, they’re frugal organizations,
they don’t pay people a lot of money, don’t
waste money, they made some smart
investments, and have a lot of assets.”
All that, he suggests, runs counter to the
widely held assumption that the U.S. labor
movement is dying. “I think there’s a
revival,” he contends. Others concur.
“When everyone said unions are dead or
declining rapidly, it was all totally true, but
something has happened,” explains
Stanley Aronowitz, professor of sociology
at the City University of New York and
author of several books on labor unions.
“It finally got to the point where unions
Continued on page 33
Rank-and-filé leader JoAinne Jocelyn and Russo await going on the air, taking the campaign
to the Haitian community via radio
members appear on several Haitian radio
shows, including Haitian-American
Democratic Club president Jacques
Despinosse’s Saturday talk show on
WKAT-AM (1360), where they discuss
UNITE’s position on various workers’ and
“We have so little access to
the workers, and the employers have
eight hours a day.”
union issues. Russo and rank-and-file
leader JoAinne Jocelyn are invited to
address the congregation of a Haitian
Baptist church. And some 50 union mem¬
bers and supporters march in the Martin
Luther King Day parade. Then on March
4, at a UNITE press conference called to
officially introduce the nursing home cam¬
paign, an emotional U.S. Rep. Carrie Meek
puts the first signature on a “Nursing
Home Workers’ Bill of Rights” petition. “I
may be a congresswoman, but I came
from the trenches,” Meek declares, her
voice breaking as she mentions her
mother’s back-breaking labor as a domes¬
tic, earning poverty wages. “I will do all I
can to help people know what’s going on
here.” CNAs from the three nursing
homes with the most active current cam¬
paigns — Hebrew Home, Palm Garden,
and Villa Maria — are present, and some
of them speak. UNITE has already peti-
Must be the
Stylists.
The Salon
announces the arrival
of Master Stylists
Javier & Alexis
The Salon
Doral Ocean Beach Resort
4833 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
532-4555
Free Valet Parking
Why do
so Many
Beautiful
Women
come from
Venezuela?
YAMAHA
IM'lJJ.H'l.UllJU'l,
1200 NW 57 Ave. Miami • Phone 264-4433
AioiopowmA.
a
Miami’s Finest Selection
of YAMAHA Motorcycles
& Personal Watercrafts
31
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


Hew Tima» Mreli 14 20,1996
OCEANFRONT
SOUTH BEACH-OCEAN DRIVE
SELLING OUT!
*
LIQUIDATED AT COST OR BELOW!
DROOMS START AT
The Best Value
32 OPTOwSjnIiy Oi^represerrtatkxi cannot be reBeduponas owraotty stating representatlops qtttte developer. For correct representations, mete referí to thls advertisement


Travertine
»6x 16
$2.50 sq ft '4,‘n
Shell Stone
16 x 16
$3.10 sq ft
Champagne
Limestone
16x16
$3.30 Sq ft
8
3012 NW 24th St. Miami
635-2996
Over 800 Shades to Choose From
We Carry:
Makeup For Ever from Paris
Neal’s Yard • J.F. Lazertique
Molton Brown
Eye Brow Shaping
Eye Lash Tinting
South Beach Makeup
Specializing In Customized Service
439Española Way •MiamiBeach
538-0805
ITH FLORIDA
lEPTitfsyows
ReptHe^JSSS
| |Arachnid§
¿Supplies
Sale
She
â–  RedStaroet
OH®"™*) 84 |
»l-95lTgoa
$1,00 Children
9:00 AM To 5d)0 PM
£all (3Sff98I-?15(
United
Continued from pafe 31
and union members were beaten down so
hard they finally said, "We’ve got nothing
more to lose, let’s try to turn it around.’
When you have no protection, a voice
telling you your job is down the drain,
your sense of despair and powerlessness
is acute. If you have the option to join a
union during a period of change, you’re
going to do it. The workers will fight even¬
tually, because at a certain point they say,
This is undignified’ — not just in an eco¬
nomic sense, but in the sense of who they
Francena Sheffield doesn’t express it
exactly that way, but she will tell you that
her low wages aren’t the only reason she’s
working so hard to bring the union into
Villa Maria Nursing Center. A large
woman with downturned eyes and black
curls that sweep up to the top of her head,
Sheffield has been a CNA at Villa Maria
for 31 years. She refuses to talk about her
wage, saying it makes her too angry.
“Years back I could work for less money
and be happy,” she allows. “But now
you’re harassed. It don’t seem like you do
enough. [The former management] would
always call us together and talk to us to
get our opinion before they did some¬
thing, but now these people send out a
memo. You don’t see them. It’s gotten to
the point where they call a patient a cus¬
tomer.”
Sheffield, who has lived in the same tree-
shaded yellow-brick house in Liberty City
since she and her late husband bought it
in 1960, heard about UNITE from a co¬
worker several months before the blitz
began. “I said, ‘Oh boy, we need it here,’ ”
Sheffield recalls. Since then she has
accompanied organizers on house calls to
fellow Villa Maria CNAs and handed out
union cards on her 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
shift. “When you talk to people, right away
they say the union’s no good,” she
explains, the black pen she uses at work
still lodged in her curls. “They are really
frightened, because the administration
told them, ‘If you sign you’re gonna lose
your job, you’re gonna lose your house
and car.’ I say, ‘That’s not right — it’s
against the law for them to say that,’ but
still they’re afraid. I say, ‘I’m 60 years old,
I’m ready to walk out the door, but I want
you to make a good living and get some
respect.’ I say, ‘If it was not good, I would
not take it.’ A lot of them say, ‘Okay,
Sheffield, if you think so. Let me think
about it’ ”
But archdiocese spokeswoman Mary
Ross Agosta says that Villa Maria’s admin¬
istration would never indulge in such tac¬
tics. “Never, ever would that be the
church’s approach,” asserts Agosta.
“We’re a pastoral organization and we sup¬
port their rights to join a union. However,
we’re concerned about what it means to be
unionized. We have people who need their
paycheck, and they have to understand
that if they’re in a union, they may have to
walk off the job because of something hap¬
pening somewhere else to support what
their union brothers and sisters are doing.
We’re trying to keep the lines of communi¬
cation open so that if anybody has any
questions, the supervisors and administra¬
tors are available to answer them.”
From the beginning of the campaign,
UNITE has taken a somewhat different
tack with the archdiocese’s homes, a con¬
ciliatory strategy that includes a meeting
scheduled for earlier this week between a
committee of workers and union leaders
Continued on paje 34
Premier
Gat's II
B mm -m â„¢ SHU W Original Formula
C ^BwjtiAJ p at 90 Potent Tablets
CÉÜB of 500 Milligrams
Recent studies at various international Universities suggest the Uncaria
Tomentosa Willd DC or “Cat’s Claw”, a plant cultivated in the Andes, can
be useful in the treatment of Cancer, Arthritis, Allergies, Ulcer,
Irregularities of the Menstrual period, those affected by the AIDS virus and
many other conditions. Premier brings the bark extract directly from Peru,
to be processed here in the States, to guarantee the best quality.
"I agreed to endorse premier
vitamins because I finally found
a line of products that work.
Premier Cat's Claw*> helped
alleviate the arthritis that was
developing in my broken wrist which
was caused in part from some
accidents that occurred during the
filming of my show "Chips".
Since Premier Cat’s Claw-
uses only the purest ingredients and
the latest technology, they can
deliver a product you can feel
good about using, and the results...
They're great!"
To order by phone
call 1-800-999-3535
A donation to support AIDS
research will be made for every
bottle sold with this ad.
As a dietary supplement take three to four
tablets dally or as directed by a physician.
Vitamins Corporation
AVAILABLE AT
. and Other Fine Health Food Stores -
GENERAL NUTRITION CENTERS
Here's To Your Health, America!
” GNC
“ -PRODUCT
**.. CODE 20951
33


New Times March 14 â–  20,1996
a
LEVI’S *9*
LEATHER JACKETS
\CE TO SHOP FOR THE HIPPIE LOOfe f \ % j
â– BEST PLACE TO SHOP FOR THE HIPPIE Lift
â– m times m
COWBOY BOOTS
POLYESTER SHIRTS $8.95
SILVER JEWELRY, WATCHES
HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
TV MOVIE RENTALS
OVERALLS-ARMY
☆KIDS LEVIS 5.00 .
Dm DERM0TS
1436 NE 163rd St. *940-1587
MON-SAT 9:30-7:30* SUN By Appt Only
54
arid Cuarteto Cubano
. .the greatest pianist I have heard in
more than a decade.”
Dizzy Gillespie, 1989
WEDNESDAY
APRIL 10th, 8:00PM
Gusman Center
Traccr^AgTTgg? 358-5885
Gusman Box Office 372-0925
United
Continued from page 33
and top church officials. UNITE seeks
Wenski’s counsel and encouragement con¬
cerning its campaign. And while he’s not
directly concerned with the church’s nurs¬
ing home operations, he can influence poli¬
cymaking at the homes. UNITE’s ultimate
goal is simply to build support within the
archdiocese for what the union contends
has always been the church’s pro-union
position. Enough support, in fact, that the
archdiocese would agree to voluntarily rec¬
ognize UNITE as bargaining agent for the
nursing home employees, instead of the
union taking the more direct, antagonistic
approach of petitioning for an election.
Russo and her staff have opted for this tac¬
tic even after having signed up 65 percent of
Villa Maria’s workers by early March.
“The Catholic Church has some responsi¬
bility to the community, unlike private cor¬
porations where there are no such expecta¬
tions,” explains Russo. “The archdiocese is
a nonprofit institution, and we need to make
them accountable to the community. We
feel optimistic they would respect workers’
rights to organize.”
However, in recent weeks it became evi¬
dent that the archdiocese would not be as
receptive as the union had hoped. After
some workers and organizers expressed
impatience at the slow pace of the cam¬
paign, and after the archdiocese hired
Kunkel, Miller & Hament, the Tampa-based
union-busting law firm, the union stepped
up its activity. In a letter and a video distrib¬
uted to Villa Maria employees, past and pre¬
sent statements by Catholic leaders, includ¬
ing Pope John Paul II, endorse the
worthiness of unions and the right of work¬
ers to form them. Additionally, UNITE has
distributed to parishes a petition that quotes
the same pronouncements and concludes,
“We join with the U.S. Bishops who believe
these teachings of our Church also apply to
workers in Catholic institutions such as
[name of the home] owned by the Catholic
Archdiocese of Miami.”
But UNITE still has not petitioned the
NLRB for a vote. Cassandra Davis, lead
organizer at Villa Maria, admits to being
somewhat apprehensive when she learns
that two ex-labor organizers who now con¬
sult for Kunkel, Miller & Hament have
begun meeting with workers at the home;
not only that, but she’s concerned about
steps management has taken to pacify long¬
standing employee grievances, such as
removing an unpopular supervisor. Both
are classic moves companies use to derail
unions. “I’ve never run a campaign lasting
this long,” Davis worries. “These guys are
getting ready to knock us out of the box if
we don’t take some kind of action. Some of
the women [workers] say, T don’t want to
go against the archdiocese like that’ I say,
‘Listen, the archdiocese is not Jesus Christ
and they don’t walk on water.’ ”
Even as Davis, Russo, and Villa Maria
CNAs were preparing to meet with church
officials, UNITE organizing teams were
gearing up for elections at Hebrew Home
and Palm Garden, and making plans to
organize other area nursing homes. The
NLRB has set a March 21 election date for
Hebrew Home, and workers from other
homes, including Villa Maria, are volunteer-
ing to help with the campaign there.
Meanwhile, no one expects either an elec¬
tion or voluntary recognition of UNITE at
Villa Maria in the immediate future. “The
momentum takes us a different way each
day,” Russo enthuses. “We have different
time lines, a different rhythm for each home
we’re concentrating on, but it’s all part of
the bigger picture, which includes the
whole [nursing home] industry.” CQ
''Best Consignment Shop"
•New Times 1995
Liz, Claiborne jjlgfc
Perry Ellis .
Christian pSrarE*?
Cafyin Klein ^
Carole Little , *
Ann Taylor... \ \
I
Whether it's vinta casual ,and formed wear we Hhve it all!
Quality Consignment Clothing and
Accessories for Men & Women
fabulous Finds
Of MIAMI m A C H
1216 NcmifciigSy Dr. • Miami Bfeach 861-5299
Discover
your inner
knowledge
and find
your true
strength.
THOUSANDS OF YEARS OF
KNOWLEDGE - REVEALED.
KABBALAH
Free Introductory Lecture
Sunday, March 17,7:00pm
(English/Spanish)
(305) 692-9223
The Kabbalah ^ Learning Centre
Established 1922 Jerusalem
Director: Rabbi Berg
At the Promenade Shoppes
20695 Biscayne Boulevard, Aventura


SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
By Pregnant Women May Result in Fetal
Injury, Premature Birth, And Low Birth Weight.


New Timas March 14 â–  20,1996
The National Ballet of S|iain spins legends on Thursday
Jerry Lewis beats the devil out of Damn Yankees on Tuesday
National Ballet of Spain: One of Spain’s
top dance ensembles takes the
stage tonight at 8:00 at the Jackie
Gleason Theatre of the Performing
Arts (1700 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach). Presenting pieces set to the music of
great Spanish composers and to traditional
popular songs, the National Ballet of Spain
captures its nation’s passion and color in an
explosion of rhythm and movement Tie pro¬
gram features José Granero’s intense Leyen¬
da and sensual Bolero, artistic director Victo¬
ria Eugenia’s energetic Oración del Torero
and Chacona, and Curillo and Mila de Var¬
gas’s flamenco-inspired A Ritmo y a Compás.
Tickets range from $25 to $45. Performances
continue tomorrow through Saturday at 8:00,
with matinees Saturday at 2:00 and Sunday at
3:00. Call 673-7300. (GC)
Italian Renaissance festival: The garden of Villa
Vizcaya (3251 S. Miami Ave.) will be filled
with the lively sights and sounds of the Fif¬
teenth Century as it hosts the fourteenth
annual Italian Renaissance Festival this week¬
end. More than 250 costumed actors will
roam the grounds portraying commedia
dell’arte characters, while jugglers, minstrels,
and the flag-throwing team of Sbandieratori
del Palio d’Asti provide entertainment. The
festival runs from 10:00 to 5:00 through Sun¬
day. Admission is ten dollars (half-price for
38 kids under age twelve). Call 250-9133. (GC)
SOM Miami Expo: More than 50 art galleries
and dealers from the U.S., Australia, Eng¬
land, and Mexico offer three-dimensional art¬
works in a wide variety of media at the sec¬
ond annual Sculpture, Objects, and
Functional Art (SOFA) Exposition, taking
place at the Coconut Grove Convention Cen¬
ter (2700 S. Bayshore Dr.) through Sunday.
Among the works on view are folkloric pieces
by Mexican-American brothers Einar and
Jamex De La Torre. Throughout the event,
gallery owners, museum curators, and artists
will conduct lectures about jewelry and
ceramics. Admission is $10 ($16 for a three-
day pass). Expo hours are 11:00 to 8:00 today
and tomorrow, and noon to 6:00 on Sunday.
Call 800-561-SOFA (GC)
Dade County Vbuth Fair: The Dade County
Youth Fair and Exposition (10901 Coral Way)
returns with a new look and more attractions.
With twenty additional acres of land, the fair
features a revamped front entrance for
improved access (forget those red and yellow
gates!), a new Kiddieland, two renovated exhi¬
bition halls, and additional carnival rides. Fair-
goers can also enjoy live Latin and country
music and dancing, a children’s musical star¬
ring nine-foot puppets, an ice-skating revue,
wildlife and high-dive shows, and laser dis¬
plays, as well as arts and crafts and agricultur¬
al and horticultural exhibits. Admission is
seven dollars for adults, five dollars for kids
under age twelve. Fair hours are 3:00 p.m. to
11:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10:00
a.m. to 11:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday
through March 31. Call 2236070. (GC)
li—1 Waiting for Godot. In 1956 the Coconut
11 v Grove Playhouse (3500 Main Hwy.)
I opened its doors with the American
ri I premiere of Irish playwright Samuel
Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. Tonight
at 8:00 the Playhouse marks its 40th anniver¬
sary with a revival of the avante-garde work
considered by many to be the watershed of
modem drama. Reni Santoni (who plays the
recurring characters Poppi on Seinfeld and
Archie Solomon on NYPD Blue) and Luis
Avalos star in the roles of Estragón and
Vladimir, respectively. Tickets cost $35 for
Friday and Saturday nights, and $30 for
shows from Tuesday through Thursday, on
Sunday, and for all matinees. Performances
run through March 31. Call 442-4000 for
times and reservations. (GC)
Jackson Browne: Good politics don’t always
make for good albums, and no one knows
this better than Jackson Browne (well,
maybe Little Steven does, but who wants to
ask?). After releasing who knows how many
albums of slogan-slinging political dogma,
Browne has come out with Looking East,
returning to what he knows best mopey, self-
absorbed love songs. Of course, good as they
are, none of them can top quintessential loser
ballads such as “These Days,” “For a
Dancer,” and “Fountain of Sorrow.” Really, it
doesn’t matter: Any respite from the likes of
“I Am a Patriot’ is welcome, and most people
will be happy with the inevitable encore per¬
formance of “Running On Empty.” Browne
will be mixing the old and the new tonight at
7:30 at the Sunrise Musical Theatre (5555
NW 95th Ave.) with opening act Vonda Shep¬
ard. Tickets cost $25 and $35. Call 741-7300
for more information. OF)
Cirque Ingénieux: The circus enters the 21st
Century with Cirque Ingénieux, a perfor¬
mance troupe that combines new-age music,
colorful costumes, and state-of-the-art light¬
ing effects with pantomime, contortion, and
acrobatic innovation for a dreamlike produc¬
tion that departs from the traditional circus
concept; they call it “theatre of the imagina¬
tion.” The Cirque takes over the Parker Play¬
house (707 NE Eighth St, Fort Lauderdale)
tonight through Sunday at 8:00, with 2:00
matinees tomorrow and Sunday. The produc¬
tion features a special performance by
Mylaine Mays, a nine-year-old South Florida
girl who is HIV-positive. Tickets cost $35 and
$50 (proceeds benefit the Children’s AIDS
Network). Call 764-0700.(GC)
e Conjunto Cespedes: More spiritual
leader than frontwoman, Gladys
“Bobi” Cespedes combines Santería
chants with the syncopated dance
rhythms of son. At times somber, at
times celebratory, Cespedes’s rich singing
conveys the AfroTuban duality of her native


â–¡ Damn Yankees: Legendary comic
actor Jerry Lewis puts in the most
1 devilish performance of his career as
he stars in the National Touring
Company’s production of Damn
Yankees, which opens tonight at 8:00 at the
Jackie Gleason Theatre of the Performing
Arts (1700 Washington Ave., Miami Beach).
After more than 50 years in show biz, Lewis
made his Broadway debut last year in the the
role of Mr. Applegate (the Prince of Dark¬
ness in disguise). Performances continue
tomorrow through Saturday at 8:00, and Sun¬
day at 7:00, with 2:00 matinees on Saturday
and Sunday. Ticket prices range from $32 to
$47. Call 673-7300. (GC)
Wednesday
Robert Thiele: Robert Thiele is not
exactly a painter or a sculptor, but
rather an artistic hybrid. He cov¬
ers his small, oddly shaped can¬
vas objects and his works on
paper with strongly concentrated paints to
create intimate, brightly colored gems. His
brush strokes lend both his two- and three-
dimensional works texture and movement.
Thiele’s works are on view at Fredric Snitzer
Gallery (1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral
Gables) through March 27. Admission is free.
Gallery hours are 10:00 to 5:00 from Tuesday
through Saturday. Call 448-8976. (GC)
IllHi ffmHiffftPO
to a memorable visual crescendo in the now-
famous hall of mirrors scene. To fully appre¬
ciate the film, one should see it on the big
screen. Hey, you’re in luck. Today at noon
Cinema Vortex will show The Lady from
Shanghai at the Alliance Cinema (927 Lin¬
coln Rd., Miami Beach). Admission is four
dollars. Call 531-8504. (MY)
Conjunto Cespedes plays Cuban soul muslo on Saturday
Cirque Ingénleux sends In the clowns on Friday
| Ray Fisher: Photographer Ray Fisher
J has spent 50 years capturing the
Q' % images of hundreds of the world’s
I most notable individuals. In addi-
—J tion to snapping shots of everyone
from boxer Joe Louis (while Fisher was still
in high school) to Gen. George Patton
(while Fisher was working as a combat pho¬
tographer in the Signal Corps) to boxer
Muhammad Ali and Fidel Castro (while
Fisher was free-lancing for Time), Fisher
has also photographed Miami’s best and
brightest. “Miami’s Movers and Shakers,”
on view at the Historical Museum of South¬
ern Florida (101 W. Flagler St.) through
April 7, features 121 portraits of entertain¬
ers, sports figures, politicians, businesspeo¬
ple, and other citizens who have shaped
Miami since the Forties. Museum hours are
10:00 to 5:00 from Monday through Satur¬
day (to 9:00 on Thursday), and noon to 5:00
on Sunday. Admission is four dollars for
adults, two dollars for kids under twelve.
Call 375-1492. (GC)
The Calendar is written by
Judy Cantor,
Georgina Cárdenas, John Fioyd,
and Michael Yockel.
For more listings, turn the page
On Friday, Jackson Browne sings songs of love and politics
culture: This is Cuban soul music. Bobi —
who left Cuba for California in 1960—found¬
ed Conjunto Cespedes in 1981 along with her
brother Luis and her nephew Guillermo.
Since then the group has expanded to
include twelve musicians (they hail from all
over the place — U.S., Chile, El Salvador,
Puerto Rico, Mexico, and Cuba). Una Sola
Casa and Vivito y Coleando, their two albums
on Xenophile Records, have garnered inter¬
national critical acclaim. Hear why tonight at
8:00 when Conjunto Cespedes performs out¬
doors, courtesy of the Miami Light Project,
on the roof of the Sony Building (605 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach). Admission is $18. Before
the concert, at 6:00, ticket holders are invited
to partake of free dance lessons and cock¬
tails. Earlier in the day, take the kids to the
Center for the Fine Arts (101W. Flagler St)
for a family concert by Conjunto at 11:30 a.m.
Tickets cost three dollars for kids and seven
dollars for adults. For more information call
531-3747. (IC)
Sister Machine Gun: Sister Machine Gun’s
third album Burn is possibly one of 1995’s
most aptly titled records. Led by former Wax
Trax! Records mailroom boy and one-time
Die Warzau keyboardist Chris Randall, Sister
Machine Gun is at the forefront of the new
industrial movement, incorporating funk,
soul, and noise into a solid, darkly aggressive
electronic mix. Tonight SMG sears the stage
at Nemesis (627 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Laud¬
erdale) with labelmates Gravity Kills opening
the show. Admission is eight dollars. Show¬
time is 12:30 a.m. Call 768-9222. (GC)
Maynard Ferguson: No one will ever accuse
Maynard Ferguson of being the most subtle
trumpet man on the planet, but what he may
lack in stylistic nuance he compensates for
by the sheer power of his playing. He’s been
blowing the hell out of trumpets — and
fltigelhoms, baritone horns, and valve trom¬
bones — since the late Forties, when he per¬
formed with the big bands of Boyd Raeburn
and Stan Kenton. After recording some tra¬
ditional jazz offerings in the Fifties and Six¬
ties, Ferguson ventured into pop and jazz-
rock, releasing a string of popular albums
that includes Carnival and two M.F. Horn
sets. These days Ferguson’s fronting his
Big Bop Nouveau Band, which will be play¬
ing tonight at the Coral Gables Congrega¬
tional Church (3010 DeSoto Blvd.) at 8:00.
Tickets cost $20 and $25. Call 448-7421 for
more information. QF)
Hialeah Park: The old gray mare ain’t
what she used to be, and yet Hialeah
Park remains one of the nation’s
great thoroughbred racetracks, not
so much for the caliber of its sport,
which has diminished in recent years, but
rather for the sheer grandness of the place.
Simply by existing, it pays mute tribute to a
time when horse racing enjoyed an elevated
status in our collective consciousness. Dur¬
ing its 1996 season, which opens today and
runs through May 22, Hialeah Park (2200 E.
Fourth Ave., Hialeah) will host a bevy of
important stakes and handicap races, includ¬
ing the Widener (March 23), the Flamingo
(April 6), and the Hialeah Turf Cup (April
20). Post time for the first race each day is
1:15. Admission is four dollars (clubhouse)
and two dollars (grandstand) on weekends,
two dollars (clubhouse) and one dollar
(grandstand) on weekdays. Call 885-8000 for
more information. (MY)
Are You There?'. Mojazz Cafe (928 71st St.,
Miami Beach), the area’s premiere jazz
club, makes the move into theater with a
production of Are You There? A Hip History
Lesson Based on the Words and Stories of
Lord Buckley. Off-Broadway actor and come¬
dian Frank Speiser (best known for his one-
man show The World of Lenny Bruce) stars
as “Lord” Richard Merrill Buckley, a satiric
comedian who appeared regularly on the
Steve Allen Show and the Ed Sullivan Show
in the Forties and Fifties, in this bebop cele¬
bration of comedy, history, and Beat poetry.
Tickets cost ten dollars for a table, seven for
a seat at the bar. Showtimes are 8:30 and
10:30. Call 865-2636. (GC)
The Lady from Shanghai. Orson Welles pro¬
duced, directed, scripted, and starred in this
quirky 1947 murder mysteiy about an Irish¬
man (Welles) who hooks up with a married
couple (Rita Hayworth and Everett Sloane)
on a Pacific cruise. But for many cineastes,
the film’s charms lie not in its story line, but
instead in cinematographer Charles Lawton,
Jr.’s atmospheric camerawork, which builds
I
i
i
St
i


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
I â– â– â– â– â– **]
Are you still
hanging around
on
waiting to get (
the Internet?
Sign on with Safari Internet. While other online services
have as many as 20 subscribers per modem, Safari has a
low subscriber to modem ratio, so you can get on right
away. Our state-of-the-art equipment makes Safari's
service one of the fastest, most reliable and available.
We offer unlimited access to the Internet for just
$24.95 per month. Safari Internet also offers:
•The most preferred software,Netscape Navigator
Personal Edition free; a $39.95 retail value.
• Free seminars to help learn how to get on and
use the Internet.
• No hourly fees or surcharges.
• No setup fee.
• Your own E-mail address.
• Space for your personal web page.
• Maximum reliability.
• More than 5,000 Usenet news groups.
• User friendly graphical interface, just point and click.
So what are you hanging around for? Sign on right away with Safari Internet. Call (954)537-9550.
1149 N. Federal Hwy.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304
Voice: (954^537-9550
(800)411-8167
sales@safari.net
STRATOGEN HEALTH
OF
MIAMI BEACH
comprehensive and compassionate
medical treatment and care
for
HIV/AIDS
Lori Bell, Acupuncture Physician
Fabian Escobar, Licensed Massage Therapist
Tom Fought, R.N., B.S.N., Clinical Coordinator
Patrece Frisbee, Doctor of Chiropractic
Susan Luck, R.N., Health Educator
Joseph Piperato, M.D., Primary Care Physician
David Schmitt, M.D., Medical Director
Melanie Walgren, R.D., L.D.N., Nutritionist
Stratogen Health of Miami Beach
300 Arthur Godfrey Road, Suite 200
Miami Beach, Florida
305-538-1400
SUPERCUTS
$2.00
OFF
Reg. $10.00
Valid only at
Miami Beach Location
14th dhd Washington
531-8575
OPEN 7 DAYS
Call Ahead Service
Not valid with any other offer
exp. 3/96
We accept dll competitors coupons
One of the folk scenes most talented writers...
CHRISTINE
LAVIN
returns to Bailey Hall with an evening of her
insightful and humorous story-songs.
March 22 • 8pm • Tickets $ 16
Enjoy a delicious TONY ROMA'S chicken
& rib dinner at Bailey Hall before the IbNYROMAS
show. Only $7.50 with purchase of one (-famous rm ribs-)
adult ticket.
BOX OFFICE (954)475-6884
nr PAT T • (305) 358-5885
Ur 1,/ILL. (305) 523-3309
AvMed
BROWARD
| COMMUNITY
COUEGE
1AILLY
3501 Southwest Davie Road, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33314
r awp i AQ/ Bring this ad to the box office for a 10% discount to any evening performance.
9iAw C lw/0 Limit 4 tickets per show. Not accepted atTicketMaster outlets.
Laser Treatment for
Wrinkles & Facial scars
Cosmetic Skin Resurfacing
with the revolutionary
ULTRAPULSE CARBON
DIOXIDE LASER***
the scientific answer for wrinkled,
scarred, sun damaged skin.
YOUR SKIN CAN LOOK BETTER
Free consultation.
Lance P. Raiffe, M.D.
Diplómate
American Board of Plastic Surgery
4302 Alton Road, Suite 620, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
305.538.8658
38


m
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, Mew Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Music
Thursday March 14
Bayfront Park After Dark: The Miami Lakes High School
Band performs favorite tunes. Free. 6:30 p.m. South
End Amphitheater, 301 Biscayne Blvd; 358-7550.
Dora Koutelas: Young soprano Koutelas performs works
by Schubert, Wolfj R Strauss, Puccini, Verdi, and
Wagner, among others. Free. 7:30 p.m. MDCC
Wolfeon Campus auditorium, 300 NE 2nd Ave;
758-8701.
Lively Lunchtime Music Series: Lunchtime on Lincoln
Road takes a musical turn with weekly concerts;
today’s program features internationally renowned
Latin jazz pianist Paquito Hechavarria and the Heart
Quartet Free. Noon. Lincoln Road and Euclid Avenue,
Miami Beach; 531-3442.
Montreal Symphony Orchestra: Viola player Yuri Bashmet
joins music director Charles Dutoit and the orch to
perform Adams’s Short Ride in a Fast Machine and
Mahler’s Symphony no. 1 in D major (Titan), among
other selections; WTMI-FM (88.1) program director
Lyn Farmer will lead a pre-concert discussion about
“Post-Romantic Progression*’ at 7:15. $20-$70. Concert
begins at 8:00 p.m. Dade County Auditorium, 2901W
Flagler St; 532-3491.
NWSA Jazz Combo: The New World School of the Arts’s
jazz ensemble performs favorite selections. Noon.
Free. 1221 Brickell, 1221 Brickell Ave; 536-1221.
A Page of Ellington: Jazz vocalist Ronnie WeQs and the
Nathan Page Quintet perform favorite songs by Duke
Ellington. $20.8:00 p.m. 110 Tower, 110 SE 6th St, 7th
fl, Ft Lauderdale; 524-0805.
Symphony of the Americas: Violinist Christos Galileas and
guest conductor Kosmas Galileas join the orch to
perform Paganini’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra,
Dvofák’s Symphony no. 9 (From the New World), plus
a premiere work by a Greek composer. $19.8:15 p.m.
Broward Center, 201SW 5th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
561-5882.
Friday, March 15
Jackson Browne: See “Calendar.”
Arturo Fuente: Flamenco guitarist Fuente performs as
part of the CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 7:00 p.m.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove; 444-0777.
The H Hites: The campus’s show chorus performs songs
from Runyon’s Guys and Dolls and other works. $7.
Noon and 8:00 p.m. Lehman Theatre, MDCC North
Campus, 11380 NW 27th Ave; 237-1431.
Magda Hiller: This local vocalist—voted “Best Solo
Vocalist” by New Times for three years running—
performs bluesy, gutsy originals. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Borders Books and Music, 19925 Biscayne Blvd,
Aventura; 9354X127.
The Uffey Folk: James Kelly, Patrick Kelleghan, and
Jennie Klein perform Irish songs. Free. Tonight at 8:00
at Borders Book Shop (9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800)
and tomorrow at 2:00 at Barnes & Noble Bookstore
(7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292).
NWSA Rute Quartet The New World School of the Arts’s
flute ensemble performs classical selections. Noon.
Free. One Brickell, 801 Brickell Ave; 667-0808.
Opera Master Class: Soprano Evelyn Lear and baritone
Thomas Stewart offer a two-hour class on vocal
techniques, body language, and interpretation. Free.
7:30 p.m. Arturo di Filippi Education^ Center, 1200
Coral Way, 854-1643.
Nicole Yarling: Local violinist Yarling performs tonight at
9:00 at Borders Books and Music (2240 E Sunrise
Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 954-5660358) and Wednesday at
7:00 as part of the free CocoWalk Concert Series at
CocoWalk (3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove;
4440777).
Saturday, March 16
Billy Ross Quartet The quartet performs as part of the
Jazz and Java series. $8.8:00 p.m. Art and Culture
Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St, Hollywood;
921-3274.
Blues Express: This blues band performs as part of the
CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 7:00 p.m. CocoWalk,
3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove; 444-0777.
Copjunto Cespedes: See “Calendar.”
Maynard Ferguson: See “Calendar.”
New World Symphony: Guest conductor-cellist Lynn
Harrell leads the orch to perform Berlioz’s Roman
Carnival Overture, Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C major,
and Beethoven’s Symphony no. 2 in D major. $16$43.
Tonight at 8:00 and tomorrow at 3.*00 p.m. Lincoln
Theatre, 555 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 673-3331.
AMs Pheromone: Palm Beach-based singer-songwriter-
guitarist Pheromone performs original tunes for kids
and adults alike. Free. 2:00 p.m. Miami Lakes Branch
library, 6699 Windmill Gate Rd, Miami Lakes;
822-6520.
Richard Brookens and Yellow Bell: This band combines
the latest musical technology with traditional ethnic
folk instruments for an eclectic sound. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Borders Books and Music, 3390 Mary St, Coconut
Grove; 444-2907.
Sister Machine Gun: See “Calendar.”
Ricky Skaggs: Country star Skaggs performs his hit
bluegrass-inspired tunes. $16$18.2:00 and 8:00 p.m.
Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 5555 N Federal
Hwy, Ft Lauderdale; 806987-9818.
Werther.The Florida Grand Opera presents jules
Massenet’s tragic tale of love and loss set in the late
Eighteenth Century (performed in French with
projected English translations). $18-$100. Tonight and
Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Dade County Auditorium, 2901W
Flagler St; 854-7890.
Sunday; March 17
Davis and Dow: Julie Davis and Kelly Dow perform lively
jazz selections as part of the CocoWalk Concert Series.
Free. 1:00 p.m. CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut
Grove; 4440777.
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
Lupine Return
^-i Packs of wolves, which
have been seen roaming
A the French Alps after a 60-
By Steve Newman
year absence, are causing tension
between animal lovers and farmers
who fear for the safety of their live¬
stock. Seventeen wolves have been
counted in four areas of the French
maritime Alps since the animals first
reappeared in the region in 1992.
Scientists believe the wolves
were lured from neighboring Italy
(where their numbers are estimated
to be about 400) by easy prey,
including deer, chamois and wild
boar. But farmers say the wolves
also attack sheep and have been
spotted on the outskirts of villages
during cold snaps in the mountains.
The French government is trying to
determine “where the wolf will be
welcome, and where it won’t be.”
Chernobyl Danger
Ukraine warned that the
damaged nuclear reactor
buried in concrete at Cher¬
nobyl might explode unless mea¬
sures are taken to secure it. The
Interfax news agency reported that
Environment Minister Yuri Kostenko
said heat migrating from the nuclear
fuel in the reactor could build to a
critical level, causing “a thermic
explosion” with large quantities of
radioactive material sent into the
atmosphere. Kostenko said the
country does not have the resources
to deal with the situation, and needs
massive international aid.
Floods
n Torrential rains in Java
caused heavy flooding that
swept through two-thirds of
the central Pekalongan district, forc¬
ing 18,000 people from their homes.
Months of drought in Ecuador
ended with torrential rains and flash
floods in the south of the country that
killed at least seven people. The
inundations caused 60 homes to
collapse, and swamped farmland.
W, Australia 1 §£| \
For the week ending
March 8, 1996
.©1996 Chronicle Features
7
Earthquakes
Swarms of sharp earth¬
quakes shook parts of
Central America, causing
panic in capital cities, and killing one
child in northwest Nicaragua. Some
temblors were soundly felt in Man¬
agua and San Jose, as well as in
many other smaller communities.
Earth movements were also felt
in eastern Indonesia’s Biak Island
aftershock zone, Taiwan, eastern
and western parts of Japan,
Alaska’s Kodiak Island and in Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands.
Hokkaido Plume
~~mm Mount Komagatake
Jl erupted over Japan’s
northernmost Hokkaido
Island for the first time in 54 years,
prompting local villagers to flee the
area. Vulcanologists do not believe
that the small eruption, which
ejected a plume of white ash 500
feet above the crater, is a sign of an
impending explosive eruption.
Komagatake last erupted harm¬
lessly during 1942, but killed 20 peo¬
ple during a violent eruption in 1856.
Tropical Storm
Typhoon Flossy veered
suddenly to the south over
the open waters of the
Indian Ocean, missing all land
areas. It had been feared that the
storm would bring another round of
high winds and heavy rains to
cyclone-weary Madagascar.
Record Winter
Two more waves of heavy
snow in the northeastern
U.S. put the season’s
snowfall totals over record levels in
several locations. The 13th winter
snowstorm topped New York City’s
previous record of 63.2 inches, set
during the winter of 1946-47.
Another dumping of heavy snow
in Ukraine cut off dozens of towns,
disrupted the shaky national power
grid and blocked major roads. This
has been the country’s harshest
winter in decades.
Toad Invasion
>i
A plague of toads in central
Bolivia caused widespread
panic during the last 10
days of February, according to press
reports from La Paz. Three villages
near Cochabamba were overrun by
thousands of the amphibians, and
farmers in the area reportedly feel
that the onslaught is a sign of
impending tragedy. Radio reports
from the villages of Vinto, San Jorge
and Viloma said that the main road
connecting the region with La Paz is
coated with a thick layer of dead
toads, and that the stench is unbear¬
able. Children are said to be terrified
by the toads and unable to sleep.
Experts believe that weeks of
drought has forced the toads out of
their usual habitats into farmland in
search of water.
Additional Sources: U.S. Climate Analysis
Center, U.S. Earthquake Information Center
and the World Meteorological Organization.
~ CENTER
EUROPEAN SYSTEM
'Titulo A Cfneial
TCair fQtmtuttr Speeiaihii
Hair Today... Gone Tomorrow!
The Most Innovative
Permanent Hair
Removal System!
• Application of Gel
• 20 Minutes of Biothermal Application
• 8-15 Sessions
• Any Area of Face or Body
• Emerge Completely Hairless
• It's Forever
Permanent Hair Removal
5% OFF
|Any Individual Item exp 3/3i/96j
The Most Successful
EUROPEAN WAXING
System is Available ONLY at
Unikwax Center
• Painless Waxing
•15 Minutes
• Face or Body
• Special Waxes For Different Skin Types
• Ingrown Hair Treatments
[Ladies or Men European Waxing^
! 10% OFF !
^ Any Individual Waxing exp 3/31/96 j
1370 Washington Ave., Suite 302
Miami Beach • 531-7777
(Entrance on 14th Street)
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


Hew Times March 14 â–  20,1086
Carol E. Weingrod
M.D. P.A.
Diplómate American Board of
Psychiatry & Neurology
Specializing in
Anxiety
Depression
Sleep
Problems
Weight
Problems
Chemical
Dependency
Sc
Attention
Deficit Disorder
The Utmost
in Caring
Confidentiality
is Guaranteed.
975 41 st Street
Suite 308
Miami Beach
673-3101
GUARANTEED
BEST SKATE PRICE
INTOWN
Famous for our kids 50%
trade-in allowance
FREE LESSONS- Sundays tOam-Noon
S â– â–  sM SlrfllM* wl
10%OFF
al Skates***
afl Wheels** â– 
al Protective
I
Gear** I
â– 
jExp. «3096
The
Body...
THAT
DIETED A THOUSAND TIMES
WALKED COUNTLESS MILES
OVERINDULGED
WORKED OUT
WORKED OUT
WORKED OUT
Can Be Resculpted
For Consultation Call
Sam Gershenbaum, D.o.
Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery
One Turnberry Place, Aventura
933-1838
LIPOSUCTION
TUMMY TUCK
BREAST SURGERY
COSMETIC SURGERY
OF THE NOSE
EYELID SURGERY
FACELIFT
LASER SURGERY
COLLAGEN
SKIN CARE
Maryei Epps: Gospel chanteuse Epps performs as part
of the CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 8:00 p.m.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove;
4440777.
Robert Rozolc Florida Philharmonic violinist Rozek
performs favorite selections. $5.2:30 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274.
SL Patrick's Day in the Garden: Florida Philharmonic
cellist Robert Moore and his string quartet perform
traditional Irish melodies. $13.3:00 p.m. Fairchild
Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Rd; 667-1651.
Singout In the Park: Grab your guitar, harmonica, or
other acoustic thing and share your original works or
just sit back and listen. Free. 1:00 p.m. Secret Woods
Nature Center, 2701W SR 84, Ft Lauderdale;
563-3328.
Tuesday, March 19
Full Power Jazz Trio: Bobby Ramirez and his group
perform contemporary Latin jazz and R&B as part of
the CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 7:00 p.m.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove;
444-0777.
Wednesday, March 20
Florida Philharmonic Orchestra: Conductor James Judd
leads trumpeter Jaffrey Kaye and the orch to perform
Rossini’s La Scala di Seta Overture, Aratunian’s
Trumpet Concerto, and Rachmaninoffs Symphony
no. 2. $15-$60.8:00 pjn. Broward Center, 201SW 5th
Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 930-1812.
Theater
Aladdin and the Lamp: Aladdin meets the Genie in this
children’s version of the story from One Thousand and
One Arabian Nights. Ongoing. Matinee Saturday at
2:00. Stage Door Theater, 8036 W Sample Rd, Coral
Springs; 344-7765.
All in the Timing: David Ives’s witty, modem, and brain-
challenging collection of she one-act comedies. They
include Sure Thing, about two people who attempt to
get to know each other after meeting in a cafe;
Variations onihe Death of Trotsky, in which the
doomed Russian revolutionary copes with an ax he’s
discovered lodged in his head; and Philip Glass Buys a
Loaf of Bread, wherein the well-known minimalist
composer suffers from angst while in a bakery.
Through April 14. Evening performances Wednesday
through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinee
Sunday, April 7, and Sunday, April 14, at 2:00. Acme
Acting Company, Little Stage, 2100 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 576-7500.
Broadway: The Music of the '80s and '90s: John Raitt and
Jo Sullivan host a tribute to recent Broadway
musicals, including Cats, Crazy for You, Dream Girls,
and La Cage aux Folies. March 16 and 17. Evening
performance Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00.
North Miami Beach Performing Arts Center, 17011
NE 19th Ave, North Miami Beach; 929-6913.
Carousel: Reviewed in this issue. Rodgers and
Hammerstein’s poignant and melancholy musical tale
of Julie Jordan's ill-fated marriage to the irresponsible
Billy Bigelow, and the daughter he left behind when
he died. A dark and brooding revival by British
director Nicholas Hytner. March 12 through 17.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees Wednesday, Saturday,
and Sunday at 2:00. Kravis Center for the Performing
Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach;
407-832-7469.
Conversations with My Father Unremarkable
production of Herb Gardner’s cloyingly sentimental
1991 effort to explore the bonds between fathers and
sons. Through March 17. Evening performances
Wednesday through Saturday at 8:00; matinees
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00. Off
Broadway Theatre, 1444 NE 26th St, Ft Lauderdale;
5660554.
The Convertible Girl: Rod Goldman, who is Jewish, and
his live-in Catholic girlfriend Christina Donatelli
wrangle over kids, marriage, commitment, and
religion in this Daniel (brother of Neil) Simon
comedy. Through March 17. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday at 8:00; matinees
Wednesday and Sunday at 2:00. Broward Stage Door
Theatre, 8036 W Sample Rd, Coral Springs; 3447765.
Courage and the Magic Mirror Denise de Dragon must
find her courage in time to save the troubled kingdom
of WizzleWazzle Wuzzle Wuz in this children’s
musical performed by adults and written and directed
by James Michael March 16 through 30. Morning
performances Saturday at 11:00. Hollywood
Playhouse, 2640 Washington St, Hollywood; 9220404.
Damn Yankees: See “Calendar.” Funnyman Jerry Lewis
stars as the Devil in this hit Broadway revival which
features tunes such as “Whatever Lola Wants (Lola
Gets)” and “You Gotta Have Heart” March 19 to 24.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00, Sunday at 700; matinees Saturday and Sunday at
2:00. Jackie Gleason Center for the Performing Arts,
1700 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 673-7300.
Death and the Maiden: Ariel Dorfrnan’s searing political
drama about power and revenge. In Colombia, a
woman who was tortured for months while
blindfolded hears the voice of her former torturer in
her living room—her husband has brought home a
stranger who helped him change the flat tire on his
car. Through March 17. Evening performances
Friday through Sunday at 7:00. Imazari
Entertainment, RSC Respectable Street, 218 Española
Way, Miami Beach; 4464906.
Fish or Gut Bait A comedy by John Holleman about two
men stranded on a desert island who search for food
and water, wait for help, ponder the meaning of life,
and encounter a Danish sailor named Inga. Through
March 31. Evening performances Wednesday
Life in
Heuw
©m6
GROEJttNG
/pots Wl rlAkfcpN
l &OM ARouSfc /
\90V»/
E#
— Ü
91^
i
l
i
r
f KlOT A
1 RtACU'O.I
/wait a secT\
1 I F0C60T I
ISomethhogU
f, fa \
a
/ooh\
U.A PA.1
:


BOULEVARD BAR & GRILL • BIGA BAKERY • PUCCI PIZZA • VIRTUA CAFE
€ *1
NEXT WEEKEND!
The 9th Annual
Taste of the Beach
Saturday & Sunday, March 23rd & 24th
Hours: Sat. I1am-10pm â–  Sun. 11am-9pm
South Pointe Park, Miami Beach
ADMISSION!
ip
safe
Ü
Complimentary Shuttle from the
Following Lots:
17th Street Garage (17th &, Meridian).
17th Street & Washington Avenue.
18th Street & Washington Avenue
(behind City Hall).
Additional parking available at Collins Avenue & 7th &
14th Streets and at Southpointe Park.
rijMÉM
Live Continuous Entertainment on the
â– The Best of Miami
Beach Restaurants
â– Chef
Demonstrations
â– Ice Sculpting
â– Farmer's Market
â– Health & Fitness
Pavilion
â– Virtual Reality
â– Special Family
Area
fREPt
m stage
SATURDAY. 3/23
8:00pm
The Legendary WAR
6:30pm INHOUSE
m Also Miami 5-0
BIG 106
SUNDAY. 3/24
4:00pm
Jazz Extraordinaries
SPYRO GYRA
. Also, Dave Valentin Band,
Ed Calle & Terrance Blanchard
An Event for the Body, Mind & Soul
UEANNE’S MARKET • LES DEUX FONTAINES • HOTEL ASTOR • FOLIA


New Times March 14 - 20.1996
MARCH 15. 16, 17
PARKER PLAYHOUSE, FT. LAUDERDALE
Hollywood Productions
Fridays PRESENTS-
Saurday
Evening
Performances
SOLD
OUT
THEATRE OF THE IMAGINATION
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
THE EVOLUTION GROUP, INC.
BENEFITING:
Childrens Aids network National
C.A.N.N
CALL TICKETMASTER f 305.523.3309
11»PETERW.BUSCH K||j]fJQ ,/rj. Ackdfe?
Family Foundation I > II â–  Il|/UU O MOTOROLA Qutdooi*
<>!•* i*’i.ouii>a South Florida's Alternative ujpIMH • AdwH lisill"
Mm SHEÍ03! L>39 ••
<>!•* M,orida South Florida's Rock Alternative WDZL
LJAMiami-Dade
Mr W COMMUNITY COHEGE
North Campus
Looking for the
experience of your
life? Check this out!
You can now have
a BLAST and EARN
COLLEGE CREDITS at the
same time. Get with it!
Register now in the
Study Abroad Program
at Miami-Dade Community College
North Campus
Travel to ITALY, MEXICO, SPAIN and...
• soak yourself in the country's
exotic daily life
• experience outrageous cultures
and meet cool young people
• learn/improve Italian or Spanish
while visiting booming cities
• earn college credits at a price
you can afford
Cost: $1,500- $2,600.
Includes airfare, room/board, land trans¬
portation, and field trips Financial Aid avail¬
able for those who qualify
ITALY: July - Four weeks
6 to 7 credits
• MEXICO: July - Four weeks
6 to 7 credits
• SPAIN: June/July/August
Four and eight weeks
6 to 18 credits
Eligibility - one of the following:
• Graduating high school senior
• Holder of high school diploma
or equivalent
• University or college student in good
standing
Don’t lay low! Call 237-1304 today or through
the Florida Relay Service TDD at 1-800-955-8771.


through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees
Wednesday and Sunday at 2:00. Pope Theatre
Company, 262 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan;
407-585-3404.
Bay Amnesia: Jerry Radloffs new comedy about a
man who returns from a business trip to find that
his lover has been hit on the head by a two-by-four
and has forgotten he’s gay. Through March 24.
Evening performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00. Public Theatre of South
Florida at the Museum of Fine Arts, 1 Las Olas Blvd,
Ft Lauderdale; 568-2243.
The Brand Tarot A satire on the cosmic mysticism of
the Tarot, featuring roles for seventeen actors, by
the late Charles Ludlam, master of absurd camp and
founder of New York’s the Ridiculous Theatrical
Company. Ongoing. Evening performances,
Thursday, March 14 at 8:00; all other performances,
Friday and Saturday at 11:00. Florida Playwrights’
Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925
8123.
The Hope Zone: Florida premiere of playwright Kevin
Heelan’s most recent work, about family and
relationships and set on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.
March 14 through 31. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday
at 2:00. Hollywood Boulevard Theatre, 1938
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 929-5400.
John Barrymore: Confessions of an Actor: Carbonell
Award nominee David Kwiat performs his one-man
show based on the life of actor John Barrymore.
March 15 through April 6. Evening performances
Friday and Saturday at 8:30. 3rd Street Black Box,
San Villa Restaurant, 230 NE 3rd St, Miami; 381-
9613.
Keely and Du: Pseudonymous playwright Jane
Martin’s controversial drama about a young woman
seeking an abortion who is captured by anti¬
abortionists trying to force her to deliver her baby
against her will. Through March 31. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 3:00. New Theatre, 65 Almeria
Ave, Coral Gables; 4455909.
La Cafe am Folies: Jerry Herman’s buoyant musical
about the relationship between aging drag queen
Zsa Zsa and his lover, nightclub owner Georges.
Through May 26. Evening performances Tuesday
through Saturday at 8:00 (dinner at 6:00), Sunday at
6:00 (dinner at 4:00); matinees Wednesday and
Saturday at 2:00 (lunch at noon). Jan McArf s Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre, 303 Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton;
800-841-6765.
Low Letters: A.R. Gurney’s lovely two-character play
traces the relationship between a man and woman
from childhood to old age, through their letters to
each other. March 18. Evening performance Monday
at 8:00. Caldwell Theatre Company, Levitz Plaza, 7873
N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton; 407-241*7432.
Love! Valour! Compassion!: An excellent regional
production of Terrence McNally’s witty and
insightful 1994 Tony Award-winner is unabashedly
faithful to the Broadway original. Through March
31. Evening performances Tuesday through
Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00. Caldwell
Theatre Company, Levitz Plaza, 7873 N Federal
Hwy, Boca Raton; 407-241-7432.
Macbeth: Ambition, greed, murder, corruption, and
fate inform this great Shakespearean tragedy about
Lady and Lord Macbeth, who stop at nothing to gain
the crown of Scotland. Through March 31. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:30. Florida Playwrights’ Theatre, 1936
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Marjory: Novelist and University of Miami professor
Evelyn Wide Mayerson wrote this tribute (a world
premiere) to Marjory Stoneman Douglas, South
Florida writer and conservationist, who celebrates
her 106th birthday this April. Through April 28.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:30; matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at
2:15. Encore Room, Coconut Grove Playhouse, 3500
Main Hwy; 442-4000.
Mateoumbo: The Flight of a Pedro Pan: Mario Ernesto
Sánchez's play about a Cuban teenager who escapes
to Miami in 1962 with the help of the famous
Operation Pedro Pan rescue effort that brought
children to the U.S. from Cuba. Through March 31.
Evening performances Friday at 8:15 (in English)
and Saturday at 9:00 (in Spanish); matinee Sunday
at 3:00 (in Spanish). El Carrusel Theatre, 235
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 4457144.
The Pajama Barns: Although an enthusiastic cast
infuses with spirit this 1954 musical comedy—
about Sleeptite pajama-factory workers who love,
lust, and strike — a bit of snap, crackle, and pop
would have made it a more dazzling revival.
Through March 17. Evening performances
Wednesday through Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00. Actors’ Playhouse, Miracle Theatre,
280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-9293.
Rapunzel: Musical adaption of the Brothers Grimm
fairy tale about a sweet young thing with very, very,
very long hair who finds herself locked in a tower by
a wicked witch until, of course, a handsome prince
comes along to rescue her. Through April 4.
Matinee performances Saturday at 2:00. Actors’
Playhouse, 280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-
9293.
Salt-Water Moon: In a coastal town in Newfoundland
in 1926, young Mary Snow waits on her porch for
her flaneé until she’s interrupted by Jacob Mercer, a
former beau who left town without saying goodbye.
By Canadian playwright David French. Through
Ernie Pook's Comeek
by Lynda J. Barry
mmmmm
What woKe me up was tny Sister
Shouting "I Am not on drugsA//o
AtvyWAU WHATIF I AM?'/"toy brother
frtdéie, who does not tike shouting,
was already in ftly room, Si thing m
the dark at the end of my hunk bed
Saginq/USD. USD. LSD. USO. “
Why does tog Sister false drugs?
Carla wanted to take May bonne to
the hospital. May bonne said She
never felt better and happier and
more beautiful and her voice was
getting closer and Carla Said
* Don't wake them up/" /\nd my
Bedroom door came open and
my light went on and toy sister
Came in with her hands out. ■“ “
/ could See the moon through the
telephone wires through the wmJow
of my bedroom. The reason I looked
at it was because my sister was
Saying the moon understood her
and all the foster mother Carla nnrf
to do was look at the moon and
Freddie looked at me and his eye¬
balls Were glowing, he said
''Marlysf she said. "Freddie."she
Wanted to hug us Which was when
I knew the thing of her being on
drugs Was real. She kept Showing
US her hands. Her eyes were big
and black. Freddie Said, "Now
you know about the moot)." May-
bonne Said *i do, /do. "She looked
at my face and told me / was so
beautiful. She was scaring meso
bad. / S' not like drugs.


& New Times March 14 -20,1996
At Vizcaya
ARCh 14,15,16,171996
• the “Living chessqame" staged comBat
peRfonmed By the chessmasteRs d' Vizcaya
• Beautiful CRafts and aRts
displayed By meRChants
• singeRs and mmstRels fill the aiRe
with music
*juggleRs, mimes and stReet peRfORmeRs
wimm amuse and enteRtain
•food vendORSoffeRingdelicious
faRe to delight aLL
• SBandieRatoRi d'asti - flag thRoweRs
fRom asti, Italy
• adults $io* childRen $5l twelve and undeRl
villa Vizcaya museum and qaRdens
3251 south, miami avenue
•pResentedBythe
Renaissance histoRical society of floRida, inc.
♦ with the suppoRt of metRo-dade county cultuRal
affaiRscounciLand
BoaRd of county commissioneRs
• foR festival infORmation call I305I250-9133 ext. 3
pick up youR fRee pass to Ride metRORailhome
at the mfORmation Booth
NationsBank /llitalia
&WTMI
Entertainment
iPWS&yiTHS,
,rw if
.O^s Qrv.
RYDER
Truck Rental & Loasng
v
fitiami Hrratfi
March 17. Evening performances Thursday through
Sunday at 8:15; matinee Sunday at 5:00. Area Stage
Company, 645 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 673-8002.
The Shomer: A mother refuses to leave her
daughter’s corpse for fear that the daughter’s soul
will be taken before her body is buried. (Shomer, by
the way, is Hebrew for guardian.) Through March 25.
Evening performance Sunday at 7:00; matinee
Saturday at 2:00 (March 23 only). Public Theatre of
South Florida at the Museum of Fine Arts, 1 Las Olas
Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 568-2243.
South Beach - the Play: The 12th Street Beach serves
as the setting for this comic chronicle of life in the
playland we know as Miami Beach. Written by Jim
Tommaney and featuring four men and four women
in swimsuits playing six sunbathers and two
mysterious lifeguards. Through April 7. Evening
performances Friday through Sunday at 8:00.
EDGE/Theatre, 495 Española Way, Miami Beach;
531-6083.
The Virgin and the Bathtub: Staged reading of local
playwright Michael McKeeveris drama about a
wealthy German woman in 1938 watching the Third
Reich seize more and more power in her homeland
and wondering what to do about it Presented by the
Theatre with Your Coffee group. March 19. Evening
performance Tuesday at 8:00. New Theatre, 65
Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Waiting for Godot See “Calendar.’’ In Samuel Beckett’s
groundbreaking 1952 tragicomedy, Vladimir and
Estragón wait by a tree on a country road for the
imminent arrival of the enigmatic Godot, quarreling
with each other and making up, vowing to go
somewhere else but never managing to leave. This
production celebrates the 40th anniversary of the
American premiere of Beckett’s masterpiece at
Coconut Grove Playhouse, as well as the theater’s
40th anniversary. Through March 31. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:15,
Sunday at 7:15; matinees Tuesday through Thursday,
Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00. Coconut Grove
Playhouse, 3500 Main Hwy; 4424000.
Thursday, March 14
Israeli FBm Senes: Temple Beth Or, UM’s Judaic
Studies program, and die Israeli Consulate present
award-winning films that depict life in contemporary
Israel; this month’s screening features The Distance
(Hammerhak) (in Hebrew with English subtitles).
$10.8:00 p.m. Cosford Cinema, off Campo Sano Drive
on UM campus, Coral Gables; 235-1419.
Reel Work: The museum continues its series of artists'
films and videos of the 70s; tonight’s program, "The
Come On: Gender Roles, Seduction, and the Gaze,”
features works by Vito Acconi, Lynda Benglis, David
Salle, and others. Free. 8:00 p.m. Museum of
Contemporary Art, 12340 NE 8th Ave, North Miami;
8936211.
Video Rewind: The Louis Woifson II Media History
Center screens programming from its archives,
including recent Peabody Award-winning television
shows and Dade Heritage Day offerings. Free. 1:00
p.m. every Thursday and Tuesday. Main Library
Auditorium, 1Ó1W Flagler St; 375-4527.
Sunday, March 17
The Lady from Shanghai See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, March 19
FNm Alternative: FIU continues its classic film series
with the “Seven Deadly Sins” theme; tonight’s
programcelebrates anger with Sam Peckinpah’s 1971
film, Straw Dogs. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU North Miami
Campus, University Center 100, Biscayne Boulevard
and NW 151st Street; 940-5731.
Wednesday March 20
Cinema Wednesdays: FIU reprises its classic film series;
tonight’s program features Roman Polanski’s 1974
film, Chinatown. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU University Park
Campus, SW 8th Street and 107th Ave; 348-2461.
Events
Thursday, March 14
Dade County Youth Fain See “Calendar.”
Italian Renalssanoe Festival: See “Calendar.”
SOFA Miami Expo: See “Calendar.”
Taste of the Nation: Share Our Strength (SOS) hosts
this ninth annual fundraiser for the Daily Bread Food
Bank, Camillus House, and other hunger relief
organizations, featuring dishes cooked up by 37 of the
area’s finest chefs. $65.7:00 p.m. Grand Bay
Residences, 455 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne
¡MmoRte/Ze
Day Spa & Clinique
Everlasting Beauty
the holistic approach
To Maintain harmony, we
must find the material in
nature with a special affinity
to the particular skin function
which is out of balance. The
idea is to encourage the skin
to become active, to balance
itself.
448-5371 •59 Merrick Way
Ste. 202, Coral Cables.
Join us for a complimentary
FACIAL SAMPLER
(Dr. Haasdika Skin A Body Cara) |
50% Off
Cellex - C eye gel with purchase of
Cellex - C serum
GUSMAN
ALIVE!
Miami Dance Futures
“High School Dance Festival"
Friday, March 15 4pm & 8pm
Saturday, March lfi 4pm & 8pm
Call 237-3582
The Golddiggers
Annual Musical Variety Show
"I Need a Vacation”
Friday, March 22 -
Sunday, March 24
Call 4458833
Florida Philharmonic
“First Impressions”
Wednesday, March 27 8.*00pm
$55/45/30/20/15
Support A Child Int’l
presents a thought-provoking play
"Sound of the Kidnapped Afriken”
Saturday
March 30 8:00pm
® GUSMAN
CENTER
174 E.Flagler Street, Downtown Miami
for info, caü 37-GUSMAN
$4 Special Event Parking, fT]
2 Convenient Locations IÃœI
These events are sponsored with the support of the Metropolitan
Dade County Cultural Affairs Council ana the Metropolitan Dade
County Board of Commissioners


advanced
dermatology
State of the art Cosmetic Surgery
laser Resurfacing for Sun Damage
Wrinkles and Acne Scarring.
Laser for Blood Vessels-Sun Spots
Stretch Marks and Tattoos
Hair Transplantation • Facial Reeling
Sclerotherapy.
SRESNIK
HWATOLOGV
GROUP
Barry I Resnik. M D
Sorrel S. Resnik, M D
Snapper Creek
Professional Center
7800 S.W. 87 Ave„ Miami
279.6060
If you want the truth before
you waste your time.
I FILM CAPSULESl
NewTimes
RCHIDS
BRANCHING
PHALAENOPSIS
•FLOWERING
TOPIARY'S
INTERIOR PLANTS TO 8'
!• FINE SELECTIONS
OF HERBS
ÍOSES: ON FORTUNIANA
ROOT, ANTIQUES, CLASSICS,
AND HYBRID TEA
Family Run Since 1959
CORNELL'S NURSERY
17091 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami Beach • Next to Porch & Patio
REG#00728000 947-4454 • Open 7 Days
Village
futon
270 MW 27th St.
Miami
576-27$$
, 719 5th St
Vjfi Miami Beach
2035 NE 163rd st.
N. Miami Beach
949-3665
Lounger
SpedaiSaM
$199
Frame with Futon
Reg.S32T
12579 Biscayne Blvd.
::fMr
891*1313
A Deco Slide
Frame & Futon $379
Reg. $69$
The Hillary â–º
Chair $79
Reg. $159
A Queen A-Frame with Queen Size
Futon $ 169 (also available in Full)
Reg. $20?
^Magazine Rack $13
Frame with Futon $269
includes 2 free pillows
Reg--
L-Frame Special Price
$ 179 Frame & Futon â–º
Reg. $259"
With any $100 purchase you’ll
receive a free Bayside cruise
certificate good for 4 people.
With any $200 purchase
receive the cruise certificate &
2 free pillows.
TAfeDéHver;
100% COTTON • COVERS FROM $20
FUTONS STARTING AT $59
We’ll Beat Any Price!
Hours: Alon.-Thúrs. 10--&
Fri. 10-5 • Sun. 11-7
45
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 â–  20,1996
Affordable
Gosmeiic Surgery
Where the emphasis is
on Quality of care.
THE MOST ADVANCED
LASER PEEL TECHNOLOGY
IS NOW AVAILABLE
Robert H. Hunsaker, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Board Certified By American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF
Face, Neck and Brow Lifts * Nose & Ckin
Reshaping • Eyelid Surgery * Breast Surgery
• Advanced Tumescent Liposculpture
• Tummy Tucks • Laser Skin Resurfacing
• Spid er Vein Therapy
dPtemiete (Sentet
fot (Soimetic <2Stttgettj
(800) 403-3370
3370 Mary Street - Coconut Grove
By Appointment
7357 W. Flagler St
443-7070
2550 Douglas Rd. 2nd Fir.
Coral Gables
jui/t/rad
¿eau/y. Qfo, í^BWo/eÁña/fce
Mt0tvecuUñ¿ ¿yu EIT^ ^ 0¿/ , // r
cc&meuc ¿wzjpemf. Qyouaoe
amazed wMfo tihe wud&.
Breast Surgery (enlargement, reduction)
Liposuction * Laser * Nasal Contouring
Fab its •mn Fitness Program
«AJA
¿Sames
es a
Lose up,
in
Serving Soutl
dedication am
makes us th
of obesity,
M.D. is on tl
latest medic;
for optimu
why when the1
the latest devel
they come to
you?
BaaS
Renowned author of
Women Who Run With The Wolves
and The Faithful Gardener.
Poet, Jungian Psychoanalyst, cantadora (keeper of the old
stories in the Latina tradition).
An Evening of Story "The Creative Fire
Commentary, & Poetry A Salon
TUESDAY, MARCH 19
Colony Theater, 7:30 PM
1040 Lincoln
Miami Beach,$)5adv.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 M
First Unitarian Church
10:00 am-1:00 pm
7701 $W76thAve„
Miami $50 adv.
Limited Seating
TICKETS AVAILABLE;: Books&Books
stores; Changing Times, W. Palm
Beach; By Phone w/ Visa or MC:
800-813-1376,
In cooperation w/ Books&Books.
46


633-9861.
World's Largest Indoor Flea Market Browse through
rows of bargain merchandise from fine merchants
and wholesalers from around the world, and enjoy
an International Ice Show, with daily per¬
formances at 2:00,5:00, and 8:00, and music by
Alex Fox and the Calypso Island Steel Band. $4
adults, $1 kids under age twelve. Today from noon
to 10:00; tomorrow and Saturday from noon to
11:00; and Sunday from noon to 8:00. Miami Beach
Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr;
651-9530.
Friday, March 15
Cirque Ingenieux: See “Calendar.”
An Evening of Dave Barry: Channel 10’s Michael
Putney and Ana Azcuy host this benefit for the
Fellowship House. $125. 7:30 p.m. Biltmore Hotel,
1200 Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 667-1036.
Main Street Live: Local jazz, blues, and pop groups
perform live music while shoppers take in Miami
Lakes’s establishments each Friday and Saturday
night; tomorrow, Eugene Timmons and Kendall
Connection perform. Free. 7:00 p.m. Main Street,
Miami Lakes; 821-1130, ext 207.
Saturday, March 16
Cajun Crawfish Barbeque: Taste authentic Cajun
crawfish, barbecue chicken, spiced rum, and
reggae music by Broken Sound and Zydeco DJ.
$20.2:00 p.m. Power Studios, 3701NE 2nd Ave;
576-1336.
Caral Gables Farmers Market Local growers,
bakeries, and florists offer their wares. Free.
Every Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
through March 30. Merrick Park, Miracle Mile
and Le Jeune Road, Coral Gables; 460-5311.
Sunday, March 17
Coin and Stamp Shove Philatelists and coin
connoisseurs can find rare treasures at this show.
Free. 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Coral Ridge Mall,
Oakland Park Boulevard and Federal Highway,
Cutler Ridge; 791-6198.
From Russia, With Talent II: The Jewish Family
Service hosts an evening with singers, dancers,
and musicians resettled in Broward County from
the former Soviet Union. $6-$8. Hollywood Central
Performing Art Center, 1770 Monroe St,
Hollywood; 966-0956.
Viva La Música: The Miami Choral Society hosts a
fundraiser to celebrate its 30th anniversary
season. $15.4:00 p.m. Biltmore Hotel, 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 443-7816.
Tuesday, March 19
Multi-Media Performance Tuesdays: Artists,
filmmakers, videographers, actors, and other
assorted performers and creators are invited to
show off their talents or just hang out with the Art-
Act arts group. $3.7:30 p.m. Art-Act Space, 10 NE
39th St; 573-7272.
New Moon Power Ceremony: Bring your drums,
rattles, shakers, and friends and make some
empowering and re-energizing music with Roots,
Rhythms, and Rituals. $10 donation requested.
8:00 p.m. Collins Avenue and 53rd Street, Miami
Beach; 460-3365.
Wédnesday, March 20
Caribbean Expo: Taste a variety of Caribbean foods
and enjoy calypso, reggae, and zouk music. Free.
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 11011SW 104th St;
237-2854.
Equinox Drum and Dance Circle: Celebrate the spring
by making some rejuvenating music with Roots,
Rhythms, and Rituals. $10 donation requested.
8:00 p.m. Collins Avenue and 53rd Street, Miami
Beach; 460-3365.
Museums
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through March 31 —
“Jerusalem at 3000,” photographs of contemporary
Jerusalem by Gary Monroe; and “Minds in Motion,”
works by local psychiatric patients. Through June 23
—"Tales of Enchantment Legend and Myth,” works
by children from the International Museum of
Children’s Art in San Francisco; “Graffiti Art,” works
by Danny Polanco; and works by Samuel Komberg.
Art Museum at HU, University Park, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 348-2890. Through March
30—“American Art Today Images From Abroad,”
works by 27 American artists working overseas.
Bass Museum of Art, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530. Through April 7—“Fellini: Costumes and
Fashion,” more than 80 costumes worn in Fellini’s
films, including 8 le, Juliet of the Spirits, and La Dolce
Vita.
Art & All that Jazz Neu/Tunes
March 16 & 17 • 10 to 5pm
Harrison St., Downtown Hollywood
150 Fine Artists & Craftsmen
Food Fest • Daily Live Jazz
Admission is free
Hwy.
Hollywood-^
Blvd.
s
â–º
Dixie
Harrison 8
St.
N
Vitamins • Herbs
Juice Bar
Hollywood Central
Performing Arts Center
Presents:
A local bistro with
world flavor
kkkk
1 HMEST YILL2GE
Oldest Health Store in
Downtown
ALVIN AILEY
REPERTORY
ENSEMBLE
TTTT
oasis
hot food â–¼ cool atmosphere
1928 Harrison St
Tues. April 9 & Wed. April 10
8pm • Adults *20 / Chüd *10
1770 Monroe St. 929-8175
open seven days a week
serving lunch thru dinner
weekend brunch & late nite
921-5149
2009 Harrison Street • 927-7133
New, Old and
Unexpected
f/MM04+>t.
I *0^ TRADER JOHN'S
1 h & Book Exchange
contemporary pottery
& sculpture
“UNIQUE GIFTS FOR
YOURSELF AND OTHERS”
TRY MY
THAI CAFE
"Exceptional"
After You've Read It -
Exchange It
Sun-Thurs: 10-6pm
Fri & Sat: 10-9pm
GALLERY HOURS: 10:30-5PM
OR BY APPOINTMENT
2011 HARRISON ST
929-4801
1907 Hollywood Blvd.
922-2466
2003 Harrison St.
926-5585
NEXT MONTH
Family Owned and Operated 1
WH
5 7
Warehaus 57
-ARTWALK
DOWNTOWN
HOLLYWOOD
MTALIAN
RISTORANTE
Cafe Books Clothing
Friday, April 19
5:30-9:30pm
Open Sun - Thurs
11:30am - 11:00pm
1904 B Hollywood Blvd.
926-6633
Featuring Local Artists
Galleries and Melton
Mustafa Orchestra
e Fri & Sat
- 11:30am - Midnight
1818 S. Young Circle
923-0555
h m
i
I
I
s
£
47


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Boca Raton Museum of Art, 801W Palmetto Park Rd,
Boca Raton; 407-392-2500. Through March 24 —
“Clarence Holbrook Carter: An American
Century,” a retrospective exhibition of American
realist Carter.
Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-1700.
Through March 17 — “The Music Box Project,”
music boxes created or inspired by artists such as
Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, John Cage, Nam
June Paik, and Kiki Smith. Through March 31 —
“Heads,” new work by Kenny Scharf.
Center for Visual Communication, 4021 Laguna St,
Coral Gables; 446-6811. Through March 16 —
“Seeing the Light,” Florida landscape photographs
by Clyde Butcher.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art, 1
NE 40th St; 576-5171. Through April 6 — “7
Women from 7 Countries (no. 7),” works by seven
Latin-American women artists, including Bolivia’s
Maria Teresa Camacho-Hull, Chile’s Susana
Errazuriz, and Venezuela’s Liliana Gonzalez.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler
St; 375-1492. Through April 7 — “Miami’s Movers
and Shakers,” photographs by Ray Fisher. (See
“Calendar.”)
Joan Lehman Museum of Contemporary Art, (formerly
COCA), 12340 NE 8th Ave, North Miami;
893-6211. Through March 31 — “Defining the
Nineties: Consensus Making in New York, Miami,
and Los Angeles,” a survey of emerging artists
from these three cities. Through April 27 —
“Gabriel Orozco: Project for Miami,” a site-specific
installation. Through May 2 — “Reel Work: Artists
Films and Videos of the 70s,” featuring works by
Vito Acconi, John Baldessari, William Wegman,
Andy Warhol, and many others.
Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 1301
Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536. March 16
through April 28 — “Content and Discontent in
Today’s Photography.” Through June 5 — “A
Celebration of 45 Years of Collecting: Selections
from the Permanent Collection.”
Main Library, 101W Flagler St; 375-2665. Through
March 15 — Photographs by Life magazine
photographer Gordon Parks, and a collection of
Caribbean steel pans.
Metro-Dade Art in Public Places - Miami International
Airport, Concourse E, Departure Level; 375-5362.
Through June 14 — “Relationships,” photographs
by Fran Bitett Beck.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit
Planetarium, 3280 S Miami Ave; 8544247. Through
May 30 — “CyberCity,” an interactive exhibition
that explores the latest computer technology.
Ongoing — “Laser Mannheim Steamroller,”
“Visions of the Universe,” “Hubble Adventure,”
and more.
Morikami Museum, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray
Beach; 407495-0233. March 19 through July 7 —
“Folding Images: Japanese Screens from the Liza
Hyde Collection.” Ongoing — “The Yamato
Colony: Pioneering Japanese in Florida.”
Museum of Art, 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
525-5500. Through April 14 — “Bruce Helander:
Curious Collages.” Through May 5 — “Glackens
Circle,” works by members of the Glackens family;
and “On a Somber Note,” paintings by Gustavo
Acosta and Paul Soria. Through May 12 —
Sculpture by Lyman Kipp. Through May 19 —
“Grandma Moses: Pictures From the Past,” and
“Tomás Sánchez: Different Worlds.” Through
November 30 — “Oceania: Man, Ritual, and
Spirit.”
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401SW 2nd St, Ft
Lauderdale; 467-6637. Through May 6 — “The
Science of Sports,” an interactive exhibition about the
laws of nature at play in sports. Ongoing—Eight
interactive exhibition areas featuring “Gizmo City,”
“Florida Ecoscapes,” “KidScience,” “Space Base,”
“Choose Health,” “Sound,” and “No Place Like
Home.”
Sanford L Ziff Jewish Museum, 301 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 672-5044. Through April 14 —
“Daughter of Zion: Henrietta Szold and American
Jewish Womanhood.” Ongoing—“Mosaic,” an
exhibition about the Jewish history of Florida.
The Wotfsonian, 1001 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
531-1001. Through April 28 — "The Arts of Reform
and Persuasion, 1885-1945,” an exhibition of more
than 250 objects that demonstrate the relationship
between design, reform, and propaganda.
Galleries
Alliance Frangaise, 1414 Coral Way, Coral Gables;
8593760. March 15 (reception 6:30 p.m.) through
April 15—“Paris Cemeteries,” photographs by Judi
Mintz.
Ambrosino Gallery, 3155 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 445-2211. Through March 30—"Tryst,”
works by Cesár Trasobares; and “Who Will Tend the .
Sheep,” works by Conrad Hamather.
Americas Collection, 126 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5578. Through April 2 — “Como el Destello del
Cobre,” works by Luis Marin.
AmerJHch Galleries, 180 NE 39th St, ste 107; 573-7200.
Ongoing—Original and reproduced works by
Picasso, Chemakin, Tarkay, Rockwell, and others.
Antonia Studio, 640 S Miami Ave, 2nd fl; 3734)850.
Ongoing—“Grass is Green,” works by Antonia.
Arquideco: 3132 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral Gables;
445-5445. Through April 15—Works by Argentine
artist Estela Pereda.
Art Collectors, 4200 Aurora St, Coral Gables; 445-6624.
Through March 30—“Director’s Choice ’96,” works
by gallery artists Patrice Girard, Claire Garrett,
Richard Medlock, and others.
Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-8278.
Through April 6—“Uno,” works by Carolina Sardi.
Art Express, 12022 N Kendall Dr; 598-6622. Ongoing—
Works by Montelle Kline.
Artists Gallery, 4222 NE 20th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
491-9479. Ongoing—Southwestern art and pottery;
abstract, classical, and country French art
ArtServe Gallery, 1350 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
458-5825. March 16 through April 19 — “Southern
Expressions,” works by Florida artists.
Artspace Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 444-4493. Through March 30—
“Vessels and Reliquaries,” sculpture by Sharon
Kopriva.
Astoria Fine Art, 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1222. Through March 31 — "The Line of
Time: Homage to René Descartes,” works by *
A/K/RONA.
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-7872. Through April 7 — Group show.
Barbara Scott Gallery, 919 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-9171. Through April 7—Works by Jane Manus.
Bany University, Library Gallery, 11300 NE 2nd Ave,
Miami Shores; 899-3424. Through March 29 —
Works by the late artist Carlos Macia.
Bash, 655 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 538-2274.
Through March 26—“Art Up,” works by Alex J.
Escarano.
BCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3501S Davie Rd, Davie; 475-6517.
Through March 21 — “Wheel,” wheel-themed works
by 31 artists.
BCC South Campus Art Gallery, 7200 Pines Blvd,
Pembroke Pines; 9633895. March 14 (reception 7:00
pjn.) through April 26—“Jachut: Vestiges,” paintings
by Kay Kang.
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
673-6677. Through April 8—Works by Australian
glass artists. Ongoing—Glass sculpture by
international artists.
Best Buddies Art Company, 1637 Jefferson Ave, Miami
Beach; 5313821. Through April 7—Limited edition
prints by Haring, Lichtenstein, Britto, Dine, and
Scharf.
Bettcher Gallery, 1628Jefferson Ave, Miami Beach;
5343533. Through April 7 — “Field,” works by Perry
Greaves.
Bizarre Bazaar, 180 NE 39th St, ste 107; 573-7200.
Ongoing—Works by Dior Valgas.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
442-4408. Through March 31 — Photographs by
Diana Rosen.
Brickell Square, 801 Brickell Ave; 667-0808. Through
March 31—Works by Leandro Soto.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 5313821.
Through April 7 — “Britto Bonanza,” recent works by
Romero Britto.
Capen Gallery, 22400 Old Dixie Hwy, Homestead;
2580388. Through March 23—Works by Luis
Guzman Molina.
Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-2627. Through April 7—“Jerusalem 3000.”
Carel Gallery, 928 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 534-4384.
Ongoing—“Post-Impressionists,” nineteenth- and
twentieth-century masters, including works by
Bernard Buffet and new acquisitions.
Carlos Art Gallery, 3162 Commodore Plaza #A1;
445-3020. Ongoing—Multimedia works by Haitian
artists.
C. Firgau Art Gallery, 1940 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 567-9191. Through May 29 — “España y
Realismo (Spain and Realism),” recent works by six
Spanish artists.
Chad Elliott Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd; 5343547. Ongoing
— Recent works and works-in-progress by Chad Elliot
and works by photographer AIL
Clean Machine, 22612th St, Miami Beach; 534-9429.
Through March 22—Surrealist paintings by Jude
Tapa Loko” Thegenus.
Collective Souls, 1224 SW 1st Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
467-2292. Ongoing—“Soul Fusion,” two- and three-
dimensional works by local artists.
Common Space, 1665 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
6743278. Through April 7 — “Women’s
Visions/Women’s Voices.”
Contemporary Art Foundation, 1630Jefferson Ave, Miami
48
SCULPTURE
OBJECTS
FUNCTIONAL
ART
O
â– MIAMI]
EXPOSITION
19 9 6
March 15-17
vention Center
South Bayshore Drive at 27th Avenue
Gala Opening Night Preview
Thursday, March 14
To benefit The Lowe Art Museum
For benefit tickets: 305.284.1645
Open to the public.
Make your own world
from a world of art!
contemporary art furniture • sculpture in ceramic,
glass, wood and metal • ethnographic art
• vessels • contemporary studio ceramics and glass
• exquisite art jewelry • outsider, folk and tribal
objects • hand blown and cast glass and more!
All artwork is for sale.
A project of Expressions of Culture, Florida, Inc.
http://www.sofaexpo.com
Nick Cave Sound Suit
represented by
Wood Street Gallery, Chicago
;%118
For information: 305.444.1196


â– 
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
isii
HHMMH
'
49
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Beach; 674-9541. Through April 7—“Genesis y Big
Bang,” works by Leonor Coifman.
Continuum Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-8504. Through April 7 — Paintings by Brooke
Engle.
Deerlng Hospital, 933 SW 152nd St; 251-2500. Ongoing
—"The South Africa Exhibit,” works from the
collection of the Black Heritage Museum.
Dorsch Gallery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 85&4080. March 15
(reception 6:00 p.m.) through April 5—New works
by John McCaffrey.
Elite Fine Art Gallery, 3140 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 448-3800. Through March 22—Works by
Brazilian painter Antonio H. Amaral.
Española Way Art Center, 405 Española Way, Miami
Beach; 673-6248. Through March 15—“Bulls, Wine,
Women, and Country,” works by John Bailly.
Through June 30—Second annual Tibetan National
Day exhibition.
Exit Gallery, 904 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-1280.
Ongoing—Paintings by Peter Stanick.
For Art's Sake, 52 S Federal Hwy, Dania; 920-9205.
Ongoing—Works by more than 90 local artists.
Fred lie Snitzer Gallery, 1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 44841976. Through March 27 — Recent works
by Robert Thiele. (See “Calendar.”)
Galería del sol, 1628 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
674-7076. Through April 7 — Group show.
Gallery Hue Art, 2117 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 447-8502. Through March 31—Works by
Argentine artists Carlota Basóla, Vera Eizenberg,
Stella ViDamayor, and others.
Gallery 219,219 S Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
832-0779. Ongoing — Recent works by Virginia Best,
Bee Clare, and other gallery artists.
Hannah & Her Scissors, 533 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
674-1408. Ongoing—Works by Hannah Lasky.
Infinite Possibilities, 2007 Tyler St, Hollywood;
921-7622. Through April 30—“Metamorphs,” works
by Susana G. Barral.
International Fine Arts College, 1737 N Bayshore Dr;
6356614. Ongoing—"The Dead Artists Don’t Eat,”
alternative art by students.
Jeanine Cox Fine Art, 1071 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands; 861-1060. Through March 31 —
Sculpture by Sophie Ryder; “Glass From the South,”
works by Shane Fero, Susan Pelish, Richard Jolley,
and others; and photography by Robert Bery.
Joy Moos Gallery, 355 NE 59th Terr; 754-9373. Through
March 30—“Strength and Endurance,” works by
Barbara Clark-Fleming, Damian Rojo, Purvis Young,
and Claude Bolduc.
J. Vincent, 323 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 4458381.
Through March 15 — “Lechon (Pork),” works by Luis
Miguel Campos.
Kennedy Studio, 3059 Grand Ave; 441-8555. Ongoing—
Works by Cliff Bailey and Phyllis Jean.
IGrschnerHaack Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-7730. Through April 7—The Surrealistic
Cosmos of Ellen Grobman.”
Margulies Taplin Gallery, 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 447-1199. Through April 1—Works
from the private collection of Fran and Lee Ruwiteh.
Mayfair Fine Art, 701 Lincoln Rd, ste 701, Miami Beach;
534-1004. Through April 7 — The Russians Are
Coming,” contemporary Russian oils and tempera.
MDCC Building One Atrium, 300 NE 2nd Ave; 237-3278.
Through May 3—“Passing,” an installation by Hillary
Leone and Jennifer Macdonald.
MDCC Centre Gallery, 300 NE 2nd Ave, ste 1365;
237-3278. Through May 3—“Passing,” an installation
by Hillary Leone and Jennifer Macdonald.
MDCC Gallery North, 11380 NW 27th Ave, Collins
Campus Center, rm 4207-1; 237-1532. Through March
25—“Field of Imagination,” works by students from
all four Miami-Dade Community College campuses.
MDCC InterAmerican Art Gallery, 627 SW 27th Ave, ste
3104; 237-3278. Through April 5 — “Love, Flesh, and
Water,” works by Tag Purvis, Leeanne Schmidt, and
Oscar Muñoz.
MDCC Kendall Campus Art Gallery, 11011 SW 104th St;
237-2322. Through March 22 — Paintings by obscure
New York artists of the 1950s, featuring Paul Bodin,
Norman Carton, Mario Garda, John Von Wicht, and
others.
NWSA Art Gallery, 25 NE 2nd Ave; 237-3501. March 19
(reception 500 p.m.) through April 16—NWSA
student exhibition.
Old and Modern Masters, 730 Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach; 531-4900. Through April 7—“Reasons for
Buying Bronze Sculpture.”
Osuna-Lennon Gallery, 1635Jefferson Ave, Miami
Beach; 6753324. Through April 7 — “Italian Masters
from the Eighteenth Century.”
Paganiopez Fine Art 224 Washington Ave, Homestead;
242-9883. Through March 23—Works by Florida
artists.
Pallas Photographic, 50 NE 40th St, ste 103; 5757020.
Through April 9—“Baby Doll Series,” photographs
by Renee Collins.
Pamberi Studios, 1912 Van Burén St, Hollywood;
927-1905. Through May 1 — Osogbo art of the
Yoruba, and recently acquired rare African art
Passage Gallery, 529 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-3036. Through April 6—Works by Kench
DeGeorge, Tañan Tanka, Brian Miller, and Jean
Claude Brasset
Photogroup, 130 Madeira Ave, Coral Gables; 4440198.
Through April 12—“En Divina Luz. The Penitente
Moradas of New Mexico,” photographs by Craig
Varjabedian.
Photos and Photos, 1037 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands; 864-2624. Through March 31 — “Cara de
Cuba (The Face of Cuba),” photography by Juan
Roberto Camacho.
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art 900 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 5324141. Through April 7—Group
show, featuring works by Andrea Zemel, and a
collection of Israeli art
Scharf Shop, 435 Española Way, Miami Beach;
6759308. Ongoing—“Closet no. 14,” an installation
by Kenny Scharf.
Sher Galleries, 3585 NE 207th St North Miami Beach;
9359930. Ongoing—Works by Erie, Neiman,
Tobiasse, Hart, and other gallery artists.
Sky Gallery, NationsBank Tower, 100 SE 2nd St;
539-7100. Through March 31 — “100 Years
Downtown,” a photographic exhibition organized by
the Dade Heritage Foundation.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 4416166. Through March 29—
“Fhotowork ’96,” juried photography exhibition.
Through April 4—“Artists Who Are Women,”
featuring works by Louisa Chase, Joyce Kozloff,
Barbara Schwartz, and Michelle Stuart
South Florida Art Center-ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 534-3339. Through March 26—The
46th annual members’ exhibition of the Ceramic
League of Miami.
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through March 26—
“Remnants and Remembrance,” works by Anthony T.
Allegro and Bill Burke.
South Florida Art Center - The toft, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through March 26 (lecture
on March 20 at 7:00 pm.) — “Offerings for a
Sanctuary,” works by Margarita Cortes, Liliam
Cuenca, and Blanca Femandez-SiegeL
Studio Holomontage, 630E Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
532-8880. Through April 7—"The Sensation of
Graphics with Holograms.”
Ugarte & Candela, 2105 Le Jeune Rd, Coral Gables;
4466162. Through March 15—‘Triathlon,” works by
Antonio Ugarte.
UM New Gallery, 1300 Campo Sano Dr, AR101, Coral
Gables; 284-2542. Through March 22—Annual
student exhibition.
World Resources Gallery, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9095. Through April 7—Traditional handwoven
textiles from northern India.
Readings fr Discussions
Thursday, March 14
Electronic Pidtllshing Seminar Learn how to use the
Internet to publish information on the World Wide
Web. $30.3:00 pm. Museum of New Arts auditorium,
1350 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 954-5251760.
Lester Goran: University of Miami English professor
and author Goran reads from and discusses his recent
book, Tales from the Irish Club: A Collection of Short
Don’t let the
“Sun Set”
on your hair care...
If DBPR gets its way, cosmetologists and barbers could be headed back to
prehistoric times. Legislators are being asked to pass a bill calling for a sunset
review to decide if cosmetology & .barbering should be regulated and to what
degree. The Dept. Of Business & Professional Regulation is recommending the
elimination of The Board of Cosmetology & Barbering. Losing this regulatory process
could lead to unsafe conditions in the salons and barber shops.
The Dept is calling the review, a means to do a study. However, A Study does not
require legislative approval!
What Sunsetting Could Mean to You:
• Untrained stylists and barbers
• Practitioners with little or no knowledge of scalp diseases & disorders
• Practitioners with little or no knowledge of sanitary procedures
• A true danger of communicable diseases
• Insurance coverage will be “VERY” hard to find and even harder to “AFFORD”
What You Can Do:
• Encourage your favorite stylist or barber to take part in our “Good Hair Day In
Tallahassee”. This will be an electrifying rally to show support of the “Total
Regulatory Process”
• Write to your local legislators and oppose “Sunset Review”
• Call your local legislators and ask them to oppose “Sunset Review”
• Help your favorite stylist or barber by calling our verbal petition Une
Call our “Verbal Petition” line and...
Vote “YES” to Your Health, Safety & Welfare
Tell the legislators in your own words, why you think Cosmetology should be regulated
CALL 1-900-GET-SAFE (900) 438-7233
The call costs $1.45 per min. Average call is 2 min. You must be 18 or older.
Touch tone phone required
This announcement, is sponsored by the National Alliance of Salon Professionals, and the following “Licensed
Professionals” who care about you and your hair, skin and nails: Elite Salon Systems Distributors of Paul Mitchell
Professional Salon Hair Care and Framesi Italian Color and Professional Hair Care Products


