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Miami New Times (Florida)

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Title:
Miami New Times (Florida)
Uniform Title:
Miami New Times (Florida) (Online)
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL
Publisher:
New Times, Inc.
Village Voice Media Holdings LLC.
Voice Media Group
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Miami ( fast )
Florida -- Miami-Dade County ( fast )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Creation/Production Credits:
Print began in 1995.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Voice Media Group. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
891087301 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
NWfims
June 2 B - J uIy 5 . 19 0 5 FREE
Metro: Rocky
coasts on
Stallone property
Volume ID, Number II
Cafe: Jen gets penne ante from Casa Rolandi
System overload: HRS protective
investigators attempt to put out
Dade’s child abuse fires.
By Art Levine
Batman and
Rasin
cane with
Boukman
Eksperyans


Contents
Letters
Best ethnic slur
3
News of the Weird
Air porn
II
Earthweek
41
Swelter
Kingdom of Kink
07
On the cover:
illustration by
Polly Becker
Metro: Fine by Me 5
If you’re Sly Stallone or his marine contractor,
penalties for violating environmental regulations
don’t add up to much.
By Kirk Semple
The Littlest Victims 12
Bureaucratic bungling and case overload make life
hell for Dade’s HRS child abuse watchdogs. But guess
who suffers the most.
By Art Levine
The Long Fall ofSgt.
Niki Lawrence 24
A cautionary tale about cops, women, and the high
cost of being a trailblazer.
By Elise Ackerman
Their Roots Are Showing 81
Haitian rasin band Boukman Eksperyans plays music
that touches the heart, the mind, and the soul.
By Jim Murphy
Volume 1.0
Number 11
June 29-
July 5, 1995
Metro
Page 5
TroubletDwn
Page II
Life in Hell
Page 43
Ernie Pook
Page 45
Film
Page 59
Staff
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Tom Finkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Staff Writers Elise Ackerman,
Steven Almond, Todd Anthony,
Tom Austin, Judy Cantor, Jim DeFede,
Kathy Glasgow, Art Levine, Robert Andrew Powell,
Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Ann Clark Espuelas,
Bob Weinberg
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
Listings Specialist Elizabeth Martinez
Proofreader Georgia Rachman
Contributors Jen Karetnick,
Pamela Gordon
Editorial Intern Roberto Manzano
Art Director Brian M. Stauffer
Production Manager Carla Peters
Assistant Production Manager
Charles Masella
Editorial Layout Ray Villarosa
Production Marcy Mock, Sam Williams
Circulation Manager C. Robert Jones III
Circulation Assistant Manager
Leonard F. lyescas
Advertising Director Patrick Flood
Senior Account Executives Carolina Falla,
Shari Gherman-Rance
Account Executives Shifra Abramson,
Alina Blanco, Beth Brandes, Scott Cohen,
Luis de Cardenas, Kara Harris, Steen Lawson,
Anthony J. Marsallo, Michael Parra, Jenni Price,
Suzanne Ross, Richard Santelises,
Frank Tomasino, Claudia Valencia
Account Managers Hillary Crane, Andrew Polsky
House Account Manager Jennifer Granat
Sales Assistant Eileen Quintero
Sales Administrator Diane Maxwell
Sales Secretary Julie Ahern
Ad Designer J.P. Robinson
Contributing Ad Designer
Vivian Galainena
Classified Director Maureen Bohannon-Olson
Classified Department Administrator
Juan Saborido
Classified Sales Supervisor Joanne Morrow
Classified Advertising Representatives
Amy Brito, Carl Brunswick, Alex Budyszewick,
Tracey Burger, Miriam Galindez,
Kevin Montgomery, Henry Pinto, Edward Reid
Romance Director Leisa Sanchez
Romance Administrator
Jennifer Velazquez
Business Manager Maria Cabrera
Accounting Supervisor Michelle Fabelo
Classified Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Accounting Clerks Beatriz Avellan,
Orlando Hislop
Systems Manager Kevin Mitchell
Front Desk Administrator Barbara C. Garcia
General Manager Irene T. Bustamante
Publisher Greg Stier
New Times mailing address:
P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL
33101-1591
Street address:
330 Biscayne Blvd, 10th Floor
Miami, FL 33132-2220
For general information call:
372-0004 or 763-2422 (Broward)
For advertising call: 372-3380
For classified advertising call:
372-9393
June 29-July 5, 1995


*»' ¿i' j I g V
Best Journalistic
Knuckle-draggers
After reading your selection of the best bak¬
ery in the “Best of Miami” issue (June 22), I
have several questions and suggestions. “Jew
food”? How about complementing that choice
with some “nigger nuggets” and “goy gar¬
nish,” washed down with a good “wetback
wine”?
Perhaps after peeking out from your rec¬
hinas, you might notice there is a real world
outside worth joining. Should you abandon
your journalistic cave-inscripting long enough
to become somewhat adroit at walking on
your hind legs, you might lope over to the
Holocaust memorial, find a merry band of sur¬
vivors, and ask them: “Where is the best place
to go for Jew food? Do they serve Christian
babies for appetizers at Easter?”
Or maybe you could assemble your editori¬
al staff (if you could get them to turn away
from their mirrors long enough) and ask
them: “How would we describe the Herald if
they used the phrase Jew food?"
Hey! I’ve got it! Maybe a full page in your
next edition explaining the exact nature of the
cognitive process that resulted in this particu¬
lar culinary description and how you feel this
best represents the editorial policy of your
paper? But maybe I’m wrong. Maybe you real¬
ly are just a mediocre bunch of journalistic
assholes.
Joseph Weinman McElwee
Miami Beach
Best Self-Effacement
Thank you for the kind and generous words
regarding me and Books & Books. It’s gratify¬
ing to be included in New Times’s “Best of
Miami” issue. I did, though, want to clarify
one point. Many, many people were instru¬
mental in the founding of the Miami Book
Fair International, including two other fine
booksellers — Raquel Roque of the Down¬
town Book Center and Craig Pollock — as
well as the wonderful people at the Wolfson
campus of Miami-Dade Community College,
led by their president, Eduardo Padrón, with¬
out whom this fair would never have hap¬
pened.
Mitchell Kaplan
Coral Gables
Herald Body Count: The Fewer
the Better
Jim DeFede’s insightful examination of condi¬
tions in the Miami Herald newsroom (“The
Incredible Shrinking Herald,” June 8) enlight¬
ened even some of us who work there and
have to live with the near daily staff-departure
postings. But the bottom line (pun intended)
is this: Herald management won’t do anything
about the “problem” of the brain drain
because Herald management doesn’t see it as
a problem.
There is only one problem, given current
corporate goals and priorities: too many bod¬
ies. Therefore any condition or force that pro¬
pels bodies out the door — bad morale, intol¬
erable stress, foreclosed opportunities — is
part of the solution. You need look no further
for proof than the defensive comments of
executive editor Doug Clifton and managing
editor Saundra Keyes. He’s “not in the busi¬
ness to win popularity contests.” She doesn’t
see “a correlation between the number of peo¬
ple in a section and the qualify of that section.”
You might argue which is more appalling,
his arrogance or her ignorance. What you
can’t argue with is the message implicit in
their refusal to yield a single centimeter to a
newsroom full of insecure and demoralized
employees: If there’s money to be saved, all
else becomes irrelevant
Name Withheld by Request
Miami
Were the ***** Herald and
Proud of It!
“The Incredible Shrinking Herald’ was one of
your best exposés ever. Unfortunately, you
failed to mention that part of the paper’s many
problems stems from many years ago, when it
opted to be the Anti-Miami Herald. I dare you
to find another major local newspaper that is
so negative and so determined to destroy the
community in which it exists. Read other
newspapers in our country’s most troubled
cities and you will find that, while always
addressing and exposing the local problems,
they are not in a constant mood of self-flagella¬
tion.
Another fact you didn’t mention is that the
Miami Herald has two names — one for
Miami and another for elsewhere (simply the
Herald.) Evidently they are ashamed and
embarrassed to use the name of the city
where we and they live. Check the listings of
newspapers in other American cities, large or
small, and you will see how the name of the
community is always used with pride.
Sidney Brown
Miami
Distribution: New Times is available free of
charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional
copies of the current issue of New Times may be
purchased for $1.00, payable at the New Times
office in advance. New Times may be distributed
only by New Times’s authorized distributors. No
person may, without prior written permission of
New Times, take more than one copy of each
New Times weekly issue.
Subscriptions: Domestic subscriptions may be pur¬
chased for $50 yearly or $30 for she months. Mail
to: Subscriptions/New Times, P.O. Box 011591,
Miami, Florida 33101. Delivery may take one
week.
New Times: (ISSN 10723331) (USPS 010669) is
published by New Times, Inc., 330 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, FL 33132, weekly, 52 times per
year. Second-class postage rate is paid at Miami,
Florida 33152.
Postmaster Send address changes to New Times,
Post Office Box 011591, Miami, Florida 33101-
1591.
Copyright: The entire contents of New Times are
Copyright 1995 by New Times, Inc. No portion
may be reproduced in whole or part by any
means including electronic retrieval systems
without the express written permission of the
Publisher, New Times, 330 Biscayne Blvd., Tenth
Floor, Miami, FL 33132. Please call the New
Times office for back issue information.
JSL ABC
AUDITED
New Times, Inc.
Executive Editor Michael Lacey,
Design Director Kim Klein, Executive Managing
Editors Christine Fleming, Deborah Laake,
Corporate Editorial Assistant Alex McCall,
Operations Director Marjorie Rothrock,
Computer Systems Dave Ritter,
Corporate Administrator Kathy Ziegler, Director
of Human Resources Yolanda Celis, Financial
Coordinator Michelle Anderson, Sales Director
Michele Laven, Chief Financial Officer Jed Brunst,
Executive Vice President Scott Spear, President
and Chief Operating Officer Hal Smith,
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jim Larkin
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Vúftt 29-J.ifry'S, 1995
'faeW Times Pag«i 3


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Page 4 New Times


"Most of it is the dragging of the feet of
environmental regulators, and it’s
real hard to stomach.”
contractor Richard Bunnell
First Build
Sly Stallone's contractor pays the price for doing
waterfront work without acquiring the proper permits.
Heck, it's only money.
By Kirk Semple
instances of illegal construction on the movie
star’s property. This past August, for instance,
builders constructed a pier before Metro reg¬
ulators had completed their review of the
plans and given the final go-ahead. That same
month, workmen rebuilt a boat dock that
exceeded the size regulators had permitted.
Not long afterward, inspectors noted that
Stallone had not acquired permits before
installing boulders and sand along a concrete
seawall. And in March of this year DERM offi¬
cials found that a boat lift, a jet-ski lift, and a
catwalk had been built on the property, also
without permits.
The regulators say the blame for these viola¬
tions lies not so much with
the actor as with one of his
contractors. One of Dade’s
pre-eminent marine contrac¬
tors, Richard Bunnell, presi¬
dent of Bunnell Foundation,
Inc., counts among his past
clients prominent attorney
Dan Paul and former Miami
Dolphin Nick Buoniconti. He
also is the director of an effort
to build the Manatee Halfway
House at the Miami Sea-
quarium and has been a bene¬
factor of Shake A Leg, a pro¬
gram for handicapped sailboat
enthusiasts.
DERM officials have no
quarrel with the quality of
Bunnell’s work. They object
to the way he seems to skirt
regulations to accomplish it.
The agency’s records indicate
e that Bunnell has been cited
i for at least fifteen violations in
| the past five years — not
| including the recent Stallone
e projects — almost all of them
* for doing work without proper
ince moving here just over a year ago,
Sylvester Stallone has endeavored to
become Miami’s nouveau civic icon.
He made his debut by plunking down
eight million dollars on a bayfront mansion
next to Villa Vizcaya, then wasted no time in
casting himself as a patron of the arts and
charitable causes. But while many local offi¬
cials have been genuflecting in Stallone’s gen¬
eral direction, he hasn’t exactly engendered
warm feelings at one particular agency.
That agency would be the Metro-Dade
Department of Environmental Resources
Management (DERM). During the past year
DERM inspectors have discovered several
permits. DERM assistant director Carlos
Espinosa says that as far as he knows, no
other marine contractors in Dade have vio:
lated permitting codes as consistently as
Bunnell.
Bunnell corrects most of his violations by
paying a fine (usually $500 per incident) and
applying for an after-the-fact permit, for which
he must pay twice the amount he would have
paid had he gone through the normal permit¬
ting process. The contractor, for instance,
applied for and received after-the-fact permits
for Stallone’s pier and
seawall projects. He has
applied for, but hasn’t yet
received, an after-the-fact
permit for the boat lifts
and catwalk. Regulators
refused to issue an after-
the-fact permit for the
extra-large dock, saying it
never would have been
allowed in the first place.
They penalized the con¬
tractor by ordering him
to plant 1000 square feet
of native coastal wetland vegetation on
Stallone’s property and to pay a $12,500 fine in
the form of cash and more plantings.
“We’ve had a number of meetings with Mr.
Bunnell for a number of different projects, and
we’ve indicated to him that we’re not happy or
satisfied with him starting work without per¬
mits and going beyond the scope of the per¬
mits,” says Carlos Espinosa. Because the stan¬
dard penalties don’t seem to be having the
desired effect, Espinosa adds, his agency
might “have to take steps to curtail this. A con¬
tinuous pattern could be grounds for revoca¬
tion of a [contractor’s] license,” the DERM
official says suggestively.
Bunnell argues that the regulatory process
is simply too slow. “When you tell a guy it’s
going to take seven months to get a permit
that should take a month, in my opinion most
of it is the dragging of the feet of environmen¬
tal regulators, and it’s real hard to stomach,”
says the contractor. “One of their favorite
ways to regulate is to wear you out They do it
by stonewalling and by not responding and
then by responding partially.” Often, he adds,
he has received verbal approval for a project
and is only waiting for “the paperwork” when
he begins construction. “It’s not something
you should do — I’m not saying you should do
that,” he says. “But when it takes three weeks
to get something typed....”
In the case of Stallone’s pier, for example,
Bunnell admits he began building before he
had received a final letter of approval. But, he
contends, he didn’t make a move until two
DERM workers had performed an on-site
inspection and deemed the project feasible.
“We wanted to get the dam thing finished,”
the contractor complains. “So we put in some
piling because we had the piling on-site.” In
some instances, Bunnell asserts, he’s sure he
violated no laws. He concedes, though, that
he usually does not contest the citations.
“What can you do, fight city hall?” he asks.
“It’s a stacked deck.” As for who eventually
pays the penalty, Bunnell says sometimes
he picks up the bill, and sometimes the
client “understands the situation” and
agrees to take care of it. “It’s not so much
the amount of the fines as the the fact that
we get them,” the contractor says. “I’m not
happy about these violations, [my clients]
are not happy about them. It doesn’t look
good on my part, but that’s not the whole
story.”
(Calls to Stallone’s management company
in Philadelphia went unretumed.)
Bunnell has met with DERM’s directors
“out of frustration” and has urged them to
hire more people to process permit requests
and to hold occasional meetings with
marine contractors “to chew the fat.” In
response to his complaints, DERM has col¬
lated a list of his recent projects and
recorded the time it has taken for regulators
to approve the work. “I think we’ve
attempted to streamline the process, and in
many ways we’ve responded quickly to
many of the projects he’s been involved
with,” Espinosa says. “But the fact of
the matter is everybody has to follow
procedures.” CQ
Bunnell has been cited for at
least fifteen violations in the
past five years - not including
the Stallone projects.
The Collector, Convicted
A Swiss jury finds art connoisseur/embezzler Roberto Polo
guilty as charged - thirteen times over
By Steven Almond
fter more than seven years spent
dodging prosecution for embezzle¬
ment, Roberto Polo finally stood trial
three weeks ago in Geneva. Accused
of skimming $124 million from wealthy
investors, the former art collector, whose
case became a cause célébre within
Miami’s Cuban exile community, pulled
out all the stops during the weeklong pro¬
ceeding. Among others called to the stand
by his high-priced defense team were an
official from the Louvre, a famed human-
rights activist, and Polo’s tearful mother.
, i! vifj â– 9*11
June 29—July S, 199S
In the end, however, the twelve-person
jury found Polo to be what prosecutors on
both sides of the Atlantic have long main¬
tained: a crook. The 43-year-old former res¬
ident of Coral Gables was found guilty of
thirteen counts of aggravated breach of
trust and sentenced to five years in prison.
Ironically, after his lawyers successfully
argued that he had served more than two-
thirds of his sentence while awaiting trial,
Polo was set free last week, in accordance
with Swiss law.
In the mid-1980s, Polo had launched a
company that specialized in managing
funds for rich foreigners, mostly Latin
Americans. According to bookkeeping
statements Polo sent to his clients, he was
investing their money in low-risk certifi¬
cates of deposit. Actually, as documented
in the 1993 New Times cover story ‘The
Collector,” Polo was spending the money
on an awesome array of collectibles, a
failed fashion house, and an opulent
lifestyle, profligacy that made him the dar¬
ling of the New York art scene.
By 1988 his clients had grown worried
and demanded their money. When Polo
refused, they filed civil charges in New
York and criminal charges in Geneva,
where he had relocated his investment
company. After police searched his Paris
apartment, Polo fled to Italy and soon was
arrested. A month later, in July 1988, a civil
judge in New York ruled that Polo owed his
clients $124 million.
Though Polo fought his extradition to
Switzerland, his final appeal failed in
March 1989. While out on bail he escaped
to Miami, where he lived as a free man for
two years, until April 1992, when Swiss
authorities caught up with him. He was
arrested by U.S. marshals and held for
extradition.
Family and friends decried Polo’s arrest
and formed a committee called Citizens
Against the Extradition of Roberto Polo.
With the help of two sympathetic editorials
in the Miami Herald, membership grew to
include former Cuban political prisoner
Armando Valladares; Xavier Suarez, then-
mayor of Miami; U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-
Lehtinen; County Commissioner Alex
Penelas; and a host of other prominent
Cuban Americans. Thanks to his well-
placed allies Polo was a celebrity prisoner,
portrayed in the local Spanish-language
media as a martyr.
Federal Judge Federico Moreno saw
Continuad on page 7
New Times Page S


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Convicted
Continued from page 5
things differently; in August 1993, he
shipped Polo back to Geneva. After nearly
two more years of pretrial wrangling, Polo
entered the courtroom inside Geneva’s
Palais de Justice to face his accusers.
For all the buildup, the trial offered few
surprises. The defense lawyers reiterated
what Polo had claimed all along: that he
had been given permission to invest his
clients’ money in artwork. The prosecution
called five of those clients to the witness
stand, where all five testified that they had
given Polo no such permission. They also
told of the dozens of fraudulent account
statements Polo had sent them.
Polo testified that the statements were
faked by someone who wished to harm him.
His defense team called various art experts,
including Louvre curator Daniel Alcouffe, to
attest to the defendant’s exquisite taste in
collectibles. They also called Armando
Valladares, who conceded he was not famil¬
iar with the minutiae of the case but had
read press reports about it and was offended
by the injustices Polo allegedly had suf¬
fered. The final witness for the defense was
Roberto Polo, shown here in 1993 at South Dade's Metropolitan
Correctional Center a few months before his extradition to Switzerland
Polo’s own mother, Maria Polo, who spent
much of her hour on the stand sobbing.
The only surprising testimony came
from Polo’s former wife, Rosa Franco Suro,
who was called by the prosecution.
Married to Polo for 22 years (they were
divorced earlier this month), Franco said
she had been bemused by the affluence
that overtook her life
in the Eighties. Her
husband, she said,
explained that he
had rich clients and
was managing “bil¬
lions of dollars.” She
testified that she
always had been led
to believe that the
jewels and furniture
and art that crowded
their apartments in
New York and Paris
were personal prop¬
erty, not investments
as Polo was now
claiming. She added
that Polo had even
asked her permis¬
sion to sell some jewelry when his legal
problems began.
On Friday, June 16, after five hours of
deliberation, the jury found Polo guilty of
all thirteen counts. Though the maximum
sentence for each charge was fifteen years,
the prosecution requested a sentence of
seven years. The jurors, who mete out
punishments in Switzerland, sentenced
Polo to five. He also was expelled from
Switzerland for ten years and ordered to
pay court fees totaling almost $15,000.
This past Tuesday he was freed because
his 44 months in jail while awaiting trial
exceeded two-thirds of his sentence.
Polo and his family were in Europe and
unavailable for comment. This past
Wednesday, the Swiss newspaper Tribune
de Geneve reported that Polo was in Italy;
his brother Marco lives in Milan. The
Tribune also hinted that Polo did not wish
to return to the United States in light of the
fact that officials here had extradited him.
Lawyers for Polo’s investors contend that
the collector and his extended family are
still shielding millions of dollars in assets
owed to the victims, monies they are pur¬
suing in a litany of civil court cases stretch¬
ing from Paris to Miami. ‘The important
thing is that a jury was able to see past all
the smoke and mirrors and found that this
man, Roberto Polo, is a criminal,” says
Robert Reger, whose client, Emilio
Martinez-Manautou, was one of Polo’s pri¬
mary accusers. “It took seven and a half
years, but justice was served.” CD
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New Times Page 7


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Page 8 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


etro
No Comment, Part 2
Finally, some well-chosen words about Metro-Dade Police Sgt.
David Simmons's incomprehensible transfer
By Steven Almond
hen Metro-Dade Police Cmdr.
Antonio Prieto transferred Sgt.
David Simmons out of the Juvenile
Investigations Bureau to a patrol
unit eighteen months ago, the comment
most frequently heard among Simmons’s
subordinates was, “What a joke.”
Exile a recognized expert in the field of
child-abuse investigation? “'What a joke."
Risk dashing the morale of Simmons’s
highly motivated squad? “What a joke.”
Dispatch one of the department’s finest
detectives to break up domestic disputes in
Liberty City? l The joke, as it turns out, is on Prieto. And
on the Metro-Dade Police Department. And
on county taxpayers, who will foot the bill for
its long-overdue punch line.
After his involuntary transfer, the 45-year-
old Simmons, who joined the Metro-Dade
force in 1973, filed a grievance against the
county, requesting reinstatement to an inves¬
tigative position in another detective bureau.
His superiors balked, and the complaint
spurred a costly legal battle that culminated in
a three-day arbitration hearing this past
January. (The case was the subject of the
April 27 New Times story “No Comment.”)
Three weeks ago arbitrator Edward
Pereles issued a fifteen-page opinion in
which he scolded Metro-Dade officials for
violating their own labor contract with
police and ordered that Simmons’s year-
and-a-half-old request be granted.
The problems began in 1990, when
Simmons joined the Child Exploitation
Unit, which investigates the physical and
sexual abuse of minors. His annual evalua¬
tions portray him as a model supervisor
with “an incredible ability to motivate his
personnel.” His handling of various high-
profile cases often cast him in the spot¬
light; the Miami Herald's Tropic magazine
devoted an entire cover story to his pursuit
of the notorious Pillow Case Rapist, and
crime writer Edna Buchanan lauded him in
her books.
But in 1992 Simmons ran afoul of Prieto,
who felt he was too friendly with the media.
The conflict came to a head in October 1993,
when the commander called Simmons and
one of his subordinates into his office and told
them to “find a home” outside his bureau.
Simmons was bewildered by the transfer
and infuriated to learn he would be moving to
a patrol unit in Liberty City, the same beat he
had worked 22 years earlier as a rookie. His
grievance bounced up the chain of command
and eventually was denied by police depart¬
ment director Fred Taylor, forcing the matter
into arbitration.
The arbitrator’s June 9 ruling boiled the dis¬
pute down to its essentials. Pereles notes that
the principal reason for a transfer, as set forth
in the negotiated agreement between police
and the county, “is to improve the effective¬
ness or efficiency of the department.
However, with regard to the transfer of
Simmons, this arbitrator cannot find evidence
to support an improvement in either the effec¬
tiveness or efficiency in the depart¬
ment. In support of the transfer, the
county only offered the argument
that Simmons was a ‘burr’ to
Commander Prieto. In what way?
Did he refuse an order? No. Did
Simmons fail to do something he
was required to do? No. Did he do
something illegal? No. Although
Commander Prieto states that
Simmons violated his guidelines,
Commander Prieto was unable to testify as to
what Simmons did.” Pereles also noted that
the transfer seemed to have been “an alterna¬
tive to discipline,” another violation of the
police contract In conclusion Pereles’s ruling
states that “the grievant shall be promptly
“Did he refuse an order,
fail to do something, do
something illegal? No.”
Sgt. David Simmons prevailed in arbitration,
but he’s still waiting for that transfer
placed in an investigative detective’s position
commensurate with his ability and previous
experience.”
Both Simmons and Prieto declined to com¬
ment on the verdict. Carole Anderson, the
assistant county attorney who argued Metro’s
case during arbitration, says she has ordered
the county to “find a new home for Simmons.”
Lt. Linda O’Brien, a police spokeswoman,
says Fred Taylor has already assigned
staffers to scout available positions for
Simmons. “But no action will be taken until
the director has a chance to review the deci¬
sion,” O’Brien adds. (Taylor was out of town
last week.)
In the meantime, Simmons, a 22-year vet¬
eran recognized as one of the department’s
finest investigators, remains in Liberty City,
overseeing a squad of six patrol units. CD
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Page lO New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


News of the Weird
Lead Story
• On May 31, a small plane buzzed the U.S.
nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge,
Tennessee, and dropped more than 100
sheets of pornographic photos. Oak Ridge
police suspected that the culprit was the for¬
mer boyfriend of a female plant employee,
who had earlier accused the man of stalking
her.
The Entrepreneurial Spirit
•The former principal of PS 100 in Brooklyn,
New York, Stuart Posner, was accused in
February of stealing from the school candy
store, establishing businesses on school prop¬
erty, and charging students admission to
watch television during class tíme.
•Among cities in which “mile high club”
entrepreneurs were reported operating
recently were Hayward, California; Santa
Monica, California; Meriden, Connecticut;
and Cincinnati, Ohio. For fees ranging from
$199 to $279, a pilot will fly a couple around
for an hour so that they can have sexual inter¬
course while airborne.
•Among new products recently developed or
on the market: toe floss (invented by Ronald
M. Hannon), a three foot long rope that
attaches to the floor of the shower, is held
taut, and permits the user to clean between
his toes; a tiered cocktail-waitress “dress” that
holds 250 canapes, from designer Bruno
Ferrer; a 30-inch high, porcelain-headed doll
of Indiana University basketball coach Bobby
Knight, wearing traditional red sweater and
Converse sneakers, from local dollmaker
Tom Alberts for $545; and a line of
toilet seat lids in the shape of guitars
(electric and acoustic), starting at
$49, from Marvin Maxwell of
Louisville, Kentucky.
• In March one Japanese company intro¬
duced “odor eater” underwear containing a
substance that stops the growth of certain
bacteria, and in April, another Japanese
company introduced preodorized under¬
wear containing a synthetic pheromone
found in underarm sweat, masked by a
musk fragrance. The manufacturer sug¬
gests, but does not guarantee, that the scent
attracts women.
•In May, the New York Times ran a routine
classified ad placed by Russian-born Victor
Rylkov, announcing that he had for sale a
genuine Russian space shuttle, the Buran.
According to a follow-up story in the New
York Post, Rylkov said he and his partner, the
Molniya aerospace company, actually had
two and were asking five million dollars to
ten million dollars each. Said Rylkov, “A lot
of things are for sale in today’s Russia if
you’ve got the right people working for you.”
•A firm called UltraTech Products of
Houston is offering the Toot Trapper Chair
Cushion, a foam cushion with a “superacti-
vated carbon filter” which supposedly
absorbs passed gas before it can escape
($29.95 plus shipping).
•Among the crime-protection products now
available by mail are Dyewitness, a canister
of green foam that will make an assailant (or
anyone else) foam up to look like a Chia Pet,
and Rapel, a foul-smelling liquid that victims
spray on themselves so as to be unbearable.
People With Too Much Time on Their Hands
•A Chicago Sun Times wire service report
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New Times Page 11


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in the child abuse
trenches with a Dade
county hrs protective
investigator
Blist of childhood abuses hangs on the glass partition in the tiny cubicle used
by Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) protective investigator Lulus
McQueen. It serves, in some ways, as a stark reminder of the cruelties that
he may uncover each day on the job. The list is meant to provide coded cate¬
gories that will be used in confidential abuse reports, but it also reveals the astonishing
range of harm that can be inflicted on children in Miami. Physical injuries start with
“bruises/welts” and “bums/scalds,” escalate through “brain or spinal cord damage” and
“suffocation/drowning,” and end, finally, with “death due to abuse/neglect.” The list also
includes separate categories for different forms of sexual battery, substance abuse,
neglect, and abandonment. About 900 such abuse and neglect allegations are routed
each month to Dade County HRS’s Children and Families Program through a central
hotline (1-800-96ABUSE) located in Tallahassee. It is up to people such as the Bahamian-
born McQueen to find out as quickly as possible if the accusations are true — and, if
needed, to do whatever’s necessary to protect the children from any further harm.
HRS protective investigators even are required at times to make life-and-death deci¬
sions, and if a child somehow remains in a dangerous home, the results can be fatal. In
1993, for instance, a Dade protective investigator wasn’t able to confirm a report that a
four-year-old boy almost was drowned by his parents. A few months later, the child was
beaten to death by the mother’s live-in boyfriend. Being a protective investigator, or P.I.,
then, entails enormous responsibility. Not only that, but every time Lulus McQueen goes
out into the inner-city neighborhoods of Miami to deal with the cases assigned to him, he
faces a special challenge: How will he maneuver his way through a minefield of conflict¬
ing stories, divided families, and bureaucratic snafus to help children in need? And these
days McQueen and the 90 other Dade P.I.’s are doing their work in a particularly
unfriendly political environment Republican legislators in Tallahassee have denounced
the department for mismanagement (Miami State Sen. Mario Diaz-Balart brands it “the
worst-run state agency in the country”) and voted out Jim Towey, the mentor of HRS
District 11 administrator Anita Bock, as chief of the agency.
For her part, Bock, whose bailiwick includes Dade and Monroe counties, concedes “it
is a mismanaged agency,” but sharply improved. For instance Bock says that when she
started at Dade HRS in 1992, the protective investigations division was “an unqualified
disaster.... There was just chaos in this area.” But she argues that tighter management
controls and a more accurate computer system have strengthened a work force that is
still underpaid and inadequately trained. She also contends that her district has been
hamstrung by the legislature’s budget cuts and its refusal to grant her the financial flexi¬
bility she wants to upgrade training and salaries. The deeper problem, she insists, is “this
community and Florida at large are not prepared to take care of their children and tire
elderly.”
The controversy over HRS is just a faint undercurrent on a recent Friday morning in
May when Lulus McQueen leaves his run-down Little Havana office on his first case of
the day. McQueen, an affable, casually dressed 43-year-old man with a slight paunch, isn’t
thinking about politics, but rather about the alleged sexual abuse of a three-year-old child
— and the travails of HRS investigators. It’s a hot day, and the prospect of driving around
in his own 1988 Audi with a broken air conditioner, a hand-me-down from his brother,
seems especially unappealing. (HRS provides no official agency cars for investigators.)
Given his base salary of $22,000, McQueen shrugs, “I can’t afford to fix it now.” But
despite his paltry pay, he at least remains idealistic: “You don’t come here to make
money. You’re here to save lives and help families.”
That’s what he’s trying to do as he heads to Overtown to pursue an investigation he


New Times Page 13
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started the day before. (To protect the confidentiality of
families and children, names have been changed in all
cases and certain details have been altered or dis¬
guised.) Each case, after being approved by Tallahassee
for further investigation, is tagged as either “immediate”
or “24-hour” by the central abuse registry, and although
this case didn’t require his instant attention, McQueen
chose to start in on it right away: “I wanted to make sure
that the child isn’t in any danger.” Investigators are the
firemen of family turmoil, and speed is usually essential.
But in the murky arena of sexual abuse, the truth
often proves elusive. Yesterday, McQueen managed to
speak to the grandmother of the alleged victim and to
the child himself, who was taken by police to Jackson
Memorial Hospital’s Rape Treatment Center (RTC) for
an exam. (As is often the case, the child’s mother
phoned the police, who in turn notified the HRS hot¬
line.)
The child told a story about his father — who lives
apart from his mother —
touching his “pee-pee” and
putting the father’s “pee-
pee” in the son’s “butt.”
Today, when McQueen
speaks to the boy’s mother,
she tells him that while
bathing her son, “I saw what
looked like come in his
behind.”
After talking a while with
the mother, McQueen con¬
tinues to sort things out in
his mind on the trip back to
the office. “I feel badly for
the mother and the child,
but I’ve got to keep my
focus on how to prove what
actually happened,” he
points out. Later today, after
his interview with the
mother, he learns from the
detective on the case that
the RTC examination found
no evidence of penetration
or sexual abuse. (No arrests
are made, and McQueen,
after concluding that the
sexual allegation was
unfounded, refers the
mother a few days later to counseling to help her cope
with the stresses of raising her child.) McQueen still has
no firm idea of what really happened, but he doesn’t
have time to dwell on it. He’s got other cases to pursue.
McQueen isn’t frustrated by the large portion of
unproven and unfounded cases he encounters. “If noth¬
ing happened, that’s great,” he says. “There’s a sense of
relief that nothing has taken place.” Only about ten per¬
cent of the approximately 10,000 abuse reports handled
by Dade HRS annually are definitively confirmed. At
least 30 percent fall into a muddy category where some¬
thing may have happened, but there’s no way to prove it.
But if abuse allegations appear to be well-grounded
and McQueen feels a child is in immediate danger, he
has the authority to remove the child from a home and
place him or her with relatives or in an HRS shelter,
then seek court approval within 24 hours. In truth it is a
power that is invoked only infrequently because of the
state legislature’s 1993 directive promoting “family
preservation.” The agency generally has sought to com¬
ply with this policy — only eight percent of abuse
reports lead to a child’s removal from the home — but
even so, among the families that Lulus McQueen visits,
the fear of having their kids snatched away by the gov¬
ernment is a very real one.
Inside the decaying Liberty City apartment building,
with unsupervised children playing outside near
exposed wiring and amid broken windows, a mother is
very nervous. Anna, a thin Hispanic woman in her early
thirties, bustles about the apartment, smiling, tense, and
deferential, even offering to fetch a drink for McQueen.
She has been accused in the report he holds of abusing
drugs and endangering her two children, a boy and a
girl, and she has been the target of similar earlier com¬
plaints to HRS.
McQueen tries to put her at ease. “We want to see if
we can help. We were called about some allegations,
and I’m here to assist in any way I can,” he explains,
seated across from her with a notepad. In the last year
and a half, HRS has sought to move away from a coplike
approach in abuse investigations, and move toward what
director Anita Bock calls a “social worker mode.”
Although McQueen has been a P.l. only for she months,
he is well-suited to this
new style because he has
worked for years as a drug
and alcohol counselor, first
for a nonprofit agency, then
for HRS, and later for the
University of Miami.
Despite his gentle style, he must ask the woman hard
questions. In a matter-of-fact way, he glances down at
his abuse report and begins reading aloud the allega¬
tions to her:
“Anna is abusing illicit drugs and it is likely affecting
her ability to care for her children. She has sudden
mood swings. She’s talked of killing herself and her
kids. She was so high on drugs she got in a car accident
while one of the kids was inside.” McQueen speaks
softly, almost apologetically. “Sometimes these reports
are true, sometimes they’re not,” he adds. (The identity
of the person who reported Anna to HRS is kept secret
from everyone except HRS officials, a procedure
designed to encourage citizens to report abuse without
fear of retaliation.)
Anna continues to smile while listening to the litany of
complaints, doing her best to be charming. “I know why
this report was called in,” she finally says in a fast-talk¬
ing, high-strung way. “I was late picking up my daugh¬
ter from daycare, and I was turning the comer when this
car ran into me.” Her son was in the car at the time.
However, her faqade of good cheer crumbles for a
moment when she realizes the gravity of the charges
against her. “I don’t believe this,” she suddenly says,
shaking her head.
McQueen nods understanding^, then goes over the
allegations one by one. “Do you use drugs?” he asks.
“I got off drugs a year ago,” she says, and when
McQueen asks, she agrees to take a voluntary drug test,
then goes on to deny or explain away all of the allega¬
tions. She’s eager to prove that she’s a good parent and
there’s a certain desperation in her voice when she says,
“You could look at my refrigerator and check to see
there’s no problem. That’s what the lady who was here
last time did.”
McQueen declines, and asks Anna to take him over to
both a grade school and a day-care center in the neigh¬
borhood so he can talk to her children. The first stop is
the elementary school, where McQueen arranges to
speak privately with the eight-year-old child in a confer¬
ence room. The boy, in his Ninja Turtles T-shirt, obedi¬
ently follows the P.I. inside. McQueen acts as friendly as
he can, but even with
his easygoing manner
there’s no disguising
the difficulty of the
questions he has to ask.
“Have you every
By Art Levine
seen your mommy using
drugs?”
The boy shakes his head quietly.
“Does she beat you?” Again, the youngster shakes his
head. Trying to gain his confidence, McQueen leans
closer and asks, “Is there anything else you want to tell
me? Is everything okay at this time?”
“Yes.”
When McQueen emerges with the boy, Anna tells the
P.I., “This is the third or fourth time, so he’s used to it by
now.”
She then takes McQueen to a nearby day-care center,
and when Anna’s daughter espies her mother, she runs
over happily. Accompanied by a day-care worker,
McQueen goes into a small office with the four-year-old
girl and tries to talk to her. The girl sits on a tiny chair,
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'i. i : 6 ¡X'i 1» t a i't I , . V f t


Protectors
Continued from page 13
looking overwhelmed by the adults surround¬
ing her. “You’re a pretty little girl,” McQueen
says reassuringly. But when he asks her, “Do
you know what drugs are?” and she shakes
her head, he realizes this interview won’t pro¬
duce anything useful. The child leaves the
room to rejoin her mother, and Anna is
allowed to return home.
McQueen turns his attention to the day-care
instructor, seeking to get her impressions.
She praises Anna for being affectionate with
her children, but also notes that she’s looked
high on drugs at times. “When that stuff starts
taking over, I get scared for her and the chil¬
dren,” the woman says.
Finally, McQueen says to the day-care
worker, “I have mixed feelings about this and
I will sort it out.”
It’s a tricky case for McQueen, because he
has to balance the obvious affection between
the mother and her children with the possibil¬
ity that her risky behavior could endanger
their lives. (When he catches up with Anna on
another visit a few days later, he convinces
her to enter a drug treatment program, even
though there’s no concrete evidence that
she’s using drugs. “If there’s another report
on her and she didn’t follow through on the
drug program, we’ll have to take action,” he
says later.)
Today, however, on the way back to the
office in the late afternoon after his visit to the
day-care center, he’s sure of only one thing
regarding this family: “You never want to put
a child in a shelter.” In McQueen’s view, shel¬
ters — temporary way stations for children
until permanent homes can be found or
they’re returned to their parents — don’t offer
the warm, loving attention children need. If
children have to be removed from a home, it’s
far better to place them with other relatives
than in a shelter, he believes, a view shared in
part by Dade HRS administrators. There are
eighteen child shelters in Dade County, with
a total of 90 beds, all secretly located in resi¬
dential neighborhoods so abusive relatives
can’t find them.
His next stop, it turns out, is just such a
shelter. While he is returning to the office, he
gets an urgent beeper message to call his
supervisor, who tells him over a cellular
phone that he has to pick up a sick child at a
shelter in Cutler Ridge and take him to a hos¬
pital. Before McQueen can get any further
information, the battery in the early-model
cellular phone goes dead. It happens every
day about this time.
The agency’s deployment of personnel
doesn’t seem to work much better than its
high-tech equipment An HRS office in South
Dade is far closer to the Cutler Ridge shelter
than McQueen is at the moment, crawling
along in rush-hour traffic late on a Friday
afternoon. And while McQueen, a seven-year
veteran of the U.S. army, realizes that there
are some orders one has to accept, this one
irks him. “Am I the only HRS investigator
working right now?” he asks rhetorically.
“Nobody wants to be the one to be responsi-
June 29-July 5, 1995
ble.” (Bock, when asked later about the P.I.’s
sudden assignment, says, “It makes no sense
to me.” She blames everything from poor staff
judgment to personnel shortages.)
Before driving to Cutler Ridge, McQueen
returns to the office to learn more details
about the case, then heads out again about
4:30 p.m. As the car moves slowly down South
Dixie Highway, McQueen gripes, “Why in
hell do I have to go to Southwest Dade to take
a kid to a hospital? By the time I get there the
kid could be dead.” He’s also on call after 5:00
p.m. for emergency investigations, and en
route to Cutler Ridge he gets a beeper mes¬
sage urging him to call Dade’s central child
protection office at the Juvenile Justice Center
on Northwest 27th Avenue. “I can only work
on one case at a time,” he says, choosing to
ignore the message. The dispatcher will have
to find somebody else.
When he arrives at the shelter, a ranch
house in a middle-class neighborhood, he
can’t help but notice a truck parked outside
piled high with garbage. “Jesus Christ!” he
exclaims. “Children live here?” He adds bit-
ingly, “The trash is enough to make a child
sick.” Inside the house, a dozen children,
mostly black, from an infant in a crib to grade
schoolers, loll about in
a stupor of apathy.
They sit around in a
sparse, depressing liv¬
ing room; one wall has
been decorated with
cheerful Disney char¬
acters, incongruous
amid the gloom. The
Box cable channel
blares rap videos in
one comer, and lying
on a small couch near
the TV set is the sick
child himself, a cold
towel resting on his forehead. The child-care
staffer on duty (they work in three eight-hour
shifts) greets McQueen laconically and tells
him the boy has a 104-degree temperature.
She helps the child get up, hands McQueen a
folder with some information on the seven-
year-old, and ushers them out the door.
The boy is strikingly quiet and passive, say¬
ing only that he has been sick for four days.
At the hospital emergency room, when a
nurse finally sees the boy, McQueen finds he
can’t answer the nurse’s questions about
whether the child has allergies or major
health problems. It’s information the hospital
needs in order for the boy to avoid any poten¬
tial side effects from treatments. McQueen
looks through the sketchy background report
he was given and admits, “I don’t know any¬
thing about this child.” The answer points up
just how vulnerable and isolated the child —
sitting silently next to the nurse’s desk —
really is.
While waiting, the boy says he doesn’t
want to go back to the shelter because
“they beat me.” He’s vague and unclear
about who does the alleged beating. (“I
can’t blame him for not wanting to go back
to the shelter,” McQueen says later, but he
claims he doesn’t have enough solid infor¬
mation to pursue an abuse investigation —
or even phone in to the hotline — regard¬
ing one of HRS’s own shelters. Under state
law, HRS investigators and others who
deal with children are required to report
suspected child abuse, but they’re given
discretion to make judgments about what
cases should be reported.) It takes a few
more hours before the doctors tell them —
after making several tests — that the boy
just has a bad cold.
It is close to 9:30 p.m. when McQueen and
the child leave the hospital. Before he
departs, however, McQueen calls his wife to
say, as he often does, that he’ll be late.
Continued on page 16
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accident while one of
the kids was inside.”
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Protectors
Continued from page 15
“Why are you doing this job?” she asks him
angrily.
“It’s because of the kids," he tells her.
“What about our kid?” she shoots back.
Sometimes when an abuse investigator such
as McQueen is called in to explore a new alle¬
gation, HRS already has been involved, but it
is left to the P.I. to try to patch up again the
shredded fabric of family life. It’s not easy to
pinpoint blame for the failures: Everything
from the agency’s periodic inability to provide
thorough family monitoring to the erratic
lives and schedules of the impoverished par¬
ents themselves can play a part. Bock says
part of the fault comes from a system that
passes along supervision of a family from
worker to worker, division to division. The
result is that some families end up falling
through the cracks of HRS services. That
appears to be what’s happened in McQueen’s
first new case of the next week, when he
heads out on Monday morning to another
slum neighborhood to check out a report that
a young mother’s child has been spotted with
bruises on his body.
When McQueen gets to the ramshackle
house, he finds a pregnant, lethargic black
woman surrounded by four preschoolers
scampering around on a dirty gray carpet.
Like almost all the mothers he visits, this
woman is on welfare. In the next room, the
boy who is supposed to have been bruised is
sleeping. When McQueen goes in to examine
him, he doesn’t find any bruises, but he does
learn that this twenty-year-old mother is over¬
whelmed by all of her kids. And in the course
of denying that she mistreats her children,
she also tells him about another HRS worker
who promised to help her get daycare but
never did.
“If the others didn’t do that, then I will,” he
vows.
She also tells him about the gas and hot
water that have been turned off, the rats in the
home, the ceiling that’s peeling off. “You need
help like yesterday,” he tells her. (In the next
few days he lines up a nearby HRS-funded
day-care center for her, as well as counseling
about birth control and parenting; he also con¬
tacts the landlord about restoring the hot
water and gas.)
(The lack of HRS follow-through uncovered
by McQueen in this case underscores why in
recent years the agency has developed a two¬
pronged approach to abuse investigations.
People such as McQueen are known as a
“triage” investigators, and their work subse¬
quently is reinforced and double-checked by
“followup” investigators. Although McQueen
seems unusually thorough in his work, many
other triage investigators are not. ‘They go
out in a hurry and lay the groundwork, and I
make sure they didn’t make any mistakes,”
explains Cyprion Onuoha, a jovial Nigerian
who has been working as an investigator for
five years. ‘There are so many things left
undone by the triage worker.”)
On the way back to his office after his visit
to the harried pregnant mother, McQueen is
disturbed by the implications of what he’s just
seen, noting “The family has fallen apart in
the black community.”
The dissolution of the black family has
reached its virtual endpoint in the home he’s
assigned to visit next—despite previous HRS
efforts to keep the family together. A three-
year-old girl was left home alone in the morn¬
ing when her mildly retarded mother,
Barbara, went with her fourteen-year-old
daughter Joan to pick up a check from the
Association for Retarded Citizens, the agency
that handles her finances.
McQueen learns from the HRS file he car¬
ries with him that the mother has at least two
prior complaints lodged against her, including
one for giving birth to a boy last September
who tested positive for marijuana. He also can
see that she’s been listed as receiving some
sort of counseling services, but clearly some¬
thing went wrong. “This is the last time
they’re going to dump this one,” he asserts.
“Somebody’s not doing what they’re sup¬
posed to do.” He wants to reach the worker
who tracked the family for HRS’s protective
services division — which offers long-term
monitoring — but he doesn’t have time to
locate the worker before getting to the house.
“I need to know what was done,” he com¬
plains, “but I’m going in there totally cold.”
As he enters a cramped, sweltering two-
bedroom apartment, he finds a black woman
in a housedress staring blankly at him while
cradling her three-year-old daughter. A smil¬
ing nine-month-old boy plays in his little
walker, unaware of the trouble ahead, while
Barbara’s teenage daughter looks on fear¬
fully. McQueen tries to ask the mother if she
indeed left her youngest daughter at home
alone, but the 35-year-old mother has trouble
understanding the question. So he turns to
Joan for the answer. She glances over at the
mother to see what she should say before
admitting, “She [the baby girl] was home
asleep with the flu, and we didn’t want to
wake her.”
McQueen tries to make the mother under¬
stand that she shouldn’t leave the child alone
at that age. The daughter nervously inter¬
rupts, “I hope you’re not going to take her
away from Mom.” Joan is the only member of
the family who understands what may be at
stake, and she stares at McQueen warily,
clutching her hands together.
McQueen evades the girl’s plea for now, as
he continues to quiz the mother about the
help she’s supposed to receive and the way
she cares for the kids. Her answers are halt¬
ing and confused, all about the daddies that
don’t come to visit and the food stamps she
doesn’t get and the drug-treatment appoint¬
ments she’s missed.
Suddenly, in a voice stripped of every emo¬
tion except weariness, the mother asks, “Are
you going to take all three children from me?”
“Do you want us to take them?” McQueen
says.
‘The oldest one ain’t doing me right... 1
have seizures.. .yeah, take all three of them,”
she announces, as if they were pieces of furni¬
ture she was ready to discard. ‘Take ’em with
you all today.”
Everything is changing for Barbara’s family
now, but McQueen needs to fulfill some offi¬
cial reporting requirements — obtaining all
the children’s names and social security num¬
bers from papers the
mother provides —
before he takes any
further action. The
teenager begins
weeping softly. The
mother looks at her
coldly: “Don’t start
crying. I don’t care.”
McQueen stands up
and tries to reach the
family’s protective
service worker on his
cellular phone, but
since it’s about 4 p.m., the phone has gone
dead again. “Like clockwork,” he says, bor¬
rowing the family’s phone. He reaches the
worker’s supervisor and outlines the neglect
charge and the current crisis in a cool profes¬
sional manner while the family looks on: “She
Continued on page 18
suddenly, the mother
asks, “Are you ^oin^
to take all three
children from me?”
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Protectors
Continued from page 16
wants to give the children up. She suffers
from seizures and other problems, and if s too
much for her.” It’s clear that the supervisor
doesn’t fully understand the urgency of the
situation, because McQueen shouts, in
response to a query about the neglect allega¬
tion, “Yes, if s founded!” When he hangs up
he expects that the protective services worker
will be contacted and arrange to take the chil¬
dren to a shelter or drop them with relatives.
Meanwhile, the mother orders the daugh¬
ter to start packing. The girl heads into her
room, emptying the clothing from her draw¬
ers into green garbage bags the mother
hands her. Barbara casually removes pho¬
tographs of the children from picture frames
and throws them on top of a pile of clothing
and baby paraphernalia she’s shoved next to
the door.
After a while, McQueen calls back the
supervisor, who tells him that she’ll try to
beep the protective services worker.
Eventually he realizes that the worker isn’t
going to show up, and he’ll have to make
arrangements for the children himself. He
gets from Joan the phone numbers of
Barbara’s mother and two sisters, trying to
find someone willing to take the kids right
now. “If nobody’s willing to take the children,
I have to put them in a shelter,” he tells one
sister. Ultimately he convinces the mother
and Barbara’s other sister to come over.
In the course of speaking to the relatives, he
discovers that they’ve made several previous
efforts to gain custody of the children, but
were rebuffed by the court — with the
approval of HRS. “This time I’m going to file a
detention petition, and I’ll do it the right way
once and for all,” he tells Barbara’s mother
over the phone.
As the teenager stomps angrily around the
house packing up the children’s belongings,
she stops for a moment to ask McQueen,
“Can I take my games?” With a smile,
McQueen answers, “I believe so.”
The family’s unraveling is happening so
quickly, and the bizarre unreality of it
becomes even greater shortly after Joan
slumps on the floor and starts sobbing. The
mother then does something truly unsettling:
She begins to laugh. “This ain’t funny,” Joan
tells her.
“It’s funny to me. I’m glad you all leaving,”
the mother says, staring defiantly at her.
Eventually, Barbara’s mother and sister,
Trida, arrive. Trida scoops up the youngest
boy and says playfully to him, “You want to go
home with me?” As they gather the children
together, Trida says, “This is for the good,
they should have done this at the beginning.”
She also recalls telling a judge at one hearing
that it was actually the teenager who was tak¬
ing care of the kids, not the retarded mother;
she says she asked the judge, “Has some¬
thing serious got to happen before you do
anything?” The judge, she claims, told her
yes.
Before they drive off, Joan tries to embrace
her mother, but Barbara tells her, “Don’t be
hugging me goodbye.”
McQueen hurries back to the office to fill
out a court petition to place the children in the
custody of Barbara’s mother and sister. On
the way, he grouses about the way HRS previ¬
ously has handled the case, although at this
point he doesn’t know its frill background. “I’d
like to know who decided to give the children
back to the mother,” he says. “She’s incapable
of caring for them.... I’m so pissed at those
other workers. If they can live with them¬
selves, so be it. But if they don’t want to work,
then for the safety of the children they should
get out of the business.” (In all fairness, pro¬
tective services workers who do long-term fol¬
lowup — such as the one McQueen tried to
reach from Barbara’s home — usually have
too many cases to handle any individual one
thoroughly. Their caseload of 75 or more is at
least five times the national average.
Combined with what HRS director Bock
admits is low pay, low skill, and high turnover,
it can be a recipe for disaster. Indeed, with 63
protective services workers in her district
monitoring 6300 children, Bock admits,
“Protective services can’t do that job. It’s one
of the biggest shams in the state of Florida.”)
The agency has made efforts over the years
to help Barbara raise her children. A though
the youngest daughter briefly was taken out
of the home after being bom in 1992, the juve¬
nile court, HRS investigators, assorted legal
guardians, and medical experts have deter¬
mined at a series of hearings that Barbara
was capable of raising
the children herself—
if a variety of counsel¬
ing and day-care
services were offered.
Programs such as
Family Builders,
which provides inten¬
sive therapy and emer¬
gency aid, have been
offered, but Barbara
has spumed their help
at times, just as she
often has rejected her
family’s offers to provide assistance. After a
second child, a boy, was bom with traces of
drugs last year, HRS removed the baby and
temporarily placed him with Barbara’s
mother from November 1994 to March 1995,
until a full range of services were put in place
under a court-ordered plan. Barbara’s family,
though, began asking in December for cus¬
tody of all the children, but HRS contended
that the two children still in the home weren’t
in immediate danger, so the family’s request
was denied. The son was returned to Barbara
in March, when HRS officials concluded that
— with enough services now available — that
Barbara, a drug-using retarded mother, was
capable of raising all the children on her own.
“If we had to do it all over again, we’d do the
same thing,” says Todd Faber, assistant dis¬
trict legal counsel for HRS.
Now Barbara’s family is back in court once
more. A day after McQueen has arranged to
remove the kids, the mother has changed her
mind and wants the teenage daughter back.
Today she hugs Joan when she comes into
the hallway outside Circuit Court Judge
Victoria Platzer’s juvenile division courtroom.
Joan, though, is feeling ambivalent about
what to do. She huddles with a court-
appointed lawyer, who then tells the judge,
“She’s angry at her mother for having her
removed. She doesn’t want to live with her,
but wants to be able visit her.” This time all
the children are finally taken away from
Barbara.
Sitting on a bench afterward, Trida tells one
of the lawyers, “If Barbara had just let us help
her, you all could have kept out of this.”
Lawyers and investigators for HRS are,
indeed, often drawn into family disputes that
can’t be resolved peaceably. One way this
Continued on page 21
June 29^Julx 5, 1995
“There are so many
needs in this city of
Miami, so many
situations where
people are abused.”


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Protectors
Continued from page 18
most clearly emerges is in the filing of false
abuse reports. Even Anita Bock allows,
“People do use the abuse registry for harass¬
ment purposes.”
But to a P.I. such as Lulus McQueen, the
benefits of the current reporting system —
including the use of anonymous reports —
outweigh any drawbacks. “If a person is
fearful of being accused of filing a false
report, real abuse may not be called in,”
contends McQueen, as he heads out one
day to check out a report of medical
neglect that was phoned in anonymously.
When he enters the house, he confronts a
middle-age mother, Lucy, her 22-year-old
daughter, Louise, and Lucy’s two-year-old
granddaughter. They sit in a well-kept liv¬
ing room, the sofas covered with plastic
slipcovers and the shelves neatly display¬
ing figurines.
“What did they say about us?” Lucy
demands, and McQueen apologetically
reads out allegations that the child has
open sores and hasn’t been taken to the
doctor. Lucy is dumbfounded and stands
up angrily, her right hand on her hip. “Get
out of there with those lies!” she exclaims,
before calming down and trying to figure
out what prompted McQueen’s visit. “She
had the chickenpox...but look how fat and
healthy she is.” Louise adds that she’s
been taking her daughter to the doctor
regularly, and when McQueen examines
the young girl, he sees that there’s nothing
wrong with the child. Lucy is still simmer¬
ing, though, and begins marching around
her kitchen, opening up pantry doors.
“Look at all this food!”
Then Lucy and her daughter begin spec¬
ulating on who could have phoned in the
report. “I wouldn’t be surprised if that old
nasty dad did this,” Lucy says, and her
daughter agrees. Louise and the man had
broken up recently, and she had rejected
his request to move in with her.
“You see it’s all lies,” Lucy says, and
McQueen concurs. ‘This case is not going
another step,” he reassures them. Still, the
family wonders why this investigation was
necessary at all. “It’s wasting your time,”
Lucy says of such visits triggered by
anonymous tips, “taking you away from
seeing kids you really should see.”
McQueen views it differently. “If the
calls are not made, we are in a situation
where we may lose a child,” he points out.
As he leaves, however, he tries to make
amends, remarking, “Sorry about having
to do this.”
Regardless of whether or not abuse
reports are borne out, they trigger HRS
investigations that sometimes can result in
valuable help to families, particularly when
previous HRS services have fallen short.
For instance when another protective
investigator, Rosemary Bridges, who
works in the North Dade office, went out
on a recent weekday to check out a
teenage daughter’s allegation of beatings
by her father, she discovered something
perhaps even worse: a frail, crippled
mother, almost as bone-thin as a concen¬
tration camp survivor, staring addle-
brained at the television in a stifling apart¬
ment. Sitting with her was another
daughter, staying home from school to
take care of her. “Who feeds her?” Bridges
asks.
“When my dad comes home from work
[in the morning], he does,” the girl
answers, adding that after school she and
her sister supposedly take over. But. it’s
about noon and the father is nowhere to be
found. Later that day, when Bridges ques¬
tions the daughter who made the original
Continued on page 23
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Continued from page 21
abuse allegation, the P.I. learns that some¬
times the father bars his daughters from
even feeding their mother cereal without
his permission. By the end of her prelimi¬
nary interviews on this first day, Bridges
hasn’t settled the issue of child abuse, but
she’s sure the mother needs more regular
attention and meals than she’s been get¬
ting. In fact HRS already had been notified
in February 1994 that the mother was
being neglected. “Maybe the father’s so
mean, he’s starving her to death,” she
speculates. Bridges later discovers the
mother receives only once-a-month visits
from another HRS division, Aging and
Adult Services, which investigates abuse
and neglect of adults; it somehow has
missed the obvious fact that a woman is
wasting away in front of their eyes.
(Bridges, who can’t prove the child abuse
allegation, later arranges for the family to
receive counseling and for the mother to
receive visits from another HRS division,
too, one that helps the handicapped.
Before all these services can be provided,
however, there still will be no guarantee
that the mother is being regularly fed.)
‘There are so many needs in this city of
Miami,” says Lulus McQueen, “so many
situations where people are abused.”
Suffering is the common currency in vir¬
tually all the homes that McQueen visits,
but he doesn’t let himself get over¬
whelmed by the problems he sees. He
tries to close cases quickly so he can move
on to the next one, and as a result he has a
backlog of only about ten cases, slightly
lower than that of the average triage inves¬
tigator. On any given day, he will receive
an average of three new abuse reports to
investigate, and the truth about each one is
never easy to determine.
One day in the late afternoon, McQueen
is expecting to finish some overdue paper¬
work when he receives an inflammatory
report. It is a shocking letter — passed
along to HRS from the governor’s office of
a Southern state, then routed to McQueen
to handle. In the letter, the parents allege
that their son attends a school in Miami for
emotionally disturbed children where staff
members pay children for sex, teach them
to steal from nearby stores, and only clean
the place up when the state conducts
inspections. Yet when McQueen goes to
the school, officials there accept his pres¬
ence calmly because they’re used to such
visits. The teenage boy mentioned in the
letter is ushered into an empty classroom
to speak to McQueen alone, and the P.I. is
careful not to tell him that the allegations
come from his own parents. When he’s
asked about the sex and theft charges, the
boy says simply, “I haven’t heard nothing
about that.” But he does agree that the
school officials take pains to spruce up the
school only before inspections. (McQueen
drops in unannounced on the school a few
days later, and takes a few other boys
aside; they offer similar denials.)
This preliminary visit is his last case for
the day. McQueen, as he heads back to his
car, isn’t disappointed that the charges
didn’t pan out. “Even if the allegations are
not proven, there’s a sense of excitement
about this work,” he says. But he’s also
aware that his mission of helping the chil¬
dren is not easily fulfilled, in part because
of the roadblocks his own agency often
puts in the way. “We need more committed
P.I.’s to this work,” says McQueen. “HRS
is trying to do their best with the few good
P.I.’s they have, but their best may not be
good enough.”CD
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New Times Page 23


She was a pioneer at the Metro-Dade Police
Department, a rabble-rousing advocate for women
BEHIND THE BADGE. AND NOW, OF COURSE,
SHE'S PAYING FOR IT.
BY ELISE ACKERMAN
the
long fall of
Niki Lawrence lives in a world
that has been diminished. Placed
on compulsory unpaid leave from
the Metro-Dade Police Department,
she spends her days alone in her
Deerwood Estates home north of
Metrozoo. After 22 years of police
work, Lawrence survives on just $250
per week in unemployment benefits, her
former annual salary of $53,000 now a
receding memory. She jokes about econo¬
mizing: no air conditioner, no magazine sub¬
scriptions, no driving unless it’s absolutely nec¬
essary.
Her life is a tight pattern of reiterated move¬
ments among five rooms: the white-tiled
kitchen, a tiny bedroom bursting with legal
papers, another room where she sometimes
lifts weights, her bedroom, and the living room
with its large-screen television. On good days
Lawrence exercises, plays with her terrier, and
works on the numerous lawsuits, complaints,
and grievances she has pending against her for¬
mer employers. On bad days she tanks up on
prescription drugs to stave off panic attacks,
pills with cheerful names such as Xanax,
Ambien, and Dalmane. These are the moments
when isolation presses in like a smothering
layer of doubt when she tries to avoid thoughts
of suicide and fights against the growing evi¬
dence that all her battles have been fruitless.
Although Lawrence is not the only woman to
have charged the Metro-Dade Police
Department with sexual harassment (in the
past year, two other federal suits were filed, and
at least a half-dozen potential lawsuits are incu¬
bating with the federal Equal Opportunity
Employment Commission), she is, by all
accounts, the grande dame of sexual-harass¬
ment vigilance, the stalwart advocate of
women’s rights — and an object of ridicule.
“I’m sure that some people would like to por¬
tray [Lawrence] as a wacko,” says Scott
Partridge, a retired Metro-Dade sergeant who


has known Lawrence since he supervised her in
the Seventies. “But if I had to pick the best five
police officers who ever worked for me during my
seventeen-year career, she would be one of them.
The women who are coming on the job today are
having a lot easier time of it because of women like
Niki who came before them and made the
changes early on. I keep telling her, “You can’t give
up, you can’t let them beat you, you have to keep
on going.’ But I think she’s getting real tired.”
There was a time, more than two decades ago,
June 29-July 5, 1995
when Lawrence was tireless, a dynamo who
prided herself on being a role model for other
female police officers. That, however, was before
the department took away her gun and badge.
Before the rumors spread that she had been
detained for being mentally impaired. Before she
lost her squad, her self-esteem, and her job.
An unlikely candidate for police work, Lawrence
Continued on page 26
New Times Page 25


Lawrence has been on unpaid psychological leave since October 1994
five feet, nine inches tall and not particularly
athletic, she wasn’t much of a match for her
brawnier peers. “I was continually getting
thrown because I was so slow,” she remem¬
bers. “I was continually getting beaten up.”
Despite such obstacles, she graduated
from the academy, and joined Metro-Dade.
Her first assignment placed her at Station
Five, now known as the Kendall station, one
of the five substations then operated by the
department. (Metro-Dade has since grown
to include nine such stations.) It was a time
when female officers were considered to be
interlopers. “I went through this whole
period in which I wouldn’t get any backups,”
Lawrence recalls. “I would make a traffic
stop on the midnight shift, and people would
Continued on page 29
Long Fall
Continued from page 25
grew up in a quiet, well-to-do town in Bergen
County, New Jersey, the daughter of
Quakers. As a teenager in 1963, she
marched on Washington for civil rights,
wore tie-dyed clothing, grew her hair long.
But an early marriage pre-empted her youth¬
ful rebellion and she moved to Florida with
her new husband, a garment worker prone
to occasional bursts of ill temper. Their mar¬
riage eventually crumbled, and Lawrence
began taking courses at Miami-Dade
Community College in
hopes of finding a career
that would enable her to
raise her two young sons
comfortably. Predisposed
toward issues dealing
with social justice,
Lawrence grew fascinated
with the criminal justice
system. After two ride-
alongs with police offi¬
cers, she decided to make
law enforcement her
career.
But she soon learned
that in 1970 few police
departments were eager
to employ women; most,
in fact, rejected them out¬
right. The City of Miami
maintained a quota system and told her she
would be put on a five-year waiting list
behind fifty other applicants. In contrast, the
Metro-Dade police force professed to wel¬
come women, as long as they had a two-year
college degree. Indignant that male officers
were hired right out of high school, and
exhausted by her efforts to work full-time,
attend college, and raise her children alone,
Lawrence enlisted the aid of the local chap¬
ter of the American Civil Liberties Union to
protest the unequal hiring practices.
ACLU lawyers eventually persuaded
Metro-Dade to abolish the extra educational
requirement, and they also prompted the
department to stop distinguishing between
“patrolmen” and “policewomen.” The differ¬
ence was more than a matter of semantics.
Patrolmen were issued six-shot revolvers
with four-inch barrels; policewomen
received less accurate five-shot revolvers
with three-inch barrels. Patrolmen who
passed a sergeant’s exam were eligible for
promotion to the position of “sergeant”;
policewomen who passed
the same test were raised
to the rank of “police¬
woman two,” which car¬
ried a smaller pay raise
and fewer supervisory
responsibilities.
Lawrence’s legal strug¬
gles did little to endear
her to other police train¬
ees when she finally
entered the police acad¬
emy in 1973. Feisty, with a
tousle of red hair to com¬
plement her outspoken¬
ness, the 26-year-old
missed no opportunity to
needle the chauvinists in
her class. As she recalls,
“If a guy came up to me
and said, ‘Women don’t belong in police
work,’ I’d say, ‘Excuse me, but I worked very
hard to get here. What did you do? You just
walked in off the street.’”
Not surprisingly, her brashness elicited
special attention. The other half-dozen
women in her class of 82 cadets were
allowed to spar with each other when they
practiced fighting techniques, but
Lawrence’s instructors insisted she square
off with male partners. A slim woman, about
Punishment
Policy: Give
'Em a Break
The Metro-Dade Police Department has
nearly completed its program to have all
4300 employees — sworn officers and civil¬
ians alike — view a training video explaining
the department's sexual harassment policy,
which was adopted in 1985 and revised sev¬
eral times since then. According to the
video, any act or statement with a sexual
connotation can be considered sexual
harassment. “Remember, whether or not it’s
unacceptable is in the eye of the beholder,”
warns the video’s narrator. “If you feel
remotely uncomfortable with the way you
are treated, don’t hesitate to report it imme¬
diately.” The training tape also threatens
offenders with severe punishment.
“Discipline may include suspension or termi¬
nation, depending on the incident,” a grim¬
faced police officer advises.
Since Metro-Dade began screening the
video last year as part of a settlement agree¬
ment with the federal Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission (the result of a
complaint filed by two female officers), a
number of department employees say that
workplace relationships have taken on an
Orwellian cast “It is making people so para¬
noid that we can’t work together any more,”
gripes a long-time female officer who once
filed a sexual harassment complaint herself.
A review of department records, however,
suggests that any perceptions of a crack¬
down on offenders is more likely due to the
mandatory, day-long sexual harassment
training sessions than to vigorous enforce¬
ment of the policy. In fact, while approxi¬
mately 38 percent of all sexual harassment
complaints filed since 1989 were found to
have merit, the punishment meted out to
offenders has been far from severe. Only
one officer, a probationary rookie, was termi¬
nated. Four others were suspended without
pay, none for more than twenty days. The
rest were merely reprimanded.
Maj. Richard Ward, head of the depart¬
ment’s training bureau, defends the discipli¬
nary record and points out that in order for
discipline to withstand appeal, it must be
applied consistently throughout the depart¬
ment and over time. And certainly some vic¬
tims of sexual harassment praise the depart¬
ment for reacting to their complaints with
sensitivity and swiftness.
Sgt. Lorraine Bloomfield, for example,
filed a complaint in 1991 while she was an
officer working at the Miami Lakes station.
She stated to internal affairs investigators
that during the daily roll call, a corporal had
been spreading malicious rumors about her
sexual habits. Several officers confirmed he
had sneered that Bloomfield had slept with
almost every officer in the district and had
used a coat hanger for a self-induced
abortion.
Following the investigation the corporal
was issued a two-day suspension for miscon-
duct, though the allegations of sexual
harassment were not upheld because he was
not found to have created a hostile working
environment. “All the way down the line I
had support,” Bloomfield recalls. “Both
males and females were offended.”.
Bloomfield acknowledges, however, that
one factor played an important role in her
decision to file her complaint: She knew she
was about to receive a promotion. Before the
investigation ended, she held a higher rank
than the corporal she was accusing of
harassment — a clear psychological advan¬
tage.
Metro-Dade’s sexual harassment policy is
ten years old, but the department only began
tracking complaints in 1989; since then 58
have been filed. Based on the current num¬
ber of female officers — 552 of2956 — about
ten percent have filed sexual harassment
complaints. (Three complainants were
male.) More than half the complaints were
made in the past two years.
Cmdr. Harriet Janosky, head of the the
department’s “women’s committee,” views
the upsurge in harassment complaints as a
reflection of the increased emphasis on
addressing the problem, as well as the suc¬
cess of the department’s educational pro¬
gram. She also points out that incidents of
sexual harassment are hardly restricted to
Metro-Dade, noting that a 1993 Florida
Department of Law Enforcement study
found 62 percent of all female police officers
in Florida considered themselves victims of
sexual harassment. Forty percent said they
had seen sexually oriented materials or
heard off-color jokes at work on a daily basis.
Twenty percent described their workplace
as a hostile environment.
Initiated by Capt. George Robinson of the
No means no: The department's training video portrays a supervisor pressuring a rookie for a date
Page 26 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


Ocala Police Department, the study was
conducted as part of a research project for
FDLE’s Executive Institute. Robinson
admits the results concerned him. "I
wanted to think that it was less prevalent
than it was reported,” he says. He recom¬
mends that departments take immediate
action to educate their employees about
sexual harassment and to enforce policies.
Metro-Dade has made a strong commit¬
ment to education. However, the enforce¬
ment aspect of the department’s policy has
raised questions among some officers. An
examination of 25 sexual harassment inves¬
tigations completed during the past seven
years, and interviews with a half-dozen vic¬
tims, reveals inconsistencies in the way the
department deals with complaints, espe¬
cially those filed by women against their
male superiors. In one particularly shock¬
ing case that allegedly bordered on sexual
battery, an officer was suspended for only
twenty days, and the incident was later
expunged from his record altogether.
Ofcr. Donna Stewart had made arrange¬
ments to go home early on February 11,
1990. The eight-year veteran, who was suf¬
fering from a broken ankle at the time, had
labored through an unpleasant shift at the
Miami Lakes station. Not only was her
ankle throbbing, but the young officer
working vdth her had spent file entire after¬
noon making graphic sexual comments.
“He asked me if I swallowed,” Stewart
later told Sgt Kenneth Bematt, an investi¬
gator with the internal affairs bureau (also
known as the internal review bureau and
currently called the professional compli¬
ance bureau). Stewart, age 32, reported
that Ofcr. Brian Montero had mentioned
“that he was getting an erection, that he
wanted to be inside me, inside my mouth.
This went on for a few hours.”
Stewart said she tried to ignore the 22-
year-old officer and finally got up to leave
shortly before 6:00 p.m. She picked up her
crutches and began hobbling toward the
exit “Officer Montero
was following close
behind,” she recounted
in a sworn statement
given a week and a half
after the incident “And
I went down the two
flights of stairs to
where the cell area is,
where the prisoner
booking area is, he
started pushing me —
holding on to me and
pushing me back into
the cell area. And all the while I kept resist¬
ing him, pushing against him to try and
leave the station. But he continued to just
keep pushing, picking me up and pushing
me against the wall.
“I tried to get away. I resisted him by
pushing as best I could. I mean, I was on
crutches, I had the cast. So I was just trying
to push against his chest with my hands,
telling him to get away from me.
“Well, he put his body real tight up
against mine, like to pin me against the
wall, and said, T want to fuck your brains
out’”
As Stewart struggled with Montero, a
buzzer sounded in the lobby — someone
wanted to enter the building. At that
moment Montero finally let her go. As
Stewart moved to open the front door for
another officer, she said Montero again fol¬
lowed her. Just before she left the building,
he grabbed one of her crutches. “He
wouldn’t let me have it,” she told Sergeant
Bematt. “Finally he gave it back to me and
I left the station.”
As word of Stewart’s formal complaint
spread around the department, two other
women filed additional complaints, alleging
that Montero had made crude and graphic
remarks to them, as well. One of the
women said Montero had put his arms
around her and asked if he could see her
breasts.
In three separate sworn statements to
investigators, Montero asserted that the
incidents did not occur the way the women
had described them, and he categorically
denied forcing Stewart into the cell block or
molesting her.
All three women were asked to take a lie
detector test (the reports do not indicate
whether Montero was also asked). Only
Stewart agreed. She passed, and her com¬
plaint was sustained. The other two com¬
plaints were not upheld for lack of corrobo¬
rating witnesses or evidence.
Although the department’s discipline
coordinator initially recommended that
Montero be terminated, Metro-Dade Police
Department Director Fred Taylor reduced
his punishment to a twenty-day suspension.
(All internal affairs investigations are
reviewed by Taylor.)
Today Montero’s personnel file contains
no record of the incident. His current
supervisor, Maj. Madeline Pearson, says
she knows nothing about the allegations
made by Donna Stewart or the other two
female officers. Once Montero was trans¬
ferred to her command (following his sus¬
pension in early 1992), she says the officer
was given a fresh start.
Disciplinary actions are routinely purged
from officers’ personnel files every two
years. In fact around the time of Stewart’s
complaint notes in Montero’s file leave the
impression that his behavior was under
control. In his evaluation spanning April
1989 to April 1990 (the incident occurred in
February 1990), Montero is described as
displaying “a ‘cocky,’ ‘macho’ attitude,
which at this point has not presented a
problem.” However, the next year’s evalua¬
tion states, “Although Montero relates well
to his squad members, there have been dif¬
ficulties with other female peers.” Still,
from 1989 to 1991 all of Montero’s evalua¬
tions were “satisfactory,” and he was rec¬
ommended for a merit raise each of those
years.
In explaining the disciplinary procedures
regarding sexual harassment, Major Ward
notes that first-time offenders are often
given a second chance. “We also believe in
progressive discipline,” he adds, referring
to the practice of more severe punishment
for repeated offenses. Yet other cases sug¬
gest the department is reluctant to deal
harshly with officers who repeatedly violate
the sexual harassment policy.
In 1986 a civilian secretary at the Kendall
station filed two complaints against Sgt.
Richard Braithwaite, accusing him of forc¬
ing her to have sexual intercourse during a
social date and of sexually harassing her
afterward with threatening phone calls.
Continued on page 2(9
The coordinator recommended
Montero be terminated, but
Taylor reduced that to a
twenty-day suspension.
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New Times Page 27
¡an f °
June 29-July 5, 1995


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Page 28 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