, ihi#«rMíJTfl#
not an
A ¿i
/s A v
fw ib%¿ M*¿Taiá
athlete.
'm not a
This is not a time for thin<
that are easy. Over 300,000 ^
Americans have died of AIDS since 1981. If
you wanted to hold all of their names, you'd
have to build a
memorial five times
the size of the Vietnam
Veteran’s War Memorial to do
it So this is not a time to be ^
looking for things that are easy. This
is a time to seek out the boldest, most
challenging ways for our voices to be heard, and for our abilities to be tested. We must seek out
challenges that are as big as this disease. That’s what this ad you’re reading is all about
aiPSp
to make
in the IBI
Éü mm
ainst AIDS.
-Marty Starr,
California AIDS Ride I,
BostonONew York AIDS Ride participant
What is it?
It’s a ride, not a race, and it’s for anyone who wants to grow beyond
their limits. 1,200 riders. Amazing people like you - most of whom have
never done anything like this before in their lives. Three days, 275 miles.
Orlando to Miami on a bicycle through some of the most incredible
scenery in America It will raise $2 million for AIDS service agencies in
Florida, and leave you a changed person.
Is this something new?
It is in Florida The AIDS-Ride has been done twice in California and once from Boston to New York. Over 6000
people have raised more than $13.6 million for important AIDS services, breaking long-standing AIDS fundraising
smsmmmm records. And their lives have been changed in the process. They’ve redefined
their ideas about their potential. They’ve experienced a sense of community
and teamwork that is rare in the world today. This is a lot more than a bike
ride. It’s about awakening your life and the lives of others.
Where do you eat, sleep, shower?
The Ride is incredibly well-supported with hot and cold showers, hot catered meals,
five daily water and snack stops, transports for your gear; massage therapists, nighty
entertainment, roving medical and tech support and much more. We even provide two-
person tents
No way, I could never do that...
It's true that the Ride is not easy. It’s demanding and
challenging. That’s why it’s valuable. It is also appropriate
that it be demanding and challenging. Because anything less
just doesn’t cut it - not when AIDS is the number one killer
of people ages 25-44.
You can do this Grandmothers have done the Ride. People in their sixties and
seventies People with full-blown AIDS. The Ride is based on the notion that the
thrill of challenging yourself is a lot better than the boredom of staying in a lifeless,
comfortable rut Often times we live our lives unconsciously within the confines of
a box The Ride will take you outside of that box and into one of the most exhilarating
experiences of your existence. It’s an incredible event to do with friends, co-workers, or your
spouse or partner It’s also an incredible place to make new life-long friends.
You’ll ride at your own pace. As quickly or leisurely as you like. And through the
organized training rides we offer throughout the year; you’ll get better and better
Where does the money go?
It goes to help people in the Florida area who have AIDS and who are without food, without housing, without medical care,
and without support. Specifically, the Ride will^enefit Center One, AIDS Resource
Alliance, Action for AIDS, Poverello Center; and the United Protestant Appeal.
What do I do to register or volunteer?
Call today. We’ll send you a full-color brochure that explains everything and a registration
form. We need volunteers too. This is no time to give up. This is a time for boldness. Space is
limited. Call now.
AI DS Ride-
Volunteers * Riders
Donations To The Cause
(305) 532-6055
B E N E F I T if; N G :
Center One
AIDS Resource Alliance
Action for AIDS
Poverello Center
United Protestant Appeal
Sponsored By:
Banana Republic,
POZ Magazine,
USAir/USAir Express
1200 RIDERS • 275 MILES • ORLANDO TO MIAMI
3 DAYS • MAY 17-19, 1996
Created & Produced by Pallotta & Associates, Inc., Los Angeles
I
I
51
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
FunFest
April ii - i (, 1996
Presented
by
American|iifHni9
Para dije Island - (able Beach
B d h a m a 5
ton just can't miss this tot! Iliis celebrity Golf Challenge G
FunFest is nothing less than the chance of a lifetime. 100 of Hollyiuood's, music and
the NFL's brightest stars mill be there, ready to play mith or against you.
52
This ultimate challenge is a turn-round, four-man scramble played on turn of the
Bahamas' top rated courses at Paradise Island and Cable Beach. This national fundraiser
for Sickle Cell Disease Research is pint big chance to help raise amareness and
"Break the Sickle Cycle." IN by the may, this rare opportunity to play in the
Celebrity Challenge on a team mith BUir UWtfiMl OaRSSSa Bill
Calloiuay, Bartini Units, Hutton Banks, Ion (natos, Brote
BUásoo, Irnco Smith, Bim FioUs Frooman, Utíar Barton,
Richard Bnandtroo, lono lnc, Halcnlm Jamaat Blarnor,
Bañil Jamos EUiott, Jambo FUiott, FR's Eriq USaUiaiti
many, many others has neuer been auailable to the public, find the day doesn't end
mith a round of golf, our FunFest actiuities include celebrity parties, parties and more
parties.
Spots are limited so call today
Still
-COIF
URQUE SE COMPANIES
—” y\n^NTi5
^\AX/ír, ÜA^tAMAy- '
Towrinm á OmJopaaeoi
— ■ MUt W-
©
hbrbh,
"Awé r 9frUf c'yf/t*
t 0 c e e d s to Biiofit Sick
M,
VHP
Cable Beach
GOLF CLUB
Radissor
CABLE BEACH
(oil B 1 s 0 a s 0
Stories. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Steve Gould: Cartoonist and cancer patient Gould
discusses Thank God It’s Only Cancer, his humorous
collection meant to promote healing. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Health Care Careers: MDCC’s Wolfson Campus hosts a
series of lectures to complement its job fair event;
representatives from Mount Sinai Medical Center,
PCA Healthcare, the MDCC Medical Center
Campus, and All Medical Recruiting assess the future
of careers in the health field. Free. 11:00 am Wolfson
Campus, 300 NE 2nd Ave, rm 2106; 237-3358.
Preview to Sleuth Fast ’96: Mystery authors Stuart
Kaminsky, Kathryn Jensen, and Betsy Haynes discuss
their woiis and craft Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books
and Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
954-5660358.
The Snake and the Snail: Astronomers David H. Menke
and Mark Rosauer explore astronomy and
archaeology in the Mayan and Aztec cultures of
ancient Mexico. $5.7:30 p.m. Buehler Planetarium,
3501SW Davie Rd, Davie; 475-6680.
Vegetarian Cooking; Learn how to prepare exotic and
healthy Thai foods. $25.6:30 p.m. Hammocks
Middle School, 9889 Hammocks Blvd, rm 119;
237-7641.
Wolfson Center Seminar Series: The Louis Wolfson
Media History Center hosts a series of seminars
today and tomorrow, including topics such as Miami
in the news (9:30 am. today), writing for television
(12:30 and 3:30 p.m. today), trends in television news
(6:00 pm today), and careers in television (KfcOO
am. tomorrow). Free. Main library Auditorium, 101
W Flagler St; 375-1505.
Friday, March 15
Beyond Body Building: Fitness trainer Linda Pescatore
discusses fitness and nutrition at this Friday Night
Womyn’s Group meeting. $2.8:00 p.m. Lesbian, Gay,
and Bisexual Community Center, 1335 Alton Rd,
Miami Beach, 253-3740.
Buchanaidsm: The Militant Labor Forum hosts a tree-
speech forum about Pat Buchanan’s controversial
right-wing views. $4.7:30 p.m. Pathfinder Bookstore,
137 NE 54th St; 756-1020.
Maria Christina Garda: Garcia discusses her recent
book, Havana USA.: Cuban Exiles and Cuban
Americans in South Florida. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books &
Books, 296Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 4424408.
The Meaning of Dreams: Psychologist and author Joan
Cacdatore Mazza delves into dreams and howto
gain insight through their interpretation. Free. 7:30
p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 645 University Dr,
Coral Springs; 753-6650.
OpenkHke Poetry: Share a few original works with
other writers. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books and
Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
954-5660358.
Poetry Mike Night Celebrate Women’s History Month
be sharing some original works about Women or
pieces by favorite women poets. Free. 8:30 p.m.
Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 591S University Dr,
Plantation; 7280489.
Winona Sullivan: Author Sullivan (A Sudden Death at
the Norfolk Cafe) reads from and discusses her latest
mystery novel, Dead South. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Saturday; March 16
Capitalism andArt The Socialist Labor Party hosts
this discussion about capitalism and its effect on the
arts. Free. 4:30 p.m. Performing Arts Network, 555
17th St, Miami Beach; 891-0752.
Family Pinhole Camera Woriishop: Photographers
Rebecca Loveless and Sharon Socol demonstrate
how to build a pinhole camera and make paper
negatives. $45 for parent and child. 9:00 am Barry
University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave, Fine Arts rm 154,
Miami Shores; 444-0198.
German Design and National Identity: Laurie A. Stein,
curator of Berlin’s Werkbund Archive, discusses
German design from 1890 to 1918 at 1.00 p.m.; at
2:30, Illinois Institute of Technology design professor
John Heskett discusses design in inter-war
Germany. $7. The WoKsonian, 1001 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; 531-6287.
Edvard Raddnsky: Russian historian Radzinsky (The
Last Tsar) reads from and discusses his recent
biography, Stalin. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books,
296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Women and Stress: Barnes & Noble Bookstore hosts a
day of workshops for women with too much stress in
their lives; topics including how to stop fighting with
your mate (11:00 am), stress management (1:00
pm), relaxation techniques (2:30 pm), and
women’s health issues (4:00 pm). Free. 591S
University Dr, Plantation; 723-0489.
Sunday; March 17
Jews in Ancient China: Xu Xin, professor of English and
director of the Center for Judaic Studies at China's
COSTA RICA
3-Night packages from $419 ♦tax
Per person/double occupancy
ACT NOW! CaU 531-0551
Upgrades/Extensions
Add-ons available
Hablamos Español
Parliamo
EUROPE
France
From $468.00* + tax
Mon.-Fri. 9:30am to 5:30pm.|
Se Habla Español.
\ Call: 374-8822
* * ‘some restrictions apply
I* Travel must be completed by March. 31,1996
Tours & Tickets Inc.
Tours: (3 days, ppd)
S&ft (305)888.7738
Round Trip Tickets:
New York $ 144 Chicago $ 198
Los Angeles $295 Tampa $48
Dallas $216 Gainesville $ 118
Sarasota $88 Washington $180
Tow to Kwropt - S. SieHcn - CnrHihonn Creel—
JAMAICA
I TWO-NIGHT GBTAWAYSII
R.T Air, Hotel A Transfers from MIA/FL
If.’
REGGAE SPECIAL from
$269.00
Portside Villas • Rio Blanco • Jamaina
Fantasy Resort • Gloucestershire Hotel
1 Foote Prints * Rode Cliff • Samsara
• Summerset Villoge
Choose from over 200 Hotel/Air Packages »hr
N C L U S I V E
Your Jamaica Specialists!
1-800-555-9330
’All pockoges ore person, double occupancy & include lowest roundtrip airfare
from Ml A/FL airport tnmsfecs, hotel accommodations & hate! tax service.
Pockoges do not include S32.95 deportee & airport tax. Rales are valid through
March 31,1996 subject to charge, availability & cancellation charges.
Weekend surcharges additional.
«I
Boats
liable for:
1/3 Day to Weekly Charters
Deep Sea Fishing
Sailing Lessons
Snorkling/Diving
Special Events
Private/ Corporate Parties
T http://www.shadow.net/'-exsail


Sell it
Quick.
Ncwlimes
CLASSIFIED
ITALY ON SAXE
Airfare from $550 ♦tax
Packages from $800 7-Days I
Villa Rentals from $ 900 weekly
Call Today! Call 531-0551
Hablamos Español-Parllamo Italiano
Mexico Vacation Specialists!
"Buy 4 get I Free" Amares
P/ouqes - Homs - Cars - Diving - Archaeology
Active Vacations
Adventure Travel - Bike - Hike - Walk - Trekk
Europe & The World
Airpasses - Rail - Around the World Fares - Discount Air-
Scandinavia ..
Spain/Holland
London
Italy/ Potugal
Peru 2 for 1
Í550 Yucatan/Cancun $189
499 Mexico City $199
449 Brazil $575
550 B. Aires $595
255 Ecuador $400
ALL FARES ARE ROUND TRIP. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY.
lOtfA TRAVEL (305)532-7309
AUSTRALIA
tiy huwíh umi/Liv
with the only Australian
Specialists in Miami.
Mon.-fti.
9:30am to 5:30pm |
Se Habla Español.
Call: 374-8822
For Men
Experiencing
Hair Loss.
As seen on Good Morning America,
The Today Show and CBS Morning News.
The natural hailline,
the closer you get,
the better we look!
Try our Hair System and if you don’t
absolutely love the way it looks and feels,
we’ll refund your money within 30 days...
no questions asked. We Service and Repair
all types of hair systems while you wait.
305*928*1755 1*800*321*2413
Call for an appointment
4390 North Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale
Between Oakland Park Blvd. & Commercial Blvd.
Credit Cards Accepted.
Nanjing University, discusses the ancient Jewish
community at Kaifeng. Free. 7:30 p.m. FIU
University Park Campus, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, Wertheim Conservatory; 348-2186.
Reading Aloud: Writers from the South Florida
Chapter of the National Writers Association,
including Barbara Weston, Karen Whitting, Eva
Sartorio, and Anita Wright, read from their
works. Free. 3:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205
S Dixie Hwy, 665-8800.
Monday, March 18
Raymond Luczak: Author Luczak discusses St.
Michael's Fall, his autobiographical account of
growing up deaf in a small Midwestern town in
the 1970s. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop,
9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Modern Jewelry as Art Form: New Orleans-based
sculptor and jeweler Thomas Mann discusses the
elevation of jewelry-making to an art form. Free.
6:30 p.m. UM School of Art, 1300 Campo Sano Dr,
Coral Gables; 251-8766.
Women and Investment Financial consultant Steve
Camp shares tips for women seeking new and
improved investment opportunities. Free. 1:00
p.m. North Regional library, 1100 Coconut Creek
Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 969-2608.
Tuesday, March 19
Ann Armbruster: Author Armbruster discusses her
book The Ufe and Times of Miami Beach. Free.
7:30 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925
Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 9354)027.
Art Symbolism, Music, and Psychiatry: Psychologists
Ruth Kalinsky and Peter Lever discuss how music
influences color, line, and freedom of expression.
Free. Tonight at 7:00 and tomorrow at 1:00 p.m.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650
Harrison St, Hollywood; 921-3274.
Business Planning Workshop: Learn about the Info-
Bid Link and how to win government contracts at
this FIU Small-Business Development Center
seminar. Free. 6:00 p.m. Kendall Branch Library,
9101 SW 97th Ave; 348-2272.
Butterfly Lightning Series: Poets and fiction writers
from the University of Miami, Florida
International University, Miami-Dade Community
College, and all over Dade and Broward counties
read their works aloud every Tuesday night;
tonight’s program features Virgil Suarez and
Roberto G. Fernandez. Free. 8:00 p.m. Tobacco
Road, 626 S Miami Ave; 826-8596.
Children Can Be Angels, Too: Photographer Nancy
Bell Hamilton demonstrates how to photograph
kids in angel costumes and settings. $20.7:30 p.m.
Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave, Thompson
Hall, 2nd fl, Miami Shores; 444-0198.
Clarissa Pinkolas Estés: Poet, Jungian psycho¬
analyst, and author Estés (Women who Run with
the Wolves) hosts an evening of poetry,
storytelling, and commentary. $17. Tonight at 7:30
at the Colony Theater (1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach), and tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. at the
Unitarian Universalist Society (7701 SW 76th
Ave); also, Estés will be autographing her books at
tomorrow at 6:00 at Books & Books (296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables); 800-813-1376.
Quicken Seminar: Accountants Philip Shechter and
Emery Sheer demonstrate how to use this popular
tax-oriented software. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Vegetarian Cooking: Learn how to health-
consdously satisfy your sweet tooth with fat-,
sugar-, and dairy-free treats. $25.6:30 p.m.
Hammocks Middle School, 9889 Hammocks Blvd,
rm 119; 237-7641.
Frances Weaver: Author Weaver reads from and
discusses her book about women and aging, The
Girls with the Grandmother Faces. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
442-4408.
Young Again!: Fitness instructor and physician Roy
A Alterwein shares tips from his book for being
healthier and fitter. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books
and Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
954-5664)358.
Wednesday, March 20
The Everglades: Can We Save ThemP: Friends of the
Everglades vice president Joette Lorian discusses
efforts to restore and protect the Everglades. Free.
7:30 p.m. MDCC Kendall Campus, 11011 SW
104th St, rm D-413; 237-2854.
The Fine Art of Flirting: Singles consultant Jeanne
Baccarat demonstrates effective flirting methods.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925
Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 9354)027.
Paul Kropp: Author-educator Kropp (Raising a
Reader: Make Your Child a Reader for Life)
discusses ways for young people to improve their
reading skills. Free. 11:00 a.m. Wolfson Campus,
300 NE 2nd Ave, rm 2106; 237-3258.
BBÃœBI
iMakcís^ii lX)t
l/ne BlVdL'Sttit
nnatural
2-5557
SSPb'fhal/l
19405 Biscaj!
SPECIAl ClEARANCE full
fUTON MATTRESS Queen
BUY SOFA AND GET
MATCHING LOVESEAT FREE
*347
METAL FUTON
2 POSITION: SOFA & BED
*99
THE COMBO IS BACK. ITS A SOFA,
4-POSITION LOUNGER & BED.
SOLID WOOD FULL FRAME
79
JUST $50 MORE GETS YOU FRAME & MATTRESS
DINETTES: 3 PIECES
$99
5 PIECE DINETTE
*117
5 PIECE DINETTE
*167
3 PIECE WALL UNIT
WITH LIGHTS COMPLETE
*299
METAL QUEEN,
HEADBOARD & FOOTBOARD
$6995
3 PIECES DESK, CHAIR, LAMP
*47
"$* TABLES
*169
HEAD/FOOT/CANOPY WALL UNITS
*97 $147
3 PIECE COFFEE TABLES
*77
SCREEN, CD/HALOGEN
LAMPJV/VCR STAND
METAL ROCKING CHAIR BLACK WROUGHT FINISH
Ch«r M09
Nighhtand S59
Dresser $169
Mirror *39
*19
CD HOLDER, TV STAND, BAR
STOOL DESIGNER TABLE,
CHEVAL MIRROR YOUR CHOICE
*29
YOUR CHOICE
*57
ANY PURCHASE
OVER *200 RECEIVE A BATTERY
OPERATED BODY MASSAGER
677 NE 79TH STREET, MIAMI, 7547618
OPEN EVERYDAY
WAREHOUSE
53
ACTUAL PATIENT


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
3rd ANNUAL
eek of
APRIL 22
thru
APRIL 28
(Dine at your favorite participating restaurant
and
Support United Foundation for AIDS
Community AIDS program
at South Shore Hospital
BIIIbméibíébbbbbbéi ^
FOR INFORMATION CALL
UFA
305-531-1711
• For restaurants wishing to participate call 305- 53I-I7II •
Free Yourself!
.from the inconvenience of eye glasses or contact lenses
If you're nearsighted, you've probably heard a lot of rumors
â–  ' ' nd Laser Kei
about Radial and
veratotomy.
But have you seen the facts?
RK was developed to help people with nearsightedness and
astigmatism — the most common of all eye problems. RK is
outpatient surgery taking less than half an hour to perform.
No hospitalization. No injections. No pain.'
Miami Heart Institute's ophthalmologists have performed
more than 20,000 successful eye surgeries and wiü answer all
questions about RK and Laser Surgery. As ophthalmologists,
these medical doctors provide more than 50 years of
experience to this integrated healthcare approach. They’re
your total eye care specialists in a total health care environment.
So when you're ready to free yourself — come in and see us.
We'll help clear things up.
MIAMI HEART INSnTUTE
\ 305-674-3004 4701 Meridian Avenue • Miami Beach, FL • 33140
Our patient are the ones who have tried everything else.
The difference is that our Dietecâ„¢ Medication Program works. Get proven, affordable results from
the leading facility in South Florida.
Richard J. Rose, M.D. EA.C.S.
Medical Director
Norman J. Blum, M.D.
Donald Mmervini, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Neal A. Nirenberg, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Miami Heart Institute’s Aventura Health Center Bldg.
Call our counselors now for more information.
MEDICAL
INSTITUTE FOR
WEIGHT LOSS
« 931-2477
Program covered by most insurance
54


Look and Feel
Great Now!
Two Medication Medically Supervised
Program As Featured On 20/20.
MCTOiOmiOJTLOtt
642-7111 Contact Gladys.
4100 North west 9th Street in Miami.
F1 M
AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE OF MIAMI PRESENTS
HOT TAP-COOL JAZZ&QUEEN
FRI, MARCH 15 @ 8:00PM, SAT MARCH 16 @ 8:00PM,
SUN, MARCH 17 @ 2:00PM
FOR INFO CALLUCKETMASTIR
@358-5885 OR 552-0617
; H I
MAVEN PR0DUG10NS PRESENTS
DR. CLARISSA PINKOLA ESTES, PH. D.
AN EVENING OFSTORY, COMMENTARY & POETRY
TUE, MARCH 19 @ 7:30PM
FOR INFO CALL (800) 813-1376 OR
BOOKS & BOOKS @532-3222
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SCHOOL OF LAW REVUE
EQUITY PLAYHOUSE
SAT, MARCH 23 @8:00 PM
FOR INFO CALL 6730904
ifllffiil
DADE COALITION FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION &
THE NEW WORLD SCHOOL OFTHE ARTS PRESENT
ROBERT GARMES MEMORIAL CONCERT
SUN, MARCH 24 @2:00 PM
FOR INFO CALL 5384985
•
MIAMTOADE COMMUNITY COLLEGE PRESENTS
DAVID RUSSEY
FRI, MARCH 29 @ 8:00 PM & SAT, MARCH 30 @ 8:00PM
FOR INFO CALL 1KKETMASTER
@358-5885
THE COLONY THEATER
1040 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
AT THE CORNER OF LINCOLN ROAD & LENOX AVENUE
BOX OFFICE INFORMATION UNE:674-1026
THE COLONY IOX OFFICE OPENS 1 HOUR KFOK SHOWTIME.
FOR ADVANCE TICKET ORDERS MASE
CALL THE NUMBERS USTED AMOVE
SiXc? FUNDNI6 FOR THE COLONY THEATER IS PROYIDEDII PARTLY THE fT\
Wfei METMTOADE CULTURAL AFFAIRS COUNCIL, THE MIAMI REACH
- ' : yisiTOR«amvoinoH authority s the on or miami reach
Money Management' Financial consultant Steve
Camp shares tips from his book, Money: 127
Answers to Your Most-Asked Financial Questions.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 591S
University Dr, Plantation; 723-0489.
Open-Mike Fiction and Poetry: Writers are invited to
share a few pieces of poetry or short fiction. Free.
7:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy;
665-8800.
Spinal Care and Nutrition: Chiropractor Larry
Apotheker offers nutritional tips for spinal health.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 2240 E
Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 954-566-0358.
Dance
Thursday, March 14
Cubic Burke: Choreographer and former Dance
Theatre of Harlem soloist Burke teaches a series of
modem dance classes. $18 per class. Tonight at 8:00;
tomorrow at 7:00 p.m.; and Saturday at 11:30 a.m.
Performing Arts Network, 55517th St, Miami Beach;
672-0552.
Miami City Ballet Miami City Ballet concludes its
season with a program featuring resident
choreographer Jimmy Gamonet De Los Heros’s D
Symphonies, Lynn Taylor-Corbetf s Mystery of the
Dancing Princesses, and George Balanchine’s Sylvia
Pas de Deux and Western Symphony. $17-$52. Tonight
through Saturday at 8:00, and Sunday at 7:00 p.m.,
with 2:00 matinees on Saturday and Sunday. Bailey
Hall, 3501SW Davie Rd, Davie; 532-4880.
National Ballet of Spain: See “Calendar.”
Friday, March 15
American Dance Theatre of Miami: ADT presents two
original works: Hot Tap/Cool Jazz and A Night at the
Opera (featuring music by the rock band Queen). $18.
Tonight and tomorrow at 8:00 and Sunday at 7:00 p.m.
Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
5520617.
Saturday, March 16
Ballroom Dancing: Swing, merengue, disco, foxtrot,
tango, and cha-cha till you drop every Saturday night;
tonight’s dance features music by Norman Wayne. $5.
7:30 p.m. Polish American Club, 1250 NW 22nd Ave;
2480540.
Sunday, March 17
Best of Times St Paddy's Dance: Celebrate the luck of
the Irish while dancing to Latin and ballroom sounds
from the Thirties to the present $7.6:30 to midnight
Elks Lodge, 22 Giralda St Coral Gables; 267-6923.
Meet Me at the Oasis: The Harmonic Motion Trio
presents an afternoon of Middle Eastern dance and
music. $7.3:00 p.m. ArtServe Auditorium, 1350 E
Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 462-9191.
Kids
Thursday, March 14
Traveling Magic School Bus: Meet Ms. Frizzle and hop
on the bus for a magical adventure. Free. Today at
9:00 a.m. at the North Dade Regional Library (2455
NW 193rd St 625-6424) and at 3:00 p.m. at the West
Kendall Regional Library (10201 Hammocks Blvd;
385-7135); tomorrow at 9:00 am. at the South Dade
Regional Library (10750 SW 211th St 233-8140) and at
1:00 p.m. at the Miami Beach Branch Library (2100
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 5354219); and Saturday at
9.00 am. at the Coral Gables Branch Library (3443
Segovia St Coral Gables; 4428706) and at 3:00 p.m. at
the West Dade Regional Library (9445 Coral Way
553-1134).
Saturday March 16
Piece It Together Create a collage with pictures from
magazines, comic strips, and other printed materials.
$8.10:00 am Museum of Art, 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale; 525-5500.
Rapunzet Will the girl with the longest locks around
get out of the tower in time for her sweet sixteen
party? Actor’s Playhouse presents its wickedly funny
version of the favorite fairy tale. $6. Every Saturday at
2:00 p.m. through April 6. Miracle Theater, 280
Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-9293.
St Patrick's Day Pin Craft Make a shamrock pin to
wear on St Paddy’s Day. Free. 11:00 a.m. Pianet Kid
Club House, Máll at 163rd Street, 1421NE 163rd
St, North Miami Beach; 944-7132.
Sounds: Noise or Music?: Learn about sound waves and
sound travel interference, “white noise,” and
reverberation. $25.9:00 p.m. BCC Central Campus,
3501 SW Davie Rd, bldg 2, rm 105, Davie; 47&6680.
Me Like It Heret. Two aliens visit a college campus
SATURDAY NIGHT NEW AGE & ROCK-N-ROLL
5-
W P B T
John Tesh: Live at Red Rocks
with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra
6PM
Yanni in Concert: Live at the Acropolis
8PM
The Eagles in the Spotlight
10PM
Glenn Frey: Strange Weather, Live in Dublin
12Midnight
CAREERS IN MASSAGE THERAPY AND SKIN CARE
Ft. Lauderdale Campus, 5453 North University Drive, Lauderhill, FL 33351 • 800 541-9299
Miami Campus, 7925 N.W. 12 St. Suite 201, Miami, FL 33126 • 800 599-9599
Better yet, in six months the
homework ends and your career
begins. Because at the Florida
Institute that’s all the time it takes
to train to become a hcensed
Massage Therapist or a Skin Care
FLORIDA
Professional. Financial aid is avail¬
able to those who qualify. And we
offer job placement assistance.
Classes begin monthly and fill up
fast. So call or visit today. You’ll be
glad you did. As will your friends.
Loreena McKennit: No Journey's End
1:30AM
|
I
£
S
I


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Quality Service Is Our Key For
Your Dependable Ride,
OIL-FILTER
SERVICE
*16”
Includes:
—
J
MAJOR
SERVICE
$ I79 95
FRONT OR
REAR
BRAKES SPECIAL
*90
Top Off fluids And Safety Check
Some Models Slightly Higher
Otter Expires 3/28/96
15,000 *45,000-75,000
Some Models SSghtty Higher. |
1 Offer Expires 3(28/96 1
J
Fuel Injection Slightly Higher
Otter Expires 3/28/96
L _l
Some Models Slightly Higher
Otter Expires 3/28/96
id
cpcrtAin
paneti
IKIfZ OKUY Ik! B
efefC
inMnA A Aril
£f€ ||i
CADE
We use genuine Honda A Acura parts. Tax and shop supplies not included*
■ 8am épn/Set Oam Sfwn* Call for an appointment and ask for Caries
2901 SW 72 AVENUE • 262-0002
Midway between Coral Way & Bird Rd on SW 72nd Ave.
DC- MVP 94100)760 Sr. AtV0J402 “MUST PfcESEW COUPON AT T1M€ OF SERVICE
DISCOVERY’S MIAMI
DAY AND DINNER CRUISES
FUN DAY CRUISES»
Includes Two Meals.
Sails 10:00 a.m. - Wednesday, Sunday
FREE BIRTHDAY CRUISE with Deluxe Dinner! \
Sail within one week of your birthday.
é MARD WINNING FOOD
Second
Person
tt*
11
FREE
JPPfit
Kids Sail FreeT*
SESIORSPECIAL (60+)* ,s“!ou:“,Tta
v J this ad for Day and Night Cruises
DINNER PARTY CRUISESn
Wednesday - Sails 7:15 PM.
Sunday - Sails 5:00 PM.
SUPPER CLUB CRUISESn
Friday, Saturday. Sails at 10:00 PM.
Dinner, Dancing All Night Long
_ w Happy Hour - 2 for 1 Drinks
SPECIAL THEMES Jâ„¢ fbe
On Wed. Dinner Cruises
When You Board Early.
Well Brands Only.'
"Learn How To Play” Casino Lessons.
Sun. Champagne Brunch
Featuring Breakfast & Lunch
Sun. Night -
Wine & All That Jazz
with Dana Paul & The Jazz Way Band
Wed. Night - Mardi Gras Night
+> Fri. Night - Discovery’s
Budweiser Bash
Sat. Night - Merengue
. Salsa and Latin Spice
V Featuring Clockwork and JM
Sabor Latino to Dance to. ^ '
Call your Travel Agent or
DISCOVERY CRUISE UNE”
Daily from Miami and Ft. Lauderdale
1-800-937-4477 or (954) 525-7800 Ext. 764
ALL ADVERTISED RATES ARE FOR FLORIDA'S RESIDENTS & AAA MEMBERS ONLY.
All specials and discounts Florida residents only. Valid through V.M/96.
Limited space per cruise. All discounted rates require advance reservations and payment
Certain restrictions apply Activities. Entertainment, rates subject to change.
•ALL PASSENGERS GOVT/SVC. FEES $19 ADDITIONAL.
I I
Open 7 days - until 11:00 pan.. (Sundays until 6:00 pan.). Se habla español.
Private Cabins Available. Most credit cards and PERSONAL CHECKS accepted.
fKids under 12 sail fee*, one per adult. Ships' Registry Panama.
THE PARTY SHIPS


ON PHEN-f EN
& MOT LOSING ENOUGH WEIGHT?
Let our 15 Year People
Proven Program take
lOyrs. off you
Our Medical Weight
Management Program can
combine your Doctor's
Phen-fen Medications with
our Natural Weight Loss
Program of 100%
Guaranteed oneonone
supervision guidance &
follow up.
/ Yes Unlimited Visits
/Yes More Food than You Con Eat : -V
/Yes Behavior Moderation <*mL*JL*
/ Yes Fast Immediate Results
• No Groups
• No Prepackaged Meals
• No Hunger
• No Caloñe Counting
â– iUUjl
ITnlbsJ
I to 30 k. EASY! Never Ml hun¬
gry! Gol 'piatfy of smelts' Al
the fane! And I feel yeot!
fiaren duration
(Indrviduat results may very)
1-800-466-2116
Natural Weight Loss Centers
12 Locations South Dade to West Palm
EUROPEAN
WAX CENTER
FABULOUS SKIN
A new wax is on the market. A Painless Wax.
One which has never before been seen anywhere
in this country. This EUROPEAN WAX
SYSTEM not only contains a special polymer
that shrink wraps the hair for easy, painless
removal, but it’s a low temperature zoax designed
with soothing jojoba oil which moisturizes the
skin at the same time.
Our unique EUROPEAN WAX SYSTEM
creates unbelievable results in unbelievable time.
Within minutes you too will realize that waxing
and european waxing are two totally different
concepts.
PAINLESS WAXING
FULL LEGS * : MEN'S BACK
bikini : <&on
UNDER ARMS ; 'PJU
EXPIRES 3/31/96 •• 3/31 9&
(305) 933-3341
3009 Aventura Boulevard
and rescue the school from bankruptcy with their
super intellectual powers in this musical comedy.
$3. Today at 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.; and
tomorrow 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. Fort Lauderdale
Children’s Theatre, 640 N Andrews Ave, Ft
Lauderdale; 584-9076.
Sports
Saturday, March 16
Fort Lauderdale Christian School Basketball Tournament
Miami Dolphins players face the faculty of the
Christian School in this benefit game. $4.7:00 p.m.
6330 NW 31st Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 972-3444.
Knights of Miami: The Knights meet the Palmetto
Hogs. $5.7:30 p.m. Curtis Park, 1901 NW 24th Ave;
374-2034.
Yoga: Stretch those muscles and relax that mind every
Saturday at 9:30 am. and Monday and Wednesday at
6:00 pm $8. First Presbyterian Church, 609 Brickell
Ave; 371-3439.
Sunday, March 17
Florida Panthers: The Panthers meet New Jersey. $22-
$27.6:00 p.m. Miami Arena 721 NW 1st Ave;
5304444.
Hialeah Park; See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, March 19
Florida Panthers: The Panthers meet Ottawa $22-$27.
7:30 p.m. Miami Arena 721 NW 1st Ave; 5304444.
Wednesday; March 20
Miami Heat The Heat meets Detroit $14-$28.7:30 p.m.
Miami Arena 721 NW 1st Ave; 5304444.
On the Road & Sea
Thursday, March 14
Guided Tour Adventures; Hop aboard the Tri-County
Commuter Rail Authority for guided tours of a
number of South Florida attractions—including Lake
Worth (Monday), South Beach, Lincoln Road, and the
Holocaust Memorial on Miami Beach (Tuesday),
Palm Beach’s Worth Avenue (Thursday), and Bayside
Marketplace (Friday) — each weekday (except
Wednesday) through April 7. $3 (round-trip). Call
800-TRI-RAIL for schedules and further information.
Saturday, March 16
Bear Cut Wading Tour Wade through the sand fiats and
grass beds of Biscayne Bay and discover some of the
bay*s most interesting creatures. $3.11:00 am. Meet
at Crandon Park Beach, 4000 Crandon Blvd, Key
Biscayne; 6624124.
Family Campfire Night Hike the park’s nature trails in
search of possum, owls, and foxes, then gather
around a bonfire for a marshmallow roast $3.7:00
p.m. AD. Barnes Park, 3401SW 72nd Ave; to reserve,
call 6624124.
Sunday, March 17
Art Deco District Garden Tour Explore the garden
spaces of Miami Beach’s older residences. $15. Today
at 9:00 and 1030 am., noon, and 1:30,3:00, and 4:30
p.m. Miami Beach Garden Center, 2000 Convention
Center Dr, Miami Beach; 672-2014.
“How to..." Series: Nature experts lead monthly hands-
on demonstrations; this month: “How to Adopt a
Rabbit” $1.2:00 p.m. Tree Tops Park, 3900 SW 100th
Ave, Davie; 370-3750.
Key Biscayne Sunset Canoe Trip: Paddle across the bay in
the tranquility of the late afternoon and view wildlife
up close. $20.4:00 p.m. Meet at Crandon Park Beach,
4000 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne; 6624124.
Propagation Workshop: Leam about the various
methods of reproducing tropical fruit trees. $25.10:00
a.m. Fruit and Spice Park, 24801 SW 187th Ave;
247-5727.
Hotlines
AIDS Housing Hotline; 652-8281 (Dade);
800-652-8284 (outside Dade)
Al-Anon: 6874049
Alzheimer’s Disease Hotline: 324-8415
American Cancer Society; 5944363
American Heart Association: 751-1041
American Red Cross: 644-1200
Animal Rights Foundation of Florida: 968-7622
Anti-Cult Hotline: (for help in leaving a cult or
families of cult members) 800-572-0372
Breast Implants Help Hotline: 457-0443
Broward and Palm Beach HELP: 476-2240
6 Performances * Mar. 14 - Mar. 17
"White hot intensity...Bold...Flamboyant
...Great Fun and Hugely Entertaining."
1075 FM
IBERIAtt
de los Artes Escénicos y lo Músico
-N. Y. Times
H Carnival Air Lines
Fl orí da. The Northeast. California. The Caribbean.
Presenta
National
Ballet
of
Spai
I Artistic Direction:
Aurora Nana Victoria
Pons Lorca Eugenia
The extraordinary art and
magic of Spain in a
spectacular presentation
of sensual passion.
BUY TICKETS
â– ncKmqji
Dade 358-5885
Broward 523-3309
Jackie Gleason Theater
673-7300
City of Hope
A Theatrical Presentation
AGENCY, INC.' PRODUCTION
NOW THROUGH
All programs subject to change. No refunds or exchanges.
MINISTERIO DE CULTURA
Floor Sample
Sale
UP TO
50% Off
Dinette Table &
4 Chairs
Entertainment
Center
149“
Designer Furniture Without Designer Prices
5850 South Dixie Hwy, South Miami •
661-9345 • 661-8077 Monday and Friday 10-8pm
Tue.,Wed.,Thur.,Sat. 10-7pm Sundays 12-5pm •
Ample Free Parking
Lay-away Plan «Financing & Delivery Available
Sale prices only valid when presenting ad
SE H Wb. ÃœS
57
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
it iil.-v i fbi lllft I* U-ilia. C
5 pc Dinette
Futons! < lio
MATTRESS SALE
Mattress.. & Box Spring
Twin $109.95 __
Full $139.95
Queen... $169.95
King....*..$269.95
> • Free Layaway
• Same Day Delivery Available
♦ Prices Valid w/ad Only
5 Drawer Cheft
(choke off colon)
$139.00
M«tai ftewfe ieci U
♦ Fv*on f
$239{chok« of<
FREE GIFT
w/purchase
$100 & more
• Free Layaway
Same Day Delivery Avada
♦ Prices Valid w/ad
m-, WIDE WORLD OF FURNITUR
It’s Time To See The Pros
Where Service Is #1!
No matter what age Honda ^¿IMIWERtIF certified, the services we offer on
or Acura you own, mainte- ^ new cars won’t void manufáctur-
nance plays an important part er’s warranty, and we’re sure
in its overall performance. you’ll drive away happy.
That’s why at Jap. Tech., we not only So, remember, when it’s time for car ser-
recommend regular check-ups, we make it vice... Go with Quality» Go with
affordable and quite simply — painless. Service, Go with Jap. Tech.
Our technicians are Honda and Acura
Bring this ad in for 5% off any repairs, (cannot be used with any others specials)
*42**! *189
Cooling System Service
'Acura's higher
EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON
Major Service Interval
Recommended at 15,000 • 30,000
•45,000 etc
‘Some models slghfly higher *
EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON
iron i w
Brake Special j Timing 9$iti
“L xa* | Belt Replacement
andmodeis ¡ Some models Witty higher
EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON ! EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON
cat. ri i*oo muji rntocroi uwrw | CAT. *4-11*30 muoi mcocni wurun ^
*Mini Major Meets the minimum level of service recommended by Honda.
TIE BEST EXPERT HORDA AN) ACURA SBflflCE
Open Saturday 8am - 2pm, by appointment Miami location only.
Monday-Friday 8am-6pm: 3625 S. State Road 7 (441) Hollywood. 652-0959 Brwd. 981-1700
7311 S.W. 41 Street (2 blks east of 826, behind Gables Honda) 261-0040 Brwd. Co. Lie# AR0404
All repairs warranty 6 mos./6,000 miles.
58
MIAMI'S BEST DEALS!
We'll Meet or Beat Any Competitor's Advertised Prices
Lounger & Ottoman
Sale Price ♦47
5pc. Dinette Set
Sale Price* 167
5 Piece Dinette
♦117
Twin/Full Bunk Bed
Frame *157
Tile Top Dining Room
Set with 4 Chairs
Sale Price ♦197
Matching Hutch &
Larger Table Avail.
Desk, Chair,
Hutch & Lamp
Sale Price
*47
Screens/
Room Divider
Sale Price *57
Vanity Mirror & Bench
♦97 * ,
(matching pieces available)
Chest
Sale Price
♦107
Canopy Bed
Headboard
footboard, and canopy Armoire*157
Sale Price *97 Choice of Colors
Entertainment
Center
Sale Price *147
(Black only)
Buy the Sofa, Get the
Matching Love Seat FREE
pearfoMSale Price *347
liner,
& Ottoman
(avaiable in 3 bofedkx colors)
Sale price * 137 I
Complete Metal Futon
w/8" Mattress
Sale Price ♦147
Head board/Footboard
$79
ultimate
furniture collection
3 Pc Coffee Tables
Sale Price *77
Your Futon Specialist
Major credit cards accepted
6833SW59th PL
South Miami
6634302
(Next to S. Miami Ftost Office)
Barstool
Sale Price
♦47
Financing with Approved Credit
Free Layaway Plan
Delivery Available
Prices Valid With Ad Only
18790S.W. 105 PL
Cutter RUge
2323996
(Martin Road Trade Oerter behind
Paramount G&m. West of US 1)
30342 Old Dixie Hwy
Homestead
2465364
(Next to Scotty’s)
And nothing gives yon back:
yonr hair, and yonr youth
like new UNIDERM
It’s a young man’s world. And nothing makes you look older than lost
hair. But now there’s new Uniderm, the amazing new procedure that
attaches hair directly through the skin-tonkin process of intervention.
You can have a new hairline, a new crown, and treat your new hair just
like it was growing: get it wet, rub it down, tousle it up...you’ll look just the
way you used to- and you’ll get the looks just like you used to, too. And
best of all, no one will know it’s not your own growing hair, no matter
how dose they get. For a free private consultation or brochure, call today
or send in the coupon below.
Also Available
for Women
REPLACEMENT
■ SYSTLMS»
11440 SW 88th StJlll
(N. Kendall Dr.) Kendall, FL 33176
598-5234
Name
,
Address
City
j
Staff
Phone
©HRS, 1996 As seen on TV Nationally
NT 314 ¡


Broward County Guttural Affairs Arts and Culture
Hotline: 357-5700 (Broward); 800-249-ARTS (outside
Broward)
Broward County Public Health Unit (HRS): 467-4882
Cancer Information: 358-8000
COC National AIDS Hotline: 800342-2437 (English);
800344-7432 (Spanish); 800243-7889 (TIYservices
for the deaf)
CMIdhelp I0F Foresters Hotline: 80O4-ACHHD
Coalition for Hypertension Education and Control:
8006644447
Cocaine Anonymous: 537-1379
Cocaine Hotline: 800COCAINE
Crisis Intervention/Suicide Hotline: 358-HELP
Dade County Citizens Safety Council: 592-3232
Deaf Services Bureau: 800955-8770 (voice line through
Florida Relay Service); 6684693 (TTY)
Domestic Violence Hotline: 547-3170
Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation for Adolescents: (The
Starting Place) 925-2225
Drugs, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens: 800443-3784
Environmental Hotline: (Citizens for a Better South
Florida) 444-9484
Families Anonymous: (for families who have an addict,
alcoholic, or loved one with a behavioral problem)
4430303
Family Counseling Services: (for in-home counseling to
people with HIV) 5732500
Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service: 800342-8011
Florida MV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English);
80O545-SIDA (Spanish); 800-AIDS-101 (Haitian
Creole)
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Information and
Referral Hotline: 5764000 ext 283
Guardian Ad Litem: (to assist abused and neglected
children in court) 6386861.
Habitat for Humanity: 670-2224
Health Crisis Network/AIDS Hotline: 751-7751
Helping Hands: Hands in Action (for victims of
physical, sexual, or emotional abuse) 952-0785
Hepatitis* Hotline: 80OHEP-B373
Herpes Speak-Easy Hollina: 8935555
HIV+National Support Croup: 441-9860
Homeless Hotline: 576HOME
Hospice Caro: (support for terminally ill patients)
591-1606
Housing Opportunities for Excellence: 3744660
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 800-329-FQOD.
I.CJLR.E.: (HIV outreach program) 324-9042
Jewish Family Service of Broward County: 749-1505 or
9660956
Legal Hotline for Older Floridians: 5765997 (Dade);
800-2525997 (outside of Dade)
Mental Health Crisis Center 6431400
Metro-Dado Cultural Affairs Arts and Culture Hotline:
557-5600
Miami Bridge: (runaway, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 324-8953
Miami Project to Cure Paralysis: 1-80OSTAND-UP
Miami Women's Health Center. 8336165
Narcotics Anonymous: 6620280
National AIDS Hotline: 80O343AIDS
National Cancer Institute Hotline: 547-6920 (Dade);
721-7600 (Broward)
National Food Addiction Hotline: 8008720088
National Organization for Women: 9337444
Office Paper Recycling Hotline: 594-1680
Overeaters Anonymous: 2748800
Planned Parenthood: 441-2022
Pregnancy and Drug Abuse Information: 5484528
Rape Treatment Center at Jackson: 5837273 (to report
a rage); 5836949 (|or recovery support)
Senior Center Hotline: (referral service for all elderly
services) 6284354
Seniors Hotline: (assistance with daily tasks) 3586060
SHE Center (Sex Health Education and women’s
medical care, including abortion information)
8955555
SIDS Hotline: (Sudden Infont Death Syndrome)
800-221-SIDS
South Florida HealthLine: 8236269 (Dade);
800624-3365 (outside Dade)
Spinal Cord LMngAssIstance Development (support
services for physically disabled persons) 887-8838
Survivors of Authority Abuse: (support for those
sexually victimized by trusted professionals)
5835833
Switchboard of Miami: (suicide hotline) 358-HELP
University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Contar Surgeon
Referral Line: 585-SURG
Vietnam Veterans Hotline: 646VETS
Women in Distress: (domestic violence hotline)
761-1133
Women of Miami Beach (WOMB) Helpline: 5346900
Women's Resource Counseling Center 4488325
rich and famous froi
is now in Coconut Grovo
Myron M. Persoff, M.D., F.A.C.S.
• Clinical Associate Professor
UM Medical Department of Plastic Surgery
• American Board of Plastic Surgery
• American Society of Plastic
& Reconstructive Surgeons
• American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
• Founding President, Palm Beach County
Society of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons
State-of-the-Art Surgical Facility
Complimentary overnight
Financing Available
Se Habla Español
Call Today for a FREE
Consultation and Video Imaging
* nose & chin reshaping
* facial & eyelid surgery
* breast enlargement
* breast reduction
* lifts
* tummy tucks
* liposuction
* body contouring
• laser skin resurfacing
This symbol designates surgeons
who are certified in the specialty
of plastic surgery by the American
Board of Plastic Surgery and are
dedicated to the higheststandards
® of patient welfare and surgical
excellence.
COCONUT GROVE PLASTIC SURGERY
2912 S.W. 27th Ave. Coconut Grove / 567.2889
M5M
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination, or treatment which is performed as a result of within 72 hours of responding to fne advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or tedment.
59
Hew Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
THE BIRDCAGE’ IS THE FALLING-DOWN
FUNNIEST COMEDY YOU’LL SEE THIS YEAR!”
Gene Shalit, THE TODAY SHOW
•••■• •••••• #« •« .*«• #« «»
a
★★★★
HYSTERICAL!
SCREAMINGLY FUNNY!”
BQl Diehl, ABC RADIO
•imUMSMBBBIKMBMCMlMim
An MGM Comían»
NOW SHOWING!
¿me
COCOWALK 16
3015 Grand Ave.
448-6641
^FtiHMtaDU
18741 Biscayne Btvd e 167M SL.
931-2873
¿me.
MALL OF AMERICAS 14
Palmetto Expressway & 836
266-6646
KBIDALL TDWnI COUNTRY
Ha. Turnpike & Kendall Or.
271-8196
ooiSmkii
A1A & Hollywood BML Hdywood Bdt
920-6330
ame.
OMN110
Omni International Mali
358-2304
snSiu
4999 Sheridan SL
987-4680
sotmubu
18591 S.DMeHwy.
238-4424
./ GENERAL CINEMA
* MIRACLE CENT® 11
3301 Coral Way
442-2299
*/ GENERAL CINEMA
^PEMBROKE PINES CINEMA 8
SW Pines Btvd. at Ramingo
437-7790
./ REGAL CINEMAS M.
^ CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
850 Ives Dairy Rd.(1 mi W oil-95)
652-8558
OCEAN CINEMA
LeJEUNE6
782 NW LeJeune Rd.
529-8883
.y UNITED ARTISTS
Amoves § hialeah
780 West 49th Street
826-7242
.y UNITED ARTISTS
^MOVIES § THE FALLS
U.S.1SW 136th SL
255-5200
COBB
v BAY HARBOR 4
96 SL W.of Coins. MamiBch.
866-2441
COBB
UNIVERSITY 7
SW 107th Ave. opp RU. S. Dade
223-2700
.y COBB
v MIAMI LAKES 18
At Main & Ludtam
558-3810
COBB
MILLER SQUARE 8
SW 138th Ave. South Dade
387-3494
ay COBB
V OAKWOO018
Oakwood Plan W5 & StWng
923-7777
✓ |
>ICITAL
✓ GENERAL CINEMA
RIVIERA CINEMA
South U S. 1 & 57th Ave.
666-8513
IN BROWARD: CORAL RIDGE, SAWGRASS, FOX FESTIVAL, CORAL SQUARE, DEERFIELD, FOUNTAINS. 8 @ WESTON.
GATEWAY, MERCEDE, MOVIES @ LAUDERHILL, MOVIES @ POMPANO, MARGATE 8, SWAP SHOP, INVERRARY. IN BOCA: MIZNER, SHADOWOOD, MOVIES @ TOWN CENTER.
FOR SHOWTIMES & TICKETS CALL 888-FILM
STARTS TOMORROW
AMCT>CAmE8
jSHERDAN PLAZA 12
M SHERIDAN STREET
NOUVWOOO ^
867-4460 â–¼
AMC THEATRES
FASMON BLAND 16
18741 BISCAYNE BLVO
031-2873 ♦
AMC THEATERS
COCO WALK 16
3018 QMNO ME.
COCONUT GROVE .
MALL OF THE
AMERICAS 14
PALMETTO XWYB36 .
284 MM a|l
AMC THEATRES
OCEANWALK 10
OCEANWALK MALL
KXLYWDOOBLVO O AIAl.
920-4330 ?
AMC THEATRES
OMN110
OIMWTOMATKJNM.
358-2304
AMCTVCXTRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. 1 XTS.W. laSTHST
238-4424
COM
KENDALL»
KENOALL OR W
Of FLA.TFW
BYRON-CARLYLE
SCO- 71 STREET
MIAMI BEACH
888-8823
0098
UNIVERSITY 7
Miner weoppfu
223-2700
0099
MIAMI LAKES 10
ATMAM8LU0ÃœIM
668-3810
0099
MILLER SQUARE 8
1S9M9WMTNÍT
387-3484
ALL MOVIES STEREO
0098
mm
883-7777
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVMS AT
THE FALLS
U.S. 1A S.W 136TH ST
255-5200
UMTSDARH9TÍ
MOVES AT
PEMBROKE
11360 PMESBLVD.
435-3700
0848MLCMEkM
HIALEAH CBIEMA
RALMETTO XWY 4
NW 103ROST
667-8888
GENERAL CM RM
MIRACLE CENTER
10
CORAL WRY -
442-2288 ¥
OCEAN CM BAAS
LE JEUNE CMEMA 6
7TN 819 NW LEJGUNE RO
REGAL CM BIAS
CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
ISO IVES DAIRY RO
(1 MIWOF >-K|
3HX*
R PK. FOX FESTTVM. FOX SUNRISE
SAWOPMSS. MOVtE&aOMMNO. 4MRKETPL
•I9VERBR. WE9TON. DBJMY IQl SWAP 9H0P 0.L
OATEVMY. MVERRARY POUNTMNS C9L, M9SK7N BAY
C9L.0EEflFU)C94, CORAL 9P 9. TRML DI. M0ME81
MAMATE. CROSS PITY, 00—OYHTON.
WATCH THE ACADEMY AWARD8 MARCH 85â„¢
*¡SIUSEL
STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 15TH!
GENERAL CINEMA'S
INTRACOASTAL THEATRE
SUNNY ISLES 8LVD.
3701 N.E. 1 ¿3RD ST.
N. MIAMI BEACH
NS-74H
COM THEATRES
BAY HARBOR 4
96 ST. W. OF COUJNS
MIAMI BEACH
866-2441
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMBHCAS
PALMETTO X-WAY
IS36
OAA 41AA
GENERAL CINEMA’S
MIRACLE C841ER 10
CORAL WAY
442-2299
COM THEATRES
OAKWOOO IB CINEMAS
2600 OAKWOOO BLVO..
HOLLYWOOD
923-4321
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. I A
S.W. 185THST.
238-4424
GENOA! aNOHA*
HIALEAH 6
PALMETTO EXFWY, &
N.W. I03RD.ST.
557-96M
GENERAL CINEMA’S
PEMBROKE PINS 8
S.W PME5 BLVD. 8
FLAMINGO RD.
437-7790
Watch the Academy Awards March 25 on ABC
COM THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 6
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
COM THEATRES
KENDALL 9
KENDALL DR.
W. OF RA. TURNPKE
598-5000
AMC THEATRES
COCO WALK 14
3015 GRAND AVE.
448-4441
antonio melanie daryl
banderas griffitli hannan
A comedy about
two sisters
who thought
they had nothing
in common.
“TWOTHUMBS UP.WAY UP!”
• SISKEL & EBERT
“THERE WONT BE A
BETTER FILM THAN THIS.
A fantastic, original piece of work.
- Gene StskeL SISKEL & EBERT
w
to
a f ilm by
&EthanEoen
homespun
:í;:: PwyGram • •• GRi
©1996 Poly Or aro Film Production# B.V. r AH Rights Reserved.
R
STARTS FRIDAY
MARCH 15!
amc, Qowwdt CINEMA
AT
COCO WALK 16
301$ GRAND AYE
448-6641
IN BROWARD: SURISE. IN BOCA: SHADOWOOD.
hearts 81
i Mi
■HI lili Hü Hi 1UL1I
iililil JliillW ,«Ii^ MIL
BlcsShákm m KM iünHi mi
Cl
.Bgilli Mi ^KHMilil
PolyGram
111 “"t ill ill
miner
Touchstone
Pictures


The Young and
the Shiftless
By Todd Anthony
A bottle rocket is little more than a glorified
firecracker on a stick. You point one upward
and light it, but you can never be sure that it’ll
fly in the direction you want it to go. Some¬
times bottle rockets just fizzle out At best they
sparkle, streak skyward, and pop. Unlike dyna¬
mite, they can’t blow up anything. They do not
erupt into a thousand glittering points of light
that cascade gently to earth and make people
ooh and ah in wonder, nor do they burst in
midair with a concussive eardrum-splitting
report
Which is why the self-deprecating movie
title Bottle Rocket is deceptive. Although small
in scale and not designed to compete with
big-budget Hollywood pyrotechnics, this
droll, exuberant debut from a tightly knit
group of ambitious twentysomething Texans
defies the odds. Despite a first-time director
and a cast of nobodies (with the exception of
small supporting turns from James Caan and
Like Water for Chocolate’s Lumi Cavazos), it
delivers more entertainment bang than nine
out of ten of its flashier,
more expensive counter¬
parts.
Nobody expects much
from a bottle rocket, nor,
very likely, did anyone
expect much from
cowriter/director Wes
Anderson and his friend,
cowriter/star Owen C. Wil¬
son. They met while both
were students at the Univer¬
sity of Texas. Neither had
ever so much as apprenticed
on a feature film before. Short on cash and
experience but long on enthusiasm and
dreams, they wrote the Bottle Rocket script
and then enlisted Wilson’s younger brother
Luke and older sibling Andrew to act in what
would become, owing to financial constraints,
a thirteen-minute black-and-white short But
that short played at the Sundance Film Festi¬
val and ultimately convinced Hollywood pro¬
ducers Polly Platt and James L Brooks (The
War of the Roses, Say Anything, Broadcast
News) to bankroll a full-color feature.
Bottle Rocket tells the story of three misfits
— not unlike Anderson and the Wilsons —
who, bound by friendship, loyalty, and the
desire to do something with their lives,
embark upon a petty crime spree. Tightly
wound Dignan (Owen C. Wilson, loony and
intense as Dennis Hopper), the most enter¬
prising of the three, supplies the energy and
chutzpah. He idolizes an eccentric but suc¬
cessful thief, Mr. Henry Games Caan), who
rips off homes using his landscaping service
— the Lawn Rangers — as a front. But Dig¬
nan has a penchant for screwing up every¬
thing he becomes involved with, and as the
film opens, Mr. Henry has just fired him.
Anthony (Luke Wilson) is smarter and
more levelheaded than Dignan, but he goes
along with his best pal’s half-baked schemes
because he understands how badly Dignan
wants to be a leader. Bob (Robert Musgrave),
the black sheep of a well-to-do family that
includes his sadistic older brother Futureman
(Andrew Wilson), is the only member of the
gang with a car. Individually or collectively,
these three amigos pose about as much of a
threat to society as, well, a bottle rocket For¬
get The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight,
these chronic underachievers are the Gang
That Couldn’t Walk and Chew Gum at the
Same Time. Call it Slacker meets Reservoir
Dogs.
A potent combination of dry humor, quirky
This droll, exuberant debut
from a tightly knit group of
ambitious twentysomething
Texans defies the odds.
characterizations, and surprisingly strong act¬
ing from a fresh but inexperienced cast pro¬
pel Bottle Rocket to altitudes far above the
norm for ultra-low-budget independent films.
The writing by Wilson and Anderson is spiky
and unhinged. (Example: After successfully
robbing a bookstore, Dignan announces,
“Before we divide the loot, Bob gets the Spirit
award.”) At times Bottle Rocket feels like it’s
unraveling into an episodic collection of
tongue-in-cheek riffs, but the center ulti¬
mately holds; it veers off in a few unexpected
DEPARTING TWICE DAILY
FROM MARTHA'S
ON THE INTERCOASTAL
1-800-474-DICE
ACUPUNCTURE = PAIN RELIEF
LOWCOSTCONIMUNITY CUNIC $20 F€R VISIT
Tuesdays • Thursday • Saturdays
Low Back Pain
Sciatica
Headache
Neck & Shoulder
Insomnia
Digestive Disorders
Menstrual Disorders
Depression
Stress
Stop Smoking
ACUPRESSURE
ACUPUNCTURE INSTITUTE
9835 Sunset Dr., S-207 595-9500
directions but some¬
how remains aloft.
The misguided roman¬
tics on-screen may not
be capable of realizing
their dreams, but their
real-life counterparts
behind the cameras
have succeeded in
pulling off the film-
making equivalent of
the big heist: an
assured, original, and
endearing motion pic¬
ture.
Joshua Melville’s The
Day is another debut.
The picture, which
chronicles the final 24
hours in the life of a
fallen Seventies punk
rock idol, marks a
career shift into film-
Anthony (Luke Wilson,
their crime spree in a
making by the Miami resident and former
major-label record producer/mixer/engineer.
Dedicated to the late jazz bassist Jaco Pasto-
rius and punk-glam guitarist Johnny Thun¬
ders, Melville’s gritty black-and-white compo¬
sition follows the downward spiral of Jarred
Fillmore, a singer/songwriter turned junkie
whose fifteen minutes of fame expired fifteen
years ago. Nowadays Jarred whiles away the
time bumming change, making his ex-lover’s
life miserable, and ducking the loan shark to
whom he owes twenty grand. As if all that
isn’t bad enough, someone has stolen the
master tapes to the poor guy’s current record¬
ing project, pretty much nixing any shot at a
comeback Jarred might have had.
Owen Comaskey nails the strung-out char¬
acter of Jarred in the lead role, and Melville’s
direction evokes the anonymity and squalor
that have become the washed-up rocker’s
constant companions. Melville, who had a
hand in just about every aspect of the film’s
making, captures some arresting visual
imagery — notably a few fuzzy, dreamlike
New York cityscapes - but he doesn’t give
us much reason to like Jarred or to care
about his predicament. Comaskey tries to
humanize Jarred by conveying some of his
frustration and vulnerability, but Melville
We 11 a damn abL his proS
mst because nobody loves him. It’s aserióos
invest much emotion
to
in someone who
left) and Dignan (Owen C. Wilson, right) launch
bookstore
doesn’t care about himself. Nor does the
writer/director provide much of a plot.
Jarred bounces around the East Village mak¬
ing a nuisance of himself until the very real
threat of bodily harm from his knife-wielding
loan shark sends the down-on-his-luck musi¬
cian packing — to Miami, final resting place
for so many of the entertainment industry’s
has-beens.
Still, Melville’s direction is impressive; The
Day does not look like the work of a rookie,
let alone one straining against a tight budget
And Coriiaskey’s performance, while not
exactly compelling, makes his character far
more interesting than he would otherwise
be. More like a bottle rocket than Bottle
Rocket, Joshua Melville’s film throws off a
few sparks but never explodes.
The Day plays March 14,15, and 16 at 8:00 p.m.
at B.A.R. space, 1659 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
538-8242. Admission is $6.
Bottle Rocket
Written by Owen G. Wilson and Wes Anderson;
directed by Wes Anderson; with Owen C. Wilson,
Luke Wilson, Andrew Wilson, Robert Musgrave,
Lumi Cavazos, and James Caan.
The Day.
Written and directed by Joshua Melville;
with Owen Comaskey, Kimberly Weiant, and
Al Grandpa" Lewis.
mini
Have \Ne Got The Answer F°rJ0U--
VOICE MAIL
Price includes a new private phone number answered (? ^ ^ (V¿ START
24 hours a day with your voice. ; s joDAY!
• Confidential ONLY M
• Unlimited Messages OOp /imgriCdU ®
•.bnu„sSc~$(\95
• 800 #’s Only $4.95 ^ Pat VAonttt (305\ 442-8080 - Dade
Per Month (+ usage) (jhtt 7644544 - Broward 1
MIA895 (H
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
DIET CLINICS CAN BE DANGEROUS!
Don’t Entrust Your Health To An Impersonal Clinic or
Doctor Who Treats Your Weight Problem As A “Sideline”
We Are South Florida’s Oldest, Established
“Fen-Phen” Program
Many Other Medications Are Also Available
• Private M.D. Supervision
• No Nurse Practioners
• Evening Hours
• Affordable Private Treatment
• Over 10 Years Experience You Can Trust
For Information:
Call Now
BOCA MEDICAL
BARIATRIC GROUP
Marc H. Sencer M.D.
Visiting Clinical Fellow
Columbia University
MIAMI OFFICE
6280 Sunset Drive
Suite 404
South Miami FL
BOCA OFFICE
801 Meadows Road
Suite M4|
Boca Raton FL
(305)669-040! (407)347-1071
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
AIDS CLINICAL RESEARCH UNIT
(ACRU)
NOW AVAILABLE
IN CLINICAL TRIALS
MERCK PROTEASE INHIBITOR
• Indinavir Sulfate as monotherapy, or in
various combinations with ZDV, 3TC,
and/or d4T. Open-label Indinavir available
in a protocol-specified select population.
• Indinavir available for HIV + individuals
with CD4 500 cells/mm3 or less.
CURRENTLY SCREENING
AND ENROLLING CALL ACRU
PROTOCOL SCREENING
243-3838
If you want the truth before |
you waste your time.
I FILM CAPSULESl
NewTimes
rnrurm stttict
i M1 1 l
K 4 1
ie to 1 *The La
* * n° Ba
MSB il * Weeke
• Mini &
GRAFT - No Mis
test in Techniques
ndages
nd Appointments
Micro Grafts
;sed Work
onsultation
PHYSICIAN t SURGEONS,
1E SKIN, HAIR t HAILS
ielroy Beach, FL 33445
Ite C • Hollywood, FL
& Kev West
DR. LAWRENCE.. SHAPIRO •
D.O.P.A. DISEASES OF H
4983 W. Atlantic Ave., I
4050 Sheridan St. • Sa
Also Orlando
mm gam ;m i h
I listen to Dr. S. On W1NZ (940 AM) This Saturday at 10:30AM 1
I THE PATIENT AMY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENTS HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAT. CANCEL PAYMENT OR 1
IK IQNURSK) FOR AjrrOTHBSamCLEXAMUnOHOt TCAHiaTMaiBPaRMMBASAI&UIOf ANO 1
IwmumHOUBOfKSrOUJUGTOTKAOWnSUeTFOOWIHHDBaunBfHOOIBIUCBFHSHia. I
1 EXAMINATION Of TREATMENT
w.
1st Anniversary
CELEBRATION OFFER
— — — — COUPON — — — —
First 100 Sail Free*
On All Cruises
(Day or Nite)
MH 3-14-96
Advance Reservations Required (No Walk-Ups) *Pay Only Port/Serv Chgs $19.00
Featuring
Sat. A.M. Gambler’s Spree 11:004:00 • Double Jackpot Awards
Player Bonus Awards • 2 Las Vegas Rules Casinos • Player Tracking
on Florida’s Hottest Slots • Double & Triple Jackpots Daily!
Live Liberal Lotto • All Valid V.I.P. Cards Accepted
V.I.P. Bonus & Discounts • Thurs. Night Blackjack Tournaments
TROPICANA SAILING SCHEDULE
Sailing From the Port of Miami, Pier 6
Day Cruises Evening Cruises
Tues 11:00am - 4:30pm Mon-Wed 7:30 - Midnight
Wed-Fri 1:00pm - 6:00pm Thu-Fri 7:30pm - 1:00am
Sat 11:00am - 4:00pm Sat 8:30pm - 2:00am
Sun 11:00am - 4:30pm Sun 6:00pm - 11:30pm
SPECIAL - FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMAS
Sailing Feb. 12 and Mar. 11 Departs 4:30AM - Arrive Freeport 10:30AM, LV Freeport 12:00PM,
AR Miami 6:00PM, $25.00 plus $49.00 Govt Port & Svc Fee. First 100 Sail Free Does Not Apply to Bahama Cruises.
Sumptuous
Complimentary
Buffet Dining
Live Entertainment
Throughout Ship
Live Music & Dancing
Exquisite Ala
Carte Dining**
(** Fri./Sat. Evening Cruises)
Reservations Call
(305) 447-9999 or (800) 965-3999
or Call Your travel Agent or Concierge Today!
Prepaid Resv. Req. tor free Cruises. Coupon must be presented at embarkations. Restrictions Apply. Offers are for
FI res. only and may not be combined with any other discounts or promotions. All cruises/activities subject to can¬
cellation without notice. $19 port svc fee all cruises. Offer expires 3-31-96. Ships Registry: Bahamas
COUPON
nd
fÜÜ
CARIBBEAN
6S0CA LMUZIK/(j
^merengue
&JUNKAN00
® STREET DANCING I
SPARROW INNER CIRCLE
EXUMA ARTURO TAPPIN
BARRINGTON LEW SPICE & CO.
SHINEHEAD TONY REBEL
L CRAZY DENYSE PLUMMER
\ FREDDIE MCGREGOR RASILEY
HOT CHOCOLATE
FUNKYD
ADMIRAL BAILEY
RED PLASTIC BAS
FRIDAY MARCH 22nd
* Time: 8pm *
CALL YOUR LOCAL CABLE
OPERATOR NOW!


Gun control: Police chief Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand) draws a bead on the bad guys
Raising the
Coen
Brothers
By Todd Anthony
Fans of black comedy and fiendishly frisky
film noir rejoice: The Coen brothers are
back! The savagely funny Fargo is a vicious
sidesplitter, easily the drollest, hippest,
sweetest satire Joel and Ethan Coen have
dreamed up since 1987’s Raising Arizona.
The film marks a return to form for the sick
siblings whose joint moviemaking career —
they ¿ways share writing, directing, produc¬
ing, and editing duties — had followed a
downward trajectory that reached its nadir
with 1994’s big-budget (by the Coens’ stan¬
dards, anyway) turkey The Hudsucker Proxy.
Fargo recalls the cheeky spirit of Blood Sim¬
ple, the pair’s hell-bent-for-leather 1984
debut Like that audaciously assured coming-
out party, Fargo squeezes both dramatic ten¬
sion and comic relief from a tale of small¬
town treachery, tapping into spontaneously
combusting violence and twisted character-
driven humor.
Sly wit perverse camer¬
awork, and characteriza¬
tions that seem at once
loving and lacerating per¬
meate the Coen brothers’
work. The duo has taken
some critical hits for
the crime of allegedly
appearing condescending
toward their regular-folk
characters. But those
who lob such charges
grossly oversimplify the
matter. One of the brothers’ greatest assets
is their ability to simultaneously smile on
and poke fun at their creations. For exam¬
ple, Fargo’s heroine, pregnant police chief
Marge Gunderson (Blood Simple’s Frances
McDormand) is low-key to a fault, begins
every other sentence with the word “yeah”
(pronounced “yah”), and utilizes quaint
phrases such as “in a jiff.” Although she may
seem terminally polite and more concerned
about the source of her next lunch buffet
than she is about catching a killer, don’t let
that fool you. This lady cop knows how to
play hardball when she needs to. Marge
may battle morning sickness during her
examination of a snow-covered crime scene,
but she doesn’t back down from an armed
confrontation with a ruthless murderer.
Just as Dan Hedaya’s sleazy Texas bar
owner set Blood Simple’s plot in motion by
hiring a lowlife private detective to kill his
wife, so too scamming car salesman Jerry
Lundegaard (a cartoonishly hapless William
H. Macy) kicks off the fun in Fargo by
procuring a pair of bumbling bad guys — the
loquacious Carl Showalter (bug-eyed Steve
Buscemi as yet another hilariously caf-
feinated motormouth) and the silent loose
cannon Gaear Grimsrud (Peter Stormare) —
to kidnap his squeaky-voiced spouse Jean
(Kristin Rudrud). Jerry intends to pay off the
oafish thugs with a tiny fraction of the mil-
lion-dollar ransom he hopes to collect from
Jean’s rich, despotic father Wade (Harve
Presnell). (The powerfiil-guy-behind-a-desk
is a recurring motif in Coen brothers films.
Wade is Faso’s.)
Wade, no stranger to double-dealing in the
name of business, doesn’t much care for his
spineless son-in-law. Their tense relationship
(and the Coen brothers’ talent for crafting
sharp dialogue) can best be summed up by
one exchange following the car salesman’s
attempt to convince Wade to finance a real
estate deal:
“This could work out real good for me and
Jean and [the Lundegaards’ son] Scotty,”
Jerry pleads.
“Jean and Scotty never have to worry,”
Wade growls.
But Jerry certainly does. First, Jean nearly
eludes her blundering abductors. Then a cop
stops the car driven by the two fleeing crooks
(with Jean bound and gagged and bundled
up in the back seat) because Carl forgot to
screw on the license tags. Carl’s pathetic
attempt to talk, then bribe, his way out of
trouble only makes the lawman more suspi¬
cious. Gaear intervenes. When Jerry finally
hears from his blundering accomplices, Carl
informs him that “circumstances have
changed, Jerry. Acts of God. Force majeur.
Blood has been shed. We’ve incurred risk.”
Coen brothers films have provided more
than their share of outstanding perfor¬
mances: Dan Hedaya and M. Emmet Walsh
up to their scuzzy necks in duplicity in Blood
Simple; Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter as
the star-crossed white-trash lovers in Raising
Arizona; and now William H. Macy and Steve
Buscemi in Fargo. Buscemi, with his rheumy
eyes and lips drawn tight over protruding
teeth, is perfectly cast as the chatterbox who
isn’t quite as intelligent as he thinks he is.
And Macy beautifully conveys the transpar¬
ent desperation of a man who long ago mort¬
gaged his soul and now wants to refinance.
But the actors merely ride shotgun on this
stagecoach. Joel and Ethan Coen hold the
reins. It was a long and bumpy trip from Ari¬
zona to Fargo, but they made it. Welcome
back, fellas.
Fargo.
Written by Joel and Ethan Coen; directed by
Joel Coen; with Steve Buscemi, Frances
McDormand, William H. Macy; Peter Stormare,
Kristin Rudrud, and Harve Presnell.
One of the Coens’greatest
assets is their ability to
simultaneously smile on and
poke fun at their creations.
ACTORS
MODELS
ACTING TECHNIQUE
STUDIO WORKSHOPS
FOR FILM, TV, STAGE
Within the actor-model, 8m
different roles he chooses io portray,
the business he competes in, and the
Iegwy ot the art, itere is a promising bu
fragile potential for an extraordinary lift
and career. An actors workshop should
enhance this potential insiglttfolly, and devel¬
op the actor-model's ability to he creative and
function to Ms brightest capacity and compete
in the business with a secure edge.
styles demanded by Film, TV, and Stage is the priority of the
Process Actors Studio Workshops, the actors professionalism in
the business, which include th interview and die audition process;
The protocol in approaching the agents and the cashng directors;
His responsibility while employed as an Actor in a professional.
production on stage, film, or TV set; and ultimately the working
relationship with other actors and die director is discussed. The
awareness ot the importad differences and applications between
the actois own identity and the identity of the character which he
portrays is an integral part of the Process training.
For 10 week workshops, which include one pri¬
vate session, at $350or tor private sessions in
English or Spanish at $50 a session or .10 lor $400
or for Alexander Technique by the only certified
teacher in Miami at $45 a session
Call THE “PROCESS”
(305)867-9274
yapr Smile 11
Bra First Thitii
Pe|ple Notice
[KÉfapfiaoo^M
*7 An Anointment
BEACH DEHTAL CENTER
Georgia M. Hernandez, DMD & Associates
AUCTION, DECO TO DIKO-miD CENTUM MU UIODEAN
miMDMJUupn)
(PMVIÍWmCilWHOOH-M)
Heywood Wakefield • Barcelona • George Nakashima • Russell Wright • Bertoia
Knoll • Herman Miller • Eames Action Series • Stardust • Tiffany Studios • Paul
Woodard • Walter Von Nessen • Maxfield Parrish • Chagall • Miro • Dali •
Wesselman • McCoy • Roseville • Frankoma • Erie • Frankart • Nu Art • Gio Pont!
• Thaden & Jordan • Thonet • Parian • Bakelite • Chrome • Art & Italian Glass
• 1950's & 60's Lamps, French Copper Enamels & More
OF SPECIAL INTEREST
• • • A Very Rare Jungle Green Ruba Rhombic Vase • • •
• • • George Nakashima Dining Table & Chairs • • •
Sale conducted by Lonle L Buchner, Auctioneer AU 1410 AB 954
10% Buyers Premium
PRIVATE COLLECTIONS
660 S.Tamiami Trail • Osprey (Sarasota), Florida
(941) 9663255 Fax (941) 966-7629
Call or Fax for more Information or Directions


New Timas March 14 - 20,1996
PARIS • NEW Vfjp
i—
FASCINATING!"
â– Howard Feinstein, New York Post
INTRIGUING
"For anyone who
has ever fantasized
about what it's really
like to be a model
Leaves the viewer
hungering for more!
â– Kirk Honeycutt Hollywood Reporter
SEE THIS
MOVIE!"
Candace Bushnell, Vogue
A Danel NMxr Rtaxxjcnoj CATWALK FEflllM] ChrbtyHiuoiim
â–¡rcnn. Mlbc Score Malcolm McLaren Rxxxcer Suq mlla fasmcn rxxxder edc luxe Dwjiuh Ruumr l E>mrK
CP-CHil II 11 AND BDfTPR MUCH MDSES CiI iTTlVI EXECUTIVE F*3QDUCERS DAtd. WOLF AND DCNALD R05EhfQD
© 1996 Arrow nr EAsn n »C. mx wcmti reserved AN AjUOWhv
«^5
WOLF Production
Visit arrow Entertainment web Site http://www.arrowfilms.com
RELEASE
J
ALLIANCE CINEMA
927 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH CALL 531-8504 FOR INFO
64
SOUNDTRACK AVAIIABIE ON SIMEN RECORDS
htlpy/www.dimtmionlilim.tom/dimension.hlml
Ü
m
m
"THE FINAL HELLRAISER' IS
THE MOST TERRIFYING OF ALL!"
Joseph o. Maticen, world of fandom magazine
cocoSfóii
3015 Grand Aw.
448-6641
SHER¡DAÍÍl2
4999 Sheridan St.
967-4680
SOimiDAbEI
18591 S. Dixie Hwy.
238-4424
GENERAL CINEMA
MIRACLE COTTER 11
3301 Coral Way
442-2299
GENERAL CINEMA
HIALEAH CINEMA 8
103rd Si Opposite Westland M«
567-9888
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES 0 PQIBfMME PINES
11350 Pines Blvd.
435-3700
OCEAN CINEMA
LeJEUME 6
782 NW LsJeuna Rd.
529-8883
KENDALLS
ail Or. W. ol FL Tumpika
596-5000
COBB
0AKW00D
11
Oakwood Ptaa 1-86 4 SUrting
923-7777
III BROWARD: CORAL RI06E. SAW6RASS, FESTIVAL. CORAL SO. MOVES OIAU0ERMU.. MOVES O POMPANO. SWAP SHOP.
NOW
SHOWING!
mhsuIndis
FASHH
18741 Bscaynt Btal0187th SL
931-2873
omc,
MALL OF AMERICAS 14
Palmetto Expressway 4 836
266 6646
amg.
OCEAN WALK 10
AM 4 mpmt M. MywoJ Bdi
920-6330
Omni International 4
358-2304
Fill
T1
jg
t
Fil
m 1
Ãœapsu
les
The following are capsule reviews of movies opening this
week, or currently showing, in the Greater Miami area. For
information about movie times and locations, see
“Showtimes,” contact local theaters, or call 888-FILM, a
free service.
Openings
Dersu Uzala (U): A wOy Mongolian hunter befriends a
Russian surveyor who has been dispatched to map
out the Siberian wasteland. Director Akira Kurosawa
ruminates about the nature of friendship and the
indomitability of the human spirit against a
breathtaking backdrop of sweeping, starkly
magnificent vistas.
Ed (PG): The cute-animals-in-ludicrous-situations
movies just keep rolling out Friends star Matt
LeBlanc, already accustomed to being upstaged by a
precocious monkey on his hit TV show, now shares
screen time with a baseball-playing chimp (no, really)
in LeBlanc’s motion picture debut
Executive Decision (R): Die Hard on a plane! Joel Silver,
epitome of the slick, money-grubbing modem
Hollywood producer and the man responsible for the
Bruce Willis action series (not to mention Fair Game)
presents this far-fetched, testosterone-driven, stop-the-
terrorist flick. Six elite U.S. military operatives led by
Steven Seagal and Kurt Russell board a hijacked plane
in midair and attempt to defuse a bomb loaded with
nerve gas that if exploded, could paralyze
Washington, D.C. (Not that anyone would notice.)
Fargo (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Two Much (PG-13): Fernando Trueba’s eagerly
anticipated followup to 1992’s enchanting Belle
Epoque falls flat Antonio Banderas plays a shifty art
dealer who pretends to be identical twins in order to
woo a pair of sisters: ditzy Melanie Griffith and
horribly coiffed Daryl Hannah. Banderas gives it his
best shot and actually enlivens a few uninspired
comedic bits; and Joan Cusack earns a chuckle as
Banderas’s bemused assistant But Griffith and
Hannah do nothing with a script that offers little in the
way of originality or wit Too little.
Ongoing
12 Monkeys (R): A reluctant time traveler (Bruce
Willis at his least smirky and most intense) from a
bleak, virus-plagued Philadelphia of the future
visits the City of Brotherly Love in 1996, where,
with the help of a skeptical psychiatrist (Madeleine
Stowe), he attempts to prevent the original
outbreak of the virus. But his plans clash with
those of a terrorist cell known as the Army of the
12 Monkeys and their mentally unbalanced leader
(Brad Pitt in a caffeinated, turbocharged rush of a
performance that would have been right at home in
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest). Director Terry
Gilliam (Brazil, Time Bandits) returns to peak form
with this mind-blower, using a crackeijack script
by Janet and David Peoples (Blade Runner) as a
point of departure and fleshing it out with his own
vividly twisted, cynical imagination.
Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (PG-13): All righty,
then. America’s best-paid pet detective returns, and
this time he’s recruited the entire animal kingdom
to transport his earnings. Yuk along as Ace
ventures from a Tibetan ashram to the jungles of
deepest, darkest Africa, embarking upon one
wacky escapade after another.
Angels & Insects (U): Peter Greenaway would be
proud of this dry, droll English period drama (set
in the mid-1800s and based on A.S. Byatt’s novella
Morpho Eugenia, one of two that compose her
book Angels & Insects). Drawing parallels between
the behavior of people and that of bugs, it uses the
unbiased eye of a scientist to look at love, passion,
and the fine line separating appearances from
reality. Written by Belinda and Philip Haas and
directed by the latter (the same team responsible
for 1993’s The Music of Chance).
Anne Frank Remembered (PG): Jon Blair’s
documentary (narrated by Kenneth Branagh)
reconstructs much of the heroic writer’s young life
through interviews with those who knew her.
Beautiful Girls (R): Guys. Gals. Relationships.
Commitment problems. Turning 30. Angst But
with Uma Thurman, Mira Sorvino, and thirteen-
year-old bombshell-in-training Natalie (The
Professional) Portman lighting up the huge
ensemble cast at least the title meets truth-in-
advertising criteria.
Bed of Roses (PG): More like a wilted bouquet this
limp arrangement from first-time writer-director
Michael Goldenberg offers Christian Slater and
Mary Stuart Masterson in a romantic comedy so
mushy they should have checked it for head rot
Before and After (PG-13): A teenage girl meets a
brutal death and all signs point to murder at the
hands of her introverted boyfriend (Edward
Furlong). The boy’s parents (Liam Neeson and
Meryl Streep) wrestle with doubts about their
son’s innocence while battling to keep him out of
jail. Adapted from the 1992 novel of the same name
and directed by Barbet Schroeder (Reversal of
Fortune).
The Birdcage (R): Mike Nichols (The Graduate)
directs Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, and
Nathan Lane in the English-language remake of
the beloved French comedy La Cage Aux Folies,
about a middle-age gay couple who pretend to be
straight Elaine May (Heaven Can Wait, Ishtar)
scripted. The Birdcage marks the first motion
picture collaboration of the legendary Nichols-May
comedy team that split up in the mid-Sixties so that
both could try their luck in Hollywood.
Black Sheep (PG-13): Frightening, isn’t it how
those untalented Saturday Night Uve alumni just
keep churning out the product?
Bottle Rocket (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Broken Arrow: John Travolta is the bad hotshot
pilot Christian Slater is the good hotshot pilot and
stolen nuclear warheads are the booty for which
they wrangle. Directed by Hong Kong action
maestro John Woo from a screenplay by Graham
Yost the man who wrote Speed.
Casino (R): Did anyone complain that John Ford
directed too many Westerns, or that Hitchcock
made too many suspense thrillers? Director Martin
Scorsese has taken a few slugs from critics who
have called his latest wiseguy epic “GoodFellas
goes to Vegas.” True, some GoodFellas
comparisons are inevitable: Casino stars
GoodFellas headliners Joe Pesd and Robert De
Niro (Pesci’s role closely reprises the loose cannon
mafioso he played in the earlier film) and was
adapted by Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi from a
non-fiction Pileggi book — as was GoodFellas. But
Casino deserves better than to be written off as a
second jaunt over familiar turf. For starters,
Scorsese may well be this country’s greatest still-
active director, and Casino showcases the master
at the top of his game. Sharon Stone also
commands respect with her career-best
performance as a hooker with a heart of dry ice.
And, as is usually the case in Scorsese films, the
supporting cast is uniformly excellent Hollywood
offers no surer thing than Scorsese, DeNiro, and
Pesci working it Only a sucker would pass on
Casino.
City Hall (R): A1 Pacino plays a popular New York
City mayor (á la Fiorello LaGuardia). Things get
hairy when a stray bullet from a gun battle between
a cop and a drug dealer kills a six-year-old black
child. Harold Becker (Sea of Love) directs from a
script cowritten by a gaggle of heavyweights: Paul
Schrader (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull), Nicholas
Pileggi (Casino, GoodFellas), Bo Goldman (One
Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest), and Ken Upper
(founder of the billion-dollar Wall Street
investment firm Upper & Company).
Dead Man Walking (R): Surprise! Just when you
think you have this film pegged as a well-
intentioned, by-the-numbers anti-capital-
punishment treatise, it changes course in
midstream and evolves into something much more
original and affecting. Susan Sarandon plays a
naive nun who helps a death row inmate appeal his
sentence. Both the sister and the film take a pretty
sympathetic view of his plight until she meets the
families of the murder victims and becomes
entangled in their grief as well. Sean Penn is
stunning as the condemned man watching the
minutes tick by. Forget the bad-boy antics and the
questionable move into directing. This tour de
force re-establishes Penn as one of the most gifted
actors of his generation.
Don’t Be a Menace (R): Big brother Keenen Ivory
Wayans made a name for himself lampooning
Seventies blaxploitation flicks in I'm Gonna Git
You Sucka; younger siblings Shawn and Marlon
Wayans set their sights on more recent gangsta
flicks like Menace II Society and Juice.
Down Periscope (PG-13): Some men buy Vettes.
Some men wave big guns. Frasier Crane — er,
Kelsey Grammer — works out his phallic
insecurities by commanding a submarine.
Whatever floats yer boat, doc.
Eye for an Eye (R): The Flying Nun with a Death
Wish. When creepy Kiefer Sutherland (still pissed


}X off about the Julia Roberts thing, apparently)
\ murders her daughter and then goes free on a
Jt technicality, Sally Field (!) takes the law into her
I own hands.
Father of the Bride Part II (PG): Sven if you enjoyed
1991’s Father of the Bride, there’s still less than a
I 50-50 chance you’ll like this schmaltzy, predictable
i sequel. And if you didn Y like the earlier film, keep
| your distance. The only plot development of
I significance in Father 2 is that both the bride and
â–  her mother get pregnant at the same time. The rest
I is all, um, formula.
French Twist (R): Victoria Abril has never been
\ funnier or sexier than she is in this variation on the
| tried-and-true romantic triangle formula. The twist:
I The other man is a woman.
Happy Gilmore (PG-13): Too bad Gary Gilmore
j didn’t get ahold of Adam Sandler before he went
: into production on yet another lame cash grab
masquerading as a comedy.
Heat (R): What you see is what you get: A1 Pacino
í and Robert DeNiro as a cop and a robber out to do
what they do best. Exciting fare, although not
( much nutritional value. Too many fine supporting
i players to mention here. Directed in high -Vice
I style by Michael Mann.
Heavy Metal (R): The animated 1981 soft-core sci-fi
I odyssey based on the magazine of the same name
has been the single most active title in Columbia
Pictures’ entire library over the last ten years.
Although today it has been eclipsed in terms of
I innovative animation and erotic content, the film
maintains a loyal core of fanatic devotees who can’t
get enough of its sci-fi, fantasy, and sword-and-
sorcery story lines, as well as its charmingly dated
soundtrack featuring cuts by early Eighties arena
i rockers.
Hellralser: Bloodline (R): Remember when it used to
be an insult to call somebody a pinhead? That all
I' changed with the advent of Clive Barker’s
Hellraiser series (Bloodline is the fourth
installment). Barker’s Pinhead is billed as the
Black Prince of Hell, qualifying him as the epitome
I of cool.
Homeward Bound II (G): Two mutts and a cool cat
court danger on the streets of San Francisco.
If Lucy Fell (R): Writer-director Eric Schaeffer is no
fool. First he cast himself as a regular guy who
dates his neighbor in this romantic comedy. Then
he cast Elle Macpherson as the neighbor. Sarah
Jessica Parker costars.
The Juror (R): Demi Moore plays the only single
mother in America who welcomes jury duty.
Somehow it seems fitting that she winds up
trapped in a deadly dilemma about whether or not
to acquit a mobster whose sexy hitman (Alec
Baldwin) is threatening to kill her son if the
Mafioso is convicted. What does it say about our
) country that an actual juror gets paid something
l like $12 per day, while Demi Moore earns $12
million for portraying one in a movie?
Leaving Las Vegas (R): If it’s happy loving couples
\ you want, look elsewhere. John O’Brien, the author
| of the book from which this bleak movie is
adapted, committed suicide shortly after learning
that his semi-autobiographical novel would become
a film. Nicolas Cage has collected the most effusive
critical accolades of his career in the role of
" recently fired Hollywood screenwriter Ben, an
unapologetically self-destructive drunk who settles
on Vegas as the proper locale for his terminal
bender. Plans for his farewell binge are
momentarily interrupted when he falls hopelessly
in love with Sara (Elizabeth Shue, also receiving
excellent notices), a variation on the hooker-with-a-
heart-of-gold archetype who may well be Ben’s lost-
soul mate.
Mary Reilly (R): Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde have a
lovely new assistant—Julia Roberts! Stephen
Frears (My Beautiful Laundrette, Dangerous
Liaisons) directs, and John Malkovich costars as
the medicine man with the whopping identity
crisis.
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG): Sincere, predictable Richard
Dreyfiiss vehicle about a teacher-composer who must
reconcile his love of music with the fact that his own
son cannot hear.
Mr. Wrong (PG-13): You know the pattern by now:
Quirky but unthreatening stand-up comic hits the
jackpot with TV sitcom, writes breezy but insanely
popular book, then takes a shot at movie stardom.
Hoping to follow in Tim Allen’s and Paul Reiser’s
footsteps, Ellen DeGeneres plays a thirtysomething
single woman who thinks she’s met the perfect guy
only to find out otherwise.
Muppet Treasure Island (G): Kermit, Miss Piggy,
Gonzo, and Rizzo take on Long John Silver and his
entire chain of fast-food franchises.
The Postman (PG): “Poetry dbesn’t belong to those
who write it, but to those who need it,” reasons Mario
(Massimo Troisi), the timid title character, in an
attempt to enlist the aid of exiled Chilean poet Pablo
Neruda (Cinema Paradiso's Philippe Noiret) to
support Mario’s quest to woo the most beautiful
woman on sun-dappled Capri. The Italian island’s
postmaster, overwhelmed by the volume of mail
bound for Neruda (mail that begins to arrive even
before the fabled wordsmith does), hires Mario, the
son of a local fisherman, to serve as Neruda’s personal
letter carrier. The unlikely friendship that develops
between poet and postman leads to a Cyrano-like
courtship in this enchanting character study. Troisi,
considered by many to be Italy’s finest actor, died of
heart failure at the age of 41 one day after completing
principal photography on the film.
Rumble in the Bronx OR): Jackie Chan (winner of a
1995 MTV Lifetime Achievement Award!), one of
the world’s most popular action/martial-arts stars,
takes on thugs, mobsters, and motorcycle
gangs© running loose in the South Bronx.
Nobody kicks butt more stylishly than martial
artist-acrobat-choreographer Chan, who, over the
course of his remarkable 20-year career, has done
all his own stunts (his physical feats earning him
comparisons to the great silent film comedians
Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd).
Sabrina (PG): Yet more evidence of the decline of
civilization: Harrison Ford, Greg Kinnear, ajad Julia
Ormond highlight Sydney Pollack’s remake of the
incomparable Billy 'Wilder original, which featured
Humphrey Bogart, William Holden, and Audrey
Hepburn. Ford and Kinnear play rich brothers who
fight for Ormond’s affections.
Sense and Sensibility (PG): Nineteenth Century mores
provide a backdrop for this adaption of Jane Austen’s
classic novel about two sisters who struggle to find
romance in a society obsessed with status. Co-writer
Emma Thompson stars with Kate Winslet, Hugh
Grant, and Alan Rickman.
Taxi Driver (IQ: This Paul Schrader-penned, Martin
Scorcese-directed descent into a hellish maw of urban
angst and anomie still packs a wallop twenty years
later, retaining the power to shock and unsettle
viewers. With Robert DeNiro, Jodie Foster, and
Harvey Keitel.
That Day (U): Reviewed in this issue.
Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead (R): Don’t be
fooled; the only thing this Tarantino-esque film noir
has in common with the Warren Zevon song is the
title. Reformed mobster “Jimmy the Saint” (Andy
Garcia) — known for using words as his weapons—
tries to go straight But ex-boss “the Man with the
Flan” (Christopher Walken) lures Jimmy out of
retirement with an offer to pull one last job.
Complicating matters drastically is Jimmy’s promising
new romance with the alluring Dagney (Gabrielle
Anwar). Things get sticky when Jimmy’s boys botch
the job and Walken’s character hires “Mr. Shhh”
(Steve Buscemi) to cap them all.
Toy Story (G): Following the disappointing box-office
(by Lion King standards, anyway) generated by this
summer's cartoon fare, Disney takes animation into
the next century with the world’s first completely
computer-animated feature film. Tom Hanks, Tun
Allen, Don Rickies, and Annie Potts give voice to a
room full of toys that come alive whenever the young
boy who owns them leaves. Bet there isn’t a
Pocahontas doll among them.
Up Close & Personal (PG-13): A onetime craps dealer
from Reno (Michelle Pfeiffer) rises to the top of the
TV newscasting heap with the help of an older
newsman (Robert Bedford) who becomes both her
mentor and her lover.
The White Balloon (U): This sly and deceptively simple
comedy about a young Iranian girl in search of the
perfect goldfish thoroughly beguiled the audience
that saw it at the 1996 Miami Film Festival. Written by
acclaimed Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami and
directed by one of his disciples, Jafar Panahi.
White Squall (PG-13): An adventure becomes a rite
of passage when a freak storm sinks a floating
prep school and outside authorities threaten to
assign blame for the calamity to the vessel’s
enigmatic skipper (Jeff Bridges). Directed by
Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner).
ALTÍHE CRITICS AGREE
THE WHrtE BALLOON'
SOARS!
i WINNER! CAMERA POR i
^ CANNES FILM FESTIVAL W
CISÍS OCTOBER FILMS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. OCTOBER
NOW SHOWING
EXCLUSIVELY IN
FLORIDA AT
avc. CINEMaI
cocoWalk It
44*4*41
1—
Uctober Films Website:
http://www.octoberfilms.com
GENERAL CINEMAS
miracle CENTER 10
CORAL WAY
442-2299
“TC¡kresistible'.
a Family Winner!”
/\ AMERICAN URBAN RADIO NETWORKS
A .Ron Btewington, American
i “Nothing Short Of AgrowwS.
“Exciting!’
-Stephen Holden,
THE NEW YORK TIMES
AMC THEATRES
SHERIDAN PLAZA 12
4999 SHERIDAN ST.
HOLLYWOOD
987-4680
AMC THEATRES
OCEAN WALK 10
333 HARRISON ST.
HOLLYWOOD BEACH
920-6330
AMC THEATRES
FASHION ISLAND 16
18741 BISCAYNE
BLVD.
931-2873
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
PALMETTO X-WAY
8636
266-6646
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT PEMBROKE
3 ML W. UNIV.BIVD.
ON PINES BLVD.
435-3700
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT
HIALEAH
780 WEST 49TH STREET
826-7242
COB8 THEATRES
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107THAVE.
OPP.F1U
223-2700
OAKWOOD 18
â—¦NEMAS
2800 OAKWOOD
BLVD.,
HOLLYWOOD
923-4321
OCEAN ONEMA
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
N.W.7THST.
8 LEJEUNE RO.
529-8883
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 6
US. 18
S.W. 185THST.
238-4424
COBB THEATRES
BYEON/CARIYIE 1.
5C0-7VSTRFET
KIAMI BEACH
866-9623
COB8 THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
AMC THEATRES
KENDALL TOWN
8 COUNTRY 10
HA. TPKE. AT KENDALL DR.
271-8198
COBB'S
MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3390 MARY ST.. SUITE. 380
ABOVE PLANET
HOLLYWOOD
447-9969
COBB THEATRE5
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT MAIN 8 LUDLAM
558-3810
Alto In Biowara at cora* Sida© Fo*
&r^Fou£talns' saworc.ssW4sto?
Mercedes, Swaps nop. Movies at
ffy0* »»*=■*g&towoc
WWch IN. Academy Awart, March 25 on
iNO!*5£fSiic5uR8gfcc;
Visit “Homeward Bound 11^ at http://www.disney.com


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Beaches
Fil
m
¡g¡
Showtimes
Following lo a schedule for movies opening and currently
screening at local theaters. All times p.m. unless otherwise
noted. A # Indicates a movie that opens this week. All movie
times are subject to change without notice; please call
individual theaters or 888-FILM (a free service) to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna «¡4434777
French Twist (R) Daily 6:00,8:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun matinee
4:00)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Orand Ave; 448-6641
Sense and Sensibility (PS) Thur 1:45,5:00,7:45,10:35; Fri-
Sun 12:00n, 5:00,10:00; Mon-Wed 1:20,7:45
City Hall (R) Thur 1:20,5:00,7:40,10:10; Fri-Sun 2:40,7:40
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed 5:05,10:10
Things to Do In Denver When You're Dead (R) Thur 3/14 only
10:45
Mr. Wrong (P6-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:20
The Postman (PG) Thur 1:25,5:30,8:05,10:35; Fri-Sun
12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a);
Mon-Wed 1:25,5:30,8:05,10:35
Angels 4 Insects (U) Thur 3/14 only 1:35,5:30,8:05
Leaving Las Vegas (R) Thur 3/14 only 5:10,7:50,10:20
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 1:45,5:35,8:10,10:25; Fri-Sun
12:40,2:50,5:35,8:10,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:25a);
Mon-Wed 1:15,5:25,7:35,10:10
Up Close & Personal (PC-13) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:50,10:35;
Fri-Sun 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,7:35,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show
12:50a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:40,10:20
Down Periscope (P6-13) Thur 1:30,5:20,8:00,10:20; Fri-
Sun 12:20,2:40,5:20,8:00,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show
12:35a); Mon-Wed 1:30,5:20,8:00,10:20
Heavy Metal (R) Thur-Sun 12:30,2:45,5:30,8:05,10:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:35a); Mon-Wed 1:35,5:30,8:15,10:40
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:40,5:15,7:30,10:10; Fri-Sun 12:20,
5:20,10:20; Mon-Wed 1:20,7:50
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 1:15,1:55,5:00,5:40,7:25,8:10,
10:00,10:45; Fri-Sun 12:00n, 1:00,2:35,4:30,5:25,7:15,
8:10,10:10 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,12:45a); Mon-Wed
1:15,1:55,5:00,5:40,7:30,8:10,10:05,10:45
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Thur 1:50,5:20,8:00,10:05; Fri-
Sun 12:45,2:55,5:30,8:10,10:25; Mon-Wed 1:50,5:20,
8:15,10:30
RetUe Rocket (R) Thur 1:40,5:25,7:50,10:00; Fri-Sun 2:50,
7:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 5:30,10:35
The White Ralloon (U) Thur 1:30,5:10,7:30,9:45; Fri-Sun
12:25,2:35,5:10,7:30,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m);
Mon-Wed 1:30,5:10,7:30,9:45
«Fargo (R) Fri-Sun 12:30,2:45,5:40,8:15,10:30 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:15,8:00,10:25
«Two Much (PO-13) Fri-Sun 12:05,2:30,5:05,7:40,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:40,5:20,8:00,
10:35
*Ed (PD) Fri-Sun 12:10,2:25,5:15,7:30,9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a); Mon-Wed 1:10,5:15,7:30,10:00
«Executive Decision (R) Fri-Sun 12:45,1:30,4:15,5:00,7:00,
7:50,10:00,10:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed
1:00,1:45,5:00,5:30,7:50,8:30,10:40
Bill Cosford Cinema
University of Miami (off Campe Sane Ave); 284-4861
Dersu Uzala (U) Fri 7:30; Sat-Sun 5:00,7:30
Le Jeune Cinemas 6
782 UdeuneRd; 529-8883
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 3/14 only 2:30,5:05,7:40,10:00
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Down Periscope (PD-13) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:10
(Thur 10:15) (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Birdcage (R) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:30,9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
Homeward Round II (0) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:05,10:05
Hellraiser: Rleedline (R) Daily 2:10,4:10,6:10,8:10,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 2:00,4:45,7:20,9:50 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:15a)
3380 Mary Street; 447-8888
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 1:40,4:25,7:35,10:00 (Fri-Sat
Info c Vi AW 1 9*9^0^
Mr. Holland's Opus (PD) Daily 1:15,4:15,7:15,10:00
ReautHúl Girts (R) Daily 1:25,4:10,7:45,10:10 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:50,4:45,8:00,10:25 (Thur 10:35)
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Nuppet Treasure Island (D) Daily 1:45,4:35,7:20,9:55 (Fri-
Cut Iptp ofiAtv 10'0T1p\
Happy Dilmere (PD-13) Daily 1:30,4:00,7:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat
lste show 12*152)
Before and Alter (PS-13) Daily 1:50,4:30,7:40,10:05 (Fri-
g0 Sat late show 12:20a)
Mary Reilly (R) Daily 1:15,4:30,7:25, )0:20 (Fri-Sat late
show l2:30a)
French Twist (R) Daily 1:35,4:20,7:40,10:10 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:35a)
Homeward Bound II (8) Daily 1:20,4:05,7:05,9:45 (Fri-Sat
matinee 12:10)
Miracle Center 10
3301 Coral Way; 442-2289
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:25,4:15,7:30,10:20 (Fri-Sat
10:35)
City Hall (R) Thur 1:35,4:25,7:15,10:15; Fri-Wed 4:25,
10:00 (Fri-Sat 10:15)
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:00,3:00,7:20
Before and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 5:00,10:00
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:30,7:50,10:20
(Fri-Sat 10:25)
Down Periscope (P6-13) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:25,7:45,10:00
(Fri-Sat 10:10)
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:20,4:15,7:15,10:00
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:15 (Thur 1:30), 4:20,7:30,10:10
(Fri-Sat 10:20)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:15,7:45,10:05; Fri-Wed
1:10,7:45
Hellraiser: Bloodline (R) Daily 1:10,3:15,5:25,7:40,10:15
(Fri-Sat 10:30)
Homeward Round II (C) Thur 1:00,3:05,5:15,7:15,9:15; Fri-
Wed 1:05,3:05,5:15,7:20,9:30
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:35,10:15 (Fri-Sat
10:30)
«Two Much (PD-13) Daily 1:25,4:40,7:40,10:15 (Fri-Sat
10:25)
Omni 4 and 6
1601 Biscayne Blvd; 372-3439 and 358-2304
Don’t Be a Menace (R) Thur 1:45,5:35,7:50,10:00; Fri-Wed
7:50,10:00
Rroken Arrow (R) Thur-Fri 1:40,5:10,7:40,10:15; Sat-Sun
12:10, 2:30,5:10,7:40,10:15; Mon-Wéd 1:40,5:10,7:40,
10:15
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 1:55; Fri 1:45,5:25; Sat-Sun
12:15,2:50,5:35; Mon-Wed 1:45,5:25
City Hall (R) Thur 2:20,5:20,7:50,10:20; Fri 2:20,7:30; Sat-
Sun 2:50,8:10; Mon-Wed 2:20,7:30
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 1:30,2:00,5:00,5:30,7:30,
8:00,10:00,10:30; Fri 1:30,2:30,5:10,5:20,7:40,8:00,
10:00,10:10; Sat-Sun 12:10,12:40,2:40,3:00,5:00,5:30,
7:30,8:00,10:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 1:30,2:30,5:10,5:30,
7:40,8:00,10:00,10:10
Down Periscope (PD-13) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:35,9:50; Fri 2:00,
5:00,7:35,9:50; Sat-Sun 12:Q0n, 2:20,5:00,7:35,9:50; Mon-
Wed 2:00,5:00,7:35,9:50
Hellraiser: Rleedline (R) Thur 1:50,5:20,7:30,9:45; Fri 1:50,
5:20,7:30,9:45; Sat-Sun 12:30,2:40,5:20,7:30,9:45; Mon-
Wed 1:50,5:20,7:30,9:45
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 2:30,5:30,8:00,10:30; Fri 5:15,10:20;
Sat-Sun 12:15,5:10,10:30; Mon-Wed 5:15,10:20
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:40,10:10; Fri 2:15,5:10,
8:00,10:35; Sat-Sun 12:00n, 2:45,5:20,7:45,10:15; Mon-
Wed 2:15, 5:10,8:00,10:35
«Executive Decision (R) Fri 2:00,5:00,7:45,10:30; Sat-Sun
11:50a, 2:30,5:15,8:00,10:40; Mon-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:45,
10:30
*Ed (PC) Fri 1:35,5:15,7:45,10:20; Sat-Sun 12:20,2:35,
5:15,7:45,10:20; Mon-Wed 1:35,5:15,7:40,10:20
Riviera
1560 S Dixie Hwy, 666-8514
City Hall (R) Thur 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15; Fri-Wed
7:00,9:30
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 12:15,2:30,7:15; Fri-Wed
12:15,2:30,4:45
Before and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 4:45,9:30
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 12:35,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Fri-
Cat loto chow 1
The Rirdcage (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:15,5:00,7:40,10:25 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:55a)
Pink Floyd: The Wall (R) Fri-Sat 12:00m
«The Postman (PD) Daily 11:30a, 2:00,4:45,7:30,10:15
Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Bakery Centre 7
5701 SunsetDr 6624841
Theater closed for renovation.
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr 598-5000
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:10,9:40 (Sat early
show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Sense and Sensibility (PD) Thur 3/14 only 7:00,9:45
City Hall (R) Thur 12:25,2:40,5:00,7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed
1:30,7:15 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Mr. Wrong (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 12:30,2:40,4:45,8:00,
10:10
Rumble In the Rronx (R) Daily 12:40,2:50,5:00,7:50,10:00
(Sat early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Rabe (0) Thur 3/14 only 12:50,3:00,5:10
Down Periscope (PD-13) Daily 12:30,2:40,5:00,8:00,10:15
(Sat early show 10:20a; Fri-Sat late show 12:25a)
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Thur 1:45,4:40,7:30,10:00;
Fri-Wed 1:30,4:30,7:20,9:50 (Sat early show 10:30a; Fri-
Sat late show 12:30a)
Hellraiser Rleedline (R) Thur 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:15,9:30;
Fri-Wed 12:30,2:45,4:50,7:30,9:45 (Sat early show
10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 12:30,3:00,5:00,7:3p„ lQ:P0pEri.Wed
4:45,9:40 (Sat early show 10:30a)
•Ed (PD) Daily 12:20,2:15,4:10,6:10,8:10,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
•Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:30,4:40,7:25,10:00 (Sat
early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
•Two Much (PD-13) Daily 2.-00,4:30,7:10,9:40 (Sat early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Or 271-8198
Toy Story (8) Thur 2:15,5:25; Fri-Sun 12:55,2:45,5:15;
Mon-Wed 1:50,5:35
Leaving Las Vegas (R) Thur 1:50,5:35,8:00,10:30; Fri-Sun
7:30,10:00; Mon-Wed 7:30,10:05
Mr. Holland's Opus (PD) Thur 1:45,4:50,7:45,10:35; Fri-Sun
1:20,4:50,7:45,10:40; Mon-Wed 1:45,4:50,7:45,
10:35
The Juror (R) Thur 7:30,9:55; Fri-Sun 1:25,5:05,7:35,
10:10 (Fri-Sat late show 12:25a); Mon-Wed 2:15,5:05,
7:35,10:10
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 1:40,5:20,8:05,10:25; Fri-Sun
12:45,3:10,5:35,7:55,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a);
Mon-Wed 1:40,5:20,8:05,10:25
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 2:10,5:05,7:15,
9:30; Fri-Sun 1:00,3:10,5:20; Mon-Wed 2:10,5:05,7:15,
9:30
Happy Gilmore (PD-13) Thur 1:55,5:45,8:15,10:30; Fri-Sun
12:50,3:20,5:25,7:50,9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a);
Mon-Wed 1:55,5:45,8:15,10:30
Refore and After (PG-13) Thur 2:05,5:15,7:50,10:10; Fri-
Sun 12:40,3:15,5:40,8:00,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a); Mon-Wed 2:05,5:15,7:50,10:10
The Birdcage (R) Thur 1:40,2:15,5:00,5:30,7:40,8:10,
10:15,10:40; Fri-Sun 12:25,1:30,3:05,5:00,5:40,7:40,
8:15,10:20,10:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed
1:40,2:15,5:00,5:30,7:40,8:10,10:15,10:40
Homeward Round II (8) Thur 2:00,5:10,7:25,9:40; Fri-Sun
12:30,2:40,5:10,7:15,9:30; Mon-Wed 2:00,5:10,7:25,
9:40
Miller Square VIII
13838 Miller Rd; 387-3494
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 7:40,9:45; Fri-Wed 7:30,9:35 (Sat-
Sun matinees 2:10,4:50; Fri-Sat late show 11:40)
Muppet Treasure Island (D) Thur 3/14 only 7:15
Happy Dilmere (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 7:30,9:35
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 7:45,9:55; Fri-Wed 8:00 (Sat-
Sun matinees 1:55,3:55,6:00; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Refore and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 9:40
Down Periscope (P8-13) Thur 7:50,9:50; Fri-Wed 7:45,9:45
(Sat-Sun matinees 1:45,3:45,5:45; Fri-Sat late show
11:45)
The Birdcage (R) Thur 7:00,9:30; Fri-Wed 7:10,9:30 (Sat-
Sun matinees 2:00,4:40; Fri-Sat late show 11:50)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 8:00,10:00; Fri-Wed 10:00
Homeward Bound II (6) Daily 7:00,9:00 (Sat-Sun matinees
1:45,3:30,5:15; Fri-Sat late show 11:00)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 7:15,9:40 (Sat-Sun matinees
2:05,4:45; Fri-Sat late show 11:55)
*Ed (PD) Daily 7:50,9:50 (Sat-Sun matinees 1:50,3:50; Fri-
Sat late show 11:50)
«Two Much (PD-13) Daily 7:40,9:55 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:15,
5:25; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Movies at the Falls
8888 Reward Dr; 255-5200
Mr. Holland's Opus (P6) Thur 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00; Fri-
Wed 12:45,4:10,7:10,10:10
Black Sheep (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 2:20,7:00
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 12:20,2:40,4:45,7:20,9:30;
Fri-Wed 12:20,2:30,4:40,7:20,9:20 (Fri-Sat late show
11:40)
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 12:40,3:00,5:00,7:25,9:35
CThur9:40) (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
City Hall (R) Thur 1:30,4:20,7:20,9:45; Fri-Wed 12:40,
5:20,10:15
If Lucy Fell (R) Daily 12:30,2:45,4:50 (Thur 4:40), 7:40,
9:35 (Fri-Sat late show 11:50)
The Juror (R) Thur 2:30,7:40; Fri-Wed 3:00,7:45
Mary Reilly (R) Thur 3/14 only 12:00n, 5:10,10:10
Reautiftil Girls (R) Thur 12:10,4:20,9:20; Fri-Wed 9:15
Rroken Arrow (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:25,4:50,7:35,10:10; Fri-
Wed 12:00n, 2:20,4:40,7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show
12:20a)
Muppet Treasure Island (D) Thur 12:10,2:15,4:30,7:15,
9:25; Fri-Wed 12:10,2:15,4:30,7:00
Down Periscope (PG-13) Daily 12:25,2:40,5:15 (Thur 5:10),
7:35 (Thur 7:30), 9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Thur 1:15,4:10,7:10,9:50; Fri-
Wed 1:15,4:20,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,5:15,7:40,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:30,4:15,7:10,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
' «Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:20a)
•Ed (PD) Daily 12:15,2:25,4:25,7:30,9:40 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
South Dade 8
18581 South Dixie Hwy; 2384424
Movie times for Friday through Wednesday were not
available at press time
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 1:45,5:30,7:45,10:00
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 1:35,7:55,9:55
City Hall (R) Thur 5:35
Rumble In the Rronx (R) Thur 2:00,5:55,8:05,9:55
Down Periscope (PO-13) Thur 1:30,5:45,7:45,9:45
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 1:30,5:25,7:50,10:10
Homeward Bound II (0) Thur 1:55,6:00,8:00,9:50
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:40,5:40,7:40,9:40
Hellraiser: Rloodllne (R) Thur 1:50,5:50,8:10,10:05
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Suite 119; 531-8504
Taxi Driver (R) Thur 8:00,10:15; Fri-Wed 8:00 (Sat-Sun
matinees 3:30,5:45; Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
«Catwalk (U) Daily 10:15
Bay Harbor IV
1170 sane Concourse; 866-2441
Before and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:50,4:20,7:30,
10:00
Up Close A Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:30,4:10,7:05 (Thur
7:00), 9:40
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:40 (Thur 2:00), 4:30,7:20,10:00
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG) Daily 1:20 (Ihur 1:30), 4:15,7:00,
9:45
•Two Much (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:40,7:30,10:00
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St; 860-9623
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:50,4:30,7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
City Hall (R) Thur 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:05; Fri-Wed 1:30,7:30
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 5:00,10:20
Muppet Treasure Island (8) Thur 3/14 only 2:15,7:30
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:45,4:40,7:50,10:25 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Hewn Periscope (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:45,8:00,10:15 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:20a)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 2:15,4:15,6:15,8:15,10:15; Fri-Wed
4:50,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Homeward Bound II (G) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:00,8:00,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
•Ed (PD) Daily 2:15,5:00,7:50,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show
12:15a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:40,4:45,7:40,10:15 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:40a)
North Dade
California Club VI
850 Ives Daily Rd; 652-8558
Broken Arrew (R) Thur 3/14 only 1:00,3.-05,5:20,7:30,9:45
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:15,3:10,5:15,7:30 (Thur
7:20), 9:35 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Up Cíese & Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:10,4:00,7:10 (Thur
7:00), 9:30 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Daily 1:05,3:00,5:10,7:15,9:15
(Sat early show 10:00a)
The Rirdcage (R) Daily 1:30,4:05,7:00,9:25 (Sat early show
10:00a)
Hellraiser: Bloodline (R) Daily 1:20,3:20,5:30,7:35,9:45
(Thur 9:40) (Sat early show 10:00a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:00,4:10,7:20,9:50 (Sat
early show 10:00a)
Fashion Island
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 931-2873
Dead Man Walking (R) Thur 3/14 only 4:40
The Juror (R) Thur 3/14 only 2:05,7:20
Rroken Arrew (R) Thur 1:30,5:45,8:15,10:40; Fri-Wed
12:25,3:20,5:45,8:15,10:40 (Wed early show 10:40a; Fri-
Sat late show 12:55a)
Muppet Treasure Island (PG) Thur 1:55,5:05,7:10; Fri-Sun
12:30,2:50,4:55; Mon-Wed 12:30,2:50,4:55,7:20,9:35
(Wed early show 10:35a)
City Hall (R) Thur 2:25,5:15,7:40,10:05; Fri-Wed 12:15,
2:30,5:05,7:40,9:50 (Wed early show 10:50a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:05a)
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 1:15,6:00,8:25,9:20,10:05;
Fri-Wed 12:45,2:55,5:45,7:55,10:30 (Wed eariy show
10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Baba (8) Thur 3/14 only 2:30
Up Cíese & Personal (PG-13) Thur 2:35,4:40,5:25,7:15,
8:00,9:55,10:35; Fri-Sun 11:15a, 1:50,4:35,7:20,10:05
(Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 1:50,5:10,7:45,
10:20 (Wed eariy show 10:45a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Thur 1:25,5:30,7:35,9:45; Fri-Wed
1:05,3:10,5:45,7:50,9:55 (Wed early show 10:25a; Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
French Twist (R) Thur 1:45,5:35,7:50,10:10; Fri-Wed 1:20,
3:15,5:35,7:35,9:35 (Wed early show 10:35a; Fri-Sat late
show 11:35)
Anne Frank Remembered (PG) Thur 3/14 only 4:50
Heavy Metal (R) Thur 1:35,5:45,8:30,10:25; Fri-Wed 12:35,
5:30,10:35 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Birdcage (R) Thur 1:20,2:15,4:30,5:20,7:25,8:10,
10:15; Fri-Wed 11:20a (Fri-Sun only), 12:50,2:15,4:00,
5:15,7:00,8:10,10:00,11:00 (Fri-Sat 11:15) (Wed eariy
show 11:00a; Fri-Sat late show 12:50a)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:50,5:40,7:45,9:50; Fri-Wed 1:15,
3:20,5:25,8:05,10:10 (Wed early show 10:55a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a)
Bettis Rocket (R) Thur 1:40,6:00,8:20,10:20; Fri-Sun 3:15,
8:30; Mon-Wed 3:15,8:15 (except Wed)
Hellraiser Rleedline (R) Thur 2:00,5:10,7:05,9:15,10:45;
Fri-Wed 12:40,2:40,5:40,8:00,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show
12:25a)
Homeward Round II (G) Thur 2:10,5:00,7KX), 9:00; Fri-Wed
12:55,3:05,5:15,7:25,9:25 (Wed eariy show 10:30a)
•Executive Decision (R) Daily 11:30a (Fri-Sun only), 1:10,
2:15,4:15,5:20,7:10,8:20,10:15,11:00 (Fri-Sat 11:30)
(Wed early show 10:45a; Fri-Sat late show 12:55a)
•Ed (PD) Fri-Sun 12:20,2:35,4:50,7:05,9:10; Mon-Wed
12:20,2:35,5:05,7:30,9:40 (Wed early show 10:15a)


Intracoastal
3701 HE 163rd St; 945-7416
Grumpier OH Man (PG-13) Thur 1:30,4:15,7:10,9:35; Fri-Wed
2:10,4:40,7:10,9:25 (FriSat late show 11:45)
Eye for an Eye (R) Thur 3/14 only 1:45,7:20
Mr. HeOamfs Opus (PQ) Daily IKK), 2:30,4/10,5:30,7:10 (Ihur
7:00), 8:30,10*» (FriSat late show 11:30)
Leaving Las Vegas (R) Daily 2*», 4:45,7:20,9:50 (Thur 9:45)
(Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Black Shaap (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 4:30,9:30
The Bruges of Mattson County (PG-13) Thur 1:20,4:30,7:15,
10*»; Fri-Wed 1:10,4:30,725,10*» (FriSat late show 11:15)
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 1:10,3:20,520,7:30,930; Fri-Wed
2:15,5*»] 7:30,925 (FriSat late show 11:45)
Before and After (PG-13) Thur 12:40,3*», 520,7:40,10:10; Fri-
Wed 1:00'430,7:10,9:50
«Two Much (PG-13) Daily 130,4:10,7*», 9:40 (FriSat late
show 12:10a)
Skylake II
1720NE Miami Gardens Dr 944-2810
Ace Ventura 2: When Nature Cats (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 4*»,
7:45
Father of the Bride Part H (PG) Thur 3/14 only 2:00,5:45,930
Waiting to Exhalo (R) Thur 2:45,7:25; Fri-Wed 1*», 5:30,9:55
12 Monkeys (R) Thur 5:00,930; Fri-Wed 3*», 7:35
«The American President (PG-13) Daily 1:15,5:40,9:50
«Sabrina (PG) Daily 325,7:45
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas 14
7775 W Ragler St 2686664
Jumanjl (PG) Thur 3/14 only 1:30,5:00,7:30,10:00
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 2:00,5:10,7:50,10:15; FriSun 12:30,
3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Sat early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:15,8:00,10:30
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 2:00,4:45,7:15; FriSun
12:00n, 2:15,5:00 (Sat early show 10:00a); Mon-Wed 2:00,
5:00
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 1:45,5:30,7:40,9:50; FriSun
12:30,2:45,5:15,7:30,9:45 (Sat early show 10:15a; FriSat late
show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 1:45,5:30,7:45,10:00
City HaH (R) Thur 1:30,5:00,7:45,10:15; FriSun 12:15,5:15,
10:00 (Sat early show 10*»a); Mon-Wed 1:45,5:00,7:45,
10:15
Before and After (PG-13) Thur 1:15,5:10,7:30,1020; FriSun
7:50,10:15 (FriSat late show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 7:20,9:45
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Thur 2:00,530,8:00,1030; FriSun
12:15,2:30,5:00,7:30,9:45 (Sat early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 1:15,5:15,7:30,9:45
Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead (R) Thur 3/14 only
1:45,4:45,730,10:10
Down Periscope (PG-13) Thur 1:15,5:15,8:00,10:10; FriSun
12:45,3:00,5:15,8:00,1020 (Sat early show 10:30; FriSat late
show 12:30a); Mon-Wed 1:00,5:00,7:10,9:30
Up Close & Personal (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:30,7:15,10:00; Fri¬
Sun 12:30,4:30,7:15,10:00 (Sat early show 10:00; Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:00,4:30,7:15,10*»
The Juror (R) Thur 3/14 only 10:00
Homeward Bound II (G) Thur 1:30,5:00,7:00,9:30; FriSun
12:15,2:30,5:00,7:30,9:45 (Sat early show 10:15a; FriSat late
show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 1:15,5:15,730,9:45
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:15,5:15,7:30,10:15; Fri-Sun 2:45,7:45
(FriSat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed 1:30,5:10,7:45,10:15
HeHralser Bloodline (R) Thur 2:00,5:30,8*», 10:30; FriSun
12:45,3*», 5:30,8:00,1030 (Sat early show 10:30a; FriSat
late show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 2*», 5:30,8*», 1030
«The Birdcage (R) FriSun 1*», 4:30,7:30,10:15 (Sat early
show 10:15a; FriSat late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:15,4:30,
7:15,10*»
«Two Much (PG-13) FriSun 1:00,4:45,7:40,10:15 (Sat early
show 1030a; Fri-Sat late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:30,4:30,
7:15,9:50
*Ed (PG) FriSun 12:00n, 2:15,5:15,7:45,10:00 (Sat early
show 10*»a; FriSat late show 12:15a); Mon-Wed 1:45,5*»,
7:15,930
«Executive Decision (R) FriSun 1:00,4:00,7*», 9:55 (Sat early
show lftlSA; FriSat late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:30,4:45,
730,10:15
Super Saver Cinema
11501 Bird Rd; 227-0277
Money Train (R) Thur 1:15,3:15,5:15,8*», 10:15; Fri-Wed
3:30,8*»
Ace Ventura t When Nature Calls (PG-13) Daily 1:30,330,5:30,
8:00,10*»
Goldeneye (PG-13) Thur 130,4:15,730,10*»; Fri-Wed 1:00,
5:30,10*»
Tom and Huck (PG) Thur 3/14 only 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:30,9:30
Fatbor of the Bride Part D (PG) Daily 1:00,3:15,530, &*», 10:15
Braveheart (R) Thur 1:00,4:30,8:00; Fri-Wed 9*»
Sabrina (PG) Thur 3/14 only 2:45,930
Dunston Checks In (PG) Thur 1:00,5:15,7:15; Fri-Wed 1:15,
3:15,5:15,'7:15
12 Monkeys (R) Thur 1:15,4*», 7:15,9:45; Fri-Wed 1:30,4:15,
7:15,9:45
•Waiting to Exhale (R) Daily I*», 3:15,5:30,8*», 10:15
«Heat (R) Daily 1:15,4:30,8*»
«The American President (PG-13) Daily 1*», 3:15,530,7:45,
10*»
University VII
1645 SW 107th Ave; 225-2700
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 7:25,9:55; Fri-Wed 7:30,10:00 (Sat-Sun
matinees 1:15,4:50; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Rumble In the Bronx (R) Thur 3/14 only 7:40, l(h05
Up (Rose & Personal (PG-13) Huir 7:15,9:45; Fri-Wed 7:10,9:45
(sá-Silíi fttótiHées $rí§átfetS show ’
The Birdcage (R) Thur 7:20,9:50; Fri-Wed 7:15,9:50 (Sat-Sun
matinees 1:40,4:20; Fri-Sat late show 12:05a)
Homeward Bound II (6) Thur 7:10,9:40; Fri-Wed 7:05,9:15 (Sat-
Sun matinees 1:10,3:00,4:55; Fri-Sat late show 11:15)
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Thur 7:50,10:10; Fri-Wed 7:50 (Sat-
Sun matinees 1:25,3:15,5:05)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed 10:10 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:05a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 7:20,9:55 (Sat-Sun matinees
1:50,4:30; FriSat late show 12:10a)
#Ed (PG) Daily 7:40,10:05 (Sat-Sun matinees 1:20,3:20,5:20,
7:40,10:05; FriSat late show 12:00m)
Valentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 266-2002
Movie times were not available at press time.
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Apollo Theatre
3800 W 12th Ave; 8264606
Ace Ventura 2: When Nature Calls (PG-13) Thur-Fri 8:00,10:00;
Sat-Sun 1:00,3*», 5*», 7:50,10:10; Mon-Wed 8:00,10:00
Braveheart (R) Thur 3/14 only 8:00
Father of the Bride Part II (PG) Thur 3/14only 8:00,10*»
12 Monkeys (R) Thur 8*», 10:15; Fri 7:50,10*»; Sat-Sun 2:50,
5*», 7:50,10:20; Mon-Wed 7:50,10*»
«Heat (R) Fri 8:00; Sat-Sun 1:00,4:15,7:50; Mon-Wed 8:00
«The American President (PG) Fri 8*», 10:00; Sat-Sun 1*»,
3:00,.5:00,7:50,10:10; Mon-Wed 8:00,10*»
Hialeah Cinema VIII
4650 W 17th Ct; 557-9888
City Hall (R) Thur 4:55,7:10,9:25; Fri-Sun 4:30,9:30; Mon-Wed
7:10,9:25
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 5:20,7:25,9:25; FriSun 1:20,3:30,
5:45,7:45,9:55; Mon-Wed 5:20,735,9:25
Before and Alter (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 5:00,7:15,930
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Thur 5:05,7*», 9:00; FriSun 1:30,
3:35,5:40,8:00,10:05; Mon-Wed 5:05,7:00,9:00
Up Close & Personal (PG-13) Thur 5:40,8:45; FriSun 1:25,4*»,
7:10,9:50; Mon-Wed 5:40,8:30
Down Periscope (PG-13) Thur 5:15,7:30,935; FriSun 1:05,
3:10,5:20,7:30,9:40; Mon-Wed 5:15,7:30,935
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 5:30,7:35,9:40; FriSun 2:00,730; Mon-
Wed 5:10
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Thur 5:00,7*», 9:10; FriSun 1:10,
3:15,5:25,7:35,10:00; Mon-Wed 5*», 7:05,9:10
«Executive Decision (R) Fri-Sun 1:00,4:00,7:00,9:45; Mon-
Wed 5:45,8:45
«Two Much (PG-13) FriSun 1:35,4:15,7:15,9:50; Mon-Wed
5:55,8:50
Miami Lakes X
6711 Main St 558-3810
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 2:10,4:30,7:20,9:40 (Fri-Sat late show
12:10a)
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:40,7:40
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 2:00,4:20,7:00; Fri-Wed 2*»,
4:10
City Hail (R) Daily 2:00,430,7:30,10:00 (FriSat late show
12:15a)
Mr. Wrong (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 4:40,9:40
Before and After (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 930
Rumble In the Bronx (R) Daily 1:50,4:40 (Thur 4:50), 7:50,
10:10 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Daily 1:50,4:50,8*», 10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
If lucy FeH (R) Thur 1:40,4:10,7:50,10*»; Fri-Wed 7:00,9:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Homeward Bound II (G) Thur 2:10,4:50,7:20,930; Fri-Wed
2:10,4:50,7*», 9:10 (FriSat late show 12*»m)
Up Close & Personal (PG-13) Daily 130,4:10,7:10,9:50 (FriSat
late show 12:20a)
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:10,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show
12:20a)
*Ed (PG) Daily 1:40,4:40,7:40,10:00 (FriSat late show
12:20a)
«Executive Decisión (R) Daily 1:40,4:20,730,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Movies at Hialeah
780 W 49th St 826-7242
Eye for an Eye (R) Daily 2:20,4:50,7:40,9:40 (FriSat late show
11:45)
Don't Be a Menace (R) Daily 2:10,4:15,7:20,935 (FriSat late
show 11:30)
Toy Story (G) Daily 2:05,4*», 7:00,9:00 (FriSat late show
11:00)
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG) Daily 2:00,5:00,8:00 (Fri-Sat late show
11*»)
The Juror (R) Daily 2:00,4:30,7:10,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show
12:10a)
Leaving Las Vegas (R) Thur 3/14 only 2:05,435,7:10,935
BeautifM Girls (R) Daily 2:10,4:45,7:30,10:00
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 2:05,4:25,7:00,9:25 (Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Daily 2:15,4:25,7:05,9:15 (FriSat
late show 11:30)
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 230,4:55,735,10:10
Mary Reilly (R) Thur 3/14 only 2:10,4:45,7:20,9:50
Bed of Roses (PG) Daily 2:15,4:20,7:00,9:10 (FriSat late show
1130)
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:30,4:05,7:00,9:40 (FriSat late show
12:10a)
Homeward Bound II (G) Daily 1:30,3:35,5:40,735,9:45 (FriSat
late show 12:00m)
«Éd (P¡B):Daily í ií3:45,5:45;'745 9:5Í)‘ (KiSatíatfe’Mbw
11:50)
«Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead (R) Daily 1:40,4:15,
7:15,9:45 (FriSat late show 12:10a)
South Broward
Honda IV
300 N Park Rd; 987-9350
Sabrina (PG) Thur 3/14 only 1:50,7*»
Father of the Bride Part H (PG) Thur 3/14 only 4:30,930
Braveheart (R) Thur 1:45,5:00,830; Fri-Wed 1:00,6:45
Waiting to Exhale (R) Thur 2:15,5:00,7:30,10*»; Fri-Wed 2:15,
4:45,730,9:50
12 Monkeys (R) Thur 2:00,4:40,7:15,9:50; Fri-Wed 4:10,10:00
•The American President (PG) Daily 2:00,4:30,7:00,9:30
•Heat (R) Daily 1:30,5:00,8:30
Oakwood 18
2800 Oakwood Blvd; 923-7777
Sense and Sensibility (PG) Daily 7*», 10:00
Leaving Us Vegas (R) Thur 1:30,7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed 130,
430,7:30,10*» (FriSat late show 12:30a)
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 1:10,4:40,7:30,10:20 (FriSat late
show 12:40a)
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00
Black Sheep (PG-13) Thur 3/14 oidy 430
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:00,4:30,7:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Beautifld Girls (R) Thur 1:30,4:20,7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed 1:30,
7:30
CHy Hall (R) Daily 1:30,4:10,730,10:00 (FriSat late show
12:30a)
Mr. Wrong (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 7:10,9:30
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Daily 2:00,4:30,7:00 (Thur only)
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Daily 1:50,4:40,8*», 10:20 (Fri-Sat late
show 12*40a)
Before and After (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:20,4:20,7:40,10:20
Mary Reilly (R) Thur 3/14 only 10:00
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:30,4:20,7:40,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 1230a)
Babe (G) Thur 3/14 only 1:00,3:00,5:30
Toy Story (G) Thur 3/14 only 1:00,3*», 5:00
Up Close & Personal (PG-13) Daily 130,4:10,730,10:10 (Fri- -
Sat late show 12:40a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Daily 1:50,4:20,7:40,10:20 (FriSat
late show 12:50a)
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:10,4:00,7:40,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Hellraiser: Bloodline (R) Daily 1:40,4:10,8:00,10:30 (FriSat
late show 12:40a)
Homeward Bound II (G) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:00,930 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:00m)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 2:00,4:40,8*», 10:30; Fri-Wed 4:20,10:00
(FriSat late show 12:30a)
•Executive Decision (R) Daily 2:00,4:40,7:40, lOTlO (Fri-Sat
late show 12:40a)
*Ed (PG) Daily 1:30,4:10,7:00,930 (Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
«Two Much (PG-13) Daily 1:40,4:20,7:30,10:20 (FriSat late
show 12:40a)
Oceanwalk Mall 10
HoRywood Boulevard at A1A; 9208330
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 1:35,5:15,7:25,9:50; FriSun 1:05,3:15,
535,7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a); Mon-Wed 1:35,
5:15,7:25,9:50 (Wed early show 10:10a)
City Hall (R) Thur 3/14 only 9:30
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:45,7:20
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 3/14 only 1:45,5:00,730
Before and Alter (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 5:00,9:30
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Thur 1:35,5:15,7:25,9:55; FriSun
1:20,3:20,535,735,9:45 (FriSat late show 11:55); Mon-Wed
1:35,5:15,7:25,9:55 (Wed early show 10:10a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Thur 1:30,5:10,7:15,9:40; FriSun
1:10,3:05,5*», 7:10,935 (FriSat late show 11:50); Món-Wed
1:40,5:00,7:30,10:05 (Wed early show 10:00a)
Up Close & Personal (PG-13) Thur 1:40,5*», 7:40,10:15; Fri¬
Sun 1:00,4:45,7:20,9:55 (Fri-Satlate show 12:25a); Mon-Wed
1:40,5:00,7:30,10:05 (Wed eariy show 10:00a)
If Lucy Fen (R) Thur 1:50,530,7:30,10:00; FriSun 1:05,3:00,
5:15,7:50, 10:15 (FriSat late show 12:15a); Mon-Wed 1:50,
5:20,7:30,10:00 (Wed early show 10:30a)
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Thur 1:50,530,7:30,10:05; FriSun
1:20,3:25,5:30,7:45,10:10 (FriSat late show 12:15a); Mon-
Wed 1:50,530,7:30,10:05 (Wed early show 10:30a)
TheBMcmte (R) Thur 1:40,5:05, £40, Jfl;15; FriSun 1:M *
5*», 7:30,10:00 (FriSat late show 12:20a); Mon-Wed 1:30,
4:50,7:35,10:15 (Wed eariy show 10:20a)
Homeward Bound N (6) Thur 1:30,5:10,7:15,9:40; FriSun 1:00,
3:05,5:10,7:15,930 (FriSat late show 12:05a); Mon-Wed
1:45,5:10,7:20,9:30 (Wed eariy show 10:40a)
«Executive Decision (R) Fri-Sun 1:30,4:45,7:35,1030; Mon-
Wed 1:30,4:50,7:35,10:15 (Wed eariy show 10:20a)
•Ed (PG) Fri-Sun 1:00,3:05,5:10,7:35,9:40 (FriSat late show
12*»m); Mon-Wed 1:45,5:10,7:20,9:30 (Wed eariy show
10:40a)
Movies at Pembroke Pines
11350 Pines Blvd; 435-3700
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG) Thur 1:00,4:00,7*», 10:00; Fri-Wed
1:05,4:05,7*15,10:00
Black Sheep (PG-13) Thur 1:00,5:15,9:35; Fri-Wed 1:10,5:40,
9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 11:55)
Leaving las Vegas (R) Thur 3/14 only 3:00,7:15
City HaH (R) Daily 1:35,4:10,7:10,9:40 (FriSat late show
12:00m)
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15 (FriSat
late show 11:35)
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:25,3:25,5:25,735,9:25 (Fri¬
Sat late show 1135)
Before and After (PG-13) Thur 1:05,3:20,5:35,7:45,10:00; Fri-
Wed 1:40,4:20,7:15, Í0*» (FriSat late show 12:15a)
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Daily 1:30,3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30 (Fri¬
Sat late show 11:30)
If Lucy FeH (R) Thur 1:10,3:35,5:40,7:45,9:50; Fri-Wed 3:30,
7:45
Homeward Bound II (G) Daily 1:20,3:20,5:20,730,9:20
•Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00
Pembroke Pines 8
12520 Pinos Blvd; 437-7790
The Juror (R) Thur 1:15,4:00,7*», 9:45; Fri-Wed 7:40,
10:10
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:30,4:00,7:30,10:00
Mr. Wrong (PG13) Thur 3/14 only 2:00,7:00
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 1:00,3:20,5:40,7:50,10:00;
Fri-Wed 1:00,3:15,5:30
Mary Reilly (R) Thur 3/14 only 4:15,9:30
Up Close & Personal (PG13) Daily 1:15,4:15,7:15,10:00
Down Periscope (PG13) Daily 1:00,3:20,5:40,7:55,10:15
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:00,1:30,3:45,4:15,7:00,7:30,9:45,
10:15
«Two Much (PG13) Daily 1:30,4:15,7*», 9:45
♦Ed (PG) Daily 1:00,3:15,5:30,7:45,9:55
Sheridan Plaza 12
4999 Sheridan St: 987-4680
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG) ThurSun 1:30,4:30,7:20,10:10 (Sat-
Sun eariy show 10:05a); Mon-Wed 1:30,4:30,730,10:10
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 1:55,5:40,8:00,10:15; FriSun 12:35,
3:05,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Sat-Sun early show 10:10a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 1:55,5:40,8*», 10:15
City Hall (R) Thur 1:40,530,7:40,10:15; FriSun 1:15,8:00;
Mon-Wed 1:40,8:00
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 1:35,5:15,730; FriSun 12:40,
2:50,5:40 (SatSun eariy show 10:30a); Mon-Wed 1:35,
5:15
Happy Gilmore (PG13) Thur 3/14 only 9:50
Before and After (PG15) Thur 1:50,5:30,7:50,10:10; FriSun
5:20,10:40; Mon-Wed 5:30,1035
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Thur 2:05,5:45,8:05,10:05; Fri-Sun
12:55,3:10,5:35,8:05,10:15 (SatSun early show 10:20a; Fri¬
Sat late show 12:25a); Mon-Wed 12:05,5:45,8:45,10:05
Up Clbse & Personal (PG13) Thur 1:30,5:10,7:45,10:20; Fri¬
Sun 1:20,5*», 7:45,10:30 (Sat-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat
late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:10,7:45,1030
Down Periscope (PG-13) Thur 2:10,5:25,7:30,9:45; FriSun
12:45,2:55,5:15,7:25,9:50 (Sat-Sun eariy show 10:35a; Fri-Sat
late show 12:05a); Mon-Wed 2:10,535,7:30,9:45
The Birdcage (R) Thur 1:45,5:15,7:55,10:20; FriSun 1:10,
5:00,7:50,10:35 (SatSun eariy show 1035a; Fri-Sat late show
12:50a); Mon-Wed 1:45,5:15,7:50,1030
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Thur 1:55,5:35,8:00,10:00; FriSun
12:50,3:00,5:25,7:55,10:10 (FriSat late show 12:20a); Mon-
Wed 1:55,5:35,7:55,9:55
Homeward Bound H (G) Thur 1:50,5:20,7:25,9:40; Fri-Sun
12:35,2:40,5:10,7:25,9:45 (Sat eariy show 1030a); Mon-Wed jj
1:50 5:20 735 9:40
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 2:00,5:25,7:30,9:45; FriSun 730,10*»;
Mon-Wed 7:20,9:40
«Executive Decision (R) FriSun 1:30,4:40,7:30,1030 (Sat-Sun
eariy show 10:15a; FriSat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 1:30,
4:40,7:30,10:15
*Ed (PG) FriSun 12:30,2:45,5:10,7:30,9:55 (Sat-Sun eariy
show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:15a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:20,
7:30,9:50
Taft Hollywood 12
7001 Taft St; 981-5443
Money Train (R) Daily 12:40,2:55,5:10,7:25,9:40
It Takes Two (PG) Daily 1*)5,3:05,5:05,7*», 9:05
Casino (R) Daily 12:50,4:45,8:05
Sudden Death (R) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:30,9:40
Ace Ventura 2: When Nature Calls (PG13) Daily 1:00,3:00,
5:00,7:00,9*»
Tom and Huck (PG) Daily 1:05,3*15,5:05,7:05,9:05
Goldeneye (PG13) Daily 12:45,3:15,7:00,9:35
Bioflome (PG13) Thur 3/14 only 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,
9:15
Braveheart (R) Daily 12:50,4:45,8:05
Father of the Bride Part H (PG) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:30,
9:40
Sabrina (PG) Daily 12:45,3:15,7:00,9:35
12 Monkeys (R) Daily 12:45,3:15,7:00,9:35
«The American President (PG-13) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:20,
7:30,9:40
87,
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
ACMl-
March 1 ~ u4, 41MG
at Miami Reach's Little Stage • 2.100 Washington Ave. (Lorner of Dade &lvd.)
Wed.-i>at. at £pm • Sundays at 1pm
Wed-Sat: Tickets $16" all seat • Sundays: Tickets $ri.50 all seats.
In All in the Timing Ives explores the themes of "time" and "timing" in this intensel>j
¿lever collection of one-ad comedies. Sparklingfj poetic, profoundly witty and slightly
surreal, Timing is a sophisticated jaunt saturated with off-beat humor.
ACME 51(*-1600 for reservations.
Sponsored in part by: Miami Dade Wolf son College, Wolfson Campus, Cultra del Lobo Series;
The Miami Beach Visitors and Convention Authority City of Miami Beach; Metropolitan Dade
County Cultural Affairs Council and the Metropolitan Dade County Board of County
Commissioners.
I 3 PERFORMANCES ONLY!
“Raucously Funny!”
- NewYorklimes
Robert Levy and Arnie Smith A present
party
Written by
David Dillon
Directed by John
Kellum Lewis
Starring Original
Acclaimed Star
TED BALES
t APRIL 3
through
I APRIL 11,1996
í Colony Theater,
1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach
Tickets available at all G9aÜ^^^9 Outlets or charge by phone
by calling (305) 358-5885. Tickets go on sale Saturday March 2, 1996!
A Creative Concept Production
MODEL&TAIEN1
cyiclJ£ fmojcMJartdOrzlstni
IWjcinjcuzG/i Jto Acjojui in nWicurii janri
jlvjUI inio/uvimv siclu
SATURDAY MARCH 23
Shelborne Beach Resort
Collins Avenue and 18th Street.
For a guaranteed appointment
Call Now 305.957.1479
Tomorrow Talent, 149 Fifth Ave. 8th Floor, New York, NY 10010
MAYNARD FERGUSON AND HIS
BIG BOP NOUVEAU BAND
One of the Jazz world’s best known musicians is still redefining Big Band Jazz.
From Swing and Funk to Bebop and Straight Ahead Jazz, this 3 time Grammy
nominee is bringing it live to. you.
SAT. MARCH 16
8PM f CORAL GABLES
F°J tickets &mf° CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
448-7421 3010 DeSoto Boulevard, Coral Gables
TICKETS
$15 in advance
$20 at door
$25 patron seating
includes pre¬
concert reception


Not So Very
Merry-Co-
Round
I By Pamela Gordon
Sometimes it takes an outsider’s perspective to
appreciate the nuances of a culture in ways
that the members of the culture itself cannot
appreciate. That certainly seems to be the case
with the magnificent revival of Richard
Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s 1945
American masterpiece, Carousel, in its current
production by the Royal National Theatre of
the United Kingdom.
Two distinctly American sensibilities have
always characterized this haunting musical,
set near the turn of the century, about a ne’er-
do-well carnival barker who leaves behind a
pregnant wife to fend for herself when he dies:
faith in the future, and a dark current of brutal¬
ity, anger, and disappointment Most renewals
of the show (including a 1956 film version)
tend to downplay that brutality in favor of a
glossy sentimentality. Director Nicholas Hyt-
ner (an Englishman) and set designer Bob
Crowley (an Irishman) would have none of
that for their Royal National Theatre interpre¬
tation, on-stage at the Kravis Center for the
Performing Arts in West Palm Beach through
this Sunday, March 17. Hytner’s subtle and
insightful direction refrains from softening the
violence in the relationship between central
characters Billy Bigelow and Julie Jordan; the
director also compassionately illuminates the
pair’s working-class hardships. Meanwhile,
Crowley’s miraculous designs, influenced by
the paintings of Andrew Wyeth, Winslow
Homer, and Grant Wood, both underscore and
enhance the director’s vision. Scenes unfold in
a series of stunning visual tableaux that por¬
tray stark and lonely New England landscapes
as well as storybook renditions of an amuse¬
ment park and heaven. Hytner and Crowley
have created an “American primitive” version
of Carousel that taps into the despair at the
core of the show.
The opening scene will take your breath
away. To the minor-key strains of Rodgers’s
“Carousel Waltz,” the curtain rises on an enor¬
mous factory clock bearing down on young
women working at a row of industrial looms.
As the clock strikes the quitting hour, the
music explodes and the girls burst from their
chairs. The set begins to revolve; the dock and
the loom disappear. On comes a huge metal
gate, through which the girls escape. Next
appears a wooden boat being worked on by an
ensemble of young men, who dance with the
girls. And then the boat gives way to an old-
fashioned carousel, which twirls round and
round, illuminated by hot orange light It’s an
exhilarating transformation from forbidding
gray factory to heady carousel ride, brilliantly
imagined by the British team while simultane¬
ously honoring Rodgers and Hammerstein’s
conception.
When composer Rodgers and libretfist-lyri-
dst Hammerstein joined forces in 1943, they
began a partnership that changed the nature of
American theater. Beginning with the seminal
Oklahoma! in 1943, they departed from the
sophisticated but lighthearted comedies and
the score-dominated operettas that had charac¬
terized musicals since the Twenties. They cre¬
ated the musical play — a combination of a
well-made story, a strong score in which the
lyrics directly relate to the tale being told, and
modem-dance choreography in which every
piece of music and every movement on the
stage is part of the show’s total concept Their
partnership lasted seventeen years and pro¬
duced nine stage musicals, including The King
and I, South Pacific, and The Sound of Music,
plus State Fair for film and Cinderella for tele¬
vision.
For Carousel, their second career collabora¬
tion, they did away with the traditional over¬
ture that blended together snippets from the
show’s complete score, and in its place created
a piece that stood on its own. The show
opened with the wordless “Carousel Waltz,”
accompanied by a pantomimed prologue. After
“Waltz” came the novel “If I Loved You”
courtship episode, in which Hammerstein
combined musical and spoken phrasing in an
extended song-and-dialogue scene.
I saw the Hytner/Crowley production at the
Jackie Gleason Theater of the Performing
Arts, where it played from February 28
through March 3. Regrettably, on the night I
attended both Patrick Wilson (Billy) and
Sherry D. Boone Qulie’s marriage-obsessed
best friend Carrie Pipperidge) were victimized
by the Gleason Theater’s unpredictable sound
system.
While the role of Julie presents an actress
with several lovely songs (“If I Loved You,”
“What’s the Use of Wond’rin’ ” ), the acting
possibilities have always seemed limited owing
to Julie’s apparently unconditional submission
to Billy’s neglect and abuse. In contrast to the
traditionally passive interpretation of the char¬
acter, Sarah Uriarte’s Julie knows what she
wants from the outset and dares to go after it,
even though by the end of the show she has
clearly suffered as a result of her attachment to
the wrong man. As for Wilson, he imbues Billy
with a swaggering air of danger mixed with
insecurity and confusion. Throughout, the pair
radiates an attraction to each other, and, in
general, the production exudes more lust and
sensuality than others I have seen. In support¬
ing roles, Boone delivers a sassy comic perfor¬
mance as Carrie, while Sean Palmer portrays
Carrie’s intended husband Enoch Snow as
equal parts endearing and insufferable.
Handkerchief warning: As Aunt Nettie,
Rebecca Eichenberger belts out the show’s
anthem “You’ll Never Walk Alone” with such
conviction that she’ll have you sniffling after
the first few notes. But the revelation of the
evening turns out to be Dana Stackpole, who
plays Louise, Julie and Billy’s restless daugh¬
ter. Stackpole is heartbreaking in the famous
ballet sequence at the fair¬
grounds, while Joseph
Woelfel, as her anony¬
mous dance partner,
proves a powerful match.
I have one major com¬
plaint to lodge about
Carousel, and it has noth¬
ing to do with the quality
of the production. The
show was booked for a
pitifully short run in
Miami Beach. It never
even made it to the
Broward Center in Fort
Lauderdale. In fact, if you
want to catch it, pick up
the phone now and
reserve tickets before it
closes on Sunday in West
Palm Beach.
Stage Whispers
When Evelyn Wude May-
erson was asked to write
a one-woman show about
writer, conservationist,
and Miami icon Marjory
Stoneman Douglas, her
first reaction was disbe¬
lief. Her second reaction
was fear. “I got a call
from [Coconut Grove
Playhouse producing
artistic director] Arnold
Mittelman,” Mayerson
recounts recently over
coffee in a Surfside cafe.
“This was December 1994. He said, ‘Evelyn,
the centennial’s coming up. What do you
think about a play about Marjory Stoneman
Douglas?’ I said, ‘Arnold, that sounds terrific.’
So then there was silence because I’m still
not getting it He said. Well?’ So I said, Wefl,
what?’ And he said, Well, will you accept the
commission?’”
The Playhouse and the writer have some¬
thing of a history, with her The Long and
Lovely Suicide, Mayerson’s award-winning
drama about Oscar Wilde, having enjoyed a
staged reading there in 1987. Mittelman had
read Mayerson’s most recent novel, Miami:
A Saga, about 100 years in the lives of five
South Florida families, and thought she was
the best person to tackle
the job of re-creating the
inspired and inspiring life
of Douglas (who will turn
106 this April) for presenta¬
tion at the Playhouse. “It
was a tremendous chal¬
lenge,” Mayerson admits. “I
was flabbergasted, hon¬
ored, scared to death.”
Author of eight novels,
two plays (including Marjory), and two chil¬
dren’s books, the slim, graceful Mayerson is
also an English professor at the University of
Miami. She dove into the Douglas project,
following a method she uses when writing
her historically based fiction — immersing
herself in background material, including
Douglas’s archives at UM. In addition to
interviewing people who had worked for
Douglas, the playwright spent six months
poring over Douglas’s diaries, manuscripts,
notes, and letters. Mayerson also met with
Douglas herself, although she drew exten¬
sively on interviews she’d conducted with
Douglas eight and fifteen years ago because,
she concedes, Douglas is now very frail.
Finally, she notes, “sometime last April or
May I started to write.” But composing a play
posed different demands than writing a long,
discursive novel. “There are several difficul¬
ties that I was challenged with,” Mayerson
explains. “Number one, she’s 105 years old.
You have to reduce 105 years to two hours.
What is representative that I can do in two
hours? I tried to focus on her humanity, the
things that make her tick. I tried to get into
her life and really nail what motivates her as
a person. But the play can’t just be a docud-
rama. They’d be running out of every exit So
in addition to the inner forces of her personal
life, I needed to establish some kind of ficti¬
tious scenario where we have something at
stake at the beginning and we follow it
through two acts.” After what Mayerson
terms six “wholesale revisions,” the com¬
pleted work telescopes decades of actual
events into a two-month period. During the
course of the play, the activist, at age 89,
takes her campaign to save acres of the Ever¬
glades before the state legislature.
Mayerson credits Marjory’s director Gail
Garrisan with helping to bang the drama into
its current shape. “She’s been invaluable in
my rewrites,” Mayerson insists. “She was
always there to read it She was always there
to comment She’d say, T think this speech
needs to be shifted here, the actress will
need a transition here.’ ” What actress Joan
Turner brought to the role once rehearsals
started solidified the final draft as well.
“There are a lot of changes that you do in a
brand new play that you do on the spot when
you hear the actors perform it,” Mayerson
says. “Ultimately my guiding principle has
been what serves the play.”
You can see Marjory at Coconut Grove
Playhouse’s Encore Room through April 28.
Call 4424000 for information.
Carousel.
Book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein; music by
Richard Bodgers; directed by Nicholas Hytner; with
Patrick Wilson, Sarah Uñarte, Sherry D. Boone,
Rebecca Eichenberger, Sean Palmer, Joseph
Isetfel, aad Dana Stackpole. Through March 17.
Cal 407-832-7469 or see “Calendar Listings." 69
They'll never walk alone: Julie (Sarah Uñarte) and Billy (Patrick
Wilson) see eye to eye in Carousel
Hytner and Crowley have
created an “American primitive"
version of Carousel.
New Times March 14 • 20,1996


New Time* March 14 • 20,1990
{£9
2 FOR 1 TUESDAYS
RECEIVE 1 FREE
ENTREE WHEN 1
ENTREE PURCHASED
(MUST BRING COUPON)
Traditional Italian Dishes
At Traditional Prices
2445 Collins Avenue
(305)534-7111
La Famiglia is located inside the Traymore Hotel
Business Lunch at Cafe Sci Sci
‘One (if South Florida’s
best Italian restaurantsI
Indoor & Outdooor Dining
For Reservations
Call 446-5104
New Dinner Menu
3043 Grand Ave.,
Coconut Grove.
LAFAMIGLIA
Hi
this is not your
average pretzel.
Everyday our Pretzels are
hand rolled using only the
finest dough made of
all natural ingredients.
Then we bake them to
perfection and serve
-them piping hot right
to your mouth, for the |
ultimate taste sensation.
The all new South Beach
Pretzel Factory is now o
business, right on Washington Avenue.
Serving the best in Homemade
Gourmet Knishes, Fat-Free Frozen
Yogurt, Hand Scooped Real Italian
Ices, and the finest Rretzels this side of
Heaven.
JAPANESE RESTAURANT & SUSHI BAR
SUSHI • SASHIMI • YAKITORI
Thclnk You SouAi
Hiro Best Japanese
Restaurant!
Open for lunch Mon. - Fri.
After Midnight Dinner
Special *7.50 1 Drink included
Sunny Isles Square
3007 N.E. 163rd Street,
N. Miami Beach
(305) 948-3687
Mon.-Fri. 11:30am- 3:30am
Sat. & Sun. 5pm-3:30am
70


Good Enough
| for Mama
I By Jen Karetnick
; In my mother’s kitchen, I am pupil. I am disciple,
| apprentice. In my mother’s kitchen, I am prep cook
and sous chef. And in my mother’s kitchen, now that
I Fm grown, I am also sometimes rival.
My mother’s kitchen is not only in her house. My
I mother's kitchen is every restaurant and every cuisine
? to which she has introduced me, from the lobster
I shack in Maine to the Indonesian restaurant in the
; New Jersey bowling alley to the tiny French bistro in
California, where she moaned so effusively over the
rack of lamb that the waiter asked her if she was sick.
In my own kitchen, I’m in charge. Thanks to my
mother, I have knowledge. I have technical experi-
; ence. And if I do say so myself I know how to criticize.
Still, when my mother visits me every year around the
time of my birthday, I can’t seem to impress her.
Maybe because she was responsible for my culinary
upbringing, maybe because she continues to be my
mentor (not to mention my mother). But in my
kitchen — and, by extension, in Dade County restau¬
rant kitchens—we’ve had nothing but disasters.
At the Hungarian place, the chef walked out in the
middle of our meal. The Russian restaurant was so
laughably awful that we were convinced it was a Mafia
front The Thai food was pre-prepared, the Cuban food
too heavy, the sushi not to her taste. In short, I’ve
taken my mother out for some of the worst meals of
her life.
This year I was determined. To celebrate the day
that mothers birth daughters into a world of kitchens, I
would find the perfect restaurant Not in either of our
spheres of influence. Somewhere for¬
eign to us both.
Fort Lauderdale’s Darrel & Oliver's
East City Grill, located at the Riviera
Ocean Resort on North Atlantic
Boulevard, seemed to fit the birthday
bill A few blocks north of increasingly
touristy Las Olas Boulevard, East City
Grill dominates the newly revamped
Fort Lauderdale Strip. Only two
months old, the restaurant is already
packed with the well built and well
dressed; valet parkers look you up
and down and ask if you have a reservation before they
welcome you. The message is clear: If you haven’t
booked a table already, you don’t have a prayer. No
matter what you’re wearing.
The bilevel dining room, centerpieced by an onyx
“Tropical Steamer Bar” where patrons can consume
native and imported shellfish infused with a variety of
Asian flavors, opens via French doors onto an enclosed
porch. lighting is muted, walls are accented by dark
wood. White linens and a slate floor deliver cool,
casual sophistication. Though the prices tend to reflect
that sophistication, bargains can also be found, espe¬
cially given the enormous quantities of food served.
The same goes for the mostly American wine list
Owned by restaurateur Darrel Broek and New
World chef Oliver Saucy, the same men who made a
nationally acclaimed success out of Darrel & Oliver’s
Cafe Maxx in Pompano Beach, this new venture is run
by a woman. Executive chef Susan Feny, who worked
at Louie’s Backyard in Key West (the breeding ground
that spawned Norman Van Aken) and has been fea¬
tured in Food & Wine and Southern Living, among
other magazines, commands a Floridian/pan-Asian
kitchen that rivals our own Pacific Time for excellence.
She has helpers, of course, all of whom are named on
the menu: chefs Greg Strickland, Troy Terorotua, and
Brent Lahaye; pastry chef Christian Rivera; and baker
Joe Russo. Add Saucy’s hand in creating the offerings,
and that’s a lot of of egos for one kitchen. But what
comes out of there is pure harmony.
The bread basket symbolizes the establishment’s
exquisite attention to detail, not to mention its willing¬
ness to feed customers till they burst. An arranged
assortment of flatbreads, rolls, and specialty loafs such
as black-olive-walnut are served with an earthy truffle
butter as well as a tapénade, a spread of black olives
and anchovies juiced with a splash of brandy. (Regular
butter is also supplied.) Servers are happy to describe
anything and everything they place on the oil-lamped
table and might even quiz more knowledgeable cus¬
tomers to see if tneyVe kept up with recipe trivia: Teas-
ingly challenged, my husband identified all the ingre¬
dients in the tapénade except the brandy.
Choosing what to order can be pleasantly difficult
We eventually decided on Chinese steamed crab and
goat cheese dumplings, which drifted in a rich shiitake
mushroom broth like kites in a stiff beach wind.
Although the texture of the melted goat cheese over¬
whelmed the bits of crab in the filling, the flavor of the
crab came through intact Ginger, scallions, coriander
leaf, and parsley intensified the liquid that cradled the
four dumplings, while the addition of chopped zuc¬
chini, cauliflower, and red pepper compelled us to
keep spooning up the broth once the dumplings were
gone.
We stuck with Asian flavors, ordering a Japanese-
influenced grilled beef kushiyaki, four skewers of ten¬
der, pink-middle meat accented by a savory soy-and-
sesame-oil flavor. The grilled beef lay on a cooling
cucumber salad, tangy from a vinegar dressing and
dotted with black sesame seeds. Coated with a thick
peanut sauce, a tangle of curly egg noodles zinged the
taste buds with a slight piquancy. The complementary
components of this delicious dish won us over immedi¬
ately.
Though ginger-steamed chicken salad didn’t
impress instantaneously, it was pleasantly refreshing.
Presented on pale gréen leaves of butter lettuce, the
chicken breast was sliced thinly and arranged gener¬
ously. The meat was moist and pleasingly scented but
seemed bland at first, especially after the highly fla¬
vored appetizers that preceded it Still, the salad was
fresh and well executed. Spears of pencil asparagus
and sections of mandarin oranges garnished the let¬
tuce, while a sprinkle of black and white sesame seeds
added nutty crunch, and decorative swirls of a creamy
orangehoney-tahini dressing provided sweet relief.
We departed tropical Asia for temperate Louisiana
with Creole commeal-dusted oysters. Served in the
shell, the half-dozen fried nuggets were exceptional,
buttery and slippery inside their crisp outer skins, and
moistened by a smattering of sharp and juicy pineap¬
ple-red bell pepper salsa. A ramekin in the center of
the dish held a Cajun red pepper remoulade, the may¬
onnaiselike dressing a wonderful spicy condiment
N’Awlins was also available in a main course of Cre¬
ole shellfish jambalaya, another felicitous departure
from the Pacific Rim-biased menu. listed under the
not-quite-accurate title “Steamy Steamers and the
Caribbean Wok,” the seafood stew was the best I’ve
ever had, in New Orleans or elsewhere. A mound of
white rice, fragrant like basmati, was topped with a
startling assortment of seafood: butterflied shrimp, sea
scallops, exceedingly fresh whitewater clams and
black Mediterranean mussels, and calamari. Drawing
on chunks of peppery andouille sausage and the unde¬
To celebrate the day that
mothers birth daughters Into a
world of kitchens, 8 would find
the perfect restaurant.
niable essence of shellfish, the unifying sauce com¬
prised plum tomatoes, fresh com sliced off the cob,
and okra. Fantastic—and a huge portion.
As if the decisions at East City Grill aren’t sufficiently
difficult, clams and mussels come either solo or as a
duet, in a choice of three quantities, and with a choice
of three accompaniments. In other words, order clams,
mussels, or a combination as an appetizer, as an
entrée, or as an extra-large entrée to be shared around
the table. Then choose your preparation: lemongrass-
coconut milk with sticky rice and sweet pepper con¬
fetti; white wine, garlic, tasso ham, roasted com with
tomato, hominy, and cayenne-buttered bruschetta; or
sake-and-miso broth with cilantro, ginger, scallions,
and soba noodles.
We went with the last combination in a regular
entrée size, which turned out to be enough to share,
with plenty of leftovers. The broth was mild and tasty,
the ginger and scallions giving it depth, the cilantro
lending it an immediate freshness. Of the same obvi¬
ous quality as the shellfish in the jambalaya, the mus¬
sels were objectionable in only one way—many were
still “bearded,” dangling the long, grasslike fibers with
which they clung to their beds. An assortment of stir-
fried zucchini, red cabbage, red pepper, and onions
rounded out the meal with some vitamin zest, but the
starchy soba noodles that lay on the bottom of the
bowl were soggy and unappealing.
By contrast, the steamed rice cakes that supported
two boneless chicken breasts were ideal: glutinous
rice, shaped into patties and pan-fried until as golden
as the skin on the bird, was just beginning to melt into
the buttery bath of lemongrass sauce. A plethora of the
above-mentioned stir-fried vegetables was companion¬
able, but the real star was the chicken. Too often
chicken breasts are dry and overdone; these plump
specimens, however, were seared to near-perfection,
the meat supple, the skin crackling.
Still more of the stir-fried vegetables, along with rice
noodles encased in a crisp spring roll and served with
a sweet-and-sour duck sauce, elevated a Korean barbe¬
cue pork tenderloin, found under the menu heading
“Grill, Sauté, and Others.” Like breast of chicken,
boneless pork is easily mined by indiscriminate
kitchens, but East City Grill deftly lived up to its name,
with two filets of pork grilled to an ideal pink-white¬
ness. Rolled in crushed spiced peanuts, the meat
exhibited just a touch of spiciness and had a richness
that rivaled dessert
A beautiful flourless chocolate mousse cake, pre¬
sented by the server with a candle in it just as my
mother had arranged, was an appropriate birthday
sweet Yet it was my mother who moaned delightedly
over the lush display, my mother who leaned over and
thanked me at the end of the meal
“Finally,” she said.
“Finally,” I agreed. In Darrel and Oliver’s kitchen, in
Susan’s kitchen, in Greg’s and Troy’s and Brents and
Christian’s and Joe’s kitchen, in admiration of their
accomplishments, my mother and I are equals. CD
Darrel & Oliver's
East City Grill
505 N Atlantic
Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale;
565-5569.
breakfast and
lunch from 8:30
to 3:00 daily.
Dinner nightly
from 5:30 to
10:30 (until 3:00
a.m. Friday and
Saturday.)


Cafe
WWW*
D
ining
Guie
na
The following restaurants are recommended by the
New Times food critic. Please call in advance for
operating hours, reservations, and other specific
information.
Price Guide
(based on a complete meal for one, excluding tip and
alcoholic beverages)
Inexpensive, less than $15: $
Moderate, $15 to $30: $*
Expensive, more than $30: ***
North Dade: Mainland and causeways, north of
N 36th Street, excluding the areas covered under
West Dade-Hialeah (see below).
North Beaches: All beachside communities north of
Dade Boulevard in Miami Beach.
South Beach: Miami Beach south of Dade
Boulevard.
Miami-Central Dade: Mainland east of SR 826, from
North 36th Street south to Miller Road.
West Dade-Hialeah: Hialeah and adjacent municipali¬
ties (Hialeah Gardens, Opa-locka, Medley, Miami
Springs), as well as everything west of SR 826 from
Okeechobee Road south to Miller Road.
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne: Key Biscayne proper
and everything in the City of Miami east of U.S. 1
and south of the Rickenbacker Causeway.
Coral Gables: Everything within the Coral Gables
city limits.
South Miam(-Kendall-South Dade: South Miami proper,
and everything south of Miller Road.
North Dade
The BarC-QCam 11705 NW 7th Ave; 681-2491. An
air-conditioned, carpeted fern-bar rendition of a
barbecue shack. You got your spare ribs, your
baby-back ribs, your sliced-to-order barbecue
turkey, beef, and ham, plus the lean and mean
combination plates. Lunch and dinner. $
Basilique Cafe 18640 NW 67th Ave; 6234)096. Johnson &
Wales grad Ralph Salvador and chef-partner PJ.
Flaherty put their best knives forward at this
reasonably priced Mediterranean eatery in Miami
Lakes. Though some of the fare seems experimental
and uneven, you can certainly count on a hefty, four-
cheese foccacia for starters and a pungent rigatoni
rusticcio with sausage, roasted peppers, onions, sun-
dried tomatoes, and Gorgonzola and mozzarella
cheeses for an entrée. Desserts are more than reliable
—they’re delicious. Lunch and dinner. **
Biscayne Wins Merchants & Bistro 738 NE 125th St;
899-1997. Arugula salad and homemade páté start any
meal off right Of the main courses, there’s shrimp with
peppercorn sauce and chicken stuffed with leeks, dill,
and crab with dill sauce. The main deal here is the wine
policy—each bottle costs the same whether you take
it home or have it here. Daily specials range from fish
and chicken to lamb and veal, usually excellent
Dinner, weekday lunch. $
The Burrito Place 2120 NE 123rd St; 8954)501. As the
name implies, burritos are the specialty of the house,
along with pepitos (sandwiches) and quesadillas. Try
the roast pork loin with sauteed onions and peppers, or
the shredded chicken with beans and rice, ¿you have
an eyes-on-the-thighs philosophy, go for the fresh leaf
spinach and mushroom burrito, stir-fried with garlic
and folded in an oversize flour tortilla with black beans,
white rice, salsa, a sprinkle of cheese, and guacamole,
served with nonfat yogurt on the side. Wash it down
with a Dos Equis special lager—at least it looks light
Lunch, dinner, and delivery. $
Café Primóla 13200 Biscayne Blvd; 899-1081. The Cea
family’s second restaurant Cafe Primóla serves the
same great homemade breads and pastas as Cafe
Prima Pasta (see listing under North Beaches). The
marinara here is heavy on the garlic and covers
everything from triangles of fried mozzarella to the
pasta sides that accompany veal and chicken entrées.
Pumpkin ravioli in a tangy tomato-cream sauce and
spinach-and-cheese agnolotti with pesto sauce are two
succulent stuffed pasta creations, while beef carpaccio,
vaunted on the menu as the “Best in the USA,” is no
empty boast Lunch and dinner. $
Chef Allen's 19088 NE 29th Ave; 935-2900. Since opening
in 1986 this unique restaurant has dominated the New
World scene. These days innovative chef-owner Allen
Susser continues to cater to his community’s fine-
dining needs. Ajames Beard Award-winning chef he
prepares the finest fish in Miami, particularly whole
yellowtail smothered in a coconut-milk-and-curry
sauce. Caribbean antipasto, featuring tamarind-
barbecue shrimp and jerk calamari, is a fiesta of fire;
swordfish, dotted with sumdried fruit confit is moist
and meaty. Nightly soufflés, prepared by Michele
Kutas, range from lemon-blackberry to chocolate-
brownie and are an exceptional end to an outstanding
meaL $$$
Chef & Apprentice 1701 NE 127th St; 892-7001. This
practicum facility for students at the North Miami
campus of Johnson & Wales University is more than
just a test site. In feet, very few culinary bombs go off
here. New American offerings worth exploring include
Rice Krispied (9 crab cakes with red pepper aioli, and
an earthy wild mushroom bisque. Fish entrées are well
tended, though too many flavors sometimes vie for
attention on the plate. Seared salmon is a seafood
favorite; citrus-marinated chicken is its poultry
equivalent Desserts are home — make that
campusmzde. $$
Gourmet Diner 13951 Biscayne Blvd; 947-2255. Cheap in
price but not in quality, this North Miami Beach
institution serves some of the best French-roots cuisine
in Dade. Steamed artichoke served chilled with a
fabulous pink vinaigrette makes a simple but satisfying
appetizer; snails are succulent in butter, garlic, and a
powerful portion of white wine; and loin of lamb
encrusted with herbs is served rare and juicy. House-
made desserts are popular—you’d better reserve a
piece of that custard fruit tart before digging in to your
seafood au gratín. Lunch, dinner, and weekend
breakfast $
Hlro Japanese Restaurant and Sushi & Yakitori Bar 3007
NE 163rd St; 948-3687. Soothing jazz soundtracks and
late-night hours (till 3:30 am.) make Hiro appealing for
cocktail-hour snacks and after-movie munchies, but
grilled yakatori and fresh sushi rolls are appropriate for
mealtimes too. Don’t pass up the spider roll (made with
soft-shell crab) or the salmon, scallion, and cream
cheese roll, a creamy delicacy designed to make you
crave more. Lunch and dinner. $$
Mark's Place 2286 NE 123rd St; 8936888. Named one of
the fifty best restaurants in the nation and a recipient of
the Distinguished Restaurant Award from Condé Nast
Traveler, chef-owner Mark MHitello’s upscale
establishment has placed Miami on the fancy-food
map. A nominee at the James Beard Awards, Militello
has garnered top praise for his startlingly inventive
cuisine—pappardelle with grilled rabbit for example,
or pan-roasted pheasant with black truffles and braised
"swiss chard. The menu changes daily, but count on its
being both exquisite and extensive. And dessert,
dessert, dessert! Lunch and dinner. ***
Mike Gordon 1201 NE 79th St; 751-4429. You can tell by
looking in the fish tanks: There’s no fresher seafood in
town. In this institution, black grouper—fried or
broiled—acquires legendary status. Lobster with
drawn butter has never tasted so sweet, and crab
dishes are also wonderful If there’s room at the end,
tiie mountainous key lime pie is a treat Overlooks
beautiful Biscayne Bay. Lunch and dinner. **
Neal's 2570 NE Miami Gardens Dr, 936-833$. Husband-
and-wife team Neal Cooper and Mary Mass-Cooper run
this charming, 70-seat Aventura eatery. Entrées—
such as fillet of salmon served over mashed potatoes,
or the inchesthick pork chop with spiced apples—are
mouth-watering and reasonably priced. Asian
influences add a touch of reinvention to duck and
stuffed pasta dishes; Italian notes abound in the grilled
vegetablegoat cheese pizza and homemade focaccia.
Dusted with 24-karat gold dust Almond Roca
chocolate surprise is a dessert worthits weight in, well
gold.**
Outback Steakhouse 3161 NE 163rd St; 9444329. For
information see listing under West Dade.
Sara's Dairy and Vegetarian 2214 NE 123rd St; 891-3312.
(Also 1127 NE 163rd St; 9487777.) An orthodox pizza
parlor, Sara’s also offers some of the most authentic
Middle Eastern and homecooked Jewish fere in
Miami. Hummus and felafel, stuffed cabbage and
mushroom barley soup have two things in common:
they’re meat-free, and they’re fantastic. Complimentary
egg bread with entrees is a challah of a good time.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Tivoli Restaurant 3439 NE 163rd St; 9457080. Not much
truly Danish cuisine here, despite the name (derived
from a famous Copenhagen landmark); but classic
continental dishes are well prepared and the hospitality
is first-rate. Standouts include a juicy and flavorful duck
with apple-and-chutney sauce, and a sublime red
snapper in pastry. Save room for dessert—there are
dozens to choose from. $$
Unicorn «Hago Restaurant 3595 NE 207th St; 9338829.
Not only healthy but politically correct, too. Try the
dolphinsafe tongol tuna tossed with canola mayo or
substitute soy cheese on that tempting Jamaican pizza.
Aside from the regular menu, fresh seafood such as the
coconut-crusted grouper is worth investigation. Lunch
and dinner. $
NEW TIMES Best of Miamll995
BEST INEXPENSIVE Italian ResLaumnL
ana
BEST HOMEMADE PASTA
WEaf are you waiting for?
• ROOM FOR PRIVATE PARTY AVAHARLE
• MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
• RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Open Seven Days
1740 79sl Cswq.
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
PL 866-1238 / E« 867-0309


Wong's Shanghai 12420 Biscayne Blvd; 8914313.
Szechuan dishes are some of the high points of this
famous Chinese haven, still one of the best despite the
passage of time. Among appetizers, the best
unquestionably are tender dumplings laden with
ginger and swimming in a light soy broth. Simple
things such as fried rice can surprise one by the high
quality of preparation. Reliable service of the speedy
kind. Lunch and dinner. $
North Beaches
al Carbón Cm the Sheraton Bal Harbour Beach Resort)
9701 Collins Ave; 865-7511. Literally “over coal”—and
if you stick with the name, you won’t go wrong: The
best items at this pricey Argentine-Mediterranean
supper dub are the succulent grilled steaks and chops,
which come with all manner of relishes and chutneys.
Among the appetizers, empanadas are expertly turned
out, as are a combo of feta cheese, rock shrimp, and
kalamata olives served on a bed of bitter greens, and
grilled baby calamari stuffed with minced shrimp. Live
music frequently spices up the dinner hour. $$$
Amie and Richie's 525 41st St; 531-7691. As you walk in,
you know you’re in deli heaven: Fresh cuts of smoked
fish, ham, salami, roast beef, cheese, and other
favorites line the refrigerated display case. Sandwiches
are hard to beat here; there’s no better pastrami on iye
anywhere. Knishes also excel Breakfast, lunch, and
early dinner. $
Cafe Prima Pasta 414 71st St; 867-0106. One of the best
pasta cafés in town. Eat here for fine handmade pasta at
fine-with-everybody prices. Coarsely chopped fresh
tomato sauces are especially good. But be prepared to
mill about on the sidewalk for a while — this
establishment always has a wait Lunch and dinner. $$
Cafe Ragazzi 9500 Harding Ave; 8664495. The
fascination with tiny trattorias continues, judging by
the business at this 40-seater. Though the service is
warm and personable, homemade bread, a decent
house wine, and a pleasant selection of Italian meat and
fish staples, such as osso buco and salmon with
sautéed radicchio and grapes, are the real draws. You
can eat your fill without padding the bill, especially if
you stick to wonderful baked pastas such as spinach-
and-cheese cannelloni and meaty lasagna. Daily
specials can be misleadingly pricey, so be sure to ask
before ordering—credit cards aren’t accepted (neither
are reservations). Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Da Vinci 1009 Kane Concourse; 861-8166. Run by
the folks who made Oggi a pasta-producing legend in
this town (see separate listing below), this elegant
trattoria serves gnocchi that float in pesto, addictive
ricotta-and-spinach agnolotti, pappardelle that rival
your wrist for width. Fish and séafood specials are
always fresh and feisty, and a meringue layer cake for
dessert is like a cloud sandwich. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Coco's Sidewalk Cafe 9700 Collins Ave; 864-2626. The
best thing about Coco’s is that it’s outdoors — ultimate
people-watching atmosphere. But the food, if high-tab,
isn’t bad. Of the appetizers, the fried zucchini with
horseradish is infinitely better than the famous
mozzarella marinara. For sandwich-seekers, the
croque mademoiselle and roast beef are
recommended. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$
Dominique's 5225 Collins Ave; 865-6500. The famous
lamb chops — marinated and cooked to poetic
perfection — raise the status of Dominique’s to near¬
legendary, which is unfair. If you’re adventurous, you
should try the alligator, rattlesnake, or buffalo dishes
that have become part of the lore. Desserts are
memorable, with soufflés from chocolate to pistachio.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$$
East Ocean Restaurant (in the Thunderbird Hotel) 18401
Collins Ave; 937-1006. Aged sirloin steaks and Maine
lobsters, served Cantonese style, are the house
specialties at this gourmet north-shore eatery. Though
X.O. chicken exudes peppery exuberance, anyone
looking to spice up the night will want to request it
extra-hot Same goes for other treats, such as hot-and-
sour soup and tender Szechuan wontons. $$
Kyung Ju 400 NE 167th St; 947-3838. This would be
worth a visit even if it weren’t one of the only Korean
dining spots in Dade. Highlights include a tofu-with-
hot-sauce appetizer that will have you contemplating
the fire-extinguishing properties of tea, and a dish of
cold noodles with beef in a red chili paste dressing that
rivals nasal spray for clearing the sinuses. Less spicy
but equally flavorful are the traditional barbecue
dishes: beef, pork, ribs, and chicken cooked on an
open gas grill brought to your table, then dipped in a
variety of homemade sauces and wrapped in lettuce
leaves. Lunch and dinner. $
L'Aurora Ristorante Italiano 18250 Collins Ave; 936-8166.
In a clean-lined, contemporary setting, Nando Hetroni
serves upscale Italian specialties to customers who
have followed him for years. A former pastry chef on
the Love Boat, Pietroni crafts wonderful breads, pastas,
and desserts. But don’t overlook the seafood dishes,
particularly when their succulence is enhanced by a
garlicky, red pepper fra diavolo sauce. Sliced sirloin
over arugula with peppercorns is also a treat $$
Le Petit Cafe 910 71st St; 861-0720. Petit is right But this
28-seater dishes up French and Italian fare at
neighborhood prices. Skip the mostly mediocre pastas
and go straight to steak au poivre, an excellent cut
topped with a creamy peppercorn sauce. Veal
parmagiana is that rare animal, tender and juicy cutlets
laced with mozzarella and Brie. Eggy créme brúlée is
more like a soufflé, but it’s still a dessert to inspire
spoon duels. $$
Oggi Caffe 1740 79th St Cswy; 866-1238. Expanded
seating now allows for more diners and greater comfort
at this 70-odd-seat restaurant and deli in the White Star
Center. Fettuccine, agnolotti, penne, and spaghetti are
all handmade; the tortelloni bicolore, stuffed with sun-
dried tomatoes and ricotta, is the prince of the pile.
Homemade desserts deserve devouring. Lunch and
dinner. $
The Rascal House 17190 Collins Ave; 9474581. A
labyrinthine deli, but surely one of the bestTTie menu
is a trip through all the glories of Jewish fare: chopped
liver with shmaltz; herring; smoked fish; Reuben,
corned beet and pastrami sandwiches; huge potato
latkes with sour cream; brisket of beet borscht... you
get the picture. Atmosphere is frantic but alive and
infectiously buoyant Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Sea Gate 7300 Ocean Terr; 8654940. At this dine-in,
dine-out spot in the Olson Hotel (off 73rd Street),
salt-air sensations are served in a laid-back,
unpremeditatedly funky setting. Whether it’s finger
food, ceviche, burgers, grilled catch of the day,
baby back ribs, or steak, you won’t leave the beach
hungry. In fact, the Gate might even become your
favorite place to avoid the hordes while strapping
on the ol’ feed bag. Lunch and dinner. $
Treffpunkt Blergarten 18090 Collins Ave; 933-3942.
Don’t trust what you read on the menu here —
descriptions are frequently a little off—but do
trust the kitchen to turn out German and
Continental masterpieces such as chopped steak
served in a skillet with crisp home fries and bread
pudding; and a Bavarian platter for two, a feast of
sausages and smoked pork loin. Wash it down with
Oktoberfest dark beer, a beverage that packs a nine
percent alcohol wallop no matter what the
season. $
South Beach
Blue Door (in the Delano hotel) 1685 Collins Ave;
674-6400. Shrouded elegantly in white (including white
draperies that reach from the ceiling all the way to the
floor, 28 feet below), this restaurant matches its
clientele: rich, chic, and beautifully turned out The
food’s pretty good, too: Try an appetizer of seared duck
foie gras resting on a bed of braised chickpeas,
chopped carrots, and fresh green peas; Or Maine
lobster salad paired with a chévre tortelli. An entrée of
lamb loin is velvet afloat a balsamic vinegar reduction,
while a stacked construction of farm-raised bunny is
the Wonderbra of wabbit Breakfast lunch, and
dinner. $$$
Boulevard Bar & Grill 740 Ocean Dr; 532-9069. A favorite
among locals and tourists alike, Boulevard may well be
the best on the Drive. Appetizers — a meaty crab cake
soaking in lemon-butter, for instance, and warm goat
cheese encased in a volcanic burst of phyllo dough —
attest to this distinction. Of Mediterranean origin and
stylistic bent Chef Arcoub is particularly skilled with
fish, and main courses reflect that preference; choose
from sea bass, pompano, snapper, tuna, and a number
of tasty shellfish and pasta preparations. Breakfast
lunch, and dinner. $$
Cafe Thai Bistro 1533 Washington Ave; 5314181. This
optimistic little restaurant raises the level of the local
ethnic market with some of the best basic Thai fare
around. Chef-owner Matida Apunikpinyo stirs up a
mean massaman curry and a zippy garlic squid. She
might even come out of the kitchen to make sure
you’re eating her noodles fast enough, while they’re
still hot and juicy. Don’t be afraid to prove her wrong—
if you order too much, the pad Thai and ba mee poo
(egg noodles with crab and ham) are good as cold
leftovers, too. Lunch and dinner. $
Casablanca 650 Ocean Dr; 534-9463. Dinner menu
changes every week and features a subtle take on New
World cuisine. Potato-crusted corbina and onion-
crusted Chilean salmon are two South American fillets
frequently showcased to great advantage. Whitewater
clams steamed in chardonnay, garlic, capers, and
tomatoes are a tangy starter, while double-chocolate
mousse is a rich, ice-creamlike dessert Breakfast,
lunch, and dinner. $$
Chrysanthemum 1248 Washington Ave; 531-5656.
Service is as elegant and pleasant as the Szechuan and
‘Try Brittany’s Favorite.
Our Fresh Napoleon
French Bakery & Cqfe
Lunches served
Monday thru Saturday
from 10am
13274 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami (305) 893-3336
Open
FOR
Lunch
Come In for Special Values
Vecchia B®era
IL RISTORANTE
1440 Ocean Drive • Miami.Beach • (305) 535-9995
Mon - Fri: 12:00 - 2:00 pm
Sat: Dinner Only
Sun : 1:00-4:00 pm*
*(Kendall Open Sunday 1:00-3:00pm)
Don’t Forget to visit us for dinner
Steak • Chicken • Seafood • Sushi
MIAMI North Bay Village on the 79th Street Causeway, (305) 866-2768
KENDALL 8727 South Dixie Highway, (305) 665-0044
FT. LAUDERDALE 276 E. Commercial Blvd. at the Intracoastal Waterway, (954) 776-0111
73
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Hie Tri-County's
Favorite Luncheon
Buffet Is Closer
Than You think.
tftuwse of 0)u\u\
ick+ck
Best Indian Restaurant • New Times '95
Award Winning Restaurant Since 1975
House off India
22 Merrick Way Coral Gables (305) 444-2348
Dawatto India Sunrise{305) 742-7558
Ta| Mahal Kendall (305) 382-9993
Indlaa Oardon West Palm Beach (407) 586-9579
Hoaeo off India Ft. Lauderdale(305) 566-5666
White
Lion
Cole
Serving Lunch
Tuesday-Saturday • 11:00am-3:00pm
Serving Dinner Thurs., Fri. & Sat.
5:oo pm HU The Fat Lady Sings
Live entertainment by Katie P. Jones
Free Secured Perking
146 NW 7th St« Homestead * 24S-1076
71
and you'll discover why The Fish Market was voted one of
Miami's Top Five seafood restaurants by the Zagat Survey for 1995
and 1996. Like The Miami Herald, you'll agree we're "Miami's best
seafood restaurant."
tile
^Jis/TS/larfiet
Biscayne Boulevard at 16th Street, Miami, Florida 33132 • Located inside Crowne Plaza Miami-Biscaync Bay
Phone 374-0000, ext. 475 • Reservations suggested • Complimentary valet parking
D
ine where the ambiance is as fresh as the menu
Pekingese cuisine at this sister to Thai Toni and Toni's
Sushi Bar. Descended from Montreal and previously in
Fort Lauderdale, Chrysanthemum’s reputation is well-
deserved. Ravioli in sesame and peanut butter sauce is
a rich, delicious way to begin a meal; chicken with crisp
spinach and eggplant in black Chinese vinaigrette are
signature dishes that shouldn't be missed. $$
da Lao Trattoria 819 Lincoln Rd; 6740350. A typical
pasta shop that gets a boost from its setting. The inside
is cramped, but this value-driven trattoria features
extensive outdoor seating in the middle of the malL
Beef carpaccio is delicate and pungent; simple bowls of
noodles are cheap enough to start your meal and deep
enough to be your meal Follow up, if you have room,
with veal Marsala, the best dish the house has to offer.
Homemade desserts are especially good with a shot of
expertly brewed espresso. $
B Rancho Grande Mexican Restaurant 1626 Pennsylvania
Ave; 673-0480. As the flavor of the recently trendy
Lincoln Road region continues to mutate, this homey
Mexican cantina maintains its individuality. The
atmosphere is authentic, right down to the service,
which is often casual to the point of being nonexistent
Fortunately, the guacamole alone is worth the effort of
stealing your own silverware from an adjacent table.
Likewise beef flautas, bean tostadas, chicken taquitos,
and more. Lunch and dinner. $
B Viajante Segundo 1676 Collins Ave; 534-2101. (Also in
Hialeah.) Formerly part of the La Carreta chain of
Cuban restaurants, El Viajante Segundo (The Second
Traveler) has gone solo, but not without retaining all
the elements that worked so well in the past, most
notably a wide range of great Cuban dishes at
reasonable prices. This Collins Avenue hot spot is
tourist-friendly, printing its menu in English, Spanish,
French, and German. $
Embers 1661 Meridian Ave; 5380997. An appropriate
addition to Lincoln Road, which is also experiencing a
rebirth, this revival of a 1940s eatery takes several of its
recipes from the original restaurant, including the ones
for French-style salad dressing, twice-baked potatoes,
and barbecue ribs. Not everything is a reproduction,
however. Chef David Sloane’s New American creations
gear the restaurant toward the future, not the past,
while pastry chef David Schindel’s red banana-Oreo
cheesecake promises retro satisfaction for newfangled
tastes. $$
Joe's Stone Crab 227 Biscayne St; 673-0365. Don’t let the
address fool ya; the entrance (and a parking garage!) is
now actually on Washington Avenue. And don’t worry,
diehards—the digs may be revamped, but the eats are
the same oI\ Here’s all you need to know; crabs, crabs,
crabs. Mustard dip. Creamed spinach, garlic or
otherwise. And key lime pie made as if it were
invented here. $$$
Kaori 136 Collins Ave; 534-2005. Japanese tapas are the
reason to visit this extensive sushi bar and restaurant
Eighty-four appetizers entice the diner into sampling
several plates like the shrimp dumplings with mustard
sauce. And the license to create your own roll with
ingredients like salmon tempura and Alaskan king crab
leg is the reason to come back. Lunch and dinner. $$
Larios on the Beach 820 Ocean Dr, 532-9577. (Also in
Miami) Most of the traditional favorites are offered in
this festive Cuban eatery. Shrimp creole and pork loin
are two of the recommended items. Desserts are some
of the best around, including an extraordinary rice
pudding and a stellar mamey flan. Breakfast, lunch,
and dinner. $
(.’Entrecote de Paris 413 Washington Ave; 673-1002. Yet
another reason to venture south of Fifth Street
Twentysomething owners Susana Nouel and Pedro
Infante designed the menu to appeal to folks like
themselves—young, hip, and living on credit It
works. Scarf down sirloins, complete with salad and a
pile of pommes frites for a prix fixe of fourteen bucks.
Either that or opt for the salmon—that’s about all
there is to choose from at this 50-seater. Wine and
dessert aren’t included, but it’s as difficult to pass up a
moist crumbly apple tart as it is to allow a kir royale to
escape your attention. $
Lulu's 1053 Washington Ave; 532-6147. listen up,
trendoids, here’s a veritable Graceland-by-the-sea.
While the service is sketchy, the surroundings
themselves are a sketch. (Hint picture every Elvis
souvenir extant) The menu is unabashedly southern
fried—chicken-fried steak, hush puppies, com-and-
okra fritters. The griddle sizzles with strip steak, crab
cakes, burgers, pork chops, and even a fried peanut-
butter-and-banana sandwich. Lunch and dinner. $
Lure 805 Lincoln Rd; 538-5873. The newest New Asian
eatery to troll on Lincoln Road, this place ain’t no fish
bait Innovative sushi rolls are as much of a draw as
chef Scott Howard’s stellar creations. Soba noodles
with sweet basil and coconut milk are sweetened even
further with shrimp and clams; turmeric-seared tuna
with beets and mashed potatoes is divine; whole
yellowtail with a Scotch bonnnet-mango reduction is
mild fish, flavorfiil sauce. If that isn’t enough mango for
you, be sure to order the basil-mango cheesecake
edged with red pepper marmalade and cilantro syrup
—an herby pastry worthy of being dished up in
Eden.$$
Maiko Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar 1255
Washington Ave; 531-6369. Lines are out the door for
innovative sushi creations, such as the spider roll
combining soft-shell crab, asparagus, and avocado.
Noodle dishes are generous portions of sautéed
buckwheat noodles. Generous also are the dinners
such as ebi misoyaki, shrimp in miso sauce, served with
your choice of soup or green salad. The miso honey
salad dressing is such an attraction you probably won’t
age a week before a return visit Lunch and dinner. $$
Max's South Beach 764 Washington Ave; 5320070. What
chef Kerry Simon says (and does) turns out extremely
well in this New Yoridsh bistro brought to you by the
famed Dennis Max-Burt Rapoport team. Roasted pork
loin and grilled rib eye steak glazed with maple syrup
are succulent treats, as is a fabulous tandoori salmon
with an almost-candied coating. Simon’s side dishes—
basil mashed potatoes, sweet potato hash, buttermilk-
battered onion rings—are superb, and they can be
ordered á la carte. $$
Monty's on the Beach 300 Alton Rd; 6783444. For
information see listing under Coconut Grove.
Nemo Restaurant 100 Collins Ave; 5324550. Wear your
tightest dress, your splashiest suit to this stunning
prestige palace, where the patrons sparkle almost as
brightly as the bejeweled, raw metal décor. Fortunately,
tiie fare outshines it all. Chef Michael Schwartz,
formerly of Wolfgang Puck’s Chinois, weaves Asian
influences into appetizers such as housecured salmon
wrapped around alfalfa sprouts. Main courses include a
curry-heavy pork loin dressed with caramelized onions
and papaya relish, as well as a surplus of South Florida
fishes. Side dishes are rich, setting the stage for
patissier Matthew Lazarchick’s chocolate delectables.
Lunch and dinner. $$
News Café 800 Ocean Dr; 5386397. Munch cold cuts and
any of a dozen cheeses and sip your choice of three fine
wines by the glass, or while away an entire day with a
bottle, listening to piped-in and piped-out (to porch)
jazz. Tahini salad with pita is tops, and the gazpacho is
great Look cool with a Euro mag from the in-house
newsstand (hence the name). Open 24 hours. $
Norma's on the Beach! 646 Lincoln Rd; 532-2809. An
offshoot of the internationally noted pair of restaurants
in Jamaica, Norma’s serves Caribbean ingredients
prepared with French flair. A brief menu yields an
intriguing smoked-marlin appetizer and a feta-and-herb-
encrusted lamb chop entrée; blackboard offerings have
included specialties such as West Indian pumpkin soup
and red snapper with a lime-butter sauce. Golden rum
cake provides a cocktail and a dessert, after which you
might want to sober up with French-pressed Jamaica
Blue Mountain coffee. Lunch and dinner. $$
Osteria del Teatro 1443 Washington Ave; 538-7850.
Recipient of the 1993 Golden Spoon Award and named
one of the top 200 restaurants in the country by Trend
magazine, Osteria is one of Miami’s favorites as welL
National Chefs Award-winner Antonio Tettamanzi has a
delicate hand with fish, poaching salmon to perfection
and grilling tuna to aT. He also creates such fabulous
pasta dishes as pappardelle sauteed with stone crab
meat, sea scallops in the shell, fresh tomatoes, and
vodka cream sauce, and linguine with mixed seafood
baked in parchment paper. Now you can enjoy these
specialties from 6:00 to 7:30 pm at Twilight Pasta, the
hippest early birder on the beach. $$$
Pacific Time 915 Lincoln Rd; 534-5979. Chef and co¬
proprietor Jonathan Eismann stuns the New World
with his take on Pacific Rim cuisine. Florida Keys
grouper is enticing, served with sake, shallot, and
ginger and tempura-fried sweet potatoes. Freshwater
catfish, also in tempura batter, is stuffed with ginger
and served whole. Honey-roasted Chinese duck with a
fresh plum and phim wine sauce and supple Peking
pancakes are simply outstanding. Finally, pastry chef
Jennifer Warren’s chocolate bomb dessert is a baked-
toorder explosion that’s guaranteed to blow you
away. $$$
The Palace 1200 Ocean Dr; 531-9077. Want to lighten up,
physically as well as psychologically? This spot offers a
royal array of true goodies—salad platters, homemade
soups, sandwiches (try fresh turkey breast, roasted on
the premises), and charbroiled meats and seafood—
and you needn’t feel guilty as you munch and sip, and
those perfect bodies stride, skate, and sashay by.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and late-night $
Pan Coast 2727 Indian Creek Dr (in the Indian Creek
Hotel); 531-2727. A boutique restaurant for a boutique
community. The twenty-seat dining room at Pan Coast
dishes up exactly what the establishment’s name
implies. The Pacific Rim menu rotates frequently;
appetizers may include a succulent cashew-dusted beef
and a shiitake mushroom salad, while main courses
might highlight a sesame-studded rack of lamb and
guava-soy barbecued pork tenderloin. Chef Mary K.
Rohan is especially skilled with shellfish preparation—
look for her sake-steamed scallops and shrimp.
Desserts such as ginger-spiced mascarpone
cheesecake are apropos. Breakfast, lunch, and
dinner. $$
The Paramount Cafe 1040 Lincoln Rd; 5388020. This little
cafe does far more than cater to the aprés-performance
Colony Theater crowd. Beef or turkey burgers (and a