Long Fall
Continued from page 26
announce on the radio that they would be
there, and then they wouldn’t show up.”
Inside the station she was treated as a nov¬
elty. “I was continually manhandled,” she
says. “I would walk down the hall and
someone would snap my bra or hit me in
the ass.”
Today such actions would be fodder for a
federal lawsuit, but back then Lawrence
believed them to be tests of her mettle, and
she reacted by concentrating her energy
on affecting change. She
protested the uniform —
an A-line skirt, pumps,
and dainty white hat —
by explaining to anyone
who’d listen that it not
only restricted physical
movement, it also
turned female officers
into targets after dark.
She agitated fpr new
gun belts better suited
to the female anatomy.
She argued for the right
of women to patrol by
themselves.
“Whatever women
may have on the depart¬
ment — three-quarters
of it came from Niki,
and women don’t realize that,” says Donna
Munro, a Metro-Dade sergeant who retired
two years ago after spending twenty years
on the force. “She was extremely compe¬
tent, a very good police officer. Niki fought
to get us a lot of things, and at the time peo¬
ple said, ‘Oh, this is stupid.’ But it was true:
Niki made a lot of changes that people
don’t know about and don’t appreciate.
Niki’s a rabble-rouser. That’s been the gist
of her career. But you can’t take on Ithe
department] over everything; you have to
let some issues go. Sometimes I think she
should have walked away.”
In fact, there were incidents — sordid,
unpleasant, and unremarkable — that
Lawrence did let pass unchallenged. She
tells of a patrol partner who attempted to
sexually assault her while she sat on the
hood of their car during a break. Luckily she
had the keys. She drove back to the station,
requested another partner, and let the inci¬
dent slide. About a year later, she says, a
supervisor shoved his hand down her
blouse: “I said, ‘Wait a minute! Wait a
minute! What’s going
on?”’ She slugged the
supervisor and almost
immediately found her¬
self booted from her
post under his com¬
mand, a coveted position
in a specialized unit.
After that experience
in the late Seventies,
Lawrence finally under¬
stood. “They sincerely
believed that it went
with the territory,” she
recalls bitterly. “You just
weren’t supposed to
complain about it.” So in
1980, when a high-rank¬
ing officer proposed that
they go together to a
motel in Broward County, she didn’t refuse.
“He didn’t demand it,” she says, “but it was
very clear what would happen if I didn’t go.”
As one of the top scorers on the sergeant’s
exam, Lawrence was scheduled for a promo¬
tion, and most likely a transfer to another
district, which would disrupt the compli¬
cated baby-sitting arrangements she had
made for her children. “So I slept with him
one time.” she says, “and I got to stay in the
district.” In light of her promotion, this was a
Continued on page 31
^supervisor
shoved! [his hand
down her blouse
* w
*1 saip,aWait a
minute! What's
“going on?“
. SheIslugged him.
Punishment
Continued from page 27
The secretary withdrew her initial com¬
plaint of sexual battery, but an internal
affairs investigation confirmed that
Braithwaite had stalked her during lunch
hours and left personal letters for her at
home and at work. As a result, Braithwaite
was suspended without pay for four days.
In 1993 two female officers from the
Kendall station filed another sexual
harassment complaint against
Braithwaite. Ofcr. Lisa Goulden and
Ofcr. Lisa Locasio accused Braithwaite
of referring to them as “dykes” during
daily roll calls dating back four years.
After a seven-month investigation involv¬
ing more than 31 sworn statements, a
disposition panel upheld the women’s
allegations. Braithwaite’s punishment
for this second offense: a five-day sus¬
pension without pay. His appeal of that
action is pending.
A similar case involved Sgt. Dante
Starks. An extensive investigation found
that Starks had verbally and physically
harassed five female officers between
1989 and 1993. A top-level review panel,
which characterized the sergeant’s
behavior as “hostile and offensive,”
issued a stern memo in August 1994 that
warned: “Collectively, these incidents
indisputably support the finding that
[Starks’s] actions were at times crimi¬
nal.... The liability in
Sergeant Starks’s
behavior is too great
to assume, for himself,
the department, and
those female employ¬
ees with whom he
may interact in the
future.” As detailed in
the New Times article
“Dante’s Inferno”
(April 13), two
sources familiar with
the case say the
sergeant’s own super¬
visor urged his superiors to consider fir¬
ing him. Instead Stark was demoted one
rank and reassigned to a unit that patrols
Miami International Airport.
Cmdr. Harriet Janosky admits that the
department may have made some errors
in the past. “I also think that the depart¬
ment has made a real effort to correct
these issues so that they don’t recur,” she
says. “It’s a learning process. Currently
we have a very stringent policy, [but] I
think that as long as human beings are
involved, there is no fool-proof system.”
- Elise Ackerman
Sources familiar with the case
say the supervisor urged his
superiors to consider firing
Stark. Instead he was demoted.
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Page 30 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1095


Long Fall
Continued from page 29
minor victory. “Normally, any time you got
promoted you got transferred,” Lawrence
explains. “They seemed to have this belief
that you couldn’t supervise people you had
been working on an equal level with, and my
attitude was that if you can supervise, you
can supervise. I was one of the first people
[to receive a promotion] who didn’t get
transferred.” For the next four years her
annual performance evaluations alternated
between above satisfactory and excellent,
and her personnel file brimmed with com¬
mendations.
It was during this period Lawrence crossed
paths with Becky Card. Also a single mother,
Card had the well-scrubbed mien and whole-
some friendliness of a Girl Scout troop
leader. Recruited by Metro-Dade in 1982,
Card, like all rookies, spent her first year on
probation under the close supervision of var¬
ious field-training officers. She says she had
been working for several months when one
of her training officers made an unusual
v 1 ' 7 • 7
She even süspected
! co workers of 7
• ■ •• 7 ' 7 - '$
¡I vandalism: Her [tires
punctured:
proposition. “He said, ‘Let’s go out in the
country and see what kind of police officer
you are,”’ she recalls. “Stupid me, I thought
we were going to do some kind of surveil¬
lance. It turns out he wanted sex.’”
According to Card, not only was she
harassed by her training officers, but a
sergeant who was their supervisor also
began to badger her for dates. She says she
finally filed a sexual harassment complaint
with the human resources section of the
department in 1983 in an attempt to dissuade
him. (Sexual harassment complaints are now
routinely handled by internal affairs, which
recently was renamed the professional com¬
pliance bureau.) “That’s when the trouble
began,” she remembers, her eyes tearing up
at the memory. Investigators did not
sustain Card’s complaint. Instead she was
accused of attempting to discredit the
sergeant because he had criticized her job
performance.
Card believes her complaint unleashed a
bureaucratic vendetta. A month after she
filed her complaint, she was transferred to
the Kendall station and assigned to a female
supervisor, who turned out to be Sgt. Niki
Lawrence. “I was told that she was assigned
to me so I could terminate her,” Lawrence
asserts, “and there wouldn’t be any sign of
impropriety.” But Lawrence says she
observed no problems with Card’s work and
evaluated her accordingly.
Nonetheless Card was fired, despite a full
year’s worth of satisfactory evaluations and
four commendations. “I found out [the
department] had to hire us by federal man¬
date, but they didn’t have to keep us,” Card
says. So she sued for reinstatement. The
department, she claims, initially offered her
$100,000 to drop the suit, but eventually
agreed to let her return. “I said, ‘I don’t want
money. I want my job back, my respect back.
Can you do that?”’ According to a settlement
contained in her personnel file, the depart¬
ment paid Card’s attorney’s fees and she
returned as a probationary officer.
The deal, however, turned out to have no
guarantees. After completing yet another
year of probation, Card was informed she
had flunked her second chance. This time
she held on to her job only because of a tech¬
nicality: The department had failed to fire
her before her probationary period expired.
“I produced my court settlement,” she points
out, “and they angrily agreed I had passed.”
Card, who is still with the department, filed
her lawsuit in 1985. That same year Metro-
Dade adopted a new policy explicitly pro¬
hibiting “intimidation, insult, humiliation, or
offensive physical/verbal abuse of a sexual
nature.” In addition, special internal affairs
investigators were assigned to handle allega¬
tions of sexual harassment. The new policy
prompted Niki Lawrence to file her first com¬
plaint. After silently seething for more than
ten years, Lawrence says her complaint was
triggered by a joke a male sergeant had
made about her latest project — an effort to
induce the department to change the fabric
used in its uniforms. According to Lawrence,
several female officers had developed yeast
infections as a result of the heavy polyester
pants that were standard issue. She was in
the process of surveying other female offi¬
cers about the problem when she learned
that the sergeant had authored a bit of dog¬
gerel describing the condition as “polyester
fester,” much to the amusement of fellow
officers in her district.
Lawrence’s humiliation was compounded
when she was abruptly removed from her
position as a supervisor of field-training offi¬
cers. She filed a grievance to protest her
removal, and later made a sexual harass¬
ment complaint to the internal affairs
bureau. (In filing the departmental griev¬
ance, Lawrence was contesting the proce¬
dure used to remove her from the training
squad; her sexual harassment complaint
ascribed her removal to sexual discrimina¬
tion.) In her harassment complaint, she
alleged that female officers in her district
were treated unfairly and demeaned. As
examples, she cited the sergeant’s “poly¬
ester fester” joke and continuing personal
calls and visits to her home made by the
high-ranking officer she had accompanied to
the Broward motel.
Eventually Lawrence’s grievance was
upheld, but the sexual harassment complaint
was not. (Internal affairs reported that the
Continued on page 33
June 29 —July 5, 1995
New Times Page 31


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June 29-July 5, 1995
Page 32 New Times


Long Fall
Continued from page 31
command staff of the district had decided to
rotate all field-training officers in order to
prevent burnout, and Lawrence simply had
been the first to be selected.) In the wake of
her complaint, however, Lawrence says the
atmosphere at the Kendall station became
unbearable. She even suspected hostile co¬
workers of vandalism: Her tires were
punctured, and turpentine was
splashed on her car before she trans¬
ferred to Key Biscayne in October
1985.
For a while Lawrence’s career
seemed back on track. She spent two
years at the small community station
and received twelve commendations
as well as above-satisfactory evalua¬
tions. Her supervisors praised her
knowledge of federal and state laws,
her high ethical standards, and her
sound judgment. “Sergeant
Lawrence consistently displays a
high degree of motivation and initia¬
tive,” wrote Lt. Charles Miller in
February 1986. “[She] has main¬
tained an excellent working relation¬
ship with all those she has come in
contact with.... She takes a genuine
interest in any problem affecting one
of her subordinates.”
Officers who worked under
Lawrence describe her as a strict but
unusually considerate supervisor.
For example, Ofcr. Betsy Walker, a
nineteen-year veteran, was involved
in a devastating car accident in 1986,
shortly after she had transferred
from Lawrence’s squad. “1 had a concussion
for six months,” Walker recalls. “I couldn’t
drive, I couldn’t walk. Niki made arrange¬
ments for me to be picked up and taken to
doctors — I had to go to different therapists
twice a day — she would come check on me
herself. She checked on me daily for about
she months. I thought she was a very caring
person. She really looked out for her peo¬
ple.”
But a move back to south Dade in June
1987 reignited old antagonisms. Her new sta¬
tion was Cutler Ridge, not Kendall, where
she previously has worked, but the friction
between the 40-year-old
sergeant and her supe¬
riors was similar, as evi¬
denced by her evalua¬
tions, which noted her
“autocratic demeanor”
even while commend¬
ing her judgment and
leadership skills.
Lawrence also admits
to having felt stymied
generally. “There were
so many units that
excluded females,” she
says. Repeated
requests for assign¬
ment to specialized
units such as robbery,
internal affairs, or the
training bureau were
denied. Twice she passed the written portion
of the lieutenant’s test, only later to fail the
more subjective “assessment test” that mea¬
sures skills in simulated situations.
In October 1988, Lawrence applied unsuc¬
cessfully for a vacancy as sergeant of the
canine unit, and later complained to the fed¬
eral Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC) that she’d improperly
been disqualified from consideration
because she failed a rope-climbing test that
discriminated against female applicants.
That complaint later would become part of a
federal lawsuit, but in the meantime she con¬
tinued working at Cutler Ridge, where a
series of health problems quickly put her on
a collision course with her supervisors.
In March 1989, Lawrence suffered a minor
injury to her right wrist while vaulting a
fence to investigate a ringing burglar alarm.
Her injury became arthritic, and one of the
small bones in her wrist eroded, creating a
gap within the bone structure and causing
excruciating pain. Lawrence’s doctor recom¬
mended a partial bone fusion, but the opera¬
tion was not approved by the department’s
risk-management division for more than two
years.
Her physical discomfort mounted as a con¬
genital spinal deformity became aggravated
by the pressure produced by her gun belt.
Lawrence requested permission to remove
the belt while filling out paperwork in the
station. That request was denied, and she
was removed from her post as a patrol super¬
visor and ordered to work the desk at the
station while the department verified her fit¬
ness for duty.
Although Lawrence’s
personnel file contains
letters from her doctors
attesting to her physical
ability to work her regu¬
lar job, as well as
evidence that she had
taught three self-defense
courses one day prior to
being removed from duty,
she was not sent back to
patrol. The desk job not
only carried a stigma, she
recalls, it also required
her to spend most of her
time sitting down, which
only exacerbated the pain
caused by the gun belt.
Particularly galling to her
was the fact that other
employees considered physically unfit were
allowed to wear civilian clothes while they
carried out their duties at the station. She, on
the other hand, was not even permitted to
wear a shoulder holster.
Lawrence says she became convinced that
the man in charge of the Cutler Ridge dis¬
trict, Maj. Thomas Lamont, was singling her
out for punishment. She fell into a deep
depression and began seeing a psychologist
and a psychiatrist. “I was really just in a state
of shock,” she says. “I couldn’t believe that I
Continued on page 34
Lawrence with sons Frank and Matthew soon after she
joined Metro-Dade in 1973
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New Times Page 33


Long Fall
Continued from page 33
was being taken off the road, put on the
desk, and forced to wear this gun belt, which
caused so much pain for me — and I have a
high tolerance for pain. But there were some
days I had to take two hours of sick leave
and go home because I couldn’t stand it. To
know that it was a totally arbitrary decision
made by one individual was very hard for me
to understand.”
In May 1989, Lawrence filed a second com¬
plaint with the federal EEOC, accusing
Major Lamont of retaliating against her for
submitting the first complaint about the
canine unit test. Six months later, she found
herself transferred to the Northside station,
a move she believes was a direct conse¬
quence of her EEOC complaints. She points
out that Northside was 38 miles from her
home, further away than three other sta¬
tions, including Cutler Ridge.
Despite the inconvenience, the transfer
brought temporary relief. After a month at
Northside, she was allowed to return to patrol.
Her evaluations improved, and for a brief
period it seemed her problems with the
department would be resolved. There did
remain the matter other wrist operation, how¬
ever. Frustrated by the department5 s refusal to
pay for the procedure, Lawrence hired a
worker’s compensation attorney, who filed a
claim arguing that the needless physical suf¬
fering was causing Lawrence psychological
damage. The department’s response was
immediate. The claim was cited as evidence
that Lawrence was psychologically unfit for
duty, and on October 23, 1990, she was
stripped other gun and badge and transferred
to the Alternate Response Unit, a section of
the communications bureau whose primary
function is Uptake police reports over the tele¬
phone. Nicknamed “the rubber gun squad,”
the unit is a common holding pen for officers
who have been relieved of duty pending disci¬
plinary action or the results of an internal
investigation.
Soon after Lawrence was transferred, one of
her former supervisors, Lt. Charles Miller of
Key Biscayne, allegedly announced during
roll call that she had been “Baker Acted,”
police jargon for detaining someone who is
mentally disturbed. Lawrence filed an internal
affairs complaint against Miller, which was
upheld. “I feel that my
reputation has been so
totally annihilated that
nobody actually knows
the truth,” Lawrence
sighs. “All they’ve heard
are rumors, and the
rumors are terrible.”
Lawrence won back
her badge and gun by
successfully filing yet
another departmental
grievance, but she con¬
tinued working for about
four years in the
Alternate Response Unit,
where she persisted in
offering suggestions to
improve the work envi¬
ronment. Concerned
about the level of stress
experienced by her co-workers, for instance,
she contacted departmental psychologists and
asked if someone would provide the unit with
group counseling sessions. Nothing came of
that request On her own time, Lawrence then
traveled to St Petersburg and took a course in
“Critical Incident Stress Debriefing” (CISD),
which teaches techniques used by police and
fire departments nationwide to help employ¬
ees cope with traumatie situations. Lawrence
explains she had learned about CISD from
some Metro-Dade firemen, and she thought
the police department should use the tech¬
nique as well. But her suggestions, expressed
in memoranda, were rejected.
The harder she tried to act like an effective
sergeant, the more Lawrence’s relationship
with her supervisors seemed to deteriorate.
One incident in particular sparked contro¬
versy. In the fall of 1993, she complained to the
county’s affirmative action office about photos
of nude women posted on the walls of the
homicide unit at police
headquarters.
Department director Fred
Taylor quickly ordered
the pinups removed.
Workers in the headquar¬
ters building, including
women, frequently cite
the episode as an example
of sexual-harassment
fever, evidence that the
policy had spun out of
control.
Lawrence says the inci¬
dent infuriated her super¬
visor, Lt. Donald Kausal,
and that he began to
make increasingly unrea¬
sonable demands of her.
According to court docu¬
ments, she claimed that
Kausal forbade her from leaving the building
without first asking permission and that he
delayed her vacation pay. (Kausal contends his
actions “were not intentional or malicious” and
has denied the accusations.)
The adverse fallout from the pinup-photo
affair led Lawrence to file yet another com¬
plaint with the EEOC, which later became a
formal lawsuit filed in June 1994. Not long
afterward the department ordered her to ;
undergo a battery 'of psychological tests,1
despite the fact that her supervisors had
known about her problems with depression
since 1989. The resulting three-page evalua¬
tion does not explicitly state whether or not
Lawrence is fit for duly, but it does describe
her as “anxious, depressed, tense, entrenched
in a great deal of anger, and acutely over¬
whelmed by her current emotional upheaval.
The magnitude other distress is severe and it
likely interferes with her ability to think
clearly, which places her at increased risk for
impulsive behavior. Sleep disturbance,
decreased concentration, somatic complaints
and forgetfulness are likely to be present She
appears to be experiencing an intense sense of
emotional deprivation, loneliness, vulnerabil¬
ity, and helplessness.
‘Test data indicate that Sergeant Lawrence
has a longstanding and enduring tendency to
feel mistreated, picked on, resentful and vic¬
timized,” the report continues. “She exhibits a
negative, angry attitude toward her environ¬
ment, which impacts her ability to cope with
stress, make decisions, and function effectively
in interpersonal situations.”
Lawrence counters that her feelings should
come as no surprise. “My reactions, my emo¬
tional condition, is a normal reaction to what
I’ve been subjected to,” she argues. “That’s not
a rationalization. Thaf s a psychological fact” If
she had been such a basket case, she won¬
ders, why wasn’t that noted in her most recent
evaluation, from February 1994, which ranked
her as “satisfactory.”
Nonetheless, based on the test results,
department officials ordered Lawrence to take
a compulsory, unpaid leave of absence “for
one year or until it is medically determined
that you have returned to normal health.” She
was also stripped of her gun and badge.
Continued on page 37
“She was one of the
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Long Fall
Continued from page 34
Other women who have known Lawrence
since her early years on the force say they
believe she is suffering the cumulative effects
of years of stress. “She was one of the forerun¬
ners,” observes Becky Card, “but she paid a
very high price. I think they’ll do anything to
discredit her. Any time you’re involved in a
long lawsuit, it’s a stressful time. I think she
needs a support group to help her through
this.”
A high-ranking female officer who asked not
to be named refers to Lawrence as “a very
intelligent, very caring human being. The
problem with Niki is that she didn’t know how
to pick her battles.”
One of those battles took place this past
October, when Lawrence got her day in court.
As part of her lawsuit alleging that the rope¬
climbing test for the canine unit was evidence
of sexual discrimination, Lawrence also
argued that the she was disabled by panic
attacks and by her back condition. The depart¬
ment she contended, had failed to make a rea¬
sonable accommodation for her physical hand¬
icaps, as required by federal law.
A jury decided the rope-climbing test was
not discriminatory, and the judge separately
found that Lawrence could not be considered
a disabled person because none of her handi¬
caps affected the performance of a “major life
activity.”
Mention Niki Lawrence’s name to Carol
Anderson, the assistant county attorney who
defends Metro-Dade, and Anderson rolls her
eyes. “People are going to court after they
have refused generous settlements that they
were too greedy to accept,” she complains.
“There’s some awkwardness in handling per¬
sonal relationships, and there are sometimes
people who offend others in the course of
those relationships. But we can’t throw away
hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars to
people who were merely insulted or inconve¬
nienced. Everyone who complains isn’t a vic¬
tim. Some may have suffered real mental dis¬
tress on account of real harassment, but that
still doesn’t entitle them to one million dollars
apiece.”
In fact, Lawrence’s lawyers had asked the
federal jury to award her more than one mil¬
lion dollars. She justifies the amount by
explaining that she was asking only for com¬
pensation, not for punitive damages. The com¬
pensation broke down as $68,000 in past lost
wages, $736,000 in future lost wages, and lost
pension benefits of $566,000. (Lawrence does
admit she turned down a $250,000 settlement
offer from the county before going to trial.)
The courtroom defeat seems to have
deflated Lawrence’s confidence. Her second
lawsuit — this one regarding Lt. Donald
Kausal and the post-pinup controversies —
may end in settlement. “I have a very good
case,” she contends, “but if I go to court and I
win, they’re going to appeal and we’re talking
about another five years, and I don’t know if I
have it in me.” From vows of fighting on till the
bitter end, she now allows she’s prepared to
walk away from it all with nearly nothing. All
she’d like in a settlement is reimbursement of
her attorney’s fees and her retirement bene¬
fits.
“I’m at the point where I’ve lost all my
friends, I’m completely isolated, I’m starting to
have real bad panic attacks, and I’m not going
to allow it to kill me emotionally,” she says. “If
something positive were to come out of my
case, whether it’s positive in the sense of help¬
ing me directly or if it improves the system for
sexual-harassment victims in the future, it
would make this all worthwhile. Looking back
on 25 years of battle with the police depart¬
ment, it has to have counted for something. It
really does.” CD
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• BEDDING - OFFICE - ODIENTAL - OUTDOOD


Oumou Sangare perforins languorously at Africa Féte Monday
t h u r s d a y
june
ínl ini $'x Women With Brain Death:
Jill Pssssst. Did you hear? Award-
// *■— winning director David Arisco
// r» and the Actors’ Playhouse Group
resuscitates its production of
Mark Houston’s Six Women With Brain
Death, or Expiring Minds Want to Know begin¬
ning tonight at 8:00 at the Carrusel Theater
(235 Alcazar Ave., Coral Gables) and running
through August 5. The two-act musical spoofs
supermarket tabloid headlines, with six fork-
tongued female characters ripping through
the lives and times of such notables as OJ.
Simpson, Michael Jackson, and that slut Bar¬
bie (you know, the doll). Tickets cost $18 and
$20. Additional performances take place Fri¬
day and Saturday at 8:00 p.m., with a 2:00
matinee on Sunday. Tell ’em you read it here
first at 444-9293. (GC)
Barry White: “Let me touch you
and ruuuubbb you all over.”
Whoa! Who else? Barry White,
the major-domo of makeout (and
beyond) music, elbowed his way
back on to the charts late last year with his
nineteenth album, The Icon Is Love, a collec¬
tion of lush, slow-cooking grooves that finds
the Big Man casting his ample shadow over
the army of peach-fuzzed new-jack pretenders
who’ve clogged the R&B airwaves recently.
The bass voice groan, the deliberate delivery,
the silky arrangements, the sultry pillow talk
(“Let me undress you from your clothes to
your underwear”) — White works it all into
foreplay overdrive. In support of his best
record in ages, Barry White, abetted by his
Love Unlimited Orchestra, saunters into Sun¬
rise Musical Theater (5555 NW 95th Ave.)
tonight and tomorrow night for 8:00 shows.
Chanté Moore opens. Tickets cost $28, $38,
and $48, but you may have a hard time finding
some. Call 741-7300. (MY)
Night Sky: The New River Repertory opens its
production of Susan Yankowitz’s Night Sky
tonight at 8:00 at the Studio (640 N. Andrews
Ave., Fort Lauderdale). The evocative drama
tells the story of Anna — an astronomer
afflicted with aphasia after an auto accident —
and the effects her temporary inability to
speak have on her family relationships. Tick¬
ets cost $12. The production runs through
July 23, with performances each Friday and
Saturday night at 8:00, and Sunday at 2:00
p.m. For more info, call 763-6882. (GC)
Mambo Brothers: Mention mambo in Miami
and people immediately think Cachao or
Hilton Ruiz or Celia Cruz. But the Mambo
Brothers, led by guitarist-vocalist-saxman
Charlie Brent (one-time musical director for
Wayne Cochran and the C.C. Riders) and
singer-harmonica man Dennis Booth (one¬
time Muddy Waters keyboardist), have more
to do with the French Quarter than with little
Havana. Their sound encompasses the rolling
piano rhythms, martial drumming, and
squonkin’ honky-tonk sax of the best Cres¬
cent City R&B, with some gritty blues harp
thrown into the mix; in fact, on several tracks
on their new CD, Night Owl (the cover of
which — depicting Brent and Booth ogling a
female’s buttocks — is one of the most egre¬
gious displays of non-PC behavior seen since
2 live Crew), you’ll swear you were listening
to Dr. John himself. For a partyin’ evening,
join the Bros, tonight at 10:00 at Tobacco
Road (626 S. Miami Ave.). Admission costs
six dollars. It’s a Mardi gras mambo at
374-1198. (BW)
Richard Ford: At once lyrical and epiphani-
cal, Richard Ford’s Rock Springs was one
of the best short-story collections pub¬
lished in the 1980s. If that book made any¬
one forget Ford is also a novelist, his Inde¬
pendence Day, published just in time for the
Fourth of July, promises to be a powerful
reminder. The new novel is a sequel to Ford’s
1986 work The Sportswriter, which chronicles
narrator Frank Bascombe’s Easter-week
attempts to resurrect himself from a failed
marriage. Independence Day, as the title indi¬
cates, follows Bascombe through another cru¬
cial and revelatory holiday. Thanks to Books
& Books, Ford is in Miami tonight to read
from his new work. The time is 8:00 p.m., the
address is 296 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables.
The phone number is 442-4408, and the price,
as always, is nil. (TF)
Mike Barra: Seasoned singer-songwriter-gui-
tarist and former New York studio scenester
Mike Barra has been described as “the most
satirical, lyrical, sardonic, monophonic but not
moronic, touching, gut-wrenching, original
acoustic fiasco worth attending anywhere.”
That’s quite a mouthful. Find out if Barra lives
up to this wordy praise tonight at 8:00 at the
Miami Institute of Expanding light (8905 SW
87th Ave.), as the Folk Club of South Florida
continues its Acoustic Underground series.
Key Biscayne singer-songwriter Keith Hope
opens the show. Admission is six dollars. Call
the folks at 279-8100. (GC)
Sunday
j u I y
Goo Goo Dolls: The Buffalo-based Goo
Goo Dolls could be the nation’s best-
known unknown band. You’ve proba¬
bly heard of them. They’ve toured with
Soul Asylum, appeared on Late Night
With Conan O’Brien, and contributed a cover
of the Rolling Stones’ “Bitch” to the No Alter¬
native AIDS benefit compilation. But how
many of their tunes can you hum off the top of
your head? Where’s the hype? Where’s the
Rolling Stone cover story and the MTV
Unplugged appearance? With their recent
release, A Boy Named Goo, probably their
best work to date, the band brings a brilliant
XI ft' .<*».» I T n, t *
Page 38 Néw Tintes
’/uirre <2'9V/u-ty¿'Ü, ^895


Al Freddy
New Times Page 39
U America’s Birthday Bash: Celebrate the
Ilf nation’s birthday at the biggest shindig
11 in town, as the eighth annual Ameri-
(--| ca’s Birthday Bash gets under way
with a day full of music and activities
beginning at 2:00 p.m. at the Bayfront Park
Amphitheater (301 Biscayne Blvd.). An Amer¬
ican jamboree of bands — the Pan Symphony
Steel Band, the Frank Hubbell Dixieland
Band, Cross Creek, the Joanna Connor Blues
Band, and four all-star barbershop quartets —
graces two stages, while those who prefer to
celebrate internationally can enjoy music by
Jerry Rivera, Orquesta Guayacan, Donato y
Estefano, and la Muralla. Magicians, jugglers,
rides, games, and contests provide additional
fun, and fireworks fill the sky starting at 9:00
p.m. Admission is free. Call 358-7550. (GC)
Pops on the Beach: If you don’t want to travel to
the mainland for the U.S.’s 219th birthday,
travel to North Beach (73rd Street and Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach) instead for the third
annual Pops on the Beach concert and picnic.
Groove to the Latin jazz rhythms of Carlos
Oliva and los Sobrinos del Juez, Pow Wow,
and the dynamic Melton Mustafa Big Band.
The party starts at noon and wraps up at
11:00 after the requisite fireworks. Call
868-1763. (GC)
Slang Hi Frequency: Enter the ambiance of inner
space when members of Slang, Embryo (of
L.U.N.G.S.), synth wizard David L/B, experi¬
mental video artist Larry Hawks, cyberpunk
extraordinaire James Fletcher, and others pre¬
sent live and processed music and video
manipulation tonight at 10:00 at Squeeze (2 S.
New River Dr., Fort Lauderdale). The event
explores the impact of images of high-tech
warfare, sex, industrialization, space, and
genetics. Admission is five dollars for
attendees over 21 years of age, seven for ages
20 and under. Admission is free. Call
522-2151. (GC)
|wednesday|
■pa ‘Alone in a Crowd": Hie Bass Museum of
I Art (2121 Park Ave., Miami Beach) is
currently showing 103 rare prints by 45
ri I little-known African-American artists.
Dating from the 1930s and 1940s, the
works have been culled from the collection of
Reba and Dave Williams for the exhibition
“Alone in a Crowd,” on view through August
20. The show provides a body of work that
captures the vibrant period in the African-
American community that followed the
Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, a period
that helped shape modern-day African-Ameri¬
can images, ideals, and identity by focusing on
heritage, history, culture, political and social
injustice, and racial consciousness and pride
through the arts. The prints depict rural and
urban life in a wide variety of styles, ranging
from modernist abstraction and surrealism to
documentary social realism and American
scene painting. Admission is seven dollars.
Museum hours are 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and noon to 5:00
p.m. on Sunday. Call 673-7530. (GC)
Barry White pours it on sweet and low Friday
On Friday the Mambo Brothers do it Mardi gras-style
-
«■S
The Calendar is written by
Judy Cantor, Georgina Cárdenas,
Tom Finkel, Bob Weinberg,
and Michael Yockel.
For more listings, turn the page
Carlos Oliva and his Sobrinos pop the Fourth of July Tuesday The Goo Goo Dolls make their ascent Sunday
luster to their gut-level, hardcore pop-rock,
smoothing out some of the rough edges while
sharpening others. Consider yourself one of
the lucky when you witness the Goo Goo
Dolls live tonight at 8:00 at Marsbar (8505
Mills Dr.) with guests Hum. Tickets cost ten
dollars. Call 271-6605 for more info. (GC)
Barbershop Quartet Society: If you imagine bar¬
bershop quartets as foursomes of middle-age
guys sporting handlebar mustaches and wear¬
ing quaint straw hats and striped vests, you’re
living in the Nineteenth Century. More than
8000 barbershoppers from all walks of life
converge on the Miami Beach Convention
Center (1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami
Beach) beginning today as the Barbershop
Harmony Society hosts its annual convention.
With a cappella singing making a comeback,
the society hopes to give a new spin to this
old-fashioned variety of the art form. Passes to
the six-day convention cost $38 and $75. Tick¬
ets to two performances featuring pianist-
humorist Victor Borge on Wednesday at 6:00
and 9:00 p.m. range in price from $15 to $50.
Call 80O-876-SING for tickets and a complete
schedule. (GC)
Freedom Festival: Grammy Award-winning
country singer Crystal Gayle headlines the
third annual Freedom Festival, a full day of
music, culture, and activities beginning at
11:00 a.m. today at Miccosukee Indian Bingo
and Gaming (500 SW 177th St). Enjoy perfor¬
mances by rock group Tiger Tiger, folk
singer James Billie, and the Juan Salinas
Aztec Dancers, plus airboat rides, a Miccosu¬
kee fashion show, a kiddie carnival, arts and
June 29-July 5, JL995
crafts, and traditional Miccosukee foods.
Admission is free. Call 223-8380 for
details. (GC)
Africa Fete: Everybody say Wassoulou!
Everybody say yelal Hold the fire¬
works and shake your gourd instead.
Afro-pop rules the day as 76 musicians
and dancers descend on Miami Beach
for Island Records’ annual world-music cele¬
bration. This year’s Africa Fete tour features
Senegalese singer Baaba Maal, whose uplift¬
ing Afro-beat spirituals bring new swing to
ancient African folk rhythms; Haitian roots
band Boukman Eksperyans (see “Music”
story on page 81); Nigerian singer Fema Kuti,
son of Original Sujferhead Fela Anikulapo
Kuti, who follows in his father’s dance
steps with frenetic jazz-funk; and Oumou
Sangare, the languorous-voiced, feminist
troubadour who’s been called the Madon¬
na of Mali. The concert, produced here by
the Rhythm Foundation, takes place at
Marlin Gardens (1200 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach), which Haitian artists have decorat¬
ed with murals and Vodou sculpture. Gates
open at 6:00 p.m., with performances by
local musicians, African dance groups, and
storytellers — also on hand, vendors sell¬
ing instruments, crafts, and food. Tickets
cost $13. For details call 672-5202. GC)
Rhythm Mania: Get into the beat tonight at
10:00 at the Colony Theater (1040 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach) as two of the world’s
best congueros, revered elder statesman
Carlos “Patato” Valdes and innovative star
Giovanni Hidalgo, slap the skins in
“Rhythm Mania,” a celebration of Afro-
Caribbean percussion. The two are backed
by a Latin jazz band boasting bassist Eddie
“Gua Gua” Rivera, pianist Erick Figueroa,
drummer Archie Peña, percussionist Edwin
Bonilla on timbales, and a horn section con¬
sisting of Dana Teboe, Feliciano Gomez
“Pachu”, and José “Pepe” Vera. Tickets are
$20. Tell them your nickname at 826-5392.
(GC)
South Florida Slammie Awards: Party hard as
the area’s top hard rock and heavy metal
bands are honored at the South Florida
Slammie Awards, taking place tonight at
8:00 at the Edge (200 W. Broward Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale). The Genitorturers, Smite,
Strongarm, Anger, Puya, and L.U.N.G.S.
are among the performers dominating the
stage. Admission is $12. Call 525-9333 for
the hard facts. (GC)
What Is Dancehall?: Just what is dancehall?
Well, if you have to ask.... Explore the vibes
of dancehall tonight at 10:00 at the Coconut
Grove Exhibition Center (2700 Bayshore
Dr.) as two-time Grammy Award-winner
Shabba Ranks, Spragga Benz, Vicious,
Mega Banton, Honorebel, Mix Master
Steve and Mello Sound, and Big Belly Sky
Juice mix up the hottest dancehall this side
of Montego Bay. Tickets cost $20. Call
252-7787 for details. (GC)


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Page 40 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


alendar
VI 4 â– 
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, New Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Thursday, June 29
Fabulons: The Fabuions perform Fifties, Sixties, and
Seventies rock and doo-wop tunes as as part of the
free Summer Stars concert series at 7:30 at The Falls
(8888 SW 136th St; 2554570) and tomorrow at 7:30 as
part of the NationsBank Starlight Musicals series at
Holiday Park (U.S. 1 and Sunrise Boulevard, Ft
Lauderdale; 761-5363).
Quartetto Gelato: This foursome performs a wide range
of music from classical favorites to tangos to pop
melodies. $15.8:00 p.m. Coral Gables Congregational
Church, 3010 De Soto Blvd, Coral Gables; 448-7421.
Friday, June 30
Bobby Ramirez Jazz Duo: Latin jazz flautist Ramirez and
partner perform jazz originals. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Magda Hiller: Singer-songwriter-guitarist Hiller
performs jazzy-bluesy-folky and often humorous
meditations and reflections on life, love, and pets.
Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925
Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 9350027.
Mambo Brothers: See '‘Calendar.”
South Pointe Jazz Series: Local jazz artists perform each
Friday night; tonight’s show features saxman Ed
Calle. Free. 7:00 p.m. South Pointe Seafood House.
Washington Avenue and 1st Street, Miami Beach;
673-1708.
Barry White: See “Calendar."
Saturday, July 1
Mike Barra' See “Calendar.”
Miami Philharmonic Steel and Percussion Orchestra The
MPSPO performs steel pan, marimba, and jazz music
in two free concerts: tonight at 8:00 at the Seville
Hotel (2901 Collins Ave, Miami Beach) and tomorrow
at 6:00 p.m. at the North Miami Beach Amphitheater
(16425 NE 16th Ave, North Miami Beach); 532-9179.
Markinhos Moura and Banda Crystal: Moura and band
perform Brazilian jazz and bossa nova each Saturday
night at 9:00 and 11:00 and Sunday night at 7:00 and
9:00. Free. Hotel Inter-Continental, 100 Chopin Plaza;
358-7565.
Sunday, July 2
Barbershop Quartet Society: See “Calendar.”
Gerald Dimitri: PACE saxophonist Dimitri performs
smooth jazz originals. $7 museum admission. 3:00
p.m. Bass Museum of Art, 2121.Park Ave, Miami
Beach; 673-7530.
Goo Goo Dolls: See “Calendar.”
SunBank Sunday Jazz Brunch: Munch on brunch while
listening to tunes by the John Sinibaldi Big Band,
Bonnie and the Wise Guys, the Per Lofgren Trio, and
the Funk Filharmonic. Free. 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Riverwalk, SW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue, Ft
Lauderdale; 761-5703.
Vincent Borino Wind Quintet This wind ensemble
performs classical selections. $5.2:30 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274.
Monday, June 3
Africa Fete: See “Calendar.”
Rhythm Mania: See “Calendar.”
South Florida Slammie Awards: See “Calendar.”
What Is Dancehall?: See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, July 4
Pops on the Beach: See “Calendar.”
Slang Hi Frequency: See “Calendar.”
Theater
The Broadway Express: Dinner theater presented by
Forrest J. Wdlingham and his Songs of Broadway
Company, with selections from fifteen Broadway
musicals, including Showboat and Les miserables.
Through July 15. Evening performances Thursday,
Saturday, and Sunday at 8:00 (dinner at 6:00).
Mermaid Room, Sea Club Oceanfront Resort Hotel,
619 N Atlantic Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 564-3211.
Driving Miss Daisy: The new Hollywood Boulevard
Theatre kicks off with a production of Alfred Uhry’s
Pulitzer Prize-winning play about the querulous yet
affectionate relationship between a proper Southern
white lady and her long-time black male chauffeur.
Through July 2. Evening performances Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00.
Hollywood Boulevard Theatre, 1938 Hollywood Blvd,
Hollywood; 929- 5400.
Faith Healer: Reviewed in this issue. Through July 2.
Evening performances Friday, June 30, Saturday,
June 24, at 8:00; matinee Sunday, and July 2 at 2:00.
New World Rep Company, Louise O. Gerrits Theater,
25 NE 2nd St; 237-3541.
Fiddler on the Roof: Tevye and the gang celebrate
tradition under the czar’s harsh rule. Through July 9.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00 (6:00 dinner); Sunday at 6:00 (4:00 dinner);
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 (noon
dinner); Jan McArt’s Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, 303
SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton; 800-841-6765.
Forever Plaid: Fifties-style musical about a quartet
called the Four Plaids, who meet an untimely end in a
bus accident and are allowed back to Earth for one
final performance. Through July 9. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00,
Sunday at 7:00; matinees Wednesday and Saturday at
2:00. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701
Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach; 407-832-7469.
Lenny: Julian Barry’s play about Lenny Bruce, the late
social-critic-cum-stand-up-comedian who shocked
audiences in the 1950s and 1960s while feeing
censorship and arrest. Bruce’s style broke ground for
the crop of comics who followed him, most of whom
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
By Steve Newman
Earthquakes
Indonesia's Flores Island
was rocked by several
major tremors, the
strongest of which wrecked more
than 100 homes and injured two
people. In Peru, a correspondent for
the Agence France Presse news
agency was killed while driving
through metropolitan Lima when a
tremor unleashed a rockslide that
sent a boulder crashing through the
window of his car. No other casual¬
ties or damage were reported from
the magnitude 4.9 quake.
Earth movements were also felt
in the Kobe, Japan aftershock zone,
Crete, Belgium, Alaska's Kenai
Peninsula, and the desert and coast
of Southern California.
Drought
Farmers in China's north-
west Gansu province have
y given up any hope of a
summer harvest as their crops with¬
ered under the region’s worst
drought in 60 years. The China Daily
reported that more than 70 percent
of the poverty-stricken province's
farmlands have been affected by the
extended dry spell.
The Southern African Develop¬
ment Community (SADC) appealed
to the international community for
$90.7 million in emergency food aid
to help avert starvation in five of the
region's worst drought-stricken
countries. SADC said it was seek¬
ing 520,000 tons of cereal for imme¬
diate shipment to Lesotho, Malawi,
Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
Wildfires
Forest fires that have
scarred many parts of
northern and western
Canada in recent weeks spread into
northern Ontario as temperatures in
the remote region warmed to record
high levels. With blazes still roaring
in British Columbia. Manitoba and
Saskatchewan, the only relief for
firefighters was in northern Alberta
where heavy rain dampened some
of the blazes.
Petroleum waste may be fueling
a two-week-old Mexican forest fire
that has destroyed 1,000 acres in
Tabasco State. Authorities quoted
by the official Notimex news agency
said investigators detected
flammable hydrocarbons two feet
below the surface, which are keep¬
ing the blaze going long after the
vegetation has been charred.
Monsoon
n Unrelenting heat that has
killed hundreds across the
Indian subcontinent was
broken by a sudden onset of the
monsoon season that also triggered
cloudbursts and massive flooding.
As many as two million people may
have been marooned by high waters
in Bangladesh that were largely fed
by rivers flowing from neighboring
India. In the Himalayan kingdom of
Nepal, landslides and flash floods
killed 60 people in two weeks of
unusually heavy downpours. Show¬
ers fell as far west as Pakistan, end¬
ing a month of record high temper¬
atures.
China's Guangdong province
was hit with a round of severe flood¬
ing that damaged 8,000 homes and
caused $12 million in damage to the
largely agricultural area north of
Hong Kong.
Amazon Poaching
/T\ More than 12 million exotic
( animals a year are illegally
trapped in Brazil's Amazon
rain forest and sold, according to the
World Wide Fund for Nature. Of
those captured, only 10 percent
make it to the black market and
stores alive, where they are sold.
Hurricane Season
Adolph, the season’s first
hurricane in the eastern
Pacific, formed several
weeks later than has been the aver¬
age in recent years, briefly threat¬
ening the Mexican coast near
Mazatlan.
Métro Refuge
French insect lovers want
parts of the Paris Métro to
be declared a nature
(D
reserve, fearing the subway is get¬
ting too clean for rare colonies of
crickets that chirp in the warm, dark
tunnels. While most commuters wel¬
come efforts to clean up the Métro
and rid it of mosquitoes, rats and
other pests, one insect special inter¬
est group wants protective mea¬
sures taken for the crickets, whose
buzzing is a symbol of good fortune
in French folklore. “Ideally, we’d like
the two Métro lines where there are
the most crickets to be declared a
natural park,” said Lionel Antoine,
president of the Protection League
for the Crickets of the Paris Métro.
The league warns that powerful new
vacuum cleaners, pesticides and
efforts to stop water leaks all
threaten the insects.
Additional Sources: U.S. Climate Analysis
Center, U.S. Earthquake Information Center
and the World Meteorological Organization.
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Page 42 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


have not come close to replicating his brilliance. July
1-23. Evening performances Friday and Saturday at
8:00; matinees Sunday at 2:30. Florida Playwrights’
Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Marisol: Reviewed in this issue. Through July 1.
Evening performances Friday, June 23 and Saturday,
July 1, at 8:00; matinee Sunday, June 25 at 2:00. Louise
O. Gerrits Theater, 25 NE 2nd St; 237-3541.
Moyshe and Maria's Meshugenah Wedding: Interactive
theater in which audience members attend a wedding
ceremony, a cocktail reception, and a gourmet meal
while rubbing elbows with actors playing bride,
groom, relatives, and guests. All performances begin
with a cash bar at 6:30; wedding begins at 7:00. June
23, Boca Marriott Hotel, 5150 Town Center Cir; Boca
Raton; 480-9153.
Neil’s Garden: Geoffrey Hassman’s engaging drama —
about a terminally ill man spending his last evening
with his soul mate of 40 years before committing
suicide — moves from Miami Beach to Broward
County. Matinee previews June 23-25 at 2:00. Regular
run June 28 through July 9. Evening performances
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00. Brian C. Smith’s Off Broadway
Theatre, 1444 NE 26th St, Ft Lauderdale; 5664)554.
Night Sky: Susan Yankowitz’s compelling drama
explores both family relationships and the nature of
language and thinking, as an astronomer attempts to
recover from aphasia after a car accident (See
“Calendar.”) June 30 through July 23. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinees
Sunday at 2:00. New River Repertory Company, 640 N
Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 523-0507.
Park You Car in the Harvard Yard: A bit of New England
comes to Miami in this well-directed, finely acted
rendition of Israel Horovitz’s play about two lonely
and stubborn people coming to grips with their lives.
Through July 9. Evening performances Friday and
Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00. New
Theatre, 65 Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Platero yyo: A poetic ode to Spanish author Juan
Ramon Jimenez, performed by children. (In Spanish.)
Ongoing. Performances Saturday at 4:00 p.m. Tafia
Circle Theater, 33 Curtiss Pkwy, Miami Springs;
888-7500.
the Princess and the Pea: You know the tale: The
kingdom can’t function without a “true king and
queen,” and the prince, heir to the throne, needs a
“true princess.” Well, what better way to find one that
to test-drive a batch of babes on a bed? A-ha! Matinee
performances Wednesday, June 28, at 1:00 p.m., and
Wednesday, July 5, at 10:30 a.m. Florida Playwrights’
Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Six Women With Brain Death: If you missed these half-
dozen housewives singing, dancing, and overdosing
on popular culture in Kendall last month, catch them
as they strut their stuff this summer in Coral Gables.
(See “Calendar.”) Through August 5. Evening
performances Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00. Actors’ Playhouse at El
LfpEltl
H-ELU
Carrusel Theatre, 235 Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 444-
9293.
Vampire Lesbians of Sodom and Little Bunny Foo Foo:
Camp comes to Hollywood (Florida, that is) as
playwright Charles Busch’s time-traveling vampires
and Paul Wiemerslage’s version of a twisted Bunny
Foo Foo share a late-night bill every weekend.
Ongoing. Evening performances Friday and Saturday
at 11:30. Florida Playwrights’Theatre, 1936
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Film
Thursday, June 29
Jewish Film Series: As an accompaniment to its current
exhibition, “Building a Place in the Sun: The Jews of
Miami Beach, 1913-1945,” the Sanford L Ziff Jewish
Museum screen the second of a four-part film-and-
discussion series that features movies dealing with
issues faced by American Jews; tonight’s program
features The Apprenticeship ofDuddy Kravitz. $6.7:00
p.m. 301 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 672-5044.
Saturday, July 1
"Alone in a Crowd" Film Series: The Bass Museum hosts
a film series to accompany its current exhibition of
prints by African-American artist of the 1930s and
1940’s. Today’s program features The Life and Art of
William H. Johnson. Free with $7 museum admission.
Bass Museum, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530.
Sunday, July 2
Cinema Vortex: The Alliance Film/Video Co-op
presents screenings of milestone films; tonight’s
program features Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. $4
donation suggested. 8:00 p.m. BAR., 1663 Lenox
Ave, Miami Beach; 674-9709.
Events
Thursday, June 29
New Directions Tropical Happy Hour This young
professionals’ organization hosts a bugaloo to benefit
the American Cancer Society. $10.6:00 p.m. Bayside
Hut (behind Miami Marine Stadium, 3601
Rickenbacker Cswy), Key Biscayne; 5944363.
World’s Largest Indoor Flea Market Bargain shoppers
can roam through miles of aisles of the fine clothing,
jewelry, home furnishings, electronics, and other
sundry items; enjoy the Wizard of Oz Revue
(performed daily at 2:00,5:00, and 7:00 p.m.) or take a
break from with music by the Trinidad Island Steel
Band. $4. Through July 2. Today from noon to 10:00
IRD ANNUAL
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otic Indian Arts and Crafts • Indian Food
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June 2 9 —JuIy 5, 1995


p.m.; tomorrow and Saturday from noon to 11:00 p.m.;
and Sunday from noon to 8:00 p.m. Miami Beach
Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr,
Miami Beach; 651-9530.
Friday, June 30
Main Street Live: Local jazz, blues, and pop groups
perform live music while shoppers take in Miami
Lakes’s establishments each Friday and Saturday
night. Tonight’s show features Mel Dancy and the
Melting Pot; tomorrow, Passion performs. Free. 7:00
p.m. Main Street, Miami Lakes; 821-1130, ext 207.
Sunday, July 2
Broward Center Backstage Tour See what goes on
behind the scenes at Fort Lauderdale’s most
prestigious venue. $2.11:00 a.m. 201SW 5th Ave, Ft
Lauderdale; 462-0222.
Coin, Stamp, and Collectibles Show: Philatelists and coin
connoisseurs converge for this show featuring
baseball cards, comics, and other rare collectibles.
Free. 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Rotary Club, Taylor
Street and 24th Avenue, Hollywood; 522-3226.
Freedom Festival: See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, July 4
America's Birthday Bash: See “Calendar.”
Fantasy Fireworks Family Celebration: Enjoy live music
by Band of Gold and the North Miami Community
Concert Band, performances by the Fantasy Theatre
Factory and the North Miami and North Miami Beach
Police Color Guards, and a huge fireworks display.
Free. 6:00 p.m. North Miami Athletic Stadium, NE
151st St and Biscayne Boulevard; 893-6511.
Fourth of July Parade: Celebrate U.S. Independence
Day with a one-mile march through Sabal Chase.
Free. 10:00 a.m. Alper Jewish Community Center,
11155 SW 112th Ave; 271-9000.
Museums
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through August 27 — “The
Floralia Series,” works by Kyra Belán.
Art Museum at Fill, University Park, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 348-2890. Through July 14
— Recent sculpture by R F. Buckley.
Bass Museum of Art, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530. Through August 20 — “Alone in a Crowd,”
prints by African-American artist of the 1930s and
1940s from the collection of Reba and Dave Williams.
(See “Calendar.”) Through August 27 — “Legacy of
the Tsarina: Master Paintings from the Palace of
Pavlovsk,” works by sixteenth- to eighteenth-century
Western European masters.
Casa de Mexico, Mexican Cultural Institute, 800
Douglas Entrance, Ste 170, Coral Gables; 529-0110.
Through June 30'— Works by Claudio Ruanova.
Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-1700.
Through July 30 — “Andres Serrano: Works, 1983-
1993.” Through August 20—“Roberto Juarez: They
Entered the Road,” and “Space of Time:
Contemporary Art from the Americas," works by
fifteen artists, including Fernanda Cardoso, Saint Clair
Cemin, Kim Dingle, and Felix González-Torres.
Center for Visual Communication, 4021 Laguna St Coral
Gables; 446-6811. Through July 26 — “Contemporary
Masters: Prints and Photographs,” featuring works by
David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Jane Hammond, Kiki
Smith, Edward Weston, and many others.
Center of Contemporary Art, 12340 NE 8th Ave, North
Miami; 893-6211. Through September 16 — Works by
Teresita Fernández and Quisqueya Henriquez.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art 1 NE
40th St; 576-5171. Through July 1 — Posters by
Fernando Botero and sculpture by Luis Moré.
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport 1-95 and
1-595, Ft Lauderdale; 357-7457. June 29 through
August 31 — Paintings by Betty Usdan Zwickler.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler St;
375-1492. Through September 24 — “Better Than
Gold: The Plants and Animals of the New World,” a
natural and human history exhibition about the
environment of the Caribbean in the 1500s.
Main Library, 101W Flagler St 375-2665. Through July
2 — “Produce for Victory: Posters on the American
Home Front 1941-1945,” and “South Florida Goes to
War,” two World War II commemorative exhibitions.
Metro-Dade Art in Public Places - MDCC Wolfson Campus,
300 NE 2nd Ave; 375-5362. Ongoing — “Sculpture
Walk,” sculptures by Ronald Bladen, Kenneth
Snelson, Peter Forakis, and others.
Metro-Dade Art in Public Places - Miami International
Airport Concourse E, Departure Level; 375-5362.
Through August 18 — “Fragments that Make a
Whole,” photographs by Mark Koven.
Metro-Dade Cultural Resource Center, 111 NW 1st St
3754635. July 5 (reception noon) through August 30
— Wood sculpture by Frank Verrili.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium,
3280 S Miami Ave; 8544247. Through August 27 —
“Hidden Kingdoms: A Journey through the
Microscopic World,” an interactive exhibition about
microscopic organisms.
Museum of Art 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
525-5500. Through August 13 — “José Bedia: Artist
and Collector,” works created and collected by the
artist ’Works in Progress,” an interactive exhibition,
and “The Spiritual Realm: African Art in Context,” and
“Selections from the CoBrA Collection.”
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2nd St Ft
Lauderdale; 467-6637. Ongoing — Seven interactive
Ernie Pook's Gomeek
by Lynda J. Barry
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Dear Brenda. 1 miss our old times
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to |pe getting ct lettcr-fnem your long
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,
So the name of if is a -foster home.
Truthfully if you Could See it you
would SaH'/Naybonne really gets It
Wade./"The house IS incredible-
and everg house on the Street
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They Said don’t sweat calling them
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this School doesn't Sack- No fights,
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June 29*July 5, 1995


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“KidScience,” “Space Base,” “Choose Health,”
“Sound,” and “No Place Like Home.”
Museum of Natural History of the Florida Keys, Crane
Point Hammock, mile marker 50, Marathon; 743-9100.
Ongoing — Exhibitions covering the evolution of
geography, botany, and zoology in the Keys.
Sanford L. Ziff Jewish Museum, 301 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 672-5044. Ongoing — “Mosaic,” an
exhibition about the Jewish history of Florida.
South Florida Science Museum, 4801 Dreher Trail N,
West Palm Beach; 407-832-1988. Ongoing — “Sense-
ational Senses,” a hands-on exhibition designed to
teach about the senses.
Weeks Air Museum, 14710 SW 128th St; 233-5197.
Through August 15 — “Tuskegee Airmen: World War
IPs Black Aviators.”
Wolfsonian Foundation Gallery, 1001 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach; 531-1001. Ongoing — “Design 1880-
1945: The Modem Idiom,” selections from the
Mitchell Wolfson, Jr., collection.
Young at Art - A Children's Museum, 801S University Dr,
Plantation; 424-0085. Through September 4 —
“Earthworks,” a hands-on exhibition that
demonstrates the importance of the ecology and its
preservation.
Galleries
Abacus Fine Art 1659 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
531-3210. Ongoing — “Ivan Santos and Lina
Velazquez: Landscapes and Nudes.”
Adamar Fine Arts, 177 NE 39th St; 576-1355. Through
October 3 — “Director’s Choice,” works by gallery
artists Ted Kerzie, Jack Amoroso, Joan Tyka, and
others.
Alliance Frangaise, 1414 Coral Way, Coral Gables;
85941760. Through July 16 — “Tropicalis,” oil
paintings by French artist Emmanuelle Trincal.
Americas Collection, 126 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5578. Through June 30 — Recent works by
Aramis O’Reilly and Tibisay Martinez.
AmerJRich Galleries, 180 NE 39th St, ste 107; 573-7200.
Ongoing — Original and reproduced works by
Picasso, Chemakin, Tarkay, Rockwell, and others.
Arquideco: 3132 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral Gables;
445-5445. Through July 6 — Recent works by
Venezuelan artist Ricardo Reyes.
Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-8278.
Through July 1 — “Artists of the 800 Building,” works
by gallery artists.
Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, 1799 SE 17th St, Ft
Lauderdale; 463-3000. Through July 6 — Paintings
and sculpture by Connie Lloverás.
Artefacts Gallery, 609 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
674-3233. Through July 6 — Vintage original poster
art.
Artists Gallery, 4222 NE 20th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
491-9479. Ongoing — Southwestern art and pottery;
abstract classical, and country French art.
Artspace-Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 444-4493. Through July 4 — “New
Visions,” recent works by German artist Florian
Depenthal and American artists Gregory Homdeski,
Betty Mobley, Lincoln Perry, and Clyde Lynd.
Astoria Fine Art 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1222. Through June 30 — “Argentinean
Colors,” works by Esther Cruz.
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-7872. Through July 5 — “Orpheus in the Alley,”
mixed media on canvas by Ken Shaw; “Dwellings,”
ceramic sculptures by Peter Kuentzel; and “Icons of
Jazz,” photographs by Herman Leonard.
Barnes and Noble, 7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292.
Through July 3 — “The Art of Orchids,” natural-light
photographs by Joel B. McEachem.
Barnes and Noble, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura;
935-9770. Through July 14 — “Second Nature,”
photographs by Sharon Kersten.
BCG South Campus Art Gallery, 7200 Pines Blvd,
Pembroke Pines; 963-8895. Through August 25 —
1995 Studio Art Club Juried Exhibition.
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
673-6677. Through July 6 — Glass sculpture by
international artists.
Bizarre Bazaare, 180 NE 39th St ste 107; 573-7200.
Ongoing — Works by Dior Vargas.
Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
4424408. Through June 30 — Works by
photographer Budge Mead.
Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 6658800.
Through June 30 — Recent works by Elizabeth Anne
Holden.
Brickell Square, 801 Brickell Ave; 667-0808. Through
June 30—Selections from the Southeast Collection,
and hand-painted animation cells.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-8821.
Through July 6 — “Fresh Hot Pop,” recent works by
Romero Britto.
Capen Gallery, 22400 Old Dixie Hwy, Homestead;
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June 29—July 5, 1995


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Caravel Interiors, 4141NE 2nd Ave; 576-8684. Through
June 30 — “New York Transit Art,” works by artists
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Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-2627. Through July 6 — “Wedding Gift Month,”
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Carel Gallery, 928 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 5344384.
Ongoing — “Post-Impressionists,” nineteenth- and
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Carlos Art Gallery, 3162 Commodore Plaza #A1;
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Chad Elliott Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd; 534-8547. Ongoing
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Through July 28 — “Afn«t''~
photograoW,,izz4 SW 1st Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
■m 7-2292. Ongoing — “Soul Fusion," two- and three
dimensional works by local artists.
Common Space, 1665 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
674-8278. Through July 1 — An exhibition of works by
selected SFAC artists.
Dorset) Gallery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 8564080. Through
July 7 — “Interior Motives,” works by Liz Bums.
Española Way Art Center, 405 Española Way, Miami
Beach; 673-6248. Through August 18 — “A League of
Our Own,” a mixed-media group show of women
^sts
Exit Gallery, 904 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-1280.
Ongoing — Paintings by Peter Stanick.
For Art’s Sake, 52 S Federal Hwy, Dania; 920-9205.
Ongoing — Works by more than 90 local artists.
Fredric Snitzer Gallery, 1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 448-8976. Through July 5 — Works by
Quisqueya Henriquez.
Galería del sol, 1628 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
674-7076. Through July 6 — Works by José Perdomo,
Benjamin Hierro, Femando Daza, and Sopehap Pich.
Gallery Art II, 20445 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami
Beach, 932-6166. Through July 31 — Original oil
paintings and sculptures by contemporary masters
Peter Max, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Roy
Lichtenstein and others.
Gallery Fine Art 2117 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 447-8502. Through June 30 — ‘Two Brazilian
Painters: Juarez Machado and Carlos Bracher.” July 5
(reception 6:00 p.m.) through August 2 — Works by
Brazilian artist Beatriz Amaral.
Gallery of the Eccentric, 233 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5550. Through June 30 — “That’s All, Faux!”
furniture with faux finishes by McVay Christy.
Gallery 219, 219 S Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
832-0779. Ongoing — Recent works by Virginia Best,
Bee Clare, and other gallery artists.
Gutierrez Fine Arts, 1628 Pennsylvania Ave, Miami
Beach; 674-0418. Through July 6 — “Clean Sweep,” a
collaborative installation by Gary Moore and Karen
Ritas.
Hetzer Gallery, 4030 N Miami Ave; 576-9141. Through
July 2 — “Cave Paintings: Origins or Endings?” recent
works by Jerome Leyendecker.
Hollywood City Hall, 2600 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood;
921-3201. Through July 15 — Flower oil paintings by
Bertha C. Sotolongo.
International Fine Arts College, 1737 N Bayshore Dr;
635-6614. Ongoing — “The Dead Artists Don’t Eat,”
alternative art by students.
Jacques Harvey Gallery, 815 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
672-6427. Through July 6 — “Expressionism,” works
by Jacques Harvey.
Jeanine Cox Fine Art, 1029 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9003. Through July 1 — “Artist’s Invitational,” a
group exhibition of new works.
Joel Kessler Fine Art, 927 Lincoln Rd, ste 208, Miami
Beach; 532-8075. Through September 6—Works by
gallery artists Jane Manus, Carol Hunt, Norman
Mercer, and others.
Joy Moos Gallery, 355 NE 59th Terr; 754-9373. Through
September 15 — “Summer Show,” featuring works by
Damian Rojo, Purvis Young, Claude Bolduc, and
others.
Joya, 527 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 534-5191.
Through July 3 — ‘Waking Dreams,” works by Poni
Parras, and mixed-media photographs by J.W.
Paclipan.
Kennedy Gallery, 225 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables;
461-2026. Ongoing—Works by Michele and Robert
Kennedy, Oulie, Naoko, Kline, Jean Brodie, and
others.
Kirschner-Haack Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-7730. Through July 6 — Works by Lois Duffy.
LeMar Gallery, 856 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
6654380. Ongoing — Recent works by Alain Despert.
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Page 50 N^w Times
Le musée imaginaire, 1209 E Las Olas Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale; 522-5812. Ongoing — Legal copies of
masterpieces by van Gogh, Monet, and others.
Margulies Taplin Gallery, 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 447-1199. Through July 1 —Works by
Dan Peterson and Kevin Cummins.
Marvin Markman Fine Art The Shoppes at the
Waterways, 3575 NE 207 St Aventura; 937-0922.
Ongoing — Works by Botero, Chagall, Markman,
Picasso, and Renoir.
Mayfair Fine Art 701 Lincoln Rd, ste 701, Miami Beach;
534-1004. Through July 6 — Original Russian oils and
tempera.
MDCC InterAmerican Art Gallery, 627 SW 27th Ave, ste
3104; 237-3278. Through July 28 — “Core Cor,” works
by George Sardinias and Dan Solomon.
MDCC Kendall Campus Art Gallery, 11011 SW 104th St
237-2322. June 30 (reception 7:00 p.m.) through July
27 — Ceramic League of Miami 45th Annual
Members’ Exhibition.
Menelik I & II, 1661 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
^34-5556. Through July 6 — “Colors of Hope: Images
Jude ThegeiWhv Haitian artists Alyx Kellington and
Meza Fine Arts, 275 Giralda íftv.,
461-2723. Through July 2 — “Art Spaces:' -
Installations,” works by William Barbosa.
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza; 376-2906. Through June
30 — Royal Poinciana Festival exhibition. July 5
through July 31 — Posters by Fernando Botero.
Muted Media Gallery, 937 NE 19th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
5224143. Ongoing — Handcraft art and art-to-wear.
Neil Loeb Gallery, 2911 Grand Ave, ste 620; 444-9583.
Ongoing—Recent works by Loeb, including
animation art for Hanna-Barbera and Warner Bros.
1221 Brickell, 1221 Brickell Ave; 536-1221. Through
June 30 — Cast-iron sculpture by Rafael Consuegra.
July 1 through July 31 — Paintings by Rafael Casasa.
Pallas Photographic, 50 NE 40th St, ste 103; 5737020.
Through June 30 — “Black and White Is Beautiful,”
photographs by Bob Lasky, Lynn Parks, and Stephen
Watt.
Pamberi Studios, 1912 Van Burén St, Hollywood;
927-1905. Through July 27 — Sculpture by Geoffrey
Lee.
Paper Moon Art Gallery, 1054 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands; 8614920. Ongoing — Modem and
contemporary art by Picasso, Miró, Chagall, Leger,
Botero, Warhol, and others.
Pastabilities, 11652 N Kendall Dr; 5939868. Through
June 30 — “Art in Suburbia,” works by Adalberto
Delgado, Pablo Donoso, Sergio Garcia, Rhonda Maria
Morton, and others.
Profiles Gallery, 244 Valencia Ave, Coral Gables;
4433313. Through July 7 — Works by painter Judith
Salmon and ceramist Joan Hane.
Rado Gallery, 800 West Ave, Miami Beach; 5332803.
Through July 23 — “Scary Monsters, Super Freaks,”
works by Frederick Soler. Through September 23 —
“Director’s Own,” works by AR. Harte.
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art, 900 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 5324141. Ongoing — Group show, and
a collection of Israeli art.
R.S.V.P. Collection, 3900 N Miami Ave; 5735032.
Through July 12 — “Erophytas: The Private Life of
Plants,” erotic nature works by painter Lisa Remeny
and sculptor Ramón Lago.
Scharf Shop, 435 Española Way, Miami Beach;
6739308. Ongoing — “Closet no. 14,” an installation
by Kenny Scharf.
Sher Galleries, 3585 NE 207th St North Miami Beach;
932-9930. Ongoing — Works by Erte, Neiman,
Tobiasse, Hart, and other gallery artists.
Sky Gallery, NationsBank Tower, 100 SE 2nd St;
539-7100. Through June 30 — Abstract paintings by
Robert Rider. July 1 through July 31 — Shadow
expressions by Vincent Luca, a.k.a. the Shadow Man.
South Florida Art Center - ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 534-3339. Through July 1 — “New
South Florida Clay," new works by local artists.
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through July 31 —
“Contemporary Expressions of Haitian Art,” works by
fifteen contemporary Haitian artists, including
Edouard Duval-Carrie, Marie-Helene Cauvin, and
Lionel St. Pierre.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 371-2711. Through June 30 —
“Japanese Artists.”
Steiner Galleries, 9700 Collins Ave, Bal Harbour,
866-1816. Ongoing — Russian master works and fairy¬
tale paintings, sculpture by Leon Axelrod and Fanny
Haiot, and contemporary artworks by several gallery
artists.
Storefront Art 431N Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
5574650. June 30 through August 29 — “Mes cheveux
resemblent un chapeau (My Hair Looks like a Hat),”
an exhibition of works by French artists.
Susane R. Gallery, 93 NE 40th St; 573-8483. Through
July 14 — Architectural embellishments from
nineteenth-century France.
Tanner Studio, Lumonics Light and Sound Theatre,
3017 NW 60th St Ft Lauderdale; 979-3161. Ongoing
— Acrylic light and water sculpture and video art
Tap Tap Restaurant 819 5th St Miami Beach; 672-2898.
Through June 30 — “Ghosts of Guantánamo,” images
of Haitian refugees at the base.
Tom Seghi Fine Arts, 920 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
6724549. Ongoing — ‘Tom Seghi: New Works.”
Visual Extremes, 23 Almería Ave, Coral Gables;
441-2331. Ongoing — New works by Leonardo
Hidalgo.
Wire, 1638 Euclid Ave, Miami Beach; 538-3111.
Ongoing — Recent works by painter-sculptor Craig
Coleman.
Wirtz Gallery, 5750 Sunset Dr, South Miami; 662-5414.
Through June 30 — Works by Colombian artists
Cecilia Di Fiore and Rodolf Kohn Hinestrosa and
Cuban artist Orlando Acosta. July 1 through July 31
— Works by Alice Brock, Evelyn Geisenheyner,
Lucille Keathley, and others.
World Resources Gallery, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9095. Ongoing — Wood carvings from the Sepik
River tribes of Papua New Guinea.
Readings & Discussions
Thursday, June
Baby-Care Seminar Moms- and dads-to-be w„,. _
to miss this class on breastfeeding. $15 per couple.
7:00 p.m. Mercy Hospital, 3663 S Miami Ave;
285-2770.
Black Hole of Cash Flow: Financial advisor Susan E.
Masaitis shares simple steps for getting a grip on
spending habits and securing your financial future.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 710
University Dr, Pembroke Pines; 433-2192.
Is Your Kid on Drugs?: The City of North Miami Beach
Police Department leads a seminar on recognizing the
symptoms of drug use in kids and teens. Free. 7:00
p.m. Tonight at the Uleta Recreation Center (16880
NE 4th Ave, North Miami Beach) and tomorrow at
the Allen Park Recreation Center (1770 NE 162nd St,
North Miami Beach); 5756744.
Miami and the Beaches Business Luncheon: Merret
Stierheim, CEO of the Greater Miami Convention and
Visitors Bureau, moderates a panel of speakers from
across the county discussing the economic impact of
South Florida attractions. $25.12:30 p.m. Miami
Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center
Dr, Miami Beach; 672-1270.
Miami Beach Writers Group: Take your latest writings
and your thickest skin to the gallery for this weekly
group critique. Free. 7:30 p.m. Gallery of the
Unknown Artists, 735 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
673-5922.
Miami Storytellers Guild: Listen every Thursday to
legends and tales about the historic Biltmore Hotel
and the stars who stayed there. Free. 7:00 p.m. 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 4451926.
Poetry Circle: Share your favorite and original poems
and bring your improvisational energy to this weekly
poetry reading. Free. 8:30 p.m. Pine Tree House, 3795
Pine Tree Dr, Miami Beach; 674-9348.
South Beach Business Guild: Businessowners,
professionals, and others serving South Beach’s gay
community are invited to attend this meeting. Free.
10:00 a.m. Gertrude’s, 826 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
5314614.
William Wharton: Bestselling author Wharton (Birdy,
Dad, and A Midnight Clear reads from and discusses
his first work of non-fiction, Ever After. A Father’s True
Story. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables; 4424408.
Writers in the Sand: Serious writers meet every
Thursday for this weekly writers’ workshop. Free.
8:00 p.m. 405 Española Way, 3rd fl, Miami Beach;
442-1497.
Friday, June 30
After Hours: Musicians, singers, comedians, and
entertainers of every type are invited to show off their
talents at this weekly open mike. $3. Tonight and
tomorrow night at 11:30. Miamiway Theater, 12615 W
Dixie Hwy, North Miami; 893-0005.
Caribbean Writers Summer Institute: The University of
Miami continues its lecture series with a reading by
Jamaican poet and short-story writer Opal Palmer
Adisa tonight at 8:00; on Sunday at 5:00 with
Guadeloupan novelist and scholar Maryse Conde (in
French and English) reads; and on Wednesday at 8:00
p.m., Guyanese poet and novelist Sasenarine Persaud
reads from her works. Free. Whitten University
Center, 1306 Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-2182.
Immigrant Workers Rights: The Militant Labor Forum
hosts a free-speech discussion about the fight against
California’s Proposition 187. $5.7:30 p.m. Pathfinder
Bookstore, 137 NE 54th St; 7551020.
Kaffeine: Anything goes (as long as it’s not violent or
pornographic) at this late-night, open-mike
coffeehouse; register an hour before showtime and
June 29 —July 5, 1995


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June 29-July 5, 1995


keep it under five minutes. $5 for spectators.
Midnight. Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650
Harrison St, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Tie Meaning of Dreams: Psychologist and author Joan
Cacciatore Mazza delves into dreams and how to gain
insight through their interpretation. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Bookstop, 801S University Dr, Plantation; 370-2456.
Susan Lee Mint*: AIDS volunteer Mintz, author of Safe
Sex Never Tasted So Good, discusses her late
husband’s AIDS diagnosis and recent death and her
experiences as a caregiver. Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes &
Noble Bookstore, 645 University Dr, Coral Springs;
753-6650.
Music, Monologues, and Poetry: Poets Rose Virgo and
Sharkmeat Blue host an evening of spoken-word and
musical performances. Free. 8:00 p.m. Barnes &
Noble Bookstore, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura;
935-9770.
Spitfire Productions Presents: This new theatrical
production company makes its professional review
with pieces from Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song
Trilogy and Tony Kushner’s Angels in America. Free.
7:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy;
665-8800.
Saturday, July 1
Richard Ford: See “Calendar.”
Sunday, July 2
Poetry in the Woods: The East Coast Academy of Poets
invites local poets to read their original works. $1
donation requested. 1:00 p.m. Secret Woods Nature
Center, 2701W State Rd 84, Ft Lauderdale; 791-1030.
Tuesday, July 4
A Group of Expressives: Musicians, poets, writers, and
thespians step up to the mike with their original
material every Tuesday night. $2.9:00 p.m. Cool
Beans Cafe, 12573 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami;
899-8815.
Tongue and Groove: Catch a vibe and groove to the
spoken, chanted, and rapped words of local poets,
writers, musicians, and thespians at this weekly
spoken-word jam. Free. 8:00 p.m. Java Junkies, 1446
Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 754-9204.
Wednesday, July 5
Business Planning Workshop: Leant how to prepare a
business plan at this FIU Small-Business
Development Center seminar. Free. 6:00 p.m. South
Dade Regional Library, 10751SW 211th St; 348-2272.
In Pursuit of Gay Rights: Nancy M. Graham discusses
her efforts to support gay and lesbian rights at this
Broward Women in Network meeting. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Church, 3970 NW 21st Ave, Ft
Lauderdale; 537-0866.
Open-Mike Comedy Night Think you’re funny? Prove it!
Step up to the mike as amateur stand-uppers share
original material every Wednesday. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Java Junkies, 1446 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
754-9204.
Shambala, the Myth of Immortality: Indo-Tibetan tantric
culture expert Glenn Mullin discusses yoga,
meditation, and Himalayan culture. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Books & Books, 933 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
532-3222.
Sick and Tred of Being Sick and Tred?: Leam how to
boost your health and energy with nutritionist David
Sontag. Free. 7:00 p.m. Advanced Wellness Institute,
7860 Peters Rd, ste F-109, Plantation; call 424-3883 to
reserve.
South Beach Bohemians: Expect the unexpected as local
characters unite weekly to spew everything from
Shakespeare to Monty Python to original poetry,
prose, and music. Free. 9:00 p.m. BAR., 1663 Lenox
Ave, Miami Beach; 532-1191.
Thursday, June 29
African Dance and Drumming Workshops: Move to some
invigorating rhythms as Bamba Febrissy and
Adeyemi Olamina host an African and Caribbean
dance and drumming class. $5. Tonight at 7:00 and
Saturday at 4:00 p.m. Miami Beach Community
Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7730.
Afro-Cuban and Latin Dance: Leam how to move to
Caribbean and Latin-American rhythms with
choreographer Neri Torres. $10. Afro-Cuban class
tonight at 6:00 and Tuesday at 7:00; Latin class tonight
at 7:00 and Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Higher Ground
Studio, Roney Plaza Hotel, ste PH A-31,2301 Collins
Ave, Miami Beach; 883-1375.
Horton Dance!: Young dancers from across Broward
County perform to benefit the company’s outreach
efforts. $5.3:00 p.m. Fort Lauderdale Children’s
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An Extensive
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Discover The Mystery of
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June 29-July 5, 1995
Merengue Dance Party: Howard Marlow and Lois
Walser demonstrate and teach the merengue. Free.
7:30 p.m. Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St;
375-3000.
Friday, June 30
Capoeira Workshop: Brazilian dance and percussion
master Caboquinho leads a workshop on Angolan-
style capoeira. $10. Today at 4:30 and Tuesday at 8:30
p.m. Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste
505, Miami Beach; 538-1608.
Drum Dance Theatre: Lumonics hosts an evening of
drumming, dancing, and mind-altering electronics
with master percussionist Hodeen. $10. Every Friday
at 8:30 p.m. Lumonics Light and Sound Theatre, 3017
NW 60th St, Ft Lauderdale; to reserve, call 979-3161.
Monday, June 3
Spiritual Belly Dance: Tap into the exotic, feminine, and
mysterious movement while getting into shape. $5.
10:30 a.m. 3795 Pine Tree Dr, Miami Beach; 674-9348.
Tuesday, July 4
Latin and Ballroom Dance: Trip the light fantastic while
you learn those steps in beginner and Intermediate
workshops on Tuesday nights. $5.8:00 p.m.
Streetdance in the Gables, 238 Minorca Ave, Coral
Gables; 442-6002.
Kids
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ONLY THE ADVENTUROUS
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Thursday, June 29
Beach-Ocean Awareness Program: Learn the basics of
sun and water safety while having fun at the beach
during this three-hour safety course. Free. 10:00
a.m. Every Thursday and Tuesday through August
24. Crandon Beach lifeguard headquarters, 4000
Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne; call 361-7373 for
details.
Saturday, July 1
Free to Be... You and Me: Actors' Playhouse presents
this children’s musical based on the 1970s
television special about feeling good about
yourself. Runs every Saturday through August 5.
$7 adults, $6 kids. 2:00 p.m. Carrusel Theatre, 235
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 595-0010.
Independence Day Flagmaklng: July marks the
independence-day celebrations of the U.S., Canada,
Puerto Rico, France, Bahamas, Colombia, and
Peru; make a flag of any of these countries. Free.
11:00 a.m. Mall at 163rd Street clubhouse, 1421 NE
163rd St, North Miami Beach; 944-7132, ext 209.
Junior Tennis Clinic: Kids ages twelve and under can
learn the secrets of the court. Free. 8:00 a.m.
Milander Park, 4700 Palm Ave, Hialeah; 887-1515.
The Princess and the Pea; The Professional
Children’s Theatre presents this fairy tale play
about the search for a true princess. Adults $7,
kids $5. Today at 11:00 a.m. and tomorrow at 2:00
p.m. and Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. Florida
Playwrights’ Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd,
Hollywood; 925-8123.
Sunday, July 2
It’s A Grand Old Flag: Celebrate our nation’s
independence by singing patriotic songs, making a
flag, and eating red, white, and blue treats. Ages
four and up. $3.1:00 and 2:15 p.m. Miami Youth
Museum, 5701 Sunset Dr; 661-3046.
Sports
Friday, June 30
Florida Marlins: The Marlins mash the Montreal
Expos in a three-game sweep tonight and
tomorrow at 7:05 and Sunday at 1:35. $7-$30. Joe
Robbie Stadium, 2269 NW 199th St; 930-7800.
Saturday, July 1
Steelman 5K Run-Walk: Strap on your sneaks and
run or walk in this race to benefit the American
Diabetes Association and the Diabetes Research
Institute. Registration is $20. 7:00 p.m. Tropical
Park, 7900 SW 40th St; 227-1500.
Sunday, July 2
Dolphins All-Pro Softball Tournament: Several
Dolphins players step up to the plate in a tourney
against the City of Wilton Manors’ team. Free.
4:00 p.m. Mickel Field, 2675 NW 7th Ave, Wilton
Manors; 390-2137.
Monday, June 3
Florida Marlins: The Marlins pound the San Diegos
in a three-game sweep tonight through
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Page 56 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