grifled-toorder tuna sandwich) served with steak' fries
are deliciously downscale, while appetizers and entrées
I are appropriately upmarket All are big-time bargains.
I Lunch and dinner. $
Puerto Sigua 700 Collins Ave; 673-1115. If you’re allergic
I to Calle Ocho, then there’s this excellent Cuban
I emporium. Most of the usual favorites are here, the
I best of which is ropa vieja—not too saucy and not dry.
I Specials are tasty as well, from sauteed chicken livers to
| salt cod. When it’s available, the shrimp in “enchilada”
i sauce is pleasing. Enormous portions. Breakfast lunch,
| and dinner. $
Raleigh Bar and Restaurant 1775 Collins Ave; 534-1775.
f Forget the blues and Mow the rising star of the
i Raleigh Hotel’s stylish restaurant Head chef Marc
| Lippman has some creative ways for you to start your
f meal: lamb sausage and couscous with cumin and mint
and a creamless yellow-squash soup with spiced
| croutons are just two. FoDow that with an entree of
I roasted grouper in a slow-roasted vegetable sauce or
j grilled loin of lamb. Order the roasted garlic mashed
1 potatoes for Americana with a kick. Breakfast and
£ lunch daily; dinner Wednesday through Saturday
I only. 88
Ruen Thai 947 Washington Ave; 534-1504. In this
startlingly beautiful room, the teak tables are glass-
i topped and intricately carved. The food is superb,
particularly mee krob, crunchy vermicelli in an
intriguing sweet-and-sour sauce garnished with bean
sprouts, tiny shrimp, and a butterfly sculpted from a
carrot Delicious house specialties include lobster with
F chili paste, curried grouper, and a crispy, amazingly
lean, dude. Hot dishes are not as hot as billed, so crank
up your order accordingly. (
San Loco 23514th St 5333009. Choose beef chicken, or
vegetarian, wrap it in a flour or com tortilla, specify
mild, medium, or hot sauce, and you’ve built your own
taco (or burrito, enchilada, or quesadilla) to
specifications. The chili is as hot as a mid-July day, and
the chicken soup, about as comforting as South Beach
gets, is stocked with breast meat onions, peppers, and
crushed jalapeños—while not exactly designed for the
sickbed, it’ll certainly clear your sinuses. Lunch, dinner,
and late night $
The Strand Restaurant 671 Washington Ave; 532-2340.
Perennially on the edge, this Beach institution now
goes to the Pacific Rim. For starters there’s a
Vietnamese spring roll or a new twist on the joint’s
erstwhile favorite, shrimp with leek hay, which now
comes with a lemongrass sauce. Choosing charred
sliced tuna with mixed greens in a wasabhniso
vinaigrette would maintain the seafood theme, though
stir-fried tenderloin of beef with curried vegetables on
crisp egg noodles would round out your food
groups. $$
Tap Tap 819 5th St; 672-2898. ArtMy prepared Haitian
cuisine in an artistically rendered space that took a
team of artists years to create. Fortunately, the food
doesn’t take that long. Chicken, goat, and whole
snapper grilled over charbon bwa (hardwood charcoal)
are especially flavorful, while savory pumpkin soup or
shrimp curled in coconut sauce appeal to the more
barbecue-phobic. Try the watermelon soda, too—it’s a
sweet alternative to dessert Lunch, dinner, and Sunday
brunch. $
Texas Steakhouse and Sushi Bar 960 Ocean Dr; 531-8188.
Big 350-seat Texas meatery comes to tiny South Beach,
and if s a perfect fit Down a “yard” of beer with the two-
alarm chili, chunky with steak and kidney beans. A
prime rib eye is an excellent cut for the connoisseur,
while a sliced skirt steak smothered with barbecue
sauce entices the more robust palate. Side orders of
sautéed onions and a “trilogy” of mushrooms
complement the meats. Dinner; lunch Saturday and
Sunday. $$
Villa Dei 1608 Alton Rd; 5384552. You don’t have to ask,
“Where’s the beef?” at this chowdown emporium—
you don’t even have to ask, “Where’s the juice?” The
freshly sliced, juicy corned beef sandwich is sublime,
but there’s much more to the Villa than corned beef
Let us now pay tribute to turkey and to tongue, and give
praise to pastrami Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Yuca 501 Lincoln Rd; 532-9822. For more information
see listing under Coral Gables.
Miami-Central Dade
Aladdin 2841 Coral Way; 443-1426. Experience the
magic of authentic Lebanese cooking at this 58-seat
restaurant decorated with—you guessed it—brass
oil lamps on the wall You won’t even notice die décor
once the/ul medames appetizer (lava beans mixed with
hummus and served with pita bread) arrives. Same
goes for the mild and moist grape leaves and the
stewlike couscous topped with beef and chicken.
Syrupy baklava are crunchy, buttery sweets that make
for a fine finish. Lunch and dinner. (
Bahama's Hsii Market A Restaurant 7200 SW 8th St;
264-1448 Not really a Caribbean restaurant, this family-
style operation is, however, a good spot for fresh
standard seafood dishes with Cuban nuances. Don’t
miss the escabeche, a chilled extravaganza of lightly
breaded and fried pickled kingfish smothered with a
tart onion-and-pepper studded marinade. Nothing is
frozen here and seasonal catches are priced by the
pound. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Brasserie Brickell Key 601 BrickeU Key Dr; 577-0907. An
upscale neighborhood restaurant iocated on Claughton
Island, this place is ideal for before-sports (or other
downtown entertainment) dining. Pasta dishes such as
linguine with white clam sauce or agnolotH ollegria
(stuffed with ricotta, layered with cream) are key to
fulfillment For a different starter try the French onion
soup with a hearty tomato base. Giant bonbons —
gourmet ice cream dipped and rolled in tricolor
chocolate—rival the mousse pie for irresistible
richness. Dinner and Sunday brunch. $$
Café del Sol 1601 Biscayne Blvd (in the Crowne Plaza
HoteD; 374-0000. Not to be confused with the car of
similar name, this café has plenty to do with the sun,
serving a stunning variety of Caribbean and Latin
American cuisine. Beef dishes are especially good,
including a thicker-than-usual vaca frita marinated in
lime and Seville orange. Red snapper encrusted with
green plantain chips is the fish equivalent, while black
bean soup is the best in town, rich and heady and
fragrant Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Casa Juancho 2436 SW 8th St 642-2452. This cavernous
Spanish emporium has become one of the better-
known attractions of little Havana. A shame, because
the food can often be better than that Besides tapas,
there’s a large selection of Iberian fish specialties, such
as snapper in green sauce and baby eels in garlic and
olive oil Of the desserts, none is better than the crema
catalana custard topped with burnt carameL Lunch and
dinner. $$$
Casa Larios 7929 NW 2nd St 266-5494. For information
see listing under Larios on the Beach under South
Beach.
Catch of the Day Raw Bar and Gril 1050 NLeJeune Rd;
448-7810. Funky open-air seafood restaurant in the
unlikely vicinity of the State Road 836 overpass, in the
midst of car lots, gas stations, airport hotels, and traffic,
lots of traffic. For starters, dig into cooked-to-perfection
conch fritters or other finger foods and raw bar
offerings. Seafaring entrées, which include dolphin,
shrimp, and yellowtail dishes, among others, are fresh,
simple, and tasty. Lunch, dinner, and late night $
Cisco's Café 5911 NW 36th St; 871-2764. Looks like a
chain, but this is the only link. Standardized Mexican
fare—burritos, chimichangas, tacos, tamales, fajitas —
is elevated by the appetizers. Both com and flour
tortilla chips are homemade, as are all three salsas, the
hottest of which could singe nose hair. Guacamole is
buttery, ranch dressing is creamy, and a breast of
chicken smothered in tomatoes and bell peppers is
plump and juicy enough to distract from the fireplaces,
all of which operate on gas. Lunch and dinner. $
Covadonga 6480 SW 8th St; 261-2406. Cubans know
about seafood, and this restaurant shows us how much
and why. A plain snapper fillet sautéed in the skillet can
raise comparisons with José Marti”s verse. One of the
seasonal specialties is fish stuffed with crab meat
Desserts vary in quality. Lunch and dinner. 8$
East Coast Fisheries 360 W Flagler St; 372-1300. It’s
pricey, it’s always frill, it’s noisy, but oh-so-good. The
wonders of the sea come alive in this landmark fish
restaurant, so full of character and homespun charm.
Conch fritters as appetizers are a must As for sauces,
where else can you find blackened fish served with a
red pepper sauce? Lunch and dinner. 88
El Novillo 6830 Bird Rd; 284-8417. (Also in Hialeah and
Kendall) One of the finest Nicaraguan restaurants to
appear in recent years. The décor suggests a hacienda,
not a stable. The appetizers offer a cornucopian variety,
from fried cheese to nacatamalitos to ceviche. But the
churrasco is worth saving room for There is no more
tender cut of meat anywhere. And surprisingly, they
prepare a fine pepper steak in cream sauce. Dessert?
The pío quinto and queque cristal win hands down
Lunch and dinner. $$
Fishbone Grille 650 S Miami Ave; 530-1915. This funky
spawn of Miami’s venerable Tobacco Road offers
eclectic décor, fresh seafood favorites, and a few
regional adaptions. Bait your hook with one of their
sensational soups—seafood gumbo or salmon and dill
chowder. But bring a book—service fluctuates
between speedy and slow. Lunch and dinner. $
Garcia's Seafood Grille It Fish Market 398 NW North River
Dr; 3754)765. Overlooking Miami’s North River, this
indoor-outdoor restaurant serves up fresh fish-dishes
and family hospitality courtesy of father-son team Este¬
ban and Este Garcia. Choose blackboard specialties or
house favorites such as lemon-flavored grilled grouper
or blackened or breaded preparations of your favorite
fish. Seafood caesar salad, spicy conch salad, or
grouper chowder make tasty starters; you can order
your meal with a side of crinkle fries or hushpuppies
(just a dollar a pup). Lunch and early dinner. 8
Giacomo 1060 Brickell Ave; 379-1525. Breaking ground
on Brickell, this small Italian establishment features
indoor and outdoor dining. Carpaccios, antipasti, and
fresh salads (Belgian endive with a balsamic-sharp wal¬
nut purée, for example) are refreshing paired with plen-
Established 1958
or
food
market
Fine Wines
&
Champagnes
when only the best will do!
1077-95TH ST. • BAY HARBOR ISLANDS • 865-0331
KAMPAJ!
Japanese Restaurant
8745 Sunset Drive, South Miami
Lunch • Dinner «Open 7 Days
596-1551
in^onjunctioii with
Del Sol Brewing
presents Friday March 15
Featurlng: Frisbee, Joel Shantz
plus Special Guest
Sooth Bench**
Home Made Brews«me
Late Night Dining • 630
Microbrewery & Kitchen to Open Soon
What is a
tomato pie?
A light and airy Italian pastry, formed
in a seasoned pie pan. Baked to perfec¬
tion, creating a delicate, golden chewy
crust, garnished with savory sauces and
gourmet toppings. Pretty interesting
wouldn’t you say?
GREAT WHITE PIE
Sweet onions with mozzarella and
Italian cheese.
8” ........$5.75
10" $6.75
FABULOUS PHILLY PIE
Lean roast beef, in a light horseradish
sauce, with tomatoes, sweet onions,
bell peppers &. mozzarella cheese.
8” : $8.50
10” $9.50
Best New Restaurant - NmUmsS
Delicious
Miami Herald
4 Carrots
4 Chef Hats
Florida Sports
Free Delivery
Limited area
Min. $10 order
12447 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami 305.233.3344
Let us cater your next party
“Best fish-joint
on South Beach”
BOULGUbRD
BhR & GRILL
740 Ocean Drive, South Beach
Tel (305) 532-9069
New Times March 14 • 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
A neighborhood
cafe on the more
peaceful end of
Ocean Drive
Since 1990.
Full Bar
1420 Ocean Drive - South Beach
Open 8:00am - 10:30pm Daily
531-8300
â– ' ( Attitude Not Required)
life is not meant to be spent
alone.
Brochure available • Free consultation
(309) 989 8202 or (309) 989-3828
76
Great Food, Served By Great People, In A Warm Intimate Setting
Savor These Entrees At Their New Prices
Cappellini with Broccoli and Tomatoes
Angel hair pasta sauteed with olive oil, garlic, fresh tomatoes,
and broccoli florets, topped with sour cream.
$10.95
Tortellini
Cheese filled tortellinis, flavored in garlic and sage cream sauce,
or served in our marinara sauce - your choice.
$11.95
Gnocchi Rossini
Gnocchi with mushrooms in a light pink cream sauce served
with peas and Parmesan cheese.
$12.95
VealPicatta
Tender veal medallions sauteed with white wine, lemon slices,
capers, and butter, served with our specialty pasta primavera.
$14.95
Or choice of chicken breast
$12.95
Black and White Delight
Black and white fettucine served with scallops, shrimp,
clams and mussels in a garlic cream sauce.
$14.95
All Entrees Served With Fresh Hot Bread and House Salad
Lunch and Dinner
139-141 Giralda Avenue
Coral Gables, Florida (305) 567-9555
tiful pasta dishes. Ravioli of the day, sauced with diced
zucchini and melting mounds of mozzarella, is a stand¬
out, while meat specials, such as lamb and veal chops,
are both savory and juicy. Breakfast, lunch, and
dinner. $$
Guayaca* 1933 SW 8th St; 649-2015. A cozy spot in little
Havana offers all die increasingly familiar Nicaraguan
dishes, from nacatamales to vigorón and churrasco to
tres leches and pío quinto—and it does a bang-up
pescado a la Tipitapa, a red snapper deep-fried whole
and drenched in a sauce of onions and peppers, as well
as a delectable beef tongue in tomato sauce. But what
sets Guayacan apart from the crowd of Nica spots is
the array of hearty, homemade sopas — different ones
fix- every day of the week. Lunch and dinner. 6$
Hy-Vong 3458 SW 8th St; 4463674. Some of the best
Vietnamese food in town. People have been coming
back (with reason) for years. Fish in mango sauce is
delectable, as is the chicken liver mousse with
blueberry sauce. Pork dishes are similarly
multifaceted, with a gingery tang both authentic and
delicious. And a musk the Vietnamese-style coffee at
the end of the meaL $
bias Canarias 285 NW 27th Ave; 6490440. A tiny space
packed with hungry patrons who know what Cuban
food is all about It may take three people to finish the
bistec uruguayo, a breaded palomilla steak filled with
Swiss cheese and ham. All the daily specials are
wonderful and are gone quickly. Suggestions: half
chicken with mojo, pigs’ feet “a la andaluza,” oxtail
stew, and fried whole snapper. If there’s room, try the
deceitfully delicate tocino del cielo, a flan made with egg
yolks and cinnamon syrup—sublime. Lunch and
dinner. $
La Carrafa 3632 SW 8th St 444-7501. (Also in West
Dade and Kendall.) A muncher’s mecca, with the
flashy wagon wheel out front The food is not flashy,
but comprehensively Cuban and reliably good. Open
24 hours. $
La Casona 6355 SW 8th St 262-2828. Not your run-of-
the-mill Cuban restaurant Try the coconut shrimp for
starters, which is zipped wife an orange-guava sauce,
and then dig into a roast guinea hen stuffed with black
beans and rice and topped with an almond sauce.
Unusual dishes abound: baby goat marinated in red
wine, for example, and a cassoulet-type dish of rice,
beans, veal, pork, and rabbit Lunch and dinner. $$
La Esquina de Tejas 101 SW 12th Ave; 545-5341. Ronnie
ate here, remember? One of the most famous Cuban
cafeterias, the sandwiches are first-class, especially
such everyday items as medianoches. The Elena Ruz
sandwich, filled with turkey and cream cheese, is also
excellent Daily specials include picadillo and tasajo,
traditionally served with rice and all the trimmings. For
dessert try the simple torrejas, Cuban-style French
toast drenched in cinnamon syrup. Lunch and
dinner. 6
Los Ranchos at Bayside, 401 Biscayne Blvd; 375-0666.
For information see listing under West Dade.
Malaga 740 SW 8th St; 8584224. A Cuban restaurant
celebrating a Spanish heritage. The charming, covelike
décor adds warmth to the dining room, while the
cuisine is excellent You may have to wait for arroz con
polio or paella, but you’ll be glad you did. Fried snapper
and grouper are specialties, as is chicken with wine
sauce. On the sweet side, Malaga offers satisfying
boniatillo (sweet potato pudding), and arroz con leche.
Lunch and dinner. $
Mykonos 1201 Coral Way; 8563140. Mediterranean
specialties such as gyros and souvlaki yield much
pleasure because the pita bread is heated to perfection
and the lamb is lean. Like the island ifs named after,
filings are e-a-s-y. Lovely galaktobourico, overflowing
with custard. Lunch and dinner. (
Now Hickory Bar&Qus 3170 Coral Way; 569-0098. Rustic-
style barbecue that aims to please Latins and good ol’
boys alike. Cooked over wood chips, the offerings
include the standard barbecue items plus ribs of beef
lamb, veal, and sometimes even chicken livers. For
Latin-style barbecue lovers, lots of bistec dishes are also
featured, plus sides of rice and black beans. Lunch and
dinner. $
Orlando Seafood Restaurant & Rsh Market 501 NW 37th
Ave; 6426767. The seafood at this wonderful standup
eatery is fresh and inexpensive. Fried squid and fish
croquetas are homemade treats; a fantastic kingfish
escabeche is hearty. The house specialty, a Cuban
fishwich, comes with grouper, tuna, swordfish, dolphin,
or snapper, according to your preference. The service
is as sweet as the flan dessert Lunch and dinner. $
Ths Pasta Factory 5733 SW 8th St; 261-3899. Lively place
where you can watch pasta being churned from
antiquated machines and filled by hand as you dine.
While chicken, veal, beef, sausage, and shrimp dishes
are available, the emphasis is, of course, on the
homemade pasta dishes and a wide variety of sauces.
No doggy bags and no sharing, but half-portions can be
ordered for children under twelve. Lunch and dinner. $
S&S Dinar 1757 NE 2nd Ave; 3734291. A Miami
institution made famous by Mel Kiser and Corky
hick’s movie Last Night at the S&S Diner. Bring a book
while you writ ’cause writ you will in this popular
counter spot Tty the chopped steak with onions and
Where Else in Miami can you eat
Steak & Lobster for $4.95....
only at Miccosukee Indian Gaming
Featuring:
• Dancing & Live Entertainment
• 400 Video Pull Thb Machines
• Over 35 Poker Tables
• Lightning Lotto
• Winnings that exceed 9 million/month
• Open 24 hrs a day, 365 days per year
AT MICCOSUKEE INDIAN GAMING
Just A Few Minutes West Of The Turnpike
Krome Ave. 500 SW 177 Ave; Miami, 222-4600
Offer Available at Cafe Hammock i lam-lam
Must Present Ad For Offer. One Per Customer
Exp. 3-20-96
gUpM
W iif^I
* life;
&WT S* I WM
irffc « ¡life!
JJS> frag,. ,;
^3 J1§P¡«
K IS
LAS PUERTAS
The Vibrant & Diverse Tastes of Mexico.
148 Giralda Avenue, 442-0708
THE
LARGEST
SELECTION
OF LIQUOR
IN THE AREA.
1 WE CATER TO THE FINER TASTES./
•Single Malt Scotches
j 'Specialty Tequilas
I «Armagnacs & Cognacs
I «Grappas, Ports A Sherries
J «Imported Cigarettes
â–  Collectible Ceramic Decanters,
Miniatures and Zlppos
I «Large Selection of Imported and
Domestic Wines, Champagnes
and Beers
.Serví/
iüSJhe community since IQKa
®SLNNY ISLES
I LIQUORS
18180 Collins Avenue
North Miami Beach
932-5782


Bacco
RESTAURANT
From the Heart of Rome
—to South Beach—
Chef Giorgio Nisti
Open for Lunch and Dinner
1346 Washington Avenue
538-7122
rrain
BACHS
BUY ONE DOZEN
BAGELS AND GET
I 1/2 DOZEN FREE! I
gravy, the roast turkey, or the fried sole or shrimp. And
diere are few better mashed potatoes served in the
area. Desserts are unexceptional, but there’s a decent
rice pudding. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Scala Brill 801S Bayshore Dr; 5774202. The specialty
here is rodizio—a steady rotation of grilled poultry
and meats, sliced and served at the table from sizzling
skewers. If s authentic, if s well prepared, and if s filling.
Outstanding fish dishes flesh out the menu for meat-
free folks. And in direct contrast to the round-robin
tournament of meats, desserts are fruity and light
Challenge a date to dinner. Lunch and dinner. $$
Tacos by the Road 638 S Miami Ave; 5700059. Check out
of the office and hit the Road—the Taco one, not the
Tobacco one. Named for its location next to that
venerable institution—as well as for its nod to
Mexico’s infamous roadside taco stands—this
counter-service eatery is the place for a quick meal .
Steak fajitas and nachos grandes topped with beef pork,
or chicken are flavorful and filling. Tacos and burritos,
both made with flour tortillas, are also worth
investigating. Three different help-yourselfto-’em
salsas aren’t particularly piquant For real heat go to
the Arena Lunch and dinner. $
Taquerías el Mexicano 1961SW 8th St; 649-9150 (Also at
521 SW 8th St; 858-1160). Alunch counter of a
restaurant that serves the typical Mexican items, plus
some rarer concoctions such as pozole and menudo.
This is the perfect place for those who like their
Mexican food more picante than a pepper pot Mexican
beers, sodas, and other refrescos are offered. Breakfast
(available all day), lunch, and dinner. $
Tobacco Road 626 S Miami Ave; 374-1198. More famous
for its gritty sounds and blues-drenched ambiance than
for its dishes, the 80-year-oid fixture is as easy on the
palate as it is on the ears. Hamburgers can be ordered
with mushrooms, chili, cheese, and fried egg piled on,
while the chili itself is a fire-hydrant fixing. Soups and
salads are all good. Leave room for the homemade ice
cream, especially star fruit and cinnamon. Rough-and-
ready, nefritis eating. Lunch and dinner. $
Uncle Tom's Barbecue 3988 SW 8th St; 446-9528. Tom’s
has been around longer than most natives care to
remember. And best of all, it ain’t changed none. Ribs
are none too sweet, with a tang all their own. And amid
all the photos of goddesses such as Rita Hayworth,
Mae West, and Liberace, you can count on barbecued
chicken thaf s moist, tender, and tasty. Lunch and
dinner. $
Uva Wine Bar & Eatery 3850 SW 8th St; 529-2264. A classy
addition to Eighth Street, Uva serves tapas, pastas, and
main courses under a vaulted, ocher-bricked ceiling.
Murals of grapes and wine casks complete the wine-
cellar atmosphere, while deep-fried crab-meat
empanadas, polenta with porcini mushrooms, and the
most tender calamari in town speak to chef-owner
Vasco Cecchi’s experience. Homemade fettuccine is
fabulous, and pork chops smothered with peppery
white beans are pretty darn tasty when washed down
with any vintage on this small but well-chosen
California/European list Lunch and dinner. $
Versailles 3555 SW 8th St; 4444)240. A Cuban monolith,
a tradition, a reality. Here’s where it all began—or so
it seems. These days the menu is longer than the Old
Testament Also a good place for a midnight snack—
expertly prepared medianoches and sandwiches
cubanos, for instance. Recently they’ve expanded the
dessert selection to include a few odd choices, such as
majarete (com custard) and dulce de leche, a soured
milk confection. Lunch and dinner. $
Victor's Café 2340 SW 32nd Ave; 4461313. The best
New York City export to the Miami area since the deli,
this local hermana to a Big Apple Cuban eatery is
spectacular. If you’re on a limited budget fry the
mejillones en salsa verde, fresh mussels sauteed in
green sauce, which is both yummy and half the price of
most of the other dishes. If you’re flush and want to pig
out die lechón asado is wonderfully crunchy on the
outside, moist on the inside. The wine list is one of the
most comprehensive in town. Lunch and dinner. $$
Villa Habana Restaurant 3398 Coral Way; 4467427. In its
second incarnation, this Cuban café delivers first-rate
traditional cuisine. From white bean and black bean
soups to white rice and black bean side dishes,
everything is homemade by the same team that runs
Villa Italia. Especially promising are the croquettes and
vaca frita, the favored flavor of shredded and fried
flank steak. Lunch and dinner. $
West Dade-Hialeah
Canton 9796 SW 8th St; 226-8032. For information see
listing under Coral Gables.
B Cristo 8177 Bird Rd; 261-2947. Choose from every
Cuban classic imaginable, and have enough change left
over to take home something from the butcher, fruit,
or wine shops. Don’t miss the superb tasajo and boliche,
made all the more memorable by the side dishes; the
plátanos will drive you bananas. Breakfast, lunch, and
dinner. $
ween
industry
welcome!
LESLIE CAff
MARTINI BAR
77
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 â–  20,1996
â– Cl IJCiP
(ItMClIMiNCI » B»M«I «MCCCIM
B Inka 11049 Bird Rd; 553-4074. The rustic setting is
humble, but the cuisine soars to Andean heights at
Miami’s oldest Peruvian restaurant Memorable
ceviches and spicy meat and seafood entrées abound.
Don’t miss the Inka Special ceviche, the best in town,
chock-full of fresh sea bass, squid, clams, scallops, and
octopus. For the simply ravenous: try seco de res, a
meat-and-potatoes dish that gives new meaning to the
word “stew.” Lunch and dinner. $
B Novillo 1255 W 46th St; 556-6888. For information see
listing under Miami-Central Dade.
B Viajante Segundo 2846 Palm Ave; 888-5465. For
information see listing under South Beach.
Ron Chau 8376 Bird Rd; 553-7799. All you need here is a
big appetite and a little cash (no credit cards accepted).
Dozens of dim sum dishes offered daily, from steamed
shrimp dumplings to the truly exotic, such as chicken
feet or duck feet tidbits. Full selection of Chinese
dishes offered on standard menu, and house specialties
such as a dish of shrimp, roast pork, and chicken
sautéed with vegetables. Lunch, dinner, and special
Saturday and Sunday additions to dim sum menu. $
La Carreta 5350 W 16th Ave; 823-5200. (Also 8650 Bird
Rd; 5538383.) For information see listing under Miami-
Central Dade.
Los Ranchos 125 SW 107th Ave; 221-9367. (Also in
Miami, Coral Gables, and Kendall) Out in the wild,
wild West, this Nica steak house introduced many a
left-wing skeptic to right-wing delicacies. Beef has
rarely been so kill of flavor. Pile on the chimichurri and
gorge on gallo pinto and fried plantains. As for the
famous tres leches, it, too, aims at re-creating the first
time—and nearly succeeds. Fine food and service.
Lunch and dinner. ($
Outback Stoakhouso 8255 W Flagler St; 262-9766. (Also
in North Miami Beach and KendalL) Leave it to the
Aussies to beat us at our own game: good of thick,
juicy steaks. Except for a couple of pseudo-Australian
offerings, you’ll find the menu comparable to an
American house o’ beef—right down to offerings of
non-beef items such as chicken and fish—but
delicious steaks are what this restaurant is all about $
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne
Bayslde Hut 3501 Rickenbacker Cswy; 361-0808. They
don’t use big words like “convivial” here, but that’s the
word that best describes this local treasure, adjacent to
Miami Marine Stadium. Fresh seafood dishes are
rendered simply but deliciously and served in a
mellow, waterside setting. What more could you want?
A spot where Fido is welcome, too? Doggone if it ain’t
so. Lunch and dinner. $
Brasserie L'Entrecote 2901 Florida Ave; 444-9495. Two
words: prix fixe. For $23 you’re served a three-course
meal of soup or salad, a main course, and dessert
Entrees are well-prepared renditions of classical
French recipes, such as the sliced steak l’entrecote for
which the place is named, coupled with the best
pommes frites in the bistro business. Watch for the fish
of the day—swordfish in pink peppercorn sauce is a
zinger. Desserts, particularly the mouth-puckering
lemon tart, are exceptional—and hey, they’re
included. Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Europa 3159 Commodore Plaza; 448-5723.
Traditional French cuisine has never tasted fresher.
Cassoulet Toulousain (navy beans, duck, and garlic
sausage) and coq au vin are Chef Bernard Lapo’s
specialties. Snails Bernard á la Bourguignonne are
bread-dipping pots of pleasure, a necessity for
escargots lovers. A limited selection of pastas are
homemade. Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Med 3015 Grand Ave; 4421770. If you can stand the
wait and the noise, you’ll be rewarded with good food
and especially reasonable prices at this tony CocoWalk
cafe. Carpaccios—particularly the Tropicale, with
hearts of palm, avocados, and Parmesan shavings—
and thin-crust pizzas are among the highlights of an
adventurous Mediterranean menu. Lunch and
dinner. $
Café Tu Tu Tango 3015 Grand Ave; 529-2222. This
perpetually crowded tapas bar in the CocoWalk
extravaplaza is much more than the sum of its artsy
parts. Styled after a European artist’s loft, the Cafe
serves up a wide and wonderful variety of chips, dips,
frittatas, empanadas, kebabs, and assorted other
tidbits. Don’t miss the designer pizzas or the plantain
and boniato chips with chunky salsa Lunch and
dinner. $
The Chart House 51 Chart House Dr, 856-9741. The
prime rib of beef and filet mignon are sinfully tender
and flavorful, but there’s also fresh fish every day.
Swordfish and dolphin, in particular, have rarely been
this good. Mammoth portions and a lovely setting at
Dinner Key Marina $$
Grand Cafe 2669 S Bayshore Dr; 858-9600. Former Euro
Disney exec chef Pascal Oudin brings his classical
French training to bear on South Florida’s bounty. The
results are superbly restrained and succulent For
starters, try Chilean salmon in sherry vinaigrette.
Entrées include local soft-shell crabs over springy
buckwheat linguine, and an inchesthick New York
strip steak coupled with a juniper-berry reduction and a
mélange of wild mushrooms. Desserts are Oudin-
designed luxury treats in a deluxe setting—the two-
fiered, mirrored and carpeted dining room Breakfast
lunch, afternoon tea, Sunday brunch, and dinner. $$$
Greenstreet Cafe 3110 Commodore Plaza; 567-0662.
Pleasant sidewalk cafe in the Grove, with above-
average food. Traditional soups, sandwiches, and
salads compete with eclectic dishes from the Middle
East Greece, Italy, and Jamaica Jamaican chicken
wings are a treat for a wonderful warm-weather cooler,
try the fresh asparagus salad. Breakfast is served all
day, every day; start your Sunday the right way, with
eggs Benedict alfresco. Breakfast and lunch. $
Kaleidoscope 3112 Commodore Plaza; 4485010. Pasta
dishes can surprise with their delicate sauces, and old
standards such as beef stroganoff are rewarding.
Among desserts is a delicious puff pastry with a mocha
filling. Service is always exemplary. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Las Rías Gallegas 2890 SW 27th Ave; 4430037. For
information see listing under Coral Gables.
Le Bouchon du Grove 3430 Main Hwy; 4486060.
Goldenrod-colored walls and open-to-the-sidewalk
French doors beckon you inside this charmant French
eatery; friendly service and bubbly kir royales make
you want to stay. But it’s the homemade duck páté, the
fresh fish or chicken en papillote, the steak with green
peppercorn sauce, and the freshly prepared desserts
that will bring you back. Breakfast, lunch, and
dinner. $$
Mandarin Garden 3268 Grand Ave; 4489999. One of the
secret wonders of the Grove, this Chinese haven may
be small and unassuming, but it features the best
sesame chicken and Beijing duck in the area The food
is spicy and Szechuan-inspired. Dumplings are
gingery, and the hot-and-sour soup is a sinus blaster.
Dishes are expertly prepared and served by a
pleasantly attentive, unaffected staff Lunch and
dinner. $$
Monty’s Stone Crab Seafood House & Raw Bar 2550 S
Bayshore Dr; 8581431. (Also on South Beach.) This
snazzy, scenic spot is housed in a vertical shopping
strip on Dinner Key. St indoors, or dine outside on a
vast, bar-studded terrace overlooking the bay. Count
on beaucoup seafood goodies, especially, in season, the
stone-crab fixation that made Monty’s mighty mollusk
reputation A phone call wifi net you file market price.
Lunch and dinner. $$
Murphy's Law Irish Pub 4 Restaurant 2977 McFarlane Rd;
4489956. An Irish pub that has adapted to its
commercial surroundings. Stick with the Irish
offerings—shepherd’s pie washed down with
Murphy’s Irish stout, for instance—and you’re
unlikely to be disappointed. For dessert, honey-and-
raisin bread pudding makes two scoops of happiness.
Lunch and dinner. $
Señor Frog's 3008 Grand Ave; 4480999. A quesadilla is a
quesadilla, right? Wrong. Frog’s offers above-average
Mexican fere. It may not be the real item, but with the
strolling mariachi band and the fast-moving decadence
all around, who cares? Tostadas, burritos, and
enchiladas show the ingredients to best advantage.
And then there’s the amazing natilla custard—
absolutely the best in the city. Lunch and dinner. $$
Stetano's 24 Crandon Blvd; 361-7007. Despite its
weekend transformation into a Latin hot spot, the food
is variably outstanding. Calamari fritti and antipasto are
the best of the nonfarinaceous appetizers; amatririana
sauce on the pasta also exceeds expectations. Veal
dishes are file best of die main courses, and the
superior pafilard of veal competes with the best at any
French restaurant $$$
Sunrice 3195 Commodore Plaza; 4481933. One of
Miami’s most innovative and attractive Japanese restau¬
rants. “Sunrice Chicken Tonight” and “Son of a Beef
take cooked sushi rolls one step further, substituting
poultry and filet mignon (respectively) for fish. "TVopi-
cal twist” a salad comprising cooked shrimp, raw sol-
lops, tomato, mango, papaya, avocado, and scallion is
an ideal subtropical dish. Lunch and dinner. $$
Taurus Steak House 3540 Main Hwy, 4480633. Lively
and busy, this is another steak house with good
seafood. The salads at lunchtime—tuna, turkey, or
otherwise—are excellent The Reuben sandwich gets
high marks, as does the hamburger, one of the best
But the desserts are homemade, with file cheesecake,
key lime pie, and chocolate mousse bring the best
Lunch and dinner. $$
Trattoria Pampered Chef 3145 Commodore Plaza;
567-0104. Distinctive, Genovese food in a partylike
atmosphere. Pastas come with flavorful sauces, from
Irish (and vice versa)
78


^ â–  tuco to pesto to walnut to cream to creamy mushroom
| It’s one of the few places around that offers vitelk)
i tonnato and paesano ham. Osso buco here is one of the
. m best, richly fragrant and served with a fine risotto.
I Service is above par. Superb crépes (suzette and
I"'' ^suchard) for dessert Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$
Tuscany Trattoria 3484 Main Hwy; 445-0022. The
I Leaning Tower of Pisa is this trattoria’s logo, and
: apropos. Pastas pile haphazardly on the plates amidst
I the familial warmth of green-and-white-checked
tablecloths. Meats here are simply and deliciously
grilled, like Úie galleta al mattone, free range baby
chicken marinated and charbroiled. Sauces are wine -
and-herb-based, garnished with fresh mushrooms and
$ 1 chopped tomatoes. The papardelle Giuseppe,
fe I homemade noodles in a truffle sauce, is a house
$ 1 specialty. Lunch and dinner. $$
Coral Gables
Bangkok Bangkok 157 Giralda Ave; 444-2397. (Also in
B Kendall.) This “so nice they named it twice” place for
R Thai has become something of an institution in just a
E few years. The huge, tasty “Little Big Man,” a fresh
I mackerel fried whole, might as well be called “Holy
m Mackerel,” and the “Roasted Duck Darling” is
E delectable. Curries are exquisite, particularly the
| shrimp. Traditional Thai treats such as pad Thai, mee
W krob, and satay are among the appetizers. Flawless
â–  service. Lunch and dinner. $
Cafe Barcelona 160 Giralda Ave; 4460912. Like the dty
â–  of Barcelona itself, this storefront restaurant displays
jp an unselfconscious elegance and timelessness.
B Excellent fish and meat dishes represent the best of
K Spanish cooking. The sea bass in sea salt is
I: exceptionally tender, as is the lamb and skewered
â–  shrimp Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Kolibri 6901 Red Rd; 665-2421. The Bakery
I Centre area finally has another bakery—and this
I one carries gourmet, low-fat, and vegan items. It’s
I also a deli, market, and restaurant Décor is as
r beautiful as the cuisine, and both reflect the natural
| side of life. Don’t miss the portabello mushrooms and
I anything roasted in the Tuscan oven. A beer-and-wine
I bar features some organic choices, but desserts —
| mostly chocolate-and-liqueur varieties — sport a
l higher proof than the wines. Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Abbracci 318 Aragon Ave; 441-0700. A verifiable
I- showplace where Italian dishes of supreme
I refinement reign: snails with polenta in a red-wine
sauce and mushrooms; gnocchi with porcini-tomato
l sauce; veal chop and grilled seafood dishes with
virgin olive oil and herbs. Desserts (Campari sorbet!)
are the finest Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffe Bad 2522 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 4420600. Now
under its second owners, this veteran of Coral Gables
fine Italian dining once again shows its native colors.
Fare takes on a Mediterranean flair depending more
on light oils and spices than heavy, rich creams, and
menus are seasonal Expect some excellent fish and
meats, baked in the Tuscan oven, and some lovely
cold salad and carpaccio plates. Don’t expect a quiet
little spot for two—this business rivals Mezzanotte’s
for elite appeal. Lunch and dinner. $$
Canton 2614 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 448-3736. (Also in
South Miami, West Dade, and Pembroke Pines.)
Faves at these popular eateries are golden mountains
of honey garlic chicken and huge steaks—yes,
steaks. In addition to Cantonese, there’s Szechuan
and Mandarin cuisine. Sauces tend toward thick,
gravylike textures, but this is not a place for people
with tiny feet and similarly bound appetites. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Christy's 3101 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 446-1400. An
upwardly mobile carnivore’s hangout Apart from
enormous and beautifully prepared caesar salads,
there are the massive cuts of beef, among the best in
the dty. The prime ribs alone would make Fred
Flintstone envious. For the Japanese-minded, a rich
filet mignon is prepared with teriyaki. The baked
Alaska is terrific. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Barbar 276 Alhambra Cir; 448-9691. The room is
sleek, masculine, and clubby looking, but the staff
goes out of its way to make you feel comfortable and
to introduce you to fine Indian cooking. Try the lamb
Madras with basmati rice if you like it hot An array of
curries is offered from various regions of India, along
with a cornucopia of fruits, sweets, and potable
concoctions. Lunch and dinner. $$
House of India 22 Merrick Way; 444-2348. Can rice
dishes get any better? This restaurant prepares them
with style. Splendid curries are a staple, even if they
can be coriander-strong. A tandoor is in full view as
blazing skewers are extracted bearing tender, moist,
brick-colored chicken. If the atmosphere is dark and
cloying, the sarnosas quickly make you forget Lunch
and dinner. $$
Islands 2345 SW 37th Ave; 444-0334. This popular
Caribbean-style roadhouse changed its name
(formerly Kountry Kottage) to better fit its simple but
simply great island cuisine. Known from here to
Trinidad for its wood-scented, tangy, barbecued ribs
and chicken, this spot also features sandwiches,
salads, breads, and muffins bursting with raisins,
nuts, and other goodies. Noisy, cross-generational,
big-family atmosphere tempered by the soft, musical
English of the wait staff. Lunch and dinner. $
JohnMartin's 253 Miracle Mile; 445-3777. Who said
Irish food was all stew? This authentic Irish
emporium boasts a charming pub and an elegant
dining room serving the best poached salmon and
hollandaise in the area, sirloin steak with a whiskey
sauce, lovely homemade pátés, soups, and desserts.
(Try the Bailey’s ice cream!) $$
Justa Pasta 139 Giralda Ave; 567-9555. It’s easy to
order exactly what you want to eat at this enchanting
restaurant, now in its second location. Feel like
seafood? Choose the black-and-white delight bicolore
fettuccine with scallops, shrimp, clams, and mussels
in cream sauce, from the “Entrees with Seafood”
category. Have a yen for veal and vegetables? Got
those categories, too, even one that reads “Entrees
with Cheese,” which offers everything from cheese
tortellini to bite-size raviolini. Choose from a dozen
different salads for lunch. Lunch and dinner. $$
La Bussola 270 Giralda Ave; 445-8783. There is no
better service anywhere—formal, warm, attentive.
Rice and pasta dishes are finished at tableside, a nice
touch that helps to overcome some of the kitchen’s
inconsistencies. Lovely, cold vitello tonnato is a
memorable appetizer. Veal scallops with porcini
mushrooms arrive on a skillet, but the success is
mixed. Unquestionably, though, a restaurant of
superior standards. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Las Puertas 148 Giralda Ave; 4420708. A smashing
Mexican restaurant that puts Miami on the map in
terms of topnotch Mexican fare. The chef performs
miracles with fresh ingredients — Haas avocados
flown in from Mexico, for example. Don’t miss the
grilled duck fajitas, the sopa de tortilla, the enchiladas
with scallops, the flautas encasing spiced chicken, or
the warm apple pie. Lunch and dinner. $$
Las Rías Gallegas 804 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 4429058.
(Also in Coconut Grove.) Named for the estuaries of
the Galicia region in Spain, this restaurant deals,
appropriately enough, in sea fere. Paella is the best in
town and a bargain to boot at $14.95 per person; arroz
con pescado makes a hearty meal for a heart¬
warming price, while swordfish and tuna steaks
served on hoagie rolls are grilled sandwich treats.
(The Coconut Grove location offers a bigger menu
and a wider range of prices to match.) Lunch and
dinner. $
Le Provencal 382 Miracle Mile; 448-8984. Leeks,
tomatoes, garlic, onions, olive oil... this is French
cuisine that beats the butter-and-cream rap. The.
bouillabaisse gets all the honors—various fish fillets,
seafood, toasted rounds of French bread, and the
piquant red pepper rouille. If the famed soup is too
ambitious, there’s an excellent dolphin in leek sauce.
Service is outstanding. Lunch and dinner. $$
Los Ranchos 2728 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 4460050. For
information see listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Marlin Seafood Grill 3841 Bird Rd; 443-3474. Seafood
and the startling color of Marlin blue are foregone
conclusions at this retro-look diner; a pretty patio and
monstrous televisions are the surprises. A good
inexpensive spot for lunch or happy hour, where the
fried calamari is tender and true. Caribbean grouper
chowder is a hearty snack. Lunch and dinner. $
Mozart Stube Restaurant 325 Alcazar Ave; 446-3364.
You may not find Mozart here, but you will find stube
— a place to relax. The Wiener schnitzel comforts
even the pickiest schnitzel-seeker, and meats like
roast pork and smoked ham are top quality. For
dessert, traditional apfelstrudel is stocked with fruit,
but the egg-white soufflé eclipses both apples and
your appetite. Lunch and dinner. $
Norman's 21 Almería Ave; 446-6767. He’s up to his old
tricks again, and some new ones, too. Award-winning
chef and cookbook author Norman Van Aken returns
to the field to test the creative limits of New World
cuisine with specialties such as Rioja-braised lamb
shanks with South American fries and caramelized
root vegetables; hibachi tuna with Asian jus and
Oriental mushroom salsa; and smoked tearand-
shallot-stuffed grilled salmon. Paella is always a hit, as
is Van Aken’s signature rhum-and-pepper-painted
grouper. For the culinary adventurer who likes to
sample a little bit of everything, tapas at the bar are
the way to go. Desserts, too, are well worth
exploring. Lunch (weekdays) and dinner. $$$
Peppy’s in the Gables 216 Palermo Ave; 448-1240. Don’t
be misled by the vaguely Spanish name—this place
is purely Italian. Peruse your take-home copy of the
menu while enjoying complimentary roasted and
mashed garlic spread on crusty bread. Pasta dishes
are masterful, especially those made with cream
sauces and seafood. The dante veal preparation is an
inferno of flavor. Amaretto cheesecake is an
exceptional dessert Lunch and dinner. $$
Picnics at Allen's Drug Store 4000 Red Rd; 6666964.
ALL-U-CAN- EAT
SUSHI
& CHICKEN
TERIYAKI
6
$10.95
Open 5-11pm
ALL-U-CAN-DR1NK
w/ FREE BUFFET
& KARAOKE
Ladies Night
Weekday - $10.00
Weekend - $12.00
Men's Admission -
$15.00
.... ^ 11pm-4am /
Tokyo x
Club
3425 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH
534-5358/673-9702
CLOSED MONDAYS
New World
Caribbean Cuisine
Indulge Yourself in Tropical Ecstasy In or Out
Best Caribbean Restaurant'
â– Mew Times, 1995
Lunch and Dinner * Closed Mondays
646 Lincoln Road (at Euclid) 532-2809
Free Parking • Catering • Delivery
If You’re Looking For A Finer
French Restaurant,
May We Suggest
A Little Place We Know
Outside Of Paris.
Brasserie l’Entrecote
Join us for an Evening of fine dining and
UVE ENTERTAINMENT ON THURSDAY EVENINGS.
Featuring on Friday march 15th the famous
BILLY ROLLE JAZZ SWING ORCHESTRA
Brasserie L’Entrecote Coconut Grove
2901 Florida Ave. (Across from Mayfair House)
305.444.9697
Valet Parking Available
79
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


RESTAURANT • BAR
Tuesday
Arabian Aiglu
with Belly Dancers!
Wednesday
Ja%K Night
Special Performance
Carolyn Ranting
Jazz Quartet
7:30-10:30pm
Friday
Flamenco Night
Featuring
Nueva Rumba
U VJLU
560 Washington Avenue • Miami Beach
534-8847 Fax 534-3196
STEP UP
TO JAPANESE
DELIGHTS
HHM
MMii
AK4SHI
JAPANESE RESTAURANT
5830 S. Dixie Hwy.
(at the CHd Depot location)
665-6261
* & » V •
St TQcutc/io. ^
tfrcuute &
Mexican
Restaurant *
“Best Mexican Restaurant” m
“Best Fajitas”
“Best Place to Buy Salsa Mexicans”
-New Times, Best of Miami *
Lunch & Dinner
^ 1626 Pennsylvania Ave. Miami Beach
half block S. of Uncoln Rd.
^ 673-0480
* J \ m J ^ ^
CHARLOTTE’S
CHINESE KITCHEN
“Critics Favorite Budget
â–  Chinese Restaurant"
-Miami Herald ‘93
THE SOURCE
FOR AN
INCREDIBLE
NICARAGUAN
EXPERIENCE
GUAYACAN
THE BEST NICARAGUAN FOOD
"Lunch Ejecutivo" (Incluye soda) 4.75
Limes a Viernes 11am a 3pm
"Executive Lunch" (includes soda)
Monday thru Friday 11am - 3pm
NO INCLUYE DIAS FERIADOS
DOES NOT INCLUDE HOLIDAYS
"Dos Por Uno" 2x1
(No esta disponbile para llevar)
Lunes a Viernes 4pm a 7pm
"Two For One" 2x1
(Not available for Take out)
Monday - Friday 4pm-7pm
NO INCLUYE DIAS FERIADOS
DOES NOT INCLUDE HOLIDAYS
1933 SW 8 Street Miami, Florida
Telephone 649-2015 - Fax 642-7383
â–  11:00 am -11:00 pm
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
Diner ambiance and home cooking plunked down in
a drugstore. Tasty staples such as fried chicken, liver
and onions, meaty chfli, not to mention burgers,
sodas, deli sandwiches, genuine key lime pie, and
salads. Lots to survey as you munch: jukebox with
moldy-oldie tunes, wait staff that looks to have been
lifted out of an Archie comic, pics of James Dean and
other idols. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Restaurant St Michel 162 Alcazar Ave; 4466572. Some
stars shine brighter after they bum out Recovered
from a 1995 fire, the French-rooted New American
kitchen sparkles. Among the appetizers, choose from
páté of the day served with onion relish, plump
sautéed escargots, or steamed mussels. Long Island
duckling in a caramelized orange sauce and rack of
Australian spring lamb on a pinot noir reduction are
entrées that highlight the talents of New Renaissance
chef Curtis Whittícar. For dessert, a puffy chocolate
soufflé eclipses all other sweets. Breakfast lunch,
and dinner. $$$
Rodeo Grill 2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 447-6336. An alt
you-can-eat carnivore’s paradise where sausages,
chicken, turkey, lamb, short ribs, top sirloin, ham,
pork loin, and surprises such as chicken hearts are
skewered onto long swords, grilled over hot coals,
and theatrically whisked to your table. Seafood
kebabs are also available and the salad bar is one of
the best in town. Fast before going and, afterward, do
not get on your scale. Lunch and dinner. $$
Tina's Place 166 Giralda Ave; 4486313. Peru meets
Italy in this family-owned establishment in the heart
of the Gables. Go from starch to starch with papa a la
huancaina (boiled potatoes covered with a creamy,
bright-yellow cheese sauce) and homemade tortelloni
and agnolotti. Or from salad plate to salad plate with
ceviche and carpaccio. Whatever nationality you
order, it’s bound to be well-prepared. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Two Sisters Restaurant 50 Alhambra Plaza (in the
Hyatt Regency); 441-1234. Newly revamped, TVo
Sisters now features Pacific Rim cuisine with a
Spanish twist Tapas include succulent squid rings
married to a lemongrass dressing. Pot stickers filled
with minced chicken and duck are fragrant treats,
topped with poblano-chili-and-tomato relish. Seafood
rules the entrée list Try whole tempura-battered
yellowtail swimming through a sea of shredded
cucumber and cellophane noodles, or mahi-mahi
grilled and sauced with a fabulous black sesame seed
butter. Mango sorbet with a sesame macaroon
cookie for dessert is tropically sweet Breakfast
lunch, and dinner. $$
Vatapá 2415 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 461-5669. Named
after a popular Brazilian dish, this eatery serves an
excellent version of the shrimp and fish stew in a
tropical rain-forest setting. Such delicacies as feijoada
(smoked meats and black beans) and the Bahian
favorite chicken in herb sauce vie for attention with
the hanging hammocks and painted parrots. Start
with a cocktail made from cuchafa (sugar-cane rum)
and passion-fruit juice, and finish with a flourish of
cafezinho and Brazilian bread pudding. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Yuca Restaurant 177 Giralda Ave; 4444448. Chef
Guillermo Veloso continues to impress with finely
prepared, imaginative cuisine. Such standards as the
sweet plantain stuffed with dried cured beef and the
guava-barbecued baby back ribs remain on the
menu, in addition to a fabulous three-bean terrine and
a crisp plantain basket filled with tender conch and
shrimp. A skirt steak, cut to resemble a tutu, is always
a sound choice, and for Latin with an Asian flair, pan-
seared tuna with coconut-curry rice is a rare treat
Chocolate tres leches, paired with a rich cocoa sorbet,
works wonderfully for dessert Lunch and dinner. $$$
South Miami-Kendall
South Dade
Akashi Japanese Restaurant 5830 S Dixie Hwy; 6656261.
Formerly the Depot Akashi retains that restaurant’s
train-theme glass tables. The best sushi boats in town,
however, are no holdover—generous and artistic
(reparations of tuna, salmon, yellowtail, and shrimp.
Cooked fare is also excellent particularly the ton katsu
(fried pork cutlet), and a distinctive char-grilled chick¬
en teriyakL Amaretto cheesecake, dipped in a tempura
batter and deep-fried, then served with drizzled choco¬
late and whipped cream, beats red bean ice cream any
day. $$
Bahama's Hsh Market and Restaurant 13399 Bird Rd;
2254932. For information see listing under Miami-
Central Dade.
Bangkok Bangkok 12584 N Kendall Dr 595-5839. For
information see listing under Coral Gables.
Cafa Bistro 10121 Sunset Dr; 595-3663. Charming, two-
story Italian restaurant with a well-rounded selection of
chicken, veal, seafood, and pasta dishes at ultra-
reasonable prices. Lightly breaded and fried calamari
• SMÓQGÁSBODD ■
Gravad Lax Herring Seafood
Poached Salmon Meatballs
Jansson Temptation Salads
Thurs/Fri/Sat Dinners
Sunday Brunch
NOW - Tuesdays Special
WHOLE MAINE LOBSTER
GREEN MUSSELS
AND PESTO PASTA
$14.95 (Wow!)
Call now for reservations
FOOD BY TROLLS
Fine European Cuisine
9707 &. Dixie Hwy, Miami 668-9395
Gentusui Recudí
Gluh PteAesiti:
“Rltce Plicfltti "
LIVE JAZZ ENTERTAINMENT
EVERY FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY,
SHOWTIME 9PM.
SEQUESTER YOURSELF TO OUR
SECRET GARDEN...FOR INTIMATE
AFFAIRS UNDER THE STARS...
COCKTAILS...HORS D'OEUVRES
AND SECRET RENDEZVOUS...
WON T TELL A
SOUL... PROMISE!!!
CENTURY
HOTEL • RESTAURANT • BAR
BEACH CLUB*GALLERY
140 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach
674-8855


B ringlets, zucchini fingers, and mozzarella sticks make
â–  good starters; the horseradish dressing
m accompanying the zucchini is finger-licking fine.
■ Don’t miss the dolphin prepared Greek-style with feta
B cheese and a few Szechuan dishes. Known for its
I many, cooked-upon-order hearty soups in lightly
B seasoned broths. Duck on the menu in many
m different styles, and lots of deep-fried appetizers,
I favorites of Peruvians. Chinese and Peruvian beers.
B Lunch Tuesday through Sunday; dinner nightly. $
Café Creole 12983 SW 112th St; 386-7070. Haitian
B specialties in a spiffy Kendall setting. Malanga fritters
K dipped in a powerful chili pepper sauce are crunchy
1 nuggets. Lambi, tender marinated conch served in a
I rich tomato Creole sauce, is rightfully the house
W specialty, and whole snapper is mild and sweet
K Lunch and dinner. $
Canton 6661S Dixie Hwy; 666-5511. (Also 14487 S
I Dixie Hwy, 233-6224.) For information see listing
I under Coral Gables.
Captain's Tavern 9621S Dixie Hwy; 666-5979. A fixture
I for nearly twenty years, this nautical-theme seafood
I house offers more local (and distant) fresh catches
I than your local fishmonger. Among the South Florida
( seafaring fare: lobster, yellowtail, snapper, pompano,
I bay scallops, conch, dolphin, grouper, and stone
I crabs. Steaks and other meat dishes are available, as
I are some trendy seafood creations, but for the most
I part dishes are simply — and tastily—rendered.
| Vast and varied wine list Lunch and dinner. $
Chilango's Mexican Grill 5859 SW 73rd St;
I 663-9333. For well-prepared Mexican food served
I with a humorous flair, try this pretty remake of the
L old UM hangout Coach’s. The chunkiest, richest
| guacamole in town is a quick start, easing you into
moist and tender sopes and spicy tortilla soup. Follow
up with an enchilada platter smothered in a salsa
verde and wash it down with Pacífico. Lunch and
dinner. $
Chopsticks House 20553 Old Cutler Rd (in Old Cutler
Towne Center); 254-0080. Thai owners satisfy a
double demand with expertly prepared Thai and
Chinese fare. Spring rolls are fresh and greaseless,
stuffed with shredded vegetables. Larb tofu is
marinated bean curd, chopped and tossed in the deep
fryer. Black bean and red curry rival each other for
best sauce; pad Thai is the House speciality. Lunch
and dinner. $
Doc Graham's Taproom & Eatery 20537 Old Cutler Rd;
235-4373. Chicago and New Orleans influence this
handsome brick-lined pub, named for the baseball
player with the remarkably short major league
career. This segment of the rebuilt Old Cutler Towne
Center is destined for more extended fame, thanks to
superb charbroiled burgers, crisp and colossal onion
rings, and meaty chicken wings, not to mention
simple and well-prepared fresh seafood specialties.
Twenty international beers on draft don’t hurt, either.
Lunch and dinner. $
Fancy’s 7382 SW 56th Ave; 661-3981. Looks like a
spaghetti house but aspires to carbohydrate
greatness — and frequently succeeds. If you like
your pasta with a kick, try the puttanesca, made
with hot Italian sausage. If you like your noodles
creamy with a little crunch, order the primavera.
Nine veal dishes are offered, along with a vast
selection of appetizers and nearly 1000 wines. Lunch
and dinner. $
Finicky's Little Diner 7310 Red Rd; 661-0535. A tiny,
charming, hole-in-the-wall diner. You won’t find a
finer New England clam chowder anywhere
(available only on Friday and Saturday). Tasty daily
lunch specials: beef stroganoff and chicken with
yellow rice are especially good, but who can resist
the soup-and-sandwich servings, including tender
roast beef and meatball sandwiches? Good
cheesecake. Breakfast and lunch. $
Food by Trolls 9707 S Dixie Hwy; 668-9395. Gravlax.
Pickled herring in sour cream. The all-important
Swedish meatball. Don’t underestimate the pull of
northern climes at this 30-seat European bistro;
Greek- and Italian-influenced dishes pale in
comparison to the Scandinavian specialties. But if the
midnight-sun menu doesn’t suit your style, you
certainly won’t go hungry. Lamb, chicken, beef, and
fish dishes abound, and more than a dozen pastas are
served in hearty portions. Lunch and dinner. $$
Gil Capa's Bistro 10712 SW 113th PI; 273-1102. This is
a restaurant like no other, but it offers Italian-
American food at its homey best, cooked by the
Owner himself (who likes to inspect his customers).
A delightful antipasto salad prepared with Capa’s
secret herb dressing starts things off The finest
entrée is the sirloin with a superb sauce made from
green pepperoncini, black olives, garlic, tomatoes,
and capers. Good cannoli for dessert $$
K.C. Cagney & Co. 11230 SW 137th Ave; 386-1555. West
Kendall gets a diner. A unique combination of old-
fashioned and new-fangled goodies is made even
more inviting by sincere pricing and an irreverent
sense of humor. Asia goes deli with Thai chicken
salad and “rice bowls” topped with fresh fish and a
pungent black bean sauce; and more than 30 varieties
of hamburgers and other sandwiches are featured,
including a stellar homemade shrimp salad with
lettuce and tomato on a poppy-seed roll. Classic
sundaes and cream pies star for dessert Lunch and
dinner. $
Le Glacier 5950 S Dixie Hwy; 666-3120. Delightful,
unpretentious French café with friendly service and
filling, affordable daily specials. Or try onion soup,
quiche, crab salad, or a sandwich — on a croissant of
course. As the name indicates, this pretty auberge-
style restaurant — with greenery galore and
skylights — features wonderful ice cream desserts.
Lunch and dinner. $
Los Ranchos 8505 Mills Dr; 596-5353. For information
see listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Mekong 18073 S. Dixie Hwy; 238-3500. Vietnam
comes to Cutler Ridge. Salad rolls (noodles, meats,
and herbs wrapped in chewy rice paper) are great
doused with the ubiquitous nuoc cham, while green
papaya salad lights up the palate with a host of
spices. Among entrées, lemon-grass chicken and
stir-fried garlic jumbo shrimp are the best bargains,
as are the traditional noodle soups. Incurable
phobics can opt for any of the Chinese selections.
Lunch and dinner. $
Old Cutler Oyster Co. & Raw Bar 18415 S Dixie Hwy;
238-2051. The motto here is “Where the Cape meets
the Keys.” And the menu covers the Eastern
seaboard, from New England clam chowder to Key
West cioppino. Oysters are the house specialty, but
there’s also steamed shrimp and Buffalo-style
cracked conch. Homemade salad dressings, tartar
sauce, cole slaw, and parsley potatoes are truly
special. Lunch, happy hour, and dinner. $
Outback Steakhouse 13145 SW 89th PI; 254-4456. (Also
11800 Sherri Ln; 596-6771.) For information see
listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Palace Cuisine 9537 S Dixie Hwy; 662-1113. Brightly
lighted and exceptionally clean, this Lebanese eatery
serves basic, authentic fore. Falafel balls are loaded
with chunky chickpea texture; hummus is a savory,
smoother version of the same legume. Fattoush is
fresh and tangy, topped with pita croutons and
homemade lemon dressing. Don’t bother choosing
between the walnut and pistachio baklava for dessert;
at these prices, you should order both. Lunch and
dinner. $
Punjab Palace 11780 N Kendall Dr; 274-1300.
Turbaned, bearded, and impressive, Punjabi Sikhs
run this immaculate Indian restaurant Tandoori
chicken is a high point Sarnosa pastries with either
vegetables or meat are crumbly and satisfying. Of the
main courses, rogan josh made with cubed lamb is
creamy and mild, and the chicken curries are
immensely fragrant and delicious. Indian food at its
finest and most elegant Lunch and dinner. $$
Romano's Macaroni Grill 12100 N Kendall Dr; 270-0621.
An Italian family restaurant with excellent food and
hospitality to match. Focaccia is fabulous; a caesar
salad costs less than a buck when ordered with an
entrée. Try the thin-crust pizza with sun-dried
tomatoes, mozzarella, basil, and oregano, or the
penne with scallops and Italian peppers. $
Shibui 10141 Sunset Dr; 274-5578. Sushi is
magnificent — unagi, California roll, shrimp, salmon,
tuna — all beautifully prepared. Teriyaki, katsu, stir
fry, sukiyaki, and tempura dinners all show
excellence. Kiwi cheesecake and key lime pie
confound preconceived ideas about Japanese
desserts. Enchanting service, homey atmosphere. $$
Shorty's Bar-B-Q 9200 S Dixie Hwy; 670-7732. Another
landmark barbecue joint, this one features the
ubiquitous ribs and chicken in slightly sweeter and
spicier renditions than elsewhere. Hot off the wood,
such specialties continue to please after all these
years. Lots of character, lots of fun. Lunch and
dinner. $
Siam Lotus Room 6388 S Dixie Hwy; 666-8134. Some of
the best Thai food anywhere. The prize item is the
fried whole snapper with fiery chili sauce. The same
sauce lights up the “Volcano Shrimp” entrée. Satay
beef or pork sticks are pungently sweet, especially
with the peanut sauce. Spring rolls, different from
Chinese, also add spice and variety. Clean
surroundings and pleasant ambiance. Lunch and
dinner. $
Tani Thai 12260 S Dixie Hwy; 253-3583. You’ll need
some imagination to consider dishes named “Hello
Ginger!” and “Kiss Me!” — but don’t worry, all is not
lost The pad Thai noodles are excellent, as are the
various fish and duck dishes flavored with red pepper
flakes and peanuts. Service is first-rate, and the
setting has charm. Lunch and dinner. $$
White Lion Cafe 146 NW 7th St, Homestead; 248-1076.
A cute café in an antique store, with a Key West-style
outdoor patio. Though main courses are uneven,
homey soups and housemade vinaigrettes dress up
appetizers, and ultrafresh produce nicely reflects the
Homestead setting. Don’t miss the selection of layer
cakes, pies, and cobblers, made daily by chef-owner
Loryann Swank. Lunch and dinner. $
THE LUCK OF THE IRISH
IS YOURS ON
SUNDAY, MARCH 17
6PM TO 9PM
Airport Lakes South
1101 N.W. 57th Avenue, Miami
Just off the 836 at Red Road (57th Ave) Exit
If you’re single, you’re invited to a special singles-
only St. Patrick s Day party on Sunday, March 17 from 6
to 9pm at the Holiday Inn Airport Lakes South. The only
way to participate is to place a 40-word personal ad in
New Times Romance at the door. We'll be giving away the
ads absolutely free!
All participants will receive:
• Free admission
• Free cocktail
• Free Buffet
• Free New Times T-Shirt for all ladies
And you’ll be automatically
registered in a drawing for a trip
for two, dinner for two and a
valuable bar tab.
(Winner will be selected at 8:30pm. Must be present to win)
NoffilMS Call 579-1525 for more
¡ROMANCE information
81
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14-20,1996
li
82
Specks
Events
Coconut Grove
Across from Cocowalk
461-8661 • Open 10am - 1am
Friday 3/15 10pm
rauu
KHS1A&B
Groovy. Intense. Don’t leave ..
Xy without getting a sticker.
Saturday 3/16 1pm
KIDS! KIDS! KIDS!
Snoopy’s
Jazz
Meet the members of the Miami
High Jazz’ Band and learn about
' ^different instruments. Watch a
especial viewing of “Snoopy’s Jazz”,
plus free treats to eat.
Saturday 3/16 10pm
CHINA DOLL
Originahpop with catchy hooks
' and powerful female vocals.
Sunday 3/17 8pm
L Ron
Castonguay
Smooth sounds of the soprano sax.
Monday 3/18 7-1 1pm
Monday Night
Music Trivia
Test your knowledge of jazz and
T,yói| could win a Coleman Cooler.
Wednesday 3/20 9-11 pm
My Private
Mic Night
South Beach
Collins Ave. & 5th St.
p4-3667 • Open 10am - 1am
Friday 3/15 11pm
UVE MUSIC! !
Saturday 3/16 4pm
KIDS! KIDS! KIDS!
Snoopy’s
Jazz
Meet the members of the Miami
High Jazz Band and learn about
- different instruments. Watch a
special viewing of “Snoopy’s Jazz”
plus free treats to eat.
Saturday 3/16 9-1 1pm
Saturday ¡Might
Dance Party
Sunday 3/17 8pm
Peter Betan and
Marc Berner
... Melodic, acoustic interplay. . I
Monday 3/18 7-11pm
Monday Night
Music Trivia
WAYAYAYAYAYA
Don’t Miss the
Taste of
the Beach
March 23 -24
at South Pointe Park,
With Over
35 Miami Restaurants
Participating!
YAYAYAYAYAYA
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THE YOUNG GODS
SUNDAY • APRIL 28TH
TIX $25.75 ADV. DOORS 6:30 PM
WEST PALMBCH* AUDITORIUM
1610 PALM BCH. LAKES BLVD.
ON SALE NOW !!!
TICKETS available thru ticketmaster
MAY BE SUBJECT TO SERVICE CHARGE
PRESENTID BY CELLAR DOOR


Nil Lara, Miami's favorite son, poised to take his Cuban-American rock nationwide
His First
Child
By Steven Almond
Nil Lara doesn’t know where he is. He’s not
even quite sure what state he’s in. “Nevada?”
he screams into the phone when pressed for
his exact location. “California?” This is what
it’s been like recently for Lara, who, it turns
out, really doesn’t know where he is during a
midtour phone interview. Since putting the
finishing touches on his self-titled major-label
debut a few months ago, Miami’s favorite son
has been mapping new territoiy with a dive-
bomb tour across the U.S. “I do know one
thing,” Lara says, his velvety voice suddenly
turning devilish. “We’re exactly 50 miles
from the world’s biggest roller coaster. Now
thatshould be a blast”
It’s an apt time to catch up with the 31-year-
old dervish. If all goes as planned, the release
next week of his new disc on Metro Blue — a
start-up subsidiary of Blue Note Records
that’s distributed by Capitol — will put the
singer/songwriter on the ultimate roller
coaster national, maybe international, fame.
Although local fans have been swarming
Lara’s club shows for years, and area critics
have long touted him as South Florida’s artist
most likely to succeed, Lara himself remains
characteristically standoffish on the topic of
feme and success. “If that happens, fine,” he
mutters. “But it’s not something I’m reaching
for. The music comes first Everything else is
shit”
That kind of artistic purism comes naturally
to Lara, who spent much of his youth in
Venezuela playing traditional South
American music with his
family and neighborhood
friends, and giving little
thought to pursuing a
career in entertainment.
While still in his teens, he
and his Cuban-American
parents and two brothers
moved to Miami. In the
mid-Eighties, Lara attended
the University of Miami and
fronted a rock band called K.R.U., which
released two indie albums and relocated tem¬
porarily to New York City before disbanding.
Upon his return to Miami, Lara formed
Beluga Blue and released two
independent discs: the 1994
album My First Child and a follow¬
up EP The Monkey.
A gushing February 1994 article
in Billboard about My First Child
triggered a scramble to sign Lara,
whose fusion of Cuban and
American pop and virtuosic voice
has drawn comparisons to Elton
John, Van Morrison, Billy Joel,
and Paul Simon. No fewer than
four labels began vying for his tal¬
ents. “Once the article came out it
was like everyone jumped on the
bandwagon,” Lara recalls. “They
all wanted a piece of this new,
bicultural thing that I’d been
doing all my life.” He took meet¬
ings with Miami music mogul
Emilio Estefan, was schmoozed
by honchos from Atlantic, and
was courted by David Byrne, who
flew to Miami in hope of signing
Lara to his Warner Brothers
imprimatur, Luaka Bop, a
respected world-music label
known for its eye-opening reis¬
sues as well as its contemporary
releases by artists from Peru,
Brazil, and Cuba
After all the wining and dining, Lara settled
on Metro Blue. “They understood what I was
about,” he explains of his signing with the
newcomer label. I told them, ‘Look, I’m an
artist and you’ve got to let me do my thing.’
And their response was, ‘Hey, that’s why we
want you.”’
The resulting disc, coproduced by Lara and
Susan Rogers (whose previous credits
include Byrne and Michael Penn), suggests
the label made good on its word. It’s his
strongest work to date: The eleven songs
showcase Lara’s phenomenal ability to incor¬
porate traditional Afro-Caribbean instruments
and rhythms into accessible and instantly
hummable pop. Six of the eleven songs
appeared previously on Lara’s Beluga Blue
discs, but all of them — save the lovely
acoustic ballad “Vida Mas Simple”—were re¬
recorded for his Metro Blue outing. And
while the arrangements of these new ver¬
sions have been pared down (“Strings and
skins with no extra garbage” is how he
describes the album), Lara has introduced a
fleet of folkloric instruments into the mix.
The layers of guitar that propelled his previ¬
ous recording of the song “fyly First Child”
are gone, replaced by spicy percussion gener¬
ated by a half-dozen instruments, including
the shaker, cabasa, beads, and a two-headed
drum called the batá. The shimmering
anthem “I Will Be Free” opens with the dul¬
cet tones of Lara tickling a 1959 Philharmonic
organ before building to a thunderous batá-
fueled climax. The hypnotic organ sounds
almost like a hurdy-gurdy on a smartly synco¬
pated revamp of the mordant “Money Makes
the Monkey Dance.”
Lara himself plays more than a dozen
instruments on the album, primarily the
cautro (a four-stringed Venezuelan guitar
Lara began strumming at age eight) and the
tres, a Cuban guitar that he sometimes equips
with bass strings for a more resonant sound.
On “Fighting for My Love,” Lara plays an
instrument of his own invention: a National
Triolian tres, basically a steel-bodied Dobro
with tres strings, which adds an undulating
zip to the song’s jaunty tempo.
A second Dobro-fm hybrid—with a wood,
rather than a steel body — appears on
“Baró,” Lara’s mournful tribute to his late
conguero, Florencio Baró. The song show¬
cases Lara’s expressive tenor, an instrument
capable of leaping registers with grace and
dipping low for throaty howls. His Spanish
lyrics convey the debt he owes to Baró, Lara’s
spiritual mentor until he passed away in 1994:
“La cara me queda frta/Tu sangre llena la
mía” (“My face grows cold/Your blood fills
mine”).
With the exception of versatile drummer
David Goodstein, Lara has parted ways, ami¬
cably, with the musicians who backed him in
Beluga Blue (two of whom have toured
recently with Jon Secada). Beluga guitarist
Mark Vuksanovic, however, makes a delight¬
ful cameo on “Baby,” turning in some bluesy
Dobro slide work that chugs around Lara’s
gutsy belting. “Crawl,” another new offering,
is an oddly joyous ode to addiction that, like
Continued on page 85
‘They all wanted a piece of
this new, bicultural thing
that rd been doing all my life.”


Hew Time» March 14 - 20.1996
Neither a bar nor a lounge, the Tudor
Lounge mixes the best of both worlds
together, creating a mellow habitat
tor people-watching, snacking, and
enjoying a cocktail. Graze to your
hearts content at the free buffet
Monday though Thursday, from gpm
to iipm. Expect to see long-legged
models, artists, club types and beau-
ti¡ul people mixing together on the
outdoor patio.
Jessies
Walking into Jessie’s is like taking a trip to your Favorite
neighborhood bar. It’s got all the elements you need For a
Fun-Filled evening: pool table, outdoor patio and aFFordable
drinks. Everybody knows each other here, which creates a
Friendly cozy vibe.
615 Washington Avenue
538-6686
XerAJtoiir
Big Star Coffee
Any way you like your coFFee, Big Star will be able to Fix it up
For you steaming hot (or cold). There are so many coFFees to
choose From at Big Star that even the most jaded java lover
will be impressed with the selection. Light snacks like sand¬
wiches, bagels, cakes and muffins are the perfect accompa¬
niment to any coFFee choice.
1259 Washington Avenue
532*0012
Groove Jet
LiFe’s one big party at this mammoth nightclub. There’s non¬
stop excitement at Groove Girl Thursdays where ladies drink
2-4-1 all night. Fridays and Saturdays prepare For a trip when
DJs Luis Diaz and Carlos Menendez take you on a Journey.
Devote yourselF to alternative music Sundays at The Church.
Groove Jet...the only club that matters!
323 23rd Street
532*2002
Folfia
Part Italian restaurant, part dance club and part lounge, is
the best way to describe Follia. AFter a major renovation,
Follia has emerged as the hot spot oF choice For discriminat¬
ing diners and partiers. Tuesday nights are a hit with promot¬
er Tommy Pooch, Wednesday nights are For jazz lovers,
spend the night with DJ Louis Oliver on Thursdays, salsa to
hot Latin rhythms on Fridays and go wild on Saturdays at
Follia’s Extreme party.
929 Washington Avenue
V 674-9299
liquid
”We pour For you.” This mega-club packs in the hottest look¬
ing croud in South Beach. Mondays - Fat Black Pussycat.
“Purrrrrrrfect". Thursdays - Stereotype. “Mix, mingle. Fuse"
Fridays and Saturdays - Liquid. "Submerge your body."
Sundays - Manwich.
1439 Washington Avenue
532*9154
'ssssssssss&aim
Ü IgÉliiliiÜS TOBACCO if
bars
CHIC AGO.:.NEW YORKr.Li A
DALLAS *.MIAMIJL SEATTLE
First Person
Rob Goldstein
Co-owner Society Hill
Why is this man smiling?
restaurants
lounges
A hip bar owned by Ideals,
arid ruñ by loqwre
featuring live bands 4
nighfl a week. Friday and
Saturday, DJs $j§mid<3n£e
tunes. Drink specials all
week long. No altitude and
great parties. Wheat Spyth \
beach should be!
With a southern fried menu,
Elsie memorabilia and fast
service, Lula's is the place
to §o. Try their chicken
fried steak, hush puppies,
eorn-and-okra fritters
and crab cakes.
Whether you are
having a drink at
the bar or a late
night snack, every*
thing at Lulu's is deli*
cious and affordable.
1053 Washington Avenue
mgton i
-6147
E>5
Cosmic Café
This casual haven For artists, musicians, travelers and locals
is truly cosmic. Most people gather at Cosmic Café to shoot
a game oF pool, drink a Few beers and snack on light Food.
And because Cosmic Café is perFectly situated, many
Friends meet there beFore they go out For the night. It’s the
perFect way to start your night oFF right.
410 Española Way
532*6680
Caffe Torino
Pasta lovers will flock to Caffe Torino For it’s hefty portions
of spaghetti and penne as well as For it’s nightclub
ambiance. The eatery is located within the heart of South
Beach and attracts a beautiful looking crowd. Monday nights
rock at Caffe Torino with their weekly drag performances.
1437 Washington Avenue
531*5722
Lucky Cheng’s
Life’s a drag a Lucky Cheng’s • a drag show that is. With
drag servers who double as performers and Chino-Latino
cuisine, how can you go wrong? This is the perfect spot For
birthday parties, bacheloKette) parties and dinner patties.
Kitsch prevails at Lucky Cheng’s.
1412 Ocean Drive
672-1505
Charlie Brown’s
Wednesday, Reggae Nights with Caribbean-style atmosphere
with $2 Coronas. Thursday, $5.00 Bud Ice buckets and Free
pool till 11pm. Friday and Saturday nights join DJ Peewee at
South Beaches’ craziest, high energy dance club. Sunday
Night Fever, jump back to the 70’s and disco dance all night
with DJ Big J. Drinks are always 2-for-1 until lam and
there’s never a cover.
623 Washington Avenue
534*3834
Virtua Café
Anyone can plug into the computer age at this virtual reality
bar and cafe. Experts or novices can surf the net, experience
virtual reality and hook into interactive multimedia. After
your brain is stimulated, munch on edibles From the Fantasy
menu or sip an exotic drink in the Victorian lounge.
1309 Washington Avenue
532*0234
Century Club
We’ve got a secret garden! Join us For cocktails in the
Lizard Lounge From 6pm to 2am. Movie Mondays happen
under the stars at 9pm. Call For details. Sequester yourselF
at Blue Nights For live jazz entertainment every Friday and
Saturday, starting at 9pm.
M
140 Ocean Drive
674*8855
mi Collins Avenue
604-9770
SURGEON GENERAL’S WARNING: Smoking
By Pregnant Women May Result in Fetal
Injury, Premature Birth, And Low Birth Weight.
Mil HILL
627 Washington Avenue
534-9993


sj/jr \/ v -— v — \y — v X'-Cr''
% ®íje Éfebep Jl
Brewing Company ^
FKATI RING OI K OWN
HANDCRAFTED ALES
And Ihc finest selection of
\1ierobrens in South Florida
Now available 64 oz.
Abbey Growlers TO GO
Indulge in our fine
selection of cigars
Appetizers Served l mil 4:30am
Happy Hour 4-7 Mon. - Fri.
Open I pm - 5am 7 Hays
538-8110
1115 I6tli St. * Miami Keaeli
Between l.enox Ave. & Alton Kd.
Look eok hie oreen
NEON BAR SIGN
SOCIETY
HILL
Sun 3/17
Miami Beach
Live Music Weekdays
The staff welcomes all Spring breakers
with drink specials all week long!!
St. Pattys Day Blowout
green beer & the live music of
Manchild
Trash Can Tuesday's
w/ the music of Watson's Army
2.00 Cans oi Beer
[Wed 3/20 J ELLA
jrtiur» 3/211 Solomon Grundy
(Call for more Info.)
534-9993
Child
Continued from page 83
many Lara compositions, seamlessly com¬
bines English lyrics with a slangy Spanish
refrain. Both songs draw from the rich tradi¬
tion of Cuban sow, the bedrock for nearly all
of that nation’s popular music. “Bleeding,” a
chiming mainstream rocker, essays the toll
exacted by an unbalanced romance. The
album closes with the primal-thumping
“Mama’s Chant," a Lara classic from his
Miami nightclub days. Back then the song
would often veer off into improv excursions
that incorporated Pink Floyd’s “Another
Brick in the Wall” and Stevie Wonder’s
“Superstition.” The song has been stream¬
lined here, yet it still tramples into a climactic
riot of percussion, with Lara chanting in time
to his own throbbing slide bass.
To help prepare American radio for Lara’s
Latin-rock fusion, Metro Blue has shipped a
four-song sampler (“Bleeding,” “Baby,”
“Money Makes the Monkey Dance,” and
“Fighting for My Love”) to Adult Album
Alternative stations. Their response will deter¬
mine which of these cuts will be pitched as
the album’s first single. “They sent mostly
stuff in English, so radio doesn’t get misled
and think we’re just a Latin thing,” Lara notes.
“Obviously, we don’t want to get labeled. I
mean, in the end who cares where the fuck
the music comes from?” Banking on
crossover popularity in Spain and Latin
America, Metro Blue will also be promoting a
version of Lara’s debut there that will feature
two new Spanish-language cuts not included
on the domestic edition: “Amor a Ti” and
“Bonifacio,” the latter dedicated to Lara’s
grandfather.
Certainly, audiences who’ve caught Lara’s
first cross-country tour haven’t seemed to
mind his bilingual balladeering, nor have the
critics: His performances have garnered raves
at nearly every stop, including glowing write¬
ups in tiie New York Times and Los Angeles
Times. “The response has been amazing,”
crows Lara. The most memorable date on the
tour, he adds, was at Ziggy’s, a small club in
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The show
was held during an ice storm, and the club’s
electricity went out just minutes before show¬
time. “Oh man, that night was crazy,” Lara
recounts. “Some kid went out and got this gas
generator and we ran the show off that” Lara
wound up performing on top of a pool table in
a candle-lit room and, at the crowd’s urging,
he played an entire second set as an encore.
The music didn’t stop until 3:00 a.m.
The rigors of the road, however, are taking
their toll on Lara and his band, which includes
drummer Goodstein, guitarist Andrew
Yoemanson, and bassist Leo Nobre. “This
touring thing is beating us up a little.” Lara
admits. “It’s a lot of fun, but it’s also a lot of
work. We drive ourselves to gigs, set up our
own equipment There’s a very punk attitude
to what we’re doing:”
Fresh from his West Coast swing, Lara will
return to Miami next week for a March 18 CD
release party at Temptations, a newish Latin
music club in Miami Beach. Then he’ll hit the
road again, this time in support of the release.
If response to the album is as widespread as
his supporters expect his life could change
considerably. ‘These past few months have
been great We’ve been getting press. People
love what we’re doing. The mailing list is
growing. We’ve even got a little website.
Things are moving. But I’ve got to take it one
step at a time,” Lara stresses. “life’s a short
trip, man. You got to make sure you enjoy it”
With this, Lara announces that he has to go:
“I got a roller coaster to catch, man.”
1096 Fort Lauderdale
Festival
of tlTO
SATURDAY • MARCH 23
at Bubier Park Downtown Ft. Lauderdale
& enjoy the music of the GRATEFUL DEAD with special guest
CRRZH FINGERS
GATES OPEN 5:30PM TICKETS ONLY $10.00
PRESENTED BY:
BROWARD CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS,
FORT LAUDERDALE PARKS AND RECREATION, 6 CEIIAR DOOR
m:v tickets ^aa^ now thiiu ch
TVtZMJmff/tlASmSn
Sun-Sentinel
On Sale At Spec’s
THE BAND
high on the hog
THE BAND are widely recognized as the
definitive purveyors of American roots rock.
Coconut Drove Grand Ave. across from Cocowalk South Beach Collins Ave. at 5th St. Aventura
20880 Biscayne Blvd. • Aventura Mall N. Miami Beach The Mall at 163rd St. • 12415 Biscayne Blvd.
Downtown Miami 361 E. Flagler St. ♦ 202 S.E. 1st St. . Hialeah Westland Mall • 1001 W. 49th St.
Nil Lara's CD release party will be held Monday
March 18, at Temptations, 1532 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 5344288. Showtime Is 11:15..
Admission is $5.
Central Miami Miami International Mall • Mall of the Americas • Miracle Center Coral Gables 1570 S.
Dixie Hwy. South Dade Dadeland Mall • 11600 N. Kendall Dr. • 13801 S. Dixie Hwy. • Cutler Ridge Mall
831 N. Homestead Blvd. iw^gaa At Selected Locations
85
t>
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Twin Picks
By Raymond Tuttle
Sixteen years ago record company executives
scoffed at the idea of marketing the work of
genre-fusing acoustic guitarists Jorge Strunz
and Ardeshir Farah. So after one too many
rejections, the duo decided to release their first
album themselves. Now, after seven Strunz
and Farah albums on a host of labels, a 1992
World Music award from Billboard magazine,
and a 1993 Grammy nomination, perhaps
those shortsighted executives have gotten the
message: Modem jazz is hot, world music is
hotter, and the combination of the two under
the banner of “world jazz” can be downright
incendiary.
“We didn’t start out thinking about a role in
world jazz,” Strunz insists during a recent
phone interview from their home base in
Woodland Hills, California. “It took us time to
get the broader picture beyond the guitar
itself.”
The duo’s most recent release, Heat of the
Sun, issued on their own label (Selva) merges
musical styles from Spain, the Americas, and
the Middle East, plus adds ample doses of jazz-
based improvisation while showcasing the per¬
cussion-heavy work of their eight-piece band.
Although Strunz and Farah’s music remains
steeped in the flamenco style of their previous
albums, Heat of the Sun finds them branching
out, with slinky Afro-pop rhythms lurking
SM.MJPgRR*'
Music
Strunz and Farah, the dynamic duo of world-jazz guitar
beneath “Anaconda” and choppy gui¬
tars lending an almost Jamaican feel
to ‘'Terremoto.”
The pair has been performing and
writing together since 1979, but even
before Strunz and Farah hooked up
they shared common musical
ground. Both had been raised on
classical music; both had a passion
for jazz. To this mix Strunz brought
the Latin and Caribbean sounds he
heard while living in his native Costa
Rica, while the Iranian-born Farah
added the influence of the Middle
East
Both guitarists began playing at age eleven
and were surrounded by a vast range of musi¬
cal styles. Strunz’s father was a diplomat so
the young guitarist was constantly moving,
absorbing the music of Mexico, Colombia,
Spain, England, Canada, and the U.S. By the
late Sixties, the teenage Strunz was playing fla¬
menco guitar professionally as both a soloist
and a sideman. In the Seventies he formed the
Latin jazz-fusion ensemble Caldera, which
recorded four albums for Capitol before Strunz
left the group in 1979 to concentrate on
acoustic music.
Farah was inspired to take up music in the
mid Sixties by a violin-playing uncle who per¬
formed with the Tehran Symphony, but his
family didn’t approve. They sent him off to
school in the early Seventies, first to England,
then the U.S., where he earned a degree in
architecture. But he continued to hone his six-
string skills throughout the decade, perform¬
ing in the States with exiled Iranian musicians
before connecting with Strunz in the late
Seventies through a mutual acquaintance in
Los Angeles.
Even from the beginning the men were able
to fuse their diverse backgrounds and musical
influences into a songwriting process based on
collaboration and improvisation, with dramatic
flamenco-style guitar lines skittering atop a
rhythm bed of Latin percussion and darting
bass riffs. “I do most of the basic composition,”
Strunz explains. “But sometimes Ardeshir and
I divide what we’re working on into sections.
Each composition has a place, usually in the
middle, where either I or Ardeshir will freely
improvise for a time, using the music’s har¬
monic foundation as a template.”
The pair has also found inspiration in the
wont of flamenco, jazz, and rock musicians
such as Sabicas, Paco de Lucia, McCoy Tyner,
John Coltrane, Miles Davis, John McLaughlin,
and Jimi Hendrix. “There aren’t necessarily
any similarities between our music and theirs,”
Strunz cautions. “We’re influenced not so
much by their content or styles but by the
techniques and high standards those musi¬
cians used to get their results.”
Although the two live in Southern California,
Strunz says Miami feels “a bit more like home”
to them. “We feel closer to our roots here,
rhythmically speaking, because of the strong
Latin substrate and the Latin and Afro-Cuban
influences that meet here.” He adds that, para¬
doxically, they have found it difficult to reach
Latin audiences in the U.S., mostly owing to
the restrictive programming of Latin radio sta¬
tions. “They are very conservative and tend not
to play much instrumental music,” Strunz
claims. "The result is that many Latinos don’t
think of the guitar as a solo instrument They
tend to think of it only as something that
accompanies vocals.”
Still, their previous shows in Miami have
drawn enthusiastic and demographically
mixed audiences. "They run the gamut of ages
and they’re a nice cross section of the popula¬
tion,” Strunz notes. “They add up to a compos¬
ite of people who are interested in the guitar
and people who like the Afro-Latin bass and
Middle Eastern components of our music. And
if there’s room, people usually dance. Our
music speaks to the body as well as the heart”
Strunz and Farah perform Friday, March 15, at the
Jamas L Knight Center, 400 SE 2nd Ave; 372-0929.
Showtime is 8:00. Opening acts are Keiko Matsui
and Fattburger. Tickets cost $25 and $29.
Your life is worthdefending.
These artists want you # ^ ¡
to know that. J
í isn’t just another album,
it’s a way to fight báck.
‘ 7'íáé ** má 0 • ^ 79* .. '-7* -
jello Biafra Shark Chum Fastbacks
The Gits Green Applé Quick Step Jim Carroll
Monster Track Driver |§. .
Nirvana Cristian Storm Supersuckers
Tribe 8 with guest guitarist» Shaunna Hall Sc Cara Crash
Bobby Miller Pearl Jam 7 Year Bitch
The Body feas A Head Lydia Lunch Los Hornets
Gretta Harley with Naked Take Out
The Posies Martha Linehan Jesse Bernstein
North American Bison Michael Nichols
The Presidents Of The Ann & Nancv Wils
i
Mia Zapata Natalie Jacobson Beene
Catfood The VIVA Project
Joan Jett featuring The
Blackhearta, Kathleen n
Andrew Horwits ^
Dancing Trench Liberals Of *48
Maria Mabra Kristen Kosmas
Love Battery
(TCHKUNG! chhistdrivbs
Http!/
‘*4.1 ' , - . * ;í; «,Vir and
m. 'r ’' j
WMK&tm
vc crksUui! e Ui
urns vc lie vaults Uuiiu.
Ws
86


u
lusic
py
J 4k
F
iotations
Mutiny
Aftershock 2005
(Black Arc/Rykodisc)
Of all the spin-off satellites orbiting
George Clinton’s Parliafunkadelicment
mothership, Mutiny was arguably the best
— and one of the few to distance itself
from its former employer. The group was
formed in the late Seventies by drummer
Jerome “Bigfoot” Brailey, the coauthor of
several P-Funk hits who left the band after
a financial squabble with Clinton. Mutiny’s
debut album, 1979’s Mutiny on the
Mamaship, was a masterful bitch session
in which Brailey railed against Clinton
(described in one song as “George
Penatentiory”) and backed up his rants
with a minimalist brand of funk punctu¬
ated with chopping guitar, horns worthy of
James Brown, and fatback beats that made
good on Brailey’s nickname. Two more
fine albums followed (1980’s Funk Plus the
One, 1983’s A Night Out with the Boys), but
by the late Eighties Brailey had aban¬
doned the group to work as a producer.
Aftershock 2005, Mutiny’s first new
release in more than a decade, is an ambi¬
tious and largely successful fusion of
dense hip-hop beats, Sixties freak-out gui¬
tar, and the cosmic fimk you’d expect from
a guy who had a songwriting hand in
loopy hits such as Parliament’s ‘Tear the
Roof Off the Sucker.” Brailey and original
Mutiny guitarslinger Skitch Lovett are
joined by a cast of innovative musicians,
including P-Funk synth man Bernie
Worrell, Material guitarist Nicky
Skopelitis, and turntable whiz DXT. Under
the direction of executive producer Bill
Laswell, the conglomeration spans the
gamut of black rock and funk — from the
hard-riffing boogie crunch of “It’s All
Good” to the neoclassic soul stylings of
“Passion.” And “No Choice,” Brailey’s
most explicit foray into rap, reveals the
genius at work throughout Aftershock:
He’s one of only four or five old-school
funksters who can both summon the
power of R&B’s latest mutation and make
it his own. - John Floyd
Pulp
Different Class
(Island)
American alternative rock encourages lis¬
teners to look inward — not outward —
for the sources of their discomfort.
England’s Pulp, however, targets the sta¬
tus quo, sometimes physically: Angular
frontman Jarvis Cocker was recently
arrested for crashing Michael Jackson’s
stomach-turning performance of his
“Earth Song” at the Brits, the British
equivalent of the Grammy Awards.
Cocker’s behavior expressed his disgust
with a society that permits an accused
pedophile to perform with children on
international TV.
Expressing disgust is Pulp’s forte. The
band attended the Brits because its
“Common People,” included on Different
Class, was a smash in the U.K. last sum¬
mer, yet it’s hard to imagine thousands of
British teenagers dancing to this song at
discos. In this epic track, Cocker snidely
dresses down a rich girl who’s into slum¬
ming. But what starts as nasty sarcasm
builds into a vicious attack, not only
against the girl’s attitude but against the
entire British upper class: “You will never
understand how it feels/To live your life
with no meaning or control/And with
nowhere left to go.” All the while, synthe¬
sizers, guitars, and drum machines chum
in the background, ebbing and flowing in
exhilarating crescendos that help commu¬
nicate Cocker’s rage. .
Nearly every song on Different Class
tackles the soul-numbing banality of
English life: A bitter, disillusioned nobody
who feels entitled to greatness goes after
his neighbors in “I Spy”; “Disco 2000”
steals a riff from Laura Branigan’s psy¬
chodrama “Gloria” to back up a perverse
sexualization of a supposedly innocent
playground romance; “Sorted For E’s &
Wizz” disses rave culture; and
“Underwear” captures hilariously the ludi¬
crous aspects of sexual attraction.
Throughout all of these soap operas,
Cocker gasps and groans, snarls and
seethes, making him one of the most
entertaining British singers since
Morrissey warbled for the Smiths.
Blur’s Damon Albam once said that pop
music is better than rock music because
only pop music transcends race, class,
gender, and sexual orientation. If you buy
into Albarn’s dictum, then you no doubt
also accept that pop music can tap into the
collective consciousness and express and
encourage real subversion. Like Blur,
Pulp uses pop music as a forum for the
British underclass by smartly and power¬
fully expressing its dissatisfaction with the
way things are. - Jeffery Kennedy
Wynonna
revelations
(MCA/Curb)
Generally speaking, I don’t think parents
and their children should perform
together. They should stick to arguing,
which is what they do best. Despite this
bias, I’ve always harbored a soft spot for
the country mom-and-daughter duo the
Judds, who not only got along on-stage,
but also appeared ready at all times to hug
one another to death.
Although mama Naomi always struck
me as mere window dressing, daughter
Wynonna’s bluesy leanings and sultry
purring tenor lent the pair’s music a rare
vibrancy. I was overjoyed when Wynonna
struck off on her own, and liked her first
solo album just fine. But the only “revela¬
tion” apparent from Wynonna’s second
outing is this: Maybe Naomi wasn’t so bad
after all.
Judds albums were always heavily pro¬
duced, but revelations sounds not so much
produced as assembled. Wynonna
recruited Nashville’s finest songwriters
and session players, and then constructed
ten cuts that just sort of sit there. With a
couple of exceptions — the foot-stomping
“Old Enough to Know Better” and a sultry
ballad titled “Change the World” — this is
Nashville pablum at its worst Wynonna’s
Continued on page SS
7400 North Kendall Drive • Suite 203 • Miami, FL
(305) 670 - 10 03
Record Release Concert
Monda# March 18th, 1996
10:30 PM
1532 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
CDs/Cassettes available at the venue after midnight.
Free limited 5 song CD with the purchase of Nil Lara's debut album
on Metro Hlue/Capitol Records,
for morí- details rail 400-3200
Nill.ara@aol.coin • htt|i:/Av\v\v.iictriiiincr.iHl/-niatl I¡I
m


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
See What’s New k Exciting...
. IN THE HEART OF COCONUT GROVE
(MX 1USUI«TUUIKMHK
It all starts Every Thursday at
MAPPVMOUK
5-9PM
Our Buffet includes SUSMJ and
a whole lot more... Absolutely FREE!
To book your FREE office party call: 444-5333 1 *
Happy Hour
jjMj ’t Tues. thru Fri. 5-9pm
“Drinking & Dancing All Night
IN THE GROVE
■ \ 3339 Virginia Street • Coconut Grove, FL ¡ ¿
(305)444-5333
THE CHAMPIONSHIP PARTI
BRUNO
TYSON
imvjsiMsum
SATURDAY, MARCH 16,8:00 PM
SEE IT LIVE IN THE CYPRESS LOUNGE
990 DRAFTS & HOT DOGS • 8 JUMBO SCREEN & 50 TV MONITORS
• HIGH STAKES BINGO • OVER 35 POKER TABLES • OVER 400 VIDEO
GAMING MACHINES • LIGHTNING LOTTO • WINNINGS EXCEED
9 MILLION DOLLARS A MONTH • REGISTER TO WIN AUTHENTICALLY
AUTH0GRAPHED MIKE TYSON LITHOGRAPH
Turnpike on S. W. 8th Street MiccosukeE
and Krome Ave. in Miami. m rYVi|
Information (305) 222-4600 \JAM 1 IN VJ
Rotations
Continued from page 87
attempts to accessorize her songs with
gospel backing vocals and strings fall flat
within the uninspired arrangements. Her
ballads are still excruciatingly sappy, and
her up-tempo offerings feel about as
authentically rowdy as a bunch of com¬
modities traders playing Nerf football in
an empty conference room. And you know
Wynonna’s in trouble when she trots out a
lackluster cover of “Free Bird,” fast
becoming the “Yesterday” of the hayseed
set
I’ve got a sneaking suspicion that
Wynonna’s new attention to image and
aesthetics is behind the nosedive in musi¬
cal quality. Judging by the photos that
blanket the album, the ugly Juddling has
been airbrushed into a swan. She’s jazzer-
cized her plump frame into oblivion, and
Rebacized her noggin with a mane of
bright orange hair. She’s a soft-filtered
babe, all right, and imminently marketable
to a mainstream audience that doesn’t par¬
ticularly cotton to musical innovation.
Come to think of it, there may be a second
revelation floating around here: The apple
doesn’t fall far from the tree. - Steven Almond
Steve Reich
The Cave
(Nonesuch)
Part musical theater piece, part documen¬
tary, The Cave is an extremely ambitious
work. Composer Steve Reich and video
artist Beryl Korot asked dozens of Israeli
Jews, Palestinian Moslems, and
Americans of various belief systems (as
well as those with none) about the biblical
figure of Abraham — Was he a Jew or a
Moslem? — and about his sons Isaac and
Ishmael, who are regarded as the progeni¬
tors of the Jews and Moslems, respec¬
tively. The responses, which were as per¬
sonal and different as fingerprints, were
recorded on video. Reich then translated
the intrinsic pitches and rhythms of the
respondents’ spoken answers into musical
notation (a technique he also used in
1988’s Different Trains), and Korot manip¬
ulated and edited the video portion of the
tapes.
The combined result — which includes
keyboards, percussion, winds, singers, a
string quartet, and the faces and voices of
the interviewees — was a potential hodge¬
podge. However, Reich and Korot exerted
remarkable control over their material,
and they shaped it into a totality that I
found curiously moving as it stimulated
reflection on my own spiritual and familial
roots, which belong neither to Judaism
nor Islam. Although The Cave is not an
overtly political work, it opens a door to
peace in the Middle East by pointing out
that Jews and Arabs might have a common
ancestor in Abraham. If half-brothers
Isaac and Ishmael reconciled by coming
together to bury their father in a cave in
Hebron — the biblical event that gives
this work its title — can’t other peoples
reconcile as well?
Speakers include professors, artists, jour¬
nalists, a hotel manager, an actress, Carl
Sagan, an advocate for gay and lesbian youth,
and Daniel Berrigan — “Jesuit priest, author,
convicted felon — alleluia!” The vocalists
echo their words and sing relevant portions
of scripture, and the instrumentalists provide
supporting drones and riff on the speech
rhythms.
One caveat: Clearly, this is a work that
deserves to be seen and heard. An opportu¬
nity for CD-ROM has been missed here, but
it’s a tribute to the strength of Reich’s and
Korof s concept that, even minus the visuals,
The Cave is so compelling. — Raymond Tuttle
Leather
Latex
Rubber
Clothing
Shoes
Mags
B+DS+M
Accessorie
live Exhibition
March 17 at the
Crash Club
New
Adult
Baby
Section
INTIMATE
GLAMOUR
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOUIH PARK CENTER
255-9922
J.A. Cabrera
MASTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY
South Beach’s Best
Live Music Venue
“The Back Room”
Presents
ST. PATTY’S DAY
WEEKEND BLOWOUT
THURSDAY, MARCH 14,1996
Shhhh... Local debut Egg -
Loudest per capita audience response yet!
FRIDAY, MARCH 15,1996
Crazy Fingers
from West Palm Beach
a tribute to
The Grateful Dead
SATURDAY, MARCH 16,1996
All local original music! NEUROTICA
Island recording artist ARLAN &
SUNDAY, MARCH 17,1996
Early Show 9-12
Debut of Birdmans
Sunday Night OPEN mic
Featuring: Roztynn at the door,
Nikki the singer/songwriter &
Sufi the bearded Collie!
“The Back Room” opens at 11 AO,
music starts at midnight.
Friday Happy Hour 5-9pm
$1. 50 Domestic - $2.00 Well Drinks
717 Washington Ave
532-PUB1 » 9pm - 5am


M
usic I
Reverb
“After the accident, like the next day, we
made a conscious decision that if there
was any kind of passion in our music, any
kind of legacy we wanted to create, we had
to keep doing this.”
For Squirrels guitarist Travis Tooke is rumi¬
nating on the aftermath of the September
1995 automobile accident in which the
Gainesville group’s vocalist Jack Vigliatura,
bassist Bill White, and road manager Tim
Bender were killed. Tooke sustained a bro¬
ken elbow and several minor injuries,
while drummer Jack Griego suffered a neck
fracture. The group’s van flipped over
three times after a tire blowout on a
stretch of 1-95 in Midway, Georgia, about a
month before their major-label debut,
Example, was set for release on 550 Music,
a division of Epic Records.
The album was issued as scheduled
while Tooke and Griego recovered. Now,
six months after the accident, For
Squirrels are back on the road for a .two-
month tour that will take them to Austin’s
South By Southwest Music Conference for
a Friday, March 15, performance at Emo’s.
They’ve already played a few unannounced
dates in Florida, including a February per¬
formance at Rose’s Bar & Music Lounge
under the nom de plume Rev Lover
{revolver spelled backward), and made
their official return earlier this month with
a gig in Gainesville. Tooke has assumed
vocal duties, and Andy Lord — a long-time
friend of the band’s — has joined as
• bassist
“It’s been hard,” says Tooke of the
Squirrels’ return to the road. “The
response from people so far has been awe¬
some, but it’s not easy. On the one hand it
hurts because they’re seeing us play, and
even though half of them don’t know about
the accident, they still love the band and
the music. It makes me wish they could’ve
seen us with Jack and Bill. At the same
time, though, I think we’re doing a good
job of standing up for the guys.”
In addition to his new role as lead vocal¬
ist, Tooke is now the group’s lyricist. “The
way we used to work, the music would
start with me, then Bill would make
changes to it and Jack would write the
lyrics,” he explains. “Now I’m doing the
lyrics, the melodies, and playing guitar.
I’ve read that most of the time you only use
a small percentage of your brain, but now I
feel like I’m using it aU.”
The band has added five of Tooke’s com¬
positions to their current set list, including
“World’s Greatest Lover,” “The Critic’s
Razor,” “pleH,” “Madness Is Genius by
Design,” and “Never the Best.” For
Squirrels manager Rich Ulloa has heard the
new songs and suggests they reflect the
group’s new personality and chemistry.
“The new songs are definitely different
than what came before,” notes Ulloa, who
released the For Squirrels EP Plymouth in
1994 on his Y&T label. “It’s very exciting,
how Travis has emerged as such a creative
force. You knew he had it in him, but the
degree to which he has emerged is just
astoufiding. And Jack has worked his butt
off to get to where he is.”
There’s a sixth Tooke-penned song that
For Squirrels has worked up, but the gui¬
tarist is reluctant to add it to the band’s live
shows just yet, and not because the title
has not yet been determined. “Pretend,” or
“Pretend You’re Alive,” is the nascent
wordsmith’s attempt to confront the
tragedy that is still fresh in his mind. “It
sounds corny, but I really can’t sing it live,”
Tooke admits. “It’s kind of slow, sort of
like [John Lennon’s] ‘Imagine,’ and it’s
pretty sad. When I sing it, I can’t help but
think about everything and I get choked
up.”
After they wrap up their current tour, For
Squirrels will open some dates for
Echobelly and the Nixons, then headline
some more club gigs. Tooke expects the
band to go back into the studio sometime
in November to record the followup to
Example, which may be released by spring
1997. “The label’s been very supportive
and excited about what we’re doing,” he
exclaims. “Actually, everyone’s been great.
Fans have been very supportive and hope¬
fully we’re getting better and better.
Maybe some people won’t like us, or will
say they like the old band better, and thaf s
fine. I mean, I like the old band better,
too.”
The Miami radio duo of Steve Alvin and Greg
Baker will be making an appearance at this
year’s South By Southwest shebang. The
hosts of The Beast & Baker Show, which airs
every Saturday from midnight to 2:00 a.m.
on WAXY-AM (790), are emceeing a surf-rock
bonanza on Friday, March 15, at Scholz
Garten that will feature some of the heavy¬
weights of the twang-and-reverb commu¬
nity, including the Mermen, Satan’s
Pilgrims, the Minstrels, Huevos
Rancheros, and Teisco Del Ray, all regu¬
lars on the B&B Show.
“We just arranged it,” Alvin states mat-
ter-of-factly of the duo’s upcoming emcee
gig. “I assume the entire surf scene will be
there, and hopefully we can get a lot of
those groups from up there to come down
here from time to time, instead of them
ending their tours in Tampa.”
Already, Alvin and Baker have been
instrumental in bringing nuevo surf groups
such as the Mermen and iconic string-ben¬
der Dick Dale to Miami. They’ve also lined
up Nashville’s wrestling-masked combo
Los Straitjackets for a March 28 show at
Churchill’s Hideaway, and are expecting to
bring Alabama’s Man or Astro-Man? into
town this spring. In addition, The Beast &
Baker Show was featured last month in a
Billboard magazine roundup of surf-inten¬
sive radio shows across the U.S. They
were also featured in a recent issue ofXS,
a weekly Fort Lauderdale paper.
“People can really relate to surf music,”
Alvin says, explaining the popularity of the
show. “It’s a kind of music that serves a
dual purpose: You can listen to it through
your feet and dance to it, or listen through
your heart. There’s a lot of music out there
that you can dance to, but there’s not
much out there that’s made for your heart.
Surf music does both. That’s what
attracted me to it.”
If you’re Austin bound, you can also catch
Miami singer/songwriter Gigi DeNisco at
South By Southwest during the Seventh
Annual Regional Roundup at Maggie
Mae’s on Saturday, March 16.
DeNisco’s show there, will kick off a
seven-state tour that will take her through¬
out the South and Southeast, from Texas
to South Carolina. DeNisco, a regular on
the local club circuit, is touring in support
of her recently released indie album On
My Way. She’ll be back in the area in late
March for performances at Tobacco Road
(March 24) and Chili Pepper (March 25).
-By John Floyd
WEDNESDAY- GUEST DJ'S
THURS, FRI&SAT- THE PEPPER RULES -VON HALLE SPINS!
Sundays - ADAM'S HIP HOP- funk + rare grooves
MONDAY MARCH 18TH- WMC-DANCE PARTY
UK’ LABEL PLANET DOG & MAMMOTH RECORDS PRESENT:
DJ MICHAEL DOG • DJ FREDDY BE
DJ NOVA • DJ STRYKE
621 WASHINGTON • MIAMI BEACH 531-9661
â– * i


New Times March 14 - 20,1996
itfc
c&r
I
TOWN & COUNTRY CENTER
TURNPIKE & KENDALL DR.
8505 MILLS DR 274-4948
UPSTAIRS AT CAFE IGUANA
TOWN 8c COUNTRY CENTER
CALL THE FELINE AT 274-8090
G CAFE
mpeg
I wmwr I
Sunday
March
17th
at...
She 103.5 Bill Murphy
Live Broadcast
Free “Blarney Backwash”
Shots to Everyone
Wearing Green
1 Hour FREE Pool
If Your Birthday is
March 17th
Participate in the
Scavenger Hunt Win
$100 Fat Kats Gift
Certificates
She 103.5 Bill Murphy
Live Broadcast
Enjoy the Traditional March 17th
Dinner of Corned Beef and
Cabbage While it Lasts!
Experience the
“Blarney Stone” for some
Luck O' The Irish
$2 Killians Red
All Night Long
$100 Cash Will be
Awarded to the Loveliest
Lassie in Green
Play Irish Interactive - Win a
chance to pull a prize from the
Pot O'Gold
ryiTRSDAtS
RETRO *SPECT
80'S ALTERNATIVE CLASSICS
$2 BEERS ALL NIGHT
SATURDAYS
LIVE ON WSHE W/DJ JULIE GUY
$1 DRINKS 8-10
MARCH 16 -
ST. PATTY'S CELEBRATION
AT 12:00AM
GiJICR
W£DlT£SDATS
LADIES DRINK FREE 8-12
MARCH 23-
SPRING BREAK
LAKESIDE FUNKFESTIVAL
L
Musi
c
a
m
Concert Cal
lend
an
Jackson Browne: Friday, March 15, Sunrise
Musical Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave, 741-7300,
with Vonda Shepard.
House of Pain: Friday, March 15, the Edge, 200
W Broward Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 525-9333,
with Big Hate, LU.N.G.S.
Strunz and Farah: Friday, March 15, James L
Knight Center, 400 SE 2nd Ave, 3720929, with
Fattburger, Keiko Matsui.
Craig Chaquico: Saturday, March 16, Pompano
Beach Amphitheatre, 1801 NE 6th St,
946-2402.
Downchild Blues Band: Saturday, March 16,
Musician’s Exchange, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 764-1912.
Richard Elliot Saturday, March 16, Pompano
Beach Amphitheatre, 1801 NE 6th St,
946-2402.
Sister Machine Gun: Saturday, March 16,
Nemesis, 627 N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
768-9222, with Gravity Mils.
Squirt Gun: Thursday, March 21, Cheers, 2490
SW 17th Ave, 857-0041, with Blink 182, Joe
Popp.
MU330: Friday, March 22, Respectable Street
Cafe, 518 Clematis St, West Palm Beach,
407-832-9999, with Jive Step Bunch, and
Sunday, March 24, Cheers, 2490 SW 17th Ave,
857-0041, with Puya, Grass Patch, Caught
Inside.
Six Feet Under Friday, March 22, Nemesis, 627
N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale, 954-768-9222,
with Brutal Mastication, Murder Machine.
Fingers Taylor: Friday, March 22, Musicians
Exchange, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
764-1912.
Jason Bonham: Thursday, March 28, Mr. Laffs,
2079 N University Dr, Sunrise, 954-748-7800
and Saturday, March 30, Respectable Street
Cafe, 518 Clematis St, West Palm Beach,
407-832-9999.
Impotent Sea Snakes: Thursday, March 28,218
Española Way, Miami Beach, 672-1707.
Los Straitjackets: Thursday, March 28,
Churchill’s Hideaway, 5501 NE 2nd Ave,
757-1807, with Category 5, the Underbellys.
Ricky Martin: Friday, March 29, James L Knight
Center, 400 SE 2nd Ave, 3720929.
Misery Loves Company: Friday, March 29, Crash
Club, 4915 NE 12th Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
7723611, with Wicker Man.
Jethro Tull: Saturday, March 30, Sunrise
Musical Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave, 741-7300.
Roberto Perrera: Saturday, March 30, Scala
Miami, 905 S Bayshore Dr, 371-5604.
Peter, Paul, and Mary: Saturday, March 30,
Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West
Palm Beach, 407-8327469.
Velo Volo: Saturday, March 30, Club Kays,
1710 E Hallandale Beach Blvd, Hallandale,
456-5297.
Johnny Cash: Thursday, April 4, Broward
Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5th
Ave, Ft Lauderdale, 462-0222.
Agent Orange: Sunday, April 7, Club Impact
4301 N Federal Hwy, Pompano Beach,
954-946-1704, with the Cows, Horace
Pinker.
Front Line Assembly: Monday, April 8,
Nemesis, 627 N Federal Hwy, Ft
Lauderdale, 768-9222, with Acid Fist X, Die
Krupps.
Bill Frisell: Thursday, April 11, Coral Gables
Congregational Church, 3010 DeSoto Blvd,
3244337.
Tears for Fears: Thursday, April 11, Cameo
Theatre, 1445 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 532-0922.
Tori Amos: Friday, April 12, Sunrise Musical
Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave, 741-7300.
SWIETCH THE BODY.
EXPAND THE MIND.
CLASSES IN HATHA YOGA
IN THE TRADITION OF B.K.S. IYENGAR
JULIE SHULMAN
DIRECTOR
The Yoga Center Of Miami Beach
960 Arthur Godfrey Rd, Suite 206
Phone: 673-8380
ANTI-CELLULITE
& ANTI-FAT
Bodywrap Treatments
THOtPSA SUMMER SIDE TO YOU
INCH LOSS NOT A PERSPIRATION LOSS!
The bodywrap treatments using super absorbent raw
volcanic ash day, can produce
AN ACTUAL REDUCED AND
THINNER APPEARANCE: CHS
THE HUMAN BODY
with its powerful detoxification and 1
“pulling out” effect on fadnsarld
impurities from surface fatty
areas and oeOuEte,
ESPECIALLY THIGHS,
BUTTOCKS, HIPS & WAIST.
A measurable difference. For an
introductory treatment for onlv
<¿14.00
CALL
444-9727 NOW
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
Lose Weight
Gain Self Esteem
NEW WEIGHT LOSS
PROGRAM “SUPERVISED
BY PHYSICIANS”
2 Medicines: Phen/Fen
CORAL GABIES - 470 Biltmore Way
Ste. 200 - Ask for Belkys - 4488134
KENDALL - 8224 Mills Dr. - Town &.
Country Mall-Ask for Liza - 595-1300
WESTCHESTER - 6090 SW 40 St -
Ask for Ana - 661-6336
90


Into the Night
rhythms of the
Tribe. 719 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach
534-9095.
Get ready for heaps of promoters, DJs,
performers, and producers from the
frozen north. They’ll be here thawing
out for the Winter Music Conference, a
networking extravaganza based at the
Fontainebleau Hilton, featuring more than
40 artists performing at various venues
about town. On Saturday, March 16,
Paragon hosts a preopening party with
Nadine René performing. Sunday, March 17,
is the official opening party at Salvation (the
old Diamante space) with transplant impre¬
sario Jellybean Benitez spinning and several
recording artists from his record label per¬
forming. Paragon also hosts the blowout
closing party on Wednesday, Márch 30.
Chances are, most Beach clubs will sponsor
some WMC event or another, so you won’t
be able to avoid the thing even if you want to.
Another extended party brews at
JohnMartin's (253 Miracle Mile, Coral
Gables, 445-3777), which hosts a marathon
celebration beginning Friday, March 15, at
4:00 presenting plenty of corned beef and
cabbage, green beer, and traditional Irish
music by some of our best homegrown tal¬
ent. The party continues through the big
day, Sunday, March 17. Look for the giant
tent in the parking lot behind the restaurant
Irish eyes are also smiling on another of
Miami’s own: On Monday, March 18, Metro
Blue/Capitol recording artist Nil Lara cele¬
brates the release of his self-titled new CD at
Temptations (1532 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, 534-4288). Lara performs old and
new songs with help from his band and sev¬
eral special guests.
Thursday
Tobacco Road, “The Beast & Baker.” Rockin’
local music in a down-to-earth setting.
Tonight Purple Mustard opens for the
Robbie Gennet Band upstairs and Louie
Archambeaux rocks downstairs with his
own brand of jazz and blues. 626 S. Miami
Ave., 374-1198.
Marsbar, “Retrospect” The hinterland alter¬
native club hurls musical classics at the
paint-it-black crowd, all dressed up and look¬
ing for angst Town & Country mall, 8505
Mills Dr., 271-6909.
821, “Thursday Cabaret” Mary D.’s Sappho
love riot of dancing, drinking, and cruising
— a juicy wallow at a louche refuge. 821
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 534-0087.
Follia, “Celebrity Thursday.” Miami Dolphins
player/party-promoter Louis Oliver hosts
the usual mix of sports celebrities and mod¬
els. 929 Washington Ave., Miami Beach,
674-9299.
Saturday
Friday
Churchills Hideaway. Local label Starcrunch
presents a night of noisy fun with Kreamy
Lectric Santa, Stun Guns, Los Canadians,
Cavity, and the Funyons performing. 5501
NE 2nd Ave., 757-1807.
Victor's Cafe. Keep Cuban company as Hansel
& Raul add some salsa to your life in the
upstairs cabaret room. 2340 SW 32nd Ave.,
445-1313.
Amnesia, “Noche Latina.” Live bands liven up
the Latin scene with a night of tropical
rhythms at the megamall of clubs. 136
Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 531-5535.
0'Zone. Tiffany Arieagus hosts a special night
of buff boys in bikinis for some hot and
heavy fun. 6620 Red Rd., South Miami,
667-2888.
World Resources, “World Beat” Fast and furi¬
ous cross-cultural drumming with the jungle
Bash. DJ Marc Sacheli spins the latest and
greatest dance music in the main room,
while international DJ Ivano Bellini pumps
out world beats under the stars in the back¬
yard Magic Garden. 655 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 538-8858.
Les Bains, “Stag Lounge.” A mixed bag of
pleasures with an edge of lesbian chic. 753
Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 532-8768.
Twist. The bar for boys, always brimming
with excess and overindulgence, with dance
master DJ Charlie Mercado. 1057
Washington Aye., Miami Beach, 538-9478.
Sunday
Trio Nightclub, “Decadance." DJ Tre pumps
out retro tunes to take you back in time —
with dangerous disco spinning in the side
room. Cheap drinks and hearty fun. 2660 E.
Commercial Blvd., Fort EáüdéfdáléT
958-9971.
La Covacha, “La Cárcel." A Cuban country
roadhouse packed with patrons dancing to
Latin rock. The club where a good time is
always the first priority. 10730 NW 25th St,
West Dade, 594-3717.
Monday
Leslie Cafe, “Teeny Weeny Martini Party.”
Sample and sip a wild selection of “flavored”
martinis — redefining the tasty drink with a
new twist. 1244 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach,
538-5386.
Rose's Bar & Music Lounge, “Open Mike
Night” Local talents belt out their best to a
crowd of appreciative regulars. 754
Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 532-0228.
Groove Jet, “Nothin’ But Love.” A great club
with an outdoor cool-out zone — kicking
with guest DJs and groove love music. 323
23rd St, Miami Beach, 532-2002.
Tuesday
Society Hill, 'Trash Can Tuesday.” Local band
Watson’s Army helps you trash it up with the
world’s cheapest beer. Trash and thrash to
your heart’s content 627 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 534-9993.
Thunder Alley, Tantalizing Tuesday.” Live
reggae music and free food for the ladies,
punching up a vibrant lefs-party-on atmos¬
phere. 3025 NE 188th St., Aventura,
933-9003.
Strand, “Brazil Unplugged.” An evening of
traditional and original Brazilian music at the
first restaurant of nightlife culture. 671
Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 532-2340.
Wednesday
The Space. Turn back the hands of time with
drink prices and door charges reminiscent
of the days of bell bottoms and platform
shoes. 841 Washington Ave., Miami Beach,
674-0408.
CaffB Torino, “Drag Dating Game.” Public par¬
ticipation, party favors, and prizes for the
winners, hosted by legendary drag queen
Shelley Novak. 1437 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 531-5722.
Bermuda Bar, “Wild Women Wednesday.”
Tropical gourmet munchies, dancing till
dawn, and cocktail courtesies for women.
3509 NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach,
9454)196.
-By Liz Martinez
Send information regarding special “one-
nighters" to “Into theNight.”Fax material to
372-3446 or call 579-1572.
Bobby B candt, Edc Levin & Robert Ziehm
proudly invite you to loin us fot out
One Year Anniversary
At
Thursday, Match 21st, 10pm
Sponsored in Pact by
nOET&CHANDON
For Guest List Information Call 531-9661
619 Washington Ave • South Beach • USA
TOHMU
Sunday
Monday
Thursday
Save the Planet^ “S.O.S.*Globe*Green”
Fri. & Sat.
Liquid..... “Vivid*Slick»Wanton”
Fat Black Pussycat^, “Funked Jazz*soui”
WmSSBm
111
jpspi* |
Liquid Nightclub*1439 Washington Ave.*Miami Beach*(305) 532-9154 P
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Timet March 14 - 20,1996
LOOKING FOR A SOUND INVESTMENT?
PUT YOUR MOREY IN CD’S.
All PIT? $7-95 EXCHANGEs205
Htt Ull W f WE BUY FOR s5°°
Coral Gables North Miami Downtown Miami laudertiill R. Lauderdale Davie
1S90 Soutti Dine Hwy 13150 Biscayne Blvd. 223 NE 2nd Ave 4938N Unh#re#yDr. 1012 NE1551 Aw. 2052 S University Dr
662-7100 892-1048 374-3680 740-9929 761-71(0 473-2)06
Mon-Sat 10 to 10, Sun 12 -5* Gables location open Fri & Sat til midnight * Downtown location Mon-Sat 1(H> closed Sun
be Included, please call 579-1572, Monday through
Friday before 5:00 p.m. The listings are free.
P
Rock ft Roll
Club listings are compiled by Liz Martinez. If you with to
Saturday, Mar. 16 @9PM
â–  Smile-Level 9
fedMbfhllNftflDeei fbR%34Td*eÉSPtfl tpIrtuiüi
Cheers, 2490 SW 17th Ave, 857-0041: Sheer Terror phis
Alcohol plus Tension plus Bretheren, Thursday; Arlan
plus Raw B Jae and the Liquid Funk, Friday; Smite plus
Level Nine plus Caught Inside, Saturday; Circulo
Cerrado plus Estación Local (Latin rock), Sunday; Los
Bacilos, Wednesday.
Chill Pepper, 621 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
531-9661: DJ, Thursday; DJ Rick Von Halle, Thursday
through Saturday, live music, Sunday.
Churchill's Hideaway, 5501 NE 2nd Ave, 757-1807:
Garland Room plus Laundry Room Squelchers plus
Snatch the Pebble, Thursday; Star Crunch record
showcase featuring Kreamy 'Leetrie Santa plus Stun
Guns phis Los Canadians phis Cavity plus die Funyons,
Friday; Slyce, Saturday, Core plus Red Road plus Crabs
plus Kennedy plus Killing Season, Sunday, Pop and die
Waifs, Monday.
Clevelander, 1020 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 531-3485:
Pangaea, Thursday through Saturday; SOBE Blue
Sunday (afternoon); the Wizz Band, Sunday; Ruby
Baker and the Future, Monday; Ruffhouse, Tuesday;
the Wizz Band, Wednesday.
The Edge, 200 W Broward Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 525-9333:
House of Pain plus Big Hate plus L.U.N.G.S., Friday;
Planet E rave featuring Crystal Method with DJ Ice plus
DJ Voodoo, Saturday.
Rsherman’s Wharf, 222 Pompano Beach Blvd, Pompano,
941-5522: Crazy Fingers, Thursday, Ann Monaco and
Simply Blue, Friday; Present Tense, Saturday
(afternoon); Tune Machine, Sunday (afternoon);
Present Tense, Sunday, Mervyn Jones (reggae),
Monday; Double Trouble, Tuesday, Crazy Fingers,
Wednesday.
Joan's Galley II, 20400 Old Cutler Rd, Cutler Ridge,
253-9360: Open mike night, hosted by Nick Jason,
Tuesday.
New Worid Cafe, 9661W Sample Rd, Coral Springs,
340-7108: Open mike night, hosted by Miles, Thursday,
Jonathan Kreisberg Jazz Trio, Friday, Doug Ramsey
Group (blues), Saturday; reggae night featuring X-High,
Sunday My Girlfriend, Monday live music,
Wednesday.
Roekandy, 909 E Cypress Creek Rd, Ft Lauderdale,
492-0099: The Bleeding, Thursday Baloney Sandwich
plus Sea Level, Friday Baloney Sandwich plus Stone
Balloons, Saturday, open jam night, hosted by Motor,
Monday, D.B.T. (classic rock), Tuesday Slyce,
Wednesday.
Rom's Bar A Music Lounge, 754 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 5324)228: Live music, Thursday through
Saturday reggae night, Sunday open mike night,
Monday, live music, Tuesday Manchild, Wednesday.
RSC Respectable Street, 218 Española Way, Miami Beach,
672-1707: Lydia Lunch, Thursday Direct Drive launch
party with DJ, Friday the Gates with DJ, Saturday, St
Patrick’s Day party with DJ, Sunday G Spot girls party
with DJ, Tuesday Sin, Wednesday.
Society HIM, 627 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
534-9993: South of Winter, Thursday DJ Chili, Friday
and Saturday, Manchild, Sunday Quinquinna, Monday
Trash Can Tuesday with Watson’s Army, Tuesday, Ella,
Wednesday.
South Beach Pub, 717 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-PUB1: Shhhhh! plus Egg, Thursday Crazy Fingers,
Friday Arlan plus Neurotica plus Manchild, Saturday
open mike, hosted by Birdman, Sunday.
Squeeze, 2 S New River Dr, Ft Lauderdale, 522-2151:
Ladies night with DJ Guy, Thursday Naked Rhythm,
Friday DJ Guy (retro), Saturday ladies night with DJ
Guy, Tuesday Jack Off Jill plus the Johnsons plus
Cousin’s Chrome, Wednesday.
Taurus: 3540 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove, 4484)633: Live
music, Thursday RoadkiH, Friday and Saturday, Joe
Donato, Tuesday Toussaint, Wednesday.
Thunder Alley, 3025 NE 188th St, Aventura, 933-9003:
Thunder Thursday college night; the Rockerfellas,
Friday and Saturday football night, Sunday and
Monday Tantalizing Tuesday ladies night
TlgartaH Lounge, 3205 SW 27th Ave, Coconut Grove,
854-9172: Open mike night hosted by the Captain &
Coyote, Thursday Coyote, Friday karaoke night
hosted by Coyote, Saturday.
Wormhole, 115 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach,
407-659-3082: Live music Friday, Darwin’s Waiting
Room, Saturday.
f t t f f f 4F' Yf f * .+■1» f
RAT
GarlandRoom • Laundry Room Squelchers
TtBUEM Star Crunch Records
Showcase
CREAMY ‘LECTR1C CENTER
CAVITY •Funions • StUll (illllS
Los Canadians
l&iU SLYCE & FRIENDS
eebm CORE
RED ROA D
CRABS • KILLING SEASON
KENNEDY
Hnnni
Pop • THE WAIFS
£
OUfurctfiU a
5501 NE 2nd Ave Miami • 757-1807
Over IK with 1.0.
Pan Am Oave Barbeqiie
5 Nations Kui»b\
Sat 16 Mar. k.O. Ii):60am
Wales V. France
English Preni. Div. Soccer
- Sat 16 Mar. K.O. Noon
y.l*.R. V. Manchester I nited
RSC 218 Española Way
Miami Beach, 672-1707
S.I.N. DRINK SPECIALS
SERVICE INDUSTRY NITE
LYDIA LUNCH
CONFRONTATIONA6. SPOKEN WORD
I Native Chemistry
1 w/ DJ’s Len Dog / NTENSE
THE GATES
HIP HOP/ DANCE HALL
siMnrsMiY
GREEN BEER/DRINK SPECIALS
KA BOOM
G - SPOT
Ladies Nile
Ladies drink Free at 1:00AM
S.I.N. DRINK SPECIALS
20 SERVICE INDUSTRY NITE
LIVE MUSIC
$1.50 Lonflneefa, $2 Wet» Til Midnit», 7 Nites


THE S R A O EE AT 841
WEDNESDAY
"1977"
Classic Disco
Drink prices and door
charge are rolled back
to 1977-with the music
from the era
THURSDAY
"ALTER EGO"
at the
"ETHOS MAMA CLUB"
A European Dance Club
FRIDAY
THE SPACE AT 841
DJ Charlie Mercado
SATURDAY
THE SPACE AT 841
DJ Charlie Mercado
I SUNDAY
The Cigar Social Club
Cigars, Live Music and
Authentic Food
Starting March 24
MONDAY, MARCH 18 - Host to the Winter Music Conference
Showcasing Live Bands: * DJ's Charlie Mercado & Special Guests
• D'Sauce, "Lost 'N D'Sauce"
• Karel, "Dance... Or Else"
• Perfect Tommy, "Feel This"
• Samantha - "Cravin Your Love"
SUNDAY, MARCH 24
LANDY CASTRO PERFORMING LIVE
Billboard #2 Salsa Song in the Country
the S R A O EE at 841
841 WASHINGTON AVENUE
CLUB ATTIRE • VALET PARKING • FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 305-674-0408
New Tf^s March 14-20,1996


Announcing the arrival of New Management at
JBi
The World Largest Outdoor Club on South Beach,
FOAMPfl
THURSDAYS
With the M Pac Band and the exotiesounds of our DJ’s
CLASSIC SORE
Friday LATIN NIGHT WITH SHOWS
Saturdays GRAND CENTRAL
Sundays TEA DANCE
DINE IN OUR ALL NEW
SAFARI CLUB
PIANO BAR AND RESTAURANT
Fine dining with the world famous French Chef Phillipe Gaudal
and the group Ambiance Rhythm & Blues.
Jazz, Romantic Atmosphere and Slow Dancing. Limited seating.
Reservations 136 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach.Tel: 531-5535


STEP INTO THE BEAT
ALL WEEK WITH
Watch for the Grand Opening of
KEEP IT REAL fUNDAYt 3/17
Followed by the Opening of
600DTIMEI MONDAYS 3/18
Outrageous Drink Specials
Private Parties Available At Request
615 Washington Ave.
538-6688
Jazz & Blues
Backroom, 16 E Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach,
407-243-9110: Live music, Thursday through Saturday;
open mike mike, hosted by the Nucklebusters,
Tuesday.
Berlin Bar, 661 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
674-9300: Leesa Richards, Friday.
Bier Brunnen German Pub, 425 S Atlantic Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 462-1008: Motel Mel and the Innkeepers,
Thursday and Tuesday.
Cheers, 941E Cypress Creek Rd, Ft Lauderdale,
771-6337: Big Bob and the Blue Tornados, Thursday;
Whiskey on Ice plus Big Bob and the Blue Tomados,
Friday; Jr. Drinkwater and the Thirstquenchers plus
Chance Wayne, Saturday; Andy Mendez, Sunday;
James Graft Monday; Jimmy Spagna, Tuesday; Robbie
Sanford, Wednesday.
Cool Beans Cafe, 2039 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood,
929-1772: Jet Nero Trio, Thursday; Stephan Mikés,
Friday; Jet Nero Trio, Saturday; open mike night
hosted by Gil Bitten, Monday; Jet Nero Trio, Tuesday.
Cool Beans Cafe, 12573 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami,
8993815: Skintite, Thursday; Jet Nero and Rene Wood,
Friday; Stephan Mikés, Saturday; Jet Nero Trio,
Monday; open mike night hosted by Gil Bitton,
Tuesday.
Crown and Garter British Pub, 270 Catalonia Ave, Coral
Gables, 441-0204: Colin James C60s & 70s), Friday; the
Midnight Band, Saturday; live music, Tuesday.
Doc Dammers Saloon, 180 Aragon Ave (Omni Colonnade
Hotel), Coral Gables, 441-2600: Raul Midon, Friday and
Saturday; Valerie Tyson plus George Tandy, Tuesday
and Wednesday (happy hour).
Dominique's, 5225 Collins Ave (inside the Alexander
Hotel), Miami Beach, 861-5252: Jazz champagne
brunch featuring Ruby Baker, Sunday.
East Side, 131 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton,
407-393-3252: Chamber Quartet featuring Debbie
Spring, Friday; Silky Waters, Saturday; Brazilian jazz
night, Sunday; Davis & Dow, Tuesday; John Michalak
Quartet, Wednesday.
Jazz Showcase, 424 24th St, West Palm Beach,
407-832-1200: Bonnie and the Wise Guys, Thursday;
Paul Chafin Quartet, Friday; Bob Bunin & C.O.DA,
Saturday; jazz jam, Sunday; Patti Wicks, Wednesday.
MoJazz Bar and Lazy Lizard Grill, 928 71st St (facing
Normandy Fountain), Miami Beach, 865-2636: Claudio
Spiewack (Brazilian jazz), Thursday; jazz open house
featuring the MoJazz Band, Friday; Maria Marshall
Saturday; Frank Speiseris “World of Lord Buckley"
featuring the MoJazz Band, Sunday; F.I.U. jazz night,
Tuesday; Simon Salz and Chris LaBarbara Klez Jazz
Quintet Wednesday.
Musician's Exchange, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
764-1912: Delmar Brown, Friday; Downchild Blues
Band, Saturday.
Nappa Grille, 1135 N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
568-1977: Tommy Belmont Trio, Thursday; Big City
Blues Band, Friday; Tommy Belmont Trio, Saturday;
Brenda Tomey, Wednesday.
Ocean Bistro Cafe, 101S Atlantic Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
7697500: Rainforest Band, Friday; Mantra, Saturday.
O'Hara's Pub, 722 E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
524-1764: O’Hara’s All-Star Band plus Jesse Jones plus
Dennis Marks plus Juanita Dixon, Thursday; O’Hara’s
All-Star Band plus Ed Calle plus Lou Hollis plus Juanita
Dixon, Friday; O’Hara’s All-Star Band plus Turk Mauro
plus Dave Wertman plus Juanita Dixon, Saturday;
Afrodisiak, Sunday (afternoon); “Sunday After Dark,”
featuring Dr. Lonnie Smith plus Danny Burger plus
Eric Allison plus Dennis Marks, Sunday; Sha-Shaty,
Monday; Dana Paul and the Nantucket Sound,
Tuesday; Sal Oristano and Johnny Hodge, Wednesday.
Pi. Doogie's, 1025 E Hillsboro Blvd, Deerfield Beach,
4286438: Dana Paul & Jazzway, Friday and Saturday;
Dixieland jazz featuring Lou Colombo and Jerry’s Kats
’n’ Jammers, Tuesday; Turk Mauro, Wednesday.
Poor House, 110 SW 3rd Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
954-522-5145: Motel Mel and the Innkeepers, Friday.
The Strand, 671 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-2340: Brazil Unplugged featuring the Rainforest
Band, Thursday.
Tobacco Road, 626 S Miami Ave., 374-1198: "The Beast
and Baker” show featuring Purple Mustard plus ■
Robbie Gennet Band, Thursday; Tony “O”, Friday
and Saturday; August Campbell, Sunday; Iko-Iko,
Monday; Piano Bob and the Snowman, Tuesday;
Mark Krumich’s jazz jam, Wednesday.
Van Dyke Cafe, 846 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
534-3600: Randy Tomesello plus Bobby Thomas, Jr.,
Thursday; Toni Bishop, Friday and Saturday, live
music, Sunday through Wednesday.
Country
Chubby's, 12992 SW 89th Ave, 2330610: Charlie
Rathbum, Thursday Chubby’s BBQ’d Band, Friday
with DJ Shannon
Plus Green Beer Saint
Patty Days Specials
GROOVE DOWN PRODUCTIONS
INVITES YOU TO
AWESOME VIRTUAL REALITY
$2 DRAFTS $2 (YBERSEX SHOOTERS
LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR IAM-5AM
2-4-1 DRINKS W/ INVITE OR RSVP
1109 WASHINGTON AVE.
SUNDAYS
ST. PATRICKS DAY
IN THE BIZ BLOWOUT
$200 BAR TAB TO LARGEST
GROUP AT MIDNIGHT
WEDNESDAYS
VOODOO LOUNOE
EXOTIC MUSK FROM DJ SHANNON
DRINK SPECIALS/ COMPLIMENTARY CIGARS
512-0214 OPEN 7 DAYS • 2-4-1 HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY
FRIDAY, Marc h 15
Live Music with Doghouse
9- close great new & old alter
native free pool ó - 7pm
Red Dog Special all night.
SATURDAY, March 16
come «ateli the Tyson Vs.
liruno light with ns! Specials
on Sam Adams beers all
SUNDAY, MARCH 17
Ü ft'É'tifrtii ¡


March 14 -20,1996
New Artists Debut Releases
Otherwise known as their Greatest Hits—Volume One
2 Unlimited
Critique
Hits Unlimited
Various Artists
Putumayo
Total
Bad Boy
Women of the
World Celtic
Total
J
Garbage
Geffen
3T
550 Music
Garbage Keiko Matsui
White Cat
new artists
on sale now
SJ2.99 CD
Brotherhood
(jotdcn Sn»oc
Sapphire Golden Smog
Ryko Disc
Down by the Old
Mainstream
Kenny Wayne Shepherd Ledbetter
Giant Heights
j
P
a
Coconut Grove - 3015 Grand Avenue; Coral Springs -1270 University Drive;
Ft. Lauderdale - 2360 N. Federal Highway; Lauderhill - 4850 N. University Drive; Miami - 7231 Dadeland Mall;
3505 Mills Drive; 12014 Kendall Drive;7703 W. Flager Street; North Miami Beach -1205 NE 163rd Street;
Pembroke Pines -11433 Pines Blvd.; Pompano Beach - 419 N. Federal Highway;
South Miami - 6460 S. Dixie Highway; Sunrise -12605 W. Sunrise Blvd.
BLOCKBUSTER MUSIC name and design are registered trademarks of Blockbuster Entertainment, Inc., Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33301 ©1996 Blockbuster Entertainment Inc Sale ends 4/1/96
2840660041K, 1748440274K, 1906840187K. 1906840185K. 1908010011K, 1907050141K, 1907210154K, 1906840186K. 1908010012K
7yprgF^edS7gyr
Not available at all locations.


open mike night, hosted by David Leicht, Tuesday;
Chubby’s BBQ’d Band, Wednesday.
Cypress Lounge, 17701SW 8th St (Miocosukee Indian
Bingo Hall), 222-4600: Sundown, Tuesday.
Desperado, 2520 S Miami Rd, Ft Lauderdale,
463-2855: Boots and Bikini night with live music
plus DJ, Thursday; live music plus DJ, Friday and
Saturday.
Cafe Nostalgia, 2212 SW 8th St, 541-2631: Grupo
Nostalgia plus DJ plus vintage Cuban music film clips,
Thursday through Sunday.
Centro Vasco, 2235 SW 8th St, 643-9606: Salon Jaleo:
Albita Rodriguez, Friday and Saturday; Salon Habana:
Malena Burke, Friday, Saturday, and Wednesday.
Club Mystique, 5101 Blue Lagoon Dr (Miami Airport
Hilton), 265-3900: DJ Hector San Roman plus DJ
Gilbert plus salsa lessons, Thursday; live music plus DJ
Hector San Roman plus DJ Gilbert, Friday and
Saturday; Super Salsa Sunday with DJ Hector San
Roman plus DJ Gilbert, Sunday; ladies night with DJ,
Wednesday.
QubTropigala, 4441 Collins Ave (Fontainebleau Hilton),
Miami Beach, 672-7469: Moncho plus Orquesta
Tropigala, Friday and Saturday.
Costa Vasca, 5779 SW 8th St, 261-2394: La Taberna: Juan
de Alba plus Flamenco show, Friday through Sunday.
Crossway, 1850 Le Jeune Rd (Howard Johnson’s Hotel),
871-4350: DJ, Thursday; Clouds, Friday and Saturday;
DJ, Sunday, Monday, and Wednesday.
La Covacha, 10730 NW 25th St, 594-3717: DJ Ray Perez,
Friday and Saturday; La Cárcel with DJ (Latin rock),
Sunday.
Les Violins Supper Chib, 1751 Biscayne Blvd, 371-8668:
Hollywood in Miami revue, Friday and Saturday.
Lombardi's, 401 Biscayne Blvd (Bayside Marketplace),
381-9580: Miguel Cruz and Loco Mambo featuring
Dayami, Friday and Saturday.
Malaga, 740 SW 8th St, 854-9101: Salon Cafe Azúcar
Candi Sosa, Friday through Sunday.
Mango's, 900 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 6734422: Max
Montana, Thursday through Sunday; party night with
live music, Monday; Erica and the Brazilian Explosion,
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Maxim's, 7397 SW 8th St, 2654800: DJ, Thursday;
Combinación Cubana musical revue plus Orquesta
Kubason, Friday and Saturday; DJ, Wednesday.
Miami's Concorde, 2301 SW 32nd Ave, 441-6974: Elio
Rodriguez Orquesta plus Los Fonomemecos, Friday;
Nueva Rumba revue, Saturday; Elio Rodriguez
Orquesta plus Los Fonomemecos, Sunday.
Scab Miami, 905 S Bayshore Dr, 371-5604: Fabulous
Miami musical revue, Thursday through Saturday;
Billy Rolle and the Gingerman Jazz Band, Monday.
Studio 23,247 23rd St, Miami Beach, 538-1196: DJ,
Thursday; Guillermo Zuluaga (comedy) plus Grupo
Motivación, Friday and Saturday; DJ, Sunday and
Wednesday.
Swiss Chateau, 2471 SW 32nd Ave, 445-3633: Chateau
Latin Band, Friday and Saturday.
Temptations, 1532 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
5344288: DJ, Thursday through Saturday; Nil Lara CD
release party, Monday.
2000 Club, 1115 NW 22nd Ave, 642-1000: Ladies night
with DJ, Friday; DJ, Saturday through Monday.
Victor's Cafe, 2340 SW 32nd Ave, 4451313: Sushi &
Jazz featuring live music, Thursday; Cabaret Babalu:
Hansel & Raul plus DJ, Friday; Explosion Latina revue
plus live music plus DJ, Saturday.
Zaragonzana, 8488 SW 8th St, 267-8411: Leo Heredia,
Friday through Sunday and Wednesday.
Dance Music & DJs
Alcazaba, 50 Alhambra Plaza (Hyatt Regency), Coral
Gables, 441-1234: DJ Alex Gutierrez, Friday, Saturday,
and Wednesday; ladies night, Wednesday.
Amnesia, 136 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, 531-5535:
Foam party with DJ, Thursday; Noche Latina featuring
live music plus DJ, Friday; Grand Central with DJ,
Saturday; T-Dance with DJ Wendy Hunt, Sunday.
Bqja Beach Club, 3015 Grand Ave (CocoWalk), Coconut
Grove, 4450278: DJ, Thursday through Sunday and
Wednesday; Car Wash with DJ (disco), Friday; Power
96 dance party, Saturday; ladies night, Wednesday.
Bar None, 411 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 672-9252:
Funkadelica with DJ Mark Leventhal, Thursday; Phat
Free with DJ, Tuesday.
Bar BOB, 609 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 673-5609:
Snatch! with DJ Tony Garcia, Thursday; Rumba with
DJ, Friday; DJ, Saturday; ladies night with DJ,
Wednesday.
Bash, 655 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 538-2274:
Brazilian night with DJ, Thursday; DJ Marc Sacheli
plus DJ Ivano Bellini, Friday and Saturday; retro disco
night with DJ Christian (disco), Sunday; Winter Music
Conference party with DJ, Monday; Winter Music
Conference featuring Spice, Tuesday; swimwear
fashion show with DJ, Wednesday.
Bermuda Bar, 3509 NE 163rd St, North Miami Beach,
9450196: DJ, Thursday and Friday; Wild Women
Wednesday with DJ, Wednesday.
Cafe Iguana, 8505 Mills Dr (Town and Country centre),
2744948: Dressed to Kill with DJ, Thursday; Y-100
Awesome '80s live broadcast, Friday; DJ Angel,
Saturday; country night with DJ, Sunday; Monday
night boxing with DJ; ladies night with DJ, Tuesday;
Noche Hispana with DJ (Latin), Wednesday.
Cameo Theatre, 1445 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
5320922: Power 96 live broadcast with DJ Eddie Mix,
Friday; DJ WaggyTee (reggae), Saturday; Disco
Inferno with DJ George Jett plus DJ Jack DeMatas
(oldies disco), Sunday.
Dan Marino's, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove,
567-0013: DJ, nightly.
821,821 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 5340887: Mary D.’s
cabaret night with DJ Gigi, Thursday; Overdrive retro
party with DJ Tony, Friday; Maiy D.’s cozy lounge with
DJ Alex, Saturday; Top Secret Lounge with DJ, Sunday;
live music, Monday; Seventh Grade with DJ Shannon
(70s), Tuesday; DJ Monty Q, Wednesday.
Foifia, 929 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 6749299:
Celebrity Thursday, hosted by Louis Oliver, with DJ
Cool G.; Hot Latin Rhythms Night with live music,
Friday; Extreme with DJ Peter Nelcher, Saturday;
Tommy Pooch Tuesday with DJ Mark Leventhal; jazz
night featuring live music, Wednesday.
Groove Jet, 323 23rd St, Miami Beach, 532-2002: Groove
Girl night with DJ Luis Diaz plus DJ Glenn Richards,
Thursday DJ Carlos Menendez plus DJ Luis Diaz,
Friday and Saturday; the Church with DJ Carlos
Menendez and DJ Charles Arnold, Sunday; Love
Lounge with DJ Carlos Menendez, Monday.
Hooligan's Pub and Oyster Bar, 9555 S Dixie Hwy,
667-9673: DJ Danny, Thursday and Friday; DJ Neal the
Wheel, Saturday; karaoke, Sunday; Smut Night,
Monday; college night with DJ Little Al, Tuesday;
karaoke, Wednesday.
Hooligan's Pub and Oyster Bar, 15356 NW 79th Ct, Miami
Lakes, 829-2329: Ladies night with DJ Eddie Mix,
Wednesday; college night, Thursday; DJ, Friday; ladies
night with DJ, Saturday.
Kremlin, 727 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 6753150: Hot
Tropical Salsa Friday with DJ Lazaro Leon; girls for
girls party with DJ Lazaro Leon, Saturday.
Les Bains, 753 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 5328768:
Loverboy with DJ, Thursday; Danceteria, hosted by
Tomnry Pooch, with DJ, Friday; Stag Lounge with DJ,
Saturday; DJ, Monday and Tuesday.
Liquid, 1439 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 5329154:
Stereotype with DJ, Thursday; No Cheese, Ever! with
DJ, Friday and Saturday; Manwich with DJ Jojo
Odyssey, Sunday; Fat Black Pussycat with DJ,
Monday.
Lua, 409 Española Way, Miami Beach, 5340061: Nights
of Rio Brazilian party, hosted by Claudia Heimes, with
DJ Kid, Thursday; DJ, Friday; DJ, Saturday; Hercules
with DJ Mark Leventhal plus DJ Sugar, Sunday; Pep-O-
Mint, hosted by Ernie H., Tuesday.
Marco's Club Tqj, 3339 Virginia St, Coconut Grove,
444-5333: The Chamber with DJ, Wednesday.
Marsbar, 8505 Mills Dr (Kendall Town & Country
mall), 271-6909: Retrospect, with DJ Tun Gallagher,
Thursday; Fris Frame Friday with DJ Tim Gallagher,
Friday; WSHE House of Retro Pleasure live broadcast
with DJ Chuck E., Saturday; Red Planet Rock with DJ
Rick Von Halle, Tuesday; Hippy Chick with DJ Chuck
E., Wednesday.
Hew Times March 14 - 20,1996


New Times March 14 â–  20,1996
PUSSYCAT
ANNIVERSARY CARNIVAL PARTY
March 28 from 4pm-10pm A
HOURS: NOON-5AM MON-SAT • SUN 2PM-5AM
3900 NW 36 ST • MIAMI • 6334000
18 & OVER WELCOME • ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED!
1527 WASHINGTON AVENUE • MIAMI BEACH • 534-2000
NEW POLICY, NEW HOURS, OPEN 3PM-6AM • MUST BE 18 ♦ OVER


Something Sety
VÍ3I2&*#:
|j|a^i#i|iiib u’Jnf,
mh^aiau^mm
lijmií j-ijiaiíiur*'
(umi Bt*A 33'j
Teddies
^4]
Wo , . , * For him & her^
w/Q . . * For him & hei
We wholesale & export
48 oSr W St. North Miami Beach,
Lnro^í,?49:6775 Fax:949-0809
— cated m'le East of Golden Glades.
Prepare
yourself
for college.
For the Savings Bond
Investor Information
pamphlet, write
U.S. Savings Bonds,
Washington, DC 20226.
iW/C
merles v/ KJ*
Take
Stock
•n America
SAVINGS ¿g&
BONDS 'SgC
A public service of this newspaper
Nemesis, 627$ Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale, 768-9222:
Ladies night with DJ Frank Mendez, Friday; Sister
Machine Gun plus Gravity Kills plus DJ Danny Bled
plus DJ Vivyan, Saturday; Skull Park Jones plus DJ
Danny Bled, Monday.
Niva, 643 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 534-2357; DJ
Charlie Mercado, Friday and Saturday (afterhours).
O'Zone, 6620 Red Rd, South Miami, 667-2888: DJ,
nightly.
Pacha, 155 Lincoln Rd (DiLido Hotel), Miami Beach,
672-2423: Latin night with DJ, Thursday; Euronight
with DJ, Friday; DJ Hugo Elias, Saturday; reggae night
with DJ, Sunday.
Rocket Club, 1417 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
5327500: Muscle Beach with DJ Charlie Mercado,
Thursday; The Big Sandwich with DJ Jorge Vidal,
Friday; Flamingo Park with DJ Armando Flavor,
Saturday; DJ, Sunday; the Cockpit with DJ Jorge Vidal,
Wednesday.
The Space, 841 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
674-0408: Alter Ego with DJ Charlie Mercado,
Thursday; DJ Charlie Mercado, Friday; DJ the Kid,
Saturday; the Cigar Club with live music plus DJ,
Sunday; Winter Music Conference party with live
music, Monday and Tuesday; classic disco night with
DJ, Wednesday.
Splash, 5922 S Dixie Hwy, South Miami, 661-0917: Soar
after hours party with DJ Sean Vance, Friday.
Twist, 1057 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 53-TWIST:
DJ Flavor, Thursday; DJ Robbie Leslie, Friday; DJ
Charlie Mercado, Saturday; DJ, Sunday; DJ Lee,
Monday; DJ Killer Bugie, Tuesday; Disco Inferno with
DJ, Wednesday.
The Vault 601 Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 261-2938:
Pride 96 party with DJ Sweat Thursday.
Virtua Cafe, 1309 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-0234: Da Groove with DJ Shannon, Friday;
Synesthesia with DJ Shannon (retro), Saturday; in the
biz night Sunday; Reality Sucks with DJ, Monday;
Voodoo Lounge with DJ Shannon, Wednesday.
Warsaw Ballroom, 1450 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
531-4555: DJ, Thursday; CarWash, hosted by Gary
James and Bobby Stark, Friday; DJ David Padilla,
Saturday; DJ Scotty J., Sunday; Meat Rack with DJ,
Tuesday; Amateur Strip Contest with DJ David
Padilla, Wednesday.
Comedy Clubs
ComedySportz, 1432 N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
954-565-1369: Comedy show, Thursday through
Sunday.
Comedy Zone, 1121 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
6724788: Bill Keller plus Manny Oliveira, Thursday
through Sunday.
New Theatre, 65 Almería Ave, Coral Gables, 461-1161:
Laughing Gas Comedy Improvisation Theatre
Company, Saturday.
Uncle Funny's 9160 SR 84, Ft Lauderdale, 954474-5653:
Paul Rodriguez, Friday through Sunday.
Folk & Ethnic
JohnMartin's, 253 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables,
445-3777: St Patrick’s Day celebration, Friday
through Sunday.
Kelly's Pub, 1832 \ Harrison St Hollywood, 929-7940:
Hollywood Jazz Quintet Friday (happy hour); Faithful
Departed (Irish), Saturday,
lime Key, 10625 Kendall Dr, 279-6511: Top Vice,
Thursday; DJ, Friday; Waggy Tee, Saturday; Paradise
Wednesday with DJ Pete Moreno.
Mike's at Plaza Venetia, 555 NE 15th St 374-5731:
August Campbell, Thursday; Johnny Wales, Friday
(happy hour).
Murphy's Law, 2977 McFarlane Rd, Coconut Grove,
446-9956: Back Beat (rock), Thursday; Avalon (Irish),
Friday; Liffey Folk (Irish), Saturday; Hugh O’Neill
(Irish), Sunday; Super Trolley (blues), Tuesday; Back
Beat (ladies night), Wednesday.
Paddy Mac’s, 10971N Military Tr, Palm Beach
Gardens, 407-6914366: Tracy Sands and Rod
MacDonald, Friday and Saturday.
Stinger Lounge, 6029 Miramar Pkwy, Miramar,
981-0202: DJ (oldies), Thursday; after-work jam with
DJ Yo-Yo, Friday; Caribbean night with DJ Yo-Yo,
Saturday; singles’ party, Sunday.
Sunday's on the Bay, 5420 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne,
3616777: Pluto & Company (reggae, soca), Sunday.
Tugboat Annie's, 24777 SW 87th Ave, 258-3918: Captain
Harry, Friday through Sunday; Sir Cedrick’s Island
Riddim, Saturday and Sunday (afternoon).
World Resources, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
534-9095: Angela Patua (Brazilian folk), Thursday; the
Tribe (world), Friday; Joe Zeytoonian, Saturday,
Cedric Brooks, Sunday Moriba (Caribbean),
Monday world beat jam session, Tuesday; Stephan
Mikés (sitar), Wednesday.
EROTIC
SECRET
DOMINATION
DIRECTORY
INTERNATIONAL
$12.95
POCKET ROCKET
SIMPLY THE BEST
MINI MASSAGER!
LOVE WHIP $9-95
FETISH A EROTIC
VIDEOS FROM $14.95 &
SEXsations
THE EROTIC GAME FOR
CONSENTING ADULTS
$19.95
HERBAL ECSTASY „
SEXUAL FITNESS M /'TWYS'
A WORKOUT FOR LOVERS /a STORE TOR ADULTSI)
BY DR. MICHAEL
$14.95
? LOVE MACHINE, INC.
Whore Couture
Tel: 305-534-4588
Fax: 305-534-5880
1409 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 33139
*
SENSATIONS
^ ///
VIDEO
4
Come check out
the most extensive
video selection
in South Florida.
OVER 10,000 VIDEOS
now in stock.
GAY , LESBIAN .BIZARRE AND KINK
FOREIGN AND NEW RELEASES.
RUBBER, LEATHER, & ADULT TOYS
CD ROMS AND 64 CHANNELS
T.V. AND VIDEO AREA
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 24 HOURS A DAY
1317 WASHINGTON AVENUE • SOUTH BEACH • 534-2330
Totally
Exposed,
Full Liquor,
Friction
Dancing,
Relaxed
Atmosphere,
We Have
It All!
Every
Saturday
Night...
Optional
Open Bar
8-llpm
Only
$25
255 Sunny Isles Blvd. • (305) 948-3087
(One Block West of Collins Avenue on 163rd St.)
New Times March 14 - 20,1996


1
s
1
I
1
Alone?
Call 24 hrs. A Day
LIVE TALK
1-900-
230-DATE
.790 PER. MIN.
Browte exciting greeting* from real
people-LIVE on the Talkline with
much more, to pick up the
phone and explore all the thrilling
poifibilitiei on the nation’*
hottest Talkline!
Ladies Call Free*
(215)
471-MEET
CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE 215-625-9371
M-F 9AM - 5PM
You must be 18 years or older to call.
* Long Distance Charges May Apply
TALK LIVE
ONE-ON-ONE
1-809474-0333
For the latest information
on internet providers
and computer services,
turn to Byte Site in this
week's Classifieds.
To advertise, call an
Advertising Representative at 372-9393
NewTunes
CLASSIFIED
Party Line 011-237-7777-66
Romance 011-683-7388
Chat 1-809-537-0585
Man to Man 1-809-537-0720
Psychic 1-809474-0777
used to have sex with enría, but
broke it off after he found out she slept with
â– su-, who often had sex with
IKEXCBL
[,who also slept with CHUCK/ w^°
managed to hide the fact that he occasion¬
ally slept withjOSC, who had sex on a
pretty regular basis with bob, who once
had sex with MARIA. Unfortunately for all of
the above, Jf¥¥Rl¥i kvas intected with HIV
S
Health
Crisis
Network
HOTLINE.. 751-7751
FREE
MIAMI GAY
DATE LINE
FREE
MIAMI GAY
DATE LINE
FREE
MIAMI GAY
DATE LINE
FREE
MIAMI GAY
DATE LINE
(305) 891-1005
Free Membership
Access Code: 031117
We’re Just A Standard Call to
Miami. No Hidden Charges.
Try Us For Free. Adults Only.
Miami BuddySystem®
Clip This Hot Stop Sizzler Coupon
FREE VIDEO TAPE
Purchase any 2
videos at reg. price'
Get 1 of equal
value FREE. Limit
I 6 videos per coupon.
I I
190 NE 167 St. 956-9629
Next to Papaya’s


Full Text
H a r c h U - ZD . 9 9 B ! F R E E
Metro:
Guzzling champagne
T from the public trough
Volume ÍD, Number 48
Film: Bottle Rocket sets off unexpected fireworks
-v Everyone says Commodore Bay tePlISyr
would make a nice park. But S' ,
it’s up to its mangroves in nastiness. 1
By Robert Andrew Powell feátsÉfl
Music: You may
like him, but will
Nil Lara play in
Peoria?
Theater:
A
captivating
Carousel

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Contents
UNITED They Stand 22
For Monica Russo, unionizing local nursing home
workers is a labor of love.
By Kathy Glasgow
Metro: It’s Our
Party 5
And we’ll spend your
money if we want to.
By Robert Andrew
Powell
*The Ten Yfears’
War 13
The sad truth about
Commodore Bay, the
park that couldn’t be.
By Robert Andrew
Powell
Msyor League. .83
King of the hill in Miami,
Nil Lara now goes
national.
By Steven Almond
Volume lO
Number 48
March 14-20,
1996
Letters 3
Metro 5
News of the Weird .11
Troubletown 11
Calendar 36
Calendar Listings 39
Earthweek 39
Life in Hell 40
Ernie Pook’s Comeek 43
Film 61
Film Capsules 64
Showtimes 66
Theater 69
Cafe 71
Dining Guide 72
Music 83
Rotations ...87
Reverb 89
Concert Calendar 90
Into the Night 91
Clubs .92
Classified 100
Comics 102
This Modern World
Steven
In a Perfect World
Julius Knipl
The Quigmans
Romance 121
On the cover:
photo by
Steve Satterwhite
Editorial
Editor Jim Muliin
Managing Editor Tom Rnkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Music Editor John Floyd
Staff Writers Elisa Ackerman, Judy Cantor,
Jim DeFede, Kathy Glasgow, Oscar Musibay,
Robert Andrew Powell, Sean Rowe, Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Dorothy Atcheson,
Christine Tague
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
listings Specialist Elizabeth Martinez
Proofreader Georgia Rachman
Contributors Todd Anthony, Pamela Gordon,
Jen Karetnick
Editorial Administrator Rebecca Kennedy
Art
Art Director Dave Hogerty
Staff Photographer Steve Satterwhite
Production
Production Manager Carla Peters
Production Assistant Manager Jeffrey Rakes
Editorial Layout Belén López
Production Amy Cinnamon, Ewald Fuchs,
Marcy Mock
Advertising
General Sales Manager Jenni Price
Retail Sales Director Shari Gherman-Rance
Senior Account Executives Scott Cohen,
Frank Tomasino
Account Executives Shifra Abramson,
Doug Bescher, Beth BrandesAntonia Calzad ilia,
Hillary Crane, Carol Evans, Dana Fox,
Ivan Gutierrez, Michael Parra,
Richard Santelises, Sheila SL Amour
Account Managers Louise Fuller, Kristi Kinard,
Allison McCall-Mayfield
Ad Designer J.P. Robinson
Sales Assistant Will Griffin
Sales Coordinator Samanta Naranjo
Sales Secretary Annika Butardo
National Advertising The Ruxton Group
National Sales Director Susan Belair
Classified
Classified Director Maureen Olson
Classified Department Administrator
Juan Saborido
Classified Sales Supervisor Kevin Montgomery
Senior Advertising Representatives
Alex Budyszewlck, Tracey Burger
Classified Advertising Representatives
Amy Brito, Sam Heltman, Nicole Kalil,
Henry Pinto, Andrew Polsky, Edward Reid,
Humberto Wispe
Romance Director Leisa Sanchez
Romance Coordinator Jane Mercer
Romance Representatives Todd Chttoff,
Alyson Gold, David Shor
Circulation
Circulation Manager Leonard F. lyescas
Circulation Assistant David Figueredo
Business
Business Manager Jeff Scott Fried
Accounting Supervisor Michelle Fabelo
Classified Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Accounting Clerks Beatriz Avnllan,
Orlando Hislop
Systems Manager Frank Yglesias
Front Desk Administrator Barbara C. Garcia
Publisher Crag Stier
New Times mailing address:
P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL 33101-1591
Street address:
330 Biscayne Blvd, 10th Floor
Miami, FL 33132-2220
For general information:
372-0004 or 763-2422 (Broward)
For advertising: 372-3380
For classiMed advertising: 372-9393
For romance Information: 579-1350
For national advertising information:
(312)82841364
Audit Bureau
of Circulations

Letters Policy
We welcome letters to the editor via mail,
fax, or Internet, Letters may be edited for
length or clarity and must refer to materi¬
al published in New Times. Please include
your address, daytime telephone (for con¬
firmation only), and complete name,
Gga Mail: Letters, New Times
‘■’^P.O.Box 011591
Miami, FL 33101-1591
Fax: 372-3446
Jjg| Internet
editorial@miami-newtimes,com
Austin: Swooning over Swelter
I’ve never set foot in a South Beach nightclub.
I haven’t even a passing acquaintance with
the frivolity, venality, and fabulosity rampant
in the world Tom Austin has covered in “Swel¬
ter” as a reporter for New Times.
I have, however, been a devoted reader,
plowing to “Swelter” first with a fervor last felt
when I copped a look at my dad’s confidential
magazines, probably before Austin was bom.
The difference, of course, is that when I
read Austin’s trash, I was savoring the jottings
of an artist My sincere apologies for not writ¬
ing sooner to tell you of my regard and appre¬
ciation of him.
I am guilt-ridden, but then, I have just
returned from my front yard, where I affixed a
“For Sale by Owner” sign to the gates of the
home I have owned in Coconut Grove for
almost twenty years.
I am guilt-ridden, but I am prepared to let it
be.
FU miss Tom Austin.
Jane Ross Scott
Coconut Grove
Austin: Swelter from the Storm
I’m sad to see Tom Austin go. I’ve enjoyed
“Swelter” for its humanity, insight, and quirky
use of language. I wish him the best of luck in
his future endeavors.
AdamMatza
Fort Lauderdale
Drugs and Kayaks
Sean Rowe’s well-written article “Bahama
Trauma” (February 22), about kayaker
Miguel Hernandez’s traumatic experience in
the Bahamas, was a thoughtful human-inter¬
est stoiy that provided a lot of insight
Op-BAT (Operation Bahamas and Turks-
Caicos), which is an expensive collaboration
of U.S. Coast Guard and DEA personnel
working with Bahamian authorities to dimin¬
ish drug trafficking in the area, had no right to
incarcerate Hernandez in a Nassau jail, as he
wasn’t involved in any criminal activity.
A seasoned traveler like Hernandez, in a
solo journey in a kayak looking for adventure,
has the right to do what he wants as long as
he is carrying a bona fide U.S. passport Hope¬
fully, drug smuggling in that part of the world
will eventually be stopped — when Congress
decides to legalize the stuff
Robert S. Denchfield, Sr.
Miami Beach
Digestive Tract
I would be remiss if I didn’t compliment your
restaurant critic, Jen Karetnick, on her astute
reviewing. Many restaurant critics detail their
own personal likes and dislikes, so we learn
more about the critics than about the food.
I’ve read critiques in which the reviewer
writes that some dish was wonderful or was
mouth-watering; the only things we’ve
learned are that the critic carries around a set
of rules in his head where his open mind
ought to be — and that he’s capable of salivat¬
ing. Ms. Karetnick does what good critics are
supposed to do: describe the subject in depth.
As a past president of a state restaurant
association, I appreciate a critic who does a
fair review without putting a restaurant in
harm’s way — one who, by conscientious
description, points out the attributes of a dish,
whether positive or negative. Imperfections
really should be pointed out in a relatively
benign way. Rather than say, for instance, that
the red snapper was old and fishy, wouldn’t it
be more merciful to say that the snapper was
properly cooked but could have lost its life a
little more recently? Oh yes, Ms. Karetnick
occasionally will write that “the roast beef was
cold and tough and a real disappointment,”
but there is really no other way to get across
such information.
In my younger days as a restaurant
reviewer, I once wrote that a certain dish
could have been improved by the addition of
anything. That kind of sarcastic remark
doesn’t really help anything but the writer’s
ego. Ms. Karetnick’s comprehensively
descriptive reviews, however, can indeed be
helpful to potential dining-out customers as
well as to restaurateurs.
Jay Tischenkel
Aventura
Distribution: New Times is available free of
charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional
copies of the current issue of New Times may be
purchased for $1.00, payable at the New Tunes
office in advance. New Times may be distributed
only by New Tunes’s authorized distributors. No
person may, without prior written permission of
New Times, take more than one copy of each
New Times weekly issue.
Subscriptions: Domestic subscriptions may be pur¬
chased for $75 yearly. Mail to:
Subscriptions/New Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, Florida 33101. Delivery may take one
week.
New Times: (ISSN 10723331) (USPS 010669) is
published by New Tunes, Inc., 330 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, FL 33132, weekly, 52 times per
year. Second-class postage rate is paid at Miami,
Florida 33152.
Postmaster Send address changes to New Times,
Post Office Box 011591, Miami, Florida 33101-
1591.
Copyright The entire contents of New Times are
Copyright 1996 by New Times, Inc. No portion
may be reproduced in whole or part by any
means including electronic retrieval systems
without the express written permission of the
Publisher, New Times, 330 Biscayne Blvd., Tenth
Floor, Miami, FL 33132. Please call the New
Times office for back issue information.
ft
Audit Bureau
of Circulations
New Times, Inc.
Executive Editor Michael Lacey
Design Director Km Klein Executive Managing Editor
Christine Heming Corporate Editorial Assistant Bridget
McKeever Operations Director Marjorie Rothrock
Computer Systems Dave Ritter Systems Developer
Wade Simmons Director of Electronic Publishing
Braxton Jarratt Corporate Administrator Kathy Ziegler
Director of Human Resources Yolanda Calis Financial
Coordinator Michalls Anderson Sales Director Michele
Laven Chief Financial Officer Jed Brunst Executive Vice
President Scott Spear President and Chief Operating
Officer Hal Smith
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jim Larkin
4MS&
uiWittventorm
’ : ■l' ■ •
- Sunday
,. r ;%Z
Visit our new showroom
11 SW 7th St.
(Brickell Area Adjacent to Fishbone Grille)
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

■iiütii n iitiifi
S4
& '¡y
CL0SI1G SALE
we're leaving Bal Harbour
EVERY thing MUST GO
to the bare walls
nothinq held back
with discounts up to
80% OFF
regular prices on all
fashion, jewelry, art & stuff
the twenty-four collection
where it’s usual to find unusual fashion, jewelry, art & STUFF.
9700 Collins Ave. Bal Harbour Shops (305) 868-2400
Open Mon. Thurs & Fri until 9 pm • Tues. Wed. Sat & Sun until 6 pm
Hawk Your
Quality ofLife?
Live on the water.
At a rate you can afford.
And it’s bound to improve!
You’D enjoy:
• BreathTaking Views
• Comfortable Floor Plans
• European Style Eat-in Kitchens
• Ceiling Fans
• Designer Vertical Blinds
• Large Balconies & Terraces with Bay Views
• Designer Color Coordinated Flooring
Resort Recreation.
• Docking Facilities with Direct Access to Deep Water
• Bayside Pool and Spa
• Elegant Sundeck
• Private Clubhouse with Lounge
Poolside Cabana & Bar
• Waterfront Jogging Course
• Meticulous Landscaped Gardens
• Media Room with Large Screen T. V. & V.C.R.
• Card Room
• Laundry Facilities
• Car Wash Area
• Volleyball Court
• Controlled Access Entry System
• State of the Art Exercise Room
• Planned Social Activities
LUXURY RENTAL APARTMENTS
PhOIl€¡ (305) 757-8474 8000West Drive in Miami • Minutes away from Downtown Miami and South Beach’s historic Ait Deco District

Your Tax Dollars at Work
(Hiccup!)
The City of Miami’s upstanding leadership had a swell time at a
swanky centennial party. Who paid? You did, of course.
By Robert Andrew Powell
Cries of “Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-De-Ay!” bel¬
lowed from tuxedoed revelers
crammed inside a replica of Henry
Flagler’s luxurious Royal Palm Hotel.
Jazz music wafted from one stage, Latin
music from a second, rock from a third.
Partiere stuffed with cote de boeufbourguignon
slammed champagne while they admired the
tum-of-the-century costumes worn by their
fellow celebrants. One woman dressed as
Miami matriarch Julia Tuttle. A gentleman
paraded around as railroad baron Flagler.
Lots of men wore funny-looking bowler hats.
By the end of the night, as all of the 1040
people lucky enough to attend the Miami
Centennial Ball grabbed their souvenirs and
headed for their antique cars or authentic
horse-drawn carriages, they gushed at the
sheer spectacle of Miami’s 100th birthday cel¬
ebration. “It was a great party,” declared
Miami Police Chief Donald Warehaw. “It was
the first of these kinds of parties where people
were saying they
wanted to be there
rather than they had
to be there.”
It was also yet
another creative use
of taxpayer money.
City of Miami offi¬
cials spent 4500
public dollars on
tickets to the birth¬
day gala, held
February 24 under
For many city staffers, the free tickets were
no big deal. What’s wrong with spending a
measly $4500 so that a select group of munici¬
pal employees might attend a dazzling birth¬
day party honoring the very city for which
they work? The city supports Centennial ’96
(the nonprofit group organizing the year-long
celebration) in many ways — free office
space, computers, telephones, postage and
more. Commissioner J.L. Plummer is a co-
chairman of the organizing committee.
But this party was different, explains Amy
Deutch, executive director of Centennial ’96
and a city employee. A charity fundraiser for
the restoration of Overtown’s historic Lyric
Theater and other local landmarks, it created
unusually strong demand for the limited num¬
ber of tickets. In fact, so many people were
eager to pay (more than 1000 would-be
partiere were turned away) that organizers
upped ticket prices from an initial $150 to an
eventual $1000 apiece. The combination of
"It was [one] of these parties where
people were saying they wanted
to be there rather than
they hadto be there."
an elaborately decorated tent pitched in a
parking lot across from downtown’s Dupont
Plaza Hotel. The city purchased three tables
of ten seats each, at a cost of $1500 per table,
with the 30 tickets being distributed among all
five city commissioners, the city manager, all
six assistant city managers, and three other
staffers — plus a guest for each. Not one of
those officials was asked to repay the city for
the privilege of attending the sold-out party.
charity and fierce demand also forced the
organizers to crack down on freeloaders. “A
lot of people in this town are used to getting
things for free,” says Deutch. “We went out of
our way to make sure no one got in for free.”
Indeed, other public officials at the gala paid
their own way. All ten seats at Sen. Bob
Graham’s $2500 table were purchased by the
senator’s Graham Companies. Coral Gables
City Manager Jack Eads did not dip into his
“We went out of our way1
to make sure no one
got in for free.”
Centennial ’96 executive director Amy Deutch
HKf (If;
I 31
¡Ül lyS.. V ~ J§§f
§gf § ^ mam'
> I5SJLjm í3éH
... i' 1 HI 1
UlSi -«. -• . lUsj
It ^
B r WnÁi JÜ
Hr 1 Shs
â– k ^ jpi jra
Hi
IF... Ü
Commissioner J.L Plummer (left) and Miami Police Chief Donald Warshaw enjoying themselves at
the big bash
city’s coffers for ticket money. Neither did
West Miami Mayor Rebeca Sosa. Her
impoverished dtyr she T?ays,'cannot afford to
misspend even one cent. “The city [of West
Miami] does not pay for things like that,”
she notes. “We are a very poor city. We even
pay from our pockets for most things
because the city doesn’t have the money.”
(Sosa attended as a guest of her daughter’s
godfather, whom she says does not work for
the City of Miami.)
Miami City Commissioners Plummer,
Willy Gort, and Mayor Steve Clark attended
the ball. Commissioner Miller Dawkins did
not, though he would not say what he did
with his tickets. City Manager Cesar Odio
couldn’t make it because he was preoccu¬
pied with that day’s Brothers to the Rescue
crisis. Commissioner Joe Carollo attended
the party, and like his commission peers,
did not pay for his tickets. He assumed that
the city had received free tickets in the first
place. “It concerns me in that it was our
event,” he says. “Why should we have to pay
for our own event?”
Chief Warehaw, a guest of the city, admits
he was unsure of the rules governing the
acceptance of his gift. “I thought about it
when the tickets were offered to me,” he
recalls. “When I go to banquets around the
city, I always pay for my guests. That is the
policy citywide, I think. I guess [accepting a
free ticket to the ball] is not playing by or is
manipulating the rules, but the way I saw it,
it was the city’s centennial. A lot of money
was raised -by the-people who work for the
city. And it is a rarity that the city would buy
anything [for the staff] that includes
spouses and guests.”
Although Warshaw sat for free at one of
the city’s tables, he also purchased a police
department table with money specifically set
aside to celebrate the centennial. Five top
police officials attended the ball for free, but
at Warshaw’s insistence (and unlike
Warshaw himself), the police officials had to
pay $200 each to bring their spouses.
City officials were not alone in their free-
loading. Five members of the city’s
International Trade Board attended the ball
for free (with their spouses) at a table
bought with trade board money. County
commissioners Maurice Ferre and Betty
Ferguson also attended for free, at a table
purchased with public money by County
Manager Armando Widal. Joining Vidal and
the commissioners were five assistant
county managers. “Generally at these kinds
of things you want your public officials to be
in attendance,” offers Alyce Robertson, the
county’s liaison to Centennial ’96. “I actually
think this was one of the things where I was
glad that they were in attendance. This was
really a magic night in Miami. There was a
real sense of community that is hard to feel
the rest of the year.” CQ
Voulez Vous Boudoir?
12413 Biscayne Blvd,
North Miami
(305)895-1207
AGORA
FOLK ART • POTTERY • FURNITURE
640 Lincoln Road * Miami Beach * 673-5589
SOUTH BEACH
2 BEDROOM
C0ND0I
Pool, Gym, Valet Parking, 24 Hr. Security
Call Mike 673-1700
5
Hew Time» March 14 -20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
JabubuA JaAhwnA
J-Dh SÍ¡A&W íO 26 \ J
187&5áSÍMxiifrts filed tdJjxámoMAjsaihichQAland
Th/dh ’Yniam&tack JtoAida.
iÚ5'9i7*6í«
JJm - Jtrf 10-1Qtm&$m 104
Spring1
Spruce-Up
^ Sale! •
20-40% Off
Selected Items
(Sale good thru March 1996)
“Best Tiles" of 1992 - New Tunes Best of Miami.
7800 NW 34 St #99 in Miami, 591 *7283
1911 Ponce De Leon Blvd,
Cota1 Gables, 567-9755
1000 Pliippen Wait ter Road
Danta, FL 923-2255
Wool Blend Suit, Shirt & Silk Tie
Now *129 & 2 for *199
100% Cotton Dress Shirts Made in Italy
Now *19.95 & 2 for *29.95
100% Wool Slacks Made in Italy
Reg. *140 Now *59 & 2 for *100
Designer Ties - Hugo Boss, Giorgio Armani,
Valentino, Lancel, Azaro, etc.
Reg. *89 Now *24.95 & 2 for *39.95
100% Silk Ties Now *5.95 & 2 for *10
Baby Alligator Shoes Reg. *750 Now *299
Crocodile Belts *29.95 & 2 for *50
Purchases over *300 Recieve a free Crocodile Belt.
EUROPEAN
OWLET INC
3750 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 576-5355
Monday-Saturday 104 * Sunday 11-6 • Across the street from the Police Museum
Free Secure Parking in the rear off of NE 4th Court, 1 block west of Biscayne Blvd.
Christian Dior & Ungaro
Suits made in Italy
Now $199 & 2 for $300
IDEAS CELLULAR USA
MIAMI RADISSON MERCHANDISE MART
755 NW 72ND AVENUE, #23 • (305) 265-7776
Fax (305) 265-7988 • Bp (305) 645-1770
apAlhir Wireless Services
—^ Authorized Dealer
We're proud to be an authorized dealer for AT&T Wireless
Services providing the products & services from the
most trusted name in tele communications.
BANYAN BAY
APARTMENTS
Marty floor plans to choose from • Panoramic Views
Dry Dock • Lighted Tennis Courts • Cafe & Convenience Shop •
Valet & Dry Cleaners • On Premises Hair Salon for Men & Women •
Two Unique Pools • Laundry Facilities in Every Building
Exercise Room • Outdoor Barbecues • Jacuzzi & Sauna •
Tropical Landscaping • Ceramic Tile Floors • Models open daily
Professionally Managed by: GREAT ATLANTIC Call For Rental Information, Prices Subject to Availability
703 NE 63rd Street
'srr.
â–  JO
0\
703. ÚB 63*° ST.
Sri
' ’***
•5°Q
QQ
.X
195 East
One Bedroom Starting at $575

etro
One Hot Idea
The call came in at 4:00 a.m. Pacific
time. A man in a phone booth in
Seattle had a question. He needed an
answer fast
The question: Do chickens wear contact
lenses? If so, why?
Three thousand miles away, Bob Sherman
booted up his computer in North Miami
Beach and went to work. Eight minutes later
he was inside a U.S. Department of
Agriculture database in Washington, D.C.
At 4:12 he called back his new client and
took down his Visa card number. Only then
did he answer. Yes, hundreds of thousands of
chickens wear rose-colored contact lenses.
Poultry experts discovered long ago that
tinted eyewear reduces pecking brawls in
jam-packed commercial growing houses.
Five weeks after the early-morning call,
this arcane tidbit surfaced on ABC’s 20/20.
The mystery man in the Seattle phone booth
turned out to be a producer for the TV show.
For the past thirteen years, private detec¬
tives, paparazzi, professors, and public offi¬
cials have sought out Bob Sherman, Florida’s
premier information broker. As founder and
president of Computer Assisted Research On
Line, Sherman hunts answers to oddball
questions, traces people and property, and
works with some of the country’s biggest net¬
works and newspapers chasing the hottest
stories of the horn-.
Now hundreds of South Florida firefighters
and fire buffs are getting to know the 56-year-
old ex-newshound. Sherman’s newest ven¬
ture, Gold Coast Fire Net, supplies a growing
clientele with 24-hour-per-day news flashes
and updates on everything from brush blazes
to 30-story infernos — local and national —
as they are actually occurring. Subscribers
pay $5.50 per month for the service and cany
high-quality alphanumeric pagers. The
minibulletins pop up on the pagers’ tiny
screens 30 to 40 times per day.
“I think it’s the cat’s pajamas,” says John
Maury, a supply officer for Boca Raton Fire
Rescue Services who first heard about the
technology from a friend at Metro-Dade Fire
Rescue. “When I first got this thing, I
thought the whole country was burning
down. At night I leave the pager in the fámily
room. But first thing I do in the morning,
after I take the dog out but before I go to the
bathroom, I review the overnight pages.”
Maury notes that subscribers to Gold
Coast Fire Net knew hours before the public
last Monday that a forest fire had closed off
the Keys, thus enabling them to avoid traffic
hassles. Last month customers heard about
the crash of a Boeing 757 off the coast of the
Dominican Republic a full 45 minutes before
the Associated Press filed its first story. And
last year, Maury says, news of the bomb
explosion at the Oklahoma City federal build¬
ing came over his pager nearly a half-hour in
advance of the first CNN broadcast on TV.
Interviewing the mastermind behind Gold
Coast Fire Net is an exercise in interruption.
The pager next to his milkshake glass keeps
humming to life with two-line blurbs. One is
out of Dekalb County, Georgia, where fire is
shooting through the roof of a three-story
brick building. Walls and floors are collaps¬
tural reasons, New England is the biggest
hotbed for fire buffs. East Coast Paging
Systems, a Boston-based commercial outfit
similar to Sherman’s, boasts about 4000
pager-carrying members.
Locally Sherman scans the dispatch fre¬
quencies of Dade and Broward fire depart¬
ments, but he also makes frequent phone
calls to fire department headquarters to
make sure he hasn’t missed anything. Most
of the larger and more media-friendly depart¬
ments page him or fax him with official infor¬
mation as soon as it is known to their spokes¬
men. But in some cases the public-affairs
personnel themselves find out about a signifi¬
cant fire from Sherman’s pagers long before
learning about it through official channels.
For his clients Sherman is careful to edit out
dime-a-dozen kitchen fires and smoldering
garbage Dumpsters, but he throws in the
occasional tornado, fatal car wreck, or plane
crash.
Lt Paul Blake, a Metro-Dade firefighter,
says he thinks Gold Coast Fire Net will
grow and spark the development of a South
Florida fire buff subculture, heretofore
small and unorganized. He notes that until
recently, curious civilians with $50 scanners
could easily eavesdrop on three well-known
radio frequencies used by police and fire
personnel. That is changing fast as local
departments switch from 400-megahertz to
800-megahertz transmitting equipment.
The new dispatching equipment jumps
from frequency to frequency. It’s harder for
fire buffs to monitor, requiring vastly more
expensive scanners.
Within the official fire fraternity, it’s also
harder for curious firefighters to listen in
on other jurisdictions. Blake, for example,
works at a fire station down the street from
the city boundaries of Miami. Until he
joined Gold Coast Fire Net, he was often
unaware of fires taking place close by. “The
service is going to expand,” Blake predicts.
He is unconcerned about the prospect of
hundreds of fire buffs showing up at fire
scenes and clogging streets, as occasionally
happens up north.
Sherman says he welcomes tips from the
public about fires to his news hotline,
829-6161. The Fire Net remains a side busi¬
ness, spreading slowly by word of mouth.
Sherman’s computer-assisted research
(Does boxing promoter Don King have a
house in Palm Beach County? Has the
Defense Department done a study on how
weather affects human behavior? Does ex-
Miami commissioner Miriam Alonso own
property in Hialeah?) still keeps him the
busiest In addition he helps his wife of 30
years run Carolyn Sherman News Service, a
spot-news notification system subscribed to
by many of the big media in the Southeast
“When you add up the phone bills and
everything else, I’m not sure we’re making
money with the Fire Net,” Sherman says.
“But we’re having fun with it”
To what degree is he himself a fire nut?
“I’ve covered my share of fires working the
police beat,” he says with a shrug. “I will
not go out of my way to go to a fire.”
All the more reason to carry a Fire Net
pager, he notes. On cue, the little gadget
starts humming again: Fort Lauderdale. A
triplex at 701 W. 21st Terr. Smoke and
flame showing. CD
ing, ten fire engines on the scene, four ladder
trucks. In Washington, D.C., a firefighter has
been hit by a car outside Engine 25 head¬
quarters. And closer to home, the pager
screen says, “Metro-Dade Fire on scene of
Code 2 fire for three units at 6870 SW 44th St
Also a Code 2 for three at 291NW 177th St”
Later a tenement fire in New York halts
Sherman’s chuckling banter. From the infor¬
mation on the pager screen, he recognizes
the neighborhood. It’s the same part of
Queens he scoured as a young nighthawk
news photographer for the New York Daily
Mirror. In December 1964, he moved to
Miami with Life magazine, just in time to
cover the famous Murph the Surf jewelry
heist
Today Sherman spends his days and nights
in a small house near the Skylake Mall in
North Dade, surrounded by banks of police
scanners, computers, and phone lines. The
radios squawk and the calls pour in from as
Bob Sherman blazes down the info highway in an endless
search for towering infernos
By Sean Rowe
far away as Tokyo and Paris. Nudge him a bit
and hell tell how he successfully sued AT&T
in 1966 to become the first American with a
truly portable telephone. (Prior to that,
mobile phones were registered, and
anchored, to cars.) With a bit more urging,
Sherman describes how he unscrambled and
monitored the Secret Service radio frequency
at the 1988 Republican national convention in
New Orleans, while working as an editor for
a national newsweekly. (Men in dark suits
invited him to Washington to explain how he
did it) But Sherman, a vet¬
eran hacker and technol¬
ogy buff, says it is human
sources, not gizmos, that
give him the edge. “Never
bum a source,” he warns.
“I haven’t”
That advice is particu¬
larly germane to the one-
year-old Fire Net, which
Sherman touts as “Florida’s
Premier Incident Notification System.”
Sherman depends on Gold Coast clients to
phone in tips. Each client has an identifica¬
tion number, and if the tip goes out on the
pagers, the source’s ID code gets broadcast
along with it The result is a friendly competi¬
tion among subscribers to feed Sherman hot
news fast
For out-of-town fires, Sherman trades infor¬
mation with a loose network of volunteer and
commercial pyrophiliac groups stretching
across the nation from Chicago to Seattle to
Los. Angeles to Phoenix to New Orleans to
Atlanta. For historical, cultural, and architec¬
Firebug: Bob Sherman with tools of the trade, a pager and a two-way radio
“When I first got this thing, I
thought the whole country was
burning down.”
7
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 • 20,1996
Judgment
Day
After two years of litigation,
a libel lawsuit against
New Times is tossed out
This past week Circuit Judge Juan
Ramirez, Jr., granted a motion for
summary judgment in favor of New
Times Newspapers of Florida, Inc.,
thereby ending a two-year-old libel lawsuit
filed by a prominent nursery owner against
the newspaper company, which owns Miami
New Times. The lawsuit was filed February
14,1994, following the
publication of a story,
“The Great Largo
Gumbo Limbo Im¬
broglio,” regarding a
Monroe County code
enforcement dispute
involving Manuel
Diaz, owner of the vast
Manuel Diaz Farms in
South Dade. The law¬
suit claimed that the story, published
January 5,1994, was “false and defamatory.”
“He blamed the messenger instead of the
person who created the message,” says
attorney Sanford Bohrer, who represents
New Times. “His original problem was with
Monroe County, and he claimed he was mis¬
treated by Monroe County. All we did was
report what the official spokesperson said
and report what was in the county’s official
records."
The story explained that Diaz was facing
accusations that he illegally removed hun¬
dreds of gumbo-limbo cuttings from a pro¬
tected forest in north Key Largo, and dam¬
aged hundreds of other plants in the
process. The incident occurred in May J993
in the North Key Largo Habitat Con¬
servation Area, a sensitive biological ecosys¬
tem. A Monroe County biologist who investi¬
gated the case told New Times that Diaz’s
employees took approximately 350 gumbo-
limbo cuttings and damaged at least 350
other plants by trampling a path across the
property to the gumbo-limbo stand.
While some parts of the conservation area
are under private ownership, strict develop¬
ment rules apply within its boundaries. Diaz
told Monroe County officials he had
received permission from a private
landowner in the area to remove the gumbo-
limbo plants from the property, but the offi¬
An attorney representing Diaz contended
that no land-clearing permits were needed
because Diaz was only “pruning” the trees.
The Monroe County Code Enforcement
Department disagreed, issued a notice of vio¬
lation to the property
owners — the Bell *
Family Trust — and ;
ordered the planting of •
700 trees and shrubs at ?
a state-owned nature •
preserve as a form of
restitution. But after
negotiations between
the two sides, Monroe
County reduced that
number to 150. On
March 2,1994, Manuel
Diaz Farms donated the
trees to the state for
planting at Fort Zachary
Taylor State Park in
Key West
While Diaz was re
Nurseryman Manuel Diaz
phrase,” in the newspaper. “Publication of
the statements which are in the article are
privileged as part of a neutral report of gov¬
ernment actions,” he wrote.
Diaz also complained that an accompany¬
ing illustration was “grossly
distracted [sic] and exagger¬
ated.” The drawing depicted
a path cut through dense
foliage and strewn with bro¬
ken twigs and branches.
Bohrer argued that the car¬
toon qualifies as “rhetorical
hyperbole” and is therefore
protected by the First
Amendment. In his com¬
plaint, Diaz also maintained
that the article insinuated he
was “poaching trees in
Monroe County and selling
to Dade County.” In fact, the
article only mentioned that
in addition to his extraordi¬
nary philanthropy and high-
“All we did was report what the official
spokesperson said and report what was
in the county’s official records.”
cials said he never secured the necessary
land-clearing permits. A Monroe official told
New Times that even if Diaz had applied, he
wouldn’t have been given a permit because
county regulations prohibited land-clearing
in that particular subdivision.
solving the code-enforcement issue, he was
also suing New Times. The lawsuit specifi¬
cally took issue with several
phrases that appeared in the
story, among them “tree
poacher,” “raping a hammock,”
“felling trees in a protected
area,” and “leaving a path of
destruction.” Diaz also
objected to a county biologist’s
characterization of him as a
“dirtbag” and a “scumbucket”
In his request for summary
judgment, New Times attorney Bohrer
argued that aside from the phrase “leaving a
path of destruction,” which doesn’t appear in
the article, all the statements at issue were
made by public officials and “simply
reported, either by quotation or by para¬
profile private work with some of South
Florida’s wealthiest developers, he also had
a contract to provide trees to the Metro-
Dade Parks and Recreation Department.
The article pointed out that the contract
called for gumbo-limbos, among other trees.
As a result of the publication of the story,
the lawsuit stated, Diaz “suffered the indig¬
nity of ridicule, damage to reputation, hon¬
esty has been questioned, standing as a citi¬
zen has been impugned, and . . . suffered
great mental distress,” as well as “business
losses.” But when questioned by Bohrer
during a deposition, Diaz was hard-pressed
to point out the exact injuries he suffered,
monetary or otherwise. “I can assure you it
didn’t help me sell any trees,” he noted.
Diqz’s trial attorney did not respond to a
request for comment CD
I
Waáfom
1006-1008 Lincoln Rd
Miami Beach
305 672 - 7779
n Daily From 11am to 9pm Friday and Saturday till 10pm Sundays Noon to 6png
AlWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION, AN0 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. AN0 PLEASE RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT. Obey the law, and read your
owner's manual thoroughly. For rider training information, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-80^447-4700.
ST1100
There are lots of ways to get where you want to go. But if the journey is as important
as the arrival, make sure you’re on a Honda ST1100.
• Liquid-cooled 1084cc longitudinally mounted V-4 engine is smooth and powerful.
• Enormous 7.4-gallon fuel tank provides unsurpassed cruising range.
• Detachable, lockable, color-matched 35-liter saddlebags can each hold a full-face helmet
•Wide, rigid windshield incorporates integral vents for less noise and reduced turbulence.
• Dual-disc front brake with twin-piston calipers and a single-disc rear for solid
stopping performance.
Do more than just arrive. Arrive in style-aboard Honda's 1996 ST1100.
GABLES HONDA
7300 Bird Road • Mlam
•83(
Rhonda
Come ride with us.