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Soothing therapeutic massage. By appoint¬
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Cozy bookstore featuring hard-to-find titles,
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CAFE MIEL - Enjoy fresh juices, gourmet sal¬
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Wellness Practitioners (healing touch, coun¬
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Call: (305) 279-0052
Wednesday at 7:05. $7-$30. Joe Robbie Stadium,
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On the Road & Sea
Wednesday, July 5
Naturalist Luncheon Series: Bring a brown-bag lunch
and listen as local naturalists lecture about animals,
insects, and habitats; this week, naturalist Darlene
Fonkin discusses the everyday lives of tum-of-the-
century Florida pioneers. $1.11:00 a.m. Fem Forest
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Hotlines
AIDS Housing Hotline; 652-8281 (Dade); 800052-8284
(outside Dade)
AJ-Anon: 6874049
Alternative Health & Meditation: 534-2769
Alzheimer's Disease Hotline: 324-8415
American Cancer Society: 5944363
American Heart Association: 751-1041
Broward County Public Health Unit (HRS): 4674882
Cancer Information: 3580000
CDC National AIDS Hotline: 800-342-2437 (English);
800-344-7432 (Spanish); 800-243-7889 (TTYservices
for the deaf)
Coalition for Hypertension Education and Control;
800-6644447
Cocaine Hotline: 800-COCAINE
Crisis Intervention-Suicide Hotline: 358-HELP
Dade County Citizens Safety Council: 592-3232
Deaf Services Bureau: 444-2266 (voice line); 444-2211
(TDD line)
Domestic Violence Hotline: 547-3170
Drugs, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens: 800443-3784
Environmental Hotline: (Citizens for a Better South
Florida) 444-9484
Family Counseling Services: (provide in-home
counseling to people with HIV) 573-2500
Florida HIV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English);
80O545-SIDA (Spanish); 800-AIDS-101 (Haitian
Creole)
Guardian Ad Litem: (to assist abused and neglected
children in court) 638-6861.
Habitat for Humanity: 670-2224
Health Crisis Network AIDS Hotline: 751-7751
Helping Hands: Hands in Action (for victims of physical,
sexual, or emotional abuse) 952-0785
Hospice Care: (support for terminally ill patients)
591-1606
Housing Opportunities for Excellence: 3744660
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 80O329-FOOD
I.CJLR.E.: (HIV outreach program) 324-9042
Legal Hotline for Older Floridians: 576-5997 (Dade);
800-252-5997 (outside of Dade)
Mental Health Crisis Center 643-1400
Metro-Dade Cultural Affairs Arts and Culture Hotline:
557-5600
Miami Bridge: (runaways, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 324-8953
Miami Women's Health Center 835-6165
Narcotics Anonymous: 662-0280
National AIDS Hotline: 800342-AIDS
National Cancer Institute Hotline: 547-6920 (Dade);
721-7600 (Broward)
National Food Addiction Hotline: 800-872-0088
National Organization for Women: 932-7444
Office Paper Recycling Hotline: 594-1680
Overeaters Anonymous: 274-8800
Planned Parenthood: 441-2022
Pregnancy and Drug Abuse Information: 5484528
Rape Treatment Center at Jackson: 585-7273 (to report a
rape); 585-6949 (for recovery support)
Senior Center Hotline: (referral service for all elderly
services) 6284354
Seniors Hotline: (for assistance with daily tasks)
3506060
SHE Center (Sex Health Education and women’s
medical care, including abortion information)
895-5555
SIDS Hotline: (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)
80O221-SIDS
South Florida HealthUne: 825-6269 (Dade); 800624-3365
(outside Dade)
Spinal Cord livingAssistance Development (support
services for physically disabled persons) 887-8838
Survivors of Authority Abuse: (support for those sexually
victimized by trusted professionals) 583-5833
Switchboard of Miami: (suicide hotline) 358-HELP
Vietnam Veterans Hotline: 646-VETS
Women in Distress: (domestic violence hotline)
761-1133
Women of Miami Beach (WOMB) Helpline: 534-6900
Women's Resource Counseling Center 448-8325
Thursday >
NightH
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MERENGUE
DANCE PARTY!
Join Us for Thursday Night Live
Howard Marlow and partner Lois Walser will
teach and demonstrate the merengue.
7pm Tour
7:30pin Program
Thurs June 29
Free
Produced by Tigertail Productions
On View in the Galleries:
Space of Time: Contemporary
Art front die Americas
Andres Serrano: Works 1983-1993
Moberto Juarez- They Entered the Komi
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June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 57


SHOP THE FLAGLER FLEA MARKET SAT. & SUN. 9 AM-4 PM
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Page 58 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


Tales of Two Gotham Cities
By Todd Anthony
Amazing, really, the similarities between the brood¬
ing superhero of Batman Forever and the Priscilla-
meets-Woodstock inhabitants of the documentary
Wigstock: The Movie. Start with the obvious parallel:
Batman patrols the mean streets of Gotham City in a
tight batsuit that exaggerates his padded muscles;
Wigstock’s drag queens strut their stuff in New York
City (nicknamed Gotham) in tight dresses that
accentuate their padded boobs. The heroes of both
films are outsiders harboring a secret identity,
although most of Wigstock’s participants already
have come out, while Batman appears ready to burst
from the strain of concealing his alter ego.
No transgression committed in Batman begins to
rival the fashion crimes perpetrated in Wigstock. But
Jim Carrey (as the Riddler) and Tommy Lee Jones
(as Two-Face) mug for the cameras every bit as
shamelessly as Wigstock’s Lypsinka and Misstress
Formika. Both movies relegate women to secondary
roles in narratives that revolve around men whose
flamboyant outfits define their personalities. Batman
has the happier ending of the two films — Bruce
Wayne eventually finds his Boy Wonder (whose
name, by the way, is Dick. Coincidence? I think
not.). But the bottom line is still a pair of movies
about grown men who get their jollies playing dres-
sup. Batman pairs up with Robin, the Riddler bonds
with Two-Face. Neither boy-boy couple would look
out of place among Wigstock’s revelers. Maybe the
Caped Crusader even could offer a few tips on how
to make dramatic entrances and exits to the “Lady”
Bunny, who has been organizing and emceeing the
annual Wigstock events (this documentary includes
footage from the 1993 and 1994 installments) for the
past ten years.
Both films push all the expected buttons. Batman
Forever ditches Tim Burton’s jaundiced world-view
and murky visuals for Joel Schumacher’s frenetic
pacing, slick sets, eye-popping special effects, and
vibrant primary colors. It seems as if at least one
vivid hologram, laser beam, or glowing Plexiglas
backdrop illuminates every frame.
Of course if it’s slightly more exotic shades you
want, get a load of the bizarre fluorescent-metallic
hues and tints on display in Wigstock. And that’s just
the hairl This documentary chronicling an annual
festival for cross-dressers borrows its structure from
(and parodies) Woodstock, the popular film account
of the fabled late-Sixties counterculture blowout.
The newer ‘Stock is a pleasant enough diversion, but
as both drag-culture commentary and pure enter¬
tainment it suffers in comparison to 1990’s landmark
Paris Is Burning. Paris was fresher, better struc¬
tured, and less preachy, although Wigstock might be
the funnier of the two movies in a high-camp, lowest-
common-denominator way. What structure exists in
the newer film results from its attempts to lampoon
Woodstock; those efforts feel sporadic and half¬
hearted, although Misstress Formika’s opening
“Age of Aquarius” spoof and John Kelly’s closing
homage to Joni Mitchell (singing “Woodstock,”
natch) register high marks.
Wigstock boasts some funny bits: Jackie Beat and
Alexis Arquette hitting on a pair of construction
workers with lines such as “You remind me of that
guy on Baywatch, David Hasselhoff” and “Oooo —
did you get those tattoos in prison?”; an Elvis imper¬
sonator sporting a stiff, jet-black pompadour the size
of a dolphin; Perfidia introducing a dance move,
“Thees step wuss geeven to me by Carmen
Miranda, and boy wuss shee glad to be reed of eet!”
The candid reaction shots are a hoot, as average
people on the street gape at passing queens in full
regalia. (Isn’t it amazing that some people are still
shocked by drag queens?) And then there are the
names themselves: Flotilla DeBarge, Girlina, Coco
Peru, the Duelling Bankheads, Honey Dijon, Anna
Conda, Pepper Grinder, and my personal favorite,
Toddrique.
But it doesn’t take long for the novelty to wear off.
This is, to a large extent, a movie about men pre¬
tending to be women while they pretend to sing.
That’s a lot of pretending. Not the most respected
art form in the world to begin with, lip-synching
loses much of its appeal on film. A club setting
where the drugs have kicked in and the music
pumps and you can dance is one thing; a movie the¬
ater where you can only sit and watch while other
people enjoy themselves is another matter, espe¬
cially when many of the folks on-screen feel the
need to keep telling you how fabulous they are.
Several performers rhapsodize about how wonder¬
ful it feels to walk on the wild side in stiletto heels,
and a few go so far as to tout drag as a panacea for
all the world’s ills. And the filmmakers insist on
drumming into our heads what wonderful, well-
Small Film,
Big Deal
Well, Batman did it again. Swooped down just in
time to save the day. An aura of resignation had
started to permeate the superhero’s stomping
grounds. (Gotham City? Get real. We’re talkin’
Hollywood, babe.) Just as surely as he dis¬
patched nefarious supervillains Two-Face and the
Riddler, the Caped Crusader laid a serious butt-
kicking on the gloom-and-doomers whose predic¬
tions of looming box-office catastrophe had
begun to fall on increasing numbers of sympa¬
thetic ears. It was white-knuckle time in Tinsel¬
town, where summer blockbuster season so far
had been more bust than boom.
Half a dozen potential megahits — Crimson
Tide (a Tom Clancy surrogate), Die Hard With a
Vengeance, Braveheart (Mel Gibson topless!),
Congo (the mandatory Michael Crichton offer¬
ing), Casper (from the house of Spielberg), and
June 29-July 5, 1995
The Bridges of Madison County (Clint Eastwood
and Meryl Streep in an adaption of a book that
sold more than five million copies) — rode
proudly into box-office battle only to emerge with
lackluster results. As of this writing not one of
them has crossed the magical $100 million thresh¬
old that marks clear victory, much less entered
the $300 million winner’s circle to shake hands
with last year’s champs, Forrest Gump and The
Lion King.
Enter Mr. Cowl-and-Scowl to save the day. Even
Batman’s greediest enemies would have to admire
his record-breaking $50 million opening weekend
take. Suddenly the picture looks a lot brighter for
Pocahontas, Apollo 13, Judge Dredd, and Water-
world (although the latter film needs to outgross
the Cali cartel just to break even).
While I enjoyed Batman Forever, I fear that
some really fine small films will be buried in the
avalanche of hype surrounding the new gross-
receipts champ and its subsequent challengers.
A Pure Formality is just such a film.
Formality is a movie for grownups who prefer
nuanced performances and intelligent dialogue to
eye-popping special effects and the usual macho-
adjusted creatures drag queens are by conducting
interviews wherein “normal” (old, plain-looking, and
presumably hetero) residents of the neighborhoods
being invaded by festivalgoers reassure the camera
that all this gender-bending is cool with them. The
device smacks of both dogmatic overkill and preach¬
ing to the converted.
It probably doesn’t help matters any that a few of
the performances fall as flat as the performers’
chests — sans falsies. The filmmakers try to punch
up things by including a few segments in dubious
taste, such as a shocking faux-live-birth tableau, or
Wendy Wild fresh out of the hospital after a bone-
marrow transplant, performing while schlepping a
Continued on page 50
man posturing. Gérard Depardieu and Roman
Polanski supply the acting muscle (perhaps in the
former’s case the correct word would be heft),
while acclaimed Italian director Giuseppe Torna-
tore (who wrote and directed the bittersweet,
enchanting Cinema Paradiso) mans the cameras.
Pascale Quignard (Tous les matins du monde)
scripted.
The film that results from this distinguished col¬
laboration feels as if it were adapted from a play. It
wasn’t. It also feels a lot like Polanski’s most
recent directorial effort, Death and the Maiden
(which was appropriated from the stage).
Like Death and the Maiden, the action in A Pure
Formality focuses on an intense, protracted inter¬
rogation that takes place inside an isolated build¬
ing located in a remote part of the countryside
while a violent rainstorm rages outside. The set¬
ting calls to mind all those Peanuts comic strips
that started out with wanna-be novelist Snoopy
typing “It was a dark and stormy night...”. Count
on two things: The phones won’t work and the
power eventually will go out.
Polanski plays a cop whose men find Depardieu
Continued on page 60
A You go, girl;
The“Lady"
Bunny struts for
the cameras
in Wigstock
Wigstock,
Directed by Barry
Shits; with the
“Lady" Bunny,
Misstress
Formika, Flloyd,
Joey Arias,
Lypsinka, Crystal
Waters, and
RiiPaul,
Batman Forever.
Directed by Joel
Schumacher; with
Val Kilmer, Jim
Carrey, Tommy
Lee Jones, Nicoie
Kidman, and Chris
O'Donnell.
New Times Page 59


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Continued from page 59
portable IV around the stage. But Wigstock's
makers never lick the problem that plagues
most concert flicks: Anything less than incen¬
diary performances kinetically shot and eco¬
nomically edited quickly grows wearisome.
Despite a few delightful surprises — such as
a drop-dead impromptu Billie Holiday imper¬
sonation sung a cappella by Joey Arias —
Wigstock loses much of its bounce as the
party wears on.
Speaking of overkill, the deliriously over-
the-top Batman Forever must set some kind
of record for heavyweight talent enlisted in
the service of lightweight plot. The real battle
here was not between Batman and the vil¬
lains who wanted to do him in. (Although
that is the story line in a nutshell.) It was
among high-priced supporting players Nicole
Kidman, Chris O’Donnell, and Drew Barry¬
more as they struggled to cop a few seconds
of screen time from headliners Val Kilmer,
Jim Carrey, and Tommy Lee Jones. The
guardians of the Batman screen legacy were
taking no chances; they wanted to make
damn sure that after Batman Returns (Tim
Burton’s dark sequel to his equally opaque
but more profitable Batman) earned less
money than its predecessor, this third install¬
ment in the series would turn a handsome
profit and thereby perpetuate the franchise.
So they signed Carrey, the hottest box-office
attraction in La-La land, to star opposite their
new, improved Caped Crusader, Val Kilmer.
(Let’s face it, Michael Keaton’s talents were
wasted in the role, which utilized none of his
ironic humor or deadpan sarcasm. Come to
think of it, why even bother with Val Kilmer?
Sure he’s handsome and can act, but the pro¬
ducers could have saved a bundle and filled
out the batsuit better by hiring a buffed,
square-jawed mannequin such as Dolph
Lundgren or Adrian Zmed.)
Not all the money went to the talent in
front of the cameras. Directorial reins were
handed over to slickmeister Joel Schu¬
macher (The Client, Flatliners), with quirky,
murky Burton staying on as producer. If
Schumacher’s mandate was to retool Bur¬
ton’s apocalyptic vision into a vibrant live-
action cartoon, he succeeded magnificently.
(He deserves some sort of award just for jug¬
gling all those egos.) Batman Forever is a
stylish, bigger-than-life sound and light
extravaganza, bursting with eccentric gad¬
gets, sleek vehicles, and snappy dialogue.
(Kilmer’s crime-fighter fends off the
advances of Kidman’s lusty shrink, Dr.
Chase Meridian, with the line, “It’s the car.
Chicks dig the car.”)
Oh sure, one could nitpick. The Batman-
Dr. Meridian-Bruce Wayne love triangle
slows down things too much. Jones’s Two-
Face character represents a transparent
attempt to invoke the schizoid menace of
Jack Nicholson’s unforgettable Joker with¬
out actually having to meet Nicholson’s
salary demands. Chris O’Donnell’s Boy
Wonder looks more like Batman’s contem¬
porary than his teenage apprentice. And
there are so many characters and corre¬
sponding subplots introduced that none of
them get properly developed.
But don’t dwell on those shortcomings.
Get in touch with your inner child and let
him or her enjoy Batman Forever for the
campy celluloid comic book it is. CD
Big Deal
Continued from page 59
sloshing through the woods, breathless,
disoriented, and devoid of ID. They rou¬
tinely haul the big fellow in for questioning.
He claims to be a famous writer named
Onoff; the inspector, an Onoff buff, scoffs —
until the prisoner flawlessly recalls a pas¬
sage from one of the writer’s works. Onoff
grows increasingly belligerent and indig¬
nant as the questioning drags on. But the
inspector will not be cowed, and the movie
settles in for a battle of wits, wherein we
find out relatively early on that A) a murder
has been committed; B) Onoff has a few
secrets; and C) the cunning inspector hides
a few cards up his sleeve, as well. The final
“shocking” revelation is a metaphysical cop-
out, but the image that lingers is that of a
brilliantly fought verbal sparring match
between two well-met combatants.
Who knew that Roman Polanski, famed
equally for his directing and his scandalous-
tragic private life, could hold his own acting
with a heavyweight (in every sense of the
word) thespian such as Depardieu? Polan¬
ski’s wily, world-weary police inspector
makes A Pure Formality anything but.
Depardieu may be approaching Brando in
both girth and renown, but it’s the diminu¬
tive, rodent-faced Pole who snares the ele¬
phantine Frenchman in a metaphysical
mousetrap. It would be a damn shame to
see his bravura performance disappear into
the shadow of a bat.
- By Todd Anthony
A Pure Formality. Written by Giuseppe
Tornatore and Pascale Quignard; directed by
Giuseppe Tornatore; with Gérard Depardieu
and Roman Polanski.
Page 60 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


Film Capsules
The following are capsule reviews of movies opening this
week, or currently showing, in the Greater Miami area.
For information about movie times and locations, see
"Showtimes," contact local theaters, or call 888-FILM, a
free service.
Openings
Apollo 13 (PG): Does Tom Hanks have the right stuff
to send this scrupulously authentic account of the
failed 1970 moonshot into orbit, or are movies about
astronauts doomed to crash and bum at the box
office?
The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love (U):
Yet another girhneets-girl flick, this one’s chief
distinctions being the youth and comeliness of the
interracial couple at the film’s core.
Judge Dredd (R): Cross the worst elements from Tank
Girl and Demolition Man and you’d still probably
come up with a better film than this obscenely
expensive loser. Dredd starts out with a bang —
hundreds, if not thousands of them, actually — but
then goes so horribly wrong you wonder if the
filmmakers were shooting for parody of the whole sci-
fi-action genre. Let the “Dread"/Dredd puns roll.
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG): Strictly
for kids and Toys R Us shareholders.
The Postman (PG): MassimoTroisi, considered by
many to be Italy’s finest actor, died of heart failure at
the age of 41 immediately after completing principal
photography on this lyrical character study. Philippe
Noiret (Cinema Paradiso) costars as exiled Chilean
poet Pablo Neruda, who has been granted sanctuary
by the Italian government and has taken up residence
on a beautiful island off the coast of Naples. The
island’s postmaster, overwhelmed by the volume of
mail suddenly arriving at his office, hires Mario
(Troisi), the son of a local fisherman, to serve as
Neruda’s personal mailman. An unlikely friendship
develops between poet and postman that culminates
with Mario enlisting the aid of the wordsmith (á la
Cyrano) in wooing the most beautiful woman on the
island with the rationale, “Poetry doesn’t belong to
those who write it but to those who need it”
Ongoing
Amateur (R): Heard the one about the amnesiac, the
ex-nun who thinks she’s a nymphomaniac, the
homicidal CPA and the porno queen with the heart of
gold? The punchline is Hal Hartley’s latest film, an
exercise in quirky absurdist humor, deadpan
dialogue, outrageous characterization, and slick
production values. Hartley, perhaps the closest thing
to a true auteur working on the fringes of mainstream
cinema in the U.S., goes over the top from the first
frame and stays there throughout. As Letterman has
done with TV talk shows, Hartley simultaneously pays
homage to and ridicules the conventions of the
traditional film noir.
Batman Forever (PG-13): Reviewed in this issue.
Braveheart (R): Mel Gibson dons hair extensions and
hikes up his skirt to direct himself as thirteenth-
century Scottish hero William Wallace, who battled
evil English King Edward 1 for Scotland’s freedom.
Both Gibson the star and Gibson the director turn in
workmanlike performances. Gory battle scenes pack
visceral whallop but share too much screen time with
predictable filler. Jesus should sue for copyright
infringement over the excruciatingly masochistic
ending, a blatant attempt to portray Wallace as Christ
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13): Clint Eastwood
directs himself in the screen version of Robert James
Waller’s critically loathed but immensely popular
novel. Meryl Streep costars as the restless rural
hausfrau who finds passion in the arms of a National
Geographic photographer while her husband and kids
are out of town.
Casper (PG): George Lucas’s Industrial Light & Magic
and Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment team up
to reanimate the friendliest ghost of them all with $50
million worth of special effects.
Congo (PG-13): Nasty monkey business in the deep,
dark jungle. Summer movie season just isn’t complete
without at least one offering based on a Michael
Crichton work, but this fetid variation on the monster-
gorillas-and-secret-treasure theme isn’t likely to make
anybody forget Jurassic Park. It’s as if Crichton never
heard of a fellow named Kong. Aping every jungle-
safari-lost-city-deadly-curse flick from King Solomon’s
Mines to Raiders of the Lost Ark to [insert your favorite
Tarzan movie here], Congo's few shining moments of
inspired Tremors-esque humor cannot prevent the
whole expedition from getting lost in the bush.
Crimson Tide (R): In the latest testosterone-overdriven,
macho military movie from the producing-directing
team that brought you Top Gun (producers Don
Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer, director Tony
Scott), a volatile Russian nationalist and a rebel faction
of the Soviet Army seize control of a nuclear missile
base. The only hope of stopping them from launching
World War III rests with a U.S. nuclear submarine
manned by former University of Aabama football
players and commanded by legendary coach Paul
“Bear” Bryant. The fate of the world and a Sugar Bowl
bid hang in the balance.
Forget Paris (PG-13): Can Billy Crystal and Debra
Winger French kiss better than Kevin Kline and Meg
Ryan? Billy C. (not the former Heat owner) stars as an
NBA referee whose marriage has gone from a fast-
break into a stall.
French Kiss (PG-13): Is the world ready for When Luc
met Kate...? How about Sleepless in Gay Paree? Meg
Ryan fakes nary an orgasm in this romantic comedy
from director Lawrence Kasdan about a woman who
tracks down her wayward fiancé (Timothy Hutton) in
the City of Light. But with Kevin Kline as her sexy
French love interest Luc, presumably Meg didn’t
need to pretend.
The Glass Shield (PG-13): A black male cop (Michael
Boatman) teams with a white female cop (Tank Girts
Lori Petty in an abrupt change-of-pace) to battle
corruption and prejudice within an LA Sheriff’s
station. The life of a black man wrongly convicted of
murder (Ice Cube) hangs in the balance. Charles
Burnett (To Sleep with Anger, Killer of Sheep) wrote
and directed.
Johnny Mnemonic (R): Talk about the dangers of
silicone implants! This techno-cyber-thriller from
author William Gibson stars Speedy Keanu Reeves as
a 21st-century data smuggler in a race against time to
deliver the chip that’s been hard-wired into his brain.
Failure means one hell of a migraine. With noted
thespians Dolph Lundgren, Ice-T, and Henry Rollins.
A Little Princess (G): Adapted from Francis Hodgson
Burnett’s classic children’s book about a privileged
young girl who shops a lot, gets her nails done, drives
a Jag, and joins a sorority at UM.
Mad Love (PG-13): Wild at heart Drew Barrymore and
Chris O’Donnell do the young-lovers-on-the-run
thing.
My Family (R): Acclaimed filmmaker Gregory Nava (El
Norte) tries and fails to depict the Mexican-American
experience without resorting to the usual clichés.
New Jersey Drive (R): An over-the-top cop chases a
gang of teenage car thieves down the streets of
Newark in this boyz-under-the-hood tale from writer-
director Nick Gomez (Laws of Gravity).
Outbreak (R): Deadlier than the black plague and
more contagious than the common cold, a lethal virus
threatens to decimate the inhabitants of a small town
in Northern California and, if it isn’t contained, the
world. Dustin Hoffman is the scientist in a race
against time to halt the disease’s spread. Rene Russo
is his ex-wife, who works at the Centers for Disease
Control and eventually must team up with him to find
a cure. Donald Sutherland is the sinister military guy
who gets in the way. Whether or not Hoffman and
Russo succeed in containing the virus, at least they
beat The Hot Zone to the big screen.
The Perez Family (R): First My Family revisited every
modem Mexican movie cliché. Now an Indian
director (Mira Nair) directs an American actress
(Marisa Tomei) and tries to convey the essence of the
Cuban experience in a doting but dimwitted and
overromantirized tale of dreams and identities lost or
mistaken in the Mariel boatlift. Casting Celia Cruz as
a wise old santera does not buy a movie instant
credibility.
Pocahontas (G): This summer’s eagerly awaited
offering from the House of Mouse falls short of its
recent predecessors (The Lion King, Aladdin, The
Little Mermaid) in almost every respect, yet still
manages to conjure up a bit of that old Disney magic.
And if the native American babe-in-the-woods looks
familiar, perhaps it’s because her sultry, raven-haired
image was modeled upon pouty cover girl Christy
Turlington.
A Pure Formality (U): Reviewed in this issue.
While You Were Sleeping (PG): Sandra Bullock (Speed)
carries this lightweight farce about a Chicago Transit
Authority token-taker who saves a mugging victim’s
life and then is mistaken for his fiancée by the
comatose man’s family. The role demands none of the
pluck or sharpness of tongue that made her so
endearing behind the wheel of that booby-trapped
bus, but Bullock does perky almost as well as she did
spunky. The script furnishes a few unexpected laughs
to help wash down the mush.
Wigstock (U): Reviewed in this issue.
OR CALL
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June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 61


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U.S. 14 S.W. 136THST.
255-5200
PALMETTO X-WAY 4 836
266-6646
Deerfield Delray.
1NO tWSSÍS OR COCPCNS ACCEPT K>
CALI
B 8 8- FILM
FOR SHOW
TIMES & TICKETS
■ See “The Spirit of Pocahontas" live at the ■
Dlsney-MGM Studios, Florida.
FROM THE BEST SELLING
NOVEL or TOE AUTHOR
OF 1RRASSIC PARK
WHERE YOU ARE
THE ENDANGERED
«MI?»
Ail BSMlSKSTRVffa
4TH SMASH WEEK
General Cinema's
IHTRAC0ASTAL THEATRE
Sunny bies BbA
3701 Hi. 163d St.
MS-7416
KB
Cobb Theatres
KENDALL 9
Kendall drive
W. OF FL Turnpike
598-5000
HTPl
General Gnemo's
MIRACLE CENTER 10
3301 Carol Way
442-2299
nra
Cobb Theatres
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT Main & Ludlam
558-3810
General Gnemo's
HIALEAH 8
Palmetto Expwy. &
N.W. 103rd. St.
557-9888
Cobb Theatres
BAY HARBOR 4
96 St. W. Of Collins
Miami Beach
866-2441
rrm
Cobb's
MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3390 Mary St., Suite 380
Above Planet Hollywood
447-9969
nm
United Artists
MOVIES AT THE FALLS
U.S. 1 & S.W. 136th St.
255-5200
rm
AMC Theatres
SOUTH DADE 8
U.S. 1 &
S.W. 185th St.
238-4424
AMC Theatres
OCEAN WALK 10
333 Harrison St.
Hollywood Beach
920-6330
AMC
MALI OF THE AMERICAS
Palmetto X-Way & 836
266-6646
General Gnema's
PEMBROKE PINES 8
S.W. Pines Blvd. &
Flamingo Rood
437-7790
AMC Theotres
OMNI 10
Omni International
358-2304
Wometco's
FLORIDA 4
Hollywood Mall
987-9350
Muvico Theotres
CALIFORNIA
CLUB 6 EX-
850 Ives Dairy Road
652-8558 rTTd
Ocean Ctnema
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
N.W. 7th St.
& LeJeune Rd.
529-8883
Cobb Theatres
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107th Ave.
0pp. FIU
223-2700
AMC Theotres
BAKERY CENTRE 7
U.S. 1 At Red Rood
(57th Ave.)
662-4841
Also in Broward at: Galleria, Fox Sunrise, Fountains, Sawgrass, Weston, Swapshop, Coral Square, Shodowood, Towncenter, Pompano
Cinema 4. Fox Festival. Deerfield. Delray, Inverrary. i no passss oft coupons accepted 1
Visit the CONGO website at http://www.paramount.com or on AOL (keyword: CONGO)
CALL 888-FILM FOK SHOWTIMKS & TICKETS
He fell in love with the island’s most beautiful woman.
But he didn’t stand a chance, until a great poet, Pablo Neruda,
gave him the courage and the words to win her heart.
“★★★★! AWinning Romance!
-Michael Lightcap, BOX OFFICE MAGAZINE
STARTS FRIDAY,
JUNE 30!
ASTOR ART CINEMA
AMC THEATRES
AMC THEATRES
COBB
SHERIDAN 12
FASHION ISLAND 16
MAYFAIR 10
4120 Laguna SI.
4999 Sheridan St.
18741 Biscayne Blvd @ 187th St.
Above Planet Hollywood Coconut Grove
443-67/7
987-4680
Mi-2873
447-9969
IN BROWARD. FOX SUNRISE- IN BOCA COBB SHAOOWOOD
Music Soundtrack and Poetry Album Featuring Readings by:
CUCN'Nt ■!.(.»>(•; RALPH fEErNNSiS SAMITI. E. JACKSON MJRANDA fUCBARMSON WGStEY SftJpgS
WILLEM DAFOE ANDY GARCIA MADONNA JCLJA ROBERTS SUNG
ETilAN HAWKE VINCENT PEREZ Itt YUS SEWELL
Visit "Judge Dredd" Online At http://www disney com
COBB THEATRES
MIAMI LAKES 10
AT MAIN 4 LUDLAM
558-3810
* AMC THEATRES
FASHION ISLAND 16
18741 BISCA YNE BlVD.
931-2873
GENERAL CINEMA’S
AT MRACIE CENTER 10
CORAL WAY
442-2299
GENERAL CINEMA’S
RIVIERA CINEMA
1560 S. DIXIE HWY.
CORAL GABIES
666-8513
OCEAN CINEMA
LEJEUNE CINEMA 6
N.W. 7TH ST.
A LEJEUNE RD,
529-8883
COBB THEATRES
KENDALL 9
KENDALL DR.
W. OF FLA. TURNPIKE
598-5000
COBB'S
MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3390 MARY ST.. SUITE. 380
447-9969
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT THE FALLS
U.S. 14S.W. 136TH ST.
255-5200
* AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
PALMETTO X-WAY & 836
266-6646
UNITED ARTISTS
MOVIES AT
HIALEAH
780 WEST 49TH STREET
826-7242
COBB THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
COBB THEATRES
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107THAVE.
OPP. FIU
223-2700
COBB THEATRES
OAKWOOD 18 CINEMAS
2800 OAKWOOD BLVD..
HOLLYWOOD
923-4321
Also in Broward at: Coral Square. Gateway. Fox Sin rise.
Sawgrass. Weston. Swapshop Coral Springs. Fax Festival
" to Cinema 4. Mzner. Movies at Town Center,
rood. Fountains. Delray.
| NO PASSES OR COUPONS ACCEPTED'
STARTS
FRIDAY
COBB THEATRES
BYRON/CARLYLE 7
500-71 STREET
MIAMI BEACH
866-9623
GENERAL CINEMA'S
PEMBROKE PINES 8
S.W. PINES BLVD. 4
FLAMINGO RD.
437-7790
* AMC THEATRES
OCEAN WALK 10
333 HARRISON ST.
HOLLYWOOD BEACH
920-6330
WOMETCO’S
FLORIDA 4
HOLLYWOOD MALL
987-9350
Page 62 New Times
June 29 —July 5, 1995


Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Film
Showtimes
Following is a schedule for movies opening and
currently screening at local theaters. All times p.m.
unless otherwise noted. A ♦ indicates a movie that
opens this week. All movie times are subject to change
without notice; please call individual theaters or 888-
FILM (a free service) to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna St; 443-6777
You Men Are All the Same (U) Thur 6/29 only 10:00
Latcho Drom (U) Thur 6/29 only 8:00
Hotel Sorrento (U) Thur 6/29 only 6:00
♦The Postman (PG) Daily 5:45, 8:00,10:15 (Sat-Sun,
Tue matinees 1:15, 3:30)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Grand Ave; 448-6641
French Kiss (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:40, 5:05, 7:30,
10:05
The Perez Family (R) Thur 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:45,
10:15,12:30a; Fri-Tue 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 7:55,10:25
(Fri-Sun late show 12:45a); Wed 12:30,2:50, 5:10,
7:45,10:15
Crimson Tide (R) Daily 1:30, 5:10, 7:45,10:20 (Thur
late show 12:35a; Fri-Sun late show
12:50a)
The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill but Came Down a
Mountain (PG) Daily 1:05, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15,10:20; Fri-
Wed 10:15 (Fri-Sun late show 12:30a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 12:30, 2:45, 5:40, 8:00,
10:30; Fri-Tue 1:45, 5:20, 7:40, 9:50 (Fri-Sun late
show 12:00m); Wed 1:05, 5:20, 7:40, 9:50
Rurnt by the Sun (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45, 4:30, 7:20,
10:20
A Little Princess (G) Thur 12:40, 2:45, 5:15, 7:30,
9:45; Fri-Wed 12:40, 2:45, 5:15
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:15,1:45,
2:30, 4:15, 4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 8:15, 9:45,10:20,
10:50, 12:15a; Fri-Tue 10:30a, 11:30a, 12:30, 1:30,
2:30, 3:15,4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 7:30, 8:15, 9:00,10:15
(Fri-Sun late shows 11:00a, 12:00m, 12:50a); Wed
12:30,1:30, 2:30, 3:15, 4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 7:30, 8:05,
9:15, 10:15, 10:45
Muriel's Wedding (R) Thur 6/29 only 2:00, 5:45, 8:15,
10:35
Amateur (U) Daily 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 8:05,10:35 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:45a)
Wigstock (U) Thur 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:00,10:15,
12:30a; Fri-Tue 8:00, 10:15 (Fri-Sun late show
12:30a); Wed 8:00,10:15
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:00n, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00,
5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00,9:00, 9:55 (Fri-Tue early show
10:00a; Thur late show 12:00m; Fri-Sun late shows
11:00,12:00m)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
11:45a, 12:30, 2:15, 2:55, 4:45, 5:30, 7:15, 8:05, 9:45
(Mon-Tue early show 10:15a; Fri-Sun late show
12:00m)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Thur 12:00m; Fri-Tue 10:00a,
12:00n, 1:00, 2:00,4:00,4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30,
10:00,10:45 (Mon-Tue early show 11:00a; Fri-Sun
late shows 11:30a, 12:50a); Wed 12:00,1:00, 2:00,
4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 7:00, 7:45, 8:00, 9:55, 10:30,
10:50
♦The Incredibly True Adventure of Two Girls in Love
(U) Fri-Tue 12:10, 2:35, 4:50, 7:15, 9:50 (Fri-Sun
late show 12:15a); Wed 12:10, 2:35, 4:50,
7:15
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Cobb s Mayfair 10 Cinema
3390 Mary Street; 447-9969
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Daily 12:00n, 2:50,
5:20, 8:05, 10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:05,
4:40, 7:25,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:00n, 3:30, 7:15, 8:15; Fri-
Wed 12:00n, 3:30, 7:45 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Mad Love (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 11:40a, 2:20, 4:30
Casper (PG) Daily 11:40a, 2:10, 4:30
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 11:15a,
2:00, 4:40, 7:25, 8:00, 10:10, 10:40 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a)
Rocky Horror Picture Show (U) Fri-Sat 12:30a
Congo (PG-13) Daily 11:30a, 2:00, 4:30, 7:40,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
A Pure Formality (U) Daily 12:00n, 2:30,4:50
♦Judge Dredd (R) Fri-Wed 11:30a, 12:00n, 1:50,
2:30, 4:20, 5:00, 7:45, 8:15,10:10,10:40 (Fri-Sat late
shows 12:15, 12:45)
♦The Postman (PG) Fri-Wed 11:50a, 2:20, 4:50, 8:00,
10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Miracle Center 10
3301 Coral Way; 442-2299
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:10,10:30;
Fri-Sat 8:10,10:40; Sun-Wed 8:10,10:30
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:30, 4:35, 7:50,
10:30; Fri-Sat 7:40,10:30; Sun-Wed 7:40,
10:20
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00, 5:15, 9:15
Casper (PG) Thur 12:30, 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, 9:50; Fri-
Wed 12:30, 2:50, 5:15
Congo (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:20, 4:50, 7:40,
10:25
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:00, 2:30,
4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 7:40, 9:40,10:20; Fri-Wed 12:00n,
1:00, 2:30, 4:00, 5:10, 7:00, 7:50,10:20
Pocahontas (G) Thur 12:00n, 1:00, 2:15, 3:15, 4:30,
5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 9:15,10:00; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 1:00,
2:15, 3:15, 4:30, 5:30, 7:00, 9:00
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Dally
12:00n, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:30, 2:45, 5:20, 7:40,10:30
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:00 (Fri-
Sat 10:15)
Omni 4 and 6
1601 Biscayne Blvd; 372-3439 and 358-2304
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:45, 5:00, 7:50,
10:35; Fri-Tue 10:55a, 1:45, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30; Wed
1:45, 5:05, 7:50,10:30
Braveheart (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:10, 3:30, 7:15,
10:30
Tales From the Hood (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:30, 4:30,
7:30,10:00
Casper (PG) Thur 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:15, 9:45; Fri-
Tue 10:50a, 1:15, 4:55, 7:30,9:55; Wed 12:00n, 2:20,
4:55, 7:30, 9:55
Glass Shield (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 11:40a, 1:50,
5:30, 7:40, 10:15
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 6/29
only 2:00,4:45, 7:45,10:35
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,10:15;
Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,10:10
New Jersey Drive (R) Thur 11:45a, 2:00, 4:15, 7:00,
9:30; Fri-Tue 10:45a, 1:00,4:00, 7:00, 9:30; Wed
11:45a, 2:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 1:00, 2:15,
4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 7:45,10:00,10:30; Fri-Tue 10:45a,
1:00, 4:00, 4:45, 7:00, 7:40, 9:55,10:25; Wed 11:30a,
1:00, 2:15, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 7:40,10:25
♦Mad Love (PG-13) Fri-Tue 8:00,10:15; Wed 1:50,
5:15, 8:00,10:15
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:40, 4:30, 7:30,10:30; Wed
12:40, 4:30, 7:30,10:30
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers; The Movie (PG) Fri-
Tue 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:30, 2:30, 4:30, 5:00, 7:15,8:00,
9:45, 10:20
LeJeune Cinemas 6
782 Le Jeune Rd; 529-8883
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45,
4:30, 7:20,10:00
Casper (PG) Thur 6/29 only 1:15, 3:35, 5:40, 8:00,
10:10
Congo (PG-13) Daily 2:30 (Thur 2:15), 5:00, 7:30,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:30,1:45,3:15,4:30,
6:05, 7:20, 8:45, 10:00; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 1:45, 4:30,
7:20,10:00 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:40,12:20a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 12:00n, 1:55, 4:05, 6:10, 8:15,
10:15; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 1:55, 4:05, 6:10, 8:10,
10:00
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:15, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40,9:45
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Fri-Sat 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40,
12:20a; Sun-Wed 12:45, 3:45, 7:00,10:00
Riviera
1560 S Dixie Hwy; 666-8514
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45; Fri-Sun
11:30a, 7:45,10:20; Mon-Wed 1:40, 7:30,
10:10
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:15, 7:15
Braveheart (R) Thur 1:20, 5:00, 9:00; Fri-Sun 12:15,
4:00, 8:00; Mon-Wed 1:20, 5:00, 9:00
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 1:15,1:45, 4:00,4:30,
7:00, 7:30,10:00,10:30; Fri-Sun 11:00a, 1:40,2:20,
4:20, 5:00, 7:20,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a);
Mon-Wed 1:45, 4:00, 4:30, 7:30,10:30
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Fri-Sun 11:00a, 2:00, 5:20, 8:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:45); Mon-Wed 1:00, 4:00, 7:15,
10:20
♦Judge Dredd (R) Fri-Sun 11:10a, 1:30, 4:00, 7:00,
9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 1:30,
4:15, 7:00, 9:30
Bakery Centre 7
5701 Sunset Dr; 662-4841
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 1:45, 5:40, 8:05,
10:20; Fri-Wed 10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:40, 5:00, 8:00,
10:45; Fri-Wed 8:00,10:40
Casper (PG) Thur 1:00, 3:15, 5:35, 7:50,10:05; Fri-
Wed 1:20, 5:10 (Fri-Tue early show 10:20a)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Fri-Wed
1:25, 4:15, 7:10,10:20
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:50, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10,10:30;
Fri-Wed 1:00, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10, 10:30 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:30, 2:40, 3:30,
4:50, 5:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:00,9:35,10:50; Fri-Wed
11:30a, 12:30,1:30, 2:35, 3:30, 4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:30
(except Fri), 9:10 (Fri-Sat, Mon-Tue early show
10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers; The Movie (PG) Daily
12:15,12:45, 2:40, 3:15, 5:00, 5:40, 7:15, 7:50, 9:30,
10:10 (Fri-Tue early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late show
12:25a)
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr; 598-5000
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 11:30a, 2:00,4:45, 7:20, 9:45;
Fri-Wed 11:30a, 2:00, 4:45, 8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:50a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 7:30,10:00
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:45,4:15, 7:45; Fri-Wed
12:45, 4:15, 8:15 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:20, 2:20, 4:30
Congo (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:40, 2:50, 4:00,
5:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:40, 10:30; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 2:30,
5:00, 7:30, 9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:15a, 2:00, 2:30,
4:45, 5:15, 7:20,10:05, 10:50; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 12:15,
1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25, 7:15, 8:00, 9:50,10:45 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:40a)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 11:00a (except Tue-Wed),
1:10,1:50, 4:15, 4:40, 7:15, 7:45,10:05,10:45 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:50a)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
11:00a (exceptTue-Wed), 1:00, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30,
9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:15, 3:00, 5:15, 7:45,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Dr; 271-8198
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 1:50, 5:55, 8:15,
10:35; Fri-Wed 12:50, 5:40, 8:10,10:30
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 12:45, 3:10
(Thur 3:00), 5:50, 8:30,11:00
Johnny Mnemonic (R) Thur 12:50, 5:40,10:30; Fri-
Wed 1:00, 4:05, 8:15,10:40 (Fri-Mon late show
12:40a)
Casper (PG) Thur 10:25a, 12:10, 2:25, 3:30, 5:30,
7:45, 8:10,10:10; Fri-Wed 12:10, 2:25, 5:30, 7:45,
10:10 (Fri-Mon late show 12:20a)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 12:20,
4:15, 7:30,10:20
New Jersey Drive (R) Daily 12:30, 4:30, 8:30,10:45
(Fri-Mon late show 12:35a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur-Tue 10:00a, 10:40a, 11:20a,
12:00n, 12:40,1:20, 2:00, 2:40, 3:20, 4:00, 4:40, 5:20, !
6:00, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 8:40, 9:20,10:00,10:40; Wed 1
11:20a, 12:00n, 12:40,1:20, 2:00, 2:40, 3:20, 4:00,
4:40, 5:20, 6:00, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 8:40, 9:20,10:00,
10:40, 11:00 1
Miller Square VIII
13838 Miller Rd; 387-3494
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45,
4:25, 7:20, 10:10
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:30, 4:00, 7:30; Fri-Wed 7:20
(Fri-Sat late show 11:00)
Casper (PG) Thur 1:15, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Fri-Wed
1:10,3:15, 5:20
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:15,
4:10, 7:50,10:30; Fri-Wed 4:40,10:25
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:45,1:30, 3:30, 4:15,
7:15, 7:40, 10:15, 10:30; Fri-Wed 1:30,1:50, 4:15,
7:15, 7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 3:55, 5:20
(Thur 5:00), 6:05, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00,10:00,11:00 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:00m)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:20, 4:30, 7:30,10:30
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:15, 3:25, 5:30, 7:50,10:10
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45
Movies at the Falls
8888 Howard Dr; 255-5200
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n,
4:50, 7:15, 9:40
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 11:45a, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15;
Fri-Wed 11:30a, 5:00, 7:40
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 7:20,10:00
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 12:30, 4:10, 7:15,
10:15; Fri-Wed 2:15, 10:15
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:00n, 4:15, 7:45; Fri-Wed
12:00n, 3:45, 7:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:05)
Casper (PG) Daily 11:30a, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:30)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:00,
4:00, 7:00,10:15; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 2:15, 5:30, 8:15
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 11:45a, 2:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 2:00, 4:40, 7:30,10:10;
Fri-Wed 11:30a, 2:00,4:40, 7:15, 9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a) ,
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:30a, 1:15, 2:30, 4:15 ,
(Thur 4:00), 5:15, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45 (Thur 10:00)
(Sat-Sun, Tue early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late shows ,
11:00,12:00m)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 11:30a, 12:30,1:45, 2:45, 4:00,
4:45, 7:10, 7:50 (Thur 7:45), 9:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late ,
shows 11:15, 12:00m)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:30, 2:45, 5:10, 7:30, 9:45
(Sat-Sun, Tue early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show ,
11:50)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers; The Movie (PG) Daily .
12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:25, 9:50 (Sat-Sun, Tue early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,10:00 (Sat-
Sun, Tue early show 10:05a)
South Dade 8
18591 South Dixie Hwy; 238-4424
Braveheart (R) Daily 12:00n, 3:30, 7:00,10:30
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 12:30, 4:15, 7:15, â– 
10:10; Fri-Wed 8:00,10:40
Casper (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 9:45; Fri-
Wed 10:15a, 12:30, 2:45, 5:05, 7:30, 9:45 (Fri-Mon ;
late show 12:00m)
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:45, 4:30, 7:30,
10:15
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 6/29
only 12:30,4:30, 7:45,10:30 ;
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 8:15,10:40;
Fri-Wed 11:45a, 2:10, 4:30, 7:50,10:10 (Fri-Mon
late show 12:30a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:00a, 1:15, 2:00,
4:10, 4:55, 7:10, 7:40, 9:50,10:20 (Fri-Mon early
show 10:00a; Fri-Mon late show 12:30a)
♦Apollo 13 (R) Daily 10:00a, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00,
12:45a ‘
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
10:00a, 10:30a, 12:15, 12:45, 2:30, 3:00, 4:45, 5:15,
7:20, 9:30 (Fri-Mon late show 11:45)
Beaches
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Suite 119; 531-8504
Faster, Pussycat! Kill, Kill! (U) Thur 6/29 only 10:00
Wigstock (U) Thur 8:00; Fri-Wed 10:00 (Sat-Sun
matinee 4:00; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
♦You Men Are All the Same (U) Daily 8:00 (except
Sat) (Sun matinee 6:00)
♦One Minute Film Festival (U) Sat 8:00 only
At 1663 Lenox Ave
Open City (U) Sun 8:00 only
June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 63


Bay Harbor IV
1170 Kane Concourse; 866-2441
Forget Paris (PC-13) Thur 6/29 only 2:10, 4:40, 7:50,
10:05
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00, 4:30, 8:00
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 1:30,
4:15, 7:15, 10:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 2:00, 4:30, 7:40,10:10; Fri-Wed
2:00, 4:30, 7:30,10:15
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:50, 4:40, 7:45,10:35 (Sat
early show 11:00a)
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St; 866-9623
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45, 4:45, 7:40,
10:05
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 2:00, 4:45, 7:40,
10:10; Fri-Wed 7:40,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Casper (PG) Thur 1:45, 5:00, 7:30, 9:45; Fri-Wed
1:45, 5:00 (Sat early show 11:45a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 2:00, 2:30, 4:45, 5:15,
7:20, 8:00,10:05, 10:40 (Sat early shows 11:15a,
11:45a; Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00,
6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00,10:00 (Sat early show 11:00a;
Sat matinee 12:00n; Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,
12:00m)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 (Sat early show 11:30a;
Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:15, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50,10:20
(Sat matinee 12:00n; Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
North Dade
California Club VI
850 Ives Dairy Rd; 652-8558
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:10,
2:40, 5:10, 7:55,10:30
Casper (PG) Thur 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 8:00, 10:15; Fri-
Wed 12:25, 2:30, 5:15
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 12:05,
3:00, 7:15,10:05; Fri-Wed 7:35,10:20
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:15, 2:50, 5:10,8:05,10:25;
Fri-Wed 12:50, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10,10:45
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:30, 3:05, 5:40, 8:10,
10:35; Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45,10:35
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00, 6:05, 8:00,
10:00
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:15, 10:15
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45
Fashion Island
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 931-2873
Friday (R) Thur 5:05, 7:15,10:25; Fri-Sun 12:50a
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 11:45a, 12:30, 2:20, 3:00,4:55,
6:35, 7:30, 8:15,10:10; Fri-Wed 11:40a, 2:20, 5:05,
7:55,10:30 (Fri-Sun late show 12:50a)
A Little Princess (G) Thur 6/29 only 12:25, 2:45
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:25,
9:50; Fri-Wed 9:45 (Fri-Sun late show 12:10a)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:30, 4:30, 7:35,
10:20; Fri-Wed 1:15, 4:30, 7:15,10:10 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:10a; Fri-Sun late show 12:45a)
Tales From the Hood (R) Thur 2:15, 4:50, 7:40,10:20;
Fri-Wed 12:15a
Glass Shield (PG-13) Thur 12:45, 3:05, 5:25, 7:50,
10:25; Fri-Wed 11:20a, 5:10,10:45
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:20,2:30, 4:45, 7:20,
9:35
French Kiss (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:00, 4:35, 7:10,
9:45
Amateur (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:15, 2:25, 4:40, 7:05,
9:15
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:30,
2:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30,10:30; Fri-
Wed 12:15,1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:15, 7:00, 8:00,
9:00, 9:50 (Fri-Tue early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
♦A Pure Formality (PG-13) Daily 10:25 (Fri-Sun late
show 12:40a)
«Apollo 13 (R) Daily 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15,
4:20, 5:20, 6:40, 7:35, 8:45, 10:00 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:00a; Fri-Tue late show 11:00; Fri-Sun late
show 12:00m)
«The incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love
(U) Daily 12:25, 2:35,4:55, 7:10, 9:30 (Fri-Sun early
show 10:20a; Fri-Sun late show 11:45)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (PG) Daily 11:15a,
12:15,1:00, 1:30, 2:30,3:30, 4:00, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30,
7:30, 8:15, 9:25 (Fri-Tue early shows 10:00a,
10:30a)
♦New Jersey Drive (R) Daily 12:35, 2:45, 5:35, 8:20,
10:30 (Fri-Tue early show 10:30a; Fri-Sun late
show 12:35a)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 11:30a, 12:45,1:45, 3:10,
Page 64 New Times
4:10, 5:30, 6:45, 7:45, 9:15,10:15 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sun late shows 11:45, 12:45a)
♦The Postman (PG) Daily 12:30, 2:50, 5:25, 8:10,
10:40 (Fri-Sun early show 10:10a)
Intracoastal
3701 NE 163rd St; 945-7416
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Daily 1:30,4:30, 7:00,
9:50
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00,4:30, 8:15
Casper (PG) Daily 12:45,3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:40 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:40)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:15,
2:00, 4:15, 4:45, 7:30,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:45,1:15,
3:30, 4:15, 7:00, 7:30, 9:45,10:15
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:15,4:25, 7:00, 7:40,
9:15, 10:00; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 2:15, 4:35, 7:00, 9:15
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:45, 2:45, 4:00,
5:00, 7:15, 8:00, 9:30, 10:10; Fri-Wed 11:30a, 12:30,
1:45, 2:45, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:15, 8:00,9:30,10:10
(Fri-Sat late shows 11:30,12:00m)
Skylake II
1720 NE Miami Gardens Dr; 944-2810
Major Payne (PG-13) Thur 3:00, 6:45,10:20; Fri-Wed
4:35,10:15
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 1:00, 4:45, 8:30; Fri-
Wed 2:35, 8:15
The Pebble and the Penguin (G) Thur 6/29 only
12:45, 4:30, 8:15
Jury Duty (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 2:45, 6:30, 10:10
♦Tommy Boy (PG-13) Daily 12:45, 6:25
♦Bad Boys (R) Daily 1:00, 5:35,10:05
•Panther (R) Dally 3:15, 7:45
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas 14
7775 W Flagler St; 266-6664
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:15, 5:00,
7:30,10:10; Fri-Sun 11:00; Mon-Wed 10:00
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00,
10:30; Fri-Wed 8:00,10:45
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 1:15, 4:15, 7:15,
10:10 (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sun late
show 12:45a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 7:45,10:15
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00, 4:45, 8:30 (Fri-Sun late
show 12:00m)
Casper (PG) Daily 10:00a, 12:15, 2:45, 5:30, 8:00,
10:30
Johnny Mnemonic (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:30, 3:00,
5:30, 10:30
Tales From the Hood (R) Thur-Sun 12:30a
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:15,
4:15, 7:15, 10:15; Fri-Wed 7:45,10:45 (Fri-Sun early
show 10:00a)
Congo (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
(Fri-Sun early show 10:00a; Fri-Sun late show
12:30a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 1:00, 2:00,4:00, 5:00,
7:00, 8:00, 9:55,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
9:55 (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a, Fri-Sun late show
12:30a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:15,1:15, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45,
5:45, 7:00, 9:15, (Fri-Sun early show 10:00a, Fri-
Sun late show 11:30)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Fri-
Sun 10:15a, 11:30a, 12:30, 2:00,3:00, 4:45, 5:30,
7:30, 9:55,12:15a; Mon-Wed 11:45a, 12:30, 2:00,
3:00, 4:45, 5:30, 7:30, 9:55
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,10:15
(Fri-Sun 10:00a, Fri-Sun late show 12:30a)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 10:00a, 1:00,4:30, 7:30,10:30
University VII
1645 SW 107th Ave; 223-2700
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 2:10,4:40, 7:30,
10:30; Fri-Wed 10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Casper (PG) Daily 1:40,4:30, 7:20, 9:35 (Thur only)
Congo (PG-13) Thur 2:25, 5:00, 7:40,10:35; Fri-Wed
2:00, 4:40, 8:00,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 1:20, 4:10, 7:15,10:20;
Fri-Wed 1:40, 4:10, 7:30,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:50 (Thur 1:00), 3:00, 5:00,
7:00, 9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:15, 4:15, 7:15,10:05 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:45a)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:20, 3:30, 5:30, 7:45,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:45 (Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
Super Saver Cinema
11501 Bird Rd; 227-0277
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 8:00,
10:15
Pulp Fiction (R) Thur 12:30,3:45, 6:30, 9:30; Fri-Wed
2:00, 7:00
Man of the House (PG) Thur 12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 6:15,
8:15, 10:15; Fri-Wed 2:30, 7:45
M^jor Payne (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00, 6:00,
8:00, 10:15; Fri-Wed 12:30, 2:30,4:30, 7:30, 9:45
Outbreak (R) Daily 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,10:00
Don Juan DeMarco (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00,
6:00, 8:00, 10:15 (Thur 10:00)
Top Dog (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n, 4:00, 8:00
Jury Duty (PG-13) Thur 2:00, 5:45,10:00; Fri-Wed
12:15, 5:00, 10:00
Circle of Friends (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n,
2:15, 4:30, 7:45,10:00
Gordy (G) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00
♦Bad Boys (R) Daily 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:45, 10:00
♦French Kiss (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:15, 4:30, 8:00,
10:15
*My Family (R) Daily 12:00n, 4:30,10:00
♦Tommy Boy (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:00,4:00, 6:00,
8:00,10:15
Valentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 266-2002
Casper (PG) Thur 6/29 only 7:00, 9:00
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 7:00, 9:00; Fri-
Sun 6:00, 8:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:00, 4:00);
Mon-Wed 7:00, 9:00 (Tue matinee 5:00)
Congo (PG-13) Thur 7:00, 9:00; Fri-Sun 6:00, 8:00,
10:00 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:00, 4:00); Mon-Wed
7:00, 9:00 (Tue matinee 5:00)
*My Family (R) Fri 6:00, 8:00,10:20; Sat-Sun 2:00,
4:10, 6:20, 8:30, 10:30; Mon 7:00,9:00; Tue 5:00,
7:10, 9:10; Wed 7:00, 9:00
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Apollo Theatre
3800 W 12th Ave; 826-6606
Movie times for Friday through Wednesday were
not available at press time.
M^jor Payne (PG-13) Thur 8:00,10:00
Top Dog (PG-13) Thur 8:00, 10:00
Gordy (G) Thur 8:00,10:00
Fluke (PG) Thur 8:00,10:00
Hialeah Cinema VIII
4650 W 17th Ct; 557-9888
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
10:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 11:00a, 2:00, 3:45, 7:00, 9:15;
Fri-Wed 12:30, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45
New Jersey Drive (R) Thur 6/29 only 4:30, 7:00, 9:45
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:45a, 2:00, 2:45,
4:45, 5:45, 7:15, 8:45,10:00
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:00n, 1:00, 2:15, 3:15, 4:30,
5:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:15,10:15
«Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,10:30
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:00n, 3:15, 7:00, 10:15
Miami Lakes X
6711 Main St; 558-3810
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 2:05, 4:30, 7:45,
10:25
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 2:00, 4:30, 7:40,
10:15 (Thur-Mon early show 11:20a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:55a)
Braveheart (R) Thur 11:30a, 3:00, 7:30; Fri-Mon
11:30a, 3:00, 7:30,10:45; Tue-Wed 3:00,7:30,10:45
Casper (PG) Daily 11:15a, 1:50 (Thur 2:00), 4:15,
7:15, 9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:45,
4:25, 7:25, 10:10; Fri-Mon 11:00a, 4:50,10:15; Tue-
Wed 4:50,10:15
Congo (PG-13) Thur 2:10, 4:30, 8:00,10:25; Fri-Mon
11:40a, 2:00, 4:30, 8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late show
12:45a); Tue-Wed 2:00, 4:30, 8:00, 10:30
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 11:10a, 11:45a, 1:45,
2:30, 4:20, 5:00, 7:15, 8:00,10:10,10:40; Fri-Wed
11:15a, 1:45,2:10, 4:20, 7:15, 7:45,10:10 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:45a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 11:00a, 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00,
9:00; Fri-Wed 11:00a, 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30
(Fri-Sat late show 11:15)
«Judge Dredd (R) Daily 11:20a, 1:30, 3:40, 5:50,
8:00,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a)
•Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
11:15a, 1:15,3:15, 5:15, 7:30, 9:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 11:30)
Movies at Hialeah
780 W 49th St; 826-7242
Don Juan DeMarco (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:00,
3:15, 5:30, 8:00
My Family (R) Daily 12:45, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40
Panther (R) Thur 7:20, 9:45; Fri-Wed 12:55, 4:00,
7:10, 9:45
Crimson Tide (R) Daily 12:30, 3:00, 5:30,8:00 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:00)
Gordy (G) Thur 6/29 only 1:00, 3:15, 5:20
Braveheart (R) Daily 12:05 (Thur 12:00n), 4:00, 8:00
Tales From the Hood (R) Daily 12:45, 3:00, 5:00, 7:40,
9:55 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
Casper (PG) Daily 12:00n, 1:00, 2:30, 3:15,5:00,
5:30, 7:30, 8:00, 10:00 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,
12:10a)
Johnny Mnemonic (R) Daily 12:30, 3:00, 5:15, 7:45,
9:50 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00,
7:30,10:00; Fri-Wed 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 9:55
(Fri-Sat late show 12:05a)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 12:30,
3:15, 7:00, 9:40
Friday (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,10:00; Fri-
Wed 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,10:00 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:10a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:00; Fri-Wed 12:20, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:10a)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
12:00n, 1:00, 2:30, 3:15, 5:00, 5:30, 7:30,8:00,10:00
(Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,12:10a)
South Broward
Florida IV
300 N Park Rd; 987-9350
Braveheart (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:55, 5:10, 8:20
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 1:40
(Thur 1:30), 4:15, 6:50, 9:30
Congo (PG-13) Thur 1:40, 4:05, 7:05, 9:20; Fri-Wed
2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Dally
1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20
«Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:45, 9:45
Hollywood Boulevard at A1A; 920-6330
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:10, 2:30, 5:30,
7:50,10:15
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 2:00, 5:00, 7:30,
10:10; Fri-Wed 7:45,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
June 29 —July 5, 1995
Oceanwalk Mall 10


NEW CONCEPT
video
New Releases, Foreign,
Lesbian & Gay, Cult Classics,
Japanese Animation, Drama,
Comedy, Sci-Fi, Film
Festival Favorites, Horror
& Adult Movies
New Members,
Rent 1 Get 1 Free
11am-12am Everyday
749 Lincoln Road
Pick up
your FREE
copy of
New Times
every
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at any
AMC Theatre
in Dade.
THEATRES
&
NeufTimes
Braveheart (R)Thur 1:30,5:00,8:30; Fri-Sun 12:00n,
3:30,7:00,10:30; Mon-Wed 1:30,5:00,8:30
Tales From the Hood (R) Fri-Sat 12:45a only
Casper (PC) Thur 12:45,3:00,5:30,7:30,9:45; Fri-Sun
10:20a, 12:40,2:45,5:30; Mon-Wed 12:30,2:45,5:30
(Wed early show 10:20a)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 2:00,4:45,
7:20,10:00; Fri-Sun 10:30a, 1:30,4:30,7:15,9:50 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:30a); Mon-Wed 2:00,4:45,7:20,10:00
(Wed early show 10:30a)
Congo (PC-13) Thur 12:30,2:45,5:20,7:50,10:15; Fri-
Sun 10:20a, 12:30,2:50,5:20,7:50,10:20 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 12:30,2:50,5:20,7:50,10:20
(Wed early show 10:20a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,
10:20; Fri-Sun 12:00n, 2:30,5:20,7:40,10:20 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:45a); Mon-Wed 12:10,2:30,5:10,7:40,
10:15 (Wed early show 10:00a)
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Sun 10:15a, 12:00n, 2:00,4:00,6:00,8:00,10:00 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 12:00n, 2:00,4:00,6:00,
8:00,9:50 (Wed early show 10:15a)
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(Fri-Sat late show 12:40a); Mon-Wed 1:00,4:30,7:15,
10:10 (Wed early show 10:10a)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Fri-Sun
10:00a, 12:15,2:30,5:00,7:30,9:45 (Fri-Sat late show
12:10a); Mon-Wed 12:15,2:30,5:00,7:30,9:40 (Wed
early show 10:10a)
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12520 Pines Blvd; 437-7790
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Casper (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:30,4:50, 7:10,9:30; Fri-Wed
12:20,2:35,4:45
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:00,4:00,
7:05,10:00; Fri-Wed 1:00,4:45,7:30,10:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:15,2:45,5:15,7:45,10:15; Fri-
Wed 2:15,4:45,7:15,9:45
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:15a, 2:00,4:45,7:30,
10:15
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«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
12:10,2:40,5:10,7:35,9:55
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«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:30,3:40,7:00,10:10
Sheridan Plaza 12
4999 Sheridan St; 987-4680
Casper (PG) Daily 12:40,2:55,5:10,7:30,9:55 (Fri-Tue
early show 10:40a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
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10:15 (Thur 10:20) (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
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12:40a; Mon-Wed 7:25,9:40
Forget Paris (PG-13) Daily 12:15 (Thur 12:30), 2:50,
5:20,7:50,10:25 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Crimson Tide (R) Daily 1:40 (Thur 1:30), 5:25,7:55,
10:30 (Fri-Tue early show 10:50a; Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
A Little Princess (G) Daily 12:50,3:00,5:15 (Fri-Sat early
show 10:45a)
French Kiss (PG-13) Thur 5:05,7:40,10:15; Fri-Sun 7:40,
10:25; Mon-Tue 10:20a, 1:55,5:05,7:40,10:25; Wed
1:55,5:05,7:40,10:25
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Daily 1:50,5:15,7:45,10:20
(Fri-Sat early show 10:55a; Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Glass Shield (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:55,4:40,7:10,
9:40
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:35,2:45
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:15a, 1:00,2:00,4:00,
5:00,7:00,8:00,10:00,10:40 (Fri-Tue 10:50) (Fri-Tue
early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:30,2:30,3:30,
4:30,5:30,7:15,8:15,9:45,10:15 (Fri-Sat, Mon-Tue
early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late shows 11:45,12:15a)
«The Postman (PG-13) Daily 12:20,2:40,5:15,7:45,
10:20 (Fri-Tue early show 10:05a; Fri-Sat late show
12:35a)
Taft Hollywood 12
7001 Taft St; 981-5443
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,
9:15
Outbreak (R) Daily 12:45,3:05,5:25,7:45,10:05
Pulp Fiction (R) Daily 12:45,3:45,6:45,9:45
Mpjor Payne (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15
Man of the House (PG) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:00,9:00
Dolores Claiborne (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:45,3:45,6:45,
9:45
Don Juan DeMarco (PG-13) Daily 12:45,3:05,5:25,7:45,
10:05
Circle of Friends (PG-13) Daily 1:10,3:20,5:30,7:40,9:50
Jury Duty (PG-13) Daily 1:15,3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15
Losing Isaiah (R) Daily 1:10,3:20,5:30,7:40,9:50
Gordy (G) Daily 1:00,3:00,5:00,7:00,9:00
Jefferson in Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 12:45,3:45,
6:45,9:45
*My Family (R) Daily 12:45,3:05,5:25,7:45,10:05
«Bad Boys (R) Daily 12:45,3:05,5:25,7:45,10:05
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June 29-July 5, 1995


immigrant assimilation — all of these elements
inform his attempts to make sense of the senseless¬
ness we live with each day. Intriguing, unnerving,
and wickedly ironic at its best moments, this ambi¬
tious drama is illuminated by director Jorge
Guerra’s salient staging and some excellent perfor¬
mances. But Rivera’s kitchen-sink approach blurs
his play’s focus. He falls prey to the chaos he imag¬
ines, and lets go of the narrative reins. The result —
an unwieldy act two, formless despite Guerra’s dis¬
cerning direction, and filled with hysterical
speeches that obscure Rivera’s language and his
intent, if one exists.
Ultimately the play left me with mere impressions
rather than conveying a coherent whole (not to be
confused with a logical whole — good drama need
not be logical, or realistic, but it does need to have a
semblance of shape). And those impressions merit
mentioning: Marisol and a young woman (Karin
Zoeller) sitting side by side on regular chairs in the
play’s opening scene, eliciting the claustrophobia
and spastic jerking of a New York subway ride; the
guardian angel’s visit to Marisol, a tightly choreo¬
graphed episode passionately enacted by Randolph
and Espinosa, which has the feel of a fever dream;
Cynthia Caquelin (Faith Healer's Grace) as a society
matron on a rampage, calling street people credit
risks; David Kwiat, in a 180-degree turn from his
role in Faith Healer, as Lenny, whose sinister mania
conjured for me the perverse image of Dustin Hoff¬
man’s autistic Rain Man character on steroids; and a
moving, revelatory performance by Chaz Mena as
the Man With Scar Tissue, a homeless person
burned by skinheads. Mena brings remarkable
humanity to this character, who could be the invisi¬
ble, disenfranchised street person many of us pass
daily.
Guerra, New World Rep Company’s artistic direc¬
tor, made an inspired decision in pairing the chal¬
lenging Marisol with the far more subtle Faith
Healer for the company’s debut. The cultural back¬
grounds of the dramas contrast cleverly; the unique
demands of each production showcase the com¬
pany’s formidable range of talent; casting some of
the same actors in each show highlights that range
even further. New World Rep promises to be an
awesome addition to South Florida’s professional
theater scene. CD
New Rep on
the Block
By Pamela Gordon
Like the veteran gambler who frequents the race¬
track or the casino in the hope of this time hitting it
big, seasoned theatergoers return to the theater
faithfully anticipating a win. And every once in a
while, among the duds, the disappointments, and
the well-intended productions — even among the
energetic, the very good, and the excellent shows —
there is an evening that transcends all others. The
New World Rep Company’s rendition of Brian
Friel’s magnificent Faith Healer provides one of those
exceptional, not-to-be-missed evenings, and marks
an auspicious beginning for New World Rep, a pro¬
fessional company that debuted in downtown Miami
three weeks ago. (The drama plays in repertory
through this weekend with José Rivera’s Marisol,
reviewed below.)
Brian Friel, one of Ireland’s premier dramatists,
built a repertoire over the past 30 years that includes
Philadelphia, Here I Come!, Translations, and the
Tony Award-winning Dancing at Lughnasa. Sharing
the themes of communication, memory, identity,
and exile with his other plays, Faith Healer, written
in 1979, also explores the ordeal of being an artist
blessed with a talent that is both an inspiration and
an affliction.
The drama consists of four monologues delivered
by three characters, none of whom appear on stage
at the same time. This deceptively simple structure
allows Frank, an itinerant healer who is part con
man-part miracle worker, to speak first, followed by
his wife, Grace, his manager, Teddy, and then Frank
again. In rich, anecdotal language that shifts seam¬
lessly from memory to self-delusion to confession,
each monologue offers different recollections of the
same events during the trio’s twenty-year relation¬
ship. Traveling the back roads of Scotland and
Wales in a van, they bring one-night “performances”
of Frank’s healing powers — which sometimes
work for him but just as often fail him — to the
blind, the crippled, the rejected, and the maimed. By
the final monologue, an exquisitely textured tableau
of a complex life together emerges — a life, as
Frank describes it, “always balanced somewhere
between the absurd and the momentous.”
I was not surprised to read in the pro¬
gram that Friel published short stories
early in his career. Combining the poetry
and potency of Celtic names, keenly
observed details about people and
places, and numerous other details left
to the imagination, Friel’s writing in
Faith Healer taps into the Irish flair for
storytelling while achieving what great
fiction does best — disclosing its charac¬
ters’ inner lives. Yet no one would mis¬
take the play for prose. Friel undeniably
has conceived the work for the stage,
and reaches dramatic heights through
distinct voices and a purposefully crafted layering of
information. Patrice Bailey honors the playwright’s
haunting and poignant script with cautiously paced
direction that allows the mesmerizing language and
the characters’ pain to resonate fully. And she elicits
stirring, memorable performances from each actor.
As Grace, Cynthia Caquelin begins a bit on the
self-consciously earnest side, and her alleged Irish
accent, wavering between uneven and nonexistent,
proves initially distracting. But the characterization
builds until Caquelin the actress fades, and the enig¬
matic, contradictory Grace appears — fiercely intel¬
ligent, dependent, tenacious, rebellious, ironic,
devoted — to close act one on a stunning emotional
note. David Kwiat balances com¬
edy, compassion, and integrity in
his heartbreaking portrayal of
the all-forgiving manager-servant
Teddy, who sees Grace and
Frank’s relationship more clearly
than the couple itself does, even
as he grapples with his own feel¬
ings for each of them. And
Andrew Noble delivers a noth-
ing-short-of-remarkable perfor¬
mance as Frank. Although the
faith healer finds himself bur¬
dened by a gift he neither under¬
stands nor seems able to control,
Noble the actor is in full posses¬
sion of his powers, infusing his
character with equal measures of
cruelty, selfishness, self-pity,
pain, and charm.
While Jeff Quinn’s sparse set
— consisting of a banner, a plat¬
form, and several chairs — and
subdued yet evocative lighting
evoke lonely rural byways and
shabby bed-sitters, a mere review
cannot begin to transmit the
power of Friel’s language in a live
setting. Do not miss this chance
to see an excellent production of
this playwright’s fine work.
On the other side of the world
from Faith Healer’s small-town
Britain, New York City pulses as a war-tom battle¬
field, a place where disaffected angels have
descended from Heaven in order to lead a rebellion
against God. Termed by some critics as magical-
realist, Puerto Rican-born José Rivera’s Marisol is
more accurately described as an apocalyptic passion
play, at the center of which lies the fall, the suffer¬
ing, and the re-education of the title character.
Marisol Perez (Micha Espinosa), a Puerto Rican-
born copy editor, aspires to a form of the American
dream by donning trench coat and high heels every
morning and riding the subway from the run-down
South Bronx to a steady job in Manhattan. Protected
partially by a veneer of job security and partially by
the efforts of a guardian angel, Marisol has steered
clear of New York’s street culture — the menagerie
of homeless people, psychotics, and bullies whose
paths most city dwellers attempt to avoid. On the
eve of the heavenly rebellion, however, Marisol’s
guardian angel Games Samuel Randolph) visits to
say he’s withdrawing his talismanic powers because
he’s needed to fight the good fight — from now on,
Marisol must make it on her own. By the next morn¬
ing the violence simmering just below the city’s sur¬
face starts to erupt, and Marisol’s life on the street
begins.
Although it operates as something of a parody of
Tony Kushner’sAwge/s in America and something of
a catholicized take on the lawless urban landscape
portrayed in the Ridley Scott movie Blade Runner,
Rivera’s violent vision of absurdist modern life
remains very much his own. Feminism, outrage at
the conditions under which poor people live, a cri¬
tique of yuppie culture, and the condemnation of
Friel reaches dramatic
heights through distinct voices
and a purposefully crafted
layering of information.
â–² Optical
delusion; In Faith
Healer, the three
actors never
appear together
on-stage
Faith Healer.
Written by Brian
Friel; directed by
Patrice Bailey;
with Andrew
Noble, Cynthia
Caquelin, and
David Kwiat.
Through July 2.
Marisol.
Written by José
Rivera; directed
by Jorge Guerra;
with Micha
Espinosa, James
Samuel Randolph,
and Chaz Mena.
Through July 1.
For further
information on
both productions,
call 237-3541 or
see “Calendar
Listings".
June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 67


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Page 68 New Times
June 29 —JuIy 5, 1995


Linguine Roast
By Jen Karetnick
The past few years’ influx of New York chef-owners
and New York customers brought New York prices
to Miami eateries. Miami-born restaurants followed
suit, charging in excess of twenty bucks for a single
entrée. And it only took a major recession and some
very empty restaurants to prove South Florida
salaries weren’t up to the uppage.
Lately, though, it looks as if local restaurateurs
have finally divined what Dade’s dining public really
wants: fancy fare in less formal dining rooms. Quan¬
tity as well as quality. Sophistication without pricey
pretension. Hence the remodeling of North Miami
Beach’s stuffy Chez Philippe into comfy Philippe’s
Café. The bargain of the prix-fixe menu at Brasserie
L’Entrecote in Coconut Grove. The success of South
Beach’s Nemo, where portions are plentiful and the
model-watching is fine.
So I was shocked to find that the revamped Casa
Rolandi. whose ownership has been taken over by the
Tula Group (owners of the Italian restaurant Tula in
Coconut Grove), was charging $22.50 for risotto al
radicchio. For those readers whose Italian is a little
rusty, I’ll translate the name of that dish, which was a
special on the night of my visit: rice with lettuce.
Then again, only two out of Rolandi’s she appetizers
sell for under ten dollars. And a mere two out of four¬
teen main courses go for less than twenty. Knowing
the tally from the outset, I suppose I’d still have
paid it gladly if the food and service had been
outstanding.
Needless to say, they weren’t.
Though the restaurant wasn’t busy, twenty min¬
utes elapsed before our waiter even bothered to
greet us; he proceeded to disappear for long intervals
throughout the meal. His lack of interest in his job
abated only when we seemed likely to order the
most expensive items on the menu.
"How’s the quail?” I asked. (Almost 25 smackers.)
“Oh, excellent,” he beamed.
Another twenty minutes later, he was back. The
restaurant had no quail. I requested the menu.
‘Try the duck,” he said, instead of complying.
(Same price tag, natch.) I requested the menu again.
He brought it, reluctantly. Though I wound up order¬
ing pasta (half the price), I got charged for the quail.
The waiter’s laxness was matched by the restau¬
rant’s general lack of direction. I can’t imagine, for
instance, why an Italian eatery would serve pita
bread — unless it ran out of a more appropriate
starch and borrowed some from Vakhos, its Greek
neighbor across the street Yet there it was, hot from
the oven, puffed up like a blowfish, brushed with
olive oil, and flanked by packaged Italian bread
sticks.
We used the pita to scoop up a garlicky, brothy
tomato sauce in which a dozen or so clams had been
poached. Small but plump, the shellfish were tasty,
as was the tangy marinara. Two of the clams were
closed tight, however, signifying that they were dead
before they’d been cooked and shouldn’t be eaten.
This happens at seafood shacks. But Casa Rolandi is
no seafood shack.
An appetizer of smoked chicken sausage pre¬
sented Asian flavors, an odd pairing with the very
Mediterranean clam zuppa. One commercial-tasting
sausage, red as an Oscar Mayer wiener,
had been grilled and split in half length¬
wise, then dressed with slices of tough,
skin-on apples instead of the apple sauce
promised on the menu. A garnish of rub¬
bery shiitake mushrooms was similarly
detrimental. Another starter, sliced sir¬
loin steak resting on a bed of chopped
arugula, was unwarrantedly generous,
given the poor quality of the meat Gristly
beef, sharp with too much balsamic vine¬
gar, was topped with spiny, improperly
steamed sun-dried tomatoes.
A long pause between courses left us
plenty of time to dread the upcoming
entrées. It’s a good thing we prepared
ourselves. Baked leg of lamb, the worst of
the lot, brought back memories of the
countless overdone pot roasts I’ve had to
gnaw on at Passover seders. The slice of
meat was arid and chewy, stuffed with
minced spinach, and smothered in an
onion-heavy vegetable-and-wine sauce.
Shaped into a sphere the size of a matzo
ball, a polenta side dish had good flavor
but was dense enough to displace its
weight in water.
Tortelloni Casa Rolandi brought us
from Mesopotamia back to the Mediter¬
ranean — sort of. Five large dumplings,
folded over like won tons, were filled with
fontina cheese. Though a glossy truffle
demiglace accented the mild stuffing and
al dente wrapping perfectly, the cheese
had a tendency to congeal as the tortel¬
loni cooled, which it did rapidly. A bowl of
penne didn’t have this difficulty — the
amount of oil that lubricated these noodles would
have kept the Tin Man break dancing all the way to
the Emerald City. Tossed with garlic, canned tuna,
and fresh green broccoli, the pasta was passable if a
bit slippery. Any thought of packaging hard-to-spear
leftovers to take home, however, was extinguished
when the waiter threw crumpled bread-stick wrap¬
pers into the bowl before he removed it from the
table.
Cellophane notwithstanding, we wouldn’t have
wanted to take dolphin in a creamy curry sauce any¬
where. The trip from plate to mouth was difficult
enough. The fish, a special that evening, was lacking
in both flavor and expertise of preparation. It wasn’t
about to be redeemed by a medicinal yellow curry
dressing whose bitterness was hardly tempered by
an abundant supply of cream. A side dish of over¬
cooked summer squash and carrots didn’t represent
any improvement
The restaurant had little to offer by way of
dessert. A black-and-white chocolate
mousse cake sounded appealing. Wrong
again. A slice of all-black (no white) choco¬
late cake was old and crumbly, not moist
and rich. An appropriately past-its-prime
end to the meal.
Recessed murals, wood-trimmed walls, a
ceiling beamed with tree trunks, and pat¬
terned banquettes make Casa Rolandi a
handsome place to dine. Prospective cus¬
tomers might be drawn in by such promising sur¬
roundings, as well as by the change of management,
heralded in advertisements. But exorbitant prices,
indifferent service, and sloppy execution will cer¬
tainly temper any enthusiasm the public has redis¬
covered for this Coral Gables establishment.
Side Dish
Where there’s smoke, there ain’t always fire.
Last summer, South Beach’s Bang was wet wood,
trying to overcome a debilitating nightclub image
and regain its popularity as a romantic dining spot.
Enter award-winning chef Robbin Haas — whose
high-profile, New World skills have been the kin¬
How's the quail?” I asked.
(Almost 25 smackers.) “Oh,
excellent,” he beamed.
dling that renewed Bang’s explosive potential.
A year later, Haas, who was made part owner when
he joined the establishment, is giving up his Bang
shares to combine forces with fellow chef-restaura¬
teur Mark Miller, a long-time friend. Miller, who
gained national attention for his Coyote Cafe restau¬
rants and his cookbooks that feature Southwestern
cuisine, operates the renowned Red Sage restaurant
in Washington, D.C., in addition to numerous other
enterprises. After touring Asia for six weeks,
researching cooking techniques and flavors, Miller
and Haas will return to practice new recipes at Red
Sage in preparation for the opening of Miller’s com¬
pany’s latest concept; Raku, an Asian diner (three of
which will debut in D.C. by the spring of next year.
Then they’ll be off to San Francisco’s Ghirardelli
Square, where in the summer of 1997 they will open
what Miller calls a “huge modem Asian bistro.”
Still nameless, the bilevel restaurant, which is
housed in a tum-of-the century restaurant overlook¬
ing the bay, will feature 40-foot ceilings, brick walls,
and gallery-quality lacquerware. “Robbin knows
what he’s getting into, and I know what I’m getting,”
an optimistic Miller says by phone from his corpo¬
rate headquarters in the nation’s capital.
Although Haas says he’s looking forward to his
new challenges, his departure is tinged with some
regret. “Miami has been more than beneficial for
me,” he notes. “It’s been benevolent”
No doubt some of that bittersweetness will be
wiped out by the spicy fare chef Scott Howard of
Lure is cooking for Haas’s farewell dinner at the end
of this month. Culinary luminaries on the guest list
include Oliver Saucy, Mark Militello, Allen Susser,
and Norman Van Aken.
As for Bang, Haas says he and his staff, which will
stay on at least until a new chef is named, are devis¬
ing a simpler menu that will be executable without
his guidance. With accomplished chef and part-
owner Geoffrey Murray still in the biz. Bang may
well blaze again.
Suggestions? Write me at Hew Times, P.0. Box 011591,
Miami, FL, 33101-1591
Casa Rolandi
1930 Ponce de
Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 444-2187.
Lunch Nlonday-
Friday from noon
until 2:20; dinner
Sunday-
Thursday from
6:00 until 11:00
p.m., and until
midnight Friday
and Saturday.
Chicken sausage
$10.50
Tortelloni
$17.50
Leg of lamb
$22.50
Chocolate cake
$5.00
June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 69


(The Miami Herald)
Los Ranchos
Now Featuring
Our New
Lunch Express:
85.50
All Inclusive Lunch
(In Addition To Our Regular
Executive Lunch Menu)
Lunch Express 8-
Executive Lunch Menu
available Mon.-Fri. from
11:30am to 3:00pm.
'Salad, bread, main course w/rice
or gallo-pinto, fries or plantains
and a soda drink of your choice.
5 LOCATIONS IN DADE:
Bayside Market Place:
375-8188
Kendall-Town £> Country
Center: 596-5353
Sweetwater-Holiday Plaza:
221-9367
The Falls Shopping Center:
238-6867
NOW IN
Coral Gables: 446-0050
•GRILL*
Grilled Yellowtail
Stuffed with Spinach, covered in
a white wine cream sauce.
15% off dinner with this ad.
3841 Bird Road • 443-3474
MANAGER’S TREAT
DINNER
FOR TWO
ONLY 128.50
I NT
“I’d like to invite you to an incredible dinner
for two, prepared hibachi style right
at your table, for just $28.50! THE JRPM1E5E STERKHOUSE
Your meal will include a shrimp appetizer, the
traditional Benihana healthy salad, Teriyaki Beef
Julienne cooked with scallions and mushrooms,
chicken with sesame seeds, Japanese onion soup,
Hibachi chicken fried rice and freshly cut
vegetables. All served with the ultimate
companions to a great meal, ice cream and green
tea. So bring my ad for the food, the fun
and the fantastic price.
It’s my treat”
Willy Horigome, Manager
Miami North Bay Village on the 79th Street Causeway 866-2768.
Kendall 8727 South Dixie Highway 665-0044
Miami & Kendall open for Sunday lunch. Rocky Aoki’s Sushi Palace at both restaurants.
Offer valid through July 31, 1995, Sunday through Thursday only.
Present this coupon when ordering. Not valid with any other promotional offers
Cafe
D
ining
Suit
le
The following restaurants are recommended by the
New Times food critic. Please call in advance for
operating hours, reservations, and other specific
information.
Price Guide
(based on a complete meal for one, excluding tip and
alcoholic beverages)
Inexpensive, less than $15: $
Moderate, $15 to $30: $$
Expensive, more than $30: $$$
North Dade: Mainland and causeways, north of
N 36th Street excluding the areas covered under
West-Dade-Hialeah (see below).
North Beaches: All beachside communities north of
Dade Boulevard in Miami Beach.
South Beach: Miami Beach south of Dade
Boulevard.
Miami-Central Dade: Mainland east of SR 826, from N
36th Street south to Miller Road.
West Dade-Hialeah: Hialeah and adjacent municipali¬
ties (Hialeah Gardens, Opa-locka, Medley, Miami
Springs), as well as everything west of SR 826 from
Okeechobee Road south to Miller Road.
Coconut GroveKey Biscayne: Key Biscayne proper
and everything in the City of Miami east of U.S. 1
and south of the Rickenbacker Causeway.
Coral Gables: Everything within the Coral Gables
city limits.
South MiamHtendall-South Dade: South Miami proper,
and everything south of Miller Road.
North Dade
The Bar-B4)4am 11705 NW 7th Ave; 681-2491. An air-
conditioned, carpeted fern-bar rendition of a barbecue
shack. You got your spare ribs, your baby back ribs,
your sliced-to-order barbecue turkey, beef, and ham,
plus the lean and mean combination plates. Lunch
and dinner. $
Basifique Cafe 18640 NW 67th Ave; 6234)096. Johnson
& Wales grad Ralph Salvador and chef-partner PJ.
Flaherty put their best knives forward at this
reasonably priced Mediterranean eatery in Miami
Lakes. Though some of the fare seems experimental
and uneven, you can certainly count on a hefty, four-
cheese focaccia for starters and a pungent rigatoni
rusticcio with sausage, roasted peppers, onions, sun-
dried tomatoes, and gorgonzola and mozzarella
cheeses for an entrée. Desserts are more than reliable
— they’re delicious. Lunch and dinner; closed
Tuesday. $$
The Burrito Place 2120123rd St; 8954)501. As the name
implies, burritos are the specialty of the house, along
with pepitos (sandwiches) and quesadillas. Try the
roast pork loin with sauteed onions and peppers, or
the shredded chicken with beans and rice. If you have
an eyes-on-the-thighs philosophy, go for the fresh leaf
spinach and mushroom burrito, stir-fried with garlic
and folded in an oversize flour tortilla with black
beans, white rice, salsa, a sprinkle of cheese, and
guacamole, served with nonfat yogurt on the side.
Wash it down with a Dos Equis special lager — at
least it looks light Lunch, dinner, and delivery. $
Chef Allen's 19088 NE 29th Ave; 935-2900. Since
opening in 1986 this unique restaurant has dominated
the New World scene. These days innovative chef-
owner Allen Susser continues to cater to his
community’s fine-dining needs. Ajames Beard
Award-winning chef he prepares the finest fish in
Miami, particularly whole yellowtail smothered in a
coconut-milk-and-curry sauce. Caribbean antipasto,
featuring tamarind-barbecue shrimp and jerk
calamari, is a fiesta of fire; swordfish, dotted with sun-
dried fruit confit, is moist and meaty. Nightly soufflés,
prepared by Michele Kutas, range from lemon-
blackberry to chocolate-brownie and are an
exceptional end to an outstanding meal. $$$
Cool Beans Café 12573 Biscayne Blvd; 899-8815.
Bananas Foster. Spiced Jamaican rum. Cherries
jubilee. As flavors for coffee, these are cool beans,
indeed. Salads and sandwiches are also worth a look
at this cozy, arty coffee-and-wine bar, as are desserts.
Also try a cup of the house specialty, beanoccino —
made with chocolate and coconut flavors. Lunch and
dinner. $
Gourmet Diner 13951 Biscayne Blvd; 947-2255. Cheap
in price but not in quality, this North Miami Beach
institution serves some of the best French-roots
cuisine in Dade. Steamed artichoke served chilled
with a fabulous pink vinaigrette makes a simple but
satisfying appetizer; snails are succulent in butter.
garlic, and a powerful portion of white wine; and loin
of lamb encrusted with herbs is served rare and juicy.
House-made desserts are popular — you’d better
reserve a piece of that custard fruit tart before digging
in to your seafood au gratín. Lunch, dinner, and
weekend breakfast Cash only. $
Hiro Japanese Restaurant and Sushi & Yakitori Bar 3007
NE 163rd St 948-3687. Soothing jazz soundtracks and
late-night hours (till 3:00 a.m.) make Hiro appealing
for cocktail-hour snacks and after-movie munchies;
but grilled yakitori and fresh sushi rolls are appropri¬
ate for mealtimes, too. Don't pass up the spider roll
(made with softshell crab) or the salmon, scallion, and
cream cheese roll, a creamy delicacy designed to
make you crave more. Lunch and dinner. $$
II Piccolo Diner 2112 NE 123rd St 89345538. Dress
casually for this homestyle happening, where locals in
Lycra workout wear go to exercise their appetites for
Italian cuisine. But don’t expect heavy food — the
chef/owners have a wonderfully light touch with
everything from chicken with a cognac-mushroom
sauce and veal marsala to eggplant parmigiana and
baked ziti. Even desserts, such as the outstanding
white chocolate mousse cake, seem like they have
more fluff, less fat. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Kebab 514 NE 167th St; 9436309. Well, kebabs aren’t
all Middle Eastern, as this lovély Indian restaurant
proves. Your skewer can be ordered with lamb
chunks, minced lamb, or chicken — each resting atop
a mound of basmati rice. Among the more traditional
Indian dishes, the chicken tikka and butter chicken
are spectacularly fragrant, as are the lamb curries,
including a Madras sauce that sings with spice and
vegetable flavor. Rice biryanis are also a plus here.
Among desserts, the best is gulab jamun — sweet
pastry in rosewater syrup. Service is attentive. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Mark's Place 2286 NE 123rd St; 8936888. Named one
of the fifty best restaurants in the nation and a
recipient of the Distinguished Restaurant Award from
Condé Nast Traveler, chef/owner Mark Militello’s
upscale establishment has placed Miami on the fancy
food map. A nominee at the James Beard Awards,
Militello has garnered top praise for his startlingly
inventive cuisine—pappardelle with grilled rabbit, for
example, or pan roasted pheasant with black truffles
and braised swiss chard. The menu changes daily, but
count on its being both exquisite and extensive. And
dessert, dessert dessert! Lunch and dinner. $$$
Mike Gordon 1201 NE 79th Sf 751-4429. You can tell by
looking in the fish tanks: There’s no fresher seafood
in town. In this institution, black grouper—fried or
broiled — acquires legendary status. Lobster with
drawn butter has never tasted so sweet and crab
dishes are also wonderful. If there’s room at the end,
the mountainous key lime pie is a treat Overlooks
beautiful Biscayne Bay. Lunch and dinner. $$
Neal's 2570 NE Miami Gardens Dr; 9338333.
Husband-and-wife team Neal Cooper and Mary Mass-
Cooper run this charming, 70-seat Aventura eatery.
Entrees—such as fillet of salmon served over
mashed potatoes, or the inches-thick pork chop with
spiced apples—are mouth-watering and reasonably
priced. Asian influences add a touch of reinvention to
duck and stuffed pasta dishes; Italian notes abound in
the grilled vegetable-goat cheese pizza and
homemade focaccia. Dusted with 24-karat gold dust,
Almond Roca chocolate surprise is a dessert worth its
weight in, well gold. $$
Peking Noodle Gourmet Chinese Restaurant 3207 NE
163rd St; 9539999. Lost arts are Peking’s specialty:
Watch owner Ken Chan twist and pull a lump of
dough into a graceful skein of noodles, then order
them for dinner. For dessert, the crushed lotus seed
pancake is just sweet enough, as is the service. Closed
Monday. $$
Sara's Dairy and Vegetarian 2214 NE 123rd St; 891-3312.
(Also 1127 NE 163rd St; 9437777.) An orthodox pizza
parlor, Sara’s also offers some of the most authentic
middle-Eastem and home-cooked Jewish fare in
Miami. Hummus and falafel, stuffed cabbage and
mushroom barley soup have two things in common:
they’re meat-free, and they're fantastic.
Complimentary egg bread with entrees is a challah of
a good time. Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Siam River 3455 NE 163rd St 9438079. If you don’t
mind leisure, then vacation at the River. Though
service can be slow, the traditional Thai cuisine is
freshly prepared and a good choice if you’re in the
neighborhood. Start with the tiger tear, a marinated
cold beef dish made warm by spice. Different levels of
spiciness can be ordered for any dish (category four is
recommended “for mad Thai people only”). The
ginger beef is aromatic enough without the boost as
is the filling chicken asparagus. For drama, try the
“stand-up” chicken — it’s a literal interpretation.
Lunch Monday through Saturday. $
Tani Guchi’s Place 2224 NE 123rd St 892-6744. What
this tiny husband-and-wife restaurant lacks in space, it
makes up for in taste. A dazzling array of Japanese
dishes is offered, both raw and cooked. Grilled tofu
with peanut miso sauce and steamed broccoli with
shiitake mushrooms and mustard sauce are pure
June 29-July 5, 1995
Page 70 New Times


pleasure; yaki-soba and yaki-udon are more traditional
offerings. $
Thai House II2250 NE 163rd St; 940-6075. Elegance is
the keyword here. Carved wood and sophisticated
furnishings show Thai food to great advantage. Whole
fried snapper in red-hot chili pepper sauce is a
specialty, as is the sweet chicken made with honey,
scallions, and ginger. Appetizers are all worthwhile,
especially the egg roll and beef satay. The duck
dishes are more intricately complicated than anyone
would think possible. Lunch and dinner. $
Tivoli Restaurant 3439 NE 163rd St; 945-7080. Not
much truly Danish cuisine here, despite the name
(derived from a famous Copenhagen landmark); but
classic contintental dishes are well prepared and the
hopitality is first-rate. Standouts include a juicy and
flavorful duck with apple-and-chutney sauce, and a
sublime red snapper in pastry. Save room for dessert
— there are dozens to choose from. $$
Unicorn Village Restaurant 3595 NE 207th St; 933-8829.
Not only healthy but politically correct, too. Try the
dolphin-safe tongol tuna tossed with canola mayo or
substitute soy cheese on that tempting Jamaican
pizza. Aside from the regular menu, fresh seafood
such as the coconut-crusted grouper is worth
investigation. Lunch and dinner. $
Wong's Shanghai 12420 Biscayne Blvd; 8914313.
Szechuan dishes are some of the high points of this
famous Chinese haven, still one of the best despite the
passage of time. Among appetizers, the best
unquestionably are tender dumplings laden with
ginger and swimming in a light soy broth. Simple
things such as fried rice can surprise one by the high
quality of preparation. Reliable service of the speedy
kind. Lunch and dinner. $
North Beaqhes
Arnie and Richie's 525 41st St; 531-7691. As you walk in,
you know you’re in deli heaven: Fresh cuts of smoked
fish, ham, salami, roast beef cheese, and other
favorites line the refrigerated display case.
Sandwiches are hard to beat here; there’s no better
pastrami on rye anywhere. Knishes also excel.
Breakfast, lunch, and early dinner. $
Café Avanti 732 41st St; 538-4400. Pleasant Northern
Italian restaurant with a number of French nuances.
Start with soups as good as their pretty names
promise; minestrone Genovese, tortellini in brodc, or
zuppa maitata. The shrrimp “fra diavolo” is spunky;
the veal dishes are exquisite and you won’t have to
take out a second mortgage to pay the check. Cuisine
is classical, but with a flair — and the chef has a
penchant for Pernod (notably with pears, as a grand
finale). $$
Café Gisela 1009 Kane Concourse; 861-8166. Don’t
waste your time on the all-American hot dog, or any of
the other American foods here. Check out the
cevapcici at this Eastern European café, or do your
worst to the bratwurst — don’t worry, it won’t bite
back. Homemade goulash is also good, but watch out
for the oven-fresh apple strudel — it sometimes runs
hot, but mostly it’s cold. Lunch and dinner. $
Cafe Prima Pasta 414 71st St; 867-0106. One of the best
pasta cafés in town. Eat here for fine handmade
pasta at fine-with-everybody prices. Coarsely chopped
fresh tomato sauces are especially good. But be
prepared to mill about on the sidewalk for a while —
this establishment always has a wait. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Cafe Ragazzi 9500 Harding Ave; 866-4495. The
fascination with tiny trattorias continues, judging by
the business at this 40-seater. Though the service is
warm and personable, homemade bread, a decent
house wine, and a pleasant selection of Italian meat
and fish staples, such as osso buco and salmon with
sautéed radicchio and grapes, are the real draws. You
can eat your fill without padding the bill, especially if
you stick to wonderful baked pastas such as spinach-
and-cheese cannelloni and meaty lasagna. Daily
specials can be misleadingly pricey, so be sure to ask
before ordering — credit cards aren’t accepted
(neither are reservations). Lunch and dinner. $$
Coco's Sidewalk Café 9700 Collins Ave; 864-2626. The
best thing about Coco’s is that it’s outdoors —
ultimate people-watching atmosphere. But the food, if
high-tab, isn’t bad. Of the appetizers, the fried
zucchini with horseradish is infinitely better than the
famous mozzarella marinara. For sandwich-seekers,
the croque mademoiselle and roast beef are
recommended. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$
Crystal Cafe 726 41st St; 673-8266. A dressed-up
Gourmet Diner. Lovingly prepared Continental
cuisine bears a touch of reinvention — chef-owner
Klime Kovaceski has lightened up traditionally heavy
recipes and eased up on prices. Osso buco is a
fantastic bargain, pink veal falling away in tender
hunks from the eye of bone. Served on herb-specked
and paprika-dusted plates, penne with plump shimp
bears testimony to the quality of ingredients; chicken
paprikash is a tangy version of an old favorite. Lunch
June 29-July 5, 1995
and dinner. $$
Dominique's 5225 Collins Ave; 865-6500. The famous
lamb chops — marinated and cooked to poetic
perfection — raise the status of Dominique’s to near¬
legendary, which is unfair. If you’re adventurous, you
should tiy the alligator, rattlesnake, or buffalo dishes
that have become part of the lore. Desserts are
memorable, with soufflés from chocolate to pistachio.
Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $$$
Kamon Japanese Restaurant 4441 Collins Ave;
538-0050. Tired of teriyaki? C’mon to Kamon. Sushi
and other authentic Japanese fare, such as somen
noodles on ice, are a refreshing end to a hot day. Or
try the filet mignon, grilled on a hot stone at your
table and served with three steak sauces—none of
them teriyaki. $$
La Famiglia 2445 Collins Ave; 534-7111. Located in the
refurbished Traymore Hotel, this ballroom-size
restaurant is a stunner in more ways than one. Try the
clam appetizer, with bivalves steamed in an
intoxicating broth of champagne, shallots, green
peppers, and herbs, or the pasta e fagioli, which is
among the best in town. This continental menu leans
heavily toward Italian, and vitello Sinatra will light up
your ol’ eyes, no matter what color they are. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Oggi Caffé and Deli 1740 79th St Cswy; 866-1238. (Also
in South Beach.) Expanded seating now allows for
more diners and greater comfort at this 70-odd-seat
restaurant and deli in the White Star Center.
Fettuccine, agnolotti, penne, and spaghetti are all
handmade; the tortelloni bicolore, stuffed with sun-
dried tomatoes and ricotta, is the prince of the pile.
Homemade desserts deserve devouring. Lunch and
dinner. $
Pasta Tango Tratoria 7904 West Dr; 756-5885. The third
point on an almost geographically straight line, this
from-scratch pizza-and-pasta café joins distinguished
trend setters Oggi Caffé and Cafe Prima Pasta. But at
Tango, there’s no wait (at least not yet).
Distinguishing features, aside from the delicious
cheese-and-herb bread, fugazza pizza, and whole¬
wheat linguine, include the Argentine-style free-range
grilled items, of which a half chicken marinated in
lemon sauce is particularly memorable. A list of
Chilean and Argentinean wines will complement your
meal, a slice of homemade tiramisu will cap it. Lunch
and dinner. $
The Rascal House 17190 Collins Ave; 9474581. A
labyrinthine deli, but surely one of the best. The menu
is a trip through all the glories of Jewish fare: chopped
liver with shmaltz; herring; smoked fish; Reuben,
corned beef, and pastrami sandwiches; huge potato
latkes with sour cream; brisket of beef; borscht.. .you
get the picture. Atmosphere is frantic but alive and
infectiously buoyant Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $
Salty's 10880 Collins Ave; 945-6065. A maze of elegant
rooms with large, lively deck for cocktails, sunset
viewing, and al fresco dining. The menu is a
combination of continental and Key West-style
seafood preparations. The coconut shrimp is not to be
missed and three renditions of snapper should appeal
to all tastes; French-style; topped with a multifruit
sauce, brandy, and almonds; and baked with a paste of
butter, chablis, oregano, and garlic. Lunch, dinner,
and Sunday brunch. $
Sea Gate 7300 Ocean Terr; 8654940. At this dine-in,
dine-out spot in the Olson Hotel (off 73rd Street), salt-
air sensations are served in a laid-back,
unpremeditatedly funky setting. Whether it’s finger
food, ceviche, burgers, grilled catch of the day, baby
back ribs, or steak, you won’t leave the beach hungry.
In fact, the Gate might even become your favorite
place to avoid the hordes while strapping on the ol’
feed bag. Lunch and dinner. $
Treffpunkt Biergarten 18090 Collins Ave; 933-3942.
Don’t trust what you read on the menu here —
descriptions are frequently a little off—but do trust
the kitchen to turn out German and continental
masterpieces such as chopped steak served in a
skillet with crisp home fries and bread pudding; and a
Bavarian platter for two, a feast of sausages and
smoked pork loin. Wash it down with Oktoberfest
dark beer, a beverage that packs a nine percent
alcohol wallop no matter what the season. $
Tutto Matto 17000 Collins Ave; 945-0765. The sister
restaurant to South Beach’s i Papparazzi is no twin,
but there is a family resemblance. A wide-ranging
menu includes good pasta dishes, meats, fowl, and
fishes. Homemade bread and desserts are Sunny Isles
standouts. Lunch and dinner. $$
South Beach
A Fish Called Avalon 700 Ocean Dr; 532-1727. This sleek
South Beach eatery, located in the refurbished Avalon
Hotel, combines minimalist décor with top-notch
cuisine. The menu changes daily, but the choices
consistently reflect the essence of South Florida fare
— fresh local seafood shown off to its best advantage
with fresh local fruits and vegetables. Any catch of the
CELEBRATE
THE BISTRO
REVOLUTION!
This month, France and America both mark their in
- the US on July 4 and France on July 14, Bastille Day.
In honor of the occasion, Cafes and Bistros all over South Florida
are celebrating French-American friendship with Independence
Day/Bastille Day menus, French wines by-the-glass, special din¬
ners and other surprises. Some of your favorite French wines,
cheeses and foods will be featured, and perhaps some that|
are new to you.
So go ahead, show your independence. Improve your French at|
any of these outstanding restaurants from July 1-14. Call indi¬
vidual restaurants for further details.
MIAMI AREA
Norma's
646 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach
532-2809
The Melting Pot
9835 SW 72nd St.
Miami
279-8816
Chef Allen's
19088 NE 29th Ave.
Aventura
935-2900
Biscayne Wine
Merchants & Bistro
738 NE 125th St.
N. Miami
899-1997
Gourmet Diner
13951 Biscayne Blvd
N. Miami
947-2255
Le Bouchon du Grove
3430 Main Hwy.
Coconut Grove
448-6060
Gourmet Cafe
1300 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach
673-8803
Harpoon Mickey's
Cleavlender Hotel
1020 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach
672-7388
L'Entrecote de Paris
413 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
673-1002
Royal Palm Court
Hotel Intercontinental
100 Chopin Plaza
Miami
372^4408
Dominique's
The Alexander Hotel
5225 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach
865-6500
DEERFIELD BEACH/BOCA RATON AREA
Cafe Claude
1544 SE 3rd Ct.
Deerfield Beach
(305) 421-7337
Gazebo Cafe
4199 N. Federal Hwy.
Boca Raton
(407) 395-6033
Cafe Gloria
â– 855 S. Federal Hwy.
Boca Raton
(407) 338-9692
Bistro Zenith
3011 Yamato Rd.
Boca Raton
(407) 997-2570
Auberge Le Grillon
6900 N Federal Hwy.
Boca Raton
(407)997-6888
La Reserve
3115 NE 32nd Ave.
Ft.Lauderdale
(305) 563-6644
FT. LAUDERDALE AREA
Ireland's Inn
2220 N. Atlantic Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
(305) 565-6661
*7
Blue Goose Cafe
1491 N. Palm Ave.
Pembroke Pines
(305) 436-8677
FOOD AND WINES
FROM FRANCE
SOPEXA
New Times Page 71


“Sushi Price
Breakers”
$ 1 ^ Sushi
$2°° Handró ((s
HOUR CHOICE!
Lunch & Dinner
ASAKA
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20355 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura
(Promenade Shops next to Winn Dixie)
m-9331
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Mexican
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AUTHENTIC
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“ Best Fajitas”
-New Times,
Best of Miami ‘95
Lunch &• Dinner
1626 Pennsylvania Ave. Miami Beach
half blocks, of Lincoln Rd.673-0480
Do The Taco"!
Two Step j
CELEBRATING OUR 2ND BIRTHDAY
í SAN LOCO 1
235 14th St. South Beach
538-3009 J
day served with fruit relish and citrus beurre blanc is
bound to be delicious; likewise the winning combo of
cucumber-tomato and avocado salsas. Closed
Monday. $$
Allioli 1300 Ocean Dn 538-0553. It may be named after
a condiment but it takes its influences from a
continent. Serving Euro-Mediterranean cuisine, the
menu relies largely on traditional Spanish appetizers
and French and Italian entrees. Tapas like the bacalao
empanadillas are tasty starters; gazpacho is of the
Andalusian variety. The veal chop and boneless duck
are dependable main courses. Lunch and dinner. $$
Cafe Soieil 1233 Lincoln Rd; 672-3800. A respite from
the bustle of South Beach. Inventive Asian-influenced
French fare yields appetizers as disparate as
vegetarian nori rolls and a country páté plate, both of
which are delicious. Fish entrées, such as swordfish
with black-olive pesto, are as expertly prepared as
rack of lamb, rolled in crushed mint and grainy
mustard. Lunch and dinner. $$
Cafe Thai Bistro 1533 Washington Ave; 5314181. This
optimistic little restaurant raises the level of the local
ethnic market with some of the best basic Thai fare
around. Chef-owner Matida Apunikpinyo stirs up a
mean massaman curry and a zippy garlic squid. She
might even come out of the kitchen to make sure
you’re eating her noodles fast enough, while they’re
still hot and juicy. Don’t be afraid to prove her wrong
— if you order too much, the pad Thai and ba mee poo
(egg noodles with crab and ham) are good as cold
leftovers, too. Lunch and dinner. $
Casablanca 650 Ocean Dr; 534-9463. Dinner menu
changes every week and features a subtle take on
New World cuisine. Potato-crusted corbina and onion-
crusted Chilean salmon are two South American
fillets frequently showcased to great advantage.
Whitewater clams steamed in chardonnay, garlic,
capers, and tomatoes are a tangy starter, while
double-chocolate mousse is a rich, ice-creamlike
dessert Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $$
Century 150 Ocean Dr; 674-8855. This sleek, stylish yet
casual restaurant emphasizes light mouth-watering
cuisine, not attitude. While the décor is pre-
Colombian. the cuisine is up to the minute with
Oriental and Southwestern touches. Although
chicken, pasta, and occasionally turkey dishes are
also featured, the restaurant excels in its fish
treatments, such as Cajun mahi-mahi. Good sides
include wild rice, garlicky mashed potatoes, and
spunky black beans. Breakfast lunch, and dinner. $$
Charlotte's Chinese Kitchen 1403 Washington Ave;
672-8338. Cuisine is light and flavorful and the menu
extensive at this neighborhood Chinese restaurant.
Choose from Hong Kong or Szechuan specialties.
Especially tempting is the beef and green pepper chow
fun in black bean sauce; the honey-glazed walnut and
sautéed shrimp on a bed of shredded lettuce is a lull-
course meal, but try the appetizers anyway.
Vegetarian lettuce rolls are a must. Pork is plentiful in
the best-on-the-Beach eggrolls. Lunch and dinner
daily. $
Chrysanthemum 1248 Washington Ave; 531-5656.
Service is as elegant and pleasant as the Szechuan and
Pekingese cuisine at this sister to Thai Toni and
Toni’s Sushi Bar. Descended from Montreal and
previously in Fort Lauderdale, Chrysanthemum’s
reputation is well-deserved. Ravioli in sesame and
peanut butter sauce is a rich, delicious way to begin a
meal; chicken with crisp spinach and eggplant in
black Chinese vinaigrette are signature dishes that
shouldn’t be missed. $$
Dab Haus 852 Alton Rd; 534-9557. Deutschland is
definitely liber alies in this Austro-German cubbyhole
on the Beach. Five varieties of chicken, pork, and veal
schnitzels are available, each deliquescently sautéed
and served. Among the appetizers, the curry and veal
wurst platter is fine, as is the vampire-frightening
garlic soup. Sauerbraten and beef roulades, two
notable German specialties, are also wonderfully
authentic. Desserts are few, but the warm, apricot-
filled crepes — otherwise known as palatschinten —
are delightful. $
da Leo Trattoria 819 Lincoln Rd; 674-0350. A typical
pasta shop that gets a boost from its setting. The
inside is cramped, but this value-driven trattoria
features extensive outdoor seating in the middle of
the mall. Beef carpaccio is delicate and pungent;
simple bowls of noodles are cheap enough to start
your meal and deep enough to be your meal. Follow
up, if you have room, with veal Marsala, the best dish
the house has to offer. Homemade desserts are
especially good with a shot of expertly brewed
espresso.$
El Rancho Grande Mexican Restaurant 1626 Pennsylvania
Ave; 673-0480. As the flavor of the recently trendy
Lincoln Road region continues to mutate, this homey
Mexican cantina maintains its individuality. The
atmosphere is authentic, right down to the service,
which is often casual to the point of being nonexistent.
Fortunately, the guacamole alone is worth the effort of
stealing your own silverware from an adjacent table,
likewise, beef flautas, bean tostadas, chicken
taquitos, and more. Lunch and dinner. $
El Segundo Viajante 1676 Collins Ave: 534-2101. (Also in
Hialeah.) Formerly part of the La Carreta chain of
Cuban restaurants, El Segundo Viajante (the second
traveler) has gone solo, but not without retaining all
the elements that worked so well in the past, most
notably a wide range of great Cuban dishes'at
reasonable prices. This Collins Avenue hot spot is
tourist-friendly, printing its menu in English, Spanish,
French, and German. Closed only between 1:00 and
7:00 a.m. $
Embers 1661 Meridian Ave; 538-0997. An appropriate
addition to Lincoln Road, which is also experiencing a
rebfrth, this revival of a 1940s eatery takes several of
its recipes from the original restaurant including the
ones for French-style salad dressing, twice-baked
potatoes, and barbecue ribs. Not everything is a
reproduction, however. Chef David Sloane’s New
American creations gear the restaurant toward the
future, not the past while pastry chef David Schindel’s
red banana-Oreo cheesecake promises retro
satisfaction for newfangled tastes. $$
Escopazzo 1311 Washington Ave; 674-9450. Service
can be “a little crazy” in this minuscule 35-seat
establishment But the red snapper baked in a
balsamic bread shell is usually moist and flavorful,
and the came — free-range guinea breast and veal in
white wine and sage sauce, for example — could very
well save your sanity. $$
Fellini Restaurant 860 Washington Ave; 532-8984. A
standout among Beach trattorias, this modest
storefront eatery is geared toward locals. Sautéed
grouper with fresh spinach is a wonder of a pan-
seared fillet flavored with roasted garlic; strozzapretti
is gnocchi dough formed into long twists and dressed
in cream with a rainbow of shredded arugula,
tomatoes, zucchini, and fresh com. For dessert torta
di cioccolato is Italian for moist oven-hot brownie,
topped with whipped cream and berries. Service is
friendly and effective. $$
Larios on the Beach 820 Ocean Dr; 532-9577. Most of
the traditional favorites are offered in this festive
Cuban eatery. Shrimp creole and pork loin are two of
the recommendable items. Desserts are some of the
best around, including an extraordinary nee pudding
and a stellar mamey flan. Breakfast, iunch, and
dinner. $
News Café 800 Ocean Dr 538-6397. Munch cold cuts
and any of a dozen cheeses and sip your choice of
three fine wines by the glass, or while awav an entire
day with a bottle, listening to piped-in and piped-out
(to porch) jazz. Tahini salad with pita is tops, and the
gazpacho is great Look cool with a Euro mag from
the in-house newsstand (hence the name). Open 24
hours. $
Nick’s Miami Beach 300 Alton Rd; 673-3444. At 1000
seats, this venture is touted as the largest new
restaurant in the U.S. And the self-hvpe has been
nearly as monstrous as the eatery. But you wouldn’t
know it from either the personalized service or the
excellent cuisine. Whether you attempt a five-pound
Maine lobster or a 22-ounce porterhouse steak, your
experience at Nick’s is bound to be prime. $$$
Norma s on the Beach! 646 Lincoln Rd; 532-2809. An
offshoot of the internationally noted pair of
restaurants in Jamaica, Norma’s serves Caribbean
ingredients prepared with French flair. A brief menu
yields an intriguing smoked-marlin appetizer and a
feta-and-herb-encrusted lamb chop entrée; blackboard
offerings have included specialties such as West
Indian pumpkin soup and red snapper with a lime-
butter sauce. Golden mm cake provides a cocktail
and a dessert, after which you might want to sober up
with French-pressed Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee.
Lunch and dinner. $$
Osteria del Teatro 1443 Washington Ave; 538-7850.
Recipient of the 1993 Golden Spoon Award and
named one of the top 200 restaurants in the country
by Trend magazine, Osteria is one of Miami’s favorites
as well. National Chefs Award-winner Antonio
Tettamanzi has a delicate hand with fish, poaching
salmon to perfection and grilling tuna to a T. He also
creates such fabulous pasta dishes as pappardelle
sauteed with stone crab meat, sea scallops in the
shell, fresh tomatoes, and vodka cream sauce, and
linguine with mixed seafood baked in parchement
paper. Now you can enjoy these specialties from 6:00
to 7:30 p.m. at Twilight Pasta, the hippest early birder
on the beach. $$$
Pacific Time 915 Lincoln Rd; 534-5979. Chef and co¬
proprietor Jonathan Eismann stuns the New World
with his take on Pacific Rim cuisine. Florida Keys
grouper is enticing, served with sake, shallot, and
ginger and tempura-fried sweet potatoes. Freshwater
catfish, also in tempura batter, is stuffed with ginger
and served whole. Honey-roasted Chinese duck with
a fresh plum and plum wine sauce and supple Peking
pancakes are simply outstanding. Finally, pastry chef
Jennifer Warren’s chocolate bomb dessert is a baked-
to-order explosion that’s guaranteed to blow you
away. $$$
Pane Caldo Ristorante Italiano 1440 Ocean Dr; 538-1440.
Venice comes to South Beach via the innovative
Italian fare at this indoor-outdoor café in the Betsy
June 29-July 5, 1995


Ross Hotel. The stuffed grilled onion starter is tasty,
as is beet carpaccio laced with sweet prunes and tiny
diced vegetables. Homemade breads justify the
restaurant's name (which translates as "warm
bread”); pastas and rich risottos will ensure its
reputation. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner.$$
Puerto Sagua 700 Collins Ave; 673-1115. If you’re
allergic to Calle Ocho, then there’s this excellent
Cuban emporium. Most of the usual favorites are
here, the best of which is ropa vieja — not too saucy
and not dry. Specials are tasty as well, from sautéed
chicken livers to salt cod. When it’s available, the
shrimp in “enchilada” sauce is pleasing. Enormous
portions. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Raleigh Bar and Restaurant 1775 Collins Ave; 534-1775.
Forget the blues and follow the rising star of the
Raleigh Hotel’s stylish restaurant. Head chef Marc
Lippman has some creative ways for you to start your
meal: lamb sausage and cous-cous with cumin and
mint and a creamless yellow-squash soup with spiced
croutons are just two. Follow that with an entree of
roasted grouper in a slow-roasted vegetable sauce or
grilled loin of lamb. Order the roasted garlic mashed
potatoes for Americana with a kick. Breakfast and
lunch daily; dinner Wednesday through Saturday
only. $$
Ruen Thai 947 Washington Ave; 534-1504. In this
startlingly beautiful room, the teak tables are glass-
topped and intricately carved. The food is superb,
particularly mee krob, crunchy vermicelli in an
intriguing sweet-and-sour sauce garnished with bean
sprouts, tiny shrimp, and a butterfly sculpted from a
carrot. Delicious house specialties include lobster
with chili paste, curried grouper, and a crispy,
amazingly lean, duck. Hot dishes are not as hot as
billed, so crank up your order accordingly. $
San Loco 23514th St; 538-3009. Choose beef, chicken,
or vegetarian, wrap it in a flour or com tortilla, specify
mild, medium, or hot sauce, and you’ve built your own
taco (or burrito, enchilada, or quesadilla) to
specifications. The chili is as hot ,as a mid-July day,
and the chicken soup, about as comforting as South
Beach gets, is stocked with breast meat, onions,
peppers, and crushed jalapeños — while not exactly
designed for the sickbed, it’ll certainly clear your
sinuses. Lunch, dinner, and late night. $
Shabeen Cookshack and Bar 1200 Collins Ave; 673-8373.
Dive into the Caribbean at the Marlin Hotel’s
Shabeen. C’mon in, the jerk chicken and oxtail and
beans are a tropical find. Vegetable dishes, such as
the stuffed cho-cho (chayóte squash) are light on the
pocketbook as well as the purse of your belly. And
service is fairly matched to the fare: stylish, warm¬
hearted, and genuine. Lunch and dinner. $
The Strand 671 Washington Ave: 532-2340. The menu
at this Beach hot spot reflects a penchant for variety.
There are the appetizers, tour spa-cuisine offerings,
low in fat and calories: the “classic comforts’’
(including meat loaf with mashed potatoes and pan
gravy); salads, and pastas. Oh, and ask about the day’s
specials. $$
Sushi Rock Cafe 1351 Collins Ave; 532-2133. The proto¬
typical sushi bar where everyone claims to be a regu¬
lar. Don’t be intimidated if you’re not — service is
pleasant and efficient no matter who you are. and the
sushi is outstanding. Choose from 25 exotic maki-
mono or from a generous list of cooked vegetarian
stir-fry dishes, teriyaki dinners, and light crisp tem¬
puras. Lunch and dinner $$
Texas Steakhouse 960 Ocean Dr, 531-8188. Big 350-seat
Texas meatery comes to tiny South Beach, and it’s a
perfect fit. Down a “yard” of beer with the two-alarm
chili, chunky with steak and kidney beans. A prime
rib eye is an excellent cut for the connoisseur, while a
sliced skirt steak smothered with barbecue sauce
entices the more robust palate. Side orders of sautéed
onions and a “trilogy” of mushrooms complement the
meats. Dinner, lunch Saturday and Sunday. $$
Toni's New Tokyo Cuisine and Sushi Bar 1208 Washington
Ave; 673-9368. A blade runner of a Japanese dining
place. Apart from the wonderful sushi, cooked fish
can be served with a variety of sauces: tarragon
butter, ravigóte, house tomato, cream, or the more
common teriyaki. The atmosphere is — as much else
on the Beach — celeb-conscious, but no worse for
that. Posey and enjoyable. Lunch and dinner. $$
Villa Deli 1608 Alton Rd; 5384552. You don’t have to
ask, “Where's the beef?” at this chow-down emporium
— you don’t even have to ask, “Where’s the juice?”
The freshly sliced, juicy corned beef sandwich is
sublime, but there’s much more to the Villa than
corned beef. Let us now pay tribute to turkey and to
tongue, and give praise to pastrami. Breakfast, lunch,
and dinner. $
Miami-CentraJ Dade
Aladdin 2841 Coral Way; 443-1426. Experience the
magic of authentic Lebanese cooking at this 58-seat
restaurant decorated with — you guessed it — brass
oil lamps on the wall. You won’t even notice the décor
June 29 —July 5, 1995
once the ful medames appetizer (fava beans mixed
with hummus and served with pita bread) arrives.
Same goes for the mild and moist grape leaves and
the stewlike couscous topped with beef and chicken.
Syrupy baklava are crunchy, buttery sweets that make
for a fine finish. Lunch and dinner. $
Tlie Bricked Club 1221 Brickell Ave; 536-9000. The view
from this penthouse restaurant is sky-high, as are the
prices. Furnishings are predictably snooty — leather
banquettes, oiled mahogany, fine china, engraved
silverware — but the cuisine is surprisingly
innovative. Try the mesquite onion soup, made with
sweet Vidalias and bits of chorizo. Similarly delicious
are roast loin of lamb and chicken paillard in lemon
and cilantro, which is accompanied by guacamole,
pineapple salsa, plantain chips, and black bean
salad. $$$
Café del Sol 1601 Biscayne Blvd (in the Crowne Plaza
hotel); 374-0000. Not to be confused with the car of
similar name, this café has plenty to do with the sun,
serving a stunning variety of Caribbean and Latin
American cuisine. Beef dishes are especially good,
including a thicker-than-usual vaca frita marinated in
lime and Seville orange. Red snapper encrusted with
green plantain chips is the fish equivalent, while black
bean soup is the best in town, rich and heady and
fragrant. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Casa Juancho 2436 SW 8th St; 642-2452. This
cavernous Spanish emporium has become one of the
better-known attractions of Little Havana. A shame,
because the food can often be better than that
Besides tapas, there’s a large selection of Iberian fish
specialties, such as snapper in green sauce and baby
eels in garlic and olive oil. Of the desserts, none is
better than the crema catalana custard topped with
burnt caramel. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Covadonga 6480 SW 8th St; 261-2406. Cubans know
about seafood, and this restaurant shows us how
much and why. A plain snapper fillet sautéed in the
skillet can raise comparisons with José Marti’s verse.
One of the seasonal specialties is fish stuffed with
crab meat. Desserts vary in quality. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Crocodile Cantina at Bayside, 401 Biscayne Blvd;
374-7417. For Southwestern fare with a South Florida
flair, this restaurant serves the meekest — i.e., most
tender—alligator fajitas in town. But the chili
peppers are anything but tame. An authentic Santa Fe
seafood stew demonstrates their spicy properties
properly. And a crab com chowder isn’t shy of spice,
either. Lunch and dinner. $
East Coast Fisheries 360 W Flagler St: 373-5514. It’s
pricey, it’s always full, it’s noisy, but oh-so-good. The
wonders of the sea come alive in this landmark fish
restaurant, so full of character andhomespun charm.
Conch fritters as appetizers are a must. As for sauces,
where else can you find blackened fish served with a
red pepper sauce? Lunch and dinner. $$
El Bodegón de Castilla 2499 SW 8th St; 6400863. A
popular restaurant offering standard Spanish seafood.
Decoration is stereotypically Iberian, but the food is
authentic. Snapper in green sauce brims with garlic
and parsley flavor. Grilled grouper and dolphin fillets
shine, and the imported Dover sole with lemon is
exceedingly delicate. The famed"cazuela de mariscos"
is a veritable who’s who of seafood. For dessert try the
crema catalana or the fried custard. Lunch and
dinner. $$
El Novillo 6830 Bird Rd; 284-8417. (Also in Hialeah and
Kendall.) One of the finest Nicaraguan restaurants to
appear in recent years. The décor suggests a
hacienda, not a stable. The appetizers offer
cornucopian variety, from fried cheese to
nacatamalitos to ceviche. But the churrasco is worth
saving room for: Thehe is no more tender cut of meat
anywhere. And surprisingly, they prepare a fine
pepper steak in cream sauce. Dessert? The pío
quinto and queque cristal win hands down. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Fishbone Grille 650 S Miami Ave; 530-1915. This funky
spawn of Miami’s venerable Tobacco Road offers
eclectic décor, fresh seafood favorites, and a few
regional adaptions. Bait your hook with one of their
sensational soups — seafood gumbo or salmon and
dill chowder. But bring a book — service fluctuates
between speedy and slow. Lunch and dinner. $
Islas Canarias 285 NW 27th Ave; 649-0440. A tiny space
packed with hungry patrons who know what Cuban
food is all about. It may take three people to finish the
bistec uruguayo, a breaded palomilla steak filled with
Swiss cheese and ham. All the daily specials are
wonderful and are gone quickly. Suggestions: half
chicken with mojo, pigs’ feet “a la andaluza,” oxtail
stew, and fried whole snapper. If there’s room, try the
deceitfully delicate tocino del cielo, a flan made with
egg yolks and cinnamon syrup — sublime. Lunch and
dinner. $
La Carreta 3632 SW 8th St; 444-7501. (Also in West
Dade and Kendall.) A muncher’s mecca, with the
flashy wagon wheel out front. The food is not flashy,
but comprehensively Cuban and reliably good. Open
24 hours. $
La Casona 6355 SW 8th St; 262-2828. Not your run-of-
avvsse
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274-BAKE (2253)
“Some of the Best
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1533 Washington Avenue
South Beach 531-4181
Colossal Baked Potatoes! Phenomenal Salads!
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New Times Page 73


3501 Rickenbacker Cwy., Key Biscayne
361-0808
(Enter at Marine Stadium and Take a Left)
All dogs welcome in our marina backyard
Party At The Hut!
Mon thru Thur
Office Parties, Birthday
Celebrations,
Wedding
Rehersals
4 hours
Open Bar!
All -U- Can
Eat!
the menu)
$25/person
Tax & Tip
Included
SUSHI
ALL-U-CAN-EAT
5-7pm $1 2.95
7-11pm ^1 3.95
Karaoke & Full Menu after 11 pm
TOKYO CLUB
3425 COLLINS AVE. MIAMI BEACH534-5358
1223 Lincoln Rd.
Between Alton and West Ave.
Store Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-7pm
Sat 7am-6pm & Sun 7am-3pm
531-9877
NEW STORE POLICY
BUY 6 BAGELS
GET 6 BAGELS FREE
MON • TUES • WED
EXCEPT HOLIDAYS
BUY 12 BAGELS
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THURSDAY THRU SUNDAY
Delivery Available 672-DINE
9533 South Uixie, Miami
(In Dadeland Plaza, Next to
Hooligans) Rooftop Parking
Open 7 days 668-9367
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the-mill Cuban restaurant. Try the coconut shrimp for
starters, which is zipped with an orange-guava sauce,
and then dig into a roast guinea hen stuffed with black
beans and rice, and topped with an almond sauce.
Unusual dishes abound: baby goat marinated in red
wine, for example, and a cassoulet-type dish of rice,
beans, veal, pork, and rabbit. Lunch and dinner. $$
La Esquina de Tejas 101 SW 12th Ave; 545-5341. Ronnie
ate here, remember? One of the most famous Cuban
cafeterias, the sandwiches are first-class, especially
such everyday items as medianoches. The Elena Ruz
sandwich, filled with turkey and cream cheese, is also
excellent. Daily specials include picadillo and tasajo,
traditionally served with rice and all the trimmings.
For dessert try the simple torrejas, Cuban-style
French toast drenched in cinnamon syrup. Lunch and
dinner. $
Lombardi's Bayside Marketplace at Bayside, 401
Biscayne Blvd; 391-9580. Go solar or lunar to this
sidewalk trattoria located in a shoppers’ paradise. Al
fresco dining is a satisfaction in itself. Escape the whirl
of passersby and watch them watching you order the
risotto digiomo or a traditional thin-crust pizza. For a
lighter meal, the focaccia paired with the antipasto
misto is a generous refresher. The authentic gelato
proves the freshest ice in Miami (next to the Florida
Panthers). Lunch and dinner. $$
Los Gallegos 6549 Bird Rd; 661-3040. The most
authentic Spanish omelet in Miami, surely. This
modest restaurant also features other fine Iberian
fere, from snapper in green sauce to paella. The menu
doesn’t vary, so what you see is what you get — every
day. As for desserts, there is flan or natilla in standard
recipes. Lunch and dinner. $
Los Ranchos at Bayside, 401 Biscayne Blvd; 375-0666.
For information see listing under West Dade.
Malaga 740 SW 8th St; 8584224. A Cuban restaurant
celebrating a Spanish heritage. The charming,
covelike décor adds warmth to the dining room, while
the cuisine is excellent. You may have to wait for arroz
con polio or paella, but you’ll be glad you did. Fried
snapper and grouper are specialties, as is chicken
with wine sauce. On the sweet side, Malaga offers
satisfying boniatillo (sweet potato pudding), and arroz
con leche. Lunch and dinner. $
Maria's Greek American Food Shop 1363 Coral Way;
856-0938. Taramosalata roe spread has never tasted
more lemony than at Maria's. Served with toasted
slices of pita, it makes for a beautiful beginning.
Moussaka and pastitsio are made with beef instead of
lamb, and the béchamel sauce on top is rich — so
you’ll need an Olympian appetite to finish the plate.
Fine rice pudding and baklava for dessert. Very
authentic. Lunch and dinner. $
New Hickory Bar-B-Que 3170 Coral Way; 443-0842.
Rustic-style barbecue that aims to please Latins and
good ol’ boys alike. Cooked over wood chips, the
offerings include the standard barbecue items plus
ribs of beef, lamb, veal, and sometimes even chicken
livers. For Latin-style barbecue lovers, lots of bistec
dishes are also featured, plus sides of rice and black
beans. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Orlando Seafood Restaurant & Fish Market 501NW 37th
Ave; 642-6767. The seafood at this wonderful standup
eatery is fresh and inexpensive. Fried squid and fish
croquetas are homemade treats; a fantastic kingfish
escabeche is hardy. The house specialty, a Cuban
fishwich, comes with grouper, tuna, swordfish,
dolphin, or snapper, according to your preference.
The service is as sweet as the flan dessert. Lunch and
dinner. $
The Pasta Factory 5725 SW 8th St; 261-3899. Lively
place where you can watch pasta being churned from
antiquated machines and filled by hand as you dine.
While chicken, veal, beef, sausage, and shrimp dishes
are available, the emphasis is, of course, on the
homemade pasta dishes and a wide variety of sauces.
No doggy bags and no sharing, but half-portions can
be ordered for children under twelve. Lunch and
dinner. $
Salmon & Salmon: 2907 NW 7th St; 649-5924. Don’t
expect the Great Northwest at this excellent Peruvian
restaurant — Salmon is the owner’s name. The
specialty here is corbina, a white-fleshed fish. It’s
especially delicious sauced with seafood a lo
“Salmon.” The fresh, pungent coriander sauce is also
wonderful. Lunch and dinner. $
S&S Diner 1757 NE 2nd Ave; 3734291. A Miami
institution made famous by Mel Kiser and Corky
Irick’s movie Last Night at the S&S Diner. Bring a
book while you wait ’cause wait you will in this
popular counter spot. Try the chopped steak with
onions and gravy, the roast turkey, or the fried sole or
shrimp. And there are few better mashed potatoes
served in the area. Desserts are unexceptional, but
there’s a decent rice pudding. Breakfast lunch, and
dinner. $
Scala Grill 801S Bayshore Dr; 5774202. The specialty
here is rodizio — a steady rotation of grilled poultry
and meats, sliced and served at the table from sizzling
skewers. It’s authentic, it’s well prepared, and it’s
filling. Outstanding fish dishes flesh out the menu
for meat-free folks. And in direct contrast to the
round-robin tournament of meats, desserts are
fruity and light. Challenge a date to dinner. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Sergio's Sandwich Shop 3252 Coral Way; 529-0047. A
combination of an American-style coffee shop and a
Cuban cafétería that works, especially when you
hanker for a BLT or tuna salad sandwich, but your
significant other is dreaming of the perfect
medianoche or pan con bistec. Tostones are served with
a gutsy garlic dip, and beers, including domestic and
many Latin American, are served in frosty mugs.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and all night weekends. $
Tacos by the Road 638 S Miami Ave; 5794)059. Check
out of the office and hit the Road — the Taco one, not
the Tobacco one. Named for its location next to that
venerable institution — as well as for its nod to
Mexico’s infamous roadside fish taco stands — this
counter-service eatery is the place for a quick meal.
Steak fajitas and nachos grandes topped with beef,
pork, or chicken are flavorful and filling. Tacos and
burritos, both made with flour tortillas, are also worth
investigating. Three different help-yourself-to-’em
salsas aren’t particularly piquant. For real heat, go to
the Arena. Lunch and dinner. $
Taquerías El Mexicano 1945 SW 8th St; 649-9150. A
lunch counter of a restaurant that serves the typical
Mexican items, plus some rarer concoctions such as
pozole and menudo. This is the perfect place for those
who like their Mexican food more picante than a
pepper pot. Mexican beers, sodas, and other refrescos
are offered. Breakfast (available all day), lunch, and
dinner. $
Tobacco Road 626 S Miami Ave; 374-1198. More
famous for its gritty sounds and blues-drenched
ambiance than for its dishes, the 80-year-old fixture is
as easy on the palate as it is on the ears. Hamburgers
can be ordered with mushrooms, chili, cheese, and
fried egg piled on, while the chili itself is a fire-hydrant
fixing. Soups and salads are all good. Leave room for
the homemade ice cream, especially star fruit and
cinnamon. Rough-and-ready, no-frills eating. Lunch
and dinner. $
Uncle Tom's Barbecue 3988 SW 8th St: 446-9528. Tom’s
has been around longer than most natives care to
remember. And best of all, it ain’t changed none. Ribs
are none too sweet, with a tang all their own. And
amid all the photos of goddesses such as Rita
Hayworth, Mae West, and Liberace, you can count on
barbecued chicken that’s moist tender, and tasty.
Lunch and dinner. $
Uva Wine Bar & Eatery 3850 SW 8th St 529-2264. A
classy addition to Calle Ocho, Uva serves tapas,
pastas, and main courses under a vaulted, ocher-
bricked ceiling. Murals of grapes and wine casks
complete the wine-cellar atmosphere, while deep-fried
crab-meat empanadas, polenta with porcini
mushrooms, and the most tender calamari in town
speak to chef-owner Vasco Cecchi’s experience.
Homemade fettuccine is fabulous, and pork chops
smothered with peppery white beans are pretty dam
tasty when washed down with any vintage on this
small but well-chosen Califomia/European list. Lunch
and dinner. $
Versailles 3555 SW 8th St; 4440240. A Cuban
monolith, a tradition, a reality. Here’s where it all
began — or so it seems. These days the menu is
longer than the Old Testament. Also a good place for
a midnight snack — expertly prepared medianoches
and sandwiches cubanos, for instance. Recently
they’ve expanded the dessert selection to include a
few odd choices, such as majarete (com custard) and
dulce de leche, a soured milk confection. Lunch and
dinner. $
Victor's Café 2340 SW 32nd Ave; 445-1313. The best
New York City export to the Miami area since the
deli, this local hermana to a Big Apple Cuban eatery is
spectacular. If you’re on a limited budget, try the
mejillones en salsa verde, fresh mussels sautéed in
green sauce, which is both yummy and half the price
of most of the other dishes. If you’re flush and want to
pig out, the lechón asado is wonderfully crunchy on
the outside, moist on the inside. The wine list is one
of the most comprehensive in town. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Villa Habana Restaurant 3398 Coral Way; 446-7427. In
its second incarnation, this Cuban café delivers first-
rate traditional cuisine. From white bean and black
bean soups to white rice and black bean side dishes,
everything is homemade by the same team that runs
Villa Italia. Especially promising are the croquettes
and vaca frita, the favored flavor of shredded and fried
flank steak. Lunch and dinner. $
West Dade-Hialeah
Cami’s, The Seafood Place 869 SW 107th Ave; 227-2722.
(Also in Kendall and Pembroke Pines.) Specializes in
standard seafood offerings in Plain Jane surroundings.
The oysters, shrimp, clams, grouper, scallops, lobster,
et cetera, are not gussied up — and neither are the
prices. Shellfish pasta is as uptown as it gets here, but
June 29—July 5, 1995
Page 7^. New Jitney


it's so good you might find yourself licking your plate.
You don't need to put on your best bib and tucker—a
paper napkin and a big appetite will do. Lunch and
dinner. $
El Cristo 8177 Bird Rd; 261-2947. Choose from every
Cuban classic imaginable, and have enough change
left over to take home something from the butcher,
fruit, or wine shops. Don’t miss the superb tasajo and
boliche, made all the more memorable by the side
dishes: the plátanos will drive you bananas. Breakfast,
lunch and dinner. $
El Inka 11049 Bird Rd; 553-4074. The rustic setting is
humble, but the cuisine soars to Andean heights at
Miami’s oldest Peruvian restaurant Memorable
ceviches and spicy meat and seafood entrees abound.
Don’t miss the Inka Special ceviche, the best in town,
chock-full of fresh sea bass, squid, clams, scallops,
and octopus. For the simply ravenous: try seco de res, a
meat-and-potatoes dish that gives new meaning to the
word “stew”. Lunch and dinner. $
Kon Chau 8376 Bird Rd; 553-7799. All you need here is
a big appetite and a little cash (no credit cards
accepted). Dozens of dim sum dishes offered daily,
from steamed shrimp dumplings to the truly exotic,
such as chicken feet or duck feet tid-bits. Full
selection of Chinese dishes offered on standard menu,
and house specialties such as a dish of shrimp, roast
pork, and chicken sautéed with vegetables. Lunch,
dinner, and special Saturday and Sunday additions to
dim sum menu. $
Los Ranchos 125 SW 107th Ave; 221-9367. (Also in
Central Dade, Coral Gables, and Kendall.) Out in the
wild, wild West, this Nica steak house introduced
many a left-wing skeptic to right-wing delicacies. Beef
has rarely been so full of flavor. Pile on the
chimichurri and gorge on gallo pinto and fried
plantains. As for the famous tres leches, it, too, aims at
re-creating the first time — and nearly succeeds. Fine
food and service. Lunch and dinner. $$
Mrs. Mendoza's 9739 NW 41st St; 477-5119 (also on
South Beach) .This incongruously located and
unassuming Mexican spot serves uncommonly tasty
food. If you like your salsa garden-fresh and you don’t
mind helping yourself out of communal bowls, you
can have all the fine south-of-theborder eats a person
could fathom (including pork fajitas, destined to
become a local fed). This restaurant also serves the
best frijoles refritos in the area — no lard and very
little salt — plus most other traditional taco-stand
treats. Lunch and dinner. $
Outback Steakhouse 8255 W Flagler St; 262-9766. (Also
in North Miami Beach and Kendall.) Leave it to the
Aussies to beat us at our own game: good ol’ thick,
juicy steaks. Except for a couple of pseudoAustralian
offerings, you’ll find the menu comparable to an
American house o’ beef— right down to offerings of
non-beef items such as chicken and fish — but
delicious steaks are what this restaurant is all about. $
Shula’s Steakhouse 7601 Miami Lakes Dr (NW 154th
Street at the Palmetto Expressway); 822-2324.
“Portions” isn’t the operative word at this meaty and
posh emporium owned by the Dolphin coach and
housed at the Miami Lakes Golf Resort—the
operative word is “slabs.” The prices, like the weights,
are double-digit, but the beef is tasty, simply but
perfectly prepared to order. A few fish and seafood
dishes are available, but this is no place to take k.d.
lang or others of the anti-meat ilk. Breakfast, lunch,
and dinner. $$$
Tropical Chinese Restaurant 7991 Bird Rd; 262-7576. An
intriguing menu ranges beyond China for spicy
masterpieces like black-bean chicken and Hong
Kong-style steak, succulent from a sake marinade.
Clay-pot cooking renders some of the best Asian fere
in Miami; flaming pineapple boats certainly make it
the most dramatic. Lunch and dinner. $$
Coconut Grove-Key Biscayne
Bayside Hut 3501 Rickenbacker Cswy; 361-0808. They
don’t use big words like “convivial” here, but that’s the
word that best describes this local treasure, adjacent
to Miami Marine Stadium. Fresh seafood dishes are
rendered simply but deliciously and served in a
mellow, waterside setting. What more could you
want? A spot where Fido is welcome, too? Doggone if
it ain’t so. Lunch and dinner. $
Café Tu Tu Tango 3015 Grand Ave; 529-2222. This
perpetually crowded tapas bar in the CocoWalk
extravaplaza is much more than the sum of its artsy
parts. Styled after a European artist’s loft, the Café
serves up a wide and wonderful variety of chips, dips,
frittatas, empanadas, kebabs, and assorted other
tidbits. Don’t miss the designer pizzas or the plantain
and boniato chips with chunky salsa. Lunch and
dinner. $
The Chart House 51 Chart House Dr; 856-9741. The
prime rib of beef and filet mignon are sinfully tender
and flavorful, but there’s also fresh fish every day.
Swordfish and dolphin, in particular, have rarely been
this good. Mammoth portions and a lovely setting at
S&itá 29-{JtfT> *5, ÍS?éS
Dinner Key Marina. $$
Chiyo Japanese Restaurant at Mayfeir, 3399 Virginia St;
445-0865. Sleek and sexy décor with splashes of
brilliant color. The wait staff is attentive and gracious,
and decked in authentic Japanese garb. Appetizers
from either the sushi bar or the teriyaki grill, plus two
soups, including a superb miso. Very fresh sushi and
sashimi, good tempura dishes (including a fried ice
cream-and-banana combo for dessert) and generous,
delicious teriyaki dinners. Lunch and dinner. $$
Green Street Café 3110 Commodore Plaza; 567-0662.
Pleasant sidewalk café in the Grove, with above-
average food. Traditional soups, sandwiches, and
salads compete with eclectic dishes from the Middle
East, Greece, Italy, and Jamaica. Jamaican chicken
wings are a treat; for a wonderful warm-weather
cooler, try the fresh asparagus salad. Breakfast is
served all day, every day; start your Sunday the right
way, with eggs Benedict al fresco. Breakfast and
lunch. $
Johnny Rockets 3036 Grand Ave; 444-1000. (Also in
Kendall.) Fifties-sfyle diner serving only burgers and
sandwiches, but burgers and sandwiches so good
you’ll think you were back in the days when parents
wore "I like Ike” buttons and Elvis sightings were
actual. Burgers are cooked before your eyes, shakes
are almost too thick to drink, and the staff entertains
diners by grooving to jukebox tunes. Lunch and
dinner. $
Kaleidoscope 3112 Commodore Plaza; 446-5010.
Owned by the creators of Charade, this restaurant is
the cozier of the two. Pasta dishes can surprise with
their delicate sauces, and old standards such as beef
stroganoff are rewarding. Among desserts is a
delicious puff pastry with a mocha filling. Service is
always exemplary. Lunch and dinner. $$
Unda B. Staak House 320 Crandon Blvd; 361-1111. Rich,
juicy porterhouse, firm sirloin strip, and succulent
prime rib and filet mignon are the draw here. Maine
and Florida lobster rival the Angus for attention.
Service is extremely pleasant in this beautifully
designed, two-story eatery. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Mandarin Garden 3268 Grand Ave; 446-9999. One of the
secret wonders of the Grove, this Chinese haven may
be small and unassuming, but it features the best
sesame chicken and Beijing duck in the area. The
food is spicy and Szechuan-inspired. Dumplings are
gingery, and the hot-and-sour soup is a sinus blaster.
Dishes are expertly prepared and served by a
pleasantly attentive, unaffected staff. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Monty's Stone Crab Seafood House & Raw Bar 2550 S
Bayshore Dr; 858-1431. This snazzy, scenic spot is
housed in a vertical shopping strip on Dinner Key. Sit
indoors, or dine outside on a vast, bar-studded terrace
overlooking the bay. Count on beaucoup seafood
goodies, especially, in season, the stone-crab fixation
that made Monty’s mighty mollusk reputation. A
phone call will net you the market price. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Señor Frog's 3008 Grand Ave; 448-0999. A quesadilla is
a quesadilla, right? Wrong. Frog’s offers above-
average Mexican fere. It may not be the real item, but
with the strolling mariachi band and the fest-moving
decadence all around, who cares? Tostadas, burritos,
and enchiladas show the ingredients to best
advantage. And then there’s the amazing natilla
custard — absolutely the best in the city. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Trattoria Pampered Chef 3145 Commodore Plaza;
567-0104. Distinctive, Genovese food in a partylike
atmosophere. Pastas come with flavorfiil sauces, from
tuco to pesto to walnut to cream to creamy
mushroom. It’s one of the few places around that
offers vitello tonnato and paesano ham. Osso buco
here is one of the best, richly fragrant and served with
a fine risotto. Service is above par. Superb crépes
(suzette and suchard) for dessert. Breakfast, lunch,
and dinner. $$
Tuscany Trattoria 3483 Main Hwy; 4450022. The
Leaning Tower of Pisa is this trattoria’s logo, and
apropos. Pastas pile haphazardly on the plates amidst
the familial warmth of green-and-white-checked
tablecloths. Meats here are simply and deliciously
grilled, like thegalleto al mattone, free range baby
chicken marinated and charbroiled. Sauces are wine -'
and-herb-based, garnished with fresh mushrooms and
chopped tomatoes. The papardelle Giuseppe,
homemade noodles in a truffle sauce, is a house
specialty. Lunch and dinner. $$
Coral Gables
Bangkok Bangkok 157 Giralda Ave; 444-2397. (Also in
Kendall.) This “so nice they named it twice” place for
Thai has become something of an institution in just a
few years. The huge, tasty “Little Big Man,” a fresh
mackerel fried whole, might as well be called “Holy
Mackerel,” and the “Roasted Duck Darling” is
delectable. Curries are exquisite, particularly the
shrimp. Traditional Thai treats such as Pad Thai, mee
at the Hofei Cardozo
1300 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach
538-0553
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krob, and satay are among the appetizers. Flawless
service. Lunch and dinner. $
Caffe Baci 2522 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 442-0600. Now
under its second owners, this veteran of Coral Gables
fine Italian dining once again shows its native colors.
Fare takes on a Mediterranean flair depending more
on light oils and spices than heavy, rich creams, and
menus are seasonal. Expect some excellent fish and
meats, baked in the Tuscan oven, and some lovely
cold salad and carpaccio plates. Don’t expect a quiet
little spot for two — this business rivals Mezzanotte’s
for elite appeal. Lunch and dinner. $$
Caffie GJ 65 Merrick Way; 445-1200. The namesake of
owner C J. Levenstein, hardly an Italian-sounding
appellation. Seats 200, hardly a caffe. Yet this quiet
restaurant excels in Italian cuisine, thanks to chef Jose
Cadavid, who grills lamb and veal chops to stunning
perfection, a culinary feat matched by his fragrant
pesto and buttery cream sauce. The menu tends
toward the fine-dining classics, though nightly
specials occasionally present more unusual, and
welcome, possibilities. House-made desserts include
liqueur-heavy tiramisu puddled in sabayon sauce.
Lunch and dinner. $$
Christy's 3101 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 446-1400. An
upwardly mobile carnivore’s hangouL Apart from
enormous and beautifully prepared caesar salads,
there are the massive cuts of beef, among the best in
the city. The prime ribs alone would make Fred
Flintstone envious. For the Japanese-minded, a rich
filet mignon is prepared with teriyaki. The baked
alaska is terrific. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Darbar 276 Alhambra Cir; 448-9691. The room is
sleek, masculine, and clubby looking, but the staff
goes out of its way to make you feel comfortable and
to introduce you to fine Indian cooking. Try the lamb
Madras with basmati rice if you like it hoL An array of
curries is offered from various regions of India, along
with a cornucopia of fruits, sweets, and potable
concoctions. Lunch and dinner. $$
Didier's 2530 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 567-2444. This fine
French restaurant boasts more than double the
seating capacity in its new location, but if s the same
family affair. The three brothers Collongette who
hosL serve, and cook welcome guests with pungent
snails, herb-encrusted roasted rack of lamb, and a
fabulous inches-thick veal chop. Off-the-menu
specialties are also trustworthy. For dessert, tarte
tatin comes equipped with silky, cinnamon-scented
apples and a luscious layer of caramel. Lunch and
dinner. $$$
El Corral 3545 Coral Way; 444-8272. Tired of tres
leches? This Nicaraguan restaurant features a unique
alternative: “Sweet Carolina,” a rum-soaked sponge
cake covered with rich custard and topped with a
mound of meringue. Delicious. Before dessert, the
churrasco steaks are charred to perfection. Big
portions, polite service — was it ever any better? The
refried-bean appetizer is a recommended overture.
Lunch and dinner. $$
House of India 22 Merrick Way; 444-2348. Can rice
dishes get any better? This restaurant prepares them
with style. Splendid curries are a staple, even if they
can be coriander-strong. A tandoor is in full view as
blazing skewers are extracted bearing tender, moisL
brick-colored chicken. If the atmosphere is dark and
cloying, the sarnosas quickly make you forget. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Islands 2345 SW 37th Ave; 444-0334. This popular
Caribbean-style roadhouse changed its name
(formerly Kountry Kottage) to better fit its simple but
simply great island cuisine. Known from here to
Trinidad for its wood-scented, tangy, barbecued ribs
and chicken, this spot also features sandwiches,
salads, breads, and muffins bursting with raisins, nuts,
and other goodies. Noisy, cross-generational, big-
family atmosphere tempered by the soft, musical
English of the wait staff. Lunch and dinner. $
JohnMartin’s 253 Miracle Mile; 445-3777. Who said
Irish food was all stew? This authentic Irish emporium
boasts a charming pub and an elegant dining room
serving the best poached salmon and hollandaise in
the area, sirloin steak with a whiskey sauce, lovely
homemade pátés, soups, and desserts. (Try the
Bailey’s ice cream!) $$
Kaori Japanese Restaurant 5701 Sunset Dr; 662-8484.
Japanese tapas is the reason to visit this extensive
sushi bar and restaurant. Eighty-four appetizers entice
the diner into sampling several plates like the shrimp
dumplings with mustard sauce. And the license to
create your own roll with ingredients like salmon
tempura and Alaskan king crab leg is the reason to
come back. Lunch and dinner. $$
La Bussola 270 Giralda Ave; 445-8783. There is no
better service anywhere — formal, warm, attentive.
Rice and pasta dishes are finished at tableside, a nice
touch that helps to overcome some of the kitchen’s
inconsistencies. Lovely, cold vitello tonnato is a
memorable appetizer. Veal scallops with porcini
mushrooms arrive on a skillet, but the success is
mixed. Unquestionably, though, a restaurant of
superior standards. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Las Puertas 148 Giralda Ave; 442-0708. A smashing
Mexican restaurant that puts Miami on the map in
terms of top-notch Mexican fare. The chef performs
miracles with fresh ingredients — Haas avocados
flown in from Mexico, for example. Don’t miss the
grilled duck fajitas, the sopa de tortilla, the enchiladas
with scallops, the flautas encasing spiced chicken, or
the warm apple pie. Lunch and dinner. $$
Le Glacier 166 Giralda Ave; 447-9667. (Also in South
Miami.) Delightful, unpretentious French café with
friendly service and filling, affordable daily specials.
Or try onion soup, quiche, crab salad, or a sandwich
— on a croissant of course. As the name indicates,
this pretty auberge-style restaurant — with greenery
galore and skylights — features wonderful ice cream
desserts. Lunch and dinner. $
Le Provencal 382 Miracle Mile; 4488984. Leeks,
tomatoes, garlic, onions, olive oil.. .this is French
cuisine that beats the butter-and-cream rap. The
bouillabaisse gets all the honors — various fish fillets,
seafood, toasted rounds of French bread, and the
piquant red-pepper rouille. If the famed soup is too
ambitious, there’s an excellent dolphin in leek sauce.
Service is outstanding. Lunch and dinner. $$
Los Ranchos 2728 Ponce de Leori Blvd; 4464)050. For
information see listing under West Dade-Hialeah.
Louisiana Restaurant 1630 Ponce de Leon Blvd;
445-0481. Combining haute cuisine, Acadian and
Norman artistry, and Low Country, Delta, and
Caribbean ingredients, Louisiana marches to its own
drummer, and has a word-of-mouth following that
makes it the Pied Piper of this town’s restaurant
scene. Liqueurs, fruits, and nuts are employed
liberally, along with stuffings and toppings such as
lobster, crab meat, and caviar. The cassoulet
toulousain is the best this side of Anden Quebec.
Lunch and dinner. $$
Mozart Stube Restaurant 325 Alcazar Ave; 446-3364.
You may not find Mozart here, but you will find stube
— a place to relax. The wiener schnitzel comforts
even the pickiest schnitzel-seeker, and meats like
roast pork and smoked ham are top quality. For
dessert, traditional apfelstrudel is stocked with fruit,
but the egg-white soufflé eclipses both apples and
your appetite. Lunch and dinner. $
Norman's 21 Almería Ave; 446-6767. He’s up to his old
tricks again, and some new ones, too. Award-winning
chef and cookbook author Norman Van Aken returns
to the field to test the creative limits of New World
cuisine with spedalties such as Rioja-braised lamb
shanks with South American fries and caramelized
root vegetables; hibachi tuna with Asian jus and
Oriental mushroom salsa; and smoked tea-and-shailot-
stuffed grilled salmon. Paella is always a hit as is Van
Aken’s signature rhum-and-pepper-painted grouper.
For the culinary adventurer who likes to sample a
little bit of everything, tapas at the bar are the way to
go. Desserts, too, are well worth exploring. Lunch
(weekdays) and dinner. SSS
Picnics at Wien's Drug Store 4000 Red Rd; 665-6964.
Diner ambiance and home cooking plunked down in a
drug store. Tasty staples such as fried chicken, liver
and onions, meaty chili, not to mention burgers,
sodas, deli sandwiches, “genuine” key lime pie, and
salads. Lots to survey as you munch: jukebox with
moldy-oldie tunes, wait staff that looks to have been
lifted out of an Archie comic, pics of James Dean and
other idols. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. $
Ramiro's Restaurant 2700 Ponce de Leon Blvd;
443-7605. Rub elbows with Miami’s glitterati and enjoy
classic Spanish cuisine fused with tropical inspiration.
Spinach flan with black-olive sauce and lamb-meat pie
in tamarind sauce replace the standard salads found at
more pedestrian places. Order the prix fixe dinner, or
choose á la carte from fresh seafood and game
offerings in a variety of fruit and wine sauces. Four-
seasons chocolate satisfies even the most discerning
chocoholic. Lunch and dinner. $$$
Restaurant St Michel 162 Alcazar Ave; 446-6572. This
lushly romantic spot in the ivy-covered landmark
Place St. Michel Hotel is a culinary fairy tale come to
life. The menu, which changes monthly according to
the seasons and the prevailing dining trends, is always
varied, featuring meats and seafoods inventively
sparked with tropical and other nuances. Lunch,
dinner, and Sunday brunch. $$$
Two Sisters Restaurant Hyatt Regency Coral Gables, 50
Alhambra Plaza; 441-1234. Named for the royal
harem’s residence in the Moors’ Alhambra palace,
Two Sisters offers fabulous New World cuisine in an
Old World setting. The menu changes weekly,
keeping the experience as fresh as the local seafood.
Lamb is also done especially well. Finish the meal like
royalty with homemade desserts. The sultans never
had it so good. $$$
Vatapa 2415 Ponce de Leon Blvd; 461-5669. Named
after a popular Brazilian dish, this eatery serves an
excellent version of the shrimp and fish stew in a
tropical rain-forest setting. Such delicacies asfeijoada
(smoked meats and black beans) and the Bahian
favorite chicken in herb sauce vie for attention with
the hanging hammocks and painted parrots. Start
with a cocktail made from cuchaba (sugar-cane rum)
and passion-fruit juice, and finish with a flourish of
June 29 —July 5, 1995