Order toll-free 1-800-334-SHOP #4 b®Ur& a day'Yi
your skin type.
for Normal to Dry Skin Types:
FHJMQ0ÍAU: Visibly Revitalizing Solution,
GALATÉE DOUCEUR Milky Creme Cleanser,
TOSIOUE DOUCEUR Akohof-Free Freshener,
AH in
Flos,
Full-
All tucked
For Normal to Oily Skin Types:
PRIM ODIALE Visibly Revitalizing Solution,
CLARIFIANCE Oil-free Del Oeonser,
CLARIFIANCE: Alcohol-free Natural Astringent,
$m
Full-size LipCote in Motto Brúlé end
¡8TENCU.S Full Intensity Moscow. All tucked
a sleek block and while cosmetic bog.
THE FLORIDA STORE*
Choose your
customized gift of S
skincare essentials.
Yours with any 17.50
Laucóme purchase.
MM
9
s
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
PROVEN RESULTS
FOR A DOLLAR A DA
J3ponnei|yWorid Trade Center YMCA.
90 in Miami, Phone: 577-3091
r
L
how can our
fine salon offer
haircuts for
half price?
simuNumu nave to
oo some ol die cutting
yourself. 50% off
your first hair cut.
Brickell Harbour Condominium
200 SE I5th Rd. Miami • 854-5858
Specialism» in Exotic Birds
with pnces... cheap, cheap, cheap
tremendous variety and a
triendly, knowledgeable staff.
Seed‘Toys «Books «Cages
Tutéétfe Mótil Azadabh.
Coconut Grove
3065 Fuller St. Coconut Grove
448-5750
/VEDA
OPEN 7 DAYS
Offer expires 4/4/96. Offer good one visit, first time clients only
at the Coconut Grove location only. Not valid with any other offer.
It*s wor (It die drive from anywhere.
Tic s4u¿CVUf
22707 South Dixie Highway
258-BIRD
PÜ
m
experience the passion
Experience Miami Beach's premiere sports and fitness facility. Whether you choose
to cross train on South Florida's only rock climbing wall, shoot hoops on our pro sized
courts, slam a squash or racquet,had^fejgpjillllll^gyate, air-conditioned court club,
the choice is vours. With MlllÍÍÍÍÍIÉIiÍlllÍl8l^illiybex vr-2 strength training,
unlimited aerobic pool», cabanas* and lavish spa treatments, no
other club even you don't make the call.
¡®J1
■Éiál
. ill
•? • '
of-
Located at the Eden Roc Resort 4S2S Collins
674-5585
Beach
the Public
OPEN SATURDAYS
MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT
180 NE 39 STREET #112.
MIAMI.FL 33137
TELEPHONE (305) 573-6493
FAX (305) 576-5229
10

ews
Troubletáwn
IF All the "EbVcATtoN RE FORKS'' HAffENEo AT OfJce.
Lead Story
•Among recent passings of note: in
Columbus, Ohio, Mr. M.S. Tooill; in
Arlington, Virginia, Mr. W.M. Croker; and in
Oklahoma City, Mr. William Death. In
February a 44-year-old man was killed on 1-95
in Rhode Island after being hit by a truck
while standing on the shoulder between two
other trucks — one hauling granite slabs for
tombstones and the other belonging to the
Yates Casket Company. And three weeks ear¬
lier, a 23-year-old man was killed in Fallston,
Maryland, when his car smashed into a truck
carrying burial vaults.
Weird Science
• In December surgeon Isam Felahy
removed an inch-long tree sprig from the
right lung of sixteen-year-old Tracy McIntyre
in Stockton, California. Tracy had apparently
inhaled it from the family Christmas tree in
1980. The sprig, which was still green, was
apparently the source of Tracy’s notoriously
bad breath.
•In December scientists at the Japan Atomic
Power Company in Takasaki reported that
bombarding cheap wine and whiskey with a
deadly (for humans) dose of gamma rays
actually improved the taste. According to
researcher Hiroshi Watanabe, irradiation
promotes a blend that poorly made wine and
whiskey lack. He predicts that by the year
2000 irradiation will be used to improve the
taste of many common foods. (Watanabe
admits that irradiating good wine and
whiskey makes them taste worse.)
•An October Houston Chronicle
report on University of Texas bio¬
chemist Barrie Kitto revealed that
the only way government inspectors
can currently detect microscopic par¬
ticles of feces in cereal grain (to ascertain
whether the allowable level of two rat pellets
per kilogram of grain has been exceeded) is
by visual inspection. Dr. Kitto has developed
a substance sensitive to the feces that will
turn a sample green, thereby making inspec¬
tion easier.
Cultural Diversity
•The city of Bacolod in the Philippines
endured a rash of cemetery invasions during
the summer, as a gang of thieves dug up
graves to steal corpses’ kneecaps, which are
thought by some Filipinos to have magical
properties. The kneecaps were ground into
powder and burned outside homes in order
to put residents to sleep, making them easier
targets for the gang’s burglaries.
•A court in Grenaa, Denmark, announced it
would soon impose a higher fine on a woman
because she refuses to change the spelling of
her son’s name, “Christophpher,” which is
unapproved by the ministry that regulates
names. She has paid about $18 a week since
1989. Chris is now eight years old, and so far
his name has cost the woman thousands of
dollars in fines. She insists the uniqueness is
worth it
•In November Knight-Ridder News Service
reported that the government in Nanking,
China, is levying fines of about $1.50 for peo¬
ple in restaurants who order more food than
they can eat
People With Too Much Time on Their Hands
•A study of 12,000 people done by University
of North Carolina researchers revealed that
most people who drink lots of beer have large
bellies, but most people who drink lots of
wine don’t
•In December the Arizona Republic profiled
animal psychologist Krista Cantrell, who says
she can communicate telepathically with ani¬
mals. She was praised by the owner of a
horse, on the verge of being euthanized, that
was able to tell Cantrell that he was simply
overmedicated. (Five weeks later, the horse
won a race.)
-By Chuck Shepherd
SOUTH BEACH
CONDOS
Bret Taylor, Lie. Real Estate Broker
THE SOUTH BEACH CONDO SPECIALIST!â„¢
531-BRET
5 3 1 - 2 7 3 8
Bret Taylor Real Estate • 420 Lincoln Road • Suite 260 • Miami Beach
BEWARE OF
BIG CITY
SHARKS!
If you are car shopping, don't get attacked by sharks
disguised as salesmen.
Escape the big city
pressure, and call Largo
Honda. We'll give you the
best possible price
without the hassle.
Uivclkdc
Just call 930-HONDA toll-free.
Great selection, low prices... and no more sharks!
11
H«w Timas March 14-20,1996

New Timas March 14 • 20,1996
And To Everything
That Moves On The Earth
Which Has Life, I Have
Given Every Green Plant
For Food.”
Genesis 1:30
Nutrition For Life
Now Featured At
FLORIDA
CORPORATION
INCORPORATE OVER THE PHONE... ITS EASY
*99«
COMPLETE - INCLUDES: Artid« of
Incorporation, Corporal* Minutes, By
Laws, Corporal* Book, Corporal* Seal,
Stock Certifícate, Preliminary Name
Search, State Filing Fees, Attorney’s Fees
Corps also immediately available W/Tax LDi Also Sob S
Corps., Non Profit Corps., Limited Partnerships, LLCs, DBAs,
Trademarks, Business Sale/Purchase, and On Shore Corps.
*93, '94, ft ’95 Corps also available for immsdisl* delivery
Counselor and Attorney at Law vitA-M-UfO* a*
HaUrta|4ilNHrbMtaeMMiMiNM*NUMlkiMMiqiifH
■SwSncia* S»fcr«y SsOSmOi ■§ m —4*— O— «iMwIMwir
qualifications and experience. Carat CiMm • U»r— J. Spkijtl.Esq,
m A unique
collection of
handmade
ceramics
featuring our
exclusive
Lime Dolls
(Descaradas)
We offer
Stencil and
Wall Treatment
Lessons
turn*
213 Aragon Avenue
Coral Gables
(formerly located at
Falls Shopping Center)
448-6005
Comfort and Style
Slipcover Sofas
Starting at $699
Slipcovers Starting At
Sofa $699
$279
Apartment Sofa $679
$269
Love Seat $649
$249
Chair & 1/2 $549
$219
Ottoman $349
4077 Ponce De Leon
$179
• Coral Gables
Phone: 445-
Mon-Fri 10am-8pm •
â– 3848
Sat llam-6pm
Sunday llam-5pm
12

wasted
Solitude standing: Michael Goldstein stands alone on the
ground between the owners' and the city's attorneys
This waterfront
plot i
in Coconut Grove
isn’t park land,
it’s a factory.
A
lawsuit factory.
ill he hugs were a good sign. So were
the back slaps and handshakes
I that followed Michael Goldstein’s
presentation to the Miami City
Commission last July. In ten short minutes
on that summer morning, the environmen¬
tal lawyer and activist had solved a twelve-
year legal puzzle. Thanks to his work, it
looked as if a piece of cherished Coconut
Grove property that once was slated for
massive development would finally
become a public park.
Armed with posters and charts and speak¬
ing with the confidence of a poker player
holding four aces, Goldstein had explained
to commissioners that the owners were will¬
ing to sell the property. He had explained
how, after nearly a year of lobbying on his
part, the state and the county were prepared
to pony up more than half the purchase
price, whatever it might be. Tapping his fin¬
ger on the podium, he had triumphantly
announced that the state was even willing to
loan the city the rest of the money — at file
very appealing interest rate of exactly zero
percent for the first five years of the loan.
The commissioners jockeyed to applaud
Goldstein’s efforts. Miller Dawkins recited
an impromptu ode to green space. Victor De
Continued on page 15
13
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

W«w Times March 14 - 20,1996
PUBLISHING
Imagine creating your own hard cover, library quality
books, Custom Presentations, Portfolios, Thesis
Papers, Family History, Poems, Short Stories, Recipes,
JDiaries, Manuals... anything!
Let Mar Com of Miami turn your
, next binding project into a
i masterpiece of professional
B quality. Now you can be your
very own publisher for a
â–  fraction of the cost of regular
process binding. Call Mar Com
today for free information on our
ChannelBindâ„¢ System, and put
us to work for you.
MAR COM
Mar Com Enterprises 13200 S.W. 128th St. B3, Miami FL, 33186. (305) 256.7811
NOW IS THE BEST TIME
TO BUYA DIGITAL
CELLULAR PHONE!
We're proud to be an authorized dealer for AT&T Wireless
Services providing the products and services from the most
trusted name in telecommunications.
ELITE
HOME THEATER
30 Day Money Back Guarantee
30 Day Price Guarantee • Free Delivery
50 NE 2nd Ave • 377-4466
Call for Directions • Free Parking
MOUNTAIN BIKE
TREK 800 sport
$219“
CYCLE WORLD
Bikes come fully assembled
Open SundaysfBird Rd. only)
9541 BIRD RD. MIAMI 221-2123
5090 WEST 12THAVE. HIALEAH 362-0003
big feet
great seat
scandia
furniture, inc.
14321 South Dixie Highway, Miami. 252-9867
Monday - Saturday 10-6. Sunday 12-5
Major Credit Cards & Financing
The Salon
Package We
Can’t Stop
Running...
HAIR CGI
Full hour massage, manicure,
mini-facial, hair color consulta¬
tion, hair color/clear glossing,
deep conditioning treatment,
color correction service,
haircut/style, steamroom/ sauna.
ONLY $100
$60 without massage
50% off highlights with package
50% off acrylics with package
50% off glycolic wash with package
50% off waxing services with package
50% off — hair straight¬
ening system with package.
Our New Oceansidi
Gift Certificates
Available
AT THE LUXURIOU
NO
★ 5151 CO
PENTHOUSE
305 -
Hours: Tuesday I
-
Fabulous Lincoln Road • South Beach Lifestyle
SpaciousOne & Two Bedroom • Two Bath & Walk-in Closets
Floor to Ceding Tile Bath • Beautiful Wood Floor
flstom Designed Kitchen • Security Code Entry
1614 Pennsylvania Avenue, Miami Beach
l/2 Block from Lincoln Road Mall
Buy Direct from Developer
Brokers Welcome
Open Saturday 3-6pm
For Appointment
Call 674-8687
The South Beach Lifestyle
At It’s Best!
tsaagSKsasatt;
14

u
Commodore Bay is like a majestic lion. It is beautiful to look at,
but on the other hand it chews up a lot of people.”
A chainlink gate separates Commodore Bay from the development and traffic of central Coconut Grove
Wasteid
Continued from page 13
Yurre, who was facing a tough re-election
battle, asked to lead the sale negotiations.
He knew a purchase would win him votes
and quash the threat of more lawsuits from
the property owners, a trio of developers
known for their litigiousness. “People were
congratulating me and slapping me on the
back,” Goldstein recalls. “It certainly felt like
a victory.”
Precisely what the young lawyer had won,
though, was unclear. The commissioners
appeared to have approved a motion to buy
the property and turn it into a park. But what
they actually passed was in fact so fuzzy that
eight months later the city attorney’s office
has not deciphered the motion well enough
to frame it in precise legal language. The
owners’ attorneys, in the meantime, have
broken off negotiations, the attorneys for the
city having made it known that they refuse
to close a deal without a written promise in
advance that they won’t be sued. Even the
city commissioners have been muzzled, lest
their comments come back to haunt them in
court
Unless the stalemate ends soon, warns
Michael Goldstein, lawsuits will indeed fol¬
low, delaying yet again the sale of
Commodore Bay. “I think we are so close
and that is why it is so frustrating,”
Goldstein groans. “It is such a wonderful
opportunity. All the money is there and
we’ve come so far, and it is 3 way to end all
the litigation.”
He sighs at the thought that his work
might come to nothing. “Commodore Bay is
like a beautiful animal,” he ventures.
“Maybe like a majestic lion. It is beautiful to
look at, but on the other hand it chews up a
lot of people.”
Bubba Red stands at the shore of Biscayne
Bay, squinting into the noon sun, his dark
eyes shaded by a weathered Yankees cap. A
self-confessed crack addict, he lives on the
Commodore Bay property full-time. Raising
a Marlboro as if it were a pointer, he sweeps
the glowing cigarette across the panorama
to convey the majesty of the view, then turns
180 degrees to face a stand of hardwood
trees and exotic grasses, and nineteen fellow
homeless people. He sucks one last drag,
The owners stung Linda Dann when she tried to
help out
flicks the Marlboro into the bay, and com¬
mences a guided tour of his home.
“This is the most tranquil place in the
Grove,” says Red, traversing the dirt path
that starts where the bay meets a four-foot-
tall chainlink fence separating the property
from Peacock Park. To his left, Red points
out, is the Barnacle, the homestead of
Commodore Ralph Munroe. The early set¬
tler erected Coconut Grove’s first house,
referred to by some as the Plymouth Rock
of South Florida, with wood recovered from
a shipwreck. A well-patrolled fence keeps
Red and his ilk away from the state historic
site.
Farther up the path the vegetation grows
denser, thick with live oak and gumbo-
limbo. The entire property takes up a little
more than six acres, and after a few minutes
Red’s short walk ends at Main Highway and
a padlocked gate. Out beyond the fence is
the concrete amusement park of the Grove
—Fuddrucker’s and CocoWalk, thousands
of weekend visitors. A world away from
Commodore Bay’s trees and shade. “It’s a
place where we can escape the noise and
the horns of the rest of the village,” Red
says, patting his jacket in search of a ciga¬
rette. “It’s a place where you can get away
and relax your mind.”
The son of a prominent Grove activist,
Bubba Red has always lived in the village. He
has seen it change from an artists’ colony to a
hippie hangout, and finally to an overgrown
Continued on page 16
}'4li
•are1’
there.
a ¡jinn
ROBERT’S
WESTERN WEAR
1 The Largest
â–  Lucchese Dealer
if in the Southeast
Justin
Durango
Code West
Boots • Jeans
Shirts • Hats
5854 South Dixie Hwy
South Miami
666-6647
Redisoover
^Tradition
of junctional &
(tHC P©TTító PRLM.)
Cauley Square Historic District • 22400 Old Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida • 258-7474
15
New Times March 14 - 20.1996

New Times March 14 • 20,1996
THE GRIDIRON CUIR
FOR TOTAL FRINESS
BUY 3 MONTHS
GE! 1 MINI H
FREE!
BUY 1YEAB
GET 3 MONTHS
FREE!
INCLUDES INE FREE IOUR 0F PERSONAL TRAINING
531-GRID
IS7G ALTON RIAD, MIAMI DEMI
HDORS: 5:31AM - M* M* - 8 -1 SAL -1 - 6 SUN
Wasted
Continued from page 15
mall. The Grove still had a faint hippie feel
to it back in 1983, when this wild property
was purchased by three developers with a
grand vision.
Along with partners Howard Scharlin and
Gerald Katcher, Ken Treister, the architect of
Mayfair, bought the parcel for three million
dollars. Though the trio knew the land was
zoned for single-family homes, they felt it had
more potential. They wanted to build a 195-unit
condo complex on top of a massive shopping
center filled with stores and art galleries.
There would be subsidized art studios and
classes to evoke the village’s past, and a 650-
space parking garage to ease the Grove’s
growing car crunch. The property had no
name, but the blueprints submitted to the city
on June 15, 1984, bore the imprint
Commodore Bay.
City officials lapped it up like an architectural
parfait. The way they saw it, the Brickell
Avenue boom — gleaming, skyscraping con¬
dos rising along the waterfront as quickly as
anyone with a few dollars could find a con¬
struction crane—was arriving in the Grove.
Village residents, on the other hand, are
known for their anti-development zeal, and
many failed to share their elected officials’
taste for suites. The project’s opponents
noticed with relief that while the Community
Planning and Revitalization Department had
approved the plans, staffers had attached myr¬
iad conditions. A big hangup was traffic:
Compact and congested, Coconut Grove could
not support a massive condo project without
additional access from the site onto McFarlane
Road. The developers solved the problem by
adding to their blueprints a new road across
the parking lot of adjacent St. Stephen’s
Episcopal Church.
Bad call. The owners didn’t count on the
wrath of St Stephen’s congregation. Many
members balked at the idea of a road running
past the playground near their children’s gram¬
mar school. “I began working on this the day
my child started junior kindergarten and now
he’s in the tenth grade,” grumbles Linda Dann,
a St Stephen’s parent who became active in
the fight to nix the condo complex.
The partners also failed to factor in the envi¬
ronmental backlash that resulted when they
called for a gutting of the property’s hardwood
hammock. Activists, including the esteemed
Marjory Stoneman Douglas, joined the church
parents to sway the commission. Ultimately
they succeeded. On November 12,1984, the
commissioners voted 3-2 to kill the project
Still, they gave the developers an extraordi¬
nary second chance: Instead of going by the
law and waiting a year before presenting
another development plan, the partners were
invited to revisit the commission as soon as
they were ready. Six months was all it took to
craft another, slightly smaller plan. Instead of
195 condos, there would be only 150. Instead
of 80,000 square feet of commercial restau¬
rants and shops, there would be only 49,000.
The parking garage would hold only 533
spaces.
The planning department conditionally
approved the plan once again, but it was
rejected by the Zoning Board and the Planning
Advisory Board. Without waiting for a public
hearing before the city commission, the devel¬
opers withdrew the plans and the project died
a second death.
South Beach's
Newest Hot Spot
Isn't A Restaurant
This season the place to see and be seen is our humble thrift
shop! Here you 'll find everything from the practical to the
sublime, haute couture to T-shirts, meat grinders to doorknobs,
lawn furniture to sofas, Russian novels to comic books and
more! Your purchases and donations fund programs which
help people living with HIV. For
information please call: 672-7251. ^Ej3=network
1435 Alton Road • Miami Beach
Open Mon.-Sat 10«m-7pm / Sundays Noon-5pm
AT WAREHOUSE
PRICES!
â– Portable Antennas
*9.9* /
Car Chargers Jg
$15.95 m
mmm
m <» cs
m <$
mmm
NEW Battery with Built -In Digital
Recorder for Messages, Memos, Etc. |
*79.»
NEW Battery with Built -In Charger -
Plugs into Any 120v Outlet with No
Adapter ^
Solar Battery - Recharges From Sun,
12vor 120v
*99»
Export Prices Available
It was dawning on city officials, meanwhile,
that the property might make a nice park. That
way the Grove’s anti-development soldiers
would be appeased. Better still, the city would
be in a better position to proceed with its plan
to develop Bayside Marketplace downtown.
A shopping mall, food court, and eventual
mothership to a Hard Rock Cafe, Bayside was
(305) 599-1804 Fax (305) 599-1805
4995 NW 79 Ave. Suite 120
Miami, FL 33166

Because Commodore Bay is privately owned, homeless people can live on the property free from
police harassment
born as the city’s attempt to revitalize
Bayfront Park. In 1985 construction was
ready to begin. But to build docks and pavil¬
ions on the waterfront, the city needed spe¬
cial permits from the state. During a visit to
then-governor Bob Graham, Commissioner
J.L. Plummer proposed a trade: If the city
were allowed to proceed with Bayside, he’d
create a trust fund to collect a portion of the
developer’s rent paid to the city each year,
with the money earmarked for the purchase
of waterfront property along the Miami
River or Biscayne Bay. The first choice was
obvious. “The priority item will be agreed to
by the city, once again, and that is the prop¬
erty adjacent to the Barnacle,” Plummer
told Graham, as recorded in a transcript of
the meeting. The governor gave his bless¬
ing, and the trust began stockpiling cash.
Yet the owners weren’t quite ready to sell.
Forty-three days after abandoning their sec¬
ond plan, they came back to the city with an
unusual request. They wanted a zoning
change, from single-family homes to some¬
thing more dense, far more dense. The
change, if approved, would permit not only
a development of, say, 195 condo units and
a 650-space parking garage, but something
four times that dense.
In itself, a zoning-change request isn’t
uncommon. But astonished officials didn’t
fail to discern that the owners stood to ben¬
efit handsomely from a change that would
boost the value of their land. They also
noticed that the partners had not attached
any blueprints to their request. “[Our previ¬
ous] recommendations [in favor of the first
two projects] are irrelevant because [the
third application] is something completely
different,” a planning department staffer
told city commissioners. “It’s like compar¬
ing, for example, a contract in which you
specify all the terms ... and a blank check.
We’re recommending against a blank
check.”
The commissioners agreed.
Thrice rejected, the owners turned to the
courts. In a 1986 lawsuit, they alleged that city
officials were trying to “take” the
land by keeping the value as low
as possible, making it easier for
the city to buy it for a park. It was
a blatant double standard, they
complained: The city was pro¬
development on Brickell Avenue,
at CocoWalk, and even on
Biscayne Bay, where politically
connected restaurateur Monty
Trainer was afforded certain exemptions from
the rules, such as permission for his cus¬
tomers to park on adjacent city property.
The city, however, prevailed. An appeal
failed, as did a second lawsuit, and a third. Five
more legal maneuvers — all primarily regard¬
ing the requested zoning change — Med as
well.
Nine years after purchasing the land, the
owners pitched one last development idea: a
parking lot. The Department of Off-Street
Parking rejected the plan, leaving the owners
frustrated and willing to sell.
Michael Goldstein is a fitness nut That fact,
more than his lifetime spent in Coconut
Grove, has made him an environmentalist
“I run a lot, usually on the same path
through the Grove,” says the 28-year-old
Ransom Everglades High School alumnus.
“Over the years, I noticed a significant
change in the community. A lot of develop¬
ment, a lot of concrete. Every time a tree
would come down, literally it was like they
took a rib from my chest I don’t know why,
but it gave me such anger and sadness, and
a level of frustration and hopelessness.”
Earning a law degree from the University
of Miami, he found hope. He joined (and
soon became president of) the zealous zon¬
ing activists collectively known as the
Coconut Grove Civic Club. He fought
against the development of Virginia Key.
Now he is concentrating on Commodore
Bay. “This is the kind of stuff that is impor¬
tant to me,” Goldstein says. “I am an invet¬
erate, unabashed, unrepentant tree hugger.
This is what’s important to me. This is how
I spend my time.”
Goldstein knew the Commodore Bay
owners from his frequent battles against
the development. As their proposals were
shot down one after the other, he saw in
their frustration an opportunity to save the
property. They weren’t doing anything with
the land, so why not sell it to someone who
Continued on page 19
Astonished officials didn’t fail to discern that the
owners stood to benefit handsomely
from a zoning change.
AT THE MIAMI BEACH MARINA * 538-3500
BAD TO THE BONE!
We’ve got the finest cuts of meat, poultry
AND SEAFOOD ON THE BEACH.
i MARKET
OPEN 7 DAYS 7AM-8PM • 300 ALTON ROAD
m
Xv*
m
m
j&sS»*
fob* VS)
VICTORS
ELECTRONIC DISCOUNT CENTER
358-0333
29 S.E. 2ND AVE. S.E. HABLA
ESPAñOL FALA-SE PORTUGUES
• Requires 12 month service agreement with Victor’s and AT&T.
r
r
i
s
i

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
COLONIAL MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN FURNITURE & ACCESSORIES
TWO GREAT LOCATIONS TO SERVI YOU • 8880 S.W. 129 TERRACE IN MIAMI, 378-0377
137 MIMCIE MILE IN COMI 6MIES, 460-9880 • Open Hoe. - Sol. 10am-6pm
All Custom
Table Pads
50% Off
Your mother saved
her table from bums
and scratches with
beautiful SUPERIOR
table pads. We’re your
exclusive SUPERIOR
dealer, & we’ll come
out and measure your
table for free!
IratiftrW
R.MS. Tabfo Pouk
Call now for your
immediate
appointment!
271-8333
Guaranteed Speedy Delivery
SAM'S COMMUNICATON CENTER
We're proud to be an authorized dealer lor AT&T Wireless Services providing the products and services from the most trusted name in telecommunications.
AT&T WIRELESS IS HERE!
$49.95* $59.95* FREEA
19
FREE
New digital subscribers
receive UNLIMITED
home airtime usage for
the 1st and 13th month
Digital Advantage 2-5
subscribers also receive
the access fee waived for
the 1st and 13th month
Subscribers
may purchase
FREE nights and
weekends for just
$4.95/month (digital) or
$9.95/month (analog)!!!
==AW
Wireless Services
Authorized Dealer
$29.95 $39.95
Requires activation Requires activation
Requires sctivaUoa on AT&T's ATT, AN2, AN3, AN4 or ANS plan.
742 ALTON ROAD - MIAMI BE AC 11
PHONE: (305) 538-9494
- OONTEIVIFORARY - SOFAS - RUGS - IV1IRRORS - FUTONS -
Up To 80% Off On All
Black Hi-Tech Items
Bads Starting At *99
* Ovar 75 Stylas
Dining Sats
Chairs $24" Rag. $99
Tobias $99" Rag. $199
Introducing A Complete ,
Line of Mexican Furniture
• Over 100 Items
fe i e m e n ff s
. AH Sizas 2227 CORAL WAY • 2854)899
Reconstructs
Revitalizes
Reconditions
Manageability
Adds Volume
Adds texture to fine limp hair
Facilitates style versatility
Removes unwanted perms
Eliminates frizzies
Repairs over processing
We use and recommend
Paul Brown products kA*ia"
Salon and Skin Care
Gift Certificates
Available
STRAIGHT PERM SYSTEM*
I All
«It 1IU‘
ECC
AV3118 Dle €|| ||||i Protecting Endangered Beauty...
Complimentary ccc Hours: Mon-Fri 10-8
Valet Parking I————J Sat-Sun 10-6
Eden Roc Resort & Spa • 4525 Collins Ave • 674-5584 • Miami Beach, FL
ACCESSORIES - LAIVIRS - DINING ROOIVIS

“I am an inveterate, unabashed,
unrepentant tree hugger.
This is what’s important to me. This is iKTW
I spend my time.”
Wasted
Continued from page 17
I would preserve the trees and the open
â–  space? Why not sell it to the city so it could
\ become a park?
On a November dáy in 1994, the idealistic
I lawyer met Kenneth Treister for lunch at
I Greenstreet Cafe, across Main Highway from
I the disputed property. Goldstein asked
I Treister if he would be amenable to the idea of
| a park on his property. Treister said he was.
I Goldstein asked Treister if he would be willing
I to sell the property to the public to achieve that
I end. Treister said he was. Granted a third yes
s after asking whether the owners would reim¬
burse him for the costs of searching out a
| buyer (although not pay him anything more
I for his services), Goldstein set out to make it
| happen.
“Michael Goldstein cares about the commu-
I nity and he is active in the community,” says
I Treister’s partner Howard Scharlin. “He’s a
| bright young man. He is not our attorney, but
I from our point of view, his personal desires for
I this property are not inconsistent with what
I would be a good deal for us.”
Flying off to Tallahassee on the owners’;
I nickel, Goldstein lobbied bureaucrats in sev-
| eral state agencies. The land, he argued, was
I too valuable and time was too short to let its
I purchase be anything other than a priority. On
I June 27,1995, Goldstein secured a commit-
I ment from the state for half the cost of the pur-
I chase, plus a loan to the city on very favorable
repayment terms.
Goldstein knew of a Metro-Dade fund dedi¬
cated to the purchase of park land, so he also
made a pitch to the county officials who over¬
see the fund. “As concrete replaces canopy,”
he wrote in a persuasive letter to the
Environmentally Endangered Lands Program,
“the name itself, ‘Coconut Grove,’ may very
well become a bittersweet and ironic reminder
of what this village once was.” Sure enough,
county officials were in for ten percent of the
property’s cost
All this Goldstein presented to city commis¬
sioners last July. He even mentioned the
approximately $500,000 that sits in the Bayside
: Agreement trust fund, the money J.L.
Plummer had promised for Commodore Bay.
And as the commissioners thanked
Goldstein for his efforts and slapped him on
the back, the first fateful letters were already
being typed.
“The day after Michael Goldstein’s presenta¬
tion, Kenneth Treister sent a letter to the city
saying the deal was off” says Joseph Fleming,
one of three outside counsel representing the
dty in the Commodore Bay matter. “I told him,
‘Michael, I think you are being played for this
one, just like Linda Dann was.’ ” (Fleming was
referring to an earlier effort by Dann, one of
the parents at St Stephen’s church, to gather
state money to purchase the property. “I
worked my butt off for several years to get
them to sell, then at the last minute they
changed their minds,” Dann says today, her
words laced with bitterness. “Then they just
jerked the rug out from under us. They filed a
whole bunch of lawsuits, including one in
which they accused me of collaborating with
Monty Trainer. I don’t even know Monty
Trainer.”)
The owners’ attorney, renowned land-use
lawyer Toby Prince Brigham, dashed off a let¬
ter as well. “The willingness of the city to
resolve the matter is a never-ending illusion,”
Brigham wrote in a July 25 missive to another
of the city’s trio of attorneys, Gary Held. “It
seems to me your suggestions for further
negotiation are a snare and a delusion. We can
see no reason to continue further negotiations
with the dty. We deem them concluded.”
Held snapped back in a letter dated August
4. “You claim illusion, snare, and delusion on
the part of the city, but those same words
could describe how my clients feel about yours
following the years of litigation and your letter
tome.”
The dtys attorneys don’t have a lot of trust
in the owners, nor for the lawyers who repre¬
sent them. Lead attorney Joe Fleming asserts
that the partners have filed so many lawsuits
and set so many legal traps that he has no
cause to believe they’ve changed their ways.
Goldstein’s presentation might very well be
another trap, he figures, designed to demon¬
strate that the dty “took” the land by keeping
the low-density zoning. “He says his heart is in
the right place and that he is from the Grove,”
Fleming says. “But I tell him: “It doesn’t matter
where you are from, you have to be careful that
you are not setting up the city for a lawsuit.
They.aregoing.to-takeuallthis-[infQnnation].
you collected and put it in their context and
then be able to force the city to give them
whatever they want At that point Michael, you
will not be the architect of a settlement you
will be the architect of a high-rise.’ ”
Goldstein is accustomed to such admonish¬
ments. Ever since he proposed a dialogue with
Treister and Scharlin, he has been criticized by
park activists for selling out to developers.
“Working hand in hand with the property own¬
ers has not been a tremendously easy
process,” he admits. “I have come under attack
by certain segments of the community who
feel I am naive or have been co-opted by the
property owners or that I’ve negotiated a settle¬
ment or made a deal to profit from it” He esti¬
mates that he has collected less than $2000 for
his work, a far cry from his hourly rate, which
by now would have netted him closer to
Continued on page 21
Cool girl seeks sociable
silent type to share
la dolce vita”.
try it as
a shot, try it
with a new
date, try it with
your hat on,
try it chilled,
try it with
someone you
don’t know,
yet
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

MBL ‘oz • U M3JBH seuni mon
CCM Cellular
mtim* Connection of
*ww Miami, Inc.
BELLSOUTH MOBILITY
GIVES YOU
HONE*
2 FREE
PHONES
TO CHOOSE
FROM
&
3
MONTHS
UNLIMITED NIGHTS/
WEEKEI
&
DEUVEI
cellular sen.ice by
@ BellSouth Mobility
•> 1®
take
application
er the phone
305)371-6942
PH (305)371-6942 / FAX(305)371-6943
1 N.E.1ST. STREET #403 - Miami - FL 33132
Subject to credit approval and early cancellation fee. Effective until 3/31/96
Tmaiurner
T1NAM. TURNER, CPA ESQ.
Low Rates Rom $35
Personal / Business Returns
Evening / Weekend Appointments.
598-8722 361-6484
Sunset Dr. Key Biscayne
$15 after 11am
*520before 11am
r AGC members only
AGC Membership $20
play anytime from
11/15/95 lo 4/15/96
and pay no more than $20
a* V\
I Normandy Shores Golf Club
2401 Biarritz Dr. Miami Beach
868-6502
taxes

Buy Direct From The Manufacturer
Of The Famous “Y* Necklaces
DELFINI
Wholesale • Retail
779 W. Flagler St. Miami, FL
(305) 325-8858 Parking In Rear
Open Weekdays 95
n
best haircut in
town guaranteed
or it's on us!
pete of bncBh
116 Avenue and Kendall Drive
274-1166
Hammocks Town Center
387-3711
15 f i f n s i *»fi 111 i f n -1 f f f ■■ 11
Wasted
Continued from page 19
$40,000. (Howard Scharlin refers to
Goldstein’s costs as “peanuts.”)
“I am not paranoid,” Fleming insists. “I act
this way because I litigated this, because I
know the case history. I paint them as being
very, very interested in litigating because that’s
what they have been doing for a long time. I
would think that if they really wanted to [turn
the land into a park], then Mr. Goldstein could
initiate the process. The city doesn’t own the
property, they do. They could sell it to the state
any time they want”
Or to the dty, Fleming adds. But before that
could occur, or even before sale negotiations
could begin, he demands that the partners sign
a legal agreement never to sue the city again.
"They want a full release!” snorts Goldstein.
“There is no way in hell Tm going to do that—
to give away every right simply for the privi¬
lege of sitting down with the city to discuss
what may or may not occur!"
Attorney Toby Brigham suspects Fleming’s
insistence on a release might be a ploy of his
own, designed to drag out the sale indefinitely.
The only pending lawsuit, Brigham points out,
is Fleming’s own, seeking fees for himself and
cocounsel Gary Held and Parker Thomson.
(The three lawyers signed witiTthe city at a
mere $50 an hour, a modified pro bono rate
that covered only costs. But under Florida law,
winning attorneys in pro bono cases can sue
the losing side for fees.) Fleming could collect
more than $1.5 million. T think Joe Fleming
has enjoyed being special counsel for the city,”
Brigham confides. “Mr. Fleming is condi¬
tioned because of the fact he would love to
keep this [potentially lucrative contract] for
himself There is a lot of money to be made in
city fees.”
While Fleming concedes that he’ll gladly
take the money if he can get if he is adamant
that he’s not impeding a deal. “I am very inter¬
ested in this coming to a close,” he offers.
“Frankly, I do enough pro bono work. I don’t
need to see the Treister case in the Grove go
from ten years to twenty years.”
The owners seem to share his desire to
bring the matter to a close by selling the prop¬
erty. “I have been with this so long I am not
looking to hurt anyone,” says Howard
Scharlin. “I would like only to get a fair price
for the property. I don’t want to be involved in
court procedures any more. I am worn out”
Even the city remains onboard, though
somewhat guardedly. J.L Plummer, on advice
of Fleming, chooses his words carefully when
he endorses the land’s sale. “I support it being
put into public ownership,” the veteran com¬
missioner says. “I am not going to be put in a
comer by saying I want it to be a park, but I
support acquiring it for public use.”
Everyone is in agreement and yet nothing is
being done. “Right now we are at an absolute
impasse and I don’t understand why,”
Goldstein complains, adding that time is run¬
ning out on the deal he presented to the com¬
mission: Unless the city shows interest the
state might decide to spend the Commodore
Bay money on another piece of property some¬
where else. If necessary, Goldstein says, he will
sue the city to enforce the Bayside Agreement
in which Plummer said the purchase of
Commodore Bay was a top priority.
litigation, though, is a bleak scenario. Not
only would it further delay a sale, it would
bring the property to the brink of a land use
that—right now, at least — everyone wants
to avoid. “The default scenario here is devel¬
opment,” Goldstein warns. “Ultimately,
eventually, [the owners] are not going to be
able to [afford to pay the taxes] on the prop¬
erty any more. They can develop it them¬
selves or they will sell it to someone else
who is willing to deal with the zoning prob¬
lems and with the Coconut Grove zoning
activists. ”GD I
feet
vervtime.
GRAND
OPENING SPECIAL
Free Cellular phone with any
$85.00 Package.
Massage •Tanning
Manicures • Painless European during
ifedicures • Fiacials
MiAMiTAN
A TANNING SALON «Turning $8.°°
•Manicure $8.°°
.«USHSCAYNEBLVD. .J^Ien s Mankure $5.°°
(Tieonly)
Offer requires a new activation on an AT&T Wireless Services
An2,3,4 annual rate plans. Subject to credit approval. Some
restrictions apply. Offer avaiable while supplies last
SILVER JEWELRY
SALE
Mon. . Fri. ioam - 7pm
Sat. ioam - opm • Sun. Closed
Huge Selection of Silver & Marcasite Jewelrj
Chains • Bracelets • Rings • Charms
Earrings ‘Nameplates • “Y” Necklaces
loooo S.W 56th Street #19
598-8656
Footworks
3724 Sunset Drive • South Miami
667-9322 • Open 7 Days
Hew Times March 14 - 20,1986

Labor organizer Monica Russo helps Dade’s nursing home
workers form a more perfect union

stand
UNfTFs Monica Russo has covered her office walls (left) with reminders of labor
campaigns past and present
le’ve been train¬
ing for this moment ¡not just the past few
hours or days, but for the past few years,”
Monica Russo declares emphatically, her
Voice tinged with a southern drawl. “And
now the moment has arrived.” She -paces,
lips pursed, pausing for a Haitian man to
translate her words into: Creole, andâ– . then
for a Peruvian woman to put everything
into Spanish. The 31-year-old Russo — styl¬
ishly dressed, bespectacled, no makeup,
simply done shoulder-length brown hair —
doesn’t remotely resemble the popular
image of a labor union boss. Yet that’s what
she is: the southern regional director of
organizing for the Union of Néedletrades,
Industrial and Textile Emplé¡|fé’es
(UNITE).
At this moment, on a chilly morning in
early January, Russo is standing in front of
about .50 people in a conference room at
the Howard Johnson Hotel on NW 163rd
Street in North Miami. She’s kicking off a
massive campaign to unionize nursing
home employees throughout South
Florida, where the booming health-care
industry employs increasing numbers of
immigrants in low-paying,
nonunion jobs. Nearly half of
those jobs belong to certified
nursing assistants (CNAs), also
called nurses’ aides, who earn an
average of $6.03 per hour while
performing one of the most dan¬
gerous jobs for women in the
''ÍES., at least according to a study done last
year by the Washington, D.C.-based
Service Employees International Union.
Russo has spent her ten-year adult pro-'
fessional career ás a labor organizer in the
Southeast. And even though she herself
hás never worked in a nursing home, for
this campaign she has corralled dozens of
organizers and union members with expe¬
rience as factory and/or nursing home
workers.
The translations completed, Russo
resumes. “What are we gonna talk about?”
she asks. “Conditions for nursing home
workers in South Florida have never been
worse. It’s so bad that women who’ve been
working as CNAs up to twenty years are
still making $5,25 an hour. How can you
afford to pay.$300 a month for medical
insurance when you’re making $5.25 an
hour\” Russo shouts.. Her audience
responds with the nodding of heads, the
clapping of hands, and calls of affirmation.
“Not only are the workers makin’ no
money,” she continues, “but they’re suffer-
ing from back injuries, injuries to their
legs, arms, shoulders — injuries they suf¬
fer for toe,”
Cassandra Davis, standing at the back of
the room, knows all this andjevery other
pitfall of the profession. Davis, a. tall woman
with a determined gaze, worked as a CNA
for fourteen years in her home state of
Indiana. The Teamsters had organized
healthrcare workers there, and Davis was
an early and active union member.
Although she loved her work, she loved
union business even more, and now her job
as a UNITE organizer in the South keeps
her on the road three weeks out of each
month, away from her home and husband
back in Gary. Along with about ten other
itinerant organizers, she has come to
By Kathy Glasgow
Miami to work alongside local UNITE
staffers and a contingent of rank-and-file
members.
“We think it’s bad now-r-we ain’t seen
nothin’.yet!” Russo tells the crowd. “With
the cuts coming down from Washington,
the entire bottom is gonna fall out There’s
not gonna be nothing for workers. So
there’s never been a better time in history
for nursing home workers to organize than
right now. Today. Not just one nursing
home. Unless we organize hundreds and
hundreds of workers all over South
Florida, we won’t have the power to defend
ourselves against the cuts coming down
Continued on page 28
23
Haw Timas March 14 - 20.1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
6 MONTHS - SAME AS CASH!
0% Financing - No payments. No interest for 6 months with approved credit
AM/FM Cassette Player
Auto reverse, 18 presets & digital clock'
Detachable face cassette
Auto reverse, disital clock, bass
& treble, high power.
Detachable face cassette
Built-in 60 watt amp, bass & treble, clock
CM) PIOIMCEJ?
Detachable face cassette
Auto reverse, 24 presets & digital clock,
line out, bass & treble.
*268®^ «268» *298
Detachable face CD
4x20 watt amp., clock & line output.
FM/AMw/24 presets
KENWOOD
Detachable face CD
Clock, dual illumination, line output &
high power
/ALPINE
348
fí(EMIER^
Detachable face CD
Built-in 100 watt amp, bass & treble,
dock, wireless remote
Installed*
Detachable face CD
140w amp, 2 yr. warranty
High Power radio cassette.
w/10 CD changer package
20Wx4, full logic tape deck, 30 presets
Universal 10 CD changer
w/ remote commander
add CD changer to your factory stereo
Installed*
Universal 6-CD changer w/
wireless remote
add CD changer to your factory stereo
Installed*
Universal 6-CD changer w/
wireless remote
add CD changer to your factory stereo
W
SCRATCH & DENT I AUTO ALARMS
Systems from
$149
installed*
Lifetime Guarantee
Nakamichi 3 way separates $300/set
Sony XK - 8D cass $150
Rockford Speakers from$39/pr
Pioneer DEX-M88WT $350
Bazooka tubes (Amp'd & Non Amp'd) from $79
Sherwood 240 w amp (dean).. $129
Kenwood 2x25 w amp $49
Uneaf Power amps closeout
Hifonicsamps closeout
Hifonics Pluto 70 wrms amp $129
CUF Designs Separates dosout
JVC Direct Drive Turntable. S shape ioneami w/shure V-15 III. .$ 149
Altec 6X9 2 way carbon fiber $79/pr
Asst woofers (Rockford, Kicker, Hifonics) . .from $39 ea
I
HIGH-END
HEADQUARTERS
MB Quart • Mobile ES
Phoenix Gold • Premier
Boston Acoustics * Rockford
Soundstream • JL Audio
esat&t
Wireless Services
Authorized Dealer
Available Features: Remote arm-disorm • active/passive arming 9
motion/shock sensor9 ignition kill 9 flashing IÍD 9 volet switch 9
remote trunk release 9 power door locks9 remote panic9 glass
sensor9 battery back-up 9 window roll up/down 9 remote engine
start 9 interior motion sensor9 perimeter sensor
NOKIA MOTOROLA
DIGITAL PHONE ANALOG FLIP
Requires new acthraHoi o
DI3, DI4, or DI5
No More Excuses.
Today’s promotions make it
easier titan ever to own a
cellular phone.
We're proud to be an authorized dealer for AT&T Wireless
Services providing the products and services from the most
trusted name in telecommunications.
DIGITAL RATE PLANS FROM
$19.99 PER MONTH WITH FIRST
MONTH AIRTIME FREE
ANALOG RATE PLANS FROM
$29.99 PER MONTH INCLUDING
30 MINUTES PER MONTH.
2 HOURS FREE WITH EVERY
NEW ACTIVATION.
Requires 12 month service agreement with AT&T Wireless
Services and Sounds Good. Fees for early cancellation.
Mon.-Sat.
9-5:30pm
* All major
credit cards
m EST1983 2227 Biscoyne Boulevard, Miami
Sounds Good Stereo57—
custom installation extra.

United
Continued from page 23
now. The workers are ready, and all
they’re waiting on is us to back ’em up.
Our job now is to go and talk to people
wherever we find ’em — at home, at their
second job, on the radio, on the job. We
need to let ’em know what their rights
are. And we need to make sure they know
this ain’t no freebie. This is gonna be a
fight. We need to prepare our people for
the bosses’ campaign of intimidation that
we all know because we’ve been through
it many times. How many of you been
threatened for getting a union?”
Among those waving their hands in the
air is Jean-Claude Demosthene, the per¬
sonable young Creole translator. He
immigrated to Miami seven years ago
from Port-de-Paix, Haiti, and is a single
father of a two-year-old girl. Until last fall,
Demosthene worked in a warehouse at
Parts Depot, Inc. and was among several
active UNITE members. He was also one
of about a dozen union members who
were told they were being laid off from
the company for economic reasons; how¬
ever, they’re certain they were let go in
retaliation for their union activity, and
UNITE lawyers have asked the National
Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to order
their reinstatement. Demosthene has
become a valued rank-and-file organizer
for UNITE and is considered an instru¬
mental liaison with the city’s Haitian com¬
munity in this campaign. “Talking to my
people,” he says often, placing a hand
over his heart and tilting his angular,
vaguely feline face.
Winding up her pep talk, Russo pre¬
pares to hand out manila folders bearing
lists of names, addresses, positions,
shifts, and whatever other information
organizers have been able to glean about
workers at several area nursing homes.
Two- and three-person teams will fan out
from Homestead to Fort Lauderdale to
announce the start of what is generally
called “the blitz.” For the next two weeks,
union campaigners will work around the
clock to make their presence and intent
inescapably clear, both to employees and
to management.
“When we’re out there, we have no time
to waste,” Russo concludes. “Remember,
our vision is to change the way nursing
homes operate in South Florida.”
When UNITE organizer Gihan Perera and
Lionel Laurat, a union member on leave
from his factory job as a sewing machine
mechanic, drive to northwest Dade late
on a Saturday morning, they know the 63-
year-old Haitian CNA they are looking for
wants to introduce a union into the Villa
Maria Nursing Center where she works.
And they know from talking to other
CNAs that she is respected not just for
her age and her fifteen years at the North
Miami nursing home, but also for her
great influence among her Haitian co¬
workers. Perera and Laurat’s mission is to
persuade her to bring others into the
union.
By now the UNITE organizers have
some idea of the floor plans and working
conditions in a dozen area nursing homes,
as well as who the best-known employees
are and what shifts they work, and how
sympathetic or unsympathetic their
supervisors may be to the possibility of a
union. This information, garnered from
conversations with workers and through
other channels the union doesn’t want to
make public, is the starting point for the
blitz. (While organizers obviously want to
avoid tipping their hand to nursing home
operators, they also fear the clout busi¬
ness interests have with the state legisla¬
ture, which periodically entertains pro¬
posals to limit access to public records.)
As the campaign progresses, computer¬
generated lists will be compiled and
posted at UNITE’s Allapattah headquar¬
ters. The lists, which contain the names
and addresses of workers, show who has
been visited at home. They also contain a
numerical ranking characterizing a
worker’s estimated level of support for the
union, and, most important, a notation
indicating whether she (or occasionally
he — there are some male nurses’ aides)
has signed a yellow card declaring her
intention to join UNITE. Depending on
the reception UNITE gets at the homes
initially targeted, Russo may decide to
concentrate more on one or pay less
attention to another. “We just cast a wide
net to see what jumped,” she notes about
the initial few weeks. “We really didn’t
know what to expect.”
Once 30 percent of the employees at any
nursing home have signed the cards, the
union can petition the NLRB — the fed¬
eral agency created in 1935 to protect
workers’ rights to organize unions — to
hold a vote. If the union wins a majority of
that vote, it becomes the official bargain¬
ing agent for all employees. (In Florida, a
right-to-work .state, no employee is
required to join a union, but any contract
negotiated by the union applies to mem¬
bers and nonmembers alike.)
Perera and Laurat find Yolaine (not her
real name) standing in the driveway of
her brown brick house. She wears an
ankle-length ruffled white nightgown cov¬
ered with a long pajama top, white socks,
and brown sandals. Perera, tall and thin
with short, neatly barbered black hair,
strides up and hugs the woman. “Hey,
how you doin’?” he asks. Yolaine smiles*,
wearily, and the trio files into her living *
room. g
“What’s going to happen if we sign the 8
cards and after that the management»
doesn’t want the union coming in, then i-
they fire people?” Yolaine wants to know. »
It’s illegal to do that, replies Perera. By ¿
law the workers have the right to orga-
nize. In any case, he adds, the union never 8
shows the cards to other workers or to
Continued on page 27 25
“There’s never been a better time
in history for nursing home workers
to organize than right now.”

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
28
MARCH MADNESS BLOWOUT SALE!
WE'RE MAKING
YOU AN OFFER YOU
CAN'T REFUSE.*
Right now cellular service from BellSouth Mobility is only $19.96 a month. And,
if you act now, we'll throw in 15 minutes of local night and weekend airtime every
month. You could also get up to 6 months of unlimited night and weekend
calling and waived activation. That’s a $50 value. So go ahead and call today.
P120
• 24 Number Speed
Dial Memory
• 100 Min. Continuous Talk
•Any Key Answer
NEC
• 100 min. ot Continuous Talk
• 9.9 oz. with Talk Pak Battery
• Signal Strength, Volume &
Battery Meter
<8>
i MOTOROLA
820
•135 Minutes Talk Time
•36 Hrs. Standby Time
• One Touch Dialing
• 24 Number Memory
NEC
TeleTac 200
• Up to 100 min. of Talk Time
and 18 Hrs. of Standby Time
• Super Speed Dial • Battery Meter
• 11.5 oz. w/ Talk Pak Battery
MOTOROLA
Free Leather Case With
All New Activations
TRADING
FULL WARRANTY, INSTALLATION & SERVICE CENTER
fflBHPSA • 9548 S. DIXIE HWY, SOUTH MIAMI, 6704440
l/Ration . kendall town & country center, 279-0440
NEAR YOU! • 1440 BRICKELLAVENUE, MIAMI, 377-044»
authorized agent of
@ BellSouth Mobility8
COUNT ON IT.
• BellSouth Mobility provides Autopie x®
System 1000 advanced digital Technology.
• BellSouth Mobility offers exciting new services
. like Prolink One Humber Service and Mobile
2 Mobile Discount Calling.
‘Now minimum 12-month service agreement required. The $19.95 Plan includes the first 15 minutes of off-peak airtime a month. Free Unlimited Night &
Weekend local calling available for three months with a new 24-month agreement and for six months with a new 36-month agreement. Activation tee of
$19.95 available with a new 12-month agreement Waived activation fee (regularly $50) available with a new minimum 24-month agreement Offer does
not Include cost of long distance and/or roaming or applicable sales tax. Offer good at participating authorized BellSouth Mobility agents and retailers.
Subject to credit approval and early cancellation lee. Not good In conjunction with any other offers. Limited time offer. Certain other restrictions may apply.
Providing Autoplex® System 1000 advanced digital technology. Copyright 1996 BellSouth Mobility. “ Advertised pricing requires minimum 12-montn
service agreement with Dick Anderson's Cellular Trading and BellSouth Mobility* on approved price plan.
305 - 530 ~ 5350
HOT!
SELECTED AS ONE OF THE
OUTSTANDING SCHOOLS
IN THE USA FOR ART DIRECTION
AND COPYWRITING.
MIAMI AD SCHOOL
^538 3193
UTH BEACH
Next quarter registration March 15
NEED A
CELLULAR PHONE
OR BEEPER?
NO CREDIT?
BAD CREDIT?
Pager Deal, One Beeper, One Year Airtime,
One Beeper Chain, One Free Month of Voice Mail
only S96.M Plus Taxes and Connection Fee.
1-800-799-7928 or 674-9030
407 Lincoln Road Suite# 12-N Miami Beach
Personal Checks Accepted
ALUMINUM FURNITURE
FACTORY OUTLET
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
S2031 N.E. 163rd St.. Metro Center
Phone 947-2143.
Open Mon. — Sat. 106*Sun 12-5
PEMBROKE PINES
8369 Pines Bhrd. Scotty Plaza
Phone: 438-8383,
Mon - Sat 1045 *Fri 10-8* Sun 12-5

United
Continuad from page 26
anyone connected with the employer.
Yolaine listens dispassionately, appearing
almost convinced.
Even before the blitz started, Villa Maria’s
management held what it called an informa¬
tional meeting — what the union called a
brainwash meeting. Workers said they
were told they’d lose their homes, cars, and
jobs if they joined a union. The 272-bed Villa
Maria, which the Catholic Archdiocese of
Miami bought two years ago from an order
of nuns, is one of three nursing homes the
archdiocese owns in Dade County.
Archdiocese spokeswoman Mary Ross
Agosta denies that Villa Maria administra¬
tors would threaten employees. Tensions
escalated at the nursing home when union
teams showed up to hand out leaflets and
talk to workers between shifts, and North
Miami police were called in to disperse
them. One morning a security guard threat¬
ened to turn a hose on the union advocates.
(At St John’s, another home owned by the
archdiocese, police were also called in, and
that nursing home’s administrator came out
to shoo away the union people.) Still,
Yolaine insists she’s so tired of the long
hours and poor pay that she isn’t fazed by
the Villa Maria administration’s tactics.
“I’ve been there fifteen years,” she says.
“And how much you think I get?”
“Ten, eleven dollars an hour,” Perera sug¬
gests, knowing full well the real answer will
be far less.
“Six-ninety. Last week they gave me a
thirteen-cents raise. They give us insurance,
but we pay $35 every fifteen days. It would
be $378 per month for my family; that’s why
I don’t put my kids in. But I got insurance
because I’m old.” Yolaine looks sideways at
the 25-year-old Perera, who’s sitting beside
her on a cushiony brown sofa. A teenage
boy and girl drift in and out of the adjacent5
kitchen, nodding politely at the visitors.
Yolaine smiles and smoothes her
uncombed hair. This is her only weekend
off all month.
She wakes up at 5:00 a.m. to arrive at Villa
Maria by 7:00, where she works until 3:00
helping residents — some of whom are
senile or mentally disturbed — do the
things they can’t do for themselves: dress,
walk, negotiate a bathtub or toilet, eat, sit,
get into or out of bed. She isn’t allowed to
administer medicine, but owing to staff cut¬
backs she sometimes must perform duties
that are normally the responsibilities of
licensed practical nurses. At any given time
she may be responsible for as few as eight
or as many as twenty patients, depending
on how many workers are on duty or, some¬
times, on the whims of her supervisors.
When her shift at Villa Maria ends, Yolaine
hurries to her second job as a CNA at Plaza
Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, another
nursing home in North Miami. She’s sup¬
posed to be there by 3:00 p.m., but her
bosses at Plaza give her a break because of
her schedule and allow her to arrive by 3:30.
After getting off work at 11:00 p.m., she
makes it to bed by about 1:00 a.m.
Before he leaves, Perera firmly places a
half-dozen yellow union cards (written in
Creole) in Yolaine’s hands. He wants her to
pass them out at Villa Maria and return
them to him, signed. She shakes her head".
“You know I can’t give it,” she tells him.
“You don’t trust nobody. I don’t want to do
that.” She confers in Creole with Laurat,
who then explains to Perera that the Haitian
CNAs are worried they’ll be reported to
management and are afraid even to discuss
the union among themselves.
“What if we had a meeting they could all
come to?” Perera asks.
“I don’t know,” Yolaine says doubtfully.
Perera protests gently, with no hint of
annoyance: “Unless you use your rights,
you’re not going to get any more rights. The
only way you’re gonna get a union there is if
all the people sign each other up.
Somebody has to stand up, and that’s you.”
Yolaine shakes her head. The men leave
some cards with her anyway. She may
change her mind in the coming days.
“She can sign everyone up in that place if
she wants to,” Perera remarks to Laurat as
they climb into his UNITE company car, a
light green Pontiac. “You can’t be easy, not
now. If you’re easy, you won’t get a union.
It’s difficult and not comfortable to push
people like that, but if you don’t, it’s not
going to happen.”
After a fruitless few stops (no one’s
home), Laurat offers to make lunch at his
North Miami apartment — a room in the
back of a house, actually — since they’re
already in the neighborhood. “Not much
food here',” he announces, slipping off his
black Calvin Klein baseball cap and ducking
behind a white curtain into his kitchen. He
returns with a large glass jar of confiture a
friend brought him from Haiti. He ladles the
thick, sweet brown jam — the product of
grapefruits and sugar that have been
cooked for hours — into Styrofoam cups,
then pushes a cassette into an ancient tape
player. The infectious, buoyant music of the
Haitian superstar Sweet Mickey immedi¬
ately brightens the dim room. On a tabletop
is an envelope addressed in flowery hand¬
writing to “Mon Amour Lionel Laurat” It’s
from his fiancée in Port-au-Prince, whom he
left behind in 1994. Laurat fled the country,
he says with little expression, a few days
after armed men burst into his family’s
home and shot to death his brother and his
mother. He hid under a bed. He assumes
the attack, was in retaliation for his family’s
support of Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s return to
power.
Once in Miami the 35-year-old Laurat
landed a job operating a sewing machine at
Bag Specialists in Opa-Locka, one of seven
local plants whose work force is repre¬
sented by UNITE. A few months ago he was
promoted to mechanic after receiving addi¬
tional training. He plans to study English
and possibly resume his pursuit of a law
degree, which he began in Haiti. Soon, he
hopes, his fiancée can join him here.
Monica Russo’s small corner office is
located on the second floor of a nonde¬
script gray building in working-class
Allapattah. The room is adorned with
scores of snapshots of union members and
union rallies and victory celebrations.
Continued on page 29
“It’s difficult and not comfortable
to push people like that, but if you
don’t, it’s not going to happen.”
’oelive'V **
gapping
State of Florida
Concealed Firearm
Licensing
Call For
Next Class
Florida Firearms
State Certified
Guns, Rifles and Accessories
"G” Armed Security Training
11060 Biscayne Blvd.
893-6500
South Beach
Surfside
BAYSIDE
MARKETPLACE
GENERAL NUTRITION CENTERS
Here's To Your Health America!â„¢
A Special
multiple
vitamin for
a special
woman.
You.
MET-Rx $36.”
anytime
Cats daw Root m stock (Uña de Gato)
GNC Melatonin - End 1/S price
SO% off with GNC Gold Card
Baysidc
401 Biscayne Stud.
378-7181
Open every day til lOpai
South Beach Surfside
540 Lincoln Bd. 9441 Harding Ave
538-9513 165-8443
Nightly til fpu
SendaystflSpa
betpt flnrstiys Jt Saptr
Táctil? Wipe
LARGEST ROLLERBLADE INVENTORY IN MIAMI
AUTHENTIC ROLLERBLADE®IN-UNE SKATES
* 1 SOUTH BEACH 726 LINCOLN ROAD MALL 532-1954
*2 SOUTH BEACH FIFTH STREET AND OCEAN DRIVE, 5324)054
»3 CLEARWATER 700 CLEVELAND STREET, (813) 445-1954
REMEMBER, WE WILL MATCH ANY SKATE SHOP'S PRICES NO QUESTIONS ASKED!
27
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

tt Hew Un»» March 14-20,1998
Bring the Light of a
New Dawn Into Your Home
Í -X- - T \ FUTON & FURNITURE ^
^ Contemporary Designs Classic Hardwood Furniture ^
^ Guaranteed! O
O Highest Quality & Lowest Price ^
8 CONE SEE ENTIRE SELECTION OF h
; FUTON FURNITURE ¿
Cj SOUTH MIAMI PLANTATION O
Í 5820 South Dixie Highway 801 South University Drive H
2 667-8830 4726044 g
FUTON • FUTON • FUTON • FUTON • FUTON • FUTON
UMhi )■ n (;> a <• * v-r t b r> ViI***»
American Dance Theatre of Miami
Enter two worids with American Dance Theatre of Miami presented in ADT’s trademark theatrical style.
Rhythm and improvisational tap explodes in Hot Tap/Cool Jazz with guest artist, The Great Jenny Lane.
Then experience the dramatic tale of ADT’s Rock Ballet “A Night At the Opera” as told through the
music of Queen. Tickets '17.50, '12.50 for seniors and students. For more information call, 552-0617.
With support of the Miami Beach Visitor and Convention Authority and the City of Miami Beach.
ini—. - 11?* , Buy Tickets at Sears, Spec’s Marshall’s, BlockBuster Music, Caches, Select Eckerds.
Or Call: (305) 358-5885 • (305) 523-3309 • («7) 966-3309 Ip
CONDOS FOR SALE
In the Heart of South Beach
From $64,900 Cali 535-3530
940 Ocean Drive, Suite 230, Miami Beach - Sales Office Open
UNIQUE BEACH PROPERTIES, INC.
, Sleighbeds
starting at
l$699.O0
84” Solid Pine Dining Table
Reg. $999.-Sale $749.00 Ȥfll v
42” Solid Wood Dining Tables from $199.00 ip& gt&S '
EVERYTHINGS IS ON SALE!
starting at
KxJIUKBíOp urniture
12475 S. Dixie Hwy • Miami • 238-5379
lours: Mon-Wed-Fii 10-8 • Tue-Thur 10-6 • Sat 10-5 • Sun 12-5
St. Patrick’s Day
Furniture Sale
The Original Finished and Unfinished Furniture Store.

United
Continuad from page 27
Hanging on the wall are two maps of Haiti
— gifts from workers — whimsical assem¬
blages of colored gravel and shells glued
onto paper to represent palm trees, boats,
and Haiti’s different provinces. There’s a
poster of the late labor organizer Cesar
Chavez, and one of Emiliano Zapata,
emblazoned with the Mexican revolution-
aiys famous quote: “I would rather die on
my feet than live on my knees.”
Russo was bom in Oxford, Pennsylvania,
to activist parents, both of whom taught at
nearby Lincoln University, the nation’s
oldest black university. According to
Russo, her father, a history professor, was
fired for starting a union at the school.
After graduating from Georgetown
University in Washington, D.C., in 1986
with a BA in history, she searched for a
union-related job while working as a secre¬
tary. “The Bakery, Confectionary and
Tobacco Workers Union [BCTWU] called
and said they were conducting some cam¬
paigns in the South and was I interested,”
recalls Russo. “I packed up my stuff and
drove to Georgia and never went back.”
Actually, she did go back north for a few
After a few years Russo movecf on Id work
for the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile
Workers Union (ACTWU), one of the few
unions at the time committed to organiz¬
ing in the South. Like most organizers,
she traveled constantly, and yet she still
was able to start putting down some roots
in Miami. She picked up Creole from the
Haitian garment and factory workers she
was organizing, and Spanish from Latin
American and Caribbean workers.
When UNITE was created last year
through the merger of two venerable
institutions — ACTWU and the 95-year-
old International Ladies’ Garment
Workers’ Union (ILGWU, originator of
the “Look for the Union Label” advertis¬
ing campaign) — Russo was named direc¬
tor of organizing for its nine-state south¬
ern region headquartered in Atlanta.
Currently she’s keeping tabs on five other
campaigns besides the nursing home pro¬
ject
She owns a two-bedroom A-frame in
North Miami, which she has decorated
with Caribbean art, mostly Haitian paint¬
ings and carvings. Union colleagues fre¬
quently drop by to strategize or socialize,
and there’s usually a house guest. Russo
“Monica makes sure she has a lot of
workers around her all the time. She
makes sure they’re the leadership.”
months, to Patterson, New Jersey, where
she helped unionize a Bagel Crisps fac¬
tory. It was her first time running a cam¬
paign, and she credits helpful rank-and-file
organizers from a neighboring English
muffin factory for its successful outcome.
seems always to be working, but her
deceptively informal, lightsome manner
makes it appear as if she’s putting on a
play at a small-town community center
rather than supervising a multipronged
organizing offensive.
Francena Sheffield is proud of her 31 years at Villa Maria,
but not of her pay
Despite her young age, Russo
is regarded in union circles as
one of the top organizers in the
nation. Those who have worked
with her credit her close associ¬
ation with workers as a major
factor in her success. “You have
the danger of a really charis¬
matic person becoming the
union,” cautions Allison Porter,
assistant director of the organiz¬
ing department of the American
Federation of Labor-Congress
of International Organizations
(AFL-CIO, the powerful
national umbrella organization
of labor unions, with which
UNITE is affiliated). “Monica
makes sure she has a lot of
workers around her all the
time. She makes sure they’re
the leadership. It takes an
incredibly unusual person to
succeed as an organizer, and
it’s unusual to have really
strong leadership qualities and
to be empathetic at the same
time.”
Russo is emblematic of a new
direction in the labor move¬
ment nationwide. Last month
at the AFDCIO’s annual execu¬
tive committee meeting held in
Miami Beach, she received an
award citing her “achievements in organiz¬
ing which provide a model to American
labor and a beacon of hope to working
people.” In a closed session before the
executive committee, Russo and two rank-
and-file members described their organiz¬
ing efforts in the South, the region tradi¬
tionally neglected by most unions and
only recently singled out for special atten¬
tion by the AFL-CIO.
Many saw last year’s election of John J.
Sweeney to, the presidency of the AFL-CIO
as confirmation of organized labor’s deter¬
mination to break with long-standing iner¬
tia and to change its old image as a corrup¬
tion-prone old-boy network. At the
executive committee meeting, federation
leaders announced an unprecedented com¬
mitment to pour $20 million into organizing
Continued on pago 30
jag n? jES«
Watercraft Center
Parts, Sates & Service
Free Estimate (Unless Tear-Down is required)
Pick-up & Delivery Available
Sea -Doo ‘93 XP $3995.00
94 Yamaha Wave Blaster Riva Pipe
IxGeJteflt£ggfflaE^^y^
95 XP 800 Limited Production
Rare 787R Engine $7995.00
and other usadas available
YAMAHA* J5G<\000- Kawasaki
SAVE IKE MANATEES ______ „ - ' ’ • JaEíS %' „
â–  700Lincoln Rd. Mall
S. Beach530-1330
SLOW DOWN IN MANATEE ZORfS Fax 53B-9G5G
Roam Where
You Want To
New Ronda Calling from AT&T Wireless Services
Anywhere you go in Florida you get the same rate on any digital calling plan
new digital subscribers
receive free monthly
access and unlimited
airtime free*
Also
Digital subscribers
receive Florida calling
at home airtime prices!!!
SAME STATE
SAME RATE
Hi AW
Wireless Services
Authorized Dealer
It’s Good To Be With AT&T
We're proud to be an authorized dealer
for AT&T Wireless Services providins the
products and services from the most
trusted name in telecommunications.
Coconut Grove • 445-2299
Restrictions Apply. Requires activation on AT&T’s D12, D13, D14 or D15 plan. Long Distance Charges Not Included.
IM ®
LULAR
3208 Grand Avenue
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
“The other side’d better watch out,
because immigrant workers are gonna get
power and things are gonna change.”
(Tñítecl
Continued from page 29
over the next five years with an emphasis
on heretofore largely untargeted groups
such as women, immigrants, and workers
in the South.
Union membership has been declining
over the last 30 years, from 28 percent of
the U.S. work force in 1966 to less than 15
percent in 1995, according to the federal
government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The current union-dues-paying proportion
of the work force drops to 10.4 percent
when government employees are
excluded. Under Sweeney, a white-haired,
pink-faced man who made his name orga¬
nizing health care workers in New York
City, the AFUCIO’s Organizing Institute
has a new lease on life: The six-year-old
training school for organizers now hás a
$3.3 million annual budget, up from
$350,000 in 1990. These days the empha¬
sis is on aggressive and innovative orga¬
nizing — personal contact and recruit¬
ment, broadening the membership base
— as opposed to concentrating on protect¬
ing gains made by workers in traditional
industrial occupations.
“In my opinion the whole ability of
unions to organize nursing homes and
other kinds of service jobs is really their
future,” says Ed Lawler, a professor at the
University of Southern California’s busi¬
ness school who specializes in the organi¬
zation and economics of labor unions. “If
they can’t succeed in organizing this kind
of workplace, they’re basically history.”
Bruce Raynor, executive vice president
of New York City-based UNITE, agrees
with Lawler in principle, and underscores
the significance of the current effort to
organize area nursing homes: “This is a
big and important effort.” The newly
merged union, with a combined $46 mil¬
lion in net assets, employs about 750 peo¬
ple and claim» 350,000 members in the
U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico. “[Nursing
home workers] need to be organized and
want to be organized,” Raynor adds.
As of last month there were 678 nursing
homes in Florida — 94 in Dade and
Broward alone — employing more than
180,000 certified nursing assistants,
according to the Florida Agency for
Health Care Administration, which
licenses CNAs. The nursing home indus¬
try in general — and in Florida in particu¬
lar — is growing steadily, with net rev¬
enues in the state rising from about $1.5
billion in 1990 to $2.5 billion in 1994. Yet in
contrast to other urban areas, South
Florida’s health care workers, for the most
part, remain un-unionized. They have
become a priority for many unions not
only because they represent a relatively
untapped and expanding field, but also
because federal and corporate cutbacks,
among other factors, have made workers
more nervous about job security.
“With the changes taking place in health
care, everything seems to be going to big¬
ger and bigger conglomerates, and that
creates uncertainty,” points out labor
attorney Dan Kunkel of Kunkel, Miller &
Hament, a Tampa law firm that has coun¬
seled the owners of three different Miami
nursing homes on how to counter
UNITE’s efforts. After a lull in union activ¬
ity in the health care industry, Kunkel and
other observers say, unions are attempt¬
ing a comeback. (Union-busting has
become a specialty of many law firms, who
are called in by savvy employers at the
first sign of union activity. Though UNITE
took pains to keep its campaign under
wraps until January, it didn’t take long for
word to leak out. Monica Russo has a copy
of an undated memo faxed late last year to
South Florida nursing homes by Kunkel,
Miller & Hament: “This newly formed
union has begun to target Florida nursing
homes. It cannot be emphasized strongly
enough the importance of ensuring that
you are prepared for a possible union
organizing attempt at your facility.”)
According to UNITE’s Raynor, who
oversees the union’s operations in nine
southeastern states, the situation for work¬
ers in area nursing homes is critical.
“Workers in South Florida are mostly
immigrants, some African Americans, who
are being exploited by an industry that’s
growing,” he explains. “Not only growing,
but budget cuts are putting more and
more pressure on companies who are not
going to sacrifice profits and so will sacri¬
fice their workers’ rights and welfare
instead. More so than in the past, employ¬
ers feel they can get away with violating
workers’ rights and pay low wages, some¬
how in the name of competition.”
UNITE’s broad campaign isn’t particu¬
larly unusual, but it does represent some¬
thing of a departure for this regional
office, whose major successes to date have
been at textile, manufacturing, and laun¬
dry operations. Russo says the nursing
home campaign developed over the past
few years, after her staff received com¬
plaints from workers and their relatives,
many of whom were referred by friends or
family already employed at a UNITE shop.
One CNA had been injured on the job, and
her employers were denying worker’s
compensation. Another, a supervisor for
fifteen years who was the only black main¬
tenance staffer where he worked, came to
UNITE, having been fired after training
the man who eventually took his job. A
CNA with a history of commendations was
fired after an argument with a relative of a
patient; the CNA claimed that she had
never been allowed to speak in her own
eautíñil Legs...Naturally.
There’s nothing natural about varicose and spider veins.
They are a medical condition which only worsens with time.
Age and sunspots also detract from your natural beauty.
At Guylaine Lanctot, South Florida’s oldest and largest
non-surgical varicose and spider vein treatment center, we’ve
been making women’s legs and bodies more beautiful for
over 25 years. There’s no substitute for experience.
Call for a free medical consultation and learn how you can
restore your natural beauty today.
Guylaine Lanctót
Cliniques
Aventura
"l9495 Biscayne Blvd
Suite 204
(305) 936-5347
South Miami
*6701 Sunset Drive
Suite 209
(305) 666-5347
*Se Habla Español
Varicose and Spider Vein Treatment
Total Skin Health
Boca Raton
2255 Glades Road
Suite 238 West
(407) 998-8869
Palm Beach Gardens
3300 PGA Blvd
Suite 310
(407) 624-5347
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR
ANY OTHER SERVICE OR EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.

defense and had been
forced to sign a paper
that later was altered to
state that she could not
work in any other nurs¬
ing home. When
UNITE organizers fol¬
lowed up on these and
other complaints, they
met long-time employ¬
ees who were earning
less than subsistence
wages. They also heard
of homes that failed to
pay overtime, of racial
discrimination and
favoritism, and of staff
cutbacks resulting in
increasingly heavy
workloads. It was no
coincidence, they con¬
cluded, that local nurs¬
ing home workers were
mostly women of color
— immigrants from
Caribbean and Latin
American countries as
well as African
Americans.
It’s this heteroge¬
neous, largely immi¬
grant, and marginal¬
ized work force that
makes South Florida as
formidable as any chal¬
lenge confronted by
organized labor — a
challenge to union peo¬
ple such as Russo to
think creatively, to try
different ways to coax
ethnic groups who
don’t necessarily speak
the same language to
act as a unified force.
“My experience until
about four years ago
has been organizing in
the South, in more
rural, small-town set¬
tings,” admits Russo, who
nonetheless is fluent in Creole, Spanish,
and Portuguese. “And organizing immi¬
grant workers in the city is a totally differ¬
ent ball game. I love it. To me this isn’t
about helping the helpless but about
empowering workers. And it’s very, very
exciting, especially
with immigrants
who’ve been so
dogged out, so
trounced. The other
side’d better watch
out, because immi¬
grant workers are
gonna get power
and things are gonna change.”
Despite the widespread reluctance — fear
is the word UNITE’s organizers use — of
Villa Maria employees to attempt to union¬
ize, UNITE teams assigned to the Hebrew
Home for the Aged and Palm Garden
Nursing Home, both in North Miami
Beach, have been welcomed with enthusi¬
asm. Their reception has been particularly
encouraging at the Hebrew Home, where
the firing in November of the CNA who
had exchanged harsh words with a
patient’s family member galvanized her
colleagues. There, UNITE workers are
signing up almost everyone they show a
card to.
At the same time, UNITE is bringing its
campaign to the general public, notably
the area’s Haitian and African-American
communities. Russo and other union
tioned the NLRB for
elections at Hebrew
Home and Palm
Garden and is waiting
for the board to set
dates.
According to Russo,
the press conference is
an important symbolic
gesture toward the
workers, a show of sup¬
port for their first steps
in a new and untested
direction. It’s important
for the union’s public
image, too, as UNITE
works to establish itself
not only as a viable
union but as a nursing
home workers’ union.
“It’s all about imagery,”
Russo insists. In addi¬
tion to the unfamiliarity
of UNITE’s name
among workers, its pre¬
vious successes in
South Florida have
been in fields other
than health care.
Competing unions and
nursing home admin¬
istrators have been
quick to jump on this
point “We have so lit¬
tle access to the work¬
ers, and the employ¬
ers have eight hours a
day,” Russo laments.
“We have to show
we’re a union actively
fighting for the work¬
ers. We have to define
UNITE as the union
for nursing home
workers.”
That will be expen¬
sive. Salaries for more
than a dozen organiz¬
ers (not all working at
the same time) and
union staffers (Russo
earns about $41,000 per year).
Compensation for rank-and-file volunteers’
lost wages. Travel. Meals. Rental cars.
Conference rooms and motel rooms.
Printing expenses for the reams of
leaflets, cards, and posters. UNITE execu¬
tive vice president
Bruce Raynor says it’s
impossible to tell how
much money the union
will spend on the entire
campaign because it
has no annual budget
per se, with funds allot¬
ted as needed. It
spends what it has to when it has to. And
the union can afford to foot the bills. “The
merged union has ample resources to go
up against any corporation in society,”
asserts Raynor. “No company is too big for
us. These unions have been around for a
long time, they’re frugal organizations,
they don’t pay people a lot of money, don’t
waste money, they made some smart
investments, and have a lot of assets.”
All that, he suggests, runs counter to the
widely held assumption that the U.S. labor
movement is dying. “I think there’s a
revival,” he contends. Others concur.
“When everyone said unions are dead or
declining rapidly, it was all totally true, but
something has happened,” explains
Stanley Aronowitz, professor of sociology
at the City University of New York and
author of several books on labor unions.
“It finally got to the point where unions
Continued on page 33
Rank-and-filé leader JoAinne Jocelyn and Russo await going on the air, taking the campaign
to the Haitian community via radio
members appear on several Haitian radio
shows, including Haitian-American
Democratic Club president Jacques
Despinosse’s Saturday talk show on
WKAT-AM (1360), where they discuss
UNITE’s position on various workers’ and
“We have so little access to
the workers, and the employers have
eight hours a day.”
union issues. Russo and rank-and-file
leader JoAinne Jocelyn are invited to
address the congregation of a Haitian
Baptist church. And some 50 union mem¬
bers and supporters march in the Martin
Luther King Day parade. Then on March
4, at a UNITE press conference called to
officially introduce the nursing home cam¬
paign, an emotional U.S. Rep. Carrie Meek
puts the first signature on a “Nursing
Home Workers’ Bill of Rights” petition. “I
may be a congresswoman, but I came
from the trenches,” Meek declares, her
voice breaking as she mentions her
mother’s back-breaking labor as a domes¬
tic, earning poverty wages. “I will do all I
can to help people know what’s going on
here.” CNAs from the three nursing
homes with the most active current cam¬
paigns — Hebrew Home, Palm Garden,
and Villa Maria — are present, and some
of them speak. UNITE has already peti-
Must be the
Stylists.
The Salon
announces the arrival
of Master Stylists
Javier & Alexis
The Salon
Doral Ocean Beach Resort
4833 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
532-4555
Free Valet Parking
Why do
so Many
Beautiful
Women
come from
Venezuela?
YAMAHA
IM'lJJ.H'l.UllJU'l,
1200 NW 57 Ave. Miami • Phone 264-4433
AioiopowmA.
a
Miami’s Finest Selection
of YAMAHA Motorcycles
& Personal Watercrafts
31
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

Hew Tima» Mreli 14 20,1996
OCEANFRONT
SOUTH BEACH-OCEAN DRIVE
SELLING OUT!
*
LIQUIDATED AT COST OR BELOW!
DROOMS START AT
The Best Value
32 OPTOwSjnIiy Oi^represerrtatkxi cannot be reBeduponas owraotty stating representatlops qtttte developer. For correct representations, mete referí to thls advertisement

Travertine
»6x 16
$2.50 sq ft '4,‘n
Shell Stone
16 x 16
$3.10 sq ft
Champagne
Limestone
16x16
$3.30 Sq ft
8
3012 NW 24th St. Miami
635-2996
Over 800 Shades to Choose From
We Carry:
Makeup For Ever from Paris
Neal’s Yard • J.F. Lazertique
Molton Brown
Eye Brow Shaping
Eye Lash Tinting
South Beach Makeup
Specializing In Customized Service
439Española Way •MiamiBeach
538-0805
ITH FLORIDA
lEPTitfsyows
ReptHe^JSSS
| |Arachnid§
¿Supplies
Sale
She
â–  RedStaroet
OH®"™*) 84 |
»l-95lTgoa
$1,00 Children
9:00 AM To 5d)0 PM
£all (3Sff98I-?15(
United
Continued from pafe 31
and union members were beaten down so
hard they finally said, "We’ve got nothing
more to lose, let’s try to turn it around.’
When you have no protection, a voice
telling you your job is down the drain,
your sense of despair and powerlessness
is acute. If you have the option to join a
union during a period of change, you’re
going to do it. The workers will fight even¬
tually, because at a certain point they say,
This is undignified’ — not just in an eco¬
nomic sense, but in the sense of who they
Francena Sheffield doesn’t express it
exactly that way, but she will tell you that
her low wages aren’t the only reason she’s
working so hard to bring the union into
Villa Maria Nursing Center. A large
woman with downturned eyes and black
curls that sweep up to the top of her head,
Sheffield has been a CNA at Villa Maria
for 31 years. She refuses to talk about her
wage, saying it makes her too angry.
“Years back I could work for less money
and be happy,” she allows. “But now
you’re harassed. It don’t seem like you do
enough. [The former management] would
always call us together and talk to us to
get our opinion before they did some¬
thing, but now these people send out a
memo. You don’t see them. It’s gotten to
the point where they call a patient a cus¬
tomer.”
Sheffield, who has lived in the same tree-
shaded yellow-brick house in Liberty City
since she and her late husband bought it
in 1960, heard about UNITE from a co¬
worker several months before the blitz
began. “I said, ‘Oh boy, we need it here,’ ”
Sheffield recalls. Since then she has
accompanied organizers on house calls to
fellow Villa Maria CNAs and handed out
union cards on her 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
shift. “When you talk to people, right away
they say the union’s no good,” she
explains, the black pen she uses at work
still lodged in her curls. “They are really
frightened, because the administration
told them, ‘If you sign you’re gonna lose
your job, you’re gonna lose your house
and car.’ I say, ‘That’s not right — it’s
against the law for them to say that,’ but
still they’re afraid. I say, ‘I’m 60 years old,
I’m ready to walk out the door, but I want
you to make a good living and get some
respect.’ I say, ‘If it was not good, I would
not take it.’ A lot of them say, ‘Okay,
Sheffield, if you think so. Let me think
about it’ ”
But archdiocese spokeswoman Mary
Ross Agosta says that Villa Maria’s admin¬
istration would never indulge in such tac¬
tics. “Never, ever would that be the
church’s approach,” asserts Agosta.
“We’re a pastoral organization and we sup¬
port their rights to join a union. However,
we’re concerned about what it means to be
unionized. We have people who need their
paycheck, and they have to understand
that if they’re in a union, they may have to
walk off the job because of something hap¬
pening somewhere else to support what
their union brothers and sisters are doing.
We’re trying to keep the lines of communi¬
cation open so that if anybody has any
questions, the supervisors and administra¬
tors are available to answer them.”
From the beginning of the campaign,
UNITE has taken a somewhat different
tack with the archdiocese’s homes, a con¬
ciliatory strategy that includes a meeting
scheduled for earlier this week between a
committee of workers and union leaders
Continued on paje 34
Premier
Gat's II
B mm -m â„¢ SHU W Original Formula
C ^BwjtiAJ p at 90 Potent Tablets
CÉÜB of 500 Milligrams
Recent studies at various international Universities suggest the Uncaria
Tomentosa Willd DC or “Cat’s Claw”, a plant cultivated in the Andes, can
be useful in the treatment of Cancer, Arthritis, Allergies, Ulcer,
Irregularities of the Menstrual period, those affected by the AIDS virus and
many other conditions. Premier brings the bark extract directly from Peru,
to be processed here in the States, to guarantee the best quality.
"I agreed to endorse premier
vitamins because I finally found
a line of products that work.
Premier Cat's Claw*> helped
alleviate the arthritis that was
developing in my broken wrist which
was caused in part from some
accidents that occurred during the
filming of my show "Chips".
Since Premier Cat’s Claw-
uses only the purest ingredients and
the latest technology, they can
deliver a product you can feel
good about using, and the results...
They're great!"
To order by phone
call 1-800-999-3535
A donation to support AIDS
research will be made for every
bottle sold with this ad.
As a dietary supplement take three to four
tablets dally or as directed by a physician.
Vitamins Corporation
AVAILABLE AT
. and Other Fine Health Food Stores -
GENERAL NUTRITION CENTERS
Here's To Your Health, America!
” GNC
“ -PRODUCT
**.. CODE 20951
33

New Times March 14 â–  20,1996
a
LEVI’S *9*
LEATHER JACKETS
\CE TO SHOP FOR THE HIPPIE LOOfe f \ % j
â– BEST PLACE TO SHOP FOR THE HIPPIE Lift
â– m times m
COWBOY BOOTS
POLYESTER SHIRTS $8.95
SILVER JEWELRY, WATCHES
HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
TV MOVIE RENTALS
OVERALLS-ARMY
☆KIDS LEVIS 5.00 .
Dm DERM0TS
1436 NE 163rd St. *940-1587
MON-SAT 9:30-7:30* SUN By Appt Only
54
arid Cuarteto Cubano
. .the greatest pianist I have heard in
more than a decade.”
Dizzy Gillespie, 1989
WEDNESDAY
APRIL 10th, 8:00PM
Gusman Center
Traccr^AgTTgg? 358-5885
Gusman Box Office 372-0925
United
Continued from page 33
and top church officials. UNITE seeks
Wenski’s counsel and encouragement con¬
cerning its campaign. And while he’s not
directly concerned with the church’s nurs¬
ing home operations, he can influence poli¬
cymaking at the homes. UNITE’s ultimate
goal is simply to build support within the
archdiocese for what the union contends
has always been the church’s pro-union
position. Enough support, in fact, that the
archdiocese would agree to voluntarily rec¬
ognize UNITE as bargaining agent for the
nursing home employees, instead of the
union taking the more direct, antagonistic
approach of petitioning for an election.
Russo and her staff have opted for this tac¬
tic even after having signed up 65 percent of
Villa Maria’s workers by early March.
“The Catholic Church has some responsi¬
bility to the community, unlike private cor¬
porations where there are no such expecta¬
tions,” explains Russo. “The archdiocese is
a nonprofit institution, and we need to make
them accountable to the community. We
feel optimistic they would respect workers’
rights to organize.”
However, in recent weeks it became evi¬
dent that the archdiocese would not be as
receptive as the union had hoped. After
some workers and organizers expressed
impatience at the slow pace of the cam¬
paign, and after the archdiocese hired
Kunkel, Miller & Hament, the Tampa-based
union-busting law firm, the union stepped
up its activity. In a letter and a video distrib¬
uted to Villa Maria employees, past and pre¬
sent statements by Catholic leaders, includ¬
ing Pope John Paul II, endorse the
worthiness of unions and the right of work¬
ers to form them. Additionally, UNITE has
distributed to parishes a petition that quotes
the same pronouncements and concludes,
“We join with the U.S. Bishops who believe
these teachings of our Church also apply to
workers in Catholic institutions such as
[name of the home] owned by the Catholic
Archdiocese of Miami.”
But UNITE still has not petitioned the
NLRB for a vote. Cassandra Davis, lead
organizer at Villa Maria, admits to being
somewhat apprehensive when she learns
that two ex-labor organizers who now con¬
sult for Kunkel, Miller & Hament have
begun meeting with workers at the home;
not only that, but she’s concerned about
steps management has taken to pacify long¬
standing employee grievances, such as
removing an unpopular supervisor. Both
are classic moves companies use to derail
unions. “I’ve never run a campaign lasting
this long,” Davis worries. “These guys are
getting ready to knock us out of the box if
we don’t take some kind of action. Some of
the women [workers] say, T don’t want to
go against the archdiocese like that’ I say,
‘Listen, the archdiocese is not Jesus Christ
and they don’t walk on water.’ ”
Even as Davis, Russo, and Villa Maria
CNAs were preparing to meet with church
officials, UNITE organizing teams were
gearing up for elections at Hebrew Home
and Palm Garden, and making plans to
organize other area nursing homes. The
NLRB has set a March 21 election date for
Hebrew Home, and workers from other
homes, including Villa Maria, are volunteer-
ing to help with the campaign there.
Meanwhile, no one expects either an elec¬
tion or voluntary recognition of UNITE at
Villa Maria in the immediate future. “The
momentum takes us a different way each
day,” Russo enthuses. “We have different
time lines, a different rhythm for each home
we’re concentrating on, but it’s all part of
the bigger picture, which includes the
whole [nursing home] industry.” CQ
''Best Consignment Shop"
•New Times 1995
Liz, Claiborne jjlgfc
Perry Ellis .
Christian pSrarE*?
Cafyin Klein ^
Carole Little , *
Ann Taylor... \ \
I
Whether it's vinta casual ,and formed wear we Hhve it all!
Quality Consignment Clothing and
Accessories for Men & Women
fabulous Finds
Of MIAMI m A C H
1216 NcmifciigSy Dr. • Miami Bfeach 861-5299
Discover
your inner
knowledge
and find
your true
strength.
THOUSANDS OF YEARS OF
KNOWLEDGE - REVEALED.
KABBALAH
Free Introductory Lecture
Sunday, March 17,7:00pm
(English/Spanish)
(305) 692-9223
The Kabbalah ^ Learning Centre
Established 1922 Jerusalem
Director: Rabbi Berg
At the Promenade Shoppes
20695 Biscayne Boulevard, Aventura

SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
By Pregnant Women May Result in Fetal
Injury, Premature Birth, And Low Birth Weight.