cafezinho and Brazilian bread pudding. Lunch and
dinner. $$
Yuca Restaurant 177 Giralda Ave; 4444448. Despite the
departure of nuevo cubano innovator Douglas
Rodriguez, Yuca continues to impress with finely
prepared, imaginative cuisine. Such standards as the
sweet plantain stuffed with dried cured beef and the
guava-barbecued baby back ribs remain on the menu,
in addition to a fabulous three-bean terrine and a crisp
plantain basket filled with tender conch and shrimp. A
skirt steak, cut to resemble a tutu, is always a sound
choice, and for Latin with an Asian flair, pan-seared
tuna with coconut-curry rice is a rare treat. Chocolate
tres leches, paired with a rich cocoa sorbet, works
wonderfully for dessert. Lunch and dinner. $$$
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June 29-July 5, 1995
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Akashi Japanese Restaurant 5830 S Dixie Hwy;
665-6261. Formerly the Depot, Akashi retains that
restaurant’s train-theme glass tables. The best
sushi boats in town, however, are no holdover —
generous and artistic preparations of tuna, salmon,
yellowtail, and shrimp. Cooked fare is also excel¬
lent, particularly the ton katsu (fried pork cutlet),
and a distinctive char-grilled chicken teriyaki.
Amaretto cheesecake, dipped in a tempura batter
and deep-fried, then served with drizzled chocolate
and whipped cream, beats red bean ice cream any
day. $$
Bangkok Inn 12260 S Dixie Hwy; 253-3583. You’ll
need some imagination to consider dishes named
“Hello Ginger!” and “Kiss Me!” — but don’t worry,
all is not lost. The pad thai noodles are excellent, as
are the various fish and duck dishes flavored with
red pepper flakes and peanuts. Service is first-rate,
and the setting has charm. Lunch and dinner. $$
Café Bistro 10121 Sunset Dr; 595-3663. Charming,
two-story Italian restaurant with a well-rounded
selection of chicken, veal, seafood, and pasta dishes
at ultra-reasonable prices. Lightly breaded and fried
calamari ringlets, zucchini fingers, and mozzarella
sticks make good starters; the horseradish
dressing accompanying the zucchini is finger¬
licking fine. Don’t miss the dolphin prepared
Greek-style with feta cheese and a white wine
sauce. Lunch and dinner. $
Chilango's Mexican Grill 5859 SW 73rd St;
663-9333. For well-prepared Mexican food served
with a humorous flair, try this pretty remake of the
old UM hangout Coach’s. The chunkiest, richest
guacamole in town is a quick start, easing you into
moist and tender sopes and spicy tortilla soup.
Follow up with an enchilada platter smothered in a
salsa verde and wash it down with Pacifico. Lunch
and dinner. $
Delta Blues Cafe and Catering Company 10481N
Kendall Dr; 273-9533. Emcee, owner, designer, and
cook Deborah Cross introduces Cajun fare to
Kendall (along with assorted southern and
southwestern specialties). Jambalaya here is the
real thing, chock-full of sausage and shrimp with
robust tomato flavor but too little spice — be sure
to ask for it “nuclear.” Catch of the day is best
blackened; a twelve-ounce sirloin satisfies the
carnivore. Don’t let dessert go unchallenged — try
the “famous” bread pudding and see if you don’t
agree that if it isn’t now, it ought to be. Lunch and
dinner. $
Doc Graham's Taproom & Eatery 20537 Old Cutler Rd;
2354373. Chicago and New Orleans influence this
handsome brick-lined pub, named for the baseball
player with the remarkably short major league
career. This segment of the rebuilt Old Cutler
Towne Center is destined for more extended fame,
thanks to superb charbroiled burgers, crisp and
colossal onion rings, and meaty chicken wings, not
to mention simple and well-prepared fresh seafood
specialties. Twenty international beers on draft
don’t hurt, either. Lunch and dinner. $
El Manara 5811 Sunset Dr; 6653374. Middle Eastern
cuisine remains one of the oldest on earth, and
when you consider an ingredient such as tahini
(ground sesame seeds), it’s easy to see why. El
Manara’s menu is less Arabic than one would
expect: hummus, baba ghannouj, stuffed vine
leaves, lamb kebabs, kibbeh, and such excellent
side dishes as rice pilaf and marinated stringbeans
in tomato sauce are equally magnificent. Service
can be spotty here, but there’s no gainsaying the
superb dividends the kitchen offers. Tasty baked
desserts, too, if you like ’em very, very sweet. Lunch
and dinner. $
El Toro Taco 1 Krome Ave, Homestead; 2458182.
Andrew couldn't blow away this Mexican
establishment, which dishes up authentic cuisine
and plenty of it. Chicken burritos burst at the
seams with shredded white meat and taco shells
spill over with ground beef. Although you won’t
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torch your tastebuds on this mostly mild fare, tasty
selections such as mole de polio — chicken glazed
with a sleek sauce — and steak, onion, and pepper-
filled fajitas supply more than enough flavor. A
great stop to or from the Keys, when you can’t
honestly face another conch fritter. Breakfast,
lunch, and dinner. $
Fancy's 7382 SW 56th Ave; 661-3981. Looks like a
spaghetti house but aspires to carbohydrate
greatness — and frequently succeeds. If you like
your pasta with a kick, try the puttanesca, made
with hot Italian sausage. If you like your noodles
creamy with a little crunch, order the primavera.
Nine veal dishes are offered, along with a vast
selection of appetizers and nearly 1000 wines.
Lunch and dinner. $
Finicky’s Little Diner 7310 Red Rd; 661-0535. A tiny,
charming, hole-in-the-wall diner. You won’t find a
finer New England clam chowder anywhere
(available only on Friday and Saturday). Tasty daily
lunch specials: beef stroganoff and chicken with
yellow rice are especially good, but who can resist
the soup-and-sandwich servings, including tender
roast beef and meatball sandwiches? Good
cheesecake. Breakfast and lunch. $
Food by Trolls 9707 S. Dixie Hwy; 668-9395. Gravlax.
Pickled herring in sour cream. The all-important
Swedish meatball. Don’t underestimate the pull of
northern climes at this 30-seat European bistro;
Greek- and Italian-influenced dishes pale in
comparison to the Scandinavian specialties. But if
the midnight-sun menu doesn’t suit your style, you
certainly won’t go hungry. Lamb, chicken, beef, and
fish dishes abound, and more than a dozen pastas
â– we served in hearty portions. Lunch and dinner. $$
is a restatthte* J0712 SW 113th PI; 273-1102. This
American food at its hofiivj but it offers Italian-
owner himself (who likes to inspect fns-Lhv.the
A delightful antipasto salad prepared with Capa’s
secret herb dressing starts things off. The finest
entrée is the sirloin with a superb sauce made from
green pepperoncini, black olives, garlic, tomatoes,
and capers. Good cannoli for dessert. $$
Miami's Tropical Bar & Grill 8888 SW 136th St;
255-5050. If you’re thinking seafood and you’re
headed toward The Falls, the Key West-style Grill
features a spectacular and tasty spread — oysters,
clams, shrimp, conch, calamari, snapper fingers,
snapper, swordfish, and dolphin. Caribbean
touches abound as well: shrimp coated in coconut,
jerk chicken, sweet tater fries, and frosty brews.
Lunch and dinner. $
New Chinatown 5958 S Dixie Hwy; 662-5649. The
most celebrated Chinese restaurant in Miami isn’t
necessarily the greatest, but it inspires confidence.
Dishes from every culture — Cantonese, Szechuan,
Mandarin, and even transfigured Chinese-
American. Beef with spicy orange sauce and
chicken with cashews are recommended. For
starters, the honey-garlic chicken wings are
heavenly. Service is quick and to the point. Lunch
and dinner. $$
Punjab Palace 11780 N Kendall Dr; 274-1300.
Turbaned, bearded, and impressive, Punjabi Sikhs
run this immaculate Indian restaurant Tandoori
chicken is a high point. Sarnosa pastries with either
vegetables or meat are crumbly and satisfying. Of
the main courses, rogan josh made with cubed lamb
is creamy and mild, and the chicken curries are
immensely fragrant and delicious. Indian food at its
finest and most elegant. Lunch and dinner. $$
Romano's Macaroni Grill 12100 N Kendall Dr;
270-0621. An Italian family restaurant with excellent
food and hospitality to match. Focaccia is fabulous; a
caesar salad costs less than a buck when ordered
with an entrée. Try the thin-crust pizza with sun-
dried tomatoes, mozzarella, basil, and oregano, or
the penne with scallops and Italian peppers. $
Shibui 10141 Sunset Dr; 274-5578. Sushi is
magnificent — unagi, California roll, shrimp,
salmon, tuna — all beautifully prepared.
Teriyaki, katsu, stir fry, sukiyaki, and tempura
dinners all show excellence. Kiwi cheesecake and
key lime pie confound preconceived ideas about
Japanese desserts. Enchanting service, homey
atmosphere. $$
Shorty's Bar-B-Q 9200 S Dixie Hwy; 665-5732. Another
landmark barbecue joint, this one features the
ubiquitous ribs and chicken in slightly sweeter and
spicier renditions than elsewhere. Hot off the wood,
such specialties continue to please after all these
years. Lots of character, lots of fun. Lunch and
dinner. $
Siam Lotus Room 6388 S Dude Hwy; 666-8134. Some
of the best Thai food anywhere. The prize item is
the fried whole snapper with fiery chili sauce. The
same sauce lights up the “Volcano Shrimp” entrée.
Satay beef or pork sticks are pungently sweet,
especially with the peanut sauce. Spring rolls,
different from Chinese, also add spice and variety.
Clean surroundings and pleasant ambiance. Lunch
and dinner. $
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June 29-July 5, 1995


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Page 80 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


The Vodou They Do So Well
By Jim Murphy
The telephone connection crackles with static
as Theodore “Lolo” Beaubrun, Jr., front man
for the Haitian roots band Boukman
Eksperyans, shushes the half-dozen children
who happily scamper about his father’s Port-
au-Prince home. “It’s ‘vacation noise,”’
Beaubrun notes lightheartedly, before return¬
ing to a very serious discussion of his band’s
precarious position within the tumultuous
environment of Haitian politics for the past
seventeen years. “Yeah, we’ve been aware of
the danger, because we started the band with
a spiritual focus.... We say that Jesus tells us
to put selfishness away from us.”
Such a claim normally would invite skeptical
hoots, given the prefabricated, marketdriven
posings of Western pop stars. But Beaubrun’s
comment is, if anything, an understatement.
Consider the scene during a 1994 concert in
Port-au-Prince when, in full view of the audi¬
ence, a Haitian soldier put a gun to the
singer’s head as Boukman Eksperyans
launched into the government-banned song
“Kalfou Danjere” (“Dangerous Crossroads”).
bassist-drummer Michel-Melthon “Olicha”
Lynch came down with a severe case of bacte¬
rial meningitis. Because of the U.S. embargo
against Haiti, medicine that had saved
Lynch’s life during a bout with the illness the
previous year was unavailable this time. On
June 3, Dan Behrman, the band’s Montreal-
based manager, couriered a package of antibi¬
otics from the-U.S., but the medicine disap¬
peared after it reached the Port-au-Prince
airport. Lynch passed away the next day as
family, friends, and band members prayed at
his side.
Seven weeks later, just having completed a
successful tour of Europe and ready to
embark on a fifteen-date trek across the U.S.,
Boukman Eksperyans found itself stranded in
London. Days before the band's scheduled
flight to New York City, the U.S. government
tightened the screws on Haiti’s military junta
by issuing a stop order on financial transac¬
tions involving the two nations. Suddenly the
group’s plane tickets were useless; visas
allowing them to stay in England were valid
Are you Eksperyans? Boukman colors its spiritual music with an informed political consciousness
The group continued playing; the audience
members sang the Creole lyrics in
Beaubrun’s stead (translated: “If you’re an
assassin, get out of here/If you’re a thief, get
out of here...Murderers, schemers,
thieves/You’re heading for a dangerous cross¬
roads”) ; and the police moved in with tear gas,
clubs, and Uzis to break up the show.
The episode was typical of the physical dan¬
gers Boukman Eksperyans has faced for
much of its existence. But it was also a chilling
portent of the trials and tribulations the band
would experience through much of 1994.
Indeed, the past year has been especially
rough for Boukman, despite the reinstate¬
ment in October of Jean-Bertrand Aristide,
Haiti’s democratically elected president, and
more recently, the nearly unanimous critical
acclaim that has greeted the release of the
band’s third album, Líbete (Pran Pou Pranl!)
— in English, Freedom (Let’s Take It!).
In May 1994, for example,- Boukman
June 29-Juty 5, 1995
only through the next day.
Unable to secure a flight back to Haiti from
England, manager Behrman called the New
York headquarters of Island Records (which
distributes Boukman’s work on its Mango
Records imprint) and discreetly arranged for
the band members to fly to Jamaica as undoc¬
umented aliens. They spent the next several
months stashed away in a “safe house” in
Jamaica’s Blue Mountains — no telephone,
no electricity, no running water, out of touch
with their family and friends — while
Behrman tried to put the necessary papers in
order. Inquiring reporters were fed a steady
diet of misinformation about the band’s
whereabouts. “Jamaica had a lot of Haitian
boat people,” explains Behrman, “and the
Jamaicans, at the request of the U.S. govern¬
ment, had set up a ship that served as a float¬
ing refugee camp. Island was afraid that [the
Jamaican government] would want to stick
the members of Boukman on the ship.”
Behrman pauses to consider the band’s
penchant for courting trouble. “Sometimes it’s
freaky,” he notes. “But let me tell you, I prefer
working with this kind of situation than with a
band that worries about the size of the holes
in their jeans. These people live what they
sing, and sing what they live.”
What Boukman Eksperyans sings and plays
is an exotic blend of traditional Haitian rasin
(roots music) — built upon and around the
multiple rhythms laid down by three Vodou
drums — and such diverse elements as
African and Western melodies, gospel cho¬
ruses, and the thoroughly modern sounds of
bass, electric guitar, synthesizers, and drum
machines. What they live is Vodou, the intri¬
cate Haitian belief system closely associated
with that nation’s vast peasant population; in
the West, Vodou often has been caricatured
with images of devil dolls and zombies.
“Vodou is not a religion,” emphasizes Lolo
Beaubrun. “It’s a way of life. For so much
time, there was propaganda against Vodou.
It’s important for people to see the truth.”
Ironically, Beaubrun himself was bom into
the ranks of Haiti’s cultural elite, whose mid¬
dle- and upper-class members have embraced
Westernization and rejected their country’s
Vodou heritage. His father is director of the
National Theatre and a popular comic actor
often referred to as “the Haitian Bill Cosby.”
Lolo, now 38 years old, recoiled from his
Protestant upbringing at an early age. “Since I
was little, I saw that many of the people I
knew who were going to church every
Sunday were hypocrites,” he says. ‘They
didn’t practice the word of Jesus.” (Beaubrun
is quick to note his father is open-minded,
adding, ‘We don’t have a problem to express
ourselves in Vodou.”)
In search of spiritual satisfaction, Beaubrun
spent his late teens and early twenties con¬
templating a number of religions and philoso¬
phies, even as he studied business adminis¬
tration in the U.S. for two years. The decision
inevitably led him back to his roots, to his
family’s lakou. (An essential part of Vodou,
lakous are reminiscent of communes, in
which members trace their heritage and
rhythms directly back to the original African
tribe from which their ancestors came.)
Beaubrun realized that Vodou’s underlying
message was consistent with the ideals he’d
embraced in Christianity. “It’s important to
see the unity of all religions,” he stresses.
“Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism,
the word of Moses, the message of Krishna
— the essence is the same.”
While Boukman Eksperyans’ social voice is
informed by Vodou, the band’s music reflects
the wide range of artists who Beaubrun and
his bandmates were exposed to as children.
Beaubrun excitedly recounts how his father
returned from a trip to the U.S. in 1963 with a
copy of James Brown’s Live at the Apollo. “My
father told us about this guy on-stage and how
he was dancing,” recalls Beaubrun. The rising
tenor of his voice evokes his initial wide-eyed
reaction to his father’s account. Beaubrun’s
interests eventually turned to heavier sounds:
Hendrix, Santana, Pink Floyd, and
Parliament-Funkadelic are all cited as impor¬
tant influences, and their presence is felt
throughout Boukman’s work.
It took the mid-1970s breakthrough success
of Bob Marley and the Wailers to tie the
social and musical strands together. “I found
someone who was talking seriously about
what is wrong in the world, and telling the
people what to do,” notes Beaubrun. His
Continued on page 83
Rara Raveup
Boukman Eksperyans
Líbete (Pran Pou PranV.)
(Mango)
For listeners whose perception of
“voodoo” has been formed through the
distorted lens of Hollywood, Líbete (Pran
Pou PranV), the third release by Haitian
rasin band Boukman Eksperyans, is a joy¬
ous revelation. Central to the album —
indeed, to the the importance of
Boukman Eksperyans in its homeland —
is the traditional role of rara (Haiti’s
Vodou-based music) to spread informa¬
tion, discuss current events, and inspire
action among the country’s largely illiter¬
ate population through the use of oblique,
allegorical lyrics (all sung in Creole).
The CD, whose title translates into
English as Freedom (Let’s Take It!), opens
with the somber “Legba.” Accompanied
by the soft shake of a lone percussion
instrument, brothers Theodore and
Daniel Beaubrun alternately sing of a pro¬
tective spirit who is “in the courtyard, in
the compound.” The Beaubruns’ lilting
vocals eventually are met by the gorgeous
choral response “Aleba is at the gate.”
The band’s ability to seamlessly fuse its
musical influences becomes more evident
on the following cut, “Sa’m Pedi” (“What
I’ve Lost”). A synthesizer and bass
announce the song in tandem with a brief
Afro-pop burst. Three Vodou drums and
assorted percussive sounds then join the
mix, and the song settles into a dreamy,
polyrhythmic current that’s punctuated
by extended licks from Daniel’s Santana-
esque fuzz guita:'.
That approach is indicative of the rest of
the CD, in which Boukman spreads its
musical net far and wide. Piercing guitars,
funky bass lines, calypso melodies, and
infectious chants from the chorus weave
their way through joyous raras such as
“Peye Pou Peye” (“You Must Pay”) and
“Jou Male” (“Day of the Shock”); a jazzy
saxophone solo floats into the compás-
tinged “Ki Moun” (“Who Will”); the syn¬
thesizers that wash through lush num¬
bers such as the fide track and “Zan’j Yo
Tounen” (“The Spirits Are Back") nod to
the influence of Pink Floyd and Eighties
Europop bands. On “Ganga” (named for a
spirit from the Kongo nation), a synthe¬
sizer forms a velvety layer of sound, while
over the song’s soothing harmonic cho¬
rus a band member possessed by Ganga
reveals some secrets in the KiKongo
tongue.
But it would be a mistake to focus too
much on the Western influences that, at
best, provide interesting signposts. What
ultimately makes the CD so compelling is
its defiant social outlook: Veiled topical
references to Haiti’s litany of woes and vil¬
lains are interspersed with the broader
themes of suffering, justice, and redemp¬
tion. Add the extensive liner notes,
Creole-to-English lyric translations, and
glossary of terms that crop up throughout
the CD, and Líbete is nothing less than
an insider’s view of the ongoing struggle
over Haiti’s soul — and a powerful
introduction for the uninitiated to the
beautiful complexities of Vodou lakou.
-Jim Murphy
New Times Page 81


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June 29 —July 5, 1995


They Do
Continued from page 81
musically inclined brother, Daniel, several
years younger than Lolo, responded to the
Wailers’ use of the bass to drive the music
home. (Daniel plays several instruments
and handles lead and background vocals in
Boukman Eksperyans, while also serving as
the band’s musical director.)
As for the the band itself, its origins trace
back to 1978 when Lolo and his wife,
Mimerose, set out to explore the spiritual
and social implications of Vodou and its
attendant system of cooperative lakous.
Although Vodou’s focus is more on spiritual
ends than on the temporal concerns of poli¬
tics, the Beaubruns’ direction necessarily
would put them at odds with the policies of
then-President Jean-Claude “Baby Doc”
Duvalier. (The original Boukman was a
Vodou priest who sparked the uprising
among escaped slaves that led to Haiti’s
independence from France in 1804.) Vodou
spurns materialism in favor of the quest for
ginen, a state of enlightenment that comes
about when a person’s inner nature and
outer actions are harmonized. “We want the
inside change,” says Beaubrun, “but you
can’t have the inside change without a
change in the system, as well. The state has
to serve the people, not just the pockets of
some people who control the country with
their money.” That kind of talk got
Beaubrun labeled as a troublemaker and a
communist.
In 1987 Daniel returned to Haiti for good
after having spent the better part of a
decade attending school in the U.S. (During
that time, he shuttled back and forth
between the two countries, bringing with
him musical ideas and demo tapes that
would help shape the band’s sound.)
Daniel’s wife, Marjorie, also joined the
band, and as the roster expanded, the
group steadily cultivated a following among
the Haitian peasant population in which the
Vodou message resounded most strongly.
‘We continued the work of Bob Marley on
another level,” says Beaubrun.
Though authorities were mindful of
Boukman’s growing popularity — the 1980s
were marked by wiretaps, arrests, and
other forms of harassment against various
band members — the celebrity status of
Beaubrun’s family provided no small
degree of protection, and the group kept a
fairly low profile until Duvalier left the coun¬
try in 1986. Boukman’s full impact on
Haitian politics wasn’t realized until 1990.
The song “Ke’-m Pa Sote” (“My Heart
Doesn’t Leap [I’m Not Afraid])” won the
competition in that year’s Carnival festival
and became a rallying cry for tens of thou¬
sands of protesters who took to the streets
the week after Carnival demanding the
departure of Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril, who
controlled the government at the time. The
self-appointed leader left the country within
days.
The band was signed by Mango Records
that same year, and their debut, Vodou
Adaje, was nominated for a Grammy (adaje
means to dance while possessed by a
spirit). The followup', Kalfou Danjéré
June 29-July 5, 1995
(.Dangerous Crossroads), released in 1992,
spent eighteen weeks on Billboard’s then-
new World Music chart, including four
weeks at the top spot Besides the band’s exu¬
berant sound and the universal appeal of its
message, a major factor in Boukman’s suc¬
cess has been its reputation for roof-raising
performances (as South Florida fans know
from the band’s appearances at venues such
as Bayfront Park and the recently closed
Stephen Talkhouse). “They have an excellent
sense of showmanship,” says Brian Rochlin, a
friend of the band and a former editor of
Reggae Report magazine. “Lolo has the inten¬
sity of Marley, but can also bounce across the
stage as if he were Prince.”
The band has toured relentlessly — North
America, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia —
although the clash of cultures Boukman occa¬
sionally has experienced has led to some
strange scenes. In New York, for instance,
wary policemen drew their guns on two fans
who had been escorted outside a club after
being possessed by Vodou spirits during a
Boukman performance; in a Denver parking
lot, Beaubrun was drawn into a lengthy dis¬
cussion of the differences between Vodou and
Satanism with a fairly hostile Christian funda¬
mentalist. Overall, however, manager
Behrman says the band has been well
received. “People’s response to the Vodou
aspect has been understanding,” he says,
“even sympathetic.”
Now, it would appear, the extreme dan¬
gers faced by the members of Boukman
Eksperyans are behind them. Military
strongman Raoul Cedras left the island in
October; Aristide — a Catholic priest whose
sympathetic understanding of Vodou’s
place in Haitian society has been misrepre¬
sented and exploited by his oppo¬
nents in both Haiti and the U.S.
— has been reinstated as presi¬
dent. Líbete, released in April, has
garnered overwhelmingly posi¬
tive press. Boukman’s songs are
back on Haitian radio stations,
and fans can once again hum the
melodies to those songs in public
without risking a beating at the
hands of the police. In January
the band played a free concert in
Port-au-Prince for an enthusiastic
crowd numbering more than
100,000.
But true to his unswerving idealism,
Beaubrun refuses to celebrate these devel¬
opments as a triumph for Haiti’s long-
oppressed masses. “I’m glad Aristide is in
power, because he’s made many important
decisions like disbanding the army,”
Beaubrun contends. “But things have only
changed on the surface. We want a complete
change. The revolution we’re talking about
has to be a change of the whole life. We need
a new system, an alternative to capitalism
and communism that makes the connection
between the material and spiritual.”
Given the continued influence of Haiti’s
well-entrenched, moneyed elite, as well as
the knee-jerk reaction that Beaubrun’s mes¬
sage of social reform is sure to evoke in
Haiti’s imposing western neighbor, it may be
a long wait. Then again, as Beaubrun points
out, “Haiti is a magical country. You can see
somebody on the street, maybe he shines
shoes, and by Western standards he would
be nothing compared with someone who has
a lot of money. But in Haiti he can be a great
priest, he can be a healer, he can be some¬
one with good power. Anything can happen.”
Boukman Eksperyans performs as part of Africa
Féte on Monday, July 3, at Marlin Gardens, 12th
Street and Collins Avenue, Miami Beach; 673-
5202. Other scheduled acts include Baaba Maal,
Femi Kuti, and Oumou Sangare. Gates open at
6:00 p.m. Admission costs $10.
“Lolo has the intensity
of Marley, but can also
bounce across the stage
as if he were Prince.”
Presented by Cellar Door
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New Times Page 83


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Rotations
Various Artists
For the Love of Harry: Everybody Sings Nilsson
(MusicMasters/BMG)
Harry Nilsson was to the Seventies what
Warren Zevon was to the Eighties. Imagine
Randy Newman, but suave. Now imagine
Randy Newman, suave and drunk as hell on
martinis.
Maybe we all needed to be reminded about
Nilsson. His best songs are laden with hooks,
but they’re fishhooks, sharp and barbed.
Nilsson writes a sweet song about moon¬
beams, and he somehow works into it the
word crap. He writes a song about a breakup
that guts you with irony, not pathos: “In the
summer by the poolside/While the fireflies
are all around you/I’ll miss you and I know
that I’ll miss the alimony, too.” And no one
else could have written an assessment such
as, ‘You’re breaking my heart/You’re tearing
it apart/So fuck you.”
The trouble with tribute albums is that, like
memorial services, they too often say more
about the people who make them than about
the tributee. Fortunately, that isn’t the case
with this one, produced by A1 Kooper and initi¬
ated before Nilsson’s death of a heart attack
last January.
“Remember,” which opens the proceedings,
marks the first time Randy Newman ever
recorded a Nilsson tune (surprising given
Nilsson’s early LP full of Newman tunes).
Other contributors are equally predictable if
less inspired, (Ringo Starr and Brian Wilson),
while some (Marshall Crenshaw, Steve
Forbert, the Roches, Victoria Williams) are
revelatory in that it suddenly dawns on you
that Nilsson was a mondo influence on their
work.
Lavem Baker does a mean “Jump into the
Fire”; ditto Aimee Mann’s take on “One.” Plus
others too numerous to mention. In fact, this
project’s only serious flaw is overkill: 23
songs.
Buy it anyway. Your bucks’ll go to a good
cause (royalties and net profits benefit the
Coalition to Stop Gun Violence). While you’re
at it, pick up a copy of BMG’s recently
released Personal Best, a two-CD Nilsson ret¬
rospective. Like Harry sang: “When we’re
older, full of cancer/It doesn’t matter now,
come on get happy/Cuz nothin’ lasts forever
but I will always love you.”
Don’t forget him. - Tom Finkel
Primus
Tales from the Punchbowl
(Interscope)
So I’m listening to this thing, to the discordant
twangs and spastic thumps and mindless
screaming, and after about two “songs” it
becomes apparent that I want nothing more to
do with the CD, that I want, in fact, to break
the CD. Then, a bit further along, right in the
midst of “Wynona’s Big Brown Beaver” — the a
first single, wouldn’t you know it? — I decide
that breaking this one CD really would not be
enough. Not at all.
What I really want is to have all copies of this
album destroyed. Then I want to have a good
long talk with the responsible parties. Not
with the “musicians,” who are, near as I can
reckon, the punk equivalent of Spinal Tap. But
with whoever in God’s name was responsible
for listening to the original demos and okay¬
ing theft full-fledged recording and release.
Obviously, I’m missing something, because
the band’s equally unlistenable previous j
album (their fourth) sold, like, a million j
copies. I suspect it’s that portion of the limbic
brain responsible for crucial cognitive func¬
tions, such as swinging a baseball bat and
grunting.
I’m sure there are a whole slew of Beavises
and Butt-heads out there who disagree with
these views violently (how else?). And I look
forward to debating the merits of Primus with
them, provided they attempt to speak in com¬
plete sentences. — Steven Almond
John Lee Hooker
Chill Out
(Charisma/Pointblank)
Despite the Carlos Santana-Lzation of the title
track — wailing lead guitar, inappropriate
Latin percussion — John Lee Hooker’s Chill
Out is magnificent. Producer-slide guitarist
Roy Rogers plays to all of the 74-year-old boo¬
gie-blues pioneer’s strengths: Hooker’s dark,
booming voice; his melodically spare, rhyth¬
mically rich guitar; and his larger-than-life per¬
sona. Unlike the Hook’s revolving-door guest
policy on recent releases, he keeps the star
shine to a minimum here, bringing in Van
Morrison to duet on a combination platter of
“Serves Me Right to Suffer/Syndicator,” on
which the pair sound just as menacing as the
lyrics and the evil groove (laid down by key¬
boardist Booker T. Jones) would suggest.
However, top guest-spot honors go to the
indefatigable septuagenarian Charles Brown
on piano, elegantly stroking his way through
“Kiddio” and “Annie Mae,” driven by a thor¬
oughly jazzed Hooker. But the moments of
sheer sublimity occur when it’s Hooker alone.
Tracks such as “Deep Blue Sea” and ‘Tupelo,”
featuring the man, his guitar, and his feet
keeping time on a miked board, are stunning
examples of why Hooker is so revered.
-Bob Weinberg
John Santos and the Machete Ensemble
Machete
(Xenophile)
Afro-Cuban scholar, bandleader, arranger,
and master drummer John Santos is a walking
encyclopedia of Latin music. On this set he’s
joined by four Cuban legends: mambo king-
bassist Israel “Cachao” Lopez; Alfredo
“Chocolate” Armenteros, whose blazing trum¬
pet was featured on many Beny Moré sides in
the Forties; timbalero Orestes Vilató; and
hand drummer Anthony Carrillo. Not forget¬
ting pianist-arranger Rebecca Mauleón.
Recorded over the course of six years,
Machete covers vast musical ground while cel¬
ebrating Cuba’s contributions to various world
rhythms. “Iya,” the album’s most African
piece, is a funky prayer to Santería mother
goddess Ochún — it’s embroidered by the fat,
golden notes of David Yamasaki’s guitar and
Lakiba Pittman’s deep, yearning vocals. “El
mago vilató” is a bembé (a folkloric Afro-Cuban
rhythm) driven by Vilató’s timbales and
Armenteros’s short, sharp trumpet solo;
“Modupue” sounds like a smooth, early
Sixties-style Cuban jazz outing; and “Media
Luna,” a lush danzón-mambo, showcases the
graceful charanga-\ike solos of violinist
Anthony Blea and flautist Melecio
Magdaluyo. But the track that bést sums up
June 29 —July 5, 1995
Page 84 New Times


Corbett's
Sft&ito- Sa/i & tyu£¿
the disc is “La patria del son,” a montuno with
all the elements that make Cuban music magi¬
cal: relentless interlocking rhythms, stinging
trumpet flights, shimmering tres, and poetic
lyrics, -j. poet
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Zac’s Local Soup
A Celebration of Local Music
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Over 21.1.D. required
6pm Friday Patio Barbeque
Count Bass D
Pre-Life Crisis
(Chaos/Columbia)
With other rappers “trying to be 3Pac and
Spice 2/What’s an original MC to do?” Count
Bass D wonders on his debut, Pre-Life Crisis.
Answer: Exactly what Count does here —
scoop up new flavors without regard to what
the rest are serving. Hence, he comes up with
one of the more lyrically inventive and musi¬
cally developed menus in recent memory, a
poppy hip-hop treat that takes notes from Biz
Markie’s dictionary of cultural references and
trades in Arrested Development’s live, south¬
ern-fried grooves.
Count understands that his Nashville home
base would be enough to turn any hardcore
pretensions into Opry-land farce, so he steers
clear of such poses. He’s just a guy who
admits he’s as friendly as Captain Stubing,
who values his years in Sunday school, and
who’s not cool enough to hide from us his
enthusiasm for Carmex lip balm or his crush
on T-Boz from TLC. He plays the dozens and
the Name Game with equal relish, then slips
bits of “Frére Jacques” and “Rosanna” into his
singsong patter; and all the while he trips
through laid-back verses like a top-flight
Bronx battler.
What’s more, Count constructs a solid mel¬
low funk sound with his own bass, drums, and
piano playing, abetted by Mark Nash’s
smooth guitar work. Tracks such as “Broke
Thursday,” “Agriculture,” and “Sandwiches”
are at least as song-oriented as Basehead dit¬
ties, and more true to hip-hop. With humor his
top priority, Count Bass D’s Pre-Life Crisis
sounds more like the time of his.life.
- Roni Sarig
Big Heifer
That Lucid Feeling
(Hat Factory)
Outrageous Cherry
Outrageous Cherry
(Bar/None)
Twenty-five years after Lou Reed split from
the band (rendering the aggregate that car¬
ried on without him for a while afterward
somewhat pointless), the Velvet Underground
continues to cast a long, jagged shadow over
Amerindie rock and pop, with beaucoup de
bands in thrall of the Velvets vortex: a
buzzing, tuneful rhythm guitar strum, a relent¬
less snare and tom-tom pound, and deadpan
downtown vocals. Yet two more groups spin
variations on the signature Sturm und Drang.
First, Chattanooga-gone-Baltimore trio Big
Heifer pushes all the right naif-rock buttons,
with guitarist Roby and bassist Barbara
singing endearingly about Hercules, the rig¬
ors of friendship, intergalactic nice guy Dr.
Neptar, and love stuff (‘Ten rolls of duct tape
wouldn’t keep us together/And I think it’s for
the better”) while cranking out whooshing
three-minute guitar pop. Frolicsome, frantic,
and fissionable. (Box 41343, Baltimore, MD
21203-6343)
Meanwhile, Detroit’s Outrageous Cherry
takes a more studied tack, with singer-song-
writer-guitarist Matthew Smith and his mates
zigzagging between hooky, fuzzed-out
nuggets (“Til I Run Out,” “Pale Frail Lovely
One,” “Overwhelmed”) and reverberating gui¬
tar clangor (“The Stare,” ‘Withdrawal,” “Radio
Telephone Operator Procedures Pt. 2”), much
of it iced with Smith’s gritty baritone, which
occasionally calls to mind the gravelly voice of
Lee Hazelwood. Anyone who ever genu¬
flected at the tabernacle of the Perfect
Disaster should get up close and personal
with Outrageous Cherry. - Michael Yockel
CELEBRATE!
Highlights of
Africa Fete’9S
on Mango Cds and Cassettes
AFRICA FETE 3
BQUKMAN EKSPERYANS
FEMI KUTI
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A SupaQubs Super-Inclusive" Resort
Oumou Sangare appears
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Femi Kuti appears courtesy
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Mango Records an Island Records Company © 1995 Island Records. Inc.
Show at Marlin Gardens
Monday Evening July 3rd.
1151-1201 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach
For further information please call 531-6117
Tickets: $10, $12.50
JAMAICA
Aventura 20880 Biscayne Blvo. • Aventura Mall N. Miami Beach Yhe Mall at 163rd St. •
12415 Biscayne Blvd. Miami Beach 1655 Washington Ave. Downtown Miami 361 E.
Flagler St. • 202 S.E. 1st St. Hialeah Westland Mall • 1001 W. 49th St. Central Miami
Miami International Mall • Mall of the Americas • Miracle Center Coral Gables 1570 S.
Dixie Hwy. South Dade Daoelaio Mall • 11600 N. Kendall Dr. • 11921 S. Dixie Hwy. • 13801 á. Dixie
Hwy. • Cutler Ridge Mall • 831 N. Homestead Blvd. TTcxéjfáxsfs* At SELECTED Locations
IT'S AT
SPECS
June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 85


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PLEASURE ISLAND
On The
Walt Disney World Co.
Salaried Casting
Dept, kemh 0001
P.O. Box 10,090
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
FAX 407-934-7243
We are an equal opportunity employer committed to a
diverse work place©The Walt Disney Company
Page 86 New Times
June 29 —July 5, 1995


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673-7300.
Boston: Friday, June 30, Miami Arena, 721
NW 1st Ave, 5304444.
Mambo Brothers: Friday, June 30, Tobacco
Road, 626 S Miami Ave, 374-1198.
Snapcase: Friday, June 30, the Attic, 3339 N
Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale, 785-4845.
Chris Whitley: Friday, June 30 through Sunday,
July 2, New World Cafe, 9661 W Sample Rd,
Coral Springs, 3407108, with Dan Whitley.
Barry White: Friday, June 30 and Saturday,
July 1, Sunrise Musical Theater, 741-7300,
with Chanté Moore.
China Doll: Saturday, July 1, Malone’s
Zipperhead Room, 619 E Sunrise Blvd,
761-1115.
“Beach Fest ’95": Sunday, July 2, Virginia Key
Beach, with Notorious B.I.G.S., Bone Thugs
and Harmony, Method Man, Adina Howard,
Outkast, Whitehead Brothers.
Crystal Gayle: Sunday, July 2, Miccosukee
Indian Bingo and Gaming, 500 SW 177th St,
223-8380.
Goo Goo Dolls: Sunday, July 2, Marsbar, 8505
Mills Dr, 271-6605.
Melissa Etheridge: Monday, July 3, Miami
Arena, 721 NW 1st Ave, 530-4444, with Paula
Cole.
“Rhythm Mania": Monday, July 3, Colony
Theater, 1040 Lincoln Rd, 674-1040 or
826-5392, with Patato Valdes, Giovanni
Hidalgo.
“South Florida Slammie Awards”: Monday, July
3, the Edge, 200 W Broward Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 525-9333, with Genitorturers,
Smite, Strongarm, Anger, Puya, L.U.N.G.S.
“What is DancehallP”: Monday, July 3, Coconut
Grove Convention Center, 2700 S Bayshore
Dr, 252-7787, with Shabba Ranks, Spragga
Benz, Vicious, Mega Banton, Honorebel, Big
Belly Sky Juice.
Susan Werner, Thursday, July 6, New World
Cafe, 9661 W Sample Rd, Coral Springs,
340-7108.
E.L.0: Tuesday, July 11, Mr. Laffs, 2079 N
University Dr, Sunrise, 748-7800.
Lynyrd Skynyrd: Tuesday, July 11, Sunrise
Musical Theatre, 5555 NW 95th Ave,
741-7300, with Tesla, Bloodline.
Sponge: Saturday, July 15, the Edge, 200 W
Broward Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 525-9333, with
Letters to Cleo, Our Lady Peace.
Filter: Sunday, July 16, the Edge, 200 W
Broward Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, 525-9333, with
Die Cheerleader.
Morbid Angel: Sunday, July 16, Button South,
100 Ansin Blvd, Hallandale, 457-8800, with
Malevolent Creation, Grip, Inc.
Yanni: Thursday, July 20, Miami Arena, 721
NW 1st Ave, 5304444.
Popa Chubby: Friday, July 21, Musicians
Exchange, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 764-1912.
Tad: Saturday, July 22, Button South, 100
Ansin Blvd, Hallandale, 457-8800, with
Clutch.
White Zombie: Monday, July 24, West Palm
Beach Auditorium, 1610 Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd, West Palm Beach, 407-683-6012, with
Babes in Toyland, Reverend Horton Heat.
Peter Murphy Tuesday, July 25, Cameo
Theater, 1445 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 532-0922.
Live: Sunday, July 30, Miami Arena, 721 NW
1st Ave, 530-4444, with Veruca Salt, Buffalo
Tom.
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June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 87


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Page 88 New Times
June 29 —July 5, 1995


Independence Day weekend, time for
another all-American wallow in Fourth of
July fever: fireworks, picnics, sex, and
sloppy fun. On Thursday, June 29, Twist —
everyone’s favorite gay bar — celebrates its
second anniversary with massive cocktail
courtesies (1057 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, 538-9478). The necessary barbecue
component of the weekend might be aptly
met by the “Kostas and Tommy’s Greek
BBQ” at the Fairmont Hotel on Sunday
evening. Great food, music by DJ Sugar,
and frolics galore (1000 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach, 531-0050). At the Edge in Fort
Lauderdale (109 SW 2nd Ave., 525-9333),
the fourth annual Slammie Awards on
Monday, July 3, offers the latest in assault
rock. The Genitorturers, L.U.N.G.S., Anger,
Strongarm, Puya, and Smite will top off the
underground music awards ceremony, a
rigorous enough program for any club
head. And possibly the evening will be tir¬
ing enough to fill the fun quotient for the
weekend.
Thursday
Bash. Hip central throws something novel
into the mix: a launch party7 for Spectrum
magazine, along with a “Caribbean Affair”
on the patio. 655 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, 538-2274
La Voile Rouge. Tommy Pooch’s tasty crowd
of internationals and club beasts, gathering
together for drinks, dinner, and revolving
homages to the model world. 455 Ocean
Dr., Miami Beach, 534-8700.
Howl at the Moon Saloon, “The Night Is
Young.” Diversions of the simple-pleasures
school: sing-alongs, dueling pianos, and
epic beer specials. 3015 Grand Ave.,
Coconut Grove, 4444411.
Bermuda Bar, “Hot Summer Salsa.” Salsa,
merengue, and Top 40 disco in a Bermuda-
gone-ballistic setting, a pitched barrage of
food, drink, and cha-cha merriment. 3509
NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach,
945-0196.
Bar 609, “Social Thursdays.” It’s college
night, with DJ Danny G. and the usual beer-
fueled rutting fever. 609 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 673-5609.
Friday
Virtua Care, “CyberSex on the Beach.” A cel¬
ebration of carnality and virtual reality
machines, featuring CyberSex models and
erotic multimedia mania. 1309 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach, 538-7646.
Pacha. Full bore fun. Disco, rampant titilla-
tion, and erotic dancers, intensely energetic
and not particularly subtle. 155 Lincoln Rd.
(Di Lido Hotel), Miami Beach, 672-2423.
Nick's Miami Beach, “Friday Night Happy
Hour.” After-work fun for the young profes¬
sional set: drink specials, a free buffet, and
the company of fellow drudges in the
workaday world. 300 Alton Rd., Miami
Beach, 673-3444.
Saturday
Cheetah Club, ‘The Loft.” An onslaught of
thematic elements — dancing, retro dining,
cigar rollers, live jazz, and live cats — in a
Forties-style supper club. 220 21st St.,
Miami Beach, 532-0042.
Squeeze, “Dance Your Ass Off.” All the disco
disciplines — progressive to tribal — in a
sympathetic atmosphere. 2 S. New River
Dr., Ft. Lauderdale, 522-2151.
Cameo Theatre. Club boot camp for the party-
hearty troops, loaded with hormones, teen
spirit, and an awe¬
some thirst. 1445
Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach,
532-0922.
Sunday
821, “Jazz & Swing Sundays.” The talented
Carolyn Ranting sings the standards — let’s
all have one more for the road. 821 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach, 5340887.
Amnesia, ‘T-Dance.” All the usual drag lumi¬
naries joining forces for a long revel. 136
Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 531-5535.
Groove Jet, ‘The Church.” Alternative in
every sense of the word, positively stewing
in underground integrity. 323 23rd St.,
Miami Beach, 532-2002.
Monday
Cafe Iguana. An array of rough pleasures,
from amateur boxing to a bikini contest.
Your basic romper-room of fun. 8505 Mills
Dr., Town & Country mall, Kendall,
2744948.
Glam Slam, “Fat Black Pussycat.” Miami’s
classic one-nighter, always packed to the
rafters. 1235 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, 6724858.
Brandt's Break. The happy-hour aesthetic
comes to sports playland, with pool tables,
satellite TV, and just about everything else.
619 Washington Ave., Miami Beach.
531-9661.
Embers, “Young and the Restless."
Civilization at last: an early evening min-
gling-and-dining session in actual tasty sur¬
roundings. 1661 Meridian Ave., Miami
Beach, 538-0997.
Tuesday
Rose’s Bar & Music Lounge, “Phat Tuesday.”
The weekly carnival of “acid jazz, rare
grooves, and phat phunk,” DJ Snowhite for¬
ever spiraling off into the stratosphere. 754
Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 532-0228.
Bar None, ‘Tuesday Night Music Club.” An
evening of live jazz and R&B, presented in
an opulent setting. 411 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, 672-9252.
MoJazz Cafe, “Big Mo's Tuesday.” Mo
Morgen and his collective of jazz artists
work the downbeat path. 928 71st St.,
Miami Beach, 865-2636.
World Resources, ’“Open Microphone Night.”
The world beat café invites multicultural
artists to take a stab at regional fame. 719
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 5349095.
Wednesday
Jillian's, “Ladies Night.” The restaurant-bar-
pool hall salutes women with a longish
happy hour, free billiards, and other
delights. 12070 N. Kendall Dr., Kendall,
595-0070.
Marsbar, “Wicked Wednesdays.” Earth girls
drink for free, and compete in an “outra¬
geous outfit” contest. 8505 Mills Dr„ Town
& Country mall, Kendall, 271-6909.
Jessie's, “Reggae Night.” A reggae-theme
bash, incorporating live music in the “Irie
Garden” and various artistic representa¬
tions of island culture. 615 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach, 5384)688.
Chili Pepper, “Pepper Unplugged.” An open
acoustic jam for fame-bedazzled musicians,
hosted by Vinyl Swampcookie, the
Pepperian audience always ready for fun
and follies. 621 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, 531-9661.
-By Tom Austin
Send information regarding special “one-
nighters” to “Into the Night. ” Fax material to
372-3446 or call 579-1578.
June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 89


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June 29
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DJ Snowhite
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Miami Brai't • ^ i)??n
Club listings are compiled by Liz Martinez, if you wish to
be included, please call 579-1572, Monday through Friday
before 5:00 p.m. The listings are free.
Rock & Roll
Bamboo Inn Lounge. 14301W Dixie Hwy, North
Miami, 948-8800: Marty (’60s & 70s), Friday and
Saturday.
Button South, 100 Ansin Blvd, Hallandale, 457-8800:
Vendetta plus Incessant Torment plus Malicious
Damage, Thursday; Vendetta plus Company Kane
plus Melodic Rape, Friday; Vendetta plus Melodic
Rape, Saturday; the Toadies plus the Nixons,
Wednesday.
Cheers, 2490 SW 17th Ave, 857-0041: Milk Shed plus
Cotton Side, Thursday; Was plus Nobutjest plus
Swivel Stick, Saturday.
Chili Pepper, 621 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
531-9661; live music, Thursday; DJ Rick Von Halle,
Friday and Saturday; Mr. Tasty and the Bread
Healers plus Shank plus the Haze plus Elysian,
Sunday; acoustic open jam hosted by Vinyl
Swampcookie, Wednesday.
Churchill's Hideaway, 5501 NE 2nd Ave, 757-1807:
Velvet and Nails plus Ivory Ghost plus Drive Choir,
Thursday; the Tribe plus Peerless Super Eye plus
Periwinkle, Friday; I Don’t Know plus Basketcase,
Saturday; Jill Kahn group photo shoot and jam,
Sunday; Grooveyard plus Drive Choir plus Laundry
Room Squelchers, Monday; Local Soup, hosted by
Zac, Tuesday; AJ. and the Stick People, Wednesday.
Clevelander, 1020 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 531-3485:
Pangaea, featuring Ani Espriella, Thursday through
Saturday; New Image (reggae), Saturday and
Sunday afternoon; Wizz Band, Sunday; SoBe Blue,
Monday; Ruffhouse, Tuesday; Wizz Band,
Wednesday.
Crown and Garter British Pub, 270 Catalonia Ave, Coral
Gables, 441-0204: Colin James (’60s & 70s), Friday;
Crown Trio, Saturday.
Cypress Lounge, 13800 SW 8th St (Miccosukee Indian
Bingo Hall), 2224600: Velvet and Nails, Thursday.
Doc Oammers Saloon, 180 Aragon Ave (Colonnade
Hotel), Coral Gables, 441-2600: Peter Betan,
Saturday.
Doc Graham's Taproom and Eatery, 20537 Old Cutler
Rd, 2354373: Brooks Reid, Thursday; Chameleon,
Friday.
The Edge, 200 W Broward Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
525-9333: South Florida Slammie Awards, featuring
Genitorturers plus L.U.N.G.S. plus Puya plus Anger
plus Strongarm plus Smite, Monday.
Howl at the Moon Saloon, 3015 Grand Ave (CocoWalk),
Coconut Grove, 442-8300: Plano sing-along, nightly.
Jimmy Johnson's Three Rings Bar and Grille, 4525
Collins Ave (Eden Roc Hotel), Miami Beach,
672-6224: Live music, Friday through Sunday.
Malone's, 619 E Sunrise Blvd, 761-1115: The
Zipperhead Room: DJ, nightly; Strychnine plus
Steam, Thursday; the Fallen plus Little Pink Badger,
Friday; China Doll, Saturday.
Marsbar, 8505 Mills Dr (Kendall Town & Country
Centre), 271-6909: Retrospect, with DJ Tim
Gallagher, Thursday; DJ Tim Gallagher, Friday; DJ
Brett Thom, Saturday; Goo Goo Dolls, Sunday;
Groovy Tuesday, with DJ Tim Gallagher; DJ Carlos
Menendez, Wednesday.
Mr. Laffs, 2079 N University Dr, Sunrise, 748-7800:
DJ, Thursday through Saturday and Wednesday;
ladies night Wednesday.
New World Cafe, 9661W Sample Rd, Coral Springs,
340-7108: Open mike, Thursday; Chris and Dan
Whiteley plus Sabatella, Friday; Chris and Dan
Whiteley plus Betty at the Station, Saturday; Chris
and Dan Whiteley plus Inhouse, Sunday.
Nocturnal Cafe, 110 SW 3rd Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
525-9656: Jennifer Culture, Friday; Hashbrown,
Saturday; Nucklebusters, Sunday.
Pickles Nitespot 2311 Federal Hwy, Pompano Beach,
946-2002: Boys’ Night Out Thursday through
Saturday; Actual Proof, Sunday; Boys’ Night Out,
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Rockandy, 909 E Cypress Creek Rd, Ft Lauderdale,
492-0099: Rulette, Thursday through Saturday; open
jam hosted by Motor, Monday; Club It alternative
dance party, with DJ Art Garza, Wednesday.
Rose's Bar & Music Lounge. 754 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach, 532-0228: Company Kane plus Sway,
Thursday; Johnny Dread, Friday; Dennis Britt and
forget the Beach.
Tor?et the Grove,
The True Blues are in Hialeah.
Come See
Cafhy Cotton
Live Every
Saturday
at 9 pm
Victor's Loun?e
2801 Okeechobee Rd.
888-9115
Never a Cover!
61S WASHINGTON AVE.
SOUTH BEACH, FL.
305 5 38 6688
Come & Celebrate
July 4th Weekend
MON JULY 3
Special Reggae
appearance
Le Coup
TUES JULY 4
Grand Re-opening
Hip Hop Night
June 29—July 5, 1995


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Y !jl. L~eS > • '_
June 29-July 5, 1995
West Indian, Saturday; Acoustic Sunday, with
Matthew Sabatella; Nuclear Valdez plus Phineas J.
Whoopie plus Jennifer Culture, Monday; Phat
Tuesday, with DJ Snowhite; Manchild, Wednesday.
Scully's Tavern, 9809 Sunset Dr, 271-7404: The Back
Beats, Friday and Saturday.
Silver Dollar Lounge, 14075 W Dixie Hwy, North
Miami, 891-9024; Sabatella plus Boon Docks,
Thursday; Livin’ End plus Maximum Drive, Friday
and Saturday; Southern Axxent (country western),
Monday; open mike hosted by Maximum Drive,
Wednesday.
Smokeless Pub, 13067 SW112 St, 382-1516: Joe
Anthony, Friday; Bob Bonnen, Saturday.
Squeeze, 2 S New River Dr, Ft Lauderdale, 522-2151:1
Don’t Know, Friday; South Florida Slammie Awards
pre-party featuring Jack Off Jill plus Radiobaghdad
plus the Unseelie Court, Sunday; Slang, Tuesday; DJ
Glenn Richards, Wednesday.
Taurus, 3540 Main Hwy, Coconut Grove, 448-0633;
Willi and Dave, Thursday; Road Kill, Friday and
Saturday; Joe Donato and friends, Tuesday; the
Kickbacks, Wednesday.
Three R’s, 13789 SW 152nd St, 238-5551: Velvet and
Nails, Wednesday.
Tigertail Lounge, 3205 SW 27th Ave, Coconut Grove,
854-9172: Velvet and Nails, Friday and Saturday.
Jazz & Blues
Backroom, 16 E Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach,
407-243-9110: Live music, Thursday through
Monday; open-mike night hosted by the
Nucklebusters, Tuesday; Piano Bob and the
Snowman, Wednesday.
Backstage Restaurant and Bar, 640 Ocean Dr (Park
Central Hotel), Miami Beach, 673-6181: Valerie
Tyson, Thursday through Saturday.
Brasserie L'Entrecote, 2901 Florida Ave, Coconut
Grove, 444-9697: David DeArmas (piano),Thursday
through Saturday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.
Capone's Flickerlite, 1014 N Ocean Dr, Hollywood
Beach, 9224232: Live music, Friday and Saturday.
Cheers, 941E Cypress Creek Rd, Ft Lauderdale,
771-6337: Simply Blue, featuring Ann Monaco,
Thursday; Wesley B. Wright and the No Regrets
Band plus Midnite Johnny and Smokestack
Lightnin’, Friday; Wesley B. Wright and the No
Regrets Band, Saturday; acoustic jam hosted by
Jamie and Roger, Sunday through Tuesday; the Law
(rock), Wednesday.
Club M, 2037 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood, 925-8396:
Josh Smith and the Rhino Cats pro blues jam,
Thursday; live music, Friday and Saturday; Gigi
DeNisco, Wednesday.
CocoWalk, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove, 444-0777:
Hugo Martinez, Sunday.
Cool Beans Cafe, 12573 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami,
899-8815: Rene Wood (swing Jazz), Friday; live
music, Saturday; Jet Nero and His Real Cool Human
Beings, Monday; open mike, hosted by UM Jazz
Quartet, Tuesday; Jet Nero and His Real Cool
Human Beings, Wednesday.
Double Play Pub, 7821 SW 40th St 261-9105: Harry
Morgan, Friday; open mike hosted by Tim
Brockland, Tuesday.
Down Under, 3000 E Oakland Park Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 5634123: Dave Siegel, Friday; Roger
Wilder, Saturday.
Dr. Feelgoode’s, 2471 E Commercial Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 491-7440: Open jam, hosted by Deja
Blue, Thursday; Jr. Drinkwater and the Spunky
Blues Band, Friday; Midnite Johnny and
Smokestack Lightnin’, Saturday; Duffy Jackson
Quintet, Sunday; Duffy Jackson birthday jazz jam,
Monday.
Fresco Meditteranean Cafe, 4525 Collins Ave (Eden
Roc Hotel), Miami Beach, 531-0000: Joe Petrone,
Thursday through Saturday and Wednesday.
Hofbrau Pub, 172 Giralda Ave, Coral Gables, 442-2730:
Jeni Cawley and the Super Trolley, Thursday.
Jazz Showcase, 905 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach,
407-832-1200: Arthur Barron, Friday.
Les deux fontaines, 1230 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach,
672-7878: John Chapman Jazz Ensemble, Thursday
through Saturday; Alica Duet Sunday and Monday;
tropical music jam, Wednesday.
MoJazz Cafe, 928 71st St (facing Normandy
Fountain), Miami Beach, 865-2636: Jazz of Brazil,
featuring the Rain Forest Band, Thursday; July 4th
Trumpet Fireworks, featuring Melton Mustafa plus
Ira Sullivan plus MoJazz Band, Friday through
Sunday; Mo’s Jazz Jam, with Tony Prentice plus Lew
Berryman plus Mo Morgen, Tuesday; Gary Fan-
Quintet Wednesday.
Musicians Exchange Cafe, 729 W Sunrise Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale, 944-2627: Sundown (country),
Thursday; live music, Friday; Joanna Connor Blues
Band, Saturday.
O'Hara's Pub, 722 E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
TYPEONEGADVE
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BLOCKBUSTER MUSC and Design are Trademarks of Viacom, Inc., New York, NY 10036, © 1995. Sale ends 7/17/95 Job #930010095P


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SALE ENDS
JULY 3,1995
At Selected Locations
IT'S AT
SPEC'S
Page New Times'^'
June 29-July V,* 1895


524-1764: O’Hara's All-StarBand plus Jesse Jones
plus Don Miller plus Mel Dancy, Thursday; O’Hara’s
All-Star Band plus Turk Mauro plus Don Miller plus
Juanita Dixon, Friday; O’Hara’s All-Star Band plus
Jesse Jones plus Dave Wertman plus Juanita Dixon,
Saturday; Melton Mustafa Big Band, Sunday
afternoon; “Sunday After Dark,” featuring Dr. Lonnie
Smith plus Danny Burger plus Eric Allison plus Don
Coffman, Sunday; Sha-Shaty, Monday; Dana Paul
and the Nantucket Sound, Tuesday; O’Hara’s All-Star
Band plus Sal Arstano plus Johnny Hodge,
Wednesday.
Pier Top Lounge, 2301 SE 17th St Cswy, Ft Lauderdale,
525-6666: Yvonne Brown and the Wonderful World
Band, Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday and
Wednesday.
The Strand, 671 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-2340: Piano Bob and the Snowman, Tuesday.
Tobacco Road, 626 S Miami Ave, 374-1198: “Pete’s
Wicked Night Out,” hosted by Beast and Baker,
featuring Mr. Tasty and the Bread Healers plus Milk
Can, Thursday; Mambo Brothers, Friday; live music,
Saturday and Sunday; Iko-Iko, Monday; live music,
Tuesday; Jolynn Daniel plus Room for Thought,
Wednesday.
Van Dyke Cafe, 846 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
534-3600: Tony Prentice, Thursday; Toni Bishop,
Friday and Saturday; Rita Quintero, Sunday; Eddie
Higgins, Monday and Tuesday; Hal Schaefer plus
Dennis Marks, Wednesday.
Country
Desperado, 2520 S Miami Rd, Ft Lauderdale,
463-2855: Colt Prather Band, Friday through Sunday;
John Nelson Band, Wednesday.
Straw Hat, 1236 S Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
779-1107: Open jam, Thursday; Country Bill, Sunday;
New River Riders, Monday; Terry and Jerry,
Tuesday.
Latin
Caché, 7397 SW 8th St, 265-4800: Clouds plus DJ,
Friday through Sunday.
Centro Vasco, 2235 SW 8th St, 643-9606: Juan Pablo
Torres, Thursday; Albita Rodriguez, Friday and
Saturday; Candi Sosa, Saturday; Mirtha Medina,
Sunday.
Club Mystique, 5101 Blue Lagoon Dr (Miami Airport
Hilton), 265-3900: DJ Hector San Roman plus DJ
Gilbert, Thursday through Sunday and Wednesday.
Club Tropigala, 4441 Collins Ave (Fontainebleau
Hilton), Miami Beach, 672-7469: Zun Zun Dambae
musical revue, Friday and Saturday; Alvarez Guedes,
Friday through Sunday.
Costa Vasca, 5779 SW 8th St, 261-2394: La Taberna:
Flamenco show with Cacharrito de Malaga, Friday
through Sunday.
Diamante, 1771 West Ave, Miami Beach, 538-5567:
Chemical after hours party with DJ, Friday; Love
Muscle hosted by Louis Canales with DJ Mark
D’Aleo, Saturday.
La Covacha, 10730 NW 25th St, 594-3717: DJ Ray
Perez, Friday and Saturday; La Cárcel (Latin rock),
Sunday.
La Paloma, 10999 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami,
891-0505: Larry Brendler, (piano) Thursday through
Sunday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.
Les Violins Supper Club, 1751 Biscayne Blvd, 371-8668:
Frankie Kein Show, Thursday through Sunday;
Motel — The Play, Friday and Saturday; La Mulata
Soy Yo show featuring Aymee, Sunday.
Málaga, 740 SW 8th St, 854-9101: Flamenco show,
Thursday through Sunday.
Mango's Tropical Cafe, 900 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach,
673-4422: Max Montana (flamenco), Thursday and
Friday; Max Montana Saturday and Sunday
(afternoon), Saturday and Sunday; Miguel Cruz and
Tropical Dreams featuring Dayami, Saturday
through Monday; Erica and the Brazilian Explosion,
Tuesday; Broken Sound, Wednesday.
Miami's Concorde, 2301 SW 32nd Ave, 441-6974:
Miami’s Concorde Band, Friday and Saturday; Los
Fonomemécos (comedy), Friday and Sunday.
Penthouse Cafe, 2100 W 76th St, Hialeah, 362-2100:
Luis Garcia, Thursday through Saturday; Oscar de
Fontana plus Penthouse Band, Friday and Saturday.
Stefano’s, 24 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne, 361-7007:
DJ Carlos Sarli, Thursday through Saturday and
Wednesday; Latin night, Thursday; ladies night,
Friday; Brazilian Tanga Follies, Wednesday.
Studio 23,247 23rd St, Miami Beach, 538-1196: DJ
Juan Diego Alvarez (salsa, cumbia, merengue),
Thursday through Sunday and Wednesday; Latin
Connection Band, Friday and Saturday.
Swiss Chateau Club, 2471 SW 32nd Ave, 445-3633:
Chateau Latin Band, Thursday through Sunday.
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Aventura—20880 Biscayne Blvd. • Aventura Mall North Miami—The Mall at 163rd St. *12415 Biscayne
Blvd. Miami Beach-1655 Washington Ave. Downtown Miami—361 E. Flagler St. • 202 S.E. 1st St.
Hialeah—Westland Mall • 1001 W. 49th St. Central Miami—Miami International Mall • Mall of the
Americas • Miracle Center Coral Gables—1570 S. Dixie Hwy. South Dade— Dadeland Mall • 11600 N.
Kendall Dr. • 11921 S. Dixie Hwy. • 13801 S. Dixie Hwy. •’Cutler Ridge Mall • 831 N. Homestead Blvd.
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EURO DISCOTHEQUE
THURSDAY, JUNE 29
Ladies Night
LADIES FREE ADMISSION ALL NITE LONG
LADIES OPEN BAR 11-12
MEN W/ AD $5.00 ADMISSION
FRIDAY, JUNE 30
White Party
FREE ADMISSION IF YOU DRESS IN WHITE
AND ALSO RECEIVE A FREE DRINK
SATURDAY, JULY 1
Saturday Night Fever
COME EXPERIENCE THE WILDEST NIGHT AT PACHA
SUNDAY, JULY 2
4th July Theme Party
COMPLIMENTARY BBQ
AND ALSO A TASTE OF CALIFORNIA WINE
MONDAY, JULY 3
COME AMD CELEBRATE WITH US
THE 4TH OF JULY EVE
SOUTH BEACH
155 Lincoln Road • Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel. 305.672.2423 • Fax. 305.672.7423
P»gb 94 New TitnéS
lili)
“The Summer Party is Here “
TUESDAY
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Enjoy $2.00 Domestic Beer &25C Raw Bar
ALL NIGHT
BARTENDERS!
Enter t u E u 111 tr e t e for Casilt aind F^rizies in our
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Ladies Drink free 5-8 pm
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Guys Receive a key
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'Jáne 29-Juiy 5, 1995
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Buy Vinyl
by New Times
Best of Miami 1995
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1376 N.E. 163RD ST. N.M.B.
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s& Grilled burgers & steaks till 1am
^ Frosted mugs of beer • ale • stout
^ Pool Tables • Darts • Foosball
A Neighborhood Pub
Since 1938
1430 Alton Rd., Miami Beach
534-5667
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EVENINGS / WEEKENDS
300 Arthur Godfrey Rd. (4R St) ste loo
Miami Beach
532-3186
Se Habla Español
Dance Music & DJs
821 Lincoln, 821 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 534-0887:
Maty D.’s cabaret night, Thursday; Overdrive with
DJ Tony (alternative), Friday; Mary D.’s Steaming
Saturday; Martini Monday; Fuse with DJ Danny
Garcia, Tuesday; Hood on 45, Wednesday.
Alcazaba, 50 Alhambra Plaza (Hyatt Regency), Coral
Gables, 441-1234: DJ Alex Gutierrez, Friday,
Saturday, and Wednesday; ladies night, Wednesday.
Amnesia, 136 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 531-5535:
Espuma party with DJ David Padilla, Thursday; disco
night with DJ Charlie Mercado, Friday; DJ Noel
Sander, Saturday; T-dance with DJ David Knapp,
Sunday; Espuma party with DJ David Knapp,
Tuesday; DJ Jab, Wednesday.
Bgja Beach Club, 3015 Grand Ave (CocoWalk),
Coconut Grove, 4454)278: DJ, Thursday through
Sunday and Wednesday; Power 96 dance party,
Saturday; ladies night, Wednesday.
Bgja Beach Club, 3200 N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
5614257: DJ, Thursday through Sunday and
Wednesday; ladies night, Wednesday.
Bar 609, 609 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
673-5609: Social Thursday with DJ; Funky Friday
with DJ Danny G.; Slamming Saturday with DJ Jorge
Milan, Saturday.
Bash, 655 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 538-2274:
Spectrum Magazine party with DJ, Thursday; DJ,
Friday through Sunday; Some Like it Hot with DJ,
Wednesday.
Bermuda Bar, 3509 NE 163rd St, North Miami Beach,
945-0196: DJ, nightly; Hot Summer Salsa with DJ,
Thursday.
Cafe Iguana, 8505 Mills Dr (Kendall Town & Country
Centre), 2744948: DJ AJ Falcon plus DJ Angel plus
DJ Greg Hunt, nightly; Latin night, Wednesday;
ladies night, Thursday and Tuesday.
Cameo Theatre, 1445 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-0922: Power 96 live broadcast with DJ Eddie
Mix, Friday; Cafe Latino plus DJ, Saturday; DJ
George Jett plus DJ Jack DeMatas (oldies disco),
Sunday.
Club Soda, 5460 N SR 7, Ft Lauderdale, 486-4010: DJ
Larry Starr plus DJ Michael J., Friday; Fashion Hi
Power (reggae, hip-hop), Saturday.
Club Union, 653 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
672-9958: DJ, Thursday through Saturday.
Coco Bongo, 1045 5th St, Miami Beach, 5344999: DJ,
Thursday through Saturday and Wednesday.
Coco Loco, 495 Brickell Ave (Sheraton Brickell Point),
373-6000: DJ Carlos Marban, Friday; DJ, Saturday.
Crash Club, 4915 NE 12th Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
772-3611: Ladies night with DJ Smooth Boy,
Thursday; DJ Smooth Boy, Friday; DJ Smooth Boy,
Saturday and Monday; open mike, Tuesday; ladies
night with DJ Smooth Boy) Wednesday.
Dan Marino's, 3015 Grand Ave, Coconut Grove,
567-0013: DJ, nightly.
Ensign Bitters, 3000 Florida Ave, Coconut Grove,
448-2582: DJ, Thursday through Saturday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday.
Glam Slam, 1235 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
6724858: Icon 1235 with DJ Abel, Friday; DJ,
Saturday; Reggae Vibe Sunday; Fat Black Pussycat
with DJ Sugar plus DJ Mark Leventhal, Monday.
Groove Jet 323 23rd St, Miami Beach, 532-2002: DJ,
Thursday; DJ Carlos Menendez plus DJ Luis Diaz,
Friday and Saturday; the Church with DJ Carlos
Menendez plus DJ Charles Arnold, Sunday.
Hooligan's Pub and Oyster Bar, 9555 S Dixie Hwy,
667-9673: DJ Danny, Thursday and Friday; DJ Neal
the Wheel, Saturday; karaoke, Sunday; Smut Night,
Monday; college night with DJ Little Al, Tuesday;
karaoke, Wednesday.
Hooligan's Pub and Oyster Bar, 15356 NW 79th Ct,
Miami Lakes, 829-2329: College night, Thursday; DJ
Jumpin’ Charlie D. plus DJ Wildman Bobby V.,
Thursday and Friday; Sunflower Blues Band plus DJ
Crazy Ed plus DJ Wildman Bobby V., Saturday;
ladies night with DJ Jumpin’ Charlie D. plus DJ Vic,
Wednesday.
Jessie's, 615 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
538-6688: DJ, nightly.
Kremlin, 727 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 673-3150: DJ
David Knapp, Thursday; Hot Tropical Salsa Friday
with DJ Lazaro Leon; DJ Lazaro Leon, Saturday.
La Voile Rouge, 455 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, 535-0099:
Live music (jazz and blues), Thursday; World Beat
and Funk party, Friday and Saturday.
Linda B., 320 Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne, 361-1111:
The Hideaway: DJ Rob, Friday and Saturday.
Lua, 409 Española Way, Miami Beach, 534-0061:
Brazilian night with DJ Pierre Zon Zon, Thursday;
DJ, Friday and Saturday; Hercules with DJ Sista
Leventhal plus DJ Sugar plus DJ Vixen, Sunday; The
Good Life with DJ Chilly, Monday; Worldbeat
Wednesday.
Marco's Club Tgj, 3339 Virginia St, Coconut Grove,
444-5333: DJ, nightly; Galaxy VI with DJ, Thursday;
The Brazilian Jazz
& BossaNova
Summer Concerts
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June 29-auly «, 1995
New Times Page 95


DJ Efren, Friday and Saturday; hot salsa
Wednesday.
Metro Underground, 925 Washington Ave, Miami
Beach, 538-7883: DJ, Thursday through Saturday;
DJ, Thursday; Fetish and Levi Leather alley
entrance party, Friday; Butt Bar, Saturday; DJ,
Sunday.
Nemesis, 627 N Federal Hwy, Ft Lauderdale,
768-9228: Live music, Thursday; ladies night with DJ
Frank Mendez, Friday; DJ Danny Bled, Saturday;
Freak night with DJ Danny Bled, Monday; phat
blues and jazz night, Tuesday; DJ, Wednesday.
O'Zone, 6620 Red Rd, South Miami, 667-2888: DJ,
nightly; classic disco night, Friday.
Pacha, 155 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, 672-2423:
Ladies night with DJ, Thursday; DJ, Friday and
Saturday.
Paragon, 245 22nd St, Miami Beach, 534-1235: Go!
after-hours party with DJ Charlie Mercado,
Thursday; Go! after-hours party with DJ Eric Joseph,
Friday through Sunday and Wednesday.
Rebar, 1121 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
6724788: DJ, Friday through Monday.
Ruins, 601 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 532-4292:
DJ, Thursday through Saturday and Wednesday.
The Spirit 7250 NW 11th St, 262-9500: DJ, Friday; DJ
Mad Squad plus DJ Crazy J. (Latin), Saturday.
Splash, 5922 S Dixie Hwy, South Miami, 662-8779:
DJ, Thursday through Monday; country-western
night Tuesday; DJ, Wednesday.
Steel, 841 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 674-0408:
DJ, Friday; the Abyss with DJ, Saturday; DJ, Sunday;
Drive Shaft with DJ, Monday; Funk Fest with DJ,
Wednesday.
Twist 1057 Washington Ave, Miami Beach, 538-9478:
DJ, nightly; DJ JoJo Odyssey, Friday; DJ Charlie
Mercado, Saturday; DJ Brent Sunday; DJ Eric
Cabrera, Monday.
Virtua Cafe, 1309 Washington Ave, Miami Beach,
532-0234: CyberSex on the Beach with DJ, Friday;
Cyber World Beat with DJ Pierre Zon Zon, Saturday;
Chocolate City 2000 with DJ GiGi, Monday.
Warsaw Ballroom, 1450 Collins Ave, Miami Beach,
5314555: Fever rave with guest DJ’s, Friday; DJ
David Padilla, Saturday; DJ Scotty J., Sunday;
Amateur Strip Contest with DJ David Padilla,
Wednesday.
Comedy Clubs
New Theatre, 65 AlmeriaAve, Coral Gables, 461-1161:
Laughing Matters Comedy Improvisation Theatre
Company, Saturday.
Uncle Funny's, 9160 SR 84, Ft Lauderdale, 4745653:
Eddie Brill plus Anna Collins, Thursday through
Sunday; Joby Saad plus Jimi Mack plus Tim Steed,
Wednesday.
Falk & Ethnic
Aruba Beach Cafe, 1 Commerical Blvd, Ft Lauderdale,
776-0001: Bob Vandivort and Just Jazz, featuring
Nicky Yarling, Friday; Sweet Justice (reggae),
Saturday; Bob Vandivort and Just Jazz, featuring
Juanita Dixon plus Dr. Lonnie Smith, Sunday.
Club Utopia, 1610 NW 119th St, 685-2582: Ladies
night, with DJ Uncle A1 (reggae), Thursday and
Friday; international party with DJ, Saturday.
JohnMartin's, 253 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables,
445-3777: Watch Fire C60s and 70s), Saturday;
James Kelly, Sunday; Tricianne Garrihy, Tuesday.
Kelly's Pub, 1832 1/2 Harrison St, Hollywood,
929-7940: Hollywood Jazz Quintet, Friday (from 4:00
to 7:00 p.m.); Faithful Departed (Irish), Saturday.
Le Gala, 295 NW 199th St (John Walsh Center),
North Miami, 7541330: Top Vice (Haitain compos),
Sunday.
Lime Key, 10625 Kendall Dr, 279-6511: Top Vice,
Thursday; DJ, Friday; Waggy Tee, Saturday;
Paradise Wednesday with DJ Pete Moreno.
Mombasa Bay, 3051 NE 32nd Ave, Ft Lauderdale,
565-7441: Broken Sound, Thursday; RPI, Friday and
Saturday; Don Fedele, Sunday afternoon; Broken
Sound, Monday; Motel Mel and the Innkeepers,
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Starfish, 1427 West Ave, Miami Beach, 673-1717: The
Seventh Veil, featuring Joe Zeytoonian (Middle
Eastern), Wednesday.
Stinger Lounge, 6029 Miramar Pkwy, Miramar,
981-0202: DJ (oldies), Thursday; after-work jam with
DJ Yo-Yo, Friday; Caribbean night, with DJ Yo-Yo,
Saturday; singles’ party, Sunday.
World Resources, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach,
5349095: Loray Mistik (Haitian), Thursday; Cedric
“IM” Brooks (African), Friday; Joe Zeytoonian
(Middle Eastern), Saturday; Cedric “IM” Brooks,
Sunday; Stephan Mikés (sitar), Monday; open mike,
Tuesday; Stephan Mikés, Wednesday.
goo^oog
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14075 WEST DIXIE HWY, N. MIAMI 891-9024
Page 96 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995


ome sweet home, immersed in a dan¬
gerous fallow period, nurturing our
pet obsessions — sex, fame, making
a living — and taking a breather
from the tabernacle of degradation, these
loathsome adventures in the societal
trenches, this ring of fire and fury signifying
nothing. It’s all one big celebrity circle jerk,
the money and shamelessness really gush¬
ing forth for PrimeTime Live’s Diane
Sawyer, debasing her profession before the
beastly pairing of Michael Jackson and
beard-wife/white-trash queen Lisa Marie
Presley. Sinister stuff, despite the couple
dismissing those charges of anti-Semitism,
religious fanaticism, and ten-million-dollar
payoffs for child molestation as nothing but
tragic misunderstandings: In an ideal world,
Elvis would come back and give them both a
good whupping. And if Sawyer still consid¬
ers herself a “serious journalist,” we’re defi¬
nitely overdue for a raise. Howard Stern
sidekick-in-filth Robin Quivers, a pioneer of
lucrative dancing with the Devil, making a
depressingly well-attended appearance at
Borders Book Shop to hype her memoirs,
Quivers: A Life. The book, not that it really
matters, breathtakingly vapid, a self-
obsessed recounting of her tragedies, tri¬
umphs, romantic liaisons, and figure fluc¬
tuations. With all due disrespect, we’re not
talking Mahalia Jackson here.
In other breaking fluff from the unilat¬
eral conquest of trash culture, Melanie
Griffith turning up on the Horatio Alger
Awards as a cohost, pre¬
senting various plaudits
to the bizarre. As it hap¬
pens, Griffith a uniquely
qualified success story,
having bounced back big-
time from a rough period
over the loves me-loves-
me-not Don Johnson: At
one point, Griffith actu¬
ally sympathizing with
Forrest Gump’s painful
passion for an abusive
woman. Now, through an
act of divine voodoo,
everyone’s favorite work¬
ing girl snatching
Antonio Banderas from Daryl Hannah,
who seemed to be closing in on him dur¬
ing the Two Much production. Former sex
symbol Burt Reynolds hosting an auction
this Saturday at his ranch in Jupiter, a sur¬
real accumulation of artifacts — from a
Mercedes go-cart to signed Evening Shade
scripts and a collection of Little Rascals
tapes — a step-right-up sale in the ashes
of fame. The formerly anonymous Jim
Carrey — who we couldn’t even be both¬
ered to watch, let alone interview, during
the production of Ace Ventura, Pet
Detective on Española Way — now very
big, very newsworthy, and terminally inac¬
cessible. Who knew? Art, romance, journal¬
ism, it’s all the same shit, a dodgy business
at heart.
The endgame of the weekend, ritualized
recreation being an absurd notion when
fun’s your business: Armageddon, if nothing
else, would break up the boredom of the
day. Yet again missing an assortment of wor¬
thy public events — Kostas & Tommy’s Greek
barbecue at the Fairmont Hotel, Mary Luft’s
sleepover benefit for Tigertail Productions
at the Miami River Inn, Migel Delgado’s “Sex
2000” show — and staying suckled up to the
bosom of the rich. Coral Gables for a beauti-
in the wings. Beside the “wall of shame” bul¬
letin board, the muscle boy clutching his
crotch as if he has to pee (“Jesus Christ, my
dick’s going to fall off’) and making trade
talk with the New Jersey girl-next-door type,
the whole scene hopelessly banal.
After some squaring off with the mon¬
strous Byrd over some protocol infraction
— bitches will be bitches — it’s show time,
the great woman behind the camera (“Oh,
that’s so hot when you touch yourself’) as
the female dancer obligingly spreads her
ass cheeks for the camera. The degrada¬
tion of show biz steadily escalating during
the male segment, the kid unveiling a cock
ring — attached an hour beforehand
according to Byrd’s edict of proper hot¬
ness — his member painfully swollen.
Afterward, the proud strippers joining
Byrd for a brief chat, behaving as if they’re
doing the Tonight Show, a brief thong
bikini not quite covering enough of the
hostess’s obscenely enormous ass. From
there, bathetic phoned-in questions (“Do
you go both ways?”) pouring in over the
transom, the cash register of porn singing
a merry tune. As always, Byrd
wrapping things up with her
trademark “Bang Your Box”
number, the female stripper
patently uncomfortable as Byrd
sucks on her nipples. Struck,
yet again, by the lonely hell of
New York, the atomized horror
that would allow for a blatant
hustler to profit so handsomely
j|j at the great well of human mis¬
ery.
The sex-on-a-budget tour wrap¬
ping up in the East Village,
where human life is cheap, and
yet resolutely conscious of being
a walking, talking, self-created,
and oftentimes self-delusional
metaphor of artistic realization.
An evening in cutting-edge cen¬
tral, a private loft serving double
duty as a tawdry performance
space, monologist Amanda Vogel
proving that whininess, despite consider¬
able appeal, still does not quality as an art
form. The truly homy Vogel, a thirtysome¬
thing creature embodying the intense des¬
peration of the New York prowl — so much
time, so few viable men — railing against
the male taste for uncomplicated young
flesh: “I’m older and there’s a few flaws
now, but do you know how many skanky
cocks I had to suck to learn how to do it
right?” A good point, Vogel dodging a
stalker in the audience — maybe she’s a tad
fabulous — and ruinously crossing the bat¬
tle lines of the sexes: “How many of the
men here are afraid of my sexual sophistica¬
tion?” Naturally, no hands raised, the gentle
art of cocksucking being a prized talent.
Unfortunately, Vogel inspiring the same
lack of enthusiasm with a plaintive ques¬
tion: “How many of you men would go out
with me on a date?” Even in the modern
era, a man’s got to draw the line some¬
where.
ful house party, flowing with wine and good
cheer, one woman beaming back to the
Josephine Baker era: “Oh look, my husband
is dancing with a Negress — don’t they look
divine?” A connected type reminiscing about
Mary McFadden’s old-meets-new-money
dinner for Ivana Trump, dance instructors
attending to regal crones. The first Mrs.
Trump, who recently gave the prenup
brushoff to companion Riccardo
Mazzucchelli, commenting that “writing
books is a lot easier than working for the
Donald.” Some Beach publicist — is there
one scrap of nonhype-tainted earth left? —
lobbing a celebrity sex sound bite about
another girl-made-good, the naughty,
bosoms-rule Anna Nicole Smith: “We were
in Vegas together, right after everything hit
about her mauling that baby sitter, hanging
out with Tanya Tucker. Anna was coming on
strong, grabbing these two guys and then
hitting on Tanya, who tells her, ‘You know,
Anna, I have a reputation as a solid hetero¬
sexual.’ Anna’s all fucked up — and not too
bright anyway — and starts to get even
hornier, backing her into a corner: Tanya,
that’s great — you go both ways, too.’”
It never ends, this itch of ambition and
desire, the spring/summer rutting season
of the vogue for Fourth Reich decadence
among good burghers. On to the Elaine’s
arena, drinks with Lawrence Norfolk of
Lempriere’s Dictionary, other assorted
beyond-serious novelists, and Barney Rosset,
the legendary founder of Grove Press. A
survivor of a bazooka assault on his office by
right-wing extremists upset over his pub¬
lishing Che Guevara — now
the namesake of a British
beer — Rosset also coming
under fire for Naked Lunch
and Lady Chatterley’s Lover.
Heady company, and yet lots
of easy Gutter Lite conversa¬
tion, gonads putting every¬
one, geniuses and reporters
alike, on the level ground of
coarse commonality.
Down into the bowels of
pop culture, a late-night taping of the Robin
Byrd pornucopia cable show, passing aban¬
doned theater marquees emblazoned with
manifestoes of the fringe: “Many can bear
adversity, but few can bear contempt.” Out
of the cab, the admonishment taking on a
prophetic ring, a gang gal on the street
being most insistent: “Give me some money,
honky, or I’ll cut your fucking dick off and
unfolding, as Adelaide so aptly lamented in
Guys and Dolls, like “a horrible dream.”
What with one petty circumstance or
another, frantically stuck in town and
reduced to summoning forth a kind of astral-
projection holiday, a reverie of darkness
from our last trip to New York City: Sex
everywhere and, in our case, nowhere at
once. Easing into the stygian depths of Kink
City with real live cultivated people, the
great salvation in the metropolis of the ugly.
SoHo’s enoki mushroom crowd, German
filmmaker Winfried Bonegec — of the new
documentary Profession: Neo-Nazi — talking
jam it down your mama’s throat.” Fleeing
into Byrdland, the usual union technician
nodding off at the video panel in the shit-
hole studio. A tiny, middle-age French
woman negotiating the incessant clamor of
the four-dollars-per-minute Byrdian sex line
(“These people are so mean and crazy after
midnight”), Byrd’s fans turning ugly with
the inevitable costly wait on hold. Several
stars of erotica having bailed out, Byrd
killing time with an evangelical monologue
(“If you’re home alone masturbating,
remember that you’ll always have me”) as
two anxious strippers, a boy and a girl, wait
The American dream machine, cranked
up and ready to roll: (Clockwise from
top) Hunk with the mostest Antonio
Banderas; Howard Stern sidekick
Robin Quivers at Borders Book Shop;
glamour gal Ivana Trump; Kenneth Rey
and Ernie Varela at Kostas & Tommy's
Greek cookout at the Fairmont Hotel
“Oh look, my husband is
dancing with a Negress —
don't they look divine?”
By Tom Austin
June 29 —July 5, 1995
New Times Page 97


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This Modern World
by Tom Tomorrow
THIS week: a behind-tme-scenes expose of
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INTEREST IN POLITICS WHATSOEVER-OFTEN
SHOWS UP FOR WORK COMPLETELY BLASTED
AND UNABLE To REMEMBER HIS UNES...
AND THEN THERE’S ToM TOMORROW HIMSELF... A
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THE "LIBERAL CARTOONIST" NICHE DRY— UNTiL
A BETTER OFFER COMES ALONG, THAT IS...
Steven
by Doug Allen In A Perfect Wbrld
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• a ekes /
Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer
by Ben Katchor The Quigmans
by Buddy Hickerson
A, LOP UCAk'y CMMH
locked to tm sidewalk
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C&LWAR
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TO S-TAHT WORK BEFORE
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COMMIT T£& To Memory-
For a free copy of Julius Knipl’s favorite tabloid, The Dally Pigeon
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send a 32C stamp to: Katchor, P.O. Box 2358,
Page IOO New Times
I’m sorry, gentlemen. I have no recollection of
chowing down on a Japanese city of any kind.”
June 29-July 5, 1995


Full Text
NWfims
June 2 B - J uIy 5 . 19 0 5 FREE
Metro: Rocky
coasts on
Stallone property
Volume ID, Number II
Cafe: Jen gets penne ante from Casa Rolandi
System overload: HRS protective
investigators attempt to put out
Dade’s child abuse fires.
By Art Levine
Batman and
Rasin
cane with
Boukman
Eksperyans

Contents
Letters
Best ethnic slur
3
News of the Weird
Air porn
II
Earthweek
41
Swelter
Kingdom of Kink
07
On the cover:
illustration by
Polly Becker
Metro: Fine by Me 5
If you’re Sly Stallone or his marine contractor,
penalties for violating environmental regulations
don’t add up to much.
By Kirk Semple
The Littlest Victims 12
Bureaucratic bungling and case overload make life
hell for Dade’s HRS child abuse watchdogs. But guess
who suffers the most.
By Art Levine
The Long Fall ofSgt.
Niki Lawrence 24
A cautionary tale about cops, women, and the high
cost of being a trailblazer.
By Elise Ackerman
Their Roots Are Showing 81
Haitian rasin band Boukman Eksperyans plays music
that touches the heart, the mind, and the soul.
By Jim Murphy
Volume 1.0
Number 11
June 29-
July 5, 1995
Metro
Page 5
TroubletDwn
Page II
Life in Hell
Page 43
Ernie Pook
Page 45
Film
Page 59
Staff
Editor Jim Mullin
Managing Editor Tom Finkel
Associate Editor Michael Yockel
Staff Writers Elise Ackerman,
Steven Almond, Todd Anthony,
Tom Austin, Judy Cantor, Jim DeFede,
Kathy Glasgow, Art Levine, Robert Andrew Powell,
Kirk Semple
Copy Editors Ann Clark Espuelas,
Bob Weinberg
Calendar Editor Georgina Cárdenas
Listings Specialist Elizabeth Martinez
Proofreader Georgia Rachman
Contributors Jen Karetnick,
Pamela Gordon
Editorial Intern Roberto Manzano
Art Director Brian M. Stauffer
Production Manager Carla Peters
Assistant Production Manager
Charles Masella
Editorial Layout Ray Villarosa
Production Marcy Mock, Sam Williams
Circulation Manager C. Robert Jones III
Circulation Assistant Manager
Leonard F. lyescas
Advertising Director Patrick Flood
Senior Account Executives Carolina Falla,
Shari Gherman-Rance
Account Executives Shifra Abramson,
Alina Blanco, Beth Brandes, Scott Cohen,
Luis de Cardenas, Kara Harris, Steen Lawson,
Anthony J. Marsallo, Michael Parra, Jenni Price,
Suzanne Ross, Richard Santelises,
Frank Tomasino, Claudia Valencia
Account Managers Hillary Crane, Andrew Polsky
House Account Manager Jennifer Granat
Sales Assistant Eileen Quintero
Sales Administrator Diane Maxwell
Sales Secretary Julie Ahern
Ad Designer J.P. Robinson
Contributing Ad Designer
Vivian Galainena
Classified Director Maureen Bohannon-Olson
Classified Department Administrator
Juan Saborido
Classified Sales Supervisor Joanne Morrow
Classified Advertising Representatives
Amy Brito, Carl Brunswick, Alex Budyszewick,
Tracey Burger, Miriam Galindez,
Kevin Montgomery, Henry Pinto, Edward Reid
Romance Director Leisa Sanchez
Romance Administrator
Jennifer Velazquez
Business Manager Maria Cabrera
Accounting Supervisor Michelle Fabelo
Classified Accountant Moses A. Betancourt
Accounting Clerks Beatriz Avellan,
Orlando Hislop
Systems Manager Kevin Mitchell
Front Desk Administrator Barbara C. Garcia
General Manager Irene T. Bustamante
Publisher Greg Stier
New Times mailing address:
P.0. Box 011591, Miami, FL
33101-1591
Street address:
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Miami, FL 33132-2220
For general information call:
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For advertising call: 372-3380
For classified advertising call:
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June 29-July 5, 1995

*»' ¿i' j I g V
Best Journalistic
Knuckle-draggers
After reading your selection of the best bak¬
ery in the “Best of Miami” issue (June 22), I
have several questions and suggestions. “Jew
food”? How about complementing that choice
with some “nigger nuggets” and “goy gar¬
nish,” washed down with a good “wetback
wine”?
Perhaps after peeking out from your rec¬
hinas, you might notice there is a real world
outside worth joining. Should you abandon
your journalistic cave-inscripting long enough
to become somewhat adroit at walking on
your hind legs, you might lope over to the
Holocaust memorial, find a merry band of sur¬
vivors, and ask them: “Where is the best place
to go for Jew food? Do they serve Christian
babies for appetizers at Easter?”
Or maybe you could assemble your editori¬
al staff (if you could get them to turn away
from their mirrors long enough) and ask
them: “How would we describe the Herald if
they used the phrase Jew food?"
Hey! I’ve got it! Maybe a full page in your
next edition explaining the exact nature of the
cognitive process that resulted in this particu¬
lar culinary description and how you feel this
best represents the editorial policy of your
paper? But maybe I’m wrong. Maybe you real¬
ly are just a mediocre bunch of journalistic
assholes.
Joseph Weinman McElwee
Miami Beach
Best Self-Effacement
Thank you for the kind and generous words
regarding me and Books & Books. It’s gratify¬
ing to be included in New Times’s “Best of
Miami” issue. I did, though, want to clarify
one point. Many, many people were instru¬
mental in the founding of the Miami Book
Fair International, including two other fine
booksellers — Raquel Roque of the Down¬
town Book Center and Craig Pollock — as
well as the wonderful people at the Wolfson
campus of Miami-Dade Community College,
led by their president, Eduardo Padrón, with¬
out whom this fair would never have hap¬
pened.
Mitchell Kaplan
Coral Gables
Herald Body Count: The Fewer
the Better
Jim DeFede’s insightful examination of condi¬
tions in the Miami Herald newsroom (“The
Incredible Shrinking Herald,” June 8) enlight¬
ened even some of us who work there and
have to live with the near daily staff-departure
postings. But the bottom line (pun intended)
is this: Herald management won’t do anything
about the “problem” of the brain drain
because Herald management doesn’t see it as
a problem.
There is only one problem, given current
corporate goals and priorities: too many bod¬
ies. Therefore any condition or force that pro¬
pels bodies out the door — bad morale, intol¬
erable stress, foreclosed opportunities — is
part of the solution. You need look no further
for proof than the defensive comments of
executive editor Doug Clifton and managing
editor Saundra Keyes. He’s “not in the busi¬
ness to win popularity contests.” She doesn’t
see “a correlation between the number of peo¬
ple in a section and the qualify of that section.”
You might argue which is more appalling,
his arrogance or her ignorance. What you
can’t argue with is the message implicit in
their refusal to yield a single centimeter to a
newsroom full of insecure and demoralized
employees: If there’s money to be saved, all
else becomes irrelevant
Name Withheld by Request
Miami
Were the ***** Herald and
Proud of It!
“The Incredible Shrinking Herald’ was one of
your best exposés ever. Unfortunately, you
failed to mention that part of the paper’s many
problems stems from many years ago, when it
opted to be the Anti-Miami Herald. I dare you
to find another major local newspaper that is
so negative and so determined to destroy the
community in which it exists. Read other
newspapers in our country’s most troubled
cities and you will find that, while always
addressing and exposing the local problems,
they are not in a constant mood of self-flagella¬
tion.
Another fact you didn’t mention is that the
Miami Herald has two names — one for
Miami and another for elsewhere (simply the
Herald.) Evidently they are ashamed and
embarrassed to use the name of the city
where we and they live. Check the listings of
newspapers in other American cities, large or
small, and you will see how the name of the
community is always used with pride.
Sidney Brown
Miami
Distribution: New Times is available free of
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JSL ABC
AUDITED
New Times, Inc.
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Corporate Editorial Assistant Alex McCall,
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"Most of it is the dragging of the feet of
environmental regulators, and it’s
real hard to stomach.”
contractor Richard Bunnell
First Build
Sly Stallone's contractor pays the price for doing
waterfront work without acquiring the proper permits.
Heck, it's only money.
By Kirk Semple
instances of illegal construction on the movie
star’s property. This past August, for instance,
builders constructed a pier before Metro reg¬
ulators had completed their review of the
plans and given the final go-ahead. That same
month, workmen rebuilt a boat dock that
exceeded the size regulators had permitted.
Not long afterward, inspectors noted that
Stallone had not acquired permits before
installing boulders and sand along a concrete
seawall. And in March of this year DERM offi¬
cials found that a boat lift, a jet-ski lift, and a
catwalk had been built on the property, also
without permits.
The regulators say the blame for these viola¬
tions lies not so much with
the actor as with one of his
contractors. One of Dade’s
pre-eminent marine contrac¬
tors, Richard Bunnell, presi¬
dent of Bunnell Foundation,
Inc., counts among his past
clients prominent attorney
Dan Paul and former Miami
Dolphin Nick Buoniconti. He
also is the director of an effort
to build the Manatee Halfway
House at the Miami Sea-
quarium and has been a bene¬
factor of Shake A Leg, a pro¬
gram for handicapped sailboat
enthusiasts.
DERM officials have no
quarrel with the quality of
Bunnell’s work. They object
to the way he seems to skirt
regulations to accomplish it.
The agency’s records indicate
e that Bunnell has been cited
i for at least fifteen violations in
| the past five years — not
| including the recent Stallone
e projects — almost all of them
* for doing work without proper
ince moving here just over a year ago,
Sylvester Stallone has endeavored to
become Miami’s nouveau civic icon.
He made his debut by plunking down
eight million dollars on a bayfront mansion
next to Villa Vizcaya, then wasted no time in
casting himself as a patron of the arts and
charitable causes. But while many local offi¬
cials have been genuflecting in Stallone’s gen¬
eral direction, he hasn’t exactly engendered
warm feelings at one particular agency.
That agency would be the Metro-Dade
Department of Environmental Resources
Management (DERM). During the past year
DERM inspectors have discovered several
permits. DERM assistant director Carlos
Espinosa says that as far as he knows, no
other marine contractors in Dade have vio:
lated permitting codes as consistently as
Bunnell.
Bunnell corrects most of his violations by
paying a fine (usually $500 per incident) and
applying for an after-the-fact permit, for which
he must pay twice the amount he would have
paid had he gone through the normal permit¬
ting process. The contractor, for instance,
applied for and received after-the-fact permits
for Stallone’s pier and
seawall projects. He has
applied for, but hasn’t yet
received, an after-the-fact
permit for the boat lifts
and catwalk. Regulators
refused to issue an after-
the-fact permit for the
extra-large dock, saying it
never would have been
allowed in the first place.
They penalized the con¬
tractor by ordering him
to plant 1000 square feet
of native coastal wetland vegetation on
Stallone’s property and to pay a $12,500 fine in
the form of cash and more plantings.
“We’ve had a number of meetings with Mr.
Bunnell for a number of different projects, and
we’ve indicated to him that we’re not happy or
satisfied with him starting work without per¬
mits and going beyond the scope of the per¬
mits,” says Carlos Espinosa. Because the stan¬
dard penalties don’t seem to be having the
desired effect, Espinosa adds, his agency
might “have to take steps to curtail this. A con¬
tinuous pattern could be grounds for revoca¬
tion of a [contractor’s] license,” the DERM
official says suggestively.
Bunnell argues that the regulatory process
is simply too slow. “When you tell a guy it’s
going to take seven months to get a permit
that should take a month, in my opinion most
of it is the dragging of the feet of environmen¬
tal regulators, and it’s real hard to stomach,”
says the contractor. “One of their favorite
ways to regulate is to wear you out They do it
by stonewalling and by not responding and
then by responding partially.” Often, he adds,
he has received verbal approval for a project
and is only waiting for “the paperwork” when
he begins construction. “It’s not something
you should do — I’m not saying you should do
that,” he says. “But when it takes three weeks
to get something typed....”
In the case of Stallone’s pier, for example,
Bunnell admits he began building before he
had received a final letter of approval. But, he
contends, he didn’t make a move until two
DERM workers had performed an on-site
inspection and deemed the project feasible.
“We wanted to get the dam thing finished,”
the contractor complains. “So we put in some
piling because we had the piling on-site.” In
some instances, Bunnell asserts, he’s sure he
violated no laws. He concedes, though, that
he usually does not contest the citations.
“What can you do, fight city hall?” he asks.
“It’s a stacked deck.” As for who eventually
pays the penalty, Bunnell says sometimes
he picks up the bill, and sometimes the
client “understands the situation” and
agrees to take care of it. “It’s not so much
the amount of the fines as the the fact that
we get them,” the contractor says. “I’m not
happy about these violations, [my clients]
are not happy about them. It doesn’t look
good on my part, but that’s not the whole
story.”
(Calls to Stallone’s management company
in Philadelphia went unretumed.)
Bunnell has met with DERM’s directors
“out of frustration” and has urged them to
hire more people to process permit requests
and to hold occasional meetings with
marine contractors “to chew the fat.” In
response to his complaints, DERM has col¬
lated a list of his recent projects and
recorded the time it has taken for regulators
to approve the work. “I think we’ve
attempted to streamline the process, and in
many ways we’ve responded quickly to
many of the projects he’s been involved
with,” Espinosa says. “But the fact of
the matter is everybody has to follow
procedures.” CQ
Bunnell has been cited for at
least fifteen violations in the
past five years - not including
the Stallone projects.
The Collector, Convicted
A Swiss jury finds art connoisseur/embezzler Roberto Polo
guilty as charged - thirteen times over
By Steven Almond
fter more than seven years spent
dodging prosecution for embezzle¬
ment, Roberto Polo finally stood trial
three weeks ago in Geneva. Accused
of skimming $124 million from wealthy
investors, the former art collector, whose
case became a cause célébre within
Miami’s Cuban exile community, pulled
out all the stops during the weeklong pro¬
ceeding. Among others called to the stand
by his high-priced defense team were an
official from the Louvre, a famed human-
rights activist, and Polo’s tearful mother.
, i! vifj â– 9*11
June 29—July S, 199S
In the end, however, the twelve-person
jury found Polo to be what prosecutors on
both sides of the Atlantic have long main¬
tained: a crook. The 43-year-old former res¬
ident of Coral Gables was found guilty of
thirteen counts of aggravated breach of
trust and sentenced to five years in prison.
Ironically, after his lawyers successfully
argued that he had served more than two-
thirds of his sentence while awaiting trial,
Polo was set free last week, in accordance
with Swiss law.
In the mid-1980s, Polo had launched a
company that specialized in managing
funds for rich foreigners, mostly Latin
Americans. According to bookkeeping
statements Polo sent to his clients, he was
investing their money in low-risk certifi¬
cates of deposit. Actually, as documented
in the 1993 New Times cover story ‘The
Collector,” Polo was spending the money
on an awesome array of collectibles, a
failed fashion house, and an opulent
lifestyle, profligacy that made him the dar¬
ling of the New York art scene.
By 1988 his clients had grown worried
and demanded their money. When Polo
refused, they filed civil charges in New
York and criminal charges in Geneva,
where he had relocated his investment
company. After police searched his Paris
apartment, Polo fled to Italy and soon was
arrested. A month later, in July 1988, a civil
judge in New York ruled that Polo owed his
clients $124 million.
Though Polo fought his extradition to
Switzerland, his final appeal failed in
March 1989. While out on bail he escaped
to Miami, where he lived as a free man for
two years, until April 1992, when Swiss
authorities caught up with him. He was
arrested by U.S. marshals and held for
extradition.
Family and friends decried Polo’s arrest
and formed a committee called Citizens
Against the Extradition of Roberto Polo.
With the help of two sympathetic editorials
in the Miami Herald, membership grew to
include former Cuban political prisoner
Armando Valladares; Xavier Suarez, then-
mayor of Miami; U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-
Lehtinen; County Commissioner Alex
Penelas; and a host of other prominent
Cuban Americans. Thanks to his well-
placed allies Polo was a celebrity prisoner,
portrayed in the local Spanish-language
media as a martyr.
Federal Judge Federico Moreno saw
Continuad on page 7
New Times Page S

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Convicted
Continued from page 5
things differently; in August 1993, he
shipped Polo back to Geneva. After nearly
two more years of pretrial wrangling, Polo
entered the courtroom inside Geneva’s
Palais de Justice to face his accusers.
For all the buildup, the trial offered few
surprises. The defense lawyers reiterated
what Polo had claimed all along: that he
had been given permission to invest his
clients’ money in artwork. The prosecution
called five of those clients to the witness
stand, where all five testified that they had
given Polo no such permission. They also
told of the dozens of fraudulent account
statements Polo had sent them.
Polo testified that the statements were
faked by someone who wished to harm him.
His defense team called various art experts,
including Louvre curator Daniel Alcouffe, to
attest to the defendant’s exquisite taste in
collectibles. They also called Armando
Valladares, who conceded he was not famil¬
iar with the minutiae of the case but had
read press reports about it and was offended
by the injustices Polo allegedly had suf¬
fered. The final witness for the defense was
Roberto Polo, shown here in 1993 at South Dade's Metropolitan
Correctional Center a few months before his extradition to Switzerland
Polo’s own mother, Maria Polo, who spent
much of her hour on the stand sobbing.
The only surprising testimony came
from Polo’s former wife, Rosa Franco Suro,
who was called by the prosecution.
Married to Polo for 22 years (they were
divorced earlier this month), Franco said
she had been bemused by the affluence
that overtook her life
in the Eighties. Her
husband, she said,
explained that he
had rich clients and
was managing “bil¬
lions of dollars.” She
testified that she
always had been led
to believe that the
jewels and furniture
and art that crowded
their apartments in
New York and Paris
were personal prop¬
erty, not investments
as Polo was now
claiming. She added
that Polo had even
asked her permis¬
sion to sell some jewelry when his legal
problems began.
On Friday, June 16, after five hours of
deliberation, the jury found Polo guilty of
all thirteen counts. Though the maximum
sentence for each charge was fifteen years,
the prosecution requested a sentence of
seven years. The jurors, who mete out
punishments in Switzerland, sentenced
Polo to five. He also was expelled from
Switzerland for ten years and ordered to
pay court fees totaling almost $15,000.
This past Tuesday he was freed because
his 44 months in jail while awaiting trial
exceeded two-thirds of his sentence.
Polo and his family were in Europe and
unavailable for comment. This past
Wednesday, the Swiss newspaper Tribune
de Geneve reported that Polo was in Italy;
his brother Marco lives in Milan. The
Tribune also hinted that Polo did not wish
to return to the United States in light of the
fact that officials here had extradited him.
Lawyers for Polo’s investors contend that
the collector and his extended family are
still shielding millions of dollars in assets
owed to the victims, monies they are pur¬
suing in a litany of civil court cases stretch¬
ing from Paris to Miami. ‘The important
thing is that a jury was able to see past all
the smoke and mirrors and found that this
man, Roberto Polo, is a criminal,” says
Robert Reger, whose client, Emilio
Martinez-Manautou, was one of Polo’s pri¬
mary accusers. “It took seven and a half
years, but justice was served.” CD
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New Times Page 7

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Page 8 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

etro
No Comment, Part 2
Finally, some well-chosen words about Metro-Dade Police Sgt.
David Simmons's incomprehensible transfer
By Steven Almond
hen Metro-Dade Police Cmdr.
Antonio Prieto transferred Sgt.
David Simmons out of the Juvenile
Investigations Bureau to a patrol
unit eighteen months ago, the comment
most frequently heard among Simmons’s
subordinates was, “What a joke.”
Exile a recognized expert in the field of
child-abuse investigation? “'What a joke."
Risk dashing the morale of Simmons’s
highly motivated squad? “What a joke.”
Dispatch one of the department’s finest
detectives to break up domestic disputes in
Liberty City? l The joke, as it turns out, is on Prieto. And
on the Metro-Dade Police Department. And
on county taxpayers, who will foot the bill for
its long-overdue punch line.
After his involuntary transfer, the 45-year-
old Simmons, who joined the Metro-Dade
force in 1973, filed a grievance against the
county, requesting reinstatement to an inves¬
tigative position in another detective bureau.
His superiors balked, and the complaint
spurred a costly legal battle that culminated in
a three-day arbitration hearing this past
January. (The case was the subject of the
April 27 New Times story “No Comment.”)
Three weeks ago arbitrator Edward
Pereles issued a fifteen-page opinion in
which he scolded Metro-Dade officials for
violating their own labor contract with
police and ordered that Simmons’s year-
and-a-half-old request be granted.
The problems began in 1990, when
Simmons joined the Child Exploitation
Unit, which investigates the physical and
sexual abuse of minors. His annual evalua¬
tions portray him as a model supervisor
with “an incredible ability to motivate his
personnel.” His handling of various high-
profile cases often cast him in the spot¬
light; the Miami Herald's Tropic magazine
devoted an entire cover story to his pursuit
of the notorious Pillow Case Rapist, and
crime writer Edna Buchanan lauded him in
her books.
But in 1992 Simmons ran afoul of Prieto,
who felt he was too friendly with the media.
The conflict came to a head in October 1993,
when the commander called Simmons and
one of his subordinates into his office and told
them to “find a home” outside his bureau.
Simmons was bewildered by the transfer
and infuriated to learn he would be moving to
a patrol unit in Liberty City, the same beat he
had worked 22 years earlier as a rookie. His
grievance bounced up the chain of command
and eventually was denied by police depart¬
ment director Fred Taylor, forcing the matter
into arbitration.
The arbitrator’s June 9 ruling boiled the dis¬
pute down to its essentials. Pereles notes that
the principal reason for a transfer, as set forth
in the negotiated agreement between police
and the county, “is to improve the effective¬
ness or efficiency of the department.
However, with regard to the transfer of
Simmons, this arbitrator cannot find evidence
to support an improvement in either the effec¬
tiveness or efficiency in the depart¬
ment. In support of the transfer, the
county only offered the argument
that Simmons was a ‘burr’ to
Commander Prieto. In what way?
Did he refuse an order? No. Did
Simmons fail to do something he
was required to do? No. Did he do
something illegal? No. Although
Commander Prieto states that
Simmons violated his guidelines,
Commander Prieto was unable to testify as to
what Simmons did.” Pereles also noted that
the transfer seemed to have been “an alterna¬
tive to discipline,” another violation of the
police contract In conclusion Pereles’s ruling
states that “the grievant shall be promptly
“Did he refuse an order,
fail to do something, do
something illegal? No.”
Sgt. David Simmons prevailed in arbitration,
but he’s still waiting for that transfer
placed in an investigative detective’s position
commensurate with his ability and previous
experience.”
Both Simmons and Prieto declined to com¬
ment on the verdict. Carole Anderson, the
assistant county attorney who argued Metro’s
case during arbitration, says she has ordered
the county to “find a new home for Simmons.”
Lt. Linda O’Brien, a police spokeswoman,
says Fred Taylor has already assigned
staffers to scout available positions for
Simmons. “But no action will be taken until
the director has a chance to review the deci¬
sion,” O’Brien adds. (Taylor was out of town
last week.)
In the meantime, Simmons, a 22-year vet¬
eran recognized as one of the department’s
finest investigators, remains in Liberty City,
overseeing a squad of six patrol units. CD
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June 29-July 5, 1995

News of the Weird
Lead Story
• On May 31, a small plane buzzed the U.S.
nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge,
Tennessee, and dropped more than 100
sheets of pornographic photos. Oak Ridge
police suspected that the culprit was the for¬
mer boyfriend of a female plant employee,
who had earlier accused the man of stalking
her.
The Entrepreneurial Spirit
•The former principal of PS 100 in Brooklyn,
New York, Stuart Posner, was accused in
February of stealing from the school candy
store, establishing businesses on school prop¬
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watch television during class tíme.
•Among cities in which “mile high club”
entrepreneurs were reported operating
recently were Hayward, California; Santa
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$199 to $279, a pilot will fly a couple around
for an hour so that they can have sexual inter¬
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on the market: toe floss (invented by Ronald
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his toes; a tiered cocktail-waitress “dress” that
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of Indiana University basketball coach Bobby
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Converse sneakers, from local dollmaker
Tom Alberts for $545; and a line of
toilet seat lids in the shape of guitars
(electric and acoustic), starting at
$49, from Marvin Maxwell of
Louisville, Kentucky.
• In March one Japanese company intro¬
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substance that stops the growth of certain
bacteria, and in April, another Japanese
company introduced preodorized under¬
wear containing a synthetic pheromone
found in underarm sweat, masked by a
musk fragrance. The manufacturer sug¬
gests, but does not guarantee, that the scent
attracts women.
•In May, the New York Times ran a routine
classified ad placed by Russian-born Victor
Rylkov, announcing that he had for sale a
genuine Russian space shuttle, the Buran.
According to a follow-up story in the New
York Post, Rylkov said he and his partner, the
Molniya aerospace company, actually had
two and were asking five million dollars to
ten million dollars each. Said Rylkov, “A lot
of things are for sale in today’s Russia if
you’ve got the right people working for you.”
•A firm called UltraTech Products of
Houston is offering the Toot Trapper Chair
Cushion, a foam cushion with a “superacti-
vated carbon filter” which supposedly
absorbs passed gas before it can escape
($29.95 plus shipping).
•Among the crime-protection products now
available by mail are Dyewitness, a canister
of green foam that will make an assailant (or
anyone else) foam up to look like a Chia Pet,
and Rapel, a foul-smelling liquid that victims
spray on themselves so as to be unbearable.
People With Too Much Time on Their Hands
•A Chicago Sun Times wire service report
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New Times Page 11

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in the child abuse
trenches with a Dade
county hrs protective
investigator
Blist of childhood abuses hangs on the glass partition in the tiny cubicle used
by Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) protective investigator Lulus
McQueen. It serves, in some ways, as a stark reminder of the cruelties that
he may uncover each day on the job. The list is meant to provide coded cate¬
gories that will be used in confidential abuse reports, but it also reveals the astonishing
range of harm that can be inflicted on children in Miami. Physical injuries start with
“bruises/welts” and “bums/scalds,” escalate through “brain or spinal cord damage” and
“suffocation/drowning,” and end, finally, with “death due to abuse/neglect.” The list also
includes separate categories for different forms of sexual battery, substance abuse,
neglect, and abandonment. About 900 such abuse and neglect allegations are routed
each month to Dade County HRS’s Children and Families Program through a central
hotline (1-800-96ABUSE) located in Tallahassee. It is up to people such as the Bahamian-
born McQueen to find out as quickly as possible if the accusations are true — and, if
needed, to do whatever’s necessary to protect the children from any further harm.
HRS protective investigators even are required at times to make life-and-death deci¬
sions, and if a child somehow remains in a dangerous home, the results can be fatal. In
1993, for instance, a Dade protective investigator wasn’t able to confirm a report that a
four-year-old boy almost was drowned by his parents. A few months later, the child was
beaten to death by the mother’s live-in boyfriend. Being a protective investigator, or P.I.,
then, entails enormous responsibility. Not only that, but every time Lulus McQueen goes
out into the inner-city neighborhoods of Miami to deal with the cases assigned to him, he
faces a special challenge: How will he maneuver his way through a minefield of conflict¬
ing stories, divided families, and bureaucratic snafus to help children in need? And these
days McQueen and the 90 other Dade P.I.’s are doing their work in a particularly
unfriendly political environment Republican legislators in Tallahassee have denounced
the department for mismanagement (Miami State Sen. Mario Diaz-Balart brands it “the
worst-run state agency in the country”) and voted out Jim Towey, the mentor of HRS
District 11 administrator Anita Bock, as chief of the agency.
For her part, Bock, whose bailiwick includes Dade and Monroe counties, concedes “it
is a mismanaged agency,” but sharply improved. For instance Bock says that when she
started at Dade HRS in 1992, the protective investigations division was “an unqualified
disaster.... There was just chaos in this area.” But she argues that tighter management
controls and a more accurate computer system have strengthened a work force that is
still underpaid and inadequately trained. She also contends that her district has been
hamstrung by the legislature’s budget cuts and its refusal to grant her the financial flexi¬
bility she wants to upgrade training and salaries. The deeper problem, she insists, is “this
community and Florida at large are not prepared to take care of their children and tire
elderly.”
The controversy over HRS is just a faint undercurrent on a recent Friday morning in
May when Lulus McQueen leaves his run-down Little Havana office on his first case of
the day. McQueen, an affable, casually dressed 43-year-old man with a slight paunch, isn’t
thinking about politics, but rather about the alleged sexual abuse of a three-year-old child
— and the travails of HRS investigators. It’s a hot day, and the prospect of driving around
in his own 1988 Audi with a broken air conditioner, a hand-me-down from his brother,
seems especially unappealing. (HRS provides no official agency cars for investigators.)
Given his base salary of $22,000, McQueen shrugs, “I can’t afford to fix it now.” But
despite his paltry pay, he at least remains idealistic: “You don’t come here to make
money. You’re here to save lives and help families.”
That’s what he’s trying to do as he heads to Overtown to pursue an investigation he

New Times Page 13
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started the day before. (To protect the confidentiality of
families and children, names have been changed in all
cases and certain details have been altered or dis¬
guised.) Each case, after being approved by Tallahassee
for further investigation, is tagged as either “immediate”
or “24-hour” by the central abuse registry, and although
this case didn’t require his instant attention, McQueen
chose to start in on it right away: “I wanted to make sure
that the child isn’t in any danger.” Investigators are the
firemen of family turmoil, and speed is usually essential.
But in the murky arena of sexual abuse, the truth
often proves elusive. Yesterday, McQueen managed to
speak to the grandmother of the alleged victim and to
the child himself, who was taken by police to Jackson
Memorial Hospital’s Rape Treatment Center (RTC) for
an exam. (As is often the case, the child’s mother
phoned the police, who in turn notified the HRS hot¬
line.)
The child told a story about his father — who lives
apart from his mother —
touching his “pee-pee” and
putting the father’s “pee-
pee” in the son’s “butt.”
Today, when McQueen
speaks to the boy’s mother,
she tells him that while
bathing her son, “I saw what
looked like come in his
behind.”
After talking a while with
the mother, McQueen con¬
tinues to sort things out in
his mind on the trip back to
the office. “I feel badly for
the mother and the child,
but I’ve got to keep my
focus on how to prove what
actually happened,” he
points out. Later today, after
his interview with the
mother, he learns from the
detective on the case that
the RTC examination found
no evidence of penetration
or sexual abuse. (No arrests
are made, and McQueen,
after concluding that the
sexual allegation was
unfounded, refers the
mother a few days later to counseling to help her cope
with the stresses of raising her child.) McQueen still has
no firm idea of what really happened, but he doesn’t
have time to dwell on it. He’s got other cases to pursue.
McQueen isn’t frustrated by the large portion of
unproven and unfounded cases he encounters. “If noth¬
ing happened, that’s great,” he says. “There’s a sense of
relief that nothing has taken place.” Only about ten per¬
cent of the approximately 10,000 abuse reports handled
by Dade HRS annually are definitively confirmed. At
least 30 percent fall into a muddy category where some¬
thing may have happened, but there’s no way to prove it.
But if abuse allegations appear to be well-grounded
and McQueen feels a child is in immediate danger, he
has the authority to remove the child from a home and
place him or her with relatives or in an HRS shelter,
then seek court approval within 24 hours. In truth it is a
power that is invoked only infrequently because of the
state legislature’s 1993 directive promoting “family
preservation.” The agency generally has sought to com¬
ply with this policy — only eight percent of abuse
reports lead to a child’s removal from the home — but
even so, among the families that Lulus McQueen visits,
the fear of having their kids snatched away by the gov¬
ernment is a very real one.
Inside the decaying Liberty City apartment building,
with unsupervised children playing outside near
exposed wiring and amid broken windows, a mother is
very nervous. Anna, a thin Hispanic woman in her early
thirties, bustles about the apartment, smiling, tense, and
deferential, even offering to fetch a drink for McQueen.
She has been accused in the report he holds of abusing
drugs and endangering her two children, a boy and a
girl, and she has been the target of similar earlier com¬
plaints to HRS.
McQueen tries to put her at ease. “We want to see if
we can help. We were called about some allegations,
and I’m here to assist in any way I can,” he explains,
seated across from her with a notepad. In the last year
and a half, HRS has sought to move away from a coplike
approach in abuse investigations, and move toward what
director Anita Bock calls a “social worker mode.”
Although McQueen has been a P.l. only for she months,
he is well-suited to this
new style because he has
worked for years as a drug
and alcohol counselor, first
for a nonprofit agency, then
for HRS, and later for the
University of Miami.
Despite his gentle style, he must ask the woman hard
questions. In a matter-of-fact way, he glances down at
his abuse report and begins reading aloud the allega¬
tions to her:
“Anna is abusing illicit drugs and it is likely affecting
her ability to care for her children. She has sudden
mood swings. She’s talked of killing herself and her
kids. She was so high on drugs she got in a car accident
while one of the kids was inside.” McQueen speaks
softly, almost apologetically. “Sometimes these reports
are true, sometimes they’re not,” he adds. (The identity
of the person who reported Anna to HRS is kept secret
from everyone except HRS officials, a procedure
designed to encourage citizens to report abuse without
fear of retaliation.)
Anna continues to smile while listening to the litany of
complaints, doing her best to be charming. “I know why
this report was called in,” she finally says in a fast-talk¬
ing, high-strung way. “I was late picking up my daugh¬
ter from daycare, and I was turning the comer when this
car ran into me.” Her son was in the car at the time.
However, her faqade of good cheer crumbles for a
moment when she realizes the gravity of the charges
against her. “I don’t believe this,” she suddenly says,
shaking her head.
McQueen nods understanding^, then goes over the
allegations one by one. “Do you use drugs?” he asks.
“I got off drugs a year ago,” she says, and when
McQueen asks, she agrees to take a voluntary drug test,
then goes on to deny or explain away all of the allega¬
tions. She’s eager to prove that she’s a good parent and
there’s a certain desperation in her voice when she says,
“You could look at my refrigerator and check to see
there’s no problem. That’s what the lady who was here
last time did.”
McQueen declines, and asks Anna to take him over to
both a grade school and a day-care center in the neigh¬
borhood so he can talk to her children. The first stop is
the elementary school, where McQueen arranges to
speak privately with the eight-year-old child in a confer¬
ence room. The boy, in his Ninja Turtles T-shirt, obedi¬
ently follows the P.I. inside. McQueen acts as friendly as
he can, but even with
his easygoing manner
there’s no disguising
the difficulty of the
questions he has to ask.
“Have you every
By Art Levine
seen your mommy using
drugs?”
The boy shakes his head quietly.
“Does she beat you?” Again, the youngster shakes his
head. Trying to gain his confidence, McQueen leans
closer and asks, “Is there anything else you want to tell
me? Is everything okay at this time?”
“Yes.”
When McQueen emerges with the boy, Anna tells the
P.I., “This is the third or fourth time, so he’s used to it by
now.”
She then takes McQueen to a nearby day-care center,
and when Anna’s daughter espies her mother, she runs
over happily. Accompanied by a day-care worker,
McQueen goes into a small office with the four-year-old
girl and tries to talk to her. The girl sits on a tiny chair,
Continued on page 15

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Protectors
Continued from page 13
looking overwhelmed by the adults surround¬
ing her. “You’re a pretty little girl,” McQueen
says reassuringly. But when he asks her, “Do
you know what drugs are?” and she shakes
her head, he realizes this interview won’t pro¬
duce anything useful. The child leaves the
room to rejoin her mother, and Anna is
allowed to return home.
McQueen turns his attention to the day-care
instructor, seeking to get her impressions.
She praises Anna for being affectionate with
her children, but also notes that she’s looked
high on drugs at times. “When that stuff starts
taking over, I get scared for her and the chil¬
dren,” the woman says.
Finally, McQueen says to the day-care
worker, “I have mixed feelings about this and
I will sort it out.”
It’s a tricky case for McQueen, because he
has to balance the obvious affection between
the mother and her children with the possibil¬
ity that her risky behavior could endanger
their lives. (When he catches up with Anna on
another visit a few days later, he convinces
her to enter a drug treatment program, even
though there’s no concrete evidence that
she’s using drugs. “If there’s another report
on her and she didn’t follow through on the
drug program, we’ll have to take action,” he
says later.)
Today, however, on the way back to the
office in the late afternoon after his visit to the
day-care center, he’s sure of only one thing
regarding this family: “You never want to put
a child in a shelter.” In McQueen’s view, shel¬
ters — temporary way stations for children
until permanent homes can be found or
they’re returned to their parents — don’t offer
the warm, loving attention children need. If
children have to be removed from a home, it’s
far better to place them with other relatives
than in a shelter, he believes, a view shared in
part by Dade HRS administrators. There are
eighteen child shelters in Dade County, with
a total of 90 beds, all secretly located in resi¬
dential neighborhoods so abusive relatives
can’t find them.
His next stop, it turns out, is just such a
shelter. While he is returning to the office, he
gets an urgent beeper message to call his
supervisor, who tells him over a cellular
phone that he has to pick up a sick child at a
shelter in Cutler Ridge and take him to a hos¬
pital. Before McQueen can get any further
information, the battery in the early-model
cellular phone goes dead. It happens every
day about this time.
The agency’s deployment of personnel
doesn’t seem to work much better than its
high-tech equipment An HRS office in South
Dade is far closer to the Cutler Ridge shelter
than McQueen is at the moment, crawling
along in rush-hour traffic late on a Friday
afternoon. And while McQueen, a seven-year
veteran of the U.S. army, realizes that there
are some orders one has to accept, this one
irks him. “Am I the only HRS investigator
working right now?” he asks rhetorically.
“Nobody wants to be the one to be responsi-
June 29-July 5, 1995
ble.” (Bock, when asked later about the P.I.’s
sudden assignment, says, “It makes no sense
to me.” She blames everything from poor staff
judgment to personnel shortages.)
Before driving to Cutler Ridge, McQueen
returns to the office to learn more details
about the case, then heads out again about
4:30 p.m. As the car moves slowly down South
Dixie Highway, McQueen gripes, “Why in
hell do I have to go to Southwest Dade to take
a kid to a hospital? By the time I get there the
kid could be dead.” He’s also on call after 5:00
p.m. for emergency investigations, and en
route to Cutler Ridge he gets a beeper mes¬
sage urging him to call Dade’s central child
protection office at the Juvenile Justice Center
on Northwest 27th Avenue. “I can only work
on one case at a time,” he says, choosing to
ignore the message. The dispatcher will have
to find somebody else.
When he arrives at the shelter, a ranch
house in a middle-class neighborhood, he
can’t help but notice a truck parked outside
piled high with garbage. “Jesus Christ!” he
exclaims. “Children live here?” He adds bit-
ingly, “The trash is enough to make a child
sick.” Inside the house, a dozen children,
mostly black, from an infant in a crib to grade
schoolers, loll about in
a stupor of apathy.
They sit around in a
sparse, depressing liv¬
ing room; one wall has
been decorated with
cheerful Disney char¬
acters, incongruous
amid the gloom. The
Box cable channel
blares rap videos in
one comer, and lying
on a small couch near
the TV set is the sick
child himself, a cold
towel resting on his forehead. The child-care
staffer on duty (they work in three eight-hour
shifts) greets McQueen laconically and tells
him the boy has a 104-degree temperature.
She helps the child get up, hands McQueen a
folder with some information on the seven-
year-old, and ushers them out the door.
The boy is strikingly quiet and passive, say¬
ing only that he has been sick for four days.
At the hospital emergency room, when a
nurse finally sees the boy, McQueen finds he
can’t answer the nurse’s questions about
whether the child has allergies or major
health problems. It’s information the hospital
needs in order for the boy to avoid any poten¬
tial side effects from treatments. McQueen
looks through the sketchy background report
he was given and admits, “I don’t know any¬
thing about this child.” The answer points up
just how vulnerable and isolated the child —
sitting silently next to the nurse’s desk —
really is.
While waiting, the boy says he doesn’t
want to go back to the shelter because
“they beat me.” He’s vague and unclear
about who does the alleged beating. (“I
can’t blame him for not wanting to go back
to the shelter,” McQueen says later, but he
claims he doesn’t have enough solid infor¬
mation to pursue an abuse investigation —
or even phone in to the hotline — regard¬
ing one of HRS’s own shelters. Under state
law, HRS investigators and others who
deal with children are required to report
suspected child abuse, but they’re given
discretion to make judgments about what
cases should be reported.) It takes a few
more hours before the doctors tell them —
after making several tests — that the boy
just has a bad cold.
It is close to 9:30 p.m. when McQueen and
the child leave the hospital. Before he
departs, however, McQueen calls his wife to
say, as he often does, that he’ll be late.
Continued on page 16
“she was so high on
drugs she got in a car
accident while one of
the kids was inside.”
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New Times Page 15

Protectors
Continued from page 15
“Why are you doing this job?” she asks him
angrily.
“It’s because of the kids," he tells her.
“What about our kid?” she shoots back.
Sometimes when an abuse investigator such
as McQueen is called in to explore a new alle¬
gation, HRS already has been involved, but it
is left to the P.I. to try to patch up again the
shredded fabric of family life. It’s not easy to
pinpoint blame for the failures: Everything
from the agency’s periodic inability to provide
thorough family monitoring to the erratic
lives and schedules of the impoverished par¬
ents themselves can play a part. Bock says
part of the fault comes from a system that
passes along supervision of a family from
worker to worker, division to division. The
result is that some families end up falling
through the cracks of HRS services. That
appears to be what’s happened in McQueen’s
first new case of the next week, when he
heads out on Monday morning to another
slum neighborhood to check out a report that
a young mother’s child has been spotted with
bruises on his body.
When McQueen gets to the ramshackle
house, he finds a pregnant, lethargic black
woman surrounded by four preschoolers
scampering around on a dirty gray carpet.
Like almost all the mothers he visits, this
woman is on welfare. In the next room, the
boy who is supposed to have been bruised is
sleeping. When McQueen goes in to examine
him, he doesn’t find any bruises, but he does
learn that this twenty-year-old mother is over¬
whelmed by all of her kids. And in the course
of denying that she mistreats her children,
she also tells him about another HRS worker
who promised to help her get daycare but
never did.
“If the others didn’t do that, then I will,” he
vows.
She also tells him about the gas and hot
water that have been turned off, the rats in the
home, the ceiling that’s peeling off. “You need
help like yesterday,” he tells her. (In the next
few days he lines up a nearby HRS-funded
day-care center for her, as well as counseling
about birth control and parenting; he also con¬
tacts the landlord about restoring the hot
water and gas.)
(The lack of HRS follow-through uncovered
by McQueen in this case underscores why in
recent years the agency has developed a two¬
pronged approach to abuse investigations.
People such as McQueen are known as a
“triage” investigators, and their work subse¬
quently is reinforced and double-checked by
“followup” investigators. Although McQueen
seems unusually thorough in his work, many
other triage investigators are not. ‘They go
out in a hurry and lay the groundwork, and I
make sure they didn’t make any mistakes,”
explains Cyprion Onuoha, a jovial Nigerian
who has been working as an investigator for
five years. ‘There are so many things left
undone by the triage worker.”)
On the way back to his office after his visit
to the harried pregnant mother, McQueen is
disturbed by the implications of what he’s just
seen, noting “The family has fallen apart in
the black community.”
The dissolution of the black family has
reached its virtual endpoint in the home he’s
assigned to visit next—despite previous HRS
efforts to keep the family together. A three-
year-old girl was left home alone in the morn¬
ing when her mildly retarded mother,
Barbara, went with her fourteen-year-old
daughter Joan to pick up a check from the
Association for Retarded Citizens, the agency
that handles her finances.
McQueen learns from the HRS file he car¬
ries with him that the mother has at least two
prior complaints lodged against her, including
one for giving birth to a boy last September
who tested positive for marijuana. He also can
see that she’s been listed as receiving some
sort of counseling services, but clearly some¬
thing went wrong. “This is the last time
they’re going to dump this one,” he asserts.
“Somebody’s not doing what they’re sup¬
posed to do.” He wants to reach the worker
who tracked the family for HRS’s protective
services division — which offers long-term
monitoring — but he doesn’t have time to
locate the worker before getting to the house.
“I need to know what was done,” he com¬
plains, “but I’m going in there totally cold.”
As he enters a cramped, sweltering two-
bedroom apartment, he finds a black woman
in a housedress staring blankly at him while
cradling her three-year-old daughter. A smil¬
ing nine-month-old boy plays in his little
walker, unaware of the trouble ahead, while
Barbara’s teenage daughter looks on fear¬
fully. McQueen tries to ask the mother if she
indeed left her youngest daughter at home
alone, but the 35-year-old mother has trouble
understanding the question. So he turns to
Joan for the answer. She glances over at the
mother to see what she should say before
admitting, “She [the baby girl] was home
asleep with the flu, and we didn’t want to
wake her.”
McQueen tries to make the mother under¬
stand that she shouldn’t leave the child alone
at that age. The daughter nervously inter¬
rupts, “I hope you’re not going to take her
away from Mom.” Joan is the only member of
the family who understands what may be at
stake, and she stares at McQueen warily,
clutching her hands together.
McQueen evades the girl’s plea for now, as
he continues to quiz the mother about the
help she’s supposed to receive and the way
she cares for the kids. Her answers are halt¬
ing and confused, all about the daddies that
don’t come to visit and the food stamps she
doesn’t get and the drug-treatment appoint¬
ments she’s missed.
Suddenly, in a voice stripped of every emo¬
tion except weariness, the mother asks, “Are
you going to take all three children from me?”
“Do you want us to take them?” McQueen
says.
‘The oldest one ain’t doing me right... 1
have seizures.. .yeah, take all three of them,”
she announces, as if they were pieces of furni¬
ture she was ready to discard. ‘Take ’em with
you all today.”
Everything is changing for Barbara’s family
now, but McQueen needs to fulfill some offi¬
cial reporting requirements — obtaining all
the children’s names and social security num¬
bers from papers the
mother provides —
before he takes any
further action. The
teenager begins
weeping softly. The
mother looks at her
coldly: “Don’t start
crying. I don’t care.”
McQueen stands up
and tries to reach the
family’s protective
service worker on his
cellular phone, but
since it’s about 4 p.m., the phone has gone
dead again. “Like clockwork,” he says, bor¬
rowing the family’s phone. He reaches the
worker’s supervisor and outlines the neglect
charge and the current crisis in a cool profes¬
sional manner while the family looks on: “She
Continued on page 18
suddenly, the mother
asks, “Are you ^oin^
to take all three
children from me?”
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Protectors
Continued from page 16
wants to give the children up. She suffers
from seizures and other problems, and if s too
much for her.” It’s clear that the supervisor
doesn’t fully understand the urgency of the
situation, because McQueen shouts, in
response to a query about the neglect allega¬
tion, “Yes, if s founded!” When he hangs up
he expects that the protective services worker
will be contacted and arrange to take the chil¬
dren to a shelter or drop them with relatives.
Meanwhile, the mother orders the daugh¬
ter to start packing. The girl heads into her
room, emptying the clothing from her draw¬
ers into green garbage bags the mother
hands her. Barbara casually removes pho¬
tographs of the children from picture frames
and throws them on top of a pile of clothing
and baby paraphernalia she’s shoved next to
the door.
After a while, McQueen calls back the
supervisor, who tells him that she’ll try to
beep the protective services worker.
Eventually he realizes that the worker isn’t
going to show up, and he’ll have to make
arrangements for the children himself. He
gets from Joan the phone numbers of
Barbara’s mother and two sisters, trying to
find someone willing to take the kids right
now. “If nobody’s willing to take the children,
I have to put them in a shelter,” he tells one
sister. Ultimately he convinces the mother
and Barbara’s other sister to come over.
In the course of speaking to the relatives, he
discovers that they’ve made several previous
efforts to gain custody of the children, but
were rebuffed by the court — with the
approval of HRS. “This time I’m going to file a
detention petition, and I’ll do it the right way
once and for all,” he tells Barbara’s mother
over the phone.
As the teenager stomps angrily around the
house packing up the children’s belongings,
she stops for a moment to ask McQueen,
“Can I take my games?” With a smile,
McQueen answers, “I believe so.”
The family’s unraveling is happening so
quickly, and the bizarre unreality of it
becomes even greater shortly after Joan
slumps on the floor and starts sobbing. The
mother then does something truly unsettling:
She begins to laugh. “This ain’t funny,” Joan
tells her.
“It’s funny to me. I’m glad you all leaving,”
the mother says, staring defiantly at her.
Eventually, Barbara’s mother and sister,
Trida, arrive. Trida scoops up the youngest
boy and says playfully to him, “You want to go
home with me?” As they gather the children
together, Trida says, “This is for the good,
they should have done this at the beginning.”
She also recalls telling a judge at one hearing
that it was actually the teenager who was tak¬
ing care of the kids, not the retarded mother;
she says she asked the judge, “Has some¬
thing serious got to happen before you do
anything?” The judge, she claims, told her
yes.
Before they drive off, Joan tries to embrace
her mother, but Barbara tells her, “Don’t be
hugging me goodbye.”
McQueen hurries back to the office to fill
out a court petition to place the children in the
custody of Barbara’s mother and sister. On
the way, he grouses about the way HRS previ¬
ously has handled the case, although at this
point he doesn’t know its frill background. “I’d
like to know who decided to give the children
back to the mother,” he says. “She’s incapable
of caring for them.... I’m so pissed at those
other workers. If they can live with them¬
selves, so be it. But if they don’t want to work,
then for the safety of the children they should
get out of the business.” (In all fairness, pro¬
tective services workers who do long-term fol¬
lowup — such as the one McQueen tried to
reach from Barbara’s home — usually have
too many cases to handle any individual one
thoroughly. Their caseload of 75 or more is at
least five times the national average.
Combined with what HRS director Bock
admits is low pay, low skill, and high turnover,
it can be a recipe for disaster. Indeed, with 63
protective services workers in her district
monitoring 6300 children, Bock admits,
“Protective services can’t do that job. It’s one
of the biggest shams in the state of Florida.”)
The agency has made efforts over the years
to help Barbara raise her children. A though
the youngest daughter briefly was taken out
of the home after being bom in 1992, the juve¬
nile court, HRS investigators, assorted legal
guardians, and medical experts have deter¬
mined at a series of hearings that Barbara
was capable of raising
the children herself—
if a variety of counsel¬
ing and day-care
services were offered.
Programs such as
Family Builders,
which provides inten¬
sive therapy and emer¬
gency aid, have been
offered, but Barbara
has spumed their help
at times, just as she
often has rejected her
family’s offers to provide assistance. After a
second child, a boy, was bom with traces of
drugs last year, HRS removed the baby and
temporarily placed him with Barbara’s
mother from November 1994 to March 1995,
until a full range of services were put in place
under a court-ordered plan. Barbara’s family,
though, began asking in December for cus¬
tody of all the children, but HRS contended
that the two children still in the home weren’t
in immediate danger, so the family’s request
was denied. The son was returned to Barbara
in March, when HRS officials concluded that
— with enough services now available — that
Barbara, a drug-using retarded mother, was
capable of raising all the children on her own.
“If we had to do it all over again, we’d do the
same thing,” says Todd Faber, assistant dis¬
trict legal counsel for HRS.
Now Barbara’s family is back in court once
more. A day after McQueen has arranged to
remove the kids, the mother has changed her
mind and wants the teenage daughter back.
Today she hugs Joan when she comes into
the hallway outside Circuit Court Judge
Victoria Platzer’s juvenile division courtroom.
Joan, though, is feeling ambivalent about
what to do. She huddles with a court-
appointed lawyer, who then tells the judge,
“She’s angry at her mother for having her
removed. She doesn’t want to live with her,
but wants to be able visit her.” This time all
the children are finally taken away from
Barbara.
Sitting on a bench afterward, Trida tells one
of the lawyers, “If Barbara had just let us help
her, you all could have kept out of this.”
Lawyers and investigators for HRS are,
indeed, often drawn into family disputes that
can’t be resolved peaceably. One way this
Continued on page 21
June 29^Julx 5, 1995
“There are so many
needs in this city of
Miami, so many
situations where
people are abused.”