New Timas March 14 â–  20,1996
The National Ballet of S|iain spins legends on Thursday
Jerry Lewis beats the devil out of Damn Yankees on Tuesday
National Ballet of Spain: One of Spain’s
top dance ensembles takes the
stage tonight at 8:00 at the Jackie
Gleason Theatre of the Performing
Arts (1700 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach). Presenting pieces set to the music of
great Spanish composers and to traditional
popular songs, the National Ballet of Spain
captures its nation’s passion and color in an
explosion of rhythm and movement Tie pro¬
gram features José Granero’s intense Leyen¬
da and sensual Bolero, artistic director Victo¬
ria Eugenia’s energetic Oración del Torero
and Chacona, and Curillo and Mila de Var¬
gas’s flamenco-inspired A Ritmo y a Compás.
Tickets range from $25 to $45. Performances
continue tomorrow through Saturday at 8:00,
with matinees Saturday at 2:00 and Sunday at
3:00. Call 673-7300. (GC)
Italian Renaissance festival: The garden of Villa
Vizcaya (3251 S. Miami Ave.) will be filled
with the lively sights and sounds of the Fif¬
teenth Century as it hosts the fourteenth
annual Italian Renaissance Festival this week¬
end. More than 250 costumed actors will
roam the grounds portraying commedia
dell’arte characters, while jugglers, minstrels,
and the flag-throwing team of Sbandieratori
del Palio d’Asti provide entertainment. The
festival runs from 10:00 to 5:00 through Sun¬
day. Admission is ten dollars (half-price for
38 kids under age twelve). Call 250-9133. (GC)
SOM Miami Expo: More than 50 art galleries
and dealers from the U.S., Australia, Eng¬
land, and Mexico offer three-dimensional art¬
works in a wide variety of media at the sec¬
ond annual Sculpture, Objects, and
Functional Art (SOFA) Exposition, taking
place at the Coconut Grove Convention Cen¬
ter (2700 S. Bayshore Dr.) through Sunday.
Among the works on view are folkloric pieces
by Mexican-American brothers Einar and
Jamex De La Torre. Throughout the event,
gallery owners, museum curators, and artists
will conduct lectures about jewelry and
ceramics. Admission is $10 ($16 for a three-
day pass). Expo hours are 11:00 to 8:00 today
and tomorrow, and noon to 6:00 on Sunday.
Call 800-561-SOFA (GC)
Dade County Vbuth Fair: The Dade County
Youth Fair and Exposition (10901 Coral Way)
returns with a new look and more attractions.
With twenty additional acres of land, the fair
features a revamped front entrance for
improved access (forget those red and yellow
gates!), a new Kiddieland, two renovated exhi¬
bition halls, and additional carnival rides. Fair-
goers can also enjoy live Latin and country
music and dancing, a children’s musical star¬
ring nine-foot puppets, an ice-skating revue,
wildlife and high-dive shows, and laser dis¬
plays, as well as arts and crafts and agricultur¬
al and horticultural exhibits. Admission is
seven dollars for adults, five dollars for kids
under age twelve. Fair hours are 3:00 p.m. to
11:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10:00
a.m. to 11:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday
through March 31. Call 2236070. (GC)
li—1 Waiting for Godot. In 1956 the Coconut
11 v Grove Playhouse (3500 Main Hwy.)
I opened its doors with the American
ri I premiere of Irish playwright Samuel
Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. Tonight
at 8:00 the Playhouse marks its 40th anniver¬
sary with a revival of the avante-garde work
considered by many to be the watershed of
modem drama. Reni Santoni (who plays the
recurring characters Poppi on Seinfeld and
Archie Solomon on NYPD Blue) and Luis
Avalos star in the roles of Estragón and
Vladimir, respectively. Tickets cost $35 for
Friday and Saturday nights, and $30 for
shows from Tuesday through Thursday, on
Sunday, and for all matinees. Performances
run through March 31. Call 442-4000 for
times and reservations. (GC)
Jackson Browne: Good politics don’t always
make for good albums, and no one knows
this better than Jackson Browne (well,
maybe Little Steven does, but who wants to
ask?). After releasing who knows how many
albums of slogan-slinging political dogma,
Browne has come out with Looking East,
returning to what he knows best mopey, self-
absorbed love songs. Of course, good as they
are, none of them can top quintessential loser
ballads such as “These Days,” “For a
Dancer,” and “Fountain of Sorrow.” Really, it
doesn’t matter: Any respite from the likes of
“I Am a Patriot’ is welcome, and most people
will be happy with the inevitable encore per¬
formance of “Running On Empty.” Browne
will be mixing the old and the new tonight at
7:30 at the Sunrise Musical Theatre (5555
NW 95th Ave.) with opening act Vonda Shep¬
ard. Tickets cost $25 and $35. Call 741-7300
for more information. OF)
Cirque Ingénieux: The circus enters the 21st
Century with Cirque Ingénieux, a perfor¬
mance troupe that combines new-age music,
colorful costumes, and state-of-the-art light¬
ing effects with pantomime, contortion, and
acrobatic innovation for a dreamlike produc¬
tion that departs from the traditional circus
concept; they call it “theatre of the imagina¬
tion.” The Cirque takes over the Parker Play¬
house (707 NE Eighth St, Fort Lauderdale)
tonight through Sunday at 8:00, with 2:00
matinees tomorrow and Sunday. The produc¬
tion features a special performance by
Mylaine Mays, a nine-year-old South Florida
girl who is HIV-positive. Tickets cost $35 and
$50 (proceeds benefit the Children’s AIDS
Network). Call 764-0700.(GC)
e Conjunto Cespedes: More spiritual
leader than frontwoman, Gladys
“Bobi” Cespedes combines Santería
chants with the syncopated dance
rhythms of son. At times somber, at
times celebratory, Cespedes’s rich singing
conveys the AfroTuban duality of her native

â–¡ Damn Yankees: Legendary comic
actor Jerry Lewis puts in the most
1 devilish performance of his career as
he stars in the National Touring
Company’s production of Damn
Yankees, which opens tonight at 8:00 at the
Jackie Gleason Theatre of the Performing
Arts (1700 Washington Ave., Miami Beach).
After more than 50 years in show biz, Lewis
made his Broadway debut last year in the the
role of Mr. Applegate (the Prince of Dark¬
ness in disguise). Performances continue
tomorrow through Saturday at 8:00, and Sun¬
day at 7:00, with 2:00 matinees on Saturday
and Sunday. Ticket prices range from $32 to
$47. Call 673-7300. (GC)
Wednesday
Robert Thiele: Robert Thiele is not
exactly a painter or a sculptor, but
rather an artistic hybrid. He cov¬
ers his small, oddly shaped can¬
vas objects and his works on
paper with strongly concentrated paints to
create intimate, brightly colored gems. His
brush strokes lend both his two- and three-
dimensional works texture and movement.
Thiele’s works are on view at Fredric Snitzer
Gallery (1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral
Gables) through March 27. Admission is free.
Gallery hours are 10:00 to 5:00 from Tuesday
through Saturday. Call 448-8976. (GC)
IllHi ffmHiffftPO
to a memorable visual crescendo in the now-
famous hall of mirrors scene. To fully appre¬
ciate the film, one should see it on the big
screen. Hey, you’re in luck. Today at noon
Cinema Vortex will show The Lady from
Shanghai at the Alliance Cinema (927 Lin¬
coln Rd., Miami Beach). Admission is four
dollars. Call 531-8504. (MY)
Conjunto Cespedes plays Cuban soul muslo on Saturday
Cirque Ingénleux sends In the clowns on Friday
| Ray Fisher: Photographer Ray Fisher
J has spent 50 years capturing the
Q' % images of hundreds of the world’s
I most notable individuals. In addi-
—J tion to snapping shots of everyone
from boxer Joe Louis (while Fisher was still
in high school) to Gen. George Patton
(while Fisher was working as a combat pho¬
tographer in the Signal Corps) to boxer
Muhammad Ali and Fidel Castro (while
Fisher was free-lancing for Time), Fisher
has also photographed Miami’s best and
brightest. “Miami’s Movers and Shakers,”
on view at the Historical Museum of South¬
ern Florida (101 W. Flagler St.) through
April 7, features 121 portraits of entertain¬
ers, sports figures, politicians, businesspeo¬
ple, and other citizens who have shaped
Miami since the Forties. Museum hours are
10:00 to 5:00 from Monday through Satur¬
day (to 9:00 on Thursday), and noon to 5:00
on Sunday. Admission is four dollars for
adults, two dollars for kids under twelve.
Call 375-1492. (GC)
The Calendar is written by
Judy Cantor,
Georgina Cárdenas, John Fioyd,
and Michael Yockel.
For more listings, turn the page
On Friday, Jackson Browne sings songs of love and politics
culture: This is Cuban soul music. Bobi —
who left Cuba for California in 1960—found¬
ed Conjunto Cespedes in 1981 along with her
brother Luis and her nephew Guillermo.
Since then the group has expanded to
include twelve musicians (they hail from all
over the place — U.S., Chile, El Salvador,
Puerto Rico, Mexico, and Cuba). Una Sola
Casa and Vivito y Coleando, their two albums
on Xenophile Records, have garnered inter¬
national critical acclaim. Hear why tonight at
8:00 when Conjunto Cespedes performs out¬
doors, courtesy of the Miami Light Project,
on the roof of the Sony Building (605 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach). Admission is $18. Before
the concert, at 6:00, ticket holders are invited
to partake of free dance lessons and cock¬
tails. Earlier in the day, take the kids to the
Center for the Fine Arts (101W. Flagler St)
for a family concert by Conjunto at 11:30 a.m.
Tickets cost three dollars for kids and seven
dollars for adults. For more information call
531-3747. (IC)
Sister Machine Gun: Sister Machine Gun’s
third album Burn is possibly one of 1995’s
most aptly titled records. Led by former Wax
Trax! Records mailroom boy and one-time
Die Warzau keyboardist Chris Randall, Sister
Machine Gun is at the forefront of the new
industrial movement, incorporating funk,
soul, and noise into a solid, darkly aggressive
electronic mix. Tonight SMG sears the stage
at Nemesis (627 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Laud¬
erdale) with labelmates Gravity Kills opening
the show. Admission is eight dollars. Show¬
time is 12:30 a.m. Call 768-9222. (GC)
Maynard Ferguson: No one will ever accuse
Maynard Ferguson of being the most subtle
trumpet man on the planet, but what he may
lack in stylistic nuance he compensates for
by the sheer power of his playing. He’s been
blowing the hell out of trumpets — and
fltigelhoms, baritone horns, and valve trom¬
bones — since the late Forties, when he per¬
formed with the big bands of Boyd Raeburn
and Stan Kenton. After recording some tra¬
ditional jazz offerings in the Fifties and Six¬
ties, Ferguson ventured into pop and jazz-
rock, releasing a string of popular albums
that includes Carnival and two M.F. Horn
sets. These days Ferguson’s fronting his
Big Bop Nouveau Band, which will be play¬
ing tonight at the Coral Gables Congrega¬
tional Church (3010 DeSoto Blvd.) at 8:00.
Tickets cost $20 and $25. Call 448-7421 for
more information. QF)
Hialeah Park: The old gray mare ain’t
what she used to be, and yet Hialeah
Park remains one of the nation’s
great thoroughbred racetracks, not
so much for the caliber of its sport,
which has diminished in recent years, but
rather for the sheer grandness of the place.
Simply by existing, it pays mute tribute to a
time when horse racing enjoyed an elevated
status in our collective consciousness. Dur¬
ing its 1996 season, which opens today and
runs through May 22, Hialeah Park (2200 E.
Fourth Ave., Hialeah) will host a bevy of
important stakes and handicap races, includ¬
ing the Widener (March 23), the Flamingo
(April 6), and the Hialeah Turf Cup (April
20). Post time for the first race each day is
1:15. Admission is four dollars (clubhouse)
and two dollars (grandstand) on weekends,
two dollars (clubhouse) and one dollar
(grandstand) on weekdays. Call 885-8000 for
more information. (MY)
Are You There?'. Mojazz Cafe (928 71st St.,
Miami Beach), the area’s premiere jazz
club, makes the move into theater with a
production of Are You There? A Hip History
Lesson Based on the Words and Stories of
Lord Buckley. Off-Broadway actor and come¬
dian Frank Speiser (best known for his one-
man show The World of Lenny Bruce) stars
as “Lord” Richard Merrill Buckley, a satiric
comedian who appeared regularly on the
Steve Allen Show and the Ed Sullivan Show
in the Forties and Fifties, in this bebop cele¬
bration of comedy, history, and Beat poetry.
Tickets cost ten dollars for a table, seven for
a seat at the bar. Showtimes are 8:30 and
10:30. Call 865-2636. (GC)
The Lady from Shanghai. Orson Welles pro¬
duced, directed, scripted, and starred in this
quirky 1947 murder mysteiy about an Irish¬
man (Welles) who hooks up with a married
couple (Rita Hayworth and Everett Sloane)
on a Pacific cruise. But for many cineastes,
the film’s charms lie not in its story line, but
instead in cinematographer Charles Lawton,
Jr.’s atmospheric camerawork, which builds
I
i
i
St
i

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
I â– â– â– â– â– **]
Are you still
hanging around
on
waiting to get (
the Internet?
Sign on with Safari Internet. While other online services
have as many as 20 subscribers per modem, Safari has a
low subscriber to modem ratio, so you can get on right
away. Our state-of-the-art equipment makes Safari's
service one of the fastest, most reliable and available.
We offer unlimited access to the Internet for just
$24.95 per month. Safari Internet also offers:
•The most preferred software,Netscape Navigator
Personal Edition free; a $39.95 retail value.
• Free seminars to help learn how to get on and
use the Internet.
• No hourly fees or surcharges.
• No setup fee.
• Your own E-mail address.
• Space for your personal web page.
• Maximum reliability.
• More than 5,000 Usenet news groups.
• User friendly graphical interface, just point and click.
So what are you hanging around for? Sign on right away with Safari Internet. Call (954)537-9550.
1149 N. Federal Hwy.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304
Voice: (954^537-9550
(800)411-8167
sales@safari.net
STRATOGEN HEALTH
OF
MIAMI BEACH
comprehensive and compassionate
medical treatment and care
for
HIV/AIDS
Lori Bell, Acupuncture Physician
Fabian Escobar, Licensed Massage Therapist
Tom Fought, R.N., B.S.N., Clinical Coordinator
Patrece Frisbee, Doctor of Chiropractic
Susan Luck, R.N., Health Educator
Joseph Piperato, M.D., Primary Care Physician
David Schmitt, M.D., Medical Director
Melanie Walgren, R.D., L.D.N., Nutritionist
Stratogen Health of Miami Beach
300 Arthur Godfrey Road, Suite 200
Miami Beach, Florida
305-538-1400
SUPERCUTS
$2.00
OFF
Reg. $10.00
Valid only at
Miami Beach Location
14th dhd Washington
531-8575
OPEN 7 DAYS
Call Ahead Service
Not valid with any other offer
exp. 3/96
We accept dll competitors coupons
One of the folk scenes most talented writers...
CHRISTINE
LAVIN
returns to Bailey Hall with an evening of her
insightful and humorous story-songs.
March 22 • 8pm • Tickets $ 16
Enjoy a delicious TONY ROMA'S chicken
& rib dinner at Bailey Hall before the IbNYROMAS
show. Only $7.50 with purchase of one (-famous rm ribs-)
adult ticket.
BOX OFFICE (954)475-6884
nr PAT T • (305) 358-5885
Ur 1,/ILL. (305) 523-3309
AvMed
BROWARD
| COMMUNITY
COUEGE
1AILLY
3501 Southwest Davie Road, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33314
r awp i AQ/ Bring this ad to the box office for a 10% discount to any evening performance.
9iAw C lw/0 Limit 4 tickets per show. Not accepted atTicketMaster outlets.
Laser Treatment for
Wrinkles & Facial scars
Cosmetic Skin Resurfacing
with the revolutionary
ULTRAPULSE CARBON
DIOXIDE LASER***
the scientific answer for wrinkled,
scarred, sun damaged skin.
YOUR SKIN CAN LOOK BETTER
Free consultation.
Lance P. Raiffe, M.D.
Diplómate
American Board of Plastic Surgery
4302 Alton Road, Suite 620, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
305.538.8658
38

m
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, Mew Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. Items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Music
Thursday March 14
Bayfront Park After Dark: The Miami Lakes High School
Band performs favorite tunes. Free. 6:30 p.m. South
End Amphitheater, 301 Biscayne Blvd; 358-7550.
Dora Koutelas: Young soprano Koutelas performs works
by Schubert, Wolfj R Strauss, Puccini, Verdi, and
Wagner, among others. Free. 7:30 p.m. MDCC
Wolfeon Campus auditorium, 300 NE 2nd Ave;
758-8701.
Lively Lunchtime Music Series: Lunchtime on Lincoln
Road takes a musical turn with weekly concerts;
today’s program features internationally renowned
Latin jazz pianist Paquito Hechavarria and the Heart
Quartet Free. Noon. Lincoln Road and Euclid Avenue,
Miami Beach; 531-3442.
Montreal Symphony Orchestra: Viola player Yuri Bashmet
joins music director Charles Dutoit and the orch to
perform Adams’s Short Ride in a Fast Machine and
Mahler’s Symphony no. 1 in D major (Titan), among
other selections; WTMI-FM (88.1) program director
Lyn Farmer will lead a pre-concert discussion about
“Post-Romantic Progression*’ at 7:15. $20-$70. Concert
begins at 8:00 p.m. Dade County Auditorium, 2901W
Flagler St; 532-3491.
NWSA Jazz Combo: The New World School of the Arts’s
jazz ensemble performs favorite selections. Noon.
Free. 1221 Brickell, 1221 Brickell Ave; 536-1221.
A Page of Ellington: Jazz vocalist Ronnie WeQs and the
Nathan Page Quintet perform favorite songs by Duke
Ellington. $20.8:00 p.m. 110 Tower, 110 SE 6th St, 7th
fl, Ft Lauderdale; 524-0805.
Symphony of the Americas: Violinist Christos Galileas and
guest conductor Kosmas Galileas join the orch to
perform Paganini’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra,
Dvofák’s Symphony no. 9 (From the New World), plus
a premiere work by a Greek composer. $19.8:15 p.m.
Broward Center, 201SW 5th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
561-5882.
Friday, March 15
Jackson Browne: See “Calendar.”
Arturo Fuente: Flamenco guitarist Fuente performs as
part of the CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 7:00 p.m.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove; 444-0777.
The H Hites: The campus’s show chorus performs songs
from Runyon’s Guys and Dolls and other works. $7.
Noon and 8:00 p.m. Lehman Theatre, MDCC North
Campus, 11380 NW 27th Ave; 237-1431.
Magda Hiller: This local vocalist—voted “Best Solo
Vocalist” by New Times for three years running—
performs bluesy, gutsy originals. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Borders Books and Music, 19925 Biscayne Blvd,
Aventura; 9354X127.
The Uffey Folk: James Kelly, Patrick Kelleghan, and
Jennie Klein perform Irish songs. Free. Tonight at 8:00
at Borders Book Shop (9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800)
and tomorrow at 2:00 at Barnes & Noble Bookstore
(7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292).
NWSA Rute Quartet The New World School of the Arts’s
flute ensemble performs classical selections. Noon.
Free. One Brickell, 801 Brickell Ave; 667-0808.
Opera Master Class: Soprano Evelyn Lear and baritone
Thomas Stewart offer a two-hour class on vocal
techniques, body language, and interpretation. Free.
7:30 p.m. Arturo di Filippi Education^ Center, 1200
Coral Way, 854-1643.
Nicole Yarling: Local violinist Yarling performs tonight at
9:00 at Borders Books and Music (2240 E Sunrise
Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 954-5660358) and Wednesday at
7:00 as part of the free CocoWalk Concert Series at
CocoWalk (3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove;
4440777).
Saturday, March 16
Billy Ross Quartet The quartet performs as part of the
Jazz and Java series. $8.8:00 p.m. Art and Culture
Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St, Hollywood;
921-3274.
Blues Express: This blues band performs as part of the
CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 7:00 p.m. CocoWalk,
3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove; 444-0777.
Copjunto Cespedes: See “Calendar.”
Maynard Ferguson: See “Calendar.”
New World Symphony: Guest conductor-cellist Lynn
Harrell leads the orch to perform Berlioz’s Roman
Carnival Overture, Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C major,
and Beethoven’s Symphony no. 2 in D major. $16$43.
Tonight at 8:00 and tomorrow at 3.*00 p.m. Lincoln
Theatre, 555 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 673-3331.
AMs Pheromone: Palm Beach-based singer-songwriter-
guitarist Pheromone performs original tunes for kids
and adults alike. Free. 2:00 p.m. Miami Lakes Branch
library, 6699 Windmill Gate Rd, Miami Lakes;
822-6520.
Richard Brookens and Yellow Bell: This band combines
the latest musical technology with traditional ethnic
folk instruments for an eclectic sound. Free. 9:00 p.m.
Borders Books and Music, 3390 Mary St, Coconut
Grove; 444-2907.
Sister Machine Gun: See “Calendar.”
Ricky Skaggs: Country star Skaggs performs his hit
bluegrass-inspired tunes. $16$18.2:00 and 8:00 p.m.
Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 5555 N Federal
Hwy, Ft Lauderdale; 806987-9818.
Werther.The Florida Grand Opera presents jules
Massenet’s tragic tale of love and loss set in the late
Eighteenth Century (performed in French with
projected English translations). $18-$100. Tonight and
Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Dade County Auditorium, 2901W
Flagler St; 854-7890.
Sunday; March 17
Davis and Dow: Julie Davis and Kelly Dow perform lively
jazz selections as part of the CocoWalk Concert Series.
Free. 1:00 p.m. CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut
Grove; 4440777.
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
Lupine Return
^-i Packs of wolves, which
have been seen roaming
A the French Alps after a 60-
By Steve Newman
year absence, are causing tension
between animal lovers and farmers
who fear for the safety of their live¬
stock. Seventeen wolves have been
counted in four areas of the French
maritime Alps since the animals first
reappeared in the region in 1992.
Scientists believe the wolves
were lured from neighboring Italy
(where their numbers are estimated
to be about 400) by easy prey,
including deer, chamois and wild
boar. But farmers say the wolves
also attack sheep and have been
spotted on the outskirts of villages
during cold snaps in the mountains.
The French government is trying to
determine “where the wolf will be
welcome, and where it won’t be.”
Chernobyl Danger
Ukraine warned that the
damaged nuclear reactor
buried in concrete at Cher¬
nobyl might explode unless mea¬
sures are taken to secure it. The
Interfax news agency reported that
Environment Minister Yuri Kostenko
said heat migrating from the nuclear
fuel in the reactor could build to a
critical level, causing “a thermic
explosion” with large quantities of
radioactive material sent into the
atmosphere. Kostenko said the
country does not have the resources
to deal with the situation, and needs
massive international aid.
Floods
n Torrential rains in Java
caused heavy flooding that
swept through two-thirds of
the central Pekalongan district, forc¬
ing 18,000 people from their homes.
Months of drought in Ecuador
ended with torrential rains and flash
floods in the south of the country that
killed at least seven people. The
inundations caused 60 homes to
collapse, and swamped farmland.
W, Australia 1 §£| \
For the week ending
March 8, 1996
.©1996 Chronicle Features
7
Earthquakes
Swarms of sharp earth¬
quakes shook parts of
Central America, causing
panic in capital cities, and killing one
child in northwest Nicaragua. Some
temblors were soundly felt in Man¬
agua and San Jose, as well as in
many other smaller communities.
Earth movements were also felt
in eastern Indonesia’s Biak Island
aftershock zone, Taiwan, eastern
and western parts of Japan,
Alaska’s Kodiak Island and in Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands.
Hokkaido Plume
~~mm Mount Komagatake
Jl erupted over Japan’s
northernmost Hokkaido
Island for the first time in 54 years,
prompting local villagers to flee the
area. Vulcanologists do not believe
that the small eruption, which
ejected a plume of white ash 500
feet above the crater, is a sign of an
impending explosive eruption.
Komagatake last erupted harm¬
lessly during 1942, but killed 20 peo¬
ple during a violent eruption in 1856.
Tropical Storm
Typhoon Flossy veered
suddenly to the south over
the open waters of the
Indian Ocean, missing all land
areas. It had been feared that the
storm would bring another round of
high winds and heavy rains to
cyclone-weary Madagascar.
Record Winter
Two more waves of heavy
snow in the northeastern
U.S. put the season’s
snowfall totals over record levels in
several locations. The 13th winter
snowstorm topped New York City’s
previous record of 63.2 inches, set
during the winter of 1946-47.
Another dumping of heavy snow
in Ukraine cut off dozens of towns,
disrupted the shaky national power
grid and blocked major roads. This
has been the country’s harshest
winter in decades.
Toad Invasion
>i
A plague of toads in central
Bolivia caused widespread
panic during the last 10
days of February, according to press
reports from La Paz. Three villages
near Cochabamba were overrun by
thousands of the amphibians, and
farmers in the area reportedly feel
that the onslaught is a sign of
impending tragedy. Radio reports
from the villages of Vinto, San Jorge
and Viloma said that the main road
connecting the region with La Paz is
coated with a thick layer of dead
toads, and that the stench is unbear¬
able. Children are said to be terrified
by the toads and unable to sleep.
Experts believe that weeks of
drought has forced the toads out of
their usual habitats into farmland in
search of water.
Additional Sources: U.S. Climate Analysis
Center, U.S. Earthquake Information Center
and the World Meteorological Organization.
~ CENTER
EUROPEAN SYSTEM
'Titulo A Cfneial
TCair fQtmtuttr Speeiaihii
Hair Today... Gone Tomorrow!
The Most Innovative
Permanent Hair
Removal System!
• Application of Gel
• 20 Minutes of Biothermal Application
• 8-15 Sessions
• Any Area of Face or Body
• Emerge Completely Hairless
• It's Forever
Permanent Hair Removal
5% OFF
|Any Individual Item exp 3/3i/96j
The Most Successful
EUROPEAN WAXING
System is Available ONLY at
Unikwax Center
• Painless Waxing
•15 Minutes
• Face or Body
• Special Waxes For Different Skin Types
• Ingrown Hair Treatments
[Ladies or Men European Waxing^
! 10% OFF !
^ Any Individual Waxing exp 3/31/96 j
1370 Washington Ave., Suite 302
Miami Beach • 531-7777
(Entrance on 14th Street)
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

Hew Times March 14 â–  20,1086
Carol E. Weingrod
M.D. P.A.
Diplómate American Board of
Psychiatry & Neurology
Specializing in
Anxiety
Depression
Sleep
Problems
Weight
Problems
Chemical
Dependency
Sc
Attention
Deficit Disorder
The Utmost
in Caring
Confidentiality
is Guaranteed.
975 41 st Street
Suite 308
Miami Beach
673-3101
GUARANTEED
BEST SKATE PRICE
INTOWN
Famous for our kids 50%
trade-in allowance
FREE LESSONS- Sundays tOam-Noon
S â– â–  sM SlrfllM* wl
10%OFF
al Skates***
afl Wheels** â– 
al Protective
I
Gear** I
â– 
jExp. «3096
The
Body...
THAT
DIETED A THOUSAND TIMES
WALKED COUNTLESS MILES
OVERINDULGED
WORKED OUT
WORKED OUT
WORKED OUT
Can Be Resculpted
For Consultation Call
Sam Gershenbaum, D.o.
Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery
One Turnberry Place, Aventura
933-1838
LIPOSUCTION
TUMMY TUCK
BREAST SURGERY
COSMETIC SURGERY
OF THE NOSE
EYELID SURGERY
FACELIFT
LASER SURGERY
COLLAGEN
SKIN CARE
Maryei Epps: Gospel chanteuse Epps performs as part
of the CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 8:00 p.m.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove;
4440777.
Robert Rozolc Florida Philharmonic violinist Rozek
performs favorite selections. $5.2:30 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274.
SL Patrick's Day in the Garden: Florida Philharmonic
cellist Robert Moore and his string quartet perform
traditional Irish melodies. $13.3:00 p.m. Fairchild
Tropical Garden, 10901 Old Cutler Rd; 667-1651.
Singout In the Park: Grab your guitar, harmonica, or
other acoustic thing and share your original works or
just sit back and listen. Free. 1:00 p.m. Secret Woods
Nature Center, 2701W SR 84, Ft Lauderdale;
563-3328.
Tuesday, March 19
Full Power Jazz Trio: Bobby Ramirez and his group
perform contemporary Latin jazz and R&B as part of
the CocoWalk Concert Series. Free. 7:00 p.m.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove;
444-0777.
Wednesday, March 20
Florida Philharmonic Orchestra: Conductor James Judd
leads trumpeter Jaffrey Kaye and the orch to perform
Rossini’s La Scala di Seta Overture, Aratunian’s
Trumpet Concerto, and Rachmaninoffs Symphony
no. 2. $15-$60.8:00 pjn. Broward Center, 201SW 5th
Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 930-1812.
Theater
Aladdin and the Lamp: Aladdin meets the Genie in this
children’s version of the story from One Thousand and
One Arabian Nights. Ongoing. Matinee Saturday at
2:00. Stage Door Theater, 8036 W Sample Rd, Coral
Springs; 344-7765.
All in the Timing: David Ives’s witty, modem, and brain-
challenging collection of she one-act comedies. They
include Sure Thing, about two people who attempt to
get to know each other after meeting in a cafe;
Variations onihe Death of Trotsky, in which the
doomed Russian revolutionary copes with an ax he’s
discovered lodged in his head; and Philip Glass Buys a
Loaf of Bread, wherein the well-known minimalist
composer suffers from angst while in a bakery.
Through April 14. Evening performances Wednesday
through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinee
Sunday, April 7, and Sunday, April 14, at 2:00. Acme
Acting Company, Little Stage, 2100 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 576-7500.
Broadway: The Music of the '80s and '90s: John Raitt and
Jo Sullivan host a tribute to recent Broadway
musicals, including Cats, Crazy for You, Dream Girls,
and La Cage aux Folies. March 16 and 17. Evening
performance Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00.
North Miami Beach Performing Arts Center, 17011
NE 19th Ave, North Miami Beach; 929-6913.
Carousel: Reviewed in this issue. Rodgers and
Hammerstein’s poignant and melancholy musical tale
of Julie Jordan's ill-fated marriage to the irresponsible
Billy Bigelow, and the daughter he left behind when
he died. A dark and brooding revival by British
director Nicholas Hytner. March 12 through 17.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees Wednesday, Saturday,
and Sunday at 2:00. Kravis Center for the Performing
Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach;
407-832-7469.
Conversations with My Father Unremarkable
production of Herb Gardner’s cloyingly sentimental
1991 effort to explore the bonds between fathers and
sons. Through March 17. Evening performances
Wednesday through Saturday at 8:00; matinees
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00. Off
Broadway Theatre, 1444 NE 26th St, Ft Lauderdale;
5660554.
The Convertible Girl: Rod Goldman, who is Jewish, and
his live-in Catholic girlfriend Christina Donatelli
wrangle over kids, marriage, commitment, and
religion in this Daniel (brother of Neil) Simon
comedy. Through March 17. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday at 8:00; matinees
Wednesday and Sunday at 2:00. Broward Stage Door
Theatre, 8036 W Sample Rd, Coral Springs; 3447765.
Courage and the Magic Mirror Denise de Dragon must
find her courage in time to save the troubled kingdom
of WizzleWazzle Wuzzle Wuz in this children’s
musical performed by adults and written and directed
by James Michael March 16 through 30. Morning
performances Saturday at 11:00. Hollywood
Playhouse, 2640 Washington St, Hollywood; 9220404.
Damn Yankees: See “Calendar.” Funnyman Jerry Lewis
stars as the Devil in this hit Broadway revival which
features tunes such as “Whatever Lola Wants (Lola
Gets)” and “You Gotta Have Heart” March 19 to 24.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00, Sunday at 700; matinees Saturday and Sunday at
2:00. Jackie Gleason Center for the Performing Arts,
1700 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 673-7300.
Death and the Maiden: Ariel Dorfrnan’s searing political
drama about power and revenge. In Colombia, a
woman who was tortured for months while
blindfolded hears the voice of her former torturer in
her living room—her husband has brought home a
stranger who helped him change the flat tire on his
car. Through March 17. Evening performances
Friday through Sunday at 7:00. Imazari
Entertainment, RSC Respectable Street, 218 Española
Way, Miami Beach; 4464906.
Fish or Gut Bait A comedy by John Holleman about two
men stranded on a desert island who search for food
and water, wait for help, ponder the meaning of life,
and encounter a Danish sailor named Inga. Through
March 31. Evening performances Wednesday
Life in
Heuw
©m6
GROEJttNG
/pots Wl rlAkfcpN
l &OM ARouSfc /
\90V»/
E#
— Ü
91^
i
l
i
r
f KlOT A
1 RtACU'O.I
/wait a secT\
1 I F0C60T I
ISomethhogU
f, fa \
a
/ooh\
U.A PA.1
:

BOULEVARD BAR & GRILL • BIGA BAKERY • PUCCI PIZZA • VIRTUA CAFE
€ *1
NEXT WEEKEND!
The 9th Annual
Taste of the Beach
Saturday & Sunday, March 23rd & 24th
Hours: Sat. I1am-10pm â–  Sun. 11am-9pm
South Pointe Park, Miami Beach
ADMISSION!
ip
safe
Ü
Complimentary Shuttle from the
Following Lots:
17th Street Garage (17th &, Meridian).
17th Street & Washington Avenue.
18th Street & Washington Avenue
(behind City Hall).
Additional parking available at Collins Avenue & 7th &
14th Streets and at Southpointe Park.
rijMÉM
Live Continuous Entertainment on the
â– The Best of Miami
Beach Restaurants
â– Chef
Demonstrations
â– Ice Sculpting
â– Farmer's Market
â– Health & Fitness
Pavilion
â– Virtual Reality
â– Special Family
Area
fREPt
m stage
SATURDAY. 3/23
8:00pm
The Legendary WAR
6:30pm INHOUSE
m Also Miami 5-0
BIG 106
SUNDAY. 3/24
4:00pm
Jazz Extraordinaries
SPYRO GYRA
. Also, Dave Valentin Band,
Ed Calle & Terrance Blanchard
An Event for the Body, Mind & Soul
UEANNE’S MARKET • LES DEUX FONTAINES • HOTEL ASTOR • FOLIA

New Times March 14 - 20.1996
MARCH 15. 16, 17
PARKER PLAYHOUSE, FT. LAUDERDALE
Hollywood Productions
Fridays PRESENTS-
Saurday
Evening
Performances
SOLD
OUT
THEATRE OF THE IMAGINATION
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
THE EVOLUTION GROUP, INC.
BENEFITING:
Childrens Aids network National
C.A.N.N
CALL TICKETMASTER f 305.523.3309
11»PETERW.BUSCH K||j]fJQ ,/rj. Ackdfe?
Family Foundation I > II â–  Il|/UU O MOTOROLA Qutdooi*
<>!•* i*’i.ouii>a South Florida's Alternative ujpIMH • AdwH lisill"
Mm SHEÍ03! L>39 ••
<>!•* M,orida South Florida's Rock Alternative WDZL
LJAMiami-Dade
Mr W COMMUNITY COHEGE
North Campus
Looking for the
experience of your
life? Check this out!
You can now have
a BLAST and EARN
COLLEGE CREDITS at the
same time. Get with it!
Register now in the
Study Abroad Program
at Miami-Dade Community College
North Campus
Travel to ITALY, MEXICO, SPAIN and...
• soak yourself in the country's
exotic daily life
• experience outrageous cultures
and meet cool young people
• learn/improve Italian or Spanish
while visiting booming cities
• earn college credits at a price
you can afford
Cost: $1,500- $2,600.
Includes airfare, room/board, land trans¬
portation, and field trips Financial Aid avail¬
able for those who qualify
ITALY: July - Four weeks
6 to 7 credits
• MEXICO: July - Four weeks
6 to 7 credits
• SPAIN: June/July/August
Four and eight weeks
6 to 18 credits
Eligibility - one of the following:
• Graduating high school senior
• Holder of high school diploma
or equivalent
• University or college student in good
standing
Don’t lay low! Call 237-1304 today or through
the Florida Relay Service TDD at 1-800-955-8771.

through Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees
Wednesday and Sunday at 2:00. Pope Theatre
Company, 262 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan;
407-585-3404.
Bay Amnesia: Jerry Radloffs new comedy about a
man who returns from a business trip to find that
his lover has been hit on the head by a two-by-four
and has forgotten he’s gay. Through March 24.
Evening performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00. Public Theatre of South
Florida at the Museum of Fine Arts, 1 Las Olas Blvd,
Ft Lauderdale; 568-2243.
The Brand Tarot A satire on the cosmic mysticism of
the Tarot, featuring roles for seventeen actors, by
the late Charles Ludlam, master of absurd camp and
founder of New York’s the Ridiculous Theatrical
Company. Ongoing. Evening performances,
Thursday, March 14 at 8:00; all other performances,
Friday and Saturday at 11:00. Florida Playwrights’
Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925
8123.
The Hope Zone: Florida premiere of playwright Kevin
Heelan’s most recent work, about family and
relationships and set on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.
March 14 through 31. Evening performances
Thursday through Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday
at 2:00. Hollywood Boulevard Theatre, 1938
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 929-5400.
John Barrymore: Confessions of an Actor: Carbonell
Award nominee David Kwiat performs his one-man
show based on the life of actor John Barrymore.
March 15 through April 6. Evening performances
Friday and Saturday at 8:30. 3rd Street Black Box,
San Villa Restaurant, 230 NE 3rd St, Miami; 381-
9613.
Keely and Du: Pseudonymous playwright Jane
Martin’s controversial drama about a young woman
seeking an abortion who is captured by anti¬
abortionists trying to force her to deliver her baby
against her will. Through March 31. Evening
performances Thursday through Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 3:00. New Theatre, 65 Almeria
Ave, Coral Gables; 4455909.
La Cafe am Folies: Jerry Herman’s buoyant musical
about the relationship between aging drag queen
Zsa Zsa and his lover, nightclub owner Georges.
Through May 26. Evening performances Tuesday
through Saturday at 8:00 (dinner at 6:00), Sunday at
6:00 (dinner at 4:00); matinees Wednesday and
Saturday at 2:00 (lunch at noon). Jan McArf s Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre, 303 Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton;
800-841-6765.
Low Letters: A.R. Gurney’s lovely two-character play
traces the relationship between a man and woman
from childhood to old age, through their letters to
each other. March 18. Evening performance Monday
at 8:00. Caldwell Theatre Company, Levitz Plaza, 7873
N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton; 407-241*7432.
Love! Valour! Compassion!: An excellent regional
production of Terrence McNally’s witty and
insightful 1994 Tony Award-winner is unabashedly
faithful to the Broadway original. Through March
31. Evening performances Tuesday through
Saturday at 8:00, Sunday at 7:00; matinees
Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00. Caldwell
Theatre Company, Levitz Plaza, 7873 N Federal
Hwy, Boca Raton; 407-241-7432.
Macbeth: Ambition, greed, murder, corruption, and
fate inform this great Shakespearean tragedy about
Lady and Lord Macbeth, who stop at nothing to gain
the crown of Scotland. Through March 31. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:30. Florida Playwrights’ Theatre, 1936
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Marjory: Novelist and University of Miami professor
Evelyn Wide Mayerson wrote this tribute (a world
premiere) to Marjory Stoneman Douglas, South
Florida writer and conservationist, who celebrates
her 106th birthday this April. Through April 28.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:30; matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday at
2:15. Encore Room, Coconut Grove Playhouse, 3500
Main Hwy; 442-4000.
Mateoumbo: The Flight of a Pedro Pan: Mario Ernesto
Sánchez's play about a Cuban teenager who escapes
to Miami in 1962 with the help of the famous
Operation Pedro Pan rescue effort that brought
children to the U.S. from Cuba. Through March 31.
Evening performances Friday at 8:15 (in English)
and Saturday at 9:00 (in Spanish); matinee Sunday
at 3:00 (in Spanish). El Carrusel Theatre, 235
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 4457144.
The Pajama Barns: Although an enthusiastic cast
infuses with spirit this 1954 musical comedy—
about Sleeptite pajama-factory workers who love,
lust, and strike — a bit of snap, crackle, and pop
would have made it a more dazzling revival.
Through March 17. Evening performances
Wednesday through Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00. Actors’ Playhouse, Miracle Theatre,
280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-9293.
Rapunzel: Musical adaption of the Brothers Grimm
fairy tale about a sweet young thing with very, very,
very long hair who finds herself locked in a tower by
a wicked witch until, of course, a handsome prince
comes along to rescue her. Through April 4.
Matinee performances Saturday at 2:00. Actors’
Playhouse, 280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-
9293.
Salt-Water Moon: In a coastal town in Newfoundland
in 1926, young Mary Snow waits on her porch for
her flaneé until she’s interrupted by Jacob Mercer, a
former beau who left town without saying goodbye.
By Canadian playwright David French. Through
Ernie Pook's Comeek
by Lynda J. Barry
mmmmm
What woKe me up was tny Sister
Shouting "I Am not on drugsA//o
AtvyWAU WHATIF I AM?'/"toy brother
frtdéie, who does not tike shouting,
was already in ftly room, Si thing m
the dark at the end of my hunk bed
Saginq/USD. USD. LSD. USO. “
Why does tog Sister false drugs?
Carla wanted to take May bonne to
the hospital. May bonne said She
never felt better and happier and
more beautiful and her voice was
getting closer and Carla Said
* Don't wake them up/" /\nd my
Bedroom door came open and
my light went on and toy sister
Came in with her hands out. ■“ “
/ could See the moon through the
telephone wires through the wmJow
of my bedroom. The reason I looked
at it was because my sister was
Saying the moon understood her
and all the foster mother Carla nnrf
to do was look at the moon and
Freddie looked at me and his eye¬
balls Were glowing, he said
''Marlysf she said. "Freddie."she
Wanted to hug us Which was when
I knew the thing of her being on
drugs Was real. She kept Showing
US her hands. Her eyes were big
and black. Freddie Said, "Now
you know about the moot)." May-
bonne Said *i do, /do. "She looked
at my face and told me / was so
beautiful. She was scaring meso
bad. / S' not like drugs.

& New Times March 14 -20,1996
At Vizcaya
ARCh 14,15,16,171996
• the “Living chessqame" staged comBat
peRfonmed By the chessmasteRs d' Vizcaya
• Beautiful CRafts and aRts
displayed By meRChants
• singeRs and mmstRels fill the aiRe
with music
*juggleRs, mimes and stReet peRfORmeRs
wimm amuse and enteRtain
•food vendORSoffeRingdelicious
faRe to delight aLL
• SBandieRatoRi d'asti - flag thRoweRs
fRom asti, Italy
• adults $io* childRen $5l twelve and undeRl
villa Vizcaya museum and qaRdens
3251 south, miami avenue
•pResentedBythe
Renaissance histoRical society of floRida, inc.
♦ with the suppoRt of metRo-dade county cultuRal
affaiRscounciLand
BoaRd of county commissioneRs
• foR festival infORmation call I305I250-9133 ext. 3
pick up youR fRee pass to Ride metRORailhome
at the mfORmation Booth
NationsBank /llitalia
&WTMI
Entertainment
iPWS&yiTHS,
,rw if
.O^s Qrv.
RYDER
Truck Rental & Loasng
v
fitiami Hrratfi
March 17. Evening performances Thursday through
Sunday at 8:15; matinee Sunday at 5:00. Area Stage
Company, 645 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 673-8002.
The Shomer: A mother refuses to leave her
daughter’s corpse for fear that the daughter’s soul
will be taken before her body is buried. (Shomer, by
the way, is Hebrew for guardian.) Through March 25.
Evening performance Sunday at 7:00; matinee
Saturday at 2:00 (March 23 only). Public Theatre of
South Florida at the Museum of Fine Arts, 1 Las Olas
Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 568-2243.
South Beach - the Play: The 12th Street Beach serves
as the setting for this comic chronicle of life in the
playland we know as Miami Beach. Written by Jim
Tommaney and featuring four men and four women
in swimsuits playing six sunbathers and two
mysterious lifeguards. Through April 7. Evening
performances Friday through Sunday at 8:00.
EDGE/Theatre, 495 Española Way, Miami Beach;
531-6083.
The Virgin and the Bathtub: Staged reading of local
playwright Michael McKeeveris drama about a
wealthy German woman in 1938 watching the Third
Reich seize more and more power in her homeland
and wondering what to do about it Presented by the
Theatre with Your Coffee group. March 19. Evening
performance Tuesday at 8:00. New Theatre, 65
Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Waiting for Godot See “Calendar.’’ In Samuel Beckett’s
groundbreaking 1952 tragicomedy, Vladimir and
Estragón wait by a tree on a country road for the
imminent arrival of the enigmatic Godot, quarreling
with each other and making up, vowing to go
somewhere else but never managing to leave. This
production celebrates the 40th anniversary of the
American premiere of Beckett’s masterpiece at
Coconut Grove Playhouse, as well as the theater’s
40th anniversary. Through March 31. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:15,
Sunday at 7:15; matinees Tuesday through Thursday,
Saturday, and Sunday at 2:00. Coconut Grove
Playhouse, 3500 Main Hwy; 4424000.
Thursday, March 14
Israeli FBm Senes: Temple Beth Or, UM’s Judaic
Studies program, and die Israeli Consulate present
award-winning films that depict life in contemporary
Israel; this month’s screening features The Distance
(Hammerhak) (in Hebrew with English subtitles).
$10.8:00 p.m. Cosford Cinema, off Campo Sano Drive
on UM campus, Coral Gables; 235-1419.
Reel Work: The museum continues its series of artists'
films and videos of the 70s; tonight’s program, "The
Come On: Gender Roles, Seduction, and the Gaze,”
features works by Vito Acconi, Lynda Benglis, David
Salle, and others. Free. 8:00 p.m. Museum of
Contemporary Art, 12340 NE 8th Ave, North Miami;
8936211.
Video Rewind: The Louis Woifson II Media History
Center screens programming from its archives,
including recent Peabody Award-winning television
shows and Dade Heritage Day offerings. Free. 1:00
p.m. every Thursday and Tuesday. Main Library
Auditorium, 1Ó1W Flagler St; 375-4527.
Sunday, March 17
The Lady from Shanghai See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, March 19
FNm Alternative: FIU continues its classic film series
with the “Seven Deadly Sins” theme; tonight’s
programcelebrates anger with Sam Peckinpah’s 1971
film, Straw Dogs. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU North Miami
Campus, University Center 100, Biscayne Boulevard
and NW 151st Street; 940-5731.
Wednesday March 20
Cinema Wednesdays: FIU reprises its classic film series;
tonight’s program features Roman Polanski’s 1974
film, Chinatown. Free. 8:00 p.m. FIU University Park
Campus, SW 8th Street and 107th Ave; 348-2461.
Events
Thursday, March 14
Dade County Youth Fain See “Calendar.”
Italian Renalssanoe Festival: See “Calendar.”
SOFA Miami Expo: See “Calendar.”
Taste of the Nation: Share Our Strength (SOS) hosts
this ninth annual fundraiser for the Daily Bread Food
Bank, Camillus House, and other hunger relief
organizations, featuring dishes cooked up by 37 of the
area’s finest chefs. $65.7:00 p.m. Grand Bay
Residences, 455 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne
¡MmoRte/Ze
Day Spa & Clinique
Everlasting Beauty
the holistic approach
To Maintain harmony, we
must find the material in
nature with a special affinity
to the particular skin function
which is out of balance. The
idea is to encourage the skin
to become active, to balance
itself.
448-5371 •59 Merrick Way
Ste. 202, Coral Cables.
Join us for a complimentary
FACIAL SAMPLER
(Dr. Haasdika Skin A Body Cara) |
50% Off
Cellex - C eye gel with purchase of
Cellex - C serum
GUSMAN
ALIVE!
Miami Dance Futures
“High School Dance Festival"
Friday, March 15 4pm & 8pm
Saturday, March lfi 4pm & 8pm
Call 237-3582
The Golddiggers
Annual Musical Variety Show
"I Need a Vacation”
Friday, March 22 -
Sunday, March 24
Call 4458833
Florida Philharmonic
“First Impressions”
Wednesday, March 27 8.*00pm
$55/45/30/20/15
Support A Child Int’l
presents a thought-provoking play
"Sound of the Kidnapped Afriken”
Saturday
March 30 8:00pm
® GUSMAN
CENTER
174 E.Flagler Street, Downtown Miami
for info, caü 37-GUSMAN
$4 Special Event Parking, fT]
2 Convenient Locations IÃœI
These events are sponsored with the support of the Metropolitan
Dade County Cultural Affairs Council ana the Metropolitan Dade
County Board of Commissioners

advanced
dermatology
State of the art Cosmetic Surgery
laser Resurfacing for Sun Damage
Wrinkles and Acne Scarring.
Laser for Blood Vessels-Sun Spots
Stretch Marks and Tattoos
Hair Transplantation • Facial Reeling
Sclerotherapy.
SRESNIK
HWATOLOGV
GROUP
Barry I Resnik. M D
Sorrel S. Resnik, M D
Snapper Creek
Professional Center
7800 S.W. 87 Ave„ Miami
279.6060
If you want the truth before
you waste your time.
I FILM CAPSULESl
NewTimes
RCHIDS
BRANCHING
PHALAENOPSIS
•FLOWERING
TOPIARY'S
INTERIOR PLANTS TO 8'
!• FINE SELECTIONS
OF HERBS
ÍOSES: ON FORTUNIANA
ROOT, ANTIQUES, CLASSICS,
AND HYBRID TEA
Family Run Since 1959
CORNELL'S NURSERY
17091 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami Beach • Next to Porch & Patio
REG#00728000 947-4454 • Open 7 Days
Village
futon
270 MW 27th St.
Miami
576-27$$
, 719 5th St
Vjfi Miami Beach
2035 NE 163rd st.
N. Miami Beach
949-3665
Lounger
SpedaiSaM
$199
Frame with Futon
Reg.S32T
12579 Biscayne Blvd.
::fMr
891*1313
A Deco Slide
Frame & Futon $379
Reg. $69$
The Hillary â–º
Chair $79
Reg. $159
A Queen A-Frame with Queen Size
Futon $ 169 (also available in Full)
Reg. $20?
^Magazine Rack $13
Frame with Futon $269
includes 2 free pillows
Reg--
L-Frame Special Price
$ 179 Frame & Futon â–º
Reg. $259"
With any $100 purchase you’ll
receive a free Bayside cruise
certificate good for 4 people.
With any $200 purchase
receive the cruise certificate &
2 free pillows.
TAfeDéHver;
100% COTTON • COVERS FROM $20
FUTONS STARTING AT $59
We’ll Beat Any Price!
Hours: Alon.-Thúrs. 10--&
Fri. 10-5 • Sun. 11-7
45
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 â–  20,1996
Affordable
Gosmeiic Surgery
Where the emphasis is
on Quality of care.
THE MOST ADVANCED
LASER PEEL TECHNOLOGY
IS NOW AVAILABLE
Robert H. Hunsaker, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Board Certified By American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF
Face, Neck and Brow Lifts * Nose & Ckin
Reshaping • Eyelid Surgery * Breast Surgery
• Advanced Tumescent Liposculpture
• Tummy Tucks • Laser Skin Resurfacing
• Spid er Vein Therapy
dPtemiete (Sentet
fot (Soimetic <2Stttgettj
(800) 403-3370
3370 Mary Street - Coconut Grove
By Appointment
7357 W. Flagler St
443-7070
2550 Douglas Rd. 2nd Fir.
Coral Gables
jui/t/rad
¿eau/y. Qfo, í^BWo/eÁña/fce
Mt0tvecuUñ¿ ¿yu EIT^ ^ 0¿/ , // r
cc&meuc ¿wzjpemf. Qyouaoe
amazed wMfo tihe wud&.
Breast Surgery (enlargement, reduction)
Liposuction * Laser * Nasal Contouring
Fab its •mn Fitness Program
«AJA
¿Sames
es a
Lose up,
in
Serving Soutl
dedication am
makes us th
of obesity,
M.D. is on tl
latest medic;
for optimu
why when the1
the latest devel
they come to
you?
BaaS
Renowned author of
Women Who Run With The Wolves
and The Faithful Gardener.
Poet, Jungian Psychoanalyst, cantadora (keeper of the old
stories in the Latina tradition).
An Evening of Story "The Creative Fire
Commentary, & Poetry A Salon
TUESDAY, MARCH 19
Colony Theater, 7:30 PM
1040 Lincoln
Miami Beach,$)5adv.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 M
First Unitarian Church
10:00 am-1:00 pm
7701 $W76thAve„
Miami $50 adv.
Limited Seating
TICKETS AVAILABLE;: Books&Books
stores; Changing Times, W. Palm
Beach; By Phone w/ Visa or MC:
800-813-1376,
In cooperation w/ Books&Books.
46

633-9861.
World's Largest Indoor Flea Market Browse through
rows of bargain merchandise from fine merchants
and wholesalers from around the world, and enjoy
an International Ice Show, with daily per¬
formances at 2:00,5:00, and 8:00, and music by
Alex Fox and the Calypso Island Steel Band. $4
adults, $1 kids under age twelve. Today from noon
to 10:00; tomorrow and Saturday from noon to
11:00; and Sunday from noon to 8:00. Miami Beach
Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr;
651-9530.
Friday, March 15
Cirque Ingenieux: See “Calendar.”
An Evening of Dave Barry: Channel 10’s Michael
Putney and Ana Azcuy host this benefit for the
Fellowship House. $125. 7:30 p.m. Biltmore Hotel,
1200 Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 667-1036.
Main Street Live: Local jazz, blues, and pop groups
perform live music while shoppers take in Miami
Lakes’s establishments each Friday and Saturday
night; tomorrow, Eugene Timmons and Kendall
Connection perform. Free. 7:00 p.m. Main Street,
Miami Lakes; 821-1130, ext 207.
Saturday, March 16
Cajun Crawfish Barbeque: Taste authentic Cajun
crawfish, barbecue chicken, spiced rum, and
reggae music by Broken Sound and Zydeco DJ.
$20.2:00 p.m. Power Studios, 3701NE 2nd Ave;
576-1336.
Caral Gables Farmers Market Local growers,
bakeries, and florists offer their wares. Free.
Every Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
through March 30. Merrick Park, Miracle Mile
and Le Jeune Road, Coral Gables; 460-5311.
Sunday, March 17
Coin and Stamp Shove Philatelists and coin
connoisseurs can find rare treasures at this show.
Free. 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Coral Ridge Mall,
Oakland Park Boulevard and Federal Highway,
Cutler Ridge; 791-6198.
From Russia, With Talent II: The Jewish Family
Service hosts an evening with singers, dancers,
and musicians resettled in Broward County from
the former Soviet Union. $6-$8. Hollywood Central
Performing Art Center, 1770 Monroe St,
Hollywood; 966-0956.
Viva La Música: The Miami Choral Society hosts a
fundraiser to celebrate its 30th anniversary
season. $15.4:00 p.m. Biltmore Hotel, 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 443-7816.
Tuesday, March 19
Multi-Media Performance Tuesdays: Artists,
filmmakers, videographers, actors, and other
assorted performers and creators are invited to
show off their talents or just hang out with the Art-
Act arts group. $3.7:30 p.m. Art-Act Space, 10 NE
39th St; 573-7272.
New Moon Power Ceremony: Bring your drums,
rattles, shakers, and friends and make some
empowering and re-energizing music with Roots,
Rhythms, and Rituals. $10 donation requested.
8:00 p.m. Collins Avenue and 53rd Street, Miami
Beach; 460-3365.
Wédnesday, March 20
Caribbean Expo: Taste a variety of Caribbean foods
and enjoy calypso, reggae, and zouk music. Free.
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 11011SW 104th St;
237-2854.
Equinox Drum and Dance Circle: Celebrate the spring
by making some rejuvenating music with Roots,
Rhythms, and Rituals. $10 donation requested.
8:00 p.m. Collins Avenue and 53rd Street, Miami
Beach; 460-3365.
Museums
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through March 31 —
“Jerusalem at 3000,” photographs of contemporary
Jerusalem by Gary Monroe; and “Minds in Motion,”
works by local psychiatric patients. Through June 23
—"Tales of Enchantment Legend and Myth,” works
by children from the International Museum of
Children’s Art in San Francisco; “Graffiti Art,” works
by Danny Polanco; and works by Samuel Komberg.
Art Museum at HU, University Park, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 348-2890. Through March
30—“American Art Today Images From Abroad,”
works by 27 American artists working overseas.
Bass Museum of Art, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530. Through April 7—“Fellini: Costumes and
Fashion,” more than 80 costumes worn in Fellini’s
films, including 8 le, Juliet of the Spirits, and La Dolce
Vita.
Art & All that Jazz Neu/Tunes
March 16 & 17 • 10 to 5pm
Harrison St., Downtown Hollywood
150 Fine Artists & Craftsmen
Food Fest • Daily Live Jazz
Admission is free
Hwy.
Hollywood-^
Blvd.
s
â–º
Dixie
Harrison 8
St.
N
Vitamins • Herbs
Juice Bar
Hollywood Central
Performing Arts Center
Presents:
A local bistro with
world flavor
kkkk
1 HMEST YILL2GE
Oldest Health Store in
Downtown
ALVIN AILEY
REPERTORY
ENSEMBLE
TTTT
oasis
hot food â–¼ cool atmosphere
1928 Harrison St
Tues. April 9 & Wed. April 10
8pm • Adults *20 / Chüd *10
1770 Monroe St. 929-8175
open seven days a week
serving lunch thru dinner
weekend brunch & late nite
921-5149
2009 Harrison Street • 927-7133
New, Old and
Unexpected
f/MM04+>t.
I *0^ TRADER JOHN'S
1 h & Book Exchange
contemporary pottery
& sculpture
“UNIQUE GIFTS FOR
YOURSELF AND OTHERS”
TRY MY
THAI CAFE
"Exceptional"
After You've Read It -
Exchange It
Sun-Thurs: 10-6pm
Fri & Sat: 10-9pm
GALLERY HOURS: 10:30-5PM
OR BY APPOINTMENT
2011 HARRISON ST
929-4801
1907 Hollywood Blvd.
922-2466
2003 Harrison St.
926-5585
NEXT MONTH
Family Owned and Operated 1
WH
5 7
Warehaus 57
-ARTWALK
DOWNTOWN
HOLLYWOOD
MTALIAN
RISTORANTE
Cafe Books Clothing
Friday, April 19
5:30-9:30pm
Open Sun - Thurs
11:30am - 11:00pm
1904 B Hollywood Blvd.
926-6633
Featuring Local Artists
Galleries and Melton
Mustafa Orchestra
e Fri & Sat
- 11:30am - Midnight
1818 S. Young Circle
923-0555
h m
i
I
I
s
£
47

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Boca Raton Museum of Art, 801W Palmetto Park Rd,
Boca Raton; 407-392-2500. Through March 24 —
“Clarence Holbrook Carter: An American
Century,” a retrospective exhibition of American
realist Carter.
Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-1700.
Through March 17 — “The Music Box Project,”
music boxes created or inspired by artists such as
Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, John Cage, Nam
June Paik, and Kiki Smith. Through March 31 —
“Heads,” new work by Kenny Scharf.
Center for Visual Communication, 4021 Laguna St,
Coral Gables; 446-6811. Through March 16 —
“Seeing the Light,” Florida landscape photographs
by Clyde Butcher.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art, 1
NE 40th St; 576-5171. Through April 6 — “7
Women from 7 Countries (no. 7),” works by seven
Latin-American women artists, including Bolivia’s
Maria Teresa Camacho-Hull, Chile’s Susana
Errazuriz, and Venezuela’s Liliana Gonzalez.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler
St; 375-1492. Through April 7 — “Miami’s Movers
and Shakers,” photographs by Ray Fisher. (See
“Calendar.”)
Joan Lehman Museum of Contemporary Art, (formerly
COCA), 12340 NE 8th Ave, North Miami;
893-6211. Through March 31 — “Defining the
Nineties: Consensus Making in New York, Miami,
and Los Angeles,” a survey of emerging artists
from these three cities. Through April 27 —
“Gabriel Orozco: Project for Miami,” a site-specific
installation. Through May 2 — “Reel Work: Artists
Films and Videos of the 70s,” featuring works by
Vito Acconi, John Baldessari, William Wegman,
Andy Warhol, and many others.
Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, 1301
Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-3536. March 16
through April 28 — “Content and Discontent in
Today’s Photography.” Through June 5 — “A
Celebration of 45 Years of Collecting: Selections
from the Permanent Collection.”
Main Library, 101W Flagler St; 375-2665. Through
March 15 — Photographs by Life magazine
photographer Gordon Parks, and a collection of
Caribbean steel pans.
Metro-Dade Art in Public Places - Miami International
Airport, Concourse E, Departure Level; 375-5362.
Through June 14 — “Relationships,” photographs
by Fran Bitett Beck.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit
Planetarium, 3280 S Miami Ave; 8544247. Through
May 30 — “CyberCity,” an interactive exhibition
that explores the latest computer technology.
Ongoing — “Laser Mannheim Steamroller,”
“Visions of the Universe,” “Hubble Adventure,”
and more.
Morikami Museum, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray
Beach; 407495-0233. March 19 through July 7 —
“Folding Images: Japanese Screens from the Liza
Hyde Collection.” Ongoing — “The Yamato
Colony: Pioneering Japanese in Florida.”
Museum of Art, 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
525-5500. Through April 14 — “Bruce Helander:
Curious Collages.” Through May 5 — “Glackens
Circle,” works by members of the Glackens family;
and “On a Somber Note,” paintings by Gustavo
Acosta and Paul Soria. Through May 12 —
Sculpture by Lyman Kipp. Through May 19 —
“Grandma Moses: Pictures From the Past,” and
“Tomás Sánchez: Different Worlds.” Through
November 30 — “Oceania: Man, Ritual, and
Spirit.”
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401SW 2nd St, Ft
Lauderdale; 467-6637. Through May 6 — “The
Science of Sports,” an interactive exhibition about the
laws of nature at play in sports. Ongoing—Eight
interactive exhibition areas featuring “Gizmo City,”
“Florida Ecoscapes,” “KidScience,” “Space Base,”
“Choose Health,” “Sound,” and “No Place Like
Home.”
Sanford L Ziff Jewish Museum, 301 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 672-5044. Through April 14 —
“Daughter of Zion: Henrietta Szold and American
Jewish Womanhood.” Ongoing—“Mosaic,” an
exhibition about the Jewish history of Florida.
The Wotfsonian, 1001 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
531-1001. Through April 28 — "The Arts of Reform
and Persuasion, 1885-1945,” an exhibition of more
than 250 objects that demonstrate the relationship
between design, reform, and propaganda.
Galleries
Alliance Frangaise, 1414 Coral Way, Coral Gables;
8593760. March 15 (reception 6:30 p.m.) through
April 15—“Paris Cemeteries,” photographs by Judi
Mintz.
Ambrosino Gallery, 3155 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 445-2211. Through March 30—"Tryst,”
works by Cesár Trasobares; and “Who Will Tend the .
Sheep,” works by Conrad Hamather.
Americas Collection, 126 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5578. Through April 2 — “Como el Destello del
Cobre,” works by Luis Marin.
AmerJHch Galleries, 180 NE 39th St, ste 107; 573-7200.
Ongoing—Original and reproduced works by
Picasso, Chemakin, Tarkay, Rockwell, and others.
Antonia Studio, 640 S Miami Ave, 2nd fl; 3734)850.
Ongoing—“Grass is Green,” works by Antonia.
Arquideco: 3132 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral Gables;
445-5445. Through April 15—Works by Argentine
artist Estela Pereda.
Art Collectors, 4200 Aurora St, Coral Gables; 445-6624.
Through March 30—“Director’s Choice ’96,” works
by gallery artists Patrice Girard, Claire Garrett,
Richard Medlock, and others.
Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-8278.
Through April 6—“Uno,” works by Carolina Sardi.
Art Express, 12022 N Kendall Dr; 598-6622. Ongoing—
Works by Montelle Kline.
Artists Gallery, 4222 NE 20th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
491-9479. Ongoing—Southwestern art and pottery;
abstract, classical, and country French art
ArtServe Gallery, 1350 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
458-5825. March 16 through April 19 — “Southern
Expressions,” works by Florida artists.
Artspace Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 444-4493. Through March 30—
“Vessels and Reliquaries,” sculpture by Sharon
Kopriva.
Astoria Fine Art, 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1222. Through March 31 — "The Line of
Time: Homage to René Descartes,” works by *
A/K/RONA.
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-7872. Through April 7 — Group show.
Barbara Scott Gallery, 919 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-9171. Through April 7—Works by Jane Manus.
Bany University, Library Gallery, 11300 NE 2nd Ave,
Miami Shores; 899-3424. Through March 29 —
Works by the late artist Carlos Macia.
Bash, 655 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 538-2274.
Through March 26—“Art Up,” works by Alex J.
Escarano.
BCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3501S Davie Rd, Davie; 475-6517.
Through March 21 — “Wheel,” wheel-themed works
by 31 artists.
BCC South Campus Art Gallery, 7200 Pines Blvd,
Pembroke Pines; 9633895. March 14 (reception 7:00
pjn.) through April 26—“Jachut: Vestiges,” paintings
by Kay Kang.
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
673-6677. Through April 8—Works by Australian
glass artists. Ongoing—Glass sculpture by
international artists.
Best Buddies Art Company, 1637 Jefferson Ave, Miami
Beach; 5313821. Through April 7—Limited edition
prints by Haring, Lichtenstein, Britto, Dine, and
Scharf.
Bettcher Gallery, 1628Jefferson Ave, Miami Beach;
5343533. Through April 7 — “Field,” works by Perry
Greaves.
Bizarre Bazaar, 180 NE 39th St, ste 107; 573-7200.
Ongoing—Works by Dior Valgas.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
442-4408. Through March 31 — Photographs by
Diana Rosen.
Brickell Square, 801 Brickell Ave; 667-0808. Through
March 31—Works by Leandro Soto.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 5313821.
Through April 7 — “Britto Bonanza,” recent works by
Romero Britto.
Capen Gallery, 22400 Old Dixie Hwy, Homestead;
2580388. Through March 23—Works by Luis
Guzman Molina.
Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-2627. Through April 7—“Jerusalem 3000.”
Carel Gallery, 928 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 534-4384.
Ongoing—“Post-Impressionists,” nineteenth- and
twentieth-century masters, including works by
Bernard Buffet and new acquisitions.
Carlos Art Gallery, 3162 Commodore Plaza #A1;
445-3020. Ongoing—Multimedia works by Haitian
artists.
C. Firgau Art Gallery, 1940 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 567-9191. Through May 29 — “España y
Realismo (Spain and Realism),” recent works by six
Spanish artists.
Chad Elliott Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd; 5343547. Ongoing
— Recent works and works-in-progress by Chad Elliot
and works by photographer AIL
Clean Machine, 22612th St, Miami Beach; 534-9429.
Through March 22—Surrealist paintings by Jude
Tapa Loko” Thegenus.
Collective Souls, 1224 SW 1st Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
467-2292. Ongoing—“Soul Fusion,” two- and three-
dimensional works by local artists.
Common Space, 1665 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
6743278. Through April 7 — “Women’s
Visions/Women’s Voices.”
Contemporary Art Foundation, 1630Jefferson Ave, Miami
48
SCULPTURE
OBJECTS
FUNCTIONAL
ART
O
â– MIAMI]
EXPOSITION
19 9 6
March 15-17
vention Center
South Bayshore Drive at 27th Avenue
Gala Opening Night Preview
Thursday, March 14
To benefit The Lowe Art Museum
For benefit tickets: 305.284.1645
Open to the public.
Make your own world
from a world of art!
contemporary art furniture • sculpture in ceramic,
glass, wood and metal • ethnographic art
• vessels • contemporary studio ceramics and glass
• exquisite art jewelry • outsider, folk and tribal
objects • hand blown and cast glass and more!
All artwork is for sale.
A project of Expressions of Culture, Florida, Inc.
http://www.sofaexpo.com
Nick Cave Sound Suit
represented by
Wood Street Gallery, Chicago
;%118
For information: 305.444.1196

â– 
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
isii
HHMMH
'
49
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Beach; 674-9541. Through April 7—“Genesis y Big
Bang,” works by Leonor Coifman.
Continuum Gallery, 927 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-8504. Through April 7 — Paintings by Brooke
Engle.
Deerlng Hospital, 933 SW 152nd St; 251-2500. Ongoing
—"The South Africa Exhibit,” works from the
collection of the Black Heritage Museum.
Dorsch Gallery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 85&4080. March 15
(reception 6:00 p.m.) through April 5—New works
by John McCaffrey.
Elite Fine Art Gallery, 3140 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 448-3800. Through March 22—Works by
Brazilian painter Antonio H. Amaral.
Española Way Art Center, 405 Española Way, Miami
Beach; 673-6248. Through March 15—“Bulls, Wine,
Women, and Country,” works by John Bailly.
Through June 30—Second annual Tibetan National
Day exhibition.
Exit Gallery, 904 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-1280.
Ongoing—Paintings by Peter Stanick.
For Art's Sake, 52 S Federal Hwy, Dania; 920-9205.
Ongoing—Works by more than 90 local artists.
Fred lie Snitzer Gallery, 1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 44841976. Through March 27 — Recent works
by Robert Thiele. (See “Calendar.”)
Galería del sol, 1628 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
674-7076. Through April 7 — Group show.
Gallery Hue Art, 2117 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 447-8502. Through March 31—Works by
Argentine artists Carlota Basóla, Vera Eizenberg,
Stella ViDamayor, and others.
Gallery 219,219 S Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
832-0779. Ongoing — Recent works by Virginia Best,
Bee Clare, and other gallery artists.
Hannah & Her Scissors, 533 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
674-1408. Ongoing—Works by Hannah Lasky.
Infinite Possibilities, 2007 Tyler St, Hollywood;
921-7622. Through April 30—“Metamorphs,” works
by Susana G. Barral.
International Fine Arts College, 1737 N Bayshore Dr;
6356614. Ongoing—"The Dead Artists Don’t Eat,”
alternative art by students.
Jeanine Cox Fine Art, 1071 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands; 861-1060. Through March 31 —
Sculpture by Sophie Ryder; “Glass From the South,”
works by Shane Fero, Susan Pelish, Richard Jolley,
and others; and photography by Robert Bery.
Joy Moos Gallery, 355 NE 59th Terr; 754-9373. Through
March 30—“Strength and Endurance,” works by
Barbara Clark-Fleming, Damian Rojo, Purvis Young,
and Claude Bolduc.
J. Vincent, 323 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 4458381.
Through March 15 — “Lechon (Pork),” works by Luis
Miguel Campos.
Kennedy Studio, 3059 Grand Ave; 441-8555. Ongoing—
Works by Cliff Bailey and Phyllis Jean.
IGrschnerHaack Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-7730. Through April 7—The Surrealistic
Cosmos of Ellen Grobman.”
Margulies Taplin Gallery, 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 447-1199. Through April 1—Works
from the private collection of Fran and Lee Ruwiteh.
Mayfair Fine Art, 701 Lincoln Rd, ste 701, Miami Beach;
534-1004. Through April 7 — The Russians Are
Coming,” contemporary Russian oils and tempera.
MDCC Building One Atrium, 300 NE 2nd Ave; 237-3278.
Through May 3—“Passing,” an installation by Hillary
Leone and Jennifer Macdonald.
MDCC Centre Gallery, 300 NE 2nd Ave, ste 1365;
237-3278. Through May 3—“Passing,” an installation
by Hillary Leone and Jennifer Macdonald.
MDCC Gallery North, 11380 NW 27th Ave, Collins
Campus Center, rm 4207-1; 237-1532. Through March
25—“Field of Imagination,” works by students from
all four Miami-Dade Community College campuses.
MDCC InterAmerican Art Gallery, 627 SW 27th Ave, ste
3104; 237-3278. Through April 5 — “Love, Flesh, and
Water,” works by Tag Purvis, Leeanne Schmidt, and
Oscar Muñoz.
MDCC Kendall Campus Art Gallery, 11011 SW 104th St;
237-2322. Through March 22 — Paintings by obscure
New York artists of the 1950s, featuring Paul Bodin,
Norman Carton, Mario Garda, John Von Wicht, and
others.
NWSA Art Gallery, 25 NE 2nd Ave; 237-3501. March 19
(reception 500 p.m.) through April 16—NWSA
student exhibition.
Old and Modern Masters, 730 Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach; 531-4900. Through April 7—“Reasons for
Buying Bronze Sculpture.”
Osuna-Lennon Gallery, 1635Jefferson Ave, Miami
Beach; 6753324. Through April 7 — “Italian Masters
from the Eighteenth Century.”
Paganiopez Fine Art 224 Washington Ave, Homestead;
242-9883. Through March 23—Works by Florida
artists.
Pallas Photographic, 50 NE 40th St, ste 103; 5757020.
Through April 9—“Baby Doll Series,” photographs
by Renee Collins.
Pamberi Studios, 1912 Van Burén St, Hollywood;
927-1905. Through May 1 — Osogbo art of the
Yoruba, and recently acquired rare African art
Passage Gallery, 529 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-3036. Through April 6—Works by Kench
DeGeorge, Tañan Tanka, Brian Miller, and Jean
Claude Brasset
Photogroup, 130 Madeira Ave, Coral Gables; 4440198.
Through April 12—“En Divina Luz. The Penitente
Moradas of New Mexico,” photographs by Craig
Varjabedian.
Photos and Photos, 1037 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands; 864-2624. Through March 31 — “Cara de
Cuba (The Face of Cuba),” photography by Juan
Roberto Camacho.
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art 900 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 5324141. Through April 7—Group
show, featuring works by Andrea Zemel, and a
collection of Israeli art
Scharf Shop, 435 Española Way, Miami Beach;
6759308. Ongoing—“Closet no. 14,” an installation
by Kenny Scharf.
Sher Galleries, 3585 NE 207th St North Miami Beach;
9359930. Ongoing—Works by Erie, Neiman,
Tobiasse, Hart, and other gallery artists.
Sky Gallery, NationsBank Tower, 100 SE 2nd St;
539-7100. Through March 31 — “100 Years
Downtown,” a photographic exhibition organized by
the Dade Heritage Foundation.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 4416166. Through March 29—
“Fhotowork ’96,” juried photography exhibition.
Through April 4—“Artists Who Are Women,”
featuring works by Louisa Chase, Joyce Kozloff,
Barbara Schwartz, and Michelle Stuart
South Florida Art Center-ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 534-3339. Through March 26—The
46th annual members’ exhibition of the Ceramic
League of Miami.
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through March 26—
“Remnants and Remembrance,” works by Anthony T.
Allegro and Bill Burke.
South Florida Art Center - The toft, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through March 26 (lecture
on March 20 at 7:00 pm.) — “Offerings for a
Sanctuary,” works by Margarita Cortes, Liliam
Cuenca, and Blanca Femandez-SiegeL
Studio Holomontage, 630E Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
532-8880. Through April 7—"The Sensation of
Graphics with Holograms.”
Ugarte & Candela, 2105 Le Jeune Rd, Coral Gables;
4466162. Through March 15—‘Triathlon,” works by
Antonio Ugarte.
UM New Gallery, 1300 Campo Sano Dr, AR101, Coral
Gables; 284-2542. Through March 22—Annual
student exhibition.
World Resources Gallery, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9095. Through April 7—Traditional handwoven
textiles from northern India.
Readings fr Discussions
Thursday, March 14
Electronic Pidtllshing Seminar Learn how to use the
Internet to publish information on the World Wide
Web. $30.3:00 pm. Museum of New Arts auditorium,
1350 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 954-5251760.
Lester Goran: University of Miami English professor
and author Goran reads from and discusses his recent
book, Tales from the Irish Club: A Collection of Short
Don’t let the
“Sun Set”
on your hair care...
If DBPR gets its way, cosmetologists and barbers could be headed back to
prehistoric times. Legislators are being asked to pass a bill calling for a sunset
review to decide if cosmetology & .barbering should be regulated and to what
degree. The Dept. Of Business & Professional Regulation is recommending the
elimination of The Board of Cosmetology & Barbering. Losing this regulatory process
could lead to unsafe conditions in the salons and barber shops.
The Dept is calling the review, a means to do a study. However, A Study does not
require legislative approval!
What Sunsetting Could Mean to You:
• Untrained stylists and barbers
• Practitioners with little or no knowledge of scalp diseases & disorders
• Practitioners with little or no knowledge of sanitary procedures
• A true danger of communicable diseases
• Insurance coverage will be “VERY” hard to find and even harder to “AFFORD”
What You Can Do:
• Encourage your favorite stylist or barber to take part in our “Good Hair Day In
Tallahassee”. This will be an electrifying rally to show support of the “Total
Regulatory Process”
• Write to your local legislators and oppose “Sunset Review”
• Call your local legislators and ask them to oppose “Sunset Review”
• Help your favorite stylist or barber by calling our verbal petition Une
Call our “Verbal Petition” line and...
Vote “YES” to Your Health, Safety & Welfare
Tell the legislators in your own words, why you think Cosmetology should be regulated
CALL 1-900-GET-SAFE (900) 438-7233
The call costs $1.45 per min. Average call is 2 min. You must be 18 or older.
Touch tone phone required
This announcement, is sponsored by the National Alliance of Salon Professionals, and the following “Licensed
Professionals” who care about you and your hair, skin and nails: Elite Salon Systems Distributors of Paul Mitchell
Professional Salon Hair Care and Framesi Italian Color and Professional Hair Care Products

, ihi#«rMíJTfl#
not an
A ¿i
/s A v
fw ib%¿ M*¿Taiá
athlete.
'm not a
This is not a time for thin<
that are easy. Over 300,000 ^
Americans have died of AIDS since 1981. If
you wanted to hold all of their names, you'd
have to build a
memorial five times
the size of the Vietnam
Veteran’s War Memorial to do
it So this is not a time to be ^
looking for things that are easy. This
is a time to seek out the boldest, most
challenging ways for our voices to be heard, and for our abilities to be tested. We must seek out
challenges that are as big as this disease. That’s what this ad you’re reading is all about
aiPSp
to make
in the IBI
Éü mm
ainst AIDS.
-Marty Starr,
California AIDS Ride I,
BostonONew York AIDS Ride participant
What is it?
It’s a ride, not a race, and it’s for anyone who wants to grow beyond
their limits. 1,200 riders. Amazing people like you - most of whom have
never done anything like this before in their lives. Three days, 275 miles.
Orlando to Miami on a bicycle through some of the most incredible
scenery in America It will raise $2 million for AIDS service agencies in
Florida, and leave you a changed person.
Is this something new?
It is in Florida The AIDS-Ride has been done twice in California and once from Boston to New York. Over 6000
people have raised more than $13.6 million for important AIDS services, breaking long-standing AIDS fundraising
smsmmmm records. And their lives have been changed in the process. They’ve redefined
their ideas about their potential. They’ve experienced a sense of community
and teamwork that is rare in the world today. This is a lot more than a bike
ride. It’s about awakening your life and the lives of others.
Where do you eat, sleep, shower?
The Ride is incredibly well-supported with hot and cold showers, hot catered meals,
five daily water and snack stops, transports for your gear; massage therapists, nighty
entertainment, roving medical and tech support and much more. We even provide two-
person tents
No way, I could never do that...
It's true that the Ride is not easy. It’s demanding and
challenging. That’s why it’s valuable. It is also appropriate
that it be demanding and challenging. Because anything less
just doesn’t cut it - not when AIDS is the number one killer
of people ages 25-44.
You can do this Grandmothers have done the Ride. People in their sixties and
seventies People with full-blown AIDS. The Ride is based on the notion that the
thrill of challenging yourself is a lot better than the boredom of staying in a lifeless,
comfortable rut Often times we live our lives unconsciously within the confines of
a box The Ride will take you outside of that box and into one of the most exhilarating
experiences of your existence. It’s an incredible event to do with friends, co-workers, or your
spouse or partner It’s also an incredible place to make new life-long friends.
You’ll ride at your own pace. As quickly or leisurely as you like. And through the
organized training rides we offer throughout the year; you’ll get better and better
Where does the money go?
It goes to help people in the Florida area who have AIDS and who are without food, without housing, without medical care,
and without support. Specifically, the Ride will^enefit Center One, AIDS Resource
Alliance, Action for AIDS, Poverello Center; and the United Protestant Appeal.
What do I do to register or volunteer?
Call today. We’ll send you a full-color brochure that explains everything and a registration
form. We need volunteers too. This is no time to give up. This is a time for boldness. Space is
limited. Call now.
AI DS Ride-
Volunteers * Riders
Donations To The Cause
(305) 532-6055
B E N E F I T if; N G :
Center One
AIDS Resource Alliance
Action for AIDS
Poverello Center
United Protestant Appeal
Sponsored By:
Banana Republic,
POZ Magazine,
USAir/USAir Express
1200 RIDERS • 275 MILES • ORLANDO TO MIAMI
3 DAYS • MAY 17-19, 1996
Created & Produced by Pallotta & Associates, Inc., Los Angeles
I
I
51
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
FunFest
April ii - i (, 1996
Presented
by
American|iifHni9
Para dije Island - (able Beach
B d h a m a 5
ton just can't miss this tot! Iliis celebrity Golf Challenge G
FunFest is nothing less than the chance of a lifetime. 100 of Hollyiuood's, music and
the NFL's brightest stars mill be there, ready to play mith or against you.
52
This ultimate challenge is a turn-round, four-man scramble played on turn of the
Bahamas' top rated courses at Paradise Island and Cable Beach. This national fundraiser
for Sickle Cell Disease Research is pint big chance to help raise amareness and
"Break the Sickle Cycle." IN by the may, this rare opportunity to play in the
Celebrity Challenge on a team mith BUir UWtfiMl OaRSSSa Bill
Calloiuay, Bartini Units, Hutton Banks, Ion (natos, Brote
BUásoo, Irnco Smith, Bim FioUs Frooman, Utíar Barton,
Richard Bnandtroo, lono lnc, Halcnlm Jamaat Blarnor,
Bañil Jamos EUiott, Jambo FUiott, FR's Eriq USaUiaiti
many, many others has neuer been auailable to the public, find the day doesn't end
mith a round of golf, our FunFest actiuities include celebrity parties, parties and more
parties.
Spots are limited so call today
Still
-COIF
URQUE SE COMPANIES
—” y\n^NTi5
^\AX/ír, ÜA^tAMAy- '
Towrinm á OmJopaaeoi
— ■ MUt W-
©
hbrbh,
"Awé r 9frUf c'yf/t*
t 0 c e e d s to Biiofit Sick
M,
VHP
Cable Beach
GOLF CLUB
Radissor
CABLE BEACH
(oil B 1 s 0 a s 0
Stories. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Steve Gould: Cartoonist and cancer patient Gould
discusses Thank God It’s Only Cancer, his humorous
collection meant to promote healing. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Health Care Careers: MDCC’s Wolfson Campus hosts a
series of lectures to complement its job fair event;
representatives from Mount Sinai Medical Center,
PCA Healthcare, the MDCC Medical Center
Campus, and All Medical Recruiting assess the future
of careers in the health field. Free. 11:00 am Wolfson
Campus, 300 NE 2nd Ave, rm 2106; 237-3358.
Preview to Sleuth Fast ’96: Mystery authors Stuart
Kaminsky, Kathryn Jensen, and Betsy Haynes discuss
their woiis and craft Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books
and Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
954-5660358.
The Snake and the Snail: Astronomers David H. Menke
and Mark Rosauer explore astronomy and
archaeology in the Mayan and Aztec cultures of
ancient Mexico. $5.7:30 p.m. Buehler Planetarium,
3501SW Davie Rd, Davie; 475-6680.
Vegetarian Cooking; Learn how to prepare exotic and
healthy Thai foods. $25.6:30 p.m. Hammocks
Middle School, 9889 Hammocks Blvd, rm 119;
237-7641.
Wolfson Center Seminar Series: The Louis Wolfson
Media History Center hosts a series of seminars
today and tomorrow, including topics such as Miami
in the news (9:30 am. today), writing for television
(12:30 and 3:30 p.m. today), trends in television news
(6:00 pm today), and careers in television (KfcOO
am. tomorrow). Free. Main library Auditorium, 101
W Flagler St; 375-1505.
Friday, March 15
Beyond Body Building: Fitness trainer Linda Pescatore
discusses fitness and nutrition at this Friday Night
Womyn’s Group meeting. $2.8:00 p.m. Lesbian, Gay,
and Bisexual Community Center, 1335 Alton Rd,
Miami Beach, 253-3740.
Buchanaidsm: The Militant Labor Forum hosts a tree-
speech forum about Pat Buchanan’s controversial
right-wing views. $4.7:30 p.m. Pathfinder Bookstore,
137 NE 54th St; 756-1020.
Maria Christina Garda: Garcia discusses her recent
book, Havana USA.: Cuban Exiles and Cuban
Americans in South Florida. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books &
Books, 296Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 4424408.
The Meaning of Dreams: Psychologist and author Joan
Cacdatore Mazza delves into dreams and howto
gain insight through their interpretation. Free. 7:30
p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 645 University Dr,
Coral Springs; 753-6650.
OpenkHke Poetry: Share a few original works with
other writers. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books and
Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
954-5660358.
Poetry Mike Night Celebrate Women’s History Month
be sharing some original works about Women or
pieces by favorite women poets. Free. 8:30 p.m.
Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 591S University Dr,
Plantation; 7280489.
Winona Sullivan: Author Sullivan (A Sudden Death at
the Norfolk Cafe) reads from and discusses her latest
mystery novel, Dead South. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Saturday; March 16
Capitalism andArt The Socialist Labor Party hosts
this discussion about capitalism and its effect on the
arts. Free. 4:30 p.m. Performing Arts Network, 555
17th St, Miami Beach; 891-0752.
Family Pinhole Camera Woriishop: Photographers
Rebecca Loveless and Sharon Socol demonstrate
how to build a pinhole camera and make paper
negatives. $45 for parent and child. 9:00 am Barry
University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave, Fine Arts rm 154,
Miami Shores; 444-0198.
German Design and National Identity: Laurie A. Stein,
curator of Berlin’s Werkbund Archive, discusses
German design from 1890 to 1918 at 1.00 p.m.; at
2:30, Illinois Institute of Technology design professor
John Heskett discusses design in inter-war
Germany. $7. The WoKsonian, 1001 Washington
Ave, Miami Beach; 531-6287.
Edvard Raddnsky: Russian historian Radzinsky (The
Last Tsar) reads from and discusses his recent
biography, Stalin. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books,
296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables; 442-4408.
Women and Stress: Barnes & Noble Bookstore hosts a
day of workshops for women with too much stress in
their lives; topics including how to stop fighting with
your mate (11:00 am), stress management (1:00
pm), relaxation techniques (2:30 pm), and
women’s health issues (4:00 pm). Free. 591S
University Dr, Plantation; 723-0489.
Sunday; March 17
Jews in Ancient China: Xu Xin, professor of English and
director of the Center for Judaic Studies at China's
COSTA RICA
3-Night packages from $419 ♦tax
Per person/double occupancy
ACT NOW! CaU 531-0551
Upgrades/Extensions
Add-ons available
Hablamos Español
Parliamo
EUROPE
France
From $468.00* + tax
Mon.-Fri. 9:30am to 5:30pm.|
Se Habla Español.
\ Call: 374-8822
* * ‘some restrictions apply
I* Travel must be completed by March. 31,1996
Tours & Tickets Inc.
Tours: (3 days, ppd)
S&ft (305)888.7738
Round Trip Tickets:
New York $ 144 Chicago $ 198
Los Angeles $295 Tampa $48
Dallas $216 Gainesville $ 118
Sarasota $88 Washington $180
Tow to Kwropt - S. SieHcn - CnrHihonn Creel—
JAMAICA
I TWO-NIGHT GBTAWAYSII
R.T Air, Hotel A Transfers from MIA/FL
If.’
REGGAE SPECIAL from
$269.00
Portside Villas • Rio Blanco • Jamaina
Fantasy Resort • Gloucestershire Hotel
1 Foote Prints * Rode Cliff • Samsara
• Summerset Villoge
Choose from over 200 Hotel/Air Packages »hr
N C L U S I V E
Your Jamaica Specialists!
1-800-555-9330
’All pockoges ore person, double occupancy & include lowest roundtrip airfare
from Ml A/FL airport tnmsfecs, hotel accommodations & hate! tax service.
Pockoges do not include S32.95 deportee & airport tax. Rales are valid through
March 31,1996 subject to charge, availability & cancellation charges.
Weekend surcharges additional.
«I
Boats
liable for:
1/3 Day to Weekly Charters
Deep Sea Fishing
Sailing Lessons
Snorkling/Diving
Special Events
Private/ Corporate Parties
T http://www.shadow.net/'-exsail

Sell it
Quick.
Ncwlimes
CLASSIFIED
ITALY ON SAXE
Airfare from $550 ♦tax
Packages from $800 7-Days I
Villa Rentals from $ 900 weekly
Call Today! Call 531-0551
Hablamos Español-Parllamo Italiano
Mexico Vacation Specialists!
"Buy 4 get I Free" Amares
P/ouqes - Homs - Cars - Diving - Archaeology
Active Vacations
Adventure Travel - Bike - Hike - Walk - Trekk
Europe & The World
Airpasses - Rail - Around the World Fares - Discount Air-
Scandinavia ..
Spain/Holland
London
Italy/ Potugal
Peru 2 for 1
Í550 Yucatan/Cancun $189
499 Mexico City $199
449 Brazil $575
550 B. Aires $595
255 Ecuador $400
ALL FARES ARE ROUND TRIP. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY.
lOtfA TRAVEL (305)532-7309
AUSTRALIA
tiy huwíh umi/Liv
with the only Australian
Specialists in Miami.
Mon.-fti.
9:30am to 5:30pm |
Se Habla Español.
Call: 374-8822
For Men
Experiencing
Hair Loss.
As seen on Good Morning America,
The Today Show and CBS Morning News.
The natural hailline,
the closer you get,
the better we look!
Try our Hair System and if you don’t
absolutely love the way it looks and feels,
we’ll refund your money within 30 days...
no questions asked. We Service and Repair
all types of hair systems while you wait.
305*928*1755 1*800*321*2413
Call for an appointment
4390 North Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale
Between Oakland Park Blvd. & Commercial Blvd.
Credit Cards Accepted.
Nanjing University, discusses the ancient Jewish
community at Kaifeng. Free. 7:30 p.m. FIU
University Park Campus, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, Wertheim Conservatory; 348-2186.
Reading Aloud: Writers from the South Florida
Chapter of the National Writers Association,
including Barbara Weston, Karen Whitting, Eva
Sartorio, and Anita Wright, read from their
works. Free. 3:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205
S Dixie Hwy, 665-8800.
Monday, March 18
Raymond Luczak: Author Luczak discusses St.
Michael's Fall, his autobiographical account of
growing up deaf in a small Midwestern town in
the 1970s. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop,
9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Modern Jewelry as Art Form: New Orleans-based
sculptor and jeweler Thomas Mann discusses the
elevation of jewelry-making to an art form. Free.
6:30 p.m. UM School of Art, 1300 Campo Sano Dr,
Coral Gables; 251-8766.
Women and Investment Financial consultant Steve
Camp shares tips for women seeking new and
improved investment opportunities. Free. 1:00
p.m. North Regional library, 1100 Coconut Creek
Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 969-2608.
Tuesday, March 19
Ann Armbruster: Author Armbruster discusses her
book The Ufe and Times of Miami Beach. Free.
7:30 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925
Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 9354)027.
Art Symbolism, Music, and Psychiatry: Psychologists
Ruth Kalinsky and Peter Lever discuss how music
influences color, line, and freedom of expression.
Free. Tonight at 7:00 and tomorrow at 1:00 p.m.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650
Harrison St, Hollywood; 921-3274.
Business Planning Workshop: Learn about the Info-
Bid Link and how to win government contracts at
this FIU Small-Business Development Center
seminar. Free. 6:00 p.m. Kendall Branch Library,
9101 SW 97th Ave; 348-2272.
Butterfly Lightning Series: Poets and fiction writers
from the University of Miami, Florida
International University, Miami-Dade Community
College, and all over Dade and Broward counties
read their works aloud every Tuesday night;
tonight’s program features Virgil Suarez and
Roberto G. Fernandez. Free. 8:00 p.m. Tobacco
Road, 626 S Miami Ave; 826-8596.
Children Can Be Angels, Too: Photographer Nancy
Bell Hamilton demonstrates how to photograph
kids in angel costumes and settings. $20.7:30 p.m.
Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave, Thompson
Hall, 2nd fl, Miami Shores; 444-0198.
Clarissa Pinkolas Estés: Poet, Jungian psycho¬
analyst, and author Estés (Women who Run with
the Wolves) hosts an evening of poetry,
storytelling, and commentary. $17. Tonight at 7:30
at the Colony Theater (1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami
Beach), and tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. at the
Unitarian Universalist Society (7701 SW 76th
Ave); also, Estés will be autographing her books at
tomorrow at 6:00 at Books & Books (296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables); 800-813-1376.
Quicken Seminar: Accountants Philip Shechter and
Emery Sheer demonstrate how to use this popular
tax-oriented software. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Vegetarian Cooking: Learn how to health-
consdously satisfy your sweet tooth with fat-,
sugar-, and dairy-free treats. $25.6:30 p.m.
Hammocks Middle School, 9889 Hammocks Blvd,
rm 119; 237-7641.
Frances Weaver: Author Weaver reads from and
discusses her book about women and aging, The
Girls with the Grandmother Faces. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
442-4408.
Young Again!: Fitness instructor and physician Roy
A Alterwein shares tips from his book for being
healthier and fitter. Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books
and Music, 2240 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
954-5664)358.
Wednesday, March 20
The Everglades: Can We Save ThemP: Friends of the
Everglades vice president Joette Lorian discusses
efforts to restore and protect the Everglades. Free.
7:30 p.m. MDCC Kendall Campus, 11011 SW
104th St, rm D-413; 237-2854.
The Fine Art of Flirting: Singles consultant Jeanne
Baccarat demonstrates effective flirting methods.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925
Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 9354)027.
Paul Kropp: Author-educator Kropp (Raising a
Reader: Make Your Child a Reader for Life)
discusses ways for young people to improve their
reading skills. Free. 11:00 a.m. Wolfson Campus,
300 NE 2nd Ave, rm 2106; 237-3258.
BBÃœBI
iMakcís^ii lX)t
l/ne BlVdL'Sttit
nnatural
2-5557
SSPb'fhal/l
19405 Biscaj!
SPECIAl ClEARANCE full
fUTON MATTRESS Queen
BUY SOFA AND GET
MATCHING LOVESEAT FREE
*347
METAL FUTON
2 POSITION: SOFA & BED
*99
THE COMBO IS BACK. ITS A SOFA,
4-POSITION LOUNGER & BED.
SOLID WOOD FULL FRAME
79
JUST $50 MORE GETS YOU FRAME & MATTRESS
DINETTES: 3 PIECES
$99
5 PIECE DINETTE
*117
5 PIECE DINETTE
*167
3 PIECE WALL UNIT
WITH LIGHTS COMPLETE
*299
METAL QUEEN,
HEADBOARD & FOOTBOARD
$6995
3 PIECES DESK, CHAIR, LAMP
*47
"$* TABLES
*169
HEAD/FOOT/CANOPY WALL UNITS
*97 $147
3 PIECE COFFEE TABLES
*77
SCREEN, CD/HALOGEN
LAMPJV/VCR STAND
METAL ROCKING CHAIR BLACK WROUGHT FINISH
Ch«r M09
Nighhtand S59
Dresser $169
Mirror *39
*19
CD HOLDER, TV STAND, BAR
STOOL DESIGNER TABLE,
CHEVAL MIRROR YOUR CHOICE
*29
YOUR CHOICE
*57
ANY PURCHASE
OVER *200 RECEIVE A BATTERY
OPERATED BODY MASSAGER
677 NE 79TH STREET, MIAMI, 7547618
OPEN EVERYDAY
WAREHOUSE
53
ACTUAL PATIENT

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
3rd ANNUAL
eek of
APRIL 22
thru
APRIL 28
(Dine at your favorite participating restaurant
and
Support United Foundation for AIDS
Community AIDS program
at South Shore Hospital
BIIIbméibíébbbbbbéi ^
FOR INFORMATION CALL
UFA
305-531-1711
• For restaurants wishing to participate call 305- 53I-I7II •
Free Yourself!
.from the inconvenience of eye glasses or contact lenses
If you're nearsighted, you've probably heard a lot of rumors
â–  ' ' nd Laser Kei
about Radial and
veratotomy.
But have you seen the facts?
RK was developed to help people with nearsightedness and
astigmatism — the most common of all eye problems. RK is
outpatient surgery taking less than half an hour to perform.
No hospitalization. No injections. No pain.'
Miami Heart Institute's ophthalmologists have performed
more than 20,000 successful eye surgeries and wiü answer all
questions about RK and Laser Surgery. As ophthalmologists,
these medical doctors provide more than 50 years of
experience to this integrated healthcare approach. They’re
your total eye care specialists in a total health care environment.
So when you're ready to free yourself — come in and see us.
We'll help clear things up.
MIAMI HEART INSnTUTE
\ 305-674-3004 4701 Meridian Avenue • Miami Beach, FL • 33140
Our patient are the ones who have tried everything else.
The difference is that our Dietecâ„¢ Medication Program works. Get proven, affordable results from
the leading facility in South Florida.
Richard J. Rose, M.D. EA.C.S.
Medical Director
Norman J. Blum, M.D.
Donald Mmervini, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Neal A. Nirenberg, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Miami Heart Institute’s Aventura Health Center Bldg.
Call our counselors now for more information.
MEDICAL
INSTITUTE FOR
WEIGHT LOSS
« 931-2477
Program covered by most insurance
54