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Protectors
Continued from page 18
most clearly emerges is in the filing of false
abuse reports. Even Anita Bock allows,
“People do use the abuse registry for harass¬
ment purposes.”
But to a P.I. such as Lulus McQueen, the
benefits of the current reporting system —
including the use of anonymous reports —
outweigh any drawbacks. “If a person is
fearful of being accused of filing a false
report, real abuse may not be called in,”
contends McQueen, as he heads out one
day to check out a report of medical
neglect that was phoned in anonymously.
When he enters the house, he confronts a
middle-age mother, Lucy, her 22-year-old
daughter, Louise, and Lucy’s two-year-old
granddaughter. They sit in a well-kept liv¬
ing room, the sofas covered with plastic
slipcovers and the shelves neatly display¬
ing figurines.
“What did they say about us?” Lucy
demands, and McQueen apologetically
reads out allegations that the child has
open sores and hasn’t been taken to the
doctor. Lucy is dumbfounded and stands
up angrily, her right hand on her hip. “Get
out of there with those lies!” she exclaims,
before calming down and trying to figure
out what prompted McQueen’s visit. “She
had the chickenpox...but look how fat and
healthy she is.” Louise adds that she’s
been taking her daughter to the doctor
regularly, and when McQueen examines
the young girl, he sees that there’s nothing
wrong with the child. Lucy is still simmer¬
ing, though, and begins marching around
her kitchen, opening up pantry doors.
“Look at all this food!”
Then Lucy and her daughter begin spec¬
ulating on who could have phoned in the
report. “I wouldn’t be surprised if that old
nasty dad did this,” Lucy says, and her
daughter agrees. Louise and the man had
broken up recently, and she had rejected
his request to move in with her.
“You see it’s all lies,” Lucy says, and
McQueen concurs. ‘This case is not going
another step,” he reassures them. Still, the
family wonders why this investigation was
necessary at all. “It’s wasting your time,”
Lucy says of such visits triggered by
anonymous tips, “taking you away from
seeing kids you really should see.”
McQueen views it differently. “If the
calls are not made, we are in a situation
where we may lose a child,” he points out.
As he leaves, however, he tries to make
amends, remarking, “Sorry about having
to do this.”
Regardless of whether or not abuse
reports are borne out, they trigger HRS
investigations that sometimes can result in
valuable help to families, particularly when
previous HRS services have fallen short.
For instance when another protective
investigator, Rosemary Bridges, who
works in the North Dade office, went out
on a recent weekday to check out a
teenage daughter’s allegation of beatings
by her father, she discovered something
perhaps even worse: a frail, crippled
mother, almost as bone-thin as a concen¬
tration camp survivor, staring addle-
brained at the television in a stifling apart¬
ment. Sitting with her was another
daughter, staying home from school to
take care of her. “Who feeds her?” Bridges
asks.
“When my dad comes home from work
[in the morning], he does,” the girl
answers, adding that after school she and
her sister supposedly take over. But. it’s
about noon and the father is nowhere to be
found. Later that day, when Bridges ques¬
tions the daughter who made the original
Continued on page 23
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Continued from page 21
abuse allegation, the P.I. learns that some¬
times the father bars his daughters from
even feeding their mother cereal without
his permission. By the end of her prelimi¬
nary interviews on this first day, Bridges
hasn’t settled the issue of child abuse, but
she’s sure the mother needs more regular
attention and meals than she’s been get¬
ting. In fact HRS already had been notified
in February 1994 that the mother was
being neglected. “Maybe the father’s so
mean, he’s starving her to death,” she
speculates. Bridges later discovers the
mother receives only once-a-month visits
from another HRS division, Aging and
Adult Services, which investigates abuse
and neglect of adults; it somehow has
missed the obvious fact that a woman is
wasting away in front of their eyes.
(Bridges, who can’t prove the child abuse
allegation, later arranges for the family to
receive counseling and for the mother to
receive visits from another HRS division,
too, one that helps the handicapped.
Before all these services can be provided,
however, there still will be no guarantee
that the mother is being regularly fed.)
‘There are so many needs in this city of
Miami,” says Lulus McQueen, “so many
situations where people are abused.”
Suffering is the common currency in vir¬
tually all the homes that McQueen visits,
but he doesn’t let himself get over¬
whelmed by the problems he sees. He
tries to close cases quickly so he can move
on to the next one, and as a result he has a
backlog of only about ten cases, slightly
lower than that of the average triage inves¬
tigator. On any given day, he will receive
an average of three new abuse reports to
investigate, and the truth about each one is
never easy to determine.
One day in the late afternoon, McQueen
is expecting to finish some overdue paper¬
work when he receives an inflammatory
report. It is a shocking letter — passed
along to HRS from the governor’s office of
a Southern state, then routed to McQueen
to handle. In the letter, the parents allege
that their son attends a school in Miami for
emotionally disturbed children where staff
members pay children for sex, teach them
to steal from nearby stores, and only clean
the place up when the state conducts
inspections. Yet when McQueen goes to
the school, officials there accept his pres¬
ence calmly because they’re used to such
visits. The teenage boy mentioned in the
letter is ushered into an empty classroom
to speak to McQueen alone, and the P.I. is
careful not to tell him that the allegations
come from his own parents. When he’s
asked about the sex and theft charges, the
boy says simply, “I haven’t heard nothing
about that.” But he does agree that the
school officials take pains to spruce up the
school only before inspections. (McQueen
drops in unannounced on the school a few
days later, and takes a few other boys
aside; they offer similar denials.)
This preliminary visit is his last case for
the day. McQueen, as he heads back to his
car, isn’t disappointed that the charges
didn’t pan out. “Even if the allegations are
not proven, there’s a sense of excitement
about this work,” he says. But he’s also
aware that his mission of helping the chil¬
dren is not easily fulfilled, in part because
of the roadblocks his own agency often
puts in the way. “We need more committed
P.I.’s to this work,” says McQueen. “HRS
is trying to do their best with the few good
P.I.’s they have, but their best may not be
good enough.”CD
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New Times Page 23

She was a pioneer at the Metro-Dade Police
Department, a rabble-rousing advocate for women
BEHIND THE BADGE. AND NOW, OF COURSE,
SHE'S PAYING FOR IT.
BY ELISE ACKERMAN
the
long fall of
Niki Lawrence lives in a world
that has been diminished. Placed
on compulsory unpaid leave from
the Metro-Dade Police Department,
she spends her days alone in her
Deerwood Estates home north of
Metrozoo. After 22 years of police
work, Lawrence survives on just $250
per week in unemployment benefits, her
former annual salary of $53,000 now a
receding memory. She jokes about econo¬
mizing: no air conditioner, no magazine sub¬
scriptions, no driving unless it’s absolutely nec¬
essary.
Her life is a tight pattern of reiterated move¬
ments among five rooms: the white-tiled
kitchen, a tiny bedroom bursting with legal
papers, another room where she sometimes
lifts weights, her bedroom, and the living room
with its large-screen television. On good days
Lawrence exercises, plays with her terrier, and
works on the numerous lawsuits, complaints,
and grievances she has pending against her for¬
mer employers. On bad days she tanks up on
prescription drugs to stave off panic attacks,
pills with cheerful names such as Xanax,
Ambien, and Dalmane. These are the moments
when isolation presses in like a smothering
layer of doubt when she tries to avoid thoughts
of suicide and fights against the growing evi¬
dence that all her battles have been fruitless.
Although Lawrence is not the only woman to
have charged the Metro-Dade Police
Department with sexual harassment (in the
past year, two other federal suits were filed, and
at least a half-dozen potential lawsuits are incu¬
bating with the federal Equal Opportunity
Employment Commission), she is, by all
accounts, the grande dame of sexual-harass¬
ment vigilance, the stalwart advocate of
women’s rights — and an object of ridicule.
“I’m sure that some people would like to por¬
tray [Lawrence] as a wacko,” says Scott
Partridge, a retired Metro-Dade sergeant who

has known Lawrence since he supervised her in
the Seventies. “But if I had to pick the best five
police officers who ever worked for me during my
seventeen-year career, she would be one of them.
The women who are coming on the job today are
having a lot easier time of it because of women like
Niki who came before them and made the
changes early on. I keep telling her, “You can’t give
up, you can’t let them beat you, you have to keep
on going.’ But I think she’s getting real tired.”
There was a time, more than two decades ago,
June 29-July 5, 1995
when Lawrence was tireless, a dynamo who
prided herself on being a role model for other
female police officers. That, however, was before
the department took away her gun and badge.
Before the rumors spread that she had been
detained for being mentally impaired. Before she
lost her squad, her self-esteem, and her job.
An unlikely candidate for police work, Lawrence
Continued on page 26
New Times Page 25

Lawrence has been on unpaid psychological leave since October 1994
five feet, nine inches tall and not particularly
athletic, she wasn’t much of a match for her
brawnier peers. “I was continually getting
thrown because I was so slow,” she remem¬
bers. “I was continually getting beaten up.”
Despite such obstacles, she graduated
from the academy, and joined Metro-Dade.
Her first assignment placed her at Station
Five, now known as the Kendall station, one
of the five substations then operated by the
department. (Metro-Dade has since grown
to include nine such stations.) It was a time
when female officers were considered to be
interlopers. “I went through this whole
period in which I wouldn’t get any backups,”
Lawrence recalls. “I would make a traffic
stop on the midnight shift, and people would
Continued on page 29
Long Fall
Continued from page 25
grew up in a quiet, well-to-do town in Bergen
County, New Jersey, the daughter of
Quakers. As a teenager in 1963, she
marched on Washington for civil rights,
wore tie-dyed clothing, grew her hair long.
But an early marriage pre-empted her youth¬
ful rebellion and she moved to Florida with
her new husband, a garment worker prone
to occasional bursts of ill temper. Their mar¬
riage eventually crumbled, and Lawrence
began taking courses at Miami-Dade
Community College in
hopes of finding a career
that would enable her to
raise her two young sons
comfortably. Predisposed
toward issues dealing
with social justice,
Lawrence grew fascinated
with the criminal justice
system. After two ride-
alongs with police offi¬
cers, she decided to make
law enforcement her
career.
But she soon learned
that in 1970 few police
departments were eager
to employ women; most,
in fact, rejected them out¬
right. The City of Miami
maintained a quota system and told her she
would be put on a five-year waiting list
behind fifty other applicants. In contrast, the
Metro-Dade police force professed to wel¬
come women, as long as they had a two-year
college degree. Indignant that male officers
were hired right out of high school, and
exhausted by her efforts to work full-time,
attend college, and raise her children alone,
Lawrence enlisted the aid of the local chap¬
ter of the American Civil Liberties Union to
protest the unequal hiring practices.
ACLU lawyers eventually persuaded
Metro-Dade to abolish the extra educational
requirement, and they also prompted the
department to stop distinguishing between
“patrolmen” and “policewomen.” The differ¬
ence was more than a matter of semantics.
Patrolmen were issued six-shot revolvers
with four-inch barrels; policewomen
received less accurate five-shot revolvers
with three-inch barrels. Patrolmen who
passed a sergeant’s exam were eligible for
promotion to the position of “sergeant”;
policewomen who passed
the same test were raised
to the rank of “police¬
woman two,” which car¬
ried a smaller pay raise
and fewer supervisory
responsibilities.
Lawrence’s legal strug¬
gles did little to endear
her to other police train¬
ees when she finally
entered the police acad¬
emy in 1973. Feisty, with a
tousle of red hair to com¬
plement her outspoken¬
ness, the 26-year-old
missed no opportunity to
needle the chauvinists in
her class. As she recalls,
“If a guy came up to me
and said, ‘Women don’t belong in police
work,’ I’d say, ‘Excuse me, but I worked very
hard to get here. What did you do? You just
walked in off the street.’”
Not surprisingly, her brashness elicited
special attention. The other half-dozen
women in her class of 82 cadets were
allowed to spar with each other when they
practiced fighting techniques, but
Lawrence’s instructors insisted she square
off with male partners. A slim woman, about
Punishment
Policy: Give
'Em a Break
The Metro-Dade Police Department has
nearly completed its program to have all
4300 employees — sworn officers and civil¬
ians alike — view a training video explaining
the department's sexual harassment policy,
which was adopted in 1985 and revised sev¬
eral times since then. According to the
video, any act or statement with a sexual
connotation can be considered sexual
harassment. “Remember, whether or not it’s
unacceptable is in the eye of the beholder,”
warns the video’s narrator. “If you feel
remotely uncomfortable with the way you
are treated, don’t hesitate to report it imme¬
diately.” The training tape also threatens
offenders with severe punishment.
“Discipline may include suspension or termi¬
nation, depending on the incident,” a grim¬
faced police officer advises.
Since Metro-Dade began screening the
video last year as part of a settlement agree¬
ment with the federal Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission (the result of a
complaint filed by two female officers), a
number of department employees say that
workplace relationships have taken on an
Orwellian cast “It is making people so para¬
noid that we can’t work together any more,”
gripes a long-time female officer who once
filed a sexual harassment complaint herself.
A review of department records, however,
suggests that any perceptions of a crack¬
down on offenders is more likely due to the
mandatory, day-long sexual harassment
training sessions than to vigorous enforce¬
ment of the policy. In fact, while approxi¬
mately 38 percent of all sexual harassment
complaints filed since 1989 were found to
have merit, the punishment meted out to
offenders has been far from severe. Only
one officer, a probationary rookie, was termi¬
nated. Four others were suspended without
pay, none for more than twenty days. The
rest were merely reprimanded.
Maj. Richard Ward, head of the depart¬
ment’s training bureau, defends the discipli¬
nary record and points out that in order for
discipline to withstand appeal, it must be
applied consistently throughout the depart¬
ment and over time. And certainly some vic¬
tims of sexual harassment praise the depart¬
ment for reacting to their complaints with
sensitivity and swiftness.
Sgt. Lorraine Bloomfield, for example,
filed a complaint in 1991 while she was an
officer working at the Miami Lakes station.
She stated to internal affairs investigators
that during the daily roll call, a corporal had
been spreading malicious rumors about her
sexual habits. Several officers confirmed he
had sneered that Bloomfield had slept with
almost every officer in the district and had
used a coat hanger for a self-induced
abortion.
Following the investigation the corporal
was issued a two-day suspension for miscon-
duct, though the allegations of sexual
harassment were not upheld because he was
not found to have created a hostile working
environment. “All the way down the line I
had support,” Bloomfield recalls. “Both
males and females were offended.”.
Bloomfield acknowledges, however, that
one factor played an important role in her
decision to file her complaint: She knew she
was about to receive a promotion. Before the
investigation ended, she held a higher rank
than the corporal she was accusing of
harassment — a clear psychological advan¬
tage.
Metro-Dade’s sexual harassment policy is
ten years old, but the department only began
tracking complaints in 1989; since then 58
have been filed. Based on the current num¬
ber of female officers — 552 of2956 — about
ten percent have filed sexual harassment
complaints. (Three complainants were
male.) More than half the complaints were
made in the past two years.
Cmdr. Harriet Janosky, head of the the
department’s “women’s committee,” views
the upsurge in harassment complaints as a
reflection of the increased emphasis on
addressing the problem, as well as the suc¬
cess of the department’s educational pro¬
gram. She also points out that incidents of
sexual harassment are hardly restricted to
Metro-Dade, noting that a 1993 Florida
Department of Law Enforcement study
found 62 percent of all female police officers
in Florida considered themselves victims of
sexual harassment. Forty percent said they
had seen sexually oriented materials or
heard off-color jokes at work on a daily basis.
Twenty percent described their workplace
as a hostile environment.
Initiated by Capt. George Robinson of the
No means no: The department's training video portrays a supervisor pressuring a rookie for a date
Page 26 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

Ocala Police Department, the study was
conducted as part of a research project for
FDLE’s Executive Institute. Robinson
admits the results concerned him. "I
wanted to think that it was less prevalent
than it was reported,” he says. He recom¬
mends that departments take immediate
action to educate their employees about
sexual harassment and to enforce policies.
Metro-Dade has made a strong commit¬
ment to education. However, the enforce¬
ment aspect of the department’s policy has
raised questions among some officers. An
examination of 25 sexual harassment inves¬
tigations completed during the past seven
years, and interviews with a half-dozen vic¬
tims, reveals inconsistencies in the way the
department deals with complaints, espe¬
cially those filed by women against their
male superiors. In one particularly shock¬
ing case that allegedly bordered on sexual
battery, an officer was suspended for only
twenty days, and the incident was later
expunged from his record altogether.
Ofcr. Donna Stewart had made arrange¬
ments to go home early on February 11,
1990. The eight-year veteran, who was suf¬
fering from a broken ankle at the time, had
labored through an unpleasant shift at the
Miami Lakes station. Not only was her
ankle throbbing, but the young officer
working vdth her had spent file entire after¬
noon making graphic sexual comments.
“He asked me if I swallowed,” Stewart
later told Sgt Kenneth Bematt, an investi¬
gator with the internal affairs bureau (also
known as the internal review bureau and
currently called the professional compli¬
ance bureau). Stewart, age 32, reported
that Ofcr. Brian Montero had mentioned
“that he was getting an erection, that he
wanted to be inside me, inside my mouth.
This went on for a few hours.”
Stewart said she tried to ignore the 22-
year-old officer and finally got up to leave
shortly before 6:00 p.m. She picked up her
crutches and began hobbling toward the
exit “Officer Montero
was following close
behind,” she recounted
in a sworn statement
given a week and a half
after the incident “And
I went down the two
flights of stairs to
where the cell area is,
where the prisoner
booking area is, he
started pushing me —
holding on to me and
pushing me back into
the cell area. And all the while I kept resist¬
ing him, pushing against him to try and
leave the station. But he continued to just
keep pushing, picking me up and pushing
me against the wall.
“I tried to get away. I resisted him by
pushing as best I could. I mean, I was on
crutches, I had the cast. So I was just trying
to push against his chest with my hands,
telling him to get away from me.
“Well, he put his body real tight up
against mine, like to pin me against the
wall, and said, T want to fuck your brains
out’”
As Stewart struggled with Montero, a
buzzer sounded in the lobby — someone
wanted to enter the building. At that
moment Montero finally let her go. As
Stewart moved to open the front door for
another officer, she said Montero again fol¬
lowed her. Just before she left the building,
he grabbed one of her crutches. “He
wouldn’t let me have it,” she told Sergeant
Bematt. “Finally he gave it back to me and
I left the station.”
As word of Stewart’s formal complaint
spread around the department, two other
women filed additional complaints, alleging
that Montero had made crude and graphic
remarks to them, as well. One of the
women said Montero had put his arms
around her and asked if he could see her
breasts.
In three separate sworn statements to
investigators, Montero asserted that the
incidents did not occur the way the women
had described them, and he categorically
denied forcing Stewart into the cell block or
molesting her.
All three women were asked to take a lie
detector test (the reports do not indicate
whether Montero was also asked). Only
Stewart agreed. She passed, and her com¬
plaint was sustained. The other two com¬
plaints were not upheld for lack of corrobo¬
rating witnesses or evidence.
Although the department’s discipline
coordinator initially recommended that
Montero be terminated, Metro-Dade Police
Department Director Fred Taylor reduced
his punishment to a twenty-day suspension.
(All internal affairs investigations are
reviewed by Taylor.)
Today Montero’s personnel file contains
no record of the incident. His current
supervisor, Maj. Madeline Pearson, says
she knows nothing about the allegations
made by Donna Stewart or the other two
female officers. Once Montero was trans¬
ferred to her command (following his sus¬
pension in early 1992), she says the officer
was given a fresh start.
Disciplinary actions are routinely purged
from officers’ personnel files every two
years. In fact around the time of Stewart’s
complaint notes in Montero’s file leave the
impression that his behavior was under
control. In his evaluation spanning April
1989 to April 1990 (the incident occurred in
February 1990), Montero is described as
displaying “a ‘cocky,’ ‘macho’ attitude,
which at this point has not presented a
problem.” However, the next year’s evalua¬
tion states, “Although Montero relates well
to his squad members, there have been dif¬
ficulties with other female peers.” Still,
from 1989 to 1991 all of Montero’s evalua¬
tions were “satisfactory,” and he was rec¬
ommended for a merit raise each of those
years.
In explaining the disciplinary procedures
regarding sexual harassment, Major Ward
notes that first-time offenders are often
given a second chance. “We also believe in
progressive discipline,” he adds, referring
to the practice of more severe punishment
for repeated offenses. Yet other cases sug¬
gest the department is reluctant to deal
harshly with officers who repeatedly violate
the sexual harassment policy.
In 1986 a civilian secretary at the Kendall
station filed two complaints against Sgt.
Richard Braithwaite, accusing him of forc¬
ing her to have sexual intercourse during a
social date and of sexually harassing her
afterward with threatening phone calls.
Continued on page 2(9
The coordinator recommended
Montero be terminated, but
Taylor reduced that to a
twenty-day suspension.
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Page 28 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

Long Fall
Continued from page 26
announce on the radio that they would be
there, and then they wouldn’t show up.”
Inside the station she was treated as a nov¬
elty. “I was continually manhandled,” she
says. “I would walk down the hall and
someone would snap my bra or hit me in
the ass.”
Today such actions would be fodder for a
federal lawsuit, but back then Lawrence
believed them to be tests of her mettle, and
she reacted by concentrating her energy
on affecting change. She
protested the uniform —
an A-line skirt, pumps,
and dainty white hat —
by explaining to anyone
who’d listen that it not
only restricted physical
movement, it also
turned female officers
into targets after dark.
She agitated fpr new
gun belts better suited
to the female anatomy.
She argued for the right
of women to patrol by
themselves.
“Whatever women
may have on the depart¬
ment — three-quarters
of it came from Niki,
and women don’t realize that,” says Donna
Munro, a Metro-Dade sergeant who retired
two years ago after spending twenty years
on the force. “She was extremely compe¬
tent, a very good police officer. Niki fought
to get us a lot of things, and at the time peo¬
ple said, ‘Oh, this is stupid.’ But it was true:
Niki made a lot of changes that people
don’t know about and don’t appreciate.
Niki’s a rabble-rouser. That’s been the gist
of her career. But you can’t take on Ithe
department] over everything; you have to
let some issues go. Sometimes I think she
should have walked away.”
In fact, there were incidents — sordid,
unpleasant, and unremarkable — that
Lawrence did let pass unchallenged. She
tells of a patrol partner who attempted to
sexually assault her while she sat on the
hood of their car during a break. Luckily she
had the keys. She drove back to the station,
requested another partner, and let the inci¬
dent slide. About a year later, she says, a
supervisor shoved his hand down her
blouse: “I said, ‘Wait a minute! Wait a
minute! What’s going
on?”’ She slugged the
supervisor and almost
immediately found her¬
self booted from her
post under his com¬
mand, a coveted position
in a specialized unit.
After that experience
in the late Seventies,
Lawrence finally under¬
stood. “They sincerely
believed that it went
with the territory,” she
recalls bitterly. “You just
weren’t supposed to
complain about it.” So in
1980, when a high-rank¬
ing officer proposed that
they go together to a
motel in Broward County, she didn’t refuse.
“He didn’t demand it,” she says, “but it was
very clear what would happen if I didn’t go.”
As one of the top scorers on the sergeant’s
exam, Lawrence was scheduled for a promo¬
tion, and most likely a transfer to another
district, which would disrupt the compli¬
cated baby-sitting arrangements she had
made for her children. “So I slept with him
one time.” she says, “and I got to stay in the
district.” In light of her promotion, this was a
Continued on page 31
^supervisor
shoved! [his hand
down her blouse
* w
*1 saip,aWait a
minute! What's
“going on?“
. SheIslugged him.
Punishment
Continued from page 27
The secretary withdrew her initial com¬
plaint of sexual battery, but an internal
affairs investigation confirmed that
Braithwaite had stalked her during lunch
hours and left personal letters for her at
home and at work. As a result, Braithwaite
was suspended without pay for four days.
In 1993 two female officers from the
Kendall station filed another sexual
harassment complaint against
Braithwaite. Ofcr. Lisa Goulden and
Ofcr. Lisa Locasio accused Braithwaite
of referring to them as “dykes” during
daily roll calls dating back four years.
After a seven-month investigation involv¬
ing more than 31 sworn statements, a
disposition panel upheld the women’s
allegations. Braithwaite’s punishment
for this second offense: a five-day sus¬
pension without pay. His appeal of that
action is pending.
A similar case involved Sgt. Dante
Starks. An extensive investigation found
that Starks had verbally and physically
harassed five female officers between
1989 and 1993. A top-level review panel,
which characterized the sergeant’s
behavior as “hostile and offensive,”
issued a stern memo in August 1994 that
warned: “Collectively, these incidents
indisputably support the finding that
[Starks’s] actions were at times crimi¬
nal.... The liability in
Sergeant Starks’s
behavior is too great
to assume, for himself,
the department, and
those female employ¬
ees with whom he
may interact in the
future.” As detailed in
the New Times article
“Dante’s Inferno”
(April 13), two
sources familiar with
the case say the
sergeant’s own super¬
visor urged his superiors to consider fir¬
ing him. Instead Stark was demoted one
rank and reassigned to a unit that patrols
Miami International Airport.
Cmdr. Harriet Janosky admits that the
department may have made some errors
in the past. “I also think that the depart¬
ment has made a real effort to correct
these issues so that they don’t recur,” she
says. “It’s a learning process. Currently
we have a very stringent policy, [but] I
think that as long as human beings are
involved, there is no fool-proof system.”
- Elise Ackerman
Sources familiar with the case
say the supervisor urged his
superiors to consider firing
Stark. Instead he was demoted.
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Page 30 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1095

Long Fall
Continued from page 29
minor victory. “Normally, any time you got
promoted you got transferred,” Lawrence
explains. “They seemed to have this belief
that you couldn’t supervise people you had
been working on an equal level with, and my
attitude was that if you can supervise, you
can supervise. I was one of the first people
[to receive a promotion] who didn’t get
transferred.” For the next four years her
annual performance evaluations alternated
between above satisfactory and excellent,
and her personnel file brimmed with com¬
mendations.
It was during this period Lawrence crossed
paths with Becky Card. Also a single mother,
Card had the well-scrubbed mien and whole-
some friendliness of a Girl Scout troop
leader. Recruited by Metro-Dade in 1982,
Card, like all rookies, spent her first year on
probation under the close supervision of var¬
ious field-training officers. She says she had
been working for several months when one
of her training officers made an unusual
v 1 ' 7 • 7
She even süspected
! co workers of 7
• ■ •• 7 ' 7 - '$
¡I vandalism: Her [tires
punctured:
proposition. “He said, ‘Let’s go out in the
country and see what kind of police officer
you are,”’ she recalls. “Stupid me, I thought
we were going to do some kind of surveil¬
lance. It turns out he wanted sex.’”
According to Card, not only was she
harassed by her training officers, but a
sergeant who was their supervisor also
began to badger her for dates. She says she
finally filed a sexual harassment complaint
with the human resources section of the
department in 1983 in an attempt to dissuade
him. (Sexual harassment complaints are now
routinely handled by internal affairs, which
recently was renamed the professional com¬
pliance bureau.) “That’s when the trouble
began,” she remembers, her eyes tearing up
at the memory. Investigators did not
sustain Card’s complaint. Instead she was
accused of attempting to discredit the
sergeant because he had criticized her job
performance.
Card believes her complaint unleashed a
bureaucratic vendetta. A month after she
filed her complaint, she was transferred to
the Kendall station and assigned to a female
supervisor, who turned out to be Sgt. Niki
Lawrence. “I was told that she was assigned
to me so I could terminate her,” Lawrence
asserts, “and there wouldn’t be any sign of
impropriety.” But Lawrence says she
observed no problems with Card’s work and
evaluated her accordingly.
Nonetheless Card was fired, despite a full
year’s worth of satisfactory evaluations and
four commendations. “I found out [the
department] had to hire us by federal man¬
date, but they didn’t have to keep us,” Card
says. So she sued for reinstatement. The
department, she claims, initially offered her
$100,000 to drop the suit, but eventually
agreed to let her return. “I said, ‘I don’t want
money. I want my job back, my respect back.
Can you do that?”’ According to a settlement
contained in her personnel file, the depart¬
ment paid Card’s attorney’s fees and she
returned as a probationary officer.
The deal, however, turned out to have no
guarantees. After completing yet another
year of probation, Card was informed she
had flunked her second chance. This time
she held on to her job only because of a tech¬
nicality: The department had failed to fire
her before her probationary period expired.
“I produced my court settlement,” she points
out, “and they angrily agreed I had passed.”
Card, who is still with the department, filed
her lawsuit in 1985. That same year Metro-
Dade adopted a new policy explicitly pro¬
hibiting “intimidation, insult, humiliation, or
offensive physical/verbal abuse of a sexual
nature.” In addition, special internal affairs
investigators were assigned to handle allega¬
tions of sexual harassment. The new policy
prompted Niki Lawrence to file her first com¬
plaint. After silently seething for more than
ten years, Lawrence says her complaint was
triggered by a joke a male sergeant had
made about her latest project — an effort to
induce the department to change the fabric
used in its uniforms. According to Lawrence,
several female officers had developed yeast
infections as a result of the heavy polyester
pants that were standard issue. She was in
the process of surveying other female offi¬
cers about the problem when she learned
that the sergeant had authored a bit of dog¬
gerel describing the condition as “polyester
fester,” much to the amusement of fellow
officers in her district.
Lawrence’s humiliation was compounded
when she was abruptly removed from her
position as a supervisor of field-training offi¬
cers. She filed a grievance to protest her
removal, and later made a sexual harass¬
ment complaint to the internal affairs
bureau. (In filing the departmental griev¬
ance, Lawrence was contesting the proce¬
dure used to remove her from the training
squad; her sexual harassment complaint
ascribed her removal to sexual discrimina¬
tion.) In her harassment complaint, she
alleged that female officers in her district
were treated unfairly and demeaned. As
examples, she cited the sergeant’s “poly¬
ester fester” joke and continuing personal
calls and visits to her home made by the
high-ranking officer she had accompanied to
the Broward motel.
Eventually Lawrence’s grievance was
upheld, but the sexual harassment complaint
was not. (Internal affairs reported that the
Continued on page 33
June 29 —July 5, 1995
New Times Page 31

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Page 32 New Times

Long Fall
Continued from page 31
command staff of the district had decided to
rotate all field-training officers in order to
prevent burnout, and Lawrence simply had
been the first to be selected.) In the wake of
her complaint, however, Lawrence says the
atmosphere at the Kendall station became
unbearable. She even suspected hostile co¬
workers of vandalism: Her tires were
punctured, and turpentine was
splashed on her car before she trans¬
ferred to Key Biscayne in October
1985.
For a while Lawrence’s career
seemed back on track. She spent two
years at the small community station
and received twelve commendations
as well as above-satisfactory evalua¬
tions. Her supervisors praised her
knowledge of federal and state laws,
her high ethical standards, and her
sound judgment. “Sergeant
Lawrence consistently displays a
high degree of motivation and initia¬
tive,” wrote Lt. Charles Miller in
February 1986. “[She] has main¬
tained an excellent working relation¬
ship with all those she has come in
contact with.... She takes a genuine
interest in any problem affecting one
of her subordinates.”
Officers who worked under
Lawrence describe her as a strict but
unusually considerate supervisor.
For example, Ofcr. Betsy Walker, a
nineteen-year veteran, was involved
in a devastating car accident in 1986,
shortly after she had transferred
from Lawrence’s squad. “1 had a concussion
for six months,” Walker recalls. “I couldn’t
drive, I couldn’t walk. Niki made arrange¬
ments for me to be picked up and taken to
doctors — I had to go to different therapists
twice a day — she would come check on me
herself. She checked on me daily for about
she months. I thought she was a very caring
person. She really looked out for her peo¬
ple.”
But a move back to south Dade in June
1987 reignited old antagonisms. Her new sta¬
tion was Cutler Ridge, not Kendall, where
she previously has worked, but the friction
between the 40-year-old
sergeant and her supe¬
riors was similar, as evi¬
denced by her evalua¬
tions, which noted her
“autocratic demeanor”
even while commend¬
ing her judgment and
leadership skills.
Lawrence also admits
to having felt stymied
generally. “There were
so many units that
excluded females,” she
says. Repeated
requests for assign¬
ment to specialized
units such as robbery,
internal affairs, or the
training bureau were
denied. Twice she passed the written portion
of the lieutenant’s test, only later to fail the
more subjective “assessment test” that mea¬
sures skills in simulated situations.
In October 1988, Lawrence applied unsuc¬
cessfully for a vacancy as sergeant of the
canine unit, and later complained to the fed¬
eral Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC) that she’d improperly
been disqualified from consideration
because she failed a rope-climbing test that
discriminated against female applicants.
That complaint later would become part of a
federal lawsuit, but in the meantime she con¬
tinued working at Cutler Ridge, where a
series of health problems quickly put her on
a collision course with her supervisors.
In March 1989, Lawrence suffered a minor
injury to her right wrist while vaulting a
fence to investigate a ringing burglar alarm.
Her injury became arthritic, and one of the
small bones in her wrist eroded, creating a
gap within the bone structure and causing
excruciating pain. Lawrence’s doctor recom¬
mended a partial bone fusion, but the opera¬
tion was not approved by the department’s
risk-management division for more than two
years.
Her physical discomfort mounted as a con¬
genital spinal deformity became aggravated
by the pressure produced by her gun belt.
Lawrence requested permission to remove
the belt while filling out paperwork in the
station. That request was denied, and she
was removed from her post as a patrol super¬
visor and ordered to work the desk at the
station while the department verified her fit¬
ness for duty.
Although Lawrence’s
personnel file contains
letters from her doctors
attesting to her physical
ability to work her regu¬
lar job, as well as
evidence that she had
taught three self-defense
courses one day prior to
being removed from duty,
she was not sent back to
patrol. The desk job not
only carried a stigma, she
recalls, it also required
her to spend most of her
time sitting down, which
only exacerbated the pain
caused by the gun belt.
Particularly galling to her
was the fact that other
employees considered physically unfit were
allowed to wear civilian clothes while they
carried out their duties at the station. She, on
the other hand, was not even permitted to
wear a shoulder holster.
Lawrence says she became convinced that
the man in charge of the Cutler Ridge dis¬
trict, Maj. Thomas Lamont, was singling her
out for punishment. She fell into a deep
depression and began seeing a psychologist
and a psychiatrist. “I was really just in a state
of shock,” she says. “I couldn’t believe that I
Continued on page 34
Lawrence with sons Frank and Matthew soon after she
joined Metro-Dade in 1973
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June 29 —July 5, 1995
New Times Page 33

Long Fall
Continued from page 33
was being taken off the road, put on the
desk, and forced to wear this gun belt, which
caused so much pain for me — and I have a
high tolerance for pain. But there were some
days I had to take two hours of sick leave
and go home because I couldn’t stand it. To
know that it was a totally arbitrary decision
made by one individual was very hard for me
to understand.”
In May 1989, Lawrence filed a second com¬
plaint with the federal EEOC, accusing
Major Lamont of retaliating against her for
submitting the first complaint about the
canine unit test. Six months later, she found
herself transferred to the Northside station,
a move she believes was a direct conse¬
quence of her EEOC complaints. She points
out that Northside was 38 miles from her
home, further away than three other sta¬
tions, including Cutler Ridge.
Despite the inconvenience, the transfer
brought temporary relief. After a month at
Northside, she was allowed to return to patrol.
Her evaluations improved, and for a brief
period it seemed her problems with the
department would be resolved. There did
remain the matter other wrist operation, how¬
ever. Frustrated by the department5 s refusal to
pay for the procedure, Lawrence hired a
worker’s compensation attorney, who filed a
claim arguing that the needless physical suf¬
fering was causing Lawrence psychological
damage. The department’s response was
immediate. The claim was cited as evidence
that Lawrence was psychologically unfit for
duty, and on October 23, 1990, she was
stripped other gun and badge and transferred
to the Alternate Response Unit, a section of
the communications bureau whose primary
function is Uptake police reports over the tele¬
phone. Nicknamed “the rubber gun squad,”
the unit is a common holding pen for officers
who have been relieved of duty pending disci¬
plinary action or the results of an internal
investigation.
Soon after Lawrence was transferred, one of
her former supervisors, Lt. Charles Miller of
Key Biscayne, allegedly announced during
roll call that she had been “Baker Acted,”
police jargon for detaining someone who is
mentally disturbed. Lawrence filed an internal
affairs complaint against Miller, which was
upheld. “I feel that my
reputation has been so
totally annihilated that
nobody actually knows
the truth,” Lawrence
sighs. “All they’ve heard
are rumors, and the
rumors are terrible.”
Lawrence won back
her badge and gun by
successfully filing yet
another departmental
grievance, but she con¬
tinued working for about
four years in the
Alternate Response Unit,
where she persisted in
offering suggestions to
improve the work envi¬
ronment. Concerned
about the level of stress
experienced by her co-workers, for instance,
she contacted departmental psychologists and
asked if someone would provide the unit with
group counseling sessions. Nothing came of
that request On her own time, Lawrence then
traveled to St Petersburg and took a course in
“Critical Incident Stress Debriefing” (CISD),
which teaches techniques used by police and
fire departments nationwide to help employ¬
ees cope with traumatie situations. Lawrence
explains she had learned about CISD from
some Metro-Dade firemen, and she thought
the police department should use the tech¬
nique as well. But her suggestions, expressed
in memoranda, were rejected.
The harder she tried to act like an effective
sergeant, the more Lawrence’s relationship
with her supervisors seemed to deteriorate.
One incident in particular sparked contro¬
versy. In the fall of 1993, she complained to the
county’s affirmative action office about photos
of nude women posted on the walls of the
homicide unit at police
headquarters.
Department director Fred
Taylor quickly ordered
the pinups removed.
Workers in the headquar¬
ters building, including
women, frequently cite
the episode as an example
of sexual-harassment
fever, evidence that the
policy had spun out of
control.
Lawrence says the inci¬
dent infuriated her super¬
visor, Lt. Donald Kausal,
and that he began to
make increasingly unrea¬
sonable demands of her.
According to court docu¬
ments, she claimed that
Kausal forbade her from leaving the building
without first asking permission and that he
delayed her vacation pay. (Kausal contends his
actions “were not intentional or malicious” and
has denied the accusations.)
The adverse fallout from the pinup-photo
affair led Lawrence to file yet another com¬
plaint with the EEOC, which later became a
formal lawsuit filed in June 1994. Not long
afterward the department ordered her to ;
undergo a battery 'of psychological tests,1
despite the fact that her supervisors had
known about her problems with depression
since 1989. The resulting three-page evalua¬
tion does not explicitly state whether or not
Lawrence is fit for duly, but it does describe
her as “anxious, depressed, tense, entrenched
in a great deal of anger, and acutely over¬
whelmed by her current emotional upheaval.
The magnitude other distress is severe and it
likely interferes with her ability to think
clearly, which places her at increased risk for
impulsive behavior. Sleep disturbance,
decreased concentration, somatic complaints
and forgetfulness are likely to be present She
appears to be experiencing an intense sense of
emotional deprivation, loneliness, vulnerabil¬
ity, and helplessness.
‘Test data indicate that Sergeant Lawrence
has a longstanding and enduring tendency to
feel mistreated, picked on, resentful and vic¬
timized,” the report continues. “She exhibits a
negative, angry attitude toward her environ¬
ment, which impacts her ability to cope with
stress, make decisions, and function effectively
in interpersonal situations.”
Lawrence counters that her feelings should
come as no surprise. “My reactions, my emo¬
tional condition, is a normal reaction to what
I’ve been subjected to,” she argues. “That’s not
a rationalization. Thaf s a psychological fact” If
she had been such a basket case, she won¬
ders, why wasn’t that noted in her most recent
evaluation, from February 1994, which ranked
her as “satisfactory.”
Nonetheless, based on the test results,
department officials ordered Lawrence to take
a compulsory, unpaid leave of absence “for
one year or until it is medically determined
that you have returned to normal health.” She
was also stripped of her gun and badge.
Continued on page 37
“She was one of the
forerunners!
BUT SHE
VERY HIGH prICC
I ¡THINK THEY'LL DO
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Long Fall
Continued from page 34
Other women who have known Lawrence
since her early years on the force say they
believe she is suffering the cumulative effects
of years of stress. “She was one of the forerun¬
ners,” observes Becky Card, “but she paid a
very high price. I think they’ll do anything to
discredit her. Any time you’re involved in a
long lawsuit, it’s a stressful time. I think she
needs a support group to help her through
this.”
A high-ranking female officer who asked not
to be named refers to Lawrence as “a very
intelligent, very caring human being. The
problem with Niki is that she didn’t know how
to pick her battles.”
One of those battles took place this past
October, when Lawrence got her day in court.
As part of her lawsuit alleging that the rope¬
climbing test for the canine unit was evidence
of sexual discrimination, Lawrence also
argued that the she was disabled by panic
attacks and by her back condition. The depart¬
ment she contended, had failed to make a rea¬
sonable accommodation for her physical hand¬
icaps, as required by federal law.
A jury decided the rope-climbing test was
not discriminatory, and the judge separately
found that Lawrence could not be considered
a disabled person because none of her handi¬
caps affected the performance of a “major life
activity.”
Mention Niki Lawrence’s name to Carol
Anderson, the assistant county attorney who
defends Metro-Dade, and Anderson rolls her
eyes. “People are going to court after they
have refused generous settlements that they
were too greedy to accept,” she complains.
“There’s some awkwardness in handling per¬
sonal relationships, and there are sometimes
people who offend others in the course of
those relationships. But we can’t throw away
hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars to
people who were merely insulted or inconve¬
nienced. Everyone who complains isn’t a vic¬
tim. Some may have suffered real mental dis¬
tress on account of real harassment, but that
still doesn’t entitle them to one million dollars
apiece.”
In fact, Lawrence’s lawyers had asked the
federal jury to award her more than one mil¬
lion dollars. She justifies the amount by
explaining that she was asking only for com¬
pensation, not for punitive damages. The com¬
pensation broke down as $68,000 in past lost
wages, $736,000 in future lost wages, and lost
pension benefits of $566,000. (Lawrence does
admit she turned down a $250,000 settlement
offer from the county before going to trial.)
The courtroom defeat seems to have
deflated Lawrence’s confidence. Her second
lawsuit — this one regarding Lt. Donald
Kausal and the post-pinup controversies —
may end in settlement. “I have a very good
case,” she contends, “but if I go to court and I
win, they’re going to appeal and we’re talking
about another five years, and I don’t know if I
have it in me.” From vows of fighting on till the
bitter end, she now allows she’s prepared to
walk away from it all with nearly nothing. All
she’d like in a settlement is reimbursement of
her attorney’s fees and her retirement bene¬
fits.
“I’m at the point where I’ve lost all my
friends, I’m completely isolated, I’m starting to
have real bad panic attacks, and I’m not going
to allow it to kill me emotionally,” she says. “If
something positive were to come out of my
case, whether it’s positive in the sense of help¬
ing me directly or if it improves the system for
sexual-harassment victims in the future, it
would make this all worthwhile. Looking back
on 25 years of battle with the police depart¬
ment, it has to have counted for something. It
really does.” CD
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New Times Page 37
• BEDDING - OFFICE - ODIENTAL - OUTDOOD

Oumou Sangare perforins languorously at Africa Féte Monday
t h u r s d a y
june
ínl ini $'x Women With Brain Death:
Jill Pssssst. Did you hear? Award-
// *■— winning director David Arisco
// r» and the Actors’ Playhouse Group
resuscitates its production of
Mark Houston’s Six Women With Brain
Death, or Expiring Minds Want to Know begin¬
ning tonight at 8:00 at the Carrusel Theater
(235 Alcazar Ave., Coral Gables) and running
through August 5. The two-act musical spoofs
supermarket tabloid headlines, with six fork-
tongued female characters ripping through
the lives and times of such notables as OJ.
Simpson, Michael Jackson, and that slut Bar¬
bie (you know, the doll). Tickets cost $18 and
$20. Additional performances take place Fri¬
day and Saturday at 8:00 p.m., with a 2:00
matinee on Sunday. Tell ’em you read it here
first at 444-9293. (GC)
Barry White: “Let me touch you
and ruuuubbb you all over.”
Whoa! Who else? Barry White,
the major-domo of makeout (and
beyond) music, elbowed his way
back on to the charts late last year with his
nineteenth album, The Icon Is Love, a collec¬
tion of lush, slow-cooking grooves that finds
the Big Man casting his ample shadow over
the army of peach-fuzzed new-jack pretenders
who’ve clogged the R&B airwaves recently.
The bass voice groan, the deliberate delivery,
the silky arrangements, the sultry pillow talk
(“Let me undress you from your clothes to
your underwear”) — White works it all into
foreplay overdrive. In support of his best
record in ages, Barry White, abetted by his
Love Unlimited Orchestra, saunters into Sun¬
rise Musical Theater (5555 NW 95th Ave.)
tonight and tomorrow night for 8:00 shows.
Chanté Moore opens. Tickets cost $28, $38,
and $48, but you may have a hard time finding
some. Call 741-7300. (MY)
Night Sky: The New River Repertory opens its
production of Susan Yankowitz’s Night Sky
tonight at 8:00 at the Studio (640 N. Andrews
Ave., Fort Lauderdale). The evocative drama
tells the story of Anna — an astronomer
afflicted with aphasia after an auto accident —
and the effects her temporary inability to
speak have on her family relationships. Tick¬
ets cost $12. The production runs through
July 23, with performances each Friday and
Saturday night at 8:00, and Sunday at 2:00
p.m. For more info, call 763-6882. (GC)
Mambo Brothers: Mention mambo in Miami
and people immediately think Cachao or
Hilton Ruiz or Celia Cruz. But the Mambo
Brothers, led by guitarist-vocalist-saxman
Charlie Brent (one-time musical director for
Wayne Cochran and the C.C. Riders) and
singer-harmonica man Dennis Booth (one¬
time Muddy Waters keyboardist), have more
to do with the French Quarter than with little
Havana. Their sound encompasses the rolling
piano rhythms, martial drumming, and
squonkin’ honky-tonk sax of the best Cres¬
cent City R&B, with some gritty blues harp
thrown into the mix; in fact, on several tracks
on their new CD, Night Owl (the cover of
which — depicting Brent and Booth ogling a
female’s buttocks — is one of the most egre¬
gious displays of non-PC behavior seen since
2 live Crew), you’ll swear you were listening
to Dr. John himself. For a partyin’ evening,
join the Bros, tonight at 10:00 at Tobacco
Road (626 S. Miami Ave.). Admission costs
six dollars. It’s a Mardi gras mambo at
374-1198. (BW)
Richard Ford: At once lyrical and epiphani-
cal, Richard Ford’s Rock Springs was one
of the best short-story collections pub¬
lished in the 1980s. If that book made any¬
one forget Ford is also a novelist, his Inde¬
pendence Day, published just in time for the
Fourth of July, promises to be a powerful
reminder. The new novel is a sequel to Ford’s
1986 work The Sportswriter, which chronicles
narrator Frank Bascombe’s Easter-week
attempts to resurrect himself from a failed
marriage. Independence Day, as the title indi¬
cates, follows Bascombe through another cru¬
cial and revelatory holiday. Thanks to Books
& Books, Ford is in Miami tonight to read
from his new work. The time is 8:00 p.m., the
address is 296 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables.
The phone number is 442-4408, and the price,
as always, is nil. (TF)
Mike Barra: Seasoned singer-songwriter-gui-
tarist and former New York studio scenester
Mike Barra has been described as “the most
satirical, lyrical, sardonic, monophonic but not
moronic, touching, gut-wrenching, original
acoustic fiasco worth attending anywhere.”
That’s quite a mouthful. Find out if Barra lives
up to this wordy praise tonight at 8:00 at the
Miami Institute of Expanding light (8905 SW
87th Ave.), as the Folk Club of South Florida
continues its Acoustic Underground series.
Key Biscayne singer-songwriter Keith Hope
opens the show. Admission is six dollars. Call
the folks at 279-8100. (GC)
Sunday
j u I y
Goo Goo Dolls: The Buffalo-based Goo
Goo Dolls could be the nation’s best-
known unknown band. You’ve proba¬
bly heard of them. They’ve toured with
Soul Asylum, appeared on Late Night
With Conan O’Brien, and contributed a cover
of the Rolling Stones’ “Bitch” to the No Alter¬
native AIDS benefit compilation. But how
many of their tunes can you hum off the top of
your head? Where’s the hype? Where’s the
Rolling Stone cover story and the MTV
Unplugged appearance? With their recent
release, A Boy Named Goo, probably their
best work to date, the band brings a brilliant
XI ft' .<*».» I T n, t *
Page 38 Néw Tintes
’/uirre <2'9V/u-ty¿'Ü, ^895

Al Freddy
New Times Page 39
U America’s Birthday Bash: Celebrate the
Ilf nation’s birthday at the biggest shindig
11 in town, as the eighth annual Ameri-
(--| ca’s Birthday Bash gets under way
with a day full of music and activities
beginning at 2:00 p.m. at the Bayfront Park
Amphitheater (301 Biscayne Blvd.). An Amer¬
ican jamboree of bands — the Pan Symphony
Steel Band, the Frank Hubbell Dixieland
Band, Cross Creek, the Joanna Connor Blues
Band, and four all-star barbershop quartets —
graces two stages, while those who prefer to
celebrate internationally can enjoy music by
Jerry Rivera, Orquesta Guayacan, Donato y
Estefano, and la Muralla. Magicians, jugglers,
rides, games, and contests provide additional
fun, and fireworks fill the sky starting at 9:00
p.m. Admission is free. Call 358-7550. (GC)
Pops on the Beach: If you don’t want to travel to
the mainland for the U.S.’s 219th birthday,
travel to North Beach (73rd Street and Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach) instead for the third
annual Pops on the Beach concert and picnic.
Groove to the Latin jazz rhythms of Carlos
Oliva and los Sobrinos del Juez, Pow Wow,
and the dynamic Melton Mustafa Big Band.
The party starts at noon and wraps up at
11:00 after the requisite fireworks. Call
868-1763. (GC)
Slang Hi Frequency: Enter the ambiance of inner
space when members of Slang, Embryo (of
L.U.N.G.S.), synth wizard David L/B, experi¬
mental video artist Larry Hawks, cyberpunk
extraordinaire James Fletcher, and others pre¬
sent live and processed music and video
manipulation tonight at 10:00 at Squeeze (2 S.
New River Dr., Fort Lauderdale). The event
explores the impact of images of high-tech
warfare, sex, industrialization, space, and
genetics. Admission is five dollars for
attendees over 21 years of age, seven for ages
20 and under. Admission is free. Call
522-2151. (GC)
|wednesday|
■pa ‘Alone in a Crowd": Hie Bass Museum of
I Art (2121 Park Ave., Miami Beach) is
currently showing 103 rare prints by 45
ri I little-known African-American artists.
Dating from the 1930s and 1940s, the
works have been culled from the collection of
Reba and Dave Williams for the exhibition
“Alone in a Crowd,” on view through August
20. The show provides a body of work that
captures the vibrant period in the African-
American community that followed the
Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, a period
that helped shape modern-day African-Ameri¬
can images, ideals, and identity by focusing on
heritage, history, culture, political and social
injustice, and racial consciousness and pride
through the arts. The prints depict rural and
urban life in a wide variety of styles, ranging
from modernist abstraction and surrealism to
documentary social realism and American
scene painting. Admission is seven dollars.
Museum hours are 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and noon to 5:00
p.m. on Sunday. Call 673-7530. (GC)
Barry White pours it on sweet and low Friday
On Friday the Mambo Brothers do it Mardi gras-style
-
«■S
The Calendar is written by
Judy Cantor, Georgina Cárdenas,
Tom Finkel, Bob Weinberg,
and Michael Yockel.
For more listings, turn the page
Carlos Oliva and his Sobrinos pop the Fourth of July Tuesday The Goo Goo Dolls make their ascent Sunday
luster to their gut-level, hardcore pop-rock,
smoothing out some of the rough edges while
sharpening others. Consider yourself one of
the lucky when you witness the Goo Goo
Dolls live tonight at 8:00 at Marsbar (8505
Mills Dr.) with guests Hum. Tickets cost ten
dollars. Call 271-6605 for more info. (GC)
Barbershop Quartet Society: If you imagine bar¬
bershop quartets as foursomes of middle-age
guys sporting handlebar mustaches and wear¬
ing quaint straw hats and striped vests, you’re
living in the Nineteenth Century. More than
8000 barbershoppers from all walks of life
converge on the Miami Beach Convention
Center (1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami
Beach) beginning today as the Barbershop
Harmony Society hosts its annual convention.
With a cappella singing making a comeback,
the society hopes to give a new spin to this
old-fashioned variety of the art form. Passes to
the six-day convention cost $38 and $75. Tick¬
ets to two performances featuring pianist-
humorist Victor Borge on Wednesday at 6:00
and 9:00 p.m. range in price from $15 to $50.
Call 80O-876-SING for tickets and a complete
schedule. (GC)
Freedom Festival: Grammy Award-winning
country singer Crystal Gayle headlines the
third annual Freedom Festival, a full day of
music, culture, and activities beginning at
11:00 a.m. today at Miccosukee Indian Bingo
and Gaming (500 SW 177th St). Enjoy perfor¬
mances by rock group Tiger Tiger, folk
singer James Billie, and the Juan Salinas
Aztec Dancers, plus airboat rides, a Miccosu¬
kee fashion show, a kiddie carnival, arts and
June 29-July 5, JL995
crafts, and traditional Miccosukee foods.
Admission is free. Call 223-8380 for
details. (GC)
Africa Fete: Everybody say Wassoulou!
Everybody say yelal Hold the fire¬
works and shake your gourd instead.
Afro-pop rules the day as 76 musicians
and dancers descend on Miami Beach
for Island Records’ annual world-music cele¬
bration. This year’s Africa Fete tour features
Senegalese singer Baaba Maal, whose uplift¬
ing Afro-beat spirituals bring new swing to
ancient African folk rhythms; Haitian roots
band Boukman Eksperyans (see “Music”
story on page 81); Nigerian singer Fema Kuti,
son of Original Sujferhead Fela Anikulapo
Kuti, who follows in his father’s dance
steps with frenetic jazz-funk; and Oumou
Sangare, the languorous-voiced, feminist
troubadour who’s been called the Madon¬
na of Mali. The concert, produced here by
the Rhythm Foundation, takes place at
Marlin Gardens (1200 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach), which Haitian artists have decorat¬
ed with murals and Vodou sculpture. Gates
open at 6:00 p.m., with performances by
local musicians, African dance groups, and
storytellers — also on hand, vendors sell¬
ing instruments, crafts, and food. Tickets
cost $13. For details call 672-5202. GC)
Rhythm Mania: Get into the beat tonight at
10:00 at the Colony Theater (1040 Lincoln
Rd., Miami Beach) as two of the world’s
best congueros, revered elder statesman
Carlos “Patato” Valdes and innovative star
Giovanni Hidalgo, slap the skins in
“Rhythm Mania,” a celebration of Afro-
Caribbean percussion. The two are backed
by a Latin jazz band boasting bassist Eddie
“Gua Gua” Rivera, pianist Erick Figueroa,
drummer Archie Peña, percussionist Edwin
Bonilla on timbales, and a horn section con¬
sisting of Dana Teboe, Feliciano Gomez
“Pachu”, and José “Pepe” Vera. Tickets are
$20. Tell them your nickname at 826-5392.
(GC)
South Florida Slammie Awards: Party hard as
the area’s top hard rock and heavy metal
bands are honored at the South Florida
Slammie Awards, taking place tonight at
8:00 at the Edge (200 W. Broward Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdale). The Genitorturers, Smite,
Strongarm, Anger, Puya, and L.U.N.G.S.
are among the performers dominating the
stage. Admission is $12. Call 525-9333 for
the hard facts. (GC)
What Is Dancehall?: Just what is dancehall?
Well, if you have to ask.... Explore the vibes
of dancehall tonight at 10:00 at the Coconut
Grove Exhibition Center (2700 Bayshore
Dr.) as two-time Grammy Award-winner
Shabba Ranks, Spragga Benz, Vicious,
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Page 40 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

alendar
VI 4 â– 
Calendar listings are offered as a
free service to New Times readers
and are subject to space restrictions.
Submissions should be mailed to
Calendar Editor, New Times, P.0. Box
011591, Miami, FL 33101. items must be received ten days
prior to date of issue.
Thursday, June 29
Fabulons: The Fabuions perform Fifties, Sixties, and
Seventies rock and doo-wop tunes as as part of the
free Summer Stars concert series at 7:30 at The Falls
(8888 SW 136th St; 2554570) and tomorrow at 7:30 as
part of the NationsBank Starlight Musicals series at
Holiday Park (U.S. 1 and Sunrise Boulevard, Ft
Lauderdale; 761-5363).
Quartetto Gelato: This foursome performs a wide range
of music from classical favorites to tangos to pop
melodies. $15.8:00 p.m. Coral Gables Congregational
Church, 3010 De Soto Blvd, Coral Gables; 448-7421.
Friday, June 30
Bobby Ramirez Jazz Duo: Latin jazz flautist Ramirez and
partner perform jazz originals. Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders
Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy; 665-8800.
Magda Hiller: Singer-songwriter-guitarist Hiller
performs jazzy-bluesy-folky and often humorous
meditations and reflections on life, love, and pets.
Free. 8:00 p.m. Borders Books and Music, 19925
Biscayne Blvd, Aventura; 9350027.
Mambo Brothers: See '‘Calendar.”
South Pointe Jazz Series: Local jazz artists perform each
Friday night; tonight’s show features saxman Ed
Calle. Free. 7:00 p.m. South Pointe Seafood House.
Washington Avenue and 1st Street, Miami Beach;
673-1708.
Barry White: See “Calendar."
Saturday, July 1
Mike Barra' See “Calendar.”
Miami Philharmonic Steel and Percussion Orchestra The
MPSPO performs steel pan, marimba, and jazz music
in two free concerts: tonight at 8:00 at the Seville
Hotel (2901 Collins Ave, Miami Beach) and tomorrow
at 6:00 p.m. at the North Miami Beach Amphitheater
(16425 NE 16th Ave, North Miami Beach); 532-9179.
Markinhos Moura and Banda Crystal: Moura and band
perform Brazilian jazz and bossa nova each Saturday
night at 9:00 and 11:00 and Sunday night at 7:00 and
9:00. Free. Hotel Inter-Continental, 100 Chopin Plaza;
358-7565.
Sunday, July 2
Barbershop Quartet Society: See “Calendar.”
Gerald Dimitri: PACE saxophonist Dimitri performs
smooth jazz originals. $7 museum admission. 3:00
p.m. Bass Museum of Art, 2121.Park Ave, Miami
Beach; 673-7530.
Goo Goo Dolls: See “Calendar.”
SunBank Sunday Jazz Brunch: Munch on brunch while
listening to tunes by the John Sinibaldi Big Band,
Bonnie and the Wise Guys, the Per Lofgren Trio, and
the Funk Filharmonic. Free. 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Riverwalk, SW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue, Ft
Lauderdale; 761-5703.
Vincent Borino Wind Quintet This wind ensemble
performs classical selections. $5.2:30 p.m. Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274.
Monday, June 3
Africa Fete: See “Calendar.”
Rhythm Mania: See “Calendar.”
South Florida Slammie Awards: See “Calendar.”
What Is Dancehall?: See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, July 4
Pops on the Beach: See “Calendar.”
Slang Hi Frequency: See “Calendar.”
Theater
The Broadway Express: Dinner theater presented by
Forrest J. Wdlingham and his Songs of Broadway
Company, with selections from fifteen Broadway
musicals, including Showboat and Les miserables.
Through July 15. Evening performances Thursday,
Saturday, and Sunday at 8:00 (dinner at 6:00).
Mermaid Room, Sea Club Oceanfront Resort Hotel,
619 N Atlantic Blvd, Ft Lauderdale; 564-3211.
Driving Miss Daisy: The new Hollywood Boulevard
Theatre kicks off with a production of Alfred Uhry’s
Pulitzer Prize-winning play about the querulous yet
affectionate relationship between a proper Southern
white lady and her long-time black male chauffeur.
Through July 2. Evening performances Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 2:00.
Hollywood Boulevard Theatre, 1938 Hollywood Blvd,
Hollywood; 929- 5400.
Faith Healer: Reviewed in this issue. Through July 2.
Evening performances Friday, June 30, Saturday,
June 24, at 8:00; matinee Sunday, and July 2 at 2:00.
New World Rep Company, Louise O. Gerrits Theater,
25 NE 2nd St; 237-3541.
Fiddler on the Roof: Tevye and the gang celebrate
tradition under the czar’s harsh rule. Through July 9.
Evening performances Tuesday through Saturday at
8:00 (6:00 dinner); Sunday at 6:00 (4:00 dinner);
matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 (noon
dinner); Jan McArt’s Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, 303
SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton; 800-841-6765.
Forever Plaid: Fifties-style musical about a quartet
called the Four Plaids, who meet an untimely end in a
bus accident and are allowed back to Earth for one
final performance. Through July 9. Evening
performances Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00,
Sunday at 7:00; matinees Wednesday and Saturday at
2:00. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701
Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach; 407-832-7469.
Lenny: Julian Barry’s play about Lenny Bruce, the late
social-critic-cum-stand-up-comedian who shocked
audiences in the 1950s and 1960s while feeing
censorship and arrest. Bruce’s style broke ground for
the crop of comics who followed him, most of whom
EARTHWEEK: A DIARY OF THE PLANET
By Steve Newman
Earthquakes
Indonesia's Flores Island
was rocked by several
major tremors, the
strongest of which wrecked more
than 100 homes and injured two
people. In Peru, a correspondent for
the Agence France Presse news
agency was killed while driving
through metropolitan Lima when a
tremor unleashed a rockslide that
sent a boulder crashing through the
window of his car. No other casual¬
ties or damage were reported from
the magnitude 4.9 quake.
Earth movements were also felt
in the Kobe, Japan aftershock zone,
Crete, Belgium, Alaska's Kenai
Peninsula, and the desert and coast
of Southern California.
Drought
Farmers in China's north-
west Gansu province have
y given up any hope of a
summer harvest as their crops with¬
ered under the region’s worst
drought in 60 years. The China Daily
reported that more than 70 percent
of the poverty-stricken province's
farmlands have been affected by the
extended dry spell.
The Southern African Develop¬
ment Community (SADC) appealed
to the international community for
$90.7 million in emergency food aid
to help avert starvation in five of the
region's worst drought-stricken
countries. SADC said it was seek¬
ing 520,000 tons of cereal for imme¬
diate shipment to Lesotho, Malawi,
Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
Wildfires
Forest fires that have
scarred many parts of
northern and western
Canada in recent weeks spread into
northern Ontario as temperatures in
the remote region warmed to record
high levels. With blazes still roaring
in British Columbia. Manitoba and
Saskatchewan, the only relief for
firefighters was in northern Alberta
where heavy rain dampened some
of the blazes.
Petroleum waste may be fueling
a two-week-old Mexican forest fire
that has destroyed 1,000 acres in
Tabasco State. Authorities quoted
by the official Notimex news agency
said investigators detected
flammable hydrocarbons two feet
below the surface, which are keep¬
ing the blaze going long after the
vegetation has been charred.
Monsoon
n Unrelenting heat that has
killed hundreds across the
Indian subcontinent was
broken by a sudden onset of the
monsoon season that also triggered
cloudbursts and massive flooding.
As many as two million people may
have been marooned by high waters
in Bangladesh that were largely fed
by rivers flowing from neighboring
India. In the Himalayan kingdom of
Nepal, landslides and flash floods
killed 60 people in two weeks of
unusually heavy downpours. Show¬
ers fell as far west as Pakistan, end¬
ing a month of record high temper¬
atures.
China's Guangdong province
was hit with a round of severe flood¬
ing that damaged 8,000 homes and
caused $12 million in damage to the
largely agricultural area north of
Hong Kong.
Amazon Poaching
/T\ More than 12 million exotic
( animals a year are illegally
trapped in Brazil's Amazon
rain forest and sold, according to the
World Wide Fund for Nature. Of
those captured, only 10 percent
make it to the black market and
stores alive, where they are sold.
Hurricane Season
Adolph, the season’s first
hurricane in the eastern
Pacific, formed several
weeks later than has been the aver¬
age in recent years, briefly threat¬
ening the Mexican coast near
Mazatlan.
Métro Refuge
French insect lovers want
parts of the Paris Métro to
be declared a nature
(D
reserve, fearing the subway is get¬
ting too clean for rare colonies of
crickets that chirp in the warm, dark
tunnels. While most commuters wel¬
come efforts to clean up the Métro
and rid it of mosquitoes, rats and
other pests, one insect special inter¬
est group wants protective mea¬
sures taken for the crickets, whose
buzzing is a symbol of good fortune
in French folklore. “Ideally, we’d like
the two Métro lines where there are
the most crickets to be declared a
natural park,” said Lionel Antoine,
president of the Protection League
for the Crickets of the Paris Métro.
The league warns that powerful new
vacuum cleaners, pesticides and
efforts to stop water leaks all
threaten the insects.
Additional Sources: U.S. Climate Analysis
Center, U.S. Earthquake Information Center
and the World Meteorological Organization.
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Page 42 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

have not come close to replicating his brilliance. July
1-23. Evening performances Friday and Saturday at
8:00; matinees Sunday at 2:30. Florida Playwrights’
Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Marisol: Reviewed in this issue. Through July 1.
Evening performances Friday, June 23 and Saturday,
July 1, at 8:00; matinee Sunday, June 25 at 2:00. Louise
O. Gerrits Theater, 25 NE 2nd St; 237-3541.
Moyshe and Maria's Meshugenah Wedding: Interactive
theater in which audience members attend a wedding
ceremony, a cocktail reception, and a gourmet meal
while rubbing elbows with actors playing bride,
groom, relatives, and guests. All performances begin
with a cash bar at 6:30; wedding begins at 7:00. June
23, Boca Marriott Hotel, 5150 Town Center Cir; Boca
Raton; 480-9153.
Neil’s Garden: Geoffrey Hassman’s engaging drama —
about a terminally ill man spending his last evening
with his soul mate of 40 years before committing
suicide — moves from Miami Beach to Broward
County. Matinee previews June 23-25 at 2:00. Regular
run June 28 through July 9. Evening performances
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8:00; matinee
Sunday at 2:00. Brian C. Smith’s Off Broadway
Theatre, 1444 NE 26th St, Ft Lauderdale; 5664)554.
Night Sky: Susan Yankowitz’s compelling drama
explores both family relationships and the nature of
language and thinking, as an astronomer attempts to
recover from aphasia after a car accident (See
“Calendar.”) June 30 through July 23. Evening
performances Friday and Saturday at 8:00; matinees
Sunday at 2:00. New River Repertory Company, 640 N
Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale; 523-0507.
Park You Car in the Harvard Yard: A bit of New England
comes to Miami in this well-directed, finely acted
rendition of Israel Horovitz’s play about two lonely
and stubborn people coming to grips with their lives.
Through July 9. Evening performances Friday and
Saturday at 8:00; matinee Sunday at 3:00. New
Theatre, 65 Almería Ave, Coral Gables; 443-5909.
Platero yyo: A poetic ode to Spanish author Juan
Ramon Jimenez, performed by children. (In Spanish.)
Ongoing. Performances Saturday at 4:00 p.m. Tafia
Circle Theater, 33 Curtiss Pkwy, Miami Springs;
888-7500.
the Princess and the Pea: You know the tale: The
kingdom can’t function without a “true king and
queen,” and the prince, heir to the throne, needs a
“true princess.” Well, what better way to find one that
to test-drive a batch of babes on a bed? A-ha! Matinee
performances Wednesday, June 28, at 1:00 p.m., and
Wednesday, July 5, at 10:30 a.m. Florida Playwrights’
Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Six Women With Brain Death: If you missed these half-
dozen housewives singing, dancing, and overdosing
on popular culture in Kendall last month, catch them
as they strut their stuff this summer in Coral Gables.
(See “Calendar.”) Through August 5. Evening
performances Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8:00;
matinee Sunday at 2:00. Actors’ Playhouse at El
LfpEltl
H-ELU
Carrusel Theatre, 235 Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 444-
9293.
Vampire Lesbians of Sodom and Little Bunny Foo Foo:
Camp comes to Hollywood (Florida, that is) as
playwright Charles Busch’s time-traveling vampires
and Paul Wiemerslage’s version of a twisted Bunny
Foo Foo share a late-night bill every weekend.
Ongoing. Evening performances Friday and Saturday
at 11:30. Florida Playwrights’Theatre, 1936
Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Film
Thursday, June 29
Jewish Film Series: As an accompaniment to its current
exhibition, “Building a Place in the Sun: The Jews of
Miami Beach, 1913-1945,” the Sanford L Ziff Jewish
Museum screen the second of a four-part film-and-
discussion series that features movies dealing with
issues faced by American Jews; tonight’s program
features The Apprenticeship ofDuddy Kravitz. $6.7:00
p.m. 301 Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 672-5044.
Saturday, July 1
"Alone in a Crowd" Film Series: The Bass Museum hosts
a film series to accompany its current exhibition of
prints by African-American artist of the 1930s and
1940’s. Today’s program features The Life and Art of
William H. Johnson. Free with $7 museum admission.
Bass Museum, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530.
Sunday, July 2
Cinema Vortex: The Alliance Film/Video Co-op
presents screenings of milestone films; tonight’s
program features Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. $4
donation suggested. 8:00 p.m. BAR., 1663 Lenox
Ave, Miami Beach; 674-9709.
Events
Thursday, June 29
New Directions Tropical Happy Hour This young
professionals’ organization hosts a bugaloo to benefit
the American Cancer Society. $10.6:00 p.m. Bayside
Hut (behind Miami Marine Stadium, 3601
Rickenbacker Cswy), Key Biscayne; 5944363.
World’s Largest Indoor Flea Market Bargain shoppers
can roam through miles of aisles of the fine clothing,
jewelry, home furnishings, electronics, and other
sundry items; enjoy the Wizard of Oz Revue
(performed daily at 2:00,5:00, and 7:00 p.m.) or take a
break from with music by the Trinidad Island Steel
Band. $4. Through July 2. Today from noon to 10:00
IRD ANNUAL
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June 29—July 5, 1995
New Times Page 43°

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Page 44 New Times
June 2 9 —JuIy 5, 1995

p.m.; tomorrow and Saturday from noon to 11:00 p.m.;
and Sunday from noon to 8:00 p.m. Miami Beach
Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr,
Miami Beach; 651-9530.
Friday, June 30
Main Street Live: Local jazz, blues, and pop groups
perform live music while shoppers take in Miami
Lakes’s establishments each Friday and Saturday
night. Tonight’s show features Mel Dancy and the
Melting Pot; tomorrow, Passion performs. Free. 7:00
p.m. Main Street, Miami Lakes; 821-1130, ext 207.
Sunday, July 2
Broward Center Backstage Tour See what goes on
behind the scenes at Fort Lauderdale’s most
prestigious venue. $2.11:00 a.m. 201SW 5th Ave, Ft
Lauderdale; 462-0222.
Coin, Stamp, and Collectibles Show: Philatelists and coin
connoisseurs converge for this show featuring
baseball cards, comics, and other rare collectibles.
Free. 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Rotary Club, Taylor
Street and 24th Avenue, Hollywood; 522-3226.
Freedom Festival: See “Calendar.”
Tuesday, July 4
America's Birthday Bash: See “Calendar.”
Fantasy Fireworks Family Celebration: Enjoy live music
by Band of Gold and the North Miami Community
Concert Band, performances by the Fantasy Theatre
Factory and the North Miami and North Miami Beach
Police Color Guards, and a huge fireworks display.
Free. 6:00 p.m. North Miami Athletic Stadium, NE
151st St and Biscayne Boulevard; 893-6511.
Fourth of July Parade: Celebrate U.S. Independence
Day with a one-mile march through Sabal Chase.
Free. 10:00 a.m. Alper Jewish Community Center,
11155 SW 112th Ave; 271-9000.
Museums
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St,
Hollywood; 921-3274. Through August 27 — “The
Floralia Series,” works by Kyra Belán.
Art Museum at Fill, University Park, SW 8th Street and
107th Avenue, PC rm 110; 348-2890. Through July 14
— Recent sculpture by R F. Buckley.
Bass Museum of Art, 2121 Park Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7530. Through August 20 — “Alone in a Crowd,”
prints by African-American artist of the 1930s and
1940s from the collection of Reba and Dave Williams.
(See “Calendar.”) Through August 27 — “Legacy of
the Tsarina: Master Paintings from the Palace of
Pavlovsk,” works by sixteenth- to eighteenth-century
Western European masters.
Casa de Mexico, Mexican Cultural Institute, 800
Douglas Entrance, Ste 170, Coral Gables; 529-0110.
Through June 30'— Works by Claudio Ruanova.
Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St; 375-1700.
Through July 30 — “Andres Serrano: Works, 1983-
1993.” Through August 20—“Roberto Juarez: They
Entered the Road,” and “Space of Time:
Contemporary Art from the Americas," works by
fifteen artists, including Fernanda Cardoso, Saint Clair
Cemin, Kim Dingle, and Felix González-Torres.
Center for Visual Communication, 4021 Laguna St Coral
Gables; 446-6811. Through July 26 — “Contemporary
Masters: Prints and Photographs,” featuring works by
David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Jane Hammond, Kiki
Smith, Edward Weston, and many others.
Center of Contemporary Art, 12340 NE 8th Ave, North
Miami; 893-6211. Through September 16 — Works by
Teresita Fernández and Quisqueya Henriquez.
Florida Museum of Hispanic and Latin American Art 1 NE
40th St; 576-5171. Through July 1 — Posters by
Fernando Botero and sculpture by Luis Moré.
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport 1-95 and
1-595, Ft Lauderdale; 357-7457. June 29 through
August 31 — Paintings by Betty Usdan Zwickler.
Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 101W Flagler St;
375-1492. Through September 24 — “Better Than
Gold: The Plants and Animals of the New World,” a
natural and human history exhibition about the
environment of the Caribbean in the 1500s.
Main Library, 101W Flagler St 375-2665. Through July
2 — “Produce for Victory: Posters on the American
Home Front 1941-1945,” and “South Florida Goes to
War,” two World War II commemorative exhibitions.
Metro-Dade Art in Public Places - MDCC Wolfson Campus,
300 NE 2nd Ave; 375-5362. Ongoing — “Sculpture
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Metro-Dade Cultural Resource Center, 111 NW 1st St
3754635. July 5 (reception noon) through August 30
— Wood sculpture by Frank Verrili.
Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium,
3280 S Miami Ave; 8544247. Through August 27 —
“Hidden Kingdoms: A Journey through the
Microscopic World,” an interactive exhibition about
microscopic organisms.
Museum of Art 1E Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale;
525-5500. Through August 13 — “José Bedia: Artist
and Collector,” works created and collected by the
artist ’Works in Progress,” an interactive exhibition,
and “The Spiritual Realm: African Art in Context,” and
“Selections from the CoBrA Collection.”
Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2nd St Ft
Lauderdale; 467-6637. Ongoing — Seven interactive
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Sanford L. Ziff Jewish Museum, 301 Washington Ave,
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Galleries
Abacus Fine Art 1659 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
531-3210. Ongoing — “Ivan Santos and Lina
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Adamar Fine Arts, 177 NE 39th St; 576-1355. Through
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others.
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Ongoing — Original and reproduced works by
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445-5445. Through July 6 — Recent works by
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Art 800,800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 674-8278.
Through July 1 — “Artists of the 800 Building,” works
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Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, 1799 SE 17th St, Ft
Lauderdale; 463-3000. Through July 6 — Paintings
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Artefacts Gallery, 609 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
674-3233. Through July 6 — Vintage original poster
art.
Artists Gallery, 4222 NE 20th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
491-9479. Ongoing — Southwestern art and pottery;
abstract classical, and country French art.
Artspace-Virginia Miller Galleries, 169 Madeira Ave,
Coral Gables; 444-4493. Through July 4 — “New
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Depenthal and American artists Gregory Homdeski,
Betty Mobley, Lincoln Perry, and Clyde Lynd.
Astoria Fine Art 2980 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 461-1222. Through June 30 — “Argentinean
Colors,” works by Esther Cruz.
Barbara Gillman Gallery, 939 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-7872. Through July 5 — “Orpheus in the Alley,”
mixed media on canvas by Ken Shaw; “Dwellings,”
ceramic sculptures by Peter Kuentzel; and “Icons of
Jazz,” photographs by Herman Leonard.
Barnes and Noble, 7710 N Kendall Dr; 598-7292.
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photographs by Joel B. McEachem.
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935-9770. Through July 14 — “Second Nature,”
photographs by Sharon Kersten.
BCG South Campus Art Gallery, 7200 Pines Blvd,
Pembroke Pines; 963-8895. Through August 25 —
1995 Studio Art Club Juried Exhibition.
Belvetro Glass Gallery, 934 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
673-6677. Through July 6 — Glass sculpture by
international artists.
Bizarre Bazaare, 180 NE 39th St ste 107; 573-7200.
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Books & Books, 296 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
4424408. Through June 30 — Works by
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Holden.
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and hand-painted animation cells.
Britto Central, 818 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 531-8821.
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Caravel Interiors, 4141NE 2nd Ave; 576-8684. Through
June 30 — “New York Transit Art,” works by artists
from the New York City area.
Carefully Chosen Gallery, 827 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-2627. Through July 6 — “Wedding Gift Month,”
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Carel Gallery, 928 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 5344384.
Ongoing — “Post-Impressionists,” nineteenth- and
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Carlos Art Gallery, 3162 Commodore Plaza #A1;
445-3020. Ongoing — Multimedia works by Haitian
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Gables; 567-9191. Through July 6 — “Cara de Cuba
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Chad Elliott Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd; 534-8547. Ongoing
— Recent works and works-in-progress by Chad Elliot
and works by photographer Ali.
Clean Machine, 226 12th St, Miami Beach- Va "
Through July 28 — “Afn«t''~
photograoW,,izz4 SW 1st Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
■m 7-2292. Ongoing — “Soul Fusion," two- and three
dimensional works by local artists.
Common Space, 1665 Lenox Ave, Miami Beach;
674-8278. Through July 1 — An exhibition of works by
selected SFAC artists.
Dorset) Gallery, 2157 SW 13th Ave; 8564080. Through
July 7 — “Interior Motives,” works by Liz Bums.
Española Way Art Center, 405 Española Way, Miami
Beach; 673-6248. Through August 18 — “A League of
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^sts
Exit Gallery, 904 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 672-1280.
Ongoing — Paintings by Peter Stanick.
For Art’s Sake, 52 S Federal Hwy, Dania; 920-9205.
Ongoing — Works by more than 90 local artists.
Fredric Snitzer Gallery, 1810 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 448-8976. Through July 5 — Works by
Quisqueya Henriquez.
Galería del sol, 1628 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
674-7076. Through July 6 — Works by José Perdomo,
Benjamin Hierro, Femando Daza, and Sopehap Pich.
Gallery Art II, 20445 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami
Beach, 932-6166. Through July 31 — Original oil
paintings and sculptures by contemporary masters
Peter Max, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Roy
Lichtenstein and others.
Gallery Fine Art 2117 Ponce de Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables; 447-8502. Through June 30 — ‘Two Brazilian
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(reception 6:00 p.m.) through August 2 — Works by
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Gallery of the Eccentric, 233 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables;
446-5550. Through June 30 — “That’s All, Faux!”
furniture with faux finishes by McVay Christy.
Gallery 219, 219 S Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
832-0779. Ongoing — Recent works by Virginia Best,
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Gutierrez Fine Arts, 1628 Pennsylvania Ave, Miami
Beach; 674-0418. Through July 6 — “Clean Sweep,” a
collaborative installation by Gary Moore and Karen
Ritas.
Hetzer Gallery, 4030 N Miami Ave; 576-9141. Through
July 2 — “Cave Paintings: Origins or Endings?” recent
works by Jerome Leyendecker.
Hollywood City Hall, 2600 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood;
921-3201. Through July 15 — Flower oil paintings by
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International Fine Arts College, 1737 N Bayshore Dr;
635-6614. Ongoing — “The Dead Artists Don’t Eat,”
alternative art by students.
Jacques Harvey Gallery, 815 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
672-6427. Through July 6 — “Expressionism,” works
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Jeanine Cox Fine Art, 1029 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9003. Through July 1 — “Artist’s Invitational,” a
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Joel Kessler Fine Art, 927 Lincoln Rd, ste 208, Miami
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Joy Moos Gallery, 355 NE 59th Terr; 754-9373. Through
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others.
Joya, 527 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach; 534-5191.
Through July 3 — ‘Waking Dreams,” works by Poni
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Paclipan.
Kennedy Gallery, 225 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables;
461-2026. Ongoing—Works by Michele and Robert
Kennedy, Oulie, Naoko, Kline, Jean Brodie, and
others.
Kirschner-Haack Gallery, 922 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
531-7730. Through July 6 — Works by Lois Duffy.
LeMar Gallery, 856 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
6654380. Ongoing — Recent works by Alain Despert.
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Page 50 N^w Times
Le musée imaginaire, 1209 E Las Olas Blvd, Ft
Lauderdale; 522-5812. Ongoing — Legal copies of
masterpieces by van Gogh, Monet, and others.
Margulies Taplin Gallery, 3310 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 447-1199. Through July 1 —Works by
Dan Peterson and Kevin Cummins.
Marvin Markman Fine Art The Shoppes at the
Waterways, 3575 NE 207 St Aventura; 937-0922.
Ongoing — Works by Botero, Chagall, Markman,
Picasso, and Renoir.
Mayfair Fine Art 701 Lincoln Rd, ste 701, Miami Beach;
534-1004. Through July 6 — Original Russian oils and
tempera.
MDCC InterAmerican Art Gallery, 627 SW 27th Ave, ste
3104; 237-3278. Through July 28 — “Core Cor,” works
by George Sardinias and Dan Solomon.
MDCC Kendall Campus Art Gallery, 11011 SW 104th St
237-2322. June 30 (reception 7:00 p.m.) through July
27 — Ceramic League of Miami 45th Annual
Members’ Exhibition.
Menelik I & II, 1661 Michigan Ave, Miami Beach;
^34-5556. Through July 6 — “Colors of Hope: Images
Jude ThegeiWhv Haitian artists Alyx Kellington and
Meza Fine Arts, 275 Giralda íftv.,
461-2723. Through July 2 — “Art Spaces:' -
Installations,” works by William Barbosa.
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza; 376-2906. Through June
30 — Royal Poinciana Festival exhibition. July 5
through July 31 — Posters by Fernando Botero.
Muted Media Gallery, 937 NE 19th Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
5224143. Ongoing — Handcraft art and art-to-wear.
Neil Loeb Gallery, 2911 Grand Ave, ste 620; 444-9583.
Ongoing—Recent works by Loeb, including
animation art for Hanna-Barbera and Warner Bros.
1221 Brickell, 1221 Brickell Ave; 536-1221. Through
June 30 — Cast-iron sculpture by Rafael Consuegra.
July 1 through July 31 — Paintings by Rafael Casasa.
Pallas Photographic, 50 NE 40th St, ste 103; 5737020.
Through June 30 — “Black and White Is Beautiful,”
photographs by Bob Lasky, Lynn Parks, and Stephen
Watt.
Pamberi Studios, 1912 Van Burén St, Hollywood;
927-1905. Through July 27 — Sculpture by Geoffrey
Lee.
Paper Moon Art Gallery, 1054 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands; 8614920. Ongoing — Modem and
contemporary art by Picasso, Miró, Chagall, Leger,
Botero, Warhol, and others.
Pastabilities, 11652 N Kendall Dr; 5939868. Through
June 30 — “Art in Suburbia,” works by Adalberto
Delgado, Pablo Donoso, Sergio Garcia, Rhonda Maria
Morton, and others.
Profiles Gallery, 244 Valencia Ave, Coral Gables;
4433313. Through July 7 — Works by painter Judith
Salmon and ceramist Joan Hane.
Rado Gallery, 800 West Ave, Miami Beach; 5332803.
Through July 23 — “Scary Monsters, Super Freaks,”
works by Frederick Soler. Through September 23 —
“Director’s Own,” works by AR. Harte.
Rita Gombinski Contemporary Art, 900 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 5324141. Ongoing — Group show, and
a collection of Israeli art.
R.S.V.P. Collection, 3900 N Miami Ave; 5735032.
Through July 12 — “Erophytas: The Private Life of
Plants,” erotic nature works by painter Lisa Remeny
and sculptor Ramón Lago.
Scharf Shop, 435 Española Way, Miami Beach;
6739308. Ongoing — “Closet no. 14,” an installation
by Kenny Scharf.
Sher Galleries, 3585 NE 207th St North Miami Beach;
932-9930. Ongoing — Works by Erte, Neiman,
Tobiasse, Hart, and other gallery artists.
Sky Gallery, NationsBank Tower, 100 SE 2nd St;
539-7100. Through June 30 — Abstract paintings by
Robert Rider. July 1 through July 31 — Shadow
expressions by Vincent Luca, a.k.a. the Shadow Man.
South Florida Art Center - ClaySpace, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 534-3339. Through July 1 — “New
South Florida Clay," new works by local artists.
South Florida Art Center - Ground Level, 1035 Lincoln Rd,
Miami Beach; 674-8278. Through July 31 —
“Contemporary Expressions of Haitian Art,” works by
fifteen contemporary Haitian artists, including
Edouard Duval-Carrie, Marie-Helene Cauvin, and
Lionel St. Pierre.
Southeast Collection Gallery, 3211 Ponce de Leon Blvd,
Coral Gables; 371-2711. Through June 30 —
“Japanese Artists.”
Steiner Galleries, 9700 Collins Ave, Bal Harbour,
866-1816. Ongoing — Russian master works and fairy¬
tale paintings, sculpture by Leon Axelrod and Fanny
Haiot, and contemporary artworks by several gallery
artists.
Storefront Art 431N Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
5574650. June 30 through August 29 — “Mes cheveux
resemblent un chapeau (My Hair Looks like a Hat),”
an exhibition of works by French artists.
Susane R. Gallery, 93 NE 40th St; 573-8483. Through
July 14 — Architectural embellishments from
nineteenth-century France.
Tanner Studio, Lumonics Light and Sound Theatre,
3017 NW 60th St Ft Lauderdale; 979-3161. Ongoing
— Acrylic light and water sculpture and video art
Tap Tap Restaurant 819 5th St Miami Beach; 672-2898.
Through June 30 — “Ghosts of Guantánamo,” images
of Haitian refugees at the base.
Tom Seghi Fine Arts, 920 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
6724549. Ongoing — ‘Tom Seghi: New Works.”
Visual Extremes, 23 Almería Ave, Coral Gables;
441-2331. Ongoing — New works by Leonardo
Hidalgo.
Wire, 1638 Euclid Ave, Miami Beach; 538-3111.
Ongoing — Recent works by painter-sculptor Craig
Coleman.
Wirtz Gallery, 5750 Sunset Dr, South Miami; 662-5414.
Through June 30 — Works by Colombian artists
Cecilia Di Fiore and Rodolf Kohn Hinestrosa and
Cuban artist Orlando Acosta. July 1 through July 31
— Works by Alice Brock, Evelyn Geisenheyner,
Lucille Keathley, and others.
World Resources Gallery, 719 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
534-9095. Ongoing — Wood carvings from the Sepik
River tribes of Papua New Guinea.
Readings & Discussions
Thursday, June
Baby-Care Seminar Moms- and dads-to-be w„,. _
to miss this class on breastfeeding. $15 per couple.
7:00 p.m. Mercy Hospital, 3663 S Miami Ave;
285-2770.
Black Hole of Cash Flow: Financial advisor Susan E.
Masaitis shares simple steps for getting a grip on
spending habits and securing your financial future.
Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Bookstore, 710
University Dr, Pembroke Pines; 433-2192.
Is Your Kid on Drugs?: The City of North Miami Beach
Police Department leads a seminar on recognizing the
symptoms of drug use in kids and teens. Free. 7:00
p.m. Tonight at the Uleta Recreation Center (16880
NE 4th Ave, North Miami Beach) and tomorrow at
the Allen Park Recreation Center (1770 NE 162nd St,
North Miami Beach); 5756744.
Miami and the Beaches Business Luncheon: Merret
Stierheim, CEO of the Greater Miami Convention and
Visitors Bureau, moderates a panel of speakers from
across the county discussing the economic impact of
South Florida attractions. $25.12:30 p.m. Miami
Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center
Dr, Miami Beach; 672-1270.
Miami Beach Writers Group: Take your latest writings
and your thickest skin to the gallery for this weekly
group critique. Free. 7:30 p.m. Gallery of the
Unknown Artists, 735 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
673-5922.
Miami Storytellers Guild: Listen every Thursday to
legends and tales about the historic Biltmore Hotel
and the stars who stayed there. Free. 7:00 p.m. 1200
Anastasia Ave, Coral Gables; 4451926.
Poetry Circle: Share your favorite and original poems
and bring your improvisational energy to this weekly
poetry reading. Free. 8:30 p.m. Pine Tree House, 3795
Pine Tree Dr, Miami Beach; 674-9348.
South Beach Business Guild: Businessowners,
professionals, and others serving South Beach’s gay
community are invited to attend this meeting. Free.
10:00 a.m. Gertrude’s, 826 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
5314614.
William Wharton: Bestselling author Wharton (Birdy,
Dad, and A Midnight Clear reads from and discusses
his first work of non-fiction, Ever After. A Father’s True
Story. Free. 8:00 p.m. Books & Books, 296 Aragon
Ave, Coral Gables; 4424408.
Writers in the Sand: Serious writers meet every
Thursday for this weekly writers’ workshop. Free.
8:00 p.m. 405 Española Way, 3rd fl, Miami Beach;
442-1497.
Friday, June 30
After Hours: Musicians, singers, comedians, and
entertainers of every type are invited to show off their
talents at this weekly open mike. $3. Tonight and
tomorrow night at 11:30. Miamiway Theater, 12615 W
Dixie Hwy, North Miami; 893-0005.
Caribbean Writers Summer Institute: The University of
Miami continues its lecture series with a reading by
Jamaican poet and short-story writer Opal Palmer
Adisa tonight at 8:00; on Sunday at 5:00 with
Guadeloupan novelist and scholar Maryse Conde (in
French and English) reads; and on Wednesday at 8:00
p.m., Guyanese poet and novelist Sasenarine Persaud
reads from her works. Free. Whitten University
Center, 1306 Stanford Dr, Coral Gables; 284-2182.
Immigrant Workers Rights: The Militant Labor Forum
hosts a free-speech discussion about the fight against
California’s Proposition 187. $5.7:30 p.m. Pathfinder
Bookstore, 137 NE 54th St; 7551020.
Kaffeine: Anything goes (as long as it’s not violent or
pornographic) at this late-night, open-mike
coffeehouse; register an hour before showtime and
June 29 —July 5, 1995

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June 29-July 5, 1995

keep it under five minutes. $5 for spectators.
Midnight. Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650
Harrison St, Hollywood; 925-8123.
Tie Meaning of Dreams: Psychologist and author Joan
Cacciatore Mazza delves into dreams and how to gain
insight through their interpretation. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Bookstop, 801S University Dr, Plantation; 370-2456.
Susan Lee Mint*: AIDS volunteer Mintz, author of Safe
Sex Never Tasted So Good, discusses her late
husband’s AIDS diagnosis and recent death and her
experiences as a caregiver. Free. 7:30 p.m. Barnes &
Noble Bookstore, 645 University Dr, Coral Springs;
753-6650.
Music, Monologues, and Poetry: Poets Rose Virgo and
Sharkmeat Blue host an evening of spoken-word and
musical performances. Free. 8:00 p.m. Barnes &
Noble Bookstore, 18711 Biscayne Blvd, Aventura;
935-9770.
Spitfire Productions Presents: This new theatrical
production company makes its professional review
with pieces from Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song
Trilogy and Tony Kushner’s Angels in America. Free.
7:00 p.m. Borders Book Shop, 9205 S Dixie Hwy;
665-8800.
Saturday, July 1
Richard Ford: See “Calendar.”
Sunday, July 2
Poetry in the Woods: The East Coast Academy of Poets
invites local poets to read their original works. $1
donation requested. 1:00 p.m. Secret Woods Nature
Center, 2701W State Rd 84, Ft Lauderdale; 791-1030.
Tuesday, July 4
A Group of Expressives: Musicians, poets, writers, and
thespians step up to the mike with their original
material every Tuesday night. $2.9:00 p.m. Cool
Beans Cafe, 12573 Biscayne Blvd, North Miami;
899-8815.
Tongue and Groove: Catch a vibe and groove to the
spoken, chanted, and rapped words of local poets,
writers, musicians, and thespians at this weekly
spoken-word jam. Free. 8:00 p.m. Java Junkies, 1446
Washington Ave, Miami Beach; 754-9204.
Wednesday, July 5
Business Planning Workshop: Leant how to prepare a
business plan at this FIU Small-Business
Development Center seminar. Free. 6:00 p.m. South
Dade Regional Library, 10751SW 211th St; 348-2272.
In Pursuit of Gay Rights: Nancy M. Graham discusses
her efforts to support gay and lesbian rights at this
Broward Women in Network meeting. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Church, 3970 NW 21st Ave, Ft
Lauderdale; 537-0866.
Open-Mike Comedy Night Think you’re funny? Prove it!
Step up to the mike as amateur stand-uppers share
original material every Wednesday. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Java Junkies, 1446 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
754-9204.
Shambala, the Myth of Immortality: Indo-Tibetan tantric
culture expert Glenn Mullin discusses yoga,
meditation, and Himalayan culture. Free. 8:00 p.m.
Books & Books, 933 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach;
532-3222.
Sick and Tred of Being Sick and Tred?: Leam how to
boost your health and energy with nutritionist David
Sontag. Free. 7:00 p.m. Advanced Wellness Institute,
7860 Peters Rd, ste F-109, Plantation; call 424-3883 to
reserve.
South Beach Bohemians: Expect the unexpected as local
characters unite weekly to spew everything from
Shakespeare to Monty Python to original poetry,
prose, and music. Free. 9:00 p.m. BAR., 1663 Lenox
Ave, Miami Beach; 532-1191.
Thursday, June 29
African Dance and Drumming Workshops: Move to some
invigorating rhythms as Bamba Febrissy and
Adeyemi Olamina host an African and Caribbean
dance and drumming class. $5. Tonight at 7:00 and
Saturday at 4:00 p.m. Miami Beach Community
Center, 2100 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;
673-7730.
Afro-Cuban and Latin Dance: Leam how to move to
Caribbean and Latin-American rhythms with
choreographer Neri Torres. $10. Afro-Cuban class
tonight at 6:00 and Tuesday at 7:00; Latin class tonight
at 7:00 and Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. Higher Ground
Studio, Roney Plaza Hotel, ste PH A-31,2301 Collins
Ave, Miami Beach; 883-1375.
Horton Dance!: Young dancers from across Broward
County perform to benefit the company’s outreach
efforts. $5.3:00 p.m. Fort Lauderdale Children’s
Theatre, 640 N Andrews Ave, Ft Lauderdale;
584-9076.
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June 29-July 5, 1995
Merengue Dance Party: Howard Marlow and Lois
Walser demonstrate and teach the merengue. Free.
7:30 p.m. Center for the Fine Arts, 101W Flagler St;
375-3000.
Friday, June 30
Capoeira Workshop: Brazilian dance and percussion
master Caboquinho leads a workshop on Angolan-
style capoeira. $10. Today at 4:30 and Tuesday at 8:30
p.m. Mideastem Dance Exchange, 350 Lincoln Rd, ste
505, Miami Beach; 538-1608.
Drum Dance Theatre: Lumonics hosts an evening of
drumming, dancing, and mind-altering electronics
with master percussionist Hodeen. $10. Every Friday
at 8:30 p.m. Lumonics Light and Sound Theatre, 3017
NW 60th St, Ft Lauderdale; to reserve, call 979-3161.
Monday, June 3
Spiritual Belly Dance: Tap into the exotic, feminine, and
mysterious movement while getting into shape. $5.
10:30 a.m. 3795 Pine Tree Dr, Miami Beach; 674-9348.
Tuesday, July 4
Latin and Ballroom Dance: Trip the light fantastic while
you learn those steps in beginner and Intermediate
workshops on Tuesday nights. $5.8:00 p.m.
Streetdance in the Gables, 238 Minorca Ave, Coral
Gables; 442-6002.
Kids
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ONLY THE ADVENTUROUS
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Thursday, June 29
Beach-Ocean Awareness Program: Learn the basics of
sun and water safety while having fun at the beach
during this three-hour safety course. Free. 10:00
a.m. Every Thursday and Tuesday through August
24. Crandon Beach lifeguard headquarters, 4000
Crandon Blvd, Key Biscayne; call 361-7373 for
details.
Saturday, July 1
Free to Be... You and Me: Actors' Playhouse presents
this children’s musical based on the 1970s
television special about feeling good about
yourself. Runs every Saturday through August 5.
$7 adults, $6 kids. 2:00 p.m. Carrusel Theatre, 235
Alcazar Ave, Coral Gables; 595-0010.
Independence Day Flagmaklng: July marks the
independence-day celebrations of the U.S., Canada,
Puerto Rico, France, Bahamas, Colombia, and
Peru; make a flag of any of these countries. Free.
11:00 a.m. Mall at 163rd Street clubhouse, 1421 NE
163rd St, North Miami Beach; 944-7132, ext 209.
Junior Tennis Clinic: Kids ages twelve and under can
learn the secrets of the court. Free. 8:00 a.m.
Milander Park, 4700 Palm Ave, Hialeah; 887-1515.
The Princess and the Pea; The Professional
Children’s Theatre presents this fairy tale play
about the search for a true princess. Adults $7,
kids $5. Today at 11:00 a.m. and tomorrow at 2:00
p.m. and Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. Florida
Playwrights’ Theatre, 1936 Hollywood Blvd,
Hollywood; 925-8123.
Sunday, July 2
It’s A Grand Old Flag: Celebrate our nation’s
independence by singing patriotic songs, making a
flag, and eating red, white, and blue treats. Ages
four and up. $3.1:00 and 2:15 p.m. Miami Youth
Museum, 5701 Sunset Dr; 661-3046.
Sports
Friday, June 30
Florida Marlins: The Marlins mash the Montreal
Expos in a three-game sweep tonight and
tomorrow at 7:05 and Sunday at 1:35. $7-$30. Joe
Robbie Stadium, 2269 NW 199th St; 930-7800.
Saturday, July 1
Steelman 5K Run-Walk: Strap on your sneaks and
run or walk in this race to benefit the American
Diabetes Association and the Diabetes Research
Institute. Registration is $20. 7:00 p.m. Tropical
Park, 7900 SW 40th St; 227-1500.
Sunday, July 2
Dolphins All-Pro Softball Tournament: Several
Dolphins players step up to the plate in a tourney
against the City of Wilton Manors’ team. Free.
4:00 p.m. Mickel Field, 2675 NW 7th Ave, Wilton
Manors; 390-2137.
Monday, June 3
Florida Marlins: The Marlins pound the San Diegos
in a three-game sweep tonight through
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June 29-July 5, 1995

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Cozy bookstore featuring hard-to-find titles,
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CAFE MIEL - Enjoy fresh juices, gourmet sal¬
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Wellness Practitioners (healing touch, coun¬
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Wednesday at 7:05. $7-$30. Joe Robbie Stadium,
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On the Road & Sea
Wednesday, July 5
Naturalist Luncheon Series: Bring a brown-bag lunch
and listen as local naturalists lecture about animals,
insects, and habitats; this week, naturalist Darlene
Fonkin discusses the everyday lives of tum-of-the-
century Florida pioneers. $1.11:00 a.m. Fem Forest
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Hotlines
AIDS Housing Hotline; 652-8281 (Dade); 800052-8284
(outside Dade)
AJ-Anon: 6874049
Alternative Health & Meditation: 534-2769
Alzheimer's Disease Hotline: 324-8415
American Cancer Society: 5944363
American Heart Association: 751-1041
Broward County Public Health Unit (HRS): 4674882
Cancer Information: 3580000
CDC National AIDS Hotline: 800-342-2437 (English);
800-344-7432 (Spanish); 800-243-7889 (TTYservices
for the deaf)
Coalition for Hypertension Education and Control;
800-6644447
Cocaine Hotline: 800-COCAINE
Crisis Intervention-Suicide Hotline: 358-HELP
Dade County Citizens Safety Council: 592-3232
Deaf Services Bureau: 444-2266 (voice line); 444-2211
(TDD line)
Domestic Violence Hotline: 547-3170
Drugs, Alcohol, and Troubled Teens: 800443-3784
Environmental Hotline: (Citizens for a Better South
Florida) 444-9484
Family Counseling Services: (provide in-home
counseling to people with HIV) 573-2500
Florida HIV/AIDS Hotline: 800-FLA-AIDS (English);
80O545-SIDA (Spanish); 800-AIDS-101 (Haitian
Creole)
Guardian Ad Litem: (to assist abused and neglected
children in court) 638-6861.
Habitat for Humanity: 670-2224
Health Crisis Network AIDS Hotline: 751-7751
Helping Hands: Hands in Action (for victims of physical,
sexual, or emotional abuse) 952-0785
Hospice Care: (support for terminally ill patients)
591-1606
Housing Opportunities for Excellence: 3744660
Hunger Hotline: (helps locate emergency food
resources) 80O329-FOOD
I.CJLR.E.: (HIV outreach program) 324-9042
Legal Hotline for Older Floridians: 576-5997 (Dade);
800-252-5997 (outside of Dade)
Mental Health Crisis Center 643-1400
Metro-Dade Cultural Affairs Arts and Culture Hotline:
557-5600
Miami Bridge: (runaways, abused, abandoned, and
neglected youth shelter) 324-8953
Miami Women's Health Center 835-6165
Narcotics Anonymous: 662-0280
National AIDS Hotline: 800342-AIDS
National Cancer Institute Hotline: 547-6920 (Dade);
721-7600 (Broward)
National Food Addiction Hotline: 800-872-0088
National Organization for Women: 932-7444
Office Paper Recycling Hotline: 594-1680
Overeaters Anonymous: 274-8800
Planned Parenthood: 441-2022
Pregnancy and Drug Abuse Information: 5484528
Rape Treatment Center at Jackson: 585-7273 (to report a
rape); 585-6949 (for recovery support)
Senior Center Hotline: (referral service for all elderly
services) 6284354
Seniors Hotline: (for assistance with daily tasks)
3506060
SHE Center (Sex Health Education and women’s
medical care, including abortion information)
895-5555
SIDS Hotline: (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)
80O221-SIDS
South Florida HealthUne: 825-6269 (Dade); 800624-3365
(outside Dade)
Spinal Cord livingAssistance Development (support
services for physically disabled persons) 887-8838
Survivors of Authority Abuse: (support for those sexually
victimized by trusted professionals) 583-5833
Switchboard of Miami: (suicide hotline) 358-HELP
Vietnam Veterans Hotline: 646-VETS
Women in Distress: (domestic violence hotline)
761-1133
Women of Miami Beach (WOMB) Helpline: 534-6900
Women's Resource Counseling Center 448-8325
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Page 58 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

Tales of Two Gotham Cities
By Todd Anthony
Amazing, really, the similarities between the brood¬
ing superhero of Batman Forever and the Priscilla-
meets-Woodstock inhabitants of the documentary
Wigstock: The Movie. Start with the obvious parallel:
Batman patrols the mean streets of Gotham City in a
tight batsuit that exaggerates his padded muscles;
Wigstock’s drag queens strut their stuff in New York
City (nicknamed Gotham) in tight dresses that
accentuate their padded boobs. The heroes of both
films are outsiders harboring a secret identity,
although most of Wigstock’s participants already
have come out, while Batman appears ready to burst
from the strain of concealing his alter ego.
No transgression committed in Batman begins to
rival the fashion crimes perpetrated in Wigstock. But
Jim Carrey (as the Riddler) and Tommy Lee Jones
(as Two-Face) mug for the cameras every bit as
shamelessly as Wigstock’s Lypsinka and Misstress
Formika. Both movies relegate women to secondary
roles in narratives that revolve around men whose
flamboyant outfits define their personalities. Batman
has the happier ending of the two films — Bruce
Wayne eventually finds his Boy Wonder (whose
name, by the way, is Dick. Coincidence? I think
not.). But the bottom line is still a pair of movies
about grown men who get their jollies playing dres-
sup. Batman pairs up with Robin, the Riddler bonds
with Two-Face. Neither boy-boy couple would look
out of place among Wigstock’s revelers. Maybe the
Caped Crusader even could offer a few tips on how
to make dramatic entrances and exits to the “Lady”
Bunny, who has been organizing and emceeing the
annual Wigstock events (this documentary includes
footage from the 1993 and 1994 installments) for the
past ten years.
Both films push all the expected buttons. Batman
Forever ditches Tim Burton’s jaundiced world-view
and murky visuals for Joel Schumacher’s frenetic
pacing, slick sets, eye-popping special effects, and
vibrant primary colors. It seems as if at least one
vivid hologram, laser beam, or glowing Plexiglas
backdrop illuminates every frame.
Of course if it’s slightly more exotic shades you
want, get a load of the bizarre fluorescent-metallic
hues and tints on display in Wigstock. And that’s just
the hairl This documentary chronicling an annual
festival for cross-dressers borrows its structure from
(and parodies) Woodstock, the popular film account
of the fabled late-Sixties counterculture blowout.
The newer ‘Stock is a pleasant enough diversion, but
as both drag-culture commentary and pure enter¬
tainment it suffers in comparison to 1990’s landmark
Paris Is Burning. Paris was fresher, better struc¬
tured, and less preachy, although Wigstock might be
the funnier of the two movies in a high-camp, lowest-
common-denominator way. What structure exists in
the newer film results from its attempts to lampoon
Woodstock; those efforts feel sporadic and half¬
hearted, although Misstress Formika’s opening
“Age of Aquarius” spoof and John Kelly’s closing
homage to Joni Mitchell (singing “Woodstock,”
natch) register high marks.
Wigstock boasts some funny bits: Jackie Beat and
Alexis Arquette hitting on a pair of construction
workers with lines such as “You remind me of that
guy on Baywatch, David Hasselhoff” and “Oooo —
did you get those tattoos in prison?”; an Elvis imper¬
sonator sporting a stiff, jet-black pompadour the size
of a dolphin; Perfidia introducing a dance move,
“Thees step wuss geeven to me by Carmen
Miranda, and boy wuss shee glad to be reed of eet!”
The candid reaction shots are a hoot, as average
people on the street gape at passing queens in full
regalia. (Isn’t it amazing that some people are still
shocked by drag queens?) And then there are the
names themselves: Flotilla DeBarge, Girlina, Coco
Peru, the Duelling Bankheads, Honey Dijon, Anna
Conda, Pepper Grinder, and my personal favorite,
Toddrique.
But it doesn’t take long for the novelty to wear off.
This is, to a large extent, a movie about men pre¬
tending to be women while they pretend to sing.
That’s a lot of pretending. Not the most respected
art form in the world to begin with, lip-synching
loses much of its appeal on film. A club setting
where the drugs have kicked in and the music
pumps and you can dance is one thing; a movie the¬
ater where you can only sit and watch while other
people enjoy themselves is another matter, espe¬
cially when many of the folks on-screen feel the
need to keep telling you how fabulous they are.
Several performers rhapsodize about how wonder¬
ful it feels to walk on the wild side in stiletto heels,
and a few go so far as to tout drag as a panacea for
all the world’s ills. And the filmmakers insist on
drumming into our heads what wonderful, well-
Small Film,
Big Deal
Well, Batman did it again. Swooped down just in
time to save the day. An aura of resignation had
started to permeate the superhero’s stomping
grounds. (Gotham City? Get real. We’re talkin’
Hollywood, babe.) Just as surely as he dis¬
patched nefarious supervillains Two-Face and the
Riddler, the Caped Crusader laid a serious butt-
kicking on the gloom-and-doomers whose predic¬
tions of looming box-office catastrophe had
begun to fall on increasing numbers of sympa¬
thetic ears. It was white-knuckle time in Tinsel¬
town, where summer blockbuster season so far
had been more bust than boom.
Half a dozen potential megahits — Crimson
Tide (a Tom Clancy surrogate), Die Hard With a
Vengeance, Braveheart (Mel Gibson topless!),
Congo (the mandatory Michael Crichton offer¬
ing), Casper (from the house of Spielberg), and
June 29-July 5, 1995
The Bridges of Madison County (Clint Eastwood
and Meryl Streep in an adaption of a book that
sold more than five million copies) — rode
proudly into box-office battle only to emerge with
lackluster results. As of this writing not one of
them has crossed the magical $100 million thresh¬
old that marks clear victory, much less entered
the $300 million winner’s circle to shake hands
with last year’s champs, Forrest Gump and The
Lion King.
Enter Mr. Cowl-and-Scowl to save the day. Even
Batman’s greediest enemies would have to admire
his record-breaking $50 million opening weekend
take. Suddenly the picture looks a lot brighter for
Pocahontas, Apollo 13, Judge Dredd, and Water-
world (although the latter film needs to outgross
the Cali cartel just to break even).
While I enjoyed Batman Forever, I fear that
some really fine small films will be buried in the
avalanche of hype surrounding the new gross-
receipts champ and its subsequent challengers.
A Pure Formality is just such a film.
Formality is a movie for grownups who prefer
nuanced performances and intelligent dialogue to
eye-popping special effects and the usual macho-
adjusted creatures drag queens are by conducting
interviews wherein “normal” (old, plain-looking, and
presumably hetero) residents of the neighborhoods
being invaded by festivalgoers reassure the camera
that all this gender-bending is cool with them. The
device smacks of both dogmatic overkill and preach¬
ing to the converted.
It probably doesn’t help matters any that a few of
the performances fall as flat as the performers’
chests — sans falsies. The filmmakers try to punch
up things by including a few segments in dubious
taste, such as a shocking faux-live-birth tableau, or
Wendy Wild fresh out of the hospital after a bone-
marrow transplant, performing while schlepping a
Continued on page 50
man posturing. Gérard Depardieu and Roman
Polanski supply the acting muscle (perhaps in the
former’s case the correct word would be heft),
while acclaimed Italian director Giuseppe Torna-
tore (who wrote and directed the bittersweet,
enchanting Cinema Paradiso) mans the cameras.
Pascale Quignard (Tous les matins du monde)
scripted.
The film that results from this distinguished col¬
laboration feels as if it were adapted from a play. It
wasn’t. It also feels a lot like Polanski’s most
recent directorial effort, Death and the Maiden
(which was appropriated from the stage).
Like Death and the Maiden, the action in A Pure
Formality focuses on an intense, protracted inter¬
rogation that takes place inside an isolated build¬
ing located in a remote part of the countryside
while a violent rainstorm rages outside. The set¬
ting calls to mind all those Peanuts comic strips
that started out with wanna-be novelist Snoopy
typing “It was a dark and stormy night...”. Count
on two things: The phones won’t work and the
power eventually will go out.
Polanski plays a cop whose men find Depardieu
Continued on page 60
A You go, girl;
The“Lady"
Bunny struts for
the cameras
in Wigstock
Wigstock,
Directed by Barry
Shits; with the
“Lady" Bunny,
Misstress
Formika, Flloyd,
Joey Arias,
Lypsinka, Crystal
Waters, and
RiiPaul,
Batman Forever.
Directed by Joel
Schumacher; with
Val Kilmer, Jim
Carrey, Tommy
Lee Jones, Nicoie
Kidman, and Chris
O'Donnell.
New Times Page 59

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Continued from page 59
portable IV around the stage. But Wigstock's
makers never lick the problem that plagues
most concert flicks: Anything less than incen¬
diary performances kinetically shot and eco¬
nomically edited quickly grows wearisome.
Despite a few delightful surprises — such as
a drop-dead impromptu Billie Holiday imper¬
sonation sung a cappella by Joey Arias —
Wigstock loses much of its bounce as the
party wears on.
Speaking of overkill, the deliriously over-
the-top Batman Forever must set some kind
of record for heavyweight talent enlisted in
the service of lightweight plot. The real battle
here was not between Batman and the vil¬
lains who wanted to do him in. (Although
that is the story line in a nutshell.) It was
among high-priced supporting players Nicole
Kidman, Chris O’Donnell, and Drew Barry¬
more as they struggled to cop a few seconds
of screen time from headliners Val Kilmer,
Jim Carrey, and Tommy Lee Jones. The
guardians of the Batman screen legacy were
taking no chances; they wanted to make
damn sure that after Batman Returns (Tim
Burton’s dark sequel to his equally opaque
but more profitable Batman) earned less
money than its predecessor, this third install¬
ment in the series would turn a handsome
profit and thereby perpetuate the franchise.
So they signed Carrey, the hottest box-office
attraction in La-La land, to star opposite their
new, improved Caped Crusader, Val Kilmer.
(Let’s face it, Michael Keaton’s talents were
wasted in the role, which utilized none of his
ironic humor or deadpan sarcasm. Come to
think of it, why even bother with Val Kilmer?
Sure he’s handsome and can act, but the pro¬
ducers could have saved a bundle and filled
out the batsuit better by hiring a buffed,
square-jawed mannequin such as Dolph
Lundgren or Adrian Zmed.)
Not all the money went to the talent in
front of the cameras. Directorial reins were
handed over to slickmeister Joel Schu¬
macher (The Client, Flatliners), with quirky,
murky Burton staying on as producer. If
Schumacher’s mandate was to retool Bur¬
ton’s apocalyptic vision into a vibrant live-
action cartoon, he succeeded magnificently.
(He deserves some sort of award just for jug¬
gling all those egos.) Batman Forever is a
stylish, bigger-than-life sound and light
extravaganza, bursting with eccentric gad¬
gets, sleek vehicles, and snappy dialogue.
(Kilmer’s crime-fighter fends off the
advances of Kidman’s lusty shrink, Dr.
Chase Meridian, with the line, “It’s the car.
Chicks dig the car.”)
Oh sure, one could nitpick. The Batman-
Dr. Meridian-Bruce Wayne love triangle
slows down things too much. Jones’s Two-
Face character represents a transparent
attempt to invoke the schizoid menace of
Jack Nicholson’s unforgettable Joker with¬
out actually having to meet Nicholson’s
salary demands. Chris O’Donnell’s Boy
Wonder looks more like Batman’s contem¬
porary than his teenage apprentice. And
there are so many characters and corre¬
sponding subplots introduced that none of
them get properly developed.
But don’t dwell on those shortcomings.
Get in touch with your inner child and let
him or her enjoy Batman Forever for the
campy celluloid comic book it is. CD
Big Deal
Continued from page 59
sloshing through the woods, breathless,
disoriented, and devoid of ID. They rou¬
tinely haul the big fellow in for questioning.
He claims to be a famous writer named
Onoff; the inspector, an Onoff buff, scoffs —
until the prisoner flawlessly recalls a pas¬
sage from one of the writer’s works. Onoff
grows increasingly belligerent and indig¬
nant as the questioning drags on. But the
inspector will not be cowed, and the movie
settles in for a battle of wits, wherein we
find out relatively early on that A) a murder
has been committed; B) Onoff has a few
secrets; and C) the cunning inspector hides
a few cards up his sleeve, as well. The final
“shocking” revelation is a metaphysical cop-
out, but the image that lingers is that of a
brilliantly fought verbal sparring match
between two well-met combatants.
Who knew that Roman Polanski, famed
equally for his directing and his scandalous-
tragic private life, could hold his own acting
with a heavyweight (in every sense of the
word) thespian such as Depardieu? Polan¬
ski’s wily, world-weary police inspector
makes A Pure Formality anything but.
Depardieu may be approaching Brando in
both girth and renown, but it’s the diminu¬
tive, rodent-faced Pole who snares the ele¬
phantine Frenchman in a metaphysical
mousetrap. It would be a damn shame to
see his bravura performance disappear into
the shadow of a bat.
- By Todd Anthony
A Pure Formality. Written by Giuseppe
Tornatore and Pascale Quignard; directed by
Giuseppe Tornatore; with Gérard Depardieu
and Roman Polanski.
Page 60 New Times
June 29-July 5, 1995

Film Capsules
The following are capsule reviews of movies opening this
week, or currently showing, in the Greater Miami area.
For information about movie times and locations, see
"Showtimes," contact local theaters, or call 888-FILM, a
free service.
Openings
Apollo 13 (PG): Does Tom Hanks have the right stuff
to send this scrupulously authentic account of the
failed 1970 moonshot into orbit, or are movies about
astronauts doomed to crash and bum at the box
office?
The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love (U):
Yet another girhneets-girl flick, this one’s chief
distinctions being the youth and comeliness of the
interracial couple at the film’s core.
Judge Dredd (R): Cross the worst elements from Tank
Girl and Demolition Man and you’d still probably
come up with a better film than this obscenely
expensive loser. Dredd starts out with a bang —
hundreds, if not thousands of them, actually — but
then goes so horribly wrong you wonder if the
filmmakers were shooting for parody of the whole sci-
fi-action genre. Let the “Dread"/Dredd puns roll.
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG): Strictly
for kids and Toys R Us shareholders.
The Postman (PG): MassimoTroisi, considered by
many to be Italy’s finest actor, died of heart failure at
the age of 41 immediately after completing principal
photography on this lyrical character study. Philippe
Noiret (Cinema Paradiso) costars as exiled Chilean
poet Pablo Neruda, who has been granted sanctuary
by the Italian government and has taken up residence
on a beautiful island off the coast of Naples. The
island’s postmaster, overwhelmed by the volume of
mail suddenly arriving at his office, hires Mario
(Troisi), the son of a local fisherman, to serve as
Neruda’s personal mailman. An unlikely friendship
develops between poet and postman that culminates
with Mario enlisting the aid of the wordsmith (á la
Cyrano) in wooing the most beautiful woman on the
island with the rationale, “Poetry doesn’t belong to
those who write it but to those who need it”
Ongoing
Amateur (R): Heard the one about the amnesiac, the
ex-nun who thinks she’s a nymphomaniac, the
homicidal CPA and the porno queen with the heart of
gold? The punchline is Hal Hartley’s latest film, an
exercise in quirky absurdist humor, deadpan
dialogue, outrageous characterization, and slick
production values. Hartley, perhaps the closest thing
to a true auteur working on the fringes of mainstream
cinema in the U.S., goes over the top from the first
frame and stays there throughout. As Letterman has
done with TV talk shows, Hartley simultaneously pays
homage to and ridicules the conventions of the
traditional film noir.
Batman Forever (PG-13): Reviewed in this issue.
Braveheart (R): Mel Gibson dons hair extensions and
hikes up his skirt to direct himself as thirteenth-
century Scottish hero William Wallace, who battled
evil English King Edward 1 for Scotland’s freedom.
Both Gibson the star and Gibson the director turn in
workmanlike performances. Gory battle scenes pack
visceral whallop but share too much screen time with
predictable filler. Jesus should sue for copyright
infringement over the excruciatingly masochistic
ending, a blatant attempt to portray Wallace as Christ
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13): Clint Eastwood
directs himself in the screen version of Robert James
Waller’s critically loathed but immensely popular
novel. Meryl Streep costars as the restless rural
hausfrau who finds passion in the arms of a National
Geographic photographer while her husband and kids
are out of town.
Casper (PG): George Lucas’s Industrial Light & Magic
and Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment team up
to reanimate the friendliest ghost of them all with $50
million worth of special effects.
Congo (PG-13): Nasty monkey business in the deep,
dark jungle. Summer movie season just isn’t complete
without at least one offering based on a Michael
Crichton work, but this fetid variation on the monster-
gorillas-and-secret-treasure theme isn’t likely to make
anybody forget Jurassic Park. It’s as if Crichton never
heard of a fellow named Kong. Aping every jungle-
safari-lost-city-deadly-curse flick from King Solomon’s
Mines to Raiders of the Lost Ark to [insert your favorite
Tarzan movie here], Congo's few shining moments of
inspired Tremors-esque humor cannot prevent the
whole expedition from getting lost in the bush.
Crimson Tide (R): In the latest testosterone-overdriven,
macho military movie from the producing-directing
team that brought you Top Gun (producers Don
Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer, director Tony
Scott), a volatile Russian nationalist and a rebel faction
of the Soviet Army seize control of a nuclear missile
base. The only hope of stopping them from launching
World War III rests with a U.S. nuclear submarine
manned by former University of Aabama football
players and commanded by legendary coach Paul
“Bear” Bryant. The fate of the world and a Sugar Bowl
bid hang in the balance.
Forget Paris (PG-13): Can Billy Crystal and Debra
Winger French kiss better than Kevin Kline and Meg
Ryan? Billy C. (not the former Heat owner) stars as an
NBA referee whose marriage has gone from a fast-
break into a stall.
French Kiss (PG-13): Is the world ready for When Luc
met Kate...? How about Sleepless in Gay Paree? Meg
Ryan fakes nary an orgasm in this romantic comedy
from director Lawrence Kasdan about a woman who
tracks down her wayward fiancé (Timothy Hutton) in
the City of Light. But with Kevin Kline as her sexy
French love interest Luc, presumably Meg didn’t
need to pretend.
The Glass Shield (PG-13): A black male cop (Michael
Boatman) teams with a white female cop (Tank Girts
Lori Petty in an abrupt change-of-pace) to battle
corruption and prejudice within an LA Sheriff’s
station. The life of a black man wrongly convicted of
murder (Ice Cube) hangs in the balance. Charles
Burnett (To Sleep with Anger, Killer of Sheep) wrote
and directed.
Johnny Mnemonic (R): Talk about the dangers of
silicone implants! This techno-cyber-thriller from
author William Gibson stars Speedy Keanu Reeves as
a 21st-century data smuggler in a race against time to
deliver the chip that’s been hard-wired into his brain.
Failure means one hell of a migraine. With noted
thespians Dolph Lundgren, Ice-T, and Henry Rollins.
A Little Princess (G): Adapted from Francis Hodgson
Burnett’s classic children’s book about a privileged
young girl who shops a lot, gets her nails done, drives
a Jag, and joins a sorority at UM.
Mad Love (PG-13): Wild at heart Drew Barrymore and
Chris O’Donnell do the young-lovers-on-the-run
thing.
My Family (R): Acclaimed filmmaker Gregory Nava (El
Norte) tries and fails to depict the Mexican-American
experience without resorting to the usual clichés.
New Jersey Drive (R): An over-the-top cop chases a
gang of teenage car thieves down the streets of
Newark in this boyz-under-the-hood tale from writer-
director Nick Gomez (Laws of Gravity).
Outbreak (R): Deadlier than the black plague and
more contagious than the common cold, a lethal virus
threatens to decimate the inhabitants of a small town
in Northern California and, if it isn’t contained, the
world. Dustin Hoffman is the scientist in a race
against time to halt the disease’s spread. Rene Russo
is his ex-wife, who works at the Centers for Disease
Control and eventually must team up with him to find
a cure. Donald Sutherland is the sinister military guy
who gets in the way. Whether or not Hoffman and
Russo succeed in containing the virus, at least they
beat The Hot Zone to the big screen.
The Perez Family (R): First My Family revisited every
modem Mexican movie cliché. Now an Indian
director (Mira Nair) directs an American actress
(Marisa Tomei) and tries to convey the essence of the
Cuban experience in a doting but dimwitted and
overromantirized tale of dreams and identities lost or
mistaken in the Mariel boatlift. Casting Celia Cruz as
a wise old santera does not buy a movie instant
credibility.
Pocahontas (G): This summer’s eagerly awaited
offering from the House of Mouse falls short of its
recent predecessors (The Lion King, Aladdin, The
Little Mermaid) in almost every respect, yet still
manages to conjure up a bit of that old Disney magic.
And if the native American babe-in-the-woods looks
familiar, perhaps it’s because her sultry, raven-haired
image was modeled upon pouty cover girl Christy
Turlington.
A Pure Formality (U): Reviewed in this issue.
While You Were Sleeping (PG): Sandra Bullock (Speed)
carries this lightweight farce about a Chicago Transit
Authority token-taker who saves a mugging victim’s
life and then is mistaken for his fiancée by the
comatose man’s family. The role demands none of the
pluck or sharpness of tongue that made her so
endearing behind the wheel of that booby-trapped
bus, but Bullock does perky almost as well as she did
spunky. The script furnishes a few unexpected laughs
to help wash down the mush.
Wigstock (U): Reviewed in this issue.
OR CALL
MOVIEFONE
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times and locations. Luck
won’t tell you what’s playing at
you local theatre. Or where
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everyone’s talking about, or
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MovieFone will even sell you
tickets in advance. Just punch
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June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 61

1
:
i*r
“Pure Disney magic!”
- Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
“DISNEY’S DONE IT AGAIN!”
-Joel Siegel, GOOD MORNING AMERICA
NOW
[SHOWING
MUVICO THEATERS
CALIFORNIA CLUB 6
850 IVES DAIRY RD.
652-8558
COBB THEATRES
BYRON/CARLYLE 7
500-71 STREET
MIAMI BEACH
866-9623
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S.W. PINES BLVD. 4
FLAMINGO RD.
437-7790
AMC THEATRES 1
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4999 SHERIDAN ST.
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987-4680
f AMC THEATRES
1 OCEAN WALK 10
J 333 HARRISON ST.
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COBB THEATRES
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AT MAIN 4 LUDLAM
558-3810
COBB THEATRES
UNIVERSITY 7
S.W. 107THAVE.
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223-2700
GENERAL CINEMA’S
INTRACOASTAL THEATRE
SUNNY ISLES BLVD.
3701 N.E. 163RDST.
N. MIAMI BEACH
945-7416
GENERAL CINEMA’S *
HIALEAH 8
PALMETTO EXrWY., 4
N.W. 103RD.ST.
557-9868
I GENERAL CINEMA’S
AT MIRACLE CENTER 10
CORAL WAY
1 442-2299
OCEAN CINEMA
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N.W. 7TH ST.
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AMC THEATRES
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mfeggajar
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4 COUNTRY 10
FLA. TPKE. AT KENDALL DR.
271-8198
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BAKERY CENTRE 7
U.S. 1 AT RED ROAD
(57TH AVE.)
662-4841
F UNITED ARTISTS
1 MOVIES AT
COBB THEATRES
MILLER SQUARE 8
S.W. 138 AVE.
387-3494
AMC
MALL OF
THE AMERICAS
Also in Broward at: Coral Ridge. Swapshop Fox Sunrise.
Fountains. Sawgross. Weston. Mercedes. Fox Festival
Movies at Pompano. Coral Square. Mener. Movies at
U.S. 14 S.W. 136THST.
255-5200
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FROM THE BEST SELLING
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3701 Hi. 163d St.
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Cobb Theatres
KENDALL 9
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W. OF FL Turnpike
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MIRACLE CENTER 10
3301 Carol Way
442-2299
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MIAMI LAKES 10
AT Main & Ludlam
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Palmetto Expwy. &
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Cobb Theatres
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96 St. W. Of Collins
Miami Beach
866-2441
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MAYFAIR 10 CINEMAS
3390 Mary St., Suite 380
Above Planet Hollywood
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MOVIES AT THE FALLS
U.S. 1 & S.W. 136th St.
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OMNI 10
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358-2304
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Hollywood Mall
987-9350
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850 Ives Dairy Road
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& LeJeune Rd.
529-8883
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BAKERY CENTRE 7
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Also in Broward at: Galleria, Fox Sunrise, Fountains, Sawgrass, Weston, Swapshop, Coral Square, Shodowood, Towncenter, Pompano
Cinema 4. Fox Festival. Deerfield. Delray, Inverrary. i no passss oft coupons accepted 1
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CALL 888-FILM FOK SHOWTIMKS & TICKETS
He fell in love with the island’s most beautiful woman.
But he didn’t stand a chance, until a great poet, Pablo Neruda,
gave him the courage and the words to win her heart.
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Also in Broward at: Coral Square. Gateway. Fox Sin rise.
Sawgrass. Weston. Swapshop Coral Springs. Fax Festival
" to Cinema 4. Mzner. Movies at Town Center,
rood. Fountains. Delray.
| NO PASSES OR COUPONS ACCEPTED'
STARTS
FRIDAY
COBB THEATRES
BYRON/CARLYLE 7
500-71 STREET
MIAMI BEACH
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GENERAL CINEMA'S
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S.W. PINES BLVD. 4
FLAMINGO RD.
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HOLLYWOOD MALL
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Page 62 New Times
June 29 —July 5, 1995

Kendall-South Miami-South Dade
Film
Showtimes
Following is a schedule for movies opening and
currently screening at local theaters. All times p.m.
unless otherwise noted. A ♦ indicates a movie that
opens this week. All movie times are subject to change
without notice; please call individual theaters or 888-
FILM (a free service) to confirm.
Downtown-Gables-Grove
Astor Art Cinema
4120 Laguna St; 443-6777
You Men Are All the Same (U) Thur 6/29 only 10:00
Latcho Drom (U) Thur 6/29 only 8:00
Hotel Sorrento (U) Thur 6/29 only 6:00
♦The Postman (PG) Daily 5:45, 8:00,10:15 (Sat-Sun,
Tue matinees 1:15, 3:30)
CocoWalk 16
3015 Grand Ave; 448-6641
French Kiss (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:40, 5:05, 7:30,
10:05
The Perez Family (R) Thur 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:45,
10:15,12:30a; Fri-Tue 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 7:55,10:25
(Fri-Sun late show 12:45a); Wed 12:30,2:50, 5:10,
7:45,10:15
Crimson Tide (R) Daily 1:30, 5:10, 7:45,10:20 (Thur
late show 12:35a; Fri-Sun late show
12:50a)
The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill but Came Down a
Mountain (PG) Daily 1:05, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15,10:20; Fri-
Wed 10:15 (Fri-Sun late show 12:30a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 12:30, 2:45, 5:40, 8:00,
10:30; Fri-Tue 1:45, 5:20, 7:40, 9:50 (Fri-Sun late
show 12:00m); Wed 1:05, 5:20, 7:40, 9:50
Rurnt by the Sun (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45, 4:30, 7:20,
10:20
A Little Princess (G) Thur 12:40, 2:45, 5:15, 7:30,
9:45; Fri-Wed 12:40, 2:45, 5:15
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:15,1:45,
2:30, 4:15, 4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 8:15, 9:45,10:20,
10:50, 12:15a; Fri-Tue 10:30a, 11:30a, 12:30, 1:30,
2:30, 3:15,4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 7:30, 8:15, 9:00,10:15
(Fri-Sun late shows 11:00a, 12:00m, 12:50a); Wed
12:30,1:30, 2:30, 3:15, 4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 7:30, 8:05,
9:15, 10:15, 10:45
Muriel's Wedding (R) Thur 6/29 only 2:00, 5:45, 8:15,
10:35
Amateur (U) Daily 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 8:05,10:35 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:45a)
Wigstock (U) Thur 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:00,10:15,
12:30a; Fri-Tue 8:00, 10:15 (Fri-Sun late show
12:30a); Wed 8:00,10:15
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:00n, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00,
5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00,9:00, 9:55 (Fri-Tue early show
10:00a; Thur late show 12:00m; Fri-Sun late shows
11:00,12:00m)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
11:45a, 12:30, 2:15, 2:55, 4:45, 5:30, 7:15, 8:05, 9:45
(Mon-Tue early show 10:15a; Fri-Sun late show
12:00m)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Thur 12:00m; Fri-Tue 10:00a,
12:00n, 1:00, 2:00,4:00,4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30,
10:00,10:45 (Mon-Tue early show 11:00a; Fri-Sun
late shows 11:30a, 12:50a); Wed 12:00,1:00, 2:00,
4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 7:00, 7:45, 8:00, 9:55, 10:30,
10:50
♦The Incredibly True Adventure of Two Girls in Love
(U) Fri-Tue 12:10, 2:35, 4:50, 7:15, 9:50 (Fri-Sun
late show 12:15a); Wed 12:10, 2:35, 4:50,
7:15
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45,10:00
(Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
Cobb s Mayfair 10 Cinema
3390 Mary Street; 447-9969
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Daily 12:00n, 2:50,
5:20, 8:05, 10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 11:30a, 2:05,
4:40, 7:25,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:00n, 3:30, 7:15, 8:15; Fri-
Wed 12:00n, 3:30, 7:45 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Mad Love (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 11:40a, 2:20, 4:30
Casper (PG) Daily 11:40a, 2:10, 4:30
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 11:15a,
2:00, 4:40, 7:25, 8:00, 10:10, 10:40 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:45a)
Rocky Horror Picture Show (U) Fri-Sat 12:30a
Congo (PG-13) Daily 11:30a, 2:00, 4:30, 7:40,10:10
(Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
A Pure Formality (U) Daily 12:00n, 2:30,4:50
♦Judge Dredd (R) Fri-Wed 11:30a, 12:00n, 1:50,
2:30, 4:20, 5:00, 7:45, 8:15,10:10,10:40 (Fri-Sat late
shows 12:15, 12:45)
♦The Postman (PG) Fri-Wed 11:50a, 2:20, 4:50, 8:00,
10:20 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Miracle Center 10
3301 Coral Way; 442-2299
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:10,10:30;
Fri-Sat 8:10,10:40; Sun-Wed 8:10,10:30
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:30, 4:35, 7:50,
10:30; Fri-Sat 7:40,10:30; Sun-Wed 7:40,
10:20
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00, 5:15, 9:15
Casper (PG) Thur 12:30, 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, 9:50; Fri-
Wed 12:30, 2:50, 5:15
Congo (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:20, 4:50, 7:40,
10:25
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 1:00, 2:30,
4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 7:40, 9:40,10:20; Fri-Wed 12:00n,
1:00, 2:30, 4:00, 5:10, 7:00, 7:50,10:20
Pocahontas (G) Thur 12:00n, 1:00, 2:15, 3:15, 4:30,
5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 9:15,10:00; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 1:00,
2:15, 3:15, 4:30, 5:30, 7:00, 9:00
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Dally
12:00n, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:30, 2:45, 5:20, 7:40,10:30
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:00 (Fri-
Sat 10:15)
Omni 4 and 6
1601 Biscayne Blvd; 372-3439 and 358-2304
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:45, 5:00, 7:50,
10:35; Fri-Tue 10:55a, 1:45, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30; Wed
1:45, 5:05, 7:50,10:30
Braveheart (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:10, 3:30, 7:15,
10:30
Tales From the Hood (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:30, 4:30,
7:30,10:00
Casper (PG) Thur 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:15, 9:45; Fri-
Tue 10:50a, 1:15, 4:55, 7:30,9:55; Wed 12:00n, 2:20,
4:55, 7:30, 9:55
Glass Shield (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 11:40a, 1:50,
5:30, 7:40, 10:15
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 6/29
only 2:00,4:45, 7:45,10:35
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,10:15;
Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,10:10
New Jersey Drive (R) Thur 11:45a, 2:00, 4:15, 7:00,
9:30; Fri-Tue 10:45a, 1:00,4:00, 7:00, 9:30; Wed
11:45a, 2:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 1:00, 2:15,
4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 7:45,10:00,10:30; Fri-Tue 10:45a,
1:00, 4:00, 4:45, 7:00, 7:40, 9:55,10:25; Wed 11:30a,
1:00, 2:15, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 7:40,10:25
♦Mad Love (PG-13) Fri-Tue 8:00,10:15; Wed 1:50,
5:15, 8:00,10:15
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:40, 4:30, 7:30,10:30; Wed
12:40, 4:30, 7:30,10:30
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers; The Movie (PG) Fri-
Tue 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:30, 2:30, 4:30, 5:00, 7:15,8:00,
9:45, 10:20
LeJeune Cinemas 6
782 Le Jeune Rd; 529-8883
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45,
4:30, 7:20,10:00
Casper (PG) Thur 6/29 only 1:15, 3:35, 5:40, 8:00,
10:10
Congo (PG-13) Daily 2:30 (Thur 2:15), 5:00, 7:30,
10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:30,1:45,3:15,4:30,
6:05, 7:20, 8:45, 10:00; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 1:45, 4:30,
7:20,10:00 (Fri-Sat late shows 11:40,12:20a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 12:00n, 1:55, 4:05, 6:10, 8:15,
10:15; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 1:55, 4:05, 6:10, 8:10,
10:00
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:15, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40,9:45
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Fri-Sat 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40,
12:20a; Sun-Wed 12:45, 3:45, 7:00,10:00
Riviera
1560 S Dixie Hwy; 666-8514
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45; Fri-Sun
11:30a, 7:45,10:20; Mon-Wed 1:40, 7:30,
10:10
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:15, 7:15
Braveheart (R) Thur 1:20, 5:00, 9:00; Fri-Sun 12:15,
4:00, 8:00; Mon-Wed 1:20, 5:00, 9:00
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 1:15,1:45, 4:00,4:30,
7:00, 7:30,10:00,10:30; Fri-Sun 11:00a, 1:40,2:20,
4:20, 5:00, 7:20,10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:35a);
Mon-Wed 1:45, 4:00, 4:30, 7:30,10:30
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Fri-Sun 11:00a, 2:00, 5:20, 8:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:45); Mon-Wed 1:00, 4:00, 7:15,
10:20
♦Judge Dredd (R) Fri-Sun 11:10a, 1:30, 4:00, 7:00,
9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m); Mon-Wed 1:30,
4:15, 7:00, 9:30
Bakery Centre 7
5701 Sunset Dr; 662-4841
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 1:45, 5:40, 8:05,
10:20; Fri-Wed 10:00 (Fri-Sat late show 12:15a)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:40, 5:00, 8:00,
10:45; Fri-Wed 8:00,10:40
Casper (PG) Thur 1:00, 3:15, 5:35, 7:50,10:05; Fri-
Wed 1:20, 5:10 (Fri-Tue early show 10:20a)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Fri-Wed
1:25, 4:15, 7:10,10:20
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:50, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10,10:30;
Fri-Wed 1:00, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10, 10:30 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:30, 2:40, 3:30,
4:50, 5:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:00,9:35,10:50; Fri-Wed
11:30a, 12:30,1:30, 2:35, 3:30, 4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:30
(except Fri), 9:10 (Fri-Sat, Mon-Tue early show
10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers; The Movie (PG) Daily
12:15,12:45, 2:40, 3:15, 5:00, 5:40, 7:15, 7:50, 9:30,
10:10 (Fri-Tue early show 10:00a; Fri-Sat late show
12:25a)
Kendall 9
12090 Kendall Dr; 598-5000
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 11:30a, 2:00,4:45, 7:20, 9:45;
Fri-Wed 11:30a, 2:00, 4:45, 8:00,10:30 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:50a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 7:30,10:00
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:45,4:15, 7:45; Fri-Wed
12:45, 4:15, 8:15 (Fri-Sat late show 11:45)
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:20, 2:20, 4:30
Congo (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:40, 2:50, 4:00,
5:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:40, 10:30; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 2:30,
5:00, 7:30, 9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:20a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:15a, 2:00, 2:30,
4:45, 5:15, 7:20,10:05, 10:50; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 12:15,
1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25, 7:15, 8:00, 9:50,10:45 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:40a)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 11:00a (except Tue-Wed),
1:10,1:50, 4:15, 4:40, 7:15, 7:45,10:05,10:45 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:50a)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
11:00a (exceptTue-Wed), 1:00, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30,
9:45 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:15, 3:00, 5:15, 7:45,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Kendall Town & Country
8400 Mills Dr; 271-8198
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 1:50, 5:55, 8:15,
10:35; Fri-Wed 12:50, 5:40, 8:10,10:30
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 12:45, 3:10
(Thur 3:00), 5:50, 8:30,11:00
Johnny Mnemonic (R) Thur 12:50, 5:40,10:30; Fri-
Wed 1:00, 4:05, 8:15,10:40 (Fri-Mon late show
12:40a)
Casper (PG) Thur 10:25a, 12:10, 2:25, 3:30, 5:30,
7:45, 8:10,10:10; Fri-Wed 12:10, 2:25, 5:30, 7:45,
10:10 (Fri-Mon late show 12:20a)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 12:20,
4:15, 7:30,10:20
New Jersey Drive (R) Daily 12:30, 4:30, 8:30,10:45
(Fri-Mon late show 12:35a)
Pocahontas (G) Thur-Tue 10:00a, 10:40a, 11:20a,
12:00n, 12:40,1:20, 2:00, 2:40, 3:20, 4:00, 4:40, 5:20, !
6:00, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 8:40, 9:20,10:00,10:40; Wed 1
11:20a, 12:00n, 12:40,1:20, 2:00, 2:40, 3:20, 4:00,
4:40, 5:20, 6:00, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 8:40, 9:20,10:00,
10:40, 11:00 1
Miller Square VIII
13838 Miller Rd; 387-3494
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45,
4:25, 7:20, 10:10
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:30, 4:00, 7:30; Fri-Wed 7:20
(Fri-Sat late show 11:00)
Casper (PG) Thur 1:15, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Fri-Wed
1:10,3:15, 5:20
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:15,
4:10, 7:50,10:30; Fri-Wed 4:40,10:25
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:45,1:30, 3:30, 4:15,
7:15, 7:40, 10:15, 10:30; Fri-Wed 1:30,1:50, 4:15,
7:15, 7:40,10:05 (Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 3:55, 5:20
(Thur 5:00), 6:05, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00,10:00,11:00 (Fri-
Sat late show 12:00m)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:20, 4:30, 7:30,10:30
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:15, 3:25, 5:30, 7:50,10:10
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45
Movies at the Falls
8888 Howard Dr; 255-5200
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n,
4:50, 7:15, 9:40
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 11:45a, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15;
Fri-Wed 11:30a, 5:00, 7:40
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 7:20,10:00
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 12:30, 4:10, 7:15,
10:15; Fri-Wed 2:15, 10:15
Braveheart (R) Thur 12:00n, 4:15, 7:45; Fri-Wed
12:00n, 3:45, 7:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:05)
Casper (PG) Daily 11:30a, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:30 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:30)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:00,
4:00, 7:00,10:15; Fri-Wed 11:15a, 2:15, 5:30, 8:15
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 11:45a, 2:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 2:00, 4:40, 7:30,10:10;
Fri-Wed 11:30a, 2:00,4:40, 7:15, 9:50 (Fri-Sat late
show 12:15a) ,
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:30a, 1:15, 2:30, 4:15 ,
(Thur 4:00), 5:15, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45 (Thur 10:00)
(Sat-Sun, Tue early show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late shows ,
11:00,12:00m)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 11:30a, 12:30,1:45, 2:45, 4:00,
4:45, 7:10, 7:50 (Thur 7:45), 9:15,10:00 (Fri-Sat late ,
shows 11:15, 12:00m)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:30, 2:45, 5:10, 7:30, 9:45
(Sat-Sun, Tue early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late show ,
11:50)
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers; The Movie (PG) Daily .
12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:25, 9:50 (Sat-Sun, Tue early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sat late show 12:10a)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,10:00 (Sat-
Sun, Tue early show 10:05a)
South Dade 8
18591 South Dixie Hwy; 238-4424
Braveheart (R) Daily 12:00n, 3:30, 7:00,10:30
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 12:30, 4:15, 7:15, â– 
10:10; Fri-Wed 8:00,10:40
Casper (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 9:45; Fri-
Wed 10:15a, 12:30, 2:45, 5:05, 7:30, 9:45 (Fri-Mon ;
late show 12:00m)
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:45, 4:30, 7:30,
10:15
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 6/29
only 12:30,4:30, 7:45,10:30 ;
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 8:15,10:40;
Fri-Wed 11:45a, 2:10, 4:30, 7:50,10:10 (Fri-Mon
late show 12:30a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:00a, 1:15, 2:00,
4:10, 4:55, 7:10, 7:40, 9:50,10:20 (Fri-Mon early
show 10:00a; Fri-Mon late show 12:30a)
♦Apollo 13 (R) Daily 10:00a, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00,
12:45a ‘
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
10:00a, 10:30a, 12:15, 12:45, 2:30, 3:00, 4:45, 5:15,
7:20, 9:30 (Fri-Mon late show 11:45)
Beaches
Alliance Cinema
927 Lincoln Rd, Suite 119; 531-8504
Faster, Pussycat! Kill, Kill! (U) Thur 6/29 only 10:00
Wigstock (U) Thur 8:00; Fri-Wed 10:00 (Sat-Sun
matinee 4:00; Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
♦You Men Are All the Same (U) Daily 8:00 (except
Sat) (Sun matinee 6:00)
♦One Minute Film Festival (U) Sat 8:00 only
At 1663 Lenox Ave
Open City (U) Sun 8:00 only
June 29-July 5, 1995
New Times Page 63

Bay Harbor IV
1170 Kane Concourse; 866-2441
Forget Paris (PC-13) Thur 6/29 only 2:10, 4:40, 7:50,
10:05
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00, 4:30, 8:00
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Daily 1:30,
4:15, 7:15, 10:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 2:00, 4:30, 7:40,10:10; Fri-Wed
2:00, 4:30, 7:30,10:15
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:50, 4:40, 7:45,10:35 (Sat
early show 11:00a)
Byron-Carlyle VII
500 71st St; 866-9623
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 1:45, 4:45, 7:40,
10:05
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 2:00, 4:45, 7:40,
10:10; Fri-Wed 7:40,10:10 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Casper (PG) Thur 1:45, 5:00, 7:30, 9:45; Fri-Wed
1:45, 5:00 (Sat early show 11:45a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 2:00, 2:30, 4:45, 5:15,
7:20, 8:00,10:05, 10:40 (Sat early shows 11:15a,
11:45a; Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00,
6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00,10:00 (Sat early show 11:00a;
Sat matinee 12:00n; Fri-Sat late shows 11:00,
12:00m)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 (Sat early show 11:30a;
Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:15, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50,10:20
(Sat matinee 12:00n; Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
North Dade
California Club VI
850 Ives Dairy Rd; 652-8558
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:10,
2:40, 5:10, 7:55,10:30
Casper (PG) Thur 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 8:00, 10:15; Fri-
Wed 12:25, 2:30, 5:15
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 12:05,
3:00, 7:15,10:05; Fri-Wed 7:35,10:20
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:15, 2:50, 5:10,8:05,10:25;
Fri-Wed 12:50, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10,10:45
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 12:30, 3:05, 5:40, 8:10,
10:35; Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45,10:35
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00, 6:05, 8:00,
10:00
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:15, 10:15
♦Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45
Fashion Island
18741 Biscayne Blvd; 931-2873
Friday (R) Thur 5:05, 7:15,10:25; Fri-Sun 12:50a
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 11:45a, 12:30, 2:20, 3:00,4:55,
6:35, 7:30, 8:15,10:10; Fri-Wed 11:40a, 2:20, 5:05,
7:55,10:30 (Fri-Sun late show 12:50a)
A Little Princess (G) Thur 6/29 only 12:25, 2:45
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:25,
9:50; Fri-Wed 9:45 (Fri-Sun late show 12:10a)
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 1:30, 4:30, 7:35,
10:20; Fri-Wed 1:15, 4:30, 7:15,10:10 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:10a; Fri-Sun late show 12:45a)
Tales From the Hood (R) Thur 2:15, 4:50, 7:40,10:20;
Fri-Wed 12:15a
Glass Shield (PG-13) Thur 12:45, 3:05, 5:25, 7:50,
10:25; Fri-Wed 11:20a, 5:10,10:45
Fluke (PG) Thur 6/29 only 12:20,2:30, 4:45, 7:20,
9:35
French Kiss (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 1:00, 4:35, 7:10,
9:45
Amateur (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:15, 2:25, 4:40, 7:05,
9:15
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:30,
2:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30,10:30; Fri-
Wed 12:15,1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:15, 7:00, 8:00,
9:00, 9:50 (Fri-Tue early show 10:15a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:30a)
♦A Pure Formality (PG-13) Daily 10:25 (Fri-Sun late
show 12:40a)
«Apollo 13 (R) Daily 11:00a, 12:00n, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15,
4:20, 5:20, 6:40, 7:35, 8:45, 10:00 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:00a; Fri-Tue late show 11:00; Fri-Sun late
show 12:00m)
«The incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love
(U) Daily 12:25, 2:35,4:55, 7:10, 9:30 (Fri-Sun early
show 10:20a; Fri-Sun late show 11:45)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (PG) Daily 11:15a,
12:15,1:00, 1:30, 2:30,3:30, 4:00, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30,
7:30, 8:15, 9:25 (Fri-Tue early shows 10:00a,
10:30a)
♦New Jersey Drive (R) Daily 12:35, 2:45, 5:35, 8:20,
10:30 (Fri-Tue early show 10:30a; Fri-Sun late
show 12:35a)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 11:30a, 12:45,1:45, 3:10,
Page 64 New Times
4:10, 5:30, 6:45, 7:45, 9:15,10:15 (Fri-Tue early
show 10:30a; Fri-Sun late shows 11:45, 12:45a)
♦The Postman (PG) Daily 12:30, 2:50, 5:25, 8:10,
10:40 (Fri-Sun early show 10:10a)
Intracoastal
3701 NE 163rd St; 945-7416
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Daily 1:30,4:30, 7:00,
9:50
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00,4:30, 8:15
Casper (PG) Daily 12:45,3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:40 (Fri-
Sat late show 11:40)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:15,
2:00, 4:15, 4:45, 7:30,10:15; Fri-Wed 12:45,1:15,
3:30, 4:15, 7:00, 7:30, 9:45,10:15
Congo (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:15,4:25, 7:00, 7:40,
9:15, 10:00; Fri-Wed 12:00n, 2:15, 4:35, 7:00, 9:15
(Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
Pocahontas (G) Thur 11:30a, 12:30,1:45, 2:45, 4:00,
5:00, 7:15, 8:00, 9:30, 10:10; Fri-Wed 11:30a, 12:30,
1:45, 2:45, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:15, 8:00,9:30,10:10
(Fri-Sat late shows 11:30,12:00m)
Skylake II
1720 NE Miami Gardens Dr; 944-2810
Major Payne (PG-13) Thur 3:00, 6:45,10:20; Fri-Wed
4:35,10:15
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 1:00, 4:45, 8:30; Fri-
Wed 2:35, 8:15
The Pebble and the Penguin (G) Thur 6/29 only
12:45, 4:30, 8:15
Jury Duty (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 2:45, 6:30, 10:10
♦Tommy Boy (PG-13) Daily 12:45, 6:25
♦Bad Boys (R) Daily 1:00, 5:35,10:05
•Panther (R) Dally 3:15, 7:45
Westchester-West Dade
Mall of the Americas 14
7775 W Flagler St; 266-6664
While You Were Sleeping (PG) Thur 12:00n, 2:15, 5:00,
7:30,10:10; Fri-Sun 11:00; Mon-Wed 10:00
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 12:00n, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00,
10:30; Fri-Wed 8:00,10:45
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 1:15, 4:15, 7:15,
10:10 (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a; Fri-Sun late
show 12:45a)
Forget Paris (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 7:45,10:15
Braveheart (R) Daily 1:00, 4:45, 8:30 (Fri-Sun late
show 12:00m)
Casper (PG) Daily 10:00a, 12:15, 2:45, 5:30, 8:00,
10:30
Johnny Mnemonic (R) Thur 6/29 only 12:30, 3:00,
5:30, 10:30
Tales From the Hood (R) Thur-Sun 12:30a
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:15,
4:15, 7:15, 10:15; Fri-Wed 7:45,10:45 (Fri-Sun early
show 10:00a)
Congo (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
(Fri-Sun early show 10:00a; Fri-Sun late show
12:30a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 1:00, 2:00,4:00, 5:00,
7:00, 8:00, 9:55,10:30; Fri-Wed 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
9:55 (Fri-Sun early show 10:30a, Fri-Sun late show
12:30a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:15,1:15, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45,
5:45, 7:00, 9:15, (Fri-Sun early show 10:00a, Fri-
Sun late show 11:30)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Fri-
Sun 10:15a, 11:30a, 12:30, 2:00,3:00, 4:45, 5:30,
7:30, 9:55,12:15a; Mon-Wed 11:45a, 12:30, 2:00,
3:00, 4:45, 5:30, 7:30, 9:55
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,10:15
(Fri-Sun 10:00a, Fri-Sun late show 12:30a)
♦Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 10:00a, 1:00,4:30, 7:30,10:30
University VII
1645 SW 107th Ave; 223-2700
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 2:10,4:40, 7:30,
10:30; Fri-Wed 10:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:40a)
Casper (PG) Daily 1:40,4:30, 7:20, 9:35 (Thur only)
Congo (PG-13) Thur 2:25, 5:00, 7:40,10:35; Fri-Wed
2:00, 4:40, 8:00,10:15 (Fri-Sat late show 12:45a)
Batman Forever (PG-13) Thur 1:20, 4:10, 7:15,10:20;
Fri-Wed 1:40, 4:10, 7:30,10:20 (Fri-Sat late show
12:40a)
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:50 (Thur 1:00), 3:00, 5:00,
7:00, 9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 11:30)
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 1:15, 4:15, 7:15,10:05 (Fri-Sat
late show 12:45a)
♦Judge Dredd (R) Daily 1:20, 3:30, 5:30, 7:45,10:15
(Fri-Sat late show 12:30a)
«Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (PG) Daily
1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:45 (Fri-Sat late show
12:00m)
Super Saver Cinema
11501 Bird Rd; 227-0277
Dumb and Dumber (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 8:00,
10:15
Pulp Fiction (R) Thur 12:30,3:45, 6:30, 9:30; Fri-Wed
2:00, 7:00
Man of the House (PG) Thur 12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 6:15,
8:15, 10:15; Fri-Wed 2:30, 7:45
M^jor Payne (PG-13) Thur 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00, 6:00,
8:00, 10:15; Fri-Wed 12:30, 2:30,4:30, 7:30, 9:45
Outbreak (R) Daily 12:00n, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,10:00
Don Juan DeMarco (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00,
6:00, 8:00, 10:15 (Thur 10:00)
Top Dog (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n, 4:00, 8:00
Jury Duty (PG-13) Thur 2:00, 5:45,10:00; Fri-Wed
12:15, 5:00, 10:00
Circle of Friends (PG-13) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n,
2:15, 4:30, 7:45,10:00
Gordy (G) Thur 6/29 only 12:00n, 2:00, 4:00
♦Bad Boys (R) Daily 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:45, 10:00
♦French Kiss (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:15, 4:30, 8:00,
10:15
*My Family (R) Daily 12:00n, 4:30,10:00
♦Tommy Boy (PG-13) Daily 12:00n, 2:00,4:00, 6:00,
8:00,10:15
Valentino Super Discount Cinema
8524 SW 8th St; 266-2002
Casper (PG) Thur 6/29 only 7:00, 9:00
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Thur 7:00, 9:00; Fri-
Sun 6:00, 8:00,10:00 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:00, 4:00);
Mon-Wed 7:00, 9:00 (Tue matinee 5:00)
Congo (PG-13) Thur 7:00, 9:00; Fri-Sun 6:00, 8:00,
10:00 (Sat-Sun matinees 2:00, 4:00); Mon-Wed
7:00, 9:00 (Tue matinee 5:00)
*My Family (R) Fri 6:00, 8:00,10:20; Sat-Sun 2:00,
4:10, 6:20, 8:30, 10:30; Mon 7:00,9:00; Tue 5:00,
7:10, 9:10; Wed 7:00, 9:00
Hialeah-Miami Springs-Miami Lakes
Apollo Theatre
3800 W 12th Ave; 826-6606
Movie times for Friday through Wednesday were
not available at press time.
M^jor Payne (PG-13) Thur 8:00,10:00
Top Dog (PG-13) Thur 8:00, 10:00
Gordy (G) Thur 8:00,10:00
Fluke (PG) Thur 8:00,10:00
Hialeah Cinema VIII
4650 W 17th Ct; 557-9888
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
10:00
Congo (PG-13) Thur 11:00a, 2:00, 3:45, 7:00, 9:15;
Fri-Wed 12:30, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45
New Jersey Drive (R) Thur 6/29 only 4:30, 7:00, 9:45
Batman Forever (PG-13) Daily 11:45a, 2:00, 2:45,
4:45, 5:45, 7:15, 8:45,10:00
Pocahontas (G) Daily 12:00n, 1:00, 2:15, 3:15, 4:30,
5:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:15,10:15
«Judge Dredd (R) Daily 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,10:30
«Apollo 13 (PG) Daily 12:00n, 3:15, 7:00, 10:15
Miami Lakes X
6711 Main St; 558-3810
Crimson Tide (R) Thur 6/29 only 2:05, 4:30, 7:45,
10:25
Die Hard With a Vengeance (R) Daily 2:00, 4:30, 7:40,
10:15 (Thur-Mon early show 11:20a; Fri-Sat late
show 12:55a)
Braveheart (R) Thur 11:30a, 3:00, 7:30; Fri-Mon
11:30a, 3:00, 7:30,10:45; Tue-Wed 3:00,7:30,10:45
Casper (PG) Daily 11:15a, 1:50 (Thur 2:00), 4:15,
7:15, 9:30 (Fri-Sat late show 12:00m)
The Bridges of Madison County (PG-13) Thur 1:45,
4:25, 7:25, 10:10; Fri-Mon 11:00a, 4:50,10:15; Tue-
Wed 4:50,10:15
Congo