Look and Feel
Great Now!
Two Medication Medically Supervised
Program As Featured On 20/20.
MCTOiOmiOJTLOtt
642-7111 Contact Gladys.
4100 North west 9th Street in Miami.
F1 M
AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE OF MIAMI PRESENTS
HOT TAP-COOL JAZZ&QUEEN
FRI, MARCH 15 @ 8:00PM, SAT MARCH 16 @ 8:00PM,
SUN, MARCH 17 @ 2:00PM
FOR INFO CALLUCKETMASTIR
@358-5885 OR 552-0617
; H I
MAVEN PR0DUG10NS PRESENTS
DR. CLARISSA PINKOLA ESTES, PH. D.
AN EVENING OFSTORY, COMMENTARY & POETRY
TUE, MARCH 19 @ 7:30PM
FOR INFO CALL (800) 813-1376 OR
BOOKS & BOOKS @532-3222
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SCHOOL OF LAW REVUE
EQUITY PLAYHOUSE
SAT, MARCH 23 @8:00 PM
FOR INFO CALL 6730904
ifllffiil
DADE COALITION FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION &
THE NEW WORLD SCHOOL OFTHE ARTS PRESENT
ROBERT GARMES MEMORIAL CONCERT
SUN, MARCH 24 @2:00 PM
FOR INFO CALL 5384985
•
MIAMTOADE COMMUNITY COLLEGE PRESENTS
DAVID RUSSEY
FRI, MARCH 29 @ 8:00 PM & SAT, MARCH 30 @ 8:00PM
FOR INFO CALL 1KKETMASTER
@358-5885
THE COLONY THEATER
1040 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
AT THE CORNER OF LINCOLN ROAD & LENOX AVENUE
BOX OFFICE INFORMATION UNE:674-1026
THE COLONY IOX OFFICE OPENS 1 HOUR KFOK SHOWTIME.
FOR ADVANCE TICKET ORDERS MASE
CALL THE NUMBERS USTED AMOVE
SiXc? FUNDNI6 FOR THE COLONY THEATER IS PROYIDEDII PARTLY THE fT\
Wfei METMTOADE CULTURAL AFFAIRS COUNCIL, THE MIAMI REACH
- ' : yisiTOR«amvoinoH authority s the on or miami reach
Money Management' Financial consultant Steve
Camp shares tips from his book, Money: 127
Answers to Your Most-Asked Financial Questions.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 591S
University Dr, Plantation; 723-0489.
Open-Mike Fiction and Poetry: Writers are invited to
share a few pieces of poetry or short fiction. Free.
7:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy;
665-8800.
Spinal Care and Nutrition: Chiropractor Larry
Apotheker offers nutritional tips for spinal health.
Free. 7:00 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 2240 E
Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 954-566-0358.
Dance
Thursday, March 14
Cubic Burke: Choreographer and former Dance
Theatre of Harlem soloist Burke teaches a series of
modem dance classes. $18 per class. Tonight at 8:00;
tomorrow at 7:00 p.m.; and Saturday at 11:30 a.m.
Performing Arts Network, 55517th St, Miami Beach;
672-0552.
Miami City Ballet Miami City Ballet concludes its
season with a program featuring resident
choreographer Jimmy Gamonet De Los Heros’s D
Symphonies, Lynn Taylor-Corbetf s Mystery of the
Dancing Princesses, and George Balanchine’s Sylvia
Pas de Deux and Western Symphony. $17-$52. Tonight
through Saturday at 8:00, and Sunday at 7:00 p.m.,
with 2:00 matinees on Saturday and Sunday. Bailey
Hall, 3501SW Davie Rd, Davie; 532-4880.
National Ballet of Spain: See “Calendar.”
Friday, March 15
American Dance Theatre of Miami: ADT presents two
original works: Hot Tap/Cool Jazz and A Night at the
Opera (featuring music by the rock band Queen). $18.
Tonight and tomorrow at 8:00 and Sunday at 7:00 p.m.
Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
5520617.
Saturday, March 16
Ballroom Dancing: Swing, merengue, disco, foxtrot,
tango, and cha-cha till you drop every Saturday night;
tonight’s dance features music by Norman Wayne. $5.
7:30 p.m. Polish American Club, 1250 NW 22nd Ave;
2480540.
Sunday, March 17
Best of Times St Paddy's Dance: Celebrate the luck of
the Irish while dancing to Latin and ballroom sounds
from the Thirties to the present $7.6:30 to midnight
Elks Lodge, 22 Giralda St Coral Gables; 267-6923.
Meet Me at the Oasis: The Harmonic Motion Trio
presents an afternoon of Middle Eastern dance and
music. $7.3:00 p.m. ArtServe Auditorium, 1350 E
Sunrise Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 462-9191.
Kids
Thursday, March 14
Traveling Magic School Bus: Meet Ms. Frizzle and hop
on the bus for a magical adventure. Free. Today at
9:00 a.m. at the North Dade Regional Library (2455
NW 193rd St 625-6424) and at 3:00 p.m. at the West
Kendall Regional Library (10201 Hammocks Blvd;
385-7135); tomorrow at 9:00 am. at the South Dade
Regional Library (10750 SW 211th St 233-8140) and at
1:00 p.m. at the Miami Beach Branch Library (2100
Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 5354219); and Saturday at
9.00 am. at the Coral Gables Branch Library (3443
Segovia St Coral Gables; 4428706) and at 3:00 p.m. at
the West Dade Regional Library (9445 Coral Way
553-1134).
Saturday March 16
Piece It Together Create a collage with pictures from
magazines, comic strips, and other printed materials.
$8.10:00 am Museum of Art, 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale; 525-5500.
Rapunzet Will the girl with the longest locks around
get out of the tower in time for her sweet sixteen
party? Actor’s Playhouse presents its wickedly funny
version of the favorite fairy tale. $6. Every Saturday at
2:00 p.m. through April 6. Miracle Theater, 280
Miracle Mile, Coral Gables; 444-9293.
St Patrick's Day Pin Craft Make a shamrock pin to
wear on St Paddy’s Day. Free. 11:00 a.m. Pianet Kid
Club House, Máll at 163rd Street, 1421NE 163rd
St, North Miami Beach; 944-7132.
Sounds: Noise or Music?: Learn about sound waves and
sound travel interference, “white noise,” and
reverberation. $25.9:00 p.m. BCC Central Campus,
3501 SW Davie Rd, bldg 2, rm 105, Davie; 47&6680.
Me Like It Heret. Two aliens visit a college campus
SATURDAY NIGHT NEW AGE & ROCK-N-ROLL
5-
W P B T
John Tesh: Live at Red Rocks
with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra
6PM
Yanni in Concert: Live at the Acropolis
8PM
The Eagles in the Spotlight
10PM
Glenn Frey: Strange Weather, Live in Dublin
12Midnight
CAREERS IN MASSAGE THERAPY AND SKIN CARE
Ft. Lauderdale Campus, 5453 North University Drive, Lauderhill, FL 33351 • 800 541-9299
Miami Campus, 7925 N.W. 12 St. Suite 201, Miami, FL 33126 • 800 599-9599
Better yet, in six months the
homework ends and your career
begins. Because at the Florida
Institute that’s all the time it takes
to train to become a hcensed
Massage Therapist or a Skin Care
FLORIDA
Professional. Financial aid is avail¬
able to those who qualify. And we
offer job placement assistance.
Classes begin monthly and fill up
fast. So call or visit today. You’ll be
glad you did. As will your friends.
Loreena McKennit: No Journey's End
1:30AM
|
I
£
S
I

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Quality Service Is Our Key For
Your Dependable Ride,
OIL-FILTER
SERVICE
*16”
Includes:
—
J
MAJOR
SERVICE
$ I79 95
FRONT OR
REAR
BRAKES SPECIAL
*90
Top Off fluids And Safety Check
Some Models Slightly Higher
Otter Expires 3/28/96
15,000 *45,000-75,000
Some Models SSghtty Higher. |
1 Offer Expires 3(28/96 1
J
Fuel Injection Slightly Higher
Otter Expires 3/28/96
L _l
Some Models Slightly Higher
Otter Expires 3/28/96
id
cpcrtAin
paneti
IKIfZ OKUY Ik! B
efefC
inMnA A Aril
£f€ ||i
CADE
We use genuine Honda A Acura parts. Tax and shop supplies not included*
■ 8am épn/Set Oam Sfwn* Call for an appointment and ask for Caries
2901 SW 72 AVENUE • 262-0002
Midway between Coral Way & Bird Rd on SW 72nd Ave.
DC- MVP 94100)760 Sr. AtV0J402 “MUST PfcESEW COUPON AT T1M€ OF SERVICE
DISCOVERY’S MIAMI
DAY AND DINNER CRUISES
FUN DAY CRUISES»
Includes Two Meals.
Sails 10:00 a.m. - Wednesday, Sunday
FREE BIRTHDAY CRUISE with Deluxe Dinner! \
Sail within one week of your birthday.
é MARD WINNING FOOD
Second
Person
tt*
11
FREE
JPPfit
Kids Sail FreeT*
SESIORSPECIAL (60+)* ,s“!ou:“,Tta
v J this ad for Day and Night Cruises
DINNER PARTY CRUISESn
Wednesday - Sails 7:15 PM.
Sunday - Sails 5:00 PM.
SUPPER CLUB CRUISESn
Friday, Saturday. Sails at 10:00 PM.
Dinner, Dancing All Night Long
_ w Happy Hour - 2 for 1 Drinks
SPECIAL THEMES Jâ„¢ fbe
On Wed. Dinner Cruises
When You Board Early.
Well Brands Only.'
"Learn How To Play” Casino Lessons.
Sun. Champagne Brunch
Featuring Breakfast & Lunch
Sun. Night -
Wine & All That Jazz
with Dana Paul & The Jazz Way Band
Wed. Night - Mardi Gras Night
+> Fri. Night - Discovery’s
Budweiser Bash
Sat. Night - Merengue
. Salsa and Latin Spice
V Featuring Clockwork and JM
Sabor Latino to Dance to. ^ '
Call your Travel Agent or
DISCOVERY CRUISE UNE”
Daily from Miami and Ft. Lauderdale
1-800-937-4477 or (954) 525-7800 Ext. 764
ALL ADVERTISED RATES ARE FOR FLORIDA'S RESIDENTS & AAA MEMBERS ONLY.
All specials and discounts Florida residents only. Valid through V.M/96.
Limited space per cruise. All discounted rates require advance reservations and payment
Certain restrictions apply Activities. Entertainment, rates subject to change.
•ALL PASSENGERS GOVT/SVC. FEES $19 ADDITIONAL.
I I
Open 7 days - until 11:00 pan.. (Sundays until 6:00 pan.). Se habla español.
Private Cabins Available. Most credit cards and PERSONAL CHECKS accepted.
fKids under 12 sail fee*, one per adult. Ships' Registry Panama.
THE PARTY SHIPS

ON PHEN-f EN
& MOT LOSING ENOUGH WEIGHT?
Let our 15 Year People
Proven Program take
lOyrs. off you
Our Medical Weight
Management Program can
combine your Doctor's
Phen-fen Medications with
our Natural Weight Loss
Program of 100%
Guaranteed oneonone
supervision guidance &
follow up.
/ Yes Unlimited Visits
/Yes More Food than You Con Eat : -V
/Yes Behavior Moderation <*mL*JL*
/ Yes Fast Immediate Results
• No Groups
• No Prepackaged Meals
• No Hunger
• No Caloñe Counting
â– iUUjl
ITnlbsJ
I to 30 k. EASY! Never Ml hun¬
gry! Gol 'piatfy of smelts' Al
the fane! And I feel yeot!
fiaren duration
(Indrviduat results may very)
1-800-466-2116
Natural Weight Loss Centers
12 Locations South Dade to West Palm
EUROPEAN
WAX CENTER
FABULOUS SKIN
A new wax is on the market. A Painless Wax.
One which has never before been seen anywhere
in this country. This EUROPEAN WAX
SYSTEM not only contains a special polymer
that shrink wraps the hair for easy, painless
removal, but it’s a low temperature zoax designed
with soothing jojoba oil which moisturizes the
skin at the same time.
Our unique EUROPEAN WAX SYSTEM
creates unbelievable results in unbelievable time.
Within minutes you too will realize that waxing
and european waxing are two totally different
concepts.
PAINLESS WAXING
FULL LEGS * : MEN'S BACK
bikini : <&on
UNDER ARMS ; 'PJU
EXPIRES 3/31/96 •• 3/31 9&
(305) 933-3341
3009 Aventura Boulevard
and rescue the school from bankruptcy with their
super intellectual powers in this musical comedy.
$3. Today at 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.; and
tomorrow 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. Fort Lauderdale
Children’s Theatre, 640 N Andrews Ave, Ft
Lauderdale; 584-9076.
Sports
Saturday, March 16
Fort Lauderdale Christian School Basketball Tournament
Miami Dolphins players face the faculty of the
Christian School in this benefit game. $4.7:00 p.m.
6330 NW 31st Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 972-3444.
Knights of Miami: The Knights meet the Palmetto
Hogs. $5.7:30 p.m. Curtis Park, 1901 NW 24th Ave;
374-2034.
Yoga: Stretch those muscles and relax that mind every
Saturday at 9:30 am. and Monday and Wednesday at
6:00 pm $8. First Presbyterian Church, 609 Brickell
Ave; 371-3439.
Sunday, March 17
Florida Panthers: The Panthers meet New Jersey. $22-
$27.6:00 p.m. Miami Arena 721 NW 1st Ave;
5304444.
Hialeah Park; See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, March 19
Florida Panthers: The Panthers meet Ottawa $22-$27.
7:30 p.m. Miami Arena 721 NW 1st Ave; 5304444.
Wednesday; March 20
Miami Heat The Heat meets Detroit $14-$28.7:30 p.m.
Miami Arena 721 NW 1st Ave; 5304444.
On the Road & Sea
Thursday, March 14
Guided Tour Adventures; Hop aboard the Tri-County
Commuter Rail Authority for guided tours of a
number of South Florida attractions—including Lake
Worth (Monday), South Beach, Lincoln Road, and the
Holocaust Memorial on Miami Beach (Tuesday),
Palm Beach’s Worth Avenue (Thursday), and Bayside
Marketplace (Friday) — each weekday (except
Wednesday) through April 7. $3 (round-trip). Call
800-TRI-RAIL for schedules and further information.
Saturday, March 16
Bear Cut Wading Tour Wade through the sand fiats and
grass beds of Biscayne Bay and discover some of the
bay*s most interesting creatures. $3.11:00 am. Meet
at Crandon Park Beach, 4000 Crandon Blvd, Key
Biscayne; 6624124.
Family Campfire Night Hike the park’s nature trails in
search of possum, owls, and foxes, then gather
around a bonfire for a marshmallow roast $3.7:00
p.m. AD. Barnes Park, 3401SW 72nd Ave; to reserve,
call 6624124.
Sunday, March 17
Art Deco District Garden Tour Explore the garden
spaces of Miami Beach’s older residences. $15. Today
at 9:00 and 1030 am., noon, and 1:30,3:00, and 4:30
p.m. Miami Beach Garden Center, 2000 Convention
Center Dr, Miami Beach; 672-2014.
“How to..." Series: Nature experts lead monthly hands-
on demonstrations; this month: “How to Adopt a
Rabbit” $1.2:00 p.m. Tree Tops Park, 3900 SW 100th
Ave, Davie; 370-3750.
Key Biscayne Sunset Canoe Trip: Paddle across the bay in
the tranquility of the late afternoon and view wildlife
up close. $20.4:00 p.m. Meet at Crandon Park Beach,
4000 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne; 6624124.
Propagation Workshop: Leam about the various
methods of reproducing tropical fruit trees. $25.10:00
a.m. Fruit and Spice Park, 24801 SW 187th Ave;
247-5727.
Hotlines
AIDS Housing Hotline; 652-8281 (Dade);
800-652-8284 (outside Dade)
Al-Anon: 6874049
Alzheimer’s Disease Hotline: 324-8415
American Cancer Society; 5944363
American Heart Association: 751-1041
American Red Cross: 644-1200
Animal Rights Foundation of Florida: 968-7622
Anti-Cult Hotline: (for help in leaving a cult or
families of cult members) 800-572-0372
Breast Implants Help Hotline: 457-0443
Broward and Palm Beach HELP: 476-2240
6 Performances * Mar. 14 - Mar. 17
"White hot intensity...Bold...Flamboyant
...Great Fun and Hugely Entertaining."
1075 FM
IBERIAtt
de los Artes Escénicos y lo Músico
-N. Y. Times
H Carnival Air Lines
Fl orí da. The Northeast. California. The Caribbean.
Presenta
National
Ballet
of
Spai
I Artistic Direction:
Aurora Nana Victoria
Pons Lorca Eugenia
The extraordinary art and
magic of Spain in a
spectacular presentation
of sensual passion.
BUY TICKETS
â– ncKmqji
Dade 358-5885
Broward 523-3309
Jackie Gleason Theater
673-7300
City of Hope
A Theatrical Presentation
AGENCY, INC.' PRODUCTION
NOW THROUGH
All programs subject to change. No refunds or exchanges.
MINISTERIO DE CULTURA
Floor Sample
Sale
UP TO
50% Off
Dinette Table &
4 Chairs
Entertainment
Center
149“
Designer Furniture Without Designer Prices
5850 South Dixie Hwy, South Miami •
661-9345 • 661-8077 Monday and Friday 10-8pm
Tue.,Wed.,Thur.,Sat. 10-7pm Sundays 12-5pm •
Ample Free Parking
Lay-away Plan «Financing & Delivery Available
Sale prices only valid when presenting ad
SE H Wb. ÃœS
57
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
it iil.-v i fbi lllft I* U-ilia. C
5 pc Dinette
Futons! < lio
MATTRESS SALE
Mattress.. & Box Spring
Twin $109.95 __
Full $139.95
Queen... $169.95
King....*..$269.95
> • Free Layaway
• Same Day Delivery Available
♦ Prices Valid w/ad Only
5 Drawer Cheft
(choke off colon)
$139.00
M«tai ftewfe ieci U
♦ Fv*on f
$239{chok« of<
FREE GIFT
w/purchase
$100 & more
• Free Layaway
Same Day Delivery Avada
♦ Prices Valid w/ad
m-, WIDE WORLD OF FURNITUR
It’s Time To See The Pros
Where Service Is #1!
No matter what age Honda ^¿IMIWERtIF certified, the services we offer on
or Acura you own, mainte- ^ new cars won’t void manufáctur-
nance plays an important part er’s warranty, and we’re sure
in its overall performance. you’ll drive away happy.
That’s why at Jap. Tech., we not only So, remember, when it’s time for car ser-
recommend regular check-ups, we make it vice... Go with Quality» Go with
affordable and quite simply — painless. Service, Go with Jap. Tech.
Our technicians are Honda and Acura
Bring this ad in for 5% off any repairs, (cannot be used with any others specials)
*42**! *189
Cooling System Service
'Acura's higher
EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON
Major Service Interval
Recommended at 15,000 • 30,000
•45,000 etc
‘Some models slghfly higher *
EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON
iron i w
Brake Special j Timing 9$iti
“L xa* | Belt Replacement
andmodeis ¡ Some models Witty higher
EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON ! EXP. 4-11-96 MUST PRESENT COUPON
cat. ri i*oo muji rntocroi uwrw | CAT. *4-11*30 muoi mcocni wurun ^
*Mini Major Meets the minimum level of service recommended by Honda.
TIE BEST EXPERT HORDA AN) ACURA SBflflCE
Open Saturday 8am - 2pm, by appointment Miami location only.
Monday-Friday 8am-6pm: 3625 S. State Road 7 (441) Hollywood. 652-0959 Brwd. 981-1700
7311 S.W. 41 Street (2 blks east of 826, behind Gables Honda) 261-0040 Brwd. Co. Lie# AR0404
All repairs warranty 6 mos./6,000 miles.
58
MIAMI'S BEST DEALS!
We'll Meet or Beat Any Competitor's Advertised Prices
Lounger & Ottoman
Sale Price ♦47
5pc. Dinette Set
Sale Price* 167
5 Piece Dinette
♦117
Twin/Full Bunk Bed
Frame *157
Tile Top Dining Room
Set with 4 Chairs
Sale Price ♦197
Matching Hutch &
Larger Table Avail.
Desk, Chair,
Hutch & Lamp
Sale Price
*47
Screens/
Room Divider
Sale Price *57
Vanity Mirror & Bench
♦97 * ,
(matching pieces available)
Chest
Sale Price
♦107
Canopy Bed
Headboard
footboard, and canopy Armoire*157
Sale Price *97 Choice of Colors
Entertainment
Center
Sale Price *147
(Black only)
Buy the Sofa, Get the
Matching Love Seat FREE
pearfoMSale Price *347
liner,
& Ottoman
(avaiable in 3 bofedkx colors)
Sale price * 137 I
Complete Metal Futon
w/8" Mattress
Sale Price ♦147
Head board/Footboard
$79
ultimate
furniture collection
3 Pc Coffee Tables
Sale Price *77
Your Futon Specialist
Major credit cards accepted
6833SW59th PL
South Miami
6634302
(Next to S. Miami Ftost Office)
Barstool
Sale Price
♦47
Financing with Approved Credit
Free Layaway Plan
Delivery Available
Prices Valid With Ad Only
18790S.W. 105 PL
Cutter RUge
2323996
(Martin Road Trade Oerter behind
Paramount G&m. West of US 1)
30342 Old Dixie Hwy
Homestead
2465364
(Next to Scotty’s)
And nothing gives yon back:
yonr hair, and yonr youth
like new UNIDERM
It’s a young man’s world. And nothing makes you look older than lost
hair. But now there’s new Uniderm, the amazing new procedure that
attaches hair directly through the skin-tonkin process of intervention.
You can have a new hairline, a new crown, and treat your new hair just
like it was growing: get it wet, rub it down, tousle it up...you’ll look just the
way you used to- and you’ll get the looks just like you used to, too. And
best of all, no one will know it’s not your own growing hair, no matter
how dose they get. For a free private consultation or brochure, call today
or send in the coupon below.
Also Available
for Women
REPLACEMENT
■ SYSTLMS»
11440 SW 88th StJlll
(N. Kendall Dr.) Kendall, FL 33176
598-5234
Name
,
Address
City
j
Staff
Phone
©HRS, 1996 As seen on TV Nationally
NT 314 ¡

Broward County Guttural Affairs Arts and Culture
Hotline: 357-5700 (Broward); 800-249-ARTS (outside
Broward)
Broward County Public Health Unit (HRS): 467-4882
Cancer Information: 358-8000
COC National AIDS Hotline: 800342-2437 (English);
800344-7432 (Spanish); 800243-7889 (TIYservices
for the deaf)
CMIdhelp I0F Foresters Hotline: 80O4-ACHHD
Coalition for Hypertension Education and Control:
8006644447
Cocaine Anonymous: 537-1379
Cocaine Hotline: 800COCAINE
Crisis Intervention/Suicide Hotline: 358-HELP
Dade County Citizens Safety Council: 592-3232
Deaf Services Bureau: 800955-8770 (voice line through
Florida Relay Service); 6684693 (TTY)
Domestic Violence Hotline: 547-3170
Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation for Adolescents: (The
Starting Place) 925-2225
Drugs, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens: 800443-3784
Environmental Hotline: (Citizens for a Better South
Florida) 444-9484
Families Anonymous: (for families who have an addict,
alcoholic, or loved one with a behavioral problem)
4430303
Family Counseling Services: (for in-home counseling to
people with HIV) 5732500
Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service: 800342-8011
Florida MV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English);
80O545-SIDA (Spanish); 800-AIDS-101 (Haitian
Creole)
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Information and
Referral Hotline: 5764000 ext 283
Guardian Ad Litem: (to assist abused and neglected
children in court) 6386861.
Habitat for Humanity: 670-2224
Health Crisis Network/AIDS Hotline: 751-7751
Helping Hands: Hands in Action (for victims of
physical, sexual, or emotional abuse) 952-0785
Hepatitis* Hotline: 80OHEP-B373
Herpes Speak-Easy Hollina: 8935555
HIV+National Support Croup: 441-9860
Homeless Hotline: 576HOME
Hospice Caro: (support for terminally ill patients)
591-1606
Housing Opportunities for Excellence: 3744660
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 800-329-FQOD.
I.CJLR.E.: (HIV outreach program) 324-9042
Jewish Family Service of Broward County: 749-1505 or
9660956
Legal Hotline for Older Floridians: 5765997 (Dade);
800-2525997 (outside of Dade)
Mental Health Crisis Center 6431400
Metro-Dado Cultural Affairs Arts and Culture Hotline:
557-5600
Miami Bridge: (runaway, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 324-8953
Miami Project to Cure Paralysis: 1-80OSTAND-UP
Miami Women's Health Center. 8336165
Narcotics Anonymous: 6620280
National AIDS Hotline: 80O343AIDS
National Cancer Institute Hotline: 547-6920 (Dade);
721-7600 (Broward)
National Food Addiction Hotline: 8008720088
National Organization for Women: 9337444
Office Paper Recycling Hotline: 594-1680
Overeaters Anonymous: 2748800
Planned Parenthood: 441-2022
Pregnancy and Drug Abuse Information: 5484528
Rape Treatment Center at Jackson: 5837273 (to report
a rage); 5836949 (|or recovery support)
Senior Center Hotline: (referral service for all elderly
services) 6284354
Seniors Hotline: (assistance with daily tasks) 3586060
SHE Center (Sex Health Education and women’s
medical care, including abortion information)
8955555
SIDS Hotline: (Sudden Infont Death Syndrome)
800-221-SIDS
South Florida HealthLine: 8236269 (Dade);
800624-3365 (outside Dade)
Spinal Cord LMngAssIstance Development (support
services for physically disabled persons) 887-8838
Survivors of Authority Abuse: (support for those
sexually victimized by trusted professionals)
5835833
Switchboard of Miami: (suicide hotline) 358-HELP
University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Contar Surgeon
Referral Line: 585-SURG
Vietnam Veterans Hotline: 646VETS
Women in Distress: (domestic violence hotline)
761-1133
Women of Miami Beach (WOMB) Helpline: 5346900
Women's Resource Counseling Center 4488325
rich and famous froi
is now in Coconut Grovo
Myron M. Persoff, M.D., F.A.C.S.
• Clinical Associate Professor
UM Medical Department of Plastic Surgery
• American Board of Plastic Surgery
• American Society of Plastic
& Reconstructive Surgeons
• American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
• Founding President, Palm Beach County
Society of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons
State-of-the-Art Surgical Facility
Complimentary overnight
Financing Available
Se Habla Español
Call Today for a FREE
Consultation and Video Imaging
* nose & chin reshaping
* facial & eyelid surgery
* breast enlargement
* breast reduction
* lifts
* tummy tucks
* liposuction
* body contouring
• laser skin resurfacing
This symbol designates surgeons
who are certified in the specialty
of plastic surgery by the American
Board of Plastic Surgery and are
dedicated to the higheststandards
® of patient welfare and surgical
excellence.
COCONUT GROVE PLASTIC SURGERY
2912 S.W. 27th Ave. Coconut Grove / 567.2889
M5M
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination, or treatment which is performed as a result of within 72 hours of responding to fne advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or tedment.
59
Hew Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
THE BIRDCAGE’ IS THE FALLING-DOWN
FUNNIEST COMEDY YOU’LL SEE THIS YEAR!”
Gene Shalit, THE TODAY SHOW
•••■• •••••• #« •« .*«• #« «»
a
★★★★
HYSTERICAL!
SCREAMINGLY FUNNY!”
BQl Diehl, ABC RADIO
•imUMSMBBBIKMBMCMlMim
An MGM Comían»
NOW SHOWING!
¿me
COCOWALK 16
3015 Grand Ave.
448-6641
^FtiHMtaDU
18741 Biscayne Btvd e 167M SL.
931-2873
¿me.
MALL OF AMERICAS 14
Palmetto Expressway & 836
266-6646
KBIDALL TDWnI COUNTRY
Ha. Turnpike & Kendall Or.
271-8196
ooiSmkii
A1A & Hollywood BML Hdywood Bdt
920-6330
ame.
OMN110
Omni International Mali
358-2304
snSiu
4999 Sheridan SL
987-4680
sotmubu
18591 S.DMeHwy.
238-4424
./ GENERAL CINEMA
* MIRACLE CENT® 11
3301 Coral Way
442-2299
*/ GENERAL CINEMA
^PEMBROKE PINES CINEMA 8
SW Pines Btvd. at Ramingo
437-7790
./ REGAL CINEMAS M.
^ CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
850 Ives Dairy Rd.(1 mi W oil-95)
652-8558
OCEAN CINEMA
LeJEUNE6
782 NW LeJeune Rd.
529-8883
.y UNITED ARTISTS
Amoves § hialeah
780 West 49th Street
826-7242
.y UNITED ARTISTS
^MOVIES § THE FALLS
U.S.1SW 136th SL
255-5200
COBB
v BAY HARBOR 4
96 SL W.of Coins. MamiBch.
866-2441
COBB
UNIVERSITY 7
SW 107th Ave. opp RU. S. Dade
223-2700
.y COBB
v MIAMI LAKES 18
At Main & Ludtam
558-3810
COBB
MILLER SQUARE 8
SW 138th Ave. South Dade
387-3494
ay COBB
V OAKWOO018
Oakwood Plan W5 & StWng
923-7777
✓ |
>ICITAL
✓ GENERAL CINEMA
RIVIERA CINEMA
South U S. 1 & 57th Ave.
666-8513
IN BROWARD: CORAL RIDGE, SAWGRASS, FOX FESTIVAL, CORAL SQUARE, DEERFIELD, FOUNTAINS. 8 @ WESTON.
GATEWAY, MERCEDE, MOVIES @ LAUDERHILL, MOVIES @ POMPANO, MARGATE 8, SWAP SHOP, INVERRARY. IN BOCA: MIZNER, SHADOWOOD, MOVIES @ TOWN CENTER.
FOR SHOWTIMES & TICKETS CALL 888-FILM
STARTS TOMORROW
AMCT>CAmE8
jSHERDAN PLAZA 12
M SHERIDAN STREET
NOUVWOOO ^
867-4460 â–¼
AMC THEATRES
FASMON BLAND 16
18741 BISCAYNE BLVO
031-2873 ♦
AMC THEATERS
COCO WALK 16
3018 QMNO ME.
COCONUT GROVE .
MALL OF THE
AMERICAS 14
PALMETTO XWYB36 .
284 MM a|l
AMC THEATRES
OCEANWALK 10
OCEANWALK MALL
KXLYWDOOBLVO O AIAl.
920-4330 ?
AMC THEATRES
OMN110
OIMWTOMATKJNM.
358-2304
AMCTVCXTRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. 1 XTS.W. laSTHST
238-4424
COM
KENDALL»
KENOALL OR W
Of FLA.TFW
BYRON-CARLYLE
SCO- 71 STREET
MIAMI BEACH
888-8823
0098
UNIVERSITY 7
Miner weoppfu
223-2700
0099
MIAMI LAKES 10
ATMAM8LU0ÃœIM
668-3810
0099
MILLER SQUARE 8
1S9M9WMTNÍT
387-3484
ALL MOVIES STEREO
0098
mm
883-7777
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVMS AT
THE FALLS
U.S. 1A S.W 136TH ST
255-5200
UMTSDARH9TÍ
MOVES AT
PEMBROKE
11360 PMESBLVD.
435-3700
0848MLCMEkM
HIALEAH CBIEMA
RALMETTO XWY 4
NW 103ROST
667-8888
GENERAL CM RM
MIRACLE CENTER
10
CORAL WRY -
442-2288 ¥
OCEAN CM BAAS
LE JEUNE CMEMA 6
7TN 819 NW LEJGUNE RO
REGAL CM BIAS
CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
ISO IVES DAIRY RO
(1 MIWOF >-K|
3HX*
R PK. FOX FESTTVM. FOX SUNRISE
SAWOPMSS. MOVtE&aOMMNO. 4MRKETPL
•I9VERBR. WE9TON. DBJMY IQl SWAP 9H0P 0.L
OATEVMY. MVERRARY POUNTMNS C9L, M9SK7N BAY
C9L.0EEflFU)C94, CORAL 9P 9. TRML DI. M0ME81
MAMATE. CROSS PITY, 00—OYHTON.
WATCH THE ACADEMY AWARD8 MARCH 85â„¢
*¡SIUSEL
STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 15TH!
GENERAL CINEMA'S
INTRACOASTAL THEATRE
SUNNY ISLES 8LVD.
3701 N.E. 1 ¿3RD ST.
N. MIAMI BEACH
NS-74H
COM THEATRES
BAY HARBOR 4
96 ST. W. OF COUJNS
MIAMI BEACH
866-2441
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMBHCAS
PALMETTO X-WAY
IS36
OAA 41AA
GENERAL CINEMA’S
MIRACLE C841ER 10
CORAL WAY
442-2299
COM THEATRES
OAKWOOO IB CINEMAS
2600 OAKWOOO BLVO..
HOLLYWOOD
923-4321
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. I A
S.W. 185THST.
238-4424
GENOA! aNOHA*
HIALEAH 6
PALMETTO EXFWY, &
N.W. I03RD.ST.
557-96M
GENERAL CINEMA’S
PEMBROKE PINS 8
S.W PME5 BLVD. 8
FLAMINGO RD.
437-7790
Watch the Academy Awards March 25 on ABC
COM THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 6
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
COM THEATRES
KENDALL 9
KENDALL DR.
W. OF RA. TURNPKE
598-5000
AMC THEATRES
COCO WALK 14
3015 GRAND AVE.
448-4441
antonio melanie daryl
banderas griffitli hannan
A comedy about
two sisters
who thought
they had nothing
in common.
“TWOTHUMBS UP.WAY UP!”
• SISKEL & EBERT
“THERE WONT BE A
BETTER FILM THAN THIS.
A fantastic, original piece of work.
- Gene StskeL SISKEL & EBERT
w
to
a f ilm by
&EthanEoen
homespun
:í;:: PwyGram • •• GRi
©1996 Poly Or aro Film Production# B.V. r AH Rights Reserved.
R
STARTS FRIDAY
MARCH 15!
amc, Qowwdt CINEMA
AT
COCO WALK 16
301$ GRAND AYE
448-6641
IN BROWARD: SURISE. IN BOCA: SHADOWOOD.
hearts 81
i Mi
■HI lili Hü Hi 1UL1I
iililil JliillW ,«Ii^ MIL
BlcsShákm m KM iünHi mi
Cl
.Bgilli Mi ^KHMilil
PolyGram
111 “"t ill ill
miner
Touchstone
Pictures

The Young and
the Shiftless
By Todd Anthony
A bottle rocket is little more than a glorified
firecracker on a stick. You point one upward
and light it, but you can never be sure that it’ll
fly in the direction you want it to go. Some¬
times bottle rockets just fizzle out At best they
sparkle, streak skyward, and pop. Unlike dyna¬
mite, they can’t blow up anything. They do not
erupt into a thousand glittering points of light
that cascade gently to earth and make people
ooh and ah in wonder, nor do they burst in
midair with a concussive eardrum-splitting
report
Which is why the self-deprecating movie
title Bottle Rocket is deceptive. Although small
in scale and not designed to compete with
big-budget Hollywood pyrotechnics, this
droll, exuberant debut from a tightly knit
group of ambitious twentysomething Texans
defies the odds. Despite a first-time director
and a cast of nobodies (with the exception of
small supporting turns from James Caan and
Like Water for Chocolate’s Lumi Cavazos), it
delivers more entertainment bang than nine
out of ten of its flashier,
more expensive counter¬
parts.
Nobody expects much
from a bottle rocket, nor,
very likely, did anyone
expect much from
cowriter/director Wes
Anderson and his friend,
cowriter/star Owen C. Wil¬
son. They met while both
were students at the Univer¬
sity of Texas. Neither had
ever so much as apprenticed
on a feature film before. Short on cash and
experience but long on enthusiasm and
dreams, they wrote the Bottle Rocket script
and then enlisted Wilson’s younger brother
Luke and older sibling Andrew to act in what
would become, owing to financial constraints,
a thirteen-minute black-and-white short But
that short played at the Sundance Film Festi¬
val and ultimately convinced Hollywood pro¬
ducers Polly Platt and James L Brooks (The
War of the Roses, Say Anything, Broadcast
News) to bankroll a full-color feature.
Bottle Rocket tells the story of three misfits
— not unlike Anderson and the Wilsons —
who, bound by friendship, loyalty, and the
desire to do something with their lives,
embark upon a petty crime spree. Tightly
wound Dignan (Owen C. Wilson, loony and
intense as Dennis Hopper), the most enter¬
prising of the three, supplies the energy and
chutzpah. He idolizes an eccentric but suc¬
cessful thief, Mr. Henry Games Caan), who
rips off homes using his landscaping service
— the Lawn Rangers — as a front. But Dig¬
nan has a penchant for screwing up every¬
thing he becomes involved with, and as the
film opens, Mr. Henry has just fired him.
Anthony (Luke Wilson) is smarter and
more levelheaded than Dignan, but he goes
along with his best pal’s half-baked schemes
because he understands how badly Dignan
wants to be a leader. Bob (Robert Musgrave),
the black sheep of a well-to-do family that
includes his sadistic older brother Futureman
(Andrew Wilson), is the only member of the
gang with a car. Individually or collectively,
these three amigos pose about as much of a
threat to society as, well, a bottle rocket For¬
get The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight,
these chronic underachievers are the Gang
That Couldn’t Walk and Chew Gum at the
Same Time. Call it Slacker meets Reservoir
Dogs.
A potent combination of dry humor, quirky
This droll, exuberant debut
from a tightly knit group of
ambitious twentysomething
Texans defies the odds.
characterizations, and surprisingly strong act¬
ing from a fresh but inexperienced cast pro¬
pel Bottle Rocket to altitudes far above the
norm for ultra-low-budget independent films.
The writing by Wilson and Anderson is spiky
and unhinged. (Example: After successfully
robbing a bookstore, Dignan announces,
“Before we divide the loot, Bob gets the Spirit
award.”) At times Bottle Rocket feels like it’s
unraveling into an episodic collection of
tongue-in-cheek riffs, but the center ulti¬
mately holds; it veers off in a few unexpected
DEPARTING TWICE DAILY
FROM MARTHA'S
ON THE INTERCOASTAL
1-800-474-DICE
ACUPUNCTURE = PAIN RELIEF
LOWCOSTCONIMUNITY CUNIC $20 F€R VISIT
Tuesdays • Thursday • Saturdays
Low Back Pain
Sciatica
Headache
Neck & Shoulder
Insomnia
Digestive Disorders
Menstrual Disorders
Depression
Stress
Stop Smoking
ACUPRESSURE
ACUPUNCTURE INSTITUTE
9835 Sunset Dr., S-207 595-9500
directions but some¬
how remains aloft.
The misguided roman¬
tics on-screen may not
be capable of realizing
their dreams, but their
real-life counterparts
behind the cameras
have succeeded in
pulling off the film-
making equivalent of
the big heist: an
assured, original, and
endearing motion pic¬
ture.
Joshua Melville’s The
Day is another debut.
The picture, which
chronicles the final 24
hours in the life of a
fallen Seventies punk
rock idol, marks a
career shift into film-
Anthony (Luke Wilson,
their crime spree in a
making by the Miami resident and former
major-label record producer/mixer/engineer.
Dedicated to the late jazz bassist Jaco Pasto-
rius and punk-glam guitarist Johnny Thun¬
ders, Melville’s gritty black-and-white compo¬
sition follows the downward spiral of Jarred
Fillmore, a singer/songwriter turned junkie
whose fifteen minutes of fame expired fifteen
years ago. Nowadays Jarred whiles away the
time bumming change, making his ex-lover’s
life miserable, and ducking the loan shark to
whom he owes twenty grand. As if all that
isn’t bad enough, someone has stolen the
master tapes to the poor guy’s current record¬
ing project, pretty much nixing any shot at a
comeback Jarred might have had.
Owen Comaskey nails the strung-out char¬
acter of Jarred in the lead role, and Melville’s
direction evokes the anonymity and squalor
that have become the washed-up rocker’s
constant companions. Melville, who had a
hand in just about every aspect of the film’s
making, captures some arresting visual
imagery — notably a few fuzzy, dreamlike
New York cityscapes - but he doesn’t give
us much reason to like Jarred or to care
about his predicament. Comaskey tries to
humanize Jarred by conveying some of his
frustration and vulnerability, but Melville
We 11 a damn abL his proS
mst because nobody loves him. It’s aserióos
invest much emotion
to
in someone who
left) and Dignan (Owen C. Wilson, right) launch
bookstore
doesn’t care about himself. Nor does the
writer/director provide much of a plot.
Jarred bounces around the East Village mak¬
ing a nuisance of himself until the very real
threat of bodily harm from his knife-wielding
loan shark sends the down-on-his-luck musi¬
cian packing — to Miami, final resting place
for so many of the entertainment industry’s
has-beens.
Still, Melville’s direction is impressive; The
Day does not look like the work of a rookie,
let alone one straining against a tight budget
And Coriiaskey’s performance, while not
exactly compelling, makes his character far
more interesting than he would otherwise
be. More like a bottle rocket than Bottle
Rocket, Joshua Melville’s film throws off a
few sparks but never explodes.
The Day plays March 14,15, and 16 at 8:00 p.m.
at B.A.R. space, 1659 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
538-8242. Admission is $6.
Bottle Rocket
Written by Owen G. Wilson and Wes Anderson;
directed by Wes Anderson; with Owen C. Wilson,
Luke Wilson, Andrew Wilson, Robert Musgrave,
Lumi Cavazos, and James Caan.
The Day.
Written and directed by Joshua Melville;
with Owen Comaskey, Kimberly Weiant, and
Al Grandpa" Lewis.
mini
Have \Ne Got The Answer F°rJ0U--
VOICE MAIL
Price includes a new private phone number answered (? ^ ^ (V¿ START
24 hours a day with your voice. ; s joDAY!
• Confidential ONLY M
• Unlimited Messages OOp /imgriCdU ®
•.bnu„sSc~$(\95
• 800 #’s Only $4.95 ^ Pat VAonttt (305\ 442-8080 - Dade
Per Month (+ usage) (jhtt 7644544 - Broward 1
MIA895 (H
New Times March 14 - 20,1996

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
DIET CLINICS CAN BE DANGEROUS!
Don’t Entrust Your Health To An Impersonal Clinic or
Doctor Who Treats Your Weight Problem As A “Sideline”
We Are South Florida’s Oldest, Established
“Fen-Phen” Program
Many Other Medications Are Also Available
• Private M.D. Supervision
• No Nurse Practioners
• Evening Hours
• Affordable Private Treatment
• Over 10 Years Experience You Can Trust
For Information:
Call Now
BOCA MEDICAL
BARIATRIC GROUP
Marc H. Sencer M.D.
Visiting Clinical Fellow
Columbia University
MIAMI OFFICE
6280 Sunset Drive
Suite 404
South Miami FL
BOCA OFFICE
801 Meadows Road
Suite M4|
Boca Raton FL
(305)669-040! (407)347-1071
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
AIDS CLINICAL RESEARCH UNIT
(ACRU)
NOW AVAILABLE
IN CLINICAL TRIALS
MERCK PROTEASE INHIBITOR
• Indinavir Sulfate as monotherapy, or in
various combinations with ZDV, 3TC,
and/or d4T. Open-label Indinavir available
in a protocol-specified select population.
• Indinavir available for HIV + individuals
with CD4 500 cells/mm3 or less.
CURRENTLY SCREENING
AND ENROLLING CALL ACRU
PROTOCOL SCREENING
243-3838
If you want the truth before |
you waste your time.
I FILM CAPSULESl
NewTimes
rnrurm stttict
i M1 1 l
K 4 1
ie to 1 *The La
* * n° Ba
MSB il * Weeke
• Mini &
GRAFT - No Mis
test in Techniques
ndages
nd Appointments
Micro Grafts
;sed Work
onsultation
PHYSICIAN t SURGEONS,
1E SKIN, HAIR t HAILS
ielroy Beach, FL 33445
Ite C • Hollywood, FL
& Kev West
DR. LAWRENCE.. SHAPIRO •
D.O.P.A. DISEASES OF H
4983 W. Atlantic Ave., I
4050 Sheridan St. • Sa
Also Orlando
mm gam ;m i h
I listen to Dr. S. On W1NZ (940 AM) This Saturday at 10:30AM 1
I THE PATIENT AMY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENTS HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAT. CANCEL PAYMENT OR 1
IK IQNURSK) FOR AjrrOTHBSamCLEXAMUnOHOt TCAHiaTMaiBPaRMMBASAI&UIOf ANO 1
IwmumHOUBOfKSrOUJUGTOTKAOWnSUeTFOOWIHHDBaunBfHOOIBIUCBFHSHia. I
1 EXAMINATION Of TREATMENT
w.
1st Anniversary
CELEBRATION OFFER
— — — — COUPON — — — —
First 100 Sail Free*
On All Cruises
(Day or Nite)
MH 3-14-96
Advance Reservations Required (No Walk-Ups) *Pay Only Port/Serv Chgs $19.00
Featuring
Sat. A.M. Gambler’s Spree 11:004:00 • Double Jackpot Awards
Player Bonus Awards • 2 Las Vegas Rules Casinos • Player Tracking
on Florida’s Hottest Slots • Double & Triple Jackpots Daily!
Live Liberal Lotto • All Valid V.I.P. Cards Accepted
V.I.P. Bonus & Discounts • Thurs. Night Blackjack Tournaments
TROPICANA SAILING SCHEDULE
Sailing From the Port of Miami, Pier 6
Day Cruises Evening Cruises
Tues 11:00am - 4:30pm Mon-Wed 7:30 - Midnight
Wed-Fri 1:00pm - 6:00pm Thu-Fri 7:30pm - 1:00am
Sat 11:00am - 4:00pm Sat 8:30pm - 2:00am
Sun 11:00am - 4:30pm Sun 6:00pm - 11:30pm
SPECIAL - FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMAS
Sailing Feb. 12 and Mar. 11 Departs 4:30AM - Arrive Freeport 10:30AM, LV Freeport 12:00PM,
AR Miami 6:00PM, $25.00 plus $49.00 Govt Port & Svc Fee. First 100 Sail Free Does Not Apply to Bahama Cruises.
Sumptuous
Complimentary
Buffet Dining
Live Entertainment
Throughout Ship
Live Music & Dancing
Exquisite Ala
Carte Dining**
(** Fri./Sat. Evening Cruises)
Reservations Call
(305) 447-9999 or (800) 965-3999
or Call Your travel Agent or Concierge Today!
Prepaid Resv. Req. tor free Cruises. Coupon must be presented at embarkations. Restrictions Apply. Offers are for
FI res. only and may not be combined with any other discounts or promotions. All cruises/activities subject to can¬
cellation without notice. $19 port svc fee all cruises. Offer expires 3-31-96. Ships Registry: Bahamas
COUPON
nd
fÜÜ
CARIBBEAN
6S0CA LMUZIK/(j
^merengue
&JUNKAN00
® STREET DANCING I
SPARROW INNER CIRCLE
EXUMA ARTURO TAPPIN
BARRINGTON LEW SPICE & CO.
SHINEHEAD TONY REBEL
L CRAZY DENYSE PLUMMER
\ FREDDIE MCGREGOR RASILEY
HOT CHOCOLATE
FUNKYD
ADMIRAL BAILEY
RED PLASTIC BAS
FRIDAY MARCH 22nd
* Time: 8pm *
CALL YOUR LOCAL CABLE
OPERATOR NOW!

Gun control: Police chief Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand) draws a bead on the bad guys
Raising the
Coen
Brothers
By Todd Anthony
Fans of black comedy and fiendishly frisky
film noir rejoice: The Coen brothers are
back! The savagely funny Fargo is a vicious
sidesplitter, easily the drollest, hippest,
sweetest satire Joel and Ethan Coen have
dreamed up since 1987’s Raising Arizona.
The film marks a return to form for the sick
siblings whose joint moviemaking career —
they ¿ways share writing, directing, produc¬
ing, and editing duties — had followed a
downward trajectory that reached its nadir
with 1994’s big-budget (by the Coens’ stan¬
dards, anyway) turkey The Hudsucker Proxy.
Fargo recalls the cheeky spirit of Blood Sim¬
ple, the pair’s hell-bent-for-leather 1984
debut Like that audaciously assured coming-
out party, Fargo squeezes both dramatic ten¬
sion and comic relief from a tale of small¬
town treachery, tapping into spontaneously
combusting violence and twisted character-
driven humor.
Sly wit perverse camer¬
awork, and characteriza¬
tions that seem at once
loving and lacerating per¬
meate the Coen brothers’
work. The duo has taken
some critical hits for
the crime of allegedly
appearing condescending
toward their regular-folk
characters. But those
who lob such charges
grossly oversimplify the
matter. One of the brothers’ greatest assets
is their ability to simultaneously smile on
and poke fun at their creations. For exam¬
ple, Fargo’s heroine, pregnant police chief
Marge Gunderson (Blood Simple’s Frances
McDormand) is low-key to a fault, begins
every other sentence with the word “yeah”
(pronounced “yah”), and utilizes quaint
phrases such as “in a jiff.” Although she may
seem terminally polite and more concerned
about the source of her next lunch buffet
than she is about catching a killer, don’t let
that fool you. This lady cop knows how to
play hardball when she needs to. Marge
may battle morning sickness during her
examination of a snow-covered crime scene,
but she doesn’t back down from an armed
confrontation with a ruthless murderer.
Just as Dan Hedaya’s sleazy Texas bar
owner set Blood Simple’s plot in motion by
hiring a lowlife private detective to kill his
wife, so too scamming car salesman Jerry
Lundegaard (a cartoonishly hapless William
H. Macy) kicks off the fun in Fargo by
procuring a pair of bumbling bad guys — the
loquacious Carl Showalter (bug-eyed Steve
Buscemi as yet another hilariously caf-
feinated motormouth) and the silent loose
cannon Gaear Grimsrud (Peter Stormare) —
to kidnap his squeaky-voiced spouse Jean
(Kristin Rudrud). Jerry intends to pay off the
oafish thugs with a tiny fraction of the mil-
lion-dollar ransom he hopes to collect from
Jean’s rich, despotic father Wade (Harve
Presnell). (The powerfiil-guy-behind-a-desk
is a recurring motif in Coen brothers films.
Wade is Faso’s.)
Wade, no stranger to double-dealing in the
name of business, doesn’t much care for his
spineless son-in-law. Their tense relationship
(and the Coen brothers’ talent for crafting
sharp dialogue) can best be summed up by
one exchange following the car salesman’s
attempt to convince Wade to finance a real
estate deal:
“This could work out real good for me and
Jean and [the Lundegaards’ son] Scotty,”
Jerry pleads.
“Jean and Scotty never have to worry,”
Wade growls.
But Jerry certainly does. First, Jean nearly
eludes her blundering abductors. Then a cop
stops the car driven by the two fleeing crooks
(with Jean bound and gagged and bundled
up in the back seat) because Carl forgot to
screw on the license tags. Carl’s pathetic
attempt to talk, then bribe, his way out of
trouble only makes the lawman more suspi¬
cious. Gaear intervenes. When Jerry finally
hears from his blundering accomplices, Carl
informs him that “circumstances have
changed, Jerry. Acts of God. Force majeur.
Blood has been shed. We’ve incurred risk.”
Coen brothers films have provided more
than their share of outstanding perfor¬
mances: Dan Hedaya and M. Emmet Walsh
up to their scuzzy necks in duplicity in Blood
Simple; Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter as
the star-crossed white-trash lovers in Raising
Arizona; and now William H. Macy and Steve
Buscemi in Fargo. Buscemi, with his rheumy
eyes and lips drawn tight over protruding
teeth, is perfectly cast as the chatterbox who
isn’t quite as intelligent as he thinks he is.
And Macy beautifully conveys the transpar¬
ent desperation of a man who long ago mort¬
gaged his soul and now wants to refinance.
But the actors merely ride shotgun on this
stagecoach. Joel and Ethan Coen hold the
reins. It was a long and bumpy trip from Ari¬
zona to Fargo, but they made it. Welcome
back, fellas.
Fargo.
Written by Joel and Ethan Coen; directed by
Joel Coen; with Steve Buscemi, Frances
McDormand, William H. Macy; Peter Stormare,
Kristin Rudrud, and Harve Presnell.
One of the Coens’greatest
assets is their ability to
simultaneously smile on and
poke fun at their creations.
ACTORS
MODELS
ACTING TECHNIQUE
STUDIO WORKSHOPS
FOR FILM, TV, STAGE
Within the actor-model, 8m
different roles he chooses io portray,
the business he competes in, and the
Iegwy ot the art, itere is a promising bu
fragile potential for an extraordinary lift
and career. An actors workshop should
enhance this potential insiglttfolly, and devel¬
op the actor-model's ability to he creative and
function to Ms brightest capacity and compete
in the business with a secure edge.
styles demanded by Film, TV, and Stage is the priority of the
Process Actors Studio Workshops, the actors professionalism in
the business, which include th interview and die audition process;
The protocol in approaching the agents and the cashng directors;
His responsibility while employed as an Actor in a professional.
production on stage, film, or TV set; and ultimately the working
relationship with other actors and die director is discussed. The
awareness ot the importad differences and applications between
the actois own identity and the identity of the character which he
portrays is an integral part of the Process training.
For 10 week workshops, which include one pri¬
vate session, at $350or tor private sessions in
English or Spanish at $50 a session or .10 lor $400
or for Alexander Technique by the only certified
teacher in Miami at $45 a session
Call THE “PROCESS”
(305)867-9274
yapr Smile 11
Bra First Thitii
Pe|ple Notice
[KÉfapfiaoo^M
*7 An Anointment
BEACH DEHTAL CENTER
Georgia M. Hernandez, DMD & Associates
AUCTION, DECO TO DIKO-miD CENTUM MU UIODEAN
miMDMJUupn)
(PMVIÍWmCilWHOOH-M)
Heywood Wakefield • Barcelona • George Nakashima • Russell Wright • Bertoia
Knoll • Herman Miller • Eames Action Series • Stardust • Tiffany Studios • Paul
Woodard • Walter Von Nessen • Maxfield Parrish • Chagall • Miro • Dali •
Wesselman • McCoy • Roseville • Frankoma • Erie • Frankart • Nu Art • Gio Pont!
• Thaden & Jordan • Thonet • Parian • Bakelite • Chrome • Art & Italian Glass
• 1950's & 60's Lamps, French Copper Enamels & More
OF SPECIAL INTEREST
• • • A Very Rare Jungle Green Ruba Rhombic Vase • • •
• • • George Nakashima Dining Table & Chairs • • •
Sale conducted by Lonle L Buchner, Auctioneer AU 1410 AB 954
10% Buyers Premium
PRIVATE COLLECTIONS
660 S.Tamiami Trail • Osprey (Sarasota), Florida
(941) 9663255 Fax (941) 966-7629
Call or Fax for more Information or Directions

New Timas March 14 - 20,1996
PARIS • NEW Vfjp
i—
FASCINATING!"
â– Howard Feinstein, New York Post
INTRIGUING
"For anyone who
has ever fantasized
about what it's really
like to be a model
Leaves the viewer
hungering for more!
â– Kirk Honeycutt Hollywood Reporter
SEE THIS
MOVIE!"
Candace Bushnell, Vogue
A Danel NMxr Rtaxxjcnoj CATWALK FEflllM] ChrbtyHiuoiim
â–¡rcnn. Mlbc Score Malcolm McLaren Rxxxcer Suq mlla fasmcn rxxxder edc luxe Dwjiuh Ruumr l E>mrK
CP-CHil II 11 AND BDfTPR MUCH MDSES CiI iTTlVI EXECUTIVE F*3QDUCERS DAtd. WOLF AND DCNALD R05EhfQD
© 1996 Arrow nr EAsn n »C. mx wcmti reserved AN AjUOWhv
«^5
WOLF Production
Visit arrow Entertainment web Site http://www.arrowfilms.com
RELEASE
J
ALLIANCE CINEMA
927 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH CALL 531-8504 FOR INFO
64
SOUNDTRACK AVAIIABIE ON SIMEN RECORDS
htlpy/www.dimtmionlilim.tom/dimension.hlml
Ü
m
m
"THE FINAL HELLRAISER' IS
THE MOST TERRIFYING OF ALL!"
Joseph o. Maticen, world of fandom magazine
cocoSfóii
3015 Grand Aw.
448-6641
SHER¡DAÍÍl2
4999 Sheridan St.
967-4680
SOimiDAbEI
18591 S. Dixie Hwy.
238-4424
GENERAL CINEMA
MIRACLE COTTER 11
3301 Coral Way
442-2299
GENERAL CINEMA
HIALEAH CINEMA 8
103rd Si Opposite Westland M«
567-9888
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES 0 PQIBfMME PINES
11350 Pines Blvd.
435-3700
OCEAN CINEMA
LeJEUME 6
782 NW LsJeuna Rd.
529-8883
KENDALLS
ail Or. W. ol FL Tumpika
596-5000
COBB
0AKW00D
11
Oakwood Ptaa 1-86 4 SUrting
923-7777
III BROWARD: CORAL RI06E. SAW6RASS, FESTIVAL. CORAL SO. MOVES OIAU0ERMU.. MOVES O POMPANO. SWAP SHOP.
NOW
SHOWING!
mhsuIndis
FASHH
18741 Bscaynt Btal0187th SL
931-2873
omc,
MALL OF AMERICAS 14
Palmetto Expressway 4 836
266 6646
amg.
OCEAN WALK 10
AM 4 mpmt M. MywoJ Bdi
920-6330
Omni International 4
358-2304
Fill
T1
jg
t
Fil
m 1
Ãœapsu
les
The following are capsule reviews of movies opening this
week, or currently showing, in the Greater Miami area. For
information about movie times and locations, see
“Showtimes,” contact local theaters, or call 888-FILM, a
free service.
Openings
Dersu Uzala (U): A wOy Mongolian hunter befriends a
Russian surveyor who has been dispatched to map
out the Siberian wasteland. Director Akira Kurosawa
ruminates about the nature of friendship and the
indomitability of the human spirit against a
breathtaking backdrop of sweeping, starkly
magnificent vistas.
Ed (PG): The cute-animals-in-ludicrous-situations
movies just keep rolling out Friends star Matt
LeBlanc, already accustomed to being upstaged by a
precocious monkey on his hit TV show, now shares
screen time with a baseball-playing chimp (no, really)
in LeBlanc’s motion picture debut
Executive Decision (R): Die Hard on a plane! Joel Silver,
epitome of the slick, money-grubbing modem
Hollywood producer and the man responsible for the
Bruce Willis action series (not to mention Fair Game)
presents this far-fetched, testosterone-driven, stop-the-
terrorist flick. Six elite U.S. military operatives led by
Steven Seagal and Kurt Russell board a hijacked plane
in midair and attempt to defuse a bomb loaded with
nerve gas that if exploded, could paralyze
Washington, D.C. (Not that anyone would notice.)
Fargo (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Two Much (PG-13): Fernando Trueba’s eagerly
anticipated followup to 1992’s enchanting Belle
Epoque falls flat Antonio Banderas plays a shifty art
dealer who pretends to be identical twins in order to
woo a pair of sisters: ditzy Melanie Griffith and
horribly coiffed Daryl Hannah. Banderas gives it his
best shot and actually enlivens a few uninspired
comedic bits; and Joan Cusack earns a chuckle as
Banderas’s bemused assistant But Griffith and
Hannah do nothing with a script that offers little in the
way of originality or wit Too little.
Ongoing
12 Monkeys (R): A reluctant time traveler (Bruce
Willis at his least smirky and most intense) from a
bleak, virus-plagued Philadelphia of the future
visits the City of Brotherly Love in 1996, where,
with the help of a skeptical psychiatrist (Madeleine
Stowe), he attempts to prevent the original
outbreak of the virus. But his plans clash with
those of a terrorist cell known as the Army of the
12 Monkeys and their mentally unbalanced leader
(Brad Pitt in a caffeinated, turbocharged rush of a
performance that would have been right at home in
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest). Director Terry
Gilliam (Brazil, Time Bandits) returns to peak form
with this mind-blower, using a crackeijack script
by Janet and David Peoples (Blade Runner) as a
point of departure and fleshing it out with his own
vividly twisted, cynical imagination.
Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (PG-13): All righty,
then. America’s best-paid pet detective returns, and
this time he’s recruited the entire animal kingdom
to transport his earnings. Yuk along as Ace
ventures from a Tibetan ashram to the jungles of
deepest, darkest Africa, embarking upon one
wacky escapade after another.
Angels & Insects (U): Peter Greenaway would be
proud of this dry, droll English period drama (set
in the mid-1800s and based on A.S. Byatt’s novella
Morpho Eugenia, one of two that compose her
book Angels & Insects). Drawing parallels between
the behavior of people and that of bugs, it uses the
unbiased eye of a scientist to look at love, passion,
and the fine line separating appearances from
reality. Written by Belinda and Philip Haas and
directed by the latter (the same team responsible
for 1993’s The Music of Chance).
Anne Frank Remembered (PG): Jon Blair’s
documentary (narrated by Kenneth Branagh)
reconstructs much of the heroic writer’s young life
through interviews with those who knew her.
Beautiful Girls (R): Guys. Gals. Relationships.
Commitment problems. Turning 30. Angst But
with Uma Thurman, Mira Sorvino, and thirteen-
year-old bombshell-in-training Natalie (The
Professional) Portman lighting up the huge
ensemble cast at least the title meets truth-in-
advertising criteria.
Bed of Roses (PG): More like a wilted bouquet this
limp arrangement from first-time writer-director
Michael Goldenberg offers Christian Slater and
Mary Stuart Masterson in a romantic comedy so
mushy they should have checked it for head rot
Before and After (PG-13): A teenage girl meets a
brutal death and all signs point to murder at the
hands of her introverted boyfriend (Edward
Furlong). The boy’s parents (Liam Neeson and
Meryl Streep) wrestle with doubts about their
son’s innocence while battling to keep him out of
jail. Adapted from the 1992 novel of the same name
and directed by Barbet Schroeder (Reversal of
Fortune).
The Birdcage (R): Mike Nichols (The Graduate)
directs Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, and
Nathan Lane in the English-language remake of
the beloved French comedy La Cage Aux Folies,
about a middle-age gay couple who pretend to be
straight Elaine May (Heaven Can Wait, Ishtar)
scripted. The Birdcage marks the first motion
picture collaboration of the legendary Nichols-May
comedy team that split up in the mid-Sixties so that
both could try their luck in Hollywood.
Black Sheep (PG-13): Frightening, isn’t it how
those untalented Saturday Night Uve alumni just
keep churning out the product?
Bottle Rocket (R): Reviewed in this issue.
Broken Arrow: John Travolta is the bad hotshot
pilot Christian Slater is the good hotshot pilot and
stolen nuclear warheads are the booty for which
they wrangle. Directed by Hong Kong action
maestro John Woo from a screenplay by Graham
Yost the man who wrote Speed.
Casino (R): Did anyone complain that John Ford
directed too many Westerns, or that Hitchcock
made too many suspense thrillers? Director Martin
Scorsese has taken a few slugs from critics who
have called his latest wiseguy epic “GoodFellas
goes to Vegas.” True, some GoodFellas
comparisons are inevitable: Casino stars
GoodFellas headliners Joe Pesd and Robert De
Niro (Pesci’s role closely reprises the loose cannon
mafioso he played in the earlier film) and was
adapted by Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi from a
non-fiction Pileggi book — as was GoodFellas. But
Casino deserves better than to be written off as a
second jaunt over familiar turf. For starters,
Scorsese may well be this country’s greatest still-
active director, and Casino showcases the master
at the top of his game. Sharon Stone also
commands respect with her career-best
performance as a hooker with a heart of dry ice.
And, as is usually the case in Scorsese films, the
supporting cast is uniformly excellent Hollywood
offers no surer thing than Scorsese, DeNiro, and
Pesci working it Only a sucker would pass on
Casino.
City Hall (R): A1 Pacino plays a popular New York
City mayor (á la Fiorello LaGuardia). Things get
hairy when a stray bullet from a gun battle between
a cop and a drug dealer kills a six-year-old black
child. Harold Becker (Sea of Love) directs from a
script cowritten by a gaggle of heavyweights: Paul
Schrader (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull), Nicholas
Pileggi (Casino, GoodFellas), Bo Goldman (One
Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest), and Ken Upper
(founder of the billion-dollar Wall Street
investment firm Upper & Company).
Dead Man Walking (R): Surprise! Just when you
think you have this film pegged as a well-
intentioned, by-the-numbers anti-capital-
punishment treatise, it changes course in
midstream and evolves into something much more
original and affecting. Susan Sarandon plays a
naive nun who helps a death row inmate appeal his
sentence. Both the sister and the film take a pretty
sympathetic view of his plight until she meets the
families of the murder victims and becomes
entangled in their grief as well. Sean Penn is
stunning as the condemned man watching the
minutes tick by. Forget the bad-boy antics and the
questionable move into directing. This tour de
force re-establishes Penn as one of the most gifted
actors of his generation.
Don’t Be a Menace (R): Big brother Keenen Ivory
Wayans made a name for himself lampooning
Seventies blaxploitation flicks in I'm Gonna Git
You Sucka; younger siblings Shawn and Marlon
Wayans set their sights on more recent gangsta
flicks like Menace II Society and Juice.
Down Periscope (PG-13): Some men buy Vettes.
Some men wave big guns. Frasier Crane — er,
Kelsey Grammer — works out his phallic
insecurities by commanding a submarine.
Whatever floats yer boat, doc.
Eye for an Eye (R): The Flying Nun with a Death
Wish. When creepy Kiefer Sutherland (still pissed

}X off about the Julia Roberts thing, apparently)
\ murders her daughter and then goes free on a
Jt technicality, Sally Field (!) takes the law into her
I own hands.
Father of the Bride Part II (PG): Sven if you enjoyed
1991’s Father of the Bride, there’s still less than a
I 50-50 chance you’ll like this schmaltzy, predictable
i sequel. And if you didn Y like the earlier film, keep
| your distance. The only plot development of
I significance in Father 2 is that both the bride and
â–  her mother get pregnant at the same time. The rest
I is all, um, formula.
French Twist (R): Victoria Abril has never been
\ funnier or sexier than she is in this variation on the
| tried-and-true romantic triangle formula. The twist:
I The other man is a woman.
Happy Gilmore (PG-13): Too bad Gary Gilmore
j didn’t get ahold of Adam Sandler before he went
: into production on yet another lame cash grab
masquerading as a comedy.
Heat (R): What you see is what you get: A1 Pacino
í and Robert DeNiro as a cop and a robber out to do
what they do best. Exciting fare, although not
( much nutritional value. Too many fine supporting
i players to mention here. Directed in high -Vice
I style by Michael Mann.
Heavy Metal (R): The animated 1981 soft-core sci-fi
I odyssey based on the magazine of the same name
has been the single most active title in Columbia
Pictures’ entire library over the last ten years.
Although today it has been eclipsed in terms of
I innovative animation and erotic content, the film
maintains a loyal core of fanatic devotees who can’t
get enough of its sci-fi, fantasy, and sword-and-
sorcery story lines, as well as its charmingly dated
soundtrack featuring cuts by early Eighties arena
i rockers.
Hellralser: Bloodline (R): Remember when it used to
be an insult to call somebody a pinhead? That all
I' changed with the advent of Clive Barker’s
Hellraiser series (Bloodline is the fourth
installment). Barker’s Pinhead is billed as the
Black Prince of Hell, qualifying him as the epitome
I of cool.
Homeward Bound II (G): Two mutts and a cool cat
court danger on the streets of San Francisco.
If Lucy Fell (R): Writer-director Eric Schaeffer is no
fool. First he cast himself as a regular guy who
dates his neighbor in this romantic comedy. Then
he cast Elle Macpherson as the neighbor. Sarah
Jessica Parker costars.
The Juror (R): Demi Moore plays the only single
mother in America who welcomes jury duty.
Somehow it seems fitting that she winds up
trapped in a deadly dilemma about whether or not
to acquit a mobster whose sexy hitman (Alec
Baldwin) is threatening to kill her son if the
Mafioso is convicted. What does it say about our
) country that an actual juror gets paid something
l like $12 per day, while Demi Moore earns $12
million for portraying one in a movie?
Leaving Las Vegas (R): If it’s happy loving couples
\ you want, look elsewhere. John O’Brien, the author
| of the book from which this bleak movie is
adapted, committed suicide shortly after learning
that his semi-autobiographical novel would become
a film. Nicolas Cage has collected the most effusive
critical accolades of his career in the role of
" recently fired Hollywood screenwriter Ben, an
unapologetically self-destructive drunk who settles
on Vegas as the proper locale for his terminal
bender. Plans for his farewell binge are
momentarily interrupted when he falls hopelessly
in love with Sara (Elizabeth Shue, also receiving
excellent notices), a variation on the hooker-with-a-
heart-of-gold archetype who may well be Ben’s lost-
soul mate.
Mary Reilly (R): Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde have a
lovely new assistant—Julia Roberts! Stephen
Frears (My Beautiful Laundrette, Dangerous
Liaisons) directs, and John Malkovich costars as
the medicine man with the whopping identity
crisis.
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG): Sincere, predictable Richard
Dreyfiiss vehicle about a teacher-composer who must
reconcile his love of music with the fact that his own
son cannot hear.
Mr. Wrong (PG-13): You know the pattern by now:
Quirky but unthreatening stand-up comic hits the
jackpot with TV sitcom, writes breezy but insanely
popular book, then takes a shot at movie stardom.
Hoping to follow in Tim Allen’s and Paul Reiser’s
footsteps, Ellen DeGeneres plays a thirtysomething
single woman who thinks she’s met the perfect guy
only to find out otherwise.
Muppet Treasure Island (G): Kermit, Miss Piggy,
Gonzo, and Rizzo take on Long John Silver and his
entire chain of fast-food franchises.
The Postman (PG): “Poetry dbesn’t belong to those
who write it, but to those who need it,” reasons Mario
(Massimo Troisi), the timid title character, in an
attempt to enlist the aid of exiled Chilean poet Pablo
Neruda (Cinema Paradiso's Philippe Noiret) to
support Mario’s quest to woo the most beautiful
woman on sun-dappled Capri. The Italian island’s
postmaster, overwhelmed by the volume of mail
bound for Neruda (mail that begins to arrive even
before the fabled wordsmith does), hires Mario, the
son of a local fisherman, to serve as Neruda’s personal
letter carrier. The unlikely friendship that develops
between poet and postman leads to a Cyrano-like
courtship in this enchanting character study. Troisi,
considered by many to be Italy’s finest actor, died of
heart failure at the age of 41 one day after completing
principal photography on the film.
Rumble in the Bronx OR): Jackie Chan (winner of a
1995 MTV Lifetime Achievement Award!), one of
the world’s most popular action/martial-arts stars,
takes on thugs, mobsters, and motorcycle
gangs© running loose in the South Bronx.
Nobody kicks butt more stylishly than martial
artist-acrobat-choreographer Chan, who, over the
course of his remarkable 20-year career, has done
all his own stunts (his physical feats earning him
comparisons to the great silent film comedians
Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd).
Sabrina (PG): Yet more evidence of the decline of
civilization: Harrison Ford, Greg Kinnear, ajad Julia
Ormond highlight Sydney Pollack’s remake of the
incomparable Billy 'Wilder original, which featured
Humphrey Bogart, William Holden, and Audrey
Hepburn. Ford and Kinnear play rich brothers who
fight for Ormond’s affections.
Sense and Sensibility (PG): Nineteenth Century mores
provide a backdrop for this adaption of Jane Austen’s
classic novel about two sisters who struggle to find
romance in a society obsessed with status. Co-writer
Emma Thompson stars with Kate Winslet, Hugh
Grant, and Alan Rickman.
Taxi Driver (IQ: This Paul Schrader-penned, Martin
Scorcese-directed descent into a hellish maw of urban
angst and anomie still packs a wallop twenty years
later, retaining the power to shock and unsettle
viewers. With Robert DeNiro, Jodie Foster, and
Harvey Keitel.
That Day (U): Reviewed in this issue.
Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead (R): Don’t be
fooled; the only thing this Tarantino-esque film noir
has in common with the Warren Zevon song is the
title. Reformed mobster “Jimmy the Saint” (Andy
Garcia) — known for using words as his weapons—
tries to go straight But ex-boss “the Man with the
Flan” (Christopher Walken) lures Jimmy out of
retirement with an offer to pull one last job.
Complicating matters drastically is Jimmy’s promising
new romance with the alluring Dagney (Gabrielle
Anwar). Things get sticky when Jimmy’s boys botch
the job and Walken’s character hires “Mr. Shhh”
(Steve Buscemi) to cap them all.
Toy Story (G): Following the disappointing box-office
(by Lion King standards, anyway) generated by this
summer's cartoon fare, Disney takes animation into
the next century with the world’s first completely
computer-animated feature film. Tom Hanks, Tun
Allen, Don Rickies, and Annie Potts give voice to a
room full of toys that come alive whenever the young
boy who owns them leaves. Bet there isn’t a
Pocahontas doll among them.
Up Close & Personal (PG-13): A onetime craps dealer
from Reno (Michelle Pfeiffer) rises to the top of the
TV newscasting heap with the help of an older
newsman (Robert Bedford) who becomes both her
mentor and her lover.
The White Balloon (U): This sly and deceptively simple
comedy about a young Iranian girl in search of the
perfect goldfish thoroughly beguiled the audience
that saw it at the 1996 Miami Film Festival. Written by
acclaimed Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami and
directed by one of his disciples, Jafar Panahi.
White Squall (PG-13): An adventure becomes a rite
of passage when a freak storm sinks a floating
prep school and outside authorities threaten to
assign blame for the calamity to the vessel’s
enigmatic skipper (Jeff Bridges). Directed by
Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner).
ALTÍHE CRITICS AGREE
THE WHrtE BALLOON'
SOARS!
i WINNER! CAMERA POR i
^ CANNES FILM FESTIVAL W
CISÍS OCTOBER FILMS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. OCTOBER
NOW SHOWING
EXCLUSIVELY IN
FLORIDA AT
avc. CINEMaI
cocoWalk It
44*4*41
1—
Uctober Films Website:
http://www.octoberfilms.com
GENERAL CINEMAS
miracle CENTER 10
CORAL WAY
442-2299
“TC¡kresistible'.
a Family Winner!”
/\ AMERICAN URBAN RADIO NETWORKS
A .Ron Btewington, American
i “Nothing Short Of AgrowwS.
“Exciting!’
-Stephen Holden,
THE NEW YORK TIMES
AMC THEATRES
SHERIDAN PLAZA 12
4999 SHERIDAN ST.
HOLLYWOOD
987-4680
AMC THEATRES
OCEAN WALK 10
333 HARRISON ST.
HOLLYWOOD BEACH
920-6330
AMC THEATRES
FASHION ISLAND 16
18741 BISCAYNE
BLVD.
931-2873
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
PALMETTO X-WAY
8636
266-6646
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT PEMBROKE
3 ML W. UNIV.BIVD.
ON PINES BLVD.
435-3700
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT
HIALEAH
780 WEST 49TH STREET
826-7242
COB8 THEATRES
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107THAVE.
OPP.F1U
223-2700
OAKWOOD 18
â—¦NEMAS
2800 OAKWOOD
BLVD.,
HOLLYWOOD
923-4321
OCEAN ONEMA
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
N.W.7THST.
8 LEJEUNE RO.
529-8883
AMC THEATRES
SOUTH DADE 6
US. 18
S.W. 185THST.
238-4424
COBB THEATRES
BYEON/CARIYIE 1.
5C0-7VSTRFET
KIAMI BEACH
866-9623
COB8 THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
AMC THEATRES
KENDALL TOWN
8 COUNTRY 10
HA. TPKE. AT KENDALL DR.
271-8198
COBB'S
MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3390 MARY ST.. SUITE. 380
ABOVE PLANET
HOLLYWOOD
447-9969
COBB THEATRE5
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT MAIN 8 LUDLAM
558-3810
Alto In Biowara at cora* Sida© Fo*
&r^Fou£talns' saworc.ssW4sto?
Mercedes, Swaps nop. Movies at
ffy0* »»*=■*g&towoc
WWch IN. Academy Awart, March 25 on
iNO!*5£fSiic5uR8gfcc;
Visit “Homeward Bound 11^ at http://www.disney.com

New Times March 14 - 20,1996
Beaches
Fil
m
¡g¡
Showtimes
Following lo a schedule for movies opening and currently
screening at local theaters. All times p.m. unless otherwise
noted. A # Indicates a movie that opens this week. All movie
times are subject to change without notice; please call
individual theaters or 888-FILM (a free service) to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna «¡4434777
French Twist (R) Daily 6:00,8:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun matinee
4:00)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Orand Ave; 448-6641
Sense and Sensibility (PS) Thur 1:45,5:00,7:45,10:35; Fri-
Sun 12:00n, 5:00,10:00; Mon-Wed 1:20,7:45
City Hall (R) Thur 1:20,5:00,7:40,10:10; Fri-Sun 2:40,7:40
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed 5:05,10:10
Things to Do In Denver When You're Dead (R) Thur 3/14 only
10:45
Mr. Wrong (P6-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:20
The Postman (PG) Thur 1:25,5:30,8:05,10:35; Fri-Sun
12:30,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a);
Mon-Wed 1:25,5:30,8:05,10:35
Angels 4 Insects (U) Thur 3/14 only 1:35,5:30,8:05
Leaving Las Vegas (R) Thur 3/14 only 5:10,7:50,10:20
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 1:45,5:35,8:10,10:25; Fri-Sun
12:40,2:50,5:35,8:10,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:25a);
Mon-Wed 1:15,5:25,7:35,10:10
Up Close & Personal (PC-13) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:50,10:35;
Fri-Sun 12:00n, 2:30,5:00,7:35,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show
12:50a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:40,10:20
Down Periscope (P6-13) Thur 1:30,5:20,8:00,10:20; Fri-
Sun 12:20,2:40,5:20,8:00,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show
12:35a); Mon-Wed 1:30,5:20,8:00,10:20
Heavy Metal (R) Thur-Sun 12:30,2:45,5:30,8:05,10:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:35a); Mon-Wed 1:35,5:30,8:15,10:40
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:40,5:15,7:30,10:10; Fri-Sun 12:20,
5:20,10:20; Mon-Wed 1:20,7:50
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 1:15,1:55,5:00,5:40,7:25,8:10,
10:00,10:45; Fri-Sun 12:00n, 1:00,2:35,4:30,5:25,7:15,
8:10,10:10 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,12:45a); Mon-Wed
1:15,1:55,5:00,5:40,7:30,8:10,10:05,10:45
Hellraiser Bloodline (R) Thur 1:50,5:20,8:00,10:05; Fri-
Sun 12:45,2:55,5:30,8:10,10:25; Mon-Wed 1:50,5:20,
8:15,10:30
RetUe Rocket (R) Thur 1:40,5:25,7:50,10:00; Fri-Sun 2:50,
7:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 5:30,10:35
The White Ralloon (U) Thur 1:30,5:10,7:30,9:45; Fri-Sun
12:25,2:35,5:10,7:30,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m);
Mon-Wed 1:30,5:10,7:30,9:45
«Fargo (R) Fri-Sun 12:30,2:45,5:40,8:15,10:30 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 2:00,5:15,8:00,10:25
«Two Much (PO-13) Fri-Sun 12:05,2:30,5:05,7:40,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 1:40,5:20,8:00,
10:35
*Ed (PD) Fri-Sun 12:10,2:25,5:15,7:30,9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a); Mon-Wed 1:10,5:15,7:30,10:00
«Executive Decision (R) Fri-Sun 12:45,1:30,4:15,5:00,7:00,
7:50,10:00,10:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed
1:00,1:45,5:00,5:30,7:50,8:30,10:40
Bill Cosford Cinema
University of Miami (off Campe Sane Ave); 284-4861
Dersu Uzala (U) Fri 7:30; Sat-Sun 5:00,7:30
Le Jeune Cinemas 6
782 UdeuneRd; 529-8883
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 3/14 only 2:30,5:05,7:40,10:00
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Down Periscope (PD-13) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:10,10:10
(Thur 10:15) (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
The Birdcage (R) Daily 2:30,5:00,7:30,9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
Homeward Round II (0) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:05,8:05,10:05
Hellraiser: Rleedline (R) Daily 2:10,4:10,6:10,8:10,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 2:00,4:45,7:20,9:50 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:15a)
3380 Mary Street; 447-8888
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 1:40,4:25,7:35,10:00 (Fri-Sat
Info c Vi AW 1 9*9^0^
Mr. Holland's Opus (PD) Daily 1:15,4:15,7:15,10:00
ReautHúl Girts (R) Daily 1:25,4:10,7:45,10:10 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:50,4:45,8:00,10:25 (Thur 10:35)
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Nuppet Treasure Island (D) Daily 1:45,4:35,7:20,9:55 (Fri-
Cut Iptp ofiAtv 10'0T1p\
Happy Dilmere (PD-13) Daily 1:30,4:00,7:30,10:00 (Fri-Sat
lste show 12*152)
Before and Alter (PS-13) Daily 1:50,4:30,7:40,10:05 (Fri-
g0 Sat late show 12:20a)
Mary Reilly (R) Daily 1:15,4:30,7:25, )0:20 (Fri-Sat late
show l2:30a)
French Twist (R) Daily 1:35,4:20,7:40,10:10 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:35a)
Homeward Bound II (8) Daily 1:20,4:05,7:05,9:45 (Fri-Sat
matinee 12:10)
Miracle Center 10
3301 Coral Way; 442-2289
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:25,4:15,7:30,10:20 (Fri-Sat
10:35)
City Hall (R) Thur 1:35,4:25,7:15,10:15; Fri-Wed 4:25,
10:00 (Fri-Sat 10:15)
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:00,3:00,7:20
Before and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 5:00,10:00
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:30,7:50,10:20
(Fri-Sat 10:25)
Down Periscope (P6-13) Daily 1:00,3:10,5:25,7:45,10:00
(Fri-Sat 10:10)
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:20,4:15,7:15,10:00
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:15 (Thur 1:30), 4:20,7:30,10:10
(Fri-Sat 10:20)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:00,3:10,5:15,7:45,10:05; Fri-Wed
1:10,7:45
Hellraiser: Bloodline (R) Daily 1:10,3:15,5:25,7:40,10:15
(Fri-Sat 10:30)
Homeward Round II (C) Thur 1:00,3:05,5:15,7:15,9:15; Fri-
Wed 1:05,3:05,5:15,7:20,9:30
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:35,10:15 (Fri-Sat
10:30)
«Two Much (PD-13) Daily 1:25,4:40,7:40,10:15 (Fri-Sat
10:25)
Omni 4 and 6
1601 Biscayne Blvd; 372-3439 and 358-2304
Don’t Be a Menace (R) Thur 1:45,5:35,7:50,10:00; Fri-Wed
7:50,10:00
Rroken Arrow (R) Thur-Fri 1:40,5:10,7:40,10:15; Sat-Sun
12:10, 2:30,5:10,7:40,10:15; Mon-Wéd 1:40,5:10,7:40,
10:15
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 1:55; Fri 1:45,5:25; Sat-Sun
12:15,2:50,5:35; Mon-Wed 1:45,5:25
City Hall (R) Thur 2:20,5:20,7:50,10:20; Fri 2:20,7:30; Sat-
Sun 2:50,8:10; Mon-Wed 2:20,7:30
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 1:30,2:00,5:00,5:30,7:30,
8:00,10:00,10:30; Fri 1:30,2:30,5:10,5:20,7:40,8:00,
10:00,10:10; Sat-Sun 12:10,12:40,2:40,3:00,5:00,5:30,
7:30,8:00,10:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 1:30,2:30,5:10,5:30,
7:40,8:00,10:00,10:10
Down Periscope (PD-13) Thur 2:00,5:00,7:35,9:50; Fri 2:00,
5:00,7:35,9:50; Sat-Sun 12:Q0n, 2:20,5:00,7:35,9:50; Mon-
Wed 2:00,5:00,7:35,9:50
Hellraiser: Rleedline (R) Thur 1:50,5:20,7:30,9:45; Fri 1:50,
5:20,7:30,9:45; Sat-Sun 12:30,2:40,5:20,7:30,9:45; Mon-
Wed 1:50,5:20,7:30,9:45
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 2:30,5:30,8:00,10:30; Fri 5:15,10:20;
Sat-Sun 12:15,5:10,10:30; Mon-Wed 5:15,10:20
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 2:10,5:10,7:40,10:10; Fri 2:15,5:10,
8:00,10:35; Sat-Sun 12:00n, 2:45,5:20,7:45,10:15; Mon-
Wed 2:15, 5:10,8:00,10:35
«Executive Decision (R) Fri 2:00,5:00,7:45,10:30; Sat-Sun
11:50a, 2:30,5:15,8:00,10:40; Mon-Wed 2:00,5:00,7:45,
10:30
*Ed (PC) Fri 1:35,5:15,7:45,10:20; Sat-Sun 12:20,2:35,
5:15,7:45,10:20; Mon-Wed 1:35,5:15,7:40,10:20
Riviera
1560 S Dixie Hwy, 666-8514
City Hall (R) Thur 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15; Fri-Wed
7:00,9:30
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 12:15,2:30,7:15; Fri-Wed
12:15,2:30,4:45
Before and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 4:45,9:30
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 12:35,3:00,5:30,8:00,10:30 (Fri-
Cat loto chow 1
The Rirdcage (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:15,5:00,7:40,10:25 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:55a)
Pink Floyd: The Wall (R) Fri-Sat 12:00m
«The Postman (PD) Daily 11:30a, 2:00,4:45,7:30,10:15
Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Bakery Centre 7
5701 SunsetDr 6624841
Theater closed for renovation.
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr 598-5000
Dead Man Walking (R) Daily 1:30,4:30,7:10,9:40 (Sat early
show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Sense and Sensibility (PD) Thur 3/14 only 7:00,9:45
City Hall (R) Thur 12:25,2:40,5:00,7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed
1:30,7:15 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Mr. Wrong (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 12:30,2:40,4:45,8:00,
10:10
Rumble In the Rronx (R) Daily 12:40,2:50,5:00,7:50,10:00
(Sat early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Rabe (0) Thur 3/14 only 12:50,3:00,5:10
Down Periscope (PD-13) Daily 12:30,2:40,5:00,8:00,10:15
(Sat early show 10:20a; Fri-Sat late show 12:25a)
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Thur 1:45,4:40,7:30,10:00;
Fri-Wed 1:30,4:30,7:20,9:50 (Sat early show 10:30a; Fri-
Sat late show 12:30a)
Hellraiser Rleedline (R) Thur 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:15,9:30;
Fri-Wed 12:30,2:45,4:50,7:30,9:45 (Sat early show
10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 12:30,3:00,5:00,7:3p„ lQ:P0pEri.Wed
4:45,9:40 (Sat early show 10:30a)
•Ed (PD) Daily 12:20,2:15,4:10,6:10,8:10,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
•Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:30,4:40,7:25,10:00 (Sat
early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
•Two Much (PD-13) Daily 2.-00,4:30,7:10,9:40 (Sat early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Or 271-8198
Toy Story (8) Thur 2:15,5:25; Fri-Sun 12:55,2:45,5:15;
Mon-Wed 1:50,5:35
Leaving Las Vegas (R) Thur 1:50,5:35,8:00,10:30; Fri-Sun
7:30,10:00; Mon-Wed 7:30,10:05
Mr. Holland's Opus (PD) Thur 1:45,4:50,7:45,10:35; Fri-Sun
1:20,4:50,7:45,10:40; Mon-Wed 1:45,4:50,7:45,
10:35
The Juror (R) Thur 7:30,9:55; Fri-Sun 1:25,5:05,7:35,
10:10 (Fri-Sat late show 12:25a); Mon-Wed 2:15,5:05,
7:35,10:10
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 1:40,5:20,8:05,10:25; Fri-Sun
12:45,3:10,5:35,7:55,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a);
Mon-Wed 1:40,5:20,8:05,10:25
Muppet Treasure Island (G) Thur 2:10,5:05,7:15,
9:30; Fri-Sun 1:00,3:10,5:20; Mon-Wed 2:10,5:05,7:15,
9:30
Happy Gilmore (PD-13) Thur 1:55,5:45,8:15,10:30; Fri-Sun
12:50,3:20,5:25,7:50,9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 12:10a);
Mon-Wed 1:55,5:45,8:15,10:30
Refore and After (PG-13) Thur 2:05,5:15,7:50,10:10; Fri-
Sun 12:40,3:15,5:40,8:00,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a); Mon-Wed 2:05,5:15,7:50,10:10
The Birdcage (R) Thur 1:40,2:15,5:00,5:30,7:40,8:10,
10:15,10:40; Fri-Sun 12:25,1:30,3:05,5:00,5:40,7:40,
8:15,10:20,10:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed
1:40,2:15,5:00,5:30,7:40,8:10,10:15,10:40
Homeward Round II (8) Thur 2:00,5:10,7:25,9:40; Fri-Sun
12:30,2:40,5:10,7:15,9:30; Mon-Wed 2:00,5:10,7:25,
9:40
Miller Square VIII
13838 Miller Rd; 387-3494
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 7:40,9:45; Fri-Wed 7:30,9:35 (Sat-
Sun matinees 2:10,4:50; Fri-Sat late show 11:40)
Muppet Treasure Island (D) Thur 3/14 only 7:15
Happy Dilmere (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 7:30,9:35
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 7:45,9:55; Fri-Wed 8:00 (Sat-
Sun matinees 1:55,3:55,6:00; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Refore and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 9:40
Down Periscope (P8-13) Thur 7:50,9:50; Fri-Wed 7:45,9:45
(Sat-Sun matinees 1:45,3:45,5:45; Fri-Sat late show
11:45)
The Birdcage (R) Thur 7:00,9:30; Fri-Wed 7:10,9:30 (Sat-
Sun matinees 2:00,4:40; Fri-Sat late show 11:50)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 8:00,10:00; Fri-Wed 10:00
Homeward Bound II (6) Daily 7:00,9:00 (Sat-Sun matinees
1:45,3:30,5:15; Fri-Sat late show 11:00)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 7:15,9:40 (Sat-Sun matinees
2:05,4:45; Fri-Sat late show 11:55)
*Ed (PD) Daily 7:50,9:50 (Sat-Sun matinees 1:50,3:50; Fri-
Sat late show 11:50)
«Two Much (PD-13) Daily 7:40,9:55 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:15,
5:25; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Movies at the Falls
8888 Reward Dr; 255-5200
Mr. Holland's Opus (P6) Thur 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00; Fri-
Wed 12:45,4:10,7:10,10:10
Black Sheep (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 2:20,7:00
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 12:20,2:40,4:45,7:20,9:30;
Fri-Wed 12:20,2:30,4:40,7:20,9:20 (Fri-Sat late show
11:40)
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 12:40,3:00,5:00,7:25,9:35
CThur9:40) (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
City Hall (R) Thur 1:30,4:20,7:20,9:45; Fri-Wed 12:40,
5:20,10:15
If Lucy Fell (R) Daily 12:30,2:45,4:50 (Thur 4:40), 7:40,
9:35 (Fri-Sat late show 11:50)
The Juror (R) Thur 2:30,7:40; Fri-Wed 3:00,7:45
Mary Reilly (R) Thur 3/14 only 12:00n, 5:10,10:10
Reautiftil Girls (R) Thur 12:10,4:20,9:20; Fri-Wed 9:15
Rroken Arrow (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:25,4:50,7:35,10:10; Fri-
Wed 12:00n, 2:20,4:40,7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show
12:20a)
Muppet Treasure Island (D) Thur 12:10,2:15,4:30,7:15,
9:25; Fri-Wed 12:10,2:15,4:30,7:00
Down Periscope (PG-13) Daily 12:25,2:40,5:15 (Thur 5:10),
7:35 (Thur 7:30), 9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Up Close & Personal (PD-13) Thur 1:15,4:10,7:10,9:50; Fri-
Wed 1:15,4:20,7:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,5:15,7:40,10:15; Fri-
Wed 1:30,4:15,7:10,9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
' «Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:20a)
•Ed (PD) Daily 12:15,2:25,4:25,7:30,9:40 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
South Dade 8
18581 South Dixie Hwy; 2384424
Movie times for Friday through Wednesday were not
available at press time
Broken Arrow (R) Thur 1:45,5:30,7:45,10:00
Happy Dilmore (PD-13) Thur 1:35,7:55,9:55
City Hall (R) Thur 5:35
Rumble In the Rronx (R) Thur 2:00,5:55,8:05,9:55
Down Periscope (PO-13) Thur 1:30,5:45,7:45,9:45
The Rirdcage (R) Thur 1:30,5:25,7:50,10:10
Homeward Bound II (0) Thur 1:55,6:00,8:00,9:50
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:40,5:40,7:40,9:40
Hellraiser: Rloodllne (R) Thur 1:50,5:50,8:10,10:05
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Suite 119; 531-8504
Taxi Driver (R) Thur 8:00,10:15; Fri-Wed 8:00 (Sat-Sun
matinees 3:30,5:45; Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
«Catwalk (U) Daily 10:15
Bay Harbor IV
1170 sane Concourse; 866-2441
Before and After (PD-13) Thur 3/14 only 1:50,4:20,7:30,
10:00
Up Close A Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:30,4:10,7:05 (Thur
7:00), 9:40
The Birdcage (R) Daily 1:40 (Thur 2:00), 4:30,7:20,10:00
Mr. Holland's Opus (PG) Daily 1:20 (Ihur 1:30), 4:15,7:00,
9:45
•Two Much (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:40,7:30,10:00
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St; 860-9623
Broken Arrow (R) Daily 1:50,4:30,7:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
City Hall (R) Thur 1:30,4:30,7:30,10:05; Fri-Wed 1:30,7:30
Happy Gilmore (PG-13) Thur 3/14 only 5:00,10:20
Muppet Treasure Island (8) Thur 3/14 only 2:15,7:30
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:45,4:40,7:50,10:25 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:30a)
Hewn Periscope (PG-13) Daily 2:00,4:45,8:00,10:15 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:20a)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 2:15,4:15,6:15,8:15,10:15; Fri-Wed
4:50,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Homeward Bound II (G) Daily 2:00,4:00,6:00,8:00,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
•Ed (PD) Daily 2:15,5:00,7:50,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show
12:15a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:40,4:45,7:40,10:15 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:40a)
North Dade
California Club VI
850 Ives Daily Rd; 652-8558
Broken Arrew (R) Thur 3/14 only 1:00,3.-05,5:20,7:30,9:45
Rumble in the Bronx (R) Daily 1:15,3:10,5:15,7:30 (Thur
7:20), 9:35 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Up Cíese & Personal (PD-13) Daily 1:10,4:00,7:10 (Thur
7:00), 9:30 (Sat early show 10:00a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Daily 1:05,3:00,5:10,7:15,9:15
(Sat early show 10:00a)
The Rirdcage (R) Daily 1:30,4:05,7:00,9:25 (Sat early show
10:00a)
Hellraiser: Bloodline (R) Daily 1:20,3:20,5:30,7:35,9:45
(Thur 9:40) (Sat early show 10:00a)
«Executive Decision (R) Daily 1:00,4:10,7:20,9:50 (Sat
early show 10:00a)
Fashion Island
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 931-2873
Dead Man Walking (R) Thur 3/14 only 4:40
The Juror (R) Thur 3/14 only 2:05,7:20
Rroken Arrew (R) Thur 1:30,5:45,8:15,10:40; Fri-Wed
12:25,3:20,5:45,8:15,10:40 (Wed early show 10:40a; Fri-
Sat late show 12:55a)
Muppet Treasure Island (PG) Thur 1:55,5:05,7:10; Fri-Sun
12:30,2:50,4:55; Mon-Wed 12:30,2:50,4:55,7:20,9:35
(Wed early show 10:35a)
City Hall (R) Thur 2:25,5:15,7:40,10:05; Fri-Wed 12:15,
2:30,5:05,7:40,9:50 (Wed early show 10:50a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:05a)
Rumble in the Rronx (R) Thur 1:15,6:00,8:25,9:20,10:05;
Fri-Wed 12:45,2:55,5:45,7:55,10:30 (Wed eariy show
10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Baba (8) Thur 3/14 only 2:30
Up Cíese & Personal (PG-13) Thur 2:35,4:40,5:25,7:15,
8:00,9:55,10:35; Fri-Sun 11:15a, 1:50,4:35,7:20,10:05
(Fri-Sat late show 12:50a); Mon-Wed 1:50,5:10,7:45,
10:20 (Wed eariy show 10:45a)
Down Periscope (PG-13) Thur 1:25,5:30,7:35,9:45; Fri-Wed
1:05,3:10,5:45,7:50,9:55 (Wed early show 10:25a; Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m)
French Twist (R) Thur 1:45,5:35,7:50,10:10; Fri-Wed 1:20,
3:15,5:35,7:35,9:35 (Wed early show 10:35a; Fri-Sat late
show 11:35)
Anne Frank Remembered (PG) Thur 3/14 only 4:50
Heavy Metal (R) Thur 1:35,5:45,8:30,10:25; Fri-Wed 12:35,
5:30,10:35 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
The Birdcage (R) Thur 1:20,2:15,4:30,5:20,7:25,8:10,
10:15; Fri-Wed 11:20a (Fri-Sun only), 12:50,2:15,4:00,
5:15,7:00,8:10,10:00,11:00 (Fri-Sat 11:15) (Wed eariy
show 11:00a; Fri-Sat late show 12:50a)
If Lucy Fell (R) Thur 1:50,5:40,7:45,9:50; Fri-Wed 1:15,
3:20,5:25,8:05,10:10 (Wed early show 10:55a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a)
Bettis Rocket (R) Thur 1:40,6:00,8:20,10:20; Fri-Sun 3:15,
8:30; Mon-Wed 3:15,8:15 (except Wed)
Hellraiser Rleedline (R) Thur 2:00,5:10,7:05,9:15,10:45;
Fri-Wed 12:40,2:40,5:40,8:00,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show
12:25a)
Homeward Round II (G) Thur 2:10,5:00,7KX), 9:00; Fri-Wed
12:55,3:05,5:15,7:25,9:25 (Wed eariy show 10:30a)
•Execut